WorldWideScience

Sample records for tendinopathy

  1. Achilles tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wetke, E; Johannsen, F; Langberg, Henning

    2015-01-01

    In published efficacy studies on Achilles tendinopathy (AT) exercise alone results in improvement in 60-90% of the cases. However, this high success rate cannot be expected in usual clinical practice. We prospectively investigated the effectiveness of a treatment regimen consisting of home......-based exercises (concentric, eccentric, and stretching) and optional glucocorticosteroid (GCS) injections in patients with (AT) in a usual clinical setting. Patients unable to commence or progress in exercise were offered GCS, hypothesizing that the GCS would facilitate exercise. Ninety-three consecutive patients...... with AT referred to two outpatient rheumatology clinics were registered, and seen at five visits over a 6-month period. Exercises seemed to have a slow, but long-lasting effect with GCS having a dramatic short-term effect on symptoms. Twenty-six percent of the patients could proceed with training alone...

  2. Exercise for tendinopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitrios, Stasinopoulos

    2015-01-01

    Tendinopathies are one of the most common sports/musculoskeletal injury in modern western societies. Many physiotherapy approaches have been recommended in the literature for the management of tendinopathy. The most effective treatment in the management of tendinopathy is the eccentric training. Load, speed and frequency of contractions are the three principles of eccentric exercises, discussed in this report. However, eccentric training is not effective for all patients with tendinopathy and...

  3. Current Opinions on Tendinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaux, Jean-François; Forthomme, Bénédicte; Goff, Caroline Le; Crielaard, Jean-Michel; Croisier, Jean-Louis

    2011-01-01

    Tendinopathy is characterized by pain in the tendon and impaired performance sometimes associated with swelling of the tendon. Its diagnosis is usually clinical but ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging can refine the diagnosis. Tendinopathy is highly prevalent and is one of the most frequently self reported musculoskeletal diseases in physical workers and sports people. Nevertheless, it is very difficult to carry out general epidemiologic studies on tendinopathy because of the varying sports cultures and sports habits in different countries. The aetiology of tendinopathy seems to be multi-factorial, involving intrinsic and extrinsic factors. The role of inflammation is still debated but the absence of inflammatory cells does not mean that inflammatory mediators are not implicated. Different theories have been advanced to explain pain and chronicity mechanisms, but these mechanisms remain largely unknown. “Conventional ”treatments are generally employed empirically to fight pain and inflammation but they do not modify the histological structure of the tendon. However, these treatments are not completely satisfactory and the recurrence of symptoms is common. Currently, eccentric training remains the treatment of choice for tendinopathy, even though some studies are contradictory. Moreover, many interesting new treatments are now being developed to treat tendinopathy, but there is little evidence to support their use in clinical practice. Key points The word “tendinopathy ”is the correct term for the clinical diagnosis of pain accompanied by impaired performance, and sometimes swelling in the tendon. The aetiology of tendinopathy seems to be a multi-factorial process, involving promoting factors that are intrinsic or extrinsic, working either alone or in combination. US (with color Doppler) and MRI are usually prescribed when tendinopathy is unresponsive to treatment and entails lingering symptoms. Eccentric training is currently considered to be the

  4. TENDINOPATHY AND OBESITY

    OpenAIRE

    Adham do Amaral e Castro; Skare, Thelma Larocca; Nassif, Paulo Afonso Nunes; Sakuma, Alexandre Kaue; BARROS,Wagner Haese

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Tendinopathies and tendon tears account for over 30% of all musculoskeletal consultations. Obesity, which is becoming one of the world´s most prevalent public health issues, may be associated with this condition. Objective: To review the literature about tendinopathies and obesity association. Methods: This is a descriptive exploratory study using the portal Medline. Literature in English language from 2006 to 2014 were reviewed. Results: The pathogenesis of ten...

  5. Injection treatments for patellar tendinopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ark, Mathijs; Zwerver, Johannes; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge

    2011-01-01

    Objective Injection treatments are increasingly used as treatment for patellar tendinopathy. The aim of this systematic review is to describe the different injection treatments, their rationales and the effectiveness of treating patellar tendinopathy. Methods A computerised search of the Medline,

  6. Tendinopathy in Sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Paul W.; Renström, Per

    2012-01-01

    Context: Tendinopathy is increasing in prevalence and accounts for a substantial part of all sports injuries and occupational disorders. Despite the magnitude of the disorder, high-quality scientific data on etiology and available treatments have been limited. Evidence Acquisition: The authors conducted a MEDLINE search on tendinopathy, or “tendonitis” or “tendinosis” or “epicondylitis” or “jumpers knee” from 1980 to 2011. The emphasis was placed on updates on epidemiology, etiology, and recent patient-oriented Level 1 literature. Results: Repetitive exposure in combination with recently discovered intrinsic factors, such as genetic variants of matrix proteins, and metabolic disorders is a risk factor for the development of tendinopathy. Recent findings demonstrate that tendinosis is characterized by a fibrotic, failed healing response associated with pathological vessel and sensory nerve ingrowth. This aberrant sensory nerve sprouting may partly explain increased pain signaling and partly, by release of neuronal mediators, contribute to the fibrotic alterations observed in tendinopathy. The initial nonoperative treatment should involve eccentric exercise, which should be the cornerstone (basis) of treatment of tendinopathy. Eccentric training combined with extracorporeal shockwave treatment has in some reports shown higher success rates compared to any therapies alone. Injection therapies (cortisone, sclerosing agents, blood products including platelet-rich plasma) may have short-term effects but have no proven long-term treatment effects or meta-analyses to support them. For epicondylitis, cortisone injections have demonstrated poorer long-time results than conservative physiotherapy. Today surgery is less indicated because of successful conservative therapies. New minioperative procedures that, via the endoscope, remove pathologic tissue or abnormal neoinnervation demonstrate promising results but need confirmation by Level 1 studies. Conclusions

  7. TENDINOPATHY AND OBESITY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Adham do Amaral E; Skare, Thelma Larocca; Nassif, Paulo Afonso Nunes; Sakuma, Alexandre Kaue; Barros, Wagner Haese

    Tendinopathies and tendon tears account for over 30% of all musculoskeletal consultations. Obesity, which is becoming one of the world´s most prevalent public health issues, may be associated with this condition. To review the literature about tendinopathies and obesity association. This is a descriptive exploratory study using the portal Medline. Literature in English language from 2006 to 2014 were reviewed. The pathogenesis of tendinopathies includes inflammatory, regenerative and degenerative processes that happen simultaneously from early to late phases of the disease. Mechanical stress upon tendons seems to be one of the most important factors to initiate the inflammatory response, but it´s not the only one that can deflagrate it: there are other extrinsic, genetic and metabolic factors that may be involved. Therefore, tendinopathies in obese patients can be due to tendon overload because of the excess of weight, but also because of increased production of pro-inflammatory mediators related to fat tissue such as adipokines. This pro-inflammatory state that obese people can suffer is known as adiposopathy, or sick fat syndrome. Weight loss is associated with decrease in adipokines and improvement of musculoskeletal symptoms. The relation of obesity and tendinopathies is supported by evidences of recent studies, exemplified in this review of literature. As tendinopatias e as fissuras em tendões respondem por 30% de todas as consultas médicas. A obesidade, que está se tornando um dos problemas de saúde pública mais prevalentes no mundo, pode estar associada com esta condição. Revisar a literatura acerca da associação entre obesidade e tendinopatias. Este é um estudo exploratório e descritivo utilizando artigos em língua inglesa do portal médico Medline, do período de 2006 a 2014. Na patogênese das tendinopatias incluem-se elementos inflamatórios, regenerativos e degenerativos que aparecem de maneira simultânea em todos os estágios da doen

  8. Injection treatments for patellar tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ark, Mathijs; Zwerver, Johannes; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge

    2011-10-01

    Injection treatments are increasingly used as treatment for patellar tendinopathy. The aim of this systematic review is to describe the different injection treatments, their rationales and the effectiveness of treating patellar tendinopathy. A computerised search of the Medline, Embase, CINAHL and Web of Knowledge databases was conducted on 1 May 2010 to identify studies on injection treatments for patellar tendinopathy. 11 articles on seven different injection treatments (dry needling, autologous blood, high-volume, platelet-rich plasma, sclerosis, steroids and aprotinin injections) were found: 4 randomised controlled trials (RCTs), 1 non-RCT, 4 prospective cohort studies and 2 retrospective cohort studies. All studies reported positive results. The Delphi scores of the four RCTs ranged from 5 to 8 out of 9. Different and sometimes contradictory rationales were used for the injection treatments. All seven different injection treatments seem promising for treating patellar tendinopathy. Unlike the other injection treatments, steroid treatment often shows a relapse of symptoms in the long term. Results should be interpreted with caution as the number of studies is low, few high-quality studies have been conducted and the studies are hard to compare due to different methodology. More high-quality studies using the same cross-cultural reliable and valid outcome measure are needed, as well as further research into the pathophysiology. Finally, some implications are provided for clinicians who want to use injection treatments as a part of their treatment for patellar tendinopathy, distinguishing between reactive and degenerative phase of patellar tendinopathy.

  9. Patellar Tendinopathy: Diagnosis and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, David; Figueroa, Francisco; Calvo, Rafael

    2016-12-01

    Patellar tendinopathy is a common cause of pain in athletes' knees. Historically, it has been related to jumping sports, such as volleyball and basketball. Repetitive jumping generates a considerable load of energy in the extensor mechanism, leading to symptoms. The main pathophysiologic phenomenon in patellar tendinopathy is tendinosis, which is a degenerative disorder rather than an inflammatory disorder; therefore, the other popular term for this disease, tendinitis, is not appropriate. The nonsurgical treatment of patellar tendinopathy is focused on eccentric exercises and often has good results. Other experimental options, with variable levels of evidence, are available for recalcitrant cases. Surgical treatment is indicated for cases that are refractory to nonsurgical treatment. Open or arthroscopic surgery can be performed; the two methods are comparable, but arthroscopic surgery results in a faster recovery time.

  10. Tendinopatia patelar Patellar tendinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moisés Cohen

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available A tendinopatia do patelar ou jumper's knee (joelho do saltador é uma afecção que acomete freqüentemente atletas praticantes de atividades de salto ou aquelas que exigem força de impacto repetitivo. Histologicamente, a sobrecarga excessiva no tendão pode provocar alterações na matriz extracelular, resultando em pequenas lesões que, cronicamente, poderão levar a um quadro de tendinose, principalmente na região do pólo inferior da patela. A dor na região anterior do joelho é o primeiro sintoma relatado pelo paciente portador dessa afecção. Seu início é insidioso e gradual, principalmente após atividade física, mas, com a progressão da doença, pode tornar-se freqüente durante ou já no início da atividade. O diagnóstico de tendinopatia do patelar é eminentemente clínico, caracterizado por dor à palpação no pólo inferior da patela e adjacências e, nos casos mais avançados, nódulo palpável e edema associado podem ser visualizados. Exames complementares, como radiografia, ultra-sonografia (US e ressonância magnética (RM auxiliam no diagnóstico. O US e a RM são os mais indicados, pois podem definir o local exato da lesão, sua extensão, como também identificar a presença ou não de alterações degenerativas, sendo a RM o que fornece melhor resolução. O tratamento inicial da tendinopatia é clínico, com repouso relativo, correção dos fatores etiológicos, além de crioterapia e medidas fisioterápicas. A utilização da medicação analgésica e antiinflamatória é controversa. Nos casos que não respondem ao tratamento clínico, o cirúrgico é opção, e várias técnicas são descritas, a literatura demonstrando índices variados de bons resultados.Patellar tendinopathy, or jumper's knee, is often seen in athletes that practice jumping modalities, or modalities that require repetitive impact strength. Histologically, the excessive load on the tendon may cause changes in the extracellular matrix and

  11. Achilles tendinopathy in amateur runners: role of adiposity (Tendinopathies and obesity)

    OpenAIRE

    Abate, Michele; Oliva, Francesco; Schiavone, Cosima; Salini, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is an important risk factor for Achilles tendinopathy, and running is usually carried out to reduce excess body weight. Aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of Achilles tendinopathy in young over-weight amateur runners.

  12. Advanced Ultrasound-Guided Interventions for Tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Evan; Jelsing, Elena; Onishi, Kentaro

    2016-08-01

    Tendinopathy is increasingly recognized as an important cause of musculoskeletal pain and disability. Tendinopathy is thought to be principally a degenerative process, rather than inflammatory as was traditionally believed. Consequently, traditional tendinopathy treatments focused solely on decreasing inflammation have often been ineffective or even harmful. The advancement of ultrasonography as for guidance of outpatient musculoskeletal procedures has facilitated the development of novel percutaneous procedures for the treatment of tendinopathy, mostly by using mechanical intervention to stimulate regeneration. Several of these techniques, including percutaneous needle tenotomy, percutaneous ultrasonic tenotomy, high-volume injection, and percutaneous needle scraping, are reviewed in this article. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Sports and performing arts medicine: 6. Tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnoff, Jonathan T; Willick, Stuart; Akau, Cedric K; Harrast, Mark A; Storm, Seneca A

    2009-03-01

    This self-directed learning module highlights tendinopathy associated with sports and performing arts. It is part of the study guide on sports and performing arts medicine in the Self-Directed Physiatric Education Program for practitioners and trainees in physical medicine and rehabilitation. Using a case vignette format, this article specifically focuses on the etiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic imaging, and management recommendations for tendinopathy. The goal of this article is to allow the learner to better describe the pathophysiology and diagnostic imaging characteristics of tendinopathy, and to formulate an appropriate nonsurgical management algorithm for tendinopathies.

  14. Preventive interventions for tendinopathy : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Janne A; Zwerver, Johannes; Diercks, Ronald L; Elferink-Gemser, Marije T; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge

    Objectives: Tendinopathy, the most prevalent tendon disorder which is considered as the clinical diagnosis of pain and dysfunction, is common in sports and its prevalence is ever-increasing. Despite the lack of clarity about risk factors, various preventive interventions for tendinopathy have been

  15. Regulation of gene expression in human tendinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archambault Joanne M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic tendon injuries, also known as tendinopathies, are common among professional and recreational athletes. These injuries result in a significant amount of morbidity and health care expenditure, yet little is known about the molecular mechanisms leading to tendinopathy. Methods We have used histological evaluation and molecular profiling to determine gene expression changes in 23 human patients undergoing surgical procedures for the treatment of chronic tendinopathy. Results Diseased tendons exhibit altered extracellular matrix, fiber disorientation, increased cellular content and vasculature, and the absence of inflammatory cells. Global gene expression profiling identified 983 transcripts with significantly different expression patterns in the diseased tendons. Global pathway analysis further suggested altered expression of extracellular matrix proteins and the lack of an appreciable inflammatory response. Conclusions Identification of the pathways and genes that are differentially regulated in tendinopathy samples will contribute to our understanding of the disease and the development of novel therapeutics.

  16. Severe shoulder tendinopathy associated with levofloxacin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eyer-Silva, Walter de Araujo; Netto, Henrique de Barros Pinto; Pinto, Jorge Francisco da Cunha; Ferry, Fernando Raphael de Almeida; Neves-Motta, Rogério

    2012-01-01

    .... The case of a 63-year-old previously asymptomatic female patient who developed severe left shoulder tendinopathy after surreptitiously doubling the prescribed dose of levofloxacin for the treatment...

  17. Non-insertional tendinopathy of the subscapularis

    OpenAIRE

    Dierckman, Brian D.; Shah, Nirav R.; Larose, Connor R.; Stacey Gerbrandt; Getelman, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: (1) Describe a previously unreported finding involving the intra-articular portion of the subscapularis, the Conrad lesion. (2) Describe a novel classification system for the spectrum of non-insertional tendinopathy of the subscapularis. (3) Report the outcomes of surgical treatment of this spectrum of pathology. Materials and Methods: Outcomes of 34 patients (23 males and 11 females, mean age 60.5 ± 7.5) with non-insertional tendinopathy of the subscapularis treated arthroscopic...

  18. Severe shoulder tendinopathy associated with levofloxacin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter de Araujo Eyer-Silva

    Full Text Available Fluoroquinolone (FQ-associated tendinopathy and myopathy are uncommon but well recognized complications of the use of this class of antibacterial agents. The case of a 63-year-old previously asymptomatic female patient who developed severe left shoulder tendinopathy after surreptitiously doubling the prescribed dose of levofloxacin for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia is reported here. Surgical stabilization with suture anchors and subacromial decompression were needed.

  19. Tendinopathy treatment: where is the evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skjong, Christian C; Meininger, Alexander K; Ho, Sherwin S W

    2012-04-01

    Tendinopathy is a common and debilitating condition that results in significant deficits in performance and prolonged time away from activity. For this reason, much effort has been placed in defining beneficial and cost-effective treatments. This review has outlined the current literature on some of the most widely used therapies for cases of tendinopathy. As such, recommendations remain limited by the evidence available. The variability in both quantity and quality of research into tendinopathy treatments makes it difficult to make definitive treatment recommendations. In general, however, a reasonable first line of treatment for tendinopathy should include a course of NSAIDs and eccentric exercise-based physical therapy. Corticosteroid injections seem to offer excellent short-term pain relief but lack long term efficacy. Alternative injections, such as PRP, have shown short-term efficacy for tendinopathy sufferers; data are lacking to support sclerosing agents and proteinase inhibitors. Operative management seems to offer some benefit in symptomatic relief but carries a higher complication rate than other treatment options and should be reserved only for patients recalcitrant to other more conservative options. Although the inability to make definitive therapeutic recommendations in some instances is discouraging, it is important to note that a lack of high-quality evidence supporting specific treatments does not necessarily imply that they are inherently ineffective. Given the growing prevalence of tendinopathy and the impact it has on the general public, it is more important now than ever to continue the search for the most effective and accessible treatment modalities.

  20. New options in the management of tendinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Maffulli

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Nicola Maffulli1, Umile Giuseppe Longo2, Mattia Loppini2, Filippo Spiezia2, Vincenzo Denaro21Centre for Sports and Exercise Medicine, Queen Mary University of London, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Mile End Hospital, London, England; 2Department of Orthopedic and Trauma Surgery, Campus Biomedico University, Rome, ItalyAbstract: Tendon injuries can be acute or chronic, and caused by intrinsic or extrinsic factors, either alone or in combination. Tendinopathies are a common cause of disability in occupational medicine and account for a substantial proportion of overuse injuries in sports. Tendinopathy is essentially a failed healing response, with haphazard proliferation of tenocytes, abnormalities in tenocytes, with disruption of collagen fibres and subsequent increase in noncollagenous matrix. The scientific evidence base for managing tendinopathies is limited. What may appear clinically as an “acute tendinopathy” is actually a well advanced failure of a chronic healing response in which there is neither histologic nor biochemical evidence of inflammation. In this review we report the new options for the management of tendinopathy, including eccentric exercises, extracorporeal shockwave therapy, injections (intratendinous injections of corticosteroids, aprotinin, polidocanol platelet-rich plasma, autologous blood injection, high-volume injections and surgery. Open surgery aims to excise fibrotic adhesions, remove areas of failed healing and make multiple longitudinal incisions in the tendon to detect intratendinous lesions, and to restore vascularity and possibly stimulate the remaining viable cells to initiate cell matrix response and healing. New surgical techniques aim to disrupt the abnormal neoinnervation to interfere with the pain sensation caused by tendinopathy. These procedures are intrinsically different from the classical ones in present use, because they do not attempt to address directly the pathologic

  1. Animal models for the study of tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warden, S J

    2007-04-01

    Tendinopathy is a common and significant clinical problem characterised by activity-related pain, focal tendon tenderness and intratendinous imaging changes. Recent histopathological studies have indicated the underlying pathology to be one of tendinosis (degeneration) as opposed to tendinitis (inflammation). Relatively little is known about tendinosis and its pathogenesis. Contributing to this is an absence of validated animal models of the pathology. Animal models of tendinosis represent potential efficient and effective means of furthering our understanding of human tendinopathy and its underlying pathology. By selecting an appropriate species and introducing known risk factors for tendinopathy in humans, it is possible to develop tendon changes in animal models that are consistent with the human condition. This paper overviews the role of animal models in tendinopathy research by discussing the benefits and development of animal models of tendinosis, highlighting potential outcome measures that may be used in animal tendon research, and reviewing current animal models of tendinosis. It is hoped that with further development of animal models of tendinosis, new strategies for the prevention and treatment of tendinopathy in humans will be generated.

  2. IL-21 Receptor Expression in Human Tendinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail L. Campbell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenetic mechanisms underlying tendinopathy remain unclear, with much debate as to whether inflammation or degradation has the prominent role. Increasing evidence points toward an early inflammatory infiltrate and associated inflammatory cytokine production in human and animal models of tendon disease. The IL-21/IL-21R axis is a proinflammatory cytokine complex that has been associated with chronic inflammatory diseases including rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. This project aimed to investigate the role and expression of the cytokine/receptor pair IL-21/IL-21R in human tendinopathy. We found significantly elevated expression of IL-21 receptor message and protein in human tendon samples but found no convincing evidence of the presence of IL-21 at message or protein level. The level of expression of IL-21R message/protein in human tenocytes was significantly upregulated by proinflammatory cytokines (TNFα/IL-1β in vitro. These findings demonstrate that IL-21R is present in early human tendinopathy mainly expressed by tenocytes and macrophages. Despite a lack of IL-21 expression, these data again suggest that early tendinopathy has an inflammatory/cytokine phenotype, which may provide novel translational targets in the treatment of tendinopathy.

  3. Histopathological changes in tendinopathy--potential roles of BMPs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Pauline Po Yee

    2013-12-01

    The pathogenesis of tendinopathy remains unclear. Chondro-osteogenic BMPs such as BMP-2, BMP-4 and BMP-7 have been reported in clinical samples and animal models of tendinopathy. As chondrocyte-like cells and ossified deposits have been observed in both clinical samples and animal models of failed tendon healing tendinopathy, chondro-osteogenic BMPs might contribute to tissue metaplasia and other histopathological changes in tendinopathy. In this review I have summarized the current evidence supporting the roles of chondro-osteogenic BMPs in the histopathological changes of tendinopathy. The potential targets, effects and sources of these BMPs are discussed. I have also provided directions for future studies about the potential roles of BMPs in the pathogenesis of tendinopathy. Better understanding of the roles of these BMPs in the histopathological changes of tendinopathy could provide new options for the prevention and treatment of this disabling tendon disorder.

  4. Chiropractic management of tendinopathy: a literature synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefer, Mark T; Cooper, Stephan R; Uhl, Nathan L

    2009-01-01

    Chronic tendon pathology is a soft tissue condition commonly seen in chiropractic practice. Tendonitis, tendinosis, and tendinopathy are terms used to describe this clinical entity. The purpose of this article is to review interventions commonly used by doctors of chiropractic when treating tendinopathy. The Scientific Commission of the Council on Chiropractic Guidelines and Practice Parameters (CCGPP) was charged with developing literature syntheses, organized by anatomical region, to evaluate and report on the evidence base for chiropractic care. This article is the outcome of this charge. As part of the CCGPP process, preliminary drafts of these articles were posted on the CCGPP Web site www.ccgpp.org (2006-8) to allow for an open process and the broadest possible mechanism for stakeholder input. A literature search was performed using the PubMed; Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature; Index to Chiropractic Literature; Manual, Alternative, and Natural Therapy Index System; National Guidelines Clearinghouse; Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects; and Turning Research Into Practice databases. The inclusion criteria were manual therapies, spinal manipulation, mobilization, tendonitis, tendinopathy, tendinosis, cryotherapy, bracing, orthotics, massage, friction massage, transverse friction massage, electrical stimulation, acupuncture, exercise, eccentric exercise, laser, and therapeutic ultrasound. There is evidence that ultrasound therapy provides clinically important improvement in the treatment of calcific tendonitis. There is limited evidence of the benefit of manipulation and mobilization in the treatment of tendinopathy. Limited evidence exists to support the use of supervised exercise, eccentric exercise, friction massage, acupuncture, laser therapy, use of bracing, orthotics, and cryotherapy in the treatment of tendinopathy. Chiropractors often provide a number of conservative interventions commonly used to treat tendinopathy.

  5. Achilles and Patellar Tendinopathy Loading Programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malliaras, Peter; Barton, Christian J; Reeves, Neil D

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Achilles and patellar tendinopathy are overuse injuries that are common among athletes. Isolated eccentric muscle training has become the dominant conservative management strategy for Achilles and patellar tendinopathy but, in some cases, up to 45 % of patients may not respond...... mechanism that was consistently associated with improved clinical outcomes in both Achilles and patellar tendon rehabilitation was improved neuromuscular performance (e.g. torque, work, endurance), and Silbernagel-combined (Achilles) HSR loading (patellar) had an equivalent or higher level of evidence than...

  6. Patellar tendinopathy : physical therapy and injection treatments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ark, Mathijs

    2015-01-01

    Patellar tendinopathy, commonly known as jumper’s knee, is an overuse injury of the patellar tendon. It is a frequent injury, particularly in jumping athletes such as volleyball and basketball players. Jumper’s knee is often a long-lasting injury and can have a major impact on sports and even work

  7. ESWT for tendinopathy : technology and clinical implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Worp, Henk; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; van Schie, Hans; Zwerver, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    The general consensus that tendinopathy, at least in the chronic stage, is mainly a degenerative condition and inflammation plays a minor role has led to a shift from treatments that target inflammation towards treatment options that promote regeneration. One of these treatments is extracorporeal

  8. Investigating Achilles and patellar tendinopathy prevalence in elite athletics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Ina; van der Worp, Henk; Hensing, Sjoerd; Zwerver, Johannes

    2018-01-01

    Although injury surveillance in athletics is routinely conducted, discipline-specific Achilles and patellar tendinopathy prevalence remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to explore discipline-specific tendinopathy prevalence and identify whether injury-specific risk factors differed in athletes. Elite athletes were recruited and provided information on their sport training including Achilles and patellar tendon pain history. In order to ascertain whether between-discipline differences existed, data were categorized into discipline groups. Middle-distance athletes reported the highest prevalence of Achilles tendinopathy and the combined athletes reported the highest patellar tendinopathy prevalence. Greater calf stiffness was reported in athletes who experienced Achilles tendinopathy compared to those who did not. A substantial portion of athletes believed their performance decreased as a result of their tendon pain. In order to develop discipline-specific evidence-based injury prevention programmes, further discipline-specific research is required to quantify the mechanism for Achilles and patellar tendinopathy development in elite athletics.

  9. Tendinopathy: a review of the pathophysiology and evidence for treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldin, Michael; Malanga, Gerard A

    2013-09-01

    The understanding of tendinopathy has evolved over the past several decades. Initially thought to be a primarily inflammatory process, histologic evaluation has revealed that there is an absence of inflammatory cells, and rather, tendinopathy is more of a degenerative process. Various types of medications, rehabilitation, modalities, injections, and minimally invasive procedures have been described as treatment for this condition. The purpose of our article is to describe the pathophysiology of tendinopathy as currently understood and the evidence for the various available treatments. We performed a literature search to determine the types of reviews that have been performed previously regarding treatment for tendinopathy, and summarized these reviews. We then performed a systematic review of randomized controlled trials for treating patients with tendinopathy. It is our hope that our review of trial data will help providers to determine optimal management for their patients with tendinopathy.

  10. Lateral elbow tendinopathy: Evidence of physiotherapy management

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitrios, Stasinopoulos

    2016-01-01

    Lateral elbow tendinopathy (LET) is a common musculoskeletal/sports injury. A plethora of physiotherapy techniques has been proposed in the management of LET. The exercise programme is the most common treatment in the management of LET. The optimal protocol of exercise programme is still unknown. The effectiveness of the exercise programme is low when it is applied as monotherapy. Therefore, exercise programme is combined with other physiotherapy modalities such as soft tissue techniques, ext...

  11. New options in the management of tendinopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Maffulli, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    Nicola Maffulli1, Umile Giuseppe Longo2, Mattia Loppini2, Filippo Spiezia2, Vincenzo Denaro21Centre for Sports and Exercise Medicine, Queen Mary University of London, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Mile End Hospital, London, England; 2Department of Orthopedic and Trauma Surgery, Campus Biomedico University, Rome, ItalyAbstract: Tendon injuries can be acute or chronic, and caused by intrinsic or extrinsic factors, either alone or in combination. Tendinopathies are a com...

  12. Local biochemical and morphological differences in human Achilles tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pingel, Jessica; Fredberg, U.; Qvortrup, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of Achilles tendinopathy is high and underlying etiology as well as biochemical and morphological pathology associated with the disease is largely unknown. The aim of the present study was to describe biochemical and morphological differences in chronic Achilles tendinopathy. The ex...

  13. Tendinopathy in diabetes mellitus patients-Epidemiology, pathogenesis, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, P P Y

    2017-08-01

    Chronic tendinopathy is a frequent and disabling musculo-skeletal problem affecting the athletic and general populations. The affected tendon is presented with local tenderness, swelling, and pain which restrict the activity of the individual. Tendon degeneration reduces the mechanical strength and predisposes it to rupture. The pathogenic mechanisms of chronic tendinopathy are not fully understood and several major non-mutually exclusive hypotheses including activation of the hypoxia-apoptosis-pro-inflammatory cytokines cascade, neurovascular ingrowth, increased production of neuromediators, and erroneous stem cell differentiation have been proposed. Many intrinsic and extrinsic risk/causative factors can predispose to the development of tendinopathy. Among them, diabetes mellitus is an important risk/causative factor. This review aims to appraise the current literature on the epidemiology and pathology of tendinopathy in diabetic patients. Systematic reviews were done to summarize the literature on (a) the association between diabetes mellitus and tendinopathy/tendon tears, (b) the pathological changes in tendon under diabetic or hyperglycemic conditions, and (c) the effects of diabetes mellitus or hyperglycemia on the outcomes of tendon healing. The potential mechanisms of diabetes mellitus in causing and exacerbating tendinopathy with reference to the major non-mutually exclusive hypotheses of the pathogenic mechanisms of chronic tendinopathy as reported in the literature are also discussed. Potential strategies for the management of tendinopathy in diabetic patients are presented. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Autologous growth factor injections in chronic tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrey, Michelle A

    2014-01-01

    de Vos RJ, van Veldhoven PLJ, Moen MH, Weir A, Tol JL. Autologous growth factor injections in chronic tendinopathy: a systematic review. Br Med Bull. 2010;95:63-77. The authors of this systematic review evaluated the literature to critically consider the effects of growth factors delivered through autologous whole-blood and platelet-rich-plasma (PRP) injections in managing wrist-flexor and -extensor tendinopathies, plantar fasciopathy, and patellar tendinopathy. The primary question was, according to the published literature, is there sufficient evidence to support the use of growth factors delivered through autologous whole-blood and PRP injections for chronic tendinopathy? The authors performed a comprehensive, systematic literature search in October 2009 using PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane library without time limits. The following key words were used in different combinations: tendinopathy, tendinosis, tendinitis, tendons, tennis elbow, plantar fasciitis, platelet rich plasma, platelet transfusion, and autologous blood or injection. The search was limited to human studies in English. All bibliographies from the initial literature search were also viewed to identify additional relevant studies. Studies were eligible based on the following criteria: (1) Articles were suitable (inclusion criteria) if the participants had been clinically diagnosed as having chronic tendinopathy; (2) the design had to be a prospective clinical study, randomized controlled trial, nonrandomized clinical trial, or prospective case series; (3) a well-described intervention in the form of a growth factor injection with either PRP or autologous whole blood was used; and (4) the outcome was reported in terms of pain or function (or both). All titles and abstracts were assessed by 2 researchers, and all relevant articles were obtained. Two researchers independently read the full text of each article to determine if it met the inclusion criteria. If opinions differed on

  15. Lateral elbow tendinopathy: Evidence of physiotherapy management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrios, Stasinopoulos

    2016-08-18

    Lateral elbow tendinopathy (LET) is a common musculoskeletal/sports injury. A plethora of physiotherapy techniques has been proposed in the management of LET. The exercise programme is the most common treatment in the management of LET. The optimal protocol of exercise programme is still unknown. The effectiveness of the exercise programme is low when it is applied as monotherapy. Therefore, exercise programme is combined with other physiotherapy modalities such as soft tissue techniques, external support, acupuncture, manual therapy and electrotherapy, in the treatment of LET. Future research is needed to determine which treatment strategy combined with exercise programme will provide the best results in LET rehabilitation.

  16. Non-insertional tendinopathy of the subscapularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierckman, Brian D; Shah, Nirav R; Larose, Connor R; Gerbrandt, Stacey; Getelman, Mark H

    2013-07-01

    (1) Describe a previously unreported finding involving the intra-articular portion of the subscapularis, the Conrad lesion. (2) Describe a novel classification system for the spectrum of non-insertional tendinopathy of the subscapularis. (3) Report the outcomes of surgical treatment of this spectrum of pathology. Outcomes of 34 patients (23 males and 11 females, mean age 60.5 ± 7.5) with non-insertional tendinopathy of the subscapularis treated arthroscopically were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had anterior shoulder pain with no weakness during belly-press testing and no subscapularis footprint involvement on magnetic resonance imaging. All patients were managed with subscapularis tendon debridement and side-to-side repair along with treatment of concomitant pathology. Seven patients had a Type I lesion (so-called Conrad lesion) - a nodule on the leading edge of the subscapularis. Eighteen patients had a Type II lesion - a visible split tear with degeneration in the upper ½ of the intra-articular tendon. Nine patients had a Type III lesion - more extensive splitting in the tendon with advanced tendon degeneration. At a mean follow-up of 24 months, 97% of patients were completely satisfied. Significant improvements were seen in forward elevation (152 ± 12° to 172 ± 5°, P < 0.001) and visual analog scale pain scores (5.9 ± 1.7-0.6 ± 1.0, P < 0.001). Internal rotation strength and external rotation motion at the side were maintained. ASES scores averaged 95.4 ± 7.4, disabilities of arm, shoulder and hand scores averaged 6.19 ± 9.8, Western Ontario Rotator Cuff scores averaged 91.7 ± 9.3 and the average University of California at Los Angeles score was 33.1 ± 2.4. We present a previously unreported finding of the subscapularis, the Conrad lesion, along with a novel classification system for non-insertional tendinopathy of the subscapularis. Arthroscopic treatment of this spectrum of tendinopathy along with concomitant shoulder pathology eliminated

  17. Noninsertional Achilles Tendinopathy Pathologic Background and Clinical Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feilmeier, Mindi

    2017-04-01

    The term tendinopathy includes a series of pathologies, all of which have a combination of pain, swelling, and impaired performance. The terms tendinosis, tendinitis and peritendinitis are all within the main heading of tendinopathy; this terminology provides a more accurate understanding of the condition and highlights the uniformity of clinical findings while distinguishing the individual histopathological findings of each condition. Understanding the clinical features and the underlying histopathology leads to a more accurate clinical diagnosis and subsequent treatment selection. Misuse of the term tendinitis can lead to the underestimation of chronic degenerative nature of many tendinopathies, affecting the treatment selection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Hormones and tendinopathies: the current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Francesco; Piccirilli, Eleonora; Berardi, Anna C; Frizziero, Antonio; Tarantino, Umberto; Maffulli, Nicola

    2016-03-01

    Tendinopathies negatively affect the quality of life of millions of people, but we still do not know the factors involved in the development of tendon conditions. Published articles in English in PubMed and Google Scholar up to June 2015 about hormonal influence on tendinopathies onset. One hundred and two papers were included following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. In vitro and in vivo, tenocytes showed changes in their morphology and in their functional properties according to hormonal imbalances. Genetic pattern, sex, age and comorbidities can influence the hormonal effect on tendons. The increasing prevalence of metabolic disorders prompts to investigate the possible connection between metabolic problems and musculoskeletal diseases. The influence of hormones on tendon structure and metabolism needs to be further investigated. If found to be significant, multidisciplinary preventive and therapeutic strategies should then be developed. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Chronic Achilles Tendinopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shalabi, A. [Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden). Center for Surgical Sciences Divisions of Radiology and Orthopedics

    2004-09-01

    The main objective of this thesis was to evaluate and monitor the morphological response following treatment interventions in patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy by using different MRI techniques. For this purpose, we investigated different types of sequences, including gadolinium contrast medium-enhanced T1-WI images (CME T1-WI), and developed a precise method to measure tendon volume and mean intratendinous signal of the Achilles tendon. Study I aimed at evaluating 15 patients with chronic, painful Achilles tendinosis, before and 2 years after surgical treatment. There was marked regression of the intratendinous signal postoperatively. The most sensitive sequence for depicting an intratendinous lesion in this study was CME T1-WI images. They showed a regression of the intratendinous signal abnormality from 13/15 patients preoperatively to 4/15 postoperatively. The clinical outcome was excellent in eight, good in five, fair in one and poor in one patient. In study II, the early contrast agent enhancement in the dynamically enhanced MRI signal (DEMRI) was correlated with the histopathologic findings in 15 patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy. Early contrast enhancement (within the first 72 s) was seen in DEMRI in the symptomatic Achilles tendons, with a significant difference compared to the asymptomatic contralateral tendons. Increased severity of tendon changes, including fiber structure abnormality, increased vascularity, rounding of nuclei, and increased amount of glycosaminoglycans, correlated to CME. In study III, we developed a computerized 3-D seed-growing MRI technique to measure tendon volume and mean intratendinous signal. This technique showed an excellent inter- and intra-observer reliability. The technique was also used to follow up prospectively the tendon adaptation and healing described in studies IV-VI. In study IV, using serial MRI during a period of 1 year, we evaluated the biological effect of tendon repair following iatrogenic

  20. Achilles tendinopathy in amateur runners: role of adiposity (Tendinopathies and obesity).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, Michele; Oliva, Francesco; Schiavone, Cosima; Salini, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is an important risk factor for Achilles tendinopathy, and running is usually carried out to reduce excess body weight. Aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of Achilles tendinopathy in young over-weight amateur runners. MALE RUNNERS AND NON RUNNERS WERE RECRUITED AND, IN EACH CATEGORY, DIVIDED IN TWO GROUPS: normal weight, and overweight. Data about Achilles tendon thickness, vascularisation and structural abnormalities were collected using a Power Doppler Ultrasonography device. Achilles tendon thickness was greater in both normal weight or overweight runners, but the difference was significant only in normal weight subjects. In non - runners, thickness was significantly higher only in over-weight subjects. Sonographic abnormalities were significantly prevalent in overweight runners. Running is associated to a physiologic hypertrophy of Achilles tendon in normal weight subjects. Overweight runners may precociously develop tendon abnormalities, due to the increased stress and the unfavourable milieu of repair.

  1. The effectiveness of manual therapy in supraspinatus tendinopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Senbursa, Gamze; Baltaci, Gul; Atay, O.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this randomized controlled study was to assess the efficacy of manual therapy in the treatment of patients with symptomatic supraspinatus tendinopathy. Methods: Seventy-seven patients (age range, 30 to 55 years) with supraspinatus tendinopathy, were randomly assigned to one of the three treatment groups: a supervised exercise program (Group 1), a supervised exercise program combined with joint and soft tissue mobilization (Group 2), or a home-based rehabilitation pro...

  2. Is proprioception diminished in patients with patellar tendinopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot, H E; van der Worp, H; Nijenbanning, L; Diercks, R L; Zwerver, J; van den Akker-Scheek, I

    2016-03-01

    Patellar tendinopathy is a highly prevalent overuse injury, and most treatments are only effective to some extent. This persistence of complaints could be linked to changed proprioception. One study showed diminished proprioception in athletes with lateral epicondylitis. Aim of this study was to determine differences in proprioception, by measuring threshold to detect passive motion (TTDPM) between recreational athletes diagnosed with patellar tendinopathy and healthy controls. The TTDPM as measure of proprioception was determined in 22 recreational athletes with patellar tendinopathy and 22 healthy recreational athletes using a validated instrument. Amount of knee flexion and extension before the movement was noticed by the subject was determined. 80 measurements per athlete (left and right leg, towards extension and flexion and with two starting angles of 20° and 40° flexion) were performed. Mean TTDPM was compared between groups and among the injured recreational athletes between the affected and unaffected knee. No significant difference in TTDPM was found between recreational athletes with patellar tendinopathy and healthy controls. We did find a significant difference between the injured and non-injured knee in recreational athletes with patellar tendinopathy; mean TTDPM was 0.02° higher in the injured knee (p=0.044). No difference was found in proprioception between recreational athletes with patellar tendinopathy and healthy recreational athletes. It is unclear whether such a small difference in TTDPM between affected and unaffected knee is important in clinical setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Rehabilitation and Prevention of Proximal Hamstring Tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Nicholas R; Félix, Ioonna; Hettler, Jessica; Moley, Peter J; Wyss, James F

    Proximal hamstring tendinopathy (PHT) comprises a small but significant portion of hamstring injuries in athletes, especially runners. PHT is a chronic condition that is clinically diagnosed but can be supported with imaging. The main presenting complaint is pain in the lower gluteal or ischial region that may or may not radiate along the hamstrings in the posterior thigh. There is little scientific evidence on which to base the rehabilitation management of PHT. Treatment is almost always conservative, with a focus on activity modification, addressing contributing biomechanical deficiencies, effective tendon loading including eccentric training, and ultrasound-guided interventional procedures which may facilitate rehabilitation. Surgery is limited to recalcitrant cases or those involving concomitant high-grade musculotendinous pathology. The keys to PHT management include early and accurate diagnosis, optimal rehabilitation to allow for a safe return to preinjury activity level, and preventative strategies to reduce risk of reinjury.

  4. Patellar tendinopathy - recent developments toward treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Robert A; Rossy, William H; Sherman, Orrin H

    2014-01-01

    Patellar tendinopathy (PT) is a clinical and chronic overuse condition of unknown pathogenesis and etiology marked by anterior knee pain typically manifested at the inferior pole of the patella. PT has been referred to as "jumper's knee" since it is particularly common among populations of jumping athletes, such as basketball and volleyball players. Due to its common refractory response to conservative treatment, a variety of new treatments have emerged recently that include dry-needling, sclerosing injections, platelet-rich plasma therapy, arthroscopic surgical procedures, surgical resection of the inferior patellar pole, extracorporeal shock wave treatment, and hyperthermia thermotherapy. Since PT has an unknown pathogenesis and etiology, PT treatment is more a result of physician experience than evidence-based science. This review will summarize the current literature on this topic, identify current research efforts aimed to understand the pathological changes in abnormal tendons, provide exposure to the emerging treatment techniques, and provide suggested direction for future research.

  5. Fibril morphology and tendon mechanical properties in patellar tendinopathy: effects of heavy slow resistance training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsgaard, Mads; Qvortrup, Klaus; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patellar tendinopathy is characterized by pathologic abnormalities. Heavy slow resistance training (HSR) is effective in the management of patellar tendinopathy, but the underlying functional mechanisms remain elusive. PURPOSE: To investigate fibril morphology and mechanical propertie...

  6. Evidence of Nervous System Sensitization in Commonly Presenting and Persistent Painful Tendinopathies : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plinsinga, Melanie L.; Brink, Michel S.; Vicenzino, Bill; Van Wilgen, C. Paul

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Systematic review. OBJECTIVES: To elucidate if there is sensitization of the nervous system in those with persistent rotator cuff (shoulder), lateral elbow, patellar, and Achilles tendinopathies. BACKGROUND: Tendinopathy can be difficult to treat, and persistent intractable pain and

  7. A pilot study on biomarkers for tendinopathy: lower levels of serum TNF-α and other cytokines in females but not males with Achilles tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaida, James E; Alfredson, Håkan; Forsgren, Sture; Cook, Jill L

    2016-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is a painful musculoskeletal condition that is common among athletes, and which limits training capacity and competitive performance. The lack of biomarkers for tendinopathy limits research into risk factors and also the evaluation of new treatments. Cytokines and growth factors involved in regulating the response of tendon cells to mechanical load have potential as biomarkers for tendinopathy. This case-control study compared serum concentration of cytokines and growth factors (TNF-α, IL-1β, bFGF, PDFG-BB, IFN-γ, VEGF) between individuals with chronic Achilles tendinopathy and controls. These were measured in fasting serum from 22 individuals with chronic Achilles tendinopathy and 10 healthy controls. Results were analysed in relation to gender and physical activity pattern. TNF-α concentration was lower in the entire tendinopathy group compared with the entire control group; none of the other cytokines were significantly different. TNF-α levels were nevertheless highly correlated with the other cytokines measured, in most of the subgroups. Analysed by gender, TNF-α and PDGF-BB concentrations were lower in the female tendinopathy group but not the male tendinopathy group. A trend was seen for lower IL-1β in the female tendinopathy group. Physical activity was correlated with TNF-α, PDGF-BB and IL-1β to varying extents for control subgroups, but not for the female tendinopathy group. No correlations were seen with BMI or duration of symptoms. This pilot study indicates a lower level of TNF-α and PDGF-BB, and to some extent IL-1β among females, but not males, in the chronic phase of Achilles tendinopathy. It is suggested that future studies on tendinopathy biomarkers analyse male and female data separately. The lack of correlation between cytokine level and physical activity in the female tendinopathy group warrants further study.

  8. Treatment of supraspinatus tendinopathy with ultrasound guided dry needling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settergren, Roy

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this case study is to describe the treatment of a patient with tendinopathy using sonographically guided dry needling. Tendinopathies are a highly prevalent problem in musculoskeletal medicine, and no one form of treatment has gained universal acceptance as being superior to another. A 30-year-old woman with a 4-month history of anterolateral right shoulder pain was diagnosed with supraspinatus tendinopathy upon physical examination, which was confirmed with diagnostic sonography. Sonography was used to guide an acupuncture needle into the pathologic tissue to induce a humoral healing response. Therapeutic exercise was also prescribed. At 10-day follow-up, increased echogenicity was found in the previously heterogenous hypoechoic areas. The patient also experienced a subjective resolution of her shoulder pain, which did not return with increased physical activity. Sonographically guided dry needling was shown to be beneficial for this patient as evident by sonographic changes pre- and postprocedure.

  9. Acetabular anteversion is associated with gluteal tendinopathy at MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulton, Kyle M; Aly, Abdel-Rahman; Rajasekaran, Sathish; Shepel, Michael; Obaid, Haron

    2015-01-01

    Gluteal tendinopathy and greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS) remain incompletely understood despite their pervasiveness in clinical practice. To date, no study has analyzed the morphometric characteristics of the hip on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that may predispose to gluteal tendinopathy. This study aimed to evaluate whether acetabular anteversion (AA), femoral neck anteversion (FNA), and femoral neck-shaft angle (FNSA) are associated with MRI features of gluteal tendinopathy. A total of 203 MRI examinations of the hip met our inclusion and exclusion criteria. A single blinded investigator measured AA, FNA, and FNSA according to validated MRI techniques. Two blinded subspecialty-trained musculoskeletal radiologists then independently evaluated the presence of gluteal tendinosis, trochanteric bursitis, and subgluteal bursitis. Statistical analysis was performed using a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA; post-hoc Tukey's range test). At MRI, 57 patients had gluteal tendinosis with or without bursitis, 26 had isolated trochanteric bursitis, and 11 had isolated subgluteal bursitis. AA was significantly (p = 0.01) increased in patients with MRI evidence of gluteal tendinosis with or without bursitis [mean: 18.4°, 95 % confidence interval (CI): 17.2°-19.6°] compared with normal controls (mean: 15.7°, 95 % CI: 14.7°-16.8°). Similarly, AA was significantly (p = 0.04) increased in patients with isolated trochanteric bursitis (mean: 18.8°, 95 % CI: 16.2°-21.6°). No association was found between FNA or FNSA and the presence of gluteal tendinopathy. Interobserver agreement for the presence and categorization of gluteal tendinopathy was very good (kappa = 0.859, 95 % CI: 0.815-0.903). Our MRI study suggests that there is an association between increased AA and gluteal tendinopathy, which supports a growing body of evidence implicating abnormal biomechanics in the development of this condition.

  10. The Dose That Works: Low Level Laser Treatment of Tendinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumilty, Steve; Munn, Joanne; McDonough, Suzanne; Hurley, Deirdre A.; Basford, Jeffrey R.; David Baxter, G.

    2010-05-01

    Background: Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) is used in the treatment of tendon injuries. However, the clinical effectiveness of this modality remains controversial with limited agreement on the most efficacious dosage and parameter choices. Purpose: To assess the clinical effectiveness of LLLT in the treatment of tendinopathy and the validity of current dosage recommendations for treatment. Method: Medical databases were searched from inception to 1st August 2008. Controlled clinical trials evaluating LLLT as a primary intervention for any tendinopathy were included in the review. Methodological quality was classified using the PEDro scale. Appropriateness of treatment parameters were assessed using established guidelines. Results: Twenty five trials met the inclusion criteria. There was conflicting findings from multiple trials: 12 showed positive effects and 13 were inconclusive or showed no effect. Dosages used in the 12 positive studies support the existence of an effective dosage window that closely resembled current guidelines. Where pooling of data was possible, LLLT showed a positive effect size; in high quality studies of lateral epicondylitis, participants' grip strength was 9.59 Kg higher than the control group; for participants with Achilles tendinopathy, the effect was 13.6 mm less pain on a 100 mm visual analogue scale. Conclusion: This study found conflicting evidence as to the effectiveness of LLLT in the treatment of tendinopathy. However, an effective dosage window emerged showing benefit in the treatment of tendinopathy. Strong evidence exists from the 12 positive studies that positive outcomes are associated with the use of current dosage recommendations for the treatment of tendinopathy.

  11. Acetabular anteversion is associated with gluteal tendinopathy at MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moulton, Kyle M. [University of Saskatchewan, Department of Medical Imaging, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Royal University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Aly, Abdel-Rahman [University of Saskatchewan, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Rajasekaran, Sathish [Health Pointe - Pain, Spine and Sport Medicine, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Shepel, Michael; Obaid, Haron [University of Saskatchewan, Department of Medical Imaging, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2015-01-15

    Gluteal tendinopathy and greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS) remain incompletely understood despite their pervasiveness in clinical practice. To date, no study has analyzed the morphometric characteristics of the hip on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that may predispose to gluteal tendinopathy. This study aimed to evaluate whether acetabular anteversion (AA), femoral neck anteversion (FNA), and femoral neck-shaft angle (FNSA) are associated with MRI features of gluteal tendinopathy. A total of 203 MRI examinations of the hip met our inclusion and exclusion criteria. A single blinded investigator measured AA, FNA, and FNSA according to validated MRI techniques. Two blinded subspecialty-trained musculoskeletal radiologists then independently evaluated the presence of gluteal tendinosis, trochanteric bursitis, and subgluteal bursitis. Statistical analysis was performed using a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA; post-hoc Tukey's range test). At MRI, 57 patients had gluteal tendinosis with or without bursitis, 26 had isolated trochanteric bursitis, and 11 had isolated subgluteal bursitis. AA was significantly (p = 0.01) increased in patients with MRI evidence of gluteal tendinosis with or without bursitis [mean: 18.4 , 95 % confidence interval (CI): 17.2 -19.6 ] compared with normal controls (mean: 15.7 , 95 % CI: 14.7 -16.8 ). Similarly, AA was significantly (p = 0.04) increased in patients with isolated trochanteric bursitis (mean: 18.8 , 95 % CI: 16.2 -21.6 ). No association was found between FNA or FNSA and the presence of gluteal tendinopathy. Interobserver agreement for the presence and categorization of gluteal tendinopathy was very good (kappa = 0.859, 95 % CI: 0.815-0.903). Our MRI study suggests that there is an association between increased AA and gluteal tendinopathy, which supports a growing body of evidence implicating abnormal biomechanics in the development of this condition. (orig.)

  12. Is proprioception diminished in patients with patellar tendinopathy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, H.E.; van der Worp, H.; Nijenbanning, L.; Diercks, R.L.; Zwerver, J.; van den Akker-Scheek, I.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Patellar tendinopathy is a highly prevalent overuse injury, and most treatments are only effective to some extent. This persistence of complaints could be linked to changed proprioception. One study showed diminished proprioception in athletes with lateral epicondylitis. Aim of this study

  13. Tendon needling for treatment of tendinopathy: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krey, David; Borchers, James; McCamey, Kendra

    2015-02-01

    To summarize the best available evidence to determine if tendon needling is an effective treatment for tendinopathy. Data source. Medline and Cochrane Databases through November 2013. Utilizing the search terms tendinopathy, needle, needling, tenotomy, dry needling, needling tendon, needle fenestration, and tendon fenestration, 17 articles were identified through our systematic literature search. Of these, 4 studies met the inclusion criteria. Four independent reviewers reviewed the articles. The study results and generated conclusions were agreed upon. The studies that were included in this review suggest that tendon needling improves patient reported outcomes in patients with tendinopathy. In 2 studies evaluating tendon needling in lateral epicondylosis, one showed an improvement in a subjective visual analogue scale score of 34% (significant change > 25%) from baseline at 6 months. The other showed an improvement of 56.1% in a visual analogue scale score from baseline. In 1 study evaluating tendon needling in addition to eccentric therapy for Achilles tendinosis, the subjective Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Achilles (VISA-A) score improved by 19.9 (significant change > 10) (95% CI, 13.6-26.2) from baseline. In 1 study evaluating tendon needling in rotator cuff tendinosis, the subjective shoulder pain and disability index showed statistical significant improvement from baseline at 6 months (P < 0.05). The evidence suggests that tendon needling improves patient-reported outcome measures in patients with tendinopathy. There is a trend that shows that the addition of autologous blood products may further improve theses outcomes.

  14. Patellar tendinopathy : Causes, consequences and the use of orthoses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Astrid Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Patellar tendinopathy (PT), also known as jumper’s knee, is a painful overuse injury of the patellar tendon. This injury is common in jumping athletes. There are numerous treatment options currently available for PT, yet none of them guarantee full recovery. As a result, many athletes have

  15. Epidemiology of Patellar Tendinopathy in Elite Male Soccer Players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hägglund, Martin; Zwerver, Johannes; Ekstrand, Jan

    Background: Patellar tendinopathy is common among athletes in jumping sports and in sports with prolonged repetitive stress of the knee extensor apparatus. The epidemiology in soccer is not well described. Purpose: This study was undertaken to investigate and describe the epidemiology of patellar

  16. Relationship between landing strategy and patellar tendinopathy in volleyball

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisseling, Rob W.; Hof, At L.; Bredeweg, Steef W.; Zwerver, Johannes; Mulder, Theo

    Objective: The aetiology of patellar tendinopathy ( jumper's knee) remains unclear. To see whether landing strategy might be a risk factor for the development of this injury, this study examined whether landing dynamics from drop jumps differed among healthy volleyball players ( CON) and volleyball

  17. Imaging and Treatment of Chronic Midportion Achilles Tendinopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J. de Vos (Robert-Jan)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: It is estimated that 30-50% of sports injuries are caused by tendon disorders. Chronic midportion Achilles tendinopathy is a frequent problem, particularly occurring in athletes but also affecting inactive people. Diagnosis is made based on clinical findings and currently

  18. Central pain processing is altered in people with Achilles tendinopathy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tompra, N.; van Dieen, J.H.; Coppieters, M.W.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tendinopathy is often a chronic condition. The mechanisms behind persistent tendon pain are not yet fully understood. It is unknown whether, similar to other persistent pain states, central pain mechanisms contribute to ongoing tendon pain. Aim: We investigated the presence of altered

  19. Eccentric versus conventional exercise therapy in patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy: a randomized, single blinded, clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dejaco, B.; Habets, B.; Loon, C.J.M. van; Grinsven, S. van; Cingel, R.E. van

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effectiveness of isolated eccentric versus conventional exercise therapy in patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy. METHODS: Thirty-six patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy, diagnosed by an orthopaedic surgeon, were included and randomly allocated to an isolated

  20. Dry needling as a method of tendinopathy treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagraba, Łukasz; Tuchalska, Julia; Mitek, Tomasz; Stolarczyk, Artur; Deszczyński, Jarosław

    2013-01-01

    Tendinopathy is a broad concept that describes any painful condition that occurs in or around a tendon.The ideal treatment for tendinopathy is still nebulous. Dry needling is a treatment method in which a special needle is placed into the focus of tendinosis. The aim of this procedure is to form fenestrations which may initiateadvantageous bleeding and thus bring about the influx of growth factors (activating healing and regeneration). Relevant clinical studies have often combineddry needling with autologous blood injection therapy. Results from these studies are encouraging. This review of English-language literature aims to present this noteworthy method of tendino- and enthesopathytreatmentm by describing the results of several trials, hypotheses explaining the underlying mechanism and the application of dry needling in other fields of medicine.

  1. Heat Shock Proteins in Tendinopathy: Novel Molecular Regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neal L. Millar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tendon disorders—tendinopathies—are the primary reason for musculoskeletal consultation in primary care and account for up to 30% of rheumatological consultations. Whilst the molecular pathophysiology of tendinopathy remains difficult to interpret the disease process involving repetitive stress, and cellular load provides important mechanistic insight into the area of heat shock proteins which spans many disease processes in the autoimmune community. Heat shock proteins, also called damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs, are rapidly released following nonprogrammed cell death, are key effectors of the innate immune system, and critically restore homeostasis by promoting the reconstruction of the effected tissue. Our investigations have highlighted a key role for HSPs in tendion disease which may ultimately affect tissue rescue mechanisms in tendon pathology. This paper aims to provide an overview of the biology of heat shock proteins in soft tissue and how these mediators may be important regulators of inflammatory mediators and matrix regulation in tendinopathy.

  2. Clinical Applications of Platelet-Rich Plasma in Patellar Tendinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. U. Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet-rich plasma (PRP, a blood derivative with high concentrations of platelets, has been found to have high levels of autologous growth factors (GFs, such as transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF, fibroblastic growth factor (FGF, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, and epidermal growth factor (EGF. These GFs and other biological active proteins of PRP can promote tissue healing through the regulation of fibrosis and angiogenesis. Moreover, PRP is considered to be safe due to its autologous nature and long-term usage without any reported major complications. Therefore, PRP therapy could be an option in treating overused tendon damage such as chronic tendinopathy. Here, we present a systematic review highlighting the clinical effectiveness of PRP injection therapy in patellar tendinopathy, which is a major cause of athletes to retire from their respective careers.

  3. Tendon Cell Behavior and Matrix Remodeling in Degenerative Tendinopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Mos, Marieke

    2009-01-01

    textabstractTendon injuries are common in human athletes [1-4]. Furthermore, such injuries are also prevalent in the ageing sedentary population [5-7]. In recent decades, the incidence of tendon injuries has risen due to both an increase in an elderly population and a rise in participation in recreational and competitive sporting activities. In the general population the lifetime cumulative incidence of Achilles tendinopathy is 5.9 % among sedentary people and 50 % among elite endurance athle...

  4. Are Tendinopathies really a common injury in volleyball?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustos, Aldo; Locaso, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To perform a description of tendinopathies as an injury in volleyball high performance. Methods: An observational and prospective study was conducted from 2014-2016 in the senior Argentinian volleyball team. The same was held by two observers. Moreover, 78 athletes were evaluated. We support Dvorak’s claims that an injury is determined by the loss of at least one training session or a match. Results: 78 players were exposed to 21812 hours of training and matches. As a result 37 injuries were evaluated in 31 players. Taking into account tendinopathies, it can be said that 34 players consulted 412 times, showing a prevalence of 43.5% of the whole enquires but when we refer to the same pathology as injury the average lowers, presenting 8 lesions in 6 players and showing a prevalence of 7.6% as injuries. Incidence of tendon injuries is 0.32 per 1000 hours of exposure Tendon Injuries: 5 were patellar, 2 supraspinatus, 1 aquiles. 5 Slight, 2 moderate, 1 severe. Conclusion: Clearly, tendinopathy is a common problem in this sport but it is not a common cause of injury. This is demonstrated in prevalence rates whereas 43.5 % just consulted and 7,6 % suffer from real injuries. We think this might be due to several factors such as, advances in medical therapy, preventive protocols and increase in thresholds of pain that high-performance athletes can bear. In our experience this pathology was shown to be the third leading cause of injuries. In 2016 we did not deal with any case of injury for tendinopathy.

  5. WHY ARE ECCENTRIC EXERCISES EFFECTIVE FOR ACHILLES TENDINOPATHY?

    OpenAIRE

    O’Neill, Seth; Watson, Paul J; Barry, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Achilles Tendinopathy is a complex problem, with the most common conservative treatment being eccentric exercises. Despite multiple studies assessing this treatment regime little is known about the mechanism of effect. This lack of understanding may be hindering therapeutic care and preventing optimal rehabilitation. Of the mechanisms proposed, most relate to tendon adaptation and fail to consider other possibilities. The current consensus is that tendon adaptation does not occur within timef...

  6. Treatment for insertional Achilles tendinopathy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegerinck, J I; Kerkhoffs, G M; van Sterkenburg, M N; Sierevelt, I N; van Dijk, C N

    2013-06-01

    Systematically search and analyse the results of surgical and non-surgical treatments for insertional Achilles tendinopathy. A structured systematic review of the literature was performed to identify surgical and non-surgical therapeutic studies reporting on ten or more adults with insertional Achilles tendinopathy. MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE (Classic) and the Cochrane database of controlled trials (1945-March 2011) were searched. The Coleman methodology score was used to assess the quality of included articles, and these were analysed with an emphasis on change in pain score, patient satisfaction and complication rate. Of 451 reviewed abstracts, 14 trials met our inclusion criteria evaluating 452 procedures in 433 patients. Five surgical techniques were evaluated; all had a good patient satisfaction (avg. 89 %). The complication ratio differed substantially between techniques. Two studies analysed injections showing significant decrease in visual analogue scale (VAS). Eccentric exercises showed a significant decrease in VAS, but a large group of patients was unsatisfied. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) was superior to both wait-and-see and an eccentric training regime. One study evaluated laser CO(2), TECAR and cryoultrasound, all with significant decrease in VAS. Despite differences in outcome and complication ratio, the patient satisfaction is high in all surgical studies. It is not possible to draw conclusions regarding the best surgical treatment for insertional Achilles tendinopathy. ESWT seems effective in patients with non-calcified insertional Achilles tendinopathy. Although both eccentric exercises resulted in a decrease in VAS score, full range of motion eccentric exercises shows a low patient satisfaction compared to floor level exercises and other conservative treatment modalities.

  7. Tendinopathy: Is Imaging Telling Us the Entire Story?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docking, Sean I; Ooi, Chin Chin; Connell, David

    2015-11-01

    Synopsis Tendinopathy is frequently associated with structural disorganization within the tendon. As such, the clinical use of ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging for tendinopathy has been the focus of numerous academic studies and clinical discussions. However, similar to other musculoskeletal conditions (osteoarthritis and intervertebral disc degeneration), there is no direct link between tendon structural disorganization and clinical symptoms, with findings on imaging potentially creating a confusing clinical picture. While imaging shows the presence and extent of structural changes within the tendon, the clinical interpretation of the images requires context in regard to the features of pain and the aggravating loads. This review will critically evaluate studies that have investigated the accuracy and sensitivity of imaging in the detection of clinical tendinopathy and the methodological issues associated with these studies (subject selection, lack of a robust gold standard, reliance on subjective measures). The advent of new imaging modalities allowing for the quantification of tendon structure or mechanical properties has allowed new critical insight into tendon pathology. A strength of these novel modalities is the ability to quantify properties of the tendon. Research utilizing ultrasound tissue characterization and sonoelastography will be discussed. This narrative review will also attempt to synthesize current research on whether imaging can predict the onset of pain or clinical outcome, the role of monitoring tendon structure during rehabilitation (ie, does tendon structure need to improve to get a positive clinical outcome?), and future directions for research, and to propose the clinical role of imaging in tendinopathy. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2015;45(11):842-852. Epub 21 Sep 2015. doi:10.2519/jospt.2015.5880.

  8. Gluteal Tendinopathy: A Review of Mechanisms, Assessment and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Alison; Mellor, Rebecca; Hodges, Paul; Bennell, Kim; Wajswelner, Henry; Vicenzino, Bill

    2015-08-01

    Tendinopathy of the gluteus medius and gluteus minimus tendons is now recognized as a primary local source of lateral hip pain. The condition mostly occurs in mid-life both in athletes and in subjects who do not regularly exercise. Females are afflicted more than males. This condition interferes with sleep (side lying) and common weight-bearing tasks, which makes it a debilitating musculoskeletal condition with a significant impact. Mechanical loading drives the biological processes within a tendon and determines its structural form and load-bearing capacity. The combination of excessive compression and high tensile loads within tendons are thought to be most damaging. The available evidence suggests that joint position (particularly excessive hip adduction), together with muscle and bone elements, are key factors in gluteal tendinopathy. These factors provide a basis for a clinical reasoning process in the assessment and management of a patient presenting with localized lateral hip pain from gluteal tendinopathy. Currently, there is a lack of consensus as to which clinical examination tests provide best diagnostic utility. On the basis of the few diagnostic utility studies and the current understanding of the pathomechanics of gluteal tendinopathy, we propose that a battery of clinical tests utilizing a combination of provocative compressive and tensile loads is currently best practice in its assessment. Management of this condition commonly involves corticosteroid injection, exercise or shock wave therapy, with surgery reserved for recalcitrant cases. There is a dearth of evidence for any treatments, so the approach we recommend involves managing the load on the tendons through exercise and education on the underlying pathomechanics.

  9. Obesity as a Risk Factor for Tendinopathy: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Franceschi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. In the last few years, evidence has emerged to support the possible association between increased BMI and susceptibility to some musculoskeletal diseases. We systematically review the literature to clarify whether obesity is a risk factor for the onset of tendinopathy. Methods. We searched PubMed, Cochrane Central, and Embase Biomedical databases using the keywords “obesity,” “overweight,” and “body mass index” linked in different combinations with the terms “tendinopathy,” “tendinitis,” “tendinosis,” “rotator cuff,” “epicondylitis,” “wrist,” “patellar,” “quadriceps,” “Achilles,” “Plantar Fascia,” and “tendon.” Results. Fifteen studies were included. No level I study on this subject was available, and the results provided are ambiguous. However, all the 5 level II studies report the association between obesity measured in terms of BMI and tendon conditions, with OR ranging between 1.9 (95% CI: 1.1–2.2 and 5.6 (1.9–16.6. Conclusions. The best evidence available to date indicates that obesity is a risk factor for tendinopathy. Nevertheless, further studies should be performed to establish the real strength of the association for each type of tendinopathy, especially because the design of the published studies does not allow identifying a precise cause-effect relationship and the specific role of obesity independently of other metabolic conditions.

  10. Obesity as a Risk Factor for Tendinopathy: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschi, Francesco; Papalia, Rocco; Franceschetti, Edoardo; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. In the last few years, evidence has emerged to support the possible association between increased BMI and susceptibility to some musculoskeletal diseases. We systematically review the literature to clarify whether obesity is a risk factor for the onset of tendinopathy. Methods. We searched PubMed, Cochrane Central, and Embase Biomedical databases using the keywords “obesity,” “overweight,” and “body mass index” linked in different combinations with the terms “tendinopathy,” “tendinitis,” “tendinosis,” “rotator cuff,” “epicondylitis,” “wrist,” “patellar,” “quadriceps,” “Achilles,” “Plantar Fascia,” and “tendon.” Results. Fifteen studies were included. No level I study on this subject was available, and the results provided are ambiguous. However, all the 5 level II studies report the association between obesity measured in terms of BMI and tendon conditions, with OR ranging between 1.9 (95% CI: 1.1–2.2) and 5.6 (1.9–16.6). Conclusions. The best evidence available to date indicates that obesity is a risk factor for tendinopathy. Nevertheless, further studies should be performed to establish the real strength of the association for each type of tendinopathy, especially because the design of the published studies does not allow identifying a precise cause-effect relationship and the specific role of obesity independently of other metabolic conditions. PMID:25214839

  11. Factors Associated with Operative Treatment of De Quervain Tendinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Reza Kachooei

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background:  Geographic and doctor-to-doctor variations in care are a focus of quality and safety efforts in medicine. This study addresses factors associated with variation in the rate of operative treatment of de Quervain tendinopathy.   Methods: We used a database including all patient encounters at 2 large medical centers, to study the experience of 10 hand surgeons and 1 physiatrist working in a hand surgery office in the treatment of 2,513 patients with de Quervain tendinopathy over a 12-year period. Survival analysis using the Kaplan-Meier method was used to compare surgery rates and time to surgery. Cox multivariable regression analysis was applied to identify factors associated with operative treatment. Results:  One hundred ninety nine (7.9% patients had surgery. The odds of operative treatment were 1.7 times greater after corticosteroid injection and varied more than 10-fold among providers. There was substantial variation in the overall rate of surgery by provider. Corticosteroid injection delayed surgery slightly, but was associated with a higher rate of surgery.  Conclusion:  Providers have substantial influence on treatment of de Quervain tendinopathy. The use of decision aids and other methods that help involve the patient in decision-making merit investigation as interventions to help reduce doctor-to-doctor variation.

  12. Factors Associated with Operative Treatment of De Quervain Tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachooei, Amir Reza; Nota, Sjoerd P F T; Menendez, Mariano E; Dyer, George S M; Ring, David

    2015-07-01

    Geographic and doctor-to-doctor variations in care are a focus of quality and safety efforts in medicine. This study addresses factors associated with variation in the rate of operative treatment of de Quervain tendinopathy. We used a database including all patient encounters at 2 large medical centers, to study the experience of 10 hand surgeons and 1 physiatrist working in a hand surgery office in the treatment of 2,513 patients with de Quervain tendinopathy over a 12-year period. Survival analysis using the Kaplan-Meier method was used to compare surgery rates and time to surgery. Cox multivariable regression analysis was applied to identify factors associated with operative treatment. One hundred ninety nine (7.9%) patients had surgery. The odds of operative treatment were 1.7 times greater after corticosteroid injection and varied more than 10-fold among providers. There was substantial variation in the overall rate of surgery by provider. Corticosteroid injection delayed surgery slightly, but was associated with a higher rate of surgery. Providers have substantial influence on treatment of de Quervain tendinopathy. The use of decision aids and other methods that help involve the patient in decision-making merit investigation as interventions to help reduce doctor-to-doctor variation.

