WorldWideScience

Sample records for tenosynovial giant cell

  1. Arthroplasty for tenosynovial giant cell tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verspoor, F.G.; Hannink, G.; Scholte, A.; Geest, I.C. van der; Schreuder, H.W.

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose - Tenosynovial giant cell tumors (t-GCTs) can behave aggressively locally and affect joint function and quality of life. The role of arthroplasty in the treatment of t-GCT is uncertain. We report the results of arthroplasty in t-GCT patients. Patients and methods - t-GCT

  2. Multifocal tenosynovial giant cell tumors in a child with Noonan syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, Arthur B. [Children' s Hospital of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Nemours Children' s Health System/Nemours Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Orlando, FL (United States); Awomolo, Agboola O. [Children' s Hospital of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Szabo, Sara [Medical College of Wisconsin and Children' s Hospital of Wisconsin, Department of Pathology, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Noonan syndrome is a genetic disorder with variable expression of distinctive facial features, webbed neck, chest deformity, short stature, cryptorchidism and congenital heart disease. The association of Noonan syndrome and giant cell granulomas of the mandible is widely reported. However, Noonan syndrome may also be associated with single or multifocal tenosynovial giant cell tumors, also referred to as pigmented villonodular synovitis. We report a child with Noonan syndrome, giant cell granulomas of the mandible and synovial and tenosynovial giant cell tumors involving multiple joints and tendon sheaths who was initially misdiagnosed with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. It is important for radiologists to be aware of the association of Noonan syndrome and multifocal giant cell lesions, which can range from the more commonly described giant cell granulomas of the mandible to isolated or multifocal intra- or extra-articular tenosynovial giant cell tumors or a combination of all of these lesions. (orig.)

  3. Molecular Cytogenetic Characterization of Tenosynovial Giant Cell Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petter Brandal

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Tenosynovial giant cell tumor (TSGCT is a disease of disputed etiology and pathogenesis. Some investigations indicate a neoplastic origin of the tumors; others indicate that they are polyclonal and inflammatory. The cytogenetic and molecular genetic features of TSGCTs are largely unknown, as only some 20 localized and 30 diffuse tumors with cytogenetic aberrations have been reported. The most common karyotypic aberrations have been trisomy for chromosomes 5 and 7 and translocations involving chromosomal area 1 pi 1-13. We decided to screen the genomes of TSGCTs by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH to perform interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (IP-FISH, looking for numerical aberrations of chromosomes 1, 5, and 7, and to analyze the tumors for microsatellite instability. Except for two diffuse TSGCTs that came fresh to us, and which, by karyotyping, exhibited t(1;22(p13;g12 and a t(1;1(g21;p11 and +7, respectively, all studies had to be performed on formalinfixed, paraffin-embedded material. DNA was extracted from 51 localized and nine diffuse TSGCTs. CGH was successful for 24 tumors, but none of them showed copy number changes. The IP-FISH studies showed trisomy 7 in 56% of the tumors (15/27, whereas chromosomes 1 and 5 seemed to be disomic in all TSGCTs. All informative tumors were wild-type by microsatellite instability analysis.

  4. Cryosurgery as Additional Treatment in Tenosynovial Giant Cell Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. G. M. Verspoor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Tenosynovial giant cell tumors (TGCT emerge from the synovium and can behave aggressively. Surgical resection is the standard treatment. However, up to half of the patients with diffuse type show recurrences. Several additional treatments have been applied to reduce recurrences; none of these treatments was proven to be superior to surgical resection solely. This article describes the results of additional cryosurgery to surgical resection. Materials and Methods. We retrospectively evaluated 141 TGCT patients, between 1999 and 2007. Twelve patients had additional cryosurgery. The knee (n=8, hip (n=2, ankle (n=1, and elbow (n=1 were affected. Primary outcome variables were treatment indications, recurrences, and complications. Results. Indications for additional cryosurgery were extended disease, bone involvement, and locations that are difficult to surgically get disease-free such as cruciate ligaments. Five patients had recurrent disease, all of which had prior treatments. None of the primary treated patients had recurrent disease. One patient had a deep infection. Discussion. Cryosurgery may serve as an additional treatment for diffuse TCGT in selected cases. However, because of the small number of patients and the heterogeneous group we could not prove an advantage of additional cryosurgery over surgical resection only. Cryosurgery should be considered for further evaluation in a prospective study. If there is any effect it would be helpful, especially in patients with multiple TGCT recurrences.

  5. Therapeutic Antibodies Targeting CSF1 Impede Macrophage Recruitment in a Xenograft Model of Tenosynovial Giant Cell Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Cheng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Tenosynovial giant cell tumor is a neoplastic disease of joints that can cause severe morbidity. Recurrences are common following local therapy, and no effective medical therapy currently exists. Recent work has demonstrated that all cases overexpress macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF1, usually as a consequence of an activating gene translocation, resulting in an influx of macrophages that form the bulk of the tumor. New anti-CSF1 drugs have been developed; however there are no preclinical models suitable for evaluation of drug benefits in this disease. In this paper, we describe a novel renal subcapsular xenograft model of tenosynovial giant cell tumor. Using this model, we demonstrate that an anti-CSF1 monoclonal antibody significantly inhibits host macrophage infiltration into this tumor. The results from this model support clinical trials of equivalent humanized agents and anti-CSF1R small molecule drugs in cases of tenosynovial giant cell tumor refractory to conventional local therapy.

  6. Giant cell tumor of bone and tenosynovial tissue : surgical outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, Lizz van der

    2014-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is an intermediate, locally aggressive but rarely metastasizing tumor. Radiologically, GCTB shows typical lytic lesions. MR imaging is required to evaluate extent of GCTB for surgical planning. Preferred treatment for GCTB is extended curettage with local adjuvants,

  7. Pitfalls in the cytological diagnosis of tenosynovial giant cell tumor: An illustration of eight discordant cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Krishnendu; Mandal, Rupali; Khan, Kalyan; Chakraborty, Jasashwi

    2017-09-23

    Tenosynovial giant cell tumor (TSGCT) is a highly recurrent benign tumor of the extremities. Wide local excision is usually sufficient to achieve its recurrence-free outcome. However, that needs a confident pre-operative cytological diagnosis as TSGCT. Aspirates from this tumor express the characteristic polymorphic cytological pattern, enough to impose a definite diagnosis. However rarely so, inadequate sampling from smaller tumors or due to faulty techniques, and selective sampling from topographic clusters of any individual component may lead to wrong interpretation. An unorthodox location near the larger limb joints further complicates the diagnostic misery on occasions. Such tumors are amenable to incomplete removal and risk for future recurrence. In this report, we describe eight cases of TSGCTs that were cytologically diagnosed otherwise. The cytological features of these discrepant tumors and the factors attributable to such dilemma are elaborated. Finally, a possible remedy has been proposed at conclusion in order to avoid future inconveniences. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Tenosynovial giant cell tumors of the temporomandibular joint and lateral skull base: Review of 11 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Matthew L; Osetinsky, L Mariel; Alon, Eran E; Inwards, Carrie Y; Lane, John I; Moore, Eric J

    2017-10-01

    To elucidate the clinical behavior, treatment, and outcomes of tenosynovial giant cell tumors (TGCT) involving the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and adjacent temporal bone. Retrospective case series with histopathologic review. A retrospective chart review was performed identifying and collecting data from all cases of TGCT involving the TMJ and adjacent temporal bone that were treated at the authors' center between January 1960 and December 2015. Eleven histopathologically confirmed cases met inclusion criteria. The median age at diagnosis was 49 years, eight patients were men, and the median follow-up was 116 months. Computed tomographic (CT) imaging revealed a lytic expansile mass centered on the TMJ. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) most commonly exhibited hypointense signal on precontrast T1- and T2-weighted sequences and variable postcontrast enhancement. The median delay in diagnosis was 24 months, and the most common presenting symptoms were hearing loss and pain. All patients underwent surgical resection, eight receiving gross total removal, one receiving near total removal, and two patients from early in the series receiving subtotal resection with neoadjuvant or adjuvant radiation. Histopathological review of surgical specimens revealed chondroid metaplasia in seven tumors. Eight of nine cases receiving gross total or near total resection have no evidence of recurrence to date. TGCT of the TMJ and temporal bone are rare and locally aggressive tumors that commonly present with nonspecific symptoms. A careful review of CT and MRI followed by early biopsy is critical in establishing an accurate diagnosis and facilitating appropriate treatment. TGCT of the TMJ more commonly contain chondroid metaplasia when compared to TGCT at other anatomic locations. Gross total resection is achievable in most cases and offers long-term cure. Radiation may be considered for recurrent disease or adjuvant therapy following subtotal resection. 4. Laryngoscope, 127

  9. [Diagnosis and treatment of diffuse tenosynovial giant cell tumor arising from temporomandibular joints].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, J H; Guo, Y X; Luo, H Y; Guo, C B; Ma, X C

    2016-12-18

    To retrospectively analyze the clinical features, treatment and prognosis to the diffuse tenosynovial giant cell tumor (D-TSGCT) arising from the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), and to give a reference for the early diagnosis and treatment of this disease. In this study, 15 patients finally diagnosed as D-TSGCT of TMJ histopathologically at the Peking University Hospital of Stomatology from October 2003 to August 2015 were selected and reviewed. Their clinical manifestations, imaging and histological features, diagnoses and differential diagnoses, treatments and follow-ups were summarized and discussed. D-TSGCT of TMJ showed obvious female predominance (12/15), the main symptoms included painful preauricular swelling or mass, limited mouth-opening and mandibular deviation with movement. D-TSGCT on computed tomography (CT) scan often showed ill-defined soft tissue masses around TMJ, enhancement after contrast administration, usually with widening of the joint spaces and with bone destruction of the condyle, the fossa and even the skull base. On magnetic resonance images (MRI), the majority of lesions on T1 weighted images and T2 weighted images both showed the characteristics of low signals (6/11). The lesions could extend beyond the joints (9/11) and into the infratemporal fossa (4/11) and the middle cranial fossa (4/11). Surgical resection was performed in 14 cases and biopsy in 1 case. Postoperative radiotherapy was performed in 3 cases. In follow-ups, 3 cases showed recurrence postoperatively. D-TSGCT arising from TMJ should be differentiated with TMJ disorders, other tumors and tumor-like lesions of TMJ and parotid neoplasms, etc. CT and MRI examinations have important values in the diagnosis and treatment design of D-TSGCT. Because of the local aggressive and extensive behavior, complete resection should be performed as soon as possible. Postoperative radiotherapy was helpful for the extensive lesions including destruction of skull base and may be a good

  10. Tenosynovial giant cell tumor presenting as a parotid gland mass: Expanding the differential diagnosis of giant cell-rich lesions in salivary glands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tenosynovial giant cell tumors (TGCT are rare benign soft tissue tumors affecting mostly young adults. The most common affected sites include the knee, ankle, elbow, shoulder, and fingers. The temporomandibular joint is occasionally affected. Herein, we report a case of a 31-year-old Caucasian male who presented clinically with a parotid gland mass. The initial clinical and radiological work-up failed to reveal any involvement of the adjacent temporomandibular joint. Fine-needle aspiration revealed a cellular tumor composed of mononuclear and multinucleated giant cells with fibrosis and hemosiderin deposition. This was subsequently found to be a TGCT arising from the temporomandibular joint. Giant cell-rich lesions are uncommon in salivary glands. Herein, we describe the cytomorphology and clinico-radiographic features of this tumor with emphasis on the differential diagnosis of giant cell-rich lesions presenting in salivary glands. Despite its rare occurrence, this entity should be considered when giant cells are prominent in specimens acquired from this location.

  11. CSF1R inhibition with emactuzumab in locally advanced diffuse-type tenosynovial giant cell tumours of the soft tissue: a dose-escalation and dose-expansion phase 1 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassier, Philippe A; Italiano, Antoine; Gomez-Roca, Carlos A; Le Tourneau, Christophe; Toulmonde, Maud; Cannarile, Michael A; Ries, Carola; Brillouet, Anne; Müller, Claudia; Jegg, Anna-Maria; Bröske, Ann-Marie; Dembowski, Markus; Bray-French, Katharine; Freilinger, Christine; Meneses-Lorente, Georgina; Baehner, Monika; Harding, Ross; Ratnayake, Jayantha; Abiraj, Keelara; Gass, Nathalie; Noh, Karen; Christen, Randolph D; Ukarma, Lidia; Bompas, Emmanuelle; Delord, Jean-Pierre; Blay, Jean-Yves; Rüttinger, Dominik

    2015-08-01

    Diffuse-type tenosynovial giant cell tumour (dt-GCT) of the soft tissue (alternatively known as pigmented villonodular synovitis), an orphan disease with unmet medical need, is characterised by an overexpression of colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF1), and is usually caused by a chromosomal translocation involving CSF1. CSF1 receptor (CSF1R) activation leads to the recruitment of CSF1R-expressing cells of the mononuclear phagocyte lineage that constitute the tumor mass in dt-GCT. Emactuzumab (RG7155) is a novel monoclonal antibody that inhibits CSF1R activation. We have assessed the safety, tolerability and activity of emactuzumab in patients with Dt-GCT of the soft tissue. In this phase 1, first-in-human dose-escalation and dose-expansion study, eligible patients were aged 18 years or older with dt-GCT of the soft tissue with locally advanced disease or resectable tumours requiring extensive surgery, an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 1 or less, measurable disease according to Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors version 1.1, and adequate end-organ function. Patients with GCT of the bone were not eligible. Patients received intravenous emactuzumab at 900 mg, 1350 mg, or 2000 mg every 2 weeks in the dose-escalation phase and at the optimal biological dose in a dose-expansion phase. The primary objective was to evaluate the safety and tolerability of emactuzumab, and to determine the maximum tolerated dose or optimal biological dose. All treated patients were included in the analyses. Expansion cohorts are currently ongoing. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01494688. Between July 26, 2012, and Oct 21, 2013, 12 patients were enrolled in the dose-escalation phase. No dose-limiting toxicities were noted in the dose-escalation cohort; on the basis of pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and safety information, we chose a dose of 1000 mg every 2 week for the dose-expansion cohort, into which 17 patients were enrolled

  12. Incidental tenosynovial huge cell tumors of the flexor hallucis longus muscle: seldom differential diagnosis of metabolic lesions using F18-FDG PET/CT; Inzidenteller tenosynovialer Riesenzelltumor des Musculus flexor hallucis longus. Seltene Differenzialdiagnose stoffwechselaktiver Laesionen in der F-18-FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koestner, W.; Daemmrich, M.; Derlin, T.

    2016-03-15

    Tenosynovial huge cell tumors are seldom benign tumors in extremities originating from bone joint synovia and tendon sheats. In F18-FDG PET/CT imaging the tenosynovial huge cell tumors show increased metabolic activity and can trigger false diagnoses.

  13. Postsurgical Paracicatricial Cutaneous Satellitosis of Giant Cell Tumour of the Tendon Sheath, Localized Type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Caputo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Tenosynovial giant cell tumour (localized type is a tumour of tendon sheaths and interphalangeal joints, affecting the digits and arising from the synovium. It is characterized by a proliferation of mononuclear cells and osteoclast-like polykaryocytes. Its propagation to the skin is an exceptional event, which can take place either in localized form in the fingertips (localized type or in the rare diffuse form called giant cell tumour of the tendon sheath (diffuse type. We report here a case of giant cell tumour with cutaneous satellites, which appeared close to and around the surgical scar following the excision of the primary lesion, in a 9-year-old boy. In the cutaneous satellites, a few signs of transformation could be observed, consisting of the lack of stroma and pronounced cellularity characterized by sheets of rounded synovial-like cells admixed with multinucleated giant cells and xanthoma cells. No relapse was observed 1 year after a plastic surgery procedure (complete replacement of the involved skin. Diffuse lesions usually represent a diagnostic problem in comparison with their localized counterparts. The malignant transformation of an originally typical tenosynovial giant cell tumour is a rare but well-documented event. Our case seems to represent a typical example because the pronounced cellularity might wrongly lead to a diagnosis of malignancy.

  14. Diffuse-type giant cell tumor of the subcutaneous thigh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanghvi, D.A. [KEM Hospital, Department of Radiology, Parel, Mumbai (India); Purandare, N.C. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Bio Imaging Unit, Parel, Mumbai (India); Jambhekar, N.A.; Agarwal, A. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Department of Pathology, Parel, Mumbai (India); Agarwal, M.G. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Bone and Soft Tissue Unit, Parel, Mumbai (India)

    2007-04-15

    Diffuse-type giant cell tumor is an extra-articular form of pigmented villonodular synovitis. The localized form of this lesion (tenosynovial giant cell tumor) is frequent, representing the most common subset arising from the synovium of a joint, bursa or tendon sheath, with 85% of cases occurring in the fingers. The less frequent diffuse-type giant cell tumors are commonly located in the periarticular soft tissues, but on rare occasions these lesions can be purely intramuscular or subcutaneous We report the case of a 26-year-old female with diffuse-type giant cell tumor of the subcutaneous thigh, remote from a joint, bursa or tendon sheath. A review of the literature did not reveal any similar description of a diffuse-type giant cell tumor completely within the subcutaneous thigh, remote from a joint, bursa or tendon sheath. These lesions were initially regarded as inflammatory or reactive processes, but since the identification of clonal abnormalities in these patients, and in view of their capacity for autonomous growth, they are now widely considered to represent benign neoplasms. (orig.)

  15. Giant Cell Arteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giant cell arteritis is a disorder that causes inflammation of your arteries, usually in the scalp, neck, and arms. ... arteries, which keeps blood from flowing well. Giant cell arteritis often occurs with another disorder called polymyalgia ...

  16. Metaphyseal giant cell tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, L.F.; Hemais, P.M.P.G.; Aymore, I.L.; Carmo, M.C.R. do; Cunha, M.E.P.R. da; Resende, C.M.C.

    Three cases of metaphyseal giant cell tumor are presented. A review of the literature is done, demostrating the lesion is rare and that there are few articles about it. Age incidence and characteristics of the tumor are discussed.

  17. Multinucleated giant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J M

    2000-01-01

    Recent studies directed toward developing a better understanding of the molecular and cellular biology basis of monocyte-derived multinucleated giant cell formation, function, and biologic activity are presented. In addition, HIV-1-infected T-lymphocyte syncytia and the significance of adhesion molecule/ligand interactions in the formation of these syncytia are described. Interleukin-4 or interleukin-13 induction of monocyte-macrophage fusion provides a model for foreign body giant cell formation. On the other hand, interferon-gamma induction of monocyte-macrophage fusion provides a model for Langhans' giant cell formation. Variations in monocyte-macrophage adhesion and fusion to form foreign body giant cells are provided by substrates with different surface chemistries. Recent advances in osteoclast biology have identified the role of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in regulating osteoclast bone resorption and receptor-ligand interactions and signal pathways for osteoclast activation. Although foreign body giant cells, Langhans' giant cells, and osteoclasts are derived from monocytes or monocyte progenitor cells, the ways in which they are formed, whether induced by cytokines, receptors, or biologic activity, are markedly different.

  18. Clinical and Histologic Features of 26 Canine Peripheral Giant Cell Granulomas (Formerly Giant Cell Epulis)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Desoutter, A. V; Goldschmidt, M. H; Sánchez, M. D

    2012-01-01

    ... (formerly giant cell epulis) are reported. Two main histologic categories were evident: (1) “classic” peripheral giant cell granuloma, characterized by variable numbers of multinucleated giant cells...

  19. Tenosynovial osteochondromatosis of the tarsal tunnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Kazuya; Iwai, Makoto [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Saiseikai Nara Hospital, 4-643 Hachijo, Nara-shi, Nara (Japan); Kawate, Kenji; Yajima, Hiroshi; Takakura, Yoshinori [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara-shi, Nara (Japan)

    2003-02-01

    A case of tenosynovial osteochondromatosis in the tarsal tunnel in a 23-year-old man is presented. The lesion was treated surgically, and multiple osteochondromas were excised, which had no continuity with any tarsal bone or joint cavity but did with the sheaths of the flexor digitorum longus and flexor hallucis longus. Histologic examination of the lesion showed a fibrous capsule, hyaline cartilage and extensive areas of cancellous bone. Necrosis and mitosis were absent in the hyaline cartilage and there were no synovial nodules indicative of synovial metaplasia. The macroscopic findings showed ''end-stage'' tenosynovial osteochondromatosis. There was no evidence of recurrence 5 years after operation, and the patient remains free of symptoms. (orig.)

  20. [Giant cell glioblastoma. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Betancourt, Leonardo; López-Ortega, Salvador; Caldera-Duarte, Agustín

    2004-01-01

    Glioblastomas (World Health Organization, (WHO), grade IV) are the most frequent and malignant neoplasms of the human nervous system. Giant cells glioblastomas, a subtype of these, account for less than 1% of all brain toumors and up to 5% of glioblastomas. We present the case of a female who was diagnosed and treated for a right intra and paraventricular giant cell glioblastoma. We enfatize the importance of histological features of this toumor related to its prognosis.

  1. Giant Cell Arteritis - Who to Refer to?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, L T; Ah-Kee, E Y; Strang, A; Ferguson, A

    2015-06-29

    Giant cell arteritis is a systemic immune-mediated vasculitis affecting the medium and large arteries. Typical symptoms include new headache, jaw claudication, tender temporal artery, polymyalgia rheumatica, fever and anorexia. Visual loss resulting from giant cell arteritis is an ophthalmic emergency and requires immediate assessment and referral to the ophthalmologist for prompt treatment with steroids. This article provides a systematic approach to the diagnosis and management of giant cell arteritis.

  2. Morphological aspects of giant cells in giant cell arteritis: an electron-microscopic and immunocytochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordborg, E; Bengtsson, B A; Petursdottir, V; Nordborg, C

    1997-01-01

    To compare the morphology of foreign body and Langhans giant cells in the two different inflammatory phases of giant cell arteritis (GCA). Electron microscopy was performed on 6 positive temporal arterial biopsies. Light microscopy and immunocytochemistry for macrophage-associated antigen (KP1) and alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) were performed on 16 positive biopsies. A focal granulomatous reaction with foreign body giant cells was found only in association with the internal elastic membrane (IEM) in atrophic arterial segments, which often displayed calcification of the IEM. Diffuse invasion of lymphocytes and monocytes/macrophages affected non-atrophic as well as atrophic arterial segments. Within such segments Langhans giant cells were found in all layers of the wall. Electron microscopy of biopsies displaying the focal foreign body reaction revealed that large cells devoid of lysosomes but with cytoplasmic densities, tightly packed cytoplasmic filaments and numerous micropinocytotic vesicles formed clusters close to calcified parts of the internal elastic membrane. Furthermore, foreign body giant cells were surrounded by large cells devoid of lysosomes. Lysosomes tended to concentrate in central parts of the foreign body giant cells. In the diffusely inflamed arteries, the Langhans giant cells were surrounded by mononuclear cells rich in lysosomes. The lysosomes in the Langhans giant cells were more evenly distributed than in foreign body giant cells. Immunocytochemistry of biopsies displaying the focal granulomatous reaction revealed an uneven, often central immunoreactivity for the macrophage marker (KP1) in the foreign body giant cells, and immunostaining for alpha-smooth muscle antigen (alpha-SMA) showed their poor delineation from the surrounding vascular smooth muscle cells. The Langhans giant cells in the diffusely inflamed arteries displayed a strong even cytoplasmic immunoreactivity for KP1 and a distinct delineation from the smooth muscle cells

  3. Are Langhans giant cells precursors of foreign-body giant cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Rhee, H J; Hillebrands, W; Daems, W T

    1978-01-01

    Granulomas were induced in rats by subcutaneous implantation of pieces of Melinex plastic into the dorsum. The pieces of Melinex were removed at intervals varying from 16 h to 14 days, and the adherent cells were studied morphologically and quantitatively. Giant cell formation started about 32 h after implantation. The first giant cells to appear were of the Langhans type. Two days after implantation, most of the giant cells are still Langhans-type cells. A few giant cells of the foreign-body type and transition forms between the Langhans and foreign-body types are also present. From the third day on, the foreign-body type gradually becomes predominant. Independent of the duration of implantation, giant cells with 3, 4, or 5 nuclei are virtually without exception of the Langhans type. The higher the number of nuclei between 6 and 30, the more cells are of the foreign-body type. Giant cells with 30 or more nuclei are all foreign-body type. The findings are discussed in the light of current knowledge concerning giant cell formation. It is concluded that under the present experimental conditions, Langhans-type giant cells are the precursors of foreign-body-type giant cells.

  4. SYNOVIAL GIANT CELL TUMOR OF THE KNEE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Rene Jorge; Cohen, Moisés; Nóbrega, Jezimar; Forgas, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Synovial giant cell tumor is a benign neoplasm, rarely reported in the form of malignant metastasis. Synovial giant cell tumor most frequently occurs on the hand, and, most uncommon, on the ankle and knee. In the present study, the authors describe a rare case of synovial giant cell tumor on the knee as well as the treatment approach. Arthroscopy has been shown, in this case, to be the optimal method for treating this kind of lesion, once it allowed a less aggressive approach, while providing good visualization of all compartments of knee joint and full tumor resection.

  5. Granuloma with langhans giant cells: An overview

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, S Nalin; Prasad, T Srinivasa; Narayan, P Anantha; Muruganandhan, J

    2013-01-01

    Granuloma formation with multinucleated giant cells is seen in numerous diseases. A granuloma is a focus of chronic inflammation consisting of a microscopic aggregation of macrophages surrounded by a collar of lymphocytes and plasma cells. In this article, we present a case of granuloma formation with multiple Langhans giant cells along with an overview of the differential diagnoses, which include mycobacterium diseases, other bacterial infections, fungal infections, protozoal infections, and...

  6. Granuloma with langhans giant cells: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S Nalin; Prasad, T Srinivasa; Narayan, P Anantha; Muruganandhan, J

    2013-09-01

    Granuloma formation with multinucleated giant cells is seen in numerous diseases. A granuloma is a focus of chronic inflammation consisting of a microscopic aggregation of macrophages surrounded by a collar of lymphocytes and plasma cells. In this article, we present a case of granuloma formation with multiple Langhans giant cells along with an overview of the differential diagnoses, which include mycobacterium diseases, other bacterial infections, fungal infections, protozoal infections, and other granulomatous diseases.

  7. Giant cell ependymoma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamek, Dariusz; Dec, Malgorzata; Sobol, Grazyna; Urbanowicz, Barbara; Jaworski, Marian

    2008-02-01

    Ependymomas account for 3-9% of all neuroepithelial tumors. A peculiar variant of ependymoma known as "giant cell ependymoma" ("GCE") is especially rarely reported, it may pose some difficulties for the diagnosing neuropathologist. Here we present a case of a giant cell ependymoma occuring in a 17-year-old patient with the history of 2-year recurrent headaches and a 1-month history of vision impairment. CT scanning demonstrated a mass in the left occipital lobe, arising from the occipital horn of the lateral ventricle. Histological, immunohistochemical and electron microscopic findings were consistent with high-grade ependymoma. Especially striking was the presence of bizzare pleomorphic giant cells which predominated in the tumor tissue. As a result the diagnosis of GCE was established. This type of neoplasm necessitates, at least in theory, differentiation with anaplastic oligodendroglioma, clear cell ependymoma, pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma, giant cell glioblastoma, and subependymal giant cell astrocytoma. To date giant cell ependymomas (GCEs) were reported in seven cases in the literature. To the best of our knowledge this is the 8th case in the literature. In spite of apparently "worrisome" histology GCE seems to be a neoplasm with a relatively good prognosis.

  8. Hepatic Giant Cell Arteritis and Polymyalgia Rheumatica

    OpenAIRE

    Duerksen, Donald R; Jewell, Laurence D.; Bain, Vincent G

    1994-01-01

    Polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) is a clinical syndrome of the elderly characterized by malaise, proximal muscle aching and stiffness, low grade fever, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rare and the frequent association with temporal giant cell arteritis. The authors describe a case of PMR associated with hepatic giant cell arteritis. This lesion has been described in two other clinical reports. The distribution of the arteritis may be patchy; in this report, diagnosis was made with a wedge biop...

  9. Genetic profile of the giant cell glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peraud, A; Watanabe, K; Schwechheimer, K; Yonekawa, Y; Kleihues, P; Ohgaki, H

    1999-02-01

    Giant cell glioblastoma is a rare glioblastoma variant characterized by the presence of large, bizarre, multinucleated giant cells. This glioblastoma subtype develops clinically de novo after a short clinical history and contains a high frequency of p53 mutations. In this study, we screened a series of 18 giant cell glioblastomas for additional genetic alterations. PCR-SSCP followed by DNA sequencing revealed PTEN mutations in 5 of 15 tumors (33%). Of these, two mutations were located in exon 5, two mutations in exon 6, and one mutation each in exons 1 and 9. Four mutations were point mutations and two mutations were deletions. One neoplasm contained two PTEN mutations (exons 5 and 6). None of the giant cell glioblastomas showed a homozygous deletion of PTEN orp16, or amplification of MDM2. Immunohistochemically, MDM2 overexpression was either not observed or detected in only a minor fraction of tumor cells. Differential PCR revealed EGFR amplification in only one of 17 tumors (6%). These results indicate that giant cell glioblastomas occupy a hybrid position, sharing with primary (de novo) glioblastomas a short clinical history, the absence of a less malignant precursor lesion and a 30% frequency of PTEN mutations. With secondary glioblastomas that develop through progression from low-grade astrocytomas, they have in common a younger patient age at manifestation and a high frequency (>70%) of p53 mutations.

  10. Neglected Giant Scalp Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Kristine Larsen, MD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Rarely, basal cell carcinoma grows to a giant size, invading the underlying deep tissue and complicating the treatment and reconstruction modalities. A giant basal cell carcinoma on the scalp is in some cases treated with a combination of surgery and radiation therapy, resulting in local control, a satisfactory long-term cosmetic and functional result. We present a case with a neglected basal cell scalp carcinoma, treated with wide excision and postoperative radiotherapy, reconstructed with a free latissimus dorsi flap. The cosmetic result is acceptable and there is no sign of recurrence 1 year postoperatively.

  11. Neglected giant scalp Basal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anne Kristine; El-Charnoubi, Waseem-Asim Ghulam; Gehl, Julie

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY: Rarely, basal cell carcinoma grows to a giant size, invading the underlying deep tissue and complicating the treatment and reconstruction modalities. A giant basal cell carcinoma on the scalp is in some cases treated with a combination of surgery and radiation therapy, resulting in local...... control, a satisfactory long-term cosmetic and functional result. We present a case with a neglected basal cell scalp carcinoma, treated with wide excision and postoperative radiotherapy, reconstructed with a free latissimus dorsi flap. The cosmetic result is acceptable and there is no sign of recurrence...

  12. Hepatic Giant Cell Arteritis and Polymyalgia Rheumatica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald R Duerksen

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR is a clinical syndrome of the elderly characterized by malaise, proximal muscle aching and stiffness, low grade fever, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rare and the frequent association with temporal giant cell arteritis. The authors describe a case of PMR associated with hepatic giant cell arteritis. This lesion has been described in two other clinical reports. The distribution of the arteritis may be patchy; in this report, diagnosis was made with a wedge biopsy performed after an initial nonspecific percutaneous liver biopsy. The authors review the spectrum of liver involvement in PMR and giant cell arteritis. Hepatic abnormalities respond to systemic corticosteroids, and patients with hepatic arteritis have a good prognosis.

  13. Floret-like multinucleated giant cells in neurofibroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golka Dariusz

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This short report discusses a case of neurofibroma containing floret-like multinucleated giant cells. This being the second such case in the literature. Floret-like multinucleated giant cells have been reported in gynaecomastia and neurofibroma in neurofibromatosis type 1. These cells have been reported in uncommon soft tissue tumours including pleomorphic lipoma, giant cell collagenoma, giant cell fibroblastoma and giant cell angiofibroma. We recommend these cells to be interpreted carefully keeping in mind the rare malignant change in neurofibromas. Immunohistochemistry would help in defining the nature of such cells.

  14. Giant-cell lesions of the facial bones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Som, P.M.; Lawson, W.; Cohen, B.A.

    1983-04-01

    Giant-cell lesions of the paranasal sinuses, including the giant-cell reparative granuloma, the brown tumor of hyperparathyroidism, the true giant-cell tumor, cherubism, and the aneurysmal bone cyst, are uncommon entities. Plain radiographic and computed-tomographic studies of these lesions are described and the differential diagnosis is discussed.

  15. Polymyalgia rheumatica and giant cell arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, Brian; Williams, Cynthia M; Gilliland, William

    2006-11-01

    Polymyalgia rheumatica and giant cell arteritis are common, closely related vasculitic conditions that almost exclusively occur in patients older than 50 years. They may be manifestations of the same underlying disease and often coexist. Patients with polymyalgia rheumatica usually present with acute onset of stiffness and pain in the shoulder and pelvic musculature, which may be accompanied by fever, malaise, and weight loss. If untreated, polymyalgia rheumatica may result in significant disability. Giant cell arteritis may manifest as visual loss or diplopia, abnormalities of the temporal artery such as tenderness or decreased pulsation, jaw claudication, and new-onset headaches. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and temporal artery biopsy help make the diagnosis. Giant cell arteritis requires urgent diagnosis because without treatment it may lead to irreversible blindness. Patients with either condition also may have nonspecific symptoms. Corticosteroids are the mainstay of therapy for both conditions, with higher doses required for treatment of giant cell arteritis. Duration of corticosteroid therapy can be five years or longer before complete clinical remission is achieved. Monitoring for corticosteroid-associated side effects such as osteoporosis and diabetes, as well as for relapses and flare-ups, is key to chronic management. The prognosis for either condition, if treated, is good.

  16. Giant cell arteritis: diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo Romero, J M

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis is the most common primary systemic vasculitis in adults. The condition is granulomatous arteritis of large and medium vessels, which occurs almost exclusively in patients aged 50 years or more. This article reviews the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  17. CD34 expression in glioblastoma and giant cell glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, M

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether CD34 is expressed in glioblastomas and giant cell glioblastomas, as this information may be of value when attempting to differentiate between giant cell glioblastomas and other relevant differential diagnoses such as pleomorphic xanthoastrocytomas with anaplastic features and anaplastic gangliogliomas. 11 giant cell glioblastomas and 16 non-giant cell glioblastomas were assessed with immunocytochemical staining for CD34. Standard immunocytochemical techniques were used, to reflect the staining patterns likely to be seen in routine diagnostic practice. Positive staining refers to staining of neoplastic cells. 73% of giant cell glioblastomas showed some degree of staining for CD34, and 55% showed strong widespread staining. 56% of non-giant cell glioblastomas showed some degree of CD34 staining, and 25% showed strong widespread staining. Both giant cell and non-giant cell glioblastomas frequently show CD34 expression by neoplastic cells, which may in some cases be strong and diffuse. Strong widespread staining of neoplastic cells for CD34 was more frequent in giant cell than non-giant cell glioblastomas, however this difference was not statistically significant. CD34 staining in isolation is unlikely to be of assistance in differentiating between giant cell glioblastoma and pleomorphic xanthoastrocytomas with anaplastic features or anaplastic gangliogliomas.

  18. Giant basal cell carcinoma Carcinoma basocelular gigante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilton Nasser

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer but the giant vegetating basal cell carcinoma reaches less than 0.5 % of all basal cell carcinoma types. The Giant BCC, defined as a lesion with more than 5 cm at its largest diameter, is a rare form of BCC and commonly occurs on the trunk. This patient, male, 42 years old presents a Giant Basal Cell Carcinoma which reaches 180 cm2 on the right shoulder and was negligent in looking for treatment. Surgical treatment was performed and no signs of dissemination or local recurrence have been detected after follow up of five years.O carcinoma basocelular é o tipo mais comum de câncer de pele, mas o carcinoma basocelular gigante vegetante não atinge 0,5% de todos os tipos de carcinomas basocelulares. O Carcinoma Basocelular Gigante, definido como lesão maior que 5 cm no maior diâmetro, é uma forma rara de carcinoma basocelular e comumente ocorre no tronco. Este paciente apresenta um Carcinoma Basocelular Gigante com 180cm² no ombro direito e foi negligente em procurar tratamento. Foi realizado tratamento cirúrgico e nenhum sinal de disseminação ou recorrência local foi detectada após 5 anos.

  19. Lipidized giant-cell glioblastoma of cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, L S; Faria, A V; Zanardi, V A; Netto, J R Menezes

    2005-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is recognized rarely in the cerebellum. We describe a peculiar case with lipid accumulation in giant tumor cells, possibly the second example so far reported in this unusual location. A 46-year-old man with a 5-month history of headache, vomiting, dizziness and instability of gait, was found to have on magnetic resonance imaging an expanding mass situated deep in the left cerebellar hemisphere. The lesion was hypointense in T 1- and hyperintense in T2-weighted images, had poorly defined borders, peripheral edema and annular foci of contrast enhancement. Eight months after subtotal removal and radiotherapy, control MRI showed tumor recurrence with aggressive features. The patient was alive 15 months after operation but follow-up was eventually lost. Histologically, the tumor showed marked pleomorphism, with many giant cells characterized by finely vacuolated cytoplasm strongly suggestive of lipid accumulation. There were few, sometimes atypical mitotic figures and foci of endothelial proliferation. The tumor cells were strongly positive for GFAP, vimentin and S100 protein, all of which stressed the foamy appearance of the giant cells. About 15% of nuclei were positive for Ki-67. We considered the case to be a so-called lipidized glioblastoma, first recognized as a subtype by Kepes and Rubinstein [1981]. Differential diagnosis with anaplastic pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma is discussed.

  20. Giant Cell Tumor of Bone - an Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshul Sobti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant Cell tumors (GCT are benign tumors with potential for aggressive behavior and capacity to metastasize. Although rarely lethal, benign bone tumors may be associated with a substantial disturbance of the local bony architecture that can be particularly troublesome in peri-articular locations. Its histogenesis remains unclear. It is characterized by a proliferation of mononuclear stromal cells and the presence of many multi- nucleated giant cells with homogenous distribution. There is no widely held consensus regarding the ideal treatment method selection. There are advocates of varying surgical techniques ranging from intra-lesional curettage to wide resection. As most giant cell tumors are benign and are located near a joint in young adults, several authors favor an intralesional approach that preserves anatomy of bone in lieu of resection. Although GCT is classified as a benign lesion, few patients develop progressive lung metastases with poor outcomes. Treatment is mainly surgical. Options of chemotherapy and radiotherapy are reserved for selected cases. Recent advances in the understanding of pathogenesis are essential to develop new treatments for this locally destructive primary bone tumor.

  1. Cranial vault metastasis of giant cell tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notarianni, Christina; Abreo, Fluerette; Nanda, Anil

    2008-08-01

    Giant cell tumors are benign bony tumors involving the epiphysis of long bones. Here, we present a case of giant cell tumor involving the parietal bone that had metastasized from the sacrum. A 36-year-old healthy woman presented to neurosurgery clinic in April 2005 reporting a "bump" over the left parietal area that had been increasing in size over the past 6 months. The lesion was nontender, and the patient had no other associated neurological symptoms. As we have presented here, cranial vault metastases can occur and should be considered in a differential diagnosis of bony lesions found in this location. These distant metastases, although relatively uncommon, must be managed aggressively. Newer radiation treatments seem to be a promising favorable adjunct to wide local resection and should be investigated further for these tumors.

  2. Multicentric giant cell tumor around the knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salgia Anil

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of multicentric giant cell tumor with synchronous occurrence in all three bones around the knee is reported here in view of its rarity. A 33-year-old average built male reported with complaints of severe pain, gradually increasing swelling around the right knee. A 3 x 2 cm swelling was present on the lateral aspect of the distal end of the right femur and a 3 x 3 cm swelling on the proximal part of the right tibia. Plain X-ray of right knee showed subarticular eccentrically located expansile lytic lesion in the lateral tibia condyle, lateral condyle of femur and patella. Fine needle aspiration cytology and subsequent histology ascertained the diagnosis of giant cell tumor of the bone. The patient was treated successfully with curettage, bone grafting and methyl methacrylate cementing (Sandwich technique.

  3. Peripheral giant cell granuloma: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Kota, Kasim; Kodanda, Ram; Jaisekharan, V P

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG) is a non neoplastic reactive lesion of the gingiva, originating from the periosteum or periodontal membrane following local irritation or chronic trauma. PGCG manifests as a red-purple growth located in the gingiva or edentulous alveolar margins. The lesion can develop at any age, shows a slight female predilection. Usually, they cause one or the other problem in eruption or alignment of teeth, but may also present without disturbing the normal occlusion...

  4. YKL-40 in giant cells and macrophages from patients with giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J S; Baslund, B; Garbarsch, C

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: YKL-40, a mammalian member of the family 18 glycosyl hydrolases, is secreted by activated macrophages at a late stage of differentiation. Macrophages are present in inflammation of the arterial wall and are thought to participate in the pathogenesis of giant cell arteritis (GCA). The aim...... of this study was to evaluate whether macrophages and giant cells of patients with GCA produce YKL-40, and whether serum YKL-40 concentrations are elevated in these patients. METHODS: Serum YKL-40 was determined by radioimmunoassay in 19 patients with GCA and 8 patients with polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) who...... was found in CD68+ giant cells and mononuclear cells located in the media. Macrophages located in the adventitia and intima were negative for YKL-40. At the time of diagnosis, patients with GCA had an increased median serum level of YKL-40 (256 microg/liter; P

  5. Cytoskeletal control of nuclear arrangement in Langhans multinucleate giant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, P J; Papadimitriou, J M

    1984-05-01

    Examination of the role of the cytoskeleton in macrophage polykarya (multinucleate giant cells) has established that microfilaments and microtubules are interrelated and contractile cytoskeletal components with opposing actions; when critically maintained at equilibrium, they are responsible for maintenance of the highly organized cellular architecture characteristic of Langhans type syncytia. Disruption of the function of these structures by in vitro incubation with cytochalasin B and/or colchicine can result in reversion to a cytoarchitecture which is more typical of the 'foreign body' multinucleate giant cell. These observations strongly reinforce previous suggestions that Langhans multinucleate giant cells are special, more highly organized forms than are 'foreign body' multinucleate giant cells.

  6. Metastatic giant basal cell carcinoma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellahammou, Khadija; Lakhdissi, Asmaa; Akkar, Othman; Rais, Fadoua; Naoual, Benhmidou; Elghissassi, Ibrahim; M'rabti, Hind; Errihani, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer, characterised by a slow growing behavior, metastasis are extremely rare, and it occurs in less than 0, 1% of all cases. Giant basal cell carcinoma is a rare form of basal cell carcinoma, more aggressive and defined as a tumor measuring more than 5 cm at its largest diameter. Only 1% of all basal cell carcinoma develops to a giant basal cell carcinoma, resulting of patient's negligence. Giant basal cell carcinoma is associated with higher potential of metastasis and even death, compared to ordinary basal cell carcinoma. We report a case of giant basal cell carcinoma metastaticin lung occurring in a 79 years old male patient, with a fatal evolution after one course of systemic chemotherapy. Giant basal cell carcinoma is a very rare entity, early detection of these tumors could prevent metastasis occurrence and improve the prognosis of this malignancy.

  7. Giant cell tumour of talar body.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bapat M

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumour (osteoclastoma of talar bone is a rare entity and is seen more commonly in the third decade of life. We report this disease entity in a 17-years-old girl. The patient presented with painful swelling of the left ankle with an osteolytic lesion in the talus on conventional radiographs. Intralesional curettage and autologous bone grafting was performed following which patient′s pain and swelling disappeared. Complete range of movement at the ankle joint was regained with minimal restriction at the subtalar joint. There is no evidence of relapse at six months follow up.

  8. Lyme carditis mimicking giant cell arteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krati Chauhan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Presenting an interesting case of a patient who complained of myalgias, fatigue, headache, jaw claudication and scalp tenderness. Patient’s physical examination was unremarkable. Laboratory findings showed elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein, bilateral temporal artery biopsy results were negative and first degree atrioventricular block was seen on electrocardiogram. Serology for Borrelia burgdorferi was positive; patient was diagnosed with Lyme carditis and treated with doxycycline. Lyme is a tick-borne, multi-system disease and occasionally its presentation may mimic giant cell arteritis. On follow-up there was complete resolution of symptoms and electrocardiogram findings.

  9. Giant cell reparative granuloma of the hallux following enchondroma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Giant cell reparative granuloma (GCRG) is a rare, benign intra osseous lytic lesion occurring especially in gnathis bone but also seen in feet and hands. It has similar clinical and radiological presentations than giant cell tumor, chondroblastoma, aneurysmal bone cyst, and hyperparathyroidism brown tumors but with specific ...

  10. Management of Giant Cell Tumour: A Nigerian Experience | Eyesan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Giant cell tumours (GCT) are the commonest bone tumours worldwide. It is rarely malignant but when it does it progresses to fibrosarcoma with high mortality. Otherwise it causes poor cosmesis, disability and pathological fractures. A total of 19 cases of histologically established Giant cell tumour of the bone were reviewed ...

  11. Metastatic giant basal cell carcinoma: a case report | Khadija | Pan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... characterised by a slow growing behavior, metastasis are extremely rare, and it ... develops to a giant basal cell carcinoma,resulting ofpatient's negligence. ... cell carcinoma metastaticin lung occurringin a 79 years old male patient, with a ...

  12. Histogenesis of the development of Langhans' giant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zółtowska, A

    1986-01-01

    Microscopic analysis of the development of Langhans' giant cells in lymph nodes of hyperimmunized animals was performed. It seems that they originate from the primitive mesenchymal cells, arranged along the blood vessels especially along the capillaries.

  13. Giant cell tumor of dorsal vertebral body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Redhu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 30-year-old female patient presented with complaints of backache, weakness in both lower limbs and bladder/bowel dysfunction. Imaging showed an osteolytic lesion at tenth dorsal (D10 vertebra with anterior compression on the spinal cord. Complete intralesional tumor excision with reconstruction was carried out using the anterolateral extrapleural approach. Histopathological examination was suggestive of giant cell tumor (GCT. Because of complete intralesional tumor excision and fear of post-radiation osteonecrosis of bone used for delayed bony union, a conservative approach was used, and radiation therapy was not given. After one year of follow-up patient is doing well without any recurrence of the tumor and is ambulant with support. GCT of dorsal vertebral body is an uncommon entity and total en bloc excision is difficult. Therefore, the treatment strategy is not well-defined. We discuss in brief about incidence, presentation and various treatment modalities available for spinal GCT.

  14. Osteoclastic giant cell tumor of the pancreas: an immunohistochemical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dizon, M A; Multhaupt, H A; Paskin, D L

    1996-01-01

    A case of an osteoclastic giant cell tumor of the pancreas is presented. Immunohistochemical studies were performed, which showed keratin (CAM, AE1) and epithelial membrane antigen positivity in the tumor cells. The findings support an epithelial origin for this tumor.......A case of an osteoclastic giant cell tumor of the pancreas is presented. Immunohistochemical studies were performed, which showed keratin (CAM, AE1) and epithelial membrane antigen positivity in the tumor cells. The findings support an epithelial origin for this tumor....

  15. Varicella zoster virus and giant cell arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilden, Don; Nagel, Maria A

    2016-06-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is a serious disease and the most common cause of vasculitis in the elderly. Here, studies describing the recent discovery of varicella zoster virus (VZV) in the temporal arteries of patients with GCA are reviewed. GCA is characterized by severe headache/head pain and scalp tenderness. Many patients also have a history of vision loss, jaw claudication, polymyalgia rheumatica, fever, night sweats, weight loss, and fatigue. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein are usually elevated. Diagnosis is confirmed by temporal artery biopsy, which reveals vessel wall damage and inflammation, with multinucleated giant cells and/or epithelioid macrophages. Skip lesions are common. Importantly, temporal artery biopsies are pathologically negative in many clinically suspect cases. The present review highlights recent virological findings in temporal arteries from patients with pathologically verified GCA and in temporal arteries from patients who manifest clinical and laboratory features of GCA but whose temporal artery biopsies are pathologically negative for GCA. Virological analysis revealed that VZV is present in most GCA-positive and GCA-negative temporal artery biopsies, particularly in skip areas that correlate with adjacent GCA disease. The presence of VZV in GCA-positive and GCA-negative temporal arteries reflects the possible role of VZV in triggering the immunopathology of GCA and indicates that both groups of patients should be treated with antivirals in addition to corticosteroids. Whether oral antiviral agents and steroids are as effective as intravenous acyclovir and steroids, and the dosage and duration of treatment, remain to be determined.

  16. Giant cell tumour of extensor tendon sheath: Preventing recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S S Shirol

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant Cell Tumour of tendon sheath is relatively rare tumour with an overall incidence of around 1 in 50,000 individuals. Marginal excision of giant cell tumour of the tendon sheath is the treatment of choice. It is also the commonest hand lesion to recur after excision. The incidence of local recurrence is high, ranging from 9-44%. Here we present a case report of a giant cell tumour of extensor tendon sheath in hand which was successfully treated with special emphasis on ways of prevention of recurrence.

  17. Spectrum of giant cells and its significance on FNAC in breast lesions

    OpenAIRE

    S Dayal; M Mathur; V Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Fine needle aspiration of breast is being performed from last several years. It is not uncommon to find giant cell on FNAC of breast smears .Giant cells arises from monocyte / macrophage lineage which are capable of fusion to form multinucleated giant cell. The common giant cell seen in breast on fna smears are foreign body , Langhan’s type , stromal giant cells , tumor giant cells and osteoclastic giant cell . It arises in benign as well as malignant lesions of the breast. Hence, their recog...

  18. Analyzing the spatial positioning of nuclei in polynuclear giant cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stange, Maike; Hintsche, Marius; Sachse, Kirsten; Gerhardt, Matthias; Valleriani, Angelo; Beta, Carsten

    2017-11-01

    How cells establish and maintain a well-defined size is a fundamental question of cell biology. Here we investigated to what extent the microtubule cytoskeleton can set a predefined cell size, independent of an enclosing cell membrane. We used electropulse-induced cell fusion to form giant multinuclear cells of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. Based on dual-color confocal imaging of cells that expressed fluorescent markers for the cell nucleus and the microtubules, we determined the subcellular distributions of nuclei and centrosomes in the giant cells. Our two- and three-dimensional imaging results showed that the positions of nuclei in giant cells do not fall onto a regular lattice. However, a comparison with model predictions for random positioning showed that the subcellular arrangement of nuclei maintains a low but still detectable degree of ordering. This can be explained by the steric requirements of the microtubule cytoskeleton, as confirmed by the effect of a microtubule degrading drug.

  19. Cytogenetic and molecular genetic analyses of giant cell glioblastoma multiforme reveal distinct profiles in giant cell and non-giant cell subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Ramon; Roggendorf, Wolfgang; Baretton, Gustavo; Klein, Rüdiger; Toedt, Grisha; Lichter, Peter; Schackert, Gabriele; Joos, Stefan

    2007-05-01

    We have comparatively analyzed mechanisms associated with chromosomal and microsatellite instability in giant cell glioblastoma multiforme (gcGBM) and classic GBM. This included microsatellite instability (MSI), loss of expression of four major mismatch repair (MMR) proteins, aberrations of five chromosomes, EGFR copy number, and TP53 mutations. MSI was more frequent among gcGBM (30 vs. 7.8%, P = 0.054). TP53 mutations were more commonly observed in gcGBM (83.3%), whereas EGFR was amplified in just one gcGBM (8.3%). By tumor cell phenotype-specific cytogenetic analysis of gcGBM, increased chromosome copy numbers were identified in 72-84% of giant cells but in only 4-14% of nongiant cells; in classic GBM, intermediate frequencies were noted (11-49%). Chromosome 10 deletions were found in nongiant cells of all gcGBM cases but in only approximately 45% of the cell population in classic GBM. The present study shows a distinct pattern of cytogenetic alterations in nongiant and giant cell phenotypes in gcGBM and suggests that multinuclear giant cells evolve from nongiant tumor cells at an early tumor stage. Furthermore, the data point to differences in the profile of chromosomal and microsatellite instability in gcGBM and classic GBM that might underscore the distinct pathological features of both tumor subtypes.

  20. Cerebellar giant cell glioblastoma multiforme in an adult

    OpenAIRE

    Sudhansu Sekhar Mishra; Sanjay Kumar Behera; Manmath Kumar Dhir; Satya Bhusan Senapati

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a rare tumor that accounts for only 1% of all cases of GBM and its giant cell variant is even much rarely encountered in adults. A case of cerebellar giant cell GBM managed at our institution reporting its clinical presentation, radiological and histological findings, and treatment instituted is described. In conjunction, a literature review, including particular issues, clinical data, advances in imaging studies, pathological characteristics, treat...

  1. Frequency of Giant Cell Lesions in Oral Biopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Mohajerani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Oral lesions are among the important reasons for seeking dental care. Being frequently encountered, giant cell lesions form an important group of oral lesions. The epidemiologic data on these lesions, however, is scarce in Iran. The present study investigatedepidemiological and demographic characteristics of giant cell lesions in oral biopsies done in one of the largest oral pathology departments in Iran.Materials and Methods: This descriptive survey studied the existing biopsy records of 2265 patients referred to the Department of Oral Pathology in Shahid Beheshti Dental School from 1991 to 2002. Records with final diagnosis of giant cell lesion were identified.Data on type of lesion, distribution of lesions, the involved jaw, and patients' gender and age was extracted from these records.Results: In total, 144 giant cell lesions were identified. These lesions comprised peripheral giant cell granuloma (59.5%, central giant cell granuloma (36.6%, cherubism (2.5%,and aneurysmal bone cyst (1.4%. Most of the cases had been occurred among women(54.9%, in their second and third decades of life (49.4%. The anterior region of the mandible was the most common location of these lesions (26.2%. In approximately half of the cases, the first clinical diagnosis was similar to the histopathologic diagnosis.Conclusion: The giant cell lesions were more common in women and in the anterior region of the mandible. More commonly, they occurred in the second and third decades of life unilaterally. This study elucidates the epidemiologic data of giant cell lesions in Iranand the results can be helpful for dental scholars in various fields.

  2. Giant Cell Arteritis and Polymyalgia Rheumatica: 2016 Update

    OpenAIRE

    Gideon Nesher; Breuer, Gabriel S.

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) and polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) are both more common among people of North European decent than among Mediterranean people. Women are 2–3 times more commonly affected. Giant cell arteritis and PMR are extremely rare before age 50 years. Polymyalgia rheumatica may be “isolated” or associated with GCA. There is increased expression of inflammatory cytokines in temporal arteries of PMR patients, without overt histological evidence of arteritis. One-third of “isolated”...

  3. Peripheral and Central Giant Cell Lesions in Children: Institutional Experience at Subharti Dental College and Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Chandna, Preetika; Srivastava, Nikhil; Bansal, Vishal; Wadhwan, Vijay; Dubey, Prajesh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Giant cell lesions (GCG) are a group of varied lesions that contain a multitude of multinucleated, osteoclast like giant cells within connective tissue stroma. These include giant cell granulomas which may be central (CGCG), if they lie within the jaw bone, or, peripheral (PGCG) if they lie within the soft tissue. Giant cell granulomas comprised 9.29% of all oral lesions. This case series comprises of 5 giant cell lesions in children between the ages of 4 to 12 years. Materials ...

  4. Genetic Alterations in Gliosarcoma and Giant Cell Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ji Eun; Ohta, Takashi; Nonoguchi, Naosuke; Satomi, Kaishi; Capper, David; Pierscianek, Daniela; Sure, Ulrich; Vital, Anne; Paulus, Werner; Mittelbronn, Michel; Antonelli, Manila; Kleihues, Paul; Giangaspero, Felice; Ohgaki, Hiroko

    2016-07-01

    The majority of glioblastomas develop rapidly with a short clinical history (primary glioblastoma IDH wild-type), whereas secondary glioblastomas progress from diffuse astrocytoma or anaplastic astrocytoma. IDH mutations are the genetic hallmark of secondary glioblastomas. Gliosarcomas and giant cell glioblastomas are rare histological glioblastoma variants, which usually develop rapidly. We determined the genetic patterns of 36 gliosarcomas and 19 giant cell glioblastomas. IDH1 and IDH2 mutations were absent in all 36 gliosarcomas and in 18 of 19 giant cell glioblastomas analyzed, indicating that they are histological variants of primary glioblastoma. Furthermore, LOH 10q (88%) and TERT promoter mutations (83%) were frequent in gliosarcomas. Copy number profiling using the 450k methylome array in 5 gliosarcomas revealed CDKN2A homozygous deletion (3 cases), trisomy chromosome 7 (2 cases), and monosomy chromosome 10 (2 cases). Giant cell glioblastomas had LOH 10q in 50% and LOH 19q in 42% of cases. ATRX loss was detected immunohistochemically in 19% of giant cell glioblastomas, but absent in 17 gliosarcomas. These and previous results suggest that gliosarcomas are a variant of, and genetically similar to, primary glioblastomas, except for a lack of EGFR amplification, while giant cell glioblastoma occupies a hybrid position between primary and secondary glioblastomas. © 2015 International Society of Neuropathology.

  5. Giant cell arteritis (cranial arteritis, polymyalgia rheumatica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumenthaler, M

    1978-08-25

    Giant cell arteritis, which is probably due to disturbed immune mechanisms, has a spectrum of clinical symptoms in elderly people. In nearly all cases such general signs as loss of appetite, loss of weight and fever are present. The sedimentation rate is almost without exception about 100 mm in the first hour. The two most frequent and typical clinical syndromes are polymyalgia rheumatica and cranial arteritis. The polymyalgia rheumatica is characterized by periarticular pain which is mostly symmetrical and accentuated in the shoulder girdle. Increasingly severe temporal headache and ocular distrubances are found with cranial arteritis in more than 50% of cases. A combination of both diseases is frequent. Other arterial branches are rarely involved. The course of the disease is over a period of 1 1/2 to 2 years. Treatment with corticosteroids is indicated mainly because of the severe ocular complications with blindness. It should begin immediately, be intensive and last over a long period. Regular followup is necessary over several years in order to avoid relapses.

  6. Localized Giant Cell Tumors of the Flexor Tendon Sheath of the Finger: An Analysis of Twenty Five Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asli Tanrivermis Sayit

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aims of this retrospective study were to evaluate localized giant cell tumors of the tendon sheath (GCTTS with Magnetic Resonance (MR imaging findings and to review the epidemiological features of the disease. We also evaluated the literature regarding GCTTS and performed an analysis of the available information. Material and Method: We retrospectively reviewed the MR images of 25 histologically proven cases of GCTTS of the finger during the period between 2012-2014. In addition, a retrospective analysis of the patients’ records was carried out, and age, gender, site and size of lesion, recurrence, and MRI findings were reviewed. Results: The patients were predominantly female (n = 16 and had a mean age of 51.9 ± 12.8 years. Nine patients were male with a mean age of 45.1 ± 13.4 years. The size of the tumors ranged from 6 mm to 30 mm, with a mean size of 15.3±6.8 mm. Tumors were present on the right hand in 15 patients and on the left hand in 10 patients. Among women, 11 tumors were located on the right hand and 5 were found on the left. In men, 4 of the tumors were located on the right hand and 5 were on the left. The most frequent digit on which tumors were found was the index finger, accounting for 40% of cases (n=10. The most frequent location was the index finger for both women (n=6 and men (n=4. All of the lesions were described as well-circumscribed, encapsulated, lobulated, or multilobulated solitary masses with MR imaging. Signal intensity on T1 weighted images (WI was equal to that of skeletal muscle in 23 cases. In two cases, signal intensity was slightly higher. On T2WIs, the signal intensities tended to be between those of skeletal muscle and fat in all of the cases. All of the lesions showed mild to moderate contrast enhancement when compared with precontrast images. There was no statistically significant differences between male and female patients in terms of age, tumor side, involved digit, and highest tumor size

  7. The pathogenesis of giant cell arteritis: morphological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordborg, C; Nordborg, E; Petursdottir, V

    2000-01-01

    The light-microscopic, electron-microscopic and immunocytochemical characteristics of giant cell arteritis (GCA) have been investigated in a number of studies on temporal arteries. Arterial atrophy and calcification of the internal elastic membrane appear to be prerequisites for the evolution of the inflammatory process. Foreign body giant cells form close to calcifications, apparently without connection with other inflammatory cells and probably by the fusion of modified vascular smooth muscle cells. The foreign body giant cells attack the calcifications. Lymphocytes accumulate around them and may be found in pockets in their cell surface. This focal reaction is found in atrophic, calcified arterial segments in a minority of inflamed temporal artery biopsies. More commonly seen is a diffuse mononuclear attack of the vessel wall in atrophic as well as non-atrophic segments which leads to severe arterial dilatation. Langhans giant cells form by the fusion of macrophages in the diffuse inflammatory infiltrate. The fact that the diffusely inflamed arteries are markedly widened compared to the focally inflamed vessels suggests that the inflammatory process starts as a focal foreign body giant cell reaction directed at calcifications which in turn initiates a more diffuse and widespread inflammation.

  8. Cytologic characteristics of subependymal giant cell astrocytoma in squash smears: morphometric comparisons with gemistocytic astrocytoma and giant cell glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se Hoon; Lee, Kwang-Gil; Kim, Tai Seung

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the squash smear features of subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) in comparison with gemistocytic astrocytoma and giant cell glioblastoma. We compared the squash smear features of 3 cases of SEGA, 9 cases of gemistocytic astrocytoma and 3 cases of giant cell glioblastoma with the morphometric findings. SEGA had, on average, a 15.84 +/- 5.03-microm nucleus, 33.22 +/- 12.05-microm cytoplasm and 0.50 +/- 0.12 nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio in squash smears. In addition, SEGA showed hairlike processes distributed along the squash direction like strap cells. While the gemistocytic astrocytoma had several tumor cells showing a vertically located nucleus, the tumor cells of SEGA showed nuclei oriented mainly in parallel. These squash cytologic features of SEGA can be very helpful in the differential diagnosis by excluding mimics.

  9. Giant cell temporal arteritis associated with overlying basal cell carcinoma: co-incidence or connection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salem Alowami

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell arteritis is a granulomatous vasculitis of large and medium sized arteries manifesting as temporal arteritis and/or polymyalgia rheumatica. The histological assessment of temporal artery biopsies is frequently encountered in anatomical pathology and has important diagnostic consequences in patients clinically suspected of having giant cell arteritis. We present an intriguing case of giant cell arteritis associated with a Basal cell carcinoma and discuss the ongoing controversy pertaining to the association of giant cell arteritis/polymyalgia rheumatica with malignancy.

  10. Giant Cell Myocarditis: Not Always a Presentation of Cardiogenic Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Tompkins

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell myocarditis is a rare and often fatal disease. The most obvious presentation often described in the literature is one of rapid hemodynamic deterioration due to cardiogenic shock necessitating urgent consideration of mechanical circulatory support and heart transplantation. We present the case of a 60-year-old man whose initial presentation was consistent with myopericarditis but who went on to develop a rapid decline in left ventricular systolic function without overt hemodynamic compromise or dramatic symptomatology. Giant cell myocarditis was confirmed via endomyocardial biopsy. Combined immunosuppression with corticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitor resulted in resolution of symptoms and sustained recovery of left ventricular function one year later. Our case highlights that giant cell myocarditis does not always present with cardiogenic shock and should be considered in the evaluation of new onset cardiomyopathy of uncertain etiology as a timely diagnosis has distinct clinical implications on management and prognosis.

  11. Multicentric Giant Cell Tumor of Bone: Synchronous and Metachronous Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiner Wirbel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 27-year-old man treated 2.5 years ago for synchronous multicentric giant cell tumor of bone located at the right proximal humerus and the right 5th finger presented now with complaints of pain in his right hip and wrist of two-month duration. Radiology and magnetic resonance revealed multicentric giant cell tumor lesions of the right proximal femur, the left ileum, the right distal radius, and the left distal tibia. The patient has an eighteen-year history of a healed osteosarcoma of the right tibia that was treated with chemotherapy, resection, and allograft reconstruction. A literature review establishes this as the first reported case of a patient with synchronous and metachronous multicentric giant cell tumor who also has a history of osteosarcoma.

  12. Giant cell reparative granuloma of the occipital bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos-Briz, A.; Ricoy, J.R.; Martinez-Tello, F.J. [Department of Anatomical Pathology, Hospital Universitario ' ' 12 de Octubre' ' , Madrid (Spain); Lobato, R.D. [Department of Neurosurgery, Hospital Universitario ' ' 12 de Octubre' ' , Madrid (Spain); Ramos, A.; Millan, J.M. [Department of Radiology, Hospital Universitario ' ' 12 de Octubre' ' , Madrid (Spain); Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Departamento de Anatomia Patologica, Avda. de Andalucia s/n, Madrid 28041 (Spain)

    2003-03-01

    Giant cell reparative granuloma (GCRG) is a non-neoplastic fibrous lesion with unevenly distributed multinucleated giant cells, areas of osseous metaplasia and hemorrhage. The small bones of the hands and feet are the most common sites, followed by the vertebral bodies and craniofacial bones. In the craniofacial bones GCRG has been reported in the temporal bone, in the frontal bone and paranasal sinus. However, to the best of our knowledge no case has been reported in the occipital bone. We report on the imaging findings and pathological features of a GCRG of the occipital bone and discuss the differential diagnosis of this entity in this particular location, especially with giant cell tumor because of the therapeutic and prognostic implications. (orig.)

  13. Peripheral Giant Cell Granuloma Associated With Dental Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarano, Antonio; Lorusso, Carmen; Mortellaro, Carmen; Limongelli, Luisa; Tempesta, Angela; Favia, Gianfranco

    2018-01-04

    Peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG) is a nonneoplastic lesion of the oral mucosa arising on the buccal or lingual attached gingiva or alveolar mucosa and the crest of the edentulous alveolar ridge and contains numerous giant cells. This case series describes 3 cases regarding the clinical and surgical management of PGCG associated with dental implants. This case series presents 3 patients, mean age 36 years, who showed a pedunculated painless lesion associated with dental implants that radiographically appeared as an osseous rarefaction corresponding the implants. Histological examination provided the diagnosis of PGCG. The treatment approach consisted in a surgical complete resection of the lesion and implant removal. After 1-year-follow-up, all the investigated cases did not show signs of recurrence. A correct diagnosis and an appropriate surgical treatment of peri-implant giant cell granuloma are very important aspects for proper management of the lesion.

  14. [Atypical presentation of a clinical case of giant cell arteritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosselló Aubach, L L; Torres Cortada, G; Cabau Rúbies, J; Aragón Sanz, M A; Oncins Torres, R

    2006-06-01

    We present a very unusual clinical case of giant cell arteritis with uterus involvement, in a women of 66 years old, that began clinical features of pain and functional limitation of shoulders and hip 3 mouth before been operated of uterus prolapse with hysterectomy. Biopsy of uterus found affected arterial vesels with wall sclerosis and granulomatous inflamation with giant cells, without necrosis, involving media and perivascular portions suggesting giant cell arteritis. In a previous reports review, we only found ten similar clinical cases. In that cases, clinical features were no suggestif of the disease. Although the well known tendency of arteritis to involve some specific vascular areas, the case we present is an example of the systemic course of the disease and his difficulty to diagnose.

  15. Breast carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerdrum, L M; Lauridsen, M C; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    2001-01-01

    Primary carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells is a very rare tumour of the female breast. The clinical course, histological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural features of 61 cases of invasive duct carcinoma with osteoclast-like multinucleated giant cells (OMGCs) are reviewed and a new ...... case is presented. The median patient age of all patients included in the review was 42 years, the tumour was located in the upper outer quadrant and the mammographic and gross findings were of a well-defined tumour of dark-brown colour, resembling a metastatic melanoma. Follow-up data...... stroma. Immunohistochemical and ultrastructural studies have claimed a benign histiocytic nature of the OMGCs; they may represent a special type of polykaryon, distinct from both osteoclasts and inflammatory giant cells....

  16. Giant cell tumor-like lesion of the urinary bladder: a report of two cases and literature review; giant cell tumor or undifferentiated carcinoma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oznur Meltem

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary Giant cell tumor, excluding its prototype in bone, is usually a benign but local aggressive neoplasm originating from tendon sheath or soft tissue. Malignant behavior is uncommon. Visceral organ involvement including urinary bladder is rare. Giant cell tumors in visceral organs usually accompany epithelial tumors and the clinical behavior of giant cell tumor in urinary bladder is similar to its bone counterpart. Here, we report two cases of giant cell tumor located in urinary bladder in comparison with nine reported cases in the English literature. Concurrent noninvasive urothelial carcinoma was also described in all these previous reports and only one patient with follow-up died of disease. One of the two cases we present had no concurrent urothelial tumor at the time of diagnosis but had a history of a low grade noninvasive urothelial carcinoma with three recurrences. The histology of these two cases was similar to the giant cell tumor of bone and composed of oval to spindle mononuclear cells with evenly spaced osteoclast-like giant cells. Immunohistochemically, the giant cells showed staining with osteoclastic markers including CD68, TRAP, and LCA. Immunohistochemical expression of vimentin, CD68, LCA, and smooth muscle actin in mononuclear cells supported a mesenchymal origin with histiocytic lineage. The histologic and immunohistochemical properties in our cases as well as their clinical courses were consistent with a giant cell tumor. Consequently, tumors in urinary bladder showing features of giant cell tumor of bone may also be considered and termed "giant cell tumor".

