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Sample records for temporomandibular point part

  1. Intra-articular vs. systemic administration of etanercept in antigen-induced arthritis in the temporomandibular point. Part I: histological effects

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    Nyengaard Jens R

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Temporomandibular joint (TMJ arthritis in children causes alterations in craniomandibular growth. This abnormal growth may be prevented by an early anti-inflammatory intervention. We have previously shown that intra-articular (IA corticosteroid reduces TMJ inflammation, but causes concurrent mandibular growth inhibition in young rabbits. Blockage of TNF-α has already proven its efficacy in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis not responding to standard therapy. In this paper we evaluate the effect of IA etanercept compared to subcutaneous etanercept in antigen-induced TMJ-arthritis in rabbits on histological changes using histomorphometry and stereology. This article presents the data and discussion on the anti-inflammatory effects of systemic and IA etanercept. In Part II the data on the effects of systemic and IA etanercept on facial growth are presented. Methods Forty-two rabbits (10 weeks old pre-sensitized with ovalbumin and locally induced inflammation in the temporomandibular joints were divided into three groups: a placebo group receiving IA saline injections in both joints one week after arthritis induction (n = 14, an IA etanercept group receiving 0.1 mg/kg etanercept per joint one week after arthritis induction (n = 14 and a systemic etanercept group receiving 0.8 mg/kg etanercept weekly throughout the 12-week study (n = 14. Arthritis was maintained by giving four inductions three weeks apart. Additional IA saline or etanercept injections were also given one week after the re-inductions. Histomorphometric and unbiased stereological methods (optical fractionator were used to assess and estimate the inflammation in the joints. Results The histomorphometry showed synovial proliferation in all groups. The plasma cell count obtained by the optical fractionator was significantly reduced when treating with systemic etanercept but not with IA etanercept. Semi-quantitative assessments of synovial proliferation and

  2. Temporomandibular disorders and bruxism. Part I.

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    Kevilj, R; Mehulic, K; Dundjer, A

    2007-01-01

    Correct functioning of the entire stomatognathic system is achieved by a compatible relationship of all its parts. Four determinants, by their mutual harmonious activity, dictate the function of the entire system: the teeth, periodontium with supporting structure, muscles, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and CNS. In such a complex system a disorder of any integrative part causes disturbances also in other parts of the system. Changed functions can arise through organic disorder, and also iatrogenically by inadequate conservative, prosthetic, surgical or orthodontic therapy. For this reason it is often difficult to recognise the primary cause. The first responses of the system to the disorder are adaptive mechanisms which occur within one or more integrative parts, and depending on their intensity and duration symptoms grow more prominent. Tissue response can be ortho- or parafunctional. Attempts are made to exclude psychoemotional influences and the obstacle eliminated by either abrasion, clenching or grinding of the teeth. If the obstacle is not eliminated by abrasion, the cause of such functional disorder becomes the trigger for parafunctional activity. From a review of the relevant literature it can be concluded that parafunctional activity is caused by changed occlusion, with determined psychological habits of the patient and specific tissue response of the stomatognathic system. Therefore, therapy of these disorders is made more difficult and includes a multidisciplinary approach.

  3. Is temporomandibular pain in chronic whiplash-associated disorders part of a more widespread pain syndrome?

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    Visscher, Corine; Hofman, Nico; Mes, Carola; Lousberg, Richel; Naeije, Machiel

    2005-01-01

    The prevalence of temporomandibular disorders in patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorder is a controversial issue that may be influenced by the widespread pain character and psychologic distress frequently observed in patients with chronic pain. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of temporomandibular disorder pain, widespread pain, and psychologic distress in persons with chronic whiplash-associated disorder pain, using a controlled, single blind study design. The prevalence of temporomandibular disorder pain in the chronic whiplash-associated disorder pain group was compared with 2 control groups: a chronic neck pain group and a no neck pain group. From 65 persons, a standardized oral history was taken, a physical examination of the neck and the masticatory system was performed, widespread pain was investigated by tender point palpation, and psychologic distress was measured with a questionnaire (SCL-90). Because the recognition of temporomandibular disorder pain and neck pain remains a matter of debate, 3 well-defined classification systems were used: one based on the oral history, a second on a combination of oral history and pain on active movements and palpation, and a third one based on a combination of oral history and function tests. Irrespective of the classification system used, the chronic whiplash-associated disorder pain group more often suffered from temporomandibular disorder pain (0.001neck pain group. Moreover, patients with whiplash-associated disorder showed more psychologic distress (0.000disorder suggests that the higher prevalence of temporomandibular disorder pain in these patients is part of a more widespread chronic pain disorder.

  4. Temporomandibular joint ankylosis as part of the clinical spectrum of Carey-Fineman-Ziter syndrome?

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    Pasetti, Martina; Mazzoleni, Fabio; Novelli, Giorgio; Iascone, Maria; Bozzetti, Alberto; Selicorni, Angelo

    2016-08-01

    The Carey-Finema-Ziter syndrome (CFZS, MIM 254940) is an apparently autosomal recessively inherited disorder consisting of the combination of non-progressive congenital myopathy with Moebius and Pierre Robin sequence, facial anomalies and growth delay. Mental development has been described as normal or delayed. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is the immobility of the joint caused by ankylotic fusion of the mandible to the cranial base or zygoma. It is a serious and disabling condition that may cause problems in mastication, digestion, speech, appearance, and oral hygiene. Most often is a true ankylosis of the TMJ but other pathological mechanisms are described (i.e., the fusion of the coronoid process to temporal bone or with the zygoma, or a variety of soft tissues disorders like Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva). Here we report a 2-year-old girl fitting with a clinical diagnosis of CFZS associated with a limited mouth opening in which temporomandibular joint ankylosis was suspected. Because it has been postulated that many clinical features in CFZS may only be secondary effects of brainstem anomalies and muscle weakness during development, the limited opening of the mouth observed in our patient could represent a rare clinical feature of CFZS itself. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The postnatal development of the temporal part of the human temporomandibular joint. A quantitative study on skulls.

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    Dibbets, J M; Dijkman, G E

    1997-12-01

    The morphology of the temporal part of the human temporomandibular joint (TMJ) changes drastically during postnatal development. The glenoid fossa will acquire its characteristic S shape and a tubercle will develop. The combined results of the literature and of this study allow a reconstruction of the actual growth processes. The roof of the glenoid fossa appears to enlarge forward by remodeling while sagittal and vertical growth is mainly achieved by deposition at the top of the tubercle. These latter changes result in a steeper slope of the eminence and take place in 3 phases, parallelling the eruption of the first incisors, the permanent first molars and the permanent second molars. While the zygomatic arch thickens by deposition at all surfaces, it also remodels downward relative to the external meatus. As a result, the neonate anulus occupies a lower position relative to this arch than does the adult meatus.

  6. Splint therapy for disc displacement with reduction of the temporomandibular joint. Part I: Modified mandibular splint therapy

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    Huang, I-Yueh; Wu, Ju-Hui; Kao, Yu-Hsun; Chen, Chao-Ming; Chen, Chun-Ming; Yang, Yi-Hsin

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this preliminary study were to present a modified mandibular splint together with a treatment regimen and to evaluate their effects on the treatment of reciprocal joint sounds of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The study participants were recruited from 312 consecutive patients in the temporomandibular disorder clinic of a medical center in Taiwan from January 2003 to December 2003. From among these, 59 cases with typical reciprocal clicking were selected for this study. All pa...

  7. The temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, W.

    1984-01-01

    Whilst the temporomandibular joint is in many ways unique, it is subject to all the diseases and disorders found in joints in other parts of the human skeleton. By far the most common disorder is injury, followed by arthropathy, acute and chronic dislocations, ankylosis, and in rare instances, neoplasms. The diagnosis and management of the temporomandibular joint are the primary responsibility of the oral surgeon. Nevertheless, this anatomical region is an area in which the cooperation of medical and dental disciplines may be required for the satisfactory conclusion of treatment. The more so when the disease process involves either associated psychosomatic illness or malignancy. The mainstay of the diagnosis is a careful radiological examination of the joint. There exists a delicate relationship between the dentition, the muscles of mastication, and the temporomandibular articulation, which is controlled by arthrokinetic reflex activity of the branches of the 5th cranial nerve. Imbalance between one or more of the components of this integrated system frequently leads to disturbances in function. Pain-dysfunction disorders constitute the larger part of temporomandibular joint disturbances generally encountered

  8. Temporomandibular disorders and headaches.

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    Graff-Radford, Steven B; Bassiur, Jennifer P

    2014-05-01

    Headache and temporomandibular disorders should be treated together but separately. If there is marked limitation of opening, imaging of the joint may be necessary. The treatment should then include education regarding limiting jaw function, appliance therapy, instruction in jaw posture, and stretching exercises, as well as medications to reduce inflammation and relax the muscles. The use of physical therapies, such as spray and stretch and trigger point injections, is helpful if there is myofascial pain. Tricyclic antidepressants and the new-generation antiepileptic drugs are effective in muscle pain conditions. Arthrocentesis and/or arthroscopy may help to restore range of motion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The Diagnostic Value of Pressure Algometry for Temporomandibular Disorders

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    Włodzimierz Więckiewicz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine the diagnostic value of pressure algometry in temporomandibular disorders. Two hundred volunteers aged 19.3 to 27.8 (mean 21.50, SD 0.97 participated in this study. An analogue pressure algometer was used for the evaluation of muscle tenderness of the following masticatory muscles: superficial and deep parts of the masseter muscle; anterior and posterior parts of the temporal muscle; and the tissues adjacent to the lateral and dorsal part of the temporomandibular joint capsule. Each patient described the algometry result for the individual components of the masticatory motor system, by selecting each time the intensity of pain on a 100 mm Visual Analogue Scale (VAS ruler. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve, indicating the discriminatory efficiency for asymptomatic subjects and patients with temporomandibular dysfunction according to the dysfunction Di index, was the largest for the mean pain value (AUC = 0.8572; SEM = 0.0531. The 7.4 VAS cut-off point marked 95.3% specificity for this variable in identifying healthy subjects and 58.4% sensitivity in identifying patients with symptoms of dysfunctions (accuracy 68.1%. Assuming comparable sensitivity (74.9% and specificity (74.2% for a diagnostic test, there was test accuracy of 74.5% at the 4.2 VAS cut-off point.

  10. Splint therapy for disc displacement with reduction of the temporomandibular joint. Part I: Modified mandibular splint therapy

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    I-Yueh Huang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this preliminary study were to present a modified mandibular splint together with a treatment regimen and to evaluate their effects on the treatment of reciprocal joint sounds of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ. The study participants were recruited from 312 consecutive patients in the temporomandibular disorder clinic of a medical center in Taiwan from January 2003 to December 2003. From among these, 59 cases with typical reciprocal clicking were selected for this study. All participants were treated with a modified mandibular splint and then followed up for 6 months. Successful treatment was defined as leading to the disappearance of the joint sounds of TMJ, as described by patients. Based on clinical evaluation, the overall success rate was 71.2% (42/59 with minimal temporary complications. Patients with clicking at less than 3.5 cm of interincisal opening had a success rate of 92.5%, which was higher than the success rate of patients with clicking at a mouth opening of 3.5 cm or more. This study showed that a modified mandibular splint can be used to treat reciprocal clicking of the TMJ effectively and encouraged us to conduct further study on the efficacy of this splint to treat disc displacement with reduction of TMJ using magnetic resonance imaging examination.

  11. Temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westesson, P.L.; Hatala, M.; Tallents, R.H.; Katzberg, R.W.; Musgrave, M.; Levitt, S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper determines the frequency of MR signs of abnormal temporomandibular joints (TMJs) in asymptomatic volunteers. Forty-two volunteers with 84 clinically normal TMJs were imaged in the sagittal and coronal planes with surface coil MR imaging. Sagittal closed and open and coronal closed views were obtained bilaterally in all volunteers. The images were classified as normal (superior disk position) or abnormal (disk displacement of degenerative joint disease). Eighteen joints in 11 volunteers were abnormal; 12 had disk displacement with reduction and six had disk displacement without reduction, with associated degenerative joint disease in three of the six. Asymptomatic internal derangement and degenerative joint disease occur in about one-fourth of asymptomatic volunteers

  12. Gnathological splint therapy in temporomandibular joint disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Gnanashanmugham, K.; Saravanan, B.; Sukumar, M. R.; Tajir, T. Faisal

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) forms an integral functional part of stomatognathic system. Position, shape, structure and function of teeth have an influence on the proper functioning and health of TMJ. But a problem associated with TMJ is often neglected, and treatment for it is mostly restricted to palliative therapy. A proper understanding of the underlying cause of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) is necessary to device a proper treatment plan. Etiology of TMDs varies from idiopathic...

  13. [Tinnitus and temporomandibular joint: State of the art].

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    Lina-Granade, G; Truy, E; Ionescu, E; Garnier, P; Thai Van, H

    2016-12-01

    Tinnitus has been described in temporomandibular joint dysfunction for a long time. Yet, other disorders, such as hearing loss, stress, anxiety and depression, play a major role in the pathophysiology of tinnitus. Temporomandibular joint dysfunctions seem to increase the risk of tinnitus in patients with other predisposing factors. Especially somatosensory tinnitus, which is characterized by sound modulations with neck or mandible movements, is frequently associated with temporomandibular joint dysfunction, but it is not pathognomonic of such a disorder. In such cases, functional therapy of the temporomandibular joint should be part of the multidisciplinary rehabilitation of patients with tinnitus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. MR imaging of the temporomandibular joint. Part 2. Effect of flip angle on MR imaging with FLASH sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Maya; Sasano, Takashi; Higano, Shuichi; Takahashi, Shoki; Kurihara, Noriko

    1998-01-01

    In our previous study on MR imaging of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), fast low angle shot (FLASH) showed the highest image contrast between disc and surrounding TMJ tissues compared with those of 4 other sequences (i,e., fast imaging with steady precession (FISP), conventional T1-weighted spin echo (SE) and fast spin echo (FSE, TR/TE/ETL: 1100/12/3, 3000/15/7)). Furthermore, FLASH also received a high score on visual evaluation including the position and contour of the disc, and the border between the disc and surrounding tissues. Therefore, we concluded that FLASH was the most suitable sequence for evaluating the TMJ disc. However, the image contrast and signal intensity on MR imaging with gradient echo pulse sequence are affected by flip angle. Consequently, in this report, to find the most suitable flip angle for MR scanning of the TMJ using a FLASH sequence (TR/TE: 450/11), ten TMJs of 5 volunteers were experimentally imaged with various flip angles from 10 degrees to 70 degrees at an interval of 10 degrees between 10 to 70. The image contrast and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) between the disc and surrounding tissues were compared. In addition, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of phantoms was also calculated using the same imaging parameters. Visual evaluation including position and contour of the disc, and the border between the disc and surrounding tissues, was also performed by 4 radiologists. As the flip angle increased, imaging contrast decreased while SNR increased. Images with flip angles between 30 and 60 degrees demonstrated high CNR. On visual evaluation, images using flip angles between 30 and 50 degrees received high scores. In conclusion, FLASH sequence with a flip angle between 30 and 50 degrees was considered most suitable for evaluating the TMJ disc based on the results of visual assessment and analysis of three major components of image diagnostic quality: image contrast, CNR and SNR. (author)

  15. [Temporo-mandibular joint. Morpho-functional considerations].

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    Scutariu, M D; Indrei, Anca

    2004-01-01

    The temporo-mandibular joint is distinguished from most other synovial joints of the body by two features: 1. the two jointed components carry teeth whose position and occlusion introduce a very strong influence on the movements of the temporo-mandibular joint and 2. its articular surfaces are not covered by hyaline cartilage, but by a dense, fibrous tissue. This paper describes the parts of the temporo-mandibular joint: the articular surfaces (the condylar process of the mandible and the glenoid part of the temporal bone), the fibrocartilaginous disc which is interposed between the mandibular and the temporal surface, the fibrous capsule of the temporo-mandibular joint and the ligaments of this joint. All these parts present a very strong adaptation at the important functions of the temporo-mandibular joint.

  16. Vehicle parts detection based on Faster - RCNN with location constraints of vehicle parts feature point

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    Yang, Liqin; Sang, Nong; Gao, Changxin

    2018-03-01

    Vehicle parts detection plays an important role in public transportation safety and mobility. The detection of vehicle parts is to detect the position of each vehicle part. We propose a new approach by combining Faster RCNN and three level cascaded convolutional neural network (DCNN). The output of Faster RCNN is a series of bounding boxes with coordinate information, from which we can locate vehicle parts. DCNN can precisely predict feature point position, which is the center of vehicle part. We design an output strategy by combining these two results. There are two advantages for this. The quality of the bounding boxes are greatly improved, which means vehicle parts feature point position can be located more precise. Meanwhile we preserve the position relationship between vehicle parts and effectively improve the validity and reliability of the result. By using our algorithm, the performance of the vehicle parts detection improve obviously compared with Faster RCNN.

  17. Temporomandibular disorders and tension-type headache.

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    Mongini, Franco

    2007-12-01

    Pathologies currently defined as temporomandibular disorders may be different in nature. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders and craniofacial and cervical myogenous pain (MP) are distinct pathologies but may be superimposed and share some etiologic factors. Tension-type headache (TTH) may often be associated with craniofacial and cervical pain, and the same pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment may be efficacious for both. Psychiatric comorbidity (depression and/or anxiety disorder) is less frequent in sheer TMJ disorders, compared with MP and TTH. A screening for the presence of an underlying psychiatric disorder should be part of the clinical evaluation in patients suffering from headache and facial pain.

  18. Temporomandibular Joint Disorder

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    ... Baby Bottle Tooth Decay? Pacifiers Have Negative and Positive Effects What is Dental Amalgam (Silver Filling)? Check Menstrual Calendar for Tooth Extraction Temporomandibular Joint Disorder Learn what those dental words mean. Check out how your teeth and mouth ...

  19. Relation of the otological symptoms in the temporomandibular dysfunctions

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    Machado, Ilza Maria

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The temporomandibular joint dysfunctions (TMJ include several clinical problems which wrap the masticatory muscle, the joint itself and structures associated to the ear region. Objective: To analyze the relation between temporomandibular dysfunction and otological symptoms. Method: Were part of a retrospective study 20 women with mean age of 22, 38 years. This study was realized by a multidisciplinary team that wrapped otorhinolaryngologist, speech therapist and orthodontist. The participants were submitted to the filling of a questionnaire that addressed questions about otological symptoms and later they were submitted to an otoscopy exam and a clinical examination of the temporomandibular joint. Results: Eighty-five per cent had simultaneously temporomandibular dysfunction with otological symptoms complaints. The otological symptoms more mentioned were auricular plenitude (50%, tinnitus (35%, and dizziness (10%. Conclusion: The results showed high percentage between DTMs and otological symptoms. Other researches with a larger sample are suggested with the aim of confirm the correlation between DTM and otological symptoms.

  20. Temporomandibular disorders and migraine headache

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    Demarin, Vida; Bašić Kes, Vanja

    2010-01-01

    Migraine headache and temporomandibular disorders show significant overlap in the area or distribution of pain, the gender prevalence and age distribution. Temporomandibular disorders may cause headaches per se, worsen existent primary headaches, and add to the burden of headache disorders. The patients with combined migraine and tension-type headaches had a higher prevelance of temporomandibular disorders. Evidence supporting a close relationship include the increased masticatory...

  1. Gnathological splint therapy in temporomandibular joint disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Gnanashanmugham

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint (TMJ forms an integral functional part of stomatognathic system. Position, shape, structure and function of teeth have an influence on the proper functioning and health of TMJ. But a problem associated with TMJ is often neglected, and treatment for it is mostly restricted to palliative therapy. A proper understanding of the underlying cause of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD is necessary to device a proper treatment plan. Etiology of TMDs varies from idiopathic reasons to systemic disorders. The option of Gnathological splint is a conservative, safe and an effective mode of therapy for TMDs caused by occlusal discrepancies (fulcrum/interferences. This article presents a case report of a patient with TMD caused by occlusal discrepancy

  2. HISTORY OF SURGERY TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOIN

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    P. G. Sysolyatin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the main stages of the historical development of the temporo-mandibular joint surgery. It was shown the evolution of treatments for diseases and injuries of joints. It summarizes the main work of domestic and foreign authors that influenced the development of surgery of the temporo-mandibular joint. 

  3. A patient's view on the location of the temporomandibular joint.

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    Koole, Paul; Zonnenberg, Adriaan J J; Mulder, Jan

    2018-03-25

    Objective A survey was held to establish whether laypeople knew the location of their temporomandibular joint. Methods A sample of 61 participants, visiting their dental office for a routine check-up, was given a three-question survey of whether they knew the location of their temporomandibular joint and could point to this location. Results Thirty-eight participants answered the question affirmatively. Only 13 pointed to the correct location. Of these, six participants received consultation for TMD in the past, three participants were healthcare providers, and four participants actually had knowledge of the exact location. Out of 23 participants who did not know the location, one accidently designated the correct position. Conclusion The location of the temporomandibular joint is not a well-known site for many patients. In the presence of orofacial pain, it seems advisable to let the patient designate and record the site of the pain on a drawing on the patient chart.

  4. Temporomandibular joint motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, M.; Kawamura, Y.; Matsuda, T.; Itou, S.; Odori, T.; Ishii, Y.; Torizuka, K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates MR imaging with the therapeutic effect after splint therapy in internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Fifteen patients (19 TMJs) with internal derangement of the TMJ and five normal volunteers (10 TMJs) were examined with sagittal T1-weighted spin-echo and gradient recalled acquisition in a steady state (GRASS) MR imaging. MR studies of the patients undergoing splint therapy were performed with an without splints. Pseudodynamic images of TMJ motion provide information that was not available from spin-echo T1-weighted images

  5. Temporomandibular Disorders and Headache.

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    Graff-Radford, Steven B; Abbott, Jeremy J

    2016-08-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and primary headaches can be perpetual and debilitating musculoskeletal and neurological disorders. The presence of both can affect up to one-sixth of the population at any one time. Initially, TMDs were thought to be predominantly musculoskeletal disorders, and migraine was thought to be solely a cerebrovascular disorder. The further understanding of their pathophysiology has helped to clarify their clinical presentation. This article focuses on the role of the trigeminal system in associating TMD and migraine. By discussing recent descriptions of prevalence, diagnosis, and treatment of headache and TMD, we will further elucidate this relationship. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Salient Point Detection in Protrusion Parts of 3D Object Robust to Isometric Variations

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    Mirloo, Mahsa; Ebrahimnezhad, Hosein

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, a novel method is proposed to detect 3D object salient points robust to isometric variations and stable against scaling and noise. Salient points can be used as the representative points from object protrusion parts in order to improve the object matching and retrieval algorithms. The proposed algorithm is started by determining the first salient point of the model based on the average geodesic distance of several random points. Then, according to the previous salient point, a new point is added to this set of points in each iteration. By adding every salient point, decision function is updated. Hence, a condition is created for selecting the next point in which the iterative point is not extracted from the same protrusion part so that drawing out of a representative point from every protrusion part is guaranteed. This method is stable against model variations with isometric transformations, scaling, and noise with different levels of strength due to using a feature robust to isometric variations and considering the relation between the salient points. In addition, the number of points used in averaging process is decreased in this method, which leads to lower computational complexity in comparison with the other salient point detection algorithms.

  7. Differences Regarding Branded HA in Italy, Part 2: Data from Clinical Studies on Knee, Hip, Shoulder, Ankle, Temporomandibular Joint, Vertebral Facets, and Carpometacarpal Joint

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    Migliore, A.; Bizzi, E.; De Lucia, O.; Delle Sedie, A.; Tropea, S.; Bentivegna, M.; Mahmoud, A.; Foti, C.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The aim of the current study is to collect scientific data on all branded hyaluronic acid (HA) products in Italy that are in use for intra-articular (IA) injection in osteoarthritis (OA) compared with that reported in the leaflet. METHODS An extensive literature research was performed for all articles reporting data on the IA use of HA in OA. Selected studies were taken into consideration only if they are related to products based on HAs that are currently marketed in Italy with the specific joint indication for IA use in patients affected by OA. RESULTS Sixty-two HA products are marketed in Italy: 30 products are indicated for the knee but only 8 were proved with some efficacy; 9 products were effective for the hip but only 6 had hip indication; 7 products proved to be effective for the shoulder but only 3 had the indication; 5 products proved effective for the ankle but only one had the indication; 6 products were effective for the temporomandibular joint but only 2 had the indication; only 2 proved effective for vertebral facet joints but only 1 had the indication; and 5 products proved effective for the carpometacarpal joint but only 2 had the indication. CONCLUSIONS There are only a few products with some evidences, while the majority of products remain without proof. Clinicians and regulators should request postmarketing studies from pharmaceuticals to corroborate with that reported in the leaflet and to gather more data, allowing the clinicians to choose the adequate product for the patient. PMID:27279754

  8. Temporomandibular joint movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, M.; Itou, S.; Ishii, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Kawamura, Y.; Matsuda, T.; Hayashi, N.; Ishii, J.

    1992-01-01

    Ten temporomandibular joints (TMJs) of 5 healthy volunteers and 19 TMJs of internal derangements in 16 patients with splint therapy were examined with MR imaging. T1-weighted images were obtained only in the closed mouth position, and gradient recalled acquisition in steady state (GRASS) images were obtained in active opening and closing phases, allowing a pseudodynamic display of TMJ movement. All patients received protrusive splint treatment. The usefulness of MR imaging to assess the efficacy of splint therapy was evaluated. Corrected disk position with the splint in place was clearly demonstrated in 9 TMJs, corresponding with elimination of reciprocal clicking. Ten other TMJs of anterior disk displacement without reduction showed uncorrected disk position by the splint. This information could confirm the therapeutic efficacy, or suggest other treatment alternatives. GRASS MR imaging can provide accurate and physiologic information about disk function in initial and follow-up assessment of protrusive splint therapy. (orig.)

  9. Temporomandibular joint arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hyung Sik; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Myoung Joon; Jun, Young Hwan; Chang, Duk Soo; Jung, Don Young; Jung, In Won

    1988-01-01

    The stress and occlusion disturbance are very important etiologic factors in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain dysfunction syndromes. Authors performed TMJ arthrograms in the patients with TMJ problem such as pain, click sound, limited motion and locking, etc. The following results noted: 1. The arthrographic findings of 22 TMJ were analyzed. a) Normal: 6 cases b) Anterior disc displacement with rediction: 6 cases · Early reduction: 2 cases · Intermediate reduction: 3 cases · Late reduction: 1 case c) Anterior disc displacement without reduction: 6 cases · Two cases had adhesion between the posterior portion of disc and the posterior surfaces of the articular eminence. 2. Among 22 cases, the clinical findings of 16 cases (73%) were compatible with arthrographic findings. 6 cases showed disparity between them.

  10. The temporomandibular joint in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomaroli, A.; Lener, M.

    1988-01-01

    The first part describes details of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) which are of interest for the examination by computed tomography. In the second part three new planes of reference for scanning of the ventral, middle or dorsal part of the joint are presented. CT examinations were made of 14 TMJ of corpses to identify the medial or ventral parts of the articular disc, medial wall of the articular capsule and medial or triangular recessus to achieve this were scanned the corpses with opened and closed mouth, as well as with closed sets of teeth using a sort of hypomochlion in the molar region to distract the TMJ. More over we applicated different contrast mediums like air and niob. (orig.) [de

  11. Temporomandibular Joint Septic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco Frojo, MD

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary:. Infection of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ is a rare pediatric condition resulting from the introduction of pathogens into the joint by hematogenous seeding, local extension, or trauma. Early recognition of the typical signs and symptoms including fever, trismus, preauricular swelling, and TMJ region tenderness are critical in order to initiate further evaluation and prevent feared complications of fibrosis, ankylosis, abnormal facial structure, or persistence of symptoms. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography with ancillary laboratory analysis including erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, and white blood cell count are beneficial in confirming the suspected diagnosis and monitoring response to therapy. Initial intervention should include empiric parenteral antibiotics, early mandibular mobilization, and joint decompression to provide synovial fluid for analysis including cultures. This report describes a case of TMJ bacterial arthritis in a healthy 6-year-old male who was promptly treated nonsurgically with intravenous antibiotics and localized needle joint decompression with return to normal function after completion of oral antibiotics and physical therapy.

  12. Temporomandibular joint examination reviewed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Guarda Nardini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ it’s a joint closely related to the skull base, the spine, and the jaws; all these anatomical structures must be taken in consideration when evaluating pain involving the tmj. In order to detect patients affected by pathology or dysfunctions of the tmj, physical examination is of great value in orienting the diagnosis. Inspection must consider the symmetry of the body, the dental status and the type of occlusion. Palpation is a way to assess contractiont involving the muscles of the masticatory system and of the neck. Auscultation, based on articular noise provides means to determine whether we are dealing with degeneration of the joint or a dislocation of the intrarticular disc. In order to confirm the diagnosis obtained with the clinical evaluation, it’s useful to perform imaging techniques as opt, tomography and TC of the tmj and electromyokineosiography – index of the mandibular functionality and of the muscles status. MRI and dynamic MRI are among the non invasive exams which give the greatest amount of information, regarding the disc position and the joint degeneration. Arthroscopy is an invasive technique that allows early diagnosis of degeneration and is helpful to reveal early inflammatory processes of the joint.

  13. [Temporo-mandibular ankylosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bénateau, H; Chatellier, A; Caillot, A; Diep, D; Kün-Darbois, J-D; Veyssière, A

    2016-09-01

    Ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint is defined as a permanent constriction of the jaws with less than 30mm mouth opening measured between the incisors, occurring because of bony, fibrous or fibro-osseous fusion. Resulting complications such as speech, chewing, swallowing impediment and deficient oral hygiene may occur. The overall incidence is decreasing but remains significant in some developing countries. The most frequent etiology in developed countries is the post-traumatic ankylosis occurring after condylar fracture. Other causes may be found: infection (decreasing since the advent of antibiotics), inflammation (rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis mainly) and congenital diseases (very rare). Management relies on surgery: resection of the ankylosis block in combination with bilateral coronoidectomy… The block resection may be offset by the interposition temporal fascia flap, a costochondral graft or a TMJ prosthesis according to the loss of height and to the impact on dental occlusion. Postoperative rehabilitation is essential and has to be started early, to be intense and prolonged. Poor rehabilitation is the main cause of ankylosis recurrence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Temporomandibular Joint Regenerative Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Van Bellinghen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The temporomandibular joint (TMJ is an articulation formed between the temporal bone and the mandibular condyle which is commonly affected. These affections are often so painful during fundamental oral activities that patients have lower quality of life. Limitations of therapeutics for severe TMJ diseases have led to increased interest in regenerative strategies combining stem cells, implantable scaffolds and well-targeting bioactive molecules. To succeed in functional and structural regeneration of TMJ is very challenging. Innovative strategies and biomaterials are absolutely crucial because TMJ can be considered as one of the most difficult tissues to regenerate due to its limited healing capacity, its unique histological and structural properties and the necessity for long-term prevention of its ossified or fibrous adhesions. The ideal approach for TMJ regeneration is a unique scaffold functionalized with an osteochondral molecular gradient containing a single stem cell population able to undergo osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation such as BMSCs, ADSCs or DPSCs. The key for this complex regeneration is the functionalization with active molecules such as IGF-1, TGF-β1 or bFGF. This regeneration can be optimized by nano/micro-assisted functionalization and by spatiotemporal drug delivery systems orchestrating the 3D formation of TMJ tissues.

  15. Temporomandibular disorders in adolescents with headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojka, Anna; Żarowski, Marcin; Steinborn, Barbara; Hedzelek, Wiesław; Wiśniewska-Spychała, Beata; Dorocka-Bobkowska, Barbara

    2018-02-01

    Headache is a common complaint in all age groups and is a frequent cause of medical consultations and hospitalization. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of bite and non-bite parafunctions as well as the signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) in adolescents presenting with primary headaches. Parents of adolescents presented with headaches to the Department of Developmental Neurology within a 12-month period were asked to complete a questionnaire developed by the authors of this study. Of the 1000 patients evaluated, 19 females and 21 males, aged 13 to 17 years, met the inclusion criterion - a confirmed clinical diagnosis of migraine or a tension headache according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd edition. The diagnostic algorithm of the study group consisted of a full medical history, an assessment of the occurrence of bite habits and a physical examination based on the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD). Bite and non-bite parafunctions were found in 36 of the study group patients. A significant difference (p = 0.0003) between the number of bite parafunctions and non-bite parafunctions was found in females but not in males. However, bite parafunctions were more frequent in boys compared to girls (p = 0.01). Our findings suggest that it may be useful for pediatricians and neurologists to include TMD dysfunctions as a part of a standard examination of adolescents presenting with persistent headaches.

  16. Optimality with feedback control in relativistic dynamics of a mass point. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaquiere, A.; Pauchard, M.; Tahri-Yousfi, N.; Wickers, D.

    1984-01-01

    This article is an account of part of a research task currently in progress; it deals with relativistic dynamics of a mass-point from the point of view of the theory of optimal feedback control. In the first part, the theoretical frame is presented with an application to the case of special Relativity. This application shows that the way followed in this article is a natural one for approaching Wave mechanics, and that it closely parallels the way along which Louis de Broglie introduced Wave mechanics [fr

  17. Temporomandibular disorders in headache patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Christiane-Espinola-Bandeira; Oliveira, José-Luiz-Góes; Jesus, Alan-Chester-Feitosa; Maia, Mila-Leite-de Moraes; de Santana, Jonielly-Costa-Vasconcelos; Andrade, Loren-Suyane-Oliveira; Siqueira Quintans, Jullyana-de Souza; Quintans-Junior, Lucindo-José; Conti, Paulo-César-Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify the frequency of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and its seve-rity in individuals with headache. Study Design: 60 adults divided into three groups of 20 individuals: chronic daily headache (CDH), episodic headache (EH) and a control group without headache (WH). Headache diagnosis was performed according to the criteria of International Headache Society and the signs and symptoms of TMD were achieved by using a clinical exam and an anamnestic questionnaire. The severity of TMD was defined by the temporomandibular index (TMI). Results: The TMD signs and symptoms were always more frequent in individuals with headache, especially report of pain in TMJ area (CDH, n=16; EH, n=12; WH, n=6), pain to palpation on masseter (CDH, n=19; EH, n=16; WH, n=11) which are significantly more frequent in episodic and chronic daily headache. The mean values of temporomandibular and articular index (CDH patients) and muscular index (CDH and EH patients) were statistically higher than in patients of the control group, notably the articular (CDH=0.38; EH=0.25;WH=0.19) and muscular (CDH=0.46; EH=0.51; WH=0.26) indices. Conclusions: These findings allow us to speculate that masticatory and TMJ pain are more common in headache subjects. Besides, it seems that the TMD is more severe in headache patients. Key words:Temporomandibular dysfunction, headache disorders. PMID:22926473

  18. Power plant site evaluation - Douglas Point site. Volume 1, part 2. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    This is part of a series of reports containing an evaluation of the proposed Douglas Point nuclear generating station site located on the Potomac River in Maryland 30 miles south of Washington, DC. This report contains sections on cooling tower air emissions, noise impacts, transmission line effects, radiation from normal releases, site features affecting radiological accidents, and meteorology

  19. 32 CFR Appendix B to Part 290 - DCAA's FOIA Points of Contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROGRAM DEFENSE CONTRACT AUDIT AGENCY (DCAA) FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROGRAM Pt. 290, App. B Appendix B to Part 290—DCAA's FOIA Points of Contact (Regional Offices.... Pacific Ocean and Asian Islands. Asia except the Middle East. Australia. Georgia DCAA Eastern Regional...

  20. Actualización terapéutica de los trastornos temporomandibulares Updating on the treatment of temporomandibular disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indira García Martínez

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una revisión bibliográfica con el objetivo de actualizar las diferentes alternativas terapéuticas que se disponen por parte de los profesionales para el tratamiento de los trastornos temporomandibulares, para lo cual los primeros esfuerzos están encaminados al alivio del dolor y al restablecimiento de la función, aunque previamente es necesario un buen diagnóstico y detección de los factores causales, enfatizando que el estrés es un elemento primordial que se debe considerar. La existencia de variados enfoques terapéuticos para los trastornos temporomandibulares queda justificada por la multifactorialidad de la etiología; las 2 alternativas más utilizadas son las férulas oclusales y el tallado selectivo. Se prefiere la fisioterapia a la quimioterapia, como coadyuvante terapéutica de los trastornos temporomandibulares, ya que disminuye el peligro de producir reacciones adversas. Solo se indicará el tratamiento quirúrgico cuando han fracasado los métodos conservadores.A literature review was made to provide updated information on the different therapeutic alternatives at the disposal of dental professionals for the treatment of termporomandibular disorders aimed at relieving pain and re-establish the functioning of the joint. However, it is necessary to firstly make a good diagnosis and then detect the causative factors, emphasizing that stress is a key element to be taken into consideration. The existence of various therapeutical approaches for temporomandibular disorders is due to the multiple factors present in the etiology; the two most used alternatives are occlusal splints and selective carving. Physiotherapy is prefered over chemotherapy, as therapeutic coadjuvant for temporomandibular disorders, because likely occurence of adverse reaction decreases. The surgical treatment will be advised only in the event of failure of standard methods.

  1. Temporomandibular disorder in otolaryngology: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepan, L; Shaw, C-K L; Oue, S

    2017-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorder poses a diagnostic challenge to otolaryngologists as orofacial pain, headache and otology symptoms are very common in temporomandibular disorder, and mimic a number of otolaryngological conditions. Missed diagnosis of temporomandibular disorder can lead to unnecessary investigation and treatment, resulting in further patient suffering. To review the current literature and propose management pathways for otolaryngologists to correctly differentiate temporomandibular disorder from other otolaryngological conditions, and to initiate effective treatment for temporomandibular disorder in collaboration with other health professionals. A systematic review using PubMed and Medline databases was conducted, and data on temporomandibular disorder in conjunction with otolaryngological symptoms were collected for analysis. Of 4155 potential studies, 33 were retrieved for detailed evaluation and 12 met the study criteria. There are questionnaires, examination techniques and radiological investigations presented in the literature to assist with distinguishing between otolaryngological causes of symptoms and temporomandibular disorder. Simple treatment can be initiated by the otolaryngologist. Initial temporomandibular disorder treatment steps can be undertaken by the otolaryngologist, with consideration of referral to dentists, oral and maxillofacial surgeons, or physiotherapists if simple pharmacological treatment or temporomandibular disorder exercise fails.

  2. Osseous temporomandibular joint abnormalities in rheumatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larheim, T.A.; Kolbenstvedt, A.; Rikshospitalet, Oslo

    1990-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was compared with hypocycloidal tomography in 30 joints of 15 adults with rheumatic disease. CT included 1.5 mm thick axial scans (at 1.0 mm intervals) with reformatted oblique sagittal and oblique coronal sections. Multisection (at 2.0 mm intervals) tomography included oblique sagittal and occasionally, oblique coronal sections. CT demonstrated bone abnormalities in 21 and tomography in 20 joints, indicating high agreement between the imaging modalities regarding number of abnormal TMJs. Bone structures were, however, better visualized by multiplanar CT due to superior contrast and spatial resolution particularly in the most lateral and medial parts of the joint, indicating superiority of CT for depicting subtle bony TMJ abnormalities in patients with rheumatic disease. (orig.)

  3. Three-dimensional temporomandibular joint modeling and animation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascone, Piero; Rinaldi, Fabrizio; Pagnoni, Mario; Marianetti, Tito Matteo; Tedaldi, Massimiliano

    2008-11-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) temporomandibular joint (TMJ) model derives from a study of the cranium by 3D virtual reality and mandibular function animation. The starting point of the project is high-fidelity digital acquisition of a human dry skull. The cooperation between the maxillofacial surgeon and the cartoonist enables the reconstruction of the fibroconnective components of the TMJ that are the keystone for comprehension of the anatomic and functional features of the mandible. The skeletal model is customized with the apposition of the temporomandibular ligament, the articular disk, the retrodiskal tissue, and the medial and the lateral ligament of the disk. The simulation of TMJ movement is the result of the integration of up-to-date data on the biomechanical restrictions. The 3D TMJ model is an easy-to-use application that may be run on a personal computer for the study of the TMJ and its biomechanics.

  4. Temporomandibular disorders after whiplash injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasch, Helge; Hjorth, Tine; Svensson, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Aims: Whiplash injury to the neck, is often considered a significant risk factor for development of temporomandibular disorders (TMD), and has been proposed to produce internal derangements of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Few studies however have examined TMD-related pain in acute whiplash...... patients compared with a matched control group. The aim of the present study was to assess pain and sensorimotor function in the craniofacial region in an unselected group of patients sustaining a motor vehicle accident involving a rear collision. Methods: Prospectively, 19 acute whiplash patients exposed...... obtained at each visit. Results: One whiplash patient and I ankle-injury patient bad jaw pain at the first visit. Palpation scores of the TMJ and the summated palpation scores only tended to be higher in patients sustaining a whiplash injury than in ankle-injury controls at the first visit. However, MPQ...

  5. Temporomandibular disorders in headache patients

    OpenAIRE

    Mello, Christiane-Espinola-Bandeira; Oliveira, José-Luiz-Góes; Jesus, Alan-Chester-Feitosa; Maia, Mila-Leite-de Moraes; de Santana, Jonielly-Costa-Vasconcelos; Andrade, Loren-Suyane-Oliveira; Siqueira Quintans, Jullyana-de Souza; Quintans-Junior, Lucindo-José; Conti, Paulo-César-Rodrigues; Bonjardim, Leonardo-Rigoldi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify the frequency of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and its seve-rity in individuals with headache. Study Design: 60 adults divided into three groups of 20 individuals: chronic daily headache (CDH), episodic headache (EH) and a control group without headache (WH). Headache diagnosis was performed according to the criteria of International Headache Society and the signs and symptoms of TMD were achieved by using a clinical exam and an anamnestic quest...

  6. The headache of temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virdee, J

    2018-03-01

    This article endeavours to revise the key guidance and evidence on temporomandibular disorders (TMD), with a particular focus on myofascial pain. It highlights the important role that primary care dental practitioners play in providing holistic care during the patient's journey to manage this painful condition. I hope to give an insight into my own personal experiences to highlight the challenges patients can face in seeking appropriate support.

  7. MR diagnosis of temporomandibular arthrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suenaga, Shigeaki [Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Dentistry

    1996-09-01

    This review described lesions of articular disk and its surrounding tissues revealed by MR examination in temporomandibular arthrosis, and problems and limits of the examination. Apparatus and imaging methods: Spin echo method was generally used and gradient echo method was alternatively used. Author`s apparatus was 1.5 tesla Signa, Advantage type, equipped with surface coil for temporomandibular joint. Imaging conditions were T1-weighted spin echo method, T2-weighted fast spin echo method, spoiled GRASS (gradient recalled acquisition in the steady state) method and GRASS method. MR findings of articular disk: MR images of normal and abnormal temporomandibular joint were presented together with computed radiographic findings. The role of dynamic imaging was described for evaluation and analysis of the joint functioning. MR findings of surrounding tissues of the disk: Dynamic MRI of the tissues was found useful to see whether the cause of pain was present inside or outside of the articular capsule. Joint effusion could not be fully imaged in T2-weighted conditions. (K.H.)

  8. MR diagnosis of temporomandibular arthrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suenaga, Shigeaki

    1996-01-01

    This review described lesions of articular disk and its surrounding tissues revealed by MR examination in temporomandibular arthrosis, and problems and limits of the examination. Apparatus and imaging methods: Spin echo method was generally used and gradient echo method was alternatively used. Author's apparatus was 1.5 tesla Signa, Advantage type, equipped with surface coil for temporomandibular joint. Imaging conditions were T1-weighted spin echo method, T2-weighted fast spin echo method, spoiled GRASS (gradient recalled acquisition in the steady state) method and GRASS method. MR findings of articular disk: MR images of normal and abnormal temporomandibular joint were presented together with computed radiographic findings. The role of dynamic imaging was described for evaluation and analysis of the joint functioning. MR findings of surrounding tissues of the disk: Dynamic MRI of the tissues was found useful to see whether the cause of pain was present inside or outside of the articular capsule. Joint effusion could not be fully imaged in T2-weighted conditions. (K.H.)

  9. [Diagnosis and treatment of temporo-mandibular disorders in orthodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocquet, Emmanuelle; Moreau, Alexis; Danguy, Michel; Danguy, Chantal

    2010-03-01

    Orthodontists are fully prepared to treat the problems of occlusion that they are called upon to deal with every day. On the other hand temporo-mandibular joint disorders present more obscure difficulties from the point of view of detection and diagnosis as well the management of their treatment. That is why a profound understanding of the anatomical and physiological functioning of the temporo-mandibular joint has become indispensable for today's orthodontists who are now asked to detect and diagnose an assortment of TMJ disturbances whose etiology may vary greatly. By performing a rigorous diagnostic procedure, based on a thorough clinical examination supported by careful axiographic and radiological studies, of temporo-mandibular malfunctioning and its underlying etiological causes, which are primarily dento-alveolar and occlusal in nature, orthodontists will be able to adopt an appropriate therapeutic approach that might be purely orthodontic or multi-disciplinary and carried out with the collaboration of specialists in occlusion, oral surgery, and even osteopathy. EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2010.

  10. Segmenting Bone Parts for Bone Age Assessment using Point Distribution Model and Contour Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Amandeep; Singh Mann, Kulwinder, Dr.

    2018-01-01

    Bone age assessment (BAA) is a task performed on radiographs by the pediatricians in hospitals to predict the final adult height, to diagnose growth disorders by monitoring skeletal development. For building an automatic bone age assessment system the step in routine is to do image pre-processing of the bone X-rays so that features row can be constructed. In this research paper, an enhanced point distribution algorithm using contours has been implemented for segmenting bone parts as per well-established procedure of bone age assessment that would be helpful in building feature row and later on; it would be helpful in construction of automatic bone age assessment system. Implementation of the segmentation algorithm shows high degree of accuracy in terms of recall and precision in segmenting bone parts from left hand X-Rays.

  11. Estimating the physicochemical properties of polyhalogenated aromatic and aliphatic compounds using UPPER: part 1. Boiling point and melting point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Admire, Brittany; Lian, Bo; Yalkowsky, Samuel H

    2015-01-01

    The UPPER (Unified Physicochemical Property Estimation Relationships) model uses enthalpic and entropic parameters to estimate 20 biologically relevant properties of organic compounds. The model has been validated by Lian and Yalkowsky on a data set of 700 hydrocarbons. The aim of this work is to expand the UPPER model to estimate the boiling and melting points of polyhalogenated compounds. In this work, 19 new group descriptors are defined and used to predict the transition temperatures of an additional 1288 compounds. The boiling points of 808 and the melting points of 742 polyhalogenated compounds are predicted with average absolute errors of 13.56 K and 25.85 K, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A clinical study of temporomandibular disorder. The value of bone scintigraphy as an aid to diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiura, Masashi [Nippon Dental Univ. (Japan). School of Dentistry at Niigata

    2000-07-01

    Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is still not defined with respect to the point of an entity, terminological problems, and clinical classification and gradings. Moreover, diagnostic problems of internal deranegement and osteodeformity at the temporomandibular joint such as type IV and mechanism of bone remodeling at condylar head are also still not clear. In this investigation, we tried to classify the severity and progressive grading according to the symptoms and objective laboratory data taken from soft tissues such as muscles related to mastication, discs and ligaments, and hard tissues such as condylar head and temporal bone changes around the temporomandibular joint. Preliminary diagnostic clinical tool of the assessment of temporomandibular joint by maens of bone scintigraphy was attributed to the additional diagnostic procedure and research for the bone remodeling for the temporomandibular disorder because this can be defined between subjective and objective symptoms in this disorder. Bone scintigraphy will solve many problems concerning undefined degenerative bone changes in TMD, enable more accurate diagnosis, and the selection of treatment and prognosis in future investigation. Also, it is believed single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) nuclear bone imaging is a highly accurate diagnostic method for craniomandibular disorders. (author)

  13. A clinical study of temporomandibular disorder. The value of bone scintigraphy as an aid to diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiura, Masashi

    2000-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is still not defined with respect to the point of an entity, terminological problems, and clinical classification and gradings. Moreover, diagnostic problems of internal deranegement and osteodeformity at the temporomandibular joint such as type IV and mechanism of bone remodeling at condylar head are also still not clear. In this investigation, we tried to classify the severity and progressive grading according to the symptoms and objective laboratory data taken from soft tissues such as muscles related to mastication, discs and ligaments, and hard tissues such as condylar head and temporal bone changes around the temporomandibular joint. Preliminary diagnostic clinical tool of the assessment of temporomandibular joint by maens of bone scintigraphy was attributed to the additional diagnostic procedure and research for the bone remodeling for the temporomandibular disorder because this can be defined between subjective and objective symptoms in this disorder. Bone scintigraphy will solve many problems concerning undefined degenerative bone changes in TMD, enable more accurate diagnosis, and the selection of treatment and prognosis in future investigation. Also, it is believed single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) nuclear bone imaging is a highly accurate diagnostic method for craniomandibular disorders. (author)

  14. Traumatic injuries of the temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puig, S.; Krestan, C.; Lomoschitz, F.; Robinson, S.; Glaser, C.; Staudenherz, A.

    2001-01-01

    Injuries of the temporomandibular joint are mostly due to injuries or fractures of the mandibular condyle. Fractures of the skull base involving the temporomandibular joint are rare. Classification of fractures refers to their anatomical positions and the presence or absence of a luxation. Further, it is important whether the fracture is intra- or extra-capsular. The primary imaging method should be orthopantomography. As for therapy planning, especially surgery, also evaluation of soft tissue is necessary, computed tomography is the imaging method of choice. For diagnosis of complications or internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint, magnetic resonance imaging is to be recommended. (orig.) [de

  15. Trastornos temporomandibulares en adictos al qat

    OpenAIRE

    Orlando Guerra Cobián; Raúl J Pupo Triguero; Humberto Sarracent Pérez; Kirenia M Rabilero Salgado

    2012-01-01

    Introducción: los trastornos temporomandibulares se asocian frecuentemente al hábito de masticar qat, pero se carece de estudios que detallan sus particularidades, por lo que se realiza este trabajo, con los objetivos de determinar la prevalencia de trastornos temporomandibulares en pacientes adictos al qat, identificar los hallazgos clínicos- radiográficos asociados y clasificar los trastornos temporomandibulares presentes en la población estudiada. Métodos: se realizó un estudio prospectivo...

  16. Nutrition content of brisket point end of part Simental Ongole Crossbred meat in boiled various temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riyanto, J.; Sudibya; Cahyadi, M.; Aji, A. P.

    2018-01-01

    This aim of this study was to determine the quality of nutritional contents of beef brisket point end of Simental Ongole Crossbred meat in various boiling temperatures. Simental Ongole Crossbred had been fattened for 9 months. Furthermore, they were slaughtered at slaughterhouse and brisket point end part of meat had been prepared to analyse its nutritional contents using Food Scan. These samples were then boiled at 100°C for 0 (TR), 15 (R15), and 30 (R30) minutes, respectively. The data was analysed using Randomized Complete Design (CRD) and Duncan’s multiple range test (DMRT) had been conducted to differentiate among three treatments. The results showed that boiling temperatures significantly affected moisture, and cholesterol contents of beef (P<0.05) while fat content was not significantly affected by boiling temperatures. The boiling temperature decreased beef water contents from 72.77 to 70.84%, on the other hand, the treatment increased beef protein and cholesterol contents from 20.77 to 25.14% and 47.55 to 50.45 mg/100g samples, respectively. The conclusion of this study was boiling of beef at 100°C for 15 minutes and 30 minutes decreasing water content and increasing protein and cholesterol contents of brisket point end of Simental Ongole Crossbred beef.

  17. The craniocervical connection: a retrospective analysis of 300 whiplash patients with cervical and temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, M H; Weisberg, J

    2000-07-01

    Because the concept of whiplash as a causative factor for temporomandibular disorders (TMD) is highly controversial, we decided to do a retrospective analysis of patients treated in our office who had sustained whiplash injuries and were treated for cervical and temporomandibular disorders. The records of 300 patients with TMD preceded by a motor vehicle accident were examined retrospectively. The most common presenting symptoms, in order, were: jaw pain, neck pain, post-traumatic headache, jaw fatigue, and severe temporomandibular joint (TMJ) clicking. The most common TMD diagnoses were: masseter trigger points, closing jaw muscle hyperactivity, TMJ synovitis, opening jaw muscle hyperactivity, and advanced TMJ disk derangement. Based primarily on the physical examination, we concluded that the TMJ and surrounding musculature should be examined similarly to other joints, with no preconceived notion that TMD pathology after whiplash is unlikely.

  18. [The temporo-mandibular articulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargaud, J; Vinkka-Puhakka, H

    2004-04-01

    The standing posture of humans has created both morphological and functional adaptations in the temporo-mandibular joint and the masticatory function. This biped state is the one of the most important characteristic of human evolution. It is furthermore the agent determining most of the functional changes in the whole body. This survey will be carried out in several levels including, a descriptive anatomy, biomechanics, radiological imaging, functioning in the articulation of TMJ. The descriptive anatomic picture will be obtained by the traditional dissection techniques. 20 TMJ joints are dissected from 10 cadavers: 7 cadavers, 65-75 year old, 3 cadavers, 60-65 year old. The x-rays are lateral view and the subjects of the radiological imaging are young's, adults and olds: 1, 3 y-old Male; 1, 7 y-old Female; 1, 14 y-old Female; 10, 19-23 y-old Male; 1, 26 y-old Female; 1, 34 y-old Male; 1, 75 y-old Female. The anatomic elements in the TMJ well resembled the ones described in the literature of the capsule, the ligament, the masticator muscles (masseter, temporal, medial and lateral pterygoids). The temporo-mandibular ligament proved to be difficult to separate from the capsule in some of the specimens. Sometimes it was not always found after a dissection.

  19. Chronic Temporomandibular Pain Treatment Using Sodium Diclofenac

    OpenAIRE

    Kurita Varoli, Fernando; Sato, Sandra; Sucena Pita, Murillo; do Nascimento, Cássio; Pedrazzi, Vinícius

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluate spontaneous pain after and before administration of sodium diclofenac, isolated or associated to carisoprodol, acetaminophen and caffeine, in chronic temporomandibular disorders (TMD) patients. Were selected eighteen volunteers, both men and women, between 35-70 years of age (mean age 50 years). The inclusion criteria was masticatory muscle pain, and the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) was used on the diagnose. The selection of treatm...

  20. Temporomandibular disorders, facial pain, and headaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Steven D

    2012-05-01

    Headaches and facial pain are common in the general population. In many cases, facial pain can be resultant from temporomandibular joint disorders. Studies have identified an association between headaches and temporomandibular joint disorders suggesting the possibility of shared pathophysiologic mechanisms of these 2 maladies. The aim of this paper is to elucidate potential commonalities of these disorders and to provide a brief overview of an examination protocol that may benefit the headache clinician in daily practice. © 2012 American Headache Society.

  1. The Temporomandibular Joint Pain Dysfunction Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Speck, John E.

    1988-01-01

    When a patient complains of headache, neckache, or earache and these are associated with noisy temporomandibular joint function, restricted opening or increased pain when chewing, a temporomandibular joint or masticatory muscle disorder should be considered in the differential diagnosis, because signs and symptoms of these disorders are common in all age groups. This article indicates the more common etiological contributions, that is, microtrauma, repeated microtrauma, muscle hyperactivity, ...

  2. Cervical Musculoskeletal Impairments and Temporomandibular Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Susan Armijo-Olivo; David Magee

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The study of cervical muscles and their significance in the development and perpetuation of Temporomandibular Disorders has not been elucidated. Thus this project was designed to investigate the association between cervical musculoskeletal impairments and Temporomandibular Disorders. Material and Methods A sample of 154 subjects participated in this study. All subjects underwent a series of physical tests and electromyographic assessment (i.e. head and neck posture, maxima...

  3. Trastornos temporomandibulares en adictos al qat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Guerra Cobián

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: los trastornos temporomandibulares se asocian frecuentemente al hábito de masticar qat, pero se carece de estudios que detallan sus particularidades, por lo que se realiza este trabajo, con los objetivos de determinar la prevalencia de trastornos temporomandibulares en pacientes adictos al qat, identificar los hallazgos clínicos- radiográficos asociados y clasificar los trastornos temporomandibulares presentes en la población estudiada. Métodos: se realizó un estudio prospectivo, descriptivo, de corte transversal, en una muestra de 352 pacientes, del total de pacientes adictos, atendidos en el Departamento de Cirugía, Colegio Dental. Ibb,Yemen en el periodo octubre 2010-abril 2011. Se determinaron los hallazgos clínicos y radiográficos presentes, y se diagnosticó el tipo de trastorno temporomandibular. Resultados: se evidenció que estaban afectados por trastornos temporomandibulares el 55,7 % de los pacientes. Se encontró dolor articular agudo en 14,1 % y aplanamiento condilar anterior en 35,6 %. Conclusiones: los trastornos temporomandibulares afectaron más de la mitad de la población estudiada, adicta al qat. Los desórdenes en la relación cóndilo-disco fueron los más encontrados (41 %. El aplanamiento condilar anterior dominó en el análisis radiográfico.

  4. Three-dimensional (3D) analysis of the temporomandibular joint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kitai, N.; Kreiborg, S.; Murakami, S.

    Symposium Orthodontics 2001: Where are We Now? Where are We Going?, three-dimensional analysis, temporomandibular joint......Symposium Orthodontics 2001: Where are We Now? Where are We Going?, three-dimensional analysis, temporomandibular joint...

  5. Patients profiles and outcomes of care in temporomandibular disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, N.

    2018-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are a frequent disease in general population. Patients with TMDs may have orofacial pain, jaw functional limitation and joint sounds, which may negatively affect patients’ physical and psychological wellbeing. Temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ OA) and

  6. PATHOLOGY OF TEMPOROMANDIBULAR-JOINT INTERNAL DERANGEMENT AND OSTEOARTHROSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEBONT, LGM; STEGENGA, B

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthrosis and disk displacement seem to be strongly related, but they may also represent mutually independent temporomandibular disorders. This paper presents relevant aspects of normal physiology and degeneration of synovial joints, aspects of normal

  7. Radiographic study on temporomandibular joint Arthrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Dong Soo [Dept. of Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University , Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1980-11-15

    The author analysed the routine radiographic changes and clinical symptoms of 205 cases of temporomandibular joint arthrosis. The clinical symptoms of the patients were classified and the morphological changes of condylar head, articular eminence, and articular fossa were analyzed and discussed from radiographic view point. The positional change of condylar head and articular fossa relation in TMJ arthrosis were observed. The frequencies of coincidence between the site of complaints and the site of the abnormal images which could be detected were examined. The results were obtained as follows; 1. Bone erosion, deformity, marginal proliferation and sclerosis were selected from many abnormal images as the radiographic diagnostic criteria of TMJ arthritic lesions. 2. Abnormal radiographic findings were revealed in 150 cases (73.9%) of 205 total TMJ arthrosis cases and site with abnormal findings coincided with the site of complaints in 105 cases (70.7%) of 150 cases and coincidence rates were higher above fourth decades than below third decades. 3. Sclerosis of the abnormal radiographic findings could be found more often below third decades than above fourth decades. 4. The positional changes of condylar head were revealed in 176 cases (85.9%) of 205 total cases. 5. Pain complaints were revealed in 170 cases(82.9%) and clicking sounds were revealed in 120 cases (58.6%) of clinical symptoms of TMJ arthrosis. 6. No tendency was found so far the differential diagnosis between pain dysfunction syndrome and osteoarthrosis of TMJ.

  8. Radiographic study on temporomandibular joint Arthrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Dong Soo

    1980-01-01

    The author analysed the routine radiographic changes and clinical symptoms of 205 cases of temporomandibular joint arthrosis. The clinical symptoms of the patients were classified and the morphological changes of condylar head, articular eminence, and articular fossa were analyzed and discussed from radiographic view point. The positional change of condylar head and articular fossa relation in TMJ arthrosis were observed. The frequencies of coincidence between the site of complaints and the site of the abnormal images which could be detected were examined. The results were obtained as follows; 1. Bone erosion, deformity, marginal proliferation and sclerosis were selected from many abnormal images as the radiographic diagnostic criteria of TMJ arthritic lesions. 2. Abnormal radiographic findings were revealed in 150 cases (73.9%) of 205 total TMJ arthrosis cases and site with abnormal findings coincided with the site of complaints in 105 cases (70.7%) of 150 cases and coincidence rates were higher above fourth decades than below third decades. 3. Sclerosis of the abnormal radiographic findings could be found more often below third decades than above fourth decades. 4. The positional changes of condylar head were revealed in 176 cases (85.9%) of 205 total cases. 5. Pain complaints were revealed in 170 cases(82.9%) and clicking sounds were revealed in 120 cases (58.6%) of clinical symptoms of TMJ arthrosis. 6. No tendency was found so far the differential diagnosis between pain dysfunction syndrome and osteoarthrosis of TMJ.

  9. Rheumatoid arthritis affecting temporomandibular joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandeep Sodhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic, systemic, autoimmune inflammatory disorder that is characterized by joint inflammation, erosive properties and symmetric multiple joint involvement. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ is very rare to be affected in the early phase of the disease, thus posing diagnostic challenges for the dentist. Conventional radiographs fail to show the early lesions due to its limitations. More recently cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT has been found to diagnose the early degenerative changes of TMJ and hence aid in the diagnosis of the lesions more accurately. Our case highlights the involvement of TMJ in RA and the role of advanced imaging (CBCT in diagnosing the bony changes in the early phase of the disease.

  10. [Temporomandibular joint, occlusion and bruxism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orthlieb, J D; Ré, J P; Jeany, M; Giraudeau, A

    2016-09-01

    Temporomandibular joint and dental occlusion are joined for better and worse. TMJ has its own weaknesses, sometimes indicated by bad functional habits and occlusal disorders. Occlusal analysis needs to be addressed simply and clearly. The term "malocclusion" is not reliable to build epidemiological studies, etiologic mechanisms or therapeutic advice on this "diagnosis". Understanding the impact of pathogenic malocclusion is not just about occlusal relationships that are more or less defective, it requires to locate them within the skeletal framework, the articular and behavioural context of the patient, and above all to assess their impact on the functions of the masticatory system. The TMJ-occlusion couple is often symbiotic, developing together in relation to its environment, compensating for its own shortcomings. However, a third partner may alter this relationship, such as bruxism, or more generally oral parafunctions, trauma or an interventionist practitioner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Temporomandibular disorder in chronic migraine

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    N. V. Latysheva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: For many years, temporomandibular disorder (TMD has been studied primarily by dentists and maxillofacial surgeons. However, new data is emerging that TMD is comorbid with various types of headache; however this association has not been studied in detail. Aim: To analyze TMD prevalence and clinical structure in patients with migraine. Materials and methods: We assessed 84 patients with chronic migraine (CM and 42 patients with episodic migraine (EM. TMD was diagnosed according to the Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders: Clinical Protocol and Assessment Instruments 2014. We also performed subgroup analysis for low-frequency EM (less than 4 headache days per month, LFEM vs. high-frequency EM and CM (over 10 headache days per month, HFEM + CM. Results: In both groups, myofascial pain was the most prevalent form of TMD. The prevalence of TMD was higher in CM as compared to EM (52.4% vs. 28.6%, correspondingly, р = 0.02. Even more evident differences were observed between LFEM and HFEM + CM (18.2% vs. 51.6%, correspondingly, р < 0.009. The difference was significant for painrelated TMD only. The prevalence of bruxism was comparable across LFEM and HFEM + CM (18% vs. 30.5%, correspondingly, р = 0.3 and significantly lower than TMD prevalence in HFEM + CM (30.5% vs. 51.6%, correspondingly, p = 0.005. The anxiety level in patients with and without TMD was also comparable (8.1 ± 4.1 vs. 8.3 ± 4.7, correspondingly, р = 0.8. Conclusion: CM patients have a high prevalence of pain-related TMD (52.4%. The prevalence of TMD in LFEM is comparable to that in the general population. The presence of bruxism or anxiety cannot be associated with a high TMD prevalence in our patients. In CM, pain in the masticatory muscles may be caused by anti-nociceptive dysfunction, mirroring central sensitization and disrupted descending modulation of pain.