  13. Diagnosing and Treating Popliteal Tendinopathy After Total Knee Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ryan Martin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The following office tip describes four patients that underwent primary total knee arthroplasty and developed posterolateral knee pain at a mean follow-up duration of 1.6 months postoperatively. The first patient in this series noted substantial pain lying in bed (in a lateral decubitus position with the operative leg up while attempting to abduct her leg to adjust her sheet in bed. A thorough clinical and radiographic work-up was performed. This patient’s posturing in bed (and subsequent physical exam maneuver led to a presumptive diagnosis of popliteal tendinopathy. The diagnosis was confirmed arthroscopically by identifying a frayed and inflamed popliteal tendon. After undergoing arthroscopic popliteal tendon release, the patient noted complete pain relief while retaining coronal stability in both flexion and extension. The following office tip defines a previously undescribed clinical diagnostic examination for popliteal tendinopathy that was identified based on a patient’s symptomatology and subsequently utilized to identify three additional cases of arthroscopically confirmed popliteal tendinopathy.

  14. Differences in tendon properties in elite badminton players with or without patellar tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couppé, C; Kongsgaard, M; Aagaard, P

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the structural and mechanical properties of the patellar tendon in elite male badminton players with and without patellar tendinopathy. Seven players with unilateral patellar tendinopathy (PT group) on the lead extremity (used for forward lunge) and nine players...

  15. Lower limb biomechanics during running in individuals with achilles tendinopathy: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Munteanu Shannon E; Barton Christian J

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Abnormal lower limb biomechanics is speculated to be a risk factor for Achilles tendinopathy. This study systematically reviewed the existing literature to identify, critique and summarise lower limb biomechanical factors associated with Achilles tendinopathy. Methods We searched electronic bibliographic databases (Medline, EMBASE, Current contents, CINAHL and SPORTDiscus) in November 2010. All prospective cohort and case-control studies that evaluated biomechanical factor...

  16. The Risk of Achilles Tendon Rupture in the Patients with Achilles Tendinopathy: Healthcare Database Analysis in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youichi Yasui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Disorders of the Achilles tendon can be broadly classified into acute and chronic entities. Few studies have established chronic Achilles tendinopathy as a precursor to acute Achilles ruptures. In this study, we assessed the relationship between Achilles tendinopathy and rupture, clarifying the incidence of rupture in the setting of underlying tendinopathy. Methods. The United Healthcare Orthopedic Dataset from the PearlDiver Patient Record Database was used to identify patients with ICD-9 codes for Achilles rupture and/or Achilles tendinopathy. The number of patients with acute rupture, chronic tendinopathy, and rupture following a prior diagnosis of tendinopathy was assessed. Results. Four percent of patients with an underlying diagnosis of Achilles tendinopathy went on to sustain a rupture (7,232 patients. Older patients with tendinopathy were most vulnerable to subsequent rupture. Conclusions. The current study demonstrates that 4.0% of patients who were previously diagnosed with Achilles tendinopathy sustained an Achilles tendon rupture. Additionally, older patients with Achilles tendinopathy were most vulnerable. These findings are important as they can help clinicians more objectively council patients with Achilles tendinopathy.

  17. Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon Transfer for Calcific Insertional Achilles Tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Michael A; Catanzariti, Alan R

    2016-01-01

    Calcific insertional Achilles tendinopathy can result in significant pain and disability. Although some patients respond to nonoperative therapy, many patients are at risk for long-term morbidity and unpredictable clinical outcomes. There is no evidence-based data to support the timing of operative invention, choice of procedures, or whether equinus requires treatment. This article suggests the need for a classification system based on physical examination and imaging to help guide treatment. There is an obvious need for evidence-based studies evaluating outcomes and for properly conducted scientific research to establish appropriate treatment protocols. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Dextrose Prolotherapy Versus Control Injections in Painful Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Helene; Reeves, Kenneth Dean; Bennett, Cameron J; Bicknell, Simon; Cheng, An-Lin

    2016-01-01

    To compare the effect of dextrose prolotherapy on pain levels and degenerative changes in painful rotator cuff tendinopathy against 2 potentially active control injection procedures. Randomized controlled trial, blinded to participants and evaluators. Outpatient pain medicine practice. Persons (N=73) with chronic shoulder pain, examination findings of rotator cuff tendinopathy, and ultrasound-confirmed supraspinatus tendinosis/tear. Three monthly injections either (1) onto painful entheses with dextrose (Enthesis-Dextrose), (2) onto entheses with saline (Enthesis-Saline), or (3) above entheses with saline (Superficial-Saline). All solutions included 0.1% lidocaine. All participants received concurrent programmed physical therapy. Primary: participants achieving an improvement in maximal current shoulder pain ≥2.8 (twice the minimal clinically important difference for visual analog scale pain) or not. Secondary: improvement in the Ultrasound Shoulder Pathology Rating Scale (USPRS) and a 0-to-10 satisfaction score (10, completely satisfied). The 73 participants had moderate to severe shoulder pain (7.0±2.0) for 7.6±9.6 years. There were no baseline differences between groups. Blinding was effective. At 9-month follow-up, 59% of Enthesis-Dextrose participants maintained ≥2.8 improvement in pain compared with Enthesis-Saline (37%; P=.088) and Superficial-Saline (27%; P=.017). Enthesis-Dextrose participants' satisfaction was 6.7±3.2 compared with Enthesis-Saline (4.7±4.1; P=.079) and Superficial-Saline (3.9±3.1; P=.003). USPRS findings were not different between groups (P=.734). In participants with painful rotator cuff tendinopathy who receive physical therapy, injection of hypertonic dextrose on painful entheses resulted in superior long-term pain improvement and patient satisfaction compared with blinded saline injection over painful entheses, with intermediate results for entheses injection with saline. These differences could not be attributed to a

  19. Achilles Tendinopathy: Current Concepts about the Basic Science and Clinical Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Yun Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Achilles tendinopathy is one of the most frequently ankle and foot overuse injuries, which is a clinical syndrome characterized by the combination of pain, swelling, and impaired performance. The two main categories of Achilles tendinopathy are classified according to anatomical location and broadly include insertional and noninsertional tendinopathy. The etiology of Achilles tendinopathy is multifactorial including both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Failed healing response and degenerative changes were found in the tendon. The failed healing response includes three different and continuous stages (reactive tendinopathy, tendon disrepair, and degenerative tendinopathy. The histological studies have demonstrated an increased number of tenocytes and concentration of glycosaminoglycans in the ground substance, disorganization and fragmentation of the collagen, and neovascularization. There are variable conservative and surgical treatment options for Achilles tendinopathy. However, there has not been a gold standard of these treatments because of the controversial clinical results between various studies. In the future, new level I researches will be needed to prove the effect of these treatment options.

  20. Heavy Slow Resistance Versus Eccentric Training as Treatment for Achilles Tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beyer, Rikke; Kongsgaard, Mads; Hougs Kjær, Birgitte

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown that eccentric training has a positive effect on Achilles tendinopathy, but few randomized controlled trials have compared it with other loading-based treatment regimens. PURPOSE: To evaluate the effectiveness of eccentric training (ECC) and heavy slow...... resistance training (HSR) among patients with midportion Achilles tendinopathy. STUDY DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. METHODS: A total of 58 patients with chronic (>3 months) midportion Achilles tendinopathy were randomized to ECC or HSR for 12 weeks. Function and symptoms......), and the mean training session compliance rate was 78% in the ECC group and 92% in the HSR group, with a significant difference between groups (P

  1. Inflammatory and metabolic alterations of Kager's fat pad in chronic achilles tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pingel, Jessica; Petersen, Marie Christine Helby; Fredberg, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    and lipid metabolism. RESULTS: Expression of the majority of analyzed inflammatory marker genes was increased in patients with Achilles tendinopathy compared to that in healthy controls. Expression patterns of the patient group were consistent with reduced lipolysis and increased fatty acid β...... of inflammatory markers and metabolic enzymes in Kager's fat pad. METHODS: A biopsy was taken from Kager's fat pad from 31 patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy and from 13 healthy individuals. Gene expression was measured by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR. Focus was on genes related to inflammation...... inflamed than in the healthy control group. Additionally, the results indicate an altered lipid metabolism in Kager's fat pad of Achilles tendinopathy patients....

  2. The effectiveness of manual therapy in supraspinatus tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şenbursa, Gamze; Baltaci, Gül; Atay, Ö Ahmet

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this randomized controlled study was to assess the efficacy of manual therapy in the treatment of patients with symptomatic supraspinatus tendinopathy. Seventy-seven patients (age range, 30 to 55 years) with supraspinatus tendinopathy, were randomly assigned to one of the three treatment groups: a supervised exercise program (Group 1), a supervised exercise program combined with joint and soft tissue mobilization (Group 2), or a home-based rehabilitation program (Group 3). All patients had rehabilitation for 12 weeks. Pain level was evaluated with a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the range of motion (ROM) was measured with a goniometer. The Modified American Shoulder and Elbow Surgery (MASES) score was used in functional assessment. Flexion, abduction, internal and external rotation strengths were measured with a manual muscle test. All patients were evaluated before, and at the 4th and 12th week of the rehabilitation. All groups experienced significant decrease in pain and an increase in shoulder muscle strength and function by both the 4th and 12th weeks of treatment (p0.05). However, the greatest improvement in functionality was found in Group 2. Supervised exercise, supervised and manual therapy, and home-based exercise are all effective and promising methods in the rehabilitation of the patients with subacromial impingement syndrome. The addition of an initial manual therapy may improve the results of the rehabilitation with exercise.

  3. BMP4 and FGF3 haplotypes increase the risk of tendinopathy in volleyball athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salles, José Inácio; Amaral, Marcus Vinícius; Aguiar, Diego Pinheiro; Lira, Daisy Anne; Quinelato, Valquiria; Bonato, Letícia Ladeira; Duarte, Maria Eugenia Leite; Vieira, Alexandre Rezende; Casado, Priscila Ladeira

    2015-03-01

    To investigate whether genetic variants can be correlated with tendinopathy in elite male volleyball athletes. Case-control study. Fifteen single nucleotide polymorphisms within BMP4, FGF3, FGF10, FGFR1 genes were investigated in 138 elite volleyball athletes, aged between 18 and 35 years, who undergo 4-5h of training per day: 52 with tendinopathy and 86 with no history of pain suggestive of tendinopathy in patellar, Achilles, shoulder, and hip abductors tendons. The clinical diagnostic criterion was progressive pain during training, confirmed by magnetic resonance image. Genomic DNA was obtained from saliva samples. Genetic markers were genotyped using TaqMan real-time PCR. Chi-square test compared genotypes and haplotype differences between groups. Multivariate logistic regression analyzed the significance of covariates and incidence of tendinopathy. Statistical analysis revealed participant age (p=0.005) and years of practice (p=0.004) were risk factors for tendinopathy. A significant association between BMP4 rs2761884 (p=0.03) and tendinopathy was observed. Athletes with a polymorphic genotype have 2.4 times more susceptibility to tendinopathy (OR=2.39; 95%CI=1.10-5.19). Also, association between disease and haplotype TTGGA in BMP4 (p=0.01) was observed. The FGF3 TGGTA haplotype showed a tendency of association with tendinopathy (p=0.05), and so did FGF10 rs900379. FGFR1 showed no association with disease. These findings indicate that haplotypes in BMP4 and FGF3 genes may contribute to the tendon disease process in elite volleyball athletes. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Efficacy of exercise therapy in workers with rotator cuff tendinopathy: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Desmeules, Fran?ois; Boudreault, Jennifer; Dionne, Clermont E; Fr?mont, Pierre; Lowry, V?ronique; MacDermid, Joy C.; Roy, Jean-S?bastien

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To perform a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the efficacy of therapeutic exercises for workers suffering from rotator cuff (RC) tendinopathy. Methods: A literature search in four bibliographical databases (Pubmed, CINAHL, EMBASE, and PEDro) was conducted from inception up to February 2015. RCTs were included if participants were workers suffering from RC tendinopathy, the outcome measures included work-related outcomes, and at least one of the interventi...

  5. Ultrasound guided electrocoagulation in patients with chronic non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, M Ilum; Torp-Pedersen, S; Koenig, M Juhl

    2006-01-01

    High resolution colour Doppler ultrasound shows intratendinous Doppler activity in patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy. Treatment of this neovascularisation with sclerosing therapy seems to relieve the pain. However, the procedure often has to be repeated.......High resolution colour Doppler ultrasound shows intratendinous Doppler activity in patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy. Treatment of this neovascularisation with sclerosing therapy seems to relieve the pain. However, the procedure often has to be repeated....

  6. Progressive high-load strength training compared with general low-load exercises in patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingwersen, Kim G; Christensen, Robin; Sørensen, Lilli

    2015-01-01

    tendinopathy. Exercise is often considered the primary treatment option for rotator cuff tendinopathy, but there is no consensus on which exercise strategy is the most effective. As eccentric and high-load strength training have been shown to have a positive effect on patella and Achilles tendinopathy, the aim...... cuff tendinopathy will be recruited from three outpatient shoulder departments in Denmark, and randomised to either 12 weeks of progressive high-load strength training or to general low-load exercises. Patients will receive six individually guided exercise sessions with a physiotherapist and perform...

  7. Chronic Achilles Tendon Disorders: Tendinopathy and Chronic Rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffulli, Nicola; Via, Alessio Giai; Oliva, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    Tendinopathy of the Achilles tendon involves clinical conditions in and around the tendon and it is the result of a failure of a chronic healing response. Although several conservative therapeutic options have been proposed, few of them are supported by randomized controlled trials. The management is primarily conservative and many patients respond well to conservative measures. If clinical conditions do not improve after 6 months of conservative management, surgery is recommended. The management of chronic ruptures is different from that of acute ruptures. The optimal surgical procedure is still debated. In this article chronic Achilles tendon disorders are debated and evidence-based medicine treatment strategies are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The impact of physically demanding work of basketball and volleyball players on the risk for patellar tendinopathy and on work limitations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Worp, H.; Zwerver, J.; Kuijer, P.P.F.M.; Frings-Dresen, M.H.W.; Van Den Akker-Scheek, I.

    Patellar tendinopathy is a common injury in jumping athletes. Little is known about work-related etiological factors for patellar tendinopathy and related work limitations. The aim of this study was to identify work-related etiological factors for patellar tendinopathy and to determine the relation

  9. Extra-corporeal pulsed-activated therapy ("EPAT" sound wave) for Achilles tendinopathy: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Amol; Ramdath, Sona; O'Halloran, Patrick; Gerdesmeyer, Ludger; Gollwitzer, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is common and extracorporeal shockwaves have become a popular treatment for this condition, even though previous research has not provided conclusive results regarding its efficacy in cases of Achilles tendinopathy. Our aim was to evaluate 3 weekly shockwave treatments in patients with Achilles tendinopathy, as quantified by the Roles and Maudsley score. A total of 74 tendons in 60 patients were assessed at baseline and at least 1 year posttreatment, including 32 (43.24%) paratendinoses, 23 (31.08%) proximal tendinoses, and 19 (25.68%) insertional tendinoses. The mean age of the participants was 48.6 ± 12.94 years, and patients with paratendinosis (41.44 ± 14.01 years) were statistically significantly younger than those with proximal (53 ± 8.9 years) and insertional (54.26 ± 9.74 years) tendinopathy, and these differences were statistically significant (P = .0012 and P = .0063, respectively). Overall, 58 (78.38%) tendons improved by at least 1 year posttreatment, including 75% in the paratendinosis, 78.26% in the proximal tendinosis, and 84.21% in the insertional tendinosis groups, and no adverse effects were observed. The Roles and Maudsley score improved from 3.22 ± 0.55 to 1.84 ± 1.05 (P < .0001) in the paratendinosis group, 3.39 ± 0.5 to 1.57 ± 0.66 (P < .0001) in the proximal tendinopathy group, and 3.32 ± 0.58 to 1.47 ± 0.7 (P = .0001) in the insertional tendinopathy group. Based on these results, we believe that shockwave therapy serves as a safe, viable, and effective option for the treatment of Achilles tendinopathy. Copyright © 2011 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Sports and exercise-related tendinopathies : a review of selected topical issues by participants of the second International Scientific Tendinopathy Symposium (ISTS) Vancouver 2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scott, Alex; Docking, Sean; Vicenzino, Bill; Alfredson, Hakan; Zwerver, Johannes; Lundgreen, Kirsten; Finlay, Oliver; Pollock, Noel; Cook, Jill L.; Fearon, Angela; Purdam, Craig R.; Hoens, Alison; Rees, Jonathan D.; Goetz, Thomas J.; Danielson, Patrik

    In September 2010, the first International Scientific Tendinopathy Symposium (ISTS) was held in Umea, Sweden, to establish a forum for original scientific and clinical insights in this growing field of clinical research and practice. The second ISTS was organised by the same group and held in

  11. Patient guided Piezo-electric Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy as treatment for chronic severe patellar tendinopathy : A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwerver, J.; Dekker, F.; Pepping, G.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Patellar tendinopathy is a common overuse injury for which no evidence-based treatment guidelines exist. Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy (ESWT) seems to be an effective treatment for patellar tendinopathy but the most beneficial treatment strategies still need to be

  12. Incidence and prevalence of lower extremity tendinopathy in a Dutch general practice population : a cross sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, Iris Sophie; Zwerver, Johannes; Diercks, Ronald Leo; Dekker, Janny Hendrika; Van den Akker-Scheek, Inge

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lower extremity tendinopathy is a common sports injury, but it can also affect non-athletes. Because tendinopathy is difficult to treat and has negative effects on the ability to work and quality of life, development of preventive interventions is important. The first step in the Van

  13. Jumper's Knee or Lander's Knee? : A Systematic Review of the Relation between Jump Biomechanics and Patellar Tendinopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Worp, Henk; de Poel, H. J.; Diercks, R. L.; van den Akker-Scheek, I.; Zwerver, J.

    Patellar tendinopathy (jumper's knee) is a common injury in sports that comprise jump actions. This article systematically reviews the literature examining the relation between patellar tendinopathy and take-off and landing kinematics in order to uncover risk factors and potential prevention

  14. No effect of extracorporeal shockwave therapy on patellar tendinopathy in jumping athletes during the competitive season : A randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwerver, Johannes; Hartgens, Fred; Verhagen, Evert; van der Worp, Henk; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Diercks, Ronald

    Background: Patellar tendinopathy is a common overuse injury among jumping athletes. No evidence-based treatment guidelines exist. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) appears to be a promising treatment but its effectiveness has not been studied in athletes with patellar tendinopathy who have

  15. Biomedical Risk Factors of Achilles Tendinopathy in Physically Active People: a Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlovskaia, Maria; Vlahovich, Nicole; Ashton, Kevin J; Hughes, David C

    2017-12-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is the most prevalent tendon disorder in people engaged in running and jumping sports. Aetiology of Achilles tendinopathy is complex and requires comprehensive research of contributing risk factors. There is relatively little research focussing on potential biomedical risk factors for Achilles tendinopathy. The purpose of this systematic review is to identify studies and summarise current knowledge of biomedical risk factors of Achilles tendinopathy in physically active people. Research databases were searched for relevant articles followed by assessment in accordance with PRISMA statement and standards of Cochrane collaboration. Levels of evidence and quality assessment designation were implemented in accordance with OCEBM levels of evidence and Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale, respectively. A systematic review of the literature identified 22 suitable articles. All included studies had moderate level of evidence (2b) with the Newcastle-Ottawa score varying between 6 and 9. The majority (17) investigated genetic polymorphisms involved in tendon structure and homeostasis and apoptosis and inflammation pathways. Overweight as a risk factor of Achilles tendinopathy was described in five included studies that investigated non-genetic factors. COL5A1 genetic variants were the most extensively studied, particularly in association with genetic variants in the genes involved in regulation of cell-matrix interaction in tendon and matrix homeostasis. It is important to investigate connections and pathways whose interactions might be disrupted and therefore alter collagen structure and lead to the development of pathology. Polymorphisms in genes involved in apoptosis and inflammation, and Achilles tendinopathy did not show strong association and, however, should be considered for further investigation. This systematic review suggests that biomedical risk factors are an important consideration in the future study of propensity to the development

  16. Knee extensor dynamics in the volleyball approach jump: the influence of patellar tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorenson, Shawn C; Arya, Shruti; Souza, Richard B; Pollard, Christine D; Salem, George J; Kulig, Kornelia

    2010-09-01

    Controlled laboratory study using a cross-sectional design. To evaluate knee joint dynamics in elite volleyball players with and without a history of patellar tendinopathy, focusing on mechanical energy absorption and generation. We hypothesized that tendinopathy would be associated withreduced net joint work and net joint power. Patellar tendinopathy is a common, debilitating injury affecting competitive volleyball players. Thirteen elite male players with and without a history of patellar tendinopathy (mean ± SD age, 27 ± 7 years) performed maximum-effort volleyball approach jumps. Sagittal plane knee joint kinematics, kinetics, and energetics were quantified in the lead limb, using data obtained from a force platform and an 8-camera motion analysis system. Vertical ground reaction forces and pelvis vertical velocity at takeoff were examined. Independent sample t tests were used to evaluate group differences (α = .05). The tendinopathy group, compared to controls, demonstrated significant reductions (approximately 30%) in net joint work and net joint power during the eccentric phase of the jump, with no differences in the concentric phase. Positive to-negative net joint work and net joint power ratios were significantly higher in the tendinopathy group, which had a net joint work ratio of 1.00 (95% CI: 0.77, 1.24) versus 0.76 (95% CI: 0.64, 0.88) for controls, and a net joint power ratio of 1.62 (95% CI: 1.15, 2.10) versus 1.00 (95% CI: 0.80, 1.21) for controls. There were no significant differences in net joint moment, angular velocity, or range of motion. Peak vertical ground reaction forces were lower for the tendinopathy group, while average vertical ground reaction forces and pelvis vertical velocity were similar. Patellar tendinopathy is associated with differences in sagittal plane mechanical energy absorption at the knee during maximum-effort volleyball approach jumps. Net joint work and net joint power may help define underlying mechanisms, adaptive

  17. Diagnostic confidence of sonoelastography as adjunct to greyscale ultrasonography in lateral elbow tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Giyoung; Kwon, Dongrak; Park, Junghyun

    2014-01-01

    Conventional ultrasonography or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is commonly performed to obtain information about the severity of the disease, location of the injury, and differential diagnosis. The aim of this research was to investigate the diagnostic confidence of sonoelastography as an adjunct to greyscale ultrasonography in lateral elbow tendinopathy. A single experienced physiatrist performed greyscale ultrasonography and sonoelastography in 28 patients (9 men, 19 women; mean age, 48.5 years; age range, 36-67 years) with unilateral symptoms of lateral elbow tendinopathy; the asymptomatic elbows were used as controls. Greyscale images were described as normal, tendinosis, partial-thickness tear, and full-thickness tear. Sonoelastographic images of the common extensor tendon were analyzed qualitatively (scoring of the elastic spectrum) and quantitatively (based on a color histogram). Both the imaging methods had high sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for diagnosing lateral elbow tendinopathy. Considering the clinical diagnosis of lateral elbow tendinopathy, sonoelastography showed significantly higher diagnostic accuracy (96.4%) than ultrasonography (89.5%, P < 0.01). Quantitative analysis showed objective interpretation of the sonoelastographic images that revealed greater intensity of green and blue pixels in symptomatic elbows (P < 0.01). Sonoelastography increases diagnostic confidence in tennis elbow pathology over greyscale ultrasonography alone and may be an additional powerful diagnostic tool in cases of lateral elbow tendinopathy with inconclusive greyscale ultrasonographic findings.

  18. Impact of Patellar Tendinopathy on Knee Proprioception: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Rui; Ferreira, João; Silva, Diogo; Rodrigues, Elisa; Bessa, Isabel M; Ribeiro, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    To determine whether high-level athletes with patellar tendinopathy have diminished knee proprioceptive acuity. Cross-sectional study. University research laboratory (institutional). Twenty-one basketball and volleyball players with patellar tendinopathy (13 men and 8 women; mean age 24.5 ± 3.6; body mass index = 22.5 ± 2.0 kg/m) and an equal number of athletes without symptoms of patellar tendinopathy injury were included in this study. Participants underwent knee proprioception assessments on a single day. Furthermore, age, sex, height, weight, VISA-P (Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment) questionnaire sports participation, medical history, knee injuries, previous treatment, and medication were obtained. Knee proprioception was evaluated by assessing sense of resistance, using a weight discrimination protocol, and joint position sense (JPS). No significant differences were observed in JPS at 30 and 60 degrees of knee flexion between groups (P = 0.165 and 0.481, respectively). In regard to the ability to discriminate weight, significant differences between the 2 groups were found with the tendinopathy group showing a higher percentage of error (P = 0.009), namely when the set of incremental weights varied by 10% from the standard weight. Athletes with patellar tendinopathy have a diminished perception of force signals required for weight discrimination, whereas JPS remains unaffected in these athletes.

  19. Ultrasonograph and Clinical Quantitative Characterization of Tendinopathy by Modified Splitting in a Goat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kavaguchi De Grandis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A tendinopathy is a clinical condition characterized by activity-related pain, focal tendons tenderness, and intratendinous imaging changes. This study characterizes a surgically induced tendinopathy in a goat model with a noninvasive in vivo longitudinal followup based on physical examination and US. Cross-sectional area (CSA is the most objective feature for the evaluation of tendinopathy in correlation with clinical findings. The deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT of the left hind limb of six goats was isolated and scarified by a modified splitting. Pain and lameness at walk and trot were evaluated. External width and thickness of tendon region were measured by calipers. CSA and the ratio lesion/tendon CSA were obtained at days 0, 7, 21, 42, and 84 by US. The highest value of global functional score was obtained at day 7, then decreased until day 40 and was not significantly different from day 0 at the end of the study. The external width recovered a normal value at the end of the study, but the external thickness was still significantly increased (P<0.05. Peritendinous oedema was observed at day 7, but intratendinous lesions were visible only at day 21 as a focal hypo to anechoic area. At day 84, two tendons still presented visible lesions. US examination was reproducible, specific, and provided complementary information to the global functional score. A standardized focal tendinopathy was induced in goats. This experimental model of focal tendinopathy could be used to study the effect of different treatments.

  20. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy and therapeutic exercise for supraspinatus and biceps tendinopathies in 29 dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeman, J J; Shaw, K K; Mison, M B; Perry, J A; Carr, A; Shultz, R

    2016-10-15

    Supraspinatus tendinopathy (ST) and biceps tendinopathy (BT) are common causes of forelimb lameness in large-breed dogs and have historically been treated with conservative management or surgery. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) and therapeutic exercise (TE) are thought to be treatment options for these conditions. The objectives of this study were to report the clinical presentations of dogs treated with ESWT for shoulder tendinopathies, to determine the association between shoulder lesion severity identified on ultrasonography or MRI and outcome, and to compare the outcomes of dogs treated with ESWT with and without TE. Medical records of 29 dogs diagnosed with shoulder tendinopathies and treated with ESWT were reviewed, and 24 dogs were diagnosed with either unilateral BT or BT and ST. None were found to have unilateral ST. Five dogs were diagnosed with bilateral disease. Eighty-five per cent of dogs had good or excellent outcomes determined by owner assessment 11-220 weeks after therapy. Outcomes were found to be better as tendon lesion severity increased (P=0.0497), regardless if ESWT was performed with or without TE (P=0.92). ESWT should be considered a safe primary therapeutic option for canine shoulder tendinopathies. Larger controlled prospective studies are needed to adequately assess these findings. British Veterinary Association.

  1. Pain, Disability and Sleep Quality in Patients With Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy and Concurrent Myofascial Pain

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    Morteza Nakhaei Amroodi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Rotator cuff tendinopathy and concurrent myofascial pain may result in sleep disturbances, poor quality of life, and social dysfunction along with chronic annoying pain and progressive physical disability. Objectives The present study aimed to assess severity of pain, physical disability, and sleep quality in patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy and concurrent myofascial pain. Patients and Methods This case-control study was conducted on 30 consecutive patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy without tear (impingement syndrome and concurrent myofascial pain referred to the shoulder clinic in Shafa-Yahyaian Hospital during year 2014 (January to April. Eighteen gender and age-matched healthy individuals without any history of rotator cuff tendinopathy were included as controls. Along with baseline assessment, for determining the level of arm, shoulder and hand disability, the quick disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand questionnaire was also used. Sleep quality was assessed by the pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI. Results Compared to healthy individuals, the mean shoulder disability score was significantly higher in the patient group (P = 0.001. Also, regarding sleep quality, the mean score was significantly higher in the patient group when compared with healthy subjects (P = 0.002. Conclusions Patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy concurrent with myofascial pain experienced low level of sleep quality along with severe pain and physical disability. In order to improve clinical outcome of these patients, improving physical function and sleep quality in these patients is necessary.

  2. Evidence-based soft tissue rheumatology: epicondylitis and hand stenosing tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Nemegyei, Jose; Canoso, Juan J

    2004-02-01

    Lateral and medial epicondylitis represent overuse tendinopathies of wrist extensor and wrist flexor muscles, respectively. In lateral epicondylitis, a short-term therapeutic efficacy of glucocorticoid injection and limited evidence on the efficacy of acupuncture has been shown. De Quervain tendinopathy is caused by tendinous impingement by a thickened retinaculum. There is limited evidence on the efficacy of glucocorticoid injection in this condition.Trigger finger usually results from tendon entrapment beneath a thickened A1 flexor pulley. An association with hand tool use and diabetes has been shown in this condition, and there is evidence on the therapeutic efficacy of glucocorticoid injection. No other therapeutic modality has shown efficacy or has been assessed in a placebo-controlled clinical trial in these conditions.It can be concluded that epicondylitis and stenosing tendinopathy are readily diagnosed, and most patients recover with current therapies. However, still unsolved issues preclude a purely evidence-based approach to these entities.

  3. Previously identified patellar tendinopathy risk factors differ between elite and sub-elite volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, I; Steele, J R; Munro, B J; Brown, N A T

    2015-06-01

    Patellar tendinopathy is the most common knee injury incurred in volleyball, with its prevalence in elite athletes more than three times that of their sub-elite counterparts. The purpose of this study was to determine whether patellar tendinopathy risk factors differed between elite and sub-elite male volleyball players. Nine elite and nine sub-elite male volleyball players performed a lateral stop-jump block movement. Maximum vertical jump, training history, muscle extensibility and strength, three-dimensional landing kinematics (250 Hz), along with lower limb neuromuscular activation patterns (1500 Hz), and patellar tendon loading were collected during each trial. Multivariate analyses of variance (P volleyball players. Interventions designed to reduce landing frequency and improve quadriceps extensibility are recommended to reduce patellar tendinopathy prevalence in volleyball players. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Spanish Consensus Statement: Clinical Management and Treatment of Tendinopathies in Sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Jaén, Tomas; Rey, Guillermo Álvarez; Angulo, Francisco; Cuesta, Jordi Ardevol; Loureda, Rafael Arriaza; España, Fernando Ávila; Ayala, Juan; Matas, Ramón Balius; Pazos, Fernando Baró; de Dios Beas Jiménez, Juan; Rosell, Jorge Candel; Fernandez, César Cobián; del Pilar Doñoro Cuevas, Mª; Ros, Francisco Esparza; Colmenero, Josefina Espejo; de Prado, Jorge Fernández; García Cota, Juan José; Garrido González, Jose Ignacio; de Vega, Carlos Gonzalez; Santander, Manuela González; Herrador Munilla, Miguel Ángel; Ruiz, Francisco Ivorra; Díaz, Fernando Jiménez; Fernandez, Antonio Maestro; Marqueta, Pedro Manonelles; Muñoz Benito, Juan José; Vilás, Ramón Olivé; Pedret, Carles; Teres, Xavier Peirau; Amaro, José Peña; Grifell, Jordi Puigdellivoll; San Roque, Juan Pérez; Parenteu, Christophe Ramírez; Serna, Juan Ribas; Font, Gil Rodas; Álvarez, Mikel Sánchez; Marchori, Carlos Sanchez; Perez, Lluis Til; Durán, Rosario Ureña; del Valle Soto, Miguel; Villalón Alonso, José María; García, Pedro Guillen

    2017-01-01

    On October 15, 2016, experts met at Clínica CEMTRO in Madrid, Spain, under the patronage of the Spanish Society for Sports Traumatology (SETRADE), the Spanish Society of Sports Medicine (SEMED), the Spanish Association of Medical Services for Football Clubs (AEMEF), the Spanish Association of Medical Services for Basketball Clubs (AEMB), F.C. Barcelona, and Clínica CEMTRO. The purpose was to consider the most appropriate clinical management and treatment of tendinopathies in sports, based on proven scientific data described in the medical literature as well as on each expert’s experience. Prior to the meeting, each expert received a questionnaire regarding clinical management and treatment of tendinopathies in sports. The present consensus document summarizes the answers to the questionnaire and the resulting discussion and consensus regarding current concepts on tendinopathies in sports.

  5. Tendinopathies and platelet-rich plasma (PRP): from pre-clinical experiments to therapeutic use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaux, Jean-François; Drion, Pierre; Croisier, Jean-Louis; Crielaard, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The restorative properties of platelets, through the local release of growth factors, are used in various medical areas. This article reviews fundamental and clinical research relating to platelet-rich plasma applied to tendinous lesions. Materials and method: Articles in French and English, published between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2014. dealing with PRP and tendons were searched for using the Medline and Scopus data bases. Results: Forty-seven articles were identified which addressed pre-clinical and clinical studies: 27 relating to in vitro and in vivo animal studies and 20 relating to human studies. Of these, five addressed lateral epicondylitis, two addressed rotator cuff tendinopathies, ten dealt with patellar tendinopathies and three looked at Achilles tendinopathies. Conclusions: The majority of pre-clinical studies show that PRP stimulates the tendon’s healing process. However, clinical series remain more controversial and level 1, controlled, randomised studies are still needed. PMID:26195890

  6. Tendinopathies and platelet-rich plasma (PRP: from pre-clinical experiments to therapeutic use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaux JF

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The restorative properties of platelets, through the local release of growth factors, are used in various medical areas. This article reviews fundamental and clinical research relating to platelet-rich plasma applied to tendinous lesions. Materials and method: Articles in French and English, published between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2014. dealing with PRP and tendons were searched for using the Medline and Scopus data bases. Results: Forty-seven articles were identified which addressed pre-clinical and clinical studies: 27 relating to in vitro and in vivo animal studies and 20 relating to human studies. Of these, five addressed lateral epicondylitis, two addressed rotator cuff tendinopathies, ten dealt with patellar tendinopathies and three looked at Achilles tendinopathies. Conclusions: The majority of pre-clinical studies show that PRP stimulates the tendon's healing process. However, clinical series remain more controversial and level 1, controlled, randomised studies are still needed.

  7. VEGF Expression in Patellar Tendinopathy: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Øystein; Bahr, Roald; Hart, David A.; Duronio, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Vascular function and angiogenesis are regulated by vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF). The purpose of this preliminary study was to address the following questions: Is VEGF expression in the patellar tendon more prevalent in patients with patellar tendinopathy than in individuals with normal, pain-free patellar tendons? Which cell populations express VEGF in normal and tendinopathic tendon? Is there a difference in symptom duration between VEGF+ and VEGF− tendons? We collected patellar tendon tissue from 22 patients undergoing open débridement of the patellar tendon and from 10 patients undergoing intramedullary nailing of the tibia. VEGF expression was assessed immunohistochemically. Relevant inflammatory and repair cell types were immunolabeled. VEGF expression was absent from control tendons, but was present in a subset of patients with histopathological evidence of angiofibroblastic tendinosis. VEGF was expressed in the intimal layer of tendon vessels, but was absent in other cell types. Patients demonstrating VEGF expression in the patellar tendon had a shorter symptom duration (12 ± 7.8 months) than patients with no detectable VEGF (32.8 ± 23.5 months). VEGF may contribute to the vascular hyperplasia that is a cardinal feature of symptomatic tendinosis, particularly in cases with more recent onset. PMID:18459027

  8. Causative factors and rehabilitation of patellar tendinopathy: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanell Morgan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patellar tendinopathy (PT is a common chronic pathology of the knee, with a high prevalence in athletes and the general population.Objectives: The objectives of this article were to systematically investigate all the evidence applicable to the intrinsic and extrinsic causative factors and rehabilitation of PT, and then integrate and link rehabilitation with the main causative factors identified.Method: The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines were followed. Various tools were used to evaluate the methodological quality of the eligible articles. Data were interpreted descriptively, and the causative factors and rehabilitation of PT were analysed.Results: Twenty studies were included in the review. The distinctive factor responsible for PT is the mechanical theory. Seven intrinsic and four extrinsic risk factors were identified, with the main intrinsic risk factors being muscle flexibility and strength, and extrinsic risk factors being acquisition and level of skills. PT can be treated with numerous different therapeutic modalities, although eccentric muscle training showed exceptional results. The intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors can only be transformed and reduced by rehabilitation, which is inevitable to improve PT pain and function.Conclusion: The essence of an integrated management protocol for PT is to identify the dominant contributing factors, whether intrinsic or extrinsic, and to reduce the load on the patellar tendon by modifying these factors by either rehabilitation intervention or direct modification of the equipment or environment to obtain a positive outcome towards pain management and function.

  9. Hip Biomechanics Are Altered in Male Runners with Achilles Tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creaby, Mark W; Honeywill, Conor; Franettovich Smith, Melinda M; Schache, Anthony G; Crossley, Kay M

    2017-03-01

    Achilles tendinopathy (AT) is a prevalent injury in running sports. Understanding the biomechanical factors associated with AT will assist in its management and prevention. The purpose of this study was to compare hip and ankle kinematics and kinetics in runners with and without AT. Fourteen male runners with AT and 11 healthy male runners (CTRL) ran over ground while lower-limb joint motion and ground reaction force data were synchronously captured. Hip and ankle joint angles, moments, and impulses in all three planes (sagittal, transverse, and frontal) were extracted for analysis. Independent t-tests were used to compare the differences between the AT and the CTRL groups for the biomechanical variables of interest. After Bonferroni adjustment, an alpha level of 0.0026 was set for all analyses. The AT group exhibited an increased peak hip external rotation moment (P = 0.001), hip external rotation impulse (P biomechanics were observed. This study presents preliminary evidence indicating that male runners with AT display altered hip biomechanics with respect to their healthy counterparts. Because of the retrospective design of the study, it is unknown whether these alterations are a predisposing factor for the disorder, a result of the condition, or a combination of both. The results of this study suggest that optimizing hip joint function should be considered in the rehabilitation of runners with AT.

  10. Creating an Animal Model of Tendinopathy by Inducing Chondrogenic Differentiation with Kartogenin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Yuan

    Full Text Available Previous animal studies have shown that long term rat treadmill running induces over-use tendinopathy, which manifests as proteoglycan accumulation and chondrocytes-like cells within the affected tendons. Creating this animal model of tendinopathy by long term treadmill running is however time-consuming, costly and may vary among animals. In this study, we used a new approach to develop an animal model of tendinopathy using kartogenin (KGN, a bio-compound that can stimulate endogenous stem/progenitor cells to differentiate into chondrocytes. KGN-beads were fabricated and implanted into rat Achilles tendons. Five weeks after implantation, chondrocytes and proteoglycan accumulation were found at the KGN implanted site. Vascularity as well as disorganization in collagen fibers were also present in the same site along with increased expression of the chondrocyte specific marker, collagen type II (Col. II. In vitro studies confirmed that KGN was released continuously from KGN-alginate in vivo beads and induced chondrogenic differentiation of tendon stem/progenitor cells (TSCs suggesting that chondrogenesis after KGN-bead implantation into the rat tendons is likely due to the aberrant differentiation of TSCs into chondrocytes. Taken together, our results showed that KGN-alginate beads can be used to create a rat model of tendinopathy, which, at least in part, reproduces the features of over-use tendinopathy model created by long term treadmill running. This model is mechanistic (stem cell differentiation, highly reproducible and precise in creating localized tendinopathic lesions. It is expected that this model will be useful to evaluate the effects of various topical treatments such as NSAIDs and platelet-rich plasma (PRP for the treatment of tendinopathy.

  11. Increased Upper Trapezius Muscle Stiffness in Overhead Athletes with Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Hio Teng; Hug, François; Fu, Siu Ngor

    2016-01-01

    Although excessive tension of the upper trapezius (UT) is thought to contribute to rotator cuff tendinopathy, no study examined UT tension in athletes with and without rotator cuff tendinopathy. Here we used UT shear modulus measured using ultrasound shear wave elastography as an index of muscle stiffness/tension. The aims of this study were twofold: 1) to determine whether the UT muscle shear modulus is altered in athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy compared to asymptomatic athletes, and 2) to detect optimal cut-off points of UT shear modulus in identifying athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy. Forty-three male volleyball players (17 asymptomatic and 26 with rotator cuff tendinopathy, mean age = 22.9±3.5 years) participated in the study. UT shear modulus was quantified during active arm holding at 30° and 60° of shoulder abduction and passive arm positioning at 0°, 30° and 60° of shoulder abduction. During the active tasks, the UT shear modulus was higher in athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy than the asymptomatic athletes (p = 0.002), regardless the arm position. During the passive tasks, athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy exhibited a higher UT shear modulus than asymptomatic athletes only at 0° of shoulder abduction (13.0±2.5 kPa vs 10.2±1.8 kPa, p = 0.001). When considering the active task, an optimal cut-off shear modulus of 12.0 kPa at 30° of shoulder abduction (sensitivity = 0.84, specificity = 0.57, AUC = 0.757, p = 0.008) and 9.5 kPa at 60° of shoulder abduction (sensitivity = 0.88, specificity = 0.67, AUC = 0.816, p = 0.002) was detected. When considering the passive task at 0° of shoulder abduction, a cut-off of 12.2 kPa was found (sensitivity = 0.73, AUC = 0.817, p = 0.001). Findings from the present study show that monitoring passive and active UT muscle shear modulus may provide important information for the prevention/rehabilitation of rotator cuff tendinopathy.

  12. Treating tendinopathy: perspective on anti-inflammatory intervention and therapeutic exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Michael F; Denegar, Craig R

    2015-04-01

    Tendinopathy is a common and complex disorder. Once viewed as an inflammatory condition labeled tendinitis, it is now viewed along a continuum that can lead to tissue necrosis and risk of tendon rupture. Anti-inflammatory medications can alter symptoms but may also promote tissue degeneration. Loading of the tendon through exercise, especially exercise involving eccentric muscle contraction, has been shown to promote symptom resolution and functional recovery in many patients. This article reviews the pathoetiology of tendinopathy and the role anti-inflammatory interventions and therapeutic exercise in treatment of active patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. MRI and US of gluteal tendinopathy in greater trochanteric pain syndrome

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    Kong, Andrew; Van der Vliet, Andrew [Regional Imaging Border, Albury, NSW (Australia); Zadow, Steven [Dr Jones and Partners Medical Imaging, Adelaide, SA (Australia)

    2007-07-15

    Greater trochanteric pain syndrome is commonly due to gluteus minimus or medius injury rather than trochanteric bursitis. Gluteal tendinopathy most frequently occurs in late-middle aged females. In this pictorial review the pertinent MRI and US anatomy of the gluteal tendon insertions on the greater trochanter and the adjacent bursae are reviewed. The direct (peritendinitis, tendinosis, partial and complete tear) and indirect (bursal fluid, bony changes and fatty atrophy) MRI signs of gluteal tendon injury are illustrated. The key sonographic findings of gluteal tendinopathy are also discussed. (orig.)

  14. Increased Upper Trapezius Muscle Stiffness in Overhead Athletes with Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hio Teng Leong

    Full Text Available Although excessive tension of the upper trapezius (UT is thought to contribute to rotator cuff tendinopathy, no study examined UT tension in athletes with and without rotator cuff tendinopathy. Here we used UT shear modulus measured using ultrasound shear wave elastography as an index of muscle stiffness/tension. The aims of this study were twofold: 1 to determine whether the UT muscle shear modulus is altered in athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy compared to asymptomatic athletes, and 2 to detect optimal cut-off points of UT shear modulus in identifying athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy. Forty-three male volleyball players (17 asymptomatic and 26 with rotator cuff tendinopathy, mean age = 22.9±3.5 years participated in the study. UT shear modulus was quantified during active arm holding at 30° and 60° of shoulder abduction and passive arm positioning at 0°, 30° and 60° of shoulder abduction. During the active tasks, the UT shear modulus was higher in athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy than the asymptomatic athletes (p = 0.002, regardless the arm position. During the passive tasks, athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy exhibited a higher UT shear modulus than asymptomatic athletes only at 0° of shoulder abduction (13.0±2.5 kPa vs 10.2±1.8 kPa, p = 0.001. When considering the active task, an optimal cut-off shear modulus of 12.0 kPa at 30° of shoulder abduction (sensitivity = 0.84, specificity = 0.57, AUC = 0.757, p = 0.008 and 9.5 kPa at 60° of shoulder abduction (sensitivity = 0.88, specificity = 0.67, AUC = 0.816, p = 0.002 was detected. When considering the passive task at 0° of shoulder abduction, a cut-off of 12.2 kPa was found (sensitivity = 0.73, AUC = 0.817, p = 0.001. Findings from the present study show that monitoring passive and active UT muscle shear modulus may provide important information for the prevention/rehabilitation of rotator cuff tendinopathy.

  15. In vivo biological response to extracorporeal shockwave therapy in human tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waugh, C. M.; Morrissey, D.; Jones, E.

    2015-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) is a non-invasive treatment for chronic tendinopathies, however little is known about the in-vivo biological mechanisms of ESWT. Using microdialysis, we examined the real-time biological response of healthy and pathological tendons to ESWT. A single session......-responders based on a minimum 5-fold increase in any inflammatory marker or MMP from pre- to post-ESWT. Our findings provide novel evidence of the biological mechanisms underpinning ESWT in humans in vivo. They suggest that the mechanical stimulus provided by ESWT might aid tendon remodelling in tendinopathy...

  16. Development of a self-managed loaded exercise programme for rotator cuff tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlewood, Chris; Malliaras, Peter; Mawson, Sue; May, Stephen; Walters, Stephen

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes a self-managed loaded exercise programme which has been designed to address the pain and disability associated with rotator cuff tendinopathy. The intervention has been developed with reference to current self-management theory and with reference to the emerging benefit of loaded exercise for tendinopathy. This self-managed loaded exercise programme is being evaluated within the mixed methods SELF study (ISRCTN 84709751) which includes a pragmatic randomised controlled trial conducted within the UK National Health Service. Copyright © 2012 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Treatment Options for Patellar Tendinopathy: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everhart, Joshua S; Cole, Devon; Sojka, John H; Higgins, John D; Magnussen, Robert A; Schmitt, Laura C; Flanigan, David C

    2017-04-01

    To compare the efficacy of common invasive and noninvasive patellar tendinopathy (PT) treatment strategies. A systematic search was performed in PubMed, Google Scholar, CINAHL, UptoDate, Cochrane Reviews, and SPORTDiscus. Fifteen studies met the following inclusion criteria: (1) therapeutic outcome trial for PT, and (2) Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment was used to assess symptom severity at follow-up. Methodological quality and reporting bias were evaluated with a modified Coleman score and Begg's and Egger's tests of bias, respectively. A total of 15 studies were included. Reporting quality was high (mean Coleman score 86.0, standard deviation 9.7), and there was no systematic evidence of reporting bias. Increased duration of symptoms resulted in poorer outcomes regardless of treatment (0.9% decrease in improvement per additional month of symptoms; P = .004). Eccentric training with or without core stabilization or stretching improved symptoms (61% improvement in the Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment score, 95% confidence interval [CI] 53% to 69%). Surgery in patients refractory to nonoperative treatment also improved symptoms (57%, 95% CI 52% to 62%) with similar outcomes among arthroscopic and open approaches. Results from shockwave (54%, 95% CI 22% to 87%) and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) studies (55%, 95% CI 5% to 105%) varied widely though PRP may accelerate early recovery. Finally, steroid injection provided no benefit (20%, 95% CI -20% to 60%). Initial treatment of PT can consist of eccentric squat-based therapy, shockwave, or PRP as monotherapy or an adjunct to accelerate recovery. Surgery or shockwave can be considered for patients who fail to improve after 6 months of conservative treatment. Corticosteroid therapy should not be used in the treatment of PT. Level IV, systematic review of Level II-IV studies. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Sports and exercise-related tendinopathies: a review of selected topical issues by participants of the second International Scientific Tendinopathy Symposium (ISTS) Vancouver 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Alex; Docking, Sean; Vicenzino, Bill; Alfredson, Håkan; Zwerver, Johannes; Lundgreen, Kirsten; Finlay, Oliver; Pollock, Noel; Cook, Jill L; Fearon, Angela; Purdam, Craig R; Hoens, Alison; Rees, Jonathan D; Goetz, Thomas J; Danielson, Patrik

    2013-01-01

    In September 2010, the first International Scientific Tendinopathy Symposium (ISTS) was held in Umeå, Sweden, to establish a forum for original scientific and clinical insights in this growing field of clinical research and practice. The second ISTS was organised by the same group and held in Vancouver, Canada, in September 2012. This symposium was preceded by a round-table meeting in which the participants engaged in focused discussions, resulting in the following overview of tendinopathy clinical and research issues. This paper is a narrative review and summary developed during and after the second ISTS. The document is designed to highlight some key issues raised at ISTS 2012, and to integrate them into a shared conceptual framework. It should be considered an update and a signposting document rather than a comprehensive review. The document is developed for use by physiotherapists, physicians, athletic trainers, massage therapists and other health professionals as well as team coaches and strength/conditioning managers involved in care of sportspeople or workers with tendinopathy. PMID:23584762

  19. Plantaris Excision Reduces Pain in Midportion Achilles Tendinopathy Even in the Absence of Plantaris Tendinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, James D F; Stephen, Joanna M; van Dijk, C Niek

    2016-12-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that the plantaris can contribute to symptoms in at least a subset of patients with midportion Achilles tendinopathy. However, the nature of its involvement remains unclear. To determine whether excised plantaris tendons from patients with midportion Achilles tendinopathy display tendinopathic changes and whether the presence of such changes affect clinical outcomes. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Sixteen plantaris tendons in patients with midportion Achilles tendinopathy recalcitrant to conservative management underwent histological examination for the presence of tendinopathic changes. All patients had imaging to confirm the presence of the plantaris tendon adherent to or invaginated into the focal area of Achilles tendinosis. Visual analog scale (VAS) and Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS) results were recorded pre- and postoperatively. Sixteen patients (mean age, 26.2 years; range, 18-47 years) underwent surgery, with a mean follow-up of 14 months (range, 6-20 months). The plantaris tendon was histologically normal in 13 of 16 cases (81%). Inflammatory changes in the loose peritendinous connective tissue surrounding the plantaris tendon were evident in all cases. There was significant improvement in mean VAS scores (P < .05) and all domains of the FAOS postoperatively (P < .05). The absence of any tendinopathic changes in the excised plantaris of 13 patients who clinically improved suggests plantaris involvement with Achilles tendinopathy may not yet be fully understood and supports the concept that this may be a compressive or a frictional phenomenon rather than purely tendinopathic.

  20. A Proposed Return-to-Sport Program for Patients With Midportion Achilles Tendinopathy: Rationale and Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Crossley, Kay M

    2015-11-01

    Synopsis Achilles tendinopathy is a common overuse injury in athletes involved in running and jumping activities and sports. The intervention with the highest level of evidence is exercise therapy, and it is recommended that all patients initially be treated with exercise for at least 3 months prior to considering other treatment options. Recovery from Achilles tendinopathy can take up to a year, and there is a high propensity for recurrence, especially during the return-to-sport phase. The extent of the tendon injury, the age and sex of the athlete, the magnitude of pain/symptoms, the extent of impairments, and the demands of the sport all need to be considered when planning for return to sport. This clinical commentary describes an approach to return to sport for patients with midportion Achilles tendinopathy. The aim of the return-to-sport program is to facilitate the decision-making process in returning an athlete with midportion Achilles tendinopathy back to full sport participation and to minimize the chances for recurrence of the injury. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2015;45(11):876-886. Epub 21 Sep 2015. doi:10.2519/jospt.2015.5885.

  1. Ultrasound-guided platelet-rich plasma injection for distal biceps tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Scott L; Bell, Simon N; Connell, David; Coghlan, Jennifer A

    2015-04-01

    Distal biceps tendinopathy is an uncommon cause of elbow pain. The optimum treatment for cases refractory to conservative treatment is unclear. Platelet-rich plasma has been used successfully for other tendinopathies around the elbow. Six patients with clinical and radiological evidence of distal biceps tendinopathy underwent ultrasound-guided platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection. Clinical examination findings, visual analogue score (VAS) for pain and Mayo Elbow Performance scores were recorded. The Mayo Elbow Performance Score improved from 68.3 (range 65 to 85) (fair function) to 95 (range 85 to 100) (excellent function). The VAS at rest improved from a mean of 2.25 (range 2 to 5) pre-injection to 0. The VAS with movement improved from a mean of 7.25 (range 5 to 8) pre-injection to 1.3 (range 0 to 2). No complications were noted. Ultrasound-guided PRP injection appears to be a safe and effective treatment for recalcitrant cases of distal biceps tendinopathy. Further investigation with a randomized controlled trial is needed to fully assess its efficacy.

  2. COMPARISON OF ASTYM THERAPY AND KINESIOTAPING FOR ROTATOR CUFF TENDINOPATHY IN DIABETIC PATIENTS: RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azza Atya

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rotator cuff tendinopathy is a significant problem among diabetics that frequently restricts patient’s activity in terms of pain and disability. The purpose of this study was to compare between the effect of Astym therapy and kinesiotaping in treating diabetic patients with chronic rotator cuff tendinopathy. Methods: 56 diabetic patients diagnosed with chronic rotator cuff tendinopathy were randomly assigned into Astym therapy group (n=28 or kinesiotaping group (n= 28. All patients received conventional program in addition to Astym treatment or Kinesiotaping for 24 sessions (2times/week. Patients were assessed at baseline and at the end of corresponding intervention with visual analogy scale (VAS for pain intensity, shoulder disability questioner (SDQ for shoulder disability, and electrogoniometer for shoulder range of motion. Results: For the 56 study participants (21 males and 35 females; mean age=41.9±6.9 years there were significant differences in all measuring outcomes in both group when compared to baseline measurements (p 0.05. Conclusion: kinesiotaping appears to be more effective than Astym therapy in reducing pain for diabetic patients with chronic rotator cuff tendinopathy.

  3. Corticosteroid injections, eccentric decline squat training and heavy slow resistance training in patellar tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsgaard, M; Kovanen, V; Aagaard, P

    2009-01-01

    A randomized-controlled single-blind trial was conducted to investigate the clinical, structural and functional effects of peritendinous corticosteroid injections (CORT), eccentric decline squat training (ECC) and heavy slow resistance training (HSR) in patellar tendinopathy. Thirty-nine male...

  4. Patient- and Disease-Specific Factors Associated With Operative Management of de Quervain Tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmers, Nikolas H; Liu, Tiffany C; Gordon, Joshua A; Bozentka, David J; Steinberg, David R; Gray, Benjamin L

    2017-09-07

    It remains unclear which factors, patient- or disease-specific, are associated with electing to undergo operative management for de Quervain tendinopathy. Our null hypothesis was that no patient- or disease-specific factors would be associated with the choice of surgical treatment of de Quervain tendinopathy. We performed a retrospective review of consecutive patients diagnosed with de Quervain tendinopathy over 3 years by 1 of 3 fellowship-trained hand surgeons at an urban academic institution. Descriptive statistics were calculated for patient baseline and disease-specific characteristics. Cohorts were compared using bivariate analysis for all collected variables. Binary logistic regression with backward stepwise term selection was performed including independent predictors identified by bivariate analysis. A total of 200 patients were identified for inclusion. Bivariate analysis revealed that surgically treated patients were significantly more likely to have Medicaid insurance, psychiatric illness history, and disabled work status. Regression analysis revealed an association between surgical treatment and 2 of the factors evaluated: Medicaid insurance status and psychiatric illness history. Psychiatric illness and Medicaid insurance status are associated with undergoing surgical release of the first dorsal compartment. These findings support the use of a biopsychosocial framework when treating patients with de Quervain tendinopathy. Prognostic IV. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Therapeutic exercise for rotator cuff tendinopathy: a systematic review of contextual factors and prescription parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlewood, Chris; Malliaras, Peter; Chance-Larsen, Ken

    2015-06-01

    Exercise is widely regarded as an effective intervention for symptomatic rotator cuff tendinopathy but the prescription is diverse and the important components of such programmes are not well understood. The objective of this study was to systematically review the contextual factors and prescription parameters of published exercise programmes for rotator cuff tendinopathy, to generate recommendations based on current evidence. An electronic search of AMED, CiNAHL, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, PEDro and SPORTDiscus was undertaken from their inception to June 2014 and supplemented by hand searching. Eligible studies included randomized controlled trials evaluating the effectiveness of exercise in participants with rotator cuff tendinopathy. Included studies were appraised using the Cochrane risk of bias tool and synthesized narratively. Fourteen studies were included, and suggested that exercise programmes are widely applicable and can be successfully designed by physiotherapists with varying experience; whether the exercise is completed at home or within a clinic setting does not appear to matter and neither does pain production or pain avoidance during exercise; inclusion of some level of resistance does seem to matter although the optimal level is unclear, the optimal number of repetitions is also unclear but higher repetitions might confer superior outcomes; three sets of exercise are preferable to two or one set but the optimal frequency is unknown; most programmes should demonstrate clinically significant outcomes by 12 weeks. This systematic review has offered preliminary guidance in relation to contextual factors and prescription parameters to aid development and application of exercise programmes for rotator cuff tendinopathy.

  6. Feasibility and reliability of pain pressure threshold measurements in patellar tendinopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, Paul; van der Noord, Robert; Zwerver, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Patellar tendinopathy is a common and often difficult to treat overuse injury which is characterized by activity-related anterior knee and focal palpation tenderness of the patellar tendon. The clinical diagnosis is mainly based on clinical examination, in which the yardstick is a non-standardized

  7. Mechanical properties of the patellar tendon in elite volleyball players with and without patellar tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helland, Christian; Bojsen-Møller, Jens; Raastad, Truls; Seynnes, Olivier R; Moltubakk, Marie M; Jakobsen, Vidar; Visnes, Håvard; Bahr, Roald

    2013-09-01

    Although differences in mechanical properties between symptomatic and healthy tendons have been observed for the Achilles tendon, the impact of tendinopathy on patellar tendon mechanics is not fully documented. The aim of the present case-control study was to assess the mechanical properties of the tendon and jump performance in elite athletes with and without patellar tendinopathy. We identified 17 male volleyball players with patellar tendinopathy and 18 healthy matched controls from a 5-year prospective cohort study on junior elite volleyball players. Outcome variables included three measures of maximal vertical jump performance and ultrasound-based assessments of patellar tendon cross-sectional area, stiffness and Young's modulus. The proximal cross-sectional area of the patellar tendon was significantly larger in the tendinopathic group (133 ± 11 vs 112 ± 9 mm(2), respectively; p jump height and the squat jump height (3.4 ± 2.2 vs 1.2 ± 1.5 cm, p = 0.005) was significantly higher in the tendinopathic group compared with the control group. Patellar tendinopathy is associated with a decrease in the mechanical and material properties of the tendon in elite athletes subjected to a high volume of jumping activity. However, compared with their healthy counterparts, tendinopathic volleyball players have a better ability to utilise the stretch-shortening cycle when jumping.

  8. Nerve distributions in insertional Achilles tendinopathy - a comparison of bone, bursae and tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Gustav; Backman, Ludvig J; Christensen, Jens; Alfredson, Håkan

    2017-03-01

    In a condition of pain in the Achilles tendon insertion there are multiple structures involved, such as the Achilles tendon itself, the retrocalcaneal bursa and a bony protrusion at the calcaneal tuberosity called Haglund's deformity. The innervation patterns of these structures are scarcely described, and the subcutaneous calcaneal bursa is traditionally not considered to be involved in the pathology. This study aimed at describing the innervation patterns of the four structures described above to provide a better understanding of possible origins of pain at the Achilles tendon insertion. Biopsies were taken from 10 patients with insertional Achilles tendinopathy, which had pathological changes in the subcutaneous and retrocalcaneal bursae, a Haglund deformity and Achilles tendon tendinopathy as verified by ultrasound. The biopsies were stained using immunohistochemistry in order to delineate the innervation patterns in the structures involved in insertional Achilles tendinopathy. Immunohistochemical examinations found that the subcutaneous bursa scored the highest using a semi-quantitative evaluation of the degree of innervation when compared to the retrocalcaneal bursa, the Achilles tendon, and the calcaneal bone. These findings suggest that the subcutaneous bursa, which is traditionally not included in surgical treatment, may be a clinically important factor in insertional Achilles tendinopathy.

  9. Pain assessment in patellar tendinopathy using pain pressure threshold algometry: : An observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kregel, Jeroen; van Wilgen, Cornelis Paul; Zwerver, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    ObjectiveAssessing pain in patellar tendinopathy (PT) is difficult to perform in a standardized way. With this study, we measured pain in athletes with PT by means of pain pressure threshold (PPT) algometry in a standardized manner. Subsequently, the goal of this study is to determine normative

  10. Risk factors for patellar tendinopathy in basketball and volleyball players : A cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Worp, H.; Van Ark, M.; Zwerver, J.; Van den Akker-Scheek, I.

    2012-01-01

    Patellar tendinopathy (PT) has a multifactorial etiology, and many possible risk factors have been described in the literature. The findings are conflicting, though, and most research has been conducted on elite athletes. The aim of the current study is to determine the risk factors for PT in a

  11. The impact of patellar tendinopathy on sports and work performance in active athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vries, Astrid J; Koolhaas, Wendy; Zwerver, Johannes; Diercks, Ron L.; Nieuwenhuis, Kari; Van Der Worp, Henk; Brouwer, Sandra; Van Den Akker-Scheek, Inge

    2017-01-01

    Greater insight into sports and work performance of athletes with patellar tendinopathy (PT) will help establish the severity of this common overuse injury. Primary aim of this study is to investigate the impact of PT on sports and work performance. Seventy seven active athletes with PT (50 males;

  12. Effect of patellar strap and sports tape on pain in patellar tendinopathy : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries , de A.; Zwerver, J.; Diercks, R.; Tak, I.; van Berkel, S.; van Cingel, R.; van der Worp, H.; van den Akker-Scheek, I.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous athletes with patellar tendinopathy (PT) use a patellar strap or sports tape during sports. This study's aim was to investigate the short-term effect of these orthoses on patellar tendon pain. Participants performed the single-leg decline squat, vertical jump test, and triple-hop test under

  13. Risk factors for patellar tendinopathy : A systematic review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Worp, Henk; van Ark, Mathijs; Roerink, Saskia; Pepping, Gert-Jan; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Zwerver, Johannes

    Patellar tendinopathy (PT) is an injury with a high prevalence in sports. Knowledge of risk factors is essential for developing preventive measures and rehabilitation programmes. However, risk factors associated with PT have not yet been systematically studied. This review was undertaken to identify

  14. Eccentric overload training in patients with a chronic Achilles tendinopathy: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. de Knikker; T. Takken; J.J. Kingma; Dr. H.M. Wittink

    2007-01-01

    Background: Eccentric overload training seems to be a promising conservative intervention in patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy. The efficacy of eccentric overload training on the outcome measures of pain and physical functioning are not exactly clear. Study design: Systematic review of the

  15. Ultrasound assessment for grading structural tendon changes in supraspinatus tendinopathy: an inter-rater reliability study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingwersen, Kim Gordon; Hjarbæk, John; Eshøj, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the inter-rater reliability of measuring structural changes in the tendon of patients, clinically diagnosed with supraspinatus tendinopathy (cases) and healthy participants (controls), on ultrasound (US) images captured by standardised procedures. Methods A total of 40 participants...

  16. Rocker shoes reduce Achilles tendon load in running and walking in patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sobhani, Sobhan; Zwerver, Johannes; van den Heuvel, Edwin; Postema, Klaas; Dekker, Rienk; Hijmans, Juha M.

    OBJECTIVES: Relative rest and pain relief play an important role in the management of Achilles tendinopathy, and might be achieved by reducing the load on the Achilles tendon. Previous studies have provided evidence that rocker shoes are able to decrease the ankle internal plantar flexion moment in

  17. Sonographic prevalence of groin hernias and adductor tendinopathy in patients with femoroacetabular impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naal, Florian D; Dalla Riva, Francesco; Wuerz, Thomas H; Dubs, Beat; Leunig, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a common debilitating condition that is associated with groin pain and limitation in young and active patients. Besides FAI, various disorders such as hernias, adductor tendinopathy, athletic pubalgia, lumbar spine affections, and others can cause similar symptoms. To determine the prevalence of inguinal and/or femoral herniation and adductor insertion tendinopathy using dynamic ultrasound in a cohort of patients with radiographic evidence of FAI. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. This retrospective study consisted of 74 patients (36 female and 38 male; mean age, 29 years; 83 symptomatic hips) with groin pain and radiographic evidence of FAI. In addition to the usual diagnostic algorithm, all patients underwent a dynamic ultrasound examination for signs of groin herniation and tendinopathy of the proximal insertion of the adductors. Evidence of groin herniation was found in 34 hips (41%). There were 27 inguinal (6 female, 21 male) and 10 femoral (9 female, 1 male) hernias. In 3 cases, inguinal and femoral herniation was coexistent. Overall, 5 patients underwent subsequent hernia repair. Patients with groin herniation were significantly older than those without (33 vs 27 years, respectively; P = .01). There were no significant differences for any of the radiographic or clinical parameters. Tendinopathy of the proximal adductor insertion was detected in 19 cases (23%; 11 female, 8 male). Tendinopathy was coexistent with groin herniation in 8 of the 19 cases. There were no significant differences for any of the radiographic or clinical parameters between patients with or without tendinopathy. Patients with a negative diagnostic hip injection result were more likely to have a concomitant groin hernia than those with a positive injection result (80% vs 27%, respectively). Overall, 38 hips underwent FAI surgery with satisfactory outcomes in terms of score values and subjective improvement. The results demonstrate that groin

  18. Astym treatment vs. eccentric exercise for lateral elbow tendinopathy: a randomized controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas L. Sevier

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Patients with chronic lateral elbow (LE tendinopathy, commonly known as tennis elbow, often experience prolonged symptoms and frequent relapses. Astym treatment, evidenced in animal studies to promote the healing and regeneration of soft tissues, is hypothesized to improve outcomes in LE tendinopathy patients. This study had two objectives: (1 to compare the efficacy of Astym treatment to an evidence-based eccentric exercise program (EE for patients with chronic LE tendinopathy, and (2 to quantify outcomes of subjects non-responsive to EE who were subsequently treated with Astym treatment.Study Design. Prospective, two group, parallel, randomized controlled trial completed at a large orthopedic center in Indiana. Inclusion criteria: age range of 18–65 years old, with clinical indications of LE tendinopathy greater than 12 weeks, with no recent corticosteriod injection or disease altering comorbidities.Methods. Subjects with chronic LE tendinopathy (107 subjects with 113 affected elbows were randomly assigned using computer-generated random number tables to 4 weeks of Astym treatment (57 elbows or EE treatment (56 elbows. Data collected at baseline, 4, 8, 12 weeks, 6 and 12 months. Primary outcome measure: DASH; secondary outcome measures: pain with activity, maximum grip strength and function. The treating physicians and the rater were blinded; subjects and treating clinicians could not be blinded due to the nature of the treatments.Results. Resolution response rates were 78.3% for the Astym group and 40.9% for the EE group. Astym subjects showed greater gains in DASH scores (p = 0.047 and in maximum grip strength (p = 0.008 than EE subjects. Astym therapy also resolved 20/21 (95.7% of the EE non-responders, who showed improvements in DASH scores (p < 0.005, pain with activity (p = 0.002, and function (p = 0.004 following Astym treatment. Gains continued at 6 and 12 months. No adverse effects were reported.Conclusion. This study

  19. Effect of 3 months of progressive high-load strength training in patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy: Primary results from the double-blind, randomised, controlled Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy Exercise (RoCTEx) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingwersen, Kim Gordon; Jensen, Steen Lund; Sørensen, Lilli

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Progressive high-load exercise (PHLE) has led to positive clinical results in patients with patellar and Achilles tendinopathy. However, its effects on rotator cuff tendinopathy still need to be investigated. PURPOSE: To assess the clinical effects of PHLE versus low-load exercise (LLE......) among patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy. STUDY DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. METHODS: Patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy were recruited and randomized to 12 weeks of PHLE or LLE, stratified for concomitant administration of corticosteroid injection. The primary...... outcome measure was change from baseline to 12 weeks in the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) questionnaire, assessed in the intention-to-treat population. RESULTS: A total of 100 patients were randomized to PHLE (n = 49) or LLE (n = 51). Mean changes in the DASH questionnaire were 7...