  17. Breast carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerdrum, L M; Lauridsen, M C; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    2001-01-01

    Primary carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells is a very rare tumour of the female breast. The clinical course, histological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural features of 61 cases of invasive duct carcinoma with osteoclast-like multinucleated giant cells (OMGCs) are reviewed and a new...... in the literature have shown that 86% of patients with these tumours are still alive after 5 years. Histologically, these tumours are invasive ductal carcinomas with OMGCs next to the neoplastic glands and within their lumen. Signs of recent and past haemorrhage are ubiquitously present in the highly vascularized...

  18. A recurrent giant cell tumor of bone treated with denosumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Stadler

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Although the giant cell tumor of bone is generally classified as a benign tumor it can rarely metastasize and has a potential risk of local recurrence. We want to report about a female patient who suffered from a recurrence of a giant cell tumor of bone after the implantation of a total endoprosthesis of the knee joint. We have treated her with denosumab, which is a receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand inhibitor. In this case report we want to present a new option to treat this kind of neoplasm.

  19. Methods for the differentiation of giant cells in canine and feline neoplasias in paraffin sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jösten, M; Rudolph, R

    1997-05-01

    In the following study cells with at least two cell nuclei are addressed as giant cells. In 47 biopsies of feline neoplasias (fibrosarcoma, haemangioendothelsarcoma, mammary adenocarcinoma, osteoidsarcoma, complex sarcoma), and 25 biopsies of canine neoplasias (malignant seminoma, mammary adenocarcinoma, haemangioendothelsarcoma, fibrosarcoma, osteoblastic sarcoma, complex sarcoma) giant cells are distinguished either as neoplastic giant cells or as reactive (non-neoplastic) giant cells. Cell nuclei of neoplastic giant cells which are labelled with the monoclonal antibody MIB 1 are mitotic active; cell nuclei are polymorph and can show atypical mitosis; the cytoplasmic reaction with tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) is negative. Negative reactions with MIB 1, positive TRAP staining and homogeneous cell nuclei are distinctive for osteoclast-like glant cells. Other non-neoplastic giant cells (e.g. foreign body cells, Langhans-giant cells) are negative with both MIB 1 and TRAP. Double staining of paraffin sections is possible. Routine formalin-fixation, embedding in paraffin and decalcifying tissue samples do not interfere with MIB 1 immunoreactions or TRAP reactions. Methodological modifications that were necessary for the preparation of paraffin sections from canine and feline tissue samples are discussed. As the presence of neoplastic giant tumour cells is an index for a poor prognosis in human medicine, not only the entity of the tumour must be named, but also the exact significance of the giant cell type:, e.g. fibrosarcoma with osteoclast-like giant cells, hepatic carcinoma with reactive giant cells, malignant seminoma with neoplastic giant cells, angiosarcoma with both neoplastic giant cells and osteoclast-like giant cells. This would enable the classification of further neoplasias dealing with clinical courses of the diseases. Over the past years our stains have remained stable. It is possible to carry out retrospective investigations with archived

  20.  An Uncommon Presentation of Giant Cell Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Malhotra

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available  Giant Cell Tumors commonly occur at the ends of long bones. However in rare cases, they can occur in the bones of the hands and feet. Tumors in these locations occur in younger patients; in addition, these tumors are more commonly multifocal and are associated with a higher risk for local recurrence than tumors at the ends of long bones. Since lesions in the small bones may be multifocal, a patient with a giant cell tumor of the small bones should undergo a skeletal survey to exclude similar lesions elsewhere. Primary surgical treatment ranges from curettage or excision with or without bone grafting to amputation. The success of surgical treatment depends on the completeness with which the tumor was removed. We are presenting a case report of a 34 year old female, who presented with a swelling in the right hand, following trauma. X-ray of the hand showed an osteolytic expansile lesion at the base of the 1st metacarpal bone. The lesion was initially curetted and then treated by local resection with bone grafting. Histological examination revealed a typical benign giant cell tumor composed of closely packed stromal cells with a variable admixture of giant cells. Follow up at the end of one year did not reveal any recurrence of the tumor.

  1. Giant cell arteritis associated with chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Giardina

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell arteritis is an inflammatory vasculopathy that preferentially affects medium-sized and large arteries. A viral cause has been suspected but not confirmed in polymyalgia rheumatica and giant-cell arteritis. We report the case of a 81-year-old female who suffered from chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection and developed giant cell temporal arteritis.

  2. Giant cell glioblastoma in the pediatric age group: Report of two cases

    OpenAIRE

    Sachin Anil Borkar; Lakshmiprasad, G.; Kiran Chikkanahalli Subbarao; Mehar Chand Sharma; Ashok K Mahapatra

    2013-01-01

    Giant cell glioblastoma multiforme is a rare subgroup of glioblastoma multiforme. It constitutes about 5% of all glioblastoma cases. Pediatric giant cell glioblastoma is extremely rare. We report two such cases of giant cell glioblastoma in pediatric age group (≤18 years). The pertinent literature is reviewed regarding this uncommon entity.

  3. Giant cell glioblastoma in the pediatric age group: Report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkar, Sachin Anil; Lakshmiprasad, G; Subbarao, Kiran Chikkanahalli; Sharma, Mehar Chand; Mahapatra, Ashok K

    2013-01-01

    Giant cell glioblastoma multiforme is a rare subgroup of glioblastoma multiforme. It constitutes about 5% of all glioblastoma cases. Pediatric giant cell glioblastoma is extremely rare. We report two such cases of giant cell glioblastoma in pediatric age group (≤18 years). The pertinent literature is reviewed regarding this uncommon entity.

  4. A case report of peripheral giant cell granuloma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Soo; Jung, Yeon Hwa; Cho, Bong Hae; Nah, Kyung Soo [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Pusan(Korea, Republic of)

    1997-08-15

    The authors experienced one case of peripheral giant cell granuloma occurred at the gingiva of right maxillary molar in a 12-year-old male patient. The lesion showed amorphous calcification within soft tissue mass which made difficult to differentiate this lesion from peripheral ossifying fibroma and peripheral odontogenic fibroma clinically and radiographically. The final diagnosis was made histologically.

  5. Exophytic giant cell glioblastoma of the medulla oblongata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luetjens, Goetz; Mirzayan, M Javad; Brandis, Almuth; Krauss, Joachim K

    2009-03-01

    Giant cell glioblastoma is a rare variant within the spectrum of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors. A giant cell glioblastoma may be associated with a better prognosis than the common type of GBM after combined treatment involving tumor resection and radiochemotherapy. A giant cell glioblastoma may occur at various sites in the brain and spinal cord. To the authors' knowledge, this type of tumor has not been previously reported as arising as an exophytic tumor from the medulla oblongata. The authors report on a 40-year-old man who presented with a large tumor located in the caudal fourth ventricle. The tumor was removed completely and the patient underwent percutaneous radiotherapy with 60 Gy and concomitant chemotherapy with temozolomide. Histopathological examination of the tumor revealed the typical features of a giant cell glioblastoma. At the 2-year follow-up the patient was doing well and showed no signs of tumor recurrence. It is important to identify variants of GBM because they may predict favorable long-term outcome, even when they arise from the caudal brainstem.

  6. Radiological and epidemiological aspects of central giant cell granuloma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noleto, Jose Wilson [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia]. E-mail: wilsonnoleto@ig.com.br; Marchiori, Edson [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia; Sampaio, Renato Kobler [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina; Irion, Klaus L. [Liverpool NHS Trust, Liverpool (United Kingdom). Cardiothoracic Centre; Collares, Felipe Birchal [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC)

    2007-05-15

    Objective: The present study was aimed at evaluating main radiological and epidemiological aspects of giant cell lesions (central giant cell granuloma and brown tumors of hyperparathyroidism). Materials and methods: The sample consisted of 26 giant cell lesions diagnosed in 22 patients divided into two groups, one of them including 17 patients who were not affected by hyperparathyroidism (group A) and another including five patients with such a disorder (group B). Results: Prevalence was higher in female patients (72.7%). Most frequently, lesions occurred more in the second decade of life (mean age, 27 years). The mandible arc was most frequently involved (61.5%). Radiographically, 57.7% of lesions were multilocular and 42.3% were unilocular with defined limits. All of the 26 lesions caused expansion of bone, 15.4% radicular resorption, 50% dental displacement, and 11.5% produced pain. In the mandible 18.7% of the lesions crossed the midline. Group A showed 66.7% of lesions in the mandible and group B showed an even distribution of lesions between arches. In group A 66.7% of lesions were multilocular, and 33.3% unilocular; in group B 62.5% were unilocular, and 37.5% multilocular. Conclusion: Giant cells lesions may present themselves with a wide spectrum, from small, slow-growing unilocular lesions to extensive multilocular lesions. They present features of benignity, though some lesions may demonstrate a locally aggressive behavior. (author)

  7. Reparative giant cell granuloma in a pediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte Ruiz, Blanca; Riba García, Francisco de Asís; Navarro Cuéllar, Carlos; Bucci, Tommaso; Cuesta Gil, Matías; Navarro Vila, Carlos

    2007-08-01

    Reparative giant cell granulomas are benign, infrequent tumors, of non-odontogenic origin, that develop at central or peripheral level. Peripherally located lesions are frequently denominated "giant cell epulis", and never correspond to true neoplasia, but rather to inflammatory reactions secondary to another lesion (hemorrhage, etc.). It should be taken into account, that in general, head and neck tumors of infancy usually demonstrate an atypical biological behaviour. Furthermore, the anatomicopathologic diagnosis is often compromised in this type of lesion. We present the case of a 6-year-old boy, who, three weeks after suffering a slight facial trauma, developed a painless, exophytic swelling of approximately 4 cm, with bleeding on palpation, in the ipsilateral hemimaxilla. The lesion demonstrated rapid, progressive and continuous growth. The facial CT and incisional biopsy confirmed the suspected diagnosis of reparative giant cell granuloma. The patient was surgically treated, carrying out a left marginal maxillectomy associated with the extirpation of the soft-tissue lesion. The resultant defect was reconstructed with a Bichat fat-pad providing the patient with optimal esthetic and functional results. The definitive anatomicopathologic report of the surgical piece is compatible with reparative giant cell granuloma.

  8. Decreased Immunity to Varicella Zoster Virus in Giant Cell Arteritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rondaan, Christien; van der Geest, Kornelis S. M.; Eelsing, Elisabeth; Boots, Annemieke M. H.; Bos, Nicolaas A.; Westra, Johanna; Brouwer, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Herpes zoster, which can have a major impact on quality of life, results from reactivation of a latent varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection. We hypothesized that giant cell arteritis (GCA) patients are at increased risk of herpes zoster because of treatment with high-dose

  9. Vessel involvement in giant cell arteritis : an imaging approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holm, Pieter W.; Sandovici, Maria; Slart, Riemer H. J. A.; Glaudemans, Andor W. J. M.; Rutgers, Abraham; Brouwer, Elisabeth

    Vasculitis is classified based on the size of the involved vessels. The two major forms are small vessel vasculitis and large vessel vasculitis (LVV). Main forms of LVV are Takayasu arteritis, giant cell arteritis (GCA), isolated aortitis and chronic periaortitis. This manuscript will focus on GCA,

  10. Giant cell arteritis and polymyalgia rheumatica : current challenges and opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dejaco, Christian; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Mason, Justin C; Buttgereit, Frank; Matteson, Eric L; Dasgupta, Bhaskar

    2017-01-01

    The fields of giant cell arteritis (GCA) and polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) have advanced rapidly, resulting in a new understanding of these diseases. Fast-track strategies and improved awareness programmes that prevent irreversible sight loss through early diagnosis and treatment are a notable

  11. Alternative pharmacologic therapy for aggressive central giant cell granuloma: denosumab

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, Willem H.; Coumou, Annet W.; Kessler, Peter A. H. W.; de Lange, Jan

    2014-01-01

    In the search for new pharmacologic therapies for central giant cell granuloma (CGCG), proteins that are essential to osteoclastogenesis are intriguing potential targets. In the present case report, we describe a 25-year-old patient with an aggressive CGCG of the maxilla, who was successfully

  12. CENTRAL GIANT CELL GRANULOMA OF THE MANDIBLE: A RARE PRESENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virendra SINGH

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Central giant cell granuloma (CGCG is an intra-osseous lesion consisting of cellular fibrosis tissue containing multiple foci of hemorrhage, multinucleated giant cells and trabecules of woven bone. This lesion accounts for less than 7% of all benign jaw tumours. Jaffe considered it as a locally reparative reaction of bone, which can be possibly due to either an inflammatory response, hemorrhage or local trauma. Females are affected more frequently than males. It occurs over a wide age range.It has been reported that this lesion is diagnosed during the first two decades of life in approximately 48% of cases, and 60% of cases are evident before the age of 30. It is considerably more common in the mandible than in the maxilla. Most lesions occur in the molar and premolar area, some of these extending up to the ascending ramus. The presence of giant cell granuloma in the mandibular body area, the entire ramus, condyle and coronoid represents a therapeutic challenge for the oral and maxillofacial surgeons. The aim of this report is to describe an unusual presentation of central giant cell granuloma involving the mandibular body, ramus, condylar and coronoid processes, and to discuss the differentiated diagnosis, the radiographic presentation and the management of this lesion.

  13. Delayed Diagnosis: Giant Basal Cell Carcinoma of Scalp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didem Didar Balcı,

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Although basal cell carcinoma (BCC is the most common form of skin cancer, the scalp lesions of BCC have been rarely reported. Giant BCC is defined as a tumor larger than 5 cm in diameter and only 0.5-1 % of all BCCs achieve this size. We report a case of giant BCC on the scalp that was treated with topical coticosteroids and antifungal shampoo for five years. BCC should be considered in the differential diagnosis in erythematous plaque type lesions resistant to therapy with long duration localized on the scalp.

  14. Interleukin-4 induces foreign body giant cells from human monocytes/macrophages. Differential lymphokine regulation of macrophage fusion leads to morphological variants of multinucleated giant cells.

    OpenAIRE

    McNally, A. K.; Anderson, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Interleukin-4 induced the formation of foreign body-type giant multinucleated cells from human monocyte-derived macrophages, an effect that was optimized with either granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor or interleukin-3, dependent on the concentration of interleukin-4, and specifically prevented by anti-interleukin-4. Very large foreign body giant cells and, predominantly, giant cell syncytia with randomly arranged nuclei and extensive cytoplasmic spreading (285 +/- 121 nuclei and...

  15. SH3BP2 is rarely mutated in exon 9 in giant cell lesions outside cherubism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lietman, Steven A; Prescott, Nichole L; Hicks, David G; Westra, William H; Levine, Michael A

    2007-06-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone and giant cell reparative granuloma are benign lesions with prominent giant (multinucleated) cells, and an understanding of the molecular biology and genetics of these lesions will likely aid in more effective treatment. Cherubism is a benign lesion of the maxilla and mandible histologically similar to giant cell tumor of bone and giant cell reparative granuloma. Germline mutations in exon 9 of the gene encoding Src homology 3 binding protein 2 (SH3BP2) occur in most patients with cherubism. We therefore hypothesized SH3BP2 and its putative downstream effector nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 isoform (NFATc1) are highly expressed in sporadic nonsyndromic giant cell lesions and associated with somatic SH3BP2 mutations. We analyzed giant cell lesions for SH3BP2 and NFATc1 expression by RNA blot and/or immunohistochemistry and for exon 9 SH3BP2 mutations. We found the SH3BP2 transcripts and protein were abundantly expressed in giant cell tumors of bone, as well as NFATc1 protein. Sequencing of exon 9 of SH3BP2 was normal in all sporadic nonsyndromic giant cell lesions. Although many multinucleated giant cell lesions of bone share histologic features, the primary genetic defect in cherubism and these other giant cell lesions appears different.

  16. Annular elastolytic giant cell granuloma of conjunctiva: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karabi Konar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Annular elastolytic giant cell granuloma is a condition characterized histologically by damaged elastic fibers associated with preponderance of giant cells along with absence of necrobiosis, lipid, mucin, and pallisading granuloma. It usually occurs on sun-damaged skin and hence the previous name actinic granuloma. A similar process occurs on the conjunctiva. Over the past three decades only four cases of conjunctival actinic granuloma have been documented. All the previous patients were females with lesions in nasal or temporal bulbar conjunctiva varying 2-3 mm in size. We report a male patient aged 70 years presenting with a 14 mm × 7 mm fleshy mass on right lower bulbar conjunctiva. Clinical differential diagnoses were lymphoma, squamous cell carcinoma in situ and amyloidosis. Surgical excision followed by histopathology confirmed it to be a case of actinic granuloma. This is the first case of isolated conjunctival actinic granuloma of such a large size reported from India.

  17. Cerebellar giant cell glioblastoma multiforme in an adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sudhansu Sekhar; Behera, Sanjay Kumar; Dhir, Manmath Kumar; Senapati, Satya Bhusan

    2014-07-01

    Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a rare tumor that accounts for only 1% of all cases of GBM and its giant cell variant is even much rarely encountered in adults. A case of cerebellar giant cell GBM managed at our institution reporting its clinical presentation, radiological and histological findings, and treatment instituted is described. In conjunction, a literature review, including particular issues, clinical data, advances in imaging studies, pathological characteristics, treatment options, and the behavior of such malignant tumor is presented. It is very important for the neurosurgeon to make the differential diagnosis between the cerebellar GBM, and other diseases such as metastasis, anaplastic astrocytomas, and cerebellar infarct because their treatment modalities, prognosis, and outcome are different.

  18. Cerebellar giant cell glioblastoma multiforme in an adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhansu Sekhar Mishra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a rare tumor that accounts for only 1% of all cases of GBM and its giant cell variant is even much rarely encountered in adults. A case of cerebellar giant cell GBM managed at our institution reporting its clinical presentation, radiological and histological findings, and treatment instituted is described. In conjunction, a literature review, including particular issues, clinical data, advances in imaging studies, pathological characteristics, treatment options, and the behavior of such malignant tumor is presented. It is very important for the neurosurgeon to make the differential diagnosis between the cerebellar GBM, and other diseases such as metastasis, anaplastic astrocytomas, and cerebellar infarct because their treatment modalities, prognosis, and outcome are different.

  19. Central Giant Cell Granuloma: A potential endodontic misdiagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Seifi, Safoura; Fouroghi, Ramin

    2009-01-01

    Central Giant Cell Granulomas (CGCGs) may manifest as radiolucencies anywhere in the mandible or maxilla. In rare cases, it can appear as a localized periradicular area and mimic an endodontic lesion. This case report presents an uncommon location of CGCG which was not accurately diagnosed nor timely treated. Periodic follow ups of periapical radiolucencies after RCT are necessary. Dentists should include CGCG in differential diagnosis of lesions that are refractory to endodontic treatment. [...

  20. Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath: Spectrum of radiologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasick, D.; Karasick, S. (Jefferson Medical Coll., Philadelphia, PA (United States) Thomas Jefferson Univ. Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States))

    1992-05-01

    Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath is the second most common tumor of the hand. It can also occur in larger joints. Radiologic features include a soft-tissue mass with or without osseous erosion. Less commonly, it can cause periostitis or permeative osseous invasion; it may rarely calcify. The entire imaging spectrum of this lesion is presented, with emphasis on atypical appearances which can mimic other lesions. (orig.).

  1. Giant cell glioblastoma: review of the literature and illustrated case

    OpenAIRE

    Valle-Folgueral, JM; Mascarenhas, L; Costa, JA; Vieira, F; Soares-Fernandes, J; Beleza, P; Alegria, C

    2009-01-01

    Giant cell glioblastoma is an infrequent variety of glioblastoma (5% of the cases). It has deserved a separate category in the World Health Organization classification of grade IV tumors. The clinical, imaging, histological and immunohistochemical characteristics, and the genetic alterations are reviewed. Treatment and prognosis are discussed and updated. The case of a patient that survived 19 months and died of spinal leptomeningeal metastases is illustrated.

  2. Giant cell glioblastoma in a child: A rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, S K; Sundar, I Vijay; Sinha, V D; Sharma, Vinod; Bhasme, Vishal; Goel, Ravishankar S

    2012-07-01

    Giant cell glioblastoma (GCG) is a subtype of Glioblastoma multiforme that is rare in incidence and distinct in features and histopathological examination. It is reported to have better prognosis than common glioblastomas. The incidence of GCG in children is even more rare. We report a case of GCG in a 10-year-old boy along with a review of the relevant literature focusing on the differentiating points from common glioblastoma.

  3. Giant cell glioblastoma in a child: A rare case report

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, S.K; Sundar, I. Vijay; V D Sinha; Sharma, Vinod; Bhasme, Vishal; Ravishankar S Goel

    2012-01-01

    Giant cell glioblastoma (GCG) is a subtype of Glioblastoma multiforme that is rare in incidence and distinct in features and histopathological examination. It is reported to have better prognosis than common glioblastomas. The incidence of GCG in children is even more rare. We report a case of GCG in a 10-year-old boy along with a review of the relevant literature focusing on the differentiating points from common glioblastoma.

  4. Giant cell glioblastoma: review of the literature and illustrated case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle-Folgueral, J M; Mascarenhas, L; Costa, J A; Vieira, F; Soares-Fernandes, J; Beleza, P; Alegria, C

    2008-08-01

    Giant cell glioblastoma is an infrequent variety of glioblastoma (5% of the cases). It has deserved a separate category in the World Health Organization classification of grade IV tumors. The clinical, imaging, histological and immunohistochemical characteristics, and the genetic alterations are reviewed. Treatment and prognosis are discussed and updated. The case of a patient that survived 19 months and died of spinal leptomeningeal metastases is illustrated.

  5. Clinical Management of a Peri-Implant Giant Cell Granuloma

    OpenAIRE

    Pacifici, A.; Carbone, D.; Marini, R.; Sfasciotti, G. L.; Pacifici, L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Implant therapy plays an important role in contemporary dentistry with high rates of long-term success. However, in recent years, the incidence of peri-implantitis and implant failures has significantly increased. The peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG) rarely occurs in peri-implant tissues and it is clinically comparable to the lesions associated with natural teeth. Therefore, the study of possible diseases associated with dental implants plays an important role in order to be ab...

  6. Giant cell tumor of the frontal sinus: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matushita, Joao Paulo, E-mail: jpauloejulieta@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas; Matushita, Julieta S.; Matushita Junior, Joao Paulo Kawaoka [Centro de Diagnostico por Imagem Dr. Matsushita, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Matushita, Cristina S. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho; Simoes, Luiz Antonio Monteiro; Carvalho Neto, Lizando Franco de

    2013-06-15

    The authors report the case of a giant cell tumor of the frontal sinus in a 54-year-old male patient. This tumor location is rare, and this is the third case reported in the literature with radiographic documentation and histopathological confirmation. The patient underwent surgery, with curettage of frontal sinus and placement of a prosthesis. He died because a voluntary abrupt discontinuation of corticosteroids. (author)

  7. Giant Cell Fibroma in a Two-Year-Old Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Carolina Volpi Mello-Moura

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The giant cell fibroma is a benign nonneoplastic fibrous tumor of the oral mucosa. It occurs in the first three decades of life in the mandibular gingiva, predominantly, showing predilection for females. This article reports a case of giant cell fibroma in a 2-year-old girl, which is an uncommon age for this lesion. The patient was brought for treatment at the Research and Clinical Center of Dental Trauma in Primary Teeth, where practice for the Discipline of Pediatric Dentistry (Faculty of Dentistry, University of São Paulo, Brazil takes place. During clinical examination, a tissue growth was detected on the lingual gingival mucosa of the lower right primary incisors teeth. The lesion was excised under local anesthesia and submitted to histological examination at the Oral Pathology Department of the Faculty of Dentistry, University of São Paulo, which confirmed the diagnosis of giant cell fibroma. There was no recurrence after 20 months of monitoring. This instance reinforces the importance of oral care from the very first months of life in order to enable doctors to make precocious diagnosis and offer more appropriate treatments for oral diseases, as well as to promote more efficient oral health in the community.

  8. Leiomyosarcoma of the skin with osteoclast-like giant cells: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarma Deba P

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Osteoclast-like giant cells have been noted in various malignant tumors, such as, carcinomas of pancreas and liver and leiomyosarcomas of non-cutaneous locations, such as, uterus and rectum. We were unable to find any reported case of a leiomyosarcoma of the skin where osteoclast-like giant cells were present in the tumor. Case presentation We report a case of a 59-year-old woman with a cutaneous leiomyosarcoma associated with osteoclast-like giant cells arising from the subcutaneous artery of the leg. The nature of the giant cells is discussed in light of the findings from the immunostaining as well as survey of the literature. Conclusion A rare case of cutaneous leiomyosarcoma with osteoclast-like giant cells is reported. The giant cells in the tumor appear to be reactive histiocytic cells.

  9. Giant cell tumor of soft tissue: a case report with emphasis on MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Moon Young; Jee, Won-Hee [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Seocho-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Chan Kwon [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Pathology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Seocho-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Ie Ryung [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Seocho-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Yang-Guk [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Seocho-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-03

    Giant cell tumor of soft tissue is a rare neoplasm, histologically resembling giant cell tumor of bone. In this report, we describe a deep and solid giant cell tumor of soft tissue interpreted as a benign soft tissue tumor based on magnetic resonance (MR) findings with hypointense to intermediate signals on T2-weighted images and impeded diffusivity (water movement) on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), which could suggest a giant-cell-containing benign soft tissue tumor, despite the malignancy suggested by {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography in a 35-year-old male. To our knowledge, this report introduces the first deep, solid giant cell tumor of soft tissue with MR features of a giant-cell-containing benign soft tissue tumor, despite the malignancy-mimicking findings on {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT. (orig.)

  10. Wheatstone bridge giant-magnetoresistance based cell counter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chiun-Peng; Lai, Mei-Feng; Huang, Hao-Ting; Lin, Chi-Wen; Wei, Zung-Hang

    2014-07-15

    A Wheatstone bridge giant magnetoresistance (GMR) biosensor was proposed here for the detection and counting of magnetic cells. The biosensor was made of a top-pinned spin-valve layer structure, and it was integrated with a microchannel possessing the function of hydrodynamic focusing that allowed the cells to flow in series one by one and ensured the accuracy of detection. Through measuring the magnetoresistance variation caused by the stray field of the magnetic cells that flowed through the microchannel above the GMR biosensor, we can not only detect and count the cells but we can also recognize cells with different magnetic moments. In addition, a magnetic field gradient was applied for the separation of different cells into different channels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Giant Cell Reparative Granuloma Mimicking Aneurysmal Bone Cyst in Proximal Phalanx of Toe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan CM

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Giant Cell Reparative Granuloma (GCRG of phalanx is uncommon. It is a benign osteolytic lesion but can be locally aggressive. GCRG has certain radiology and histological features that are similar to other giant cell lesions of the bone. We present a case report of a young patient with giant cell reparative granuloma of proximal phalanx of left third toe. The bone lesion was successfully treated surgically.

  12. Spindle and Giant Cell Type Undifferentiated Carcinoma of the Proximal Bile Duct

    OpenAIRE

    Ide, Takao; Miyoshi, Atsushi; Kitahara, Kenji; Kai, Keita; Noshiro, Hirokazu

    2012-01-01

    Undifferentiated spindle and giant cell carcinoma is an extremely rare malignant neoplasm arising in the extrahepatic bile duct. We herein present the case of a 67-year-old male who developed an undifferentiated spindle and giant cell carcinoma of the proximal bile duct. A nodular infiltrating tumor was located at the proximal bile duct, resulting in obstructive jaundice. Histologically, the tumor was composed of mainly spindle-shaped and giant cells and showed positive immunoreactivity for b...

  13. A Case of Giant Cell Hepatitis Recurring after Liver Transplantation and Treated with Ribavirin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziad Hassoun

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient who underwent orthotopic liver transplantation for giant cell hepatitis with cirrhosis and in whom giant cell hepatitis recurred twice after orthotopic liver transplantation is reported. He was treated with ribavirin with an excellent result. The literature on this subject is reviewed. This observation clearly confirms the efficacy of ribavirin for the treatment of giant cell hepatitis, thus providing evidence for its viral origin.

  14. Giant cell reparative granuloma in soft tissue of foot: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Gyeong Min; Lee, Jihae; Kang, Mijin; Lee, Han Bee; Bae, Kyung Eun; Kim, Jae Hyung; Kim, Hyun Jung [Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    Giant cell reparative granuloma is a benign reactive process following intraosseous hemorrhage rather than a true tumor. This lesion most commonly affects the maxilla and mandible, followed by phalanges, hands, and feet. Local invasion of surrounding soft tissue is a typical feature of giant cell reparative granuloma in the bones of the upper and lower limbs. We present the rare case of giant cell reparative granuloma arising from soft tissue of the foot without erosion or engulfing of the adjacent bone.

  15. Intraoperative squash cytologic features of subependymal giant cell astrocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra Nasit

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA is a low grade (WHO Grade I tumor, usually seen in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex and commonly occurs at a lateral ventricular location. Intraoperative squash cytologic features can help in differentiating SEGA from gemistocytic astrocytoma (GA, giant cell glioblastoma and ependymoma, in proper clinical context and radiological findings, which may alter the surgical management. Here, we present a case of SEGA with squash cytologic findings and a review of cytology findings of SEGA presently available in the literature. Loose cohesive clusters of large polygonal cells containing an eccentric nucleus, evenly distributed granular chromatin, distinct to prominent nucleoli, and moderate to the abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm in a hair-like fibrillar background are the key cytologic features of SEGA. Other important features are moderate anisonucleosis and frequent binucleation and multinucleation. The absence of mitoses, necrosis, and vascular endothelial proliferation are important negative features. Other consistent features are cellular smears, few dispersed cells, few spindly strap-like cells, rare intranuclear cytoplasmic inclusion, and perivascular pseudorosettes.

  16. Intraoperative Squash Cytologic Features of Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasit, Jitendra; Vaghsiya, Viren; Hiryur, Srilaxmi; Patel, Smita

    2016-01-01

    Subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) is a low grade (WHO Grade I) tumor, usually seen in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex and commonly occurs at a lateral ventricular location. Intraoperative squash cytologic features can help in differentiating SEGA from gemistocytic astrocytoma (GA), giant cell glioblastoma and ependymoma, in proper clinical context and radiological findings, which may alter the surgical management. Here, we present a case of SEGA with squash cytologic findings and a review of cytology findings of SEGA presently available in the literature. Loose cohesive clusters of large polygonal cells containing an eccentric nucleus, evenly distributed granular chromatin, distinct to prominent nucleoli, and moderate to the abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm in a hair-like fibrillar background are the key cytologic features of SEGA. Other important features are moderate anisonucleosis and frequent binucleation and multinucleation. The absence of mitoses, necrosis, and vascular endothelial proliferation are important negative features. Other consistent features are cellular smears, few dispersed cells, few spindly strap-like cells, rare intranuclear cytoplasmic inclusion, and perivascular pseudorosettes.

  17. Analysis of giant cell tumour of bone cells for Noonan syndrome/cherubism-related mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskovszky, Linda; Idowu, Bernadine; Taylor, Richard; Mertens, Fredrik; Athanasou, Nicholas; Flanagan, Adrienne

    2013-01-01

    Giant cell tumour of bone (GCTB) is an osteolytic tumour which contains numerous osteoclast-like giant cells and a proliferation of mononuclear stromal cells (MSC). Giant cell-rich osteolytic lesions can also develop in the jaw bones in Noonan syndrome, a cherubism-like developmental abnormality that is transmitted in an autosomal dominant fashion, often because of mutation in the PTPN11 or BRAF genes. We screened GCTBs for mutations in PTPN11 and BRAF to determine whether GCTBs develop through alterations of genes involved in Noonan syndrome. MSC were isolated from 10 GCTBs. Chromosome banding analysis of these cells revealed telomeric associations (tas) in 7 of the 10 cases. Thus, the cultured cells expressed a cytogenetic abnormality typically found in short-term cultures from GCTBs. Sequencing of DNA extracted from the seven GCTB-derived MSC cultures displaying tas did not identify any mutation in PTPN11 or in exons 9-15 of BRAF. Our findings indicate that the molecular pathways involved in GCTB development are different from those causing Noonan syndrome. The method for isolating and culturing GCTB stromal cells described in this study generated a population of MSC that contained tas, indicating that it is useful for obtaining stromal cells from GCTB and other giant cell-rich lesions, such as giant cell reparative granuloma, for genetic and other studies. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. Peripheral giant cell granuloma associated with dental implants: a rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozden, Feyza Otan; Ozden, Bora; Kurt, Murat; Gündüz, Kaan; Günhan, Omer

    2009-01-01

    The peripheral giant cell granuloma is a benign reactive exophytic lesion of unknown etiology occurring on the gingiva and alveolar ridge. Different local causal factors have been associated with this type of lesion. Although peripheral giant cell granuloma is the most common giant cell lesion of the jaws, it is rarely seen in association with implants. This report discusses the etiology and management of a peripheral giant cell granuloma around dental implants in a 60-year-old woman. A new implant-supported prosthesis with adequate marginal adaptation between the restoration and abutments was made. There were no complications during 1 year of clinical and radiologic follow-up.

  19. Giant cell ependymoma of the thoracic spine: pathology case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamji, Mohammed F; Benoit, Brien G; Perry, Arie; Jansen, Gerard H

    2009-03-01

    INTRODUCTION AND IMPORTANCE: Spinal ependymomas are slow-growing lesions that comprise the majority of primary spinal cord neoplasms. When surgery is indicated, the extent of tumor removal is most prognostic for long-term survival. Unusual histological subtypes can make intraoperative diagnosis spurious, possibly altering the surgical approach from gross total resection for ependymomas to debulking for high-grade astrocytomas. We describe a 67-year-old woman with a thoracic spine intramedullary giant cell ependymoma. She presented with decreased lower extremity sensation leading to unsteadiness and an eventual fall. A physical examination revealed lower extremity hyperreflexia and ankle clonus, but no clear sensory level. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an intramedullary T1 and T2 hypointense, homogenously enhancing lesion at T8 with extensive cephalad and caudal edema. A laminectomy at T8 to T9 afforded gross total resection of the lesion that had a clear cleavage plane with normal spinal cord. Intraoperative pathology suggested a high-grade glioblastoma, but final section showed sporadic giant cells with marked pleomorphism, uniform immunofluorescence staining with both glial fibrillary acidic protein and cluster of differentiation 99, and high MIB-1 index. Electron microscopy showed "zipper-like" junctions. There were no detected genomic abnormalities consistent with glioblastoma. We present this first reported case of thoracic spine giant cell ependymoma alongside scant literature yielding 1 case in the cervical spine and 2 cases at the filum terminale. Those cases had benign courses, whereas ours demonstrates a high degree of proliferation, making the malignant potential difficult to assess.

  20. Giant cell ependymoma of the thoracic spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, E; Lejeune, J-P; Sartenaer, D; Crèvecoeur, J; Deprez, M

    2012-03-01

    We report a new case of giant cell ependymoma (GCE) of the thoracic spinal cord. Ependymomas predominate in children and young adults and are frequently intracranial and infra-tentorial. However, a second age peak at 30-40 years is reported for spinal tumours. Microscopically, ependymomas show a large variety of histological features, among which a rare variant with giant cells. This 59-year-old woman presented with a 6-month history of numbness and burning sensation affecting the left lower limb and hemi-trunk. A cervico-thoracic MRI revealed a solid intra-medullary tumour at the level of T1-T3, slightly T1-hypointense, T2-hyperintense and contrast enhancing. A complete surgical resection was carried out through a C7 to T4 laminectomy. Recovery was complete with no sign of recurrence at 18-month follow-up. The initial histological diagnosis of glioblastoma was challenged on the basis of the imaging and operative findings of a well-circumscribed tumour. The case was sent to us for second opinion and we diagnosed a GCE, WHO grade II, with a biphasic pattern including a predominant giant cell component (>90%), with genetic evidence of polyploidy, and a very limited classic component, showing a characteristic loss of chromosome 22. Our report adds to the clinical, imaging, pathological and genetic characterisation of GCE and brings the first genetic evidence that these rare tumours are at least bi-clonal. It also suggests that GCE have a good prognosis after complete surgical resection.

  1. Giant Cell Arteritis and Polymyalgia Rheumatica: 2016 Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gideon Nesher

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell arteritis (GCA and polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR are both more common among people of North European decent than among Mediterranean people. Women are 2–3 times more commonly affected. Giant cell arteritis and PMR are extremely rare before age 50 years. Polymyalgia rheumatica may be “isolated” or associated with GCA. There is increased expression of inflammatory cytokines in temporal arteries of PMR patients, without overt histological evidence of arteritis. One-third of “isolated” PMR patients have vascular uptake in positron emission tomography (PET scans, suggesting clinically unrecognized, “hidden” GCA. Typical manifestations of GCA are headache, tenderness over temporal arteries, jaw claudication, PMR, acute vision loss, and low-grade fever. Bilateral aching of the shoulders with morning stiffness is typical for PMR. In both conditions sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein are elevated, and anemia and thrombocytosis may occur. Color duplex ultrasonography of the temporal arteries may aid in GCA diagnosis. Temporal artery biopsy showing vasculitis, often with giant cells, confirms GCA diagnosis. In cases with negative biopsy one must rely on the clinical presentation and laboratory abnormalities. The diagnosis of PMR is made primarily on clinical grounds. Other conditions that may mimic GCA or PMR must be excluded. Glucocorticoids are the treatment of choice for both conditions. Prompt treatment is crucial in GCA, to prevent irreversible complications of acute vision loss and stroke. Addition of low-dose aspirin may further prevent these complications. The average duration of treatment is 2–3 years, but some patients require a prolonged course of treatment, and some may develop disease-related or treatment-related complications. No steroid-sparing agent has been proven to be widely effective thus far, but some promising therapeutic agents are currently being studied.

  2. Giant Cell Arteritis and Polymyalgia Rheumatica: 2016 Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesher, Gideon; Breuer, Gabriel S

    2016-10-31

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) and polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) are both more common among people of North European decent than among Mediterranean people. Women are 2-3 times more commonly affected. Giant cell arteritis and PMR are extremely rare before age 50 years. Polymyalgia rheumatica may be "isolated" or associated with GCA. There is increased expression of inflammatory cytokines in temporal arteries of PMR patients, without overt histological evidence of arteritis. One-third of "isolated" PMR patients have vascular uptake in positron emission tomography (PET) scans, suggesting clinically unrecognized, "hidden" GCA. Typical manifestations of GCA are headache, tenderness over temporal arteries, jaw claudication, PMR, acute vision loss, and low-grade fever. Bilateral aching of the shoulders with morning stiffness is typical for PMR. In both conditions sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein are elevated, and anemia and thrombocytosis may occur. Color duplex ultrasonography of the temporal arteries may aid in GCA diagnosis. Temporal artery biopsy showing vasculitis, often with giant cells, confirms GCA diagnosis. In cases with negative biopsy one must rely on the clinical presentation and laboratory abnormalities. The diagnosis of PMR is made primarily on clinical grounds. Other conditions that may mimic GCA or PMR must be excluded. Glucocorticoids are the treatment of choice for both conditions. Prompt treatment is crucial in GCA, to prevent irreversible complications of acute vision loss and stroke. Addition of low-dose aspirin may further prevent these complications. The average duration of treatment is 2-3 years, but some patients require a prolonged course of treatment, and some may develop disease-related or treatment-related complications. No steroid-sparing agent has been proven to be widely effective thus far, but some promising therapeutic agents are currently being studied.

  3. The differentiation of monocytes into macrophages, epithelioid cells, and multinucleated giant cells in subcutaneous granulomas. I. Fine structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Rhee, H J; van der Burgh-de Winter, C P; Daems, W T

    1979-04-12

    The morphological changes occurring in monocytes during their differentiation into macrophages, epithelioid cells, Langhans-type giant cells, and foreign-body-type giant cells were investigated in foreign-body granulomas induced by subcutaneous implantation of pieces of Melinex plastic. Analysis based on Adams's (1974) criteria for discrimination between the several types of cell of the monocyte line, showed that each type has a characteristic type of granule. Primary and secondary granules, numerous in the Golgi area of monocytes were generally found close to the cell membrane and decreased in number in maturing macrophages. This was accompanied by an increase in the number of microtubules. Mature macrophages show numerous characteristic macrophage granules, which are round (average diameter: 280 nm) and have a halo between the limiting membrane and granular matrix. Mature epithelioid cells have characteristic epithelioid cell granules, and multinucleated giant cells a heterogenous population of granules. Fusing macrophages generally have their Golgi areas facing each other, and also show a reduced thickness of the cell coat. The morphology of the multinucleated giant cell is closely related to the number of nuclei present. In Langhans-type giant cells, which generally have two to ten nuclei, a giant centrosphere with numerous aggregated centrioles is found. In transition forms between Langhans-type and foreign-body-type giant cells, which generally contain 10--30 nuclei, the centrioles show less aggregation. In the foreign-body-type giant cells, which generally have more than 30 nuclei, centrioles are virtually absent and never aggregated. These differences between the Langhans-type giant cells, the foreign-body-type giant cells, and the transition forms, support our previous finding that Langhans-type giant cells are the precursors of foreign-body-type giant cells.

  4. Unusual case of granulomatous dermohypodermitis with giant cells and elastophagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessi, E; Crosti, C; Sala, F

    1986-01-01

    A 27-year-old man presented with a reddish hard-elastic plaque on his back near the right armpit, which had slowly developed during 1 year. A granulomatous infiltration with many giant cells which were phagocytizing lymphocytes and elastic fibers was seen at histological examination. The lesion was removed and no new lesions developed after surgery. This case may represent a localized form of Convit's 'Progressive atrophying chronic granulomatous dermohypodermitis' or a rare form of 'Maladie de Besnier-Boeck-Schaumann chalazodermique', but it is also possible that it is a new entity never described before.

  5. Fever of unknown origin, giant cell arteritis, and aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofheinz, K; Bertz, S; Wacker, J; Schett, G; Manger, B

    2017-02-01

    Giant cell arteritis is one of the most frequent causes of pyrexia of unknown origin after infectious or malignant causes have been ruled out. In this case report we describe a 66-year old female patient, who after five weeks of remitting fever developed a life-threatening, painless severe aortic dissection. The timely use of modern imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance angiography or positron emission computed tomography could in the future be of help to recognize aortic involvement early and to avoid this devastating complication in patients with fever of unknown origin.

  6. Clinical Management of a Peri-Implant Giant Cell Granuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pacifici

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Implant therapy plays an important role in contemporary dentistry with high rates of long-term success. However, in recent years, the incidence of peri-implantitis and implant failures has significantly increased. The peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG rarely occurs in peri-implant tissues and it is clinically comparable to the lesions associated with natural teeth. Therefore, the study of possible diseases associated with dental implants plays an important role in order to be able to diagnose and treat these conditions. Materials and Methods. This report described a 60-year-old Caucasian male who presented a reddish-purple pedunculated mass, of about 2 cm in diameter, associated with a dental implant and the adjacent natural tooth. Results. An excisional biopsy was performed and the dental implant was not removed. Histological examination provided the diagnosis of PGCG. After 19-month follow-up, there were no signs of recurrence of peri-implantitis around the implant. Conclusion. The correct diagnosis and appropriate surgical treatment of peri-implant giant cell granuloma are very important for a proper management of the lesion in order to preserve the implant prosthetic rehabilitation and prevent recurrences.

  7. Peripheral and Central Giant Cell Lesions in Children: Institutional Experience at Subharti Dental College and Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandna, Preetika; Srivastava, Nikhil; Bansal, Vishal; Wadhwan, Vijay; Dubey, Prajesh

    2017-01-01

    Giant cell lesions (GCG) are a group of varied lesions that contain a multitude of multinucleated, osteoclast like giant cells within connective tissue stroma. These include giant cell granulomas which may be central (CGCG), if they lie within the jaw bone, or, peripheral (PGCG) if they lie within the soft tissue. Giant cell granulomas comprised 9.29% of all oral lesions. This case series comprises of 5 giant cell lesions in children between the ages of 4 to 12 years. A retrospective analysis was conducted of all patients who were diagnosed with giant cell lesions and treated over a period of 10 years (from August 2004 to August 2014) at Subharti Dental College and Hospital, Meerut, India. A total of 5 giant cell lesions were identified in this case series, of which 2 cases were diagnosed as PGCG and 3 cases as CGCG. Surgical excision and curettage was performed for 2 peripheral lesions under local anesthesia while 1 central lesion was excised under general anesthesia. Two central lesions were treated with a non-surgical approach using intralesional corticosteroid. Our experience suggests that a correct diagnosis and complete surgical excision with curettage is effective in complete management of oral giant cell lesions in the pediatric age group.

  8. Dermatopathology in historical perspective: the Montgomery giant cell of lichen simplex chronicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubakovic, Svetlana; Steffen, Charles

    2010-01-01

    In this short historical review, we will discuss the origin and references to the giant cell that is sometimes histopathologically present in the dermis of lichen simplex chronicus that was first described by Hamilton Montgomery, MD. A photomicrograph of the giant cell was included by Montgomery in his text Dermatopathology published in 1967. We will then provide a short biography of Montgomery.

  9. Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath: A review | al Kadi | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Tumors of hand are uncommon entities. Giant Cell Tumour of Tendon Sheath (GCTTS) is the second most common soft tissue tumour, next only to ganglion cysts. Method and Result: We report two cases of giant cell tumours of tendon sheath. One arose from the flexor tendon in the palm of a 22 years old ...

  10. Histological Regression of Giant Cell Tumor of Bone Following RANK Ligand Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin F. Dietrich MD, PhD

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Lung metastases are a rare complication of giant cell tumors of bone. We herein describe an interesting case of histological regression and size reduction of lung metastases originating from a primary giant cell tumor of bone in response to the RANK ligand inhibitor denosumab.

  11. Interleukin-4 induces foreign body giant cells from human monocytes/macrophages. Differential lymphokine regulation of macrophage fusion leads to morphological variants of multinucleated giant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, A K; Anderson, J M

    1995-11-01

    Interleukin-4 induced the formation of foreign body-type giant multinucleated cells from human monocyte-derived macrophages, an effect that was optimized with either granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor or interleukin-3, dependent on the concentration of interleukin-4, and specifically prevented by anti-interleukin-4. Very large foreign body giant cells and, predominantly, giant cell syncytia with randomly arranged nuclei and extensive cytoplasmic spreading (285 +/- 121 nuclei and 1.151 +/- 0.303 mm2 per syncytium) were consistently obtained. Under otherwise identical culture conditions, relatively much smaller Langhans-type giant cells with circularly arranged nuclei were induced with a previously described combination of interferon-gamma plus granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor or interleukin-3 (16 +/- 6 nuclei and 0.033 +/- 0.013 mm2 per giant cell); their formation was prevented by anti-interferon-gamma but not by anti-interleukin-4. Similar rates of macrophage fusion were obtained in both culture systems (72 +/- 5% and 74 +/- 6%, respectively), but these two morphological variants did not occur simultaneously or form from one another within the 10-day culture period. These findings demonstrate that interleukin-4 is a potent human macrophage fusion factor and that differential regulation of macrophage fusion by interleukin-4 and interferon-gamma may lead to morphological variants of multinucleated giant cells.

  12. Osteoclast-like Giant Cell Carcinoma of the Urinary Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pa-Jan Wu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Extraskeletal osteoclast-like giant cell (OGC tumors are uncommon and have mainly been found in the breast and pancreas. OGC neoplasms of the urinary tract are extremely rare, and their histogenesis and biologic behavior remain controversial. Gross hematuria is the most common presenting symptom, as in transitional cell carcinoma. The prognosis is poor in patients with extraskeletal OGC tumors. Here, we present the case of a 62-year-old man who received transurethral bladder tumor resection due to painless gross hematuria. Pathology showed OGC carcinoma. Abdominal computed tomography showed tumor invasion over the right lateral wall of the bladder and distal third of the ureter. The patient received radical cystectomy and partial distal ureterectomy with transureteroureterostomy. No local tumor recurrence or distant metastasis was found at the 5-month follow-up.

  13. Giant Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lumbosacral Region: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzu Akçal

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Although frequently regarded as a low grade malignancy, basal cell carcinoma (BCC sometimes shows aggressive behavior. Giant BCC is defined as a lesion  greater then 5 centimeter. Material and Methods: The authors described the diagnosis and treatment protocol of giant BCC, involving lumbosacral region without any local or distant metastasis. Also the authors went through a thorough a retrospective literature research of giant BCCs in terms of frequency and treatment. Results: Giant BCCs are biologically more aggressive; however, patient’s negligence is a key factor for the tumor size. İnternational medical database (PubMed search reveals 253 giant BCCs with the most commonly seen site as the face and back area. However perianal BCCs are seen lower then 1%. Conclusion: In general, diagnosed giant BCCs account for  lower then 1% of all BCCs. One must keep in mind this diagnosis to discard the metastasis rate among BCCs.

  14. Nonepiphyseal Giant Cell Tumor of the Rib: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschouris, Hippocrates; Marinis, Athanasios; Bouma, Evanthia; Karagiannis, Evangelos; Kiltenis, Michalis; Papadaki, Marina

    2012-01-01

    A case of a 32-year-old female patient with a giant cell tumor originating in the middle part of the left 10th rib is presented. On X-rays and CT, the tumor caused a well-defined osteolysis with nonsclerotic borders. On MRI, it exhibited intermediate signal intensity on T1 sequences and central high signal and peripheral intermediate signal on T2 sequences. On contrast-enhanced MR images both central and peripheral-periosteal enhancement was noted. Thanks to its small size (2 × 1.3 cm), the lesion was easily resected en bloc with a part of the affected rib. The patient is free of recurrence for 3 years after the operation. PMID:23119206

  15. Nonepiphyseal Giant Cell Tumor of the Rib: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hippocrates Moschouris

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of a 32-year-old female patient with a giant cell tumor originating in the middle part of the left 10th rib is presented. On X-rays and CT, the tumor caused a well-defined osteolysis with nonsclerotic borders. On MRI, it exhibited intermediate signal intensity on T1 sequences and central high signal and peripheral intermediate signal on T2 sequences. On contrast-enhanced MR images both central and peripheral-periosteal enhancement was noted. Thanks to its small size ( cm, the lesion was easily resected en bloc with a part of the affected rib. The patient is free of recurrence for 3 years after the operation.

  16. Varicella zoster virus triggers the immunopathology of giant cell arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilden, Don; Nagel, Maria A

    2016-07-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is a severe form of vasculitis in the elderly. The recent discovery of varicella zoster virus (VZV) in the temporal arteries and adjacent skeletal muscle of patients with GCA, and the rationale and strategy for antiviral and corticosteroid treatment for GCA are reviewed. The clinical features of GCA include excruciating headache/head pain, often with scalp tenderness, a nodular temporal arteries and decreased temporal artery pulsations. Jaw claudication, night sweats, fever, malaise, and a history of polymyalgia rheumatica (aching and stiffness of large muscles primarily in the shoulder girdle, upper back, and pelvis without objective signs of weakness) are common. ESR and CRP are usually elevated. Diagnosis is confirmed by temporal artery biopsy which reveals vessel wall damage and inflammation, with multinucleated giant cells and/or epithelioid macrophages. Skip lesions are common. Importantly, temporal artery biopsies are pathologically negative in many clinically suspect cases. This review highlights recent virological findings in temporal arteries from patients with pathologically verified GCA and in temporal arteries from patients who manifest clinical and laboratory features of GCA, but whose temporal artery biopsies (Bx) are pathologically negative for GCA (Bx-negative GCA). Virological analysis revealed that VZV is present in most GCA-positive and GCA-negative temporal artery biopsies, mostly in skip areas that correlate with adjacent GCA pathology. The presence of VZV in Bx-positive and Bx-negative GCA temporal arteries indicates that VZV triggers the immunopathology of GCA. However, the presence of VZV in about 20% of temporal artery biopsies from non-GCA postmortem controls also suggests that VZV alone is not sufficient to produce disease. Treatment trials should be performed to determine if antiviral agents confer additional benefits to corticosteroids in both Bx-positive and Bx-negative GCA patients. These studies should

  17. Gene transfection in primary stem-like cells of giant cell tumor of bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalini Singh

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Shalini Singh1, Isabella Mak1, Patricia Power1, Melissa Cunnigham2, Robert Turcotte3, Michelle Ghert11Departments of Surgery, 2Biology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario; 3Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, McGill University Medical Centre, Montreal, Quebec, CanadaAbstract: The neoplastic stem-like stromal cell of giant cell tumor of bone (GCT survives for multiple passages in primary culture with a stable phenotype, and exhibits multipotent characteristics. The pathophysiology of this tumor has been studied through the primary culture of these cells. However, successful gene transfer of these cells has not been reported to date. In this short report, we describe the development of the first reported technique that results in efficient gene transfection in primary stem-like cells of GCT.Keywords: gene, transfection, primary cells, TWIST, giant cell tumor

  18. Establishment and cryopreservation of a giant panda skeletal muscle-derived cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fang-Jian; Zeng, Chang-Jun; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Cheng-Dong; Xiong, Tie-Yi; Fang, Sheng-Guo; Zhang, He-Min

    2015-06-01

    The giant panda Ailuropoda melanoleuca is an endangered species and is a symbol for wildlife conservation. Although efforts have been made to protect this rare and endangered species through breeding and conservative biology, the long-term preservation of giant panda genome resources (gametes, tissues, organs, genomic libraries, etc.) is still a practical option. In this study, the giant panda skeletal muscle-derived cell line was successfully established via primary explants culture and cryopreservation techniques. The population doubling time of giant panda skeletal cells was approximately 33.8 h, and this population maintained a high cell viability before and after cryopreservation (95.6% and 90.7%, respectively). The two skeletal muscle-specific genes SMYD1 and MYF6 were expressed and detected by RT-PCR in the giant panda skeletal muscle-derived cell line. Karyotyping analysis revealed that the frequencies of giant panda skeletal muscle cells showing a chromosome number of 2n=42 ranged from 90.6∼94.2%. Thus, the giant panda skeletal muscle-derived cell line provides a vital resource and material platform for further studies and is likely to be useful for the protection of this rare and endangered species.

  19. A case of giant cell glioblastoma: a mimicker of a cerebral metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Eiki; Yoshiura, Takashi; Hiwatashi, Akio; Togao, Osamu; Yamashita, Kouji; Kamano, Hironori; Mizoguchi, Masahiro; Amano, Toshiyuki; Honda, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    We report a rare case of giant cell glioblastoma that was difficult to distinguish from cerebral metastasis. The MRI finding was a ring-enhancing well-circumscribed solitary brain tumor that was very similar to cerebral metastasis. Even when MRI results were considered together with the findings by magnet resonance spectroscopy and perfusion-weighted MRI, it was hard to distinguish between giant cell glioblastoma and cerebral metastasis before surgery. When we find a solitary ring-enhancing intracranial mass with little tendency of invasion, we need to consider the possibility of giant cell GBM as a differential diagnosis.

  20. Favorable outcome of giant cell glioblastoma in a child. Report of an 11-year survival period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, R; Mölenkamp, G; Sörensen, N; Roggendorf, W

    1998-06-01

    Giant cell glioblastomas are defined as glioblastomas with a marked predominance of bizarre, multinucleated giant cells. They represent about 5% of all glioblastomas and can occur at any site of the central nervous system, but the temporal and frontal lobes are the sites of predilection. Overall, giant cell glioblastomas show a prolonged survival period compared with common glioblastoma multiforme, and survival periods of 7 and 9 years have been reported in adults. Here we report on a child aged 11 years at diagnosis, who has so far survived for 11 years since operation and adjunctive radio- and chemotherapy.

  1. Giant cell reparative granuloma of the phalanx of the hand with aggressive radiographic features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertoni, F.; Bacchini, P. [Department of Pathology, Rizzoli Orthopedic Inst., Bologna (Italy); Biscaglia, R. [Department of Orthopedics, University of Verona (Italy)

    1998-10-01

    This report describes a giant cell (reparative) granuloma in the proximal phalanx of the third finger of the right hand in a 52-year-old man. Radiographically it showed aggressive features with bony permeation, breaking of the cortex, and soft tissue extension. These features suggested a malignant lesion. Histology was characteristic of giant cell reparative granuloma. This lesion, along with aneurysmal bone cyst and giant cell tumor in the small bones of hand and foot, occasionally may show aggressive features mimicking a malignant lesion. (orig.) With 4 figs., 1 tab., 11 refs.

  2. Giant cell angiitis of the central nervous system with atypical presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciappetta, Pasqualino; D'Urso, Pietro Ivo; Colamaria, Antonio; Lauta, Enrico; Cimmino, Antonia; D'Urso, Oscar Fernando; Rossi, Roberta; Resta, Leonardo; Ingravallo, Giuseppe

    2010-08-01

    Giant cell angiitis of the CNS is an uncommon form of vasculitis. Neurological manifestations, both of the peripheral and CNS, are common. The most frequent manifestations are visual loss and stroke. Hemorrhagic onset is uncommon. Most cases have a fatal outcome and a tissue diagnosis is rarely established in life. We describe an unusual case of giant cell angiitis beginning as a hemorrhagic tumoral-like lesion. The results of the histological and ultrastructural analysis have also been reported. Our case illustrates that giant cell angiitis should be considered as a cause of intracerebral hemorrhage, particularly when associated with a relapsing and remitting disease of the CNS.

  3. Cytomorphology of giant cell glioblastoma: Report of a case and brief review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Sushila; Vij, Mukul; Jaiswal, Awadhesh Kumar; Srivastava, Arun Kumar; Behari, Sanjay; Pandey, Rakesh

    2012-05-01

    Giant cell glioblastoma is a histological variant of glioblastoma that accounts for less than 1% of intracranial tumors and to 5% of glioblastoma. They occur at any age and are likely to affect the younger as well the older age group unlike the conventional glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). They are often located subcortically in the temporal and parietal lobes. Cytological descriptions of giant cell glioblastoma are extremely rare. We describe squash cytomorphology of giant cell glioblastoma of left posterior frontal region in 35-year-old male. The squash smears were moderately cellular displaying malignant astrocytic tumor cells disposed in cohesive clusters and dispersed population on a necrotic background. Most striking feature was numerous multinucleated giant cells. We also discuss the differential diagnosis in light of relevant literature. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Evolution of microscopic colitis to giant cell colitis without significant intraepithelial lymphocytosis or thickened collagen plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Petris, Giovanni; Chen, Longwen

    2015-05-01

    Microscopic colitis (MC) is an umbrella term that encompasses lymphocytic colitis (LC) and collagenous colitis (CC). Several histological variants of these 2 entities exist; among them is the uncommon giant cell colitis (GCC), in which histiocytic giant cells (GCs) are present in background of CC or LC. We report the case of a 71-year-old woman complaining of watery diarrhea for several years that was diagnosed with CC. At follow-up, she developed giant cell colitis (GCC). Nine years later, a colectomy revealed a form of microscopic colitis in which significant intraepithelial lymphocytosis and collagen plate thickening have disappeared while GCs persisted with diffuse mononuclear cells inflammation of the lamina propria. Thinning of the collagen plate in association with GCs has been described previously. The case contributes the possibility of further evolution of MC into a pure giant cell colitis in which the prototypical manifestations of MC have all but disappeared. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Benign giant-cell tumor of the common bile duct: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan-Dan; Zheng, Ya-Min; Teng, Liang-Hong; Sun, Yan-Ni; Gao, Wei; Wang, Lei-Ming; Wang, Yue-Hua; Li, Fei; Lu, De-Hong

    2014-11-07

    Primary giant-cell tumors rarely arise in the common bile duct. We herein report a case of primary giant-cell tumor of the common bile duct. The patient was an 81-year-old male who was diagnosed with a well-defined 1.2-cm mass projecting into the lumen of the middle common bile duct. Excision of the gallbladder and extrahepatic bile duct and a Roux-en-Y cholangiojejunostomy were performed. Histologically, the tumor had no association with carcinomas of epithelial origin and was similar to giant-cell tumors of the bone. The tumor consisted of a mixture of mononuclear and multinucleated osteoclast-like giant cells. The mononuclear cells showed no atypical features, and their nuclei were similar to those of the multinucleated giant cells. CD68 was expressed on the mononuclear and multinucleated osteoclast-like giant cells, whereas CD163 immunoreactivity was restricted to the mononuclear cells. Six months after the operation, the patient was still alive and had no recurrence. The interest of this case lies in the rarity of this entity, the difficulty of preoperative diagnosis, and this tumor's possible confusion with other malignant tumors.

  6. [From pathogenesis of giant cell arteritis to new therapeutic targets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, M; Bonnotte, B

    2017-10-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is the most common vasculitis in adults. GCA is a granulomatous large-vessel vasculitis involving the aorta and its major branches in people>50 years. Glucocorticoids (GC) remain the cornerstone of GCA treatment. Prednisone is usually started at 0.7 or 1mg/kg/day depending on the occurrence of ischemic complications. Then, GC are progressively tapered and stopped after a mean duration of 18 months. GC are very efficient but relapses often occur during their tapering. Moreover, GC-related side effects are very common during this long term GC therapy. Thus, it can be assumed that GC are not the ideal treatment for GCA and that GC-sparing strategies have to be developed. The pathogenesis of GCA is not fully understood but major advances have been achieved in the recent years. If the trigger of GCA, which is suspected to be infectious, is still not identified, mechanisms triggering the granulomatous inflammation of the arterial wall and the progressive vascular remodeling leading to the occurrence of ischemic events have been better and better deciphered. Thanks to these advances in the knowledge of GCA pathogenesis, new therapeutic targets have emerged such as blockade of the activation of T cells or inhibition of the interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-12/23 or IL-1β pathways. Copyright © 2017 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Acute Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Caused by Diffuse Giant Cell Tumor of Tendon Sheath: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Christina M; Lueck, Nathan E; Steyers, Curtis M

    2007-01-01

    A 46 year old male developed spontaneous acute carpal tunnel syndrome of the right wrist without any antecedent trauma. Surgical exploration revealed hemorrhage secondary to diffuse giant cell tumor of tendon sheath as the underlying cause. PMID:17907439

  8. Florid cemento-osseous dysplasia and peripheral giant cell granuloma in a patient with neurofibromatosis 1*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento, Dmitry José de Santana; de Carvalho, Sérgio Henrique Gonçalves; de Araújo Filho, José Cadmo Wanderley Peregrino; Carvalho, Marianne de Vasconcelos; da Silveira, Éricka Janine Dantas

    2017-01-01

    We report a 35-year-old mulatto female patient with neurofibromatosis Type 1 who presented with facial asymmetry. The patient had two lesions: florid cemento-osseous dysplasia associated with peripheral giant cell granuloma. She was referred for surgical treatment of the peripheral giant cell granuloma and the florid cemento-osseous dysplasia was treated conservatively by a multidisciplinary team. So far, no changes have been observed in the patient's clinical status. We observed no recurrence of peripheral giant cell granuloma. To the best of our knowledge, the present case is the first report of a patient with neurofibromatosis Type 1 associated with a giant cell lesion and florid cemento-osseous dysplasia. PMID:28538890

  9. Florid cemento-osseous dysplasia and peripheral giant cell granuloma in a patient with neurofibromatosis 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento, Dmitry José de Santana; Carvalho, Sérgio Henrique Gonçalves de; Araújo, José Cadmo Wanderley Peregrino de; Carvalho, Marianne de Vasconcelos; Silveira, Éricka Janine Dantas da

    2017-01-01

    We report a 35-year-old mulatto female patient with neurofibromatosis Type 1 who presented with facial asymmetry. The patient had two lesions: florid cemento-osseous dysplasia associated with peripheral giant cell granuloma. She was referred for surgical treatment of the peripheral giant cell granuloma and the florid cemento-osseous dysplasia was treated conservatively by a multidisciplinary team. So far, no changes have been observed in the patient's clinical status. We observed no recurrence of peripheral giant cell granuloma. To the best of our knowledge, the present case is the first report of a patient with neurofibromatosis Type 1 associated with a giant cell lesion and florid cemento-osseous dysplasia.

  10. Increased angiotensin II type 1 receptor expression in temporal arteries from patients with giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimitrijevic, Ivan; Malmsjö, Malin; Andersson, Christina

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Currently, giant cell arteritis (GCA) is primarily treated with corticosteroids or immunomodulating agents, but there is interest in identifying other noncorticosteroid alternatives. Similarities exist in the injury pathways between GCA and atherosclerosis. Angiotensin II is a vasoactive...

  11. Methylprednisolone prevents tumour necrosis factor-alpha-dependent multinucleated giant cell formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maltesen, Henrik Rasmus; Nielsen, Claus H; Dalbøge, Christina Schjellerup

    2010-01-01

    Granulomas contain multinucleated giant cells (MGCs), the function of which remains largely unknown. In patients with autoimmune granulomatous disease, the granulomas can be resolved during treatment with glucocorticosteroid (GCS). However, little is known about the influence of GCSs...

  12. Giant cell tumor of the flexor tendon of the wrist: US and MRI evaluation. Case report

    OpenAIRE

    Bassetti, E.; Candreva, R.; Santucci, E.

    2011-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCTTS) is a benign proliferative lesion of synovial origin that may affect the joints, bursae and tendon sheaths. We report the case of a giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath arising from the carpal tunnel of the wrist in a 47-year-old woman. The patient underwent ultrasound (US) examination and subsequently magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

  13. Subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA): a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahiri Elousrouti, Layla; Lamchahab, Meryem; Bougtoub, Nawal; Elfatemi, Hinde; Chbani, Laila; Harmouch, Taoufik; Maaroufi, Mustapha; Amarti Riffi, Afaf

    2016-02-09

    Subependymal giant cell astrocytoma is a rare tumor that occurs in the wall of the lateral ventricle and foramen of Monro and, rarely, in the third ventricle. It is one of the intracranial lesions found in tuberous sclerosis complex (which include subependymal nodules, cortical tubers, retinal astrocytoma and subependymal giant cell astrocytoma), but cases without such lesions have also been reported in the literature. It was described for the first time in 1908 by Vogt as part of the typical triad of tuberous sclerosis complex. At the 2012 Washington Consensus Conference, it was decided by the invited expert panel to document the definition of subependymal giant cell astrocytoma as a lesion at the caudothalamic groove with either a size of more than 1 cm in any direction or a subependymal lesion at any location that has shown serial growth on consecutive imaging regardless of size. Most subependymal giant cell astrocytomas will show avid enhancement after contrast administration; however, a growing subependymal lesion even in the absence of enhancement should be considered a subependymal giant cell astrocytoma. We report a case of subependymal giant cell astrocytoma in a 10-year-old white girl, who had no clinical symptoms of tuberous sclerosis. A computed tomography scan revealed a voluminous mass in her perilateral ventricle. An extemporaneous examination was in favor of a benign ganglioglioma tumor. After fixation in 10 % neutral-buffered formalin, embedding in paraffin and staining with hematoxylin, eosin and safran, the definitive diagnosis was subependymal giant cell astrocytoma. Subependymal giant cell astrocytoma is a rare tumor of the central nervous system whose diagnosis is based on clinical, radiological, histological and immunohistochemical arguments. For its rarity, we must consider this diagnosis when faced with a mass near the foramen of Monro in the pediatric population even if there are no other features of tuberous sclerosis complex.

  14. Peripheral Giant Cell Granuloma Associated With Residual Cement and Periimplantitis: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Yasemin Sezgin; Emine Elif Alaaddinoglu; Mehtap Bilgin Cetin; Eda Yilmaz Akcay

    2016-01-01

    Residual cement in cement retained restorations, poses a problem which cause peri-implant disease. Peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG) is a reactive and exophytic lesion occurring on the gingiva and alveolar ridge. Although PGCG is the most common giant cell lesion of the jaws, there is little data in the literature regarding the prevalence of reactive lesions associated with dental implants. The purpose of this paper is to report a rare case which a PGCG was found in association with exce...

  15. Characterization of multinucleated giant cells in synovium and subchondral bone in knee osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Prieto-Potin, Iv?n; Largo, Raquel; Roman-Blas, Jorge A; Herrero-Beaumont, Gabriel; Walsh, David A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Multinucleated giant cells have been noticed in diverse arthritic conditions since their first description in rheumatoid synovium. However, their role in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA) or rheumatoid arthritis (RA) still remains broadly unknown. We aimed to study the presence and characteristics of multinucleated giant cells (MGC) both in synovium and in subchondral bone tissues of patients with OA or RA. Methods: Knee synovial and subchondral bone samples were...

  16. Giant cells mandibular lesion: surgical treatment with preservation of the dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrissi, Jorge O

    2013-07-01

    Giant cell tumors of the jaw (GCTJ) are common in the long bones but rare in the craniofacial region, with only 1% of cases occurring in the latter; they account for approximately 3% to 5% of all primary bone tumors and 15% to 20% of all benign bone tumors. The biologic behavior of central giant cell lesions of the jaws ranges from quiescent to aggressive with destructive expansion, and the clinical behavior of GCTJ of the jaws is variable and difficult to predict. A number of tumors that occur in the jaws contain giant cells but are not true benign giant cell tumors. These include aneurysmal bone cyst, cherubism, simple bone cyst, osteoid osteoma, giant cell granuloma reparative, and tumor of hyperparathyroidism. This article reports a patient study of giant cell extended lesion in the left mandible from dental canine element to mandibular angle. The patient underwent excision of neoplasm and reconstruction of the mandible with an autologous bone graft of the iliac crest, but dentition was preserved over the resected area. No complications were detected, and 8 months postoperative control revealed excellent aesthetic and functional recuperation. This case is presented because of the following: (1) GCTJ is an infrequent tumor; (2) uncommon clinical presentation, severe deformity; (3) excessive size and jaw deformity; (4) fast growing; and (5) surgical treatment with preservation of the dentition in affected area.

