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Sample records for tendon stem cells

  1. Engaging Stem Cells for Customized Tendon Regeneration

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    Hatim Thaker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for a consistent therapeutic approach to tendon injury repair is long overdue. Patients with tendon microtears or full ruptures are eligible for a wide range of invasive and non invasive interventions, often subjectively decided by the physician. Surgery produces the best outcomes, and while studies have been conducted to optimize graft constructs and to track outcomes, the data from these studies have been inconclusive on the whole. What has been established is a clear understanding of healthy tendon architecture and the inherent process of healing. With this knowledge, tissue regeneration efforts have achieved immense progress in scaffold design, cell line selection, and, more recently, the appropriate use of cytokines and growth factors. This paper evaluates the plasticity of bone-marrow-derived stem cells and the elasticity of recently developed biomaterials towards tendon regeneration efforts. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, hematopoietic progenitor cells, and poly(1,8-octanediol co-citrate scaffolds (POC are discussed in the context of established grafting strategies. With POC scaffolds to cradle the growth of MSCs and hematopoietic progenitor cells, developing a fibroelastic network guided by cytokines and growth factors may contribute towards consistent graft constructs, enhanced functionality, and better patient outcomes.

  2. Equine induced pluripotent stem cells have a reduced tendon differentiation capacity compared to embryonic stem cells

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    Emma Patricia Bavin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Tendon injuries occur commonly in horses and their repair through scar tissue formation predisposes horses to a high rate of re-injury. Pluripotent stem cells may provide a cell replacement therapy to improve tendon tissue regeneration and lower the frequency of re-injury. We have previously demonstrated that equine embryonic stem cells (ESCs differentiate into the tendon cell lineage upon injection into the damaged horse tendon and can differentiate into functional tendon cells in vitro to generate artificial tendons. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs have now been derived from horses but, to date, there are no reports on their ability to differentiate into tendon cells. As iPSCs can be produced from adult cell types, they provide a more accessible source of cells than ESCs, which require the use of horse embryos. The aim of this study was to compare tendon differentiation by ESCs and iPSCs produced through two independent methods. In 2-dimensional differentiation assays the iPSCs expressed tendon associated genes and proteins, which were enhanced by the presence of transforming growth factor-β3. However, in 3-dimensional differentiation assays the iPSCs failed to differentiate into functional tendon cells and generate artificial tendons. These results demonstrate the utility of the 3-dimensional in vitro tendon assay for measuring tendon differentiation and the need for more detailed studies to be performed on equine iPSCs to identify and understand their epigenetic differences from pluripotent ESCs prior to their clinical application.

  3. The effect of decellularized matrices on human tendon stem/progenitor cell differentiation and tendon repair.

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    Yin, Zi; Chen, Xiao; Zhu, Ting; Hu, Jia-jie; Song, Hai-xin; Shen, Wei-liang; Jiang, Liu-yun; Heng, Boon Chin; Ji, Jun-feng; Ouyang, Hong-Wei

    2013-12-01

    It is reported that decellularized collagen matrices derived from dermal skin and bone have been clinically used for tendon repair. However, the varying biological and physical properties of matrices originating from different tissues may influence the differentiation of tendon stem cells, which has not been systematically evaluated. In this study, the effects of collagenous matrices derived from different tissues (tendon, bone and dermis) on the cell differentiation of human tendon stem/progenitor cells (hTSPCs) were investigated, in the context of tendon repair. It was found that all three matrices supported the adhesion and proliferation of hTSPCs despite differences in topography. Interestingly, tendon-derived decellularized matrix promoted the tendinous phenotype in hTSPCs and inhibited their osteogenesis, even under osteogenic induction conditions, through modulation of the teno- and osteolineage-specific transcription factors Scleraxis and Runx2. Bone-derived decellularized matrix robustly induced osteogenic differentiation of hTSPCs, whereas dermal skin-derived collagen matrix had no apparent effect on hTSPC differentiation. Based on the specific biological function of the tendon-derived decellularized matrix, a tissue-engineered tendon comprising TSPCs and tendon-derived matrix was successfully fabricated for Achilles tendon reconstruction. Implantation of this cell-scaffold construct led to a more mature structure (histology score: 4.08 ± 0.61 vs. 8.51 ± 1.66), larger collagen fibrils (52.2 ± 1.6 nm vs. 47.5 ± 2.8 nm) and stronger mechanical properties (stiffness: 21.68 ± 7.1 Nm m(-1) vs.13.2 ± 5.9 Nm m(-1)) of repaired tendons compared to the control group. The results suggest that stem cells promote the rate of repair of Achilles tendon in the presence of a tendinous matrix. This study thus highlights the potential of decellularized matrix for future tissue engineering applications, as well as developing a practical strategy for functional tendon

  4. Stem cell technology for tendon regeneration: current status, challenges, and future research directions

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    Lui PP

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pauline Po Yee Lui Headquarter, Hospital Authority, Hong Kong SAR, People's Republic of China Abstract: Tendon injuries are a common cause of physical disability. They present a clinical challenge to orthopedic surgeons because injured tendons respond poorly to current treatments without tissue regeneration and the time required for rehabilitation is long. New treatment options are required. Stem cell-based therapies offer great potential to promote tendon regeneration due to their high proliferative, synthetic, and immunomodulatory activities as well as their potential to differentiate to the target cell types and undergo genetic modification. In this review, I first recapped the challenges of tendon repair by reviewing the anatomy of tendon. Next, I discussed the advantages and limitations of using different types of stem cells compared to terminally differentiated cells for tendon tissue engineering. The safety and efficacy of application of stem cells and their modified counterparts for tendon tissue engineering were then summarized after a systematic literature search in PubMed. The challenges and future research directions to enhance, optimize, and standardize stem cell-based therapies for augmenting tendon repair were then discussed. Keywords: stem cells, tendon repair, tendon tissue engineering, tendon injuries

  5. No evidence for the use of stem cell therapy for tendon disorders: a systematic review

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    Pas, Haiko I. M. F. L.; Moen, Maarten H.; Haisma, Hidde J.; Winters, Marinus

    2017-01-01

    Stem cells have emerged as a new treatment option for tendon disorders. We systematically reviewed the current evidence for stem cell therapy in tendon disorders. Randomised and non-randomised controlled trials, cohort studies and case series with a minimum of 5 cases were searched in MEDLINE,

  6. No evidence for the use of stem cell therapy for tendon disorders : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, Haiko I M F L; Moen, Maarten H; Haisma, Hidde J; Winters, Marinus

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Stem cells have emerged as a new treatment option for tendon disorders. We systematically reviewed the current evidence for stem cell therapy in tendon disorders. METHODS: Randomised and non-randomised controlled trials, cohort studies and case series with a minimum of 5 cases were

  7. Effects of celecoxib on proliferation and tenocytic differentiation of tendon-derived stem cells

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    Zhang, Kairui; Zhang, Sheng [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Li, Qianqian [Cancer Research Institute, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Yang, Jun [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Department of Orthopaedics, 421 Hospital of PLA, Guangzhou 510318 (China); Dong, Weiqiang [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Department of Orthopaedics, The First Affiliated Hospital to Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Wang, Shengnan; Cheng, Yirong; Al-Qwbani, Mohammed [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Wang, Qiang, E-mail: 1780468505@qq.com [Department of Orthopaedics, Subei People’s Hospital of Jiangsu Province (Clinical Medical College of Yangzhou University), Yangzhou, Jiangsu Province 225001 (China); Yu, Bin, E-mail: carryzhang1985@live.com [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Celecoxib has no effects on TDSCs cell proliferation in various concentrations. • Celecoxib reduced mRNAs levels of tendon associated transcription factor. • Celecoxib reduced mRNAs levels of main tendon associated collagen. • Celecoxib reduced mRNAs levels of tendon associated molecules. - Abstract: NSAIDs are often ingested to reduce the pain and improve regeneration of tendon after tendon injury. Although the effects of NSAIDs in tendon healing have been reported, the data and conclusions are not consistent. Recently, tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) have been isolated from tendon tissues and has been suggested involved in tendon repair. Our study aims to determine the effects of COX-2 inhibitor (celecoxib) on the proliferation and tenocytic differentiation of TDSCs. TDSCs were isolated from mice Achilles tendon and exposed to celecoxib. Cell proliferation rate was investigated at various concentrations (0.1, 1, 10 and 100 μg/ml) of celecoxib by using hemocytometer. The mRNA expression of tendon associated transcription factors, tendon associated collagens and tendon associated molecules were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The protein expression of Collagen I, Collagen III, Scleraxis and Tenomodulin were determined by Western blotting. The results showed that celecoxib has no effects on TDSCs cell proliferation in various concentrations (p > 0.05). The levels of most tendon associated transcription factors, tendon associated collagens and tendon associated molecules genes expression were significantly decreased in celecoxib (10 μg/ml) treated group (p < 0.05). Collagen I, Collagen III, Scleraxis and Tenomodulin protein expression were also significantly decreased in celecoxib (10 μg/ml) treated group (p < 0.05). In conclusion, celecoxib inhibits tenocytic differentiation of tendon-derived stem cells but has no effects on cell proliferation.

  8. Stem cell technology for tendon regeneration: current status, challenges, and future research directions.

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    Lui, Pauline Po Yee

    2015-01-01

    Tendon injuries are a common cause of physical disability. They present a clinical challenge to orthopedic surgeons because injured tendons respond poorly to current treatments without tissue regeneration and the time required for rehabilitation is long. New treatment options are required. Stem cell-based therapies offer great potential to promote tendon regeneration due to their high proliferative, synthetic, and immunomodulatory activities as well as their potential to differentiate to the target cell types and undergo genetic modification. In this review, I first recapped the challenges of tendon repair by reviewing the anatomy of tendon. Next, I discussed the advantages and limitations of using different types of stem cells compared to terminally differentiated cells for tendon tissue engineering. The safety and efficacy of application of stem cells and their modified counterparts for tendon tissue engineering were then summarized after a systematic literature search in PubMed. The challenges and future research directions to enhance, optimize, and standardize stem cell-based therapies for augmenting tendon repair were then discussed.

  9. Multipotent Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Human Subacromial Bursa: Potential for Cell Based Tendon Tissue Engineering

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    Song, Na; Armstrong, April D.; Li, Feng; Ouyang, Hongsheng

    2014-01-01

    Rotator cuff injuries are a common clinical problem either as a result of overuse or aging. Biological approaches to tendon repair that involve use of scaffolding materials or cell-based approaches are currently being investigated. The cell-based approaches are focused on applying multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) mostly harvested from bone marrow. In the present study, we focused on characterizing cells harvested from tissues associated with rotator cuff tendons based on an assumption that these cells would be more appropriate for tendon repair. We isolated MSCs from bursa tissue associated with rotator cuff tendons and characterized them for multilineage differentiation in vitro and in vivo. Human bursa was obtained from patients undergoing rotator cuff surgery and cells within were isolated using collagenase and dispase digestion. The cells isolated from the tissues were characterized for osteoblastic, adipogenic, chondrogenic, and tenogenic differentiation in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that the cells isolated from bursa tissue exhibited MSCs characteristics as evidenced by the expression of putative cell surface markers attributed to MSCs. The cells exhibited high proliferative capacity and differentiated toward cells of mesenchymal lineages with high efficiency. Bursa-derived cells expressed markers of tenocytes when treated with bone morphogenetic protein-12 (BMP-12) and assumed aligned morphology in culture. Bursa cells pretreated with BMP-12 and seeded in ceramic scaffolds formed extensive bone, as well as tendon-like tissue in vivo. Bone formation was demonstrated by histological analysis and immunofluorescence for DMP-1 in tissue sections made from the scaffolds seeded with the cells. Tendon-like tissue formed in vivo consisted of parallel collagen fibres typical of tendon tissues. Bursa-derived cells also formed a fibrocartilagenous tissue in the ceramic scaffolds. Taken together, the results demonstrate a new source of MSCs with a

  10. Characterization of differential properties of rabbit tendon stem cells and tenocytes

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    Wang James

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tendons are traditionally thought to consist of tenocytes only, the resident cells of tendons; however, a recent study has demonstrated that human and mouse tendons also contain stem cells, referred to as tendon stem/progenitor cells (TSCs. However, the differential properties of TSCs and tenocytes remain largely undefined. This study aims to characterize the properties of these tendon cells derived from rabbits. Methods TSCs and tenocytes were isolated from patellar and Achilles tendons of rabbits. The differentiation potential and cell marker expression of the two types of cells were examined using histochemical, immunohistochemical, and qRT-PCR analysis as well as in vivo implantation. In addition, morphology, colony formation, and proliferation of TSCs and tenocytes were also compared. Results It was found that TSCs were able to differentiate into adipocytes, chondrocytes, and osteocytes in vitro, and form tendon-like, cartilage-like, and bone-like tissues in vivo. In contrast, tenocytes had little such differentiation potential. Moreover, TSCs expressed the stem cell markers Oct-4, SSEA-4, and nucleostemin, whereas tenocytes expressed none of these markers. Morphologically, TSCs possessed smaller cell bodies and larger nuclei than ordinary tenocytes and had cobblestone-like morphology in confluent culture whereas tenocytes were highly elongated. TSCs also proliferated more quickly than tenocytes in culture. Additionally, TSCs from patellar tendons formed more numerous and larger colonies and proliferated more rapidly than TSCs from Achilles tendons. Conclusions TSCs exhibit distinct properties compared to tenocytes, including differences in cell marker expression, proliferative and differentiation potential, and cell morphology in culture. Future research should investigate the mechanobiology of TSCs and explore the possibility of using TSCs to more effectively repair or regenerate injured tendons.

  11. Capacity of muscle derived stem cells and pericytes to promote tendon graft integration and ligamentization following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

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    Ćuti, Tomislav; Antunović, Maja; Marijanović, Inga; Ivković, Alan; Vukasović, Andreja; Matić, Igor; Pećina, Marko; Hudetz, Damir

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the capacity of muscle tissue preserved on hamstring tendons forming candy-stripe grafts in order to improve tendon to bone ingrowth and ligamentization. We hypothesized that muscle tissue does possess a stem cell population that could enhance the healing process of the ACL graft when preserved on the tendons. Human samples from gracilis and semitendinosus muscles were collected during ACL surgery from ten patients and from these tissue samples human muscle-derived stem cells and tendon-derived stem cells were isolated and propagated. Both stem cell populations were in-vitro differentiated into osteogenic lineage. Alkaline phosphatase activity was determined at days zero and 14 of the osteogenic induction and von Kossa staining to assess mineralization of the cultures. Total RNA was collected from osteoblast cultures and real time quantitative PCR was performed. Western-blot for osteocalcin and collagen type I followed protein isolation. Immunofluorescence double labeling of pericytes in muscle and tendon tissue was performed. Mesenchymal stem cells from muscle and tendon tissue were isolated and expanded in cell culture. More time was needed to grow the tendon derived culture compared to muscle derived culture. Muscle derived stem cells exhibited more alkaline phosphatase actvity compared to tendon derived stem cells, whereas tendon derived stem cells formed more mineralized nodules after 14 days of osteoinduction. Muscle derived stem cells exhibited higher expression levels of bone sialoprotein, and tendon derived stem cells showed higher expression of dental-matrix-protein 1 and osteocalcin. Immunofluorescent staining against pericytes indicated that they are more abundant in muscle tissue. These results indicate that muscle tissue is a better source of stem cells than tendon tissue. Achievement of this study is proof that there is vast innate capacity of muscle tissue for enhancement of bone-tendon integration and

  12. Isolation and biological characterization of tendon-derived stem cells from fetal bovine.

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    Yang, Jinjuan; Zhao, Qianjun; Wang, Kunfu; Liu, Hao; Ma, Caiyun; Huang, Hongmei; Liu, Yingjie

    2016-09-01

    The lack of appropriate candidates of cell sources for cell transplantation has hampered efforts to develop therapies for tendon injuries, such as tendon rupture, tendonitis, and tendinopathy. Tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) are a type of stem cells which may be used in the treatment of tendon injuries. In this study, TDSCs were isolated from 5-mo-old Luxi Yellow fetal bovine and cultured in vitro and further analyzed for their biological characteristics using immunofluorescence and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays. It was found that primary TDSCs could be expanded for 42 passages in vitro maintaining proliferation. The expressions of stem cell marker nucleostemin and tenocyte-related markers, such as collagen I, collagen II, collagen III, and tenascin-C, were observed on different passage cells by immunofluorescence. The results from RT-PCR show that TDSCs were positive for collagen type I, CD44, tenascin-C, and collagen type III but negative for collagen type II. Meanwhile, TDSC passage 4 was successfully induced to differentiate into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Our results indicate that the fetal bovine TDSCs not only had strong self-renewal capacity but also possess the potential for multi-lineage differentiation. This study provides theoretical basis and experimental foundation for potential therapeutic application of the fetal bovine TDSCs in the treatment of tendon injuries.

  13. Mesenchymal stem cells for tendon healing: what is on the horizon?

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    Veronesi, Francesca; Salamanna, Francesca; Tschon, Matilde; Maglio, Melania; Nicoli Aldini, Nicolo; Fini, Milena

    2017-11-01

    Tendon injuries are a noteworthy morbidity but at present there are few effective scientifically proven treatments. In recent decades, a number of new strategies including tissue engineering with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been proposed to enhance tendon healing. Although MSCs are an interesting and promising approach, many questions regarding their use in tendon repair remain unanswered. This descriptive overview of the literature of the last decade explores the in vivo studies on tendon healing, in small and large animal models, which used MSCs harvested from different tissues, and the state of the art in clinical applications. It was observed that there are still doubts about the optimum amount of MSCs to use and their source and the type of scaffolds to deliver the cells. Thus, further studies are needed to determine the best protocol for MSC use in tendon healing. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Tissue engineering of flexor tendons: the effect of a tissue bioreactor on adipoderived stem cell-seeded and fibroblast-seeded tendon constructs.

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    Angelidis, Ioannis K; Thorfinn, Johan; Connolly, Ian D; Lindsey, Derek; Pham, Hung M; Chang, James

    2010-09-01

    Tissue-engineered flexor tendons could eventually be used for reconstruction of large tendon defects. The goal of this project was to examine the effect of a tissue bioreactor on the biomechanical properties of tendon constructs seeded with adipoderived stem cells (ASCs) and fibroblasts (Fs). Rabbit rear paw flexor tendons were acellularized and seeded with ASCs or Fs. A custom bioreactor applied a cyclic mechanical load of 1.25 N at 1 cycle/minute for 5 days onto the tendon constructs. Three additional groups were used as controls: fresh tendons and tendons reseeded with either ASCs or Fs that were not exposed to the bioreactor treatment and were left in stationary incubation for 5 days. We compared the ultimate tensile stress (UTS) and elastic modulus (EM) of bioreactor-treated tendons with the unloaded control tendons and fresh tendons. Comparison across groups was assessed using one-way analysis of variance with the significance level set at ptendons that were exposed to cyclic load were significantly higher than those of unloaded control tendons. Acellularized tendon constructs that were reseeded with ASCs and exposed to a cyclic load had a UTS of 66.76 MPa and an EM of 906.68 MPa; their unloaded equivalents had a UTS of 47.90 MPa and an EM of 715.57 MPa. Similar trends were found in the fibroblast-seeded tendon constructs that were exposed to the bioreactor treatment. The bioreactor-treated tendons approached the UTS and EM values of fresh tendons. Histologically, we found that cells reoriented themselves parallel to the direction of strain in response to cyclic strain. The application of cyclic strain on seeded tendon constructs that were treated with the bioreactor helped achieve a UTS and an EM comparable with those of fresh tendons. Bioreactor pretreatment and alternative cell lines, such as ASCs and Fs, might therefore contribute to the in vitro production of strong tendon material. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Mesenchymal stem cells modulate release of matrix proteins from tendon surfaces in vitro: a potential beneficial therapeutic effect.

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    Garvican, Elaine R; Dudhia, Jayesh; Alves, Ana-Liz; Clements, Lucy E; Plessis, Francois Du; Smith, Roger K W

    2014-05-01

    Injury of tendons contained within a synovial environment, such as joint, bursa or tendon sheath, frequently fails to heal and releases matrix proteins into the synovial fluid, driving inflammation. This study investigated the effectiveness of cells to seal tendon surfaces and provoke matrix synthesis as a possible effective injectable therapy. Equine flexor tendon explants were cultured overnight in suspensions of bone marrow and synovium-derived mesenchymal stems cells and, as controls, two sources of fibroblasts, derived from tendon and skin, which adhered to the explants. Release of the most abundant tendon extracellular matrix proteins into the media was assayed, along with specific matrix proteins synthesis by real-time PCR. Release of extracellular matrix proteins was influenced by the coating cell type. Fibroblasts from skin and tendon appeared less capable of preventing the release of matrix proteins than mesenchymal stems cells. The source of cell is an important consideration for cell therapy.

  16. Therapeutic Mechanisms of Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Rat Tendon Injury Model.

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    Lee, Sang Yoon; Kwon, Bomi; Lee, Kyoungbun; Son, Young Hoon; Chung, Sun G

    2017-05-01

    Although survival of transplanted stem cells in vivo and differentiation of stem cells into tenocytes in vitro have been reported, there have been no in vivo studies demonstrating that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) could secrete their own proteins as differentiated tenogenic cells. Purpose/Hypothesis: Using a xenogeneic MSC transplantation model, we aimed to investigate whether MSCs could differentiate into the tenogenic lineage and secrete their own proteins. The hypothesis was that human MSCs would differentiate into the human tenogenic lineage and the cells would be able to secrete human-specific proteins in a rat tendon injury model. Controlled laboratory study. The Achilles tendons of 57 Sprague Dawley rats received full-thickness rectangular defects. After the modeling, the defective tendons were randomly assigned to 3 groups: (1) cell group, implantation with human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASCs) and fibrin glue (106 cells in 60 μL); (2) fibrin group, implantation with fibrin glue and same volume of cell media; and (3) sham group, identical surgical procedure without any treatment. Gross observation and biomechanical, histopathological, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot analyses were performed at 2 and 4 weeks after modeling. hASCs implanted into the defective rat tendons were viable for 4 weeks as detected by immunofluorescence staining. Tendons treated with hASCs showed better gross morphological and biomechanical recovery than those in the fibrin and sham groups. Furthermore, the expression of both human-specific collagen type I and tenascin-C was significantly higher in the cell group than in the other 2 groups. Transplantation of hASCs enhanced rat tendon healing biomechanically. hASCs implanted into the rat tendon defect model survived for at least 4 weeks and secreted human-specific collagen type I and tenascin-C. These findings suggest that transplanted MSCs may be able to differentiate into the tenogenic lineage and contribute

  17. Tendon Reattachment to Bone in an Ovine Tendon Defect Model of Retraction Using Allogenic and Xenogenic Demineralised Bone Matrix Incorporated with Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

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    Tanujan Thangarajah

    Full Text Available Tendon-bone healing following rotator cuff repairs is mainly impaired by poor tissue quality. Demineralised bone matrix promotes healing of the tendon-bone interface but its role in the treatment of tendon tears with retraction has not been investigated. We hypothesized that cortical demineralised bone matrix used with minimally manipulated mesenchymal stem cells will result in improved function and restoration of the tendon-bone interface with no difference between xenogenic and allogenic scaffolds.In an ovine model, the patellar tendon was detached from the tibial tuberosity and a complete distal tendon transverse defect measuring 1 cm was created. Suture anchors were used to reattach the tendon and xenogenic demineralised bone matrix + minimally manipulated mesenchymal stem cells (n = 5, or allogenic demineralised bone matrix + minimally manipulated mesenchymal stem cells (n = 5 were used to bridge the defect. Graft incorporation into the tendon and its effect on regeneration of the enthesis was assessed using histomorphometry. Force plate analysis was used to assess functional recovery.Compared to the xenograft, the allograft was associated with significantly higher functional weight bearing at 6 (P = 0.047, 9 (P = 0.028, and 12 weeks (P = 0.009. In the allogenic group this was accompanied by greater remodeling of the demineralised bone matrix into tendon-like tissue in the region of the defect (p = 0.015, and a more direct type of enthesis characterized by significantly more fibrocartilage (p = 0.039. No failures of tendon-bone healing were noted in either group.Demineralised bone matrix used with minimally manipulated mesenchymal stem cells promotes healing of the tendon-bone interface in an ovine model of acute tendon retraction, with superior mechanical and histological results associated with use of an allograft.

  18. Engineered stem cell niche matrices for rotator cuff tendon regenerative engineering.

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    Peach, M Sean; Ramos, Daisy M; James, Roshan; Morozowich, Nicole L; Mazzocca, Augustus D; Doty, Steven B; Allcock, Harry R; Kumbar, Sangamesh G; Laurencin, Cato T

    2017-01-01

    Rotator cuff (RC) tears represent a large proportion of musculoskeletal injuries attended to at the clinic and thereby make RC repair surgeries one of the most widely performed musculoskeletal procedures. Despite the high incidence rate of RC tears, operative treatments have provided minimal functional gains and suffer from high re-tear rates. The hypocellular nature of tendon tissue poses a limited capacity for regeneration. In recent years, great strides have been made in the area of tendonogenesis and differentiation towards tendon cells due to a greater understanding of the tendon stem cell niche, development of advanced materials, improved scaffold fabrication techniques, and delineation of the phenotype development process. Though in vitro models for tendonogenesis have shown promising results, in vivo models have been less successful. The present work investigates structured matrices mimicking the tendon microenvironment as cell delivery vehicles in a rat RC tear model. RC injuries augmented with a matrix delivering rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) showed enhanced regeneration over suture repair alone or repair with augmentation, at 6 and 12-weeks post-surgery. The local delivery of rMSCs led to increased mechanical properties and improved tissue morphology. We hypothesize that the mesenchymal stem cells function to modulate the local immune and bioactivity environment through autocrine/paracrine and/or cell homing mechanisms. This study provides evidence for improved tendon healing with biomimetic matrices and delivered MSCs with the potential for translation to larger, clinical animal models. The enhanced regenerative healing response with stem cell delivering biomimetic matrices may represent a new treatment paradigm for massive RC tendon tears.

  19. Mechanical Loading Improves Tendon-Bone Healing in a Rabbit Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Model by Promoting Proliferation and Matrix Formation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Tendon Cells

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    Fanglong Song

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This study investigated the effect of mechanical stress on tendon-bone healing in a rabbit anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction model as well as cell proliferation and matrix formation in co-culture of bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs and tendon cells (TCs. Methods: The effect of continuous passive motion (CPM therapy on tendon-bone healing in a rabbit ACL reconstruction model was evaluated by histological analysis, biomechanical testing and gene expressions at the tendon-bone interface. Furthermore, the effect of mechanical stretch on cell proliferation and matrix synthesis in BMSC/TC co-culture was also examined. Results: Postoperative CPM therapy significantly enhanced tendon-bone healing, as evidenced by increased amount of fibrocartilage, elevated ultimate load to failure levels, and up-regulated gene expressions of Collagen I, alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, Tenascin C and tenomodulin at the tendon-bone junction. In addition, BMSC/TC co-culture treated with mechanical stretch showed a higher rate of cell proliferation and enhanced expressions of Collagen I, Collagen III, alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, Tenascin C and tenomodulin than that of controls. Conclusion: These results demonstrated that proliferation and differentiation of local precursor cells could be enhanced by mechanical stimulation, which results in enhanced regenerative potential of BMSCs and TCs in tendon-bone healing.

  20. [ISOLATION OF RAT PATELLAR TENDON STEM CELLS AND EFFECT OF MECHANICAL STRETCHING ON Sox-9 EXPRESSION].

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    Qin, Shengnan; Wang, Wen; Fu, Shiquan; Cheng, Yushan; Chen, Honghui; Dong, Fei; Chen, Qiming; Li, Aiguo

    2015-07-01

    To isolate the tendon stem cells (TSCs) from rat patellar tendon and to investigate the effect of mechanical stretching on the expression of Sox-9. TSCs were isolated from Sprague Dawley rat (12 weeks old) patellar tendon by collagenase digestion and low density culture. The cell colony morphology and number were observed by crystal violet staining; the cell morphology was observed by inverted phase contrast microscope, and the immunophenotypes of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were determined by flow cytometry. The TSCs at passage 3 was given the mechanical stretching at 4%, 0.17 Hz for 4 hours and 24 hours in the experimental group, and cells without stretching was used as control. The Sox-9 gene and protein expressions were detected by real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR and Western blot. Primary cells showed clonal growth and star shape; after subculture, cells at passage 1 showed fibroblast-like shape. The cells formed cell colonies after 7 days; the expressions were positive for CD29, CD44, and CD90 and negative for CD45. The result of real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR showed that Sox-9 gene was down-regulated at 4 hours after mechanical stretching compared with control (P Sox-9 protein expression was lower at 4 hours after stretching, but higher at 24 hours after mechanical stretching than that in control group (P Sox-9 expression, but the inhibited effect might stimulate the Sox-9 expression after the mechanical stretching effect disappears.

  1. Mesenchymal stem cells and insulin-like growth factor-I gene-enhanced mesenchymal stem cells improve structural aspects of healing in equine flexor digitorum superficialis tendons.

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    Schnabel, Lauren V; Lynch, Maureen E; van der Meulen, Marjolein C H; Yeager, Amy E; Kornatowski, Matthew A; Nixon, Alan J

    2009-10-01

    Tendinitis remains a catastrophic injury among athletes. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have recently been investigated for use in the treatment of tendinitis. Previous work has demonstrated the value of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) to stimulate cellular proliferation and tendon fiber deposition in the core lesion of tendinitis. This study examined the effects of MSCs, as well as IGF-I gene-enhanced MSCs (AdIGF-MSCs) on tendon healing in vivo. Collagenase-induced bilateral tendinitis lesions were created in equine flexor digitorum superficialis tendons (SDFT). Tendons were treated with 10 x 10(6) MSCs or 10 x 10(6) AdIGF-MSCs. Control limbs were injected with 1 mL of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Ultrasound examinations were performed at t = 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks. Horses were euthanized at 8 weeks and SDFTs were mechanically tested to failure and evaluated for biochemical composition and histologic characteristics. Expression of collagen types I and III, IGF-I, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13), and aggrecanase-1 (ADAMTS-4) were similar in MSC and control tendons. Both MSC and AdIGF-MSC injection resulted in significantly improved tendon histological scores. These findings indicate a benefit to the use of MSCs and AdIGF-MSCs for the treatment of tendinitis. (c) 2009 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells obtained during arthroscopic rotator cuff repair surgery show potential for tendon cell differentiation after treatment with insulin.

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    Mazzocca, Augustus D; McCarthy, Mary Beth R; Chowaniec, David; Cote, Mark P; Judson, Christopher H; Apostolakos, John; Solovyova, Olga; Beitzel, Knut; Arciero, Robert A

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether a one-time physiologic dose of insulin when compared with the growth factors insulin-like growth factor 1, β-fibroblastic growth factor, and growth differentiation factor 5 is capable of differentiating bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into tendon. Eleven patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair consented to undergo aspiration of bone marrow. A dose-response curve was calculated to determine the optimal dose of insulin needed to differentiate MSCs into tendon. After purification of bone marrow in the operating room, MSCs were exposed to either insulin or tendon-inducing growth factors or were left untreated to serve as a control. The potential for MSCs in each of these groups to differentiate into tendon was evaluated with a multistep process that included determination of the genetic upregulation for tendon-specific proteins, confirmation that the levels of these proteins were actually increased, staining of the MSCs with antibodies for these proteins to ensure that they were expressed on the cell surface, and finally, evaluation of cell morphology to verify the MSCs' tendon-like appearance. MSCs treated with insulin showed increased gene expression of tendon-specific markers (P differentiated into cells with characteristics consistent with tendon. The potential for MSCs to differentiate into tendon after a 1-time dose of insulin may assist in developing practical biologic options for augmentation of rotator cuff repairs. Copyright © 2011 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Regeneration of Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tendon Tear After Ultrasound-Guided Injection With Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Rabbit Model

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Gi-Young; Kwon, Dong Rak; Lee, Sang Chul

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic effects of ultrasound-guided human umbilical cord blood (UBC)-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) injection to regenerate a full-thickness subscapularis tendon tear in a rabbit model were studied. Gross morphology and histology of the injected tendon were evaluated, and improvement in functional ability was assessed by motion analysis. Histology revealed that UCB-derived MSCs induced regeneration of the rotator cuff tendon; motion analysis showed improved walking capacity.

  4. Transplantation of tendon-derived stem cells pre-treated with connective tissue growth factor and ascorbic acid in vitro promoted better tendon repair in a patellar tendon window injury rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Pauline Po Yee; Wong, On Tik; Lee, Yuk Wa

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) with connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and ascorbic acid promoted their tenogenic differentiation. We investigated the effects of TDSCs pre-treated with CTGF and ascorbic acid on tendon repair in a patellar tendon window injury rat model. Green fluorescent protein-TDSCs (GFP-TDSCs) were pre-treated with or without CTGF and ascorbic acid for 2 weeks before transplantation. The patellar tendons of rats were injured and divided into three groups: fibrin glue-only group (control group), untreated and treated TDSC group. The rats were followed up until week 16. The treated TDSCs accelerated and enhanced the quality of tendon repair compared with untreated TDSCs up to week 8, which was better than that in the controls up to week 16 as shown by histology, ultrasound imaging and biomechanical test. The fibrils in the treated TDSC group showed better alignment and larger size compared with those in the control group at week 8 (P = 0.004). There was lower risk of ectopic mineralization after transplantation of treated or untreated TDSCs (all P ≤ 0.050). The transplanted cells proliferated and could be detected in the window wound up to weeks 2 to 4 and week 8 for the untreated and treated TDSC groups, respectively. The transplantation of TDSCs promoted tendon repair up to week 16, with CTGF and ascorbic acid pre-treatment showing the best results up to week 8. Pre-treatment of TDSCs with CTGF and ascorbic acid may be used to further enhance the rate and quality of tendon repair after injury. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Human multipotent mesenchymal stem cells improve healing after collagenase tendon injury in the rat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machová-Urdzíková, Lucia; Sedláček, R.; Suchý, T.; Amemori, Takashi; Růžička, Jiří; Lesný, P.; Havlas, V.; Syková, Eva; Jendelová, Pavla

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 42 (2014) ISSN 1475-925X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP304/10/0326; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : Achilles tendon * mesenchymal stromal cells * osteogenesis Subject RIV: FI - Traumatology, Orthopedics Impact factor: 1.427, year: 2014

  6. Human multipotent mesenchymal stem cells improve healing after collagenase tendon injury in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machova Urdzikova, Lucia; Sedlacek, Radek; Suchy, Tomas; Amemori, Takashi; Ruzicka, Jiri; Lesny, Petr; Havlas, Vojtech; Sykova, Eva; Jendelova, Pavla

    2014-04-09

    Mesenchymal stromal cells attract much interest in tissue regeneration because of their capacity to differentiate into mesodermal origin cells, their paracrine properties and their possible use in autologous transplantations. The aim of this study was to investigate the safety and reparative potential of implanted human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs), prepared under Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) conditions utilizing human mixed platelet lysate as a culture supplement, in a collagenase Achilles tendon injury model in rats. Eighty-one rats with collagenase-induced injury were divided into two groups. The first group received human mesenchymal stromal cells injected into the site of injury 3 days after lesion induction, while the second group received saline. Biomechanical testing, morphometry and semiquantitative immunohistochemistry of collagens I, II and III, versican and aggrecan, neovascularization, and hMSC survival were performed 2, 4, and 6 weeks after injury. Human mesenchymal stromal cell-treated rats had a significantly better extracellular matrix structure and a larger amount of collagen I and collagen III. Neovascularization was also increased in hMSC-treated rats 2 and 4 weeks after tendon injury. MTCO2 (Cytochrome c oxidase subunit II) positivity confirmed the presence of hMSCs 2, 4 and 6 weeks after transplantation. Collagen II deposits and alizarin red staining for bone were found in 6 hMSC- and 2 saline-treated tendons 6 weeks after injury. The intensity of anti-versican and anti-aggrecan staining did not differ between the groups. hMSCs can support tendon healing through better vascularization as well as through larger deposits and better organization of the extracellular matrix. The treatment procedure was found to be safe; however, cartilage and bone formation at the implantation site should be taken into account when planning subsequent in vivo and clinical trials on tendinopathy as an expected adverse event.

  7. Aging-related viscoelasticity variation of tendon stem cells (TSCs) characterized by quartz thickness shear mode (TSM) resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huiyan; Zhao, Guangyi; Zu, Hongfei; Wang, James H-C; Wang, Qing-Ming

    2015-04-01

    Aging not only affects the whole body performance but also alters cellular biological properties, including cell proliferation and differentiation. This study was designed to determine the effect of aging on the mechanical properties of tendon stem cells (TSCs), a newly discovered stem cell type in tendons, using quartz thickness shear mode (TSM) resonators. TSCs were isolated from both old and young rats, and allowed to grow to confluency on the surface of TSM resonators. The admittance spectrums of TSM with TSC monolayer were acquired, and a series of complex shear modulus G' + jG″ as well as average thickness hTSC were calculated based on a two-layer-loading transmission line model (TLM) for TSM resonator sensor. The results showed an overall increase in G', G″ and hTSC during aging process. Specifically, the storage modulus G' of aging TSCs was over ten times than that of young, revealing an important increase in stiffness of aging TSCs. Additionally, through phase-contrast and scanning electronic microscopy, it was shown that aging TSCs were large, flat and heterogeneous in morphologies while young TSCs were uniformly elongated. Increased cell size and irregular cell shape might be associated with the dense cytoskeleton organization, which could lead to an increase in both stiffness and viscosity. These results are in agreement with previously published data using different measurement methods, indicating TSM resonator sensor as a promising tool to measure the mechanical properties of cells.

  8. Effect of in vitro passaging on the stem cell-related properties of tendon-derived stem cells-implications in tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Qi; Lui, Pauline Po Yee; Rui, Yun Feng

    2012-03-20

    This study aimed to compare clonogenicity, proliferation, stem cell-related marker expression, senescence, and differentiation potential of rat patellar tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) at early (P5), mid (P10), and late (P20, P30) passages. The clonogenicity of the cells was assessed by colony-forming assay and their proliferative potential was assessed by bromodeoxyuridine assay. The surface expression of CD90 and CD73 was assessed by flow cytometry. The cellular senescence was assessed by β-galactosidase activity. The adipogenic, chondrogenic, and osteogenic differentiation potentials of TDSCs were assessed by standard assays after induction. The mRNA expression of tendon-related markers, scleraxis (Scx) and tenomodulin (Tnmd), was measured by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Both the colony numbers and proliferative potential of TDSCs increased with passaging. Concomitantly, there was significant upregulation of β-galactosidase activity with TDSC passaging. The subculture of TDSCs downregulated the expression of CD90 and CD73. Lipid droplets were formed in the early and mid passages of TDSCs upon adipogenic induction, but were absent in the late passages. The expression of peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma 2 (PPARγ2) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBPα) in TDSCs after adipogenic induction decreased with passaging. Chondrogenesis, proteoglycan deposition, collagen type II protein expression, collagen type 2A1 (Col2AI), and aggrecan (Acan) mRNA expression were less in pellets formed with later passages of TDSCs after chondrogenic induction. The expression of Scx and Tnmd was lower in the late, compared with early and mid, passages of TDSCs. However, matrix mineralization and expression of alkaline phosphatase (Alpl) and osteocalcin (Bglap) mRNA after osteogenic induction increased with TDSC passaging. Researchers and clinicians should consider the changes of stem cell-related properties of

  9. Runx2-Modified Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Promote Tendon Graft Integration in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Ma, Yong; Fu, Xin; Liu, Qiang; Shao, Zhenxing; Dai, Linghui; Pi, Yanbin; Hu, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Jiying; Duan, Xiaoning; Chen, Wenqing; Chen, Ping; Zhou, Chunyan; Ao, Yingfang

    2016-01-08

    Runx2 is a powerful osteo-inductive factor and adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) are multipotent. However, it is unknown whether Runx2-overexpressing ADSCs (Runx2-ADSCs) could promote anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. We evaluated the effect of Runx2-ADSCs on ACL reconstruction in vitro and in vivo. mRNA expressions of osteocalcin (OCN), bone sialoprotein (BSP) and collagen I (COLI) increased over time in Runx2-ADSCs. Runx2 overexpression inhibited LPL and PPARγ mRNA expressions. Runx2 induced alkaline phosphatase activity markedly. In nude mice injected with Runx2-ADSCs, promoted bone formation was detected by X-rays 8 weeks after injection. The healing of tendon-to-bone in a rabbit model of ACL reconstruction treated with Runx2-ADSCs, fibrin glue only and an RNAi targeting Runx2, was evaluated with CT 3D reconstruction, histological analysis and biomechanical methods. CT showed a greater degree of new bone formation around the bone tunnel in the group treated with Runx2-ADSCs compared with the fibrin glue group and RNAi Runx2 group. Histology showed that treatment with Runx2-ADSCs led to a rapid and significant increase at the tendon-to-bone compared with the control groups. Biomechanical tests demonstrated higher tendon pullout strength in the Runx2-ADSCs group at early time points. The healing of the attachment in ACL reconstruction was enhanced by Runx2-ADSCs.

  10. Harmful Effects of Leukocyte-Rich Platelet-Rich Plasma on Rabbit Tendon Stem Cells In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Chen, Shuo; Chang, Peng; Bao, Nirong; Yang, Chao; Ti, Yufan; Zhou, Liwu; Zhao, Jianning

    2016-08-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is now widely used as a promising treatment for patients with tendinopathy. However, the efficacy of PRP treatment for tendinopathy is controversial mainly because of inconsistent results from human clinical trials and particularly because the concentration and effect of leukocytes in PRP remain largely unknown. Leukocyte-rich PRP (L-PRP) inhibits growth factor release, decreases proliferation, and induces nontenocyte differentiation of tendon stem cells (TSCs); increases catabolic cytokine concentrations; and causes inflammation and apoptosis. Thus, L-PRP has a detrimental effect on tendon stem/progenitor cells, which impairs injured tendon healing. Controlled laboratory study. Pure PRP (P-PRP) and L-PRP were prepared from the same individual rabbit blood, and platelet numbers in each PRP product were adjusted to reach the same level. The leukocyte level in L-PRP was 4 and 8 times higher than those in whole blood and P-PRP, respectively. The growth factors in both P-PRP and L-PRP were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. The morphology, stemness, proliferation, and differentiation of TSCs grown in L-PRP and P-PRP were examined by microscopy, immunocytochemistry, population doubling time, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and histological analysis. L-PRP produced lower levels of growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), than did P-PRP. TSC proliferation was significantly decreased in L-PRP in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, TSCs cultured in P-PRP produced more collagen and formed tendon-like tissue; however, TSCs grown in L-PRP differentiated into nontenocytes and produced more inflammatory factors such as membrane-associated prostaglandin synthase (mPGES) and interleukin (IL)-1β. Moreover, L-PRP was associated with increased apoptosis. L-PRP has harmful

  11. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy regenerates the native bone-tendon junction after surgical repair in a degenerative rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffroy Nourissat

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The enthesis, which attaches the tendon to the bone, naturally disappears with aging, thus limiting joint mobility. Surgery is frequently needed but the clinical outcome is often poor due to the decreased natural healing capacity of the elderly. This study explored the benefits of a treatment based on injecting chondrocyte and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC in a new rat model of degenerative enthesis repair. METHODOLOGY: The Achilles' tendon was cut and the enthesis destroyed. The damage was repaired by classical surgery without cell injection (group G1, n = 52 and with chondrocyte (group G2, n = 51 or MSC injection (group G3, n = 39. The healing rate was determined macroscopically 15, 30 and 45 days later. The production and organization of a new enthesis was assessed by histological scoring of collagen II immunostaining, glycoaminoglycan production and the presence of columnar chondrocytes. The biomechanical load required to rupture the bone-tendon junction was determined. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The spontaneous healing rate in the G1 control group was 40%, close to those observed in humans. Cell injection significantly improved healing (69%, p = 0.0028 for G2 and p = 0.006 for G3 and the load-to-failure after 45 days (p<0.05 over controls. A new enthesis was clearly produced in cell-injected G2 and G3 rats, but not in the controls. Only the MSC-injected G3 rats had an organized enthesis with columnar chondrocytes as in a native enthesis 45 days after surgery. CONCLUSIONS: Cell therapy is an efficient procedure for reconstructing degenerative entheses. MSC treatment produced better organ regeneration than chondrocyte treatment. The morphological and biomechanical properties were similar to those of a native enthesis.

  12. Paracrine interactions between mesenchymal stem cells affect substrate driven differentiation toward tendon and bone phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram I Sharma

    Full Text Available We investigated substrate dependent paracrine signaling between subpopulations of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs that may affect the formation, or perhaps malformation, of the regenerating tendon to bone enthesis. Polyacrylamide substrates approximating the elastic modulus of tendon granulation tissue and the osteoid of healing bone (10-90 kPa were functionalized with whole length fibronectin (Fn, type-I collagen (Col, or a mixed ligand solution (Fn/Col, and BMSCs were cultured in growth media alone or media supplemented with soluble Col or Fn. More rigid substrates with a narrow mechanical gradient (70-90 kPa robustly induced osteogenic cell differentiation when functionalized with either Col or Fn. On broader mechanical gradient substrates (with a linear elastic modulus gradient from 10-90 kPa, cell differentiation was markedly osteogenic on subregions of Fn functionalized substrates above 20 kPa, but osteogenic activity was inhibited on all subregions of Col substrates. Osteogenic behavior was not observed when cells were cultured on Fn substrates if Col was present either in the media or on the substrate (Fn/Col. Tenogenic differentiation markers were observed only on Col substrates with moderate rigidity (∼30-50 kPa. Tenogenic differentiation was unaltered by soluble or substrate bound Fn. Co-culture of narrow gradient subsections revealed that any inclusion of tenogenic substrates (30-50 kPa, Col, caused otherwise osteogenic substrates to not develop markers of osteogenic differentiation, while increasing cell proliferation. These apparently paracrine effects could be mediated by bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2, as first confirmed by gene-level expression of BMP-2 and the transcription factor Smad8, and verified by BMP-2 media supplementation at levels similar to observed cell-secreted concentrations, which arrested osteogenic differentiation in 14 day cultures. Thus, cell instructive biomaterials with engineered mechanical and

  13. Comparison of the early period effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and platelet-rich plasma on the Achilles tendon ruptures in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, Serdar; Guleç, M Akif; Gultekin, M Zeki; Adanır, Oktay; Caglar, Aysel; Beytemur, Ozan; Onur Küçükyıldırım, B; Avcı, Ali; Subaşı, Cansu; İnci, Çiğdem; Karaoz, Erdal

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to histopathologically, biomechanically, and immunohistochemically compare the fourth-week efficiencies of local platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (rBM-MSC) treatments of the Achilles tendon ruptures created surgically in rats. The study included 35 12-month-old male Sprague Dawley rats, with an average weight of 400-500 g. Five rats were used as donors for MSC and PRP, and 30 rats were separated into MSC, PRP, and control groups (n = 10). The Achilles tendons of the rats were cut transversely, the MSC from bone marrow was administered to the MSC group, the PRP group received PRP, and the control group received physiological saline to create the same surgical effect. In previous studies, it was shown that this physiological saline does not have any effect on tendon recovery. Thirty days after the treatment, the rats were sacrificed and their Achilles tendons were examined histopathologically, immunohistochemically, and biomechanically. The use of rBM-MSC and PRP in the Achilles tendon ruptures when the tendon is in its weakest phase positively affected the recovery of the tendon in histopathologic, immunohistochemical, and biomechanical manners compared to the control group (p tendon recovery, such as IL2, VEGF, transforming growth factor-beta, and HGF, were significantly higher in the MSC group than those of the PRP and control groups (p tendon and increase its structural strength. The use of PRP and MSC provides hope for the treatment of the Achilles tendon ruptures that limit human beings' functionalities and quality of life, particularly for athletes. It is thought that the use of MSC can be more effective for tendon healing; hence, more extensive and advanced studies are needed on this topic.

  14. MRI-Based Assessment of Intralesional Delivery of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Model of Equine Tendonitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Scharf

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound-guided intralesional injection of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs is held as the benchmark for cell delivery in tendonitis. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the immediate cell distribution following intralesional injection of MSCs. Unilateral superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT lesions were created in the forelimb of six horses and injected with 10 × 106 MSCs labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs under ultrasound guidance. Assays were performed to confirm that there were no significant changes in cell viability, proliferation, migration, or trilineage differentiation due to the presence of SPIOs. Limbs were imaged on a 1.5-tesla clinical MRI scanner postmortem before and after injection to determine the extent of tendonitis and detect SPIO MSCs. Clusters of labeled cells were visible as signal voids in 6/6 subjects. Coalescing regions of signal void were diffusely present in the peritendinous tissues. Although previous reports have determined that local injury retains cells within a small radius of the site of injection, our study shows greater than expected delocalization and relatively few cells retained within collagenous tendon compared to surrounding fascia. Further work is needed if this is a reality in vivo and to determine if directed intralesional delivery of MSCs is as critical as presently thought.

  15. Application of tendon-derived stem cell sheet for the promotion of graft healing in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Pauline Po Yee; Wong, On Tik; Lee, Yuk Wa

    2014-03-01

    Both osteointegration and remodeling of graft midsubstance (collectively called graft healing) are slow processes after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) form a cell sheet after treatment with connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and ascorbic acid, which exhibits higher tenogenic and maintains high chondro-osteogenic gene expression of TDSCs. No external scaffold is required for cell delivery. Wrapping the TDSC sheet around the ACL graft would promote early graft healing in a rat model. Controlled laboratory study. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) rat TDSCs were treated with connective tissue growth factor and ascorbic acid to promote cell sheet formation. Rats undergoing unilateral ACL reconstruction were divided into a control group and a TDSC group. The tendon graft was wrapped with the GFP-TDSC sheet before graft insertion in the TDSC group. At weeks 2, 6, and 12 after reconstruction, the samples were harvested for computed tomography imaging and histologic or biomechanical testing. The fate of the transplanted cell sheet was examined by immunohistochemical staining of GFP. There were significantly higher tunnel bone mineral density (BMD) (42.3% increase, P = .047) and bone volume/total volume (BV/TV) (625% increase, P = .009) at the metaphyseal region of the tibial tunnel at week 2 and at the femoral tunnel at week 6 (BMD: 30.8% increase, P = .014; BV/TV: 100% increase, P = .014) in the TDSC group compared with the control group. Only the TDSC group showed a time-dependent increase in tunnel BMD (overall P = .038) and BV/TV (overall P = .015) at the epiphyseal region of the tibial tunnel. Semiquantitative image analysis showed better graft osteointegration and higher intra-articular graft integrity with lower cellularity and vascularity, better cell alignment, and higher collagen birefringence in the TDSC group. The ultimate load at week 2 (52.5% increase, P = .027) and stiffness at week 6 (62% increase, P

  16. Clinical follow-up of horses treated with allogeneic equine mesenchymal stem cells derived from umbilical cord blood for different tendon and ligament disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Loon, Vic J F; Scheffer, Carmen J W; Genn, Herman J; Hoogendoorn, Arie C; Greve, Jan W

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) offer promise as therapeutic aids in the repair of tendon and ligament disorders in sport horses. Equine allogeneic MSCs derived from umbilical cord blood (eUCB-MSCs) can be obtained in a minimally invasive fashion with successful propagation of MSCs. The objective of this study was to determine the applicability and therapeutic effect of eUCB-MSCs on tendinitis of the superficial digital flexor tendon, desmitis of the suspensory ligament, tendinitis of the deep digital flexor tendon, and desmitis of the inferior check ligament in clinical cases. A retrospective clinical study was performed. At two equine clinics, 52 warmblood horses were treated with cultured eUCB-MSCs between 2009 and 2012. About 2-10 × 10(6) cells per lesion were administered. When a lesion was treated twice, the total amount could run up to 20 × 10(6) cells. Pearson's chi-squared test was used to compare the effect of the injured structure on the success rate, as well as the effect of the age of the horse. Based on repeated examinations, 40 horses (77%) returned to work on the same or a higher level based on information provided by the owner. Neither the injured structure nor the age of the horse had a statistically significant influence on the result. Overall, the results of treatment of some tendon and ligament injuries with eUCB-MSCs in clinical cases are promising.