  20. Plantaris excision in the treatment of non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy in elite athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, James D F; Freeman, Richard; Pollock, Noel

    2015-12-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is a serious and frequently occurring problem, especially in elite athletes. Recent research has suggested a role for the plantaris tendon in non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy. To assess whether excising the plantaris tendon improved the symptoms of Achilles tendinopathy in elite athletes. This prospective consecutive case series study investigated 32 elite athletes who underwent plantaris tendon excision using a mini-incision technique to treat medially located pain associated with non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy. Preoperative and postoperative visual analogue scores (VAS) for pain and the foot and ankle outcome score (FAOS) as well as time to return to sport and satisfaction scores were assessed. At a mean follow-up of 22.4 months (12-48), 29/32 (90%) of athletes were satisfied with the results. Thirty of the 32 athletes (94%) returned to sport at a mean of 10.3 weeks (5-27). The mean VAS score improved from 5.8 to 0.8 (p<0.01) and the mean FAOS improved in all domains (p<0.01). Few complications were seen, four athletes experienced short-term stiffness and one had a superficial wound infection. The plantaris tendon may be responsible for symptoms in some athletes with non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy. Excision carries a low risk of complications and may provide significant improvement in symptoms enabling an early return to elite-level sports. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  1. Bicomponent ultrashort echo time T2* analysis for assessment of patients with patellar tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijowski, Richard; Wilson, John J; Liu, Fang

    2017-11-01

    To compare bicomponent ultrashort echo time (UTE) T2* parameters of patellar tendon between healthy volunteers and patients with patellar tendinopathy. This study was performed with Institutional Review Board approval and with all subjects signing informed consent. A UTE- T2* mapping sequence was performed at 3.0T on the knees of 10 healthy volunteers and in 11 patients with patellar tendinopathy. The UTE- T2* relaxation times of the fast relaxing macromolecular bound water component ( T2*F) and the slow relaxing bulk water component ( T2*S) and the fraction of the fast relaxing macromolecular bound water component (F F ) of patellar tendon were measured in all subjects. Wilcoxon rank-sum tests were used to compare UTE- T2* parameters between healthy volunteers and patients with patellar tendinopathy. Mean T2*F, T2*S, and F F of the patellar tendon was 1.5 msec, 23.1 msec, and 79.5%, respectively, for healthy volunteers and 1.9 msec, 22.3 msec, and 75.5%, respectively, for patients with patellar tendinopathy. There were statistically significant differences between groups of subjects for T2*F (P = 0.01) and F F (P = 0.007) but not T2*S (P = 0.10) of the patellar tendon. Patients with patellar tendinopathy had significantly higher T2*F and significantly lower F F of patellar tendon than healthy volunteers, which suggests that bicomponent UTE- T2* parameters can detect changes in the composition and microstructure of degenerative tendon. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;46:1441-1447. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  2. Efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for rotator cuff tendinopathy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmeules, F; Boudreault, J; Roy, J S; Dionne, C E; Frémont, P; MacDermid, J C

    2016-03-01

    To perform a systematic review on the efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for the treatment of rotator cuff tendinopathy in adults. A literature search was conducted in four databases (CINAHL, Embase, PubMed and PeDRO) for randomised controlled trials published from date of inception until April 2015, comparing the efficacy of TENS for the treatment of rotator cuff tendinopathy with placebo or any other intervention. Risk of bias was evaluated using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Results were summarised qualitatively. Six studies were included in this review. The mean methodological score was 49% (standard deviation 16%), indicating an overall high risk of bias. One placebo-controlled trial reported that a single TENS session provided immediate pain reduction for patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy, but did not follow the participants in the short, medium or long term. Two trials that compared ultrasound therapy with TENS reported discrepancy and contradictory results in terms of pain reduction and shoulder range of motion. Corticosteroid injections were found to be superior to TENS for pain reduction in the short term, but the differences were not clinically important. Other studies included in this review concluded that TENS was not superior to heat or pulsed radiofrequency. Due to the limited number of studies and the overall high risk of bias of the studies included in this review, no conclusions can be drawn on the efficacy of TENS for the treatment of rotator cuff tendinopathy. More methodologically sound studies are needed to document the efficacy of TENS. Until then, clinicians should prefer other evidence-based rehabilitation interventions proven to be efficacious to treat patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy. Copyright © 2015 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Sodium MR imaging of Achilles tendinopathy at 7 T: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juras, Vladimir; Zbýn, Stefan; Pressl, Christina; Domayer, Stephan E R; Hofstaetter, Jochen G; Mayerhoefer, Marius E; Windhager, Reinhard; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of sodium magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the diagnosis of Achilles tendinopathy. Institutional review board approval and written informed consent were obtained. Twenty healthy volunteers and eight patients with Achilles tendinopathy were examined by using a 7-T whole-body MR imager with a 15-channel sodium knee coil. The sodium signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) from each region, as well as from the whole Achilles tendon, was compared between patients and healthy control subjects. The changes in SNR were assessed with a two-tailed unpaired t test in three regions of the Achilles tendon: the insertion area, the middle portion, and the muscle-tendon junction. P values less than .05 were considered to indicate a statistically significant difference. To validate a relationship between the sodium SNR and the glycosaminoglycan content in tendon, five cadaver ankles were examined with MR imaging and immunohistologically. The Pearson correlation coefficient between sodium SNR and glycosaminoglycan content was calculated. Significant differences (P sodium SNR of healthy control subjects (mean SNR, 4.9 ± 2.1 [standard deviation]) and patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy (mean SNR, 9.3 ± 2.3) were observed. Similar results were found at the insertion (mean SNR in control subjects, 6.7 ± 2.3; mean SNR in patients, 12.3 ± 4.5; P 1.9; mean SNR in patients, 9.4 ± 3.0; P sodium SNR difference between control subjects and patients was small but still bellow the significance level (P = .0137). The increase in sodium SNR was observed in all regions independently of the location of morphologic findings. The Pearson correlation coefficient between sodium SNR and glycosaminoglycan content was 0.71. Sodium MR imaging may allow detection of the proteoglycan content increase in Achilles tendinopathy and thus identify the biochemical changes in the early stages of tendinopathy. © RSNA, 2011.

  4. The efficacy of manual therapy for rotator cuff tendinopathy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins-Charbonneau, Ariel; Roy, Jean-Sébastien; Dionne, Clermont E; Frémont, Pierre; MacDermid, Joy C; Desmeules, François

    2015-05-01

    Systematic review and meta-analysis. To evaluate the efficacy of manual therapy (MT) for patients with rotator cuff (RC) tendinopathy. Rotator cuff tendinopathy is a highly prevalent musculoskeletal disorder, for which MT is a common intervention used by physical therapists. However, evidence regarding the efficacy of MT is inconclusive. A literature search using terms related to shoulder, RC tendinopathy, and MT was conducted in 4 databases to identify randomized controlled trials that compared MT to any other type of intervention to treat RC tendinopathy. Randomized controlled trials were assessed with the Cochrane risk-of-bias tool. Meta-analyses or qualitative syntheses of evidence were performed. Twenty-one studies were included. The majority had a high risk of bias. Only 5 studies had a score of 69% or greater, indicating a moderate to low risk of bias. A small but statistically significant overall effect for pain reduction of MT compared with a placebo or in addition to another intervention was observed (n = 406), which may or may not be clinically important, given a mean difference of 1.1 (95% confidence interval: 0.6, 1.6) on a 10-cm visual analog scale. Adding MT to an exercise program (n = 226) significantly decreased pain (mean difference, 1.0; 95% confidence interval: 0.7, 1.4), as reported on a 10-cm visual analog scale, which may or may not be clinically important. Based on qualitative analyses, it is unclear whether MT used alone or added to an exercise program improves function. For patients with RC tendinopathy, based on low- to moderate-quality evidence, MT may decrease pain; however, it is unclear whether it can improve function. More methodologically sound studies are needed to make definitive conclusions. Therapy, level 1a-.

  5. Rocker shoes reduce Achilles tendon load in running and walking in patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhani, Sobhan; Zwerver, Johannes; van den Heuvel, Edwin; Postema, Klaas; Dekker, Rienk; Hijmans, Juha M

    2015-03-01

    Relative rest and pain relief play an important role in the management of Achilles tendinopathy, and might be achieved by reducing the load on the Achilles tendon. Previous studies have provided evidence that rocker shoes are able to decrease the ankle internal plantar flexion moment in healthy runners during walking and running. Since plantar flexion moment is related to the Achilles tendon loading, rocker shoes might be considered in the conservative management of Achilles tendinopathy. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the biomechanics of running and walking in a group of patients with Achilles tendinopathy wearing standard shoes versus rocker shoes. Cross-over. Thirteen Achilles tendinopathy patients (mean age 48 ± 14.5 years) underwent three-dimensional gait analysis wearing standard running shoes and rocker shoes during running and walking. Surface electromyography of triceps surae and tibialis anterior was recorded simultaneously. Patients had symptoms for an average of 22.5 months (median 11.5 months) and VISA-A scores were 54 ± 16. With the rocker shoes, the peak plantar flexion moment was reduced by 13% in both running (0.28 N m/kg, pshoes in walking. There was no difference between electromyography peak amplitudes of triceps surae between two shoe sessions in both activities. When used by patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy, rocker shoes cause a significant reduction in plantar flexion moment in the late stance phase of running and walking without substantial adaptations in triceps surae muscular activity. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Relation between ankle joint dynamics and patellar tendinopathy in elite volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, David P; Ajemian, Stanley V; Wiley, J Preston; Brunet, Jacques A; Zernicke, Ronald F

    2002-09-01

    Ankle joint complex dynamics developed during volleyball spike jumps take-offs and landings were quantified to assess potential relations between these joint dynamics and patellar tendinopathy. Three-dimensional kinematic data provided information about movements of the lower limbs, while the kinetic data permitted analysis of ground reaction forces as players took-off and landed from full-speed spike jumps. Simulated volleyball court with net in a biomechanics research laboratory. 10 members of the Canadian Men's National Volleyball Team. From history and physical examination, 3 of the 10 players had patellar tendon pain associated with activity and were diagnosed with patellar tendinopathy at the time of the study. Investigators were blinded about the injury status of the players. None. Three-dimensional kinematics and joint moments of the ankle, knee, and hip joints. Our analysis revealed that maximal external tibial rotation occurred at or near maximal dorsiflexion while maximal internal tibial rotation coincided with maximal plantarflexion. The plantarflexion moment was 3 to 10 times greater than all the other moments measured, with the maximal plantarflexor moment being calculated at 0.4 BWm (360 Nm). In blinded logistic regression analyses, we found one of the dynamics variables (inversion moment during the landing of the spike jump) was a significant predictor of patellar tendinopathy. Coupling the results of the current analysis of ankle joint complex dynamics with previously reported results of knee joint dynamics related to patellar tendinopathy suggests that a cluster of variables linked to patellar tendinopathy includes: high ankle inversion-eversion moments, high external tibial rotation and plantarflexion moments, large vertical ground reaction forces, and high rate of knee extensor moment development.

  7. The role of ultrasound guided peri-tendinous injection in the treatment of non-calcific tendinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamal Niazi

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: Ultrasound is a non invasive imaging technique that allows real time guidance for interventional therapy of non-calcific tendinopathy improving the result of peri-tendinous corticosteroid injection.

  8. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the VISA-A questionnaire for German-speaking achilles tendinopathy patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lohrer, Heinz; Nauck, Tanja

    2009-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is the predominant overuse injury in runners. To further investigate this overload injury in transverse and longitudinal studies a valid, responsive and reliable outcome measure is demanded...

  9. Release of the medial head of the gastrocnemius for Achilles tendinopathy in sedentary patients: a retrospective study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maffulli, Nicola; Del Buono, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    ... of the Achilles tendon and allows return to daily activities.Eighteen patients (seven men, 11 women) underwent release of the gastrocnemius medial head to manage chronic unilateral Achilles tendinopathy...

  10. Alfredson versus Silbernagel exercise therapy in chronic midportion Achilles tendinopathy : Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habets, Bas; Van Cingel, Robert E.H.; Backx, Frank J.G.; Huisstede, Bionka M.A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Midportion Achilles tendinopathy (AT) is a common overuse injury, usually requiring several months of rehabilitation. Exercise therapy of the ankle plantar flexors (i.e. tendon loading) is considered crucial during conservative rehabilitation. Alfredson's isolated eccentric and

  11. Three Months of Progressive High-Load Versus Traditional Low-Load Strength Training Among Patients With Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingwersen, Kim Gordon; Jensen, Steen Lund; Sørensen, Lilli

    2017-01-01

    benefit from PHLE over traditional LLE among patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy. Further investigation of the possible interaction between exercise type and corticosteroid injection is needed to establish optimal and potentially synergistic combinations of these 2 factors. REGISTRATION: NCT01984203...

  12. Jumper's knee or lander's knee? A systematic review of the relation between jump biomechanics and patellar tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Worp, H; de Poel, H J; Diercks, R L; van den Akker-Scheek, I; Zwerver, J

    2014-07-01

    Patellar tendinopathy (jumper's knee) is a common injury in sports that comprise jump actions. This article systematically reviews the literature examining the relation between patellar tendinopathy and take-off and landing kinematics in order to uncover risk factors and potential prevention strategies. A systematic search of the Pubmed, Embase and Amed databases was performed to identify studies that reported kinematics of sport specific jumps in relation to patellar tendinopathy. A quantitative analysis was performed on 4 indentified studies. Differences were found only between controls and asymptomatic subjects with patellar tendon abnormalities. Most differences were found during horizontal landing after forward acceleration. A synthesis of the literature suggests that horizontal landing poses the greatest threat for developing patellar tendinopathy. A stiff movement pattern with a small post-touchdown range of motion and short landing time is associated with the onset of patellar tendinopathy. Accordingly, employing a flexible landing pattern seems to be an expedient strategy for reducing the risk for (re-) developing patellar tendinopathy. Together, these findings indicate that improving kinetic chain functioning, performing eccentric exercises and changing landing patterns are potential tools for preventive and/or therapeutic purposes. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Platelet-rich plasma: evidence for the treatment of patellar and Achilles tendinopathy--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Matteo, B; Filardo, G; Kon, E; Marcacci, M

    2015-04-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been introduced in the clinical practice to treat a growing number of different musculoskeletal pathologies. It is currently applied in the treatment of Achilles and patellar tendinopathies, which are common sport-related injuries very challenging to manage. Aim of the present paper was to review systematically the available clinical evidence concerning the application of PRP in the treatment of patellar and Achilles tendinopathy. A systematic review of the literature was performed according to the following inclusion criteria for relevant articles: (1) clinical reports of any level of evidence, (2) written in the English language, (3) with no time limitation and (4) on the use of PRP to treat conservatively Achilles and patellar tendinopathy. Twenty-two studies were included and analyzed. Two studies on patellar tendinopathy were randomized controlled trials (RCTs), whereas just one RCT was published on Achilles tendon. All the papers concerning patellar tendon reported positive outcome for PRP, which proved to be superior to other traditional approaches such as shock-wave therapy and dry needling. In the case of Achilles tendon, despite the encouraging findings reported by case series, the only RCT available showed no significant clinical difference between PRP and saline solution. The main finding of this study was the paucity of high-level literature regarding the application of PRP in the management of patellar and Achilles tendinopathy. However, the clinical data currently available, although not univocal, suggest considering PRP as a therapeutic option for recalcitrant patellar and Achilles tendinopathies.

  14. Role of VEGF, Nitric Oxide and sympathetic neurotransmitters in the pathogenesis of tendinopathy: a review of the current evidences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastiano Vasta

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic tendinopathy is a painful common condition affecting athletes as well as the general population undergoing to tendon overuse. Although its huge prevalence, little is known about tendinopathy pathogenesis, and even cloudier is its treatment.Traditionally, tendinopathy has been defined as a lack of tendon ability to overcome stressing stimuli with appropriate adaptive changes. Histologic studies have demonstrated the absence of inflammatory infiltrates, as a consequence conventional antinflammatory drugs have shown little or no effectiveness in treating tendinopathies. New strategies should be therefore identified to address chronic tendon disorders. Angiofibroblastic changes have been highlighted as the main feature of tendinopathy, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF has been demonstrated as one of the key molecules involved in vascular hyperplasia. More recently, attention has been focused on new peptides such as Substance P, nitric oxide and calcitonin gene-related peptide. Those new findings support the idea of a nerve-mediated disregulation of tendon metabolism. Each of those molecules could be a target for new treatment options. This study aimed to systematically review the current available clinical and basic science in order to summarize the latest evidences on the pathophysiology and its effect on treatment of chronic tendinopathy, and to spread suggestions for future research on its treatment.

  15. Role of VEGF, Nitric Oxide, and Sympathetic Neurotransmitters in the Pathogenesis of Tendinopathy: A Review of the Current Evidences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasta, Sebastiano; Di Martino, Alberto; Zampogna, Biagio; Torre, Guglielmo; Papalia, Rocco; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Chronic tendinopathy is a painful common condition affecting athletes as well as the general population undergoing to tendon overuse. Although its huge prevalence, little is known about tendinopathy pathogenesis, and even cloudier is its treatment. Traditionally, tendinopathy has been defined as a lack of tendon ability to overcome stressing stimuli with appropriate adaptive changes. Histologic studies have demonstrated the absence of inflammatory infiltrates, as a consequence conventional antinflammatory drugs have shown little or no effectiveness in treating tendinopathies. New strategies should be therefore identified to address chronic tendon disorders. Angiofibroblastic changes have been highlighted as the main feature of tendinopathy, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been demonstrated as one of the key molecules involved in vascular hyperplasia. More recently, attention has been focused on new peptides such as Substance P, nitric oxide, and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Those new findings support the idea of a nerve-mediated disregulation of tendon metabolism. Each of those molecules could be a target for new treatment options. This study aimed to systematically review the current available clinical and basic science in order to summarize the latest evidences on the pathophysiology and its effect on treatment of chronic tendinopathy, and to spread suggestions for future research on its treatment. PMID:27555817

  16. The impact of physically demanding work of basketball and volleyball players on the risk for patellar tendinopathy and on work limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Worp, H; Zwerver, J; Kuijer, P P F M; Frings-Dresen, M H W; van den Akker-Scheek, I

    2011-01-01

    Patellar tendinopathy is a common injury in jumping athletes. Little is known about work-related etiological factors for patellar tendinopathy and related work limitations. The aim of this study was to identify work-related etiological factors for patellar tendinopathy and to determine the relation between patellar tendinopathy and work limitations. Basketball and volleyball players between 18 and 35 years were invited to complete an online-questionnaire concerning knee complaints, etiological risk factors for patellar tendinopathy and related work limitations. A total of 1505 subjects were included in the analysis. Risk factors for patellar tendinopathy were gender and heavy physically demanding work. The odds for having patellar tendinopathy were significantly higher for heavy physically demanding occupations compared to mentally demanding occupations. 30% of subjects with patellar tendinopathy with a physically demanding job reported to be impaired in their work and 17% reported to be less productive. Basketball and volleyball players with heavy physically demanding work seem to have an increased risk for developing patellar tendinopathy. This finding has important clinical relevance in the treatment of this injury. Working activities should be adjusted in order to reduce the total load on the patellar tendon and help prevention and recovery.

  17. Short-term outcomes of extracorporeal shock wave therapy for the treatment of chronic non-calcific tendinopathy of the supraspinatus: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Galasso, Olimpio; Amelio, Ernesto; Riccelli, Daria Anna; Gasparini, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    There is evidence supporting the use of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) in calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff, but the best current evidence does not support its use in non-calcifying tendinopathy...

  18. [Guideline 'Chronic Achilles tendinopathy, in particular tendinosis, in sportsmen/sportswomen'].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Linschoten, R; den Hoed, P T; de Jongh, A C

    2007-10-20

    --Chronic Achilles tendinopathy in sports often leads to various therapeutic strategies, medical shopping and frequently to inability to perform at the desired level. --Although it is clear that this chronic tendinopathy is not an inflammatory disease of the tendon, the cause of the degeneration of the tendon fibres is not understood. --The main therapeutic measure--based on scientific evidence--is eccentric calf-muscle training for at least 3 months. --Recent therapies such as sclerotherapy ofneovascularizations in and around the Achilles tendon appear to be promising, but more studies are required. --About 20% of the patients tend to be refractive to conservative measures. --In selected cases surgery can be undertaken, with percutaneous longitudinal tenotomy proving effective in 75-80% of the cases.

  19. No inflammatory gene-expression response to acute exercise in human Achilles tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pingel, Jessica; Fredberg, Ulrich; Mikkelsen, Lone Ramer

    2013-01-01

    Although histology data favour the view of a degenerative nature of tendinopathy, indirect support for inflammatory reactions to loading in affected tendons exists. The purpose of the present study was to elucidate whether inflammatory signalling responses after acute mechanical loading were more....... All ultrasonographic outcomes were unchanged in response to acute exercise and not influenced by NSAID. The signalling for collagen and TGF-beta was upregulated after acute loading in tendinopathic tendon. In contrast to the hypothesis, inflammatory signalling was not exaggerated in tendinopathic...... pronounced in tendinopathic versus healthy regions of human tendon and if treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAID's) reduces this response. Twenty-seven tendinopathy patients (>6 months) were randomly assigned to a placebo (n = 14) or NSAID (Ibumetin NYCOMED GmbH Plant Oranienburg...

  20. THE ROLE AND IMPLEMENTATION OF ECCENTRIC TRAINING IN ATHLETIC REHABILITATION: TENDINOPATHY, HAMSTRING STRAINS, AND ACL RECONSTRUCTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiman, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The benefits and proposed physiological mechanisms of eccentric exercise have previously been elucidated and eccentric exercise has been used for well over seventy years. Traditionally, eccentric exercise has been used as a regular component of strength training. However, in recent years, eccentric exercise has been used in rehabilitation to manage a host of conditions. Of note, there is evidence in the literature supporting eccentric exercise for the rehabilitation of tendinopathies, muscle strains, and in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rehabilitation. The purpose of this Clinical Commentary is to discuss the physiologic mechanism of eccentric exercise as well as to review the literature regarding the utilization of eccentric training during rehabilitation. A secondary purpose of this commentary is to provide the reader with a framework for the implementation of eccentric training during rehabilitation of tendinopathies, muscle strains, and after ACL reconstruction. PMID:21655455

  1. Use of extracorporeal shock waves in the treatment of tendinopathy and other orthopedic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dushyant Nadar

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Use of extracorporeal shock waves in the treatment of tendinopathy and other orthopedic diseases. Patients and methods: 35 patients received shock wave therapy using Econolith 2000 lithotripter 19 patients had isolated lateral epicondylitis, 12 medical epicondylitis and 4 plantar fascitis. A total of 120 shock waves were given in the first sitting. Each patient received a total of three sittings with a gap of one week between each of them. Results: Based on the patients′ self-assessment, about 75% pain relief was observed in 60% of the patients. Fur-ther, in patients having isolated tendinopathies, the pain relief was better. Conclusion: The study indicated that the application of shock waves is not restricted to the fragmentation of urinary calculi. The shock waves can be effectively used for the pain relief in the common orthopedic diseases. Thus, the urologists can widen the application of lithotripters, in a cost-effective manner, to the other medical speciali-ties.

  2. Unilateral surgical treatment for patients with midportion Achilles tendinopathy may result in bilateral recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfredson, Håkan; Spang, Christoph; Forsgren, Sture

    2014-10-01

    Bilateral midportion Achilles tendinopathy/tendinosis is not unusual, and treatment of both sides is often carried out. Experiments in animals suggest of the potential involvement of central neuronal mechanisms in Achilles tendinosis. To evaluate the outcome of surgery for Achilles tendinopathy. This observational study included 13 patients (7 men and 6 women, mean age 53 years) with a long duration (6-120 months) of chronic painful bilateral midportion Achilles tendinopathy. The most painful side at the time for investigation was selected to be operated on first. Treatment was ultrasound-guided and Doppler-guided scraping procedure outside the ventral part of the tendon under local anaesthetic. The patients started walking on the first day after surgery. Follow-ups were conducted and the primary outcome was pain by visual analogue scale. In an additional part of the study, specimens from Achilles and plantaris tendons in three patients with bilateral Achilles tendinosis were examined. Short-term follow-ups showed postoperative improvement on the non-operated side as well as the operated side in 11 of 13 patients. Final follow-up after 37 (mean) months showed significant pain relief and patient satisfaction on both sides for these 11 patients. In 2 of 13 patients operation on the other, initially non-operated side, was instituted due to persisting pain. Morphologically, it was found that there were similar morphological effects, and immunohistochemical patterns of enzyme involved in signal substance production, bilaterally. Unilateral treatment with a scraping operation can have benefits contralaterally; the clinical implication is that unilateral surgery may be a logical first treatment in cases of bilateral Achilles tendinopathy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. Are inflammatory cells increased in painful human tendinopathy? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Benjamin John Floyd; Gettings, Peter; Dakin, Stephanie Georgina; Carr, Andrew Jonathan

    2016-02-01

    The role of inflammation in tendinopathy has historically been a subject of significant controversy. Our primary aim was to determine whether inflammatory cell numbers were increased in painful human tendinopathy versus healthy control tendons. Our secondary aim was to assess whether the inflammatory cells had been linked with symptoms or disease stage. We conducted a systematic review of the scientific literature using the PRISMA and Cochrane guidelines of the Medline database using specific search criteria. Only studies measuring inflammatory cells using specific markers in tissue from human patients with the clinical diagnosis of tendinopathy were included. Inclusion was agreed on by 2 independent researchers on review of abstracts or full-text using specific predetermined criteria. The search yielded 5 articles in total. There were increased numbers of macrophages (4 studies) and mast cells (3 studies) in tendinopathic versus healthy control tissues. One study demonstrated increased numbers of T cells in tendinopathic tissue versus healthy control tendons. There were reduced numbers of T cells (1 study), macrophages (2 studies) and mast cells (2 studies) in torn tendon versus intact tendinopathic tissue. The existing evidence supports the hypothesis that increased numbers of inflammatory cells are present in pathological tendons. The lack of high-quality quantitative studies in this area demonstrates a clear need for future research to better understand the role of inflammation in tendinopathy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  4. Achilles tendinopathy in elderly subjects with type II diabetes: the role of sport activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, Michele; Salini, Vincenzo; Schiavone, Cosima

    2016-04-01

    Exercise is an important therapeutic tool in the management of diabetes in older people. Aim of this study was to assess the relationship among type II diabetes, sport, overweight, and symptomatic Achilles tendinopathy in elderly subjects. Thirty-eight patients suffering from Achilles tendinopathy and thirty-eight controls were enrolled. The prevalence of diabetes and sport practice as well as BMI and Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1c) values were registered. An ultrasound evaluation of Achilles tendon was performed. Patients showed an increased prevalence of diabetes (42 vs. 13.1 %, p = 0.004), and practice of sport (60.5 vs. 28.9 %, p = 0.0001), and higher BMI values (26.8 ± 3 vs. 24.8 ± 2.3, p = 0.001). Sonographic abnormalities, being diagnostic criteria, were present in all the patients with Achilles tendinopathy, but signs of degeneration were also found in 36.8 % of asymptomatic controls. Symptomatic subjects with diabetes, compared to those without, showed a higher prevalence of severe degeneration (75 vs. 36.3 %, p = 0.01). HbA1c values were significantly lower in sport practitioners, both diabetics and non-diabetics. Moreover, patients practicing sport showed a trend towards lower BMI values, compared to the sedentary counterpart. Sport practice in elderly diabetics provides relevant metabolic advantages, reducing HbA1c and BMI. However, some sport activities (e.g., speed walking, jogging or tennis) can expose to the risk of Achilles tendinopathy. So, sport practice should be encouraged, but practitioners should follow individual training programs and be submitted to periodic sonographic controls.

  5. Presentation and conservative management of acute calcific tendinopathy: a case study and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scibek, Jason S; Carcia, Christopher R

    2012-11-01

    The efficacy of a variety of noninvasive, conservative management techniques for calcific tendinopathy has been investigated and established for improving pain and function and/or facilitating a decrease in the size or presence of calcium deposits. Surprisingly, few have reported on the use of traditional therapeutic exercise and rehabilitation alone in the management of this condition, given the often spontaneous resorptive nature of calcium deposits. The purpose of this case is to present the results of a conservative approach, including therapeutic exercise, for the management of calcific tendinopathy of the supraspinatus, with an emphasis on patient outcomes. The patient was a self-referred 41-y-old man with complaints of acute right-shoulder pain and difficulty sleeping. Imaging studies revealed liquefied calcium deposits in the right supraspinatus. The patient reported constant pain at rest (9/10) and tenderness in the area of the greater tuberosity. He exhibited a decrease in all shoulder motions and had reduced strength. The simple shoulder test (SST) revealed limited function (0/12). Conservative management included superficial modalities and medication for pain and a regimen of scapulothoracic and glenohumeral range-of-motion (ROM) and strengthening exercises. At discharge, pain levels decreased to 0/10 and SST scores increased to 12/12. ROM was full in all planes, and resisted motion was strong and pain free. The patient was able to engage in endurance activities and continue practicing as a health care provider. The outcomes with respect to pain, function, and patient satisfaction provide evidence to support the use of conservative therapeutic interventions when managing patients with acute cases of calcific tendinopathy. Successful management of calcific tendinopathy requires attention to outcomes and an understanding of the pathophysiology, prognostic factors, and physical interventions based on the current stage of the calcium deposits and the

  6. Differences in tendon properties in elite badminton players with or without patellar tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couppé, C; Kongsgaard, M; Aagaard, P; Vinther, A; Boesen, M; Kjaer, M; Magnusson, S P

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the structural and mechanical properties of the patellar tendon in elite male badminton players with and without patellar tendinopathy. Seven players with unilateral patellar tendinopathy (PT group) on the lead extremity (used for forward lunge) and nine players with no current or previous patellar tendinopathy (CT group) were included. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess distal patellar tendon dimensions. Patellar tendon mechanical properties were assessed using simultaneous tendon force and deformation measurements. Distal tendon cross-sectional area (CSA) normalized for body weight (mm(2) /kg(2/3) ) was lower in the PT group compared with the CT group on both the non-lead extremity (6.1 ± 0.3 vs 7.4 ± 0.2, P < 0.05) and the lead extremity (6.5 ± 0.6 vs 8.4 ± 0.3, P < 0.05). Distal tendon stress was higher in the PT group compared with the CT group for both the non-lead extremity (31 ± 1 vs 27 ± 1 MPa, P < 0.05) and the lead extremity (32 ± 3 vs 21 ± 3 MPa, P < 0.01). Conclusively, the PT group had smaller distal patellar tendon CSA on both the injured (lead extremity) and the uninjured side (non-lead extremity) compared with the CT group. Subsequently, the smaller CSA yielded a greater distal patellar tendon stress in the PT group. Therefore, a small tendon CSA may predispose to the development of tendinopathy. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. THE EFFICACY OF TAPING FOR ROTATOR CUFF TENDINOPATHY: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND META-ANALYSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins-Charbonneau, Ariel; Roy, Jean-Sébastien; Dionne, Clermont E; Desmeules, François

    2015-08-01

    Rotator cuff (RC) tendinopathy is a highly prevalent musculoskeletal disorder. Non-elastic taping (NET) and kinesiology taping (KT) are common interventions used by physiotherapists. However, evidence regarding their efficacy is inconclusive. To examine the current evidence on the clinical efficacy of taping, either NET or KT, for the treatment of individuals with RC tendinopathy. Systematic review and meta-analysis. A literature search was conducted in four bibliographical databases to identify randomized controlled trials (RCT) that compared NET or KT to any other intervention or placebo for treatment of RC tendinopathy. Internal validity of RCTs was assessed with the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. A qualitative or quantitative synthesis of evidence was performed. Ten trials were included in the present review on overall pain reduction or improvement in function. Most RCTs had a high risk of bias. There is inconclusive evidence for NET, either used alone or in conjunction with another intervention. Based on pooled results of two studies (n=72), KT used alone resulted in significant gain in pain free flexion (MD: 8.7 ° 95%CI 8.0 ° to 9.5 °) and in pain free abduction (MD: 10.3 ° 95%CI 9.1 ° to 11.4 °). Based on qualitative analyses, there is inconclusive evidence on the efficacy of KT when used alone or in conjunction with other interventions on overall pain reduction or improvement in function. Although KT significantly improved pain free range of motion, there is insufficient evidence to formally conclude on the efficacy of KT or NET used alone or in conjunction with other interventions in patients with RC tendinopathy. Therapy, level 1a.

  8. Lower limb biomechanics during running in individuals with achilles tendinopathy: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munteanu Shannon E

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormal lower limb biomechanics is speculated to be a risk factor for Achilles tendinopathy. This study systematically reviewed the existing literature to identify, critique and summarise lower limb biomechanical factors associated with Achilles tendinopathy. Methods We searched electronic bibliographic databases (Medline, EMBASE, Current contents, CINAHL and SPORTDiscus in November 2010. All prospective cohort and case-control studies that evaluated biomechanical factors (temporospatial parameters, lower limb kinematics, dynamic plantar pressures, kinetics [ground reaction forces and joint moments] and muscle activity associated with mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy were included. Quality of included studies was evaluated using the Quality Index. The magnitude of differences (effect sizes between cases and controls was calculated using Cohen's d (with 95% CIs. Results Nine studies were identified; two were prospective and the remaining seven case-control study designs. The quality of 9 identified studies was varied, with Quality Index scores ranging from 4 to 15 out of 17. All studies analysed running biomechanics. Cases displayed increased eversion range of motion of the rearfoot (d = 0.92 and 0.67 in two studies, reduced maximum lower leg abduction (d = -1.16, reduced ankle joint dorsiflexion velocity (d = -0.62 and reduced knee flexion during gait (d = -0.90. Cases also demonstrated a number of differences in dynamic plantar pressures (primarily the distribution of the centre of force, ground reaction forces (large effects for timing variables and also showed reduced peak tibial external rotation moment (d = -1.29. Cases also displayed differences in the timing and amplitude of a number of lower limb muscles but many differences were equivocal. Conclusions There are differences in lower limb biomechanics between those with and without Achilles tendinopathy that may have implications for the prevention and management of

  9. Insertional tendinopathy of the adductors and rectus abdominis in athletes: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Valent, Alessandro; Frizziero, Antonio; Bressan, Stefano; Zanella, Elena; Giannotti, Erika; Masiero, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Insertional tendinopathy of the adductors and rectus abdominis is common in male athletes, especially in soccer players. It may be worsened by physical activity and it usually limits sport performance. The management goal in the acute phase consists of analgesic and anti-inflammatory drugs and physical rehabilitation. In the early stages of rehabilitation, strengthening exercises of adductors and abdominal muscles, such as postural exercises, have been suggested. In the sub-acute phase, muscu...

  10. Changes of Gait Parameters and Lower Limb Dynamics in Recreational Runners with Achilles Tendinopathy

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    SungJoong Kim, JaeHo Yu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to clarify the mechanical gait changes caused by achilles tendinopathy by comparing gait parameters and changes in hip, knee, and ankle moments between an experimental group (EG and a control group (CG. Twenty runners with achilles tendinopathy were included in the EG (male/female: 10/10, age: 27.00 ± 4.63, and 20 CG (male/female: 10/10, age: 27.25 ± 4.33 participants were recruited. Subjects walked a 13-m distance at their normal walking speed 5 times to obtain motion analysis and joint moment data. Gait parameter analysis showed significant differences in double-limb support (EG: 22.65 ± 4.26%, CG: 20.37 ± 4.46%, step length (EG: 0.58 ± 0.0 7m, CG: 0.64 ± 0.08 m, step width (EG: 0.16 ± 0.04 m, CG: 0.14 ± 0.05 m, stride time (EG: 1.09 ± 0.10 second, CG: 1.05 ± 0.08 second, and walking speed (EG: 1.09±0.18 m·s-1, CG: 1.23 ± 0.17 m·s-1 between the 2 groups (p < 0.05. Significant differences were found in hip joint moment for initial contact, mid-stance, terminal stance, and pre-swing phases; knee joint moment for initial contact and pre-swing phases; and ankle joint moment for pre-swing and terminal swing phases (p < 0.05. Gait parameters and hip, knee, and ankle moments were altered in runners with achilles tendinopathy. Thus, clinical features of gait changes should be understood for optimal treatment of achilles tendinopathy; further research is required in this field.

  11. Combined osteopathy and exercise management of Achilles tendinopathy in an athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Georgia; Macfarlane, Chris; Vaughan, Brett

    2018-01-01

    Mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy is a common injury in sporting populations. There is conflicting evidence about the best approach to conservative management. This report focuses on the rehabilitation of an Achilles tendinopathy utilizing osteopathic manual therapy (OMT) and a structured exercise program in a semi-professional volleyballer. The patient presented with a 4-month history of right mid-portion Achilles tendon pain that began after a lateral inversion sprain of the right ankle. The primary complaint was pain impacting the patients vertical jump performance. The patient complained of pain that was greatest in the morning and at the beginning of a training session prior to warming up. The inventory therapy was a combination of OMT. The manual therapy was complemented with a rehabilitation program. Outcomes were assessed with the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment - Achilles (VISA-A), visual analogue scales (VAS), painful arc, London Hospital Test, soleus lunge test and maximum vertical jump. This case presented many challenging management options including a resolving right ankle lateral inversion sprain, a past history of contralateral Achilles tendinopathy and a high training load. The case demonstrated the importance of patient-centered practice. It was integral that the patient's role as a semi-professional athlete on the volleyball court was analyzed closely in order to replicate different facets of his game, so that the rehabilitation program could support a return to performance at the highest level. Once the initial deficits in mobility and strength were addressed, the rehabilitation program focus moved to injury prevention.

  12. [Surgical treatment of chronic non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy in runners using bipolar radiofrequency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnal-Burró, J; López-Capapé, D; Igualada-Blázquez, C; Ortiz-Espada, A; Martín-García, A

    2016-01-01

    To present the surgical technique with release of peritendon and radiofrequency as an effective treatment for athletes with chronic tendinopathy of the Achilles tendon body. This is a retrospective case series descriptive type study. The series consists of 17 Achilles tendon surgeries in 13 patients, who habitually run. The study included patients with non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy refractory to conservative treatments. After a minimum follow-up of 12 months, clinical improvement of the athletes was assessed using the Nirschl pain scale, as well as athletic performance. An improvement was obtained in 94% of symptoms and a return to the previous performance in of 70% of cases in the 12 months follow-up. Peritendon release combined with bipolar radiofrequency is presented as an effective solution in this condition, for which there is currently no consensus on the best treatment. In patients in whom, after an appropriate conservative treatment for a sufficient period (at least 6 months) the non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy persists, open adhesiolysis combined with bipolar radiofrequency is a safe and with a high success rate clinical and functional intervention. In high performance athletes this technique allows a return to previous activity in a high percentage of cases. Copyright © 2015 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Rehabilitation protocol for patellar tendinopathy applied among 16- to 19-year old volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biernat, Ryszard; Trzaskoma, Zbigniew; Trzaskoma, Lukasz; Czaprowski, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the efficacy of rehabilitation protocol applied during competitive period for the treatment of patellar tendinopathy. A total of 28 male volleyball players were divided into two groups. Fifteen from experimental group (E) and 13 from control group (C) fulfilled the same tests 3 times: before the training program started (first measurement), after 12 weeks (second measurement) and after 24 weeks (third measurement). The above-mentioned protocol included the following: USG imagining with color Doppler function, clinical testing, pain intensity evaluation with VISA-P questionnaire, leg muscle strength and power and jumping ability measurements. The key element of the rehabilitation program was eccentric squat on decline board with additional unstable surface. The essential factor of the protocol was a set of preventive functional exercises, with focus on eccentric exercises of hamstrings. Patellar tendinopathy was observed in 18% of the tested young volleyball players. Implementation of the presented rehabilitation protocol with eccentric squat on decline board applied during sports season lowered the pain level of the young volleyball players. Presented rehabilitation protocol applied without interrupting the competitive period among young volleyball players together with functional exercises could be an effective method for the treatment of patellar tendinopathy.

  14. Treatment of Chronic Patellar Tendinopathy with Autologous Bone Marrow Stem Cells: A 5-Year-Followup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Pascual-Garrido

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine if patients with chronic patellar tendinopathy will improve clinically after the inoculation of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs. Eight patients with chronic patellar tendinopathy were included. Patients averaged 24 years old (range 14–35. All patients were refractory to conservative treatment for at least 6 months before the procedure. BM-MNCs were harvested from the iliac bone crest and inoculated under ultrasound guide in the patellar tendon lesion. Improvement was assessed through established clinical scores and ultrasound. At 5-year followup, statistically significant improvement was seen for most clinical scores. Seven of eight patients said they would have the procedure again if they had the same problem in the opposite knee and were completely satisfied with the procedure. Seven of 8 patients thought that the results of the procedure were excellent. According to our results, inoculation of BM-MNCs could be considered as a potential therapy for those patients with chronic patellar tendinopathy refractory to nonoperative treatments.

  15. Proximal disinsertion of the common extensor tendon for lateral elbow tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusco, Xavier; Alsina, Montserrat; Seijas, Roberto; Ares, Oscar; Alvarez-Diaz, Pedro; Cugat, Ramon

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate surgical outcomes of disinsertion of the common extensor tendon for lateral elbow tendinopathy. Records of 277 men and 128 women who underwent surgery for lateral elbow tendinopathy were reviewed. The indication for surgery was insufficient improvement of pain and inability to return to work after 3 weeks of physiotherapy (stretching, ultrasound) and local corticosteroid injections. According to the Tavernier technique, the origin of the tendons of the extensor carpi radialis brevis and extensor digitorum communis was located, and proximal disinsertion of the common extensor tendon was performed. Outcome was excellent in 344 (85%) of the patients, good in 46 (11.5%), regular in 9 (2%), and poor in 2 (0.5%). The mean time to return to work was 29 (range, 5-93) days. Immediate complications included infection (n=1), seroma (n=1), cicatricial fibrosis (n=10), radial neuritis (sensory) [n=4], and reactive dermatitis (n=2). Late complications included Frohse's arcade syndrome (n=1) and carpal tunnel syndrome (n=2). Disinsertion of the proximal common tendon is a good option for treating lateral elbow tendinopathy.

  16. Shockwave therapy for the treatment of chronic proximal hamstring tendinopathy in professional athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacchio, Angelo; Rompe, Jan D; Furia, John P; Susi, Piero; Santilli, Valter; De Paulis, Fosco

    2011-01-01

    Chronic proximal hamstring tendinopathy is an overuse syndrome that is usually managed by nonoperative methods. Shockwave therapy has proved to be effective in many tendinopathies. Shockwave therapy may be more effective than other nonoperative treatments for chronic proximal hamstring tendinopathy. Randomized controlled clinical study; Level of evidence, 1. Forty professional athletes with chronic proximal hamstring tendinopathy were enrolled between February 1, 2004, and September 30, 2006. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either shockwave therapy, consisting of 2500 impulses per session at a 0.18 mJ/mm² energy flux density without anesthesia, for 4 weeks (SWT group, n = 20), or traditional conservative treatment consisting of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, physiotherapy, and an exercise program for hamstring muscles (TCT group, n = 20). Patients were evaluated before treatment, and 1 week and 3, 6, and 12 months after the end of treatment. The visual analog scale (VAS) score for pain and Nirschl phase rating scale (NPRS) were used as primary outcome measures. The patients were observed for a mean of 10.7 months (range, 1-12 months). Six patients were lost to follow-up because they underwent a surgical intervention: 3 (all in TCT group) were lost at 3 months; 2 (1 in each group), at 6 months; and 1 (in the TCT group), at 12 months. Primary follow-up was at 3 months after the beginning of treatment. The VAS scores in the SWT and TCT groups were 7 points before treatment (P = .84), and 2 points and 5 points, respectively, 3 months after treatment (P < .001). The NPRS scores in the SWT and TCT groups were 5 points in either group before treatment (P = .48), and 2 points and 6 points, respectively, 3 months after treatment (P < .001). At 3 months after treatment, 17 of the 20 patients (85%) in the SWT group and 2 of the 20 patients (10%) in the TCT group achieved a reduction of at least 50% in pain (P < .001). There were no serious complications in

  17. Changes of gait parameters and lower limb dynamics in recreational runners with achilles tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, SungJoong; Yu, JaeHo

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to clarify the mechanical gait changes caused by achilles tendinopathy by comparing gait parameters and changes in hip, knee, and ankle moments between an experimental group (EG) and a control group (CG). Twenty runners with achilles tendinopathy were included in the EG (male/female: 10/10, age: 27.00 ± 4.63), and 20 CG (male/female: 10/10, age: 27.25 ± 4.33) participants were recruited. Subjects walked a 13-m distance at their normal walking speed 5 times to obtain motion analysis and joint moment data. Gait parameter analysis showed significant differences in double-limb support (EG: 22.65 ± 4.26%, CG: 20.37 ± 4.46%), step length (EG: 0.58 ± 0.0 7m, CG: 0.64 ± 0.08 m), step width (EG: 0.16 ± 0.04 m, CG: 0.14 ± 0.05 m), stride time (EG: 1.09 ± 0.10 second, CG: 1.05 ± 0.08 second), and walking speed (EG: 1.09±0.18 m·s(-1), CG: 1.23 ± 0.17 m·s(-1)) between the 2 groups (p runners with achilles tendinopathy. Thus, clinical features of gait changes should be understood for optimal treatment of achilles tendinopathy; further research is required in this field. Key pointsA reduction in gait parameters, namely, step length, stride length, and walking speed, and an increase in double-limb support occurs in runners with achilles tendinopathy.A reduction in the hip extension moment occurs during the initial contact, as well as a reduction in the knee flexion moment from the mid-stance to pre-swing phases, a continuous decrease in the knee flexion moment from the early stance phase, and a reduction in the extension moment during the terminal stance phase.A reduction in the ankle plantar flexion moment occurs from the mid-stance phase and that a reduction in the dorsiflexion moment occurs during the terminal swing phase.

  18. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2 Polymorphisms Have Protective Effect against the Development of Tendinopathy in Volleyball Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salles, José Inácio; Duarte, Maria Eugenia Leite; Guimarães, João Matheus; Lopes, Lucas Rafael; Vilarinho Cardoso, Jessica; Aguiar, Diego Pinheiro; Machado Neto, João Olyntho; Machado, Daniel Escorsim; Perini, Jamila Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether genetic variants in VEGF and KDR genes can be correlated with susceptibility of tendinopathy in volleyball athletes. This study was conducted at the Brazilian Volleyball Federation, and comprised 179 volleyball athletes: 88 had a confirmed diagnosis of tendinopathy (cases), whereas 91 had no evidence of the disease (controls). The VEGF (-2578C>A, -460T>C and +936C>T) and KDR (-604C>T, 1192G>A and 1719T>A) polymorphisms were determined by TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction. The odds ratio (OR) with their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using an unconditional logistic regression model. The evaluation of demographic and clinical characteristics revealed the athlete age (P volleyball (P T, 1192G>A and 1719T>A) haplotypes CGA and CAT were associated with decreased tendinopathy risk (OR: 0.46, 95% CI: 0.21-0.99 and OR: 0.23, 95% CI: 0.07-0.76, respectively). With regards to pain, traumatic lesion and away from training due to injury, VEGF and KDR polymorphisms were not associated with clinical symptoms complaints. The present results provide evidence that the KDR polymorphisms were associated with development of tendinopathy, and can contribute to identify new therapeutic targets or personalized training programs to avoid tendinopathy development in athletes.

  19. Novel use of a manual therapy technique and management of a patient with peroneal tendinopathy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Craig P; Kavchak, Alicia J Emerson

    2012-02-01

    Peroneal tendinopathy is an uncommon but underappreciated source of lateral hindfoot pain and dysfunction. There is a paucity of literature describing optimal intervention for those suffering with pain secondary to peroneal tendinopathy. The purpose of this case report is to describe the evaluation and treatment incorporating manual therapy and therapeutic exercise for a patient diagnosed with peroneal tendinopathy. The patient was a 50 year-old female with a history of chronic lateral ankle pain and whose presentation was consistent with peroneal tendinopathy. Despite attempts to improve pain and function with over-the-counter orthotics, manual therapy to a hypomobile talocrural joint, and strengthening of the peroneal tendons, successful response was not reported until a lateral calcaneal glide was added. Improvement in impairments (pain, talocrural dorsiflexion, unilateral heel raises, and Star Excursion Balance Test) and function (Lower Extremity Functional Scale and Global Rating of Change), were observed over a course of eight visits. The patient was able to return to work and her recreational work out routine without limitations. In conclusion a successful physical therapy intervention for a patient with peroneal tendinopathy included a unique manual therapy technique, the lateral calcaneal glide, in conjunction with other manual therapy techniques and a structured home exercise program. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Effects of Low-Level Laser Therapy on Pain Associated With Tendinopathy: A Critically Appraised Topic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Andrew T; Lauber, Christine; Sabine, Kendra

    2016-02-01

    Tendinopathies plague many active individuals, causing pain and reducing sport activity by decreasing range of motion and strength. There are many modalities that have been used to treat pain associated with chronic inflammation, such as ultrasound, moist heat packs, and electrical stimulation. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is one such modality. Potential benefits of managing pain associated with tendinopathies have been investigated using LLLT. Cellular respiration and metabolism are thought to be increased by LLLT acting on the mitochondrial cytochromes. The effects LLLT may have on cellular activity could increase blood flow to progress the healing process by reducing the pain-spasm cycle. The purpose of this critically appraised topic is to identify the clinical effectiveness of LLLT on pain associated with tendinopathy and to identify the parameters used to achieve statistically and clinically relevant pain outcomes. FOCUSED CLINICAL QUESTIon: What is the effect of LLLT on pain associated with tendinopathy? Although LLLT significantly decreases pain from baseline, its use may be no better than placebo or traditional treatments such as ultrasound, moist heat packs, electrical stimulation, or therapeutic exercise to reduce pain associated with tendinopathy. Total accumulated joules across the treatment sessions may need to be taken into account as a parameter.

  1. Finite element simulation on posterior tibial tendinopathy: Load transfer alteration and implications to the onset of pes planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Duo Wai-Chi; Wang, Yan; Leung, Aaron Kam-Lun; Yang, Ming; Zhang, Ming

    2018-01-01

    Posterior tibial tendinopathy is a challenging foot condition resulting in pes planus, which is difficult to diagnose in the early stage. Prior to the deformity, abnormal internal load transfer and soft tissue attenuation are anticipated. The objective of this study was to investigate the internal load transfer and strain of the ligaments with posterior tibial tendinopathy, and the implications to pes planus and other deformities. A three-dimensional finite element model of the foot and ankle was reconstructed from magnetic resonance images of a 28-year-old normal female. Thirty bones, plantar fascia, ligaments and tendons were reconstructed. With the gait analysis data of the model subject, walking stance was simulated. The onset of posterior tibial tendinopathy was resembled by unloading the tibialis posterior and compared to the normal condition. The load transfer of the joints at the proximal medial column was weaken by posterior tibial tendinopathy, which was compromised by the increase along the lateral column and the intercuneiforms during late stance. Besides, the plantar tarsometatarsal and cuboideonavicular ligaments were consistently over-stretched during stance. Particularly, the maximum tensile strain of the plantar tarsometatarsal ligament was about 3-fold higher than normal at initial push-off. Posterior tibial tendinopathy altered load transfer of the medial column and unbalanced the load between the proximal and distal side of the medial longitudinal arch. Posterior tibial tendinopathy also stretched the midfoot plantar ligaments that jeopardized midfoot stability, and attenuated the transverse arch. All these factors potentially contributed to the progress of pes planus and other foot deformities. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Are the take-off and landing phase dynamics of the volleyball spike jump related to patellar tendinopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisseling, R W; Hof, A L; Bredeweg, S W; Zwerver, J; Mulder, T

    2008-06-01

    The causal mechanism of the chronic sports injury patellar tendinopathy is not well understood. The aim of the present study was to compare ankle and knee joint dynamics during the performance of the volleyball spike jump between healthy volleyball players (n = 8) and asymptomatic volleyball players with previous patellar tendinopathy (n = 7). Cross-sectional. Inverse dynamics were used to estimate ankle and knee joint dynamics. From these multiple biomechanical variables, a logistic regression was performed to estimate the probability of the presence or absence of previous patellar tendinopathy among the volleyball players studied. Several biomechanical variables improved the prediction of the presence or absence of previous patellar tendinopathy. For landing, ankle plantar flexion at the time of touch-down, and knee range of motion during the first part of impact, and for take-off, loading rate of the knee extensor moment during the eccentric countermovement phase of take-off were predictive. As interaction effects, the presence or absence of previous patellar tendinopathy were correctly predicted by ankle and knee range of motion during the first part of impact, by loading rate of the knee extensor moment during the eccentric phases of take-off and landing, and by knee angular velocity during the eccentric phases of take-off and landing. Smaller joint flexion during the first part of landing impact , and higher rate of knee moment development during the eccentric phases of the spike-jump landing sequence, together with higher knee angular velocities, might be risk factors in the development of patellar tendinopathy in volleyball players.

  3. Patellar tendinopathy in young elite soccer- clinical and sonographical analysis of a German elite soccer academy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Gerrit; Hammer, Thorsten; Karvouniaris, N; Feucht, M J; Konstantinidis, L; Südkamp, N P; Hirschmüller, A

    2017-08-08

    The prevalence of patellar tendinopathy is elevated in elite soccer compared to less explosive sports. While the burden of training hours and load is comparably high in youth elite players (age elite soccer academy. One hundred nineteen male youth soccer players (age 15,97 ± 2,24 years, height 174, 60 ± 10,16 cm, BMI 21, 24 ± 2,65) of the U-13 to U-23 teams were part of the study. Data acquisition included sport specific parameters such as footwear, amount of training hours, leg dominance, history of tendon pathologies, and clinical examination for palpatory pain, indurations, muscular circumference, and range of motion. Subjective complaints were measured with the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment Patellar (VISA-P) Score. Furthermore, sonographical examinations (Aplio SSA-770A/80; Toshiba, Tokyo, Japan) with 12-MHz multifrequency linear transducers (8-14 MHz) of both patellar tendons were performed with special emphasis on hyper- and hypo echogenic areas, diameter and neovascularization. The prevalence of patellar tendinopathies was 13.4%. Seventy-five percent of the players complained of pain of their dominant leg with onset of pain at training in 87.5%. The injured players showed a medium amount of 10.34 ± 3.85 training hours and a medium duration of symptoms of 11.94 ± 18.75 weeks. Two thirds of players with patellar tendinopathy were at the age of 15-17 (Odds ratio 1.89) while no differences between players of the national or regional league were observed. In case of patellar tendinopathy, VISA-P was significantly lower in comparison to healthy players (mean ± SD 76.80 ± 28.56 points vs. 95.85 ± 10.37). The clinical examination revealed local pain at the distal patella, pain at stretching, and thickening of the patellar tendon (p = 0.02). The mean tendon diameter measured 2 cm distally to the patella was 4.10 ± 0.68 mm with a significantly increased diameter of 0.15 mm in case of an underlying tendinopathy (p = 0

  4. De Quervain tendinopathy: survivorship and prognostic indicators of recurrence following a single corticosteroid injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earp, Brandon E; Han, Carin H; Floyd, W Emerson; Rozental, Tamara D; Blazar, Philip E

    2015-06-01

    To determine short- and long-term success rates of a single corticosteroid injection for de Quervain tendinopathy while identifying prognostic indicators for symptom recurrence and repeat intervention. Fifty consecutive patients with de Quervain tendinopathy treated with corticosteroid injections (lidocaine plus triamcinolone acetonide or dexamethasone) were prospectively enrolled. Patients with inflammatory arthritis, carpometacarpal osteoarthritis, or a previous distal radius fracture affecting the symptomatic wrist were excluded. Demographic data and information on existing comorbidities were recorded. Patients were seen in clinic at 6 weeks after injection and contacted at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months following injection to determine symptom recurrence and further intervention. Medical records were also reviewed for this purpose. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox regression modeling were used to estimate recurrence rates and identify predictors of symptom recurrence and repeat intervention. Fifty wrists in 50 patients (average age, 49 y) were included. One patient was lost to follow-up. Eighty-two percent of patients had resolved symptoms 6 weeks after a steroid injection. Twenty-four patients had a recurrence of symptoms at a median of 84 days after the injection. Eleven patients underwent additional intervention (7 surgical releases and 4 repeat injections) at a median of 129 days (range, 42-365) after the injection. Estimated freedom from symptom recurrence was 52% at 6 and 12 months. Estimated freedom from repeat intervention was 81% at 6 months and 77% at 12 months. Two of 3 patients with a history of trigger finger required subsequent de Quervain surgery. We demonstrated that a single cortisone injection was effective in alleviating symptoms of de Quervain tendinopathy in 82% of patients and that over half remained symptom-free for at least 12 months. All patients with recurring symptoms developed them within the first 6 months. Prognostic IV. Copyright

  5. Long-term effect of Prolotherapy on symptomatic rotator cuff tendinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suad Trebinjac

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The objective of this study was to assess a long-term clinical effect of Prolotherapy on chronic symptomatic rotator cuff tendinopathy.Methods: We conducted a retrospective, uncontrolled study in the outpatient setting with 12 months follow-up. Adults diagnosed clinically and radiologically with rotator cuff tendinopathy that has been persisting for a minimum of six months were included. Patients received 15% extra-articular and 25% intra-articular hyperosmolar dextrose injections, repeated at weeks 5, 9, 13, 17 and 21. Primary outcome measure was validated Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI. Secondary outcome measure was validated visual pain analogue scale (VAS 0-10. The third outcome measures were patient’s satisfaction with Prolotherapy and adverse reactions after injections.Results: Twenty-one patients, 14 male and 7 female were treated with 6 sessions of hyperosmolar dextrose Prolotherapy repeated every 4 weeks. Average SPADI before starting the treatment was 73.995 ± 13.6, while 12 months after completed treatment was 20.84 ± 26.03 (P< 0.0001. Average VAS score before starting the treatment was 8.14 ± 1.2, while 12 months after completed treatment was 2.29 ± 2.8 (P<0.0001. Out of 21 patients, 18 (85.71% would recommend Prolotherapy to other people with the similar condition, and no one participant reported any side effect that was not resolved within one week after the treatment.Conclusion: Hyperosmolar dextrose Prolotherapy may result in significant reduction of pain and disability index in adult patients with chronic rotator cuff tendinopathy, without eliciting long-lasting side effects. Results of this pilot study need to be validated in prospective controlled randomized trials.

  6. Efficacy of exercise therapy in workers with rotator cuff tendinopathy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmeules, François; Boudreault, Jennifer; Dionne, Clermont E; Frémont, Pierre; Lowry, Véronique; MacDermid, Joy C; Roy, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-09-30

    To perform a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the efficacy of therapeutic exercises for workers suffering from rotator cuff (RC) tendinopathy. A literature search in four bibliographical databases (Pubmed, CINAHL, EMBASE, and PEDro) was conducted from inception up to February 2015. RCTs were included if participants were workers suffering from RC tendinopathy, the outcome measures included work-related outcomes, and at least one of the interventions under study included exercises. The methodological quality of the studies was evaluated with the Cochrane Risk of Bias Assessment tool. The mean methodological score of the ten included studies was 54.4%±17.2%. Types of workers included were often not defined, and work-related outcome measures were heterogeneous and often not validated. Three RCTs of moderate methodological quality concluded that exercises were superior to a placebo or no intervention in terms of function and return-to-work outcomes. No significant difference was found between surgery and exercises based on the results of two studies of low to moderate methodological quality. One study of low methodological quality, comparing a workplace-based exercise program focusing on the participants' work demands to an exercise program delivered in a clinical setting, concluded that the work-based intervention was superior in terms of function and return-to-work outcomes. There is low to moderate-grade evidence that therapeutic exercises provided in a clinical setting are an effective modality to treat workers suffering from RC tendinopathy and to promote return-to-work. Further high quality studies comparing different rehabilitation programs including exercises in different settings with defined workers populations are needed to draw firm conclusions on the optimal program to treat workers.

  7. Effectiveness of customised foot orthoses for Achilles tendinopathy: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munteanu, Shannon E; Scott, Lisa A; Bonanno, Daniel R; Landorf, Karl B; Pizzari, Tania; Cook, Jill L; Menz, Hylton B

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of customised foot orthoses in chronic mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy. This was a participant-blinded, parallel-group randomised controlled trial at a single centre (La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia). One hundred and forty participants aged 18-55 years with mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy were randomised to receive eccentric calf muscle exercises with either customised foot orthoses (intervention group) or sham foot orthoses (control group). Allocation to intervention was concealed. The Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment-Achilles (VISA-A) questionnaire was completed at baseline, then at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months, with 3 months being the primary end point. Differences between groups were analysed using intention to treat with analysis of covariance. After randomisation into the customised foot orthoses group (n=67) or sham foot orthoses group (n=73), there was 70.7% follow-up of participants at 3 months. There were no significant differences between groups at any time point. At 3 months, the mean (SD) VISA-A score was 82.1 (16.3) and 79.2 (20.0) points for the customised and sham foot orthosis groups, respectively (adjusted mean difference (95% CI)=2.6 (-2.9 to 8.0), p=0.353). There were no clinically meaningful differences between groups in any of the secondary outcome measures. Customised foot orthoses, prescribed according to the protocol in this study, are no more effective than sham foot orthoses for reducing symptoms and improving function in people with mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy undergoing an eccentric calf muscle exercise programme. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: number ACTRN12609000829213. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Equivalence of online and clinician administration of a patellar tendinopathy risk factor and severity questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morton, S; Morrissey, D; Valle, X

    2015-01-01

    The VISA-P is a questionnaire for assessing the severity of patellar tendinopathy (PT). Our study aim was to evaluate the equivalence of self-administration of the VISA-P online with the addition of risk factor questions to develop a tool suitable for high-volume remote use. A crossover study...... design with 107 subjects was used to determine equivalence between online and clinician administration. Three population groups were used to ensure construct validity. Online vs clinician administration revealed an intraclass correlation (ICC) of 0.79 [confidence interval (CI): 0.68-0.86] for the VISA...

  9. The impact of patellar tendinopathy on sports and work performance in active athletes

    OpenAIRE

    de Vries, Astrid J; Koolhaas, Wendy; Zwerver, Johannes; Diercks, Ron L.; Nieuwenhuis, Kari; van der Worp, Henk; Brouwer, Sandra; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge

    2017-01-01

    Greater insight into sports and work performance of athletes with patellar tendinopathy (PT) will help establish the severity of this common overuse injury. Primary aim of this study is to investigate the impact of PT on sports and work performance. Seventy seven active athletes with PT (50 males; age 28.1 +/- 8.2years; Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment Patella 56.4 +/- 12.3) participated in this survey. Sports performance, work ability and work productivity were assessed using the Osl...

  10. Autologous Blood and Platelet-Rich Plasma Injections in the Treatment of Achilles Tendinopathy: A Critically Appraised Topic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinnott, Cori; White, Hayley M; Cuchna, Jennifer W; Van Lunen, Bonnie L

    2017-05-01

    Clinical Scenario: Achilles tendinopathy is a painful condition commonly affecting the general and athletic population. It presents with localized pain, stiffness, and swelling in the midportion of the Achilles tendon. The physical stress placed on the tendon results in microtrauma, which leads to subsequent inflammation and degeneration. While it is not surprising that this condition affects the physically active, nearly one-third of Achilles tendinopathy cases occur in sedentary individuals. Etiology for this condition stems from a change in loading patterns and/or overuse of the tendon, resulting in microscopic tearing and degenerative changes. There are numerous causes contributing to the maladaptive response in these patients, such as mechanical, age-related, genetic, and vascular factors. The treatment for these patients is typically load management and eccentric strengthening of the gastrocnemius-soleus complex. Unfortunately, conservative treatment can lead to surgical intervention in up to 45% of cases. A relatively new phenomenon in the treatment of this condition is the use of autologous blood injections (ABI) and platelet-rich plasma injections (PRPI). This need for a less invasive treatment fostered more investigation into ABI and PRPI to treat these nonresponsive patients. However, the evidence concerning the effectiveness of these treatments in patients with Achilles tendinopathy has not been synthesized. Focused Clinical Question: In patients with Achilles tendinopathy, how do variations of ABI and PRPI compared with a placebo and/or eccentric training affect pain and function?

  11. The effect of a patellar strap on knee joint proprioception in healthy participants and athletes with patellar tendinopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Astrid J.; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Diercks, Ron L.; Zwerver, Johannes; van der Worp, Henk

    Objectives: The primary aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the use of a patellar strap on knee joint proprioception in both healthy participants and in patients with patellar tendinopathy (PT). Secondary aims are to examine whether there is a difference in effectiveness of the use of

  12. The victorian institute of sports assessment - achilles questionnaire (visa-a) - a reliable tool for measuring achilles tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Jonas Vestergård; Bartels, Else Marie; Langberg, Henning

    2012-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy (AT) is a common pathology and the aetiology is unknown. For valid and reliable assessment The Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment has designed a self-administered Achilles questionnaire, the VISA-A. The aim of the present study was to evaluate VISA-A as an outcome meas...

  13. An exercise-based physical therapy program for patients with patellar tendinopathy after platelet-rich plasma injection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ark, Mathijs; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Meijer, L.T.B.; Zwerver, Hans

    Objectives: To describe a post platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection, exercise-based physical therapy program, investigate feasibility and report the first results of patellar tendinopathy patients treated with PRP injection combined with the physical therapy program. Study Design: Case-series.

  14. Risk factors for patellar tendinopathy in volleyball and basketball players : A survey-based prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, A. J.; van der Worp, H.; Diercks, R. L.; van den Akker-Scheek, I.; Zwerver, J.

    2015-01-01

    Patellar tendinopathy (PT) is a common overuse injury of the patellar tendon in jumping athletes. In a recent large cross-sectional study from 2008 several factors were identified that may be associated with the etiology of PT. However, because of the study design no conclusions could be drawn about

  15. Rehabilitation of proximal hamstring tendinopathy utilizing eccentric training, lumbopelvic stabilization, and trigger point dry needling: 2 case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaseelan, Dhinu J; Moats, Nick; Ricardo, Christopher R

    2014-03-01

    Case report. Proximal hamstring tendinopathy is a relatively uncommon overuse injury seen in runners. In contrast to the significant amount of literature guiding the evaluation and treatment of hamstring strains, there is little literature about the physical therapy management of proximal hamstring tendinopathy, other than the general recommendations to increase strength and flexibility. Two runners were treated in physical therapy for proximal hamstring tendinopathy. Each presented with buttock pain with running and sitting, as well as tenderness to palpation at the ischial tuberosity. Each patient was prescribed a specific exercise program focusing on eccentric loading of the hamstrings and lumbopelvic stabilization exercises. Trigger point dry needling was also used with both runners to facilitate improved joint motion and to decrease pain. Both patients were treated in 8 to 9 visits over 8 to 10 weeks. Clinically significant improvements were seen in pain, tenderness, and function in each case. Each patient returned to running and sitting without symptoms. Proximal hamstring tendinopathy can be difficult to treat. In these 2 runners, eccentric loading of the hamstrings, lumbopelvic stabilization exercises, and trigger point dry needling provided short- and long-term pain reduction and functional benefits. Further research is needed to determine the effectiveness of this cluster of interventions for this condition. Therapy, level 4.

  16. Do isometric and isotonic exercise programs reduce pain in athletes with patellar tendinopathy in-season? : A randomised clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ark, Mathijs; Cook, Jill L; Docking, Sean I; Zwerver, Hans; Gaida, James E; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Rio, Ebonie

    Objectives: Many athletes with patellar tendinopathy participate in sports with symptoms during or after activities. Current treatments do not decrease pain in-season; eccentric exercises in-season result in an increase in pain. This study examined if isometric and isotonic exercises relieved pain

  17. Are the take-off and landing phase dynamics of the volleyball spike jump related to patellar tendinopathy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisseling, R.W.; Hof, A.L.; Bredeweg, S.W.; Zwerver, J.; Mulder, T.

    Objective: The causal mechanism of the chronic sports injury patellar tendinopathy is not well understood. The aim of the present study was to compare ankle and knee joint dynamics during the performance of the volleyball spike jump between healthy volleyball players (n = 8) and asymptomatic

  18. No difference in effectiveness between focused and radial shockwave therapy for treating patellar tendinopathy : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Worp, H.; Zwerver, J.; Hamstra, M.; van den Akker-Scheek, I.; Diercks, R. L.

    The aim of the study was to compare the effectiveness of focused shockwave therapy (FSWT) and radial shockwave therapy (RSWT) for treating patellar tendinopathy. Patients were randomized into two groups. One group received three sessions of FSWT, and the other group received three sessions of RSWT.

  19. The victorian institute of sports assessment - achilles questionnaire (visa-a) - a reliable tool for measuring achilles tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Jonas Vestergård; Bartels, Else Marie; Langberg, Henning

    2012-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy (AT) is a common pathology and the aetiology is unknown. For valid and reliable assessment The Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment has designed a self-administered Achilles questionnaire, the VISA-A. The aim of the present study was to evaluate VISA-A as an outcome...

  20. A 5-year follow-up study of Alfredson's heel-drop exercise programme in chronic midportion Achilles tendinopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.F.A.N. van der Plas; S. de Jonge (Suzan); R.J. de Vos (Robert-Jan); H.J.L. van der Heide; J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan); A. Weir (Adam); J.L. Tol (Johannes)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Eccentric exercises have the most evidence in conservative treatment of midportion Achilles tendinopathy. Although short-term studies show significant improvement, little is known of the long-term (>3 years) results. Aim: To evaluate the 5-year outcome of patients with

  1. Usefulness of rehabilitation in patients with rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy after ultrasound-guided percutaneous treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, Michele; Schiavone, Cosima; Salini, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a specific rehabilitation program for patients in whom ultrasound-guided percutaneous treatment (UGPT) was performed for rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy (RCCT). In this prospective observational study, 86 patients (22 males and 64 females) with shoulder calcific tendinopathy treated with UGPT were enrolled. At the end of the procedure, a corticosteroid injection into the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa was performed. The patients were then asked to follow a specific rehabilitation protocol (2 times/week for 5 weeks) that focused on mobility, strength and function. At baseline and after 6 weeks, clinical parameters, visual analog scale (VAS) and Constant-Murley scale (CMS) scores and ultrasound (US) features were collected. The mean age of the patients was 48.9 ± 8.4 years and their mean BMI was 22.7 ± 2.1. Considering the whole cohort, the treatment was effective, with a significant decrease in the VAS score and an improvement in the CMS score. Thereafter, on the basis of the compliance to the rehabilitation program (by self-report), 53 and 33 patients were included in the rehabilitation group (Rehab group; performed exercises ≥2 times/week) and the No Rehab group (performed exercises rehabilitation program, was an effective treatment for RCCT. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. The efficacy of therapeutic ultrasound for rotator cuff tendinopathy: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmeules, François; Boudreault, Jennifer; Roy, Jean-Sébastien; Dionne, Clermont; Frémont, Pierre; MacDermid, Joy C

    2015-08-01

    A systematic review and meta-analysis on the efficacy of therapeutic ultrasound (US) in adults suffering from rotator cuff tendinopathy. A literature search was conducted in four databases for randomized controlled trials (RCT) published until 12/2013, comparing the efficacy of US to any other interventions in adults suffering from rotator cuff tendinopathy. The Cochrane Risk of Bias tool was used to evaluate the risk of bias of included studies. Data were summarized qualitatively or quantitatively. Eleven RCTs with a low mean methodological score (50.0% ± 15.6%) were included. Therapeutic US did not provide greater benefits than a placebo intervention or advice in terms of pain reduction and functional improvement. When provided in conjunction with exercise, US therapy is not superior to exercise alone in terms of pain reduction and functional improvement (pooled mean difference of the Constant-Murley score: -0.26 with 95% confidence interval of -3.84 to 3.32). Laser therapy was found superior to therapeutic US in terms of pain reduction. Based on low to moderate level evidence, therapeutic US does not provide any benefit compared to a placebo or advice, to laser therapy or when combined to exercise. More methodologically sound studies on the efficacy of therapeutic US are warranted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Local treatment of tendinopathies and myofascial pain syndromes with the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist tropisetron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, W; Stratz, T

    2004-01-01

    The use of local tropisetron injections improved the treatment of tendinopathies considerably, with the effect being comparable to the topical application of local anaesthetics combined with depot corticosteroids. On the other hand, local injection of prilocaine alone exerted a shorter and weaker effect on the condition. After it had been proven that systemic application of the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist tropisetron exerts an analgesic effect on musculoskeletal pain in fibromyalgia, we investigated the efficacy of the substance in tendinopathies and myofascial pain syndromes. Local injections of tropisetron as a treatment for trigger points in myofascial pain syndrome also brought about rapid and prolonged relief in the majority of cases. The analgesic effect was far superior to the action of local anaesthetics. The present findings indicate that the analgesic action of the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist tropisetron sets in rapidly and lasts for a long time. Various mechanisms are under discussion to explain the long duration of the effect. Tropisetron not only has an analgesic but probably also an antiphlogistic effect which can be attributed to the inhibited release of substance P and other neuropeptides from the nociceptors and the blocked release of phlogistic substances from macrophages, monocytes etc.