  17. GIANT CELL-RICH LESIONS OF BONE AND JOINTS: A ONE YEAR PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Nithisa H

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Giant cell-rich lesions constitute a group of biologically and morphologically diverse bone and joint tumours. The common feature is presence of numerous multinucleated osteoclast-like giant cells. However, they differ from each other by in terms of clinical and radiographic features and in many cases by their distinct morphological features. METHODS All the bone and joint specimens with giant cell-rich lesions received in the period of one year were studied along with clinical and radiological data available. Gross and microscopic findings were noted. RESULTS In a period of one year, 10 cases of giant cell-rich lesions of bone and joints have been studied, which were and correlated with clinical and radiological findings. Five were lesions from bone and two were from joints, which are chondroblastoma, chondromyxoid fibroma, osteoclastoma, aneurysmal bone cyst, pigmented villonodular synovitis, giant cell lesion of tendon sheath, and tendinous xanthoma. CONCLUSION In the present study, variety of giant cell lesions of bone and joints are studied. Of which, the mean age in young patients being 20 years and in elderly patients being 50 years. The common site being lower end of femur.

  18. Odontogenic tumors and giant cell lesions of jaws - a nine year study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Objectives A definite geographic variation has been observed in the frequency of odontogenic tumors and giant cell lesions of the jaws reported from different parts of the world. However, there are a few studies on these lesions, especially giant cell lesions, reported from India. Hence, this study was designed to provide a demographic data on the odontogenic tumors and giant cell lesions reported from our institute located in the city of Hyderabad. Hyderabad is the capital city of the southern state of Andhra Pradesh in India. A retrospective analysis of odontogenic tumors and giant cell lesions of jaws reported in our institute between the years 2000 and 2009 was done and this data was compared with previous reports from different parts of the world and India. Methods Biopsies of the lesions received between the years 2000 and 2009 were reviewed and patient's history, clinical, radiological and histopathological characteristics were analyzed. Results A total of 77 biopsies were received during the nine year study period. These lesions were more frequently seen in the males, in a younger age group and showed a predilection for the mandible. Most of them presented as radiolucent, slow growing and painless lesions. Ameloblastomas (71.4%) constituted the majority of odontogenic tumors while central giant cell granulomas (7.8%) constituted the majority of giant cell lesions. Conclusion These lesions showed a definite geographic variation with ameloblastomas being the most common odontogenic tumors and odontomas being relatively rarer lesions in our region. PMID:21729276

  19. Treatment of giant-cell arteritis, a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watelet, Bénédicte; Samson, Maxime; de Boysson, Hubert; Bienvenu, Boris

    2017-09-01

    Giant-cell arteritis (GCA) is the most common vasculitis in people aged more than 50 years. Despite the frequency of this disease, there is currently no international consensus on its therapeutic modalities. The aim of this study was to conduct a review on an international literature about the treatment of GCA, whatever the clinical pattern might be. Oral corticosteroids remain the cornerstone treatment, possibly preceded by intravenous bolus in complicated forms. In cases of glucocorticoid (GC) dependence or GC-related side effects, a GC-sparing agent may be necessary. Methotrexate is one of the most used treatments despite its low level of evidence and mild efficacy. Cyclophosphamide and tocilizumab look promising but require validation in further studies. The results for TNF-α blockers and azathioprine are disappointing. Preventing complications of prolonged corticosteroid therapy is a world challenge and the management of GC-induced osteoporosis is not the same from one country to another. There is a significant risk of arterial thrombosis, mainly at treatment onset, which may encourage to associate an antiplatelet therapy, especially in patients with other cardiovascular risk factors. Place of statins in the treatment of the disease is uncertain.

  20. Giant cell arteritis. Part I. Terminology, classification, clinical manifestations, diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azamat Makhmudovich Satybaldyev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell arteritis (GCA is a vasculitis affecting mainly large and medium-sized arteries, which the classification of systemic vasculitides refers to as those mainly involving the large vessels. GCA is typified by the involvement of extracranial aortic branches and intracranial vessels, the aorta and its large vessels are being affected most frequently. The paper considers the terminology, classification, prevalence, major pathogenic mechanisms, and morphology of GCA. A broad spectrum of its clinical subtypes is due to target vessel stenosis caused by intimal hyperplasia. In 40% of cases, GCA is shown to be accompanied by polymyalgia rheumatica that may either precede or manifest simultaneously with GCA, or follow this disease. The menacing complications of GCA may be visual loss or ischemic strokes at various sites depending on the location of the occluded vessel. Along with the gold standard verification of the diagnosis of GCA, namely temporal artery biopsy, the author indicates other (noninvasive methods for detection of vascular lesions: color Doppler ultrasonography of the temporal arteries, fluorescein angiography of the retina, mag-netic resonance angiography, magnetic resonance imaging, and computed tomography to rule out aortic aneurysm. Dynamic 18F positron emission tomography is demonstrated to play a role in the evaluation of therapeutic effectiveness.

  1. Effect of diabetes mellitus on giant cell arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Anne S; Yashkin, Arseniy P; Sloan, Frank A; Lee, Michael S

    2015-06-01

    To determine if Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is protective against giant cell arteritis (GCA) and to estimate the incidence of GCA diagnosis from Medicare claims. Medicare 5% claims files from 1991 to 2011 were used to identify beneficiaries diagnosed with DM, but not GCA, within a 3-year ascertainment period. Propensity score matching was used to define a control group of nondiabetics with comparable demographic covariates. Competing risk regression was then used to assess the impact of DM diagnosis on GCA diagnosis. To allow for a 3-year ascertainment period, the analysis sample was limited to beneficiaries older than 68 years at baseline. A total of 151,041 beneficiaries diagnosed with DM were matched to an equal number of controls. Mean study follow-up was 67.75 months. GCA was diagnosed among 1116 beneficiaries with DM (0.73%) vs 465 (0.30%) controls. The risk of receiving a GCA diagnosis among patients with DM was increased by 100% (subhazard ratio, 2.00; 95% confidence interval, 1.78-2.25). The annual incidence of GCA diagnosis among claims for US Medicare beneficiaries older than 68 years old was 93 in 100,000. A DM diagnosis is not protective against a GCA diagnosis in the Medicare population. Our data suggest that a DM diagnosis increases the risk of GCA diagnosis within 5.7 years for Medicare beneficiaries older than 68 years.

  2. Giant cell glioblastoma in the cerebrum of a Pembroke Welsh corgi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, D K; Aloisio, F; Alosio, F; Ajithdoss, D K; Ambrus, A; Lidbury, J A; Hein, H E; Porter, B F

    2011-05-01

    A 6-year-old, neutered female Pembroke Welsh corgi was presented with a 1-month history of ataxia and panting. The clinical signs progressed until the dog became anorexic, obtunded and exhibited circling to the left. At necropsy examination, a mass was detected in the left forebrain, impinging on the cribriform plate. Microscopically, the mass was composed of sheets of round to pleomorphic neoplastic cells with vacuolated cytoplasm. Nuclear atypia, anisocytosis and anisokaryosis were common. Numerous bizarre, multinucleated giant cells containing 60 or more nuclei and giant mononuclear cells were present. The matrix contained abundant reticulin. Immunohistochemistry revealed the neoplastic cells uniformly to express vimentin, and a small number of neoplastic cells expressed glial fibrillary acid protein. A diagnosis of giant cell glioblastoma was made. Although well recognized in man, this tumour has been documented rarely in the veterinary literature. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Diagnosing an atypical site of giant cell arteritis with magnetic resonance angiography: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Boon L; Liu, Jonathan J; Yong, Tuck Y; Tan, Chrismin C; Li, Jordan Y

    2016-06-23

    Giant cell arteritis typically involves the temporal arteries, but can involve other cranial arteries. Temporal artery biopsy is the mainstay for the diagnosis of giant cell arteritis; however, biopsy may be problematic if giant cell arteritis involves other cranial arteries that are inaccessible for sampling. In these situations, magnetic resonance angiography is a useful, non-invasive adjunctive method in the diagnosis of giant cell arteritis. In this case report, we describe a case of giant cell arteritis involving only the occipital artery which was revealed by magnetic resonance angiography. A 67-year-old Caucasian man was admitted to our hospital with a 4-week history of malaise, fever, and mild occipital headaches. There were no other positive findings on physical examination. Laboratory studies were remarkable for normocytic anemia, raised inflammatory markers, and mildly deranged liver function tests. To exclude intracranial pathology, he underwent a cranial magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium, which demonstrated a thickened wall and mural enhancement of his right occipital artery, consistent with giant cell arteritis. His temporal arteries were normal. His occipital arteries were not accessible for biopsy and he was commenced on high-dose prednisolone (60 mg daily). His symptoms resolved completely after a week of glucocorticoid steroid treatment and he was well on 5 mg of prednisolone once a day on follow-up. While magnetic resonance angiography may not replace the need for biopsy, it may have a diagnostic role in suspected giant cell arteritis, such as when the involved arteries are inaccessible for biopsy.

  4. Giant-cell tumor of the patella: An uncommon cause of fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Carbó-Laso

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Primary patellar tumors are highly unusual. Most are benign neoplasms with giant-cell tumors being the most common, followed by chondroblastomas and aneurysmal bone cysts. Intralesional curettage and bone grafting is the treatment of choice for most giant-cell tumors in the patella. The use of adjuvants can reduce the high recurrence rate. This is a case report of a giant-cell tumor in a 61-year-old man who was diagnosed with a pathological fracture in the patella after minimal trauma. Extended curettage through an osteotomy made in the medial cortical of the patella was performed. The tumor cavity was filled with high viscosity bone cement and the medial cortical was repositioned. Histological analysis showed mononuclear cells and numerous multinucleated giant cells, confirming the diagnosis. Twenty-four months after surgery, the patient was asymptomatic and there was no evidence of local recurrence. Epidemiology, symptomatology, imagenology, histopathology, treatment options and prognoses of giant-cell tumors of the patella are discussed herein. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2017; 6(2.000: 112-116

  5. Oral Paracoccidioidomycosis Granulomas are Predominantly Populated by CD163+ Multinucleated Giant Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Prado Gomes Pedreira, Renato; de Carli, Marina Lara; Beijo, Luiz Alberto; Nonogaki, Suely; Pereira, Alessandro Antônio Costa; Junior, Noé Vital Ribeiro; Sperandio, Felipe Fornias; Hanemann, João Adolfo Costa

    2016-10-01

    Multinucleated giant cells (MGC) are considered to be a hallmark of granulomatous inflammation; thus, they may play an essential role in the host response against pathogens, particularly Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. This study characterizes the MGC found in oral paracoccidioidomycosis and assesses the correlation of MGC with the amount of fungi within oral tissues. Twenty-six cases were included. They were classified as loose or dense granulomas, and the total MGC, including foreign-body and Langhans giant cells, besides the total and intracellular fungi, were taken into consideration. CD163 immunoexpression was performed, and CD163+ multinucleated giant cells were also quantified. Dense granulomas revealed more foreign-body type and total giant cells than loose granulomas (P giant cells showed a positive linear correlation with the CD163+ cells (P = 0.003; r = 0.56) and intracellular fungi quantification (P = 0.045; r = 0.40). Oral paracoccidioidomycosis lesions contain MGC that mainly belong to a CD163+ phenotype, also showing both Langhans and foreign-body arrangements. Additionally, the higher the presence of MGC, the higher the amount of phagocytized fungi.

  6. Subependymal giant cell astrocytoma: one case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan WANG

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA is a rare kind of central nervous system tumor typically occurring in children or adolescents under the age of 20. The tumor commonly arises in the region of the foramen of Monro. Most SEGA patients present distinctive histopathological and immunohistochemical characteristics.  Methods The clinical features, histopathological findings and immunohistochemical staining in one case of SEGA were analyzed, and the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of this disease with literature review were studied.  Results A 13-year-old female patient presented dizziness, headache and vomiting. Cranial MRI examination showed abnormal signals in the left lateral ventricle near the foramen of Monro, and exhibited heterogeneous enhancement after contrast. Histologically, the tumor was composed of clustering of fibrillated spindle cells and giant cells with abundant cytoplasm, and they were mixed. Glassy hyaline cytoplasm and eccentric vesicular nuclei with prominent nucleoli were frequently seen in the giant tumor cells. Some of the giant cells appeared to resemble gemistocytic astrocytes or ganglion cells. Considerable nuclear pleomorphism and multinuclear cells were frequently seen. There was no significant microvascular proliferation or necrosis. Immunohistochemical findings showed diffuse and strong positivity in tumor cells for vimentin (Vim, and partial positivity for S-100 protein (S-100, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP. A few giant tumor cells were positive for synaptophysin (Syn, but negative for neurofilament protein (NF, neuronal nuclei (NeuN and cytokeratin (CK. Ki-67 labeling index was very low (< 1%.  Conclusions SEGA is a benign central nervous system tumor (WHOⅠ. It has distinctive clinical and histopathological features, and should be differentiated from gemistocytic astrocytoma, ependymoma, gangliocytoma and giant cell glioblastoma. doi: 10

  7. Transcriptional analysis through RNA sequencing of giant cells induced by Meloidogyne graminicola in rice roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Hongli; Gheysen, Godelieve; Denil, Simon; Lindsey, Keith; Topping, Jennifer F; Nahar, Kamrun; Haegeman, Annelies; De Vos, Winnok H; Trooskens, Geert; Van Criekinge, Wim; De Meyer, Tim; Kyndt, Tina

    2013-09-01

    One of the reasons for the progressive yield decline observed in aerobic rice production is the rapid build-up of populations of the rice root knot nematode Meloidogyne graminicola. These nematodes induce specialized feeding cells inside root tissue, called giant cells. By injecting effectors in and sipping metabolites out of these cells, they reprogramme normal cell development and deprive the plant of its nutrients. In this research we have studied the transcriptome of giant cells in rice, after isolation of these cells by laser-capture microdissection. The expression profiles revealed a general induction of primary metabolism inside the giant cells. Although the roots were shielded from light induction, we detected a remarkable induction of genes involved in chloroplast biogenesis and tetrapyrrole synthesis. The presence of chloroplast-like structures inside these dark-grown cells was confirmed by confocal microscopy. On the other hand, genes involved in secondary metabolism and more specifically, the majority of defence-related genes were strongly suppressed in the giant cells. In addition, significant induction of transcripts involved in epigenetic processes was detected inside these cells 7 days after infection.

  8. Frequent upregulation of cyclin D1 and p16 expression with low Ki-67 scores in multinucleated giant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jung-Woo; Lee, Ju-Han; Kim, Young-Sik

    2011-01-01

    Multinucleated giant cells are formed from the fusion of macrophages and are classified into foreign body-type giant cells (FBGCs), osteoclast-type giant cells (OCGCs) and Langhans-type giant cells (LHGCs). OCGCs display upregulated cyclin D1 expression with low Ki-67 activity. However, little is known about the expression of cell cycle regulators in the other types of multinucleated giant cells. We aimed to investigate the cell cycle status of multinucleated giant cells. The immunohistochemical expressions of cyclin D1, p16(INK4a) and Ki-67 were analyzed in a total of 127 cases showing multinucleated giant cells. Cyclin D1 was overexpressed in 45 (88%) of 51 FBGC cases, 25 (86%) of 29 OCGC cases and 22 (47%) of 47 LHGC cases. p16(INK4a) showed diffuse nuclear and/or cytoplasmic overexpression in 45 (88%) of 51 FBGC cases, 27 (93%) of 29 OCGC cases and 24 (51%) of 47 LHGC cases. Ki-67 immunostaining was negative in almost all FBGC, OCGC and LHGC cases. This study demonstrates that FBGCs and OCGCs frequently show upregulation of cyclin D1 and p16(INK4a) expression with low Ki-67 scores. This suggests that multinucleated giant cells are arrested in the G1/S cell cycle transition. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Multinucleated giant cell reaction in lower lip squamous cell carcinoma: a clinical, morphological, and immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Hellen Bandeira de Pontes; Miguel, Márcia Cristina da Costa; Pinto, Leão Pereira; Gordón-Núñez, Manuel Antonio; Alves, Pollianna Muniz; Nonaka, Cassiano Francisco Weege

    2017-10-01

    Multinucleated giant cell (MGC) reactions have been identified in several malignancies, but their frequency and significance in lower lip squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are not established. This study evaluated the MGC reactions and their association with clinicopathological parameters in lower lip SCCs. The polarization profile of these cells (M1 or M2 macrophages) was also assessed. The presence and distribution of MGC reactions in high-power fields (400×) were evaluated in hematoxylin/eosin-stained histological sections of 91 lower lip SCCs. The histopathological grade of malignancy was evaluated using two grading systems (World Health Organization [WHO] and Malignancy Grading of the Deep Invasive Margins). The histiocytic nature (CD68) and polarization profile (M1-HLA-DR+ or M2-CD163+) of MGCs were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Multinucleated giant cell reaction was identified in 36 (39.6%) cases, and its frequency was 3.3 times higher in well/moderately differentiated tumors than in poorly differentiated tumors (WHO grading system) (P = 0.006). For Malignancy Grading of the Deep Invasive Margins, the frequency was 2.03 times higher in highly/moderately keratinized tumors than in tumors with minimal/no keratinization (P = 0.012). No significant associations were observed between the presence/distribution of MGCs and clinical parameters (tumor size, lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, and clinical stage) (P > 0.05). All MGCs were positive for CD68 and there was a predominance of HLA-DR+ over CD163+ MGCs (P = 0.031). Multinucleated giant cell reactions may not be involved in tumor progression in lower lip SCCs. In this microenvironment, MGCs tend to exhibit a predominantly M1 phenotype and may represent a foreign body reaction to SCC keratin pearls. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Making it big : how characean algae use cytoplasmic streaming to enhance transport in giant cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meent, Jan Willem van de

    2010-01-01

    Organisms show a remarkable variation in sizes, yet cell sizes are surprisingly similar across species, typically ranging from 10 μm to 100 μm. A striking exception are the giant cells of the algal weed Chara, which can exceed 10 cm in length and 1 mm in diameter. A circulation known as cytoplasmic

  11. Cathepsin K is the principal protease in giant cell tumor of bone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindeman, J.H.N.; Hanemaaijer, R.; Mulder, A.; Dijkstra, P.D.S.; Szuhai, K.; Bromme, D.; Verheijen, J.H.; Hogendoorn, P.C.W.

    2004-01-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone is a neoplasm of bone characterized by a localized osteolytic lesion. The nature of GCT is an enigma and the cell type(s) and protease(s) responsible for the extensive localized clinicoradiological osteolysis remain unresolved. We evaluated protease expression and

  12. Giant cell tumor of the rib: Two cases of F-18 FDG PET/CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hye Lim; Yoo, Le Ryung; Lee, Yeong Joo; Jung, Chan Kwon [Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of MedicineThe Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sonya Young Ju [Molecular Imaging Program, Dept. of Radiology, Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Stanford (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    We report two cases of giant cell tumor arising from the rib and their F-18 FDG PET/CT findings. The two patients complained of chest wall pain, and large lobulated soft tissue masses with intense FDG uptake were seen on F-18 FDG PET/CT. A malignant tumor such as osteosarcoma or chondrosarcoma was suspected due to the large size of the mass, bony destruction, and intense FDG uptake. En bloc resection was performed and final pathologic results revealed giant cell tumor of the rib. Giant cell tumor of the rib is very rare, and larger lesions with high FDG uptake can be misdiagnosed as an intrathoracic malignancy arising from the rib, pleura, or chest wall.

  13. Treatment of central giant cell lesions using bisphosphonates with intralesional corticosteroid injections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da Silva Newton

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Central giant cell lesions are benign intraosseous proliferative lesions that have considerable local aggressiveness. Nonsurgical treatment methods, such as intralesional corticosteroid injections, systemic calcitonin and interferon have been reported. Recently, bisphosphonates have been used to treat central giant cell lesions. A case of a 36-year-old male with a central giant cell lesion crossing the mandibular midline was treated with intralesional corticosteroids combined with alendronate sodium for the control of systemic bone resorption. The steroid injections and the use of bisphosphonates were stopped after seven months when further needle penetration into the lesion was not possible due to new bone formation. After two years, the bony architecture was near normal, and only minimal radiolucency was present around the root apices of the involved teeth. The patient was followed up for four years, and panoramic radiography showed areas of new bone formation. Thus far, neither recurrence nor side effects of the medication have been detected.

  14. [Diagnostic value of clinical signs in giant cell arteritis: analysis of 415 temporal artery biopsy findings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strady, Christophe; Arav, Eric; Strady, Alain; Jaussaud, Roland; Beguinot, Isabelle; Rouger, Christine; Pluot, Michel; Remy, Gérard

    2002-02-01

    The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) has proposed a list of criteria for diagnosis of giant cell arteritis in order to guide clinical research by differentiating it from other vasculitis. The aim of this retrospective investigation, based on the findings of 415 temporal artery biopsies was to assess the diagnostic value of these criteria in the daily clinical setting. The demographic, clinical and biological characteristics of patients with positive (confirmed cases of giant cell arteritis) or negative (controls) histopathological temporal artery biopsy findings were analyzed using downward step-by-step logistic regression analysis. This analysis enabled investigators to list signs with inherent diagnostic value. Based their odds-ratio, these factors were used to determine a clinical score for giant cell arteritis. A score of over 7 - out of a maximum score of 32 - enables the diagnosis for giant cell arteritis with the best possible compromise between a sensitivity of 75.7% and a specificity of 72.2%. ACR criteria had a sensitivity of 97.5% and a specificity of 78.9% when used in our patient group. Our study results are original in that the control group was composed of patients in whom the diagnosis of giant cell arteritis had been suggested but refuted by the absence of histopathological findings on the temporal artery biopsy. This pragmatic attitude in selecting the control group may explain the difference observed with the ACR criteria in terms of sensitivity and specificity. Further research is needed to develop a diagnostic method for giant cell arteritis without resorting to temporal artery biopsy.

  15. FASN expression, angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis in central and peripheral giant cell lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saulo Gabriel Moreira FALCI

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Central giant cell lesion (CGCL and peripheral giant cell lesion (PGCL are non-neoplastic proliferative processes of the jaws. PGCL is a reactive process induced by irritant local factors and CGCL is an intra-osseous lesion of unknown etiology. Both lesions exhibit similar histologic features showing abundant mononuclear cells, admixed with a large number of multinucleated giant cells and a rich vascularized stroma with extravasated erythrocytes, hemosiderin deposition, and blood-filled pools. Recent studies have linked fatty acid synthase (FASN with angiogenesis. Objective: To evaluate angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis and their relationship with FASN expression in CGCL and PGCL. Material and Methods: Thirteen CGCL and 14 PGCL of the jaws were selected for immunoexpression of FASN; CD34 and CD105 (to assess blood microvessel density [MVD] and microvessel area [MVA]; and D2-40 (to assess lymphatic MVD and MVA. Results: Within PGCL and CGCL, MVD-CD34 was signifcantly higher than MVD-CD10S, followed by MVD-D2-40. Moreover, a signifcantly higher number of FASN-positive multinucleated giant cells than mononuclear cells were observed. Between PGCL and CGCL, only MVD-CD34 and all MVA were signifcantly higher in PGCL. Positive correlation between MVA-CD10S with FASNpositive mononuclear cells in both lesions was observed. Conclusions: Our results show both lesions exhibiting similar levels of FASN expression and neoangiogenesis, suggesting constitutive processes that regulate tissue maintenance.

  16. Giant cell tumour of peroneus brevis tendon sheath--a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goni, Vijay; Gopinathan, Nirmal Raj; Radotra, B D; Viswanathan, Vibhu Krishnan; Logithasan, Rajesh Kumar; S, Balaji

    2012-07-13

    Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath is a benign soft tissue lesion most commonly found in the flexor aspect of hand and wrist. Being rare in foot and ankle, the unusual presentation of this lesion may sometimes mimic other lesions like lipoma, synovial sarcoma, malignant fibrous histiocytoma, synovial cyst and ganglion. Hence it is important to include this lesion in differential diagnoses especially if the lesion is found to be anchored to any of the surrounding tendons. This article describes the unusual occurrence of giant cell tumour of the tendon sheath of peroneus brevis which is rarely described in literature.

  17. Pleomorphic (giant cell) carcinoma of the intestine. An immunohistochemical and electron microscopic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Martin; Teglbjaerg, P S

    1989-01-01

    Pleomorphic (giant cell) carcinomas have been described in the lungs, thyroid, pancreas, and gallbladder. Two pleomorphic carcinomas of the small bowel and two of the large bowel are presented. On light microscopic study, the carcinomas were solid, without squamous or glandular differentiation....... Intestinal pleomorphic carcinomas are histologically identical to pulmonary giant cell carcinomas. The prognosis is poor due to early tumor spread, with only a few months of postoperative survival. The pleomorphic carcinomas have some of the differentiation characteristics of carcinoid tumors and are best...

  18. Multiple Synchronous Central Giant Cell Granulomas of the Maxillofacial Region: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Min Seok; Kim, Hak Jin [Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-01-15

    Multifocal central giant cell granulomas (CGCG) in the maxillofacial region are suggestive of systemic disease such as hyperparathyroidism or an inherited syndrome such as Noonan-like multiple giant cell lesion syndrome. Only 5 cases of multifocal CGCGs in the maxillofacial region without any concomitant systemic disease have currently been reported. We report here on an unusual case of 17-year-old man who presented with multifocal CGCGs of the bilateral posterior mandible and right maxilla and he was without any concomitant systemic disease

  19. SOME ASPECTS OF DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSTICS OF GIANT-CELL TUMOUR, OSTEOCYSTOMA AND OSTEOSARCOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Pavlenko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The problems of timeliness and correctness of diagnostics of bone tumours, as well as therapeutic decision deserve the most careful consideration. The present research concerns the detection of criteria of differential diagnostics of giant-cell tumours, osteocystoma and osteosarcoma (according to the literary data. According to the literature the study of clinical and radiologic diagnostics, allowed to work out differential and diagnostic tables of signs and algorithms of diagnostics of giant-cell tumours, osteocystoma and osteosarcoma. It enabled to detect a therapeutic and diagnostic approach to patients with bone tumours.

  20. The value of recognizing suspect diagnoses in the triple diagnosis of giant cell tumor of bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotru Mrinalini

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumor (GCT of bone is the most frequently over-diagnosed neoplasm in orthopedic pathology because giant cells are a common component of many neoplastic and nonneoplastic conditions of bone. Triple diagnosis, requiring substantial individual and collective inputs by orthopedic surgeons, radiologists and pathologists, is the preferred method for the workup of patients with suspected bone neoplasms. At each stage in triple diagnosis, deviations from the typical must be regarded as clues to alternate diagnoses: the greater the deviation, the more a diagnosis of GCT must be considered suspect. A suspect diagnosis must trigger renewed analysis of the available data and a diligent search to exclude alternate diagnoses.

  1. Central giant cell lesion of the mandible in a 2-year old girl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oda, Takaaki; Sue, Mikiko; Okada, Yasuo; Kanri, Yoriaki; Ono, Junya; Ogura, Ichiro [The Nippon Dental University School of Life Dentistry at Niigata, Niigata (Japan)

    2017-09-15

    Central giant cell lesions are rare, benign, osteolytic, pseudocystic, solitary, localized lesions that are common in the skeletal structure, but less so in the maxillofacial region. Furthermore, to perform panoramic radiography and cone-beam computed tomography, it is necessary to prepare patients properly and to position their heads carefully. However, this can be difficult in pediatric patients, who may be anxious. In this report, we describe the case of a central giant cell lesion of the mandible in a 2-year-old girl that was evaluated with multidetector computed tomography.

  2. Bortezomib Inhibits Giant Cell Tumor of Bone through Induction of Cell Apoptosis and Inhibition of Osteoclast Recruitment, Giant Cell Formation, and Bone Resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Leqin; Luo, Jian; Jin, Rongrong; Yue, Zhiying; Sun, Peng; Yang, Zhengfeng; Yang, Xinghai; Wan, Wei; Zhang, Jishen; Li, Shichang; Liu, Mingyao; Xiao, Jianru

    2016-05-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is a rare and highly osteolytic bone tumor that usually leads to an extensive bone lesion. The purpose of this study was to discover novel therapeutic targets and identify potential agents for treating GCTB. After screening the serum cytokine profiles in 52 GCTB patients and 10 normal individuals using the ELISA assay, we found that NF-κB signaling-related cytokines, including TNFα, MCP-1, IL1α, and IL17A, were significantly increased in GCTB patients. The results were confirmed by IHC that the expression and activity of p65 were significantly increased in GCTB patients. Moreover, all of the NF-κB inhibitors tested suppressed GCTB cell growth, and bortezomib (Velcade), a well-known proteasome inhibitor, was the most potent inhibitor in blocking GCTB cells growth. Our results showed that bortezomib not only induced GCTB neoplastic stromal cell (NSC) apoptosis, but also suppressed GCTB NSC-induced giant cell differentiation, formation, and resorption. Moreover, bortezomib specifically suppressed GCTB NSC-induced preosteoclast recruitment. Furthermore, bortezomib ameliorated GCTB cell-induced bone destruction in vivo As a result, bortezomib suppressed NF-κB-regulated gene expression in GCTB NSC apoptosis, monocyte migration, angiogenesis, and osteoclastogenesis. Particularly, the inhibitory effects of bortezomib were much better than zoledronic acid, a drug currently used in treating GCTB, in our in vitro experimental paradigms. Together, our results demonstrated that NF-κB signaling pathway is highly activated in GCTB, and bortezomib could suppress GCTB and osteolysis in vivo and in vitro, indicating that bortezomib is a potential agent in the treatment of GCTB. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(5); 854-65. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. DNA analysis of the SH3BP2 gene in patients with aggressive central giant cell granuloma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Lange, Jan; van Maarle, Merel C.; van den Akker, Hans P.; Redeker, Egbert J. W.

    2007-01-01

    A mutation of the SH3BP2 gene is known to cause cherubism. As there are clinical and histopathological similarities between central giant cell granuloma and cherubism, we made a constitutional DNA analysis of the SH3BP2 gene in four patients with aggressive giant cell granuloma (having one or more

  4. Giant cell granuloma of the maxilla - a case report and review of the literature; Granuloma de celulas gigantes da maxila - relato de um caso e revisao de literatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setubal, Roger; Menezes, Benedito; Carvalho, Marcos Brasilino de; Soares, Aldemir Humberto; Souza, Ricardo Pires de [Hospital Heliopolis, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    1997-04-01

    Giant cell granuloma is an uncommon lesion of the giant cell lesion`s group, which includes brown tumor of hyperparathyroidism, true giant cell tumor, cherubism and aneurysmal bone cyst. their histologic features are very similar and make certain types indistinguishable from each other, remaining a considerable controversy on its classification. The authors report a case of giant cell maxillary granuloma and makes a review of the literature. (author) 13 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Giant cell tumor of the tendon seath of the tendinous insertion in pes anserinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikaterini Solomou, MD, PhD

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A 56-year-old woman with a palpable lump in the medial surface of her left knee was referred for diagnostic workup with magnetic resonance imaging. The lesion was pathogically confirmed to be a giant cell tumor of the tendon seath. The MR features of the lesion are presented.

  6. Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath—Use of fine-needle aspiration cytology for diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Meena

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumour of the tendon sheath (GCTTS is a slow-growing, usually painless benign lesion of soft tissues. We report the case of a 38-year-old male with a painless, slowly enlarging swelling on right thumb in order to highlight the role of fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC in diagnosing GCTTS.

  7. Giant cell tumor of the tendon seath of the tendinous insertion in pes anserinus

    OpenAIRE

    Solomou, Aikaterini; Kraniotis, Pantelis

    2017-01-01

    A 56-year-old woman with a palpable lump in the medial surface of her left knee was referred for diagnostic workup with magnetic resonance imaging. The lesion was pathogically confirmed to be a giant cell tumor of the tendon seath. The MR features of the lesion are presented.

  8. A case of squamous cell carcinoma caused by previous irradiation to the giant pigmented nevus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoashi, Toshihiko; Kakinuma, Takashi; Idetsuki, Takeo; Kawabata, Yasuhiro; Imakado, Sumihisa; Tamaki, Kunihiko [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1999-02-01

    We report a case of squamous cell carcinoma of the left leg caused by previous irradiation to the giant pigmented nevus. In treating skin cancers originated from radiation dermatitis, we think it is important to resect surrounding radiation dermatitis lesions as well as tumor itself. (author)

  9. Clinical Presentation and Management of Peripheral Giant Cell Granulomas in Children: 2 Cases Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lefkelidou Anna

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG is a reactive, proliferative, exophytic lesion developing on the gingiva and alveolar ridge, originating from the periosteum or periodontal membrane. The lesion develops mostly in adults, commonly in the lower jaw, with slight female predilection although is uncommon in children.

  10. Imaging Manifestations of a Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma in Tuberous Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Stein, Joseph R.; Reidman, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis is a rare genetic disorder resulting in benign tumor growth in various organs including the brain, heart, skin, eyes, kidney, and lung as well as systemic manifestations including seizures, cognitive impairment, and dermatologic abnormalities. This report shows the radiological findings and differentiation between a subependymal nodule and subependymal giant cell astrocytoma in a patient with tuberous sclerosis presenting with new onset seizures.

  11. Regression of central giant cell granuloma by a combination of imatinib and interferon: a case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Lange, J.; van Rijn, R.R.; van den Berg, H.; van den Akker, H.P.

    2009-01-01

    Central giant cell granuloma is a benign lesion of the jaws which is sometimes aggressive locally. The most common treatment is curettage which has a high recurrence rate. particularly, in more aggressive lesions. Other treatments Such as interferon (IFN) and calcitonin have been described. We

  12. Methylprednisolone prevents tumour necrosis factor-alpha-dependent multinucleated giant cell formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maltesen, Henrik Rasmus; Nielsen, Claus H; Dalbøge, Christina Schjellerup

    2010-01-01

    Granulomas contain multinucleated giant cells (MGCs), the function of which remains largely unknown. In patients with autoimmune granulomatous disease, the granulomas can be resolved during treatment with glucocorticosteroid (GCS). However, little is known about the influence of GCSs on the forma...

  13. Temporal artery biopsy is not required in all cases of suspected giant cell arteritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quinn, Edel Marie

    2012-07-01

    Temporal artery biopsy (TAB) is performed during the diagnostic workup for giant cell arteritis (GCA), a vasculitis with the potential to cause irreversible blindness or stroke. However, treatment is often started on clinical grounds, and TAB result frequently does not influence patient management. The aim of this study was to assess the need for TAB in cases of suspected GCA.

  14. Repigmentation of gray hair in lesions of annular elastolytic giant cell granuloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Flores, Angel; Manjon, Jose A

    2015-07-01

    Hair pigmentation is a complex phenomenon that involves many hormones, neurotransmitters, cytokines, growth factors, eicosanoids, cyclic nucleotides, nutrients, and a physicochemical milieu. We report a case of repigmentation of gray hairs in lesions of annular elastolytic giant cell granuloma (AEGCG) on the scalp of a 67-year-old man.

  15. Treatment of central giant cell granuloma of the jaw with calcitonin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Lange, J.; Rosenberg, A. J.; van den Akker, H. P.; Koole, R.; Wirds, J. J.; van den Berg, H.

    1999-01-01

    Giant cell granuloma of the jaw is a benign lesion that may cause local destruction of bone and displacement of teeth. The common therapy is curettage or resection, which may be associated with loss of teeth and, in younger patients, loss of dental germs. An alternative treatment has recently been

  16. Involvement of Monocyte Subsets in the Immunopathology of Giant Cell Arteritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sleen, Yannick; Wang, Qi; van der Geest, Kornelis S. M.; Westra, Johanna; Abdulahad, Wayel H.; Heeringa, Peter; Boots, Annemieke M. H.; Brouwer, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    Monocytes/macrophages are critical in systemic and local inflammation in giant cell arteritis (GCA) and possibly in clinically overlapping polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR). Therefore, we aimed to understand the contribution of monocyte subsets and the CX3CR1-CX3CL1 and CCR2-CCL2 migratory pathways, to

  17. Osteoclastic Giant Cell Rich Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Alemán-Meza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical carcinoma is the most common malignancy of the female genital tract and represents the second most common malignancy in women worldwide. Histologically 85 to 90% of cervical cancers are squamous cell carcinoma. Osteoclastic giant cell rich squamous cell carcinoma is an unusual histological variant of which only 4 cases have been reported. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman with a 6-month history of irregular vaginal bleeding. Examination revealed a 2.7 cm polypoid mass in the anterior lip of the uterine cervix. The patient underwent hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Microscopically the tumor was composed of infiltrative nests of poorly differentiated nonkeratinizing squamous cell carcinoma. Interspersed in between these tumor cells were numerous osteoclastic giant cells with abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm devoid of nuclear atypia, hyperchromatism, or mitotic activity. Immunohistochemistry was performed; CK and P63 were strongly positive in the squamous component and negative in the osteoclastic giant cells, while CD68 and Vimentin were strongly positive in the giant cell population and negative in the squamous component. The patient received chemo- and radiotherapy for recurrent disease identified 3 months later on a follow-up CT scan; 7 months after the surgical procedure the patient is clinically and radiologically disease-free.

  18. Morphological assessment of the development of multinucleated giant cells in glioma by using mitosis-specific phosphorylated antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Kenkou; Mizuno, Masaaki; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Takasu, Syuntarou; Nagasaka, Tetsurou; Inagaki, Masaki; Yoshida, Jun

    2003-04-01

    The nature and origin of multinucleated giant cells in glioma have not been made clear. To investigate the phosphorylation of intermediate filaments, the authors studied multinucleated giant cells in vitro and in vivo by using mitosis-specific phosphorylated antibodies. Cultured human glioma cells were immunostained with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) 4A4, KT13, and TM71, which recognized the phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser55, glial fibrillary acidic protein at Serl3, and vimentin at Ser71, respectively. Subsequently, the nature of multinucleated giant cells was investigated using laser scanning confocal microscopy. In addition, paraffin-embedded tissue sections obtained in three patients with giant cell glioblastoma were also investigated. Multinucleated giant cells were immunoreacted with the mAb 4A4 and not with KT13 and TM71 in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the authors obtained these results in multinucleated giant cells under natural conditions, without drug treatments. Findings in this investigation indicated that multinucleated giant cells are those remaining in mitosis between metaphase and telophase, undergoing neither fusion nor degeneration.

  19. Characterization of multinucleated giant cells in synovium and subchondral bone in knee osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto-Potin, Iván; Largo, Raquel; Roman-Blas, Jorge A; Herrero-Beaumont, Gabriel; Walsh, David A

    2015-08-27

    Multinucleated giant cells have been noticed in diverse arthritic conditions since their first description in rheumatoid synovium. However, their role in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA) or rheumatoid arthritis (RA) still remains broadly unknown. We aimed to study the presence and characteristics of multinucleated giant cells (MGC) both in synovium and in subchondral bone tissues of patients with OA or RA. Knee synovial and subchondral bone samples were from age-matched patients undergoing total joint replacement for OA or RA, or non-arthritic post mortem (PM) controls. OA synovium was stratified by histological inflammation grade using index tissue sections. Synovitis was assessed by Krenn score. Histological studies employed specific antibodies against macrophage markers or cathepsin K, or TRAP enzymatic assay. Inflamed OA and RA synovia displayed more multinucleated giant cells than did non-inflamed OA and PM synovia. There was a significant association between MGC numbers and synovitis severity. A TRAP negative/cathepsin K negative Langhans-like subtype was predominant in OA, whereas both Langhans-like and TRAP-positive/cathepsin K-negative foreign-body-like subtypes were most commonly detected in RA. Plasma-like and foam-like subtypes also were observed in OA and RA synovia, and the latter was found surrounding adipocytes. TRAP positive/cathepsin K positive osteoclasts were only identified adjacent to subchondral bone surfaces. TRAP positive osteoclasts were significantly increased in subchondral bone in OA and RA compared to PM controls. Multinucleated giant cells are associated with synovitis severity, and subchondral osteoclast numbers are increased in OA, as well as in RA. Further research targeting multinucleated giant cells is warranted to elucidate their contributions to the symptoms and joint damage associated with arthritis.

  20. Effects of thermoablation with or without caffeine on giant cell tumour of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimolsanti, Rapin; Wongkajornsilpa, Adisak; Chotiyarnwong, Pojchong; Asavamongkolku, Apichart; Waikakul, Saranatra

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of caffeine on the apoptosis rate of giant cell tumour of bone cells during thermoablation. Giant cell tumour of bone tissue (2 cm3) was collected from 10 patients. Cells were incubated at 37ºC, 40ºC, 45ºC, 50ºC, 52.5ºC, and 55ºC for 20 minutes (3 tubes for each temperature). Caffeine was added to the tubes in amounts of 0 μg/ml (control), 50 μg/ml, and 100 μg/ml. The apoptotic effect of thermoablation with or without caffeine was evaluated. In all test conditions, the apoptotic rate of tumour cells increased when the temperature increased. Compared with controls (no caffeine), adding 50 or 100 μg/ml of caffeine did not increase the apoptotic rate significantly at 40ºC to 52.5ºC. Caffeine had no enhancing effect at any temperature. Conversely, at 55ºC, the apoptotic rate was lower when 100 μg/ml of caffeine was added than when no or 50 μg/ml of caffeine added (p=0.045). Thermoablation at 40ºC to 52.5ºC for 20 minutes increased the apoptosis rate of giant cell tumour of bone cells. Caffeine had no enhancing effect at any temperature. Conversely, at 55ºC, caffeine had cytoprotective effects on the tumour cells against thermoablation.

  1. Characteristics of cerebrovascular accidents at time of diagnosis in a series of 98 patients with giant cell arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenone, Thierry; Puget, Marie

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the characteristics of cerebrovascular accidents at time of diagnosis in patients with giant cell arteritis. Retrospective data were collected from 98 patients at a single hospital with giant cell arteritis (according to the American College of Rheumatology classification criteria) diagnosed between October 1999 and January 2012. Cerebrovascular accident was found at initial presentation in 6 patients (6.1 %, 95 % CIs 2.3-12.9). Most of them had other symptoms of giant cell arteritis when the disease began. Signs reflecting the involvement of vertebro-basilar territory were present in 3 cases. No other case of cerebrovascular accident was described during the follow-up of patient; particularly no case of cerebrovascular accident occurred once corticosteroid therapy for the treatment of giant cell arteritis had been initiated. No differences in the epidemiologic, clinical and laboratory features at the time of diagnosis between patients who had cerebrovascular accidents and the rest of the giant cell arteritis patients were observed. Prognosis was good in our survey. However, there was no case of bilateral vertebral artery occlusion, a condition associated with poor prognosis. The present study confirms that cerebrovascular accidents may be the initial manifestation of giant cell arteritis, an argument in favor of a direct effect of the vasculitis in the development of cerebrovascular accidents rather than a complication of the corticosteroid therapy. The diagnosis of giant cell arteritis should always be considered in an elderly patient with stroke and an unexplained elevation of inflammatory biomarkers.

  2. Correlation of Histopathologic Features with Demographic, Gross and Radiographic Findings in Giant Cell Granulomas of the Jaws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirala Aghbali

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. The correlation between morphology of giant cells in peripheral granulomas of the jaws and the aggressive behavior of the lesion is unknown. This study investigated the correlation between the histopathologic features with demographic, gross and radiographic findings in giant cell granulomas. Materials and methods. In this analytical study, data from 23 cases of central giant cell granuloma (CGCG and 42 cases of peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG were analyzed, focusing on age, gender, location, and gross and radiographic features. For each patient, microscopic slides were assessed in terms of histologic features of giant cells and stroma. Results. No significant differences were found in the mean number of nuclei or the size of nuclei and giant cell distribution patterns between the jaws and genders in both lesions (P > 0.05. Correlation between the mean number of nuclei and age was positively significant and correlation between the size of nuclei and age was negatively significant (P 0.05. Conclusion. There were correlations between the mean number of nuclei per giant cell and the size of the lesion and age, and between the size of nuclei and size of the lesion. No relation was observed between histopathologic and radiographic features.

  3. Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) Buccal Mucosa Tissue as a Source of Multipotent Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Hilary M A; Manning, Craig; Gardner, Aaron; Ritchie, William A; Pizzi, Romain; Girling, Simon; Valentine, Iain; Wang, Chengdong; Jahoda, Colin A B

    2015-01-01

    Since the first mammal was cloned, the idea of using this technique to help endangered species has aroused considerable interest. However, several issues limit this possibility, including the relatively low success rate at every stage of the cloning process, and the dearth of usable tissues from these rare animals. iPS cells have been produced from cells from a number of rare mammalian species and this is the method of choice for strategies to improve cloning efficiency and create new gametes by directed differentiation. Nevertheless information about other stem cell/progenitor capabilities of cells from endangered species could prove important for future conservation approaches and adds to the knowledge base about cellular material that can be extremely limited. Multipotent progenitor cells, termed skin-derived precursor (SKP) cells, can be isolated directly from mammalian skin dermis, and human cheek tissue has also been shown to be a good source of SKP-like cells. Recently we showed that structures identical to SKPs termed m-SKPs could be obtained from monolayer/ two dimensional (2D) skin fibroblast cultures. Here we aimed to isolate m-SKPs from cultured cells of three endangered species; giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca); red panda (Ailurus fulgens); and Asiatic lion (Panthera leo persica). m-SKP-like spheres were formed from the giant panda buccal mucosa fibroblasts; whereas dermal fibroblast (DF) cells cultured from abdominal skin of the other two species were unable to generate spheres. Under specific differentiation culture conditions giant panda spheres expressed neural, Schwann, adipogenic and osteogenic cell markers. Furthermore, these buccal mucosa derived spheres were shown to maintain expression of SKP markers: nestin, versican, fibronectin, and P75 and switch on expression of the stem cell marker ABCG2. These results demonstrate that giant panda cheek skin can be a useful source of m-SKP multipotent progenitors. At present lack of sample numbers

  4. Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca Buccal Mucosa Tissue as a Source of Multipotent Progenitor Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilary M A Prescott

    Full Text Available Since the first mammal was cloned, the idea of using this technique to help endangered species has aroused considerable interest. However, several issues limit this possibility, including the relatively low success rate at every stage of the cloning process, and the dearth of usable tissues from these rare animals. iPS cells have been produced from cells from a number of rare mammalian species and this is the method of choice for strategies to improve cloning efficiency and create new gametes by directed differentiation. Nevertheless information about other stem cell/progenitor capabilities of cells from endangered species could prove important for future conservation approaches and adds to the knowledge base about cellular material that can be extremely limited. Multipotent progenitor cells, termed skin-derived precursor (SKP cells, can be isolated directly from mammalian skin dermis, and human cheek tissue has also been shown to be a good source of SKP-like cells. Recently we showed that structures identical to SKPs termed m-SKPs could be obtained from monolayer/ two dimensional (2D skin fibroblast cultures. Here we aimed to isolate m-SKPs from cultured cells of three endangered species; giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca; red panda (Ailurus fulgens; and Asiatic lion (Panthera leo persica. m-SKP-like spheres were formed from the giant panda buccal mucosa fibroblasts; whereas dermal fibroblast (DF cells cultured from abdominal skin of the other two species were unable to generate spheres. Under specific differentiation culture conditions giant panda spheres expressed neural, Schwann, adipogenic and osteogenic cell markers. Furthermore, these buccal mucosa derived spheres were shown to maintain expression of SKP markers: nestin, versican, fibronectin, and P75 and switch on expression of the stem cell marker ABCG2. These results demonstrate that giant panda cheek skin can be a useful source of m-SKP multipotent progenitors. At present lack of

  5. Giant cell tumor of the capitate: an unusual case with 10 years follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duman Serda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumor of the small bones, particularly the carpal bones of the hand, is exceedingly rare. We present a case report of giant cell tumor of the capitate in a 24 year-old female with 10 years postoperative follow-up. Although carpal bones are extremely unusual location, orthopedic surgeons should always keep in mind that differential diagnosis must include giant cell tumor of bone whenever an expansile osteolytic lesion with well-defined but nonsclerotic margins is identified in a young adult with closed physes.

  6. Giant Cell Tumor of the Thoracic Spine Presenting as a Posterior Mediastinal Tumor with Benign Pulmonary Metastases: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Hun [Daegu Fatima Hospital College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Rho, Byung Hak; Bahn, Young Eun; Choi, Won Il [Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    Giant cell tumor of bone is a benign, but potentially aggressive lesion that can show local recurrence and metastases. We report here on a case of a 29-year-old man who presented with an incidentally found mediastinal mass. Chest radiography and computed tomography showed a huge mediastinal mass with bilateral pulmonary nodules and the diagnosis of giant cell tumor with benign pulmonary metastasis was confirmed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of primary thoracic spinal giant cell tumor manifesting as a huge mediastinal mass with pulmonary metastases

  7. CD98 immunoreactivity in multinucleated giant cells of glioblastomas: an immunohistochemical double labeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Kubota, Toshihiko; Kitai, Ryuhei; Nakagawa, Takao; Hashimoto, Norichika

    2008-04-01

    CD98, which is identical to fusion regulatory protein-1 (FRP-1), has been reported to induce and regulate cell fusion and multinucleated giant cell formation. To investigate the association between CD98 and multinucleated giant cells (MNGCs) in glioblastomas, we investigate the CD98 immunoreactivity of MNGCs and the proliferative potential in CD98 immunoreactive MNGCs in paraffin-embedded sections obtained from patients with glioblastomas. Double immunohistochemical staining for CD98 and Ki67 as a mitotic marker were performed in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded specimens obtained from 16 patients with primary glioblastomas including MNGCs. Most CD98 immunoreactive (CD98+) tumor cells were negative for Ki67. CD98+ MNGCs were identified in 15 cases. CD98+ Ki67- MNGCs were identified in 14 cases and ranged in number from one to 48 (6.7 +/- 11.5). CD98- Ki67+ MNGCs were identified in 15 cases and ranged in number from one to 32 (11.1 +/- 9.6). Mitotic index (MI) of CD98+ MNGCs (4.8 +/- 2.7%) was significantly lower than that of CD98- MNGCs (91.1 +/- 24.6%) (P giant cell formation may be developed by fusion among CD98- producing cells in glioblastomas.

  8. Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath in palmar region-cytological aspect of an uncommon tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeddula Chakrapani Spoorthy Rekha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath (GCTTS is a benign soft tissue neoplasm. It is the second most common tumor of the hand after ganglion. The pathogenesis of GCTTS is not known. This tumor is known to recur after excision. We present a case of GCTTS in the palmar aspect of the right hand of a 41-year-old female. Ultrasonography of hand revealed a well-defined hypoechoic lesion in the subcutaneous plane with focal areas of calcification. She underwent fine-needle aspiration (FNA. The FNA smears showed the characteristic presence of stromal cells and multinucleated osteoclast-like giant cells. This is an uncommon case of GCTTS present in the palmar aspect of hand diagnosed by FNA.

  9. Malignant melanoma mimicking giant cell variant of glioblastoma multiforme: a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcega, Ramir; Yong, William H; Xu, Haodong

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of metastatic malignant melanoma in a patient initially diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme, giant cell variant. A forty year old female presented to our institution for a re-resection of a recurrent right parietal lobe mass, presumed to be recurrent glioblastoma multiforme. PET scan during preoperative evaluation revealed a 3 cm left lower lobe lung mass. Metastatic glioblastoma to lung was considered in the differential diagnosis. Resection of the brain mass revealed a highly pleomorphic giant and spindle cell lesion with an immunophenotype strongly supportive of melanoma. Immunostains for melanocytic markers were subsequently performed on the lung biopsy specimen, and demonstrated diffuse staining of the atypical cells, supporting the diagnosis of malignant melanoma in the lung. This case demonstrates the importance of considering melanoma in the differential in any tumor with high grade features.

  10. Aurora-B dysfunction of multinucleated giant cells in glioma detected by site-specific phosphorylated antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Mitsugu; Mizuno, Masaaki; Nagasaka, Tetsuro; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Maeda, Kenkou; Ishii, Dai; Arima, Toru; Kawajiri, Aie; Inagaki, Masaki; Yoshida, Jun

    2004-12-01

    The origin of multinucleated giant cells in glioma has not been made clear. In a previous paper the authors studied multinucleated giant tumor cells by using mitosis-specific phosphorylated antibodies to determine the phosphorylation of intermediate filaments and demonstrated that these cells stay in the early mitotic stage, undergoing neither fusion nor degeneration. In the current study the authors investigated the possible genetic causes of multinucleated giant tumor cells. Cultured mono- or multinucleated human glioma cells were immunostained with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) 4A4, YT33, TM71, HTA28, YG72, and alphaAIM-1. The three former antibodies revealed a particular mitotic cell cycle through site-specific phosphorylation of vimentin; that is, the early phase, mid phase, and late phase, respectively. The three later antibodies demonstrated phosphorylation of H3 at Ser28, phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser72, and aurora-B, respectively, making it possible to identify aurora-B distribution and function during mitosis. In addition, paraffin-embedded tissue sections obtained in three patients with giant cell glioblastoma were also examined. Multinucleated giant tumor cells immunoreacted with the mAb 4A4 and alphaAIM-1 but not with YT33, TM71, HTA28, and YG72 in vitro and in vivo. Findings in this study indicated that multinucleated giant tumor cells remain in the early mitotic phase because of aurora-B dysfunction, effecting aberrations in cytoplasmic cleavage without affecting nuclear division.

  11. Cell fusion as a mechanism for the formation of giant cells (Langhans' type). Autoradiographic findings in autoimmune tubulo-interstitial nephritis of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoenes, W; Sonntag, W; Heine, W D; Langer, K H

    1982-01-01

    The formation of multinuclear giant cells of the Langhans' type in tubulo-interstitial auto-immune nephritis in the rat has been investigated by means of autoradiography. While in the majority of giant cells all nuclei were radiolabeled, in a few both labeled and unlabeled nuclei were present. This latter finding represents strong evidence in favour of the hypothesis that giant cells do not form by endomitotic processes but rather through fusion of certain precursor cells. According to previous studies this precursor cell population consists mainly of epitheloid cells, i.e. modified monocytes.

  12. Rare Giant Granular Cell Ameloblastoma: A Case Report and an Immunohistochemical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Hunasgi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. The aim is to present a case of rare giant granular cell ameloblastoma and to review the pertinent literature highlighting the molecular aspects of its pathogenesis by analyzing the expression of CD-68, Bcl-2, and β-catenin. Methods. H and E stained sections showed large odontogenic islands showing peripheral ameloblast-like cells and central stellate reticulum-like cells with extensive granular cell transformation surrounded by fibrous stroma. Polyclonal rabbit anti-CD 68, anti-Bcl2, and anti-β-catenin were stained immunohistochemically. Results. CD-68 showed a moderate to strong staining intensity in granular cells. Moderate staining of Bcl-2 was expressed by the peripheral columnar cells of tumor islands and negative in the granular cells. Expression of β-catenin was generally weak, except for only the focal areas that showed a moderate staining intensity and weak in peripheral cells. Conclusion. The present case of giant granular cell ameloblastoma is a rare entity. Development of monstrous size is indicative of ameloblastomas persistent growth. Granular cell transformation in ameloblastomas probably occurs as a consequence of extensive molecular changes. Immunohistochemical studies help us to know the pathogenesis of this granular cell ameloblastoma. Therefore, an effort has been made here to study the expression of Bcl-2, CD-68, and β-catenin.

  13. Effect of denosumab on recurrent giant cell reparative granuloma of the lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akeda, Koji; Kasai, Yuichi; Sakakibara, Toshihiko; Matsumine, Akihiko; Takegami, Norihiko; Yamada, Junichi; Sudo, Akihiro

    2015-05-15

    A case of recurrent giant cell reparative granuloma (GCRG) of the lumbar spine successfully treated with denosumab is reported; a fully human monoclonal antibody against the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B (RANK) ligand (RANKL). To report the first case of recurrent GCRG of the lumbar spine treated with denosumab. GCRG is a non-neoplastic osteofibrous lesion usually found in the maxilla and mandible but rarely in the spine. It is clinically distinct from giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB), although common histological characteristics such as the proliferation of spindle-shaped stromal cells and multinucleated giant cells are shared. Denosumab has recently been reported to be effective for unresectable GCTB; however, there is only one report of its effect on GCRG. Moreover, the effect of denosumab on GCRG of the spine is unknown. The clinical course, radiological features, pathology, and treatment outcome of a patient with recurrent GCRG of the lumbar spine treated with denosumab are documented. Denosumab treatment was used for this patient with unresectable recurrent GCRG of the lumbar spine. Follow-up lumbar radiography showed significant bone formations in the tumor lesion after 3 months of treatment. On follow-up computerized tomography scans of the L2 and L3 vertebral lesions, the replacement of osoteolytic lesions by the formation of cortical-like bone tissue was clearly identified. We report the first case of recurrent GCRG of the spine successfully treated with denosumab. Treatment with denosumab induced significant bone formation in the unresectable lumbar lesion with stable clinical improvement during the 12-month follow-up period without apparent complications. Denosumab shows promise as a new alternative treatment option for osteoclastic giant cell-rich tumors, such as GCRG, especially for unresectable lesions of the spine. 4.

  14. Giant basal cell carcinoma of the face: surgical management and challenges for reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maimaiti, A; Mijiti, A; Yarbag, A; Moming, A

    2016-02-01

    Giant basal cell carcinoma, in which the tumour measures 5 cm or greater in diameter, is a very rare skin malignancy that accounts for less than 1 per cent of all basal cell tumours. Very few studies have reported on the incidence, resection and reconstruction of this lesion worldwide. In total, 17 patients with giant basal cell carcinoma of the head and neck region underwent surgical excision and reconstruction at our hospital. Medical charts were retrospectively reviewed and analysed. The lesion was usually in the forehead, eyelid, lips or nasal-cheek region. The greatest diameter ranged from 5 to 11 cm, with 5-6 cm being the most common size at the time of presentation. All patients had their tumour resected and reconstructed in a single-stage procedure, mostly with a local advancement flap, and with no post-operative flap failure. Giant basal cell carcinoma of the head and neck can be successfully treated with a local flap in a single-stage approach.

  15. Cardiac Sarcoidosis or Giant Cell Myocarditis? On Treatment Improvement of Fulminant Myocarditis as Demonstrated by Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Bogabathina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell myocarditis, but not cardiac sarcoidosis, is known to cause fulminant myocarditis resulting in severe heart failure. However, giant cell myocarditis and cardiac sarcoidosis are pathologically similar, and attempts at pathological differentiation between the two remain difficult. We are presenting a case of fulminant myocarditis that has pathological features suggestive of cardiac sarcoidosis, but clinically mimicking giant cell myocarditis. This patient was treated with cyclosporine and prednisone and recovered well. This case we believe challenges our current understanding of these intertwined conditions. By obtaining a sense of severity of cardiac involvement via delayed hyperenhancement of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, we were more inclined to treat this patient as giant cell myocarditis with cyclosporine. This resulted in excellent improvement of patient’s cardiac function as shown by delayed hyperenhancement images, early perfusion images, and SSFP videos.

  16. [The diffuse giant cell tumor of tendon sheath with chondroid metaplasia in right temporomandibular joint: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yang; Qian, Zhang; Ning, Geng; Junyu, Liu; Haoman, Niu; Yu, Chen

    2017-04-01

    A case diagnosed as diffuse giant cell tumor of tendon sheath with chondroid metaplasia in right temporomandibular joint was reported. The clinicopathological features, diagnosis, and treatment were discussed with the literature review.

  17. [Diffuse tenosenovial giant cell tumor of the wrist revealed by carpal tunnel syndrome: report of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait Essi, F; Younsi, A; Abkari, I; Benhima, M A; Najeb, Y; Latifi, M; Fakhri, A; Belaabidia, B

    2012-10-01

    Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath is a benign proliferative lesion of synovial origin that may affect the joints, bursae and tendon sheaths. It is the second most common soft tissue tumor of the hand after ganglion cyst. The localised (nodular) form is the most common. However, the less-common diffuse-type giant cell tumour is usually located in the peri-articular soft tissue. The authors report the case of a giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath arising from the carpal tunnel of the wrist in a 42-year-old woman. The patient presented a mild carpal tunnel syndrome and a mid-palmar swelling. We present an unusual localization of giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath, causing carpal tunnel syndrome. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Case report: acute spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture in a patient with giant cell arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, T Jared; Welsh, Gail A; Miller, Dylan V; Santhi, V Swaroop

    2003-01-01

    We report a case of a 69-yr-old previously healthy man with acute spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture and severe tendonitis, which occurred after 2 weeks of steroid therapy for newly diagnosed giant cell arteritis. The Achilles tendon rupture was treated conservatively and the tendonitis resolved incrementally with steroid dose reduction. The patient made a complete recovery. In view of the widespread use of steroids in practice, this novel case presentation has important clinical implications. The tendon rupture early in the course of high-dose steroid therapy expands the understanding of this adverse reaction, which was previously reported only with long-term steroid therapy. The severe tendonitis responded to steroid therapy reduction suggesting a dose correlation. This report adds to a sole previous report of a spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture associated with giant cell arteritis.

  19. Radiographic features of central giant cell granuloma of the jaws in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodner, L. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Soroka Medical Center, P. O. Box 151, Beer-Sheva 84101 (Israel); Bar-Ziv, J. [Department of Radiology, Hebrew University and Hadassah School of Medicine, Jerusalem (Israel)

    1996-02-01

    The radiographic features of ten pediatric cases of central giant cell granuloma of the jaws were studied, using plain film radiography (PFR), computed tomography (CT), and a dental CT software program (DS). The radiologic features varied from ill-defined destructive lesions to a well-defined, multilocular appearance. Teeth or root displacement was found as the most consistent feature. Root resorption was rare. The features seen on CT were clearer than those seen on PFR. DS, by its visualization of the jaw in three plans - axial, panoramic, and buccolingual - provided useful information for determining the topography of the lesion in its structure (uni- or multilocular) and proximity to adjacent anatomic structures, such as teeth, nerves, or maxillary sinus. CT and, ideally, CT with DS should be used for diagnosis and surgical management of central giant cell granuloma of the jaws in children. (orig.). With 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Primary angiitis of the central nervous system with diffuse cerebral mass effect and giant cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kinsella, J A

    2012-02-01

    Primary angiitis of the central nervous system (PACNS), also called primary CNS vasculitis, is an idiopathic inflammatory condition affecting only intracranial and spinal cord vessels, particularly medium-sized and smaller arteries and arterioles. Angiography and histopathology typically do not reveal evidence of systemic vasculitis.(1,2) Histopathology usually reveals granulomatous inflammation affecting arterioles and small arteries of the parenchyma and\\/or leptomeninges, similar to that seen in Takayasu\\'s or giant cell arteritis.(1-3) We report a patient with biopsy-proven PACNS with giant cells and cerebral mass effect on MRI. Magnetic resonance angiography and cerebral angiography appeared normal and there was no evidence of extracranial vasculitis.

  1. Giant cells glioblastoma: case report and pathological analysis from this uncommon subtype of glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belsuzarri, Telmo A B; Araujo, João F M; Catanoce, Aguinaldo P; Neves, Maick W F; Sola, Rodrigo A S; Navarro, Juliano N; Brito, Leandro G; Silva, Nilton R; Pontelli, Luis Otavio C; Mattos, Luiz Gustavo A; Gonçales, Tiago F; Zeviani, Wolnei M; Marques, Renata M B

    2015-02-11

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common glial tumor of the brain system; nevertheless, the giant cell (GC) subtype is uncommon. Recent reviews report for an incidence of 1% in adults and 3% in children. The GCs usually have a better prognosis than GBM and also an increasing long-term survival rate. It is known that the diagnosis of this tumor is due to its histological findings and patterns, such as the unusual increased number of giant cells. Unfortunately, due to its rarity, the immunohistochemical and cytogenetical analysis of this tumor is not well known. Some authors also suggest that there are few subtypes of GCs and their patterns of aggressiveness could be due to cytogenetical markers. It is recognized that maximum safe resection treatment and adjuvant radiotherapy can improve survival rate (5-13 months) similar to GBM patients.

  2. Giant cells glioblastoma: case report and pathological analysis from this uncommon subtype of glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telmo A.B. Belsuzarri

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common glial tumor of the brain system; nevertheless, the giant cell (GC subtype is uncommon. Recent reviews report for an incidence of 1% in adults and 3% in children. The GCs usually have a better prognosis than GBM and also an increasing long-term survival rate. It is known that the diagnosis of this tumor is due to its histological findings and patterns, such as the unusual increased number of giant cells. Unfortunately, due to its rarity, the immunohistochemical and cytogenetical analysis of this tumor is not well known. Some authors also suggest that there are few subtypes of GCs and their patterns of aggressiveness could be due to cytogenetical markers. It is recognized that maximum safe resection treatment and adjuvant radiotherapy can improve survival rate (5-13 months similar to GBM patients.

  3. Pediatric giant cell glioblastoma: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Prada, I; Cordobés, F; Azorín, D; Contra, T; Colmenero, I; Glez-Mediero, I

    2006-03-01

    Giant cell glioblastoma is a subtype of glioblastoma multiforme (GM) whose most characteristic histology is the presence of plentiful multinucleated giant cells. These tumours are very rare and account for only 5% of GM. They do not have specific localization, although normally they are supratentorial and affect mostly the temporal lobe. They may occur at any age, but mostly they occur in younger people than GM. They are infrequent in childhood, but they have longer survival in paediatric age. We present an 11-year-old girl that was operated but whose tumour recurred in a month after apparent total removal. We review in the literature the clinical, histological, immuno-histochemical and genetic characteristics, as well the prognosis of this tumour.

  4. Giant-cell glioblastoma of childhood associated with HIV-1 and JC virus coinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassesco, María Sol; Darrigo, Luiz Guilherme; Valera, Elvis Terci; Oliveira, Ricardo Santos; Yamamoto, Yulie Aparecida; de Castro Barros, Marcus Vinícius; Tone, Luiz Gonzaga

    2013-08-01

    John Cunningham (JC) viral DNA sequence has seldom been reported in patients with brain tumors such as high grade gliomas and medulloblastomas, pointing to a role in the etiopathogenesis of such tumors. We present a unique clinical case of an HIV-positive pediatric patient with multifocal leukoencephalopathy and confirmed JC virus (JCV) infection that developed a giant-cell glioblastoma. Experimental data with infected primates has previously hypothesized an association of human giant-cell glioblastoma with JCV or progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, though such association has not been documented in the literature for humans. Future studies with larger cohorts and molecular pathological analyses are still needed to corroborate the role of the widely spread human neurotropic virus in early transformation and in the development of brain tumors with different histology in the setting of HIV-related severe immunosuppression.

  5. THE CASE OF THE GIANT-CELL ARTERITIS MANIFESTED AS DORSOLATERAL MEDULLARY INFARCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Akimov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The case of a giant-cell arteritis is presented. First clinical signs of the disease were fewer and development of infarction in the basin of the left vertebral artery. Magnetic resonance angiography showed its prolonged diminution. Laboratory results were remarkable for the high rate of erythrocyte sedimentation and the increase of C-reactive protein (CRP concentration. Physical examination revealed acrotism in temporal arteries. Diagnosis was proven by biopsy results which included giant multinucleate cells. Authors discuss problems of diagnosis of the disease, the role of radiological methods (angio-ultrasonography, magnetic resonance and computed tomography aided angiography, positron-emission tomography and the necessity to pay particular attention to the elderly patients with high rate of erythrocyte sedimentation and the increased CRP concentration.

  6. Clinical and imagiological findings of central giant cell lesion and cherubism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Lucas R; Pinheiro, João J V; Júnior, Sérgio A; Guerreiro, Newton; Cavalcanti, Marcelo G P

    2013-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is the best examination for bone lesions of the maxilla, allowing the dentist to evaluate precisely the behavior and components of the lesion and their relationship to the surrounding structures. Central giant cell lesion and cherubism are histologically very similar lesions. Therefore clinical and radiological examinations are fundamentally important for the diagnosis. The aim of this paper is to report two cases diagnosed as central giant cell lesions and cherubism using CBCT. This imaging modality was very important for the diagnosis of the lesions presented in the current study. It also allowed observing precisely the limits of the lesions, the components, the behavior and the exact relationship to adjacent structures.

  7. From the archives of AFIP. Imaging of giant cell tumor and giant cell reparative granuloma of bone: radiologic-pathologic correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphey, M D; Nomikos, G C; Flemming, D J; Gannon, F H; Temple, H T; Kransdorf, M J

    2001-01-01

    The radiologic features of giant cell tumor (GCT) and giant cell reparative granuloma (GCRG) of bone often strongly suggest the diagnosis and reflect their pathologic appearance. At radiography, GCT often demonstrates a metaepiphyseal location with extension to subchondral bone. GCRG has a similar appearance but most commonly affects the mandible, maxilla, hands, or feet. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are helpful in staging lesions, particularly in delineating soft-tissue extension. Cystic (secondary aneurysmal bone cyst) components are reported in 14% of GCTs. However, biopsy must be directed at the solid regions, which harbor diagnostic tissue. These solid components demonstrate low to intermediate signal intensity at T2-weighted MR imaging, a feature that can be helpful in diagnosis. Multiple GCTs, although rare, do occur and may be associated with Paget disease. Malignant GCT accounts for 5%-10% of all GCTs and is usually secondary to previous irradiation of benign GCT. Treatment of GCT usually consists of surgical resection. Recurrence is seen in 2%-25% of cases, and imaging is vital for early detection. Recognition of the spectrum of radiologic appearances of GCT and GCRG is important in allowing prospective diagnosis, guiding therapy, and facilitating early detection of recurrence.