  12. Temporomandibular joint involvement caused by Borrelia Burgdorferi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesnicar, Gorazd; Zerdoner, Danijel

    2007-12-01

    Lyme borreliosis is an endemic disease in Slovenia with an incidence of around 150 patients per 100,000 inhabitants. Although the large joints are most typically affected in Lyme borreliosis, there are also periods of disease activity with arthritis or arthralgias involving smaller joints, including the temporo-mandibular joint. During the years between 2000 and 2003, two patients with Lyme borreliosis affecting the temporo-mandibular joints were treated. The patients presented with fatigue and pain in diverse muscle groups accompanied by arthralgia, which was most pronounced in the temporomandibular joint area. None of the patients were febrile or had joint effusions. Both patients were examined by means of biochemical and serological examinations for Borrelia burgdorferi using ELISA assay and Western blot test (both for IgM and IgG), plain radiographs, MR and CT scans, and scinti-scan of the temporo-mandibular joints They both had positive serum markers for an acute B. burgdorferi infection and were treated with intravenous ceftriaxone. None of the patients had clinical or laboratory signs of chronic Lyme disease activity two and four years following therapy, respectively. Roentgenographic and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the temporo-mandibular joints had not shown any persistent sign of acute inflammation. There are only few reports of patients with manifest temporo-mandibular joint involvement of Lyme borreliosis in the literature. This report emphasizes the importance of differential diagnosis of acute temporo-mandibular joint arthralgia, of early diagnosis of Lyme borreliosis, and of the necessity for prompt antibiotic treatment.

  13. Superluminous Devices Versus Low-Level Laser for Temporomandibular Disorders

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    Sveshtarov Vasil

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to compare the pain intensity reduction between the mean radiation doses per session of gallium-aluminum-arsenide (GaAIAs laser with superluminous diodes (SLD in four of the most common pain-related chronic temporomandibular disorders (TMD - local myalgia, myofascial pain, myofascial pain with a referral, and arthralgia. This study was implemented on 124 patients with pain-related temporomandibular disorders according to the DC/TMD criteria. We applied trigger point oriented near-infrared laser (785 nm, 100 s, 8 J/cm2 and SLD cluster sessions (the cluster is composed of 49 SLDs with a combination of visible red (633 nm and infrared (880 nm diodes, 200 mW, 300 s, 8 J/cm2 for the temporomandibular joints and the affected muscles. Patients were evaluated at the start of the treatment, and after the 6th session of combined phototherapy. The pain intensity scores were measured according to the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS. Our results show that the most statistically manifested pain reduction is found for the SLD dose, р = 0,000118, followed by the overall dose (laser plus SLD; р = 0,001031, and the laser dose; р = 0,030942 (ANOVA dispersion analyses. Consequently, it can be concluded that myalgia is better treated through lower doses of red light compared to infrared laser doses because SLDs combine the prooxidative effect of photons with 633 nm wavelength, a large area of exposure, sufficient tissue penetration, and some positive warming thermal impact of the SLD clusters.

  14. CT imaging in the surgical treatment of one-sided extraarticular temporomandibular joint ankylosis; Uso da tomografia computadorizada no planejamento cirurgico da anquilose temporomandibular extra-articular unilateral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villamizar, Lenin A.; Ghirelli, Carolina de Oliveira; Baroni, Carina Outi; Ferro, Daniel; Pinto, Ana Carolina Brandao de Campos Fonseca, E-mail: carinaouti@yahoo.com.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia. Dept. de Cirurgia

    2012-07-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is characterized by difficulty to open the mouth. The ankylosis may be articular when TJM is involved and extra-articular when other factors lead to a restriction of chewing movements without TJM involvement. Case report of one patient with unilateral ankylosis and his surgical planning through the tomography imaging. CT imaging helps preoperative planning because it can locate the exact point of injury and can make the difference between the true and false ankylosis of the TJM. (author)

  15. RADIOGRAPHIC EXAMINATION OF TEMPOROMANDIBULAR DISORDERS IN CHILDREN

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    Heru Suryonegoro

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The temporomandibular joint has a very important role in the stomatognathic system. Its main function is for the opening and closing movement, mastication, and speech. It is located anterior to the ear. The temporomandibular joint connects maxilla and mandible through the articular fossa, hence the slightest change that happens would cause serious matters such as pain, exiting, speech disorder, difficulty in opening and closing movement, headache, and even trismus. In a child or an adolescent, the symptoms are often vague; everything is interpreted as “pain”. This is probably why temporomandibular disorder are often undetected by dentists. Therefore, patience and accuracy is needed to determine the actual disorder through means of clinical and radiographic examination. The radiographic examination suitable for child is the transcranial projection. This projection is believed to be more accurate amongst other projection for child patients.

  16. Nonsurgical Management of Pediatric Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrivani, Steven John; Khawaja, Shehryar Nasir; Bavia, Paula Furlan

    2018-02-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are a subgroup of craniofacial pain problems involving the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), masticatory muscles, and associated head and neck musculoskeletal structures. These disorders are subclassified into TMJ articular disorders and masticatory muscle disorders. Patients with TMD most commonly present with pain, restricted or asymmetric mandibular motion, and TMJ sounds during mandibular movements. The prevalence tends to increase with age. Management of TMJ articular disorders consists of a combination of patient education, home-care plan, biobehavioral therapy, physical therapy, orthotic jaw appliance therapy, pharmacotherapy, and/or surgery. The goal is to increase function, reduce pain, and improve quality of life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiodiagnosis of occlusal temporomandibular joint dysfunctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundert, M.

    1980-01-01

    The diagnostic value of conventional oblique-lateral transcranial standard projections for radiography of the temporomandibular joints is limited by various anatomical factors and the projection geometry. Improved results are obtained by individualization of the projection. The author describes a method for determining the individually optimum oblique-lateral projection, a method which is based on pre-exposure fluoroscopy of the temporomandibular joint with an electronic image intensifier system incorporating a television chain. The method has been employed as routine practice for 15 years; it has been modified several times and enables documentation studies to be made with an unusually high degree of reproducibility with respect to beam projection. (Auth.)

  18. Dental occlusion and temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, J Caitlin; Hannah, Andrew; Nagar, Nathan

    2017-10-27

    Data sourcesMedline, Scopus and Google Scholar.Study selectionTwo reviewers selected studies independently. English language clinical studies assessing the association between temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and features of dental occlusion were considered.Data extraction and synthesisStudy quality was assessed based on the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS) and a narrative synthesis was presented.ResultsIn all 25 studies (17 case-control, eight comparative) were included. Overall there was a high variability between occlusal features and TMD diagnosis. Findings were consistent with a lack of clinically relevant association between TMD and dental occlusion. Only two studies were associated with TMD in the majority (≥50%) of single variable analyses in patient populations. Only mediotrusive interferences are associated with TMD in the majority of multiple variable analyses.ConclusionsThe findings support the absence of a disease-specific association, there is no ground to hypothesise a major role for dental occlusion in the pathophysiology of TMDs. Dental clinicians are thus encouraged to move forward and abandon the old-fashioned gnathological paradig.

  19. Magnetic resonance in temporomandibular articulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte Filho, D.L.; Ferreira, R.

    1994-01-01

    Dysfunction of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is extremely common, mainly in women. The indication of imaging study of TMJ is the evaluation of its internal derangements, since disc dislocation is treated by different way than other intrinsic mechanical conditions and of the painful myofacial dysfunction, as well where there is no anatomic lesion. The patients, who do not improve with the clinical approach, should be referred to imaging evaluation, in order to rule out mechanical disorder. When the patient is supposed to be operated upon, imaging of the contralateral TMJ is necessary. The presence of a thick and stiff disc perforated with adhesion to the mandibular condyle will change the surgical management. The plain x-ray film is able to demonstrate the bone outlines and joint space but it is not able to show the soft articular tissues. Arthrography is very reliable to demonstrate perforation. However it is an invasive method and demands skilled radiographer radiologist. MRI has shown to be reliable method and it is becoming to be progressively used in routine investigation of TMJ. Nevertheless, MRI still has some limitations concerning to disc perforation. (author). 16 refs, 9 figs

  20. Trastornos temporomandibulares en adictos al qat Temporomandibular disorders in qat addicted people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Guerra Cobián

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: los trastornos temporomandibulares se asocian frecuentemente al hábito de masticar qat, pero se carece de estudios que detallan sus particularidades, por lo que se realiza este trabajo, con los objetivos de determinar la prevalencia de trastornos temporomandibulares en pacientes adictos al qat, identificar los hallazgos clínicos- radiográficos asociados y clasificar los trastornos temporomandibulares presentes en la población estudiada. Métodos: se realizó un estudio prospectivo, descriptivo, de corte transversal, en una muestra de 352 pacientes, del total de pacientes adictos, atendidos en el Departamento de Cirugía, Colegio Dental. Ibb,Yemen en el periodo octubre 2010-abril 2011. Se determinaron los hallazgos clínicos y radiográficos presentes, y se diagnosticó el tipo de trastorno temporomandibular. Resultados: se evidenció que estaban afectados por trastornos temporomandibulares el 55,7 % de los pacientes. Se encontró dolor articular agudo en 14,1 % y aplanamiento condilar anterior en 35,6 %. Conclusiones: los trastornos temporomandibulares afectaron más de la mitad de la población estudiada, adicta al qat. Los desórdenes en la relación cóndilo-disco fueron los más encontrados (41 %. El aplanamiento condilar anterior dominó en el análisis radiográfico.Introduction: the temporomandibular disorders has been associated frequently to the habit of chewing qat, but in previous studies, there are lack of specific details of this problem, for this reason this study is carried out ,to determine it prevalence, to identify clinical and radiografical findings associated , and to classify the temporomandibular disorders observed in the sample. Methods: a cross-sectional, descriptive and prospective study was done, in a sample of 352 patients of the total qat addicted patients which came to the Department of surgery, Dentistry College .Ibb Yemen October2010-April 2011. The clinical and radiographical findings were

  1. Relação entre bruxismo e o grau de sintomatologia de disfunção temporomandibular The relationship between the bruxism and the severity of symptoms in the temporomandibular disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cíntia Corrêa Blini

    2010-06-01

    jaw dysfunction and its association with the level of temporomandibular symptoms. METHODS: 28 women, with ages between 19 and 56 years, who had temporomandibular jaw dysfunction and had not been submitted to a preview treatment, made part of this study. All subjects answered a questionnaire written by Fonseca et al (1994 entitled Anamnesic Index, that enabled us to classify temporomandibular jaw symptoms level and also to check the symptoms of this oral parafunction behavioral bruxism; the subjects were submitted an odontological evaluation, that was composed by an exam of masticatory muscles, though the digital touch in the oral and extra-oral muscles, examination in the temporomandibular joint and a teeth examination. The results were analyzed in a descriptive form, and in order to check the relationship between the severity level of temporomandibular dysfunction with the bruxism occurrence Independent Square-Qui test and the Fisher test were used with a statistic significance of 5%. RESULTS: it was observed the parafuntional habit was presented in 50% of the cases with temporomandibular dysfunction. It wasn't possible a relationship between bruxism and the level of symptoms in temporomandibular jaw dysfunction, by Anamnesic Index. CONCLUSION: the results of this study suggest that subjects with symptoms of temporomandibular jaw dysfunction must be asked and evaluated about bruxism, regardless of the level of temporomandibular dysfunction. Besides this, it is important to investigate the diagnosis and the treatment of bruxism also in patients without temporomandibular jaw dysfunction in order to prevent development of lesions in the temporomandibular joints and the other structures of the stomatognatic system.

  2. [Trigeminal motor paralysis and dislocation of the temporo-mandibular joints].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkawa, S; Yoshida, T; Ohsumi, Y; Tabuchi, M

    1996-07-01

    A 64-year-old woman with diabetes mellitus was admitted to our hospital with left hemiparesis of sudden onset. A brain MRI demonstrated a cerebral infarction in the ventral part of the right lower pons. When left hemiparesis worsened, she had dislocation of the temporo-mandibular joints repeatedly. Then, her lower jaw deviated to the right when she opened her mouth. Also, there was decreased contraction of the right masseter when she clenched her teeth. These findings suggest that there was trigeminal motor paralysis on the right side resulting from involvement of the intrapontine trigeminal motor nerve. She has no history of dislocation of the temporo-mandibular joints. An X-ray film showed that the temporo-mandibular joints were intact. Thus, it is possible that deviation of the lower jaw was the cause of this dislocation. We suspect that dislocation of the temporo-mandibular joints may occur as a complication of unilateral trigeminal motor paralysis. This has not been reported to our knowledge.

  3. Is playing string or wind musical instruments a risk factor for temporomandibular dysfunction? A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Leite Cavalcanti

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Medical problems specifically affecting professional musicians are commonly mentioned in the literature. The present study is aimed to evaluate, through a systematic review, the possible association between the practice of string with bow and wind musical instruments and the occurrence of Temporomandibular Dysfunction (TMD. Methods. The search for articles was conducted in PubMed/Medline, Web of Science, Scopus, Lilacs, Cochrane Library, and Open Gray databases, and there was no restriction on language or date of publication. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA guidelines were followed. The MeSH terms used were: “music”; “temporomandibular joint”; “temporomandibular joint disorders”; “temporomandibular joint dysfunction syndrome”; and “occupational diseases”. Cross-sectional studies, case-control, cohort and clinical trials were included that involved the practice of string with bow and wind musical instruments and the occurrence of Temporomandibular Dysfunction (TMD. Articles were previously selected by title and abstract. Qualitative evaluation was done through the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Results. The literature search identified 732 studies, of which 10 met the inclusion criteria, nine of them cross-sectional studies and one a clinical intervention study. The TMD prevalence ranged from 47.0% to 89.0%. Recruitment of participants took place in professional schools and orchestras, and in bands of professional musicians. All studies reported associations between TMD and the practice of musical instruments, and violinists presented higher prevalence rates when compared to other instrument groups. Conclusion. All studies pointed to a possible association between TMD and the practice of string and wind musical instruments. More longitudinal and clinical trials studies are needed to verify any possible interrelationship.

  4. Melting point of polymers under high pressure Part I: Influence of the polymer properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeger, Andreas; Freitag, Detlef; Freidel, Frank; Luft, Gerhard

    2004-01-01

    The pressure dependence of the melting point of various polymers including homo- and copolymers (HDPE, LDPE, PP and ethylene vinyl acetate copolymers (EVA)) was investigated under nitrogen atmosphere up to 330 MPa within a high pressure differential thermal analysis cell designed by our group. The properties of the polymers (vinylacetate content, melt flow index, molecular weight, isotactic index, crystallinity, density, and frequency of branching) have been correlated with the change of the melting point under pressure (dT m /dp). It could be shown that the melting point always increases linearly with pressure up to 330 MPa. The pressure dependence was found to be in the range of 11-17 K/(100 MPa). From these results it is possible to approximate dT m /dp using the enthalpy of fusion of the polymers at ambient pressure

  5. First impressions and beyond: marketing your practice in touch points--Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisera, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    When calling in a marketing expert to boost a practice's numbers, administrators and providers are usually looking for external marketing strategies--ways to attract new patients to the practice. However, one of the most important, yet often overlooked, elements to successfully marketing a practice is the very important work of retaining current patients and turning them into enthusiastic referrers. When new patients are simply filling the place of previous patients that have moved on, you are not building solid practice growth. You can create an atmosphere of loyal referring patients by providing positive touch points that fulfill the needs of your patients. This article will cover touch points that occur before a patient has chosen your practice. Laying the groundwork for positive touch points will give your marketing efforts a snowball effect, build growth, and deliver the most bang for your marketing bucks.

  6. Acupuncture Therapy on Temporomandibular Joint Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Nai-nian; HUANG Ming-juan

    2005-01-01

    @@ Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) syndrome, an commonly and frequently encountered disease, is characterized by motor dysfunction of mandibular joint and snapping articular surface as major complaints, and then tinnitus, facial pain and occasional headache, most patients got limited mouth open and pain inside the joints or masseter muscle. The authors of this article have treated 68cases of TMJ syndrome since 2001.

  7. [Whiplash lesions and temporomandibular joint disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gola, R; Richard, O; Guyot, L; Cheynet, F

    2004-11-01

    Attributing dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) to whiplash injury is a difficult problem to solve. TMJ disorders do not seem to be secondary to direct articular trauma but rather caused by a postural disorder of the cervical spine. Occlusal disorders and stress further complicate the picture. Four clinical cases illustrate a new hypothetical approach.

  8. Synovial osteochondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemnon, Jorge; Nemnon, Marcelo; Staffieri, Roberto; Villavicencio, C.; Marconi, G.; Masjoan, Diego

    2004-01-01

    Synovial osteochondromatosis (SO) is a meta plastic process by which synovial mesenchymal cells transform into chondroblasts and chondrocytes. This disease affects most frequently the knee, the hip, the elbow, and uncommonly the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The authors present 2 cases of synovial osteochondromatosis of the TMJ. (author)

  9. Temporomandibular joint involvement in psoriatic arthritis | Okkesim ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Psoriasis is a chronic, papulosquamous, and an inflammatory skin disease. It has been found that between 5% and 24% of patients develop psoriatic arthritis (PA) at the same time after or even prior to skin findings. The involvement of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare condition. In this report, a-46-year-old male ...

  10. Bibliography of papers, reports, and presentations related to point-sample dimensional measurement methods for machined part evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldwin, J.M. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Integrated Manufacturing Systems

    1996-04-01

    The Dimensional Inspection Techniques Specification (DITS) Project is an ongoing effort to produce tools and guidelines for optimum sampling and data analysis of machined parts, when measured using point-sample methods of dimensional metrology. This report is a compilation of results of a literature survey, conducted in support of the DITS. Over 160 citations are included, with author abstracts where available.

  11. Temporomandibular dysfunction and headache disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speciali, José G; Dach, Fabíola

    2015-02-01

    It has been well established that primary headaches (especially migraine, chronic migraine, and tension-type headache) and temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) are comorbid diseases, with the presence of one of them in a patient increasing the prevalence of the others. The relationship between the 2 diseases may involve the sharing of common physiopathological aspects. Studies about the treatment of this disease association have shown that a simultaneous therapeutic approach to the 2 diseases is more effective than the separate treatment of each. As a consequence, specialists in orofacial pain are now required to know the criteria for the diagnosis of headaches, and headache physicians are required to know the semiologic aspects of orofacial pain. Nevertheless, a headache may be attributed to TMD, instead be an association of 2 problems - TMD and primary headaches - in these cases a secondary headache, described in item 11.7 of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, is still a controversial topic. Attempts to determine the existence of this secondary headache with a specific or suggestive phenotype have been frustrated. The conclusion that can be reached based on the few studies published thus far is that this headache has a preferential unilateral or bilateral temporal location and migraine-like or tension-type headache-like clinical characteristics. In the present review, we will consider the main aspects of the TMD-headache relationship, that is, comorbidity of primary headaches and TMD and clinical aspects of the headaches attributed to TMD from the viewpoint of the International Headache Society and of a group of specialists in orofacial pain. This paper aims to explore our understanding of the association between TMD and headaches in general and migraine in particular. © 2015 American Headache Society.

  12. Cervical Musculoskeletal Impairments and Temporomandibular Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, David

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The study of cervical muscles and their significance in the development and perpetuation of Temporomandibular Disorders has not been elucidated. Thus this project was designed to investigate the association between cervical musculoskeletal impairments and Temporomandibular Disorders. Material and Methods A sample of 154 subjects participated in this study. All subjects underwent a series of physical tests and electromyographic assessment (i.e. head and neck posture, maximal cervical muscle strength, cervical flexor and extensor muscles endurance, and cervical flexor muscle performance) to determine cervical musculoskeletal impairments. Results A strong relationship between neck disability and jaw disability was found (r = 0.82). Craniocervical posture was statistically different between patients with myogenous Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) and healthy subjects. However, the difference was too small (3.3º) to be considered clinically relevant. Maximal cervical flexor muscle strength was not statistically or clinically different between patients with TMD and healthy subjects. No statistically significant differences were found in electromyographic activity of the sternocleidomastoid or the anterior scalene muscles in patients with TMD when compared to healthy subjects while executing the craniocervical flexion test (P = 0.07). However, clinically important effect sizes (0.42 - 0.82) were found. Subjects with TMD presented with reduced cervical flexor as well as extensor muscle endurance while performing the flexor and extensor muscle endurance tests when compared to healthy individuals. Conclusions Subjects with Temporomandibular Disorders presented with impairments of the cervical flexors and extensors muscles. These results could help guide clinicians in the assessment and prescription of more effective interventions for individuals with Temporomandibular Disorders. PMID:24422022

  13. Cervical Musculoskeletal Impairments and Temporomandibular Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Armijo-Olivo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The study of cervical muscles and their significance in the development and perpetuation of Temporomandibular Disorders has not been elucidated. Thus this project was designed to investigate the association between cervical musculoskeletal impairments and Temporomandibular Disorders. Material and Methods: A sample of 154 subjects participated in this study. All subjects underwent a series of physical tests and electromyographic assessment (i.e. head and neck posture, maximal cervical muscle strength, cervical flexor and extensor muscles endurance, and cervical flexor muscle performance to determine cervical musculoskeletal impairments. Results: A strong relationship between neck disability and jaw disability was found (r = 0.82. Craniocervical posture was statistically different between patients with myogenous Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD and healthy subjects. However, the difference was too small (3.3º to be considered clinically relevant. Maximal cervical flexor muscle strength was not statistically or clinically different between patients with TMD and healthy subjects. No statistically significant differences were found in electromyographic activity of the sternocleidomastoid or the anterior scalene muscles in patients with TMD when compared to healthy subjects while executing the craniocervical flexion test (P = 0.07. However, clinically important effect sizes (0.42 - 0.82 were found. Subjects with TMD presented with reduced cervical flexor as well as extensor muscle endurance while performing the flexor and extensor muscle endurance tests when compared to healthy individuals. Conclusions: Subjects with Temporomandibular Disorders presented with impairments of the cervical flexors and extensors muscles. These results could help guide clinicians in the assessment and prescription of more effective interventions for individuals with Temporomandibular Disorders.

  14. Augmented reality environment for temporomandibular joint motion analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, A; Ploder, O; Zuniga, J; Undt, G; Ewers, R

    1996-01-01

    The principles of interventional video tomography were applied for the real-time visualization of temporomandibular joint movements in an augmented reality environment. Anatomic structures were extracted in three dimensions from planar cephalometric radiographic images. The live-image fusion of these graphic anatomic structures with real-time position data of the mandible and the articular fossa was performed with a see-through, head-mounted display and an electromagnetic tracking system. The dynamic fusion of radiographic images of the temporomandibular joint to anatomic temporomandibular joint structures in motion created a new modality for temporomandibular joint motion analysis. The advantages of the method are its ability to accurately examine the motion of the temporomandibular joint in three dimensions without restraining the subject and its ability to simultaneously determine the relationship of the bony temporomandibular joint and supporting structures (ie, occlusion, muscle function, etc) during movement before and after treatment.

  15. First impressions and beyond: marketing your practice in touch points--Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisera, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    Often medical administrators or providers call in a marketing expert when they feel the practice is lacking the growth they want. What's on their mind is usually how to bring in more patients, and they automatically look to external marketing strategies. However, one of the most important elements to successfully marketing a practice is making sure you haven't created a turnstile, where new patients are coming often but not returning or being converted into loyal, referring patients. When new patients are going as quickly as they are coming, you aren't building solid growth. Loyal, referring patients are powerful marketing assets-they are in the community speaking good of you and your practice from first-hand experience. You can create this atmosphere of loyal, referring patients by providing positive touch points that fulfill the needs of your patients. Touch points are the groundwork supporting other types of marketing. This article covers three important touch points that are crucial to a positive patient experience.

  16. Radiographic appearance of the normal temporomandibular joint in newborns and small children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larheim, T.A.

    1981-01-01

    The radiographic anatomy of the normal temporomandibular joint in newborns and children up to 4 years of age was investigated, partly on specimens, obtained at autopsy, with methods corresponding to clinical procedures, and partly on patients. A rather flat mandibular fossa and immature mandibular head were found at birth, whereas a well-developed articular tubercle and an adult-like radiographic appearance of the joint were found at about one year of age. No evident changes of the radiographic anatomy seemed to occur from one to 4 years of age. A striking similarity was observed between the dystrophic temporomandibular joint in patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and micrognathia and the normal radiographic appearance in the first months of life, indicating an early involvement of this joint in patients developing micrognathia. (Auth.)

  17. Temporomandibular joint osteochondromatosis: an unusual cause of preauricular swelling.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Phelan, Eimear

    2012-02-01

    We report an unusual and rare cause of preauricular swelling and review the most recent literature concerning synovial osteochondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint. We report the clinical and radiologic findings of a case of synovial osteochondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint that presented as preauricular swelling in a female patient. This disease typically affects large joints; fewer than 100 cases reported in the literature affect the temporomandibular joint. This case illustrates that disorders of the temporomandibular joint should also be included in the differential diagnosis of patients who present with a preauricular mass.

  18. Uranium-zirconium based alloys part I: reference points for thermophysical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Marcio Soares; Mattos, Joao Roberto L. de

    2015-01-01

    An integrated modelling process named Relative Variational Model (RVM) is in development by the fuel designers of the CDTN. The lack of measurements in the thermal and physical properties for new fuels, as well as the high dispersion of the existing measurements are challenges in the development of nuclear fuel concepts since that higher uncertainties of the material properties have as result the detrimental reduction on the safety margins . Based on the RVM, the integrated process has been applied to the derivation of reference points for the U-Zr based alloy. (author)

  19. Orofacial manual therapy improves cervical movement impairment associated with headache and features of temporomandibular dysfunction: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Piekartz, Harry; Hall, Toby

    2013-08-01

    There is evidence that temporomandibular disorder (TMD) may be a contributing factor to cervicogenic headache (CGH), in part because of the influence of dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint on the cervical spine. The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to determine whether orofacial treatment in addition to cervical manual therapy, was more effective than cervical manual therapy alone on measures of cervical movement impairment in patients with features of CGH and signs of TMD. In this study, 43 patients (27 women) with headache for more than 3-months and with some features of CGH and signs of TMD were randomly assigned to receive either cervical manual therapy (usual care) or orofacial manual therapy to address TMD in addition to usual care. Subjects were assessed at baseline, after 6 treatment sessions (3-months), and at 6-months follow-up. 38 subjects (25 female) completed all analysis at 6-months follow-up. The outcome criteria were: cervical range of movement (including the C1-2 flexion-rotation test) and manual examination of the upper 3 cervical vertebra. The group that received orofacial treatment in addition to usual care showed significant reduction in all aspects of cervical impairment after the treatment period. These improvements persisted to the 6-month follow-up, but were not observed in the usual care group at any point. These observations together with previous reports indicate that manual therapists should look for features of TMD when examining patients with headache, particularly if treatment fails when directed to the cervical spine. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Analysis of residual stress state in sheet metal parts processed by single point incremental forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maaß, F.; Gies, S.; Dobecki, M.; Brömmelhoff, K.; Tekkaya, A. E.; Reimers, W.

    2018-05-01

    The mechanical properties of formed metal components are highly affected by the prevailing residual stress state. A selective induction of residual compressive stresses in the component, can improve the product properties such as the fatigue strength. By means of single point incremental forming (SPIF), the residual stress state can be influenced by adjusting the process parameters during the manufacturing process. To achieve a fundamental understanding of the residual stress formation caused by the SPIF process, a valid numerical process model is essential. Within the scope of this paper the significance of kinematic hardening effects on the determined residual stress state is presented based on numerical simulations. The effect of the unclamping step after the manufacturing process is also analyzed. An average deviation of the residual stress amplitudes in the clamped and unclamped condition of 18 % reveals, that the unclamping step needs to be considered to reach a high numerical prediction quality.

  1. On the Nature of the Microwave Background at the Lagrange 2 Point. Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borissova L.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work the mathematical methods of General Relativity are used to answer the following questions: if a microwave background originates from the Earth, what would be its density and associated dipole measured at the altitude of a U2 aeroplane (25 km, the COBE satellite (900 km, and the 2nd Lagrange point (1.5 million km, the position of the WMAP and PLANCK satellites? The first problem is solved via Einstein’s equations for the electromagnetic field of the Earth. The second problem is solved using the geodesic equations for light-like particles (photons which are mediators for electromagnetic radiation. We have determined that a microwave background that originates at the Earth (the Earth microwave background decreases with altitude so that the density of the energy of such a background at the altitude of the COBE orbit (900 km is 0.68 times less than that at the altitude of a U2 aeroplane. The density of the energy of the background at the L2 point is only ~1E-7 of the value detected by a U2 aeroplane or at the COBE orbit. The dipole anisotropy of the Earth microwave background, due to the rapid motion of the Earth relative to the source of another field which isn’t connected to the Earth but is located in depths of the cosmos, doesn’t depend on altitute from the surface of the Earth. Such a dipole will be the same irrespective of the position at which measurements are taken.

  2. Temporomandibular joint ankylosis in child: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul J Hegde

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ is an intracapsular union of the disc-condyle complex to the temporal articular surface that restricts mandibular movements, including the fibrous adhesions or bony fusion between condyle, disc, glenoid fossa, and eminence. It is a serious and disabling condition that may cause problems in mastication, digestion, speech, appearance, and hygiene. Case Report: This report describes a case of a 12-year-old girl with inability to open her mouth, diagnosed with unilateral right bony TMJ ankylosis. The surgical approach consisted of gap arthroplasty with interpositional temporalis muscle flap followed by vigorous physiotherapy. Conclusion: The treatment of TMJ ankylosis poses a significant challenge because of technical difficulties and a high incidence of recurrence. Its treatment includes the orthodontist, oral and maxillofacial surgeon, pediatric dentist, and psychologist and physical therapist as part of the healthcare team.

  3. Diagnosis and treatment of temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauer, Robert L; Semidey, Michael J

    2015-03-15

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are a heterogeneous group of musculoskeletal and neuromuscular conditions involving the temporomandibular joint complex, and surrounding musculature and osseous components. TMD affects up to 15% of adults, with a peak incidence at 20 to 40 years of age. TMD is classified as intra-articular or extra-articular. Common symptoms include jaw pain or dysfunction, earache, headache, and facial pain. The etiology of TMD is multifactorial and includes biologic, environmental, social, emotional, and cognitive triggers. Diagnosis is most often based on history and physical examination. Diagnostic imaging may be beneficial when malocclusion or intra-articular abnormalities are suspected. Most patients improve with a combination of noninvasive therapies, including patient education, self-care, cognitive behavior therapy, pharmacotherapy, physical therapy, and occlusal devices. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and muscle relaxants are recommended initially, and benzodiazepines or antidepressants may be added for chronic cases. Referral to an oral and maxillofacial surgeon is indicated for refractory cases.

  4. Imaging of the temporomandibular joint: An update

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Asim; K; Bag; Santhosh; Gaddikeri; Aparna; Singhal; Simms; Hardin; Benson; D; Tran; Josue; A; Medina; Joel; K; Curé

    2014-01-01

    Imaging of the temporomandibular joint(TMJ) is continuously evolving with advancement of imaging technologies. Many different imaging modalities are currently used to evaluate the TMJ. Magnetic resonance imaging is commonly used for evaluation of the TMJ due to its superior contrast resolution and its ability to acquire dynamic imaging for demonstration of the functionality of the joint. Computed tomography and ultrasound imaging have specific indication in imaging of the TMJ. This article focuses on state of the art imaging of the temporomandibular joint. Relevant normal anatomy and biomechanics of movement of the TMJ are discussed for better understanding of many TMJ pathologies. Imaging of internal derangements is discussed in detail. Different arthropathies and commontumors are also discussed in this article.

  5. Comprehensive treatment of temporomandibular joint disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navrátil, Leos; Navratil, Vaclav; Hajkova, Simona; Hlinakova, Petra; Dostalova, Tatjana; Vranová, Jana

    2014-01-01

    Changing lifestyles, decreasing physical activity, which is increasing the number of degenerative joint diseases of various etiology, and certain dental procedures are increasing the number of patients complaining of pain in their temporomandibular joints. The aim of the study was to assess the benefits of comprehensive physiotherapy sessions in order to decrease the number of temporomandibular joint problems, thereby improving the patient's quality of life. An examination by a dentist determined each patient's treatment plan, which consisted of a medical exam, physical therapy and education. Each form of treatment was applied 10 times at intervals of 7-14 days. The main goal of the therapeutic physical education was to redress the muscle imbalance in the mandibular joint. This was achieved by restoring balance between the masticatory muscles, along with releasing the spastic shrouds found in the masticatory muscles. The aim of education was to teach the patient exercises focused on the temporomandibular joint and masticatory muscles. The intensity of the exercises and their composition were individually adjusted and adapted to their current state. Physical therapy consisted of the application of pulsed magnetic therapy, laser therapy, and non-invasive positive thermotherapy. The above procedure was conducted on a therapeutic group of 24 patients (3 men and 20 women). In the course of therapy, there were no complications, and all patients adhered to the prescribed regime. None reported any side effects. The mean treatment duration was 123 +/- 66 days. The outcome of the therapy was evaluated as described in the methodology, the degree of pain affecting the joint, and the opening ability of the mouth. In both parameters, there was a significant decline in patient pain. In a study devoted to tactics of rehabilitation treatment for temporomandibular joint disorders, the need for comprehensive long-term therapy, involving education, and learning proper chewing habits

  6. Temporomandibular Disorders: The Habitual Chewing Side Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana-Mora, Urbano; López-Cedrún, José; Mora, María J.; Otero, Xosé L.; Santana-Penín, Urbano

    2013-01-01

    Background Temporomandibular disorders are the most common cause of chronic orofacial pain, but, except where they occur subsequent to trauma, their cause remains unknown. This cross-sectional study assessed chewing function (habitual chewing side) and the differences of the chewing side and condylar path and lateral anterior guidance angles in participants with chronic unilateral temporomandibular disorder. This is the preliminary report of a randomized trial that aimed to test the effect of a new occlusal adjustment therapy. Methods The masticatory function of 21 randomly selected completely dentate participants with chronic temporomandibular disorders (all but one with unilateral symptoms) was assessed by observing them eat almonds, inspecting the lateral horizontal movement of the jaw, with kinesiography, and by means of interview. The condylar path in the sagittal plane and the lateral anterior guidance angles with respect to the Frankfort horizontal plane in the frontal plane were measured on both sides in each individual. Results Sixteen of 20 participants with unilateral symptoms chewed on the affected side; the concordance (Fisher’s exact test, P = .003) and the concordance-symmetry level (Kappa coefficient κ = 0.689; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.38 to 0.99; P = .002) were significant. The mean condylar path angle was steeper (53.47(10.88) degrees versus 46.16(7.25) degrees; P = .001), and the mean lateral anterior guidance angle was flatter (41.63(13.35) degrees versus 48.32(9.53) degrees P = .036) on the symptomatic side. Discussion The results of this study support the use of a new term based on etiology, “habitual chewing side syndrome”, instead of the nonspecific symptom-based “temporomandibular joint disorders”; this denomination is characterized in adults by a steeper condylar path, flatter lateral anterior guidance, and habitual chewing on the symptomatic side. PMID:23593156

  7. Temporomandibular disorders: the habitual chewing side syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urbano Santana-Mora

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Temporomandibular disorders are the most common cause of chronic orofacial pain, but, except where they occur subsequent to trauma, their cause remains unknown. This cross-sectional study assessed chewing function (habitual chewing side and the differences of the chewing side and condylar path and lateral anterior guidance angles in participants with chronic unilateral temporomandibular disorder. This is the preliminary report of a randomized trial that aimed to test the effect of a new occlusal adjustment therapy. METHODS: The masticatory function of 21 randomly selected completely dentate participants with chronic temporomandibular disorders (all but one with unilateral symptoms was assessed by observing them eat almonds, inspecting the lateral horizontal movement of the jaw, with kinesiography, and by means of interview. The condylar path in the sagittal plane and the lateral anterior guidance angles with respect to the Frankfort horizontal plane in the frontal plane were measured on both sides in each individual. RESULTS: Sixteen of 20 participants with unilateral symptoms chewed on the affected side; the concordance (Fisher's exact test, P = .003 and the concordance-symmetry level (Kappa coefficient κ = 0.689; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.38 to 0.99; P = .002 were significant. The mean condylar path angle was steeper (53.47(10.88 degrees versus 46.16(7.25 degrees; P = .001, and the mean lateral anterior guidance angle was flatter (41.63(13.35 degrees versus 48.32(9.53 degrees P = .036 on the symptomatic side. DISCUSSION: The results of this study support the use of a new term based on etiology, "habitual chewing side syndrome", instead of the nonspecific symptom-based "temporomandibular joint disorders"; this denomination is characterized in adults by a steeper condylar path, flatter lateral anterior guidance, and habitual chewing on the symptomatic side.

  8. Factores de riesgo asociados a trastornos temporomandibulares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth de la Torre Rodríguez

    Full Text Available Introducción: los trastornos temporomandibulares conforman un conjunto de condiciones músculo-esqueléticas que afectan la articulación temporomandibular, músculos de la masticación y estructuras anatómicas adyacentes; complejas y moldeadas por diversos factores de riesgo interactuantes. Resulta de gran valor el conocimiento de los mismos para poder actuar sobre ellos e impedir la aparición y/o agravamiento de la enfermedad. Objetivo: caracterizar a la población objeto de estudio según las variables sociodemográficas: edad y sexo, factores precipitantes, hábitos parafuncionales y trastornos oclusales. Métodos: se realizó un estudio observacional, descriptivo, de corte transversal, en el Hospital Clinicoquirúrgico Universitario «Miguel Enríquez», en una población constituida por 181 pacientes que acudieron a la Consulta Multidisciplinaria de Atención Integral de la articulación temporomandibular en el período comprendido de enero del 2010 a enero del 2012. Resultados: del total de pacientes, 133 pertenecían al sexo femenino, para un 73 %. El grupo de edades de 25-35 años estuvo representado por 45 pacientes para un 24 %. En el 79 % se observó bruxismo, en el 24 % interposición lingual en tanto que el 52 % presentó dientes ausentes no restituidos. Conclusiones: el sexo predominante fue el femenino y el grupo de edades más representado es el de 25-35 años. El factor predisponente que más se observó fue los dientes ausentes no restituidos protésicamente. El factor precipitante que predominó fue el bruxismo y no se observaron factores perpetuantes de los trastornos temporomandibulares.

  9. Trastornos temporomandibulares en pacientes con maloclusiones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Soto Cantero

    Full Text Available Introducción: existe una prevalencia de trastornos oclusales en gran medida relacionados con la presencia de disfunción temporomandibular. Objetivo: determinar el grado de disfunción temporomandibular según el Índice de Maglione en correspondencia con la prevalencia de maloclusiones en el área de salud del policlínico "Turcios Lima". Métodos: se realizó un estudio observacional descriptivo, de corte transversal, en la consulta de ortodoncia, de junio del 2008 a junio del 2009. De un universo constituido por los 280 pacientes que acudieron al servicio de ortodoncia en el período señalado con presencia de maloclusiones, se seleccionó una muestra de 84 pacientes por muestreo aleatorio simple, teniendo en cuenta los criterios de inclusión y exclusión realizados por criterios de expertos. Resultados: presentaban disfunción temporomandibular 74 pacientes y dentro de ellos 44 (52,4 % tenían disfunción grado II (Moderada. El 97 % de los pacientes con relación molar de clase II, presentaban disfunción temporomandibular. El 42,9 % de los pacientes con una maloclusión, presentaban disfunción grado I. El 60 % de los pacientes con dos maloclusiones presentaban disfunción grado II y el 66,7 % de los pacientes con tres maloclusiones, presentaban disfunción grado III. La mayor cantidad de pacientes tuvieron disfunción grado II (Moderada. Conclusiones: el mayor por ciento de los pacientes con disfunciones presentó una clase II molar y a medida que aumentó el número de maloclusiones aumentó también la severidad de la disfunción.

  10. Temporomandibular disorders dysfunction in headache patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Christiane-Espinola-Bandeira; Oliveira, José-Luiz-Góes; Jesus, Alan-Chester-Feitosa; Maia, Mila-Leite-de Moraes; de Santana, Jonielly-Costa-Vasconcelos; Andrade, Loren-Suyane-Oliveira; Quintans, Jullyana-de Souza Siqueira; Quintans-Junior, Lucindo-José; Conti, Paulo-César-Rodrigues; Bonjardim, Leonardo-Rigoldi

    2012-11-01

    To identify the frequency of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and its severity in individuals with headache. 60 adults divided into three groups of 20 individuals: chronic daily headache (CDH), episodic headache (EH) and a control group without headache (WH). Headache diagnosis was performed according to the criteria of International Headache Society and the signs and symptoms of TMD were achieved by using a clinical exam and an anamnestic questionnaire. The severity of TMD was defined by the temporomandibular index (TMI). The TMD signs and symptoms were always more frequent in individuals with headache, especially report of pain in TMJ area (CDH, n=16; EH, n=12; WH, n=6), pain to palpation on masseter (CDH, n=19; EH, n=16; WH, n=11) which are significantly more frequent in episodic and chronic daily headache. The mean values of temporomandibular and articular index (CDH patients) and muscular index (CDH and EH patients) were statistically higher than in patients of the control group, notably the articular (CDH=0.38; EH=0.25;WH=0.19) and muscular (CDH=0.46; EH=0.51; WH=0.26) indices. These findings allow us to speculate that masticatory and TMJ pain are more common in headache subjects. Besides, it seems that the TMD is more severe in headache patients.

  11. Expression of CGRP in the temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caviedes Bucheli, Javier; Medina Buitrago, Diana Marcela

    2002-01-01

    The presence and content of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is evaluated in the hyperplastic retrodiscal tissue of the temporomandibular joint in patients with joint degenerative disease by radioimmunoassay. Study population has included 8 female patients in pre-menopausic status, without to be pregnant, without to be lactating for a year and with diagnostic of joint degenerative disease (osteoarthrosis). Pain levels are registered with visual analog scale, where 0 is absence of pain and 16 acute pain. A bone degeneration is classified as mild, moderate and severe, according to findings of nuclear magnetic resonance. The 15 retrodiscal hyperplastic tissue samples are taken from patients undergoing to open surgery of temporomandibular joint. The specimens were placed in plastic blocks with freezing medium and are stored at -70 degrees celsius until neuropeptide extraction by radioimmunoassay with kit for CGRP. A directly proportional relationship is established between the degree of bone degeneration and neuropeptide expression and between the osteoarthrosis classification with analogue visual scale. Findings have shown definitive correlation between pain levels and expression of neuropeptide. CGRP is expressed in the retrodiscal tissue of temporomandibular joint in human with joint degenerative disease and is directly related with levels osteoarthrosis and pain [es

  12. Bone structure of the temporo-mandibular joint in the individuals aged 18-25.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parafiniuk, M; Gutsch-Trepka, A; Trepka, S; Sycz, K; Wolski, S; Parafiniuk, W

    1998-01-01

    Osteohistometric studies were performed in 15 female and 15 male cadavers aged 18-25. Condyloid process and right and left acetabulum of the temporo-mandibular joint have been studied. Density has been investigated using monitor screen linked with microscope (magnification 80x). Density in the spongy part of the condyloid process was 26.67-26.77%; in the subchondrial layer--72.13-72.72%, and in the acetabular wall 75.03-75.91%. Microscopic structure of the bones of the temporo-mandibular joint revealed no differences when compared with images of compact and cancellous bone shown in the histology textbooks. Sex and the side of the body had no influence on microscopic image and proportional bone density. Isles of chondrocytes in the trabeculae of the spongy structure of the condyloid process were found in 4 cases and isles of the condensed bone resembling the compact pattern in 7 cases.

  13. Diagnostic criteria for headache attributed to temporomandibular disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffman, Eric; Ohrbach, Richard; List, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We assessed and compared the diagnostic accuracy of two sets of diagnostic criteria for headache secondary to temporomandibular disorders (TMD).......We assessed and compared the diagnostic accuracy of two sets of diagnostic criteria for headache secondary to temporomandibular disorders (TMD)....

  14. MR diagnosis of temporomandibular joint. A study of joint effusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneda, Takashi; Yamashiro, Mitsuaki; Ozawa, Kaoru; Suzuki, Hiromi; Okada, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu

    1998-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the relationship between correlation of MR joint effusion of the temporomandibular joint and disk position, to evaluate the relationship between joint effusion and aging, and to assess the frequency of MR joint effusion of bilateral temporomandibular joints. The temporomandibular joints of 192 patients with clinical symptoms of temporomandibular joint disorders were imaged bilaterally using high field, surface-coil MR imaging. Oblique sagittal and coronal proton density-weighted and T2-weighted images were obtained. Imaging findings of joint effusion were correlated with disk position, aging, and bilateral temporomandibular joints. MR showed effusion in 4% of the joints with normal superior disk position, 36% of the joints with disk displacement with reduction, and 45% of the joints with disk displacement without reduction. There were significant differences in the incidence of joint effusion between normal disk position and anterior disk displacement with or without reduction. Younger patients less than 40 years were significant higher the incidence of joint effusion than those of older patients. A significant association was seen between joint effusion and aging. MR showed effusion in 17% of the unilateral temporomandibular joint, 24% of the bilateral temporomandibular joints. There was no significant difference between unilateral and bilateral case. These results indicated that joint effusion using MR imaging was associated with varied temporomandibular joint pathologic states. (author)

  15. Evidence-based review on temporomandibular disorders among musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Selms, M K A; Ahlberg, J; Lobbezoo, F; Visscher, C M

    2017-07-01

    Playing a musical instrument that loads the masticatory system has frequently been linked to temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). Previous literature reviews on this topic do not conform to the current standards of evidence-based medicine. To investigate the effects of playing a musical instrument (i.e. violin/viola and wind instruments) or singing on the presence of TMDs, based on evidence derived from observational studies. Databases of Medline, Web of Science and Google Scholar were searched using MeSH and other relevant terms. For each study, a quality assessment was undertaken using a modified version of the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS). Fifteen relevant papers were identified for inclusion in this review. Of the seven possible points that could be scored with the NOS, the majority of these studies scored under half. Based on the available evidence, the purported relationship between the playing of specific musical instruments and TMDs was not as evident as reported in previous literature reviews. There is limited evidence to conclude that playing a wind instrument is a hazard to the temporomandibular system. Furthermore, there is no available evidence to suggest that vocalists experience more TMDs than controls. The studies that investigated the presence of TMDs among violists and violinists yielded ambiguous outcomes; some studies reported no association between the playing of these instruments and the presence of signs and symptoms of TMDs, whereas in studies where a clinical examination was performed (though of lower methodological quality), an association was found. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  16. Can Preoperative Psychological Assessment Predict Outcomes After Temporomandibular Joint Arthroscopy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouloux, Gary F; Zerweck, Ashley G; Celano, Marianne; Dai, Tian; Easley, Kirk A

    2015-11-01

    Psychological assessment has been used successfully to predict patient outcomes after cardiothoracic and bariatric surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine whether preoperative psychological assessment could be used to predict patient outcomes after temporomandibular joint arthroscopy. Consecutive patients with temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) who could benefit from arthroscopy were enrolled in a prospective cohort study. All patients completed the Millon Behavior Medicine Diagnostic survey before surgery. The primary predictor variable was the preoperative psychological scores. The primary outcome variable was the difference in pain between the pre- and postoperative periods. The Spearman rank correlation coefficient and the Pearson product-moment correlation were used to determine the association between psychological factors and change in pain. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed using a mixed-effects linear model and multiple linear regression. A P value of .05 was considered significant. Eighty-six patients were enrolled in the study. Seventy-five patients completed the study and were included in the final analyses. The mean change in visual analog scale (VAS) pain score 1 month after arthroscopy was -15.4 points (95% confidence interval, -6.0 to -24.7; P psychological factors was identified with univariable correlation analyses. Multivariable analyses identified that a greater pain decrease was associated with a longer duration of preoperative symptoms (P = .054) and lower chronic anxiety (P = .064). This study has identified a weak association between chronic anxiety and the magnitude of pain decrease after arthroscopy for TMD. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of chronic anxiety in the outcome after surgical procedures for the treatment of TMD. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Synovial osteochondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint; Osteocondromatosis sinovial en la articulacion temporomandibular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemnon, Jorge; Nemnon, Marcelo; Staffieri, Roberto; Villavicencio, C; Marconi, G; Masjoan, Diego [Fundacion Villavicencio, Rosario (Argentina). Diagnostico Medico

    2004-07-01

    Synovial osteochondromatosis (SO) is a meta plastic process by which synovial mesenchymal cells transform into chondroblasts and chondrocytes. This disease affects most frequently the knee, the hip, the elbow, and uncommonly the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The authors present 2 cases of synovial osteochondromatosis of the TMJ. (author)

  18. Muscle disorders and dentition-related aspects in temporomandibular disorders: controversies in the most commonly used treatment modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerjes Waseem

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This review explores the aetiology of temporomandibular disorders and discusses the controversies in variable treatment modalities. Pathologies of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ and its' associated muscles of mastication are jointly termed temporomandibular disorders (TMDs. TMDs present with a variety of symptoms which include pain in the joint and its surrounding area, jaw clicking, limited jaw opening and headaches. It is mainly reported by middle aged females who tend to recognize the symptoms more readily than males and therefore more commonly seek professional help. Several aetiological factors have been acknowledged including local trauma, bruxism, malocclusion, stress and psychiatric illnesses. The Research Diagnostic Criteria of the Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD is advanced to other criteria as it takes into consideration the socio-psychological status of the patient. Several treatment modalities have been recommended including homecare practices, splint therapy, occlusal adjustment, analgesics and the use of psychotropic medication; as well as surgery, supplementary therapy and cognitive behavioural therapy. Although splint therapy and occlusal adjustment have been extensively used, there is no evidence to suggest that they can be curative; a number of evidence-based trials have concluded that these appliances should not be suggested as part of the routine care. Surgery, except in very rare cases, is discouraged since it is the most invasive alternative; recent studies have shown healthier outcome with cognitive behavioural therapy.

  19. Assessment of the relationship between stress and temporomandibular joint disorder in female students before university entrance exam (Konkour exam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mottaghi

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: The parallel increase of temporomandibular disorders and anxiety between the two stages can suggest a possible relationship between anxiety and temporomandibular disorders. Therefore, the effect of anxiety in triggering temporomandibular disorder symptoms is probable.

  20. Temporomandibular disorders, headaches and chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrzewska, Joanna M

    2015-03-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are a major cause of non-dental orofacial pain with a suggested prevalence of 3% to 5% in the general population. TMDs present as unilateral or bilateral pain centered round the pre-auricular area and can be associated with clicking and limitation in jaw movements. It is important to ascertain if there are other comorbid factors such as headaches, widespread chronic pain and mood changes. A biopsychosocial approach is crucial with a careful explanation and self-care techniques encouraged.

  1. Association between headache and temporomandibular disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouelhuda, Amira Mokhtar; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Kim, Sang-Yun; Kim, Young-Kyun

    2017-12-01

    Headaches are one of the most common conditions associated with temporomandibular disorder (TMD). In the present paper, we evaluated the relationship between headache and TMD, determined whether headache influences the symptoms of TMD, and reported two cases of TMD accompanied by headache. Our practical experience and a review of the literature suggested that headache increases the frequency and intensity of pain parameters, thus complicating dysfunctional diseases in both diagnostic and treatment phases. Therefore, early and multidisciplinary treatment of TMD is necessary to avoid the overlap of painful events that could result in pain chronicity.

  2. Chronic hematic cyst of the temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orhan, K.; Delilbasi, C.; Nishiyama, H.; Furukawa, S.; Mitsunobu, K.

    2005-01-01

    Hematic cyst refers to accumulation of blood or blood breakdown products in a non epithelium-lined fibrous tissue capsule. Hepatic cyst is a term often used for deeply placed, incompletely resorbed hematoma hemorrhagic cyst, which may remain unchanged and unidentified for long periods of time. Trauma is the major causative factor, although it is often vague or totally uncalled by the patient. Chronic hematic cysts are uncommon lesions those can present diagnostic challenge. In this article we report a first case of a chronic hematic cyst of the temporomandibular joint TMJ. (author)

  3. [Temporo-mandibular joints and orthognathic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouletreau, P

    2016-09-01

    Temporo-Mandibular Joints (TMJ) and orthognathic surgery are closely linked. In the past, some authors have even described (with mixed results) the correction of some dysmorphosis through direct procedures on the TMJs. Nowadays, performing orthognathic surgery involves the TMJ in three different occasions: (1) TMJ disorders potentially responsible for dento-maxillary dysmorphosis, (2) effects of orthognathic surgery on TMJs, and (3) condylar positioning methods in orthognathic surgery. These three chapters are developed in order to focus on the close relationships between TMJ and orthognathic surgery. Some perspectives close this article. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Voz e disfunção temporomandibular em professores Voice and temporomandibular joint disorders in teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilza Maria Machado

    2009-12-01

    -reported speech pathological, medical and dental evaluation data. METHODS: 29 public school teachers from the city of Sorocaba - SP took part in this study. The teachers filled out a questionnaire about vocal disorders and on TMJD. The four following assessments were performed: auditory-perceptive, ENT medical assessment, oral-facial mobility, and a dental assessment. The mentioning about three or more symptoms in the questionnaire determined 'presence' of vocal and TMJD complaint. Both auditory-perceptive and ENT evaluations concluded whether there was 'presence' of voice and laryngeal disorders. TMJD was considered present when three or more signs or symptoms, necessarily including pain, were registered during oral-facial mobility and dental assessments. For statistical analysis of the data the following tests were applied: Two Proportions Equality Test, Fischer's Exact Test and Kappa Agreement Test. RESULTS: among the participating subjects, 82.8% reported having a vocal disorder, and 62.1% reported TMJD symptoms; 51.7% showed vocal disorders in ENT evaluation, and 65.5% had TMJD according to dental assessments. When comparing vocal and TMJ disorder assessments, a significant correlation was present for auditory-perceptual and oral-facial mobility for TMJD, with a tendency towards significance also when applying the questionnaire. CONCLUSION: the results point towards confirming the presence of TMJ and vocal disorders in the group of teachers in this research, as well as positive correlations between these two disorders.

  5. Sensibilidade dolorosa à palpação em pacientes com disfunção temporomandibular crônica Sensibilidad dolorosa a la palpación en pacientes con disfunción temporomandibular crónica Painful sensitivity to palpation in patients presenting with chronic temporomandibular dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lúcia Franco

    2011-12-01

    , assessment and grouping of muscular and articular areas for palpation were carried out according to the Diagnostic Criteria for above mentioned disorders, considering bilaterally the masseter muscle, the temporalis muscle, the cervical region and the temporomandibular joint. Sample included 213 (88.0 % of women and 29 (12.0 % men with a mean age of 37.41 years. The mean of number of zones positive to palpation in the groups without headaches, tension headache, migraine and daily chronic headache were: 12.43, 14.38, 15.21 and 15.62 (p= 0.107 (min 2 max 22. The areas of temporalis muscle showed significant differences among groups (p= 0.007. The number of painful points was not statistically different among groups and only in the temporalis muscle there were differences with statistical significant to palpation.

  6. Expression of CGRP in the temporomandibular joint; Expresion de CGRP en la articulacion temporomandibular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caviedes Bucheli, Javier [Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Facultad de Odontologia, Bogota, D.C. (Colombia); Medina Buitrago, Diana Marcela [Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogota, D.C. (Colombia)

    2002-07-01

    The presence and content of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is evaluated in the hyperplastic retrodiscal tissue of the temporomandibular joint in patients with joint degenerative disease by radioimmunoassay. Study population has included 8 female patients in pre-menopausic status, without to be pregnant, without to be lactating for a year and with diagnostic of joint degenerative disease (osteoarthrosis). Pain levels are registered with visual analog scale, where 0 is absence of pain and 16 acute pain. A bone degeneration is classified as mild, moderate and severe, according to findings of nuclear magnetic resonance. The 15 retrodiscal hyperplastic tissue samples are taken from patients undergoing to open surgery of temporomandibular joint. The specimens were placed in plastic blocks with freezing medium and are stored at -70 degrees celsius until neuropeptide extraction by radioimmunoassay with kit for CGRP. A directly proportional relationship is established between the degree of bone degeneration and neuropeptide expression and between the osteoarthrosis classification with analogue visual scale. Findings have shown definitive correlation between pain levels and expression of neuropeptide. CGRP is expressed in the retrodiscal tissue of temporomandibular joint in human with joint degenerative disease and is directly related with levels osteoarthrosis and pain [Spanish] La presencia y el contenido del peptido relacionado con el gen de la calcitonina (CGRP) es evaluado en el tejido retrodiscal hiperplasico de la articulacion temporomandibular en pacientes con enfermedad degenerativa articular mediante radioinmunoensayo. La poblacion del estudio ha incluido 8 pacientes de genero femenino en estado premenopausico, sin estar embarazada, sin estar lactando por un ano y con diagnostico de enfermedad degenerativa articular (osteoartrosis). Los niveles de dolor son registrados con escala visual analoga, donde 0 es ausencia de dolor y 16 dolor agudo. Una

  7. Treatment of temporomandibular disorder using occlusal splint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Dahlan

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patient suffering from occlusal abnormality is usually detected months or even years when the acute patient visits a dentist, and generally the patient does not receive direct treatment upon his complaints since minimum information is available on this type of treatment. In general, the dentist provides medication only or conducts incorrect selective grinding where in fact, the patient does not feel better from the previous conditions. Purpose: The objective of this study is to discuss the treatment on the dysfunctional temporomandibular joint followed by orofacial pain caused by occlusal disorder using occlusal splint. Case: In this case, a forty three years old male having trouble with the joint on the left jaw followed by orofacial pain caused by occlusal disorder. Case Management: Initial treatment with occlusal splint makes the patient comfortable and recovers from his complaints since the patient could restructure the chewing muscles. This treatment will be more successful if the dentist has the knowledge to use and choose occlusal splint method properly. Occlusal Splint could be used as a supporting therapy and consideration as one of the therapies to avoid the unwanted side effects. The use of occlusal splint is meant as an alternative of the main therapy in overcoming the problem of occlusal splint. Conclusion: Finally, therapy with occlusal splint is very effective as an alternative treatment to handle the dysfunction of temporomandibular joint caused by occlusion.

  8. The Melting Point of Palladium Using Miniature Fixed Points of Different Ceramic Materials: Part II—Analysis of Melting Curves and Long-Term Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edler, F.; Huang, K.

    2016-12-01

    Fifteen miniature fixed-point cells made of three different ceramic crucible materials (Al2O3, ZrO2, and Al2O3(86 %)+ZrO2(14 %)) were filled with pure palladium and used to calibrate type B thermocouples (Pt30 %Rh/Pt6 %Rh). A critical point by using miniature fixed points with small amounts of fixed-point material is the analysis of the melting curves, which are characterized by significant slopes during the melting process compared to flat melting plateaus obtainable using conventional fixed-point cells. The method of the extrapolated starting point temperature using straight line approximation of the melting plateau was applied to analyze the melting curves. This method allowed an unambiguous determination of an electromotive force (emf) assignable as melting temperature. The strict consideration of two constraints resulted in a unique, repeatable and objective method to determine the emf at the melting temperature within an uncertainty of about 0.1 μ V. The lifetime and long-term stability of the miniature fixed points was investigated by performing more than 100 melt/freeze cycles for each crucible of the different ceramic materials. No failure of the crucibles occurred indicating an excellent mechanical stability of the investigated miniature cells. The consequent limitation of heating rates to values below {± }3.5 K min^{-1} above 1100° C and the carefully and completely filled crucibles (the liquid palladium occupies the whole volume of the crucible) are the reasons for successfully preventing the crucibles from breaking. The thermal stability of the melting temperature of palladium was excellent when using the crucibles made of Al2O3(86 %)+ZrO2(14 %) and ZrO2. Emf drifts over the total duration of the long-term investigation were below a temperature equivalent of about 0.1 K-0.2 K.

  9. Effect of Watsu therapy on psychological aspects and quality of life of patients with temporomandibular disorder: case report

    OpenAIRE

    BARBOSA,Gustavo Augusto Seabra; ROCHA,Cibele Oliveira Melo; RESENDE,Camila Maria Bastos Machado de; SALES,Kelly Verônica de Melo

    2014-01-01

    Watsu therapy is a water relaxation intervention technique performed individually in a warm pool with music and peaceful settings involving harmonious rotational movements, stretching, tractions on the joints and pressures at the points of muscle tension. This study evaluated the effect of Watsu therapy on psychological aspects (anxiety and minor psychiatric disorders) and on the quality of life of a patient with temporomandibular disorders. The patient answered three questionnaires: STAI (St...

  10. Source of salts in the Waianae part of the Pearl Harbor aquifer near Barbers Point water tunnel, Oahu, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyre, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    The salinity of the water supply of Barbers Point Naval Air Station has increased markedly since 1983. The Naval Air Station obtains its water, about 3 million gal/day, from Barbers Point shaft, a water shaft that taps the Waianae part of the Pearl Harbor aquifer underlying the dry, southeastern flank of the Waianae mountains on the island on Oahu, Hawaii. From 1983 to 1985 the chloride concentration of the water, increased from 220 to 250 mg/L and has remained near that level through 1986. The EPA has established 250 mg/L as the maximum recommended chloride concentration in drinking water because above that level many people can taste the salt. The high chloride concentration in shallow groundwater at all wells in the area indicates that most of the salts in the freshwater lens are contributed by rainfall, sea spray, and irrigation return water. At Barbers Point shaft, pumping may draw a small amount of saltwater from the transition zone and increase the chloride concentration in the pumped water by about 20 mg/L. Salinity of the lens decreases progressively inland in response to recharge from relatively fresher water and in response to an increasing lens thickness with increasing distance from the shoreline. The increase, in 1983, in the chloride concentration of water at the shaft was most probably the result of saltier recharge water reaching the water table, and not the result of increased mixing of underlying saltwater with the freshwater. The chloride concentration of the recharge water has probably increased because, in 1980, the drip method of irrigation began to replace the furrow method on sugarcane fields near the shaft. A mixing-cell model was used to estimate the effect of drip irrigation on the chloride concentration of the groundwater in the vicinity of Barbers Point shaft. The model predicted an increase in chloride concentration of about 50 mg/L. The observed increase was about 30 mg/L and the chloride concentration is presently stable at 245 to

  11. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3940 Total temporomandibular joint... implanted in the human jaw to replace the mandibular condyle and augment the glenoid fossa to functionally...

  12. Tomographic study of temporomandibular joints before orthodontic treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Ki Jeong [Kyung Hee Univ. College of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-15

    To determine whether there is a relationship between abnormal temporomandibular joint radiographic findings and age or gender in a sample of preorthodontic patients. Individualized corrected sagittal tomographs of 188 temporomandibular joints in 94 preorthodontic patients, aged 11 to 29 years, were taken and viewed by an observer blinded to clinical records. The study population was divided into 2 aged groups (11-15 years and 16-29 years) for comparative purpose. Temporomandibular joint radiographic findings were classified as normal or abnormal. There was no difference in ratio of abnormal to normal findings between the both aged groups. The frequency of osseous abnormalities was similar with that of abnormalities of condylar position. Abnormalities in CP and JS were most frequent in all aged groups. There is no significant difference between ages or genders for temporomandibular joint radiographic abnormalities.

  13. A Case of Chondrosarcoma Arising in the Temporomandibular Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsutomu Nomura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chondrosarcoma is a malignant tumor originating in cartilaginous cells. And there are only few reports of the case of chondrosarcoma in temporomandibular joint. We discuss a case of chondrosarcoma in temporomandibular joint in a 28-year-old man. Tumor was in contact with the dura, but en bloc resection was performed. After surgical resection of the tumor, face defect was reconstructed by rectus abdominis-free flap. And there is no recurrence after ten years from the resection.

