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Sample records for temporomandibular point part

  1. Temporomandibular disorders. Part 2: conservative management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Stephen M; Brismée, Jean-Michel; Sizer, Phillip S; Courtney, Carol A

    2014-01-01

    Appropriate management of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) requires an understanding of the underlying dysfunction associated with the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and surrounding structures. A comprehensive examination process, as described in part 1 of this series, can reveal underlying clinical findings that assist in the delivery of comprehensive physical therapy services for patients with TMD. Part 2 of this series focuses on management strategies for TMD. Physical therapy is the preferred conservative management approach for TMD. Physical therapists are professionally well-positioned to step into the void and provide clinical services for patients with TMD. Clinicians should utilize examination findings to design rehabilitation programs that focus on addressing patient-specific impairments. Potentially appropriate plan of care components include joint and soft tissue mobilization, trigger point dry needling, friction massage, therapeutic exercise, patient education, modalities, and outside referral. Management options should address both symptom reduction and oral function. Satisfactory results can often be achieved when management focuses on patient-specific clinical variables. PMID:24976744

  2. Intra-articular vs. systemic administration of etanercept in antigen-induced arthritis in the temporomandibular point. Part I: histological effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyengaard Jens R

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Temporomandibular joint (TMJ arthritis in children causes alterations in craniomandibular growth. This abnormal growth may be prevented by an early anti-inflammatory intervention. We have previously shown that intra-articular (IA corticosteroid reduces TMJ inflammation, but causes concurrent mandibular growth inhibition in young rabbits. Blockage of TNF-α has already proven its efficacy in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis not responding to standard therapy. In this paper we evaluate the effect of IA etanercept compared to subcutaneous etanercept in antigen-induced TMJ-arthritis in rabbits on histological changes using histomorphometry and stereology. This article presents the data and discussion on the anti-inflammatory effects of systemic and IA etanercept. In Part II the data on the effects of systemic and IA etanercept on facial growth are presented. Methods Forty-two rabbits (10 weeks old pre-sensitized with ovalbumin and locally induced inflammation in the temporomandibular joints were divided into three groups: a placebo group receiving IA saline injections in both joints one week after arthritis induction (n = 14, an IA etanercept group receiving 0.1 mg/kg etanercept per joint one week after arthritis induction (n = 14 and a systemic etanercept group receiving 0.8 mg/kg etanercept weekly throughout the 12-week study (n = 14. Arthritis was maintained by giving four inductions three weeks apart. Additional IA saline or etanercept injections were also given one week after the re-inductions. Histomorphometric and unbiased stereological methods (optical fractionator were used to assess and estimate the inflammation in the joints. Results The histomorphometry showed synovial proliferation in all groups. The plasma cell count obtained by the optical fractionator was significantly reduced when treating with systemic etanercept but not with IA etanercept. Semi-quantitative assessments of synovial proliferation and

  3. Temporomandibular disorders. Part 1: anatomy and examination/diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Stephen M; Brismée, Jean-Michel; Sizer, Phillip S; Courtney, Carol A

    2014-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are a heterogeneous group of diagnoses affecting the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and surrounding tissues. A variety of methods for evaluating and managing TMD have been proposed within the physical therapy profession but these sources are not peer-reviewed and lack updates from scientific literature. The dental profession has provided peer-reviewed sources that lack thoroughness with respect to the neuromusculoskeletal techniques utilized by physical therapists. The subsequent void creates the need for a thorough, research informed, and peer-reviewed source regarding TMD evaluation and management for physical therapists. This paper is the first part in a two-part series that seeks to fill the current void by providing a brief but comprehensive outline for clinicians seeking to provide services for patients with TMD. Part one focuses on anatomy and pathology, arthro- and osteokinematics, epidemiology, history taking, and physical examination as they relate to TMD. An appreciation of the anatomical and mechanical features associated with the TMJ can serve as a foundation for understanding a patient’s clinical presentation. Performance of a thorough patient history and clinical examination can guide the clinician toward an improved diagnostic process. PMID:24976743

  4. The temporomandibular joint of California sea lions (Zalophus californianus): part 2-osteoarthritic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzi, B; Leale, D M; Sinai, N L; Kass, P H; Lin, A; Verstraete, F J M

    2015-01-01

    Following comprehensive characterization of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of the California sea lion, as well demonstrating that TMJ-osteoarthritis (OA) occurs in this species, the objective of this part of the investigation was to describe the macroscopic osteologic findings associated with TMJ-OA in a large museum collection of skull specimens. Museum skull specimens (n=497) of California sea lions were examined macroscopically according to defined criteria for the presence, severity, location and characteristics of TMJ-OA. The specimens, acquired from strandings, varied in age from young adults to mature adults. Overall 63.5% of the specimens had findings consistent with TMJ-OA. Of these, 56.2% were from females 43.8% were from males. Moreover, 71.2% specimens were from mature adults and 28.8% from young adults. However, there was no significant association between age and sex with the presence or severity of TMJ-OA. The most prominent TMJ-OA changes were the presence of subchondral bone defects and abnormal porosity. The majority of the OA present at the mandibular head affected the entire articular surface. In contrast, the OA present on the mandibular fossa of the temporal bone was located primarily on the medial aspect (PTMJ-OA in California sea lions is high and varies in severity. Although the significance of the high incidence of this disease in the California sea lion remains elusive, the occurrence and severity of TMJ-OA detected in this study may play an important role in the species' morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Orofacial injuries due to trauma following motor vehicle collisions: part 2. Temporomandibular disorders.

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    Epstein, Joel B; Klasser, Gary D; Kolbinson, Dean A; Mehta, Sujay A

    2010-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) following motor vehicle collisions (MVCs) may result from direct orofacial trauma but also occur in patients with whiplash-associated disorder (WAD) without such trauma. TMDs may not be identified at the time of first assessment, but may develop weeks or more after the MVC. TMDs in WAD appear to occur predominantly in females and can be associated with regional or widespread pain. TMDs following MVCs may respond poorly to independent therapy and may be best managed using multidisciplinary approaches.

  6. Effects of myofascial trigger point dry needling in patients with sleep bruxism and temporomandibular disorders: a prospective case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco-Bonora, Paloma María; Martín-Pintado-Zugasti, Aitor

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the effects of deep dry needling (DN) of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) of the masseter and temporalis on pain, pressure pain threshold (PPT), pain-free maximal jaw opening and temporomandibular disorder (TMD)-related disability in patients with sleep bruxism (SB) and myofascial TMD. Seventeen subjects (11 women, 6 men) aged 39±13 years (range 23-66) diagnosed with SB and myofascial TMD were invited to participate in this prospective case series study. Each subject received a deep DN intervention in the masseter and temporalis MTrPs. Pain intensity, PPT, pain-free maximal jaw opening and TMD-related disability were assessed before treatment, immediately after treatment and at 1-week follow-up. Jaw disability was assessed using the jaw disability checklist (JDC) at baseline and 1 week post-treatment only. One-way analyses of variance showed significant improvements in pain intensity, PPT and jaw opening (pmyofascial TMD and SB was associated with immediate and 1-week improvements in pain, sensitivity, jaw opening and TMD-related disability. NCT02587182; Results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. Referred pain from muscle trigger points in the masticatory and neck-shoulder musculature in women with temporomandibular disoders.

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    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Galán-Del-Río, Fernando; Alonso-Blanco, Cristina; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Svensson, Peter

    2010-12-01

    Our aim was to describe the referred pain patterns and size of areas of trigger points (TrPs) in the masticatory and neck-shoulder muscles of women with myofascial temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Twenty-five women with myofascial TMD and 25 healthy matched women participated. Bilateral temporalis, deep masseter, superficial masseter, sternocleidomastoid, upper trapezius and suboccipital muscles were examined for TrPs by an assessor blinded to the subjects' condition. TrPs were identified with manual palpation and categorized into active and latent according to proposed criteria. The referred pain areas were drawn on anatomical maps, digitalized, and measured. The occurrence of active (P latent TrPs (P = .04) were different between groups. In all muscles, there were significantly more active and latent TrP in patients than controls (P .703). The local and referred pain elicited from active TrPs in the masticatory and neck-shoulder muscles shared similar pain pattern as spontaneous TMD, which supports the concept of peripheral and central sensitization mechanisms in myofascial TMD. The current study showed the existence of multiple active muscle TrPs in the masticatory and neck-shoulder muscles in women with myofascial TMD pain. The local and referred pain elicited from active TrPs reproduced pain complaints in these patients. Further, referred pain areas were larger in TMD pain patients than in healthy controls. The results are also in accordance with the notion of peripheral and central sensitization mechanisms in patients with myofascial TMD. Copyright © 2010 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Conservative management of temporomandibular dysfunction: A literature review with implications for clinical practice guidelines (Narrative review part 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butts, Raymond; Dunning, James; Pavkovich, Ron; Mettille, Jersey; Mourad, Firas

    2017-07-01

    The effective management of temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) requires a thorough understanding of the pathoanatomic factors that drive the underlying condition. After reviewing the etiology associated with TMD in Part 1 of this narrative review, the temporomandibular joint capsule, articular disc and muscles of mastication emerged as key players. (http://dx.doi.org/10.​1016/​j.​jbmt.​2017.​05.​017) Part 2 focuses on conservative treatment strategies best able to reduce the pain and disability associated with TMD. A review of the literature revealed limited support of strengthening exercises targeting the muscles of mastication. There was also limited evidence for manual soft tissue work targeting muscles of mastication, which may be specifically related to the limited accessibility of the pterygoid muscles to palpation. For the reduction of pain, there was little to no evidence supporting splint therapy and electrophysical modalities, including laser therapy, ultrasound, TENs and iontophoresis. However, for the reduction of pain and disability, non-thrust mobilization and high-velocity, low amplitude thrust manipulation techniques to the TMJ and/or upper cervical articulations that directly and indirectly target the TMJ joint capsule were generally supported in the literature. Studies that used dry needling or acupuncture of the lateral pterygoid and posterior, peri-articular connective tissue also led to significant improvements in pain and disability in patients with TMD. Thus, the most effective conservative management of TMD seems to be techniques best able to impact anatomic structures directly related to the etiology of TMD, to include the joint capsule, articular disc and muscles of mastication, specifically the superior and inferior head of the lateral pterygoid. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The temporomandibular joint of California sea lions (Zalophus californianus): part 1 - characterisation in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzi, B; Murphy, M K; Leale, D M; Vapniarsky-Arzi, N; Verstraete, F J M

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to characterise the histologic, biomechanical and biochemical properties of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of California sea lions. In addition, we sought to identify structure-function relationships and to characterise TMJ lesions found in this species. Temporomandibular joints from fresh cadaver heads (n=14) of California sea lions acquired from strandings were examined macroscopically and microscopically. The specimens were also evaluated for their mechanical and biochemical properties. Furthermore, if TMJ arthritic changes were present, joint characteristics were described and compared to healthy joints. Five male and 9 female specimens demonstrated macroscopically normal fibrocartilaginous articular surfaces and fibrous discs in the TMJ. Out of the 9 female specimens, 4 specimens had TMJ lesions were seen either in the articular surface or the disc. Histologically, these pathologic specimens demonstrated subchondral bone defects, cartilage irregularities and inflammatory cell infiltrates. The normal TMJ discs did not exhibit significant direction dependence in tensile stiffness or strength in the rostrocaudal direction compared with the mediolateral direction among normal discs or discs from affected joints. The TMJ discs were not found to be anisotropic in tensile properties. This feature was further supported by randomly oriented collagen fibres as seen by electron microscopy. Furthermore, no significant differences were detected in biochemical composition of the discs dependent upon population. The TMJ and its disc of the California sea lion exhibit similarities but also differences compared to other mammals with regards to structure-function relationships. A fibrous TMJ disc rich in collagen with minimal glycosaminoglycan content was characterised, and random fibre organisation was associated with isotropic mechanical properties in the central region of the disc. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The relationship between dental occlusion/temporomandibular joint status and general body health: part 2. Fascial connection of TMJ with other parts of the body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hyung-Joo; Lee, Yong-Keun

    2011-12-01

    In part 1 of this study, it was discussed that dental occlusion/temporomandibular joint (TMJ) status is functionally connected to general body health. The purpose of this part of the study was to attempt to formulate a conceptual account, the "fascial connection theory for TMJ and other parts of the body," to explain the functional connection between TMJ and other parts of the body. The first hypothesis that was studied is that TMJ and other parts of body are connected through the fascia as asserted by the myofascial-release schools, and the second one is that they are connected through the meridian system constituted of fascia (connective tissue). The fascial connection theory proposed here can explain the functional connection between dental occlusion/TMJ and other parts of the body based on either myofascial release or the qi and meridian system, or a combination of the two. Therefore, dental occlusion should be built up and maintained in a normal natural condition, and causes of deterioration of TMJ status should be treated in an effort to restore the natural condition. Other possible mechanisms that can account for these connections require elucidation, and additional experimental investigation should be undertaken.

  11. Deep dry needling of trigger points located in the lateral pterygoid muscle: Efficacy and safety of treatment for management of myofascial pain and temporomandibular dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante-Cossio, Pedro; Granados-Nunez, Mercedes; Urresti-Lopez, Francisco-Javier; Lopez-Martos, Ricardo; Ruiz-Canela-Mendez, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Background To determine whether deep dry needling (DDN) of trigger points (TPs) in the lateral pterygoid muscle (LPM) would significantly reduce pain and improve function, compared with methocarbamol/paracetamol medication. Material and Methods Forty-eight patients with chronic myofascial pain located in the LPM were selected and randomly assigned to one of two groups (DDN test group, n=24; drug-treated control group, n=24). The test group received three applications of needling of the LPM once per week for three weeks, while control group patients were given two tablets of a methocarbamol/paracetamol combination every six hours for three weeks. Assessments were carried out pretreatment, 2 and 8 weeks after finishing the treatment. Results A statistically significant difference (pdry needling, lateral pterygoid muscle, randomized controlled trial, temporomandibular disorders. PMID:25662558

  12. Short-term effects of dry needling of active myofascial trigger points in the masseter muscle in patients with temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Carnero, Josué; La Touche, Roy; Ortega-Santiago, Ricardo; Galan-del-Rio, Fernando; Pesquera, Jorge; Ge, Hong-You; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the effects of dry needling over active trigger points (TrPs) in the masseter muscle in patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Twelve females, aged 20 to 41 years old (mean = 25, standard deviation +/- 6 years) diagnosed with myofascial TMD were recruited. Each patient attended two treatment sessions on two separate days and received one intervention assigned in a random fashion, at each visit: deep dry needling (experimental) or sham dry needling (placebo) at the most painful point on the masseter muscle TrP. Pressure pain threshold (PPT) over the masseter muscle TrP and the mandibular condyle and pain-free active jaw opening were assessed pre- and 5 minutes postintervention by an examiner blinded to the treatment allocation of the subject. A two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) with intervention as the between-subjects variable and time as the within-subjects variable was used to examine the effects of the intervention. The ANOVA detected a significant interaction between intervention and time for PPT levels in the masseter muscle (F = 62.5; P dry needling compared to the sham dry needling (P dry needling into active TrPs in the masseter muscle induced significant increases in PPT levels and maximal jaw opening when compared to the sham dry needling in patients with myofascial TMD.

  13. Temporomandibular disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, Thomas; Jensen, Rigmor Højland

    2017-01-01

    Background Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) is an umbrella term for pain and dysfunction involving the masticatory muscles and the temporomandibular joints (TMJs). TMD is the most common orofacial pain condition. Its prominent features include regional pain in the face and preauricular area......, limitations in jaw movement, and noise from the TMJs during jaw movements. TMD affects up to 15% of adults and 7% of adolescents. Chronic pain is the overwhelming reason that patients with TMD seek treatment. TMD can associate with impaired general health, depression, and other psychological disabilities......, and arthralgia) as well as disorders associated with the TMJ (primarily disc displacements and degenerative disease). As peripheral mechanisms most likely play a role in the onset of TMD, a detailed muscle examination is recommended. The persistence of pain involves more central factors, such as sensitization...

  14. Change the Myofascial Pain and Range of Motion of the Temporomandibular Joint Following Kinesio Taping of Latent Myofascial Trigger Points in the Sternocleidomastoid Muscle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bae, Youngsook

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the changes in the myofascial pain and range of the motion of temporomandibular joint when Kinesio taping is applied to patients with latent myofascial...

  15. Temporomandibular Disorders and Physical Therapy Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ilke Coskun Benlidayi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular disorders are comprised of clinical problems associated with masticatory muscles, temporomandibular joint and neighboring tissues. The frequency of temporomandibular disorders is high among premenopausal women. Patient education and behavioral therapy, occlusal splints, pharmacological agents, intra-articular and surgical approaches and physical therapy methods are used in the treatment of temporomandibular disorders. Physical therapy approaches include exercise (passive stretching, resistive and posture exercises, superficial heat and cold applications, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, therapeutic ultrasound, trigger point injections, acupuncture and laser. In this article, temporomandibular disorders were reviewed and physical therapy methods used for treatment were discussed in detail. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2015; 24(4.000: 542-554

  16. The Diagnostic Value of Pressure Algometry for Temporomandibular Disorders

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    Włodzimierz Więckiewicz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine the diagnostic value of pressure algometry in temporomandibular disorders. Two hundred volunteers aged 19.3 to 27.8 (mean 21.50, SD 0.97 participated in this study. An analogue pressure algometer was used for the evaluation of muscle tenderness of the following masticatory muscles: superficial and deep parts of the masseter muscle; anterior and posterior parts of the temporal muscle; and the tissues adjacent to the lateral and dorsal part of the temporomandibular joint capsule. Each patient described the algometry result for the individual components of the masticatory motor system, by selecting each time the intensity of pain on a 100 mm Visual Analogue Scale (VAS ruler. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve, indicating the discriminatory efficiency for asymptomatic subjects and patients with temporomandibular dysfunction according to the dysfunction Di index, was the largest for the mean pain value (AUC = 0.8572; SEM = 0.0531. The 7.4 VAS cut-off point marked 95.3% specificity for this variable in identifying healthy subjects and 58.4% sensitivity in identifying patients with symptoms of dysfunctions (accuracy 68.1%. Assuming comparable sensitivity (74.9% and specificity (74.2% for a diagnostic test, there was test accuracy of 74.5% at the 4.2 VAS cut-off point.

  17. The relationship between dental occlusion/temporomandibular joint status and general body health: part 1. Dental occlusion and TMJ status exert an influence on general body health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hyung-Joo; Lee, Yong-Keun

    2011-11-01

    There have been varied studies that have suggested a relationship between dental occlusion/temporomandibular joint (TMJ) status and general body health. Therefore, it is important to elucidate the systematic relationships and corresponding action mechanisms between them. The purpose of this part of study was to review the relationships between dental occlusion/TMJ status and systemic body health based on the published literature. This study, based mostly on peer-reviewed specialist articles, has determined that dental occlusion/TMJ status exerts an influence on (1) synchronization of head and jaw muscles with the muscles from other body sites for proper body posture; (2) body stability such as body equilibrium (balance), center of gravity fluctuation, and gaze stability; and (3) physical performance along with physical fitness. Therefore, these relationships should be further investigated and extended to the whole body, and the action mechanisms should be elucidated. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  18. Characteristics of referred muscle pain to the head from active trigger points in women with myofascial temporomandibular pain and fibromyalgia syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alonso-Blanco, Cristina; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; de-la-Llave-Rincón, Ana Isabel; Zarco-Moreno, Pedro; Galán-del-Río, Fernando; Svensson, Peter

    2012-01-01

    ...) between women with myofascial temporomandibular disorder (TMD) or fibromyalgia (FMS). Twenty women (age 46 ± 8 years) with TMD and 20 (age 48 ± 6 years) with FMS were recruited from specialized clinic...

  19. [Tinnitus and temporomandibular joint: State of the art].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lina-Granade, G; Truy, E; Ionescu, E; Garnier, P; Thai Van, H

    2016-12-01

    Tinnitus has been described in temporomandibular joint dysfunction for a long time. Yet, other disorders, such as hearing loss, stress, anxiety and depression, play a major role in the pathophysiology of tinnitus. Temporomandibular joint dysfunctions seem to increase the risk of tinnitus in patients with other predisposing factors. Especially somatosensory tinnitus, which is characterized by sound modulations with neck or mandible movements, is frequently associated with temporomandibular joint dysfunction, but it is not pathognomonic of such a disorder. In such cases, functional therapy of the temporomandibular joint should be part of the multidisciplinary rehabilitation of patients with tinnitus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Temporomandibular joint reconstruction with a 2-part chrome-cobalt prosthesis, chondro-osseous graft, and silastic: clinical and experimental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummoona, Raja

    2009-11-01

    Seventy-six patients including 27 females and 49 males, with ages ranging between 4 and 35 years (mean, 19.5 y), all experienced loss of weight, stiff temporomandibular joints and inability to chew food, and facial deformities. These patients were treated in the Maxillofacial Unit, Surgical Specialties Hospital, Medical City, Baghdad, Iraq, using 4 different techniques according to the requirement of each case and the facilities available. These patients were divided into 4 groups: the first group consists of 16 children (21.06%) treated with a chondro-osseous graft; the second group, 10 children (13.16%) treated with a 2-part chrome-cobalt prosthesis; the third group, 32 children (42.11%) treated with a Sialastic rubber silicone implant (Koken Co, Tokyo, Japan); and the fourth group, 18 children (23.69%) treated with interposition arthroplasty with a temporalis muscle flap. The follow-up period of the cases ranged between 3 and 15 years. Experimental studies were done on using rabbits to assess the viability of the chondro-osseous graft and on monkeys to demonstrate the biological acceptability of the 2-part chrome-cobalt prosthesis. The aim of this clinical and experimental study was to show our experience in managing difficult tasks that craniofacial or maxillofacial surgeons may face and to share these experiences with other colleagues all over the world.

  1. A pilot trial on the molecular pathophysiology of traumatic temporomandibular joint bony ankylosis in a sheep model. Part I: Expression of Wnt signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ying-Bin; Li, Jiang-Ming; Xiao, E; An, Jin-Gang; Gan, Ye-Hua; Zhang, Yi

    2014-03-01

    To preliminarily investigate the temporal patterns of the endogenous mRNA expression for members of the Wnt signaling and a series of genes regulating bone formation during the development of traumatic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) bony ankylosis in a sheep model. Six sheep were used for the induction of bony ankylosis of TMJ. We performed a condylar fracture, excision of the lateral 2/3 disc and serious injury to the glenoid fossa to induce bony ankylosis on the right TMJ. An isolated condylar fracture was performed on the left side. Two sheep were sacrificed at 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after surgery, respectively. The specimens from the ankylosed joint and the condylar fracture were harvested for RNA extraction respectively. In this report (Part I), only the bony ankylosed samples were used for analysis of gene expressions. The specimens 1 month postoperatively were taken as the control, and the changes of expression of target genes over time were examined by real-time PCR. mRNA expression of Wnt1, Wnt2b, Wnt3a, β-catenin, Sfrp1, Lrp6, Lef1, CyclinD1, and Runx2 was up-regulated at 3 and 6 months compared with 1 month. The expression of Wnt5a, Sox9, and Osterix was up-regulated with a peak at 3 months, and then fell back to the basal levels at 6 months. The expression of Ocn began to up-regulate until 6 month postoperatively. Our findings suggested that Wnt signaling was involved in the formation of traumatic TMJ bony ankylosis and thus may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of the disease in the future. Copyright © 2013 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Intra-articular vs. systemic administration of etanercept in antigen-induced arthritis in the temporomandibular joint. Part II: mandibular growth

    OpenAIRE

    Gelineck John; Pedersen Thomas K; Küseler Annelise; Kristensen Kasper D; Stoustrup Peter; Herlin Troels

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthritis in children causes alterations in the craniomandibular growth. Resultant abnormalities include; condylar erosions, a posterior mandibular rotation pattern, micrognathia, malocclusion with an anterior open bite, altered joint and muscular function occasionally associated with pain. These alterations may be prevented by early aggressive anti-inflammatory intervention. Previously, we have shown that intra-articular (IA) corticosteroid r...

  3. Best Entry Points for Structured Document Retrieval - Part I: Characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reid, Jane; Lalmas, Mounia; Finesilver, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Structured document retrieval makes use of document components as the basis of the retrieval process, rather than complete documents. The inherent relationships between these components make it vital to support users' natural browsing behaviour in order to offer effective and efficient access...... to structured documents. This paper examines the concept of best entry points, which are document components from which the user can browse to obtain optimal access to relevant document components. In particular this paper investigates the basic characteristics of best entry points....

  4. Intra-articular vs. systemic administration of etanercept in antigen-induced arthritis in the temporomandibular joint. Part II: mandibular growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelineck John

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Temporomandibular joint (TMJ arthritis in children causes alterations in the craniomandibular growth. Resultant abnormalities include; condylar erosions, a posterior mandibular rotation pattern, micrognathia, malocclusion with an anterior open bite, altered joint and muscular function occasionally associated with pain. These alterations may be prevented by early aggressive anti-inflammatory intervention. Previously, we have shown that intra-articular (IA corticosteroid reduces TMJ inflammation but causes additional mandibular growth inhibition in young rabbits. Local blockage of TNF-α may be an alternative treatment approach against TMJ involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. We evaluated the anti-inflammatory effect of IA etanercept compared to subcutaneous etanercept in antigen-induced TMJ-arthritis in young rabbits in terms of mandibular growth. This article (Part II presents the data and discussion on the effects on facial growth. In Part I the anti-inflammatory effects of systemic and IA etanercept administration are discussed. Methods Arthritis was induced and maintained in the TMJs of 10-week old pre-sensitized rabbits (n = 42 by four repeated IA TMJ injections with ovalbumin, over a 12-week period. One group was treated weekly with systemic etanercept (0.8 mg/kg (n = 14, another group (n = 14 received IA etanercept (0.1 mg/kg bilaterally one week after induction of arthritis and one group (n = 14 served as an untreated arthritis group receiving IA TMJ saline injections. Head computerized tomographic scans were done before arthritis was induced and at the end of the study. Three small tantalum implants were inserted into the mandible, serving as stable landmarks for the super-impositions. Nineteen variables were evaluated in a mandibular growth analysis for inter-group differences. All data was evaluated blindedly. ANOVA and T-tests were applied for statistical evaluation using p Results Significant larger

  5. Intra-articular vs. systemic administration of etanercept in antigen-induced arthritis in the temporomandibular joint. Part II: mandibular growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoustrup, Peter; Kristensen, Kasper D; Küseler, Annelise; Pedersen, Thomas K; Gelineck, John; Herlin, Troels

    2009-02-06

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthritis in children causes alterations in the craniomandibular growth. Resultant abnormalities include; condylar erosions, a posterior mandibular rotation pattern, micrognathia, malocclusion with an anterior open bite, altered joint and muscular function occasionally associated with pain. These alterations may be prevented by early aggressive anti-inflammatory intervention. Previously, we have shown that intra-articular (IA) corticosteroid reduces TMJ inflammation but causes additional mandibular growth inhibition in young rabbits. Local blockage of TNF-alpha may be an alternative treatment approach against TMJ involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). We evaluated the anti-inflammatory effect of IA etanercept compared to subcutaneous etanercept in antigen-induced TMJ-arthritis in young rabbits in terms of mandibular growth. This article (Part II) presents the data and discussion on the effects on facial growth. In Part I the anti-inflammatory effects of systemic and IA etanercept administration are discussed. Arthritis was induced and maintained in the TMJs of 10-week old pre-sensitized rabbits (n = 42) by four repeated IA TMJ injections with ovalbumin, over a 12-week period. One group was treated weekly with systemic etanercept (0.8 mg/kg) (n = 14), another group (n = 14) received IA etanercept (0.1 mg/kg) bilaterally one week after induction of arthritis and one group (n = 14) served as an untreated arthritis group receiving IA TMJ saline injections. Head computerized tomographic scans were done before arthritis was induced and at the end of the study. Three small tantalum implants were inserted into the mandible, serving as stable landmarks for the super-impositions. Nineteen variables were evaluated in a mandibular growth analysis for inter-group differences. All data was evaluated blindedly. ANOVA and T-tests were applied for statistical evaluation using p < 0.05 as significance level. Significant larger mandibular

  6. Attractive points : New points with no moving parts could put an end to train delays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, H.; Verheul, W.; Hartmann, L.

    2003-01-01

    Failing points are one of the main causes of train delays. The design of the current type of railway points dates back to pre-World War II days, and is in urgent need of replacement. Five Industrial Design students at TU Delft decided to forget about existing principles and came up with a set of

  7. Comparative analysis between findings of magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the masseter muscle in patients with and without temporomandibular disorder: part III

    OpenAIRE

    Luiz Fernando Giazzi NASSRI; ABDALA, NITAMAR; Szejnfeld, Jacob [UNIFESP; Maria Renata Giazzi NASSRI

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the possible modifications of the massetermuscle regarding the metabolites – creatine, choline and lipid – inpatients with and without temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD)trough magnetic resonance spectroscopy sequence. Material andmethods: 20 volunteers were selected (11 without TMD and 9 withTMD), with full dentition and Angle class I occlusion. Results: Therelationship between the metabolites was preserved in both groups,but it showed an increasing tendency of the ...

  8. Pain Part 6: Temporomandibular Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, Pamela L; Durham, Justin; Wassell, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    TMDs are a complex collection of conditions which can have a significant impact on an individual's quality of life. The aetiology, diagnosis and management of TMDs will be described in this article with the hope of increasing a general dental practitioner's knowledge of these problems, thus helping them to institute simple, initial, conservative therapies for such patients. Diagnosis of TMDs can be simplified by following recent published clinical diagnostic criteria such as those outlined in this article. CPD/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Pain and functional disturbances related to TMDs are common and require simple and pragmatic interventions for most patients. After providing a diagnosis, reassure patients that they do not have a sinister disease, and explain that the condition is usually self-limiting.

  9. Engineering Alloplastic Temporomandibular Joint Replacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinno, Hani; Tahiri, Youssef; Gilardino, Mirko; Bobyn, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are part of a heterogeneous group of pathologies that manifest with a constellation of signs and symptoms. They are the most frequent cause of chronic orofacial pain and are prevalent in 12% of the general population. Despite the debilitating nature of these disorders, there is no standardization for treatment of the diseased temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In this review, we present an overview of the functional anatomy of the TMJ and the engineering concepts that must be understood to better understand the indications for surgical management, the types of available treatments and the requirements for reconstruction. A comparison is made of the clinical outcomes with autogenous versus alloplastic reconstruction, including a history of alloplastic materials and the design features of currently available implants. Emphasis is made on material selection, modulus, stiffness, notch sensitivity and modularity. For the treatment of TMD, engineered TMJ alloplastic replacements have had considerable promise with additional room for improvement using new materials and recent design concepts. PMID:22363183

  10. Diagnosis and treatment of temporomandibular disorders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gauer, Robert L; Semidey, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are a heterogeneous group of musculoskeletal and neuromuscular conditions involving the temporomandibular joint complex, and surrounding musculature and osseous components...

  11. Imaging the temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katzberg, R.W.; Manzione, J.V.; Westesson, P.L.

    1988-01-01

    This book encompasses all imaging modalities as they apply to the Temporomandibular Joint and its disorders. The volume employs correlative line drawings to elaborate on diagnostic images. It helps teach methods of TMJ imaging and describes findings identified by different imaging modalities to both radiologists and dental clinicians.

  12. Adjacent, distal, or combination of point-selective effects of acupuncture on temporomandibular joint disorders: A randomized, single-blind, assessor-blind controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Won Kang

    2012-12-01

    Conclusion: Our results suggest that point-selective effects among adjacent, distal, or a combination of acupoints are hardly associated with pain intensity or palpation index in participants with TMDs. Larger sample size trials are required to overcome the shortcomings of the study.

  13. Temporomandibular joint in rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syrjaenen, S.M.

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was investigated clinically and by orthopantomography in 110 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in 73 control subjects. Clinical symptoms in the TMJ were established in 34% of the RA patients and in 18% of the controls. Radiographic abnormalities were found in 60% of the RA patients compared with 15% in the controls. No single radiographic abnormality was characteristic of joint involvement by RA. The most common radiologic features in RA patients were changes in the morphology of the condylar head and articular eminentia, marginal irregularities, reduced mobility, and an anterior position of the condylar head. No abnormalities were encountered in the early stage of the disease, which at least in part could be attributed to the inherent limitations of orthopantomography. The incidence of joint lesions increased with duration of the RA. (orig.).

  14. Temporomandibular disorders in patients with craniocervical dystonia

    OpenAIRE

    Costa,André L.; Campos, Lidiane S.; Marcondes C. França Jr.; Anelyssa D'Abreu

    2011-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders are a set of musculoskeletal dysfunctions within the masticatory system, with multiple etiologies. Objective: Since craniocervical dystonia can involye the same neuromuscular structure as the temporomandibular joint, we sought to assess the correlation between temporomandibular disorders and craniocervical dystonia. Method: We applied the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders to 42 patients with craniocervical dystonia, in order to identify o...

  15. Gnathological splint therapy in temporomandibular joint disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Gnanashanmugham

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint (TMJ forms an integral functional part of stomatognathic system. Position, shape, structure and function of teeth have an influence on the proper functioning and health of TMJ. But a problem associated with TMJ is often neglected, and treatment for it is mostly restricted to palliative therapy. A proper understanding of the underlying cause of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD is necessary to device a proper treatment plan. Etiology of TMDs varies from idiopathic reasons to systemic disorders. The option of Gnathological splint is a conservative, safe and an effective mode of therapy for TMDs caused by occlusal discrepancies (fulcrum/interferences. This article presents a case report of a patient with TMD caused by occlusal discrepancy

  16. Temporomandibular joint disorder (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugashvili, G; Menabde, G; Janelidze, M; Chichua, Z; Amiranashvili, I

    2013-02-01

    Etiopathogenesis and clinical management of TMJD integrates a number of medical disciplines. In particular, dentistry, oral - facial surgery, neurology, rheumatology and so on. Nowadays there is no unified strategy for the management of this disease. Most cases of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) respond to simple treatment and the prognosis is good. Symptoms usually remit with simple care. In cases of secondary involvement of temporomandibular joint (TMJ), the prognosis depends on the primary disease. A comprehensive, chronological history and physical and examination of the patient, including dental history and examination, is essential to diagnose the specific condition to decide further investigations, if any, and to provide specific treatment. in severe cases, a joint consultation of a dentist, neurologist and rheumatologist is needed.

  17. EAMJ Jan. Temporomandibular 10.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-01-01

    Jan 1, 2010 ... American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry. Treatment of temporomandibular disorders in children. J. Am. Dent. Assoc. 1990; 120: 265-269. 12. Knibble, A., Carter, J.B. and Frokjer, G.M. Postanaesthetic temporomandibular joint dysfunction. Anesth. Prog. 1989; 36: 21-25. 13. Rastogi, N.K. and Vakharia, ...

  18. Design and wear testing of a temporomandibular joint prosthesis articulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loon, JP; Verkerke, GJ; de Vries, MP; de Bont, LGM

    As part of the development of a total temporomandibular joint prosthesis, a prosthesis articulation was designed. The articulation consists of a spherical head (ball) of the mandibular part, rotating against an enveloping ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) disc with a flat cranial

  19. A Theory of Solvability for Lossless Power Flow Equations -- Part I: Fixed-Point Power Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson-Porco, John W.

    2017-01-01

    This two-part paper details a theory of solvability for the power flow equations in lossless power networks. In Part I, we derive a new formulation of the lossless power flow equations, which we term the fixed-point power flow. The model is stated for both meshed and radial networks, and is parameterized by several graph-theoretic matrices -- the power network stiffness matrices -- which quantify the internal coupling strength of the network. The model leads immediately to an explicit approxi...

  20. Temporomandibular disorders in patients with craniocervical dystonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André L. Costa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular disorders are a set of musculoskeletal dysfunctions within the masticatory system, with multiple etiologies. OBJECTIVE: Since craniocervical dystonia can involve the same neuromuscular structure as the temporomandibular joint, we sought to assess the correlation between temporomandibular disorders and craniocervical dystonia. METHOD: We applied the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders to 42 patients with craniocervical dystonia, in order to identify orofacial pain and temporomandibular characteristics on the day of botulinum toxin injection. RESULTS: Twenty-two patients (52.3% reported temporomandibular joint pain; 24 (57.1%, joint sounds; 20 (47.6%, masticatory muscle pain; and 21 (50%, diminished jaw mobility. The patients with oromandibular dystonia presented temporomandibular disorders more frequently than did patients with other types of craniocervical dystonia (p<0.001. CONCLUSION: Temporomandibular disorders occur frequently in patients with oromandibular dystonia. Further studies should address the proper treatment of temporomandibular disorders associated with dystonia.

  1. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and craniofacial form

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dibbets, JMH; vanderWeele, LT

    Signs and symptoms attributed to temporomandibular disorder (TMD) were registered in 170 persons at an average age of 12.5 years. One hundred and ten were reexamined at an average age of 26.4 years. Craniofacial form was defined on standardized lateral cephalograms, taken at the time points

  2. There are infinitely many limit points of the fractional parts of powers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Suppose that > 1 is an algebraic number and > 0 is a real number. We prove that the sequence of fractional parts { n } , n = 1 , 2 , 3 , … , has infinitely many limit points except when is a PV-number and ∈ Q ( ) . For =1 and being a rational non-integer number, this result was proved by Vijayaraghavan.

  3. Temporomandibular Disorders and Headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff-Radford, Steven B; Abbott, Jeremy J

    2016-08-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and primary headaches can be perpetual and debilitating musculoskeletal and neurological disorders. The presence of both can affect up to one-sixth of the population at any one time. Initially, TMDs were thought to be predominantly musculoskeletal disorders, and migraine was thought to be solely a cerebrovascular disorder. The further understanding of their pathophysiology has helped to clarify their clinical presentation. This article focuses on the role of the trigeminal system in associating TMD and migraine. By discussing recent descriptions of prevalence, diagnosis, and treatment of headache and TMD, we will further elucidate this relationship. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Temporomandibular Joint Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamimi, Dania; Jalali, Elnaz; Hatcher, David

    2018-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is an anatomically and biomechanically complex structure. Understanding how this structure grows and functions is essential to accurate radiographic evaluation. This article discusses the anatomy, function, and growth and development of the TMJ and how growth changes can affect the morphology of the craniofacial structures. Accordingly, the radiographic appearance of the entities that may alter the TMJ are discussed, including developmental, degenerative, inflammatory, and traumatic changes. Both osseous imaging and soft tissue imaging are shown. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Temporomandibular joint examination reviewed

    OpenAIRE

    L. Guarda Nardini

    2011-01-01

    The temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) it’s a joint closely related to the skull base, the spine, and the jaws; all these anatomical structures must be taken in consideration when evaluating pain involving the tmj. In order to detect patients affected by pathology or dysfunctions of the tmj, physical examination is of great value in orienting the diagnosis. Inspection must consider the symmetry of the body, the dental status and the type of occlusion. Palpation is a way to assess contractiont inv...

  6. [Temporomandibular joint disc surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potier, J; Maes, J-M; Nicot, R; Dumousseau, T; Cotelle, M; Ferri, J

    2016-09-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders are a common disease and may be responsible for major functional and painful repercussions. Treatment is not consensual. The literature highlights the role of conservative treatments (physiotherapy, analgesics, splints) in a first attempt. Minimally invasive surgical techniques (arthroscopy, arthrocentesis) have developed rapidly in recent decades. They have proven effective and reliable, especially in patients suffering from irreducible or reducible anterior disc dislocation or presenting with arthopathies. The goal of our work was to make an update about disk surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. TEMPOROMANDIBULAR-JOINT OSTEOARTHROSIS AND TEMPOROMANDIBULAR-JOINT HYPERMOBILITY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DIJKSTRA, PU; DEBONT, LGM; DELEEUW, R; STEGENGA, B; BOERING, G

    1993-01-01

    For studying the relationship between condylar hypermobility of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and osteoarthrosis (OA), 13 patients with bilateral condylar hypermobility were evaluated clinically and radiographically, 30 years after non-surgical treatment. The evaluation included range of motion,

  8. Is Hyaluronic Acid or Corticosteroid Superior to Lactated Ringer Solution in the Short-Term Reduction of Temporomandibular Joint Pain After Arthrocentesis? Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouloux, Gary F; Chou, Jolie; Krishnan, Deepak; Aghaloo, Tara; Kahenasa, Nora; Smith, Julie Ann; Giannakopoulos, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Arthrocentesis has been used for the management of patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain, with good success. The additional use of hyaluronic acid (HA) or corticosteroid (CS) remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to compare HA, CS, and lactated Ringer solution (LR; placebo) after arthrocentesis. This was a prospective multicenter double-blinded randomized clinical trial. Consecutive patients presenting to the oral and maxillofacial departments at Emory University, the University of Pennsylvania, the University of California-Los Angeles, the University of Cincinnati, and the Oregon Health Sciences University were enrolled in the study. Patients were randomized to HA, CS, or LR. All patients underwent arthrocentesis and then the instillation of HA, CS, or LR. Patients were evaluated clinically at 1 and 3 months. The primary outcome variable was pain at 1 month (by visual analog scale). Secondary outcome variables were pain at 3 months and analgesic consumption. Univariate, bivariate, and multivariate statistics were computed, with a P value less than .05 considered significant. One hundred two patients were enrolled in the study. Four were lost to follow-up, leaving 98 patients for the final analysis. The mean age of patients in the HA, CS, and LR groups was 39.6, 44.3, and 51.8 years, respectively (P = .02). There was no difference among groups in time to follow-up at 1 month (P = .11). The mean decrease in pain in the CS group was 19% for right-side procedures (P = .12) and 36% for left-side procedures (P = .02). The mean decrease in pain in the HA group was 31% for right-side procedures (P = .01) and 34% for left-side procedures (P = .01). The mean decrease in pain in the LR group was 43% for right-side procedures (P pain decrease among groups (P = .55). There was no difference in the use of narcotic (P = .52) or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (P = .71) among groups. Arthrocentesis alone is as efficacious as

  9. Theory of non-local point transformations - Part 2: General form and Gedanken experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Tessarotto, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The problem is posed of further extending the axiomatic construction proposed in Part 1 for non-local point transformations mapping in each other different curved space times. The new transformations apply to curved space times when expressed in arbitrary coordinate systems. It is shown that the solution permits to achieve an ideal (Gedanken) experiment realizing a suitable kind of phase-space transformation on point-particle classical dynamical systems. Applications of the theory are discussed both for diagonal and non-diagonal metric tensors.

  10. Clinical Aspects of Temporomandibular Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZDEN, Asiye Nehir

    2014-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders are common problems in populations presenting signs and symptoms of muscle and joint pain on palpation, limitations in mandibular motion, joint sounds, pain and locking on mandibular function as well as dental, periodontal, occlusal and psychosocial variables. Problems that involve the temporomandibular joint and related structures include myofacial pain-dysfunction, various internal disarrangements of the joint space and degenerative joint diseases. T...

  11. There are infinitely many limit points of the fractional parts of powers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Suppose that α > 1 is an algebraic number and ξ > 0 is a real number. We prove that the sequence of fractional parts {ξαn}, n = 1, 2, 3,..., has infinitely many limit points except when α is a PV-number and ξ ∈ Q(α). For ξ = 1 and α being a rational non-integer number, this result was proved by Vijayaraghavan.

  12. Tuberculosis of the temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assouan, C; Anzouan, K; Nguessan, N D; Millogo, M; Horo, K; Konan, E; Zwetyenga, N

    2014-04-01

    Extrapulmonary and extra-spinal tuberculosis (TB) is rare, even in countries where the disease is endemic. Ten percent of these localizations are cervico-facial. Involvement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is very unusual. We present the features of such a case. We looked for patients managed for TMJ TB in 2 Maxillofacial Surgery departments and in 1 Pneumology & Phthisiology Department since 1992. The second part of the study was a literature review. One case was found in our departments and 15 other cases were found in published data. Most patients were women with mean age of 39.9 years (5 to 68). Pre-auricular swelling was the predominant functional sign, often without fever or change in the health status. The biological and radiological abnormalities were non-specific (osteolysis, joint pinching, etc.). No lung involvement was observed. The joint recovered its normal function after appropriate management. Tuberculosis of the TMJ is difficult to diagnose given its rarity and the non-specific nature of clinical and paraclinical signs. It must be considered in the differential diagnosis for common diseases of the TMJ whether TB is endemic or not. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Temporomandibular joint arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hyung Sik; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Myoung Joon; Jun, Young Hwan; Chang, Duk Soo; Jung, Don Young; Jung, In Won [Capital Armed Forces General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-04-15

    The stress and occlusion disturbance are very important etiologic factors in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain dysfunction syndromes. Authors performed TMJ arthrograms in the patients with TMJ problem such as pain, click sound, limited motion and locking, etc. The following results noted: 1. The arthrographic findings of 22 TMJ were analyzed. a) Normal: 6 cases b) Anterior disc displacement with rediction: 6 cases {center_dot} Early reduction: 2 cases {center_dot} Intermediate reduction: 3 cases {center_dot} Late reduction: 1 case c) Anterior disc displacement without reduction: 6 cases {center_dot} Two cases had adhesion between the posterior portion of disc and the posterior surfaces of the articular eminence. 2. Among 22 cases, the clinical findings of 16 cases (73%) were compatible with arthrographic findings. 6 cases showed disparity between them.