  8. Synchronous Multicentric Giant Cell Tumour of Distal Radius and Sacrum with Pulmonary Metastases

    OpenAIRE

    Tandra, Varun Sharma; Kotha, Krishna Mohan Reddy; Satyanarayana, Moorthy Gadisetti Venkata; Vadlamani, Kali Varaprasad; Yerravalli, Vyjayanthi

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell tumour (GCT) is an uncommon primary bone tumour, and its multicentric presentation is exceedingly rare. We report a case of a 45-year-old female who presented to us with GCT of left distal radius. On the skeletal survey, osteolytic lesion was noted in her right sacral ala. Biopsy confirmed both lesions as GCT. Pulmonary metastasis was also present. Resection-reconstruction arthroplasty for distal radius and thorough curettage and bone grafting of the sacral lesion were done. Multic...

  9. Giant Cell Glioblastoma in a Child with Clinical and Family History of Neurofibromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Ishita; Nazir, Wajid; Ujjawal, Vinita; Chaturvedi, Sujata

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of giant cell glioblastoma (GCG) in a 13-year-old child with clinical features and family history of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). To the best of our knowledge, only two cases of GCG have been reported in a scenario of NF1, and only one of that was in a pediatric age group. A report on our case is presented here along with a review of literature.

  10. Malignant melanoma mimicking giant cell variant of glioblastoma multiforme: A case report and review of literature

    OpenAIRE

    Arcega, R; Yong, WH; Xu, H

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of metastatic malignant melanoma in a patient initially diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme, giant cell variant. A forty year old female presented to our institution for a re-resection of a recurrent right parietal lobe mass, presumed to be recurrent glioblastoma multiforme. PET scan during preoperative evaluation revealed a 3 cm left lower lobe lung mass. Metastatic glioblastoma to lung was considered in the differential diagnosis. Resection of the brain mass revealed a ...

  11. Giant cell glioblastoma manifesting as traumatic intracerebral hemorrhage--case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, S Meltem; Aydin, Yunus; Turkmenoglu, Osman; Aydin, Faruk; Ziyal, Ibrahim

    2002-12-01

    A 33-year-old male presented with intracerebral hemorrhage in the left temporoparietal region after a traffic accident. Ten months later, the traumatic hemorrhage was found to originate in an underlying giant cell glioblastoma. Our case indicates that non-traumatic underlying pathologies, such as vasculopathies, coagulopathies, or tumors, should be considered in the differential diagnoses of intracerebral hemorrhage occurring in unusual locations after traumatic accidents.

  12. Recurrent nitrofurantoin-induced giant cell interstitial pneumonia: Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boeun Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell interstitial pneumonia (GIP is a rare form of chronic interstitial pneumonia typically associated with hard metal exposure. Only two cases of GIP induced by nitrofurantoin have been reported in the medical literature. We are reporting a case of recurrent nitrofurantoin-induced GIP. Although extremely rare, GIP needs to be included in the differential diagnosis in patients with chronic nitrofurantoin use who present with respiratory illness.

  13. Giant oral tumor in a child with malnutrition and sickle cell trait: Anesthetic challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preet Mohinder Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric oral tumors have always been challenging for the even most skilled anesthesiologists. The conventional method of awake intubation is not realistic in this age group. The management is to chart out a plan to intubate the child post induction. We describe successful management of a case of giant of ossifying fibroma in a child with sickle cell trait where non-conventional innovate approach helped us to secure the airway pre-operatively and avoid possible medical complications.

  14. Flares in Biopsy-Proven Giant Cell Arteritis in Northern Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Restuccia, Giovanna; Boiardi, Luigi; Cavazza, Alberto; Catanoso, Mariagrazia; Macchioni, Pierluigi; Muratore, Francesco; Cimino, Luca; Aldigeri, Raffaella; Crescentini, Filippo; Pipitone, Nicol?; Salvarani, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study evaluated the frequency, timing, and characteristics of flares in a large cohort of Italian patients with biopsy-proven giant cell arteritis (GCA) and to identify factors at diagnosis able to predict the occurrence of flares. We evaluated 157 patients with biopsy-proven transmural GCA diagnosed and followed at the Rheumatology Unit of Reggio Emilia Hospital (Italy) for whom sufficient information was available from the time of diagnosis until at least 4 years of follow-up....

  15. Giant cell glioblastoma is associated with altered aurora b expression and concomitant p53 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temme, Achim; Geiger, Kathrin D; Wiedemuth, Ralf; Conseur, Katharina; Pietsch, Torsten; Felsberg, Jörg; Reifenberger, Guido; Tatsuka, Masaaki; Hagel, Christian; Westphal, Manfred; Berger, Hilmar; Simon, Matthias; Weller, Michael; Schackert, Gabriele

    2010-06-01

    Giant cell glioblastoma (gcGB), a subtype of GB, is characterized by the presence of numerous multinucleated giant cells. The prognosis for gcGB is poor, but it may have a better clinical outcome compared with classic GB. The molecular alterations that lead to the multinucleated cell phenotype of gcGB have not been elucidated. Giant cell GB has a higher frequency of the tumor suppressor protein p53 mutations than GB, however, and a role for the mitotic Aurora B kinase has been suggested. We analyzed Aurora B expression in gcGB (n = 28) and GB (n = 54) patient tumor samples by immunohistochemistry; 17 gcGB and 22 GB samples were analyzed at the DNA and mRNA levels. No mutations in the Aurora B gene (AURKB) were found, but its mRNA and protein levels were significantly higher in gcGB than in GB. Fifty-nine percent of gcGB samples but only 18% of the GB samples showed p53 mutations. Ectopic overexpression of Aurora B induced a significant increase inthe proportion of multinucleated cells in p53 mutant U373-MG, but not in p53 wild-type U87-MG, glioma cells. RNAi of p53 in U87-MG cells led to an increase in the fraction of multinucleated cells that was further augmented by ectopic overexpression of Aurora B. These results suggest that loss of p53 function and dysregulated Aurora B protein levels might represent factors that drive the development of multinucleated cells in gcGB.

  16. Tumor gigantocelular sinovial do joelho Synovial giant cell tumor of the knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Jorge Abdalla

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Tumor gigantocelular sinovial é uma neoplasia benigna, raramente sendo relatada na forma de metástase maligna. A localização mais comum de ocorrer um tumor gigantocelular sinovial é na mão e as mais infrequentes são tornozelo e joelho. No presente estudo os autores têm como objetivo descrever um caso raro de tumor gigantocelular sinovial localizado no joelho e o tratamento escolhido. A artroscopia demonstrou, nesse caso, ser o método ideal para o tratamento da lesão, uma vez que permitiu abordagem pouco agressiva e, ao mesmo tempo, boa visualização de todos os compartimentos da articulação do joelho e a completa ressecção do tumor.Synovial giant cell tumor is a benign neoplasm, rarely reported in the form of malignant metastasis. Synovial giant cell tumor most frequently occurs on the hand, and, most uncommon, on the ankle and knee. In the present study, the authors describe a rare case of synovial giant cell tumor on the knee as well as the treatment approach. Arthroscopy has been shown, in this case, to be the optimal method for treating this kind of lesion, once it allowed a less aggressive approach, while providing good visualization of all compartments of knee joint and full tumor resection.

  17. [Benign giant cell tumors associated with Paget's disease. Apropos of 1 case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch-Michel, H; Benoist, M; Cophignon, J; Degott, C; Godefroy, Y; Weiss, A M; Rouvière, J

    1975-11-01

    The authors report the observation of two benign giant-cell tumours that developed in the cranium of Paget's disease patients. The two tumours were resected and cure was complete. Eighteen other cases of benign giant-cell tumours were found in the literature. All were discovered in relation to tumefaction occurring in an affected bone in a patient with generalized Paget's disease, often unrecognized. The tumours were usually unique although multiple tumours were found, with particular predilection for the bones of the cranium and the face. The radiological signs consisted of an osteolytic zone in an affected bone; there were no specific characteristics and it was not possible to distinguish the tumours from a malignant tumour. Diagnosis was based upon an anatomo-pathological examination. In the 18 cases in the literature, the benign caracter indicated by the biopsy was confirmed by the favourable evolution. In contrast in 17 other cases the atypical nature of the stroma, the irregular arrangement of the giant cells together with the occurrence of atypical mitoses and the abnormal character of the vascularization indicated straight away the malignant nature of the lesions, which was regularly and rapidly fatal.

  18. Subacute bacterial endocarditis presenting as polymyalgia rheumatica or giant cell arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auzary, C; Le Thi Huong, D; Delarbre, X; Sbai, A; Lhote, F; Papo, T; Wechsler, B; Cacoub, P; Martin-Hunyadi, C; Piette, J-C

    2006-01-01

    To report on several patients with subacute bacterial endocarditis who were initially presumed, incorrectly, to have polymyalgia rheumatica or giant cell arteritis. We report 3 cases of subacute streptococcal endocarditis mimicking giant cell arteritis in 2 cases and polymyalgia rheumatica in one. We reviewed the literature through Medline search of French and English-language articles published between 1966 and 2005 and found 5 similar cases. Shoulder and/or pelvic girdle pain was associated with neck or back pain in all patients. Scalp tenderness, bilateral jaw pain, amaurosis fugax were present in 2 patients. One patient had no fever. Two patients were treated with corticosteroids with initial good clinical response in one. Appropriate antibiotic therapy resulted in the rapid disappearance of rheumatic complaints in 2 patients and achieved a definitive cure of endocarditis in all cases. Rheumatologic symptoms may hinder the correct diagnosis of infective endocarditis in patients who present with a clinical picture suggesting polymyalgia rheumatica or giant cell arteritis. In such cases, blood cultures should be systematically drawn.

  19. Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath and synovial membrane: A review of 26 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Kumar Shashi; Manav, Ajoy Kumar; Kumar, Rakesh; Abhinav; Sinha, Vishvendra Kumar; Sharma, Akshat

    2017-11-01

    Aim of our study is to highlight the incidence and benign nature of Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath and need for complete removal, thus minimizing the chances of recurrence. A total of 26 cases of Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath operated in the department of Orthopaedics, Patna Medical College & Hospital, Patna from 2003 to 2010 were included in this study. The surgery was performed after clinical evaluation of the lesion and Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC). The tumour underwent en bloc marginal excision. The patients were followed up for minimum two year. Our study population consisted of 18 females and 8 males. The mean age at the time of surgery was 38.3 years (range, 18-62 years). Twenty three cases were found in the 3rd and 4th decade. Twenty two cases involved upper extremity and only 4 cases in lower extremity. MRI was done in 2 cases where diagnosis was in doubt. Bony indentation on X-ray film was found in 7 cases and thorough curettage of cortical shell was done. All the cases were treated by marginal excision. Three cases developed post-operative stiffness but regained full range of movement with physiotherapy. Sensory impairment was seen in 3 cases. Recurrence occurred in 2 case and they were treated by repeat marginal excision. Meticulous en-masse marginal excision of the giant cell tumour of tendon sheath in blood less field using magnification is the treatment of choice.

  20. Increased expression of NFATc1 in giant cell lesions of the jaws, cherubism and brown tumor of hyperparathyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    DUARTE, ALESSANDRA PIRES; GOMES, CAROLINA CAVALIÉRI; GOMEZ, RICARDO SANTIAGO; AMARAL, FABRÍCIO REZENDE

    2011-01-01

    A variety of diseases of the jaws may present multinucleated giant cells. These diseases include central giant cell lesions (CGCL), peripheral giant cell lesions (PGCL), brown tumor of hyperparathyroidism (BTH), and cherubism. The multinucleated giant cells in these lesions are osteoclast-like. Since NFATc1 plays a significant role in osteoclast differentiation, the present study aimed to compare the expression of NFATc1 in CGCL, PGCL, BTH and cherubism. A total of 14 formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue samples of CGCL (n=4), PGCL (n=5), BTH (n=3) and cherubism (n=2) were included in the study. An immunohistochemical analysis was performed to investigate the NFATc1 protein. The majority of giant cells in all of the cases were positive for nuclear NFATc1 and the immunostaining pattern was similar in all of the groups. Although our study supports the hypothesis that giant cell accumulation in PGCL, CGCL, BTH and cherubism is mediated by NFATc1, functional studies are required to investigate this hypothesis. PMID:22866121

  1. Interferon alfa-2b for recurrent and metastatic giant cell tumor of the spine: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Feng; Liu, Xiaoguang; Liu, Zhongjun; Jiang, Liang; Dang, Gengting; Ma, Qingjun; Dang, Lei

    2010-11-15

    Case report. To demonstrate that interferon alfa-2b is a therapeutic option for obtaining long-term control of recurrent and metastatic giant cell tumor of spine. Interferon alfa served as angiogenesis inhibitor and has been successfully used to treat giant cell tumor of long bones and facial bones. Up to date, no report is found with regard to the use of interferon as a stand-alone treatment for unresectable, recurrent, and metastatic giant cell tumor originated from the spine. A 29-year-old woman with C1 and C2 giant cell tumor was treated by radiotherapy, intralesional curet, and chemotherapy orderly. Tumor recurred after 2 years. A second curet was undertaken. Tumor recurred second time and caused severe spinal cord compression. Lung metastasis was diagnosed simultaneously. A 24-year-old man with recurrent giant cell tumor of T5 and T6 was treated by spondylectomy of T5 and T6. Six months later, a giant metastatic lesion was found in sacrococcygeal region, which was excised and proved to be giant cell tumor of bone. Four months later, 2 recurrent lesions were found beside the rectum. Interferon alfa-2b at a dose of 3,000,000 U/m was then administered subcutaneously everyday for both patients for 3.5 and 3 years, respectively. No major complications related to the use of interferon occurred. The lesion in C1-C2 of the first patient regressed steadily and was restricted and encircled within the lateral mass. The metastatic lesions in the lungs also significantly reduced. The pararectal lesions of the second patient disappeared completely. Interferon therapy may be an effective and safe treatment for spine giant cell tumor recurrence and metastasis in soft tissue. The effectiveness may be time and dosage dependent.

  2. Ultrastructural Changes Caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici in Meloidogyne javanica Induced Giant Cells in Fusarium Resistant and Susceptible Tomato Cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattah, F.; Webster, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) seedlings, susceptible (cv. Pearson A-I Improved) and resistant (cv. Pearson Improved) to race 1 Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Sacc.) Snyd &Hans., were inoculated with Meloidogyne javanica (Trueb) Chitwood second-stage juveniles and 3 weeks later with race 1 F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici spores. One week after fungal inoculation, no fungus was visible in root tissue of the tomato cultivars and the giant cells were normal. Two weeks after fungal inoculation, abundant hyphae were visible in xylem tissues of Fusarium-susceptible but not of Fusarium-resistant plants. In susceptible plants, giant cell degeneration occurred, characterized by membrane and organelle disruption. In addition, where hyphae were in direct contact with the giant cell, dissolution of the giant cell wall occurred. Three weeks after fungal inoculation, fungal hyphae and spores were visible inside xylem tissues and giant cells in Fusarium-susceptible plants and in xylem tissue of the resistant plants. In susceptible and resistant plants, giant cell degeneration was apparent. Giant cell walls were completely broken down in Fusarium-susceptible tomato plants. In both cultivars infected by Fusarium, giant cell nuclei became spherical and dark inclusions occurred within the chromatin material which condensed adjacent to the fragmented nuclear membrane. No such ultrastructural changes were seen in the giant cells of control plants inoculated with nematode alone. Giant cell deterioration in both cultivars is probably caused by toxic fungal metabolites. PMID:19295778

  3. Squamous Cell Carcinoma Arising in a Giant Condyloma Acuminatum (Buschke-Lowenstein Tumour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael W.T. Chao

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Giant condyloma acuminatum (GCA is a tumour that primarily affects the genital and perianal areas. Despite the histologically benign appearance, it behaves in a malignant fashion, destroying adjacent tissues, and is regarded as an entity intermediate between an ordinary condyloma acuminatum and squamous cell carcinoma. Primary anorectal lesions account for only a small number of GCA cases and, as with squamous cell carcinoma, the human papilloma virus is the causative agent. The hallmark of GCA is the high rate of local recurrence and transformation into squamous cell carcinoma. We describe a case of GCA complicated by malignant transformation, where locoregional control was achieved with combined chemoradiotherapy.

  4. The involvement of lethal giant larvae and Wnt signaling in bottle cell formation in Xenopus embryos

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Sun-Cheol; Sokol, Sergei Y.

    2009-01-01

    Lethal giant larvae (Lgl) plays a critical role in establishment of cell polarity in epithelial cells. While Frizzled/Dsh signaling has been implicated in the regulation of the localization and activity of Lgl, it remains unclear whether specific Wnt ligands are involved. Here we show that Wnt5a triggers the release of Lgl from the cell cortex into the cytoplasm with the concomitant decrease in Lgl stability. The observed changes in Lgl localization were independent of atypical PKC (aPKC), wh...

  5. Application of Nuclear Volume Measurements to Comprehend the Cell Cycle in Root-Knot Nematode-Induced Giant Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Dijair Antonino de Souza Junior

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Root-knot nematodes induce galls that contain giant-feeding cells harboring multiple enlarged nuclei within the roots of host plants. It is recognized that the cell cycle plays an essential role in the set-up of a peculiar nuclear organization that seemingly steers nematode feeding site induction and development. Functional studies of a large set of cell cycle genes in transgenic lines of the model host Arabidopsis thaliana have contributed to better understand the role of the cell cycle components and their implication in the establishment of functional galls. Mitotic activity mainly occurs during the initial stages of gall development and is followed by an intense endoreduplication phase imperative to produce giant-feeding cells, essential to form vigorous galls. Transgenic lines overexpressing particular cell cycle genes can provoke severe nuclei phenotype changes mainly at later stages of feeding site development. This can result in chaotic nuclear phenotypes affecting their volume. These aberrant nuclear organizations are hampering gall development and nematode maturation. Herein we report on two nuclear volume assessment methods which provide information on the complex changes occurring in nuclei during giant cell development. Although we observed that the data obtained with AMIRA tend to be more detailed than Volumest (Image J, both approaches proved to be highly versatile, allowing to access 3D morphological changes in nuclei of complex tissues and organs. The protocol presented here is based on standard confocal optical sectioning and 3-D image analysis and can be applied to study any volume and shape of cellular organelles in various complex biological specimens. Our results suggest that an increase in giant cell nuclear volume is not solely linked to increasing ploidy levels, but might result from the accumulation of mitotic defects.

  6. Giant Glial Cell: New Insight Through Mechanism-Based Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postnov, D. E.; Ryazanova, L. S.; Brazhe, Nadezda

    2008-01-01

    of the glial cell activation: (1) via IP3 production and Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum and (2) via increase of the extracellular potassium concentration, glia depolarization, and opening of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. We suggest that the second pathway is the more significant...

  7. A diagnostic dilemma in breast pathology – benign fibroadenoma with multinucleated stromal giant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobbia Igdam

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fibroadenomas are common benign breast tumours that display a characteristic pathological morphology, although several epithelial and stromal variations exist. A very rare histological finding is the presence of multinucleated giant cells throughout the stroma of a benign fibroadenoma. Cells of this type, which are more commonly found incidentally within the interlobular stroma of breast tissue, are benign and should not be mistaken for malignant cells on microscopic examination. Unfortunately a lack of awareness of this pathological entity can lead to diagnostic confusion amongst pathologists resulting in the multinucleate giant cells being mistaken for highly mitotic cells and consequently the fibroadenoma being mistaken for a malignant lesion. This may have serious implications for the subsequent management of the patient. The presence of this unusual cell type in the stroma does not alter the prognosis of otherwise benign lesion. We encountered two such cases at our institution in a six month period recently. We present their histories along with relevant radiological, microscopic and immunohistochemical features, followed by a discussion of this unusual pathological entity.

  8. The involvement of lethal giant larvae and Wnt signaling in bottle cell formation in Xenopus embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sun-Cheol; Sokol, Sergei Y

    2009-12-01

    Lethal giant larvae (Lgl) plays a critical role in establishment of cell polarity in epithelial cells. While Frizzled/Dsh signaling has been implicated in the regulation of the localization and activity of Lgl, it remains unclear whether specific Wnt ligands are involved. Here we show that Wnt5a triggers the release of Lgl from the cell cortex into the cytoplasm with the concomitant decrease in Lgl stability. The observed changes in Lgl localization were independent of atypical PKC (aPKC), which is known to influence Lgl distribution. In ectodermal cells, both Wnt5a and Lgl triggered morphological and molecular changes characteristic of apical constriction, whereas depletion of their functions prevented endogenous and ectopic bottle cell formation. Furthermore, Lgl RNA partially rescued bottle cell formation in embryos injected with a dominant negative Wnt5a construct. These results suggest a molecular link between Wnt5a and Lgl that is essential for apical constriction during vertebrate gastrulation.

  9. Giant Mediastinal Germ Cell Tumour: An Enigma of Surgical Consideration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firdaus Hayati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of 16-year-old male, who was referred from private centre for dyspnoea, fatigue, and orthopnea. The chest radiograph revealed complete opacification of left chest which was confirmed by computed tomography as a large left mediastinal mass measuring 14 × 15 × 18 cm. The diagnostic needle core biopsy revealed mixed germ cell tumour with possible combination of embryonal carcinoma, yolk sac, and teratoma. After 4 cycles of neoadjuvant BEP regime, there was initial response of tumour markers but not tumour bulk. Instead of classic median sternotomy or clamshell incision, posterolateral approach with piecemeal manner was chosen. Histology confirmed mixed germ cell tumour with residual teratomatous component without yolk sac or embryonal carcinoma component. Weighing 3.5 kg, it is one of the largest mediastinal germ cell tumours ever reported. We describe this rare and gigantic intrathoracic tumour and discuss the spectrum of surgical approach and treatment of this exceptional tumour.

  10. Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath composed largely of epithelioid histiocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCTTS) is a relatively uncommon lesion. GCTTS composed largely epithelioid histiocytes are very rare. In the literature, the author could not find such cases. A 73-year-old man presented with a mass of right thumb, and resection of the mass was performed. Grossly, the mass was encapsulated and yellowish, and measured 1.5 x 2 x 2 cm. Microscopically, the mass was composed of cellular and hypocellular zones. The former was composed of spindle cells and osteoclast-like giant cells, while the latter of epithelioid clear histiocytes. The area of the former was 20%, and the latter 80%. Pigment was seen in the former elements. Mitotic figures were seen in 3/per 30 high power fields (HPFs) in the former element and 2/per 30 HPFs in the latter element. Histochemically, the pigment was hemosiderin positive with Prussian blue staining. Immunohistochemically, both the elements were negative for cytokeratin (CK) CE1/3, CK CAM5.2, CEA, HMB45, alpha-smooth muscle antigen, p53, CD10, TTF-1, and CDX2. Both the elements were positive for CD68 and Ki-67 (cellular element 30% and hypocellular element 20%). The histiocytes of the hypocellular element and osteoclast-like giant cell of the cellular element were positive for CD45. S100-protein positive Langerhans cells and CD45-positive lymphocytes were scattered. The pathological diagnosis was GCTTS. In the author's experience, GCTTS composed largely epithelioid histiocytes are very rare. In the literature, the author could not find such cases. Thus, the author reports herein this case.

  11. Diagnostic Efficacy of Radiology in the Diagnosis of Giant Cell Tumour of Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afia Akhter

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Giant cell tumour (GCT is an aggressive and potentially malignant lesion. Microscopic feature reveals osteoclast like giant cells in a mononuclear stromal cells background. The mononuclear stromal cell is interpreted as neoplastic. Objective: As radiological diagnosis is non invasive and cost effective in comparison to histopathological diagnosis, considering the patients’ compliance, the aim of the study was to observe the diagnostic efficacy of radiology in diagnosis of GCT. Materials and method: This cross sectional study was carried out in the department of Pathology, Delta Hopital Ltd., Dhaka, Bangladesh from July 2011 to December 2012. A total of 30 study subjects were enrolled in the study irrespective of age and sex. Biopsy material and relevant data of clinically suspected cases of GCT along with radiology report were sent from National Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedic Rehabilitation (NITOR, Dhaka, Bangladesh. Histopathological diagnosis was made by expert pathologists. Results: Mean (±SD age of the study subjects was 29.20 (±7.34 years with highest number of patients were observed in 3rd decade and female was predominant (60% with a male female ratio of 1:1.5. Common site of GCT was around knee (50%. Among 30 clinically diagnosed GCT, 25 (83.3% cases were radiologically diagnosed as GCT, 2 (6.7% diagnosed as fibrous dysplasia, 1 (3.3% as chondroblastoma, 1 (3.3% as simple bone cyst and 1 (3.3% as aneurysmal bone cyst. However among 30 clinically diagnosed GCT, 28 (93.3% patients were histopathologically diagnosed as Giant cell lesion and rest 2 (6.7% patients diagnosed as fibrous dysplasia. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of radiological diagnosis of GCT were found to be 92.6%, 100.0%, 100.0%, 40.0% and 90.0%, respectively. Conclusion: Radiology can be effectively used as a screening tool in diagnosing GCT.

  12. Macrophages, Foreign Body Giant Cells and Their Response to Implantable Biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeeshan Sheikh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available All biomaterials, when implanted in vivo, elicit cellular and tissue responses. These responses include the inflammatory and wound healing responses, foreign body reactions, and fibrous encapsulation of the implanted materials. Macrophages are myeloid immune cells that are tactically situated throughout the tissues, where they ingest and degrade dead cells and foreign materials in addition to orchestrating inflammatory processes. Macrophages and their fused morphologic variants, the multinucleated giant cells, which include the foreign body giant cells (FBGCs are the dominant early responders to biomaterial implantation and remain at biomaterial-tissue interfaces for the lifetime of the device. An essential aspect of macrophage function in the body is to mediate degradation of bio-resorbable materials including bone through extracellular degradation and phagocytosis. Biomaterial surface properties play a crucial role in modulating the foreign body reaction in the first couple of weeks following implantation. The foreign body reaction may impact biocompatibility of implantation devices and may considerably impact short- and long-term success in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, necessitating a clear understanding of the foreign body reaction to different implantation materials. The focus of this review article is on the interactions of macrophages and foreign body giant cells with biomaterial surfaces, and the physical, chemical and morphological characteristics of biomaterial surfaces that play a role in regulating the foreign body response. Events in the foreign body response include protein adsorption, adhesion of monocytes/macrophages, fusion to form FBGCs, and the consequent modification of the biomaterial surface. The effect of physico-chemical cues on macrophages is not well known and there is a complex interplay between biomaterial properties and those that result from interactions with the local environment. By having a

  13. A giant cell surface protein in Synechococcus WH8102 inhibits feeding by a dinoflagellate predator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Suzanne L; Brahamsha, Bianca; Fredrickson, Kerri A; Apple, Jude K; Rodríguez, Andres Gutiérrez

    2012-03-01

    Diverse strains of the marine planktonic cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. show consistent differences in their susceptibility to predation. We used mutants of Sargasso Sea strain WH8102 (clade III) to test the hypothesis that cell surface proteins play a role in defence against predation by protists. Predation rates by the heterotrophic dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina on mutants lacking the giant SwmB protein were always higher (by 1.6 to 3.9×) than those on wild-type WH8102 cells, and equalled predation rates on a clade I strain (CC9311). In contrast, absence of the SwmA protein, which comprises the S-layer (surface layer of the cell envelope that is external to the outer membrane), had no effect on predation by O. marina. Reductions in predation rate were not due to dissolved substances in Synechococcus cultures, and could not be accounted for by variations in cell hydrophobicity. We hypothesize that SwmB defends Synechococcus WH8102 by interfering with attachment of dinoflagellate prey capture organelles or cell surface receptors. Giant proteins are predicted in the genomes of multiple Synechococcus isolates, suggesting that this defence strategy may be more general. Strategies for resisting predation will contribute to the differential competitive success of different Synechococcus groups, and to the diversity of natural picophytoplankton assemblages. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. The macrophage origin of the HIV-expressing multinucleated giant cells in hyperplastic tonsils and adenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orenstein, J M; Wahl, S M

    1999-01-01

    Replication and storage of virus are characteristic features of hyperplastic lymphoid tissues in HIV infection. In opportunistic infections, HIV is synthesized by phagocytic mononuclear and Langhans'-type multinucleated macrophages that coexpress the dendritic cell-associated S-100 and p55 antigens. However, similar cells in hyperplastic tonsils and adenoids from HIV+ individuals were alternatively identified as macrophages or, on the basis of the same S-100 and p55 staining, as dendritic cells. To consider establishing the role of these HIV-rich cells in HIV disease, it is important to reconcile this apparent discrepancy in identity. Hyperplastic tonsils and adenoid specimens were analyzed by HIV RNA in situ hybridization (ISH), light and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and immunohistochemistry (IHC) (HIV Gag p24 protein, S-100, p55, CD68, HAM56, lysozyme, alpha-1-anti-trypsin, and alpha-1-anti-chymotrypsin). In HIV+ pediatric and adult surgical specimens (n = 11), the giant cells and their mononuclear counterpart were positive for both macrophage and p55 and S-100 IHC markers. In addition, TEM, p24 IHC, and ISH showed HIV expression by cells with typical features of macrophages. Furthermore, these cells were not unique to HIV+ specimens, being seen in 20% of hyperplastic T&A surgical specimens (n = 57) lacking HIV as well as in several types of granulomatous processes, such as sarcoidosis. These cells appear to represent an activated phenotype that can develop independent of HIV, but that may represent a viral host in HIV-infected individuals. Thus, the giant and mononuclear cells that produce striking amounts of HIV in tonsils and adenoids are of macrophage origin, yet, as in opportunistic infections, share dendritic cell-associated antigens, reflecting a common CD34+ bone marrow progenitor.

  15. Long-term survival of a patient with giant cell glioblastoma. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabel, M; Reifenberger, J; Weber, R G; Reifenberger, G; Schmitt, H P

    2001-04-01

    The authors report on a patient who had undergone resection of a left-sided temporal giant cell glioblastoma at the age of 69 years and who survived for more than 17 years. This man had not undergone postoperative radiotherapy or adjuvant chemotherapy. He died at the age of 86 years without clinical evidence of tumor recurrence. Histologically, the lesion was characterized by highly pleomorphic tumor cells (including bizarre multinucleated giant cells) with high mitotic activity, large necroses, and prominent mononuclear infiltration. A point mutation in the TP53 tumor suppressor gene (c.524G>A; R175H) and no epidermal growth factor receptor gene amplification were revealed on molecular genetic analysis. No diagnostic chromosomal imbalances were identified on comparative genomic hybridization, although the average ratio profile for chromosome 10 indicated loss of 10p15 in a subpopulation of tumor cells. This patient is exceptional because tumor resection, probably in conjunction with a marked antitumor immune response, apparently resulted in eradication of the lesion.

  16. Immunohistochemical expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin and glucocorticoid and calcitonin receptors in central giant-cell lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiz, Nancy Noya; de la Rosa-García, Estela; Camacho, María Esther Irigoyen

    2016-04-01

    Central giant-cell lesions (CGCLs) are reactive lesions that consist histologically of spindle-shaped stromal cells, (fibroblasts and myofibroblasts) loosely arranged in a fibrous stroma, multinucleated giant cells and mononuclear cells with haemorrhagic areas. This study identified the immunoexpression of alpha-smooth muscle actin in spindle-shaped stromal cells, and glucocorticoid and calcitonin receptors in multinucleated giant cells and mononuclear cells. Their association with the clinical and radiographic characteristics of these lesions was identified. Thirty-five cases of CGCLs were studied. Expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin, glucocorticoid and calcitonin was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The labelling index was 100 times the quotient of the number of positive cells divided by the total number of cells of each type. Logistic regression analysis was applied. Alpha-smooth muscle actin was positive (54%) for spindle stromal cells (myofibroblasts). A significant association was observed with root resorption (P = 0.004) and cortical bone destruction (P = 0.024). Glucocorticoid immunoexpression was positive for 99% of the giant cells and 86.7% of the mononuclear cells. Glucocorticoid immunoexpression in the mononuclear cells was associated with root resorption (P = 0.031). A longer evolution time was associated with lower immunoexpression of glucocorticoid (OR 12.4: P = 0.047). Calcitonin immunoexpression was positive in 86% of the giant cells. Immunoexpression of calcitonin was associated with age (P = 0.040). Myofibroblasts are important components of CGCLs, stromal cells and alpha-smooth muscle. Actin immunoexpression was associated with root and cortical bone resorption. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Intralesional corticosteroid injections in the treatment of central giant cell lesions of the jaws: A meta-analytic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Phelype M.; de Souza-Carvalho, Abrahao C.; Cavalcante, Roberta B.; Sant’Ana, Eduardo; Nongueira, Renato L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the response of treatment of central giant cell lesion to intralesional corticosteroid injections. Study Design: Review of articles indexed in PubMed on the topic between the years 1988 and 2011, and development of a descriptive meta-analysis of the results. Results: Sample of 41 patients primarily treated with intralesional corticosteroid injections was obtained, with a male female ratio of 1:0.95, being 23 aggressive and 18 non-aggressive central giant cell lesions. Triamcinolone acetonide and triamcinolone hexacetonide were the drugs used, and 78.0% cases were considered as good result, 14.6% were considered as moderate response and 7.3% were considered as negative result to treatment. Considering the aggressiveness, 88.9% of non-aggressive lesions presented a good response to treatment, in aggressive central giant cell lesions, 69.6% presented a good response to intralesional corticosteroid injections. Conclusion: In view of the results analyzed, intralesional corticosteroid injections could be considered as first treatment option for central giant cell lesion. Key words:Central giant cell lesion, corticosteroids injections, triamcinolone hexacetonide, triamcinolone acetonide. PMID:23385503

  18. Primary hyperparathyroidism diagnosed after surgical ablation of a costal mass mistaken for giant-cell bone tumor: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lara

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Primary hyperparathyroidism is a common endocrine disorder characterized by elevated parathyroid hormone levels, which cause continuous osteoclastic bone resorption. Giant cell tumor of bone is an expansile osteolytic tumor that contains numerous osteoclast-like giant cells. There are many similarities in the radiological and histological features of giant cell tumor of bone and brown tumor. This is a rare benign focal osteolytic process most commonly caused by hyperparathyroidism. Case presentation We report the unusual case of a 40-year-old Caucasian woman in which primary hyperparathyroidism was diagnosed after surgical ablation of a costal mass. The mass was suspected of being neoplastic and histopathology was compatible with a giant cell tumor of bone. On the basis of the biochemical results (including serum calcium, phosphorous and intact parathyroid hormone levels primary hyperparathyroidism was suspected and a brown tumor secondary to refractory hyperparathyroidism was diagnosed. Conclusions Since giant cell tumor is a bone neoplasm that has major implications for the patient, the standard laboratory tests in patients with bone lesions are important for a correct diagnosis.

  19. Giant Cell Lesions of Lungs: A Histopathological and Morphometric Study of Seven Autopsy Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumarguru, B N; Natarajan, M; Biligi, Dayananda S; Raghupathi, A R

    2015-11-01

    Macrophages undergo fusion to form multinucleated giant cells (MGC) in several pathologic conditions. The exact mechanism of their generation is still unclear. MGC are a common feature of granulomas that develop during various inflammatory reactions. To study the histopathological features of giant cell lesions in lungs and correlate the characteristics of giant cells with other histopathological findings. Also, to determine the utility of morphometry to differentiate foreign body and Langhans MGC. Seven cases were analysed. Specimen of lungs was grossed, sectioned and processed. Routinely, tissue sections were stained by Haematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) stain. Polarizing microscopy and special stains were employed in selected cases. Granulomas and MGC were counted and measured. Several other parameters like location, distribution, type and number of MGC, associated predominant inflammatory component and nature of granulomas were analysed. Five patterns of lesions were observed in seven cases. Aspiration pneumonia was seen in three cases (42.85%) and constituted the most common pattern. However, aspiration pneumonia as the only cause of MGC was seen in only one case (14.28%). Pulmonary tuberculosis and asteroid bodies constituted two cases (28.57%) each. Cryptococcal pneumonia and cholesterol clefts constituted one case (14.28%) each. Crypococci were demonstrated to be positively birefringent by polarized microscopy on Ziehl-Neelsen stained sections. Based on statistical analysis of morphometric data, a new index (NP index) was proposed to statistically categorize MGC into foreign body type and Langhans type. NP index value of ≤0.016 was found to be statistically significant (p<0.005) in foreign body MGC. It had high sensitivity and efficacy. MGC may not be always associated with granulomas. The mechanisms that lead to the occurrence of MGC, independent of granuloma needs to be elucidated. Morphometry may serve as a useful aid. But a pathologist has to rely on the

  20. Malignant supratentorial ganglioglioma (ganglion cell-giant cell glioblastoma): a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, R C; Provenzale, J M; McComb, R D; Perry, D A; Longee, D C; McLendon, R E

    1999-04-01

    From both epidemiologic and pathologic viewpoints, gangliogliomas exhibiting components of giant cell glioblastomas are extraordinary neoplasms. We report herein the case of a 6-year-old girl who presented initially with a World Health Organization grade IV anaplastic ganglioglioma (a mixed ganglion cell tumor-giant cell glioblastoma). Despite aggressive management, the patient died of disease in a relatively short period. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue blocks were sectioned at 5 microm for histochemical and immunohistochemical analyses. Hematoxylin-eosin-stained sections and immunohistochemically stained sections from the primary and secondary resections were reviewed. Reactivity for glial fibrillary acidic protein, neurofilament protein, synaptophysin, and Ki67 nuclear antigen was evaluated. Histologically, 2 distinct cell populations were noted on both the primary and secondary resections. The primary resection revealed a neoplasm having a predominant glial component consistent with a glioblastoma. Interspersed were dysmorphic ganglion cells supporting a diagnosis of ganglioglioma. The second resection (following therapy) demonstrated a much more prominent dysmorphic ganglion cell component and a subdued glial component. Although immunohistochemical analysis clearly distinguished the 2 tumor cell populations, the identification of Nissl substance in neurons proved to be equally helpful. Although other cases of grade III gangliogliomas and rare cases of grade IV gangliogliomas have been reported, the present case is exceptional in that, to our knowledge, it is the only report of a patient who presented initially with a composite grade IV ganglioglioma and who was clinically followed up to the time of death. This case allows direct comparison between the histologic findings in a giant cell glioblastoma and a ganglioglioma and documents the aggressive biologic behavior of this complex neoplasm.

  1. Primary hyperparathyroidism associated with a giant cell tumor: One case in the distal radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzaa, M R; Bennis, A; Iken, M; Abouzzahir, A; Boussouga, M; Jaafar, A

    2015-10-01

    Hyperparathyroidism can present itself as brown tumors (or osteolytic expansive lesions) that usually disappear after normalization of calcium and phosphate levels. It rarely occurs simultaneously with a giant cell tumor. The authors report one case of a localized form at the distal radius in a patient being followed for primary hyperparathyroidism. The diagnostic challenges related to the clinical and radiological similarities of these two pathological entities are discussed, as they can lead to delays in therapeutic management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Synchronous Multicentric Giant Cell Tumour of Distal Radius and Sacrum with Pulmonary Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandra, Varun Sharma; Kotha, Krishna Mohan Reddy; Satyanarayana, Moorthy Gadisetti Venkata; Vadlamani, Kali Varaprasad; Yerravalli, Vyjayanthi

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell tumour (GCT) is an uncommon primary bone tumour, and its multicentric presentation is exceedingly rare. We report a case of a 45-year-old female who presented to us with GCT of left distal radius. On the skeletal survey, osteolytic lesion was noted in her right sacral ala. Biopsy confirmed both lesions as GCT. Pulmonary metastasis was also present. Resection-reconstruction arthroplasty for distal radius and thorough curettage and bone grafting of the sacral lesion were done. Multicentric GCT involving distal radius and sacrum with primary sacral involvement is not reported so far to our knowledge.

  3. Carpal tunnel syndrome caused by a giant cell tumour of the flexor tendon sheath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Marcel F; Sheikh, Zahid A; Quinton, David N

    2014-02-01

    A 76-year-old woman developed right carpal tunnel syndrome after being conservatively treated for tenosynovitis of the flexor tendons with associated mild carpal tunnel syndrome. A magnetic resonance imaging scan showed a tumour in the carpal tunnel. Re-exploration showed that the median nerve was being compressed by a giant cell tumour of the flexor tendon sheaths. Appropriate imaging is advised in patients with additional findings (such as swelling) or in patients with secondary carpal tunnel syndrome and incomplete response to conservative treatment, to exclude a space-occupying lesion.

  4. Regression of Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma With Rapamycin in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Mary Kay; Butler, Ian J.; Northrup, Hope

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a 21-year-old woman who has been receiving rapamycin for 5 months for bilateral subependymal giant cell astrocytomas. The patient was started at a dose of 0.2 mg/kg/day. Levels were maintained between 11 and 13 ng/mL. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain 2½ months after initiating rapamycin demonstrated a decrease in size of both astrocytomas (11 to 7.5 mm on the right and 8 to 5 mm on the left). Further studies are needed with prolonged observation to confirm these findings, determine the length of necessary treatment, and evaluate recurrence risk after discontinuation of rapamycin. PMID:18952591

  5. Concomitant Central Giant Cell Granuloma and Aneurysmal Bone Cyst in a Young Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepika Pai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Although Central Giant Cell Granuloma (CGCG is a benign tumor of the jaw and aneurysmal bone cyst seen in children, its aggressive behavior causes extensive loss of hard tissue requiring wide excision and extensive rehabilitation. We report a rare case of concomitant CGCG and aneurysmal bone cyst in a two-year-old male child, involving the coronoid and condylar process. Young age, large tumor, its aggressive nature, and future growth of orofacial region pose a significant challenge in the management of such conditions. For a successful outcome, the systematic approach to the presurgical evaluation and appropriate treatment planning is essential for such conditions.

  6. Central giant cell granuloma in a 4-year-old female child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinath Krishnappa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Central giant cell granulomas (CGCG are reddish lesions of gingiva that account for an important number of disorders frequently diagnosed in the regular dental practice. Although the majority of the lesions are nonaggressive, asymptomatic, and slow-growing, about 30% show an aggressive, progressively destructive behavior, and a tendency to recur. We present a case of aggressive CGCG of the maxilla in a 4-year-old female child managed by surgical excision. To minimize the possible cost of esthetic, functional, and psychological problems, mainly in young patients, CGCG should be diagnosed and managed at the earliest.

  7. Peripheral giant cell granuloma associated with dental implants: clinical case and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñarrocha-Diago, Maria A; Cervera-Ballester, Juan; Maestre-Ferrín, Laura; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David

    2012-09-01

    Peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG) associated to dental implants is a very infrequent peri-implant soft-tissue complication, with only 11 cases recorded in the literature to date. The present study describes a 54-year-old woman presenting a swelling of the alveolar margin in the fourth quadrant in relation to a fixed prosthesis cemented over implants. Treatment consisted of complete resection of the lesion with implantoplasty of the exposed implant threads. The diagnosis of PGCG was confirmed by histological study, and no relapse has been recorded after 12 months of follow-up.

  8. Synchronous Multicentric Giant Cell Tumour of Distal Radius and Sacrum with Pulmonary Metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varun Sharma Tandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumour (GCT is an uncommon primary bone tumour, and its multicentric presentation is exceedingly rare. We report a case of a 45-year-old female who presented to us with GCT of left distal radius. On the skeletal survey, osteolytic lesion was noted in her right sacral ala. Biopsy confirmed both lesions as GCT. Pulmonary metastasis was also present. Resection-reconstruction arthroplasty for distal radius and thorough curettage and bone grafting of the sacral lesion were done. Multicentric GCT involving distal radius and sacrum with primary sacral involvement is not reported so far to our knowledge.

  9. The clinical pictures of giant cell arteritis. Temporal arteritis, polymyalgia rheumatica, and fever of unknown origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmvall, B E; Bengtsson, B A; Alestig, K; Bojs, G; Iwarson, S

    1980-01-01

    In a prospective study, 68 hospitalized patients were diagnosed as having giant cell arteritis. Temporal artery biopsy was performed in all patients and showed histologic evidence of arteritis in 42 (62%). Twenty-six patients had a negative biopsy but met the clinical criteria for the diagnosis. Four different clinical pictures were recognized. Thirteen patients (19%) had symptoms of localized temporal arteritis without muscular discomfort. The polymyalgia rheumatica syndrome without signs of localized arteritis was seen in 33 patients (49%). Seventeen (25%) had symptoms of both polymyalgia rheumatica and temporal arteritis. Five patients (7%) had general symptoms only, such as fever, anorexia, and fatigue, without muscular or arteritic symptoms.

  10. Giant Cell Arteritis in a 12-Year-Old Girl Presenting with Nephrotic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab A. El-Sayed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell arteritis (GCA is rare in children. The kidneys are generally spared. We present a case of GCA in a 12-year-old girl with severe headache and tender scalp especially over the right temporal area. The right superficial temporal artery was cord like and nodular and the pulsations were barely felt. Several small tender nodular swellings were felt in the occipital area. She had been previously diagnosed as a case of nephrotic syndrome due to underlying membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. This report is aimed at drawing attention to this rare form of vasculitis in children aiming at decreasing its morbidities.

  11. Giant Anterior Chest Wall Basal Cell Carcinoma: An Approach to Palliative Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Joy F. Santos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior chest wall giant basal cell carcinoma (GBCC is a rare skin malignancy that requires a multidisciplinary treatment approach. This case report demonstrates the challenges of anterior chest wall GBCC reconstruction for the purpose of palliative therapy in a 72-year-old female. Surgical resection of the lesion included the manubrium and upper four ribs. The defect was closed with bilateral pectoral advancement flaps, FlexHD, and pedicled VRAM. The palliative nature of this case made hybrid reconstruction more appropriate than rigid sternal reconstruction. In advanced metastatic cancers, the ultimate goals should be to avoid risk for infection and provide adequate coverage for the defect.

  12. Giant cell variant of malignant fibrous histiocytoma of male breast: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamlesh Kumar Harsh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH is the most common form of soft tissue sarcoma during middle and late adulthood in the deep connective tissue of the extremities, abdominal cavity, and retroperitoneum. However, primary breast sarcoma is a rare disease entity, comprising less than 1% of all breast malignancies. MFH of the male breast is very rare. We present a case of MFH of giant cell variant of the right breast in a 50-year-old male who presented with a painless lump. Following cytological investigation, simple mastectomy was performed. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed the diagnosis.

  13. The fate of radiation induced giant-nucleated cells of human skin fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almahwasi, A. A.; Jeynes, J. C.; Bradley, D. A.; Regan, P. H.

    2017-11-01

    Radiation-induced giant-nucleated cells (GCs) have been observed to occur within survivors of irradiated cancerous and within healthy cells, both in vivo and in vitro. The expression of such morphological alterations is associated with genomic instability. This study was designed to investigate the fate of GCs induced in a normal human fibroblast cell line (AG1522) after exposure to 0.2, 1 or 2 Gy of X-ray or proton irradiation. The total of 79 individual AG1522 GCs present at 7, 14 or 21 days after each dose point were analysed from fluorescence microscopy images captured over approximately 120 h. The GCs were identified at the beginning of the observation period for each time point post-irradiation and the area of the cell nucleus was measured (μm2) using a cell-recognition MATLAB code. The results demonstrate that the majority of GCs had undergone a prolonged mitotic arrest, which might be an indication of the survival strategy. The live cell microscopy confirms that a giant-nucleated cell formed 14 days after exposure to 0.2 Gy of proton irradiation was divided into two asymmetrical normal-sized cells. These results suggest that a small fraction of GCs can proliferate and form progeny. Some of GCs had disappeared from the microscopy fields. The rate of their loss was decreased as the dose increased but there remains the potential for them to have progeny that could continue to proliferate, ultimately contributing to development of cancer risk. This important method to access delayed effects in normal tissues could act as a potential radioprotective assay for a dose-limiting parameter when applying radiotherapy. These results might have important implications in evaluating risk estimates for patients during radiation therapy treatment.

  14. Nucleoli in large (giant bi- and multinucleate cells after apoptosis-inducing photodynamic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Smetana

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The present experimental study was undertaken to provide information on nucleolar changes accompanying the apoptotic process in large or giant binucleate and multinucleate cells (LBMNCs. Such cells were present in a small but constant percentage in cultures of HL-60 cells. The apoptotic process was induced by photodynamic treatment (PDT by means of 5-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA as the precursor of the photosensitizer protoporphyrin IX and irradiation with broad spectrum blue light (BL. Nucleolar changes in LBMNCs were characterized by marked reduction or disappearance of silver stained particles representing AgNORs in nucleoli including the large ones. In addition, PDT also significantly reduced the number of nucleoli regardless of their size. These changes apparently reflected the decrease or cessation of nucleolar biosynthetic activities and resembled those which were previously observed in naturally maturing bone marrow megakaryocytes (Janoutová et al., 2001.

  15. Cherubism misdiagnosed as giant cell tumor: a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yang; Zhou, Mi; Yang, Yaowu; Zhou, Jun; Duan, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Cherubism is characterized by progressive, painless, bilateral enlargement of the mandible and/or maxilla resulting from the replacement of bone with multilocular cysts composed of fibrotic stromal cells and osteoclast-like cells. Here we report one Chinese cherubism case that has been misdiagnosed for more than forty years. The patient displayed no typical clinical or radiographical signs of cherubism due to multi-surgical treatments. Her histopathologic examination revealed the proliferating fibrous connective tissue with few multinucleated giant cells. The family history suggested us to perform sequence analysis of the SH3BP2 gene, a candidate marker for cherubism, in the family, and it was found that both the proband and the son had a missense mutation in SH3BP2 in exon 9 (p. Arg415Gln). Here we emphasize the importance of gene testing in the diagnosis of suspected cherubism, especially for those cases with non-typical clinical, radiographic and histological presentations.

  16. Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Stimulates the Proliferation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun-Jie; Liu, Yu-Liang; Sun, Yuan-Chao; Ge, Wei; Wang, Yong-Yong; Dyce, Paul W; Hou, Rong; Shen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    It has been widely known that the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is one of the most endangered species in the world. An optimized platform for maintaining the proliferation of giant panda mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is very necessary for current giant panda protection strategies. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), a member of the FGF family, is widely considered as a growth factor and differentiation inducer within the stem cell research field. However, the role of bFGF on promoting the proliferation of MSCs derived from giant panda bone marrow (BM) has not been reported. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of bFGF on the proliferation of BM-MSCs derived from giant panda. MSCs were cultured for cell proliferation analysis at 24, 48 and 72 hrs following the addition of bFGF. With increasing concentrations of bFGF, cell numbers gradually increased. This was further demonstrated by performing 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) cell proliferation assay, 5-Bromo-2-deoxyUridine (BrdU) labeling and cell cycle testing. Furthermore, the percentage of MSCs that were OCT4 positive increased slightly following treatment with 5 ng/ml bFGF. Moreover, we demonstrated that the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway may play an important role in the proliferation of panda MSCs stimulated by bFGF. In conclusion, this study suggests that giant panda BM-MSCs have a high proliferative capacity with the addition of 5 ng/ml bFGF in vitro.

  17. Aneurysmal bone cyst secondary to giant cell tumor of the mobile spine: a report of 11 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhipeng; Yang, Xinghai; Xiao, Jianru; Feng, Dapeng; Huang, Quan; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Wending; Zhou, Zhenhua

    2011-10-01

    A retrospective analysis was performed. To analyze the characteristics of aneurysmal bone cyst arising from giant cell tumor of the mobile spine and to discuss the outcome of corresponding surgical and nonsurgical treatment. Giant cell tumors are generally benign neoplasms that exhibit aggressive behavior with a tendency to recur locally. Aneurysmal bone cysts are benign, highly vascular osseous lesions. Although both of them have been described separately in previous literatures, few reports have described aneurysmal bone cyst secondary to giant cell tumor of the mobile spine. Between January 2004 and December 2009, 11 patients were identified with an aneurysmal bone cyst arising from giant cell tumor of the mobile spine. Four patients underwent subtotal tumor resection followed by radiotherapy, and the other 7 patients underwent total tumor resection. Patients with lesions located below T6 were treated with selective arterial embolization before surgery. Clinical data and the efficacy of surgery were analyzed via chart review Of the eleven patients identified for inclusion in this study, the average age was 33 months (range ∇ 14-65 months). The mean length of follow-up was 31 months. Seven patients kept disease-free during the follow-ups. The remaining four patients recurred and one died of local re-recurrence and lung metastasis. Unlike primary aneurysmal bone cyst, secondary aneurysmal bone cyst arising from giant cell tumor of the mobile spine has a more aggressive tendency to recurrence locally. Complete resection with systematic radiotherapy should be undertaken for the treatment of aneurysmal bone cyst secondary to giant cell tumor of the mobile spine, which is associated with a good prognosis for local tumor control. As complete or as radical an operation as possible should be performed at first presentation. The best chance for the patient is the first chance. Selective preoperative embolization is advised to minimize intraoperative blood loss.

  18. Custom-made wrist prosthesis in a patient with giant cell tumor of the distal radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damert, Hans-Georg; Altmann, Silke; Kraus, Armin

    2013-05-01

    Treatment for giant cell tumors of the distal radius is challenging when motion is to be preserved. As standard wrist prostheses typically do not achieve favorable results, we treated a 36-year-old man with giant cell tumor of the distal radius with a new, custom-made implant. A custom-made wrist prosthesis with a long shaft was designed according to the patient's X-ray findings. After complete tumor resection, the prosthesis was subsequently implanted into the distal radius without complications. Two months after surgery, range of motion was 30°-0-25° for extension/flexion, 10°-0-5° for ulnar/radial abduction, 80°-0-0 for pronation/supination, complete range of motion for the fingers, and a grip strength of 6 kg. Two years after surgery, implant position was still correct and range of motion was 45°-0-10° for extension/flexion, 10°-0-20° for ulnar/radial abduction, and 80°-0-10° for pronation/supination. Grip strength was 16 kg, and DASH score was 25 compared to 39 before surgery. The patient returned to work as a craftsman. Custom-made wrist prostheses could become a practical option in patients with large defects of the distal radius who desire to preserve wrist motion.

  19. Giant cell tumor expanded into the thoracic cavity with spinal involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demura, Satoru; Kawahara, Norio; Murakami, Hideki; Akamaru, Tomoyuki; Kato, Satoshi; Oda, Makoto; Tomita, Katsuro; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2012-03-07

    This article describes a case of a giant cell tumor that expanded into the thoracic cavity and through the spinal canal into the vertebrae. A 36-year-old man presented with a 6-month history of back pain and dyspnea. Plain chest radiographs showed a huge mass accompanied by right pleural effusion. The mass involved the 12th thoracic spine, and the spinal cord was severely compressed. The tumor was resected with a 2-stage procedure. As a first stage to separate the tumor from the anterior vital structures under direct vision, thoracic surgeons performed a right thoracotomy with chest wall reconstruction from the 8th to 11th ribs. The right lung and inferior vena cava were gently retracted, and the tumor was carefully detached from these structures. We were not able to separate the tumor from the right diaphragm due to severe invasion; therefore, we performed partial resection of the right diaphragm with the tumor. After excision of the anterior part of the tumor, the thoracic wall was reconstructed with the right eighth rib and Marlex mesh. When the patient's general condition improved 2 weeks later, spondylectomy by posterior approach was performed. We achieved excision of a giant cell tumor that had expanded into the thoracic cavity and through the spinal canal into the vertebrae. The patient had achieved full rehabilitation with no neurological or respiratory abnormalities at 7 years postoperatively. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Fibroma and giant-cell tumor of tendon sheath: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batista KT

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Kátia Tôrres Batista,1 Heveline Becker de Moura,1 Maria Isabel Lima,2 Kikue Terada Abe3 1Department of Plastic Surgery and Pathology, 2Electron Microscopy Laboratory, 3Cytogenetic Laboratory, Sarah Hospital Brasilia, Brazil Abstract: A 53-year-old man presented in 2009 with a tumor over the dorsum of his hand and wrist. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed before surgery and histopathological and immunohistochemical studies were performed after surgery. This demonstrated an ill-defined lesion measuring 46 mm × 31 mm confined to the subcutaneous tissues, extensor tendons, and articular capsule on the dorsum of the hand and wrist with heterogeneous intermediate and high T1 and T2 signal suggesting a complex mixture of fat and fibrous elements. A histopathological differential diagnosis of hemosiderotic fibrohistiocytic lipomatous lesion/tumor (HFLL/T and giant-cell tumor of tendon sheath and fibroma of tendon sheath was made. We describe this rare lesion and call attention to important points in diagnosis. Keywords: giant cell tumor, fibroma tumor, sheath tendon tumor

  1. Clinical outcomes of peri-implant peripheral giant cell granuloma: a report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Gonzalo; Lopez-Pintor, Rosa M; Torres, Jesús; de Vicente, Juan Carlos

    2009-07-01

    Peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG) is a reactive lesion that occurs on the gingiva or alveolar mucosa and contains numerous giant cells. Its recurrence rate is 10%. Only five cases associated with dental implants have been reported. This case report describes three additional cases with clinical courses and outcomes. Three women presented with a chief complaint of a gingival mass around the implants. The lesions were surgically excised under local anesthesia. The initial diagnosis at presentation was pyogenic granuloma. Radiography showed marginal bone loss accompanying the lesions. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of PGCG. In two cases, several recurrences resulted in explantation of the fixture. One case healed uneventfully. Despite its usually benign clinical behavior, peri-implant PGCG may follow an aggressive course. Treatment planning for this condition should take into account the presence of recurrences to evaluate the necessity of an aggressive surgical approach that may involve advanced bone loss and explantation. Further research on the origin of this implant-associated condition with a larger series of cases is necessary to provide a basis for adequate management.

  2. Giant cell tumor of bone: current review of morphological, clinical, radiological, and therapeutic characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgi P. Georgiev

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumor of bone accounts for about 5% of all primary bone tumors in adults and is still one of the most obscure and intensively examined tumors of bone. This largely results from the lack of uniform clinical, radiographic, histological or morphological aspects that allow prediction of recurrence. Classified by the World Health Organization as “an aggressive, potentially malignant lesion”, the giant cell tumor of bone could give lung metastases, could undergo malignant degeneration or could have multicentric localization. It usually develops in long bones but can also occur in unusual locations. The common presenting symptom is increasing pain at the tumor site. Standard treatment ranges from curettage to wide resection, with reports of varying oncological and functional results. The recurrence rate is high during the first 2-3 years after surgery regardless of pre-operative tumor stage. Herein, we discuss the morphological, clinical, radiological, and therapeutic characteristics of this pathologic entity as well as its differential diagnosis. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (3: 475-485

  3. What is the impact of giant cell arteritis on patients' lives? A UK qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddle, Jennifer; Bartlam, Roisin; Mallen, Christian D; Mackie, Sarah L; Prior, James A; Helliwell, Toby; Richardson, Jane C

    2017-08-23

    Clinical management of giant cell arteritis (GCA) involves balancing the risks and burdens arising from the disease with those arising from treatment, but there is little research on the nature of those burdens. We aimed to explore the impact of giant cell arteritis (GCA) and its treatment on patients' lives. UK patients with GCA participated in semi-structured telephone interviews. Inductive thematic analysis was employed. 24 participants were recruited (age: 65-92 years, time since diagnosis: 2 months to >6 years). The overarching themes from analysis were: ongoing symptoms of the disease and its treatment; and 'life-changing' impacts. The overall impact of GCA on patients' lives arose from a changing combination of symptoms, side effects, adaptations to everyday life and impacts on sense of normality. Important factors contributing to loss of normality were glucocorticoid-related treatment burdens and fear about possible future loss of vision. The impact of GCA in patients' everyday lives can be substantial, multifaceted and ongoing despite apparent control of disease activity. The findings of this study will help doctors better understand patient priorities, legitimise patients' experiences of GCA and work with patients to set realistic treatment goals and plan adaptations to their everyday lives. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Immunohistochemical evaluation of estrogen and progesterone receptors in peripheral and central giant cell granuloma of the jaws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razavi SM

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Giant cell granuloma is a relatively common benign proliferative lesion of the oral cavity. This lesion has a marked gender predilection with more prevalence in females and tendency to rapid growth and recurrence during pregnancy. The aim of this study was the evaluation of specific receptors of sex hormones in giant cell granuloma. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, twenty five cases of formalin fixed paraffin embedded giant cell granulomas were retrieved from the oral pathology archive of dental school Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. Also twenty five normal oral mucosa biopsies resected during different surgical procedures were prepared as control group. Cases were immunohistochemically stained for estrogen and progesterone receptors using the biotin-streptavidine method. Data were analyzed by SPSS package. Results: Staining for ER/PR markers were negative for the mononuclear stromal cells and multinucleated giant cells in all cases. The epithelial cells and connective tissue stromal cells of the control group were also negative for these receptors. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, immunostaining for ER/PR was negative in all cases. These findings suggest that in most cases development and growth of this lesion is not directly related to these hormones. However further studies with more sensitive techniques are recommended.

  5. Peripheral Gingiva Giant Cell Granuloma: A Differential Diagnosis Approach among Gingival Overgrowths: A Case Report and a Brief Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dervisoglou Theodoros

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral giant cell granuloma is the most common jaw located giant cell lesion. It originates from periosteum or from periodontal membrane as a response to local irritation or chronic trauma. It appears as a firm, soft or elastic nodule, sessile or pedunculated. Early and accurate diagnosis leads to sufficient management, minimizing possible damage of the adjacent tissues.

  6. Roe Protein Hydrolysates of Giant Grouper (Epinephelus lanceolatus Inhibit Cell Proliferation of Oral Cancer Cells Involving Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Iong Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Roe protein hydrolysates were reported to have antioxidant property but the anticancer effects were less addressed, especially for oral cancer. In this study, we firstly used the ultrafiltrated roe hydrolysates (URH derived from giant grouper (Epinephelus lanceolatus to evaluate the impact of URH on proliferation against oral cancer cells. We found that URH dose-responsively reduced cell viability of two oral cancer cells (Ca9-22 and CAL 27 in terms of ATP assay. Using flow cytometry, URH-induced apoptosis of Ca9-22 cells was validated by morphological features of apoptosis, sub-G1 accumulation, and annexin V staining in dose-responsive manners. URH also induced oxidative stress in Ca9-22 cells in terms of reactive oxygen species (ROS/superoxide generations and mitochondrial depolarization. Taken together, these data suggest that URH is a potential natural product for antioral cancer therapy.

  7. Inhibitory influences of tranilast on multinucleated giant cell formation from monocytes by supernatant of concanavalin A-stimulated mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, K; Okamoto, H; Horio, T

    2000-12-01

    Tranilast is an anti-allergic drug that inhibits the release of chemical mediators from mast cells. There have been cases-reports showing that tranilast is effective for the treatment of granulomatous diseases such as granuloma annulare and cutaneous sarcoidosis. Here we examined the in vitro effects of tranilast on the formation of multinucleated giant cells (MGCs) from human peripheral monocytes. Supernatant of concanavalin A (Con A)-stimulated mononuclear cells induced Langhans-type and foreign body-type MGCs and the addition of 10 or 100 microg/ml tranilast inhibited the formation of total MGCs and foreign body-type MGCs. Tranilast decreased the number of MGCs with 16cell sorting analysis showed that tranilast-treated monocytes had lower expressions of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). These findings suggest that tranilast is effective for cutaneous lesions in some cases of granulomatous disorders partly through a direct effect on monocyte/macrophage-lineage cells.

  8. Mitotic activity of multinucleated giant cells with glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactivity in glioblastomas: an immunohistochemical double labeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Sato, Kazufumi; Ido, Kazunori; Kubota, Toshihiko

    2006-05-01

    To investigate the mitotic activity of multinucleated giant cells (MNGCs) with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in glioblastomas, double immunohistochemical staining for GFAP and Ki67 was performed in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded specimens obtained from 12 primary glioblastomas with MNGCs including three giant cell glioblastomas. The Ki67 labeling index (LI:%) of GFAP+ tumor cells ranged from 0 to 5.6 (2.5+/-1.7, mean+/-standard deviation). The Ki67 LI of GFAP- tumor cells ranged from 18.6 to 35.9 (24.7+/-6.6). The Ki67 LI of GFAP+ cells was significantly lower than that of GFAP- cells (Pglioblastomas. MNGCs identified in glioblastomas may develop via not only the proliferation of abnormal nuclei in a single tumor cell but also other processes.

  9. Giant-cell interstitial pneumonia and hard-metal pneumoconiosis. A clinicopathologic study of four cases and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohori, N.P.; Sciurba, F.C.; Owens, G.R.; Hodgson, M.J.; Yousem, S.A.

    1989-07-01

    We report four cases of giant-cell interstitial pneumonia that occurred in association with exposure to hard metals. All patients presented with chronic interstitial lung disease and had open-lung biopsies that revealed marked interstitial fibrosis, cellular interstitial infiltrates, and prominent intraalveolar macrophages as well as giant cells displaying cellular cannibalism. We also review the literature to determine the sensitivity and specificity of giant-cell interstitial pneumonia for hard-metal pneumoconiosis. Although hard-metal pneumoconiosis may take the form of usual interstitial pneumonia, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, and giant-cell interstitial pneumonia, the finding of giant-cell interstitial pneumonia is almost pathognomonic of hard-metal disease and should provoke an investigation of occupational exposure. 25 references.

  10. Increased angiotensin II type 1 receptor expression in temporal arteries from patients with giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimitrijevic, Ivan; Malmsjö, Malin; Andersson, Christina

    2009-01-01

    immunohistochemical study of temporal arteries using archival formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue. PARTICIPANTS: Ten patients with GCA and 10 control patients, who were clinically suspected of having GCA but were diagnosed as not having GCA, were included. METHODS: Immunohistochemistry, using anti-AT(1) and anti......-AT(2) antibodies, was performed on formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded temporal arteries. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: AT(1) and AT(2) receptor immunostaining intensity was quantified. RESULTS: Hematoxylin-eosin-stained sections of temporal arteries from patients with GCA showed intimal hyperplasia......, internal elastic lamina degeneration, and band-shaped infiltrates of inflammatory cells, including lymphocytes, histocytes, and multinucleated giant cells. AT(1) receptor staining was primarily observed in the medial layer of the temporal arteries and was higher in the patients with GCA than in the control...

  11. Mycobacteria exploit nitric oxide-induced transformation of macrophages into permissive giant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharun, Kourosh; Senges, Julia; Seidl, Maximilian; Lösslein, Anne; Kolter, Julia; Lohrmann, Florens; Fliegauf, Manfred; Elgizouli, Magdeldin; Vavra, Martina; Schachtrup, Kristina; Illert, Anna L; Gilleron, Martine; Kirschning, Carsten J; Triantafyllopoulou, Antigoni; Henneke, Philipp

    2017-11-02

    Immunity to mycobacteria involves the formation of granulomas, characterized by a unique macrophage (MΦ) species, so-called multinucleated giant cells (MGC). It remains unresolved whether MGC are beneficial to the host, that is, by prevention of bacterial spread, or whether they promote mycobacterial persistence. Here, we show that the prototypical antimycobacterial molecule nitric oxide (NO), which is produced by MGC in excessive amounts, is a double-edged sword. Next to its antibacterial capacity, NO propagates the transformation of MΦ into MGC, which are relatively permissive for mycobacterial persistence. The mechanism underlying MGC formation involves NO-induced DNA damage and impairment of p53 function. Moreover, MGC have an unsurpassed potential to engulf mycobacteria-infected apoptotic cells, which adds a further burden to their antimycobacterial capacity. Accordingly, mycobacteria take paradoxical advantage of antimicrobial cellular efforts by driving effector MΦ into a permissive MGC state. © 2017 The Authors.