  14. Alternative methodology for assessing part-through-wall cracks in carbon steel bends removed from Point Lepreau Generating Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan Xinjian, E-mail: duanx@aecl.c [Senior Engineer, Reactor Engineering Department, Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Mississauga, ON (Canada); Kozluk, Michael J., E-mail: kozlukm@aecl.c [Independent Consultant, Oakville, ON (Canada); Gendron, Tracy [Manager-HTS Materials Integrity, Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada); Slade, John [Senior Technical Advisor, Point Lepreau Generating Station, Lepreau, NB (Canada)

    2011-03-15

    In 2008 April Point Lepreau Generating Station entered an extended refurbishment outage that will involve the replacement of key reactor components (fuel channels and connecting feeder pipes). Prior to the refurbishment outage, New Brunswick Power Nuclear had been successfully managing intergranular, axial cracking of carbon steel feeder piping, that were also experiencing thinning, in the Point Lepreau Generating Station, primarily by an aggressive program of inspection, repair and testing of ex-service material. For the previous three maintenance outages, a probabilistic safety evaluation (PSE) had been used to demonstrate that annual inspection of the highest risk locations maintains the nuclear safety risk from cracking at an acceptably low level. The PSE makes use of the Failure Assessment Diagram (FAD) model to predict the failure of part-through-wall cracks. Burst-pressure testing of two ex-service feeder pipe sections with part-through-wall cracks showed that this FAD model significantly under predicts the failure pressure measured in the component tests. Use of this FAD model introduces undesirable conservatism into PSE assessments that are used to optimize feeder piping inspection and maintenance plans. This paper describes an alternative finite element approach, which could be used to provide more representative structural models for use in PSE assessments. This alternative approach employs the elasto-plastic large strain finite element formulation; uses representative material properties; considers the spatial microstructural distribution; accounts for the effect of work hardening rate; models all deformation processes, i.e., uniform deformation, localized necking, and failure imitation and propagation. Excellent pre-test prediction was shown for the burst-pressure test performed in 2006. Although cold-worked feeder bends have reduced fracture toughness compared to the parent straight pipe, post-test metallurgical examinations showed that failure at the

  15. Radiographic analysis of temporomandibular joint arthrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Dong Soo [Department of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-11-15

    The author analysed the bone changes, the positional relationships between condylar head and articular fossa, and the interrelationship between the bone changes and the abnormal position of condylar head, from 1,036 radiographs of 259 patients with temporomandibular joint arthrosis, which were obtained by the oblique-lateral transcranial projection and orthopantomograms. The results were as follows: 1. Among the radiographic bone changes of the temporomandibular joint arthrosis, deformity was 36..90% (217 cases), sclerosis 34.18% (201 cases), erosive change 25.58% (152 cases) and marginal proliferation 3.06% (18 cases) respectively. 2. In the positional changes between condylar head and articular fossa, the downward positioning of condylar head in centric occlusion was most frequent (36.90%), of which frequency was significantly higher than forward positioning (11.22%) and backward positioning (4.76%) in same condition. Also, radiographs showed that the enlargement of articular space showed higher frequency than its narrowing. In the opening position of mouth, the restrict ed movement of condylar head within articular fossa was most frequent (35.03%). The forward positioning and the downward positioning was 15.65% and 9.52% respectively. Also, radiographs revealed that the incomplete movement or no positional change of condylar head was most frequent. 3. In the interrelationship between bone changes and abnormal position of condylar head, deformity was 42.79% in the cases of downward positioning of condylar head in centric occlusion and 37.50% in those of normal positioning of condylar head in same condition. This revealed that deformity was most frequent bone change in above condylar positionings. However, erosive change was 34.62% in the cases of downward positioning of condylar head in centric occlusion and 33 .33% in those of forward positioning. In opening position of condylar head, and deformity in the cases of norma l positioning, forward positioning and

  16. Radiographic analysis of temporomandibular joint arthrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Dong Soo

    1984-01-01

    The author analysed the bone changes, the positional relationships between condylar head and articular fossa, and the interrelationship between the bone changes and the abnormal position of condylar head, from 1,036 radiographs of 259 patients with temporomandibular joint arthrosis, which were obtained by the oblique-lateral transcranial projection and orthopantomograms. The results were as follows: 1. Among the radiographic bone changes of the temporomandibular joint arthrosis, deformity was 36..90% (217 cases), sclerosis 34.18% (201 cases), erosive change 25.58% (152 cases) and marginal proliferation 3.06% (18 cases) respectively. 2. In the positional changes between condylar head and articular fossa, the downward positioning of condylar head in centric occlusion was most frequent (36.90%), of which frequency was significantly higher than forward positioning (11.22%) and backward positioning (4.76%) in same condition. Also, radiographs showed that the enlargement of articular space showed higher frequency than its narrowing. In the opening position of mouth, the restrict ed movement of condylar head within articular fossa was most frequent (35.03%). The forward positioning and the downward positioning was 15.65% and 9.52% respectively. Also, radiographs revealed that the incomplete movement or no positional change of condylar head was most frequent. 3. In the interrelationship between bone changes and abnormal position of condylar head, deformity was 42.79% in the cases of downward positioning of condylar head in centric occlusion and 37.50% in those of normal positioning of condylar head in same condition. This revealed that deformity was most frequent bone change in above condylar positionings. However, erosive change was 34.62% in the cases of downward positioning of condylar head in centric occlusion and 33 .33% in those of forward positioning. In opening position of condylar head, and deformity in the cases of norma l positioning, forward positioning and

  17. Relationship Between Orthodontics and Temporomandibular Disorders: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes Ortega, Ana Carolina Bannwart; Pozza, Daniel Humberto; Rocha Rodrigues, Luciane Lacerda Franco; Guimarães, Antônio Sergio

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the possible relationship between the orthodontic treatment of Class II malocclusion and the development of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). A total of 40 patients was evaluated at four time points: the day before the start of treatment employing bilateral Class II elastics (baseline), as well as at 24 hours, 1 week, and 1 month after the start of treatment. The development of TMD pain complaints in the orofacial region and changes in the range of mouth opening were assessed at these times. Shapiro-Wilk, McNemar, and Friedman tests with 5% significance level were used to analyze the data. The treatment produced pain of a transitory, moderate intensity, but there was no significant change from baseline after 1 month. There were no restrictions in the range of jaw motion or any evidence of limitations in mouth opening. Orthodontic treatment with bilateral Class II elastics does not cause significant orofacial pain or undesirable changes in the range of mouth opening. Furthermore, this modality of orthodontic treatment was not responsible for inducing TMD.

  18. Laterality of proprioception in the orofacial muscles and temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frayne, Ellie; Coulson, Susan; Adams, Roger; Croxson, Glen; Waddington, Gordon

    2016-12-02

    Laterality of function in the orofacial musculature suggests there may be side-to-side asymmetry of proprioceptive acuity in lip movement compared to the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In the present work, 14 young adults were tested for acuity of lip and TMJ closure movements onto plugs varying from 5 to 8mm without visual feedback. Testing was conducted on both left and right sides, using the same psychophysical task and stimuli. Results showed superior proprioceptive acuity at the lips, with no significant side effect. However, there was side-to-side asymmetry in the correlations between proprioceptive performance for the two anatomical structures, with performance on the right side strongly correlated but not on the left. This is consistent with the need for coordination between structures during chewing. When acuity at different points in the stimulus range was examined, the right side lips were better with small stimuli. Overall, results support enhanced use-specific proprioception. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Health point prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus and pulmonary tuberculosis among patients in various parts of Delta State, Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jemikalajah, Johnson D.; Okogun, Godwin Ray A.

    2009-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in the study population in Delta State of Nigeria. Two hundred and five patients suspected of HIV and TB were prospectively studied in Kwale, Agbor and Eku in Delta State of Nigeria from February 2006 to February 2008. Human immunodeficiency virus status was determined using World Health Organization systems II, and Zeihl Nelson staining technique was used for TB screening. A health point prevalence rate of 53.2%, was obtained for HIV, 49.3% for TB, and 16.6% for HIV/TB. The population of HIV positive (p=0.890, p=0.011, p=0.006) and TB positive (p=0.135, p=0.0003, p=0.0001) subjects were statistically significant among the suspected subjects while the HIV/TB positive cases were not statistically significant (p=0.987, p=0.685, p=0.731). Our study showed that HIV and PTB infections remains high in parts of Delta State in Nigeria. (author)

  20. Role of Auriculotherapy in the Treatment of Temporomandibular Disorders with Anxiety in University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Hollanda Iunes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of auriculotherapy with mustard seeds in the treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs, anxiety, and electromyographic (EMG activity in university students. Methodology. The State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI, Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC for TMDs (RDC/TMDs, and electromyography were used in this study of 44 college students with high levels of anxiety and TMDs. The subjects were divided into two groups: an auriculotherapy (AA group (n=31 and an AA sham group (n=13. The mustard seeds were applied to the shenmen, rim, sympathetic, brain stem, and temporomandibular joint (TMJ points in the AA group and to sham points in the external ear and wrist in the AA sham group. The treatment protocol was 10 sessions (two treatments per week. Results. Anxiety (p<0.01 was significantly reduced in the AA group. This group also showed a decrease in tender points in the mandibular posterior region (p=0.04 and in the right side of the submandibular region (p=0.02. Complaints of bilateral pain were reduced in the temporal tendon (p≤0.01 and in the left side of the ATM (p<0.01. In addition, electromyographic (EMG activity was reduced during temporal muscle contraction (p=0.03.  Conclusion. Auriculotherapy was effective in the treatment of students with anxiety and TMDs.

  1. Correlation between headache and temporomandibular joint dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Menezes, Mariana Sampaio; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; Biasotto-Gonzalez, Daniela Aparecida

    2008-01-01

    A relação entre disfunções temporomandibulares (DTM) e os diferentes tipos de cefaléias ainda não está bem compreendida, mas a dor de cabeça é provavelmente o sintoma mais comum da DTM. O objetivo deste estudo foi correlacionar cefaléia com o índice clínico de Fonseca de avaliação da DTM. Participaram 160 voluntários estudantes da Universidade Nove de Julho na faixa dos 18 aos 36 anos, sendo 80 mulheres e 80 homens. Foram aplicados dois questionários: o índice clínico de Fonseca e um question...

  2. Ankylosis of temporomandibular joint in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das U

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Temporomandibular joint (TMJ ankylosis or hypomobility involves fusion of the mandibular condyle to the base of the skull. It is a major clinical problem that affects many patients suffering from facial trauma, infection, or systemic disease. The treatment of TMJ ankylosis poses a significant challenge because of technical difficulties and a high incidence of recurrence. Case Report: This report describes a case of a 4-year-old boy with inability to open mouth, diagnosed with unilateral right bony TMJ ankylosis. The surgical approach consisted of gap arthroplasty followed by vigorous physiotherapy. Conclusion: A detailed history, clinical and functional examination, radiographic examination facilitating correct diagnosis followed by immediate surgical intervention, and physiotherapy can help us to restore physical, psychological, and emotional health of the child patient.

  3. Temporomandibular disorders: Old ideas and new concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, Thomas; Jensen, Rigmor Højland

    2017-06-01

    Background Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) is an umbrella term for pain and dysfunction involving the masticatory muscles and the temporomandibular joints (TMJs). TMD is the most common orofacial pain condition. Its prominent features include regional pain in the face and preauricular area, limitations in jaw movement, and noise from the TMJs during jaw movements. TMD affects up to 15% of adults and 7% of adolescents. Chronic pain is the overwhelming reason that patients with TMD seek treatment. TMD can associate with impaired general health, depression, and other psychological disabilities, and may affect the quality of life of the patient. Assessment Evaluations indicate that the recently published Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (DC/TMD) are reliable and valid. These criteria cover the most common types of TMD, which include pain-related disorders (e.g., myalgia, headache attributable to TMD, and arthralgia) as well as disorders associated with the TMJ (primarily disc displacements and degenerative disease). As peripheral mechanisms most likely play a role in the onset of TMD, a detailed muscle examination is recommended. The persistence of pain involves more central factors, such as sensitization of the supraspinal neurons and second-order neurons at the level of the spinal dorsal horn/trigeminal nucleus, imbalanced antinociceptive activity, and strong genetic predisposition, which also is included in DC/TMD. Conclusion The etiology is complex and still not clearly understood, but several biological and psychosocial risk factors for TMD have been identified. Several studies indicate that patients with TMD improve with a combination of noninvasive therapies, including behavior therapy, pharmacotherapy, physical therapy, and occlusal appliances. More stringently designed studies, however, are needed to assess treatment efficacy and how to tailor treatment to the individual patient.

  4. Headache and temporomandibular disorders: evidence for diagnostic and behavioural overlap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaros, A G; Urban, D; Locke, J

    2007-06-01

    To assess the diagnostic and behavioural overlap of headache patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD), individuals recruited from the general population with self-described headaches were compared with non-headache controls. The examination and diagnostic procedures in the Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC) for TMD were applied to both sets of subjects by a blinded examiner. Following their examination, subjects used experience sampling methods to obtain data on pain, tooth contact, masticatory muscle tension, emotional states and stress. Results showed that a significantly higher proportion of the headache patients received an RDC/TMD diagnosis of myofascial pain than non-headache controls. Headache patients also reported significantly more frequent and intense tooth contact, more masticatory muscle tension, more stress and more pain in the face/head and other parts of the body than non-headache controls. These results are similar to those reported for TMD patients and they suggest that headache patients and TMD patients overlap considerably in diagnosis and oral parafunctional behaviours.

  5. Association between otalgia, tinnitus, vertigo and hypoacusia, with temporomandibular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Guedes Pereira de Alencar Junior

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Because nonespecific symptoms and signs are associated with others well-established in the temporomandibular disorders, it is difficult for the clinician to decide what symptoms and signs should be considered during the diagnosis and the treatment plan. Therefore, the aim of this literature review was to evaluate the prevalence of aural symptoms (otalgias, tinnitus, dizziness and deafness in patients with orofacial pain. Although several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the association between aural symptoms and temporomandibular disorders, the results of the previous studies differed in magnitude. For this reason, it is difficult to establish the prevalence of these aural symptoms concomitantly with temporomandibular disorders. Moreover, such relationship does not necessarily imply a cause-effect relationship. Because of the diagnosis complexity, different treatments must be considered, so the nonespecific symptoms of temporomandibular disorders can be effectively controlled as well. It is crucial for the the clinician to be aware of the possible etiology of aural symptoms, so he should determine if such symptoms may be associated with temporomandibular disorders and thus include them in the treatment.

  6. Algunas consideraciones sobre los trastornos temporomandibulares Some considerations on the temporomandibular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ileana Grau León

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una revisión documental mediante revistas, libros, tesis y otros documentos en formato electrónico acerca de la epidemiología de los trastornos de la articulación temporomandibular, con el objetivo de actualizar el material existente y ampliar nuestros conocimientos sobre esta alteración. En nuestro país se han llevado a cabo en las 2 últimas décadas, varios estudios epidemiológicos sobre los trastornos temporomandibulares (TTM y se ha hecho un esfuerzo notable por esclarecer su causa. De forma general, se acepta la idea de que el origen de los disturbios funcionales del sistema estomatognático es multifactorial, pero a pesar de que tanto en niños como en adultos la prevalencia de los trastornos temporomandibulares (TTM ha sido alta, no se ha evidenciado un factor causal predominante. La literatura alude que estas disfunciones afectan a un porcentaje muy elevado de la población mundial (80 %, con una edad media de 34 años y una proporción de 3 mujeres por cada hombre. Este dato es muy interesante, porque los estudios precisan que las mujeres de edades comprendidas entre los 25 y los 35 años presentan trastornos temporomandibulares (TTM con más asiduidad.A documental review of different sources was carried out to study the disfunctions of temporal mandibular joint (TMJ with the objective of updating and enlarge our knowledge of this disorder. In or country in the last two decades several epidemiological studies about the temporal mandibular joint dysfunction were carried out. In a general wade the idea about of the origin of the functional problems of the stomatognatic system is multifactioral. But although, in children as well as in adults the prevalence of temporal mandibular dysfunction (DTM has been high, a casual predominant factor has not been evidenced. Literature states that this dysfunction affect a very high percentage of the world populations, 80 % , the mean age 34 years old and the proportion 3 woman for

  7. Influência do tratamento das desordens temporomandibulares na dor e na postura global

    OpenAIRE

    Azato, Flaviane Keiko; Castillo, Daisilene Baena; Coelho, Tulio Marcos Kalife; Taciro, Charles; Pereira, Paulo Zarate; Zomerfeld, Valquiria; Silva, Marcela Galdina da; Insarraulde, Elizeu; Vinholi, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: A disfunção temporomandibular é uma síndrome clínica que acomete principalmente músculos mastigatórios e articulações temporomandibulares. Como a articulação temporomandibular está diretamente relacionada à região cervical e escapular por meio de cadeias musculares, alterações posturais da coluna podem acarretar distúrbios de articulação temporomandibular, e vice-versa. A relação entre a postura corporal e a disfunção temporomandibular pode estabelecer uma forma de ...

  8. Background Document on Starting Points for Sustainable Biomass. Part 1. Risks and chances with regard to the import of biomass in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richert, W.; Sielhorst, S.

    2006-03-01

    Social organizations point out the sustainability risks involved in biomass production. Upon urgent request of Dutch environmental organizations a set of sustainability criteria must be developed for imported biomass. Part 1 of this background document intends to sketch the background of the risks that are observed by the environmental organizations. Part 2, which is yet to be published, will look at the risks in the light of opportunities of energy crops for producing countries. [nl

  9. On the radiation exposure in temporomandibular joint examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rother, U.; Hildebrandt, K.H.

    1979-01-01

    The radiation exposure caused by standardized examinations of the temporomandibular joint has been determined with the aid of 660 exposures of an Alderson phantom. Comparative examinations were performed with the classic contact technique according to Parma to elucidate the results obtained. The lowest surface exposure was observed in contact examinations of the temporomandibular joint. Application of a flat cone led to a 13-fold reduction in surface exposure compared to contact examinations according to Parma. Furthermore, radiation exposure strongly decreased from the irradiation field to the adjacent area if a cone (flat cone and ear cone) was used. (author)

  10. Evaluation of aural manifestations in temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhy, O A; Koutb, A R; Abdel-Baki, F A; Ali, T M; El Raffa, I Z; Khater, A H

    2004-08-01

    Thirty patients with temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction were selected to investigate the changes in otoacoustic emissions before and after conservative treatment of their temporo-mandibular joints. Pure tone audiometry, transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE), distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) as well as a tinnitus questionnaire were administered to all patients before and after therapy. Therapy was conservative in the form of counselling, physiotherapy, anti-inflammatory agents, muscle relaxants, and occlusal splints. Results indicated insignificant changes in the TEOAEs, whereas there were significant increases in distortion product levels at most of the frequency bands. These results were paralleled to subjective improvement of tinnitus.

  11. The application of magnetic resonance imaging in temporomandibular joint pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehmedov, E.T.; Qahramanov, E.T.

    2007-01-01

    The diseases and damages of temporomandibular joint have compleceted diagnostic unlike other bone-joint pathologies. In 2005 for the first time in history it was implemented the magnetic resonance imaging in diagnostics of patients with with temporomandibular joints pathology. The current researches are in place till today. Being the golden standart the application of magnetic resonance tomography has a great role in differential diagnostics of the chronic arthritis, sclerosanse, deformanse arthrosis and arthrosis with internal derancement. This method guaranteed the correct valuation of the bone, disc and muscle structures of the joint and therefore brought full clearance into the problem

  12. Pseudodynamic MR imaging of temporomandibular joint disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Ehara, Shigeru

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has now been established as a procedure of choice in the evaluation of TMJ disorders. In this study, we evaluated the dynamics of TMJ motion on MR imaging, which resembles arthrography. Sixty-eight TMJs in 38 symptomatic patients and one healthy volunteer were examined using pseudodynamic images with gradient echo sequences using a 0.5 Tesla MR unit and 8 cm circular planar surface coil. For depiction of each compartment of the meniscus, the optimum sequence was 200/15/2 (TR/TE/excitations) with 50 deg or 60 deg flip angle in gradient refocused acquisition in steady-state (GRASS) sequences. Three contiguous slices on sagittal MR images were routinely obtained at 14-18 different phases of the opening cycle and displayed in closed-loop cine fashion. Internal derangement was observed in 57% of 68 joints. The most common type was anterior meniscal displacement without reduction. Sideway and rotational displacements, observed in 10% each, were noted on both sagittal multislice images and axial reference images. As a pseudodynamic MR technique, jaw movement specifically designed to check bite procedure to adjust splints is useful for detecting the exact time of meniscal redisplacement on the second click. After conservative therapy for arthrosis, pseudodynamic MR provided information on changes in the meniscus and condylar relationship. Pseudodynamic MR with multiple phases is suitable for evaluating subtle motion abnormality of the meniscus and for post-therapeutic monitoring. (author)

  13. Orthodontics is temporomandibular disorder-neutral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredini, Daniele; Stellini, Edoardo; Gracco, Antonio; Lombardo, Luca; Nardini, Luca Guarda; Siciliani, Giuseppe

    2016-07-01

    To assess if subjects with a clinical diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) have a similar prevalence of orthodontic history as a population of TMD-free individuals and to assess if those subjects who have a history of ideal orthodontics have fewer symptoms than those with a history of nonideal orthodontics. Two groups of age- and sex-matched individuals belonging to either a study ("TMD") or a control group were recruited. Subjects who underwent orthodontic treatment were classified as having a history of ideal or nonideal orthodontics based on the current presence of normal values in five reference occlusal features. The correlation with a history of orthodontic treatment was not clinically significant for any of the TMD diagnoses (ie, muscle pain, joint pain, disc displacement, arthrosis), with Phi (Φ) coefficient values within the -0.120 to 0.058 range. Within the subset of patients with a history of orthodontics, the correlation of ideal or nonideal orthodontic treatment with TMD diagnoses was, in general, not clinically relevant or was weakly relevant. Findings confirmed the substantial absence of clinically significant effects of orthodontics as far as TMD is concerned. The very low correlation values of a negative or positive history of ideal or nonideal orthodontics with the different TMD diagnoses suggest that orthodontic treatment could not have a true role for TMD.

  14. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes Macías, Juan Francisco; Sánchez Prieto, Martín

    2007-01-01

    Synovial Chondromatosis (SC) is a disease whose etiology is unknown, can be defined as a benign synovial process characterized by the formation of metaplastic cartilaginous nodes inside connective tissue of articular surfaces, is considered an active metaplastic phenomenon better than a neoplastic process; it presents a greater preference to affect women who constitute almost 70% of reported cases, the age range is wide and oscillates between 18-75 years (average 44.6 years). Between the main clinical findings are: pain, crackle, volume augmentation and a limited buccal opening. SC is an unusual state and the reports in the English literature are no more than 75 cases, only 66 of those where histologically verified, most of those were affecting great joints like hip, knee and shoulder, but if SC is not frequent in this sites, is even more infrequent on temporomandibular joint. The aim of this paper is to report a clinical case and at the same time to realize a brief review of the literature.

  15. Sleep bruxism and myofascial temporomandibular disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphael, Karen G.; Sirois, David A.; Janal, Malvin N.; Wigren, Pia E.; Dubrovsky, Boris; Nemelivsky, Lena V.; Klausner, Jack J.; Krieger, Ana C.; Lavigne, Gilles J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Many dentists believe that sleep bruxism (SB) is a pathogenic factor in myofascial temporomandibular disorder (TMD), but almost all supportive data rely on patients’ self-reports rather than on direct observation. Methods The authors administered a structured self-report interview to determine whether a large and well-characterized sample of patients with myofascial TMD (124 women) experienced SB more often than did matched control participants (46 women). The authors then used data from a two-night laboratory-based polysomnographic (PSG) study to determine whether the case participants exhibited more SB than the control participants. Results The results of independent sample t tests and χ2 analyses showed that, although self-reported rates of SB were significantly higher in case participants (55.3 percent) than in control participants (15.2 percent), PSG-based measures showed much lower and statistically similar rates of SB in the two groups (9.7 percent and 10.9 percent, respectively). Grinding noises were common in both case participants (59.7 percent) and control participants (78.3 percent). Conclusions Most case participants did not exhibit SB, and the common belief that SB is a sufficient explanation for myofascial TMD should be abandoned. Clinical Implications Although other reasons to consider treating SB may exist, misplaced concern about SB’s sustaining or exacerbating a chronic myofascial TMD condition should not be used to justify SB treatment. PMID:23115152

  16. Pseudodynamic MR imaging of temporomandibular joint disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Ehara, Shigeru (Iwate Medical Coll., Morioka (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-09-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has now been established as a procedure of choice in the evaluation of TMJ disorders. In this study, we evaluated the dynamics of TMJ motion on MR imaging, which resembles arthrography. Sixty-eight TMJs in 38 symptomatic patients and one healthy volunteer were examined using pseudodynamic images with gradient echo sequences using a 0.5 Tesla MR unit and 8 cm circular planar surface coil. For depiction of each compartment of the meniscus, the optimum sequence was 200/15/2 (TR/TE/excitations) with 50 deg or 60 deg flip angle in gradient refocused acquisition in steady-state (GRASS) sequences. Three contiguous slices on sagittal MR images were routinely obtained at 14-18 different phases of the opening cycle and displayed in closed-loop cine fashion. Internal derangement was observed in 57% of 68 joints. The most common type was anterior meniscal displacement without reduction. Sideway and rotational displacements, observed in 10% each, were noted on both sagittal multislice images and axial reference images. As a pseudodynamic MR technique, jaw movement specifically designed to check bite procedure to adjust splints is useful for detecting the exact time of meniscal redisplacement on the second click. After conservative therapy for arthrosis, pseudodynamic MR provided information on changes in the meniscus and condylar relationship. Pseudodynamic MR with multiple phases is suitable for evaluating subtle motion abnormality of the meniscus and for post-therapeutic monitoring. (author).

  17. Temporomandibular Joint Anatomy Assessed by CBCT Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Caruso

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Since cone beam computed tomography (CBCT has been used for the study of craniofacial morphology, the attention of orthodontists has also focused on the mandibular condyle. The purpose of this brief review is to summarize the recent 3D CBCT images of mandibular condyle. Material and Methods. The eligibility criteria for the studies are (a studies aimed at evaluating the anatomy of the temporomandibular joint; (b studies performed with CBCT images; (c studies on human subjects; (d studies that were not clinical case-reports and clinical series; (e studies reporting data on children, adolescents, or young adults (data from individuals with age ≤ 30 years. Sources included PubMed from June 2008 to June 2016. Results. 43 full-text articles were initially screened for eligibility. 13 full-text articles were assessed for eligibility. 11 articles were finally included in qualitative synthesis. The main topics treated in the studies are the volume and surface of the mandibular condyle, the bone changes on cortical surface, the facial asymmetry, and the optimum position of the condyle in the glenoid fossa. Conclusion. Additional studies will be necessary in the future, constructed with longitudinal methodology, especially in growing subjects. The limits of CBCT acquisitions are also highlighted.

  18. Review: Psychological intervention in temporomandibular disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Araneda

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD frecuently present psychological and psychiatric problems. These patients often show increased somatization, depression, anxiety, stress reaction and catastrophism, wich plays a role in the predisposition, initiation and perpetuation of TMD and treatment response. This review presents thaerapeutic options that compromise the psychological axis of patients with TMD, wich primarily seek to reduce the anxiety and the emotional stress present, modify different perceptions of pain and coping. There are different posibilities, within wich are: patient education, identifying situations that increase the tension to avoid them, teaching relaxation techniques such as biofeedback, hipnosis and yoga. As for psychological treatment, the most common for chronic orofacial pain is cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT. The appropriate and effective psychological intervention can reduce TMD pain, decreasing the probability that the symptoms become more complex. Within psychological treatment options for TMD, conservative standard treatment (education, self-instruction, avoidance of painful movements, soft diet, even the shortest, may be sufficient in the short term for most patients with TMD, especially in cases of acute conditions. The addition of CBT, by a specialist, gives coping skills that will add to the effectiveness, especially in chronic cases, obtaining better results in the long term.

  19. Long-Term Symptoms Onset and Heterotopic Bone Formation around a Total Temporomandibular Joint Prosthesis: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Guarda-Nardini

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The literature on total alloplastic temporomandibular joint (TMJ reconstructions is encouraging, and studies on total alloplastic TMJ replacements outcomes showed acceptable improvements in terms of both pain levels and jaw function. Nevertheless, some adverse events, such as heterotopic bone formation around the implanted prosthesis, may occur. In consideration of that, the present manuscript describes a case of heterotopic bone formation around a total temporomandibular joint prosthesis, which occurred several years after the implant. Methods: The present manuscript describes a case of heterotopic bone formation around a total TMJ prosthesis, which occurred several years after the implant in patients, who previously underwent multiple failed TMJ surgeries. Results: Ten years after the surgical TMJ replacement to solve an ankylotic bone block, the patient came to our attention again referring a progressive limitation in mouth opening. A computerized tomography showed evidence of marked heterotopic bone formation in the medial aspects of the joint, where a new-born ankylotic block occupied most part of the gap created by resecting the coronoid process at the time of the TMJ prosthesis insertion. Conclusions: Despite this adverse event has been sometimes described in the literature, this is the first case in which its occurrence happened several years after the temporomandibular joint replacement. It can be suggested that an accurate assessment of pre-operative risk factors for re-ankylosis (e.g., patients with multiple failed temporomandibular joint surgeries and within-intervention prevention (e.g., strategies to keep the bone interfaces around the implant separated should be better standardized and define in future studies.

  20. RUNX1/AML1 point mutations take part in the pathogenesis of radiation-and therapy-related myeloid neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Yuka; Kimura, Akiro; Harada, Hironori

    2012-01-01

    High frequency of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) has been reported in Hiroshima A-bomb exposed survivors, in resident around Semipalatinsk Nuclear Laboratory and in exposed people by Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station Accident. MDS/acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is thought to be caused by mutation of runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1) gene after a long time post exposure to relatively low dose radiation. In this study, participation of RUNX1/AML1 point mutations was examined in pathogenesis of the title neoplasms experienced in authors' facility. Subjects were 18/417 cases in whom myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) had switched to MDS or AML in the follow-up period of 1-25 years, and 11/124 cases in whom t-MN (therapy-related myeloid neoplasms) had developed during the remission of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) in the 1-9.7 years follow up. Point mutations were analyzed by PCR-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) followed by base sequencing. In the former cases above, RUNX1 point mutation was found in 5/18 cases and in the latter, 4/11. When patients with persistent decrease of blood cells post therapy of APL were followed up for mutation, their RUNX1 point mutation was detected before they were diagnosed to be morbid of MDS/AML. The point mutation was thus a biomarker of myelo-hematogenic cancer, and was thought useful for early diagnosis of MDS and AML. (T.T.)

  1. Choosing the Optimal Number of B-spline Control Points (Part 1: Methodology and Approximation of Curves)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmening, Corinna; Neuner, Hans

    2016-09-01

    Due to the establishment of terrestrial laser scanner, the analysis strategies in engineering geodesy change from pointwise approaches to areal ones. These areal analysis strategies are commonly built on the modelling of the acquired point clouds. Freeform curves and surfaces like B-spline curves/surfaces are one possible approach to obtain space continuous information. A variety of parameters determines the B-spline's appearance; the B-spline's complexity is mostly determined by the number of control points. Usually, this number of control points is chosen quite arbitrarily by intuitive trial-and-error-procedures. In this paper, the Akaike Information Criterion and the Bayesian Information Criterion are investigated with regard to a justified and reproducible choice of the optimal number of control points of B-spline curves. Additionally, we develop a method which is based on the structural risk minimization of the statistical learning theory. Unlike the Akaike and the Bayesian Information Criteria this method doesn't use the number of parameters as complexity measure of the approximating functions but their Vapnik-Chervonenkis-dimension. Furthermore, it is also valid for non-linear models. Thus, the three methods differ in their target function to be minimized and consequently in their definition of optimality. The present paper will be continued by a second paper dealing with the choice of the optimal number of control points of B-spline surfaces.

  2. Management of pain in patients with temporomandibular disorder (TMD: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil-Martínez A

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Alfonso Gil-Martínez,1–3 Alba Paris-Alemany,1–4 Ibai López-de-Uralde-Villanueva,1–3 Roy La Touche1–4 1Department of Physiotherapy, 2Motion in Brains Research Group, Instituto de Neurociencias y Ciencias del Movimiento, Centro Superior de Estudios Universitarios La Salle, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 3Hospital La Paz Institute for Health Research, IdiPAZ, 4Institute of Neuroscience and Craniofacial Pain (INDCRAN, Madrid, Spain Abstract: Thanks to advances in neuroscience, biopsychosocial models for diagnostics and treatment (including physical, psychological, and pharmacological therapies currently have more clinical support and scientific growth. At present, a conservative treatment approach prevails over surgery, given it is less aggressive and usually results in satisfactory clinical outcomes in mild–moderate temporomandibular disorder (TMD. The aim of this review is to evaluate the recent evidence, identify challenges, and propose solutions from a clinical point of view for patients with craniofacial pain and TMD. The treatment we propose is structured in a multimodal approach based on a biobehavioral approach that includes medical, physiotherapeutic, psychological, and dental treatments. We also propose a new biobehavioral model regarding pain perception and motor behavior for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with painful TMD. Keywords: biobehavioral, review, temporomandibular disorders, biobehavioral orofacial pain, multimodal approach, motor behavior, disability

  3. Analyzing Menton Deviation in Posteroanterior Cephalogram in Early Detection of Temporomandibular Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trelia Boel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Some clinicians believed that mandibular deviation leads to facial asymmetry and it also had a correlation with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs. Posteroanterior (PA cephalogram was widely reported as a regular record in treating facial asymmetry and craniofacial anomalies. The objective of this study was to analyze the relationship of menton deviation in PA cephalogram with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs symptoms. Materials and Methods. TMJ function was initially screened based on TMD-DI questionnaire. PA cephalogram of volunteer subjects with TMDs (n=37 and without TMDs (n=33 with mean age of 21.61±2.08 years was taken. The menton deviation was measured by the distance (mm from menton point to midsagittal reference (MSR horizontally, using software digitized measurement, and categorized as asymmetric if the value is greater than 3 mm. The prevalence and difference of menton deviation in both groups were evaluated by unpaired t-test. Result. The prevalence of symmetry group showed that 65.9% had no TMDs with mean of 1,815 ± 0,71 mm; in contrast, the prevalence of asymmetry group showed that 95.5% reported TMDs with mean of 3,159 ± 1,053 mm. There was a significant difference of menton deviation to TMDs (p=0.000 in subjects with and without TMDs. Conclusion. There was a significant relationship of menton deviation in PA cephalogram with TMDs based on TMD-DI index.

  4. In search of income reference points for SLCA using a country level sustainability benchmark (part 2): fair minimum wage. A contribution to the Oiconomy project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croes, Pim R.; Vermeulen, Walter J. V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper is part 2 of our twin articles on income reference points for social life cycle assessment (SLCA). The purpose of this article is to provide a well-founded fair minimum wage standard, which enables the determination of the preventative costs for the impact category of unfair

  5. Analysis of Chronic Temporomandibular Disorders Based on the Latest Diagnostic Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svechtarov V.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to analyze the distribution of the most common diagnoses observed in patients with chronic temporomandibular disorders, based on the new diagnostic criteria (DC/TMD adopted in 2014. The previous Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC/TMD adopted in 1992, consisted of three main groups of eight diagnostic subgroups and is currently transformed into two main groups and twelve subgroups, respectively. All subgroups correspond to the nomenclature of the ICD-10. The new clinical diagnostic indices are also modified. The analysis showed a prevalence of Pain-Related TMD compared with that of intra-articular disorders in ratio 57.89% to 42.10%. In Pain-Related TMD arthralgia was represented in 55% of cases; local myalgia - in 12%, myofascial pain - in 18%, myofascial pain with referral - in 14%, headache attributed to TMD - in 1%. In Intra-articular TMD disc displacement with reduction was found in 23% of the cases, disc displacement with reduction with intermittent locking - in 3%, disc displacement without reduction with limited opening - in 25%, disc displacement without reduction and without limited opening - in 8%. Degenerative diseases were found in 14.28%, and hypermobility and subluxations - in 26.98%. These analyzes differ and can only partly be compared with previous analyzes based on RDC system. The changes in the diagnostic criteria require new clinical studies in order to refine the picture of temporomandibular pathology in accordance with the modern views on the matter.

  6. Sensory innervation of the temporomandibular joint in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreessen, D; Halata, Z; Strasmann, T

    1990-01-01

    The sensory innervation of the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) of 8 STR/IN mice was investigated by means of light and electron microscopy. Through the cutting of complete semithin sections in series it was possible to investigate the joints thoroughly. Additionally, one joint with its nerve supply was reconstructed three-dimensionally with a computerized three-dimensional programme. The reconstruction was based on one complete semithin section series. The joint's nerve supply originates from the nervus auriculotemporalis and additionally from motor branches of the n. mandibularis: n. massetericus, n. pterygoideus lateralis and the nn. temporales posteriores. The greatest number of nerve fibres and endings is located in the dorsolateral part of the joint capsule. They lie only in the stratum fibrosum and subsynovially. Neither the stratum synoviale nor the discus articularis contain any nerve fibres or endings, whereas the peri-articular loose connective tissue is richly innervated. The only type of nerve ending observed within the joint was the free nerve ending, which is assumed to serve not only as a nociceptor but also as a polymodal mechanoreceptor. Merely within the insertion of the musculus pterygoideus lateralis at the collum mandibulae single stretch receptors of the Ruffini type were observed. Ultrastructurally, they correspond to those described in the cat's knee joint. Neither lamellated nor nerve endings of the Golgi or Pacini type were observed in the joint or in the peri-articular connective tissue. The unexpected paucity of nerve fibres and endings in the TMJ itself of the mouse suggests that the afferent information from the joint is less important for position sense and movement than the afferent information from muscles, tendons and periodontal ligaments.

  7. Feasibility Study for Using a Linear Transverse Flux Machine as part of the Structure of Point Absorber Wave Energy Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilana Pereira da Costa Cunha

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This is a feasibility study for the generation of wave energy by means of a transverse flux machine connected to a device for converting wave energy known as Point Absorber. The article contains literature review on the topic and analysis of data obtained by means of a prototype built in the laboratory. Based on the results, the study concludes that this use is feasible.

  8. Orofacial pain, jaw function, and temporomandibular disorders in adult women with a history of juvenile chronic arthritis or persistent juvenile chronic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakke, M.; Zak, M.; Jensen, B.L.

    2001-01-01

    Orofacial pain, jaw function, temporomandibular disorders, adult women persistent juvenil chronic arthritis......Orofacial pain, jaw function, temporomandibular disorders, adult women persistent juvenil chronic arthritis...

  9. Expanding the taxonomy of the diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peck, C.C.; Goulet, J-P; Lobbezoo, F.; Schiffman, E.L.; Alstergren, P.; Anderson, G.C.; De Leeuw, R.; Jensen, R.; Michelotti, A.; Ohrbach, R.; Petersson, A.; List, T.

    2014-01-01

    There is a need to expand the current temporomandibular disorders' (TMDs) classification to include less common but clinically important disorders. The immediate aim was to develop a consensus-based classification system and associated diagnostic criteria that have clinical and research utility for

  10. Diagnostic accuracy of temporomandibular disorder pain tests: a multicenter study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, C.M.; Naeije, M.; de Laat, A.; Michelotti, A.; Nilner, M.; Craane, B.; Ekberg, E.; Farella, M.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2009-01-01

    AIMS: To estimate the diagnostic accuracy of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) clinical examination and of the dynamic/static tests for the recognition of TMD pain. Since the diagnosis of TMD pain is especially complicated in persistent orofacial pain

  11. [Clinical application of artificial condylar process for reconstructing temporomandibular joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiangdao; Shao, Zhanying; Wang, Fasheng; Duan, Yi

    2012-01-01

    To assess the feasibility and clinical outcomes of artificial condylar process in reconstruction of the temporomandibular joint. Between January 2005 and January 2010, the reconstructions of the temporomandibular joints with artificial condylar process were performed in 10 cases (11 sides, including 7 left sides and 4 right sides). There were 7 males and 3 females with an average age of 50 years (range, 40-68 years). Mandibular condyle defects were caused by mandible tumor in 7 patients with a mean disease duration of 15 months (range, 9-24 months) and by bilateral condylar fractures in 3 patients with the disease duration of 2, 3, and 2 days respectively. According to Neff classification, there were type M and A in 1 case, type M and B in 1 case, and type M in one side and subcondylar fracture in the other side in 1 case. Incisions in all patients healed by first intention, and no complication occurred. All cases were followed up 1 to 4 years, showed facial symmetry and good occluding relation, and the mouth opening was 22-38 mm (mean, 30 mm). No temporomandibular joint clicking or pain and no recurrence of tumor were observed. Most of the artificial condylar process were in good position except 1 deviated from the correct angle slightly. All the patients could have diet normally. The results of temporomandibular joint reconstruction after tumor resection with artificial condylar process are good, but the clinical outcome for intracapsular condylar fracture is expected to be further verified.

  12. Expanding the taxonomy of the diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peck, C C; Goulet, J-P; Lobbezoo, F

    2014-01-01

    There is a need to expand the current temporomandibular disorders' (TMDs) classification to include less common but clinically important disorders. The immediate aim was to develop a consensus-based classification system and associated diagnostic criteria that have clinical and research utility f...

  13. Fibromyalgia syndrome and temporomandibular disorders with muscular pain. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Fernández, Ana Maria; Jiménez-Castellanos, Emilio; Iglesias-Linares, Alejandro; Bueso-Madrid, Débora; Fernández-Rodríguez, Ana; de Miguel, Manuel

    2017-03-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) refer to a group of clinical picture affecting the masticatory muscles and temporomandibular joint that are characterized by muscular or joint pain, dysfunction (limited or altered functions) and joint noises, as well as other associated symptoms, such as tension headaches, otalgia, dizziness, tinnitus, and others. Fibromyalgia (FM) is a syndrome of unknown etiology involving generalized chronic pain accompanied, in a high percentage of cases, by other symptoms such as asthenia, anxiety, depression, sleep disturbances, and other less frequent symptoms, such as temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Data were compiled by two experienced examiners following a specific form. An electronic search was carried out in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PUBMED, and SCOPUS electronic databases (up to April 2016, unrestricted by date or language). Comparative clinical studies with patients with both clinical pictures involving the study of pathogenic processes. Fibromyalgia and temporomandibular disorders with muscle pain both have profiles that affect the muscular system and therefore share many epidemiological, clinical, and physiopathological symptoms. Because of this, we are led to think that there is, if not a common etiology, at least a common pathogenesis. This article revises the physiopathological processes of both clinical pictures in an attempt to determine their similarities and likenesses. This would undoubtedly help in providing a better therapeutic approach.

  14. The relationship between temporomandibular dysfunction and head and cervical posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheus, Ricardo Alves; Ramos-Perez, Flávia Maria de Moraes; Menezes, Alynne Vieira; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Haiter-Neto, Francisco; Bóscolo, Frab Norberto; de Almeida, Solange Maria

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the possibility of any correlation between disc displacement and parameters used for evaluation of skull positioning in relation to the cervical spine: craniocervical angle, suboccipital space between C0-C1, cervical curvature and position of the hyoid bone in individuals with and without symptoms of temporomandibular dysfunction. The patients were evaluated following the guidelines set forth by RDC/TMD. Evaluation was performed by magnetic resonance imaging for establishment of disc positioning in the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) of 30 volunteer patients without temporomandibular dysfunction symptoms and 30 patients with symptoms. Evaluation of skull positioning in relation to the cervical spine was performed on lateral cephalograms achieved with the individual in natural head position. Data were submitted to statistical analysis by Fisher's exact test at 5% significance level. To measure the degree of reproducibility/agreements between surveys, the kappa (K) statistics was used. Significant differences were observed between C0-C1 measurement for both symptomatic (p=0.04) and asymptomatic (p=0.02). No statistical differences were observed regarding craniocervical angle, C1-C2 and hyoid bone position in relation to the TMJs with and without disc displacement. Although statistically significant difference was found in the C0-C1 space, no association between these and internal temporomandibular joint disorder can be considered. Based on the results observed in this study, no direct relationship could be determined between the presence of disc displacement and the variables assessed.

  15. The relationship between forward head posture and temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W Y; Okeson, J P; Lindroth, J

    1995-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between forward head posture and temporomandibular disorder symptoms. Thirty-three temporomandibular disorder patients with predominant complaints of masticatory muscle pain were compared with an age- and gender-matched control group. Head position was measured from photographs taken with a plumb line drawn from the ceiling to the lateral malleolus of the ankle and with a horizontal plane that was perpendicular to the plumb line and that passed through the spinous process of the seventh cervical vertebra. The distances from the plumb line to the ear, to the seventh vertebra, and to the shoulder were measured. Two angles were also measured: (1) ear-seventh cervical vertebra-horizontal plane and (2) eye-ear-seventh cervical vertebra. The only measurement that revealed a statistically significant difference was angle ear-seventh cervical vertebra-horizontal plane. This angle was smaller in the patients with temporomandibular disorders than in the control subjects. In other words, when evaluating the ear position with respect to the seventh cervical vertebra, the head was positioned more forward in the group with temporomandibular disorders than in the control group (P < .05).

  16. Temporomandibular Joint Disorders – A Few Interesting Experiences to Share

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Chattopadhyay

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint disorders rarely present in a very direct way. Often, the complaints are far away from the joint itself, making the diagnosis difficult. But a high index of suspicion and a good clinical idea often clinches the diagnosis in many cases of otalgia with apparently no definitive finding.

  17. The relationship between temporomandibular dysfunction and head and cervical posture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Alves Matheus

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the possibility of any correlation between disc displacement and parameters used for evaluation of skull positioning in relation to the cervical spine: craniocervical angle, suboccipital space between C0-C1, cervical curvature and position of the hyoid bone in individuals with and without symptoms of temporomandibular dysfunction. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The patients were evaluated following the guidelines set forth by RDC/TMD. Evaluation was performed by magnetic resonance imaging for establishment of disc positioning in the temporomandibular joints (TMJs of 30 volunteer patients without temporomandibular dysfunction symptoms and 30 patients with symptoms. Evaluation of skull positioning in relation to the cervical spine was performed on lateral cephalograms achieved with the individual in natural head position. Data were submitted to statistical analysis by Fisher's exact test at 5% significance level. To measure the degree of reproducibility/agreements between surveys, the kappa (K statistics was used. RESULTS: Significant differences were observed between C0-C1 measurement for both symptomatic (p=0.04 and asymptomatic (p=0.02. No statistical differences were observed regarding craniocervical angle, C1-C2 and hyoid bone position in relation to the TMJs with and without disc displacement. Although statistically significant difference was found in the C0-C1 space, no association between these and internal temporomandibular joint disorder can be considered. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the results observed in this study, no direct relationship could be determined between the presence of disc displacement and the variables assessed.

  18. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease: an integrative literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taysa Vannoska de Almeida Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Temporomandibular joint dysfunction is a set of disorders involving the masticatory muscles, temporomandibular joint and associated structures. It is known that the progression of motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease is an indication that these people are more prone to the development of this dysfunction. Thus, this study aims to investigate the signs and symptoms of temporomandibular dysfunction in people with Parkinson's disease. The search was performed in the databases: MEDLINE/ PubMed, LILACs, CINAHL, SCOPUS, Web of Science and PEDro, without timing or language restriction. Specific descriptors were used for each database and keywords, evaluated by the instruments: Critical Appraisal Skill Program and Agency for Health care and Research and Quality. A total of 4,209 articles were found but only 5 were included. After critical analysis of the methodology of the articles, one did not reach the minimum score required by the evaluation instruments, thus, it was excluded. The selected articles addressed, as signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint dysfunction, the following: myofascial pain, bruxism, limitation of mouth opening, dislocation of the articular disc and asymmetry in the distribution of occlusal contacts. Further studies are needed in order to determine the relationship between cause and effect of the analyzed variables, so as to contribute to more specific and effective therapeutic interventions.

  19. Multidisciplinary treatment in a patient with temporomandibular disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alexandre Camara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult patients with a multitude of problems require seamless integration of interdisciplinary protocols. This article presents a case of an adult female who reported with temporomandibular disorders, a crossbite and a Class III skeletal pattern. An interdisciplinary approach using expansion and surgery was used to treat the condition, followed by an esthetic/restorative protocol, achieving excellent results.

  20. Case-Based Learning for Orofacial Pain and Temporomandibular Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Glenn T.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    The use of interactive computer-based simulation of cases of chronic orofacial pain and temporomandibular joint disfunction patients for clinical dental education is described. Its application as a voluntary study aid in a third-year dental course is evaluated for effectiveness and for time factors in case completion. (MSE)

  1. Voice-supported Electronic Health Record for Temporomandibular Joint Disorders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hippmann, R.; Dostálová, T.; Zvárová, Jana; Nagy, Miroslav; Seydlová, M.; Hanzlíček, Petr; Kříž, P.; Šmídl, L.; Trmal, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 2 (2010), s. 168-172 ISSN 0026-1270 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : electronic health record * structured data entry * dentistry * temporomandibular joint disorder Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science Impact factor: 1.472, year: 2010

  2. Temporomandibular joint arthrography: normal anatomy and technique of examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duvoisin, B.; Schnyder, P.; Klaus, E.; Jacques, B.

    1990-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction is common. This entity is most often consecutive to internal derangements of the TMJ, which are not recognizable on plain films and tomograms. TMJ arthrography has proved a valuable tool in diagnosing these abnormalities. The technique of examination and normal arthrographic anatomy are reviewed. (author) [pt

  3. Vortex sound in bass-reflex ports of loudspeakers : part II. a method to estimate the point of separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozen, N.B.; Bockholts, M.; van Eck, P.; Hirschberg, A.

    1998-01-01

    In part I of this paper, the vortex shedding that may occur in a bass-reflex port of a loudspeaker system was discussed. At the Helmholtz frequency of the bass-reflex port, air is pumped in and out at rather high velocities, vortex shedding occurs at the end of the port, and blowing sounds are

  4. Headache Exacerbates Pain Characteristics in Temporomandibular Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Yuri Martins; Alves da Costa, Dayse Regina; de Lima Ferreira, Ana Paula; Porporatti, André Luís; Svensson, Peter; Rodrigues Conti, Paulo César; Bonjardim, Leonardo Rigoldi

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of headache in adults with masticatory myofascial pain (MMP) on the outcome variables clinical pain (ie, self-reported pain intensity and pressure pain sensitivity), sleep quality, and pain catastrophizing. A total of 97 patients with MMP were diagnosed with co-existing headache (MMPH group, n = 50) or without headache (MMP group, n = 47) according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD). The outcome parameters were the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI); the Catastrophizing Thoughts subscale of the Pain-Related Self-Statement Scale (PRSS-C); pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) of the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles; and self-reported facial pain intensity measured on a 0- to 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS). Student t test for independent samples (α = 1.2%) and factorial analysis of variance (ANOVA) (α = 5%) were used to analyze the data. The MMPH group showed significantly impaired sleep quality (mean ± standard deviation [SD] PSQI score 9.1 ± 3.5) compared with the MMP group (7.2 ± 3.4; P = .008). Subscale scores on the PRSS-C were significantly higher in the MMPH (2.1 ± 1.2) than in the MMP group (1.6 ± 1.4, uncorrected P = .048). Also, the PPTs (kgf/cm²) of the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles were significantly lower in the MMPH group (1.52 ± 0.53; 1.29 ± 0.43, respectively) than in the MMP group (2.09 ± 0.73; 1.70 ± 0.68, respectively; P headache patients had lower PPTs in the anterior temporalis muscle (P = .041) in comparison with non-headache patients. Co-existence of headache further exacerbates clinical characteristics in patients with painful TMD, which implies involvement of common mechanisms and pathways of vulnerability in these patients.

  5. An epidemiological study of temporomandibular joint ankylosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vinay Kumar; Mehrotra, Divya; Malhotra, Seema; Kumar, Sandeep; Agarwal, Girdhar Gopal; Pal, Uma Shanker

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) forms the very cornerstone of craniofacial integrity and its ankylosis in a growing child may cause problems in daily food intake, speech, appearance, and oral hygiene is affected to a major extent. It is one of the common acquired pathologies afflicting the skeleton. It is also the most overlooked and under-managed problem in children. Materials and Methods: A house to house survey was conducted between 2010 and 2011 in rural and urban areas of Lucknow. A total of 21,720 children aged between 3-15 years from 9090 houses comprising a representative sample were included. Results: Ten TMJ ankylosis cases were identified in 21,720 children. Of these, six were bilateral and four were unilateral. Male to female ratio was 1:9, with most patients (70.0%) being in the 10-15 years’ age group (mean age was 11.1 years ± 3.34). The most common cause of ankylosis was trauma for 90.0% of cases. The majority of patients (70%) were reporting the condition for the first time, with 30% patients having had previous treatment. Conclusion: TMJ ankylosis is an acquired condition in most of the cases. Birth/childhood trauma would be the major causative factor. Knowledge amongst parents, providers of health about this entity was poor. Initial management of the causative factor was poor. Mere knowledge among the general population and healthcare providers can result in primary prevention and also secondary prevention along with its successful definitive treatment. PMID:23251054

  6. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction in various rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.J. Aceves-Avila

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular disorder (TMD is an inclusive term in which those conditions disturbing the masticatory function are embraced. It has been estimated that 33% of the population have signs of TMD, but less than 5% of the population will require treatment. The objective of this study was to measure the frequency of TMD in rheumatoid arthritis (RA, osteoarthrosis (OA, ankylosing spondylitis (AS and systemic lupus erythematosus, and to define the limitations in everyday’s life that patients perceive when present. A six-month survey of consecutive outpatients in a rheumatology clinic in a teaching hospital in Mexico was carried out. We defined TMD as: 1 the presence of pain; 2 difficulty on mouth opening, chewing or speaking; 3 the presence of non-harmonic movements of the temporomaxilar joints. All three characteristics had to be present. Z test was used to define differences between proportions. We present the results of 171 patients. Overall, 50 patients had TMD according to our operational definition (29.24%. Up to 76% of the sample had symptoms associated with the condition. TMD is more frequent in OA and in AS (29.24% vs 38% OA, P=0.009; 39% AS; P=0.005. We found no association between the severity of TMD and the request for specific attention for the discomfort produced by the condition. Only 8 of 50 (16% patients with TMD had requested medical help for their symptoms, and they were not the most severe cases. TMD is more frequent in RA and OA. Although it may produce severe impairment, patients seem to adapt easily.

  7. Using City Branding as the Part of the Intersection Point of Modernization and Tradition. Case Study: Surakarta City (Solo, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nursanty Eko

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available To recognize a city is part of a city branding effort. By recognizing the dwelling, the city's inhabitants are able to create a spatial space in accordance with their easily recognizable cultural identity. In city branding, the memory of a city space is often the main ingredient in strengthening the identity. The efforts to use place making forces at this time are often used to solve the failures in multi-cultural spaces. Evolution in history is part of dynamic space planning as part of the identity of a city.The purpose of this research is to reveal the relationship between the formation of tradition spaces that are able to function in a modern way. The pattern of this relationship will produce spatial planning patterns with special characters as well. Humans as space users play a very big role as a space builder, where the decisions they make are often based on the tradition they have used for generations.The methods used in this study are qualitative, deductive using the theories that have been there before. Field research is used as empirical data in the form of interviews, photographs and field observations was conducted in various existing city spaces in Solo with the purpose to discover the existence of distinctive spatial patterns based on the typical behavior that has been passed down continuously as a result of the cultural process. The resulting discovery is a significant pattern of relationships between humans and their decision-making abilities in city space. This decision is based on self-awareness as part of the space they occupy. In a group, this awareness is part of the tradition's heritage that continues to develop in accordance with the human intellectual development.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging-based temporomandibular joint space evaluation in temporomandibular disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nah, Kyung Soo [Pusan National Univ. College of Dentistry, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    Disc and condylar position were observed on MRIs of temporomandibular joint disorder patients and condylar position agreement between MRI and tranascranal radiography was evaluated. MRI and transcranial radiographs of both TM joints from 67 patients with temporomandibular disorder were used. On MRI, the position and shape of disc and condylar position as anterior, middle, posterior was evaluated at medial, center, and lateral views. On transcranial radiographs, condylar position was evaluated using the shortest distance from condyle to fossa in anterior, superior, and posterior directions. 1. On MRI, 96 joints (71.6%) of 134 had anterior disc dispalcement with reduction and 38 joints (28.4%) without reduction. 2. Fourteen (14.6%) of 96 reducible joints showed anterior condylar position. 19 (19.8%) showed central position, 63 joints (65.6%) showed posterior position. Two joints (5.3%) of 38 non-reducible joints showed anterior condylar position, while 9 (23.7%) showed central position, and 27 (71.1%)-posterior position. 3. In 85 joints (63.4%) of 134, the transcranial condylar position agreed with that of the central MRI view, 10 joints (7.5%) with that of medial, 16 joints (11.6%) with that of lateral, and 23 joints (17.2%) disagreed with that of MRI. On MRI, most of the reducible and non-reducible joints showed posterior condylar position. Transcranial radiographs taken with machine designed for TMJ had better agreement of condylar position with that of MRI. Extremely narrow joint spaces or very posterior condylar positions observed on transcranial radiographs had a little more than fifty percent agreement with those of MRIs.

  9. Prevalence of the different Axis I clinical subtypes in a sample of patients with orofacial pain and temporomandibular disorders in the Andalusian Healthcare Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Aguilera, Antonio; Blanco-Aguilera, Elena; Serrano-del-Rosal, Rafael; Biedma-Velázquez, Lourdes; Rodríguez-Torronteras, Alejandro; Segura-Saint-Gerons, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Background The main objective of this paper is to analyze the prevalence of each of the different clinical subtypes of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in a sample of patients with this pathology. In addition, a second objective was to analyze their distribution according to gender. Material and Methods To this end, the results of 1603 patients who went to the Unit of Temporomandibular Disorders in the Córdoba Healthcare District because they suffered from this pathology were analyzed. In order to diagnose them, the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) were applied, analyzing the different Axis I subtypes (myopathy, discopathy and arthropathy) and obtaining the combined Axis I for each patient and the relation of all these variables according to gender. The null-hypothesis test confirmed the lack of connection between the gender variable and the different subtypes in the clinical analysis, and between the former and the combined Axis I of the RDC/TMD. Results The prevalence was high for the muscle disorders subtype in general, showing an 88.7% prevalence, while the presence of discopathies or arthropathies was much lower. Among discopathies, the most frequent ones were disc displacements with reduction, with 39.7% and 42.8% for the left and right temporomandibular joints (TMJ), respectively, while the prevalence of arthropathies was 26.3% for the right TMJ and 32.9% for the left TMJ. The bivariate analysis on the connection with gender reveals a p≥ 0.05 value for the muscle and arthralgia subtypes. Conclusions The patients seen at the TMD Unit where mostly middle-aged women whose main clinical axis subtype was the muscle disorder subtype. For their part, both discopathies and arthropathies, although present, are much less prevalent. Key words:RDCTMD, axis I, orofacial pain, temporomandibular disorders, gender. PMID:26615508

  10. Do bruxism and temporomandibular disorders have a cause-and-effect relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobbezoo, F; Lavigne, G J

    1997-01-01

    Controversy continues to exist over the putative role of bruxism in the etiology of temporomandibular disorders. A commonly held concept is that bruxism leads to signs and symptoms characteristic of one or more of the subdiagnoses of temporomandibular disorders, while another hypothesis suggests that bruxism is a temporomandibular disorder itself that sometimes coexists with other forms of temporomandibular disorders. Following a thorough review of the literature in this article, it is concluded that the relationship between bruxism and temporomandibular disorders is still unclear. Future research should examine longitudinal epidemiologic and clinical/experimental data to establish or refute a cause-and-effect relationship. In doing so, the existence of various sub-groups of temporomandibular disorders should be taken into account, and sleep-related bruxism should be discriminated from its daytime variant.

  11. Disfunções temporomandibulares: sinais, sintomas e abordagem multidisciplinar Temporomandibular Disorders: signs, symptoms and multidisciplinary approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Del Cistia Donnarumma

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: verificar perfil, queixa e principais sinais e sintomas de uma amostra de pacientes com disfunção temporomandibular que estiveram ou estão em tratamento ortodôntico e observar a ocorrência de atendimentos multidisciplinares. MÉTODOS: foram coletados dados de 125 prontuários em uma clínica odontológica da cidade de Sorocaba e os itens analisados nos prontuários foram: sexo, idade, profissão, queixa, três principais sinais e sintomas dos pacientes e se houve encaminhamento para avaliação fonoaudiológica, fisioterápica e psicológica. RESULTADOS: predominância feminina, sendo 107 mulheres (85,6% e 18 homens (14,4%. Média de idade de 35 anos, sendo a menor idade 14 anos e a maior 74 anos. Relação da disfunção temporomandibular com as profissões: 43 (34,4% eram profissionais com vínculo empregatício. Queixa trazida pelo paciente: dor na região da articulação temporomandibular e masseter: 86 - (68,8%. Três principais sinais e sintomas observados na avaliação ortodôntica: dor na região da articulação temporomandibular e masseter: 98 - 78,4%; estalos unilaterais: 55 - 44% e travamento: 23 - 18,4%. Conduta de encaminhamentos: fonoaudiologia 59 (47,2%; fisioterapia 40 (32% e psicologia 53 (42,4%. CONCLUSÃO: na amostra pesquisada, a prevalência de casos de disfunção temporomandibular foi maior no sexo feminino, com queixa de dor. Os principais sinais e sintomas foram: dor, estalo unilateral e travamento e houve encaminhamento para atendimentos multidisciplinares nas áreas de Fonoaudiologia, Fisioterapia e Psicologia.PURPOSE: to check the main signs and symptoms of a sample of patients with temporomandibular dysfunction that were or are under orthodontic treatment and observe if there was a possible multidisciplinary treatment. METHODS: data from 125 medical records collected in a orthodontic clinic located in Sorocaba and the analyzed items were: gender, age, profession, complains, three main signs and

  12. In search of income reference points for SLCA using a country level sustainability benchmark (part 2): fair minimum wage. A contribution to the Oiconomy project

    OpenAIRE

    Croes, Pim R.; Vermeulen, Walter J. V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper is part 2 of our twin articles on income reference points for social life cycle assessment (SLCA). The purpose of this article is to provide a well-founded fair minimum wage standard, which enables the determination of the preventative costs for the impact category of unfair prices for labour in preventative costs-based SLCA. Methods: A five-step procedure was followed, comprising of (1) definition of the impact category and characterization factor, (2) a literature survey...

  13. Does playing a musical instrument impose a risk for temporomandibular disorders? A review of literature: Stellt das Spielen eines Instruments ein Risiko für kraniomandibuläre Dysfunktionen dar? Eine Übersichtsarbeit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Selms, M.K.A.; Attallah, M.M.; Visscher, C.M.; Ahlberg, J.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2015-01-01

    Playing a musical instrument that loads the masticatory system, such as the violin or oboe, has been suggested to be part of the group of etiological factors for temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). In 2014, a review of literature was published that explicitly focused on the possible association

  14. Modified mandibular splint therapy for disc displacement with reduction of the temporomandibular joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Hui Wu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Occlusal splints are a standard method to treat disc displacement with reduction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ. They can be classified into three major groups on the basis of function: stabilization splints, distraction splints (pivot, and anterior repositioning splints. The aim of this paper is to introduce a modified mandibular splint, the Kaohsuing Medical University splint, and its associated treatment regimen for management of disc displacement with reduction of the TMJ. The key points for fabrication of the KMU splint include the occlusal surface of the mandibular splint must be indented and average bite elevation 1.5 mm vertically. The patient should wear it 24 hours a day for the first 4 weeks, then wear it while eating and sleeping for the next 2 weeks, and wear it only while sleeping for the last 2 weeks. Patients must understand that the success of treatment depends on their compliance with the regimen.

  15. Temporomandibular Joint Idiopathic Condylar Resorptions – A CBCT based case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper Dahl; Schmidt, Bjarke Hjalting; Stoustrup, Peter Bangsgaard

    Aim: To describe condylar deformation in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in subjects with idiopathic condylar resorptions (ICR) and compare these changes to a healthy control group. Materials and method: CBCT scans were analyzed using anatomical points on the skull to create a reference line....... Subsequently, anatomical structures were identified on the mandible to measure the condylar axial angle, the condylar neck angle as well as the condylar width, length, and height in 25 patients with ICR and 25 controls (50 joints in each group). Secondly, cross sections of the TMJs were evaluated for deformity...... %), cavitation defect (22 %), and flattering (22 %). In the control group condylar flattening was seen in 2 %. More than 70 % of the joints with deformity changes evaluated in the sagittal and the coronal plane respectively showed deformity changes along the entire condylar surface. Conclusion: The results...