  14. Temporomandibular disorders: evaluation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rossi, Scott S; Greenberg, Martin S; Liu, Frederick; Steinkeler, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Temporomandibular disorders remain a common cause of visits to primary care physicians, internists, pediatricians, and emergency departments. Advances in the clinical diagnosis, radiographic imaging, and classification of these disorders have improved long-term management. There are several types of disorders of the masticatory muscles and the temporomandibular joint as well as associated structures and each may have a complex cause, clinical course, and response to therapy. Host susceptibility plays a role at several stages of these disorders. Future research offers greater possibility in defining this heterogeneous group of disorders and providing more focused and effective treatment strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Temporomandibular joint examination reviewed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Guarda Nardini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ it’s a joint closely related to the skull base, the spine, and the jaws; all these anatomical structures must be taken in consideration when evaluating pain involving the tmj. In order to detect patients affected by pathology or dysfunctions of the tmj, physical examination is of great value in orienting the diagnosis. Inspection must consider the symmetry of the body, the dental status and the type of occlusion. Palpation is a way to assess contractiont involving the muscles of the masticatory system and of the neck. Auscultation, based on articular noise provides means to determine whether we are dealing with degeneration of the joint or a dislocation of the intrarticular disc. In order to confirm the diagnosis obtained with the clinical evaluation, it’s useful to perform imaging techniques as opt, tomography and TC of the tmj and electromyokineosiography – index of the mandibular functionality and of the muscles status. MRI and dynamic MRI are among the non invasive exams which give the greatest amount of information, regarding the disc position and the joint degeneration. Arthroscopy is an invasive technique that allows early diagnosis of degeneration and is helpful to reveal early inflammatory processes of the joint.

  16. Temporomandibular Joint Septic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco Frojo, MD

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary:. Infection of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ is a rare pediatric condition resulting from the introduction of pathogens into the joint by hematogenous seeding, local extension, or trauma. Early recognition of the typical signs and symptoms including fever, trismus, preauricular swelling, and TMJ region tenderness are critical in order to initiate further evaluation and prevent feared complications of fibrosis, ankylosis, abnormal facial structure, or persistence of symptoms. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography with ancillary laboratory analysis including erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, and white blood cell count are beneficial in confirming the suspected diagnosis and monitoring response to therapy. Initial intervention should include empiric parenteral antibiotics, early mandibular mobilization, and joint decompression to provide synovial fluid for analysis including cultures. This report describes a case of TMJ bacterial arthritis in a healthy 6-year-old male who was promptly treated nonsurgically with intravenous antibiotics and localized needle joint decompression with return to normal function after completion of oral antibiotics and physical therapy.

  17. Arthroscopy for temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigon, Marcelo; Pereira, Ligia M; Bortoluzzi, Marcelo C; Loguercio, Alessandro D; Ramos, Adilson Luiz; Cardoso, Jefferson R

    2011-05-11

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are considered a collection of disorders involving many organic, psychological and psychosocial factors. They can involve the masticatory muscles or the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and associated structures, or both. It is estimated that 40% to 75% of the population displays at least one sign of the disease and 33% of the population reports at least one symptom. Arthroscopy has been used to reduce signs and symptoms of patients with TMD but the effectiveness has still not been totally explained. To assess the effectiveness of arthroscopy for the management of signs and symptoms in patients with TMDs. The Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register (to 23 December 2010), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, Issue 4, 2010), MEDLINE via OVID (1950 to 23 December 2010), EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 23 December 2010), LILACS via BIREME Virtual Health Library (1982 to 23 December 2010), Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED) via OVID (1985 to 23 December 2010), CINAHL via EBSCO (1980 to 23 December 2010). There were no restrictions regarding the language or date of publication. Randomized controlled clinical trials of arthroscopy for treating TMDs were included. Two review authors independently extracted data, and three review authors independently assessed the risk of bias of included trials. The authors of the selected articles were contacted for additional information. Seven randomized controlled trials (n = 349) met the inclusion criteria. All studies were either at high or unclear risk of bias. The outcome pain was evaluated after 6 months in two studies. No statistically significant differences were found between the arthroscopy versus nonsurgical groups (standardized mean difference (SMD) = 0.004; 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.46 to 0.55, P = 0.81). Two studies, analyzed pain 12 months after surgery (arthroscopy and arthrocentesis) in 81 patients. No statistically

  18. Actualización terapéutica de los trastornos temporomandibulares Updating on the treatment of temporomandibular disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indira García Martínez

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una revisión bibliográfica con el objetivo de actualizar las diferentes alternativas terapéuticas que se disponen por parte de los profesionales para el tratamiento de los trastornos temporomandibulares, para lo cual los primeros esfuerzos están encaminados al alivio del dolor y al restablecimiento de la función, aunque previamente es necesario un buen diagnóstico y detección de los factores causales, enfatizando que el estrés es un elemento primordial que se debe considerar. La existencia de variados enfoques terapéuticos para los trastornos temporomandibulares queda justificada por la multifactorialidad de la etiología; las 2 alternativas más utilizadas son las férulas oclusales y el tallado selectivo. Se prefiere la fisioterapia a la quimioterapia, como coadyuvante terapéutica de los trastornos temporomandibulares, ya que disminuye el peligro de producir reacciones adversas. Solo se indicará el tratamiento quirúrgico cuando han fracasado los métodos conservadores.A literature review was made to provide updated information on the different therapeutic alternatives at the disposal of dental professionals for the treatment of termporomandibular disorders aimed at relieving pain and re-establish the functioning of the joint. However, it is necessary to firstly make a good diagnosis and then detect the causative factors, emphasizing that stress is a key element to be taken into consideration. The existence of various therapeutical approaches for temporomandibular disorders is due to the multiple factors present in the etiology; the two most used alternatives are occlusal splints and selective carving. Physiotherapy is prefered over chemotherapy, as therapeutic coadjuvant for temporomandibular disorders, because likely occurence of adverse reaction decreases. The surgical treatment will be advised only in the event of failure of standard methods.

  19. Temporomandibular disorders, head and orofacial pain: cervical spine considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Steve

    2007-01-01

    Head and orofacial pain originates from dental, neurologic, musculoskeletal, otolaryngologic, vascular, metaplastic, or infectious disease. It is treated by many health care practitioners, such as dentists, oral surgeons, and physicians. The article focuses on the nonpathologic involvement of the musculoskeletal system as a source of head and orofacial pain. The areas of the musculoskeletal system that are reviewed include the temporomandibular joint and muscles of mastication--collectively referred to as temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and cervical spine disorders. The first part of the article highlights the role of physical therapy in the treatment of TMDs. The second part discusses cervical spine considerations in the management of TMDs and head and orofacial symptoms. It concludes with and overview of the evaluation and treatment of the cervical spine.

  20. A short-term study in sheep with the Groningen temporomandibular joint prosthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loon, JP; de Bont, LGM; Spijkervet, FKL; Verkerke, GJ; Liem, RSB

    2000-01-01

    As part of the pre-clinical testing process of a newly developed temporomandibular joint (TMJ) prosthesis, animal experiments were performed. In 14 sheep, the right TMJ was replaced by the developed TMJ prosthesis. The prosthesis consisted of a skull part, a mandibular part and an intervening

  1. Pharmacotherapeutic agents used in temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal Kucuk, B; Tolunay Kaya, S; Karagoz Motro, P; Oral, K

    2014-11-01

    Depending on the source and character, pharmacotherapy is one of the most commonly used methods to treat temporomandibular disorders in addition to the use of appliances, physiotherapy, behavioral therapy, and surgical interventions. To decide on the appropriate treatment approach for the treatment of temporomandibular disorders, pharmacotherapeutics should be understood in great detail. As for other pain treatments, pharmacotherapy can be used as a monotherapy or combined with other treatment options in temporomandibular disorders. The aim of the present review is to overview the primary analgesics and myorelaxants used in temporomandibular disorders. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Painful Temporomandibular Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, G.D.; Ohrbach, R.; Greenspan, J.D.; Fillingim, R.B.; Bair, E.; Sanders, A.E.; Dubner, R.; Diatchenko, L.; Meloto, C.B.; Smith, S.; Maixner, W.

    2016-01-01

    In 2006, the OPPERA project (Orofacial Pain: Prospective Evaluation and Risk Assessment) set out to identify risk factors for development of painful temporomandibular disorder (TMD). A decade later, this review summarizes its key findings. At 4 US study sites, OPPERA recruited and examined 3,258 community-based TMD-free adults assessing genetic and phenotypic measures of biological, psychosocial, clinical, and health status characteristics. During follow-up, 4% of participants per annum developed clinically verified TMD, although that was a “symptom iceberg” when compared with the 19% annual rate of facial pain symptoms. The most influential predictors of clinical TMD were simple checklists of comorbid health conditions and nonpainful orofacial symptoms. Self-reports of jaw parafunction were markedly stronger predictors than corresponding examiner assessments. The strongest psychosocial predictor was frequency of somatic symptoms, although not somatic reactivity. Pressure pain thresholds measured at cranial sites only weakly predicted incident TMD yet were strongly associated with chronic TMD, cross-sectionally, in OPPERA’s separate case-control study. The puzzle was resolved in OPPERA’s nested case-control study where repeated measures of pressure pain thresholds revealed fluctuation that coincided with TMD’s onset, persistence, and recovery but did not predict its incidence. The nested case-control study likewise furnished novel evidence that deteriorating sleep quality predicted TMD incidence. Three hundred genes were investigated, implicating 6 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) as risk factors for chronic TMD, while another 6 SNPs were associated with intermediate phenotypes for TMD. One study identified a serotonergic pathway in which multiple SNPs influenced risk of chronic TMD. Two other studies investigating gene-environment interactions found that effects of stress on pain were modified by variation in the gene encoding catechol O

  3. [Metastases in the temporomandibular joint: a review from 1954 to 2013. Rare causes for temporomandibular disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretzl, Christine; Lübbers, Heinz-Theo; Grätz, Klaus W; Kruse, Astrid L

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic lesions make up approximately 1% of all oral cancers.A comparatively rare location is the temporomandibular joint.Leading symptoms can be misdirecting, especially in the beginning,because they are frequently similar or even identical to those occurring in temporomandibular disorders. Therefore it can be quite difficult to confirm the diagnosis of a TMJ metastasis.delayed initiation of therapy and thus a poor prognosis are often the results. A review of the literature from 1954 to 2013 was realized and the published cases between 1954 and January 2013 were evaluated.The results were analyzed according to gender distribution, age,first symptoms, location of the primary tumor, as well as to the occurrence of malignancies in the patients' medical history. The research identified sixty-six patients. Tumors of the lung and breast were the main starting points of the metastatic spread. The histopathological workup showed above all the diagnosis of an adenocarcinoma. In all of the cases, unspecific symptoms led to the diagnosis of a metastatic disease. In the case of nonspecific TMJ affection, diagnostics should consider less-frequent diagnoses, such as the presence of metastasis.A clinical differentiation by additional symptoms like swelling, unexplained weight loss and night sweats, as well as a tumor disease in the past or failure of conservative treatment can provide additional indications. If there is reasonable suspicion,extended medical imaging and diagnostic measures must be performed to allow early treatment initiation and a better prognosis.

  4. Prosthodontic Management of Temporomandibular Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Kaur, Harsimran; Datta, Kusum

    2012-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are examined from a biopsychosocial or illness perspective. It is considered that TMD share features with many common chronic pain conditions. Functional disturbances of the masticatory system can be as complicated as the system itself. Although numerous treatments have been advocated, the complex nature of TMD requires a multidisciplinary team. Effective treatment selection begins with a thorough understanding of the disorder & its etiology. However, the mul...

  5. MR diagnosis of temporomandibular arthrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suenaga, Shigeaki [Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Dentistry

    1996-09-01

    This review described lesions of articular disk and its surrounding tissues revealed by MR examination in temporomandibular arthrosis, and problems and limits of the examination. Apparatus and imaging methods: Spin echo method was generally used and gradient echo method was alternatively used. Author`s apparatus was 1.5 tesla Signa, Advantage type, equipped with surface coil for temporomandibular joint. Imaging conditions were T1-weighted spin echo method, T2-weighted fast spin echo method, spoiled GRASS (gradient recalled acquisition in the steady state) method and GRASS method. MR findings of articular disk: MR images of normal and abnormal temporomandibular joint were presented together with computed radiographic findings. The role of dynamic imaging was described for evaluation and analysis of the joint functioning. MR findings of surrounding tissues of the disk: Dynamic MRI of the tissues was found useful to see whether the cause of pain was present inside or outside of the articular capsule. Joint effusion could not be fully imaged in T2-weighted conditions. (K.H.)

  6. Temporomandibular Joint Disorders and Orofacial Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mansur; Schiffman, Eric L

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) affect 5% to 12% of the United States population. This article discusses common conditions related to temporomandibular joints, including disc displacements, inflammatory disturbances, loose joint bodies, traumatic disturbances, and developmental conditions. Also addressed are the appropriate imaging modalities and diagnostic criteria for TMD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Initiative Villes sûres et inclusive : Un point de départ essentiel pour ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    18 mai 2016 ... Elle affirme que les villes, en tant que moteur de la croissance économique et que principal point de prestation de services, tels que l'assainissement, l'emploi et le transport, sont un point de départ essentiel pour s'attaquer aux facteurs de fragilité, que ce soit au niveau municipal ou national. Les centres ...

  8. Non-Linear Aeroelastic Analysis Using the Point Transformation Method, Part 1: Freeplay Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIU, L.; WONG, Y. S.; LEE, B. H. K.

    2002-05-01

    A point transformation technique is developed to investigate the non-linear behavior of a two-dimensional aeroelastic system with freeplay models. Two formulations of the point transformation method are presented, which can be applied to accurately predict the frequency and amplitude of limit cycle oscillations. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the developed formulations are capable of detecting complex aeroelastic responses such as periodic motions with harmonics, period doubling, chaotic motions and the coexistence of stable limit cycles. Applications of the point transformation method to several test examples are presented. It is concluded that the formulations developed in this paper are efficient and effective.

  9. Temporomandibular disorders in scuba divers-an increased risk during diving certification training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztürk, Ozmen; Tek, Mustafa; Seven, Hüseyin

    2012-11-01

    The design of a diving regulator's mouthpiece increases the risk of a temporomandibular disorder (TMD) in scuba divers. The total weight of a diving regulator is reflected directly on the temporomandibular joint, causing articular and periarticular disorders. In the current study, the prevalence of TMD in scuba divers triggered during diving certification training is investigated. We also aimed to determine the factors that lead to TMD during diving training and clarify the observation that there is an increased incidence of TMD in inexperienced divers. The study was held between 2006 and 2011. Ninety-seven divers were referred with the complaint of pain around temporomandibular area. The divers were classified according to their diving experience. Symptoms and signs of TMD were graded. Fourteen divers were diagnosed with TMD. Temporomandibular disorder was seen more frequently in inexperienced divers than in experienced divers (P = 0.0434). The most prevalent symptom was an increased effort for mouthpiece gripping. Temporomandibular joint tenderness and trigger point activation were the mostly seen physical signs. Thirteen divers had an improvement with therapy. The increased effort for stabilizing the mouthpiece is a recognized factor in TMD development. Attention must be paid to an association of scuba diving with TMDs, especially in inexperienced divers having a scuba certification training.

  10. A clinical study of temporomandibular disorder. The value of bone scintigraphy as an aid to diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiura, Masashi [Nippon Dental Univ. (Japan). School of Dentistry at Niigata

    2000-07-01

    Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is still not defined with respect to the point of an entity, terminological problems, and clinical classification and gradings. Moreover, diagnostic problems of internal deranegement and osteodeformity at the temporomandibular joint such as type IV and mechanism of bone remodeling at condylar head are also still not clear. In this investigation, we tried to classify the severity and progressive grading according to the symptoms and objective laboratory data taken from soft tissues such as muscles related to mastication, discs and ligaments, and hard tissues such as condylar head and temporal bone changes around the temporomandibular joint. Preliminary diagnostic clinical tool of the assessment of temporomandibular joint by maens of bone scintigraphy was attributed to the additional diagnostic procedure and research for the bone remodeling for the temporomandibular disorder because this can be defined between subjective and objective symptoms in this disorder. Bone scintigraphy will solve many problems concerning undefined degenerative bone changes in TMD, enable more accurate diagnosis, and the selection of treatment and prognosis in future investigation. Also, it is believed single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) nuclear bone imaging is a highly accurate diagnostic method for craniomandibular disorders. (author)

  11. Influence of orthodontic treatment on temporomandibular disorders. A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-González, Felipe J; Cañigral, Aránzazu; López-Caballo, José L; Brizuela, Aritza; Moreno-Hay, Isabel; Del Río-Highsmith, Jaime; Vega, José A

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this literature systematic review was to evaluate the possible association between malocclusions, orthodontic treatment and development of temporomandibular disorders. A search was carried out on PubMed-Medline database from January 2000 to August 2013 using the keywords "orthodontics and temporomandibular disorders", "orthodontics and facial pain" and "malocclusion and temporomandibular disorders". Human studies included in the study were those assessing signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in relation to orthodontic treatment. A search was carried out on PubMed-Medline database from January 2000 to August 2013 using the keywords "orthodontics and temporomandibular disorders", "orthodontics and facial pain" and "malocclusion and temporomandibular disorders". Human studies included in the study were those assessing signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in relation to orthodontic treatment. The search strategy resulted in 61 articles. After selection according to the inclusion/exclusion criteria 9 articles qualified for the final analysis. The articles which linked orthodontics and development of temporomandibular disorders showed very discrepant results. Some indicated that orthodontic treatment could improve signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, but none of them obtained statistically significant differences. According to the authors examined, there is no evidence for a cause-effect relationship between orthodontic treatment and temporomandibular disorders, or that such treatment might improve or prevent them. More longitudinal studies are needed to verify any possible interrelationship. Key words:Malocclusion and temporomandibular disorders, orthodontics and facial pain, orthodontics and temporomandibular disorders, temporomandibular disorders, temporomandibular dysfunction.

  12. Temporomandibular joint pain-dysfunction syndrome in patients from “Guillermo Tejas” polyclinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delarays Ossani Pérez Alfonso

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: when the physiological levels of the components of the temporomandibular joint are altered by any risk factor, there can appear functional and structural disorders with their corresponding clinical repercussions, which are part of the temporomandibular joint pain-dysfunction syndrome.Objective: to characterize clinically and epidemiologically those patients suffering from temporomandibular joint pain-dysfunction syndrome of “Guillermo Tejas” polyclinic in Las Tunas municipality, from November, 2012 to October, 2014.Methods: a descriptive study was carried out in patients from 12 to 20 years old who came to the dental clinic of the above mentioned polyclinic and time period. The universe consisted of 135 patients who entered the service and the sample was comprised 75 patients diagnosed with temporomandibular joint pain-dysfunction syndrome.Results: females were the most representative ones; regarding age, the groups of 18, 19 and 20 years old patients prevailed. The most frequent para-functional habits were unilateral mastication and bruxism. The prevailing associated factors were occlusal disharmonies. The joint noise and mandibular deviation were the most frequent symptoms and signs.Conclusions: it was possible to characterize clinically and epidemiologically those patients suffering from temporomandibular joint pain-dysfunction syndrome, more frequently found in those older than 18 years old.

  13. Bibliography of papers, reports, and presentations related to point-sample dimensional measurement methods for machined part evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldwin, J.M. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Integrated Manufacturing Systems

    1996-04-01

    The Dimensional Inspection Techniques Specification (DITS) Project is an ongoing effort to produce tools and guidelines for optimum sampling and data analysis of machined parts, when measured using point-sample methods of dimensional metrology. This report is a compilation of results of a literature survey, conducted in support of the DITS. Over 160 citations are included, with author abstracts where available.

  14. ÉTUDE DE CAS — Amérique latine : Un point de départ pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    adaptation et la diffusion des nouvelles technologies. Ces comités constituent aussi le point de départ de projets de développement rural comme la formation de groupes de crédit et de commercialisation. Ils offrent la promesse ...

  15. Melting point of polymers under high pressure Part I: Influence of the polymer properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeger, Andreas; Freitag, Detlef; Freidel, Frank; Luft, Gerhard

    2004-12-15

    The pressure dependence of the melting point of various polymers including homo- and copolymers (HDPE, LDPE, PP and ethylene vinyl acetate copolymers (EVA)) was investigated under nitrogen atmosphere up to 330 MPa within a high pressure differential thermal analysis cell designed by our group. The properties of the polymers (vinylacetate content, melt flow index, molecular weight, isotactic index, crystallinity, density, and frequency of branching) have been correlated with the change of the melting point under pressure (dT{sub m}/dp). It could be shown that the melting point always increases linearly with pressure up to 330 MPa. The pressure dependence was found to be in the range of 11-17 K/(100 MPa). From these results it is possible to approximate dT{sub m}/dp using the enthalpy of fusion of the polymers at ambient pressure.

  16. Best Entry Points for Structured Document Retrieval - Part II: Types, Usage and Effectiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reid, Jane; Lalmas, Mounia; Finesilver, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Structured document retrieval makes use of document components as the basis of the retrieval process, rather than complete documents. The inherent relationships between these components make it vital to support users' natural browsing behaviour in order to offer effective and efficient access...... to structured documents. This paper examines the concept of best entry points, which are document components from which the user can browse to obtain optimal access to relevant document components. It investigates at the types of best entry points in structured document retrieval, and their usage...

  17. Tips for giving a memorable presentation, Part IV: Using and composing PowerPoint slides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Jay A

    2012-10-01

    Visual aids such as PowerPoint slides can be helpful or deleterious to the quality of the talk, depending on how they are done and how they are used. This article will discuss ways to optimize the composition of PowerPoint presentations. This includes the appropriate composition of word slides and the use of the right font size and style of letters. It also includes tips in the use of color, special effects, and graphs. Pointers on how to properly anonymize patient images are also given.

  18. Temporomandibular Joint Anatomy and Derangements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahadır Odabaş

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint (TMJ is a diartrodial joint which is located just before the outer ear way and between the mandibular fossa and mandibular condyle. TMJ has rotation and translation movements. Approximately the 30-50 percent of the population has joint click. Most of the patients which have TMJ click may suffer from disc displacement. By the presence of disharmony between TMJ and occlusion and masticatory muscles, natural balance disappears. Therefore the function of the craniomandibular system and the factors that affects dysfunction must be considered when treatment planning is built.

  19. Trastornos temporomandibulares en adictos al qat

    OpenAIRE

    Orlando Guerra Cobián; Raúl J Pupo Triguero; Humberto Sarracent Pérez; Kirenia M Rabilero Salgado

    2012-01-01

    Introducción: los trastornos temporomandibulares se asocian frecuentemente al hábito de masticar qat, pero se carece de estudios que detallan sus particularidades, por lo que se realiza este trabajo, con los objetivos de determinar la prevalencia de trastornos temporomandibulares en pacientes adictos al qat, identificar los hallazgos clínicos- radiográficos asociados y clasificar los trastornos temporomandibulares presentes en la población estudiada. Métodos: se realizó un estudio prospectivo...

  20. Goldenhar Syndrome and Pain-Related Temporomandibular Disorders. A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawaja, Shehryar Nasir; Crow, Heidi; Gonzalez, Yoly

    2016-04-01

    Goldenhar syndrome (GS) is a development syndrome, characterized by incomplete development of the craniofacial region. The involvement is mainly unilateral; it varies from being mild to severe; and it can range from malocclusion and facial asymmetry to a more complex phenotype with complete absence of the mandibular ramus and temporomandibular joint. However, orthopedic symptoms of orofacial pain and dysfunction have not generally been considered as part of the symptom complex in GS cases. The case presented here is of a 15-year-old Caucasian patient, who was referred for evaluation because of bilateral pain in the masticatory muscles and temporomandibular joints.

  1. Experimental and Numerical Investigations in Single Point Incremental Sheet Forming For Micro parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejardin, S.; Thibaud, S.; Gelin, J. C.

    2007-04-01

    Incremental Sheet Forming processes have been demonstrated in recent studies as a very promising technology to manufacture sheet metal parts by the CNC controlled movement of a simple generative tool. In glance with its various advantages, such process has been introduced as an alternative to reduce costs resulting from stamping technology when small batches or prototypes have to be manufactured. In this paper, an application is carried out accounting flexibility of the process linked to the fact that the punches or dies are avoided. Although the process still needs a further optimization, preliminary results have been obtained through experimental tests to manufacture micro parts. At the same time, a FEM analysis has been carried out in order to get the characteristics of the formed parts.

  2. Temporomandibular juxtaarticular chondroma: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez Mahía, Inés; López-Cedrún Cembranos, José Luis; Ferreras Granado, José; Lorenzo Franco, Fernanda

    2007-03-01

    Chondromas are benign tumours composed of mature hyaline cartilage. We present here the first case in the English language medical literature of juxtaarticular chondroma of the temporomandibular joint in the parotid region. Within the rarity of cartilage disorders of the temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ), this particular condition is a diagnostic curiosity. The patient, a 54 year old woman, presented a right preauricular tumour of 3.5 cm. which had been developing for 4 years. It was not painful but there was a recent symptomology of TMJ dysfunction, with pain and clicks. The diagnostic possibilities of a parotid pleomorphic adenoma and of a cartilage tumour of the TMJ suggested a difficult preoperative differential diagnosis, which influenced our approach regarding therapy. The tumour was excised, preserving the parotid gland. This enabled us to confirm the histological diagnosis of chondroma, composed solely of chondroide tissue. We have described the clinical characteristics of our case, and carried out a review of the relevant literature, emphasising the differential diagnoses.

  3. Chronic temporomandibular joint pain: two cases of osteoid osteoma and a review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deferm, J.T.; Steens, S.C.A.; Vriens, D.; Bekers, E.M.; Kalaykova, S.I.; Borstlap, W.A.

    2017-01-01

    Osteoid osteoma is a benign bone tumour with self-limiting growth potential occurring in any part of the body. Two rare cases of a pathologically proven osteoid osteoma invading the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are reported herein. This article also reviews the cases of osteoid osteoma of the

  4. Clinical view of the temporomandibular joint disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badel, Tomislav; Ćimić, Samir; Munitić, Mirna; Zadravec, Dijana; Kes, Vanja Bašić; Šimunković, Sonja Kraljević

    2014-12-01

    Temporomandibular pain has a musculoskeletal origin because it occurs as a consequence of masticatory muscle function disorder and temporomandibular joint disorder. Most common diagnoses of disorders are disc displacement and osteoarthritis, but their comorbidity can also occur. Pain is the most common symptom, where chronic temporomandibular pain may con- tribute to the occurrence of psychological disorders in the patient population. Splint is the most widespread dental method of treatment but other, noninvasive methods of musculoskeletal pain treatment are also recommended. Electronic axiography is used for visualization of mandibular movements, in particular pathologic sounds in the joints. Mental health, although not so obvious in dental practice, can influence the need of a multidisciplinary approach to the patient with disorder of the temporomandibular joint.

  5. Temporomandibular disorders: the habitual chewing side syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Santana-Mora, Urbano; López-Cedrún, José; Mora, María J; Otero, Xosé L; Santana-Penín, Urbano

    2013-01-01

    .... This cross-sectional study assessed chewing function (habitual chewing side) and the differences of the chewing side and condylar path and lateral anterior guidance angles in participants with chronic unilateral temporomandibular disorder...

  6. All-plastic, miniature, digital fluorescence microscope for three part white blood cell differential measurements at the point of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forcucci, Alessandra; Pawlowski, Michal E; Majors, Catherine; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S

    2015-11-01

    Three-part differential white blood cell counts are used for disease diagnosis and monitoring at the point-of-care. A low-cost, miniature achromatic microscope was fabricated for identification of lymphocytes, monocytes, and granulocytes in samples of whole blood stained with acridine orange. The microscope was manufactured using rapid prototyping techniques of diamond turning and 3D printing and is intended for use at the point-of-care in low-resource settings. The custom-designed microscope requires no manual adjustment between samples and was successfully able to classify three white blood cell types (lymphocytes, granulocytes, and monocytes) using samples of peripheral whole blood stained with acridine orange.

  7. Point Mutations in the folP Gene Partly Explain Sulfonamide Resistance of Streptococcus mutans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Buwembo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cotrimoxazole inhibits dhfr and dhps and reportedly selects for drug resistance in pathogens. Here, Streptococcus mutans isolates were obtained from saliva of HIV/AIDS patients taking cotrimoxazole prophylaxis in Uganda. The isolates were tested for resistance to cotrimoxazole and their folP DNA (which encodes sulfonamide-targeted enzyme dhps cloned in pUC19. A set of recombinant plasmids carrying different point mutations in cloned folP were separately transformed into folP-deficient Escherichia coli. Using sulfonamide-containing media, we assessed the growth of folP-deficient bacteria harbouring plasmids with differing folP point mutations. Interestingly, cloned folP with three mutations (A37V, N172D, R193Q derived from Streptococcus mutans 8 conferred substantial resistance against sulfonamide to folP-deficient bacteria. Indeed, change of any of the three residues (A37V, N172D, and R193Q in plasmid-encoded folP diminished the bacterial resistance to sulfonamide while removal of all three mutations abolished the resistance. In contrast, plasmids carrying four other mutations (A46V, E80K, Q122H, and S146G in folP did not similarly confer any sulfonamide resistance to folP-knockout bacteria. Nevertheless, sulfonamide resistance (MIC = 50 μM of folP-knockout bacteria transformed with plasmid-encoded folP was much less than the resistance (MIC = 4 mM expressed by chromosomally-encoded folP. Therefore, folP point mutations only partially explain bacterial resistance to sulfonamide.

  8. The Temporomandibular Joint Pain Dysfunction Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Speck, John E.

    1988-01-01

    When a patient complains of headache, neckache, or earache and these are associated with noisy temporomandibular joint function, restricted opening or increased pain when chewing, a temporomandibular joint or masticatory muscle disorder should be considered in the differential diagnosis, because signs and symptoms of these disorders are common in all age groups. This article indicates the more common etiological contributions, that is, microtrauma, repeated microtrauma, muscle hyperactivity, ...

  9. Cervical Musculoskeletal Impairments and Temporomandibular Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Susan Armijo-Olivo; David Magee

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The study of cervical muscles and their significance in the development and perpetuation of Temporomandibular Disorders has not been elucidated. Thus this project was designed to investigate the association between cervical musculoskeletal impairments and Temporomandibular Disorders. Material and Methods A sample of 154 subjects participated in this study. All subjects underwent a series of physical tests and electromyographic assessment (i.e. head and neck posture, maxima...

  10. A Measurement Method for Large Parts Combining with Feature Compression Extraction and Directed Edge-Point Criterion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available High-accuracy surface measurement of large aviation parts is a significant guarantee of aircraft assembly with high quality. The result of boundary measurement is a significant parameter for aviation-part measurement. This paper proposes a measurement method for accurately measuring the surface and boundary of aviation part with feature compression extraction and directed edge-point criterion. To improve the measurement accuracy of both the surface and boundary of large parts, extraction method of global boundary and feature analysis of local stripe are combined. The center feature of laser stripe is obtained with high accuracy and less calculation using a sub-pixel centroid extraction method based on compress processing. This method consists of a compressing process of images and judgment criterion of laser stripe centers. An edge-point extraction method based on directed arc-length criterion is proposed to obtain accurate boundary. Finally, a high-precision reconstruction of aerospace part is achieved. Experiments are performed both in a laboratory and an industrial field. The physical measurements validate that the mean distance deviation of the proposed method is 0.47 mm. The results of the field experimentation show the validity of the proposed method.

  11. Trastornos temporomandibulares en adictos al qat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Guerra Cobián

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: los trastornos temporomandibulares se asocian frecuentemente al hábito de masticar qat, pero se carece de estudios que detallan sus particularidades, por lo que se realiza este trabajo, con los objetivos de determinar la prevalencia de trastornos temporomandibulares en pacientes adictos al qat, identificar los hallazgos clínicos- radiográficos asociados y clasificar los trastornos temporomandibulares presentes en la población estudiada. Métodos: se realizó un estudio prospectivo, descriptivo, de corte transversal, en una muestra de 352 pacientes, del total de pacientes adictos, atendidos en el Departamento de Cirugía, Colegio Dental. Ibb,Yemen en el periodo octubre 2010-abril 2011. Se determinaron los hallazgos clínicos y radiográficos presentes, y se diagnosticó el tipo de trastorno temporomandibular. Resultados: se evidenció que estaban afectados por trastornos temporomandibulares el 55,7 % de los pacientes. Se encontró dolor articular agudo en 14,1 % y aplanamiento condilar anterior en 35,6 %. Conclusiones: los trastornos temporomandibulares afectaron más de la mitad de la población estudiada, adicta al qat. Los desórdenes en la relación cóndilo-disco fueron los más encontrados (41 %. El aplanamiento condilar anterior dominó en el análisis radiográfico.

  12. PATHOLOGY OF TEMPOROMANDIBULAR-JOINT INTERNAL DERANGEMENT AND OSTEOARTHROSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEBONT, LGM; STEGENGA, B

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthrosis and disk displacement seem to be strongly related, but they may also represent mutually independent temporomandibular disorders. This paper presents relevant aspects of normal physiology and degeneration of synovial joints, aspects of normal

  13. Management of the Temporomandibular Joint after Ablative Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Bredell, Marius; Grätz, Klaus; Obwegeser, Joachim; Gujer, Astrid Kruse

    2014-01-01

    Management of the temporomandibular joint in ablative head and neck surgery is controversial with no standardized approach. The aim of the study was to establish risk-based guidelines for the management of the temporomandibular joint after ablative surgery.

  14. Radiographic study on temporomandibular joint Arthrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Dong Soo [Dept. of Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University , Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1980-11-15

    The author analysed the routine radiographic changes and clinical symptoms of 205 cases of temporomandibular joint arthrosis. The clinical symptoms of the patients were classified and the morphological changes of condylar head, articular eminence, and articular fossa were analyzed and discussed from radiographic view point. The positional change of condylar head and articular fossa relation in TMJ arthrosis were observed. The frequencies of coincidence between the site of complaints and the site of the abnormal images which could be detected were examined. The results were obtained as follows; 1. Bone erosion, deformity, marginal proliferation and sclerosis were selected from many abnormal images as the radiographic diagnostic criteria of TMJ arthritic lesions. 2. Abnormal radiographic findings were revealed in 150 cases (73.9%) of 205 total TMJ arthrosis cases and site with abnormal findings coincided with the site of complaints in 105 cases (70.7%) of 150 cases and coincidence rates were higher above fourth decades than below third decades. 3. Sclerosis of the abnormal radiographic findings could be found more often below third decades than above fourth decades. 4. The positional changes of condylar head were revealed in 176 cases (85.9%) of 205 total cases. 5. Pain complaints were revealed in 170 cases(82.9%) and clicking sounds were revealed in 120 cases (58.6%) of clinical symptoms of TMJ arthrosis. 6. No tendency was found so far the differential diagnosis between pain dysfunction syndrome and osteoarthrosis of TMJ.

  15. Theory of non-local point transformations - Part 1: Representation of Teleparallel Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Tessarotto, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the extension of the functional setting customarily adopted in General Relativity (GR) is considered. For this purpose, an explicit solution of the so-called Einstein's\\ Teleparallel problem is sought. This is achieved by a suitable extension of the traditional concept of GR reference frame and is based on the notion of non-local point transformation (NLPT). In particular, it is shown that a solution to the said problem can be reached by introducing a suitable subset of transformations denoted here as \\textit{special} \\textit{NLPT}. These are found to realize a phase-space transformation connecting\\emph{\\}the flat Minkowski space-time with, in principle, an arbitrary curved space-time. The functional setting and basic properties of the new transformations are investigated.

  16. On the Nature of the Microwave Background at the Lagrange 2 Point. Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borissova L.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work the mathematical methods of General Relativity are used to answer the following questions: if a microwave background originates from the Earth, what would be its density and associated dipole measured at the altitude of a U2 aeroplane (25 km, the COBE satellite (900 km, and the 2nd Lagrange point (1.5 million km, the position of the WMAP and PLANCK satellites? The first problem is solved via Einstein’s equations for the electromagnetic field of the Earth. The second problem is solved using the geodesic equations for light-like particles (photons which are mediators for electromagnetic radiation. We have determined that a microwave background that originates at the Earth (the Earth microwave background decreases with altitude so that the density of the energy of such a background at the altitude of the COBE orbit (900 km is 0.68 times less than that at the altitude of a U2 aeroplane. The density of the energy of the background at the L2 point is only ~1E-7 of the value detected by a U2 aeroplane or at the COBE orbit. The dipole anisotropy of the Earth microwave background, due to the rapid motion of the Earth relative to the source of another field which isn’t connected to the Earth but is located in depths of the cosmos, doesn’t depend on altitute from the surface of the Earth. Such a dipole will be the same irrespective of the position at which measurements are taken.

  17. Rheumatoid arthritis affecting temporomandibular joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandeep Sodhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic, systemic, autoimmune inflammatory disorder that is characterized by joint inflammation, erosive properties and symmetric multiple joint involvement. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ is very rare to be affected in the early phase of the disease, thus posing diagnostic challenges for the dentist. Conventional radiographs fail to show the early lesions due to its limitations. More recently cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT has been found to diagnose the early degenerative changes of TMJ and hence aid in the diagnosis of the lesions more accurately. Our case highlights the involvement of TMJ in RA and the role of advanced imaging (CBCT in diagnosing the bony changes in the early phase of the disease.

  18. [Temporomandibular joint, occlusion and bruxism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orthlieb, J D; Ré, J P; Jeany, M; Giraudeau, A

    2016-09-01

    Temporomandibular joint and dental occlusion are joined for better and worse. TMJ has its own weaknesses, sometimes indicated by bad functional habits and occlusal disorders. Occlusal analysis needs to be addressed simply and clearly. The term "malocclusion" is not reliable to build epidemiological studies, etiologic mechanisms or therapeutic advice on this "diagnosis". Understanding the impact of pathogenic malocclusion is not just about occlusal relationships that are more or less defective, it requires to locate them within the skeletal framework, the articular and behavioural context of the patient, and above all to assess their impact on the functions of the masticatory system. The TMJ-occlusion couple is often symbiotic, developing together in relation to its environment, compensating for its own shortcomings. However, a third partner may alter this relationship, such as bruxism, or more generally oral parafunctions, trauma or an interventionist practitioner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. CT imaging in the surgical treatment of one-sided extraarticular temporomandibular joint ankylosis; Uso da tomografia computadorizada no planejamento cirurgico da anquilose temporomandibular extra-articular unilateral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villamizar, Lenin A.; Ghirelli, Carolina de Oliveira; Baroni, Carina Outi; Ferro, Daniel; Pinto, Ana Carolina Brandao de Campos Fonseca, E-mail: carinaouti@yahoo.com.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia. Dept. de Cirurgia

    2012-07-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is characterized by difficulty to open the mouth. The ankylosis may be articular when TJM is involved and extra-articular when other factors lead to a restriction of chewing movements without TJM involvement. Case report of one patient with unilateral ankylosis and his surgical planning through the tomography imaging. CT imaging helps preoperative planning because it can locate the exact point of injury and can make the difference between the true and false ankylosis of the TJM. (author)

  20. RADIOGRAPHIC EXAMINATION OF TEMPOROMANDIBULAR DISORDERS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heru Suryonegoro

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The temporomandibular joint has a very important role in the stomatognathic system. Its main function is for the opening and closing movement, mastication, and speech. It is located anterior to the ear. The temporomandibular joint connects maxilla and mandible through the articular fossa, hence the slightest change that happens would cause serious matters such as pain, exiting, speech disorder, difficulty in opening and closing movement, headache, and even trismus. In a child or an adolescent, the symptoms are often vague; everything is interpreted as “pain”. This is probably why temporomandibular disorder are often undetected by dentists. Therefore, patience and accuracy is needed to determine the actual disorder through means of clinical and radiographic examination. The radiographic examination suitable for child is the transcranial projection. This projection is believed to be more accurate amongst other projection for child patients.

  1. Relação entre bruxismo e o grau de sintomatologia de disfunção temporomandibular The relationship between the bruxism and the severity of symptoms in the temporomandibular disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cíntia Corrêa Blini

    2010-06-01

    jaw dysfunction and its association with the level of temporomandibular symptoms. METHODS: 28 women, with ages between 19 and 56 years, who had temporomandibular jaw dysfunction and had not been submitted to a preview treatment, made part of this study. All subjects answered a questionnaire written by Fonseca et al (1994 entitled Anamnesic Index, that enabled us to classify temporomandibular jaw symptoms level and also to check the symptoms of this oral parafunction behavioral bruxism; the subjects were submitted an odontological evaluation, that was composed by an exam of masticatory muscles, though the digital touch in the oral and extra-oral muscles, examination in the temporomandibular joint and a teeth examination. The results were analyzed in a descriptive form, and in order to check the relationship between the severity level of temporomandibular dysfunction with the bruxism occurrence Independent Square-Qui test and the Fisher test were used with a statistic significance of 5%. RESULTS: it was observed the parafuntional habit was presented in 50% of the cases with temporomandibular dysfunction. It wasn't possible a relationship between bruxism and the level of symptoms in temporomandibular jaw dysfunction, by Anamnesic Index. CONCLUSION: the results of this study suggest that subjects with symptoms of temporomandibular jaw dysfunction must be asked and evaluated about bruxism, regardless of the level of temporomandibular dysfunction. Besides this, it is important to investigate the diagnosis and the treatment of bruxism also in patients without temporomandibular jaw dysfunction in order to prevent development of lesions in the temporomandibular joints and the other structures of the stomatognatic system.

  2. Nonsurgical Management of Pediatric Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrivani, Steven John; Khawaja, Shehryar Nasir; Bavia, Paula Furlan

    2018-02-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are a subgroup of craniofacial pain problems involving the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), masticatory muscles, and associated head and neck musculoskeletal structures. These disorders are subclassified into TMJ articular disorders and masticatory muscle disorders. Patients with TMD most commonly present with pain, restricted or asymmetric mandibular motion, and TMJ sounds during mandibular movements. The prevalence tends to increase with age. Management of TMJ articular disorders consists of a combination of patient education, home-care plan, biobehavioral therapy, physical therapy, orthotic jaw appliance therapy, pharmacotherapy, and/or surgery. The goal is to increase function, reduce pain, and improve quality of life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Loose bodies of the temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Q.N.; Katzberg, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    We report a series of four patients presenting with symptoms of temporomandibular joint pain and dysfunction, and manifesting calcified loose bodies within the temporomandibular joint. Tomographic and arthrotomographic findings are described. Surgical confirmation was obtained in two patients and the histopathology in one demonstrated that the loose body was calcified cartilage surrounded by synovial tissue. The synovial tissue of the joint space was normal in all four cases by arthrotomography and at surgery in two patients. The findings suggest that these cases may be examples of osteochondrosis dissecans.

  4. A radiographic study on temporomandibular joint trouble

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Byoung Woon; Ahn, Hyung Kyu [Dept. of Dental Radiology, Graduate School, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1979-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the radiographic images of Temporomandibular joint trouble patients. This study included 186 patients with the chief complaints of TMJ pain and dysfunction. Their age ranged from 17 to 68 years. All patients were identified in the department of Dental Radiology at the Infirmary of College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, during the period from Apr. 1978 to Jun. 1979. The author has observed the radiographic variations of two positions of condylar head taken by modified transcranial oblique-lateral projection, which are one in centric occlusion and the other in 1 inch(2.54 cm) mouth open. The results were obtained as follows; 1. In centric occlusion, the distances and positional relationship between the summit of condylar head and the deepest point of articular fossa revealed more or less large variations; Normal range is of 37.9%, anterior displacement of 37.3% and posterior displacement of 22.6%. 2. In the horizontal movement of condylar heads when on 1 inch mouth open, it was revealed that normal range was of 46.5%, anterior displacement of 12.3%, posterior displacement of 41.1%. 3. In the positional interrelationship of both condylar heads when on 1 inch mouth open, it was revealed that symmetry(71.5%) occurred approximately 2.5 times as many as asymmetry. 4. In both centric and 1 inch mouth open, it was showed that almost all estimated figures were greater in male than in female, and in the horizontal movement of condylar head when on 1 inch open, it was showed that hypermobility was dominant in male and hypomobility in female.

  5. Trastornos temporomandibulares en adictos al qat Temporomandibular disorders in qat addicted people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Guerra Cobián

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: los trastornos temporomandibulares se asocian frecuentemente al hábito de masticar qat, pero se carece de estudios que detallan sus particularidades, por lo que se realiza este trabajo, con los objetivos de determinar la prevalencia de trastornos temporomandibulares en pacientes adictos al qat, identificar los hallazgos clínicos- radiográficos asociados y clasificar los trastornos temporomandibulares presentes en la población estudiada. Métodos: se realizó un estudio prospectivo, descriptivo, de corte transversal, en una muestra de 352 pacientes, del total de pacientes adictos, atendidos en el Departamento de Cirugía, Colegio Dental. Ibb,Yemen en el periodo octubre 2010-abril 2011. Se determinaron los hallazgos clínicos y radiográficos presentes, y se diagnosticó el tipo de trastorno temporomandibular. Resultados: se evidenció que estaban afectados por trastornos temporomandibulares el 55,7 % de los pacientes. Se encontró dolor articular agudo en 14,1 % y aplanamiento condilar anterior en 35,6 %. Conclusiones: los trastornos temporomandibulares afectaron más de la mitad de la población estudiada, adicta al qat. Los desórdenes en la relación cóndilo-disco fueron los más encontrados (41 %. El aplanamiento condilar anterior dominó en el análisis radiográfico.Introduction: the temporomandibular disorders has been associated frequently to the habit of chewing qat, but in previous studies, there are lack of specific details of this problem, for this reason this study is carried out ,to determine it prevalence, to identify clinical and radiografical findings associated , and to classify the temporomandibular disorders observed in the sample. Methods: a cross-sectional, descriptive and prospective study was done, in a sample of 352 patients of the total qat addicted patients which came to the Department of surgery, Dentistry College .Ibb Yemen October2010-April 2011. The clinical and radiographical findings were

  6. Temporomandibular joint diagnostics using CBCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamsson, A-K; Kristensen, M; Arvidsson, L Z

    2015-01-01

    The present review will give an update on temporomandibular joint (TMJ) imaging using CBCT. It will focus on diagnostic accuracy and the value of CBCT compared with other imaging modalities for the evaluation of TMJs in different categories of patients; osteoarthritis (OA), juvenile OA, rheumatoid arthritis and related joint diseases, juvenile idiopathic arthritis and other intra-articular conditions. Finally, sections on other aspects of CBCT research related to the TMJ, clinical decision-making and concluding remarks are added. CBCT has emerged as a cost- and dose-effective imaging modality for the diagnostic assessment of a variety of TMJ conditions. The imaging modality has been found to be superior to conventional radiographical examinations as well as MRI in assessment of the TMJ. However, it should be emphasized that the diagnostic information obtained is limited to the morphology of the osseous joint components, cortical bone integrity and subcortical bone destruction/production. For evaluation of soft-tissue abnormalities, MRI is mandatory. There is an obvious need for research on the impact of CBCT examinations on patient outcome. PMID:25369205

  7. Dental occlusion and temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, J Caitlin; Hannah, Andrew; Nagar, Nathan

    2017-10-27

    Data sourcesMedline, Scopus and Google Scholar.Study selectionTwo reviewers selected studies independently. English language clinical studies assessing the association between temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and features of dental occlusion were considered.Data extraction and synthesisStudy quality was assessed based on the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS) and a narrative synthesis was presented.ResultsIn all 25 studies (17 case-control, eight comparative) were included. Overall there was a high variability between occlusal features and TMD diagnosis. Findings were consistent with a lack of clinically relevant association between TMD and dental occlusion. Only two studies were associated with TMD in the majority (≥50%) of single variable analyses in patient populations. Only mediotrusive interferences are associated with TMD in the majority of multiple variable analyses.ConclusionsThe findings support the absence of a disease-specific association, there is no ground to hypothesise a major role for dental occlusion in the pathophysiology of TMDs. Dental clinicians are thus encouraged to move forward and abandon the old-fashioned gnathological paradig.