  12. Denosumab treated giant cell tumour of bone: a morphological, immunohistochemical and molecular analysis of a series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girolami, Ilaria; Mancini, Irene; Simoni, Antonella; Baldi, Giacomo Giulio; Simi, Lisa; Campanacci, Domenico; Beltrami, Giovanni; Scoccianti, Guido; D'Arienzo, Antonio; Capanna, Rodolfo; Franchi, Alessandro

    2016-03-01

    Denosumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody directed against RANKL, has recently been introduced in the treatment strategy of giant cell tumour of bone (GCTB). Aim of this study was to investigate the phenotypical modifications induced by denosumab treatment in a series of 15 GCTB. The tumours were characterised for histone 3.3 mutations, and studied immunohistochemically for the modifications of RANKL, RANK, SATB2 and RUNX2 expression, as well as of tumour proliferative activity and angiogenesis. Nine of 11 tumours investigated presented a histone 3.3 mutation in H3F3A, and 2 of these for which the analysis was carried out in pretreatment and post-treatment specimens showed the same mutation in both. Denosumab induced the disappearance of osteoclast-like giant cells, leaving residual spindle neoplastic cells arranged in a storiform pattern, with deposition of trabecular collagen matrix and osteoid, which tended to maturation in the peripheral portions of the lesion. RANK and RANKL expression was variable, with no significant variation after treatment. Moreover, we did not observe any significant modification of the expression of the osteoblastic markers SATB2 and RUNX2. Denosumab treatment determined a significant reduction of the proliferative index and of tumour angiogenesis (p=0.001, Wilcoxon rank-sum test). These results indicate that denosumab induces a partial maturation towards the osteoblastic phenotype of the neoplastic cells of GCTB, with production of fibrous and osteoid matrix, but with minor immunophenotypical changes. Finally, we first report an antiangiogenic activity of denosumab in GCTB, possibly mediated by a RANKL-dependent pathway. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. EEVD motif of heat shock cognate protein 70 contributes to bacterial uptake by trophoblast giant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Suk

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The uptake of abortion-inducing pathogens by trophoblast giant (TG cells is a key event in infectious abortion. However, little is known about phagocytic functions of TG cells against the pathogens. Here we show that heat shock cognate protein 70 (Hsc70 contributes to bacterial uptake by TG cells and the EEVD motif of Hsc70 plays an important role in this. Methods Brucella abortus and Listeria monocytogenes were used as the bacterial antigen in this study. Recombinant proteins containing tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR domains were constructed and confirmation of the binding capacity to Hsc70 was assessed by ELISA. The recombinant TPR proteins were used for investigation of the effect of TPR proteins on bacterial uptake by TG cells and on pregnancy in mice. Results The monoclonal antibody that inhibits bacterial uptake by TG cells reacted with the EEVD motif of Hsc70. Bacterial TPR proteins bound to the C-terminal of Hsc70 through its EEVD motif and this binding inhibited bacterial uptake by TG cells. Infectious abortion was also prevented by blocking the EEVD motif of Hsc70. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that surface located Hsc70 on TG cells mediates the uptake of pathogenic bacteria and proteins containing the TPR domain inhibit the function of Hsc70 by binding to its EEVD motif. These molecules may be useful in the development of methods for preventing infectious abortion.

  14. [Wrist joint reconstruction with vascularized fibular head graft after resection of distal radius giant cell tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Zhenggang; Pan, Qi; Fu, Chunjiang; Han, Xinguang

    2010-12-01

    To observe the effectiveness of wrist joint reconstruction with vascularized fibular head graft after resection of distal radius giant cell tumor. Between March 2000 and March 2009, 31 cases of distal radius giant cell tumor were treated with extended resection and vascularized fibular head graft for repairing defects of the distal radius, and reconstructing wrist joint. There were 14 males and 17 females with an average age of 37.2 years (range, 15-42 years). The disease duration ranged from 1 month to 2 years and 3 months with an average of 8 months. The size of tumor was 6.5 cm x 3.5 cm-8.0 cm x 4.5 cm. The range of motion (ROM) of wrist joint was as follows: extension 5-15 degrees (mean, 10.7 degrees), flexion 9-21 degrees (mean, 14.2 degrees), radial inclination 0-10 degrees (mean, 8.6 degrees), and ulnar inclination 0-15 degrees (mean, 7.9 degrees). The ROM of forearm was as follows: pronation 15-50 degrees (mean, 28.7 degrees) and supination 10-25 degrees (mean, 16.5 degrees). The histopathological examination revealed that there were 5 cases of stage I, 17 of stage II, and 9 of stage III. All patients achieved primary healing of incision and were followed up 1-9 years with an average of 4.5 years. The X-ray films showed that bone healing time was 12-16 weeks with an average of 13 weeks. No tumors recurrence was observed. The ROM of wrist joint was as follows at 1 year after operation: extension 20-50 degrees (mean, 29.0 degrees), flexion 30-50 degrees (mean, 35.0 degrees), radial inclination 10-20 degrees (mean, 16.5 degrees), and ulnar inclination 20-25 degrees (mean, 23.5 degrees). The ROM of forearm was as follows: pronation 40-90 degrees (mean, 68.3 degrees) and supination 30-80 degrees (mean, 59.6 degrees). There were significant differences in the ROM between before operation and after operation (P wrist score, the results were excellent in 17 cases, good in 12, and fair in 2. Wrist joint reconstruction with vascularized fibular head graft can restore

  15. Osteoarticular Allograft Reconstruction of the Distal Radius After Giant Cell Tumor Resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Modaresnejad

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Background:Resection of the distal end of the radius is indicated in the treatment of locally aggressive primary benign and malignant bone tumors.The aim of this study  was to evaluate the technique of osteoarticular allograft reconstruction of the distal radius after wide excision of a giant-cell tumor.Methods: We analyzed 15 patients retrospectively who had reconstruction of the  distal aspect of the radius with use of an osteoarticular allograft, between 1981 and   2005 after excision of a giant-cell tumor with a minimum follow-up of 2 years (range:   26–125 months, median: 45 months.  Results: 15 consecutive patients with a Campanacci grade 3 giant-cell tumor of the  distal radius formed the study population. Three patients had a local recurrence at 8, 14  and 18 months. Non-union of the osteotomy line was diagnosed 6 months after surgery  in one case and needed bone grafting. Distal radio–ulnar joint instability was observed  in nine cases. Subchondral bone alterations and joint narrowing were present in all cases but were painful in only one patient. Five patients needed a revision of the osteoarticular allograft, at an average of 5.4 years (range: 0.8 to 12 years after the initial reconstruction. The reason for the revision was a fracture of the allograft in four patients and recurrence of the tumor in one. Of the fifteen patients in whom the osteoarticular allograft survived, five patients reported no functional limitation, eight had limitation in  the ability to perform strenuous activities, and two had limitation in the ability to perform  moderate activities. The average range of motion of the wrist was 35 degrees of dorsiflexion, 30 degrees of volar flexion, 10 degrees of radial deviation, 14 degrees of ulnar deviation, 55 degrees of supination, and 70 degrees of pronation.Conclusion: Reconstruction of the distal aspect of the radius with use of an osteoarticular allograft was associated with a low rate of recurrence

  16. Mannose-binding lectin variant alleles and HLA-DR4 alleles are associated with giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Soren; Baslund, Bo; Madsen, Hans Ole

    2002-01-01

    To determine whether variant alleles of the mannose-binding lectin (MBL) gene causing low serum concentrations of MBL and/or polymorphisms of HLA-DRB1 are associated with increased susceptibility to polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) and giant cell arteritis (GCA) or particular clinical phenotypes of PMR/GCA....

  17. Limited regression of central giant cell granuloma by interferon alpha after failed calcitonin therapy: a report of 2 cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Lange, J.; van den Akker, H.P.; van den Berg, H.; Richel, D.J.; Gortzak, R.A.T.

    2006-01-01

    Central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) is a benign lesion of the jaws with a sometimes locally aggressive behaviour. The most common therapy is surgical curettage which has a high recurrence rate, especially in lesions with aggressive signs and symptoms (i.e. pain, paresthesia, root-resorption and

  18. Giant cell tumors of the sacrum-a nationwide study on midterm results in 26 patients after intralesional excision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, L. van der; Sande, M.A.B. van der; Geest, I.C.M. van der; Schreuder, H.W.B.; Royen, B.J. van; Jutte, P.C.; Bramer, J.A.; Oner, F.C.; Noort-Suijdendorp, A.P. van; Kroon, H.M.; Dijkstra, P.D.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Evaluation of recurrences, complications and function at mid-term follow-up after curettage for sacral giant cell tumor (GCT). METHODS: We retrospectively studied all 26 patients treated for sacral GCT in the Netherlands (from 1990 to 2010). Median follow-up was 98 (6-229) months. All

  19. Cellular localization of metabotropic glutamate receptors in cortical tubers and subependymal giant cell tumors of tuberous sclerosis complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, K. [=Karin; Troost, D.; Timmermans, W.; Gorter, J. A.; Spliet, W. G. M.; Nellist, M.; Jansen, F.; Aronica, E.

    2008-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant disorder associated with cortical malformations (cortical tubers) and the development of glial tumors (subependymal giant-cell tumors, SGCTs). Expression of metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) subtypes is developmentally regulated and

  20. Squamous cell carcinoma arising in a giant epidermal cyst of the perineum: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumi, Yuki; Yamamoto, Naoto; Kiyosawa, Tomoharu

    2012-09-01

    This case pertains to a 76-year-old woman with a giant cyst in the perineum. Extirpation was performed. The result of a pathological investigation was squamous cell carcinoma arising in an epidermal cyst. An epidermal cyst is necessary to conduct an examination bearing in mind the possibility of a malignant tumour.

  1. Giant cell tumors of the sacrum-a nationwide study on midterm results in 26 patients after intralesional excision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, L.; van de Sande, M. A. J.; van der Geest, I. C. M.; Schreuder, H. W. B.; van Royen, B. J.; Jutte, P. C.; Bramer, J. A. M.; Oner, F. C.; van Noort-Suijdendorp, A. P.; Kroon, H. M.; Dijkstra, P. D. S.

    Evaluation of recurrences, complications and function at mid-term follow-up after curettage for sacral giant cell tumor (GCT). We retrospectively studied all 26 patients treated for sacral GCT in the Netherlands (from 1990 to 2010). Median follow-up was 98 (6-229) months. All patients underwent

  2. Giant cell tumors of the sacrum-a nationwide study on midterm results in 26 patients after intralesional excision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, L.; van der Sande, M.; van der Geest, I.; Schreuder, H.; van Royen, B.; Jutte, P.; Bramer, J.; Oner, F.; van Noort-Suijdendorp, A.; Kroon, H.; Dijkstra, P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluation of recurrences, complications and function at mid-term follow-up after curettage for sacral giant cell tumor (GCT). Methods: We retrospectively studied all 26 patients treated for sacral GCT in the Netherlands (from 1990 to 2010). Median follow-up was 98 (6-229) months. All

  3. Combination therapies for the treatment of recurrent central giant cell lesion in the maxilla: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Jefferson Paulo; Olivete, Fernanda; de Oliveira, Naylin Danyele; Giovanini, Allan Fernando; Zielak, João César; Klüppel, Leandro; Scariot, Rafaela

    2017-03-20

    Central giant cell lesion is a non-neoplastic proliferation, usually asymptomatic, of unknown etiology. The purpose of this case report is to report the diagnosis and the treatment of a recurrent central giant cell lesion in the maxilla. A 31-year-old Brazilian woman presented to our Surgery Service for evaluation of a cystic lesion in her teeth 13 and 15, although she had previously received endodontic treatment for her teeth 13 and 15 without regression of the lesion. On clinical examination, an increase and painless swelling was observed in her right jaw. An excisional biopsy of the lesion was performed under general anesthesia; the material was sent for pathological examination and a diagnosis compatible with central giant cell lesion was made. She presented again, 10 months after the removal of the lesion, with a recurrent lesion that surrounded her incisors, canine, and right premolar. We suggested that she underwent treatment with intralesional corticosteroids injection. The lesion was significantly reduced and the remainder of the lesion was enucleated. She is monitored at 3-month intervals; at 6 months postoperatively there has been no recurrence. Central giant cell lesion can have a high degree of invasiveness, which increases the importance of early diagnosis. Combination therapies can provide a favorable prognosis. Periodic monitoring is recommended, thus avoiding the chance of a relapse.

  4. Giant-Cell Tumor of the Distal Ulna Treated by Wide Resection and Ulnar Support Reconstruction: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akio Minami

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant-cell tumor of bone occurred in the distal end of the ulna is extremely uncommon. A 23-year-old male had a giant-cell tumor occurred in the distal end of the ulna. After wide resection of the distal segment of the ulna including giant-cell tumor, ulnar components of the wrist joint were reconstructed with modified Sauvé-Kapandji procedure using the iliac bone graft, preserving the triangular fibrocartilage complex and ulnar collateral ligament in order to maintain ulnar support of the wrist, and the proximal stump of the resected ulna was stabilized by tenodesis using the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon. One year after operation, the patient's wrist was pain-free and had a full range of motion. Postoperative X-rays showed no abnormal findings including recurrence of the giant-cell tumor and ulnar translation of the entire carpus. The stability of the proximal stump of the distal ulna was also maintained.

  5. Giant-Cell Tumor of the Distal Ulna Treated by Wide Resection and Ulnar Support Reconstruction: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Akio; Iwasaki, Norimasa; Nishida, Kinya; Motomiya, Makoto; Yamada, Katsuhisa; Momma, Daisuke

    2010-01-01

    Giant-cell tumor of bone occurred in the distal end of the ulna is extremely uncommon. A 23-year-old male had a giant-cell tumor occurred in the distal end of the ulna. After wide resection of the distal segment of the ulna including giant-cell tumor, ulnar components of the wrist joint were reconstructed with modified Sauvé-Kapandji procedure using the iliac bone graft, preserving the triangular fibrocartilage complex and ulnar collateral ligament in order to maintain ulnar support of the wrist, and the proximal stump of the resected ulna was stabilized by tenodesis using the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon. One year after operation, the patient's wrist was pain-free and had a full range of motion. Postoperative X-rays showed no abnormal findings including recurrence of the giant-cell tumor and ulnar translation of the entire carpus. The stability of the proximal stump of the distal ulna was also maintained. PMID:20592994

  6. Multinucleated giant cell formation induced by IFN-gamma/IL-3 is associated with restriction of virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell to cell invasion in human monocyte monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, T F

    1998-09-15

    One of the hallmarks of an effective immune response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the formation of granulomas containing multinucleated giant cells. IFN-gamma and interleukin-3 (IL-3) promote Langhans-type multinucleated giant cell formation and have been identified in T cell clones reacting to M. tuberculosis antigens. The ability of human monocytes treated with IFN-gamma and IL-3 to limit the spread of M. tuberculosis in an in vitro infection assay was examined. Monocytes were incubated with control medium, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, and calcitriol, a combination permissive to M. tuberculosis growth, or IFN-gamma and IL-3 and infected with a low inoculum of M. tuberculosis (Erdman). IFN-gamma/IL-3 treatment reduced M. tuberculosis CFU relative to both untreated and IFN-gamma/TNF-alpha/calcitriol-treated monocytes. Specifically, CFU were reduced by 79% at 14 days in the IFN-gamma/IL-3 treatment group relative to the IFN-gamma/TNF-alpha/calcitriol treatment group, an effect that was not due to toxic monocyte metabolites. M. tuberculosis growth restriction by IFN-gamma/IL-3-treated monocyte monolayers was associated with the development of Langhans-type multinucleated giant cells. At the light microscope level, dense growth of M. tuberculosis surrounded by a ring of nuclei localized to the center of individual cells. The intracellular location of M. tuberculosis was confirmed by electron microscopy. In contrast, monocyte monolayers treated with IFN-gamma/TNF-alpha/calcitriol consisted of a syncitium of cells containing monocyte aggregates. Nonlocalized linear arrays of M. tuberculosis were observed to be growing throughout such aggregates. These results suggest that physical sequestration of M. tuberculosis by Langhans-type multinucleated giant cells may limit cell to cell spread of this pathogen, thereby restricting growth. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  7. Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath mimicking a plexiform neurofibroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swagata Arvind Tambe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant-cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCTTS is a benign soft tissue tumor of the limbs arising from the complex of the tendon sheath and periarticular soft tissues of small joints. It is the second most common benign space occupying lesion in the hand and usually presents as a painless soft tissue mass, which grows slowly in size for many years. We present an interesting case of an enormous GCTTS presenting as a slowly growing mass over left sole of a 52-year-old woman. The duration of GCTTS may range from a few weeks to 30 years but in our case the duration of tumor was almost 48 years, which could be the longest reported duration of GCTTS.

  8. Acute tetraplegia and cardiac arrest following high cervical leptomeningeal metastasis of giant cell glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammerman, Joshua M; Kerr, P Benjamin; Roberti, Fabio

    2011-08-01

    Giant cell glioblastoma multiforme (gcGBM) is an unusual subtype of high-grade glioma (grade IV, World Health Organization classification). We report a patient with a rare acute tetraplegia, followed by lethal cardiac arrest, who had undergone a prior resection of a supratentorial gcGBM. Neuroradiological workup revealed a large, high cervical compressive leptomeningeal mass consistent with a drop metastasis. Due to the possibility of a rapid clinical deterioration in patients with high cervical cord compression, the diagnosis of drop metastasis to the spine should be considered in patients with a previous history of supratentorial GBM who present with acute diffuse motor weakness. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Spinal leptomeningeal metastases of giant cell glioblastoma associated with subarachnoid haemorrhage: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C C; Kuwana, N; Ito, S; Koike, Y; Kitamura, H

    2001-01-01

    A case of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) due to spinal leptomeningeal metastases of a giant cell glioblastoma is described. A 51 year old male presented with a four week history of headache. Neurological examination was normal except for a slight left hemiparesis. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a large cyst with a mural nodule in the right temporal lobe. The tumour was removed followed by 60 Gy of radiation therapy. Thirty-two months later he developed headache and shoulder pain with symptoms of normal pressure hydrocephalus. Head CT showed ventriculomegaly and SAH. Magnetic resonance imaging showed spinal leptomeningeal metastases at the C4-5, T12, and L2 levels, but no local recurrence or tumour dissemination in the brain. He died 34 months after surgery. Autopsy revealed diffuse SAH over the whole brain and spinal cord, associated with spinal leptomeningeal metastases, but no cerebral aneurysms. Spinal radiotherapy and ventriculoperitoneal shunting could possibly have extended survival in this patient.

  10. Laser interstitial thermal therapy for subependymal giant cell astrocytoma: technical case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadey, David Y A; Kamath, Ashwin A; Leuthardt, Eric C; Smyth, Matthew D

    2016-10-01

    Subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) is a rare tumor occurring almost exclusively in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex. Although open resection remains the standard therapy, complication rates remain high. To minimize morbidity, less invasive approaches, such as endoscope-assisted resection, radiosurgery, and chemotherapy with mTOR pathway inhibitors, are also used to treat these lesions. Laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) is a relatively new modality that is increasingly used to treat a variety of intracranial lesions. In this report, the authors describe two pediatric cases of SEGA that were treated with LITT. In both patients the lesion responded well to this treatment modality, with tumor shrinkage observed on follow-up MRI. These cases highlight the potential of LITT to serve as a viable minimally invasive therapeutic approach to the management of SEGAs in the pediatric population.

  11. Giant cell tumour in the foot of a skeletally immature girl: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Baker, Joseph F

    2009-08-01

    We present a case of delayed diagnosis of a benign giant cell tumour (GCT) of the third metatarsal in a skeletally immature girl. The patient underwent en bloc excision of the tumour. The tumour had replaced the third metatarsal and had infiltrated the surrounding soft tissue and the second and fourth metatarsal bases. Deep, lateral and medial margins were all involved. A high index of suspicion is needed when evaluating any tumours of the foot, because the compact structure of the foot may delay diagnosis. Early detection is important for avoiding amputation, as the hindfoot and midfoot are classified as one compartment and radical resection is impossible to achieve. Tumours grow faster in the foot than in other bones. GCT in this location and age-group are rare and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a destructive bony lesion in skeletally immature patients.

  12. Comprehensive management of an orthognathic surgery patient with aggressive central giant cell granuloma of the mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Reza J; Closmann, James J; Pogrel, M Anthony

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a case involving a 16-year-old boy who came to the Tripler Army Medical Center Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery with a central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) on the anterior mandible. Initial management consisted of surgical curettage and intralesional injection of corticosteroids. Upon completion of steroid therapy, there was clinical and radiographic evidence of remission; however, radiographic evidence of lesion recurrence was seen at a six-month follow-up visit. The CGCG was retreated with curettage and five months of systemic injections of calcitonin, both of which failed. The lesion was most likely an aggressive form of CGCG that progressed despite conservative therapy, with destruction of hard and soft tissues, root resorption, tooth displacement, and paraesthesia in the anterior mandible. The authors present a treatment algorithm with comprehensive management involving surgical resection, reconstruction, orthodontics, and orthognathic surgery with prosthodontic considerations.

  13. Aneurysmal bone cyst: Rarity in mandible and its ambiguity with Central giant cell granuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anagha Shete

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aneurysmal bone cyst is an uncommon lesion which has been found in most bones of the skeleton, although the majority occur in the long bones and in the spine. It was first described as a distinct clinical entity by Jaffe and Lichenstein in 1942 to describe the -characteristic "blow-out" of the bone seen in the radiographs of the lesion. In the past, the lesion has been classified as an atypical giant cell tumor or benign bone cyst. We report a case of an aneurysmal bone cyst in an 18-year-old patient who reported with the chief complaint of swelling on the right side of the face since 4 months. It was non-tender, non-fluctuant, and hard in consistency. Radiographic examination revealed a large, expansile, multilocular lesion suggestive of benign odontogenic tumor. Complete enucleation was carried out and the final histopathologic diagnosis of aneurysmal bone cyst was given.

  14. Interstitial Lung Disease as an Initial Manifestation of Giant Cell Arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Chisato; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Nakai, Erika; Nishi, Kenta; Ishikawa, Ryoichi; Uematsu, Shinya; Nakao, Satoshi; Taki, Masato; Morita, Kyohei; Hee, Hwang Moon; Yoshimura, Chie; Wakayama, Toshiaki; Nishizaka, Yasuo

    2017-10-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) has rarely been reported as a manifestation of giant cell arteritis (GCA). We herein report a unique case of GCA in a 76-year-old woman who presented with ILD as an initial manifestation of GCA. Ten years before admission, she had been diagnosed with granulomatous ILD of unknown etiology. Corticosteroid therapy induced remission. One year after the cessation of corticosteroid therapy, she was admitted with a persistent fever. After admission, she developed left oculomotor paralysis. Positron emission tomography with 2-deoxy-2-[fluorine-18]fluoro-D-glucose integrated with computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) proved extremely useful in establishing the diagnosis. Our case promotes awareness of GCA as a possible diagnosis for granulomatous ILD with unknown etiology.

  15. Salvage of foot with extensive giant cell tumour with transfer of vascularised fibular bone graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Tharayil

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Though giant cell tumor is not uncommon in young adults, simultaneous involvement of multiple mid-foot bones is very uncommon and very difficult to treat. For reconstruction of large segmental bony defects following tumour excision, free vascularized bone graft is an excellent surgical option. We report a case with extensive involvement of all the tarsal bones and metatarsal bases in a young adult. After excision his foot was reconstructed with vascularised bone flap. We were able to save his foot after a wide local excision and reconstruction with free fibula graft. Graft united early and showed excellent remodelling because of good vascularity. We feel that this method deserves consideration as a last attempt to salvage functional foot in disease like this.

  16. A case of recurrent giant cell tumor of bone with malignant transformation and benign pulmonary metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gray Robert

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Giant cell tumor (GCT of bone is a locally destructive tumor that occurs predominantly in long bones of post-pubertal adolescents and young adults, where it occurs in the epiphysis. The majority are treated by aggressive curettage or resection. Vascular invasion outside the boundary of the tumor can be seen. Metastasis, with identical morphology to the primary tumor, occurs in a few percent of cases, usually to the lung. On occasion GCTs of bone undergo frank malignant transformation to undifferentiated sarcomas. Here we report a case of GCT of bone that at the time of recurrence was found to have undergone malignant transformation. Concurrent metastases were found in the lung, but these were non-transformed GCT.

  17. Aortitis due to giant cell arteritis and psoriatic arthritis: An uncommon association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cezón de la Cruz, M Del Pilar; Almodóvar, Raquel; García Pérez, Javier; Dhimes, Patricia Fanny; Zarco, Pedro

    We report the case of a 65-year-old woman with psoriatic arthritis who developed aortitis secondary to giant cell arteritis. She presented with a 2-mounth history of dry cough, fever and fatigue. There was no evidence of tumor or infectious processes. Abdominal computed tomographic and computed tomography coronary angiographic findings were suggestive of aortitis. Histological study of a temporal artery biopsy confirmed temporal arteritis. We also review the available literature on this uncommon condition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  18. Medical management of a case of central giant cell granuloma masquerading as a periapical pathosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji Babu Bangi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lesions of non-endodontic origin may mimic periapical pathosis. Errors in one or more of the clinical reasoning steps of diagnosis of such lesions may ultimately lead to misdiagnosis and ensuing complications. Central giant cell granuloma (CGCG is one such lesion of non-endodontic origin which can present as periapical pathosis. Here, we present a case of CGCG in a 33-year-old female patient who visited our department with a complaint of growth from the extraction sockets of upper front teeth, which were extracted 1 month back after a misdiagnosis as periapical pathosis. Suspecting a non-endodontic lesion, radiographic examination and incisional biopsy were performed and a final diagnosis of CGCG was made. Biweekly intra-lesional steroids were given for 6 weeks and patient was followed up for 6 months.

  19. Spinal cord infarction in giant cell arteritis associated with scalp necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Khader N; Hadidy, Azmy; Joudeh, Anwar; Obeidat, Fatima Nouri; Abdulfattah, Khalid W

    2015-02-01

    Spinal cord infarction is extremely rare in patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA). There are only four case reports in the literature. We describe a 65-year-old man who presented with sudden paraplegia and back pain of 4-days duration with sensory loss below the umbilicus and bilateral scalp necrosis. Magnetic resonance imaging finding was consistent with dorsal spinal cord infarction. Biopsy of the temporal artery confirmed the diagnosis of GCA. The patient was treated with high dose of corticosteroids, which resulted in healing of the scalp ulcerations in 3 weeks, but the paraplegia was irreversible. To our knowledge, this is the first report of spinal cord infarction and simultaneous occurrence of bilateral scalp necrosis in a histopathologically proven GCA. Although literature about spinal cord involvement in GCA is very limited, cord infarction is associated with high mortality and therapeutic challenges since little is understood regarding the pathogenesis that leads to infarction.

  20. Immunohistochemical and transmission electron microscopy study regarding myofibroblasts in fibroinflammatory epulis and giant cell peripheral granuloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filioreanu, Ana Maria; Popescu, Eugenia; Cotrutz, C; Cotrutz, Carmen Elena

    2009-01-01

    Fibroblasts represent the main cellular population in the connective tissue; they have a central role in extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis, degradation and remodeling. These cells may express a substantial heterogeneity regarding their morphology and functions in pathological conditions and during tissue remodeling. Myofibroblasts are a good example for heterogeneity and phenotypical changes. These cells can be morphologically and immunologically defined by the expression of specific cytoskeleton proteins. Myofibroblasts show cytoplasmic actin microfilaments organized as stress fibers and interconnected by gap or adherens junctions. These cells come also in contact with extracellular matrix by focal contacts. Myofibroblasts play fundamental roles in pathologic conditions, even by activation and proliferation or by deletion. Moreover, these cells seem to be involved in formation and repair of the ECM compounds, proliferation and differentiation of the epithelial, vascular or neurogenic elements. The purpose of the present study is to emphasize the presence and distribution of myofibroblasts in the reactive stromal tissue of granulation tumors in the oral area, fibroinflammatory epulis and giant cells peripheral granuloma, by means of immunocytochemical and transmission electron microscopy studies. Both tumor types shown a common characteristic of the presence of reactive inflammatory stromal tissue and myofibroblasts are a common issue.

  1. MRI in giant cell (temporal) arteritis; Magnetresonanztomografie der Arteriitis temporalis Horton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bley, T.A.; Uhl, M.; Frydrychowicz, A.; Langer, M. [Uniklinik Freiburg (Germany). Roentgendiagnostik; Markl, M. [Uniklinik Freiburg (Germany). Roentgendiagnostik - Medizinische Physik

    2007-07-15

    Giant cell (temporal) arteritis is a diagnostic challenge. Blindness is a dreaded complication, especially if high-dose steroid treatment is delayed. With an optimized MR protocol, noninvasive diagnosis of giant cell arteritis is facilitated. Submillimeter in-plane resolution makes it possible to distinguish healthy segments from inflamed segments. The lumen and arterial wall can be depicted in high detail. Post-contrast high-resolution MRI visualizes the superficial cranial arteries bilaterally and simultaneously, allowing assessment of the cranial involvement pattern. In combination with MR angiography of the aortic arch and supra-aortic arteries, the extracranial involvement pattern can be demonstrated in a single comprehensive MR examination assessing the cranial, cervical and thoracic vasculature. Good diagnostic image quality can be achieved at 1.5 Tesla and at 3 Tesla. However, due to higher signal-to-noise ratios, image quality seems to be superior at 3 Tesla. Over the course of successful long-term treatment, MR signs of mural inflammation decrease significantly and eventually vanish entirely. In contrast to color-coded Duplex sonography, which is a comparatively cost-efficient imaging modality, acquisition of high-resolution MRI is almost independent of the investigator's expertise. Compared to positron emission tomography with 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose, which is a very sensitive whole-body screening tool for detecting extracranial involvement of large vessel vasculitis, MRI allows visualization and assessment of both the superficial cranial arteries in high detail and the extracranial large artery involvement in the same investigation. (orig.)

  2. Giant cell tumor of the bone: aggressive case initially treated with denosumab and intralesional surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Von Borstel, Donald; Strle, Nicholas A. [Oklahoma State University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Tulsa, OK (United States); Taguibao, Roberto A. [University of California, Irvine, UCI Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Orange, CA (United States); Burns, Joseph E. [University of California, Irvine, UCI Medical Center, Department of Radiological Sciences, Orange, CA (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Giant cell tumor of the bone (GCTB) is a locally aggressive benign tumor, which has historically been treated with wide surgical excision. We report a case of a 29-year-old male with histology-proven GCTB of the distal ulna. The initial imaging study was a contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination of the left wrist, which was from an outside facility performed before presenting to our institution. On the initial MRI, the lesion had homogenous T2-hyperintense and T1-hypointense signal with expansive remodeling of the osseous contour. A radiographic study performed upon presentation to our institution 1 month later showed progression of the lesion with atypical imaging characteristics. After confirming the diagnosis, denosumab therapy was implemented allowing for reconstitution of bone and intralesional treatment. The patient was treated with five doses of denosumab over the duration of 7 weeks. Therapeutic changes of the GCTB were evaluated by radiography and a post-treatment MRI. This MRI was interpreted as suspicious for worsening disease due to the imaging appearance of intralesional signal heterogeneity, increased perilesional fluid-like signal, and circumferential cortical irregularity. However, on subsequent intralesional curettage and bone autografting 6 weeks later, no giant cells were seen on the specimen. Thus, the appearance on the MRI, rather than representing a manifestation of lesion aggressiveness or a non-responding tumor, conversely represented the imaging appearance of a positive response to denosumab therapy. On follow-up evaluation, 5 months after intralesional treatment, the patient had recurrent disease and is now scheduled for wide-excision with joint prosthesis. (orig.)

  3. Therapeutic radiotherapy for giant cell tumor of the spine: a systemic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yifei; Xu, Wei; Yin, Huabin; Huang, Quan; Liu, Tielong; Yang, Xinghai; Wei, Haifeng; Xiao, Jianru

    2015-08-01

    Giant cell tumor of the bone (GCTB) is a benign but locally aggressive tumor. Giant cell tumor of the spine (GCTS) accounts for 3-6 % of GCTB. Surgery remains the treatment of choice. For those not suitable for surgery, therapeutic radiotherapy (RT) is one classic modality. Although there are several articles on therapeutic RT for GCTS therapy, few systemic reviews have been performed on effects of therapeutic RT on GCTS. We searched EMBASE and Medline databases for papers reporting therapeutic radiotherapy for GCTS patients not suitable for surgical resection. The inclusion criteria and prognosis indicators have been defined prior to data extraction. Information of the included patients has been discreetly recorded. We analyzed the prognosis of therapeutic RT and multiple data concerning the GCTS patients. The indicators for prognosis were computed by SPSS software. The local control (LC) and overall survival (OS) rate was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. p values ≤0.5 were considered statistically significant. We included 13 studies comprising 42 patients who received therapeutic radiotherapy with doses ranging from 21 to 80 Gy. The results suggested a response rate of 100 %, OS of 97.6 %, 1-year local control rate (LC) of 85.4 %, 2-year LC rate of 80.2 %, and overall LC of 79 %. No patient reported malignant transformation albeit four had post-RT neurological complications. Four had distant metastasis of the tumor. Patients with previously repeated recurrence had worse prognosis after RT (p = 0.028). No association between dosage and prognosis was found. Therapeutic RT could provide a satisfactory prognosis for GCTS patients according to this study, and can be an alternative treatment modality for GCTS patients not suitable for surgery.

  4. Customized iliac prosthesis for reconstruction in giant cell tumour: A unique treatment approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Tarun; Sharma, Ankur; Sharma, Amit; Maini, Lalit

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumour (GCT) of flat bones of pelvis is extremely rare. GCT of the ilium and ischium represent less than 0.05% of all GCT. Iliac bone GCT has been treated traditionally by intra-lesion curettage with bone grafting, wide resection with or without reconstruction and hemi-pelvectomy in very aggressive tumours. None of the above treatments were without morbidities. Reconstruction using bone grafts and bone cement has also been inadequate. In GCT, where life expectancy is not decreased significantly, surgical treatment should be aimed at giving optimum functional outcome. We are reporting here a rare case of giant cell tumour of ilium bone in a 25-year-old female and its unique treatment approach. We designed a computed tomography (CT) based customized iliac prosthesis using Materialise Mimics and 3-Matic software. 3D model of pelvis was generated from the CT. After deciding the extent of resection on affected side, we virtually mirrored an identical portion of opposite ilium to the affected side. Connecting plates were made over the mirrored part and merged with it. Multiple relevant holes were made to attach various muscles to the prosthesis. Prosthesis was made in medical grade titanium by using Computerized Numerical Control (CNC) machine. The method is called as computer based subtractive manufacturing. Wide resection was done and the prosthesis was placed using multiple 3.5 millimetres screws through the connecting plates. Muscles were stitched to relevant holes using ethibond suture. Post-operative course was unremarkable. Patient was made to walk with full weight bearing after 5 weeks. Powers of abductors at 6 months is 4/5 and patient walks normally without a limp.

  5. Surgical management of giant cell tumor of axis vertebra: review of fourteen cases in literature with a case illustration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyarthee Guru Dutta

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Primary spinal giant cell tumor (PSGCT considered as rare primary neoplasm, with predilection for subarticular location and commonly located at knee joint region, sacrum or distal radius, however, spinal involvent is uncommon and comparatively much rarer in the cervical spine. Further occurrence of giant cell tumor in the Axis vertebra is extremely uncommon and easily misdiagnosed and, thus, treatment is still debated and various treatment modalities and different surgical approaches were utilized during evolution of surgical management. Authors could collect only 14 cases of primary giant cell tumor affecting Axis vertebra in a detailed Pubmed and Medline search, out of which 12 cases were primary and rest two case was recurrent. So authors reviewed in total thirteen cases primary giant cell tumor of Axis managed surgically, including our case. Out of 13 PSGCT, twelve cases were managed with surgical resection and the rest one case was managed with monoclonal antibody using Denosomab monotherapy without any surgical intervention. In the surgical group (n=12, nine cases had two staged surgical procedure, first being posterior fixation followed by anterior approach with resection of tumor while, the rest three had one stage surgical resection including current case. Authors reports a unique case of spinal giant cell tumor developing in a- 38 - year male with history of renal transplant, presented with neck pain and difficulty in walking, neuroimaging revealed a osteolytic mass lesion involving body of axis vertebra with extension into right sided lamina, underwent two stage complete surgical intervention. Authors describes management of such rare locally recurring primary bony pathology affecting axis vertebra as it is not only interesting and challenging and different management modalities, various, surgical approaches and issue of renal osteodystrophy along with pertinent literature is also reviewed briefly.

  6. Introducing micrometer-sized artificial objects into live cells: a method for cell-giant unilamellar vesicle electrofusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Akira C; Ogura, Toshihiko; Fujiwara, Kei; Murata, Satoshi; Nomura, Shin-ichiro M

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report a method for introducing large objects of up to a micrometer in diameter into cultured mammalian cells by electrofusion of giant unilamellar vesicles. We prepared GUVs containing various artificial objects using a water-in-oil (w/o) emulsion centrifugation method. GUVs and dispersed HeLa cells were exposed to an alternating current (AC) field to induce a linear cell-GUV alignment, and then a direct current (DC) pulse was applied to facilitate transient electrofusion. With uniformly sized fluorescent beads as size indexes, we successfully and efficiently introduced beads of 1 µm in diameter into living cells along with a plasmid mammalian expression vector. Our electrofusion did not affect cell viability. After the electrofusion, cells proliferated normally until confluence was reached, and the introduced fluorescent beads were inherited during cell division. Analysis by both confocal microscopy and flow cytometry supported these findings. As an alternative approach, we also introduced a designed nanostructure (DNA origami) into live cells. The results we report here represent a milestone for designing artificial symbiosis of functionally active objects (such as micro-machines) in living cells. Moreover, our technique can be used for drug delivery, tissue engineering, and cell manipulation.

  7. Introducing micrometer-sized artificial objects into live cells: a method for cell-giant unilamellar vesicle electrofusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira C Saito

    Full Text Available Here, we report a method for introducing large objects of up to a micrometer in diameter into cultured mammalian cells by electrofusion of giant unilamellar vesicles. We prepared GUVs containing various artificial objects using a water-in-oil (w/o emulsion centrifugation method. GUVs and dispersed HeLa cells were exposed to an alternating current (AC field to induce a linear cell-GUV alignment, and then a direct current (DC pulse was applied to facilitate transient electrofusion. With uniformly sized fluorescent beads as size indexes, we successfully and efficiently introduced beads of 1 µm in diameter into living cells along with a plasmid mammalian expression vector. Our electrofusion did not affect cell viability. After the electrofusion, cells proliferated normally until confluence was reached, and the introduced fluorescent beads were inherited during cell division. Analysis by both confocal microscopy and flow cytometry supported these findings. As an alternative approach, we also introduced a designed nanostructure (DNA origami into live cells. The results we report here represent a milestone for designing artificial symbiosis of functionally active objects (such as micro-machines in living cells. Moreover, our technique can be used for drug delivery, tissue engineering, and cell manipulation.

  8. Multiple skin cancers in a single patient: Multiple pigmented Bowen′s disease, giant basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Saini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma (BCC and squamous cell carcinoma are the most common type of nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs. Bowen′s disease (BD, a premalignant condition, has a marginal potential (3-5% to progress to invasive carcinoma. We report here a rarest of a rare case of multiple pigmented BD with overlying squamous cell cancer along with a giant neglected BCC on the scalp of a 76-year-old man. The occurrence of multiple BD and NMSC in a single patient compelled us to explore the following hypothesis: (1 The multiple precancerous and cancerous lesions can be due to common etiopathogenesis. Chronic ultraviolet exposure, immunosupresssion, human papillomavirus infection, dietary factors, and environmental factors including arsenic exposure were probed in to. (2 There is evolution of precancerous lesions into a different type of cancers in different time frame. (3 The new cancerous lesions are subsequent cancers that developed after neglected untreated primary cancer.

  9. The Macronuclear Genome of Stentor coeruleus Reveals Tiny Introns in a Giant Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slabodnick, Mark M; Ruby, J Graham; Reiff, Sarah B; Swart, Estienne C; Gosai, Sager; Prabakaran, Sudhakaran; Witkowska, Ewa; Larue, Graham E; Fisher, Susan; Freeman, Robert M; Gunawardena, Jeremy; Chu, William; Stover, Naomi A; Gregory, Brian D; Nowacki, Mariusz; Derisi, Joseph; Roy, Scott W; Marshall, Wallace F; Sood, Pranidhi

    2017-02-20

    The giant, single-celled organism Stentor coeruleus has a long history as a model system for studying pattern formation and regeneration in single cells. Stentor [1, 2] is a heterotrichous ciliate distantly related to familiar ciliate models, such as Tetrahymena or Paramecium. The primary distinguishing feature of Stentor is its incredible size: a single cell is 1 mm long. Early developmental biologists, including T.H. Morgan [3], were attracted to the system because of its regenerative abilities-if large portions of a cell are surgically removed, the remnant reorganizes into a normal-looking but smaller cell with correct proportionality [2, 3]. These biologists were also drawn to Stentor because it exhibits a rich repertoire of behaviors, including light avoidance, mechanosensitive contraction, food selection, and even the ability to habituate to touch, a simple form of learning usually seen in higher organisms [4]. While early microsurgical approaches demonstrated a startling array of regenerative and morphogenetic processes in this single-celled organism, Stentor was never developed as a molecular model system. We report the sequencing of the Stentor coeruleus macronuclear genome and reveal key features of the genome. First, we find that Stentor uses the standard genetic code, suggesting that ciliate-specific genetic codes arose after Stentor branched from other ciliates. We also discover that ploidy correlates with Stentor's cell size. Finally, in the Stentor genome, we discover the smallest spliceosomal introns reported for any species. The sequenced genome opens the door to molecular analysis of single-cell regeneration in Stentor. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Danger signaling protein HMGB1 induces a distinct form of cell death accompanied by formation of giant mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gdynia, Georg; Keith, Martina; Kopitz, Jürgen; Bergmann, Marion; Fassl, Anne; Weber, Alexander N R; George, Julie; Kees, Tim; Zentgraf, Hans-Walter; Wiestler, Otmar D; Schirmacher, Peter; Roth, Wilfried

    2010-11-01

    Cells dying by necrosis release the high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein, which has immunostimulatory effects. However, little is known about the direct actions of extracellular HMGB1 protein on cancer cells. Here, we show that recombinant human HMGB1 (rhHMGB1) exerts strong cytotoxic effects on malignant tumor cells. The rhHMGB1-induced cytotoxicity depends on the presence of mitochondria and leads to fast depletion of mitochondrial DNA, severe damage of the mitochondrial proteome by toxic malondialdehyde adducts, and formation of giant mitochondria. The formation of giant mitochondria is independent of direct nuclear signaling events, because giant mitochondria are also observed in cytoplasts lacking nuclei. Further, the reactive oxygen species scavenger N-acetylcysteine as well as c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase blockade inhibited the cytotoxic effect of rhHMGB1. Importantly, glioblastoma cells, but not normal astrocytes, were highly susceptible to rhHMGB1-induced cell death. Systemic treatment with rhHMGB1 results in significant growth inhibition of xenografted tumors in vivo. In summary, rhHMGB1 induces a distinct form of cell death in cancer cells, which differs from the known forms of apoptosis, autophagy, and senescence, possibly representing an important novel mechanism of specialized necrosis. Further, our findings suggest that rhHMGB1 may offer therapeutic applications in treatment of patients with malignant brain tumors. ©2010 AACR.

  11. Endocytotic activity in epitheloid and Langhans' giant cells. Tracer studies with ferritin in the tubulointerstitial (anti-TBM) nephritis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, K H; Thoenes, W

    1984-01-01

    In the experimental tubulo-interstitial (anti-basement membrane) nephritis in the rat, electron microscopic studies after the in vivo microinjection of native ferritin in areas of granulomatous inflammation near the surface of the kidney indicate that epitheloid and multinucleate Langhans' giant cells are capable of endocytosis and particularly of micropinocytosis. This suggests the possibility that endocytotic activities as well as secretion phenomena are important in the immune defense mechanisms linked with these "specifically" developed cells.

  12. Differentiation of primary chordoma, giant cell tumor and schwannoma of the sacrum by CT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Si, Ming-Jue, E-mail: smjsh@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Wang, Cheng-Sheng [Department of Radiology, Union Hospital, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350001 (China); Ding, Xiao-Yi, E-mail: dingxiaoyi1965@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Yuan, Fei, E-mail: yuanfeirj@hotmail.com [Department of Pathology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Du, Lian-Jun; Lu, Yong [Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Zhang, Wei-Bin [Department of Orthopedics, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2013-12-01

    Objective: To evaluate criteria to differentiate sacral chordoma (SC), sacral giant cell tumor (SGCT) and giant sacral schwannoma (GSS) with CT and MRI. Materials and methods: CT and MR images of 22 SCs, 19 SGCTs and 8 GSSs were reviewed. The clinical and imaging features of each tumor were analyzed. Results: The mean ages of SC, SGCT and GSS were 55.1 ± 10.7, 34.3 ± 10.7 and 42.4 ± 15.7 years old. SCs (77.3%) were predominantly located in the midline of lower sacrum, while most SGCTs (73.7%) and GSSs (87.5%) were eccentrically located in upper sacrum. There were significant differences in age, location, eccentricity, morphology of bone residues, intratumoral bleeding and septations. Multiple small cysts were mainly observed in SGCTs (73.7%) with large central cysts in GSSs (87.5%). SGCTs expanded mainly inside sacrum while SCs and GSSs often extended into pelvic cavity (P = 0.0022). Involvement of sacroiliac joints and muscles were also different. Ascending extension within sacral canal was only displayed in SCs. The preservation of intervertebral discs showed difference between large and small tumors (P = 0.0002), regardless of tumor type (P = 0.095). No significant difference was displayed in gender (P = 0.234) or tumor size (P = 0.0832) among three groups. Conclusion: Age, epicenter of the lesion (midline vs. eccentric and upper vs. lower sacral vertebra), bone residues, cysts, bleeding, septation, expanding pattern, muscles and sacroiliac joint involvement can be criteria for diagnosis. Fluid–fluid level is specific for SGCTs and ascending extension within the sacral canal for SCs. The preservation of intervertebral discs is related to tumor size rather than tumor type.

  13. Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma Presenting with Tumoral Bleeding: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Young; Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Kim, Seul-Kee

    2017-01-01

    We report a rare case of subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) associated with tumoral bleeding in a pediatric patient without tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). A 10-year-old girl presented with a 2-week history of an increasingly aggravating headache. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed an approximately 3.6-cm, well-defined, heterogeneously enhancing mass with multistage hemorrhages on the right-sided foramen of Monro. The tumor was completely resected using a transcallosal approach. Intraoperatively, the mass presented as a gray-colored firm tumor associated with acute and subacute hemorrhages. The origin of the mass was identified as the ventricular septum adjacent to the foramen of Monro. A pathological analysis revealed pleomorphic multinucleated eosinophilic tumor cells with abundant cytoplasm. These cells showed positive staining for the glial fibrillary acidic protein and S100 protein. A diagnosis of SEGA was established. The patient recovered without any neurological symptoms. There was no evidence of TSC. The radiological follow-up showed no recurrence for 2 years. This was a case of SEGA with intratumoral hemorrhage, for which a favorable outcome was achieved, without any neurological deficit after tumoral resection. PMID:28516078

  14. Effect of intravenous zoledronic acid on histopathology and recurrence after extended curettage in giant cell tumors of bone: A comparative prospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Zile Singh Kundu; Rajeev Sen; Ankur Dhiman; Pankaj Sharma; Ramchander Siwach; Parveen Rana

    2018-01-01

    Background: Giant cell tumor (GCT) of the bone is known for its locally aggressive behavior and tendency to recur. It is an admixture of rounded or spindle-shaped mononuclear neoplastic stromal cells and multinucleated osteoclast-like giant cells with their proportionate dispersion among the former. Zoledronic acid (a bisphosphonate) is being used in various cancers such as myelomas and metastasis, for osteoporosis with an aim to reduce the resorption of bone, and as an adjuvant treatment for...

  15. Foreign Body Giant Cell-Related Encapsulation of a Synthetic Material Three Years After Augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Jonas; Barbeck, Mike; Sader, Robert A; Kirkpatrick, Charles J; Russe, Philippe; Choukroun, Joseph; Ghanaati, Shahram

    2016-06-01

    Bone substitute materials of different origin and chemical compositions are frequently used in augmentation procedures to enlarge the local bone amount. However, relatively little data exist on the long-term tissue reactions. The presented case reports for the first time histological and histomorphometrical analyses of a nanocrystaline hydroxyapatite-based bone substitute material implanted in the human sinus cavity after an integration period of 3 years. The extracted biopsy was analyzed histologically and histomorphometrically with focus on the tissue reactions, vascularization, new bone formation, and the induction of a foreign body reaction. A comparably high rate of connective tissue (48.25%) surrounding the remaining bone substitute granules (42.13%) was observed. Accordingly, the amount of bone tissue (9.62%) built the smallest fraction within the biopsy. Further, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive and -negative multinucleated giant cells (4.35 and 3.93 cells/mm(2), respectively) were detected on the material-tissue interfaces. The implantation bed showed a mild vascularization of 10.03 vessels/mm(2) and 0.78%. The present case report shows that after 3 years, a comparable small amount of bone tissue was observable. Thus, the foreign body response to the bone substitute seems to be folded without further degradation or regeneration.

  16. Imaging Diagnosis of Central Giant Cell Granuloma showing Massive Osteoid Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sol Mi; Heo, Min Suk; Lee, Sam Sun; Choi, Soon Chul; Park, Tae Won [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology and Dental Research Institute College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-06-15

    A 19-year-old man was referred to Seoul National University Dental Hospital for evaluation of a large painless swelling of the left mandibular angle area in August, 1999. The growth had been first noted 6 years ago. He had visited other hospital in 1997. In spite of the treatment given at the hospital, the mass continued to grow rapidly. Conventional radiographs in 1999 showed an expansible, lobulated, and destructive lesion of the left mandibular body. CT scan demonstrated an expansible mass with a corticated margin. Bony septa were seen within the lesion. Internal calcification noted on the bone-setting CT image, and corresponded to the hypointense area in T1-weighted MRI image. MRI clearly delineated the extent of the lesion which had heterogenous intermediate signal intensity in T1-weighted images and heterogenous hyperintense signal intensity in T2-weighted images. The lesion was well-enhanced. Histopathologically, the lesion was completely encapsulated. Multinucleated giant cells were presented in a fibrous background, demonstrating a storiform pattern. Areas of osteoid rimmed by a few osteoblasts were scattered throughout the lesion. Inflammatory cells, blood vessels, and hemosiderin deposition were also shown. CGCG may show lots of internal calcification foci on the CT, and varied signal intensity in MRI. More cases will be needed to understand the features of the CT and MR finding of CGCG.

  17. Tumefactive foreign body giant cell reaction following high-pressure paint injection injury: A case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauzo, Shakuntala H; Swaby, Michael G; Covinsky, Michael H

    2017-05-01

    High-pressure paint injection injury is an uncommon but well-described injury. The histologic features of long-term paint injection injury with retained material are less recognized. A 46-year-old male presented clinically as "recurrent giant cell tumor of tendon sheath." The right index finger demonstrated fusiform enlargement by a pigmented mass with diffuse infiltration into the soft tissue of the hand. Histologically the tumor showed multiple giant cells in a fibrotic stroma extending into the dermis. There were multiple types of foreign material including diffuse brown black pigment, weakly optically polarizing foreign material and white inclusions with a "train track" appearance. The cells were positive for CD68 and negative for S100 antigen. Further investigation revealed that the patient had a history of high-pressure paint injection injury to his digit 6 years prior. Foreign material injected under high pressure into tissues may result in a pseudo-neoplastic foreign body granulomatous reaction that can mimic giant cell tumor of tendon sheath. Our case demonstrates that this reaction can be florid and can have slow growth over years. A high index of suspicion, a good clinical history and careful examination can distinguish these 2 entities. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Granuloma central de células gigantes Giant cells central granuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayelén María Portelles Massó

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available El granuloma reparativo central de células gigantes es una lesión proliferativa no neoplásica de etiología desconocida. Se presenta un paciente masculino de 40 años de edad, portador de prótesis parcial superior. Fue remitido al Servicio de Cirugía Maxilofacial del Hospital "V. I. Lenin" por presentar aumento de volumen en reborde alveolar superior, de color rojo grisáceo y que provocaba expansión de corticales óseas. Una vez analizados los exámenes clínicos, radiográficos e histopatológicos se diagnosticó un granuloma reparativo central de células gigantes Se realizó exéresis quirúrgica de la lesión y extracción de dientes adyacentes con una evolución satisfactoria sin señales de recidivas luego de tres años del tratamiento. El granuloma reparativo central de células gigantes se presentó como respuesta a un trauma. La correcta interpretación de los datos clínicos, radiográficos e histopatológicos nos permitió llegar al correcto diagnóstico y plan de tratamiento.Giant-cell central reparative granuloma is non neoplastic proliferative lesion of unknown etiology. We report a 40 years old male patient who was admitted at the Maxillofacial Service of the "V. I. Lenin" Hospital. The patient had partial upper prosthesis and was complaining of red-grey volume increase lesion in upper alveolar ridge which led to the expansion of cortical bone. Having analyzed clinical, radiographic and histopathological findings the case was concluded as a giant-cell central reparative granuloma. Surgical exeresis and adjunct tooth extraction were done. After three years of treatment, satisfactory follow up without recurrence is reported.

  19. Soft tissue recurrence of giant cell tumor of the bone: Prevalence and radiographic features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leilei Xu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Recurrence of giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB in the soft tissue is rarely seen in the clinical practice. This study aims to determine the prevalence of soft tissue recurrence of GCTB, and to characterize its radiographic features. Methods: A total of 291 patients treated by intralesional curettage for histologically diagnosed GCTB were reviewed. 6 patients were identified to have the recurrence of GCTB in the soft tissue, all of whom had undergone marginal resection of the lesion. Based on the x-ray, CT and MRI imaging, the radiographic features of soft tissue recurrence were classified into 3 types. Type I was defined as soft tissue recurrence with peripheral ossification, type II was defined as soft tissue recurrence with central ossification, and type III was defined as pure soft tissue recurrence without ossification. Demographic data including period of recurrence and follow-up duration after the second surgery were recorded for these 6 patients. Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS scoring system was used to evaluate functional outcomes. Results: The overall recurrence rate was 2.1% (6/291. The mean interval between initial surgery and recurrence was 11.3 ± 4.1 months (range, 5–17. The recurrence lesions were located in the thigh of 2 patients, in the forearm of 2 patients and in the leg of the other 2 patients. According to the classification system mentioned above, 2 patients were classified with type I, 1 as type II and 3 as type III. After the marginal excision surgery, all patients were consistently followed up for a mean period of 13.4 ± 5.3 months (range, 6–19, with no recurrence observed at the final visit. All the patients were satisfied with the surgical outcome. According to the MSTS scale, the mean postoperative functional score was 28.0 ± 1.2 (range, 26–29. Conclusions: The classification of soft tissue recurrence of GCTB may be helpful for the surgeon to select the appropriate imaging procedure to

  20. Advantages of Pressurized-Spray Cryosurgery in Giant Cell Tumors of the Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevzat Dabak

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Giant Cell Tumor is considered a benign, local and aggressive tumor. Although considered a benign bone tumor, it is still the subject of discussion and research because of the associated local bone destruction, as well as high rates of recurrence and distant metastases. Options are being developed for both surgical techniques and adjuvant therapies. Aims: The present study evaluated the administration of cryotherapy via a pressurized-spray technique in giant cell tumors of the bone. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: The study included 40 patients who were treated with extensive curettage and cryotherapy at various locations during the period from February 2006 to December 2013. Informed consent forms were obtained from the participants and ethics committee approval was taken from the local ethics committee of Ondokuz Mayıs University. The pressurized-spray technique was performed using liquid nitrogen. The patients were evaluated with respect to age, gender, radiological appearance, treatment modality, duration of follow-up, skin problems and recurrence. Results: Twenty-one patients were female; 19 were male. The average age of the patients was 33 years (range: 16–72 years, and the average duration of follow-up was 43 months (range: 12–80 months. The average time from the onset of the complaints to the diagnosis was 6 months (range: 2–12 months. Based on the Campanacci classification: 9 patients were Grade I; 25 patients were Grade II; six patients were Grade III. The lesion was located in the femur in 14 patients, in the tibia in 11 patients, in the radius in 5 patients, in the pelvis in 4 patients, in the fibula in 3 patients, in the metatarsal in 2 patients and in the phalanges of the hand in one patient. One patient had postoperative early fracture. None of the patients had skin problems and infection. Three (7.5% of the patients had recurrence. Conclusion: It was found that cryotherapy was highly effective in

  1. Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath restricting joint movement in the thumb: A case study and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzaffer Durmus

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumors of the tendon sheath are the second most common type of subcutaneous benign tumors found in the hand. These tumors are slow growing soft tissue mases that develop over a long period of time and can occur at any age. Although such lesions are usually painless, there is a possibility of recurrence of the tumor. Patients should seek postoperative management in order to prevent any possibility of recurrence. In view of the current literature, we present a case involving a patient suffering from a multifocal giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath that restricted movement of the interphalangeal joints of the thumb. [Hand Microsurg 2015; 4(1.000: 16-19

  2. Curettage and radiotherapy of giant cell tumour of the sacrum: a case report with a 10-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, M; Ohmori, K

    2005-08-01

    A case report of a 53-year-old woman with giant cell tumour of the sacrum is presented. Initial curettage was performed through a posterior approach and the patient was relieved of pain and discharged. However, 6 months later the patient was readmitted with a tumour that had progressed towards the L5 vertebra. A further curettage followed by adjuvant radiotherapy resulted in successful reduction of the tumour. Ten years after the operation, there was no recurrence or metastasis.

  3. MR imaging findings of giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath involving the foot : a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ik; Chung, Soo Young; Park, Hai Jung; Lee, Yul; Park, Young Wook; Shim, Jeong Won [Hallym Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-05-01

    Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath(GCTTS) is a benign condition which involves the synovium of the tendon sheaths, and usually occurs around the small joints, e. g. the ankle, knee, and wrist. Histologically, GCTTS is similar to pigmented villonodular synovitis(PVNS). The authors report MRI findings of a GCTTS. This showed lower signal-intensity lesions than adjacent muscles on T1-weighted, proton density weighted, and T2-weighted images.

  4. A Case of Giant Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Buttock Possibly Arose from Syringocystadenoma and Invaded to the Rectum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megumi Nishioka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of giant squamous cell carcinoma of the buttock infiltrated to the rectum. The tumor may have arisen from syringocystadenoma papilliferum. Since there was no sign of metastasis, radical operation including rectal amputation was performed after successful neoadjuvant therapies. Afterwards, the patient has been alive free from disease for 15 months with no lymph node and distant organ metastasis.

  5. Bilateral lower limb gangrene and stroke as initial manifestations of systemic giant cell arteritis in an African-American.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lie, J T; Tokugawa, D A

    1995-02-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is a systemic disease of the elderly that occurs infrequently in blacks and seldom has peripheral vascular disease and stroke as its presenting major complications. The occurrence of bilateral lower limb gangrene and a fatal stroke as manifestations of occult systemic GCA in an African-American is such a unique combination of rare occurrences that it warrants documentation in the literature.

  6. Surgical Treatment, Oral Rehabilitation, and Orthognathic Surgery After Failure of Pharmacologic Treatment of Central Giant Cell Lesion: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia Nogueira, Renato Luiz; Osterne, Rafael Lima Verde; Cavalcante, Roberta Barroso; Abreu, Ricardo Teixeira

    2016-12-01

    Although pharmacologic treatments for central giant cell lesions have gained much emphasis, these treatment modalities do not always have successful outcomes, and surgical treatment may be necessary. The purpose of the present study was to report a case of aggressive central giant cell lesion initially treated by nonsurgical methods without satisfactory results, necessitating segmental mandibular resection for definitive treatment and oral rehabilitation. A 20-year-old woman was diagnosed with an aggressive central giant cell lesion in the mandible. The patient was first treated with intralesional corticosteroid injections. Subsequently, the lesion increased in size. Therefore, a second pharmacologic treatment was proposed with salmon calcitonin nasal spray, but no signs of a treatment response were noted. Because of the lack of response, surgical excision was performed, and a mandibular reconstruction plate was installed. At 12 months after surgical resection, the patient underwent mandibular reconstruction with bone grafts. After 6 months, 7 dental implants were installed, and fixed prostheses were made. After installation of the prostheses, the patient experienced persistent mandibular laterognathism, and a mandibular orthognathic surgery was performed to correct the laterognathia. The follow-up examination 4 years after orthognathic surgery showed no signs of recurrence and good facial symmetry. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Central giant cell granuloma of the mandibular condyle: a case report, literature review, and discussion of treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan Gigliotti, DMD

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Benign and malignant neoplasms of the temporomandibular joint are uncommon. Their presence poses a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for clinicians. The central giant cell granuloma is a relatively common lesion of the jaws; however, it has been reported rarely to originate from the mandibular condyle. To date, only 5 such cases have been documented. We report a case of a large central giant cell granuloma of the condylar head with extension into the infratemporal fossa in a 29-year-old male. The patient was treated with resection and reconstruction using a costochondral graft. The signs, symptoms, and radiographic features are described and compared with the previous reports in the literature. The therapeutic options detailed in the literature have been focused mainly on lesions occupying the dentate regions of the maxilla and mandible. As such, we will review the surgical and pharmacologic options available to the surgeon and discuss their appropriateness with regard to this unique presentation of the central giant cell granuloma.

  8. Polymyalgia rheumatica and systemic giant cell arteritis. Bioptic findings of the subclavian arteries in a case of aortic arch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giacomo, V; Fraioli, A; Carmenini, G; Schietroma, M; Meloni, F; Grossi, F

    1984-08-01

    A 64 year old woman complained of aches and stiffness of the neck and the shoulders with fever and E.S.R. increase. A nonsteroid anti-inflammatory treatment was unsuccessful. A clinical examination revealed absence of both radial pulses and presence of murmurs at level of the carotids. The angiographic findings confirmed an aortic arch syndrome with severe stenosis of the subclavian and axillary arteries. The diagnostic approach, in spite of a negativity of the temporal artery biopsy, was for systemic giant cell arteries with general manifestations of polymyalgia rheumatica. The biopsies of both subclavian arteries, performed during a surgery revascularization, showed a typical giant cell arteries in acute stage. The histopathological pattern of extratemporal giant cell arteries obtained by means of a surgical biopsy is really uncommon, being the previous reports performed on necroscopic findings only. In addition this case confirms that polymyalgia rheumatica implies a systemic arteries even if the clinical and histopathological signs of temporal arteritis are lacking. Therefore the temporal artery should be only considered as a particular and inconstant localization of this vasculitis.

  9. Crowned dens syndrome misdiagnosed as polymyalgia rheumatica, giant cell arteritis, meningitis or spondylitis: an analysis of eight cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouba, A; Vuillemin-Bodaghi, V; Mutschler, C; De Bandt, M

    2004-12-01

    The crowned dens syndrome, related to microcrystalline deposition in the peri-odontoid articular and abarticular structures, is mainly responsible for acute or chronic cervical pain. We report eight cases of crowned dens syndrome with atypical presentations mimicking giant cell arteritis, polymyalgia rheumatica, meningitis or discitis. The clinical and radiological aspects of these cases are presented and discussed. For all patients, fever, cervical stiffness, headaches and biological inflammatory syndrome were reported. For three patients, impairment of general condition, occipito-temporal or mandible pain and weakness with inflammatory pain of the shoulder girdle was suggestive of giant cell arteritis and/or polymyalgia rheumatica, leading to temporal artery biopsy and/or long-term steroid treatment. Recurrence of clinical symptoms when tapering steroids was noted. In two cases, previous breast carcinoma led to the initial diagnosis of metastatic spondylitis. For three patients with vomiting, nausea and Kernig's and/or Brudzinski's sign, the first diagnosis was meningitis, leading to unhelpful lumbar puncture. In all cases, diagnosis of crowned dens syndrome once evoked, was confirmed by cervical CT scanning and dramatic improvement with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or colchicine. This under-recognized entity must be considered as a differential diagnosis of meningitis and discitis, but also of giant cell arteritis and polymyalgia rheumatica, as well as a possible aetiology for fevers of unknown origin. CT scanning is necessary for diagnosis. Clinicians should be aware of such misleading clinical presentations.

  10. MRI and CT findings of the giant cell tumors of the skull; five cases and a review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashiwagi, Nobuo [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, 3-3 Nakamichi 1-Chome, Higashinari, Osaka 537-0025 (Japan)]. E-mail: kasiwagi-no@mc.pref.osaka.jp; Hirabuki, Norio [Department of Radiology, Yao Municipal Hospital (Japan); Andou, Kumiko [Department of Radiology, Hyogo College of Medicine, 1-1 Mukogawachou, Nishinomiya-city, Hyogo 663-8851 (Japan); Yoshifumi, Narumi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, 3-3 Nakamichi 1-Chome, Higashinari, Osaka 537-0025 (Japan); Tanaka, Hisashi [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Medical School, 2-2 Yamadaoka, 565-0871 Suita-city, Osaka (Japan); Morino, Hideo [Department of Pathology, Kansai Rosai Hospital, 3-1-69 Inabaso, Amagasaki-city, Hyogo (Japan); Taki, Takuyu [Department of Neurosurgery, Kansai Rosai Hospital, 3-1-69 Inabaso, Amagasaki-city, Hyogo (Japan); Ishikura, Reiichi [Department of Radiology, Hyogo College of Medicine, 1-1 Mukogawachou, Nishinomiya-city, Hyogo 663-8851 (Japan); Hirota, Seiichi [Department of Pathology, Hyogo College of Medicine, 1-1 Mukogawachou, Nishinomiya-city, Hyogo 663-8851 (Japan); Onishi, Hiromitu [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Medical School, 2-2 Yamadaoka, 565-0871 Suita-city, Osaka (Japan); Nakamura, Hironobu [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Medical School, 2-2 Yamadaoka, 565-0871 Suita-city, Osaka (Japan)

    2006-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate CT and MR findings of giant cell tumors (GCTs) of the skull, an unusual site for such tumors. Materials and methods: CT and MR features of five histologically proven giant cell tumors of the skull were retrospectively reviewed. We also reviewed 22 cases in the literature that included MR or CT findings. Results: Three of the tumors originated from the temporal bone with predominantly medial extension, and the other two were centered in the body of the sphenoid bone and featured symmetrical soft tissue extension. CT images with bone window settings showed reactive bone changes for all three tumors of the temporal bone, suggesting slow growth for example, an expanded intradiploic space, expansive remodelling and development of foci of pressure erosion. GCTs of the sphenoid bone showed purely osteolytic changes without remodelling. Although the MR signals and enhancement patterns varied, all the tumors of the temporal bone had a markedly low intensity area on T2-weighted images, which was not seen in the tumors of the sphenoid bone. The findings for our cases generally corresponded to those reported in the literature. Conclusion: Giant cell tumors of the skull have two preferential sites and may have characteristic tendencies as to their extent. Bone changes and MR signals appear to show differences between the two sites.

  11. Everolimus in the treatment of subependymal giant cell astrocytomas, angiomyolipomas, and pulmonary and skin lesions associated with tuberous sclerosis complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz DN

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available David Neal Franz Department of Pediatrics, Tuberous Sclerosis Clinic, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA Abstract: Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder caused by inactivating mutations in either the TSC1 or TSC2 genes. It is characterized by the development of multiple, benign tumors in several organs throughout the body. Lesions occur in the brain, kidneys, heart, liver, lungs, and skin and result in seizures and epilepsy, mental retardation, autism, and renal and pulmonary organ system dysfunction, as well as other complications. Elucidation of the molecular pathways and etiological factors responsible for causing TSC has led to a paradigm shift in the management and treatment of the disease. TSC1 or TSC2 mutations lead to constitutive upregulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, which affects many cellular processes involved in tumor growth. By targeting mammalian target of rapamycin with everolimus, an orally active rapamycin derivative, clinically meaningful and statistically significant reductions in tumor burden have been achieved for the main brain (subependymal giant cell astrocytoma and renal manifestations (angiomyolipoma associated with TSC. This review provides an overview of TSC, everolimus, and the clinical trials that led to its approval for the treatment of TSC-associated subependymal giant cell astrocytoma and renal angiomyolipoma. Keywords: everolimus, subependymal giant cell astrocytoma, angiomyolipomas, lymphangioleiomyomatosis, facial angiofibromas, tuberous sclerosis complex

  12. Temporal artery biopsy in the diagnosis of giant cell arteritis: Bigger is not always better.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Marios; Kaptanis, Sarantos; Kokkori-Steinbrecher, Aikaterini; Floros, Nikolaos; Schuster, Frauke; Hübner, Gunnar

    2017-09-01

    Accurate early giant cell arteritis (GCA) diagnosis can be established through temporal artery biopsy (TAB). We herein investigate the relationship between specimen length and positive TAB result in a tertiary-care hospital in Germany during a 8-year period. Secondarily, we studied the relationships of specific epidemiological and laboratory parameters with positive TABs. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all patients with suspected GCA, who underwent TAB in our institution. The total sample consisted of 116 patients with a mean age of 76.1 (SD 7.7) years. Mean specimen length post-fixation was 0.94 cm (SD 0.49). The TAB(+) group consisted of 64 patients (55.2%). The specimen length was comparable in the two groups (0.96 cm vs 0.91 cm, p = 0.581). Twenty six TAB(+) patients (41%) had a post-fixation specimen longer than 1 cm, comparable with the respective percentage in the TAB(-) group (42%, p = 1). All laboratory tests performed were statistically significantly different in the two groups. We conclude that TAB length is not associated with the TAB diagnostic yield in patients with clinical suspicion of GCA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Pediatric giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath of the craniocervical junction involving the occipital condyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jin Mo; Chang, Jong Hee; Kim, Sun Ho; Lee, Kyu Sung

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCTTS), also called pigmented villonodular synovitis, is a common lesion of the synovial membrane of the hand joint, but it uncommonly involves the axial skeleton, especially in pediatric populations. Furthermore, GCTTS originating from the occipital condyle has not been reported previously. A 15-year-old girl presented with a palpable neck mass for 1 year, and imaging studies revealed a less demarcated and heterogeneously enhanced mass in the suboccipital region. The tumor was originating from the occipital condyle that eroded the skull and atlas, and it was completely resected via a far lateral transcondylar approach followed by transarticular screw fixation. After the resection, we performed occipitocervical fusion to prevent spinal instability. The patient made an uneventful recovery after surgery. Recurrence has not been observed after 5 years of follow-up. We report this rare case and briefly review the general features and unusual locations of GCTTS with recommendations for treatment modalities.