  17. Proanthocyanidins Attenuation of H2O2-Induced Oxidative Damage in Tendon-Derived Stem Cells via Upregulating Nrf-2 Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenshuang Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Proanthocyanidins (PCs have shown inhibition of oxidative damage by improving Nrf-2 expression in many tissues. However, the cytoprotective effects of PCs on H2O2-induced tendon damage have not been verified. The current study was aimed at assessing the cytoprotection of PCs on the oxidative cellular toxicity of tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs induced by H2O2. The TDSCs were isolated from patellar tendons of Sprague Dawley (SD rats, and the cells after third passage were used for subsequent experiments. The isolated cells were identified by flow cytometry assay and multidifferentiation potential assay. Cell Counting Kit-8 assay was performed to examine cell viability. Real-Time PCR and Western Blot were employed to, respectively, assess the mRNA and protein expressions of Nrf-2, GCLM, NQO-1, and HO-1. PCs significantly improved the cell viability of TDSCs. Furthermore, H2O2 upregulated Nrf-2, GCLM, NQO-1, and HO-1 without significant difference, while the proteins expressions were increased with significant difference in PCs group and PCs + H2O2 cotreated group. All the findings indicated that PCs could protect against the oxidative damage induced by H2O2 in TDSCs, and the cytoprotective effects might be due to the ability of PCs to activate the expressions of GCLM, HO-1, and NQO-1 via upregulating Nrf-2 signaling pathway.

  18. CXCL13 Promotes the Effect of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs on Tendon-Bone Healing in Rats and in C3HIOT1/2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Tian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are potential effective therapy for tissue repair and bone regeneration. In present study, the effects of CXC chemokine ligand-13 (CXCL13 were evaluated on tendon-bone healing of rats. Methods: Tendon bone healing of the rat model was established and biomechanical testing was performed at 2, 4, 8 weeks after surgery. Murine mesenchymal cell line (C3HIOT1/2 cells was cultured. The expression of miRNA-23a was detected by real-time PCR. The protein expression of ERK1/2, JNK and p38 was detected by western blotting. MiR-23a mimic and inhibitor were used to overexpress or silence the expression of miR-23a. Results: MSCs significantly elevated the levels of ultimate load to failure, stiffness and stress in specimens of rats, the effects of which were enhanced by CXCL13. The expression of miR-23a was down-regulated and the protein of ERK1/2 level was up-regulated by CXCL13 treatment in both in vivo and in vitro experiments. ERK1/2 expression was elevated by overexpression of miR-23a and reduced by miR-23a inhibitor. Conclusions: These findings revealed that CXCL13 promoted the tendon-bone healing in rats with MSCs treatment, and implied that the activation of ERK1/2 via miR-23a was involved in the process of MSCs treated bone regeneration.

  19. Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem cells are cells with the potential to develop into many different types of cells in the body. ... the body. There are two main types of stem cells: embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Stem ...

  20. Effect of the application of stem cells for tendon injuries in sporting horses Efecto de la aplicación de células madre en lesiones tendinosas de equinos deportivos

    OpenAIRE

    C Tuemmers; N Rebolledo; R Aguilera

    2012-01-01

    Finding a cure for tendonitis in sporting horses has been a challenge for veterinarians during a long time. Regenerative medicine using stem cells from the patient has emerged as an innovative method that allows breaking the barriers of finding a resolution that can be maintained over time. Additionally, the benefits surpass those of traditional therapies, which do not facilitate full recovery. Bone marrow and adipose tissue have been described as major sources for stem cell extraction. The u...

  1. Distribution and persistence of technetium-99 hexamethyl propylene amine oxime-labelled bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in experimentally induced tendon lesions after intratendinous injection and regional perfusion of the equine distal limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sole, A; Spriet, M; Padgett, K A; Vaughan, B; Galuppo, L D; Borjesson, D L; Wisner, E R; Vidal, M A

    2013-11-01

    Intralesional (i.l.) injection is currently the most commonly used technique for stem cell therapy in equine tendon injury. A comparison of different techniques of injection of mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of tendon lesions is required. We hypothesised that vascular perfusion of the equine distal limb with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) would result in preferential distribution of MSCs to acute tendon injuries. In vivo experimental study. Lesions were surgically induced in forelimb superficial digital flexor tendons of 8 horses. Three or 10 days after lesion induction, technetium-99 hexamethyl propylene amine oxime-labelled MSCs were injected via i.v. or intra-arterial (i.a.) regional limb perfusion (RLP) at the level of the distal antebrachium and compared to i.l. injection. Mesenchymal stem cell persistence and distribution within the forelimb and tendon lesions was assessed with scintigraphy for 24 h. Lesion uptake was higher with i.l. injection than with RLP, but MSC persistence decreased similarly over time in all 3 techniques. Intra-arterial RLP resulted in a better distribution of MSCs and a higher uptake at the lesion site than i.v. RLP. Limbs perfused i.a. on Day 10 showed greater accumulation of MSCs in the lesion than limbs perfused on Day 3. Arterial thrombosis occurred in 50% of the i.v. RLP limbs and in 100% of the i.a. RLP limbs, which led to clinical complications in one horse. Compared with i.l. injection, RLP results in lower uptake but similar persistence of MSCs at the site of tendon lesions. A time dependent accumulation of MSCs was identified with i.a. RLP. The i.a. RLP appears more advantageous than the i.v. RLP in terms of distribution and uptake. However, the described i.a. technique produced arterial thrombosis and thus cannot currently be recommended for clinical use. © 2013 EVJ Ltd.

  2. Hyperuricemic PRP in Tendon Cells

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    I. Andia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet-rich plasma (PRP is injected within tendons to stimulate healing. Metabolic alterations such as the metabolic syndrome, diabetes, or hyperuricemia could hinder the therapeutic effect of PRP. We hypothesise that tendon cells sense high levels of uric acid and this could modify their response to PRP. Tendon cells were treated with allogeneic PRPs for 96 hours. Hyperuricemic PRP did not hinder the proliferative actions of PRP. The gene expression pattern of inflammatory molecules in response to PRP showed absence of IL-1b and COX1 and modest expression of IL6, IL8, COX2, and TGF-b1. IL8 and IL6 proteins were secreted by tendon cells treated with PRP. The synthesis of IL6 and IL8 proteins induced by PRP is decreased significantly in the presence of hyperuricemia (P = 0.017 and P = 0.012, resp.. Concerning extracellular matrix, PRP-treated tendon cells displayed high type-1 collagen, moderate type-3 collagen, decorin, and hyaluronan synthase-2 expression and modest expression of scleraxis. Hyperuricemia modified the expression pattern of extracellular matrix proteins, upregulating COL1 (P = 0.036 and COMP (P = 0.012 and downregulating HAS2 (P = 0.012. Positive correlations between TGF-b1 and type-1 collagen (R = 0.905, P = 0.002 and aggrecan (R = 0.833, P = 0.010 and negative correlations between TGF-b1 and IL6 synthesis (R = −0.857, P = 0.007 and COX2 (R = −0.810, P = 0.015 were found.

  3. Histological and Immunohistochemical Evaluation of Autologous Cultured Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Bone Marrow Mononucleated Cells in Collagenase-Induced Tendinitis of Equine Superficial Digital Flexor Tendon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crovace, Antonio; Lacitignola, Luca; Rossi, Giacomo; Francioso, Edda

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare treatment with cultured bone marrow stromal cells (cBMSCs), bone marrow Mononucleated Cells (BMMNCs), and placebo to repair collagenase-induced tendinitis in horses. In six adult Standardbred horses, 4000 IU of collagenase were injected in the superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT). Three weeks after collagenase treatment, an average of either 5.5 × 106 cBMSCs or 1.2 × 108 BMMNCs, fibrin glue, and saline solution was injected intralesionally in random order. In cBMSC- and BMMNCS-treated tendons, a high expression of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) and type I collagen, but low levels of type III collagen were revealed by immunohistochemistry, with a normal longitudinally oriented fiber pattern. Placebo-treated tendons expressed very low quantities of COMP and type I collagen but large numbers of randomly oriented type III collagen fibers. Both cBMSC and BMMNCS grafts resulted in a qualitatively similar heling improvement of tendon extracellular matrix, in terms of the type I/III collagen ratio, fiber orientation, and COMP expression. PMID:20445779

  4. Cell-material interactions in tendon tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Junxin; Zhou, Wenyan; Han, Shan; Bunpetch, Varitsara; Zhao, Kun; Liu, Chaozhong; Yin, Zi; Ouyang, Hongwei

    2018-01-31

    The interplay between cells and materials is a fundamental topic in biomaterial-based tissue regeneration. One of the principles for biomaterial development in tendon regeneration is to stimulate tenogenic differentiation of stem cells. To this end, efforts have been made to optimize the physicochemical and bio-mechanical properties of biomaterials for tendon tissue engineering. However, recent progress indicated that innate immune cells, especially macrophages, can also respond to the material cues and undergo phenotypical changes, which will either facilitate or hinder tissue regeneration. This process has been, to some extent, neglected by traditional strategies and may partially explain the unsatisfactory outcomes of previous studies; thus, more researchers have turned their focus on developing and designing immunoregenerative biomaterials to enhance tendon regeneration. In this review, we will first summarize the effects of material cues on tenogenic differentiation and paracrine secretion of stem cells. A brief introduction will also be made on how material cues can be manipulated for the regeneration of tendon-to-bone interface. Then, we will discuss the characteristics and influences of macrophages on the repair process of tendon healing and how they respond to different materials cues. These principles may benefit the development of novel biomaterials provided with combinative bioactive cues to activate tenogenic differentiation of stem cells and pro-resolving macrophage phenotype. The progress achieved with the rapid development of biomaterial-based strategies for tendon regeneration has not yielded broad benefits to clinical patients. In addition to the interplay between stem cells and biomaterials, the innate immune response to biomaterials also plays a determinant role in tissue regeneration. Here, we propose that fine-tuning of stem cell behaviors and alternative activation of macrophages through material cues may lead to effective tendon

  5. Tenogenically Induced Allogeneic Peripheral Blood Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Allogeneic Platelet-Rich Plasma: 2-Year Follow-up after Tendon or Ligament Treatment in Horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Beerts

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Poor healing of tendon and ligament lesions often results in early retirement of sport horses. Therefore, regenerative therapies are being explored as potentially promising treatment for these injuries. In this study, an intralesional injection was performed with allogeneic tenogenically induced mesenchymal stem cells and platelet-rich plasma 5–6 days after diagnosis of suspensory ligament (SL (n = 68 or superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT (n = 36 lesion. Clinical, lameness and ultrasonographic evaluation was performed at 6 and 12 weeks. Moreover, a survey was performed 12 and 24 months after treatment to determine how many horses were competing at original level and how many were re-injured. At 6 weeks, 88.2% of SL (n = 68 and 97.3% of SDFT lesions (n = 36 demonstrated moderate ultrasonographic improvement. At 12 weeks, 93.1% of SL (n = 29 and 95.5% of SDFT lesions (n = 22 improved convincingly. Moreover, lameness was abolished in 78.6% of SL (n = 28 and 85.7% (n = 7 of SDFT horses at 12 weeks. After 12 months (n = 92, 11.8% of SL and 12.5% of SDFT horses were re-injured, whereas 83.8 of SL and 79.2% of SDFT returned to previous performance level. At 24 months (n = 89 after treatment, 82.4 (SL and 85.7% (SDFT of the horses returned to previous level of performance. A meta-analysis was performed on relevant published evidence evaluating re-injury 24 months after stem cell-based [17.6% of the SL and 14.3% of the SDFT group (n = 89] versus conventional therapies. Cell therapies resulted in a significantly lower re-injury rate of 18% [95% confidence interval (CI, 0.11–0.25] 2 years after treatment compared to the 44% re-injury rate with conventional treatments (95% CI, 0.37–0.51 based on literature data (P < 0.0001.

  6. Magnesium inhibits the calcification of the extracellular matrix in tendon-derived stem cells via the ATP-P2R and mitochondrial pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Jiaji; Jin, Shanzi; Li, Yaqiang; Zhang, Li; Jiang, Wenwei; Yang, Chunxi; Du, Jiang

    2016-09-09

    Tendon calcification has been widely regarded by researchers to result from the osteogenic differentiation of Tendon-Derived Stem Cells (TDSCs) and ectopic mineralization caused by the calcification of cellular matrix. Recent studies have revealed a correlation between the Mg(2+)/Ca(2+) balance and the degeneration or calcification of tendon tissues. Furthermore, the ATP-P2X/P2Y receptor pathway has been shown to play a decisive role in the process of calcification, with calcium exportation from mitochondria and calcium oscillations potentially representing the cohesive signal produced by this pathway. Our previous study demonstrated that matrix calcification is inhibited by magnesium. In this study, we examined the effects of extracellular Mg(2+) on the deposition of calcium phosphate matrix and cellular pathways in TDSCs. The suppression of the export of calcium from mitochondria has also been detected. We found that a high concentration of extracellular Mg(2+) ([Mg(2+)]e) inhibited the mineralization of the extracellular matrix in TDSCs and that 100 μM ATP reversed this inhibitory effect in vitro. In addition, the spontaneous release of ATP was inhibited by high [Mg(2+)]e levels. A high [Mg(2+)]e suppressed the expression of P2X4, P2X5 and P2X7 and activated the expression of P2Y1, P2Y2, P2Y4 and P2Y14. The interaction between Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) is therefore contradictory, Mg(2+) inhibits mitochondrial calcium concentrations, meanwhile it reverses the opening of mPTP that is induced by Ca(2+). JC-1 staining verified the protective effect of Mg(2+) on mitochondrial membrane potential and the decrease induced by Ca(2+). Taken together, these results indicate that high [Mg(2+)]e interferes with the expression of P2 receptors, resulting in decreased extracellular mineralization. The balance between Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) influences mitochondrial calcium exportation and provides another explanation for the mechanism underlying matrix calcification in TDSCs. Copyright

  7. Porous membrane with reverse gradients of PDGF-BB and BMP-2 for tendon-to-bone repair: in vitro evaluation on adipose-derived stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Hyun Ki; Oh, Se Heang; Lee, Jong Min; Im, Gun Il; Lee, Jin Ho

    2014-03-01

    Polycaprolactone (PCL)/Pluronic F127 membrane with reverse gradients of dual platelet-derived growth factor-β (PDGF-BB) and bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) concentrations was fabricated using a diffusion method to investigate the effect of reverse gradients of dual growth factor concentrations on adipose-derived stem cell (ASC) differentiations, such as tenogenesis and osteogenesis. The PDGF-BB and BMP-2 were continuously released from the membrane for up to 35 days, with reversely increasing/decreasing growth factors along the membrane length. Human ASCs were seeded on the membrane with reverse PDGF-BB and BMP-2 gradients. The cells were confluent after 1 week of culture, regardless of growth factor types or concentrations on the membrane. Gene expression (real-time polymerase chain reaction), Western blot and immunohistological analyses after 1 and 2 weeks of ASC culture showed that the membrane sections with higher PDGF-BB and lower BMP-2 concentrations provided a better environment for ASC tenogenesis, while the membrane sections with higher BMP-2 and lower PDGF-BB concentrations were better for promoting osteogenesis. The results suggest that the membrane with reverse gradients of PDGF-BB and BMP-2 may be promising for tendon-to-bone repair, as most essential biological processes are mediated by gradients of biological molecules in the body. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Types of Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stem Cell Glossary Search Toggle Nav Types of Stem Cells Stem cells are the foundation from which all ... Learn About Stem Cells > Types of Stem Cells Stem cells Stem cells are the foundation for every organ ...

  9. Application of Stem Cells in Orthopedics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Andreas; van Griensven, Martijn; Imhoff, Andreas B.; Buchmann, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell research plays an important role in orthopedic regenerative medicine today. Current literature provides us with promising results from animal research in the fields of bone, tendon, and cartilage repair. While early clinical results are already published for bone and cartilage repair, the data about tendon repair is limited to animal studies. The success of these techniques remains inconsistent in all three mentioned areas. This may be due to different application techniques varying from simple mesenchymal stem cell injection up to complex tissue engineering. However, the ideal carrier for the stem cells still remains controversial. This paper aims to provide a better understanding of current basic research and clinical data concerning stem cell research in bone, tendon, and cartilage repair. Furthermore, a focus is set on different stem cell application techniques in tendon reconstruction, cartilage repair, and filling of bone defects. PMID:22550505

  10. The Tissue-Engineered Tendon-Bone Interface: In Vitro and In Vivo Synergistic Effects of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells, Platelet-Rich Plasma, and Extracellular Matrix Hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGoldrick, Rory; Chattopadhyay, Arhana; Crowe, Christopher; Chiou, Grace; Hui, Kenneth; Farnebo, Simon; Davis, Christopher; Le Grand, Anais; Jacobs, Molly; Pham, Hung; Chang, James

    2017-12-01

    Suboptimal healing of the tendon-bone interface remains an unsolved problem. The authors hypothesized that (1) platelet-rich plasma and prolonged in vitro incubation will produce interface scaffolds with greater reseeding of viable adipose-derived stem cells; and (2) when implanted with extracellular matrix hydrogel, constructs will display superior in vivo strength repair and biocompatibility. Achilles-calcaneal composite tendon-bone interface scaffold grafts were harvested from 30 Wistar rats. After physicochemical decellularization and lyophilization, scaffolds were revitalized in rat plasma or 100% activated rat platelet-rich plasma and reseeded with viable adipose-derived stem cells. For part 2 of the study, 90 Sprague-Dawley rats underwent reconstruction with one of five decellularized, lyophilized scaffold revitalization/reseeding conditions: (1) phosphate-buffered saline; (2) lyophilized, 100% activated platelet-rich plasma; (3) platelet-rich plasma and extracellular matrix hydrogel; (4) platelet-rich plasma and 14-day reseeding with ASC-luc2-eGFP cells; and (5) plasma, reseeding, and hydrogel. In part 1, platelet-rich plasma-revitalized grafts demonstrated greater live viable adipose-derived stem cell loads at 3, 7, and 14 days and total adipose-derived stem cell loads at 7 and 14 days with visibly greater live surface cellularity, layering, migration, and penetration. In part 2, bioluminescence imaging confirmed cell viability to day 22 after implantation. Biomechanical strength testing demonstrated a significant increase in ultimate failure load for reseeded groups compared with all other groups at week 2, whereas only reseeded grafts with hydrogel remained significantly stronger at weeks 4 and 8. Histologic examination demonstrated most increased tendinous cellular invasion and fibrocartilage repopulation at 8 weeks in the reseeded group with hydrogel. Masson trichrome staining demonstrated persistence of the scaffold structure at week 8 and blinded

  11. Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhukar Thakur

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this presentation is to create awareness of stem cell applications in the ISORBE community and to foster a strategy of how the ISORBE community can disseminate information and promote the use of radiolabeled stem cells in biomedical applications. Methods: The continued excitement in Stem Cells, in many branches of basic and applied biomedical science, stems from the remarkable ability of stem cells to divide and develop into different types of cells in the body. Often called as Magic Seeds, stem cells are produced in bone marrow and circulate in blood, albeit at a relatively low concentration. These virtues together with the ability of stem cells to grow in tissue culture have paved the way for their applications to generate new and healthy tissues and to replace diseased or injured human organs. Although possibilities of stem cell applications are many, much remains yet to be understood of these remarkable magic seeds. Conclusion: This presentation shall briefly cover the origin of stem cells, the pros and cons of their growth and division, their potential application, and shall outline some examples of the contributions of radiolabeled stem cells, in this rapidly growing branch of biomedical science

  12. Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommerlund, Julie

    2004-01-01

    '. This paper is about tech-noscience, and about the proliferation of connections and interdependencies created by it.More specifically, the paper is about stem cells. Biotechnology in general has the power to capture the imagination. Within the field of biotechnology nothing seems more provocative...... and tantalizing than stem cells, in research, in medicine, or as products....

  13. Adult Cells Combined With Platelet-Rich Plasma for Tendon Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Azpeitia, Eva; Sánchez, Pello; Delgado, Diego; Andia, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    Background: The combination of cells with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) may fulfill tendon deficits and help overcome the limited ability of tendons to heal. Purpose: To examine the suitability of 3 human cell types in combination with PRP and the potential impact of the tenocyte-conditioned media (CM) to enhance tendon healing. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Tenocytes, bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells, and skin fibroblasts were cultured in 3-dimensional PRP hydrogels supplemented or not with CM, and cell proliferation and migration were examined. The effect of tendon-derived CM on matrix-forming phenotype and secretion of inflammatory proteins was determined through their administration to mesenchymal stem cells, tendon, and skin fibroblasts by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. Results: Differences were found in the matrix-forming phenotype between each of the cell types. The ratio of collagen I:collagen III was greater in bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells than in skin fibroblasts and tenocytes. The bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells expressed increased levels of cartilage-related genes than tenocytes or skin fibroblasts. The presence of the tenocyte-CM stimulated basic healing mechanisms including proliferation and chemotaxis in all cell types. In addition, the tenocyte-CM modified the matrix-forming phenotype of every cell type when cultured in PRP hydrogels. Each cell type secreted interleukin-6, interleukin-8, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 in PRP hydrogels, but mesenchymal stem cells secreted less interleukin-8 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 than tenocytes or skin fibroblasts. Conclusion: The tenocyte-CM combined with PRP stimulated tenogenesis in mesenchymal stem cells and in skin fibroblasts and reduced the secretion of inflammatory proteins. Clinical Relevance: Modifying the target tissue with PRP prior to cell

  14. Learn About Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Handbook Stem Cell Glossary Search Toggle Nav Stem Cell Basics Stem cells are the foundation from which ... original cell’s DNA, cytoplasm and cell membrane. About stem cells Stem cells are the foundation of development in ...

  15. The effect of glucocorticoids on tendon cell viability in human tendon explants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Wai Ting; Chuen Fu, Sai; Man Lee, Kwong

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose Previous studies on the culture of human tenocytes have shown that dexamethasone and triamcino-lone reduce cell viability, suppress cell proliferation, and reduce collagen synthesis. However, such cell cultures lack the extracellular matrix and three-dimensional structure of normal tendons, which affects their response to stimuli. We established a human tendon explant culture system and tested the effects of dexamethasone and triamcinolone on cell viability. Methods Primary human tendon explant cultures were prepared from healthy hamstring tendons. Tendon strips were harvested from hamstring tendons and cultured in 24-well plates in Dulbecco’s modification of Eagle’s Medium (DMEM) supplemented with 2% fetal calf serum. The tendon explants were treated with 0 μM (control), 10 μM, or 100 μM dexamethasone sodium phosphate or 0 μM (control), 10 μM, or 100 μM triamcinolone acetonide in DMEM for 96 h. Cell viability was measured by Alamar blue assay before and after glucocorticoid treatment. Results Incubation with 10 μM and 100 μM dexamethasone reduced cell viability in human tendon explants by 35% and 45%, respectively, as compared to a 6% increase in the controls (p = 0.01, mixed-effects ANOVA). Triamcinolone at 10 μM and 100 μM reduced cell viability by 33% and 36%, respectively, as compared to a 9% increase in the controls (p = 0.07, mixed-effects ANOVA). Interpretation Human tendon explant cultures can be used to study the effects of glucocorticoids on human tendon. Dexamethasone and triamcinolone suppress the cell viability of human tendon in its natural 3-dimensional environment with matrix anchorage. Human tendon explant cultures provide a species-specific model for further investigation of the effects of glucocorticoids on the metabolism of the extracellular matrix of human tendon, and on its mechanical properties. PMID:19421908

  16. Stem Cell Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tips Info Center Research Topics Federal Policy Glossary Stem Cell Information General Information Clinical Trials Funding Information Current ... Basics » Stem Cell Basics I. Back to top Stem Cell Basics I. Introduction: What are stem cells, and ...

  17. Biologics for tendon repair☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docheva, Denitsa; Müller, Sebastian A.; Majewski, Martin; Evans, Christopher H.

    2015-01-01

    Tendon injuries are common and present a clinical challenge to orthopedic surgery mainly because these injuries often respond poorly to treatment and require prolonged rehabilitation. Therapeutic options used to repair ruptured tendons have consisted of suture, autografts, allografts, and synthetic prostheses. To date, none of these alternatives has provided a successful long-term solution, and often the restored tendons do not recover their complete strength and functionality. Unfortunately, our understanding of tendon biology lags far behind that of other musculoskeletal tissues, thus impeding the development of new treatment options for tendon conditions. Hence, in this review, after introducing the clinical significance of tendon diseases and the present understanding of tendon biology, we describe and critically assess the current strategies for enhancing tendon repair by biological means. These consist mainly of applying growth factors, stem cells, natural biomaterials and genes, alone or in combination, to the site of tendon damage. A deeper understanding of how tendon tissue and cells operate, combined with practical applications of modern molecular and cellular tools could provide the long awaited breakthrough in designing effective tendon-specific therapeutics and overall improvement of tendon disease management. PMID:25446135

  18. Exposure of a tendon extracellular matrix to synovial fluid triggers endogenous and engrafted cell death: A mechanism for failed healing of intrathecal tendon injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvican, Elaine R; Salavati, Mazdak; Smith, Roger K W; Dudhia, Jayesh

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of normal synovial fluid (SF) on exposed endogenous tendon-derived cells (TDCs) and engrafted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) within the tendon extracellular matrix. Explants from equine superficial digital flexor (extra-synovial) and deep digital flexor tendons (DDFTs) from the compressed, intra-synovial and the tensile, extra-synovial regions were cultured in allogeneic or autologous SF-media. Human hamstring explants were cultured in allogeneic SF. Explant viability was assessed by staining. Proliferation of equine monolayer MSCs and TDCs in SF-media and co-culture with DDFT explants was determined by alamarblue®. Non-viable Native Tendon matrices (NNTs) were re-populated with MSCs or TDCs and cultured in SF-media. Immunohistochemical staining of tendon sections for the apoptotic proteins caspase-3, -8, and -9 was performed. Contact with autologous or allogeneic SF resulted in rapid death of resident tenocytes in equine and human tendon. SF did not affect the viability of equine epitenon cells, or of MSCs and TDCs in the monolayer or indirect explant co-culture. MSCs and TDCs, engrafted into NNTs, died when cultured in SF. Caspase-3, -8, and -9 expression was the greatest in SDFT explants exposed to allogeneic SF. The efficacy of cells administered intra-synovially for tendon lesion repair is likely to be limited, since once incorporated into the matrix, cells become vlnerable to the adverse effects of SF. These observations could account for the poor success rate of intra-synovial tendon healing following damage to the epitenon and contact with SF, common with most soft tissue intra-synovial pathologies.

  19. The promoting effect of pentadecapeptide BPC 157 on tendon healing involves tendon outgrowth, cell survival, and cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chung-Hsun; Tsai, Wen-Chung; Lin, Miao-Sui; Hsu, Ya-Hui; Pang, Jong-Hwei Su

    2011-03-01

    Pentadecapeptide BPC 157, composed of 15 amino acids, is a partial sequence of body protection compound (BPC) that is discovered in and isolated from human gastric juice. Experimentally it has been demonstrated to accelerate the healing of many different wounds, including transected rat Achilles tendon. This study was designed to investigate the potential mechanism of BPC 157 to enhance healing of injured tendon. The outgrowth of tendon fibroblasts from tendon explants cultured with or without BPC 157 was examined. Results showed that BPC 157 significantly accelerated the outgrowth of tendon explants. Cell proliferation of cultured tendon fibroblasts derived from rat Achilles tendon was not directly affected by BPC 157 as evaluated by MTT assay. However, the survival of BPC 157-treated cells was significantly increased under the H(2)O(2) stress. BPC 157 markedly increased the in vitro migration of tendon fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner as revealed by transwell filter migration assay. BPC 157 also dose dependently accelerated the spreading of tendon fibroblasts on culture dishes. The F-actin formation as detected by FITC-phalloidin staining was induced in BPC 157-treated fibroblasts. The protein expression and activation of FAK and paxillin were determined by Western blot analysis, and the phosphorylation levels of both FAK and paxillin were dose dependently increased by BPC 157 while the total amounts of protein was unaltered. In conclusion, BPC 157 promotes the ex vivo outgrowth of tendon fibroblasts from tendon explants, cell survival under stress, and the in vitro migration of tendon fibroblasts, which is likely mediated by the activation of the FAK-paxillin pathway.

  20. Potency of Stem Cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Potency of Stem Cells. Totipotent Stem Cells (Zygote + first 2 divisions). -Can form placenta, embryo, and any cell of the body. Pluripotent (Embryonic Stem Cells). -Can form any cell of the body but can not form placenta, hence no embryo. Multipotent (Adult stem cells).

  1. Giant cell tumour of extensor tendon sheath: Preventing recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S S Shirol

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant Cell Tumour of tendon sheath is relatively rare tumour with an overall incidence of around 1 in 50,000 individuals. Marginal excision of giant cell tumour of the tendon sheath is the treatment of choice. It is also the commonest hand lesion to recur after excision. The incidence of local recurrence is high, ranging from 9-44%. Here we present a case report of a giant cell tumour of extensor tendon sheath in hand which was successfully treated with special emphasis on ways of prevention of recurrence.

  2. In Vivo Study of Ligament-Bone Healing after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using Autologous Tendons with Mesenchymal Stem Cells Affinity Peptide Conjugated Electrospun Nanofibrous Scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxian Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrospinning nanofibrous scaffold was commonly used in tissue regeneration recently. Nanofibers with specific topological characteristics were reported to be able to induce osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. In this in vivo study, autologous tendon grafts with lattice-like nanofibrous scaffold wrapping at two ends of autologous tendon were used to promote early stage of ligament-bone healing after rabbit ACL reconstruction. To utilize native MSCs from bone marrow, an MSCs specific affinity peptide E7 was conjugated to nanofibrous meshes. After 3 months, H-E assessment and specific staining of collagen type I, II, and III showed direct ligament-bone insertion with typical four zones (bone, calcified fibrocartilage, fibrocartilage, and ligament in bioactive scaffold reconstruction group. Diameters of bone tunnel were smaller in nanofibrous scaffold conjugated E7 peptide group than those in control group. The failure load of substitution complex also indicated a stronger ligament-bone insertion healing using bioactive scaffold. In conclusion, lattice-like nanofibrous scaffold with specific MSCs affinity peptide has great potential in promoting early stage of ligament-bone healing after ACL reconstruction.

  3. Fish Stem Cell Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Ni; Li, Zhendong; Hong, Yunhan

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells have the potential for self-renewal and differentiation. First stem cell cultures were derived 30 years ago from early developing mouse embryos. These are pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells. Efforts towards ES cell derivation have been attempted in other mammalian and non-mammalian species. Work with stem cell culture in fish started 20 years ago. Laboratory fish species, in particular zebrafish and medaka, have been the focus of research towards stem cell cultures. Medaka is th...

  4. Tendon progenitor cells in injured tendons have strong chondrogenic potential: the CD105-negative subpopulation induces chondrogenic degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Shuji; Otsuru, Satoru; Candela, Maria Elena; Cantley, Leslie; Uchibe, Kenta; Hofmann, Ted J; Zhang, Kairui; Wapner, Keith L; Soslowsky, Louis J; Horwitz, Edwin M; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2014-12-01

    To study the cellular mechanism of the tendon repair process, we used a mouse Achilles tendon injury model to focus on the cells recruited to the injured site. The cells isolated from injured tendon 1 week after the surgery and uninjured tendons contained the connective tissue progenitor populations as determined by colony-forming capacity, cell surface markers, and multipotency. When the injured tendon-derived progenitor cells (inTPCs) were transplanted into injured Achilles tendons, they were not only integrated in the regenerating area expressing tenogenic phenotype but also trans-differentiated into chondrogenic cells in the degenerative lesion that underwent ectopic endochondral ossification. Surprisingly, the micromass culture of the inTPCs rapidly underwent chondrogenic differentiation even in the absence of exogenous bone morphogenetic proteins or TGFβs. The cells isolated from human ruptured tendon tissues also showed connective tissue progenitor properties and exhibited stronger chondrogenic ability than bone marrow stromal cells. The mouse inTPCs contained two subpopulations one positive and one negative for CD105, a coreceptor of the TGFβ superfamily. The CD105-negative cells showed superior chondrogenic potential in vitro and induced larger chondroid degenerative lesions in mice as compared to the CD105-positive cells. These findings indicate that tendon progenitor cells are recruited to the injured site of tendons and have a strong chondrogenic potential and that the CD105-negative population of these cells would be the cause for chondroid degeneration in injured tendons. The newly identified cells recruited to the injured tendon may provide novel targets to develop therapeutic strategies to facilitate tendon repair. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  5. Stem Cell Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Werner, Eric

    2016-01-01

    We present a general computational theory of stem cell networks and their developmental dynamics. Stem cell networks are special cases of developmental control networks. Our theory generates a natural classification of all possible stem cell networks based on their network architecture. Each stem cell network has a unique topology and semantics and developmental dynamics that result in distinct phenotypes. We show that the ideal growth dynamics of multicellular systems generated by stem cell ...

  6. Tracking adult stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snippert, H.J.G.; Clevers, H.

    2011-01-01

    The maintenance of stem-cell-driven tissue homeostasis requires a balance between the generation and loss of cell mass. Adult stem cells have a close relationship with the surrounding tissue--known as their niche--and thus, stem-cell studies should preferably be performed in a physiological context,

  7. Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... transplant is a procedure that infuses healthy blood stem cells into your body to replace your damaged or ... A bone marrow transplant is also called a stem cell transplant. A bone marrow transplant may be necessary ...

  8. Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Graft-versus-host disease: A potential risk when stem cells come from donors If you receive a transplant ... medications and blood products into your body. Collecting stem cells for transplant If a transplant using your own ...

  9. Living nanofiber yarn-based woven biotextiles for tendon tissue engineering using cell tri-culture and mechanical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaohua; Wang, Ying; Streubel, Philipp N; Duan, Bin

    2017-10-15

    Non-woven nanofibrous scaffolds have been developed for tendon graft application by using electrospinning strategies. However, electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds face some obstacles and limitations, including suboptimal scaffold structure, weak tensile and suture-retention strengths, and compact structure for cell infiltration. In this work, a novel nanofibrous, woven biotextile, fabricated based on electrospun nanofiber yarns, was implemented as a tissue engineered tendon scaffold. Based on our modified electrospinning setup, polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofiber yarns were fabricated with reproducible quality, and were further processed into plain-weaving fabrics interlaced with polylactic acid (PLA) multifilaments. Nonwoven nanofibrous PCL meshes with random or aligned fiber structures were generated using typical electrospinning as comparative counterparts. The woven fabrics contained 3D aligned microstructures with significantly larger pore size and obviously enhanced tensile mechanical properties than their nonwoven counterparts. The biological results revealed that cell proliferation and infiltration, along with the expression of tendon-specific genes by human adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (HADMSC) and human tenocytes (HT), were significantly enhanced on the woven fabrics compared with those on randomly-oriented or aligned nanofiber meshes. Co-cultures of HADMSC with HT or human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) on woven fabrics significantly upregulated the functional expression of most tenogenic markers. HADMSC/HT/HUVEC tri-culture on woven fabrics showed the highest upregulation of most tendon-associated markers than all the other mono- and co-culture groups. Furthermore, we conditioned the tri-cultured constructs with dynamic conditioning and demonstrated that dynamic stretch promoted total collagen secretion and tenogenic differentiation. Our nanofiber yarn-based biotextiles have significant potential to be used as engineered scaffolds to

  10. Plant stem cell niches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aichinger, Ernst; Kornet, Noortje; Friedrich, Thomas; Laux, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Multicellular organisms possess pluripotent stem cells to form new organs, replenish the daily loss of cells, or regenerate organs after injury. Stem cells are maintained in specific environments, the stem cell niches, that provide signals to block differentiation. In plants, stem cell niches are situated in the shoot, root, and vascular meristems-self-perpetuating units of organ formation. Plants' lifelong activity-which, as in the case of trees, can extend over more than a thousand years-requires that a robust regulatory network keep the balance between pluripotent stem cells and differentiating descendants. In this review, we focus on current models in plant stem cell research elaborated during the past two decades, mainly in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We address the roles of mobile signals on transcriptional modules involved in balancing cell fates. In addition, we discuss shared features of and differences between the distinct stem cell niches of Arabidopsis.

  11. Mesenchymal stem cells avoid allogeneic rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy J Mary

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Adult bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells offer the potential to open a new frontier in medicine. Regenerative medicine aims to replace effete cells in a broad range of conditions associated with damaged cartilage, bone, muscle, tendon and ligament. However the normal process of immune rejection of mismatched allogeneic tissue would appear to prevent the realisation of such ambitions. In fact mesenchymal stem cells avoid allogeneic rejection in humans and in animal models. These finding are supported by in vitro co-culture studies. Three broad mechanisms contribute to this effect. Firstly, mesenchymal stem cells are hypoimmunogenic, often lacking MHC-II and costimulatory molecule expression. Secondly, these stem cells prevent T cell responses indirectly through modulation of dendritic cells and directly by disrupting NK as well as CD8+ and CD4+ T cell function. Thirdly, mesenchymal stem cells induce a suppressive local microenvironment through the production of prostaglandins and interleukin-10 as well as by the expression of indoleamine 2,3,-dioxygenase, which depletes the local milieu of tryptophan. Comparison is made to maternal tolerance of the fetal allograft, and contrasted with the immune evasion mechanisms of tumor cells. Mesenchymal stem cells are a highly regulated self-renewing population of cells with potent mechanisms to avoid allogeneic rejection.

  12. Stress and stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tower, John

    2012-01-01

    The unique properties and functions of stem cells make them particularly susceptible to stresses and also lead to their regulation by stress. Stem cell division must respond to the demand to replenish cells during normal tissue turnover as well as in response to damage. Oxidative stress, mechanical stress, growth factors, and cytokines signal stem cell division and differentiation. Many of the conserved pathways regulating stem cell self-renewal and differentiation are also stress-response pathways. The long life span and division potential of stem cells create a propensity for transformation (cancer) and specific stress responses such as apoptosis and senescence act as antitumor mechanisms. Quiescence regulated by CDK inhibitors and a hypoxic niche regulated by FOXO transcription factor function to reduce stress for several types of stem cells to facilitate long-term maintenance. Aging is a particularly relevant stress for stem cells, because repeated demands on stem cell function over the life span can have cumulative cell-autonomous effects including epigenetic dysregulation, mutations, and telomere erosion. In addition, aging of the organism impairs function of the stem cell niche and systemic signals, including chronic inflammation and oxidative stress. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Increased mast cell numbers in a calcaneal tendon overuse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pingel, Jessica; Wienecke, Jacob; Kongsgaard Madsen, Mads

    2013-01-01

    Tendinopathy is often discovered late because the initial development of tendon pathology is asymptomatic. The aim of this study was to examine the potential role of mast cell involvement in early tendinopathy using a high-intensity uphill running (HIUR) exercise model. Twenty-four male Wistar ra...

  14. Stem Cell Information: Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it is called a fetus . Embryoid bodies - Rounded collections of cells that arise when embryonic stem cells ... dividing without differentiating for a prolonged period in culture, and are known to develop into cells and ...

  15. Dazlin' pluripotent stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welling, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can be isolated from the inner cell mass (ICM) of blastocyst embryos and differentiate into all three germ layers in vitro. However, despite their similar origin, mouse embryonic stem cells represent a more naïve ICM-like pluripotent state whereas human

  16. Aneuploidy in stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia-Martinez, Jorge; Bakker, Bjorn; Schukken, Klaske M; Simon, Judith E; Foijer, Floris

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells hold enormous promise for regenerative medicine as well as for engineering of model systems to study diseases and develop new drugs. The discovery of protocols that allow for generating induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs) from somatic cells has brought this promise steps closer to

  17. Scleraxis-Lineage Cells Contribute to Ectopic Bone Formation in Muscle and Tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Shailesh; Loder, Shawn J; Cholok, David; Peterson, Joshua; Li, John; Breuler, Christopher; Cameron Brownley, R; Hsin Sung, Hsiao; Chung, Michael T; Kamiya, Nobuhiro; Li, Shuli; Zhao, Bin; Kaartinen, Vesa; Davis, Thomas A; Qureshi, Ammar T; Schipani, Ernestina; Mishina, Yuji; Levi, Benjamin

    2017-03-01

    The pathologic development of heterotopic ossification (HO) is well described in patients with extensive trauma or with hyperactivating mutations of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptor ACVR1. However, identification of progenitor cells contributing to this process remains elusive. Here we show that connective tissue cells contribute to a substantial amount of HO anlagen caused by trauma using postnatal, tamoxifen-inducible, scleraxis-lineage restricted reporter mice (Scx-creERT2/tdTomato fl/fl ). When the scleraxis-lineage is restricted specifically to adults prior to injury marked cells contribute to each stage of the developing HO anlagen and coexpress markers of endochondral ossification (Osterix, SOX9). Furthermore, these adult preinjury restricted cells coexpressed mesenchymal stem cell markers including PDGFRα, Sca1, and S100A4 in HO. When constitutively active ACVR1 (caACVR1) was expressed in scx-cre cells in the absence of injury (Scx-cre/caACVR1 fl/fl ), tendons and joints formed HO. Postnatal lineage-restricted, tamoxifen-inducible caACVR1 expression (Scx-creERT2/caACVR1 fl/fl ) was sufficient to form HO after directed cardiotoxin-induced muscle injury. These findings suggest that cells expressing scleraxis within muscle or tendon contribute to HO in the setting of both trauma or hyperactive BMP receptor (e.g., caACVR1) activity. Stem Cells 2017;35:705-710. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  18. Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath: A review | al Kadi | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Tumors of hand are uncommon entities. Giant Cell Tumour of Tendon Sheath (GCTTS) is the second most common soft tissue tumour, next only to ganglion cysts. Method and Result: We report two cases of giant cell tumours of tendon sheath. One arose from the flexor tendon in the palm of a 22 years old ...

  19. Stem Cells in Neuroendocrinology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pfaff, Donald; Christen, Yves

    2016-01-01

    This volume starts with an elementary introduction covering stem cell methodologies used to produce specific types of neurons, possibilities for their therapeutic use, and warnings of technical problems...

  20. Cancer stem cell metabolism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peiris-Pagès, Maria; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Pestell, Richard G; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    .... Cancer stem cells also seem to adapt their metabolism to microenvironmental changes by conveniently shifting energy production from one pathway to another, or by acquiring intermediate metabolic phenotypes...

  1. Epidermal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Köse

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The epidermis is the outermost layer of the human skin and comprises a multilayered epithelium, the interfollicular epidermis, with associated hair follicles, sebaceous glands, and eccrine sweat glands. There are many origins of stem cells in the skin and skin appendages. These stem cells are localized in different part of the pilosebaseous units and also express many different genes. Epidermal stem cells in the pilosebaseous units not only ensure the maintenance of epidermal homeostasis and hair regeneration, but also contribute to repair of the epidermis after injury. In recent years, human induced pluripotent skin stem cells are produced from the epidermal cells such as keratinocytes, fibroblasts and melanocytes. These cells can be transdifferentiated to embriyonic stem cells. Human induced pluripotent stem cells have potential applications in cell replacement therapy and regenerative medicine. These cells provide a means to create valuable tools for basic research and may also produce a source of patient-matched cells for regenerative therapies. In this review, we aimed an overview of epidermal stem cells for better understanding their functions in the skin. Skin will be main organ for using the epidermal cells for regenerative medicine in near future.

  2. Fish Stem Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ni; Li, Zhendong; Hong, Yunhan

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells have the potential for self-renewal and differentiation. First stem cell cultures were derived 30 years ago from early developing mouse embryos. These are pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells. Efforts towards ES cell derivation have been attempted in other mammalian and non-mammalian species. Work with stem cell culture in fish started 20 years ago. Laboratory fish species, in particular zebrafish and medaka, have been the focus of research towards stem cell cultures. Medaka is the second organism that generated ES cells and the first that gave rise to a spermatogonial stem cell line capable of test-tube sperm production. Most recently, the first haploid stem cells capable of producing whole animals have also been generated from medaka. ES-like cells have been reported also in zebrafish and several marine species. Attempts for germline transmission of ES cell cultures and gene targeting have been reported in zebrafish. Recent years have witnessed the progress in markers and procedures for ES cell characterization. These include the identification of fish homologs/paralogs of mammalian pluripotency genes and parameters for optimal chimera formation. In addition, fish germ cell cultures and transplantation have attracted considerable interest for germline transmission and surrogate production. Haploid ES cell nuclear transfer has proven in medaka the feasibility of semi-cloning as a novel assisted reproductive technology. In this special issue on “Fish Stem Cells and Nuclear Transfer”, we will focus our review on medaka to illustrate the current status and perspective of fish stem cells in research and application. We will also mention semi-cloning as a new development to conventional nuclear transfer. PMID:21547056

  3. Fish stem cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ni; Li, Zhendong; Hong, Yunhan

    2011-04-13

    Stem cells have the potential for self-renewal and differentiation. First stem cell cultures were derived 30 years ago from early developing mouse embryos. These are pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells. Efforts towards ES cell derivation have been attempted in other mammalian and non-mammalian species. Work with stem cell culture in fish started 20 years ago. Laboratory fish species, in particular zebrafish and medaka, have been the focus of research towards stem cell cultures. Medaka is the second organism that generated ES cells and the first that gave rise to a spermatogonial stem cell line capable of test-tube sperm production. Most recently, the first haploid stem cells capable of producing whole animals have also been generated from medaka. ES-like cells have been reported also in zebrafish and several marine species. Attempts for germline transmission of ES cell cultures and gene targeting have been reported in zebrafish. Recent years have witnessed the progress in markers and procedures for ES cell characterization. These include the identification of fish homologs/paralogs of mammalian pluripotency genes and parameters for optimal chimera formation. In addition, fish germ cell cultures and transplantation have attracted considerable interest for germline transmission and surrogate production. Haploid ES cell nuclear transfer has proven in medaka the feasibility of semi-cloning as a novel assisted reproductive technology. In this special issue on "Fish Stem Cells and Nuclear Transfer", we will focus our review on medaka to illustrate the current status and perspective of fish stem cells in research and application. We will also mention semi-cloning as a new development to conventional nuclear transfer.

  4. What are Stem Cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadshah Farhat

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available   Stem cells are undifferentiated self regenerating multi potential cells. There are three types of stem cells categories by the ability to form after cells and correlated with the body’s development process. Totipotent: these stem cells can form an entire organism such as fertilized egg. Ploripotent: ploripotent cells are those that can form any cell in the body but cannot form an entire organism such as developing embryo’s totipotent cells become ploripotent  Multipotent: Multi potent stem cells are those that can only form specific cells in the body such as blood cells based. Based on the sources of stem cells we have three types of these cells: Autologous: Sources of the patient own cells are (Autologous either the cells from patient own body or his or her cord blood. For this type of transplant the physician now usually collects the periphery rather than morrow because the procedure is easier on like a bane morrow harvest it take place outside of an operating room, and the patient does not to be under general unsetting . Allogenic: Sources of stem cells from another donore are primarily relatives (familial allogenic or completely unrelated donors. Xenogenic: In these stem cells from different species are transplanted e .g striatal porcine fetal mesan cephalic (FVM xenotransplants for Parkinson’s disease. On sites of isolation such as embryo, umbilical cord and other body tissues stem cells are named embnyonic, cord blood, and adult stem cells. The scope of results and clinical application of stem cells are such as: Neurodegenerative conditions (MS,ALS, Parkinson’s, Stroke, Ocular disorders- Glaucoma, retinitis Pigmentosa (RP, Auto Immune Conditions (Lupus, MS,R. arthritis, Diabetes, etc, Viral Conditions (Hepatitis C and AIDS, Heart Disease, Adrenal Disorders, Injury(Nerve, Brain, etc, Anti aging (hair, skin, weight control, overall well being/preventive, Emotional disorders, Organ / Tissue Cancers, Blood cancers, Blood diseases

  5. Cancer stem cells revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batlle, Eduard; Clevers, Hans

    2017-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) concept was proposed four decades ago, and states that tumor growth, analogous to the renewal of healthy tissues, is fueled by small numbers of dedicated stem cells. It has gradually become clear that many tumors harbor CSCs in dedicated niches, and yet their

  6. Stem Cell Transplants (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Situations Talking to Your Parents - or Other Adults Stem Cell Transplants KidsHealth > For Teens > Stem Cell Transplants Print ... Does it Take to Recover? Coping What Are Stem Cells? As you probably remember from biology class, every ...

  7. Skeletal (stromal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem M; Kermani, Abbas Jafari; Zaher, Walid

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal (marrow stromal) stem cells (BMSCs) are a group of multipotent cells that reside in the bone marrow stroma and can differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes and adipocytes. Studying signaling pathways that regulate BMSC differentiation into osteoblastic cells is a strategy....../preadipocyte factor 1 (Dlk1/Pref-1), the Wnt co-receptor Lrp5 and intracellular kinases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Stem Cells and Bone....

  8. Viability and proliferation of pluripotential cells delivered to tendon repair sites using bioactive sutures--an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jeffrey; Korotkova, Tatiana; Smith, R Lane

    2011-02-01

    We evaluated the fate of pluripotential stem cells adherent to a suture carrier after being passed through tendon tissue in vitro. FiberWire suture segments were coated with poly-L-lysine (PLL) and a 2 × 10(6) C3H10T1/2 (a mouse embryo pluripotential cell line) cell suspension. The sutures were incubated for 7 days, passed through two 1-cm segments of acellularized rabbit Achilles tendons and tied (horizontal mattress). The repairs were frozen and sectioned (6 μm). The sections were stained with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole and a live/dead viability/cytotoxicity (calcein/ethidium homodimer) kit and examined with fluorescent microscopy to evaluate cell presence and viability. Alamar Blue was used in parallel to assess metabolic activity. PLL-coated sutures showed a 3-fold increase in fluorescence when compared with the phosphate-buffered saline-coated controls. At day 3, fluorescence was 2.2 times greater. At day 5, a 2-fold increase was found, and at day 8 there was no significant difference in values. Furthermore, after delivery of the cells into tendon, fluorescence readings for the samples (n = 19) showed 9450 compared with the positive control at 21,218. At 96 hours the mean was 27,609 compared with 34,850 for the positive control. The difference in fluorescence means at 48 hours and 96 hours were significant (p cells at the tendon repair site. Sutures seeded with pluripotential embryonic cells deliver cells to a tendon repair site. The cells deposited at the repair site survive the trauma of passage and remain metabolically active, as seen in staining and metabolic assay studies. Use of bioactive sutures leads to repopulation of the acellular zone surrounding sutures within the tendon. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Hematopoietic Stem Cells Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivu-Economescu, Mihaela; Rubach, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapies are recognized as a new way to treat various diseases and injuries, with a wide range of health benefits. The goal is to heal or replace diseased or destroyed organs or body parts with healthy new cells provided by stem cell transplantation. The current practical form of stem cell therapy is the hematopoietic stem cells transplant applied for the treatment of hematological disorders. There are over 2100 clinical studies in progress concerning hematopoietic stem cell therapies. All of them are using hematopoietic stem cells to treat various diseases like: cancers, leukemia, lymphoma, cardiac failure, neural disorders, auto-immune diseases, immunodeficiency, metabolic or genetic disorders. Several challenges are to be addressed prior to developing and applying large scale cell therapies: 1) to explain and control the mechanisms of differentiation and development toward a specific cell type needed to treat the disease, 2) to obtain a sufficient number of desired cell type for transplantation, 3) to overcome the immune rejection and 4) to show that transplanted cells fulfill their normal functions in vivo after transplants. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. Gastric Epithelial Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    MILLS, JASON C.; SHIVDASANI, RAMESH A.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of stem cells in the gastrointestinal tract include the identification of molecular markers of stem and early progenitor cells in the small intestine. Although gastric epithelial stem cells have been localized, little is known about their molecular biology. Recent reports describe the use of inducible Cre recombinase activity to indelibly label candidate stem cells and their progeny in the distal stomach, (ie, the antrum and pylorus). No such lineage labeling of epithelial stem cells has been reported in the gastric body (corpus). Among stem cells in the alimentary canal, those of the adult corpus are unique in that they lie close to the lumen and increase proliferation following loss of a single mature progeny lineage, the acid-secreting parietal cell. They are also unique in that they neither depend on Wnt signaling nor express the surface marker Lgr5. Because pathogenesis of gastric adenocarcinoma has been associated with abnormal patterns of gastric differentiation and with chronic tissue injury, there has been much research on the response of stomach epithelial stem cells to inflammation. Chronic inflammation, as induced by infection with Helicobacter pylori, affects differentiation and promotes metaplasias. Several studies have identified cellular and molecular mechanisms in spasmolytic polypeptide–expressing (pseudopyloric) metaplasia. Researchers have also begun to identify signaling pathways and events that take place during embryonic development that eventually establish the adult stem cells to maintain the specific features and functions of the stomach mucosa. We review the cytologic, molecular, functional, and developmental properties of gastric epithelial stem cells. PMID:21144849

  11. Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath: Spectrum of radiologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasick, D.; Karasick, S. (Jefferson Medical Coll., Philadelphia, PA (United States) Thomas Jefferson Univ. Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States))

    1992-05-01

    Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath is the second most common tumor of the hand. It can also occur in larger joints. Radiologic features include a soft-tissue mass with or without osseous erosion. Less commonly, it can cause periostitis or permeative osseous invasion; it may rarely calcify. The entire imaging spectrum of this lesion is presented, with emphasis on atypical appearances which can mimic other lesions. (orig.).