  8. Development of temporomandibular joint arthritis: The use of animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassemi Nejad, Sheida; Kobezda, Tamás; Tar, Ildikó; Szekanecz, Zoltán

    2017-03-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common joint disease affecting roughly one sixth of the human population. It is also the most common arthritis affecting the temporomandibular joint, often leading to severe pain and the inability to masticate. Animal models are essential to investigate the disease in part because they lend themselves to genetic manipulation and various treatments and also because of the lack of availability of human specimens from various stages of the disease. The wide range of osteoarthritis models alone are a proof of its multifactorial origin. Manipulation of collagen, cytokine, matrix metalloproteinase and small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan genes can all have an effect on the development and persistence of arthritis. Surgical models also exist, highlighting the importance of normal anatomy and trauma. Here we review the English literature of murine models of temporomandibular joint arthritis with special attention to the genetic and molecular background of osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2016 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Temporomandibular disorders and functional somatic syndromes: Deliberations for the dentist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Suma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular disorder (TMD is an umbrella term for a collection of disorders affecting the temporomandibular joint (TMJ and associated tissues. TMD is not a rare pathology for the dentist. The most common presenting symptom is pain, which causes the patient seek immediate treatment. Management is dictated by the cause. The most ′famed′ causes include trauma, inflammation, aging, parafunctional habits, infections, neoplasms, and stress; and these are always considered in the differential diagnosis of TMJ pain. There are some less ′famed′ causes of TMD, which are characterized by increased pain sensitivity due to psychosocial factors; these include myofascial pain syndrome and functional somatic syndromes (FSS such as fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome. They present with chronic pain, fatigue, disability, and impairment in ability to perform daily activities. A non-systematic search in the English literature revealed numerous studies describing the occurrence of TMD in these conditions, along with few other oral manifestations. TMD has been even considered to be a part of the FSS by some. In these patients, TMD remains a recurring problem, and adequate management cannot be achieved by traditional treatment protocols. Awareness of these conditions, with correct diagnosis and modification of management protocols accordingly, may resolve this problem.

  10. Role of Auriculotherapy in the Treatment of Temporomandibular Disorders with Anxiety in University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iunes, Denise Hollanda; Chaves, Érika de Cássia Lopes; Moura, Caroline de Castro; Côrrea, Bruna; Carvalho, Leonardo César; Silva, Andreia Maria; de Carvalho, Emília Campos

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of auriculotherapy with mustard seeds in the treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs), anxiety, and electromyographic (EMG) activity in university students. Methodology. The State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC) for TMDs (RDC/TMDs), and electromyography were used in this study of 44 college students with high levels of anxiety and TMDs. The subjects were divided into two groups: an auriculotherapy (AA) group (n = 31) and an AA sham group (n = 13). The mustard seeds were applied to the shenmen, rim, sympathetic, brain stem, and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) points in the AA group and to sham points in the external ear and wrist in the AA sham group. The treatment protocol was 10 sessions (two treatments per week). Results. Anxiety (p Auriculotherapy was effective in the treatment of students with anxiety and TMDs.

  11. Unfavourable results in temporomandibular joint ankylosis surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, Mukund; Munoli, Amarnath V.

    2013-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is a debilitating condition usually afflicting children and young adults. Treatment is surgical, i.e., release of the ankylosed joint/s with or without interposition arthroplasty and correction of secondary deformities (mandibular retrusion and asymmetry) This article deals with identifying potential setbacks in TMJ ankylosis surgery and preventing them. PMID:24501459

  12. Temporomandibular joint involvement in psoriatic arthritis | Okkesim ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Psoriasis is a chronic, papulosquamous, and an inflammatory skin disease. It has been found that between 5% and 24% of patients develop psoriatic arthritis (PA) at the same time after or even prior to skin findings. The involvement of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare condition. In this report, a-46-year-old male ...

  13. Nomenclature and classification of temporomandibular joint disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegenga, B.

    2010-01-01

    P>Currently, there are basically two approaches to classification, one based on structural and one on positional changes occurring within the joint. Despite the increase in knowledge of pathologic changes occurring within the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), the disc still seems to be a central issue

  14. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis and the temporomandibular joint

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yasser Mohammed

    e Pediatric Immunology Units, Ain Shams University hospitals, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt. Received 1 October 2011; accepted 23 November 2011. Available online 1 February 2012. KEYWORDS. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis;. Temporomandibular joint;. Magnetic resonance imaging. Abstract ...

  15. Anterior bilateral temporomandibular joint dislocation: an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anterior dislocation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) though an infrequent presentation at the emergency department; often demands an immediate reduction to relieve discomfort and prevent adverse long-term sequelae. A simple and effective technique to reduce the dislocation is successfully demonstrated by putting ...

  16. Orofacial manual therapy improves cervical movement impairment associated with headache and features of temporomandibular dysfunction: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Piekartz, Harry; Hall, Toby

    2013-08-01

    There is evidence that temporomandibular disorder (TMD) may be a contributing factor to cervicogenic headache (CGH), in part because of the influence of dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint on the cervical spine. The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to determine whether orofacial treatment in addition to cervical manual therapy, was more effective than cervical manual therapy alone on measures of cervical movement impairment in patients with features of CGH and signs of TMD. In this study, 43 patients (27 women) with headache for more than 3-months and with some features of CGH and signs of TMD were randomly assigned to receive either cervical manual therapy (usual care) or orofacial manual therapy to address TMD in addition to usual care. Subjects were assessed at baseline, after 6 treatment sessions (3-months), and at 6-months follow-up. 38 subjects (25 female) completed all analysis at 6-months follow-up. The outcome criteria were: cervical range of movement (including the C1-2 flexion-rotation test) and manual examination of the upper 3 cervical vertebra. The group that received orofacial treatment in addition to usual care showed significant reduction in all aspects of cervical impairment after the treatment period. These improvements persisted to the 6-month follow-up, but were not observed in the usual care group at any point. These observations together with previous reports indicate that manual therapists should look for features of TMD when examining patients with headache, particularly if treatment fails when directed to the cervical spine. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. The Melting Point of Palladium Using Miniature Fixed Points of Different Ceramic Materials: Part II—Analysis of Melting Curves and Long-Term Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edler, F.; Huang, K.

    2016-12-01

    Fifteen miniature fixed-point cells made of three different ceramic crucible materials (Al2O3, ZrO2, and Al2O3(86 %)+ZrO2(14 %)) were filled with pure palladium and used to calibrate type B thermocouples (Pt30 %Rh/Pt6 %Rh). A critical point by using miniature fixed points with small amounts of fixed-point material is the analysis of the melting curves, which are characterized by significant slopes during the melting process compared to flat melting plateaus obtainable using conventional fixed-point cells. The method of the extrapolated starting point temperature using straight line approximation of the melting plateau was applied to analyze the melting curves. This method allowed an unambiguous determination of an electromotive force (emf) assignable as melting temperature. The strict consideration of two constraints resulted in a unique, repeatable and objective method to determine the emf at the melting temperature within an uncertainty of about 0.1 μ V. The lifetime and long-term stability of the miniature fixed points was investigated by performing more than 100 melt/freeze cycles for each crucible of the different ceramic materials. No failure of the crucibles occurred indicating an excellent mechanical stability of the investigated miniature cells. The consequent limitation of heating rates to values below {± }3.5 K min^{-1} above 1100° C and the carefully and completely filled crucibles (the liquid palladium occupies the whole volume of the crucible) are the reasons for successfully preventing the crucibles from breaking. The thermal stability of the melting temperature of palladium was excellent when using the crucibles made of Al2O3(86 %)+ZrO2(14 %) and ZrO2. Emf drifts over the total duration of the long-term investigation were below a temperature equivalent of about 0.1 K-0.2 K.

  18. Source of salts in the Waianae part of the Pearl Harbor aquifer near Barbers Point water tunnel, Oahu, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyre, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    The salinity of the water supply of Barbers Point Naval Air Station has increased markedly since 1983. The Naval Air Station obtains its water, about 3 million gal/day, from Barbers Point shaft, a water shaft that taps the Waianae part of the Pearl Harbor aquifer underlying the dry, southeastern flank of the Waianae mountains on the island on Oahu, Hawaii. From 1983 to 1985 the chloride concentration of the water, increased from 220 to 250 mg/L and has remained near that level through 1986. The EPA has established 250 mg/L as the maximum recommended chloride concentration in drinking water because above that level many people can taste the salt. The high chloride concentration in shallow groundwater at all wells in the area indicates that most of the salts in the freshwater lens are contributed by rainfall, sea spray, and irrigation return water. At Barbers Point shaft, pumping may draw a small amount of saltwater from the transition zone and increase the chloride concentration in the pumped water by about 20 mg/L. Salinity of the lens decreases progressively inland in response to recharge from relatively fresher water and in response to an increasing lens thickness with increasing distance from the shoreline. The increase, in 1983, in the chloride concentration of water at the shaft was most probably the result of saltier recharge water reaching the water table, and not the result of increased mixing of underlying saltwater with the freshwater. The chloride concentration of the recharge water has probably increased because, in 1980, the drip method of irrigation began to replace the furrow method on sugarcane fields near the shaft. A mixing-cell model was used to estimate the effect of drip irrigation on the chloride concentration of the groundwater in the vicinity of Barbers Point shaft. The model predicted an increase in chloride concentration of about 50 mg/L. The observed increase was about 30 mg/L and the chloride concentration is presently stable at 245 to

  19. The theoretical optimal center of rotation for a temporomandibular joint prosthesis : A three-dimensional kinematic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loon, JP; Falkenstrom, CH; de Bont, LGM; Verkerke, GJ; Stegenga, B

    A unilateral temporomandibular joint (TMJ) prosthesis may cause dysfunction of the contralateral, natural TMJ because of lack of translatorial movements of the prosthetic side. The natural translatorial capacity of the mandible can be restored in part by a TMJ prosthesis with a fixed center of

  20. Cervical Musculoskeletal Impairments and Temporomandibular Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Armijo-Olivo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The study of cervical muscles and their significance in the development and perpetuation of Temporomandibular Disorders has not been elucidated. Thus this project was designed to investigate the association between cervical musculoskeletal impairments and Temporomandibular Disorders. Material and Methods: A sample of 154 subjects participated in this study. All subjects underwent a series of physical tests and electromyographic assessment (i.e. head and neck posture, maximal cervical muscle strength, cervical flexor and extensor muscles endurance, and cervical flexor muscle performance to determine cervical musculoskeletal impairments. Results: A strong relationship between neck disability and jaw disability was found (r = 0.82. Craniocervical posture was statistically different between patients with myogenous Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD and healthy subjects. However, the difference was too small (3.3º to be considered clinically relevant. Maximal cervical flexor muscle strength was not statistically or clinically different between patients with TMD and healthy subjects. No statistically significant differences were found in electromyographic activity of the sternocleidomastoid or the anterior scalene muscles in patients with TMD when compared to healthy subjects while executing the craniocervical flexion test (P = 0.07. However, clinically important effect sizes (0.42 - 0.82 were found. Subjects with TMD presented with reduced cervical flexor as well as extensor muscle endurance while performing the flexor and extensor muscle endurance tests when compared to healthy individuals. Conclusions: Subjects with Temporomandibular Disorders presented with impairments of the cervical flexors and extensors muscles. These results could help guide clinicians in the assessment and prescription of more effective interventions for individuals with Temporomandibular Disorders.

  1. Cervical musculoskeletal impairments and temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armijo-Olivo, Susan; Magee, David

    2013-01-01

    The study of cervical muscles and their significance in the development and perpetuation of Temporomandibular Disorders has not been elucidated. Thus this project was designed to investigate the association between cervical musculoskeletal impairments and Temporomandibular Disorders. A sample of 154 subjects participated in this study. All subjects underwent a series of physical tests and electromyographic assessment (i.e. head and neck posture, maximal cervical muscle strength, cervical flexor and extensor muscles endurance, and cervical flexor muscle performance) to determine cervical musculoskeletal impairments. A strong relationship between neck disability and jaw disability was found (r = 0.82). Craniocervical posture was statistically different between patients with myogenous Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) and healthy subjects. However, the difference was too small (3.3º) to be considered clinically relevant. Maximal cervical flexor muscle strength was not statistically or clinically different between patients with TMD and healthy subjects. No statistically significant differences were found in electromyographic activity of the sternocleidomastoid or the anterior scalene muscles in patients with TMD when compared to healthy subjects while executing the craniocervical flexion test (P = 0.07). However, clinically important effect sizes (0.42 - 0.82) were found. Subjects with TMD presented with reduced cervical flexor as well as extensor muscle endurance while performing the flexor and extensor muscle endurance tests when compared to healthy individuals. Subjects with Temporomandibular Disorders presented with impairments of the cervical flexors and extensors muscles. These results could help guide clinicians in the assessment and prescription of more effective interventions for individuals with Temporomandibular Disorders.

  2. Treatment of temporomandibular myofascial pain with deep dry needling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Perez, Luis-Miguel; Infante-Cossio, Pedro; Granados-Nuñez, Mercedes; Urresti-Lopez, Francisco-Javier

    2012-09-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the usefulness of deep dry needling in the treatment of temporomandibular myofascial pain. We selected 36 patients with myofascial pain located in the external pterygoid muscle (30 women/6 men, mean age=27 years with SD±6.5). We studied differences in pain with a visual analog scale and range of mandibular movements before and after intervention. We found a statistically significant relationship (p<0.01) between therapeutic intervention and the improvement of pain and jaw movements, which continued up to 6 months after treatment. Pain reduction was greater the higher was the intensity of pain at baseline. Although further studies are needed, our findings suggest that deep dry needling in the trigger point in the external pterygoid muscle can be effective in the management of patients with myofascial pain located in that muscle.

  3. TENS and low-level laser therapy in the management of temporomandibular disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Melissa Thiemi Kato; Evelyn Mikaela Kogawa; Carlos Neanes Santos; Paulo César Rodrigues Conti

    2006-01-01

    Pain relief and reestablishment of normal jaw function are the main goals of conservative management of Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and laser therapy are part of these modalities, although little is known about their real efficacy in controlled studies. This research compared these two treatments in a sample of 18 patients with chronic TMD of muscular origin, divided into two groups (LASER and TENS). Treatment consisted of ten sessions...

  4. Temporomandibular joint osteochondromatosis: an unusual cause of preauricular swelling.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Phelan, Eimear

    2012-02-01

    We report an unusual and rare cause of preauricular swelling and review the most recent literature concerning synovial osteochondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint. We report the clinical and radiologic findings of a case of synovial osteochondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint that presented as preauricular swelling in a female patient. This disease typically affects large joints; fewer than 100 cases reported in the literature affect the temporomandibular joint. This case illustrates that disorders of the temporomandibular joint should also be included in the differential diagnosis of patients who present with a preauricular mass.

  5. In search of income reference points for SLCA using a country level sustainability benchmark (part 1): fair inequality. A contribution to the Oiconomy project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croes, Pim R.; Vermeulen, Walter J. V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper is part 1 of our twin articles on income reference points for Social Life Cycle Assessment (SLCA). Preventative costs based LCA systems, such as the EcoCost system and the Oiconomy system, need targets (performance reference points) to determine the marginal preventative costs,

  6. A collaborative approach between chiropractic and dentistry to address temporomandibular dysfunction: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubis, Lisa M; Rubis, David; Winchester, Brett

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this case report is to describe the chiropractic and dental comanagement of a patient with temporomandibular dysfunction, headaches, and myalgia. A 38-year-old black female patient presented for chiropractic care with a chief concern of jaw pain, tinnitus, headaches, and neck and shoulder soreness of 8 months' duration. The patient rated the pain a 6/10. The patient had a maximum mouth opening of 42 mm, graphed evidence of disk displacement, loss of translation on opening of the right temporomandibular joint viewed on the lateral radiograph, and numerous areas of point tenderness on the Kinnie-Funt Chief Complaint Visual Index. She had decreased lateral cervical flexion. Dental treatment consisted of an anterior repositioning splint. Chiropractic care consisted of Activator treatment to the pelvis and the thoracic and cervical spine. Manual manipulation of the temporomandibular joint was performed along with a soft tissue technique intraorally on the lateral pterygoid. Postisometric relaxation in the head and neck region was also done. The patient was treated 6 times over 3 weeks. At the end of treatment, the patient had a pain rating of 0/10, maximum mouth opening of 49 mm, no tender points on the follow-up Kinnie-Funt, and increased cervical range of motion. The patient demonstrated increased mouth opening, decreased pain rating, improved Kinnie-Funt visual index, and an increased cervical lateral flexion range of motion after 3 weeks of a combination of chiropractic and dental care.

  7. Temporomandibular joint ankylosis in child: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul J Hegde

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ is an intracapsular union of the disc-condyle complex to the temporal articular surface that restricts mandibular movements, including the fibrous adhesions or bony fusion between condyle, disc, glenoid fossa, and eminence. It is a serious and disabling condition that may cause problems in mastication, digestion, speech, appearance, and hygiene. Case Report: This report describes a case of a 12-year-old girl with inability to open her mouth, diagnosed with unilateral right bony TMJ ankylosis. The surgical approach consisted of gap arthroplasty with interpositional temporalis muscle flap followed by vigorous physiotherapy. Conclusion: The treatment of TMJ ankylosis poses a significant challenge because of technical difficulties and a high incidence of recurrence. Its treatment includes the orthodontist, oral and maxillofacial surgeon, pediatric dentist, and psychologist and physical therapist as part of the healthcare team.

  8. Diagnosis and treatment of temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauer, Robert L; Semidey, Michael J

    2015-03-15

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are a heterogeneous group of musculoskeletal and neuromuscular conditions involving the temporomandibular joint complex, and surrounding musculature and osseous components. TMD affects up to 15% of adults, with a peak incidence at 20 to 40 years of age. TMD is classified as intra-articular or extra-articular. Common symptoms include jaw pain or dysfunction, earache, headache, and facial pain. The etiology of TMD is multifactorial and includes biologic, environmental, social, emotional, and cognitive triggers. Diagnosis is most often based on history and physical examination. Diagnostic imaging may be beneficial when malocclusion or intra-articular abnormalities are suspected. Most patients improve with a combination of noninvasive therapies, including patient education, self-care, cognitive behavior therapy, pharmacotherapy, physical therapy, and occlusal devices. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and muscle relaxants are recommended initially, and benzodiazepines or antidepressants may be added for chronic cases. Referral to an oral and maxillofacial surgeon is indicated for refractory cases.

  9. A Disfunção Temporomandibular

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Mariana Nunes de Almeida e

    2016-01-01

    Trabalho final do 6º ano médico com vista à atribuição do grau de mestre (área científica de estomatologia) no âmbito do ciclo de estudos de Mestrado Integrado em Medicina. A disfunção temporomandibular (DTM) é uma condição clínica cada vez mais prevalente na sociedade atual e com grande impacto na vida dos doentes. Caracteriza-se por uma série de problemas clínicos que envolvem os músculos da mastigação, a articulação temporomandibular e as estruturas associadas. É considerada uma entidad...

  10. Temporomandibular disorders: the habitual chewing side syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana-Mora, Urbano; López-Cedrún, José; Mora, María J; Otero, Xosé L; Santana-Penín, Urbano

    2013-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders are the most common cause of chronic orofacial pain, but, except where they occur subsequent to trauma, their cause remains unknown. This cross-sectional study assessed chewing function (habitual chewing side) and the differences of the chewing side and condylar path and lateral anterior guidance angles in participants with chronic unilateral temporomandibular disorder. This is the preliminary report of a randomized trial that aimed to test the effect of a new occlusal adjustment therapy. The masticatory function of 21 randomly selected completely dentate participants with chronic temporomandibular disorders (all but one with unilateral symptoms) was assessed by observing them eat almonds, inspecting the lateral horizontal movement of the jaw, with kinesiography, and by means of interview. The condylar path in the sagittal plane and the lateral anterior guidance angles with respect to the Frankfort horizontal plane in the frontal plane were measured on both sides in each individual. Sixteen of 20 participants with unilateral symptoms chewed on the affected side; the concordance (Fisher's exact test, P = .003) and the concordance-symmetry level (Kappa coefficient κ = 0.689; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.38 to 0.99; P = .002) were significant. The mean condylar path angle was steeper (53.47(10.88) degrees versus 46.16(7.25) degrees; P = .001), and the mean lateral anterior guidance angle was flatter (41.63(13.35) degrees versus 48.32(9.53) degrees P = .036) on the symptomatic side. The results of this study support the use of a new term based on etiology, "habitual chewing side syndrome", instead of the nonspecific symptom-based "temporomandibular joint disorders"; this denomination is characterized in adults by a steeper condylar path, flatter lateral anterior guidance, and habitual chewing on the symptomatic side.

  11. Factores de riesgo asociados a trastornos temporomandibulares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth de la Torre Rodríguez

    Full Text Available Introducción: los trastornos temporomandibulares conforman un conjunto de condiciones músculo-esqueléticas que afectan la articulación temporomandibular, músculos de la masticación y estructuras anatómicas adyacentes; complejas y moldeadas por diversos factores de riesgo interactuantes. Resulta de gran valor el conocimiento de los mismos para poder actuar sobre ellos e impedir la aparición y/o agravamiento de la enfermedad. Objetivo: caracterizar a la población objeto de estudio según las variables sociodemográficas: edad y sexo, factores precipitantes, hábitos parafuncionales y trastornos oclusales. Métodos: se realizó un estudio observacional, descriptivo, de corte transversal, en el Hospital Clinicoquirúrgico Universitario «Miguel Enríquez», en una población constituida por 181 pacientes que acudieron a la Consulta Multidisciplinaria de Atención Integral de la articulación temporomandibular en el período comprendido de enero del 2010 a enero del 2012. Resultados: del total de pacientes, 133 pertenecían al sexo femenino, para un 73 %. El grupo de edades de 25-35 años estuvo representado por 45 pacientes para un 24 %. En el 79 % se observó bruxismo, en el 24 % interposición lingual en tanto que el 52 % presentó dientes ausentes no restituidos. Conclusiones: el sexo predominante fue el femenino y el grupo de edades más representado es el de 25-35 años. El factor predisponente que más se observó fue los dientes ausentes no restituidos protésicamente. El factor precipitante que predominó fue el bruxismo y no se observaron factores perpetuantes de los trastornos temporomandibulares.

  12. Comprehensive treatment of temporomandibular joint disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navrátil, Leos; Navratil, Vaclav; Hajkova, Simona; Hlinakova, Petra; Dostalova, Tatjana; Vranová, Jana

    2014-01-01

    Changing lifestyles, decreasing physical activity, which is increasing the number of degenerative joint diseases of various etiology, and certain dental procedures are increasing the number of patients complaining of pain in their temporomandibular joints. The aim of the study was to assess the benefits of comprehensive physiotherapy sessions in order to decrease the number of temporomandibular joint problems, thereby improving the patient's quality of life. An examination by a dentist determined each patient's treatment plan, which consisted of a medical exam, physical therapy and education. Each form of treatment was applied 10 times at intervals of 7-14 days. The main goal of the therapeutic physical education was to redress the muscle imbalance in the mandibular joint. This was achieved by restoring balance between the masticatory muscles, along with releasing the spastic shrouds found in the masticatory muscles. The aim of education was to teach the patient exercises focused on the temporomandibular joint and masticatory muscles. The intensity of the exercises and their composition were individually adjusted and adapted to their current state. Physical therapy consisted of the application of pulsed magnetic therapy, laser therapy, and non-invasive positive thermotherapy. The above procedure was conducted on a therapeutic group of 24 patients (3 men and 20 women). In the course of therapy, there were no complications, and all patients adhered to the prescribed regime. None reported any side effects. The mean treatment duration was 123 +/- 66 days. The outcome of the therapy was evaluated as described in the methodology, the degree of pain affecting the joint, and the opening ability of the mouth. In both parameters, there was a significant decline in patient pain. In a study devoted to tactics of rehabilitation treatment for temporomandibular joint disorders, the need for comprehensive long-term therapy, involving education, and learning proper chewing habits

  13. Temporomandibular disorders: the habitual chewing side syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urbano Santana-Mora

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Temporomandibular disorders are the most common cause of chronic orofacial pain, but, except where they occur subsequent to trauma, their cause remains unknown. This cross-sectional study assessed chewing function (habitual chewing side and the differences of the chewing side and condylar path and lateral anterior guidance angles in participants with chronic unilateral temporomandibular disorder. This is the preliminary report of a randomized trial that aimed to test the effect of a new occlusal adjustment therapy. METHODS: The masticatory function of 21 randomly selected completely dentate participants with chronic temporomandibular disorders (all but one with unilateral symptoms was assessed by observing them eat almonds, inspecting the lateral horizontal movement of the jaw, with kinesiography, and by means of interview. The condylar path in the sagittal plane and the lateral anterior guidance angles with respect to the Frankfort horizontal plane in the frontal plane were measured on both sides in each individual. RESULTS: Sixteen of 20 participants with unilateral symptoms chewed on the affected side; the concordance (Fisher's exact test, P = .003 and the concordance-symmetry level (Kappa coefficient κ = 0.689; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.38 to 0.99; P = .002 were significant. The mean condylar path angle was steeper (53.47(10.88 degrees versus 46.16(7.25 degrees; P = .001, and the mean lateral anterior guidance angle was flatter (41.63(13.35 degrees versus 48.32(9.53 degrees P = .036 on the symptomatic side. DISCUSSION: The results of this study support the use of a new term based on etiology, "habitual chewing side syndrome", instead of the nonspecific symptom-based "temporomandibular joint disorders"; this denomination is characterized in adults by a steeper condylar path, flatter lateral anterior guidance, and habitual chewing on the symptomatic side.

  14. Trastornos temporomandibulares en pacientes con maloclusiones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Soto Cantero

    Full Text Available Introducción: existe una prevalencia de trastornos oclusales en gran medida relacionados con la presencia de disfunción temporomandibular. Objetivo: determinar el grado de disfunción temporomandibular según el Índice de Maglione en correspondencia con la prevalencia de maloclusiones en el área de salud del policlínico "Turcios Lima". Métodos: se realizó un estudio observacional descriptivo, de corte transversal, en la consulta de ortodoncia, de junio del 2008 a junio del 2009. De un universo constituido por los 280 pacientes que acudieron al servicio de ortodoncia en el período señalado con presencia de maloclusiones, se seleccionó una muestra de 84 pacientes por muestreo aleatorio simple, teniendo en cuenta los criterios de inclusión y exclusión realizados por criterios de expertos. Resultados: presentaban disfunción temporomandibular 74 pacientes y dentro de ellos 44 (52,4 % tenían disfunción grado II (Moderada. El 97 % de los pacientes con relación molar de clase II, presentaban disfunción temporomandibular. El 42,9 % de los pacientes con una maloclusión, presentaban disfunción grado I. El 60 % de los pacientes con dos maloclusiones presentaban disfunción grado II y el 66,7 % de los pacientes con tres maloclusiones, presentaban disfunción grado III. La mayor cantidad de pacientes tuvieron disfunción grado II (Moderada. Conclusiones: el mayor por ciento de los pacientes con disfunciones presentó una clase II molar y a medida que aumentó el número de maloclusiones aumentó también la severidad de la disfunción.

  15. Temporomandibular joint disorders' impact on pain, function, and disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantaracherd, P; John, M T; Hodges, J S; Schiffman, E L

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the association between more advanced stages of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) intra-articular disorders ("TMJ intra-articular status"), representing a transition from normal joint structure to TMJ disc displacement with and without reduction (DDwR and DDwoR) to degenerative joint disease (DJD), and patient-reported outcomes of jaw pain, function, and disability ("TMD impact"). This cross-sectional study included 614 cases from the RDC/TMD Validation Project with at least one temporomandibular disorder (TMD) diagnosis. TMJ intra-articular status was determined by 3 blinded, calibrated radiologists using magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography as one of normal joint structure, DDwR, DDwoR, or DJD, representing the subject's most advanced TMJ diagnosis. TMD impact was conceptualized as a latent variable consisting of 1) pain intensity (Characteristic Pain Index from the Graded Chronic Pain Scale [GCPS]), 2) jaw function (Jaw Functional Limitation Scale), and 3) disability (Disability Points from GCPS). A structural equation model estimated the association of TMJ intra-articular status with the latent measure TMD impact as a correlation coefficient in all TMD cases (n = 614) and in cases with a TMD pain diagnosis (n = 500). The correlations between TMJ intra-articular status and TMD impact were 0.05 (95% confidence interval [CI], -0.04 to 0.13) for all TMD cases and 0.07 (95% CI, -0.04 to 0.17) for cases with a pain diagnosis, which are neither statistically significant nor clinically relevant. Conceptualizing worsening of TMJ intra-articular disorders as 4 stages and characterizing impact from TMD as a composite of jaw pain, function, and disability, this cross-sectional study found no clinically significant association. Models of TMJ intra-articular status other than ours (normal structure → DDwR → DDwoR → DJD) should be explored. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  16. Temporomandibular Joint Disorders’ Impact on Pain, Function, and Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantaracherd, P.; John, M.T.; Hodges, J.S.; Schiffman, E.L.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the association between more advanced stages of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) intra-articular disorders (“TMJ intra-articular status”), representing a transition from normal joint structure to TMJ disc displacement with and without reduction (DDwR and DDwoR) to degenerative joint disease (DJD), and patient-reported outcomes of jaw pain, function, and disability (“TMD impact”). This cross-sectional study included 614 cases from the RDC/TMD Validation Project with at least one temporomandibular disorder (TMD) diagnosis. TMJ intra-articular status was determined by 3 blinded, calibrated radiologists using magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography as one of normal joint structure, DDwR, DDwoR, or DJD, representing the subject’s most advanced TMJ diagnosis. TMD impact was conceptualized as a latent variable consisting of 1) pain intensity (Characteristic Pain Index from the Graded Chronic Pain Scale [GCPS]), 2) jaw function (Jaw Functional Limitation Scale), and 3) disability (Disability Points from GCPS). A structural equation model estimated the association of TMJ intra-articular status with the latent measure TMD impact as a correlation coefficient in all TMD cases (n = 614) and in cases with a TMD pain diagnosis (n = 500). The correlations between TMJ intra-articular status and TMD impact were 0.05 (95% confidence interval [CI], −0.04 to 0.13) for all TMD cases and 0.07 (95% CI, −0.04 to 0.17) for cases with a pain diagnosis, which are neither statistically significant nor clinically relevant. Conceptualizing worsening of TMJ intra-articular disorders as 4 stages and characterizing impact from TMD as a composite of jaw pain, function, and disability, this cross-sectional study found no clinically significant association. Models of TMJ intra-articular status other than ours (normal structure → DDwR → DDwoR → DJD) should be explored. PMID:25572112

  17. Lucia Jig - temporomandibular dysfunction promotes muscle relaxation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia Piccolo Pereira

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Assess whether the Lucia Jig is a device that promotes masticatory muscle relaxation in individuals with temporomandibular dysfunction. This study was carried out in three stages (interviews, clinical examination, and laboratory and participation of adult individuals, between 21 and 40 years of age, of both genders, who replied to the RDC/TMD questionnaire to diagnose muscular temporomandibular dysfunction. The Lucia Jig was prepared and electromyographic examination of the masseter and temporal muscles was performed bilaterally, in the postural condition of the mandibular at rest, after immediately installing the Lucia Jig in the oral cavity and at periods of 5, 10, 15, 20, and 30 min. The values obtained were compared using repeated measures (p < 0.05 over the entire duration of the experiment (0 to 30 min with the Lucia Jig. There was an increase in the normalized electromyographic signal of the masticatory muscles, with the use of the Lucia Jig over the period of 30 min, with no statistically significant difference. Based on the results of this study through electromyographic data, the device did not promote masticatory muscle relaxation in individuals with muscular temporomandibular dysfunction.

  18. MR diagnosis of temporomandibular joint. A study of joint effusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneda, Takashi; Yamashiro, Mitsuaki; Ozawa, Kaoru; Suzuki, Hiromi; Okada, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu [Nihon Univ., Matsudo, Chiba (Japan). School of Dentistry

    1998-03-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the relationship between correlation of MR joint effusion of the temporomandibular joint and disk position, to evaluate the relationship between joint effusion and aging, and to assess the frequency of MR joint effusion of bilateral temporomandibular joints. The temporomandibular joints of 192 patients with clinical symptoms of temporomandibular joint disorders were imaged bilaterally using high field, surface-coil MR imaging. Oblique sagittal and coronal proton density-weighted and T2-weighted images were obtained. Imaging findings of joint effusion were correlated with disk position, aging, and bilateral temporomandibular joints. MR showed effusion in 4% of the joints with normal superior disk position, 36% of the joints with disk displacement with reduction, and 45% of the joints with disk displacement without reduction. There were significant differences in the incidence of joint effusion between normal disk position and anterior disk displacement with or without reduction. Younger patients less than 40 years were significant higher the incidence of joint effusion than those of older patients. A significant association was seen between joint effusion and aging. MR showed effusion in 17% of the unilateral temporomandibular joint, 24% of the bilateral temporomandibular joints. There was no significant difference between unilateral and bilateral case. These results indicated that joint effusion using MR imaging was associated with varied temporomandibular joint pathologic states. (author)

  19. Diagnostic criteria for headache attributed to temporomandibular disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffman, Eric; Ohrbach, Richard; List, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We assessed and compared the diagnostic accuracy of two sets of diagnostic criteria for headache secondary to temporomandibular disorders (TMD).......We assessed and compared the diagnostic accuracy of two sets of diagnostic criteria for headache secondary to temporomandibular disorders (TMD)....

  20. The association between Occlusion Time and Temporomandibular Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldini, Alberto; Nota, Alessandro; Cozza, Paola

    2015-02-01

    Recently, some published studies show there is a multifactorial origin for Temporomandibular Disorders, but the dental occlusion's contribution to the development of Temporomandibular Disorders, and how it may influence the adaptive capacity of the Stomatognathic system, it's still unclear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the correlation between the Occlusion Time and Temporomandibular Disorders. A total of 54 patients were enrolled in the study (24 males and 30 females, mean age 27.94 ± 8.21 years). The TMD group (8 males and 10 females) consisted of subjects who presented with at least 1 of the following signs of Temporomandibular Disorders: Temporomandibular Joint sounds (clicking or crepitation), Temporomandibular Joint locking episodes, limited mandibular opening, painful limitation of mandibular movements, pain to palpation of the Temporomandibular Joint or of the masticatory muscles. The control group (16 males and 20 females) presented as free from Temporomandibular Disorders. The T-Scan III computerized occlusal analysis system was to record the subjects' Occlusion. Times during eight mandibular opening-closing movements. The two-ways ANOVA test analyzed the variations for group and sex, showing that the TMD group mean Occlusion Time (0.64 ± 0.21s) was statistically significantly longer than the control group mean Occlusion Time (0.45 ± 0.17s) (pTMJ problems has to be carefully considered as adjunctive instrumental device. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Vertical Craniofacial Morphology and its Relation to Temporomandibular Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavia, Paula Furlan; Rodrigues Garcia, Renata Cunha Matheus

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the association between craniofacial morphology and temporomandibular disorders in adults. The influence of different craniofacial morphologies on painful temporomandibular disorders was also evaluated. A total of 200 subjects were selected, including 100 with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and 100 without TMD (control), diagnosed by research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders. All subjects were submitted to lateral cephalometric radiographs, and classified as brachyfacial, mesofacial, or dolichofacial by Ricketts' analysis. Data were analysed by Tukey-Kramer and Chi-square tests. No association between craniofacial morphology and TMD was found (P = 0.6622). However, brachyfacial morphology influences the presence of painful TMD (P = 0.0077). Craniofacial morphology is not related to temporomandibular disorders in general.

  2. Repeated tender point injections of granisetron alleviate chronic myofascial pain - a randomized, controlled, double-blinded trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Christidis, Nikolaos; Omrani, Shahin; Fredriksson, Lars; Gjelset, Mattias; Louca, Sofia; Hedenberg-Magnusson, Britt; Ernberg, Malin

    2015-01-01

    .... The aim of this study was to investigate if repeated intramuscular tender-point injections of the 5-HT3-antagonist granisetron alleviate pain in patients with myofascial temporomandibular disorders (M-TMD...

  3. Assessment of the relationship between stress and temporomandibular joint disorder in female students before university entrance exam (Konkour exam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mottaghi

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: The parallel increase of temporomandibular disorders and anxiety between the two stages can suggest a possible relationship between anxiety and temporomandibular disorders. Therefore, the effect of anxiety in triggering temporomandibular disorder symptoms is probable.

  4. Voz e disfunção temporomandibular em professores Voice and temporomandibular joint disorders in teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilza Maria Machado

    2009-12-01

    -reported speech pathological, medical and dental evaluation data. METHODS: 29 public school teachers from the city of Sorocaba - SP took part in this study. The teachers filled out a questionnaire about vocal disorders and on TMJD. The four following assessments were performed: auditory-perceptive, ENT medical assessment, oral-facial mobility, and a dental assessment. The mentioning about three or more symptoms in the questionnaire determined 'presence' of vocal and TMJD complaint. Both auditory-perceptive and ENT evaluations concluded whether there was 'presence' of voice and laryngeal disorders. TMJD was considered present when three or more signs or symptoms, necessarily including pain, were registered during oral-facial mobility and dental assessments. For statistical analysis of the data the following tests were applied: Two Proportions Equality Test, Fischer's Exact Test and Kappa Agreement Test. RESULTS: among the participating subjects, 82.8% reported having a vocal disorder, and 62.1% reported TMJD symptoms; 51.7% showed vocal disorders in ENT evaluation, and 65.5% had TMJD according to dental assessments. When comparing vocal and TMJ disorder assessments, a significant correlation was present for auditory-perceptual and oral-facial mobility for TMJD, with a tendency towards significance also when applying the questionnaire. CONCLUSION: the results point towards confirming the presence of TMJ and vocal disorders in the group of teachers in this research, as well as positive correlations between these two disorders.

  5. Sensibilidade dolorosa à palpação em pacientes com disfunção temporomandibular crônica Sensibilidad dolorosa a la palpación en pacientes con disfunción temporomandibular crónica Painful sensitivity to palpation in patients presenting with chronic temporomandibular dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lúcia Franco

    2011-12-01

    , assessment and grouping of muscular and articular areas for palpation were carried out according to the Diagnostic Criteria for above mentioned disorders, considering bilaterally the masseter muscle, the temporalis muscle, the cervical region and the temporomandibular joint. Sample included 213 (88.0 % of women and 29 (12.0 % men with a mean age of 37.41 years. The mean of number of zones positive to palpation in the groups without headaches, tension headache, migraine and daily chronic headache were: 12.43, 14.38, 15.21 and 15.62 (p= 0.107 (min 2 max 22. The areas of temporalis muscle showed significant differences among groups (p= 0.007. The number of painful points was not statistically different among groups and only in the temporalis muscle there were differences with statistical significant to palpation.

  6. In search of income reference points for SLCA using a country level sustainability benchmark (part 2): fair minimum wage. A contribution to the Oiconomy project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croes, Pim R.; Vermeulen, Walter J. V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper is part 2 of our twin articles on income reference points for social life cycle assessment (SLCA). The purpose of this article is to provide a well-founded fair minimum wage standard, which enables the determination of the preventative costs for the impact category of unfair

  7. Ultrasonographic findings in normal temporomandibular joints Achados ultra-sonográficos em articulações temporomandibulares normais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Melhem Elias

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine some ultrasonographic standards of temporomandibular joints with normally positioned discs. Nineteen patients from 18 to 45 years old (average age: 27.4 years; 16 females and 3 males, with history of orofacial pain, but without clinical or radiological signs of disc displacement, underwent ultrasonography (US and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI for the examination of their joints. In 30 joints, the distance between the most lateral point of the articular capsule and the most lateral point of the mandibular condyle (lateral capsule-condyle distance was measured, as well as the distance between the most anterior point of the articular capsule and the most anterior point of the mandibular condyle (anterior capsule-condyle distance. In the closed-mouth position, the average values found for the lateral capsule-condyle distance were 1.4 mm and 1.6 mm, respectively in the longitudinal (coronal and transverse (axial scans. In the open-mouth position, the average distance was 1.2 mm, in both longitudinal (coronal and transverse (axial scans. The average values found for the anterior capsule-condyle distance were 2.3 mm in the closed-mouth position and 1.1 mm in the open-mouth position, both in transverse (axial scans. Intra-examiner agreement, measured in terms of the intraclass correlation coefficient, varied from 0.83 to 0.93. We believe that this study can contribute to the validation of US as a diagnostic method for temporomandibular joint disorders, provided that the obtained measurements be used in future studies as normal reference values.Este estudo teve o objetivo de determinar alguns padrões ultra-sonográficos de articulações temporomandibulares com discos normalmente posicionados. Dezenove pacientes com 18 a 45 anos de idade (média de 27,4 anos, sendo 16 do sexo feminino e 3 do masculino, com queixa de dor orofacial, mas sem sinais clínicos ou radiológicos de deslocamento do disco, foram

  8. Psychosocial Profiles of Temporomandibular Disorder Pain Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kothari, Simple Futarmal; Baad-Hansen, Lene; Svensson, Peter

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: To propose a visual method to screen and assess psychosocial functioning in temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain patients in comparison with age- and gender-matched healthy controls by forming individual profiles and to evaluate the association between psychosocial profiles and quantitative...... scores were analyzed with t tests. T scores of psychosocial parameters and z scores of QST parameters were correlated using Spearman's correlation (ρ). RESULTS: Most (96.6%) TMD pain patients exhibited one or more parameters indicative of psychosocial distress, with psychological disability scores being...

  9. Atypical temporomandibular joint pain: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmer, Charles G; Wold, Courtney C; Stoll, Ethan M; Dolwick, M Franklin

    2014-12-01

    Atypical temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain can consist of an unusual intensity, location or set of pain descriptors that do not match what is traditionally observed for TMJ capsular pain, disc displacements or arthritic conditions. Presented in this case report is an atypical pain report regarding a unilateral TMJ pain as the chief complaint. An overview of typical vs atypical TMJ pain is also reviewed to highlight unusual signs and symptoms so that the clinician can identify these atypical presentations and pursue further diagnostic approaches. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Temporo-mandibular joints and orthognathic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouletreau, P

    2016-09-01

    Temporo-Mandibular Joints (TMJ) and orthognathic surgery are closely linked. In the past, some authors have even described (with mixed results) the correction of some dysmorphosis through direct procedures on the TMJs. Nowadays, performing orthognathic surgery involves the TMJ in three different occasions: (1) TMJ disorders potentially responsible for dento-maxillary dysmorphosis, (2) effects of orthognathic surgery on TMJs, and (3) condylar positioning methods in orthognathic surgery. These three chapters are developed in order to focus on the close relationships between TMJ and orthognathic surgery. Some perspectives close this article. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of Watsu therapy on psychological aspects and quality of life of patients with temporomandibular disorder: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Barbosa, Gustavo Augusto Seabra; Rocha,Cibele Oliveira de Melo; RESENDE,Camila Maria Bastos Machado de; SALES,Kelly Verônica de Melo

    2014-01-01

    Watsu therapy is a water relaxation intervention technique performed individually in a warm pool with music and peaceful settings involving harmonious rotational movements, stretching, tractions on the joints and pressures at the points of muscle tension. This study evaluated the effect of Watsu therapy on psychological aspects (anxiety and minor psychiatric disorders) and on the quality of life of a patient with temporomandibular disorders. The patient answered three questionnaires: STAI (St...