  4. Landing limb posture in volleyball athletes with patellar tendinopathy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulig, K; Joiner, D G; Chang, Y-J

    2015-05-01

    The aims of this pilot study were to investigate how a novel sagittal plane kinematic measurement - the lower extremity contact angle (LECA) - relates to the landing dynamics of elite male volleyball athletes with and without patellar tendinopathy. The LECA was defined as the angle between the ground and the line connecting the center of pressure to the L5S1 marker. 18 athletes (9 with patellar tendinopathy and 9 with asymptomatic tendons) completed simulated spike jumps while instrumented for kinetic and kinematic analysis using a force platform and 3D motion analysis system. The patellar tendinopathic group demonstrated a significantly more acute LECA compared to the asymptomatic group (65.3°±2.2° vs. 69.1°±4.5°) and was the only kinematic or kinetic variable measured to discriminate between the 2 groups. The LECA further demonstrated less variability between trials than sagittal plane hip, knee, and ankle kinematics. Additionally, the LECA's - and not individual joints' - high correlation with the braking impulse ensures its predictive value for landing dynamics (r=- 0.890). The LECA has the potential to be a valuable tool to help assess jumping athletes in both injury prevention screening and as a variable that, if modified, could help alter the maladaptive behavior observed in symptomatic athletes. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Calcific tendinopathy of the shoulder with intraosseous extension: outcomes of ultrasound-guided percutaneous irrigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klontzas, Michail E. [University Hospital and Department of Radiology, University of Crete, Department of Medical Imaging, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Imperial College London, Department of Chemical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Vassalou, Evangelia E.; Karantanas, Apostolos H. [University Hospital and Department of Radiology, University of Crete, Department of Medical Imaging, Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2017-02-15

    Rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy (RCCT) with intraosseous extension is a rare complication of tendinous and peritendinous involvement. The purpose of our study is to evaluate the outcome of ultrasound-guided percutaneous irrigation of calcific tendinopathy (US-PICT) in patients with intraosseous involvement. From January 2011 to June 2014, patients with a clinical and imaging diagnosis of RCCT were prospectively categorised in two groups based on imaging findings: group A (10 patients) with intraosseous RCCT and group B (control group 35 patients) without osseous involvement. US-PICT followed by subacromial injection was applied to all patients in groups A and B. During a 1-year follow-up, treatment outcome in terms of pain and functional improvement was evaluated at 3 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year, with the use of a four-grade scale. The study has been approved by our hospital's ethics committee. Mean improvement scores of group A were significantly lower than those of group B at all time points (p < 0.0001). Improvement of group B was noted mainly within the first 3 months post-treatment (p = 0.016). Outcomes of ultrasound-guided treatment in cases of RCCT with intraosseous extension are significantly less favourable than in purely tendinous or peritendinous disease. (orig.)

  6. [Eccentric strength training for the rotator cuff tendinopathies with subacromial impingement. Current evidence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías-Hernández, Salvador Israel; Pérez-Ramírez, Luis Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are the leading cause of pain and functional disability of the shoulder. Conservative treatment is an essential part of their management. Despite the limited evidence, rehabilitation is the mainstay of the treatment for rotator cuff tears associated to impingement syndrome. There are current reports on the utility of strengthening with resistance, particularly by eccentric exercise. This report aims to present an overview of the efficacy of eccentric exercises in tendinopathies and current evidence of its benefit in rotator cuff tears. We describe the information available in tendinopathy and analyzed four studies published on eccentric strengthening for rotator cuff tears. There is theoretical evidence about its usefulness in this pathology, but only a controlled clinical trial has been published with data on improvement in strength but not in pain or functionality. More studies are needed with better methodological designs in order to generate evidence of their utility and recommendation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A.

  7. The Use of Hyaluronic Acid after Tendon Surgery and in Tendinopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Abate

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Viscosupplementation with hyaluronic acid is safe and effective in the management of osteoarthritis, but its use in the treatment of tendon disorders has received less attention. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on this topic, evaluating experimental and clinical trials. A search of English-language articles was performed using the key search terms “hyaluronic acid” or “viscosupplementation” combined with “tendon,” “tendinopathy,“ “adhesions,“ or “gliding,“ independently. In quite all the experimental studies, performed after surgical procedures for tendon injuries or in the treatment of chronic tendinopathies, using different hyaluronic acid compounds, positive results (reduced formation of scars and granulation tissue after tendon repair, less adhesions and gliding resistance, and improved tissue healing were observed. In a limited number of cases, hyaluronic acid has been employed in clinical practice. After flexor tendon surgery, a greater total active motion and fingers function, with an earlier return to work and daily activities, were observed. Similarly, in patients suffering from elbow, patellar, and shoulder tendons disorders, pain was reduced, and function improved. The positive effect of hyaluronic acid can be attributed to the anti-inflammatory activity, enhanced cell proliferation, and collagen deposition, besides the lubricating action on the sliding surface of the tendon.

  8. Effects of In-Season Inertial Resistance Training With Eccentric Overload in a Sports Population at Risk for Patellar Tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gual, Gabriel; Fort-Vanmeerhaeghe, Azahara; Romero-Rodríguez, Daniel; Tesch, Per A

    2016-07-01

    Gual, G, Fort-Vanmeerhaeghe, A, Romero-Rodríguez, D, and Tesch, PA. Effects of in-season inertial resistance training with eccentric overload in a sports population at risk for patellar tendinopathy. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1834-1842, 2016-Volleyball and basketball players can be considered as a population at risk for patellar tendinopathy. Given the paradox that eccentric training elicits therapeutic benefits yet might provoke such injury, we investigated the influence of a weekly bout of inertial squat resistance exercise offering eccentric overload on lower limb muscle power and patellar tendon complaints. Players of 8 (4 basketball and 4 volleyball) teams (38 women and 43 men) were randomly assigned to either the intervention (IG) or control (CG) group. Although IG and CG maintained scheduled in-season training routines over 24 weeks, IG, in addition, performed 1 weekly session of eccentric overload by 4 sets of 8 repetitions of the squat using flywheel inertial resistance. Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment patellar tendinopathy questionnaire (VISA-p), vertical countermovement jump, and squat power, both concentric (Squat-Con) and eccentric (Squat-Ecc), tests were performed before (T1), during (T2), and after (T3) the 24 weeks of intervention. Neither group suffered from patellar tendinopathy during the study period. VISA-p displayed no differences across groups at any measurement period. Countermovement jump scores significantly (p ≤ 0.05) differed between groups in favor of the IG. Both Squat-Con and Squat-Ecc mean scores from the IG were significantly (p exercise routine enhances lower limb muscle power without triggering patellar tendon complaints. Future studies, using the current exercise paradigm, aim to explore its efficacy to prevent or combat patellar tendinopathy in sports calling for frequent explosive jumps.

  9. Randomized controlled trial comparing the effectiveness of the ultrasound-guided galvanic electrolysis technique (USGET) versus conventional electro-physiotherapeutic treatment on patellar tendinopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Abat, F.; S?nchez-S?nchez, J. L.; Mart?n-Nogueras, A. M.; Calvo-Arenillas, J. I.; Yajeya, J.; M?ndez-S?nchez, R.; Monllau, J. C.; Gelber, P. E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patellar tendinopathy has a high prevalence rate among athletes. Different therapeutic options can be found in the current literature, but none of them has been clearly established as the gold standard. The purpose of this study is to compare, in a randomized controlled trial, the clinical efficacy of eccentric exercise combined with either an ultrasound-guided galvanic electrolysis technique (USGET) or conventional electrophysiotherapy to treat patellar tendinopathy. Methods Sixty...

  10. Shock wave therapy associated with eccentric strengthening versus isolated eccentric strengthening for Achilles insertional tendinopathy treatment: a double-blinded randomised clinical trial protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Mansur, Nacime Salom?o Barbachan; Faloppa, Fl?vio; Belloti, Jo?o Carlos; Ingham, Sheila J McNeill; Matsunaga, Fabio Teruo; dos Santos, Paulo Roberto Dias; dos Santos, Bruno Schiefer; Carrazzone, Oreste Lemos [UNIFESP; Peixoto, Gabriel; Aoyama, Bruno Takeshi; Tamaoki, Marcel Jun Sugawara [UNIFESP

    2017-01-01

    Background There is no consensus regarding the treatment of Achilles insertional tendinopathies. Eccentric training remains the main choice in the conservative treatment of this illness; however, the good results in the management of non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy were not replicated in the insertional condition. Low energy shock wave therapy has been described as an alternative to these patients, but has yet to be empirically tested. Hypothesis Shock wave therapy, adjunctive to the ec...

  11. Real-time sonoelastography in the diagnosis of rotator cuff tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Uk; Joo, Sun Young; Kim, Sun Ki; Lee, Sang-Ho; Park, Sung-Ryeoll; Jeong, Changhoon

    2016-05-01

    Real-time sonoelastography can be used to assess tissue elasticity. The present study evaluated the relationship between tendon stiffness on sonoelastography and the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tendinosis grade in patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy. The study included 39 patients with chronic pain and no history of trauma or rotator cuff tear. The supraspinatus tendons were graded according to MRI findings (grade 0, normal; grade 1, mild tendinosis; grade 2, moderate tendinosis; grade 3, marked tendinosis), and the subcutaneous fat-to-tendon (Fat/T) and gel pad-to-tendon (Pad/T) strain ratios were assessed. We used the trend test to analyze the relationship of the MRI grade with the Fat/T strain ratio and the Pad/T strain ratio. Of the 39 patients, 9 had grade 0, 17 had grade 1, 12 had grade 2, and 1 had grade 3 tendinosis. The mean real-time elastography Fat/T and Pad/T strain ratios were 2.92 ± 2.13 and 20.77 ± 21.78 in patients with grade 0 tendinosis, 4.08 ± 4.09 and 21.78 ± 17.16 in patients with grade 1 tendinosis, 13.48 ± 10.19 and 83.00 ± 48.26 in patients with grade 2 tendinosis, and 12.3 ± 0.00 and 16.58 ± 0.00 in patients with grade 3 tendinosis, respectively. The Fat/T and Pad/T strain ratios were positively associated with the MRI grade (P tendinosis grade is associated with stiffness assessed using sonoelastography in patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy. Therefore, sonoelastography might be a useful diagnostic tool for supraspinatus tendinopathy. Level III; Diagnostic Study. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Efficacy of customised foot orthoses in the treatment of Achilles tendinopathy: study protocol for a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menz Hylton B

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Achilles tendinopathy is a common condition that can cause marked pain and disability. Numerous non-surgical treatments have been proposed for the treatment of this condition, but many of these treatments have a poor or non-existent evidence base. The exception to this is eccentric calf muscle exercises, which have become a standard non-surgical intervention for Achilles tendinopathy. Foot orthoses have also been advocated as a treatment for Achilles tendinopathy, but the long-term efficacy of foot orthoses for this condition is unknown. This manuscript describes the design of a randomised trial to evaluate the efficacy of customised foot orthoses to reduce pain and improve function in people with Achilles tendinopathy. Methods One hundred and forty community-dwelling men and women aged 18 to 55 years with Achilles tendinopathy (who satisfy inclusion and exclusion criteria will be recruited. Participants will be randomised, using a computer-generated random number sequence, to either a control group (sham foot orthoses made from compressible ethylene vinyl acetate foam or an experimental group (customised foot orthoses made from semi-rigid polypropylene. Both groups will be prescribed a calf muscle eccentric exercise program, however, the primary difference between the groups will be that the experimental group receive customised foot orthoses, while the control group receive sham foot orthoses. The participants will be instructed to perform eccentric exercises 2 times per day, 7 days per week, for 12 weeks. The primary outcome measure will be the total score of the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment - Achilles (VISA-A questionnaire. The secondary outcome measures will be participant perception of treatment effect, comfort of the foot orthoses, use of co-interventions, frequency and severity of adverse events, level of physical activity and health-related quality of life (assessed using the Short-Form-36 questionnaire

  13. Efficacy of customised foot orthoses in the treatment of Achilles tendinopathy: study protocol for a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munteanu, Shannon E; Landorf, Karl B; Menz, Hylton B; Cook, Jill L; Pizzari, Tania; Scott, Lisa A

    2009-10-24

    Achilles tendinopathy is a common condition that can cause marked pain and disability. Numerous non-surgical treatments have been proposed for the treatment of this condition, but many of these treatments have a poor or non-existent evidence base. The exception to this is eccentric calf muscle exercises, which have become a standard non-surgical intervention for Achilles tendinopathy. Foot orthoses have also been advocated as a treatment for Achilles tendinopathy, but the long-term efficacy of foot orthoses for this condition is unknown. This manuscript describes the design of a randomised trial to evaluate the efficacy of customised foot orthoses to reduce pain and improve function in people with Achilles tendinopathy. One hundred and forty community-dwelling men and women aged 18 to 55 years with Achilles tendinopathy (who satisfy inclusion and exclusion criteria) will be recruited. Participants will be randomised, using a computer-generated random number sequence, to either a control group (sham foot orthoses made from compressible ethylene vinyl acetate foam) or an experimental group (customised foot orthoses made from semi-rigid polypropylene). Both groups will be prescribed a calf muscle eccentric exercise program, however, the primary difference between the groups will be that the experimental group receive customised foot orthoses, while the control group receive sham foot orthoses. The participants will be instructed to perform eccentric exercises 2 times per day, 7 days per week, for 12 weeks. The primary outcome measure will be the total score of the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment - Achilles (VISA-A) questionnaire. The secondary outcome measures will be participant perception of treatment effect, comfort of the foot orthoses, use of co-interventions, frequency and severity of adverse events, level of physical activity and health-related quality of life (assessed using the Short-Form-36 questionnaire - Version two). Data will be collected at

  14. [Tendinopathies of the Lower Extremities in Sport--Diagnostics and Therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassel, M; Stoll, J; Mayer, F

    2015-06-01

    Tendinopathies are frequently the cause of chronic, load-dependent complaints of the lower extremity. Commonly, the large tendons of the ankle and knee joints are affected, especially the Achilles and patellar tendons. Repeated overuse in sports and/or daily activities is assumed as the aetiology. Besides the clinical examination including a comprehensive anamnesis of pain and training/loading, sonographic imaging has a high training/loading relevance for the diagnosis of tendon pathologies of the lower extremity. Training concepts are considered in first line as the treatment of choice. A combination with physical therapy interventions can be useful. In cases of a more severe pathology and long-standing complaints multimodal therapeutic options should be employed. The use of surgical treatment procedures should only be taken into account in case of failed response to conservative treatment. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. A comprehensive approach including a new enlargement technique to prevent complications after De Quervain tendinopathy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perno-Ioanna, D; Papaloïzos, M

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the outcome of our surgical approach aimed at preventing complications following surgery for De Quervain tendinopathy. Our stepwise surgical procedure is described in detail. We reviewed 56 cases operated by a senior surgeon over 5years, and re-evaluated them with a minimum 15months' follow-up. Complications mentioned in the literature (poor wound healing, adhesions, nerve injury, incomplete decompression, tendon subluxation) were not present in any of the cases; the satisfaction rate was very high. Slight residual discomfort was noted in 16 cases. Among them, 13 had an associated pathology. In summary, the outcome after the comprehensive approach presented here is highly predictable. Properly applied, good to excellent results can be expected in most patients. Potential postoperative complications are effectively prevented. Some caution is needed in cases of associated pathologies. Copyright © 2016 SFCM. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Guidelines and Pathways for Clinical Practice in Tendinopathy: Their Role and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Dylan

    2015-11-01

    Tendinopathy has significant consequences for both the athletic population and, more importantly, those who exercise for health or engage in physical activity as part of their occupation. That we are now able to perform high-quality evidence syntheses based on robust primary evidence for a wide range of conditions and therapeutic approaches is a credit to the pioneers who have driven the evidence explosion, and an inspiration for those striving to emulate and build on their achievements. How do we take that evidence and apply it in the clinical setting to individual patients? How do we adjust our decision-making schema in response to the presented information and challenges? J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2015;45(11):819-822. doi:10.2519/jospt.2015.0111.

  17. The prevalence of neovascularity in patients clinically diagnosed with rotator cuff tendinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raza Syed A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shoulder dysfunction is common and pathology of the rotator cuff tendons and subacromial bursa are considered to be a major cause of pain and morbidity. Although many hypotheses exist there is no definitive understanding as to the origin of the pain arising from these structures. Research investigations from other tendons have placed intra-tendinous neovascularity as a potential mechanism of pain production. The prevalence of neovascularity in patients with a clinical diagnosis of rotator cuff tendinopathy is unknown. As such the primary aim of this pilot study was to investigate if neovascularity could be identified and to determine the prevalence of neovascularity in the rotator cuff tendons and subacromial bursa in subjects with unilateral shoulder pain clinically assessed to be rotator cuff tendinopathy. The secondary aims were to investigate the association between the presence of neovascularity and pain, duration of symptoms, and, neovascularity and shoulder function. Methods Patients with a clinical diagnosis of unilateral rotator cuff tendinopathy referred for a routine diagnostic ultrasound (US scan in a major London teaching hospital formed the study population. At referral patients were provided with an information document. On the day of the scan (on average, at least one week later the patients agreeing to participate were taken through the consent process and underwent an additional clinical examination prior to undergoing a bilateral grey scale and colour Doppler US examination (symptomatic and asymptomatic shoulder using a Philips HDI 5000 Sono CT US machine. The ultrasound scans were performed by one of two radiologists who recorded their findings and the final assessment was made by a third radiologist blinded both to the clinical examination and the ultrasound examination. The findings of the radiologists who performed the scans and the blinded radiologist were compared and any disagreements were resolved

  18. Heated lidocaine/tetracaine patch for treatment of patellar tendinopathy pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gammaitoni AR

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Arnold R Gammaitoni,1 Henry T Goitz,2 Stephanie Marsh,2 Thomas B Marriott,3 Bradley S Galer1 1Pain Group, Nuvo Research US, West Chester, PA, USA; 2Sports Medicine, Detroit Medical Center, Warren, MI, USA; 3Pain Group, Nuvo Research US, Salt Lake City, UT, USA Introduction: The pain of patellar tendinopathy (PT may be mediated by neuronal glutamate and sodium channels. Lidocaine and tetracaine block both of these channels. This study tested the self-heated lidocaine-tetracaine patch (HLT patch in patients with PT confirmed by physical examination to determine if the HLT patch might relieve pain and improve function. Methods: Thirteen patients with PT pain of ≥14 days' duration and baseline average pain scores ≥4 (on a 0–10 scale enrolled in and completed this prospective, single-center pilot study. Patients applied one HLT patch to the affected knee twice daily for 2–4 hours for a total of 14 days. Change in average pain intensity and interference (Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment [VISA] scores from baseline to day 14 were assessed. No statistical inference testing was performed. Results: Average pain scores declined from 5.5 ± 1.3 (mean ± standard deviation at baseline to 3.8 ± 2.5 on day 14. Similarly, VISA scores improved from 45.2 ± 14.4 at baseline to 54.3 ± 24.5 on day 14. A clinically important reduction in pain score (≥30% was demonstrated by 54% of patients. Conclusion: The results of this pilot study suggest that topical treatment that targets neuronal sodium and glutamate channels may be useful in the treatment of PT. Keywords: patellar tendinopathy, patellar tendinosis, heated lidocaine/tetracaine patch, topical analgesic patch, knee pain

  19. Wireless Versus Wired Iontophoresis for Treating Patellar Tendinopathy: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, Justin H; Mortensen, Brett B; Draper, David O

    2015-11-01

    The efficacy of the relatively new wireless iontophoresis patch compared with the traditional wired dose controller is unknown. To determine the differences among 2 iontophoresis drug-delivery systems (wireless patch versus wired dose controller) and a sham treatment in treating patellar tendinopathy. Randomized controlled clinical trial. Physical therapy clinic. Thirty-one participants diagnosed with patellar tendinopathy (men = 22, women = 9, age = 24.5 ± 5.9 years). Participants were randomly assigned into 1 of 3 treatment groups: wireless patch, wired dose controller, or sham treatment. Participants in the active treatment groups received six 80 mA/min iontophoresis treatments using 2 mL of 4% dexamethasone sodium phosphate. During each visit, clinical outcome measures were assessed and then the assigned treatment was applied. Clinical outcome measures were Kujala Anterior Knee Pain Scale, pressure sensitivity, knee-extension force, and sit-to-stand pain assessment using a numeric rating scale. For each clinical outcome measure, we used a repeated-measures analysis of covariance to determine differences among the treatment groups over the treatment period. Participants reported a clinically important improvement on the Kujala Anterior Knee Pain Scale across all treatment groups, with no differences among groups (P = .571). A placebo effect was observed with pressure sensitivity (P = .0152); however, the active treatment decreased participants' pain during the sit-to-stand test (P = .042). A placebo effect occurred with the sham treatment group. Generally, improvement was noted in all groups regardless of treatment type, but greater pain reduction during a functional task was evident within the active treatment groups during the sit-to-stand test. The wireless patch and wired dose controller treatments were equivalent across all variables.

  20. Cuboid oedema due to peroneus longus tendinopathy: a report of four cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Donnell, Paul; Saifuddin, Asif [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-01

    To highlight focal bone abnormality in the cuboid due to tendinopathy of the adjacent peroneus longus. A retrospective review was carried out of the relevant clinical and imaging features. Two male and two female patients were studied, mean age 51.5 years (range 32 - 67 years), referred with foot pain and imaging showing an abnormal cuboid thought to represent either tumour or infection. A long history of foot pain was usual with a maximum of 8 years. Radiographs were normal in two cases and showed erosion in two, one of which exhibited periosteal new bone formation affecting the cuboid. Bone scintigraphy was undertaken in two patients, both of whom showed increased uptake of isotope. MRI, performed in all patients, showed oedema in the cuboid adjacent to the peroneus longus tendon. The tendon and/or paratendinous tissues were abnormal in all cases, but no tendon discontinuity was identified. One patient possessed an os peroneum. Unequivocal evidence of bone erosion was seen using MRI in three patients, but with greater clarity in two cases using CT. Additional findings of tenosynovitis of tibialis posterior, oedema in the adjacent medial malleolus and synovitis of multiple joints in the foot were seen in one patient. Imaging diagnosis was made in all cases avoiding bone biopsy, but surgical exploration of the peroneal tendons was performed in two cases and biopsy of ankle synovium in one. Oedema with erosion of the cuboid bone, simulating a bone lesion (cuboid ''pseudotumour''), may be caused by adjacent tendinopathy of peroneus longus. It is vital to be aware of this entity to avoid unnecessary biopsy of the cuboid. (orig.)

  1. An isokinetic eccentric programme for the management of chronic lateral epicondylar tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croisier, Jean-Louis; Foidart-Dessalle, Marguerite; Tinant, France; Crielaard, Jean-Michel; Forthomme, Bénédicte

    2007-04-01

    Lateral epicondylitis represents a frequent overuse injury. In spite of many conservative treatment procedures, prolonged symptoms and relapse are frequently observed. To compare the outcome of patients performing an isokinetic eccentric training with that of age-, gender-, activity-matched patients receiving a non-strengthening classical rehabilitation. Ninety-two patients with unilateral chronic lateral epicondylar tendinopathy (mean duration of symptoms 8+/-3 months) were assigned either to a control group (n = 46) or to an eccentrically trained group (n = 46). The control group underwent a passive standardised rehabilitation programme that excluded strengthening exercises. In addition to this programme, the trained group also performed eccentric exercises based on the repetitive lengthening of the active musculo-tendinous unit. The latter exercises started with submaximal contraction intensity and slow speed movement. Modalities were progressively intensified (increase in intensity contraction and speed movement) over a long period of treatment. Programme effectiveness was assessed through pain score evaluation, a disability questionnaire, muscle strength measurement and ultrasonographic examination. Compared to the non-strengthening control group, the following observations were made in the eccentrically trained group: (1) a significantly more marked reduction of pain intensity, mainly after one month of treatment; (2) an absence of strength deficit on the involved side through bilateral comparison for the forearm supinator and wrist extensor muscles; (3) an improvement of the tendon image as demonstrated by decreasing thickness and a recovered homogenous tendon structure; and (4) a more marked improvement in disability status during occupational, spare time and sports activities. These results highlight the relevance of implementing isokinetic adapted eccentric training in the management of chronic lateral epicondylar tendinopathy.

  2. Ultrasound-guided dry needling with percutaneous paratenon decompression for chronic Achilles tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Andrea; Kendall, Namita; Jayaraman, Sunderarajan

    2016-07-01

    Chronic Achilles tendinopathy is a common overuse injury. There are several modalities of treatment, reflecting difficulties in management. In particular, due to the well-recognised surgical morbidity, treatment has steered towards less invasive routes. Previous studies have targeted pathology either inside or outside the tendon in isolation with varying results. This study aimed to target both pathological sites by combining dry needling with percutaneous hydrostatic decompression as a novel treatment. Twenty-one patients with 26 chronic, non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy were prospectively enrolled. Ultrasound-guided dry needling of neovascular areas and small-volume hydrostatic paratenon decompression was performed 6-weekly. Sonographic assessment of tendon thickness and neovascularity was undertaken. Following treatment, a standardised physiotherapy regime was adopted. Visual analogue scores (VAS) were used as the primary outcome measure. Telephonic interviews were carried out 12 and 24 months post-treatment. Twenty-four tendons (in 19 patients) were successfully treated. The mean treatment session was 2. There was no significant change in neovascularity or tendon thickness. Therapeutic intervention led to a significant improvement in VAS at rest (42.4 ± 24.4 vs. 18.4 ± 26.0, p = 0.0005) and during activity (72.8 ± 16.0 vs. 33.7 ± 23.2, p 75 % of patients were highly satisfied with their outcome with nearly half reporting complete resolution of their symptoms. >85 % were also able to return to their sporting interests. Combined therapy of dry needling with percutaneous hydrostatic paratenon decompression under ultrasound guidance is a well-tolerated procedure with good short- and long-term pain and functional outcomes. Prospective case series, Level IV.

  3. Arthroscopic management of calcific tendinopathy of the shoulder--do we need to remove all the deposit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzello, Giacomo; Franceschi, Francesco; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Ruzzini, Laura; Meloni, Maria Chiara; Spiezia, Filippo; Papalia, Rocco; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2009-01-01

    Results of arthroscopic management of chronic, recalcitrant calcific tendinopathy of the shoulder in 28 patients were evaluated. Twenty-six patients (average age, 44 years) were ultimately enrolled in the study. Postoperative radiographs were performed to determine the amount of calcium deposit removal. Radiographic examination 2 months after surgery was performed to evaluate further deposit changes. The Constant score showed a statistically significant improvement in all patients. Better results were obtained when complete removal of the calcifications was achieved. On radiographic examination, performed two months after surgery, no calcification deposit increased in size and no translucent deposit changed into a dense deposit. Most of the dense deposits, partially removed, changed into translucent deposits. In this series, we found arthroscopic management was effective in treating calcific tendinopathy.

  4. Acute calcific tendinopathy of the popliteus tendon: a rare case diagnosed using a multimodality imaging approach and treated conservatively

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doucet, Cedric; Gotra, Akshat; Reddy, Santhosh Mauvva Venkatesh; Boily, Mathieu [McGill University, Royal Victoria Hospital, Department of Radiology, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2017-07-15

    Acute calcific tendinopathy of the popliteus tendon is a rare medical entity associated with significant patient discomfort. We present the case of a previously healthy 48-year-old female who presented to the emergency department with acute onset of left knee pain. Initial radiographs revealed calcifications within the posterolateral compartment of the knee. Ultrasound imaging demonstrated a swollen and hypoechoic popliteus tendon with an increased color Doppler signal at the periphery of the tendon as well as calcification in the tendon and adjacent soft tissues. Subsequently performed MRI revealed a thickened and heterogeneous popliteus tendon near its femoral attachment with marked edematous changes surrounding the tendon. Local ultrasound-guided glucocorticoid injection had successful clinical results with no recurrence at 8-month follow-up. In this case report we review the literature for similar previously reported cases. This case report of popliteus tendon calcific tendinopathy provides comprehensive multimodality imaging findings and a description of its non-surgical management. (orig.)

  5. Self-managed loaded exercise versus usual physiotherapy treatment for rotator cuff tendinopathy: a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlewood, Chris; Malliaras, Peter; Mawson, Sue; May, Stephen; Walters, Stephen J

    2014-03-01

    Rotator cuff tendinopathy is a common source of shoulder pain characterised by persistent and/or recurrent problems for a proportion of sufferers. The aim of this study was to pilot the methods proposed to conduct a substantive study to evaluate the effectiveness of a self-managed loaded exercise programme versus usual physiotherapy treatment for rotator cuff tendinopathy. A single-centre pragmatic unblinded parallel group pilot randomised controlled trial. One private physiotherapy clinic, northern England. Twenty-four participants with rotator cuff tendinopathy. The intervention was a programme of self-managed loaded exercise. The control group received usual physiotherapy treatment. Baseline assessment comprised the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) and the Short-Form 36, repeated three months post randomisation. The recruitment target was met and the majority of participants (98%) were willing to be randomised. 100% retention was attained with all participants completing the SPADI at three months. Exercise adherence rates were excellent (90%). The mean change in SPADI score was -23.7 (95% CI -14.4 to -33.3) points for the self-managed exercise group and -19.0 (95% CI -6.0 to -31.9) points for the usual physiotherapy treatment group. The difference in three month SPADI scores was 0.1 (95% CI -16.6 to 16.9) points in favour of the usual physiotherapy treatment group. In keeping with previous research which indicates the need for further evaluation of self-managed loaded exercise for rotator cuff tendinopathy, these methods and the preliminary evaluation of outcome offer a foundation and stimulus to conduct a substantive study. Copyright © 2013 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Short-term effectiveness of bi-phase oscillatory waves versus hyperthermia for isolated long head biceps tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Francesco; Via, Alessio Giai; Rossi, Silvio

    2011-07-01

    Long head biceps (LHB) tendinopathy is a common cause of anterior shoulder pain. Isolated LHB pathology is most common among younger people who practise overhead sports. The authors conducted a short-term prospective randomised study to test the effectiveness of two different methods for the treatment of isolated LHB tendinopathy: biphasic oscillatory waves and hyperthermia. The study is a prospective randomised study (Level II). The authors identified 20 patients who had clinical and ultrasound (US) evidence of LHB tendinopathy. No patient was a high-level athlete. The patients were randomly assigned to two groups. Group A (10 patients) was treated with bi-phasic oscillatory waves, while Group B received hyperthermia. During the treatment period, no other electromedical therapy, injections with corticosteroids, oral analgesics or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were allowed. All the patients were assessed at baseline (T0), immediately after the end of the treatment period (T1) and 6 months after the end of treatment (T2) using a visual analogic scale (VAS) and Constant-Murley Score (CMS). Furthermore, all patients underwent US examinations at T0 and at T1. All the US examinations were performed by the same radiologist. The VAS scores showed a highly statistically significant reduction of pain at T1 both in Group A (65%; p=0,004) and in Group B (50%; p=0,0002). The CMS also showed a statistically significant improvement between the pre-intervention, the post-treatment and the short-term follow-up in both groups. In addition, the peritendinous fluid evident on US examination at T0 was no longer present in all cases at T1. These findings suggest that both bi-phasic oscillatory waves and hyperthermia are able to relieve pain in patients with isolated LHB tendinopathy. This is a Class II level of evidence.

  7. Deep friction massage to treat tendinopathy: a systematic review of a classic treatment in the face of a new paradigm of understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Michael F; Taft, Kathryn; Moskwa, Maria; Denegar, Craig R

    2012-11-01

    Systematic literature review. To assess the efficacy of deep friction massage (DFM) in the treatment of tendinopathy. Anecdotal evidence supports the efficacy of DFM for the treatment of tendinopathy. An advanced understanding of the etiopathogenesis of tendinopathy and the resultant paradigm shift away from an active inflammatory model has taken place since the popularization of the DFM technique by Cyriax for the treatment of "tendinitis." However, increasing mechanical load to the tendinopathic tissue, as well as reducing molecular cross-linking during the healing process via transverse massage, offers a plausible explanation for observed responses in light of the contemporary understanding of tendinopathy. The authors surveyed research articles in all languages by searching PubMed, Scopus, Pedro, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Library using the terms deep friction massage, deep tissue massage, deep transverse massage, Cyriax, soft tissue mobilization, soft tissue mobilisation, cross friction massage, and transverse friction massage. They included 4 randomized comparison trials, 3 at the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) and 1 supraspinatus outlet tendinopathy; 2 nonrandomized comparison trials, both receiving DFM at the ECRB; and 3 prospective noncomparison trials-supraspinatus, ECRB, and Achilles tendons. Articles meeting inclusion criteria were assessed based on PEDro and Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine rating scales. Nine studies met the inclusion criteria. The heterogeneity of dependent measures did not allow for meta-analysis. The varied locations, study designs, etiopathogenesis, and outcome tools used to examine the efficacy of DFM make a unified conclusion tenuous. There is some evidence of benefit at the elbow in combination with a Mills manipulation, as well as for supraspinatus tendinopathy in the presence of outlet impingement and along with joint mobilization. The examination of DFM as a single modality of treatment in comparison with

  8. Clinical results after ultrasound-guided intratissue percutaneous electrolysis (EPI®) and eccentric exercise in the treatment of patellar tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abat, F; Gelber, P E; Polidori, F; Monllau, J C; Sanchez-Ibañez, J M

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the outcome of ultrasound (US)-guided intratissue percutaneous electrolysis (EPI(®)) and eccentric exercise in the treatment of patellar tendinopathy during a long-term follow-up. Forty patients with patellar tendinopathy were prospectively evaluated over a 10-year follow-up period. Pain and function were evaluated before treatment, at 3 months and at 2, 5 and 10 years using the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Patella (VISA-P) score, the Tegner score and Blazina's classification. According to VISA-P score at baseline, patients were also dichotomized into Group 1 (80 points. The same level (80 % of patients) or the Tegner score at no more than one level lower (20 % of patients) was restored, and 97.5 % of the patients were satisfied with the procedure. Treatment with the US-guided EPI(®) technique and eccentric exercises in patellar tendinopathy resulted in a great improvement in knee function and a rapid return to the previous level of activity after few sessions. The procedure has proved to be safe with no recurrences on a long-term basis. Therapeutic study, Level IV.

  9. Diagnosis of long head of biceps tendinopathy in rotator cuff tear patients: correlation of imaging and arthroscopy data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rol, Morgane; Favard, Luc; Berhouet, Julien

    2017-08-25

    The goal of this prospective study was to assess the reliability of pre-operative cross-sectional imaging for the diagnosis of long head of biceps (LHB) tendinopathy in patients with a rotator cuff tear. Cross-sectional imaging with MRI or CT arthrography data from 25 patients operated upon because of a rotator cuff tear between 1 October 2015 and 1 April 2016 was analysed by one experienced orthopaedic surgeon, one experienced radiologist and one orthopaedic resident. The analysis consisted of determining whether the LHB was present, the extrinsic tendon abnormalities (dislocation, tendon coverage) and intrinsic abnormalities (fraying, inflammation, degeneration). These findings were then compared to intra-operative arthroscopy findings, which were used as the benchmark. The interobserver correlation between the three different examiners for the cross-sectional imaging analysis as well as the correlation between the imaging and arthroscopy data were determined. The correlation between the imaging and arthroscopy data was the highest (80%) for the determination of LHB dislocation from the bicipital groove. The other diagnostic elements (subluxation, coverage and tendon degeneration) were difficult to discern with preoperative imaging, and correlated poorly with the arthroscopy findings (45% to 65%). The interobserver correlation was moderate to strong for the diagnosis of extrinsic tendon abnormalities. It was low to moderate for intrinsic abnormalities. Except for LHB dislocation, pre-operative imaging is not sufficient to make a reliable diagnosis of LHB tendinopathy. Arthroscopy remains the gold standard for the management of LHB tendinopathy, as diagnosed intra-operatively.

  10. Multimodal Care in the Management of a Patient With Chronic Tendinopathy of the Biceps Femoris: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Brett R

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this case report was to describe the use of dry needling in conjunction with auricular acupuncture, core exercises, and light aerobic activity for treating chronic tendinopathy of the biceps femoris. A 30-year-old white female presented with chronic biceps femoris tendinopathy. The injury had occurred 18 months prior while training for a triathlon. Active stretching of her right biceps femoris while standing with her feet 6 inches apart aggravated the pain at the origin in the right tendon of the biceps femoris at 0 degrees of movement. The combination of dry needling and auricular acupuncture with core rehabilitation exercises and light activity was employed. Alleviation of pain with full range of motion was achieved during hip extension, knee flexion, and standing biceps femoris stretch at the 11th, 16th, and 18th treatments. In addition, the patient also reported improvement in her symptoms, including night sweats, insomnia, anxiety, tension, and constipation. This patient's symptoms and function improved after 18 treatments of multimodal care. Dry needling employed simultaneously with auricular acupuncture, core exercises, and light activity could be considered a possible strategy for treating chronic tendinopathy.

  11. Efficacy of betamethasone valerate medicated plaster on painful chronic elbow tendinopathy: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frizziero, Antonio; Causero, Araldo; Bernasconi, Stefano; Papalia, Rocco; Longo, Mario; Sessa, Vincenzo; Sadile, Francesco; Greco, Pasquale; Tarantino, Umberto; Masiero, Stefano; Rovati, Stefano; Frangione, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective to investigate the efficacy and safety of a medicated plaster containing betamethasone valerate (BMV) 2.25 mg in patients with chronic elbow tendinopathy. Methods randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study with assignment 2:2:1:1 to BMV medicated plaster applied daily for 12 hours, daily for 24 hours or matched placebo. 62 patients aged ≥18 years with chronic lateral elbow tendinopathy were randomized. The primary efficacy variable was pain reduction (VAS) at day 28. Secondary objectives included summed pain intensity differences (SPID), overall treatment efficacy and tolerability. Results mean reduction in VAS pain score at day 28 was greater in both BMV medicated plaster groups, −39.35±27.69 mm for BMV12-h and −36.91±32.50 mm for BMV24-h, than with placebo, −20.20±27.32 mm. Considering the adjusted mean decreases, there was a statistically significant difference between BMV12-h and placebo (p=0.0110). Global pain relief (SPID) and overall treatment efficacy were significantly better with BMV. BMV and placebo plasters had similar local tolerability and there were few treatment-related adverse events. Conclusions BMV plaster was significantly more effective than placebo at reducing pain in patients with chronic elbow tendinopathies. The BMV plaster was safe and well tolerated. PMID:27331041

  12. Magnetic Resonance Signal, Rather Than Tendon Volume, Correlates to Pain and Functional Impairment in Chronic Achilles Tendinopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaerdin, A.; Bruno, J.; Movin, T.; Kristoffersen-Wiberg, M.; Shalabi, A. [Karolinska Univ. Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden). Depts. of Radiology and Orthopedics

    2006-09-15

    Purpose: To depict abnormal tendon matrix composition using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in chronic Achilles tendinopathy, and correlate intratendinous signal alterations to pain and functional impairment. Material and Methods: MRI of the Achilles tendon was performed on 25 patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy (median age 50, range 37-71 years). All patients suffered from pain in the mid-portion of the Achilles tendon. Intratendinous signal was calculated from five different sagittal sequences, using a computerized 3D seed-growing technique. Pain and functional impairment were evaluated using a questionnaire completed by patients. Results: Severity of pain and functional impairment correlated to increased mean intratendinous signal in the painful tendon in all MR sequences (P 0.05). Difference in mean intratendinous signal between symptomatic and contralateral asymptomatic tendons was highly significant in all sequences (P <0.05) except on T2-weighted images (P = 0.6). Conclusion: Severity of pain and disability correlated to increased MR signal rather than to tendon volume in patients with unilateral mid-portion chronic Achilles tendinopathy.

  13. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the VISA-A questionnaire for German-speaking Achilles tendinopathy patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nauck Tanja

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Achilles tendinopathy is the predominant overuse injury in runners. To further investigate this overload injury in transverse and longitudinal studies a valid, responsive and reliable outcome measure is demanded. Most questionnaires have been developed for English-speaking populations. This is also true for the VISA-A score, so far representing the only valid, reliable, and disease specific questionnaire for Achilles tendinopathy. To internationally compare research results, to perform multinational studies or to exclude bias originating from subpopulations speaking different languages within one country an equivalent instrument is demanded in different languages. The aim of this study was therefore to cross-cultural adapt and validate the VISA-A questionnaire for German-speaking Achilles tendinopathy patients. Methods According to the "guidelines for the process of cross-cultural adaptation of self-report measures" the VISA-A score was cross-culturally adapted into German (VISA-A-G using six steps: Translation, synthesis, back translation, expert committee review, pretesting (n = 77, and appraisal of the adaptation process by an advisory committee determining the adequacy of the cross-cultural adaptation. The resulting VISA-A-G was then subjected to an analysis of reliability, validity, and internal consistency in 30 Achilles tendinopathy patients and 79 asymptomatic people. Concurrent validity was tested against a generic tendon grading system (Percy and Conochie and against a classification system for the effect of pain on athletic performance (Curwin and Stanish. Results The "advisory committee" determined the VISA-A-G questionnaire as been translated "acceptable". The VISA-A-G questionnaire showed moderate to excellent test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.60 to 0.97. Concurrent validity showed good coherence when correlated with the grading system of Curwin and Stanish (rho = -0.95 and for the Percy and Conochie grade of

  14. Spatiotemporal variations in gene expression, histology and biomechanics in an ovine model of tendinopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Biasutti

    Full Text Available Flexor tendinopathy is a common problem affecting humans and animals. Tendon healing is poorly understood and the outcomes of conservative and surgical management are often suboptimal. While often considered a localized injury, recent evidence indicates that in the short term, tendinopathic changes are distributed widely throughout the tendon, remote from the lesion itself. Whether these changes persist throughout healing is unknown. The aim of this study was to document gene expression, histopathological and biomechanical changes that occur throughout the superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT up to 16 weeks post-injury, using an ovine surgical model of tendinopathy. Partial tendon transection was associated with decreased gene expression for aggrecan, decorin, fibromodulin, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPS 1, 2 and 3, collagen I and collagen II. Gene expression for collagen III, lumican and matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13 increased locally around the lesion site. Expression of collagen III and MMP13 decreased with time, but compared to controls, collagen III, MMP13 and lumican expression remained regionally high throughout the study. An increase in TIMP3 was observed over time. Histologically, operated tendons had higher pathology scores than controls, especially around the injured region. A chondroid phenotype was observed with increased cellular rounding and marked proteoglycan accumulation which only partially improved with time. Biomechanically, partial tendon transection resulted in a localized decrease in elastic modulus (in compression but only at 8 weeks postoperatively. This study improves our understanding of tendon healing, demonstrating an early 'peak' in pathology characterized by altered gene expression and notable histopathological changes. Many of these pathological changes become more localized to the region of injury during healing. Collagen III and MMP13 expression levels remained high close to the lesion

  15. Spatiotemporal variations in gene expression, histology and biomechanics in an ovine model of tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasutti, Sara; Dart, Andrew; Smith, Margaret; Blaker, Carina; Clarke, Elizabeth; Jeffcott, Leo; Little, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Flexor tendinopathy is a common problem affecting humans and animals. Tendon healing is poorly understood and the outcomes of conservative and surgical management are often suboptimal. While often considered a localized injury, recent evidence indicates that in the short term, tendinopathic changes are distributed widely throughout the tendon, remote from the lesion itself. Whether these changes persist throughout healing is unknown. The aim of this study was to document gene expression, histopathological and biomechanical changes that occur throughout the superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) up to 16 weeks post-injury, using an ovine surgical model of tendinopathy. Partial tendon transection was associated with decreased gene expression for aggrecan, decorin, fibromodulin, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPS 1, 2 and 3), collagen I and collagen II. Gene expression for collagen III, lumican and matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13) increased locally around the lesion site. Expression of collagen III and MMP13 decreased with time, but compared to controls, collagen III, MMP13 and lumican expression remained regionally high throughout the study. An increase in TIMP3 was observed over time. Histologically, operated tendons had higher pathology scores than controls, especially around the injured region. A chondroid phenotype was observed with increased cellular rounding and marked proteoglycan accumulation which only partially improved with time. Biomechanically, partial tendon transection resulted in a localized decrease in elastic modulus (in compression) but only at 8 weeks postoperatively. This study improves our understanding of tendon healing, demonstrating an early 'peak' in pathology characterized by altered gene expression and notable histopathological changes. Many of these pathological changes become more localized to the region of injury during healing. Collagen III and MMP13 expression levels remained high close to the lesion throughout the

  16. Physical therapies for Achilles tendinopathy: systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Achilles tendinopathy (AT) is a common condition, causing considerable morbidity in athletes and non-athletes alike. Conservative or physical therapies are accepted as first-line management of AT; however, despite a growing volume of research, there remains a lack of high quality studies evaluating their efficacy. Previous systematic reviews provide preliminary evidence for non-surgical interventions for AT, but lack key quality components as outlined in the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) Statement. The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis (where possible) of the evidence for physical therapies for AT management. Methods A comprehensive strategy was used to search 11 electronic databases from inception to September 2011. Search terms included Achilles, tendinopathy, pain, physical therapies, electrotherapy and exercise (English language full-text publications, human studies). Reference lists of eligible papers were hand-searched. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) were included if they evaluated at least one non-pharmacological, non-surgical intervention for AT using at least one outcome of pain and/or function. Two independent reviewers screened 2852 search results, identifying 23 suitable studies, and assessed methodological quality and risk of bias using a modified PEDro scale. Effect size calculation and meta-analyses were based on fixed and random effects models respectively. Results Methodological quality ranged from 2 to 12 (/14). Four studies were excluded due to high risk of bias, leaving 19 studies, the majority of which evaluated midportion AT. Effect sizes from individual RCTs support the use of eccentric exercise. Meta-analyses identified significant effects favouring the addition of laser therapy to eccentric exercise at 12 weeks (pain VAS: standardised mean difference −0.59, 95% confidence interval −1.11 to −0.07), as well as no differences in effect

  17. Physical therapies for Achilles tendinopathy: systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sussmilch-Leitch Samuel P

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Achilles tendinopathy (AT is a common condition, causing considerable morbidity in athletes and non-athletes alike. Conservative or physical therapies are accepted as first-line management of AT; however, despite a growing volume of research, there remains a lack of high quality studies evaluating their efficacy. Previous systematic reviews provide preliminary evidence for non-surgical interventions for AT, but lack key quality components as outlined in the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA Statement. The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis (where possible of the evidence for physical therapies for AT management. Methods A comprehensive strategy was used to search 11 electronic databases from inception to September 2011. Search terms included Achilles, tendinopathy, pain, physical therapies, electrotherapy and exercise (English language full-text publications, human studies. Reference lists of eligible papers were hand-searched. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs were included if they evaluated at least one non-pharmacological, non-surgical intervention for AT using at least one outcome of pain and/or function. Two independent reviewers screened 2852 search results, identifying 23 suitable studies, and assessed methodological quality and risk of bias using a modified PEDro scale. Effect size calculation and meta-analyses were based on fixed and random effects models respectively. Results Methodological quality ranged from 2 to 12 (/14. Four studies were excluded due to high risk of bias, leaving 19 studies, the majority of which evaluated midportion AT. Effect sizes from individual RCTs support the use of eccentric exercise. Meta-analyses identified significant effects favouring the addition of laser therapy to eccentric exercise at 12 weeks (pain VAS: standardised mean difference −0.59, 95% confidence interval −1.11 to −0.07, as well as no

  18. Spatiotemporal variations in gene expression, histology and biomechanics in an ovine model of tendinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaker, Carina; Clarke, Elizabeth; Jeffcott, Leo; Little, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Flexor tendinopathy is a common problem affecting humans and animals. Tendon healing is poorly understood and the outcomes of conservative and surgical management are often suboptimal. While often considered a localized injury, recent evidence indicates that in the short term, tendinopathic changes are distributed widely throughout the tendon, remote from the lesion itself. Whether these changes persist throughout healing is unknown. The aim of this study was to document gene expression, histopathological and biomechanical changes that occur throughout the superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) up to 16 weeks post-injury, using an ovine surgical model of tendinopathy. Partial tendon transection was associated with decreased gene expression for aggrecan, decorin, fibromodulin, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPS 1, 2 and 3), collagen I and collagen II. Gene expression for collagen III, lumican and matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13) increased locally around the lesion site. Expression of collagen III and MMP13 decreased with time, but compared to controls, collagen III, MMP13 and lumican expression remained regionally high throughout the study. An increase in TIMP3 was observed over time. Histologically, operated tendons had higher pathology scores than controls, especially around the injured region. A chondroid phenotype was observed with increased cellular rounding and marked proteoglycan accumulation which only partially improved with time. Biomechanically, partial tendon transection resulted in a localized decrease in elastic modulus (in compression) but only at 8 weeks postoperatively. This study improves our understanding of tendon healing, demonstrating an early ‘peak’ in pathology characterized by altered gene expression and notable histopathological changes. Many of these pathological changes become more localized to the region of injury during healing. Collagen III and MMP13 expression levels remained high close to the lesion throughout

  19. A prospective series of patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy treated with autologous-conditioned plasma injections combined with exercise and therapeutic ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deans, Victoria M; Miller, Alison; Ramos, James

    2012-01-01

    Chronic Achilles tendinopathy is a difficult problem to manage, because it can result in significant patient morbidity. We conducted a prospective case series involving 26 patients (2 bilateral cases) with painful and ultrasound-confirmed Achilles tendinopathy for a minimum duration of 6 months. Our objective was to assess whether this condition can be effectively treated with a treatment protocol combining an intratendinous autologous-conditioned plasma injection followed by a standardized rehabilitation protocol. The rehabilitation protocol consisted of full weightbearing in a pneumatic cast boot for 6 weeks, therapeutic ultrasound treatment, and an eccentric exercise program. Our results showed statistically significant improvements in terms of pain (p tendinopathy. Copyright © 2012 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Chronic Achilles tendinopathy: a case study of treatment incorporating active and passive tissue warm-up, Graston Technique, ART, eccentric exercise, and cryotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miners, Andrew L; Bougie, Tracy L

    2011-12-01

    To describe the subjective pain and functional improvements of a patient with chronic Achilles tendinopathy following a treatment plan incorporating active and passive tissue warm-up, followed respectively by soft tissue mobilization utilizing both Graston Technique(®) and Active Release Techniques(®), eccentric exercise, and static stretching in combination with cryotherapy. The primary characterization of chronic Achilles tendinopathy is gradual onset of pain and dysfunction focused in one or both Achilles tendons arising secondary to a history of repetitive use or excessive overload. Conservative treatment is commonly the initial strategy for patient management. Tissue heating, soft tissue mobilization, eccentric training, and static stretching with cryotherapy were implemented to reduce pain and improve function. A specific protocol of heat, soft tissue mobilization, eccentric exercise, stretching, and cryotherapy appeared to facilitate a rapid and complete recovery from chronic Achilles tendinopathy.

  1. Treatment of Patellar Tendinopathy Refractory to Surgical Management Using Percutaneous Ultrasonic Tenotomy and Platelet-Rich Plasma Injection: A Case Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanos, Katherine N; Malanga, Gerard A

    2015-12-01

    Chronic proximal patellar tendinopathy is a common condition in sports medicine that may be refractory to nonoperative treatments, including activity modification, medications, and comprehensive rehabilitation. Percutaneous ultrasonic tenotomy is a recently developed technique designed to cut and debride tendinopathic tissue, thus promoting pain relief and functional recovery. We present a case of a collegiate athlete with chronic proximal patellar tendinopathy who was effectively treated with percutaneous ultrasonic tenotomy after not responding to extensive nonoperative treatment, surgical debridement, and platelet-rich plasma injections. Percutaneous ultrasonic tenotomy can be considered as a treatment option in patients presenting with refractory proximal patellar tendinopathy, including those who do not respond to previous operative intervention. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Risk factors for patellar tendinopathy in basketball and volleyball players: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Worp, H; van Ark, M; Zwerver, J; van den Akker-Scheek, I

    2012-12-01

    Patellar tendinopathy (PT) has a multifactorial etiology, and many possible risk factors have been described in the literature. The findings are conflicting, though, and most research has been conducted on elite athletes. The aim of the current study is to determine the risk factors for PT in a large representative sample of basketball and volleyball players. Separate risk factors for men and women, basketball and volleyball players, and athletes with unilateral and bilateral PT were identified. All basketball and volleyball players between ages 18 and 35 from the Dutch Basketball Association and the Dutch Volleyball Association were invited to complete an online questionnaire on knee complaints and risk factors for PT. The logistic regression analyses included 2224 subjects. The risk factors for PT were age, playing at the national level, being male and playing volleyball (compared with playing basketball). The risk factors for men and women were comparable. Among volleyball players, outside hitters and middle blockers/hitters had an increased risk compared with setters. For basketball players, no risk factors could be identified. No differences in the risk factors were found between athletes with unilateral and bilateral PT. These findings should be taken into account for prevention and rehabilitation purposes. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Achilles tendinopathy alters stretch shortening cycle behaviour during a sub-maximal hopping task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debenham, James R; Travers, Mervyn J; Gibson, William; Campbell, Amity; Allison, Garry T

    2016-01-01

    To describe stretch shortening cycle behaviour of the ankle and lower limb in patients with Achilles tendinopathy (AT) and establish differences with healthy volunteers. Between-subjects case-controlled. Fifteen patients with AT (mean age 41.2±12.7 years) and 11 healthy volunteers (CON) (mean age 23.2±6.7 years) performed sub-maximal single-limb hopping on a custom built sledge-jump system. Using 3D motion analysis and surface EMG, temporal kinematic (lower limb stiffness, ankle angle at 80ms pre-contact, ankle angle at contact, peak ankle angle, ankle stretch amplitude) and EMG measures (onset, offset and peak times relative to contact) were captured. Data between AT and CON were compared statistically using a linear mixed model. Patients with AT exhibited significantly increased lower limb stiffness when compared to healthy volunteers (pbehaviour during sub-maximal hopping when compared with healthy volunteers. Patients with AT hop with greater lower limb stiffness, in a greater degree of ankle dorsiflexion and have a greater stretch amplitude. Likewise, delayed muscle activity is evident. These findings have implications in terms of informing the understanding of the pathoaetiology and management of AT. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The effectiveness of kinesio taping for athletes with medial elbow epicondylar tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, H-Y; Cheng, S-C; Lin, C-C; Chou, K-Y; Gan, S-M; Wang, C-H

    2013-11-01

    Kinesio taping has also been used for athletes with Medial Elbow Epicondylar Tendinopathy (MET) as an additional treatment method. The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical effectiveness of Kinesio tape on maximal grip strength and absolute and related force sense in athletes with MET when applied to the medial forearm. 27 male athletes who voluntarily participated in this study were divided into a healthy group (n=17) and a MET group (n=10). All subjects were assessed for the maximal grip strength and grip force sense (absolute and related force sense) under 3 taping conditions: 1) without taping; 2) with placebo Kinesio taping; and 3) with Kinesio taping. No significant interaction was found between groups and taping condition in maximal grip force and related force sense error, except for absolute force sense error (p=0.04). Both groups with absolute force sense measurements had significantly decreased errors in the placebo Kinesio taping and Kinesio taping conditions. Both taping may enhance discrimination of magnitude of grip force control (absolute force sense) in both groups when applied to the forearm. However, Kinesio taping did not change maximal grip strength in either group. The effects of Kinesio taping on other muscle functions remain to be studied. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. The impact of patellar tendinopathy on sports and work performance in active athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vries, Astrid J; Koolhaas, Wendy; Zwerver, Johannes; Diercks, Ron L; Nieuwenhuis, Kari; Van Der Worp, Henk; Brouwer, Sandra; Van Den Akker-Scheek, Inge

    2017-01-01

    Greater insight into sports and work performance of athletes with patellar tendinopathy (PT) will help establish the severity of this common overuse injury. Primary aim of this study is to investigate the impact of PT on sports and work performance. Seventy seven active athletes with PT (50 males; age 28.1 ± 8.2 years; Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment Patella 56.4 ± 12.3) participated in this survey. Sports performance, work ability and work productivity were assessed using the Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center overuse injury questionnaire, the single-item Work Ability Index and the Quantity and Quality questionnaire, respectively. Reduced sports performance was reported by 55% of the participants; 16% reported reduced work ability and 36% decreased work productivity, with 23% and 58%, respectively, for physically demanding work. This study shows that the impact of PT on sports and work performance is substantial and stresses the importance of developing preventive measures.

  6. Effect of prolotherapy on hemiplegic shoulder pain due to rotator cuff tendinopathy: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Kesikburun

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of prolotherapy on pain and shoulder range of motion in stroke patients with hemiplegic shoulder pain due to rotator cuff tendinopathy. Material and Methods: The data of 10 patients (mean age, 64.2+/-11.6 years who had a history stroke of more than six months and underwent prolotherapy treatment were collected retrospectively. The treatment included 3 sessions of dextrose pr olotherapy injections applied to rotator cuff tendon. Visual analogue scale pain scores and shoulder range of motions measured at baseline and two weeks later after end of the treatment were assessed. Results: Visual analogue scale shoulder pain scores of the patients decreased from 8.2+/-1.1 at baseline to 4.8+/-1.9 after prolotherapy The degrees of shoulder flexion and abduction increased significantly after the treatment. Conclusion: Preliminary results in this pilot study suggested the beneficial effect of proloterapi in the treatmentof hemiplegicshoulderpain. [Cukurova Med J 2017; 42(1.000: 13-18

  7. Men with unilateral Achilles tendinopathy have impaired balance on the symptomatic side.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholes, M; Stadler, S; Connell, D; Barton, C; Clarke, R A; Bryant, A L; Malliaras, P

    2017-10-06

    To investigate single leg standing balance in males with mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy (AT). Cross sectional case study. Centre of pressure (COP) path length was measured using a Wii Balance Board (WBB) in 21 male participants (20-60 years) with unilateral mid-portion AT during single-limb standing on each limb with eyes open and closed. Ultrasound imaging of both Achilles tendons was also performed by one blinded assessor, and the anteroposterior (AP) thickness and presence of pathology was determined. Comparisons were made between symptomatic and asymptomatic sides for key outcomes, and correlation between COP path length and variables of interest were investigated. Symptomatic Achilles tendons demonstrated significantly increased AP tendon thickness (pleg standing balance with eyes closed is impaired on the symptomatic side. This indicates that neuromuscular deficits affecting functional ability may be present in people with AT during more challenging balance activities. It is unclear if this deficit precedes the onset of symptoms, or is a consequence of tendon pain. Work is now needed to understand the mechanisms that may explain standing balance deficits among people with AT. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Distribution of Platelet-rich Plasma after Ultrasound-Guided Injection for Chronic Elbow Tendinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gi-Young; Kwon, Dong Rak; Cho, Hee Kyung; Park, Jinyoung; Park, Jung Hyun

    2017-03-01

    Characteristics of the spreads of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) are not widely known despite commonly use. This study aims to evaluate whether PRP stays within the injected area by using ultrasonography, to improve understanding of the spreads of intratendinous injected PRP. Thirty-nine patients (15 males, 24 females; mean age, 49.3 years), who had symptoms on their elbows (> 6 months) and diagnosed as lateral (25 elbows) or medial (14 elbows) tendinopathies of elbow, were included. The severity of tendon pathology was assessed by ultrasonography as tear or no tear. Immediately after ultrasound-guided PRP injection, ultrasound images were evaluated to assess the area of PRP distribution, which was defined as the presence of fluid or microbubbles. Ultrasound revealed that 13 elbows had tendon tear and 26 had no tear, respectively. Post-injection ultrasound confirmed the injected PRP was within the tendon in all cases. The mean distance of distribution from the injection site was 12.6 mm (5.0-26.0 mm). There was no difference in the distance of PRP distribution between tendon tear and no tear. Injected PRP spread to soft tissue outside the tendon in 20 of 39 cases. Intra-articular extension of PRP was observed in 5 cases. Although PRP remained intratendinous after the injection in all cases, some portion tended to spread outside from the injection site in a short space of time. Postinjection ultrasonographic imaging has a value for observing the spreading patterns of intratendinous PRP injection.

  9. Genome-wide association screens for Achilles tendon and ACL tears and tendinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Thomas R.; Roos, Andrew K.; Kleimeyer, John P.; Ahmed, Marwa A.; Goodlin, Gabrielle T.; Fredericson, Michael; Ioannidis, John P. A.; Avins, Andrew L.; Dragoo, Jason L.

    2017-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy or rupture and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture are substantial injuries affecting athletes, associated with delayed recovery or inability to return to competition. To identify genetic markers that might be used to predict risk for these injuries, we performed genome-wide association screens for these injuries using data from the Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA) cohort consisting of 102,979 individuals. We did not find any single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with either of these injuries with a p-value that was genome-wide significant (pAchilles tendon injury and ACL rupture, respectively. We then tested SNPs previously reported to be associated with either Achilles tendon injury or ACL rupture. None showed an association in our cohort with a false discovery rate of less than 5%. We obtained, however, moderate to weak evidence for replication in one case; specifically, rs4919510 in MIR608 had a p-value of 5.1x10-3 for association with Achilles tendon injury, corresponding to a 7% chance of false replication. Finally, we tested 2855 SNPs in 90 candidate genes for musculoskeletal injury, but did not find any that showed a significant association below a false discovery rate of 5%. We provide data containing summary statistics for the entire genome, which will be useful for future genetic studies on these injuries. PMID:28358823

  10. Tendinopathy of the long head of the biceps tendon: histopathologic analysis of the extra-articular biceps tendon and tenosynovium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Streit JJ

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Jonathan J Streit,1 Yousef Shishani,1 Mark Rodgers,2 Reuben Gobezie1 1The Cleveland Shoulder Institute, 2Department of Pathology, University Hospitals of Cleveland, Cleveland, OH, USA Background: Bicipital tendinitis is a common cause of anterior shoulder pain, but there is no evidence that acute inflammation of the extra-articular long head of the biceps (LHB tendon is the root cause of this condition. We evaluated the histologic findings of the extra-articular portion of the LHB tendon and synovial sheath in order to compare those findings to known histologic changes seen in other tendinopathies. Methods: Twenty-six consecutive patients (mean age 45.4±13.7 years underwent an open subpectoral biceps tenodesis for anterior shoulder pain localized to the bicipital groove. Excised tendons were sent for histologic analysis. Specimens were graded using a semiquantitative scoring system to evaluate tenocyte morphology, the presence of ground substance, collagen bundle characteristics, and vascular changes. Results: Chronic inflammation was noted in only two of 26 specimens, and no specimen demonstrated acute inflammation. Tenocyte enlargement and proliferation, characterized by increased roundness and size of the cell and nucleus with proteoglycan matrix expansion and myxoid degenerative changes, was found in all 26 specimens. Abundant ground substance, collagen bundle changes, and increased vascularization were visualized in all samples. Conclusion: Anterior shoulder pain attributed to the biceps tendon does not appear to be due to an inflammatory process in most cases. The histologic findings of the extra-articular portion of the LHB tendon and synovial sheath are similar to the pathologic findings in de Quervain tenosynovitis at the wrist, and may be due to a chronic degenerative process similar to this and other tendinopathies of the body. Keywords: biceps tendinitis, biceps tendinopathy, tenosynovium, anterior shoulder pain, long head biceps

  11. Effect of a single injection of autologous conditioned serum (ACS) on tendon healing in equine naturally occurring tendinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geburek, Florian; Lietzau, Maren; Beineke, Andreas; Rohn, Karl; Stadler, Peter M

    2015-06-26

    Autologous blood-derived biologicals, including autologous conditioned serum (ACS), are frequently used to treat tendinopathies in horses despite limited evidence for their efficacy. The purpose of this study was to describe the effect of a single intralesional injection of ACS in naturally occurring tendinopathies of the equine superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) on clinical, ultrasonographic, and histological parameters. Fifteen horses with 17 naturally occurring tendinopathies of forelimb SDFTs were examined clinically and ultrasonographically (day 0). Injured tendons were randomly assigned to the ACS-treated group (n = 10) receiving a single intralesional ACS injection or included as controls (n = 7) which were either untreated or injected with saline on day 1. All horses participated in a gradually increasing exercise programme and were re-examined nine times at regular intervals until day 190. Needle biopsies were taken from the SDFTs on days 0, 36 and 190 and examined histologically and for the expression of collagen types I and III by immunohistochemistry. In ACS-treated limbs lameness decreased significantly until day 10 after treatment. Swelling (scores) of the SDFT region decreased within the ACS group between 50 and 78 days after treatment. Ultrasonographically, the percentage of the lesion in the tendon was significantly lower and the echogenicity of the lesion (total echo score) was significantly higher 78 and 106 days after intralesional ACS injection compared to controls. Histology revealed that, compared to controls, tenocyte nuclei were more spindle-shaped 36 days after ACS injection. Immunohistochemistry showed that collagen type I expression significantly increased between days 36 and 190 after ACS injection. Single intralesional ACS injection of equine SDFTs with clinical signs of acute tendinopathy contributes to an early significant reduction of lameness and leads to temporary improvement of ultrasonographic parameters of repair tissue

  12. Danish VISA-A questionnaire with validation and reliability testing for Danish-speaking Achilles tendinopathy patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, J. V.; Bartels, E. M.; Jørgensen, J. E.

    2016-01-01

    The VISA-A questionnaire has proven to be a valid and reliable tool for assessing severity of Achilles tendinopathy (AT). The aim was to translate and cross-culturally adapt the VISA-A questionnaire for a Danish-speaking AT population, and subsequently perform validity and reliability tests....... Translation and following cross-cultural adaptation was performed as translation, synthesis, reverse translation, expert review, and pretesting. The final Danish version (VISA-A-DK) was tested for reliability on healthy controls (n = 75) and patients (n = 36). Tests for internal consistency, validity...