  12. Do cells contribute to tendon and ligament biomechanics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Hammer

    Full Text Available Acellular scaffolds are increasingly used for the surgical repair of tendon injury and ligament tears. Despite this increased use, very little data exist directly comparing acellular scaffolds and their native counterparts. Such a comparison would help establish the effectiveness of the acellularization procedure of human tissues. Furthermore, such a comparison would help estimate the influence of cells in ligament and tendon stability and give insight into the effects of acellularization on collagen.Eighteen human iliotibial tract samples were obtained from nine body donors. Nine samples were acellularized with sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS, while nine counterparts from the same donors remained in the native condition. The ends of all samples were plastinated to minimize material slippage. Their water content was adjusted to 69%, using the osmotic stress technique to exclude water content-related alterations of the mechanical properties. Uniaxial tensile testing was performed to obtain the elastic modulus, ultimate stress and maximum strain. The effectiveness of the acellularization procedure was histologically verified by means of a DNA assay.The histology samples showed a complete removal of the cells, an extensive, yet incomplete removal of the DNA content and alterations to the extracellular collagen. Tensile properties of the tract samples such as elastic modulus and ultimate stress were unaffected by acellularization with the exception of maximum strain.The data indicate that cells influence the mechanical properties of ligaments and tendons in vitro to a negligible extent. Moreover, acellularization with SDS alters material properties to a minor extent, indicating that this method provides a biomechanical match in ligament and tendon reconstruction. However, the given protocol insufficiently removes DNA. This may increase the potential for transplant rejection when acellular tract scaffolds are used in soft tissue repair. Further research

  13. Transcription factor EGR1 directs tendon differentiation and promotes tendon repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerquin, Marie-Justine; Charvet, Benjamin; Nourissat, Geoffroy; Havis, Emmanuelle; Ronsin, Olivier; Bonnin, Marie-Ange; Ruggiu, Mathilde; Olivera-Martinez, Isabel; Robert, Nicolas; Lu, Yinhui; Kadler, Karl E.; Baumberger, Tristan; Doursounian, Levon; Berenbaum, Francis; Duprez, Delphine

    2013-01-01

    Tendon formation and repair rely on specific combinations of transcription factors, growth factors, and mechanical parameters that regulate the production and spatial organization of type I collagen. Here, we investigated the function of the zinc finger transcription factor EGR1 in tendon formation, healing, and repair using rodent animal models and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Adult tendons of Egr1–/– mice displayed a deficiency in the expression of tendon genes, including Scx, Col1a1, and Col1a2, and were mechanically weaker compared with their WT littermates. EGR1 was recruited to the Col1a1 and Col2a1 promoters in postnatal mouse tendons in vivo. Egr1 was required for the normal gene response following tendon injury in a mouse model of Achilles tendon healing. Forced Egr1 expression programmed MSCs toward the tendon lineage and promoted the formation of in vitro–engineered tendons from MSCs. The application of EGR1-producing MSCs increased the formation of tendon-like tissues in a rat model of Achilles tendon injury. We provide evidence that the ability of EGR1 to promote tendon differentiation is partially mediated by TGF-β2. This study demonstrates EGR1 involvement in adult tendon formation, healing, and repair and identifies Egr1 as a putative target in tendon repair strategies. PMID:23863709

  14. Stem cells and solid cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Stuart A C; Graham, Trevor A; Schier, Stefanie; Wright, Nicholas A; Alison, Malcolm R

    2009-07-01

    Recently, there have been significant advances in our knowledge of stem cells found in tissues that can develop solid tumours. In particular, novel stem cell markers have been identified for the first time identifying multipotential cells: a required characteristic of a stem cell. The scarcity of cancer stem cells has been questioned. Current dogma states that they are rare, but novel research has suggested that this may not be the case. Here, we review the latest literature on stem cells, particularly cancer stem cells within solid tumours. We discuss current thinking on how stem cells develop into cancer stem cells and how they protect themselves from doing so and do they express unique markers that can be used to detect stem cells. We attempt to put into perspective these latest advances in stem cell biology and their potential for cancer therapy.

  15. Case report: acute spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture in a patient with giant cell arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, T Jared; Welsh, Gail A; Miller, Dylan V; Santhi, V Swaroop

    2003-01-01

    We report a case of a 69-yr-old previously healthy man with acute spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture and severe tendonitis, which occurred after 2 weeks of steroid therapy for newly diagnosed giant cell arteritis. The Achilles tendon rupture was treated conservatively and the tendonitis resolved incrementally with steroid dose reduction. The patient made a complete recovery. In view of the widespread use of steroids in practice, this novel case presentation has important clinical implications. The tendon rupture early in the course of high-dose steroid therapy expands the understanding of this adverse reaction, which was previously reported only with long-term steroid therapy. The severe tendonitis responded to steroid therapy reduction suggesting a dose correlation. This report adds to a sole previous report of a spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture associated with giant cell arteritis.

  16. Prostate cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Shi-Ming; Lin, Sue-Hwa

    2012-06-01

    Stem cells have long been implicated in prostate gland formation. The prostate undergoes regression after androgen deprivation and regeneration after testosterone replacement. Regenerative studies suggest that these cells are found in the proximal ducts and basal layer of the prostate. Many characteristics of prostate cancer indicate that it originates from stem cells. For example, the putative androgen receptor-negative (AR(-)) status of prostate stem cells renders them inherently insensitive to androgen blockade therapy. The androgen-regulated gene fusion TMPRSS2-ERG could be used to clarify both the cells of origin and the evolution of prostate cancer cells. In this review, we show that the hypothesis that distinct subtypes of cancer result from abnormalities within specific cell types-the stem cell theory of cancer-may instigate a major paradigm shift in cancer research and therapy. Ultimately, the stem cell theory of cancers will affect how we practice clinical oncology: our diagnosis, monitoring, and therapy of prostate and other cancers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Mammary gland stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fridriksdottir, Agla J R; Petersen, Ole W; Rønnov-Jessen, Lone

    2011-01-01

    Distinct subsets of cells, including cells with stem cell-like properties, have been proposed to exist in normal human breast epithelium and breast carcinomas. The cellular origins of epithelial cells contributing to gland development, tissue homeostasis and cancer are, however, still poorly...... and differences between mouse and human gland development with particular emphasis on the identity and localization of stem cells, and the influence of the surrounding microenvironment. It is concluded that while recent advances in the field have contributed immense insight into how the normal mammary gland...... develops and is maintained, significant discrepancies exist between the mouse and human gland which should be taken into consideration in current and future models of mammary stem cell biology....

  18. Stem cell heterogeneity revealed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Marianne S; Jensen, Kim B

    2016-01-01

    The skin forms a protective, water-impermeable barrier consisting of heavily crosslinked epithelial cells. However, the specific role of stem cells in sustaining this barrier remains a contentious issue. A detailed analysis of the interfollicular epidermis now proposes a model for how a composite...... of cells with different properties are involved in its maintenance....

  19. Release of tensile strain on engineered human tendon tissue disturbs cell adhesions, changes matrix architecture, and induces an inflammatory phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayer, Monika L; Schjerling, Peter; Herchenhan, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    -inflammatory mediators and tendon phenotypic specific molecules, in an in vitro model where tendon-like tissue was engineered from human tendon cells. Tissue sampling was performed 1, 2, 4 and 6 days after surgical de-tensioning of the tendon construct. When tensile stimulus was removed, integrin type collagen receptors...

  20. Giant cell tumor of the flexor tendon of the wrist: US and MRI evaluation. Case report

    OpenAIRE

    Bassetti, E.; Candreva, R.; Santucci, E.

    2011-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCTTS) is a benign proliferative lesion of synovial origin that may affect the joints, bursae and tendon sheaths. We report the case of a giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath arising from the carpal tunnel of the wrist in a 47-year-old woman. The patient underwent ultrasound (US) examination and subsequently magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

  1. Dental pulp stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashri, N. Y.; Ajlan, S. A.; Aldahmash, Abdullah M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory periodontal disease is a major cause of loss of tooth-supporting structures. Novel approaches for regeneration of periodontal apparatus is an area of intensive research. Periodontal tissue engineering implies the use of appropriate regenerative cells, delivered through a suitable sca...... an updated review on dental pulp stem cells and their applications in periodontal regeneration, in combination with different scaffolds and growth factors....

  2. Human mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem; Kassem, Moustapha

    2008-01-01

    introduced into clinical medicine in variety of applications and through different ways of administration. Here, we discuss approaches for isolation, characterization and directing differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). An update of the current clinical use of the cells is also provided....

  3. Advancing Stem Cell Biology toward Stem Cell Therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Scadden, David; Srivastava, Alok

    2012-01-01

    Here, the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) Clinical Translation Committee introduces a series of articles outlining the current status, opportunities, and challenges surrounding the clinical translation of stem cell therapeutics for specific medical conditions.

  4. Liver Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sameh Mikhail; Aiwu Ruth He

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the most common primary malignancy of the liver in adults. It is also the fifth most common solid cancer worldwide and the third leading cause of cancer-related death. Recent research supports that liver cancer is a disease of adult stem cells. From the models of experimental hepatocarcinogenesis, there may be at least three distinct cell lineages with progenitor properties susceptible to neoplastic transformation. Identification of specific cell surface markers fo...

  5. Stem Cell Transplants (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Late for the Flu Vaccine? Eating Disorders Arrhythmias Stem Cell Transplants KidsHealth > For Parents > Stem Cell Transplants Print A A A What's in this ... Recovery Coping en español Trasplantes de células madre Stem cells are cells in the body that have the ...

  6. Stem cells and transplant arteriosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qingbo

    2008-05-09

    Stem cells can differentiate into a variety of cells to replace dead cells or to repair damaged tissues. Recent evidence indicates that stem cells are involved in the pathogenesis of transplant arteriosclerosis, an alloimmune initiated vascular stenosis that often results in transplant organ failure. Although the pathogenesis of transplant arteriosclerosis is not yet fully understood, recent developments in stem cell research have suggested novel mechanisms of vascular remodeling in allografts. For example, stem cells derived from the recipient may repair damaged endothelial cells of arteries in transplant organs. Further evidence suggests that stem cells or endothelial progenitor cells may be released from both bone marrow and non-bone marrow tissues. Vascular stem cells appear to replenish cells that died in donor vessels. Concomitantly, stem/progenitor cells may also accumulate in the intima, where they differentiate into smooth muscle cells. However, several issues concerning the contribution of stem cells to the pathogenesis of transplant arteriosclerosis are controversial, eg, whether bone marrow-derived stem cells can differentiate into smooth muscle cells that form neointimal lesions of the vessel wall. This review summarizes recent research on the role of stem cells in transplant arteriosclerosis, discusses the mechanisms of stem cell homing and differentiation into mature endothelial and smooth muscle cells, and highlights the controversial issues in the field.

  7. Stem cell therapy for diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K O Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy holds immense promise for the treatment of patients with diabetes mellitus. Research on the ability of human embryonic stem cells to differentiate into islet cells has defined the developmental stages and transcription factors involved in this process. However, the clinical applications of human embryonic stem cells are limited by ethical concerns, as well as the potential for teratoma formation. As a consequence, alternative forms of stem cell therapies, such as induced pluripotent stem cells, umbilical cord stem cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, have become an area of intense study. Recent advances in stem cell therapy may turn this into a realistic treatment for diabetes in the near future.

  8. Fake news portrayals of stem cells and stem cell research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcon, Alessandro R; Murdoch, Blake; Caulfield, Timothy

    2017-10-01

    This study examines how stem cells and stem cell research are portrayed on websites deemed to be purveyors of distorted and dubious information. Content analysis was conducted on 224 articles from 2015 to 2016, compiled by searching with the keywords 'stem cell(s)' on a list of websites flagged for containing either 'fake' or 'junk science' news. Articles contained various exaggerated positive and negative claims about stem cells and stem cell science, health and science related conspiracy theories, and statements promoting fear and mistrust of conventional medicine. Findings demonstrate the existence of organized misinformation networks, which may lead the public away from accurate information and facilitate a polarization of public discourse.

  9. Inflammation and cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigdar, Sarah; Li, Yong; Bhattacharya, Santanu; O'Connor, Michael; Pu, Chunwen; Lin, Jia; Wang, Tao; Xiang, Dongxi; Kong, Lingxue; Wei, Ming Q; Zhu, Yimin; Zhou, Shufeng; Duan, Wei

    2014-04-10

    Cancer stem cells are becoming recognised as being responsible for metastasis and treatment resistance. The complex cellular and molecular network that regulates cancer stem cells and the role that inflammation plays in cancer progression are slowly being elucidated. Cytokines, secreted by tumour associated immune cells, activate the necessary pathways required by cancer stem cells to facilitate cancer stem cells progressing through the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and migrating to distant sites. Once in situ, these cancer stem cells can secrete their own attractants, thus providing an environment whereby these cells can continue to propagate the tumour in a secondary niche. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Porcine embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Vanessa Jane

    2008-01-01

    The development of porcine embryonic stem cell lines (pESC) has received renewed interest given the advances being made in the production of immunocompatible transgenic pigs. However, difficulties are evident in the production of pESCs in-vitro. This may largely be attributable to differences...

  11. Embryonic Stem Cell Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Ma

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cell (ESC markers are molecules specifically expressed in ES cells. Understanding of the functions of these markers is critical for characterization and elucidation for the mechanism of ESC pluripotent maintenance and self-renewal, therefore helping to accelerate the clinical application of ES cells. Unfortunately, different cell types can share single or sometimes multiple markers; thus the main obstacle in the clinical application of ESC is to purify ES cells from other types of cells, especially tumor cells. Currently, the marker-based flow cytometry (FCM technique and magnetic cell sorting (MACS are the most effective cell isolating methods, and a detailed maker list will help to initially identify, as well as isolate ESCs using these methods. In the current review, we discuss a wide range of cell surface and generic molecular markers that are indicative of the undifferentiated ESCs. Other types of molecules, such as lectins and peptides, which bind to ESC via affinity and specificity, are also summarized. In addition, we review several markers that overlap with tumor stem cells (TSCs, which suggest that uncertainty still exists regarding the benefits of using these markers alone or in various combinations when identifying and isolating cells.

  12. Materials as stem cell regulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, William L.; McDevitt, Todd C.; Engler, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    The stem cell/material interface is a complex, dynamic microenvironment in which the cell and the material cooperatively dictate one another's fate: the cell by remodelling its surroundings, and the material through its inherent properties (such as adhesivity, stiffness, nanostructure or degradability). Stem cells in contact with materials are able to sense their properties, integrate cues via signal propagation and ultimately translate parallel signalling information into cell fate decisions. However, discovering the mechanisms by which stem cells respond to inherent material characteristics is challenging because of the highly complex, multicomponent signalling milieu present in the stem cell environment. In this Review, we discuss recent evidence that shows that inherent material properties may be engineered to dictate stem cell fate decisions, and overview a subset of the operative signal transduction mechanisms that have begun to emerge. Further developments in stem cell engineering and mechanotransduction are poised to have substantial implications for stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. PMID:24845994

  13. Information on Stem Cell Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home » Current Research » Focus on Research Focus on Stem Cell Research Stem cells possess the unique ability to differentiate into many ... they also retain the ability to produce more stem cells, a process termed self-renewal. There are multiple ...

  14. Intrinsic differentiation potential of adolescent human tendon tissue: an in-vitro cell differentiation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weinans Harrie

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tendinosis lesions show an increase of glycosaminoglycan amount, calcifications, and lipid accumulation. Therefore, altered cellular differentiation might play a role in the etiology of tendinosis. This study investigates whether adolescent human tendon tissue contains a population of cells with intrinsic differentiation potential. Methods Cells derived from adolescent non-degenerative hamstring tendons were characterized by immunohistochemistry and FACS-analysis. Cells were cultured for 21 days in osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic medium and phenotypical evaluation was carried out by immunohistochemical and qPCR analysis. The results were compared with the results of similar experiments on adult bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSCs. Results Tendon-derived cells stained D7-FIB (fibroblast-marker positive, but α-SMA (marker for smooth muscle cells and pericytes negative. Tendon-derived cells were 99% negative for CD34 (endothelial cell marker, and 73% positive for CD105 (mesenchymal progenitor-cell marker. In adipogenic medium, intracellular lipid vacuoles were visible and tendon-derived fibroblasts showed upregulation of adipogenic markers FABP4 (fatty-acid binding protein 4 and PPARG (peroxisome proliferative activated receptor γ. In chondrogenic medium, some cells stained positive for collagen 2 and tendon-derived fibroblasts showed upregulation of collagen 2 and collagen 10. In osteogenic medium Von Kossa staining showed calcium deposition although osteogenic markers remained unaltered. Tendon-derived cells and BMCSs behaved largely comparable, although some distinct differences were present between the two cell populations. Conclusion This study suggests that our population of explanted human tendon cells has an intrinsic differentiation potential. These results support the hypothesis that there might be a role for altered tendon-cell differentiation in the pathophysiology of tendinosis.

  15. [Perinatal sources of stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskorska-Jasiulewicz, Magdalena Maria; Witkowska-Zimny, Małgorzata

    2015-03-08

    Recently, stem cell biology has become an interesting topic. Several varieties of human stem cells have been isolated and identified in vivo and in vitro. Successful application of hematopoietic stem cells in hematology has led to the search for other sources of stem cells and expanding the scale of their application. Perinatal stem cells are a versatile cell population, and they are interesting for both scientific and practical objectives. Stem cells from perinatal tissue may be particularly useful in the clinic for autologous transplantation for fetuses and newborns, and after banking in later stages of life, as well as for in utero transplantation in the case of genetic disorders. In this review paper we focus on the extraction and therapeutic potential of stem cells derived from perinatal tissues such as the placenta, the amnion, amniotic fluid, umbilical cord blood and Wharton's jelly.

  16. The effects of scaffold architecture and fibrin gel addition on tendon cell phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawelec, K M; Wardale, R J; Best, S M; Cameron, R E

    2015-01-01

    Development of tissue engineering scaffolds relies on careful selection of pore architecture and chemistry of the cellular environment. Repair of skeletal soft tissue, such as tendon, is particularly challenging, since these tissues have a relatively poor healing response. When removed from their native environment, tendon cells (tenocytes) lose their characteristic morphology and the expression of phenotypic markers. To stimulate tendon cells to recreate a healthy extracellular matrix, both architectural cues and fibrin gels have been used in the past, however, their relative effects have not been studied systematically. Within this study, a combination of collagen scaffold architecture, axial and isotropic, and fibrin gel addition was assessed, using ovine tendon-derived cells to determine the optimal strategy for controlling the proliferation and protein expression. Scaffold architecture and fibrin gel addition influenced tendon cell behavior independently in vitro. Addition of fibrin gel within a scaffold doubled cell number and increased matrix production for all architectures studied. However, scaffold architecture dictated the type of matrix produced by cells, regardless of fibrin addition. Axial scaffolds, mimicking native tendon, promoted a mature matrix, with increased tenomodulin, a marker for mature tendon cells, and decreased scleraxis, an early transcription factor for connective tissue. This study demonstrated that both architectural cues and fibrin gel addition alter cell behavior and that the combination of these signals could improve clinical performance of current tissue engineering constructs.

  17. Lineage tracing of resident tendon progenitor cells during growth and natural healing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel A Dyment

    Full Text Available Unlike during embryogenesis, the identity of tissue resident progenitor cells that contribute to postnatal tendon growth and natural healing is poorly characterized. Therefore, we utilized 1 an inducible Cre driven by alpha smooth muscle actin (SMACreERT2, that identifies mesenchymal progenitors, 2 a constitutively active Cre driven by growth and differentiation factor 5 (GDF5Cre, a critical regulator of joint condensation, in combination with 3 an Ai9 Cre reporter to permanently label SMA9 and GDF5-9 populations and their progeny. In growing mice, SMA9+ cells were found in peritendinous structures and scleraxis-positive (ScxGFP+ cells within the tendon midsubstance and myotendinous junction. The progenitors within the tendon midsubstance were transiently labeled as they displayed a 4-fold expansion from day 2 to day 21 but reduced to baseline levels by day 70. SMA9+ cells were not found within tendon entheses or ligaments in the knee, suggesting a different origin. In contrast to the SMA9 population, GDF5-9+ cells extended from the bone through the enthesis and into a portion of the tendon midsubstance. GDF5-9+ cells were also found throughout the length of the ligaments, indicating a significant variation in the progenitors that contribute to tendons and ligaments. Following tendon injury, SMA9+ paratenon cells were the main contributors to the healing response. SMA9+ cells extended over the defect space at 1 week and differentiated into ScxGFP+ cells at 2 weeks, which coincided with increased collagen signal in the paratenon bridge. Thus, SMA9-labeled cells represent a unique progenitor source that contributes to the tendon midsubstance, paratenon, and myotendinous junction during growth and natural healing, while GDF5 progenitors contribute to tendon enthesis and ligament development. Understanding the mechanisms that regulate the expansion and differentiation of these progenitors may prove crucial to improving future repair strategies.

  18. Passage and concentration-dependent effects of Indomethacin on tendon derived cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scutt Andy

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID are commonly used in the treatment of tendinopathies such as tendonitis and tendinosis. Despite this, little is known of their direct actions on tendon-derived cells. As NSAIDs have been shown to delay healing in a number of mesenchymal tissues we have investigated the direct effects of indomethacin on the proliferation of tendon-derived cells. Results and Discussion The results obtained were dependent on both the type of cells used and the method of measurement. When measured using the Alamar blue assay, a common method for the measurement of cell proliferation and viability, no effect of indomethacin was seen regardless of cell source. It is likely that this lack of effect was due to a paucity of mitochondrial enzymes in tendon cells. However, when cell number was assessed using the methylene blue assay, which is a simple nuclear staining technique, an Indomethacin-induced inhibition of proliferation was seen in primary cells but not in secondary subcultures. Conclusion These results suggest that firstly, care must be taken when deciding on methodology used to investigate tendon-derived cells as these cells have a quite different metabolism to other mesenchymal derive cells. Secondly, Indomethacin can inhibit the proliferation of primary tendon derived cells and that secondary subculture selects for a population of cells that is unresponsive to this drug.

  19. Normal and leukemic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pelicci, P.G.

    2012-01-01

    Studies on hematopoietic stem cells have provided several critical insights in the biology of stem cells in general; as mature blood cells are generally short lived, stem cells are in fact required to guarantee, throughout the life of an organism, the replenishment of differentiated blood cells by the generation of multi-lineage progenitors and precursors committed to individual hematopoietic lineages. Similarly, acute myeloid leukemia has been considered as a model system to study cancer ste...

  20. Tendon biomechanics and mechanobiology - a mini-review of basic concepts and recent advancements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, James H-C.; Guo, Qianping; Li, Bin

    2011-01-01

    Due to their unique hierarchical structure and composition, tendons possess characteristic biomechanical properties, including high mechanical strength and viscoelasticity, which enable them to carry and transmit mechanical loads (muscular forces) effectively. Tendons are also mechano-responsive by adaptively changing their structure and function in response to altered mechanical loading conditions. In general, mechanical loading at physiological levels is beneficial to tendons, but excessive loading or disuse of tendons is detrimental. This mechano-adaptability is due to the cells present in tendons. Tendon fibroblasts (tenocytes) are the dominant tendon cells responsible for tendon homeostasis and repair. Tendon stem cells (TSCs), which were recently discovered, also play a vital role in tendon maintenance and repair by virtue of their ability to self-renew and differentiate into tenocytes. TSCs may also be responsible for chronic tendon injury, or tendinopathy, by undergoing aberrant differentiation into non-tenocytes in response to excessive mechanical loading. Thus, it is necessary to devise optimal rehabilitation protocols in order to enhance tendon healing while reducing scar tissue formation and tendon adhesions. Moreover, along with scaffolds that can mimic tendon matrix environments and platelet-rich plasma (PRP), which serves as a source of growth factors, TSCs may be the optimal cell type for enhancing repair of injured tendons. PMID:21925835

  1. Stem cell factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNiece, I K; Briddell, R A

    1995-07-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF) is the ligand for the tyrosine kinase receptor c-kit, which is expressed on both primitive and mature hematopoietic progenitor cells. In vitro, SCF synergizes with other growth factors, such as granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor, and interleukin-3 to stimulate the proliferation and differentiation of cells of the lymphoid, myeloid, erythroid, and megakaryocytic lineages. In vivo, SCF also synergizes with other growth factors and has been shown to enhance the mobilization of peripheral blood progenitor cells in combination with G-CSF. In phase I/II clinical studies administration of the combination of SCF and G-CSF resulted in a two- to threefold increase in cells that express the CD34 antigen compared with G-CSF alone. Other potential clinical uses include ex vivo expansion protocols and in vitro culture for gene therapy.

  2. Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency and Treatment with Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barut Selver, Özlem; Yağcı, Ayşe; Eğrilmez, Sait; Gürdal, Mehmet; Palamar, Melis; Çavuşoğlu, Türker; Ateş, Utku; Veral, Ali; Güven, Çağrı; Wolosin, Jose Mario

    2017-10-01

    The cornea is the outermost tissue of the eye and it must be transparent for the maintenance of good visual function. The superficial epithelium of the cornea, which is renewed continuously by corneal stem cells, plays a critical role in the permanence of this transparency. These stem cells are localized at the cornea-conjunctival transition zone, referred to as the limbus. When this zone is affected/destroyed, limbal stem cell deficiency ensues. Loss of limbal stem cell function allows colonization of the corneal surface by conjunctival epithelium. Over 6 million people worldwide are affected by corneal blindness, and limbal stem cell deficiency is one of the main causes. Fortunately, it is becoming possible to recover vision by autologous transplantation of limbal cells obtained from the contralateral eye in unilateral cases. Due to the potential risks to the donor eye, only a small amount of tissue can be obtained, in which only 1-2% of the limbal epithelial cells are actually limbal stem cells. Vigorous attempts are being made to expand limbal stem cells in culture to preserve or even enrich the stem cell population. Ex vivo expanded limbal stem cell treatment in limbal stem cell deficiency was first reported in 1997. In the 20 years since, various protocols have been developed for the cultivation of limbal epithelial cells. It is still not clear which method promotes effective stem cell viability and this remains a subject of ongoing research. The most preferred technique for limbal cell culture is the explant culture model. In this approach, a small donor eye limbal biopsy is placed as an explant onto a biocompatible substrate (preferably human amniotic membrane) for expansion. The outgrowth (cultivated limbal epithelial cells) is then surgically transferred to the recipient eye. Due to changing regulations concerning cell-based therapy, the implementation of cultivated limbal epithelial transplantation in accordance with Good Laboratory Practice using

  3. Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency and Treatment with Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Barut Selver

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The cornea is the outermost tissue of the eye and it must be transparent for the maintenance of good visual function. The superficial epithelium of the cornea, which is renewed continuously by corneal stem cells, plays a critical role in the permanence of this transparency. These stem cells are localized at the cornea-conjunctival transition zone, referred to as the limbus. When this zone is affected/destroyed, limbal stem cell deficiency ensues. Loss of limbal stem cell function allows colonization of the corneal surface by conjunctival epithelium. Over 6 million people worldwide are affected by corneal blindness, and limbal stem cell deficiency is one of the main causes. Fortunately, it is becoming possible to recover vision by autologous transplantation of limbal cells obtained from the contralateral eye in unilateral cases. Due to the potential risks to the donor eye, only a small amount of tissue can be obtained, in which only 1-2% of the limbal epithelial cells are actually limbal stem cells. Vigorous attempts are being made to expand limbal stem cells in culture to preserve or even enrich the stem cell population. Ex vivo expanded limbal stem cell treatment in limbal stem cell deficiency was first reported in 1997. In the 20 years since, various protocols have been developed for the cultivation of limbal epithelial cells. It is still not clear which method promotes effective stem cell viability and this remains a subject of ongoing research. The most preferred technique for limbal cell culture is the explant culture model. In this approach, a small donor eye limbal biopsy is placed as an explant onto a biocompatible substrate (preferably human amniotic membrane for expansion. The outgrowth (cultivated limbal epithelial cells is then surgically transferred to the recipient eye. Due to changing regulations concerning cell-based therapy, the implementation of cultivated limbal epithelial transplantation in accordance with Good Laboratory

  4. Designing the stem cell microenvironment for guided connective tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanowicz, Danielle R; Lu, Helen H

    2017-12-01

    Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an attractive cell source for regenerative medicine because of their ability to self-renew and their capacity for multilineage differentiation and tissue regeneration. For connective tissues, such as ligaments or tendons, MSCs are vital to the modulation of the inflammatory response following acute injury while also interacting with resident fibroblasts to promote cell proliferation and matrix synthesis. To date, MSC injection for connective tissue repair has yielded mixed results in vivo, likely due to a lack of appropriate environmental cues to effectively control MSC response and promote tissue healing instead of scar formation. In healthy tissues, stem cells reside within a complex microenvironment comprising cellular, structural, and signaling cues that collectively maintain stemness and modulate tissue homeostasis. Changes to the microenvironment following injury regulate stem cell differentiation, trophic signaling, and tissue healing. Here, we focus on models of the stem cell microenvironment that are used to elucidate the mechanisms of stem cell regulation and inspire functional approaches to tissue regeneration. Recent studies in this frontier area are highlighted, focusing on how microenvironmental cues modulate MSC response following connective tissue injury and, more importantly, how this unique cell environment can be programmed for stem cell-guided tissue regeneration. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  5. Stem cells in dentistry--part I: stem cell sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egusa, Hiroshi; Sonoyama, Wataru; Nishimura, Masahiro; Atsuta, Ikiru; Akiyama, Kentaro

    2012-07-01

    Stem cells can self-renew and produce different cell types, thus providing new strategies to regenerate missing tissues and treat diseases. In the field of dentistry, adult mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have been identified in several oral and maxillofacial tissues, which suggests that the oral tissues are a rich source of stem cells, and oral stem and mucosal cells are expected to provide an ideal source for genetically reprogrammed cells such as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Furthermore, oral tissues are expected to be not only a source but also a therapeutic target for stem cells, as stem cell and tissue engineering therapies in dentistry continue to attract increasing clinical interest. Part I of this review outlines various types of intra- and extra-oral tissue-derived stem cells with regard to clinical availability and applications in dentistry. Additionally, appropriate sources of stem cells for regenerative dentistry are discussed with regard to differentiation capacity, accessibility and possible immunomodulatory properties. Copyright © 2012 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Therapeutic potential of stem cells in veterinary practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin E Gade

    Full Text Available Stem cell research acquired great attention during last decade inspite of incredible therapeutic potential of these cells the ethical controversies exists. Stem cells have enormous uses in animal cloning, drug discovery, gene targeting, transgenic production and regenerative therapy. Stem cells are the naïve cells of body which can self-renew and differentiate into other cell types to carry out multiple functions, these properties have been utilized in therapeutic application of stem cells in human and veterinary medicine. The application of stem cells in human medicine is well established and it is commonly used for chronic and accidental injuries. In Veterinary sciences previous studies mostly focused on establishing protocols for isolation and their characterization but with advancement in array of techniques for in vitro studies, stem cells rapidly became a viable tool for regenerative therapy of chronic, debilitating and various unresponsive clinical diseases and disorders. Multipotent adult stem cells have certain advantages over embryonic stem cells like easy isolation and expansion from numerous sources, less immunogenicity and no risk of teratoma formation hence their use is preferred in therapeutics. Adult stem cells have been utilized for treatment of spinal injuries, tendonitis, cartilage defects, osteoarthritis and ligament defects, liver diseases, wounds, cardiac and bone defects in animals. The multi-potential capability of these cells can be better utilized in near future to overcome the challenges faced by the clinicians. This review will emphasize on the therapeutic utilization and success of stem cell therapies in animals. [Vet. World 2012; 5(8.000: 499-507

  7. Tendon Cell Behavior and Matrix Remodeling in Degenerative Tendinopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. de Mos (Marieke)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractTendon injuries are common in human athletes [1-4]. Furthermore, such injuries are also prevalent in the ageing sedentary population [5-7]. In recent decades, the incidence of tendon injuries has risen due to both an increase in an elderly population and a rise in participation

  8. Platelet-Rich Plasma Derived Growth Factors Contribute to Stem Cell Differentiation in Musculoskeletal Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yun; Han, Qixin; Chen, Wei; Song, Jialin; Zhao, Xiaotian; Ouyang, Yuanming; Yuan, Weien; Fan, Cunyi

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell treatment and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) therapy are two significant issues in regenerative medicine. Stem cells such as bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, adipose-derived stem cells and periodontal ligament stem cells can be successfully applied in the field of tissue regeneration. PRP, a natural product isolated from whole blood, can secrete multiple growth factors (GFs) for regulating physiological activities. These GFs can stimulate proliferation and differentiation of different stem cells in injury models. Therefore, combination of both agents receives wide expectations in regenerative medicine, especially in bone, cartilage and tendon repair. In this review, we thoroughly discussed the interaction and underlying mechanisms of PRP derived GFs with stem cells, and assessed their functions in cell differentiation for musculoskeletal regeneration. PMID:29164105

  9. Platelet-Rich Plasma Derived Growth Factors Contribute to Stem Cell Differentiation in Musculoskeletal Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Qian

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell treatment and platelet-rich plasma (PRP therapy are two significant issues in regenerative medicine. Stem cells such as bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, adipose-derived stem cells and periodontal ligament stem cells can be successfully applied in the field of tissue regeneration. PRP, a natural product isolated from whole blood, can secrete multiple growth factors (GFs for regulating physiological activities. These GFs can stimulate proliferation and differentiation of different stem cells in injury models. Therefore, combination of both agents receives wide expectations in regenerative medicine, especially in bone, cartilage and tendon repair. In this review, we thoroughly discussed the interaction and underlying mechanisms of PRP derived GFs with stem cells, and assessed their functions in cell differentiation for musculoskeletal regeneration.

  10. Mesenchymal stem cell therapies in the treatment of musculoskeletal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Jamil; Sherman, Andrew; Lee, Henry; Kaplan, Lee; Hare, Joshua M

    2014-01-01

    The application of regenerative strategies to musculoskeletal ailments offers extraordinary promise to transform management of the conditions of numerous patients. The use of cell-based therapies and adjunct strategies is under active investigation for injuries and illnesses affecting bones, joints, tendons, and skeletal muscle. Of particular interest to the field is the mesenchymal stem cell, an adult stem cell found in bone marrow and adipose tissue. This cell type can be expanded ex vivo, has allogeneic application, and has the capacity for engraftment and differentiation into mesodermal lineages. Also of major interest in the field is the use of platelet-rich plasma, a strategy to concentrate endogenous cytokines and growth factors with reparative potential. Here we review the biological basis, clinical studies, safety, and current state of mesenchymal stem cell and platelet-rich plasma therapies in the treatment of musculoskeletal disease. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Stem cell tracking by nanotechnologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Chiara; Erratico, Silvia; Razini, Paola; Fiori, Fabrizio; Rustichelli, Franco; Torrente, Yvan; Belicchi, Marzia

    2010-03-12

    Advances in stem cell research have provided important understanding of the cell biology and offered great promise for developing new strategies for tissue regeneration. The beneficial effects of stem cell therapy depend also by the development of new approachs for the track of stem cells in living subjects over time after transplantation. Recent developments in the use of nanotechnologies have contributed to advance of the high-resolution in vivo imaging methods, including positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and X-Ray computed microtomography (microCT). This review examines the use of nanotechnologies for stem cell tracking.

  12. Giant cell tumour of peroneus brevis tendon sheath--a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goni, Vijay; Gopinathan, Nirmal Raj; Radotra, B D; Viswanathan, Vibhu Krishnan; Logithasan, Rajesh Kumar; S, Balaji

    2012-07-13

    Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath is a benign soft tissue lesion most commonly found in the flexor aspect of hand and wrist. Being rare in foot and ankle, the unusual presentation of this lesion may sometimes mimic other lesions like lipoma, synovial sarcoma, malignant fibrous histiocytoma, synovial cyst and ganglion. Hence it is important to include this lesion in differential diagnoses especially if the lesion is found to be anchored to any of the surrounding tendons. This article describes the unusual occurrence of giant cell tumour of the tendon sheath of peroneus brevis which is rarely described in literature.

  13. Mesenchymal stem cells in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyten, Frank P

    2004-09-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that every tissue contains stem cells. Our understanding of the biology of stem cells reveals that these cell populations have a critical role in the homeostasis and repair of tissues. Besides the local stem cell niches, additional compartments in the body such as the bone marrow may serve as reservoirs for stem cell populations. On more extensive tissue damage, and guided by local repair responses, "reparative" cell populations are mobilized from more distant stem cell reservoirs and migrate to the site of injury, thereby contributing in many aspects of local tissue repair. Osteoarthritis has long been regarded as an imbalance between destructive and reparative processes. The lack of repair of the weight-bearing articular cartilage and the associated subchondral bone changes are considered of critical importance in the progression of the disease. Recent findings indicate a depletion and/or functional alteration of mesenchymal stem cell populations in osteoarthritis. These preliminary data suggest that in joint diseases such as osteoarthritis, it is of importance to investigate further the involvement of the stem cell pool in the mechanisms contributing to joint homeostasis and driving disease progression. In view of the emerging body of evidence pointing to a potential therapeutic utility of stem cell technology, it is not surprising that local delivery of mesenchymal stem cells has been explored as a therapeutic approach in animal models of osteoarthritis. Copyright 2004 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

  14. Acute Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Caused by Diffuse Giant Cell Tumor of Tendon Sheath: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Christina M; Lueck, Nathan E; Steyers, Curtis M

    2007-01-01

    A 46 year old male developed spontaneous acute carpal tunnel syndrome of the right wrist without any antecedent trauma. Surgical exploration revealed hemorrhage secondary to diffuse giant cell tumor of tendon sheath as the underlying cause. PMID:17907439

  15. Stem cells in veterinary medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Fortier, Lisa A; Travis, Alexander J

    2011-01-01

    The stem cell field in veterinary medicine continues to evolve rapidly both experimentally and clinically. Stem cells are most commonly used in clinical veterinary medicine in therapeutic applications for the treatment of musculoskeletal injuries in horses and dogs. New technologies of assisted reproduction are being developed to apply the properties of spermatogonial stem cells to preserve endangered animal species. The same methods can be used to generate transgenic animals for production o...

  16. Aging, metabolism and stem cells: Spotlight on muscle stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Prat, Laura; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2017-04-15

    All tissues and organs undergo a progressive regenerative decline as they age. This decline has been mainly attributed to loss of stem cell number and/or function, and both stem cell-intrinsic changes and alterations in local niches and/or systemic environment over time are known to contribute to the stem cell aging phenotype. Advancing in the molecular understanding of the deterioration of stem cell cells with aging is key for targeting the specific causes of tissue regenerative dysfunction at advanced stages of life. Here, we revise exciting recent findings on why stem cells age and the consequences on tissue regeneration, with a special focus on regeneration of skeletal muscle. We also highlight newly identified common molecular pathways affecting diverse types of aging stem cells, such as altered proteostasis, metabolism, or senescence entry, and discuss the questions raised by these findings. Finally, we comment on emerging stem cell rejuvenation strategies, principally emanating from studies on muscle stem cells, which will surely burst tissue regeneration research for future benefit of the increasing human aging population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Wnt Signaling in Stem Cells and Tumor Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Michael

    2015-09-01

    The Wnt signaling cascade is critically important in stem cell biology, both in homeostatic maintenance and repair and regeneration of tissues and organs, through their respective somatic stem cells (SSCs). However, aberrant Wnt signaling is associated with a wide array of tumor types and Wnt signaling is important in the so-termed cancer stem cell/tumor-initiating cell (CSC/TIC) population. The ability to safely therapeutically target the Wnt signaling pathway offers enormous promise. However, just like the Sword of Damocles, significant risks and concerns regarding targeting such a critical pathway in normal stem cell maintenance and tissue homeostasis remain ever present. With this in mind, we review our current understanding of the role of Wnt signaling in SSCs and CSC/TICs and the potential to pharmacologically manipulate these endogenous stem cell populations (both normal and tumor). Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  18. Tendon Vasculature in Health and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempfer, Herbert; Traweger, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Tendons represent a bradytrophic tissue which is poorly vascularized and, compared to bone or skin, heal poorly. Usually, a vascularized connective scar tissue with inferior functional properties forms at the injury site. Whether the increased vascularization is the root cause of tissue impairments such as loss of collagen fiber orientation, ectopic formation of bone, fat or cartilage, or is a consequence of these pathological changes remains unclear. This review provides an overview of the role of tendon vasculature in healthy and chronically diseased tendon tissue as well as its relevance for tendon repair. Further, the nature and the role of perivascular tendon stem/progenitor cells residing in the vascular niche will be discussed and compared to multipotent stromal cells in other tissues. PMID:26635616

  19. Breast cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W Owens

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer metastasis, resistance to therapies and disease recurrence are significant hurdles to successful treatment of breast cancer. Identifying mechanisms by which cancer spreads, survives treatment regimes and regenerates more aggressive tumours are critical to improving patient survival. Substantial evidence gathered over the last 10 years suggests that breast cancer progression and recurrence is supported by cancer stem cells (CSCs. Understanding how CSCs form and how they contribute to the pathology of breast cancer will greatly aid the pursuit of novel therapies targeted at eliminating these cells. This review will summarise what is currently known about the origins of breast CSCs, their role in disease progression and ways in which they may be targeted therapeutically.

  20. Tendon Cell Behavior and Matrix Remodeling in Degenerative Tendinopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Mos, Marieke

    2009-01-01

    textabstractTendon injuries are common in human athletes [1-4]. Furthermore, such injuries are also prevalent in the ageing sedentary population [5-7]. In recent decades, the incidence of tendon injuries has risen due to both an increase in an elderly population and a rise in participation in recreational and competitive sporting activities. In the general population the lifetime cumulative incidence of Achilles tendinopathy is 5.9 % among sedentary people and 50 % among elite endurance athle...

  1. Spatial organization and isotubulin composition of microtubules in epidermal tendon cells of Artemia franciscana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criel, Godelieve R J; Van Oostveldt, Patrick; MacRae, Thomas H

    2005-02-01

    Epidermally derived tendon cells attach the exoskeleton (cuticle) of the Branchiopod crustacean, Artemia franciscana, to underlying muscle in the hindgut, while the structurally similar transalar tendon (epithelial) cells, which also arise from the epidermis and are polarized, connect dorsal and ventral exopodite surfaces. To establish these latter attachments the transalar tendon cells interact with cuticles on opposite sides of the exopodite by way of their apical surfaces and with one another via basal regions, or the cuticle attachments may be mediated through linkages with phagocytic storage cells found in the hemolymph. In some cases, phyllopod tendon cells attach directly to muscle cells. Tendon cells in the hindgut of Artemia possess microtubule bundles, as do the transalar cells, and they extend from the basal myotendinal junction to the apical domain located near the cuticle. The bundled microtubules intermingle with thin filaments reminiscent of microfilaments, but intermediate filament-like structures are absent. Microtubule bundles converging at apical cell surfaces contact structures termed apical invaginations, composed of cytoplasmic membrane infoldings associated with electron-dense material. Intracuticular rods protrude from apical invaginations, either into the cuticle during intermolt or the molting fluid in premolt. Confocal microscopy of immunofluorescently stained samples revealed tyrosinated, detyrosinated, and acetylated tubulins, the first time posttranslationally modified isoforms of this protein have been demonstrated in crustacean tendon cells. Microfilaments, as shown by staining with phalloidin, coincided spatially with microtubule bundles. Artemia tendon cells clearly represent an interesting system for study of cytoskeleton organization within the context of cytoplasmic polarity and the results in this article indicate functional cooperation of microtubules and microfilaments. These cytoskeletal elements, either acting independently

  2. Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldahmash, Abdullah; Zaher, Walid; Al-Nbaheen, May

    2012-01-01

    Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSC) represent a group of non-hematopoietic stem cells present in the bone marrow stroma and the stroma of other organs including subcutaneous adipose tissue, placenta, and muscles. They exhibit the characteristics of somatic stem cells of self......-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation into mesoderm-type of cells, e.g., to osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes and possibly other cell types including hepatocytes and astrocytes. Due to their ease of culture and multipotentiality, hMSC are increasingly employed as a source for cells suitable for a number...

  3. Bioprinting for stem cell research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasoglu, Savas; Demirci, Utkan

    2012-01-01

    Recently, there has been a growing interest to apply bioprinting techniques to stem cell research. Several bioprinting methods have been developed utilizing acoustics, piezoelectricity, and lasers to deposit living cells onto receiving substrates. Using these technologies, spatially defined gradients of immobilized proteins can be engineered to direct stem cell differentiation into multiple subpopulations of different lineages. Stem cells can also be patterned in a high-throughput manner onto flexible implementation patches for tissue regeneration or onto substrates with the goal of accessing encapsulated stem cell of interest for genomic analysis. Here, we review recent achievements with bioprinting technologies in stem cell research, and identify future challenges and potential applications including tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, wound healing, and genomics. PMID:23260439

  4. Skin Stem Cells in Skin Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mollapour Sisakht

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Context Preclinical and clinical research has shown that stem cell therapy is a promising therapeutic option for many diseases. This article describes skin stem cells sources and their therapeutic applications. Evidence Acquisition Compared with conventional methods, cell therapy reduces the surgical burden for patients because it is simple and less time-consuming. Skin cell therapy has been developed for variety of diseases. By isolation of the skin stem cell from the niche, in vitro expansion and transplantation of cells offers a surprising healing capacity profile. Results Stem cells located in skin cells have shown interesting properties such as plasticity, transdifferentiation, and specificity. Mesenchymal cells of the dermis, hypodermis, and other sources are currently being investigated to promote regeneration. Conclusions Because skin stem cells are highly accessible from autologous sources and their immunological profile is unique, they are ideal for therapeutic approaches. Optimization of administrative routes requires more investigation own to the lack of a standard protocol.

  5. Stem Cells and Tissue Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlovic, Mirjana

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells are the building blocks for all other cells in an organism. The human body has about 200 different types of cells and any of those cells can be produced by a stem cell. This fact emphasizes the significance of stem cells in transplantational medicine, regenerative therapy and bioengineering. Whether embryonic or adult, these cells can be used for the successful treatment of a wide range of diseases that were not treatable before, such as osteogenesis imperfecta in children, different forms of leukemias, acute myocardial infarction, some neural damages and diseases, etc. Bioengineering, e.g. successful manipulation of these cells with multipotential capacity of differentiation toward appropriate patterns and precise quantity, are the prerequisites for successful outcome and treatment. By combining in vivo and in vitro techniques, it is now possible to manage the wide spectrum of tissue damages and organ diseases. Although the stem-cell therapy is not a response to all the questions, it provides more...

  6. Counting stem cells : methodological constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bystrykh, Leonid V.; Verovskaya, Evgenia; Zwart, Erik; Broekhuis, Mathilde; de Haan, Gerald

    The number of stem cells contributing to hematopoiesis has been a matter of debate. Many studies use retroviral tagging of stem cells to measure clonal contribution. Here we argue that methodological factors can impact such clonal analyses. Whereas early studies had low resolution, leading to

  7. Stem cells in endodontic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sita Rama Kumar M, Madhu Varma K, Kalyan Satish R, Manikya kumar Nanduri.R, Murali Krishnam Raju S, Mohan rao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells have the remarkable potential to develop into many different cell types in the body. Serving as a sort of repair system for the body, they can theoretically divide without limit to replenish other cells as long as the person or animal is still alive. However, progress in stem cell biology and tissue engineering may present new options for replacing heavily damaged or lost teeth, or even individual tooth structures. The goal of this review is to discuss the potential impact of dental pulp stem cells on regenerative endodontics.

  8. Stem cells and respiratory diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Soraia Carvalho; Maron-Gutierrez, Tatiana; Garcia, Cristiane Sousa Nascimento Baez; Morales, Marcelo Marcos; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho. Lab. de Investigacao]. E-mail: prmrocco@biof.ufrj.br

    2008-12-15

    Stem cells have a multitude of clinical implications in the lung. This article is a critical review that includes clinical and experimental studies of MedLine and SciElo database in the last 10 years, where we highlight the effects of stem cell therapy in acute respiratory distress syndrome or more chronic disorders such as lung fibrosis and emphysema. Although, many studies have shown the beneficial effects of stem cells in lung development, repair and remodeling; some important questions need to be answered to better understand the mechanisms that control cell division and differentiation, therefore enabling the use of cell therapy in human respiratory diseases. (author)

  9. Tendon-derived progenitor cells improve healing of collagenase-induced flexor tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durgam, Sushmitha S; Stewart, Allison A; Sivaguru, Mayandi; Wagoner Johnson, Amy J; Stewart, Matthew C

    2016-12-01

    Tendinitis is a common and a performance-limiting injury in athletes. This study describes the value of intralesional tendon-derived progenitor cell (TDPC) injections in equine flexor tendinitis. Collagenase-induced tendinitis was created in both front superficial digital flexor (SDF) tendons. Four weeks later, the forelimb tendon lesions were treated with 1 × 107 autogenous TDPCs or saline. Tendinitis was also induced by collagenase in one hind SDF tendon, to study the survival and distribution of DiI-labeled TDPCs 1, 2, 4, and 6 weeks after injection. The remaining normal tendon was used as a "control." Twelve weeks after forelimb TDPC injections, tendons were harvested for assessment of matrix gene expression, biochemical, biomechanical, and histological characteristics. DiI-labeled TDPCs were abundant 1 week after injection but gradually declined over time and were undetectable after 6 weeks. Twelve weeks after TDPC injection, collagens I and III, COMP and tenomodulin mRNA levels were similar (p = 0.3) in both TDPC and saline groups and higher (p < 0.05) than normal tendon. Yield and maximal stresses of the TDPC group were significantly greater (p = 0.005) than the saline group's and similar (p = 0.6) to normal tendon. However, the elastic modulus of the TDPC and saline groups were not significantly different (p = 0.32). Histological assessment of the repair tissues with Fourier transform-second harmonic generation imaging demonstrated that collagen alignment was significantly better (p = 0.02) in TDPC group than in the saline controls. In summary, treating collagenase-induced flexor tendon lesions with TDPCs improved the tensile strength and collagen fiber alignment of the repair tissue. Study Design © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:2162-2171, 2016. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Saving Stem Cells after Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Katherine Y

    2017-12-07

    Inflammatory signals can activate hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), but how HSCs regain quiescence after stress is unclear. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Chen et al. (2017) delineate an elegant histamine-dependent feedback mechanism through which myeloid bone marrow cells restore quiescence of myeloid-biased HSCs, with implications for blood disorders, aging, and immunity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Molecular Imaging and Stem Cell Research

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon-Young Jang; Zhaohui Ye; Linzhao Cheng

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade, there has been enormous progress in understanding both multipotent stem cells such as hematopoietic stem cells and pluripotent stem cells such as embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. However, it has been challenging to study developmental potentials of these stem cells because they reside in complex cellular environments and aspects of their distribution, migration, engraftment, survival, proliferation, and differentiation often could not be suffici...

  12. Gastrointestinal stem cell up-to-date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirvulet, V

    2015-01-01

    Cellular and tissue regeneration in the gastrointestinal tract depends on stem cells with properties of self-renewal, clonogenicity, and multipotency. Progress in stem cell research and the identification of potential gastric, intestinal, colonic stem cells new markers and the signaling pathways provide hope for the use of stem cells in regenerative medicine and treatments for disease. This review provides an overview of the different types of stem cells, focusing on tissue-restricted adult stem cells.