  12. O uso da crioterapia no tratamento das disfunções temporomandibulares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Maria Moreira Moraes Furlan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Esta pesquisa teve por objetivo realizar uma revisão integrativa sobre a produção científica referente ao uso da crioterapia no tratamento das disfunções temporomandibulares, caracterizando as técnicas utilizadas, duração de aplicação da técnica, área estimulada e frequência de realização. Foi realizado um levantamento da literatura nas bases de dados Medline, LILACS, SciELO, Biblioteca Cochrane e IBECS. Os termos utilizados foram: crioterapia,temperatura baixa, transferência de calor, hipotermia induzida, articulação temporomandibular, transtornos da articulação temporomandibular, síndrome da disfunção da articulação temporomandibular e seus correspondentes em inglês e espanhol. Foram incluídos artigos que abordaram a crioterapia no tratamento das disfunções temporomandibulares, publicados em inglês, espanhol ou português, no período de 1980 a 2013. Foram considerados: técnica de aplicação, duração de aplicação, área corporal e frequência de realização. Inicialmente foram encontrados 34 estudos, dos quais 13 contemplaram os critérios de seleção propostos. Os dados foram tabulados e apresentados em ordem cronológica. A retirada do calor corporal pode ser realizada por meio da aplicação de compressas frias, bolsas com agentes frios ou aerossóis refrigerantes, aplicados sobre as áreas dolorosas, sobre regiões musculares com "trigger points", ou sobre músculos mastigatórios. O tempo médio de aplicação do estímulo variou de 10 a 15 minutos para as bolsas com agentes frios e cerca de 10 segundos no caso do spray refrigerante, repetindo-se cerca de 2 a 4 vezes por dia, precedendo as técnicas de alongamento muscular. A literatura não apresenta um consenso quanto à intensidade do estímulo térmico.

  13. Exercícios terapêuticos nas desordens temporomandibulares: uma revisão de literatura Therapeutic exercises in temporomandibular disorders: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sâmia Amire Maluf

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A articulação temporomandibular faz parte do sistema estomatognático que, junto com os dentes, periodonto, coluna cervical, crânio e cintura escapular, é responsável pela mastigação, fonação, deglutição, respiração e expressão facial. Exercícios terapêuticos têm sido empregados na reabilitação e prevenção das disfunções temporomandibulares (DTM. Este estudo teve como objetivo revisar a literatura a respeito, verificando a eficácia dos exercícios terapêuticos nas DTM. Foram examinados periódicos do período entre 1991 e agosto de 2008, nas bases de dados Medline, Lilacs e Pubmed, utilizando as palavras-chave "desordem temporomandibular", "terapia por exercícios" e as correspondentes em inglês. Foram selecionados relatos de caso, artigos de revisão e ensaios clínicos com mais de 20 pacientes, num total de 53 artigos. A maioria relatou efeitos positivos na redução da dor, melhora da mobilidade e dos aspectos psicológicos, sugerindo que os exercícios podem contribuir no tratamento da DTM. Entretanto, o tipo, tempo de duração, número de repetições, freqüência e intensidade dos exercícios não está bem descrita. A falta de padronização das pesquisas, bem como da forma de avaliar, dificultam a comparação dos resultados. Mais estudos com métodos padronizados devem ser estimulados.The temporomandibular joint is part of the stomatognathic system, which comprises a complex set of orofacial structures, including teeth, cervical spine, cranium and shoulder. The system is responsible for masticatory, phonation, and deglutition functions, as well as for breathing and facial expression. Physical therapy exercises have been used for rehabilitation and prevention of temporomandibular disorders (TMD. The purpose of this study was to review studies on the subject and assess the effectiveness of physical therapy exercises for TMD. Case reports, review articles, and clinical trials with more than 20 patients

  14. Nutritional Assessment of U.S. Military Academy Cadets at West Point: Part 2. Assessment of Nutritional Intake

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-06

    that represented different pizza sizes, and (M) smaller food items with a circular shape (e.g., cookies, p.ncakes); paperboard shapes (A) that...Ham Assorted Cereals Danish Braid Pineapple -Cherry Sauce Scrambled Eggs Assorted Jellies/Honey Buttered Macaroni Breakfast Steak Yogurt Bar Broccoli...Any City Pizza Philadelphia, Pa. Colonial Hotel New Haven, Conn. Cooking Class (Officers’ Club) West Point Coolidge Comer Pub Brookline, Mass. Corrib

  15. Feasibility Study for Using a Linear Transverse Flux Machine as part of the Structure of Point Absorber Wave Energy Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilana Pereira da Costa Cunha

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This is a feasibility study for the generation of wave energy by means of a transverse flux machine connected to a device for converting wave energy known as Point Absorber. The article contains literature review on the topic and analysis of data obtained by means of a prototype built in the laboratory. Based on the results, the study concludes that this use is feasible.

  16. Temporomandibular joint: disorders, treatments, and biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingawalé, Shirish; Goswami, Tarun

    2009-05-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a complex, sensitive, and highly mobile joint. Millions of people suffer from temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in USA alone. The TMD treatment options need to be looked at more fully to assess possible improvement of the available options and introduction of novel techniques. As reconstruction with either partial or total joint prosthesis is the potential treatment option in certain TMD conditions, it is essential to study outcomes of the FDA approved TMJ implants in a controlled comparative manner. Evaluating the kinetics and kinematics of the TMJ enables the understanding of structure and function of normal and diseased TMJ to predict changes due to alterations, and to propose more efficient methods of treatment. Although many researchers have conducted biomechanical analysis of the TMJ, many of the methods have certain limitations. Therefore, a more comprehensive analysis is necessary for better understanding of different movements and resulting forces and stresses in the joint components. This article provides the results of a state-of-the-art investigation of the TMJ anatomy, TMD, treatment options, a review of the FDA approved TMJ prosthetic devices, and the TMJ biomechanics.

  17. Using City Branding as the Part of the Intersection Point of Modernization and Tradition. Case Study: Surakarta City (Solo, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nursanty Eko

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available To recognize a city is part of a city branding effort. By recognizing the dwelling, the city's inhabitants are able to create a spatial space in accordance with their easily recognizable cultural identity. In city branding, the memory of a city space is often the main ingredient in strengthening the identity. The efforts to use place making forces at this time are often used to solve the failures in multi-cultural spaces. Evolution in history is part of dynamic space planning as part of the identity of a city.The purpose of this research is to reveal the relationship between the formation of tradition spaces that are able to function in a modern way. The pattern of this relationship will produce spatial planning patterns with special characters as well. Humans as space users play a very big role as a space builder, where the decisions they make are often based on the tradition they have used for generations.The methods used in this study are qualitative, deductive using the theories that have been there before. Field research is used as empirical data in the form of interviews, photographs and field observations was conducted in various existing city spaces in Solo with the purpose to discover the existence of distinctive spatial patterns based on the typical behavior that has been passed down continuously as a result of the cultural process. The resulting discovery is a significant pattern of relationships between humans and their decision-making abilities in city space. This decision is based on self-awareness as part of the space they occupy. In a group, this awareness is part of the tradition's heritage that continues to develop in accordance with the human intellectual development.

  18. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3940 Total temporomandibular joint... implanted in the human jaw to replace the mandibular condyle and augment the glenoid fossa to functionally...

  19. Ultrastructural characteristics of the synovial membrane in osteoarthritic temporomandibular joints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkgraaf, LC; Liem, RSB; deBont, LGM

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: This study analyzed the ultrastructural characteristics of the synovial membrane in various stages of osteoarthritis (OA) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), and developed a classification of this involvement based on these morphologic characteristics. Patients and Methods: Synovial

  20. Therapeutic outcome assessment in permanent temporomandibular joint disc displacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kropmans, TJB; Dijkstra, PU; Stegenga, B; De Bont, LGM

    In permanent temporomandibular disc displacement (TMJ-DD) outcome studies many authors claim positive effects of arthroscopic surgery, arthrocentesis and physical therapy. This literature review was undertaken to analyse whether the claimed effects are based on acceptable methodology. The recorded

  1. Oral splint for temporomandibular joint disorders with revolutionary fluid system

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Srivastava, Rahul; Jyoti, Bhuvan; Devi, Parvathi

    2013-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) diseases and disorders refer to a complex and poorly understood set of conditions, manifested by pain in the area of the jaw and associated muscles and limitations in the ability to make the normal...

  2. Effects of several temporomandibular disorders on the stress distributions of temporomandibular joint: a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhan; Qian, Yingli; Zhang, Yuanli; Fan, Yubo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate stress distributions in the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) for comparison with healthy TMJs. A model of mandible and normal TMJs was developed according to CT images. The interfaces between the discs and the articular cartilages were treated as contact elements. Nonlinear cable elements were used to simulate disc attachments. Based on this model, seven models of various TMDs were established. The maximum stresses of the discs with anterior, posterior, medial and lateral disc displacement (ADD, PDD, MDD and LDD) were 12.09, 9.33, 10.71 and 6.07 times magnitude of the identically normal disc, respectively. The maximum stresses of the posterior articular eminences in ADD, PDD, MDD, LDD, relaxation of posterior attachments and disc perforation models were 21, 59, 46, 21, 13 and 15 times greater than the normal model, respectively. TMDs could cause increased stresses in the discs and posterior articular eminences.

  3. TEMPOROMANDIBULAR DISORDERS IN SCUBA DIVERS DURING DIVING CERTIFICATION TRAINING PROGRAMME

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZTÜRK, Özmen; Tek, Mustafa; Seven, Hüseyin

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The design of a diving regulator's mouth-piece is known to increase the risk of a temporomandibular disorder (TMD) in SCUBA divers. The total weight of a diving regulator is reflected directly on the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) causing articular and periarticular problems. In this study, the prevalence of TMD in SCUBA divers having a training for diving certification is investigated. We also aimed to determine the factors that lead to TMD, and clarify the observation that there i...

  4. Current panorama of temporomandibular disorders' field in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Naila Aparecida de Godoi; Lima, Fernanda Ferruzzi; Conti, Paulo César Rodrigues

    2014-06-01

    In 2012, the recognition of the specialty of Temporomandibular Disorders and Orofacial Pain completed ten years. Given this scenario, it is extremely important to track the current situation of this field of knowledge in Brazil, specifically in the area of research and training. We hope to discuss the importance of the recognition of this specialty and the inclusion of these subjects in undergraduate programs in Dentistry. The objective of this study is to perform a bibliometric survey of researches regarding Temporomandibular Disorders and Orofacial Pain conducted in the country, determine the number of specialization courses in Orofacial Pain and the number of specialists in the field. The bibliometric survey was conducted based on the Dissertations Portal of Coordination for the Improvement of Higher education Personnel (CAPES) and on PubMed. The panorama of the field of Orofacial Pain and Temporomandibular disorders in Brazil was determined by searching on the website of the Brazilian Council of Dentistry. We found 731 theses and dissertations with Temporomandibular Disorders and Orofacial Pain as the main subjects; 81 accredited/recognized Courses on Orofacial Pain and Temporomandibular Dysfunction completed; 8 accredited/recognized Specialization Courses on Orofacial Pain and Temporomandibular Dysfunction still in progress, and 1,064 registered specialists in Orofacial Pain and Temporomandibular Dysfunction in the Brazilian Council of Dentistry. Search in the PUBMED database yielded 576 articles published with the participation of Brazilian researchers as first authors and/or co-authors in the period from 2000 to 2013. From this amount, only 5 were published in Portuguese, while all the others were published in english. We can also notice that the number of published articles increases over time. The number of researches related to temporomandibular disorders has increased over the last ten years, as well as the number of specialization courses and the number

  5. Surgical Management of Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis in Ankylosing Spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M. Felstead

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Relatively few patients develop such severe degenerative temporomandibular joint (TMJ disease that they require total joint replacement. Current indications include those conditions involving condylar bone loss such as degenerative (osteoarthritis or inflammatory joint disease (ankylosing spondylitis, rheumatoid, and psoriatic. Ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ secondary to ankylosing spondylitis remains an under investigated entity. We aim to provide an overview of treatment objectives, surgical procedures, and our experience with total TMJ replacement for this condition.

  6. Signs and symptoms of Temporomandibular Disorders in the elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Camacho, José Gustavo Dala Déa; Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa Pedron; Navarro, Ricardo de Lima; Conti, Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira; Conti, Marcio Rodrigues de Almeida; Marchiori, Luciana Lozza de Moraes; Fernandes, Karen Barros Parron

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the prevalence of Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) in the elderly and its association with palpation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), masticatory and cervical muscles as well as the presence of headache and joint noises. Methods: The sample consisted of 200 elderly of both genders (mean age: 69.2±5.7 years). The clinical evaluation of TMD signs and symptoms was divided into three stages: an anamnestic questionnaire, a TMJ evaluation, and a muscular ...

  7. Signs and symptoms of Temporomandibular Disorders in the elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Camacho,José Gustavo Dala Déa; Oltramari-Navarro,Paula Vanessa Pedron; Navarro,Ricardo de Lima; Conti,Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira; Conti,Marcio Rodrigues de Almeida; Marchiori,Luciana Lozza de Moraes; Fernandes,Karen Barros Parron

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the prevalence of Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) in the elderly and its association with palpation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), masticatory and cervical muscles as well as the presence of headache and joint noises. Methods: The sample consisted of 200 elderly of both genders (mean age: 69.2±5.7 years). The clinical evaluation of TMD signs and symptoms was divided into three stages: an anamnestic questionnaire, a TMJ evaluation, and a musc...

  8. The Manifestations and the Treatment of Temporomandibular Disorders in Patients with Chronic Whiplash-associated Disorders Grades 2 and 3

    OpenAIRE

    Klobas, Luciano

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of this project was to encircle the subtype of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) present in patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorders (WAD) and study the debut of TMD symptoms, the provoking factors and the outcome of conservative TMD treatments. The results could add to the aetiological discussion about TMD mainly as being part of chronic WAD pain or not. The subjects were referred patients with chronic WAD at a specialized rehabilitation centre where they were diagnos...

  9. A Radiographic Study of the Mandibular Asymmetry in Temporomandibular Disorder Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Sung Uk; You Dong Soo [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-08-15

    The purse of this study was to observe the relationship between mandibular asymmetry and Temporomandibular Disorders by means of the cephalometry using the posteroanterior cephalogram and the submentovertex cephalogram which were taken in 35 Temporomandibular Disorder patients and 35 normal persons ranged from 20S to 30S. The results were as follows: 1. The angulation which was formed by the median line with the ANS-Menton line (MAP) was greater in patients group and there was statistically significant difference. 2. The angulation which was formed to the median line with the Menton-Odontoid process tip line (MES), the difference of the distances from the center of the posterior surface of the both condyles to the most anterior point of the chin (DD), the difference of the distances from the center of the both condyles to the horizontal reference line (DE), the difference of the angulations which were formed by the both condyles axes with the horizontal reference line (DCE), the difference of the lengths of the both condyles (CL) and the difference of the widths of the both condyles (DW) were greater in patients group and there were statistically significant differences. 3. There was reversed correlation between MAP and the difference of the distances from the bilateral points of the lateral margin of the both zygomaticofrontal sutures to the points at the lateral inferior margin of the both antegonial protuberances in mandible (DH). 4. There was reversed correlation between MES and DD, DE, DCE. 5. There was correlation between MAP and MES.

  10. Role of Auriculotherapy in the Treatment of Temporomandibular Disorders with Anxiety in University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Hollanda Iunes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of auriculotherapy with mustard seeds in the treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs, anxiety, and electromyographic (EMG activity in university students. Methodology. The State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI, Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC for TMDs (RDC/TMDs, and electromyography were used in this study of 44 college students with high levels of anxiety and TMDs. The subjects were divided into two groups: an auriculotherapy (AA group (n=31 and an AA sham group (n=13. The mustard seeds were applied to the shenmen, rim, sympathetic, brain stem, and temporomandibular joint (TMJ points in the AA group and to sham points in the external ear and wrist in the AA sham group. The treatment protocol was 10 sessions (two treatments per week. Results. Anxiety (p<0.01 was significantly reduced in the AA group. This group also showed a decrease in tender points in the mandibular posterior region (p=0.04 and in the right side of the submandibular region (p=0.02. Complaints of bilateral pain were reduced in the temporal tendon (p≤0.01 and in the left side of the ATM (p<0.01. In addition, electromyographic (EMG activity was reduced during temporal muscle contraction (p=0.03.  Conclusion. Auriculotherapy was effective in the treatment of students with anxiety and TMDs.

  11. Doença articular degenerativa da articulação temporomandibular

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, Joana Alexandra Alves de

    2009-01-01

    Monografia apresentada à Universidade Fernando Pessoa como parte dos requisitos para obtenção do grau de Licenciada em Medicina Dentária Este trabalho foi desenvolvido com o intuito de abordar diversas questões relacionadas com o desenvolvimento da Doença Articular Degenerativa (DAD) ao nível da Articulação Temporomandibular (ATM). Os eventos moleculares que estão na base da patogénese da DAD da ATM e as artralgias associadas são complexos. Modelos contemporâneos sugerem que excessivas ...

  12. Laterality of proprioception in the orofacial muscles and temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frayne, Ellie; Coulson, Susan; Adams, Roger; Croxson, Glen; Waddington, Gordon

    2016-12-02

    Laterality of function in the orofacial musculature suggests there may be side-to-side asymmetry of proprioceptive acuity in lip movement compared to the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In the present work, 14 young adults were tested for acuity of lip and TMJ closure movements onto plugs varying from 5 to 8mm without visual feedback. Testing was conducted on both left and right sides, using the same psychophysical task and stimuli. Results showed superior proprioceptive acuity at the lips, with no significant side effect. However, there was side-to-side asymmetry in the correlations between proprioceptive performance for the two anatomical structures, with performance on the right side strongly correlated but not on the left. This is consistent with the need for coordination between structures during chewing. When acuity at different points in the stimulus range was examined, the right side lips were better with small stimuli. Overall, results support enhanced use-specific proprioception. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Dietary correlates of temporomandibular joint morphology in the great apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terhune, Claire E

    2013-02-01

    Behavioral observations of great apes have consistently identified differences in feeding behavior among species, and these differences have been linked to variation in masticatory form. As the point at which the mandible and cranium articulate, the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is an important component of the masticatory apparatus. Forces are transmitted between the mandible and cranium via the TMJ, and this joint helps govern mandibular range of motion. This study examined the extent to which TMJ form covaries with feeding behavior in the great apes by testing a series of biomechanical hypotheses relating to specific components of joint shape using linear measurements extracted from three-dimensional coordinate data. Results of these analyses found that taxa differ significantly in TMJ shape, particularly in the mandibular fossa. Chimpanzees have relatively more anteroposteriorly elongated joint surfaces, whereas gorillas tend to have relatively anteroposteriorly compressed joints. Orangutans were most commonly intermediate in form between Pan and Gorilla, perhaps reflecting a trade-off between jaw gape and load resistance capabilities. Importantly, much of the observed variation among taxa reflects differences in morphologies that facilitate gape over force production. These data therefore continue to emphasize the unclear relationship between mandibular loading and bony morphology, but highlight the need for further data regarding food material properties, jaw gape, and ingestive/food processing behaviors. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Masticatory function and temporomandibular disorders in patients with dentofacial deformities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamsson, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    About 30% of individuals in the Swedish population will at some stage during life have treatment with orthodontic appliances. In more severe cases, when orthodontic treatment is not considered sufficient enough to correct the malocclusion, the orthodontic treatment is combined with orthognathic surgery. For these cases, a satisfying jaw relation is achieved by surgically moving the maxilla and/or the mandible into a pre-planned position. Patients due to be treated with orthognathic surgery often suffer from an impaired masticatory function, symptoms from the masticatory muscles or temporomandibular joints (temporomandibular disorders), headaches as well as dissatisfaction with their facial aesthetics. Since orthognathic treatment is expensive, in many cases arduous to the patient and not without complications, it is important to assess the treatment outcome and if this is satisfying for the patients. Previous studies that have examined the outcome after orthognathic treatment have had diverging study designs and have come to different conclusions with regard to both temporomandibular disorders and masticatory function. The overall aim of this thesis was to assess and compare the frequencies of temporomandibular disorders and the masticatory function in patients with dentofacial deformities before and after orthognathic treatment. THE THESIS IS BASED ON THE FOLLOWING STUDIES: Paper I is a systematic literature review aiming to, in an evidence-based approach, answer the question whether orthognathic treatment affects the prevalence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders. The review encompasses the period from January 1966 to April 2006 and was further extended to May 2013 in the frame story of this thesis. CONCLUSIONS IN PAPER I AND THE COMPLEMENTARY SURVEY: There is insufficient scientific evidence for a decrease of sub diagnoses of temporomandibular disorders after orthognathic treatment. There is limited scientific evidence for a reduction of

  15. Women with more severe degrees of temporomandibular disorder exhibit an increase in temperature over the temporomandibular joint

    OpenAIRE

    Dibai-Filho, Almir Vieira; Costa, Ana Cláudia de Souza; Packer, Amanda Carine; de Castro, Ester Moreira; Rodrigues-Bigaton, Delaine

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of the present study was to correlate the degree of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) severity and skin temperatures over the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and masseter and anterior temporalis muscles. Materials and methods: This blind cross-sectional study involved 60 women aged 18–40 years. The volunteers were allocated to groups based on Fonseca anamnestic index (FAI) score: no TMD, mild TMD, moderate TMD, and severe TMD (n = 15 each). All volunteers underwent infrared t...

  16. Brazilian gutta-percha points. Part II: thermal properties Cones nacionais de guta-percha. Parte II: propriedades térmicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Maniglia-Ferreira

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to explore the effect of heating on gutta-percha, analyzing the occurrence of endothermic peaks corresponding to the transformation that occurs in the crystalline structure of the polymer during thermal manipulation. This study also seeked to determine the temperature at which these peaks occur, causing a transformation from the beta- to the alpha-form, and from the alpha- to the amorphous phase. Eight nonstandardized gutta-percha points commercially available in Brazil (Konne, Tanari, Endopoint, Odous, Dentsply 0.04, Dentsply 0.06, Dentsply TP, Dentsply FM and pure gutta-percha (control were analysed using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and thermogravimetry analysis (TGA. The transition temperatures were determined and analysed. With the exception of Dentsply 0.04 and Dentsply 0.06, the majority of the products showed thermal behaviour typical of beta-gutta-percha, with two endothermic peaks, exhibiting two crystalline transformations upon heating from ambient temperature to 130°. Upon cooling and reheating, few samples presented two endothermic peaks. It was concluded that heating dental gutta-percha to 130°C causes changes to its chemical structure which permanently alter its physical properties.Este estudo teve como objetivo analisar, através da Calorimetria Diferencial de Varredura (DSC e Análise Termogravimétrica (TGA, os efeitos do aquecimento sobre o polímero guta-percha, bem como explorar a ocorrência de picos endotérmicos, os quais correspondem às transformações cristalinas do polímero guta-percha, o que é traduzido em transições de fases (fase beta para alfa e fase alfa para amorfa. Foram utilizadas 8 marcas comerciais de cones de guta-percha não-estandardizados disponíveis no mercado brasileiro (Konne, Tanari, Endopoint, Odous, Dentsply 0.04, Dentsply 0.06, Dentsply TP, Dentsply FM, além da guta-percha pura (controle. As temperaturas de transição foram determinadas e analisadas

  17. Radiographic analysis of temporomandibular joint arthrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Dong Soo [Department of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-11-15

    The author analysed the bone changes, the positional relationships between condylar head and articular fossa, and the interrelationship between the bone changes and the abnormal position of condylar head, from 1,036 radiographs of 259 patients with temporomandibular joint arthrosis, which were obtained by the oblique-lateral transcranial projection and orthopantomograms. The results were as follows: 1. Among the radiographic bone changes of the temporomandibular joint arthrosis, deformity was 36..90% (217 cases), sclerosis 34.18% (201 cases), erosive change 25.58% (152 cases) and marginal proliferation 3.06% (18 cases) respectively. 2. In the positional changes between condylar head and articular fossa, the downward positioning of condylar head in centric occlusion was most frequent (36.90%), of which frequency was significantly higher than forward positioning (11.22%) and backward positioning (4.76%) in same condition. Also, radiographs showed that the enlargement of articular space showed higher frequency than its narrowing. In the opening position of mouth, the restrict ed movement of condylar head within articular fossa was most frequent (35.03%). The forward positioning and the downward positioning was 15.65% and 9.52% respectively. Also, radiographs revealed that the incomplete movement or no positional change of condylar head was most frequent. 3. In the interrelationship between bone changes and abnormal position of condylar head, deformity was 42.79% in the cases of downward positioning of condylar head in centric occlusion and 37.50% in those of normal positioning of condylar head in same condition. This revealed that deformity was most frequent bone change in above condylar positionings. However, erosive change was 34.62% in the cases of downward positioning of condylar head in centric occlusion and 33 .33% in those of forward positioning. In opening position of condylar head, and deformity in the cases of norma l positioning, forward positioning and

  18. Low-level laser therapy for temporomandibular disorders (tmd) treatment: a systematic review of randomized trials

    OpenAIRE

    Leite, Priscila; Melo, Nicole; Silva, Pâmela; Montenegro, Robinsom; Bonan, Paulo; Batista, André

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Conducting a systematic review of randomized clinical trials focusing on the efficacy of LLLT on pain control in patients with TMD, diagnosed by the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Search was performed at PubMed/MEDLINE database with the terms: (1) “Laser AND temporomandibular disorders”; (2) “Laser AND temporomandibular disorders AND RDC/TMD”; (3) “Low-level laser therapy AND temporomandibular disorders”; (4) “Low-level laser...

  19. The dynamics and control of large flexible space structures, 2. Part A: Shape and orientation control using point actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainum, P. M.; Reddy, A. S. S. R.

    1979-01-01

    The equations of planar motion for a flexible beam in orbit which includes the effects of gravity gradient torques and control torques from point actuators located along the beam was developed. Two classes of theorems are applied to the linearized form of these equations to establish necessary conditions for controlability for preselected actuator configurations. The feedback gains are selected: (1) based on the decoupling of the original coordinates and to obtain proper damping, and (2) by applying the linear regulator problem to the individual model coordinates separately. The linear control laws obtained using both techniques were evaluated by numerical integration of the nonlinear system equations. Numerical examples considering pitch and various number of modes with different combination of actuator numbers and locations are presented. The independent model control concept used earlier with a discretized model of the thin beam in orbit was reviewed for the case where the number of actuators is less than the number of modes. Results indicate that although the system is controllable it is not stable about the nominal (local vertical) orientation when the control is based on modal decoupling. An alternate control law not based on modal decoupling ensures stability of all the modes.

  20. IL-1β Inhibits TGFβ in the Temporomandibular Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, W.H.; Toothman, J.; Miller, J.H.; Tallents, R.H.; Brouxhon, S.M.; Olschowka, M.E.; Kyrkanides, S.

    2009-01-01

    Similarly to humans, healthy, wild-type mice develop osteoarthritis, including of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), as a result of aging. Pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1β, IL-6, and TNFα, are known to contribute to the development of osteoarthritis, whereas TGFβ has been associated with articular regeneration. We hypothesized that a balance between IL-1β and TGFβ underlies the development of TMJ osteoarthritis, whereby IL-1β signaling down-regulates TGFβ expression as part of disease pathology. Our studies in wild-type mice, as well as the Col1-IL1βXAT mouse model of osteoarthritis, demonstrated an inverse correlation between IL-1β and TGFβ expression in the TMJ. IL-1β etiologically correlated with joint pathology, whereas TGFβ expression associated with IL-1β down-regulation and improvement of articular pathology. Better understanding of the underlying inflammatory processes during disease will potentially enable us to harness inflammation for orofacial tissue regeneration. PMID:19587162

  1. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction in Moebius syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Blasio, A; Cassi, D; Di Blasio, C; Gandolfini, M

    2013-12-01

    Moebius syndrome is a rare condition characterised by bilateral facial and abducens nerve paralysis. In the present study, it was investigated the effect of the long term facial muscles hypoactivity on temporomandibular joint movements development. Accordingly with Terzis classification (Terzis, 2003), a wide sample of A type and B type Moebius patients was investigated for mandibular range of movements. Moebius patients were compared with a sample of healthy subjects. Both type A and type B Moebius patients develop a severe articular movement reduction, especially during mouth opening. A highly significant difference was found between Moebius patients and the healthy group. No difference was found between A and B Moebius sub-samples. The authors stress the importance of an early adequate rehabilitation of Moebius patients, in order to avoid the limitation of TMJ movement range.

  2. ALLOPLASTIC RECONSTRUCTION OF THE TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT

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    Rushil R. DANG

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint reconstruction (TMJR is often necessary for patients with severe and/or refractory TMJ disease who have failed conservative treatment. TMJR aids to improve masticatory function and is associated with improved quality of life outcomes. Currently, alloplastic reconstruction is considered as the treatment of choice in most severe TMJ disorders due to its many advantages inclusive but not limited to early mobilization, stable longterm results, and significant improvement in jaw function. Broadly speaking, two types of TMJR prostheses are available for reconstruction: 1 stock, and, 2 custommade prostheses. The purpose of this article is to provide the reader with a brief overview of the basic principles and fundamentals of TMJR while referencing pertinent existing literature.

  3. Ankylosis of temporomandibular joint in children

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    Das U

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Temporomandibular joint (TMJ ankylosis or hypomobility involves fusion of the mandibular condyle to the base of the skull. It is a major clinical problem that affects many patients suffering from facial trauma, infection, or systemic disease. The treatment of TMJ ankylosis poses a significant challenge because of technical difficulties and a high incidence of recurrence. Case Report: This report describes a case of a 4-year-old boy with inability to open mouth, diagnosed with unilateral right bony TMJ ankylosis. The surgical approach consisted of gap arthroplasty followed by vigorous physiotherapy. Conclusion: A detailed history, clinical and functional examination, radiographic examination facilitating correct diagnosis followed by immediate surgical intervention, and physiotherapy can help us to restore physical, psychological, and emotional health of the child patient.

  4. Social representations and information security of children and adolescents: the point of view of teachers (Part 1

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    Bovina I.B.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The focus of attention of the authors is the consideration of information security of children and adolescents as the object of social representations. Discusses the need for the theory of social representations to develop prophylactic and preventive programs in the field of information security of children and adolescents, in particular, says that the effectiveness of prevention and preventive programs is determined by how this information is understood by the target group, through what filters it passes. Briefly outlines the main provisions of the theory of social representations, discusses the functions of social representations, the mechanism of action ideas. Analyzed in a few studies, the focus of which was the presentation on new technologies, particularly mobile phones and the Internet. Presents the results of a series of studies devoted to the study of information security of children and adolescents, including the results of the first part of a research project dedicated to the analysis of how parents and teachers understand information security and what strategies to protect children and adolescents from dangerous information they are ready to use.

  5. Temporomandibular disorders: Old ideas and new concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, Thomas; Jensen, Rigmor Højland

    2017-06-01

    Background Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) is an umbrella term for pain and dysfunction involving the masticatory muscles and the temporomandibular joints (TMJs). TMD is the most common orofacial pain condition. Its prominent features include regional pain in the face and preauricular area, limitations in jaw movement, and noise from the TMJs during jaw movements. TMD affects up to 15% of adults and 7% of adolescents. Chronic pain is the overwhelming reason that patients with TMD seek treatment. TMD can associate with impaired general health, depression, and other psychological disabilities, and may affect the quality of life of the patient. Assessment Evaluations indicate that the recently published Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (DC/TMD) are reliable and valid. These criteria cover the most common types of TMD, which include pain-related disorders (e.g., myalgia, headache attributable to TMD, and arthralgia) as well as disorders associated with the TMJ (primarily disc displacements and degenerative disease). As peripheral mechanisms most likely play a role in the onset of TMD, a detailed muscle examination is recommended. The persistence of pain involves more central factors, such as sensitization of the supraspinal neurons and second-order neurons at the level of the spinal dorsal horn/trigeminal nucleus, imbalanced antinociceptive activity, and strong genetic predisposition, which also is included in DC/TMD. Conclusion The etiology is complex and still not clearly understood, but several biological and psychosocial risk factors for TMD have been identified. Several studies indicate that patients with TMD improve with a combination of noninvasive therapies, including behavior therapy, pharmacotherapy, physical therapy, and occlusal appliances. More stringently designed studies, however, are needed to assess treatment efficacy and how to tailor treatment to the individual patient.

  6. [Mandibular movements in speech: interference of temporomandibular disfunction according to pain indexes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchini, Esther Mandelbaum G; Paiva, Guiovaldo; de Andrade, Claudia Regina Furquim

    2007-01-01

    temporomandibular disorders can cause general alterations of the mandibular movements due to modification in the condition of muscles and articulations. Electrognathography, a computerized exam used to complement the diagnosis of these disorders, allows the objective delineation and record of the mandibular movements, determining their amplitude and speed. to verify the characteristics of mandibular movements of individuals with temporomandibular dysfunction and in asymptomatic individuals during speech, through computerized electrognathography, analyzing possible interferences of this dysfunction and severity implications regarding pain indexes. 135 adults were divided in four groups based on their pain indexes, using a numeric scale: zero for pain absence, one for mild pain, two for moderate pain and three for severe pain. Mandibular movements were observed during the sequential naming of balanced pictures taking in consideration the occurrence of phonemes in the Brazilian Portuguese language. Records were obtained using computerized electrognathography (BioEGN - BioPak system). the analysis of the results point that differences indicated as significant for mandibular opening amplitude and mandibular closing speed occurred between index zero and all of the other pain indexes. Regarding mandibular opening speed during speech, statistically significant differences were obtained between index zero and index three. It was observed that mandibular movements in speech are discreet, with an anteroposterior component and deviations in laterality. the presence of temporomandibular dysfunctions causes reduction in the values of maximum mandibular opening and a reduction in both mandibular opening speed and mandibular closing speed during speech The different pain indexes: mild, moderate and severe do not seem to determine larger reduction of these values.

  7. Influência do tratamento das desordens temporomandibulares na dor e na postura global

    OpenAIRE

    Azato,Flaviane Keiko; Castillo,Daisilene Baena; Coelho, Tulio Marcos Kalife; Taciro,Charles; Pereira,Paulo Zarate; Zomerfeld,Valquiria; Silva,Marcela Galdina da; Insarraulde,Elizeu; Vinholi,Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: A disfunção temporomandibular é uma síndrome clínica que acomete principalmente músculos mastigatórios e articulações temporomandibulares. Como a articulação temporomandibular está diretamente relacionada à região cervical e escapular por meio de cadeias musculares, alterações posturais da coluna podem acarretar distúrbios de articulação temporomandibular, e vice-versa. A relação entre a postura corporal e a disfunção temporomandibular pode estabelecer uma forma de ...

  8. Temporomandibular disorder: otologic implications and its relationship to sleep bruxism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Bruno Gama; Freitas, Jaciel Leandro de Melo; Barbosa, André Cavalcanti da Silva; Gueiros, Maria Cecília Scheidegger Neves; Gomes, Simone Guimarães Farias; Rosenblatt, Aronita; Júnior, Arnaldo de França Caldas

    2017-08-23

    Temporomandibular disorder is an umbrella term for various clinical problems affecting the muscles of mastication, temporomandibular joint and associated structures. This disorder has a multifactor etiology, with oral parafunctional habits considered an important co-factor. Among such habits, sleep bruxism is considered a causal agent involved in the initiation and/or perpetuation of temporomandibular disorder. That condition can result in pain otologic symptoms. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between temporomandibular disorder and both otologic symptoms and bruxism. A total of 776 individuals aged 15 years or older from urban areas in the city of Recife (Brazil) registered at Family Health Units were examined. The diagnosis of temporomandibular disorder was determined using Axis I of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for temporomandibular disorders, addressing questions concerning myofascial pain and joint problems (disk displacement, arthralgia, osteoarthritis and osteoarthrosis). Four examiners had previously undergone training and calibration exercises for the administration of the instrument. Intra-examiner and inter-examiner agreement was determined using the Kappa statistic. Individuals with a diagnosis of at least one of these conditions were classified as having temporomandibular disorder. The diagnosis of otologic symptoms and bruxism was defined using the same instrument and a clinical exam. Among the individuals with temporomandibular disorder, 58.2% had at least one otologic symptom and 52% exhibited bruxism. Statistically significant associations were found between the disorder and both otologic symptoms and bruxism (p<0.01 for both conditions; OR=2.12 and 2.3 respectively). Otologic symptoms and bruxism maintained statistical significance in the binary logistic regression analysis, which demonstrated a 1.7 fold and twofold greater chance of such individuals have temporomandibular disorder, respectively. The logistic

  9. Global body posture evaluation in patients with temporomandibular joint disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliza Tiemi Saito

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To identify the relationship between anterior disc displacement and global posture (plantar arches, lower limbs, shoulder and pelvic girdle, vertebral spine, head and mandibles. Common signs and symptoms of anterior disc displacement were also identified. INTRODUCTION: Global posture deviations cause body adaptation and realignment, which may interfere with the organization and function of the temporomandibular joint. METHODS: Global posture evaluation was performed in a group of 10 female patients (20 to 30 years of age with temporomandibular joint disc displacement and in a control group of 16 healthy female volunteers matched for age, weight and height. Anterior disc displacement signs, symptoms and the presence of parafunctional habits were also identified through interview. RESULTS: Patients with disc displacement showed a higher incidence of pain in the temporomandibular joint area, but there were no differences in parafunctional habits between the groups. In the disc displacement group, postural deviations were found in the pelvis (posterior rotation, lumbar spine (hyperlordosis, thoracic spine (rectification, head (deviation to the right and mandibles (deviation to the left with open mouth. There were no differences in the longitudinal plantar arches between the groups. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest a close relationship between body posture and temporomandibular disorder, though it is not possible to determine whether postural deviations are the cause or the result of the disorder. Hence, postural evaluation could be an important component in the overall approach to providing accurate prevention and treatment in the management of patients with temporomandibular disorder.

  10. Association between otalgia, tinnitus, vertigo and hypoacusia, with temporomandibular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Guedes Pereira de Alencar Junior

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Because nonespecific symptoms and signs are associated with others well-established in the temporomandibular disorders, it is difficult for the clinician to decide what symptoms and signs should be considered during the diagnosis and the treatment plan. Therefore, the aim of this literature review was to evaluate the prevalence of aural symptoms (otalgias, tinnitus, dizziness and deafness in patients with orofacial pain. Although several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the association between aural symptoms and temporomandibular disorders, the results of the previous studies differed in magnitude. For this reason, it is difficult to establish the prevalence of these aural symptoms concomitantly with temporomandibular disorders. Moreover, such relationship does not necessarily imply a cause-effect relationship. Because of the diagnosis complexity, different treatments must be considered, so the nonespecific symptoms of temporomandibular disorders can be effectively controlled as well. It is crucial for the the clinician to be aware of the possible etiology of aural symptoms, so he should determine if such symptoms may be associated with temporomandibular disorders and thus include them in the treatment.

  11. Algunas consideraciones sobre los trastornos temporomandibulares Some considerations on the temporomandibular disorders

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    Ileana Grau León

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una revisión documental mediante revistas, libros, tesis y otros documentos en formato electrónico acerca de la epidemiología de los trastornos de la articulación temporomandibular, con el objetivo de actualizar el material existente y ampliar nuestros conocimientos sobre esta alteración. En nuestro país se han llevado a cabo en las 2 últimas décadas, varios estudios epidemiológicos sobre los trastornos temporomandibulares (TTM y se ha hecho un esfuerzo notable por esclarecer su causa. De forma general, se acepta la idea de que el origen de los disturbios funcionales del sistema estomatognático es multifactorial, pero a pesar de que tanto en niños como en adultos la prevalencia de los trastornos temporomandibulares (TTM ha sido alta, no se ha evidenciado un factor causal predominante. La literatura alude que estas disfunciones afectan a un porcentaje muy elevado de la población mundial (80 %, con una edad media de 34 años y una proporción de 3 mujeres por cada hombre. Este dato es muy interesante, porque los estudios precisan que las mujeres de edades comprendidas entre los 25 y los 35 años presentan trastornos temporomandibulares (TTM con más asiduidad.A documental review of different sources was carried out to study the disfunctions of temporal mandibular joint (TMJ with the objective of updating and enlarge our knowledge of this disorder. In or country in the last two decades several epidemiological studies about the temporal mandibular joint dysfunction were carried out. In a general wade the idea about of the origin of the functional problems of the stomatognatic system is multifactioral. But although, in children as well as in adults the prevalence of temporal mandibular dysfunction (DTM has been high, a casual predominant factor has not been evidenced. Literature states that this dysfunction affect a very high percentage of the world populations, 80 % , the mean age 34 years old and the proportion 3 woman for

  12. The influence of cranio-cervical posture on maximal mouth opening and pressure pain threshold in patients with myofascial temporomandibular pain disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Touche, Roy; París-Alemany, Alba; von Piekartz, Harry; Mannheimer, Jeffrey S; Fernández-Carnero, Josue; Rocabado, Mariano

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the influence of cranio-cervical posture on the maximal mouth opening (MMO) and pressure pain threshold (PPT) in patients with myofascial temporomandibular pain disorders. A total of 29 patients (19 females and 10 males) with myofascial temporomandibular pain disorders, aged 19 to 59 years participated in the study (mean years±SD; 34.69±10.83 y). MMO and the PPT (on the right side) of patients in neutral, retracted, and forward head postures were measured. A 1-way repeated measures analysis of variance followed by 3 pair-wise comparisons were used to determine differences. Comparisons indicated significant differences in PPT at 3 points within the trigeminal innervated musculature [masseter (M1 and M2) and anterior temporalis (T1)] among the 3 head postures [M1 (F=117.78; Pcervical postures influences the MMO and PPT values of the temporomandibular joint and muscles of mastication that receive motor and sensory innervation by the trigeminal nerve. Our results provide data that supports the biomechanical relationship between the cranio-cervical region and the dynamics of the temporomandibular joint, as well as trigeminal nociceptive processing in different cranio-cervical postures.

  13. Temporomandibular joint computed tomography: development of a direct sagittal technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van der Kuijl, B.; Vencken, L.M.; de Bont, L.G.; Boering, G. (Univ. of Groningen, (Netherlands))

    1990-12-01

    Radiology plays an important role in the diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders. Different techniques are used with computed tomography offering simultaneous imaging of bone and soft tissues. It is therefore suited for visualization of the articular disk and may be used in patients with suspected internal derangements and other disorders of the temporomandibular joint. Previous research suggests advantages to direct sagittal scanning, which requires special positioning of the patient and a sophisticated scanning technique. This study describes the development of a new technique of direct sagittal computed tomographic imaging of the temporomandibular joint using a specially designed patient table and internal light visor positioning. No structures other than the patient's head are involved in the imaging process, and misleading artifacts from the arm or the shoulder are eliminated. The use of the scanogram allows precise correction of the condylar axis and selection of exact slice level.

  14. Nasal obstruction may alleviate bruxism related temporomandibular joint disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bektas, Devrim; Cankaya, Mustafa; Livaoglu, Murat

    2011-02-01

    Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is a collective term used to identify a group of musculoskeletal conditions of the temporomandibular region. Bruxism is a non-functional activity characterized by repeated tooth clenching or grinding in an unconscious manner. Over the time bruxism may lead to TMD by the uploading it causes. Nasal obstruction is a common complaint that necessitates mouth breathing when severe. The treatment of bruxism is frequently performed by oral appliances, which induce occlusal disengagement and relax jaw musculature and therefore reduce the force on the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). We believe that nasal obstruction may indirectly have a preemptive and therapeutic effect on sleep bruxism related TMD by causing mouth breathing. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Analgesia Evaluation of 2 NSAID Drugs as Adjuvant in Management of Chronic Temporomandibular Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Kurita Varoli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this triple-blind full-randomized clinical trial was to quantify analgesia in masticatory muscles and temporomandibular joints after occlusal splint therapy associated with the adjuvant administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID isolated or associated with other therapeutic agents. Pain relief was also recorded. Eighteen volunteers who had been suffering from chronic pain in masticatory muscles due to temporomandibular disorders were selected after anamnesis and assessment using RDC/TMD translated to Portuguese. The 3 proposed treatments were NSAID (sodium diclofenac, panacea (sodium diclofenac + carisoprodol + acetaminophen + caffeine, and a placebo. The total treatment duration was 10 days, preceded and succeeded by patients’ pain assessment. A washout interval of 11 days was established between each therapy. All participants received all treatments in different moments, in a full randomized crossover methodology. The assessment of drug therapies was performed using visual analogue scale for pain on palpation followed by 11-point numerical scale to quantify pain during treatment. Statistical analysis has shown that, after 10 days of treatment, all therapies were effective for pain relief. NSAID therapy promoted analgesia on the third day, while placebo only promoted analgesia in the eighth day. It has been concluded that sodium diclofenac used as splint adjuvant therapy, promotes significant analgesia in a shorter time.

  16. Emg analysis after laser acupuncture in patients with temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD). Implications for practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Patrícia Tiemy; Hotta, Takami Hirono; Bataglion, César; Bataglion, Solange Aparecida; de Souza Coronatto, Elaine Angélica; Siéssere, Selma; Regalo, Simone Cecilio Hallak

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of low level laser applied to acupuncture points of patients diagnosed with temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD). Ten patients aged between 20 and 50 years were clinically examined with regard to pain and dysfunction of the masticatory system. They received laser applications (GaAlAs diode laser, 780 nm wavelength; 70 mW power output, 35 j/cm(2)) in acupuncture specific points (Ig4, C3, E6, E7) once a week, for ten sessions. The range of jaw movement was registered after each session and visual analogue scale (VAS) was applied. Results were analyzed (SPSS-15.0-Chicago) during the comparison, before and after treatment. Statistical tests showed significant improvements (p TMD. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Accuracy of the Fonseca anamnestic index in the identification of myogenous temporomandibular disorder in female community cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berni, Kelly Cristina Dos Santos; Dibai-Filho, Almir Vieira; Rodrigues-Bigaton, Delaine

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the accuracy of the Fonseca anamnestic index (FAI) in the identification of myogenous temporomandibular disorder (TMD). Two hundred and three female volunteers participated in this study, 117 with myogenous TMD and 86 without TMD. The Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders were first applied as the gold standard for the diagnosis. The volunteers then answered the 10 items on the FAI, which furnished a score ranging from 0 to 100 points. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) was used to determine the accuracy of the diagnosis (area under the curve) and the best cutoff point of the tool. Thus, FAI demonstrated a high degree of accuracy for the diagnosis of myogenous TMD (area under the ROC curve of 0.940). The best cutoff point was a score of 47.50. Thus, a score ranging from 0 to 45 points corresponds to the absence of myogenous TMD and scores ranging from 50 to 100 points identifies individuals with the disorder. In conclusion, the high degree of diagnostic accuracy demonstrates that the FAI can be employed for the identification of myogenous TMD in female community cases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for temporomandibular joint dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Grossmann, Eduardo; Tambara,Joseane Steckel; Grossmann, Thiago Kreutz; SIQUEIRA, José Tadeu Tesseroli de

    2012-01-01

    JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: A disfunção temporomandibular (DTM) é um termo que descreve um grupo de doenças que afetam funcionalmente o aparelho mastigatório, particularmente a musculatura mastigatória e a articulação temporomandibular (ATM). Tem etiologias múltiplas e tratamentos específicos, entre os quais a estimulação elétrica nervosa transcutânea (TENS). O objetivo deste artigo é o de revisar a literatura científica sobre o uso da TENS em pacientes com DTM. CONTEÚDO: Estudos epidemiológic...