  13. Efficacy of autologous leukocyte-reduced platelet-rich plasma therapy for patellar tendinopathy in a rat treadmill model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Mamoru; Funasaki, Hiroki; Marumo, Keishi

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background An autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) therapy has currently been applied for the tendinopathy; however, its efficacy and an optimal platelets concentration in PRP were uncertain. We analyzed them in an animal model prepared using a repetitive running exercise. Methods We made the tendinopathy rat model of patellar tendon using a rodent treadmill machine. Rats with tendinopathy were injected with leukocyte-reduced PRP at the platelets concentration of 1.0×106/μL (P10 group), PRP at the platelets concentration of 5.0×105/μL (P5 group) or normal saline (control group) into the space between the patellar tendon and the fat pad bilaterally or were multiply dry-needled at the tibial insertion site (MN group) at once. To assess the pain-reliving effect, the spontaneous locomotor activities at night (12 h) were measured every day. Histological sections of the patellar tendon stained with hematoxylineosin or prepared by TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling were microscopically analyzed. Results The numbers of spontaneous locomotor activities in the P10 group were significantly larger than those in the P5, MN or control groups and they recovered up to a healthy level. On histologic examinations, the numbers of microtears, laminations, or apoptotic cells in the patellar tendons in the P10 or P5 groups were significantly lower than those in the MN or control groups, although no significant differences were observed between the P10 and P5 groups. Conclusions The injections of an autologous leukocyte-reduced PRP were effective for pain relief and for partial restoration of the patellar tendon in the tendinopathy rat model. The injections of a PRP at the platelets concentration of 1.0×106/μL completely relieved the pain and were more effective than those at the platelets concentration of 5.0×105/μL whereas there was no difference for the effect of histological restoration or apoptosis inhibition between them. PMID:27900294

  14. Conservative management of midportion Achilles tendinopathy: a mixed methods study, integrating systematic review and clinical reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Victoria; Hemmings, Stephanie; Barton, Christian; Malliaras, Peter; Maffulli, Nicola; Morrissey, Dylan

    2012-11-01

    Clinicians manage midportion Achilles tendinopathy (AT) using complex clinical reasoning underpinned by a rapidly developing evidence base. The objectives of the study were to develop an inclusive, accessible review of the literature in combination with an account of expert therapists' related clinical reasoning to guide clinical practice and future research. Searches of the electronic databases, PubMed, ISI Web of Science, PEDro, CINAHL, EMBASE, and Google Scholar were conducted for all papers published from inception to November 2011. Reference lists and citing articles were searched for further relevant articles. Inclusion required studies to evaluate the effectiveness of any conservative intervention for midportion AT. Exclusion criteria included in vitro, animal and cadaver studies and tendinopathies in other locations (e.g. patella, supraspinatus). From a total of 3497 identified in the initial search, 47 studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Studies were scored according to the PEDro scale, with a score of ≥ 8/10 considered of excellent quality, 5-7/10 good, and ≤ 4/10 poor. The strength of evidence supporting each treatment modality was then rated as 'strong', 'moderate', 'limited', 'conflicting' or 'no evidence' according to the number and quality of articles supporting that modality. Additionally, semi-structured interviews were conducted with physiotherapists to explore clinical reasoning related to the use of various interventions with and without an evidence base, and their perceptions of available evidence. Evidence was strong for eccentric loading exercises and extracorporeal shockwave therapy; moderate for splinting/bracing, active rest, low-level laser therapy and concentric exercises (i.e. inferior to eccentric exercise). In-shoe foot orthoses and therapeutic ultrasound had limited evidence. There was conflicting evidence for topical glycerin trinitrate. Taping techniques and soft-tissue mobilization were not yet examined but featured in

  15. Prognostic value of MRI in arthroscopic treatment of chronic patellar tendinopathy: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogon, Peter; Izadpanah, Kaywan; Eberbach, Helge; Lang, Gernot; Südkamp, Norbert P; Maier, Dirk

    2017-04-04

    To date, prognostic outcome factors for patients undergoing arthroscopic treatment due to chronic patellar tendinopathy (PT) are lacking. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether preoperatively assessed MRI parameters might be of prognostic value for prediction of functional outcome and return to sports in arthroscopic treatment of chronic PT. A prospective cohort study was conducted including 30 cases (4 female and 24 male competitive athletes) undergoing arthroscopic patellar release (APR) due to chronic PT. The mean age was 28.2 years (range, 18-49 years) at the time of surgery, and the mean follow-up period was 4.2 years (range, 2.2-10.4 years). Preoperatively assessed MRI parameters included bone marrow edema (BME) of the inferior patellar pole, patellar tendon thickening, infrapatellar fat pad (IFP) edema, and infrapatellar bursitis. Prevalences of preoperative MRI findings were correlated to functional outcome scores in order to determine statistically significant predictors. All athletes regained their preinjury sports levels. Athletes featuring preoperative IFP edema showed significantly inferior modified Blazina score (0.6 ± 0.7 vs. 0.2 ± 0.5), single assessment numeric evaluation (SANE; 86.0 ± 8.8 vs. 94.3 ± 7.5), and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS; 1.0 ± 1.2 vs. 0.3 ± 0.8) compared to subjects without IFP edema (p < 0.05). Return to sports required a mean of 4 ± 3.2 months. On average, patients with IFP edema needed significantly more time to return to sports than subjects without IFP edema (6.5 vs 2.8 months; p < 0.05). The simultaneous presence of BME and IFP edema was associated with significantly inferior outcomes by means of the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment questionnaire for patients with patellar tendinopathy (VISA-P; 88.1 ± 11.9 vs. 98.6 ± 4.2), SANE (84.3 ± 10.2 vs. 93.1 ± 8.3), and VAS (1.3 ± 1.4 vs. 0.3 ± 0.9) compared to an isolated BME or

  16. Outcomes after fluoroscopy-guided iliopsoas bursa injection for suspected iliopsoas tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agten, Christoph A; Rosskopf, Andrea B; Zingg, Patrick O; Peterson, Cynthia K; Pfirrmann, Christian W A

    2015-03-01

    To report patient outcomes up to 1 month after fluoroscopy-guided iliopsoas bursa injection for suspected iliopsoas tendinopathy. Thirty-nine consecutive patients (mean age 45 years; range 15-77) who underwent fluoroscopy-guided therapeutic iliopsoas bursa injection using an anterolateral approach and who returned an outcomes questionnaire were prospectively included. The Patients' Global Impression of Change (PGIC) scale was recorded 1 day, 1 week, and 1 month after the injection (primary outcome measure). Patients' subjective pain level data were collected prior to the injection (baseline) using a numeric rating scale (NRS; 0 = no pain; 10 = maximum pain). NRS scores were completed 15 min, 1 day, 1 week, and 1 month post-injection and compared to baseline. Forty-nine per cent of patients reported clinically relevant 'improvement' (PGIC) 1 month post-injection. Mean NRS score prior to injection was 5.9 ± 2.1. Mean NRS scores after 15 min (3.6 ± 2.7), 1 day (4.4 ± 2.7), 1 week (3.4 ± 1.9), and 1 month (3.5 ± 2.5) were statistically significantly lower (p ≤ 0.001) compared to baseline. Reduction of NRS ≥50 % after 15 min was achieved in 49 % (56 % of those unimproved at 1 month). Fluoroscopy-guided iliopsoas bursa injection leads to a relevant 'improvement' at 1 month or significant pain reduction after 15 min in most patients.

  17. Ultrasonography as a prognostic and objective parameter in Achilles tendinopathy: A prospective observational study

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    Bakkegaard, Mads, E-mail: mbakkegaard@hotmail.com [Department of Rheumatology, Holbæk Hospital, Smedelundsgade 60, 4300 Holbæk (Denmark); Johannsen, Finn E., E-mail: f.e.johannsen@dadlnet.dk [Private Department of Rheumatology, Furesø-reumatologerne, Farum and ISMC, Institute of Sports Medicine Copenhagen, Bispebjerg Hospital, Bispebjerg Bakke 23, 2. Tværvej, Indgang 8, 1. sal, 2400 København NV (Denmark); Højgaard, Betina, E-mail: beho@kora.dk [Danish Institute for Local and Regional Government Research, Købmagergade 22, 1150 København K (Denmark); Langberg, Henning, E-mail: henninglangberg@gmail.com [Institute of Social Medicine, Department of Public Health and Centre for Healthy Ageing, Faculty of Heath Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 5, bygn. 24, postboks 2099, 1014 København (Denmark)

    2015-03-15

    Objectives: To study prospectively whether structural changes determined by ultrasound scanning (US) can be used as prognostic markers for outcome in patients with symptomatic Achilles tendinopathy (AT) and to investigate whether there exists an association between US findings and pain measured by visual analog scale (VAS) and a general assessment score (GA). Methods: 92 consecutive patients with AT symptoms were recruited from two outpatient clinics in rheumatology. The patients underwent a conservative treatment protocol consisting of reduced activities, controlled rehabilitation including eccentric exercises of the calf muscles and if needed supplemented with corticosteroid injections. The patients were examined clinically and by US (tendon thickness, hyper- and hypoechogenicity, calcification, bursitis, calcaneusspure, tenosynovitis, gray scale and color Doppler focusing on increased flow intra- or peritendinous). The clinical and US examination were performed at entry, 1, 2, 3 and at 6 month. Results: 42 women and 50 men were included (mean age of 47 years). They had symptoms for more than 13 months and a symptomatic Achilles tendon mean thickness of 7.4 ± 2.3 mm. Heterogeneity at the initial examination was found to be a prognostic marker for the clinical outcome. Tendon thickness, hypoechogenicity and increased flow at any time point were significantly correlated to pain at function, palpatory pain and morning pain at the same time points. A reduction in tendon thickness was statistically associated with a decrease in palpatory pain. Conclusion: Heterogeneity is a prognostic marker in AT. Tendon thickness, hypoechogenicity and increased Doppler activity can be used as objective outcome parameters for the treatment effect of AT.

  18. Distribution of Platelet-rich Plasma after Ultrasound-Guided Injection for Chronic Elbow Tendinopathies

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    Gi-Young Park, Dong Rak Kwon, Hee Kyung Cho, Jinyoung Park, Jung Hyun Park

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of the spreads of platelet-rich plasma (PRP are not widely known despite commonly use. This study aims to evaluate whether PRP stays within the injected area by using ultrasonography, to improve understanding of the spreads of intratendinous injected PRP. Thirty-nine patients (15 males, 24 females; mean age, 49.3 years, who had symptoms on their elbows (> 6 months and diagnosed as lateral (25 elbows or medial (14 elbows tendinopathies of elbow, were included. The severity of tendon pathology was assessed by ultrasonography as tear or no tear. Immediately after ultrasound-guided PRP injection, ultrasound images were evaluated to assess the area of PRP distribution, which was defined as the presence of fluid or microbubbles. Ultrasound revealed that 13 elbows had tendon tear and 26 had no tear, respectively. Post-injection ultrasound confirmed the injected PRP was within the tendon in all cases. The mean distance of distribution from the injection site was 12.6 mm (5.0–26.0 mm. There was no difference in the distance of PRP distribution between tendon tear and no tear. Injected PRP spread to soft tissue outside the tendon in 20 of 39 cases. Intra-articular extension of PRP was observed in 5 cases. Although PRP remained intratendinous after the injection in all cases, some portion tended to spread outside from the injection site in a short space of time. Postinjection ultrasonographic imaging has a value for observing the spreading patterns of intratendinous PRP injection.

  19. Leukocyte-poor platelet-rich plasma versus bupivacaine for recalcitrant lateral epicondylar tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Prateek; Dhillon, Mandeep; Aggarwal, Sameer; Marwaha, Neelam; Prakash, Mahesh

    2015-04-01

    To compare a single leukocyte-poor (type-4B) platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection versus bupivacaine injection for recalcitrant lateral epicondylar tendinopathy (LET). 25 patients aged 27 to 50 years with painful and recalcitrant LET of the humerus were randomised to receive leukocyte-poor (type-4B) PRP (n=15) or bupivacaine (n=10) injection. Outcome measures included visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain, modified Mayo clinic performance index for elbow (MMCPIE) for elbow function, and Nirschl score for activity-related pain at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months by a single assessor. At baseline, the PRP and bupivacaine groups were comparable in terms of age, sex, duration of symptoms, VAS for pain, MMCPIE score, and Nirschl score. After one month, the percentage of improvement was less in the PRP than bupivacaine group in terms of the VAS for pain (17.7% vs. 26.5%), MMCPIE score (24.0% vs. 27.6%), and Nirschl score (20.7% vs. 31.1%). Nonetheless, improvement in the respective scores was greater in the PRP than bupivacaine group after 3 months (42.5% vs. 30.9%, 34.1% vs. 27.2%, and 50.7% vs. 39.6%), 6 months (67.3% vs. 20.1%, 40.6% vs. 16.3%, and 71.4% vs. 31.1%), and one year (83.2% vs. 45.6%, 47.0% vs. 21.7%, and 76.6% vs. 56.3%). The differences in scores between groups were significant at 6 months and one year only (pPRP injection for recalcitrant LET enabled good improvement in pain and function.

  20. Biomechanical Factors Associated With Achilles Tendinopathy and Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome in Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, James; James, Stanley; Wayner, Robert; Osternig, Louis; Chou, Li-Shan

    2017-09-01

    There is disagreement in the literature regarding whether the excessive excursion or velocity of rearfoot eversion is related to the development of 2 common running injuries: Achilles tendinopathy (AT) and medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS). An alternative hypothesis suggests that the duration of rearfoot eversion may be an important factor. However, the duration of eversion has received relatively little attention in the biomechanics literature. Runners with AT or MTSS will demonstrate a longer duration of eversion but not greater excursion or velocity of eversion compared with healthy controls. Controlled laboratory study. Forty-two runners participated in this study (13 with AT, 8 with MTSS, and 21 matched controls). Participants were evaluated for lower extremity alignment and flexibility, after which a 3-dimensional kinematic and kinetic running gait analysis was performed. Differences between the 2 injuries and between injured and control participants were evaluated for flexibility and alignment, rearfoot kinematics, and 3 ground-reaction force metrics. Binary logistic regression was used to evaluate which variables best predicted membership in the injured group. Injured participants, compared with controls, demonstrated higher standing tibia varus angles (8.67° ± 1.79° vs 6.76° ± 1.75°, respectively; P = .002), reduced static dorsiflexion range of motion (6.14° ± 5.04° vs 11.19° ± 5.10°, respectively; P = .002), more rearfoot eversion at heel-off (-6.47° ± 5.58° vs 1.07° ± 2.26°, respectively; P risk of sustaining AT or MTSS.

  1. Genome-wide association screens for Achilles tendon and ACL tears and tendinopathy.

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    Stuart K Kim

    Full Text Available Achilles tendinopathy or rupture and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL rupture are substantial injuries affecting athletes, associated with delayed recovery or inability to return to competition. To identify genetic markers that might be used to predict risk for these injuries, we performed genome-wide association screens for these injuries using data from the Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA cohort consisting of 102,979 individuals. We did not find any single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with either of these injuries with a p-value that was genome-wide significant (p<5x10-8. We found, however, four and three polymorphisms with p-values that were borderline significant (p<10-6 for Achilles tendon injury and ACL rupture, respectively. We then tested SNPs previously reported to be associated with either Achilles tendon injury or ACL rupture. None showed an association in our cohort with a false discovery rate of less than 5%. We obtained, however, moderate to weak evidence for replication in one case; specifically, rs4919510 in MIR608 had a p-value of 5.1x10-3 for association with Achilles tendon injury, corresponding to a 7% chance of false replication. Finally, we tested 2855 SNPs in 90 candidate genes for musculoskeletal injury, but did not find any that showed a significant association below a false discovery rate of 5%. We provide data containing summary statistics for the entire genome, which will be useful for future genetic studies on these injuries.

  2. Effects of local microwave diathermy on shoulder pain and function in patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy in comparison to subacromial corticosteroid injections: a single-blind randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabini, Alessia; Piazzini, Diana B; Bertolini, Carlo; Deriu, Laura; Saccomanno, Maristella F; Santagada, Domenico A; Sgadari, Antonio; Bernabei, Roberto; Fabbriciani, Carlo; Marzetti, Emanuele; Milano, Giuseppe

    2012-04-01

    Single-blind randomized clinical trial, with a follow-up of 24 weeks. To determine the effects of hyperthermia via localized microwave diathermy on pain and disability in comparison to subacromial corticosteroid injections in patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy. Hyperthermia improves symptoms and function in several painful musculoskeletal disorders. However, the effects of microwave diathermy in rotator cuff tendinopathy have not yet been established. Ninety-two patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy and pain lasting for at least 3 months were recruited from the outpatient clinic of the Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, University Hospital, Rome, Italy. Participants were randomly allocated to either local microwave diathermy or subacromial corticosteroids. The primary outcome measure was the short form of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Questionnaire (QuickDASH). Secondary outcome measures were the Constant-Murley shoulder outcome score and a visual analog scale for pain assessment. At the end of treatment and at follow-up, both treatment groups experienced improvements in all outcome measures relative to baseline values. Changes over time in QuickDASH, Constant-Murley, and visual analog scale scores were not different between treatment arms. In patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy, the effects of localized microwave diathermy on disability, shoulder function, and pain are equivalent to those elicited by subacromial corticosteroid injections.

  3. Efficacy of platelet-rich plasma injections for symptomatic tendinopathy: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised injection-controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Larry E; Parrish, William R; Roides, Breana; Bhattacharyya, Samir

    2017-01-01

    Aim To determine the efficacy of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections for symptomatic tendinopathy. Design Systematic review of randomised, injection-controlled trials with meta-analysis. Data sources Systematic searches of MEDLINE and EMBASE, supplemented by manual searches. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Randomised controlled trials with 3 months minimum follow-up that evaluated pain reduction with PRP versus control (saline, local anaesthetic, corticosteroid) injections in patients with symptomatic tendinopathy. Results A total of 16 randomised controlled trials (18 groups) of PRP versus control were included. Median sample size was 35 patients, a study size that would require an effect size ≥1.0 to achieve statistical significance. PRP was more efficacious than control in reducing tendinopathy pain, with an effect size of 0.47 (95% CI 0.22 to 0.72, p<0.001), signifying a moderate treatment effect. Heterogeneity among studies was moderate (I2=67%, p<0.001). In subgroup analysis and meta-regression, studies with a higher proportion of female patients were associated with greater treatment benefits with PRP. Conclusions Injection of PRP is more efficacious than control injections in patients with symptomatic tendinopathy. PMID:29177072

  4. The TOPGAME-study : effectiveness of extracorporeal shockwave therapy in jumping athletes with patellar tendinopathy. Design of a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwerver, Johannes; Verhagen, Evert; Hartgens, Fred; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Diercks, Ron L.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Patellar tendinopathy is a major problem for many athletes, especially those involved in jumping activities. Despite its frequency and negative impact on athletic careers, no evidence-based guidelines for management of this overuse injury exist. Since functional outcomes of conservative

  5. Effectiveness of dry needling and high-volume image-guided injection in the management of chronic mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy in adult population: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, F A

    2017-05-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is a common overuse condition affecting the adult population. The incidence is on the rise because of greater participation of people in recreational or competitive sporting activities. There are several treatment options available both non-operative and operative. Ultrasound-guided dry needling and high-volume image-guided injection is relatively a new procedure. The aim of this study was to find out the effectiveness of dry needling and HVIGI in the management of mid-portion chronic Achilles tendinopathy by performing a literature review. Search strategy was devised to find the suitable articles for critical appraisal using the electronic databases. Four articles were selected for critical appraisal, and these papers showed good short- to long-term results of image-guided high-volume injection in the management of Achilles tendinopathy. We conclude that high-volume image-guided injection is effective in the management of Achilles tendinopathy. It provides good short- and medium-term relief of symptoms. It should be considered as one of the many options available for this condition.

  6. Hip muscle strength is decreased in middle-aged recreational male athletes with midportion Achilles tendinopathy: A cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habets, B.; Smits, H.W.; Backx, F.J.; Cingel, R.E. van; Huisstede, B.M.A.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Investigating differences in hip muscle strength between athletes with Achilles tendinopathy (AT) and asymptomatic controls. DESIGN: Cross-sectional case-control study. SETTING: Sports medical center. PARTICIPANTS: Twelve recreational male athletes with mid-portion AT and twelve matched

  7. Marked innervation but also signs of nerve degeneration in between the Achilles and plantaris tendons and presence of innervation within the plantaris tendon in midportion Achilles tendinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spang, C.; Harandi, V.M.; Alfredson, H.; Forsgren, S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The plantaris tendon is increasingly recognised as an important factor in midportion Achilles tendinopathy. Its innervation pattern is completely unknown. Methods: Plantaris tendons (n=56) and associated peritendinous tissue from 46 patients with midportion Achilles tendinopathy and where the plantaris tendon was closely related to the Achilles tendon were evaluated. Morphological evaluations and stainings for nerve markers [general (PGP9.5), sensory (CGRP), sympathetic (TH)], glutamate NMDA receptor and Schwann cells (S-100β) were made. Results: A marked innervation, as evidenced by evaluation for PGP9.5 reactions, occurred in the peritendinous tissue located between the plantaris and Achilles tendons. It contained sensory and to some extent sympathetic and NMDAR1-positive axons. There was also an innervation in the zones of connective tissue within the plantaris tendons. Interestingly, some of the nerve fascicles showed a partial lack of axonal reactions. Conclusion: New information on the innervation patterns for the plantaris tendon in situations with midportion Achilles tendinopathy has here been obtained. The peritendinous tissue was found to be markedly innervated and there was also innervation within the plantaris tendon. Furthermore, axonal degeneration is likely to occur. Both features should be further taken into account when considering the relationship between the nervous system and tendinopathy. PMID:26032213

  8. The effects of substance p on tendinopathy are dose-dependent: an in vitro and in vivo model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y; Zhou, B; Tang, K

    2015-05-01

    Substance P (SP) is known to be involved in neuropathic pain, chronic inflammation, and tendinopathy. The present study evaluated the effects of different doses of SP on tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) in vitro and tendons in vivo. For the in vitro study, TDSCs cultured in growth medium with different concentrations of SP (negative control, 0.1 nM, and 1.0 nM). The effects of SP on TDSCs were examined with respect to their ability to proliferate and differentiate. For the in vivo study, we injected different doses of SP (saline control, 0.5 nmol, and 5.0 nmol) into rat patella tendons to investigate the effects of SP on tendons. Low and high doses SP significantly enhanced the proliferation ability of TDSCs. Low-dose of SP induced the expression of tenocyte-related genes; however, high-dose of SP induced the expression of non-tenocyte genes, which was evident by the high expression of PPARγ and collagen type II. In the in vivo study, only high-doses of SP (5.0 nmol) induced the tendinosis-like changes in the patella tendon injection model. Low doses of SP (0.5 nmol) enhanced the tenogenesis compared with saline injection and the high-dose SP group. SP enhances the proliferation of TDSCs in vitro and the effects of SP on tendinopathy are dose-dependent in vivo.

  9. Imaging in chronic achilles tendinopathy: a comparison of ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging and surgical findings in 27 histologically verified cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aastroem, M. [Department of Orthopaedics, Malmoe University Hospital (Sweden); Gentz, C.F. [Department of Radiology, Malmoe University Hospital (Sweden); Nilsson, P. [Department of Radiology, Malmoe University Hospital (Sweden); Rausing, A. [Department of Pathology, Malmoe University Hospital (Sweden); Sjoeberg, S. [Department of Radiology, Malmoe University Hospital (Sweden); Westlin, N. [Department of Orthopaedics, Malmoe University Hospital (Sweden)

    1996-10-01

    Objective. To compare information gained by ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in chronic achilles tendinopathy with regard to the nature and severity of the lesion. Design. Imaging of both achilles tendons with ultrasonography and MRI was performed prior to unilateral surgery. Operative findings and histological biopsies together served as a reference. Patients. Twenty-seven patients (22 men, 5 women; mean age 44 years; 21 athletes) suffering from chronic achilles tendinopathy participated in the study. Eighteen patients had unilateral and 9 had bilateral symptoms. Results and conclusions. Surgical findings included 4 partial ruptures, 21 degenerative lesions and 2 macroscopically normal cases. Microscopy revealed tendinosis (degeneration) in all tendon biopsies, including cases with a partial rupture, but only slight changes in the paratendinous tissues (paratenon). Ultrasonography was positive in 21 of 26 and MRI in 26 of 27 cases. Severe intratendinous abnormalities and a sagittal tendon diameter >10 mm suggested a partial rupture. In tendons with a false negative result histopathological changes were mild and a tendency towards a better clinical outcome was noted in the sonographic cases. Assessment of the paratenon was unreliable with both methods. Ultrasonography and MRI give similar information and may have their greatest potential as prognostic instruments. (orig.). With 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Tendinopathy of the long head of the biceps tendon: histopathologic analysis of the extra-articular biceps tendon and tenosynovium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streit, Jonathan J; Shishani, Yousef; Rodgers, Mark; Gobezie, Reuben

    2015-01-01

    Bicipital tendinitis is a common cause of anterior shoulder pain, but there is no evidence that acute inflammation of the extra-articular long head of the biceps (LHB) tendon is the root cause of this condition. We evaluated the histologic findings of the extra-articular portion of the LHB tendon and synovial sheath in order to compare those findings to known histologic changes seen in other tendinopathies. Twenty-six consecutive patients (mean age 45.4±13.7 years) underwent an open subpectoral biceps tenodesis for anterior shoulder pain localized to the bicipital groove. Excised tendons were sent for histologic analysis. Specimens were graded using a semiquantitative scoring system to evaluate tenocyte morphology, the presence of ground substance, collagen bundle characteristics, and vascular changes. Chronic inflammation was noted in only two of 26 specimens, and no specimen demonstrated acute inflammation. Tenocyte enlargement and proliferation, characterized by increased roundness and size of the cell and nucleus with proteoglycan matrix expansion and myxoid degenerative changes, was found in all 26 specimens. Abundant ground substance, collagen bundle changes, and increased vascularization were visualized in all samples. Anterior shoulder pain attributed to the biceps tendon does not appear to be due to an inflammatory process in most cases. The histologic findings of the extra-articular portion of the LHB tendon and synovial sheath are similar to the pathologic findings in de Quervain tenosynovitis at the wrist, and may be due to a chronic degenerative process similar to this and other tendinopathies of the body.

  11. Intense focused ultrasound stimulation of the rotator cuff: evaluation of the source of pain in rotator cuff tears and tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellhorn, Alfred C; Gillenwater, Cody; Mourad, Pierre D

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this preliminary study was to evaluate the ability of individual 0.1-s long pulses of intense focused ultrasound (iFU) emitted with a carrier frequency of 2 MHz to evoke diagnostic sensations when applied to patients whose shoulders have rotator cuff tears or tendinopathy. Patients were adults with painful shoulders and clinical and imaging findings consistent with rotator cuff disease. iFU stimulation of the shoulder was performed using B-mode ultrasound coupled with a focused ultrasound transducer that allowed image-guided delivery of precisely localized pulses of energy to different anatomic areas around the rotator cuff. The main outcome measure was iFU spatial average-temporal average intensity (I_SATA), and location required to elicit sensation. In control patients, iFU produced no sensation throughout the range of stimulation intensities (≤2000 W/cm(2) I_SATA). In patients with rotator cuff disease, iFU was able to induce sensation in the tendons of the rotator cuff, the subacromial bursa, and the subchondral bone in patients with chronic shoulder pain and rotator cuff disease, with an average ± standard deviation intensity equaling 680 ± 281 W/cm(2) I_SATA. This result suggests a primary role for these tissues in the pathogenesis of shoulder pain related to rotator cuff tendinopathy. Copyright © 2015 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Retrospective study of sonographic findings in bone involvement associated with rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy: preliminary results of a case series

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    Marcello H. Nogueira-Barbosa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: The present study was aimed at investigating bone involvement secondary to rotator cuff calcific tendonitis at ultrasonography. Materials and Methods: Retrospective study of a case series. The authors reviewed shoulder ultrasonography reports of 141 patients diagnosed with rotator cuff calcific tendonitis, collected from the computer-based data records of their institution over a four-year period. Imaging findings were retrospectively and consensually analyzed by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists looking for bone involvement associated with calcific tendonitis. Only the cases confirmed by computed tomography were considered for descriptive analysis. Results: Sonographic findings of calcific tendinopathy with bone involvement were observed in 7/141 (~ 5% patients (mean age, 50.9 years; age range, 42-58 years; 42% female. Cortical bone erosion adjacent to tendon calcification was the most common finding, observed in 7/7 cases. Signs of intraosseous migration were found in 3/7 cases, and subcortical cysts in 2/7 cases. The findings were confirmed by computed tomography. Calcifications associated with bone abnormalities showed no acoustic shadowing at ultrasonography, favoring the hypothesis of resorption phase of the disease. Conclusion: Preliminary results of the present study suggest that ultrasonography can identify bone abnormalities secondary to rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy, particularly the presence of cortical bone erosion.

  13. The TOPGAME-study: effectiveness of extracorporeal shockwave therapy in jumping athletes with patellar tendinopathy. Design of a randomised controlled trial

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    Diercks Ron L

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patellar tendinopathy is a major problem for many athletes, especially those involved in jumping activities. Despite its frequency and negative impact on athletic careers, no evidence-based guidelines for management of this overuse injury exist. Since functional outcomes of conservative and surgical treatments remain suboptimal, new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies have to be developed and evaluated. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT appears to be a promising treatment in patients with chronic patellar tendinopathy. ESWT is most often applied after the known conservative treatments have failed. However, its effectiveness as primary therapy has not been studied in athletes who keep playing sports despite having patellar tendon pain. The aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness of ESWT in athletes with patellar tendinopathy who are still in training and competition. Methods/design The TOPGAME-study (Tendinopathy of Patella Groningen Amsterdam Maastricht ESWT is a multicentre two-armed randomised controlled trial with blinded participants and outcome assessors, in which the effectiveness of patient-guided focussed ESWT treatment (compared to placebo ESWT on pain reduction and recovery of function in athletes with patellar tendinopathy will be investigated. Participants are volleyball, handball and basketball players with symptoms of patellar tendinopathy for a minimum of 3 to a maximum duration of 12 months who are still able to train and compete. The intervention group receives three patient-guided focussed medium-energy density ESWT treatments without local anaesthesia at a weekly interval in the first half of the competition. The control group receives placebo treatment. The follow-up measurements take place 1, 12 and 22 weeks after the final ESWT or placebo treatment, when athletes are still in competition. Primary outcome measure is the VISA-P (Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment - patella score

  14. Platelet-rich plasma as a treatment for patellar tendinopathy: a double-blind, randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoo, Jason L; Wasterlain, Amy S; Braun, Hillary J; Nead, Kevin T

    2014-03-01

    Previous studies have shown improvement in patellar tendinopathy symptoms after platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections, but no randomized controlled trial has compared PRP with dry needling (DN) for this condition. To compare clinical outcomes in patellar tendinopathy after a single ultrasound-guided, leukocyte-rich PRP injection versus DN. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. A total of 23 patients with patellar tendinopathy on examination and MRI who had failed nonoperative treatment were enrolled and randomized to receive ultrasound-guided DN alone (DN group; n = 13) or with injection of leukocyte-rich PRP (PRP group; n = 10), along with standardized eccentric exercises. Patients and the physician providing follow-up care were blinded. Participants completed patient-reported outcome surveys before and at 3, 6, 9, 12, and ≥26 weeks after treatment during follow-up visits. The primary outcome measure was the Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment (VISA) score for patellar tendinopathy at 12 weeks, and secondary measures included the visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, Tegner activity scale, Lysholm knee scale, and Short Form (SF-12) questionnaire at 12 and ≥26 weeks. Results were analyzed using 2-tailed paired and unpaired t tests. Patients who were dissatisfied at 12 weeks were allowed to cross over into a separate unblinded arm. At 12 weeks after treatment, VISA scores improved by a mean ± standard deviation of 5.2 ± 12.5 points (P = .20) in the DN group (n = 12) and by 25.4 ± 23.2 points (P = .01) in the PRP group (n = 9); at ≥26 weeks, the scores improved by 33.2 ± 14.0 points (P = .001) in the DN group (n = 9) and by 28.9 ± 25.2 points (P = .01) in the PRP group (n = 7). The PRP group had improved significantly more than the DN group at 12 weeks (P = .02), but the difference between groups was not significant at ≥26 weeks (P = .66). Lysholm scores were not significantly different between groups at 12 weeks (P = .81), but the DN

  15. Effects of high- and low-energy radial shock waves therapy combined with physiotherapy in the treatment of rotator cuff tendinopathy: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiangzheng; Li, Zhongli; Liu, Zhengsheng; Shi, Teng; Xue, Chao

    2017-06-09

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of high- and low-energy radial shock waves combined with physiotherapy for rotator cuff tendinopathy patients. Data from rotator cuff tendinopathy patients received high- or low-energy radial shock waves combined with physiotherapy or physiotherapy alone were collected. The Constant and Murley score and visual analog scale score were collected to assess the effectiveness of treatment in three groups at 4, 8, 12, and 24 weeks. In total, 94 patients were involved for our retrospective study. All groups showed remarkable improvement in the visual analog scale and Constant and Murley score compared to baseline at 24 weeks. The high-energy radial shock waves group had more marked improvement in the Constant and Murley score compared to the physiotherapy group at 4 and 8 weeks and at 4 weeks when compared with low-energy group. Furthermore, high-energy radial shock waves group had superior results on the visual analog scale at 4, 8, and 12 weeks compared to low-energy and physiotherapy groups. This retrospective study supported the usage of high-energy radial shock waves as a supplementary therapy over physiotherapy alone for rotator cuff tendinopathy by relieving the symptoms rapidly and maintaining symptoms at a satisfactory level for 24 weeks. Implications for Rehabilitation High-energy radial shock waves can be a supplemental therapy to physiotherapy for rotator cuff tendinopathy. We recommend the usage of high-energy radial shock waves during the first 5 weeks, at an interval of 7 days, of physiotherapy treatment. High-energy radial shock waves treatment combined with physiotherapy can benefit rotator cuff tendinopathy by relieving symptoms rapidly and maintain these improvements at a satisfactory level for quite a long time.

  16. The clinical impact of platelet-rich plasma on tendinopathy compared to placebo or dry needling injections: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsikopoulos, Konstantinos; Tsikopoulos, Ioannis; Simeonidis, Evangelos; Papathanasiou, Efthymia; Haidich, Anna-Bettina; Anastasopoulos, Nikolaos; Natsis, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this meta-analysis was to compare the impact of platelet-rich plasma with that of placebo or dry needling injections on tendinopathy. The databases of PubMed, CENTRAL, Scopus, Web of Science, and trial registries, reference lists, and conference abstract books were searched up to December 2014. Adults with tendinopathy in randomized controlled trials were enrolled. The trials compared effect of platelet-rich plasma with that of placebo or dry needling. We used subgroup analysis linked to the anatomical location of the tendinopathy. The primary outcome was pain intensity at two or three and six months after intervention. The secondary outcome was functional disability at three months after treatment. Five trials were included. There was a statistically significant difference in favor of the platelet-rich plasma intervention at the second primary outcome time point (SMD -0.48, 95%CIs -0.86 to -0.10, I(2) = 0%, p = 0.01) and at the secondary outcome time point (SMD -0.47, 95%CIs -0.85 to -0.09, I(2) = 0%, p=0.01). Platelet-rich plasma did not provide significantly greater clinical benefit versus placebo or dry needling for the treatment of tendinopathy at a six-month follow-up. However, there was a marginal clinical difference in favor of platelet-rich plasma injections on rotator cuff tendinopathy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Longitudinal microvascularity in achilles tendinopathy (power doppler ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging time-intensity curves and the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Achilles questionnaire): a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, Paula J. [University Hospital of North Staffordshire NHS Trust (UHNS), Stoke on Trent, Staffordshire (United Kingdom); Keele University, Keele, Staffordshire (United Kingdom); North Staffs. Royal Infirmary, X-ray Department, Stoke on Trent, Staffordshire (United Kingdom); McCall, Iain W. [Keele University, Keele, Staffordshire (United Kingdom); North Staffordshire NHS Trust, Stoke on Trent, Staffordshire (United Kingdom); Day, Christopher [University Hospital of North Staffordshire NHS Trust (UHNS), Stoke on Trent, Staffordshire (United Kingdom); Belcher, John [Cardiff University, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, North Wales Clinical School, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Maffulli, Nicola [Keele University, Keele, Staffordshire (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-15

    To evaluate the imaging of the natural history of Achilles tendinopathy microvascularisation in comparison with symptoms, using a validated disease-specific questionnaire [the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Achilles (VISA-A)]. A longitudinal prospective pilot study of nine patients with post-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), time-intensity curve (TIC) enhancement, ultrasound (US) and power Doppler (PD) evaluation of tendinopathy of the mid-Achilles tendon undergoing conservative management (eccentric exercise) over 1 year. There were five men and four women [mean age 47 (range 30-62) years]. Six asymptomatic tendons with normal US and MRI appearance showed less enhancement than the tibial metaphysis did and showed a flat, constant, but very low rate of enhancement in the bone and Achilles tendon (9-73 arbitrary TIC units). These normal Achilles tendons on imaging showed a constant size throughout the year (mean 4.9 mm). At baseline the TIC enhancement in those with tendinopathy ranged from 90 arbitrary units to 509 arbitrary units. Over time, 11 abnormal Achilles tendons, whose symptoms settled, were associated with a reduction in MRI enhancement mirrored by a reduction in the number of vessels on power Doppler (8.0 to 2.7), with an improvement in morphology and a reduction in tendon size (mean 15-10.6 mm). One tendon did not change its abnormal imaging features, despite improving symptoms. Two patients developed contralateral symptoms and tendinopathy, and one had more abnormal vascularity on power Doppler and higher MRI TIC peaks in the asymptomatic side. In patient with conservatively managed tendinopathy of the mid-Achilles tendon over 1 year there was a reduction of MRI enhancement and number of vessels on power Doppler, followed by morphological improvements and a reduction in size. Vessels per se related to the abnormal morphology and size of the tendon rather than symptoms. Symptoms improve before the Achilles size reduces and the

  18. Beneficial effects of autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in naturally occurring tendinopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Kenneth Whealands Smith

    Full Text Available Tendon injuries are a common age-related degenerative condition where current treatment strategies fail to restore functionality and normal quality of life. This disease also occurs naturally in horses, with many similarities to human tendinopathy making it an ideal large animal model for human disease. Regenerative approaches are increasingly used to improve outcome involving mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, supported by clinical data where injection of autologous bone marrow derived MSCs (BM-MSCs suspended in marrow supernatant into injured tendons has halved the re-injury rate in racehorses. We hypothesized that stem cell therapy induces a matrix more closely resembling normal tendon than the fibrous scar tissue formed by natural repair. Twelve horses with career-ending naturally-occurring superficial digital flexor tendon injury were allocated randomly to treatment and control groups. 1X10(7 autologous BM-MSCs suspended in 2 ml of marrow supernatant were implanted into the damaged tendon of the treated group. The control group received the same volume of saline. Following a 6 month exercise programme horses were euthanized and tendons assessed for structural stiffness by non-destructive mechanical testing and for morphological and molecular composition. BM-MSC treated tendons exhibited statistically significant improvements in key parameters compared to saline-injected control tendons towards that of normal tendons and those in the contralateral limbs. Specifically, treated tendons had lower structural stiffness (p<0.05 although no significant difference in calculated modulus of elasticity, lower (improved histological scoring of organisation (p<0.003 and crimp pattern (p<0.05, lower cellularity (p<0.007, DNA content (p<0.05, vascularity (p<0.03, water content (p<0.05, GAG content (p<0.05, and MMP-13 activity (p<0.02. Treatment with autologous MSCs in marrow supernatant therefore provides significant benefits compared to untreated tendon repair

  19. Intratendon Delivery of Leukocyte-Poor Platelet-Rich Plasma Improves Healing Compared With Leukocyte-Rich Platelet-Rich Plasma in a Rabbit Achilles Tendinopathy Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ruijian; Gu, Yanjia; Ran, Jisheng; Hu, Yejun; Zheng, Zefeng; Zeng, Mengfeng; Heng, Boon Chin; Chen, Xiao; Yin, Zi; Chen, Weishan; Shen, Weiliang; Ouyang, Hongwei

    2017-07-01

    Chronic tendinopathy is a commonly occurring clinical problem that affects both athletes and inactive middle-aged patients. Although some studies have shown that different platelet-rich plasma (PRP) preparations could exert various therapeutic effects in vitro, the role of leukocytes in PRP has not yet been defined under tendinopathy conditions in vivo. This study compared the effects of the intratendon delivery of leukocyte-poor PRP (Lp-PRP) versus leukocyte-rich PRP (Lr-PRP) in a rabbit chronic tendinopathy model in vivo. Controlled laboratory study. Four weeks after a local injection of collagenase in the Achilles tendon, the following treatments were randomly administered on the lesions: injections of (1) 200 μL of Lp-PRP (n = 8), (2) 200 μL of Lr-PRP (n = 8), or (3) 200 μL of saline (n = 8). Healing outcomes were assessed at 4 weeks after therapy with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cytokine quantification, real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of gene expression, histology, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). MRI revealed that the Lr-PRP and saline groups displayed higher signal intensities compared with the Lp-PRP group with T2 mapping. Histologically, the Lp-PRP group displayed significantly better general scores compared with the Lr-PRP ( P = .001) and saline ( P < .001) groups. Additionally, TEM showed that the Lp-PRP group had larger collagen fibril diameters than the Lr-PRP group ( P < .001). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed a significantly lower level of catabolic cytokine IL-6 in the Lp-PRP group compared with the Lr-PRP ( P = .001) and saline ( P = .021) groups. The Lp-PRP group displayed significantly increased expression of collagen I compared with the saline group ( P = .004) but not the Lr-PRP group. Both the Lp-PRP and Lr-PRP groups exhibited significantly lower matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and MMP-3 expression levels compared with the saline group. However, only the Lp-PRP group displayed significantly higher

  20. Acute Calcific Bursitis After Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Barbotage of Rotator Cuff Calcific Tendinopathy: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Bo-Sung; Lee, Seung Hak; Cho, Yung; Chung, Sun Gun

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound-guided percutaneous barbotage is an effective treatment for rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy, providing rapid and substantial pain relief. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman with aggravated pain early after ultrasound-guided barbotage of a large calcific deposit in the supraspinatus tendon. Subsequent examination revealed a thick calcification spreading along the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa space, suggesting acute calcific bursitis complicated by barbotage. Additional barbotage alleviated her pain completely. Therefore, a high index of suspicion for acute calcific bursitis is required in patients with unresolved or aggravated pain after barbotage. Repeated barbotage could be effective for this condition. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of High-Volume Injection, Platelet-Rich Plasma, and Sham Treatment in Chronic Midportion Achilles Tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Anders Ploug; Hansen, Rudi; Boesen, Morten Ilum

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Injection therapies are often considered alongside exercise for chronic midportion Achilles tendinopathy (AT), although evidence of their efficacy is sparse. PURPOSE: To determine whether eccentric training in combination with high-volume injection (HVI) or platelet-rich plasma (PRP......) injections improves outcomes in AT. STUDY DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. METHODS: A total of 60 men (age, 18-59 years) with chronic (>3 months) AT were included and followed for 6 months (n = 57). All participants performed eccentric training combined with either (1) one HVI...... with eccentric training in chronic AT seems more effective in reducing pain, improving activity level, and reducing tendon thickness and intratendinous vascularity than eccentric training alone. HVI may be more effective in improving outcomes of chronic AT than PRP in the short term. Registration: NCT02417987...

  2. Do structural changes (eg, collagen/matrix) explain the response to therapeutic exercises in tendinopathy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Benjamin T; Smith, Toby O; Littlewood, Chris; Sturrock, Ben

    2014-06-01

    Previous reviews have highlighted the benefit of loaded therapeutic exercise in the treatment of tendinopathy. Changes in observable structural outcomes have been suggested as a possible explanation for this response to therapeutic exercise. However, the mechanism for the efficacy of therapeutic exercise remains unclear. To systematically review the relationship between the observable structural change and clinical outcomes following therapeutic exercise. An electronic search of AMED, CiNAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, PEDro and SPORTDiscus was undertaken from their inception to June 2012. Any study design that incorporated observable structural outcomes and clinical outcomes when assessing the effect of therapeutic exercise on participants with tendinopathy. Included studies were appraised for risk of bias using the tool developed by the Cochrane Back Review Group. Due to heterogeneity of studies, a qualitative synthesis was undertaken. Twenty articles describing 625 patients were included. Overall, there is a strong evidence to refute any observable structural change as an explanation for the response to therapeutic exercise when treated by eccentric exercise training. Moderate evidence does exist to support the response of heavy-slow resistance training (HSR). The available literature does not support observable structural change as an explanation for the response of therapeutic exercise except for some support from HSR. Future research should focus on indentifying other explanations including neural, biochemical and myogenic changes. Registered with PROSPERO, registration number CRD42011001638. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. Patients With Insertional Achilles Tendinopathy Exhibit Differences in Ankle Biomechanics as Opposed to Strength and Range of Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimenti, Ruth L; Flemister, A Samuel; Tome, Joshua; McMahon, James M; Houck, Jeff R

    2016-12-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study; cross-sectional. Background Little is known about ankle range of motion (ROM) and strength among patients with insertional Achilles tendinopathy (IAT) and whether limited ankle ROM and plantar flexor weakness impact IAT symptom severity. Objectives The purposes of the study were (1) to examine whether participants with IAT exhibit limited non-weight-bearing dorsiflexion ROM, reduced plantar flexor strength, and/or altered ankle biomechanics during stair ascent; and (2) to determine which impairments are associated with symptom severity. Methods Participants included 20 patients with unilateral IAT (mean ± SD age, 59 ± 8 years; 55% female) and 20 individuals without tendinopathy (age, 58.2 ± 8.5 years; 55% female). A dynamometer was used to measure non-weight-bearing ROM and isometric plantar flexor strength. Three-dimensional motion analysis was used to quantify ankle biomechanics during stair ascent. End-range dorsiflexion was quantified as the percentage of non-weight-bearing dorsiflexion used during stair ascent. Group differences were compared using 2-way and 1-way analyses of variance. Pearson correlations were used to test for associations among dependent variables and symptom severity. Results Groups differed in ankle biomechanics, but not non-weight-bearing ROM or strength. During stair ascent, the IAT group used greater end-range dorsiflexion (P = .03), less plantar flexion (P = .02), and lower peak ankle plantar flexor power (P = .01) than the control group. Higher end-range dorsiflexion and lower ankle power during stair ascent were associated with greater symptom severity (Pbiomechanics during stair ascent were linked with greater symptom severity and likely contribute to decreased function. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(12):1051-1060. Epub 29 Oct 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6462.

  4. Biomechanical and histological effects of augmented soft tissue mobilization therapy on achilles tendinopathy in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Kan; Ikoma, Kazuya; Chen, Qingshan; Zhao, Chunfeng; An, Kai-Nan; Gay, Ralph E

    2015-02-01

    Augmented soft tissue mobilization (ASTM) has been used to treat Achilles tendinopathy and is thought to promote collagen fiber realignment and hasten tendon regeneration. The objective of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical and histological effects of ASTM therapy on rabbit Achilles tendons after enzymatically induced injury. This study was a non-human bench controlled research study using a rabbit model. Both Achilles tendons of 12 rabbits were injected with collagenase to produce tendon injury simulating Achilles tendinopathy. One side was then randomly allocated to receive ASTM, while the other received no treatment (control). ASTM was performed on the Achilles tendon on postoperative days 21, 24, 28, 31, 35, and 38. Tendons were harvested 10 days after treatment and examined with dynamic viscoelasticity and light microscopy. Cross-sectional area in the treated tendons was significantly greater than in controls. Storage modulus tended to be lower in the treated tendons but elasticity was not significantly increased. Loss modulus was significantly lower in the treated tendons. There was no significant difference found in tangent delta (loss modulus/storage modulus). Microscopy of control tendons showed that the tendon fibers were wavy and type III collagen was well stained. The tendon fibers of the augmented soft tissue mobilization treated tendons were not wavy and type III collagen was not prevalent. Biomechanical and histological findings showed that the Achilles tendons treated with ASTM had better recovery of biomechanical function than did control tendons. Copyright © 2015 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Tendinopatia do compartimento anterior do tornozelo Tendinopathy of the anterior compartment of the ankle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Egydio de Carvalho Junior

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Análise retrospectiva da etiopatogenia, diagnóstico e opções de tratamento nos casos de tendinopatias do compartimento anterior do tornozelo (TCAT. MÉTODO: No período de setembro de 1998 a fevereiro de 2009, 13 pacientes foram operados por tendinopatia do compartimento anterior do tornozelo. A casuística constou de 10 pacientes do sexo masculino e três do feminino. O lado direito foi acometido em 12 pés e um do esquerdo. A média de idade foi de 35 anos (15-67. A etiologia foi traumática em oito pacientes e em cinco, degenerativa (atraumática. O tempo médio do diagnóstico ao tratamento foi de 19 meses (1-60 e o seguimento foi de 34 meses (4-127. O diagnóstico foi feito através da história e exame clínico. A ressonância magnética foi realizada em nove pacientes para estadiamento e planejamento. O tratamento cirúrgico foi personalizado para cada caso (sinovectomia, ressecção de ventre muscular, solidarização com o tendão adjacente e enxerto livre de tendão semitendíneo. Para a avaliação dos resultados foram utilizadas as escalas: 1 graduação subjetiva de satisfação, 2 AOFAS e 3 Maryland. RESULTADO: Em relação à escala de graduação subjetiva de satisfação, 12 pacientes satisfeitos e um paciente insatisfeito. A média da escala AOFAS foi de 80 pontos, a média da escala Maryland foi de 86 pontos. CONCLUSÃO: O tratamento cirúrgico é eficaz para recuperação funcional. As técnicas cirúrgicas devem ser personalizadas. A opção do enxerto livre de tendão semitendíneo é eficiente nas falhas maiores que cinco centímetros.OBJECTIVE: To carry out a retrospective analysis of the etiopathogeny, diagnosis and therapeutic options in cases of tendinopathies of the anterior compartment of the ankle. METHOD: 13 patients underwent surgery between September 1998 and February 2009; ten men and three women. The right side was involved in twelve patients and the left in one. The averaging age was 35 years of

  6. Physical therapists' role in prevention and management of patellar tendinopathy injuries in youth, collegiate, and middle-aged indoor volleyball athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulig, Kornelia; Noceti-DeWit, Lisa M.; Reischl, Stephen F.; Landel, Rob F.

    2015-01-01

    Patellar tendinopathy is highly prevalent in all ages and skill levels of volleyball athletes. To illustrate this, we discuss the clinical, biomechanical, and ultrasound imaging presentation and the intervention strategies of three volleyball athletes at different stages of their athletic career: youth, middle-aged, and collegiate. We present our examination strategies and interpret the data collected, including visual movement analysis and dynamics, relating these findings to the probable causes of their pain and dysfunction. Using the framework of the EdUReP concept, incorporating Education, Unloading, Reloading, and Prevention, we propose intervention strategies that target each athlete's specific issues in terms of education, rehabilitation, training, and return to sport. This framework can be generalized to manage patellar tendinopathy in other sports requiring jumping, from youth to middle age, and from recreational to elite competitive levels. PMID:26537811

  7. The central nervous system--an additional consideration in 'rotator cuff tendinopathy' and a potential basis for understanding response to loaded therapeutic exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlewood, Chris; Malliaras, Peter; Bateman, Marcus; Stace, Richmond; May, Stephen; Walters, Stephen

    2013-12-01

    Tendinopathy is a term used to describe a painful tendon disorder but despite being a well-recognised clinical presentation, a definitive understanding of the pathoaetiology of rotator cuff tendinopathy remains elusive. Current explanatory models, which relate to peripherally driven nocioceptive mechanisms secondary to structural abnormality, or failed healing, appear inadequate on their own in the context of current literature. In light of these limitations this paper presents an extension to current models that incorporates the integral role of the central nervous system in the pain experience. The role of the central nervous system (CNS) is described and justified along with a potential rationale to explain the favourable response to loaded therapeutic exercises demonstrated by previous studies. This additional consideration has the potential to offer a useful way to explain pain to patients, for clinicians to prescribe appropriate therapeutic management strategies and for researchers to advance knowledge in relation to this clinically challenging problem. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effectiveness of the Intratissue Percutaneous Electrolysis (EPI®) technique and isoinertial eccentric exercise in the treatment of patellar tendinopathy at two years follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abat, Ferran; Diesel, Wayne-J; Gelber, Pablo-E; Polidori, Fernando; Monllau, Joan-Carles; Sanchez-Ibañez, Jose-Manuel

    2014-04-01

    to show the effect of Intratissue Percutaneous Electrolysis (EPI®) combined with eccentric programme in the treatment of patellar tendinopathy. prospective study of 33 athlete-patients consecutively treated for insertional tendinopathy with Intratissue Percutaneous Electrolysis (EPI®) and followed for 2 years. Functional assessment was performed at the first visit, at three months and two years with the Tegner scale and VISA-P. an average improvement in the VISA-P of 35 points was obtained. The mean duration of treatment was 4.5 weeks. Some 78.8% of the patients returned to the same level of physical activity as before the injury by the end of treatment, reaching 100% at two years. intratissue percutaneous electrolysis (EPI®) combined with an eccentric-based rehab program offers excellent results in terms of the clinical and functional improvement of the patellar tendon with low morbidity in a short-term period. Therapy, level 4.

  9. Physical therapists' role in prevention and management of patellar tendinopathy injuries in youth, collegiate, and middle-aged indoor volleyball athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulig, Kornelia; Noceti-DeWit, Lisa M; Reischl, Stephen F; Landel, Rob F

    2015-01-01

    Patellar tendinopathy is highly prevalent in all ages and skill levels of volleyball athletes. To illustrate this, we discuss the clinical, biomechanical, and ultrasound imaging presentation and the intervention strategies of three volleyball athletes at different stages of their athletic career: youth, middle-aged, and collegiate. We present our examination strategies and interpret the data collected, including visual movement analysis and dynamics, relating these findings to the probable causes of their pain and dysfunction. Using the framework of the EdUReP concept, incorporating Education, Unloading, Reloading, and Prevention, we propose intervention strategies that target each athlete's specific issues in terms of education, rehabilitation, training, and return to sport. This framework can be generalized to manage patellar tendinopathy in other sports requiring jumping, from youth to middle age, and from recreational to elite competitive levels.

  10. A randomised controlled feasibility study investigating the use of eccentric and concentric strengthening exercises in the treatment of rotator cuff tendinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Bateman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To conduct a feasibility study to compare concentric and eccentric rotator cuff strengthening exercises for rotator cuff tendinopathy. Methods: A total of 11 patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy who were on the waiting list for arthroscopic subacromial decompression surgery were randomised to perform eccentric rotator cuff strengthening exercises, concentric strengthening exercises or no exercises. Patients were evaluated in terms of levels of pain and function using the Oxford Shoulder Score and a Visual Analogue Scale initially, at 4 weeks and at 8 weeks. Results: The study design was found to be acceptable to patients and achieved a high level of 86% compliance. The drop-out rate was 0%. Two patients performing eccentric strengthening exercises improved sufficiently to cancel their planned surgery. Conclusion: Further research in this area is recommended. The study design was feasible and power calculations have been conducted to aid future research planning.

  11. A prospective randomized clinical trial of prescription of full-time versus as-desired splint wear for de Quervain tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez, Mariano E; Thornton, Emily; Kent, Suzanne; Kalajian, Tyler; Ring, David

    2015-08-01

    There is no consensus on the best protocol for splint wear in the non-operative management of de Quervain tendinopathy. This study aimed to determine if there is a difference between prescription of strict splint wear compared to selective splint wear in patients with de Quervain tendinopathy. We tested the primary null hypothesis that there is no difference in upper-extremity disability eight weeks after initiating splinting between patients prescribed full-time or as-desired splint wear. Secondary study questions addressed differences in grip strength, pain intensity, and treatment satisfaction. Additionally, we evaluated the influence of psychological factors on disability. Eighty-three patients diagnosed with de Quervain tendinopathy were randomly allocated into two different splint-wearing instructions: full-time wear (N = 43) or as-desired wear (N = 40). At enrollment, patients had grip strength measured and completed measures of upper-extremity disability, pain intensity, and psychological distress. An average of 7.5 weeks later, patients returned for a second visit. Analysis was by intention-to-treat and with use of mean imputation for missing data. Fifty-eight patients (70 %; 26 in the full-time cohort and 32 in the as-desired cohort) completed the study. There were no statistically significant differences in disability (p = 0.77), grip strength (p = 0.82), pain intensity (p = 0.36), and treatment satisfaction (p = 0.91) between patients instructed to wear the splint full-time and those instructed to use it as desired. Disability at final evaluation correlated significantly with baseline levels of pain anxiety (p = 0.008), catastrophic thinking (p = 0.001), and symptoms of depression (p Quervain tendinopathy is palliative at best and strict rest is not disease modifying.

  12. Patellar tendinopathy caused by a para-articular/extraskeletal osteochondroma in the lateral infrapatellar region of the knee: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Ozturan, Kutay Engin; Yucel, Istemi; Cakici, Husamettin; Guven, Melih; Gurel, Kamil; Dervisoglu, Sergulen

    2009-01-01

    Patellar tendinopathy is characterized by activity-related anterior knee pain. It is most commonly related to sports activity, but has also been reported in the non-athletic population. Most injuries are caused by microtrauma, resulting in tendinitis or tendinosis. Extraskeletal paraarticular osteochondromas, which occur in the soft tissues near the joint, are rare. The infrapatellar fat pad and joint capsule are the most common sites of these tumors. Here, a case of patellar tendinitis cause...

  13. Eccentric decline squat protocol offers superior results at 12 months compared with traditional eccentric protocol for patellar tendinopathy in volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, M A; Cook, J L; Purdam, C R; Kiss, Z S; Alfredson, H

    2005-02-01

    Conservative treatment of patellar tendinopathy has been minimally investigated. Effective validated treatment protocols are required. To investigate the immediate (12 weeks) and long term (12 months) efficacy of two eccentric exercise programmes for the treatment of patellar tendinopathy. This was a prospective randomised controlled trial of 17 elite volleyball players with clinically diagnosed and imaging confirmed patellar tendinopathy. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups: a decline group and a step group. The decline group were required to perform single leg squats on a 25 degrees decline board, exercising into tendon pain and progressing their exercises with load. The step group performed single leg squats on a 10 cm step, exercising without tendon pain and progressing their exercises with speed then load. All participants completed a 12 week intervention programme during their preseason. Outcome measures used were the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment (VISA) score for knee function and 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS) for tendon pain with activity. Measures were taken throughout the intervention period and at 12 months. Both groups had improved significantly from baseline at 12 weeks and 12 months. Analysis of the likelihood of a 20 point improvement in VISA score at 12 months revealed a greater likelihood of clinical improvements in the decline group than the step group. VAS scores at 12 months did not differ between the groups. Both exercise protocols improved pain and sporting function in volleyball players over 12 months. This study indicates that the decline squat protocol offers greater clinical gains during a rehabilitation programme for patellar tendinopathy in athletes who continue to train and play with pain.

  14. Colour doppler ultrasonography and sclerosing therapy in diagnosis and treatment of tendinopathy in horses-a research model for human medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Morten Ilum; Nanni, Simone; Langberg, Henning

    2007-01-01

    diagnosed chronic tendinopathy and to test if experience from human studies could be extrapolated to horses. Special interest was focused on the treatment with sclerosing therapy and whether we could obtain the same successful peroperative findings as in humans. Four horses with clinically diagnosed...... tendons in the horse to determine the best treatment of overuse injuries in humans as well. The animal model will allow experimental studies including substantial tissue sampling for mechanical and molecular biological analysis....

  15. The Use of Adipose Derived Progenitor Cells and Platelet Rich Plasma Combination for the Treatment of Supraspinatus Tendinopathy in 55 Dogs: A Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherman Orye Canapp

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To report clinical findings and outcomes for 55 dogs with supraspinatus tendinopathy treated with adipose derived progenitor cells and platelet rich plasma therapy.Methods: Medical records of client-owned dogs diagnosed with supraspinatus tendinopathy that were treated with adipose derived progenitor cells and platelet rich plasma (ADPC-PRP combination therapy were reviewed from 2006-2013. Data collected included signalment, medical history, limb involvement, prior treatments, physical and orthopedic examination, objective temporospatial gait analysis findings, diagnostic imaging results (radiography, magnetic resonance imaging, musculoskeletal ultrasonography, arthroscopy findings, and outcome. Results: Following ultrasound-guided injection of ADPC-PRP, objective gait analysis was available on 25 of the 55 dogs at 90 days post ADPC-PRP therapy. Following treatment, a significant increase in total pressure index percentage (TPI% was noted in the injured (treated forelimb at 90 days post treatment (p = 0.036. At 90 days following treatment, 88% of cases had no significant difference in TPI% of the injured limb to the contralateral limb. The remaining 12% of cases had significantly improved (p=0.036. Bilateral shoulder diagnostic musculoskeletal ultrasound revealed a significant reduction in tendon size (CSA in the treated tendon at 90 days following treatment when compared to the initial CSA (p=0.005. All cases showed significant improvement in fiber pattern of the affected supraspinatus tendon by the ultrasound shoulder pathology rating scale.Clinical Relevance: These findings suggest that ADPC-PRP therapy should be considered for dogs with supraspinatus tendinopathy.Abbreviations:ST: supraspinatus tendinopathyADPC: adipose derived progenitor cellsMSC: mesenchymal stem cellsPRP: platelet rich plasmaTPI%: total pressure index percentage

  16. Effects of scapular taping on the activity onset of scapular muscles and the scapular kinematics in volleyball players with rotator cuff tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Hio Teng; Ng, Gabriel Yin-Fat; Fu, Siu Ngor

    2017-06-01

    To examine the effect of scapular taping on the activity onset of scapular muscles and the scapular kinematics during arm elevation in volleyball players with rotator cuff (RC) tendinopathy. Randomized placebo-controlled repeated measures METHODS: Twenty-six male volleyball players with RC tendinopathy (mean age=23.6±3.3years) participated in the study. Electromyography (EMG) activity onset of upper trapezius (UT), middle trapezius (MT), lower trapezius (LT) and serratus anterior (SA) and the three-dimensional scapular kinematics quantified by using an acromial marker cluster method were compared with three scapular taping protocols, namely, no taping, therapeutic taping, and placebo taping. The MT, LT and SA activated significantly earlier in both therapeutic taping (all ptaping conditions than no taping conditions (all ptaping and no taping conditions were compared (p=0.007). Scapular taping may enhance the neuromotor control of the scapular muscles. Whether it provides adequate support for normal scapular kinematics during arm movement in athletes with RC tendinopathy await for further studies. Copyright © 2016 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The Effectiveness of Platelet-Rich Plasma in the Treatment of Tendinopathy: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Jane; Bulsara, Max; Zheng, Ming H

    2017-01-01

    Tendinopathy is very common in the general population. There are increasing numbers of clinical studies referring to platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and platelet-poor plasma (PPP) as treatments for tendinopathy. To perform a meta-analysis of the outcomes of the PRP groups by preparation method and injection technique in tendinopathy. To determine the clinical effectiveness of the preparations and to evaluate the effect of controls used in the studies reviewed. Systematic review and meta-analysis. The PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Medline databases were searched in March 2012, April 2014, and August 2015, and randomized controlled trials using autologous blood, PRP, PPP, or autologous conditioned plasma in tendinopathy with outcome measures of pain and follow-up time of 3 months were included in this review. Trials including surgery, tendon tears, and muscle or ligament injuries were excluded. Study quality was assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration risk-of-bias tool by 2 reviewers. Data were pooled using random-effects meta-analysis. The primary outcome measure was a change in pain intensity. Where more than 1 pain scale was included, a functional score was selected ahead of a visual analog scale score. A total of 18 studies (1066 participants) were included. Eight studies were deemed to be at low risk of bias. The most significant outcomes in the PRP groups were seen in those treated with highly cellular leukocyte-rich PRP (LR-PRP) preparations: GPS kit (standardized mean difference [SMD], 35.75; 95% CI, 28.40-43.10), MyCells kit (SMD, 31.84; 95% CI, 17.56-46.13), Prosys kit (SMD, 42.99; 95% CI, 37.73-48.25), and unspecified LR-PRP (SMD, 34.62; 95% CI, 31.69-37.55). When the LR-PRP system types were grouped, there was a strongly positive effect (SMD, 36.38; 95% CI, 34.00-38.77) when compared with leukocyte-poor PRP (SMD, 26.77; 95% CI, 18.31-35.22). In assessing the control groups, there was no clear difference between different types of control injections: saline

  18. Differential Motion and Compression Between the Plantaris and Achilles Tendons: A Contributing Factor to Midportion Achilles Tendinopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Joanna M; Marsland, Daniel; Masci, Lorenzo; Calder, James D F; Daou, Hadi El

    2017-12-01

    The plantaris tendon (PT) has been thought to contribute to symptoms in a proportion of patients with Achilles midportion tendinopathy, with symptoms improving after PT excision. There is compression and differential movement between the PT and Achilles tendon (AT) during ankle plantarflexion and dorsiflexion. Descriptive laboratory study. Eighteen fresh-frozen cadaveric ankles (mean ± SD age: 35 ± 7 years, range = 27-48 years; men, n = 9) were mounted in a customized testing rig, where the tibia was fixed but the forefoot could be moved freely. A Steinmann pin was drilled through the calcaneus, enabling a valgus torque to be applied. The soleus, gastrocnemius, and plantaris muscles were loaded with 63 N with a weighted pulley system. The test area was 40 to 80 mm above the os calcis, corresponding to where the injury is observed clinically. Medially, the AT and PT were exposed, and a calibrated flexible pressure sensor was inserted between the tendons. Pressure readings were recorded with the ankle in full dorsiflexion, full plantarflexion, and plantargrade and repeated in these positions with a 5 N·m torque, simulating increased hindfoot valgus. The pressure sensor was removed and the PT and AT marked with ink at the same level, with the foot held in neutral rotation and plantargrade. Videos and photographs were taken to assess differential motion between the tendons. After testing, specimens were dissected to identify the PT insertion. One-way analysis of variance and paired t tests were performed to make comparisons. The PT tendons with an insertion separate from the AT demonstrated greater differential motion through range (14 ± 4 mm) when compared with those directly adherent to the AT (2 ± 2 mm) ( P plantarflexion for all specimens ( P plantarflexion, suggesting that adapting rehabilitation tendon-loading programs to avoid this position may be beneficial. The insertion pattern of the PT may be a factor in plantaris-related midportion Achilles

  19. The effect of a patellar strap on knee joint proprioception in healthy participants and athletes with patellar tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Astrid J; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Diercks, Ron L; Zwerver, Johannes; van der Worp, Henk

    2016-04-01

    The primary aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the use of a patellar strap on knee joint proprioception in both healthy participants and in patients with patellar tendinopathy (PT). Secondary aims are to examine whether there is a difference in effectiveness of the use of a patellar strap between participants with low and high proprioceptive acuity and if possible predictors of effectiveness can be determined. Case-control. The threshold to detect passive motion with and without a patellar strap was assessed in 22 healthy participants and 21 unilateral PT patients. The results from the mixed model analysis show that in both groups of participants a small but statistically significant improvement in proprioception was found, primarily in those who had low proprioceptive acuity. A notable finding was that in the symptomatic leg of the PT group no improvement in proprioception by wearing a strap could be determined. Male gender and having fewer symptoms were possible predictors of effectiveness in PT patients. As proprioception plays a role in optimising movements and reducing load to joint-related structures like tendons and ligaments, it is considered an important protection mechanism. Although the improvements in proprioception as a result of wearing the strap are small, it might be that the use of a patellar strap can potentially play a role in injury prevention since poor proprioception can be a risk factor for (re)-injury. Copyright © 2015 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Autologous leukocyte-reduced platelet-rich plasma therapy for Achilles tendinopathy induced by collagenase in a rabbit model

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Juan C.; López, Catalina; Álvarez, María E.; Pérez, Jorge E.; Carmona, Jorge U.

    2016-01-01

    Leukocyte-reduced platelet-rich plasma (LR-PRP) is a therapy for tendinopathy of the Achilles tendon (TAT); however, there is scarce information regarding LR-PRP effects in rabbit models of TAT. We compared, at 4 and 12 weeks (w), the LR-PRP and placebo (PBS) effects on ultrasonography, histology and relative gene expression of collagen types I (COL1A1) and III (COL3A1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in 24 rabbits with TAT induced by collagenase. The rabbits (treated with both treatments) were euthanatised after either 4 or 12 w. A healthy group (HG (n = 6)) was included. At 4 and 12 w, the LR-PRP group had a no statistically different histology score to the HG. At w 4, the COL1A1 expression was significantly higher in the LR-PRP group when compared to HG, and the expression of COL3A1from both LR-PRP and PBS-treated tendons was significantly higher when compared to the HG. At w 12, the expression of COL3A1 remained significantly higher in the PBS group in comparison to the LR-PRP group and the HG. At w 4, the LR-PRP group presented a significantly higher expression of VEGF when compared to the PBS group and the HG. In conclusion, LR-PRP treatment showed regenerative properties in rabbits with TAT. PMID:26781753

  1. Treatment of proximal hamstring tendinopathy-related sciatic nerve entrapment: presentation of an ultrasound-guided "Intratissue Percutaneous Electrolysis" application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattiussi, Gabriele; Moreno, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Proximal Hamstring Tendinopathy-related Sciatic Nerve Entrapment (PHTrSNE) is a neuropathy caused by fibrosis interposed between the semimembranosus tendon and the sciatic nerve, at the level of the ischial tuberosity. Ultrasound-guided Intratissue Percutaneous Electrolysis (US-guided EPI) involves galvanic current transfer within the treatment target tissue (fibrosis) via a needle 0.30 to 0.33 mm in diameter. The galvanic current in a saline solution instantly develops the chemical process of electrolysis, which in turn induces electrochemical ablation of fibrosis. In this article, the interventional procedure is presented in detail, and both the strengths and limits of the technique are discussed. US-guided EPI eliminates the fibrotic accumulation that causes PHTrSNE, without the semimembranosus tendon or the sciatic nerve being directly involved during the procedure. The technique is however of limited use in cases of compression neuropathy. US-guided EPI is a technique that is quick to perform, minimally invasive and does not force the patient to suspend their activities (work or sports) to make the treatment effective. This, coupled to the fact that the technique is generally well-tolerated by patients, supports use of US-guided EPI in the treatment of PHTrSNE.

  2. Risk factors for patellar tendinopathy in volleyball and basketball players: A survey-based prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, A J; van der Worp, H; Diercks, R L; van den Akker-Scheek, I; Zwerver, J

    2015-10-01

    Patellar tendinopathy (PT) is a common overuse injury of the patellar tendon in jumping athletes. In a recent large cross-sectional study from 2008 several factors were identified that may be associated with the etiology of PT. However, because of the study design no conclusions could be drawn about causal relations. The primary aim of the current study is to investigate whether the factors identified in the previous 2008 study can also be prospectively recognized as predictors of symptomatic PT in 2011. Nine hundred twenty-six Dutch elite and non-elite basketball and volleyball players from the previous study were invited again to complete an online survey about knee complaints and risk factors for PT in 2011. The logistic regression included 385 athletes of which 51 (13%) developed PT since 2008. Male gender [odds ratio (OR) 2.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-3.5] was found to be a risk factor for developing PT. No sports-related variables could be identified to increase the risk of developing PT, but some evidence was found for performing heavy physically demanding work, like being a nurse or a physical education teacher (OR 2.3, 95% CI 0.9-6.3). These findings indicate that, when considering preventive measures, it is important to take into account the total tendon load. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. THE MINIMUM CLINICALLY IMPORTANT DIFFERENCE ON THE VISA-A AND LEFS FOR PATIENTS WITH INSERTIONAL ACHILLES TENDINOPATHY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Joshua; Underwood, Frank; Slaven, Emily; Cappaert, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Cohort study of subjects with insertional Achilles tendinopathy (IAT). The purpose of this study was to establish the minimum clinically important difference (MCID) on the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment - Achilles Questionnaire (VISA-A) and the Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS) for patients with IAT. The VISA-A and LEFS are two measures commonly utilized for patients with IAT. Previous authors have estimated the MCID for the VISA-A, but a MCID has not been formally established. The MCID for the LEFS has been established for patients with lower extremity conditions in general, but it is not clear if this MCID is applicable to patients with IAT. Fifteen subjects participating in a randomized controlled trial studying the effectiveness of intervention for IAT over a 12-week period were included in this study. Subjects completed the VISA-A and LEFS forms at baseline and 12 weeks after the initiation of treatment. All subjects also completed a 15-point global rating of change (GROC) questionnaire at 12 weeks after the initiation of treatment. Subjects were classified as improved or stable based on their GROC scores. The area under the curve (AUC) for the VISA-A was 0.97 and a MCID of 6.5 points was identified. The AUC for the LEFS was 0.97 and a MCID of 12 points was identified. The VISA-A and LEFS are both useful outcome measures to assess response in patients with IAT. 3.