  13. A Comparison of Culture Characteristics between Human Amniotic Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Dental Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusoff, Nurul Hidayat; Alshehadat, Saaid Ayesh; Azlina, Ahmad; Kannan, Thirumulu Ponnuraj; Hamid, Suzina Sheikh Abdul

    2015-04-01

    In the past decade, the field of stem cell biology is of major interest among researchers due to its broad therapeutic potential. Stem cells are a class of undifferentiated cells that are able to differentiate into specialised cell types. Stem cells can be classified into two main types: adult stem cells (adult tissues) and embryonic stem cells (embryos formed during the blastocyst phase of embryological development). This review will discuss two types of adult mesenchymal stem cells, dental stem cells and amniotic stem cells, with respect to their differentiation lineages, passage numbers and animal model studies. Amniotic stem cells have a greater number of differentiation lineages than dental stem cells. On the contrary, dental stem cells showed the highest number of passages compared to amniotic stem cells. For tissue regeneration based on animal studies, amniotic stem cells showed the shortest time to regenerate in comparison with dental stem cells.

  14. Bone regeneration and stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvidson, K; Abdallah, B M; Applegate, L A

    2011-01-01

    This invited review covers research areas of central importance for orthopedic and maxillofacial bone tissue repair, including normal fracture healing and healing problems, biomaterial scaffolds for tissue engineering, mesenchymal and fetal stem cells, effects of sex steroids on mesenchymal stem...... cells, use of platelet rich plasma for tissue repair, osteogenesis and its molecular markers. A variety of cells in addition to stem cells, as well as advances in materials science to meet specific requirements for bone and soft tissue regeneration by addition of bioactive molecules, are discussed....

  15. Thrombopoietin and hematopoietic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    de Graaf, Carolyn A; Metcalf, Donald

    2011-01-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) is the cytokine that is chiefly responsible for megakaryocyte production but increasingly attention has turned to its role in maintaining hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). HSCs are required to initiate the production of all mature hematopoietic cells, but this differentiation needs to be balanced against self-renewal and quiescence to maintain the stem cell pool throughout life. TPO has been shown to support HSC quiescence during adult hematopoiesis, with the loss of TPO s...

  16. Nanotechniques Inactivate Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goltsev, Anatoliy N.; Babenko, Natalya N.; Gaevskaya, Yulia A.; Bondarovich, Nikolay A.; Dubrava, Tatiana G.; Ostankov, Maksim V.; Chelombitko, Olga V.; Malyukin, Yuriy V.; Klochkov, Vladimir K.; Kavok, Nataliya S.

    2017-06-01

    One of the tasks of current oncology is identification of cancer stem cells and search of therapeutic means capable of their specific inhibition. The paper presents the data on phenotype characteristics of Ehrlich carcinoma cells as convenient and easy-to-follow model of tumor growth. The evidence of cancer stem cells as a part of Ehrlich carcinoma and significance of CD44+ and CD44- subpopulations in maintaining the growth of this type of tumor were demonstrated. A high (tenfold) tumorigenic activity of the Ehrlich carcinoma CD44+ cells if compared to CD44- cells was proven. In this pair of comparison, the CD44+ cells had a higher potential of generating in peritoneal cavity of CD44high, CD44+CD24-, CD44+CD24+ cell subpopulations, highlighting the presence of cancer stem cells in a pool of CD44+ cells.

  17. Matrix control of stem cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even-Ram, Sharona; Artym, Vira; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2006-08-25

    A key challenge in stem cell research is to learn how to direct the differentiation of stem cells toward specific fates. In this issue of Cell, Engler et al. (2006) identify a new factor regulating stem cell fate: the elasticity of the matrix microenvironment. By changing the stiffness of the substrate, human mesenchymal stem cells could be directed along neuronal, muscle, or bone lineages.

  18. Effect of aging and exercise on the tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Rene B; Heinemeier, Katja Maria; Couppé, Christian

    2016-01-01

    in humans, which likely reflects synthesis at the very periphery of the tendon rather than the core. Average collagen fibril diameter is largely unaffected by exercise, while there can be some hypertrophy of the whole tendon. In addition, it seems that resistance training can yield increased stiffness......Here, we review the literature on how tendons respond and adapt to ageing and exercise. With respect to aging, there are considerable changes early in life, but this seems to be maturation rather than aging per se. In vitro data indicate that aging is associated with a decreased potential for cell...... proliferation and a reduction in the number of stem/progenitor-like cells. Further, there is persuasive evidence that turnover in the core of the tendon after maturity is very slow or absent. Tendon fibril diameter, collagen content, and whole tendon size appear to be largely unchanged with aging, while...

  19. Dental stem cells--characteristics and potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojic, Sanja; Volarevic, Vladislav; Ljujic, Biljana; Stojkovic, Miodrag

    2014-06-01

    Soft dental tissues have been identified as easily accessible sources of multipotent postnatal stem cells. Dental stem cells are mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) capable of differentiating into at least three distinct cell lineages: osteo/odontogenic, adipogenic and neurogenic. They express various markers including those specific for MSC, embryonic stem cells and neural cells. Five different types of dental stem cells have been isolated from mature and immature teeth: dental pulp stem cells, stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth, periodontal ligament stem cells, stem cells from apical papilla and dental follicle progenitor cells. Dental stem cells may be used in dental tissue engineering including dental, enamel and periodontal tissue regeneration. They could also be used as a promising tool in potential treatment of neurodegenerative, ischemic and immune diseases.

  20. Myocardial infarction and stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Ananda Krishna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Permanent loss of cardiomyocytes and scar tissue formation after myocardial infarction (MI results in an irreversible damage to the cardiac function. Cardiac repair (replacement, restoration, and regeneration is, therefore, essential to restore function of the heart following MI. Existing therapies lower early mortality rates, prevent additional damage to the heart muscle, and reduce the risk of further heart attacks. However, there is need for treatment to improve the infarcted area by replacing the damaged cells after MI. Thus, the cardiac tissue regeneration with the application of stem cells may be an effective therapeutic option. Recently, interest is more inclined toward myocardial regeneration with the application of stem cells. However, the potential benefits and the ability to improve cardiac function with the stem cell-based therapy need to be further addressed. In this review, we focus on the clinical applications of stem cells in the cardiac repair.

  1. Quantification of cell density in rat Achilles tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couppé, Christian; Svensson, René B; Heinemeier, Katja M

    2017-01-01

    -3 times in three separate regions of the mid longitudinal tendon sections with fields of 390 μm × 280 μm. Unpaired t tests were used for the statistical analysis (mean ± SE). Typical Error % for replicate counts was 5.5 and 14 % coefficient of variation for the three regions. There was no difference...

  2. Beneficial effects of autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in naturally occurring tendinopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Kenneth Whealands Smith

    Full Text Available Tendon injuries are a common age-related degenerative condition where current treatment strategies fail to restore functionality and normal quality of life. This disease also occurs naturally in horses, with many similarities to human tendinopathy making it an ideal large animal model for human disease. Regenerative approaches are increasingly used to improve outcome involving mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, supported by clinical data where injection of autologous bone marrow derived MSCs (BM-MSCs suspended in marrow supernatant into injured tendons has halved the re-injury rate in racehorses. We hypothesized that stem cell therapy induces a matrix more closely resembling normal tendon than the fibrous scar tissue formed by natural repair. Twelve horses with career-ending naturally-occurring superficial digital flexor tendon injury were allocated randomly to treatment and control groups. 1X10(7 autologous BM-MSCs suspended in 2 ml of marrow supernatant were implanted into the damaged tendon of the treated group. The control group received the same volume of saline. Following a 6 month exercise programme horses were euthanized and tendons assessed for structural stiffness by non-destructive mechanical testing and for morphological and molecular composition. BM-MSC treated tendons exhibited statistically significant improvements in key parameters compared to saline-injected control tendons towards that of normal tendons and those in the contralateral limbs. Specifically, treated tendons had lower structural stiffness (p<0.05 although no significant difference in calculated modulus of elasticity, lower (improved histological scoring of organisation (p<0.003 and crimp pattern (p<0.05, lower cellularity (p<0.007, DNA content (p<0.05, vascularity (p<0.03, water content (p<0.05, GAG content (p<0.05, and MMP-13 activity (p<0.02. Treatment with autologous MSCs in marrow supernatant therefore provides significant benefits compared to untreated tendon repair

  3. Diabetes and Stem Cell Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Fujimaki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common serious metabolic diseases that results in hyperglycemia due to defects of insulin secretion or insulin action or both. The present review focuses on the alterations to the diabetic neuronal tissues and skeletal muscle, including stem cells in both tissues, and the preventive effects of physical activity on diabetes. Diabetes is associated with various nervous disorders, such as cognitive deficits, depression, and Alzheimer’s disease, and that may be caused by neural stem cell dysfunction. Additionally, diabetes induces skeletal muscle atrophy, the impairment of energy metabolism, and muscle weakness. Similar to neural stem cells, the proliferation and differentiation are attenuated in skeletal muscle stem cells, termed satellite cells. However, physical activity is very useful for preventing the diabetic alteration to the neuronal tissues and skeletal muscle. Physical activity improves neurogenic capacity of neural stem cells and the proliferative and differentiative abilities of satellite cells. The present review proposes physical activity as a useful measure for the patients in diabetes to improve the physiological functions and to maintain their quality of life. It further discusses the use of stem cell-based approaches in the context of diabetes treatment.

  4. Effects of Hypoxia and Chitosan on Equine Umbilical Cord-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Griffon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan opens new perspectives in regenerative medicine as it enhances the properties of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs through formation of spheroids. Hypoxia has also been proposed to enhance stemness and survival of MSCs after in vivo implantation. These characteristics are relevant to the development of an off-the-shelf source of allogenic cells for regenerative therapy of tendinopathies. Umbilical cord-derived MSCs (UCM-MSCs offer an abundant source of immature and immunoprivileged stem cells. In this study, equine UCM-MSCs (eqUCM-MSCs conditioned for 3 and 7 days on chitosan films at 5% oxygen were compared to eqUCM-MSCs under standard conditions. Equine UCM-MSCs formed spheroids on chitosan but yielded 72% less DNA than standard eqUCM-MSCs. Expression of Sox2, Oct4, and Nanog was 4 to 10 times greater in conditioned cells at day 7. Fluorescence-labeled cells cultured for 7 days under standard conditions or on chitosan films under hypoxia were compared in a bilateral patellar tendon defect model in rats. Fluorescence was present in all treated tendons, but the modulus of elasticity under tension was greater in tendons treated with conditioned cells. Chitosan and hypoxia affected cell yield but improved the stemness of eqUCM-MSCs and their contribution to the healing of tissues. Given the abundance of allogenic cells, these properties are highly relevant to clinical applications and outweigh the negative impact on cell proliferation.

  5. Decellularized and Engineered Tendons as Biological Substitutes: A Critical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna B. Lovati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tendon ruptures are a great burden in clinics. Finding a proper graft material as a substitute for tendon repair is one of the main challenges in orthopaedics, for which the requirement of a biological scaffold would be different for each clinical application. Among biological scaffolds, the use of decellularized tendon-derived matrix increasingly represents an interesting approach to treat tendon ruptures. We analyzed in vitro and in vivo studies focused on the development of efficient protocols for the decellularization and for the cell reseeding of the tendon matrix to obtain medical devices for tendon substitution. Our review considered also the proper tendon source and preclinical animal models with the aim of entering into clinical trials. The results highlight a wide panorama in terms of allogenic or xenogeneic tendon sources, specimen dimensions, physical or chemical decellularization techniques, and the cell type variety for reseeding from terminally differentiated to undifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells and their static or dynamic culture employed to generate implantable constructs tested in different animal models. We try to identify the most efficient approach to achieve an optimal biological scaffold for biomechanics and intrinsic properties, resembling the native tendon and being applicable in clinics in the near future, with particular attention to the Achilles tendon substitution.

  6. Stemness in Cancer: Stem Cells, Cancer Stem Cells, and Their Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aponte, Pedro M; Caicedo, Andrés

    2017-01-01

    Stemness combines the ability of a cell to perpetuate its lineage, to give rise to differentiated cells, and to interact with its environment to maintain a balance between quiescence, proliferation, and regeneration. While adult Stem Cells display these properties when participating in tissue homeostasis, Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs) behave as their malignant equivalents. CSCs display stemness in various circumstances, including the sustaining of cancer progression, and the interaction with their environment in search for key survival factors. As a result, CSCs can recurrently persist after therapy. In order to understand how the concept of stemness applies to cancer, this review will explore properties shared between normal and malignant Stem Cells. First, we provide an overview of properties of normal adult Stem Cells. We thereafter elaborate on how these features operate in CSCs. We then review the organization of microenvironment components, which enables CSCs hosting. We subsequently discuss Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells (MSCs), which, although their stemness properties are limited, represent essential components of the Stem Cell niche and tumor microenvironment. We next provide insights of the therapeutic strategies targeting Stem Cell properties in tumors and the use of state-of-the-art techniques in future research. Increasing our knowledge of the CSCs microenvironment is key to identifying new therapeutic solutions.

  7. Fetal stem-cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiblad, Eleonor; Westgren, Magnus

    2008-02-01

    Fetal stem-cell transplantation is an attractive approach to the treatment of a variety of hematological, metabolic and immunological diseases before birth. The possibility of delivering a large number of cells in an early stage of life, and of taking advantage of normal fetal stem-cell migration and development, is promising. During fetal life, the capacity to mount an immune response to allogeneic cells is impaired compared with adult life. This provides an opportunity to induce tolerance to alloantigens without the need for myeloablation, although there are possible immune barriers to foreign cells in the fetus.

  8. Neuroproteomics in stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Susanne; Mix, Eilhard; Hoffrogge, Raimund; Lünser, Katja; Völker, Uwe; Rolfs, Arndt

    2007-11-01

    The term "proteome" is used to describe the entire complement of proteins in a given organism or in a system at a given time. Proteome analysis in neuroscience, also called "neuroproteomics" or "neuromics" is in its initial stage, and shows a deficit of studies in the context of brain development. It is the main objective of this review to illustrate the potential of neuroproteomics as a tool to unravel the differentiation of neural stem or progenitor cells to terminally differentiated neurons. Experimental results regarding the rat striatal progenitor model cell line ST14A are presented to illustrate the large rearrangements of the proteome during the differentiation process of neural progenitor cells and their modification by neurotrophic factors like the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). Thereby native stem cells and cells transfected with GDNF gene were investigated at the proliferative state and at seven time points up to 72 h after induction of differentiation. In addition, the immortalized human fetal midbrain stem cell line ReNcell VM was analyzed in order to detect stem cell differentiation associated changes of the protein profile. This review gives also an outlook on technical improvements and perspectives of application of neural stem cell proteomics. Copyright © 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Stem cell evolutionary paradigm and cell engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanovic, Z

    2017-09-01

    Studying hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells for almost three decades revealed some similarities between the stem cell entity and the single-celled eukaryotes exhibiting the anaerobic/facultative aerobic metabolic features. A careful analysis of nowadays knowledge concerning the early eukaryotic evolution allowed us to reveal some analogies between stem cells in the metazoan tissues and the single-celled eukaryotes which existed during the first phase of eukaryotes evolution in mid-Proterozoic era. In fact, it is possible to trace the principle of the self-renewal back to the first eukaryotic common ancestor, the first undifferentiated nucleated cell possessing the primitive, mostly anaerobically-respiring mitochondria and a capacity to reproduction by a simple cell division "à l'identique". Similarly, the diversification of these single-cell eukaryotes and acquiring of complex life cycle allowed/conditioned by the increase of O2 in atmosphere (and consequently in the water environment) represents a prototype for the phenomenon of commitment/differentiation. This point of view allowed to predict the ex-vivo behavior of stem cells with respect to the O2 availability and metabolic profile which enabled to conceive the successful protocols of stem cell expansion and ex vivo conditioning based on "respecting" this relationship between the anaerobiosis and stemness. In this review, the basic elements of this paradigm and a possible application in cell engineering were discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Novel image analysis methods for quantification of in situ 3-D tendon cell and matrix strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Ashley K; Paredes, J J; Andarawis-Puri, Nelly

    2018-01-23

    Macroscopic tendon loads modulate the cellular microenvironment leading to biological outcomes such as degeneration or repair. Previous studies have shown that damage accumulation and the phases of tendon healing are marked by significant changes in the extracellular matrix, but it remains unknown how mechanical forces of the extracellular matrix are translated to mechanotransduction pathways that ultimately drive the biological response. Our overarching hypothesis is that the unique relationship between extracellular matrix strain and cell deformation will dictate biological outcomes, prompting the need for quantitative methods to characterize the local strain environment. While 2-D methods have successfully calculated matrix strain and cell deformation, 3-D methods are necessary to capture the increased complexity that can arise due to high levels of anisotropy and out-of-plane motion, particularly in the disorganized, highly cellular, injured state. In this study, we validated the use of digital volume correlation methods to quantify 3-D matrix strain using images of naïve tendon cells, the collagen fiber matrix, and injured tendon cells. Additionally, naïve tendon cell images were used to develop novel methods for 3-D cell deformation and 3-D cell-matrix strain, which is defined as a quantitative measure of the relationship between matrix strain and cell deformation. The results support that these methods can be used to detect strains with high accuracy and can be further extended to an in vivo setting for observing temporal changes in cell and matrix mechanics during degeneration and healing. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Stereological quantification of immune-competent cells in baseline biopsy specimens from achilles tendons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragsnaes, Maja Skov; Fredberg, Ulrich; Stribolt, Katrine

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Limited data exist on the presence and function of immune-competent cells in chronic tendinopathic tendons and their potential role in inflammation and tissue healing as well as in predicting long-term outcome. PURPOSE: To quantify subtypes of immune-competent cells in biopsy specimens...... immunohistochemically by quantifying the presence of macrophages (CD68-PGM1(+), CD68-KP1(+)), hemosiderophages (Perls blue), T lymphocytes (CD2(+), CD3(+), CD4(+), CD7(+), CD8(+)), B lymphocytes (CD20(+)), natural killer cells (CD56(+)), mast cells (NaSDCl(+)), Schwann cells (S100(+)), and endothelial cells (CD34......(+)) using a stereological technique. A follow-up examination was conducted more than 4 years (range, 4-9 years) after the biopsy procedure to evaluate the long-term presence of Achilles tendon symptoms. RESULTS: Macrophages, T lymphocytes, mast cells, and natural killer cells were observed in the majority...

  12. Flexibility of neural stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eumorphia eRemboutsika

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic cortical neural stem cells are self-renewing progenitors that can differentiate into neurons and glia. We generated neurospheres from the developing cerebral cortex using a mouse genetic model that allows for lineage selection and found that the self-renewing neural stem cells are restricted to Sox2 expressing cells. Under normal conditions, embryonic cortical neurospheres are heterogeneous with regard to Sox2 expression and contain astrocytes, neural stem cells and neural progenitor cells sufficiently plastic to give rise to neural crest cells when transplanted into the hindbrain of E1.5 chick and E8 mouse embryos. However, when neurospheres are maintained under lineage selection, such that all cells express Sox2, neural stem cells maintain their Pax6+ cortical radial glia identity and exhibit a more restricted fate in vitro and after transplantation. These data demonstrate that Sox2 preserves the cortical identity and regulates the plasticity of self-renewing Pax6+ radial glia cells.

  13. Dental Stem Cell in Tooth Development and Advances of Adult Dental Stem Cell in Regenerative Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jiali; Xu, Xin; Lin, Jiong; Fan, Li; Zheng, Yuting; Kuang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapies are considered as a promising treatment for many clinical usage such as tooth regeneration, bone repairation, spinal cord injury, and so on. However, the ideal stem cell for stem cell-based therapy still remains to be elucidated. In the past decades, several types of stem cells have been isolated from teeth, including dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED), periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs), dental follicle progenitor stem cells (DFPCs) and stem cells from apical papilla (SCAP), which may be a good source for stem cell-based therapy in certain disease, especially when they origin from neural crest is considered. In this review, the specific characteristics and advantages of the adult dental stem cell population will be summarized and the molecular mechanisms of the differentiation of dental stem cell during tooth development will be also discussed.

  14. Epigenetics in cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Tan Boon; Lim, Jhin Jieh; Chow, Edward Kai-Hua

    2017-02-01

    Compelling evidence have demonstrated that bulk tumors can arise from a unique subset of cells commonly termed "cancer stem cells" that has been proposed to be a strong driving force of tumorigenesis and a key mechanism of therapeutic resistance. Recent advances in epigenomics have illuminated key mechanisms by which epigenetic regulation contribute to cancer progression. In this review, we present a discussion of how deregulation of various epigenetic pathways can contribute to cancer initiation and tumorigenesis, particularly with respect to maintenance and survival of cancer stem cells. This information, together with several promising clinical and preclinical trials of epigenetic modulating drugs, offer new possibilities for targeting cancer stem cells as well as improving cancer therapy overall.

  15. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toyserkani, Navid Mohamadpour; Quaade, Marlene Louise; Sheikh, Søren Paludan

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence has shown that adipose tissue is the richest and most accessible source of mesenchymal stem cells. Many different therapies for chronic wounds exist with varying success rates. The capacity of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) to promote angiogenesis, secrete growth factors......, regulate the inflammatory process, and differentiate into multiple cell types makes them a potential ideal therapy for chronic wounds. The aim of this article was to review all preclinical trials using ASCs in problem wound models. A systematic search was performed and 12 studies were found where different...

  16. Stem cell therapy for inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijvestein, Marjolijn

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and mesenchymal stromal (MSC) cell therapy are currently under investigation as novel therapies for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Hematopoietic stem cells are thought to repopulate the immune system and reset the immunological response to luminal

  17. International Society for Stem Cell Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stem Cell and Current Protocols in Stem Cell Biology , included in Professional Resources. Online Now View All 16 November, 2017 Isolation and Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Human Fetal and iPSC-Derived Cone Photoreceptor Cells 16 ...

  18. Stem cells: Concepts and prospects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Regenerative therapy for organ dysfunction is a rapidly growing domain and involves application of multiple enabling technologies incorporating stem cells, genes and growth factors that can acceler- ate the recovery of a failing organ through cell and tissue regeneration within the organ. Several strategies are currently ...

  19. Carpal tunnel syndrome caused by a giant cell tumour of the flexor tendon sheath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Marcel F; Sheikh, Zahid A; Quinton, David N

    2014-02-01

    A 76-year-old woman developed right carpal tunnel syndrome after being conservatively treated for tenosynovitis of the flexor tendons with associated mild carpal tunnel syndrome. A magnetic resonance imaging scan showed a tumour in the carpal tunnel. Re-exploration showed that the median nerve was being compressed by a giant cell tumour of the flexor tendon sheaths. Appropriate imaging is advised in patients with additional findings (such as swelling) or in patients with secondary carpal tunnel syndrome and incomplete response to conservative treatment, to exclude a space-occupying lesion.

  20. Human stem cell ethics: beyond the embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugarman, Jeremy

    2008-06-05

    Human embryonic stem cell research has elicited powerful debates about the morality of destroying human embryos. However, there are important ethical issues related to stem cell research that are unrelated to embryo destruction. These include particular issues involving different types of cells used, the procurement of such cells, in vivo use of stem cells, intellectual property, and conflicts of interest.

  1. Stem cells' exodus: a journey to immortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yi; Lewallen, Michelle; Xie, Ting

    2013-01-28

    Stem cell niches provide a regulatory microenvironment that retains stem cells and promotes self-renewal. Recently in Developmental Cell, Rinkevich et al. (2013) showed that cell islands (CIs) of Botryllus schlosseri, a colonial chordate, provide niches for maintaining cycling stem cells that migrate from degenerated CIs to newly formed buds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. From regenerative dentistry to regenerative medicine: progress, challenges, and potential applications of oral stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao L

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Li Xiao,1 Masanori Nasu2 1Department of Pharmacology, 2Research Center, The Nippon Dental University, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and epithelial stem cells play essential roles in tissue repair and self-healing. Oral MSCs and epithelial stem cells can be isolated from adult human oral tissues, for example, teeth, periodontal ligament, and gingiva. Cocultivated adult oral epithelial stem cells and MSCs could represent some developmental events, such as epithelial invagination and tubular structure formation, signifying their potentials for tissue regeneration. Oral epithelial stem cells have been used in regenerative medicine over 1 decade. They are able to form a stratified cell sheet under three-dimensional culture conditions. Both experimental and clinical data indicate that the cell sheets can not only safely and effectively reconstruct the damaged cornea in humans, but also repair esophageal ulcer in animal models. Oral MSCs include dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs, stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED, stem cells from apical papilla (SCAP, periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs, and mesenchymal stem cells from gingiva (GMSCs. They are widely applied in both regenerative dentistry and medicine. DPSCs, SHED, and SCAP are able to form dentin–pulp complex when being transplanted into immunodeficient animals. They have been experimentally used for the regeneration of dental pulp, neuron, bone muscle and blood vessels in animal models and have shown promising results. PDLSCs and GMSCs are demonstrated to be ideal cell sources for repairing the damaged tissues of periodontal, muscle, and tendon. Despite the abovementioned applications of oral stem cells, only a few human clinical trials are now underway to use them for the treatment of certain diseases. Since clinical use is the end goal, their true regenerative power and safety need to be further examined.Keywords: oral mesenchymal stem cells, oral

  3. Giant cell tumor of the tendon seath of the tendinous insertion in pes anserinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikaterini Solomou, MD, PhD

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A 56-year-old woman with a palpable lump in the medial surface of her left knee was referred for diagnostic workup with magnetic resonance imaging. The lesion was pathogically confirmed to be a giant cell tumor of the tendon seath. The MR features of the lesion are presented.

  4. Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath—Use of fine-needle aspiration cytology for diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Meena

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumour of the tendon sheath (GCTTS is a slow-growing, usually painless benign lesion of soft tissues. We report the case of a 38-year-old male with a painless, slowly enlarging swelling on right thumb in order to highlight the role of fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC in diagnosing GCTTS.

  5. Giant cell tumor of the tendon seath of the tendinous insertion in pes anserinus

    OpenAIRE

    Solomou, Aikaterini; Kraniotis, Pantelis

    2017-01-01

    A 56-year-old woman with a palpable lump in the medial surface of her left knee was referred for diagnostic workup with magnetic resonance imaging. The lesion was pathogically confirmed to be a giant cell tumor of the tendon seath. The MR features of the lesion are presented.

  6. Isolation and characterization of human mesenchymal stem cells derived from shoulder tissues involved in rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsunomiya, Hajime; Uchida, Soshi; Sekiya, Ichiro; Sakai, Akinori; Moridera, Kuniaki; Nakamura, Toshitaka

    2013-03-01

    Recent studies report a relatively high failure rate for tendon-bone healing after rotator cuff repair. Several studies have investigated biologically augmented rotator cuff repair; however, none has shown the application of synovial mesenchymal stem cells for such repair. To demonstrate whether cells derived from shoulder tissues have mesenchymal stem cell properties and to identify which tissue is the best source of the mesenchymal stem cells. Controlled laboratory study. Forty-two patients with a diagnosed rotator cuff tear preoperatively were enrolled in this study. Human mesenchymal tissues were obtained during arthroscopic surgery for rotator cuff tears from 19 donors who met the inclusion criteria and had investigable amounts of tissue. Colony-forming units, yield obtained, expandability, differentiation potential, epitope profile, and gene expression were compared among the cells from 4 shoulder tissues: synovium of the glenohumeral joint, subacromial bursa, margin of the ruptured supraspinatus tendon, and residual tendon stump on the greater tuberosity (enthesis). The number of live passage 0 cells from whole tissue was significantly higher in cells derived from the subacromial bursa (P source. The findings indicate that the subacromial bursa is a good candidate for the source of mesenchymal stem cells in rotator cuff tears. Synovial cells from the subacromial bursa in patients with rotator cuff tears are a superior cell source in vitro, suggesting that mesenchymal stem cells from this tissue could be good candidates for biological augmentation of rotator cuff repair.

  7. Tendon Is Covered by a Basement Membrane Epithelium That Is Required for Cell Retention and the Prevention of Adhesion Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Susan H.; Al-Youha, Sarah; Van Agtmael, Tom; Lu, Yinhui; Wong, Jason; McGrouther, Duncan A.; Kadler, Karl E.

    2011-01-01

    The ability of tendons to glide smoothly during muscle contraction is impaired after injury by fibrous adhesions that form between the damaged tendon surface and surrounding tissues. To understand how adhesions form we incubated excised tendons in fibrin gels (to mimic the homeostatic environment at the injury site) and assessed cell migration. We noticed cells exiting the tendon from only the cut ends. Furthermore, treatment of the tendon with trypsin resulted in cell extravagation from the shaft of the tendons. Electron microscopy and immunolocalisation studies showed that the tendons are covered by a novel cell layer in which a collagen type IV/laminin basement membrane (BM) overlies a keratinised epithelium. PCR and western blot analyses confirmed the expression of laminin β1 in surface cells, only. To evaluate the cell retentive properties of the BM in vivo we examined the tendons of the Col4a1+/Svc mouse that is heterozygous for a G-to-A transition in the Col4a1 gene that produces a G1064D substitution in the α1(IV) chain of collagen IV. The flexor tendons had a discontinuous BM, developed fibrous adhesions with overlying tissues, and were acellular at sites of adhesion formation. In further experiments, tenotomy of wild-type mice resulted in expression of laminin throughout the adhesion. In conclusion, we show the existence of a novel tendon BM-epithelium that is required to prevent adhesion formation. The Col4a1+/Svc mouse is an effective animal model for studying adhesion formation because of the presence of a structurally-defective collagen type IV-containing BM. PMID:21298098

  8. Tendon is covered by a basement membrane epithelium that is required for cell retention and the prevention of adhesion formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan H Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability of tendons to glide smoothly during muscle contraction is impaired after injury by fibrous adhesions that form between the damaged tendon surface and surrounding tissues. To understand how adhesions form we incubated excised tendons in fibrin gels (to mimic the homeostatic environment at the injury site and assessed cell migration. We noticed cells exiting the tendon from only the cut ends. Furthermore, treatment of the tendon with trypsin resulted in cell extravagation from the shaft of the tendons. Electron microscopy and immunolocalisation studies showed that the tendons are covered by a novel cell layer in which a collagen type IV/laminin basement membrane (BM overlies a keratinised epithelium. PCR and western blot analyses confirmed the expression of laminin β1 in surface cells, only. To evaluate the cell retentive properties of the BM in vivo we examined the tendons of the Col4a1(+/Svc mouse that is heterozygous for a G-to-A transition in the Col4a1 gene that produces a G1064D substitution in the α1(IV chain of collagen IV. The flexor tendons had a discontinuous BM, developed fibrous adhesions with overlying tissues, and were acellular at sites of adhesion formation. In further experiments, tenotomy of wild-type mice resulted in expression of laminin throughout the adhesion. In conclusion, we show the existence of a novel tendon BM-epithelium that is required to prevent adhesion formation. The Col4a1(+/Svc mouse is an effective animal model for studying adhesion formation because of the presence of a structurally-defective collagen type IV-containing BM.

  9. Stem Cell Transplantation for Neuroprotection in Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar V. Borlongan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell-based therapies for stroke have expanded substantially over the last decade. The diversity of embryonic and adult tissue sources provides researchers with the ability to harvest an ample supply of stem cells. However, the optimal conditions of stem cell use are still being determined. Along this line of the need for optimization studies, we discuss studies that demonstrate effective dose, timing, and route of stem cells. We recognize that stem cell derivations also provide uniquely individual difficulties and limitations in their therapeutic applications. This review will outline the current knowledge, including benefits and challenges, of the many current sources of stem cells for stroke therapy.

  10. Autologous tendon-derived cell-seeded nanofibrous scaffolds improve rotator cuff repair in an age-dependent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huegel, Julianne; Kim, Dong Hwa; Cirone, James M; Pardes, Adam M; Morris, Tyler R; Nuss, Courtney A; Mauck, Robert L; Soslowsky, Louis J; Kuntz, Andrew F

    2017-06-01

    Rotator cuff tendon tears are one of the most common shoulder pathologies, especially in the aging population. Due to a poor healing response and degenerative changes associated with aging, rotator cuff repair failure remains common. Although cell-based therapies to augment rotator cuff repair appear promising, it is unknown whether the success of such a therapy is age-dependent. We hypothesized that autologous cell therapy would improve tendon-to-bone healing across age groups, with autologous juvenile cells realizing the greatest benefit. In this study, juvenile, adult, and aged rats underwent bilateral supraspinatus tendon repair with augmentation of one shoulder with autologous tendon-derived cell-seeded polycaprolactone scaffolds. At 8 weeks, shoulders treated with cells in both juvenile and aged animals exhibited increased cellularity, increased collagen organization, and improved mechanical properties. No changes between treated and control limbs were seen in adult rats. These findings suggest that cell delivery during supraspinatus repair initiates earlier matrix remodeling in juvenile and aged animals. This may be due to the relative "equilibrium" of adult tendon tissue with regards to catabolic and anabolic processes, contrasted with actively growing juvenile tendons and degenerative aged tendons. This study demonstrates the potential for autologous cell-seeded scaffolds to improve repairs in both the juvenile and aged population. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1250-1257, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Prospects and Challenges ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    relapse and organ toxicity. Sadly, because of these limitations, sickle cell anaemia, which is ... In this, the Federal. Government should provide adequate funding. Keywords: Stem cell, Transplantation, Nigeria. ... 11 Stem Cell Sources. 1. Bone marrow stem cells: Marrow is usually obtained from the donor's posterior iliac.

  12. European stem cell research in legal shackles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielen, M.G.; de Vries, S.A.; Geijsen, N.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in stem cell biology have raised legal challenges to the patentability of stem cells and any derived technologies and processes. In 1999, Oliver Brustle was granted a patent for the generation and therapeutic use of neural cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). The patent

  13. Emerging molecular approaches in stem cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaishankar, Amritha; Vrana, Kent

    2009-04-01

    Stem cells are characterized by their ability to self-renew and differentiate into multiple adult cell types. Although substantial progress has been made over the last decade in understanding stem cell biology, recent technological advances in molecular and systems biology may hold the key to unraveling the mystery behind stem cell self-renewal and plasticity. The most notable of these advances is the ability to generate induced pluripotent cells from somatic cells. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of molecular similarities and differences among various stem cell types. Moreover, we survey the current state of systems biology and forecast future needs and direction in the stem cell field.

  14. Systems Biology and Stem Cell Pluripotency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mashayekhi, Kaveh; Hall, Vanessa Jane; Freude, Kristine

    2016-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in stem cell biology have accelerated research in the area of regenerative medicine. Over the past years, it has become possible to derive patient-specific stem cells which can be used to generate different cell populations for potential cell therapy. Systems biological...... modeling of stem cell pluripotency and differentiation have largely been based on prior knowledge of signaling pathways, gene regulatory networks, and epigenetic factors. However, there is a great need to extend the complexity of the modeling and to integrate different types of data, which would further...... improve systems biology and its uses in the field. In this chapter, we first give a general background on stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. Stem cell potency is introduced together with the hierarchy of stem cells ranging from pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem...

  15. Fibroma and giant-cell tumor of tendon sheath: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batista KT

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Kátia Tôrres Batista,1 Heveline Becker de Moura,1 Maria Isabel Lima,2 Kikue Terada Abe3 1Department of Plastic Surgery and Pathology, 2Electron Microscopy Laboratory, 3Cytogenetic Laboratory, Sarah Hospital Brasilia, Brazil Abstract: A 53-year-old man presented in 2009 with a tumor over the dorsum of his hand and wrist. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed before surgery and histopathological and immunohistochemical studies were performed after surgery. This demonstrated an ill-defined lesion measuring 46 mm × 31 mm confined to the subcutaneous tissues, extensor tendons, and articular capsule on the dorsum of the hand and wrist with heterogeneous intermediate and high T1 and T2 signal suggesting a complex mixture of fat and fibrous elements. A histopathological differential diagnosis of hemosiderotic fibrohistiocytic lipomatous lesion/tumor (HFLL/T and giant-cell tumor of tendon sheath and fibroma of tendon sheath was made. We describe this rare lesion and call attention to important points in diagnosis. Keywords: giant cell tumor, fibroma tumor, sheath tendon tumor

  16. Application of Nanomaterials in Stem Cell Regenerative Medicine of Orthopedic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Pan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative medicine aims to achieve functional rehabilitation of tissue or cells injured through wound, disease, or aging. Recent findings suggest that nanotechnology provides advanced biomaterials with specified morphologies which can create a nanoscale extracellular environment capable of promoting the adhesion and proliferation of stem cells and accelerating stem cell differentiation in a controlled manner in tissue engineering. This review summarizes the biological effects of nanomaterials and their regenerative medicine applications in orthopedic surgery research, including bone, cartilage, tendons, and nerve tissue engineering.

  17. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... free Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Loading... Unsubscribe from NCIcancertopics? Cancel Unsubscribe ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  18. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Loading... Unsubscribe from NCIcancertopics? Cancel Unsubscribe ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  19. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Loading... Unsubscribe from NCIcancertopics? Cancel Unsubscribe ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  20. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Loading... Unsubscribe from NCIcancertopics? Cancel ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a ...

  1. Ethics and Governance of Stem Cell Banks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Donald; Rathjen, Peter; Rathjen, Joy; Nicol, Dianne

    2017-01-01

    This chapter examines the ethical principles and governance frameworks for stem cell banks. Good governance of stem cell banks should balance facilitation of the clinical use of stem cells with the proper respect and protection of stem cell sample providers and stem cell recipients and ensure compliance with national regulatory requirements to foster public trust in the use of stem cell technology. Stem cell banks must develop with regard to the science, the needs of scientists, and the requirements of the public, which will benefit from this science. Given the international reach of this promising research and its clinical application, it is necessary for stem cell bank governance frameworks to be harmonized across jurisdictions.

  2. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... employee, Serena Marshall, as she takes you through her blood stem cell donation experience at the National ... 31,594 views 10:58 AML Survivor meets her German stem cell donor for the first time ...

  3. Molecular mechanisms of adult stem cell aging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rudolph, K. Lenhard

    2010-01-01

    "There is growing evidence that adult stem cells age. This process can result in alterations in the number and function of stem cells, leading to distinct phenotypic outcomes in different organ systems...

  4. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Loading... Unsubscribe from NCIcancertopics? Cancel Unsubscribe ... considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  5. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MD. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) are most commonly used in the treatment of cancers like leukemia and lymphoma to restore stem cells that have been destroyed by high doses of ...

  6. FDA Warns About Stem Cell Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home For Consumers Consumer Updates FDA Warns About Stem Cell Therapies Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... see the boxed section below for more advice. Stem Cell Uses and FDA Regulation The FDA has the ...

  7. Blood-Forming Stem Cell Transplants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Ask about Your Treatment Research Blood-Forming Stem Cell Transplants On This Page What are bone marrow ... Considering becoming a bone marrow or a blood stem cell donor? View this video on YouTube. Follow a ...

  8. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... count__/__total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Loading... Unsubscribe from NCIcancertopics? ... 2011 Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of ...

  9. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it free Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Loading... Unsubscribe from NCIcancertopics? ... 2011 Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of ...

  10. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gathier, WA|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413648613; Türktas, Z; Duckers, HJ

    2015-01-01

    Until recently bone marrow was perceived to be the only significant reservoir of stem cells in the body. However, it is now recognized that there are other and perhaps even more abundant sources, which include adipose tissue. Subcutaneous fat is readily available in most patients, and can easily be

  11. Dental Tissue — New Source for Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Petrovic, Vladimir; Stefanovic, Vladisav

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells have been isolated from many tissues and organs, including dental tissue. Five types of dental stem cells have been established: dental pulp stem cells, stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth, stem cells from apical papilla, periodontal ligament stem cells, and dental follicle progenitor cells. The main characteristics of dental stem cells are their potential for multilineage differentiation and self-renewal capacity. Dental stem cells can differentiate into odontoblasts, adipo...

  12. Culture of Mouse Neural Stem Cell Precursors

    OpenAIRE

    Currle, D. Spencer; Hu, Jia Sheng; Kolski-Andreaco, Aaron; Monuki, Edwin S.

    2007-01-01

    Primary neural stem cell cultures are useful for studying the mechanisms underlying central nervous system development. Stem cell research will increase our understanding of the nervous system and may allow us to develop treatments for currently incurable brain diseases and injuries. In addition, stem cells should be used for stem cell research aimed at the detailed study of mechanisms of neural differentiation and transdifferentiation and the genetic and environmental signals that direct the...

  13. [Genetic regulation of plant shoot stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al'bert, E V; Ezhova, T A

    2013-02-01

    This article describes the main features of plant stem cells and summarizes the results of studies of the genetic control of stem cell maintenance in the apical meristem of the shoot. It is demonstrated that the WUS-CLV gene system plays a key role in the maintenance of shoot apical stem cells and the formation of adventitious buds and somatic embryos. Unconventional concepts of plant stem cells are considered.

  14. Road for understanding cancer stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serakinci, Nedime; Erzik, Can

    2007-01-01

    There is increasing evidence suggesting that stem cells are susceptive to carcinogenesis and, consequently, can be the origin of many cancers. Recently, the neoplastic potential of stem cells has been supported by many groups showing the existence of subpopulations with stem cell characteristics ......, help us both in the identification and characterization of cancer stem cells and in the further development of therapeutic strategies including tissue engineering...

  15. Pluripotent Stem Cells for Schwann Cell Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, Ming-San; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    Tissue engineering of Schwann cells (SCs) can serve a number of purposes, such as in vitro SC-related disease modeling, treatment of peripheral nerve diseases or peripheral nerve injury, and, potentially, treatment of CNS diseases. SCs can be generated from autologous stem cells in vitro by

  16. Stem/Progenitor cells in vascular regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Xu, Qingbo

    2014-06-01

    A series of studies has been presented in the search for proof of circulating and resident vascular progenitor cells, which can differentiate into endothelial and smooth muscle cells and pericytes in animal and human studies. In terms of pluripotent stem cells, including embryonic stem cells, iPS, and partial-iPS cells, they display a great potential for vascular lineage differentiation. Development of stem cell therapy for treatment of vascular and ischemic diseases remains a major challenging research field. At the present, there is a clear expansion of research into mechanisms of stem cell differentiation into vascular lineages that are tested in animal models. Although there are several clinical trials ongoing that primarily focus on determining the benefits of stem cell transplantation in ischemic heart or peripheral ischemic tissues, intensive investigation for translational aspects of stem cell therapy would be needed. It is a hope that stem cell therapy for vascular diseases could be developed for clinic application in the future.

  17. Alcohol and Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mei Xu; Jia Luo

    2017-01-01

    Heavy alcohol consumption has been associated with increased risk of several cancers, including cancer of the colon, rectum, female breast, oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, liver, and esophagus. It appears that alcohol exposure not only promotes carcinogenesis but also enhances the progression and aggressiveness of existing cancers. The molecular mechanisms underlying alcohol tumor promotion, however, remain unclear. Cancer stem cells (CSC), a subpopulation of cancer cells with self-renewal and ...

  18. College Students' Conceptions of Stem Cells, Stem Cell Research, and Cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concannon, James P.; Siegel, Marcelle A.; Halverson, Kristy; Freyermuth, Sharyn

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we examined 96 undergraduate non-science majors' conceptions of stem cells, stem cell research, and cloning. This study was performed at a large, Midwest, research extensive university. Participants in the study were asked to answer 23 questions relating to stem cells, stem cell research, and cloning in an on-line assessment before…

  19. Nine Things to Know About Stem Cell Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Toggle Nav Nine Things To Know About Stem Cell Treatments Home > Stem Cells and Medicine > Nine Things ... Know About Stem Cell Treatments Many clinics offering stem cell treatments make claims that are not supported by ...

  20. Retinal stem cells and potential cell transplantation treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Chi Lin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The retina, histologically composed of ten delicate layers, is responsible for light perception and relaying electrochemical signals to the secondary neurons and visual cortex. Retinal disease is one of the leading clinical causes of severe vision loss, including age-related macular degeneration, Stargardt's disease, and retinitis pigmentosa. As a result of the discovery of various somatic stem cells, advances in exploring the identities of embryonic stem cells, and the development of induced pluripotent stem cells, cell transplantation treatment for retinal diseases is currently attracting much attention. The sources of stem cells for retinal regeneration include endogenous retinal stem cells (e.g., neuronal stem cells, Müller cells, and retinal stem cells from the ciliary marginal zone and exogenous stem cells (e.g., bone mesenchymal stem cells, adipose-derived stem cells, embryonic stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells. The success of cell transplantation treatment depends mainly on the cell source, the timing of cell harvesting, the protocol of cell induction/transplantation, and the microenvironment of the recipient's retina. This review summarizes the different sources of stem cells for regeneration treatment in retinal diseases and surveys the more recent achievements in animal studies and clinical trials. Future directions and challenges in stem cell transplantation are also discussed.

  1. Setting FIRES to Stem Cell Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Roxanne Grietz

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this lesson is to present the basic scientific knowledge about stem cells, the promise of stem cell research to medicine, and the ethical considerations and arguments involved. One of the challenges of discussing stem cell research is that the field is constantly evolving and the most current information changes almost daily. Few…

  2. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are most commonly used in the treatment of cancers like leukemia and lymphoma to restore stem cells that have been destroyed by high doses of ... 3:22 Pain Control: Support for People with Cancer - Duration: 11:58. ... 11:58 Stem Cell Transplant Procedure | Stem Cell Treatment | Bone Marrow Transplant - ...

  3. Brain tumor stem cell dancing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Bozzuto

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Issues regarding cancer stem cell (CSC movement are important in neurosphere biology as cell-cell or cell-environment interactions may have significant impacts on CSC differentiation and contribute to the heterogeneity of the neurosphere. Aims. Despite the growing body of literature data on the biology of brain tumor stem cells, floating CSC-derived neurospheres have been scarcely characterized from a morphological and ultrastructural point of view. Results. Here we report a morphological and ultrastructural characterization performed by live imaging and scanning electron microscopy. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM CSC-derived neurospheres are heterogeneous and are constituted by cells, morphologically different, capable of forming highly dynamic structures. These dynamic structures are regulated by not serendipitous cell-cell interactions, and they synchronously pulsate following a cyclic course made of "fast" and "slow" alternate phases. Autocrine/paracrine non canonical Wnt signalling appears to be correlated with the association status of neurospheres. Conclusions. The results obtained suggest that GBM CSCs can behave both as independents cells and as "social" cells, highly interactive with other members of its species, giving rise to a sort of "multicellular organism".

  4. Methods for Stem Cell Production and Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudio, Pier Paolo (Inventor); Valluri, Jagan V. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to methods for rapidly expanding a stem cell population with or without culture supplements in simulated microgravity conditions. The present invention relates to methods for rapidly increasing the life span of stem cell populations without culture supplements in simulated microgravity conditions. The present invention also relates to methods for increasing the sensitivity of cancer stem cells to chemotherapeutic agents by culturing the cancer stem cells under microgravity conditions and in the presence of omega-3 fatty acids. The methods of the present invention can also be used to proliferate cancer cells by culturing them in the presence of omega-3 fatty acids. The present invention also relates to methods for testing the sensitivity of cancer cells and cancer stem cells to chemotherapeutic agents by culturing the cancer cells and cancer stem cells under microgravity conditions. The methods of the present invention can also be used to produce tissue for use in transplantation by culturing stem cells or cancer stem cells under microgravity conditions. The methods of the present invention can also be used to produce cellular factors and growth factors by culturing stem cells or cancer stem cells under microgravity conditions. The methods of the present invention can also be used to produce cellular factors and growth factors to promote differentiation of cancer stem cells under microgravity conditions.

  5. Dental pulp stem cells in regenerative dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casagrande, Luciano; Cordeiro, Mabel M; Nör, Silvia A; Nör, Jacques E

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells constitute the source of differentiated cells for the generation of tissues during development, and for regeneration of tissues that are diseased or injured postnatally. In recent years, stem cell research has grown exponentially owing to the recognition that stem cell-based therapies have the potential to improve the life of patients with conditions that span from Alzheimer's disease to cardiac ischemia to bone or tooth loss. Growing evidence demonstrates that stem cells are primarily found in niches and that certain tissues contain more stem cells than others. Among these tissues, the dental pulp is considered a rich source of mesenchymal stem cells that are suitable for tissue engineering applications. It is known that dental pulp stem cells have the potential to differentiate into several cell types, including odontoblasts, neural progenitors, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. The dental pulp stem cells are highly proliferative. This characteristic facilitates ex vivo expansion and enhances the translational potential of these cells. Notably, the dental pulp is arguably the most accessible source of postnatal stem cells. Collectively, the multipotency, high proliferation rates, and accessibility make the dental pulp an attractive source of mesenchymal stem cells for tissue regeneration. This review discusses fundamental concepts of stem cell biology and tissue engineering within the context of regenerative dentistry.

  6. Nuclear Mechanics and Stem Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xinjian; Gavara, Nuria; Song, Guanbin

    2015-12-01

    Stem cells are characterized by their self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation potential. Stem cell differentiation is a prerequisite for the application of stem cells in regenerative medicine and clinical therapy. In addition to chemical stimulation, mechanical cues play a significant role in regulating stem cell differentiation. The integrity of mechanical sensors is necessary for the ability of cells to respond to mechanical signals. The nucleus, the largest and stiffest cellular organelle, interacts with the cytoskeleton as a key mediator of cell mechanics. Nuclear mechanics are involved in the complicated interactions of lamins, chromatin and nucleoskeleton-related proteins. Thus, stem cell differentiation is intimately associated with nuclear mechanics due to its indispensable role in mechanotransduction and mechanical response. This paper reviews several main contributions of nuclear mechanics, highlights the hallmarks of the nuclear mechanics of stem cells, and provides insight into the relationship between nuclear mechanics and stem cell differentiation, which may guide clinical applications in the future.

  7. M1 and M2 macrophage recruitment during tendon regeneration induced by amniotic epithelial cell allotransplantation in ovine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro, Annunziata; Russo, Valentina; Di Marcantonio, Lisa; Berardinelli, Paolo; Martelli, Alessandra; Muttini, Aurelio; Mattioli, Mauro; Barboni, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that ovine amniotic epithelial cells (oAECs) allotransplanted into experimentally induced tendon lesions are able to stimulate tissue regeneration also by reducing leukocyte infiltration. Amongst leukocytes, macrophages (Mφ) M1 and M2 phenotype cells are known to mediate inflammatory and repairing processes, respectively. In this research it was investigated if, during tendon regeneration induced by AECs allotransplantation, M1Mφ and M2Mφ phenotype cells are recruited and differently distributed within the lesion site. Ovine AECs treated and untreated (Ctr) tendons were explanted at 7, 14, and 28 days and tissue microarchitecture was analyzed together with the distribution and quantification of leukocytes (CD45 positive), Mφ (CD68 pan positive), and M1Mφ (CD86, and IL12b) and M2Mφ (CD206, YM1 and IL10) phenotype related markers. In oAEC transplanted tendons CD45 and CD68 positive cells were always reduced in the lesion site. At day 14, oAEC treated tendons began to recover their microarchitecture, contextually a reduction of M1Mφ markers, mainly distributed close to oAECs, and an increase of M2Mφ markers was evidenced. CD206 positive cells were distributed near the regenerating areas. At day 28 oAECs treated tendons acquired a healthy-like structure with a reduction of M2Mφ. Differently, Ctr tendons maintained a disorganized morphology throughout the experimental time and constantly showed high values of M1Mφ markers. These findings indicate that M2Mφ recruitment could be correlated to tendon regeneration induced by oAECs allotransplantation. Moreover, these results demonstrate oAECs immunomodulatory role also in vivo and support novel insights into their allogeneic use underlying the resolution of tendon fibrosis. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Thrombopoietin and hematopoietic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Carolyn A

    2011-01-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) is the cytokine that is chiefly responsible for megakaryocyte production but increasingly attention has turned to its role in maintaining hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). HSCs are required to initiate the production of all mature hematopoietic cells, but this differentiation needs to be balanced against self-renewal and quiescence to maintain the stem cell pool throughout life. TPO has been shown to support HSC quiescence during adult hematopoiesis, with the loss of TPO signaling associated with bone marrow failure and thrombocytopenia. Recent studies have shown that constitutive activation mutations in Mpl contribute to myeloproliferative disease. In this review, we will discuss TPO signaling pathways, regulation of TPO levels and the role of TPO in normal hematopoiesis and during myeloproliferative disease. PMID:21478671

  9. Ovarian Carcinoma Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    b- myb , is also highly expressed in both FNAR cells (3.33-fold) and human 1 ovarian carcinoma [37]. 2 High levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a...AW916991 3.56 Thioredoxin AW140607 3.07 Stathmin BF281472 3.23 b- myb RGIAC37 3.33 Gene Expression Profiling of FNAR Cells 8 9 10 25 1 2 3 4

  10. [The diffuse giant cell tumor of tendon sheath with chondroid metaplasia in right temporomandibular joint: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yang; Qian, Zhang; Ning, Geng; Junyu, Liu; Haoman, Niu; Yu, Chen

    2017-04-01

    A case diagnosed as diffuse giant cell tumor of tendon sheath with chondroid metaplasia in right temporomandibular joint was reported. The clinicopathological features, diagnosis, and treatment were discussed with the literature review.