  19. Mouse genetic models for temporomandibular joint development and disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, A; Iwata, J

    2016-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a synovial joint essential for hinge and sliding movements of the mammalian jaw. Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) are dysregulations of the muscles or the TMJ in structure, function, and physiology, and result in pain, limited mandibular mobility, and TMJ noise and clicking. Although approximately 40-70% adults in the USA have at least one sign of TMD, the etiology of TMD remains largely unknown. Here, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of TMD in mouse models. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Reemplazo articular temporomandibular debido a queratoquiste odontogénico

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro Angel Peñón Vivas; Humberto Sarracent Pérez; Patricia Moreira Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    Existen disímiles condiciones que hacen necesario el reemplazo articular temporomandibular; dentro de las más frecuentes se encuentran la anquilosis, la osteoatrosis, estadíos avanzados del Síndrome de disfunción temporomandibular, daño articular postrauma y procesos neoplásicos o tumorales. Los queratoquistes odontógenos que se agrupan para su estudio dentro de los quistes odontogénicos del desarrollo, representan cerca del 7 al 10 por ciento de todos los quistes maxilo-mandibulares. Se dice...

  1. Hormonal fluctuations intensify temporomandibular disorder pain without impairing masticatory function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilanova, Larissa Soares; Gonçalves, Thais Marques; Meirelles, Lis; Garcia, Renata Cunha

    2015-01-01

    The influence of hormonal fluctuations on pain and mastication was evaluated in patients with painful temporomandibular disorder (TMD) symptoms. Fifty women were assigned to menstrual cycle and oral contraceptive groups (n = 25). Their TMD was diagnosed by Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders. Pain levels, maximum oclusal force (MOF), and masticatory performance (MP) were measured in all menstrual cycle phases. A lower pain level was observed in the ovulatory phase when compared to menstrual and luteal phases (P = .02). No differences were found regarding MOF (P = .20) or MP (P = .94). Hormonal fluctuations intensify pain in women with symptomatic TMD without impairing mastication.

  2. Clinical effectiveness of laser acupuncture in the treatment of temporomandibular joint disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Feng; Lin, Jung-Chih; Yang, Hui-Wen; Lee, Yu-Hsien; Yu, Chuan-Hang

    2014-08-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) is a general term for diseases of the temporomandibular joint and orofacial muscles. In this study, we tested whether laser acupuncture was effective for the treatment of TMD. Twenty patients with TMD were treated with diode K-Laser (wavelength 800 nm, energy density 100.5 J/cm(2)) once a week at four acupuncture points including three standard ipsilateral local points (ST6, ST7, Ashi point) and one contralateral distal point (LI4). A 10-cm visual analogue scale (0 no pain and 10 the most severe pain) was used for measuring the pain intensity before and after the treatment. Seventeen out of 20 patients (85%) showed various degrees of pain relief after laser acupuncture treatment. The average pain score was 6.3 ± 1.6 before treatment and 2.5 ± 2.2 after treatment. Significant pain relief after laser acupuncture treatment was achieved (p = 0.0003, Wilcoxon signed rank test). The 17 patients showed an average pain relief of 63 ± 31%. There were six patients who showed no TMD symptoms after an average of four treatments of laser acupuncture. The other 11 patients showed partial relief of TMD symptoms after treatment. Although the pain was still present, it was less and was acceptable. No side effects were reported in any patients during or after laser acupuncture treatments. Laser acupuncture may be an alternative treatment modality for TMD because it is non-invasive, results in partial or total relief of pain, and has no side effects. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Pseudodynamic MR imaging of temporomandibular joint disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Ehara, Shigeru (Iwate Medical Coll., Morioka (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-09-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has now been established as a procedure of choice in the evaluation of TMJ disorders. In this study, we evaluated the dynamics of TMJ motion on MR imaging, which resembles arthrography. Sixty-eight TMJs in 38 symptomatic patients and one healthy volunteer were examined using pseudodynamic images with gradient echo sequences using a 0.5 Tesla MR unit and 8 cm circular planar surface coil. For depiction of each compartment of the meniscus, the optimum sequence was 200/15/2 (TR/TE/excitations) with 50 deg or 60 deg flip angle in gradient refocused acquisition in steady-state (GRASS) sequences. Three contiguous slices on sagittal MR images were routinely obtained at 14-18 different phases of the opening cycle and displayed in closed-loop cine fashion. Internal derangement was observed in 57% of 68 joints. The most common type was anterior meniscal displacement without reduction. Sideway and rotational displacements, observed in 10% each, were noted on both sagittal multislice images and axial reference images. As a pseudodynamic MR technique, jaw movement specifically designed to check bite procedure to adjust splints is useful for detecting the exact time of meniscal redisplacement on the second click. After conservative therapy for arthrosis, pseudodynamic MR provided information on changes in the meniscus and condylar relationship. Pseudodynamic MR with multiple phases is suitable for evaluating subtle motion abnormality of the meniscus and for post-therapeutic monitoring. (author).

  4. Temporomandibular Joint Anatomy Assessed by CBCT Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Caruso

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Since cone beam computed tomography (CBCT has been used for the study of craniofacial morphology, the attention of orthodontists has also focused on the mandibular condyle. The purpose of this brief review is to summarize the recent 3D CBCT images of mandibular condyle. Material and Methods. The eligibility criteria for the studies are (a studies aimed at evaluating the anatomy of the temporomandibular joint; (b studies performed with CBCT images; (c studies on human subjects; (d studies that were not clinical case-reports and clinical series; (e studies reporting data on children, adolescents, or young adults (data from individuals with age ≤ 30 years. Sources included PubMed from June 2008 to June 2016. Results. 43 full-text articles were initially screened for eligibility. 13 full-text articles were assessed for eligibility. 11 articles were finally included in qualitative synthesis. The main topics treated in the studies are the volume and surface of the mandibular condyle, the bone changes on cortical surface, the facial asymmetry, and the optimum position of the condyle in the glenoid fossa. Conclusion. Additional studies will be necessary in the future, constructed with longitudinal methodology, especially in growing subjects. The limits of CBCT acquisitions are also highlighted.

  5. Temporomandibular joint replacement: a New Zealand perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, B; Buchanan, J; Cliff, J

    2014-05-01

    Alloplastic total temporomandibular joint replacement (TMJ TJR) has been performed in New Zealand utilizing the TMJ Concepts patient-fitted system since 2000. The data analysed in this study were collected retrospectively from questionnaires sent to all maxillofacial surgeons in New Zealand who had implanted TMJ Concepts devices between 2000 and 2011. A total of 63 devices were implanted in 42 patients (13 males, 29 females) during this 12-year period. The primary indication for TMJ TJR was end-stage joint disease resulting from ankylosis and arthritis. The mean age of the patients was 47 years (range 7-80 years). The most common complication reported was transient facial nerve impairment in 4.8% of the patients. Objective results, measured as the maximal incisional opening, improved by a mean of 17.3mm (PTMJ TJR using the TMJ Concepts prosthesis is a reliable treatment option for the management of end-stage TMJ disease. Copyright © 2013 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Bilateral synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guijarro-Martínez, Raquel; Puche Torres, Miguel; Marqués Mateo, Mariano; Solís García, Ignacio; Miragall Alba, Luis; Iglesias Gimilio, María Eugenia; Pérez-Herrezuelo Hermosa, Gonzalo; Pascual Gil, José Vicente

    2011-06-01

    To report an exceptional case of bilateral synovial chondromatosis (SC) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and discuss diagnostic approaches, treatment options and follow-up data. A 38-year-old woman presented with left preauricular swelling. Initial imaging studies revealed TMJ effusion only. Six years later, synovial calcifications were detected in the left TMJ; the right TMJ space was widened and presented incipient calcium deposits. Open arthrotomy of the left TMJ was performed, with removal of multiple cartilaginous loose bodies and complete synovectomy. Periodic controls proved the asynchronic development of intra-articular bodies in the right TMJ. SC is a metaplastic arthropathy that is uncommon in the TMJ. Bilaterality is exceptional. Diagnosis is often delayed due to the non-specific symptoms, progressive developmental stages and clinicians' lack of awareness of the condition. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is particularly helpful in defining disease extension, excluding a possible tumour and detecting internal derangement. Definitive diagnosis requires arthroscopic or open examination and histopathological analysis. Recurrences are infrequent after arthrotomy, removal of loose bodies and complete synovectomy. SC is an uncommon condition in the TMJ. Bilateral involvement is extremely rare. MRI is effective for diagnosis and postoperative follow-up. Complete synovectomy usually yields an excellent prognosis. Copyright © 2010 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Orthodontics is temporomandibular disorder-neutral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredini, Daniele; Stellini, Edoardo; Gracco, Antonio; Lombardo, Luca; Nardini, Luca Guarda; Siciliani, Giuseppe

    2016-07-01

    To assess if subjects with a clinical diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) have a similar prevalence of orthodontic history as a population of TMD-free individuals and to assess if those subjects who have a history of ideal orthodontics have fewer symptoms than those with a history of nonideal orthodontics. Two groups of age- and sex-matched individuals belonging to either a study ("TMD") or a control group were recruited. Subjects who underwent orthodontic treatment were classified as having a history of ideal or nonideal orthodontics based on the current presence of normal values in five reference occlusal features. The correlation with a history of orthodontic treatment was not clinically significant for any of the TMD diagnoses (ie, muscle pain, joint pain, disc displacement, arthrosis), with Phi (Φ) coefficient values within the -0.120 to 0.058 range. Within the subset of patients with a history of orthodontics, the correlation of ideal or nonideal orthodontic treatment with TMD diagnoses was, in general, not clinically relevant or was weakly relevant. Findings confirmed the substantial absence of clinically significant effects of orthodontics as far as TMD is concerned. The very low correlation values of a negative or positive history of ideal or nonideal orthodontics with the different TMD diagnoses suggest that orthodontic treatment could not have a true role for TMD.

  8. Review: Psychological intervention in temporomandibular disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Araneda

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD frecuently present psychological and psychiatric problems. These patients often show increased somatization, depression, anxiety, stress reaction and catastrophism, wich plays a role in the predisposition, initiation and perpetuation of TMD and treatment response. This review presents thaerapeutic options that compromise the psychological axis of patients with TMD, wich primarily seek to reduce the anxiety and the emotional stress present, modify different perceptions of pain and coping. There are different posibilities, within wich are: patient education, identifying situations that increase the tension to avoid them, teaching relaxation techniques such as biofeedback, hipnosis and yoga. As for psychological treatment, the most common for chronic orofacial pain is cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT. The appropriate and effective psychological intervention can reduce TMD pain, decreasing the probability that the symptoms become more complex. Within psychological treatment options for TMD, conservative standard treatment (education, self-instruction, avoidance of painful movements, soft diet, even the shortest, may be sufficient in the short term for most patients with TMD, especially in cases of acute conditions. The addition of CBT, by a specialist, gives coping skills that will add to the effectiveness, especially in chronic cases, obtaining better results in the long term.

  9. Sleep bruxism and myofascial temporomandibular disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphael, Karen G.; Sirois, David A.; Janal, Malvin N.; Wigren, Pia E.; Dubrovsky, Boris; Nemelivsky, Lena V.; Klausner, Jack J.; Krieger, Ana C.; Lavigne, Gilles J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Many dentists believe that sleep bruxism (SB) is a pathogenic factor in myofascial temporomandibular disorder (TMD), but almost all supportive data rely on patients’ self-reports rather than on direct observation. Methods The authors administered a structured self-report interview to determine whether a large and well-characterized sample of patients with myofascial TMD (124 women) experienced SB more often than did matched control participants (46 women). The authors then used data from a two-night laboratory-based polysomnographic (PSG) study to determine whether the case participants exhibited more SB than the control participants. Results The results of independent sample t tests and χ2 analyses showed that, although self-reported rates of SB were significantly higher in case participants (55.3 percent) than in control participants (15.2 percent), PSG-based measures showed much lower and statistically similar rates of SB in the two groups (9.7 percent and 10.9 percent, respectively). Grinding noises were common in both case participants (59.7 percent) and control participants (78.3 percent). Conclusions Most case participants did not exhibit SB, and the common belief that SB is a sufficient explanation for myofascial TMD should be abandoned. Clinical Implications Although other reasons to consider treating SB may exist, misplaced concern about SB’s sustaining or exacerbating a chronic myofascial TMD condition should not be used to justify SB treatment. PMID:23115152

  10. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes Macías, Juan Francisco; Sánchez Prieto, Martín

    2007-01-01

    Synovial Chondromatosis (SC) is a disease whose etiology is unknown, can be defined as a benign synovial process characterized by the formation of metaplastic cartilaginous nodes inside connective tissue of articular surfaces, is considered an active metaplastic phenomenon better than a neoplastic process; it presents a greater preference to affect women who constitute almost 70% of reported cases, the age range is wide and oscillates between 18-75 years (average 44.6 years). Between the main clinical findings are: pain, crackle, volume augmentation and a limited buccal opening. SC is an unusual state and the reports in the English literature are no more than 75 cases, only 66 of those where histologically verified, most of those were affecting great joints like hip, knee and shoulder, but if SC is not frequent in this sites, is even more infrequent on temporomandibular joint. The aim of this paper is to report a clinical case and at the same time to realize a brief review of the literature.

  11. Ear pain following temporomandibular surgery originating from the temporomandibular joint or the cranial nervous tissue? A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerse, Wouter K; von Piekartz, Harry J M

    2015-02-01

    A patient presenting with local pain and limitation of movement in the temporomandibular region following surgery of the left temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is described. Manual techniques like distraction of the TMJ combined with motor control exercises to restore TMJ function were not sufficient to relieve the patient's symptoms and her orofacial functions. However, during manual assessment and treatment of cranial nervous tissue, in this case the auriculotemporal nerve and its interface, pain was relieved and orofacial functions improved. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Preclinical Animal Models for Temporomandibular Joint Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almarza, Alejandro J; Brown, Bryan N; Arzi, Boaz; Ângelo, David Faustino; Chung, William; Badylak, Stephen F; Detamore, Michael

    2018-01-02

    There is a paucity of in vivo studies that investigate the safety and efficacy of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) tissue regeneration approaches, in part due to the lack of established animal models. Review of disease models for study of TMJ is presented herein with an attempt to identify relevant preclinical animal models for TMJ tissue engineering, with emphasis on the disc and condyle. Although degenerative joint disease models have been mainly performed on mice, rats, and rabbits, preclinical regeneration approaches must employ larger animal species. There remains controversy regarding the preferred choice of larger animal models between the farm pig, minipig, goat, sheep, and dog. The advantages of the pig and minipig include their well characterized anatomy, physiology, and tissue properties. The advantages of the sheep and goat are their easier surgical access, low cost per animal, and its high tissue availability. The advantage of the dog is that the joint space is confined, so migration of interpositional devices should be less likely. However, each species has limitations as well. For example, the farm pig has continuous growth until about 18 months of age, and difficult surgical access due to the zygomatic arch covering the lateral aspect of joint. The minipig is not widely available and somewhat costly. The sheep and the goat are herbivores, and their TMJs mainly function in translation. The dog is a carnivore, and the TMJ is a hinge joint that can only rotate. Although no species provides the gold standard for all preclinical TMJ tissue engineering approaches, the goat and sheep have emerged as the leading options, with the minipig as the choice when cost is less of a limitation; and with the dog and farm pig serving as acceptable alternatives. Finally, naturally occurring TMJ disorders in domestic species may be harnessed on a preclinical trial basis as a clinically relevant platform for translation.

  13. Orofacial pain, jaw function, and temporomandibular disorders in adult women with a history of juvenile chronic arthritis or persistent juvenile chronic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakke, M.; Zak, M.; Jensen, B.L.

    2001-01-01

    Orofacial pain, jaw function, temporomandibular disorders, adult women persistent juvenil chronic arthritis......Orofacial pain, jaw function, temporomandibular disorders, adult women persistent juvenil chronic arthritis...

  14. Winter 2016, Part B—Coastal oblique aerial photographs collected from Assateague Island, Virginia, to Montauk Point, New York, March 8–9, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Karen L. M.

    2017-02-28

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), as part of the National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards project, conducts baseline and storm-response photography missions to document and understand the changes in the vulnerability of the Nation's coasts to extreme storms. On March 8–9, 2016, the USGS conducted an oblique aerial photographic survey from Assateague Island, Virginia, to Montauk Point, New York, aboard a Cessna 182 aircraft at an altitude of 500 feet and approximately 1,200 feet offshore. This mission was conducted to collect baseline data for assessing incremental changes in the beach and nearshore area and can be used to assess future coastal change.The photographs in this report document the state of the barrier islands and other coastal features at the time of the survey.

  15. Prevalence of the different Axis I clinical subtypes in a sample of patients with orofacial pain and temporomandibular disorders in the Andalusian Healthcare Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Aguilera, Antonio; Blanco-Aguilera, Elena; Serrano-del-Rosal, Rafael; Biedma-Velázquez, Lourdes; Rodríguez-Torronteras, Alejandro; Segura-Saint-Gerons, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Background The main objective of this paper is to analyze the prevalence of each of the different clinical subtypes of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in a sample of patients with this pathology. In addition, a second objective was to analyze their distribution according to gender. Material and Methods To this end, the results of 1603 patients who went to the Unit of Temporomandibular Disorders in the Córdoba Healthcare District because they suffered from this pathology were analyzed. In order to diagnose them, the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) were applied, analyzing the different Axis I subtypes (myopathy, discopathy and arthropathy) and obtaining the combined Axis I for each patient and the relation of all these variables according to gender. The null-hypothesis test confirmed the lack of connection between the gender variable and the different subtypes in the clinical analysis, and between the former and the combined Axis I of the RDC/TMD. Results The prevalence was high for the muscle disorders subtype in general, showing an 88.7% prevalence, while the presence of discopathies or arthropathies was much lower. Among discopathies, the most frequent ones were disc displacements with reduction, with 39.7% and 42.8% for the left and right temporomandibular joints (TMJ), respectively, while the prevalence of arthropathies was 26.3% for the right TMJ and 32.9% for the left TMJ. The bivariate analysis on the connection with gender reveals a p≥ 0.05 value for the muscle and arthralgia subtypes. Conclusions The patients seen at the TMD Unit where mostly middle-aged women whose main clinical axis subtype was the muscle disorder subtype. For their part, both discopathies and arthropathies, although present, are much less prevalent. Key words:RDCTMD, axis I, orofacial pain, temporomandibular disorders, gender. PMID:26615508

  16. Temporomandibular Lavage Versus Nonsurgical Treatments for Temporomandibular Disorders: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Carl; Goulet, Jean-Paul; El-Ouazzani, Mehdi; Turgeon, Alexis F

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the efficacy of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) lavage (arthrocentesis or arthroscopy) for the treatment of temporomandibular disorders in reducing pain and improving jaw motion. We performed a systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing TMJ lavage with conservative measures. The data sources were MEDLINE, Embase, CENTRAL (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials), Scopus, Web of Science, and reference lists of relevant articles. Two independent reviewers identified RCTs by using controlled vocabulary (MeSH, Emtree) and free text terms. Data extracted from the selected studies included population characteristics, interventions, outcomes, and funding sources. Risk of bias was assessed with the Cochrane Collaboration risk assessment tool for RCTs. Five studies met the inclusion criteria, for a total of 308 patients. Of these studies, 3 were categorized as having a high risk of bias and 2 had a low risk. The summary effect of the 5 studies showed a reduction in pain in the intervention group at 6 months (-0.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.90 to -0.37; P < .00001; I2 = 88%) and 3 months (-0.47; 95% CI, -0.75 to -0.19; P = .001; I2 = 85%). This was not the case at 1 month. No difference in mouth opening was observed at 6 months (-0.21; 95% CI, -1.82 to 1.40; P < .80; I2 = 74%), 3 months (0.20; 95% CI, -1.81 to 2.20; P = .85; I2 = 68%), and 1 month (-1.18; 95% CI, -2.90 to 0.55; P = .18; I2 = 0%). Given the relatively small number of patients included in this meta-analysis, the high risk of bias in 3 studies, and the statistical and clinical heterogeneity of the included studies, the use of TMJ lavage for the treatment of temporomandibular disorders should be recommended with caution because of the lack of strong evidence to support its use. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Low-cost computing and network communication for a point-of-care device to perform a 3-part leukocyte differential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powless, Amy J.; Feekin, Lauren E.; Hutcheson, Joshua A.; Alapat, Daisy V.; Muldoon, Timothy J.

    2016-03-01

    Point-of-care approaches for 3-part leukocyte differentials (granulocyte, monocyte, and lymphocyte), traditionally performed using a hematology analyzer within a panel of tests called a complete blood count (CBC), are essential not only to reduce cost but to provide faster results in low resource areas. Recent developments in lab-on-a-chip devices have shown promise in reducing the size and reagents used, relating to a decrease in overall cost. Furthermore, smartphone diagnostic approaches have shown much promise in the area of point-of-care diagnostics, but the relatively high per-unit cost may limit their utility in some settings. We present here a method to reduce computing cost of a simple epi-fluorescence imaging system using a Raspberry Pi (single-board computer, Raspberry Pi to a main server and return results back to the user, exporting the bulk of the computational requirements. Six images were acquired per minute with up to 200 cells per field of view. Preliminary results showed that the differential count varied significantly in monocytes with a 1 minute time difference indicating the importance of time-gating to produce an accurate/consist differential.

  18. Expanding the taxonomy of the diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peck, C.C.; Goulet, J-P; Lobbezoo, F.; Schiffman, E.L.; Alstergren, P.; Anderson, G.C.; De Leeuw, R.; Jensen, R.; Michelotti, A.; Ohrbach, R.; Petersson, A.; List, T.

    2014-01-01

    There is a need to expand the current temporomandibular disorders' (TMDs) classification to include less common but clinically important disorders. The immediate aim was to develop a consensus-based classification system and associated diagnostic criteria that have clinical and research utility for

  19. Case-Based Learning for Orofacial Pain and Temporomandibular Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Glenn T.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    The use of interactive computer-based simulation of cases of chronic orofacial pain and temporomandibular joint disfunction patients for clinical dental education is described. Its application as a voluntary study aid in a third-year dental course is evaluated for effectiveness and for time factors in case completion. (MSE)

  20. Correlations between mandibular asymmetries and temporomandibular disorders (TMD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ippolito, Simona; Ursini, Roberto; Giuliante, Luca; Deli, Roberto

    2014-06-01

    Mandibular asymmetries are the fulcrum of many debates among modern orthodontists and maxillofacial surgeons. The interest is even greater when facial asymmetries are correlated to the development of TMJ symptoms and temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The aim of this study is to investigate how mandibular asymmetries constitute etiological or predisposing factors for the development of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). We considered patients with mandibular asymmetries associated with TMD. Using orthodontic or surgical-orthodontic treatment, patients experienced correction of their TMJ symptoms. Thus, mandibular asymmetries represent a major risk factor for the development of TMD. We studied a sample of 16 subjects aged between 14 and 36-years-old (11 females and 5 males) with mandibular asymmetries (81% structural asymmetry, 19% functional asymmetry). These subjects presented skeletal and dental malocclusions combined with several temporomandibular disorders, mostly due to muscle tension. In 100% of cases, patients received orthodontic treatment. We compared pre- and post-treatment postero-anterior (PA) cephalometric analyses in order to evaluate asymmetry resolution. Comparison of measurements from pre- and post-therapy PA cephalograms showed resolution of mandibular asymmetries after treatment. The treatment resolved mandibular asymmetries and completely eliminated temporomandibular symptoms. Orthodontic treatment of patients presenting mandibular asymmetry enables correction of all TMJ symptoms and TMD. Mandibular symmetries can therefore be considered to constitute etiological or predisposing factors for the development of TMD. Copyright © 2014 CEO. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Epidemiology and natural progression of articular temporomandibular disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deBont, LGM; Dijkgraaf, LC; Stegenga, B

    The reported prevalence of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) differs from study to study, probably because of methodologic errors and lack of standardized definitions of TMDs and their characteristics. Classification of TMDs should be in accordance with classification of synovial joint disorders as

  2. Temporomandibular joint dislocation in an epileptic and mentally ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation is defined as an excessive forward movement of the condyle beyond the articular eminence with complete separation of articular surfaces and fixation in that position.' Theories regarding the pathogenesis of TMJ dislocation propose laxity of TMJ ligaments or capsule, excessive ...

  3. Groningen temporomandibular joint prosthesis. Development and first clinical application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loon, JP; de Bont, LGM; Stegenga, B; Spijkervet, FKL; Verkerke, GJ

    Patients with a severely degenerated temporomandibular joint (TMJ) may benefit from an alloplastic TMJ replacement. The aim of the study was to develop a safe and properly functioning TMJ prosthesis. The design was based on imitation of anterior condylar translation by an inferiorly located centre

  4. Inflammatory and degenerative disease in the temporomandibular joint

    OpenAIRE

    Gynther, Göran W.

    1996-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthroscopy is an established technique withhigh diagnostic accuracy regarding synovitis and degenerative changes of the articularfibrocartilage and disk. However, so far no studies have been done to correlate themacroscopic and histologic findings with each arthroscopic criterion. Thereforepatients with TMJ internal derangement (ID) were investigated by arthroscopy andarthrotomy (with biopsy) and the findings were compared with observations usinglight microscopy...

  5. An Overall Look for Temporomandibular Joint Pathologies and Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Eren

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint (TMJ complex is one of the most complex joint which connects the mandible to the skull. This kind of joint system has ability to perform complex and bilateral movements. Because, TMJ has a complicated anatomy, there is a need for a thorough investigation to find the correct cause of TMJ disorders, as well as knowing the TMJ anatomy. Anatomical structures of TMJ contain hard tissues and soft tissues. Soft tissues consist of joint capsule, ligaments, articular disc, muscles and tendons. A healthy joint is connected to proper and compatible function of all these anatomical structures. Temporomandibular disorder (TMD is a term used for any problems that affecting the temporomandibular joint. Possible causes for TMD are injury to the TMJ or related anatomical structures, clenching the teeth or bruxism, dislocation of the disc, presence of osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis in the TMJ, emotional stress, aging, etc. The most common TMJ disorders are pain dysfunction syndrome, internal derangement, arthritis, and traumas. Radiographic imaging is an important element in the correct diagnosis. Because of the anatomic complexity of the temporomandibular joint and its proximity to the temporal bone, mastoid air cells, and auditory structures, imaging of the joint structures should also be investigated. Therefore, careful clinical and radiological examinations are essential in the evaluation of TMJ. In this review, TMJ anatomy, Imaging methods, the classification of various pathologies and radiological techniques, are discussed.

  6. Predictors for the development of temporomandibular disorders in scuba divers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lobbezoo, F.; van Wijk, A.J.; Klinger, M.C.; Ruiz Vicente, E.; van Dijk, C.J.; Eijkman, M.A.J.

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to determine predictors for the development of complaints of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in a large sample of Dutch scuba divers who were free of any TMD complaints before they started diving actively. Five-hundred and thirty-six scuba divers (mean ± SD age = 40·4 ± 11·9 years;

  7. [Temporomandibular joint septic arthritis with secondary condylar resorption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constant, M; Nicot, R; Maes, J-M; Raoul, G; Ferri, J

    2016-09-01

    Septic arthritis are serious infections rarely observed for the temporomandibular joint. They are mainly hematogenous or transmitted by contiguity. Our patient presents the case of an infection of the temporomandibular joint by maxillary sinusitis of dental origin further complicated by cerebral abscess and empyema. Initial treatment consisted of an endonasal and intraoral drainage, intravenous empirical antibiotic therapy, a close clinicoradiological monitoring, and rehabilitation following a long-term active physiotherapy. Furthermore, the patient reported the onset of a dental articulation disorder with a left side premature contact and right lateral open bite, corresponding to a significant left condylar resorption. This infectious disease is very rare for temporomandibular location; however, its general and functional outcome is determined by the precocity of the treatment. It is important to know the diagnosis and the associated symptoms even if they are not very specifically described. It is essential to consider the diagnosis when facing atypical pain of the temporomandibular joint associated with trismus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Symptom reporting in temporomandibular joint clicking; Some theoretical considerations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruijt, R.; Hoogstraten, J.

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of research on psychological aspects of temporomandibular disorders suggests that self-reports of symptoms do not constitute reliable instruments for the measurement of physiological processes. In TMJ clicking, the actual physiological signal can be measured and compared with self-reports

  9. Skeletal pattern in subjects with temporomandibular joint disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almăşan, Oana Cristina; Băciuţ, Mihaela; Almăşan, Horea Artimoniu; Bran, Simion; Lascu, Liana; Iancu, Mihaela; Băciuţ, Grigore

    2013-02-21

    To establish the skeletal pattern in subjects with malocclusions and temporomandibular disorders (TMD); to assess the relationship between craniofacial skeletal structures and TMD in subjects with malocclusions. Sixty-four subjects with malocclusions, over 18 years of age, were included in the study. Temporomandibular disorders were clinically assessed according to the Helkimo Anamnestic Index. Subjects underwent a lateral cephalogram. Subjects were grouped according to the sagittal skeletal pattern (ANB angle) into class I, II and III. Parametric Student tests with equal or unequal variations were used (variations were previously tested with Levene test). Twenty-four patients with TMD (experimental sample); 40 patients without TMD (control group); interincisal angle was higher in class I and II (p < 0.05) experimental subjects; overjet was larger in experimental subjects; midline shift and Wits appraisal were broader in the experimental group in all three classes. In class III subjects, the SNB angle was higher in the experimental group (p = 0.01). Joint noises followed by reduced mandible mobility, muscular pain and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain were the most frequent symptoms in subjects with TMD and malocclusions. Temporomandibular joint status is an important factor to consider when planning orthodontic treatment in patients with severe malocclusions; midline shift, large overjet and deep overbite have been associated with signs and symptoms of TMD.

  10. Temporomandibular disorders in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-06-05

    Jun 5, 2015 ... persisted for longer than 90 days experience a progressive. Temporomandibular disorders in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: A clinical study. C Kurtoglu, M Kurkcu1, Y Sertdemir2, S Ozbek3, CC Gürbüz. Departments of Prosthetic Dentistry and 1Oral Surgery, Faculty of Dentistry, Cukurova University,.

  11. Voice-supported Electronic Health Record for Temporomandibular Joint Disorders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hippmann, R.; Dostálová, T.; Zvárová, Jana; Nagy, Miroslav; Seydlová, M.; Hanzlíček, Petr; Kříž, P.; Šmídl, L.; Trmal, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 2 (2010), s. 168-172 ISSN 0026-1270 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : electronic health record * structured data entry * dentistry * temporomandibular joint disorder Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science Impact factor: 1.472, year: 2010

  12. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease: an integrative literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taysa Vannoska de Almeida Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Temporomandibular joint dysfunction is a set of disorders involving the masticatory muscles, temporomandibular joint and associated structures. It is known that the progression of motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease is an indication that these people are more prone to the development of this dysfunction. Thus, this study aims to investigate the signs and symptoms of temporomandibular dysfunction in people with Parkinson's disease. The search was performed in the databases: MEDLINE/ PubMed, LILACs, CINAHL, SCOPUS, Web of Science and PEDro, without timing or language restriction. Specific descriptors were used for each database and keywords, evaluated by the instruments: Critical Appraisal Skill Program and Agency for Health care and Research and Quality. A total of 4,209 articles were found but only 5 were included. After critical analysis of the methodology of the articles, one did not reach the minimum score required by the evaluation instruments, thus, it was excluded. The selected articles addressed, as signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint dysfunction, the following: myofascial pain, bruxism, limitation of mouth opening, dislocation of the articular disc and asymmetry in the distribution of occlusal contacts. Further studies are needed in order to determine the relationship between cause and effect of the analyzed variables, so as to contribute to more specific and effective therapeutic interventions.

  13. Expanding the taxonomy of the diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peck, C C; Goulet, J-P; Lobbezoo, F

    2014-01-01

    There is a need to expand the current temporomandibular disorders' (TMDs) classification to include less common but clinically important disorders. The immediate aim was to develop a consensus-based classification system and associated diagnostic criteria that have clinical and research utility f...

  14. Temporomandibular Joint Disorders in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chun Lin

    2007-12-01

    Conclusion: There was a high prevalence of TMD in RA patients. The severity of TMD variably correlated with RA severity. Clinically, a high score of hand-joint space narrowing may serve as an early indicator of RA patients at risk of severe TMD. This may facilitate early management and prevent the functional impairment of the temporomandibular joint.

  15. Temporomandibular joint dislocation in Nairobi | Sang | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Despite the diverse conservative and surgical modalities for the management of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation and the controversy that surrounds them, very little has been done within the East-African setup in terms of highlighting and provoking greater interest in the epidemiology and ...

  16. Fibromyalgia syndrome and temporomandibular disorders with muscular pain. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Fernández, Ana Maria; Jiménez-Castellanos, Emilio; Iglesias-Linares, Alejandro; Bueso-Madrid, Débora; Fernández-Rodríguez, Ana; de Miguel, Manuel

    2017-03-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) refer to a group of clinical picture affecting the masticatory muscles and temporomandibular joint that are characterized by muscular or joint pain, dysfunction (limited or altered functions) and joint noises, as well as other associated symptoms, such as tension headaches, otalgia, dizziness, tinnitus, and others. Fibromyalgia (FM) is a syndrome of unknown etiology involving generalized chronic pain accompanied, in a high percentage of cases, by other symptoms such as asthenia, anxiety, depression, sleep disturbances, and other less frequent symptoms, such as temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Data were compiled by two experienced examiners following a specific form. An electronic search was carried out in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PUBMED, and SCOPUS electronic databases (up to April 2016, unrestricted by date or language). Comparative clinical studies with patients with both clinical pictures involving the study of pathogenic processes. Fibromyalgia and temporomandibular disorders with muscle pain both have profiles that affect the muscular system and therefore share many epidemiological, clinical, and physiopathological symptoms. Because of this, we are led to think that there is, if not a common etiology, at least a common pathogenesis. This article revises the physiopathological processes of both clinical pictures in an attempt to determine their similarities and likenesses. This would undoubtedly help in providing a better therapeutic approach.

  17. Biomechanical modeling of open locks of the human temporomandibular joint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuijt, M.; Koolstra, J.H.; Lobbezoo, F.; Naeije, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with hypermobility of the temporomandibular joint may have problems closing their mouth after opening widely. In the worst case, the mandibular condyles become trapped in front of the articular eminences and the jaw muscles cannot reposition them into the fossae (open lock). The

  18. Temporomandibular disorders in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The aim of this study is to evaluate the prevalence and type of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Materials and Methods: Fifty‑four patients having RA treatment at Cukurova University in Rheumatology Clinic were enrolled to the study. Demographic and rheumatologic ...

  19. Factors associated with temporomandibular disorders pain in adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandes, G.; van Selms, M.K.A.; Gonçalves, D.A.G.; Lobbezoo, F.; Camparis, C.M.

    2015-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) pain in adolescents, it is important to study the factors associated with its presence. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate potential predictors for TMD pain in adolescents, thereby including a diversity of factors

  20. The relationship between temporomandibular dysfunction and head and cervical posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheus, Ricardo Alves; Ramos-Perez, Flávia Maria de Moraes; Menezes, Alynne Vieira; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Haiter-Neto, Francisco; Bóscolo, Frab Norberto; de Almeida, Solange Maria

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the possibility of any correlation between disc displacement and parameters used for evaluation of skull positioning in relation to the cervical spine: craniocervical angle, suboccipital space between C0-C1, cervical curvature and position of the hyoid bone in individuals with and without symptoms of temporomandibular dysfunction. The patients were evaluated following the guidelines set forth by RDC/TMD. Evaluation was performed by magnetic resonance imaging for establishment of disc positioning in the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) of 30 volunteer patients without temporomandibular dysfunction symptoms and 30 patients with symptoms. Evaluation of skull positioning in relation to the cervical spine was performed on lateral cephalograms achieved with the individual in natural head position. Data were submitted to statistical analysis by Fisher's exact test at 5% significance level. To measure the degree of reproducibility/agreements between surveys, the kappa (K) statistics was used. Significant differences were observed between C0-C1 measurement for both symptomatic (p=0.04) and asymptomatic (p=0.02). No statistical differences were observed regarding craniocervical angle, C1-C2 and hyoid bone position in relation to the TMJs with and without disc displacement. Although statistically significant difference was found in the C0-C1 space, no association between these and internal temporomandibular joint disorder can be considered. Based on the results observed in this study, no direct relationship could be determined between the presence of disc displacement and the variables assessed.

  1. Diagnostic accuracy of temporomandibular disorder pain tests: a multicenter study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, C.M.; Naeije, M.; de Laat, A.; Michelotti, A.; Nilner, M.; Craane, B.; Ekberg, E.; Farella, M.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2009-01-01

    AIMS: To estimate the diagnostic accuracy of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) clinical examination and of the dynamic/static tests for the recognition of TMD pain. Since the diagnosis of TMD pain is especially complicated in persistent orofacial pain

  2. Influence of Psychosocial Factors and Habitual Behavior in Temporomandibular Disorder–Related Symptoms in a Working Population in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Akira; Kino, Koji; Sugisaki, Masashi; Tsukagoshi, Kaori

    2012-01-01

    Background: The symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are directly influenced by numerous factors, and it is thought that additional factors exert indirect influences. However, the relationships between TMD-related symptoms (TRS) and these contributing factors are largely unknown. Thus, the goal of the present study was to investigate influences on TRS in a working population by determining the prevalence of TRS, analyzing contributing factors, and determining their relative influences on TRS. Materials and Methods: The study subjects were 2203 adults who worked for a single company. Subjects completed a questionnaire assessing TRS, psychosocial factors (stress, anxiety, depressed mood, and chronic fatigue), tooth-contacting habit, and sleep bruxism-related morning symptoms, using a 5-point numeric rating scale. Our analysis proceeded in 2 phases. First, all variables of the descriptor were divided into parts by using an exploratory factor analysis. Second, this factorial structure was verified by using a confirmatory factor analysis with structural equation modeling. Results: Of 2203 employees, 362 reported experiencing TRS (16.4%). Structural equation modeling generated a final model with a goodness of fit index of 0.991, an adjusted goodness of fit index of 0.984, and a root mean square error of approximately 0.021. These indices indicate a strong structural model. The standardized path coefficients for “habitual behavioral factors and TRS,” “psychosocial factors and habitual behavioral factors,” “psychosocial factors and TRS,” and “gender and habitual behavior factors” were 0.48, 0.38, 0.14, and 0.18, respectively. Conclusions: Habitual behavioral factors exert a stronger effect on TRS than do psychosocial factors. PMID:23346261

  3. Orthodontics for treating temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luther, Friedy; Layton, Stephen; McDonald, Fraser

    2010-07-07

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) relate to discomfort of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The disorder is multifactorial with a degree of psychogenic influence varying throughout an individual's life with phases of symptoms affecting the quality of life. In an attempt to treat this complex group of disorders many treatment modalities have been identified some of which are also considered in other Cochrane reviews. The disorder also has a normal cycle of events appearing to spontaneously improve without treatment. To establish the effectiveness of orthodontic intervention in reducing symptoms in patients with TMD (compared with any control group receiving no treatment, placebo treatment or reassurance) and to establish if active orthodontic intervention leads to TMD. The Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched. Handsearching of orthodontic journals and other related journals was undertaken in keeping with the Cochrane Collaboration handsearching programme. No language restrictions were applied. Authors of any studies were identified, as were experts offering legal advice, and contacted to identify unpublished trials. Most recent search: 13th April 2010. All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) including quasi-randomised trials assessing orthodontic treatment for TMD were included. Studies with adults aged equal to or above 18 years old with clinically diagnosed TMD were included. There were no age restrictions for prevention trials provided the follow-up period extended into adulthood. The inclusion criteria required reports to state their diagnostic criteria for TMD at the start of treatment and for participants to exhibit two or more of the signs and/or symptoms. The treatment group included treatment with appliances that could induce stable orthodontic tooth movement. Patients receiving splints for 8 to 12 weeks and studies involving surgical intervention (direct exploration/surgery of the joint and

  4. On surgical intervention in the temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmark, G

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to evaluate the indications for and the results of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) surgery in patients with long-standing severe orofacial pain and dysfunction as well as in patients with fractures of the condylar neck. The patients with long-standing pain and dysfunction had had symptoms for a mean time of 4 years, had been treated conservatively for a mean time of 2.5 years, and had undergone numerous conservative treatment methods without improvement except for a minor increase in mouth opening capacity. The indications for surgery were strict; only 1% or less of all the patients referred to the departments with a diagnosis of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) were prescribed surgery, which was considered to be the only remaining option. The TMJ surgery reduced pain, sleeping problems, and analgesic consumption and improved mouth opening capacity. The procedure showed low morbidity except for a facial nerve disturbance in three patients. Postoperatively, the bite force was observed to be normalised, and the radiographic examination showed moderate to severe osteoarthrotic changes. These changes, though extensive, were considered to be the normal outcome of diskectomy and without clinical significance, even though they resembled degenerative joint disease. In study V, surgery was performed on patients with a clear diagnosis of anterior disk displacement (ADD) with or without reduction. The preoperative pain and mouth opening capacity were markedly improved as well as other subjective symptoms. Although surgical morbidity was low, some radiographic changes were clearly detectable. In agreement with earlier reports, patients with a distinct diagnosis of ADD with or without reduction were clearly helped by diskectomy. In cases of ADD with or without reduction, it can be concluded that unsuccessful conservative treatment should not exceed 3-6 months but be discontinued in favour of the documented advantages of surgery in these cases. Patients

  5. Arthrocentesis and lavage for treating temporomandibular joint disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chunlan; Shi, Zongdao; Revington, Peter

    2009-10-07

    Temporomandibular joint disorders are important oral health problems, reducing the quality of life of sufferers. It has been estimated that approximately 20% to 30% of the adult population will experience temporomandibular joint dysfunction. Arthrocentesis and lavage has been used to treat temporomandibular joint disorders for about 10 years, but the clinical effectiveness of the therapy has not been summarized in the form of a systematic review. To assess the effectiveness and complications of arthrocentesis and lavage for the treatment of temporomandibular joint disorders compared with controlled interventions. The Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (to August 2009), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 3), MEDLINE (1950 to August 2009), EMBASE (1980 to August 2009), OpenSIGLE (to August 2009), CBMdisc (1981 to 2007 (in Chinese)) and Chinese Medical Library were searched. All the Chinese professional journals in the oral health field were handsearched and conference proceedings consulted. There was no language restriction. All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) (including quasi-randomised clinical trials) aiming to test the therapeutic effects of arthrocentesis and lavage for treating temporomandibular joint disorders. Two review authors independently extracted data, and three review authors independently assessed the risk of bias of included trials. The first authors of the selected articles were contacted for additional information. Two trials, at unclear to high risk of bias, were included in the review. The two trials, including 81 patients with temporomandibular joint disorders, compared arthrocentesis with arthroscopy. No statistically significant difference was found between the interventions in terms of pain. However, a statistically significant difference in favour of arthroscopy was found in maximum incisal opening (MIO) (weighted mean difference of -5.28 (95% confidence interval (CI) -7.10 to -3.46)).Mild and transient adverse reactions

  6. Temporomandibular disorders: a report of 124 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins-Júnior, Reynaldo Leite; Palma, Antônio José Garcia; Marquardt, Emilio Jose; Gondin, Thais Monteiro de Barros; Kerber, Florence de Carvalho

    2010-10-14

    This study aims to present both the features of 124 consecutive patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and the results of a reversible, conservative, and low-tech treatment. One hundred fifty-eight records of consecutive patients treated in School of Dentistry at the Univag-University Center in Várzea Grande-MT, Brazil, 124 of whom were considered TMD patients, were examined. The following data were obtained: gender, age, main complaint, diagnosis, co-morbidities, type of treatment performed, and treatment results. The patients who received a successful treatment were contacted for reevaluation four to six years after the conclusion of treatment. Pain was the main complaint for 92.7 percent of the patients. The majority of patients were female (female:male ratio of 4.1:1), with a peak age range between 20 and 30 years. Roughly 59.7 percent of the patients were diagnosed as having a muscular TMD, 12.9 percent as an articular TMD, and 27.4 percent as a mixed TMD. The success rate for treatment was 91.7 percent, and there was a tendency toward the long-term maintenance of good results. The features of the 124 TMD patients treated were similar to those reported in the literature with regard to gender, age, and diagnostic prevalence. Most of the disorders were of a muscular origin, and there was a predominance of women between 20 and 30 years of age. The conservative, reversible, and low-tech treatment success rate for TMD can reach values above 90 percent. Therefore, there is no need for invasive, irreversible, expensive, or high-tech treatments for the majority of patients. The majority of TMD patients can benefit from reversible, conservative, and low-tech treatments such as parafunction control and therapeutic exercises that can be performed by any clinician once an accurate diagnosis has been made.