  4. The effect of exercise repetition on the frequency characteristics of motor output force: implications for Achilles tendinopathy rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigg, Nicole L; Wearing, Scott C; O'Toole, John M; Smeathers, James E

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the frequency characteristics of the ground reaction force (GRF) recorded throughout the eccentric Achilles tendon rehabilitation programme described by Alfredson. Controlled laboratory study, longitudinal. Nine healthy adult males performed six sets (15 repetitions per set) of eccentric ankle exercise. Ground reaction force was recorded throughout the exercise protocol. For each exercise repetition the frequency power spectrum of the resultant ground reaction force was calculated and normalised to total power. The magnitude of peak relative power within the 8-12 Hz bandwidth and the frequency at which this peak occurred was determined. The magnitude of peak relative power within the 8-12 Hz bandwidth increased with each successive exercise set and following the 4th set (60 repetitions) of exercise the frequency at which peak relative power occurred shifted from 9 to 10 Hz. The increase in magnitude and frequency of ground reaction force vibrations with an increasing number of exercise repetitions is likely connected to changes in muscle activation with fatigue and tendon conditioning. This research illustrates the potential for the number of exercise repetitions performed to influence the tendons' mechanical environment, with implications for tendon remodelling and the clinical efficacy of eccentric rehabilitation programmes for Achilles tendinopathy. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The EdUReP approach plus manual therapy for the management of insertional Achilles tendinopathy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorio, Francesco; Zanetta, Anna; Ferriero, Giorgio; Bravini, Elisabetta; Vercelli, Stefano

    2017-02-21

    Insertional Achilles tendinopathy (IAT) is a challenging overuse disorder. The aim of this case report was to study the feasibility of a comprehensive rehabilitative approach according to the Education, Unloading, Reloading, and Prevention (EdUReP) framework combined with Instrument-Augmented Soft Tissue Mobilization (I-ASTM). An active 51-year-old man patient with chronic IAT was studied. Clinical assessment battery was composed by visual analogue scale for pain during the Achilles tendon palpation test, passive straight leg raise test, single leg hop test, Patient-Specific Functional Scale, and Foot and Ankle Ability Measure. The patient was treated over a 8 weeks period using the EdUReP guidelines plus 8 sessions of I-ASTM, applied with a solid instrument to the Achilles tendon and to the muscle fibrotic areas previously identified during evaluation. Clinically significant improvements were observed in all outcome measures, and a resume of patient's usual sports activities without pain or limitations was possible after treatment. Results lasted over a 6-month follow-up. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study applying a comprehensive approach based on accurate physical assessment, and using the EdUReP theoretical model. The combination of the EdUReP model and manual therapy was effective in resolving the patient's symptoms and restore his usual sport activities. While these results cannot be generalized, the present findings could provide a valuable foundation for future researches.

  6. The effect of kinesiotape on function, pain, and motoneuronal excitability in healthy people and people with Achilles tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firth, Bridget L; Dingley, Paul; Davies, Elizabeth R; Lewis, Jeremy S; Alexander, Caroline M

    2010-11-01

    To investigate the effect of kinesiotape on hop distance, pain, and motoneuronal excitability in healthy people and people with Achilles tendinopathy (AT). Within-subject design. An academic health science center, which is an acute London National Health Service trust. With ethical approval and informed consent, a convenience sample of 26 healthy people and 29 people with AT were recruited. Seven participants were lost after functional testing, leaving 24 participants in each group. Kinesiotape applied over the Achilles tendon. The single-leg hop test and visual analog scale were measured with and without the tape. Using the Hoffman (H) reflex, change in motoneuronal excitability of calf muscles was measured before tape application, with the tape on and after its removal. There were no changes to hop distance when tape was applied (P = 0.55). Additionally, there were no changes to pain (P = 0.74). The H reflex amplitude of soleus and gastrocnemius increased in the healthy group after its removal (P = 0.01 and P = 0.03, respectively), whereas the H reflex remained unchanged in people with AT (P = 0.43 and 0.16, respectively). Calf muscles were facilitated by kinesiotape in healthy participants. Despite this, there was no change to hop distance. Kinesiotape had no effect on hop distance, pain, or motoneuronal excitability in people with AT. These results do not support the use of kinesiotape applied in this way for this condition.

  7. Three Months of Progressive High-Load Versus Traditional Low-Load Strength Training Among Patients With Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy: Primary Results From the Double-Blind Randomized Controlled RoCTEx Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingwersen, Kim Gordon; Jensen, Steen Lund; Sørensen, Lilli; Jørgensen, Hans Ri; Christensen, Robin; Søgaard, Karen; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit

    2017-08-01

    Progressive high-load exercise (PHLE) has led to positive clinical results in patients with patellar and Achilles tendinopathy. However, its effects on rotator cuff tendinopathy still need to be investigated. To assess the clinical effects of PHLE versus low-load exercise (LLE) among patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. Patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy were recruited and randomized to 12 weeks of PHLE or LLE, stratified for concomitant administration of corticosteroid injection. The primary outcome measure was change from baseline to 12 weeks in the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) questionnaire, assessed in the intention-to-treat population. A total of 100 patients were randomized to PHLE (n = 49) or LLE (n = 51). Mean changes in the DASH questionnaire were 7.11 points (95% CI, 3.07-11.16) and 8.39 points (95% CI, 4.35-12.44) in the PHLE and LLE groups, respectively; this corresponded to a statistically nonsignificant adjusted mean group difference of -1.37 points (95% CI, -6.72 to 3.99; P = .61). Similar nonsignificant results were seen for pain, range of motion, and strength. However, a significant interaction effect was found between the 2 groups and concomitant corticosteroid use ( P = .028), with the largest positive change in DASH in favor of PHLE for the group receiving concomitant corticosteroid. The study results showed no superior benefit from PHLE over traditional LLE among patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy. Further investigation of the possible interaction between exercise type and corticosteroid injection is needed to establish optimal and potentially synergistic combinations of these 2 factors. NCT01984203 (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier): Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy Exercise Trial (RoCTEx).

  8. Rehabilitation of Patellar Tendinopathy Using Hip Extensor Strengthening and Landing-Strategy Modification: Case Report With 6-Month Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scattone Silva, Rodrigo; Ferreira, Ana Luisa G; Nakagawa, Theresa H; Santos, José E M; Serrão, Fábio V

    2015-11-01

    Study Design Case report. Background Although eccentric exercises have been a cornerstone of the rehabilitation of athletes with patellar tendinopathy, the effectiveness of this intervention is sometimes less than ideal. Athletes with patellar tendinopathy have been shown to have different jump-landing patterns and lower hip extensor strength compared to asymptomatic athletes. To our knowledge, the effectiveness of an intervention addressing these impairments has not yet been investigated. Case Description The patient was a 21-year-old male volleyball athlete with a 9-month history of patellar tendon pain. Pain was measured with a visual analog scale. Disability was measured with the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-patella questionnaire. These assessments were conducted before and after an 8-week intervention, as well as at 6 months after the intervention. Hip and knee kinematics and kinetics during drop vertical jump and isometric strength were also measured before and after the 8-week intervention. The intervention consisted of hip extensor muscle strengthening and jump landing strategy modification training. The patient did not interrupt volleyball practice/competition during rehabilitation. Outcomes After the 8-week intervention and at 6 months postintervention, the athlete was completely asymptomatic during sports participation. This favorable clinical outcome was accompanied by a 50% increase in hip extensor moment, a 21% decrease in knee extensor moment, and a 26% decrease in patellar tendon force during jump landing measured at 8 weeks. Discussion This case report provides an example of how an 8-week intervention of hip muscle strengthening and jump-landing modification decreased pain and disability and improved jump-landing biomechanics in an athlete with patellar tendinopathy. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 4. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2015;45(11):899-909. Epub 21 Sep 2015. doi:10.2519/jospt.2015.6242.

  9. A Pilot Study Evaluating the Effectiveness of Platelet-Rich Plasma Therapy for Treating Degenerative Tendinopathies: A Randomized Control Trial with Synchronous Observational Cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marni Wesner

    Full Text Available This pilot study aimed to inform future research evaluating the effectiveness of Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP injection for tendinopathy.Randomized control trial (RCT and synchronous observational cohort studies. For the RCT, consecutive consenting patients treated at an academic sports medicine clinic were randomly assigned to either a PRP or placebo control group.The Glen Sather Sport Medicine Clinic, Edmonton, Canada.The RCT included 9 participants with rotator cuff tendinopathy. The cohort study included 178 participants with a variety of tendinopathies.Patients receiving PRP were injected with 4 ml of platelets into the supraspinatus and/or infraspinatus, while patients in the placebo group were injected with 4 ml of saline. All participants undertook a 3-month standardized, home-based, daily exercise program.Participants in the RCT were re-evaluated 3, and 6 months post-injection. Change scores before and after injection on pain, disability and MRI-documented pathology outcomes were compared. In the cohort study, pain and disability were measured at 1, 2 and 3 months post-injection.For the RCT, 7 participants received PRP and 2 received placebo injections. Patients receiving PRP reported clinically important improvements in pain (>1.5/10 on VAS, disability (>15 point DASH change, and tendon pathology while those receiving placebo injections did not. In the observational cohort, statistically and clinically significant improvements in pain and disability were observed.This pilot study provides information for planning future studies of PRP effectiveness. Preliminary results indicate intratendinous, ultrasound-guided PRP injection may lead to improvements in pain, function, and MRI-documented tendon pathology.Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN68341698.

  10. Ultrasonography and Low-field Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Common Calcanean Tendon in a Rabbit Model for Tendinopathy Research: a Descriptive Study of Normal Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalec, A; Przyborowska-Zhalniarovich, P; Janus, I; Kirstein, K; Mieszkowska, M; Adamiak, Z; Chrószcz, A; Janeczek, M

    2016-09-01

    In spite of recent advances in treatment protocols, tendinopathies continue to challenge orthopaedists and surgeons. Due to the complexity of both tendon injuries and the healing processes, animal models are essential for addressing fundamental questions in tendinopathy research. Diagnostic imaging could contribute to the evaluation of animal models, thus providing information, which could be translated to human tendinopathies. The objective of our study was to evaluate in situ appearance of the rabbit common calcanean tendon with ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging. Additionally, we sought to assess and compare the feasibility and usefulness of these techniques in a rabbit model while focusing on the imaging of the particular structures involved in calcaneal tendon disorders. Eight California rabbits were used for post-mortem sonographic and low-field magnetic resonance examination. Morphometry was performed on longitudinal sonograms and sagittal MRI scans. The craniocaudal diameter of the tendon was measured at four points of interest. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance provided good visualisation of the tendon origin, the paratenon and the pre-Achilles fat pad. Magnetic resonance images presented in more detail the structure of the calcaneal insertion. Both modalities failed to visualise the individual components of the common calcanean tendon and the bursa of the calcaneal tendon. Statistical analysis of measurements obtained showed that the craniocaudal diameter of the common calcanean tendon in a rabbit increases significantly with a growing length from the calcaneal tuber. Both magnetic resonance and ultrasonography are feasible, and should be considered complementary, not alternative imaging techniques in a rabbit common calcanean tendon model.

  11. Shock wave therapy associated with eccentric strengthening versus isolated eccentric strengthening for Achilles insertional tendinopathy treatment: a double-blinded randomised clinical trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansur, Nacime Salomão Barbachan; Faloppa, Flávio; Belloti, João Carlos; Ingham, Sheila J McNeill; Matsunaga, Fabio Teruo; Santos, Paulo Roberto Dias Dos; Santos, Bruno Schiefer Dos; Carrazzone, Oreste Lemos; Peixoto, Gabriel; Aoyama, Bruno Takeshi; Tamaoki, Marcel Jun Sugawara

    2017-01-27

    There is no consensus regarding the treatment of Achilles insertional tendinopathies. Eccentric training remains the main choice in the conservative treatment of this illness; however, the good results in the management of non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy were not replicated in the insertional condition. Low energy shock wave therapy has been described as an alternative to these patients, but has yet to be empirically tested. Shock wave therapy, adjunctive to the eccentric strengthening protocol, will improve measures of pain and function. Double blind, placebo-controlled, parallel groups, randomised clinical trial. 93 patients with a diagnosis of chronic insertional tendinopathy, referred from primary or secondary healthcare services, will be assessed and enrolled in this study. They will be divided into two groups (randomised by sequentially numbered identical envelopes, which will be administered serially to participants), one containing the combination of low energy shock wave and eccentric exercises, as treatment and the other comprehending the exercises and the placebo treatment (an apparatus placed in the therapeutic head). The assessments will occur in 2, 4, 6, 12 and 24 weeks. Patients will be evaluated primarily by the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Achilles questionnaire and secondarily by the visual analogue scale, Algometry, the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society scale, the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score and the 12-item Short Form Health Survey. We will use comparison of two proportions via relative frequency analysis, the Pearson Correlation the χ2 test and the analysis of variance for statistical analyses. This study intends to demonstrate if the association of the eccentric exercise programme with the shock wave therapy can produce good results regarding the treatment of the Achilles insertional tendinopathy. In an attempt to prevent the high costs and complications associated with the surgical intervention, we will try to

  12. Increased palpation tenderness and muscle strength deficit in the prediction of tendon hypertrophy in symptomatic unilateral shoulder tendinopathy: an ultrasonographic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joensen, J.; Couppe, C.; Bjordal, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    . The observer was blinded in the maximal pain-free isometric force test. Setting Outpatient physiotherapy clinic at Bergen University College, Norway. Participants Sixty-four patients with an exclusive, tentative diagnosis of unilateral shoulder tendinopathy. Main outcome measures Differences in maximal pain-free...... for maximal pain-free isometric force (PFFdiff) and >= 0.6 kg for tendon pain pressure (PPTdiff), positive tests were found in 92% of patients. All three tests were sensitive for the detection of within-subject side differences with the selected cut-off values (TTdiff, n = 60/64; PPTdiff, n = 59/64 PFFdiff, n...

  13. Presence of a long accessory flexor tendon of the toes in surgical treatment for tendinopathy of the insertion of the calcaneal tendon: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Pelozo Gomes Júnior

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The presence of accessory tendons in the foot and ankle needs to be recognized, given that depending on their location, they may cause disorders relating either to pain processes or to handling of the surgical findings. We describe the presence of an accessory flexor tendon of the toes, seen in surgical exposure for transferring the long flexor tendon of the hallux to the calcaneus, due to the presence of a disorder of tendinopathy of the insertion of the calcaneal tendon in association with Haglund's syndrome.

  14. Distal intersection tenosynovitis of the wrist: a lesser-known extensor tendinopathy with characteristic MR imaging features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parellada, Antoni J. [DII - Diagnostic Imaging, Inc., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Frankford Hospitals - Torresdale Campus, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Gopez, Angela G.; Morrison, William B. [Thomas Jefferson University, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Sweet, Stephanie [Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia Hand Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Leinberry, Charles F. [Thomas Jefferson University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery - Hand Surgery, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Reiter, Sean B.; Kohn, Mark [DII - Diagnostic Imaging, Inc., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2007-03-15

    To present the MRI imaging findings of extensor tenosynovitis at the distal intersection or crossover between the second (extensor carpi radialis longus (ECRL) and brevis (ECRB)) and third (extensor pollicis longus (EPL)) extensor compartment tendons, and the anatomical details that may play a role in the pathogenesis of this condition. The imaging studies and clinical records of five patients (three females and two males, with ages ranging between 22 and 78 years; mean age, 49 years) presenting with pain on the dorsal and radial aspect of the wrist were reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists in consensus. Three cases were identified serendipitously during routine clinical reading sessions; a follow-up computerized database search for additional cases reported in the prior two years yielded two additional cases. The overall number of cases screened was 1,031. The diagnosis of tendinopathy affecting the second and third compartment extensor tendons was made on the basis of MRI findings and clinical follow-up, or synovectomy. All patients showed signs of tenosynovitis: in four patients both the tendons of the second and third extensor compartments were affected; the fifth patient showed signs of tenosynovitis of the EPL tendon, and tendinosis of the extensor carpi radialis tendons. Three patients showed tenosynovitis proximal and distal to the point of intersection; and in two of them, a discrete point of constriction was appreciated at the crossover site in relation to the extensor retinaculum. Two patients showed tenosynovitis limited to the segment distal to the point of decussation. Tendinosis tended to follow the presence of tenosynovitis. In one of the patients, subtendinous reactive marrow edema in Lister's tubercle was noted. Distal intersection tenosynovitis may be related to the biomechanical pulley effect exerted by Lister's tubercle on the EPL tendon as it leaves the third compartment and crosses over the extensor carpi radialis tendons

  15. The effect of sclerotherapy and prolotherapy on chronic painful Achilles tendinopathy-a systematic review including meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morath, O; Kubosch, E J; Taeymans, J; Zwingmann, J; Konstantinidis, L; Südkamp, N P; Hirschmüller, A

    2017-04-27

    Chronic painful Achilles tendinopathy (AT) is a common disorder among athletes. Sclerotherapy (ST) and prolotherapy (PT) are two promising options among the numerous other conservative therapies. As their efficacy and potential adverse effects (AE) are still unclear, we systematically searched, analyzed, and synthesized the available literature on ST and PT for treating AT. Electronic databases, Google Scholar and articles' reference lists were searched according to PRISMA guidelines. Eligibility criteria were set up according to the PICOS-scheme including human and animal studies. Three authors independently reviewed the results and evaluated methodological quality (Coleman Methodology Score and Cochrane Risk of Bias Assessment). The initial search yielded 1104 entries. After screening, 18 articles were available for qualitative synthesis, six of which were subjected to meta-analysis. The mean Coleman Score of the 13 human studies was 50. Four RCTs were ranked as having a low risk of selection bias. Three of those reported a statistically significant drop in the visual analog scale (VAS) score, one a significant increase in the VISA-A Score. 12 of 13 human studies reported positive results in achieving pain relief and patient satisfaction, whereas only one study's finding differed. Meta-analysis revealed an unambiguous result in favor of the intervention (weighted mean difference D=-4.67 cm, 95% CI -5.56 to -3.76 cm [P<.001]). Only one serious AE and two minor AEs were reported in the entire literature. This systematic review suggests that ST and PT may be effective treatment options for AT and that they can be considered safe. Long-term studies and RCTs are still needed to support their recommendation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Inter-examiner reliability of a standardized Ultra-sonographic method for classification of changes related to supraspinatus tendinopathy – a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Camilla Marie; Ingwersen, Kim Gordon; Hjarnbæk, John

    2015-01-01

    athletes. For optimizing rehabilitation to the different stages of tendinopathy (1) ultra-sonography (US) may be used. Reliability of such method for RT is lacking. Aims. To develop and test inter-examiner reliability of US for classifying RT. Materials and Methods. A three-phased standardized protocol......Inter-examiner reliability of a standardized Ultra-sonographic method for classification of changes related to supraspinatus tendinopathy – a pilot study Ingwersen KG1, 2, Hjarbaek J3, Eshøj H1, Larsen CM1, 4, Vobbe J5, Juul-Kristensen B1, 6 1Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics......, with the between-examiner difference tested by paired t-test. Kappa was interpreted as 0.00-0.40 (poor-fair); 0.41-0.80 (moderate-substantial) and 0.81-1.00 (almost perfect) (2). Results. Ten healthy controls and 10 cases with RT participated. For calcification and neovascularisation kappa was 0.76 and 1...

  17. Comparison of three types of exercise in the treatment of rotator cuff tendinopathy/shoulder impingement syndrome: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Stuart R; Woby, Steve R; Thompson, Dave P

    2017-06-01

    To assess the efficacy of three different exercise programmes in treating rotator cuff tendinopathy/shoulder impingement syndrome. Parallel group randomised clinical trial. Two out-patient NHS physiotherapy departments in Manchester, United Kingdom. 120 patients with shoulder pain of at least three months duration. Pain was reproduced on stressing the rotator cuff and participants had full passive range of movement at the shoulder. Three dynamic rotator cuff loading programmes; open chain resisted band exercises (OC) closed chain exercises (CC) and minimally loaded range of movement exercises (ROM). Change in Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) score and the proportion of patients making a Minimally Clinically Important Change (MCIC) in symptoms 6 weeks after commencing treatment. All three programmes resulted in significant decreases in SPADI score, however there were no significant differences between the groups. Participants making a MCIC in symptoms were similar across all groups, however more participants deteriorated in the ROM group. Dropout rate was higher in the CC group, but when only patients completing treatment were considered more patients in the CC group made a meaningful reduction in pain and disability. Open chain, closed chain and range of movement exercises all seem to be effective in bringing about short term changes in pain and disability in patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy. ISRCTN76701121. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Capacity for sliding between tendon fascicles decreases with ageing in injury prone equine tendons: a possible mechanism for age-related tendinopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, C T; Udeze, C P; Birch, H L; Clegg, P D; Screen, H Rc

    2013-01-08

    Age-related tendinopathy is common in both humans and horses; the initiation and progression of which is similar between species. The majority of tendon injuries occur to high-strain energy storing tendons, such as the human Achilles tendon and equine superficial digital flexor (SDFT). By contrast, the low-strain positional human anterior tibialis tendon and equine common digital extensor (CDET) are rarely injured. It has previously been established that greater extension occurs at the fascicular interface in the SDFT than in the CDET; this may facilitate the large strains experienced during locomotion in the SDFT without damage occurring to the fascicles. This study investigated the alterations in whole tendon, fascicle and interfascicular mechanical properties in the SDFT and CDET with increasing age. It was hypothesised that the amount of sliding at the fascicular interface in the SDFT would decrease with increasing horse age, whereas the properties of the interface in the CDET would remain unchanged with ageing. Data support the hypothesis; there were no alterations in the mechanical properties of the whole SDFT or its constituent fascicles with increasing age. However, there was significantly less sliding at the fascicular interface at physiological loads in samples from aged tendons. There was no relationship between fascicle sliding and age in the CDET. The increase in stiffness of the interfascicular matrix in aged SDFT may result in the fascicles being loaded at an earlier point in the stress strain curve, increasing the risk of damage. This may predispose aged tendons to tendinopathy.

  19. Comparing Two Exercise Programmes for the Management of Lateral Elbow Tendinopathy (Tennis Elbow/Lateral Epicondylitis—A Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Stasinopoulos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare the effectiveness of supervised exercise programme as proposed by Stasinopoulos and colleagues with home exercise programme as proposed by Pienimaki and his coworkers in the treatment of lateral elbow tendinopathy. Design: Controlled clinical trial. Setting: Physiotherapy and rehabilitation centre. Participants: This trial was carried out with 60 patients, who had lateral elbow tendinopathy. Intervention: Group A (n = 30 had received supervised exercise programme, once per day for 4 weeks. Group B (n = 30 was treated with home exercise programme four to six times daily for 8 weeks. Outcome measures: pain, using a visual analogue scale, function, using a visual analogue scale for elbow function and the pain-free grip strength. Patients were evaluated at baseline, at the end of treatment (week 12, and 3 months (week 24 after the end of treatment. Results: Both the supervised and home exercise programme were found to be significantly effective in the reduction of pain and in the improvement of functional status. The supervised exercise programme resulted in significantly different improvement in comparison to those who received home exercise programme. Conclusion: A specific supervised exercise programme is superior to a specific home exercise programme in reducing pain and improving function in patients with LET at the end of the treatment and at the 3 month follow-up. Further research is needed to confirm our results.

  20. Diagnostic value of tendon thickness and structure in the sonographic diagnosis of supraspinatus tendinopathy: room for a two-step approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arend, Carlos Frederico, E-mail: carlos_arend@hotmail.com; Arend, Ana Amalia, E-mail: ana.amalia.arend@hotmail.com; Rodrigues da Silva, Tiago, E-mail: rumoabali@hotmail.com

    2014-06-15

    Objective: The aim of our study was to systematically compare different methodologies to establish an evidence-based approach based on tendon thickness and structure for sonographic diagnosis of supraspinatus tendinopathy when compared to MRI. Methods: US was obtained from 164 symptomatic patients with supraspinatus tendinopathy detected at MRI and 42 asymptomatic controls with normal MRI. Diagnostic yield was calculated for either maximal supraspinatus tendon thickness (MSTT) and tendon structure as isolated criteria and using different combinations of parallel and sequential testing at US. Chi-squared tests were performed to assess sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of different diagnostic approaches. Results: Mean MSTT was 6.68 mm in symptomatic patients and 5.61 mm in asymptomatic controls (P < .05). When used as an isolated criterion, MSTT > 6.0 mm provided best results for accuracy (93.7%) when compared to other measurements of tendon thickness. Also as an isolated criterion, abnormal tendon structure (ATS) yielded 93.2% accuracy for diagnosis. The best overall yield was obtained by both parallel and sequential testing using either MSTT > 6.0 mm or ATS as diagnostic criteria at no particular order, which provided 99.0% accuracy, 100% sensitivity, and 95.2% specificity. Among these parallel and sequential tests that provided best overall yield, additional analysis revealed that sequential testing first evaluating tendon structure required assessment of 258 criteria (vs. 261 for sequential testing first evaluating tendon thickness and 412 for parallel testing) and demanded a mean of 16.1 s to assess diagnostic criteria and reach the diagnosis (vs. 43.3 s for sequential testing first evaluating tendon thickness and 47.4 s for parallel testing). Conclusions: We found that using either MSTT > 6.0 mm or ATS as diagnostic criteria for both parallel and sequential testing provides the best overall yield for sonographic diagnosis of supraspinatus tendinopathy when

  1. The microvascular volume of the achilles tendon is increased in patients with tendinopathy at rest and after a 1-hour treadmill run

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pingel, Jessica; Harrison, Adrian; Simonsen, Lene

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Achilles tendinopathy (AT) is initiated asymptomatically and is therefore often discovered at a very late stage. PURPOSE:To elucidate whether the microvascular volume (MV) of the Achilles tendon is elevated in patients with AT compared with healthy controls during pre-exercise rest......, after acute exercise, and 24 hours after exercise. Additionally, this study investigated the muscle activation pattern of the gastrocnemius muscle and the relative elasticity of the Achilles tendon during a 1-hour treadmill run in healthy patients and in patients with AT. STUDY DESIGN......:Controlled laboratory study. METHODS:Real-time harmonic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEU) measurements of the MV of the Achilles tendon were taken in 18 volunteers (9 patients with AT, 9 healthy controls). The CEU analyses were conducted before exercise, immediately after a 1-hour treadmill run, and 24 hours after...

  2. Tendinopatia calcárea: uma afecção local ou sistêmica? Calcifying tendinopathy: a local or a systemic condition?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benno Ejnisman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a relação existente entre os casos de tendinopatia calcárea de ombro e doenças metabólicas sintomáticas como litíase renal, biliar e gota. MÉTODO: A tendinopatia calcárea de ombro foi diagnosticada em 63 pacientes no período compreendido entre maio de 2007 e setembro de 2011. Todos os pacientes foram tratados pelo mesmo médico ortopedista e entrevistados para coleta dos seguintes dados: idade ao diagnóstico, sexo, lado acometido, lado dominante, índice de massa corpórea (IMC, tabagismo e história pregressa de litíase renal, biliar ou gota. Para análise estatística, um grupo controle de 63 pacientes com características demográficas semelhantes foi utilizado. RESULTADOS: Dos 63 pacientes que apresentavam tendinopatia calcárea do ombro, 35 (56% eram do sexo masculino. O lado direito foi afetado em 38 (60% pacientes, a média de idade foi de 48,2 anos. Trinta e um (49% pacientes apresentaram história prévia de alguma das doenças metabólicas questionadas, sendo que 20 pacientes (32% relataram litíase renal, seis (9,5% litíase biliar, quatro (6,3% gota e um (2% apresentava diagnóstico concomitante de litíase renal e gota. No grupo controle, observamos que 11 (17% pacientes apresentaram história prévia de alguma das doenças metabólicas, sendo que seis pacientes (9,5% relataram litíase renal, quatro (6,3% litíase biliar e um (1,6%, gota. CONCLUSÕES: A elevada frequência de litíase renal em pacientes diagnosticados com tendinopatia calcárea do ombro no presente estudo sugere que existam mecanismos em comum na fisiopatologia desses distúrbios. O melhor entendimento destas doenças pode possibilitar a melhoria dos seus diagnósticos e tratamentos.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relationship between cases of calcifying tendinopathy of the shoulder and symptomatic metabolic diseases such as kidney stones, gallstones and gout. METHODS: Calcifying tendinopathy of the shoulder was diagnosed in 63 patients

  3. Substance P accelerates hypercellularity and angiogenesis in tendon tissue and enhances paratendinitis in response to Achilles tendon overuse in a tendinopathy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Gustav; Backman, Ludvig J; Scott, Alexander; Lorentzon, Ronny; Forsgren, Sture; Danielson, Patrik

    2011-10-01

    Tenocytes produce substance P (SP), and its receptor (neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R)) is expressed throughout the tendon tissue, especially in patients with tendinopathy and tissue changes (tendinosis) including hypercellularity and vascular proliferation. Considering the known effects of SP, one might ask whether SP contributes to these changes. To test whether development of tendinosis-like changes (hypercellularity and angiogenesis) is accelerated during a 1-week course of exercise with local administration of SP in an established Achilles tendinopathy model. Rabbits were subjected to a protocol of Achilles tendon overuse for 1 week, in conjunction with SP injections in the paratenon. Exercised control animals received NaCl injections or no injections, and unexercised, uninjected controls were also used. Tenocyte number and vascular density, as well as paratendinous inflammation, were evaluated. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridisation to detect NK-1R were conducted. Results There was a significant increase in tenocyte number in the SP-injected and NaCl-injected groups compared with both unexercised and exercised, uninjected controls. Tendon blood vessels increased in number in the SP-injected group compared with unexercised controls, a finding not seen in NaCl-injected controls or in uninjected, exercised animals. Paratendinous inflammation was more pronounced in the SP-injected group than in the NaCl controls. NK-1R was detected in blood vessel walls, nerves, inflammatory cells and tenocytes. SP accelerated the development of tendinosis-like changes in the rabbit Achilles tendon, which supports theories of a potential role of SP in tendinosis development; a fact of clinical interest since SP effects can be effectively blocked. The angiogenic response to SP injections seems related to paratendinitis.

  4. Imbalances in the Development of Muscle and Tendon as Risk Factor for Tendinopathies in Youth Athletes: A Review of Current Evidence and Concepts of Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mersmann, Falk; Bohm, Sebastian; Arampatzis, Adamantios

    2017-01-01

    Tendons feature the crucial role to transmit the forces exerted by the muscles to the skeleton. Thus, an increase of the force generating capacity of a muscle needs to go in line with a corresponding modulation of the mechanical properties of the associated tendon to avoid potential harm to the integrity of the tendinous tissue. However, as summarized in the present narrative review, muscle and tendon differ with regard to both the time course of adaptation to mechanical loading as well as the responsiveness to certain types of mechanical stimulation. Plyometric loading, for example, seems to be a more potent stimulus for muscle compared to tendon adaptation. In growing athletes, the increased levels of circulating sex hormones might additionally augment an imbalanced development of muscle strength and tendon mechanical properties, which could potentially relate to the increasing incidence of tendon overload injuries that has been indicated for adolescence. In fact, increased tendon stress and strain due to a non-uniform musculotendinous development has been observed recently in adolescent volleyball athletes, a high-risk group for tendinopathy. These findings highlight the importance to deepen the current understanding of the interaction of loading and maturation and demonstrate the need for the development of preventive strategies. Therefore, this review concludes with an evidence-based concept for a specific loading program for increasing tendon stiffness, which could be implemented in the training regimen of young athletes at risk for tendinopathy. This program incorporates five sets of four contractions with an intensity of 85–90% of the isometric voluntary maximum and a movement/contraction duration that provides 3 s of high magnitude tendon strain. PMID:29249987

  5. A Comparison of Two Different High-Volume Image-Guided Injection Procedures for Patients With Chronic Noninsertional Achilles Tendinopathy: A Pragmatic Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Patrick C; Mahadevan, Dev; Bhatt, Raj; Bhatia, Maneesh

    2016-01-01

    We undertook a comparison evaluation of outcomes after 2 different high-volume image-guided injection (HVIGI) procedures performed under direct ultrasound guidance in patients with chronic noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy. In group A, the HVIGI involved high-volume (10 mL of 1% lidocaine combined with 40 mL of saline) and no dry needling. In group B, the HVIGI involved a smaller volume (10 mL of 1% lidocaine combined with 20 mL of saline) and dry needling of the Achilles tendon. A total of 34 patients were identified from the clinical records, with a mean overall age of 50.6 (range 26 to 83) years and an overall mean follow-up duration of 277 (range 49 to 596) days. The change between the preinjection and postinjection Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment-Achilles scores of 33.4 ± 22.5 points in group A and 6.94 ± 22.2 points in group B, was statistically significant (p = .002). In group A, 3 patients (16.7%) required surgical treatment compared with 6 patients (37.5%) in group B requiring surgical treatment (p = .180). Our results indicated that a higher volume without dry needling compared with a lower volume with dry needling resulted in greater improvement in noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy. However, confounding factors mean it is not possible to categorically state that this difference was solely due to different injection techniques. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Imbalances in the Development of Muscle and Tendon as Risk Factor for Tendinopathies in Youth Athletes: A Review of Current Evidence and Concepts of Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falk Mersmann

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Tendons feature the crucial role to transmit the forces exerted by the muscles to the skeleton. Thus, an increase of the force generating capacity of a muscle needs to go in line with a corresponding modulation of the mechanical properties of the associated tendon to avoid potential harm to the integrity of the tendinous tissue. However, as summarized in the present narrative review, muscle and tendon differ with regard to both the time course of adaptation to mechanical loading as well as the responsiveness to certain types of mechanical stimulation. Plyometric loading, for example, seems to be a more potent stimulus for muscle compared to tendon adaptation. In growing athletes, the increased levels of circulating sex hormones might additionally augment an imbalanced development of muscle strength and tendon mechanical properties, which could potentially relate to the increasing incidence of tendon overload injuries that has been indicated for adolescence. In fact, increased tendon stress and strain due to a non-uniform musculotendinous development has been observed recently in adolescent volleyball athletes, a high-risk group for tendinopathy. These findings highlight the importance to deepen the current understanding of the interaction of loading and maturation and demonstrate the need for the development of preventive strategies. Therefore, this review concludes with an evidence-based concept for a specific loading program for increasing tendon stiffness, which could be implemented in the training regimen of young athletes at risk for tendinopathy. This program incorporates five sets of four contractions with an intensity of 85–90% of the isometric voluntary maximum and a movement/contraction duration that provides 3 s of high magnitude tendon strain.

  7. Short-term outcomes of extracorporeal shock wave therapy for the treatment of chronic non-calcific tendinopathy of the supraspinatus: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galasso Olimpio

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is evidence supporting the use of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT in calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff, but the best current evidence does not support its use in non-calcifying tendinopathy. We conducted a randomized placebo-controlled trial to investigate the efficacy and safety of low energy ESWT for non-calcifying tendinopathy of the rotator cuff. Methods 20 patients with non-calcifying supraspinatus tendinopathy (NCST were randomized to an active or a sham treatment group. Physical, blood, roentgenographic, and MRI examinations of the shoulder were conducted to verify that patients met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. These examinations were repeated six and twelve weeks after treatments. Effectiveness was determined by comparison of the mean improvement in the Constant and Murley score (CMS between the treatment and the placebo groups at three months. Safety was assessed by analyzing the number and severity of adverse events. Results All the patients completed the investigation protocol. At the final follow-up, significant improvement in the total CMS score and most of the CMS subscales was observed in the ESWT group when compared to the baseline values. Significantly higher total CMS, and significantly higher scores for CMS pain and ROM were observed in the ESWT group when compared to the placebo. No serious adverse events were noted after ESWT. Conclusions Patients suffering from NCST may benefit from low energy ESWT, at least in short-term. The application protocol of ESWT is likely to play a key-role in a successful treatment. Future investigations should be undertaken on the long-term effects of this technique for the treatment of NCST. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN41236511

  8. Tendinopathy and Doppler activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, M I; Koenig, M J; Torp-Pedersen, S

    2006-01-01

    Intratendinous Doppler activity has been interpreted as an equivalent of neovessels in the Achilles tendon and as a sign of tendinosis (AT).......Intratendinous Doppler activity has been interpreted as an equivalent of neovessels in the Achilles tendon and as a sign of tendinosis (AT)....

  9. Cross-cultural adaptation of the VISA-A questionnaire, an index of clinical severity for patients with Achilles tendinopathy, with reliability, validity and structure evaluations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomeé Roland

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Achilles tendinopathy is considered to be one of the most common overuse injuries in elite and recreational athletes and the recommended treatment varies. One factor that has been stressed in the literature is the lack of standardized outcome measures that can be used in all countries. One such standardized outcome measure is the Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment – Achilles (VISA-A questionnaire, which is designed to evaluate the clinical severity for patients with Achilles tendinopathy. The purpose of this study was to cross-culturally adapt the VISA-A questionnaire to Swedish, and to perform reliability, validity and structure evaluations. Methods Cross-cultural adaptation was performed in several steps including translations, synthesis of translations, back translations, expert committee review and pre-testing. The final Swedish version, the VISA-A Swedish version (VISA-A-S was tested for reliability on healthy individuals (n = 15, and patients (n = 22. Tests for internal consistency, validity and structure were performed on 51 patients. Results The VISA-A-S had good reliability for patients (r = 0.89, ICC = 0.89 and healthy individuals (r = 0.89–0.99, ICC = 0.88–0.99. The internal consistency was 0.77 (Cronbach's alpha. The mean [95% confidence interval] VISA-A-S score in the 51 patients (50 [44–56] was significantly lower than in the healthy individuals (96 [94–99]. The VISA-A-S score correlated significantly (Spearman's r = -0.68 with another tendon grading system. Criterion validity was considered good when comparing the scores of the Swedish version with the English version in both healthy individuals and patients. The factor analysis gave the factors pain/symptoms and physical activity Conclusion The VISA-A-S questionnaire is a reliable and valid instrument and comparable to the original version. It measures two factors: pain/symptoms and physical activity, and can be used in both research and the

  10. Endogenous substance P production in the Achilles tendon increases with loading in an in vivo model of tendinopathy-peptidergic elevation preceding tendinosis-like tissue changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backman, L J; Andersson, G; Wennstig, G; Forsgren, S; Danielson, P

    2011-06-01

    To quantify the intratendinous levels of substance P (SP) at different stages of overload in an established model for Achilles tendinopathy (rabbit). Also, to study the distribution of the SP-receptor, the NK-1R, and the source of SP, in the tendon. Animals were subjected to the overuse protocol for 1, 3 or 6 weeks. One additional group served as unexercised controls. Immunoassay (EIA), immunohistochemistry (IHC), and in situ hybridisation (ISH) were performed. EIA revealed increased SP-levels in the Achilles tendon of the exercised limb in all the experimental groups as compared to in the controls (statistically significant; p=0.01). A similar trend in the unexercised Achilles tendon was observed but was not statistically significant (p=0.14). IHC and in ISH illustrated reactions of both SP and NK-1R mainly in blood vessel walls, but the receptor was also found on tenocytes. Achilles tendon SP-levels are elevated already after 1 week of loading. This shows that increased SP-production precedes tendinosis, as tendinosis-like changes occur only after a minimum of 3 weeks of exercise, as shown in a recent study using this model. We propose that central neuronal mechanism may be involved as similar trends were observed in the contralateral Achilles tendon.

  11. Treatment of proximal hamstring tendinopathy-related sciatic nerve entrapment: presentation of an ultrasound-guided “Intratissue Percutaneous Electrolysis” application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattiussi, Gabriele; Moreno, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Proximal Hamstring Tendinopathy-related Sciatic Nerve Entrapment (PHTrSNE) is a neuropathy caused by fibrosis interposed between the semimembranosus tendon and the sciatic nerve, at the level of the ischial tuberosity. Methods Ultrasound-guided Intratissue Percutaneous Electrolysis (US-guided EPI) involves galvanic current transfer within the treatment target tissue (fibrosis) via a needle 0.30 to 0.33 mm in diameter. The galvanic current in a saline solution instantly develops the chemical process of electrolysis, which in turn induces electrochemical ablation of fibrosis. In this article, the interventional procedure is presented in detail, and both the strengths and limits of the technique are discussed. Results US-guided EPI eliminates the fibrotic accumulation that causes PHTrSNE, without the semimembranosus tendon or the sciatic nerve being directly involved during the procedure. The technique is however of limited use in cases of compression neuropathy. Conclusion US-guided EPI is a technique that is quick to perform, minimally invasive and does not force the patient to suspend their activities (work or sports) to make the treatment effective. This, coupled to the fact that the technique is generally well-tolerated by patients, supports use of US-guided EPI in the treatment of PHTrSNE. PMID:27900300

  12. A systematic review with procedural assessments and meta-analysis of Low Level Laser Therapy in lateral elbow tendinopathy (tennis elbow

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    Couppe Christian

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent reviews have indicated that low level level laser therapy (LLLT is ineffective in lateral elbow tendinopathy (LET without assessing validity of treatment procedures and doses or the influence of prior steroid injections. Methods Systematic review with meta-analysis, with primary outcome measures of pain relief and/or global improvement and subgroup analyses of methodological quality, wavelengths and treatment procedures. Results 18 randomised placebo-controlled trials (RCTs were identified with 13 RCTs (730 patients meeting the criteria for meta-analysis. 12 RCTs satisfied half or more of the methodological criteria. Publication bias was detected by Egger's graphical test, which showed a negative direction of bias. Ten of the trials included patients with poor prognosis caused by failed steroid injections or other treatment failures, or long symptom duration or severe baseline pain. The weighted mean difference (WMD for pain relief was 10.2 mm [95% CI: 3.0 to 17.5] and the RR for global improvement was 1.36 [1.16 to 1.60]. Trials which targeted acupuncture points reported negative results, as did trials with wavelengths 820, 830 and 1064 nm. In a subgroup of five trials with 904 nm lasers and one trial with 632 nm wavelength where the lateral elbow tendon insertions were directly irradiated, WMD for pain relief was 17.2 mm [95% CI: 8.5 to 25.9] and 14.0 mm [95% CI: 7.4 to 20.6] respectively, while RR for global pain improvement was only reported for 904 nm at 1.53 [95% CI: 1.28 to 1.83]. LLLT doses in this subgroup ranged between 0.5 and 7.2 Joules. Secondary outcome measures of painfree grip strength, pain pressure threshold, sick leave and follow-up data from 3 to 8 weeks after the end of treatment, showed consistently significant results in favour of the same LLLT subgroup (p Conclusion LLLT administered with optimal doses of 904 nm and possibly 632 nm wavelengths directly to the lateral elbow tendon insertions

  13. The Use of Dehydrated Human Amnion/Chorion Membrane Allograft Injection for the Treatment of Tendinopathy or Arthritis: A Case Series Involving 40 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellhorn, Alfred C; Han, Alex

    2017-12-01

    Degenerative joint and tendon injuries remain difficult to treat, with few effective conservative treatment options available. Regenerative approaches aim to promote the inherent healing capacity of injured tissues. Micronized dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane (dHACM) injection is an emerging regenerative option with promising preclinical results. To test the clinical effectiveness of dHACM injection in patients with chronic tendinopathy and arthropathy. Case series. Academic medical center outpatient sports medicine clinic. A total of 40 patients with chronic tendinosis or arthropathy who received dHACM over a period of 9 months. A structured interview was administered to patients by telephone to supplement the clinical information available in the medical chart. All patients received an ultrasound-guided injection of dHACM. The primary outcome was change in pain level, and the secondary outcome was change in activities of daily living (ADLs) and sports/recreation function. More than 30% improvement in average pain and function was considered a successful outcome. Patient pain and function were measured at 1, 2, and 3 months after the procedure. Patient-reported average pain scores decreased from a baseline value of 6.4 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 5.7-7.0) to 2.7 (95% CI = 2.1-3.3; P success, defined as 30% or greater improvement in pain levels, was 68% at 1 month, 82% at 2 months, and 91% at 3 months. Patient-reported functional impairment in ADLs decreased from 6.8 (95% CI = 6.0-7.5) to 2.0 (95% CI = 1.4-2.7) (P sports/recreation decreased from 8.5 (95% CI = 7.9-9.1) to 3.2 (95% CI = 2.6-3.9) (P < .001). Frequency of pain medication use decreased from 29 of 40 patients (72.5%) before the procedure to 9 of 40 patients (22.5%) at final follow up (P < .001). Localized pain at the injection site was common, but no other adverse events or side effects were reported. In the setting of tendinosis or arthropathy, dHACM injection was clinically effective in

  14. STRENGTH EXERCISES COMBINED WITH DRY NEEDLING WITH ELECTRICAL STIMULATION IMPROVE PAIN AND FUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC ROTATOR CUFF TENDINOPATHY: A RETROSPECTIVE CASE SERIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background and Purpose Rotator cuff tendinopathy (RTCT) is regularly treated by the physical therapist. Multiple etiologies for RTCT exist, leading an individual to seek treatment from their provider of choice. Strengthening exercises (SE) have been reported to be effective in the treatment of RTCT, but there is limited evidence on the effectiveness of dry needing (DN) for this condition. The purpose of this retrospective case series was to investigate DN to various non-trigger point-based anatomical locations coupled with strengthening exercises (SE) as a treatment strategy to decrease pain and increase function in healthy patients with chronic RTC pathology. Case Descriptions Eight patients with RTCT were treated 1-2 times per week for up to eight weeks, and no more than sixteen total treatment sessions of SE and DN. Outcomes were tested at baseline and upon completion of therapy. A long-term outcome measure follow up averaging 8.75 months (range 3 to 20 months) was also performed. The outcome measures included the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and the Quick Dash (QD). Outcomes Clinically meaningful improvements in disability and pain in the short term and upon long-term follow up were demonstrated for each patient. The mean VAS was broken down into best (VASB), current (VASC), and worst (VASW) rated pain levels and the mean was calculated for the eight patients. The mean VASB improved from 22.5 mm at the initial assessment to 2.36 mm upon completion of the intervention duration. The mean VASC improved from 28.36 mm to 5.0 mm, and the mean VASW improved from 68.88 mm to 13.25 mm. At the long-term follow up (average 8.75 months), The mean VASB, VASC, and VASW scores were 0.36 mm, 4.88 mm, and 17.88 mm respectively. The QDmean for the eight patients improved from 43.09 at baseline to 16.04 at the completion of treatment. At long-term follow-up, the QDmean was 6.59. Conclusion Clinically meaningful improvements in pain and disability were

  15. STRENGTH EXERCISES COMBINED WITH DRY NEEDLING WITH ELECTRICAL STIMULATION IMPROVE PAIN AND FUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC ROTATOR CUFF TENDINOPATHY: A RETROSPECTIVE CASE SERIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saylor-Pavkovich, Estee

    2016-06-01

    Rotator cuff tendinopathy (RTCT) is regularly treated by the physical therapist. Multiple etiologies for RTCT exist, leading an individual to seek treatment from their provider of choice. Strengthening exercises (SE) have been reported to be effective in the treatment of RTCT, but there is limited evidence on the effectiveness of dry needing (DN) for this condition. The purpose of this retrospective case series was to investigate DN to various non-trigger point-based anatomical locations coupled with strengthening exercises (SE) as a treatment strategy to decrease pain and increase function in healthy patients with chronic RTC pathology. Eight patients with RTCT were treated 1-2 times per week for up to eight weeks, and no more than sixteen total treatment sessions of SE and DN. Outcomes were tested at baseline and upon completion of therapy. A long-term outcome measure follow up averaging 8.75 months (range 3 to 20 months) was also performed. The outcome measures included the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and the Quick Dash (QD). Clinically meaningful improvements in disability and pain in the short term and upon long-term follow up were demonstrated for each patient. The mean VAS was broken down into best (VAS(B)), current (VAS(C)), and worst (VAS(W)) rated pain levels and the mean was calculated for the eight patients. The mean VAS(B) improved from 22.5 mm at the initial assessment to 2.36 mm upon completion of the intervention duration. The mean VASC improved from 28.36 mm to 5.0 mm, and the mean VAS(W) improved from 68.88 mm to 13.25 mm. At the long-term follow up (average 8.75 months), The mean VAS(B), VAS(C), and VAS(W) scores were 0.36 mm, 4.88 mm, and 17.88 mm respectively. The QD(mean) for the eight patients improved from 43.09 at baseline to 16.04 at the completion of treatment. At long-term follow-up, the QD(mean) was 6.59. Clinically meaningful improvements in pain and disability were noted with the intervention protocol. All subjects

  16. Changes in morphological and elastic properties of patellar tendon in athletes with unilateral patellar tendinopathy and their relationships with pain and functional disability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Jie Zhang

    Full Text Available Patellar tendinopathy (PT is one of the most common knee disorders among athletes. Changes in morphology and elasticity of the painful tendon and how these relate to the self-perceived pain and dysfunction remain unclear.To compare the morphology and elastic properties of patellar tendons between athlete with and without unilateral PT and to examine its association with self-perceived pain and dysfunction.In this cross-sectional study, 33 male athletes (20 healthy and 13 with unilateral PT were enrolled. The morphology and elastic properties of the patellar tendon were assessed by the grey and elastography mode of supersonic shear imaging (SSI technique while the intensity of pressure pain, self-perceived pain and dysfunction were quantified with a 10-lb force to the most painful site and the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-patella (VISA-P questionnaire, respectively.In athletes with unilateral PT, the painful tendons had higher shear elastic modulus (SEM and larger tendon than the non-painful side (p<0.05 or the dominant side of the healthy athletes (p<0.05. Significant correlations were found between tendon SEM ratio (SEM of painful over non-painful tendon and the intensity of pressure pain (rho  = 0.62; p = 0.024, VISA-P scores (rho  = -0.61; p = 0.026, and the sub-scores of the VISA-P scores on going down stairs, lunge, single leg hopping and squatting (rho ranged from -0.63 to -0.67; p<0.05.Athletes with unilateral PT had stiffer and larger tendon on the painful side than the non-painful side and the dominant side of healthy athletes. No significant differences on the patellar tendon morphology and elastic properties were detected between the dominant and non-dominant knees of the healthy control. The ratio of the SEM of painful to non-painful sides was associated with pain and dysfunction among athletes with unilateral PT.

  17. Avaliação da altura patelar em atletas com tendinopatia crônica do aparelho extensor do joelho Evaluation of the patellar height in athletes with diagnosed with chronic tendinopathy of the knee extensor mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emerson Garms

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar radiograficamente a altura patelar de atletas com diagnóstico de tendinopatia crônica do aparelho extensor do joelho (TCAE. MÉTODOS: Na amostra foram avaliados radiograficamente 65 pacientes (110 joelhos com idade entre 15 e 40 anos e de diferentes modalidades esportivas com e sem diagnóstico de tendinopatia crônica do aparelho extensor do joelho (jumper's knee. Os atletas foram divididos em dois grupos: aqueles com diagnóstico de TCAE (grupo 1: 38 atletas - 56 joelhos e um grupo que denominamos de controle (grupo 2: 27 atletas - 54 joelhos. RESULTADOS: No grupo 1 tivemos 18 atletas que apresentavam a doença bilateralmente na ocasião dos exames. Para a medida da altura patelar utilizamos os índices radiográficos de Insall e Salvati e Blackburne e Peel. CONCLUSÃO: A presença de patela alta no grupo de atletas com tendinopatia crônica do aparelho extensor do joelho foi significante maior do que a observada no grupo controle.OBJECTIVES: To carry out a radiographic evaluation of patellar height in athletes diagnosed with chronic tendinopathy of the knee extensor mechanism; METHODS: Radiographic assessments were carried out on 65 patients (110 knees aged between 15 and 40 years, who practiced different kinds of sports, some with of chronic tendinopathy of the knee extensor mechanism (jumper's knee and others without. The athletes were divided into two groups: those with diagnosed "jumper's knee" (group 1:38 athletes - 56 knees and a control group (group 2:27 athletes - 54 knees. In group 1, 18 of the athletes presented the condition in both knees on examination. The height of the patella was measured using the Insall-Salvati and Blackburne-Peel x-ray methods. CONCLUSION: The presence of a high patella in the group of athletes with chronic tendinopathy of the knee extensor mechanism was significantly higher than in the control group.

  18. A comparison of isometric, isotonic concentric and isotonic eccentric exercises in the physiotherapy management of subacromial pain syndrome/rotator cuff tendinopathy: study protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsella, Rita; Cowan, Sallie M; Watson, Lyn; Pizzari, Tania

    2017-01-01

    Subacromial pain syndrome (SPS) involving rotator cuff tendinopathy is a common cause of shoulder pain and disability. Evidence suggests that structured physiotherapy may be as effective as surgery in this condition with significant improvements demonstrated in trials involving scapular retraining, rotator cuff strengthening and flexibility exercises. Most published programs typically utilise isotonic concentric and/or eccentric strengthening modes. Recently, immediate analgesic effects and muscle strength gains following heavy-load isometric exercises in lower limb tendinopathy conditions have been observed. It is pertinent to ascertain whether such outcomes can be replicated in SPS/rotator cuff tendinopathy. The primary aim of this study is to establish the feasibility of undertaking a full-scale randomised controlled trial (RCT) that compares the effects of isometric, isotonic concentric and isotonic eccentric rotator cuff contractions when used as part of a semi-standardised exercise-based physiotherapy program in patients diagnosed with SPS. The secondary aim is to explore potential trends or treatment effects of the exercise intervention. Thirty-six participants diagnosed with SPS will be randomised to one of three intervention groups and undergo a one-on-one exercise-based physiotherapy intervention, involving scapular and rotator cuff muscle retraining and strengthening. Each group will utilise a different mode of rotator cuff strengthening-isometric, isotonic concentric or isotonic eccentric. Rotator cuff tendon responses to isometric loading are not yet established in the literature; hence, individualised, progressive loading will be used in this pilot study in accordance with symptoms. The intervention will involve two phases: during Phase 1 (weeks 1-6) participants undertake the active group-specific physiotherapy treatment; in Phase 2 (weeks 6-12), they undertake a progressive, but no longer group-specific exercise program. To determine feasibility, an

  19. A influência da mobilização articular nas tendinopatias dos músculos bíceps braquial e supra-espinal The influence of joint mobilization on tendinopathy of the biceps brachii and supraspinatus muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RI Barbosa

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available As causas mais comuns de dor no ombro estão relacionadas às degenerações dos tendões da musculatura do manguito rotador. OBJETIVO: Verificar a influência da mobilização articular por meio dos movimentos acessórios do ombro na recuperação inicial de 14 pacientes com tendinopatia crônica dos mm. supra-espinal e/ou bíceps braquial. MÉTODOS: Foram comparados dois protocolos de tratamento, compostos da aplicação de ultra-som terapêutico na área do tendão afetado e de treinamento excêntrico na musculatura envolvida, acompanhados ou não de manobras de mobilização articular. Como métodos de avaliação foram utilizados os questionários de Constant e Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH, no início e ao final do tratamento. RESULTADOS: Os resultados encontrados demonstraram que ambos os protocolos de tratamento foram eficazes na reabilitação dos pacientes, pois se obtiveram melhores resultados funcionais na aplicação dos questionários quando comparados o final com o início do tratamento para os pacientes (pThe most common causes of shoulder pain are related to degeneration of the tendons of the rotator cuff muscles. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of joint mobilization by means of accessory movements of the shoulder during the early rehabilitation of 14 patients with chronic tendinopathy of the supraspinatus and/or biceps brachii muscles. METHODS: Two treatment protocols were compared: application of therapeutic ultrasound over the affected tendon area and eccentric training of the musculature involved, with or without joint mobilization maneuvers. The Constant and DASH (Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaires were used as the assessment method, before and after the treatment. RESULTS: The results showed that both treatment protocols were effective for patient rehabilitation, since better functional results were obtained at the end of the treatment, in comparison with the beginning (p<0

  20. Growth factor-based therapies provide additional benefit beyond physical therapy in resistant elbow tendinopathy: a prospective, single-blind, randomised trial of autologous blood injections versus platelet-rich plasma injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creaney, Leon; Wallace, Andrew; Curtis, Mark; Connell, David

    2011-09-01

    Growth factor technologies are increasingly used to enhance healing in musculoskeletal injuries, particularly in sports medicine. Two such products; platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and autologous blood, have a growing body of supporting evidence. No previous trial has directly compared the efficacy of these two methods. Growth factor administration improves tissue regeneration in patients who have failed to respond to conservative therapy. A prospective, double-blind, randomised trial. Elbow tendinopathy patients who had failed conservative physical therapy were divided into two patient groups: PRP injection (N=80) and autologous blood injection (ABI) (N=70). Each patient received two injections at 0 and 1 month. Patient-related tennis elbow evaluation (PRTEE) was recorded by a blinded investigator at 0, 1, 3 and 6 months. The main outcome measure was PRTEE, a validated composite outcome for pain, activities of daily living and physical function, utilising a 0-100 scale. At 6 months the authors observed a 66% success rate in the PRP group versus 72% in the ABI group, p=NS. There was a higher rate of conversion to surgery in the ABI group (20%) versus the PRP group (10%). In patients who are resistant to first-line physical therapy such as eccentric loading, ABI or PRP injections are useful second-line therapies to improve clinical outcomes. In this study, up to seven out of 10 additional patients in this difficult to treat cohort benefit from a surgery-sparing intervention.

  1. Effects of kinesiotaping added to a rehabilitation programme for patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy: protocol for a single-blind, randomised controlled trial addressing symptoms, functional limitations and underlying deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Fábio Carlos Lucas; de Fontenay, Benoît Pairot; Bouyer, Laurent Julien; Desmeules, François; Roy, Jean-Sébastien

    2017-09-24

    Rotator cuff tendinopathy (RCTe) is the most frequent cause of shoulder pain, resulting in considerable losses to society and public resources. Muscle imbalance and inadequate sensorimotor control are deficits often associated with RCTe. Kinesiotaping (KT) is widely used by clinicians for rehabilitation of RCTe. While previous studies have examined the immediate effects of KT on shoulder injuries or the effects of KT as an isolated method of treatment, no published study has addressed its mid-term and long-term effects when combined with a rehabilitation programme for patients with RCTe. The primary objective of this randomised controlled trial (RCT) will be to assess the efficacy of therapeutic KT, added to a rehabilitation programme, in reducing pain and disabilities in individuals with RCTe. Secondary objectives will look at the effects of KT on the underlying factors involved in shoulder control, such as muscular activity, acromiohumeral distance (AHD) and range of motion (ROM). A single-blind RCT will be conducted. Fifty-two participants, randomly allocated to one of two groups (KT or no-KT), will take part in a 6-week rehabilitation programme. The KT group will receive KT added to the rehabilitation programme, whereas the no-KT group will receive only the rehabilitation programme. Measurements will be taken at baseline, week 3, week 6, week 12 and 6 months. Primary outcomes will be symptoms and functional limitations assessed by the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire. Secondary outcomes will include shoulder ROM, AHD at rest and at 60° of abduction, and muscle activation during arm elevation. The added effects of KT will be assessed through a two-way analysis of variance for repeated measures. Ethics approval was obtained from the Ethics Committee of Quebec Rehabilitation Institute of the Centre Integrated University Health and Social Services. Results will be disseminated through international publications in peer-reviewed journals

  2. Imaging of rectus femoris proximal tendinopathies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesquer, Lionel; Poussange, Nicolas; Meyer, Philippe; Dallaudiere, Benjamin; Feldis, Matthieu [Clinique du Sport de Bordeaux, Centre d' Imagerie Osteo-articulaire, Merignac (France); Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand [Groupe Ramsay Generale de Sante - Hopital Prive Jean Mermoz, Centre Orthopedique Santy, Lyon (France); Graveleau, Nicolas [Clinique du Sport de Bordeaux, Centre de Chirurgie Orthopedique et Sportive, Merignac (France)

    2016-07-15

    The rectus femoris is the most commonly injured muscle of the anterior thigh among athletes, especially soccer players. Although the injury pattern of the muscle belly is well documented, less is known about the anatomy and specific lesions of the proximal tendons. For each head, three distinctive patterns may be encountered according to the location of the injury, which can be at the enthesis, within the tendon, or at the musculotendinous junction. In children, injuries correspond most commonly to avulsion of the anteroinferior iliac spine from the direct head and can lead to subspine impingement. Calcific tendinitis and traumatic tears may be encountered in adults. Recent studies have shown that traumatic injuries of the indirect head may be underdiagnosed and that injuries of both heads may have a surgical issue. Finally, in the case of tears, functional outcome and treatment may vary if the rupture involves one or both tendons and if the tear is partial or complete. Thus, it is mandatory for the radiologist to know the different ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) patterns of these lesions in order to provide accurate diagnosis and treatment. The purpose of this article is to recall the anatomy of the two heads of rectus femoris, describe a reliable method of assessment with ultrasound and MRI and know the main injury patterns, through our own experience and literature review. (orig.)

  3. Treating patellar tendinopathy with Fascial Manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrelli, Alessandro; Stecco, Carla; Day, Julie Ann

    2009-01-01

    According to Fascial Manipulation theory, patellar tendon pain is often due to uncoordinated quadriceps contraction caused by anomalous fascial tension in the thigh. Therefore, the focus of treatment is not the patellar tendon itself, but involves localizing the cause of this incoordination, considered to be within the muscular fascia of the thigh region. Eighteen patients suffering from patellar tendon pain were treated with the Fascial Manipulation technique. Pain was assessed (in VAS) before (VAS 67.8/100) and after (VAS 26.5/100) treatment, plus a follow-up evaluation at 1 month (VAS 17.2/100). Results showed a substantial decrease in pain immediately after treatment (p<0.0001) and remained unchanged or improved in the short term. The results show that the patellar tendon may be only the zone of perceived pain and that interesting results can be obtained by treating the muscular fascia of the quadriceps muscle, whose alteration may cause motor incoordination and subsequent pathology.

  4. Patellar tendinopathy - recent developments toward treatment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Christian, Robert A; Rossy, William H; Sherman, Orrin H

    2014-01-01

    .... Due to its common refractory response to conservative treatment, a variety of new treatments have emerged recently that include dry-needling, sclerosing injections, platelet-rich plasma therapy...

  5. Eccentric exercise in treatment of Achilles tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, J; Larsen, C C; Bieler, T

    2007-01-01

    Prognosis and treatment of Achilles tendon pain (achillodynia) has been insufficiently studied. The purpose of the present study was to examine the long-term effect of eccentric exercises compared with stretching exercises on patients with achillodynia....

  6. Ultrasonography as a prognostic and objective parameter in Achilles tendinopathy:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakkegaard, Mads; Johannsen, Finn E; Højgaard, Betina

    2015-01-01

    eccentric exercises of the calf muscles and if needed supplemented with corticosteroid injections. The patients were examined clinically and by US (tendon thickness, hyper- and hypoechogenicity, calcification, bursitis, calcaneusspure, tenosynovitis, gray scale and color Doppler focusing on increased flow...

  7. Risk Factors for Lower Extremity Tendinopathies in Military Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-27

    placed on strenuous and continuous physical training , as well as the demands of deployment. The military is an ideal population to study...Injuries among Recreational Cyclists . International journal of sports medicine [Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov’t]. 1995 Apr;16(3):201-6. 20. Wearing

  8. Eccentric or Concentric Exercises for the Treatment of Tendinopathies?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couppé, Christian; Svensson, René B; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare

    2015-01-01

    with respect to parameters like load magnitude, speed of movement, and recovery period between exercise sessions. Future studies should control for these loading parameters, evaluate various exercise dosages, and also think beyond isolated eccentric exercises to arrive at firm recommendations regarding...... evidence that demonstrate that isolated eccentric loading exercises improve the clinical outcome more than other loading therapies. However, the great variation and sometimes insufficient reporting of details of treatment protocols hamper the interpretation of what may be the optimal exercise regime...

  9. Tendon Cell Behavior and Matrix Remodeling in Degenerative Tendinopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. de Mos (Marieke)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractTendon injuries are common in human athletes [1-4]. Furthermore, such injuries are also prevalent in the ageing sedentary population [5-7]. In recent decades, the incidence of tendon injuries has risen due to both an increase in an elderly population and a rise in participation

  10. Corticosteroid injections, eccentric decline squat training and heavy slow resistance training in patellar tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsgaard, M.; Kovanen, V.; Aagaard, P.

    2009-01-01

    patients were randomized to CORT, ECC or HSR for 12 weeks. We assessed function and symptoms (VISA-p questionnaire), tendon pain during activity (VAS), treatment satisfaction, tendon swelling, tendon vascularization, tendon mechanical properties and collagen crosslink properties. Assessments were made at 0...... weeks, 12 weeks and at follow-up (half-year). All groups improved in VISA-p and VAS from 0 to 12 weeks (P tendon swelling decreased (-13 +/- 9% and -12 +/- 13%, P ....05) and so did vascularization (-52 +/- 49% and -45 +/- 23%, P Tendon mechanical properties were similar in healthy and injured tendons and were unaffected by treatment. HSR yielded an elevated collagen network turnover. At the half-year follow-up, treatment satisfaction differed between...

  11. A Rare Case of Deep Digital Flexor Tendinopathy following Centesis of the Navicular Bursa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froydenlund, Tim J.; Meehan, Lucinda J.; Morrison, Linda R.; Labens, Raphael

    2017-01-01

    Navicular bursa (NB) centesis is a common diagnostic and therapeutic procedure in equine practice. This case report documents the clinical, diagnostic imaging and histological findings in a horse with a suspected iatrogenic deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT) injury following centesis of the NB via a modified distal plantar approach (placement of two needles in a weight bearing position). Although it cannot be proven with absolute certainty, the authors believe that this is the first reported case where NB centesis is the likely cause of a DDFT lesion, and with magnetic resonance imaging performed both pre- and post-centesis. With this potential, though rare, complication of the procedure, alternative tendon sparing injection techniques should be considered prior to NB centesis in certain cases. PMID:29085826

  12. REHABILITATATION FOR EXTENSOR HALLUCIS LONGUS AND EXTENSOR DIGITORUM LONGUS TENDINOPATHY – AN EXERCISE PACKAGE

    OpenAIRE

    Oskar, Sten

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to create an exercise package containing research proven evidence based exercises for Extensor Hallucis Longus and Extensor Digitorum Longus muscles for strengthening purposes. The exercise package consists of eccen-tric exercises that have been proven to be beneficial in treating tendon problems. The exercise package will be provided to be implemented by the players and coaches of the co-operating bandy team. The thesis was done in collaboration with Pori N...

  13. [Conservative treatment of tendinopathies of upper limbs in occupational health: a literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorio, Francesco; Garzonio, Fabiola; Vercelli, Stefano; Bravini, Elisabetta; Ruella, Carolina; Maglio, Roberto; Cisari, Carlo; Ferriero, Giorgio

    2016-03-24

    In the last few years, the incidence of upper limbs tendon injuries has seen a dramatic increase among workers. Conservative treatment is the first choice to relieve symptoms, allowing a safe return to work. However, the scientific evidence of its  efficacy is widely debated. Research and literature review on the efficacy of conservative treatment of upper limbs tendon injuries in occupational settings. A total of 271 references were found on Medline and Embase up to May 2015. 116 papers were excluded, 155 articles were included and the full text read. After a timely diagnosis, a prompt start of the rehabilitation programme and a limitation of complete rest are useful to relieve pain, increase functionality and reduce work absenteeism in the long term. Conservative treatment combinations, such as manual therapy, specific exercises focused on increasing flexibility and muscle strength and specific-gesture training, achieves more significant results than a single isolated treatments. Currently, there is no strong scientific evidence to support prolotherapy and Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP). However, current promising results will encourage further studies. Awareness among both employers and employees about prevention and risk factors should be enhanced.

  14. Lipids, adiposity and tendinopathy : is there a mechanistic link? Critical review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scott, Alex; Zwerver, Johannes; Grewal, Navi; de Sa, Agnetha; Alktebi, Thuraya; Granville, David J.; Hart, David A.

    Being overweight or obese is associated with an elevated risk of tendon pathology. However, for sportspeople the epidemiological data linking weight or adiposity on one hand, and risk of tendon pathology on the other, are less consistent. Indeed, the mechanistic links between diet, adiposity and

  15. Ultrasound-Guided Injection Therapy of Achilles Tendinopathy With Platelet-Rich Plasma or Saline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Thøger P; Ellingsen, Torkell; Christensen, Robin

    2016-01-01

    controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. METHODS: A total of 24 patients with chronic AT (median disease duration, 33 months) were randomized (1:1) to receive either a blinded injection of PRP (n = 12) or saline (n = 12). The primary endpoint was improvement in Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment...

  16. Clinical commentary of the evolution of the treatment for chronic painful mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håkan Alfredson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe chronic painful Achilles tendon mid-portion was for many years, and still is in many countries, treated with intratendinous revision surgery. However, by coincidence, painful eccentric calf muscle training was tried, and it showed very good clinical results. This finding was unexpected and led to research into the pain mechanisms involved in this condition. Today we know that there are very few nerves inside, but multiple nerves outside, the ventral side of the chronic painful Achilles tendon mid-portion. These research findings have resulted in new treatment methods targeting the regions with nerves outside the tendon, methods that allow for a rapid rehabilitation and fast return to sports.

  17. Treatment of Tendinopathy: What Works, What Does Not, and What is on the Horizon

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andres, Brett M; Murrell, George A. C

    2008-01-01

    .... We evaluated the effectiveness of NSAIDS, corticosteroid injections, exercise-based physical therapy, physical therapy modalities, shock wave therapy, sclerotherapy, nitric oxide patches, surgery...

  18. Achilles tendinopathy and partial tear diagnosis using dual-energy computed tomography collagen material decomposition application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallinson, Paul I; Stevens, Chris; Reisinger, Clemens; Nicolaou, Savvas; Munk, Peter L; Ouellette, Hugue

    2013-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) scans of the ankle and foot are frequently obtained with in-patients with hind foot and ankle pain to identify fractures, arthritis, and bone lesions. Soft tissue detail is limited, however. Dual-energy CT provides additional information on soft tissue structures, including tendons, with no additional radiation dose to the patient. We present a case of an Achilles tendon tear visualized on DECT, which was subsequently confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging.