  11. Ethical Issues in Stem Cell Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Ali Kiani; Mohammad Reza Rasti Sani

    2014-01-01

    There is great interest worldwide in discovering and developing a permanent source of tissues which would be capable of generating any cell type and which would avoid the problem of transplant rejection. Stem cells are cells that can specialize into the many different cells found in the human body. The ethical objections concerning stem cells have focused primarily on their source. Human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research offers great promise of cures for otherwise incurable conditions: s...

  12. Polymer microarray technology for stem cell engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Robert; Jia, Jia; Mei, Ying

    2016-04-01

    Stem cells hold remarkable promise for applications in tissue engineering and disease modeling. During the past decade, significant progress has been made in developing soluble factors (e.g., small molecules and growth factors) to direct stem cells into a desired phenotype. However, the current lack of suitable synthetic materials to regulate stem cell activity has limited the realization of the enormous potential of stem cells. This can be attributed to a large number of materials properties (e.g., chemical structures and physical properties of materials) that can affect stem cell fate. This makes it challenging to design biomaterials to direct stem cell behavior. To address this, polymer microarray technology has been developed to rapidly identify materials for a variety of stem cell applications. In this article, we summarize recent developments in polymer array technology and their applications in stem cell engineering. Stem cells hold remarkable promise for applications in tissue engineering and disease modeling. In the last decade, significant progress has been made in developing chemically defined media to direct stem cells into a desired phenotype. However, the current lack of the suitable synthetic materials to regulate stem cell activities has been limiting the realization of the potential of stem cells. This can be attributed to the number of variables in material properties (e.g., chemical structures and physical properties) that can affect stem cells. Polymer microarray technology has shown to be a powerful tool to rapidly identify materials for a variety of stem cell applications. Here we summarize recent developments in polymer array technology and their applications in stem cell engineering. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Klotho, stem cells, and aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bian A

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ao Bian,1,2 Javier A Neyra,3 Ming Zhan,4 Ming Chang Hu1,3 1Charles and Jane Pak Center for Mineral Metabolism and Clinical Research, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA; 2Department of Nephrology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, 4Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Weill Cornell Medical College, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Aging is an inevitable and progressive biological process involving dysfunction and eventually destruction of every tissue and organ. This process is driven by a tightly regulated and complex interplay between genetic and acquired factors. Klotho is an antiaging gene encoding a single-pass transmembrane protein, klotho, which serves as an aging suppressor through a wide variety of mechanisms, such as antioxidation, antisenescence, antiautophagy, and modulation of many signaling pathways, including insulin-like growth factor and Wnt. Klotho deficiency activates Wnt expression and activity contributing to senescence and depletion of stem cells, which consequently triggers tissue atrophy and fibrosis. In contrast, the klotho protein was shown to suppress Wnt-signaling transduction, and inhibit cell senescence and preserve stem cells. A better understanding of the potential effects of klotho on stem cells could offer novel insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms of klotho deficiency-related aging and disease. The klotho protein may be a promising therapeutic agent for aging and aging-related disorders. Keywords: aging, cell senescence, klotho, stem cells, Wnt  

  14. Challenges for heart disease stem cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoover-Plow J

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Jane Hoover-Plow, Yanqing GongDepartments of Cardiovascular Medicine and Molecular Cardiology, Joseph J Jacobs Center for Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs are the leading cause of death worldwide. The use of stem cells to improve recovery of the injured heart after myocardial infarction (MI is an important emerging therapeutic strategy. However, recent reviews of clinical trials of stem cell therapy for MI and ischemic heart disease recovery report that less than half of the trials found only small improvements in cardiac function. In clinical trials, bone marrow, peripheral blood, or umbilical cord blood cells were used as the source of stem cells delivered by intracoronary infusion. Some trials administered only a stem cell mobilizing agent that recruits endogenous sources of stem cells. Important challenges to improve the effectiveness of stem cell therapy for CVD include: (1 improved identification, recruitment, and expansion of autologous stem cells; (2 identification of mobilizing and homing agents that increase recruitment; and (3 development of strategies to improve stem cell survival and engraftment of both endogenous and exogenous sources of stem cells. This review is an overview of stem cell therapy for CVD and discusses the challenges these three areas present for maximum optimization of the efficacy of stem cell therapy for heart disease, and new strategies in progress.Keywords: mobilization, expansion, homing, survival, engraftment

  15. Magnetic cryopreservation for dental pulp stem cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Sheng-Yang; Huang, Guo-Wei; Shiung, Jau-Nan; Huang, Yen-Hua; Jeng, Jiiang-Huei; Kuo, Tzong-Fu; Yang, Jen-Chang; Yang, Wei-Chung Vivian

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic cryopreservation has been successfully used for tooth banking with satisfactory implantation outcomes, suggesting that the method preserves human periodontal ligament cells and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs...

  16. Stem-cell therapy for neurologic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of research on stem cell therapy for various diseases, an important need was felt in the field of neurological diseases. While congenital lesion may not be amenable to stem cell therapy completely, there is a scope of partial improvement in the lesions and halt in further progression. Neuro degenerative lesions like Parkinson′s disease, multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have shown improvement with stem cell therapy. This article reviews the available literature and summarizes the current evidence in the various neurologic diseases amenable to stem cell therapy, the plausible mechanism of action, ethical concerns with insights into the future of stem cell therapy.

  17. Gametogenesis from Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitou, Mitinori; Miyauchi, Hidetaka

    2016-06-02

    The germ cell lineage originates early in development and undergoes a series of complex developmental processes that culminate in the generation of fully matured gametes, the spermatozoa and the oocytes. Remarkably, researchers have been recapitulating these developmental pathways using mouse and human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs). With further studies, including those involving non-human primate models, human gametogenesis may be fully reconstituted from PSCs, which would profoundly facilitate our understanding of human germ cell development and infertility. Here we discuss groundbreaking studies that lay the foundation for this achievement, the current state of the field, and challenges for deriving gametes from hPSCs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Strategies for future histocompatible stem cell therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nehlin, Jan; Barington, Torben

    2009-01-01

    Stem cell therapy based on the safe and unlimited self-renewal of human pluripotent stem cells is envisioned for future use in tissue or organ replacement after injury or disease. A gradual decline of regenerative capacity has been documented among the adult stem cell population in some body organs...... a developmental lineage, would facilitate the transplantation of organ/tissue-specific adult stem cells or terminally differentiated somatic cells to improve the function of diseased organs or tissues in an individual. Here, we present an overview of various experimental cell therapy technologies based on the use...... during the aging process. Recent progress in human somatic cell nuclear transfer and inducible pluripotent stem cell technologies has shown that patient-derived nuclei or somatic cells can be reprogrammed in vitro to become pluripotent stem cells, from which the three germ layer lineages can be generated...

  19. The effect of anisotropic collagen-GAG scaffolds and growth factor supplementation on tendon cell recruitment, alignment, and metabolic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliari, Steven R; Harley, Brendan A C

    2011-08-01

    Current surgical and tissue engineering approaches for treating tendon injuries have shown limited success, suggesting the need for new biomaterial strategies. Here we describe the development of an anisotropic collagen-glycosaminoglycan (CG) scaffold and use of growth factor supplementation strategies to create a 3D platform for tendon tissue engineering. We fabricated cylindrical CG scaffolds with aligned tracks of ellipsoidal pores that mimic the native physiology of tendon by incorporating a directional solidification step into a conventional lyophilization strategy. By modifying the freezing temperature, we created a homologous series of aligned CG scaffolds with constant relative density and degree of anisotropy but a range of pore sizes (55-243 μm). Equine tendon cells showed greater levels of attachment, metabolic activity, and alignment as well as less cell-mediated scaffold contraction, when cultured in anisotropic scaffolds compared to an isotropic CG scaffold control. The anisotropic CG scaffolds also provided critical contact guidance cues for cell alignment. While tendon cells were randomly oriented in the isotropic control scaffold and the transverse (unaligned) plane of the anisotropic scaffolds, significant cell alignment was observed in the direction of the contact guidance cues in the longitudinal plane of the anisotropic scaffolds. Scaffold pore size was found to significantly influence tendon cell viability, proliferation, penetration into the scaffold, and metabolic activity in a manner predicted by cellular solids arguments. Finally, the addition of the growth factors PDGF-BB and IGF-1 to aligned CG scaffolds was found to enhance tendon cell motility, viability, and metabolic activity in dose-dependent manners. This work suggests a composite strategy for developing bioactive, 3D material systems for tendon tissue engineering. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Stem cells and repair of lung injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randell Scott H

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fueled by the promise of regenerative medicine, currently there is unprecedented interest in stem cells. Furthermore, there have been revolutionary, but somewhat controversial, advances in our understanding of stem cell biology. Stem cells likely play key roles in the repair of diverse lung injuries. However, due to very low rates of cellular proliferation in vivo in the normal steady state, cellular and architectural complexity of the respiratory tract, and the lack of an intensive research effort, lung stem cells remain poorly understood compared to those in other major organ systems. In the present review, we concisely explore the conceptual framework of stem cell biology and recent advances pertinent to the lungs. We illustrate lung diseases in which manipulation of stem cells may be physiologically significant and highlight the challenges facing stem cell-related therapy in the lung.

  1. Stem cell facelift: between reality and fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atiyeh, Bishara S; Ibrahim, Amir E; Saad, Dibo A

    2013-03-01

    Stem cells are "big business" throughout medical technology, and their potential application in cosmetic procedures is no exception. One of the latest nonsurgical facial treatments (and new catchphrases) in plastic surgery is the "stem cell facelift." It is evident from the currently available scientific literature that the use of stem cell therapy for facial rejuvenation is limited to the theoretical induction of skin tightening and can in no way be equated to a facelift. In fact, what is advertised and promoted as a new and original technique of stem cell facelifting is mostly stem cell-enriched lipofilling. Despite encouraging data suggesting that adult stem cells hold promise for future applications, the data from clinical evidence available today do not substantiate the marketing and promotional claims being made to patients. To claim that the "stem cell facelift" is a complete facial rejuvenation procedure surgery is unethical.

  2. Exoskeleton anchoring to tendon cells and muscles in molting isopod crustaceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Žnidaršič

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Specialized mechanical connection between exoskeleton and underlying muscles in arthropods is a complex network of interconnected matrix constituents, junctions and associated cytoskeletal elements, which provides prominent mechanical attachment of the epidermis to the cuticle and transmits muscle tensions to the exoskeleton. This linkage involves anchoring of the complex extracellular matrix composing the cuticle to the apical membrane of tendon cells and linking of tendon cells to muscles basally. The ultrastructural arhitecture of these attachment complexes during molting is an important issue in relation to integument integrity maintenance in the course of cuticle replacement and in relation to movement ability. The aim of this work was to determine the ultrastructural organization of exoskeleton – muscles attachment complexes in the molting terrestrial isopod crustaceans, in the stage when integumental epithelium is covered by both, the newly forming cuticle and the old detached cuticle. We show that the old exoskeleton is extensively mechanically connected to the underlying epithelium in the regions of muscle attachment sites by massive arrays of fibers in adult premolt Ligia italica and in prehatching embryos and premolt marsupial mancas of Porcellio scaber. Fibers expand from the tendon cells, traverse the new cuticle and ecdysal space and protrude into the distal layers of the detached cuticle. They likely serve as final anchoring sites before exuviation and may be involved in animal movements in this stage. Tendon cells in the prehatching embryo and in marsupial mancas display a substantial apicobasally oriented transcellular arrays of microtubules, evidently engaged in myotendinous junctions and in apical anchoring of the cuticular matrix. The structural framework of musculoskeletal linkage is basically established in described intramarsupial developmental stages, suggesting its involvement in animal motility within the marsupium.

  3. Stem Cells, Science, and Public Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlbut, J. Benjamin; Robert, Jason Scott

    2012-01-01

    These are interesting days in the scientific, social, and political debates about human embryonic stem cell research. Pluripotent stem cells--cells that can, in principle, give rise to the body's full range of cell types--were previously derivable only from human embryos that were destroyed in the process. Now, a variety of somatic cell types can…

  4. Epithelial cell polarity, stem cells and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin-Belmonte, Fernando; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2011-01-01

    , deregulation of adhesion and polarity proteins can cause misoriented cell divisions and increased self-renewal of adult epithelial stem cells. In this Review, we highlight some advances in the understanding of how loss of epithelial cell polarity contributes to tumorigenesis.......After years of extensive scientific discovery much has been learned about the networks that regulate epithelial homeostasis. Loss of expression or functional activity of cell adhesion and cell polarity proteins (including the PAR, crumbs (CRB) and scribble (SCRIB) complexes) is intricately related...

  5. Multifaceted Interpretation of Colon Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hatano, Yuichiro; Fukuda, Shinya; Hisamatsu, Kenji; Hirata, Akihiro; Hara, Akira; Tomita, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    Colon cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide, despite recent advances in clinical oncology. Accumulating evidence sheds light on the existence of cancer stem cells and their role in conferring therapeutic resistance. Cancer stem cells are a minor fraction of cancer cells, which enable tumor heterogeneity and initiate tumor formation. In addition, these cells are resistant to various cytotoxic factors. Therefore, elimination of cancer stem cells is difficult but...

  6. Cell of Origin and Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype in Medulloblastomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    dominant role over some oncogene function.In addition, we recently reported that cancer stem cells (CSCs)- stem cell like cells in tumors that have stem ... cell properties and tumor initiating ability- retain epigenetic memories of their cells of origin (Chow et al., 2014). We showed that CSCs derived from

  7. Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath and synovial membrane: A review of 26 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Kumar Shashi; Manav, Ajoy Kumar; Kumar, Rakesh; Abhinav; Sinha, Vishvendra Kumar; Sharma, Akshat

    2017-11-01

    Aim of our study is to highlight the incidence and benign nature of Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath and need for complete removal, thus minimizing the chances of recurrence. A total of 26 cases of Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath operated in the department of Orthopaedics, Patna Medical College & Hospital, Patna from 2003 to 2010 were included in this study. The surgery was performed after clinical evaluation of the lesion and Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC). The tumour underwent en bloc marginal excision. The patients were followed up for minimum two year. Our study population consisted of 18 females and 8 males. The mean age at the time of surgery was 38.3 years (range, 18-62 years). Twenty three cases were found in the 3rd and 4th decade. Twenty two cases involved upper extremity and only 4 cases in lower extremity. MRI was done in 2 cases where diagnosis was in doubt. Bony indentation on X-ray film was found in 7 cases and thorough curettage of cortical shell was done. All the cases were treated by marginal excision. Three cases developed post-operative stiffness but regained full range of movement with physiotherapy. Sensory impairment was seen in 3 cases. Recurrence occurred in 2 case and they were treated by repeat marginal excision. Meticulous en-masse marginal excision of the giant cell tumour of tendon sheath in blood less field using magnification is the treatment of choice.

  8. Redox regulation of plant stem cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jian; Dong, Zhicheng; Wu, Haijun; Tian, Zhaoxia; Zhao, Zhong

    2017-10-02

    Despite the importance of stem cells in plant and animal development, the common mechanisms of stem cell maintenance in both systems have remained elusive. Recently, the importance of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) signaling in priming stem cell differentiation has been extensively studied in animals. Here, we show that different forms of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have antagonistic roles in plant stem cell regulation, which were established by distinct spatiotemporal patterns of ROS-metabolizing enzymes. The superoxide anion (O2·-) is markedly enriched in stem cells to activate WUSCHEL and maintain stemness, whereas H2O2 is more abundant in the differentiating peripheral zone to promote stem cell differentiation. Moreover, H2O2 negatively regulates O2·- biosynthesis in stem cells, and increasing H2O2 levels or scavenging O2·- leads to the termination of stem cells. Our results provide a mechanistic framework for ROS-mediated control of plant stem cell fate and demonstrate that the balance between O2·- and H2O2 is key to stem cell maintenance and differentiation. © 2017 The Authors.

  9. Tendon functional extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Screen, Hazel R C; Berk, David E; Kadler, Karl E; Ramirez, Francesco; Young, Marian F

    2015-06-01

    This article is one of a series, summarizing views expressed at the Orthopaedic Research Society New Frontiers in Tendon Research Conference. This particular article reviews the three workshops held under the "Functional Extracellular Matrix" stream. The workshops focused on the roles of the tendon extracellular matrix, such as performing the mechanical functions of tendon, creating the local cell environment, and providing cellular cues. Tendon is a complex network of matrix and cells, and its biological functions are influenced by widely varying extrinsic and intrinsic factors such as age, nutrition, exercise levels, and biomechanics. Consequently, tendon adapts dynamically during development, aging, and injury. The workshop discussions identified research directions associated with understanding cell-matrix interactions to be of prime importance for developing novel strategies to target tendon healing or repair. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Therapeutic potential of adult stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serakinci, Nedime; Keith, W. Nicol

    2006-01-01

    cells are not subject to these issues. This review will therefore focus on adult stem cells. Based on their extensive differentiation potential and, in some cases, the relative ease of their isolation, adult stem cells are appropriate for clinical development. Recently, several observations suggest...... is the necessity to be able to identify, select, expand and manipulate cells outside the body. Recent advances in adult stem cell technologies and basic biology have accelerated therapeutic opportunities aimed at eventual clinical applications. Adult stem cells with the ability to differentiate down multiple...... lineages are an attractive alternative to human embryonic stem cells (hES) in regenerative medicine. In many countries, present legislation surrounding hES cells makes their use problematic, and indeed the origin of hES cells may represent a controversial issue for many communities. However, adult stem...

  11. Therapeutic application of multipotent stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirzaei, Hamed; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Sichani, Laleh Shiri

    2018-01-01

    Cell therapy is an emerging fields in the treatment of various diseases such as cardiovascular, pulmonary, hepatic, and neoplastic diseases. Stem cells are an integral tool for cell therapy. Multipotent stem cells are an important class of stem cells which have the ability to self-renew through...... been showed that multipotent stem cells exert their therapeutic effects via inhibition/activation of a sequence of cellular and molecular pathways. Although the advantages of multipotent stem cells are numerous, further investigation is still necessary to clarify the biology and safety of these cells...... before they could be considered as a potential treatment for different types of diseases. This review summarizes different features of multipotent stem cells including isolation, differentiation, and therapeutic applications....

  12. Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells generated from human embryonic stem cells support pluripotent cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varga, Nora [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); Vereb, Zoltan; Rajnavoelgyi, Eva [Department of Immunology, Medical and Health Science Centre, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary); Nemet, Katalin; Uher, Ferenc; Sarkadi, Balazs [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); Apati, Agota, E-mail: apati@kkk.org.hu [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary)

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSC like cells were derived from hESC by a simple and reproducible method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentiation and immunosuppressive features of MSCl cells were similar to bmMSC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSCl cells as feeder cells support the undifferentiated growth of hESC. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells were generated from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) through embryoid body formation, and isolated by adherence to plastic surface. MSCl cell lines could be propagated without changes in morphological or functional characteristics for more than 15 passages. These cells, as well as their fluorescent protein expressing stable derivatives, efficiently supported the growth of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells as feeder cells. The MSCl cells did not express the embryonic (Oct4, Nanog, ABCG2, PODXL, or SSEA4), or hematopoietic (CD34, CD45, CD14, CD133, HLA-DR) stem cell markers, while were positive for the characteristic cell surface markers of MSCs (CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105). MSCl cells could be differentiated toward osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic directions and exhibited significant inhibition of mitogen-activated lymphocyte proliferation, and thus presented immunosuppressive features. We suggest that cultured MSCl cells can properly model human MSCs and be applied as efficient feeders in hESC cultures.

  13. Achilles Tendonitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You Treat Achilles Tendonitis? en español Tendinitis de Aquiles Kim didn't do much over the summer ... Achilles Tendonitis and Who Gets It? Your Achilles tendon is located at the back of your foot, ...

  14. Mechanotransduction in cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jin; Zhang, Yueling; Ye, Rui; Zheng, Yingcheng; Zhao, Zhihe; Li, Juan

    2013-09-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) concept, which arose about a decade ago, proposes that tumor growth is sustained by a subpopulation of highly malignant cells. These cells, termed CSCs, are capable of extensive self-renewal that contributes to metastasis and treatment resistance. Therefore, therapeutic strategies that target CSCs should be developed for improving outcomes of cancer patients. Recent progress has highlighted the importance of physical properties of the extracellular matrix and mechanotransduction pathway in cancer cells during cancer development. On the other hand, the significance of CXCR1, an upstream signal of FAK/PI3K/Akt has been revealed in CSCs. FAK/PI3K/Akt is a key signal mediator in mechanotransduction pathway. Therefore, mechanotransduction could be a new target for CSCs, and would be an innovative way to treat cancer by inhibiting FAK/PI3K/Akt. © 2013 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  15. Stepwise development of hematopoietic stem cells from embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Matsumoto

    Full Text Available The cellular ontogeny of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs remains poorly understood because their isolation from and their identification in early developing small embryos are difficult. We attempted to dissect early developmental stages of HSCs using an in vitro mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC differentiation system combined with inducible HOXB4 expression. Here we report the identification of pre-HSCs and an embryonic type of HSCs (embryonic HSCs as intermediate cells between ESCs and HSCs. Both pre-HSCs and embryonic HSCs were isolated by their c-Kit(+CD41(+CD45(- phenotype. Pre-HSCs did not engraft in irradiated adult mice. After co-culture with OP9 stromal cells and conditional expression of HOXB4, pre-HSCs gave rise to embryonic HSCs capable of engraftment and long-term reconstitution in irradiated adult mice. Blast colony assays revealed that most hemangioblast activity was detected apart from the pre-HSC population, implying the early divergence of pre-HSCs from hemangioblasts. Gene expression profiling suggests that a particular set of transcripts closely associated with adult HSCs is involved in the transition of pre-HSC to embryonic HSCs. We propose an HSC developmental model in which pre-HSCs and embryonic HSCs sequentially give rise to adult types of HSCs in a stepwise manner.

  16. Therapeutic potential of dental stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalisserry, Elna Paul; Nam, Seung Yun; Park, Sang Hyug; Anil, Sukumaran

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell biology has become an important field in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering therapy since the discovery and characterization of mesenchymal stem cells. Stem cell populations have also been isolated from human dental tissues, including dental pulp stem cells, stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth, stem cells from apical papilla, dental follicle progenitor cells, and periodontal ligament stem cells. Dental stem cells are relatively easily obtainable and exhibit high plasticity and multipotential capabilities. The dental stem cells represent a gold standard for neural-crest-derived bone reconstruction in humans and can be used for the repair of body defects in low-risk autologous therapeutic strategies. The bioengineering technologies developed for tooth regeneration will make substantial contributions to understand the developmental process and will encourage future organ replacement by regenerative therapies in a wide variety of organs such as the liver, kidney, and heart. The concept of developing tooth banking and preservation of dental stem cells is promising. Further research in the area has the potential to herald a new dawn in effective treatment of notoriously difficult diseases which could prove highly beneficial to mankind in the long run. PMID:28616151

  17. Therapeutic potential of dental stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalisserry, Elna Paul; Nam, Seung Yun; Park, Sang Hyug; Anil, Sukumaran

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell biology has become an important field in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering therapy since the discovery and characterization of mesenchymal stem cells. Stem cell populations have also been isolated from human dental tissues, including dental pulp stem cells, stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth, stem cells from apical papilla, dental follicle progenitor cells, and periodontal ligament stem cells. Dental stem cells are relatively easily obtainable and exhibit high plasticity and multipotential capabilities. The dental stem cells represent a gold standard for neural-crest-derived bone reconstruction in humans and can be used for the repair of body defects in low-risk autologous therapeutic strategies. The bioengineering technologies developed for tooth regeneration will make substantial contributions to understand the developmental process and will encourage future organ replacement by regenerative therapies in a wide variety of organs such as the liver, kidney, and heart. The concept of developing tooth banking and preservation of dental stem cells is promising. Further research in the area has the potential to herald a new dawn in effective treatment of notoriously difficult diseases which could prove highly beneficial to mankind in the long run.

  18. Engineering Stem Cells for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Perry T.; Han, Edward

    2018-01-01

    Stem cells are characterized by a number of useful properties, including their ability to migrate, differentiate, and secrete a variety of therapeutic molecules such as immunomodulatory factors. As such, numerous pre-clinical and clinical studies have utilized stem cell-based therapies and demonstrated their tremendous potential for the treatment of various human diseases and disorders. Recently, efforts have focused on engineering stem cells in order to further enhance their innate abilities as well as to confer them with new functionalities, which can then be used in various biomedical applications. These engineered stem cells can take on a number of forms. For instance, engineered stem cells encompass the genetic modification of stem cells as well as the use of stem cells for gene delivery, nanoparticle loading and delivery, and even small molecule drug delivery. The present Review gives an in-depth account of the current status of engineered stem cells, including potential cell sources, the most common methods used to engineer stem cells, and the utilization of engineered stem cells in various biomedical applications, with a particular focus on tissue regeneration, the treatment of immunodeficiency diseases, and cancer. PMID:25772134

  19. Cellular Mechanisms of Somatic Stem Cell Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yunjoon

    2014-01-01

    Tissue homeostasis and regenerative capacity rely on rare populations of somatic stem cells endowed with the potential to self-renew and differentiate. During aging, many tissues show a decline in regenerative potential coupled with a loss of stem cell function. Cells including somatic stem cells have evolved a series of checks and balances to sense and repair cellular damage to maximize tissue function. However, during aging the mechanisms that protect normal cell function begin to fail. In this review, we will discuss how common cellular mechanisms that maintain tissue fidelity and organismal lifespan impact somatic stem cell function. We will highlight context-dependent changes and commonalities that define aging, by focusing on three age-sensitive stem cell compartments: blood, neural, and muscle. Understanding the interaction between extrinsic regulators and intrinsic effectors that operate within different stem cell compartments is likely to have important implications for identifying strategies to improve health span and treat age-related degenerative diseases. PMID:24439814

  20. Stem cell therapy to treat heart ischaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali Qayyum, Abbas; Mathiasen, Anders Bruun; Kastrup, Jens

    2014-01-01

    (CABG), morbidity and mortality is still high in patients with CAD. Along with PCI and CABG or in patients without options for revascularization, stem cell regenerative therapy in controlled trials is a possibility. Stem cells are believed to exert their actions by angiogenesis and regeneration...... of cardiomyocytes. Recently published clinical trials and meta-analysis of stem cell studies have shown encouraging results with increased left ventricle ejection fraction and reduced symptoms in patients with CAD and heart failure. There is some evidence of mesenchymal stem cell being more effective compared...... to other cell types and cell therapy may be more effective in patients with known diabetes mellitus. However, further investigations are warranted....

  1. No donor age effect of human serum on collagen synthesis signaling and cell proliferation of human tendon fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayer, Monika L; Schjerling, Peter; Biskup, Edyta

    2012-01-01

    The aging process of tendon tissue is associated with decreased collagen content and increased risk for injuries. An essential factor in tendon physiology is transforming growth factor-ß1 (TGF-ß1), which is presumed to be reduced systemically with advanced age. The aim of this study was to invest......The aging process of tendon tissue is associated with decreased collagen content and increased risk for injuries. An essential factor in tendon physiology is transforming growth factor-ß1 (TGF-ß1), which is presumed to be reduced systemically with advanced age. The aim of this study...... and elderly donors, and we found no difference in collagen expression when cells were subjected to human serum from elderly versus young donors. In addition, tendon cell proliferation was similar when culture medium was supplemented with serum of different donor age. These findings suggest that factors...... such as the cell intrinsic capacity or the tissue-specific environment rather than systemic circulating factors are important for functional capacity throughout life in human tendon cells....

  2. Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath mimicking a plexiform neurofibroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swagata Arvind Tambe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant-cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCTTS is a benign soft tissue tumor of the limbs arising from the complex of the tendon sheath and periarticular soft tissues of small joints. It is the second most common benign space occupying lesion in the hand and usually presents as a painless soft tissue mass, which grows slowly in size for many years. We present an interesting case of an enormous GCTTS presenting as a slowly growing mass over left sole of a 52-year-old woman. The duration of GCTTS may range from a few weeks to 30 years but in our case the duration of tumor was almost 48 years, which could be the longest reported duration of GCTTS.

  3. Advances in Stem Cell Mobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopman, Rusudan K.; DiPersio, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Use of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)–mobilized peripheral blood hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) has largely replaced bone marrow (BM) as a source of stem cells for both autologous and allogeneic cell transplantation. With G-CSF alone, up to 35% of patients are unable to mobilize sufficient numbers of CD34 cells/kg to ensure successful and consistent multi-lineage engraftment and sustained hematopoietic recovery. To this end, research is ongoing to identify new agents or combinations which will lead to the most effective and efficient stem cell mobilization strategies, especially in those patients who are at risk for mobilization failure. We describe both established agents and novel strategies at various stages of development. The latter include but are not limited to drugs that target the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis, S1P agonists, VCAM/VLA-4 inhibitors, parathyroid hormone, proteosome inhibitors, Groβ, and agents that stabilize HIF. While none of the novel agents have yet gained an established role in HPC mobilization in clinical practice, many early studies exploring these new pathways show promising results and warrant further investigation. PMID:24476957

  4. Cytokines regulating hematopoietic stem cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng C; Lodish, Harvey F

    2008-07-01

    Regulation of the multiple fates of hematopoietic stem cells - including quiescence, self-renewal, differentiation, apoptosis, and mobilization from the niche - requires the cooperative actions of several cytokines and other hormones that bind to receptors on these cells. In this review we discuss recent advances in the identification of novel hematopoietic stem cell supportive cytokines and the mechanisms by which they control hematopoietic stem cell fate decisions. Several extrinsic factors that stimulate ex-vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells were recently identified by a number of experimental approaches, including forward genetic screening and transcriptional profiling of supportive stromal cells. Recent experiments in which multiple cytokine signaling pathways are activated or suppressed in hematopoietic stem cells reveal the complexity of signal transduction and cell-fate choice in hematopoietic stem cells in vivo and in vitro. The study of genetically modified mice and improvements in the in-vitro hematopoietic stem cell culture system will be powerful tools to elucidate the functions of cytokines that regulate hematopoietic stem cell function. These will further reveal the complex nature of the mechanisms by which extrinsic factors regulate signal transduction and cell-fate decisions of hematopoietic stem cells.

  5. Stem cells and respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraia Carvalho Abreu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells have a multitude of clinical implications in the lung. This article is a critical review that includes clinical and experimental studies of MedLine and SciElo database in the last 10 years, where we highlight the effects of stem cell therapy in acute respiratory distress syndrome or more chronic disorders such as lung fibrosis and emphysema. Although, many studies have shown the beneficial effects of stem cells in lung development, repair and remodeling; some important questions need to be answered to better understand the mechanisms that control cell division and differentiation, therefore enabling the use of cell therapy in human respiratory diseases.As células-tronco têm uma infinidade de implicações clínicas no pulmão. Este artigo é uma revisão crítica que inclui estudos clínicos e experimentais advindos do banco de dados do MEDLINE e SciElo nos últimos 10 anos, onde foram destacados os efeitos da terapia celular na síndrome do desconforto respiratório agudo ou doenças mais crônicas, como fibrose pulmonar e enfisema. Apesar de muitos estudos demonstrarem os efeitos benéficos das células-tronco no desenvolvimento, reparo e remodelamento pulmonar; algumas questões ainda precisam ser respondidas para um melhor entendimento dos mecanismos que controlam a divisão celular e diferenciação, permitindo o uso da terapia celular nas doenças respiratórias.

  6. Programming Retinal Stem Cells into Cone Photoreceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    to program human stem cells directly into cones. Using RNA -seq, we identified several genes that are upregulated in advance of the earliest...reverse vision loss. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Cone photoreceptor, retina, retinal stem cell, Otx2, Onecut1, Blimp1, RNA -seq., transcription factors, and...sequential activation of OTX2, BLIMP1, and ONECUT1 are sufficient to program hES cell-derived retinal stem cells into transplant- competent cones

  7. Expanding intestinal stem cells in culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heo, Inha; Clevers, Hans

    Culturing intestinal stem cells into 3D organoids results in heterogeneous cell populations, reflecting the in vivo cell type diversity. In a recent paper published in Nature, Wang et al. established a culture condition for a highly homogeneous population of intestinal stem cells.

  8. Autonomous behavior of hematopoietic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamminga, LM; Akkerman, [No Value; Weersing, E; Ausema, A; Dontje, B; Van Zant, G; de Haan, G

    2000-01-01

    Objective. Mechanisms that affect the function of primitive hematopoietic stem cells with long-term proliferative potential remain largely unknown. Here we assessed whether properties of stem cells are cell-extrinsically or cell-autonomously regulated. Materials and Methods. We developed a model in

  9. MR imaging findings of giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath involving the foot : a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ik; Chung, Soo Young; Park, Hai Jung; Lee, Yul; Park, Young Wook; Shim, Jeong Won [Hallym Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-05-01

    Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath(GCTTS) is a benign condition which involves the synovium of the tendon sheaths, and usually occurs around the small joints, e. g. the ankle, knee, and wrist. Histologically, GCTTS is similar to pigmented villonodular synovitis(PVNS). The authors report MRI findings of a GCTTS. This showed lower signal-intensity lesions than adjacent muscles on T1-weighted, proton density weighted, and T2-weighted images.

  10. Advances in Lung Stem Cells and Lung Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijing YIN

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs are emerging as a hot topic for cancer research. Lung CSCs share many characteristics with normal lung stem cells (SCs, including self-renewal and multi-potency for differentiation. Many molecular markers expressed in various types of CSCs were also found in lung CSCs, such as CD133, CD44, aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH and ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 (ABCG2. Similarly, proliferation and expansion of lung CSCs are regulated not only by signal transduction pathways functioning in normal lung SCs, such as Notch, Hedgehog and Wnt pathways, but also by those acting in tumor cells, such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K pathways. As CSC plays an critical role in tumor recurrence, metastasis and drug-resistance, understanding the difference between lung CSCs and normal lung SCs, identifying and targeting CSC markers or related signaling pathways may increase the efficacy of therapy on lung cancer and improved survival of lung cancer patients.

  11. Postsurgical Paracicatricial Cutaneous Satellitosis of Giant Cell Tumour of the Tendon Sheath, Localized Type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Caputo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Tenosynovial giant cell tumour (localized type is a tumour of tendon sheaths and interphalangeal joints, affecting the digits and arising from the synovium. It is characterized by a proliferation of mononuclear cells and osteoclast-like polykaryocytes. Its propagation to the skin is an exceptional event, which can take place either in localized form in the fingertips (localized type or in the rare diffuse form called giant cell tumour of the tendon sheath (diffuse type. We report here a case of giant cell tumour with cutaneous satellites, which appeared close to and around the surgical scar following the excision of the primary lesion, in a 9-year-old boy. In the cutaneous satellites, a few signs of transformation could be observed, consisting of the lack of stroma and pronounced cellularity characterized by sheets of rounded synovial-like cells admixed with multinucleated giant cells and xanthoma cells. No relapse was observed 1 year after a plastic surgery procedure (complete replacement of the involved skin. Diffuse lesions usually represent a diagnostic problem in comparison with their localized counterparts. The malignant transformation of an originally typical tenosynovial giant cell tumour is a rare but well-documented event. Our case seems to represent a typical example because the pronounced cellularity might wrongly lead to a diagnosis of malignancy.

  12. Induction of steroidogenic cells from adult stem cells and pluripotent stem cells [Review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazawa, Takashi; Imamichi, Yoshitaka; Miyamoto, Kaoru; Khan, Md Rafiqul Islam; Uwada, Junsuke; Umezawa, Akihiro; Taniguchi, Takanobu

    2016-11-30

    Steroid hormones are mainly produced in adrenal glands and gonads. Because steroid hormones play vital roles in various physiological processes, replacement of deficient steroid hormones by hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is necessary for patients with adrenal and gonadal failure. In addition to HRT, tissue regeneration using stem cells is predicted to provide novel therapy. Among various stem cell types, mesenchymal stem cells can be differentiated into steroidogenic cells following ectopic expression of nuclear receptor (NR) 5A subfamily proteins, steroidogenic factor-1 (also known as adrenal 4 binding protein) and liver receptor homolog-1, with the aid of cAMP signaling. Conversely, these approaches cannot be applied to pluripotent stem cells, such as embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, because of poor survival following cytotoxic expression of NR5A subfamily proteins. However, if pluripotent stem cells are first differentiated through mesenchymal lineage, they can also be differentiated into steroidogenic cells via NR5A subfamily protein expression. This approach offers a potential suitable cells for future regenerative medicine and gene therapy for diseases caused by steroidogenesis deficiencies. It represents a powerful tool to investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in steroidogenesis. This article highlights our own and current research on the induction of steroidogenic cells from various stem cells. We also discuss the future direction of their clinical application.

  13. Transplantation of Skeletal Muscle Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Monica N; Hall, John K; Cadwallader, Adam B; Pawlikowski, Bradley T; Doles, Jason D; Elston, Tiffany L; Olwin, Bradley B

    2017-01-01

    Transplanting adult stem cells provides a stringent test for self-renewal and the assessment of comparative engraftment in competitive transplant assays. Transplantation of satellite cells into mammalian skeletal muscle provided the first critical evidence that satellite cells function as adult muscle stem cells. Transplantation of a single satellite cell confirmed and extended this hypothesis, providing proof that the satellite cell is a bona fide adult skeletal muscle stem cell as reported by Sacco et al. (Nature 456(7221):502-506). Satellite cell transplantation has been further leveraged to identify culture conditions that maintain engraftment and to identify self-renewal deficits in satellite cells from aged mice. Conversion of iPSCs (induced pluripotent stem cells) to a satellite cell-like state, followed by transplantation, demonstrated that these cells possess adult muscle stem cell properties as reported by Darabi et al. (Stem Cell Rev Rep 7(4):948-957) and Mizuno et al. (FASEB J 24(7):2245-2253). Thus, transplantation strategies involving either satellite cells derived from adult muscles or derived from iPSCs may eventually be exploited as a therapy for treating patients with diseased or failing skeletal muscle. Here, we describe methods for isolating dispersed adult mouse satellite cells and satellite cells on intact myofibers for transplantation into recipient mice to study muscle stem cell function and behavior following engraftment .

  14. [Progress in microencapsulation of stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Li; Wang, Shibin

    2010-12-01

    For the regenerative therapy of refractory diseases, stem cells have become an excellent source of seed cells due to their strong self-renewal and multi-differentiation abilities. Microcapsules can provide a three-dimensional growth environment with a good immunoisolation and biocompatibility for cells, and the microencapsulation of stem cells provides a new technical support for large-scale cell culture with high activities in vitro and long-term preservation, consequently opening up a new alternative for cell transplantation. In this review, we first outlined the development of microencapsulation, then introduced the present materials and methods for the microencapsulation of stem cells and its immunoisolation, and discussed the progress in microencapsulation technology, various types of stem cell used in recent years in details. Finally, we addressed perspectives of stem cell microencapsulation technology.

  15. Two-photon imaging of stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchugonova, A.; Gorjup, E.; Riemann, I.; Sauer, D.; König, K.

    2008-02-01

    A variety of human and animal stem cells (rat and human adult pancreatic stem cells, salivary gland stem cells, dental pulpa stem cells) have been investigated by femtosecond laser 5D two-photon microscopy. Autofluorescence and second harmonic generation have been imaged with submicron spatial resolution, 270 ps temporal resolution, and 10 nm spectral resolution. In particular, NADH and flavoprotein fluorescence was detected in stem cells. Major emission peaks at 460nm and 530nm with typical mean fluorescence lifetimes of 1.8 ns and 2.0 ns, respectively, were measured using time-correlated single photon counting and spectral imaging. Differentiated stem cells produced the extracellular matrix protein collagen which was detected by SHG signals at 435 nm.

  16. Of Microenvironments and Mammary Stem Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaBarge, Mark A; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    2007-06-01

    In most adult tissues there reside pools of stem and progenitor cells inside specialized microenvironments referred to as niches. The niche protects the stem cells from inappropriate expansion and directs their critical functions. Thus guided, stem cells are able to maintain tissue homeostasis throughout the ebb and flow of metabolic and physical demands encountered over a lifetime. Indeed, a pool of stem cells maintains mammary gland structure throughout development, and responds to the physiological demands associated with pregnancy. This review discusses how stem cells were identified in both human and mouse mammary glands; each requiring different techniques that were determined by differing biological needs and ethical constraints. These studies together create a robust portrait of mammary gland biology and identify the location of the stem cell niche, elucidate a developmental hierarchy, and suggest how the niche might be manipulated for therapeutic benefit.

  17. Stem Cell Therapy in Pediatric Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Torabian

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric neurological disorders including muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy, and spinal cord injury are defined as a heterogenous group of diseases, of which some are known to be genetic. The two significant features represented for stem cells, leading to distinguish them from other cell types are addressed as below: they can renew themselves besides the ability to differentiate into cells with special function as their potency. Researches about the role of stem cells in repair of damaged tissues in different organs like myocardium, lung, wound healing, and others are developing. In addition, the use of stem cells in the treatment and improving symptoms of neurological diseases such as autism are known. Many epigenetic and immunological studies on effects of stem cells have been performed. The action of stem cells in tissue repair is a need for further studies. The role of these cells in the secretion of hormones and growth factors in the niche, induction of cell division and differentiation in local cells and differentiation of stem cells in damaged tissue is the samples of effects of tissue repair by stem cells.Cognitive disorders, epilepsy, speech and language disorders, primary sensory dysfunction, and behavioral challenges are symptoms of non-neuromotor dysfunction in half of pediatrics with CP. Occupational therapy, oral medications, and orthopedic surgery for supportive and rehabilitative approaches are part of Conventional remedy for cerebral palsy. This paper summarizes the clinical world wide experience about stem cell based therapeutic procedures for pediatric neurological disorders.

  18. Stem cell therapy in pediatric neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Torabian

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric neurological disorders including muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy, and spinal cord injury are defined as a heterogenous group of diseases, of which some are known to be genetic. The two significant features represented for stem cells, leading to distinguish them from other cell types are addressed as below: they can renew themselves besides the ability to differentiate into cells with special function as their potency. Researches about the role of stem cells in repair of damaged tissues in different organs like myocardium, lung, wound healing, and others are developing. In addition, the use of stem cells in the treatment and improving symptoms of neurological diseases such as autism are known. Many epigenetic and immunological studies on effects of stem cells have been performed. The action of stem cells in tissue repair is a need for further studies. The role of these cells in the secretion of hormones and growth factors in the niche, induction of cell division and differentiation in local cells and differentiation of stem cells in damaged tissue is the samples of effects of tissue repair by stem cells.Cognitive disorders, epilepsy, speech and language disorders, primary sensory dysfunction, and behavioral challenges are symptoms of non-neuromotor dysfunction in half of pediatrics with CP. Occupational therapy, oral medications, and orthopedic surgery for supportive and rehabilitative approaches are part of Conventional remedy for cerebral palsy. This paper summarizes the clinical world wide experience about stem cell based therapeutic procedures for pediatric neurological disorders.

  19. Can mesenchymal stem cells improve spermatogonial stem cell transplantation efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadam, P; Van Saen, D; Goossens, E

    2017-01-01

    Improved treatments have led to an increased survival rate in cancer patients. However, in pre-pubertal boys, these gonadotoxic treatments can result in the depletion of the spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) pool causing lifelong infertility. SSC transplantation has been proposed as a promising technique to preserve the fertility of these patients. In mice, this technique has resulted in live-born offspring, but the efficiency of colonization remained low. This could be because of a deficient microenvironment, leading to apoptosis of the transplanted SSCs. Interestingly, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), being multipotent and easy to isolate and multiply in vitro, are nowadays successfully and widely used in regenerative medicine. Here, we shortly review the current understanding of MSC and SSC biology, and we hypothesize that a combined MSC-SSC transplantation might improve the efficiency of SSC colonization and differentiation as paracrine factors from MSCs may contribute to the SSC niche. © 2016 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  20. Stem cells in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, Francesca; Fernandez, Pedro L; Thomson, Timothy M

    2013-06-01

    Tumors constitute complex ecosystems with multiple interactions among neoplastic cells displaying various phenotypes and functions and where the tumoral niche is built with an active participation of the host environment that also impacts the malignant progression of the tumor cells. Irrespective of the cell of origin of prostate adenocarcinoma, mounting evidences support the existence of a hierarchy within neoplastic prostate cells that contributes to the heterogeneity of these tumors. At the origin of this hierarchy are small populations of tumor cells with high self-renewal potential and also capable of generating progeny tumor cells that lose self-renewal properties as they acquire more differentiated phenotypes. These cancer stem cells (CSC) depend on active gene networks that confer them with their self-renewal capacity through symmetrical divisions whereas they can also undergo asymmetrical division and differentiation either as stochastic events or in response to environmental cues. Although new experimental evidences indicate that this is can be a reversible process, thus blurring the distinction between CSCs and non-CSCs, the former are considered as the drivers of tumor growth and evolution, and thus a prime target for therapeutic intervention. Of particular importance in prostate cancer, CSCs may constitute the repository population of androgen-insensitive and chemotherapy-resistant tumor cells responsible for castration-resistant and chemotherapy-insensitive tumors, thus their identification and quantification in primary and metastatic neoplasms could play important roles in the management of this disease.

  1. Stem Cell Therapy Advances in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lei; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Songlin

    2017-12-28

    Stem cell therapy is a promising method for the treatment of patients with a wide range of diseases and injuries. With increasing government funds for scientific research in China, stem cell research in China has developed rapidly. The number and quality of publications have increased substantially in the past 5 years. Extensive, high-quality studies have been performed in China in the areas of cell reprograming, stem cell homeostasis, gene modifications, and immunomodulation. Translation studies, including basic and preclinical investigations, have also increased. About 100 stem cell banks have been established in China and 10 stem cell drugs are currently in the approval process. More than 400 stem cell-based clinical trials have been registered in China. With continued state funding, advanced biotechnical support, and the development of regulatory standards for the clinical application of stem cells, further innovations are expected, leading to a boom in stem cell therapy. This review highlights recent achievements of stem cell research in China and discusses future prospects.

  2. Application of Graphene Based Nanotechnology in Stem Cells Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shanshan; Zeng, Yongxiang; Yang, Shuying; Qin, Han; Cai, He; Wang, Jian

    2015-09-01

    The past several years have witnessed significant advances in stem cell therapy, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Graphene, with its unique properties such as high electrical conductivity, elasticity and good molecule absorption, have potential for creating the next generation of biomaterials. This review summarizes the interrelationship between graphene and stem cells. The analysis of graphene when applied on mesenchymal stem cells, neural stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, embryonic stem cells, periodontal ligament stem cells, human adipose-derived stem cells and cancer stem cells, and how graphene influences cell behavior and differentiation are discussed in details.

  3. Angiomyeloproliferative Lesions Following Autologous Stem Cell Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Thirabanjasak, Duangpen; Tantiwongse, Kavirach; Thorner, Paul Scott

    2010-01-01

    Some reports suggest that autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation holds potential for treatment of renal diseases such as lupus nephritis, but the safety of delivering various stem cell types (hematopoietic, mesenchymal, and endothelial precursors) is not well established. Here, we report a case of lupus nephritis treated by direct renal injection of autologous stem cells recovered from peripheral blood. The patient developed masses at the sites of injection and hematuria. We suspe...

  4. Single dose of inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor induces prolonged inflammatory cell accumulation and fibrosis around injured tendon and synovium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homa Darmani

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available THE aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of inhibition of nitric oxide (NO production after injury on inflammatory cell accumulation and fibrosis around digital flexor tendon and synovium. A standard crush injury was applied to the flexor tendons of the middle digit of the hindpaw and the overlying muscle and synovium of female Wistar rats. Thirty animals received an intraperitoneal injection of either isotonic saline or N(G-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 5 mg/kg immediately following the crush injury, and five animals were then sacrificed at various intervals and the paws processed for histology. Another group of five animals was sacrificed after 3 days for nitrite determinations. The results showed that nitrite production and hence NO synthase activity is doubled at the acute phase of tendon wound healing, and we can prevent this by administering a single dose of L-NAME immediately after injury. The incidence and severity of fibrocellular adhesions between tendon and synovium was much more marked in animals treated with L-NAME. Treatment with L-NAME elicited a chronic inflammatory response characterised by a persistent and extraordinarily severe accumulation of large numbers of inflammatory cells in the subcutaneous tissues, in muscle and in tendon. These findings indicate that in the case of injured tendon and synovium, NO could act to protect the healing tissue from an uncontrolled inflammatory response.

  5. Hemopoietic stem cell mobilization in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J. Molendijk

    1987-01-01

    textabstractIn mice hemopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells are almost totally confined to the bone marrow and spleen. Only small numbers can be detected in the peripheral blood. Relatively little is known about the mechanism(s) modulating the circulation and mobilization of stem cells. At

  6. Stem cell treatment of degenerative eye disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Mead

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapies are being explored extensively as treatments for degenerative eye disease, either for replacing lost neurons, restoring neural circuits or, based on more recent evidence, as paracrine-mediated therapies in which stem cell-derived trophic factors protect compromised endogenous retinal neurons from death and induce the growth of new connections. Retinal progenitor phenotypes induced from embryonic stem cells/induced pluripotent stem cells (ESCs/iPSCs and endogenous retinal stem cells may replace lost photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells and restore vision in the diseased eye, whereas treatment of injured retinal ganglion cells (RGCs has so far been reliant on mesenchymal stem cells (MSC. Here, we review the properties of non-retinal-derived adult stem cells, in particular neural stem cells (NSCs, MSC derived from bone marrow (BMSC, adipose tissues (ADSC and dental pulp (DPSC, together with ESC/iPSC and discuss and compare their potential advantages as therapies designed to provide trophic support, repair and replacement of retinal neurons, RPE and glia in degenerative retinal diseases. We conclude that ESCs/iPSCs have the potential to replace lost retinal cells, whereas MSC may be a useful source of paracrine factors that protect RGC and stimulate regeneration of their axons in the optic nerve in degenerate eye disease. NSC may have potential as both a source of replacement cells and also as mediators of paracrine treatment.

  7. Spermatogonial stem cells in the bull

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aponte, P.M

    2009-01-01

    In the testis a complex process, called spermatogenesis, generates millions of spermatozoa per day. At the start of this process there are spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) that have the ability to divide either into new stem cells (self-renewal) or daughter cells committed to develop into

  8. Stem cells: Biology and clinical potential

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-12-30

    Dec 30, 2011 ... between apoptosis and self renewal. Yale J. Biol. Med. 82: 7-18. Alhadlaq A, Mao JJ (2004). Mesenchymal stem cells: isolation and therapeutics. Stem Cells Dev. 13: 436-448. Allan LE, Petit GH, Brundin P (2010). Cell transplantation in Parkinson's disease: problems and perspectives. Curr. Opin. Neurol.

  9. Proteomics Applications in Dental Derived Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Tian, Weidong; Song, Jinlin

    2017-07-01

    At present, the existence of a variety of dental derived stem cells has been documented. These cells displayed promising clinical application potential not only for teeth and its surrounding tissue regeneration, but also for other tissues, such as nerve and bone regeneration. Proteomics is an unbiased, global informatics tool that provides information on all protein expression levels as well as post-translational modification in cells or tissues and is applicable to dental derived stem cells research. Over the last decade, considerable progress has been made to study the global proteome, secrotome, and membrane proteome of dental derived stem cells. Here, we present an overview of the proteomics studies in the context of stem cell research. Particular attention is given to dental derived stem cell types as well as current challenges and opportunities. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1602-1610, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Stem cell biology and the plasticity polemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesenberry, Peter J; Dooner, Gerri; Colvin, Gerald; Abedi, Mehrdad

    2005-04-01

    Characterization of a cord blood derived unrestricted somatic stem cell (USSC) with capacity to differentiate into hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic tissues in the absence of cell fusion has highlighted the great potential of stem cell plasticity. A great variety of stem cell types have been defined and even the most pure marrow stem cells are highly heterogeneous. Data suggest that stem cells may exist in a continuum with continually and reversibly changing phenotype. These cells also possess a capacity to produce lung, liver, skin, and skeletal muscle under conditions of tissue injury. Arguments raised against the significance of adult marrow to nonmarrow conversions including the importance of cell fusion appear fallacious. We are at the beginning of an exciting and burgeoning field of research with great clinical potential.