  14. Giant cell glioblastoma multiforme: report of a case with prolonged survival and transformation to gliosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Prabal; Sharma, Mehar Chand; Chander, Bal; Mahapatra, Ashok Kumar; Sarkar, Chitra

    2006-03-01

    Giant cell glioblastomas (GCGs) and gliosarcomas are rare histological variants of glioblastoma multiforme (GBMs). The mean age of occurrence in GCG is 42 years, but occasional cases have been documented in children under 10 years of age. Clinically, they are associated with a better prognosis than conventional GBMs, with few reports documenting prolonged survival up to 17 years after diagnosis. In contrast, gliosarcomas have age distribution and survival characteristics similar to conventional GBMs. They either arise de novo (primary) or secondary to irradiation to GBM. We report a rare case of childhood GCG in an 8-year-old boy surviving for more than 10 years since initial diagnosis. He has had two recurrences at the ages of 16 and 17 years, respectively, with histopathology at second recurrence showing evidence of gliosarcoma. No such case of gliosarcoma following treatment for GCG has been reported in the literature. Hence, the origin of the gliosarcoma whether radiation induced or only a phenotypic change in the GBM remains conjectural.

  15. [Frontal giant cell glioblastoma: radio-induced tumor? Case report and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lrhezzioui, J; Emery, E; Chapon, F

    2007-12-01

    The current WHO classification recognizes two distinct variants of glioblastoma multiforme (GBMs): giant cell glioblastoma (GCG) and gliosarcoma, based on histological heterogeneity. Unlike conventional GBMs, GCGs preferentially occur in younger individuals and are associated with a better prognosis, a few reports documenting prolonged survival up to 17 years after diagnosis. However, transformation to gliosarcoma is possible and has been already reported. Radio-induced glioblastoma, which meets Cahan's criteria for radio-induced tumor, is very rare; the first case was published by Kleriga et al. We report a rare case observed in a 46-year-old man with a past history of right nose leiomyosarcoma treated 40 years earlier by surgery and interstitial and external beam radiation. At admission, the patient presented left hemiparesis revealing a right frontal GCG confirmed by pathology after cranial surgery. We describe this case firstly because of its rare histological variety and discuss its clinical, radiological, histopathological, therapeutic and prognostic characteristics with literature data. Secondly, because of its occurrence 40 years after external radiotherapy, which could suggest the hypothesis of radio-induced glioblastoma.

  16. Pediatric giant cell glioblastoma: New insights into a rare tumor entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karremann, Michael; Butenhoff, Sandra; Rausche, Ulrike; Pietsch, Torsten; Wolff, Johannes E A; Kramm, Christof M

    2009-06-01

    Little is known about giant cell glioblastoma (GCG) in pediatric patients. The present study identified 18 pediatric patients with centrally reviewed GCG from the HIT-GBM database of the Gesellschaft für Paediatrische Onkologie und Haematologie in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. Clinical and epidemiological data were compared with those of 178 pediatric patients with centrally reviewed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) from the same database. In this unique series, median age, male preference, and median clinical history did not differ significantly between pediatric GCG and GBM patients. GCG showed a stronger predilection for cerebral hemispheres than did GBM, which may only partly explain the higher percentage of gross total tumor resections in GCG patients. Most surprising, the widely distributed hypothesis that GCG may imply a better prognosis than GBM could not be substantiated for our pediatric series. Future studies with larger patient numbers and molecular pathological analyses are still needed to corroborate the present findings and further elucidate the biology of GCG in children.

  17. Giant cell arteritis without clinically evident vascular involvement in a defined population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; Garcia-Porrua, Carlos; Amor-Dorado, Juan C; Llorca, Javier

    2004-04-15

    To examine the frequency and clinical presentation of biopsy-proven giant cell arteritis (GCA) patients who do not exhibit overt clinical vascular manifestations. To assess whether differences exist between this group of patients and the rest of biopsy-proven GCA patients. Retrospective study of biopsy-proven GCA patients diagnosed from 1981 through 2001 at the single hospital for a well-defined population of almost 250,000 people. Patients were considered as having no evident vascular involvement if cranial ischemic manifestations or other vascular complications of GCA were not present at the time of diagnosis or during at least 12 months' followup. Between 1981 and 2001, 210 patients from the Lugo region of northwest Spain were diagnosed with biopsy-proven GCA. Eleven patients did not show overt vascular manifestations of GCA. Nine of them presented with polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) and another 2 fulfilled criteria for fever of unknown origin. Patients without clinically evident vascular involvement had a significantly longer delay to diagnosis than those with vascular manifestations. Also, PMR manifestations were more frequently observed in this group of patients. Biopsy-proven GCA without clinically evident vascular involvement is not exceptional. Despite having a longer delay to diagnosis, these patients constitute a more benign subgroup of GCA.

  18. Giant Cell Tumor Of The Long Bones: Results With Combination Of Cryosurgery, Curettage, And Cementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortazavi S.M.J

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: In this study we evaluated the treatment of giant cell tumor (GCT of long bones using cryosurgery combined with curettage and polymethylmetacrylate (PMMA cementing. Material and methods: From January 1999 to December 2004, twenty patients (mean age at the time of surgery 29.2 years; 13 females and 7 males; were included in the study. Cortical disruption were presented in 7 patients; 4 with soft tissue extension, but none of them had intra-articular extension of tumor, 3 patients presented with pathologic fracture of distal femoral lesions. These tumors were located in distal femur in 6 patients, proximal tibia in 7, distal radius in 3, proximal femur in 2, and each of proximal humerus and distal ulna in one patient. In each case diagnostic biopsy was done and surgical procedure performed including curettage, power burr of the wall, cryosurgery with liquid nitrogen and finally filling the space with PMMA cementing. The mean follow-up was 34 months (7 to 61 . Results: During follow-up, we observed one recurrence of GCT of proximal tibia. Secondary Aneurysmal bone cyst was reported at the site of one primary distal femoral lesion, without any finding in favor of a recurrence. Neurapraxia of the proneal nerve was occurred in one patient with proximal tibia tumor improved after 8 months. Conclusion: Cryosurgery combined with power burr and PMMA cementing in the treatment of GCT could be an effective approach in tumor eradication. This method obviates the need for extensive resections and reconstructive procedure.

  19. Giant cell arteritis. Part III. New trends in its treatment (role of genetically engineered drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azamat Makhmudovich Satybaldyev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell arteritis (GCA is a well-known vasculitis sensitive to glucocorticoid (GC immuno-suppression. However, during long-term treatment there may be many adverse reactions that remain a serious problem so far. Since GCA encompasses a broad spectrum of clinical subtypes, ranging from severe visual loss and neurological deficits to isolated systemic signs, its treatment must be adjusted specially to each case. The literature contains contradicting recommendations for the therapy for GCA. The paper considers different treatment options for GCA, including that with neuro-ophthalmic and neurological complications, as well as the evidence for their possible adjuvant therapies. Although there is no randomized controlled clinical trial in GCA with ocular and neurological complications, the data available in the literature suggest that these patients are recommended to be admitted for high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone, monitoring, and prevention of GC-induced complications. It is expedient to use aspirin in these cases. The evidence supporting the use of methotrexate, as well as genetically engineered agents (GEAs, infliximab, etanercept as steroid-sparing agents is discussed. Cases of using individual GEAs (adalimumab, tocilizumab and rituximab as an alternative to GC monotherapy are described. It is concluded that there is a need for extended clinical trials evaluating the most effective and safe GC-sparing drugs.

  20. Non-syndromic multiple impacted supernumerary teeth with peripheral giant cell granuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Bansal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG is a relatively frequent benign reactive lesion of the gingiva, originating from the periosteum or periodontal membrane following local irritation or chronic trauma. PGCG manifests as a red-purple nodule located in the region of the gingiva or edentulous alveolar margins. The lesion can develop at any age, although it is more common between the second and third decades of life, and shows a slight female predilection. PGCG is a soft tissue lesion that very rarely affects the underlying bone, although the latter may suffer superficial erosion. A supernumerary tooth is one that is additional to the normal series and can be found in almost any region of the dental arch. These teeth may be single, multiple, erupted or unerupted and may or may not be associated with syndrome. Usually, they cause one or the other problem in eruption or alignment of teeth, but may also present without disturbing the normal occlusion or eruption pattern. Management of these teeth depends on the symptoms. Presented here is a case of PGCG in relation to the lower left permanent first molar with three supernumerary teeth in the mandibular arch but no associated syndrome.

  1. IgG,kappa monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance with AL amyloidosis simulating giant cell arteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pompilian Valer Mihai

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal gammopathies complicated by AL amyloidosis can mimic giant cell arteritis (GCA. We hereby present the case of a 63 year old woman in whom symptoms consistent with GCA were the first manifestations of a monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS associated with amyloidosis. A 63 year old woman was admitted for temporal headache, maseterine claudication, neck and shoulder stiffness. She was recently diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome. On physical examination she had prominent temporal arteries, macroglosia and orthostatic hypotension. Muscular strength was normal. She had high ESR and CRP; in this clinical context, GCA was suspected. A gamma spike on serum protein electrophoresis raised the suspicion of monoclonal gammopathy (MG. Immunoelectrophoresis revealed monoclonal bands for IgG and kappa chains. Massive deposits of amyloid and no inflammation were found on temporal artery biopsy. Multiple myeloma and lymphoma were ruled out. A diagnosis of AL amyloidosis complicating MGUS was formulated. She did well on therapy with bortezomib, cyclophosphamide and dexamethasone. Cases published in medical literature reveal amyloidosis mimicking GCA in the setting of established MGUS. As far as we know, this is the first case of MGUS with IgG and kappa chains in which a GCA-like picture induced by amyloidosis was present from the very onset.

  2. Central giant cell granuloma of the jaws: clinical and radiological evaluation of 22 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Zhi-Jun; Cai, Yu; Zhao, Yi-Fang [School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedical Engineering of Ministry of Education, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Wuhan University, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Zwahlen, Roger A. [University of Hong Kong, Discipline of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Dentistry (China); Zheng, Yun-Fei [School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedical Engineering of Ministry of Education, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Wang, Shi-Ping [Wuhan University, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan (China)

    2009-09-15

    The objective was to investigate the clinical and radiological characteristics of central giant cell granulomas (CGCGs) of the jaws. A retrospective analysis of a 20-year database was performed regarding both clinical and radiological features of 22 patients affected with CGCGs of the jaws. Fourteen women and 8 men were included with the age range of 7-81 years (mean 31.7 years). Among the 22 lesions, 16 were located in the mandible and 6 in the maxilla. Painless swelling was the most common clinical feature in 18 of all cases. Limited mouth opening was noted in 2 patients where the lesions involved the condyle. Radiographically, 13 lesions were homogeneously osteolytic and 9 lesions were trabeculated. Fifteen lesions were unilocular and 14 lesions presented with well-defined but not sclerotic margins. CT images in 5 patients clearly showed the trabeculation within the lesions. The follow-up ranged from 1.5 to 11 years with a mean period of 5 years. Three out of 9 aggressive and 1 out of 13 nonaggressive lesions developed recurrence. Diagnosis of CGCGs of the jaws depends on both correct interpretation of clinical, radiographic and pathological data. Differentiation between aggressive and nonaggressive CGCGs should be considered to improve individual treatment planning. (orig.)

  3. Thalidomide prevents formation of multinucleated giant cells (Langhans-type cells) from cultured monocytes: possible pharmaceutical applications for granulomatous disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, K; Yashiro, M; Nagaoka, Y; Manki, A; Wada, T; Tsuge, M; Kondo, Y; Morishima, T

    2009-01-01

    Thalidomide is an effective drug for chronic inflammatory diseases, but the mechanism underlying its immunomodulatory action remains uncertain. Thalidomide has been reported to clinically improve chronic inflammatory granulomatous disorders. In such disorders, the granulomas consist of epithelioid cells, scattered lymphocytes and multinucleated giant cells (MNGC; Langhans-type cells). The present experimental approach permitted the reproduction of MNGC formation from peripheral blood monocytes and examination of thalidomides effect on it. MNGC can be effectively generated from monocytes cultured in the presence of interleukin-4 (IL-4) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor(M-CSF) for 14 days. Thalidomide can inhibit the formation of MNGC in a dose-dependent manner. MNGC formation was partly inhibited by the presence of neutralizing TNF-alpha antibody in the responses induced by IL-4 and M-CSF. Autocrinal TNF-alpha production and modulation of cadhelin expression to regulate cell adhesion might be involved in this inhibitory action of thalidomide. Our results support thalidomides clinical efficacy in the treatment of chronic granulomatous disorders (granulomatosis).

  4. Heavily lipidized, calcified giant cell glioblastoma in an 8-year-old patient, associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1): report of a case with long-term survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroh, H; Matyja, E; Marchel, A; Bojarski, P

    2004-01-01

    Giant cell glioblastoma (GCG-BM) with predominance of bizarre, multinucleated giant cells is a rare subtype of glioblastoma, however, its clinical behavior and histological features are still not fully understood. We report an unusual case of a heavily lipidized form of giant cell glioma corresponding mostly to GCGBM in a young patient with neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1). Histologically, the tumor revealed numerous characteristic histopathological features of giant cell glioblastoma including cellular pleomorphism with numerous giant tumor cells, pseudopalisades around necrotic foci and mitotic activity, accompanied by additional unique morphological elements such as massive lipidization of the neoplastic cells, abundant microcalcifications and angiomatous pattern of vascularization. Such aberrant morphology might be associated with the unusually long survival period of 12 years without clinical evidence of tumor recurrence. The coexistence of intracerebral heavily lipidized, calcified giant cell glioblastoma with NF1 has not been previously reported in literature.

  5. Somatic POLE mutations cause an ultramutated giant cell high-grade glioma subtype with better prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erson-Omay, E Zeynep; Çağlayan, Ahmet Okay; Schultz, Nikolaus; Weinhold, Nils; Omay, S Bülent; Özduman, Koray; Köksal, Yavuz; Li, Jie; Serin Harmancı, Akdes; Clark, Victoria; Carrión-Grant, Geneive; Baranoski, Jacob; Çağlar, Caner; Barak, Tanyeri; Coşkun, Süleyman; Baran, Burçin; Köse, Doğan; Sun, Jia; Bakırcıoğlu, Mehmet; Moliterno Günel, Jennifer; Pamir, M Necmettin; Mishra-Gorur, Ketu; Bilguvar, Kaya; Yasuno, Katsuhito; Vortmeyer, Alexander; Huttner, Anita J; Sander, Chris; Günel, Murat

    2015-10-01

    Malignant high-grade gliomas (HGGs), including the most aggressive form, glioblastoma multiforme, show significant clinical and genomic heterogeneity. Despite recent advances, the overall survival of HGGs and their response to treatment remain poor. In order to gain further insight into disease pathophysiology by correlating genomic landscape with clinical behavior, thereby identifying distinct HGG molecular subgroups associated with improved prognosis, we performed a comprehensive genomic analysis. We analyzed and compared 720 exome-sequenced gliomas (136 from Yale, 584 from The Cancer Genome Atlas) based on their genomic, histological, and clinical features. We identified a subgroup of HGGs (6 total, 4 adults and 2 children) that harbored a statistically significantly increased number of somatic mutations (mean = 9257.3 vs 76.2, P = .002). All of these "ultramutated" tumors harbored somatic mutations in the exonuclease domain of the polymerase epsilon gene (POLE), displaying a distinctive genetic profile, characterized by genomic stability and increased C-to-A transversions. Histologically, they all harbored multinucleated giant or bizarre cells, some with predominant infiltrating immune cells. One adult and both pediatric patients carried homozygous germline mutations in the mutS homolog 6 (MSH6) gene. In adults, POLE mutations were observed in patients younger than 40 years and were associated with a longer progression-free survival. We identified a genomically, histologically, and clinically distinct subgroup of HGGs that harbored somatic POLE mutations and carried an improved prognosis. Identification of distinctive molecular and pathological HGG phenotypes has implications not only for improved classification but also for potential targeted treatments. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Subependymal giant cell astrocytoma in a genetically negative tuberous sclerosis complex adult: Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konakondla, Sanjay; Jayarao, Mayur; Skrade, Jami; Giannini, Caterina; Workman, Michael J; Morgan, Chad J

    2016-11-01

    The well-described entity of Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma (SEGA) in the setting of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) is profound in current literature. It has been described in children as well as adults with or without identifiable clinical presentations of tuberous sclerosis. To our knowledge there has not been any report of a negative genetic workup of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex in an adult patient presenting with an isolated SEGA. We present a case of a 25-year-old female with no medical history who presented to the emergency room for headaches. Further workup included gadolinium enhanced MRI of the brain which revealed a homogenously enhancing mass in the left lateral ventricle with eccentric calcification and resultant obstructive hydrocephalus. A left frontal craniotomy with an interhemispheric transcallosal approach was taken for complete removal of the mass. Final pathological diagnosis was SEGA with suggestive cell population, positive GFAP and positive synaptophysin. Genetic testing included TSC1 (MLPA, DNA Sequencing) and TSC2 (MLPA, DNA Sequencing), which were all negative. The panel did not identify mutations associated with Tuberous Sclerosis. Rare cases of isolated SEGA have been reported in patients who do not have typical features of tuberous sclerosis, and may represent minimal penetrance of the disease with an attenuated phenotype. Negative genetic testing, as demonstrated, can be seen in adults with isolated SEGA. With a negative genetic workup of TSC, regular follow up may still be necessary; however this may prove to be low yield for identifying any TSC features in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Heterogeneity of biomaterial-induced multinucleated giant cells: Possible importance for the regeneration process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbeck, Mike; Motta, Antonella; Migliaresi, Claudio; Sader, Robert; Kirkpatrick, Charles James; Ghanaati, Shahram

    2016-02-01

    Biomaterial-associated multinucleated giant cells (BMGCs) have been found within the implantation beds of many different biomaterials. However, their exact differentiation and their involvement in the inflammatory and healing events of the foreign body response still remain mostly unclear. Silk fibroin (SF) scaffolds, which induces a tissue reaction involving both macrophages and BMGCs, was implanted in the subcutaneous connective tissue of four CD-1 mice for 15 days using an established subcutaneous implantation model. Analysis of macrophage polarization and BMGCs was performed by immunohistochemcial detection of pro- (cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), C-C chemokine receptor type 7 (CCR7), nuclear factor "kappa-light-chain-enhancer" (NF-κB)) and anti-(heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and mannose receptor (MR, also known as CD206)). Furthermore, histochemical detection of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) was conducted to test its predictive efficiency for the pro-inflammatory differentiation of cells. An established system for histomorphometrical analysis was used for counting of BMGCs expressing these molecules. The results show that BMGCs express both pro- and anti-inflammatory molecules within the implantation beds of SF scaffolds in comparable numbers, while only statistically significantly lower numbers of TRAP-positive BMGCs were measured in comparison to the BMGCs expressing the above-mentioned molecules. As these data substantiate the heterogeneity of BMGCs, the question arises to what extent BMGCs can "support" the process of tissue regeneration. Furthermore, the data prompt the question to what extent TRAP-expression within a biomaterial implantation bed can be seen as a predictive marker for an inflammatory condition, as in this study no obvious correlation between TRAP-expression and other pro-inflammatory markers could be observed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Three-dimensional ultrastructure of feeding tubes and interconnected endoplasmic reticulum in root-knot nematode-induced giant cells in rose balsam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Nao; Koga, Hironori

    2017-09-01

    We investigated the three-dimensional ultrastructure of feeding tubes and the surrounding region in giant cells induced in rose balsam (Impatiens balsamina L.) roots by the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita, using osmium maceration coupled with field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). In the roots of 35-day-old galled rose balsam plants, adult nematodes induced the formation of giant cells containing feeding tubes and numerous organelles, including tubular endoplasmic reticulum (ER), cisternal ER, and mitochondria. The feeding tubes were surrounded by fine tubular structures (20-50 nm in diameter), which were in turn surrounded by tubular ER (approximately 120 nm in diameter). The termini of the fine tubular structures appeared to be connected to the surface of the feeding tubes, suggesting that the fine tubular structures were continuous with narrow channels in the feeding tubes. The tubular ER arose from cisternal ER. Large bundles of tubular ER were present near the feeding tube, in the centers of the giant cells, and in the peripheral regions of the giant cells, such as cell wall ingrowths, while smaller bundles of tubular ER formed networks in the giant cells. These observations suggest that tubular ER functions as vascular bundles in giant cells, facilitating the transport of nutrients. We identified capsule-shaped structures (30 μm in diameter) in the giant cells that consisted of smooth, repeatedly branched ER tubules wrapped in several layers of cisternal ER. We propose that lipids and steroids are synthesized at the smooth branched ER and stored in these capsules until needed by the nematode.

  9. Flares in Biopsy-Proven Giant Cell Arteritis in Northern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restuccia, Giovanna; Boiardi, Luigi; Cavazza, Alberto; Catanoso, Mariagrazia; Macchioni, Pierluigi; Muratore, Francesco; Cimino, Luca; Aldigeri, Raffaella; Crescentini, Filippo; Pipitone, Nicolò; Salvarani, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study evaluated the frequency, timing, and characteristics of flares in a large cohort of Italian patients with biopsy-proven giant cell arteritis (GCA) and to identify factors at diagnosis able to predict the occurrence of flares. We evaluated 157 patients with biopsy-proven transmural GCA diagnosed and followed at the Rheumatology Unit of Reggio Emilia Hospital (Italy) for whom sufficient information was available from the time of diagnosis until at least 4 years of follow-up. Fifty-seven patients (36.5%) experienced ≥1 flares. Fifty-one (46.4%) of the 110 total flares (88 relapses and 22 recurrences) were experienced during the first 2 years after diagnosis. The majority of relapses occurred with doses of prednisone ≤ 10 mg/day (82.9%), whereas only 3.4% of relapses occurred for doses ≥ 25 mg/day. Polymyalgia rheumatica (46.5%) and cranial symptoms (41.9%) were the most frequent manifestations at the time of the first relapse. Cumulative prednisone dose during the first year and total cumulative prednisone dose were significantly higher in flaring patients compared with those without flares (7.8 ± 2.4 vs 6.7 ± 2.4 g, P = 0.02; 15.5 ± 8.9 vs 10.0 ± 9.2 g, P = 0.0001, respectively). The total duration of prednisone treatment was longer in flaring patients (58 ± 44 vs 30 ± 30 months, P = 0.0001). Patients with disease flares had at diagnosis more frequently systemic manifestations (P = 0.02) and fever ≥ 38°C (P = 0.02), significantly lower hemoglobin levels (P = 0.05), more frequent presence at temporal artery biopsy (TAB) specimens of giant cells (P = 0.04) and intraluminal acute thrombosis (P = 0.007), and more moderate/severe arterial inflammation (P = 0.009) compared with those without flares. In the multivariate model fever ≥ 38 °C (hazard ratio 2.14; 95% confidence interval, 1.06–4.32, P = 0.03) and the severity of inflammatory infiltrate

  10. Multivariable prediction model for suspected giant cell arteritis: development and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ing, Edsel B; Lahaie Luna, Gabriela; Toren, Andrew; Ing, Royce; Chen, John J; Arora, Nitika; Torun, Nurhan; Jakpor, Otana A; Fraser, J Alexander; Tyndel, Felix J; Sundaram, Arun NE; Liu, Xinyang; Lam, Cindy TY; Patel, Vivek; Weis, Ezekiel; Jordan, David; Gilberg, Steven; Pagnoux, Christian; ten Hove, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To develop and validate a diagnostic prediction model for patients with suspected giant cell arteritis (GCA). Methods A retrospective review of records of consecutive adult patients undergoing temporal artery biopsy (TABx) for suspected GCA was conducted at seven university centers. The pathologic diagnosis was considered the final diagnosis. The predictor variables were age, gender, new onset headache, clinical temporal artery abnormality, jaw claudication, ischemic vision loss (VL), diplopia, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and platelet level. Multiple imputation was performed for missing data. Logistic regression was used to compare our models with the non-histologic American College of Rheumatology (ACR) GCA classification criteria. Internal validation was performed with 10-fold cross validation and bootstrap techniques. External validation was performed by geographic site. Results There were 530 complete TABx records: 397 were negative and 133 positive for GCA. Age, jaw claudication, VL, platelets, and log CRP were statistically significant predictors of positive TABx, whereas ESR, gender, headache, and temporal artery abnormality were not. The parsimonious model had a cross-validated bootstrap area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) of 0.810 (95% CI =0.766–0.854), geographic external validation AUROC’s in the range of 0.75–0.85, calibration pH–L of 0.812, sensitivity of 43.6%, and specificity of 95.2%, which outperformed the ACR criteria. Conclusion Our prediction rule with calculator and nomogram aids in the triage of patients with suspected GCA and may decrease the need for TABx in select low-score at-risk subjects. However, misclassification remains a concern. PMID:29200816

  11. Survival outcomes of giant cell glioblastoma: institutional experience in the management of 20 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Taemin; Rutkowski, Martin J; Safaee, Michael; Sun, Matthew Z; Sayegh, Eli T; Bloch, Orin; Tihan, Tarik; Parsa, Andrew T

    2014-12-01

    Giant cell glioblastoma (GCG) is a rare subtype of glioblastoma (GBM) that is believed to carry an improved prognosis. However, given the rarity of this tumor, best management practices for GCG have yet to be ascertained. Here, we present our experience in managing GCG tumors at the University of California, San Francisco. Patients were retrospectively identified through chart review, and data pertaining to patient demographics, treatment plans, and follow-up were extracted from existing medical records. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were the primary and secondary endpoints, respectively. In sum, we identified 22 patients who were managed or followed for GCG. Most patients (78%) initially underwent subtotal resection as primary treatment for their tumor, and most also received post-operative adjuvant therapy (90%), with radiation being the most frequently administered modality (85%). Within this institutional cohort, median OS and PFS were 15.4 months and 5.7 months, respectively. On multivariate survival analysis, age (p=0.84), sex (p=0.05), and adjuvant radiation plus temozolomide (p=0.12) were not associated with prolonged OS. However, adjuvant radiation plus temozolomide was associated with longer PFS (p=0.01), and patients receiving this therapy demonstrated a median PFS of 32.9 months versus 13.1 months. These findings confirm the comparatively improved prognosis of GCG over GBM. Moreover, they suggest that extent of resection may not significantly delay recurrence or extend survival, and that combination radiation with temozolomide may represent the optimum adjuvant paradigm to delay tumor progression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Giant cell glioblastoma: a glioblastoma subtype with distinct epidemiology and superior prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, Kevin R; Moody, John S

    2009-12-01

    Giant cell glioblastoma (GC) is an uncommon subtype of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Consequently, the epidemiology, natural history, and factors associated with outcome are not well defined. Patients diagnosed with GC from 1988 through 2004 were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Outcomes were examined with Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox models. For comparison, similar analyses were conducted for patients diagnosed with GBM. GC was identified in 1% of 16,430 patients diagnosed with either GC or GBM. Compared with GBM, GC showed similar gender and racial distributions. Likewise, tumor size and location were not significantly different between the two histologies. GC tended to occur in younger patients with a median age at diagnosis of 51 years, compared with 62 years for GBM. Additionally, patients with GC were more likely to undergo complete resection compared with patients with GBM. For both histologies, young age, tumor size, extent of resection, and the use of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) were associated with improved survival. Cox modeling suggests the prognosis for GC is significantly superior to that for GBM (hazard ratio = 0.76; 95% confidence interval, 0.59-0.97) even after adjustment for factors affecting survival. GC is an uncommon GBM subtype that tends to occur in younger patients. Prospective data defining optimal treatment for GC are unavailable; however, these retrospective findings suggest that resection, as opposed to biopsy only, and adjuvant RT may improve survival. The prognosis of GC is superior to that of GBM, and long-term survival is possible, suggesting aggressive therapy is warranted.

  13. BRAF V600E mutations are frequent in dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors and subependymal giant cell astrocytomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dakeun; Cho, Young Hye; Kang, So Young; Yoon, Nara; Sung, Chang Ohk; Suh, Yeon-Lim

    2015-03-01

    BRAF mutation has received a great deal of attention in neuro-oncology field, recently. This study aimed to investigate the incidence and the clinical significance of BRAF(V600E) in low-grade glial tumors. An institutional cohort of 105 brain tumors (51 dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors (DNTs), 14 subependymal giant cell astrocytomas (SEGAs), 12 glioblastoma with neuronal marker expression (GBM-N), and 28 pleomorphic xanthoastrocytomas (PXAs)) from 100 patients were investigated for the presence of BRAF(V600E) by direct sequencing. We found frequent BRAF(V600E) in DNTs (26/51, 51%), SEGAs (6/14, 42.9%), and PXAs (14/28, 50%). In DNTs, BRAF(V600E) was more commonly detected in tumors with extra-temporal location (68.2% vs. 37.9%; P = 0.032). The diagnostic subgroups of tuberous sclerosis complex were not correlated with BRAF(V600E) in patients with SEGA (P = 0.533). One PXA case revealed a unique duplication mutation (p.Thr599dup) of codon 599. All GMB-N cases did not carry BRAF mutation. Our data indicate that BRAF(V600E) is a common genetic alteration in low-grade glial tumors with neuronal component or differentiation. High frequency of BRAF(V600E) in DNTs and SEGAs would be useful in the differential diagnosis, and also offers a potential specific treatment targeting BRAF(V600E) . © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Tumor-induced rickets in a child with a central giant cell granuloma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Cooke, Elisa; Cruz-Rojo, Jaime; Gallego, Carmen; Romance, Ana Isabel; Mosqueda-Peña, Rocio; Almaden, Yolanda; Sánchez del Pozo, Jaime

    2015-06-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia/rickets is a rare paraneoplastic disorder associated with a tumor-producing fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). We present a child with symptoms of rickets as the first clinical sign of a central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) with high serum levels of FGF23, a hormone associated with decreased phosphate resorption. A 3-year-old boy presented with a limp and 6 months later with painless growth of the jaw. On examination gingival hypertrophy and genu varum were observed. Investigations revealed hypophosphatemia, normal 1,25 and 25 (OH) vitamin D, and high alkaline phosphatase. An MRI showed an osteolytic lesion of the maxilla. Radiographs revealed typical rachitic findings. Incisional biopsy of the tumor revealed a CGCG with mesenchymal matrix. The CGCG was initially treated with calcitonin, but the lesions continued to grow, making it necessary to perform tracheostomy and gastrostomy. One year after onset the hyperphosphaturia worsened, necessitating increasing oral phosphate supplements up to 100 mg/kg per day of elemental phosphorus. FGF23 levels were extremely high. Total removal of the tumor was impossible, and partial reduction was achieved after percutaneous computed tomography-guided radiofrequency, local instillation of triamcinolone, and oral propranolol. Compassionate use of cinacalcet was unsuccessful in preventing phosphaturia. The tumor slowly regressed after the third year of disease; phosphaturia improved, allowing the tapering of phosphate supplements, and FGF23 levels normalized. Tumor-induced osteomalacia/rickets is uncommon in children and is challenging for physicians to diagnose. It should be suspected in patients with intractable osteomalacia or rickets. A tumor should be ruled out if FGF23 levels are high. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  15. Giant cell tumor of the mobile spine: a review of 49 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boriani, Stefano; Bandiera, Stefano; Casadei, Roberto; Boriani, Luca; Donthineni, Rakesh; Gasbarrini, Alessandro; Pignotti, Elettra; Biagini, Roberto; Schwab, Joseph H

    2012-01-01

    This is a retrospective review of 49 cases of giant cell tumor (GCT) of the mobile spine treated surgically. Our goal was to determine which factors influenced local recurrence. GCT is a benign, locally aggressive tumor that rarely occurs in the spine. The management of local recurrence can be challenging. We performed a retrospective analysis of GCTs of the mobile spine managed between 1970 and 2005. Median follow-up was 145 months with a minimum of 2 years or until death. We used the Kaplan-Meier method to test whether Enneking stage, surgery type, and surgical margin had statistically significant impact on local recurrence. The log rank test was used for comparison, and a P value of less than 0.05 was deemed significant. Of the 49 patients, 11 (22%) local recurrences occurred. The latest recurrence occurred at 60 months. Age less than 25 years was associated with a worse relapse-free survival (P = 0.03). En bloc resection was associated with better local control with Enneking stage III tumors (P = 0.01); however, intralesional resection provided adequate control of Enneking stage II tumors. There were 6 (12%) cases of metastasis, and 2 patients died from the progression of their disease. One patient died from the complications of the surgery. En bloc resection should be considered for Enneking stage III GCTs of the mobile spine. The choice of en bloc resection must be balanced with the inherent risks of the procedure. Intralesional resection of Enneking stage II tumors provides adequate local control. Patients should be followed for at least 5 years because local relapse can occur late.

  16. Epitope mapping of antibodies against ferritin heavy chain in giant cell arteritis and polymyalgia rheumatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Große, K; Schmidt, R E; Witte, T; Baerlecken, N T

    2013-01-01

    In a previous study we found an association between antibodies against the human ferritin heavy chain (HFC) protein and giant cell arteritis (GCA) and/or polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR), especially in GCA/PMR patients prior to glucocorticoid treatment. Antibodies against the N-terminal part of ferritin were present in 92% of untreated patients, 69% of patients with disease flare, and 13% of patients in remission. These antibodies appeared to be markers for the early detection of a disease complex usually diagnosed with considerable delay. Our aim in this study was to optimize the diagnostic test by epitope mapping of antibodies against HFC using peptide antigens in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). We evaluated serum samples from a selected group of GCA/PMR patients in whom the sensitivity of antibodies against the N-terminal ferritin peptide was only 35%. Patients with late-onset rheumatoid arthritis (LORA), patients with fever, patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), patients without any autoimmune disease at age > 65 years, and blood donors served as controls. By combining different ELISAs we were able to increase the frequency of human ferritin peptide antibodies in GCA/PMR (p < 0.0001) without significantly altering the false-positive rate (FPR) of the diagnostic test. The frequency of antibodies against human ferritin peptide increased from 53% to 74% in GCA/PMR patients with disease flare, from 29% to 40% in GCA/PMR patients in partial remission, and from 8% to 45% in GCA/PMR patients in complete remission. The potential diagnostic test for GCA/PMR can be improved by combining three human ferritin peptide antibodies.

  17. Diagnostic value of PET/CT for giant cell arteritis combined with pulmonary embolism presenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Xiaoming; Xu, Xiaoxiang; Peng, Qinglin; Lu, Xin; Ma, Li; Mi, Na; Wang, Guochun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Giant cell arteritis (GCA) combined with concomitant pulmonary embolism (PE) is extremely difficult to diagnose because of its low incidence and atypical clinical presentations. Patient concerns: A 62-year-old male developed fever of unknown origin. Diagnoses: Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) revealed increased glucose metabolism in the vascular walls of the ascending and descending aorta and pulmonary artery, leading to a diagnosis of GCA combined with PE. Interventions: The patient did not respond to regular antiviral and antibacterial treatment but was remised after steroid treatment. Outcomes: No specific autoantibodies were positive for this patient, and the patient did not respond to regular antiviral and antibacterial treatment. After diagnosed by PET/CT, the patient responded well to steroid treatment. Literature review found 16 cases of GCA diagnosed by PET/CT. Their median age was 68.5 (range, 21–87) years and 13 cases were female. PET/CT showed significantly increased metabolism in the ascending and descending aorta, abdominal aorta, and carotid artery. In 4 cases (including our own case), the mean maximum standardized uptake value was 4.2 ± 1.7 (range, 2.5–7.2). Six cases of GCA also had PE and 5 (6/7, 85.7%) cases were females, and the current case is the first male case of GCA combined with PE. Steroid therapy was initiated in all 5 cases. Complete remission was achieved in 4 cases and 2 patients died and the outcome of 1 patient was unknown. Lessons: Our case and the review highlight the value of PET/CT in diagnosing GCA combined with PE, suggesting that PET/CT is the preferred diagnostic tool for atypical patients presenting with fever or muscle pain. PMID:28767581

  18. Rate of Comorbidities in Giant Cell Arteritis: A Population-based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Aladdin J; Englund, Martin; Turesson, Carl; Tomasson, Gunnar; Merkel, Peter A

    2017-01-01

    To compare the rate of occurrence of comorbidities, including severe infections, in a population-based cohort of patients with biopsy-proven giant cell arteritis (GCA) with a reference population in Southern Sweden. The study included a population-based cohort of biopsy-proven GCA cases diagnosed between 1998 and 2010 from the Skåne region in Southern Sweden (population: 1.2 million). For each patient, 4 reference subjects were identified from the general population and matched for age, sex, area of residence, and date of diagnosis of GCA. Using the Skåne Healthcare Register, comorbidities and severe infections (requiring hospitalization) diagnosed after GCA onset were identified. The rate of the first occurrence of each comorbidity was the result of dividing the number of subjects with a given comorbidity by the person-years of followup. The rate ratio (RR; GCA:reference population) was also calculated. There were 768 patients (571 women) with GCA and 3066 reference persons included in the study. The RR were significantly elevated for osteoporosis (2.81, 95% CI 2.33-3.37), followed by venous thromboembolic diseases (2.36, 95% CI 1.61-3.40), severe infections (1.85, 95% CI 1.57-2.18), thyroid diseases (1.55, 95% CI 1.25-1.91), cerebrovascular accidents (1.40, 95% CI 1.12-1.74), and diabetes mellitus (1.29, 95% CI 1.05-1.56). The RR for ischemic heart disease was elevated, but did not reach statistical significance (1.20, 95% CI 1.00-1.44). Patients with GCA have higher rates of selected comorbidities, including severe infections, compared with a reference population. Several of these comorbidities may be related to treatment with glucocorticosteroids, emphasizing the unmet need to find alternative treatments for GCA.

  19. Mesenteric ischemia in giant cell arteritis: 6 cases and a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujobert, Pierre; Fardet, Laurence; Marie, Isabelle; Duhaut, Pierre; Cohen, Pascal; Grange, Claire; Gaultier, Jean-Baptiste; Arrivé, Lionel; Cabane, Jean

    2007-08-01

    To report the main features of mesenteric ischemia related to giant cell arteritis (GCA). We screened 13 French internal medicine tertiary care centers for their cases of patients exhibiting GCA-associated mesenteric ischemia during a 16-year period (1990-2006). Patients were included if they reported newly developed abdominal symptoms associated with histological proof of GCA-associated mesenteric vasculitis and/or radiological abnormalities consistent with GCA-associated mesenteric vasculitis. We performed a Medline search to identify previously reported cases of GCA-associated mesenteric ischemia. We included 6 original cases and 22 cases identified in the literature (mean age of the 28 patients: 72.4 +/- 7.1 yrs; women: 79%). GCA was histologically proven for all patients. In 12 patients GCA diagnosis preceded mesenteric inflammatory arteritis. Mesenteric ischemia occurred either soon after initiation of steroid therapy (n = 6, mean time to onset after starting steroid 12 +/- 11 days) or with a low-dose steroid regimen (n = 6, dosage 0-10 mg/day). In 16 other patients, the mesenteric involvement was the first manifestation of GCA. Only 6 patients (21%) reported cardiovascular risk factors. Clinical manifestations of GCA-associated mesenteric ischemia, as well as biological markers (mean C-reactive protein level 91 +/- 50 mg/l), were very nonspecific. Imaging explorations were performed for 14 patients and showed specific signs of vasculitis on the mesenteric artery in 10 (71%). Nineteen patients (68%) required laparotomy and 9 patients (33%) died. Early diagnosis and medical management of mesenteric GCA may ameliorate the severe prognosis of this possibly underdiagnosed complication.

  20. No detection of varicella-zoster virus in temporal arteries of patients with giant cell arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratore, Francesco; Croci, Stefania; Tamagnini, Ione; Zerbini, Alessandro; Bellafiore, Salvatore; Belloni, Lucia; Boiardi, Luigi; Bisagni, Alessandra; Pipitone, Nicolò; Parmeggiani, Maria; Cavazza, Alberto; Salvarani, Carlo

    2017-10-01

    Data on the presence of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in temporal arteries of patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA) are controversial. We analyzed VZV infection in temporal arteries from Italian patients with temporal artery biopsy (TAB)-positive GCA, TAB-negative GCA, and controls. A total of 79 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) TABs performed between 2009 and 2012 at a single institution from 34 TAB-positive GCA patients, 15 TAB-negative GCA patients, and 30 controls were retrieved. Six 5-μm sections of all FFPE TABs were cut. The first section was analyzed by immunohistochemistry using mouse monoclonal anti-VZVgE IgG1 antibody. DNA was extracted from the remaining five sections and analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the presence of VZV DNA. For 10 of the 34 TAB-positive GCA patients, an additional 2-mm piece of frozen TAB was available. DNA was extracted from the entire 2-mm length frozen specimen and analyzed by PCR for the presence of VZV DNA. Thirty additional 5-μm sections were cut from the FFPE TABs of these 10 patients and analyzed by immunohistochemistry for the presence of VZV antigen. Immunohistochemical analysis detected VZV antigen in 1/34 (3%) TAB-positive GCA, 0/15 TAB-negative GCA, and 0/30 controls, and in none of the 300 sections cut from the 10 FFPE TABs positive for GCA for which the frozen specimens were available. DNA obtained from all TABs was amplifiable. VZV DNA was neither found in any of the FFPE TABs nor found in frozen TABs. Our data do not support in Italian patients a possible role for VZV infection in the etiopathogenesis of GCA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Giant cell tumours of the mobile spine: characteristic imaging features and differential diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Ming-Jue; Wang, Chen-Guang; Wang, Cheng-Sheng; Du, Lian-Jun; Ding, Xiao-Yi; Zhang, Wei-Bin; Lu, Yong; Zu, Jin-Yan

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the characteristic imaging features of giant cell tumours (GCTs) of the mobile spine. Thirty pathologically proven GCTs of the mobile spine were reviewed. X-ray (n = 18), computed tomography (CT) (n = 24) and magnetic resonance (MR) (n = 21) images were retrospectively evaluated. Five tumours were located in the cervical spine, 15 tumours were located in the thoracic spine and 10 tumours in the lumbar spine. The characteristic X-ray findings included an osteolytic and expansile lesion with a "soap bubble" or purely lytic appearance. Cortical destruction was commonly seen. Margin sclerosis was seen in two lesions. No mineralised tumour matrix or periosteal reaction appeared. The CT findings were similar but outlined the cortical alterations in a more accurate way. The characteristic MR findings included a well-defined and expansile mass with heterogeneous low-to-iso signal intensity on T2-weighted images. Cystic areas were commonly seen in 17 cases. Five cases presented fluid-fluid levels, suggesting the development of aneurysmal bone cyst. The solid portions of the tumours were enhanced with a very heterogeneous signal pattern reflecting high blood supply after contrast-enhanced scan. Tumour involvement in the epidural space occurred in 12 cases, causing spinal cord and/or nerve root compression. Involvement of intervertebral discs and/or adjacent vertebrae appeared in two cases. Although rare, GCT can occur in the mobile spine as a kind of benign but locally aggressive tumour. Radiologists should be familiar with its characteristic imaging features in order to make a correct diagnosis and to help preoperative evaluations.

  2. Giant cell tumors of the tendon sheath may present radiologically as intrinsic osseous lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schepper, A.M. de; Bloem, J.L. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Albinusdreef 2, P.O. Box 9600, RC Leiden (Netherlands); Hogendoorn, P.C.W. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Albinusdreef 2, P.O. Box 9600, RC Leiden (Netherlands)

    2007-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to explain radiographic features of giant cell tumors of the tendon sheath (GCTTS), in particular, osseous extension, by correlating imaging findings with histology in order to increase the accuracy of radiological diagnosis. In a series of 200 consecutive osseous (pseudo) tumors of the hand, on radiography, six patients presented with an intrinsic osseous lesion caused by a histologically confirmed neighboring GCTTS. Available radiographs, computed tomography (CT), and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) images were correlated with histology. Radiography showed osseous lesions consisting of well-defined cortical defects in four (one of whom also demonstrated cortical scalloping) and a slightly expansile, well-defined osteolytic lesion in two patients. MR obtained in four patients showed the extraosseous tumor invading/eroding bone and causing cortical scalloping (three and one patients, respectively). Extension depicted on MR was confirmed on the two available resection specimens. All lesions were polylobular (cauliflower or mushroom like) and neighbored tendon sheaths. Dense collagen and hemosiderin-loaded macrophages explained the high CT attenuation and the low MR signal intensity on T2-weighted images that was observed in all four MR and in all two CT scans. The high density of proliferative capillaries explained the marked enhancement observed in all four patients with gadolinium (Gd)-chelate-enhanced MR imaging. GCTTS is a soft tissue (pseudo) tumor that may invade bone and as a consequence mimick an intrinsic osseous lesion on radiographs. In such cases, specific MR and CT features that can be explained by histological findings can be used to suggest the correct diagnosis. (orig.)

  3. Identification of herpes zoster associated temporal arteritis among cases of giant cell arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham, Erin M; Foley, Maria A; Grose, Charles; Syed, Nasreen A; Smith, Morton E; Margolis, Todd P; Thurtell, Matthew J; Kardon, Randy

    2017-12-30

    To examine whether herpes zoster antigen (also called varicella-zoster virus antigen) was detectable in temporal artery biopsies taken from individuals with giant cell arteritis (GCA). Retrospective comparative case series. Sections of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded temporal arteries were examined first by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining to establish the diagnosis of GCA. Adjacent sections of the same biopsy were then examined by immunohistochemistry, using 2 different monoclonal antibodies against a major antigen of varicella-zoster virus called gE. Pathological specimens were obtained from patients cared for at the University of Iowa and Washington University in St. Louis Ophthalmology Clinics. The study included biopsies from 25 patients with symptoms of GCA as well as positive H&E pathology and 25 patients with symptoms compatible with GCA but negative H&E pathology. Among the GCA-positive group, three patients had positive staining for herpes zoster antigen. Among the GCA-negative group, herpes zoster antigen was not detected in any biopsy. In both groups of patients, false positive staining for herpes zoster antigen was detected in the presence of calcifications in the arteries. False-positive staining was also detected on some extra-arterial skeletal muscle and erythrocytes. Herpes zoster antigen was detected in 3/25 temporal arteries from patients with biopsy-proven GCA. One of the three positive cases was noteworthy because the patient had had herpes zoster ophthalmicus diagnosed 3 weeks before the onset of GCA symptoms. False-positive staining for herpes zoster antigen was detected on several temporal artery biopsies. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Incidence of infections in patients with giant cell arteritis: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Madeleine; Thomas, Sara L

    2012-04-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is the most frequent form of vasculitis in adults. We sought to estimate the infectious risk associated with GCA and its treatment. We conducted a matched historical cohort study using data from The Health Improvement Research Network. Patients with newly diagnosed GCA were matched with up to 6 non-GCA patients by age, sex, general practice, and date of entry into the cohort. Random-effects Poisson regression models were used to obtain incidence rates and rate ratios for lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI), urinary tract infections (UTI), and sepsis, as well as for the subset of these that comprised serious infections (pneumonias, upper UTI, and sepsis). Effect modification by age, sex, and time since diagnosis of GCA was assessed. A total of 1,664 patients with GCA were matched to 8,078 patients without GCA. Overall, 805 (48%) of the GCA patients and 3,007 (37%) of the non-GCA patients experienced ≥1 episode of systemic infection during followup, with adjusted rate ratios for LRTI, UTI, and serious infections of 1.48 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.34-1.65), 1.27 (95% CI 1.10-1.46), and 1.55 (95% CI 1.22-1.96), respectively (P < 0.001 for all). The rate ratio for sepsis was 1.63 (95% CI 0.78-3.40, P = 0.20). Rate ratios for infection were highest in the first 6 months following diagnosis of GCA and in patients age <75 years, but did not vary by sex. This is the first study to show that patients with GCA are at increased risk of systemic infections, particularly in the first few months following diagnosis. New GCA medications that allow steroid sparing are needed to treat this condition. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  5. Association between histological features in temporal artery biopsies and clinical features of patients with giant cell arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuer, Gabriel S; Nesher, Ronit; Reinus, Konstantin; Nesher, Gideon

    2013-06-01

    In most cases of giant cell arteritis (GCA) the diagnosis is confirmed by temporal artery biopsy. Aside from the diagnostic purpose, histological parameters may serve as prognostic markers. To review positive temporal artery biopsies ofGCA in an attempt to correlate various histological parameters with clinical features, disease complications and outcome. Positive biopsies from 65 GCA patients were randomly selected for review by a single pathologist. In each biopsy the following parameters were scored: intensity and location of the inflammatory infiltrate, presence of giant cells and other cell types, fragmentation and calcification of the internal elastic lamina, intimal thickening, and presence of luminal thrombus. Clinical data were obtained from the patients' charts. Intensity of the initial systemic inflammatory reaction (ISIR) at the time of diagnosis was scored by the presence of five parameters: fever, anemia, thrombocytosis, leukocytosis, and sedimentation rate >100 mm/hr. In cases with bilateral positive biopsy (n=27), there was good correlation between the two sides regarding intensity of inflammation (r= 0.65, P< 0.001), location of the infiltrate (r= 0.7, P< 0.001), degree of intimal thickening (r= 0.54, P 0.001), and presence of giant cells (r= 0.83, P< 0.001). The rate of corticosteroid discontinuation tended to be quicker in patients with inflammatory infiltrates confined mainly to the adventitia, but other histological parameters did not affect this rate. Inflammatory infiltrates confined to the adventitia were associated with more neuro-ophthalmic ischemic manifestations, weak/moderate ISIR at the time of diagnosis, and faster rate of corticosteroid discontinuation. No association was found between other temporal artery biopsy histological parameters and clinical features of GCA patients.

  6. Rare Presentation of Giant Cell Tumor in the Internal Auditory Canal: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jada, Ajit S; Shrivastava, Raj K; Mannan, Abul; Kobets, Andrew; Manolidis, Spiros

    2015-07-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) is a benign but locally aggressive bone tumor that usually involves the end of long bones. It is a relatively common neoplasm in patients, constituting 5 to 10% of all benign bone tumors. Approximately 2% of GCTs occur in the craniofacial skeleton with a predilection for the ethmoid, sphenoid, and temporal bones. The skull base location is unique and not commonly described. Hearing loss, headache, tinnitus, and subcutaneous masses are the most commonly reported symptoms in GCTs of the skull base. In this case report we present the first description of a GCT within the internal auditory canal causing cranial neuropathy and review the recent pertinent literature.

  7. Percutaneous CT-Guided Cryoablation as an Alternative Treatment for an Extensive Pelvic Bone Giant Cell Tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panizza, Pedro Sergio Brito; Albuquerque Cavalcanti, Conrado Furtado de [Sírio Libânes Hospital, Radiology and Imaged Guided Intervention Service (Brazil); Yamaguchi, Nise Hitomi [Instituto Avanços em Medicina (Brazil); Leite, Claudia Costa; Cerri, Giovanni Guido; Menezes, Marcos Roberto de, E-mail: marcos.menezes@hc.fm.usp.br [Sírio Libânes Hospital, Radiology and Imaged Guided Intervention Service (Brazil)

    2016-02-15

    A giant cell tumor (GCT) is an intermediate grade, locally aggressive neoplasia. Despite advances in surgical and clinical treatments, cases located on the spine and pelvic bones remain a significant challenge. Failure of clinical treatment with denosumab and patient refusal of surgical procedures (hemipelvectomy) led to the use of cryoablation. We report the use of percutaneous CT-guided cryoablation as an alternative treatment, shown to be a minimally invasive, safe, and effective option for a GCT with extensive involvement of the pelvic bones and allowed structural and functional preservation of the involved bones.

  8. Fibular on-lay graft in the management of radial giant cell tumour--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonge, T O; Omololu, A B; Ogunlade, S O

    2001-01-01

    The management of bone loss following tumour resection poses a problem particularly in the upper limb where limb preservation is paramount. For bone loss less than 6cm, nonvascularized fibular graft has been advocated whereas in bone defects larger than this, vascularized fibular graft is the preferred option. In this case study, we have used a nonvascularized fibular on-lay graft (supplemented with cancellous bone graft) in the management of a distal radial bone loss of ten centimeters following resection of a giant cell tumour with remarkable success.

  9. Giant Cell Tumor of Bone: Documented Progression over 4 Years from Its Origin at the Metaphysis to the Articular Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Burke

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The exact location of origin for giant cell tumors of bone (GCTB remains controversial, as lesions are not routinely imaged early but rather late when the tumor is large and clinically symptomatic. At the time of diagnosis, GCTB are classically described as lucent, eccentric lesions with nonsclerotic margins, located within the epiphysis to a greater extent than the metaphysis. Here we present a case of a biopsy proven GCTB initially incidentally seen on MRI as a small strictly metaphyseal lesion, which over the course of several years expanded across a closed physis to involve the epiphysis and abut the articular surface/subchondral bone plate.

  10. Salt tolerance at single cell level in giant-celled Characeae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Jane eBeilby

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Characean plants provide an excellent experimental system for electrophysiology and physiology due to: (i very large cell size, (ii position on phylogenetic tree near the origin of land plants and (iii continuous spectrum from very salt sensitive to very salt tolerant species. A range of experimental techniques is described, some unique to characean plants. Application of these methods provided electrical characteristics of membrane transporters, which dominate the membrane conductance under different outside conditions. With this considerable background knowledge the electrophysiology of salt sensitive and salt tolerant genera can be compared under salt and/or osmotic stress. Both salt tolerant and salt sensitive Characeae show a rise in membrane conductance and simultaneous increase in Na+ influx upon exposure to saline medium. Salt tolerant Chara longifolia and Lamprothamnium sp. exhibit proton pump stimulation upon both turgor decrease and salinity increase, allowing the membrane PD to remain negative. The turgor is regulated through the inward K+ rectifier and 2H+/Cl- symporter. Lamprothamnium plants can survive in hypersaline media up to twice seawater strength and withstand large sudden changes in salinity. Salt-sensitive Chara australis succumbs to 50 - 100 mM NaCl in few days. Cells exhibit no pump stimulation upon turgor decrease and at best transient pump stimulation upon salinity increase. Turgor is not regulated. The membrane PD exhibits characteristic noise upon exposure to salinity. Depolarization of membrane PD to excitation threshold sets off trains of action potentials, leading to further loses of K+ and Cl-. In final stages of salt damage the H+/OH- channels are thought to become the dominant transporter, dissipating the proton gradient and bringing the cell PD close to 0. The differences in transporter electrophysiology and their synergy under osmotic and/or saline stress in salt sensitive and salt tolerant characean cells

  11. Arabidopsis formin AtFH6 is a plasma membrane-associated protein upregulated in giant cells induced by parasitic nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favery, Bruno; Chelysheva, Liudmila A; Lebris, Manuel; Jammes, Fabien; Marmagne, Anne; De Almeida-Engler, Janice; Lecomte, Philippe; Vaury, Chantal; Arkowitz, Robert A; Abad, Pierre

    2004-09-01

    Plant-parasitic nematodes Meloidogyne spp induce an elaborate permanent feeding site characterized by the redifferentiation of root cells into multinucleate and hypertrophied giant cells. We have isolated by a promoter trap strategy an Arabidopsis thaliana formin gene, AtFH6, which is upregulated during giant cell formation. Formins are actin-nucleating proteins that stimulate de novo polymerization of actin filaments. We show here that three type-I formins were upregulated in giant cells and that the AtFH6 protein was anchored to the plasma membrane and uniformly distributed. Suppression of the budding defect of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae bni1Delta bnr1Delta mutant showed that AtFH6 regulates polarized growth by controlling the assembly of actin cables. Our results suggest that AtFH6 might be involved in the isotropic growth of hypertrophied feeding cells via the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. The actin cables would serve as tracks for vesicle trafficking needed for extensive plasma membrane and cell wall biogenesis. Therefore, determining how plant parasitic nematodes modify root cells into giant cells represents an attractive system to identify genes that regulate cell growth and morphogenesis.

  12. Arabidopsis Formin AtFH6 Is a Plasma Membrane–Associated Protein Upregulated in Giant Cells Induced by Parasitic Nematodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favery, Bruno; Chelysheva, Liudmila A.; Lebris, Manuel; Jammes, Fabien; Marmagne, Anne; de Almeida-Engler, Janice; Lecomte, Philippe; Vaury, Chantal; Arkowitz, Robert A.; Abad, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    Plant-parasitic nematodes Meloidogyne spp induce an elaborate permanent feeding site characterized by the redifferentiation of root cells into multinucleate and hypertrophied giant cells. We have isolated by a promoter trap strategy an Arabidopsis thaliana formin gene, AtFH6, which is upregulated during giant cell formation. Formins are actin-nucleating proteins that stimulate de novo polymerization of actin filaments. We show here that three type-I formins were upregulated in giant cells and that the AtFH6 protein was anchored to the plasma membrane and uniformly distributed. Suppression of the budding defect of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae bni1Δ bnr1Δ mutant showed that AtFH6 regulates polarized growth by controlling the assembly of actin cables. Our results suggest that AtFH6 might be involved in the isotropic growth of hypertrophied feeding cells via the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. The actin cables would serve as tracks for vesicle trafficking needed for extensive plasma membrane and cell wall biogenesis. Therefore, determining how plant parasitic nematodes modify root cells into giant cells represents an attractive system to identify genes that regulate cell growth and morphogenesis. PMID:15319477

  13. Novel mutations in the SH3BP2 gene associated with sporadic central giant cell lesions and cherubism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, V M; Perdigão, P F; Amaral, F R; de Souza, P E A; De Marco, L; Gomez, R S

    2009-01-01

    Central giant cell lesion (CGCL) is a reactive bone lesion that occurs mainly in the mandible, characterized by the multinucleated osteoclast-like giant cells in a background of oval to spindle-shaped mononuclear cells. The etiology is unknown and occurs more commonly in young adults. Cherubism, a rare disease found predominantly in females has histologic characteristics indistinguishable from those of CGCL and is caused by mutations mostly present in exon 9 of the SH3BP2 gene. In this study, we investigated four cases of CGCL and one case of cherubism. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and tumor tissue and all coding and flanking regions of the SH3BP2 amplified by PCR and directly sequenced to identify underlying mutations. Two novel mutations were found; a heterozygous missense mutation c.1442A>T (Q481L) in exon 11 in one sporadic case of CGCL and a heterozygous germline and tumor tissue missense mutation c.320C>T (T107M) in exon 4 in one patient with cherubism. These findings open a new window to investigate the possible relationship between the pathogenesis of the cherubism and CGCL.

  14. Reconstructive procedures for segmental resection of bone in giant cell tumors around the knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aggarwal Aditya

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Segmental resection of bone in Giant Cell Tumor (GCT around the knee, in indicated cases, leaves a gap which requires a complex reconstructive procedure. The present study analyzes various reconstructive procedures in terms of morbidity and various complications encountered. Materials and Methods: Thirteen cases (M-six and F-seven; lower end femur-six and upper end tibia -seven of GCT around the knee, radiologically either Campanacci Grade II, Grade II with pathological fracture or Grade III were included. Mean age was 25.6 years (range 19-30 years. Resection arthrodesis with telescoping (shortening over intramedullary nail ( n=5, resection arthrodesis with an intercalary allograft threaded over a long intramedullary nail ( n=3 and resection arthrodesis with intercalary fibular autograft and simultaneous limb lengthening ( n=5 were the procedure performed. Results: Shortening was the major problem following resection arthrodesis with telescoping (shortening over intramedullary nail. Only two patients agreed for subsequent limb lengthening. The rest continued to walk with shortening. Infection was the major problem in all cases of resection arthrodesis with an intercalary allograft threaded over a long intramedullary nail and required multiple drainage procedures. Fusion was achieved after two years in two patients. In the third patient the allograft sequestrated. The patient underwent sequestrectomy, telescoping of fragments and ilizarov fixator application with subsequent limb lengthening. The patient was finally given an ischial weight relieving orthosis, 54 months after the index procedure. After resection arthrodesis with intercalary autograft and simultaneous lengthening the resultant gap (~15cm was partially bridged by intercalary nonvascularized dual fibular strut graft (6-7cm and additional corticocancellous bone graft from ipsilateral patella. Simultaneous limb lengthening with a distal tibial corticotomy was performed on an

  15. Surgical treatment for diffused-type giant cell tumor (pigmented villonodular synovitis) about the ankle joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xingchen; Xu, Yang; Zhu, Yuan; Xu, Xiangyang

    2017-11-14

    Diffused-type giant cell tumor(Dt-GCT) is a rare, aggressive disorder of the joint synovium, bursa and tendon sheaths. Osseous erosions and subchondral cysts may develop as the result of synovium infiltration in Dt-GCT. We present a retrospective study of a series of patients who are diagnosed with Dt-GCT about the ankle joint, there clinical outcome is evaluated in this study. Fifteen patients with radiologically and histologically confirmed Dt-GCT about the ankle joint were identified in our foot and ankle department. Patients were managed with open synovectomy for the tumor tissue and bone grafting for bony erosions. X-rays and MRI scans were used for evaluation of the tumor and bony erosions pre- and post-operatively. Pre- and post-operative ankle function was assessed using the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society -Ankle and Hindfoot (AOFAS-AH) score and the Muscularskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) score. The mean follow-up duration was 37.4 months (range 25 to 50 months). There were 6 males and 9 females, with a mean age of 35 years old (range 18 to 65 years). All patients had talar erosion with the average size of 10.1*9.1*8.2 mm, distal tibia was affected in 5 patients with the average size of 6.2*5.6*5.8 mm. 7 patients had tendon involvement, 2 patients had recurrence and progression of ankle osteoarthritis. Both of them underwent ankle fusion. At the time of last follow-up, the mean AOFAS-AH score increased from 49 to 80 points (p < 0.05), the MSTS score increased from 12 to 22 points (p < 0.05). For Dt-GCT with bony erosions, open synovectomy combined with bone grafting seems to be a safe and effective operation for the salvage of ankle joint. Fusion is recommended for failed and severe cartilage destruction of the ankle joint.

  16. Steroid-sparing effect and toxicity of dapsone treatment in giant cell arteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Kim Heang; Dalmay, François; Gondran, Guillaume; Palat, Sylvain; Bezanahary, Holy; Cypierre, Anne; Fauchais, Anne-Laure; Liozon, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although a glucocorticoid (GC)-sparing strategy is needed for patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA) suffering from refractory disease or serious treatment-related complications, evidence of efficacy in this setting of immunosuppressive drugs and biotherapies is lacking. Herein, we evaluated the GC-sparing effects and tolerability of addition of dapsone (DDS) to prednisone therapy in patients with GCA. We retrospectively assessed data on 18 GCA patients who received DDS as a first-line treatment (DDS-1 group) and 52 patients who received it as a second- or third-line treatment for refractory GCA, with or without excessive GC-related toxicity (DDS-2 group). Of these 70 patients, 63 belonged to an inception cohort of 478 patients, whereas the remaining 7 were referred to our department for resistant GCA. In all, 52 patients were assessable for DDS efficacy. The baseline characteristics of the DDS-1 patients were similar to those of 395 GCA patients (control group) who received prednisone alone. DDS-1 patients had a more sustained decrease in GC dose with a lower mean prednisone dose at 12 months, and they comprised higher proportions who achieved GC withdrawal within the first year, who stopped prednisone treatment, and who recovered from GCA (P < 0.001 for each variable). Patients in the DDS-2 group achieved a mean rate of prednisone reduction of 65% and a prednisone dose reduction of 16.9 ± 13.3 mg/d. The monthly decreases in the prednisone dose were 2.4 and 1.25 mg in DDS-1 and DDS-2 patients, respectively. DDS-induced side effects were recorded in 44 (64%) assessable patients. These side effects led to lowering of the DDS dose by 25 mg/d in 11 (16%) patients and permanent cessation of DDS in 14 patients (20%), due to allergic skin rash in 7, agranulocytosis in 2, icteric hepatitis in 2, and excessive hemolysis in 2 patients. DDS is a potent GC-sparing agent in GCA that should be evaluated in prospective studies. However, DDS use should

  17. Do solar cycles influence giant cell arteritis and rheumatoid arthritis incidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, Simon; Rider, Lisa G; Johnson, Jay R; Miller, Federick W; Matteson, Eric L; Crowson, Cynthia S; Gabriel, Sherine E

    2015-05-15

    To examine the influence of solar cycle and geomagnetic effects on the incidence of giant cell arteritis (GCA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We used data from patients with GCA (1950-2004) and RA (1955-2007) obtained from population-based cohorts. Yearly trends in age-adjusted and sex-adjusted incidence were correlated with the F10.7 index (solar radiation at 10.7 cm wavelength, a proxy for the solar extreme ultraviolet radiation) and AL index (a proxy for the westward auroral electrojet and a measure of geomagnetic activity). Fourier analysis was performed on AL, F10.7, and GCA and RA incidence rates. The correlation of GCA incidence with AL is highly significant: GCA incidence peaks 0-1 year after the AL reaches its minimum (ie, auroral electrojet reaches a maximum). The correlation of RA incidence with AL is also highly significant. RA incidence rates are lowest 5-7 years after AL reaches maximum. AL, GCA and RA incidence power spectra are similar: they have a main peak (periodicity) at about 10 years and a minor peak at 4-5 years. However, the RA incidence power spectrum main peak is broader (8-11 years), which partly explains the lower correlation between RA onset and AL. The auroral electrojets may be linked to the decline of RA incidence more strongly than the onset of RA. The incidences of RA and GCA are aligned in geomagnetic latitude. AL and the incidences of GCA and RA all have a major periodicity of about 10 years and a secondary periodicity at 4-5 years. Geomagnetic activity may explain the temporal and spatial variations, including east-west skewness in geographic coordinates, in GCA and RA incidence, although the mechanism is unknown. The link with solar, geospace and atmospheric parameters need to be investigated. These novel findings warrant examination in other populations and with other autoimmune diseases. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go

  18. A Rare Case of Giant Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Abdominal Wall: Excision and Immediate Reconstruction with a Pedicled Deep Inferior Epigastric Artery Perforator (DIEP) Flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lorenzo, Sara; Zabbia, Giovanni; Corradino, Bartolo; Tripoli, Massimiliano; Pirrello, Roberto; Cordova, Adriana

    2017-12-04

    BACKGROUND Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) greater than 5 cm in diameter is called giant basal cell carcinoma (GBCC), or super giant basal cell carcinoma if it has a diameter larger than 20 cm. Giant BCC only accounts for 0.5% of BCCs and super giant BCC is exceedingly rare. On account of their rarity, there are no established guidelines for GBCC treatment. CASE REPORT We describe a peculiar case of an 82-year-old woman with a GBCC carcinoma of the lower abdominal wall. The tumor was surgically removed with ipsilateral inguinal lymph nodes and the abdominal wall was reconstructed immediately with a pedicled deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) flap. CONCLUSIONS Treatment of giant basal cell carcinoma is often difficult, especially in elderly patients with poor general health and multiple pathologies. The pedicled DIEP flap is rotated to cover the loss of substance without tension, and it is easy to harvest and transfer. This flap allowed a good result without local or systemic complication. We present this report as a reminder of the occasional occurrence of extremely aggressive BCCs. We believe that, especially for rare tumors like these, it is very useful for the entire scientific community to publish these cases and the therapeutic strategies used to treat them.