  16. Application of an oral health-related quality of life questionnaire in primary care patients with orofacial pain and temporomandibular disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Aguilera, Antonio; Biedma-Velázquez, Lourdes; Serrano-del-Rosal, Rafael; González-López, Laura; Blanco-Aguilera, Elena; Segura-Saint-Gerons, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To examine whether patients who report orofacial pain (OP) and temporomandibular disorders (TMD) have a poorer perception of their oral health-related quality of life and, if so, to what extent, and to analyze the association between oral health perception, sociodemographic variables and reported pain duration. Study Design: 407 patients treated at the OP and TMD units in the Healthcare District of Cordoba, Spain, diagnosed following the standard criteria accepted by the scientific community – the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) – were administered the Spanish version of the Oral Health Impact Profile questionnaire (OHIP-14). Bivariate and logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the degree of association between the patients’ OHIP-14 score and pain duration, pain intensity, and various sociodemographic variables. Results: The observed distribution was 89.4% women and 10.6% men. The mean OHIP-14 score was 20.57 ± 10.73 (mean ± standard deviation). A significant association (ppain grade, self-perceived oral health status and pain duration. Conclusions: The analysis of self-perceived oral health status in patients with OP and TMD, as measured by the OHIP-14, showed that oral health is perceived more negatively by women. Moreover, a one-point increase in the Chronic Pain Grade indicator increases the OHIP-14 indicator by 4.6 points, while chronic pain, defined as pain suffered by patients for one year or more, increases the OHIP-14 indicator by 3.2 points. Key words:Orofacial pain, temporomandibular disorders, Oral Health Impact Profile, sociodemographic variables, primary care, Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD). PMID:24121906

  17. The effect of the vertical part of the path on the real time Feynman rules in finite temperature field theory 2-point functions and vacuum diagrams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelis, F.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of the contribution of the vertical part of the real time path is studied completely in the case of two points functions and vacuum diagrams. Indeed, this vertical part generally contributes in the calculation of a given graph. Moreover, this contribution is essential in order to have a consistent equilibrium theory: thanks to this contribution, the Green functions are effectively invariant by time translation, as they should be. As a by product, it is shown that the perturbative calculations give a result which does not depend on the initial time t I and final time t F of the path. The property of independence with respect to t I is closely related to the KMS conditions, i.e. to the fact the system is in thermal equilibrium. In the case of two point functions and vacuum diagrams, the contribution of the vertical part can be taken into account by the n(vertical stroke k 0 vertical stroke) prescription in the usual RTF Feynman rules. The extra Feynman rule needed for vacuum diagrams is shown not to be related directly to the contribution of the vertical part of the path. (orig.). With 4 figs

  18. Functional profile of patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction under physiotherapy treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrezza Pinheiro Bezerra de Menezes Kinote

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the functional profile of patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJD receiving physical therapy. Methods: A cross-sectional study carried with 21 patients receiving physiotherapy care during the year of 2007 at the Center for Integrated Medical Care (Núcleo de Atenção Médica Integrada - NAMI, in Fortaleza-CE, Brazil. Those were submitted to anamnesis (age, presence of pain, affected sites and parafunctional habits and functional assessment (presence of trigger points, movement amplitude and postural evaluation. Results: The age varied from 16 to 56 years, with an average of 31.3 ± 14.85 and female gender was the most affected with 17 (81.0% patients. Of the assessed patients, 13 (61.9% presented pain of moderate intensity, with an average of 5.4 ± 0.50. The most common sites of pain were the temporomandibular joint (TMJ, reported by 15 (71.4%,and cervical region, reported by 13 (61.9% patients. We found that 13 (61.9% assessed patients reported clenching as parafunctional habit. Significant limitation of mouth opening and movements of the cervical region were observed when compared to normal values (p <0.05. The most painful muscles on palpation were upper trapezius (n=19, medial pterygoid (n=15 and the masseter (n=15. The TMJ presented strong pain (degree 3 on palpation in 3 (14.3% patients. In postural assessment, 10 (47.6% had cervical hyperlordosis, 7 (33% had forward head posture and 7 (33% had raised shoulders. Conclusion: Patients with TMJD receiving physical therapy present limitations in TMJ and cervical movement, pain, presence of trigger points and postural changes at a more compromised and symptomatic stage of this dysfunction. In view of this, it becomes necessary to provide early evaluation and treatment with physical therapy.

  19. Functional profile of patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction under physiotherapy treatment -

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrezza Pinheiro Bezerra de Menezes Kinote

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the functional profile of patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJD receiving physical therapy. Methods: A cross-sectional study carried with 21 patients receiving physiotherapy care during the year of 2007 at the Center for Integrated Medical Care (Núcleo de Atenção Médica Integrada - NAMI, in Fortaleza-CE, Brazil. Those were submitted to anamnesis (age, presence of pain, affected sites and parafunctional habits and functional assessment (presence of trigger points, movement amplitude and postural evaluation. Results: The age varied from 16 to 56 years, with an average of 31.3 ± 14.85 and female gender was the most affected with 17 (81.0% patients. Of the assessed patients, 13 (61.9% presented pain of moderate intensity, with an average of 5.4 ± 0.50. The most common sites of pain were the temporomandibular joint (TMJ, reported by 15 (71.4%, and cervical region, reported by 13 (61.9% patients. We found that 13 (61.9% assessed patients reported clenching as parafunctional habit. Significant limitation of mouth opening and movements of the cervical region were observed when compared to normal values (p <0.05. The most painful muscles on palpation were upper trapezius (n=19, medial pterygoid (n=15 and the masseter (n=15. The TMJ presented strong pain (degree 3 on palpation in 3 (14.3% patients. In postural assessment, 10 (47.6% had cervical hyperlordosis, 7 (33% had forward head posture and 7 (33% had raised shoulders. Conclusion: Patients with TMJD receiving physical therapy present limitations in TMJ and cervical movement, pain, presence of trigger points and postural changes at a more compromised and symptomatic stage of this dysfunction. In view of this, it becomes necessary to provide early evaluation and treatment with physical therapy.

  20. Social representations and information security of children and adolescents: the point of view of teachers (Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bovina I.B.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The focus of attention of the authors is the consideration of information security of children and adolescents as the object of social representations. Discusses the need for the theory of social representations to develop prophylactic and preventive programs in the field of information security of children and adolescents, in particular, says that the effectiveness of prevention and preventive programs is determined by how this information is understood by the target group, through what filters it passes. Briefly outlines the main provisions of the theory of social representations, discusses the functions of social representations, the mechanism of action ideas. Analyzed in a few studies, the focus of which was the presentation on new technologies, particularly mobile phones and the Internet. Presents the results of a series of studies devoted to the study of information security of children and adolescents, including the results of the first part of a research project dedicated to the analysis of how parents and teachers understand information security and what strategies to protect children and adolescents from dangerous information they are ready to use.

  1. Headache children with temporomandibular disorders have several types of pain and other symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljeström, M-R; Le Bell, Y; Anttila, P; Aromaa, M; Jämsä, T; Metsähonkala, L; Helenius, H; Viander, S; Jäppilä, E; Alanen, P; Sillanpää, M

    2005-11-01

    The aim was to investigate the association between temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and overall muscle tenderness, depressive symptoms, sleep difficulties, headache frequency and related symptoms in children with primary headache in comparison with controls. Based on an unselected population sample of 1135 Finnish schoolchildren classified according to the type of headache at age 12, altogether 297 children aged 13-14 from different headache groups and healthy controls were randomly selected for an interview and clinical examinations. Children with migraine had more TMD signs than children with nonmigrainous headaches or healthy controls. High TMD total scores were associated with palpation tenderness in other parts of the body and with frequent headache attacks. We conclude that children with overall headache, migraine in particular, and high total TMD scores showed an increased overall tenderness to muscle palpation and multiply manifested hypersensitivity pain.

  2. Reemplazo articular temporomandibular debido a queratoquiste odontogénico Temporomandibular joint replacement because of odontogenic keratocyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Angel Peñón Vivas

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Existen disímiles condiciones que hacen necesario el reemplazo articular temporomandibular; dentro de las más frecuentes se encuentran la anquilosis, la osteoatrosis, estadíos avanzados del Síndrome de disfunción temporomandibular, daño articular postrauma y procesos neoplásicos o tumorales. Los queratoquistes odontógenos que se agrupan para su estudio dentro de los quistes odontogénicos del desarrollo, representan cerca del 7 al 10 por ciento de todos los quistes maxilo-mandibulares. Se dice que tienen dos picos de incidencia entre la segunda y tercera década de vida y entre los 50 y 60 años de edad, con una ligera predilección por el sexo masculino. Aparece más frecuentemente en la región del tercer molar de la mandíbula con extensión a la rama ascendente El presente trabajo tuvo como objetivo mostrar el caso de un paciente masculino de 57 años de edad en el que fue necesario el reemplazo articular temporomandibular debido a un queratoquiste odontogénico que involucraba la totalidad de la rama mandibular derecha, incluyendo el proceso condíleo y coronoideo, así como el ángulo hasta el tercio posterior del cuerpo mandibular. Tras un año de realizada la intervención quirúrgica la evolución del paciente fue satisfactoria.Temporomandibular joint replacement is required in a variety of conditions. Among the most frequent are ankylosis, osteoarthrosis, advanced stages of the temporomandibular dysfunction syndrome, post-traumatic joint damage, and neoplastic or tumoral processes. Odontogenic keratocysts, which are classified as developmental odontogenic cysts for study purposes, constitute 7-10 per cent of all maxillomandibular cysts. Two peaks have been identified in their incidence: between the second and third decades of life, and between 50 and 60 years of age, with a slight predominance of the male sex. They are most common in the third molar area of the mandibule, with expansion to the ascending branch. A case is

  3. Oral splint for temporomandibular joint disorders with revolutionary fluid system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Srivastava

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint (TMJ diseases and disorders refer to a complex and poorly understood set of conditions, manifested by pain in the area of the jaw and associated muscles and limitations in the ability to make the normal movements of speech, facial expression, eating, chewing, and swallowing. The conventional soft occlusal splint therapy is a much safer and effective mode of a conservative line of therapy in comparison to the surgical therapy for temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD. The purpose of this article is to review the Aqualizer TM , an hydrostatic oral splint, as accurate, effective treatment and differential diagnostic tool in TMD that allow treating the patient′s pain quickly and accurately saving valuable treatment time. The review article has been prepared doing a literature review from the world-wide web and pubmed/medline.

  4. VESTIBULAR SCHWANNOMA (ACOUSTIC NEUROMA) MIMICKING TEMPOROMANDIBULAR DISORDERS: A CASE REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisi, Maurício A.; Selaimen, Caio M. P.; Chaves, Karen D.; Bisi, Melissa C.; Grossi, Márcio L.

    2006-01-01

    Approximately 6 to 16% of patients with trigeminal neuralgia symptoms present intracranial tumors, the most common being the vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma). Some symptoms reported by patients include hearing loss, tinnitus, headaches, vertigo and trigeminal disturbances. An increased muscle response in the surrounding head and neck musculature may also be observed, which mimics signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders. In these cases, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proved to be a useful tool in tumor diagnosis. The differential diagnosis between myofascial and neuralgic pain is important, as both may present similar characteristics, while being of different origin, and demanding special treatment approaches. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the relationship among trigeminal neuralgia symptoms, intracranial tumors and temporomandibular dysfunction by presenting a clinical case. PMID:19089251

  5. Psychoneuroimmunological disorders and temporomandibular joint pain: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjani Shetty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychoneuroimmunology characterizes a disease entity that combines psychological components, central nervous system regulation, and immunology, to explain the etiological complexity of a disease. Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs include a heterogeneous group of painful conditions that involve the temporomandibular joint (TMJ, muscles of mastication, and the adjacent anatomic structures. This review focuses on the psychoneuroimmunological diseases and disorders that mimic the symptoms of TMDs. The differentiation of these disorders is of great significance to the oral physician - differentiating and diagnosing the cause of TMJ pain and treating it effectively to benefit the patient.The literature for this review was taken from Medline/PubMed, other indexed journals, standard text books, and online material.

  6. Parapharyngeal space tumors: another consideration for otalgia and temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosskopf, Courtney C; Kuperstein, Arthur S; O'Malley, Bert W; Sollecito, Thomas P

    2013-05-01

    Parapharyngeal space (PPS) tumors are rare, accounting for 0.5% of all head and neck neoplasms. PPS tumors are difficult to diagnose due to limited presenting signs and symptoms and because of their location deep within the neck. A 60-year-old woman presented with complaints of otalgia, which appeared to be consistent with a temporomandibular disorder (TMD). Due to disproportionate symptoms, an MRI of the temporomandibular joints was ordered. The MRI revealed a mass within the PPS, which was later diagnosed as a mucoepidermoid carcinoma. A literature search failed to reveal otalgia, and facial pain, thought to be related to a TMD, as the primary presenting symptoms of a PPS neoplasm. Patients presenting with disproportionate signs and symptoms of a TMD should be evaluated with advanced imaging to rule out occult pathology. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Patients' Priorities and Attitudes Towards Their Temporo-Mandibular Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, Martin; Ray-Chaudhuri, Arijit; Khawaja, Noman

    2015-08-01

    The diagnosis and appropriate management of temporo-mandibular disorders (TMDs) remains controversial. Current scientific evidence highlights the importance of psychosocial factors in sufferers and the reducing emphasis on occlusal or dental/prosthetic factors. This paper describes the findings of a survey of 211 patients reporting pain from their temporo-mandibular joint area and associated structures. This article offers busy primary dental care practitioners a cost effective questionnaire for obtaining relevant information from patients about the history of their condition and highlights what patients hope to achieve through the management of their disorder. It also emphasises the importance of communicating effectively with patients and offers practical tips for the management of TMDs in primary care.

  8. Statistical approaches to orofacial pain and temporomandibular disorders research

    CERN Document Server

    Manfredini, Daniele; Nardini, Luca Guarda; Carrozzo, Eleonora; Salmaso, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the biostatistical methods utilized to interpret and analyze dental research in the areas of orofacial pain and temporomandibular disorders. It will guide practitioners in these fields who would like to interpret research findings or find examples on the design of clinical investigations. After an introduction dealing with the basic issues, the central sections of the textbook are dedicated to the different types of investigations in sight of specific goals researchers may have. The final section contains more elaborate statistical concepts for expert professionals. The field of orofacial pain and temporomandibular disorders is emerging as one of the most critical areas of clinical research in dentistry. Due to the complexity of clinical pictures, the multifactorial etiology, and the importance of psychosocial factors in all aspects of the TMD practice, clinicians often find it hard to appraise their modus operandi, and researchers must constantly increase their knowledge in epidemiology and ...

  9. Prolotherapy: A new hope for temporomandibular joint pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Vijay Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common cause of orofacial pain is the Temporomandibular Joint Disorder (TMD, a collective term used to describe a group of medical disorders causing temporomandibular joint (TMJ pain and dysfunction. As the causes of TMD are varied and run the gamut from mechanical issues, such as disc degeneration and dislocation or erosion of the fibrocartilaginous surfaces of the condyle, fossa, and articular eminence, the treatment approaches for the chronic TMJ case are also quite varied. As surgery is considered a last resort for TMD, it is common for sufferers to seek out alternatives and one of the alternative treatments is ′Prolotherapy,′ which is also known as Regenerative Injection Therapy. This article provides an overview of this new alternative therapy.

  10. Temporomandibular joint - normal features and disc displacements: magnetic resonance imaging; Articulacao temporomandibular - aspectos normais e deslocamentos de disco: imagem por ressonancia magnetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Ana Carolina Araujo; Sarmento, Viviane Almeida; Campos, Paulo Sergio Flores; Gonzalez, Maria Olivia Dias [Bahia Univ., Salvador, BA (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia]. E-mail: ana_carolinaramos@hotmail.com

    2004-12-01

    Disc displacement of the temporomandibular joint has been defined as an abnormal relationship between the articular disc and the mandibular condyle, fossa and articular eminence. Disc displacements may occur without immediate interference in the function of the joint. Magnetic resonance imaging shows high diagnostic accuracy in the determination of articular disc position and has been indicated as the diagnostic method of choice for soft tissue abnormalities of the temporomandibular joint. The aim of this study is to review the literature including the normal features and different types of disc displacement of the temporomandibular joint as well as the imaging findings, emphasizing the role of magnetic resonance imaging. (author)

  11. Temporomandibular Disorders and Headache: A Retrospective Analysis of 1198 Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Di Paolo, Carlo; D'Urso, Anna; Papi, Piero; Di Sabato, Francesco; Rosella, Daniele; Pompa, Giorgio; Polimeni, Antonella

    2017-01-01

    Aim. Headache is one of the most common diseases associated with Temporomandibular Disorders (TMDs). The aim of this study was to evaluate, retrospectively, if headache influences TMD’s symptoms. Material and Methods. A total sample of 1198 consecutive TMD patients was selected. After a neurological examination, a diagnosis of headache, according to the latest edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, was performed in 625 subjects. Patients were divided into two group...

  12. A study of the temporomandibular joint during bruxism

    OpenAIRE

    Commisso Cuñarro, María Soledad; Martínez Reina, Francisco Javier; Mayo Nuñez, Juana María

    2014-01-01

    A finite element model of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and the human mandible was fabricated to study the effect of abnormal loading, such as awake and asleep bruxism, on the articular disc. A quasilinear viscoelastic model was used to simulate the behaviour of the disc. The viscoelastic nature of this tissue is shown to be an important factor when sustained (awake bruxism) or cyclic loading (sleep bruxism) is simulated. From the comparison of the two types of bruxism, it was seen that s...

  13. Temporomandibular joint space in children without joint disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larheim, T.A.

    1981-01-01

    Bilateral assessment of the temporomandibular joint space in children without joint disease is reported. Twenty-eight children were examined with conventional radiography and 23 with tomography. High prevalence of asymmetric joint spaces with both techniques indicated that great care should be taken when using narrowing or widening of the joint space as a diagnostic criterion in children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Other signs, such as restricted translation of the mandibular head, and clinical symptoms should be evaluated. (Auth.)

  14. MRI of the temporomandibular joint in patients with rheumatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okochi, Kiyoshi; Ida, Mizue; Ohbayashi, Naoto

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the MRI findings of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in patients with rheumatic disease. The characteristic MRI findings of the TMJs in rheumatic patients were considered the obscurity of temporal posterior attachment (TPA) visualization and the presence of osseous changes of the condyle. As for the osseous changes, nearly 50% of the condyles had erosive changes and 20% showed severe bone destruction. (author)

  15. Craniocervical posture analysis in patients with temporomandibular disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Iunes,DH; Carvalho,LCF; Oliveira,AS; Bevilaqua-Grossi,D

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare head positioning and cervical spine alignment between individuals with and without temporomandibular disorders (TMDs), by means of positional evaluation using photographs, radiographs and visual observation, and to investigate whether the type of TMD influences head posture and cervical spine positioning. METHODS: Ninety randomly chosen women were diagnosed using the research diagnostic criteria for TMDs (RDC/TMD) by a trained examiner and were divided into three groups:...

  16. Temporomandibular Myofacial Pain Treated with Botulinum Toxin Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niv Mor

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the diagnoses and treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMD and outlines of the role of botulinum toxin (BoNT in the treatment of myofacial TMD. This manuscript includes a brief history of the use of BoNT in the treatment of pain, the mechanism of action of BoNT, and the techniques for injections, adverse effects and contraindications when using BoNT to treat mayofacial pain caused by TMD.

  17. Long-standing temporomandibular joint dislocation: A rare experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil Malik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-standing temporomandibular joint (TMJ dislocations persist for more than a month are most challenging to treat. The management of such condition varies widely, from closed reduction to complicated surgical procedures. The choice of an appropriate methodology is questionable. At present, there are no standard rules or conventions for the ideal strategy in different circumstances. This paper attempts to present the experience of managing two cases of long-standing TMJ dislocations.

  18. Applications of multiple change point detections to monthly streamflow and rainfall in Xijiang River in southern China, part II: trend and mean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongqin David; Jiang, Jianmin; Zhu, Yuxiang; Huang, Changxing; Zhang, Qiang

    2018-05-01

    This article, as part II, illustrates applications of other two algorithms, i.e., the scanning F test of change points in trend and the scanning t test of change points in mean, to both series of the normalized streamflow index (NSI) at Makou section in the Xijiang River and the normalized precipitation index (NPI) over the watershed of Xijiang River. The results from these two tests show mainly positive coherency of changes between the NSI and NPI. However, some minor negative coherency patches may expose somewhat impacts of human activities, but they were often associated with nearly normal climate periods. These suggest that the runoff still depends upon well the precipitation in the Xijiang catchment. The anthropogenic disturbances have not yet reached up to violating natural relationship on the whole in this river.

  19. Functional disorders of the temporomandibular joints: Internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Ling; Wang, Ding-Han; Yang, Mu-Chen; Hsu, Wun-Eng; Hsu, Ming-Lun

    2018-04-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is one of the most complex joints of the human body. Due to its unique movement, in terms of combination of rotation and translator movement, disc of the joint plays an important role to maintain its normal function. In order to sustain the normal function of the TMJ, disc must be kept in proper position as well as maintain normal shape in all circumstances. Once the disc is not any more in its normal position during function of the joint, disturbance of the joint can be occurred which will lead to subsequent distortion of the disc. Shape of the disc can be influenced by many factors i.e.: abnormal function or composition of the disc itself. Etiology of the internal derangement of the disc remains controversial. Multifactorial theory has been postulated in most of previous manuscripts. Disc is composed of mainly extracellular matrix. Abnormal proportion of collagen type I & III may also leads to joint hypermobility which may be also a predisposing factor of this disorder. Thus it can be recognized as local manifestation of a systemic disorder. Different treatment modalities with from conservative treatment to surgical intervention distinct success rate have been reported. Recently treatment with extracellular matrix injection becomes more and more popular to strengthen the joint itself. Since multifactorial in character, the best solution of the treatment modalities should be aimed to resolve possible etiology from different aspects. Team work may be indication to reach satisfied results. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  20. Imaging diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). MR imaging of the disk of the temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Tsukasa; Yamamoto, Mika; Sakuma, Katsuya

    2001-01-01

    Since its introduction in the 1980s, magnetic resonance imaging has become the preferred method for diagnosing soft tissue abnormalities of temporomandibular joint (TMJ). MR imaging is non-invasive and more accurate than arthorography. In addition, it requires less operator skill and is well tolerated by patients. We are usually taking MR images of the TMJ with the fast spin echo technique that can simultaneously obtain both T2-weighted and proton density images. The purpose of this study was to determine the utility of T2-weighed and proton density images for diagnosing the disk status in TMJ, comparing the results with those obtained by T1-weighted images. We studied 104 TMJs in 52 patients with both T2-weighted and proton density images, and 80 TMJs in 40 patients with only T1-weighted images. The joints were evaluated by two oral radiologists who looked at three aspects of the joints-disk displacement, disk reduction and disk shape - giving ratings of good'' or ''fair'' in each category. Ratings of ''good'' were significant higher in all three categories in T2-weighted and proton density images than in T1-weighted images (p<0.01). Based on these results, we conclude that T2-weighted and proton density images taken with the fast spin echo technique are useful for diagnosing the disk status of the TMJ. (author)

  1. Psychological stress associated with aphthous ulcers and temporomandibular disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslam, A.; Hassan, S.H.; Khan, D.A.; Chaudhary, M.A.G.

    2017-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of stress as an etiological factor for aphthous ulcers and temporomandibular disorders. Study Design: Cross sectional descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Armed Forces Institute of Dentistry Rawalpindi, from Oct 2015 to May 2016. Material and Methods: Two groups of patients were selected. Group I included 119 patients presenting with Aphthous Ulcers while group II had 64 subjects with complaints of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). After a thorough history, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) was used to assess stress in the patients. AHADS-A score of 7 was taken as significant anxiety while a HADS-D score of 7 depicted significant depression. Both groups were then subjected to laboratory examinations. Serum cortisol levels were assessed for both groups while Serum Folate, Ferritin and Vitamin B12 level for group I only. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 21 to calculate descriptive statistics including mean and standard deviations as well as frequencies and percentages. Relationship between HADS score and serum cortisol levels was assessed using Pearson's correlation coefficient. A p-value<0.05 was considered significant. Results: For TMDs, 53 (82.8%) patients were found positive for stress while for aphthous ulcers, 61 (51.3%) were positive for stress. The correlation between HADS score and serum cortisol levels was found significant for both groups at a p=<0.001. Conclusions: Patients showed a high prevalence of stress as an etiological factor for aphthous ulcers and temporomandibular disorders in a local setting. (author)

  2. Traumatic injuries of the temporomandibular joint; Die traumatischen Kiefergelenkverletzungen

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    Puig, S.; Krestan, C.; Lomoschitz, F.; Robinson, S. [Vienna Univ. (Austria). Zentrales Inst. fuer Radiodiagnostik; Glaser, C. [Vienna Univ. (Austria). Klinik fuer Zahn-, Mund- und Kieferheilkunde; Staudenherz, A. [Vienna Univ. (Austria). Universitaetsklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2001-09-01

    Injuries of the temporomandibular joint are mostly due to injuries or fractures of the mandibular condyle. Fractures of the skull base involving the temporomandibular joint are rare. Classification of fractures refers to their anatomical positions and the presence or absence of a luxation. Further, it is important whether the fracture is intra- or extra-capsular. The primary imaging method should be orthopantomography. As for therapy planning, especially surgery, also evaluation of soft tissue is necessary, computed tomography is the imaging method of choice. For diagnosis of complications or internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint, magnetic resonance imaging is to be recommended. (orig.) [German] Die Verletzungen des Kiefergelenks gehen zumeist mit einer Verletzung oder Fraktur des Kieferkoepfchens bzw. des Kiefergelenkfortsatzes einher. Frakturen der Schaedelbasis unter Beteiligung der Kiefergelenkpfanne sind selten. Unterschieden werden die Frakturen des Gelenkfortsatzes nach anatomischer Lokalisation und danach, ob eine Luxation vorhanden ist oder nicht. Weiter ist von Bedeutung, ob der Frakturspalt intraoder extrakapsulaer verlaeuft. Die primaere Bildgebung sollte mittels Orthopantomographie erfolgen. Da fuer eine weitere operative Behandlung auch die etwaige Verletzung der Weichteile von Bedeutung ist, bietet sich die Computertomographie als bildgebende diagnostische Methode an. Zur Abklaerung von Komplikationen bzw. des so genannten ''internal derangement'' ist die Magnetresonanztomographie zu empfehlen. (orig.)

  3. Temporomandibular joint involvement as a positive clinical prognostic factor in necrotising external otitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeheskeli, E; Eta, R Abu; Gavriel, H; Kleid, S; Eviatar, E

    2016-05-01

    Necrotising otitis externa is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. This study investigated whether temporomandibular joint involvement had any prognostic effect on the course of necrotising otitis externa in patients who had undergone hyperbaric oxygen therapy after failed medical and sometimes surgical therapy. A retrospective case series was conducted of patients in whom antibiotic treatment and surgery had failed, who had been hospitalised for further treatment and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Twenty-three patients with necrotising otitis externa were identified. The temporomandibular joint was involved in four patients (17 per cent); these patients showed a constant gradual improvement in C-reactive protein and were eventually discharged free of disease, except one patient who was lost to follow up. Four patients (16 per cent) without temporomandibular joint involvement died within 90 days of discharge, while all patients with temporomandibular joint involvement were alive. Three patients (13 per cent) without temporomandibular joint involvement needed recurrent hospitalisation including further hyperbaric oxygen therapy; no patients with temporomandibular joint involvement required such treatment. Patients with temporomandibular joint involvement had lower rates of recurrent disease and no mortality. Therefore, we suggest considering temporomandibular joint involvement as a positive prognostic factor in necrotising otitis externa management.

  4. The cost-effectiveness of TheraBite® as treatment for acute myogenic temporomandibular disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heres Diddens, A.; Kraaijenga, S.; Coupe, V.; Hilgers, F.; van der Molen, L.; Smeele, L.; Retèl, V.P.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is a very common and costly pain problem concerning the temporomandibular joint. A previous study has shown that for the treatment of acute myogenic TMD, TheraBite® (TB) offers a faster and greater effect than usual care consisting of physical therapy

  5. Radiographic Study on the Bony Changes of Mandibular Condyle Head in Temporomandibular Disorder Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Moo Soon; You, Dong Soo

    1989-01-01

    The author has studied radiographic bony changes of mandibular condyle head in temporomandibular disorder patients using Oblique lateral transcranial projection, Orthopantomography, and Tomography. The bony change types and the frequencies of occurrence and the incidences of bony changes in three different radiographic techniques were examined. The coincidences of body change types between the Oblique lateral transcranial projection and the lateral part of Tomogram, the Orthopantomogram and the medial part of Tomogram were also examined. The results were as follows: 1. The mean age of patients was 31.7 years and under 40 years were 24 patients, women were 27 patients, men were 4 patients. 2. The observable cases of bony changes in all three radiographic techniques were 19 cases (50%) of 38 cases and the observable cases of bony changes in only Tomography were 5 cases (13.2%). 3. The most frequent radiographic bony change type was osteophyte and next orders were flattening, erosion, concavity. 4. The positional incidences of bony changes in Tomogram were 31 cases in lateral part and 27 cases in central part. 5. The coincidence of bony change types between the oblique lateral transcranial projection and the lateral part of Tomogram was 80%, and the coincidence between the Orthopantomogram and the medial part of Tomogram was 76.9%.

  6. Laser acupuncture therapy in patients with treatment-resistant temporomandibular disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Long Hu

    Full Text Available To investigate the clinical effects of laser acupuncture therapy for temporomandibular disorders (TMD after ineffective previous treatments.A retrospective observational study was conducted in 29 treatment-resistant TMD patients (25 women, 4 men; age range, 17-67 years. Subjects were treated 3 times per week for 4 weeks with the Handylaser Trion (GaAlAs laser diode, 810 nm, 150 mW, pulsed waves, which delivered 0.375 J of energy (5 s to ST7, ST6, and LI4 and 3 J (40 s to each Ashi point, 7.5-26.25 J/cm2 in total. The visual analog scale (VAS and maximal mouth opening (MMO were evaluated before and after treatment.VAS analysis showed that the patients were free of pain at rest (endpoint after 5.90±6.08 sessions of laser acupuncture for acute TMD and after 16.21±17.98 sessions for chronic TMD. The VAS score on palpation of the temporomandibular joint reduced to 0.30±0.67 for patients with acute TMD (p = 0.005 and to 0.47±0.84 for those with chronic TMD (p<0.001. The MMO significantly increased in patients with acute TMD (7.80±5.43 mm, p = 0.008 and in patients with chronic TMD (15.58±7.87 mm, p<0.001.Our study shows that laser acupuncture therapy improves the symptoms of treatment-resistant TMD. Further studies with a more appropriate design, involving long-term follow-up examinations in a larger patient sample, are needed to evaluate its efficacy.

  7. Assessment of Condylar Changes in Patients with Temporomandibular Joint Pain Using Digital Volumetric Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shetty, U.Sh.; Burde, K.N.; Naikmasur, V.G.; Sattur, A.P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the efficiency of DVT in comparison with OPG in the assessment of bony condylar changes in patients of TMJ pain. Methods. 100 temporomandibular joints of 62 patients with the complaint of temporomandibular joint pain were included in the study. DVT and OPG radiographs were taken for all the 100 joints. Three observers interpreted the DVT and OPG radiograph for the bony changes separately for two times with an interval of one week. The bony changes seen in the condyle were given coding from 0 to 6. (0: Normal, 1: Erosion, 2: Flattening, 3: Osteophyte, 4: Sclerosis, 5: Resorption, and 6: other changes). Interobserver and intra observer variability was assessed with one-way Anoka statistics. Z test was used to see the significant difference between OPG and DVT. Results. In the present study the inter examiner reliability for Og and DVT was 0.903 and 0.978, respectively. Intra examiner reliability for OPG and DVT was 0.908 and 0.980, respectively. The most common condylar bony change seen in OPG and DVT was erosion followed by flattening and osteophyte. There was significant difference between OPG and DVT in detecting erosion and osteophytes. The other changes observed in our study were Elys cyst, pointed condyle, and bifid condyle. All the bony changes are more commonly seen in females than males. Conclusion. DVT provides more valid and accurate information on condylar bony changes. The DVT has an added advantage of lesser radiation exposure to the patient and cost effectiveness and could be easily accessible in a dental hospital

  8. Patterns of Energy Imbalance of the Meridians in Patients with Temporomandibular Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasera Zotelli, Vera L; Grillo, Cássia M; Bressiani Gil, Maria L; Wada, Ronaldo S; Sato, Jorge E; de Sousa, Maria da Luz R

    2018-02-01

    Temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) is a set of changes that affects the muscles of mastication, temporomandibular joint, teeth, and associated periodontal and orofacial structures. According to Traditional Chinese Medicine, the imbalance of energy (Qi) circulating in the acupuncture meridians is always the primary etiologic cause of any physical manifestation. The aim of this study was to describe the patterns of Qi imbalance in patients with TMD by means of an objective measurement. The clinical study was conducted at the Piracicaba Dental School (FOP/Unicamp), in Piracicaba-SP, Brazil. We evaluated 40 adult volunteers with TMD. The Qi measurement was carried out by the researcher using the Ryodoraku method using 24 points representing the 12 acupuncture meridians: LU9 (Taiyuan), PC7 (Daling), HT7 (Shemen), SI5 (Yanggu), TE4 (Yangchi), LI5 (Yangxi), SP3 (Taibai), LR3 (Taichong), KI3 (Taixi), BL64 (Jinggu), GB40 (Qiuxu), and ST42 (Chongyang). The average total Qi of 40 volunteers (21.7 μA ± 1.5), was below the normal range (40-60 μA) and was classified as deficiency of Qi (empty). The coupled meridians that showed the highest Qi imbalance were the kidney (29.4 μA ± 2.8) and bladder (13.8 μA ± 1). The Qi planes with greatest imbalance were the Shao Yang and Shao Yin. In conclusion, volunteers with TMD presented a pattern of Qi deficiency, and the most prevalent imbalance patterns identified were in the kidney and bladder coupled meridians and in the energetic planes Shao Yin (heart/kidney) and Shao Yang (triple energizer/gall bladder). Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Patterns of Energy Imbalance of the Meridians in Patients with Temporomandibular Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera L. Rasera Zotelli

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD is a set of changes that affects the muscles of mastication, temporomandibular joint, teeth, and associated periodontal and orofacial structures. According to Traditional Chinese Medicine, the imbalance of energy (Qi circulating in the acupuncture meridians is always the primary etiologic cause of any physical manifestation. The aim of this study was to describe the patterns of Qi imbalance in patients with TMD by means of an objective measurement. The clinical study was conducted at the Piracicaba Dental School (FOP/Unicamp, in Piracicaba-SP, Brazil. We evaluated 40 adult volunteers with TMD. The Qi measurement was carried out by the researcher using the Ryodoraku method using 24 points representing the 12 acupuncture meridians: LU9 (Taiyuan, PC7 (Daling, HT7 (Shemen, SI5 (Yanggu, TE4 (Yangchi, LI5 (Yangxi, SP3 (Taibai, LR3 (Taichong, KI3 (Taixi, BL64 (Jinggu, GB40 (Qiuxu, and ST42 (Chongyang. The average total Qi of 40 volunteers (21.7 μA ± 1.5, was below the normal range (40–60 μA and was classified as deficiency of Qi (empty. The coupled meridians that showed the highest Qi imbalance were the kidney (29.4 μA ± 2.8 and bladder (13.8 μA ± 1. The Qi planes with greatest imbalance were the Shao Yang and Shao Yin. In conclusion, volunteers with TMD presented a pattern of Qi deficiency, and the most prevalent imbalance patterns identified were in the kidney and bladder coupled meridians and in the energetic planes Shao Yin (heart/kidney and Shao Yang (triple energizer/gall bladder.

  10. Assessment of Condylar Changes in Patients with Temporomandibular Joint Pain Using Digital Volumetric Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ujwala Shivarama Shetty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the efficiency of DVT in comparison with OPG in the assessment of bony condylar changes in patients of TMJ pain. Methods. 100 temporomandibular joints of 62 patients with the complaint of temporomandibular joint pain were included in the study. DVT and OPG radiographs were taken for all the 100 joints. Three observers interpreted the DVT and OPG radiograph for the bony changes separately for two times with an interval of one week. The bony changes seen in the condyle were given coding from 0 to 6. (0: Normal, 1: Erosion, 2: Flattening, 3: Osteophyte, 4: Sclerosis, 5: Resorption, and 6: other changes. Interobserver and intraobserver variability was assessed with one-way ANOVA statistics. Z test was used to see the significant difference between OPG and DVT. Results. In the present study the interexaminer reliability for OPG and DVT was 0.903 and 0.978, respectively. Intraexaminer reliability for OPG and DVT was 0.908 and 0.980, respectively. The most common condylar bony change seen in OPG and DVT was erosion followed by flattening and osteophyte. There was significant difference between OPG and DVT in detecting erosion and osteophytes. The other changes observed in our study were Ely’s cyst, pointed condyle, and bifid condyle. All the bony changes are more commonly seen in females than males. Conclusion. DVT provides more valid and accurate information on condylar bony changes. The DVT has an added advantage of lesser radiation exposure to the patient and cost effectiveness and could be easily accessible in a dental hospital.

  11. Distracción mandibular y articulación temporomandibular Mandibular distraction and the temporomandibular joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Monje Gil

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Los pacientes con deformidades craneofaciales requieren generalmente multiples y, a veces, complejos procedimientos quirurgicos para reconstruir tejidos blandos y duros alterados. Un avance importante en cirugía reconstructiva es el alargamiento de la mandibula por distracción que tiene la ventaja de una cirugía menos agresiva que determinados tipos de osteotomías. Con esta técnica una osteotomía bicortical se hace en distintas zonas de la mandibula colocandose el distractor hasta alcanzar los efectos deseados. Aunque las fuerzas aplicadas se han mostrado eficaces para alargar la mandíbula, sus efectos en segmentos proximales y distales, incluyendo la articulación temporomandibular no han sido analizados sistemáticamente. En este artículo se repasa trabajos experimentales y clínicos en los que se detalla la relación entre distracción mandibular y articulación temporomandibular.Abstract: Patients with severe craniofacial abnormalities often require multiple and complex surgical procedures to reconstruct maldeveloped hard and soft tissues of the maxillofacial complex. An important advance in reconstructive surgery is mandibular lengthening by gradual distraction, which takes advantage to be less agressive surgery than some osteotomies. With this technique, a bicortical osteotomy is made at the angle of the deficient mandible, and an expansion appliance is placed across the osteotomy line. Although the applied forces have been shown to lengthen the mandible effectively in the region of the application, their effects on the proximal and distal mandibular segments, including the temporomandibular joint region, have not been analyzed systematically. In this article, we study several experimental and clinical papers where it describes the relationship between mandibular distraction and temporomandibular joint.

  12. Temporomandibular disorders and bruxism in childhood and adolescence: review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Taís de Souza; Miyakoda, Luana Sayuri; Pocztaruk, Rafael de Liz; Rocha, Camila Pinhata; Gavião, Maria Beatriz Duarte

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this article was to review the literature about temporomandibular disorders and bruxism and their relationships in children and adolescents. The literature was searched using Medline, ISI, Cochrane Library, Scielo and the Internet, from March 1970 to the end of June 2007. The inclusion criteria were: they evaluated a possible association between TMD and bruxism, and they dealt with child and/or adolescent samples. Furthermore, interim reports, related Internet sites and chapters in textbooks were considered. From 64 records found, 30 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The prevalence of temporomandibular disorders in children and adolescent varies widely in the literature. Temporomandibular disorders are often defined on the basis of signs and symptoms, of which the most common are: temporomandibular joint sounds, impaired movement of the mandible, limitation in mouth opening, preauricular pain, facial pain, headaches and jaw tenderness on function, having mainly a mild character, fluctuation and progression to severe pain and dysfunction is rare. One of the possible causal factors suggested that temporomandibular disorders in children is a functional mandibular overload variable, mainly bruxism. Bruxism, defined as the habitual nonfunctional forceful contact between occlusal tooth surfaces, is involuntary, excessive grinding, clenching or rubbing of teeth during nonfunctional movements of the masticatory system. Its etiology is still controversial but the multifactorial cause has been attributed, including pathophysiologic, psychologic and morphologic factors. Moreover, in younger children, bruxism may be a consequence of the masticatory neuromuscular system immaturity. Complications include dental attrition, headaches, temporomandibular disorders and masticatory muscle soreness. Some studies have linked oral parafunctional habits to disturbances and diseases of the temporomandibular joint, mainly bruxism, suggesting its association with temporomandibular

  13. Comparative study between the effects of isolated manual therapy techniques and those associated with low level laser therapy on pain in patients with temporomandibular dysfunction

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    Juliana Cristina Frare

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study sought to evaluate the pain condition in patients with temporomandibular dysfunction after applying manual therapy techniques and those associated with this low level laser therapy. Methods: The study involved 20 patients with temporomandibular dysfunction, divided randomly into two groups: G1 (n = 10, formed by 7 women and 3 men, average age 28.2 years (± 7, treated with manual therapy techniques and G2 (n = 10, formed by 8 women and 2 men, with average age 24.01 (± 6.04, treated with the combination of manual therapy techniques and low level laser therapy. The patients were treated three times a week for four consecutive weeks. The memorandum of manual therapy techniques based on Chaintow,Makofsky and Bienfaint was used. For low level laser therapy GaAs laser (904 nm, 6 J/cm2, 0.38 mW/cm2 was used, applied at 4pre-auricular points. To analyze the pain level, the visual analog pain scale was used. For data analysis the Student’s-t and Wilcoxon tests were used, both with significance level of 5% (p <0.05.Results: There was significant reduction (p <0.05 in the level of pain in both groups treated, but in G2 the significance was higher.Conclusion: Manual therapy techniques, either alone or associated with low level laser therapy showed satisfactory results for pain control in patients with temporomandibular dysfunction.

  14. Change in the radiation dose at a point where an inhomogeneity partly covers the radiation field from a 60Co-γ-source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmrot, E.

    1976-04-01

    Measurements and calculations have been made in order to study the change of the radiation dose in a point when an inhomogeneity covers parts of the radiation field from a Co 60-source. An ionization chamber, placed in a water phantom, was used for the measurements. As inhomogeneity an air cavity was used. The measuring point was placed on the central axis of the radiation field during the measurement. The air cavity was moved in front of the measuring point 0.5 - 1 cm by steps laterally, i.e. along a line perpendicular to the radiation direction. Measurements were made at different depths behind the air cavity. The air cavity was placed at different distances from the front plate of the water phantom. Measurements and calculations show that the change of the radiation dose, when the edge of the air cavity passes the measuring point, varies with the depth distance to the air cavity. The greatest deviation is near the air cavity and at a great distance behind this. The change of the radiation dose is less than 2 percent at distances greater than 2 cm from the edge of the air cavity laterally. This change is independent of the depth distance to the air cavity. The maximum deviation 1 cm from the edge of the air cavity is 5 percent independent of the distance tothe air cavity. Used methods of calculation can be extended to be used for irregular inhomogeneities but this requires knowledge of the three-dimensional extension of the inhomogeneity. (M.S.)

  15. Single-needle temporomandibular joint arthrocentesis with hyaluronic acid injections. Preliminary data after a five-injection protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredini, D; Guarda-Nardini, L; Ferronato, G

    2009-10-01

    The classical technique for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthrocentesis provides a double access to the joint space, which may lead to patient's postoperatory discomfort. For this reason, a less invasive, single-needle approach has been recently described, and the present investigation reports findings on a case series of patients with TMJ osteoarthritis treated with hyaluronic acid injections following a single needle arthrocentesis. METHODS. Fourteen consecutive patients with a diagnosis of TMJ osteoarthritis according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporo-mandibular Disorders were treated with a cycle of five weekly injections of hyaluronic acid after arthrocentesis. A number of subjective (pain at rest and mastication, masticatory efficiency, functional limitation, subjective efficacy of treatment, tolerability of treatment) and objective (maximum assisted and unassited mouth opening, protrusive and laterotrusive movements) outcome variables were assessed before and after the treatment period. At the end of the five-injection protocol, significant improvements were showed in almost all the subjective outcome variables. Tolerability of the treatment was good on a four-point ordinal scale since the time of the first injection. The present investigation suggested that the single needle technique for TMJ hyaluronic injection following arthrocentesis in osteoarthritic joints may have promising applications in the clinical setting, which have to be confirmed with future studies.

  16. The arterial blood supply of the temporomandibular joint: an anatomical study and clinical implications

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    Cuccia, Antonino Marco; Caradonna, Carola; Caradonna, Domenico [Dept. of Surgical and Oncological Disciplines, University of Palermo, Palermo (Italy); Anastasi, Giuseppe; Milardi, Demetrio; Favaloro, Angelo; Caradonna, Luigi; Cutroneo, Giuseppina [Biomorphology and Biotechnologies, University of Messina, Messina (Italy); De Pietro, Anita; Angileri, Tommaso Maurizio [Villa Santa Teresa, Diagnostica per Immagini, Palermo (Italy)

    2013-03-15

    The aim of this study was to analyze three-dimensional images of the arterial supply to the temporomandibular joint. Ten patients (five men and five women, mean age 36 years) without signs or symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, who underwent contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) scanning with intravenous contrast, were studied. The direct volume rendering technique of CT images was used, and a data set of images to visualize the vasculature of the human temporomandibular joint in three dimensions was created. After elaboration of the data through post-processing, the arterial supply of the temporomandibular joint was studied. The analysis revealed the superficial temporal artery, the anterior tympanic artery, the deep temporal artery, the auricular posterior artery, the transverse facial artery, the middle meningeal artery, and the maxillary artery with their branches as the main arterial sources for the lateral and medial temporomandibular joint. The direct volume rendering technique was found to be successful in the assessment of the arterial supply to the temporomandibular joint. The superficial temporal artery and maxillary artery ran along the lateral and medial sides of the condylar neck, suggesting that these arteries are at increased risk during soft-tissue procedures such as an elective arthroplasty of the temporomandibular joint.

  17. The severity of temporomandibular joint disorder by teeth loss in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indry Herdiyani

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint dysfunction is a term that covers a number of clinical problems that involves masticatory muscles, temporomandibular joints, and related structures, or both. Loss of tooth was an etiology of temporomandibular joint dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to obtain the description of temporomandibular joint dysfunction level that caused by tooth loss of elderly in three nursing home Bandung. This was a descriptive study using the survey method of the elderly in three nursing home Bandung. A total of 34 people consist 6 males and 28 females. The subjects were examined by symptoms of temporomandibular joint dysfunction and the dysfunction level was assessed by Helkimo Clinical Dysfunction Index. The result of this study shows that elderly in Nursing Home Bandung have mild dysfunction level was 7 (14.71%, moderate dysfunction level was 22 (64.71%, and severe dysfunction level is 5 (20.58%. It can be concluded that loss of the teeth is one of the etiologies of temporomandibular joint disorder. Based on the research conducted, it can be concluded that all elderly with teeth loss will have the temporomandibular joint disorder and the most severity happens based on teeth loss by using the Helkimo Clinical Disfunction Index score was the moderate disorder.

  18. [Self-assembly tissue engineering fibrocartilage model of goat temporomandibular joint disc].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hong; Li, Zhen-Qiang; Bi, Yan-Da

    2011-06-01

    To construct self-assembly fibrocartilage model of goat temporomandibular joint disc and observe the biological characteristics of the self-assembled fibrocartilage constructs, further to provide a basis for tissue engineering of the temporomandibular joint disc and other fibrocartilage. Cells from temporomandibular joint discs of goats were harvested and cultured. 5.5 x 10(6) cells were seeded in each agarose well with diameter 5 mm x depth 10 mm, daily replace of medium, cultured for 2 weeks. One day after seeding, goat temporomandibular joint disc cells in agarose wells were gathered and began to self-assemble into a disc-shaped base, then gradually turned into a round shape. When cultured for 2 weeks, hematoxylin-eosin staining was conducted and observed that cells were round and wrapped around by the matrix. Positive Safranin-O/fast green staining for glycosaminoglycans was observed throughout the entire constructs, and picro-sirius red staining was examined and distribution of numerous type I collagen was found. Immunohistochemistry staining demonstrated brown yellow particles in cytoplasm and around extracellular matrix, which showed self-assembly construct can produce type I collagen as native temporomandibular joint disc tissue. Production of extracellular matrix in self-assembly construct as native temporomandibular joint disc tissue indicates that the use of agarose wells to construct engineered temporomandibular joint disc will be possible and practicable.

  19. Desordem Temporomandibular: relações entre sintomas otológicos e orofaciais Temporomandibular Disorder: relationship between otologic and orofacial symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Maria de Felício

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Os sintomas otológicos são freqüentes em pacientes com desordem temporomandibular, e estudos são necessários para elucidar os mecanismos envolvidos. OBJETIVO: O objetivo desse estudo clínico foi investigar a associação de sintomas otológicos (otalgia, zumbido e plenitude auricular com os achados audiológicos, os outros sinais/sintomas relacionados à desordem temporomandibular, e os hábitos parafuncionais orais. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Prospectivo clínico. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: 27 pacientes com desordem temporomandibular, da Clínica de Oclusão da Faculdade de Odontologia de Ribeirão Preto da Universidade de São Paulo, responderam um questionário sobre sinais, sintomas e hábitos orais, e passaram por avaliações otorrinolaringológica e audiológica. Os dados foram analisados pelos testes Binomial, Exato de Fisher e correlação produto-momento de Pearson. O índice de significância adotado foi pThe otologic symptoms are frequents in temporomandibular disorder patients, and studies are needed to elucidate the involved mechanisms. AIM: The objective of the present study was to investigate the association of otology symptoms (otalgia, tinnitus, ear fullness with otologic findings, the other temporomandibular disorder signs and symptoms, and parafunctional habits. STUDY DESIGN: Clinical prospective. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 27 temporomandibular patients from Occlusion Clinic of the Dental School of Ribeirão Preto – University of Sao Paulo, answered a questionnaire which included questions about signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder and parafunctional habits; they were submitted to otorhinolaryngological and audiologic examination. The data obtained were analyzed through Binomial Test, Exact Test of Fisher and Pearson Correlation, with p value < 0.05. RESULTS: Otologic symptoms were presented in 88.88% of the patients (59.26% presented otalgia, 74.07 tinnitus and 74.07% ear fullness. There was no significance between the

  20. Applications of multiscale change point detections to monthly stream flow and rainfall in Xijiang River in southern China, part I: correlation and variance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuxiang; Jiang, Jianmin; Huang, Changxing; Chen, Yongqin David; Zhang, Qiang

    2018-04-01

    This article, as part I, introduces three algorithms and applies them to both series of the monthly stream flow and rainfall in Xijiang River, southern China. The three algorithms include (1) normalization of probability distribution, (2) scanning U test for change points in correlation between two time series, and (3) scanning F-test for change points in variances. The normalization algorithm adopts the quantile method to normalize data from a non-normal into the normal probability distribution. The scanning U test and F-test have three common features: grafting the classical statistics onto the wavelet algorithm, adding corrections for independence into each statistic criteria at given confidence respectively, and being almost objective and automatic detection on multiscale time scales. In addition, the coherency analyses between two series are also carried out for changes in variance. The application results show that the changes of the monthly discharge are still controlled by natural precipitation variations in Xijiang's fluvial system. Human activities disturbed the ecological balance perhaps in certain content and in shorter spells but did not violate the natural relationships of correlation and variance changes so far.

  1. Prevalence of temporomandibular disorders in patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grozdinska, Alina; Hofmann, Elisabeth; Schmid, Matthias; Hirschfelder, Ursula

    2018-05-17

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), also known as Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT), is a degenerative inflammatory disease with high prevalence among women and has been associated with fibromyalgia and widespread chronic pain. The goal was to determine the frequency of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in patients with HT. In all, 119 women (age 19-60 years) were divided into a study (52 women diagnosed with HT) and a control (67 healthy individuals, of which 15 were excluded) group. Serum concentrations of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free triiodothyronine (fT3), free thyroxine (fT4), anti-thyroglobulin (Tg) and anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibody levels were measured. The temporomandibular jaw and muscles were examined using the German Society of Functional Diagnostics and Therapy guidelines. The Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) was used to assess TMD. Standardized questionnaires, incorporating epidemiological criteria, state and treatment of the thyroid disease, Helkimo Index (HI), and Fonseca Anamnestic Index (FAI), were filled out by all patients. The two groups did not differ in terms of demographic parameters or mandibular jaw mobility. Significantly higher levels of anti-TPO and anti-Tg were attested in all subjects of the HT group. Markedly elevated prevalence of TMD was found in the HT group. Muscle pain and stiffness were found in 45 (86.5%) subjects of the HT group (p < 0.001), of whom 33 (63.4%) also had disc displacement with reposition (p < 0.001). Whereas 50% of the control group showed no TMD symptoms, all subjects in the HT group had symptoms. A significantly elevated prevalence of TMD was found in patients with HT. Thus, patients with TMD who do not respond to therapy should be referred for thyroid diagnostic workup.

  2. Orotracheal intubation and temporomandibular disorder: a longitudinal controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Branco Battistella

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: To determine the incidence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder in elective surgery patients who underwent orotracheal intubation. METHODS: This was a longitudinal controlled study with two groups. The study group included patients who underwent orotracheal intubation and a control group. We used the American Academy of Orofacial Pain questionnaire to assess the temporomandibular disorder signs and symptoms one-day postoperatively (T1, and the patients' baseline status prior to surgery (T0 was also recorded. The same questionnaire was used after three months (T2. The mouth opening amplitude was measured at T1 and T2. We considered a pvalue of less than 0.05 to be significant. RESULTS: We included 71 patients, with 38 in the study group and 33 in the control. There was no significant difference between the groups in age (study group: 66.0 [52.5-72.0]; control group: 54.0 [47.0-68.0]; p = 0.117 or in their belonging to the female gender (study group: 57.9%; control group: 63.6%; p = 0.621. At T1, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups in the incidence of mouth opening limitation (study group: 23.7% vs. control group: 18.2%;p = 0.570 or in the mouth opening amplitude (study group: 45.0 [40.0-47.0] vs. control group: 46.0 [40.0-51.0];p = 0.278. At T2 we obtained similar findings. There was no significant difference in the affirmative response to all the individual questions in the American Academy of Orofacial Pain questionnaire. CONCLUSIONS: In our population, the incidence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder of muscular origin was not different between the groups.

  3. Auditory characteristics of individuals with temporomandibular dysfunctions and dentofacial deformities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiane Totta

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether there is any relationship between otological as well as vestibular symptoms, audiological findings and type of temporomandibular disorder (articular, muscular and mixed; and to check the distribution of the temporomandibular disorders (TMD dysfunction degree in the research population. METHODS: A retrospective study involving 30 patients of both sexes, aged between 18 and 49 years old, diagnosed with TMD and dentofacial deformities, who were subject to clinical evaluation (muscle palpation, auscultation of temporomandibular joint during mandibular motion and measurement of jaw movement, audiological testing (pure tone audiometry and immittance testing and two questionnaires, one on otological and vestibular symptoms and the other on TMD anamnesis. Based on both the anamnesis questionnaire and the clinical assessment, the subjects were divided according to the type and degree of TMD dysfunction (mild, moderate and severe, and compared regarding the occurrence of auditory signs and symptoms, vestibular symptoms and audiological findings according to TMD type. RESULTS: The anamnesis questionnaire demonstrated higher prevalence (83.33% of severe TMD. Subjects with mixed TMD had more complaints about hypoacusis than those with muscular TMD (p < 0.05. The results showed no change in either audiological and immittance testing for all assessed individuals. CONCLUSION: Otological symptoms are present in subjects with TMD and dentofacial deformities, regardless of the classification of TMD (articular, muscular or mixed. Those with mixed TMD may have higher incidence of complaints about hypoacusis than subjects with muscular TMD. Further studies are needed to investigate the relationship between otological symptoms and the different types of TMD.

  4. A clinical study of temporomandibular joint disorders by using arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prove the relationship between arthrographic and clinical features in temporomandibular joint disorders. In order to carry out this study, ninety-eight arthrographic examinations of temporomandibular joints were performed in eighty-two patients who had the temporomandibular joint disorders. As the arthrographic examination, the cases were classified in three groups, disk displacement with reduction, disk displacement without reduction, within normal limit. After this, the cases were clinically examined, and the results were compared and analyzed in each other group. The obtained results were as follows ; 1. As the classification by arthrographic examination, three groups (disc displacement with reduction, disc displacement without reduction, within normal limit) were 41%, 54%, 5% of total cases in this study, respectively. 2. The third decade (65%) was most frequent in this study. The average age of each group (disc displacement with reduction, disc displacement without reduction, within normal limit) was 24, 28, 21, and disc displacement without reduction group was higher than any other group. 3. In the chief complaint, pain was the most frequent in all three groups. Joint sound was also frequent in disc displacement with reduction group, but in disc displacement without reduction group, limitation of mouth opening was more frequent. 4. Of the various pain, the movement pain was most frequent (61%) in this study. In joint sound, click (63%) was the most frequent in disc displacement with reduction group, but sound history (42%) and no sound (31%) were more frequent in disc displacement without reduction group. 5. The average maximum opening of each group (disc displacement with reduction, disc displacement without reduction, within normal limit) was 44 mm, 32.9 mm, 44 mm, and disc displacement without reduction group was less than any other group. 6. The masticatory disturbance of each group (disc displacement with reduction, disc

  5. Temporomandibular joint articular cartilage structure and function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bont, Lambertus Gijsbertus Maria de

    1985-01-01

    One of the aims of this investigation is to obtain more insight in the pathogenesis of osteoarthrosis. The starting point for this investigation of the fibrocartilage of the mandibular condyle was the hypothesis of Freeman and Meachim (1979), which states that collagen network fragmentation

  6. A study of the temporomandibular joint during bruxism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commisso, María S; Martínez-Reina, Javier; Mayo, Juana

    2014-06-01

    A finite element model of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and the human mandible was fabricated to study the effect of abnormal loading, such as awake and asleep bruxism, on the articular disc. A quasilinear viscoelastic model was used to simulate the behaviour of the disc. The viscoelastic nature of this tissue is shown to be an important factor when sustained (awake bruxism) or cyclic loading (sleep bruxism) is simulated. From the comparison of the two types of bruxism, it was seen that sustained clenching is the most detrimental activity for the TMJ disc, producing an overload that could lead to severe damage of this tissue.

  7. Clinical assessment of patients with orofacial pain and temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Ilanit; Greenberg, Martin S

    2013-07-01

    Accurate diagnosis of chronic pain disorders of the mouth, jaws, and face is frequently complex. It is common for patients with chronic orofacial pain to consult multiple clinicians and receive ineffective treatment before a correct diagnosis is reached. This problem is a significant public health concern. Clinicians can minimize error by starting the diagnostic procedure with a careful, accurate history and thorough head and neck examination followed by a thoughtfully constructed differential diagnosis. The possibility that the patient has symptoms of a life-threatening underlying disease rather than a more common dental, sinus, or temporomandibular disorder must always be considered. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Artrosis en la articulación temporo-mandibular

    OpenAIRE

    Muñoz, Pablo Nicolás

    2017-01-01

    Se presenta un caso clínico de una paciente de 70 años que acusa dolor orofacialsimétrico y dolor local a nivel de la articulación temporo-mandibular (ATM) derecha. La exploración clínica muestra disminución del rango de movimiento articular, crepitación a la auscultación, y puntos gatillos miofascialesa nivel de la musculatura masticatoria. El estudio radiológico confirma artrosis en la ATM y se termina concluyendo que la sintomatología es provocada, principalmente, por el síndrome de dolor ...

  9. Temporo-mandibular joint disease in ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, C; Wojtulewski, J A; Bacon, P A; Winstock, D

    1975-01-01

    The occurrence of temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) disease in ankylosing spondylitis is not widely recognized and its incidence is disputed. Seventy-nine patients attending two routine rheumatology clinics were therefore examined by dental surgeon and nine (11-5 per cent) were considered to have specific TMJ involvement. These patients were older than the remainder, and had more extensive spinal and peripheral joint disease. Symptoms were mild and the predominant clinical feature was restricted mouth opening, which could present considerable difficulties during emergency anaesthesia. Bilateral condylectomy was undertaken in one patient with some benefit. Images PMID:1124959

  10. [Comparative evolution surgical accesses to temporo-mandibular joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sysoliatin, P G; Novikov, A I; Sysoliatin, S P; Bobylev, N G; Brega, I N

    2007-01-01

    In experiment on 30 corpses of adult people criteria of an operational wound (depth of a wound, a corner of operational action, an axis of operational action, a corner of an inclination of operational action) were studied at preauricularis, intrauricularis, intrauriculo-temporalis and posterior mandibullaris access to temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ). New surgical intrauriculo-temporalis access to the joint is substantrated. On the basis of the analysis of 289 operations at 268 patients the indications to a choice of surgical access were developed at various diseases and damages of TMJ.

  11. MR imaging of the juvenile temporomandibular joint before orthodontic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lieberman, J.M.; Hans, M.G.; Rozencweig, G.; Goldberg, J.S.; Bellon, E.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper determines the prevalence of internal derangement (ID) of the temporomandibular joint (TM) in a population of children prior to orthodontic therapy. Thirty-two children, aged 7-15 years, with a variety of orthodontic disorders underwent both MR imaging and physical examination to assess ID of the TMJ. With MR imaging, the disks were graded as normal, borderline anterior displaced, or anterior displaced. Fifty-nine TMJs in 32 patients were successfully imaged. Five TMJ MR examinations could not be interpreted because of patient motion. Fifty seven of the 59 joints (97%) were normal. One disk (1.7%) was anterior displaced, and one (1.7%) was considered borderline

  12. Electronic Health Record for Temporomandibular Joint Disorders – Support in Therapeutic Process

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hippmann, R.; Nagy, Miroslav; Dostálová, T.; Zvárová, Jana; Seydlová, M.; Feltlová, E.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2010), s. 27-32 ISSN 1801-5603 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : electronic health record * automatic speech recognition * dental cross * temporomandibular joint * temporomandibular joint disorders * structured data entry * dentistry * data model * text-to-speech system * Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science http://www.ejbi.org/en/ejbi/article/25-en- electronic - health - record -for-temporomandibular-joint-disorders-support-in-therapeutic-process.html

  13. Outcomes of office-based temporomandibular joint arthroscopy: a 5-year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossameldin, R H; McCain, J P

    2018-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthroscopy is a minimally invasive surgical approach for intra-articular TMJ diseases. Office-based arthroscopy using the smallest TMJ scope allows for good visualization, as well as the ability to lavage the joint in an office setting. This study aimed to assess the efficacy of an office-based TMJ arthroscopic technique. A retrospective evaluation of 363 patients with a TMJ disorder was performed. These patients underwent office-based arthroscopy using the OnPoint 1.2mm Scope System (Biomet Microfixation, Jacksonville, FL, USA) in Florida, USA, from July 2007. The following outcomes of the procedure were assessed: improvement in painless range of mandibular motion, pain on loading, and functional jaw pain; these were evaluated using a visual analog scale (VAS) over an average follow-up period of 263.81±142.1 days. The statistical analysis was performed using IBM SPSS Statistics version 20. Statistically significant improvements in TMJ pain and function, and other variables (P=0.001) were shown following TMJ arthroscopic lysis and lavage. Office-based arthroscopy using the OnPoint System was demonstrated to be a safe and efficient procedure for the treatment of patients with TMJ disorders as the first level of the algorithm of care. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Therapeutic exercises for the control of temporomandibular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto da Rocha Moraes

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Temporomandibular disorder (TMD is a multifactorial disease. For this reason, it is difficult to obtain an accurate and correct diagnosis. In this context, conservative treatments, including therapeutic exercises classified as stretching, relaxation, coordination, strengthening and endurance, are oftentimes prescribed. OBJECTIVE: Thus, the aim of the present article was to conduct a literature review concerning the types of exercises available and the efficacy for the treatment of muscular TMD. METHODS: The review included researches carried out between 2000 and 2010, indexed on Web of Science, PubMed, LILACS and BBO. Moreover, the following keywords were used: Exercise, physical therapy, facial pain, myofascial pain syndrome, and temporomandibular joint dysfunction syndrome. Studies that did not consider the subject "TMD and exercises", used post-surgery exercises and did not use validated criteria for the diagnosis of TMD (RDC/TMD were not included. RESULTS: The results comprised seven articles which proved therapeutic exercises to be effective for the treatment of muscular TMD. However, these studies are seen as limited, since therapeutic exercises were not applied alone, but in association with other conservative procedures. In addition, they present some drawbacks such as: Small samples, lack of control group and no detailed exercise description which should have included intensity, repetition, frequency and duration. CONCLUSION: Although therapeutic exercises are considered effective in the management of muscular TMD, the development of randomized clinical trials is necessary, since many existing studies are still based on the clinical experience of professionals.