  11. Hardwiring Stem Cell Communication through Tissue Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Tianchi; Greco, Valentina; Myung, Peggy

    2016-03-10

    Adult stem cells across diverse organs self-renew and differentiate to maintain tissue homeostasis. How stem cells receive input to preserve tissue structure and function largely relies on their communication with surrounding cellular and non-cellular elements. As such, how tissues are organized and patterned not only reflects organ function, but also inherently hardwires networks of communication between stem cells and their environment to direct tissue homeostasis and injury repair. This review highlights how different methods of stem cell communication reflect the unique organization and function of diverse tissues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Hardwiring stem cell communication through tissue structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Tianchi; Greco, Valentina; Myung, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    Adult stem cells across diverse organs self-renew and differentiate to maintain tissue homeostasis. How stem cells receive input to preserve tissue structure and function largely relies on their communication with surrounding cellular and non-cellular elements. As such, how tissues are organized and patterned not only reflects organ function but also inherently hardwires networks of communication between stem cells and their environment to direct tissue homeostasis and injury repair. This review highlights how different methods of stem cell communication reflect the unique organization and function of diverse tissues. PMID:26967287

  13. Nanomaterials for Engineering Stem Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerativitayanan, Punyavee; Carrow, James K; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K

    2015-08-05

    Recent progress in nanotechnology has stimulated the development of multifunctional biomaterials for tissue engineering applications. Synergistic interactions between nanomaterials and stem cell engineering offer numerous possibilities to address some of the daunting challenges in regenerative medicine, such as controlling trigger differentiation, immune reactions, limited supply of stem cells, and engineering complex tissue structures. Specifically, the interactions between stem cells and their microenvironment play key roles in controlling stem cell fate, which underlines therapeutic success. However, the interactions between nanomaterials and stem cells are not well understood, and the effects of the nanomaterials shape, surface morphology, and chemical functionality on cellular processes need critical evaluation. In this Review, focus is put on recent development in nanomaterial-stem cell interactions, with specific emphasis on their application in regenerative medicine. Further, the emerging technologies based on nanomaterials developed over the past decade for stem cell engineering are reviewed, as well as the potential applications of these nanomaterials in tissue regeneration, stem cell isolation, and drug/gene delivery. It is anticipated that the enhanced understanding of nanomaterial-stem cell interactions will facilitate improved biomaterial design for a range of biomedical and biotechnological applications. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Recent advances in hematopoietic stem cell biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jesper; Hess, David A; Nolta, Jan A

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Exciting advances have been made in the field of hematopoietic stem cell biology during the past year. This review summarizes recent progress in the identification, culture, and in vivo tracking of hematopoietic stem cells. RECENT FINDINGS: The roles of Wnt and Notch proteins...... made recently in the field of stem cell biology, researchers now have improved tools to define novel populations of stem cells, examine them ex vivo using conditions that promote self-renewal, track them into recipients, and determine whether they can contribute to the repair of damaged tissues...

  15. Epigenetics of solid cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Alok; Verma, Mukesh

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetics is an emerging science that can help to explain carcinogenesis. The possibility that carcinogenesis may originate in a stem cell process was proposed recently. Stem cells are generated and contribute to tumor formation during the process of tumor development. This chapter focuses on the role of epigenetics and genetics in stem cell formation, different theories about the origin of cancer stem cells (CSCs), and epigenetic mechanisms that occur in solid CSCs. Potential applications of knowledge gained through this field and future prospects for cancer treatment also are discussed.

  16. Single-cell sequencing in stem cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Lu; Tang, Fuchou

    2016-04-15

    Cell-to-cell variation and heterogeneity are fundamental and intrinsic characteristics of stem cell populations, but these differences are masked when bulk cells are used for omic analysis. Single-cell sequencing technologies serve as powerful tools to dissect cellular heterogeneity comprehensively and to identify distinct phenotypic cell types, even within a 'homogeneous' stem cell population. These technologies, including single-cell genome, epigenome, and transcriptome sequencing technologies, have been developing rapidly in recent years. The application of these methods to different types of stem cells, including pluripotent stem cells and tissue-specific stem cells, has led to exciting new findings in the stem cell field. In this review, we discuss the recent progress as well as future perspectives in the methodologies and applications of single-cell omic sequencing technologies.

  17. Media presentation and public understanding of stem cells and stem cell research in Hungary

    OpenAIRE

    Vicsek, Lilla; Gergely, Júlia

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on a research project which examined media coverage and audience perceptions of stem cells and stem cell research in Hungary, using focus groups and a media analysis. A background study was also conducted on the Hungarian legal, social and political situation linked to stem cell research, treatment and storage. Our data shows how stem cell research/treatments were framed by the focus group members in terms of medical results/cures and human interest stories – mirroring the ...

  18. Current Biosafety Considerations in Stem Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavinejad, Masoumeh; Andrews, Peter W.; Shoraki, Elham Kargar

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells can be valuable model systems for drug discovery and modelling human diseases as well as to investigate cellular interactions and molecular events in the early stages of development. Controlling the differentiation of stem cells into specific germ layers provides a potential source of highly specialized cells for therapeutic applications. In recent years, finding individual properties of stem cells such as their ultimate self-renewal capacity and the generation of particular cell lines by differentiation under specific culture conditions underpins the development of regenerative therapies. These futures make stem cells a leading candidate to treat a wide range of diseases. Nevertheless, as with all novel treatments, safety issues are one of the barriers that should be overcome to guarantee the quality of a patient’s life after stem cell therapy. Many studies have pointed to a large gap in our knowledge about the therapeutic applications of these cells. This gap clearly shows the importance of biosafety concerns for the current status of cell-based therapies, even more than their therapeutic efficacy. Currently, scientists report that tumorigenicity and immunogenicity are the two most important associated cell-based therapy risks. In principle, intrinsic factors such as cell characteristics and extrinsic elements introduced by manufacturing of stem cells can result in tumor formation and immunological reactions after stem cell transplantation. Therapeutic research shows there are many biological questions regarding safety issues of stem cell clinical applications. Stem cell therapy is a rapidly advancing field that needs to focus more on finding a comprehensive technology for assessing risk. A variety of risk factors (from intrinsic to extrinsic) should be considered for safe clinical stem cell therapies. PMID:27540533

  19. Stem cells in the human breast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ole William; Polyak, Kornelia

    2010-01-01

    The origins of the epithelial cells participating in the development, tissue homeostasis, and cancer of the human breast are poorly understood. However, emerging evidence suggests a role for adult tissue-specific stem cells in these processes. In a hierarchical manner, these generate the two main...... mammary cell lineages, producing an increasing number of cells with distinct properties. Understanding the biological characteristics of human breast stem cells and their progeny is crucial in attempts to compare the features of normal stem cells and cancer precursor cells and distinguish these from...... nonprecursor cells and cells from the bulk of a tumor. A historical overview of research on human breast stem cells in primary tissue and in culture reveals the progress that has been made in this area, whereas a focus on the cell-of-origin and reprogramming that occurs during neoplastic conversion provides...

  20. Stem cell therapy in the management of shoulder rotator cuff disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Maria Valencia; Ibán, Miguel A Ruiz; Heredia, Jorge Díaz; Laakso, Raul Barco; Cuéllar, Ricardo; Arranz, Mariano García

    2015-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are frequent shoulder problems that are usually dealt with surgical repair. Despite improved surgical techniques, the tendon-to-bone healing rate is unsatisfactory due to difficulties in restoring the delicate transitional tissue between bone and tendon. It is essential to understand the molecular mechanisms that determine this failure. The study of the molecular environment during embryogenesis and during normal healing after injury is key in devising strategies to get a successful repair. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) can differentiate into different mesodermal tissues and have a strong paracrine, anti-inflammatory, immunoregulatory and angiogenic potential. Stem cell therapy is thus a potentially effective therapy to enhance rotator cuff healing. Promising results have been reported with the use of autologous MSC of different origins in animal studies: they have shown to have better healing properties, increasing the amount of fibrocartilage formation and improving the orientation of fibrocartilage fibers with less immunologic response and reduced lymphocyte infiltration. All these changes lead to an increase in biomechanical strength. However, animal research is still inconclusive and more experimental studies are needed before human application. Future directions include expanded stem cell therapy in combination with growth factors or different scaffolds as well as new stem cell types and gene therapy. PMID:26029341

  1. Stem cells in bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Jeong Min [Department of Preventive and Social Dentistry and Institute of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung-Chul; Park, Jae-Hong; Kwon, Il Keun; Hwang, Yu-Shik [Department of Maxillofacial Biomedical Engineering and Institute of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Mantalaris, Anathathios, E-mail: yshwang@khu.ac.k [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    Bone tissue engineering has been one of the most promising areas of research, providing a potential clinical application to cure bone defects. Recently, various stem cells including embryonic stem cells (ESCs), bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs), umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCB-MSCs), adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs), muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) have received extensive attention in the field of bone tissue engineering due to their distinct biological capability to differentiate into osteogenic lineages. The application of these stem cells to bone tissue engineering requires inducing in vitro differentiation of these cells into bone forming cells, osteoblasts. For this purpose, efficient in vitro differentiation towards osteogenic lineage requires the development of well-defined and proficient protocols. This would reduce the likelihood of spontaneous differentiation into divergent lineages and increase the available cell source for application to bone tissue engineering therapies. This review provides a critical examination of the various experimental strategies that could be used to direct the differentiation of ESC, BM-MSC, UCB-MSC, ADSC, MDSC and DPSC towards osteogenic lineages and their potential applications in tissue engineering, particularly in the regeneration of bone. (topical review)

  2. Nonclinical safety strategies for stem cell therapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharpe, Michaela E., E-mail: michaela_sharpe@yahoo.com [Investigative Toxicology, Drug Safety Research and Development, Pfizer Ltd, Ramsgate Road, Sandwich, CT13 9NJ (United Kingdom); Morton, Daniel [Exploratory Drug Safety, Drug Safety Research and Development, Pfizer Inc, Cambridge, 02140 (United States); Rossi, Annamaria [Investigative Toxicology, Drug Safety Research and Development, Pfizer Ltd, Ramsgate Road, Sandwich, CT13 9NJ (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-01

    Recent breakthroughs in stem cell biology, especially the development of the induced pluripotent stem cell techniques, have generated tremendous enthusiasm and efforts to explore the therapeutic potential of stem cells in regenerative medicine. Stem cell therapies are being considered for the treatment of degenerative diseases, inflammatory conditions, cancer and repair of damaged tissue. The safety of a stem cell therapy depends on many factors including the type of cell therapy, the differentiation status and proliferation capacity of the cells, the route of administration, the intended clinical location, long term survival of the product and/or engraftment, the need for repeated administration, the disease to be treated and the age of the population. Understanding the product profile of the intended therapy is crucial to the development of the nonclinical safety study design.

  3. Migratory properties of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmar, Thomas; Entschladen, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells raise great expectations in regenerative medicine due to their capacity to regenerate damaged tissues, thereby restoring organ tissue integrity and functionality. Even though it is not yet clear how mesenchymal stem cells are guided to injured tissue it is generally assumed that the directed migration of these cells is facilitated by the same soluble factors that also recruit immune competent cells to inflamed tissue areas. Tumor tissue represents another type of (chronically) inflamed tissue and because of that mesenchymal stem cells are highly attracted. Although some data indicate that esenchymal stem cells might have a beneficial effect on tumor growth due to anti-tumor effects the plethora of data suggest that tumor tissue recruited mesenchymal stem cells rather promote tumor growth and metastasis formation. Nonetheless, the enhanced tumor tropism of mesenchymal stem cells makes them ideal candidates for novel anti-cancer strategies. Like Trojan Horses genetically modified mesenchymal stem cells will deliver their deadly cargo, such as anti-tumor cytokines or oncolytic viruses, into cancerous tissues, thereby destroying the tumor form within. In this chapter we will summarize the current concepts of genetic modification of mesenchymal stem cells for future anti-cancer therapies.

  4. Engineering Concepts in Stem Cell Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Karthikeyan; Mishra, Sachin; Singh, Satnam; Pei, Ming; Gulyas, Balazs; Padmanabhan, Parasuraman

    2017-09-13

    The field of regenerative medicine integrates advancements made in stem cells, molecular biology, engineering, and clinical methodologies. Stem cells serve as a fundamental ingredient for therapeutic application in regenerative medicine. Apart from stem cells, engineering concepts have equally contributed to the success of stem cell based applications in improving human health. The purpose of various engineering methodologies is to develop regenerative and preventive medicine to combat various diseases and deformities. Explosion of stem cell discoveries and their implementation in clinical setting warrants new engineering concepts and new biomaterials. Biomaterials, microfluidics, and nanotechnology are the major engineering concepts used for the implementation of stem cells in regenerative medicine. Many of these engineering technologies target the specific niche of the cell for better functional capability. Controlling the niche is the key for various developmental activities leading to organogenesis and tissue homeostasis. Biomimetic understanding not only helped to improve the design of the matrices or scaffolds by incorporating suitable biological and physical components, but also ultimately aided adoption of designs that helped these materials/devices have better function. Adoption of engineering concepts in stem cell research improved overall achievement, however, several important issues such as long-term effects with respect to systems biology needs to be addressed. Here, in this review the authors will highlight some interesting breakthroughs in stem cell biology that use engineering methodologies. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Safety reporting on implantation of autologous adipose tissue-derived stem cells with platelet-rich plasma into human articular joints

    OpenAIRE

    Pak, Jaewoo; Chang, Jae-Jin; Lee, Jung Hun; Lee, Sang Hee

    2013-01-01

    Background Adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs), a type of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), have great potential as therapeutic agents in regenerative medicine. Numerous animal studies have documented the multipotency of ADSCs, showing their capabilities to differentiate into tissues such as muscle, bone, cartilage, and tendon. However, the safety of autologous ADSC injections into human joints is only beginning to be understood and the data are lacking. Methods Between 2009 and 2010, 91 p...

  6. Mesenchymal stem cell assays and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CarloAlberto Redi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Among the many types of adult, or better, somatic, stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells (marrow-derived stromal cells, MSC are those more versatile in changing their phenotype during differentiation: from smooth muscle, adipocyte, bone and cartilage cells to name a few. In addition, they are present in large number in adults and relatively easy to isolate and colture. All these features simply explain the already large number of application that their use allow in rigenerative medicine, not to tell about researches in which they play a crucial role in understanding the meaning of stemness and stem cell niche and the other several conceptual paradigms framing the fascinating field of stem cell biology. Having clear in mind this situation.....

  7. Epidermal Stem Cells in Orthopaedic Regenerative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Zhen, Gehua; Tsai, Shin-Yi; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, great advances have been made in epidermal stem cell studies at the cellular and molecular level. These studies reported various subpopulations and differentiations existing in the epidermal stem cell. Although controversies and unknown issues remain, epidermal stem cells possess an immune-privileged property in transplantation together with easy accessibility, which is favorable for future clinical application. In this review, we will summarize the biological characteristics of epidermal stem cells, and their potential in orthopedic regenerative medicine. Epidermal stem cells play a critical role via cell replacement, and demonstrate significant translational potential in the treatment of orthopedic injuries and diseases, including treatment for wound healing, peripheral nerve and spinal cord injury, and even muscle and bone remodeling. PMID:23727934

  8. Cancer stem cells of the digestive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Hugh S; Nishida, Naohiro; Koseki, Jun; Konno, Masamitsu; Kawamoto, Koichi; Tsunekuni, Kenta; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Ishii, Hideshi

    2014-12-01

    Stem cells of the digestive system are ideal in many ways for research, given they are abundant, highly proliferative and have a uniform structural arrangement. This in turn has enormously aided the research of cancer stem cells of the digestive system, which is now shaping our understanding of cancer stem cells. In this review, the recent advances in the understanding of cancer stem cells of the digestive system have been summarized, including aspects such as their identification, origin, cell-cycle dormancy, relationship with epithelial-mesenchymal transition, cellular metabolism and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Newly acquired knowledge concerning cancer stem cells have led to the development of novel cancer therapeutics with provisional yet encouraging results. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Property Of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells And Peripheral Blood Hematopoietic Stem Cells That Differentiated Both Group To Cardiac Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jabari F; Mohammadnejad J; Yavari K

    2013-01-01

    Dental pulp is the soft live tissue inside a tooth. Dental pulp contains stem cells, known as Dental Pulp Stem Cells. The finest Dental Pulp Stem Cells are found in a baby teeth or milk teeth. The stem cells from the milk teeth are ‘mesenchymal’ type of cells. cells that have the ability to generate a wide variety of cell types like chondrocytes, osteoblasts and adipocytes. To isolate high-quality human dental pulp stem cells from accessible resources is an important goal for stem-cell resear...

  10. The potential application of stem cell in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketut Suardita

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are generally defined as cells that have the capacity to self-renewal and differentiate to specialize cell. There are two kinds of stem cell, embryonic stem cell and adult stem cells. Stem cell therapy has been used to treat diseases including Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases, spinal cord injury, stroke, burns, heart diseases, diabetes, osteoarthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Stem cells were found in dental pulp, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone marrow. Because of their potential in medical therapy, stem cells were used to regenerate lost or damage teeth and periodontal structures. This article discusses the potential application of stem cells for dental field.

  11. Clonogenicity: holoclones and meroclones contain stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte M Beaver

    Full Text Available When primary cultures of normal cells are cloned, three types of colony grow, called holoclones, meroclones and paraclones. These colonies are believed to be derived from stem cells, transit-amplifying cells and differentiated cells respectively. More recently, this approach has been extended to cancer cell lines. However, we observed that meroclones from the prostate cancer cell line DU145 produce holoclones, a paradoxical observation as meroclones are thought to be derived from transit-amplifying cells. The purpose of this study was to confirm this observation and determine if both holoclones and meroclones from cancer cell lines contain stem cells. We demonstrated that both holoclones and meroclones can be serially passaged indefinitely, are highly proliferative, can self-renew to form spheres, are serially tumorigenic and express stem cell markers. This study demonstrates that the major difference between holoclones and meroclones derived from a cancer cell line is the proportion of stem cells within each colony, not the presence or absence of stem cells. These findings may reflect the properties of cancer as opposed to normal cells, perhaps indicating that the hierarchy of stem cells is more extensive in cancer.

  12. Autologous implant of bone marrow mononuclear stem-cells as treatment for equine bicipital tendonitis: case report Implante autólogo de células mononucleares de médula ósea como tratamiento de tendinitis bicipital equina: reporte de caso clínico

    OpenAIRE

    BC Menarim; GA Fortini; PS Álvarez; J Gómez; CD Jarrín; A Ramírez; JS Galecio

    2012-01-01

    Bicipital bursitis in the horse, the inflammation of the bicipital tendon and its surrounding bursa, has been reported to represent a low percentage of lameness cause. However, it is the main cause of lameness associated to the shoulder region and it has been under diagnosed. Due to high recurrence in different types of tendon injuries, treatments aiming to re-establish tendon functionality have been a focus of research. The aim of this study is to report the implant of a bone marrow mononucl...

  13. [Clinical applications of stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth in stem cell therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaoxia, Li; Jiaozi, Fangteng; Shi, Yu; Yuming, Zhao; Lihong, Ge

    2017-10-01

    Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) are one category of dental stem cells. They belong to ectodermal mesenchymal stem cells. As an ideal stem cell source, SHED possess great potential in stem cell therapy. This review demonstrates the biological characteristics and advantages of SHED in stem cell therapy and discusses its multiple functions in tissue regeneration and repair, including multiple differentiation potentiality, cell secretion of cytokines, and immunomodulatory ability. Furthermore, this article introduces the main findings regarding the potential clinical applications of SHED to a variety of diseases. This article demonstrates research progress in dentin-pulp regeneration, maxillofacial bone regeneration, and treatment of nervous system and immune system diseases with SHED for stem cell transplantation.

  14. In vitro functional response of human tendon cells to different dosages of low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Girolamo, L; Viganò, M; Galliera, E; Stanco, D; Setti, S; Marazzi, M G; Thiebat, G; Corsi Romanelli, M M; Sansone, V

    2015-11-01

    Chronic tendinopathy is a degenerative process causing pain and disability. Current treatments include biophysical therapies, such as pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF). The aim of this study was to compare, for the first time, the functional in vitro response of human tendon cells to different dosages of PEMF, varying in field intensity and duration and number of exposures. Tendon cells, isolated from human semitendinosus and gracilis tendons (hTCs; n = 6), were exposed to different PEMF treatments (1.5 or 3 mT for 8 or 12 h, single or repeated treatments). Scleraxis (SCX), COL1A1, COL3A1 and vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) expression and cytokine production were assessed. None of the different dosages provoked apoptotic events. Proliferation of hTCs was enhanced by all treatments, whereas only 3 mT-PEMF treatment increased cell viability. However, the single 1.5 mT-PEMF treatment elicited the highest up-regulation of SCX, VEGF-A and COL1A1 expression, and it significantly reduced COL3A1 expression with respect to untreated cells. The treated hTCs showed a significantly higher release of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10 and TGF-β. Interestingly, the repeated 1.5 mT-PEMF significantly further increased IL-10 production. 1.5 mT-PEMF treatment was able to give the best results in in vitro healthy human tendon cell culture. Although the clinical relevance is not direct, this investigation should be considered an attempt to clarify the effect of different PEMF protocols on tendon cells, in particular focusing on the potential applicability of this cell source for regenerative medicine purpose, both in surgical and in conservative treatment for tendon disorders.

  15. The ageing haematopoietic stem cell compartment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geiger, Hartmut; de Haan, Gerald; Florian, M. Carolina

    Stem cell ageing underlies the ageing of tissues, especially those with a high cellular turnover. There is growing evidence that the ageing of the immune system is initiated at the very top of the haematopoietic hierarchy and that the ageing of haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) directly contributes

  16. Stem cells: Biology and clinical potential

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-12-30

    Dec 30, 2011 ... Stem cell technology has developed rapidly in recent years to the point that we can now envisage its future use in a variety of therapeutic areas. This review seeks to summarize the types and sources of stem cells that may be utilized in this way, their pattern of development, their plasticity in terms of.

  17. A MODEL FOR POSTRADIATION STEM CELL KINETICS,

    Science.gov (United States)

    In polycythemic rats observed for 17 days postradiation (300 R, 250 KVP X-rays) it was noted that stem cell release diminished to 8 percent of the...correlate these findings with a kinetic model of erythropoiesis. It was suggested that the initial depression in stem cell release might be due to cellular

  18. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 7,934 views 32:25 Stem Cell Basics - How Blood is Made. - Duration: 10:58. Vernon Louw ... 19. Children's Health 40,015 views 49:19 How to become a potential blood stem cell donor ...

  19. Stem Cell Research and Health Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eve, David J.; Marty, Phillip J.; McDermott, Robert J.; Klasko, Stephen K.; Sanberg, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells are being touted as the greatest discovery for the potential treatment of a myriad of diseases in the new millennium, but there is still much research to be done before it will be known whether they can live up to this description. There is also an ethical debate over the production of one of the most valuable types of stem cell: the…

  20. Molecular regulation of human hematopoietic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Galen, P.L.J.

    2014-01-01

    Peter van Galen focuses on understanding the determinants that maintain the stem cell state. Using human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) as a model, processes that govern self-renewal and tissue regeneration were investigated. Specifically, a role for microRNAs in balancing the human HSC

  1. Representations of stem cell clinics on Twitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenova, Kalina; Reshef, Amir; Caulfield, Timothy

    2014-12-01

    The practice of travelling abroad to receive unproven and unregulated stem cell treatments has become an increasingly problematic global phenomenon known as 'stem cell tourism'. In this paper, we examine representations of nine major clinics and providers of such treatments on the microblogging network Twitter. We collected and conducted a content analysis of Twitter posts (n = 363) by these establishments and by other users mentioning them, focusing specifically on marketing claims about treatment procedures and outcomes, discussions of safety and efficacy of stem cell transplants, and specific representations of patients' experiences. Our analysis has shown that there were explicit claims or suggestions of benefits associated with unproven stem cell treatments in approximately one third of the tweets and that patients' experiences, whenever referenced, were presented as invariably positive and as testimonials about the efficacy of stem cell transplants. Furthermore, the results indicated that the tone of most tweets (60.2 %) was overwhelmingly positive and there were rarely critical discussions about significant health risks associated with unproven stem cell therapies. When placed in the context of past research on the problems associated with the marketing of unproven stem cell therapies, this analysis of representations on Twitter suggests that discussions in social media have also remained largely uncritical of the stem cell tourism phenomenon, with inaccurate representations of risks and benefits for patients.

  2. Stem Cell Research: Applications In Haematological Conditions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haematopoietic Stem Cell Trans-plantation is a medical procedure in the field of haematology and oncology that involves transplantation of haematopoietic stem cells (HSC). It is most often performed for people with diseases of the blood or bone narrow or certain types of cancers.

  3. Skeletal stem cells in space and time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassem, Moustapha; Bianco, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The nature, biological characteristics, and contribution to organ physiology of skeletal stem cells are not completely determined. Chan et al. and Worthley et al. demonstrate that a stem cell for skeletal tissues, and a system of more restricted, downstream progenitors, can be identified in mice...

  4. Mesenchymal stem cells in oral reconstructive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, C; Sørensen, J A; Kassem, M

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated clinical outcomes following intraoperative use of adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in various oral reconstructive procedures. PubMed was searched without language restrictions from 2000 to 2011 using the search words stem cell, oral surgery, tissue engineering, sinus lift...

  5. Stem Cell Transplants in Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem cell transplants are procedures that restore blood-forming stem cells in cancer patients who have had theirs destroyed by very high doses of chemotherapy or radiation therapy. Learn about the types of transplants and side effects that may occur.

  6. Pathological modifications of plant stem cell destiny

    Science.gov (United States)

    In higher plants, the shoot apex contains undifferentiated stem cells that give rise to various tissues and organs. The fate of these stem cells determines the pattern of plant growth as well as reproduction; and such fate is genetically preprogrammed. We found that a bacterial infection can derai...

  7. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are most commonly used in the treatment of cancers like leukemia and lymphoma to restore stem cells that have been destroyed by high doses of ... 514 views 3:28 Cancer symptom pains - Pancreatic Cancer - Duration: 2:54. ... 2:54 Calum's stem cell donation for Anthony Nolan - Duration: 3:35. Anthony ...

  8. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... her German stem cell donor for the first time in Germany. #priceless - Duration: 1:04. Jacque Brohawn ... Bone Marrow Transplant Patient Information: Chapter 3 - What Are Stem Cells - Duration: 3:58. HenryFordTV 20,159 ...

  9. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... video will automatically play next. Up next Stem cell donation: Step by step - Duration: 3:35. hemaquebec1998 8,779 views 3:35 My Friend the Stem Cell Donor - Duration: 4:41. Annabelle Monks 6,482 ...

  10. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a former NCI employee, Serena Marshall, as she takes you through her blood stem cell donation experience ... Match 29,769 views 3:28 PBSC (Peripheral blood stem cell) Harvest - Duration: 2:55. bmdpsg 5,299 ... Loading... Working... Sign in to add ...

  11. Mesenchymal stem cells: cell biology and potential use in therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassem, Moustapha; Kristiansen, Malthe; Abdallah, Basem M

    2004-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells are clonogenic, non-haematopoietic stem cells present in the bone marrow and are able to differentiate into multiple mesoderm-type cell lineages e.g. osteoblasts, chondrocytes, endothelial-cells and also non-mesoderm-type lineages e.g. neuronal-like cells. Several methods a...

  12. Cancer Stem Cells: Repair Gone Awry?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Rangwala

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Because cell turnover occurs in all adult organs, stem/progenitor cells within the stem-cell niche of each tissue must be appropriately mobilized and differentiated to maintain normal organ structure and function. Tissue injury increases the demands on this process, and thus may unmask defective regulation of pathways, such as Hedgehog (Hh, that modulate progenitor cell fate. Hh pathway dysregulation has been demonstrated in many types of cancer, including pancreatic and liver cancers, in which defective Hh signaling has been linked to outgrowth of Hh-responsive cancer stem-initiating cells and stromal elements. Hence, the Hh pathway might be a therapeutic target in such tumors.

  13. Biomaterial stiffness determines stem cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Hongwei; Wang, Heping; Zhang, Zhijun; Yang, Wang; Liu, Wenbin; Li, Yulin; Li, Lisha

    2017-06-01

    Stem cells have potential to develop into numerous cell types, thus they are good cell source for tissue engineering. As an external physical signal, material stiffness is capable of regulating stem cell fate. Biomaterial stiffness is an important parameter in tissue engineering. We summarize main measurements of material stiffness under different condition, then list and compare three main methods of controlling stiffness (material amount, crosslinking density and photopolymeriztion time) which interplay with one another and correlate with stiffness positively, and current advances in effects of biomaterial stiffness on stem cell fate. We discuss the unsolved problems and future directions of biomaterial stiffness in tissue engineering. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Artificial gametes from stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Inmaculada; Míguez-Forjan, Jose Manuel; Simón, Carlos

    2015-06-01

    The generation of artificial gametes is a real challenge for the scientific community today. In vitro development of human eggs and sperm will pave the way for the understanding of the complex process of human gametogenesis and will provide with human gametes for the study of infertility and the onset of some inherited disorders. However, the great promise of artificial gametes resides in their future application on reproductive treatments for all these people wishing to have genetically related children and for which gamete donation is now their unique option of parenthood. This is the case of infertile patients devoid of suitable gametes, same sex couples, singles and those fertile couples in a high risk of transmitting serious diseases to their progeny. In the search of the best method to obtain artificial gametes, many researchers have successfully obtained human germ cell-like cells from stem cells at different stages of differentiation. In the near future, this field will evolve to new methods providing not only viable but also functional and safe artificial germ cells. These artificial sperm and eggs should be able to recapitulate all the genetic and epigenetic processes needed for the correct gametogenesis, fertilization and embryogenesis leading to the birth of a healthy and fertile newborn.

  15. Hematopoietic cell differentiation from embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells, both embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, are undifferentiated cells that can self-renew and potentially differentiate into all hematopoietic lineages, such as hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), hematopoietic progenitor cells and mature hematopoietic cells in the presence of a suitable culture system. Establishment of pluripotent stem cells provides a comprehensive model to study early hematopoietic development and has emerged as a powerful research tool to explore regenerative medicine. Nowadays, HSC transplantation and hematopoietic cell transfusion have successfully cured some patients, especially in malignant hematological diseases. Owing to a shortage of donors and a limited number of the cells, hematopoietic cell induction from pluripotent stem cells has been regarded as an alternative source of HSCs and mature hematopoietic cells for intended therapeutic purposes. Pluripotent stem cells are therefore extensively utilized to facilitate better understanding in hematopoietic development by recapitulating embryonic development in vivo, in which efficient strategies can be easily designed and deployed for the generation of hematopoietic lineages in vitro. We hereby review the current progress of hematopoietic cell induction from embryonic stem/induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:23796405

  16. Clear-cell sarcoma of tendons and aponeuroses studied by immunoscintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, M. [Oncology Hospital, Lisbon (Portugal). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Vieira, M.R. [Oncology Hospital, Lisbon (Portugal). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Marques, A. [Oncology Hospital, Lisbon (Portugal). Dept. of Medicine; Almeida, O. [Oncology Hospital, Lisbon (Portugal). Dept. of Pathology; Costa, O. [Oncology Hospital, Lisbon (Portugal). Dept. of Medicine

    1995-08-01

    Clear-cell sarcoma is a rare tumor that arises in association with tendons and aponeuroses. Although it shares with malignant melanoma several histologic and ultrastructural features, it has a clinical course different from that of conventional melanomas. A case of clear-cell sarcoma studied by immunoscintigraphy with {sup 99m}Tc-labeled F(ab`)2 fragments of the monoclonal antibody 225.28 S is reported. (orig.) [Deutsch] Das clear cell-Sarkom ist ein seltener Tumor, der von der Vereinigung von Sehnen und Aponeurosen stammt. Obwohl er mit dem malignen Melanom histologische und ultrastrukturelle Aehnlichkeiten aufweist, stimmt sein klinischer Verlauf mit jenem konventioneller Melanome nicht ueberein. Ein Fall eines clear cell-Sarkoms wurde mittels Immunszintigraphie mit {sup 99m}Tc-markierten monoklonalen Antikoerper 225.28S F(ab`)2-Fragmenten diagnostiziert. (orig.)

  17. Stem Cells: What They Are and What They Do

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem cells: What they are and what they do Stem cells and derived products offer great promise for new medical treatments. Learn about stem cell types, current and possible uses, ethical issues, and ...

  18. Organ or Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stem Cell Transplantation and Oral Health Organ or Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth Untitled Document Key Points_ ... See YourDentist Before Transplant Before an organ or stem cell transplant, have a dental checkup. Your mouth should ...

  19. Molecular Biology of Liver Cancer Stem Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Oishi, Naoki; Yamashita, Taro; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2014-01-01

    .... The concept of cancer stem cells (CSCs) is based primarily on the clinical and experimental observations that indicate the existence of a subpopulation of cells with the capacity to self-renew and differentiate as well as show increased...

  20. Spermatogonial stem cells: Progress and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuru Komeya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty years ago, the transplantation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs from a mouse to other recipient mice was shown to be feasible, which clearly demonstrated the functional identity of SSCs. Since then, several important new findings and other technical developments have followed, which included a new hypothesis on their cell kinetics and spermatogonial hierarchy in the testis, a culture method allowing their self-renewal and proliferation, a testis tissue organ culture method, which induced their complete differentiation up to sperm, and the in vitro induction of germ cells from embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. These advancements reinforced or advanced our understanding of this unique cell. Nonetheless, there are many unresolved questions in the study of spermatogonial stem cells and a long road remains until these cells can be used clinically in reproductive medicine.

  1. Nanotopographical Control of Stem Cell Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E. McNamara

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells have the capacity to differentiate into various lineages, and the ability to reliably direct stem cell fate determination would have tremendous potential for basic research and clinical therapy. Nanotopography provides a useful tool for guiding differentiation, as the features are more durable than surface chemistry and can be modified in size and shape to suit the desired application. In this paper, nanotopography is examined as a means to guide differentiation, and its application is described in the context of different subsets of stem cells, with a particular focus on skeletal (mesenchymal stem cells. To address the mechanistic basis underlying the topographical effects on stem cells, the likely contributions of indirect (biochemical signal-mediated and direct (force-mediated mechanotransduction are discussed. Data from proteomic research is also outlined in relation to topography-mediated fate determination, as this approach provides insight into the global molecular changes at the level of the functional effectors.

  2. Stem Cell-based Therapies for Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Colm; Jerkic, Mirjana; Laffey, John G

    2017-12-01

    Sepsis is a life-threatening syndrome resulting in shock and organ dysfunction stemming from a microbial infection. Sepsis has a mortality of 40% and is implicated in half of all in-hospital deaths. The host immune response to microbial infection is critical, with early-phase sepsis characterized by a hyperinflammatory immune response, whereas the later phase of sepsis is often complicated by suppression. Sepsis has no treatment, and management remains supportive.Stem cells constitute exciting potential therapeutic agents for sepsis. In this review, we examine the rationale for stem cells in sepsis, focusing on mesenchymal stem/stromal cells, which currently demonstrate the greatest therapeutic promise. We examine the preclinical evidence base and evaluate potential mechanisms of action of these cells that are important in the setting of sepsis. We discuss early-phase clinical trials and critically appraise translational barriers to the use of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells in patients with sepsis.

  3. Stem cells: A boon in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Deepika

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been a remarkable interest in stem cells within the dental and medical community mainly because of their capability of self-renewal and multiple lineage differentiation. Due to its multipotent properties, stem cells have been employed in the regeneration of body parts and curing various diseases. Stem cells have been isolated from oral and maxillofacial region including tooth, gingiva, periodontium and oral mucosa. Stem cell research and therapy may be used as an alternative to current conventional methods of restoring tooth and craniofacial defects. The objective of this literature review is to provide an overview of the different types of stem cells and their origin and characteristics features and its applications in dentistry. The literature search included PubMed, other indexed journals, and online material.

  4. Overcoming Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karobi Moitra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The principle mechanism of protection of stem cells is through the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters. These transporters serve as the guardians of the stem cell population in the body. Unfortunately these very same ABC efflux pumps afford protection to cancer stem cells in tumors, shielding them from the adverse effects of chemotherapy. A number of strategies to circumvent the function of these transporters in cancer stem cells are currently under investigation. These strategies include the development of competitive and allosteric modulators, nanoparticle mediated delivery of inhibitors, targeted transcriptional regulation of ABC transporters, miRNA mediated inhibition, and targeting of signaling pathways that modulate ABC transporters. The role of ABC transporters in cancer stem cells will be explored in this paper and strategies aimed at overcoming drug resistance caused by these particular transporters will also be discussed.

  5. Cytokine signalling in embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, David Møbjerg; Kalisz, Mark; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2006-01-01

    Cytokines play a central role in maintaining self-renewal in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells through a member of the interleukin-6 type cytokine family termed leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). LIF activates the JAK-STAT3 pathway through the class I cytokine receptor gp130, which forms a trimeric...... pathways seem to converge on c-myc as a common target to promote self-renewal. Whereas LIF does not seem to stimulate self-renewal in human embryonic stem cells it cannot be excluded that other cytokines are involved. The pleiotropic actions of the increasing number of cytokines and receptors signalling...... via JAKs, STATs and SOCS exhibit considerable redundancy, compensation and plasticity in stem cells in accordance with the view that stem cells are governed by quantitative variations in strength and duration of signalling events known from other cell types rather than qualitatively different stem...

  6. Stem cells in dentistry: A study regarding awareness of stem cells among dental professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitroda, Parita K; Katti, Girish; Attar, Nikhat M; Shahbaz, Syed; Sreenivasarao, G; Patil, Ambika

    2017-01-01

    Dental stem cell, a type of adult stem cell, exhibits multipotent differentiation capacity and is drawing worldwide attention because of its numerous applications. The advances in applications of dental stem cells seem to be unsurpassed in the near future, for which specialized skills and knowledge in this arena are of prime significance. Hence, there is a need to acquire more knowledge about dental stem cells to obtain maximum benefits from it in the coming years. Dental stem cells in India are still at the budding stage, and there seems to be limited awareness regarding dental stem cells. This study aimed to assess the awareness of stem cells among the dental professionals. The present study was a questionnaire-based study of dental professionals (MDS, BDS, postgraduates, and interns) of three different institutions. Results showed that 95.2% of dental professionals are aware of the terminology dental stem cells and 53.9% of them are aware of various applications of dental stem cells. Chi-square test showed a significant correlation between the sources of information, source of dental stem cells, and clinical applications in relation to the academic qualification of the dental professionals. This study revealed a good level of awareness among the dental professionals, and it also showed the need to spread more knowledge about the advances in applications, storage, banking, and guidelines related to dental stem cells.

  7. Stem Cell Therapy for Fanconi Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing-Shuo

    2017-07-08

    Stem cell therapy is the administration of stem cells to a patient to treat or prevent a disease. Since stem cells possess the long-term self-renewal capacity and provide daughter cells that differentiate into the specialized cells of each tissue, stem cell therapy will theoretically improve the disease condition for the lifetime of the patient. As the most widely used stem cell therapy, bone marrow transplantation is the treatment of choice for many kinds of blood disorders, including anemias, leukemias, lymphomas, and rare immunodeficiency diseases. For the fatal genetic blood disorder Fanconi anemia, allogeneic bone marrow transplantation has remained the only curative treatment. But the recent advances in stem cell and gene therapy fields may provide promising opportunities for an alternative or even better management of Fanconi anemia. Many of these new ideas and opportunities are also useful for treating other blood diseases that affect hematopoietic stem cells, such as sickle cell anemia, severe combined immunodeficiencies, and beta-thalassemias. In this chapter, these advances along with their challenges and limitations will be thoroughly discussed.

  8. Stem cells in court: historical trends in US legal cases related to stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinho, Andreia Martins; Turner, Leigh

    2017-04-01

    Using two legal research platforms, we identified 193 stem-cell-related legal cases that were decided in US courts. Classifying the cases by category, we examined historical trends in the types of legal cases related to stem cells. Major types of cases involved plaintiffs seeking to overturn denial of health insurance coverage decisions, disputes related to intellectual property, false advertising, breaches of contract, exposure to hazardous agents, regulatory decisions, stem cell procedures and professional standard of care, use of stems cells in research, and public funding of embryonic stem cell research. Analysis of court decisions provides insight into contemporary and historical legal issues related to stem cells and reveals the breadth of stem-cell-related cases now being decided by US courts.

  9. Anterior cruciate ligament- and hamstring tendon-derived cells: in vitro differential properties of cells involved in ACL reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghebes, Corina Adriana; Kelder, Cindy; Schot, Thomas; Renard, Auke J; Pakvis, Dean F M; Fernandes, Hugo; Saris, Daniel B

    2017-04-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction involves the replacement of the torn ligament with a new graft, often a hamstring tendon (HT). Described as similar, the ACL and HT have intrinsic differences related to their distinct anatomical locations. From a cellular perspective, identifying these differences represents a step forward in the search for new cues that enhance recovery after the reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to characterize the phenotype and multilineage potential of ACL- and HT-derived cells. ACL- and HT-derived cells were isolated from tissue harvest from patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) or ACL reconstruction. In total, three ACL and three HT donors were investigated. Cell morphology, self-renewal potential (CFU-F), surface marker profiling, expression of tendon/ligament-related markers (PCR) and multilineage potential were analysed for both cell types; both had fibroblast-like morphology and low self-renewal potential. No differences in the expression of tendon/ligament-related genes or a selected set of surface markers were observed between the two cell types. However, differences in their multilineage potential were observed: while ACL-derived cells showed a high potential to differentiate into chondrocytes and adipocytes, but not osteoblasts, HT-derived cells showed poor potential to form adipocytes, chondrocytes and osteoblasts. Our results demonstrated that HT-derived cells have low multilineage potential compared to ACL-derived cells, further highlighting the need for extrinsic signals to fully restore the function of the ACL upon reconstruction. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Curbing stem cell tourism in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner-Roloff, Madelein; Pepper, Michael S

    2013-12-01

    Stem cells have received much attention globally due in part to the immense therapeutic potential they harbor. Unfortunately, malpractice and exploitation (financial and emotional) of vulnerable patients have also drawn attention to this field as a result of the detrimental consequences experienced by some individuals that have undergone unproven stem cell therapies. South Africa has had limited exposure to stem cells and their applications and, while any exploitation is detrimental to the field of stem cells, South Africa is particularly vulnerable in this regard. The current absence of adequate legislation and the inability to enforce existing legislation, coupled to the sea of misinformation available on the Internet could lead to an increase in illegitimate stem cell practices in South Africa. Circumstances are already precarious because of a lack of understanding of concepts involved in stem cell applications. What is more, credible and easily accessible information is not available to the public. This in turn cultivates fears born out of existing superstitions, cultural beliefs, rituals and practices. Certain cultural or religious concerns could potentially hinder the effective application of stem cell therapies in South Africa and novel ways of addressing these concerns are necessary. Understanding how scientific progress and its implementation will affect each individual and, consequently, the community, will be of cardinal importance to the success of the fields of stem cell therapy and regenerative medicine in South Africa. A failure to understand the ethical, cultural or moral ramifications when new scientific concepts are introduced could hinder the efficacy and speed of bringing discoveries to the patient. Neglecting proper procedure for establishing the field would lead to long delays in gaining public support in South Africa. Understanding the dangers of stem cell tourism - where vulnerable patients are subjected to unproven stem cell therapies that

  11. Regenerative medicine for the kidney: renotropic factors, renal stem/progenitor cells, and stem cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeshima, Akito; Nakasatomi, Masao; Nojima, Yoshihisa

    2014-01-01

    The kidney has the capacity for regeneration and repair after a variety of insults. Over the past few decades, factors that promote repair of the injured kidney have been extensively investigated. By using kidney injury animal models, the role of intrinsic and extrinsic growth factors, transcription factors, and extracellular matrix in this process has been examined. The identification of renal stem cells in the adult kidney as well as in the embryonic kidney is an active area of research. Cell populations expressing putative stem cell markers or possessing stem cell properties have been found in the tubules, interstitium, and glomeruli of the normal kidney. Cell therapies with bone marrow-derived hematopoietic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells, and amniotic fluid-derived stem cells have been highly effective for the treatment of acute or chronic renal failure in animals. Embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells are also utilized for the construction of artificial kidneys or renal components. In this review, we highlight the advances in regenerative medicine for the kidney from the perspective of renotropic factors, renal stem/progenitor cells, and stem cell therapies and discuss the issues to be solved to realize regenerative therapy for kidney diseases in humans.

  12. Current overview on dental stem cells applications in regenerative dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Bansal, Ramta; Jain, Aditya

    2015-01-01

    Teeth are the most natural, noninvasive source of stem cells. Dental stem cells, which are easy, convenient, and affordable to collect, hold promise for a range of very potential therapeutic applications. We have reviewed the ever-growing literature on dental stem cells archived in Medline using the following key words: Regenerative dentistry, dental stem cells, dental stem cells banking, and stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth. Relevant articles covering topics related to dental...

  13. Fundamental Principles of Stem Cell Banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Changbin; Yue, Jianhui; He, Na; Liu, Yaqiong; Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells are highly promising resources for application in cell therapy, regenerative medicine, drug discovery, toxicology and developmental biology research. Stem cell banks have been increasingly established all over the world in order to preserve their cellular characteristics, prevent contamination and deterioration, and facilitate their effective use in basic and translational research, as well as current and future clinical application. Standardization and quality control during banking procedures are essential to allow researchers from different labs to compare their results and to develop safe and effective new therapies. Furthermore, many stem cells come from once-in-a-life time tissues. Cord blood for example, thrown away in the past, can be used to treat many diseases such as blood cancers nowadays. Meanwhile, these cells stored and often banked for long periods can be immediately available for treatment when needed and early treatment can minimize disease progression. This paper provides an overview of the fundamental principles of stem cell banking, including: (i) a general introduction of the construction and architecture commonly used for stem cell banks; (ii) a detailed section on current quality management practices; (iii) a summary of questions we should consider for long-term storage, such as how long stem cells can be stored stably, how to prevent contamination during long term storage, etc.; (iv) the prospects for stem cell banking.

  14. Characterization of companion animal pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Y Z; Kafarnik, C; Guest, D J

    2017-07-05

    Pluripotent stem cells have the capacity to grow indefinitely in culture and differentiate into derivatives of the three germ layers. These properties underpin their potential to be used in regenerative medicine. Originally derived from early embryos, pluripotent stem cells can now be derived by reprogramming an adult cell back to a pluripotent state. Companion animals such as horses, dogs, and cats suffer from many injuries and diseases for which regenerative medicine may offer new treatments. As many of the injuries and diseases are similar to conditions in humans the use of companion animals for the experimental and clinical testing of stem cell and regenerative medicine products would provide relevant animal models for the translation of therapies to the human field. In order to fully utilize companion animal pluripotent stem cells robust, standardized methods of characterization must be developed to ensure that safe and effective treatments can be delivered. In this review we discuss the methods that are available for characterizing pluripotent stem cells and the techniques that have been applied in cells from companion animals. We describe characteristics which have been described consistently across reports as well as highlighting discrepant results. Significant steps have been made to define the in vitro culture requirements and drive lineage specific differentiation of pluripotent stem cells in companion animal species. However, additional basic research to compare pluripotent stem cell types and define characteristics of pluripotency in companion animal species is still required. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  15. The bone marrow stem cell niche grows up: mesenchymal stem cells and macrophages move in.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehninger, Armin; Trumpp, Andreas

    2011-03-14

    Stem cell niches are defined as the cellular and molecular microenvironments that regulate stem cell function together with stem cell autonomous mechanisms. This includes control of the balance between quiescence, self-renewal, and differentiation, as well as the engagement of specific programs in response to stress. In mammals, the best understood niche is that harboring bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Recent studies have expanded the number of cell types contributing to the HSC niche. Perivascular mesenchymal stem cells and macrophages now join the previously identified sinusoidal endothelial cells, sympathetic nerve fibers, and cells of the osteoblastic lineage to form similar, but distinct, niches that harbor dormant and self-renewing HSCs during homeostasis and mediate stem cell mobilization in response to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

  16. Immune roles of dendritic cells in stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Liao, Wenwei; Liu, Furong; Zhu, Xiaofeng; He, Xiaoshun; Hu, Anbin

    2017-11-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells and initial stimulators for immune response. DCs can shape their functions based on their immune states, which are crucial for the balance of immunity and tolerance to preserve homeostasis. In the immune response involved in stem cell transplantation, DCs also play important roles in inducing immune tolerance and antitumor immunity. After the rapid development of stem cell transplantation technology in recent years, the risks of graft rejection, tumor recurrence, and tumorigenicity are still present after stem cell transplantation. It is important to understand the mechanisms of DC-mediated immune tolerance and stimulation during stem cell transplantation. In this review, we will summarize and analyze the regulatory mechanisms of DCs in stem cell transplantation and their application in clinical settings. It may help to promote the innovation in basic theories and therapeutic approaches of stem cell transplantation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Bioreactor Engineering of Stem Cell Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Nina; Marolt, Darja; Cimetta, Elisa; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells hold promise to revolutionize modern medicine by development of new therapies, disease models and drug screening systems. Standard cell culture systems have limited biological relevance because they do not recapitulate the complex 3-dimensional interactions and biophysical cues that characterize the in vivo environment. In this review, we discuss the current advances in engineering stem cell environments using novel biomaterials and bioreactor technologies. We also reflect on the challenges the field is currently facing with regard to translation of stem cell based therapies into the clinic. PMID:23531529

  18. Stem cells in neurology - current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chary Ely Marquez Batista

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system (CNS restoration is an important clinical challenge and stem cell transplantation has been considered a promising therapeutic option for many neurological diseases. Objective : The present review aims to briefly describe stem cell biology, as well as to outline the clinical application of stem cells in the treatment of diseases of the CNS. Method : Literature review of animal and human clinical experimental trials, using the following key words: “stem cell”, “neurogenesis”, “Parkinson”, “Huntington”, “amyotrophic lateral sclerosis”, “traumatic brain injury”, “spinal cord injury”, “ischemic stroke”, and “demyelinating diseases”. Conclusion : Major recent advances in stem cell research have brought us several steps closer to their effective clinical application, which aims to develop efficient ways of regenerating the damaged CNS.

  19. Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath in palmar region-cytological aspect of an uncommon tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeddula Chakrapani Spoorthy Rekha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath (GCTTS is a benign soft tissue neoplasm. It is the second most common tumor of the hand after ganglion. The pathogenesis of GCTTS is not known. This tumor is known to recur after excision. We present a case of GCTTS in the palmar aspect of the right hand of a 41-year-old female. Ultrasonography of hand revealed a well-defined hypoechoic lesion in the subcutaneous plane with focal areas of calcification. She underwent fine-needle aspiration (FNA. The FNA smears showed the characteristic presence of stromal cells and multinucleated osteoclast-like giant cells. This is an uncommon case of GCTTS present in the palmar aspect of hand diagnosed by FNA.

  20. Engineering nanoscale stem cell niche: direct stem cell behavior at cell-matrix interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Gordon, Andrew; Qian, Weiyi; Chen, Weiqiang

    2015-09-16

    Biophysical cues on the extracellular matrix (ECM) have proven to be significant regulators of stem cell behavior and evolution. Understanding the interplay of these cells and their extracellular microenvironment is critical to future tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, both of which require a means of controlled differentiation. Research suggests that nanotopography, which mimics the local, nanoscale, topographic cues within the stem cell niche, could be a way to achieve large-scale proliferation and control of stem cells in vitro. This Progress Report reviews the history and contemporary advancements of this technology, and pays special attention to nanotopographic fabrication methods and the effect of different nanoscale patterns on stem cell response. Finally, it outlines potential intracellular mechanisms behind this response. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Oxidative Stress in Stem Cell Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng; Liu, Yingxia; Wong, Nai-Kei; Xiao, Jia; So, Kwok-Fai

    2017-09-01

    Stem cell aging is a process in which stem cells progressively lose their ability to self-renew or differentiate, succumb to senescence or apoptosis, and eventually become functionally depleted. Unresolved oxidative stress and concomitant oxidative damages of cellular macromolecules including nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates have been recognized to contribute to stem cell aging. Excessive production of reactive oxygen species and insufficient cellular antioxidant reserves compromise cell repair and metabolic homeostasis, which serves as a mechanistic switch for a variety of aging-related pathways. Understanding the molecular trigger, regulation, and outcomes of those signaling networks is critical for developing novel therapies for aging-related diseases by targeting stem cell aging. Here we explore the key features of stem cell aging biology, with an emphasis on the roles of oxidative stress in the aging process at the molecular level. As a concept of cytoprotection of stem cells in transplantation, we also discuss how systematic enhancement of endogenous antioxidant capacity before or during graft into tissues can potentially raise the efficacy of clinical therapy. Finally, future directions for elucidating the control of oxidative stress and developing preventive/curative strategies against stem cell aging are discussed.