  7. Speech evaluation in children with temporomandibular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Aparecida Pizolato

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to evaluate the influence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD on speech in children, and to verify the influence of occlusal characteristics. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Speech and dental occlusal characteristics were assessed in 152 Brazilian children (78 boys and 74 girls, aged 8 to 12 (mean age 10.05 ± 1.39 years with or without TMD signs and symptoms. The clinical signs were evaluated using the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD (axis I and the symptoms were evaluated using a questionnaire. The following groups were formed: Group TMD (n=40, TMD signs and symptoms (Group S and S, n=68, TMD signs or symptoms (Group S or S, n=33, and without signs and symptoms (Group N, n=11. Articulatory speech disorders were diagnosed during spontaneous speech and repetition of the words using the "Phonological Assessment of Child Speech" for the Portuguese language. It was also applied a list of 40 phonological balanced words, read by the speech pathologist and repeated by the children. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, Fisher's exact or Chi-square tests (α=0.05. RESULTS: A slight prevalence of articulatory disturbances, such as substitutions, omissions and distortions of the sibilants /s/ and /z/, and no deviations in jaw lateral movements were observed. Reduction of vertical amplitude was found in 10 children, the prevalence being greater in TMD signs and symptoms children than in the normal children. The tongue protrusion in phonemes /t/, /d/, /n/, /l/ and frontal lips in phonemes /s/ and /z/ were the most prevalent visual alterations. There was a high percentage of dental occlusal alterations. CONCLUSIONS: There was no association between TMD and speech disorders. Occlusal alterations may be factors of influence, allowing distortions and frontal lisp in phonemes /s/ and /z/ and inadequate tongue position in phonemes /t/; /d/; /n/; /l/.

  8. Speech evaluation in children with temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizolato, Raquel Aparecida; Fernandes, Frederico Silva de Freitas; Gavião, Maria Beatriz Duarte

    2011-10-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the influence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) on speech in children, and to verify the influence of occlusal characteristics. Speech and dental occlusal characteristics were assessed in 152 Brazilian children (78 boys and 74 girls), aged 8 to 12 (mean age 10.05 ± 1.39 years) with or without TMD signs and symptoms. The clinical signs were evaluated using the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD) (axis I) and the symptoms were evaluated using a questionnaire. The following groups were formed: Group TMD (n=40), TMD signs and symptoms (Group S and S, n=68), TMD signs or symptoms (Group S or S, n=33), and without signs and symptoms (Group N, n=11). Articulatory speech disorders were diagnosed during spontaneous speech and repetition of the words using the "Phonological Assessment of Child Speech" for the Portuguese language. It was also applied a list of 40 phonological balanced words, read by the speech pathologist and repeated by the children. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, Fisher's exact or Chi-square tests (α=0.05). A slight prevalence of articulatory disturbances, such as substitutions, omissions and distortions of the sibilants /s/ and /z/, and no deviations in jaw lateral movements were observed. Reduction of vertical amplitude was found in 10 children, the prevalence being greater in TMD signs and symptoms children than in the normal children. The tongue protrusion in phonemes /t/, /d/, /n/, /l/ and frontal lips in phonemes /s/ and /z/ were the most prevalent visual alterations. There was a high percentage of dental occlusal alterations. There was no association between TMD and speech disorders. Occlusal alterations may be factors of influence, allowing distortions and frontal lisp in phonemes /s/ and /z/ and inadequate tongue position in phonemes /t/; /d/; /n/; /l/.

  9. Deglutition and temporomandibular disorders in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizolato, R A; Silva De Freitas Fernandes, F; Beatriz Duarte Gavião, M

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the characteristics of deglutition in children having or not temporomandibular disorders (TMD) or signs and/or symptoms of TMD. The sample comprised 152 children aged from 8 to 12 years (78 males and 74 females, mean age 10.05+/-1.39 years). The clinical signs were evaluated using the axis I of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD) and the symptoms, using a questionnaire. Patients were divided into the following groups: Group TMD (N.=40), signs and symptoms of TMD (Group S and S, N.=68), signs or symptoms of TMD (Group S or S, N.=33) and without signs and symptoms (Group N, N.=11). Characteristics of orofacial structures such as occlusion, tongue, lingual frenulum, lips and mentalis muscle were evaluated. Myofunctional evaluation during deglutition with solid (bread) and liquid (water) was also performed. A high prevalence of abnormal deglutition was found, with similar proportion in groups. Alterations in lips, mentalis muscle and tongue in swallowing was significantly smaller in Group N than in the other groups. The proportions of children with lower lip interposition and lateral tongue thrust, when swallowing liquid, were significantly higher than swallowing solids. There was a smaller proportion of children in Group N with lower lip interposition when swallowing liquids. TMD or presence of signs and/or symptoms of TMD was not associated with an abnormal deglutition. Nevertheless, orofacial myofunctional alterations could be considered influencing factors on TMD, due to the high prevalence of abnormal deglutition pattern. In addition, the abnormal deglutition could be attributed to the malocclusion, mixed dentition phase and orofacial myofunctional characteristics.

  10. Does playing a musical instrument impose a risk for temporomandibular disorders? A review of literature: Stellt das Spielen eines Instruments ein Risiko für kraniomandibuläre Dysfunktionen dar? Eine Übersichtsarbeit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Selms, M.K.A.; Attallah, M.M.; Visscher, C.M.; Ahlberg, J.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2015-01-01

    Playing a musical instrument that loads the masticatory system, such as the violin or oboe, has been suggested to be part of the group of etiological factors for temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). In 2014, a review of literature was published that explicitly focused on the possible association

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging-based temporomandibular joint space evaluation in temporomandibular disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nah, Kyung Soo [Pusan National Univ. College of Dentistry, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    Disc and condylar position were observed on MRIs of temporomandibular joint disorder patients and condylar position agreement between MRI and tranascranal radiography was evaluated. MRI and transcranial radiographs of both TM joints from 67 patients with temporomandibular disorder were used. On MRI, the position and shape of disc and condylar position as anterior, middle, posterior was evaluated at medial, center, and lateral views. On transcranial radiographs, condylar position was evaluated using the shortest distance from condyle to fossa in anterior, superior, and posterior directions. 1. On MRI, 96 joints (71.6%) of 134 had anterior disc dispalcement with reduction and 38 joints (28.4%) without reduction. 2. Fourteen (14.6%) of 96 reducible joints showed anterior condylar position. 19 (19.8%) showed central position, 63 joints (65.6%) showed posterior position. Two joints (5.3%) of 38 non-reducible joints showed anterior condylar position, while 9 (23.7%) showed central position, and 27 (71.1%)-posterior position. 3. In 85 joints (63.4%) of 134, the transcranial condylar position agreed with that of the central MRI view, 10 joints (7.5%) with that of medial, 16 joints (11.6%) with that of lateral, and 23 joints (17.2%) disagreed with that of MRI. On MRI, most of the reducible and non-reducible joints showed posterior condylar position. Transcranial radiographs taken with machine designed for TMJ had better agreement of condylar position with that of MRI. Extremely narrow joint spaces or very posterior condylar positions observed on transcranial radiographs had a little more than fifty percent agreement with those of MRIs.

  12. Association of Temporomandibular Joint Pain According to Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Temporomandibular Disorder Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahara, Namiaki; Nakagawa, Satoshi; Sumikura, Kanako; Kabasawa, Yuji; Sakamoto, Ichiro; Harada, Hiroyuki

    2017-09-01

    This study investigated the associations between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and pain in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The study included 646 TMJs of 323 consecutive patients with temporomandibular disorders; of these, 222 (34.4%) had TMJ pain whereas 424 (65.6%) had no TMJ pain. MRIs were used to evaluate disc position, osteoarthritis, joint fluid, and bone marrow edema. Internal derangement was classified as normal, anterior disc displacement with reduction, and anterior disc displacement without reduction (ADDWOR); condylar morphology was classified as normal, moderate bony change, and severe bony change. The odds ratio (OR) for each MRI variable for nonpainful versus painful TMJs was computed using logistic regression analysis. Compared with joints with normal disc position, the OR of those with ADDWOR was 2.74 (P pain. Similarly, compared with joints with normal condylar morphology, the OR of those with severe bony change was 4.62 (P = .02) for TMJ pain. In addition, the risk of TMJ pain increased by 2.37 in joints with joint fluid (P joints with bone marrow edema (P = .006). The risk of TMJ pain increased significantly with ADDWOR in combination with severe bony change, joint fluid, and bone marrow edema. These results suggest an association between TMJ pain and ADDWOR, severe bony change, joint fluid, and bone marrow edema. Thus, combining various MRI variables may improve the diagnostic accuracy of TMJ pain. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. IncobotulinumtoxinA Injection for Temporomandibular Joint Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Amit A; Lerner, Michael Z; Blitzer, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) involves dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint and associated muscles of mastication causing pain with chewing, limitation of jaw movement, and pain. While the exact pathophysiology of TMD is not completely understood, it is thought that hyperfunction of the muscles of mastication places stress on the temporomandibular joint, leading to degeneration of the joint and associated symptoms. We hypothesize that chemodenervation of the muscles of mastication with IncobotulinumtoxinA (Xeomin) will decrease the stress on the temporomandibular joint and improve pain associated with temporomandibular joint and muscle disorder (TMJD). Twenty patients were randomized to IncobotulinumtoxinA (170 units) or saline injection of the masticatory muscles. Patient-reported pain scale (0-10) was recorded at 4-week intervals following injection for 16 weeks. Patients who received saline injection initially were assessed for reduction in pain at the first 4-week interval and if still had significant pain were rolled over into the IncobotulinumtoxinA arm. Preinjection pain scores were similar between patients. While there was a statistically significant reduction in pain score in the placebo group one month, there was an overall larger drop in average pain scores in those patients injected with IncobotulinumtoxinA initially. All patients initially injected with placebo crossed over into the IncobotulinumtoxinA group. Similar results were seen when examining the composite masticatory muscle tenderness scores. There was no significant change in usage of pain medication. We demonstrate utility of IncobotulinumtoxinA in treating patients with TMD with pain despite pain medication usage and other conventional treatments.

  14. [Explanation of some physiological characteristics of homeostasis in elderly patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babich, V V; Ryzhak, G A; Iordanishvili, A K

    2014-01-01

    Most number of patients, particularly adult and older women with temporomandibular disfunction suffers from pain reaction in maxillofacial area. Pain symptom associated with temporomandibular disfunction is followed by some changes of physiological statistics (high sympathetic level). Temporomandibular disfunction in adult and older women is most pronounced and can serve as an indicator of concomitant chronic diseases among patients with endocrine disorder (hypothyroidism), cardiological pathology (arterial hypertension).

  15. Disfunções temporomandibulares: sinais, sintomas e abordagem multidisciplinar Temporomandibular Disorders: signs, symptoms and multidisciplinary approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Del Cistia Donnarumma

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: verificar perfil, queixa e principais sinais e sintomas de uma amostra de pacientes com disfunção temporomandibular que estiveram ou estão em tratamento ortodôntico e observar a ocorrência de atendimentos multidisciplinares. MÉTODOS: foram coletados dados de 125 prontuários em uma clínica odontológica da cidade de Sorocaba e os itens analisados nos prontuários foram: sexo, idade, profissão, queixa, três principais sinais e sintomas dos pacientes e se houve encaminhamento para avaliação fonoaudiológica, fisioterápica e psicológica. RESULTADOS: predominância feminina, sendo 107 mulheres (85,6% e 18 homens (14,4%. Média de idade de 35 anos, sendo a menor idade 14 anos e a maior 74 anos. Relação da disfunção temporomandibular com as profissões: 43 (34,4% eram profissionais com vínculo empregatício. Queixa trazida pelo paciente: dor na região da articulação temporomandibular e masseter: 86 - (68,8%. Três principais sinais e sintomas observados na avaliação ortodôntica: dor na região da articulação temporomandibular e masseter: 98 - 78,4%; estalos unilaterais: 55 - 44% e travamento: 23 - 18,4%. Conduta de encaminhamentos: fonoaudiologia 59 (47,2%; fisioterapia 40 (32% e psicologia 53 (42,4%. CONCLUSÃO: na amostra pesquisada, a prevalência de casos de disfunção temporomandibular foi maior no sexo feminino, com queixa de dor. Os principais sinais e sintomas foram: dor, estalo unilateral e travamento e houve encaminhamento para atendimentos multidisciplinares nas áreas de Fonoaudiologia, Fisioterapia e Psicologia.PURPOSE: to check the main signs and symptoms of a sample of patients with temporomandibular dysfunction that were or are under orthodontic treatment and observe if there was a possible multidisciplinary treatment. METHODS: data from 125 medical records collected in a orthodontic clinic located in Sorocaba and the analyzed items were: gender, age, profession, complains, three main signs and

  16. Orofacial pain and temporomandibular disorders: the impact on oral health and quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo César Rodrigues Conti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many conditions may cause painful symptoms in orofacial structures. Among the chronic conditions that affect this area, temporomandibular disorders are the most common. Temporomandibular Disorder is a collective term that includes a number of clinical complaints involving the masticatory muscles, the Temporomandibular Joint and associated structures. In some cases, these complaints can be associated with depression, catastrophizing behavior and impact on quality of life. The present study aims to explain the relationship between Temporomandibular Disorders and pain chronification and their relation to a variety of psychosocial and behavioral comorbid conditions. The mechanisms of pain conduction and suggestions for management are also addressed.

  17. Orofacial pain and temporomandibular disorders: the impact on oral health and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Paulo César Rodrigues; Pinto-Fiamengui, Lívia Maria Sales; Cunha, Carolina Ortigosa; Conti, Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira

    2012-01-01

    Many conditions may cause painful symptoms in orofacial structures. Among the chronic conditions that affect this area, temporomandibular disorders are the most common. Temporomandibular Disorder is a collective term that includes a number of clinical complaints involving the masticatory muscles, the Temporomandibular Joint and associated structures. In some cases, these complaints can be associated with depression, catastrophizing behavior and impact on quality of life. The present study aims to explain the relationship between Temporomandibular Disorders and pain chronification and their relation to a variety of psychosocial and behavioral comorbid conditions. The mechanisms of pain conduction and suggestions for management are also addressed.

  18. Diagnostic index of three-dimensional osteoarthritic changes in temporomandibular joint condylar morphology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gomes, Liliane R; Gomes, Marcelo; Jung, Bryan; Paniagua, Beatriz; Ruellas, Antonio C; Gonçalves, João Roberto; Styner, Martin A; Wolford, Larry; Cevidanes, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    ...) osteoarthritic morphological variations among 169 temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condyles. Cone-beam computed tomography scans were acquired from 69 subjects with long-term TMJ osteoarthritis (OA...

  19. Functional profile of patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction under physiotherapy treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrezza Pinheiro Bezerra de Menezes Kinote

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the functional profile of patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJD receiving physical therapy. Methods: A cross-sectional study carried with 21 patients receiving physiotherapy care during the year of 2007 at the Center for Integrated Medical Care (Núcleo de Atenção Médica Integrada - NAMI, in Fortaleza-CE, Brazil. Those were submitted to anamnesis (age, presence of pain, affected sites and parafunctional habits and functional assessment (presence of trigger points, movement amplitude and postural evaluation. Results: The age varied from 16 to 56 years, with an average of 31.3 ± 14.85 and female gender was the most affected with 17 (81.0% patients. Of the assessed patients, 13 (61.9% presented pain of moderate intensity, with an average of 5.4 ± 0.50. The most common sites of pain were the temporomandibular joint (TMJ, reported by 15 (71.4%,and cervical region, reported by 13 (61.9% patients. We found that 13 (61.9% assessed patients reported clenching as parafunctional habit. Significant limitation of mouth opening and movements of the cervical region were observed when compared to normal values (p <0.05. The most painful muscles on palpation were upper trapezius (n=19, medial pterygoid (n=15 and the masseter (n=15. The TMJ presented strong pain (degree 3 on palpation in 3 (14.3% patients. In postural assessment, 10 (47.6% had cervical hyperlordosis, 7 (33% had forward head posture and 7 (33% had raised shoulders. Conclusion: Patients with TMJD receiving physical therapy present limitations in TMJ and cervical movement, pain, presence of trigger points and postural changes at a more compromised and symptomatic stage of this dysfunction. In view of this, it becomes necessary to provide early evaluation and treatment with physical therapy.

  20. Functional profile of patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction under physiotherapy treatment -

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrezza Pinheiro Bezerra de Menezes Kinote

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the functional profile of patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJD receiving physical therapy. Methods: A cross-sectional study carried with 21 patients receiving physiotherapy care during the year of 2007 at the Center for Integrated Medical Care (Núcleo de Atenção Médica Integrada - NAMI, in Fortaleza-CE, Brazil. Those were submitted to anamnesis (age, presence of pain, affected sites and parafunctional habits and functional assessment (presence of trigger points, movement amplitude and postural evaluation. Results: The age varied from 16 to 56 years, with an average of 31.3 ± 14.85 and female gender was the most affected with 17 (81.0% patients. Of the assessed patients, 13 (61.9% presented pain of moderate intensity, with an average of 5.4 ± 0.50. The most common sites of pain were the temporomandibular joint (TMJ, reported by 15 (71.4%, and cervical region, reported by 13 (61.9% patients. We found that 13 (61.9% assessed patients reported clenching as parafunctional habit. Significant limitation of mouth opening and movements of the cervical region were observed when compared to normal values (p <0.05. The most painful muscles on palpation were upper trapezius (n=19, medial pterygoid (n=15 and the masseter (n=15. The TMJ presented strong pain (degree 3 on palpation in 3 (14.3% patients. In postural assessment, 10 (47.6% had cervical hyperlordosis, 7 (33% had forward head posture and 7 (33% had raised shoulders. Conclusion: Patients with TMJD receiving physical therapy present limitations in TMJ and cervical movement, pain, presence of trigger points and postural changes at a more compromised and symptomatic stage of this dysfunction. In view of this, it becomes necessary to provide early evaluation and treatment with physical therapy.

  1. Considerations for point-of-care diagnostics: evaluation of acridine orange staining and postprocessing methods for a three-part leukocyte differential test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powless, Amy J.; Conley, Roxanna J.; Freeman, Karan A.; Muldoon, Timothy J.

    2017-03-01

    There exists a broad range of techniques that can be used to classify and count white blood cells in a point-of-care (POC) three-part leukocyte differential test. Improvements in lenses, light sources, and cameras for image-based POC systems have renewed interest in acridine orange (AO) as a contrast agent, whereby subpopulations of leukocytes can be differentiated by colorimetric analysis of AO fluorescence emission. We evaluated the effect on test accuracy using different AO staining and postprocessing methods in the context of an image-based POC colorimetric cell classification scheme. Thirty blood specimens were measured for percent cell counts using our POC system and a conventional hematology analyzer for comparison. Controlling the AO concentration used during whole-blood staining, the incubation time with AO, and the colorimetric ratios among the three population of leukocytes yielded a percent deviation of 0.706%, -1.534%, and -0.645% for the lymphocytes, monocytes, and granulocytes, respectively. Overall, we demonstrated that a redshift in AO fluorescence was observed at elevated AO concentrations, which lead to reproducible inaccuracy of cell counts. This study demonstrates there is a need for a strict control of the AO staining and postprocessing methods to improve test accuracy in these POC systems.

  2. The useful of the double-contrast arthrograpic CT-MPR of the temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Koichiro; Ando, Akira; Yamada, Hiroyuki [Fujieda Municipal General Hosital, Shizuoka (Japan)] [and others

    1998-08-01

    We performed 35 double-contrast arthrographic computed tomography multiplanar reconstruction (CT-MPR) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and 35 double-contrast arthrotomography of the TMJ in 70 patients of disorder of the TMJ since June 1994 to February 1998. The comparison of double-contrast CT-MPR and double-contrast tomography were examined by 5 radiological technologists and 3 oral surgeons. Those imaging evaluation as 5 grades in the superior joint space, inferior joint space 3 parts of an articular disc were studied. Each scores of CT-MPR was statistically superior to that of tomography (p<0.05). These results suggest that CT-MPR is markedly useful for diagnosis of TMJ disorders. (author)

  3. SEGMENTAL LEFORT I OSTEOTOMY FOR TREATMENT OF A CLASS III MALOCCLUSION WITH TEMPOROMANDIBULAR DISORDER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janson, Marcos; Janson, Guilherme; Sant'Ana, Eduardo; Nakamura, Alexandre; de Freitas, Marcos Roberto

    2008-01-01

    This article reports the case of a 19-year-old young man with Class III malocclusion and posterior crossbite with concerns about temporomandibular disorder (TMD), esthetics and functional problems. Surgical-orthodontic treatment was carried out by decompensation of the mandibular incisors and segmentation of the maxilla in 4 pieces, which allowed expansion and advancement. Remission of the signs and symptoms occurred after surgical-orthodontic intervention. The maxillary dental arch presented normal transverse dimension. Satisfactory static and functional occlusion and esthetic results were achieved and remained stable. Three years after the surgical-orthodontic treatment, no TMD sign or symptom was observed and the occlusal results had not changed. When vertical or horizontal movements of the maxilla in the presence of moderate maxillary constriction are necessary, segmental LeFort I osteotomy can be an important part of treatment planning. PMID:19089265

  4. Segmental LeFort I osteotomy for treatment of a class III malocclusion with temporomandibular disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Janson

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This article reports the case of a 19-year-old young man with Class III malocclusion and posterior crossbite with concerns about temporomandibular disorder (TMD, esthetics and functional problems. Surgical-orthodontic treatment was carried out by decompensation of the mandibular incisors and segmentation of the maxilla in 4 pieces, which allowed expansion and advancement. Remission of the signs and symptoms occurred after surgical-orthodontic intervention. The maxillary dental arch presented normal transverse dimension. Satisfactory static and functional occlusion and esthetic results were achieved and remained stable. Three years after the surgical-orthodontic treatment, no TMD sign or symptom was observed and the occlusal results had not changed. When vertical or horizontal movements of the maxilla in the presence of moderate maxillary constriction are necessary, segmental LeFort I osteotomy can be an important part of treatment planning.

  5. Geologic map of the Palo Alto and part of the Redwood Point 7-1/2' quadrangles, San Mateo and Santa Clara counties, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pampeyan, Earl H.

    1993-01-01

    The Palo Alto and southern part of the Redwood Point 7-1/2' quadrangles cover an area on the San Francisco peninsula between San Francisco Bay and the Santa Cruz Mountains. San Francisquito and Los Trancos Creeks, in the southeastern part of the map area, form the boundary between San Mateo and Santa Clara Counties. The area covered by the geologic map extends from tidal and marsh lands at the edge of the bay southward across a gently sloping alluvial plain to the foothills of the northern Santa Cruz Mountains. The foothills are separated from the main mass of the mountains by two northwest-striking faults, the San Andreas and Pilarcitos, that cross the southwest corner of the map area (fig. 1). The map and adjoining areas are here divided into three structural blocks juxtaposed along these faults, adopting the scheme of Nilsen and Brabb (1979): (1) the San Francisco Bay block lying east of the San Andreas Fault Zone; (2) the Pilarcitos block lying between the San Andreas and Pilarcitos Faults; and (3) the La Honda block that includes the main mass of the Santa Cruz Mountains lying west of the Pilarcitos Fault. The west boundary of the La Honda block is the Seal Cove-San Gregorio Fault. Pre-late Pleistocene Cenozoic rocks of the foothills have been compressed into northwest-striking folds, which have been overridden by Mesozoic rocks along southwest-dipping low-angle faults. Coarse- to fine-grained upper Pleistocene and Holocene alluvial and estuarine deposits, eroded from the foothills and composing the alluvial plain, are essentially undeformed. Most of the alluvial plain, including some parts of the marsh land that borders the bay, has been covered by residential and commercial developments, and virtually all of the remaining marsh land has been diked off and used as salt evaporating ponds. The map area includes parts of the municipalities of San Carlos, Redwood City, Atherton, Woodside, Portola Valley, Menlo Park, and East Palo Alto in San Mateo County; and

  6. Association of clinical findings of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) with self-reported musculoskeletal pains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipilä, Kirsi; Suominen, Anna Liisa; Alanen, Pentti; Heliövaara, Markku; Tiittanen, Pekka; Könönen, Mauno

    2011-11-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) can be related to self-reported musculoskeletal pains. The aim of the study was to investigate the association of clinical findings of TMD with self-reported pain in other parts of the body, and to discriminate pain clusters according to definite profiles of pain conditions including TMD among subjects in general population. A nationally representative Health 2000 Survey was carried out in 2000-2001 in Finland. The data were obtained from 6227 subjects aged ⩾30years. Information about pain in different parts of the body was collected from a questionnaire. The associations between clinically assessed TMD findings and pain in other areas were analyzed using chi-square test and logistic regression analyses. Latent class analysis (LCA) was used to form natural clusters, i.e., groups in which the individuals had similar profiles of pain conditions. Masticatory muscle pain on palpation associated with back, neck and shoulder pain and pain in joints. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain on palpation associated with back, neck, shoulder and other joint pain. These associations did not change essentially after adjustment for confounders. After clustering of the study population with the LCA, 5.8% of the study population showed a multiple pain condition linked with TMD findings. Female gender, intermediate/poor self-reported health and presence of a longstanding illness increased the probability to belong to this cluster. TMD findings associate with pain in several locations. Female gender and presence of impaired health were particularly related to occurrence of multiple pain conditions. Copyright © 2011 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Temporomandibular Disorders in Psoriasis Patients with and without Psoriatic Arthritis: An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crincoli, Vito; Di Comite, Mariasevera; Di Bisceglie, Maria Beatrice; Fatone, Laura; Favia, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic, remitting and relapsing inflammatory disorder, involving the skin, nails, scalp and mucous membranes, that impairs patients' quality of life to varying degrees. Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic seronegative, inflammatory arthritis, usually preceded by psoriasis. Temporomandibular disorders is a generic term referred to clinical conditions involving the jaw muscles and temporomandibular joint. The aim of this study was to assess symptoms and signs of temporomandibular disorders in psoriasis patients with and without psoriatic arthritis. The study group included 112 patients (56 men, 56 women; median age 49.7±12 years) with psoriasis, 25 of them were affected by psoriatic arthritis. A group of 112 subjects without psoriasis (56 men, 56 women; median age 47.7±17 years) served as controls. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders were evaluated according to the standardized Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders. Psoriasis patients were subgrouped according to the presence/absence of psoriatic arthritis and by gender, to assess the prevalence of traditional symptoms and signs of temporomandibular disorders. Patients with psoriasis, and to an even greater extent those with psoriatic arthritis, were more frequently affected by symptoms and signs of temporomandibular disorders, including an internal temporomandibular joint opening derangement than healthy subjects. A statistically significant increase in symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, in opening derangement, bruxism and sounds of temporomandibular joint was found in patients with psoriatic arthritis as compared with psoriasis patients without arthritis and controls. psoriasis seems to play a role in temporomandibular joint disorders, causing an increase in orofacial pain and an altered chewing function.

  8. Temporomandibular Disorders in Psoriasis Patients with and without Psoriatic Arthritis: An Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crincoli, Vito; Di Comite, Mariasevera; Di Bisceglie, Maria Beatrice; Fatone, Laura; Favia, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Psoriasis is a chronic, remitting and relapsing inflammatory disorder, involving the skin, nails, scalp and mucous membranes, that impairs patients' quality of life to varying degrees. Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic seronegative, inflammatory arthritis, usually preceded by psoriasis. Temporomandibular disorders is a generic term referred to clinical conditions involving the jaw muscles and temporomandibular joint. The aim of this study was to assess symptoms and signs of temporomandibular disorders in psoriasis patients with and without psoriatic arthritis. METHODS: The study group included 112 patients (56 men, 56 women; median age 49.7±12 years) with psoriasis, 25 of them were affected by psoriatic arthritis. A group of 112 subjects without psoriasis (56 men, 56 women; median age 47.7±17 years) served as controls. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders were evaluated according to the standardized Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders. Psoriasis patients were subgrouped according to the presence/absence of psoriatic arthritis and by gender, to assess the prevalence of traditional symptoms and signs of temporomandibular disorders. RESULTS: Patients with psoriasis, and to an even greater extent those with psoriatic arthritis, were more frequently affected by symptoms and signs of temporomandibular disorders, including an internal temporomandibular joint opening derangement than healthy subjects. A statistically significant increase in symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, in opening derangement, bruxism and sounds of temporomandibular joint was found in patients with psoriatic arthritis as compared with psoriasis patients without arthritis and controls. CONCLUSIONS: psoriasis seems to play a role in temporomandibular joint disorders, causing an increase in orofacial pain and an altered chewing function. PMID:26019683

  9. Reemplazo articular temporomandibular debido a queratoquiste odontogénico Temporomandibular joint replacement because of odontogenic keratocyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Angel Peñón Vivas

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Existen disímiles condiciones que hacen necesario el reemplazo articular temporomandibular; dentro de las más frecuentes se encuentran la anquilosis, la osteoatrosis, estadíos avanzados del Síndrome de disfunción temporomandibular, daño articular postrauma y procesos neoplásicos o tumorales. Los queratoquistes odontógenos que se agrupan para su estudio dentro de los quistes odontogénicos del desarrollo, representan cerca del 7 al 10 por ciento de todos los quistes maxilo-mandibulares. Se dice que tienen dos picos de incidencia entre la segunda y tercera década de vida y entre los 50 y 60 años de edad, con una ligera predilección por el sexo masculino. Aparece más frecuentemente en la región del tercer molar de la mandíbula con extensión a la rama ascendente El presente trabajo tuvo como objetivo mostrar el caso de un paciente masculino de 57 años de edad en el que fue necesario el reemplazo articular temporomandibular debido a un queratoquiste odontogénico que involucraba la totalidad de la rama mandibular derecha, incluyendo el proceso condíleo y coronoideo, así como el ángulo hasta el tercio posterior del cuerpo mandibular. Tras un año de realizada la intervención quirúrgica la evolución del paciente fue satisfactoria.Temporomandibular joint replacement is required in a variety of conditions. Among the most frequent are ankylosis, osteoarthrosis, advanced stages of the temporomandibular dysfunction syndrome, post-traumatic joint damage, and neoplastic or tumoral processes. Odontogenic keratocysts, which are classified as developmental odontogenic cysts for study purposes, constitute 7-10 per cent of all maxillomandibular cysts. Two peaks have been identified in their incidence: between the second and third decades of life, and between 50 and 60 years of age, with a slight predominance of the male sex. They are most common in the third molar area of the mandibule, with expansion to the ascending branch. A case is

  10. Correlation between skin surface temperature over masticatory muscles and pain intensity in women with myogenous temporomandibular disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibai-Filho, Almir Vieira; Costa, Ana Cláudia de Souza; Packer, Amanda Carine; Rodrigues-Bigaton, Delaine

    2013-01-01

    Pain is a common clinical manifestation in individuals with temporomandibular disorder (TMD). The literature report changes in microcirculation in this condition. The aim of the present study was to correlate skin surface temperature at the central point of the masticatory muscles with pain intensity in women with myogenous TMD. The Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) and the visual analogue scale (VAS) were used to divide 40 female university students into four groups: control group (n=10), mild pain group (n=10), moderate pain group (n=10) and severe pain group (n=10). Infrared thermography was used to assess the masticatory muscles. No significant correlations were found between pain intensity and skin surface temperature over the left masseter (p=0.368), right masseter (p=0.618), left anterior temporalis (p=0.293) and right anterior temporalis (p=0.922) muscles. No correlations were found between pain intensity and asymmetry of the masseter (p=0.375) and anterior temporalis (p=0.090) muscles. Moreover, no significant difference in skin surface temperature (p> 0.05) was found among the different groups. Pain intensity in women with myogenous TMD was not associated with skin surface temperature at the central point of the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles.

  11. VESTIBULAR SCHWANNOMA (ACOUSTIC NEUROMA) MIMICKING TEMPOROMANDIBULAR DISORDERS: A CASE REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisi, Maurício A.; Selaimen, Caio M. P.; Chaves, Karen D.; Bisi, Melissa C.; Grossi, Márcio L.

    2006-01-01

    Approximately 6 to 16% of patients with trigeminal neuralgia symptoms present intracranial tumors, the most common being the vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma). Some symptoms reported by patients include hearing loss, tinnitus, headaches, vertigo and trigeminal disturbances. An increased muscle response in the surrounding head and neck musculature may also be observed, which mimics signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders. In these cases, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proved to be a useful tool in tumor diagnosis. The differential diagnosis between myofascial and neuralgic pain is important, as both may present similar characteristics, while being of different origin, and demanding special treatment approaches. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the relationship among trigeminal neuralgia symptoms, intracranial tumors and temporomandibular dysfunction by presenting a clinical case. PMID:19089251

  12. [Synovial chondromatosis in the temporomandibular joint: report of 2 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xin; Feng, Yuan-Yong; Bu, Ling-Xue; Song, Kai; Gao, Qian-Qian; Shang, Wei

    2016-10-01

    The clinical manifestations, radiographic findings, intraoperative view, histopathologic features of synovial chondromatosis(SC) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) were summarized in 2 cases. Preoperative symptoms included preauricular pain(2/2), swelling(2/2) and limitation of mouth opening (0/2). X-ray findings showed widened joint space. The articular surface destructed and irregular stippled calcifications were seen in the infratemporal fossa by CT scan in one case. MRI showed multiple small nodular formations in the articular cavity. There was no malocclusion and limitation of mouth opening after surgery. As a rare disease of the temporomandibular joint, SC often exists in superior spaces. The clinical manifestations lack specificity. Detection of calcified loose bodies on radiography was helpful to diagnosis, while final diagnosis was dependent on histopathologic examination with characteristic cartilaginous nodules in the synovial membrane.

  13. Oral splint for temporomandibular joint disorders with revolutionary fluid system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Srivastava

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint (TMJ diseases and disorders refer to a complex and poorly understood set of conditions, manifested by pain in the area of the jaw and associated muscles and limitations in the ability to make the normal movements of speech, facial expression, eating, chewing, and swallowing. The conventional soft occlusal splint therapy is a much safer and effective mode of a conservative line of therapy in comparison to the surgical therapy for temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD. The purpose of this article is to review the Aqualizer TM , an hydrostatic oral splint, as accurate, effective treatment and differential diagnostic tool in TMD that allow treating the patient′s pain quickly and accurately saving valuable treatment time. The review article has been prepared doing a literature review from the world-wide web and pubmed/medline.

  14. [Physical therapy for temporomandibular joint anterior disc displacement without reduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, B

    2017-03-09

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) anterior disc displacement without reduction (ADDwoR) is a common type of temporomandibular joint disorders. Most patients experience limited mouth opening and joint pain at the same time. The standpoint of physical therapy is the function of the joint instead of the displaced disc. The treatment aims to make symptoms disappeared and joint function regained through 3M techniques, including modality, manual and movement. For ADDwoR patients with limited mouth opening within 2 month, manual therapy may reposition disc and the following splint and movement therapy can maintain disc-condyle relationship. Even so, restoring anatomical relationship is not the end of physical therapy. Enhanced health education and multidisciplinary cooperation are important for successful management of the ADDwoR patients.

  15. Statistical approaches to orofacial pain and temporomandibular disorders research

    CERN Document Server

    Manfredini, Daniele; Nardini, Luca Guarda; Carrozzo, Eleonora; Salmaso, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the biostatistical methods utilized to interpret and analyze dental research in the areas of orofacial pain and temporomandibular disorders. It will guide practitioners in these fields who would like to interpret research findings or find examples on the design of clinical investigations. After an introduction dealing with the basic issues, the central sections of the textbook are dedicated to the different types of investigations in sight of specific goals researchers may have. The final section contains more elaborate statistical concepts for expert professionals. The field of orofacial pain and temporomandibular disorders is emerging as one of the most critical areas of clinical research in dentistry. Due to the complexity of clinical pictures, the multifactorial etiology, and the importance of psychosocial factors in all aspects of the TMD practice, clinicians often find it hard to appraise their modus operandi, and researchers must constantly increase their knowledge in epidemiology and ...

  16. Dimensions and geometry of the temporomandibular joint and masseter muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurowski, R; Gosek, M; Aleksandrowicz, R

    1976-01-01

    The bio-engineering team presents its suggestion of a method for the measurement of the temporomandibular joint and masseter muscles in order to determine the parameters necessary for exact sciences and indispensable for unified and objective cognitive studies. Ten formalin-fixed human cadavers served for the studies. The preparations were prepared by the modified method of anatomical procedure. Linear and angular measurements of temporomandibular joint and masseter muscles were carried out with the use of the three-dimensional Cartesian system of OXYZ coordinates in relation to frontal, sagittal and horizontal planes. The physiological cross-sections of the masseter, temporal, lateral and medial pterygoid muscles were also determined. The collected data make it possible to develop a mathematical three-dimensioned model of the osseo-articulo-muscular system of the mastication organ.

  17. Psychoneuroimmunological disorders and temporomandibular joint pain: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjani Shetty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychoneuroimmunology characterizes a disease entity that combines psychological components, central nervous system regulation, and immunology, to explain the etiological complexity of a disease. Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs include a heterogeneous group of painful conditions that involve the temporomandibular joint (TMJ, muscles of mastication, and the adjacent anatomic structures. This review focuses on the psychoneuroimmunological diseases and disorders that mimic the symptoms of TMDs. The differentiation of these disorders is of great significance to the oral physician - differentiating and diagnosing the cause of TMJ pain and treating it effectively to benefit the patient.The literature for this review was taken from Medline/PubMed, other indexed journals, standard text books, and online material.

  18. Psychological aspects of temporomandibular disorders – literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berger Marcin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular disorders (TMD constitute a group of clinical problems involving the masticatory muscles, the temporomandibular joint and associated structures. An etiological connection of TMD with psychological factors was proposed as early as the 1980’s. Indeed, the interdependence of psychological and health aspects in the patient’s treatment, place light upon the more important variables contributing to the various mental disorders that may accompany TMD. Current literature suggests a close relationship between TMD and selected psychological factors, such as personality traits, stress, depression, anxiety, and catastrophizing. Of note, anxiety-depressive disorders, somatisation and catastrophizing contribute to chronic TMD, mainly in the form of myofascial pain. Hence, knowledge of the influence of psychological factors affecting TMD, enables the identification of patients with an increased risk of chronic painful TMD.

  19. Rationale of arthroscopic surgery of the temporomandibular joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, KenIchiro

    2013-01-01

    Arthroscopic surgery has been widely used for treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) internal derangements and diseases for the last 40 years. Although 626 articles have been hit by Pubmed search in terms of “TMJ arthroscopic surgery”, this review article is described based on distinguished publishing works and on my experiences with TMJ arthroscopic surgery and related research with an aim to analyse the rationale of arthroscopic surgeries of the temporomandibular joint. With arthrocentesis emerging as an alternative, less invasive, treatment for internal derangement with closed lock, the primary indication of arthroscopic surgery seems to be somewhat limited. However, the value of endoscopic inspection and surgery has its position for both patient and physician with its long-term reliable results. PMID:25737901

  20. Temporomandibular Joint Disorders as a Cause of Aural Fullness

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Yongxin

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) are often associated with aural manifestations. However, it is not clear whether aural fullness could be induced by TMD. The purpose was to investigate the TMD and effectiveness of TMD treatments in patients with mainly or exclusively aural fullness complaint. Methods One hundred and twelve patients, who had aural fullness as the main or sole complaint, presented to the Otolaryngology Department, PLA Army General Hospital, Beijing, China, bet...

  1. TEMPOROMANDIBULAR DYSFUNCTION, STRESS AND COMMON MENTAL DISORDER IN UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Augusto, Viviane Gontijo; Perina, Keity Cristina Bueno; Penha,Daniel Silva Gontijo; dos Santos, Daiane Carolina Alves; Oliveira, Val?ria Aparecida Souza

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) and its association with perceived stress and common mental disorder (CMD) in academic students. Methods: This is s transversal observational study conducted at Universidade de Minas Gerais, Divinópolis Unit, in health science courses. To investigate the prevalence of TMD, the anamnestic index by Fonseca was used. Stress was assessed by the perceived stress scale, translated and adapted for the Brazilian...

  2. Therapeutic exercises for the control of temporomandibular disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto da Rocha Moraes; Monique Lalue Sanches; Eduardo Cotecchia Ribeiro; Antonio Sérgio Guimarães

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is a multifactorial disease. For this reason, it is difficult to obtain an accurate and correct diagnosis. In this context, conservative treatments, including therapeutic exercises classified as stretching, relaxation, coordination, strengthening and endurance, are oftentimes prescribed. OBJECTIVE: Thus, the aim of the present article was to conduct a literature review concerning the types of exercises available and the efficacy for the treatment...

  3. Current concepts in the pathogenesis of traumatic temporomandibular joint ankylosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis can be classified into fibrous, fibro-osseous and bony ankylosis. It is still a huge challenge for oral and maxillofacial surgeons due to the technical difficulty and high incidence of recurrence. The poor outcome of disease may be partially attributed to the limited understanding of its pathogenesis. The purpose of this article was to comprehensively review the literature and summarise results from both human and animal studies related to the genesis of TMJ ankylosis. PMID:25189735

  4. Temporomandibular Myofacial Pain Treated with Botulinum Toxin Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niv Mor

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the diagnoses and treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMD and outlines of the role of botulinum toxin (BoNT in the treatment of myofacial TMD. This manuscript includes a brief history of the use of BoNT in the treatment of pain, the mechanism of action of BoNT, and the techniques for injections, adverse effects and contraindications when using BoNT to treat mayofacial pain caused by TMD.

  5. Temporomandibular disorders: what to teach in dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, J F; Mosby, E L

    1990-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorders continue to be a nemesis for health professionals and for patients who are afflicted. The medical/dental student must be taught to recognize this often complex disorder and be able to interact with the various disciplines within the medical/dental profession to provide the care needed. This article discusses problems and a possible approach for establishing continuity of format for classifying TM disorders so students can be taught to recognize them.

  6. Temporomandibular joint dislocation in an 18-month-old child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaeson Mohanan Painatt

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint (TMJ dislocation in children is extremely rare. In our case, an 18-month-old child presented with a history of inability to close her mouth. To confirm the clinical diagnosis, a computed tomogram was taken. Clinical examination and X-ray of the TMJ revealed bilateral TMJ dislocation. Bilateral TMJ reduction was achieved manually after giving analgesia and procedural sedation. This is one of the few case reports of an acute dislocation in a toddler.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint: diagnostic difficulty caused by extensive pneumatization of the mastoid air cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, K. [Department of Radiology, Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Munk, P.L. [Department of Radiology, Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Department of Radiology, Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    1999-10-01

    Objective. During routine MR imaging of temporomandibular joints we have observed that an area of low signal is sometimes identified within the temporal bone overlying the glenoid fossa on proton-density sequences. This finding at times simulates a mass. CT in this situation has demonstrated marked pneumatization of the mastoid air cell extending to that portion of the temporal bone overlying the glenoid fossa. We undertook a clinical study to determine the frequency and appearance of such a finding.Design and patients. We reviewed the images of 12 patients who underwent both MR and CT examinations of their temporomandibular joints. The authors, by consensus, graded all 24 joints using a four-point scale for the presence and appearance of a low-signal area overlying the glenoid fossa on the MR images prior to seeing the corresponding CT images. We then compared our grading with the findings on CT to assess for the presence and extent of pneumatization of the temporal bone overlying the glenoid fossa.Results. Of the 24 joints reviewed there was identical extent of low signal on MR imaging and extent of pneumatization on CT in 22 of 24 joints. In two of the 24 joints assessed there was overestimation of pneumatization due to extensive sclerosis secondary to surgery.Conclusion. The findings of an area of low signal overlying the glenoid fossa on a T2-weighted scan of a nonoperative temporomandibular joint is often due to extensive temporal bone pneumatization of the mastoid air cells. Recognition of the nature of this finding will avoid mistaking it for a fibrous or osseous lesion. Patients with previous operative history may, however, require further investigation with CT. (orig.)

  8. Evaluation of low-level laser therapy in patients with acute and chronic temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmos-Brito, Janaina Andrade Lima; de Menezes, Rebeca Ferraz; Teixeira, Camila Epitácio Cravo; Gonzaga, Raphaella Karlla Machado; Rodrigues, Breno Henrique Mara; Braz, Rodivan; Bessa-Nogueira, Ricardo Viana; Gerbi, Marleny Elizabeth Márquez de Martínez

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to address the following question: among patients with acute or chronic temporomandibular disorders (TMD), does low-level laser therapy (LLLT) reduce pain intensity and improve maximal mouth opening? The sample comprised myogenic TMD patients (according Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD). Inclusion criteria were: male/female, no age limit, orofacial pain, tender points, limited jaw movements and chewing difficulties. Patients with other TMD subtypes or associated musculoskeletal/rheumatologic disease, missing incisors teeth, LLLT contra-indication, and previous TMD treatment were excluded. According to disease duration, patients were allocated into two groups, acute (TMD (≥ 6 months). For each patient, 12 LLLT sessions were performed (gallium-aluminum-arsenide; λ = 830 nm, P = 40 mW, CW, ED = 8 J/cm(2)). Pain intensity was recorded using a 10-cm visual analog scale and maximal mouth opening using a digital ruler (both recorded before/after LLLT). The investigators were previously calibrated and blinded to the groups (double-blind study) and level of significance was 5% (p TMD), and 26 (chronic TMD). Both groups had a significant pain intensity reduction and maximal mouth opening improvement after LLLT (Wilcoxon test, p TMD patient had a more significant pain intensity reduction (Mann-Whitney test, p = 0.002) and a more significant maximal mouth opening improvement (Mann-Whitney test, p = 0.011). Low-level laser therapy can be considered as an alternative physical modality or supplementary approach for management of acute and chronic myogenic temporomandibular disorder; however, patients with acute disease are likely to have a better outcome.