  19. Synthesizing artificial cells from giant unilamellar vesicles: state-of-the art in the development of microfluidic technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matosevic, Sandro

    2012-11-01

    Microfluidic technology - the manipulation of fluids at micrometer scales - has revolutionized many areas of synthetic biology. The bottom-up synthesis of "minimal" cell models has traditionally suffered from poor control of assembly conditions. Giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) are good models of living cells on account of their size and unilamellar membrane structure. In recent years, a number of microfluidic approaches for constructing GUVs has emerged. These provide control over traditionally elusive parameters of vesicular structure, such as size, lamellarity, membrane composition, and internal contents. They also address sophisticated cellular functions such as division and protein synthesis. Microfluidic techniques for GUV synthesis can broadly be categorized as continuous-flow based approaches and droplet-based approaches. This review presents the state-of-the-art of microfluidic technology, a robust platform for recapitulating complex cellular structure and function in synthetic models of biological cells. Copyright © 2012 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Giant cell glioblastoma and pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma show different immunohistochemical profiles for neuronal antigens and p53 but share reactivity for class III beta-tubulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Diaz, Hilda; Kleinschmidt-DeMasters, B K; Powell, Suzanne Z; Yachnis, Anthony T

    2003-09-01

    Giant cell glioblastoma multiforme (GCGBM) and pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma (PXA) are clinically, radiographically, and histologically distinct tumors of the central nervous system. However, they share features of gross circumscription, reticulin deposition, lymphocytic infiltrates, and prominent populations of tumor giant cells. Neuronal antigens have been detected in the neoplastic cells of PXAs, but to our knowledge have not been studied previously in GCGBMs. While TP53 is mutated in most GCGBMs, a feature usually paralleled by strong immunostaining of the protein, the expression pattern of PXAs has not been extensively studied. To compare the immunoprofiles of GCGBM and PXA with regard to neuronal antigens and p53 and to evaluate the potential diagnostic utility of such a panel. Archival paraffin sections of 9 GCGBMs and 9 PXAs were immunostained for class III beta-tubulin, neuronal nuclear antigen, neurofilament protein, synaptophysin, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and p53. Giant cell glioblastomas were strongly immunoreactive for class III beta-tubulin and glial fibrillary acidic protein, but showed only rare staining for the other neuronal polypeptides. In contrast, PXAs usually showed at least focal staining of individual tumor cells for most of the neuronal antigens tested. Tubulin was strongly positive in tumor giant cells and in smaller neoplastic cells of both tumor types. Double-immunolabeling revealed distinct populations of tumor cells that expressed either glial fibrillary acidic protein or tubulin and dual-labeling of individual cells in GCGBM and PXA. Strong p53 staining was observed in many tumor cells in 5 of 8 GCGBMs tested, while staining for this antigen was negative or focally positive in 6 of 8 PXAs examined. Giant cell glioblastoma multiforme and PXA show distinct patterns of immunoreactivity for neuronal antigens and p53 that may be useful diagnostically in difficult cases or in limited samples. These results provide further evidence

  1. CoCl2, a mimic of hypoxia, induces formation of polyploid giant cells with stem characteristics in colon cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M Lopez-Sánchez

    Full Text Available The induction of polyploidy is considered the reproductive end of cells, but there is evidence that polyploid giant cancer cells (PGCCs contribute to cell repopulation during tumor relapse. However, the role of these cells in the development, progression and response to therapy in colon cancer remains undefined. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to investigate the generation of PGCCs in colon cancer cells and identify mechanisms of formation. Treatment of HCT-116 and Caco-2 colon cancer cells with the hypoxia mimic CoCl2 induced the formation of cells with larger cell and nuclear size (PGCCs, while the cells with normal morphology were selectively eliminated. Cytometric analysis showed that CoCl2 treatment induced G2 cell cycle arrest and the generation of a polyploid cell subpopulation with increased cellular DNA content. Polyploidy of hypoxia-induced PGCCs was confirmed by FISH analysis. Furthermore, CoCl2 treatment effectively induced the stabilization of HIF-1α, the differential expression of a truncated form of p53 (p47 and decreased levels of cyclin D1, indicating molecular mechanisms associated with cell cycle arrest at G2. Generation of PGCCs also contributed to expansion of a cell subpopulation with cancer stem cells (CSCs characteristics, as indicated by colonosphere formation assays, and enhanced chemoresistance to 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin. In conclusion, the pharmacological induction of hypoxia in colon cancer cells causes the formation of PGCCs, the expansion of a cell subpopulation with CSC characteristics and chemoresistance. The molecular mechanisms involved, including the stabilization of HIF-1 α, the involvement of p53/p47 isoform and cell cycle arrest at G2, suggest novel targets to prevent tumor relapse and treatment failure in colon cancer.

  2. A Giant-Cell Lesion with Cellular Cannibalism in the Mandible: Case Report and Review of Brown Tumors in Hyperparathyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Azzi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A small radiolucent area in the mandible was discovered in a 58-year-old woman with no oral complaints. The patient’s history included only hypertension. The lesion was considered as an inflammatory cyst and was enucleated. Three months later, a CT revealed the presence of a cyst-like lesion in the mandible with thin expanded buccal cortical plate, localized erosion, and a polylobate appearance on the lingual aspect of the cortical plate. The histological diagnosis of the lesion was central giant-cell granuloma (CGCG. The lesion was thoroughly enucleated. Nevertheless, another X-ray carried out six months later revealed multiple bilateral osteolytic areas throughout the jaw. In addition, widespread cortical plate erosion was observed, as well as signs of root resorption and periodontal enlargement. There was no sign of neurological involvement, although the nerves appeared to be dislocated. After full blood chemistry analysis and detailed collection of radiographs, the final diagnosis was brown tumors in primary hyperparathyroidism. This case report demonstrates how dental clinicians may be the first-line specialists who identify a complex systemic disease before other clinicians. Finally, it highlights the role of cellular cannibalism in predicting the clinical aggressiveness of brown tumors as well as in other giant-cell lesions.

  3. SH3BP2-encoding exons involved in cherubism are not associated with central giant cell granuloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, R C; Horz, H P; Damante, J H; Garlet, G P; Santos, C F; Nogueira, R L M; Cavalcante, R B; Conrads, G

    2011-08-01

    Central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) is a benign lesion with unpredictable biological behaviour ranging from a slow-growing asymptomatic swelling to an aggressive lesion associated with pain, bone and root resorption and also tooth displacement. The aetiology of the disease is unclear with controversies in the literature on whether it is mainly of reactional, inflammatory, infectious, neoplasic or genetic origin. To test the hypothesis that mutations in the SH3BP2 gene, as the principal cause of cherubism, are also responsible for, or at least associated with, giant cell lesions, 30 patients with CGCG were recruited for this study and subjected to analysis of germ line and/or somatic alterations. In the blood samples of nine patients, one codon alteration in exon 4 was found, but this alteration did not lead to changes at the amino acid level. In conclusion, if a primary genetic defect is the cause for CGCG it is either located in SH3BP2 gene exons not yet related to cherubism or in a different gene. Copyright © 2011 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Giant cell interstitial pneumonia in a metal grinder with an abnormally high level of serum CA19-9].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seike, M; Usuki, J; Uematsu, K; Enomoto, T; Shinoda, K; Yoshimori, K; Fukuda, Y; Kudoh, S; Niitani, H

    1995-08-01

    Interstitial pneumonia and recurrent pneumothorax developed in a 48-year-old man who had worked as a metal grinder. He died of respiratory failure despite having received antibiotics and steroids, and despite having undergone pleural sclerosis therapy. Giant cell interstitial pneumonia was diagnosed; innumerable bizarre giant cells engulfing black granules were found within the alveoli. The results of high-energy dispersion X-ray microanalysis indicated that the patient had hard metal pneumoconiosis associated with tungsten in the black granules. When he was admitted to the hospital, his serum CA19-9 and SLEX concentrations were abnormally high (2600 and 200 ng/ml, respectively). Immunohistochemical analysis of lung tissue was done with anti-CA19-9 and SLEX antibodies. CA19-9 staining revealed strong bronchialization and squamous metaplasia in contrast to type II hyperplasia. SLEX staining showed strong type II hyperplasia. Further investigations will be needed to determine the mechanism of elevated tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens in serum.

  5. Tumor Budding, Micropapillary Pattern, and Polyploidy Giant Cancer Cells in Colorectal Cancer: Current Status and Future Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiwu Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that polyploid giant cancer cells (PGCGs induced by CoCl2 could form through endoreduplication or cell fusion. A single PGCC formed tumors in immunodeficient mice. PGCCs are also the key contributors to the cellular atypia and associate with the malignant grade of tumors. PGCCs have the properties of cancer stem cells and produce daughter cells via asymmetric cell division. Compared with diploid cancer cells, these daughter cells express less epithelial markers and acquire mesenchymal phenotype with importance in cancer development and progression. Tumor budding is generally recognized to correlate with a high recurrence rate, lymph node metastasis, chemoresistance, and poor prognosis of colorectal cancers (CRCs and is a good indicator to predict the metastasis and aggressiveness in CRCs. Micropapillary pattern is a special morphologic pattern and also associates with tumor metastasis and poor prognosis. There are similar morphologic features and molecular phenotypes among tumor budding, micropapillary carcinoma pattern, and PGCCs with their budding daughter cells and all of them show strong ability of tumor invasion and migration. In this review, we discuss the cancer stem cell properties of PGCCs, the molecular mechanisms of their regulation, and the relationships with tumor budding and micropapillary pattern in CRCs.

  6. Tumor Budding, Micropapillary Pattern, and Polyploidy Giant Cancer Cells in Colorectal Cancer: Current Status and Future Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dan; Yang, Zhengduo; Zhang, Xipeng

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that polyploid giant cancer cells (PGCGs) induced by CoCl2 could form through endoreduplication or cell fusion. A single PGCC formed tumors in immunodeficient mice. PGCCs are also the key contributors to the cellular atypia and associate with the malignant grade of tumors. PGCCs have the properties of cancer stem cells and produce daughter cells via asymmetric cell division. Compared with diploid cancer cells, these daughter cells express less epithelial markers and acquire mesenchymal phenotype with importance in cancer development and progression. Tumor budding is generally recognized to correlate with a high recurrence rate, lymph node metastasis, chemoresistance, and poor prognosis of colorectal cancers (CRCs) and is a good indicator to predict the metastasis and aggressiveness in CRCs. Micropapillary pattern is a special morphologic pattern and also associates with tumor metastasis and poor prognosis. There are similar morphologic features and molecular phenotypes among tumor budding, micropapillary carcinoma pattern, and PGCCs with their budding daughter cells and all of them show strong ability of tumor invasion and migration. In this review, we discuss the cancer stem cell properties of PGCCs, the molecular mechanisms of their regulation, and the relationships with tumor budding and micropapillary pattern in CRCs. PMID:27843459

  7. An indeterminate mucin-producing cystic neoplasm containing an undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells: a case report of a rare association of pancreatic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarelli, Marco; Guttadauro, Angelo; Gerosa, Martino; Marando, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Francesco; De Simone, Matilde; Cioffi, Ugo

    2015-11-18

    Only few case reports of mucinous cystic pancreatic neoplasm containing an undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells have been described in the literature. In the majority of cases this unusual association of tumors seems related to a favorable outcome. We present the second case of an indeterminate mucin-producting cystic neoplasm containing an area of carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells. The specific features of the two histotypes and the rapid course of the disease make our clinical case remarkable. A 68 year old female came to our attention for a pancreatic macrocystic mass detected with ultrasonography. Her past medical history was silent. The patient reported upper abdominal discomfort for two months; nausea, vomiting or weight loss were not reported. Physical examination revealed a palpable mass in the epigastrium; scleral icterus was absent. Cross-sectional imaging showed a complex mass of the neck and body of the pancreas, characterized by multiple large cystic spaces separated by thick septa and an area of solid tissue located in the caudal portion of the lesion. The patient underwent total pancreatectomy with splenectomy. Pathological examination revealed a mucinous cystic neoplasm with a component of an undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells. Because of the absence of ovarian-type stroma, the lesion was classified as an indeterminate mucin-producing cystic neoplasm of the pancreas. The immunohistochemical studies evidenced no reactivity of osteclast-like giant cells to epithelial markers but showed a positive reactivity to histiocytic markers. Numerous pleomorphic giant cells with an immunohistochemical sarcomatoid profile were present in the undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells. A rapid tumor progression was observed: liver metastases were detected after 4 months. The patient received adjuvant chemotherapy (Gemcitabine) but expired 10 months after surgery. Our case confirms that the

  8. Giant cell tumor of the metatarsal bone: case report and review of the literature; Tumor de celulas gigantes do metatarso: relato de caso e revisao da literatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benites Filho, Paulo R.; Escuissato, Dante L. [Hospital de Clinicas da Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Servico de Radiologia]. E-mail: danteluiz@onda.com.br; Urban, Linei A.B.D. [DAPI - Diagnostico Avancado por Imagem, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Gasparetto, Taisa P. Davaus [Hospital Universitario Antonio Pedro (HUAP), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia; Sakamoto, Danielle; Ioshii, Sergio [Hospital de Clinicas da Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Servico de Anatomia Patologica; Marchiori, Edson [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia

    2007-07-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone is a rare neoplasm and account for 5% of all primary bone tumors. It is common in the knee and wrist, but rare in the small bones of the foot. The authors report a 32-year old male patient presented with a four-month history of right foot pain. Plain radiographs showed an expansive lytic lesion involving the first right metatarsal bone. Computed tomography scan demonstrated a radiolucent lesion with well-defined borders. Biopsy was performed and the histological diagnostic was giant cell tumor. The authors emphasize the correlation between the imaging and histological findings. (author)

  9. Mid-term outcome after curettage with polymethylmethacrylate for giant cell tumor around the knee: higher risk of radiographic osteoarthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, Lizz; van de Sande, Michiel A J; Heineken, Adriaan C; Fiocco, Marta; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Dijkstra, P D Sander

    2013-11-06

    It has been suggested that, when a patient has a giant cell tumor, subchondral bone involvement close to articular cartilage and a hyperthermic reaction from polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) are risk factors for the development of osteoarthritis. We determined the prevalence, risk factors, and clinical relevance of osteoarthritis on radiographs after curettage and application of PMMA for the treatment of giant cell tumors around the knee. This retrospective single-center study included fifty-three patients with giant cell tumor around the knee treated with curettage and PMMA between 1987 and 2007. The median age at the time of follow-up was forty-two years (range, twenty-three to seventy years). There were twenty-nine women. Radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis was defined, preoperatively and postoperatively, as Kellgren and Lawrence grade 3 or 4 (KL3-4). We studied the influence of age, sex, tumor-cartilage distance, subchondral bone involvement (≤3 mm of residual subchondral bone), subchondral bone-grafting, intra-articular fracture, multiple curettage procedures, and complications on progression to KL3-4. Functional outcomes and quality of life were assessed with the Short Form-36 (SF-36), Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) score, and Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). After a median duration of follow-up of eighty-six months (range, sixty to 285 months), six patients (11%) had progression to KL3, two (4%) had progression to KL4, and one had preexistent KL4. No patient underwent total knee replacement. The hazard ratio for KL3-4 was 9.0 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.0 to 41; p = 0.004) when >70% of the subchondral bone was affected and 4.2 (95% CI = 0.84 to 21; p = 0.081) when the tumor-cartilage distance was ≤3 mm. Age, sex, subchondral bone-grafting, intra-articular fracture, multiple curettage procedures, and complications did not affect progression to KL3-4. Patients with KL3-4 reported lower scores on the KOOS symptom subscale

  10. A case of osteoclast-like giant cell-rich epithelioid glioblastoma with BRAF V600E mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funata, Nobuaki; Nobusawa, Sumihito; Yamada, Ryoji; Shinoura, Nobusada

    2016-01-01

    Epithelioid glioblastomas (E-GBMs) are rare, highly aggressive tumors consisting of closely packed tumor cells with smooth, round cell borders and abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm. They tend to affect younger patients compared with conventional GBM. BRAF V600E mutation is characteristically found in approximately 50% of all E-GBMs, compared with a low frequency of this mutation in conventional GBM. Here, we report an unusual case of glioma involving the right frontal lobe, basal ganglia and thalamus in an HIV-positive 30-year-old man on antiretroviral therapy. The lesion was composed of abundant discohesive, monotonous epithelioid cells with extensive necrosis, spindle and polyhedral cells, low-grade oligoastrocytoma-like areas, sarcomatous components, and numerous osteoclast-like giant cells (OLGCs) intermingled with epithelioid tumor cells. As the epithelioid cells accounted for more than one-third of the tumor, a pathological diagnosis of E-GBM was made. BRAF V600E mutation was detected in both oligoastrocytoma-like and epithelioid cell components. Similar to previously reported findings on E-GBM associated with low-grade glioma, this case suggested that low-grade astrocytic glioma with BRAF V600E mutation progressed to E-GBM. OLGCs are rarely observed in gliomas, and this is the first case report of E-GBM associated with abundant OLGC infiltration.

  11. Heat shock cognate protein 70 contributes to Brucella invasion into trophoblast giant cells that cause infectious abortion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furuoka Hidefumi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cell tropism of Brucella abortus, a causative agent of brucellosis and facultative intracellular pathogen, in the placenta is thought to be a key event of infectious abortion, although the molecular mechanism for this is largely unknown. There is a higher degree of bacterial colonization in the placenta than in other organs and many bacteria are detected in trophoblast giant (TG cells in the placenta. In the present study, we investigated mechanism of B. abortus invasion into TG cells. Results We observed internalization and intracellular growth of B. abortus in cultured TG cells. A monoclonal antibody that inhibits bacterial internalization was isolated and this reacted with heat shock cognate protein 70 (Hsc70. Depletion and over expression of Hsc70 in TG cells inhibited and promoted bacterial internalization, respectively. IFN-γ receptor was expressed in TG cells and IFN-γ treatment enhanced the uptake of bacteria by TG cells. Administering the anti-Hsc70 antibody to pregnant mice served to prevent infectious abortion. Conclusion B. abortus infection of TG cells in placenta is mediated by Hsc70, and that such infection leads to infectious abortion.

  12. Polymyalgia rheumatica and giant cell arteritis in older patients: diagnosis and pharmacological management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jean; Warrington, Kenneth J

    2011-08-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is an inflammatory vasculopathy that involves large- and medium-sized arteries and can cause vision loss, stroke and aneurysms. GCA occurs in people aged >50 years and is more common in women. A higher incidence of the disease is observed in populations from Northern European countries. Polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) is a periarticular inflammatory process manifesting as pain and stiffness in the neck, shoulders and pelvic girdle. PMR shares the same pattern of age and sex distribution as GCA. The pathophysiology of PMR and GCA is not completely understood, but the two conditions may be related and often occur concurrently. A delay in the diagnosis should be avoided because of the risk of vascular ischaemic complications due to GCA. The diagnosis should be considered in patients aged >50 years presenting with symptoms such as new headache, visual disturbances, jaw claudication or symptoms of PMR. GCA can also present as a systemic inflammatory syndrome with fever of unknown origin. Marked elevation of acute-phase reactants, recognizable in higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, is often seen in both PMR and GCA. However, some patients can present with a normal ESR. Confirmation of the diagnosis of GCA by temporal artery biopsy is important because clinical findings and laboratory tests are not specific, and because a diagnosis of GCA commits patients to long-term treatment with corticosteroids. The role of imaging techniques for the diagnosis of GCA remains unclear, but these modalities can be helpful in assessing the extent of vascular involvement, especially when extra-cranial disease is present. In PMR, subdeltoid and subacromial bursitis can be identified by imaging techniques, especially ultrasound or MRI. The clinical manifestations of GCA and PMR respond dramatically within 12-48 hours of starting corticosteroid treatment. The initial corticosteroid dosage commonly used in GCA is oral

  13. MORPHOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTIC OF SPERMATOGONIA AND TESTES DISSOCIATION : A Preliminary Study for the Germ Cell Transplantation in Giant Gouramy (Osphronemus gouramy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Andriani

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent study were attempting to develop spermatogonial germ cell transplantation as a tool to preserve and propagate male germ-plasm from endangered fish species, as well as to produce surrogate broodstock of commercially valuable fish. Spermatogonia identification and testes dissociation were the first necessary steps to obtain highly amount and viable population of spermatogonia as donor cells for transplantation. Using giant gouramy testes as a model, spermatogonia was histological characterized and two methods of testes dissociations were compared (i.e. medium A contained 0.5% trypsin in PBS and medium B contained 0.5% trypsin and DNase 10 IU/μL in PBS complemented with CaCl2, Hepes and FCS. Optimal incubation times (1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 hours in dissociation medium were also determined. Freshly isolated testes of immature giant gouramy were minced in dissociation medium and then incubated to get monodisperce cell suspension. Parameters observed were number and viability of spermatogonia (ø > 10 μm. The viability was analyzed using trypan blue exclusion dye. The results showed that the average number of spermatogonia observed in medium B was higher than in medium A (P0.05. The viability of spermatogonia decreased by the increasing duration time of dissociation. The viability of spermatogonia started to decrease significantly in 2 hours incubation time in medium A and 4 hours incubation time in medium B (P<0.05. In conclusion, application of dissociation medium B yielded higher number of viable spermatogonia than dissociation medium A.

  14. Congenital giant melanocytic nevi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahla Khan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Nevi are common skin tumors caused by abnormal overgrowth of cells from the epidermal and dermal layers of the skin. Most nevi are benign, but some pre-cancerous nevi must be monitored or removed. The giant congenital nevus is greater than 10 cm in size, pigmented and often hairy. Between 4% and 6% of these lesions will develop into a malignant melanoma. Since approximately 50% of the melanoma develop by the age of two, and 80% by the age of seven, early removal is recommended. The objective of this paper is to present a unique case of giant nevi and their surgical management.

  15. A Genome-wide Association Study Identifies Risk Alleles in Plasminogen and P4HA2 Associated with Giant Cell Arteritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carmona, F David; Vaglio, Augusto; Mackie, Sarah L; Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Monach, Paul A; Castañeda, Santos; Solans, Roser; Morado, Inmaculada C; Narváez, Javier; Ramentol-Sintas, Marc; Pease, Colin T; Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Watts, Richard; Khalidi, Nader; Langford, Carol A; Ytterberg, Steven; Boiardi, Luigi; Beretta, Lorenzo; Govoni, Marcello; Emmi, Giacomo; Bonatti, Francesco; Cimmino, Marco A; Witte, Torsten; Neumann, Thomas; Holle, Julia; Schönau, Verena; Sailler, Laurent; Papo, Thomas; Haroche, Julien; Mahr, Alfred; Mouthon, Luc; Molberg, Øyvind; Diamantopoulos, Andreas P; Voskuyl, Alexandre; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Daikeler, Thomas; Berger, Christoph T; Molloy, Eamonn S; O'Neill, Lorraine; Blockmans, Daniel; Lie, Benedicte A; Mclaren, Paul; Vyse, Timothy J; Wijmenga, Cisca; Allanore, Yannick; Koeleman, Bobby P C; Barrett, Jennifer H; Cid, María C; Salvarani, Carlo; Merkel, Peter A; Morgan, Ann W; González-Gay, Miguel A; Martín, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is the most common form of vasculitis in individuals older than SO years in Western countries. To shed light onto the genetic background influencing susceptibility for GCA, we performed a genome-wide association screening in a well-powered study cohort. After imputation,

  16. The role of positron-emission tomography in the diagnosis of giant cell arteritis : A systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. van der Schaft (Niels); K. Compagne (Kars); A. Groenendijk (Albert); M. Vis (Marijn)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Background: Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is an inflammatory disease of the larger vessels, typically affecting the temporal arteries, but involvement of the carotid and thoracic arteries is not uncommon. Serious complications such as blindness can occur if the disease is

  17. A Genome-wide Association Study Identifies Risk Alleles in Plasminogen and P4HA2 Associated with Giant Cell Arteritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carmona, Francisco David; Vaglio, Augusto; Mackie, Sarah L.; Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Monach, Paul A.; Castañeda, Santos; Solans, Roser; Morado, Inmaculada C.; Narváez, Francisco Javier; Ramentol-Sintas, Marc; Pease, Colin T.; Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Watts, Richard; Khalidi, Nader A.; Langford, Carol A.; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Boiardi, Luigi; Beretta, Lorenzo; Govoni, Marcello; Emmi, Giacomo; Bonatti, Francesco; Cimmino, Marco A.; Witte, Torsten; Neumann, Thomas; Holle, Julia; Schönau, Verena; Sailler, Laurent; Papo, Thomas; Haroche, Julien; Mahr, Alfred; Mouthon, Luc; Molberg, Øyvind; Diamantopoulos, Andreas P.; Voskuyl, Alexandre E.; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Daikeler, Thomas; Berger, Christoph T.; Molloy, Eamonn S.; O'Neill, Lorraine; Blockmans, Daniel; Lie, Benedicte A.; McLaren, Paul J; Vyse, Timothy J.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Allanore, Yannick; Koeleman, Bobby P.C.; Callejas-Rubio, José Luis; Caminal-Montero, Luis; Corbera-Bellalta, Marc; de Miguel, Eugenio; López, J. Bernardino Díaz; García-Villanueva, María Jesús; Gómez-Vaquero, Carmen; Guijarro-Rojas, Mercedes; Hidalgo-Conde, Ana; Marí-Alfonso, Begoña; Berriochoa, Agustín Martínez; Zapico, Aleida Martínez; Martínez-Taboada, Víctor Manuel; Miranda-Filloy, José A.; Monfort, Jordi; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Pérez-Conesa, Mercedes; Prieto-González, Sergio; Raya, Enrique; Fernández, Raquel Ríos; Sánchez-Martín, Julio; Sopeña, Bernardo; Tío, Laura; Unzurrunzaga, Ainhoa; Gough, Andrew; Isaacs, John D.; Green, Michael; McHugh, Neil J.; Hordon, Lesley; Kamath, Sanjeet; Nisar, Mohammed; Patel, Yusuf; Yee, Cee Seng; Stevens, Robert; Nandi, Pradip; Nandagudi, Anupama; Jarrett, Stephen; Li, Charles; Levy, Sarah; Mollan, Susan; Salih, Abdel; Wordsworth, Oliver; Sanders, Emma; Roads, Esme; Gill, Anne; Carr, Lisa; Routledge, Christine; Culfear, Karen; Nugaliyadde, Asanka; James, Lynne; Spimpolo, Jenny; Kempa, Andy; Mackenzie, Felicity; Fong, Rosanna; Peters, Genessa; Rowbotham, Bridie; Masqood, Zahira; Hollywood, Jane; Gondo, Prisca; Wood, Rose; Martin, Steve; Rashid, Lubna Haroon; Robinson, James I.; Morgan, Mike; Sorensen, Louise; Taylor, John C.; Carette, Simon; Chung, Sharon; Cuthbertson, David; Forbess, Lindsy J.; Gewurz-Singer, Ora; Hoffman, Gary S.; Koening, Curry L.; Maksimowicz-McKinnon, Kathleen M.; McAlear, Carol A.; Moreland, Larry W.; Pagnoux, Christian; Seo, Philip; Specks, Ulrich; Spiera, Robert F.; Sreih, Antoine G.; Warrington, Kenneth J.; Weisman, Michael H; Barrett, Jennifer H.; Cid, María C.; Salvarani, Carlo; Merkel, Peter A.; Morgan, Ann W.; González-Gay, Miguel A.; Martín, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is the most common form of vasculitis in individuals older than 50 years in Western countries. To shed light onto the genetic background influencing susceptibility for GCA, we performed a genome-wide association screening in a well-powered study cohort. After imputation,

  18. A Large-Scale Genetic Analysis Reveals a Strong Contribution of the HLA Class II Region to Giant Cell Arteritis Susceptibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    David Carmona, F.; Mackie, Sarah L.; Martin, Jose-Ezequiel; Taylor, John C.; Vaglio, Augusto; Eyre, Stephen; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Castaneda, Santos; Cid, Maria C.; Hernandez-Rodriguez, Jose; Prieto-Gonzalez, Sergio; Solans, Roser; Ramentol-Sintas, Marc; Francisca Gonzalez-Escribano, M.; Ortiz-Fernandez, Lourdes; Morado, Inmaculada C.; Narvaez, Javier; Miranda-Filloy, Jose A.; Beretta, Lorenzo; Lunardi, Claudio; Cimmino, Marco A.; Gianfreda, Davide; Santilli, Daniele; Ramirez, Giuseppe A.; Soriano, Alessandra; Muratore, Francesco; Pazzola, Giulia; Addimanda, Olga; Wijmenga, Cisca; Witte, Torsten; Schirmer, Jan H.; Moosig, Frank; Schoenau, Verena; Franke, Andre; Palm, Oyvind; Molberg, Oyvind; Diamantopoulos, Andreas P.; Carette, Simon; Cuthbertson, David; Forbess, Lindsy J.; Hoffman, Gary S.; Khalidi, Nader A.; Koening, Curry L.; Langford, Carol A.; McAlear, Carol A.; Moreland, Larry; Monach, Paul A.; Pagnoux, Christian; Seo, Philip; Spiera, Robert; Sreih, Antoine G.; Warrington, Kenneth J.; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Pease, Colin T.; Gough, Andrew; Green, Michael; Hordon, Lesley; Jarrett, Stephen; Watts, Richard; Levy, Sarah; Patel, Yusuf; Kamath, Sanjeet; Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Worthington, Jane; Koeleman, Bobby P. C.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Barrett, Jennifer H.; Salvarani, Carlo; Merkel, Peter A.; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.; Morgan, Ann W.; Martin, Javier

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a large-scale genetic analysis on giant cell arteritis (GCA), a polygenic immune-mediated vasculitis. A case-control cohort, comprising 1,651 case subjects with GCA and 15,306 unrelated control subjects from six different countries of European ancestry, was genotyped by the Immunochip

  19. The CD40-CD40L axis and IFN-γ play critical roles in Langhans giant cell formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Hidemasa; Okafuji, Ikuo; Nishikomori, Ryuta; Abe, Junya; Izawa, Kazushi; Kambe, Naotomo; Yasumi, Takahiro; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Heike, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    The presence of Langhans giant cells (LGCs) is one of the signatures of systemic granulomatous disorders such as tuberculosis and sarcoidosis. However, the pathophysiological mechanism leading to LGC formation, especially the contribution of the T cells abundantly found in granulomas, has not been fully elucidated. To examine the role of T cells in LGC formation, a new in vitro method for the induction of LGCs was developed by co-culturing human monocytes with autologous T cells in the presence of concanavalin A (ConA). This system required close contact between monocytes and T cells, and CD4+ T cells were more potent than CD8+ T cells in inducing LGC formation. Antibody inhibition revealed that a CD40-CD40 ligand (CD40L) interaction and IFN-γ were essential for LGC formation, and the combination of exogenous soluble CD40L (sCD40L) and IFN-γ efficiently replaced the role of T cells. Dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP), a known fusion-related molecule in monocytes, was up-regulated during LGC formation. Moreover, knock-down of DC-STAMP by siRNA inhibited LGC formation, revealing that DC-STAMP was directly involved in LGC formation. Taken together, these results demonstrate that T cells played a pivotal role in a new in vitro LGC formation system, in which DC-STAMP was involved, and occurred via a molecular mechanism that involved CD40-CD40L interaction and IFN-γ secretion.

  20. A case of giant cell tumor of sacrum with unusual pulmonary metastases: CT and FDG PET findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuyang; Reeve, Isaac P; Lewis, David H

    2012-09-01

    A 43-year-old woman was admitted for concern of postcurettage recurrence of left sacral giant cell tumor (GCT). Both MRI and FDG PET revealed a large lesion in the left sacrum with characteristics concerning for local recurrence. Preoperative staging CT showed no evidence of remote metastases. Subsequent restaging CT and FDG PET demonstrate the interval development of a 5 × 6-mm pulmonary nodule in the right lung base within 40 days after curettage with hypermetabolic features on PET, concerning for pulmonary metastasis of GCT, which was later confirmed by biopsy. As an exception, benign GCT can demonstrate metastases, rapid growth rate, and enhanced FDG avidity on PET for both primary and metastatic lesions. Our case illustrates the importance of recognizing these exceptional features when interpreting FDG PET of GCT to prevent the misinterpretation of metastases as perhaps other etiologies, such as infection.

  1. [Hemorrhagic Onset of Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma Associated with Tuberous Sclerosis:A Case Report and Review of Literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Masayo; Nakamura, Michio; Shinozaki, Natsuki; Miyazaki, Tadashi

    2017-05-01

    We report on a case of subependymal giant cell astrocytoma(SEGA)in a patient with tuberous sclerosis(TSC)that presented with intratumoral hemorrhage and acute hydrocephalus. Initial treatment was external ventricular drainage to control the intracranial pressure;however, the tumor increased in size due to recurrent hemorrhage. Subsequently, the tumor was successfully removed via the transcortical-transventricular approach without neurological deterioration. Although intratumoral hemorrhage is extremely rare in patients with SEGA, subsequent acute hydrocephalus resulting from obstruction of the foramen of Monro will be fatal if prompt surgical treatment is not available. Careful and periodical radiographic examination of the central nervous system will be mandatory in patients with TSC, especially in those who have subependymal nodules(SEN)or SEGA around the foramen of Monro. Radical surgical removal should be considered before they become symptomatic.

  2. The treatment of giant cell tumors by curettage and filling with acrylic cement. Long-term functional results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, J; Albareda, J; Bueno, A L; Nuez, A; Palanca, D; Seral, F

    1997-01-01

    Curettage and filling with acrylic cement in the treatment of para-articular giant cell tumor (GCT) has multiple advantages as compared to other methods; nonetheless, the possibility of progression in arthrosis is still a drawback. The literature does not report long-term functional results when this method was used. Four cases are presented with a mean long-term follow-up of 13.5 years (minimum 11, maximum 18). Clinical results, evaluated by the Enneking system (18), were excellent, and there were no radiological modifications, so that we believe that this is the method to choose for Campanacci stage I and II GCT (1), and in some stage III cases, as joint function is not compromised in time.

  3. Tumor-induced hypophosphatemic osteomalacia Report of a cases associated with peripheral giant cell granuloma of gingiva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Rae; Kim, Won Chul; Lee, Sang Hoon; Kim, Mee Kyung; Lee, Byung Do [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-11-15

    The authors observed a patient who referred to the Department of Oral Radiology, due to diffuse skeletal pain, muscular weakness and unknown tumor mass on the buccal gingiva of upper right molar region. The patient was found to have peripheral reparative giant cell granuloma and osteomalacia. After removal of the tumor, the clinical, radiologic, and laboratory findings of the patient was rapidly normalized with remarkable improvement of bone pain. The results were as follows: 1. After removal of the tumor, the patient improved the clinical findings such as bone pain, trismus, muscular weakness and he could walk. 2. In postoperative x-ray findings at 1 and 2 months intervals, the lamina dura of all dentition and bony trabeculae in upper and lower arches were regenerating and the bone density increased. 3. In periodic recall check, no occurrence of osteomalacia was existed and the laboratory findings of the patient showed gradual improvement.

  4. Polymyalgia rheumatica and giant cell arteritis-three challenges-consequences of the vasculitis process, osteoporosis, and malignancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emamifar, Amir; Hess, Søren; Gerke, Oke

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) and giant cell arteritis (GCA) are common inflammatory conditions. The diagnosis of PMR/GCA poses many challenges since there are no specific diagnostic tests. Recent literature emphasizes the ability of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography....../computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) to assess global disease activity in inflammatory diseases. 18F-FDG PET/CT may lead to the diagnosis at an earlier stage than conventional imaging and may also assess response to therapy. With respect to the management of PMR/GCA, there are 3 significant areas of concern...... Ethics Committee of the Region of Southern Denmark (identification number: S-20160098) and Danish Data Protection Agency (J.nr 16/40522). Results of the study will be disseminated via publications in peer-reviewed journals, and presentation at national and international conferences....

  5. Mannose-binding lectin variant alleles and HLA-DR4 alleles are associated with giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Soren; Baslund, Bo; Madsen, Hans O.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether variant alleles of the mannose-binding lectin (MBL) gene causing low serum concentrations of MBL and/or polymorphisms of HLA-DRB1 are associated with increased susceptibility to polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) and giant cell arteritis (GCA) or particular clinical...... phenotypes of PMR/GCA. METHODS: MBL and HLA-DRB1 alleles were determined by polymerase chain reaction in 102 Danish patients with PMR (n = 37) or GCA (n = 65). Two hundred fifty and 193 healthy individuals served as controls for MBL and HLA genotyping, respectively. RESULTS: The prevalence of MBL variant...... alleles in controls, patients with PMR only, and patients with GCA was 37, 32, and 53% (p = 0.01), respectively. HLA-DRB1*04 was found in 47% of patients with PMR only and in 54% of patients with GCA, which differed significantly from the 35% found in controls (p = 0.01). HLA-DR4 alleles were...

  6. Glioblastomas with giant cell and sarcomatous features in patients with Turcot syndrome type 1: a clinicopathological study of 3 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusis, Eriks A; Travers, Sarah; Jost, Sarah C; Perry, Arie

    2010-09-01

    Turcot syndrome (TS) is a rare genetic disorder of DNA mismatch repair predisposing to glioblastoma (GBM) in the type 1 variant. We report the clinicopathological and genetic features of 3 gliomas in TS type 1 patients. Three cases were reviewed from our clinical and pathology files at Washington University with the diagnosis of TS 1 and GBM over the past 14 years. All 3 had classic features of GBM, but also demonstrated bizarre multinucleated giant cells and remarkably high mitotic indices. Sarcomatous regions were found in 2. Despite these features, the patients had prolonged survival times of 44, 55, and >29 months (ie, currently alive). Demographic and clinical courses were abstracted from retrospective chart review. Histopathology was reviewed from all cases and reticulin histochemistry was added to identify possible foci of sarcomatous differentiation. All 3 had classic features of GBM, and Ki-67 labeling indices ranged from 18 to 45%. All 3 also showed strong nuclear p53 positivity. Two cases were negative for the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutation, and O-Methylguanine methyltransferase promoter methylation was seen in one. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was done using 1p/1q, 19p/19q, centromere 7/epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR), and PTEN/DMBT1 probes. Focal EGFR amplification was seen in one case, although other common alterations of either primary GBMs or gliomas with prolonged survival (1p/19q codeletion) were lacking. We conclude that 1) the giant cell variant of GBM is overrepresented in TS; 2) gliosarcomas may also be encountered; and 3) survival is often favorable, despite histological anaplasia and exuberant proliferation.

  7. Use of warm Ringer's lactate solution in the management of locally advanced giant cell tumor of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waikakul, Saranatra; Asavamongkolkul, Apichat; Phimolsarnti, Rapin

    2016-02-01

    This study was conducted to discover the effectiveness and safety of using warm Ringer's lactate solution (RLS) as a local treatment in the management of locally advanced giant cell tumor of bone with marked soft tissue invasion, including nearby neurovascular bundles. This was a longitudinal cohort study with an average follow-up period of 4.6 ± 0.3 years, ranging from 4.2 to 5.9 years. There were 21 patients (9 male and 12 female), with the ages of subjects ranging from 12 to 64 years. Eight patients (38 %) were tumor recurrence cases. Pathological fracture was found in 15 patients (71 %). After extended curettage, warm RLS (50 °C) was locally applied for 20 min. Bone stabilization and reconstruction were then performed. All patients survived the operation. No additional neurovascular injury resulting from the use of warm RLS was found. Patients who had neurological deficit before the operation experienced significant improvement in motor and sensory function during the follow-up period. Complication was found in one patient (5 %). Two patients (9.5 %), had tumor recurrence and 19 patients (90.5 %) were tumor-free with good to acceptable function. Use of warm Ringer's lactate solution as an adjunctive local treatment during intra-lesional curettage of giant cell tumor with locally soft tissue extension was found to be safe with relatively low recurrence rate. However, additional studies to identify the optimum thermoablation dose at each part of the body should be undertaken before this technique can be used as a standard treatment.

  8. Giant Magnetoresistance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 13; Issue 4. Giant Magnetoresistance - Nobel Prize in Physics 2007. Debakanta Samal P S Anil Kumar. General Article Volume 13 Issue 4 April 2008 pp 343-354. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  9. Risks and benefits of combining denosumab and surgery in giant cell tumor of bone-a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Daniel A; Beltrami, Giovanni; Scoccianti, Guido; Campanacci, Domenico A; Franchi, Alessandro; Capanna, Rodolfo

    2016-11-04

    The RANK ligand inhibitor denosumab is being investigated for treatment of giant cell tumor of bone, but the available data in the literature remains sparse and controversial. This study analyzes the results of combining denosumab with surgical treatment and highlights possible changes for the oncologic surgeon in daily practice. A total of 91 patients were treated surgically for giant cell tumor of bone between 2010 and 2014 in an institution, whereas 25 patients of the total additionally received denosumab and were part of this study. The average age of the patients was 35 years. Eleven patients received denosumab pre- and postoperatively, whereas with 14 patients, the denosumab treatment was applied either before (7 patients) or after (7 patients) the surgery. The average preoperative therapy duration was 3.9 months and the postoperative therapy 6 months by default. Sixteen patients presented a large tumor extension necessitating a resection of the involved bone or joint. In 10 of these patients, the indication for a resection procedure was abandoned due to the preoperative denosumab treatment and a curettage was performed. In the remaining six cases, the surgical indication was not changed despite the denosumab treatment, and two of them needed a joint replacement after the tumor resection. Also with patients treated with curettage, denosumab seems to facilitate the procedure as a new peripheral bone rim around the tumor was built, though a histologic analysis reveals viable tumor cells persisting in the denosumab-induced bone formation. After an average follow-up of 23 months, one histologically proven local recurrence occurred, necessitating a second curettage. A second patient showed a lesion in the postoperative imaging highly suspicious for local relapse which remained stable under further denosumab treatment. No adverse effect of the denosumab medication was observed in this study. Denosumab can be a help to the oncologic surgeon by reconstituting a

  10. Pediatric glioblastoma with giant cells and "supratentorial" primitive neuroectodermal component - case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiu, Carmen; MihuŢ, Emilia; Raus, Iulian; Mirescu, Ştefan Claudiu; Szabo, Laura; Şovrea, Alina Simona

    2015-01-01

    The glial differentiation in pediatric "supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors" (sPNET) is occasionally revealed by immunohistochemistry with GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein) as isolated positive cells among undifferentiated cells, indicative of divergent cellular phenotypes. Large malignant glial tumors in sPNETs are extremely rare and challenge the neuropathologist by raising the possibility of glioblastomas with sPNET-like features (GB sPNET). The distinction between them is important because of their different treatment and prognostic. A large parieto-occipital tumor with minimal ventricular invasion, in an 11-year-old girl, with a five-month clinical history, was proven to be a highly malignant biphasic tumor, consisting in a glioblastoma with giant cells, representing 75% of the tumor, and sPNET nodules, with one larger dominant nodule. The immunohistochemistry confirmed positivity for synaptophysin, neurofilament, neuron-specific enolase and CD56 in the sPNET compartment and for GFAP, CD56 and vimentin in the glioblastoma. In some parts of the tumor, the two components were well delineated from each other as in a "collision" tumor, but in others, the two different tumors were intermingled. It was histologically diagnosed as sPNET with double differentiation (glial and neural) or glioblastoma with sPNET-like features. These cases are very rare, few reported, especially in the pediatric population, and with high difficulties in histological differential diagnosis, subsequently reflected in the therapeutic decisions.

  11. Therapy-resistant foreign body giant cell granuloma at the periapex of a root-filled human tooth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nair, P.N.; Sjoegren, U.K.; Krey, G.; Sundqvist, G. (Dental Institute, University of Zurich (Switzerland))

    1990-12-01

    Although the primary etiological factor of periapical lesions is microbial, there are other independent factors that can adversely affect the outcome of endodontic treatment. In this communication, we present morphological evidence in support of the role of a foreign body reaction of periapical tissue to root-filling materials. The specimen consisted of a surgical biopsy of an asymptomatic periapical lesion which persisted after a decade of postendodontic follow-up. The biopsy was processed for correlated light and electron microscopy and was analyzed by various microtechniques. The unique feature of the lesion was the presence of vast numbers of large multinucleated cells and their cytoplasmic inclusion bodies. Morphologically, these multinucleated cells resembled foreign body giant cells. They contained characteristic birefringent cytoplasmic inclusions which on electron-probe x-ray microanalysis consistently revealed the presence of magnesium and silicon. The magnesium and silicon are presumably the remnants of a root-filling excess which protruded into the periapex and had been resorbed during the follow-up period. These observations strongly suggest that in the absence of microbial factors, root-filling materials which contain irritating substances can evoke a foreign body reaction at the periapex, leading to the development of asymptomatic periapical lesions that may remain refractory to endodontic therapy for long periods of time.

  12. Tumor fusocelular hialinizante con rosetas gigantes: Reporte de un caso Hyalinizing spindle cell tumor with giant rosettes: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto García Ayala

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: El tumor fusocelular hialinizante con rosetas gigantes es una neoplasia constituida por dos componentes histológicos, uno celular con elementos fusiformes, y el segundo representado por islas bien delimitadas casi acelulares, llenas de material hialino, rodeadas de células redondas u ovales, las cuales muestran un perfil inmunohistoquímico inusual, e histogénesis incierta. Objetivo: Instruir a los patólogos y clínicos sobre este tumor, su forma de presentación y diagnósticos diferenciales. Metodología y resultados: Se presenta el caso de una mujer de 42 años con masa ubicada en región inguinal, de crecimiento progresivo (1 año, que se reseca quirúrgicamente anatomía patológica informó un tumor fusocelular hialinizante con rosetas gigantes, según hallazgos morfológicos e inmuno histoquímicos, en correlación con su localización y cuadro clínico. Conclusión: Se hace necesario ampliar el conocimiento sobre esta entidad y de esta forma obtener una adecuada evaluación de sus criterios pronósticos histológicos, comportamiento clínico y tratamiento. Salud UIS 2010; 42: 282-286Introduction: The hyalinizing spindle cell tumor with giant rosettes is a neoplasia characterized by both histologic components, one of which is cellular, with spindle-shaped elements and the second represented by well defined almost acellular islands filled with hyaline material surrounded by round to oval cells, which shows an unusual immunohistochemical profile and uncertain histogenesis. Objective: Educate pathologists and clinicians about this tumor, its presentation and differential diagnosis. Methods and results: A case of a 42 year old woman with a mass located in the inguinal region, with progressive growth (1 year, surgically resected and histopathology reported as Hyalinizing spindle cell tumor with giant rosettes according to morphological, immunohistochemical findings correlates with its location and clinical. Conclusion: It is

  13. Rupturing Giant Plasma Membrane Vesicles to Form Micron-sized Supported Cell Plasma Membranes with Native Transmembrane Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Po-Chieh; Tanady, Kevin; Huang, Ling-Ting; Chao, Ling

    2017-11-09

    Being able to directly obtain micron-sized cell blebs, giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs), with native membrane proteins and deposit them on a planar support to form supported plasma membranes could allow the membrane proteins to be studied by various surface analytical tools in native-like bilayer environments. However, GPMVs do not easily rupture on conventional supports because of their high protein and cholesterol contents. Here, we demonstrate the possibility of using compression generated by the air-water interface to efficiently rupture GPMVs to form micron-sized supported membranes with native plasma membrane proteins. We demonstrated that not only lipid but also a native transmembrane protein in HeLa cells, Aquaporin 3 (AQP3), is mobile in the supported membrane platform. This convenient method for generating micron-sized supported membrane patches with mobile native transmembrane proteins could not only facilitate the study of membrane proteins by surface analytical tools, but could also enable us to use native membrane proteins for bio-sensing applications.

  14. Multi-nucleated giant cell formation from human cord blood monocytes in vitro, in comparison with adult peripheral blood monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Y; Yasui, K; Yashiro, M; Tsuge, M; Kotani, N; Morishima, T

    2009-10-01

    Multi-nucleated giant cells (MGCs; Langhans-type cell), formed from macrophage fusion, are recognized as a hallmark histological feature in chronic inflammation. However, their precise pathological role is still poorly understood, especially for microorganism pathogens in the neonatal immune system, which are capable of surviving intracellularly in phagocytes. To conduct a partial evaluation of the monocyte function of neonates, we investigated the ability of human cord blood monocytes to form MGCs in vitro by stimulating various cytokines and comparing them with adult peripheral blood monocytes. Monocytes from cord blood and adult peripheral blood were isolated and cultured for 14 days with cytokines known to induce MGC in vitro. The fusion index in experiments with a combination of interleukin (IL)-4 and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and a combination of IL-4 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) was significantly lower in cord blood than in adult blood monocytes (P = 0.0018 and P = 0.0141, respectively). The number of nuclei per MGC was significantly lower in cord blood than in adult blood monocytes in experiments with IL-4 alone, the combination of IL-4 and M-CSF, and the combination of IL-4 and GM-CSF (P < 0.0001). These results suggest the possibility that the susceptibility of newborns to mycobacterium infection is due partly to impaired MGC formation.

  15. iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis of polyploid giant cancer cells and budding progeny cells reveals several distinct pathways for ovarian cancer development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiwu Zhang

    Full Text Available Polyploid giant cancer cells (PGCCs are a morphologically distinct subgroup of human tumor cells with increased nuclear size or multiple nuclei, but they are generally considered unimportant because they are presumed to be nondividing and thus nonviable. We have recently shown that these large cancer cells are not only viable but also can divide asymmetrically and yield progeny cancer cells with cancer stem-like properties via budding division. To further understand the molecular events involved in the regulation of PGCCs and the generation of their progeny cancer cells, we comparatively analyzed the proteomic profiles of PGCCs, PGCCs with budding daughter cells, and regular control cancer cells from the HEY and SKOv3 human ovarian cancer cell lines with and without CoCl2. We used a high-throughput iTRAQ-based proteomic methodology coupled with liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectroscopy to determine the differentiated regulated proteins. We performed Western blotting and immunohistochemical analyses to validate the differences in the expression patterns of a variety of proteins between PGCCs or budding PGCCs and regular cancer cells identified by iTRAQ approach and also a selected group of proteins from the literature. The differentially regulated proteins included proteins involved in response to hypoxia, stem cell generation, chromatin remodeling, cell-cycle regulation, and invasion and metastasis. In particular, we found that HIF-1alpha and its known target STC1 are upregulated in PGCCs. In addition, we found that a panel of stem cell-regulating factors and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition regulatory transcription factors were upregulated in budding PGCCs, whereas expression of the histone 1 family of nucleosomal linker proteins was consistently lower in PGCCs than in control cells. Thus, proteomic expression patterns provide valuable insight into the underlying mechanisms of PGCC formation and the relationship

  16. Detection of the Epstein-Barr Virus and DNA-Topoisomerase II-α in Recurrent and Nonrecurrent Giant Cell Lesion of the Jawbones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manal M. Zyada

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to determine whether the expression of Topo II- correlates with presence of EBV in giant cell lesion of the jawbones and whether it is predictive of clinical biologic behavior of these lesions. Paraffin-embedded tissues from 8 recurrent and 7 nonrecurrent cases of bony GCLs and 9 peripheral giant cell lesions (PGCLs as a control group were assessed for the expression of EBV and Topo II- using immunohistochemistry. The results showed positive staining for Topo II- in mononuclear stromal cells (MSCs and multinucleated giant cells (MGCs. Student t-test showed that mean Topo II- labelling index (LI in recurrent cases was significantly higher than that in non-recurrent cases (. Moreover, Spearman's correlation coefficients method showed a significant correlation between DNA Topo II- LI and both of gender and site in these lesions. Moderate EBV expression in relation to the highest Topo II- LI was observed in two cases of GCT. It was concluded that high Topo II- LIs could be identified as reliable predicators for the clinical behavior of GCLs. Moreover, EBV has no etiological role in the benign CGCLs in contrast to its role in the pathogenesis of GCTs.

  17. {sup 99} {sup m}Tc-sulphur-colloid and heat-denatured {sup 99} {sup m}Tc-labelled red cell scans demonstrating a giant intrapelvic spleen in a girl after splenectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, P.F. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University School of Medicine, Tauyuan, Taiwan (Taiwan); Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (Taiwan); Tzen, K.Y.; Tsai, M.F. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University School of Medicine, Tauyuan, Taiwan (Taiwan); Lin, J.N. [Dept. of Paediatric Surgery, Chang Gung Childrens Hospital and Chang Gung University School of Medicine, Tauyuan, Taiwan (Taiwan)

    2001-04-01

    A 17 x 12 x 5-cm giant intrapelvic mass in a 14-year-old girl is reported. This mass developed 6 years after a splenectomy for splenic torsion. The heat-denatured {sup 99} {sup m}Tc-labelled red cell scan and {sup 99} {sup m}Tc- sulphur-colloid scan confirmed the specific red cell sequestration function and reticuloendothelial activity in the giant intrapelvic spleen. The size and development of the giant intrapelvic spleen are unusual. The usefulness of functional images to diagnosis the nature of the intrapelvic mass is well demonstrated. (orig.)

  18. Effect of water-soluble P-chitosan and S-chitosan on human primary osteoblasts and giant cell tumor of bone stromal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, T; Zhang, G; PY Lau, Carol; Zheng, L Z; Xie, X H; Wang, X L; Patrick, Y; Qin, L; Kumta, Shekhar M [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Chinese University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Wang, X H; He, K, E-mail: kumta@cuhk.edu.hk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Institute of Bio-manufacturing Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2011-02-15

    Water-soluble phosphorylated chitosan (P-chitosan) and disodium (1 {yields} 4)-2-deoxy-2-sulfoamino-{beta}-D-glucopyranuronan (S-chitosan) are two chemically modified chitosans. In this study, we found that P-chitosan significantly promotes cell proliferation of both human primary osteoblasts (OBs) and the OB like stromal cell component of the giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) cells at the concentration from 125 to 1000 {mu}g ml{sup -1} at all time points of 1, 3, 5 and 7 days after treatment. Further investigation of the osteogenic effect of the P-chitosan suggested that it regulates the levels of osteoclastogenic factors, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand and osteoprotegerin expression. An interesting finding is that S-chitosan at lower concentration (100 {mu}g ml{sup -1}) stimulates cell proliferation while a higher dose (1000 {mu}g ml{sup -1}) of S-chitosan inhibits it. The inhibitory effect of S-chitosan on human primary GCT stromal cells was greater than that of OBs (p < 0.05). Taken together, our findings elucidated the osteogenic effect of P-chitosan and the varying effects of S-chitosan on the proliferation of human primary OBs and GCT stromal cells and provided us the rationale for the construction of novel bone repair biomaterials with the dual properties of bone induction and bone tumor inhibition.

  19. Formation of multinucleated giant cells and microglial degeneration in rats expressing a mutant Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Streit Wolfgang J

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microglial neuroinflammation is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. The purpose of this study was to provide a histopathological evaluation of the microglial neuroinflammatory response in a rodent model of ALS, the SOD1G93A transgenic rat. Methods Multiple levels of the CNS from spinal cord to cerebral cortex were studied in SOD1G93A transgenic rats during three stages of natural disease progression, including presymptomatic, early symptomatic (onset, and late symptomatic (end stage, using immuno- and lectin histochemical markers for microglia, such as OX-42, OX-6, and Griffonia simplicifolia isolectin B4. Results Our studies revealed abnormal aggregates of microglia forming in the spinal cord as early as the presymptomatic stage. During the symptomatic stages there was prominent formation of multinucleated giant cells through fusion of microglial cells in the spinal cord, brainstem, and red nucleus of the midbrain. Other brain regions, including substantia nigra, cranial nerve nuclei, hippocampus and cortex showed normal appearing microglia. In animals during end stage disease at 4–5 months of age virtually all microglia in the spinal cord gray matter showed extensive fragmentation of their cytoplasm (cytorrhexis, indicative of widespread microglial degeneration. Few microglia exhibiting nuclear fragmentation (karyorrhexis indicative of apoptosis were identified at any stage. Conclusion The current findings demonstrate the occurrence of severe abnormalities in microglia, such as cell fusions and cytorrhexis, which may be the result of expression of mutant SOD1 in these cells. The microglial changes observed are different from those that accompany normal microglial activation, and they demonstrate that aberrant activation and degeneration of microglia is part of the pathogenesis of motor neuron disease.

  20. Ossified soft tissue recurrence of giant cell tumor of the bone: four case reports with follow-up radiographs, CT, ultrasound, and MR images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sun-Young; Lee, Min Hee; Chung, Hye Won [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Suk [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Joon Seon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) of the bone is a benign tumor with a high incidence of recurrence. The majority of recurrence occurs in the bone, typically where curettage was performed previously. Soft tissue recurrence is much less common and often shows ossification at the periphery of the soft tissue mass. We report four cases of ossified soft tissue recurrence of giant cell tumor of the bone after surgery at follow-up examination using plain radiography, ultrasound, CT, and MR imagings. Imaging findings of soft tissue recurrence with peripheral or central ossification were reviewed with pathologic correlation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to describe soft tissue tumor recurrence with ossification illustrated and monitored at various imaging modalities over an extended follow-up period. (orig.)

  1. Soft-tissue Necrosis Complicating Bone-cement Filling in a Patient with Proximal Tibia Giant cell Tumour and Co-morbid Depressive Illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagar Narang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Giant-cell tumors are common around the knee. Proximal tibia is a challenging location for limb-salvage due to paucity of soft-tissue cover. Bone cement has been used in treatment of giant-cell tumors after curettage. Tissue irritant properties of its monomer and exothermic reaction involved in polymerization may compromise surgical outcome to varying degrees. Preoperative planning and intra-operative positioning during cementing process are of importance to avoid complications. Co-occurrence of psychiatric illness in tumor patients should be managed by psychiatric counselling and drug therapy. This case has been presented to suggest measures for preventing soft-tissue complications during cement filling in proximal tibia, and for dealing with concomitant psychiatric problems for a holistic improvement in tumor patients.

  2. Curettage with cement augmentation of large bone defects in giant cell tumors with pathological fractures in lower-extremity long bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Som P; Garg, Gaurav

    2016-09-01

    Thorough curettage and cement augmentation is the procedure of choice for treating giant cell tumor lesions, particularly those associated with large defects. Its association with pathological fractures has not been studied to a great extent, although a pathological fracture following a giant cell tumor is not a contraindication to treatment by curettage and cementation. We present our experience of bone cementation following intralesional curettage for treatment of giant cell tumors of the long bones of lower limbs with associated pathological fractures. A total of 38 patients who had undergone a procedure in the weight-bearing long bones of lower limbs were included in the study. The age of the patients ranged from 18-79 years with a mean age of 38.57 years. The average follow-up was 102.42 months (8.5 years) ranging from 60-186 months (5-15.5 years). Results were based on serial radiographs showing consolidation of the lesion along with a subjective clinical examination and Enneking functional evaluation noted in the patient's records. Approximately 76 % of the lesions occurred around the knee. The results were graded as excellent (72 %), good (12.82 %) fair (10.25 %) and poor (5.12 %). Four cases developed a recurrence. Apart from a few documented complications, the lesions showed good consolidation and healed well. Giant cell tumors of the long bones of lower limbs with an associated pathological fracture at diagnosis can be managed with thorough curettage and cement augmentation of the bone defect with a satisfactory outcome. Level IV.

  3. Delayed persistence of giant-nucleated cells induced by X-ray and proton irradiation in the progeny of replicating normal human f ibroblast cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almahwasi, A. A.; Jeynes, J. C.; Merchant, M. J.; Bradley, D. A.; Regan, P. H.

    2017-08-01

    Ionising radiation can induce giant-nucleated cells (GCs) in the progeny of irradiated populations, as demonstrated in various cellular systems. Most in vitro studies have utilised quiescent cancerous or normal cell lines but it is not clear whether radiation-induced GCs persist in the progeny of normal replicated cells. In the current work we show persistent induction of GCs in the progeny of normal human-diploid skin fibroblasts (AG1522). These cells were originally irradiated with a single equivalent clinical dose of 0.2, 1 or 2 Gy of either X-ray or proton irradiation and maintained in an active state for various post-irradiation incubation interval times before they were replated for GC analysis. The results demonstrate that the formation of GCs in the progeny of X-ray or proton irradiated cells was increased in a dose-dependent manner when measured 7 days after irradiation and this finding is in agreement with that reported for the AG1522 cells using other radiation qualities. For the 1 Gy X-ray doses it was found that the GC yield increased continually with time up to 21 days post-irradiation. These results can act as benchmark data for such work and may have important implications for studies aimed at evaluating the efficacy of radiation therapy and in determining the risk of delayed effects particularly when applying protons.

  4. g-force induced giant efficiency of nanoparticles internalization into living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo, Sandra M.; Rodriguez, Vanessa; de La Cueva, Leonor; Salas, Gorka; Carrascosa, Jose. L.; Josefa Rodríguez, María; García-Romero, Noemí; Luis, Jose; Cuñado, F.; Camarero, Julio; Miranda, Rodolfo; Belda-Iniesta, Cristobal; Ayuso-Sacido, Angel

    2015-10-01

    Nanotechnology plays an increasingly important role in the biomedical arena. Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs)-labelled cells is one of the most promising approaches for a fast and reliable evaluation of grafted cells in both preclinical studies and clinical trials. Current procedures to label living cells with IONPs are based on direct incubation or physical approaches based on magnetic or electrical fields, which always display very low cellular uptake efficiencies. Here we show that centrifugation-mediated internalization (CMI) promotes a high uptake of IONPs in glioblastoma tumour cells, just in a few minutes, and via clathrin-independent endocytosis pathway. CMI results in controllable cellular uptake efficiencies at least three orders of magnitude larger than current procedures. Similar trends are found in human mesenchymal stem cells, thereby demonstrating the general feasibility of the methodology, which is easily transferable to any laboratory with great potential for the development of improved biomedical applications.

  5. Presurgical Administration of mTOR Inhibitors in Patients with Large Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma Associated with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tao; Du, Jiang; Raynald; Wang, Junmei; Li, Chunde

    2017-11-01

    Direct surgical resection remains the standard treatment for patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) with a large subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA). Rapamycin or everolimus is seldom used in these patients because of the risk of increased intracranial pressure and possibility of sudden death. Three patients with TSC and a large intracranial SEGA received oral rapamycin (0.5 mg/day) or everolimus (2.5 mg/day) before surgery for tumor resection. After mTOR inhibitor therapy, computed tomography scans and magnetic resonance imaging revealed tumor reduction. Tumor bleeding was easy to control during surgery, and the border between tumor and surrounding brain tissue was clearly differentiated. Analysis of postsurgical tumor specimens showed low blood density and focal necrosis. Preoperative mTOR inhibitors could be a potentially novel treatment modality in large TSC-SEGA with hydrocephalus. In this series, mTOR inhibitors were not only safe and well tolerated, but also beneficial for tumor resection. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. A Case Report of Preoperative Application of Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Diagnosis and Treatment of Central Giant Cell Granuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ebrahimi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Central giant cell granuloma(CGCG is a relatively rare and non neoplastic tumor with unclear exact etiology that is reported in children. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT technique for precise diagnosis and treatment of the jaw lesions is recommended in the recent years. The object of this case-report study is to use CBCT in the diagnosis and treatment of CGCG.Case Report: A 6-year-old boy with a painless swallowing at the right side of the lower face had been arisen 3 months before referring to the pediatric department of Mashhad dental school .The lesion had bony hard consistency and smooth surface. For more accurate examination of the region CBCT radiographs were recommended. According to CBCT radiographic sections, expansion of cortical plates and precise extension of the lesion in buccal-lingual and mesial-distal aspects were distinctly observed.Conclusion: A 12 month follow up after the surgery showed reconstruction and growth of the bone and no sign of recurrence.(Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2012;19(2:69-74

  7. Risk Factors for Permanent Visual Loss in Biopsy-proven Giant Cell Arteritis: A Study of 339 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liozon, Eric; Dalmay, François; Lalloue, Fabrice; Gondran, Guillaume; Bezanahary, Holy; Fauchais, Anne-Laure; Ly, Kim-Heang

    2016-07-01

    To determine the risk factors for permanent visual loss (PVL) in patients with biopsy-proven giant cell arteritis (GCA) and the usefulness of the factors in clinical practice. From 1976 through 2015, the clinical charts and laboratory results of 339 patients with biopsy-proven GCA were recorded prospectively at the time of diagnosis. We used multivariable logistic regression analysis to determine which of 24 pretreatment characteristics were associated with PVL. Visual ischemic manifestations occurred in 108 patients, including PVL in 53 (16%), bilaterally in 15 patients (28%). The independent predictors associated with an increased risk of PVL were age (OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.01-1.12, p = 0.01), a history of transient visual ischemic symptoms (OR 2.62, 95% CI 1.29-5.29, p fever (OR 0.30, 95% CI 0.14-0.64, p < 0.01) and rheumatic symptoms (OR 0.23, 95% CI 0.10-0.57, p = 0.001) were associated with a markedly reduced risk of developing visual loss (3.7% if features were both present). No laboratory variables were independently associated with PVL. The visual ischemic risk of untreated GCA can be readily estimated upon simple clinical findings, but not laboratory variables. However, we did not identify a subgroup of patients carrying no risk of developing visual loss. Glucocorticoid treatment remains, therefore, urgent for any patient with a high clinical suspicion index.

  8. Widespread headache as the first clinical manifestation of giant cell arteritis in patients affected by polymyalgia rheumatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Ciro

    2016-01-01

    In giant cell arteritis (GCA) headache of new onset due to inflammatory involvement of the temporal artery (TA) represents a diagnostic criterion. A widespread headache (WH) with scalp tenderness due to cranial arteritis can represent another manifestation of GCA. In 225 elderly patients with polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) followed in our rheumatologic outpatient clinic from 2004 until June 2016, the frequency of WH as the first clinical manifestation of GCA was evaluated. Among 26 patients with GCA+PMR (11.6% of total), 5 (23.07%) had WH as first clinical manifestation of GCA without TA. In all these patients TA colour duplex sonography (CDS) and 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) with total body contrast-enhanced CT was consistent with the diagnosis of arteritis. TA biopsy was not performed. High doses of prednisone (1 mg/kg/day) led to the immediate and total disappearance of the headache. The widespread headache should be considered as the first symptom GCA and in cases of suspicion of vasculitis patients should have a full diagnostics examination. Colour duplex sonography and FDG-PET with total body contrast-enhanced CT are useful tools for non-invasive diagnosis of GCA.

  9. Morphologic evaluation of the effect of denosumab on giant cell tumors of bone and a new grading scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kivilcim Eren Erdogan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumor (GCT is a rare, usually benign but locally aggressive neoplasm. Recent studies suggest new approaches in light of the elucidation of molecular pathways in bone. The osteolytic nature of GCT is caused by the receptor for activating nuclear factor-kB ligand (RANKL associated osteoclasts. Denosumab is a monoclonal antibody that affects GCT through RANKL and it prevents normal and neoplastic osteolysis. The aim of this study is to evaluate the histopathologic alterations due to denosumab treatment and the efficiency of this drug in GCT therapy. Ten patients had been treated with denosumab and were included in the study. Pretreatment biopsies were interpreted as conventional GCTs and posttreatment biopsies of the ten patients’ GCTs were classified in accordance with the grading system. Only one patient had tumor remaining after treatment. There is limited data on histopathologic alterations that follow denosumab treatment. The bone pathologist should keep these changes in mind because they mimic different types of bone tumors. Furthermore, there is no widely accepted grading system to evaluate the effect of denosumab in GCT. Our study suggested a scheme that would be helpful to evaluate the efficiency of denosumab treatment in GCT.

  10. Diagnostic performance of colour duplex ultrasonography along with temporal artery biopsy in suspicion of giant cell arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncato, Christophe; Allix-Béguec, Caroline; Brottier-Mancini, Elisabeth; Gombert, Bruno; Denis, Guillaume

    2017-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is a vasculitis that occurs in older adults, affecting vessels of medium and large caliber. GCA diagnosis is a challenge for general practitioners and specialists. The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyse performances of temporal artery biopsy (TAB) and colour duplex ultrasonography (CDU) for GCA diagnosis. All patients with suspicion of GCA and who underwent both TAB and CDU between April 2009 and March 2014 were included in the study. A positive CDU examination was defined by halos on both superficial temporal arteries. Patients were classified based on the physician final diagnosis. Among the 42 eligible patients, 12 had an alternative diagnosis and 30 were diagnosed with GCA. Sensitivities were 77% and 80% for TAB and CDU examinations, respectively. Specificities were 100% for both tests. Twenty-nine (96.7%) patients with GCA had their diagnosis confirmed either by CDU and/or by TAB. Time lengths between the first medical examination and results of TAB and CDU were 15 and 4.2 days (p<0.001), respectively. Our study suggests that in suspected GCA, CDU may be used as first line examination followed by TAB in case of CDU negative results. Such algorithm needs to be further assessed in a multicentre prospective study.

  11. Heightened ability of monocytes from sarcoidosis patients to form multi-nucleated giant cells in vitro by supernatants of concanavalin A-stimulated mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, K; Okamoto, H; Horio, T

    2001-10-01

    The main immunocompetent cells in sarcoidal lesions are epithelioid cells and multi-nucleated giant cells (MGC), both of which are derived from monocyte-macrophage lineage cells. To understand further the relevance of monocytes in sarcoidosis, we examined in vitro MGC formation using monocytes from sarcoidosis patients, patients with other granulomatous diseases (OGD) and healthy control subjects. The supernatant of concanavalin A-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (conditioned medium) generated Langhans type-MGC and foreign body type-MGC from monocytes. Conditioned medium from any three groups had the same ability to form MGC from normal monocytes. On the other hand, MGC were more highly formed using monocytes from sarcoidosis patients than from other groups. When macrophages induced by treatment of monocytes with macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) were used, the rate of MGC formation in sarcoidosis patients was about threefold or fourfold as much as that in OGD patients or healthy controls, respectively. Oxidized ATP inhibited MGC formation in all groups. The susceptibility of monocytes cultured in conditioned medium for 24 h to 2'- and 3'-o-(4-benzoyl-benzoyl)ATP-mediated cytolysis was significantly higher in sarcoidosis patients than other groups. These findings suggest that the ability of monocytes to form MGC through P2x7 receptors is enhanced in sarcoidosis patients.

  12. Heads, Tails, and Tools: Morphogenesis of a Giant Single-Celled Organism: e1001862

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mary Hoff

    2014-01-01

      [...]because its size allowed elegant surgical manipulations, Stentor became a classical model organism for studying shape and pattern formation in single-celled organisms in the first half of the 20th century...