  2. State of the Art in Stem Cell Research: Human Embryonic Stem Cells, Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells, and Transdifferentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Maria de Peppo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells divide by asymmetric division and display different degrees of potency, or ability to differentiate into various specialized cell types. Owing to their unique regenerative capacity, stem cells have generated great enthusiasm worldwide and represent an invaluable tool with unprecedented potential for biomedical research and therapeutic applications. Stem cells play a central role in the understanding of molecular mechanisms regulating tissue development and regeneration in normal and pathological conditions and open large possibilities for the discovery of innovative pharmaceuticals to treat the most devastating diseases of our time. Not least, their intrinsic characteristics allow the engineering of functional tissues for replacement therapies that promise to revolutionize the medical practice in the near future. In this paper, the authors present the characteristics of pluripotent stem cells and new developments of transdifferentiation technologies and explore some of the biomedical applications that this emerging technology is expected to empower.

  3. Muscle Stem Cells: A Model System for Adult Stem Cell Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelison, Ddw; Perdiguero, Eusebio

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle stem cells, originally termed satellite cells for their position adjacent to differentiated muscle fibers, are absolutely required for the process of skeletal muscle repair and regeneration. In the last decade, satellite cells have become one of the most studied adult stem cell systems and have emerged as a standard model not only in the field of stem cell-driven tissue regeneration but also in stem cell dysfunction and aging. Here, we provide background in the field and discuss recent advances in our understanding of muscle stem cell function and dysfunction, particularly in the case of aging, and the potential involvement of muscle stem cells in genetic diseases such as the muscular dystrophies.

  4. Immunological characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells

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    Cíntia de Vasconcellos Machado

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although bone marrow is the main source, mesenchymal stem cells have already been isolated from various other tissues, such as the liver, pancreas, adipose tissue, peripheral blood and dental pulp. These plastic adherent cells are morphologically similar to fibroblasts and have a high proliferative potential. This special group of cells possesses two essential characteristics: self-renewal and differentiation, with appropriate stimuli, into various cell types. Mesenchymal stem cells are considered immunologically privileged, since they do not express costimulatory molecules, required for complete T cell activation, on their surface. Several studies have shown that these cells exert an immunosuppressive effect on cells from both innate and acquired immunity systems. Mesenchymal stem cells can regulate the immune response in vitro by inhibiting the maturation of dendritic cells, as well as by suppressing the proliferation and function of T and B lymphocytes and natural killer cells. These special properties of mesenchymal stem cells make them a promising strategy in the treatment of immune mediated disorders, such as graft-versus-host disease and autoimmune diseases, as well as in regenerative medicine. The understanding of immune regulation mechanisms of mesenchymal stem cells, and also those involved in the differentiation of these cells in various lineages is primordial for their successful and safe application in different areas of medicine.

  5. Stem Cells in Niemann-Pick Disease

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    Sun-Jung Kim

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells are multi-potent and able to self renew to maintain its character throughout the life. Loss of self renewal ability of stem cells prevents recovery or replacement of cells damaged by disease with new cells. The Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1 disease is one of the neurodegenerative diseases, caused by a mutation of NPC1 gene which affects the function of NPC1 protein. We reported that NPC 1 gene deficiency could lead to lack of the self renewal ability of neural stem cells in Niemann pick type C disease. We also investigated many genes which are involved in stem cells proliferation and differentiation by gene profile in NPC mice.

  6. TOPICAL REVIEW: Stem cells engineering for cell-based therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taupin, Philippe

    2007-09-01

    Stem cells carry the promise to cure a broad range of diseases and injuries, from diabetes, heart and muscular diseases, to neurological diseases, disorders and injuries. Significant progresses have been made in stem cell research over the past decade; the derivation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) from human tissues, the development of cloning technology by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and the confirmation that neurogenesis occurs in the adult mammalian brain and that neural stem cells (NSCs) reside in the adult central nervous system (CNS), including that of humans. Despite these advances, there may be decades before stem cell research will translate into therapy. Stem cell research is also subject to ethical and political debates, controversies and legislation, which slow its progress. Cell engineering has proven successful in bringing genetic research to therapy. In this review, I will review, in two examples, how investigators are applying cell engineering to stem cell biology to circumvent stem cells' ethical and political constraints and bolster stem cell research and therapy.

  7. Stem cells engineering for cell-based therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taupin, Philippe

    2007-09-01

    Stem cells carry the promise to cure a broad range of diseases and injuries, from diabetes, heart and muscular diseases, to neurological diseases, disorders and injuries. Significant progresses have been made in stem cell research over the past decade; the derivation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) from human tissues, the development of cloning technology by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and the confirmation that neurogenesis occurs in the adult mammalian brain and that neural stem cells (NSCs) reside in the adult central nervous system (CNS), including that of humans. Despite these advances, there may be decades before stem cell research will translate into therapy. Stem cell research is also subject to ethical and political debates, controversies and legislation, which slow its progress. Cell engineering has proven successful in bringing genetic research to therapy. In this review, I will review, in two examples, how investigators are applying cell engineering to stem cell biology to circumvent stem cells' ethical and political constraints and bolster stem cell research and therapy.

  8. Hematopoietic stem cell mobilization: updated conceptual renditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonig, H; Papayannopoulou, T

    2013-01-01

    Despite its specific clinical relevance, the field of hematopoietic stem cell mobilization has received broad attention, owing mainly to the belief that pharmacologic stem cell mobilization might provide clues as to how stem cells are retained in their natural environment, the bone marrow ‘niche’. Inherent to this knowledge is also the desire to optimally engineer stem cells to interact with their target niche (such as after transplantation), or to lure malignant stem cells out of their protective niches (in order to kill them), and in general to decipher the niche’s structural components and its organization. Whereas, with the exception of the recent addition of CXCR4 antagonists to the armamentarium for mobilization of patients refractory to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor alone, clinical stem cell mobilization has not changed significantly over the last decade or so, much effort has been made trying to explain the complex mechanism(s) by which hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells leave the marrow. This brief review will report some of the more recent advances about mobilization, with an attempt to reconcile some of the seemingly inconsistent data in mobilization and to interject some commonalities among different mobilization regimes. PMID:22951944

  9. Adult Stem Cells and Diseases of Aging

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    Lisa B. Boyette

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Preservation of adult stem cells pools is critical for maintaining tissue homeostasis into old age. Exhaustion of adult stem cell pools as a result of deranged metabolic signaling, premature senescence as a response to oncogenic insults to the somatic genome, and other causes contribute to tissue degeneration with age. Both progeria, an extreme example of early-onset aging, and heritable longevity have provided avenues to study regulation of the aging program and its impact on adult stem cell compartments. In this review, we discuss recent findings concerning the effects of aging on stem cells, contributions of stem cells to age-related pathologies, examples of signaling pathways at work in these processes, and lessons about cellular aging gleaned from the development and refinement of cellular reprogramming technologies. We highlight emerging therapeutic approaches to manipulation of key signaling pathways corrupting or exhausting adult stem cells, as well as other approaches targeted at maintaining robust stem cell pools to extend not only lifespan but healthspan.

  10. Time to Reconsider Stem Cell Induction Strategies

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    Hans-Werner Denker

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in stem cell research suggest that it may be time to reconsider the current focus of stem cell induction strategies. During the previous five years, approximately, the induction of pluripotency in somatic cells, i.e., the generation of so-called ‘induced pluripotent stem cells’ (iPSCs, has become the focus of ongoing research in many stem cell laboratories, because this technology promises to overcome limitations (both technical and ethical seen in the production and use of embryonic stem cells (ESCs. A rapidly increasing number of publications suggest, however, that it is now possible to choose instead other, alternative ways of generating stem and progenitor cells bypassing pluripotency. These new strategies may offer important advantages with respect to ethics, as well as to safety considerations. The present communication discusses why these strategies may provide possibilities for an escape from the dilemma presented by pluripotent stem cells (self-organization potential, cloning by tetraploid complementation, patenting problems and tumor formation risk.

  11. Technology advancement for integrative stem cell analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yoon; Choi, Jonghoon; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2014-12-01

    Scientists have endeavored to use stem cells for a variety of applications ranging from basic science research to translational medicine. Population-based characterization of such stem cells, while providing an important foundation to further development, often disregard the heterogeneity inherent among individual constituents within a given population. The population-based analysis and characterization of stem cells and the problems associated with such a blanket approach only underscore the need for the development of new analytical technology. In this article, we review current stem cell analytical technologies, along with the advantages and disadvantages of each, followed by applications of these technologies in the field of stem cells. Furthermore, while recent advances in micro/nano technology have led to a growth in the stem cell analytical field, underlying architectural concepts allow only for a vertical analytical approach, in which different desirable parameters are obtained from multiple individual experiments and there are many technical challenges that limit vertically integrated analytical tools. Therefore, we propose--by introducing a concept of vertical and horizontal approach--that there is the need of adequate methods to the integration of information, such that multiple descriptive parameters from a stem cell can be obtained from a single experiment.

  12. The Stem Cell Hypothesis of Aging

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    Anna Meiliana

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is probably no single way to age. Indeed, so far there is no single accepted explanation or mechanisms of aging (although more than 300 theories have been proposed. There is an overall decline in tissue regenerative potential with age, and the question arises as to whether this is due to the intrinsic aging of stem cells or rather to the impairment of stem cell function in the aged tissue environment. CONTENT: Recent data suggest that we age, in part, because our self-renewing stem cells grow old as a result of heritable intrinsic events, such as DNA damage, as well as extrinsic forces, such as changes in their supporting niches. Mechanisms that suppress the development of cancer, such as senescence and apoptosis, which rely on telomere shortening and the activities of p53 and p16INK4a may also induce an unwanted consequence: a decline in the replicative function of certain stem cells types with advancing age. This decrease regenerative capacity appears to pointing to the stem cell hypothesis of aging. SUMMARY: Recent evidence suggested that we grow old partly because of our stem cells grow old as a result of mechanisms that suppress the development of cancer over a lifetime. We believe that a further, more precise mechanistic understanding of this process will be required before this knowledge can be translated into human anti-aging therapies. KEYWORDS: stem cells, senescence, telomere, DNA damage, epigenetic, aging.

  13. Tendon Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What OT Can Do: Video For Professionals Ethics Tendon Injuries When a person experiences a tendon injury in the hand that affects the ability ... plan. What can a person with a hand tendon injury do? Implement a home exercise program recommended ...

  14. Stem cell therapy for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

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    Zhijuan Mao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of motor neurons. Currently, no effective therapy is available to treat ALS, except for Riluzole, which has only limited clinical benefits. Stem-cell-based therapy has been intensively and extensively studied as a potential novel treatment strategy for ALS and has been shown to be effective, at least to some extent. In this article, we will review the current state of research on the use of stem cell therapy in the treatment of ALS and discuss the most promising stem cells for the treatment of ALS.

  15. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation and History

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    Atila Tanyeli

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Attemps to employ marrow stem cell for therapeutic purpose began in 1940’s. Marrow transplantation might be of use not only in irradiation protection, but also with therapeutic aim to marrow aplasia, leukemia and other diseases. The use and defining tissue antigens in humans were crucial to the improving of transplantation. The administration of methotrexate for GVHD improved the long term survival. Conditioning regimens for myeloablation designed according to diseases. Cord blood and peripheral blood stem cells were used for transplantion after 1980’s. Cord blood and bone marrow stem cell banks established to find HLA matched donor.

  16. Microencapsulation of Stem Cells for Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Shirae K; Kinney, Ramsey C; Schwartz, Zvi; Boyan, Barbara D

    2017-01-01

    An increasing demand to regenerate tissues from patient-derived sources has led to the development of cell-based therapies using autologous stem cells, thereby decreasing immune rejection of scaffolds coupled with allogeneic stem cells or allografts. Adult stem cells are multipotent and are readily available in tissues such as fat and bone marrow. They possess the ability to repair and regenerate tissue through the production of therapeutic factors, particularly vasculogenic proteins. A major challenge in cell-based therapies is localizing the delivered stem cells to the target site. Microencapsulation of cells provides a porous polymeric matrix that can provide a protected environment, localize the cells to one area, and maintain their viability by enabling the exchange of nutrients and waste products between the encapsulated cells and the surrounding tissue. In this chapter, we describe a method to produce injectable microbeads containing a tunable number of stem cells using the biopolymer alginate. The microencapsulation process involves extrusion of the alginate suspension containing cells from a microencapsulator, a syringe pump to control its flow rate, an electrostatic potential to overcome capillary forces and a reduced Ca(++) cross-linking solution containing a nutrient osmolyte, to form microbeads. This method allows the encapsulated cells to remain viable up to three weeks in culture and up to three months in vivo and secrete growth factors capable of supporting tissue regeneration.

  17. Stemness is Derived from Thyroid Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Risheng; Bonnefond, Simon; Morshed, Syed A.; Latif, Rauf; Davies, Terry F.

    2014-01-01

    Background: One hypothesis for thyroid cancer development is its derivation from thyroid cancer stem cells (CSCs). Such cells could arise via different paths including from mutated resident stem cells within the thyroid gland or via epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) from malignant cells since EMT is known to confer stem-like characteristics. Furthermore, EMT is a critical process for epithelial tumor progression, local invasion, and metastasis formation. In addition, stemness provides cells with therapeutic resistance and is the likely cause of tumor recurrence. However, the relevance of EMT and stemness in thyroid cancer progression has not been extensively studied. Methods: To examine the status of stemness in thyroid papillary cancer, we employed a murine model of thyroid papillary carcinoma and examined the expression of stemness and EMT using qPCR and histochemistry in mice with a thyroid-specific knock-in of oncogenic Braf (LSL-Braf(V600E)/TPO-Cre). This construct is only activated at the time of thyroid peroxidase (TPO) expression in differentiating thyroid cells and cannot be activated by undifferentiated stem cells, which do not express TPO. Results: There was decreased expression of thyroid-specific genes such as Tg and NIS and increased expression of stemness markers, such as Oct4, Rex1, CD15, and Sox2 in the thyroid carcinoma tissue from 6-week-old BRAFV600E mice indicating the dedifferentiated status of the cells and the fact that stemness was derived in this model from differentiated thyroid cells. The decreased expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin and increased EMT regulators including Snail, Slug, and TGF-β1 and TGF-β3, and the mesenchymal marker vimentin demonstrated the simultaneous progression of EMT and the CSC-like phenotype. Stemness was also found in a cancer thyroid cell line (named Marca cells) derived from one of the murine tumors. In this cell line, we also found that overexpression of Snail caused up-regulation of

  18. Similarity on neural stem cells and brain tumor stem cells in transgenic brain tumor mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Qiao, Guanqun; Li, Qingquan; Peng, Gang; Ma, Jun; Fan, Hongwei; Li, Yingbin

    2013-01-01

    Although it is believed that glioma is derived from brain tumor stem cells, the source and molecular signal pathways of these cells are still unclear. In this study, we used stable doxycycline-inducible transgenic mouse brain tumor models (c-myc+/SV40Tag+/Tet-on+) to explore the malignant trans-formation potential of neural stem cells by observing the differences of neural stem cells and brain tumor stem cells in the tumor models. Results showed that chromosome instability occurred in brain t...

  19. Stemness is derived from thyroid cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risheng eMa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: One hypothesis for thyroid cancer development is its derivation from thyroid cancer stem cells (CSCs. Such cells could arise via different paths including from mutated resident stem cells within the thyroid gland or via epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT from malignant cells since EMT is known to confer stem-like characteristics. Methods: To examine the status of stemness in thyroid papillary cancer we employed a murine model of thyroid papillary carcinoma and examined the expression of stemness and EMT using qPCR and histochemistry in mice with a thyroid-specific knock-in of oncogenic Braf (LSL-Braf(V600E/TPO-Cre. This construct is only activated at the time of thyroid peroxidase (TPO expression in differentiating thyroid cells and cannot be activated by undifferentiated stem cells which do not express TPO.Results: There was decreased expression of thyroid specific genes such as Tg and NIS and increased expression of stemness markers such as Oct4, Rex1, CD15 and Sox2 in the thyroid carcinoma tissue from 6 week old BRAFV600E mice. The decreased expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin and increased EMT regulators including Snail, Slug, and TGF-β1 and TGF-β3, and the mesenchymal marker vimentin demonstrated the simultaneous progression of EMT and the CSC-like phenotype. Stemness was also found in a derived cancer thyroid cell line in which overexpression of Snail caused up-regulation of vimentin expression and up regulation of stemness markers Oct4, Rex1, CD15 with enhanced migration ability of the cells. Conclusions: Our findings support our earlier hypothesis that stemness in thyroid cancer is derived via EMT rather than from resident thyroid stem cells. In mice with a thyroid-specific knock-in of oncogenic Braf (LSL-Braf(V600E/TPO-Cre the neoplastic changes were dependent on thyroid cell differentiation and the onset of stemness must have been derived from differentiated thyroid epithelial cells.

  20. Stem cells and models of astrocytomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamnasaran, Deepak

    2009-04-01

    To provide a critical assessment of current stem-cell based pre-clinical models of astrocytomas (gliomas). Data were archived from MEDLINE using Boolean formatted keyword queries. Top articles were selected for critical analyses depending on the qualitative assessment of the citation index, novelty of the findings, reputation of the research group and relevance to stem-cell based pre-clinical models of astrocytomas. The emergence of stem-cell based pre-clinical models of gliomas offers advantages for cellular transformation studies over other current in-vitro cell cultured based models. Cells utilized in these stem-cell based pre-clinical models are easier to transform, with the induced tumours demonstrating very high molecular and pathological recapitulations of astrocytomas that are derived from humans. These stem-cell based models fall into two categories. In the first, synthetic astrocytes can be differentiated from various stem cell sources such as the nervous system and embryos, and utilized in elegant forward genetic strategies to develop novel astrocytoma pre-clinical models. The second category represents a cancer stem cell pre-clinical model. In this model, glioma stem cells exhibit very high pathological recapitulations of the human tumours, and can be very informative to comprehend the basis of radio-chemoresistance among patients. The quest to develop robust pre-clinical models of astrocytomas is on an ongoing basis. The models are of clinical importance for the discovery of effective treatment modalities that can considerably improve the health of patients with this deadly disease.

  1. Human hair genealogies and stem cell latency

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    Tavaré Simon

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stem cells divide to reproduce themselves and produce differentiated progeny. A fundamental problem in human biology has been the inability to measure how often stem cells divide. Although it is impossible to observe every division directly, one method for counting divisions is to count replication errors; the greater the number of divisions, the greater the numbers of errors. Stem cells with more divisions should produce progeny with more replication errors. Methods To test this approach, epigenetic errors (methylation in CpG-rich molecular clocks were measured from human hairs. Hairs exhibit growth and replacement cycles and "new" hairs physically reappear even on "old" heads. Errors may accumulate in long-lived stem cells, or in their differentiated progeny that are eventually shed. Results Average hair errors increased until two years of age, and then were constant despite decades of replacement, consistent with new hairs arising from infrequently dividing bulge stem cells. Errors were significantly more frequent in longer hairs, consistent with long-lived but eventually shed mitotic follicle cells. Conclusion Constant average hair methylation regardless of age contrasts with the age-related methylation observed in human intestine, suggesting that error accumulation and therefore stem cell latency differs among tissues. Epigenetic molecular clocks imply similar mitotic ages for hairs on young and old human heads, consistent with a restart with each new hair, and with genealogies surreptitiously written within somatic cell genomes.

  2. Prion potency in stem cells biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Marilene H; Santos, Tiago G

    2012-01-01

    Prion protein (PrP) can be considered a pivotal molecule because it interacts with several partners to perform a diverse range of critical biological functions that might differ in embryonic and adult cells. In recent years, there have been major advances in elucidating the putative role of PrP in the basic biology of stem cells in many different systems. Here, we review the evidence indicating that PrP is a key molecule involved in driving different aspects of the potency of embryonic and tissue-specific stem cells in self-perpetuation and differentiation in many cell types. It has been shown that PrP is involved in stem cell self-renewal, controlling pluripotency gene expression, proliferation, and neural and cardiomyocyte differentiation. PrP also has essential roles in distinct processes that regulate tissue-specific stem cell biology in nervous and hematopoietic systems and during muscle regeneration. Results from our own investigations have shown that PrP is able to modulate self-renewal and proliferation in neural stem cells, processes that are enhanced by PrP interactions with stress inducible protein 1 (STI1). Thus, the available data reveal the influence of PrP in acting upon the maintenance of pluripotent status or the differentiation of stem cells from the early embryogenesis through adulthood.

  3. Calcium signaling in human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apáti, Ágota; Berecz, Tünde; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2016-03-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells provide new tools for developmental and pharmacological studies as well as for regenerative medicine applications. Calcium homeostasis and ligand-dependent calcium signaling are key components of major cellular responses, including cell proliferation, differentiation or apoptosis. Interestingly, these phenomena have not been characterized in detail as yet in pluripotent human cell sates. Here we review the methods applicable for studying both short- and long-term calcium responses, focusing on the expression of fluorescent calcium indicator proteins and imaging methods as applied in pluripotent human stem cells. We discuss the potential regulatory pathways involving calcium responses in hPS cells and compare these to the implicated pathways in mouse PS cells. A recent development in the stem cell field is the recognition of so called "naïve" states, resembling the earliest potential forms of stem cells during development, as well as the "fuzzy" stem cells, which may be alternative forms of pluripotent cell types, therefore we also discuss the potential role of calcium homeostasis in these PS cell types. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Stroke: Challenges and Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Oh Young; Kim, Eun Hee; Cha, Jae Min; Moon, Gyeong Joon

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and physical disability among adults. It has been 15 years since clinical trials of stem cell therapy in patients with stroke have been conducted using adult stem cells like mesenchymal stem cells and bone marrow mononuclear cells. Results of randomized controlled trials showed that adult stem cell therapy was safe but its efficacy was modest, underscoring the need for new stem cell therapy strategies. The primary limitations of current stem cell therapies include (a) the limited source of engraftable stem cells, (b) the presence of optimal time window for stem cell therapies, (c) inherited limitation of stem cells in terms of growth, trophic support, and differentiation potential, and (d) possible transplanted cell-mediated adverse effects, such as tumor formation. Here, we discuss recent advances that overcome these hurdles in adult stem cell therapy for stroke. PMID:27733032

  5. Embryonic stem cells: testing the germ-cell theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochedlinger, Konrad

    2011-10-25

    The exact cellular origin of embryonic stem cells remains elusive. Now a new study provides compelling evidence that embryonic stem cells, established under conventional culture conditions, originate from a transient germ-cell state. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Therapeutic potential of stem cells in auditory hair cell repair

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    Ryuji Hata

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of acquired hearing loss is very high. About 10% of the total population and more than one third of the population over 65 years suffer from debilitating hearing loss. The most common type of hearing loss in adults is idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL. In the majority of cases, ISSHL is permanent and typically associated with loss of sensory hair cells in the organ of Corti. Following the loss of sensory hair cells, the auditory neurons undergo secondary degeneration. Sensory hair cells and auditory neurons do not regenerate throughout life, and loss of these cells is irreversible and cumulative. However, recent advances in stem cell biology have gained hope that stem cell therapy comes closer to regenerating sensory hair cells in humans. A major advance in the prospects for the use of stem cells to restore normal hearing comes with the recent discovery that hair cells can be generated ex vivo from embryonic stem (ES cells, adult inner ear stem cells and neural stem cells. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence that stem cells can promote damaged cell repair in part by secreting diffusible molecules such as growth factors. These results suggest that stem-cell-based treatment regimens can be applicable to the damaged inner ear as future clinical applications.Previously we have established an animal model of cochlear ischemia in gerbils and showed progressive hair cell loss up to 4 days after ischemia. Auditory brain stem response (ABR recordings have demonstrated that this gerbil model displays severe deafness just after cochlear ischemia and gradually recovers thereafter. These pathological findings and clinical manifestations are reminiscent of ISSHL in humans. In this study, we have shown the effectiveness of stem cell therapy by using this animal model of ISSHL.

  7. Cancer stem cell targeted therapy: progress amid controversies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Shigdar, Sarah; Gantier, Michael P.; Hou, Yingchun; Wang, Li; Li, Yong; Shamaileh, Hadi Al; Yin, Wang; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Zhao, Xinhan; Duan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Although cancer stem cells have been well characterized in numerous malignancies, the fundamental characteristics of this group of cells, however, have been challenged by some recent observations: cancer stem cells may not necessary to be rare within tumors; cancer stem cells and non-cancer stem cells may undergo reversible phenotypic changes; and the cancer stem cells phenotype can vary substantially between patients. Here the current status and progresses of cancer stem cells theory is illustrated and via providing a panoramic view of cancer therapy, we addressed the recent controversies regarding the feasibility of cancer stem cells targeted anti-cancer therapy. PMID:26496035

  8. Cryopreservation and Banking of Dental Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilkens, Petra; Driesen, Ronald B; Wolfs, Esther; Gervois, Pascal; Vangansewinkel, Tim; Ratajczak, Jessica; Dillen, Yörg; Bronckaers, Annelies; Lambrichts, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, dental tissues have become an attractive source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Dental stem cells (DSCs) are not only able to differentiate into adipogenic, chondrogenic and osteogenic lineanges, but an increasing amount of research also pointed out their potential applicability in numerous clinical disorders, such as myocardial infarction, neurodegenerative diseases and diabetes. Together with their multilineage differentiation capacity, their easy availability from extracted third molars makes these stem cells a suitable alternative for bone marrow-derived MSCs. More importantly, DSCs appear to retain their stem cell properties following cryopreservation, a key aspect in their long-term preservation and upscale production. However, the vast number of different cryopreservation protocols makes it difficult to draw definite conclusions regarding the behavior of these stem cells. The routine application and banking of DSCs is also associated with some other pitfalls, such as interdonor variability, cell culture-induced changes and the use of animal-derived culture medium additives. Only thorough assessment of these challenges and the implementation of standardized, GMP procedures will successfully lead to better treatment options for patients who no longer benefit from current stem cell therapies.

  9. Ethical issues in stem cell research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Bernard; Parham, Lindsay

    2009-05-01

    Stem cell research offers great promise for understanding basic mechanisms of human development and differentiation, as well as the hope for new treatments for diseases such as diabetes, spinal cord injury, Parkinson's disease, and myocardial infarction. However, human stem cell (hSC) research also raises sharp ethical and political controversies. The derivation of pluripotent stem cell lines from oocytes and embryos is fraught with disputes about the onset of human personhood. The reprogramming of somatic cells to produce induced pluripotent stem cells avoids the ethical problems specific to embryonic stem cell research. In any hSC research, however, difficult dilemmas arise regarding sensitive downstream research, consent to donate materials for hSC research, early clinical trials of hSC therapies, and oversight of hSC research. These ethical and policy issues need to be discussed along with scientific challenges to ensure that stem cell research is carried out in an ethically appropriate manner. This article provides a critical analysis of these issues and how they are addressed in current policies.

  10. Amniotic Fluid Stem Cells: Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margit Rosner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The existence of stem cells in human amniotic fluid was reported for the first time almost ten years ago. Since this discovery, the knowledge about these cells has increased dramatically. Today, amniotic fluid stem (AFS cells are widely accepted as a new powerful tool for basic research as well as for the establishment of new stem-cell-based therapy concepts. It is possible to generate monoclonal genomically stable AFS cell lines harboring high proliferative potential without raising ethical issues. Many different groups have demonstrated that AFS cells can be differentiated into all three germ layer lineages, what is of relevance for both, the scientific and therapeutical usage of these cells. Of special importance for the latter is the fact that AFS cells are less tumorigenic than other pluripotent stem cell types. In this paper, we have summarized the current knowledge about this relatively young scientific field. Furthermore, we discuss the relevant future perspectives of this promising area of stem cell research focusing on the next important questions, which need to be answered.

  11. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... makes for happy holidays Loading... Even the scrooges will smile at 3 free months of ad-free ... Autoplay When autoplay is enabled, a suggested video will automatically play next. Up next Stem cell donation: ...

  12. Will embryonic stem cells change health policy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, William M

    2010-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells are actively debated in political and public policy arenas. However, the connections between stem cell innovation and overall health care policy are seldom elucidated. As with many controversial aspects of medical care, the stem cell debate bridges to a variety of social conversations beyond abortion. Some issues, such as translational medicine, commercialization, patient and public safety, health care spending, physician practice, and access to insurance and health care services, are core health policy concerns. Other issues, such as economic development, technologic progress, fiscal politics, and tort reform, are only indirectly related to the health care system but are frequently seen through a health care lens. These connections will help determine whether the stem cell debate reaches a resolution, and what that resolution might be.

  13. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are most commonly used in the treatment of cancers like leukemia and lymphoma to restore stem cells ... use of BMT and PBSCT, see http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/fa... If you are interested in ...

  14. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... in to make your opinion count. Sign in 1 Loading... Loading... Transcript The interactive transcript could not ... 400 views 16:11 Stem cell collection - Duration: 1:32. New Hampshire Public Radio 5,023 views ...

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  17. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... 2:30. credihealth 146 views 2:30 Pain Control: Support for ... Jeff, peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) donor, explains the donation process - Duration: 3:28. Be The Match 29,377 ...

  18. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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  19. Stomach development, stem cells and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Hee; Shivdasani, Ramesh A

    2016-02-15

    The stomach, an organ derived from foregut endoderm, secretes acid and enzymes and plays a key role in digestion. During development, mesenchymal-epithelial interactions drive stomach specification, patterning, differentiation and growth through selected signaling pathways and transcription factors. After birth, the gastric epithelium is maintained by the activity of stem cells. Developmental signals are aberrantly activated and stem cell functions are disrupted in gastric cancer and other disorders. Therefore, a better understanding of stomach development and stem cells can inform approaches to treating these conditions. This Review highlights the molecular mechanisms of stomach development and discusses recent findings regarding stomach stem cells and organoid cultures, and their roles in investigating disease mechanisms. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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  1. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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  3. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... DOUBLE STEMCELL (Hindi) 09039139777 - Duration: 4:26. Pharma Science 116,300 views 4:26 Bone Marrow Transplant Patient Information: Chapter 3 - What Are Stem Cells - Duration: 3: ...

  4. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation and History

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Atila Tanyeli; Gulcan Aykut; Ahmet Onur Demirel; Tugba Akcaoglu

    2014-01-01

    Attemps to employ marrow stem cell for therapeutic purpose began in 1940's. Marrow transplantation might be of use not only in irradiation protection, but also with therapeutic aim to marrow aplasia, leukemia and other diseases...

  5. Stem Cell-Based Dental Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petar Zivkovic

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of biological and biomaterial sciences profiled tissue engineering as a new and powerful tool for biological replacement of organs. The combination of stem cells and suitable scaffolds is widely used in experiments today, in order to achieve partial or whole organ regeneration. This review focuses on the use of tissue engineering strategies in tooth regeneration, using stem cells and stem cells/scaffold constructs. Although whole tooth regeneration is still not possible, there are promising results. However, to achieve this goal, it is important to understand and further explore the mechanisms underlying tooth development. Only then will we be able to mimic the natural processes with the use of stem cells and tissue engineering techniques.

  6. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... commonly used in the treatment of cancers like leukemia and lymphoma to restore stem cells that have ... 11 12 videos Play all exercise cassie shipman Leukemia Survivor Meets Bone Marrow Donor - Duration: 4:47. ...

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  11. Biomaterial-stem cell interactions and their impact on stem cell response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oziemlak-Schaap, Aneta M.; Kuhn, Philipp T.; van Kooten, Theo G.; van Rijn, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    In this review, current research in the field of biomaterial properties for directing stem cells are discussed and placed in a critical perspective. Regenerative medicine, in which stem cells play a crucial role, has become an interdisciplinary field between cell biology and materials science. New

  12. Clinical grade adult stem cell banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirumala, Sreedhar; Goebel, W Scott; Woods, Erik J

    2009-07-01

    There has been a great deal of scientific interest recently generated by the potential therapeutic applications of adult stem cells in human care but there are several challenges regarding quality and safety in clinical applications and a number of these challenges relate to the processing and banking of these cells ex-vivo. As the number of clinical trials and the variety of adult cells used in regenerative therapy increases, safety remains a primary concern. This has inspired many nations to formulate guidelines and standards for the quality of stem cell collection, processing, testing, banking, packaging and distribution. Clinically applicable cryopreservation and banking of adult stem cells offers unique opportunities to advance the potential uses and widespread implementation of these cells in clinical applications. Most current cryopreservation protocols include animal serum proteins and potentially toxic cryoprotectant additives (CPAs) that prevent direct use of these cells in human therapeutic applications. Long term cryopreservation of adult stem cells under good manufacturing conditions using animal product free solutions is critical to the widespread clinical implementation of ex-vivo adult stem cell therapies. Furthermore, to avoid any potential cryoprotectant related complications, reduced CPA concentrations and efficient post-thaw washing to remove CPA are also desirable. The present review focuses on the current strategies and important aspects of adult stem cell banking for clinical applications. These include current good manufacturing practices (cGMPs), animal protein free freezing solutions, cryoprotectants, freezing & thawing protocols, viability assays, packaging and distribution. The importance and benefits of banking clinical grade adult stem cells are also discussed.

  13. When stem cells grow old: phenotypes and mechanisms of stem cell aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Michael B.; Sinclair, David A.

    2016-01-01

    All multicellular organisms undergo a decline in tissue and organ function as they age. An attractive theory is that a loss in stem cell number and/or activity over time causes this decline. In accordance with this theory, aging phenotypes have been described for stem cells of multiple tissues, including those of the hematopoietic system, intestine, muscle, brain, skin and germline. Here, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of why adult stem cells age and how this aging impacts diseases and lifespan. With this increased understanding, it is feasible to design and test interventions that delay stem cell aging and improve both health and lifespan. PMID:26732838

  14. Stem Cells and Ethics: Current Issues

    OpenAIRE

    McCormick, Jennifer Blair; Huso, Holly A.

    2009-01-01

    Much attention has recently turned to the promise and potential of human stem cells in therapeutic applications for the repair of cardiac tissue. The advances being made in the laboratory are exciting, and the pace at which research using human stem cells is moving from bench to bedside is extraordinary. The social, ethical, and policy considerations embedded within this area of research also require a large amount of attention and deliberation so that the scientific progress is able to succe...

  15. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... Twomey 30,477 views 8:33 What are stem cells? How can they be used for medical benefit? - Duration: 6:15. Irishstemcell 558,370 views 6:15 Does Donating Bone Marrow Hurt? - Duration: 1:47. KCRA News 27,382 views 1:47 Mike G's Stem Cell Donation Experience - Duration: 4:17. Mike G 5, ...

  16. Sensory neurons : Stem cells and development

    OpenAIRE

    Hjerling-Leffler, Jens

    2006-01-01

    The sensory nervous system is the only means we have of communicating with the surrounding world. The neurons responsible for the sensation of pain, touch, the ability to know the position of our limbs and part of maintenance of body posture are located in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Stem cell biology has, during the recent years greatly enhanced our understanding of developmental processes. The aim of this thesis was to isolate and characterize stem cells from the sensor...

  17. Legislation governing pluripotent stem cells in South Africa | Pepper ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stem cell therapy has however been practised for many years, in SA and worldwide, in the form of haematopoietic stem cell transplantation, mainly for haematological malignancies. From a therapeutic perspective ... Adult stem cells include haematopoietic, mesenchymal and neural stem cells. The purpose of this article is to ...

  18. 3 CFR - Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of July 30, 2009 Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research..., scientifically worthy human stem cell research, including human embryonic stem cell research, to the extent...

  19. Regulatory networks define phenotypic classes of human stem cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Franz-Josef; Laurent, Louise C.; Kostka, Dennis; Ulitsky, Igor; Williams, Roy; Lu, Christina; Park, In-Hyun; Rao, Mahendra?S.; Shamir, Ron; Schwartz, Philip H.; Schmidt, Nils O.; Loring, Jeanne F.

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells are defined as self-renewing cell populations that can differentiate into multiple distinct cell types. However, hundreds of different human cell lines from embryonic, fetal, and adult sources have been called stem cells, even though they range from pluripotent cells, typified by embryonic stem cells, which are capable of virtually unlimited proliferation and differentiation, to adult stem cell lines, which can generate a far more limited repertory of differentiated cell types. The...

  20. Prostate Cancer Stem Cells: Research Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmara Jaworska

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells have been defined as cells within a tumor that possesses the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. Experimental evidence showed that these highly tumorigenic cells might be responsible for initiation and progression of cancer into invasive and metastatic disease. Eradicating prostate cancer stem cells, the root of the problem, has been considered as a promising target in prostate cancer treatment to improve the prognosis for patients with advanced stages of the disease.

  1. Tendon-muscle crosstalk controls muscle bellies morphogenesis, which is mediated by cell death and retinoic acid signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Guzman, Maria; Montero, Juan A; Santesteban, Elena; Gañan, Yolanda; Macias, Domingo; Hurle, Juan M

    2007-02-01

    Vertebrate muscle morphogenesis is a complex developmental process, which remains quite yet unexplored at cellular and molecular level. In this work, we have found that sculpturing programmed cell death is a key morphogenetic process responsible for the formation of individual foot muscles in the developing avian limb. Muscle fibers are produced in excess in the precursor dorsal and ventral muscle masses of the limb bud and myofibers lacking junctions with digital tendons are eliminated via apoptosis. Microsurgical experiments to isolate the developing muscles from their specific tendons are consistent with a role for tendons in regulating survival of myogenic cells. Analysis of the expression of Raldh2 and local treatments with retinoic acid indicate that this signaling pathway mediates apoptosis in myogenic cells, appearing also involved in tendon maturation. Retinoic acid inhibition experiments led to defects in muscle belly segmentation and myotendinous junction formation. It is proposed that heterogeneous local distribution of retinoids controlled through Raldh2 and Cyp26A1 is responsible for matching the fleshy and the tendinous components of each muscle belly.

  2. Stem cell technologies: regulation, patents and problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Then, Shih-Ning

    2004-11-01

    Human embryonic stem cell research promises to deliver in the future a whole range of therapeutic treatments, but currently governments in different jurisdictions must try to regulate this burgeoning area. Part of the problem has been, and continues to be, polarised community opinion on the use of human embryonic stem cells for research. This article compares the approaches of the Australian, United Kingdom and United States governments in regulating human embryonic stem cell research. To date, these governments have approached the issue through implementing legislation or policy to control research. Similarly, the three jurisdictions have viewed the patentability of human embryonic stem cell technologies in their own ways with different policies being adopted by the three patent offices. This article examines these different approaches and discusses the inevitable concerns that have been raised due to the lack of a universal approach in relation to the regulation of research; the patenting of stem cell technologies; and the effects patents granted are having on further human embryonic stem cell research.

  3. Biophotonics sensor acclimatization to stem cells environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad Shahimin, Mukhzeer

    2017-11-01

    The ability to discriminate, characterise and purify biological cells from heterogeneous population of cells is fundamental to numerous prognosis and diagnosis applications; often forming the basis for current and emerging clinical protocols in stem cell therapy. Current sorting approaches exploit differences in cell density, specific immunologic targets, or receptor-ligand interactions to isolate particular cells. Identification of novel properties by which different cell types may be discerned and of new ways for their selective manipulation are clearly fundamental components for improving sorting methodologies. Biophotonics sensor developed by our team are potentially capable of discriminating cells according to their refractive index (which is highly dependable on the organelles inside the cell), size (indicator to cell stage) and shape (in certain cases as an indicator to cell type). The sensor, which already discriminate particles efficiently, is modified to acclimatize into biological environment, especially for stem cell applications.

  4. Dental pulp stem cells: osteogenic differentiation and gene expression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mori, Giorgio; Brunetti, Giacomina; Oranger, Angela; Carbone, Claudia; Ballini, Andrea; Muzio, Lorenzo Lo; Colucci, Silvia; Mori, Claudio; Grassi, Felice Roberto; Grano, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are an adult stem cell population with high proliferative potential and the ability to differentiate in many cell types, and this has led scientists to consider these cells to be an...

  5. Stem Cell Banking for Regenerative and Personalized Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, David T

    2014-02-26

    Regenerative medicine, tissue engineering and gene therapy offer the opportunity to treat and cure many of today's intractable afflictions. These approaches to personalized medicine often utilize stem cells to accomplish these goals. However, stem cells can be negatively affected by donor variables such as age and health status at the time of collection, compromising their efficacy. Stem cell banking offers the opportunity to cryogenically preserve stem cells at their most potent state for later use in these applications. Practical stem cell sources include bone marrow, umbilical cord blood and tissue, and adipose tissue. Each of these sources contains stem cells that can be obtained from most individuals, without too much difficulty and in an economical fashion. This review will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each stem cell source, factors to be considered when contemplating banking each stem cell source, the methodology required to bank each stem cell source, and finally, current and future clinical uses of each stem cell source.

  6. Current overview on dental stem cells applications in regenerative dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Ramta; Jain, Aditya

    2015-01-01

    Teeth are the most natural, noninvasive source of stem cells. Dental stem cells, which are easy, convenient, and affordable to collect, hold promise for a range of very potential therapeutic applications. We have reviewed the ever-growing literature on dental stem cells archived in Medline using the following key words: Regenerative dentistry, dental stem cells, dental stem cells banking, and stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth. Relevant articles covering topics related to dental stem cells were shortlisted and the facts are compiled. The objective of this review article is to discuss the history of stem cells, different stem cells relevant for dentistry, their isolation approaches, collection, and preservation of dental stem cells along with the current status of dental and medical applications.

  7. Quality Assurance in Stem Cell Banking: Emphasis on Embryonic and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallur, Therése; Blomberg, Pontus; Stenfelt, Sonya; Tryggvason, Kristian; Hovatta, Outi

    2017-01-01

    For quality assurance (QA) in stem cell banking, a planned system is needed to ensure that the banked products, stem cells, meet the standards required for research, clinical use, and commercial biotechnological applications. QA is process oriented, avoids, or minimizes unacceptable product defects, and particularly encompasses the management and operational systems of the bank, as well as the ethical and legal frameworks. Quality control (QC ) is product oriented and therefore ensures the stem cells of a bank are what they are expected to be. Testing is for controlling, not assuring, product quality, and is therefore a part of QC , not QA. Like QA, QC is essential for banking cells for quality research and translational application (Schwartz et al., Lancet 379:713-720, 2012). Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), as cells derived from donated supernumerary embryos from in vitro fertilization (IVF) therapy, are different from other stem cell types in resulting from an embryo that has had two donors . This imposes important ethical and legal constraints on the utility of the cells, which, together with quite specific culture conditions, require special attention in the QA system. Importantly, although the origin and derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs ) differ from that of hESCs, many of the principles of QA for hESC banking are applicable to iPSC banking (Stacey et al., Cell Stem Cell 13:385-388, 2013). Furthermore, despite differences between the legal and regulatory frameworks for hESC and iPSC banking between different countries, the requirements for QA are being harmonized (Stacey et al., Cell Stem Cell 13:385-388, 2013; International Stem Cell Banking Initiative, Stem Cell Rev 5:301-314, 2009).

  8. Spheroid Culture of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe Cesarz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Compared with traditional 2D adherent cell culture, 3D spheroidal cell aggregates, or spheroids, are regarded as more physiological, and this technique has been exploited in the field of oncology, stem cell biology, and tissue engineering. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs cultured in spheroids have enhanced anti-inflammatory, angiogenic, and tissue reparative/regenerative effects with improved cell survival after transplantation. Cytoskeletal reorganization and drastic changes in cell morphology in MSC spheroids indicate a major difference in mechanophysical properties compared with 2D culture. Enhanced multidifferentiation potential, upregulated expression of pluripotency marker genes, and delayed replicative senescence indicate enhanced stemness in MSC spheroids. Furthermore, spheroid formation causes drastic changes in the gene expression profile of MSC in microarray analyses. In spite of these significant changes, underlying molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways triggering and sustaining these changes are largely unknown.

  9. Autophagy regulates the stemness of cervical cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Y

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Yi Yang,1,2 Li Yu,1 Jin Li,1 Ya Hong Yuan,1 Xiao Li Wang,1 Shi Rong Yan,1 Dong Sheng Li,1 Yan Ding1 1Hubei Key Laboratory of Embryonic Stem Cell Research, 2Reproductive Center, Taihe Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs are a rare population of multipotent cells with the capacity to self-renew. It has been reported that there are CSCs in cervical cancer cells. Pluripotency-associated (PA transcription factors such as Oct4, Sox2, Nanog and CD44 have been used to isolate CSCs subpopulations. In this study, we showed that autophagy plays an important role in the biological behavior of cervical cancer cells. The expression of the autophagy protein Beclin 1 and LC3B was higher in tumorspheres established from human cervical cancers cell lines (and CaSki than in the parental adherent cells. It was also observed that the basal and starvation-induced autophagy flux was higher in tumorspheres than in the bulk population. Autophagy could regulate the expression level of PA proteins in cervical CSCs. In addition, CRISPR/Cas 9-mediated Beclin 1 knockout enhanced the malignancy of HeLa cells, leading to accumulation of PA proteins and promoted tumorsphere formation. Our findings suggest that autophagy modulates homeostasis of PA proteins, and Beclin 1 is critical for CSC maintenance and tumor development in nude mice. This demonstrates that a prosurvival autophagic pathway is critical for CSC maintenance. Keywords: cervical cancer, autophagy, cancer stem cell, LC3, Oct4

  10. Ex vivo Expansion of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Farahbakhshian (Elnaz)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractHematopoiesis is a complex cellular differentiation process resulting in the formation of all blood cell types. In this process, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside at the top of the hematopoiesis hierarchy and have the capacity to differentiate into all blood cell lineages

  11. Inactivated Mesenchymal Stem Cells Maintain Immunomodulatory Capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luk, Franka; de Witte, Samantha F. H.; Korevaar, Sander S.; Roemeling, Marieke; Franquesa, Marcella; Strini, Tanja; van den Engel, Sandra; Gargesha, Madhusudhana; Roy, Debashish; Dor, Frank J. M. F.; Horwitz, Edwin M.; de Bruin, Ron W. F.; Betjes, Michiel G. H.; Baan, Carla C.; Hoogduijn, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are studied as a cell therapeutic agent for treatment of various immune diseases. However, therapy with living culture-expanded cells comes with safety concerns. Furthermore, development of effective MSC immunotherapy is hampered by lack of knowledge of the mechanisms of

  12. [Humoral regulation of stem cell proliferation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musashi, M; Ogawa, M

    1991-05-01

    The central feature of hematopoiesis is life-long, stable cell renewal. This process is supported by hemopoietic stem cells which, in the steady state, appear to be dormant in cell cycling. The recruitment of the dormant stem cells into cell cycle may be promoted by such factors as interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), and newly discovered IL-11. The effects of IL-1 on stem cells may be indirect. Once the stem cells leave Go and begin proliferation, the subsequent process is characterized by continued proliferation and differentiation. Though several models of stem cell differentiation have been proposed, micromanipulation studies of individual progenitors suggest that the commitment of multipotential progenitors to single lineages is a stochastic process. The proliferation of early hemopoietic progenitors requires the presence of IL-3 and/or IL-4, and the intermediate process appears to be supported by granulocyte/macrophage-CSF (GM-CSF). Once the progenitors are committed to individual lineages, the subsequent maturation process appears to be supported by late-acting, lineage-specific factors such as erythropoietin (erythropoiesis), G-CSF (neutrophil production), and IL-5 (eosinophilopoiesis). Thus, hemopoietic proliferation appears to be regulated by a cascade of factors directed at different developmental stages.

  13. In vivo gene transfer and overexpression of focal adhesion kinase (pp125 FAK) mediated by recombinant adenovirus-induced tendon adhesion formation and epitenon cell change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, J; Kubota, H; Hotokezaka, S; Ludwig, F J; Manske, P R

    1997-11-01

    Adhesion formation is a frequent complication of tendon injury repair: however, little is known about its mechanisms. The intracellular focal adhesion kinase (FAK)-related signaling pathway may be one of the mechanisms involved in the induction of tendon adhesions. The replication deficient adenovirus containing the FAK gene (pp125 FAK) was constructed and named Adv-Fak. By in vitro transductions with the recombinant virus, overexpression of the FAK protein was documented in transduced cultured primary tendon cells. By in vivo direct injection of Adv-FAK into the space between the tendon and tendon sheath of White Leghorn chickens, FAK gene transfer with overexpression of the FAK protein was detected by immunohistological staining. The morphology of these stained cells changed from the normal flat shape to cuboid. The group with overexpressed adenovirus-mediated FAK had significant adhesion formation, as seen by increased work of flexion (118.197 +/- 29.616), compared with the group with overexpressed adenovirus-mediated beta-galactosidase (67.507 +/- 36.066) (p applied. Our results show that overexpression of FAK can induce tendon adhesion formation in vivo. This indicates that FAK and the FAK-related signaling pathway may be involved in the process of tendon adhesion formation. Understanding the details of this process may help to prevent tendon adhesion and improve healing.

  14. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Development and Transcriptional Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Gekas, Christos

    2008-01-01

    The continuous production of blood cells, a process termed hematopoiesis, is sustained throughout the lifetime of an individual by a relatively small population of cells known as hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). HSCs are unique cells characterized by their ability to self-renew and give rise to all types of mature blood cells. Given their high proliferative potential, HSCs need to be tightly regulated on the cellular and molecular levels or could otherwise turn malignant. On the other hand, t...

  15. Cancer Stem Cells and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheetal Dyall

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell hypothesis is becoming more widely accepted as a model for carcinogenesis. Tumours are heterogeneous both at the molecular and cellular level, containing a small population of cells that possess highly tumourigenic “stem-cell” properties. Cancer stem cells (CSCs, or tumour-initiating cells, have the ability to self-renew, generate xenografts reminiscent of the primary tumour that they were derived from, and are chemoresistant. The characterisation of the CSC population within a tumour that drives its growth could provide novel target therapeutics against these cells specifically, eradicating the cancer completely. There have been several reports describing the isolation of putative cancer stem cell populations in several cancers; however, no defined set of markers has been identified that conclusively characterises “stem-like” cancer cells. This paper highlights the current experimental approaches that have been used in the field and discusses their limitations, with specific emphasis on the identification and characterisation of the CSC population in epithelial ovarian cancer.

  16. Stem cell-based tooth and periodontal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, L; Liu, Y; Wang, S

    2017-06-21

    Currently regeneration of tooth and periodontal damage still remains great challenge. Stem cell-based tissue engineering raised novel therapeutic strategies for tooth and periodontal repair. Stem cells for tooth and periodontal regeneration include dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs), stem cells from the dental apical papilla (SCAPs), and stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs), dental follicle stem cells (DFSCs), dental epithelial stem cells (DESCs), bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs), adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs), embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). To date, substantial advances have been made in stem cell-based tooth and periodontal regeneration, including dentin-pulp, whole tooth, bioroot and periodontal regeneration. Translational investigations have been performed such as dental stem cell banking and clinical trials. In this review, we present strategies for stem cell-based tissue engineering for tooth and periodontal repair, and the translational studies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Computational Tools for Stem Cell Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Qin; Cahan, Patrick

    2016-12-01

    For over half a century, the field of developmental biology has leveraged computation to explore mechanisms of developmental processes. More recently, computational approaches have been critical in the translation of high throughput data into knowledge of both developmental and stem cell biology. In the past several years, a new subdiscipline of computational stem cell biology has emerged that synthesizes the modeling of systems-level aspects of stem cells with high-throughput molecular data. In this review, we provide an overview of this new field and pay particular attention to the impact that single cell transcriptomics is expected to have on our understanding of development and our ability to engineer cell fate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Proteomic cornerstones of hematopoietic stem cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klimmeck, Daniel; Hansson, Jenny; Raffel, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Regenerative tissues such as the skin epidermis, the intestinal mucosa or the hematopoietic system are organized in a hierarchical manner with stem cells building the top of this hierarchy. Somatic stem cells harbor the highest self-renewal activity and generate a series of multipotent progenitors...... which differentiate into lineage committed progenitors and subsequently mature cells. In this report, we applied an in-depth quantitative proteomic approach to analyze and compare the full proteomes of ex vivo isolated and FACS-sorted populations highly enriched for either multipotent hematopoietic stem...... evaluation, 893 proteins were found differentially expressed between multipotent and myeloid committed cells. The differential protein content in these cell populations points to a distinct structural organization of the cytoskeleton including remodeling activity. In addition, we found a marked difference...