  9. Laser acupuncture therapy in patients with treatment-resistant temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wen-Long; Chang, Chih-Hao; Hung, Yu-Chiang; Tseng, Ying-Jung; Hung, I-Ling; Hsu, Sheng-Feng

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the clinical effects of laser acupuncture therapy for temporomandibular disorders (TMD) after ineffective previous treatments. A retrospective observational study was conducted in 29 treatment-resistant TMD patients (25 women, 4 men; age range, 17-67 years). Subjects were treated 3 times per week for 4 weeks with the Handylaser Trion (GaAlAs laser diode, 810 nm, 150 mW, pulsed waves), which delivered 0.375 J of energy (5 s) to ST7, ST6, and LI4 and 3 J (40 s) to each Ashi point, 7.5-26.25 J/cm2 in total. The visual analog scale (VAS) and maximal mouth opening (MMO) were evaluated before and after treatment. VAS analysis showed that the patients were free of pain at rest (endpoint) after 5.90±6.08 sessions of laser acupuncture for acute TMD and after 16.21±17.98 sessions for chronic TMD. The VAS score on palpation of the temporomandibular joint reduced to 0.30±0.67 for patients with acute TMD (p = 0.005) and to 0.47±0.84 for those with chronic TMD (pTMD (7.80±5.43 mm, p = 0.008) and in patients with chronic TMD (15.58±7.87 mm, ptreatment-resistant TMD. Further studies with a more appropriate design, involving long-term follow-up examinations in a larger patient sample, are needed to evaluate its efficacy.

  10. Real-time three-dimensional jaw tracking in temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, D V; Degan, V V; Vedovello Filho, M; Bellomo, D P; Silva, M R; Furtado, D A; Andrade, A O; Milagre, S T; Pereira, A A

    2017-08-01

    When a dysfunction occurs in any component of the stomatognathic system, temporomandibular disorders (TMD) may originate. The aim of this study was to compare the deviations, displacement and the execution speed of mandibular movements among asymptomatic participants and those with TMD. Convenience sampling was used; forty participants diagnosed by clinical evaluation following the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders were divided into three groups: arthropathy (GART, 10 participants, 40% men), myopathy (GMYO, 10 participants, 30% men), and the control group (CG, 20 asymptomatic participants, 25% men). Participants were asked to perform the movements of free maximal mouth opening and closing, right and left lateral excursions, and protrusion with sliding teeth contacts. The mandibular trajectory was recorded using opto-electronic devices tracking reflective markers placed in front of the 'soft tissue pogonion point'. The movements were analysed on the following axis: x - medial-lateral, y - vertical, z - antero-posterior. Significative differences were found in CGxGART - unassisted maximal mouth opening and closing projection on y-axis (OCY), CGxGMYO - unassisted maximal mouth opening and closing projection on x-axis (OCX), and in the measures Opening lateral deviation on x-axis (OLDX), closing lateral deviation on x-axis (CLDX) and in the measures of speed for both. In regard to GARTxGMYO, a significative difference was found in Protrusion lateral deviation on x-axis (PLDX) 'Conover-Iman Test of Multiple Comparisons Using Rank Sums' using Bonferroni correction (P < 0·05). In conclusion, the total opening movements in individuals with TMD tended to have higher deviation than in those asymptomatic individuals and a reduction in the speed of movements. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Laser acupuncture therapy in patients with treatment-resistant temporomandibular disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Long Hu

    Full Text Available To investigate the clinical effects of laser acupuncture therapy for temporomandibular disorders (TMD after ineffective previous treatments.A retrospective observational study was conducted in 29 treatment-resistant TMD patients (25 women, 4 men; age range, 17-67 years. Subjects were treated 3 times per week for 4 weeks with the Handylaser Trion (GaAlAs laser diode, 810 nm, 150 mW, pulsed waves, which delivered 0.375 J of energy (5 s to ST7, ST6, and LI4 and 3 J (40 s to each Ashi point, 7.5-26.25 J/cm2 in total. The visual analog scale (VAS and maximal mouth opening (MMO were evaluated before and after treatment.VAS analysis showed that the patients were free of pain at rest (endpoint after 5.90±6.08 sessions of laser acupuncture for acute TMD and after 16.21±17.98 sessions for chronic TMD. The VAS score on palpation of the temporomandibular joint reduced to 0.30±0.67 for patients with acute TMD (p = 0.005 and to 0.47±0.84 for those with chronic TMD (p<0.001. The MMO significantly increased in patients with acute TMD (7.80±5.43 mm, p = 0.008 and in patients with chronic TMD (15.58±7.87 mm, p<0.001.Our study shows that laser acupuncture therapy improves the symptoms of treatment-resistant TMD. Further studies with a more appropriate design, involving long-term follow-up examinations in a larger patient sample, are needed to evaluate its efficacy.

  12. Temporomandibular disorders in fibromyalgia patients: are there different pain onset?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujarra, Fábio J C; Kaziyama, Helena Hideko Seguchi; Siqueira, Silvia Regina D T de; Yeng, Lin Tchia; Camparis, Cinara M; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Siqueira, José Tadeu Tesseroli de

    2016-03-01

    To identify temporomandibular disorders (TMD) symptoms in two groups of fibromyalgia patients according to the temporal relation between the onset of facial pain (FP) and generalized body pain (GBP). CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY DESIGN: Fifty-three consecutive women with fibromyalgia and FP were stratified according to the onset of orofacial pain: Group-A (mean age 47.30 ± 14.20 years old), onset of FP preceded GBP; Group-B (mean age 51.33 ± 11.03 years old), the FP started concomitant or after GBP. Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders and the Visual Analogue Scale. Myofascial pain with mouth opening limitation (p = 0.038); right disc displacement with reduction (p = 0.012) and jaw stiffness (p = 0.004) were predominant in Group A. Myofascial pain without mouth opening limitation (p = 0.038) and numbness/burning were more common in Group B. All patients had temporomandibular joint symptoms, mainly muscle disorders. The prevalence of myofascial pain with limited mouth opening and right TMJ disc displacement with reduction were higher in Group A.

  13. [Quality of life in patients with temporomandibular disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segù, M; Lobbia, S; Canale, C; Collesano, V

    2003-06-01

    Oral disorders have a psycho-social impact on the quality of life, that can be measured with instruments as the Oral Health Impact Profile questionnaire (OHIP). Using the OHIP, we evaluated if and how the orofacial pain can affect the quality of life in temporomandibular disorders (TMD) patients. A transversal case-control study was carried out. Study subjects were patients referred to the Section of Prosthetic Dentistry and Temporomandibular Disorders of the University of Pavia (Italy). Subjects were recruited sequentially until the target of 124. The controls were 61 "pain free" subjects, who were recruited from the same clinic. In analyzing the data, the chi squared test was used for categorical data, and t test and one-way analysis of variance were used for numerical scores. The subjects in this study were predominantly females (83.9%). The mean age of subjects was 35.1 years (standard deviation= 14.0). The most frequently reported symptoms were pain in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) (87.1%). The data showed that orofacial pain had an important impact on daily life (pquality of life of TMD patients.

  14. Diagnosis of temporomandibular joint disorders: indication of imaging exams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Luciano Ambrosio; Grossmann, Eduardo; Januzzi, Eduardo; de Paula, Marcos Vinicius Queiroz; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the different imaging tests and their appropriate indications is crucial to establish the diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders, especially in patients with overlapping signs and symptoms. To present and assess the main diagnostic imaging tests for temporomandibular disorders and rationally discuss their indication criteria, advantages, and disadvantages. Literature review in the Web of Knowledge, PubMed and SciELO databases, as well as manual search for relevant publications in reference lists of the selected articles. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were considered the gold standard assessments for the temporomandibular joint to evaluate hard and soft tissues, respectively. Each diagnostic method exhibited distinct sensitivity and specificity for the different subtypes of joint dysfunction. Selecting an evaluation examination based on its accuracy, safety, and clinical relevance is a rational decision that can help lead to an accurate diagnosis and an optimum treatment plan. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Psycho-education programme for temporomandibular disorders: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Maaytah Mohammed

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs are by far the most predominant condition affecting the temporomandibular joint (TMJ, however many patients have mild self-limiting symptoms and should not be referred for specialist care. The aim of this pilot study was to develop a simple, cost-effective management programme for TMDs using CD-ROM. 41 patients (age 18–70 participated in this study, patients were divided into three groups: the 1st group were involved in an attention placebo CD-ROM (contain anatomical information about the temporomandibular system, the 2nd group received information on CD-ROM designed to increase their control and self efficacy, while the 3rd group received the same programme of the 2nd group added to it an introduction to self-relaxing techniques followed by audio tape of progressive muscle relaxation exercises. Each of the groups was asked to complete a number of questionnaires on the day of initial consultation and six weeks afterwards. Results The two experimental groups (2nd & 3rd were equally effective in reducing pain, disability and distress, and both were more effective than the attention placebo group (1st, however the experimental groups appeared to have improved at follow-up relative to the placebo-group in terms of disability, pain and depressed mood. Conclusion This pilot study demonstrates the feasibility and acceptability of the design. A full, randomized, controlled trial is required to confirm the efficacy of the interventions developed here.

  16. A Mastication Mechanism Designed for Testing Temporomandibular Joint Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan J. Frayne

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of temporomandibular joint implants has involved simplified mechanical tests that apply pure vertical forces or pure rotational movements to the implant. The aim of this study was to develop a biological based mastication mechanism and conduct preliminary testing of a novel temporomandibular joint implant. The mechanism was designed to mimic temporomandibular joint loads by performing compression and anterior/posterior translation. Pilot testing was performed on six implant/joint specimens for seven consecutive hours, completing approximately 22,000 cycles at a frequency of approximately 1 Hz. Each cycle had a joint compression phase (67.3 N over 0.15 s followed by a translation phase (8.67 N over 0.43 s that was similar to joint loads/motions that have been reported in vivo. This new mastication mechanism incorporates both anatomical and mechanical variability. The use of biological specimens is an important approach that can help bridge the gap between traditional synthetic implant materials/mechanical testing and in vivo testing.

  17. Prevalence of temporomandibular disorder signs in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurbuz, O; Alatas, G; Kurt, E

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) signs in a group of institutionalized patients with schizophrenia. Three hundred thirty-nine patients with schizophrenia were examined and compared with 107 age-matched and gender-matched control subjects. TMD signs were evaluated according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria to assess temporomandibular joint pain to palpation, limitation of maximum mouth opening, alteration of mouth opening pathway (deviation/deflection) and temporomandibular joint noises. In addition, tooth wear was recorded for the assessment of bruxism. The prevalence of any TMD signs was observed higher (P = 0.001) in the patients with schizophrenia (284/339, 83.7%) than in the controls (72/107, 67.3%). The prevalence of more than one TMD sign was also significantly higher (P = 0.03) in the patients with schizophrenia (131/339, 38.6%) than in the controls (29/107, 27.1%). Significant differences between the two groups were apparent for joint pain on palpation (P = 0.006), deflection (P = 0.006) and joint sounds (P = 0.002). Severe tooth wear was evident in 39.2% of the patients with schizophrenia compared with 21.2% in the control group (P = 0.001). The finding of the present study showed that, compared to control population, chronically hospitalized patients with schizophrenia seem to be more prone to the development of TMD signs and severe tooth wear and bruxism.

  18. Temporomandibular disorders in fibromyalgia syndrome: a short-communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Maísa Soares; Pimentel, Marcele Jardim; Rizzatti-Barbosa, Célia Marisa

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a chronic painful syndrome and the coexistence of a painful condition caused by Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) and FMS has been frequently raised for several studies, however, more likely hypothesis is that a set of FMS characteristics may lead to the onset of TMD symptoms and they are not merely coexisting conditions. Therefore, our aim is presenting a review of literature about the relation between fibromyalgia and the signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders. For this purpose, a bibliographic search was performed of the period of 1990-2013, in the Medline, Pubmed, Lilacs and Scielo databases, using the keywords fibromyalgia, temporomandibular disorders and facial pain. Here we present a set of findings in the literature showing that fibromyalgia can lead to TMD symptoms. These studies demonstrated greater involvement of the stomatognathic system in FMS and myogenic disorders of masticatory system are the most commonly found in those patients. FMS appears to have a series of characteristics that constitute predisposing and triggering factors for TMD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Management of the temporomandibular joint after ablative surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredell, Marius; Grätz, Klaus; Obwegeser, Joachim; Gujer, Astrid Kruse

    2014-12-01

    Management of the temporomandibular joint in ablative head and neck surgery is controversial with no standardized approach. The aim of the study was to establish risk-based guidelines for the management of the temporomandibular joint after ablative surgery. Analysis of all patients' records receiving ablative surgery involving the temporomandibular joint in the Department of Cranio-Maxillofacial and Oral Surgery, University Hospital of Zürich, from 2001 to 2012, was performed, identifying 15 patients and 14 reconstructive procedures. A literature search was done identifying all relevant literature on current approaches. Applicable cohorts were constructed, and relevant risks were extrapolated. Evaluated studies are not uniform in their reporting with nonhomogeneous patient groups. A diverse approach is used in the management of these patients with complications such as infection, ankylosis, limited mouth opening, plate penetration in the skull base, and plate loosening. Risk factors for complications appear to be radiation, costochondral graft, disk loss, and plate use alone. Clinical data suggest use of a plate with metal condyle reconstructions and previous radiation therapy as potential risks factors. Employing literature evidence and cumulated clinical data, a risk-based flowchart was developed to assist surgical decision making. Risk factors such as radiation, disk preservation, and soft tissue conditions are important complication-associated factors when planning surgery. Free vascularized fibula grafts appear to have the least complications that must be weighed against donor site morbidity.

  20. Improvement and care seeking for temporomandibular-pain complaints: The complexity of chronic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rollman, A.

    2013-01-01

    "Temporomandibular disorders" (TMD) is a collective term used to describe a group of musculoskeletal conditions occurring in the temporomandibular region. TMD shares features with other chronic musculoskeletal syndromes (such as low back pain and neck pain) including pain, limited range of motion

  1. Groningen temporomandibular total joint prosthesis : An 8-year longitudinal follow-up on function and pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurhuis, J.M.; Dijkstra, P.U.; Stegenga, B.; de Bont, L.G.; Spijkervet, F.K.

    2012-01-01

    Total temporomandibular joint replacement is a surgical procedure for patients with severe temporomandibular joint afflictions affecting quality of life, which have not responded beneficially to previous conventional surgery. The aim of this study was to assess the long-term outcome of the Groningen

  2. Prevalence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders and their association with young university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Cunha Matheus Rodrigues Garcia

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To verify the prevalence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder and their association with joint noise, joint hypermobility, occlusal interference, orthodontic treatment and bruxism in a specific population composed of young university students. Methods: One hundred and seventeen (117 volunteers (mean age of 22 years were selected from the undergraduate course in Dentistry at the School of Dentistry of the “Centro Universitário Hermínio Ometto” (Araras, São Paulo, Brazil. The volunteers answered a questionnaire and were submitted to clinical and electrovibratography exams. Afterwards, the volunteers were classified as either having temporomandibular disorder or not, considering the presence of painful sensitivity in the temporomandibular joint and/or presence of joint noise. The prevalenceof the studied factors was calculated together with the association between each factor, and the presence of temporomandibular disorderwas analyzed by the Chi-square test. Results: The prevalence of temporomandibular disorder in the evaluated sample was 42.9% and significant association was found between temporomandibular disorder and joint noise (p<0.05; and between temporomandibular disorder and bruxism (p<0.05. Conclusion: The results suggest that patients with presence of precisely diagnosed bruxism and joint noise should be monitored with regard to the appearance of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder.

  3. ANGLE OF MOUTH OPENING MEASUREMENT - RELIABILITY OF A TECHNIQUE FOR TEMPOROMANDIBULAR-JOINT MOBILITY ASSESSMENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, P.U.; DEBONT, L.G.M.; Stegenga, B; Boering, G.

    The maximal interincisal distance added to the vertical overlap is generally used as a measure for temporomandibular joint mobility. However, the length of the mandible also has an influence on this measure. The angle of mouth opening as a measure of temporomandibular joint mobility is independent

  4. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PRIMARY TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT DISORDERS AND CERVICAL SPINE DYSFUNCTION

    OpenAIRE

    Reggars, John W.

    1994-01-01

    The co-existence of primary temporomandibular disorders and cervical spine dysfunction is well documented. This paper reviews the anatomy and function of the temporomandibular joint and its primary disorders with particular reference to their possible effects an the cervical spine.

  5. Keys to an open lock : Subject specific biomechanical modelling of luxations of the human temporomandibular joint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuijt, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis, the aims are to: • increase the understanding of the interplay of morphological aspects, such as joint shape and muscle orientation, in open locks of the human temporomandibular joint. • increase the understanding of the biomechanics behind open locks of the temporomandibular joint.

  6. Antioxidant capacity of synovial fluid in the temporomandibular joint correlated with radiological morphology of temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimaru, Kyoko; Ohba, Seigo; Yoshimura, Hitoshi; Matsuda, Shinpei; Ishimaru, Jun-Ichi; Sano, Kazuo

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the correlation between the antioxidant capacity of synovial fluid and radiological findings of intra-articular structures in patients with disorders of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). We recruited 21 patients (9 men and 12 women, aged 18-84 years of age) with such disorders, excluding myofascial pain and dysfunction syndrome, or other muscular disorders. The clinical variables recorded included age, sex, interincisal distance, and visual analogue pain scores (VAS). Radiological findings were obtained from diagnostic arthrogram and cone-beam computed tomography (CT). The antioxidant capacity of the synovial fluid was measured by chemiluminescence. Eleven patients were radiologically diagnosed with closed lock, and the remaining 10 with no closed lock. An anchored intra-articular disc was most often seen on cone-beam CT (n=19) followed by perforated disc (n=7), osteoarthrosis (n=7), and anterior disc displacement without reduction (n=5). Although there were no significant differences between antioxidant capacity and age, sex, VAS, or any findings on cone-beam CT, antioxidant capacity was significantly decreased in the patients with closed lock compared with those who did not have closed lock (p=0.02). The results suggest an association between the oxidative stress of the synovial fluid and closed-lock in disorders of the TMJ. Copyright © 2014 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Imaging diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). MR imaging of the disk of the temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sano, Tsukasa; Yamamoto, Mika; Sakuma, Katsuya [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Dentistry] [and others

    2001-03-01

    Since its introduction in the 1980s, magnetic resonance imaging has become the preferred method for diagnosing soft tissue abnormalities of temporomandibular joint (TMJ). MR imaging is non-invasive and more accurate than arthorography. In addition, it requires less operator skill and is well tolerated by patients. We are usually taking MR images of the TMJ with the fast spin echo technique that can simultaneously obtain both T2-weighted and proton density images. The purpose of this study was to determine the utility of T2-weighed and proton density images for diagnosing the disk status in TMJ, comparing the results with those obtained by T1-weighted images. We studied 104 TMJs in 52 patients with both T2-weighted and proton density images, and 80 TMJs in 40 patients with only T1-weighted images. The joints were evaluated by two oral radiologists who looked at three aspects of the joints-disk displacement, disk reduction and disk shape - giving ratings of good'' or ''fair'' in each category. Ratings of ''good'' were significant higher in all three categories in T2-weighted and proton density images than in T1-weighted images (p<0.01). Based on these results, we conclude that T2-weighted and proton density images taken with the fast spin echo technique are useful for diagnosing the disk status of the TMJ. (author)

  8. Long-term evaluation of single-puncture temporomandibular joint arthrocentesis in patients with unilateral temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şentürk, M F; Yıldırım, D; Bilgir, E; Fındık, Y; Baykul, T

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term effects of the single-puncture arthrocentesis (SPA) technique. Forty-two patients with unilateral temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs) were treated by SPA. Thirty-eight of these patients completed 1-24 months of follow-up (short-term group) and 21 completed 11 months or longer of follow-up (long-term group). The two groups were evaluated statistically for pain (visual analogue scale), maximum mouth opening, lateral excursion, and protrusion. Both follow-up duration groups showed significant improvements when compared to baseline levels for almost all of the outcome variables (P<0.05). Single puncture temporomandibular joint arthrocentesis is an effective treatment method over both the short and long term. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Multimodal physiotherapeutic approach: effects on the temporomandibular disorder diagnosis and severity

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    Ariane Bôlla Freire

    Full Text Available Introduction The temporomandibular disorder (TMD consists of a set of signs and symptoms that affect the masticatory structures, which may cause joint and/or muscular pain. The physiotherapy approach aims at the pain relief and the functional recovery by means of several modalities.Objective To investigate the effects, short and medium-term, of a multimodal physiotherapeutic approach on TMD diagnosis and severity.Methodology Individuals with diagnosis of TMD, confirmed by the Axis I of the RDC/TMD, took part in the study. From this evaluation, the Temporomandibular Index (TMI and its sub-indices were calculated. The participants were treated during ten sessions of physiotherapy, which included therapeutic ultrasound, thermotherapy, manual therapy, stretching and neuromuscular exercises, as well as self-care and home exercises instructions. Assessments were carried out before treatment (AV1, immediately after treatment (AV2 and two months after the end of the treatment (AV3. The values of indices and the diagnosis prevalence were compared between the different periods by the t paired test (p < 0.05.Results The number of diagnoses reduced in all the subgroups and 41.7% of the 24 participants presented no diagnosis after the treatment. A significant decrease in the TMI was observed between AV1 and AV2 (p = 0.000. There was no difference between AV2 and AV3 (p = 0.204 in 13 participants assessed two months after the end of the treatment.Conclusion The multimodal physiotherapeutic approach resulted in positive effects, short and medium-term, on the symptoms and clinical signs, with deletion of the dysfunction or reduction of its severity in treated patients.

  10. Comparative study between the effects of isolated manual therapy techniques and those associated with low level laser therapy on pain in patients with temporomandibular dysfunction

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    Juliana Cristina Frare

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study sought to evaluate the pain condition in patients with temporomandibular dysfunction after applying manual therapy techniques and those associated with this low level laser therapy. Methods: The study involved 20 patients with temporomandibular dysfunction, divided randomly into two groups: G1 (n = 10, formed by 7 women and 3 men, average age 28.2 years (± 7, treated with manual therapy techniques and G2 (n = 10, formed by 8 women and 2 men, with average age 24.01 (± 6.04, treated with the combination of manual therapy techniques and low level laser therapy. The patients were treated three times a week for four consecutive weeks. The memorandum of manual therapy techniques based on Chaintow,Makofsky and Bienfaint was used. For low level laser therapy GaAs laser (904 nm, 6 J/cm2, 0.38 mW/cm2 was used, applied at 4pre-auricular points. To analyze the pain level, the visual analog pain scale was used. For data analysis the Student’s-t and Wilcoxon tests were used, both with significance level of 5% (p <0.05.Results: There was significant reduction (p <0.05 in the level of pain in both groups treated, but in G2 the significance was higher.Conclusion: Manual therapy techniques, either alone or associated with low level laser therapy showed satisfactory results for pain control in patients with temporomandibular dysfunction.

  11. Temporomandibular disorders and bruxism in childhood and adolescence: review of the literature.

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    Barbosa, Taís de Souza; Miyakoda, Luana Sayuri; Pocztaruk, Rafael de Liz; Rocha, Camila Pinhata; Gavião, Maria Beatriz Duarte

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this article was to review the literature about temporomandibular disorders and bruxism and their relationships in children and adolescents. The literature was searched using Medline, ISI, Cochrane Library, Scielo and the Internet, from March 1970 to the end of June 2007. The inclusion criteria were: they evaluated a possible association between TMD and bruxism, and they dealt with child and/or adolescent samples. Furthermore, interim reports, related Internet sites and chapters in textbooks were considered. From 64 records found, 30 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The prevalence of temporomandibular disorders in children and adolescent varies widely in the literature. Temporomandibular disorders are often defined on the basis of signs and symptoms, of which the most common are: temporomandibular joint sounds, impaired movement of the mandible, limitation in mouth opening, preauricular pain, facial pain, headaches and jaw tenderness on function, having mainly a mild character, fluctuation and progression to severe pain and dysfunction is rare. One of the possible causal factors suggested that temporomandibular disorders in children is a functional mandibular overload variable, mainly bruxism. Bruxism, defined as the habitual nonfunctional forceful contact between occlusal tooth surfaces, is involuntary, excessive grinding, clenching or rubbing of teeth during nonfunctional movements of the masticatory system. Its etiology is still controversial but the multifactorial cause has been attributed, including pathophysiologic, psychologic and morphologic factors. Moreover, in younger children, bruxism may be a consequence of the masticatory neuromuscular system immaturity. Complications include dental attrition, headaches, temporomandibular disorders and masticatory muscle soreness. Some studies have linked oral parafunctional habits to disturbances and diseases of the temporomandibular joint, mainly bruxism, suggesting its association with temporomandibular

  12. Comparison of the T2 relaxation time of the temporomandibular joint articular disk between patients with temporomandibular disorders and asymptomatic volunteers.

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    Kakimoto, N; Shimamoto, H; Chindasombatjaroen, J; Tsujimoto, T; Tomita, S; Hasegawa, Y; Murakami, S; Furukawa, S

    2014-07-01

    T2 relaxation time is a quantitative MR imaging parameter used to detect degenerated cartilage in the knee and lumbar intervertebral disks. We measured the T2 relaxation time of the articular disk of the temporomandibular joint in patients with temporomandibular disorders and asymptomatic volunteers to demonstrate an association between T2 relaxation time and temporomandibular disorder MR imaging findings. One hundred forty-four patients with temporomandibular disorders and 17 volunteers were enrolled in this study. An 8-echo spin-echo sequence for measuring the T2 relaxation times was performed in the closed mouth position, and the T2 relaxation time of the entire articular disk was measured. Patients were classified according to the articular disk location and function, articular disk configuration, presence of joint effusion, osteoarthritis, and bone marrow abnormalities. The T2 relaxation time of the entire articular disk was 29.3 ± 3.8 ms in the volunteer group and 30.7 ± 5.1 ms in the patient group (P = .177). When subgroups were analyzed, however, the T2 relaxation times of the entire articular disk in the anterior disk displacement without reduction group, the marked or extensive joint effusion group, the osteoarthritis-positive group, and the bone marrow abnormality-positive group were significantly longer than those in the volunteer group (P temporomandibular joint in patients with progressive temporomandibular disorders were longer than those of healthy volunteers. © 2014 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  13. Prevalence of the different Axis I clinical subtypes in a sample of patients with orofacial pain and temporomandibular disorders in the Andalusian Healthcare Service.

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    Blanco-Hungría, Antonio; Blanco-Aguilera, Antonio; Blanco-Aguilera, Elena; Serrano-del-Rosal, Rafael; Biedma-Velázquez, Lourdes; Rodríguez-Torronteras, Alejandro; Segura-Saint-Gerons, Rafael

    2016-03-01

    The main objective of this paper is to analyze the prevalence of each of the different clinical subtypes of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in a sample of patients with this pathology. In addition, a second objective was to analyze their distribution according to gender. To this end, the results of 1603 patients who went to the Unit of Temporomandibular Disorders in the Córdoba Healthcare District because they suffered from this pathology were analyzed. In order to diagnose them, the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) were applied, analyzing the different Axis I subtypes (myopathy, discopathy and arthropathy) and obtaining the combined Axis I for each patient and the relation of all these variables according to gender. The null-hypothesis test confirmed the lack of connection between the gender variable and the different subtypes in the clinical analysis, and between the former and the combined Axis I of the RDC/TMD. The prevalence was high for the muscle disorders subtype in general, showing an 88.7% prevalence, while the presence of discopathies or arthropathies was much lower. Among discopathies, the most frequent ones were disc displacements with reduction, with 39.7% and 42.8% for the left and right temporomandibular joints (TMJ), respectively, while the prevalence of arthropathies was 26.3% for the right TMJ and 32.9% for the left TMJ. The bivariate analysis on the connection with gender reveals a p≥ 0.05 value for the muscle and arthralgia subtypes. The patients seen at the TMD Unit where mostly middle-aged women whose main clinical axis subtype was the muscle disorder subtype. For their part, both discopathies and arthropathies, although present, are much less prevalent.

  14. Correlation between pain and degenerative bony changes on cone-beam computed tomography images of temporomandibular joints.

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    Bae, SunMee; Park, Moon-Soo; Han, Jin-Woo; Kim, Young-Jun

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess correlation between pain and degenerative bony changes on cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images of temporomandibular joints (TMJs). Two hundred eighty-three temporomandibular joints with degenerative bony changes were evaluated. Pain intensity (numeric rating scale, NRS) and pain duration in patients with degenerative joint disease (DJD) were also analyzed. We classified condylar bony changes on CBCT into five types: osteophyte (Osp), erosion (Ero), flattening (Fla), subchondral sclerosis (Scl), and pseudocyst (Pse). Degenerative bony changes were the most frequent in the age groups of 10~19, 20-29, and 50~59 years. The most frequent pain intensity was "none" (NRS 0, 34.6%) followed by "annoying" (NRS 3-5, 29.7%). The most frequent condylar bony change was Fla (219 joints, 77.4%) followed by Ero (169 joints, 59.7%). "Ero + Fla" was the most common combination of the bony changes (12.7%). The frequency of erosion was directly proportional to NRS, but the frequency of osteophyte was inversely proportional. The prevalence of Ero increased from onset until 2 years and gradually decreased thereafter. The prevalence of Osp, Ero, and Pse increased with age. Osp and Ero can be pain-related variables in degenerative joint disease (DJD) patients. "Six months to 2 years" may be a meaningful time point from the active, unstable phase to the stabilized late phase of DJD.

  15. Correlation between computer-assisted measurements of mandibular opening and closing movements and clinical symptoms of temporomandibular dysfunction.

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    Kordass, B; Hugger, A; Bernhardt, O

    2012-01-01

    197 subjects (74 male, 123 female) were evaluated in this Study of Health in Pomerania associated project (SHIP 0). Both a clinical functional status and an instrumental analysis of functional movement patterns of the mandible were performed in each subject, in the latter case using an ultrasonic jaw motion analysis system. Correlations between instrumental movement pattern features and clinical signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMD), such as joint sounds, palpable impairment of jaw movement, and the termination of opening movement at the incisal point, were particularly significant (p movement or muscle tenderness in response to pressure. A multivariate logistic regression model showed a significant correlation between Helkimo Clinical Dysfunction grades 2 and 3 and the following independent variables: frequent headaches (odds ratio [OR] 4.12; p = 0.032), frequent popping sounds in the jaw joints (OR 5.79; p = 0.012), incisal paths showing conspicuous signs of dysfunction such as deviation or deflection (OR 4.35; p = 0.05), and condylar path anomalies such as jumpy, straight/inverse or irregular tracings (OR 28.59; p = 0.006). Instrumental functional analysis of condylar path tracings allows one to draw statistically valid conclusions about the occurrence of TMD symptoms. It can be helpful to perform condylar path analysis when performing risk assessments for temporomandibular dysfunction in certain situations, particularly before prosthetic rehabilitation.

  16. Experimental Model of Zymosan-Induced Arthritis in the Rat Temporomandibular Joint: Role of Nitric Oxide and Neutrophils

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    Hellíada Vasconcelos Chaves

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To establish a new model of zymosan-induced temporomandibular joint (TMJ arthritis in the rat and to investigate the role of nitric oxide. Methods. Inflammation was induced by an intra-articular injection of zymosan into the left TMJ. Mechanical hypernociception, cell influx, vascular permeability, myeloperoxidase activity, nitrite levels, and histological changes were measured in TMJ lavages or tissues at selected time points. These parameters were also evaluated after treatment with the nitric oxide synthase (NOS inhibitors L-NAME or 1400 W. Results. Zymosan-induced TMJ arthritis caused a time-dependent leucocyte migration, plasma extravasation, mechanical hypernociception, and neutrophil accumulation between 4 and 24 h. TMJ immunohistochemical analyses showed increased inducible NOS expression. Treatment with L-NAME or 1400 W inhibited these parameters. Conclusion. Zymosan-induced TMJ arthritis is a reproducible model that may be used to assess both the mechanisms underlying TMJ inflammation and the potential tools for therapies. Nitric oxide may participate in the inflammatory temporomandibular dysfunction mechanisms.

  17. Geodesics on Point Clouds

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    Hongchuan Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel framework to compute geodesics on implicit surfaces and point clouds. Our framework consists of three parts, particle based approximate geodesics on implicit surfaces, Cartesian grid based approximate geodesics on point clouds, and geodesic correction. The first two parts can effectively generate approximate geodesics on implicit surfaces and point clouds, respectively. By introducing the geodesic curvature flow, the third part produces smooth and accurate geodesic solutions. Differing from most of the existing methods, our algorithms can converge to a given tolerance. The presented computational framework is suitable for arbitrary implicit hypersurfaces or point clouds with high genus or high curvature.

  18. The Points Of Language

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    Meier, Richard P.; Lillo-Martin, Diane

    2017-01-01

    Signed languages display a variety of pointing signs that serve the functions of deictic and anaphoric pronouns, possessive and reflexive pronouns, demonstratives, locatives, determiners, body part labels, and verb agreement. We consider criteria for determining the linguistic status of pointing signs. Among those criteria are conventionality, indexicality, phonological compositionality, being subject to grammatical constraints, and marking the kinds of grammatical distinctions expected of pronouns. We conclude that first-person points meet all these proposed criteria, but that nonfirst person points are in part gestural. Lastly, we review evidence for the grammaticization over time of systems of pointing signs within signed languages. PMID:28603596

  19. The severity of temporomandibular joint disorder by teeth loss in the elderly

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    Indry Herdiyani

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint dysfunction is a term that covers a number of clinical problems that involves masticatory muscles, temporomandibular joints, and related structures, or both. Loss of tooth was an etiology of temporomandibular joint dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to obtain the description of temporomandibular joint dysfunction level that caused by tooth loss of elderly in three nursing home Bandung. This was a descriptive study using the survey method of the elderly in three nursing home Bandung. A total of 34 people consist 6 males and 28 females. The subjects were examined by symptoms of temporomandibular joint dysfunction and the dysfunction level was assessed by Helkimo Clinical Dysfunction Index. The result of this study shows that elderly in Nursing Home Bandung have mild dysfunction level was 7 (14.71%, moderate dysfunction level was 22 (64.71%, and severe dysfunction level is 5 (20.58%. It can be concluded that loss of the teeth is one of the etiologies of temporomandibular joint disorder. Based on the research conducted, it can be concluded that all elderly with teeth loss will have the temporomandibular joint disorder and the most severity happens based on teeth loss by using the Helkimo Clinical Disfunction Index score was the moderate disorder.

  20. The arterial blood supply of the temporomandibular joint: an anatomical study and clinical implications.

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    Cuccia, Antonino Marco; Caradonna, Carola; Caradonna, Domenico; Anastasi, Giuseppe; Milardi, Demetrio; Favaloro, Angelo; De Pietro, Anita; Angileri, Tommaso Maurizio; Caradonna, Luigi; Cutroneo, Giuseppina

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze three-dimensional images of the arterial supply to the temporomandibular joint. Ten patients (five men and five women, mean age 36 years) without signs or symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, who underwent contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) scanning with intravenous contrast, were studied. The direct volume rendering technique of CT images was used, and a data set of images to visualize the vasculature of the human temporomandibular joint in three dimensions was created. After elaboration of the data through post-processing, the arterial supply of the temporomandibular joint was studied. The analysis revealed the superficial temporal artery, the anterior tympanic artery, the deep temporal artery, the auricular posterior artery, the transverse facial artery, the middle meningeal artery, and the maxillary artery with their branches as the main arterial sources for the lateral and medial temporomandibular joint. The direct volume rendering technique was found to be successful in the assessment of the arterial supply to the temporomandibular joint. The superficial temporal artery and maxillary artery ran along the lateral and medial sides of the condylar neck, suggesting that these arteries are at increased risk during soft-tissue procedures such as an elective arthroplasty of the temporomandibular joint.

  1. The arterial blood supply of the temporomandibular joint: an anatomical study and clinical implications

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    Cuccia, Antonino Marco; Caradonna, Carola; Caradonna, Domenico [Dept. of Surgical and Oncological Disciplines, University of Palermo, Palermo (Italy); Anastasi, Giuseppe; Milardi, Demetrio; Favaloro, Angelo; Caradonna, Luigi; Cutroneo, Giuseppina [Biomorphology and Biotechnologies, University of Messina, Messina (Italy); De Pietro, Anita; Angileri, Tommaso Maurizio [Villa Santa Teresa, Diagnostica per Immagini, Palermo (Italy)

    2013-03-15

    The aim of this study was to analyze three-dimensional images of the arterial supply to the temporomandibular joint. Ten patients (five men and five women, mean age 36 years) without signs or symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, who underwent contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) scanning with intravenous contrast, were studied. The direct volume rendering technique of CT images was used, and a data set of images to visualize the vasculature of the human temporomandibular joint in three dimensions was created. After elaboration of the data through post-processing, the arterial supply of the temporomandibular joint was studied. The analysis revealed the superficial temporal artery, the anterior tympanic artery, the deep temporal artery, the auricular posterior artery, the transverse facial artery, the middle meningeal artery, and the maxillary artery with their branches as the main arterial sources for the lateral and medial temporomandibular joint. The direct volume rendering technique was found to be successful in the assessment of the arterial supply to the temporomandibular joint. The superficial temporal artery and maxillary artery ran along the lateral and medial sides of the condylar neck, suggesting that these arteries are at increased risk during soft-tissue procedures such as an elective arthroplasty of the temporomandibular joint.

  2. Desordem Temporomandibular: relações entre sintomas otológicos e orofaciais Temporomandibular Disorder: relationship between otologic and orofacial symptoms

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    Cláudia Maria de Felício

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Os sintomas otológicos são freqüentes em pacientes com desordem temporomandibular, e estudos são necessários para elucidar os mecanismos envolvidos. OBJETIVO: O objetivo desse estudo clínico foi investigar a associação de sintomas otológicos (otalgia, zumbido e plenitude auricular com os achados audiológicos, os outros sinais/sintomas relacionados à desordem temporomandibular, e os hábitos parafuncionais orais. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Prospectivo clínico. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: 27 pacientes com desordem temporomandibular, da Clínica de Oclusão da Faculdade de Odontologia de Ribeirão Preto da Universidade de São Paulo, responderam um questionário sobre sinais, sintomas e hábitos orais, e passaram por avaliações otorrinolaringológica e audiológica. Os dados foram analisados pelos testes Binomial, Exato de Fisher e correlação produto-momento de Pearson. O índice de significância adotado foi pThe otologic symptoms are frequents in temporomandibular disorder patients, and studies are needed to elucidate the involved mechanisms. AIM: The objective of the present study was to investigate the association of otology symptoms (otalgia, tinnitus, ear fullness with otologic findings, the other temporomandibular disorder signs and symptoms, and parafunctional habits. STUDY DESIGN: Clinical prospective. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 27 temporomandibular patients from Occlusion Clinic of the Dental School of Ribeirão Preto – University of Sao Paulo, answered a questionnaire which included questions about signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder and parafunctional habits; they were submitted to otorhinolaryngological and audiologic examination. The data obtained were analyzed through Binomial Test, Exact Test of Fisher and Pearson Correlation, with p value < 0.05. RESULTS: Otologic symptoms were presented in 88.88% of the patients (59.26% presented otalgia, 74.07 tinnitus and 74.07% ear fullness. There was no significance between the

  3. Occupation as a potential contributing factor for temporomandibular disorders, bruxism, and cervical muscle pain: a controlled comparative study.

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    Emodi Perelman, Alona; Eli, Ilana; Rubin, Pessia F; Greenbaum, Tzvi; Heiliczer, Shimrit; Winocur, Ephraim

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the prevalence of cervical muscle pain (CMP) and myogenic temporomandibular disorders (MFP) among female dentists, high-tech workers, and a group of subjects employed in other occupations; to investigate the associations among CMP, MFP, and bruxism in those groups; and to evaluate the influence of work-related stress on MFP and CMP. Evaluation was based on clinical examinations of MFP and CMP and self-reported questionnaires concerning pain and stress. The diagnosis of sleep bruxism was adapted using the validated diagnostic criteria of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (International Classification of Sleep Disorders (ICSD-2), 2005, Westchester, IL), whilst the diagnosis of awake bruxism was made on the basis of a questionnaire. The odds of a subject with MFP experiencing concurrent CMP or bruxism (sleep and/or awake) ranged from 2.603 to 3.077. These results suggest that high-tech workers and dentists are at greater risk for developing temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and CMP when compared with general occupation workers, as defined in this study. Furthermore, the associations shown here between TMDs and CMP highlight the importance of palpating neck musculature as part of any routine examination of TMD. © 2015 Eur J Oral Sci.

  4. High-Capacity Communications from Martian Distances Part 4: Assessment of Spacecraft Pointing Accuracy Capabilities Required For Large Ka-Band Reflector Antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Richard E.; Sands, O. Scott; Huang, John; Bassily, Samir

    2006-01-01

    Improved surface accuracy for deployable reflectors has brought with it the possibility of Ka-band reflector antennas with extents on the order of 1000 wavelengths. Such antennas are being considered for high-rate data delivery from planetary distances. To maintain losses at reasonable levels requires a sufficiently capable Attitude Determination and Control System (ADCS) onboard the spacecraft. This paper provides an assessment of currently available ADCS strategies and performance levels. In addition to other issues, specific factors considered include: (1) use of "beaconless" or open loop tracking versus use of a beacon on the Earth side of the link, and (2) selection of fine pointing strategy (body-fixed/spacecraft pointing, reflector pointing or various forms of electronic beam steering). Capabilities of recent spacecraft are discussed.

  5. Auditory characteristics of individuals with temporomandibular dysfunctions and dentofacial deformities

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    Tatiane Totta

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether there is any relationship between otological as well as vestibular symptoms, audiological findings and type of temporomandibular disorder (articular, muscular and mixed; and to check the distribution of the temporomandibular disorders (TMD dysfunction degree in the research population. METHODS: A retrospective study involving 30 patients of both sexes, aged between 18 and 49 years old, diagnosed with TMD and dentofacial deformities, who were subject to clinical evaluation (muscle palpation, auscultation of temporomandibular joint during mandibular motion and measurement of jaw movement, audiological testing (pure tone audiometry and immittance testing and two questionnaires, one on otological and vestibular symptoms and the other on TMD anamnesis. Based on both the anamnesis questionnaire and the clinical assessment, the subjects were divided according to the type and degree of TMD dysfunction (mild, moderate and severe, and compared regarding the occurrence of auditory signs and symptoms, vestibular symptoms and audiological findings according to TMD type. RESULTS: The anamnesis questionnaire demonstrated higher prevalence (83.33% of severe TMD. Subjects with mixed TMD had more complaints about hypoacusis than those with muscular TMD (p < 0.05. The results showed no change in either audiological and immittance testing for all assessed individuals. CONCLUSION: Otological symptoms are present in subjects with TMD and dentofacial deformities, regardless of the classification of TMD (articular, muscular or mixed. Those with mixed TMD may have higher incidence of complaints about hypoacusis than subjects with muscular TMD. Further studies are needed to investigate the relationship between otological symptoms and the different types of TMD.

  6. Temporomandibular Joint Disorders as a Cause of Aural Fullness.

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    Peng, Yongxin

    2017-09-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) are often associated with aural manifestations. However, it is not clear whether aural fullness could be induced by TMD. The purpose was to investigate the TMD and effectiveness of TMD treatments in patients with mainly or exclusively aural fullness complaint. One hundred and twelve patients, who had aural fullness as the main or sole complaint, presented to the Otolaryngology Department, PLA Army General Hospital, Beijing, China, between January 2010 and January 2015. Patients' medical history indicated that they had previously been diagnosed and treated for otitis media or sensorineural hearing loss but without positive results. Patients were subjected to pure tone audiometry and acoustic immittance screening using GSI-61 clinical audiometer and GSI TympStar middle ear analyzer respectively. Patients were examined by questionnaire, X-ray and/or computed tomography scan of temporomandibular joint. TMD was categorized according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD). Patients were then treated for TMD. All the patients showed normal eardrum and type A tympanogram. The patients of 60.7% (68/112) were classified as group I TMD disorders (muscle disorders), 34.8% (39/112) were group II (disc displacements), and 4.5% (5/112) were group III (arthralgia, osteoarthritis, and osteoarthrosis). Aural fullness was completely resolved or significantly improved in 67 and 34 patients respectively following treatments aimed at improving TMD, with a combined effectiveness of 90.2% (101/112). TMD treatments are especially effective (94.1%) in group I TMD. TMD as a potential cause of aural fullness should be considered in otolaryngology practice.

  7. A Study on Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Temporomandibular Joint

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    Kim, HYung Sick; Kim, Jae Duck [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-08-15

    Examinations of the temporomandibular joints were performed on a 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance (MR) system. An MR surface receiver coil 3 inch in diameter was placed on plastic frame, the patient's head being placed in the frame so that the coil was pressed against the temporal region. In taking advantage of the magnetic resonance imaging that has been studied briskly till now, author obtained the images of parasagittal and paracoronal planes about the temporomandibular joint by using MPGR (Multi-Planar Gradient Recalled), GRASS (Gradient Recalled Acquisition in the Steady State), and CSMEMP (Contiguous Slice Multiple Echo, Multi-Planar), that differ from the Spin Echo pulse sequence which the previous author used. Five subjects with no symptoms of temporomandibular joint pain and dysfunction were studied. The plane images obtained by these methods were compared with those by Spin Echo pulse sequence. The results were as follows: 1. The optimal repetition times (TR) and echo times (TE) for T.M.J. image were; a. 400 msec and 18 msec in PMGR pulse sequence. b. 40 msec and 12 msec in GRASS pulse sequence. c. 700 msec and 30 msec in CSMEMP pulse sequence. d. 500 msec and 20 msec in Spin Echo pulse sequence. 2. When the MPGR pulse sequence was using, T2-weighted image was obtained in very short time. 3. On the image of the paracoronal plane by GRASS pulse sequence, meniscus showed the moderate signal intensity, and the meniscus and its anteromedial, posterolateral attachments were observed definitely with gray color. 4. The signal intensity of Spin Echo pulse sequence was equal to of CSMEMP pulse sequence, but the image by CSMEMP pulse sequence showed relatively lower level in its resolution.