  19. MRI of the Achilles tendon: A comprehensive review of the anatomy, biomechanics, and imaging of overuse tendinopathies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierre-Jerome, Claude; Moncayo, Valeria; Terk, Michael R. (Dept. of Radiology, Emory Univ. Orthopedics and Spine Center, Atlanta, GA (United States)), e-mail: cpierr3@emory.edu

    2010-05-15

    The Achilles tendon is the largest tendon in the body; it plays an important role in the biomechanics of the lower extremity. It can withstand great forces, especially during sporting exercises and pivoting. The pathologies related to the Achilles tendon are diverse and many carry undesirable consequences. We retrospectively analyzed the images of patients who underwent examinations of the ankle/foot region to review the anatomy of the Achilles tendon and its surroundings and to search for pathologies consistent with overuse injuries. The anatomy of the tendon is described from origin to insertion. The imaging characteristics of the Achilles tendon including pitfalls are reviewed. We also describe the Achilles overuse injuries: paratenonitis, tendinosis, tendon tear, atypical tear, tendon re-tear, retrocalcaneal bursitis, retro-Achilles bursitis, Haglund's deformity, and tendon calcification. We present other entities like tendon ossification and failed transplanted Achilles tendon, with emphasis on MRI

  20. Tendinopathy of the long head of the biceps tendon: histopathologic analysis of the extra-articular biceps tendon and tenosynovium

    OpenAIRE

    Streit JJ; Shishani Y; Rodgers M; Gobezie R

    2015-01-01

    Jonathan J Streit,1 Yousef Shishani,1 Mark Rodgers,2 Reuben Gobezie1 1The Cleveland Shoulder Institute, 2Department of Pathology, University Hospitals of Cleveland, Cleveland, OH, USA Background: Bicipital tendinitis is a common cause of anterior shoulder pain, but there is no evidence that acute inflammation of the extra-articular long head of the biceps (LHB) tendon is the root cause of this condition. We evaluated the histologic findings of the extra-articular portion of the LHB tendon an...

  1. Confirmatory factor analysis of VISA-P scale and measurement invariance across sexes in athletes with patellar tendinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Hernandez-Sanchez

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: The 1-factor model of the Spanish version of the VISA-P scale (VISA-P-Sp in which errors for Items 7 and 8 were correlated demonstrated relative fit in CFA. Scores obtained via VISA-P-Sp can be compared between men and women without sexes bias. Further studies should examine the VISA-P scale and other single-score patient-reported outcome measures concurrently.

  2. Retrospective study of sonographic findings in bone involvement associated with rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy: preliminary results of a case series

    OpenAIRE

    Marcello H. Nogueira-Barbosa; Gregio-Junior, Everaldo; Lorenzato, Mario Muller

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The present study was aimed at investigating bone involvement secondary to rotator cuff calcific tendonitis at ultrasonography. Materials and Methods: Retrospective study of a case series. The authors reviewed shoulder ultrasonography reports of 141 patients diagnosed with rotator cuff calcific tendonitis, collected from the computer-based data records of their institution over a four-year period. Imaging findings were retrospectively and consensually analyzed by two exp...

  3. Low-Level Laser Therapy and Cryotherapy as Mono- and Adjunctive Therapies for Achilles Tendinopathy in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslerud, Sturla; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Alvaro Brandão; Frigo, Lúcio; Bjordal, Jan Magnus; Marcos, Rodrigo Labat; Naterstad, Ingvill Fjell; Magnussen, Liv Heide; Joensen, Jon

    2017-01-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) and cryotherapy are widely used treatments in the acute phase of tendon injury. The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction of these two treatments on tendon inflammation and mechanical properties. Six groups of six Wistar rats were used in this study. The Achilles tendons of the healthy control group were not subjected to injury or treatment. The tendons of the injured nontreated group (ING) were injured, but not treated. The remaining four groups were injured and subjected to LLLT, cryotherapy, LLLT first/cryotherapy, or cryotherapy first/LLLT. All treatments were performed at 1 h post-trauma. Inflammatory mediators, tendon histology, and biomechanical properties were assessed at 24 h post-trauma by comparing the treatment groups with the ING. In all treatment groups, the inflammatory process shifted in an anti-inflammatory direction compared with the ING. Significant alterations in cytokine expression were found in only the LLLT group (↓IL-1β) and the combined intervention groups (↓IL-1β, ↓TNF-α, ↑IL-6). It was also found that cryotherapy followed by LLLT was the only treatment that significantly (p cryotherapy in combination with LLLT can produce an anti-inflammatory "add-on" effect. The order of therapy administration seems essential, as superior histology and biomechanical results were found in the cryotherapy first/LLLT group.

  4. A mouse model offers novel insights into the myopathy and tendinopathy often associated with pseudoachondroplasia and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piróg, Katarzyna A; Jaka, Oihane; Katakura, Yoshihisa; Meadows, Roger S; Kadler, Karl E; Boot-Handford, Raymond P; Briggs, Michael D

    2010-01-01

    Pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) are relatively common skeletal dysplasias belonging to the same bone dysplasia family. PSACH is characterized by generalized epi-metaphyseal dysplasia, short-limbed dwarfism, joint laxity and early onset osteoarthritis. MED is a milder disease with radiographic features often restricted to the epiphyses of the long bones. PSACH and some forms of MED result from mutations in cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), a pentameric glycoprotein found in cartilage, tendon, ligament and muscle. PSACH-MED patients often have a mild myopathy characterized by mildly increased plasma creatine kinase levels, a variation in myofibre size and/or small atrophic fibres. In some instances, patients are referred to neuromuscular clinics prior to the diagnosis of an underlying skeletal dysplasia; however, the myopathy associated with PSACH-MED has not previously been studied. In this study, we present a detailed study of skeletal muscle, tendon and ligament from a mouse model of mild PSACH harbouring a COMP mutation. Mutant mice exhibited a progressive muscle weakness associated with an increased number of muscle fibres with central nuclei at the perimysium and at the myotendinous junction. Furthermore, the distribution of collagen fibril diameters in the mutant tendons and ligaments was altered towards thicker collagen fibrils, and the tendons became more lax in cyclic strain tests. We hypothesize that the myopathy in PSACH-MED originates from an underlying tendon and ligament pathology that is a direct result of structural abnormalities to the collagen fibril architecture. This is the first comprehensive characterization of the musculoskeletal phenotype of PSACH-MED and is directly relevant to the clinical management of these patients.

  5. Muscle-tendon glucose uptake in Achilles tendon rupture and tendinopathy before and after eccentric rehabilitation: Comparative case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masood, Tahir; Kalliokoski, Kari; Bojsen-Møller, Jens; Finni, Taija

    2016-09-01

    Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) is the most common tendon rupture injury. The consequences of ATR on metabolic activity of the Achilles tendon and ankle plantarflexors are unknown. Furthermore, the effects of eccentric rehabilitation on metabolic activity patterns of Achilles tendon and ankle plantarflexors in ATR patients have not been reported thus far. We present a case study demonstrating glucose uptake (GU) in the Achilles tendon, the triceps surae, and the flexor hallucis longus of a post-surgical ATR patient before and after a 5-month eccentric rehabilitation. At baseline, three months post-surgery, all muscles and Achilles tendon displayed much higher GU in the ATR patient compared to a healthy individual despite lower plantarflexion force. After the rehabilitation, plantarflexion force increased in the operated leg while muscle GU was considerably reduced. The triceps surae muscles showed similar values to the healthy control. When compared to the healthy or a matched patient with Achilles tendon pain after 12 weeks of rehabilitation, Achilles tendon GU levels of ATR patient remained greater after the rehabilitation. Past studies have shown a shift in the metabolic fuel utilization towards glycolysis due to immobilization. Further research, combined with immuno-histological investigation, is needed to fully understand the mechanism behind excessive glucose uptake in ATR cases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of a patellar strap on the joint position sense of the symptomatic knee in athletes with patellar tendinopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Astrid J.; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Haak, Svenja L.; Diercks, Ron L.; van der Worp, Henk; Zwerver, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The primary aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a patellar strap on the proprioception of the symptomatic leg in PT. Secondary aims were to investigate a possible difference in effectiveness between athletes with high and low proprioceptive acuity, and whether predictors

  7. Studies on the importance of sympathetic innervation, adrenergic receptors, and a possible local catecholamine production in the development of patellar tendinopathy (tendinosis) in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, Patrik; Alfredson, Håkan; Forsgren, Sture

    2007-04-01

    Changes in the patterns of production and in the effects of signal substances may be involved in the development of tendinosis, a chronic condition of pain in human tendons. There is no previous information concerning the patterns of sympathetic innervation in the human patellar tendon. In this study, biopsies of normal and tendinosis patellar tendons were investigated with immunohistochemical methods, including the use of antibodies against tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and neuropeptide Y, and against alpha1-, alpha2A-, and beta1-adrenoreceptors. It was noticed that most of the sympathetic innervation was detected in the walls of the blood vessels entering the tendon through the paratendinous tissue, and that the tendon tissue proper of the normal and tendinosis tendons was very scarcely innervated. Immunoreactions for adrenergic receptors were noticed in nerve fascicles containing both sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers. High levels of these receptors were also detected in the blood vessel walls; alpha1-adrenoreceptor immunoreactions being clearly more pronounced in the tendinosis tendons than in the tendons of controls. Interestingly, immunoreactions for adrenergic receptors and TH were noted for the tendon cells (tenocytes), especially in tendinosis tendons. The findings give a morphological correlate for the occurrence of sympathetically mediated effects in the patellar tendon and autocrine/paracrine catecholamine mechanisms for the tenocytes, particularly, in tendinosis. The observation of adrenergic receptors on tenocytes is interesting, as stimulation of these receptors can lead to cell proliferation, degeneration, and apoptosis, events which are all known to occur in tendinosis. Furthermore, the results imply that a possible source of catecholamine production might be the tenocytes themselves

  8. Randomized controlled trial comparing the effectiveness of the ultrasound-guided galvanic electrolysis technique (USGET) versus conventional electro-physiotherapeutic treatment on patellar tendinopathy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abat, F; Sánchez-Sánchez, J L; Martín-Nogueras, A M; Calvo-Arenillas, J I; Yajeya, J; Méndez-Sánchez, R; Monllau, J C; Gelber, P E

    2016-01-01

    .... The purpose of this study is to compare, in a randomized controlled trial, the clinical efficacy of eccentric exercise combined with either an ultrasound-guided galvanic electrolysis technique (USGET...

  9. A modified straight leg raise test to differentiate between sural nerve pathology and Achilles tendinopathy. A cross-sectional cadaver study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coppieters, M.W.J.; Crooke, J.L.; Lawrenson, P.R.; Khoo, S.J.; Skulstad, T.; Bet-Or, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background: A modified straight leg raise test for the sural nerve (SLRSURAL) has been proposed to assist in the differential diagnosis of sural nerve pathology in people with posterior calf or ankle pain, or lateral foot pain. The biomechanical rationale is that strain in the

  10. Tendinopatía rotuliana. Modelo de actuación terapéutico en el deporte. Patellar tendinopathy. Therapetic model in the sport

    OpenAIRE

    Pruna, Ricard; Medina, Daniel; Rodas, Gil; Artells i Prats, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    El dolor tendinoso, conocido como tendinopatía, es muy común en individuos físicamente activos, ya sea a nivel competitivo como recreacional. Sin embargo, se ha demostrado que individuos físicamente inactivos también lo sufren. Por lo tanto, se puede afirmar que la actividad física no se puede asociar directamente a la histopatología, y que el ejercicio físico puede ser más importante en la provocación de los síntomas que en ser el causante de la lesión1 and 2. La sobreutilización induce esta...

  11. Effectiveness of the Intratissue Percutaneous Electrolysis (EPI®) technique and isoinertial eccentric exercise in the treatment of patellar tendinopathy at two years follow-up

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abat, Ferran; Diesel, Wayne-J; Gelber, Pablo-E; Polidori, Fernando; Monllau, Joan-Carles; Sanchez-Ibañez, Jose-Manuel

    2014-01-01

    .... intratissue percutaneous electrolysis (EPI®) combined with an eccentric-based rehab program offers excellent results in terms of the clinical and functional improvement of the patellar tendon with low morbidity in a short-term period. Therapy, level 4.

  12. Efeito de um protocolo fisioterapêutico para as disfunções decorrentes das tendinopatias do ombro = Effect of a physiotherapy protocol for the shoulder tendinopathy disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ottobelli Neto, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar o efeito de um protocolo de atendimento fisioterapêutico para as disfunções decorrentes das tendinopatias do ombro, sendo considerado o impacto destas lesões sobre a função, dor e mobilidade desta articulação. Materiais e Métodos: Sete voluntários com idade entre 20 e 53 anos, com tendionpatia do ombro, foram submetidos a um protocolo fisioterapêutico durante 8 semanas, aplicado 3 vezes por semana com duração média de 45 minutos cada. O protocolo estava dividido em 3 fases. Os objetivos da fase I foram: reduzir o processo inflamatório, a dor, e aumentar a amplitude de movimento (ADM. Na fase II objetivou-se manter e/ou aumentar a flexibilidade e fortalecer os músculos do ombro. Já a fase III teve por objetivo aprimorar o desempenho muscular e ganhar propriocepção. Como métodos de avaliação foram utilizados o Questionário Western Ontario Rotador Cuff Index (WORC, a Escala Visual Análoga (EVA, o Questionário de dor McGill e mensuração da ADM, todos aplicados no início e no final do tratamento. Resultados: A aplicação do protocolo foi eficaz no tratamento dos voluntários, apresentando melhora significativa na função (p=0,0023; redução na EVA (p=0,0142, no índice da dor (p=0,0017 e no número de descritores da dor (p=0,0011. Em relação à ADM, apenas a abdução do ombro não apresentou aumento significativo. Conclusão: O protocolo utilizado neste estudo apresentou resultado positivo no que diz respeito à melhora funcional, a dor e a mobilidade em pacientes com tendinopatias do ombro

  13. De Quervain tendinitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tendinopathy - De Quervain tendinitis; de Quervain tenosynovitis ... De Quervain tendinitis can be caused by playing sports such as tennis, golf, or rowing. Constantly lifting children can also strain ...

  14. Common problems in endurance athletes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cosca, DD

    2007-01-01

    .... Common overuse injuries in runners and other endurance athletes include patellofemoral pain syndrome, iliotibial band friction syndrome, medial tibial stress syndrome, Achilles tendinopathy, plantar...

  15. Presence of a non-neuronal cholinergic system and occurrence of up- and down-regulation in expression of M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors: new aspects of importance regarding Achilles tendon tendinosis (tendinopathy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjur, Dennis; Danielson, Patrik; Alfredson, Håkan; Forsgren, Sture

    2008-02-01

    Limited information is available concerning the existence of a cholinergic system in the human Achilles tendon. We have studied pain-free normal Achilles tendons and chronically painful Achilles tendinosis tendons with regard to immunohistochemical expression patterns of the M(2) muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M(2)R), choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). M(2)R immunoreactivity was detected in the walls of blood vessels. As evidenced via parallel staining for CD31 and alpha-smooth muscle actin, most M(2)R immunoreactivity was present in the endothelium. M(2)R immunoreactivity also occured in tenocytes, which regularly immunoreact for vimentin. The degree of M(2)R immunoreactivity was highly variable, tendinosis tendons that exhibit hypercellularity and hypervascularity showing the highest levels of immunostaining. Immunoreaction for ChAT and VAChT was detected in tenocytes in tendinosis specimens, particularly in aberrant cells. In situ hybridization revealed that mRNA for ChAT is present in tenocytes in tendinosis specimens. Our results suggest that autocrine/paracrine effects occur concerning the tenocytes in tendinosis. Up-regulation/down-regulation in the levels of M(2)R immunoreactivity possibly take place in tenocytes and blood vessel cells during the various stages of tendinosis. The presumed local production of acetylcholine (ACh), as evidenced by immunoreactivity for ChAT and VAChT and the detection of ChAT mRNA, appears to evolve in response to tendinosis. These observations are of importance because of the well-known vasoactive, trophic, and pain-modulating effects that ACh is known to have and do unexpectedly establish the presence of a non-neuronal cholinergic system in the Achilles tendon.

  16. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy, ultrasound-guided percutaneous lavage, corticosteroid injection and combined treatment for the treatment of rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy: a network meta-analysis of RCTs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arirachakaran, Alisara; Boonard, Manusuk; Yamaphai, Sarunpong; Prommahachai, Akom; Kesprayura, Suraphol; Kongtharvonskul, Jatupon

    2017-04-01

    Treatment of calcific tendinitis using extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT), ultrasound-guided percutaneous lavage (UGPL or barbotage), subacromial corticosteroid injection (SAI) and combined treatment is still controversial. This systematic review and meta-regression aimed to compare clinical outcomes between treatments. Relevant RCTs were identified using PubMed and Scopus search engines to date of September 23, 2015. Seven of 920 studies identified were eligible. Compared to the other treatments, the results of this study indicate that ESWT significantly improved CMS and VAS when compared to placebo. Barbotage plus ESWT significantly improved CMS, VAS and decreased size of calcium deposit when compared to ESWT, while barbotage plus SAI significantly improved CMS and decreased size of calcium deposit when compared to SAI. There have no different adverse effects of all treatment groups. Multiple active treatment comparisons indicated that barbotage plus SAI significantly improved VAS and size of calcium deposit when compared to other groups, while barbotage plus SAI improved CMS when compared to other groups. But there was no significant difference. The network meta-analysis suggested that combined US-guided needling and subacromial corticosteroid injection significantly decreased shoulder pain VAS, improved CMS score and decreased the size of calcium deposits, while also lowering risks of adverse event when compared to barbotage plus ESWT, ESWT and subacromial corticosteroid injection; therefore, the evidence points to UGPL as being the treatment of choice for nonsurgical options of treatment in calcific tendinitis of the shoulder. Level of evidence I.

  17. Does the adolescent patellar tendon respond to 5 days of cumulative load during a volleyball tournament?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ark, Mathijs; Docking, Sean I.; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Rudavsky, A; Rio, Ebonie; Zwerver, Johannes; Cook, Jill L.

    Patellar tendinopathy (jumper's knee) has a high prevalence in jumping athletes. Excessive load on the patellar tendon through high volumes of training and competition is an important risk factor. Structural changes in the tendon are related to a higher risk of developing patellar tendinopathy. The

  18. Increased mast cell numbers in a calcaneal tendon overuse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pingel, Jessica; Wienecke, Jacob; Kongsgaard Madsen, Mads

    2013-01-01

    Tendinopathy is often discovered late because the initial development of tendon pathology is asymptomatic. The aim of this study was to examine the potential role of mast cell involvement in early tendinopathy using a high-intensity uphill running (HIUR) exercise model. Twenty-four male Wistar ra...

  19. Uphill running improves rat Achilles tendon tissue mechanical properties and alters gene expression without inducing pathological changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinemeier, K M; Skovgaard, D; Bayer, M L

    2012-01-01

    Overuse Achilles tendinopathy is a common and challenging problem in sports medicine. Little is known about the etiology of this disorder, and the development of a good animal model for overuse tendinopathy is essential for advancing insight into the disease mechanisms. Our aim was to test...

  20. Le PRP (Platelet-Rich Plasma) peut-il favoriser la régénération tendineuse ?

    OpenAIRE

    Kaux, Jean-François; Drion, Pierre; Pascon, Frédéric; Libertiaux, Vincent; Le Goff, Caroline; Gothot, André; CESCOTTO, Serge; Rickert, Markus; Crielaard, Jean-Michel

    2009-01-01

    Introduction : Certaines tendinopathies (l’épicondylite, la tendinopathie rotulienne supérieure ou encore la tendinopathie d’Achille) demeurent rebelles malgré un traitement « classique » bien conduit : repos, orthèse, AINS, électrothérapie, kinésithérapie, infiltrations de corticoïdes, ondes de choc... Certains travaux, essentiellement in vitro, soulignent les potentialités réparatrices des plaquettes qui présentent la capacité d’accélérer la cicatrisation de différents tissus : os, muscles ...

  1. RELIABILITY AND AGREEMENT OF ULTRASONOGRAPHIC THICKNESS MEASUREMENTS OF THE COMMON LATERAL EXTENSORS OF THE ELBOW

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teggeler, Marlijn; Schmitz, Marc; Fink, Alexandra; Jansen, Jaap A. C. G.; Pisters, Martijn F.

    In individuals with lateral elbow tendinopathy, the thickness of the common lateral extensors tendon can be evaluated by musculoskeletal ultrasonography (MSU) for diagnostic and evaluative purposes. The reproducibility of these thickness measurements should be established before integrating it into

  2. Plantarflexor muscle function in healthy and chronic Achilles tendon pain subjects evaluated by the use of EMG and PET imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masood, Tahir; Kalliokoski, Kari; Bojsen-Møller, Jens

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Achilles tendon pathologies may alter the coordinative strategies of synergistic calf muscles. We hypothesized that both surface electromyography and positron emission tomography would reveal differences between symptomatic and asymptomatic legs in Achilles tendinopathy patients and b...

  3. Medial epicondylitis - golfer's elbow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Saunders; 2009:chap 19. Schmidt MJ, Adams SL. Tendinopathy and bursitis. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls ... and Disorders Read more Sports Injuries Read more Tendinitis Read more A.D.A.M., Inc. is ...

  4. Association of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation and Hypnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-02

    Limbs Arthrosis; Non Arthrosic Limbs Arthralgia; Chronic Lomboradiculalgia; Chronic Back Pain; Cervical Radiculopathy; Post-herpetic Neuralgia; Post-surgical Peripheral Neuropathic Pain; Post Trauma Neuropathic Pain; Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type I or II; Tendinopathy

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of the Achilles tendon using ultrashort TE (UTE) pulse sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robson, M.D.; Benjamin, M.; Gishen, P.; Bydder, G.M. E-mail: gbydder@ucsd.edu

    2004-08-01

    AIM: To assess the potential value of imaging the Achilles tendon with ultrashort echo time (UTE) pulse sequences. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Four normal controls and four patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy were examined in the sagittal and transverse planes. Three of the patients were examined before and after intravenous gadodiamide. RESULTS: The fascicular pattern was clearly demonstrated within the tendon and detail of the three distinct fibrocartilaginous components of an 'enthesis organ' was well seen. T2* measurements showed two short T2* components. Increase in long T2 components with reduction in short T2 components was seen in tendinopathy. Contrast enhancement was much more extensive than with conventional sequences in two cases of tendinopathy but in a third case, there was a region of reduced enhancement. CONCLUSION: UTE pulse sequences provide anatomical detail not apparent with conventional sequences, demonstrate differences in T2* and show patterns of both increased and decreased enhancement in tendinopathy.

  6. Decline eccentric squats increases patellar tendon loading compared to standard eccentric squats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsgaard, M; Aagaard, P; Roikjaer, S

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies have shown excellent clinical results using eccentric squat training on a 25 degrees decline board to treat patellar tendinopathy. It remains unknown why therapeutic management of patellar tendinopathy using decline eccentric squats offer superior clinical efficacy compared to stan...... to standard horizontal eccentric squats. This study aimed to compare electromyography activity, patellar tendon strain and joint angle kinematics during standard and decline eccentric squats....

  7. Dynamic thoracohumeral kinematics are dependent upon the etiology of the shoulder injury

    OpenAIRE

    L?pez-Pascual, Juan; Page, ?lvaro; Serra-A??, Pilar

    2017-01-01

    Obtaining kinematic patterns that depend on the shoulder injury may be important when planning rehabilitation. The main goal of this study is to explore whether the kinematic patterns of continuous and repetitive shoulder elevation motions are different according to the type of shoulder injury in question, specifically tendinopathy or rotator cuff tear, and to analyze the influence of the load handled during its assessment. For this purpose, 19 individuals with tendinopathy and 9 with rotator...

  8. Infrapatellar Straps Decrease Patellar Tendon Strain at the Site of the Jumper’s Knee Lesion

    OpenAIRE

    Lavagnino, Michael; Arnoczky, Steven P.; Dodds, Julie; Elvin, Niell

    2011-01-01

    Background: The impetus for the use of patellar straps in the treatment of patellar tendinopathy has largely been based on empirical evidence and not on any mechanistic rationale. A computational model suggests that patellar tendinopathy may be a result of high localized tendon strains that occur at smaller patella–patellar tendon angles (PPTAs). Hypothesis: Infrapatellar straps will decrease the mean localized computational strain in the area of the patellar tendon commonly involved in jumpe...

  9. High glucose alters tendon homeostasis through downregulation of the AMPK/Egr1 pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Fu Wu; Hsing-Kuo Wang; Hong-Wei Chang; Jingyu Sun; Jui-Sheng Sun; Yuan-Hung Chao

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with higher risk of tendinopathy, which reduces tolerance to exercise and functional activities and affects lifestyle and glycemic control. Expression of tendon-related genes and matrix metabolism in tenocytes are essential for maintaining physiological functions of tendon. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in diabetic tendinopathy remain unclear. We hypothesized that high glucose (HG) alters the characteristics of tenocyte. Using in vitro 2-week ...

  10. Common Running Overuse Injuries and Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Žiga Kozinc; Nejc Sarabon

    2017-01-01

    Runners are particularly prone to developing overuse injuries. The most common running-related injuries include medial tibial stress syndrome, Achilles tendinopathy, plantar fasciitis, patellar tendinopathy, iliotibial band syndrome, tibial stress fractures, and patellofemoral pain syndrome. Two of the most significant risk factors appear to be injury history and weekly distance. Several trials have successfully identified biomechanical risk factors for specific injuries, with increased groun...

  11. The role of eccentric exercise in sport injuries rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frizziero, Antonio; Trainito, Sabina; Oliva, Francesco; Nicoli Aldini, Nicolò; Masiero, Stefano; Maffulli, Nicola

    2014-06-01

    Sports injuries frequently involve tendons, muscles and ligaments. The variable outcome of surgery and medical treatment support early functional treatments. Eccentric exercise (EE) showed effectiveness in the management of Achilles tendinopathy (AT), patellar tendinopathy (PT) and lateral epicondyle tendinopathy (LET). Preliminary results of EE in other tendinopathies and sports injuries suggest its wide prescription in the sport rehabilitation field. A comprehensive search of PubMed, Web of Science, the Cochrane Collaboration Database, Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) Search review, National Guidelines, Scopus and Google Scholar was performed using keywords such as 'eccentric exercise', 'sports injuries rehabilitation', 'tendinopathy', 'hamstrings strain' 'adductor injuries' and 'ACL reconstruction rehabilitation'. EE, alone or associated with other therapies, represents a feasible, cost-effective and successful tool in the treatment of well-known targets and might be promising in shoulder tendinopathy, adductor-related groin pain, hamstring strains, and ACL rehabilitation. The lack of standardization of protocols, the variable amount, quality and follow-up of studies, the different anatomy and pathophysiology of the therapeutic targets limit the evidence of applicability of EE to sports injuries. The role of pathology and biomechanics in the response to EE should be further investigated. New randomized controlled trials should test the effectiveness of standardized EE regimens to various sites of sports injuries. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Prevalence and pattern of gluteus medius and minimus tendon pathology and muscle atrophy in older individuals using MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Andrew S. [University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Long, Suzanne S.; Zoga, Adam C.; Read, Paul J.; Deely, Diane M.; Parker, Laurence; Morrison, William B. [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-12-15

    To evaluate gluteus medius and minimus tendon pathology and muscle atrophy in older individuals using MRI. A retrospective MRI study of 185 individuals was performed. The inclusion criterion was age ≥50. Exclusion criteria were hip surgery, fracture, infection, tumor, or inadequate image quality. Greater trochanteric bursitis was graded none, mild, moderate, or severe. Gluteus medius, gluteus minimus, and iliopsoas tendinopathy was graded normal, tendinosis, low-grade partial tear, high-grade partial tear, or full thickness tear. Gluteus medius, gluteus minimus, tensor fascia lata, and iliopsoas muscle atrophy was scored using a standard scale. Insertion site of tendinopathy and location of muscle atrophy were assessed. Descriptive and statistical analysis was performed. There was increasing greater trochanteric bursitis and gluteus medius and minimus tendinopathy and atrophy with advancing age with moderate to strong positive associations (p < 0.0001) for age and tendinopathy, age and atrophy, bursitis and tendinopathy, and tendinopathy and atrophy for the gluteus medius and minimus. There is a weak positive association (p < 0.0001) for age and tensor fascia lata atrophy, and no statistically significant association between age and tendinopathy or between age and atrophy for the iliopsoas. Fisher's exact tests were statistically significant (p < 0.0001) for insertion site of tendon pathology and location of muscle atrophy for the gluteus medius. Gluteus medius and minimus tendon pathology and muscle atrophy increase with advancing age with progression of tendinosis to low-grade tendon tears to high-grade tendon tears. There is an associated progression in atrophy of these muscles, which may be important in fall-related hip fractures. (orig.)

  13. Shockwave treatment for musculoskeletal diseases and bone consolidation: qualitative analysis of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Kertzman

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Shockwave treatment is an option within orthopedics. The exact mechanism through which shockwaves function for treating musculoskeletal diseases is unknown. The aim of this study was to make a qualitative analysis on the effectiveness of shockwave treatment among patients with musculoskeletal pathological conditions and pseudarthrosis. Searches were conducted in the Cochrane Library, Medline and Lilacs databases. Thirty-nine studies that reported using shockwave treatment for musculoskeletal diseases were found. Their results varied greatly, as did the types of protocol used. The studies that evaluated the effectiveness of shockwave treatment for lateral epicondylitis, shoulder tendinopathy, knee osteoarthrosis, femoral head osteonecrosis and trochanteric bursitis reported inconsistent results for most of their patients. Those that evaluated patients with calcifying tendinopathy, plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendinopathy, patellar tendinopathy and pseudarthrosis showed benefits. Shockwave treatment is a safe and non-invasive method for chronic cases in which conventional techniques have been unsatisfactory and should be used in association with other treatment methods for tendinopathy. Further quality studies are needed.

  14. [Hindfoot pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, Joël; Bouysset, Maurice

    2010-03-20

    The hindfoot is the part of the foot which is proximal to the midtarsal joint. The obvious causes of pain are not considered (post-traumatic etiologies, sprains and fractures but also cutaneous lesions). The main etiologies on the subject are successively exposed by following the localization of the pain. Diffuse pains (ankle arthritis tarsal osteoarthritis, algodystrophy, calcaneo-navicular synostosis but also bone diseases like stress fractures, Paget disease or tumors). Plantar talalgia (Sever's disease, plantar fasciitis and entrapment neuropathies such as (esions of the medial calcaneal nerve, of the first branch of the plantar lateral nerve, medial plantar nerve and lateral plantar nerve). Posterior pains: calcaneal tendinopathy including peritendinitis, tendinosis, retro-calcaneal bursitis and pathology of the postero-lateral talar tuberosity. Medial pains: tendinopathies of the posterior tibial tendon and tendinopathy of the flexor hallucis longus tendon and tarsal tunnel syndrome. Lateral pains: fibularis tendinopathies including split lesions of the fibularis brevis tendon, displacement of the fibularis iongus tendon, sinus tarsi syndrome and finally thickenings of capsules and ligaments and ossifications localized under the tibial malleoli. Anterior pains: antero-inferior tibio-fibular ligament, anterior tibial tendinopathy and anterior impingment syndrome.

  15. Ultrasound in athletes: emerging techniques in point-of-care practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Eugene S; Corrado, Gianmichel

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasound offers sports medicine clinicians the potential to diagnose, treat, and manage a broad spectrum of conditions afflicting athletes. This review article highlights applications of ultrasound that hold promise as point-of-care diagnostics and therapeutic tools that can be used directly by clinicians to direct real-time management of athletes. Point-of-care ultrasound has been examined most in the context of musculoskeletal disorders in athletes, with attention given to Achilles tendinopathy, patellar tendinopathy, hip and thigh pathology, elbow tendinopathy, wrist pathology, and shoulder pain. More research has focused on therapeutic applications than diagnostic, but initial evidence has been generated in both. Preliminary evidence has been published also on abdominal ultrasound for splenic enlargement in mononucleosis, cardiopulmonary processes and hydration status, deep vein thrombosis, and bone mineral density. Further research will be required to validate these applications and to explore further applications of portable ultrasound that can be used in the care of athletes.

  16. Do Dietary Factors Influence Tendon Metabolism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Alex; Nordin, Cara

    There is very little direct research to conclusively prove the relevance of diet in primary tendinopathies, however it seems prudent to ask whether our current knowledge about the impact of nutrition on collagen metabolism could be useful in assessing, preventing, or treating tendinopathy. The objective of this chapter is to discuss the potential impact (negative or positive) that nutrition may have on the metabolism of tendons by summarizing the related research. The chapter briefly discusses the roles that specific vitamins, amino acids, lipids, and antioxidants have in various processes of the body that may be directly or indirectly related to tenocyte metabolism.

  17. Glyceryl trinitrate patches—An alternative treatment for shoulder impingement syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Assem

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transdermal glyceryl trinitrate patches have been investigated as an alternative therapeutic intervention for a range of tendinopathies, due to the ease of titration of dosage and the ease of their application. Glyceryl trinitrate has been inferred to reduce pain and inflammation secondary to their nitric oxide-producing action. Shoulder impingement syndrome is a soft tissue condition that manifests as anterior shoulder pain, weakness, and difficulty in daily activities. This review will evaluate the efficacy of glyceryl trinitrate patches in treating a variety of rotator cuff tendinopathies related to shoulder impingement, based on human and animal trials, and suggest its practical application in future trials and management.

  18. Successful treatment of athletic pubalgia in a lacrosse player with ultrasound-guided needle tenotomy and platelet-rich plasma injection: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholten, Paul M; Massimi, Stephen; Dahmen, Nick; Diamond, Joanne; Wyss, James

    2015-01-01

    Athletic pubalgia is a syndrome of persistent groin pain due to chronic repetitive trauma or stress involving the pelvic joints and many musculotendinous structures that cross the anterior pelvis. As a result, the differential diagnosis can be complex, but insertional tendinopathies are the most common. This case report describes a novel approach to the treatment of distal rectus abdominis tendinopathies with ultrasound-guided needle tenotomy and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection. After injection, the patient returned to pain-free play at his previous level of intensity. This suggests that PRP may be a useful treatment for this diagnosis. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Proteomics perspectives in rotator cuff research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sejersen, Maria Hee Jung; Frost, Poul; Hansen, Torben Bæk

    2015-01-01

    tendinopathies, and to evaluate perspectives of proteomics – the comprehensive study of protein composition - in tendon research. Materials and Methods We conducted a systematic search of the literature published between 1 January 1990 and 18 December 2012 in PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science. We included...... proteomics technologies may be a way to identify protein profiles (including non-prespecified proteins) that characterise specific tendon disorders or stages of tendinopathy. Thus, our results suggested an untapped potential for proteomics in tendon research....

  20. Contrast-enhanced computed tomographic evaluation of the deep digital flexor tendon in the equine foot compared to macroscopic and histological findings in 23 limbs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hamel, S E; Bergman, H J; Puchalski, S M; Groot, M.W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304833150; van Weeren, P R|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074628550

    2014-01-01

    REASONS FOR PERFORMING THE STUDY: Distal deep digital flexor tendinopathy is an important cause of foot lameness in horses that is difficult to diagnose with radiography and ultrasonography. Magnetic resonance imaging is a well-accepted and validated technique for the identification of deep digital

  1. Tracking of autologous adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells with in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and histology after intralesional treatment of artificial equine tendon lesions : A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geburek, Florian; Mundle, Kathrin; Conrad, Sabine; Hellige, Maren; Walliser, Ulrich; van Schie, Hans T M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/184641411; van Weeren, René|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074628550; Skutella, Thomas; Stadler, Peter M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (AT-MSCs) are frequently used to treat equine tendinopathies. Up to now, knowledge about the fate of autologous AT-MSCs after intralesional injection into equine superficial digital flexor tendons (SDFTs) is very limited. The purpose of

  2. Increased versican content is associated with tendinosis pathology in the patellar tendon of athletes with jumper's knee

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Alexander; Lian, Øystein; Roberts, Clive C.; Cook, Jill L.; Handley, Christopher J; Bahr, Roald; Samiric, Tom; Illic, Mirna Z.; Parkinson, John; Hart, David A.; Duronio, Vincent; Khan, Karim M.

    2007-01-01

    Expansion of the extracellular matrix is a prominent but poorly characterized feature of tendinosis. The present study aimed to characterize the extent and distribution of the large aggregating proteoglycan versican in patients with patellar tendinosis. We obtained tendon from tendinopathy patients undergoing debridement of the patellar tendon and from controls undergoing intramedullary tibial nailing. Versican content was investigated by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Microvessel...

  3. Clinical application of shock wave therapy in musculoskeletal disorders: part II related to myofascial and nerve apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saggini, R; Di Stefano, A; Saggini, A; Bellomo, R G

    2015-01-01

    Shock waves have been widely recognized in literature as a biological regulator; accordingly we carried out a review on the effect of shock waves on the mesenchymal cells in their various expressions: bone, muscle, ligament and tendon tissue. To date, the application of Shock Wave Therapy (SWT) in musculoskeletal disorders has been primarily used in the treatment of tendinopathies (proximal plantar fasciopathy, lateral elbow tendinopathy, calcific tendinopathy of the shoulder, and patellar tendinopathy, etc.) and bone defects (delayed and non-union of bone fractures, avascular necrosis of femoral head, etc.). Although the mechanism of their therapeutic effects is still unknown, the majority of published papers have shown the positive and beneficial effects of using SWT as a treatment for musculoskeletal disorders, with a success rate ranging from 65% to 91%, while the complications are low or negligible. The purpose of this paper is to present the published data on the clinical application of SWT in the treatment of myofascial and nerve disorders. With the help of the relevant literature, in this paper we outline the indications and success rates of SWT, as well as the adequate SWT parameters (e.g., rate of impulses, energy flux density) defined according to the present state of knowledge.

  4. CLINICAL APPLICATION OF SHOCK WAVE THERAPY IN MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS: PART I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saggini, R; Di Stefano, A; Saggini, A; Bellomo, R G

    2015-01-01

    The shock wave has been widely recognized in literature as a biological regulator; therefore we carried out a review on the activity performed by shock waves on the bone-myofascial tissue system. To date, the application of Shock Wave Therapy (SWT) in musculoskeletal disorders has been primarily used in the treatment of tendinopathies (proximal plantar fasciopathy, lateral elbow tendinopathy, calcific tendinopathy of the shoulder, and patellar tendinopathy, etc.) and bone defects (delayed- and non-union of bone fractures, avascular necrosis of femoral head, etc.). Although the mechanism of their therapeutic effects is still unknown, the majority of published papers have shown positive and beneficial effects of using SWT as a treatment for musculoskeletal disorders, with a success rate ranging from 65 to 91%, while the complications are low or negligible. The purpose of this paper is to inform the reader about the published data on the clinical application of SWT in the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders. In this paper, with the help of a literature review, indications and success rates for SWT in the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders are outlined, while adequate SWT parameters (e.g., rate of impulses, energy flux density, etc.) are defined according to the present state of knowledge. Given the abundance of the argument, it seems appropriate to subdivide the review into two parts, the first concerning the evidence of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy (ESWT) on bone disorders, the second concerning findings on tendon and muscle treatment.

  5. Clinical application of shock wave therapy (SWT) in musculoskeletal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioppolo, F; Rompe, J D; Furia, J P; Cacchio, A

    2014-04-01

    Currently the application of shock wave therapy (SWT) in musculoskeletal disorders has been primarily used in the treatment of tendinopathies (proximal plantar fasciopathy, lateral elbow tendinopathy, calcific tendinopathy of the shoulder, and patellar tendinopathy, etc.) and bone defects (delayed- and non-union of bone fractures, avascular necrosis of femoral head, etc.). Although the mechanism of their therapeutic effects are still unknown, the majority of published papers have shown positive and beneficial effects of using SWT as a treatment for musculoskeletal disorders, with a success rate ranging from 65% to 91%, while the complications are low or negligible. The purpose of this paper is to inform the reader about the published data on the clinical application of SWT in the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders. In this paper, with the help of a literature review, indications and success rates for SWT in the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders are outlined, while adequate SWT parameters (e.g., rate of impulses, energy flux density, etc.) are defined according to the present state of knowledge.

  6. Injury patterns of South African provincial cricket players over two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (17%) and other trauma (14%), while during S2 the injuries were primarily muscle strains (16%), other trauma (20%), tendinopathy (16%) and acute sprains (15%). ... the fast bowler most likely to sustain an acute injury to the soft tissues of the lower limb while participating in matches and practices during the early part of the ...

  7. 3-D ultrastructure and collagen composition of healthy and overloaded human tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pingel, Jessica; Lu, Yinhui; Starborg, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    tendons of six individuals with clinically diagnosed tendinopathy who had no evidence of cholesterol, uric acid and amyloid accumulation. Biochemical analyses of collagen III/I ratio were performed on all six individuals, and electron microscope analysis using transmission electron microscopy and serial...

  8. Subacromial impingement syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Umer, M.; Qadir, I.; Azam, M.

    2012-01-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS) represents a spectrum of pathology ranging from subacromial bursitis to rotator cuff tendinopathy and full-thickness rotator cuff tears. The relationship between subacromial impingement and rotator cuff disease in the etiology of rotator cuff injury is a

  9. The Achilles heel of adults and children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerinck, J.I.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the imaging and treatment of the Achilles heel of adults and children. The figurative and literal Achilles heel consists of a number of pathologies: ankle impingement, Achilles tendinopathy, retrocalcaneal bursitis and calcaneal apophysitis. Research as well as diagnosis and

  10. Biomechanics of slow running and walking with a rocker shoe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sobhani, Sobhan; Hijmans, Juha; van den Heuvel, Edwin; Zwerver, Johannes; Dekker, Rienk; Postema, Klaas

    Evidence suggests a link between the loading of the Achilles tendon and the magnitude of the ankle internal plantar flexion moment during late stance of gait, which is clinically relevant in the management of Achilles tendinopathy. Some studies showed that rocker shoes can reduce the ankle internal

  11. Patellatendinopathie ('jumper's knee'); een veelvoorkomende en lastig te behandelen sportblessure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwerver, J.

    2008-01-01

    Patellar tendinopathy is a common and difficult-to-treat overuse injury of the patellar tendon with a very negative impact on the careers of many athletes. It appears to involve a failed healing process in the tendon--not inflammation--and has consequences for the treatment strategy. Rehabilitation

  12. Prevalence of pain on palpation of the inferior pole of the patella among patients with complaints of knee pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Addêo Ramos

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Patellar tendinopathy is a common condition in sports. It may occur at any location of the patellar tendon, but the most commonly affected area is the inferior pole of the patella. Among various diagnostic tests, the one most used is palpation of the inferior pole of the patella. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of pain complaints among individuals with pathological knee conditions and to evaluate palpation of the inferior pole of the patella as a diagnostic test for patellar tendinopathy. METHODS: Palpation of the patellar tendon was performed on 318 individuals who presented with knee-related complaints. Palpation was performed with the individual in the supine position and the knee extended. The age, gender, physical activity and labor activity of each individual were recorded at the time the symptoms appeared; the diagnosis was also recorded. RESULTS: Of the total number of individuals evaluated, 124 (39% felt pain on palpation of the inferior pole of the patella. Of these, only 40 (32.3% received a diagnosis of patellar tendinopathy. We did not observe any difference with respect to gender and age distribution. When evaluating daily physical activity levels, however, we observed that individuals with pain on palpation of the inferior pole of the patella experienced more intense physical activity. CONCLUSIONS: Palpation of the inferior pole of the patella is a diagnostic procedure with high sensitivity and moderate specificity for diagnosing patellar tendinopathy, especially among individuals who perform activities with high functional demands.

  13. Predicting the patellar tendon force generated when landing from a jump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Ina; Steele, Julie R; Munro, Bridget J; Brown, Nicholas A T

    2013-05-01

    Although high patellar tendon loading is believed to be the primary causative factor for patellar tendinopathy, research investigating factors that affect patellar tendon loading during landing is scarce. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify whether factors previously associated with the development of patellar tendinopathy, and selected variables characterizing landing technique, could predict patellar tendon loading incurred by volleyball players when landing from a jump. Ten highly skilled male, 20 skilled male, and 20 skilled female volleyball players performed a lateral stop-jump movement. Sex, skill level, quadriceps strength, quadriceps extensibility, and trunk moment of inertia were recorded. Landing kinematics (250 Hz) and kinetics (1500 Hz) were collected, and peak patellar tendon force and patellar tendon force loading rate were calculated. Backward multiple regression analyses identified which risk factors or landing technique variables were predictors of patellar tendon loading. Multiple regression analyses were able to estimate and predict 52% (F4,49 = 14.258, P volleyball players with greater quadriceps strength, who displayed increased ankle dorsiflexion velocity and trunk flexion velocity during landing, were predicted to incur higher patellar tendon loading. As frequent application of high patellar tendon loading has previously been identified as a causative factor for developing patellar tendinopathy, interventions designed to decrease ankle dorsiflexion velocity and trunk flexion velocity at landing, particularly in male players with strong quadriceps muscles, may be effective in reducing patellar tendon loading and, in turn, patellar tendinopathy prevalence in this population.

  14. Tendon neuroplastic training reduces tendon pain and muscle inhibition in-season: Changing the way we think about exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rio, E.; Kidgell, D.; Van Ark, M.; Zwerver, J; Sheek, I.; Moseley, G.L.; Gaida, J.; Docking, S.; Cook, J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Patellar tendon pain is at its highest in-season but there are no published data of successful management when athletes are playing and training. Furthermore, there are changes to the cortical control of the quadriceps in patellar tendinopathy (including excess quadriceps inhibition)

  15. Biomechanical analysis of the single-leg decline squat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwerver, J.; Bredeweg, S. W.; Hof, A. L.

    Background: The single-leg squat on a 25 decline board has been described as a clinical assessment tool and as a rehabilitation exercise for patients with patellar tendinopathy. Several assumptions have been made about its working mechanism on patellar load and patellofemoral forces, but these are

  16. The effect of glenoid cavity depth on rotator cuff tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkoc, Melih; Korkmaz, Ozgur; Ormeci, Tugrul; Sever, Cem; Kara, Adna; Mahirogulları, Mahir

    2016-03-01

    Some of the most important causes of shoulder pain are inflammation and degenerative changes in the rotator cuff (RC). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive and safe imaging modality. MRI can be used for the evaluation of cuff tendinopathy. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between glenoid cavity depth and cuff tendinopathy and we investigated glenoid cavity depth on the pathogenesis of cuff tendinopathy. We retrospectively evaluated 215 patients who underwent MRI. Of these, 60 patients showed cuff tendinopathy (group A) and 54 patients showed no pathology (group B). Glenoid cavity depth was calculated in the coronal and transverse planes. The mean axial depth was 1.7 ± 0.9 and the mean coronal depth 3.8 ± 0.9, for group A. The mean axial depth was 3.5 ± 0.7 and the mean coronal depth 1.5 ± 0.8, for group B. There were significant differences in the axial and coronal depths between the two groups. High coronal and low axial depth of the glenoid cavity can be used to diagnose RC tendinitis.

  17. Excessive progression in weekly running distance and risk of running-related injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Østergaard; Parner, Erik Thorlund; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard

    2014-01-01

    trochanteric bursitis, injury to the tensor fascia latae, and patellar tendinopathy) existed in those who progressed their weekly running distance by more than 30% compared with those who progressed less than 10% (hazard ratio = 1.59; 95% confidence interval: 0.96, 2.66; P = .07). Conclusion Novice runners who...

  18. Effect of patellar strap and sports tape on jumper's knee symptoms : Protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vries, Astrid J.; den Akker-Scheek, Inge van; Diercks, Ronald; Zwerver, Johannes; der Worp, Henk van

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Patellar straps or sports tapes are commonly used by athletes with patellar tendinopathy in order to reduce pain and to continue sports participation. Currently, there is no scientific evidence for the effectiveness of a patellar strap or sports tape in the management of this common

  19. Biomechanics of running with rocker shoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sobhani, Sobhan; van den Heuvel, Edwin R.; Dekker, Rienk; Postema, Klaas; Kluitenberg, Bas; Bredeweg, Steef W.; Hijmans, Juha M.

    Objectives: Load reduction is an important consideration in conservative management of tendon overuse injuries such as Achilles tendinopathy. Previous research has shown that the use of rocker shoes can reduce the positive ankle power and plantar flexion moment which might help in unloading the

  20. [A jogger with painful heels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gool, Arthur R; Pepels, Wout R J

    2012-01-01

    A 54-year-old man had chronic pain of his left heel region, which was initially diagnosed as 'tendinopathy'. An X-ray of the ankle joint showed a Haglund deformity. After successful surgery, he developed pain on his right heel, where again a Haglund deformity was diagnosed.

  1. Shouldering the blame for impingement: the rotator cuff continuum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... research on shoulder impingement and rotator cuff pathology. A continuum model of rotator cuff pathology is described, and the challenges of accurate clinical diagnosis, imaging and best management discussed. Keywords: shoulder impingement syndrome, subacromial impingement syndrome, rotator cuff, tendinopathy, ...

  2. Effect of patellar strap and sports tape on jumper's knee symptoms: protocol of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Astrid J; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Diercks, Ron L; Zwerver, Johannes; van der Worp, Henk

    2013-12-01

    Patellar straps or sports tapes are commonly used by athletes with patellar tendinopathy in order to reduce pain and to continue sports participation. Currently, there is no scientific evidence for the effectiveness of a patellar strap or sports tape in the management of this common injury. To investigate the effect of the use of a patellar strap and sports tape on pain and sports participation in subjects with patellar tendinopathy. The study is divided into two parts: a randomised controlled crossover experiment and a randomised controlled trial (parallel group design). 140 patients diagnosed with patellar tendinopathy recruited from sports medical centres and physiotherapist practices. In the first part of the study, participants serve as their own control by performing three functional tests under four different conditions (patellar strap, sports tape, placebo tape, and no orthosis). In the second part, participants keep a log for two weeks (control week and intervention week) about the pain experienced during and after sports and their level of sports participation. In the intervention week participants will use the orthosis assigned to them during training and competition. The amount of pain (both parts of the study) and sports participation (second part only) will be measured. To analyse the effects of the orthoses a Linear Mixed Model will be used. The knowledge gained in this study can be used by practitioners in their advice for athletes with patellar tendinopathy about using patellar strap and sports tape during sports. Copyright © 2013 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Injury patterns of South African international cricket players over a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute injuries comprised 87% of the injuries. The major injuries during S1 were haematomas (20 %), muscle strains (14%) and other trauma (20%), while during S2 the injuries were primarily muscle strains (16%), other trauma (32%), tendinopathy (10%) and acute sprains (12%). The primary mechanisms of injury occurred ...

  4. The effect of dry needling and treadmill running on inducing pathological changes in rat Achilles tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bom Soo; Joo, Young Chae; Choi, Byung Hyune; Kim, Kil Hwan; Kang, Joon Soon; Park, So Ra

    2015-11-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is a common degenerative condition without a definitive treatment. An adequate chronic animal model of Achilles tendinopathy has not yet been developed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the individual and combined effects of dry needling and treadmill running on the Achilles tendon of rats. Percutaneous dry needling, designed to physically replicate microrupture of collagen fibers in overloaded tendons, was performed on the right Achilles tendon of 80 Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were randomly divided into two groups: a treadmill group, which included rats that underwent daily uphill treadmill running (n = 40), and a cage group, which included rats that could move freely within their cages (n = 40). At the end of weeks 1 and 4, 20 rats from each group were sacrificed, and bilateral Achilles tendons were collected. The harvested tendons were subjected to mechanical testing and histological analysis. Dry needling induced histological and mechanical changes in the Achilles tendons at week 1, and the changes persisted at week 4. The needled Achilles tendons of the treadmill group tended to show more severe histological and mechanical changes than those of the cage group, although these differences were not statistically significant. Dry needling combined with free cage activity or treadmill running produced tendinopathy-like changes in rat Achilles tendons up to 4 weeks after injury. Dry needling is an easy procedure with a short induction period and a high success rate, suggesting it may have relevance in the design of an Achilles tendinopathy model.

  5. Effects of anti-inflammatory (NSAID) treatment on human tendinopathic tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinemeier, Katja Maria; Ohlenschlaeger, Tommy F.; Mikkelsen, Ulla Ramer

    2017-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly used to treat tendinopathy, but evidence for this treatment is lacking, and little is known regarding effects of NSAIDs on human tendinopathic tendon. This study investigated the effects of NSAID treatment (ibuprofen) on human tendinopathic...

  6. Cyriax's deep friction massage application parameters: Evidence from a cross-sectional study with physiotherapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Paula; Simões, Daniela; Paço, Maria; Pinho, Francisco; Duarte, José Alberto; Ribeiro, Fernando

    2017-12-01

    Deep friction massage is one of several physiotherapy interventions suggested for the management of tendinopathy. To determine the prevalence of deep friction massage use in clinical practice, to characterize the application parameters used by physiotherapists, and to identify empirical model-based patterns of deep friction massage application in degenerative tendinopathy. observational, analytical, cross-sectional and national web-based survey. 478 physiotherapists were selected through snow-ball sampling method. The participants completed an online questionnaire about personal and professional characteristics as well as specific questions regarding the use of deep friction massage. Characterization of deep friction massage parameters used by physiotherapists were presented as counts and proportions. Latent class analysis was used to identify the empirical model-based patterns. Crude and adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were computed. The use of deep friction massage was reported by 88.1% of the participants; tendinopathy was the clinical condition where it was most frequently used (84.9%) and, from these, 55.9% reported its use in degenerative tendinopathy. The "duration of application" parameters in chronic phase and "frequency of application" in acute and chronic phases are those that diverge most from those recommended by the author of deep friction massage. We found a high prevalence of deep friction massage use, namely in degenerative tendinopathy. Our results have shown that the application parameters are heterogeneous and diverse. This is reflected by the identification of two application patterns, although none is in complete agreement with Cyriax's description. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Work above shoulder level and degenerative alterations of the rotator cuff tendons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Susanne Wulff; Gelineck, John; Mathiassen, S.E.

    2004-01-01

    Objective To determine whether work performed with the arms in a highly elevated position is associated with alterations in the rotator cuff tendons as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in a historical cohort of male machinists, car...... work histories obtained by questionnaire and from registry data. Supraspinatus tendinopathy was evidenced by MRI signal intensity changes and morphologic alterations. Infraspinatus and subscapularis tendinopathy were also assessed. Additional outcomes were acromioclavicular joint degeneration.......02–1.60) for a 5-month increase in the total number of full-time working months spent with the arm elevated >90°. Conclusion Work with the arms in a highly elevated position is associated with MRI-diagnosed alterations in the supraspinatus tendon. By demonstrating the first part of a possible biologic pathway...

  8. Ultrasound-guided tendon fenestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiavaras, Mary M; Jacobson, Jon A

    2013-02-01

    A potential treatment for chronic tendinosis or tendinopathy is percutaneous ultrasound-guided tendon fenestration, also termed dry needling or tenotomy. This procedure involves gently passing a needle through the abnormal tendon multiple times to change a chronic degenerative process into an acute condition that is more likely to heal. This article reviews the literature on tendon fenestration and describes the technical aspects of this procedure including postprocedural considerations. Although peer-reviewed literature on this topic is limited, studies to date have shown that ultrasound-guided tendon fenestration can improve patient symptoms. Several other percutaneous treatments for tendinopathy that include prolotherapy, autologous whole-blood injection, and autologous platelet-rich plasma injection are often performed in conjunction with fenestration. It is currently unknown if these other percutaneous procedures have any benefit over ultrasound-guided tendon fenestration alone. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  9. Effects of 12-wk eccentric calf muscle training on muscle-tendon glucose uptake and SEMG in patients with chronic Achilles tendon pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masood, Tahir; Kalliokoski, Kari; Magnusson, S Peter; Bojsen-Møller, Jens; Finni, Taija

    2014-07-15

    High-load eccentric exercises have been a key component in the conservative management of chronic Achilles tendinopathy. This study investigated the effects of a 12-wk progressive, home-based eccentric rehabilitation program on ankle plantar flexors' glucose uptake (GU) and myoelectric activity and Achilles tendon GU. A longitudinal study design with control (n = 10) and patient (n = 10) groups was used. Surface electromyography (SEMG) from four ankle plantar flexors and GU from the same muscles and the Achilles tendon were measured during submaximal intermittent isometric plantar flexion task. The results indicated that the symptomatic leg was weaker (P effect on the tendon GU. Concerning SEMG, at baseline, soleus showed more relative activity in the symptomatic leg compared with both the asymptomatic and control legs (P effective in decreasing subjective severity of Achilles tendinopathy. It also resulted in redistribution of relative electrical activity, but not metabolic activity, within the triceps surae muscle. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Developing a magnetic resonance imaging scoring system for peripheral psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McQueen, Fiona; Lassere, Marissa; Bird, Paul

    2007-01-01

    We describe the first steps in developing an OMERACT magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scoring system for peripheral psoriatic arthritis (PsA). A preexisting MRI dataset (finger joints) from 10 patients with PsA was scored by 4 readers for bone erosion, bone edema, synovitis, tendinopathy, and ext......We describe the first steps in developing an OMERACT magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scoring system for peripheral psoriatic arthritis (PsA). A preexisting MRI dataset (finger joints) from 10 patients with PsA was scored by 4 readers for bone erosion, bone edema, synovitis, tendinopathy......, and extracapsular features of inflammation (including enthesitis) according to specified criteria. Scoring reliability between readers was moderate to high for bone edema and erosion, but lower for soft tissue inflammation. Measures to improve reliability for future exercises will include reviewing definitions...

  11. COMPARATIVE STUDY BETWEEN THE PUBIS OF ASYMPTOMATIC ATHLETES AND NON-ATHLETES WITH MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, Rodrigo Castelo; da Costa Fontenelle, César Rubens; Miranda, Leandro Marques; Junior, Yonder Archanjo Ching San; Vianna, Evandro Miguelote

    2010-01-01

    To compare the magnetic resonance imaging findings from the pubis of professional soccer players without any history or clinical findings of groin pain, and from sedentary individuals, also without symptoms, and to determine the prevalence of changes compatible with pubic overload. Nineteen professional soccer players without complaints of groin pain and seventeen sedentary individuals, also asymptomatic, underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the pubis. The results from the examinations were analyzed regarding the presence of degenerative changes, boned medullary edema and tendinopathy, and the two study groups were compared. High prevalence of bone edema, tendinopathy and degenerative findings in the pubic symphysis was seen in the athletes, with statistically significant higher odds ratios and relative risk in the population studied. Professional soccer players are at a higher risk of developing changes in the pubic region, shown in magnetic resonance images, compared with sedentary individuals. These findings are not necessarily caused by groin pain, and are probably related to intense exertion.

  12. Evidence of accumulated stress in Achilles and anterior knee tendons in elite badminton players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Anders Ploug; Boesen, Morten Ilum; Koenig, Merete Juhl

    2011-01-01

    Tendon-related injuries are a major problem, but the aetiology of tendinopathies is unknown. In tendinopathies as well as during unaccustomed loading, intra-tendinous flow can be detected indicating that extensive loading can provoke intra-tendinous flow. The aim of present study is to evaluate......- and tuberositas region. Intra-tendinous flow was measured using both a semi-quantitative grading system (CD grading) and a quantitative scoring system (CF) on colour Doppler. Intra-tendinous flow in the Achilles and anterior knee tendons was examined in fourteen single players before tournament and after 1st...... and 2nd match, respectively on both the dominant and non-dominant side. All players had abnormal intra-tendinous flow (Colour Doppler = grade 2) in at least one tendon in at least one scan during the tournament. At baseline, only two of the 14 players had normal flow in all the tendons examined. After 1...

  13. Minimally invasive flexor hallucis longus transfer in management of acute achilles tendon rupture associated with tendinosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2012-04-01

    Chronic tendinopathy is characterized by pain in the tendon, generally at the start and completion of exercise. However, tendinosis may lead to decreased blood flow, increased stiffness of the tendon and reduced tensile strength, and predispose to rupture. Operative treatment is indicated to restore the function of the Achilles tendon and alleviate the prerupture heel cord pain. A case of acute Achilles tendon rupture with extensive tendinosis that was successfully treated with minimally invasive flexor hallucis longus transfer is reported.

  14. Muscle and tendon injuries: the role of biological interventions to promote and assist healing and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andia, Isabel; Maffulli, Nicola

    2015-05-01

    To summarize clinical studies after platelet-rich plasma (PRP) therapy for tendinopathy, plantar fasciopathy, and muscle injuries; to review PRP formulations used across studies; and to identify knowledge deficits that require further investigation. After a systematic review in PubMed, we identified clinical studies assessing PRP efficacy in tendon and muscle during the past decade. We standardized data extraction by grouping studies based on anatomic location; summarized patient populations, PRP formulations, and clinical outcomes; and identified knowledge deficits that require further investigation. Overall, 1,541 patients had been treated with PRP in 58 clinical studies; of these, 26 addressed upper limb tendinopathies and 32 addressed the lower limb (810 patients and 731 patients treated with PRP, respectively). The quality of research is higher for the upper limb than for the lower limb (23 controlled studies, of which 17 are Level I, v 19 controlled studies, of which 6 are Level I, respectively). Patients have been treated mostly with leukocyte-platelet-rich plasma, except in the arthroscopic management of the rotator cuff. The safety and efficacy of PRP for muscle injuries has been addressed in 7 studies including 182 patients. Differences across results are mainly attributed to dissimilarities between tissues and different stages of degeneration, numbers of PRP applications, and protocols. Given the heterogeneity in tendons and tendinopathies, currently, we are not able to decide whether PRP therapies are useful. Despite advances in PRP science, data are insufficient and there is a clear need to optimize protocols and obtain more high-quality clinical data in both tendinopathies and muscle injuries before making treatment recommendations. Level IV, systematic review of Level I through IV studies. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Recurrence of Achilles tendon injuries in elite male football players is more common after early return to play: an 11-year follow-up of the UEFA Champions League injury study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajhede-Knudsen, Mariann; Ekstrand, Jan; Magnusson, Henrik; Maffulli, Nicola

    2013-08-01

    There is limited information about Achilles tendon disorders in professional football. To investigate the incidence, injury circumstances, lay-off times and reinjury rates of Achilles tendon disorders in male professional football. A total of 27 clubs from 10 countries and 1743 players have been followed prospectively during 11 seasons between 2001 and 2012. The team medical staff recorded individual player exposure and time-loss injuries. A total of 203 (2.5% of all injuries) Achilles tendon disorders were registered. A majority (96%) of the disorders were tendinopathies, and nine were partial or total ruptures. A higher injury rate was found during the preseason compared with the competitive season, 0.25 vs 0.18/1000 h (rate ratio (RR) 1.4, 95% CI 1.1 to 2.0; p=0.027). The mean lay-off time for Achilles tendinopathies was 23±37 (median=10, Q1=4 and Q3=24) days, while a rupture of the Achilles tendon, on average, caused 161±65 (median=169, Q1=110 and Q3=189) days of absence. Players with Achilles tendon disorders were significantly older than the rest of the cohort, with a mean age of 27.2±4 years vs 25.6±4.6 years (p<0.001). 27% of all Achilles tendinopathies were reinjuries. A higher reinjury risk was found after short recovery periods (31%) compared with longer recovery periods (13%) (RR 2.4, 95% CI 2.1 to 2.8; p<0.001). Achilles tendon disorders account for 3.8% of the total lay-off time and are more common in older players. Recurrence is common after Achilles tendinopathies and the reinjury risk is higher after short recovery periods.

  16. Subacromial impingement syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Masood Umer; Irfan Qadir; Mohsin Azam

    2012-01-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS) represents a spectrum of pathology ranging from subacromial bursitis to rotator cuff tendinopathy and full-thickness rotator cuff tears. The relationship between subacromial impingement and rotator cuff disease in the etiology of rotator cuff injury is a matter of debate. However, the etiology is multi-factorial, and it has been attributed to both extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms. Management includes physical therapy, injections, and, for some patient...

  17. Subacromial Impingement Syndrome Caused by a Voluminous Subdeltoid Lipoma

    OpenAIRE

    Jean-Christophe Murray; Stéphane Pelet

    2014-01-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome is a clinical diagnosis encompassing a spectrum of possible etiologies, including subacromial bursitis, rotator cuff tendinopathy, and partial- to full-thickness rotator cuff tears. This report presents an unusual case of subdeltoid lipoma causing extrinsic compression and subacromial impingement syndrome. The patient, a 60-year-old man, presented to our institution with a few years' history of nontraumatic, posteriorly localized throbbing pain in his right sh...

  18. Tribosupplementation with Lubricin in Prevention of Post-Traumatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    emphasis on identifying and measuring the worst lesions may obscure the chondroprotective effects that are not immediately apparent in the data. Tissue...Intervertebral Disc Results in Elevated Torsional Apparent Modulus. Journal of Biomechanics. 2015 Apr 3. pii: S0021- 9290(15)00201-8 [PMID: 25907550] 6. Sun, Y...Achilles Tendinopathy. Journal of Orthopedic Research. J Orthop Res. 2015 Jun;33(6):932-7 [PMID: 25864860] 7. Reisdorf, RL., Thoreson, AR., Berglund

  19. Acute partial rupture of the common extensor tendon

    OpenAIRE

    Kachrimanis, G.; Papadopoulou, O.

    2010-01-01

    Rupture of the common extensor tendon is the most common acute tendon injury of the elbow. The authors describe a case of a patient with a clinical history of tendinopathy caused by functional overload of the common extensor tendon, treated also with infiltrations of steroids, and subsequent partial rupture of the tendon during sport activity. The diagnosis was made clinically and at ultrasound (US) examination; US follow-up after some time showed the healing of the lesion. This case confirms...

  20. Tendon vascularity in overhead athletes with subacromial pain syndrome and its correlation with the resting subacromial space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Sammi Sin Mei; Leong, Hio Teng; Leung, Vivian Yee Fong; Ying, Michael; Fu, Siu Ngor

    2017-05-01

    Supraspinatus tendinopathy is one of the common causes of subacromial pain syndrome (SAPS) in overhead athletes. Changes in tendon vascularity have been reported in painful tendons; however, the prevalence and distribution have not been investigated in young overhead athletes. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 47 overhead athletes (male, 31; female, 16) aged 18 to 36 years with SAPS for >3 months. A sonographer graded the severity of the tendinopathy and area of vascularization. Ultrasound imaging was used to measure supraspinatus tendon thickness, vascularity, and resting subacromial space. A self-written program was used to semiquantify the intensity of vascularity, expressed as the vascular index. The majority (87.2%) of the participants had signs of tendinopathy in the supraspinatus tendon, and 40 (85.1%) of the tendinopathic tendons had vascularity. The majority (66.0%) of the vascularized subjects presented with minimal increase in vascularity, and 19.1% had moderate to severe vascularization. Most (79.2%) of the vascularization was observed in the pericortical region. The vascular index was negatively correlated with the resting subacromial space in male athletes with a reduced subacromial space (ρ = -0.63; P = .038). Of overhead athletes with SAPS, 87.2% had supraspinatus tendinopathy with minimal to moderate vascularization, with the majority of vascularization occurring in the pericortical region. In male athletes with a reduced subacromial space, greater vascularity in the supraspinatus tendon was associated with a smaller resting subacromial space. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A soft patellar tendon on ultrasound elastography is associated with pain and functional deficit in volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Chin Chin; Richards, Paula J; Maffulli, Nicola; Ede, David; Schneider, Michal E; Connell, David; Morrissey, Dylan; Malliaras, Peter

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the diagnostic performance of grey scale Ultrasound (US), power Doppler (PD) and US elastography for diagnosing painful patellar tendinopathy, and to establish their relationship with Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Patella (VISA-P) scores in a group of volleyball players with and without symptoms of patellar tendinopathy. Cross-sectional study. Thirty-five volleyball players (70 patellar tendons) were recruited during a national university volleyball competition. Players were imaged with conventional US followed by elastography. The clinical findings of painful patellar tendons were used as the reference standard for diagnosing patellar tendinopathy. In addition, all participants completed the VISA-P questionnaires. Of the 70 patellar tendons, 40 (57.1%) were clinically painful. The diagnostic accuracy of grey scale US, PD and elastography were 60%, 50%, 62.9%, respectively, with sensitivity/specificity of 72.5%/43.3%, 12.5%/100%, and 70%/53.3%, respectively. Combined US elastography and grey scale imaging achieved 82.5% sensitivity, 33.3% specificity and 61.4% accuracy while routine combination technique of PD and grey scale imaging revealed 72.5% sensitivity, 43.3% specificity and 60.0% accuracy. Tendons in players categorized as soft on elastography had statistically significantly greater AP thickness (p<0.001) and lower VISA-P scores (p=0.004) than those categorized as hard. There was no significant association between grey scale US abnormalities (hypoechogenicities and/or fusiform swelling) and VISA-P scores (p=0.098). Soft tendon properties depicted by US elastography may be more related to patellar tendon symptoms compared to grey scale US abnormalities. The supplementation of US elastography to conventional US may enhance the sensitivity for diagnosing patellar tendinopathy in routine clinical practice. Copyright © 2015 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Strategies for the prevention of volleyball related injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeser, J C; Verhagen, E; Briner, W W; Askeland, T I; Bahr, R

    2006-01-01

    Although the overall injury rate in volleyball and beach volleyball is relatively low compared with other team sports, injuries do occur in a discipline specific pattern. Epidemiological research has revealed that volleyball athletes are, in general, at greatest risk of acute ankle injuries and overuse conditions of the knee and shoulder. This structured review discusses both the known and suspected risk factors and potential strategies for preventing the most common volleyball related injuries: ankle sprains, patellar tendinopathy, and shoulder overuse. PMID:16799111

  3. Delayed Exercise Promotes Remodeling in Sub-Rupture Fatigue Damaged Tendons

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, R; Boniello, M.R.; Gendron, N.R.; Flatow, E. L.; Andarawis-Puri, N.