  19. How Obesity Affects Tendons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, Michele; Salini, Vincenzo; Andia, Isabel

    Several epidemiological and clinical observations have definitely demonstrated that obesity has harmful effects on tendons. The pathogenesis of tendon damage is multi-factorial. In addition to overload, attributable to the increased body weight, which significantly affects load-bearing tendons, systemic factors play a relevant role. Several bioactive peptides (chemerin, leptin, adiponectin and others) are released by adipocytes, and influence tendon structure by means of negative activities on mesenchymal cells. The ensuing systemic state of chronic, sub-clinic, low-grade inflammation can damage tendon structure. Metabolic disorders (diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance, and dislipidemia), frequently associated with visceral adiposity, are concurrent pathogenetic factors. Indeed, high glucose levels increase the formation of Advanced Glycation End-products, which in turn form stable covalent cross-links within collagen fibers, modifying their structure and functionality.Sport activities, so useful for preventing important cardiovascular complications, may be detrimental for tendons if they are submitted to intense acute or chronic overload. Therefore, two caution rules are mandatory: first, to engage in personalized soft training program, and secondly to follow regular check-up for tendon pathology.

  20. Giant cell tumors of the tendon sheath may present radiologically as intrinsic osseous lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schepper, A.M. de; Bloem, J.L. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Albinusdreef 2, P.O. Box 9600, RC Leiden (Netherlands); Hogendoorn, P.C.W. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Albinusdreef 2, P.O. Box 9600, RC Leiden (Netherlands)

    2007-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to explain radiographic features of giant cell tumors of the tendon sheath (GCTTS), in particular, osseous extension, by correlating imaging findings with histology in order to increase the accuracy of radiological diagnosis. In a series of 200 consecutive osseous (pseudo) tumors of the hand, on radiography, six patients presented with an intrinsic osseous lesion caused by a histologically confirmed neighboring GCTTS. Available radiographs, computed tomography (CT), and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) images were correlated with histology. Radiography showed osseous lesions consisting of well-defined cortical defects in four (one of whom also demonstrated cortical scalloping) and a slightly expansile, well-defined osteolytic lesion in two patients. MR obtained in four patients showed the extraosseous tumor invading/eroding bone and causing cortical scalloping (three and one patients, respectively). Extension depicted on MR was confirmed on the two available resection specimens. All lesions were polylobular (cauliflower or mushroom like) and neighbored tendon sheaths. Dense collagen and hemosiderin-loaded macrophages explained the high CT attenuation and the low MR signal intensity on T2-weighted images that was observed in all four MR and in all two CT scans. The high density of proliferative capillaries explained the marked enhancement observed in all four patients with gadolinium (Gd)-chelate-enhanced MR imaging. GCTTS is a soft tissue (pseudo) tumor that may invade bone and as a consequence mimick an intrinsic osseous lesion on radiographs. In such cases, specific MR and CT features that can be explained by histological findings can be used to suggest the correct diagnosis. (orig.)

  1. Matrices secreted during simultaneous osteogenesis and adipogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells affect stem cells differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Rong; Nakamoto, Tomoko; Hoshiba, Takashi; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2016-04-15

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a pivotal role in regulating stem cell functions. The ECM dynamically changes during tissue development. It remains a great challenge to mimic the dynamically changing ECM. In this study, we prepared novel types of extracellular matrices that could mimic the dynamic variation of extracellular matrices, which were derived from simultaneous osteogenesis and adipogenesis of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Four ECMs simultaneously mimicking early osteogenesis and early adipogenesis (EOEA), early osteogenesis and late adipogenesis (EOLA), late osteogenesis and early adipogenesis (LOEA), late osteogenesis and late adipogenesis (LOLA) were prepared. The stepwise osteogenesis-co-adipogenesis-mimicking matrices had different compositions and different effects on the osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of MSCs. The matrices could provide very useful tools to investigate the interaction between ECM and stem cells and the role of ECM on stem cell differentiation. Extracellular matrices (ECMs) are dynamically remodeled to regulate stem cell functions during tissue development. Until now, mimicking the ECM variation during stem cell differentiation to single cell type has been reported. However, there is no report on simultaneous mimicking of stem cell differentiation to two types of cells. In this study, we prepared the mixture ECMs derived from simultaneous osteogenesis and adipogenesis of MSCs at different stages and found that they could regulate stem cell differentiation. The concept is new and the ECMs are novel. No such ECMs have been reported previously. The matrices will provide very useful tools to investigate the interaction between ECM and stem cells and the role of ECM on stem cell differentiation. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. System for tracking transplanted limbal epithelial stem cells in the treatment of corneal stem cell deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boadi, J.; Sangwal, V.; MacNeil, S.; Matcher, S. J.

    2015-03-01

    The prevailing hypothesis for the existence and healing of the avascular corneal epithelium is that this layer of cells is continually produced by stem cells in the limbus and transported onto the cornea to mature into corneal epithelium. Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency (LSCD), in which the stem cell population is depleted, can lead to blindness. LSCD can be caused by chemical and thermal burns to the eye. A popular treatment, especially in emerging economies such as India, is the transplantation of limbal stem cells onto damaged limbus with hope of repopulating the region. Hence regenerating the corneal epithelium. In order to gain insights into the success rates of this treatment, new imaging technologies are needed in order to track the transplanted cells. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is well known for its high resolution in vivo images of the retina. A custom OCT system has been built to image the corneal surface, to investigate the fate of transplanted limbal stem cells. We evaluate two methods to label and track transplanted cells: melanin labelling and magneto-labelling. To evaluate melanin labelling, stem cells are loaded with melanin and then transplanted onto a rabbit cornea denuded of its epithelium. The melanin displays strongly enhanced backscatter relative to normal cells. To evaluate magneto-labelling the stem cells are loaded with magnetic nanoparticles (20-30nm in size) and then imaged with a custom-built, magneto-motive OCT system.

  3. Transformation of intestinal stem cells into gastric stem cells on loss of transcription factor Cdx2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simmini, Salvatore; Bialecka, Monika; Huch, Meritxell; Kester, Lennart; van de Wetering, Marc; Sato, Toshiro; Beck, Felix; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Clevers, Hans; Deschamps, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    The endodermal lining of the adult gastro-intestinal tract harbours stem cells that are responsible for the day-to-day regeneration of the epithelium. Stem cells residing in the pyloric glands of the stomach and in the small intestinal crypts differ in their differentiation programme and in the gene

  4. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Attenuating Age-Related Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation towards the bone forming osteoblastic lineage decreases as a function of age and may contribute to age-related...problem of age-related reduced availability of MSC we propose to examine the bone anabolic potential of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS) derived MSC

  5. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olcay Ergurhan Kiroglu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases are almost incurable, debilitating, and they might be fatal, because of limited neurogenesis in nervous system, presence of inhibitory substances and inhibition of recovery due to development of glial scar. Despite many treatment strategies of neurodegenerative diseases no full cure has been achieved. The successful results for mesenchymal stem cells applications on muscles, heart and liver diseases and the application of these cells to the damaged area in particular, hypoxia, inflammation and apoptosis promise hope of using them for neurodegenerative diseases. Mesenchymal stem cells applications constitute a vascular and neuronal phenotype in Parkinsons disease, Huntingtons disease, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Alzheimers disease. Stem cells release bioactive agents that lead to suppression of local immune system, reduction of free radicals, increase in angiogenesis, inhibition of fibrosis, and apoptosis. In addition, tissue stem cells, increase neuronal healing, stimulate proliferation and differentiation. These findings show that stem cells might be a hope of a cure in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and intensive work on this issue should continue.

  6. Adipose derived stromal vascular fraction improves early tendon healing: an experimental study in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Behfar

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Tendon never restores the complete biological and mechanical properties after healing. Bone marrow and recently adipose tissue have been used as the sources of mesenchymal stem cells, which have been proven to enhance tendon healing. Stromal vascular fraction (SVF, derived from adipose tissue by an enzymatic digestion, represents an alternative source of multipotent cells, which undergo differentiation into multiple lineages to be used in regenerative medicine. In the present study, we investigated potentials of this source on tendon healing. Twenty rabbits were divided into control and treatment groups. Five rabbits were used as donors of adipose tissue. The injury model was unilateral complete transection through the middle one third of deep digital flexor tendon. Immediately after suture repair, either fresh stromal vascular fraction from enzymatic digestion of adipose tissue or placebo was intratendinously injected into the suture site in treatments and controls, respectively. Cast immobilization was continued for two weeks after surgery. Animals were sacrificed at the third week and tendons underwent histological, immunohistochemical, and mechanical evaluations. By histology, improved fibrillar organization and remodeling of neotendon were observed in treatment group. Immunohistochemistry revealed an insignificant increase in collagen type III and I expression in treatments over controls. Mechanical testing showed significant increase in maximum load and energy absorption in SVF treated tendons. The present study showed that intratendinous injection of uncultured adipose derived stromal vascular fraction improved structural and mechanical properties of repaired tendon and it could be an effective modality for treating tendon laceration.

  7. Large animal models for stem cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, John; Roberts, R Michael; Mirochnitchenko, Oleg

    2013-03-28

    The field of regenerative medicine is approaching translation to clinical practice, and significant safety concerns and knowledge gaps have become clear as clinical practitioners are considering the potential risks and benefits of cell-based therapy. It is necessary to understand the full spectrum of stem cell actions and preclinical evidence for safety and therapeutic efficacy. The role of animal models for gaining this information has increased substantially. There is an urgent need for novel animal models to expand the range of current studies, most of which have been conducted in rodents. Extant models are providing important information but have limitations for a variety of disease categories and can have different size and physiology relative to humans. These differences can preclude the ability to reproduce the results of animal-based preclinical studies in human trials. Larger animal species, such as rabbits, dogs, pigs, sheep, goats, and non-human primates, are better predictors of responses in humans than are rodents, but in each case it will be necessary to choose the best model for a specific application. There is a wide spectrum of potential stem cell-based products that can be used for regenerative medicine, including embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, somatic stem cells, and differentiated cellular progeny. The state of knowledge and availability of these cells from large animals vary among species. In most cases, significant effort is required for establishing and characterizing cell lines, comparing behavior to human analogs, and testing potential applications. Stem cell-based therapies present significant safety challenges, which cannot be addressed by traditional procedures and require the development of new protocols and test systems, for which the rigorous use of larger animal species more closely resembling human behavior will be required. In this article, we discuss the current status and challenges of and several major directions

  8. Embryonic stem cells in pig and cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maddox-Hyttel, Poul; Wolf, Xenia Asbæk; Rasmussen, Mikkel Aabech

    2007-01-01

    Porcine and bovine cell lines derived from the inner cell mass (ICM) or epiblasts of blastocysts have been maintained over extended periods of time and characterized by morphology, identification of some stem cell markers and, in few cases, by production of chimaeric offspring. However, germ line...... transmission in chimaeras has never been obtained. Due to this incomplete characterization of the cell lines, the expression embryonic stem (ES)-like cells is presently used in pig and cattle. The ICM or epiblast can be isolated from the blastocyst by whole blastocyst culture, mechanical isolation......, or immunosurgery, and they are generally cultured on feeder cells. The resulting ES-like cells may be differentiated in vivo by chimaera and teratoma formation or in vitro by embryoid body formation and monolayer induction. It is likely that more well characterized and stable porcine and bovine ES cell lines...

  9. Epigenetic control of embryonic stem cell fate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, Nicolaj Strøyer; Helin, Kristian

    2010-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are derived from the inner cell mass of the preimplantation embryo and are pluripotent, as they are able to differentiate into all cell types of the adult organism. Once established, the pluripotent ES cells can be maintained under defined culture conditions, but can also...... be induced rapidly to differentiate. Maintaining this balance of stability versus plasticity is a challenge, and extensive studies in recent years have focused on understanding the contributions of transcription factors and epigenetic enzymes to the "stemness" properties of these cells. Identifying...... the molecular switches that regulate ES cell self-renewal versus differentiation can provide insights into the nature of the pluripotent state and enhance the potential use of these cells in therapeutic applications. Here, we review the latest models for how changes in chromatin methylation can modulate ES cell...

  10. Deriving multipotent stem cells from mouse spermatogonial stem cells: a new tool for developmental and clinical research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rooij, Dirk G.; Mizrak, S. Canan

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, embryonic stem (ES) cell-like cells have been obtained from cultured mouse spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs). These advances have shown that SSCs can transition from being the stem cell-producing cells of spermatogenesis to being multipotent cells that can differentiate into

  11. Adipose tissue as mesenchymal stem cells source in equine tendinitis treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando de Mattos Carvalho

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Tendinitis is an important high-relapse-rate disease, which compromises equine performance and may result in early athletic life end to affected animals. Many therapies have been set to treat equine tendinitis; however, just few result in improved relapse rates, quality of extracellular matrix (ECM and increased biomechanical resistance of the treated tissue. Due to advances in the regenerative medicine, promising results were initially obtained through the implantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC derived from the bone marrow in the equine tendon injury. Since then, many studies have been using MSCs from different sources for therapeutic means in equine. The adipose tissue has appeared as feasible MSC source. There are promising results involving equine tendinitis therapy using mesenchymal stem cells from adipose tissue (AdMSCs.

  12. Intestinal lineage commitment of embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Li; Gibson, Jason D; Miyamoto, Shingo; Sail, Vibhavari; Verma, Rajeev; Rosenberg, Daniel W; Nelson, Craig E; Giardina, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Generating lineage-committed intestinal stem cells from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) could provide a tractable experimental system for understanding intestinal differentiation pathways and may ultimately provide cells for regenerating damaged intestinal tissue. We tested a two-step differentiation procedure in which ESCs were first cultured with activin A to favor formation of definitive endoderm, and then treated with fibroblast-conditioned medium with or without Wnt3A. The definitive endoderm expressed a number of genes associated with gut-tube development through mouse embryonic day 8.5 (Sox17, Foxa2, and Gata4 expressed and Id2 silent). The intestinal stem cell marker Lgr5 gene was also activated in the endodermal cells, whereas the Msi1, Ephb2, and Dcamkl1 intestinal stem cell markers were not. Exposure of the endoderm to fibroblast-conditioned medium with Wnt3A resulted in the activation of Id2, the remaining intestinal stem cell markers and the later gut markers Cdx2, Fabp2, and Muc2. Interestingly, genes associated with distal gut-associated mesoderm (Foxf2, Hlx, and Hoxd8) were also simulated by Wnt3A. The two-step differentiation protocol generated gut bodies with crypt-like structures that included regions of Lgr5-expressing proliferating cells and regions of cell differentiation. These gut bodies also had a smooth muscle component and some underwent peristaltic movement. The ability of the definitive endoderm to differentiate into intestinal epithelium was supported by the vivo engraftment of these cells into mouse colonic mucosa. These findings demonstrate that definitive endoderm derived from ESCs can carry out intestinal cell differentiation pathways and may provide cells to restore damaged intestinal tissue. Copyright © 2010 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Targeting the osteosarcoma cancer stem cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Ling

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Osteosarcoma is the most common type of solid bone cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in pediatric patients. Many patients are not cured by the current osteosarcoma therapy consisting of combination chemotherapy along with surgery and thus new treatments are urgently needed. In the last decade, cancer stem cells have been identified in many tumors such as leukemia, brain, breast, head and neck, colon, skin, pancreatic, and prostate cancers and these cells are proposed to play major roles in drug resistance, tumor recurrence, and metastasis. Recent studies have shown evidence that osteosarcoma also possesses cancer stem cells. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the osteosarcoma cancer stem cell including the methods used for its isolation, its properties, and its potential as a new target for osteosarcoma treatment.

  14. Biodegradable Polymers and Stem Cells for Bioprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meijuan Lei

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available It is imperative to develop organ manufacturing technologies based on the high organ failure mortality and serious donor shortage problems. As an emerging and promising technology, bioprinting has attracted more and more attention with its super precision, easy reproduction, fast manipulation and advantages in many hot research areas, such as tissue engineering, organ manufacturing, and drug screening. Basically, bioprinting technology consists of inkjet bioprinting, laser-based bioprinting and extrusion-based bioprinting techniques. Biodegradable polymers and stem cells are common printing inks. In the printed constructs, biodegradable polymers are usually used as support scaffolds, while stem cells can be engaged to differentiate into different cell/tissue types. The integration of biodegradable polymers and stem cells with the bioprinting techniques has provided huge opportunities for modern science and technologies, including tissue repair, organ transplantation and energy metabolism.

  15. Hedgehog and Resident Vascular Stem Cell Fate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciaran J. Mooney

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Hedgehog pathway is a pivotal morphogenic driver during embryonic development and a key regulator of adult stem cell self-renewal. The discovery of resident multipotent vascular stem cells and adventitial progenitors within the vessel wall has transformed our understanding of the origin of medial and neointimal vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs during vessel repair in response to injury, lesion formation, and overall disease progression. This review highlights the importance of components of the Hh and Notch signalling pathways within the medial and adventitial regions of adult vessels, their recapitulation following vascular injury and disease progression, and their putative role in the maintenance and differentiation of resident vascular stem cells to vascular lineages from discrete niches within the vessel wall.

  16. Metabolic Reprogramming of Stem Cell Epigenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryall, James G.; Cliff, Tim; Dalton, Stephen; Sartorelli, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    Summary For many years, stem cell metabolism was viewed as a by product of cell fate status rather than an active regulatory mechanism, however there is now a growing appreciation that metabolic pathways influence epigenetic changes associated with lineage commitment, specification, and self-renewal. Here we review how metabolites generated during glycolytic and oxidative processes are utilized in enzymatic reactions leading to epigenetic modifications and transcriptional regulation. We discuss how “metabolic reprogramming” contributes to global epigenetic changes in the context of naïve and primed pluripotent states, somatic reprogramming, and hematopoietic and skeletal muscle tissue stem cells, and the implications for regenerative medicine. PMID:26637942

  17. The cell cycle as a brake for ?-cell regeneration from embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    El-Badawy, Ahmed; El-Badri, Nagwa

    2016-01-01

    The generation of insulin-producing ? cells from stem cells in vitro provides a promising source of cells for cell transplantation therapy in diabetes. However, insulin-producing cells generated from human stem cells show deficiency in many functional characteristics compared with pancreatic ? cells. Recent reports have shown molecular ties between the cell cycle and the differentiation mechanism of embryonic stem (ES) cells, assuming that cell fate decisions are controlled by the cell cycle ...

  18. What's missing? Discussing stem cell translational research in educational information on stem cell "tourism".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Master, Zubin; Zarzeczny, Amy; Rachul, Christen; Caulfield, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell tourism is a growing industry in which patients pursue unproven stem cell therapies for a wide variety of illnesses and conditions. It is a challenging market to regulate due to a number of factors including its international, online, direct-to-consumer approach. Calls to provide education and information to patients, their families, physicians, and the general public about the risks associated with stem cell tourism are mounting. Initial studies examining the perceptions of patients who have pursued stem cell tourism indicate many are highly critical of the research and regulatory systems in their home countries and believe them to be stagnant and unresponsive to patient needs. We suggest that educational material should include an explanation of the translational research process, in addition to other aspects of stem cell tourism, as one means to help promote greater understanding and, ideally, curb patient demand for unproven stem cell interventions. The material provided must stress that strong scientific research is required in order for therapies to be safe and have a greater chance at being effective. Through an analysis of educational material on stem cell tourism and translational stem cell research from patient groups and scientific societies, we describe essential elements that should be conveyed in educational material provided to patients. Although we support the broad dissemination of educational material on stem cell translational research, we also acknowledge that education may simply not be enough to engender patient and public trust in domestic research and regulatory systems. However, promoting patient autonomy by providing good quality information to patients so they can make better informed decisions is valuable in itself, irrespective of whether it serves as an effective deterrent of stem cell tourism. © 2013 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  19. Breast cancer stem cells, cytokine networks, and the tumor microenvironment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Korkaya, Hasan; Liu, Suling; Wicha, Max S

    2011-01-01

    .... These cancer stem cells (CSCs) are regulated by complex interactions with the components of the tumor microenvironment - including mesenchymal stem cells, adipocytes, tumor associated fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and immune...

  20. Stem Cells Matter in Response to Fasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badi Sri Sailaja

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The molecular processes underlying intestinal adaptation to fasting and re-feeding remain largely uncharacterized. In this issue of Cell Reports, Richmond et al. report that dormant intestinal stem cells are regulated by PTEN and nutritional status.

  1. Mesenchymal stem cell-educated macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Eggenhofer (Elke); M.J. Hoogduijn (Martin)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractMesenchymal stem cells (MSC) mediate their immunosuppressive effects via a variety of mechanisms. One of these mechanisms involves the induction of macrophages with immunomodulatory capacities. This effect of MSC may be exploited when MSC are used as a cell therapeutic product.

  2. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood stem cell) Harvest - Duration: 2:55. bmdpsg 5,068 views 2:55 Does Donating Bone Marrow ... Cell Donation Experience - Duration: 4:17. Mike G 5,933 views 4:17 Bone Marrow Donation via ...

  3. Betulinic Acid Kills Colon Cancer Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potze, Lisette; Di Franco, Simone; Kessler, Jan H.; Stassi, Giorgio; Medema, Jan Paul

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are considered to be the origin of cancer and it is suggested that they are resistant to chemotherapy. Current therapies fail to eradicate CSCs and therefore selecting a resistant cell subset that is able to facilitate tumor recurrences. Betulinic acid (BetA) is a broad

  4. Controling stem cell proliferation - CKIs at work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggeman, SWM; van Lohuizen, M

    2006-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors or CKIs are well recognized as intrinsic regulators of the cell cycle. Here, we discuss recent data implicating their activity in restraining adult stem cell self-renewal, and the role that proteins regulating CKI expression play in this process.

  5. Stem cell sources for cardiac regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roccio, M.; Goumans, M. J.; Sluijter, J. P. G.; Doevendans, P. A.

    Cell-based cardiac repair has the ambitious aim to replace the malfunctioning cardiac muscle developed after myocardial infarction, with new contractile cardiomyocytes and vessels. Different stem cell populations have been intensively studied in the last decade as a potential source of new

  6. STEM CELL RESEARCH-CONCEPT AND CONTROVERSIES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. E. P. Gharoro

    about the right ethical and moral conclusions to be made. This article aims to define and .... anaemia, heart damage, corneal damage, etc. To be useful for transplant purposes, stem cells must be reproducibly made;. Produce extensively and generate sufficient tissues; differentiate into desired cell type(s); survive in recipient ...

  7. Abortion, embryonic stem cell research, and waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, David A

    2008-01-01

    Can one consistently deny the permissibility of abortion while endorsing the killing of human embryos for the sake of stem cell research? The question is not trivial; for even if one accepts that abortion is prima facie wrong in all cases, there are significant differences with many of the embryos used for stem cell research from those involved in abortion--most prominently, many have been abandoned in vitro, and appear to have no reasonably likely meaningful future. On these grounds one might think to maintain a strong position against abortion but endorse killing human embryos for the sake of stem cell research and its promising benefits. I will argue, however, that these differences are not decisive. Thus, one who accepts a strong view against abortion is committed to the moral impermissibility of killing human embryos for the sake of stem cell research. I do not argue for the moral standing of either abortion or the killing of embryos for stem cell research; I only argue for the relation between the two. Thus the conclusion is relevant to those with a strong view in favor of the permissibility of killing embryos for the sake of research as much as for those who may strongly oppose abortion; neither can consider their position in isolation from the other.

  8. Matrix metalloproteinases in stem cell mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Gerd; Schmal, Olga; Aicher, Wilhelm K

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have the capability to migrate back and forth between their preferred microenvironment in bone marrow niches and the peripheral blood, but under steady-state conditions only a marginal number of stem cells can be found in the circulation. Different mobilizing agents, however, which create a highly proteolytic milieu in the bone marrow, can drastically increase the number of circulating HSCs. Among other proteases secreted and membrane-bound matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are known to be involved in the induced mobilization process and can digest niche-specific extracellular matrix components and cytokines responsible for stem cell retention to the niches. Iatrogenic stem cell mobilization and stem cell homing to their niches are clinically employed on a routine basis, although the exact mechanisms of both processes are still not fully understood. In this review we provide an overview on the various roles of MMPs in the induced release of HSCs from the bone marrow. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Fish Stem Cells: Classification, Resources, Characteristics and Application Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şehriban ÇEK

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are a class of undifferentiated cells, have the potential for self-renewal that can differ to the specialized cells. First studies on stem cells in fish started with zebra fish in 1992. In this review, classification, resources, vital importance, characteristics and application areas of fish stem cell were clarified.

  10. Towards stem-cell therapy in the endocrine pancreas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gangaram-Panday, Shanti T.; Faas, Marijke M.; de Vos, Paul

    Many approaches of stem-cell therapy for the treatment of diabetes have been described. One is the application of stem cells for replacement of nonfunctional islet cells in the native endogenous pancreas; another one is the use of stem cells as an inexhaustible source for islet-cell transplantation.

  11. Limbal stem cell transplantation: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atallah MR

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Marwan Raymond Atallah, Sotiria Palioura, Victor L Perez, Guillermo Amescua Department of Ophthalmology, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA Abstract: Regeneration of the corneal surface after an epithelial insult involves division, migration, and maturation of a specialized group of stem cells located in the limbus. Several insults, both intrinsic and extrinsic, can precipitate destruction of the delicate microenvironment of these cells, resulting in limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD. In such cases, reepithelialization fails and conjunctival epithelium extends across the limbus, leading to vascularization, persistent epithelial defects, and chronic inflammation. In partial LSCD, conjunctival epitheliectomy, coupled with amniotic membrane transplantation, could be sufficient to restore a healthy surface. In more severe cases and in total LSCD, stem cell transplantation is currently the best curative option. Before any attempts are considered to perform a limbal stem cell transplantation procedure, the ocular surface must be optimized by controlling causative factors and comorbid conditions. These factors include adequate eyelid function or exposure, control of the ocular surface inflammatory status, and a well-lubricated ocular surface. In cases of unilateral LSCD, stem cells can be obtained from the contralateral eye. Newer techniques aim at expanding cells in vitro or in vivo in order to decrease the need for large limbal resection that may jeopardize the “healthy” eye. Patients with bilateral disease can be treated using allogeneic tissue in combination with systemic immunosuppressive therapy. Another emerging option for this subset of patients is the use of noncorneal cells such as mucosal grafts. Finally, the use of keratoprosthesis is reserved for patients who are not candidates for any of the aforementioned options, wherein the choice of the type of keratoprosthesis depends on

  12. Induction of iPS cells and of cancer stem cells: the stem cell or reprogramming hypothesis of cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trosko, James E

    2014-01-01

    This article as designed to examine whether the "stoichiometric" or "elite models" of the origin of the "induced pluripotent stem" (iPS) cells fits some experiment facts from the developmental biology of adult stem cells and from the field of cancer research. In brief, since the evidence presented to support the stoichiometric model failed to recognize the factual existence of adult organ specific stem cells, the model has not been rigorously tested. In addition, the demonstration of a subset of cells (MUSE cells) in normal primary in vitro cultures of human fibroblasts (the usual source of iPS cells) seems to be the origin of the iPS cells. Moreover, from the field of carcinogenesis, the "stem cell" versus "de-differentiation" or "reprogramming" hypotheses were examined. Again, using the role of glycolysis, known to be associated with the Warburg effect in cancer cells, a list of experiments showing that (a) normal stem cells, which have few mitochondria, metabolize via glycolysis; (b) the stem cells are targets for "initiation" or "immortalization" or the blockage of differentiation and apoptosis of the stem cells by "immortalizing viruses"; (c) Lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA), when expressed, is associated with glycolysis and therefore, must be expressed in normal adult stem cells, as well as in cancer cells; and (d) p53, depleted or rendered dysfunctional by SV40 Large T antigen, is associated with the reduction of mitochondrial function and mass and is associated with the Warburg effect. Together, these observations from the iPS and "cancer stem cell" fields support the idea that both iPS cells and cancer stem cell are derived from adult organ-specific stem cells that do not restore or switch their metabolism of glucose from oxidative metabolism to glycolysis but, rather, in both cases, the adult stem cell, which metabolizes by glycolysis, is prevented from differentiation or from metabolizing by oxidative phosphorylation. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals

  13. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells as Therapies for Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Xiao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic, autoimmune, inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system that leads to permanent neurological deficits. Current MS treatment regimens are insufficient to treat the irreversible neurological disabilities. Tremendous progress in the experimental and clinical applications of cell-based therapies has recognized stem cells as potential candidates for regenerative therapy for many neurodegenerative disorders including MS. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSCs derived precursor cells can modulate the autoimmune response in the central nervous system (CNS and promote endogenous remyelination and repair process in animal models. This review highlights studies involving the immunomodulatory and regenerative effects of mesenchymal stem cells and iPSCs derived cells in animal models, and their translation into immunomodulatory and neuroregenerative treatment strategies for MS.

  14. Gingiva as a new and the most accessible source of mesenchymal stem cells from the oral cavity to be used in regenerative therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartłomiej Górski

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs, many researchers have focused their attention on new sources of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. Consequently, MSCs that display self-renewal capacity, multidifferentiation potential and immunomodulatory properties have been isolated from human oral tissues, including tooth, periodontal ligament, and gingiva. Oral MSCs involve dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs, stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED, periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs, dental follicle stem cells (DFCs, stem cells from apical papilla (SCAP and gingival stem cells (GMSCs. Current research on oral stem cells is expanding at an unprecedented rate. That being the case, a plethora of in vitro differentiation assays, immunodeficient animal transplantations and preclinical trials have demonstrated that these cells exhibit strong potential for both regenerative dentistry and medicine. Oral MSCs have proved their capability to repair cornea, dental pulp, periodontal, bone, cartilage, tendon, neural, muscle and endothelial tissues without neoplasm formation as well as to treat inflammatory diseases and immune disorders. This article describes the current understanding of oral MSCs and their prospective applications in cell-based therapy, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Special attention is placed on GMSCs as they are easily accessible and may be obtained in a convenient and minimally invasive way.

  15. Pluripotent Stem Cells as a Robust Source of Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzzani, Carlos D; Miriuka, Santiago G

    2017-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been extensively studied over the past years for the treatment of different diseases. Most of the ongoing clinical trials currently involve the use of MSC derived from adult tissues. This source may have some limitations, particularly with therapies that may require extensive and repetitive cell dosage. However, nowadays, there is a staggering growth in literature on a new source of MSC. There is now increasing evidence about the mesenchymal differentiation from pluripotent stem cell (PSC). Here, we summarize the current knowledge of pluripotent-derived mesenchymal stem cells (PD-MSC). We present a historical perspective on the subject, and then discuss some critical questions that remain unanswered.

  16. Functional assessment of gap junctions in monolayer and three-dimensional cultures of human tendon cells using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching

    OpenAIRE

    Kuzma-Kuzniarska, Maria; Yapp, Clarence; Pearson-Jones, Thomas W.; Jones, Andrew K; Hulley, Philippa A.

    2014-01-01

    Gap junction-mediated intercellular communication influences a variety of cellular activities. In tendons, gap junctions modulate collagen production, are involved in strain-induced cell death, and are involved in the response to mechanical stimulation. The aim of the present study was to investigate gap junction-mediated intercellular communication in healthy human tendon-derived cells using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). The FRAP is a noninvasive technique that allows qu...

  17. Stem cell engineering a WTEC global assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Loring, Jeanne; McDevitt, Todd; Palecek, Sean; Schaffer, David; Zandstra, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This book describes a global assessment of stem cell engineering research, achieved through site visits by a panel of experts to leading institutes, followed by dedicated workshops. The assessment made clear that engineers and the engineering approach with its quantitative, system-based thinking can contribute much to the progress of stem cell research and development. The increased need for complex computational models and new, innovative technologies, such as high-throughput screening techniques, organ-on-a-chip models and in vitro tumor models require an increasing involvement of engineers and physical scientists. Additionally, this book will show that although the US is still in a leadership position in stem cell engineering, Asian countries such as Japan, China and Korea, as well as European countries like the UK, Germany, Sweden and the Netherlands are rapidly expanding their investments in the field. Strategic partnerships between countries could lead to major advances of the field and scalable expansi...

  18. Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath restricting joint movement in the thumb: A case study and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzaffer Durmus

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumors of the tendon sheath are the second most common type of subcutaneous benign tumors found in the hand. These tumors are slow growing soft tissue mases that develop over a long period of time and can occur at any age. Although such lesions are usually painless, there is a possibility of recurrence of the tumor. Patients should seek postoperative management in order to prevent any possibility of recurrence. In view of the current literature, we present a case involving a patient suffering from a multifocal giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath that restricted movement of the interphalangeal joints of the thumb. [Hand Microsurg 2015; 4(1.000: 16-19

  19. Induced pluripotent stem cell lines derived from human somatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Junying; Vodyanik, Maxim A; Smuga-Otto, Kim; Antosiewicz-Bourget, Jessica; Frane, Jennifer L; Tian, Shulan; Nie, Jeff; Jonsdottir, Gudrun A; Ruotti, Victor; Stewart, Ron; Slukvin, Igor I; Thomson, James A

    2007-12-21

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer allows trans-acting factors present in the mammalian oocyte to reprogram somatic cell nuclei to an undifferentiated state. We show that four factors (OCT4, SOX2, NANOG, and LIN28) are sufficient to reprogram human somatic cells to pluripotent stem cells that exhibit the essential characteristics of embryonic stem (ES) cells. These induced pluripotent human stem cells have normal karyotypes, express telomerase activity, express cell surface markers and genes that characterize human ES cells, and maintain the developmental potential to differentiate into advanced derivatives of all three primary germ layers. Such induced pluripotent human cell lines should be useful in the production of new disease models and in drug development, as well as for applications in transplantation medicine, once technical limitations (for example, mutation through viral integration) are eliminated.

  20. Expression and function of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman S. Cheung

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are prototypical ligand gated ion channels typically found in muscular and neuronal tissues. Functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, however, have also recently been identified on other cell types, including stem cells. Activation of these receptors by the binding of agonists like choline, acetylcholine, or nicotine has been implicated in many cellular changes. In regards to stem cell function, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor activation leads to changes in stem cell proliferation, migration and differentiation potential. In this review we summarize the expression and function of known nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in different classes of stem cells including: pluripotent stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, periodontal ligament derived stem cells, and neural progenitor cells and discuss the potential downstream effects of receptor activation on stem cell function.

  1. The importance and use of stem cells in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Owczarczyk-Saczonek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are capable of self-renewal of their population and differentiation into specialized cells. There are several “niches” in the skin: 1 interfollicular stem cells – responsible for skin regeneration after injury; 2 in the hair follicle as follicular stem cells (“bulge” and mesenchymal stem cells in the hair bulb and follicular papilla; 3 stem cells of mesodermal origin associated with blood vessels, giving rise to fibroblasts and myofibroblasts; and 4 melanocyte stem cells. Treatment with stem cells of skin diseases is still considered experimental. Intensive research is being carried out on their use in treating dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, systemic lupus erythematosus, vitiligo, different types of alopecia and ulcers and slow-healing wounds. Stem cells due to their flexibility and ability to differentiate into other specialized cells create the possibility for regenerative medicine.

  2. Controlling Redox Status for Stem Cell Survival, Expansion, and Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Sart

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS have long been considered as pathological agents inducing apoptosis under adverse culture conditions. However, recent findings have challenged this dogma and physiological levels of ROS are now considered as secondary messengers, mediating numerous cellular functions in stem cells. Stem cells represent important tools for tissue engineering, drug screening, and disease modeling. However, the safe use of stem cells for clinical applications still requires culture improvements to obtain functional cells. With the examples of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and pluripotent stem cells (PSCs, this review investigates the roles of ROS in the maintenance of self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation of stem cells. In addition, this work highlights that the tight control of stem cell microenvironment, including cell organization, and metabolic and mechanical environments, may be an effective approach to regulate endogenous ROS generation. Taken together, this paper indicates the need for better quantification of ROS towards the accurate control of stem cell fate.

  3. Identification of Abnormal Stem Cells Using Raman Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harkness, Linda; Novikov, Sergey M; Beermann, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    The clinical use of stem cells in cell-based therapeutics for degenerative diseases requires development of criteria for defining normal stem cells to ensure safe transplantation. Currently, identification of abnormal from normal stem cells is based on extensive ex vivo and in vivo testing. Raman...... microscopy is a label-free method for rapid and sensitive detection of changes in cells' bio-molecular composition. Here, we report that by using Raman spectroscopy, we were able to map the distribution of different biomolecules within 2 types of stem cells: adult human bone marrow-derived stromal stem cells...... and human embryonic stem cells and to identify reproducible differences in Raman's spectral characteristics that distinguished genetically abnormal and transformed stem cells from their normal counterparts. Raman microscopy can be prospectively employed as a method for identifying abnormal stem cells in ex...

  4. EuroStemCell: A European infrastructure for communication and engagement with stem cell research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfoot, Jan; Doherty, Kate; Blackburn, C Clare

    2017-10-01

    EuroStemCell is a large and growing network of organizations and individuals focused on public engagement with stem cells and regenerative medicine - a fluid and contested domain, where scientific, political, ethical, legal and societal perspectives intersect. Rooted in the European stem cell research community, this project has developed collaborative and innovative approaches to information provision and direct and online engagement, that reflect and respond to the dynamic growth of the field itself. EuroStemCell started as the communication and outreach component of a research consortium and subsequently continued as a stand-alone engagement initiative. The involvement of established European stem cell scientists has grown year-on-year, facilitating their participation in public engagement by allowing them to make high-value contributions with broad reach. The project has now had sustained support by partners and funders for over twelve years, and thus provides a model for longevity in public engagement efforts. This paper considers the evolution of the EuroStemCell project in response to - and in dialogue with - its evolving environment. In it, we aim to reveal the mechanisms and approaches taken by EuroStemCell, such that others within the scientific community can explore these ideas and be further enabled in their own public engagement endeavours. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Are reviewers obstructing stem cell research?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Binetruy

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Bernard BinetruyINSERM U626, Faculté de Médecine La Timone, Marseille, FranceA current controversy in stem cell research was published on the BBC website recently. Some stem cell researchers have said that "they believe a small group of scientists is effectively vetoing high quality science from publication in journals". They strongly suspected some reviewers to be deliberately sending back negative comments or asking for unnecessary experiments. Nature editor, Dr Philip Campbell, has said that "this idea is utterly false".

  6. Facts about Stem Cells and Importance of Them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masumeh Saeidi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are undifferentiated biological cells that can differentiate into specialized cells and can divide (through mitosis to produce more stem cells. They are found in multicellular organisms. In mammals, there are two broad types of stem cells: embryonic stem cells, which are isolated from the inner cell mass of blastocysts, and adult stem cells, which are found in various tissues. In adult organisms, stem cells and progenitor cells act as a repair system for the body, replenishing adult tissues. In a developing embryo, stem cells can differentiate into all the specialized cells—ectoderm, endoderm and mesoderm (see induced pluripotent stem cells—but also maintain the normal turnover of regenerative organs, such as blood, skin, or intestinal tissues. There are three accessible sources of autologous adult stem cells in humans: Bone marrow, which requires extraction by harvesting, that is, drilling into bone (typically the femur or iliac crest, Adipose tissue (lipid cells, which requires extraction by liposuction, and Blood, which requires extraction through apheresis, wherein blood is drawn from the donor (similar to a blood donation, and passed through a machine that extracts the stem cells and returns other portions of the blood to the donor. Stem cells can also be taken from umbilical cord blood just after birth. Of all stem cell types, autologous harvesting involves the least risk. By definition, autologous cells are obtained from one's own body, just as one may bank his or her own blood for elective surgical procedures. Adult stem cells are frequently used in medical therapies, for example in bone marrow transplantation. Stem cells can now be artificially grown and transformed (differentiated into specialized cell types with characteristics consistent with cells of various tissues such as muscles or nerves. Embryonic cell lines and autologous embryonic stem cells generated through Somatic-cell nuclear transfer or dedifferentiation

  7. Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath composed largely of epithelioid histiocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCTTS) is a relatively uncommon lesion. GCTTS composed largely epithelioid histiocytes are very rare. In the literature, the author could not find such cases. A 73-year-old man presented with a mass of right thumb, and resection of the mass was performed. Grossly, the mass was encapsulated and yellowish, and measured 1.5 x 2 x 2 cm. Microscopically, the mass was composed of cellular and hypocellular zones. The former was composed of spindle cells and osteoclast-like giant cells, while the latter of epithelioid clear histiocytes. The area of the former was 20%, and the latter 80%. Pigment was seen in the former elements. Mitotic figures were seen in 3/per 30 high power fields (HPFs) in the former element and 2/per 30 HPFs in the latter element. Histochemically, the pigment was hemosiderin positive with Prussian blue staining. Immunohistochemically, both the elements were negative for cytokeratin (CK) CE1/3, CK CAM5.2, CEA, HMB45, alpha-smooth muscle antigen, p53, CD10, TTF-1, and CDX2. Both the elements were positive for CD68 and Ki-67 (cellular element 30% and hypocellular element 20%). The histiocytes of the hypocellular element and osteoclast-like giant cell of the cellular element were positive for CD45. S100-protein positive Langerhans cells and CD45-positive lymphocytes were scattered. The pathological diagnosis was GCTTS. In the author's experience, GCTTS composed largely epithelioid histiocytes are very rare. In the literature, the author could not find such cases. Thus, the author reports herein this case.

  8. Thrombopoietin expands hematopoietic stem cells after transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, Norma; Priestley, Greg; Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Kaushansky, Kenneth

    2002-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence indicate that thrombopoietin (TPO) contributes to the development of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), supporting their survival and proliferation in vitro. To determine whether TPO supports the impressive expansion of HSC observed following transplantation, we transplanted normal marrow cells into lethally irradiated Tpo–/– and Tpo+/+ mice and quantified HSC self-renewal and expansion and hematopoietic progenitor cell homing. Although essentially identical numbers of...

  9. Mesenchymal dental stem cells in regenerative dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Lozano, Francisco Javier; Insausti, Carmen Luisa; Iniesta, Francisca; Blanquer, Miguel; Ramírez, María del Carmen; Meseguer, Luis; Meseguer Henarejos, Ana Belén; Marín Atucha, Noemi Teresa; Martínez, Salvador; Moraleda Jiménez, José María

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade, tissue engineering is a field that has been suffering an enormous expansion in the regenerative medicine and dentistry. The use of cells as mesenchymal dental stem cells of easy access for dentist and oral surgeon, immunosuppressive properties, high proliferation and capacity to differentiate into odontoblasts, cementoblasts, osteoblasts and other cells implicated in the teeth, suppose a good perspective of future in the clinical dentistry. However, is necessary advance in...

  10. Acceptability of stem cell therapy by pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Ryan J; Bardien, Nadia; Wallace, Euan

    2012-06-01

    Cell-based therapies may soon be used to treat disorders in the perinatal period. Our aim was to assess pregnant women's knowledge, attitudes, and acceptance of different types of stem cell therapies. Pregnant women attending an Australian tertiary center were asked to complete a questionnaire to seek their views on the potential therapeutic use of stem cells in the future. Outcome measures were women's acceptability of different types of stem cell therapies for themselves and their baby, ethical concerns, knowledge, and willingness to use stem cells for different indications. A total of 150 women completed the questionnaire. More women were happy to use any stem cell type (82%) than placental stem cells only (12.5%), adult stem cells only (2%), embryonic stem cells only (0), and 3.5 percent would not use. With respect to use for their baby, more women were happy to use any stem cell type (83%) than placental stem cells only (13%), embryonic stem cells only (2%), adult stem cells only (0), and 2 percent would not use. Ethical concerns were highest with embryonic stem cells (25%), than adult stem cells (11%), and placental stem cells (10%). Twelve percent of women were very confident and 66 percent reasonably confident with their knowledge, whereas 17 percent understood little and 5 percent reported no understanding. Acceptance of using any stem cell therapy was 75 percent for severe medical disorders, 57 percent for moderate disorders, and 25 percent for mild medical disorders. Pregnant women are confident with their knowledge of stem cells and overwhelmingly support their use to treat both themselves and their baby. The level of this support, however, is proportionate to the severity of the medical disorder. (BIRTH 39:2 June 2012). © 2012, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Stem Cell Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Regardless of the precise underlying molecular mechanisms, the fundamental defining manifestation of aging is an overall decline in the functional capacity of various organs to maintain baseline tissue homeostasis and to respond adequately to physiological needs under stress. There is an increasingly urgent need for a more complete understanding of the molecular pathways and biological processes underlying aging and age-related disorders. CONTENT: Mitochondria constitute the most prominent source of adenosine triphosphate (ATP and are implicated in multiple anabolic and catabolic circuitries. In addition, mitochondria coordinate cell-wide stress responses and control non-apoptotic cell death routines. The involvement of mitochondria in both vital and lethal processes is crucial for both embryonic and postembryonic development, as well as for the maintenance of adult tissue homeostasis. Age-associated telomere damage, diminution of telomere ‘capping’ function and associated p53 activation have emerged as prime instigators of a functional decline of tissue stem cells and of mitochondrial dysfunction that adversely affect renewal and bioenergetic support in diverse tissues. Constructing a model of how telomeres, stem cells and mitochondria interact with key molecules governing genome integrity, ‘stemness’ and metabolism provides a framework for how diverse factors contribute to aging and age-related disorders. SUMMARY: Cellular senescence defined as an irreversible proliferation arrest promotes age-related decline in mammalian tissue homeostasis. The aging of tissue-specific stem cell and progenitor cell compartments is believed to be central to the decline of tissue and organ integrity and function in the elderly. Taken into consideration that the overwhelming majority of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS are of mitochondrial origin, it is reasonable to posit that the elevated ROS production might be caused by

  12. PAF promotes stemness and radioresistance of glioma stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Derrick Sek Tong; Hu, Baoli; Ho, Yan Wing; Sauvé, Charles-Etienne Gabriel; Bristow, Christopher A; Wang, Qianghu; Multani, Asha S; Chen, Peiwen; Nezi, Luigi; Jiang, Shan; Gorman, Claire Elizabeth; Monasterio, Marta Moreno; Koul, Dimpy; Marchesini, Matteo; Colla, Simona; Jin, Eun-Jung; Sulman, Erik P; Spring, Denise J; Yung, Wai-Kwan Alfred; Verhaak, Roel G W; Chin, Lynda; Wang, Y Alan; DePinho, Ronald A

    2017-10-24

    An integrated genomic and functional analysis to elucidate DNA damage signaling factors promoting self-renewal of glioma stem cells (GSCs) identified proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-associated factor ( PAF ) up-regulation in glioblastoma. PAF is preferentially overexpressed in GSCs. Its depletion impairs maintenance of self-renewal without promoting differentiation and reduces tumor-initiating cell frequency. Combined transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses revealed that PAF supports GSC maintenance, in part, by influencing DNA replication and pyrimidine metabolism pathways. PAF interacts with PCNA and regulates PCNA-associated DNA translesion synthesis (TLS); consequently, PAF depletion in combination with radiation generated fewer tumorspheres compared with radiation alone. Correspondingly, pharmacological impairment of DNA replication and TLS phenocopied the effect of PAF depletion in compromising GSC self-renewal and radioresistance, providing preclinical proof of principle that combined TLS inhibition and radiation therapy may be a viable therapeutic option in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Published under the PNAS license.

  13. Low immunogenicity of mouse induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem/progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itakura, Go; Ozaki, Masahiro; Nagoshi, Narihito; Kawabata, Soya; Nishiyama, Yuichiro; Sugai, Keiko; Iida, Tsuyoshi; Kashiwagi, Rei; Ookubo, Toshiki; Yastake, Kaori; Matsubayashi, Kohei; Kohyama, Jun; Iwanami, Akio; Matsumoto, Morio; Nakamura, Masaya; Okano, Hideyuki

    2017-10-11

    Resolving the immunogenicity of cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) remains an important challenge for cell transplant strategies that use banked allogeneic cells. Thus, we evaluated the immunogenicity of mouse fetal neural stem/progenitor cells (fetus-NSPCs) and iPSC-derived neural stem/progenitor cells (iPSC-NSPCs) both in vitro and in vivo. Flow cytometry revealed the low expression of immunological surface antigens, and these cells survived in all mice when transplanted syngeneically into subcutaneous tissue and the spinal cord. In contrast, an allogeneic transplantation into subcutaneous tissue was rejected in all mice, and allogeneic cells transplanted into intact and injured spinal cords survived for 3 months in approximately 20% of mice. In addition, cell survival was increased after co-treatment with an immunosuppressive agent. Thus, the immunogenicity and post-transplantation immunological dynamics of iPSC-NSPCs resemble those of fetus-NSPCs.

  14. Progesterone induces adult mammary stem cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Purna A; Jackson, Hartland W; Beristain, Alexander G; Di Grappa, Marco A; Mote, Patricia A; Clarke, Christine L; Stingl, John; Waterhouse, Paul D; Khokha, Rama

    2010-06-10

    Reproductive history is the strongest risk factor for breast cancer after age, genetics and breast density. Increased breast cancer risk is entwined with a greater number of ovarian hormone-dependent reproductive cycles, yet the basis for this predisposition is unknown. Mammary stem cells (MaSCs) are located within a specialized niche in the basal epithelial compartment that is under local and systemic regulation. The emerging role of MaSCs in cancer initiation warrants the study of ovarian hormones in MaSC homeostasis. Here we show that the MaSC pool increases 14-fold during maximal progesterone levels at the luteal dioestrus phase of the mouse. Stem-cell-enriched CD49fhi cells amplify at dioestrus, or with exogenous progesterone, demonstrating a key role for progesterone in propelling this expansion. In aged mice, CD49fhi cells display stasis upon cessation of the reproductive cycle. Progesterone drives a series of events where luminal cells probably provide Wnt4 and RANKL signals to basal cells which in turn respond by upregulating their cognate receptors, transcriptional targets and cell cycle markers. Our findings uncover a dynamic role for progesterone in activating adult MaSCs within the mammary stem cell niche during the reproductive cycle, where MaSCs are putative targets for cell transformation events leading to breast cancer.

  15. Transition of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells to endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Crisan (Mihaela)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractMesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) are heterogeneous. A fraction of these cells constitute multipotent cells that can self-renew and mainly give rise to mesodermal lineage cells such as adipocytes, osteocytes and chondrocytes. The ability of MSCs to differentiate into endothelial

  16. Intrinsic differentiation potential of adolescent human tendon tissue: an in-vitro cell differentiation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. de Mos (Marieke); J.L.M. Koevoet (Wendy); H. Jahr (Holger); M.M.A. Verstegen (Monique); M.P. Heijboer (Rien); N. Kops (Nicole); J.P.T.M. van Leeuwen (Hans); H.H. Weinans (Harrie); G.J.V.M. van Osch (Gerjo); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractTendinosis lesions show an increase of glycosaminoglycan amount, calcifications, and lipid accumulation. Therefore, altered cellular differentiation might play a role in the etiology of tendinosis. This study investigates whether adolescent human tendon tissue contains a population of

  17. Plant and animal stem cells: similar yet different

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heidstra, R.; Sabatini, S.

    2014-01-01

    The astonishingly long lives of plants and their regeneration capacity depend on the activity of plant stem cells. As in animals, stem cells reside in stem cell niches, which produce signals that regulate the balance between self-renewal and the generation of daughter cells that differentiate into

  18. Stem Cell: Past, Present and Future- A Review Article | Avasthi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    having the potency to differentiate into wide range of adult cells. Self renewal and totipotency are characteristic of stem cells. Though totipotency is shown by very early embryonic stem cells, the adult stem cells possess multipotency and differential plasticity which can be exploited for future generation of therapeutic options.

  19. Ground Zero in the Debate over Stem-Cell Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southwick, Ron

    2001-01-01

    Describes how political, legal, and ethical battles over embryonic stem-cell research are focused on the University of Wisconsin at Madison, where the cells were first isolated. Addresses the issue of access to the university's stem cells and a recent presidential decision regarding funding for stem-cell research.(EV)

  20. Cancer stem cell markers in common cancers - therapeutic implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klonisch, Thomas; Wiechec, Emilia; Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine

    2008-01-01

    Rapid advance in the cancer stem cell field warrants optimism for the development of more reliable cancer therapies within the next 2-3 decades. Below, we characterize and compare the specific markers that are present on stem cells, cancer cells and cancer stem cells (CSC) in selected tissues...