  15. Posterior crossbite and temporomandibular disorders (TMDs): need for orthodontic treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thilander, Birgit; Bjerklin, Krister

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this work was to update the bibliography regarding the concept of 'temporomandibular disorder (TMD)' and 'posterior crossbite' and try to find out if there is any association between some special signs/symptoms of TMD and type of posterior crossbite. A literature search from 1970 to 2009, due to specified criterion, resulted in 14 publications that were found to be relevant for the present systematic review. An association between TMD and posterior crossbite (Yes-group) was reported as often as absence of such a relationship (No-group). The samples in the two groups showed similarities as well as differences with respect to number, gender, and age. Most articles reported only on 'presence' or 'absence' of crossbite and only few on type of crossbite opposite to a thorough account of clinical signs and symptoms of TMD. This review seems, however, to state that a functional posterior crossbite (mandibular guidance with midline deviation) is associated with headache, temporomandibular joint and muscular pain, and clicking. As evident from the discussion, such type needs orthodontic treatment to rehabilitate the asymmetric muscular activity between the crossbite and non-crossbite sides and the changed condyle/temporal relationship caused by mandibular deviation. Whether this treatment also will avoid future TMD problems can be answered only after clinical follow-up studies have been performed.

  16. Obesity as a risk factor for temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordani, P C; Campi, L B; Circeli, G Z; Visscher, C M; Bigal, M E; Gonçalves, D A G

    2017-01-01

    We conducted a clinical cross-sectional study to evaluate the association between obesity and the presence of painful temporomandibular disorders (TMD), controlling for age, gender, presence of migraine, depression, non-specific somatic symptoms and obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) in an adult population. A total of 299 individuals (76·6% women) with a mean age of 36·8 ± 12·8 years were evaluated. TMD were classified using the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD). Depression and non-specific somatic symptoms were scored by the Symptom Checklist-90, while pain and disability was rated by the Graded Chronic Pain Scale. Bioimpedanciometry (BIA) was used to assess obesity through total body fat percentage. Migraine was diagnosed according to the criteria of the International Classification of Headache Disorders-2 (ICHD-2). OSAS was classified according to the Berlin Questionnaire. We performed univariate and multivariate models, chi-square tests and odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). In the single regression analysis, TMD-pain was significantly associated with total body fat percentage (P = 0·01). In the multivariate analysis, migraine, age, non-specific somatic symptoms and OSAS showed to be stronger predictors of TMD-pain, and obesity did not retain in the regression model. The initial association found between obesity and TMD-pain is lost when it was corrected for gender, migraine, non-specific somatic symptoms and OSAS. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, José Gustavo Dala Déa; Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa Pedron; Navarro, Ricardo de Lima; Conti, Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira; Conti, Marcio Rodrigues de Almeida; Marchiori, Luciana Lozza de Moraes; Fernandes, Karen Barros Parron

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the prevalence of Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) in the elderly and its association with palpation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), masticatory and cervical muscles as well as the presence of headache and joint noises. The sample consisted of 200 elderly of both genders (mean age: 69.2±5.7 years). The clinical evaluation of TMD signs and symptoms was divided into three stages: an anamnestic questionnaire, a TMJ evaluation, and a muscular examination. The results were analyzed through descriptive statistics as well as using χ2 and the tendency tests. The presence of TMD was observed in 61% of the sample (mild: 43.5%, moderate: 13%, severe: 4.5%). A significantly greater prevalence of TMD was found for females (72.4%) compared with that for men (41.1%) (pheadaches and the presence of TMD (p=0.0001). The association between the presence of joint noises and sensitivity to TMJ palpation was not significant. The elderly presented high TMD prevalence, mostly in females, with mild severity and related to TMJ and masticatory/cervical muscles palpation. Thus, the accomplishment of a detailed clinical examination to investigate the presence of such disorders is essential and it must not be neglected during the treatment of elderly patients.

  18. The relationship of temporomandibular disorders with headaches: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkan, Nilüfer Cakir; Ozkan, Fatih

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to retrospectively analyze the incidence of the concurrent existence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and headaches. Forty patients (36 female, 4 male, mean age: 29.9±9.6 years) clinically diagnosed with TMD were screened. Patient records were analyzed regarding: range of mouth opening, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) noises, pain on palpation of the TMJ and masticatory muscles and neck and upper back muscles, and magnetic resonance imaging of the TMJ. According to patient records, a total of 40 (66.6%) patients were diagnosed with TMD among 60 patients with headache. Thirty-two (53%) patients had TMJ internal derangement (ID), 8 (13%) patients had only myofascial pain dysfunction (MPD) and 25 (41.6%) patients had concurrent TMJ ID/MPD. There were statistically significant relationships between the number of tender masseter muscles and MPD patients (p=0.04) and between the number of tender medial pterygoid muscles and patients with reducing disc displacement (RDD) (p=0.03). The TMJ and associated orofacial structures should be considered as possible triggering or perpetuating factors for headaches, especially tension-type. There might be a significant connection between TMD and headache. However, most medical and dental practitioners are unaware of this relationship. Therefore, a careful evaluation of the TMJ and associated orofacial structures is required for a correct interpretation of the craniofacial pain in headache patients, and these patients should be managed with a multidisciplinary approach.

  19. Headache attributed to temporomandibular disorders and masticatory myofascial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Kazuhiko; Shinozaki, Takahiro; Okada-Ogawa, Akiko; Matsukawa, Yumiko; Dezawa, Ko; Nakaya, Yuka; Chen, Jui-Yen; Noma, Noboru; Oka, Shunichi; Iwata, Koichi; Imamura, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the temporal association between temporomandibular disorders (TMD)-related symptoms and headache during TMD treatment for patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for headache attributed to TMD (HATMD) specified in the Diagnostic criteria for TMD (DC/TMD) and International classification of headache disorders (ICHD)-3 beta. The study enrolled 34 patients with HATMD induced by masticatory myofascial pain but not by temporomandibular arthralgia. Facial pain intensity, the pressure pain threshold of pericranial muscles, and maximum unassisted opening of the jaw were assessed at an initial examination and before and after physical therapy. The intensity and frequency of headache episodes and tooth contact ratio were also recorded before and after the intervention. Headache intensity and frequency significantly decreased, and these reductions were temporally related to improvements in facial pain intensity, maximum unassisted opening, and pressure pain threshold during TMD treatment. Linear regression analysis showed significant correlations between facial pain intensity and headache intensity and between tooth contact ratio and pressure pain threshold. Among patients who fulfilled the DC/TMD and ICHD-3 beta diagnostic criteria for HATMD, headache improved during TMD treatment, and the improvement was temporally related to amelioration of TMD symptoms. These findings suggest that sensitization in the central and peripheral nervous systems is responsible for HATMD. (J Oral Sci 58, 195-204, 2016).

  20. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in women and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Claudia Lúcia Pimenta; Silva, Marco Antônio Moreira Rodrigues da; Felício, Cláudia Maria de

    2016-01-01

    Women are more likely to present temporomandibular disorders (TMD); however, studies comparing genders in Brazilian samples are rare. To analyze the proportion of men and women, as well as the association between gender and age, problem duration, and TMD symptoms in patients admitted to an university clinic for treatment. Interview and assessment data of protocols from 1,000 patients diagnosed with TMD were collected and analyzed and then divided into two groups, male (n = 177) and female (n = 823). The exploratory analysis was based on contingency tables and χ2 test was carried out. Subsequently, the logistic regression model was used and the odds ratios (OR) concerning the evaluated comparisons were calculated. Females were more prevalent in the sample, and mean ages and TMD duration were similar between the groups, with higher occurrence in young adults (19 to 40 years old). The OR values showed an association between the female gender and the signs/symptoms of pain in the temporomandibular joint, pain in the facial muscles, neck and shoulders, headache, fatigue in the muscles of mastication, otologic symptoms, and dysphonia. Women had two times higher chances of presenting these symptoms than men. In the sample of Brazilian patients with TMD, the number of women who presented a higher prevalence of painful symptoms was greater, followed by otologic symptoms and complaints of dysphonia. The prevalence of joint noise was similar in both studied groups.

  1. Mandibular function, temporomandibular disorders, and headache in prematurely born children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsson, Liselotte; Ekberg, Ewacarin; Nilner, Maria; Bondemark, Lars

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate mandibular function, signs, and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and headache in prematurely born 8- to 10-year-old children, and to compare the findings with matched full-term born controls. Seventy-three preterm children were selected from the Medical Birth Register--one group comprising 36 extremely preterm children born before the 29th gestational week, the other group 37 very preterm children born during gestational weeks 29 to 32. The preterm children were compared with a control group of 41 full-term children matched for gender, age, nationality, and living area. The subjective symptoms of TMD and headache were registered using a questionnaire. Mandibular function, signs, and symptoms of TMD and headache were registered. TMD diagnoses were set per Research Diagnostic Criteria for temporomandibular disorders (RDC/TMD). No significant differences between groups or gender were found for TMD diagnoses according to RDC/TMD or for headache. The preterm children had smaller mandibular movement capacity than the full-term control group, but when adjusting for weight, height, and head circumference mostly all group differences disappeared. Prematurely born children of 8 to 10 years of age did not differ from full-term born children when considering diagnoses according to RDC/TMD, signs, and symptoms of TMD or headache.

  2. Diagnostic criteria for headache attributed to temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, Eric; Ohrbach, Richard; List, Thomas; Anderson, Gary; Jensen, Rigmor; John, Mike T; Nixdorf, Donald; Goulet, Jean-Paul; Kang, Wenjun; Truelove, Ed; Clavel, Al; Fricton, James; Look, John

    2012-07-01

    We assessed and compared the diagnostic accuracy of two sets of diagnostic criteria for headache secondary to temporomandibular disorders (TMD). In 373 headache subjects with TMD, a TMD headache reference standard was defined as: self-reported temple headache, consensus diagnosis of painful TMD and replication of the temple headache using TMD-based provocation tests. Revised diagnostic criteria for Headache attributed to TMD were selected using the RPART (recursive partitioning and regression trees) procedure, and refined in half of the data set. Using the remaining half of the data, the diagnostic accuracy of the revised criteria was compared to that of the International Headache Society's International Classification of Headache Diseases (ICHD)-II criteria A to C for Headache or facial pain attributed to temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder. Relative to the TMD headache reference standard, ICHD-II criteria showed sensitivity of 84% and specificity of 33%. The revised criteria for Headache attributed to TMD had sensitivity of 89% with improved specificity of 87% (p headache that is changed with jaw movement, function or parafunction and (2) provocation of that headache by temporalis muscle palpation or jaw movement. Having significantly better specificity than the ICHD-II criteria A to C, the revised criteria are recommended to diagnose headache secondary to TMD.

  3. Association between painful temporomandibular disorders, sleep bruxism and tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovana Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present cross-sectional study was designed to investigate the association between sleep bruxism (SB, tinnitus and temporomandibular disorders (TMD. The sample consisted of 261 women (mean age of 37.0 years. The Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders were used to classify TMD and self-reported tinnitus. SB was diagnosed by clinical criteria proposed by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. The results showed an association between painful TMD and tinnitus (OR = 7.3; 95%CI = 3.50-15.39; p < 0.001. With regard to SB, the association was of lower magnitude (OR = 1.9; 95%CI = 1.16-3.26; p < 0.0163. When the sample was stratified by the presence of SB and painful TMD, only SB showed no association with tinnitus. The presence of painful TMD without SB was significantly associated with tinnitus (OR = 6.7; 95%CI = 2.64-17.22; p < 0.0001. The concomitant presence of painful TMD and SB was associated with a higher degree of tinnitus severity (OR = 7.0; 95%CI = 3.00-15.89; p < 0.0001. It may be concluded that there is an association between SB, painful TMD and self-reported tinnitus; however, no relationship of a causal nature could be established.

  4. Congenital Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis: Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Chin Taw Cheong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital temporomandibular joint (TMJ ankylosis is an uncommon condition that presents itself at or soon after birth in the absence of acquired factors that could have contributed to the ankylosis such as infection and trauma. The experience of managing one such case is reported in light of a review of the literature on this condition. Key management principles include adequate removal of the ankylotic mass, costochondral grafting, and post-op physiotherapy. Most patients reported in the literature with the condition experienced relapse. This echoes our own experience where there was recurrence of the ankylosis. However, after removal of the ankylotic mass, the patient maintains a satisfactory maximal incisal opening (MIO till the present day. The additional challenges faced in the congenital form in addition to the already complex management of acquired paediatric temporomandibular joint ankylosis are (1 much earlier insult to the TMJ, (2 reduced opportunity for neuromuscular development of the muscles of mastication, and (3 reduced compliance with postoperative physiotherapy programmes due to the younger age of these patients.

  5. Occlusal Grinding Pattern during Sleep Bruxism and Temporomandibular Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeni Wijaya

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sleep Bruxism is a significant etiology of temporomandibular disorder (TMD and causes many dental or oral problems such as tooth wear or facet. There is no study analyzing the relationship between sleep bruxism and TMD. Objective: To investigate any relationship between occlusal grinding pattern during sleep bruxism and temporomandibular disorder. Methods: A cross-sectional study involving 30 sleep bruxism patients attended the Faculty Dentistry Universitas Indonesia Teaching Hospital (RSGMP FKG UI. Completion of 2 forms of ID-TMD index and questionnaire from American Academy of Sleep Medicine were done. BruxChecker was fabricated and used for two nights to record the occlusal grinding pattern. The occlusal grinding pattern was categorized into laterotrusive grinding (LG and mediotrusive side. Further divisons of LG were: incisor-canine (IC, incisor-caninepremolar (ICP and incisor-canine-premolar-molar (ICPM. Mediotrusive side was classified as mediotrusive contact (MC and mediotrusive grinding (MG. Results: It was found that occlusal grinding pattern in non-TMD subjects were IC+MC, in subjects with mild TMD were ICP+MG and in subjects with moderate TMD were ICP+MG and ICPM+MG. TMJ was more significantly affected by ICP and ICPM grinding pattern than that of IC. Conclusion: There was a significant relationship between occlusal grinding pattern during sleep bruxism and TMD.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v20i2.149

  6. [Bruxism, temporo-mandibular dysfunction and botulinum toxin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikhani, L; Dichamp, J

    2003-07-01

    Tooth grinding and tooth clenching are unvoluntary mainly nocturnal habits that result in an hypertrophy of masseter and temporalis muscles with an unbalance between opening and closing muscles of the jaw and lead to an alteration of mandibular condyles movements and to hyper pressure in the temporo-mandibular joints (TMJ) which can generate severe pain. Intra muscular injections of botulinum toxin permit to restablish the balance between closing and opening muscles, to relieve pain, to treat masseteric hypertrophy with improvement of face outline and to recover a normal cinetic of temporo-mandibular joints. Moreover, botulinum toxin injections permit to quit habits of tooth grinding and clenching and one single session of injections is curative for 2/3 of the patients. There are no side effects apart from slight diffusion to superficial muscles of the face resulting in a "fixed" smile for about 6 to 8 weeks. So injections of botulinum toxin in masseter and temporalis muscles are an efficient treatment of bruxism and TMJ dysfunction, cheap with no lasting side effect.

  7. Temporomandibular joint formation requires two distinct hedgehog-dependent steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Patricia; Joo, Brian W; Hu, Jimmy K; Tran, Pamela V; Calicchio, Monica L; O'Connell, Daniel J; Maas, Richard L; Tabin, Clifford J

    2009-10-27

    We conducted a genetic analysis of the developing temporo-mandibular or temporomandi-bular joint (TMJ), a highly specialized synovial joint that permits movement and function of the mammalian jaw. First, we used laser capture microdissection to perform a genome-wide expression analysis of each of its developing components. The expression patterns of genes identified in this screen were examined in the TMJ and compared with those of other synovial joints, including the shoulder and the hip joints. Striking differences were noted, indicating that the TMJ forms via a distinct molecular program. Several components of the hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway are among the genes identified in the screen, including Gli2, which is expressed specifically in the condyle and in the disk of the developing TMJ. We found that mice deficient in Gli2 display aberrant TMJ development such that the condyle loses its growth-plate-like cellular organization and no disk is formed. In addition, we used a conditional strategy to remove Smo, a positive effector of the Hh signaling pathway, from chondrocyte progenitors. This cell autonomous loss of Hh signaling allows for disk formation, but the resulting structure fails to separate from the condyle. Thus, these experiments establish that Hh signaling acts at two distinct steps in disk morphogenesis, condyle initiation, and disk-condyle separation and provide a molecular framework for future studies of the TMJ.

  8. Motion Artifact in the MR imaging of temporomandibular disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamamura, Kiyoharu; Miyajima, Hisashi; Nihei, Yoshinobu; Nemoto, Ryuichi; Ohno, Tomoya

    1997-01-01

    Recently, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is indispensable for the diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Motion Artifacts of MRI occur more frequently than in other conventional methods, because it takes a long time to obtain the images. This paper reported on Motion Artifacts on MRI. MRI studies of 232 temporomandibular joints were performed in 116 patients with TMD by using a 0.5-T magnetic resonance (MR) scanner, with spin echo sequence: protondensity-weighted. And we took MRI slices at opening phase and closing phase. So 232 slices were gathered and we evaluated clinically the incidence of Motion Artifacts, that is to say, double and multiple images and other factors. The 103 slices in 56 patients showed Motion Artifacts. There is no significant difference between sexes. By age group, those in their teens were most frequent, followed by those in their fifties, forties, thirties and twenties. Also the same results were obtained for double image and multiple image. Incidence of Motion Artifact was most frequent at the opening phase. There is no significant difference between double and multiple image. (author)

  9. Can pterygoid plate asymmetry be linked to temporomandibular joint disorders ?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero, Maria Eugenia; Jacobs, Reinhilde [OIC, OMFS IMPATH Research Group, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Leuven and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Beltran, Jorge [Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Post-Graduate School, Universidad Privada Cayetano Heredia, Lima (Peru); Laat, Antoon [Stomatology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dept. of Oral Health Sciences, KU Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-06-15

    This study was performed to evaluate the relationship between pterygoid plate asymmetry and temporomandibular joint disorders. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images of 60 patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) involving pain were analyzed and compared with images of 60 age- and gender-matched controls. Three observers performed linear measurements of the lateral pterygoid plates. Statistically significant differences were found between measurements of the lateral pterygoid plates on the site that had pain and the contralateral site (p<0.05). The average length of the lateral pterygoid plates (LPPs) in patients with TMD was 17.01±3.64 mm on the right side and 16.21±3.51 mm on the left side, and in patients without TMD, it was 11.86±1.97 mm on the right side and 11.98±1.85 mm on the left side. Statistically significant differences in the LPP length, measured on CBCT, were found between patients with and without TMD (p<0.05). The inter-examiner reliability obtained in this study was very high for all the examiners (0.99, 95% confidence interval: 0.98-0.99). Within the limits of the present study, CBCT lateral pterygoid plate measurements at the side with TMD were found to be significantly different from those on the side without TMD. More research is needed to explore potential etiological correlations and implications for treatment.

  10. Temporomandibular joint dislocation due to acute propranolol intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Aghabiklooei

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abbas Aghabiklooei1, Homan Elahi2, Babak Mostafazadeh31Department of Medical Toxicology and Forensic Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 2Firouzgar Hospital, Department of ENT, Tehran, Iran; 3Department of Medical Toxicology and Forensic Medicine, Shaheed Beheshty University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IranAbstract: Temporomandibular joint (TMJ dislocation has not previously been reported as a complication of beta-blocker toxicity. We are reporting two cases of TMJ dislocation resulted from acute severe intoxication with pure propranolol (PPL for the first time. Bilateral TMJ dislocation happened in two patients who were admitted to intensive care unit with diagnosis of severe acute PPL toxicity. Clinical diagnosis of TMJ dislocation was obtained by physical examination. Successful reduction was performed for both patients without subsequent recurrence in two weeks following hospital discharge. Both of our subjects had no previous history of lower jaw dislocation. There was not any risk factor for dislocation such as convulsion during admission period, recent face trauma, or oral manipulation by the medical team. This study showed that TMJ dislocation may occur after severe acute PPL toxicity probably due to spastic contraction of the lateral pterygoid muscle. This is against previously mentioned hypothesis that stated masseteric muscles contraction as the main cause of a bilateral dislocated TMJ.Keywords: propranolol, toxicity, temporomandibular joint dislocation

  11. Arthrocentesis as initial treatment for temporomandibular joint arthropathy : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, L. M.; Huddleston Slater, J. J. R.; Stegenga, B.

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness of arthrocentesis compared to conservative treatment as initial treatment with regard to temporomandibular joint pain and mandibular movement. Patients and methods: In this randomized controlled trial, 80 patients with arthralgia of the TMJ (classified

  12. Occlusion and Temporomandibular Function among Subjects with Mandibular Distal Extension Removable Partial Dentures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creugers, N.H.J.; Witter, D.J.; Spijker, A. van 't; Gerritsen, A.E.; Kreulen, C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To quantify effects on occlusion and temporomandibular function of mandibular distal extension removable partial dentures in shortened dental arches. Methods. Subjects wearing mandibular extension removable partial dentures (n = 25) were compared with subjects with shortened dental arches

  13. Evaluation relationship between temporomandibular joint disorder and headache: A review literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Aghahosseini

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: Bruxism and temporomandibular disorders are the two main contributing factors in initiation and perpetuation of headache. Treatment of these two phenomena would be effective in the treatment of headache.

  14. Synovial membrane involvement in osteoarthritic temporomandibular joints - A light microscopic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkgraaf, LC; Liem, RSB; deBont, LGM

    Objective. To study the light microscopic characteristics of the synovial membrane of osteoarthritic temporomandibular joints to evaluate synovial membrane involvement in the osteoarthritic process. Study design. Synovial membrane biopsies were obtained during unilateral arthroscopy in 40 patients.

  15. CLASSIFICATION OF TEMPOROMANDIBULAR-JOINT OSTEOARTHROSIS AND INTERNAL DERANGEMENT .2. SPECIFIC DIAGNOSTIC-CRITERIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STEGENGA, B; DEBONT, LGM; BOERING, G

    Separate entities of temporomandibular joint osteoarthrosis and internal derangement are operationally defined. Criteria are based on an analysis of the diagnostic significance of symptoms and signs, principles of synovial joint pathology in general, and on therapeutic considerations. The primary

  16. On the analysis of condylar path versus real motion of the temporomandibular joint: application for Sicat Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordaß, Bernd; Ruge, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) function using condylar path tracings is a challenge in functionally oriented dentistry. In most cases, reference points on the skin surface over the TMJ region are defined as "arbitrary", "individual" or "kinematic" condylar hinge axis points, which are displayed as "condylar paths" in motion. To what extent these reference points represent the actual condylar paths in each individual patient is ultimately unclear because the geometric relationship of the actual condyle to the selected reference point is usually unknown. Depending on the location of the point on the condyle and the centers of rotation of mandibular movement, these trajectories can vary greatly during combined rotational and sliding movements (eg, opening and closing movements of the mandible); this represents a grid of points located in the vicinity of the TMJ. To record the actual condylar path as the movement trajectory of a given point (eg, the condylar center), technological solutions are needed with which to link the tracing technology with the appropriate imaging technology capable of scanning the condyle, including the points of interest, and displaying them in real dynamic motion. Sicat Function (Sicat, D-Bonn) is such a solution. Sicat Function links cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans (made using the Galileos CBCT scanner; Sirona, Bensheim, Germany) with ultrasound-based, three-dimensional (3D) functional jaw movement recordings of the mandible (made using the JMT+ Jaw Motion Tracker; Sicat, Bonn, Germany). Digital images of the dental arches acquired with the intraoral scanner Cerec system (Sirona) can also be superimposed. This results in the generation of a 3D model of the bony mandible, including the TMJ, which reproduces the 3D real dynamic movement of the condyles simultaneously with that of the condylar paths at defined points (with the condylar centers being a particular point of interest). Sicat Function is an integrated, digital

  17. Efficacy of Temporomandibular Joint Arthrocentesis with Sodium Hyaluronate in the Management of Temporomandibular Joint Disorders: A Prospective Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorrela, Harsha; Prameela, J; Srinivas, G; Reddy, B Vijay Baskar; Sudhir, Mvs; Arakeri, Gururaj

    2017-12-01

    This study was designed to investigate the efficacy of the temporomandibular joint arthrocentesis with and without injection of sodium hyaluronate (SH) in the treatment of temporomandibular joint disorders. A total of sixty two TMJs in 34 males and 28 females aged 20-65 years comprised the study material. The patients' complaints were limited mouth opening, TMJ pain, and joint noises during function. Patients were randomly divided into 2 groups in which arthrocentesis plus intra-articular injection of sodium hyaluronate was performed in 1 group and only arthrocentesis was performed in the other group. Both groups contained patients with disc displacement with reduction and without reduction. Clinical evaluation of the patients was done before the procedure, immediately after the procedure, at 1 week and 1, 3 and 6 months postoperatively. Intensity of TMJ pain was assessed using visual analog scales. Maximal mouth opening and lateral jaw movements also were recorded at each follow-up visit. Both techniques increased maximal mouth opening, lateral movements, and function, while reducing TMJ pain and noise. Although patients benefitted from both techniques, arthrocentesis with injection of SH seemed to be superior to arthrocentesis alone.

  18. Efficacy of splint therapy for the management of temporomandibular disorders: a meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Chao; Wu, Jun-Yi; Deng, Dong-Lai; He, Bing-Yang; Tao, Yuan; Niu, Yu-Ming; Deng, Mo-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are a group of clinical problems affecting temporomandibular joint (TMJ), myofascial muscles and other related structures. Splint therapy is the most commonly used approach to treatment of TMD, but its effectiveness is remains unclear. We therefore conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the effectiveness of splint therapy for TMD in adults. The electronic databases PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and ClinicalTrials.gov were searched for reports published up ...

  19. Temporomandibular disorders – validity of clinical diagnostics compared to magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    BADEL, TOMISLAV; MAROTTI, MILJENKO; SAVIĆ PAVIČIN, IVANA; DULČIĆ, NIKŠA; ZADRAVEC, DIJANA; KERN, JOSIPA

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Orthopedic examination techniques of the musculoskeletal system contribute to the successful diagnostics of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The purpose of this study is to determine the validity of TMD clinical diagnostics by comparing the findings of manual functional analysis (MFA) and the results of MRI of temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The diagnostic significance of limited mouth opening and pain upon passive mouth opening were taken into consideration. M...

  20. Evaluation relationship between temporomandibular joint disorder and headache: A review literature

    OpenAIRE

    Farzaneh Aghahosseini; Nafiseh Sheykhbahaei

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: Headache is among the most common complaints in patients suffering from temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD). Thus, it seems that evaluation of patients with headache in terms of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders is necessary. In people with TMD, parafunctional activities play an important etiologic role. Considering the high prevalence of bruxism and TMDs in patients with headache, assessment the accuracy and severity of this association can play a key role in d...

  1. Temporomandibular Disorders and Parafunctional Habits in Children and Adolescence: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    B. Seraj; R. Ahmadi; M. Mirkarimi; S. Ghadimi; M. Beheshti

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to review the existing literature about temporomandibular disorders(TMD) and parafunctional habits (bruxism) and their relationship in children and adolescents,which is still controversial. TMD is a collective term used to identify a group ofmusculoskeletal conditions of the temporomandibular region. Bruxism defined as the habitual nonfunctional forceful contact between occlusal tooth surfaces. Some studies have linked oral parafunctional habits to TMD, whereas others...

  2. Detection of degenerative disease of the temporomandibular joint by bone scintigraphy: concise communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, H.A.; Bloom, C.Y.

    1980-01-01

    Nine patients with facial pain were evaluated with limited bone scans. The scintigrams correlated with microscopy in all patients, although radiographs correlated with microscopy in only five patients. The degenerative disease process in the temporomandibular joint was more extensive in the patients with radiographic and scintigraphic abnormalities than in those with scintigraphic abnormalities alone. The limited bone scan appears useful in detecting early degenerative changes in the temporomandibular joint

  3. Electronic System for Data Record and Automatic Diagnosis Assessment in the Temporomandibular Joint Disorders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hippmann, R.; Nagy, Miroslav; Dostálová, T.; Zvárová, Jana; Seydlová, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 1 (2011), s. 11-16 ISSN 1801-5603 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : temporomandibular joint * temporomandibular joint disorders * DentCross * electronic health record * AAOP classification Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science http://www.ejbi.eu/images/2011-1/Hippmann_en.pdf

  4. Temporomandibular joint involvement in rheumatoid arthritis patients: association between clinical and tomographic data

    OpenAIRE

    Cordeiro, Patrícia C. F; Guimaraes, Josemar P; de Souza, Viviane A; Dias, Isabela M; Silva, Jesca N. N; Devito, Karina L; Bonato, Leticia L

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation and synovial hyperplasia, which usually affects multiple joints. The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) becomes susceptible to the development of changes resulting from RA. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of TMD and degenerative bone changes in TMJ in patients diagnosed with RA (rheumatoid arthritis). The Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/ TMD) questio...

  5. Evaluation of C-Reactive Protein Level in Patients with Pain Form of Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Pihut

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint dysfunction is a functional disorder concerned with the abnormal functioning of the muscles of the stomatognathic system and temporomandibular joints involved in the dynamic movements of the jaw and surrounding structures. The aim of the study was to compare the level of C-reactive protein in patients with pain and painless forms of temporomandibular joint dysfunction. Materials and methods. The study group consisted of 72 patients who reported to the prosthetic treatment because of temporomandibular joint dysfunction. The study group included 36 patients with pain form of dysfunction, and the control group included 36 patients with painless form of disorder. Each patient underwent specialized examination of functional disorders in order to diagnose the type of dysfunction and was commissioned to carry out a study of the blood test concerned with evaluation of the C-reactive protein (CRP level in the same analytical laboratory. The results of the investigation were subjected to statistical analysis. The research obtained approval from the Ethics Committee of the Jagiellonian University (KBET/125/L/2013. Level of Evidence for primary research was established as type V. Results. The mean values of C-reactive protein levels in both groups were in the normal range and did not differ statistically significantly, which indicates the fact that the pain form of the temporomandibular joint disorders is not associated with inflammation of the soft tissues of the joint. Conclusion. Painful form of the temporomandibular joint dysfunctions is not connected with the inflammation of joints.

  6. Preliminary optical coherence tomography investigation of the temporo-mandibular joint disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mărcăuteanu, Corina; Demjan, Enikö; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda; Motoc, Adrian; Lighezan, Rodica; Vasile, Liliana; Hughes, Mike; Bradu, Adrian; Dobre, George; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2010-02-01

    Aim and objectives. The morphology and position of the temporo-mandibular disc are key issues in the diagnosis and treatment of arthrogenous temporo-mandibular disorders. Magnetic resonance imaging and arthroscopy are used today to identify: flattening of the pars posterior of the disc, perforation and/or adhesions in the pars intermedia of the disc and disc displacements. The present study proposes the investigation of the temporo-mandibular joint disc by optical coherence tomography (OCT). Material and methods. 8 human temporo-mandibular joint discs were harvested from dead subjects, under 40 year of age, and conserved in formalin. They had a normal morphology, with a thicker pars posterior (2,6 mm on the average) and a thinner pars intermedia (1mm on the average). We investigated the disc samples using two different OCT systems: an en-face OCT (time domain (TD)-OCT) system, working at 1300 nm (C-scan and B-scan mode) and a spectral OCT system (a Fourier domain (FD)-OCT) system , working at 840 nm (B-scan mode). Results. The OCT investigation of the temporo-mandibular joint discs revealed a homogeneous microstructure. The longer wavelength of the TD-OCT offers a higher penetration depth (2,5 mm in air), which is important for the analysis of the pars posterior, while the FD-OCT is much faster. Conclusions: OCT is a promising imaging method for the microstructural characterization of the temporo-mandibular disc.

  7. Assessment of the relationship between stress and temporomandibular joint disorder in female students before university entrance exam (Konkour exam).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottaghi, Ahmad; Razavi, S Mohammad; Pozveh, Elham Zamani; Jahangirmoghaddam, Milad

    2011-12-01

    Temporomandibular joint is one of the most complicated joints of the body and plays an important role in the head and neck system. One of the factors affecting the temporomandibular joint and lead to temporomandibular disorder is anxiety with all the events causing it. The aim of this study was to determine a relationship between anxiety and temporomandibular disorders. In this prospective study, subjects were randomly selected. One hundred and thirty pre-university students in Isfahan were evaluated with Ketel's test of anxiety, exam stress test and temporomandibular disorder questionnaires. The evaluation was done in two stages 10 months and 1 month prior to the university entrance exam (Konkour), clinical assessments consisted of masticatory muscles and sternocleidomastoid muscle palpation, temporomandibular joint palpation for pain and noise and its movement, and mouth opening limitations. The Wilcoxon rank test and paired t-test were used to analyze the data and the P value under 0.05 was considered significant. The level of anxiety and occurrence of temporomandibular disorders were increased between two stages and had the highest level in the second stage. There was a significant increase between two stages (Ptemporomandibular disorders and anxiety between the two stages can suggest a possible relationship between anxiety and temporomandibular disorders. Therefore, the effect of anxiety in triggering temporomandibular disorder symptoms is probable.

  8. The use of a cine-technique in the MRT investigation of the temporo-mandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogl, T.J.; Assal, J.; Eberhard, D.; Weigl, P.; Randzio, J.

    1992-01-01

    A new cine-technique in a prospective study using rapid gradient echo sequences was evaluated for the MRT investigation of the temporo-mandibular joint. A newly developed hydraulic apparatus was used to produce progressive opening of the jaw and MRT appearances were recorded during predetermined points of mandibular movement. The investigation included 16 normals and 34 patients. A modified gradient echo sequence was combined with an optimised surface coil or a special double coil and this provided good spatial resolution of the articular disc and of the muscular and bony structure. Amongst the abnormal findings were luxation of the disc (15 cases), tears in the disc (5 cases), late effects of internal derangements (12 cases) and condylar hypermobility (7 cases). The new cine-technique provides specific images in any chosen position of the mandible depending on the clinical disability of the patient. (orig.) [de

  9. The Application of Surgical Navigation in the Treatment of Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guowen; Lu, Mingxing; Hu, Qingang

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the safety and the accuracy of surgical navigation technology in the resection of severe ankylosis of the mandibular condyle with the middle cranial fossa. The computed tomography scan data were transferred to a Windows-based computer workstation, and the patient's individual anatomy was assessed in multiplanar views at the workstation. In the operation, the patient and the virtual image were matched by individual registration with the reference points which were set on the skull bone surface and the teeth. Then, the real-time navigation can be performed. The acquisition of the data sets was uncomplicated, and image quality was sufficient to assess the operative result in 2 cases. Both of the operations were performed successfully with the guidance of real-time navigation. The application of surgical navigation has enhanced the safety and the accuracy of the surgery for bony ankylosis of temporomandibular joint. The use of surgical navigation resulted in the promotion of accurate and safe surgical excision of the ankylosed skull base tissue.

  10. Chewing movements altered in the presence of temporomandibular joint internal derangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radke, John C; Kull, Robert S; Sethi, Manminder S

    2014-07-01

    The objectives were to find specific factors that are mathematically distinct between the chewing timings, movement pattern shapes, variability, and movement velocities of: (1) normal asymptomatic subjects and (2) a group of subjects with verified temporomandibular joint (TMJ) internal derangements. Left- and right-sided chewing movement recordings of 28 subjects (34.5 ± 14.0 years) were randomly selected from a large database of patients exhibiting verified unilateral or bilateral TMJ internal derangements. The chewing movements of an age- and gender-matched control group of 20 asymptomatic subjects (32.5 ± 11.6 years, P>0.60) with verified normal TMJ function were also recorded. Means and standard deviations of the opening, closing, turning point, terminal chewing position, and velocity patterns were calculated. A two-tailed Student's t-test with unequal variances was used to compare the parameters between the two groups (alpha = 0.05). The dysfunctional group functioned significantly slower and with greater variability than the control group. The vertical dimension was consistently smaller in the dysfunctional group (Pchewing position was significantly less precise in the dysfunctional group (vertical: Pchewing patterns than the control group. The functional pattern of mastication appears to be significantly altered in the presence of an internal derangement of the TMJ.

  11. Eagle's syndrome-A non-perceived differential diagnosis of temporomandibular disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoenissen, P; Bittermann, G; Schmelzeisen, R; Oshima, T; Fretwurst, T

    2015-01-01

    This article unveils a case of the classic styloid syndrome and states that panoramic imaging and ultrasound can be an alternative to computed tomography. In addition, the endoscope-assisted extraoral approach using CT-based navigation is useful. Eagle's Syndrome is an aggregate of symptoms described by Eagle in 1937. He described different forms: the classic styloid syndrome consisting of elongation of the styloid process which causes pain. Second, the stylo-carotid-artery syndrome which is responsible for transient ischemic attack or stroke. Using the example of a 66 years old male patient suffering from long term pain, we explain our diagnostic and surgical approach. After dissecting the styloid process of the right side using an extraoral approach, the pain ceased and the patient could be discharged without any recurrence of the pain up to this point. Eagle's syndrome, with its similar symptoms, is rather difficult to differentiate from temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD), but can be easily excluded from possible differential diagnoses of TMD using panoramic radiographs and ultrasound. Making use of low cost and easily accessible diagnostic workup techniques can reveal this particular cause for chronic pain restricting quality of life. Thereby differentiation from the TMD symptomatic complex is possible. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Achieved Competencies and Satisfaction in Temporomandibular Disorders and Orofacial Pain Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Sara; Dawson, Andreas; Ekberg, Ewa Carin

    2016-01-01

    To assess dental students' achieved competencies and perceived satisfaction with their temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and orofacial pain education and to compare these with the results of their final examination in TMD and orofacial pain. Dental students from two consecutive classes (2011/2012 and 2012/2013) at the Department of Orofacial Pain and Jaw Function at the dental school in Malmö, Sweden completed two self-evaluations, one at the beginning of semester seven and one at the end of semester eight. The questionnaire that they were given concerned achieved competencies and satisfaction with education in TMD and orofacial pain. Items focused on anatomy, physiology, and clinical training. Students estimated their competence and satisfaction on a numeric rating scale and described their idea of treating TMD and orofacial pain patients on a verbal rating scale. Outcome variables were tested with paired samples t test for differences over time and independent samples t test for between-class comparisons; both were adjusted for multiple testing with Bonferroni correction. Significant improvement in all items was observed for achieved competencies and satisfaction in both classes between semester seven and semester eight (P .05). This study has shown that expansion in undergraduate TMD and orofacial pain education at the dental school in Malmö has allowed all students to develop the same level of competence, independent of prior experience. The study also pointed out that continuous evaluation and enhancement of TMD and orofacial pain education in undergraduate dental education is beneficial.

  13. Craniocervical posture analysis in patients with temporomandibular disorder Análise da postura cranio-cervical em pacientes com disfunção temporomandibular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DH Iunes

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare head positioning and cervical spine alignment between individuals with and without temporomandibular disorders (TMDs, by means of positional evaluation using photographs, radiographs and visual observation, and to investigate whether the type of TMD influences head posture and cervical spine positioning. METHODS: Ninety randomly chosen women were diagnosed using the research diagnostic criteria for TMDs (RDC/TMD by a trained examiner and were divided into three groups: Group 1, with a diagnosis of myofascial dysfunction (group I of RDC axis I; Group 2, with mixed TMD (groups I, II and III of RDC axis I; and Control, without TMD. Following this, the participants were photographed in frontal and lateral views by a single examiner. To produce these photos, the following anatomical points were marked out on the skin: occipital protuberance, C4, C7, acromioclavicular joint and sternoclavicular joint. From these points, different angles were analyzed by means of the ALCimagem-2000 application. These same photos were then evaluated qualitatively (visual evaluation. Next, lateral teleradiography and radiography of the cervical spine was requested. The examiner was blind when analyzing the images. To compare the results, the chi-squared test and analysis of variance were used, with significance levels of 5%. RESULTS: Regardless of the method used, the results revealed that head and cervical spine posture did not differ between the groups with and without TMD, independent of the diagnostic group. CONCLUSION: The posture of individuals with myogenic or arthrogenous TMD does not differ from the posture of individuals without TMD. The presence of TMD does not influence the head and cervical spine posture.OBJETIVO: Comparar o posicionamento da cabeça e o alinhamento da coluna cervical em indivíduos com e sem DTM, por meio da avaliação postural por fotografias, radiografias e por observação visual e verificar se o tipo de DTM

  14. Temporomandibular Joint: MRT Diagnostics; Temporomandibulargelenk: MRT-Diagnostik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kress, B. [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg (Germany). Abteilung Neuroradiologie; Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg (Germany). Neurologische Klinik; Schmitter, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg (Germany). Poliklinik fuer zahnaerztliche Prothetik; Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg (Germany). Abteilung Neuroradiologie

    2005-09-01

    MRI of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) requires 1.5 T. The radiologist must be familiar with the anatomy and pathology of the TMJ. This review gives a description of MRI protocols for the TMJ, and MRI anatomy and pathology of the TMJ (open and closed mouth) by means of MR images and drawings. Diagnosing of the TMJ related diseases depends on standardized clinical and MR examinations. Therefore close interdisciplinary cooperation between dentist and radiologist is necessary. (orig.) [German] Magnetresonanztomographie bei Kiefergelenkbeschwerden erfordert neben guter technischer Ausstattung Kenntnisse der Anatomie und Pathologie des Kiefergelenks. Diese Uebersicht stellt neben MRT-Protokollen die Anatomie und die pathologischen Befunde des Kiefergelenks bei geoeffnetem und geschlossenem Mund anhand von Abbildungen und Graphiken systematisch dar. Bildgebende Diagnostik des Kiefergelenks gruendet sich auf eine standardisierte klinische und magnetresonanztomographische Untersuchung und erfordert eine enge interdisziplinaere Kooperation zwischen Zahnmedizin und Radiologie. (orig.)

  15. Use of Magnetic Neurostimulator Appliance in Temporomandibular Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Rossiti Florian

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular disorder (TMD is ranked the second leading cause of orofacial pain after toothache, and there is no effective standard treatment for all cases. Therefore, much research has been conducted in the therapeutic areas of TMD, such as acupuncture and electrotherapy, for this purpose. The aim of this research was to evaluate application of the neuromagnetic stimulator device Haihua model CD-9, used within the precepts of acupuncture in treating TMD-related pain symptoms and limited mouth opening. Analysis and discussion of this study were based on pain intensity index and range of mouth-opening evaluation before and after each session. Nine patients diagnosed with muscle TMD, referred by the surgery sector of Center Dental Specialties (CEO – I in Piracicaba-São Paulo participated in this research. Considering the simplicity of the technique and good results obtained, use of this device is suggested as an additional therapeutic tool for relief of TMD symptoms.

  16. CT of the temporomandibular joint: The conservative approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jend, H.H.; Jend-Rossmann, I.; Heller, M.

    1986-01-01

    Until recently, CT investigation of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders has been regarded as a sophisticated procedure. A method of investigation was developed that allows easy evaluation of axial scans. The method was evaluated in a series of 65 joints with arthrographically diagnosed internal derangements. In anterior disk displacement CT findings led to an identical diagnosis in 56 of 65 joints (sensitivity, 86%). In clinically asymptomatic joints investigated for other reasons, only one of 12 showed signs of internal derangement on CT (specificity, 92%). This conservative approach to CT evaluation of internal derangement seems to be as accurate as more sophisticated methods. It is easy to perform, requires no additional manpower or computer time, and has a very good reproducibility

  17. [Clinical evaluation and psychological aspects of temporomandibular joint disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coessens, P; De Boever, J A

    1997-01-01

    Establishing the patient's clinical diagnosis depends on gathering as much information of the patient and his or her signs and symptoms as possible. This information can be gathered from history, physical and psychological examination, diagnostic analysis. It is also important to look upon pain as a disorder and to consider the relationship between pain and psychological factors. The differential diagnosis is constructed through a biopsychological model of illness rather than through a more traditional biomedical model of disease. To arrive at a consistently accurate clinical diagnosis in patients with TMJ and craniofacial pain, the technique of clinical diagnosis must be well defined, reliable and include examination of the head and the neck, cranial nerves and the stomatognathic system. The craniomandibular index provides a standardized examination of the stomatognathic system that has been tested on validity and reliability. This chapter focuses on the techniques of history taking clinical and psychological examination and diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular joint disorders and muscle pain.

  18. Orofacial myofunctional disorder in subjects with temporomandibular disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Cláudia Lúcia Pimenta; Da Silva, Marco Antônio M Rodrigues; de Felício, Cláudia Maria

    2009-10-01

    To determine the frequency and degree of orofacial myofunctional disorder (OMD) in a sample of patients with temporomandibular disorder (TMD), the dental records of 240 patients with a diagnosis of TMD were reviewed. Mean patient age and mean TMD duration, gender frequency, complaints, and signs and symptoms were calculated. The results showed that the sample studied was quite characteristic of a TMD group. The presence of the following signs/symptoms was significant: muscular pain, TMJ pain, joint noise, at least one otologic symptom, headache, and neck and shoulder pain. Most subjects presented some degree of OMD, with grade high prevailing over grade low. The importance of evaluating the stomatognathic structures and functions during the clinical examination of patients with TMD is emphasized.

  19. Management of temporo-mandibular joint ankylosis in growing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashikiran, N D; Reddy, S V V; Patil, R; Yavagal, C

    2005-03-01

    Although temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is one of the most common pathologies afflicting the facial skeleton, it is also the most overlooked and under-managed problem in children. The TMJ forms the very cornerstone of cranio-facial integrity and hence its ankylosis in growing children adversely affects the growth and development of the jaws and occlusion. Impairment of speech, difficulty in mastication, poor oral hygiene, rampant caries and acute compromise of the airway pose a severe psychologic burden on the tender minds of children. The aim of this article is to present an overview of efficient management strategies, based on a case report, so as to increase its awareness among all dental surgeons involved in the treatment of children.

  20. [Bilateral chronic dislocation of the temporomandibular joints and Meige syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzul, L; Henoux, M; Marion, F; Corre, P

    2015-04-01

    Chronic dislocation of the temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) is rare. It occurs when an acute dislocation is left untreated, in certain situations, including severe illness, neurologic or psychiatric diseases or prolonged oral intubation. A 79 years old woman, with Meige syndrome, suffered from bilateral dislocation of the TMJ for over 1 year. Surgical repositioning of the mandibular condyles and temporal bone eminectomy were performed. At the 18 postoperative months control, no recurrence has been noted. Treatment of chronic TMJ dislocations often requires a surgical procedure. Manual reduction, even under general anaesthesia, often fails because of severe muscular spasm and periarticular fibrotic changes. The management of this disorder is still controversial. We review available surgical procedures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. High-resolution computed tomography of the osseous temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larheim, T.A.; Kolbenstvedt, A.; Rikshospitalet, Oslo

    1984-01-01

    A standardized CT procedure for examination of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) with axial and coronal scanning as well as reformatted coronal and sagittal sections, was performed on 32 adults. These included subjects with normal TMJ and patients suffering from muscular dysfunction/disc displacement, arthrosis or rheumatoid arthritis. Some normal CT appearances simulating disease were presented. Axial CT scanning appeared to be the most useful method for demonstrating osseous abnormalities of the TMJ. The diagnostic information was occasionally supplemented by the coronal scanning, which may be difficult to perform on patients with neck stiffness. Reformatted coronal or sagittal sections mostly confirmed TMJ abnormality and supplemented the findings at axial scans in about one third of the patients. (orig.)

  2. Postoperative diagnosis of the temporomandibular joint; Postoperative Kiefergelenkdiagnostik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, S. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Vienna (Austria). Abt. fuer Osteologie; Undt, G. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Mund-, Kiefer- und Gesichtschirurgie, Vienna (Austria)

    2001-09-01

    Postoperative management of patients suffering from symptoms of the temporomandibular joint does not differ considerably from the one of preoperative examination protocols. Knowledge of previous surgery helps to plan patient work-up and to interpret normal postoperative findings (eminectomy, discectomy, susceptibility artefacts from metallic residues..) and typical complications (intraarticular loose bodies, dislocations, avascular necrosis, foreign body granulomatous reactions) appropriately. (orig.) [German] Wie auch in anderen Koerperregionen differiert das Diagnoseprotokoll von prae- und postoperativen Patienten mit Beschwerden des Kiefergelenks nicht wesentlich voneinander. Die Kenntnis des vorangegangenen Eingriffs hilft allerdings, die Untersuchung entsprechend zu planen und den Befund im Kontext richtig zu bewerten, um moegliche Komplikationen (intraartikulaere Fragmente, Dislokationen, avaskulaere Nekrose, Fremdkoerperreaktionen) und zu erwartende Befunde (Eminektomie, Diskektomie, Metallartefakte usw.) richtig zu interpretieren. (orig.)

  3. Management of temporo-mandibular joint ankylosis in growing children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashikiran N

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Although temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ ankylosis is one of the most common pathologies afflicting the facial skeleton, it is also the most overlooked and under-managed problem in children. The TMJ forms the very cornerstone of cranio-facial integrity and hence its ankylosis in growing children adversely affects the growth and development of the jaws and occlusion. Impairment of speech, difficulty in mastication, poor oral hygiene, rampant caries and acute compromise of the airway pose a severe psychologic burden on the tender minds of children. The aim of this article is to present an overview of efficient management strategies, based on a case report, so as to increase its awareness among all dental surgeons involved in the treatment of children.

  4. Appearance of the temporomandibular joint after meniscoplasty on MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conway, W.F.; Hayes, C.W.; Campbell, R.L.; Laskin, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-five postmeniscoplasty temporomandibular joints (TMJs) were studied in 20 patients. In all patients, preoperative MR images showed anteriorly dislocated disks. The patients underwent a similar postoperative MR examination 4-12 months after surgery. Surgical results were classified clinically as either poor, fair, good, or excellent at the time of the follow-up MR imaging. Forty percent of patients had good or excellent clinical results, and 60% had poor or fair results. The good/excellent group all had disks that appeared to be in normal or near normal position. Almost all disks were fixed in position. The degree of condylar translation was variable. The poor/fair group all had postoperative joints with anteriorly dislocated disks that were fixed in place. Recapture of the disk was variable, as was the degree of condylar translation

  5. Effect of Surgery First Orthognathic Approach on the Temporomandibular Joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelo, Sandro; Saponaro, Gianmarco; De Angelis, Paolo; Gasparini, Giulio; Garagiola, Umberto; Moro, Alessandro

    2018-05-01

    Correction of severe malocclusions with skeletal discrepancies requires orthodontic treatment in combination with orthognathic surgery. Even though conventional orthognathic surgery (COS) is a common and well-accepted approach its influence on the signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) is still debated. Recently with the introduction of surgery first approach, a different timing for the management of dentoskeletal imbalances has been proposed. The present study is aimed at assessing the relationship between surgery first approach and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders. The study sample consisted of 24 patients who were selected to be treated with surgery first approach. Clinical follow-ups after surgery were performed every week for the first month, at 3 months, 6 months, and at 1 year. A radiological follow-up was performed at 1 week and at 1 year after the operation with a panorex and a latero-lateral teleradiograph. To assess the effect of surgery first approach on the TMDs signs and symptoms, a clinical assessment was performed 4 days before surgery (T1), 6 months after surgery (T2), and 1 year postoperatively (T3). The results of the authors' study show that pain assessment revealed a general improvement of this symptom in correspondence to TMJ and masticatory muscles except in the masseter and neck region. Also joint noises, TMJ functioning, migraine, and headache underwent a considerable improvement. Surgery first approach is an innovative orthognathic procedure and, by undergoing surgery first approach, patients with pre-existing TMJ dysfunction may experience a significant improvement or even resolution of the TMDs signs and symptoms.

  6. Temporomandibular disorders after whiplash injury: a controlled, prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasch, Helge; Hjorth, Tine; Svensson, Peter; Nyhuus, Lone; Jensen, Troels S

    2002-01-01

    Whiplash injury to the neck is often considered a significant risk factor for development of temporomandibular disorders (TMD), and has been proposed to produce internal derangements of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Few studies, however, have examined TMD-related pain in acute whiplash patients compared with a matched control group. The aim of the present study was to assess pain and sensorimotor function in the craniofacial region in an unselected group of patients sustaining a motor vehicle accident involving a rear collision. Prospectively, 19 acute whiplash patients exposed to a motor vehicle accident involving a rear collision participated in a study of TMD. The control group consisted of 20 age- and gender-matched ankle-injury patients. Participants were seen within 4 weeks and again at 6 months post-injury. The masticatory system was examined in accordance with the research diagnostic criteria. Participants underwent structured interviews, filled out the McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ), and had their masticatory system examined by a trained dentist, blinded to their diagnosis. Pain detection threshold (PDT) to pressure stimuli, and maximal voluntary occlusal force (MVOF) were obtained at each visit. One whiplash patient and 1 ankle-injury patient had jaw pain at the first visit. Palpation scores of the TMJ and the summated palpation scores only tended to be higher in patients sustaining a whiplash injury than in ankle-injury controls at the first visit. However, MPQ, TMD symptoms and signs, MVOF and PDT were not significantly different in whiplash-injury and ankle-injury patients after 4 weeks and 6 months. TMD pain after whiplash injury and ankle injury is rare, suggesting that whiplash injury is not a major risk factor for the development of TMD problems. Further studies are needed to identify which other factors may contribute to TMD pain.

  7. Temporomandibular disorders, sleep bruxism, and primary headaches are mutually associated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Giovana; Franco, Ana Lúcia; Gonçalves, Daniela Aparecida; Speciali, José Geraldo; Bigal, Marcelo Eduardo; Camparis, Cinara Maria

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the association among temporomandibular disorders (TMD), sleep bruxism, and primary headaches, assessing the risk of occurrence of primary headaches in patients with or without painful TMD and sleep bruxism. The sample consisted of 301 individuals (253 women and 48 men) with ages varying from 18 to 76 years old (average age of 37.5 years). The Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders were used to classify TMD. Sleep bruxism was diagnosed by clinical criteria proposed by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, and primary headaches were diagnosed according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders-II. Data were analyzed by chi-square and odds ratio tests with a 95% confidence interval, and the significance level adopted was .05. An association was found among painful TMD, migraine, and tension-type headache (P headache (3.7; 1.59-8.75). With regard to sleep bruxism, the association was significant only for chronic migraine (3.8; 1.83-7.84). When the sample was stratified by the presence of sleep bruxism and painful TMD, only the presence of sleep bruxism did not increase the risk for any type of headache. The presence of painful TMD without sleep bruxism significantly increased the risk in particular for chronic migraine (30.1; 3.58-252.81), followed by episodic migraine (3.7; 1.46-9.16). The association between painful TMD and sleep bruxism significantly increased the risk for chronic migraine (87.1; 10.79-702.18), followed by episodic migraine (6.7; 2.79-15.98) and episodic tension-type headache (3.8; 1.38-10.69). The association of sleep bruxism and painful TMD greatly increased the risk for episodic migraine, episodic tension-type headache, and especially for chronic migraine.

  8. Expanding the taxonomy of the diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, C C; Goulet, J-P; Lobbezoo, F; Schiffman, E L; Alstergren, P; Anderson, G C; de Leeuw, R; Jensen, R; Michelotti, A; Ohrbach, R; Petersson, A; List, T

    2014-01-01

    There is a need to expand the current temporomandibular disorders' (TMDs) classification to include less common but clinically important disorders. The immediate aim was to develop a consensus-based classification system and associated diagnostic criteria that have clinical and research utility for less common TMDs. The long-term aim was to establish a foundation, vis-à-vis this classification system, that will stimulate data collection, validity testing and further criteria refinement. A working group [members of the International RDC/TMD Consortium Network of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), members of the Orofacial Pain Special Interest Group (SIG) of the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP), and members from other professional societies] reviewed disorders for inclusion based on clinical significance, the availability of plausible diagnostic criteria and the ability to operationalise and study the criteria. The disorders were derived from the literature when possible and based on expert opinion as necessary. The expanded TMDs taxonomy was presented for feedback at international meetings. Of 56 disorders considered, 37 were included in the expanded taxonomy and were placed into the following four categories: temporomandibular joint disorders, masticatory muscle disorders, headache disorders and disorders affecting associated structures. Those excluded were extremely uncommon, lacking operationalised diagnostic criteria, not clearly related to TMDs, or not sufficiently distinct from disorders already included within the taxonomy. The expanded TMDs taxonomy offers an integrated approach to clinical diagnosis and provides a framework for further research to operationalise and test the proposed taxonomy and diagnostic criteria. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Headache associated with temporomandibular disorders among young Brazilian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Ana L; Fernandes, Giovana; Gonçalves, Daniela A G; Bonafé, Fernanda S S; Camparis, Cinara M

    2014-04-01

    To verify whether headaches (HAs) are associated with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in young Brazilian adolescents. From a population sample, 3117 public school children (12 to 14 y) were randomly invited to participate in this study. TMD was assessed according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) Axis I, in addition to questions #3, #4, and #14 of Axis II history questionnaire. HAs were investigated with question #18 of RDC/TMD Axis II. Chronic TMD pain was considered as pain that has persisted for 6 months or more, as proposed by the International Association for the Study of Pain. The statistical analysis consisted of χ tests, odds ratio (OR), and logistic regression models, adopting a significance level of 5%. The sample included 1307 individuals (a response rate of 41.93%), and 56.8% (n=742) were girls. Overall, 330 adolescents (25.2%) were diagnosed with painful TMD and 595 (45.5%) presented with HAs. Individuals presenting with HAs were more likely to present painful TMD (OR=4.94; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.73-6.54, P<0.001), especially combined muscle and joint painful TMD (OR=7.58; 95% CI, 4.77-12.05, P<0.001). HAs also increased the risk to a higher magnitude for chronic TMD pain (OR=6.12; 95% CI, 4.27-8.78, P<0.0001). All estimated ORs remained essentially unchanged after adjusting for sex. HAs were a potential risk factor for TMD in adolescents, and the risk was particularly higher for painful and chronic TMD. When HAs are present in young adolescents, a complete examination is strongly recommended with regard to the presence of painful TMD, and vice versa.

  10. Headache and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder: an epidemiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Daniela A G; Bigal, Marcelo E; Jales, Luciana C F; Camparis, Cinara M; Speciali, José G

    2010-02-01

    A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted to estimate the prevalence of migraine, episodic tension-type headaches (ETTH), and chronic daily headaches (CDH), as well as the presence of symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in the adult population. The potential comorbidity of headache syndromes and TMD has been established mostly based on clinic-based studies. A representative sample of 1230 inhabitants (51.5% women) was interviewed by a validated phone survey. TMD symptoms were assessed through 5 questions, as recommended by the American Academy of Orofacial Pain, in an attempt to classify possible TMD. Primary headaches were diagnosed based on the International Classification of Headache Disorders. When at least 1 TMD symptom was reported, any headache happened in 56.5% vs 31.9% (P headache as the reference, the prevalence of at least 1 TMD symptom was increased in ETTH (prevalence ratio = 1.48, 95% confidence interval = 1.20-1.79), migraine (2.10, 1.80-2.47) and CDH (2.41, 1.84-3.17). At least 2 TMD symptoms also happened more frequently in migraine (4.4, 3.0-6.3), CDH (3.4; 1.5-7.6), and ETTH (2.1; 1.3-3.2), relative to individuals with no headaches. Finally, 3 or more TMD symptoms were also more common in migraine (6.2; 3.8-10.2) than in no headaches. Differences were significant for ETTH (2.7 1.5-4.8), and were numerically but not significant for CDH (2.3; 0.66-8.04). Temporomandibular disorder symptoms are more common in migraine, ETTH, and CDH relative to individuals without headache. Magnitude of association is higher for migraine. Future studies should clarify the nature of the relationship.

  11. Radiologic Study of Meniscus Perforations in the Temporomandibular Joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kee Duck; Park, Chang Seo

    1990-01-01

    Thirty-nine patients (forty-four joints) who had been diagnosed as having meniscus perforation of the temporomandibular joint by inferior joint space arthrography and had been treated by surgical procedures were evaluated retrospectively. Information of clinical findings, arthrotomographic findings and surgical findings was collected on a standardized form and evaluated. The results were as follows: 1. On the 34 patients of 38 joints which were surgically confirmed perforation of meniscus or its attachments of the temporomandibular joint, there were 29 females and 5 males (5.8:1). The average age was 36 years (range 17 to 70). 2. The common clinical findings of group that had meniscus displacement without reduction and with perforation were pain on the affected joint and limitation of mouth opening. In the group showing meniscus displacement with reduction and with perforation the common clinical findings were pain and clicking on the affected joint. 3. 32 joints (84.2%) were arthrotomographically anterior meniscus displacement without reduction and with perforation, 6 joints (15.8%) showed anterior meniscus displacement with reduction and with perforation. 4. Joints categorized arthrotomographically as having meniscus displacement without reduction and with perforation were less likely to have full translation of the condyle in comparison with the normal or meniscus displacement with reduction and with perforation groups (p<0.05) 5. The arthrographic findings of 44 joints having meniscus perforation were compared with surgical findings, there were 6 false positive findings of meniscus perforation, the reliability of arthrographic findings of meniscus perforation was a 86.4% correlation with surgical findings. 6. On the site of perforations of 38 joints which were surgically confirmed perforation of meniscus or its attachments, twenty-three of perforations (60.5%) were in location at the junction of the meniscus and posterior attachment, fourteen (36.9%) were

  12. High-resolution ultrasonography in assessing temporomandibular joint disc position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talmaceanu, Daniel; Lenghel, Lavinia Manuela; Bolog, Nicolae; Popa Stanila, Roxana; Buduru, Smaranda; Leucuta, Daniel Corneliu; Rotar, Horatiu; Baciut, Mihaela; Baciut, Grigore

    2018-02-04

    The purpose of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of high-resolution ultrasonography (US) in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc displacements. A number of 74 patients (148 TMJs) with signs and symptoms of TMJ disorders, according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders, were included in this study. All patients received US and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of both TMJs 1 to 5 days after the clinical examination. MRI examinations were performed using 1.5 T MRI equipment (Siemens Avanto, Siemens, Erlangen). Ultrasonographic examination was performed on a Hitachi EUB 8500 (Hitachi Medical Corp., Tokyo, Japan) scanner with L 54 M6.5-13 MHz linear transducer. MRI depicted 68 (45.95%) normal joints, 47 (31.76%) with disc displacement with reduction, 33 (22.3%) with disc displacement without reduction and 34 (22.97%) with degenerative changes. US detected 78 (52.7%) normal joints, 37 (25%) with disc displacement with reduction, 33 (22.3%) with disc displacement without reduction and 21 (14.19%) with degenerative changes. Compared to MRI, US showed a sensitivity of 93.1%, specificity of 87.88%, accuracy of 90.32%, a positive predictive value of 87.1% and a negative predictive value of 93.55% for overall diagnosis of disc displacement. The Youden index was 0.81. Based on our results, high-resolution ultrasonography showed high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy in the diagnosis of TMJ disc displacement. It could be a valuable imaging technique in assessing TMJ disc position. The diagnostic value of high-resolution ultrasonography depends strictly on the examiner's skills and on the equipment used.

  13. Occlusal Support and Temporomandibular Disorders Among Elderly Vietnamese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minh Son; Jagomägi, Triin; Nguyen, Toai; Saag, Mare; Voog-Oras, Ülle

    The aim of this study was to analyze the associations between missing teeth, occlusal support, and temporomandibular disorders (TMD) among elderly Vietnamese. The study consisted of 145 TMD and 112 non-TMD (control group) participants aged 65 to 74 years. TMD was evaluated using Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (DC/TMD) Axis I. An occlusal unit (OU) was defined as the cusp of a tooth coupled with the fossa of its antagonist tooth. A premolar pair was counted as one OU and a molar pair as two OUs. Dentition was divided into four occlusal support zones (OSZs) based on occluding pairs of posterior teeth by using Eichner classification: Class A had 4 OSZs, Class B had 1 to 3 OSZs or only anterior teeth, and Class C had no OSZ. The TMD group lost significantly more posterior teeth (mean ± SD 5.1 ± 4.7) than the control group (4.0 ± 3.9, P = .033). The mean ± SD OUs of the TMD and control groups were 5.1 ± 4.6 and 6.0 ± 4.3, respectively, which was nonsignificant (NS). The distribution of Class A (40.7%), Class B (40.0%), and Class C (19.3%) among the TMD group was not significantly different from the control group (50.0%, 38.4%, and 11.6%, respectively, NS). The odds of having TMD were positively associated with total unilateral loss of OUs (OR = 3.4, 95% CI = 1.2-9.4, P = .020) and total bilateral loss of OUs (OR = 2.7, 95% CI = 1.2-6.6, P = .027). Total loss of OSZs on one or both sides of the mouth were found to be predictors of TMD among elderly Vietnamese.