    2015-01-01

    Tendinopathy is a common musculoskeletal injury whose treatment is limited by ineffective therapeutic interventions. Previously we have shown that tendons ineffectively repair early sub-rupture fatigue damage. In contrast, physiological exercise has been shown to promote remodeling of healthy tendons but its utility as a therapeutic to promote repair of fatigue damaged tendons remains unknown. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess the utility of exercise initiated 1 and 14 days...

  4. Basic mechanisms of tendon fatigue damage

    OpenAIRE

    Neviaser, Andrew; Andarawis-Puri, Nelly; Flatow, Evan

    2012-01-01

    Pathologic processes intrinsic and extrinsic to the tendons have been proposed as the underlying cause of rotator cuff disease, but the precise etiology is not known. Tear formation is, in part, attributable to the accumulation of subrupture tendon fatigue damage. We review the molecular, mechanical, and structural changes induced in tendons subjected to controlled amounts of fatigue loading in an animal model of early tendinopathy. The distinct tendon responses to low and moderate levels of ...

  5. Evaluation of the results from arthroscopic tenodesis of the long head of the biceps brachii on the tendon of the subscapularis muscle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baggio, Marcelo; Martinelli, Fabrício; Netto, Martins Back; Martins, Rafael Olívio; da Cunha, Romilton Crozetta; Stipp, Willian Nandi

    2016-01-01

    ... in tendinopathy/tendinitis, which may evolve to partial or total tearing and instability of the biceps. 3 When in situations of failure of conservative treatment for LHBB injuries (such as analgesia, rest and physiotherapy), surgical measures are proposed. Among the options for surgical treatment tenotomy and various techniques for biceps tenodesis can be highlighted. 4 The data in the literature are divergent regarding use of tenotomy or tenodesis for the LHBB. Although both of these techniques present pos...

  6. Psychology in sports injury rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Concannon, Michael; Pringle, Bob

    2012-01-01

    Using the case study of an 18-year-old track athlete with a chronic Achilles tendinopathy, this article identifies risk factors associated with training for major athletic events, such as the forthcoming Olympic Games, and presents evidence for adopting a multidisciplinary approach to the treatment and management of athletic injury, addressing the physical aspects of the injury, as well as the psychological needs of the athlete. The athlete’s GP and practice nurse, as well as a podiatrist and...

  7. Different Achilles Tendon Pathologies Show Distinct Histological and Molecular Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franka Klatte-Schulz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Reasons for the development of chronic tendon pathologies are still under debate and more basic knowledge is needed about the different diseases. The aim of the present study was therefore to characterize different acute and chronic Achilles tendon disorders. Achilles tendon samples from patients with chronic tendinopathy (n = 7, chronic ruptures (n = 6, acute ruptures (n = 13, and intact tendons (n = 4 were analyzed. The histological score investigating pathological changes was significantly increased in tendinopathy and chronic ruptures compared to acute ruptures. Inflammatory infiltration was detected by immunohistochemistry in all tendon pathology groups, but was significantly lower in tendinopathy compared to chronic ruptures. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR analysis revealed significantly altered expression of genes related to collagens and matrix modeling/remodeling (matrix metalloproteinases, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases in tendinopathy and chronic ruptures compared to intact tendons and/or acute ruptures. In all three tendon pathology groups markers of inflammation (interleukin (IL 1β, tumor necrosis factor α, IL6, IL10, IL33, soluble ST2, transforming growth factor β1, cyclooxygenase 2, inflammatory cells (cluster of differentaition (CD 3, CD68, CD80, CD206, fat metabolism (fatty acid binding protein 4, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α, adiponectin, and innervation (protein gene product 9.5, growth associated protein 43, macrophage migration inhibitory factor were detectable, but only in acute ruptures significantly regulated compared to intact tendons. The study gives an insight into structural and molecular changes of pathological processes in tendons and might be used to identify targets for future therapy of tendon pathologies.

  8. Ultrasound-guided interventional procedures around the shoulder

    OpenAIRE

    Messina, Carmelo; Banfi, Giuseppe; Orlandi, Davide; Lacelli, Francesca; Serafini, Giovanni; Mauri, Giovanni; Secchi, Francesco; Silvestri, Enzo; Sconfienza, Luca Maria

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is an established modality for shoulder evaluation, being accurate, low cost and radiation free. Different pathological conditions can be diagnosed using ultrasound and can be treated using ultrasound guidance, such as degenerative, traumatic or inflammatory diseases. Subacromial–subdeltoid bursitis is the most common finding on ultrasound evaluation for painful shoulder. Therapeutic injections of corticosteroids are helpful to reduce inflammation and pain. Calcific tendinopathy of...

  9. Steroid-induced Kager's fat pad atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taneja, Atul K. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Musculoskeletal Radiology Division, Imaging Department, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Musculoskeletal Imaging, Diagnostic Center, Hospital do Coracao (HCor) and Teleimagem, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Santos, Durval C.B. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Musculoskeletal Radiology Division, Imaging Department, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    We report a rare case of Kager's fat pad atrophy and fibrosis in a 60-year-old woman 1 year after a steroid injection for Achilles tendinopathy. There are few published reports of steroid-induced atrophy affecting deeper layers of fat tissue. To our knowledge, this case report is the first to illustrate its features using magnetic resonance imaging. A review of the scientific literature is also presented. (orig.)

  10. Case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    10 déc. 2015 ... Abstract. Les ruptures traumatiques du tendon quadricipital sont rares, elles surviennent préférentiellement après 40 ans, suite à un traumatisme indirect chez le sportif (flexion contrariée du genou) ou traumatisme banal chez le sédentaire. La tendinopathie préexistante est fréquente. La rupture est.

  11. Dynamic thoracohumeral kinematics are dependent upon the etiology of the shoulder injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan López-Pascual

    Full Text Available Obtaining kinematic patterns that depend on the shoulder injury may be important when planning rehabilitation. The main goal of this study is to explore whether the kinematic patterns of continuous and repetitive shoulder elevation motions are different according to the type of shoulder injury in question, specifically tendinopathy or rotator cuff tear, and to analyze the influence of the load handled during its assessment. For this purpose, 19 individuals with tendinopathy and 9 with rotator cuff tear performed a repetitive scaption movement that was assessed with stereophotogrammetry. Furthermore, static range of motion (ROM and isometric strength were evaluated with a goniometer and a dynamometer, respectively. Dynamic measurements of maximum elevation (Emax, variablility of the maximum angle (VMA, maximum angular velocity (Velmax, and time to maximum velocity (tmaxvel were found to be significantly different between the tendinopathy group (TG and the rotator cuff tear group (RTCG. No differences were found in the ROM assessed with goniometry and the isometric strength. The effect of increasing the load placed in the hand during the scaption movement led to significant differences in Emax, VMA, tmaxvel and repeatability. Therefore, only the dynamic variables showed sufficient capability of detecting differences in functional performance associated with structural shoulder injury. The differences observed in the kinematic variables between patients with tendinopathy and rotator cuff tear seem to be related to alterations in thoracohumeral rhythm and neuromuscular control. Kinematic analysis may contribute to a better understanding of the functional impact of shoulder injuries, which would help in the assessment and treatment of shoulder pain.

  12. Achilles tendon of wistar rats treated with laser therapy and eccentric exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Souza, Maria Verônica de; Silva, Carlos Henrique Osório; Silva, Micheline Ozana da; Costa, Marcela Bueno Martins da; Dornas, Raul Felipe; Borges, Andréa Pacheco Batista; Natali, Antônio José

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACTIntroduction:Both laser therapy and eccentric exercises are used in tendon injuries. However, the association of these physiotherapeutic modalities is yet little investigated.Objective:To evaluate the effect of low-level laser therapy associated to eccentric exercise (downhill walking) on Achilles tendinopathy of Wistar rats.Method:Eighteen Achilles tendon from 15 adult male Wistar rats were used. Tendons were distributed in six groups (laser, eccentric exercise, laser and eccentric e...

  13. Is Platelet-rich plasma superior to whole blood in the management of chronic tennis elbow: one year randomized clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Raeissadat, Seyed Ahmad; Rayegani, Seyed Mansoor; Hassanabadi, Hossein; Rahimi, Rosa; Sedighipour, Leyla; Rostami, Khalil

    2014-01-01

    Background Lateral humeral epicondylitis, or ‘tennis elbow’, is a common condition with a variety of treatment options. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and Autologous Whole Blood (AWB) represent new therapeutic options for chronic tendinopathies including tennis elbow. The aim of the present study was to compare the long term effects of PRP versus autologous whole blood local injection in patients with chronic tennis elbow. Methods Seventy six patients with chronic lateral humeral epicondylitis wi...

  14. Mechanical stimulation (pulsed electromagnetic fields "PEMF" and extracorporeal shock wave therapy "ESWT" and tendon regeneration: a possible alternative.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica eRosso

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of tendon degeneration and tendinopathy is still partially unclear. However, an active role of metalloproteinases (MMP, growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and a crucial role of inflammatory elements and cytokines was demonstrated. Mechanical stimulation may play a role in regulation of inflammation. In vitro studies demonstrated that both pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF and extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT increased the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine such as interleukin (IL-6 and IL-10. Moreover ESWT increases the expression of growth factors, such as transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF, and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1, as well as the synthesis of collagen I fibers. These pre-clinical results, in association with several clinical studies, suggest a potential effectiveness of ESWT for tendinopathy treatment. Recently PEMF gained popularity as adjuvant for fracture healing and bone regeneration. Similarly to ESWT, the mechanical stimulation obtained using PEMFs may play a role for treatment of tendinopathy and for tendon regeneration, increasing in-vitro TGF-beta production, as well as scleraxis and collagen I gene expression. In this manuscript the rational of mechanical stimulations and the clinical studies on the efficacy of extracorporeal shock wave (ESW and PEMF will be discussed. However, no clear evidence of a clinical value of ESW and PEMF has been found in literature with regards to the treatment of tendinopathy in human, so further clinical trials are needed to confirm the promising hypotheses concerning the effectiveness of ESWT and PEMF mechanical stimulation.

  15. Exercise Related Leg Pain (ERLP): a Review of The Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Reinking, Mark F.

    2007-01-01

    Exercise related leg pain (ERLP) is a regional pain syndrome described as pain between the knee and ankle which occurs with exercise. Indiscriminant use of terminology such as “shin splints” has resulted in ongoing confusion regarding the pathoanatomic entities associated with this pain syndrome. Each of the pathoanatomic entities – medial tibial stress syndrome, chronic exertional compartment syndrome, tibial and fibular stress fractures, tendinopathy, nerve entrapment, and vascular patholog...

  16. Magnetization transfer in human achilles tendon assessed by a 3D ultrashort echo time sequence. Quantitative examinations in healthy volunteers at 3T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syha, R.; Grosse, U.; Springer, F. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Section on Experimental Radiology; Martirosian, P.; Schick, F. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Section on Experimental Radiology; Ketelsen, D.; Claussen, C.D. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2011-11-15

    Magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) imaging provides insight into interactions between free and bounded water. Newly developed ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequences implemented on whole-body magnetic resonance (MR) scanners allow MTC imaging in tissues with extremely fast signal decay such as tendons. The aim of this study was to develop a technique for the quantification of the MT effect in healthy Achilles tendons in-vivo at 3 Tesla. 16 normal tendons of volunteers with no history of tendinopathy were examined using a 3D-UTE sequence with a rectangular on-resonant excitation pulse and a Fermi-shaped off-resonant MT preparation pulse. The frequency of the MT pulse was varied from 1 to 5 kHz. MT effects were calculated in terms of the MT ratio (MTR) between measurements without and with MT preparation. Direct saturation effects of MT preparation on the signal intensity were evaluated using numerical simulation of Bloch equations. One patient with tendinopathy was examined to exemplarily show changes of MTR under pathologic conditions. Calculation of MTR data was feasible in all examined tendons and showed a decrease from 0.53 {+-} 0.05 to 0.25 {+-} 0.03 (1 kHz to 5 kHz) for healthy volunteers. Evaluation of variation with gender and dominance of ankle revealed no significant differences (p > 0.05). In contrast, the patient with confirmed tendinopathy showed MTR values between 0.36 (1 kHz) and 0.19 (5 kHz). MT effects in human Achilles tendons can be reliably assessed in-vivo using a 3D UTE sequence at 3 T. All healthy tendons showed similar MTR values (coefficient of variation 10.0 {+-} 1.2 %). The examined patient showed a clearly different MT effect revealing a changed microstructure in the case of tendinopathy. (orig.)

  17. Decline eccentric squats increases patellar tendon loading compared to standard eccentric squats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongsgaard, M; Aagaard, P; Roikjaer, S; Olsen, D; Jensen, M; Langberg, H; Magnusson, S P

    2006-08-01

    Recent studies have shown excellent clinical results using eccentric squat training on a 25 degrees decline board to treat patellar tendinopathy. It remains unknown why therapeutic management of patellar tendinopathy using decline eccentric squats offer superior clinical efficacy compared to standard horizontal eccentric squats. This study aimed to compare electromyography activity, patellar tendon strain and joint angle kinematics during standard and decline eccentric squats. Thirteen subjects performed unilateral eccentric squats on flat-and a 25 degrees decline surface. During the squats, electromyography activity was obtained in eight representative muscles. Also, ankle, knee and hip joint goniometry was obtained. Additionally, patellar tendon strain was measured in vivo using ultrasonography as subjects maintained a unilateral isometric 90 degrees knee angle squat position on either flat or 25 degrees decline surface. Patellar tendon strain was significantly greater (Pcompared to the standard surface. The stop angles of the ankle and hip joints were significantly smaller during the decline compared to the standard squats (Pcompared to the standard squats (Pstandard and decline squats. The use of a 25 degrees decline board increases the load and the strain of the patellar tendon during unilateral eccentric squats. This finding likely explains previous reports of superior clinical efficacy of decline eccentric squats in the rehabilitative management of patellar tendinopathy.

  18. De Quervain Tenosynovitis Following Trapeziometacarpal Ball-and-Socket Joint Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goubau, Jean F; Goubau, Laurent; Goorens, Chul Ki; van Hoonacker, Petrus; Kerckhove, Diederick; Vanmierlo, Bert; Berghs, Bart

    2015-02-01

    Background One of the surgical treatment options for trapeziometacarpal (TMC) joint arthritis is a prosthetic ball-and-socket replacement. One of the complications in the postoperative setting is de Quervain tendinopathy. Purposes Although this complication has been reported following a resection athroplasty, we questioned whether lengthening of the thumb following the Ivory (Memometal, Stryker Corporate, Kalamazoo, MI, USA) ball-and-socket arthroplasty could be a causal factor. Methods In a prospective study regarding the overall outcome of the Ivory prosthesis, we analyzed 96 cases (83 patients; 69 female, 12 male, 8 bilateral) of primary implanted Ivory prosthesis and the incidence of de Quervain disease during the first year following surgery. We found a particularly high incidence (17%) of de Quervain tendinopathy the first year following this ball-and-socket arthroplasty. We measured the lengthening of the thumb radiographically in the group presenting de Quervain and the asymptomatic group and compared this measure between the two groups. Results We did not find any measurable or statistically significant difference between the groups regarding lengthening. Discussion These findings suggest that lengthening of the thumb following ball-and-socket arthroplasty is not a causal factor in the development of de Quervain tendinopathy within one year after surgery.

  19. Adhesive capsulitis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewald, Anthony

    2011-02-15

    Adhesive capsulitis is a common, yet poorly understood, condition causing pain and loss of range of motion in the shoulder. It can occur in isolation or concomitantly with other shoulder conditions (e.g., rotator cuff tendinopathy, bursitis) or diabetes mellitus. It is often self-limited, but can persist for years and may never fully resolve. The diagnosis is usually clinical, although imaging can help rule out other conditions. The differential diagnosis includes acromioclavicular arthropathy, autoimmune disease (e.g., systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis), biceps tendinopathy, glenohumeral osteoarthritis, neoplasm, rotator cuff tendinopathy or tear (with or without impingement), and subacromial and subdeltoid bursitis. Several treatment options are commonly used, but few have high-level evidence to support them. Because the condition is often self-limited, observation and reassurance may be considered; however, this may not be acceptable to many patients because of the painful and debilitating nature of the condition. Nonsurgical treatments include analgesics (e.g., acetaminophen, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), oral prednisone, and intra-articular corticosteroid injections. Home exercise regimens and physical therapy are often prescribed. Surgical treatments include manipulation of the joint under anesthesia and capsular release.

  20. Ultrasonographic evaluation of the shoulder in elite Italian beach volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteleone, G; Tramontana, A; Mc Donald, K; Sorge, R; Tiloca, A; Foti, C

    2015-10-01

    Beach volleyball is an overhead sport that subjects the hitting shoulder to intense functional loads. The purpose of this study is to identify ultrasonographically the prevalence of myotendinous alterations in professional Italian beach volleyball players at the Italian championship and to look for associations between ultrasound findings and the other data collected. Fifty-three beach volleyball players (31 women, 22 men) were recruited during the second stage of the Italian championship held in July 2012 in Rome, Italy. Clinical history was obtained from all subjects, followed by physical exam. Each athlete completed a questionnaire regarding sports activities. Bilateral ultrasonographic evaluation of the shoulders was then performed. Calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff of the hitting shoulder was identified ultrasonographically in 30% of the athletes. The mean age of the athletes with calcific tendinopathy was older than subjects with other abnormalities on ultrasonographic examination (33.1 years vs. 25.8 years, t-test; Pvolleyball players has a prevalence of 30% ultrasonographically, greater than that reported in the general population. In these athletes, the presence of calcific tendinopathy correlates positively with age.

  1. Direct Radiofrequency Application Improves Pain and Gait in Collagenase-Induced Acute Achilles Tendon Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Pu Tsai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiofrequency (RF is often used as a supplementary and alternative method to alleviate pain for chronic tendinopathy. Whether or how it would work for acute tendon injury is not addressed in the literatures. Through detailed pain and gait monitoring, we hypothesized that collagenase-induce acute tendinopathy model may be able to answer these questions. Gait parameters, including time, distance, and range of motion, were recorded and analyzed using a walking track equipped with a video-based system. Expression of substance P (SP, calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP, and galanin were used as pain markers. Beta-III tubulin and Masson trichrome staining were used as to evaluate nerve sprouting, matrix tension, and degeneration in the tendon. Of fourteen analyzed parameters, RF significantly improved stance phase, step length, preswing, and intermediary toe-spread of gait. Improved gait related to the expression of substance P, CGRP, and reduced nerve fiber sprouting and matrix tension, but not galanin. The study indicates that direct RF application may be a valuable approach to improve gait and pain in acute tendon injury. Altered gait parameters may be used as references to evaluate therapeutic outcomes of RF or other treatment plan for tendinopathy.

  2. Direct Radiofrequency Application Improves Pain and Gait in Collagenase-Induced Acute Achilles Tendon Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yun-Pu; Chang, Chi-Wen; Lee, Jung-Shun; Liang, Jen-I; Hsieh, Tsung-Hsun; Yeh, Ming-Long

    2013-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) is often used as a supplementary and alternative method to alleviate pain for chronic tendinopathy. Whether or how it would work for acute tendon injury is not addressed in the literatures. Through detailed pain and gait monitoring, we hypothesized that collagenase-induce acute tendinopathy model may be able to answer these questions. Gait parameters, including time, distance, and range of motion, were recorded and analyzed using a walking track equipped with a video-based system. Expression of substance P (SP), calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), and galanin were used as pain markers. Beta-III tubulin and Masson trichrome staining were used as to evaluate nerve sprouting, matrix tension, and degeneration in the tendon. Of fourteen analyzed parameters, RF significantly improved stance phase, step length, preswing, and intermediary toe-spread of gait. Improved gait related to the expression of substance P, CGRP, and reduced nerve fiber sprouting and matrix tension, but not galanin. The study indicates that direct RF application may be a valuable approach to improve gait and pain in acute tendon injury. Altered gait parameters may be used as references to evaluate therapeutic outcomes of RF or other treatment plan for tendinopathy. PMID:24348697

  3. Ultrasound-guided interventional procedures around the shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Carmelo; Banfi, Giuseppe; Orlandi, Davide; Lacelli, Francesca; Serafini, Giovanni; Mauri, Giovanni; Secchi, Francesco; Silvestri, Enzo; Sconfienza, Luca Maria

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound is an established modality for shoulder evaluation, being accurate, low cost and radiation free. Different pathological conditions can be diagnosed using ultrasound and can be treated using ultrasound guidance, such as degenerative, traumatic or inflammatory diseases. Subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis is the most common finding on ultrasound evaluation for painful shoulder. Therapeutic injections of corticosteroids are helpful to reduce inflammation and pain. Calcific tendinopathy of rotator cuff affects up to 20% of painful shoulders. Ultrasound-guided treatment may be performed with both single- and double-needle approach. Calcific enthesopathy, a peculiar form of degenerative tendinopathy, is a common and mostly asymptomatic ultrasound finding; dry needling has been proposed in symptomatic patients. An alternative is represented by autologous platelet-rich plasma injections. Intra-articular injections of the shoulder can be performed in the treatment of a variety of inflammatory and degenerative diseases with corticosteroids or hyaluronic acid respectively. Steroid injections around the long head of the biceps brachii tendon are indicated in patients with biceps tendinopathy, reducing pain and humeral tenderness. The most common indication for acromion-clavicular joint injection is degenerative osteoarthritis, with ultrasound representing a useful tool in localizing the joint space and properly injecting various types of drugs (steroids, lidocaine or hyaluronic acid). Suprascapular nerve block is an approved treatment for chronic shoulder pain non-responsive to conventional treatments as well as candidate patients for shoulder arthroscopy. This review provides an overview of these different ultrasonography-guided procedures that can be performed around the shoulder.

  4. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy for non-calcific supraspinatus tendinitis - 10-year follow-up of a randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efe, Turgay; Felgentreff, Markus; Heyse, Thomas J; Stein, Thomas; Timmesfeld, Nina; Schmitt, Jan; Roessler, Philip P

    2014-10-01

    Evidence for the efficacy of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) in supraspinatus tendinopathy without calcification is sparse, and therefore this treatment option is often controversial. Patients of a randomized placebo-controlled study to analyze the effects of ESWT on function and pain were revisited 10 years after the initial consultation. The former verum group received 6000 impulses (energy flux density, 0.11 mJ/mm²) in three sessions after local anesthesia between 1999 and 2000. The placebo group had 6000 impulses of a sham ESWT after local anesthesia in the same period. Re-evaluation of the patients included a relative Constant score as well as pain measurements (visual analogue scale) during activity and at rest. No significant changes (p>0.05) in relative Constant scores, pain at rest, or pain during activity could be found after a 10-year follow-up between the placebo and verum groups after ESWT. The treatment of non-calcific supraspinatus tendinopathy with ESWT does not seem to have an effect on function or pain improvement in the long run. The results of the present study cannot advise the use of ESWT in cases of non-calcific supraspinatus tendinopathy.

  5. Strain mapping in the Achilles tendon - A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogaerts, Stijn; Desmet, Hannelore; Slagmolen, Pieter; Peers, Koen

    2016-06-14

    Achilles tendinopathy remains one of the most prevalent overuse injuries in elite as well as recreational athletes. Regardless of the fact that the aetiology of tendinopathy has not been fully understood, therapeutic mechanical loading programs have emerged as being the treatment of choice. In this light, mechanical properties of the tendon and their response to changes in loading or unloading have been the subject of many previous investigations. One of these properties often investigated is strain, a measure of relative deformation. By means of a systematic review, an overview was given of research in this field, with a primary objective to list the methods used and secondary aim to synthesize data on strain mapping in the Achilles tendon. Following the guidelines of the PRISMA statement, 47 articles were found appropriate for qualitative assessment. Achilles tendon strain has been investigated across a variety of contexts, including the response to exercise, walking, unloading, ageing, hormonal changes and weight. Only three studies investigated the effect of the presence of tendinopathy on strain. Ultrasound was the most often used imaging modality to measure or estimate strain. Further methodological parameters, e.g. the location of measurement, differed greatly between all different studies. Nearly all studies considered global strain. Some studies investigated the transverse strain response of the Achilles tendon. Recently, however, the role of local - intratendinous - strain distribution has been found to be of critical importance and further studies should focus on imaging modalities to investigate these local changes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Oedema and fatty degeneration of the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles on MR images in patients with achilles tendon abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Adrienne [University Hospital Balgrist Zuerich, Radiology Department, Zuerich (Switzerland); Hirslanden Klinik Aarau, Radiology Department, Aarau (Switzerland); Mamisch, Nadja; Buck, Florian M.; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A.; Zanetti, Marco [University Hospital Balgrist Zuerich, Radiology Department, Zuerich (Switzerland); Espinosa, Norman [University Hospital Balgrist Zuerich, Orthopedic Surgery Department, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2011-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the frequency of oedema and fatty degeneration of the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles in patients with Achilles tendon abnormalities. Forty-five consecutive patients (mean 51 years; range 14-84 years) with achillodynia were examined with magnetic resonance (MR) images of the calf. The frequency of oedema and fatty degeneration in the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles was determined in patients with normal tendons, tendinopathy and in patients with a partial tear or a complete tear of the Achilles tendon. Oedema was encountered in 35% (7/20) of the patients with tendinopathy (n = 20; range 13-81 years), and in 47% (9/19) of the patients with partial tears or complete tears (n = 19; 28-78 years). Fatty degeneration was encountered in 10% (2/20) of the patients with tendinopathy, and in 32% (6/19) of the patients with tears. The prevalence of fatty degeneration was significantly more common in patients with a partial or complete tear compared with the patients with a normal Achilles tendon (p = 0.032 and p = 0.021, respectively). Oedema and fatty degeneration of the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles are common in patients with Achilles tendon abnormalities. (orig.)

  7. Correlation of MRI findings with clinical findings of trochanteric pain syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blankenbaker, Donna G.; Ullrick, Steven R.; Davis, Kirkland W.; De Smet, Arthur A. [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Haaland, Ben; Fine, Jason P. [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Departments of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics and Statistics, Madison, WI (United States)

    2008-10-15

    Greater trochanter pain syndrome due to tendinopathy or bursitis is a common cause of hip pain. The previously reported magnetic resonance (MR) findings of trochanteric tendinopathy and bursitis are peritrochanteric fluid and abductor tendon abnormality. We have often noted peritrochanteric high T2 signal in patients without trochanteric symptoms. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the MR findings of peritrochanteric fluid or hip abductor tendon pathology correlate with trochanteric pain. We retrospectively reviewed 131 consecutive MR examinations of the pelvis (256 hips) for T2 peritrochanteric signal and abductor tendon abnormalities without knowledge of the clinical symptoms. Any T2 peritrochanteric abnormality was characterized by size as tiny, small, medium, or large; by morphology as feathery, crescentic, or round; and by location as bursal or intratendinous. The clinical symptoms of hip pain and trochanteric pain were compared to the MR findings on coronal, sagittal, and axial T2 sequences using chi-square or Fisher's exact test with significance assigned as p<0.05. Clinical symptoms of trochanteric pain syndrome were present in only 16 of the 256 hips. All 16 hips with trochanteric pain and 212 (88%) of 240 without trochanteric pain had peritrochanteric abnormalities (p=0.15). Eighty-eight percent of hips with trochanteric symptoms had gluteus tendinopathy while 50% of those without symptoms had such findings (p=0.004). Other than tendinopathy, there was no statistically significant difference between hips with or without trochanteric symptoms and the presence of peritrochanteric T2 abnormality, its size or shape, and the presence of gluteus medius or minimus partial thickness tears. Patients with trochanteric pain syndrome always have peritrochanteric T2 abnormalities and are significantly more likely to have abductor tendinopathy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, although the absence of peritrochanteric T2 MR abnormalities

  8. Substance P is a mechanoresponsive, autocrine regulator of human tenocyte proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludvig J Backman

    Full Text Available It has been hypothesised that substance P (SP may be produced by primary fibroblastic tendon cells (tenocytes, and that this production, together with the widespread distribution of the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1 R in tendon tissue, could play an important role in the development of tendinopathy, a condition of chronic tendon pain and thickening. The aim of this study was to examine the possibility of endogenous SP production and the expression of NK-1 R by human tenocytes. Because tendinopathy is related to overload, and because the predominant tissue pathology (tendinosis underlying early tendinopathy is characterized by tenocyte hypercellularity, the production of SP in response to loading/strain and the effects of exogenously administered SP on tenocyte proliferation were also studied. A cell culture model of primary human tendon cells was used. The vast majority of tendon cells were immunopositive for the tenocyte/fibroblast markers tenomodulin and vimentin, and immunocytochemical counterstaining revealed that positive immunoreactions for SP and NK-1 R were seen in a majority of these cells. Gene expression analyses showed that mechanical loading (strain of tendon cell cultures using the FlexCell© technique significantly increased the mRNA levels of SP, whereas the expression of NK-1 R mRNA decreased in loaded as compared to unloaded tendon cells. Reduced NK-1 R protein was also observed, using Western blot, after exogenously administered SP at a concentration of 10⁻⁷ M. SP exposure furthermore resulted in increased cell metabolism, increased cell viability, and increased cell proliferation, all of which were found to be specifically mediated via the NK-1 R; this in turn involving a common mitogenic cell signalling pathway, namely phosphorylation of ERK1/2. This study indicates that SP, produced by tenocytes in response to mechanical loading, may regulate proliferation through an autocrine loop involving the NK-1 R.

  9. Tendinosis-like histologic and molecular changes of the Achilles tendon to repetitive stress: a pilot study in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Nam Soon; Hwang, Ji Hye; Lee, Yong Taek; Chae, Seoung Wan

    2011-11-01

    Tendinopathy (pain and tendon degeneration) is associated with repetitive use and mechanical overload. However, the etiology of tendinopathy remains unclear. Clarification of histologic and molecular changes of tendon to repetitive stress could provide better understanding of Achilles tendon disorders related to repetitive stress. We asked whether repetitive stress simulating overuse of the Achilles tendon induced (1) histologic changes in rats similar to tendinosis (increased cellularity of fibrocytes, increased disorganization of collagen fiber, and increased roundness of the nucleus of the fibrocyte), (2) increased collagen Type III occurrence, and (3) increased inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. We used an exercise protocol simulating repetitive, jerky, eccentric contraction of the triceps surae in 15 rats. We conducted the exercise for 2 hours per day, three times per week using the right rear legs only and the left legs as internal controls. We harvested Achilles tendons after either 2, 4, or 6 weeks of exercise, and evaluated changes in tendon thickness, fibrocyte count, collagen fiber arrangement, collagen fiber type, and occurrence of iNOS. Exercised Achilles tendons showed increased cellularity of fibrocytes at 4 and 6 weeks of exercise, and disorganized collagen fiber arrangement at 6 weeks of exercise. There was a trend for Type III collagen occurrence being greater in experimental groups. Expression of iNOS increased after 2 and 4 weeks of exercise when compared with that of the controls, but decreased after 6 weeks. These observations suggest repetitive, synchronized, passive, and jerky exercise induced by electrical stimulation can lead to the tendinosis-like changes in the Achilles tendons in rats with imbalance between synthesis and degeneration after 4 weeks of exercise. This newly designed exercise protocol may be used to design an animal model of Achilles tendon overuse. With this model, therapeutic interventions of tendinopathy

  10. Percutaneous ultrasonic tenotomy for chronic elbow tendinosis: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Darryl E; Beckley, James M; Smith, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Elbow tendinopathy is the most common cause of elbow pain affecting active populations. Surgical excision is reserved for patients with refractory symptoms. Percutaneous ultrasonic tenotomy performed under local anesthesia also removes degenerated tissue and therefore provides an alternative treatment option to surgical excision. This investigation prospectively documented the safety and 1-year efficacy of ultrasonic percutaneous tenotomy performed by a single operator. Nineteen patients, aged 38 to 67 years, in whom >6 months of conservative management for medial (7) or lateral (12) elbow tendinopathy had failed were prospectively studied. All patients were treated with percutaneous ultrasonic tenotomy of the elbow by a single operator. Visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, the 11-item version of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (Quick DASH) index, and the Mayo Elbow Performance Score (MEPS) were assessed by an independent observer before treatment and at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months after treatment. No procedural complications occurred. Total treatment time was <15 minutes, and ultrasonic energy time averaged 38.6 ± 8.8 seconds per procedure. Average VAS scores were significantly improved from 6.4 to 2.6 at 6 weeks and were 0.7 at 12 months (P < .0001). Similar improvement occurred with the Quick DASH (pretreatment, 44.1; 12 months, 8.6, P < .0001) and MEPS (pretreatment, 59.1; 12 months, 83.4; P < .0001). Percutaneous ultrasonic tenotomy performed under local anesthesia appears to be a safe and effective treatment option for chronic, refractory lateral or medial elbow tendinopathy up to 1 year after the procedure. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Acceleration of tendon healing using US guided intratendinous injection of bevacizumab: First pre-clinical study on a murine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dallaudière, Benjamin, E-mail: bendallau64@hotmail.fr [Service de Radiologie, Hôpital universitaire Bichat, Paris (France); Inserm U698, Hôpital universitaire Bichat, Paris (France); Université de Médecine Paris Diderot (France); Lempicki, Marta [Service de Radiologie, Hôpital universitaire Bichat, Paris (France); Université de Médecine Paris Diderot (France); Pesquer, Lionel [Centre d’Imagerie Ostéo Articulaire, Clinique du Sport de Bordeaux-Mérignac (France); Louedec, Liliane [Inserm U698, Hôpital universitaire Bichat, Paris (France); Preux, Pierre Marie [Laboratoire de Biostatistiques, Faculté de médecine, Limoges (France); Meyer, Philippe [Centre d’Imagerie Ostéo Articulaire, Clinique du Sport de Bordeaux-Mérignac (France); Hess, Agathe [Service de Radiologie, Hôpital universitaire Bichat, Paris (France); Université de Médecine Paris Diderot (France); Durieux, Marie Hèlène Moreau [Centre d’Imagerie Ostéo Articulaire, Clinique du Sport de Bordeaux-Mérignac (France); Hummel, Vincent; Larbi, Ahmed [Service de Radiologie, Hôpital universitaire Bichat, Paris (France); Deschamps, Lydia [Service d’ Anatomopathologie, Hôpital universitaire Bichat, Paris (France); and others

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Tendinopathy shows early disorganized collagen fibers with neo-angiogenesis on histology. Peri-tendinous injection of corticosteroid is the commonly accepted strategy despite the abscence of inflammation in tendinosis. The aim of our study was to assess the potential of intratendinous injection of an anti-angiogenic drug (bevacizumab, AA) to treat tendinopathy in a murine model of patellar and Achilles tendinopathy, and to evaluate its local toxicity. Materials and method: Forty rats (160 patellar and Achilles tendons) were used for this study. We induced tendinosis (T+) in 80 tendons by injecting under ultrasonography (US) guidance Collagenase 1{sup ®} (day 0 = D0, patellar = 40 and Achilles = 40). Clinical examination and tendon US were performed at D3, immediately followed by either AA (AAT+, n = 40) or physiological serum (PST+, n = 40, control) US-guided intratendinous injection. Follow-up at D6 and D13 using clinical, US and histology, and comparison between the 2 groups were performed. To study AA toxicity we compared the 80 remaining normal tendons (T−) after injecting AA in 40 (AAT−). Results: All AAT+ showed a better joint mobilization compared to PST+ at D6 (p = 0.004) with thinner US tendon diameters (p < 0.004), and less disorganized collagen fibers and neovessels on histology (p < 0.05). There was no difference at D13 regarding clinical status, US tendon diameter and histology (p > 0.05). Comparison between AAT− and T− showed no AA toxicity on tendon (p = 0.18). Conclusion: Our study suggests that high dose mono-injection of AA in tendinosis, early after the beginning of the disease, accelerates tendon's healing, with no local toxicity.

  12. Ultrasound-guided interventional procedures around the shoulder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Carmelo; Banfi, Giuseppe; Orlandi, Davide; Lacelli, Francesca; Serafini, Giovanni; Mauri, Giovanni; Secchi, Francesco; Silvestri, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound is an established modality for shoulder evaluation, being accurate, low cost and radiation free. Different pathological conditions can be diagnosed using ultrasound and can be treated using ultrasound guidance, such as degenerative, traumatic or inflammatory diseases. Subacromial–subdeltoid bursitis is the most common finding on ultrasound evaluation for painful shoulder. Therapeutic injections of corticosteroids are helpful to reduce inflammation and pain. Calcific tendinopathy of rotator cuff affects up to 20% of painful shoulders. Ultrasound-guided treatment may be performed with both single- and double-needle approach. Calcific enthesopathy, a peculiar form of degenerative tendinopathy, is a common and mostly asymptomatic ultrasound finding; dry needling has been proposed in symptomatic patients. An alternative is represented by autologous platelet-rich plasma injections. Intra-articular injections of the shoulder can be performed in the treatment of a variety of inflammatory and degenerative diseases with corticosteroids or hyaluronic acid respectively. Steroid injections around the long head of the biceps brachii tendon are indicated in patients with biceps tendinopathy, reducing pain and humeral tenderness. The most common indication for acromion–clavicular joint injection is degenerative osteoarthritis, with ultrasound representing a useful tool in localizing the joint space and properly injecting various types of drugs (steroids, lidocaine or hyaluronic acid). Suprascapular nerve block is an approved treatment for chronic shoulder pain non-responsive to conventional treatments as well as candidate patients for shoulder arthroscopy. This review provides an overview of these different ultrasonography-guided procedures that can be performed around the shoulder. PMID:26313499

  13. Accuracy of diagnostic ultrasound in patients with suspected subacromial disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottenheijm, Ramon P; Jansen, Mariëtte J; Staal, J Bart; van den Bruel, Ann; Weijers, René E; de Bie, Rob A; Dinant, Geert-Jan

    2010-10-01

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound for detecting subacromial disorders in patients presenting in primary and secondary care settings. Medline and Embase were searched on June 9, 2010. In addition, the reference list of 1 systematic review and all included articles were searched to identify relevant studies. Two reviewers independently selected the articles evaluating the accuracy of ultrasound for detecting subacromial disorders from the title and abstracts retrieved by the literature search. Selection criteria were ultrasound frequency greater than or equal to 7.5MHz as index test, surgery, magnetic resonance imaging and/or radiography as reference standards, and subacromial disorders as target conditions. Two reviewers independently extracted the data on study characteristics and results to construct 2 by 2 tables and performed a methodologic quality assessment. Twenty-three studies were included: 22 reported on full-thickness rotator cuff tears, 15 on partial-thickness tears, 3 on subacromial bursitis, 2 on tendinopathy, and 2 on calcifying tendonitis, respectively. For full-thickness tears, pooled sensitivity of ultrasound was .95 (95% confidence interval, .90-.97), and specificity .96 (.93-.98). For partial-thickness tears, pooled sensitivity was .72 (.58-.83), and specificity .93 (.89-.96). Statistical pooling was not possible for the other disorders. For subacromial bursitis, sensitivity ranged from .79 to .81, and specificity from .94 to .98. For tendinopathy, sensitivity ranged from .67 to .93, specificity from .88 to 1.00. Sensitivity for calcifying tendonitis was 1.00 in both studies, with specificity ranging from .85 to .98. We strongly recommend ultrasound in patients for whom conservative treatment fails, to rule in or out full-thickness tears, to rule in partial-thickness tears, and to a lesser extent to diagnose tendinopathy, subacromial bursitis, and calcifying tendonitis. These results can help physicians tailor treatment

  14. Achilles tendon of wistar rats treated with laser therapy and eccentric exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Verônica de Souza

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTIntroduction:Both laser therapy and eccentric exercises are used in tendon injuries. However, the association of these physiotherapeutic modalities is yet little investigated.Objective:To evaluate the effect of low-level laser therapy associated to eccentric exercise (downhill walking on Achilles tendinopathy of Wistar rats.Method:Eighteen Achilles tendon from 15 adult male Wistar rats were used. Tendons were distributed in six groups (laser, eccentric exercise, laser and eccentric exercise, rest, contralateral tendon, and healthy tendon. Unilateral tendinopathy was surgically induced by transversal compression followed by scarification of tendon fibers. The treatments laser therapy (904 nm, 3J/cm² and/or eccentric exercise (downhill walking; 12 m/min; 50 min/day; 15o inclination treadmill began 24 hours after surgery and remained for 20 days. Clinical and biomechanical analyzes were conducted. Achilles tendon was macroscopically evaluated and the transversal diameter measured. Euthanasia was performed 21 days after lesion induction. Tendons of both limbs were collected and frozen at -20°C until biomechanical analysis, on which the characteristic of maximum load (N, stress at ultimate (MPa and maximum extension (mm were analyzed.Results:Swelling was observed within 72 hours postoperative. No fibrous adhesions were observed nor increase in transversal diameter of tendons. Animals with the exercised tendons, but not treated with laser therapy, presented lower (p=0.0000 locomotor capacity. No difference occurred be-tween groups for the biomechanical characteristics maximum load (p=0.4379, stress at ultimate (p=0.4605 and maximum extension (p=0.3820 evaluated, even considering healthy and contralateral tendons.Conclusion:The concomitant use of low-level laser and the eccentric exercise of downhill walking, starting 24 hours after surgically induced tendinopathy, do not result in a tendon with the same biomechanical resistance or elasticity

  15. Tendon neuroplastic training: changing the way we think about tendon rehabilitation: a narrative review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rio, Ebonie; Kidgell, Dawson; Moseley, G Lorimer; Docking, Sean; Purdam, Craig; Cook, Jill

    2016-01-01

    Tendinopathy can be resistant to treatment and often recurs, implying that current treatment approaches are suboptimal. Rehabilitation programmes that have been successful in terms of pain reduction and return to sport outcomes usually include strength training. Muscle activation can induce analgesia, improving self-efficacy associated with reducing one's own pain. Furthermore, strength training is beneficial for tendon matrix structure, muscle properties and limb biomechanics. However, current tendon rehabilitation may not adequately address the corticospinal control of the muscle, which may result in altered control of muscle recruitment and the consequent tendon load, and this may contribute to recalcitrance or symptom recurrence. Outcomes of interest include the effect of strength training on tendon pain, corticospinal excitability and short interval cortical inhibition. The aims of this concept paper are to: (1) review what is known about changes to the primary motor cortex and motor control in tendinopathy, (2) identify the parameters shown to induce neuroplasticity in strength training and (3) align these principles with tendon rehabilitation loading protocols to introduce a combination approach termed as tendon neuroplastic training. Strength training is a powerful modulator of the central nervous system. In particular, corticospinal inputs are essential for motor unit recruitment and activation; however, specific strength training parameters are important for neuroplasticity. Strength training that is externally paced and akin to a skilled movement task has been shown to not only reduce tendon pain, but modulate excitatory and inhibitory control of the muscle and therefore, potentially tendon load. An improved understanding of the methods that maximise the opportunity for neuroplasticity may be an important progression in how we prescribe exercise-based rehabilitation in tendinopathy for pain modulation and potentially restoration of the corticospinal

  16. The Copenhagen Standardised MRI protocol to assess the pubic symphysis and adductor regions of athletes: outline and intratester and intertester reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branci, Sonia; Thorborg, Kristian; Bech, Birthe Højlund; Boesen, Mikael; Magnussen, Erland; Court-Payen, Michel; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann; Hölmich, Per

    2015-05-01

    There is currently no standardised MRI evaluation protocol for athletes who present with symptoms that may relate to the pubic symphysis, the pubic bones, and the adductor muscle insertions. We outline the protocol and reliability data. Three musculoskeletal radiologists developed an 11-element MRI evaluation protocol defined according to precise criteria and illustrated in a pictorial atlas. Eighty-six male athletes (soccer players and non-soccer players) underwent standardised 3 Tesla MRI of the pelvis. Two external musculoskeletal radiologists were trained to use the protocol and pictorial atlas during two sessions of 2-4 h each. Each radiologist rated all 86 MRI independently. One radiologist evaluated the scans once, the other twice 2 months apart. Cohen κ statistics were used to determine intraobserver and interobserver agreement. The main findings were (1) substantial intraobserver (κ range 0.65-0.67) and moderate interobserver (κ range 0.45-0.52) agreement in rating pubic bone marrow oedema, (2) substantial to moderate intraobserver (κ range 0.49-0.72) and moderate-to-fair interobserver (κ range 0.21-0.52) agreement in rating most other MRI findings, (3) slight intraobserver and interobserver (κ range -0.06-0.05) agreement in rating adductor longus tendinopathy. The Copenhagen Standardised MRI protocol demonstrated moderate-to-substantial reliability in rating bone marrow oedema, and varied from fair-to-substantial agreement for the majority of MRI features, but showed only slight agreement in rating adductor longus tendinopathy. This rigorous investigation also confirms that while MRI evaluation seems to provide reasonable reliability in rating pubic bone marrow oedema, the evaluation of adductor tendinopathy in a clinical and research setting needs further resolution by continued development and testing of MRI acquisition protocols. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence

  17. Stem cells in degenerative orthopaedic pathologies: effects of aging on therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atesok, Kivanc; Fu, Freddie H; Sekiya, Ichiro; Stolzing, Alexandra; Ochi, Mitsuo; Rodeo, Scott A

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to summarize the current evidence on the use of stem cells in the elderly population with degenerative orthopaedic pathologies and to highlight the pathophysiologic mechanisms behind today's therapeutic challenges in stem cell-based regeneration of destructed tissues in the elderly patients with osteoarthritis (OA), degenerative disc disease (DDD), and tendinopathies. Clinical and basic science studies that report the use of stem cells in the elderly patients with OA, DDD, and tendinopathies were identified using a PubMed search. The studies published in English have been assessed, and the best and most recent evidence was included in the current study. Evidence suggests that, although short-term results regarding the effects of stem cell therapy in degenerative orthopaedic pathologies can be promising, stem cell therapies do not appear to reverse age-related tissue degeneration. Causes of suboptimal outcomes can be attributed to the decrease in the therapeutic potential of aged stem cell populations and the regenerative capacity of these cells, which might be negatively influenced in an aged microenvironment within the degenerated tissues of elderly patients with OA, DDD, and tendinopathies. Clinical protocols guiding the use of stem cells in the elderly patient population are still under development, and high-level randomized controlled trials with long-term outcomes are lacking. Understanding the consequences of age-related changes in stem cell function and responsiveness of the in vivo microenvironment to stem cells is critical when designing cell-based therapies for elderly patients with degenerative orthopaedic pathologies.

  18. Overload and neovascularization of Achilles tendons in young artistic and rhythmic gymnasts compared with controls: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notarnicola, A; Maccagnano, G; Di Leo, M; Tafuri, S; Moretti, B

    2014-08-01

    The incidence of Achilles tendinopathy is very high in young female gymnasts (17.5 %). According to literature, ecography screenings show the tendons thickening, but at the same time it does not reveal a direct link to the clinical picture. The neovessels are involved in the pathophysiological process of Achilles tendinopathy. For this reason, we wanted to verify there between perfusion tendon values and the type of sport activity. We performed a clinical observational study monitoring the oximetry of the Achilles tendon and the epidemiological data of 52 elite female (artistic and rhythmic) gymnasts versus 21 age-matched controls. Analyzing the main limb, we revealed statistically higher oximetry values in the artistic gymnasts group (69.5 %) compared to the rhythmic gymnasts group (67.1 %) (t = 2.13; p = 0.01) and the sedentary group (66.2 %) (t = 2.70; p = 0.004), but we did not find any differences between rhythmic gymnasts group and the sedentary group (t = 0.68; p = 0.24). The multiple logistic regression model highlighted that the oximetry value of the main limb is not influenced by age, knowledge of the main limb, years of general and gymnastic sports activity (p > 0.05). We discovered an increase of Achilles tendon perfusion in the main limb in the artistic gymnast group. We hypothesize that specific figures of artistic sports activity are responsible for muscle overload and gastrocnemius-soleus group and, at the same time, these figures cause hyperperfusion of the tendon. Prospective longitudinal studies could explain if this could become a predictive sign of the next Achilles tendinopathy onset.

  19. Sports hernia or groin disruption injury? Chronic athletic groin pain: a retrospective study of 100 patients with long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, J F W; Hazard, H

    2014-01-01

    Chronic groin pain (athletic pubalgia) is a common problem in sports such as football, hockey, cricket, baseball and athletics. Multiple co-existing pathologies are often present which commonly include posterior inguinal canal wall deficiency, conjoint tendinopathy, adductor tendinopathy, osteitis pubis and peripheral nerve entrapment. The mechanism of injury remains unclear but sports that involve either pivoting on a single leg (e.g. kicking) or a sudden change in direction at speed are most often associated with athletic pubalgia. These manoeuvres place large forces across the bony pelvis and its soft tissue supports, accounting for the usual clinical presentation of multiple symptomatic abnormalities forming one pattern of injury. The diagnoses encountered in this series of 100 patients included rectus abdominis muscle atrophy/asymmetry (22), conjoint tendinopathy (16), sports (occult, incipient) hernia (16), groin disruption injury (16), classical hernia (11) traumatic osteitis pubis (5), and avulsion fracture of the pubic bone (4). Surgical management was generally undertaken only after failed conservative therapy of 3-6 months, but some professionals who have physiotherapy during the football season went directly to surgery at the end of the football season. A variety of operations were performed including groin reconstruction (15), open hernia repair with or without mesh (11), sports hernia repair (Gilmore) (7) laparoscopic repair (3), conjoint tendon repair (3) and adductor tenotomy (3). Sixty-six patients were available for follow at an average of 13 years after initial consultation and the combined success rate for both conservative treatment and surgery was 94%. The authors believe that athletic pubalgia or sports hernia should be considered as a 'groin disruption injury', the result of functional instability of the pelvis. The surgical approach is aimed at strengthening the anterior pelvic soft tissues that support and stabilise the symphysis pubis.

  20. Dynamic Three-Dimensional Shoulder Mri during Active Motion for Investigation of Rotator Cuff Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Tempelaere

    Full Text Available MRI is the standard methodology in diagnosis of rotator cuff diseases. However, many patients continue to have pain despite treatment, and MRI of a static unloaded shoulder seems insufficient for best diagnosis and treatment. This study evaluated if Dynamic MRI provides novel kinematic data that can be used to improve the understanding, diagnosis and best treatment of rotator cuff diseases.Dynamic MRI provided real-time 3D image series and was used to measure changes in the width of subacromial space, superior-inferior translation and anterior-posterior translation of the humeral head relative to the glenoid during active abduction. These measures were investigated for consistency with the rotator cuff diseases classifications from standard MRI.The study included: 4 shoulders with massive rotator cuff tears, 5 shoulders with an isolated full-thickness supraspinatus tear, 5 shoulders with tendinopathy and 6 normal shoulders. A change in the width of subacromial space greater than 4mm differentiated between rotator cuff diseases with tendon tears (massive cuff tears and supraspinatus tear and without tears (tendinopathy (p = 0.012. The range of the superior-inferior translation was higher in the massive cuff tears group (6.4mm than in normals (3.4mm (p = 0.02. The range of the anterior-posterior translation was higher in the massive cuff tears (9.2 mm and supraspinatus tear (9.3 mm shoulders compared to normals (3.5mm and tendinopathy (4.8mm shoulders (p = 0.05.The Dynamic MRI enabled a novel measure; 'Looseness', i.e. the translation of the humeral head on the glenoid during an abduction cycle. Looseness was better able at differentiating different forms of rotator cuff disease than a simple static measure of relative glenohumeral position.

  1. The effectiveness of extracorporeal shockwave therapy in common lower limb conditions: a systematic review including quantification of patient-rated pain reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korakakis, Vasileios; Whiteley, Rodney; Tzavara, Alexander; Malliaropoulos, Nikolaos

    2017-09-27

    To evaluate extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) in treating Achilles tendinopathy (AT), greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS), medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS), patellar tendinopathy (PT) and proximal hamstring tendinopathy (PHT). Systematic review. Randomised and non-randomised studies assessing ESWT in patients with AT, GTPS, MTSS, PT and PHT were included. Risk of bias and quality of studies were evaluated. Moderate-level evidence suggests (1) no difference between focused ESWT and placebo ESWT at short and mid-term in PT and (2) radial ESWT is superior to conservative treatment at short, mid and long term in PHT. Low-level evidence suggests that ESWT (1) is comparable to eccentric training, but superior to wait-and-see policy at 4 months in mid-portion AT; (2) is superior to eccentric training at 4 months in insertional AT; (3) less effective than corticosteroid injection at short term, but ESWT produced superior results at mid and long term in GTPS; (4) produced comparable results to control treatment at long term in GTPS; and (5) is superior to control conservative treatment at long term in PT. Regarding the rest of the results, there was only very low or no level of evidence. 13 studies showed high risk of bias largely due to methodology, blinding and reporting. Low level of evidence suggests that ESWT may be effective for some lower limb conditions in all phases of the rehabilitation. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. A systematic review of the concept and clinical applications of bone marrow aspirate concentrate in tendon pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imam Mohamed A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tendon pathologies are a group of musculoskeletal conditions frequently seen in clinical practice. They can be broadly classified into traumatic, degenerative and overuse-related tendinopathies. Rotator cuff tears, Achilles tendinopathy and tennis elbow are common examples of these conditions. Conventional treatments have shown inconsistent outcomes and might fail to provide satisfactory clinical improvement. With the growing trend towards the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs in other branches of medicine, there is an increasing interest in treating tendon pathologies using the bone marrow MSC. In this article, we provide a systematic literature review documenting the current status of the use of bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC for the treatment of tendon pathologies. We also asked the question on the safety of BMAC and whether there are potential complications associated with BMAC therapy. Our hypothesis is that the use of BMAC provides safe clinical benefit when used for the treatment of tendinopathy or as a biological augmentation of tendon repair. We followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA checklist while preparing this systematic review. A literature search was carried out including the online databases of PubMed, EMBASE, ClinicalTrial.gov and the Cochrane Library from 1960 to the end of May 2015. Relevant studies were selected and critically appraised. Data from eligible studies were extracted and classified per type of tendon pathology. We included 37 articles discussing the application and use of BMAC for the treatment of tendon pathologies. The Critical Appraisal Skills Program (CASP appraisal confirmed a satisfactory standard of 37 studies. Studies were sub-categorised into: techniques of extraction, processing and microscopic examination of BMAC (n = 18, where five studies looked at the evaluation of aspiration techniques (n = 5, augmentation of rotator cuff tears (n = 5

  3. [Pathophysiology of overuse tendon injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannus, P; Paavola, M; Paakkala, T; Parkkari, J; Järvinen, T; Järvinen, M

    2002-10-01

    Overuse tendon injury is one of the most common injuries in sports. The etiology as well as the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to tendinopathy are of crucial medical importance. At the moment intrinsic and extrinsic factors are assumed as mechanisms of overuse tendon injury. Except for the acute, extrinsic trauma, the chronic overuse tendon injury is a multifactorial process. There are many other factors, such as local hypoxia, less of nutrition, impaired metabolism and local inflammatory that may also contribute to the development of tissue damage. The exact interaction of these factors cannot be explained entirely at the moment. Further studies will be necessary in order to get more information.

  4. Stenosing tenosynovitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuillemin, V.; Guerini, H.; Bard, H.; Morvan, G.

    2012-01-01

    Tenosynovitis refers to an inflammatory condition involving the synovial sheath of a tendon. Stenosing tenosynovitis is a peculiar entity caused by multiple factors, including local anatomy, mechanical factors, and hormonal factors. The main forms include de Quervain tendinopathy; trigger finger (stenosing tenosynovitis involving the flexor digitorum tendons); stenosing tenosynovitis of the extensor carpi ulnaris, extensor carpi radialis, or extensor comunis tendons; stenosing tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis tendon; and stenosing tenosynovitis of the peroneal tendons. The cardinal finding on ultrasonography is the presence of a thickened retinaculum or pulley that constricts the osseofibrous tunnel through which the tendon runs. PMID:23396894

  5. Subacromial impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umer, Masood; Qadir, Irfan; Azam, Mohsin

    2012-05-09

    Subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS) represents a spectrum of pathology ranging from subacromial bursitis to rotator cuff tendinopathy and full-thickness rotator cuff tears. The relationship between subacromial impingement and rotator cuff disease in the etiology of rotator cuff injury is a matter of debate. However, the etiology is multi-factorial, and it has been attributed to both extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms. Management includes physical therapy, injections, and, for some patients, surgery. No high-quality randomized controlled trials are available so far to provide possible evidence for differences in outcome of different treatment strategies. There remains a need for high-quality clinical research on the diagnosis and treatment of SAIS.

  6. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous electrolysis: A new therapeutic option for mammary fistulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berná-Serna, Juan D; García-Vidal, José A; Escolar-Reina, Pilar; Berná-Mestre, Juan D

    2018-03-01

    Mammary fistula (MF) is a recurrent condition characterised by the draining of abscesses around the areola. The best management for MF remains challenging. Moreover, the main problem is the high recurrence rate of this disease. MF is considered a chronic process. The percutaneous electrolysis (PE) technique involves the application of a galvanic current with an ultrasound-guided needle to induce ablation and repair of the affected tissue. Good results have been obtained with PE in chronic tendinopathies. Below we present a hypothesis that PE may be a new therapeutic option for MF. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Simultaneous bilateral Achilles tendon ruptures associated with statin medication despite regular rock climbing exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmont, Michael R; Highland, Adrian M; Blundell, Christopher M; Davies, Mark B

    2009-11-01

    Ruptures of the Achilles tendon are common however simultaneous ruptures occur less frequently. Eccentric loading exercise programmes have been used to successfully treat Achilles tendinopathy. We report a case of simultaneous bilateral Achilles tendon rupture in a patient predisposed to rupture due to longstanding raised serum lipoprotein and recently introduced therapeutic statin medication. The patient was also a keen rock climber and had regularly undertaken loading exercise. This case illustrates that the therapeutic effect of mixed loading exercises for the Achilles tendon may not be adequate to overcome the predisposition to rupture caused by hyperlipidaemia and statin medication.

  8. Basic Science and Clinical Application of Stem Cells in Veterinary Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribitsch, I.; Burk, J.; Delling, U.; Geißler, C.; Gittel, C.; Jülke, H.; Brehm, W.

    Stem cells play an important role in veterinary medicine in different ways. Currently several stem cell therapies for animal patients are being developed and some, like the treatment of equine tendinopathies with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), have already successfully entered the market. Moreover, animal models are widely used to study the properties and potential of stem cells for possible future applications in human medicine. Therefore, in the young and emerging field of stem cell research, human and veterinary medicine are intrinsically tied to one another. Many of the pioneering innovations in the field of stem cell research are achieved by cooperating teams of human and veterinary medical scientists.

  9. [Tendinitis in athletes: etiology, diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gremion, G; Zufferey, P

    2015-03-11

    Tendinopathy is one of the most common diagnosis in sports. Knowledges about their etiology, the repair process to their diagnosis and their treatment have improved thanks to the development of imaging, especially ultra- sound. The disorder whose etiology could be mechanical or degenerative can cause long- term disability and sometimes the end of the sport carreer. The risk of reccurence is com- mon; this may lead to tendon rupture whose functional effects can be significative. The management should be early: it must respect the deadlines for tendon healing and pro- pose a gradual recovery efforts after elimina tion of the contributing factors involved.

  10. Bone scan findings in calcific tendinitis at the gluteus maximus insertion: some illustrative cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Van Damme

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe the bone scan and single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography findings in calcific tendinitis of the gluteus maximus and discuss its pathophysiology. Although this tendinopathy is mostly self-limiting, awareness of this disease is important for 2 reasons. First, it may explain acute hip symptoms in patients in the resorptive phase of the calcifications. Second, it should be considered as a differential diagnosis for bone scan hot spots in the vicinity of the gluteus maximus tendon and for cortical erosion seen in that region on X-rays or CT.

  11. The role of regenerative medicine in the treatment of sports injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malanga, Gerard; Nakamura, Reina; Nakamurra, Reina

    2014-11-01

    Traditional treatment of sports injuries includes use of the PRICE principle (Protection, Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories, physical therapy modalities, and corticosteroid injections. Recent evidence has raised concerns over this traditional treatment approach regarding the use of anti-inflammatories and injectable corticosteroids. More recent treatments, known as regenerative medicine, include platelet-rich plasma and stem cell therapies. Evidence for their efficacy in a variety of sports injuries has emerged, ranging from tendinopathy and muscle tears to ligament and chondral injuries. This article reviews the literature regarding established treatments for sports injuries and these more innovative treatments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Perspectives in ultrasound-guided musculoskeletal interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Ravindra Daftary

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonography (USG is a safe, easily available, and cost-effective modality, which has the additional advantage of being real time for imaging and image-guided interventions of the musculoskeletal system. Musculoskeletal interventions are gaining popularity in sports and rehabilitation for rapid healing of muscle and tendon injuries in professional athletes, healing of chronic tendinopathies, aspiration of joint effusions, periarticular bursae and ganglia, and perineural injections in acute and chronic pain syndromes. This article aims to provide an overview of the spectrum of musculoskeletal interventions that can be done under USG guidance both for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.

  13. Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infection following para-articular steroid injection in the knee--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artiaco, Stefano; Cicero, Giuseppe; Bellomo, Franco; Bianchi, Pasquale

    2012-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging gram-negative nosocomial pathogen that rarely causes infections in orthopaedic patients. We report a case of imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii paraarticular infection of the knee occurring in a healthy patient following one ambulatory steroid injection for the treatment of quadriceps tendinopathy. The infection was reduced by early surgical debridement of infected tissues, abscess drainage, and prolonged antibiotic therapy with colistin. To our knowledge, this is the first case in the literature reporting such an infection following single steroid injection in orthopaedic patients.

  14. Subacromial impingement syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood Umer

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS represents a spectrum of pathology ranging from subacromial bursitis to rotator cuff tendinopathy and full-thickness rotator cuff tears. The relationship between subacromial impingement and rotator cuff disease in the etiology of rotator cuff injury is a matter of debate. However the etiology is multi-factorial, and has been attributed to both extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms. Management includes physical therapy, injections, and, for some patients, surgery. No high-quality RCTs are available so far to provide possible evidence for differences in outcome of different treatment strategies. There remains a need for high-quality clinical research on the diagnosis and treatment of SAIS.

  15. Exercise Related Leg Pain (ERLP): a Review of The Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinking, Mark F

    2007-08-01

    Exercise related leg pain (ERLP) is a regional pain syndrome described as pain between the knee and ankle which occurs with exercise. Indiscriminant use of terminology such as "shin splints" has resulted in ongoing confusion regarding the pathoanatomic entities associated with this pain syndrome. Each of the pathoanatomic entities - medial tibial stress syndrome, chronic exertional compartment syndrome, tibial and fibular stress fractures, tendinopathy, nerve entrapment, and vascular pathology - which manifest as ERLP are each described in terms of relevant anatomy, epidemiology, clinical presentation, associated pathomechanics, and intervention strategies. Evidence regarding risk factors for ERLP general and specific pathoanatomic entities are presented in the context of models of sports injury prevention.

  16. A Case of Heel Cord Pain After Repair of Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture: Treated by Endoscopic Adhesiolysis of the Achilles Tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-10-01

    The causes of heel cord pain after repair of acute rupture of the Achilles tendon are unclear. The proposed etiologies include nonabsorbable suture granuloma formation, alteration of the pain receptors threshold in the tendon, and distension of the paratenon by the hypertrophied tendon, underlying tendinopathy, postrepair neovascularization, and peritendinous fibrous adhesion. We present an endoscopic technique of adhesiolysis of the Achilles tendon to deal with the various possible causes of postrepair heel cord pain. Therapeutic, Level 4: Case report. © 2015 The Author(s).

  17. Structure of the Achilles tendon at the insertion on the calcaneal tuberosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edama, Mutsuaki; Kubo, Masayoshi; Onishi, Hideaki; Takabayashi, Tomoya; Yokoyama, Erika; Inai, Takuma; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Nashimoto, Satoshi; Kageyama, Ikuo

    2016-11-01

    Findings on the twisting structure and insertional location of the AT on the calcaneal tuberosity are inconsistent. Therefore, to obtain a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying insertional Achilles tendinopathy, clarification of the anatomy of the twisting structure and location of the AT insertion onto the calcaneal tuberosity is important. The purpose of this study was to reveal the twisted structure of the AT and the location of its insertion onto the calcaneal tuberosity using Japanese cadavers. The study was conducted using 132 legs from 74 cadavers (mean age at death, 78.3 ± 11.1 years; 87 sides from men, 45 from women). Only soleus (Sol) attached to the deep layer of the calcaneal tuberosity was classified as least twist (Type I), both the lateral head of the gastrocnemius (LG) and Sol attached to the deep layer of the calcaneal tuberosity were classified as moderate twist (Type II), and only LG attached to the deep layer of the calcaneal tuberosity was classified as extreme twist (Type III). The Achilles tendon insertion onto the calcaneal tuberosity was classified as a superior, middle or inferior facet. Twist structure was Type I (least) in 31 legs (24%), Type II (moderate) in 87 legs (67%), and Type III (extreme) in 12 legs (9%). A comparison between males and females revealed that among men, 20 legs (24%) were Type I, 57 legs (67%) Type II, and eight legs (9%) Type III. Among women, 11 legs (24%) were Type I, 30 legs (67%) Type II, and four legs (9%) Type III. No significant differences were apparent between sexes. The fascicles of the Achilles tendon attach mainly in the middle facet. Anterior fibers of the Achilles tendon, where insertional Achilles tendinopathy is most likely, are Sol in Type I, LG and Sol in Type II, and LG only in Type III. This suggests the possibility that a different strain is produced in the anterior fibers of the Achilles tendon (calcaneal side) where insertional Achilles tendinopathy is most likely to occur in

  18. Ironman triathletes: MRI assessment of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiller, W.D.; Dierenfield, Laura [North Hawaii Community Hospital, Kamuela, HI (United States); Ainge, George R.; Brown, David W. [North Hawaii Community Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kamuela, HI (United States); Shellock, Frank G. [University of Southern California, Education and Research, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Crues, John V. [Radnet Inc., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Reuter, Robert M.

    2008-08-15

    The objective of this paper was to demonstrate the prevalence of shoulder magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities, including abnormal bone marrow signal at the acromioclavicular (AC) joint in symptomatic and asymptomatic Ironman Triathletes. The shoulders of 23 Ironman Triathletes, seven asymptomatic (group I) and 16 symptomatic (group II), were studied by MRI. A separate, non-triathlete group was evaluated specifically for AC joint marrow signal abnormalities to compare with the Ironman Triathletes. Partial thickness tears of the rotator cuff, rotator cuff tendinopathy, and AC joint arthrosis were common findings in both groups of triathletes. Tendinopathy was the only finding that was more prevalent in the symptomatic group, but this was not a statistically significant difference (p=0.35). There were no tears of the glenoid labrum seen in group I or II subjects. Of note is that 71% (5/7) of group I subjects and 62% (10/16) of group II subjects had increased signal changes in the marrow of the AC joint (p=0.68). The comparison group showed a lower prevalence (35%, p=0.06) of this finding. No statistically significant difference was found among the findings for group 1, group 2, or the comparison group, although the difference between the comparison group and Ironman Triathletes approached statistical significance when evaluating for AC joint abnormal signal. Shoulder MRI of Ironman Triathletes should be interpreted with an appreciation of the commonly seen findings in asymptomatic subjects. (orig.)

  19. Description of a standardized rehabilitation program based on sub-maximal eccentric following a platelet-rich plasma infiltration for jumper’s knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaux, Jean-François; Forthomme, Bénédicte; Namurois, Marie-Hélène; Bauvir, Philippe; Defawe, Nathalie; Delvaux, François; Lehance, Cédric; Crielaard, Jean-Michel; Croisier, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Summary Introduction. Different series emphasized the necessity of rehabilitation program after infiltration of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in case of tendinopathy. However, most of them describe only briefly the reeducation protocol and these programs vary. Our aim was to extensively describe a specific standardized rehabilitation program. Methods. After a review of literature of post-PRP infiltration protocols, we had developed a standardized rehabilitation protocol. This protocol was evaluated by 30 subjects with chronic jumper’s knee who. A standardised progressive sub-maximal eccentric program supervised by a physical therapist for 6 weeks was started 1 week post-infiltration. The patient benefited also from electromyostimulation, isometric strengthening and stretching of the quadriceps, cycloergometer and cryotherapy. After the supervised program, the patient had to make an auto-reeducation added to the reathletisation protocol for 6 more weeks which was followed by maintenance exercises up to 1 year. The assessments were made using a VAS, IKDC and VISA-P scores. Results. The VAS, IKDC and VISA-P scores decreased very significantly with time. The compliance to auto-reeducation was good. Conclusions. We proposed a simple and efficient protocol based on sub-maximal eccentric reeducation to add to PRP infiltrations in case of patellar tendinopathy. PMID:24932453

  20. Comparison of the effect of intra-tendon applications of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB, platelet-rich plasma, steroids in a rat achilles tendon collagenase model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solchaga, Luis A; Bendele, Alison; Shah, Vivek; Snel, Leo B; Kestler, Hans K; Dines, Joshua S; Hee, Christopher K

    2014-01-01

    This study compared the effect of intra-tendon (IT) delivery of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB (rhPDGF-BB), platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and corticosteroids in a rat tendinopathy model. Seven days after collagenase induction of tendinopathy, a 30-µl IT injection was administered. Treatments included: saline; 3 µg rhPDGF-BB; 10 µg rhPDGF-BB; PRP; and 300 µg triamcinolone acetonide (TCA). Outcomes were assessed 7 and 21 days after treatment. All groups exhibited good to excellent repair. Relative to saline, cell proliferation increased 65% in the 10 µg rhPDGF-BB group and decreased 74% in the TCA group; inflammation decreased 65% in the TCA group. At 7 days, maximum load-to-failure was increased in the 3 µg rhPDGF-BB group relative to saline, PRP, and TCA (p BB group relative to saline, PRP, and TCA (p BB group compared to saline and TCA (p BB group was increased compared to saline, PRP, and TCA (p BB increased maximum load-to-failure (3 and 10 µg) and stiffness (10 µg) relative to controls and commonly used treatments. © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 32:145-150, 2014. © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.