  13. Tumor associated osteoclast-like giant cells promote tumor growth and lymphangiogenesis by secreting vascular endothelial growth factor-C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, Yu [Department of Cellular Physiological Chemistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45, Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Department of Cardivascular Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45, Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Nakahama, Ken-ichi, E-mail: nakacell@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Cellular Physiological Chemistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45, Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Isobe, Mitsuaki [Department of Cardivascular Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45, Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Morita, Ikuo [Department of Cellular Physiological Chemistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45, Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • M-CSF and RANKL expressing HeLa cells induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro. • We established OGC-containing tumor model in vivo. • OGC-containing tumor became larger independent of M-CSF or RANKL effect. • VEGF-C secreted from OGCs was a one of candidates for OGC-containing tumor growth. - Abstract: Tumors with osteoclast-like giant cells (OGCs) have been reported in a variety of organs and exert an invasive and prometastatic phenotype, but the functional role of OGCs in the tumor environment has not been fully clarified. We established tumors containing OGCs to clarify the role of OGCs in tumor phenotype. A mixture of HeLa cells expressing macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF, HeLa-M) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL, HeLa-R) effectively supported the differentiation of osteoclast-like cells from bone marrow macrophages in vitro. Moreover, a xenograft study showed OGC formation in a tumor composed of HeLa-M and HeLa-R. Surprisingly, the tumors containing OGCs were significantly larger than the tumors without OGCs, although the growth rates were not different in vitro. Histological analysis showed that lymphangiogenesis and macrophage infiltration in the tumor containing OGCs, but not in other tumors were accelerated. According to quantitative PCR analysis, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C mRNA expression increased with differentiation of osteoclast-like cells. To investigate whether VEGF-C expression is responsible for tumor growth and macrophage infiltration, HeLa cells overexpressing VEGF-C (HeLa-VC) were established and transplanted into mice. Tumors composed of HeLa-VC mimicked the phenotype of the tumors containing OGCs. Furthermore, the vascular permeability of tumor microvessels also increased in tumors containing OGCs and to some extent in VEGF-C-expressing tumors. These results suggest that macrophage infiltration and vascular permeability are possible mediators in these tumors. These

  14. Freezing Nitrogen Ethanol Composite May be a Viable Approach for Cryotherapy of Human Giant Cell Tumor of Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Po-Kuei; Chen, Cheng-Fong; Wang, Jir-You; Chen, Paul Chih-Hsueh; Chang, Ming-Chau; Hung, Shih-Chieh; Chen, Wei-Ming

    2017-06-01

    Liquid nitrogen has been used as adjuvant cryotherapy for treating giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone. However, the liquid phase and ultrafreezing (-196° C) properties increase the risk of damage to the adjacent tissues and may lead to perioperative complications. A novel semisolid cryogen, freezing nitrogen ethanol composite, might mitigate these shortcomings because of less-extreme freezing. We therefore wished to evaluate freezing nitrogen ethanol composite as a coolant to determine its properties in tumor cryoablation. (1) Is freezing nitrogen ethanol composite-mediated freezing effective for tumor cryoablation in an ex vivo model, and if yes, is apoptosis involved in the tumor-killing mechanism? (2) Does freezing nitrogen ethanol composite treatment block neovascularization and neoplastic progression of the grafted GCTs and is it comparable to that of liquid nitrogen in an in vivo chicken model? (3) Can use of freezing nitrogen ethanol composite as an adjuvant to curettage result in successful short-term treatment, defined as absence of GCT recurrence at a minimum of 1 year in a small proof-of-concept clinical series? The cryogenic effect on bone tissue mediated by freezing nitrogen ethanol composite and liquid nitrogen was verified by thermal measurement in a time-course manner. Cryoablation on human GCT tissue was examined ex vivo for effect on morphologic features (cell shrinkage) and DNA fragmentation (apoptosis). The presumed mechanism was investigated by molecular analysis of apoptosis regulatory proteins including caspases 3, 8, and 9 and Bax/Bcl-2. Chicken chorioallantoic membrane was used as an in vivo model to evaluate the effects of freezing nitrogen ethanol composite and liquid nitrogen treatment on GCT-derived neovascularization and tumor neoplasm. A small group of patients with GCT of bone was treated by curettage and adjuvant freezing nitrogen ethanol composite cryotherapy in a proof-of-concept study. Tumor recurrence and perioperative

  15. Development of fusogenic glass surfaces that impart spatiotemporal control over macrophage fusion: Direct visualization of multinucleated giant cell formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, James J; Christenson, Wayne; Doudrick, Kyle; Ros, Robert; Ugarova, Tatiana P

    2017-06-01

    Implantation of synthetic material, including vascular grafts, pacemakers, etc. results in the foreign body reaction and the formation of multinucleated giant cells (MGCs) at the exterior surface of the implant. Despite the long-standing premise that fusion of mononucleated macrophages results in the formation of MGCs, to date, no published study has shown fusion in context with living specimens. This is due to the fact that optical-quality glass, which is required for the majority of live imaging techniques, does not promote macrophage fusion. Consequently, the morphological changes that macrophages undergo during fusion as well as the mechanisms that govern this process remain ill-defined. In this study, we serendipitously identified a highly fusogenic glass surface and discovered that the capacity to promote fusion was due to oleamide contamination. When adsorbed on glass, oleamide and other molecules that contain long-chain hydrocarbons promoted high levels of macrophage fusion. Adhesion, an essential step for macrophage fusion, was apparently mediated by Mac-1 integrin (CD11b/CD18, αMβ2) as determined by single cell force spectroscopy and adhesion assays. Micropatterned glass further increased fusion and enabled a remarkable degree of spatiotemporal control over MGC formation. Using these surfaces, we reveal the kinetics that govern MGC formation in vitro. We anticipate that the spatiotemporal control afforded by these surfaces will expedite studies designed to identify the mechanism(s) of macrophage fusion and MGC formation with implication for the design of novel biomaterials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Transcription Profiling of Bacillus subtilis Cells Infected with AR9, a Giant Phage Encoding Two Multisubunit RNA Polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavysh, Daria; Sokolova, Maria; Slashcheva, Marina; Förstner, Konrad U; Severinov, Konstantin

    2017-02-14

    Bacteriophage AR9 is a recently sequenced jumbo phage that encodes two multisubunit RNA polymerases. Here we investigated the AR9 transcription strategy and the effect of AR9 infection on the transcription of its host, Bacillus subtilis Analysis of whole-genome transcription revealed early, late, and continuously expressed AR9 genes. Alignment of sequences upstream of the 5' ends of AR9 transcripts revealed consensus sequences that define early and late phage promoters. Continuously expressed AR9 genes have both early and late promoters in front of them. Early AR9 transcription is independent of protein synthesis and must be determined by virion RNA polymerase injected together with viral DNA. During infection, the overall amount of host mRNAs is significantly decreased. Analysis of relative amounts of host transcripts revealed notable differences in the levels of some mRNAs. The physiological significance of up- or downregulation of host genes for AR9 phage infection remains to be established. AR9 infection is significantly affected by rifampin, an inhibitor of host RNA polymerase transcription. The effect is likely caused by the antibiotic-induced killing of host cells, while phage genome transcription is solely performed by viral RNA polymerases.IMPORTANCE Phages regulate the timing of the expression of their own genes to coordinate processes in the infected cell and maximize the release of viral progeny. Phages also alter the levels of host transcripts. Here we present the results of a temporal analysis of the host and viral transcriptomes of Bacillus subtilis infected with a giant phage, AR9. We identify viral promoters recognized by two virus-encoded RNA polymerases that are a unique feature of the phiKZ-related group of phages to which AR9 belongs. Our results set the stage for future analyses of highly unusual RNA polymerases encoded by AR9 and other phiKZ-related phages. Copyright © 2017 Lavysh et al.

  17. Foreign body giant cells and osteoclasts are TRAP positive, have podosome-belts and both require OC-STAMP for cell fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Usman A; Hashimi, Saeed M; Bakr, Mahmoud M; Forwood, Mark R; Morrison, Nigel A

    2013-08-01

    Macrophages have the ability to fuse and form multinucleated giant cells such as Osteoclast (OCs) and FBGCs. Osteoclast stimulatory transmembrane protein (OC-STAMP) is an important cell surface protein involved in the formation of OCs. This study sought to determine if OC-STAMP also regulates formation of FBGCs using expression analysis and subsequent inhibition studies. qPCR and Western blot analysis showed that OC-STAMP expression is significantly higher in FBGCs compared to control monocytes (P belts comprised of F-actin on Day 8. FBGCs were subsequently plated onto dentine, but despite presenting some morphologic features of OCs (OC-STAMP expression, TRAP reactivity, and podosome belts) they failed to resorb bone. To evaluate a role for OC-STAMP in FBGCs, we inhibited this cell surface protein with anti-OC-STAMP antibody and observed that cell fusion and podosome belt formation was inhibited in both OCs and FBGCs. Our data support the hypothesis that OC-STAMP is a regulatory molecule for FBGCs; and that they are functionally distinct from OCs, despite similarities in gene expression profile, podosome belt formation, and TRAP expression. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Serum markers associated with disease activity in giant cell arteritis and polymyalgia rheumatica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geest, Kornelis S. M.; Abdulahad, Wayel H.; Rutgers, Abraham; Horst, Gerda; Bijzet, Johan; Arends, Suzanne; Roffel, Mirjam P.; Boots, Annemieke M. H.; Brouwer, Elisabeth

    Objective. To compare multiple serum markers for their ability to detect active disease in patients with GCA and in those with PMR. Methods. Twenty-six markers related to immune cells that may be involved in GCA and PMR were determined by ELISA and multiplex assay in the serum of 24 newly diagnosed,

  19. Inoperable metastatic giant basal cell trunk carcinoma: radiotherapy can be useful; Carcinome basocellulaire geant du tronc metastatique inoperable: la radiotherapie peut etre utile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mania, A.; Durando, X.; Lapeyre, M. [Centre Jean-Perrin, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Barthelemy, I. [CHU Estaing, Clermont-Ferrand (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors evoke some characteristics of the basal cell carcinoma (slow evolution, local morbidity) and report and discuss the case of a giant basal cell trunk carcinoma, associated with several symptoms (pain, bleeding, anaemia), already metastatic at the moment of diagnosis, and locally treated by irradiation. Due to its size and expansion, this carcinoma was considered as inoperable. An external radiotherapy has been performed and resulted in a significant clinical tumour reduction. But the metastatic risk is high in such cases. Radiotherapy is then a therapeutic option for a local treatment with a durable efficiency. Short communication

  20. Analysis of Varicella-Zoster Virus in Temporal Arteries Biopsy Positive and Negative for Giant Cell Arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Maria A; White, Teresa; Khmeleva, Nelly; Rempel, April; Boyer, Philip J; Bennett, Jeffrey L; Haller, Andrea; Lear-Kaul, Kelly; Kandasmy, Balasurbramaniyam; Amato, Malena; Wood, Edward; Durairaj, Vikram; Fogt, Franz; Tamhankar, Madhura A; Grossniklaus, Hans E; Poppiti, Robert J; Bockelman, Brian; Keyvani, Kathy; Pollak, Lea; Mendlovic, Sonia; Fowkes, Mary; Eberhart, Charles G; Buttmann, Mathias; Toyka, Klaus V; Meyer-ter-Vehn, Tobias; Petursdottir, Vigdis; Gilden, Don

    2015-11-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is the most common systemic vasculitis in elderly individuals. Diagnosis is confirmed by temporal artery (TA) biopsy, although biopsy results are often negative. Despite the use of corticosteroids, disease may progress. Identification of causal agents will improve outcomes. Biopsy-positive GCA is associated with TA infection by varicella-zoster virus (VZV). To analyze VZV infection in TAs of patients with clinically suspected GCA whose TAs were histopathologically negative and in normal TAs removed post mortem from age-matched individuals. A cross-sectional study for VZV antigen was performed from January 2013 to March 2015 using archived, deidentified, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded GCA-negative, GCA-positive, and normal TAs (50 sections/TA) collected during the past 30 years. Regions adjacent to those containing VZV were examined by hematoxylin-eosin staining. Immunohistochemistry identified inflammatory cells and cell types around nerve bundles containing VZV. A combination of 17 tertiary referral centers and private practices worldwide contributed archived TAs from individuals older than 50 years. Presence and distribution of VZV antigen in TAs and histopathological changes in sections adjacent to those containing VZV were confirmed by 2 independent readers. Varicella-zoster virus antigen was found in 45 of 70 GCA-negative TAs (64%), compared with 11 of 49 normal TAs (22%) (relative risk [RR] = 2.86; 95% CI, 1.75-5.31; P Varicella-zoster virus antigen was frequently found in perineurial cells expressing claudin-1 around nerve bundles. Of 45 GCA-negative participants whose TAs contained VZV antigen, 1 had histopathological features characteristic of GCA, and 16 (36%) showed adventitial inflammation adjacent to viral antigen; no inflammation was seen in normal TAs. In patients with clinically suspected GCA, prevalence of VZV in their TAs is similar independent of whether biopsy results are negative or positive pathologically

  1. Giant Merkel cell carcinoma of the eyelid: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Baocun

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC is a rare cutaneous tumor and cases located in the eyelid have been described, but still its rarity may lead to difficulty in diagnosis and delay in treatment. A 51-year-old female patient that presented with large lesions in the eyelid underwent surgery after the diagnosis of acute chalazion. Following respiratory distress secondary to pulmonary metastasis, the patient's condition deteriorated and was not fit for complete excision treatment. Histopathological investigation of the biopsies, taken from the tumor, revealed that it was undifferentiated small cell carcinoma. Our aim with this paper is to point out that more cases should be reported for more effective diagnosis, histopathological study, clinical investigation, treatment and prognosis of this specific neoplasm.

  2. Giant photocurrent enhancement by transition metal doping in quantum dot sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rimal, Gaurab; Pimachev, Artem K.; Yost, Andrew J.; Poudyal, Uma; Maloney, Scott; Wang, Wenyong; Chien, TeYu; Dahnovsky, Yuri, E-mail: yurid@uwyo.edu, E-mail: jtang2@uwyo.edu; Tang, Jinke, E-mail: yurid@uwyo.edu, E-mail: jtang2@uwyo.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming 82071 (United States)

    2016-09-05

    A huge enhancement in the incident photon-to-current efficiency of PbS quantum dot (QD) sensitized solar cells by manganese doping is observed. In the presence of Mn dopants with relatively small concentration (4 at. %), the photoelectric current increases by an average of 300% (up to 700%). This effect cannot be explained by the light absorption mechanism because both the experimental and theoretical absorption spectra demonstrate several times decreases in the absorption coefficient. To explain such dramatic increase in the photocurrent we propose the electron tunneling mechanism from the LUMO of the QD excited state to the Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4} (ZTO) semiconductor photoanode. This change is due to the presence of the Mn instead of Pb atom at the QD/ZTO interface. The ab initio calculations confirm this mechanism. This work proposes an alternative route for a significant improvement of the efficiency for quantum dot sensitized solar cells.

  3. Giant Cell Tumor of Distal Radius: En Bloc Resection and Partial Wrist Arthrodesis Using Non-Vascularized Fibular Autograft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davod Jafari

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Despite several surgical techniques introduced for the treatment of distal radial giant cell tumor (GCT, most appropriate treatments remain to be discovered. Objectives The current study reported on the results of en bloc resection and partial wrist arthrodesis using non-vascularized fibular shaft. Methods Between 2004 and 2014, 7 patients with distal radial GCT (Campanacci grade III were treated by en bloc resection and partial wrist arthrodesis using non-vascularized fibular shaft. Arthrodesis was performed using an intramedullary pin. Patients were followed for 59 ± 38 months. At the last visit, active range of wrist motions, modified musculoskeletal tumor society (MSTS scoring system, instability and grip strength compared to contralateral side were measured. Also, time of union, need for further operations and recurrence of the tumor were evaluated. Results After 8.3 ± 0.5 months, complete union was achieved. The ranges of wrist flexion, wrist extension, ulnar deviation, radial deviation, supination, and pronation averaged 16.7 ± 2.6, 7.5 ± 6.1, 7.5 ± 6.1, 6.7 ± 5.2, 33.3 ± 6.8, and 30.8 ± 8.6 degrees, respectively. The mean modified MSTS score was 75.8 ± 8%. Grip strength was 53.3 ± 6.8% of the contralateral side. Graft-related complications did not occur. Recurrence occurred in 2 patients, including one bony recurrence at the graft-wrist junction and one soft tissue recurrence (28.6%. Conclusions Replacement of excised distal radius with non-vascularized fibular shaft autograft following en bloc resection and partial arthrodesis, using an intramedullary pin, could serve as an appropriate treatment of distal radial GCT.

  4. Utility of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein for the diagnosis of giant cell arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermani, Tanaz A; Schmidt, Jean; Crowson, Cynthia S; Ytterberg, Steven R; Hunder, Gene G; Matteson, Eric L; Warrington, Kenneth J

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the utility of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) for the diagnosis of giant cell arteritis (GCA) and to determine the frequency of normal ESR and CRP at diagnosis of GCA. All patients undergoing temporal artery biopsy (TAB) between 2000 and 2008 were identified. Only subjects with both ESR and CRP at the time of TAB were included. The medical records of all patients were reviewed. We included 764 patients (65% women), mean age 72.7 (±9.27) years, who underwent TAB. Biopsy was consistent with GCA in 177 patients (23%). Elevated CRP and elevated ESR provided a sensitivity of 86.9% and 84.1%, respectively, for a positive TAB. The odds ratio of a concordantly elevated ESR and CRP for positive TAB was 3.06 (95% CI 2.03, 4.62), whereas the odds ratio for concordantly normal ESR and CRP was 0.49 (95% CI 0.29, 0.83). Seven patients (4%) with a positive TAB for GCA had a normal ESR and CRP at diagnosis. Compared with GCA patients with elevated markers of inflammation, a greater proportion of these patients had polymyalgia rheumatica symptoms (P = 0.008), whereas constitutional symptoms, anemia and thrombocytosis, were observed less often (P < 0.05). CRP is a more sensitive marker than ESR for a positive TAB that is diagnostic of GCA. There may be clinical utility in obtaining both tests in the evaluation of patients with suspected GCA. A small proportion of patients with GCA may have normal inflammatory markers at diagnosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Long-Term Survival of a Patient with Giant Cell Glioblastoma: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Naydenov

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common glial tumor of the central nervous system. Overall survival is less than a year in most of the cases in spite of multimodal treatment approaches. A 45-year-old female with histologically confirmed giant cell GBM was treated at our institution. Subtotal excision of the lesion situated in the right precentral area was performed during the initial stay in August 2005. The patient improved after the procedure with no hypertension and additional neurological deficit. Radiotherapy plus concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide was performed. The patient was symptom-free for 35 months after initial surgery. From July 2008 the patient developed partial motor seizures in the left side of the body and progressive hemiparesis. Local tumor progression was demonstrated on the neuroimaging studies. In December 2008, a second operative intervention was performed with subtotal excision of the tumor. Forty-five months after the initial diagnosis the patient is still alive with moderate neurological deficit. Microarray analysis of the tumor found the following numeric chromosomal aberrations: monosomy 8, 10, 13, 22, and trisomy 21, as well as amplifications in 4q34.1, 4q28.2, 6q16.3, 7q36.1, 7p21.3, and deletions in 1q42.12, 1q32.2, 1q25.2, 1p33, 2q37.2, 18q22.3, 19p13.2, Xq28, and Xq27.3. GBMs seem to be a heterogeneous group of glial tumors with different clinical course and therapeutic response. Microarray analysis is a useful method to establish a number of possible molecular predictors.

  6. MGMT Promoter Methylation and BRAF V600E Mutations Are Helpful Markers to Discriminate Pleomorphic Xanthoastrocytoma from Giant Cell Glioblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura-Nanna Lohkamp

    Full Text Available Giant Cell Glioblastoma (gcGBM and Pleomorphic Xanthoastrocytoma (PXA are rare astroglial tumors of the central nervous system. Although they share certain histomorphological and immunohistochemical features, they are characterized by different clinical behavior and prognosis. Nevertheless, few cases remain uncertain, as their histomorphological hallmarks and immunophenotypes do correspond to the typical pattern neither of gcGBM nor PXA. Therefore, in addition to the routinely used diagnostic histochemical and immunohistochemical markers like Gömöri, p53 and CD34, we analyzed if genetic variations like MGMT promoter methylation, mutations in the IDH1/2 genes, or BRAF mutations, which are actually used as diagnostic, prognostic and predictive molecular markers in anaplastic glial tumors, could be helpful in the differential diagnostic of both tumor entities. We analyzed 34 gcGBM and 20 PXA for genetic variations in the above-named genes and found distinct distributions between both groups. MGMT promoter hypermethylation was observed in 3 out of 20 PXA compared to 14 out of 34 gcGBM (15% vs. 41.2%, p-value 0.09. BRAF V600E mutations were detected in 50% of the PXA but not in any of the gcGBM (50% vs. 0%, p-value < 0.001. IDH1 R132 and IDH R172 mutations were not present in any of the PXA and gcGBM cases. Our data indicate, that in addition to the histological and immunohistochemical evaluation, investigation of MGMT promoter methylation and in particular BRAF V600E mutations represent reliable additional tools to sustain differentiation of gcGBM from PXA on a molecular basis. Based on these data specific BRAF kinase inhibitors could represent a promising agent in the therapy of PXA and their use should be emphasized.

  7. MGMT Promoter Methylation and BRAF V600E Mutations Are Helpful Markers to Discriminate Pleomorphic Xanthoastrocytoma from Giant Cell Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohkamp, Laura-Nanna; Schinz, Maren; Gehlhaar, Claire; Guse, Katrin; Thomale, Ulrich-Wilhelm; Vajkoczy, Peter; Heppner, Frank L; Koch, Arend

    2016-01-01

    Giant Cell Glioblastoma (gcGBM) and Pleomorphic Xanthoastrocytoma (PXA) are rare astroglial tumors of the central nervous system. Although they share certain histomorphological and immunohistochemical features, they are characterized by different clinical behavior and prognosis. Nevertheless, few cases remain uncertain, as their histomorphological hallmarks and immunophenotypes do correspond to the typical pattern neither of gcGBM nor PXA. Therefore, in addition to the routinely used diagnostic histochemical and immunohistochemical markers like Gömöri, p53 and CD34, we analyzed if genetic variations like MGMT promoter methylation, mutations in the IDH1/2 genes, or BRAF mutations, which are actually used as diagnostic, prognostic and predictive molecular markers in anaplastic glial tumors, could be helpful in the differential diagnostic of both tumor entities. We analyzed 34 gcGBM and 20 PXA for genetic variations in the above-named genes and found distinct distributions between both groups. MGMT promoter hypermethylation was observed in 3 out of 20 PXA compared to 14 out of 34 gcGBM (15% vs. 41.2%, p-value 0.09). BRAF V600E mutations were detected in 50% of the PXA but not in any of the gcGBM (50% vs. 0%, p-value < 0.001). IDH1 R132 and IDH R172 mutations were not present in any of the PXA and gcGBM cases. Our data indicate, that in addition to the histological and immunohistochemical evaluation, investigation of MGMT promoter methylation and in particular BRAF V600E mutations represent reliable additional tools to sustain differentiation of gcGBM from PXA on a molecular basis. Based on these data specific BRAF kinase inhibitors could represent a promising agent in the therapy of PXA and their use should be emphasized.

  8. Long-Term Survival of a Patient with Giant Cell Glioblastoma: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naydenov, E; Bussarsky, V; Nachev, S; Hadjidekova, S; Toncheva, D

    2009-07-17

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common glial tumor of the central nervous system. Overall survival is less than a year in most of the cases in spite of multimodal treatment approaches. A 45-year-old female with histologically confirmed giant cell GBM was treated at our institution. Subtotal excision of the lesion situated in the right precentral area was performed during the initial stay in August 2005. The patient improved after the procedure with no hypertension and additional neurological deficit. Radiotherapy plus concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide was performed. The patient was symptom-free for 35 months after initial surgery. From July 2008 the patient developed partial motor seizures in the left side of the body and progressive hemiparesis. Local tumor progression was demonstrated on the neuroimaging studies. In December 2008, a second operative intervention was performed with subtotal excision of the tumor. Forty-five months after the initial diagnosis the patient is still alive with moderate neurological deficit. Microarray analysis of the tumor found the following numeric chromosomal aberrations: monosomy 8, 10, 13, 22, and trisomy 21, as well as amplifications in 4q34.1, 4q28.2, 6q16.3, 7q36.1, 7p21.3, and deletions in 1q42.12, 1q32.2, 1q25.2, 1p33, 2q37.2, 18q22.3, 19p13.2, Xq28, and Xq27.3. GBMs seem to be a heterogeneous group of glial tumors with different clinical course and therapeutic response. Microarray analysis is a useful method to establish a number of possible molecular predictors.

  9. Association between the growth rate of subependymal giant cell astrocytoma and age in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jeng-Dau; Wei, Chang-Ching; Tsao, Teng-Fu; Hsiao, Yu-Ping; Tsai, Henry J; Yang, Sheng-Hui; Tsai, Min-Ling; Sheu, Ji-Nan

    2016-01-01

    The most common neurological complications associated with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) include intractable seizures that begin in infancy and subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) complicated by hydrocephalus with increasing age. Information on SEGA growth of TSC patients is limited. This study aimed to examine the TSC-SEGA growth rates by periodic neuroimaging. This study evaluated the TSC-SEGA growth rates by serial neuroimaging. Fifty-eight patients with TSC underwent systematic evaluation, including a review of medical history and serial brain neuroimaging. While magnetic resonance imaging was more sensitive in detecting cortical tubers than computed tomography (73.1 vs. 0 %, p < 0.001), its efficacy in identifying intracranial lesions was comparable to that of computed tomography (96.2 vs. 100 %, p = 0.658). Significant tumor growth was observed in children (p = 0.012) and adults (p = 0.028) during follow-up periods, respectively (median for children 23.5 months, interquartile range 18-40 months and median for adults 23 months, interquartile range 12-34 months). Further, the SEGA growth rate in children was significantly higher than that in adults (75.6 vs. 16.5 %, p = 0.03). The results of the study show that SEGA has a significantly higher growth rate in children using serial follow-up brain imaging, suggesting the importance of performing follow-up neuroimaging at yearly intervals in childhood to identify and prevent potential comorbidities.

  10. Unique findings of subependymal giant cell astrocytoma within cortical tubers in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex: a histopathological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Joel S; Frankel, Hyman; Ma, Tracy; Zagzag, David; Liechty, Benjamin; Zeev, Bruria Ben; Tzadok, Michal; Devinsky, Orrin; Weiner, Howard L; Roth, Jonathan

    2017-04-01

    Tuberous sclerosis is associated with three central nervous system pathologies: cortical/subcortical tubers, subependymal nodules (SENs), and subependymal giant cell astrocytomas (SEGAs). Tubers are associated with epilepsy, which is often medication-resistant and often leads to resective surgery. Recently, mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTORi) have been shown to be effective reducing seizure burden in some patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC)-related refractory epilepsy. mTORi have also been shown to be an alternative for surgery treating SEGAs. We describe several cases of resected tubers that contained SEGA tissue without an intraventricular SEGA. After institutional review board (IRB) protocol approval, we retrospectively reviewed the surgical-pathological data for all TSC patients who underwent cortical resections for treatment of refractory epilepsy at NYU Langone Medical Center and Tel Aviv Medical Center between 2003 and 2013. Data included demographics, epilepsy type, MRI characteristics, epilepsy outcome, and histopathological staining. We reviewed cortical resections from 75 patients with complete pathological studies. In three patients, cortical lesions demonstrated histopathological findings consistent with a SEGA within the resected tuber tissue, with no intraventricular SEGA. All lesions were cortically based and none had any intraventricular extension. No patient had been treated before surgery with an mTORi. Two of the three patients remain Engel grade I-II. All lesions stained positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), synaptophysin, and neuronal nuclear antigen (NeuN). This is the first description of cortical tubers harboring SEGA tissue. This observation though preliminary may suggest a subgroup of patients with intractable epilepsy in whom mTORi may be considered before surgical intervention.

  11. Surgical Management of Giant Cell Tumors in Temporomandibular Joint Region Involving Lateral Skull Base: A Multidisciplinary Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yi; Ma, Chunyue; Wang, Liang; Li, Jun; Wu, Yiqun; Sun, Jian

    2016-11-01

    Giant cell tumors (GCTs) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) region invading the lateral skull base are relatively uncommon. The management of these lesions is still controversial because of their proximity to vital neurovascular structures. Although sporadically reported, the clinical outcomes of such disease after surgery are still largely unknown. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 28 patients with resectable GCTs in the TMJ region involving the lateral skull base treated from 1994 to 2013. A multidisciplinary team, formed by oral and maxillofacial surgeons, neurosurgeons, and otorhinolaryngologists, had surgically treated all these patients by craniomaxillofacial resection. Clinical variables, different treatment modalities, and outcomes are compared. Representative cases also are presented. Our case series consisted of 15 male and 13 female patients with a median age of 41 years. The median follow-up duration for our series was 5.4 years (range, 0.8-18.5 years). The average tumor size measured 8.6 cm. Most of the GCTs (n = 19, 67.9%) extended through the skull base bones into the brain parenchyma and other surrounding soft tissues. Titanium meshes for cranioplasty of skull base bones was used in 9 patients (32.1%), whereas temporalis fascia (n = 5, 17.9%) or free flaps (n = 6, 21.4%) were used more frequently for duraplasty. A postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak was found in only 1 patient. During follow-up, the local control rate reached 85.7%. Thoroughness of tumor resection (hazard ratio, 15.763; 95% confidence interval, 1.630-152.437; P = .017) was found to be associated with recurrence-free survival. Craniomaxillofacial surgery for GCTs in the TMJ region invading the skull base is feasible in selected patients. A meticulous plan via a multidisciplinary approach is mandatory for the success of such treatment. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. MRI displays involvement of the temporalis muscle and the deep temporal artery in patients with giant cell arteritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veldhoen, Simon; Bley, Thorsten A. [University Medical Center Wuerzburg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Klink, Thorsten [Inselspital - University Medical Center Bern, Department of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, Bern (Switzerland); Geiger, Julia [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Freiburg (Germany); University Children' s Hospital Zuerich, Division of Radiology, Zuerich (Switzerland); Vaith, Peter; Glaser, Cornelia [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Freiburg (Germany); Ness, Thomas [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Ophthalmology, Freiburg (Germany); Duwendag, Dirk [University Medical Center Kiel, Department of Ophthalmology, Kiel (Germany); Both, Marcus [University Medical Center Kiel, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Kiel (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    To assess deep temporal artery and temporalis muscle involvement in patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA). Ninety-nine patients who received magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and superficial temporal artery biopsy (TAB) were included in this study. Patients with positive TAB (n = 61) were defined as GCA patients, those with negative TAB (n = 38) as the GCA-negative reference group. Contrast-enhanced T1w-images were acquired utilizing 1.5 T and 3 T MRI. Two radiologists assessed the images. Mural contrast-hyperenhancement and wall thickening of the deep temporal artery and hyperenhancement of the muscle were defined as inflammation. MRI results were correlated with jaw claudication in 70 patients. The two observers found temporalis muscle involvement in 19.7 % (n = 12) and 21.3 % (n = 13) of GCA patients. It occurred bilaterally in 100 %. Specificities were 92/97 % and sensitivities were 20/21 %. Deep temporal artery involvement was found in 34.4 % (n = 21) and 49.2 % (n = 30) and occurred bilaterally in 80/90.5 %. Specificities were 84/95 % and sensitivities were 34/49 %. Both structures were affected simultaneously in 18/21.3 %. Jaw claudication correlated moderately with inflammation of the temporalis muscle (r = 0.31; p < 0.05) and the deep temporal artery (r = 0.38; p = 0.01). MRI visualizes changes in the temporalis muscle and the deep temporal artery in GCA. Moderate correlation of clinical symptoms with MRI results was observed. circle Approximately 20 % of GCA patients presented with temporalis muscle inflammation. (orig.)

  13. Repetitive 18F-FDG-PET/CT in patients with large-vessel giant-cell arteritis and controlled disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boysson, Hubert; Aide, Nicolas; Liozon, Eric; Lambert, Marc; Parienti, Jean-Jacques; Monteil, Jacques; Huglo, Damien; Bienvenu, Boris; Manrique, Alain; Aouba, Achille

    2017-12-01

    18F-FDG PET/CT can detect large-vessel involvement in giant-cell arteritis (GCA) with a good sensitivity. In patients with clinically and biologically controlled disease, we aimed to assess how vascular uptakes evolve on repetitive FDG-PET/CT. All included patients had to satisfy the 4 following criteria: 1) diagnosis of GCA was retained according to the criteria of the American College of Rheumatology or based on the satisfaction of 2 criteria associated with the demonstration of large-vessel involvement on FDG-PET/CT; 2) all patients had a positive PET/CT that was performed at diagnosis before treatment or within the first 10days of treatment; 3) another FDG-PET/CT was performed after at least 3months of controlled disease without any relapse; 4) patients were followed-up at least for 12months. Twenty-five patients (17 [68%] women, median age: 69 [65-78]) with large-vessel inflammation on a baseline FDG-PET/CT and with repetitive imaging during the period with controlled disease were included and followed-up for 62 [25-95] months. Four repeated procedures revealed total extinction of vascular uptakes at 11.5 [8-12] months after the first FDG-PET/CT. Eight PET/CT revealed decreased numbers of vascular uptakes, and 10 procedures revealed no changes. The 3 remaining procedures indicated worsening of the numbers of vascular uptakes in the absence of relapse. Our study revealed long-term persistent vascular uptake on repeated FDG-PET/CT in >80% of our GCA patients with large-vessel inflammation and clinical-biological controlled disease. Prospective studies are required to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Polymyalgia rheumatica and giant cell arteritis—three challenges—consequences of the vasculitis process, osteoporosis, and malignancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emamifar, Amir; Hess, Søren; Gerke, Oke; Hermann, Anne Pernille; Laustrup, Helle; Hansen, Per Syrak; Thye-Rønn, Peter; Marcussen, Niels; Svendstrup, Frank; Gildberg-Mortensen, Rannveig; Bang, Jacob Christian; Farahani, Ziba Ahangarani; Chrysidis, Stavros; Toftegaard, Pia; Andreasen, Rikke Asmussen; le Greves, Sebastian; Andersen, Hanne Randi; Olsen, Rudolf Nezlo; Hansen, Inger Marie Jensen

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) and giant cell arteritis (GCA) are common inflammatory conditions. The diagnosis of PMR/GCA poses many challenges since there are no specific diagnostic tests. Recent literature emphasizes the ability of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) to assess global disease activity in inflammatory diseases. 18F-FDG PET/CT may lead to the diagnosis at an earlier stage than conventional imaging and may also assess response to therapy. With respect to the management of PMR/GCA, there are 3 significant areas of concern as follows: vasculitis process/vascular stiffness, malignancy, and osteoporosis. Methods and analysis: All patients with suspected PMR/GCR referred to the Rheumatology section of Medicine Department at Svendborg Hospital, Denmark. The 4 separate studies in the current protocol focus on: the association of clinical picture of PMR/GCA with PET findings; the validity of 18F-FDG PET/CT scan for diagnosis of PMR/GCA compared with temporal artery biopsy; the prevalence of newly diagnosed malignancies in patients with PMR/GCA, or PMR-like syndrome, with the focus on diagnostic accuracy of 18F-FDG PET/CT scan compared with conventional workup (ie, chest X-ray/abdominal ultrasound); and the impact of disease process, and also steroid treatment on bone mineral density, body composition, and vasculitis/vascular stiffness in PMR/GCA patients. Ethics and dissemination: The study has been approved by the Regional Ethics Committee of the Region of Southern Denmark (identification number: S-20160098) and Danish Data Protection Agency (J.nr 16/40522). Results of the study will be disseminated via publications in peer-reviewed journals, and presentation at national and international conferences. PMID:28658131

  15. Radiotherapy for marginally resected, unresectable or recurrent giant cell tumor of the bone: a rare cancer network study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C. Miller

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The role of radiotherapy for local control of marginally resected, unresectable, and recurrent giant cell tumors of bone (GCToB has not been well defined. The number of patients affected by this rare disease is low. We present a series of 58 patients with biopsy proven GCToB who were treated with radiation therapy. A retrospective review of the role of radiotherapy in the treatment of GCToB was conducted in participating institutions of the Rare Cancer Network. Eligibility criteria consisted of the use of radiotherapy for marginally resected, unresectable, and recurrent GCToB. Fifty-eight patients with biopsy proven GCToB were analyzed from 9 participating North American and European institutions. Forty-five patients had a primary tumor and 13 patients had a recurrent tumor. Median radiation dose was 50 Gy in a median of 25 fractions. Indication for radiation therapy was marginal resection in 33 patients, unresectable tumor in 13 patients, recurrence in 9 patients and palliation in 2 patients. Median tumor size was 7.0 cm. A significant proportion of the tumors involved critical structures. Median follow- up was 8.0 years. Five year local control was 85% . Of the 7 local failures, 3 were treated successfully with salvage surgery. All patients who received palliation achieved symptom relief. Five year overall survival was 94%. None of the patients experienced grade 3 or higher acute toxicity. This study reports a large published experience in the treatment of GCToB with radiotherapy. Radiotherapy can provide excellent local control for incompletely resected, unresectable or recurrent GCToB with acceptable morbidity.

  16. A massive neglected giant basal cell carcinoma in a schizophrenic patient treated successfully with vismodegib

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rosa Marie; Lei, Ulrikke

    2015-01-01

    The small molecule vismodegib is a great treatment alternative to patients challenged, e.g. psychiatric disorders, suffering from severe basal cell carcinoma of the skin in which surgery or other treatment modalities is not possible because of patient's wish or condition. We present a case of a 73......-year-old schizophrenic patient with a 15-year history of a neglected tumour located at the forehead and scalp, admitted to hospital in a state of inanition because of tumour expansion to the meninges and severe anaemia caused by bleeding, treated successfully with vismodegib....

  17. Placental steroids in cattle: hormones, placental growth factors or by-products of trophoblast giant cell differentiation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler, G; Greven, H; Kowalewski, M P; Döring, B; Ozalp, G R; Hoffmann, B

    2008-07-01

    The bovine placenta produces large amounts of steroids, mainly estrone (E1) and progesterone (P4). Specific features of bovine placental steroidogenesis are 1) the expression of all enzymes needed for the production of estrogens from cholesterol in the trophoblast 2) an only marginal and temporal contribution to peripheral maternal P4 levels restricted to a period between approx. days 150 - 240 of gestation 3) the predominance of sulfoconjugated over free E1 and 4) a complementary setting of steroidogenic enzymes in the two morphologically discriminable trophoblast cell types, the uninucleated trophoblast cells (UTC) and the trophoblast giant cells (TGC). In cattle so far no definite information is available on the specific biological roles of placental estrogens and P4. However, the detection of estrogen receptors and progesterone receptors in the placentomes suggests a role primarily as local regulators of caruncular growth, differentiation and functions. Inconsistent with a function as a caruncular growth factor is the strong evidence that in cattle placental estrogens enter the maternal compartment almost completely as estrone sulfate (E1S), which is not active at classical nuclear receptors. On the other hand, E1S may be converted locally to free active estrogens via the action of steroid sulfatase (StS), which has been detected in specific parts of the bovine caruncular epithelium. Alternatively or in addition, StS expression in the caruncular epithelium may serve the utilization of sulfated neutral steroid precursors (e.g. pregnenolone sulfate or cholesterol sulfate) supplied with maternal blood, thus providing free substrates for further metabolization in the adjacent trophoblast. The down-regulation of P450scc and P450c17 and the up-regulation of 3beta-HSD and aromatase during the differentiation of TGC from UTC in parallel with the up-regulation of ER beta and estrogen sulfotransferase in maturing TGC suggests a function of placental estrogens primarily

  18. Docetaxel-Loaded Nanoparticles Assembled from β-Cyclodextrin/Calixarene Giant Surfactants: Physicochemical Properties and Cytotoxic Effect in Prostate Cancer and Glioblastoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego-Yerga, Laura; Posadas, Inmaculada; de la Torre, Cristina; Ruiz-Almansa, Jesús; Sansone, Francesco; Ortiz Mellet, Carmen; Casnati, Alessandro; García Fernández, José M; Ceña, Valentín

    2017-01-01

    Giant amphiphiles encompassing a hydrophilic β-cyclodextrin (βCD) component and a hydrophobic calix[4]arene (CA4) module undergo self-assembly in aqueous media to afford core-shell nanospheres or nanocapsules, depending on the nanoprecipitation protocol, with high docetaxel (DTX) loading capacity. The blank and loaded nanoparticles have been fully characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS), ζ-potential measurements and cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). The data are compatible with the distribution of the drug between the nanoparticle core and the shell, where it is probably anchored by inclusion of the DTX aromatic moieties in βCD cavities. Indeed, the release kinetics profiles evidenced an initial fast release of the drug, which likely accounts for the fraction hosted on the surface, followed by a slow and sustained release rate, corresponding to diffusion of DTX in the core, which can be finely tuned by modification of the giant amphiphile chemical structure. The ability of the docetaxel-loaded nanoparticles to induce cellular death in different prostate (human LnCap and PC3) and glioblastoma (human U87 and rat C6) cells was also explored. Giant amphiphile-based DTX formulations surpassing or matching the antitumoral activity of the free DTX formulation were identified in all cases with no need to employ any organic co-solvent, thus overcoming the DTX water solubility problems. Moreover, the presence of the βCD shell at the surface of the assemblies is intended to impart stealth properties against serum proteins while permitting nanoparticle surface decoration by supramolecular approaches, paving the way for a new generation of molecularly well-defined antitumoral drug delivery systems with improved specificity and efficiency. Altogether, the results provide a proof of concept of the suitability of the approach based on βCD-CA4 giant amphiphiles to access DTX carriers with tunable properties.

  19. Docetaxel-Loaded Nanoparticles Assembled from β-Cyclodextrin/Calixarene Giant Surfactants: Physicochemical Properties and Cytotoxic Effect in Prostate Cancer and Glioblastoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Gallego-Yerga

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Giant amphiphiles encompassing a hydrophilic β-cyclodextrin (βCD component and a hydrophobic calix[4]arene (CA4 module undergo self-assembly in aqueous media to afford core-shell nanospheres or nanocapsules, depending on the nanoprecipitation protocol, with high docetaxel (DTX loading capacity. The blank and loaded nanoparticles have been fully characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS, ζ-potential measurements and cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM. The data are compatible with the distribution of the drug between the nanoparticle core and the shell, where it is probably anchored by inclusion of the DTX aromatic moieties in βCD cavities. Indeed, the release kinetics profiles evidenced an initial fast release of the drug, which likely accounts for the fraction hosted on the surface, followed by a slow and sustained release rate, corresponding to diffusion of DTX in the core, which can be finely tuned by modification of the giant amphiphile chemical structure. The ability of the docetaxel-loaded nanoparticles to induce cellular death in different prostate (human LnCap and PC3 and glioblastoma (human U87 and rat C6 cells was also explored. Giant amphiphile-based DTX formulations surpassing or matching the antitumoral activity of the free DTX formulation were identified in all cases with no need to employ any organic co-solvent, thus overcoming the DTX water solubility problems. Moreover, the presence of the βCD shell at the surface of the assemblies is intended to impart stealth properties against serum proteins while permitting nanoparticle surface decoration by supramolecular approaches, paving the way for a new generation of molecularly well-defined antitumoral drug delivery systems with improved specificity and efficiency. Altogether, the results provide a proof of concept of the suitability of the approach based on βCD-CA4 giant amphiphiles to access DTX carriers with tunable properties.

  20. Benzothiadiazole effect in the compatible tomato-Meloidogyne incognita interaction: changes in giant cell development and priming of two root anionic peroxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melillo, Maria Teresa; Leonetti, Paola; Veronico, Pasqua

    2014-10-01

    BTH application is effective in root-knot nematode-tomato interaction in a way that involves a delay in the formation of nematode feeding site and triggers molecular responses at several levels. The compatible interaction between root-knot nematodes and their hosts requires the nematode to overcome plant defense systems so that a sophisticated permanent feeding site (giant cells) can be produced within the host roots. It has been suggested that activators of plant defenses may provide a novel management strategy for controlling root-knot nematodes but little is known about the molecular basis by which these elicitors operate. The role of pre-treatment with Benzothiadiazole (BTH), a salicylic acid analog, in inducing resistance against Meloidogyne incognita infection was investigated in tomato roots. A decrease in galling in roots and feeding site numbers was observed following BTH treatment. Histological investigations showed a delay in formation of feeding sites in treated plants. BTH-treated galls had higher H2O2 production, lignin accumulation, and increased peroxidase activity than untreated galls. The expression of two tomato genes, Tap1 and Tap2, coding for anionic peroxidases, was examined by qRT-PCR and in situ hybridization in response to BTH. Tap1 was induced at all infection points, reaching the highest level at 15 dpi. Tap2 expression, although slightly delayed in untreated galls, increased during infection in both treated and untreated galls. The expression of Tap1 and Tap2 was observed in giant cells of untreated roots, whereas the transcripts were localized in both giant cells and in parenchyma cells surrounding the developing feeding sites in treated plants. These results show that BTH applied to tomato plants makes them more resistant to infection by nematodes, which become less effective in overcoming root defense pathway.

  1. Giant renal oncocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanović, Nebojsa; Ignjatovic, Ivan; Kostov, Milos; Mijović, Zaklina; Zivković, Sladjana; Kosević, Branko

    2013-01-01

    Renal onkocytoma is a distinctive benign tumor derived from epithelial cells of the distal renal tubules. These tumors are often clinically asymptomatic, diagnosed accidentally and difficult to distinguish from renal cell carcinoma. We presented a giant renal onkocytoma in a man aged 64, without any signs or symptoms of the urogenital system disorder. The preoperative diagnosis described the tumor mass of the right kidney, size 16 x 14 cm, and indicated a malignant tumor of kidney. The patient underwent radical nephrectomy. The tumor was encapsulated at the intersection with the characteristic central hyaline scar. Microscopically, it was built of uniform polygonal cells with abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm. Immunohystochemiclly, tumor cells were immunoreactive to CK AE1/AE3 and CD 117, but showed negative immunoreactivity to CK 7, RCC marker and Vimentin. Giant renal oncocytomas are rare tumors with benign clinical course. As a rule, they are discovered by accident. Clinical differentiation from malignant tumors of the kidney is not possible. They are treated surgically, mainly by radical nephrectomy. A definitive diagnosis is made only by histopathological examination of tumors using immunohistochemical marker panels.

  2. Giant renal oncocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Nebojša

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Renal onkocytoma is a distinctive benign tumor derived from epithelial cells of the distal renal tubules. These tumors are often clinically asymptomatic, diagnosed accidentally and difficult to distinguish from renal cell carcinoma. Case report. We presented a giant renal onkocytoma in a man aged 64, without any signs or symptoms of the urogenital system disorder. The preoperative diagnosis described the tumor mass of the right kidney, size 16 x 14 cm, and indicated a malignant tumor of kidney. The patient underwent radical nephrectomy. The tumor was encapsulated at the intersection with the characteristic central hyaline scar. Microscopically, it was built of uniform polygonal cells with abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm. Immunohystochemiclly, tumor cells were immunoreactive to CK AE1/AE3 and CD 117, but showed negative immunoreactivity to CK 7, RCC marker and Vimentin. Conclusion. Giant renal oncocytomas are rare tumors with benign clinical course. As a rule, they are discovered by accident. Clinical differentiation from malignant tumors of the kidney is not possible. They are treated surgically, mainly by radical nephrectomy. A definitive diagnosis is made only by histopathological examination of tumors using immunohistochemical marker panels.

  3. Histological Structure of Gills of Giant Mudskipper (Periophthalmodon schlosseri)

    OpenAIRE

    Yudistira, Danang Bagus; Nurliani, Anni; Santoso, Heri Budi

    2012-01-01

    Giant mudskipper (Periophthalmodon schlosseri) is one of gobiidae members that does air-breathing and lives on intertidal zone with mangrove habitat. The ability of giant mudskipper to adapt with water to land environment is due to its gill histological structure. The objective of the present study was to observe the structure of giant mudskipper’s gill and to identify sort of cells and its distributions descriptively. The gills of three adult giant mudskippers were taken and processed to his...

  4. Giant cell glioblastoma with unique bilateral cerebellopontine angle localization considered as extraaxial tumor growth in a patient with neurofibromatosis Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taraszewska, Anna; Bogucki, Jacek; Powała, Agnieszka; Matyja, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    Giant cell glioblastoma multiforme (GCGBM) is a rare variant of glioblastoma, occurring predominantly in the cerebral hemispheres. Its infratentorial localization has been documented occasionally, while GCGBM in the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) region has not been described so far. We report a case of GCGBM presenting primarily as an extraaxial bilateral CPA tumor in a 29-year-old woman with neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1). The patient died shortly after surgery of the right CPA tumor. Postmortem study of the brain revealed large tumor masses, located in the CPA bilaterally, encasing the brainstem base and cisternal portions of the cranial nerves. Tumor masses were demarcated from the brainstem and cerebellum and covered by leptomeninges. Microscopically, a slight subpial tumor seeding from the leptomeninges into the brain parenchyma was observed in the right CPA region. The tumor showed highly pleomorphic, giant and multinucleated cells, densely cellular sheets of poorly differentiated cells and pseudopalisading necroses. Tumor cells were positive for GFAP, S-100 protein, and p53 and negative for neuronal antigens. The MIB-1 labeling index was very high in densely cellular areas. To our knowledge this is the second report of GCGBM in an NF1 patient and the first reported case of GCGBM presenting as an extraaxial leptomeningeal lesion with bilateral CPA localization, which might be considered as primary leptomeningeal gliomatosis.

  5. Age and Expression of CD163 and Colony-Stimulating Factor 1 Receptor (CD115) Are Associated With the Biological Behavior of Central Giant Cell Granuloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Adrian; Chaushu, Gavriel; Ginene, Lana; Vered, Marilena

    2017-07-01

    Central giant cell granulomas (CGCGs) are clinically classified as nonaggressive (nA-CGCGs) and aggressive (A-CGCGs). However, histopathologically, all lesions feature spindle mononuclear cells (MCs) and multinuclear giant cells (GCs) in a hemorrhage-rich stroma. We aimed to investigate the presence of cells with a monocyte- or macrophage-related phenotype and, together with clinical variables, to examine their predictive potential for the biological behavior of CGCGs. For our investigation, we implemented a retrospective cohort study. Sections were immunohistochemically stained for colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R) (CD115), CD163, CD68, and nuclear factor κB. The clinical variables included age, gender, and location of lesions. Associations between immunostains, clinical variables, and CGCG aggressiveness were analyzed by the Wilcoxon (Mann-Whitney) exact test and t test. Significant variables were further analyzed by a logistic regression model followed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis for diagnostic sensitivity. Significance was set at P CSF-1R (CD115)-MC combined were the best predictor in distinguishing nA-CGCGs from A-CGCGs (area under ROC curve, 0.814; P CSF-1R (CD115)-MC can serve as significant predictors of nA-CGCGs. A functional link between CD163-GC and the characteristic areas of extravasation of erythrocytes is discussed. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Giant Ulcerative Dermatofibroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turgut Karlidag

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatofibroma is a slowly growing common benign cutaneous tumor characterized by hard papules and nodules. The rarely seen erosions and ulcerations may cause difficulties in the diagnosis. Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, which is clinically and histopathologically of malignant character, displays difficulties in the diagnosis since it has similarities with basal cell carcinoma, epidermoid carcinoma, and sarcomas. Head and neck involvement is very rare. In this study, a giant dermatofibroma case, which is histopathologically, ulcerative dermatofibroma, the biggest lesion of the head and neck region and seen rarely in the literature that has characteristics similar to dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, has been presented.

  7. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Inhibitor Induced Complete Remission of a Recurrent Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma in a Patient Without Features of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appalla, Deepika; Depalma, Andres; Calderwood, Stanley

    2016-07-01

    The majority of patients with subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) have tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). In such patients, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor everolimus has been shown to induce responses. Isolated SEGA have been reported in patients without clinical or genetic features of TSC. The treatment of these patients with everolimus has not previously been reported. We treated a patient with a recurrent isolated SEGA with an mTOR inhibitor. The patient tolerated therapy well and had a sustained complete remission. MTOR inhibitors may be useful for the treatment of isolated SEGA. Further study is warranted. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Serum total acid phosphatase for monitoring the clinical course of giant cell tumors of bone--26 patients with 5 local recurrences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akahane, Tsutomu; Isobe, Ken'ichi; Shimizu, Tominaga

    2005-10-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) is a bone-destroying tumor that sometimes recurs locally after treatment. A recent study showed increased levels of serum total acid phosphatase (TACP). We assessed TACP in the serum of 26 patients with primary GCT, and in 5 of them who developed a local recurrence. We found a correlation between TACP level in serum and tumor size. TACP levels that were elevated preoperatively in patients with GCT became normalized after surgery, but increased in 3 of the 5 patients with local recurrence. TACP could be used as a tumor marker for monitoring response to treatment of GCT.

  9. Aneurysmal bone cyst or giant cell tumour; Ranking of X-ray diagnosis in differential diagnosis. Aneurysmatische Knochenzyste oder Riesenzelltumor; Wertigkeit der Roentgendiagnostik zur Differentialdiagnose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erlemann, R. (Institut fuer Radiologie, St.-Johannes-Hospital, Duisburg-Hamborn (Germany)); Picker, S. (Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Univ. Muenster (Germany)); Mueller-Miny, H. (Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Univ. Muenster (Germany)); Wuisman, P. (Orthopaedische Klinik und Poliklinik, Univ. Muenster (Germany)); Edel, G. (Gerhard-Domagk-Institut fuer Pathologie, Univ. Muenster (Germany))

    1993-04-01

    Depending on analysis of radiographic morphology, location and patient's age of 72 aneurysmal bone cysts (ABC) and 47 giant cell tumours (GCT), the following criteria suggest an ABC with a high positive predictive value: Location in the diaphysis (100%), in the shaft (92%), in the metaphysis or metadiaphysis (86%), patient younger than 17 yeras (97%) and growth rate grade Lodwick-IA (88%). GCT were selected via the following criteria: Epimetaphyseal location (82%) and growth rate grade Lodwick-II (100%). In 14% of the cases, differential diagnosis between both entities is radiologically impossible. (orig.)

  10. EFFECTS: an expanded access program of everolimus for patients with subependymal giant cell astrocytoma associated with tuberous sclerosis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarasi, Andras; De Waele, Liesbeth; Bartalini, Gabriella; Jozwiak, Sergiusz; Laforgia, Nicola; Verhelst, Helene; Petrak, Borivoj; Pedespan, Jean-Michel; Witt, Olaf; Castellana, Ramon; Crippa, Stefania; Gislimberti, Gabriella; Gyorsok, Zsuzsanna

    2016-08-08

    Everolimus, a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor, has been shown to be effective and safe in the treatment of subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) associated with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). The Everolimus For Fast Expanded aCcess in TSC SEGA (EFFECTS) study was designed to provide everolimus access to patients with SEGA associated with TSC and to mainly assess the safety and also efficacy of everolimus in a real-world setting. EFFECTS was a phase 3b, open-label, noncomparative, multicenter, expanded access study. Eligible patients were ≥ 3 years of age, with a definite diagnosis of TSC, and with at least one SEGA lesion identified by MRI or CT scan. Patients received once daily everolimus (dose adjusted to attain a trough level of 5-15 ng/mL). Safety evaluation was the primary objective and included collection of adverse events (AEs) and serious AEs, with their severity and relationship to everolimus. Efficacy evaluation, which was the secondary objective, was based on the best overall response as per medical judgment. Of the 120 patients enrolled, 100 (83.3%) completed the study. Median age of patients was 11 years (range, 1-47). Median daily dose of everolimus was 5.82 mg (range, 2.0-11.8). Median duration of exposure was 56.5 weeks (range, 0.3-130). The overall incidence of AEs was 74.2%. Aphthous stomatitis (18 [15.0%]), pyrexia (18 [15.0%]), bronchitis (11 [9.2%]), and stomatitis (10 [8.3%]) were the most common AEs reported. Overall, 25 patients had grade 3 AEs; most frequent was stomatitis (4 [3.3%]). Grade 4 AEs were reported in three (2.5%) patients. A total of 62 (51.7%) patients had suspected drug-related AEs, of which 15 (12.5%) were of grade 3 or 4. In eight (6.7%) patients, AEs led to drug discontinuation. With regard to efficacy, 81 (67.5%) patients had a partial response, 35 (29.2%) had a stable disease, and one (0.8%) had progressive disease. The response was unknown in three (2.5%) patients. This study confirms the

  11. Transforming giants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    2008-01-01

    Large corporations have long been seen as lumbering, inflexible, bureaucratic--and clueless about global developments. But recently some multinationals seem to be transforming themselves: They're engaging employees, moving quickly, and introducing innovations that show true connection with the world. Harvard Business School's Kanter ventured with a research team inside a dozen global giants--including IBM, Procter & Gamble, Omron, CEMEX, Cisco, and Banco Real--to discover what has been driving the change. After conducting more than 350 interviews on five continents, she and her colleagues came away with a strong sense that we are witnessing the dawn of a new model of corporate power: The coordination of actions and decisions on the front lines now appears to stem from widely shared values and a sturdy platform of common processes and technology, not from top-down decrees. In particular, the values that engage the passions of far-flung workforces stress openness, inclusion, and making the world a better place. Through this shift in what might be called their guidance systems, the companies have become as creative and nimble as much smaller ones, even while taking on social and environmental challenges of a scale that only large enterprises could attempt. IBM, for instance, has created a nonprofit partnership, World Community Grid, through which any organization or individual can donate unused computing power to research projects and see what is being done with the donation in real time. IBM has gained an inspiring showcase for its new technology, helped business partners connect with the company in a positive way, and offered individuals all over the globe the chance to contribute to something big.

  12. Giant Cell Arteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Jaw (ONJ) Osteoporosis Paget's Disease of Bone Periodic Fever, Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis, Adenitis Syndrome (Juvenile) Polymyalgia Rheumatica Psoriatic Arthritis Raynaud's Phenomenon Reactive Arthritis Rheumatoid Arthritis ...

  13. Effect of Intravenous Zoledronic Acid on Histopathology and Recurrence after Extended Curettage in Giant Cell Tumors of Bone: A Comparative Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Zile Singh; Sen, Rajeev; Dhiman, Ankur; Sharma, Pankaj; Siwach, Ramchander; Rana, Parveen

    2018-01-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) of the bone is known for its locally aggressive behavior and tendency to recur. It is an admixture of rounded or spindle-shaped mononuclear neoplastic stromal cells and multinucleated osteoclast-like giant cells with their proportionate dispersion among the former. Zoledronic acid (a bisphosphonate) is being used in various cancers such as myelomas and metastasis, for osteoporosis with an aim to reduce the resorption of bone, and as an adjuvant treatment for the management of GCT of bone for reduction of local recurrence. We have carried out a prospective comparative study to assess the effect of intravenous infusion of zoledronic acid on histopathology and recurrence of GCT of bone. The study was carried out in the biopsy proven GCTs in 37 patients; 15 males and 22 females, in the age range from 17 to 55 years. They were treated with extended curettage. Of these 37 patients, 18 were given three doses of 4 mg zoledronic acid infusion at 3-week intervals and extended curettage was performed 2 weeks after the last infusion whereas the other 19 were treated with extended curettage without zoledronic infusion. The post infusion histopathology of the curetted material was compared with the histopathology of initial biopsy. All the patients were evaluated at 3-month intervals for the first 2 years and then six monthly thereafter, for local recurrence and functional outcome of limb using the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) score. In postzoledronic infusion cases, the histopathology of samples showed abnormal stromal cells secreting matrix leading to fibrosis and calcification. The type of fibrosis and calcification was different from pathological calcification and fibrosis what is usually observed. There was a good marginalization and solidification of tumors which made surgical curettage easier in six cases in the study group. There was noticeable reduction in the number of giant cells and alteration in morphology of stromal cells to the

  14. [The value of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in diagnosing giant cell arteritis presenting as fever of unknown origin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Zhaohui; Tian, Xinping; Wang, Huanling

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the clinical diagnostic contribution of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in giant cell arteritis with initial presentation as fever of unknown origin (FUO) . Eight cases with initial presentation as FUO diagnosed with the contribution of PET/CT were retrospectively studied in Peking Union Medical College Hospital. The radiologic manifestations of PET/CT were analyzed. Eight patients (4 men and 4 women) with average (63 ± 7) years (range from 55-75 years) were included in our study based on the criteria.Non-specific clinical symptoms were common in these patients, including fatigue, night sweat and weight loss. They all suffered from anemia of chronic disease.Not surprisingly, the inflammatory parameters were elevated significantly in all patients. The medical history, physical examination and routine lab and radiologic examinations couldn't reveal the causes of fever. PET/CT was performed in all of them, which demonstrated intense (18)F-FDG uptake in the area of aorta and its major branches with maximal standard uptake value (SUVmax) 2.1- 4.6 (3.6 ± 0.9).Immunosuppressive agents were effective to control the inflammation activity. The SUV decreased significantly after treatment in the follow-up PET/CT. PET/CT has demonstrated high yield of diagnostic contribution in giant cell arteritis with initial presentation as fever of unknown origin. As to elderly FUO patients presenting with prominent inflammatory reaction, PET/CT may provide potential value to differentiate diagnosis from maligancies.

  15. Retrobulbar blood flow and visual organ function disturbance in the course of giant cell arteritis coexisting with optic disc drusen – a case repor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Modrzejewska

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The review presented ophthalmologic syndrome connected with visual organ function disorder in giant cell arteritis patient concomitant with optic nerve disc drusen. Diagnostic difficulties were shown in relation to incidence of both similar ophthalmic symptoms as well as interpretation of specialists examinations results (pattern visual evoked potential test, scanning laser polarimetry, and perimetric tests – kinetic and static. Apart from ophthalmic investigations, significant role of radiological examinations was considered, especially color Doppler ultrasonography of retrobulbar circulation – optic artery, central retinal artery, long posterior ciliary arteries. Adequate interpretation of results seems to be crucial to establish scheme and timing of treatment in case of co-occurrence of the abovementioned disorders. In the presented case early implementation of steroid therapy resulted in improvement of blood flow parameters and the regression of ophthalmological complaints. Visual field deficiency in kinetic perimetry, reduced wave amplitude p100 in visual evoked potential test as well as decrease in number of optic nerve fibers in optic nerve disc region in scanning laser polarimetry exam can be diagnostic features in diagnosis of visual impairment in the course of giant cell arteritis and optic nerve disc drusen. Evaluation of blood flow velocity parameters in retrobulbar arteries in color Doppler ultrasonography is the most valuable screening in monitoring ophthalmic dysregulation in presented disorders.

  16. A novel t(6;13)(q15;q34) translocation in a giant cell reparative granuloma (solid aneurysmal bone cyst).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zenggang; Sanger, Warren G; Bridge, Julia A; Hunter, William J; Siegal, Gene P; Wei, Shi

    2012-06-01

    Aneurysmal bone cyst is a rapidly growing and locally aggressive lesion that commonly affects children and young adults. Initially regarded as a reactive process, primary aneurysmal bone cyst is now widely accepted as a neoplasm owing to recent findings of recurrent clonal chromosomal alterations, mostly t(16;17)(q22;p13). However, other infrequent chromosomal rearrangements have also been reported. Giant cell reparative granuloma, previously regarded as a nonneoplastic process and histologically indistinguishable from the solid variant of aneurysmal bone cyst, is frequently seen in the gnathic bones and the short tubular bones of the hands and feet. Here we present such a case of giant cell reparative granuloma (solid aneurysmal bone cyst) in the finger of a 63-year-old white man. Cytogenetic analysis revealed a novel alteration involving a reciprocal translocation between 6q and 13q, with a karyotype of 46,XY,t(6;13)(q15;q34),del(20)(q13.1). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Surgicel application in intracranial hemorrhage surgery contributed to giant-cell granuloma in a patient with hypertension: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bowen; Yang, Hongfa; Cui, Mengzhao; Li, Ye; Yu, Jinlu

    2014-04-21

    Surgicel is an oxidized cellulose preparation that is widely applied in neurosurgery due to its hemostatic effect and good tissue compatibility. Tumor-like lesions induced by Surgicel application in cerebral surgery have been rarely reported, especially for intracranial hemorrhage debridement surgery in patients with hypertension. This case report describes a rare case in which Surgicel application led to a foreign body reaction, contributing to the development of an intracranial giant-cell granuloma. A 49-year-old female hypertensive patient was diagnosed with intracranial hemorrhage. She was treated with debridement surgery that employed Surgicel application. Although a satisfactory hemostatic effect was achieved, the patient was diagnosed with epilepsy 6 months later. Subsequent magnetic resonance imaging revealed an intracranial space-occupying lesion. After undergoing en bloc resection of the lesion, the patient was diagnosed with a Surgicel-related intracranial giant-cell granuloma by histopathology. Application of Surgicel during intracranial hemorrhage debridement surgery may be associated with a risk of granuloma development due to formation of a tumor-like space-occupying lesion in the surgery bed. Even a low risk of tumor development implies a need for caution when applying Surgicel, especially when solely used to achieve a hemostatic effect.

  18. A novel effector protein, MJ-NULG1a, targeted to giant cell nuclei plays a role in Meloidogyne javanica parasitism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Borong; Zhuo, Kan; Wu, Ping; Cui, Ruqiang; Zhang, Lian-Hui; Liao, Jinling

    2013-01-01

    Secretory effector proteins expressed within the esophageal glands of root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) are thought to play key roles in nematode invasion of host roots and in formation of feeding sites necessary for nematodes to complete their life cycle. In this study, a novel effector protein gene designated as Mj-nulg1a, which is expressed specifically within the dorsal gland of Meloidogyne javanica, was isolated through suppression subtractive hybridization. Southern blotting and BLAST search analyses showed that Mj-nulg1a is unique for Meloidogyne spp. A real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay showed that expression of Mj-nulg1a was upregulated in parasitic second-stage juveniles and declined in later parasitic stages. MJ-NULG1a contains two putative nuclear localization signals and, consistently, in planta immunolocalization analysis showed that MJ-NULG1a was localized in the nuclei of giant cells during nematode parasitism. In planta RNA interference targeting Mj-nulg1a suppressed the expression of Mj-nulg1a in nematodes and attenuated parasitism ability of M. javanica. In contrast, transgenic Arabidopsis expressing Mj-nulg1a became more susceptible to M. javanica infection than wild-type control plants. These results depict a novel nematode effector that is targeted to giant cell nuclei and plays a critical role in M. javanica parasitism.

  19. Tumor necrosis factor-α can induce Langhans-type multinucleated giant cell formation derived from myeloid dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Kozo; Yashiro, Masato; Tsuge, Mitsuru; Kondo, Yohichi; Saito, Yukie; Nagaoka, Yoshiharu; Yamashita, Nobuko; Morishima, Tsuneo

    2011-11-01

    The formation of the rich cellular features of MGCs, where the nuclei are arranged circularly at the periphery of the cell (morphologically epithelioid; Langhans-type), is assumed to be associated with any granulomatous disease. The mechanism by which TNF controls the formation of human MGCs in vitro was investigated, focusing on the effect of the TNF-neutralizing antibody. Peripheral blood monocytes were isolated with mAb-coated immunologic magnetic beads and cultured for 10 days in the presence of 20 ng/mL GM-CSF and 10 ng/mL IL-4. These cells were further incubated in the presence of TNF-α with/without its blockade antibodies for 14 days. Myeloid DCs can be generated from peripheral blood monocytes, and both IL-4 and GM-CSF can provide sufficient stimulus for their differentiation. The formation of MGC can be induced in the presence of TNF-α. This reaction was prohibited by the presence of the TNF-neutralizing antibody but not by the presence of anti-TNF receptor II antibody. The activation of Rho and focal adhesion kinases induced by TNF-α stimulation might be linked to cell assembling and the formation of Langhans-type MGCs. MGCs can produce only small amounts of superoxide anions compared to isolated macrophages such as myeloid DCs. © 2011 The Societies and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. The histone variant H3.3 G34W substitution in giant cell tumor of the bone link chromatin and RNA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jinyeong; Park, Joo Hyun; Baude, Annika; Yoo, Yeongran; Lee, Yeon Kyu; Schmidt, Christopher R; Park, Jong Bae; Fellenberg, Jörg; Zustin, Josef; Haller, Florian; Krücken, Irene; Kang, Hyun Guy; Park, Yoon Jung; Plass, Christoph; Lindroth, Anders M

    2017-10-18

    While transcription as regulated by histones and their post-translational modifications has been well described, the function of histone variants in this process remains poorly characterized. Potentially important insight into this process pertain to the frequently occurring mutations of H3.3, leading to G34 substitutions in childhood glioblastoma and giant cell tumor of the bone (GCTB). In this study, we have established primary cell lines from GCTB patients and used them to uncover the influence of H3.3 G34W substitutions on cellular growth behavior, gene expression, and chromatin compaction. Primary cell lines with H3.3 G34W showed increased colony formation, infiltration and proliferation, known hallmarks of tumor development. Isogenic cell lines with H3.3 G34W recapitulated the increased proliferation observed in primary cells. Transcriptomic analysis of primary cells and tumor biopsies revealed slightly more downregulated gene expression, perhaps by increased chromatin compaction. We identified components related to splicing, most prominently hnRNPs, by immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry that specifically interact with H3.3 G34W in the isogenic cell lines. RNA-sequencing analysis and hybridization-based validations further enforced splicing aberrations. Our data uncover a role for H3.3 in RNA processing and chromatin modulation that is blocked by the G34W substitution, potentially driving the tumorigenic process in GCTB.