  14. Relação entre disfunção temporomandibular e alterações auditivas The relationship among temporomandibular dysfunction and hearing alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela de Campos Barreto

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available TEMA: o equilíbrio das estruturas e funções do sistema estomatognático depende do adequado funcionamento da Articulação Temporomandibular, e esta, por sua vez, precisa da oclusão dental correta para a realização das funções ao movimentar a mandíbula. O desequilíbrio muscular ou estrutural da Articulação Temporomandibular poderá acarretar em uma disfunção dessa articulação e causar sinais e sintomas diversos como manifestações auditivas do tipo zumbido e otalgia. OBJETIVO: realizou-se a revisão de literatura das áreas de fonoaudiologia, otorrinolaringologia e odontologia com pesquisas em bases de dados, artigos e livros, sendo selecionadas as literaturas de 1992 a 2008 relacionadas ao tema do trabalho, a fim de associar sintomas audiológicos com a Disfunção Temporomandibular e apontar a importância da atuação multiprofissional, dando ênfase à atuação fonoaudiológica, em tal disfunção. CONCLUSÃO: várias são as hipóteses que tentam explicar a relação existente entre a Disfunção Temporomandibular e as alterações auditivas. Verificamos que há um vínculo entre o sistema estomatognático e o sistema auditivo. Contudo, mais importante que somente associar os sistemas estomatognático e auditivo, a equipe multiprofissional envolvida na assistência à pacientes com Disfunção Temporomandibular, precisa ter conhecimento a respeito da anatomia e fisiologia da Articulação Temporomandibular, de suas disfunções, causas e consequências, sendo capaz de distinguir a terapêutica eficiente para cada disfunção e, por fim, analisar a conduta com encaminhamentos adequados para a evolução do caso.BACKGROUND: the balance referring to the structures and functions of the stomatognatic system depends on the appropriate functioning of the Temporomandibular Joint, and this one, needs the correct teeth occlusion for accomplishing the functional needs when moving the jaw. The muscle or structural unbalance of the

  15. [The transverse movement of the temporo-mandibular joint (translation movement) of the dog, also with reference to dysplasia of this joint in the dachshund].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmerhaus, B; Roos, H

    1996-09-01

    Contrary to the accepted opinion, transverse movement is possible in the temporo-mandibular joint of the dog. This movement is arched and is important for mastication. Analysis of transverse movement of the temporo-mandibular joint was done in 20 dog breeds. Accidentally dysplasia of the temporo-mandibular joint was found in the dachshund, a phenomenon which has not been described before.

  16. Quantification of disc displacement in internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arayasantiparb, Raweewan; Tsuchimochi, Makoto

    2010-02-01

    Many measures have been developed to determine the extent of disc displacement in internal derangements of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) using magnetic resonance imaging. The purpose of this study was to develop a quantitative method of analyzing disc position and to evaluate the positions of the disc in internal derangements of the TMJ (group 1, with reduction; group 2, without reduction). Magnetic resonance images of 150 TMJs in 20 healthy volunteers and 55 patients with internal derangements were evaluated. The anatomical points of interest of the TMJ, including the anterior (DA) and posterior (DP) points of the disc, were marked on parasagittal magnetic resonance images of the TMJ disc taken in both the closed- and the open-mouth positions. All points were recorded using an x-y coordinate system, with reference to a referral line. In the closed-mouth position, the DP in patients in group 1 was situated in a more-anterior direction than the DP in volunteers. The DP in group 2 was located further anterior and inferior than the DP in group 1. However, the position of the DA did not differ between group 1 and group 2. In the open-mouth position, the DP was displaced anteroinferiorly to a greater extent in group 2 than in group 1 (one-way ANOVA, followed by Scheffe's test; P displaced TMJ discs revealed no significant difference. In conclusion, most of our results quantitatively support previously reported findings in imaging, surgical, and histopathological studies of TMJ internal derangement. We suggest that our measure of disc position of the TMJ would be useful to assess the status and response to treatment of internal derangements of the TMJ.

  17. Effect of Lengthy Root Canal Therapy Sessions on Temporomandibular Joint and Masticatory Muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safoora Sahebi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Trauma is one of the major factors associated with temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD. These disorders result from macro-trauma or micro-trauma. Macro-trauma might be iatrogenic; for example, from intubation procedures, third molar extraction procedures, and lengthy dental appointments. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of lengthy root canal therapy (more than 2 hours on TMJ and its supporting structures. Materials and methods. Eighty patients whose root canal therapy session lasted more than 2 hours were examined for the status of TMJ and masticatory muscles. After one week the second part of the examination was carried out for TMJ problems and pain and tenderness levels of masticatory muscles. Data was analyzed using Wilcoxon statistical test. Results. Women showed more pain compared to men. There was a significant increase in pain in the external acoustic meatus examination one week after root canal therapy. Patients who were treated for their posterior teeth suffered more pain than those who were treated for the anteriors and premolars. Other aspects of the examination were not affected significantly by lengthy root canal therapy. Conclusion. Lengthy dental treatments can harm TMJ and masticatory muscles and wide opening of the mouth during such appointments can worsen the situation. Therefore, it is wise to break the appointment into shorter intervals and let the patients rest during treatment to close their mouth to prevent iatrogenic damage to TMJ.

  18. Effect of Lengthy Root Canal Therapy Sessions on Temporomandibular Joint and Masticatory Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahebi, Safoora; Moazami, Fariborz; Afsa, Masoomeh; Nabavi Zade, Mohammad Reza

    2010-01-01

    Background and aims Trauma is one of the major factors associated with temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD). These disorders result from macro-trauma or micro-trauma. Macro-trauma might be iatrogenic; for example, from intuba-tion procedures, third molar extraction procedures, and lengthy dental appointments. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of lengthy root canal therapy (more than 2 hours) on TMJ and its supporting structures. Materials and methods Eighty patients whose root canal therapy session lasted more than 2 hours were examined for the status of TMJ and masticatory muscles. After one week the second part of the examination was carried out for TMJ problems and pain and tenderness levels of masticatory muscles. Data was analyzed using Wilcoxon statistical test. Results Women showed more pain compared to men. There was a significant increase in pain in the external acoustic meatus examination one week after root canal therapy. Patients who were treated for their posterior teeth suffered more pain than those who were treated for the anteriors and premolars. Other aspects of the examination were not affected significantly by lengthy root canal therapy. Conclusion Lengthy dental treatments can harm TMJ and masticatory muscles and wide opening of the mouth during such appointments can worsen the situation. Therefore, it is wise to break the appointment into shorter intervals and let the patients rest during treatment to close their mouth to prevent iatrogenic damage to TMJ. PMID:22991607

  19. Assessment of temporomandibular joint dysfunction in condylar fracture of the mandible using the Helkimo index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Suhas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Condylar fractures of the mandible are functionally important fractures as the condyle of the mandible being a part of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ and can lead to TMJ dysfunction if not properly treated. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of a total of 33 treated patients with fracture of the mandibular condyle who underwent examination as per the Helkimo index. Their dysfunction was quantified and clinicoepidemiological characteristics were assessed. It was found that majority of our patients were young males involved in a two-wheeler accident. All patients underwent intermaxillary fixation as the minimum treatment and 30% underwent open reduction and internal fixation in addition. Results: There was no statistically significant association between the degree of clinical dysfunction and factors such as age, mechanism of injury, type of condyle fracture, presence of other mandible fractures, and surgical procedure. However, dislocation of the mandibular condyle was found to be a negative prognostic factor and all these patients had some degree of dysfunction. Conclusion: The overall prevalence of TMJ dysfunction according to the Helkimo index was 90%. About 61% of patients had mild dysfunction (Di1 and 30% had moderate dysfunction (Di2. None of the patients had severe dysfunction. To conclude, the Helkimo index is a simple, effective, inexpensive, reliable screening index to assess TMJ dysfunction in condylar fractures of mandible.

  20. TEMPOROMANDIBULAR PAIN DYSFUNCTION SYNDROME IN PATIENTS ATTENDING LAGOS UNIVERSITY TEACHING HOSPITAL, LAGOS, NIGERIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eweka, O M; Ogundana, O M; Agbelusi, G A

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome (TMJPDS) is the most common temporomandibular disorder. This condition presents with symptoms of pain, restricted jaw movement and joint noise. Other symptoms include otalgia, headache, neck pain and trismus. To determine the pattern of Temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome patients managed at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria. A descriptive study of patients with signs and symptoms of Temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome attending the Oral Medicine Clinic of Lagos University Teaching Hospital. Twenty-one patients with Temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome were enrolled into the study, out of which 10(48%) were females and 11(52%) were males. The age range was 23-81years with a mean of 45.2 ± 18.9 years. Majority of the patients 20(95.2%) complained of pain around the joint, in the pre-auricular region, in the muscles of mastication and the ear. While 7(35%) complained of clicking sounds, 10(47.6%) complained of pain on mouth opening and during mastication only. In all 5(23.8%) had impaired movement of the jaws, mouth opening was normal in 18(85.7%) but reduced in 3(14.3%) patients. Over half of patients 12(57%) experienced clicking sounds, there was tenderness around the temporomandibular joint in 16(76.2%) cases, pain in the ear of 7(33.3%) patients and 13(61.9%) people presented with tenderness of the muscles of mastication. Conservative management of all the cases resulted in resolution of the symptoms. Temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome has diverse clinical presentation and though distressing, it responds to prompt and effective conservative management.

  1. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in adolescents Sinais e sintomas de disfunção temporomandibular em adolescentes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Rigoldi Bonjardim

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to verify the prevalence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD in adolescents and its relationship to gender. The sample comprised 217 subjects, aged 12 to 18. The subjective symptoms and clinical signs of TMD were evaluated, using, respectively, a self-report questionnaire and the Craniomandibular Index, which has 2 subscales; the Dysfunction Index and the Palpation Index. The results of muscle tenderness showed great variability (0.9-32.25%. In relation to the temporomandibular joint, tenderness of the superior, dorsal and lateral condyle regions occurred in 10.6%, 10.6% and 7.83%, respectively, of the sample. Joint sound during opening was present in 19.8% of the sample and during closing in 14.7%. The most prevalent symptoms were joint sounds (26.72% and headache (21.65%. There was no statistical difference between genders (p > 0.05, except for the tenderness of the lateral pterygoid muscles, which presented more prevalence in girls. In conclusion, clinical signs and symptoms of TMD can occur in adolescents; however, gender influence was not perceived.O objetivo deste estudo foi verificar a prevalência de sinais e sintomas de disfunção temporomandibular (DTM em adolescentes e sua relação com o gênero. A amostra foi constituída de 217 voluntários, com idade entre 12 e 18 anos. Os sintomas subjetivos e os sinais clínicos de DTM foram avaliados usando-se, respectivamente, um questionário e o "Craniomandibular Index", o qual possui 2 subescalas: "Dysfunction Index" e "Palpation Index". Os resultados para sensibilidade muscular mostraram grande variabilidade (0,9-32,25%. Com relação à articulação temporomandibular, a sensibilidade à palpação nas regiões superior, dorsal e lateral do côndilo ocorreu, respectivamente, em 10,6%, 10,6% e 7,83% da amostra. A prevalência do ruído articular no movimento de abertura foi de 19,8% e no fechamento, 14,7%. Os sintomas relatados mais

  2. Association between condylar morphology and changes in bony microstructure and subsynovial inflammation in experimental temporomandibular joint arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper Dahl; Hauge, Ellen Margrethe; Dalstra, Michel

    2010-01-01

    Association between condylar morphology and changes in bony microstructure and subsynovial inflammation in experimental temporomandibular joint arthritis. 86. Congress of the European Orthodontic Society, Slovenien, 2010.......Association between condylar morphology and changes in bony microstructure and subsynovial inflammation in experimental temporomandibular joint arthritis. 86. Congress of the European Orthodontic Society, Slovenien, 2010....

  3. Evaluation of the research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders for the recognition of an anterior disc displacement with reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naeije, M.; Kalaykova, S.; Visscher, C.M.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this Focus Article is to review critically the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) for the recognition of an anterior disc displacement with reduction (ADDR) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). This evaluation is based upon the experience gained

  4. Clinical evaluation of the low intensity laser antialgic action of GaAlAs (λ=785 nm) in the treatment of the temporomandibular disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanseverino, Nelly Tichauer Maluf

    2001-01-01

    The therapy with laser emitting low intensity has been currently used in the most diverse fields of medicine as therapeutic conduct for pain. It is a non invasive, painless, non-thermal and aseptic type therapy, without any collateral effects, having a good cost/benefit relationship. However, for the therapy with low-intensity laser to result in positive effects, a correct diagnosis is fundamental, as well as a protocol of adequate application. n odontology, the majority of patients diagnosed with temporomandibular disorders (TMD), present pain and limitations in the movements of the jaw. In this work, a GaAlAs laser emitting low intensity, was used, λ=785 nm, in patients having a dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint with a complaint of pain. Twenty patients were divided into two groups. The group treated received laser therapy in the temporomandibular articulations and in the muscles affected. The dose applied was 45 J/cm 2 , while the ten patients in the control group received 0 J/cm 2 , in a total of nine applications, carried out three times a week, during three weeks. he evaluation of the patients was made through clinical examinations of manual palpation of the masseter, temporal, cervical, posterior neck and sternocleidomastoid muscles, and measurements of opening and laterality of the mouth. The results obtained showed a diminishing of the pain and an increase of the mandibular mobility in the patients treated, when compared to the control group. These results point to this therapy as being an important tool in the treatment of pain in patients with a dysfunction in the TMJ, indicating this therapeutic modality as a co-adjuvant in these treatments. (author)

  5. A simple method for regional cerebral blood flow measurement by one-point arterial blood sampling and 123I-IMP microsphere model (part 2). A study of time correction of one-point blood sample count

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Yasuhiko; Makino, Kenichi; Gotoh, Satoshi

    1999-01-01

    In our previous paper regarding determination of the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) using the 123 I-IMP microsphere model, we reported that the accuracy of determination of the integrated value of the input function from one-point arterial blood sampling can be increased by performing correction using the 5 min: 29 min ratio for the whole-brain count. However, failure to carry out the arterial blood collection at exactly 5 minutes after 123 I-IMP injection causes errors with this method, and there is thus a time limitation. We have now revised out method so that the one-point arterial blood sampling can be performed at any time during the interval between 5 minutes and 20 minutes after 123 I-IMP injection, with addition of a correction step for the sampling time. This revised method permits more accurate estimation of the integral of the input functions. This method was then applied to 174 experimental subjects: one-point blood samples collected at random times between 5 and 20 minutes, and the estimated values for the continuous arterial octanol extraction count (COC) were determined. The mean error rate between the COC and the actual measured continuous arterial octanol extraction count (OC) was 3.6%, and the standard deviation was 12.7%. Accordingly, in 70% of the cases, the rCBF was able to be estimated within an error rate of 13%, while estimation was possible in 95% of the cases within an error rate of 25%. This improved method is a simple technique for determination of the rCBF by 123 I-IMP microsphere model and one-point arterial blood sampling which no longer shows a time limitation and does not require any octanol extraction step. (author)

  6. A retrospective analysis of the headache associated with temporomandibular joint disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungari, C; Quarato, D; Gennaro, P; Riccardi, E; Agrillo, A; Mitro, V; Cascino, F; Reale, G; Rinna, C; Filiaci, F

    2012-11-01

    Headache is a common symptom, that can be extremely disabling, affecting 26 million of patients only in Italy. ICHD-II has reported two categories: "primary headaches" and "secondary headaches". Temporomandibular joint disorders can lead to a secondary headaches. We want to evaluate the prevalence and clinical features of headache among a series of patients having temporomandibular joint disorders and we illustrate the evolution of headache following medical treatament of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders. This is a retrospective study carried out on chart review of 426 consecutive patients with various degrees of temporomandibular disorders and treated with medical devices from 2007 to 2011. Headache was reported by 73 patients (17.14%). Headache was observed in 36 of 51 patients with lock and in 32 out of 130 patients with mandibular deflections (Table I). The remaining 5 patients with headache had articular noise. Headache is not a rare finding in a population with temporomandibular dysfunctions and is more often a tension-type rather than trigeminal headache.

  7. MR of 2270 TMJs: prevalence of radiographic presence of otomastoiditis in temporomandibular joint disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orhan, Kaan [Department of Oral Diagnosis and Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Ankara University, 06500 Besevler, Ankara (Turkey)]. E-mail: call53@yahoo.com; Nishiyama, Hideyoshi [Department of Oral Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Tadashi, Sasaki [Department of Oral Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Shumei, Murakami [Department of Oral Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Furukawa, Souhei [Department of Oral Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    Objective: : The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence of radiographic presence of otomastoiditis while examining temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders in magnetic resonance images (MRI) in a series of 2270 temporomandibular joint magnetic resonance images and to examine the relationship between otomastoiditis and TMJ disorders. Materials and methods: : 2270 temporomandibular joint magnetic resonance images and patients' data were retrospectively investigated. Magnetic resonance images were obtained from the patients who referred to Osaka University Dental Hospital Outpatient Clinic with TMJ complaints for the last four years (from January 1998 to January 2003). The patients, who were diagnosed as otomastoiditis based on their temporomandibular joint magnetic resonance images, were sent to Osaka University Hospital Department of Otolaryngology for a medical consultation in order to have their pathologies certified following their MR process. Age and sex were recorded for all patients and for otomastoiditis cases; location of the disease, symptoms of patients and TMJ findings were noted as well. Results: : Seven patients were diagnosed as acute otomastoiditis and one patient diagnosed as chronic active otitis media with cholesteatoma in the series of 2270 MR, which were representing a prevalence of 0.39%. Neurilemoma diagnosed in left mastoid process in one patient. The final diagnoses of all patients were made after medical consultation. Conclusion: : While examining temporomandibular joint magnetic resonance images; it is not only important to examine just the TMJ structures, but also to look at the nearby anatomical features to check evidence for inflammatory disease.

  8. MR of 2270 TMJs: prevalence of radiographic presence of otomastoiditis in temporomandibular joint disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orhan, Kaan; Nishiyama, Hideyoshi; Tadashi, Sasaki; Shumei, Murakami; Furukawa, Souhei

    2005-01-01

    Objective: : The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence of radiographic presence of otomastoiditis while examining temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders in magnetic resonance images (MRI) in a series of 2270 temporomandibular joint magnetic resonance images and to examine the relationship between otomastoiditis and TMJ disorders. Materials and methods: : 2270 temporomandibular joint magnetic resonance images and patients' data were retrospectively investigated. Magnetic resonance images were obtained from the patients who referred to Osaka University Dental Hospital Outpatient Clinic with TMJ complaints for the last four years (from January 1998 to January 2003). The patients, who were diagnosed as otomastoiditis based on their temporomandibular joint magnetic resonance images, were sent to Osaka University Hospital Department of Otolaryngology for a medical consultation in order to have their pathologies certified following their MR process. Age and sex were recorded for all patients and for otomastoiditis cases; location of the disease, symptoms of patients and TMJ findings were noted as well. Results: : Seven patients were diagnosed as acute otomastoiditis and one patient diagnosed as chronic active otitis media with cholesteatoma in the series of 2270 MR, which were representing a prevalence of 0.39%. Neurilemoma diagnosed in left mastoid process in one patient. The final diagnoses of all patients were made after medical consultation. Conclusion: : While examining temporomandibular joint magnetic resonance images; it is not only important to examine just the TMJ structures, but also to look at the nearby anatomical features to check evidence for inflammatory disease

  9. Prevalencia de trastornos temporomandibulares en el adulto mayor institucionalizado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenia Masiel Criado Mora

    Full Text Available Introducción: los trastornos temporomandibulares (TTM son una serie de signos y síntomas buco faciales de etiología multifactorial. En Cuba existen varias investigaciones que tratan sobre los TTM %sobre todo en jóvenes dentados% no conociéndose amplias referencias de este tipo de estudio en el adulto mayor. Objetivo: identificar la prevalencia de TTM en los adultos mayores institucionalizados, los signos y síntomas más frecuentes según edad y sexo. Métodos: se realizó un estudio descriptivo transversal en 113 adultos mayores de ambos sexos, institucionalizados en dos hogares de ancianos de la Habana, de marzo a abril de 2012. Se aplicó una encuesta donde se recogió sexo, edad, signos y síntomas. Las manifestaciones clínicas evaluadas fueron: la presencia de dolor muscular, dificultad al movimiento de abertura y cierre, dolor articular, dolor muscular articular, ruidos articulares, limitación de la abertura bucal, limitación de los movimientos de lateralidad y propulsión, desviación de la mandíbula. Resultados: el 40,70 % de los adultos mayores estudiados, presentaron afectación en la articulación temporomandibular. Los ruidos articulares fue el síntoma con mayor predominio en todos los grupos etarios (76,08 %, afectando al 82,35 % de los hombres y al 72,41 % de las mujeres. Seguido por el dolor muscular que se manifestó en el 52,17 % de los afectados, con mayor porcentaje en mujeres (58,62 % que en hombres (41,17 %. La dificultad para realizar los movimientos de abertura y cierre se detectó en el 28,26 % de los afectados con mayor prevalencia en el sexo femenino (34,48 % que en el masculino (17,14 %. Conclusiones. se observó una elevada prevalencia de TTM en los adultos mayores estudiados. Los signos y síntomas más frecuentes por edad y sexo fueron los ruidos articulares y el dolor muscular y la dificultad para realizar los movimientos de abertura y cierre.

  10. Botulinum toxin for treating muscular temporomandibular disorders: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Machado

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study, through a systematic literature review, aims to analyze the effectiveness of Botulinum Toxin as a treatment for masticatory myofascial pain and muscles temporomandibular disorders (TMD. METHODS: Survey in research bases: MEDLINE, Cochrane, EMBASE, Pubmed, Lilacs and BBO, between the years of 1966 and April 2011, with focus in randomized or quasi-randomized controlled clinical trials, blind or double-blind. RESULTS: After applying the inclusion criteria, 4 articles comprised the final sample: 3 were double-blind randomized controlled clinical trials and 1 was single-blind randomized controlled clinical trial. CONCLUSIONS: According to the literature, there is lack of evidence about the real effectiveness of botulinum toxin in the treatment of masticatory myofascial pain and muscular TMD. Thus, further randomized controlled clinical trials, with representative samples and longer follow-up time, to assess the real effectiveness of the technique are needed.OBJETIVO: este trabalho, por meio de uma revisão sistemática da literatura, teve como objetivo analisar a efetividade da toxina botulínica como tratamento para dor miofascial mastigatória e disfunções temporomandibulares (DTM musculares. MÉTODOS: pesquisa nas bases de dados Medline, Cochrane, Embase, Pubmed, Lilacs e BBO, no período entre 1966 e abril de 2011, com enfoque em estudos clínicos controlados randomizados ou quase-randomizados, cegos ou duplo-cegos. RESULTADOS: após a aplicação dos critérios de inclusão, chegou-se a 4 artigos, sendo que 3 eram estudos clínicos controlados randomizados duplo-cego e 1 era estudo clínico controlado randomizado simples-cego. CONCLUSÕES: pela análise da literatura, verificou-se um número reduzido de evidências significativas sobre a real efetividade da toxina botulínica no tratamento da dor miofascial e de DTM musculares. Assim, são necessários novos estudos clínicos controlados randomizados, com amostras

  11. [Diagnosis and classification of headache and temporomandibular disorders, a new opportunity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koole, P; Koole, R

    2011-05-01

    Patients with orofacial pains are generally treated by physicians. A small number of patients are treated for pain in the temporomandibular joint, the masticatory and the neck muscles, by dentists and orofacial surgeons. Among half of the patients being treated in neurological headache clinics, the temporomandibular joint and the masticatory muscles are the source of the pain. In order to achieve better research and a classification, the International Headache Society, consisting largely of neurologists, developed a classification system. A comparable development occurred among oral health specialists. Employing these 2 methods with the same patients leads to different diagnoses and treatments. Both the International Classification of Headache Disorders II and the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders are being revised. This creates the opportunity to establish a single classification for these orofacial pains, preferably within the new International Classification of Headache Disorders.

  12. A pilot study of a chiropractic intervention for management of chronic myofascial temporomandibular disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeVocht, James W; Goertz, Christine M; Hondras, Maria

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Temporomandibular pain has multiple etiologies and a range of therapeutic options. In this pilot study, the authors assessed the feasibility of conducting a larger trial to evaluate chiropractic treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). METHODS: The authors assigned 80...... at baseline and at month 2 and month 6, including use of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders. RESULTS: The authors screened 721 potential participants and enrolled 80 people; 52 participants completed the six-month assessment. The adjusted mean change in current pain over six...... the study design and methodology to be manageable. They gained substantial knowledge to aid in conducting a larger study. AMCT, RIST and self-care should be evaluated in a future comparative effectiveness study. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: This pilot study was a necessary step to prepare for a larger study...

  13. Spinal and temporo-mandibular disorders in male workers of the State Police.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancini, Angela; Tomei, Francesco; Tomei, Gianfranco; Caciari, Tiziana; Capozzella, Assunta; Di Famiani, Manuela; Samperi, Ilaria; Scala, Barbara; Fiaschetti, Maria; Cetica, Carlotta; Ciarrocca, Manuela

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study are to evaluate the prevalence of disorders of the lumbar region and the temporo-mandibular district co-morbidity in drivers and workers of the State Police employed for different office activities. The study population included 103 drivers as cases and 100 police officers as controls. The study was carried out through questionnaire and clinical evaluation of the spine and temporo-mandibular region. At clinical examination, the drivers were found to have a higher prevalence (p temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ), when compared with the controls. The results also showed a higher prevalence (p < 0.05) of co-morbidity in the two districts among the drivers, when compared with the controls. These results confirm that morbidity related to back and TMJ and increase in co-morbidity between the two districts are higher in professional drivers.

  14. [Inferior hemiarthroplasty of the temporo-mandibular joint with articulated condylar prosthesis type Stryker].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucur, A; Dincă, O; Totan, C; Ghită, V

    2007-01-01

    The optimal reconstruction of the mandible and of the temporo-mandibular joint after mandibular hemi-resection with disarticulation is still controversial in literature. This paperwork presents our experience on four cases in the reconstruction of the mandible together with the inferior arthroplasty of the temporo-mandibular joint, after the resection of extended benign tumors of the mandible, based on fibular free vascularized grafts having attached a Stryker titanium condylar prosthesis reconstructing the inferior segment of the temporo-mandibular joint. Our results for the this technique were excellent, with a functional rehabilitation very close to normal. After reviewing the various techniques and their arguments in literature, with accent on the TMJ reconstruction, we consider this method to be optimal for the reconstruction of mandibular defects in patients with neoplastic conditions.

  15. SYNOVIAL CHONDROMATOSIS OF THE TEMPORO-MANDIBULAR JOINT. A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. MALANCHUK

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The study describes a rare clinical case of synovial chondromatosis of the temporo-mandibular joint, in a 53 year-old patient. In the prehospital stage, the patient was examined by additional diagnostic methods – 3D CT and subsequent computer simulation, in view of subsequent surgery. In January 2015, partial synovektomy of the right temporo-mandibular joint with removal of cartilaginous impurities was performed under general anesthesia. After histopathological confirmation of the clinical diagnosis, the patient was discharged in satisfactory condition, with recommendations for further examination and radiological control. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporo-mandibular joint is a disease characterized by impaired formation of cartilage or of intraarticular, cartilaginous, and relatively rare bone impurities. An important role in the diagnosis of joints’ synovial chondromatosis is played by the instrumental research methods, especially X-ray. Surgical treatment is recommended as a function of the prevalence of lesions.

  16. The Mollier diagram in theory and practice. Part 3. Examples on Calculation of Dew Point Cooling; Het Mollierdiagram in theorie en praktijk. Deel 3. Rekenvoorbeelden Dauwpuntkoeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouwenhoven, H.J.L. [Frigidarium, Driebergen-Rijsenburg (Netherlands); Huizinga, H.T. [Heat Transfer Holland HTH, Zuidwolde (Netherlands); Bootsveld, N.R. [YNO, Delft (Netherlands); Janssen, M. [Re-gent, Helmond (Netherlands); Uges, P.G.H. [StatiqCooling, Deventer (Netherlands)

    2007-04-15

    The use of direct and indirect adiabatic cooling, and recently in particular indirect diabatic cooling (dew point cooling) require knowledge of the Mollier diagram. [Dutch] Het gebruik van direct en indirect werkende adiabatische koeling en recentlijk vooral de indirect werkende systemen zoals diabatische koeling (dauwpuntkoeling, al of niet uitgevoerd als statische koeling) vragen om kennis van het Mollierdiagram.

  17. Effects of Cooking End-point Temperature and Muscle Part on Sensory 'Hardness' and 'Chewiness' Assessed Using Scales Presented in ISO11036:1994.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Keisuke; Motoyama, Michiyo; Narita, Takumi; Chikuni, Koichi

    2013-10-01

    Texture and 'tenderness' in particular, is an important sensory characteristic for consumers' satisfaction of beef. Objective and detailed sensory measurements of beef texture have been needed for the evaluation and management of beef quality. This study aimed to apply the sensory scales defined in ISO11036:1994 to evaluate the texture of beef. Longissimus and Semitendinosus muscles of three Holstein steers cooked to end-point temperatures of 60°C and 72°C were subjected to sensory analyses by a sensory panel with expertise regarding the ISO11036 scales. For the sensory analysis, standard scales of 'chewiness' (9-points) and 'hardness' (7-points) were presented to the sensory panel with reference materials defined in ISO11036. As a result, both 'chewiness' and 'hardness' assessed according to the ISO11036 scales increased by increasing the cooking end-point temperature, and were different between Longissimus and Semitendinosus muscles. The sensory results were in good agreement with instrumental texture measurements. However, both texture ratings in this study were in a narrower range than the full ISO scales. For beef texture, ISO11036 scales for 'chewiness' and 'hardness' are useful for basic studies, but some alterations are needed for practical evaluation of muscle foods.

  18. Effects of Cooking End-point Temperature and Muscle Part on Sensory ‘Hardness’ and ‘Chewiness’ Assessed Using Scales Presented in ISO11036:1994

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Sasaki

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Texture and ‘tenderness’ in particular, is an important sensory characteristic for consumers’ satisfaction of beef. Objective and detailed sensory measurements of beef texture have been needed for the evaluation and management of beef quality. This study aimed to apply the sensory scales defined in ISO11036:1994 to evaluate the texture of beef. Longissimus and Semitendinosus muscles of three Holstein steers cooked to end-point temperatures of 60°C and 72°C were subjected to sensory analyses by a sensory panel with expertise regarding the ISO11036 scales. For the sensory analysis, standard scales of ‘chewiness’ (9-points and ‘hardness’ (7-points were presented to the sensory panel with reference materials defined in ISO11036. As a result, both ‘chewiness’ and ‘hardness’ assessed according to the ISO11036 scales increased by increasing the cooking end-point temperature, and were different between Longissimus and Semitendinosus muscles. The sensory results were in good agreement with instrumental texture measurements. However, both texture ratings in this study were in a narrower range than the full ISO scales. For beef texture, ISO11036 scales for ‘chewiness’ and ‘hardness’ are useful for basic studies, but some alterations are needed for practical evaluation of muscle foods.

  19. Relação entre as disfunções temporomandibulares e a postura cervical

    OpenAIRE

    Elias, Millie Bouskela

    2017-01-01

    As disfunções temporomandibulares (DTMs) afetam os músculos da mastigação e/ou a articulação temporomandibular, bem com, estruturas associadas podendo levar ao aparecimento de uma série de sinais e sintomas muito diversos. Devido à íntima relação existente entre os músculos da cabeça e região cervical com o sistema estomatognático, e sendo crescente o número de pacientes com DTMs e concomitantemente com alterações posturais, alguns autores, sugerem a participação da postura cor...

  20. Results of MRI of the temporo-mandibular joint using optimised surface coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, T.; Kellermann, O.; Randzio, J.; Kniha, H.; Requardt, H.; Tiling, R.; Lissner, J.

    1988-11-01

    One hundred temporo-mandibular joints were examined with a super-conducting nuclear resonance tomograph (1.0 Tesla) using various high resolution surface coils. The optimal method proved to be a spin echo sequence with a repetition time of 1,000 msec and an echo period of 28 msec with a 4 mm slice width. There were significant advantages from the non-invasive MRT diagnosis of the temporo-mandibular joints when compared with CT and with arthrography in recognising abnormal discs, changes in the tissues and for post-operative control.

  1. Topical versus systemic diclofenac in the treatment of temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Rienzo Businco, L; Di Rienzo Businco, A; D'Emilia, M; Lauriello, M; Coen Tirelli, G

    2004-10-01

    The most frequent symptom of craniomandibular dysfunction is pain in the preauricular area or in the temporo-mandibular joint, usually localized at the level of the masticatory musculature. Patients sometimes also complain of reflect otalgia, headaches and facial pain. Osteoarthrosis is a frequent degenerative debilitating chronic disorder that can affect the temporomandibular joint. It causes pain and articular rigidity, a reduction in mobility, and radiological alterations are visible in stratigraphy. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of a topically applied non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug that has recently become commercially available (diclofenac sodium in a patented carrier containing dimethyl sulfoxide, that favours transcutaneous absorption) which is commonly used to alleviate pain in knee or elbow joints, versus oral diclofenac, in the treatment of symptoms of temporomandibular joint dysfunction. Dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint was diagnosed in 36 adult patients. The patients were randomized in two age- and gender -matched groups. Group A (18 patients) received oral diclofenac sodium administered after a meal in 50-mg tablets twice a day for 14 days. Group B (18 patients) received 16 mg/ml topical diclofenac (diclofenac topical solution, 10 drops 4 times a day for 14 days). All patients completed a questionnaire at the start and end of therapy. Patients were asked to quantify on a graded visual analogue scale and to reply to questions about the pain and tenderness of the temporomandibular joint and the functional limitation of mouth opening. Patients were also requested to report side-effects of the treatment. All patients showed relief from pain after treatment: the difference between the two groups was not significant (p > 0.05). Post-treatment, 16 patients of group A had epigastralgic symptoms. Three patients treated with topical diclofenac showed a modest irritation of the temporomandibular joint region, and disappeared

  2. [The para-clinic investigation of temporo-mandibular joint changes in patients with acromegaly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morăraşu, C; Burlui, V; Olaru, C; Boza, C; Bortă, C; Morăraşu, G; Brînză, M

    2001-01-01

    The Acromegaly is an endocrinological disease determined by the hypersecretion of STH in a certain period of the body evolution and it causes the hypertrophy of bones in general and of mandible and cranio-facial bones, determining a disorder due to this development of bones, associated with troubles in the activity of muscles and of the phospho-calcium metabolism. This study was made on a group of 33 acromegaly patients. Their temporo-mandibular joint was investigated by ortopantomography, tomography, computer tomography and scintigraphy. All of these exams shows the changes in temporo-mandibular joint due to the cells hyperactivity determined by the hypersecretion of STH.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography of the temporomandibular joint: beyond dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Marcelo de Mattos; Machado, Karina Freitas Soares [Clinica Axial Centro de Imagem, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Radiologia; Mascarenhas, Marcelo Henrique [Associacao Brasileira de Odontologia de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Curso de Especializacao em Disfuncao Temporomandibular e Dor Orofacial

    2008-09-15

    Several diseases should be considered in the differential diagnosis of disorders affecting the temporomandibular joints. Internal derangement is the main condition responsible for pain related to this joint. Clinical signs may, though, be quite non-specific, and many other conditions present with similar and not infrequently indistinguishable signs and symptoms. In the present study, the authors describe several non-dysfunctional conditions affecting the temporomandibular joints through computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, emphasizing the importance of these imaging methods in the diagnosis of inflammatory, neoplastic and traumatic diseases of this region. Considering that clinical presentations are frequently non-specific, radiologists play a critical role in the differential diagnosis. (author)

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography of the temporomandibular joint: beyond dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Marcelo de Mattos; Machado, Karina Freitas Soares; Mascarenhas, Marcelo Henrique

    2008-01-01

    Several diseases should be considered in the differential diagnosis of disorders affecting the temporomandibular joints. Internal derangement is the main condition responsible for pain related to this joint. Clinical signs may, though, be quite non-specific, and many other conditions present with similar and not infrequently indistinguishable signs and symptoms. In the present study, the authors describe several non-dysfunctional conditions affecting the temporomandibular joints through computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, emphasizing the importance of these imaging methods in the diagnosis of inflammatory, neoplastic and traumatic diseases of this region. Considering that clinical presentations are frequently non-specific, radiologists play a critical role in the differential diagnosis. (author)

  5. Temporomandibular Disorders and Headache: A Retrospective Analysis of 1198 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Paolo, Carlo; D'Urso, Anna; Papi, Piero; Di Sabato, Francesco; Rosella, Daniele; Pompa, Giorgio; Polimeni, Antonella

    2017-01-01

    Aim . Headache is one of the most common diseases associated with Temporomandibular Disorders (TMDs). The aim of this study was to evaluate, retrospectively, if headache influences TMD's symptoms. Material and Methods . A total sample of 1198 consecutive TMD patients was selected. After a neurological examination, a diagnosis of headache, according to the latest edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, was performed in 625 subjects. Patients were divided into two groups based on presence/absence of headache: Group with Headache (GwH) and Group without Headache (GwoH). Descriptive statistics and Chi-square index were performed. Results . Sociodemographic (gender, marital status, and occupation) and functional factors, occlusion (occlusal and skeletal classes, dental formula, and occlusal abnormalities), and familiar pain did not show a statistically significant correlation in either group. Intensity and frequency of neck pain, arthralgia of TMJ, and myalgia showed higher correlation values in GwH. Conclusion . This study is consistent with previous literature in showing a close relationship between headache and TMD. All data underlines that headache makes pain parameters more intense and frequent. Therefore, an early and multidisciplinary treatment of TMDs should be performed in order to avoid the overlay of painful events that could result in pain chronicity.

  6. Surgical treatment for temporomandibular joint osteoarthrosis. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robiony, M; Demitri, V; Costa, F; Politi, M

    1998-11-01

    TMJ osteoarthrosis and internal derangements are in close connection, representing a substantial portion of temporomandibular disorders. The authors wish to underline the role of surgery in the treatment of this degenerative disease to improve function and to alleviate pain. A 63 year-old woman suffering from closed-lock with reduced opening movements was accepted in our Department in March, 1995. Clinical and radiological evaluations showed bilateral closed lock and severe TMJ osteoarthrosis. Occlusal, pharmacological and physical therapy were performed for one year, without results. Bilateral condylectomy and diskectomy with arthroplasty were carried out. Immediate muscular rehabilitation after surgery was performed by the patient. Follow-up 3, 6, 12 months after surgery were carried out. Full opening movements and reduction of pain were obtained 20 days after surgery. The patient, followed-up one year after surgery, presented effective mandibular movements and adequate amelioration of clinical picture. TMJ surgery in association with physical therapy represents in selected cases an adequate procedure for the treatment of TMJ degenerative disease.

  7. A Young Patient with Temporomandibular Joint Osteoarthritis: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Alajbeg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a case of a young patient who sought help because of pain in the right temporomandibular joint (TMJ. She also reported increasing of pain during chewing. Clinical examination revealed limited mouth opening with uncorrected deviation to the ipsilateral side. Palpation of the lateral pole of the right condyle discovered crepitus, and maximum assisted opening elicited a report of “familiar pain”. The diagnosis of osteoarthritis of the TMJ (RDC / TMD criteria, Axis I, Group III was confirmed by CBCT of TMJ. There is no “gold standard” for the management of TMD, but the need for TMD treatment has to be based on precise indications related to the presence of pain, limitation in function of the lower jaw and signs of degenerative joint disease. Conservative, reversible therapeutic procedures are considered as the first choice for TMD treatment and their task is to improve the function of the entire masticatory system. In this case patient was treated with the combination of physical therapy and stabilization splint, in order to reduce the pain and restore the normal function of the lower jaw. At 6 months’ follow-up symptoms have almost completely disappeared, while 3 years later, the patient still has no significant subjective symptoms. In the present case non-invasive therapy was sufficient to bring, otherwise recurrent nature of osteoarthritis, in complete remission and keep it like that for years.

  8. Temporomandibular Disorders and Headache: A Retrospective Analysis of 1198 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Di Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Headache is one of the most common diseases associated with Temporomandibular Disorders (TMDs. The aim of this study was to evaluate, retrospectively, if headache influences TMD’s symptoms. Material and Methods. A total sample of 1198 consecutive TMD patients was selected. After a neurological examination, a diagnosis of headache, according to the latest edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, was performed in 625 subjects. Patients were divided into two groups based on presence/absence of headache: Group with Headache (GwH and Group without Headache (GwoH. Descriptive statistics and Chi-square index were performed. Results. Sociodemographic (gender, marital status, and occupation and functional factors, occlusion (occlusal and skeletal classes, dental formula, and occlusal abnormalities, and familiar pain did not show a statistically significant correlation in either group. Intensity and frequency of neck pain, arthralgia of TMJ, and myalgia showed higher correlation values in GwH. Conclusion. This study is consistent with previous literature in showing a close relationship between headache and TMD. All data underlines that headache makes pain parameters more intense and frequent. Therefore, an early and multidisciplinary treatment of TMDs should be performed in order to avoid the overlay of painful events that could result in pain chronicity.

  9. Are headache and temporomandibular disorders related? A blinded study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballegaard, V; Thede-Schmidt-Hansen, P; Svensson, P; Jensen, R

    2008-08-01

    To investigate overlaps between headache and temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in a clinical headache population and to describe the prevalence of TMD in headache patients, 99 patients referred to a specialized headache centre were diagnosed according to Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD) and classified in headache groups according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, second edition for headache diagnoses in a blinded design. The prevalence of TMD in the headache population was 56.1%. Psychosocial dysfunction caused by TMD pain was observed in 40.4%. No significant differences in TMD prevalence were revealed between headache groups, although TMD prevalence tended to be higher in patients with combined migraine and tension-type headache. Moderate to severe depression was experienced by 54.5% of patients. Patients with coexistent TMD had a significantly higher prevalence of depression-most markedly in patients with combined migraine and tension-type headache. Our studies indicate that a high proportion of headache patients have significant disability because of ongoing chronic TMD pain. The trend to a higher prevalence of TMD in patients with combined migraine and tension-type headache suggests that this could be a risk factor for TMD development. A need for screening procedures and treatment strategies concerning depression in headache patients with coexistent TMD is underlined by the overrepresentation of depression in this group. Our findings emphasize the importance of examination of the masticatory system in headache sufferers and underline the necessity of a multidimensional approach in chronic headache patients.

  10. Temporomandibular disorders and painful comorbidities: clinical association and underlying mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Yuri Martins; Conti, Paulo César Rodrigues; de Faria, Flavio Augusto Cardoso; Bonjardim, Leonardo Rigoldi

    2017-03-01

    The association between temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and headaches, cervical spine dysfunction, and fibromyalgia is not artefactual. The aim of this review is to describe the comorbid relationship between TMD and these three major painful conditions and to discuss the clinical implications and the underlying pain mechanisms involved in these relationships. Common neuronal pathways and central sensitization processes are acknowledged as the main factors for the association between TMD and primary headaches, although the establishment of cause-effect mechanisms requires further clarification and characterization. The biomechanical aspects are not the main factors involved in the comorbid relationship between TMD and cervical spine dysfunction, which can be better explained by the neuronal convergence of the trigeminal and cervical spine sensory pathways as well as by central sensitization processes. The association between TMD and fibromyalgia also has supporting evidence in the literature, and the proposed main mechanism underlying this relationship is the impairment of the descending pain inhibitory system. In this particular scenario, a cause-effect relationship is more likely to occur in one direction, that is, fibromyalgia as a risk factor for TMD. Therefore, clinical awareness of the association between TMD and painful comorbidities and the support of multidisciplinary approaches are required to recognize these related conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Headaches and myofascial temporomandibular disorders: overlapping entities, separate managements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, P C R; Costa, Y M; Gonçalves, D A; Svensson, P

    2016-09-01

    There are relevant clinical overlaps between some of the painful temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and headache conditions that may hamper the diagnostic process and treatment. A non-systematic search for studies on the relationship between TMD and headaches was carried out in the following databases: PubMed, Cochrane Library and Embase. Important pain mechanisms contributing to the close association and complex relationship between TMD and headache disorders are as follows: processes of peripheral and central sensitisation which take place in similar anatomical areas, the possible impairment of the descending modulatory pain pathways and the processes of referred pain. In addition, the clinical examination does not always provide distinguishing information to differentiate between headaches and TMD. So, considering the pathophysiology and the clinical presentation of some types of headache and myofascial TMD, such overlap can be considered not only a matter of comorbid relationship, but rather a question of disorders where the distinction lines are sometimes hard to identify. These concerns are certainly reflected in the current classification systems of both TMD and headache where the clinical consequences of diagnosis such as headache attributed to or associated with TMD are uncertain. There are several similarities in terms of therapeutic strategies used to manage myofascial TMD and headaches. Considering all these possible levels of interaction, we reinforce the recommendation for multidisciplinary approaches, by a team of oro-facial pain specialists and a neurologist (headache specialist), to attain the most precise differential diagnosis and initiate the best and most efficient treatment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Primary headaches interfere with the efficacy of temporomandibular disorders management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porporatti, André Luís; Costa, Yuri Martins; Conti, Paulo César Rodrigues; Bonjardim, Leonardo Rigoldi; Calderon, Patrícia dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate the influence of Primary Headache (PH) on efficacy of a Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) conservative therapy and its association with the presence of self-reported parafunctional habits. Sample was composed of 400 medical records, divided into four groups: I) Muscular TMD (n = 64); II) Muscular TMD+PH (n = 48); III) Muscular TMD+Articular TMD (n = 173); IV) Muscular TMD+Articular TMD+PH (n = 115). All groups had undergone a TMD therapy for three months with a stabilization appliance and counseling for habits and behavioral changes, with no specific headache management. Current pain intensity and existence or not of self-reported bruxism were assessed. Repeated measures ANOVA and Chi-Square test followed by Odds were used for statistical analysis, with a significance level of 5%. results of this study showed that: (1) A conservative therapy with stabilization appliance and counseling for habits and behavioral changes was effective in the TMD pain relief; (2) Groups with an additional diagnosis of PH had worsened the pain improvement significantly; and (3) no association between the presence of self-reported bruxism and PH was found. this study could elucidate the important effect that headache may have on the TMD management.

  13. Temporomandibular disorders and parafunctional oral habits: an anamnestic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa de Oliveira Melchior

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the frequency and severity of the signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD, the frequency of parafunctional oral habits and the correlation between the variables by means of the patients' perception regarding their problem. METHODS: One hundred patients diagnosed with TMD, through a clinical examination of their masticatory system, answered the questions of a previously published protocol concerning the signs and symptoms most frequently reported in the literature. RESULTS: According to the results from the non parametric statistical analysis, the frequency for the following signs and symptoms was significant: Fatigue and muscle pain, joint sounds, tinnitus, ear fullness, headache, chewing impairment and difficulty to yawn (p<0.01 and otalgia (p<0.05. As to the parafunctional oral habits, there was a significant presence of teeth clenching during the day and night (p<0.01 and teeth grinding at night (p<0.05. The variable correlation analysis showed that there was a positive correlation between symptom frequency and severity; age was correlated with the presence of otalgia, cervical pain and teeth sensitivity, besides being correlated with muscle and joint pain severity. Habit frequency was negatively correlated with age. TMD duration was also positively correlated with the symptoms of tinnitus, ear fullness, muscle and joint pain. CONCLUSION: The study results showed that the anamnestic assessment using ProDTMMulti can predict the severity of the TMD case.

  14. Circulating Omentin-1 and Chronic Painful Temporomandibular Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Jennifer B; Sanders, Anne E; Wilder, Rebecca S; Essick, Greg K; Slade, Gary D; Hartung, Jane E; Nackley, Andrea G

    To investigate the relationship between omentin-1 levels and painful temporomandibular disorders (TMD). In a case-control design, chronic painful TMD cases (n = 90) and TMD-free controls (n = 54) were selected from participants in the multisite OPPERA study (Orofacial Pain: Prospective Evaluation and Risk Assessment). Painful TMD case status was determined by examination using established Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD). Levels of omentin-1 in stored blood plasma samples were measured by using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Binary logistic regression was used to calculate the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence limits (CLs) for the association between omentin-1 and painful TMD. Models were adjusted for study site, age, sex, and body mass index. The unadjusted association between omentin-1 and chronic painful TMD was statistically nonsignificant (P = .072). Following adjustment for covariates, odds of TMD pain decreased 36% per standard deviation increase in circulating omentin-1 (adjusted OR = 0.64; 95% CL: 0.43, 0.96; P = .031). Circulating levels of omentin-1 were significantly lower in painful TMD cases than controls, suggesting that TMD pain is mediated by inflammatory pathways.

  15. Do women with migraine have higher prevalence of temporomandibular disorders?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria C Gonçalves

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD, using the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD in women with episodic and chronic migraine (M and CM, as well as in asymptomatic women. METHOD: Sample consisted of 61 women, being 38 with M and 23 with CM, identified from a headache outpatient center; we also investigated 30 women without headaches for at least 3 months (women without headache group - WHG. Assessment of TMD was conducted by a physical therapist who was blind to the headache status. RESULTS: The prevalence of TMD, assessed through the RDC, was 33.3% in the WHG, 86.8% in the M group and 91.3% of the CM group. Differences were significant when comparing M and CM groups with WHG (p0.05 as well as higher risk for TMD [odds ratio (OR=3.15, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.73-5.71 and OR=3.97, 95%CI 1.76-8.94]. CONCLUSION: Women with migraine are more likely to have muscular and articular TMD, suggesting that both disorders might be clinically associated, which demonstrate the importance of physical therapy assessment in the multidisciplinary team.

  16. Effusion in magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nah, Kyung Soo [Pusan National University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the distribution and frequency of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) effusion in magnetic resonance (MR) images of patients with disc displacements. On T2 weighted MR images of 148 TMJs taken from 74 patients presenting with TMJ pain and dysfunction, we assessed the cases showing TMJ effusion, defined as an amount of fluid that exceeded the maximum amount seen in a control group of asymptomatic volunteers. The amount of TMJ fluid was graded as: I (none or minimal), II (moderate), III (marked), and IV (extensive), according to a standard set by a reference. Disc displacement categories were also recorded. Of the 148 TMJs examined in this study, 52 joints (35.1%) presented with joint effusion, 24 (16.2%) showing bilateral joint effusion. 38 joints showed upper joint space effusion, and 3 showed lower joint space effusion, and 11 showed both upper and lower joint space effusion. 96 joints (64.9%) had grade I joint fluid, 27 (18.2%) grade II, 15 (10.1%) grade III, and 10 (6.8%) grade IV. 80.0% of the joints presenting with grade IV effusion showed disc displacement without reduction. Joint effusion was found not only in upper, but also in lower joint spaces. The higher the effusion grade, the greater the frequency of disc displacement without reduction.

  17. Primary headaches interfere with the efficacy of temporomandibular disorders management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luís PORPORATTI

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate the influence of Primary Headache (PH on efficacy of a Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD conservative therapy and its association with the presence of self-reported parafunctional habits. SAMPLE AND METHODS: Sample was composed of 400 medical records, divided into four groups: I Muscular TMD (n=64; II Muscular TMD+PH (n=48; III Muscular TMD+Articular TMD (n=173; IV Muscular TMD+Articular TMD+PH (n=115. All groups had undergone a TMD therapy for three months with a stabilization appliance and counseling for habits and behavioral changes, with no specific headache management. Current pain intensity and existence or not of self-reported bruxism were assessed. Repeated measures ANOVA and Chi-Square test followed by Odds were used for statistical analysis, with a significance level of 5%. RESULTS: results of this study showed that: (1 A conservative therapy with stabilization appliance and counseling for habits and behavioral changes was effective in the TMD pain relief; (2 Groups with an additional diagnosis of PH had worsened the pain improvement significantly; and (3 no association between the presence of self-reported bruxism and PH was found. CONCLUSIONS: this study could elucidate the important effect that headache may have on the TMD management.

  18. Relationship of Occlusal Schemes with the Occurrence of Temporomandibular Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina H. Sugiaman

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Masticatory system is a complex functional unit of the body responsible for mastication, speech, and deglutition process. Temporomandibular disorders (TMD is used to describe all functional disturbances of the masticatory system. The etiology of TMD is multifactorial, such as occlusal disharmony and emotional stress. The relationship between occlusion and TMD has been highly debated in dentistry, one of the occlusal factors is the occlusal scheme. Occlusal schemes are defined as bilateral canine guidance, unilateral canine guidance, group function and balanced occlusion. However, studies about the relationship of occlusal schemes and the occurrence of the TMD are still limited and remained controversial. Objective: To investigate the relationship of occlusal schemes witht he occurrence of TMD. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted at the Faculty of Dentistry, Uniiversitas Indonesia. A total of 127 students were included in this study. Subjects were examined based on Clinical Helkimo Index and divided into TMD and non-TMD groups. Subjects were categorized as non-TMD groups if the value of the clinical Helkimo index was 0 and as TMD group when the value ranged between 1-25. Results: Balanced occlusion schemes has a greater risk of TMD occurrence with odds ratio value 5.6 and 95% confidence interval 1.188 to 26.331 (p=0.021. Conclusion: Balanced occlusion has a significant relationship with the occurrence of TMD.

  19. Temporomandibular disorders in burning mouth syndrome patients: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsalini, Massimo; Di Venere, Daniela; Pettini, Francesco; Lauritano, Dorina; Petruzzi, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS) is a chronic disease characterized by absence of any lesions and burning of the oral mucosa associated to a sensation of dry mouth and/or taste alterations. The purpose of our study is to estimate signs and symptoms of Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) in patients with BMS and to investigate for the existence of an association between BMS and TMD. Forty-four BMS patients were enrolled; BMS subtype was established according to the classification of Lamey. After a gnathological evaluation, according to the protocol of the European Academy of Craniomandibular Disorders, patients were classified by RDC/TMD criteria. The data were compared and analyzed using a chi-square test to describe the existence of an association between BMS and TMD. 65.9% the BMS patients showed disorders classified as primary signs and symptoms of TMD according to RDC / TMD criteria, and 72.7% showed parafunctional habits. The chi-square test revealed a statistically significant association (p = 0.035) between BMS and TMD. The data suggest that there is a possible relationship not yet well understood between BMS and TMD, may be for neurophatic alterations assumed for BMS that could be also engaged in TMD pathogenesis.

  20. Roentgenographic study of the temporomandibular joint in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Ho Jung; You, Dong Soo

    1984-01-01

    For the study of the temporomandibular joint in rheumatoid arthritis 30 patients were selected who were diagnosis as rheumatoid arthritis through the clinical, radiographic examination and laboratory finding. Temporoman dibular joint involvement was evaluated through the clinical, radiographic examination. The results were as follows; 1. TMJ was involved in 15 patients of 30 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. (50% involvement). 2. Duration of rheumatoid arthritis was more longer in patients with TMJ involvement than in patients without TMJ involvement. 3. Osseous changes in TMJ were in order of frequency erosion, flattening, osteophyte, sclerosis, deformity, and most common involved site was mandibular condyle. 4. Most common positional change of condyle was forward position in centric occlusion, and restricted movement of condyle in 1 inch mouth opening. 5. TMJ involvement of rheumatoid arthritis was almost bilateral. 6. Main symptoms of TMJ were pain, stiffness, tenderness, limitation of mouth opening, crepitation. 7. There was not the case of ankylosis. 8. There was statistically insignificant correlation between mandibular deviation and TMJ involvement, but some cases showed severe deviation on mouth opening.

  1. Methadone treatment, bruxism, and temporomandibular disorders among male prisoners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enguelberg-Gabbay, Judith V; Schapir, Lior; Israeli, Yair; Hermesh, Haggai; Weizman, Abraham; Winocur, Ephraim

    2016-06-01

    There is little information on bruxism related to illicit drug use. Prolonged drug use may damage the stomatognathic system via oral motor overactivity. The aim of the present study was to compare the rates of bruxism and temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) between prisoners with and without drug-use disorders, to evaluate the association between methadone treatment and bruxism and to assess the possible relationship between bruxism and pain. The sample included 152 male prisoners, 69 of whom were drug users maintained on methadone. All prisoners were examined by an experienced dentist and completed a questionnaire on their oral habits, with the aim of detecting signs or symptoms of TMD and/or bruxism. Additional data were collected from medical files. The prevalence of sleep bruxism and awake bruxism, but not of TMDs, was significantly higher among drug-user than non-drug user prisoners (52.2% vs. 34.9% for sleep bruxism, 59.7% vs. 30.1% for awake bruxism, and 46.3% vs. 25.6% for TMDs, respectively). Participants with awake bruxism were statistically more sensitive to muscle palpation compared with participants with sleep bruxism [rating scores (mean ± SD): 0.32 ± 0.21 vs. 0.19 ± 0.28, respectively]. An association was found between sleep bruxism and awake bruxism. It seems that there is a direct or an indirect association between methadone maintenance treatment and sleep bruxism or awake bruxism in male prisoners. © 2016 Eur J Oral Sci.

  2. Temporomandibular Disorders and Headache: A Retrospective Analysis of 1198 Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Paolo, Carlo; D'Urso, Anna; Di Sabato, Francesco; Pompa, Giorgio

    2017-01-01

    Aim. Headache is one of the most common diseases associated with Temporomandibular Disorders (TMDs). The aim of this study was to evaluate, retrospectively, if headache influences TMD's symptoms. Material and Methods. A total sample of 1198 consecutive TMD patients was selected. After a neurological examination, a diagnosis of headache, according to the latest edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, was performed in 625 subjects. Patients were divided into two groups based on presence/absence of headache: Group with Headache (GwH) and Group without Headache (GwoH). Descriptive statistics and Chi-square index were performed. Results. Sociodemographic (gender, marital status, and occupation) and functional factors, occlusion (occlusal and skeletal classes, dental formula, and occlusal abnormalities), and familiar pain did not show a statistically significant correlation in either group. Intensity and frequency of neck pain, arthralgia of TMJ, and myalgia showed higher correlation values in GwH. Conclusion. This study is consistent with previous literature in showing a close relationship between headache and TMD. All data underlines that headache makes pain parameters more intense and frequent. Therefore, an early and multidisciplinary treatment of TMDs should be performed in order to avoid the overlay of painful events that could result in pain chronicity. PMID:28420942

  3. Chronic Temporomandibular Disorders: disability, pain intensity and fear of movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Martínez, Alfonso; Grande-Alonso, Mónica; López-de-Uralde-Villanueva, Ibai; López-López, Almudena; Fernández-Carnero, Josué; La Touche, Roy

    2016-12-01

    The objective was to compare and correlate disability, pain intensity, the impact of headache on daily life and the fear of movement between subgroups of patients with chronic temporomandibular disorder (TMD). A cross-sectional study was conducted in patients diagnosed with chronic painful TMD. Patients were divided into: 1) joint pain (JP); 2) muscle pain (MP); and 3) mixed pain. The following measures were included: Craniomandibular pain and disability (Craniofacial pain and disability inventory), neck disability (Neck Dsiability Index), pain intensity (Visual Analogue Scale), impact of headache (Headache Impact Test 6) and kinesiophobia (Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia-11). A total of 154 patients were recruited. The mixed pain group showed significant differences compared with the JP group or MP group in neck disability (p craniomandibular pain and disability (p Neck disability was a significant covariate (37 % of variance) of craniomandibular pain and disability for the MP group (β = 0.62; p neck disability (β = 0.40; p craniomandibular pain and disability. Mixed chronic pain patients show greater craniomandibular and neck disability than patients diagnosed with chronic JP or MP. Neck disability predicted the variance of craniofacial pain and disability for patients with MP. Neck disability and kinesiophobia predicted the variance of craniofacial pain and disability for those with chronic mixed pain.

  4. Assessment of temporomandibular and cervical spine disorders in tinnitus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björne, Assar

    2007-01-01

    In treating patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction it was noticed that tinnitus and vertigo were common in such patients and there was also muscular tension in jaw and neck. During treatment of these patients it was also noted that injection of lidocaine in a jaw muscle (m. pt. lat.) reduced not only their muscular problems but also that the tinnitus was reduced while the local anesthetic was active. Evaluation of 39 patients with disabling tinnitus, and all suffered from tinnitus, revealed that 10 of them had bilateral tinnitus and TMJ disorders revealed that pain in the face, temples or jaw occurred often among these patients. Many of such patients had also symptoms of cervical spine disorders, head, neck and shoulder pain, and limitations in side bending and rotation were also frequent complaints. One-third of these patients could influence tinnitus by jaw movements and 75% could trigger vertigo by head or neck movements. Treatment of jaw and neck disorders in 24 patients with Ménière's disease had a beneficial effect on not only their episodic vertigo but also on their tinnitus and aural fullness. At the 3-year follow-up, intensity of all symptoms were significantly reduced (p<0.001).

  5. Oral splints: the crutches for temporomandibular disorders and bruxism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, T T; Lavigne, G J

    1998-01-01

    Despite the extensive use of oral splints in the treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and bruxism, their mechanisms of action remain controversial Various hypotheses have been proposed to explain their apparent efficacy (i.e., true therapeutic value), including the repositioning of condyle and/or the articular disc, reduction in the electromyographic activity of the masticatory muscles, modification of the patient's "harmful" oral behavior, and changes in the patient's occlusion. Following a comprehensive review of the literature, it is concluded that any of these theories is either poor or inconsistent, while the issue of true efficacy for oral splints remains unsettled. However, the results of a controlled clinical trial lend support to the effectiveness (i.e., the patient's appreciation of the positive changes which are perceived to have occurred during the trial) of the stabilizing splint in the control of myofascial pain. In light of the data supporting their effectiveness but not their efficacy, oral splints should be used as an adjunct for pain management rather than a definitive treatment. For sleep bruxism, it is prudent to limit their use as a habit management aid and to prevent/limit dental damage potentially induced by the disorder. Future research should study the natural history and etiologies of TMD and bruxism, so that specific treatments for these disorders can be developed.

  6. MR findings of the temporomandibular joint with crepitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Tsukasa; Yamamoto, Mika; Yamaga, Takayoshi; Takahashi, Koji; Masuda, Saeko; Tagaya, Atsuko; Michi, Ken-ichi; Okano, Tomohiro

    1997-01-01

    Crepitus is an important sign for diagnosis of arthrosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The presence of crepitus can be evaluated by the listening test previously proposed by our group. However, TMJ can be diagnosed by MR imaging showing the disc position and related findings including bony changes and joint effusion. This study investigated the relationship between the presence of crepitus and pathology of the joint. Fourteen joints with crepitus diagnosed by the listening test were examined in this study. TMJ was categorized into four types based on findings on double spin echo MR images. The results were as follows: Of fourteen joints with crepitus, five (36%) were showed as normal superior disc position. The remaining 9 joints (64%) were diagnosed with disc displacement, of which, 6 showed reduction, one was without reduction and 2 without reduction were associated with arthrosis. Statistical analysis using the data obtained here and other data showed that the joints with crepitus tended to show disk displacement. There was no significant difference between the degree of certainty about the presence of the crepitus and the distribution of joint pathology. Joint effusion was observed only in the joints with displacement. These results indicated that TMJ with crepitus is associated with varied joint pathology. (author)

  7. MR findings of the temporomandibular joint with crepitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sano, Tsukasa; Yamamoto, Mika; Yamaga, Takayoshi; Takahashi, Koji; Masuda, Saeko; Tagaya, Atsuko; Michi, Ken-ichi; Okano, Tomohiro [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Dentistry

    1997-06-01

    Crepitus is an important sign for diagnosis of arthrosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The presence of crepitus can be evaluated by the listening test previously proposed by our group. However, TMJ can be diagnosed by MR imaging showing the disc position and related findings including bony changes and joint effusion. This study investigated the relationship between the presence of crepitus and pathology of the joint. Fourteen joints with crepitus diagnosed by the listening test were examined in this study. TMJ was categorized into four types based on findings on double spin echo MR images. The results were as follows: Of fourteen joints with crepitus, five (36%) were showed as normal superior disc position. The remaining 9 joints (64%) were diagnosed with disc displacement, of which, 6 showed reduction, one was without reduction and 2 without reduction were associated with arthrosis. Statistical analysis using the data obtained here and other data showed that the joints with crepitus tended to show disk displacement. There was no significant difference between the degree of certainty about the presence of the crepitus and the distribution of joint pathology. Joint effusion was observed only in the joints with displacement. These results indicated that TMJ with crepitus is associated with varied joint pathology. (author)

  8. Temporomandibular joint fibrocartilage degeneration from unilateral dental splints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Sarah E; Lowe, Jesse R; Tudares, Mauro A; Gold, Michael S; Almarza, Alejandro J

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which altered loading in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), as might be associated with a malocclusion, drives degeneration of articulating surfaces in the TMJ. We therefore sought to quantify the effects of altered joint loading on the mechanical properties and biochemical content and distribution of TMJ fibrocartilage in the rabbit. Altered TMJ loading was induced with a 1mm splint placed unilaterally over the maxillary and mandibular molars for 6 weeks. At that time, TMJ fibrocartilage was assessed by compression testing, biochemical content (collagen, glycosaminoglycan (GAG), DNA) and distribution (histology), for both the TMJ disc and the condylar fibrocartilage. There were no changes in the TMJ disc for any of the parameters tested. The condylar fibrocartilage from the splinted animals was significantly stiffer and the DNA content was significantly lower than that in control animals. There was significant remodeling in the condylar fibrocartilage layers as manifested by a change in GAG and collagen II distribution and a loss of defined cell layers. A connection between the compressive properties of TMJ condylar fibrocartilage after 6 weeks of splinting and the changes in histology was observed. These results suggest a change in joint loading leads to condylar damage, which may contribute to pain associated with at least some forms of TMJ disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Inflammatory Cytokines and Sleep Disturbance in Patients with Temporomandibular Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Woon; Chung, Jin Woo

    2016-01-01

    To assess the degree and interrelationship of sleep disturbance and plasma cytokine levels in temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain patients. Forty female TMD patients and 20 age-, sex-, and body mass index (BMI)-matched healthy subjects were enrolled. TMD was diagnosed using the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD. The TMD patients were classified as having low or high disability according to Graded Chronic Pain Scale findings. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) were used to measure sleep quality. Plasma concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured from blood samples collected between 9 am and noon. Statistical analyses included Kruskal-Wallis and one-way analysis of variance tests to compare results between different groups and multivariate general linear models to evaluate the effect of sleep status on cytokine levels. The high-disability group had the highest PSQI and ESS scores (P disability group exhibiting the highest values (P ≤ .001). The plasma cytokine levels were significantly correlated with PSQI scores (P disability level after adjusting for both sleep indices (both P disability, had elevated plasma cytokine levels and increased ESS and PSQI scores suggestive of sleep disturbance.

  10. Scleroderma and the temporomandibular joint: reconstruction in 2 variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacIntosh, Robert Bruce; Shivapuja, Prasanna-Kumar; Naqvi, Rabia

    2015-06-01

    This article reviews the pathophysiology of scleroderma (systemic sclerosis [SSc]) and its destructive effects on the mandible in general and the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in particular. It discusses the considerations of operating on patients with devastating chronic disease and presents 2 cases of TMJ reconstruction in patients with the diagnosis. Two patients with different degrees of SSc involvement underwent TMJ reconstruction with costochondral grafts. The patients represent the surgical considerations pertinent to this disease and different outcomes as determined by the variance in severity of their afflictions. The 2 patients tolerated the surgeries well and exhibited improvement in function in the long-term. One patient thrives and continues to do well despite her SSc approximately 10 years postoperatively; the second patient died of her disease approximately 9 years after her initial surgical care. The experience with these 2 cases showed that patients with SSc can safely undergo TMJ reconstruction with anticipated good results, but that the overall severity of the disease remains paramount in determining the feasibility of corrective surgery under this diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Anquilosis postraumatica unilateral de la articulación temporomandibular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Alberto Manotas Arévalo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available La Anquilosis Temporomandibular en una afección manifestada como la limitación del movimiento del cóndilo articular mandibular dentro de la cavidad glenoide del hueso temporal. Son frecuentes las osificaciones de las estructuras articulares intrínsecas, y en algunos otros casos fibrosis de las estructuras intrínsecas y extrínsecas que impiden la dinámica articular adecuada. Los pacientes afectados, generalmente niños y adultos jóvenes, limitan poco a poco su movilidad articular llegando a la inmovilización total de su mandíbula, con las subsecuentes alteraciones para la ingesta de alimentos sólidos, para la deglución, higiene bucal, erupción dental adecuada y para toda la fisiología bucomaxilar y la estética facial. Su corrección quirúrgica representa un reto pues se debe eliminar la masa osificada articular, reponer la fisiología articular, recuperar la estética facial y evitar la recurrencia.

  12. Effusion in magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nah, Kyung Soo

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the distribution and frequency of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) effusion in magnetic resonance (MR) images of patients with disc displacements. On T2 weighted MR images of 148 TMJs taken from 74 patients presenting with TMJ pain and dysfunction, we assessed the cases showing TMJ effusion, defined as an amount of fluid that exceeded the maximum amount seen in a control group of asymptomatic volunteers. The amount of TMJ fluid was graded as: I (none or minimal), II (moderate), III (marked), and IV (extensive), according to a standard set by a reference. Disc displacement categories were also recorded. Of the 148 TMJs examined in this study, 52 joints (35.1%) presented with joint effusion, 24 (16.2%) showing bilateral joint effusion. 38 joints showed upper joint space effusion, and 3 showed lower joint space effusion, and 11 showed both upper and lower joint space effusion. 96 joints (64.9%) had grade I joint fluid, 27 (18.2%) grade II, 15 (10.1%) grade III, and 10 (6.8%) grade IV. 80.0% of the joints presenting with grade IV effusion showed disc displacement without reduction. Joint effusion was found not only in upper, but also in lower joint spaces. The higher the effusion grade, the greater the frequency of disc displacement without reduction.

  13. Cervical flexion-rotation test and physiological range of motion - A comparative study of patients with myogenic temporomandibular disorder versus healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Tzvika; Dvir, Zeevi; Reiter, Shoshana; Winocur, Ephraim

    2017-02-01

    Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) refer to several common clinical disorders which involve the masticatory muscles, the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and the adjacent structures. Although neck signs and symptoms are found with higher prevalence in TMD patients compared to the overall population, whether limitation of cervical mobility is an additional positive finding in this cohort is still an open question. To compare the physiological cervical range of motion (CROM) and the extent of rotation during cervical flexion (flexion-rotation test, FRT) in people with TMD (muscular origin) and healthy control subjects. The range of motion of the neck and FRT was measured in 20 women with myogenic TMD and 20 age matched healthy controls. Women with myogenic TMD had significantly lower FRT scores compared to their matched healthy women. No difference was found between groups in CROM in any of the planes of movement. The FRT was positive (less than 32°) in 90% of the TMD participants versus 5% in the healthy control but the findings were not correlated with TMD severity. The results point out a potential involvement of the upper cervical joints (c1-c2) in women with myogenic TMD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Validity of self-reported sleep bruxism among myofascial temporomandibular disorder patients and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphael, K G; Janal, M N; Sirois, D A; Dubrovsky, B; Klausner, J J; Krieger, A C; Lavigne, G J

    2015-10-01

    Sleep bruxism (SB), primarily involving rhythmic grinding of the teeth during sleep, has been advanced as a causal or maintenance factor for a variety of oro-facial problems, including temporomandibular disorders (TMD). As laboratory polysomnographic (PSG) assessment is extremely expensive and time-consuming, most research testing this belief has relied on patient self-report of SB. The current case-control study examined the accuracy of those self-reports relative to laboratory-based PSG assessment of SB in a large sample of women suffering from chronic myofascial TMD (n = 124) and a demographically matched control group without TMD (n = 46). A clinical research coordinator administered a structured questionnaire to assess self-reported SB. Participants then spent two consecutive nights in a sleep laboratory. Audiovisual and electromyographic data from the second night were scored to assess whether participants met criteria for the presence of 2 or more (2+) rhythmic masticatory muscle activity episodes accompanied by grinding sounds, moderate SB, or severe SB, using previously validated research scoring standards. Contingency tables were constructed to assess positive and negative predictive values, sensitivity and specificity, and 95% confidence intervals surrounding the point estimates. Results showed that self-report significantly predicted 2+ grinding sounds during sleep for TMD cases. However, self-reported SB failed to significantly predict the presence or absence of either moderate or severe SB as assessed by PSG, for both cases and controls. These data show that self-report of tooth grinding awareness is highly unlikely to be a valid indicator of true SB. Studies relying on self-report to assess SB must be viewed with extreme caution. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Filter for underground mining for suction of preferably full cut and part cut machines, to be provided with preheated air, to avoid dropping below the dew point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoelter, H.

    1976-10-28

    Particularly when cutting hard rock, the cutting room to be provided with suction is wetted with water from nozzles, which, when sucking out air containing dust with high humidity leads to encrustation in the filter cloth. In order to avoid this, it is proposed that the air should be heated, using heat from the motor driving the ventilator, so that one avoids dropping below the dew point in the filter.

  16. Part I: Hazard, sensorial and economic implications of applying the hazard analysis and critical control points to irradiated ready-to-eat meals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haruvy, Y.F.

    2009-01-01

    The classical methodology of hazard analysis and critical control points focuses on hazards and related implications. A new methodology is suggested here, one that attempts at a systematic simultaneous assessment of safety hazards, sensorial failures and economic risks, and the critical control points necessary for their early detection and/or prevention of their potential outcomes. The new methodology also attempts to combine the three parameters to form a qualitative prioritization of the numerous control points and to screen those that can be cost effective for implementation. This is demonstrated in this paper for a complex product, i.e. radiation sterilized ready-to-eat meals. Hence, a fourth parameter specific to this product - the radiation specific pitfall - is also assessed. The advantages and drawbacks of the combined assessment methodology are described and their overall possible impact is discussed. Finally, the suggested combined assessment and control system for ensuring the safety and quality of food can provide a more structured and critical approach to control identified hazards, compared with that achievable by traditional inspection and quality control procedures. It has the potential to identify areas of concern where failure has not yet been experienced, making it particularly useful for new operations and products thereafter. (author)

  17. Clinical evaluation of the low intensity laser antialgic action of GaAlAs ({lambda}=785 nm) in the treatment of the temporomandibular disorders; Avaliacao clinica da acao antialgica do laser em baixa intensidade de arseneto de galio e aluminio ({lambda}=785 nm) no tratamento das disfuncoes da articulacao temporo-mandibular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanseverino, Nelly Tichauer Maluf

    2001-07-01

    The therapy with laser emitting low intensity has been currently used in the most diverse fields of medicine as therapeutic conduct for pain. It is a non invasive, painless, non-thermal and aseptic type therapy, without any collateral effects, having a good cost/benefit relationship. However, for the therapy with low-intensity laser to result in positive effects, a correct diagnosis is fundamental, as well as a protocol of adequate application. n odontology, the majority of patients diagnosed with temporomandibular disorders (TMD), present pain and limitations in the movements of the jaw. In this work, a GaAlAs laser emitting low intensity, was used, {lambda}=785 nm, in patients having a dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint with a complaint of pain. Twenty patients were divided into two groups. The group treated received laser therapy in the temporomandibular articulations and in the muscles affected. The dose applied was 45 J/cm{sup 2}, while the ten patients in the control group received 0 J/cm{sup 2}, in a total of nine applications, carried out three times a week, during three weeks. he evaluation of the patients was made through clinical examinations of manual palpation of the masseter, temporal, cervical, posterior neck and sternocleidomastoid muscles, and measurements of opening and laterality of the mouth. The results obtained showed a diminishing of the pain and an increase of the mandibular mobility in the patients treated, when compared to the control group. These results point to this therapy as being an important tool in the treatment of pain in patients with a dysfunction in the TMJ, indicating this therapeutic modality as a co-adjuvant in these treatments. (author)

  18. Cervical-scapular muscles strength and severity of temporomandibular disorder in women with mechanical neck pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Pasinato

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Changes in cervical muscle function have been observed in patients with neck pain (NP and TMD. However, the relationship between TMD severity and neck muscle strength in the presence/absence of NP is unknown. Objective: To determine the prevalence of TMD in women with and without mechanical NP and assess the cervical-scapular muscle strength and its association with TMD severity. Methods: Fifteen volunteers without neck pain (CG and 14 women with mechanical neck pain (NPG took part and were selected by the Neck Disability Index. The diagnosis and severity of TMD were determined by the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD and Temporomandibular Index (TI, respectively. The strength of the upper trapezius muscle, and cervical flexor and extensor muscles was measured by digital hand dynamometer. Results: 64.5% of women with NP and 33.3% without NP were diagnosed with TMD (p = 0.095. The NPG showed lower strength of the cervical flexor (p = 0.044 and extensor (p=0.006 muscles, and higher TI (p = 0.038 than in the CG. It was also verified moderate negative correlation between TI and the strength of dominant (p = 0.046, r = -0.547 and non-dominant (p = 0.007, r = -0.695 upper trapezius, and cervical flexors (p = 0.023, r = -0.606 in the NPG. Conclusion: There was no difference in the prevalence of TMD in women with and without NP. However, women with NP have lower cervical muscle strength - compared to those without NP - which was associated with greater severity of TMD. Thus, in women with NP associated with TMD, it is advisable to assess and address the severity of this dysfunction and identify the cervical-scapular muscles compromise.

  19. Masticatory muscle and temporomandibular joint pain in Croatian war veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhac, Ivone; Tariba, Petra; Kovac, Zoran; Simonić-Kocijan, Suncana; Lajnert, Vlatka; Mesić, Vesna Fugosić; Kuis, Davor; Braut, Vedrana

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and intensity of masticatory muscle and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain in Croatian war veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The examined group consisted of 100 Croatian war veterans, in whom PTSD had previously been diagnosed. Patients were compared with 92 subjects who had not taken part in the war and in whom PTSD was excluded by psychiatric examination. The clinical examination consisted of palpation of the masticatory muscles, the prominent neck musculature, and TMJ. The examination technique used and the definition of items were previously tested for reliability and validity. 93% of the subjects with PTSD had masticatory muscle tenderness compared to 45.65% of the subjects in the control group (chi2 = 51.46, p < 0.0001). The most frequent painful location in the subjects with PTSD was the left lateral pterygoid site in 88%, and in subjects of the control group the right lateral pterygoid site in 28.26% of cases. The most painful location in the PTSD group was the left lateral pterygoid site in 72%, and in the control group the left posterior digastric in 4.35% of cases. 58% of the subjects with PTSD had TMJ tenderness compared to 3.26% of subjects in the control group (chi2 = 66.23, p < 0.0001). The most frequent painful location of TMJ in both groups was the left posterior capsule; in the PTSD group 38% and in subjects in the control group 2.17% of cases. The most painful location was the left posterior capsule in 28% of subjects with PTSD, while not one subject in the control group reported severe painful sensitivity. The very high frequency and intensity of pain in subjects with PTSD confirms the effect of stress on muscle and joint sensitivity, i.e. perception of pain.

  20. Is there an association between temporomandibular disorders and playing a musical instrument? A review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attallah, M M; Visscher, C M; van Selms, M K A; Lobbezoo, F

    2014-07-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) have a multifactorial etiology. Among others, parafunctions and oral habits have been suggested as important initiating and perpetuating factors. Playing a musical instrument that loads the masticatory system, like wind instruments and the violin or viola, has been suggested to be part of this group of etiological factors. However, the evidence base for this suggestion is lacking. Therefore, the aim of this study was to review the literature on the possible association between playing a musical instrument and developing and/or having a TMD. A PubMed search, using the query ['Music'(Mesh) AND 'Craniomandibular Disorders'(Mesh)], yielded 19 articles, 14 of which were included in this review. Six of 14 papers had a case-control or pre-test-post-test design; the remaining eight papers were case reports of expert opinions. The former papers were analysed and tabulated according to the PICO (Patient/population-Intervention-Control/comparison-Outcome/results) system; the latter ones were only summarised and tabulated. All articles with a case-control or pre-test-post-test design suggested a possible association between TMD and playing a musical instrument, especially the violin and viola. However, no clear-cut conclusion could be drawn as to whether playing a musical instrument is directly associated with TMD, or only in combination with other factors. More and better research on this topic is needed, as to enable a better counselling and possibly even a better treatment of the suffering musician. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Termo do 1º Consenso em Disfunção Temporomandibular e Dor Orofacial Statement of the 1st Consensus on Temporomandibular Disorders and Orofacial Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Vieira Carrara

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available O Termo do 1º Consenso em Disfunção Temporomandibular e Dor Orofacial* foi criado com o propósito de substituir divergências por evidência científica dentro dessa especialidade da Odontologia. O documento oferece informações claras e fundamentadas para orientar o cirurgião-dentista e demais profissionais de saúde sobre os cuidados demandados pelo paciente, tanto no processo de diagnóstico diferencial quanto na fase de aplicação das terapias de controle da dor e disfunção. O Termo foi aprovado no mês de janeiro de 2010 em reunião realizada durante o Congresso Internacional de Odontologia do Estado de São Paulo e converge o pensamento dos profissionais mais conceituados do Brasil na especialidade Disfunção Temporomandibular e Dor Orofacial.This Statement of the 1st Consensus on Temporomandibular Disorders and Orofacial Pain was created with the purpose of substituting controversies for scientific evidence within this specialty field of dentistry. The document provides clear and well-grounded guidance to dentists and other health professionals about the care required by patients both in the process of differential diagnosis and during the stage when they undergo treatment to control pain and dysfunction. The Statement was approved in January 2010 at a meeting held during the International Dental Congress of São Paulo and draws together the views of Brazil's most respected professionals in the specialty of Temporomandibular Disorders and Orofacial Pain.

  2. Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma mimicking temporomandibular disorders: a case report Schwannoma vestibular (neurinoma do acústico imitando desordens temporomandibulares: um relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício A. Bisi

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 6 to 16% of patients with trigeminal neuralgia symptoms present intracranial tumors, the most common being the vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma. Some symptoms reported by patients include hearing loss, tinnitus, headaches, vertigo and trigeminal disturbances. An increased muscle response in the surrounding head and neck musculature may also be observed, which mimics signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders. In these cases, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has proved to be a useful tool in tumor diagnosis. The differential diagnosis between myofascial and neuralgic pain is important, as both may present similar characteristics, while being of different origin, and demanding special treatment approaches. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the relationship among trigeminal neuralgia symptoms, intracranial tumors and temporomandibular dysfunction by presenting a clinical case.Aproximadamente 6 a 16% dos pacientes com sintomas de neuralgia trigeminal apresentam tumores intracranianos, sendo mais comum o schwannoma vestibular (neurinoma do acústico. Alguns sintomas relatados pelos pacientes são perda da audição, zumbido, dores de cabeça, vertigens e distúrbios trigeminais. Uma resposta muscular aumentada na musculatura associada da cabeça e do pescoço também pode ser observada, o que pode mimetizar sinais e sintomas de desordens temporomandibulares. Nestes casos é de grande valia o uso de imagem de ressonância magnética (IRM para detecção de tumores. É importante, também, a diferenciação de dores miofasciais e neurálgicas, pois ambas podem apresentar características semelhantes, mas com origens e tratamentos diferentes. O objetivo desse trabalho foi demonstrar através de relato de caso clínico a associação entre sintomas de neuralgia trigeminal, tumores intracranianos e disfunção temporomandibular.

  3. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TEMPOROMANDIBULAR-JOINT MOBILITY AND PERIPHERAL JOINT MOBILITY RECONSIDERED

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, P.U.; DEBONT, L.G.M.; VANDERWEELE, L.T.; Boering, G.

    The purpose of this paper was to study the relationship between temporomandibular joint (TMJ) mobility and mobility of joints and to study the general character of joint mobility in 83 subjects, 55 females and 28 males (mean age 26.7, range 13-46 years). The subjects were recruited from the

  4. Effectiveness of Low-Level Laser Therapy in Temporomandibular Joint Disorders: A Placebo-Controlled Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fikáčková, H.; Dostálová, T.; Navrátil, L.; Klaschka, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 4 (2007), s. 297-303 ISSN 1549-5418 Grant - others:GA MZd(CZ) NR8112 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : temporomandibular joint disorder * laser therapy Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 1.230, year: 2007

  5. Automated quantification and analysis of facial asymmetry in children with arthritis in the temporomandibular joint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darvann, Tron A.; Hermann, Nuno V.; Demant, Sune

    2011-01-01

    We present an automated method of spatially detailed 3D asymmetry quantification of face surfaces obtained in a stereophotogrammetric system, and the method was applied to a population of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) who have involvement of one temporomandibular joint (TMJ). ...

  6. Cost effectiveness of arthrocentesis as initial treatment for temporomandibular joint arthralgia: A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, L.M.; Stant, A.D.; Quik, E.H.; Huddleston Slater, J.J.R.; Stegenga, B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the cost effectiveness of arthrocentesis as initial treatment compared to care as usual (CAU) for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthralgia. Materials and methods: 80 patients were randomly allocated to arthrocentesis as initial treatment (n = 40) or CAU (n = 40).

  7. Comorbid Disorders and Sociodemographic Variables in Temporomandibular Pain in the General Dutch Population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, Corine M.; Ligthart, Lannie; Schuller, Annemarie A.; Lobbezoo, Frank; de Jongh, Ad; van Houtem, Caroline M. H. H.; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: (1) To determine the prevalence of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain complaints in the general Dutch population; (2) to investigate its relationship with age, sex, educational attainment, and country of birth; (3) to determine its association with other pain complaints; and (4) to

  8. Atypical Presentation of Zoster Mimicking Headache and Temporomandibular Disorder: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Mohammad Reza; Chamani, Goli

    2016-01-01

    Herpes zoster in the prodromal stage may be mistaken for other diseases characterized by pain in the area of prodrome, such as dental pain. We report on a case of trigeminal herpes zoster, which presented as sudden onset headache and acute temporomandibular pain in the prodromal phase.

  9. Comorbid disorders and sociodemographic variables in temporomandibular pain in the general Dutch population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, C.M.; Ligthart, L.; Schuller, A.A.; Lobbezoo, F.; de Jongh, A.; van Houtem, C.M.H.H.; Boomsma, D.I.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: (1) To determine the prevalence of temporomandibular disorder (TMD)-pain complaints in the general Dutch population; (2) to investigate its relationship with age, sex, educational attainment, and country of birth; (3) to determine its association with other pain complaints; and (4) to

  10. Relationship between bruxism and temporomandibular disorders: a systematic review of literature from 1998 to 2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manfredini, D.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The present paper aims to systematically review the literature on the temporomandibular disorders (TMD)-bruxism relationship published from 1998 to 2008. Study design: A systematic search in the National Library of Medicine's PubMed database was performed to identify all studies on

  11. The Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia for Temporomandibular Disorders (TSK-TMD)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, C.M.; Ohrbach, R.; van Wijk, A.J.; Wilkosz, M.; Naeije, M.

    2010-01-01

    For musculoskeletal disorders like low back pain and fibromyalgia, evidence is growing for fear of movement to play an important role in the development of chronic pain. In temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients, however, this construct has not received any attention yet. Therefore, in this

  12. RADIOGRAPHIC SIGNS OF TEMPOROMANDIBULAR-JOINT OSTEOARTHROSIS AND INTERNAL DERANGEMENT 30 YEARS AFTER NONSURGICAL TREATMENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DELEEUW, R; BOERING, G; STEGENGA, B; DEBONT, LGM

    The aim of this study was to evaluate with radiographs the long-term status of temporomandibular joints that were treated nonsurgically for reducing disk displacement (group 1) or permanent disk displacement (group 2) 30 years ago. Transcranial and transpharyngeal radiographs were made before (T1),

  13. Osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint organ and its relationship to disc displacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegenga, B

    2001-01-01

    To overcome disagreements with regard to the relationship between disc displacement and osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), the evidence for suggested disease mechanisms and clinical course of these disorders is reviewed. The TMJ behaves as a complex organ in which biochemical and

  14. Influence of serotonin on the analgesic effect of granisetron on temporomandibular joint arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ülle Voog

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available THE influence of circulating serotonin (5-HT on the effects of intra-articular administration of granisetron on temporomandibular joint (TMJ pain was investigated in 11 patients with chronic polyarthritides. An analgesic effect superior to placebo has been shown previously.

  15. Differential diagnostics of different nosological forms of the temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kameneva L.A.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Research objective: to carry out differential diagnostics of various nosological forms of a temporal and temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome. Material and methods. On clinical base of orthopedic odontology chair of SamSMU inspection of 244 patients with temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome was performed. Diagnostics was carried out according to the special card of inspection which was developed on orthopedic odontology chair of SamSMU and included subjective, objective and special methods of research. As a result of research it is taped: 71 — an occlusal-articulation dysfunctional syndrome, 44 — a neuromuscular dysfunctional syndrome, 76 patients have a hardly set dislocation of intra joint disk and 53 — a habitual dislocation and a subluxation of a temporomandibular joint. We used Yu.A. Petrosov's classification as it displays most precisely the processes happening at pathology of the intra joint relations. Conclusion: On the basis of the obtained data the table of differential diagnostics of various nosological forms of temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome has been made.

  16. Computed tomography and treatment of chronic temporomandibular joint arthritis in a sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warmerdam, E.P.L.; Weeren, P.R. van

    1996-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging and treatment of destructive right temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthritis in a sheep are discussed. Computed tomography (CT) appears to be an attractive technique for imaging TMJ lesions in sheep. Surgical curettage of a deformed TMJ can result in functional recovery

  17. Relationship between clinical findings of temporomandibular disorders and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizuka, Yasuyuki; Miura, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Fujiro; Kikuchi, Shiori; Konishi, Nobuhiro; Sakamaki, Kimio

    1996-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the relationship between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and clinical findings of patients having symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, and to consider the possibility to grasp the internal derangement of the TMJ from clinical findings. Subjects were 80 patients who visited to ask orthodontic treatment 16 males and 64 females. The average age was 22 years and 4 months. We performed a investigation of both their previous and present illness. In addition, to decide the correct condition concerning the internal derangement of the TMJ, patients were given MRI examinations (G. E. medical system Signa 1.5 Tesla) before orthodontic treatment. Results were as follows: The three symptoms of temporomandibular disorders-noise, pain, and abnormal mandibular movement, were not related to constant disk displacement. It seemed difficult to infer and obtain the diagnosis of the condition of internal derangement of the TMJ only from clinical findings. In a dental clinics having no medical imaging instrument such as MRI, it was, however, considered that the following items will make it possible to define the condition of internal derangements of the TMJ from clinical findings. As to respects concerning clinical findings, it is necessary to consider the previous illness as well as present illness. TMJ noise indicates a higher relationship to the disk displacement in MRI findings. The temporomandibular joint with plural symptoms indicated a higher incidence of disk displacement examined by MR Imaging than that with a single symptom. (author)

  18. Early diagnostics of temporomandibular joint structural elements injures caused by traumatic mandibular bone fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohranychna, Kh R; Stasyshyn, A R; Matolych, U D

    2017-06-30

    A rapidly increasing number of mandibular condylar fractures and some complications related to injuries of temporomandibular elements make this study important. Intra-articular disorders lead to secondary pathological findings such as osteoarthritis, deforming osteoarthrosis, and temporomandibular joint ankylosis that limits mouth opening, mastication, swallowing, breathing, and decreased/lost working capacity or disability. Early diagnosis of intra-articular disorders can prevent from long-lasting functional complications caused by temporomandibular joint injuries. This study was performed for the purpose of early detection and investigation of organic pathological changes in the cartilaginous and osseous tissues of the temporomandibular joint caused by traumatic fractures of the mandibular condyle. Twenty patients underwent a general clinical examination, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and immune-enzyme testing for biochemical markers of connective tissue injury (pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline) in urine. Disk dislocation, deformation, adhesion, perforation or squeeze, tension or disruption of ligaments, and injury of articular surfaces are among complications of mandibular fractures that can be revealed on MRI. As regards biochemical findings, we revealed a sharp rise in the levels of pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline before treatment and a lack of stabilization within 21 days of treatment.

  19. The use of surface electromyography as a tool in differentiating temporomandibular disorders from neck disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrario, Virgilio F; Tartaglia, Gianluca M; Luraghi, Francesca E; Sforza, Chiarella

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the electromyographic characteristics of the masticatory muscles (masseter and temporalis) of patients with either "temporomandibular joint disorder" or "neck pain". Surface electromyography of the right and left masseter and temporalis muscles was performed during maximum teeth clenching in 38 patients aged 21-67 years who had either (a) temporomandibular joint disorder (24 patients); (b) "neck pain" (13 patients). Ninety-five control, healthy subjects were also examined. During clenching, standardized total muscle activities (electromyographic potentials over time) were significantly different in the three groups: 75 microV/microVs% in the temporomandibular joint disorder patients, 124 microV/microVs% in the neck pain patients, and 95 microV/microVs% in the control subjects (analysis of variance, Ptemporomandibular joint disorder patients also had significantly (Pneck pain patients (87%) or control subjects (92%). A linear discriminant function analysis allowed a significant separation between the two patient groups, with a single patient error of 18.2%. Surface electromyographic analysis during clenching allowed to differentiate between patients with a temporomandibular joint disorder and patients with a neck pain problem.

  20. Comorbidity of internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint and silent dysfunction of the cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiesch-Scholz, M; Fink, M; Tschernitschek, H

    2003-04-01

    The aim of this evaluation was to examine correlations between internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and cervical spine disorder (CSD). A prospective controlled clinical study was carried out. Thirty patients with signs and symptoms of internal derangement but without any subjective neck problems and 30 age- and gender-matched control subjects without signs and symptoms of internal derangement were examined. The investigation of the temporomandibular system was carried out using a 'Craniomandibular Index'. Afterwards an examiner-blinded manual medical investigation of the craniocervical system was performed. This included muscle palpation of the cervical spine and shoulder girdle as well as passive movement tests of the cervical spine, to detect restrictions in the range of movement as well as segmental intervertebral dysfunction. The internal derangement of the TMJ was significantly associated with 'silent' CSD (t-test, P temporomandibular system exhibited significantly more often pain on pressure of the neck muscles than patients without muscle tenderness of the temporomandibular system (t-test, P < 0.05). As a result of the present study, for patients with internal derangement of the TMJ an additional examination of the craniocervical system should be recommended.

  1. Dislocation of temporo-mandibular joint - an uncommon circumstance of occurrence: vaginal delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bouazzaoui, Abderrahim; Labib, Smael; Derkaoui, Ali; Adnane Berdai, Mohammed; Bendadi, Azzeddine; Harandou, Mustapha

    2010-06-25

    Dislocation of temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) is an infrequent disease but still spectacular. This disease consists of a permanent, to some extent complete disruption of the temporo-mandibular joint. These dislocations often occur in a context of yawning, and less frequently after a burst of laughing or relatively mild facial trauma (slap, punch on the chin). We report a case of TMJ occurring in an uncommon circumstance: vaginal delivery. A woman aged 24-years with no special past medical history; primipara was admitted in the Department of Maternity of the University Hospital Hassan II of Fez for an imminent delivery of a twin pregnancy. Ten minutes after admission, the patient delivered vaginally with episiotomy. She gave birth to twins weighing 2800 g and 2400 g. During labour, and due to efforts of crying, the patient developed a sudden and immediate loss of function of the temporo-mandibular joint, with difficulty of speaking, the mouth permanently opened and with the chin lowered and thrown forward. The examination found an empty glenoid fossa of the temporo-mandibular joint in both sides. The diagnosis of dislocation of the TMJ was established. A CT scan of facial bones was done, objectifying a bilateral dislocation of TMJ. The reduction of this dislocation was performed in the operating room under sedation.

  2. Temporo-mandibular joint kinetics and chewing cycles in children. A 3-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodin, C; Lodetti, G; Marinone, M G

    2002-01-01

    To report the temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) kinetics and masticatory function in healthy children. Temporo-mandibular joint palpation and electrognathographic registrations of chewing cycles were repeated for 3 years in order to evaluate changes. Healthy children without systemic pathologies, decayed cavities and previous dental treatment. Electrognathographic (EGN) registration of masticatory cycles and TMJ palpation were carried out on 52 patients (mean age: 5 years 8 months, range: 5 years 1 month, 6 years 8 months), by two university researchers, once a year for 3 consecutive years. TMJ palpation, differentiated TMJ synchronism (simultaneous bilateral opening movement) and TMJ asynchronism (not simultaneous bilateral opening movement), TMJ subluxation and click were observed. Electrognathographic registrations differentiated normal and abnormal jaw chewing cycles, and narrow and large cycles. Temporo-mandibular joint asynchronism was evident in 34 of 52 patients in the primary dentition, in 42 of 52 patients after the eruption of the first permanent molar, and in 31 of 52 patients after the eruption of the permanent incisors. TMJ subluxation increased during the full period of observation. Three temporomandibular clicks appeared after the eruption of the permanent incisors. Altered mastication was not always associated with TMJ disorders. In children, normal chewing cycles can coexist with occlusal discrepancies, cranio-facial growth and TMJ alterations.

  3. The Sport’s Bar Grandpa: an unusual left temporo-mandibular and tongue pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Leandri

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes the condition of an elderly patient admitted to hospital for a new onset headache and pain in the left temporo-mandibular joint, initially incorrectly interpreted as an angioedema, but that evolved into a tongue infarction.

  4. Indication for and accuracy of CT and MRI of the temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greess, H.; Anders, K.

    2005-01-01

    Recurrent pains of the temporomandibular joint represent a frequent symptom with numerous different causes. CT and MRI can reliably show the cause of these disorders and therefore have substituted conventional X-ray imaging. Modern multi-slice-CT (MSCT) allows for examination of the skull base including the mandible in a very short time with thinnest slice collimation (0.75 mm). With 2D- and 3D- reformations reconstructed out of this volume data set in parasagittal, coronal or any other arbitrary slice orientation excellent imaging of fractures and bony changes of arthrosis as well as benign and malignant tumors of the temporomandibular joint can be performed. MRI offers very good soft tissue contrast in order to visualize the intra-articular disc, the ligaments and muscles, as well the possibility to acquire cross sectional images in any user-defined orientation. MRI is the method of choice to diagnose 'internal derangement', particularly displacement of the intra-articular disc and inflammatory disease of the temporomandibular joint. The present paper will provide diagnostic strategies for the use of MSCT or MRI imaging concerning the different causes of disorders to the temporomandibular joint. (orig.)

  5. Muscle Fatigue in the Temporal and Masseter Muscles in Patients with Temporomandibular Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Woźniak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate muscle fatigue in the temporal and masseter muscles in patients with temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD. Two hundred volunteers aged 19.3 to 27.8 years (mean 21.50, SD 0.97 participated in this study. Electromyographical (EMG recordings were performed using a DAB-Bluetooth Instrument (Zebris Medical GmbH, Germany. Muscle fatigue was evaluated on the basis of a maximum effort test. The test was performed during a 10-second maximum isometric contraction (MVC of the jaws. An analysis of changes in the mean power frequency of the two pairs of temporal and masseter muscles (MPF% revealed significant differences in the groups of patients with varying degrees of temporomandibular disorders according to Di (P<0.0000. The study showed an increase in the muscle fatigue of the temporal and masseter muscles correlated with the intensity of temporomandibular dysfunction symptoms in patients. The use of surface electromyography in assessing muscle fatigue is an excellent diagnostic tool for identifying patients with temporomandibular dysfunction.

  6. Temporomandibular Joint and its Two-Dimensional and Three-Dimensional Modelling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hliňáková, P.; Dostálová, T.; Daněk, Josef; Nedoma, Jiří; Hlaváček, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 6 (2010), s. 1256-1268 ISSN 0378-4754 Grant - others:GA MZd(CZ) NS9902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504; CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : dentistry * temporomandibular joint * mathematical modelling * contact problem * finite element method Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry Impact factor: 0.812, year: 2010

  7. Alteration of Cartilage Degeneration and Inflammation Markers in Temporomandibular Joint Osteoarthritis Occurs Proportionally

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Lukas M.; Kuijer, Roel; Slater, James J. R. Huddleston; Stegenga, Boudewijn

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: There is a growing interest in markers for cartilage degradation in synovial joints because of their potential diagnostic and prognostic value. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify valuable degradation markers for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis (OA) by comparing

  8. The Association between Headaches and Temporomandibular Disorders is Confounded by Bruxism and Somatic Complaints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Hedwig A.; Speksnijder, Caroline M.; Engelbert, Raoul; Lobbezoo, Frank; Nijhuis – van der Sanden, Maria W G; Visscher, Corine M.

    OBJECTIVES:: The objective of this observational study was to establish the possible presence of confounders on the association between temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and headaches in a patient population from a TMD and Orofacial Pain Clinic. METHODS:: Several subtypes of headaches were

  9. The Association Between Headaches and Temporomandibular Disorders is Confounded by Bruxism and Somatic Symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, H.A. van der; Speksnijder, C.M.; Engelbert, R.H.; Lobbezoo, F.; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, M.W.G.; Visscher, C.M.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this observational study was to establish the possible presence of confounders on the association between temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and headaches in a patient population from a TMD and Orofacial Pain Clinic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Several subtypes of headaches

  10. Why seek treatment for temporomandibular disorder pain complaints? A study based on semi-structured interviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rollman, A.; Gorter, R.C.; Visscher, C.M.; Naeije, M.

    2013-01-01

    AIMS: To identify potential predictors of self-reported sleep bruxism (SB) within children's family and school environments. METHODS: A Aims: To assess possible differences between care seekers and non-care seekers with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain complaints, by using semi-structured

  11. Is there an association between temporomandibular disorders and playing a musical instrument? A review of literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atallah, M.M.; Visscher, C.M.; van Selms, M.K.A.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2014-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) have a multifactorial etiology. Among others, parafunctions and oral habits have been suggested as important initiating and perpetuating factors. Playing a musical instrument that loads the masticatory system, like wind instruments and the violin or viola, has been

  12. Temporomandibular Joint Prosthesis - 3D-CT Reconstruction before and after Treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feltlová, E.; Dostálová, T.; Kašparová, M.; Daněk, J.; Hliňáková, P.; Hubáček, M.; Nedoma, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2010), s. 15-19 ISSN 1801-5603 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : dentistry * maxillofacial surgery * partial TMJ prosthesis * three-dimensional computed tomography * magnetic resonance imaging * temporomandibular joint Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://www.ejbi.cz/articles/201012/50/1.html

  13. Investigation of an autologous blood treatment strategy for temporomandibular joint hypermobility in a pig model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štembírek, Jan; Matalová, Eva; Buchtová, Marcela; Machoň, V.; Míšek, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 3 (2013), s. 369-375 ISSN 0901-5027 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0528 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : temporomandibular joint * pig * autologous blood * hypermobility Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry Impact factor: 1.359, year: 2013

  14. Dislocation of temporo-mandibular joint - an uncommon circumstance of occurrence: vaginal delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abderrahim El Bouazzaoui

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Dislocation of temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ is an infrequent disease but still almost spectacular. This disease consists of a permanent, to some extent complete disruption of the temporo-mandibular joint. These dislocations often occurs in a context of yawning, and less frequently after a burst of laughing or relatively mild facial trauma (slap, punch on the chin.We report a case of TMJ occurring in an uncommon circumstance : vaginal delivery. A young woman aged 24-years with no special past medical history; primipara was admitted in the Department of Maternity of the University Hospital Hassan II of Fez for an imminent delivery of a twin pregnancy. Obstetrical analgesia was not possible so the parturient cried in a strong manner during labour. Ten minutes after admission, the patient delivered vaginally with episiotomy. She gave birth to twins weighing 2800g and 2400g. During labour, and effort of crying, the patient presented a sudden and immediate loss of function of the temporo-mandibular joint, with difficulty of speaking, the mouth permanently opened, with the chin lowered and thrown forward. The examination found an emptiness of the glenoid fossa of the temporo-mandibular joint in both sides. The diagnosis of dislocation of the TMJ has established. Performance of special radiologic screening to study the TM was technically not possible. A CT scan of facial bones has been achieved so objectifying a bilateral dislocation of TMJ. The reduction of this dislocation was performed in the operating room under sedation

  15. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of the fibrocartilage disc of the temporomandibular joint--a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittschieler, Elisabeth; Szomolanyi, Pavol; Schmid-Schwap, Martina; Weber, Michael; Egerbacher, Monika; Traxler, Hannes; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2014-12-01

    To 1) test the feasibility of delayed Gadolinium-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage (dGEMRIC) at 3 T in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and 2) to determine the optimal delay for measurements of the TMJ disc after i.v. contrast agent (CA) administration. MRI of the right and left TMJ of six asymptomatic volunteers was performed at 3 T using a dedicated coil. 2D inversion recovery (2D-IR) sequences were performed at 4 time points covering 120 minutes and 3D gradient-echo (3D GRE) dual flip-angle sequences were performed at 14 time points covering 130 minutes after the administration of 0.2 mmol/kg of Gd-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid ion (Gd-DTPA)(2-), i.e., 0.4 mL of Magnevist™ per kg body weight. Pair-wise tests were used to assess differences between pre-and post-contrast T1 values. 2D-IR sequences showed a statistically significant drop (pfibrocartilage disc of the TMJ. The recommended measurement time for dGEMRIC in the TMJ after i.v. CA administration is from 60 to 120 minutes. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of the fibrocartilage disc of the temporomandibular joint – a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittschieler, Elisabeth; Szomolanyi, Pavol; Schmid-Schwap, Martina; Weber, Michael; Egerbacher, Monika; Traxler, Hannes; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2014-01-01

    Objective To 1) test the feasibility of delayed Gadolinium-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage (dGEMRIC) at 3 T in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and 2) to determine the optimal delay for measurements of the TMJ disc after i.v. contrast agent (CA) administration. Design MRI of the right and left TMJ of six asymptomatic volunteers was performed at 3 T using a dedicated coil. 2D inversion recovery (2D-IR) sequences were performed at 4 time points covering 120 minutes and 3D gradient-echo (3D GRE) dual flip-angle sequences were performed at 14 time points covering 130 minutes after the administration of 0.2 mmol/kg of Gd-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid ion (Gd-DTPA)2-, i.e., 0.4 mL of Magnevist™ per kg body weight. Pair-wise tests were used to assess differences between pre-and post-contrast T1 values. Results 2D-IR sequences showed a statistically significant drop (p fibrocartilage disc of the TMJ. The recommended measurement time for dGEMRIC in the TMJ after i.v. CA administration is from 60 to 120 minutes. PMID:25131629

  17. Association between temporomandibular disorders and music performance anxiety in violinists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, M I T; Jorge, A I L

    2016-10-01

    Professional violin playing has been associated with a predisposition to develop temporomandibular disorder (TMD). There are a number of risk factors, including physical trauma from the playing posture and the presence of parafunctional habits. Music performance anxiety (MPA) may also be a factor, as it has been associated with playing-related musculoskeletal disorders (PRMD). To evaluate a possible association between the presence of TMD and the level of MPA in violin players. An observational study using a written questionnaire that retrieved data related to TMD symptoms (Fonseca Anamnestic Questionnaire), MPA level (Kenny Music Performance Anxiety Inventory, K-MPAI), instrument practice time, chinrest type, sex and age. Descriptive, bivariate and logistic regression analyses were conducted. Ninety-three professional or semi-professional violinists performing in and around Lisbon, Portugal, completed the questionnaire (73% response rate). TMD was present in 50 violinists (58%). There was a statistically significant association between the presence of TMD and high MPA levels (P < 0.001) and the most anxious violinists were six times (95% confidence interval 2.51-15.33; P < 0.001) more likely to report TMD symptoms when compared with the least anxious players. Violin players had a high prevalence of reported TMD symptoms, which was significantly associated with high MPA levels. It may therefore be necessary to address psychological and physical factors simultaneously in musicians who do not improve with physical therapy alone. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Association between temporomandibular disorders and abnormal head postures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Francisco FAULIN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the possible correlation between the prevalence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD and different head postures in the frontal and sagittal planes using photographs of undergraduate students in the School of Dentistry at the Universidade de Brasília - UnB, Brazil. In this nonrandomized, cross-sectional study, the diagnoses of TMD were made with the Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC/TMD axis I. The craniovertebral angle was used to evaluate forward head posture in the sagittal plane, and the interpupillary line was used to measure head tilt in the frontal plane. The measurements to evaluate head posture were made using the Software for the Assessment of Posture (SAPO. Students were divided into two study groups, based on the presence or absence of TMD. The study group comprised 46 students and the control group comprised 80 students. Data about head posture and TMD were analyzed with the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, version 13. Most cases of TMD were classified as degenerative processes (group III, followed by disk displacement (group II and muscle disorders (group I. There was no sex predominance for the type of disorder. No association was found between prevalence rates for head postures in the frontal plane and the occurrence of TMD. The same result was found for the association of TMD diagnosis with craniovertebral angle among men and women, and the group that contained both men and women. Abnormal head postures were common among individuals both with and without TMD. No association was found between head posture evaluated in the frontal and sagittal planes and TMD diagnosis with the use of RDC/TMD.

  19. Usefulness of posture training for patients with temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, E F; Domenech, M A; Fischer, J R

    2000-02-01

    Many practitioners have found that posture training has a positive impact on temporomandibular, or TMD, symptoms. The authors conducted a study to evaluate its effectiveness. Sixty patients with TMD and a primary muscle disorder were randomized into two groups: one group received posture training and TMD self-management instructions while the control group received TMD self-management instructions only. Four weeks after the study began, the authors reexamined the subjects for changes in symptoms, pain-free opening and pressure algometer pain thresholds. In addition, pretreatment and posttreatment posture measurements were recorded for subjects in the treatment group. Statistically significant improvement was demonstrated by the modified symptom severity index, maximum pain-free opening and pressure algometer threshold measurements, as well as by the subjects' perceived TMD and neck symptoms. Subjects in the treatment group reported having experienced a mean reduction in TMD and neck symptoms of 41.9 and 38.2 percent, respectively, while subjects in the control group reported a mean reduction in these symptoms of 8.1 and 9.3 percent. Within the treatment group, the authors found significant correlations between improvements in TMD symptoms and improvements in neck symptoms (P head and shoulder posture measurements at the outset of treatment (P Posture training and TMD self-management instructions are significantly more effective than TMD self-management instructions alone for patients with TMD who have a primary muscle disorder. Patients with TMD who hold their heads farther forward relative to the shoulders have a high probability of experiencing symptom improvement as a result of posture training and being provided with selfmanagement instructions.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of the equine temporomandibular joint anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, M J; Agut, A; Soler, M; López-Albors, O; Arredondo, J; Querol, M; Latorre, R

    2010-04-01

    In human medicine, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the 'gold standard' imaging procedure to assess the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). However, there is no information regarding MRI evaluation of equine TMJ. To describe the normal sectional MRI anatomy of equine TMJ by using frozen and plastinated anatomical sections as reference; and determine the best imaging planes and sequences to visualise TMJ components. TMJs from 6 Spanish Purebred horse cadavers (4 immature and 2 mature) underwent MRI examination. Spin-echo T1-weighting (SE T1W), T2*W, fat-suppressed (FS) proton density-weighting (PDW) and fast spin-echo T2-weighting (FSE T2W) sequences were obtained in oblique sagittal, transverse and dorsal planes. Anatomical sections were procured on the same planes for a thorough interpretation. The oblique sagittal and transverse planes were the most informative anatomical planes. SE T1W images showed excellent spatial resolution and resulted in superior anatomic detail when comparing to other sequences. FSE T2W sequence provided an acceptable anatomical depiction but T2*W and fat-suppressed PDW demonstrated higher contrast in visualisation of the disc, synovial fluid, synovial pouches and articular cartilage. The SE T1W sequence in oblique sagittal and transverse plane should be the baseline to identify anatomy. The T2*W and fat-suppressed PDW sequences enhance the study of the articular cartilage and synovial pouches better than FSE T2W. The information provided in this paper should aid clinicians in the interpretation of MRI images of equine TMJ and assist in the early diagnosis of those problems that could not be diagnosed by other means.

  1. Utility of bone SPECT in temporomandibular joint pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Dong Hunn; Sung, Mi Sook; Lee, Jung Whee; Chung, Soo Kyo; Shinn, Kyung Sub

    1997-01-01

    Temporomandibular (TM) joint pain results from many etiologic factors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of Bone SPECT in patients with TM joint pain. The subjects were 34 patients with TM joint pain. All patients underwent plain radiography, planar bone scan, and Bone SPECT. The intensity of radioisotope uptake at TM joint was graded into three; no increased uptake above the background activity as grade 0, uptake similar to occipital bone as grade I, and uptake similar to maxillary sinus as grade II. Clinical findings and therapeutic methods were reviewed. Twenty-seven patients (80%) out of 34 patients with TM joint pain had increased uptake in bone SPECT. Twenty-one (78%) out of 27 patients had increased uptake in the mandibular condyle and remaining six patients (22%) had uptake in the mandibular and maxillary arch, which proved to be dental problem. Seven patients (21%) out of 34 were grade as 0, four (12%) were grade I, 23 (68%) were grade. II. Four patients with grade I had clicking sound and symptoms which were subsided with medication in all cases. Among 23 patients with grade II, 7 patients had clicking sound and 14 patients underwent medication and decompression therapy. With Planar bone scan, 11 cases (32%) had increased uptake in TM joint area. Plain radiography revealed narrowing, distension, erosion and limitation of TM joint in 16 cases (47%). Bone SPECT can be valuable for screening and managing the patients with TM joint pain. Patients with grade II needed intensive treatment such as joint aspiration. However degree of the radioisotope uptake did not well correlated with clinical symptoms

  2. Unit 1 and Unit 2 Nuclear Power Plant Mochovce construction finishing from primary contractor of technological part. Skoda Praha a. s. point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horky, F.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper the history of delivery of technological part for NPP V-1 Mochovce as well as of reconstruction and safety improvements by the Skoda Praha a.s. is presented. Primary contractor of technological part Skoda Praha together with its final suppliers proved ability to realize under hard conditions such a complicated work what was indisputedly Units 1 and 2 finishing. Company proved capability to conform itself flexibly in the course of work to requirements of customer for realization of safety measures which means that Units 1 and 2 fully satisfy international standards. By fulfilment of primary contractor of technology obligations and above all by takeover of complex responsibility for both Units putting in operation including responsibility for 'past' Skoda Praha put away one of basic problems which occurred in decision making to whom will be assigned construction finishing contract. These facts fully qualify Skoda Praha to be selected for possible Units 3 and 4 construction finishing as one of chief construction finishing participant

  3. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain revisited with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasali, N.; Cubuk, R.; Aricak, M.; Ozarar, M.; Saydam, B.; Nur, H.; Tuncbilek, N.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We aimed to assess the contrast enhancement patterns of the retrodiscal tissue with dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI) with respect to different temporomandibular joint disc pathologies. Additionally, we questioned the relationship between the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain and the contrast enhancement pattern of the retrodiscal tissue regardless of the TMJ disc position. Materials and methods: 52 joints of 26 patients (4 males and 22 females) who have pain in at least at one of their TMJ were included in this study. For the qualitative analysis, the joints were divided into four groups in terms of their disc positions: normal (1), partially displaced with or without reduction (2), totally dislocated with reduction (3) and totally dislocated without reduction (4). Besides, two different joint groups were constituted, namely the painful group and painless group according to the clinical findings without taking the TMJ disc positions into account. Quantitative analyses were made by means of measuring signal intensity ratios (SI) ratio at the retrodiscal tissue (from internal side and external side of the each joint) using DCE-MRI and these measurements were analyzed with paired samples t test to define the difference between the measurements. At the second stage, the time-dependent arithmetical mean values of the SI ratios were calculated for each joint group and significant differences between the groups were questioned using analysis of variance (ANOVA) test. Besides, painful and painless groups which were classified on the basis of the clinical data were compared according to the mean SI ratios found for each joint and the significant differences between these two groups were assessed by means of Student's T test. The results were assessed in 95% confidence interval where the significance level was p < 0.05. Results: A significant difference was observed between the internal and external contrast enhancement of the joints with partial

  4. Trastornos temporomandibulares y su interacción con la postura corporal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Miguel Montero Parrilla

    Full Text Available Introducción: en los últimos años se ha sugerido que los trastornos temporomandibulares pueden estar influenciados por la postura corporal. Objetivo: caracterizar los trastornos temporomandibulares basados en su interacción con las variables posturales. Métodos: se realizó un estudio observacional descriptivo y transversal en el período comprendido entre febrero de 2011 y marzo 2012, en el cual a 122 estudiantes de 3er. año de la Facultad de Estomatología, se les realizó el examen clínico en dos momentos, primero se examinó la oclusión dentaria y posteriormente se realizó el examen postural. Se aplicó el Test de Krogh-Paulsen para diagnosticar trastornos temporomandibulares. Resultados: independientemente del tipo postural, los principales signos y síntomas encontrados fueron las irregularidades en abertura y cierre y los sonidos articulares, presentes en el 45,1 % y 31,2 % respectivamente. El 40,2 % de los estudiantes tuvo una postura del tipo B, seguida por la postura del tipo D, encontradas en el 29,5 % de los casos. Solo 36 de los estudiantes estaban sanos. El desequilibrio derecho de pelvis fue el más observado, presente en el 48,4 % de la muestra. Conclusiones: para todas las posibles clasificaciones del test de Krogh-Paulsen predominaron los pacientes con desequilibrio derecho de pelvis. Los pacientes con chasquidos de la articulación temporomandibular tenían las pelvis y los hombros desequilibrados en el mismo sentido, pero contrario al lugar donde aparecía el signo. No se evidencia una marcada relación entre las alteraciones posturales y los trastornos temporomandibulares.

  5. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... en español Blog About OnSafety CPSC Stands for Safety The Tipping Point Home > 60 Seconds of Safety (Videos) > The Tipping Point The Tipping Point by ... danger death electrical fall furniture head injury product safety television tipover tv Watch the video in Adobe ...

  6. National Wetlands Inventory Points

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Wetland point features (typically wetlands that are too small to be as area features at the data scale) mapped as part of the National Wetlands Inventory (NWI). The...

  7. Calculation of null points in SPAIR, FLAIR, and STIR. Part 2. Application to pelvic diffusion-weighted imaging with SPAIR at 3T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Miho; Kawano, Kazuhiro; Kometani, Katsuya; Kondo, Toshihiko; Shimamoto, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Humihiro; Oda, Hideyuki; Kojima, Akihiro; Sato, Morio

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) requires adequate fat suppression because of its sensitivity to chemical shift artifacts, especially at 3 Tesla (T). We investigated the utility of calculating the inversion time of the null point (TI null ) in pelvic DWI with spectral attenuated inversion recovery (SPAIR) at 3 T for obtaining adequate fat suppression. Thirteen volunteers underwent pelvic SPAIR-DWI using various SPAIR inversion delay times (TI) at 5-ms intervals in the range of the calculated TI null ±25 ms. The degree of fat suppression was evaluated into 3 grades and was compared among the various SPAIR-TIs with the calculated TI null . In 65 cases of prostatic disease, we evaluated the ratio of adequate fat suppression obtained using the calculated TI null . We obtained adequate fat suppression in all 13 volunteers and in 61 (94%) of the 65 patients using the calculated TI null . Fat suppression was best when the calculated TI null was used (P null (P null increased. In conclusion, this method of calculating the TI null may be useful for obtaining adequate fat suppression for pelvic SPAIR-DWI at 3T. (author)

  8. Scientific and Regulatory Policy Committee Points-to-consider Paper*: Drug-induced Vascular Injury Associated with Nonsmall Molecule Therapeutics in Preclinical Development: Part 2. Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, Jeffery A; Fant, Pierluigi; Guionaud, Silvia; Henry, Scott P; Leach, Michael W; Louden, Calvert; Scicchitano, Marshall S; Weaver, James L; Zabka, Tanja S; Frazier, Kendall S

    2015-10-01

    Drug-induced vascular injury (DIVI) is a recurrent challenge in the development of novel pharmaceutical agents. In recent years, DIVI has been occasionally observed in nonhuman primates given RNA-targeting therapeutics such as antisense oligonucleotide therapies (ASOs) during chronic toxicity studies. While DIVI in laboratory animal species has been well characterized for vasoactive small molecules, and immune-mediated responses against large molecule biotherapeutics have been well described, there is little published information regarding DIVI induced by ASOs to date. Preclinical DIVI findings in monkeys have caused considerable delays in development of promising new ASO therapies, because of the uncertainty about whether DIVI in preclinical studies is predictive of effects in humans, and the lack of robust biomarkers of DIVI. This review of DIVI discusses clinical and microscopic features of vasculitis in monkeys, their pathogenic mechanisms, and points to consider for the toxicologist and pathologist when confronted with ASO-related DIVI. Relevant examples of regulatory feedback are included to provide insight into risk assessment of ASO therapies. © 2015 by The Author(s).

  9. [The temporomandibular joint in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: what radiologists need to look for on magnetic resonance imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Hoz Polo, M; Navallas, M

    2014-01-01

    The term "juvenile idiopathic arthritis" (JIA) encompasses a group of arthritis of unknown cause with onset before the age of 16 years that last for at least 6 weeks. The prevalence of temporomandibular joint involvement in published series ranges from 17% to 87%. Temporomandibular joint involvement is difficult to detect clinically, so imaging plays a key role in diagnosis and monitoring treatment. MRI is the technique of choice for the study of arthritis of the temporomandibular joint because it is the most sensitive technique for detecting acute synovitis and bone edema. Power Doppler ultrasonography can also detect active synovitis by showing the hypervascularization of the inflamed synovial membrane, but it cannot identify bone edema. This article describes the MRI technique for evaluating the temporomandibular joint in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, defines the parameters to look for, and illustrates the main findings. Copyright © 2013 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Effectiveness of osteopathic manipulative treatment versus osteopathy in the cranial field in temporomandibular disorders - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesslbauer, Christina; Vavti, Nadja; Keilani, Mohammad; Mickel, Michael; Crevenna, Richard

    2018-03-01

    Temporomandibular disorders are a common musculoskeletal condition causing severe pain, physical and psychological disability. The effect and evidence of osteopathic manipulative treatment and osteopathy in the cranial field is scarce and their use are controversial. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the effectiveness of osteopathic manipulative treatment and osteopathy in the cranial field in temporomandibular disorders. A randomized clinical trial in patients with temporomandibular disorders was performed. Forty female subjects with long-term temporomandibular disorders (>3 months) were included. At enrollment, subjects were randomly assigned into two groups: (1) osteopathic manipulative treatment group (20 female patients) and (2) osteopathy in the cranial field group (20 female patients). Examination was performed at baseline (E0) and at the end of the last treatment (E1), consisting of subjective pain intensity with the Visual Analog Scale, Helkimo Index and SF-36 Health Survey. Subjects had five treatments, once a week. 36 subjects completed the study (33.7 ± 10.3 y). Patients in both groups showed significant reduction in Visual Analog Scale score (osteopathic manipulative treatment group: p = 0.001; osteopathy in the cranial field group: posteopathy in the cranial field group: p = 0.003) and a significant improvement in the SF-36 Health Survey - subscale "Bodily Pain" (osteopathic manipulative treatment group: p = 0.04; osteopathy in the cranial field group: p = 0.007) after five treatments (E1). All subjects (n = 36) also showed significant improvements in the above named parameters after five treatments (E1): Visual Analog Scale score (posteopathy in the cranial field as an effective treatment modality in patients with temporomandibular disorders. The positive results in both treatment groups should encourage further research on osteopathic manipulative treatment and osteopathy in the cranial field and support the

  11. Evidence of accessibility and utility of point-of-care diagnostics as an integral part of prevention of mother-to-child transmission services: systematic scoping review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoba, Juliet; Hangulu, Lydia; Mashamba-Thompson, Tivani Phosa

    2017-11-04

    Point-of-care (POC) testing has been shown to help improve healthcare access in resource-limited settings. However, there is paucity of evidence on accessibility of POC testing for prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) in resource-limited settings. We propose to conduct a systematic scoping review to map the evidence on POC testing services for PMTCT. A scoping review framework, proposed by Arksey and O'Malley, will guide the study. A comprehensive literature search will be performed in the following electronic databases: PubMed, Science Direct, Cochrane Central, Google Scholar and databases within EBSCOhost (Medline and CINAHL). The primary research articles published in peer-reviewed journals and grey articles addressing our question will be included. One reviewer will conduct title screening and the results will be exported to endnote library. Two independent reviewers will perform abstract, then full article screening in parallel. The same process shall be employed to extract data from eligible studies. Data analysis will involve a narrative summary of included studies and thematic content analysis aided by NVIVO software V.11. The mixed methods assessment tool will be used to assess the quality of studies that will be included. Ethical approval is not applicable to this study. The study findings will be disseminated through publication in a peer-reviewed journal and presentations at conferences related to syphilis, HIV, PMTCT, bacterial infections and POC diagnostics. CRD42017056267. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. [Study of self-reported health of people living near point sources of environmental pollution: a review. Second part: analysis of results and perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniau, C; Dor, F; Eilstein, D; Lefranc, A; Empereur-Bissonnet, P; Dab, W

    2013-08-01

    Epidemiological studies have investigated the health impacts of local sources of environmental pollution using as an outcome variable self-reported health, reflecting the overall perception interviewed people have of their own health. This work aims at analyzing the advantages and the results of this approach. This second part presents the results of the studies. Based on a literature review (51 papers), this article presents an analysis of the contribution of self-reported health to epidemiological studies investigating local sources of environmental pollution. It discusses the associations between self-reported health and exposure variables, and other risk factors that can influence health reporting. Studies using self-reported health showed that local sources can be associated with a wide range of health outcomes, including an impact on mental health and well-being. The perception of pollution, especially sensory information such as odors, affects self-reported health. Attitudes referring to beliefs, worries and personal behaviors concerning the source of pollution have a striking influence on reported health. Attitudes can be used to estimate the reporting bias in a biomedical approach, and also constitute the main explanatory factors in biopsychosocial studies taking into account not only the biological, physical, and chemical factors but also the psychological and social factors at stake in a situation of environmental exposure. Studying self-reported health enables a multifactorial approach to health in a context of environmental exposure. This approach is most relevant when conducted within a multidisciplinary framework involving human and social sciences to better understand psychosocial factors. The relevance of this type of approach used as an epidemiological surveillance tool to monitor local situations should be assessed with regard to needs for public health management of these situations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. The temporomandibular opening index, report of headache and TMD, and implications for screening in general practice: an initial study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Victor J; Karic, Vesna V; Ofec, Ronen; Nehete, Swati R; Smidt, Ami

    2014-01-01

    The cardinal signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) are pain in joints and/or muscles, joint sounds, and limitation of movement. They are also associated with other complaints, one of which is headache. Myogenous TMD patients can be divided into those with a high and low temporomandibular opening index (TOI). These two subgroups appear to vary in several ways, including symptom severity. The objective was to assess the relationship between reported headache and TMD patients and a control group with no TMD and to compare the report of headache in high- and low-TOI myogenous TMD patients. Sixty-six patients with TMD were included in the study. Fortythree were diagnosed with myogenous TMD, 23 with arthrogenous TMD, and 20 with no TMD were included as a control. Patients reported a history of headache using a four-point Verbal Rating Scale for both severity and frequency. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed, after adjusting for confounders of sex and age. This helped investigate the association between the study groups and reported headache. Seventeen of the myogenous TMD patients were studied further. Seven were assigned to the high and 10 to the low-TOI group. Mean ages were 38.43 years and 33.00 years respectively. The Mann Whitney test was used to examine the difference in report of headache between these two groups. 76.7% of the myogenous group, 26.1% of the arthrogenous group, and 35% of the control group reported headache. Age and myogenous TMD were significantly associated with reported headache (P = .001 and .01, respectively). Myogenous TMD is a significant risk factor (OR = 5.20, P = .01) for reported headache while arthrogenous TMD is not (OR = 0.75, P = .69) A significant difference in report of headache between the two myogenous TMD groups was found (P = .0067). The risk for reported headache is 5.20-times greater for myogenous TMD patients compared to the control group, but no difference was noted between the arthrogenous

  14. Orofacial features of subjects aged 18-30 years in the northern part of Kosovo and Metohija territory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todić Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Temporomandibular disorder (TMD is a universal term referred to herein to collectively denote a series of functional disorders of orofacial structures, the temporomandibular joint (TMJ and the masticatory muscles in particular. Objectives: The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence of temporomandibular disorders within the observed sample population of the northern part of Kosovo and Metohija, as well as the frequency of signs and symptoms of this type of disorder. Methods: The study involved a sample of 300 subjects, aged 18-30 years. The sample comprised the target student population attending the University of Pristina, Kosovska Mitrovica. A random sample, intended for sampling without replacement, was drawn from the target population. All subjects underwent the Helkimo clinical dysfunction index analysis. Results of the analysis were quantified and expressed numerically, based on severity, as the Helkimo anamnestic dysfunction index (Ai and the clinical dysfunction index (Di with specific values assigned thereto accordingly. Results: The prevalence of temporomandibular disorders within the observed sample population totaled 50.7% (Di> 0. In the majority of patients a mild form of TMP (67% was reported. Temporomandibular disorders were more common in women than in men, who appear to be three times as likely to develop the respective condition, demonstrating the ratio of 3:1. The most common TMD signs and symptoms implied mandibular kinetics disturbances (46% and TMJ sounds (45%. The prevalence of pain during mandibular movements amounted to 9%, the palpable TMJ sensitivity to 20% and the palpable sensitivity of masticatory muscles 18%. Headache and otalgia were represented with 13%, that is, 3% in the observed sample. Conclusion: Temporomandibular disorder analysis demonstrates high incidence in the population of the northern part of Kosovo and Metohija. These findings indicate the need for an extensive prevention

  15. Jaw dysfunction is associated with neck disability and muscle tenderness in subjects with and without chronic temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, A; Gadotti, I C; Armijo-Olivo, S; Biasotto-Gonzalez, D A; Magee, D

    2015-01-01

    Tender points in the neck are common in patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD). However, the correlation among neck disability, jaw dysfunction, and muscle tenderness in subjects with TMD still needs further investigation. This study investigated the correlation among neck disability, jaw dysfunction, and muscle tenderness in subjects with and without chronic TMD. Participants. Forty females between 19 and 49 years old were included in this study. There were 20 healthy controls and 20 subjects who had chronic TMD and neck disability. Subjects completed the neck disability index and the limitations of daily functions in TMD questionnaires. Tenderness of the masticatory and cervical muscles was measured using an algometer. The correlation between jaw disability and neck disability was significantly high (r = 0.915, P cervical muscles with jaw dysfunction and neck disability showed fair to moderate correlations (r = 0.32-0.65). High levels of muscle tenderness in upper trapezius and temporalis muscles correlated with high levels of jaw and neck dysfunction. Moreover, high levels of neck disability correlated with high levels of jaw disability. These findings emphasize the importance of considering the neck and its structures when evaluating and treating patients with TMD.

  16. Evaluation of validity and reliability of a methodology for measuring human postural attitude and its relation to temporomandibular joint disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Ramón Fuentes; Carter, Pablo; Muñoz, Sergio; Silva, Héctor; Venegas, Gonzalo Hernán Oporto; Cantin, Mario; Ottone, Nicolás Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJDs) are caused by several factors such as anatomical, neuromuscular and psychological alterations. A relationship has been established between TMJDs and postural alterations, a type of anatomical alteration. An anterior position of the head requires hyperactivity of the posterior neck region and shoulder muscles to prevent the head from falling forward. This compensatory muscular function may cause fatigue, discomfort and trigger point activation. To our knowledge, a method for assessing human postural attitude in more than one plane has not been reported. Thus, the aim of this study was to design a methodology to measure the external human postural attitude in frontal and sagittal planes, with proper validity and reliability analyses. METHODS The variable postures of 78 subjects (36 men, 42 women; age 18–24 years) were evaluated. The postural attitudes of the subjects were measured in the frontal and sagittal planes, using an acromiopelvimeter, grid panel and Fox plane. RESULTS The method we designed for measuring postural attitudes had adequate reliability and validity, both qualitatively and quantitatively, based on Cohen’s Kappa coefficient (> 0.87) and Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r = 0.824, > 80%). CONCLUSION This method exhibits adequate metrical properties and can therefore be used in further research on the association of human body posture with skeletal types and TMJDs. PMID:26768173

  17. Fixed Points

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 5. Fixed Points - From Russia with Love - A Primer of Fixed Point Theory. A K Vijaykumar. Book Review Volume 5 Issue 5 May 2000 pp 101-102. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  18. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... OnSafety CPSC Stands for Safety The Tipping Point Home > 60 Seconds of Safety (Videos) > The Tipping Point ... 24 hours a day. For young children whose home is a playground, it’s the best way to ...

  19. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 60 Seconds of Safety (Videos) > The Tipping Point The Tipping Point by CPSC Blogger September 22, 2009 appliance child Childproofing CPSC danger death electrical fall furniture head injury product safety television tipover tv Watch the video in Adobe Flash ...

  20. Asymmetric uptake of Tc-99m HDP on temporomandibular joints may predict prognosis of temporomandibular joint disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Mi; Lee, Won Woo; Yun, PiI Young; Kim, Young Kyun; Kim, Sang Eun

    2007-01-01

    There is no reliable predictor for therapeutic efficacy for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disease. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the usefulness of Tc-99m HDP bone scan in the pre-therapeutic assessment of prognosis for TMJ disease. Between January 2005 and July 2007, 94 patients (M: F=18: 76; mean age, 33.4±14.0 y) with TMJ disease who underwent pre-therapeutic bone scan were enrolled. Planar bone scan images were obtained at right and left lateral skull areas 3 hours post Tc-99m HDP injection (dose=1295 MBq). TMJ uptake of Tc-99m HDP was quantitated using 13X13 pixel-square region-of-interest over TMJ and parietal skull area as background. TMJ uptake ratio was calculated as; (TMJ background) / background. Asymmetric indices for involved TMJ uptake (Al invovle ) were defined as; TMJ uptake ratio of involved/non-involved joint. Asymmetric indices for greater TMJ uptake regardless of disease involvement (AI greater ) were defined as; TMJ uptake ratio of greater/smaller TMJ uptake. Splint therapy was applied to all patients with mean duration of 7 months (range; 3-34 months). Therapeutic efficacy was dichotomised as improved or non-improved in consideration of mandibular movement, TMJ noise, pain, and tenderness. Seventy-six patients experienced improvement, whereas 18 patients non-improvement. There was no significant difference between improved versus non-improved patients regarding TMJ uptake ratio of involved joint (2.92±0.82 vs. 2.91±0.66), and AI invovle (1.16±0.22 vs. 1.10±0.12) (p>0.05, t-test). However, AI greater was significantly higher in improved patients than non-improved patients (1.20±0.19 vs. 1.13±0.09, p<0.05, t-test). Regardless of disease involvement of TMJ disease, asymmetricities of Tc-99m HDP uptake were more frequently found in improved group after splint therapy. Tc-99m HDP bone scan can predict the efficacy of splint therapy in TMJ disease

  1. Asymmetric uptake of Tc-99m HDP on temporomandibular joints may predict prognosis of temporomandibular joint disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Mi; Lee, Won Woo; Yun, PiI Young; Kim, Young Kyun; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    There is no reliable predictor for therapeutic efficacy for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disease. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the usefulness of Tc-99m HDP bone scan in the pre-therapeutic assessment of prognosis for TMJ disease. Between January 2005 and July 2007, 94 patients (M: F=18: 76; mean age, 33.4{+-}14.0 y) with TMJ disease who underwent pre-therapeutic bone scan were enrolled. Planar bone scan images were obtained at right and left lateral skull areas 3 hours post Tc-99m HDP injection (dose=1295 MBq). TMJ uptake of Tc-99m HDP was quantitated using 13X13 pixel-square region-of-interest over TMJ and parietal skull area as background. TMJ uptake ratio was calculated as; (TMJ background) / background. Asymmetric indices for involved TMJ uptake (Al{sub invovle}) were defined as; TMJ uptake ratio of involved/non-involved joint. Asymmetric indices for greater TMJ uptake regardless of disease involvement (AI{sub greater}) were defined as; TMJ uptake ratio of greater/smaller TMJ uptake. Splint therapy was applied to all patients with mean duration of 7 months (range; 3-34 months). Therapeutic efficacy was dichotomised as improved or non-improved in consideration of mandibular movement, TMJ noise, pain, and tenderness. Seventy-six patients experienced improvement, whereas 18 patients non-improvement. There was no significant difference between improved versus non-improved patients regarding TMJ uptake ratio of involved joint (2.92{+-}0.82 vs. 2.91{+-}0.66), and AI{sub invovle} (1.16{+-}0.22 vs. 1.10{+-}0.12) (p>0.05, t-test). However, AI{sub greater} was significantly higher in improved patients than non-improved patients (1.20{+-}0.19 vs. 1.13{+-}0.09, p<0.05, t-test). Regardless of disease involvement of TMJ disease, asymmetricities of Tc-99m HDP uptake were more frequently found in improved group after splint therapy. Tc-99m HDP bone scan can predict the efficacy of splint therapy in TMJ disease.

  2. Avaliação vestibular em mulheres com disfunção temporomandibular Vestibular evaluation in women with temporomandibular dysfunction

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    Bianca Simone Zeigelboim

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar o comportamento vestibular em pacientes com disfunção temporomandibular. MÉTODOS: avaliaram-se 27 pacientes do sexo feminino, na faixa etária de 30 a 53 anos, encaminhadas do Centro de Diagnóstico e Tratamento da Articulação Temporomandibular para o Laboratório de Otoneurologia da Universidade Tuiuti do Paraná. Realizaram-se os seguintes procedimentos: anamnese, inspeção otológica e avaliação vestibular por meio da vectoeletronistagmografia. RESULTADOS: as queixas mais freqüentes foram: dificuldade ou dor ao movimento do pescoço (77,7%, dor irradiada para ombro/braço (77,7%, zumbido e formigamento de extremidade superior (77,7%, tontura e dor de cabeça (66,6%, ansiedade (55,5%, sensação de cabeça oca (51,8%, agitação durante o sono (51,8% e depressão (51,8%. O exame vestibular esteve alterado em 20 pacientes (74,0% na prova calórica. Houve freqüência de alteração no sistema vestibular periférico. Houve predomínio das síndromes vestibulares periféricas deficitárias. CONCLUSÃO: ressalta-se a importância de se estudar a relação do sistema vestibular com a disfunção temporomandibular uma vez que observamos, na presente pesquisa, um número elevado de alteração no exame labiríntico.PURPOSE: to evaluate the vestibular functioning in patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction. METHODS: 27 female patients were evaluated, with age varying from 30 to 53-year-old, referred from the Centre of Diagnosis and Treatment of Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction to the Otoneurological Laboratory of Tuiuti University of Paraná. The following exams were carried out: anamnesis, otoscopy and vestibular evaluations through vectoelectronystagmography. RESULTS: the most frequent complaints were: difficulty or pain with movement of the neck (77.7%, pain irradiated to the shoulder/arm (77.7%, tinnitus and paresthesia of superior extremities (77.7% in each one, dizziness and headaches (66,6%, anxiety (55

  3. [Imaging analysis of temporomandibular joint anatomy changes after intraoral condylectomy combined with orthognathic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, N J; Li, Z L; Yi, B; Liang, C; Wang, X; Wang, X X

    2016-06-01

    To quantitatively analyze the changes of facial symmetry and temporomandibular joint structure at different periods after intraoral condylectomy combined with orthognathic surgery, and to evaluate the long-term stability after the operation. Spiral CT data of 10 cases treated by intraoral condylectomy combined with orthognathic surgery were collected, and then reconstructed by ProPlan software. Mark points were drawn on the 3D-images reconstructed immediately after the operation, and 6 months and 12 months after the operation. The measurements parameters included condylar axis angle in three dimensions, condylar-glenoid relative position and condylar facial morphology related indicators. The results were statistically analyzed by the consistency test and the variance of repeated measurement data. The facial asymmetry of the patients was corrected after operation, the height of the affected mandibular ascending ramus(T1: [67.81±6.95]mm, T2: [64.49±6.24]mm, T3: [63.05±7.07]mm)as well as the degree of pogonion deviation decreased(T1: [2.79±4.93]mm, T2: [0.37±4.20]mm, T3: [0.33 ± 3.97]mm)(P0.05). The post-operative 3D changes of the position and shape of the resected and its contralateral condylar showed that the bilateral condylar axis angle in the horizontal plane gradually grew after operation(affected condyle: 71.95° ± 7.47°, 74.73°±8.44°, 76.56°±5.22°; control condyle: 72.60°±5.56°, 76.00°±5.30°, 77.19°±6.20° and had significant difference between all the post-operative periods)(P0.05). The intraoral condylectomy combined with orthognathic surgery can eliminate condylar lesions effectively and correct the facial asymmetry caused by condylar benign tumor and hyperplasia. The facial symmetry can be maintained well after the operation, and the post-operative condylar morphology changes tended to be stable six months after the operation.

  4. Decreased Temporomandibular Joint Range of Motion in a Model of Early Osteoarthritis in the Rabbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Sarah E.; Tudares, Mauro A.; Tashman, Scott; Almarza, Alejandro J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Analysis of mandibular biomechanics could help with understanding the mechanisms of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders (TMJDs), such as osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA), by investigating the effects of injury or disease on TMJ movement. The objective of the present study was to determine the functional kinematic implications of mild TMJ-OA degeneration caused by altered occlusion from unilateral splints in the rabbit. Materials and Methods Altered occlusion of the TMJ was mechanically induced in rabbits by way of a unilateral molar dental splint (n = 3). TMJ motion was assessed using 3-dimensional (3D) skeletal kinematics twice, once before and once after 6 weeks of splint placement with the splints removed, after allowing 3 days of recovery. The relative motion of the condyle to the fossa and the distance between the incisors were tracked. Results An overall decrease in the range of joint movement was observed at the incisors and in the joint space between the condyle and fossa. The incisor movement decreased from 7.0 ± 0.5 mm to 6.2 ± 0.5 mm right to left, from 5.5 ± 2.2 mm to 4.6 ± 0.8 mm anterior to posterior, and from 13.3 ± 1.8 mm to 11.6 ± 1.4 mm superior to inferior (P < .05). The total magnitude of the maximum distance between the points on the condyle and fossa decreased from 3.6 ± 0.8 mm to 3.1 ± 0.6 mm for the working condyle and 2.8 ± 0.4 mm to 2.5 ± 0.4 mm for the balancing condyle (P < .05). The largest decreases were seen in the anteroposterior direction for both condyles. Conclusion Determining the changes in condylar movement might lead to a better understanding of the early predictors in the development of TMJ-OA and determining when the symptoms become a chronic, irreversible problem. PMID:25889371

  5. Correlação entre cefaléia e disfunção temporomandibular Correlation between headache and temporomandibular joint dysfunction

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    Mariana Sampaio Menezes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A relação entre disfunções temporomandibulares (DTM e os diferentes tipos de cefaléias ainda não está bem compreendida, mas a dor de cabeça é provavelmente o sintoma mais comum da DTM. O objetivo deste estudo foi correlacionar cefaléia com o índice clínico de Fonseca de avaliação da DTM. Participaram 160 voluntários estudantes da Universidade Nove de Julho na faixa dos 18 aos 36 anos, sendo 80 mulheres e 80 homens. Foram aplicados dois questionários: o índice clínico de Fonseca e um questionário sobre cefaléia. Os dados foram analisados estatisticamente e o nível de significância fixado em pThe relationship between temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD and different kinds of headaches is still not well understood, though headache is probably the most common symptom of TMD. The aim of this study was to correlate headache with Fonseca's TMD clinical index. A total of 160 university students aged 18 to 36 years old were selected, half women, half men. Two questionnaires were applied to them: the Fonseca clinical questionnaire and one on headache. Data were statistically analysed and significance level set at p<0.05. Results showed a higher prevalence of TMD among female individuals with headache, but a direct relationship between headache and degree of temporomandibular joint dysfunction could not be found.

  6. Association between temporomandibular joint symptoms, signs, and clinical diagnosis using the RDC/TMD and radiographic findings in temporomandibular joint tomograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, Mie; Svensson, Peter; Bakke, Merete; List, Thomas; Hintze, Hanne; Petersson, Arne; Knutsson, Kerstin; Wenzel, Ann

    2008-01-01

    To identify associations between clinical symptoms of temporomandibular joint disorders and radiographic findings. Two hundred four adult patients (156 women, 48 men, mean age 40 years) with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain/sounds or changes in mandibular motion were examined according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD). Bilateral sagittal corrected TMJ tomograms in closed and open positions were assessed for the presence of flattening, erosion, osteophytes, and sclerosis in the joint components and the range of mandibular motion. Logistic regression analyses were performed with the radiographic findings as the dependent variables and the following clinical variables as independent variables: opening pattern, maximal jaw opening, TMJ sounds, number of painful muscle/TMJ sites, duration of pain, presence of arthritic disease, depression and somatization scores, graded chronic pain, and age and gender. Coarse crepitus on opening/closing (odds ratio [OR] > or = 3.12), on lateral excursions (odds ratio > or = 4.06), and on protrusion (OR > or = 5.30) was associated with increased risk of degenerative findings in tomograms. A clinical diagnosis of osteoarthritis increased the risk of radiographic findings (OR > or = 2.95) and so did increasing age (OR > or = 1.03 per year) and the female gender (OR > or = 2.36). Maximal assisted opening and maximal opening without pain (position (OR > or = 2.60). No other significant associations were observed. Age, gender, and coarse crepitus, but no pain-related variables, were associated with increased risk of degenerative findings in TMJ tomograms. Maximal opening < 40 mm was associated with a posterior condyle-to-articular tubercle relation on opening.

  7. Influencia del Estrés en la eficacia del tratamiento en pacientes con Trastornos Temporomandibulares Stress influence in efficacy of treatment in patients with temporomandibular disorders

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    Ileana Grau León

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available El efecto del estrés emocional en el dolor, el sufrimiento y la conducta de dolor es significativo y debe tenerse en cuenta cuando se evalúa o se trata cualquier trastorno doloroso. El estado emocional del paciente en gran medida depende del estrés psicológico que experimente y en el momento en que se inicia el dolor puede influir enormemente en la experiencia dolorosa. El estudio fue de tipo cuasiexperimental, se consideraron 80 pacientes que fueron diagnosticados con trastornos temporomandibulares. A los pacientes participantes en el estudio les fue aplicada una escala sintomática del estrés y terapia combinada para la reducción del dolor y relajación muscular que incluyó terapia oclusal, farmacológica, sustitutiva y técnicas de autorelajación, arribando a las conclusiones que un elevado por ciento de los pacientes refirieron síntomas de estrés que se estima puede afectar negativamente los resultados del tratamiento en pacientes con trastorno tempormandibulares.Emotional stress effect on pain, suffering and pain behavior is significant and we must to consider in assessment or treatment of any painful disorder. The emotional status of patient in large extent depends of psychological stress experimented and at moment where s(? and upe(? starts off the pain may influence extremately in painful experience. A quasi-experimental study was conducted considering 80 patients diagnosed with temporomandibular disorders. In study participating patients we applied a stress symptomatic scale and combined therapy to reduce pain and the muscular relaxation included occlusal, pharmacologic, substitute therapy and self-relaxation techniques, concluding that a high percentage of patient refered to stress symptoms considered that may to affect negatively the treatment results in patients with temporomandibular disorders.

  8. Results of Combined, Single-Session Arthrocentesis and Dextrose Prolotherapy for Symptomatic Temporomandibular Joint Syndrome: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cezairli, Burak; Sivrikaya, Efe Can; Omezli, Mehmet Melih; Ayranci, Ferhat; Seyhan Cezairli, Neslihan

    2017-10-01

    Arthrocentesis and prolotherapy are nonsurgical treatments for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) diseases. This study aimed to evaluate the treatment of hypermobility, pain, and displacement of the TMJ by consecutively performing arthrocentesis and prolotherapy in the same session. In this study, 10 adults with disc displacement and painful, hypermobile TMJ were selected. Arthrocentesis and prolotherapy were consecutively performed using a 30% dextrose solution that was simultaneously injected into five areas: posterior disc attachment, superior joint space, superior and inferior capsular attachments, and stylomandibular ligament. Paired t-test, McNemar test, and chi-square test were used to assess the maximum mouth opening, clicking sounds, pain, and subluxation of the TMJ. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis and parafunctional habits such as teeth clenching and grinding and biting of the cheeks or any other objects and those who had undergone surgery were excluded from this study. A total of 10 participants (36.20 ± 7.06 years old, 7 women and 3 men) received a single treatment session of combined arthrocentesis and prolotherapy at the same office visit. Subluxation frequency and pain significantly decreased after the first week of treatment (p < 0.05). Subluxation also decreased at the 3-month follow-up (p < 0.05). Clicking sound values did not significantly change at any of the follow-up time points. Maximum mouth opening values decreased at all follow-up time points compared to baseline (p < 0.05). A single session of combined arthrocentesis and prolotherapy to treat symptomatic TMJ safely and significantly improved the subluxation and pain after 1 week and subluxation after 3 months compared to baseline status. The maximum mouth opening significantly decreased at all follow-up time points. Future studies assessing multiple treatment sessions are warranted.

  9. Fluid extravasation of the articular capsule as a complication of temporomandibular joint pumping and perfusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Kenichi; Watahiki, Ryuichirou; Tamura, Hidetoshi; Ogura, Motoi; Shibuya, Masayuki [Kameda General Hospital, Kamogawa, Chiba (Japan)

    2002-11-01

    This report is a retrospective study of fluid extravasation as a complication of temporomandibular joint pumping and perfusion. Contrast-enhanced 3D-CT of the upper joint compartment was performed for presurgical diagnosis before temporomandibular joint arthroscopic surgery in our hospital from 1996 to 2000. From these cases, 43 joints and 38 patients were selected because they had not improved under conservative treatment during the previous six months. Fluid extravasation of the articular capsule was recognized in 9 joints (20.9%) in 9 patients, 3 males and 6 females. Two of the nine patients had undergone arthroscopic observation before surgery. This test had revealed only thin articular capsule, not a perforation, in any of these cases. The data indicate only extremely tiny perforations or infiltration leakage due to the fluid pressure in the upper joint compartment during pumping or perfusion. Oral and maxillofacial surgeons should be aware of this complication. (author)

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging in elderly patients with temporomandibular disorders. Comparison with other age groups

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    Yura, Shinya; Mabuchi, Akiko; Izumiyama, Yuri; Deyama, Ayako; Totsuka, Yasunori; Inoue, Nobuo [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Graduate School of Dental Medicine

    2002-12-01

    To estimate the incidence of disc displacement, disc deformity, and bone changes of the temporomandibular joint in elderly patients with temporomandibular disorders, 55 elderly patients (110 joints) were examined by magnetic resonance imaging. The ages of the patients ranged from 65 to 89 years (average, 70 years). They consisted of 13 men and 42 women. Normal disc position was found in 40 joints (36.4%), anterior disc displacement with reduction in 17 joints (15.5%), and anterior disc displacement without reduction in 53 joints (48.2%) on magnetic resonance imaging. Thirty-eight (71.6%) of the 53 joints with anterior disc displacement without reduction had disc deformity and 33 (62.3%) had bone changes. The frequency of bone changes in the elderly group was higher than that in the younger group. Women had a higher incidence of bone changes than men. (author)

  11. Replacement of Missing Anterior Teeth in a Patient with Temporomandibular Disorder

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    Satheesh B. Haralur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The loss of anterior teeth leads to extreme psychological trauma, along with functional and esthetic debilitations. Healthy anterior teeth play an important role of protecting the posterior teeth during excursive mandibular movement. Loss of anterior teeth induces posterior interference with extended disocclusion time. Posterior disocclusion is critical to remove the harmful force on the teeth temporomandibular joint and eliminate muscle hypertonicity. Occlusal interference is considered as contributing factor to temporomandibular disorder (TMD symptoms. Prosthesis design should eliminate deleterious tooth contacts. Establishing optimum anterior guidance is a key to establishing harmonious functional occlusion in addition to the correction of the esthetic and phonetic disabilities. This case report explains the steps involved in the rehabilitation of the TMD patient with loss of maxillary anterior teeth.

  12. Temporomandibular Disorders and Parafunctional Habits in Children and Adolescence: A Review

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    B. Seraj

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to review the existing literature about temporomandibular disorders(TMD and parafunctional habits (bruxism and their relationship in children and adolescents,which is still controversial. TMD is a collective term used to identify a group ofmusculoskeletal conditions of the temporomandibular region. Bruxism defined as the habitual nonfunctional forceful contact between occlusal tooth surfaces. Some studies have linked oral parafunctional habits to TMD, whereas others did not observe this relationship.The role of bruxism -as is currently described- can be considered a controversial and unresolved issue. Taking all evidence together, the authors suggest that there is not any clear relationship between bruxism and TMD.

  13. [Intra-articular injections of hyaluronic acid for anterior disc displacement of temporomandibular joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, X

    2017-03-09

    Anterior disc displacement (ADD) of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is regarded as one of the major findings in temporomandibular disorders (TMD). It is related to joint noise, pain, mandibular dysfunction, degenerative change and osteoarthritis. In the mean time, the pathological changes were found in synovial membrane and synovial fluid. Hyaluronic acid is a principal component of the synovial fluid which plays an important role in nutrition, lubrication, anti-inflammation and cartilage repair. The synthesis, molecule weight, and concentration of hyaluronic acid are decreased during TMD and cause TMJ degenerative changes. The clinical conditions, pathological changes, the mechanism of action for hyaluronic acid and the treatment of anterior disc displacement of TMJ are discussed in this article.

  14. The importance of the postural evaluation in patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Amantéa, Daniela Vieira; Novaes, Ana Paula; Campolongo, Gabriel Denser; Barros, Tarley Pessoa de

    2004-01-01

    O equilíbrio do corpo bem como os movimentos da cabeça são originados pelo posicionamento do crânio sobre a região cervical determinando assim a postura do indivíduo. Estando a articulação temporomandibular (ATM) diretamente relacionada com a região cervical e escapular através de um sistema neuromuscular comum, alterações posturais da coluna cervical podem acarretar em distúrbios na ATM e vice-versa. O número crescente de pacientes com disfunção da articulação temporomandibular (DTM) que apr...

  15. Application of Infrared Thermal Imaging in a Violinist with Temporomandibular Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, M; Coimbra, D; Silva, A; Aguiar Branco, C; Pinho, J C

    2015-12-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) consist of a group of pathologies that affect the masticatory muscles, temporomandibular joints (TMJ), and/or related structures. String instrumentalists, like many orchestra musicians, can spend hours with head postures that may influence the biomechanical behavior of the TMJ and the muscles of the craniocervicomandibular complex (CCMC). The adoption of abnormal postures acquired during performance by musicians can lead to muscular hyperactivity of the head and cervical muscles, with the possible appearance of TMD. Medical infrared thermography is a non-invasive procedure that can monitor the changes in the superficial tissue related to blood circulation and may serve as a complement to the clinical examination. The objective of this study was to use infrared thermography to evaluate, in one subject, the cutaneous thermal changes adjacent to the CCMC that occur before, during, and after playing a string instrument.

  16. Metastatic melanoma misdiagnosed as a temporomandibular disorder: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Samir; Desai, Bhavik; Laskin, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    Malignancies in the head and neck region are difficult to diagnose because of their deep location and presence of symptoms mimicking those of temporomandibular disorders or other orofacial pain disorders. A 75-year-old woman reported experiencing right-sided jaw pain, temporal discomfort and paresthesia. She had undergone conservative therapy for temporomandibular joint disorder, which was unsuccessful. A magnetic resonance image of the midface revealed a mass on the base of the tongue along with possible metastatic lesions to the brain. Further investigation of the lesions revealed them to be metastatic melanoma. Patients with atypical symptoms of facial pain, including neurological signs, should undergo further investigation with advanced imaging to determine the source of the symptoms, which could include neoplasms.

  17. Tinnitus with temporomandibular joint disorders: a specific entity of tinnitus patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vielsmeier, Veronika; Kleinjung, Tobias; Strutz, Jürgen; Bürgers, Ralf; Kreuzer, Peter Michael; Langguth, Berthold

    2011-11-01

    Tinnitus is frequently associated with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction. However, the nature of the relationship is not fully understood. Here the authors compared 30 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of temporomandibular joint dysfunction and tinnitus to a group of 61 patients with tinnitus but without any subjective complaints of TMJ dysfunction with respect to clinical and demographic characteristics. Case-control study. Tertiary referral center. Tinnitus patients with and without TMJ dysfunction presenting at the Department of Prosthetic Dentistry and th: Tinnitus Clinic at the University of Regensburg. Tinnitus patients with TMJ disorder had better hearing function (P neck movements (P = .001). Classical risk factors for tinnitus (age, male gender, hearing loss) are less relevant in tinnitus patients with TMJ disorder, suggesting a causal role of TMJ pathology in the generation and maintenance of tinnitus. Based on this finding, treatment of TMJ disorder may represent a causally oriented treatment strategy for tinnitus.

  18. Evaluation of body posture in individuals with internal temporomandibular joint derangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munhoz, Wagner Cesar; Marques, Amélia Pasqual; de Siqueira, José Tadeu Tesseroli

    2005-10-01

    Temporomandibular dysfunctions (TMD) comprise a great number of disruptions that may affect the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), the masticatory muscles, or both. TMJ internal derangement is a specific type of TMD, of which the etiology and physiopathology are broadly unknown, but have been suggested to be linked to head, neck, and body posture factors. This study aimed at verifying possible relationships between body posture and TMJ internal derangements (TMJ-id), by comparing 30 subjects presenting typical TMJ-id signs to 20 healthy subjects. Subjects' clinical evaluations included anamnesis, stomatognatic system evaluation, and plotting analysis on body posture photographs. No statistically significant differences were found between the groups. Results do not support the assertion that body posture plays a role in causing or enhancing TMD; however, these results should be cautiously considered because of the small number of subjects evaluated and the many posture variables submitted to statistical procedures that lead to high standard deviations.

  19. Bilateral Dislocation of Temporomandibular Joint Induced by Haloperidol Following Suicide Attempt: A Case Report

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    Mosa Arghand Dargahi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug induced dystonic reactions are among common presentations of patients in emergency departments, and typically occur with antidopaminergic agents as their extra-pyramidal side effects. Dystonic reactions usually occur within the first few hours or days after commencing a drug or dose increase. Unlike other extra-pyramidal side effects, a patient may experience acute dystonic reactions (ADRs with the administration of just a single dose. Oromandibular dystonia is a subtype of dystonia which can present with perioral manifestations. In extreme cases, it can lead to temporomandibular dislocation. Haloperidol, as a high potent typical antipsychotic drug, can induce dystonia with blocking D2 dopamine receptors. The present paper reports a case of bilateral dislocation of temporomandibular joint following ingestion of haloperidol in a suicidal attempt in a 17 years old girl.

  20. [Course of action in front of children or adolescent suffering from temporomandibular disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Olivier

    2013-03-01

    Temporomandibular disorders are described in children from the age of 4. Their prevalence and severity increase strongly during the second decade, which corresponds to the period of orthodontic treatments. At this age the most common symptoms are joint clicking sounds (more than 70% of the cases), sometimes accompanied by episodes of intermittent locking. They would be favored by oral parafunctional activities (gum chewing, biting habits, bruxism...), ligamentous hyperlaxity and modification of the intra-articular space relations during growth. The questioning of the patient and his parents and clinical examination (muscular, articular and occlusal) are essential and very often sufficient for establishing the diagnosis. Even more than in the adult, the therapeutic attitude must rely on conservative and non-irreversible methods (explanations, suppression of the parafunctions, occlusal splints in the case of severe bruxism). These considerations are illustrated by the presentation of two representative clinical cases of temporomandibular disorders frequently encountered in children and adolescents. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2013.

  1. Internal derangements of the temporomandibular joint: A review of the anatomy, diagnosis, and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew L Young

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Internal derangements of the temporomandibular joint are conditions in which the articular disc has become displaced from its original position the condylar head. Relevant anatomic structures and their functional relationships are briefly discussed. The displacement of the disc can result in numerous presentations, with the most common being disc displacement with reduction (with or without intermittent locking, and disc displacement without reduction (with or without limited opening. These are described in this article according to the standardized Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders, as well as the less common posterior disc displacement. Appropriate management usually ranges from patient education and monitoring to splints, physical therapy, and medications. In rare and select cases, surgery may be necessary. However, in for the majority of internal derangements, the prognosis is good, particularly with conservative care.

  2. Pain detection by clinical questionnaire in patients referred for temporomandibular disorders in a Chilean hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomás Maturana

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine pain frequency by means of a clinical screening questionnaire in patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD referred to the general Hospital of Valdivia (HBV between September and December 2014. Material and method: A descriptive study, which included patients referred to the TMD Unit of the dental service at HBV between September and December 2014, was carried out. A clinical screening questionnaire was applied by an examiner in order to detect painful Temporomandibular Joint Disorders. The variables age, sex, wait time, and presence of related TMD pain were measured. Results: 101 patients were surveyed; 88.17% (84 patients were women. Average age was 33.5 (11-70 years; 66% of patients had mandibular pain or stiffness upon awakening; 80% informed pain related to painful TMD. Conclusion: Most surveyed patients were women. Pain was highly frequent in the surveyed population; its main location was in temporal areas.

  3. Dew Point

    OpenAIRE

    Goldsmith, Shelly

    1999-01-01

    Dew Point was a solo exhibition originating at PriceWaterhouseCoopers Headquarters Gallery, London, UK and toured to the Centre de Documentacio i Museu Textil, Terrassa, Spain and Gallery Aoyama, Tokyo, Japan.

  4. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Point by CPSC Blogger September 22, 2009 appliance child Childproofing CPSC danger death electrical fall furniture head injury product safety television tipover tv Watch the video in Adobe Flash ...

  5. Tipping Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Point by CPSC Blogger September 22, 2009 appliance child Childproofing CPSC danger death electrical fall furniture head injury product safety television tipover tv Watch the video in Adobe Flash ...

  6. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Point by CPSC Blogger September 22, 2009 appliance child Childproofing CPSC danger death electrical fall furniture head ... see news reports about horrible accidents involving young children and furniture, appliance and tv tip-overs. The ...

  7. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Point by CPSC Blogger September 22, 2009 appliance child Childproofing CPSC danger death electrical fall furniture head ... TV falls with about the same force as child falling from the third story of a building. ...

  8. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tipping Point by CPSC Blogger September 22, 2009 appliance child Childproofing CPSC danger death electrical fall furniture ... about horrible accidents involving young children and furniture, appliance and tv tip-overs. The force of a ...

  9. Design and clinical outcome of a novel 3D-printed prosthetic joint replacement for the human temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackland, David; Robinson, Dale; Lee, Peter Vee Sin; Dimitroulis, George

    2018-05-11

    Stock prosthetic temporomandibular joint replacements come in limited sizes, and do not always encompass the joint anatomy that presents clinically. The aims of this study were twofold. Firstly, to design a personalized prosthetic total joint replacement for the treatment of a patient's end-stage temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis, to implant the prosthesis into the patient, and assess clinical outcome 12-months post-operatively; and secondly, to evaluate the influence of changes in prosthetic condyle geometry on implant load response during mastication. A 48-year-old female patient with Grade-5 osteoarthritis to the left temporomandibular joint was recruited, and a prosthesis developed to match the native temporomandibular joint anatomy. The prosthesis was 3D printed, sterilized and implanted into the patient, and pain and function measured 12-months post-operatively. The prosthesis load response during a chewing-bite and maximum-force bite was evaluated using a personalized multi-body musculoskeletal model. Simulations were performed after perturbing condyle thickness, neck length and head sphericity. Increases in prosthetic condyle neck length malaligned the mandible and perturbed temporomandibular joint force. Changes in condylar component thickness greatly influenced fixation screw stress response, while a more eccentric condylar head increased prosthetic joint-contact loading. Post-operatively, the prosthetic temporomandibular joint surgery reduced patient pain from 7/10 to 1/10 on a visual analog scale, and increased intercisal opening distance from 22 mm to 38 mm. This study demonstrates effectiveness of a personalized prosthesis that may ultimately be adapted to treat a wide-range of end-stage temporomandibular joint conditions, and highlights sensitivity of prosthesis load response to changes in condylar geometry. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Modified mandibular splint therapy for disc displacement with reduction of the temporomandibular joint

    OpenAIRE

    Ju-Hui Wu; Yu-Hsun Kao; Chao-Ming Chen; Ching-Wei Shu; Chun-Ming Chen; I-Yueh Huang

    2013-01-01

    Occlusal splints are a standard method to treat disc displacement with reduction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). They can be classified into three major groups on the basis of function: stabilization splints, distraction splints (pivot), and anterior repositioning splints. The aim of this paper is to introduce a modified mandibular splint, the Kaohsuing Medical University splint, and its associated treatment regimen for management of disc displacement with reduction of the TMJ. The key ...

  11. Eminectomy for Habitual Luxation of the Temporomandibular Joint with Sedation and Local Anesthesia: A Case Series

    OpenAIRE

    Iwanaga, Joe; Nakamura, Yoshiaki; Kusukawa, Jingo; Tubbs, R. Shane

    2016-01-01

    Eminectomy which is one of the popular and most effective treatments for habitual temporomandibular joint luxation was first described by Myrhaug in 1951. There are few reports which described eminectomy being performed under local anesthesia and conscious sedation. We present a case series of habitual luxation of the TMJ treated by eminectomy performed under local anesthesia and conscious sedation and general anesthesia. Five patients were examined and found to have recurrent luxation of the...

  12. Osteoarthrosis of Temporomandibular Joint Related to the Defects of Posterior Dentition: A Retrospective Study

    OpenAIRE

    Jitka Levorová; Vladimír Machoň; Anasuya Guha; René Foltán

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthrosis (OA) of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a progressive degenerative disease, gradually affecting cartilage, synovial membrane and bone structures. OA of TMJ clinically manifests with joint noises, pain and restricted mouth opening. In late stages, it results in severe damage of TMJ structures and development of ankylosis. Osteoarthrosis is a multifactorial disease; the occurrence is associated with TMJ overloading. The cohort included 619 patients [538 women (87%) and 81 men (1...

  13. Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia with ankylosis of temporomandibular joint and cleft palate: A rare presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Manisha; Pradhan, Gaurav; Gupta, Sunita; Kapoor, Seema

    2015-01-01

    The ectodermal dysplasias are a heterogenous group of diseases, which have one or more anomalies of the hair, teeth, nails, and sweat glands. Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is the most common type and is usually transmitted as an X-linked recessive trait. It is characterized by classical triad of hypotrichosis, anhidrosis/hypohidrosis, and hypodontia/anodontia. Here, we describe an Indian boy affected with HED and rare features including ankylosis of temporomandibular joint and cleft palate. PMID:25684924

  14. Evaluation of Pain Syndromes, Headache, and Temporomandibular Joint Disorders in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horswell, Bruce B; Sheikh, Jason

    2018-02-01

    After a thorough review of the history and presentation of a child's facial pain, a targeted head and neck examination is critical to the appropriate diagnosis of facial pain and temporomandibular joint disorders. It is critical to distinguish between the structural (trauma, degenerative disease, and tumor) and nonstructural (neurogenic, myogenic, and psychological) causes of pain, which will allow for incorporation of appropriate strategies of medical, psychological, dental, and surgical therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Is There a Relation between Tension-Type Headache, Temporomandibular Disorders and Sleep?

    OpenAIRE

    Caspersen, N.; Hirsvang, J. R.; Kroell, L.; Jadidi, F.; Baad-Hansen, L.; Svensson, P.; Jensen, R.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Tension-Type Headache (TTH) is the most prevalent headache often associated with impaired function and quality of life. Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) and TTH frequently coexist; characterized by pericranial tenderness and impact on daily life. We aim to apply a standardized questionnaire for TMD to characterize and analyse an eventual relation between sleep and oral health in TTH in a controlled design. Material and Methods. 58 consecutive TTH patients and 58 healthy control...

  16. Prevalence of degree of severity of temporomandibular joint disorder based on sex and age group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Dewanti

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint disorders are disturbances of mastication system due to one or more component of mastication system does not properly function. The factors that play a role in this problem divided into three factors; a predisposition factor (systemic, occlusion disturbances and psychological trouble, b initiation factor (traumatic and c perpetuation factor (social behavior. These disorders are able to cause a variety of symptom suck as limitedness of jaw movement, clicking, deviation locked joint, muscle pain, joint pain, jaw movement pain and pain of ear and headache. The objective of this study was to obtain information about the prevalence degree of severity of the temporomandibular joint disorder, the differences of prevalence between man and woman and the different among age groups. The study was descriptive and analysis survey, done to 134 patients as an experimental sample of 3–75-year old that have visited Dental Hospital, Padjadjaran University Bandung, during February 2008. Sample consist of 57 men and 77 women were evaluated by using Helkimo Index and analysis by using Z statistical proportion test to know the existence of difference prevalence degree of severity between man and woman and using the chi-square test to know the difference prevalence among age groups.The result of this study shows that there is highly prevalence severity of temporomandibular joint disorder (84,33% and significantly different on prevalence severity between man and woman and among a group of ages.The conclusion can be drawn that patients who visited the dental hospital, Padjadjaran University have higher prevalence severity of temporomandibular joint disorder where a woman has higher level compare to man, and the young adult group has highest either man and woman. Clicking is the most often symptom appear to man and woman.

  17. Bifid mandibular condyle with temporomandibular joint ankylosis: report of two cases and review of literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulati, Ajay; Virmani, V.; Ramanathan, S.; Khandelwal, N. [Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, PGIMER, Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Chandigarh (India); Verma, L. [Gian Sagar Dental College and Hospital, Department of Pedodontics, Patiala (India)

    2009-10-15

    Bifid mandibular condyle is an uncommon entity with a controversial etiology. It can be developmental or acquired and rarely may be associated with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis. Although the patient may be asymptomatic, the radiologist should be aware of this entity and its clinical implications. We report two cases of BMC, one developmental and the other secondary to trauma. Both were diagnosed using computed tomography, which additionally revealed the associated ankylosis of TMJ in both the patients. (orig.)

  18. Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia with ankylosis of temporomandibular joint and cleft palate: A rare presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Goyal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The ectodermal dysplasias are a heterogenous group of diseases, which have one or more anomalies of the hair, teeth, nails, and sweat glands. Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED is the most common type and is usually transmitted as an X-linked recessive trait. It is characterized by classical triad of hypotrichosis, anhidrosis/hypohidrosis, and hypodontia/anodontia. Here, we describe an Indian boy affected with HED and rare features including ankylosis of temporomandibular joint and cleft palate.

  19. Temporomandibular joint arthrocentesis for internal derangement with disc displacement without reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Darpan; Jain, Megha; Deshpande, Ashwini; Singh, Ajita; Jaiswal, Jagdish

    2015-06-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc derangement is defined as a malpositioning of the articular disc relative to the condyle and eminence. Arthrocentesis of the TMJ is a minimally invasive chair side procedure for the patients with TMJ internal derangement. This case report presents convincing results to keep arthrocentesis as an imperative procedure to relieve such patients of their acute symptoms. TMJ dynamics has also been discussed for an in-depth understanding of the pathology in cases with internal derangement.

  20. Hypersensitivity to mechanical and intra-articular electrical stimuli in persons with painful temporomandibular joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ayesh, Emad; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Svensson, P

    2007-01-01

    This study tested whether persons with TMJ arthralgia have a modality-specific and site-specific hypersensitivity to somatosensory stimuli assessed by quantitative sensory tests (QST). Forty-three healthy persons and 20 with TMJ arthralgia participated. The QST consisted of: sensory and pain dete...... of sensitization of the TMJs as well as central nociceptive pathways. QST may facilitate a mechanism-based classification of temporomandibular disorders. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Dec...

  1. Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (DC/TMD) for Clinical and Research Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffman, Eric; Ohrbach, Richard; Truelove, Edmond

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: The original Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) Axis I diagnostic algorithms have been demonstrated to be reliable. However, the Validation Project determined that the RDC/TMD Axis I validity was below the target sensitivity of ≥ 0.70 and specificity of ≥...... comprehensive instruments augment short and simple screening instruments for Axis I and Axis II. These validated instruments allow for identification of patients with a range of simple to complex TMD presentations....

  2. Management of pain secondary to temporomandibular joint syndrome with peripheral nerve stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Lopez, Manuel J; Fernandez-Baena, Mariano; Aldaya-Valverde, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint syndrome, or Costen syndrome, is a clinically diagnosed disorder whose most common symptoms include joint pain and clicking, difficulty opening the mouth, and temporomandibular joint discomfort. The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is supplied by the auriculotemporal nerve, a collateral branch of the mandibular nerve (the V3 branch of the trigeminal nerve). The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness and safety of permanent peripheral nerve stimulation to relieve TMJ pain. This case series is a prospective study. Pain Unit of a regional universitary hospital. The study included 6 female patients with temporomandibular pain lasting from 2 to 8 years that did not respond to intraarticular local anesthetic and corticoid injections. After a positive diagnostic block test, the patients were implanted with quadripolar or octapolar leads in the affected preauricular region for a 2-week stimulation test phase, after which the leads were connected to a permanent implanted pulse generator. Results of the visual analog scale, SF-12 Health Survey, Brief Pain Inventory, and drug intake were recorded at baseline and at 4, 12, and 24 weeks after the permanent implant. Five out of 6 patients experienced pain relief exceeding 80% (average 72%) and received a permanent implant. The SF-12 Health Survey results were very positive for all specific questions, especially items concerning the physical component. Patients reported returning to normal physical activity and rest at night. Four patients discontinued their analgesic medication and 1 patient reduced their gabapentin dose by 50%. Sample size; impossibility of placebo control. Patients affected with TMJ syndrome who do not respond to conservative treatments may find a solution in peripheral nerve stimulation, a simple technique with a relatively low level of complications.

  3. Healing of soft and hard tissues of rabbit temporomandibular joint following the application of stem cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Putnová, Barbora; Buchtová, Marcela; Jekl, V.; Hodan, R.; Machoň, V.; Štembírek, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 159, Suppl 1 (2015), S32-S33 ISSN 1213-8118. [Morphology 2015. International Congress of the Czech Anatomical Society /49./. Lojda Symposium on Histochemistry /52./. 06.09.2015-08.09.2015, Olomouc] R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-37368G; GA ČR(CZ) GP14-29273P Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : temporomandibular joint Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology

  4. Bifid mandibular condyle with temporomandibular joint ankylosis: report of two cases and review of literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulati, Ajay; Virmani, V.; Ramanathan, S.; Khandelwal, N.; Verma, L.

    2009-01-01

    Bifid mandibular condyle is an uncommon entity with a controversial etiology. It can be developmental or acquired and rarely may be associated with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis. Although the patient may be asymptomatic, the radiologist should be aware of this entity and its clinical implications. We report two cases of BMC, one developmental and the other secondary to trauma. Both were diagnosed using computed tomography, which additionally revealed the associated ankylosis of TMJ in both the patients. (orig.)

  5. Body posture changes in women with migraine with or without temporomandibular disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Mariana C.; Bevilaqua-Grossi, Débora; Dach, Fabíola É.; Speciali, José G.; Gonçalves, Maria C.; Chaves, Thais C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Migraine and temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are reported to be associated. However, there are no reports on the association among migraines, TMDs and changes in body posture. Objectives : To assess changes in body posture in women suffering migraines with or without TMD compared with a control group. Method: Sixty-six women with a mean age of 18 to 45 years participated in this study. The groups were composed of 22 volunteers with migraine and TMD (MTMD), 22 volunteers ...

  6. Signs of temporomandibular disorders in migraine patients: a prospective, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuginski-Barbosa, Juliana; Macedo, Henrique R; Bigal, Marcelo Eduardo; Speciali, José Geraldo

    2010-06-01

    To identify signs of temporomandibular disorders and cervical pain in individuals with episodic and chronic (transformed) migraine (CM), relative to controls without headaches. In this prospective, controlled, double-blind study, we examined 93 individuals divided in 3 groups: episodic migraine EM, (n=31), CM chronic migraine (n=34), and controls without migraine (n=28). We recorded signs of temporomandibular disorders, and of pain in the neck, after the protocol of Helkimo (1974). We calculated the odds ratio (OR) and confidence intervals (CI) of symptoms as a function of headache status. Data from all groups were paired and compared using the chi test. The level of significance was 5% in 2-tailed tests. Relative to controls, participants with EM and CM were significantly more likely to have tenderness in the masticatory muscles [controls=28%, migraine=54%, (OR=3.0, 95% CI=1.1-8.9), CM=73% (OR=6.9, 95% CI=2.3-21.2)], and in the temporomandibular joint [controls=25%, migraine=61%, (OR=4.7, 95% CI=1.5-14.5), CM=61% (OR=4.8, 95% CI=1.6-14.5)]. They were numerically (but nonsignificantly) more likely to have limited lateral jaw movements (CM=34%; EM=26%; NP=18%), joint sounds (CM=44%; EM=29%; NP=28%), and tenderness in neck muscles (CM=64%; EM=51%; NP=35%). In a tertiary care population, individuals with EM and CM are more likely to have tenderness at the temporomandibular joint and on the masticatory muscles, relative to controls. Studies are needed to investigate whether treatment of 1 disorder will improve the other.

  7. Temporo-mandibular joint dislocation: an unusual complication of transoesophageal echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantharam, Brijesh; Chahal, Navtej; Stephens, Nigel; Senior, Roxy

    2010-03-01

    Temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation is an unusual complication of transoesophageal echocardiography (TEE). We report a rare case of bilateral TMJ dislocation in an 84-year-old man prior to DC cardioversion (DCCV) for atrial flutter. Shortly after TEE and DCCV, the patient complained of bilateral facial pain. An orthopantomogram revealed bilateral TMJ dislocation. A closed reduction was performed by maxillo-facial surgeons under intravenous anaesthesia. Although very uncommon, the physician should be aware of the complication and its management.

  8. Airway Management in a Mental Retardation Patient with Temporo-mandibular Joint Ankylosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rauf GÜL

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ ankylosis makes it impossible orotracheal intubation for general anesthesia because of limited mouth opening. We applied a nasotracheal intubation via fiberoptic bronchoscopy (FOB guidance on a 36 years old mental retarded (MR patient with bilateral TMJ, having extremely limited mouth opening. As a result, nasotracheal intubation via FOB is reliable technique on even mental retarded patients with extremely limited opening.

  9. [Diagnosis of temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction caused by occlusion pathology and treatment of such patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semkin, V A; Rabukhina, N A; Kravchenko, D V

    2007-01-01

    Patients with temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction need complex treatment that includes prosthetic treatment in intrajoint relation stabilization. In cases of TMJ pathology it is necessary to examine patients and make axiography, function analysis, MPI-analysis, magnetic resonance tomography and zonography of TMJ, electromyography of the masticatory muscles. The authors examined 47 patients with TMJ dysfunction, 43 of them had occlusion pathology. We managed to eliminate the dysfunction symptoms and to receive stable result of the treatment in all the patients.

  10. Reported concepts for the treatment modalities and pain management of temporomandibular disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Wieckiewicz, Mieszko; Boening, Klaus; Wiland, Piotr; Shiau, Yuh-Yuan; Paradowska-Stolarz, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Background Pain related to temporomandibular disorders (TMD) is a common problem in modern societies. The aim of the article is to present the concepts of TMD pain clinical management. Methods A survey was performed using the PubMed, SCOPUS and CINAHL databases for documents published between 1994 and 2014. The following search keywords were selected using MeSH terms of the National Library of Medicine in combination: TMD pain, TMD, TMJ, TMJ disorders, occlusal splint, TMD physiotherapy, TMJ ...

  11. Arthroscopic lysis and lavage in patients with temporomandibular anterior disc displacement without reduction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machoň, V.; Šedý, Jiří; Klíma, K.; Hirjak, D.; Foltán, R.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 1 (2012), s. 109-113 ISSN 0901-5027 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA ČR GAP304/10/0320 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0538 Program:1M Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : temporomandibular joint * arthroscopic lysis * arthroscopic lavage Subject RIV: FJ - Surgery incl. Transplants Impact factor: 1.521, year: 2012

  12. Corrientes diadinámicas y ultrasonido en el tratamiento de las disfunciones temporomandibulares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ileana Grau León

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio preliminar en 20 pacientes sobre la aplicación de las corrientes diadinámicas y el ultrasonido para el tratamiento del dolor muscular, articular y dolor muscular y articular conjuntamente, en las disfunciones temporomandibulares. Se aplicaron un total de 10 sesiones de tratamiento a cada uno de los pacientes en el Hospital Docente «Calixto García» de Ciudad de La Habana y se utilizó el índice de dolor presente (IDP antes y después del tratamiento, para evaluar primero la intensidad del dolor y segundo la eficacia de estos tratamientos. Se obtuvo alivio total del dolor en 17 pacientes, lo cual representa el 85 % del total de tratados y los 3 restantes tuvieron un alivio parcial del dolor alcanzando un índice de dolor de 1. Este método resulta efectivo para tratar el dolor muscular, articular y muscular y articular conjuntamente en pacientes con trastornos temporomandibulares, aunque sólo sea en la primera etapa del tratamiento.Authors performed a preliminary study in 20 patients on application of diadynamic currents and ultrasound to treatment of muscular, articular pain, and muscular and articular pain together in temporomandibular dysfunctions. We applied a total of 10 treatment sessions to each patient in «Calixto García» Teaching Hospital in Havana City, and also, we used actual pain rate (APR before and after treatment, to evaluate firstly pain intensity and secondly, effectiveness os these treatments. There was a total relief of pain in 17 patients, whick represent a 85 % of total of treated patients and 3 remaining felt partial relief of pain, reaching a pain rate of 1. This method is effective to manage muscular, articular pain, and muscular and articular together in patient presenting temporomandibular disorders, even though only in early stage of treatment.

  13. Relationship between temporomandibular disorders and orthodontic treatment: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Antônio Leite

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to review the most recent studies from the last 15 years, in search of clinical studies that report the relationship between TMD and orthodontic treatment and/or malocclusion. Our intention was to determine whether orthodontic treatment would increase the incidence of signs and symptoms of TMD, and whether orthodontic treatment would be recommended for treating or preventing signs and symptoms of TMD. METHODS: Literature reviews, editorials, letters to the editor, experimental studies in animals and short communications were excluded from this review. Were included only prospective, longitudinal, case-control or retrospective studies with a large sample and significant statistical analysis. Studies that dealt with craniofacial deformities and syndromes or orthognathic surgery treatment were also excluded, as well as those that reported only the association between malocclusion and TMD. RESULTS: There were 20 articles relating orthodontics to TMD according to the inclusion criteria. The studies that associated signs and symptoms of TMD to orthodontic treatment showed discrepant results. Some have found positive effects of orthodontic treatment on signs and symptoms of TMD, however, none showed a statistically significant difference. CONCLUSIONS: All studies cited in this literature review reported that orthodontic treatment did not provide risk to the development of signs and symptoms of TMD, regardless of the technique used for treatment, the extraction or non-extraction of premolars and the type of malocclusion previously presented by the patient. Some studies with long-term follow-up concluded that orthodontic treatment would not be preventive or a treatment option for TMD.OBJETIVO: revisar a literatura mais atual, dos últimos 15 anos, em busca de estudos clínicos que relatem a relação entre a disfunção temporomandibular (DTM e o tratamento ortodôntico e/ou a má oclusão. A intenção foi

  14. The development of interpretation for temporomandibular joint roentgenograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Dong Soo; Ahn, Pyung Kyu; Park, Tae Won

    1984-01-01

    The authors analyzed the morphological change of bone structure from 3,140 radiographs (1570 joints) of 785 patients with temporomandibular joint arthrosis, which were obtained by the oblique lateral transcranial projection and orthopantomographs. The interrelation of bone change and clinical symptoms duration of the disease were examined. Also, the bone changes of articular eminence, condyle, articular fossa were examined according to positional change of the condyle in the mouth open and close state. The results were as follows. 1. In the 785 patients with TMJ arthrosis, 782 patients (99.62%) show the positional change of the condyle. Among them 691 patients (88.03%) show the bone change. 2. In TMJ arthrosis patients with bone changes 451 patients (65.27%) showed both the condylar positional changes and bone changes bilaterally. 198 patients (28.65%) show the condylar positional changes bilaterally and bone changes unilaterally. 3. The bone changes in the TMJ arthrosis were in order of frequency eburnation (647 cases, 32.8%), erosion (548 cases , 27.79%), flattening (418 cases, 21.20%), deformity (138 cases, 6.99%), sclerosis (115 cases, 5.83%), marginal proliferation (106 cases, 5.38%). The region of bone change in TMJ arthrosis with condylar positional changes were in order of frequency the articular eminence (43.97%) condylar head (38.64%), articular fossa (17.39%). 4. In the patients with bone changes, their clinical symptoms were pain (44.34%), clicking sound (33.5%), limitation of mouth opening (22.52%). In the patients complaining pain the most frequent bone change was erosion (28.60%), in the patients complaining clicking sound, eburnation (28.97%) in the patients complaining the limitation, eburnation (29.40%). Also in the patients with the duration below 1 year most common bone change was eburnation. 5. The most common condylar positional change was downward position (39.94%) in closed state, restricted movement of condyle (30.07%) in open state. The

  15. The development of interpretation for temporomandibular joint roentgenograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Dong Soo; Ahn, Pyung Kyu; Park, Tae Won [Department of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-11-15

    The authors analyzed the morphological change of bone structure from 3,140 radiographs (1570 joints) of 785 patients with temporomandibular joint arthrosis, which were obtained by the oblique lateral transcranial projection and orthopantomographs. The interrelation of bone change and clinical symptoms duration of the disease were examined. Also, the bone changes of articular eminence, condyle, articular fossa were examined according to positional change of the condyle in the mouth open and close state. The results were as follows. 1. In the 785 patients with TMJ arthrosis, 782 patients (99.62%) show the positional change of the condyle. Among them 691 patients (88.03%) show the bone change. 2. In TMJ arthrosis patients with bone changes 451 patients (65.27%) showed both the condylar positional changes and bone changes bilaterally. 198 patients (28.65%) show the condylar positional changes bilaterally and bone changes unilaterally. 3. The bone changes in the TMJ arthrosis were in order of frequency eburnation (647 cases, 32.8%), erosion (548 cases , 27.79%), flattening (418 cases, 21.20%), deformity (138 cases, 6.99%), sclerosis (115 cases, 5.83%), marginal proliferation (106 cases, 5.38%). The region of bone change in TMJ arthrosis with condylar positional changes were in order of frequency the articular eminence (43.97%) condylar head (38.64%), articular fossa (17.39%). 4. In the patients with bone changes, their clinical symptoms were pain (44.34%), clicking sound (33.5%), limitation of mouth opening (22.52%). In the patients complaining pain the most frequent bone change was erosion (28.60%), in the patients complaining clicking sound, eburnation (28.97%) in the patients complaining the limitation, eburnation (29.40%). Also in the patients with the duration below 1 year most common bone change was eburnation. 5. The most common condylar positional change was downward position (39.94%) in closed state, restricted movement of condyle (30.07%) in open state. The

  16. Occlusion and Temporomandibular Function among Subjects with Mandibular Distal Extension Removable Partial Dentures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creugers, N. H. J.; Witter, D. J.; Van 't Spijker, A.; Gerritsen, A. E.; Kreulen, C. M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To quantify effects on occlusion and temporomandibular function of mandibular distal extension removable partial dentures in shortened dental arches. Methods. Subjects wearing mandibular extension removable partial dentures (n = 25) were compared with subjects with shortened dental arches without extension (n = 74) and with subjects who had worn a mandibular extension removable partial denture in the past (n = 19). Subjects with complete dentitions (n = 72) were controls. Data were collected at baseline and at 3-, 6-, and 9-year observations. Results. Occlusal activity in terms of reported awareness of bruxism and occlusal tooth wear of lower anterior teeth did not differ significantly between the groups. In contrast, occlusal tooth wear of premolars in shortened dental arches with or without extension dentures was significantly higher than in the controls. Differences amongst groups with respect to signs and symptoms related to temporomandibular disorders were not found. Occlusal support of the dentures did not influence anterior spatial relationship. Occlusal contacts of the denture teeth decreased from 70% for second premolars via 50% for first molars, to 30% for second molars. Conclusions. Mandibular distal extension removable partial dentures in moderate shortened dental arches had no effects on occlusion and temporomandibular function. PMID:20671961

  17. Occlusion and Temporomandibular Function among Subjects with Mandibular Distal Extension Removable Partial Dentures

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    N. H. J. Creugers

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To quantify effects on occlusion and temporomandibular function of mandibular distal extension removable partial dentures in shortened dental arches. Methods. Subjects wearing mandibular extension removable partial dentures (n=25 were compared with subjects with shortened dental arches without extension (n=74 and with subjects who had worn a mandibular extension removable partial denture in the past (n=19. Subjects with complete dentitions (n=72 were controls. Data were collected at baseline and at 3-, 6-, and 9-year observations. Results. Occlusal activity in terms of reported awareness of bruxism and occlusal tooth wear of lower anterior teeth did not differ significantly between the groups. In contrast, occlusal tooth wear of premolars in shortened dental arches with or without extension dentures was significantly higher than in the controls. Differences amongst groups with respect to signs and symptoms related to temporomandibular disorders were not found. Occlusal support of the dentures did not influence anterior spatial relationship. Occlusal contacts of the denture teeth decreased from 70% for second premolars via 50% for first molars, to 30% for second molars. Conclusions. Mandibular distal extension removable partial dentures in moderate shortened dental arches had no effects on occlusion and temporomandibular function.

  18. Dynamic 3D FE modelling of the human temporomandibular joint during whiplash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez del Palomar, A; Doblaré, M

    2008-07-01

    Rear-end impacts account for more than one-third of vehicle accidents, and nearly 40% of these accidents produce whiplash injuries. Whiplash injury to the neck has often been considered a significant risk factor for the development of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The objective of this study was to simulate the dynamic response of the temporomandibular joint during two types of impacts: a rear end and a frontal impact. To understand the dynamic forces acting on the joint, we extended a previous human temporomandibular joint model and analyzed the stress distributions in the soft elements of the joint. In the rear-end impact, it could be appreciated that the inertia of the mandible caused it to move posteriorly slower than the head, and this resulted in downward and forward displacements of the disc-condyle complex relative to the cranial base. Consequently, a rapid and big mouth opening occurs. In contrast, during the frontal impact, the mouth hardly opened, because the superior maxilla pushed the mandible to move together. There was not differential movement between bony components of the joint and therefore the soft tissues of the joint were not subjected to high loads. From these results, and despite the limitations of the simulations performed, we could conclude that neither a rear-end impact at low-velocity nor a frontal impact would produce damage to the soft tissues of the joint.

  19. Oral parafunctions, piercing and signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejersjö, Christina; Ovesson, Daniel; Mossberg, Birgitta

    2016-01-01

    The use of chewing-gum and piercing has become common among adolescents and might result in increased oral muscle activity and overloading. Aim To investigate the frequency of oral piercing and parafunctions in relation to symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) among adolescents. One hundred and twenty-four third level high school students, living either in a city or in a small town, enrolled in either science or media programmes, were included. The students completed a questionnaire regarding different parafunctions and symptoms of TMD. A clinical examination of the temporomandibular system and estimation of the tooth wear was performed in 116 students. Chewing-gum was used by 86% of the students (25% with a daily use) and 14% had an oral piercing. The science students used more chewing gum than the media students (p = 0.008), while the media students had more piercings (p headache, 18% for clicking, 7% for facial pain and 6% for difficulty to open wide. Girls reported more headaches (p = 0.007) and more severe symptoms (p = 0.003), had more medical consultations and used more analgesics (both p headache (p temporomandibular joints and muscles (both p headache and muscle tenderness (both p headache (p < 0.05) and tooth wear (p = 0.004). There is an association between use of chewing gum, nail biting, oral piercing, and symptoms of TMD.

  20. Evaluation of condylar positions in patients with temporomandibular disorders: A cone-beam computed tomography study

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    Imanimoghaddam, Mahrokh; Mahdavi, Pirooze; Bagherpour, Ali; Darijani, Mansoreh; Ebrahimnejad, Hamed [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Oral and Maxillofacial Diseases Research Center, School of Dentistry, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Madani, Azam Sadat [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Oral and Maxillofacial Diseases Research Center, School of Dentistry, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    This study was performed to compare the condylar position in patients with temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs) and a normal group by using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). In the TMD group, 25 patients (5 men and 20 women) were randomly selected among the ones suffering from TMD according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD). The control group consisted of 25 patients (8 men and 17 women) with normal temporomandibular joints (TMJs) who were referred to the radiology department in order to undergo CBCT scanning for implant treatment in the posterior maxilla. Linear measurements from the superior, anterior, and posterior joint spaces between the condyle and glenoid fossa were made through defined landmarks in the sagittal view. The inclination of articular eminence was also determined. The mean anterior joint space was 2.3 mm in the normal group and 2.8 mm in the TMD group, respectively. The results showed that there was a significant correlation between the superior and posterior joint spaces in both the normal and TMD groups, but it was only in the TMD group that the correlation coefficient among the dimensions of anterior and superior spaces was significant. There was a significant correlation between the inclination of articular eminence and the size of the superior and posterior spaces in the normal group. The average dimension of the anterior joint space was different between the two groups. CBCT could be considered a useful diagnostic imaging modality for TMD patients.