  8. A clinical study of temporomandibular joint disorders by using arthrography

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    Lee, Seung Hyun; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Kyunghee University, (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to prove the relationship between arthrographic and clinical features in temporomandibular joint disorders. In order to carry out this study, ninety-eight arthrographic examinations of temporomandibular joints were performed in eighty-two patients who had the temporomandibular joint disorders. As the arthrographic examination, the cases were classified in three groups, disk displacement with reduction, disk displacement without reduction, within normal limit. After this, the cases were clinically examined, and the results were compared and analyzed in each other group. The obtained results were as follows: 1. As the classification by arthrographic examination, three groups (disc displacement with reduction, disc displacement without reduction, within normal limit) were 41%, 54%, 5% of total cases in this study, respectively. 2. The third decade (65%) was most frequent in this study. The average age of each group (disc displacement with reduction, disc displacement without reduction, within normal limit) was 24, 28, 21, and disc displacement without reduction group was higher than any other group. 3. In the chief complaint, pain was the most frequent in all three groups. Joint sound was also frequent in disc displacement with reduction group, but in disc displacement without reduction group, limitation of mouth opening was more frequent. 4. Of the various pain, the movement pain was most frequent (61%) in this study. In joint sound, click (63%) was the most frequent in disc displacement with reduction group, but sound history (42%) and no sound (31%) were more frequent in disc displacement without reduction group. 5. The average maximum opening of each group (disc displacement with reduction, disc displacement without reduction, within normal limit) was 44 mm, 32.9 mm, 44 mm, and disc displacement without reduction group was less than any other group. 6. The masticatory disturbance of each group (disc displacement with reduction, disc

  9. Orotracheal intubation and temporomandibular disorder: a longitudinal controlled study

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    Cláudia Branco Battistella

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: To determine the incidence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder in elective surgery patients who underwent orotracheal intubation. METHODS: This was a longitudinal controlled study with two groups. The study group included patients who underwent orotracheal intubation and a control group. We used the American Academy of Orofacial Pain questionnaire to assess the temporomandibular disorder signs and symptoms one-day postoperatively (T1, and the patients' baseline status prior to surgery (T0 was also recorded. The same questionnaire was used after three months (T2. The mouth opening amplitude was measured at T1 and T2. We considered a pvalue of less than 0.05 to be significant. RESULTS: We included 71 patients, with 38 in the study group and 33 in the control. There was no significant difference between the groups in age (study group: 66.0 [52.5-72.0]; control group: 54.0 [47.0-68.0]; p = 0.117 or in their belonging to the female gender (study group: 57.9%; control group: 63.6%; p = 0.621. At T1, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups in the incidence of mouth opening limitation (study group: 23.7% vs. control group: 18.2%;p = 0.570 or in the mouth opening amplitude (study group: 45.0 [40.0-47.0] vs. control group: 46.0 [40.0-51.0];p = 0.278. At T2 we obtained similar findings. There was no significant difference in the affirmative response to all the individual questions in the American Academy of Orofacial Pain questionnaire. CONCLUSIONS: In our population, the incidence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder of muscular origin was not different between the groups.

  10. [Orotracheal intubation and temporomandibular disorder: a longitudinal controlled study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battistella, Cláudia Branco; Machado, Flávia Ribeiro; Juliano, Yara; Guimarães, Antônio Sérgio; Tanaka, Cássia Emi; Garbim, Cristina Talá de Souza; Fonseca, Paula de Maria da Rocha; Sanches, Monique Lalue

    2016-01-01

    To determine the incidence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder in elective surgery patients who underwent orotracheal intubation. This was a longitudinal controlled study with two groups. The study group included patients who underwent orotracheal intubation and a control group. We used the American Academy of Orofacial Pain questionnaire to assess the temporomandibular disorder signs and symptoms one-day postoperatively (T1), and the patients' baseline status prior to surgery (T0) was also recorded. The same questionnaire was used after three months (T2). The mouth opening amplitude was measured at T1 and T2. We considered a p value of less than 0.05 to be significant. We included 71 patients, with 38 in the study group and 33 in the control. There was no significant difference between the groups in age (study group: 66 [52.5-72]; control group: 54 [47-68]; p=0.117) or in their belonging to the female gender (study group: 57.9%; control group: 63.6%; p=0.621). At T1, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups in the incidence of mouth opening limitation (study group: 23.7% vs. 18.2%; p=0.570) or in the mouth opening amplitude (study group: 45 [40-47] vs. 46 [40-51]; p=0.278). At T2 we obtained similar findings. There was no significant difference in the affirmative response to all the individual questions in the American Academy of Orofacial Pain questionnaire. In our population, the incidence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder of muscular origin was not different between the groups. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. Orotracheal intubation and temporomandibular disorder: a longitudinal controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battistella, Cláudia Branco; Machado, Flávia Ribeiro; Juliano, Yara; Guimarães, Antônio Sérgio; Tanaka, Cássia Emi; de Souza Garbim, Cristina Talá; de Maria da Rocha Fonseca, Paula; Sanches, Monique Lalue

    2016-01-01

    To determine the incidence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder in elective surgery patients who underwent orotracheal intubation. This was a longitudinal controlled study with two groups. The study group included patients who underwent orotracheal intubation and a control group. We used the American Academy of Orofacial Pain questionnaire to assess the temporomandibular disorder signs and symptoms one-day postoperatively (T1), and the patients' baseline status prior to surgery (T0) was also recorded. The same questionnaire was used after three months (T2). The mouth opening amplitude was measured at T1 and T2. We considered a p value of less than 0.05 to be significant. We included 71 patients, with 38 in the study group and 33 in the control. There was no significant difference between the groups in age (study group: 66.0 [52.5-72.0]; control group: 54.0 [47.0-68.0]; p=0.117) or in their belonging to the female gender (study group: 57.9%; control group: 63.6%; p=0.621). At T1, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups in the incidence of mouth opening limitation (study group: 23.7% vs. 18.2%; p=0.570) or in the mouth opening amplitude (study group: 45.0 [40.0-47.0] vs. 46.0 [40.0-51.0]; p=0.278). At T2 we obtained similar findings. There was no significant difference in the affirmative response to all the individual questions in the American Academy of Orofacial Pain questionnaire. In our population, the incidence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder of muscular origin was not different between the groups. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint; Internal Derangement des Temporomandibulargelenks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krestan, C.; Lomoschitz, F.; Puig, S.; Robinson, S. [Vienna Univ. (Austria). Zentrales Inst. fuer Radiodiagnostik

    2001-09-01

    Internal Derangement is one of the most common disorders of the Temporomandibular joint. It is defined as an abnormal anatomical relationship between the discus articularis and the other structures of the temporomandibular joint. More than 2/3 of patients with clinical symptoms of the temporomandibular joint have an internal derangement. The most frequent finding in internal derangement is an anterior dislocation of the disc with reduction after mouth opening. In more severe cases a complete anterior dislocation is found without reduction of the disc. Internal derangement is a risk factor for developing osteoarthritis with remodeling of the condylus and the fossa mandibularis. The most important modalities of radiologic diagnosis are arthrography, CT and MRI. The diagnosis of craniofacial dysfunction has been improved dramatically by modern imaging techniques, which have become essential tools for primary diagnostic and evaluation after conservative or surgical therapy. MRI has become the gold standard. (orig.) [German] Das Internal Derangement ist eine der haeufigsten Erkrankungen des Temporomandibulargelenks. Es ist definiert als eine abnorme anatomische Beziehung des Discus articularis zu den uebrigen gelenkbildenden Strukturen. Bei mehr als 2/3 der Patienten mit Kiefergelenkbeschwerden kann ein Internal Derangement nachgewiesen werden. Die haeufigste Form ist die Ventralverlagerung des Diskus bei erhaltener Reduktion waehrend der Mundoeffnung. Bei schwereren Formen kommt es zu totalen Ventralverlagerungen ohne Reduktion. Das Internal Derangement beguenstigt die Entwicklung einer Arthrose mit entsprechenden Veraenderungen am Caput mandibulae sowie an der Fossa mandibularis. Die Palette der bildgebenden Diagnostik reicht von der Arthrographie ueber die CT zur MRT. Durch die modernen Schnittbildverfahren wurde die Abklaerung der kraniofazialen Dysfunktion revolutioniert und sind heute essentieller Bestandteil der Initialdiagnostik sowie der Verlaufsbeurteilung

  13. Reemplazo articular temporomandibular debido a queratoquiste odontogénico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Angel Peñón Vivas

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Existen disímiles condiciones que hacen necesario el reemplazo articular temporomandibular; dentro de las más frecuentes se encuentran la anquilosis, la osteoatrosis, estadíos avanzados del Síndrome de disfunción temporomandibular, daño articular postrauma y procesos neoplásicos o tumorales. Los queratoquistes odontógenos que se agrupan para su estudio dentro de los quistes odontogénicos del desarrollo, representan cerca del 7 al 10 por ciento de todos los quistes maxilo-mandibulares. Se dice que tienen dos picos de incidencia entre la segunda y tercera década de vida y entre los 50 y 60 años de edad, con una ligera predilección por el sexo masculino. Aparece más frecuentemente en la región del tercer molar de la mandíbula con extensión a la rama ascendente El presente trabajo tuvo como objetivo mostrar el caso de un paciente masculino de 57 años de edad en el que fue necesario el reemplazo articular temporomandibular debido a un queratoquiste odontogénico que involucraba la totalidad de la rama mandibular derecha, incluyendo el proceso condíleo y coronoideo, así como el ángulo hasta el tercio posterior del cuerpo mandibular. Tras un año de realizada la intervención quirúrgica la evolución del paciente fue satisfactoria.

  14. Assessment of the relationship between stress and temporomandibular joint disorder in female students before university entrance exam (Konkour exam).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottaghi, Ahmad; Razavi, S Mohammad; Pozveh, Elham Zamani; Jahangirmoghaddam, Milad

    2011-12-01

    Temporomandibular joint is one of the most complicated joints of the body and plays an important role in the head and neck system. One of the factors affecting the temporomandibular joint and lead to temporomandibular disorder is anxiety with all the events causing it. The aim of this study was to determine a relationship between anxiety and temporomandibular disorders. In this prospective study, subjects were randomly selected. One hundred and thirty pre-university students in Isfahan were evaluated with Ketel's test of anxiety, exam stress test and temporomandibular disorder questionnaires. The evaluation was done in two stages 10 months and 1 month prior to the university entrance exam (Konkour), clinical assessments consisted of masticatory muscles and sternocleidomastoid muscle palpation, temporomandibular joint palpation for pain and noise and its movement, and mouth opening limitations. The Wilcoxon rank test and paired t-test were used to analyze the data and the P value under 0.05 was considered significant. The level of anxiety and occurrence of temporomandibular disorders were increased between two stages and had the highest level in the second stage. There was a significant increase between two stages (P<0.001). The parallel increase of temporomandibular disorders and anxiety between the two stages can suggest a possible relationship between anxiety and temporomandibular disorders. Therefore, the effect of anxiety in triggering temporomandibular disorder symptoms is probable.

  15. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... OnSafety CPSC Stands for Safety The Tipping Point Home > 60 Seconds of Safety (Videos) > The Tipping Point The Tipping Point by CPSC Blogger September 22, 2009 appliance child Childproofing CPSC danger death electrical fall furniture ...

  16. [Update on current care guideline: temporomandibular disorders (TMD)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are common. Usual symptoms are joint noises and pain, pain in masticatory muscles, difficulties in jaw movements and headache. Treatment of TMD includes information on the background and good response to treatment of these disorders. The patient is advised on self-care routines, including relaxing the lower jaw, massaging the masticatory muscles and hot or cold packs on painful sites. Pharmacotherapy consists of paracetamol or anti-inflammatory analgesics. Occlusal appliances, physiotherapy, cognitive therapies and acupuncture are recommended. Complicated cases not responding to treatment are referred to specialized care.

  17. Temporomandibular joint disorder in systemic sclerosis: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebbi, Raja; Khalifa, Hanen Ben; Dhidah, Monia

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis have several effects on the orofacial region such as widening of the periodontal ligament space, xerostomia and bone resorption of the mandible. We report a case of systemic sclerosis with temporomandibular joint involvement in a 45-year-old female patient accompanied by severe limited mouth opening and pain in the right and left preauricular regions and tenderness in masseter muscles with a morning stiffness of jaws.Magnetic resonance imaging showed a resorption of mandibular condylar process, with disk and joint abnormalities. PMID:28292126

  18. A study of the temporomandibular joint during bruxism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commisso, María S; Martínez-Reina, Javier; Mayo, Juana

    2014-06-01

    A finite element model of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and the human mandible was fabricated to study the effect of abnormal loading, such as awake and asleep bruxism, on the articular disc. A quasilinear viscoelastic model was used to simulate the behaviour of the disc. The viscoelastic nature of this tissue is shown to be an important factor when sustained (awake bruxism) or cyclic loading (sleep bruxism) is simulated. From the comparison of the two types of bruxism, it was seen that sustained clenching is the most detrimental activity for the TMJ disc, producing an overload that could lead to severe damage of this tissue.

  19. Anquilosis postraumatica unilateral de la articulación temporomandibular

    OpenAIRE

    Ivan Alberto Manotas Arévalo

    2013-01-01

    La Anquilosis Temporomandibular en una afección manifestada como la limitación del movimiento del cóndilo articular mandibular dentro de la cavidad glenoide del hueso temporal. Son frecuentes las osificaciones de las estructuras articulares intrínsecas, y en algunos otros casos fibrosis de las estructuras intrínsecas y extrínsecas que impiden la dinámica articular adecuada. Los pacientes afectados, generalmente niños y adultos jóvenes, limitan poco a poco su movilidad articular llegando a la ...

  20. Temporomandibular joint ankylosis fixation technique with ultra thin silicon sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G S Kalra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Temporomandibular joint ankylosis is a highly distressing condition in which the joint space is obliterated by scar tissue and the patient has an inability to open the mouth. Different autogenous and alloplastic interposition materials have been used after the resection of the ankylotic bone to achieve desirable and long lasting results. The recurrence of disease is most distressing for both patients and surgeon. We have been using ultra thin silicon sheet as our preferred material for providing proper fixation and cover to the joint. We have been encouraged by good patient compliance, no implant extrusion and favourable outcome. Materials and Methods: The clinical study included 80 patients with temporomandibular joint ankylosis, treated between April 2001 and March 2009. In all patients, temporomandibular joint ankylosis had resulted following trauma. Diagnosis was based on clinical assessment supplemented by radiographic examination consisting of a panoramic radiograph, axial and coronal computer tomography. The technique of using ultra thin silicon sheet covering whole of the joint space fixed with non-absorbable nylon 3-0 suture both medially to medial pterygoid muscle and laterally to periosteum of zygomatic arch was employed in all patients. Results: A total of 80 patients were in this study (59 males and 21 females. The aetiology of temporomandibular joint ankylosis was post-traumatic in all cases. The patients′ age ranged from 5 to 45 years. The disease was unilateral in 61 cases and bilateral in 19 cases. Twelve patients, who had previous surgery done in the form of gap arthroplasty in 6 cases, costochondral graft in 4 cases and temporalis muscle in 2 cases, presented with recurrence on the same side. The pre-op inter-incisal mouth opening ranged from 4 to 12 mm. The intraoperative inter-incisal mouth opening ranged from 28 to 46 mm. An additional procedure was done in 13 patients, including placement of costochondral

  1. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulian, M A; Mosby, E L; Chisum, J W

    1989-01-01

    Two cases of synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint are reported. This condition is rare but benign, with only 36 cases reported in the literature to date. Symptoms include tenderness, swelling, and limited range of motion, with deviation to the affected side. Diagnosis is made both from the clinical presentation and histologic examination. The etiology is thought to be cartilaginous foci within the synovial membrane that become detached and proliferate in the synovium as chondrocytes. Treatment includes removal of the "loose bodies" and possible resection of the synovial membrane, condyle, and disk.

  2. Los trastornos temporomandibulares y la oclusión

    OpenAIRE

    Grau León, Ileana Bárbara

    2007-01-01

    El Sistema estomatognático es una unidad compleja, que estando en equilibrio, funciona sin complicaciones importantes; sin embargo ante una alteración puede complicarse tanto como el propio sistema. El estudio de la oclusión y su relación con los trastornos temporomandibulares ha sido un tema controvertido y de interés en el campo estomatológico. En Cuba el tema de la terapia oclusal como tratamiento eficaz para resolver este problema de salud no se ha abordado ampliamente. Consideramos ...

  3. Outcomes of office-based temporomandibular joint arthroscopy: a 5-year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossameldin, R H; McCain, J P

    2018-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthroscopy is a minimally invasive surgical approach for intra-articular TMJ diseases. Office-based arthroscopy using the smallest TMJ scope allows for good visualization, as well as the ability to lavage the joint in an office setting. This study aimed to assess the efficacy of an office-based TMJ arthroscopic technique. A retrospective evaluation of 363 patients with a TMJ disorder was performed. These patients underwent office-based arthroscopy using the OnPoint 1.2mm Scope System (Biomet Microfixation, Jacksonville, FL, USA) in Florida, USA, from July 2007. The following outcomes of the procedure were assessed: improvement in painless range of mandibular motion, pain on loading, and functional jaw pain; these were evaluated using a visual analog scale (VAS) over an average follow-up period of 263.81±142.1 days. The statistical analysis was performed using IBM SPSS Statistics version 20. Statistically significant improvements in TMJ pain and function, and other variables (P=0.001) were shown following TMJ arthroscopic lysis and lavage. Office-based arthroscopy using the OnPoint System was demonstrated to be a safe and efficient procedure for the treatment of patients with TMJ disorders as the first level of the algorithm of care. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Disfunción temporomandibular y parafunciones bucales en la adolescencia tardía

    OpenAIRE

    Liset María Frías Figueredo; Deneb Nerey Arango; Ileana Grau León; Rogelio Cabo García

    2012-01-01

    Fundamento: la disfunción temporomandibular es una entidad patológica relacionada con problemas funcionales que afectan la articulación temporomandibular y/o los músculos masticatorios, así como las estructuras asociadas. Su frecuencia tiende a aumentar en la pubertad. Objetivo: determinar la frecuencia de las disfunciones temporomandibulares y su asociación con la presencia de parafunciones bucales en estudiantes de 16 a 18 años. Métodos: se realizó un estudio descriptivo en 86 estudiante...

  5. Electronic Health Record for Temporomandibular Joint Disorders – Support in Therapeutic Process

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hippmann, R.; Nagy, Miroslav; Dostálová, T.; Zvárová, Jana; Seydlová, M.; Feltlová, E.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2010), s. 27-32 ISSN 1801-5603 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : electronic health record * automatic speech recognition * dental cross * temporomandibular joint * temporomandibular joint disorders * structured data entry * dentistry * data model * text-to-speech system * Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science http://www.ejbi.org/en/ejbi/article/25-en-electronic-health-record-for-temporomandibular-joint-disorders-support-in-therapeutic-process.html

  6. Effects of Cooking End-point Temperature and Muscle Part on Sensory ‘Hardness’ and ‘Chewiness’ Assessed Using Scales Presented in ISO11036:1994

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Sasaki

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Texture and ‘tenderness’ in particular, is an important sensory characteristic for consumers’ satisfaction of beef. Objective and detailed sensory measurements of beef texture have been needed for the evaluation and management of beef quality. This study aimed to apply the sensory scales defined in ISO11036:1994 to evaluate the texture of beef. Longissimus and Semitendinosus muscles of three Holstein steers cooked to end-point temperatures of 60°C and 72°C were subjected to sensory analyses by a sensory panel with expertise regarding the ISO11036 scales. For the sensory analysis, standard scales of ‘chewiness’ (9-points and ‘hardness’ (7-points were presented to the sensory panel with reference materials defined in ISO11036. As a result, both ‘chewiness’ and ‘hardness’ assessed according to the ISO11036 scales increased by increasing the cooking end-point temperature, and were different between Longissimus and Semitendinosus muscles. The sensory results were in good agreement with instrumental texture measurements. However, both texture ratings in this study were in a narrower range than the full ISO scales. For beef texture, ISO11036 scales for ‘chewiness’ and ‘hardness’ are useful for basic studies, but some alterations are needed for practical evaluation of muscle foods.

  7. Low-melting-point titanium-base brazing alloys—part 1: Characteristics of two-, three-, and four-component filler metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, E.; Chen, C.-H.

    1997-12-01

    The melting point, microstructure, phase, and electrochemical behavior of Ti-21Ni-15Cu alloy, together with two-, three-, and four-component low-melting-point titanium-base brazing alloys, are presented in this paper. Five filler metals were selected for the study, in which melting points were measured by differential thermal analysis, phases identified by x-ray diffractometry, and corrosion behaviors tested by potentiodynamic polarization. The experimental results show that the three-component Ti-15Cu-15Ni and the newly developed Ti-21Ni-14Cu alloys exhibit the combination of lower melting point and superior corrosion resistance compared to the two-and four-component titanium alloys, 316L stainless steel, and a Co-Cr-Mo alloy in Hank’s solution at 37 °C. On a short time basis, the presence of Ti2Ni and Ti2Cu intermetallics in the Ti-15Cu-15Ni and Ti-21Ni-14Cu alloys should not be preferentially dissolved in galvanic corrosion with respect to the dissimilar Ti-6Al-4V alloy.

  8. Theory of non-local point transformations - Part 3: Theory of NLPT-acceleration and the physical origin of acceleration effects in curved space-times

    CERN Document Server

    Tessarotto, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    This paper is motivated by the introduction of a new functional setting of General Relativity (GR) based on the adoption of suitable group non-local point transformations (NLPT). Unlike the customary local point transformatyion usually utilized in GR, these transformations map in each other intrinsically different curved space-times. In this paper the problem is posed of determining the tensor transformation laws holding for the $4-$% acceleration with respect to the group of general NLPT. Basic physical implications are considered. These concern in particular the identification of NLPT-acceleration effects, namely the relationship established via general NLPT between the $4-$accelerations existing in different curved-space times. As a further application the tensor character of the EM Faraday tensor.with respect to the NLPT-group is established.

  9. CBCT analysis of bony changes associated with temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaat, Wael; Al Bayatti, Saad; Al Kawas, Sausan

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare cone-beam computerized tomography (CBCT) findings and joint space measurement in temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and non-TMD joints, and to correlate these findings with the clinical diagnosis. The study was conducted on patients diagnosed with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis or closed lock according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMDs (Group IIb, IIc, and III). CBCT and clinical records of non-TMD patients who sought treatment for purposes other than TMD were used retrospectively as a control. The following radiographic criteria were assessed: flattening, osteophyte, Ely's cyst, condylar surface irregularities, and joints' space measurements. Osteoarthritic joints had significantly more condylar irregularities (P50.0), osteophytes (P50.0), and condylar flattening (P50.003) than non-TMD joints. Osteoarthritic joints had significantlymore superior surface irregularities (P50.0) and osteophytes (P50.006) than closed lock joints.Non-TMDjoints had significantlymore joint space (5.64+1.88) compared with osteoarthritic joints (4.57+1.97), (P50.025). The correlation among TMD, osteophytes, and flattening of the condylar surface was statistically significant (r50.331, Pv0.000). Cone-beam computerized tomography findings are significantly associated with the clinical diagnosis of TMD. Osteophytes and flattening of the condylar surface are common features of TMD.

  10. Obesity as a risk factor for temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordani, P C; Campi, L B; Circeli, G Z; Visscher, C M; Bigal, M E; Gonçalves, D A G

    2017-01-01

    We conducted a clinical cross-sectional study to evaluate the association between obesity and the presence of painful temporomandibular disorders (TMD), controlling for age, gender, presence of migraine, depression, non-specific somatic symptoms and obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) in an adult population. A total of 299 individuals (76·6% women) with a mean age of 36·8 ± 12·8 years were evaluated. TMD were classified using the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD). Depression and non-specific somatic symptoms were scored by the Symptom Checklist-90, while pain and disability was rated by the Graded Chronic Pain Scale. Bioimpedanciometry (BIA) was used to assess obesity through total body fat percentage. Migraine was diagnosed according to the criteria of the International Classification of Headache Disorders-2 (ICHD-2). OSAS was classified according to the Berlin Questionnaire. We performed univariate and multivariate models, chi-square tests and odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). In the single regression analysis, TMD-pain was significantly associated with total body fat percentage (P = 0·01). In the multivariate analysis, migraine, age, non-specific somatic symptoms and OSAS showed to be stronger predictors of TMD-pain, and obesity did not retain in the regression model. The initial association found between obesity and TMD-pain is lost when it was corrected for gender, migraine, non-specific somatic symptoms and OSAS. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Voice-related disability of Iranian patients with temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Negin; Sahebi, Majid; Saki, Nader; Hosseinzadeh Nik, Tahereh; Shaterzadeh Yazdi, Mohammad Jafar; Nikakhlagh, Soheila; Soltani, Majid; Naderifar, Ehsan; Derakhshandeh, Vita; Javadipour, Shiva; Mahmoodi-Bakhtiari, Behrooz

    2014-11-01

    The relationship between handicaps because of voice disorders and temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) severity was examined. Fifty-two Persian women with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) were examined by two dentists in separate sessions and the assessment protocol of the Dentistry Clinic of Tehran University of Medical Sciences was filled by both dentists and finally they gave their opinion separately about the existence of TMD and categorized the severity of TMD as mild, moderate, and severe. To assess perceived disability resulting from voice disorders in TMD patients, the voice handicap index (VHI) questionnaire was used. The total score of VHI in 80.8% of patients with TMD was equal to or more than 14.5. A significant positive relationship was found between the severity of TMD and the total score of VHI (P = 0.000, r = 0.79). It seems that a comprehensive voice assessment should be included in the evaluation of TMD, and considering different effects of voice disorders on patients' lives, a complete voice evaluation including voice-related disability is necessary to understand the nature of pathophysiology of TMD. Copyright © 2014 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in women and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Claudia Lúcia Pimenta; Silva, Marco Antônio Moreira Rodrigues da; Felício, Cláudia Maria de

    2016-01-01

    Women are more likely to present temporomandibular disorders (TMD); however, studies comparing genders in Brazilian samples are rare. To analyze the proportion of men and women, as well as the association between gender and age, problem duration, and TMD symptoms in patients admitted to an university clinic for treatment. Interview and assessment data of protocols from 1,000 patients diagnosed with TMD were collected and analyzed and then divided into two groups, male (n = 177) and female (n = 823). The exploratory analysis was based on contingency tables and χ2 test was carried out. Subsequently, the logistic regression model was used and the odds ratios (OR) concerning the evaluated comparisons were calculated. Females were more prevalent in the sample, and mean ages and TMD duration were similar between the groups, with higher occurrence in young adults (19 to 40 years old). The OR values showed an association between the female gender and the signs/symptoms of pain in the temporomandibular joint, pain in the facial muscles, neck and shoulders, headache, fatigue in the muscles of mastication, otologic symptoms, and dysphonia. Women had two times higher chances of presenting these symptoms than men. In the sample of Brazilian patients with TMD, the number of women who presented a higher prevalence of painful symptoms was greater, followed by otologic symptoms and complaints of dysphonia. The prevalence of joint noise was similar in both studied groups.

  13. Motion Artifact in the MR imaging of temporomandibular disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamamura, Kiyoharu; Miyajima, Hisashi; Nihei, Yoshinobu; Nemoto, Ryuichi; Ohno, Tomoya [Ohu Univ., Koriyama, Fukushima (Japan). School of Dentistry

    1997-09-01

    Recently, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is indispensable for the diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Motion Artifacts of MRI occur more frequently than in other conventional methods, because it takes a long time to obtain the images. This paper reported on Motion Artifacts on MRI. MRI studies of 232 temporomandibular joints were performed in 116 patients with TMD by using a 0.5-T magnetic resonance (MR) scanner, with spin echo sequence: protondensity-weighted. And we took MRI slices at opening phase and closing phase. So 232 slices were gathered and we evaluated clinically the incidence of Motion Artifacts, that is to say, double and multiple images and other factors. The 103 slices in 56 patients showed Motion Artifacts. There is no significant difference between sexes. By age group, those in their teens were most frequent, followed by those in their fifties, forties, thirties and twenties. Also the same results were obtained for double image and multiple image. Incidence of Motion Artifact was most frequent at the opening phase. There is no significant difference between double and multiple image. (author)

  14. Congenital Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis: Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Chin Taw Cheong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital temporomandibular joint (TMJ ankylosis is an uncommon condition that presents itself at or soon after birth in the absence of acquired factors that could have contributed to the ankylosis such as infection and trauma. The experience of managing one such case is reported in light of a review of the literature on this condition. Key management principles include adequate removal of the ankylotic mass, costochondral grafting, and post-op physiotherapy. Most patients reported in the literature with the condition experienced relapse. This echoes our own experience where there was recurrence of the ankylosis. However, after removal of the ankylotic mass, the patient maintains a satisfactory maximal incisal opening (MIO till the present day. The additional challenges faced in the congenital form in addition to the already complex management of acquired paediatric temporomandibular joint ankylosis are (1 much earlier insult to the TMJ, (2 reduced opportunity for neuromuscular development of the muscles of mastication, and (3 reduced compliance with postoperative physiotherapy programmes due to the younger age of these patients.

  15. A study of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis using computed tomographic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massilla Mani, F; Sivasubramanian, S Satha

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to determine the various bony changes in osteoarthritis (OA) of elderly patients who are suffering from temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMD) and to find if all the changes manifesting in generalized OA were presented in temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Thirty TMJs of fifteen elderly patients who were diagnosed with TMD were selected for the study. Patient with TMD were subjected to computerized tomographic (CT) imaging, and the various bony changes in the TMJ were recorded. CT study of TMJ showed that there is a positive evidence of joint involvement in 80% of the cases. In this study, female patients were more commonly affected by OA than the males. The condylar changes (69.93%) are more common than the changes in the articular eminence (6.6%) and condylar fossa (10%). About 56.6% of TMJ in the study was affected by the early manifestations of the OA. CT study showed that there is a positive evidence of TMJ involvement in the elderly patients with TMD. The results show that condylar changes are more common than the changes in the articular eminence and condylar fossa. The study also shows that most of the patients are affected by early TMJ OA; hence, initiating treatment at early stages may prevent the disease progression. Copyright © 2016 Chang Gung University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Stem Cells for Temporomandibular Joint Repair and Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shipin; Yap, Adrian U J; Toh, Wei Seong

    2015-10-01

    Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) represent a heterogeneous group of musculoskeletal and neuromuscular conditions involving the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), masticatory muscles and/or associated structures. They are a major cause of non-dental orofacial pain. As a group, they are often multi-factorial in nature and have no common etiology or biological explanations. TMD can be broadly divided into masticatory muscle and TMJ disorders. TMJ disorders are characterized by intra-articular positional and/or structural abnormalities. The most common type of TMJ disorders involves displacement of the TMJ articular disc that precedes progressive degenerative changes of the joint leading to osteoarthritis (OA). In the past decade, progress made in the development of stem cell-based therapies and tissue engineering have provided alternative methods to attenuate the disease symptoms and even replace the diseased tissue in the treatment of TMJ disorders. Resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been isolated from the synovia of TMJ, suggesting an important role in the repair and regeneration of TMJ. The seminal discovery of pluripotent stem cells including embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have provided promising cell sources for drug discovery, transplantation as well as for tissue engineering of TMJ condylar cartilage and disc. This review discusses the most recent advances in development of stem cell-based treatments for TMJ disorders through innovative approaches of cell-based therapeutics, tissue engineering and drug discovery.

  17. Modified stethoscope for auscultation of temporomandibular joint sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagar, Sanjiv Rajender Singh; Turakiya, Viral; Pakhan, Ashok J; Jaggi, Nitin; Kalra, Amit; Vaidya, Vidya

    2014-04-01

    Purpose of this study was to modify the stethoscope which can auscultate the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) sounds more precisely than conventional stethoscope, and fabrication of stethoscope compatible software which analyses the auscultated sound and gives documentary evidence of that analysis in the form of graph. The conventional stethoscope was modified by attaching a custom made soundscope with a recording device which can be placed in external auditory meatus (EAM) for auscultation of TMJ sounds. When this small and smooth end of custom made soundscope of modified stethoscope is placed in EAM & connected with specially developed software it records the TMJ sounds & analyzes them in form of graph. Fabrication of modified stethoscope with software records the auscultated sound as a sound wave in form of graph and analyses this sound wave graph to give graphic evidence of prominent intensity at prominent frequency as spectrum analysis graph, and duration of that sound as a sound length graph. The use of modified stethoscope with software increases the accuracy of auscultation of TMJ sounds without any patient's discomfort and helps in diagnosis of TMJ disorders. The modified stethoscope with software for auscultation of TMJ sounds results in more precise auscultation & analysis of TMJ for sounds even of low intensity & frequency. How to cite the article: Dagar SR, Turakiya V, Pakhan AJ, Jaggi N, Kalra A, Vaidya V. Modified stethoscope for auscultation of temporomandibular joint sounds. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(2):40-4.

  18. A rat model of temporomandibular joint pain with histopathologic modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoll, Steven B; Hee, Christopher K; Davis, Martin B; Winkelstein, Beth A

    2010-01-01

    To develop a rat model of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain and to characterize in it the development and temporal response of behavioral hypersensitivity as well as to evaluate if and to what extent a loading protocol is associated with histological changes in the TMJ consistent with osteoarthritic pathology. A novel rat model of TMJ pain was developed using a noninvasive, mechanical loading protocol. Rats were exposed to steady mouth-opening for 7 days (2 N force, 1 hour/day), and mechanical hyperalgesia (increased pain response) was measured during the loading period and for 14 days thereafter. Histological modifications in the joint cartilage were also evaluated. Outcomes for the mouth-opening exposure were compared to age-matched controls. Thresholds for evoking responses were compared using a ranked ANOVA with repeated measures. Increased mechanical hypersensitivity in the temporomandibular region developed during daily loading and persisted even after the termination of the loading protocol. Histologic characterization revealed thinning of the cartilaginous structures of the joint and irregular zonal cellular arrangements in the condylar cartilage of rats subjected to the daily loading protocol. The injury model presented here is the first to demonstrate mechanically-induced behavioral hypersensitivity accompanied by osteoarthritic pathology in the TMJ.

  19. Can pterygoid plate asymmetry be linked to temporomandibular joint disorders ?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero, Maria Eugenia; Jacobs, Reinhilde [OIC, OMFS IMPATH Research Group, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Leuven and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Beltran, Jorge [Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Post-Graduate School, Universidad Privada Cayetano Heredia, Lima (Peru); Laat, Antoon [Stomatology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dept. of Oral Health Sciences, KU Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-06-15

    This study was performed to evaluate the relationship between pterygoid plate asymmetry and temporomandibular joint disorders. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images of 60 patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) involving pain were analyzed and compared with images of 60 age- and gender-matched controls. Three observers performed linear measurements of the lateral pterygoid plates. Statistically significant differences were found between measurements of the lateral pterygoid plates on the site that had pain and the contralateral site (p<0.05). The average length of the lateral pterygoid plates (LPPs) in patients with TMD was 17.01±3.64 mm on the right side and 16.21±3.51 mm on the left side, and in patients without TMD, it was 11.86±1.97 mm on the right side and 11.98±1.85 mm on the left side. Statistically significant differences in the LPP length, measured on CBCT, were found between patients with and without TMD (p<0.05). The inter-examiner reliability obtained in this study was very high for all the examiners (0.99, 95% confidence interval: 0.98-0.99). Within the limits of the present study, CBCT lateral pterygoid plate measurements at the side with TMD were found to be significantly different from those on the side without TMD. More research is needed to explore potential etiological correlations and implications for treatment.

  20. Deficient cytokine control modulates temporomandibular joint pain in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Neveen; Catrina, Anca I; Alyamani, Ahmed O; Mustafa, Hamid; Alstergren, Per

    2015-08-01

    The aim was to investigate how endogenous cytokine control of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) influences temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain in relation to the role of anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPA) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Twenty-six consecutive patients with TMJ RA were included. Temporomandibular joint pain intensity was assessed at rest, on maximum mouth opening, on chewing, and on palpation. Mandibular movement capacity and degree of anterior open bite (a clinical sign of structural destruction of TMJ tissues) were also assessed. Systemic inflammatory activity was assessed using the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28) for rheumatoid arthritis. Samples of TMJ synovial fluid and blood were obtained and analyzed for TNF, its soluble receptor, soluble TNF receptor II (TNFsRII), and ACPA. A high concentration of TNF in relation to the concentration of TNFsRII in TMJ synovial fluid was associated with TMJ pain on posterior palpation on maximum mouth opening. The ACPA concentration correlated significantly to the TNF concentration, but not to the TNFsRII concentration, indicating that increased inflammatory activity is mainly caused by an insufficient increase in anti-inflammatory mediators. This study indicates that TMJ pain on palpation in patients with RA is related to a deficiency in local cytokine control that contributes to increased inflammatory activity, including sensitization to mechanical stimuli over the TMJ. © 2015 Eur J Oral Sci.

  1. Diagnostic group differences in temporomandibular joint energy densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, L M; Iwasaki, L R; Gonzalez, Y M; Liu, H; Marx, D B; Nickel, J C

    2015-04-01

    Cartilage fatigue, due to mechanical work, may account for precocious development of degenerative joint disease in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). This study compared energy densities (mJ/mm³) in TMJs of three diagnostic groups. Sixty-eight subjects (44 women, 24 men) gave informed consent. Diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders (DC/TMD) and imaging were used to group subjects according to presence of jaw muscle or joint pain (+P) and bilateral disk displacement (+DD). Subjects (+P+DD, n=16; -P+DD, n=16; and -P-DD, n=36) provided cone-beam computed tomography and magnetic resonance images, and jaw-tracking data. Numerical modeling was used to determine TMJ loads (Fnormal). Dynamic stereometry was used to characterize individual-specific data of stress-field dynamics during 10 symmetrical jaw-closing cycles. These data were used to estimate tractional forces (Ftraction). Energy densities were then calculated as W/Q (W=work done or mechanical energy input=tractional force×distance of stress-field translation, Q=volume of cartilage). anova and Tukey-Kramer post hoc analyses tested for intergroup differences. Mean±standard error energy density for the +P+DD group was 12.7±1.5 mJ/mm³ and significantly greater (all adjusted ppain and disk displacement. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Therapeutic exercises for the control of temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Alberto da Rocha; Sanches, Monique Lalue; Ribeiro, Eduardo Cotecchia; Guimarães, Antonio Sérgio

    2013-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is a multifactorial disease. For this reason, it is difficult to obtain an accurate and correct diagnosis. In this context, conservative treatments, including therapeutic exercises classified as stretching, relaxation, coordination, strengthening and endurance, are oftentimes prescribed. Thus, the aim of the present article was to conduct a literature review concerning the types of exercises available and the efficacy for the treatment of muscular TMD. The review included researches carried out between 2000 and 2010, indexed on Web of Science, PubMed, LILACS and BBO. Moreover, the following keywords were used: Exercise, physical therapy, facial pain, myofascial pain syndrome, and temporomandibular joint dysfunction syndrome. Studies that did not consider the subject "TMD and exercises", used post-surgery exercises and did not use validated criteria for the diagnosis of TMD (RDC/TMD) were not included. The results comprised seven articles which proved therapeutic exercises to be effective for the treatment of muscular TMD. However, these studies are seen as limited, since therapeutic exercises were not applied alone, but in association with other conservative procedures. In addition, they present some drawbacks such as: Small samples, lack of control group and no detailed exercise description which should have included intensity, repetition, frequency and duration. Although therapeutic exercises are considered effective in the management of muscular TMD, the development of randomized clinical trials is necessary, since many existing studies are still based on the clinical experience of professionals.

  3. The relationship of temporomandibular disorders with headaches: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkan, Nilüfer Cakir; Ozkan, Fatih

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to retrospectively analyze the incidence of the concurrent existence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and headaches. Forty patients (36 female, 4 male, mean age: 29.9±9.6 years) clinically diagnosed with TMD were screened. Patient records were analyzed regarding: range of mouth opening, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) noises, pain on palpation of the TMJ and masticatory muscles and neck and upper back muscles, and magnetic resonance imaging of the TMJ. According to patient records, a total of 40 (66.6%) patients were diagnosed with TMD among 60 patients with headache. Thirty-two (53%) patients had TMJ internal derangement (ID), 8 (13%) patients had only myofascial pain dysfunction (MPD) and 25 (41.6%) patients had concurrent TMJ ID/MPD. There were statistically significant relationships between the number of tender masseter muscles and MPD patients (p=0.04) and between the number of tender medial pterygoid muscles and patients with reducing disc displacement (RDD) (p=0.03). The TMJ and associated orofacial structures should be considered as possible triggering or perpetuating factors for headaches, especially tension-type. There might be a significant connection between TMD and headache. However, most medical and dental practitioners are unaware of this relationship. Therefore, a careful evaluation of the TMJ and associated orofacial structures is required for a correct interpretation of the craniofacial pain in headache patients, and these patients should be managed with a multidisciplinary approach.

  4. Diagnostic criteria for headache attributed to temporomandibular disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, Eric; Ohrbach, Richard; List, Thomas; Anderson, Gary; Jensen, Rigmor; John, Mike T; Nixdorf, Donald; Goulet, Jean-Paul; Kang, Wenjun; Truelove, Ed; Clavel, Al; Fricton, James; Look, John

    2015-01-01

    Aims We assessed and compared the diagnostic accuracy of two sets of diagnostic criteria for headache secondary to temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Methods In 373 headache subjects with TMD, a TMD headache reference standard was defined as: self-reported temple headache, consensus diagnosis of painful TMD and replication of the temple headache using TMD-based provocation tests. Revised diagnostic criteria for Headache attributed to TMD were selected using the RPART (recursive partitioning and regression trees) procedure, and refined in half of the data set. Using the remaining half of the data, the diagnostic accuracy of the revised criteria was compared to that of the International Headache Society's International Classification of Headache Diseases (ICHD)-II criteria A to C for Headache or facial pain attributed to temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder. Results Relative to the TMD headache reference standard, ICHD-II criteria showed sensitivity of 84% and specificity of 33%. The revised criteria for Headache attributed to TMD had sensitivity of 89% with improved specificity of 87% (p muscle palpation or jaw movement. Conclusion Having significantly better specificity than the ICHD-II criteria A to C, the revised criteria are recommended to diagnose headache secondary to TMD. PMID:22767961

  5. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, José Gustavo Dala Déa; Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa Pedron; Navarro, Ricardo de Lima; Conti, Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira; Conti, Marcio Rodrigues de Almeida; Marchiori, Luciana Lozza de Moraes; Fernandes, Karen Barros Parron

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the prevalence of Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) in the elderly and its association with palpation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), masticatory and cervical muscles as well as the presence of headache and joint noises. The sample consisted of 200 elderly of both genders (mean age: 69.2±5.7 years). The clinical evaluation of TMD signs and symptoms was divided into three stages: an anamnestic questionnaire, a TMJ evaluation, and a muscular examination. The results were analyzed through descriptive statistics as well as using χ2 and the tendency tests. The presence of TMD was observed in 61% of the sample (mild: 43.5%, moderate: 13%, severe: 4.5%). A significantly greater prevalence of TMD was found for females (72.4%) compared with that for men (41.1%) (ppalpation of the TMJ (p=0.0168), of masticatory muscles (pmuscles (pTMJ palpation was not significant. The elderly presented high TMD prevalence, mostly in females, with mild severity and related to TMJ and masticatory/cervical muscles palpation. Thus, the accomplishment of a detailed clinical examination to investigate the presence of such disorders is essential and it must not be neglected during the treatment of elderly patients.

  6. Effect of turban use on temporomandibular joint problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, S; Avcu, N

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of daily turban wear on temporomandibular joint (TMJ) problems. This cross-sectional study was carried out on 249 female patients. Of these, 119 patients were using turban daily, while 130 patients did not use. Patients were asked questions to ascertain the signs of TMJ problems. Thereafter, the TMJ region was examined clinically. Cross-tabulations and Chi-square statistics were computed in accordance with Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. To investigate the association between continuous turban wear and temporomandibular disorder symptoms, logistic regression analysis was performed. Limited mouth opening, deviation, pain on TMJ palpation and mouth opening were not affected with turban usage. However, turban users more frequently demonstrated pain during palpation of the masticatory muscles than non-users (P = 0.001). Duration of the turban usage did not affect clinical examination findings except pain on masticatory muscles during palpation (P = 0.001). Complaint of pain on masticatory muscles are more frequently seen among the turban users.

  7. Therapeutic exercises for the control of temporomandibular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto da Rocha Moraes

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Temporomandibular disorder (TMD is a multifactorial disease. For this reason, it is difficult to obtain an accurate and correct diagnosis. In this context, conservative treatments, including therapeutic exercises classified as stretching, relaxation, coordination, strengthening and endurance, are oftentimes prescribed. OBJECTIVE: Thus, the aim of the present article was to conduct a literature review concerning the types of exercises available and the efficacy for the treatment of muscular TMD. METHODS: The review included researches carried out between 2000 and 2010, indexed on Web of Science, PubMed, LILACS and BBO. Moreover, the following keywords were used: Exercise, physical therapy, facial pain, myofascial pain syndrome, and temporomandibular joint dysfunction syndrome. Studies that did not consider the subject "TMD and exercises", used post-surgery exercises and did not use validated criteria for the diagnosis of TMD (RDC/TMD were not included. RESULTS: The results comprised seven articles which proved therapeutic exercises to be effective for the treatment of muscular TMD. However, these studies are seen as limited, since therapeutic exercises were not applied alone, but in association with other conservative procedures. In addition, they present some drawbacks such as: Small samples, lack of control group and no detailed exercise description which should have included intensity, repetition, frequency and duration. CONCLUSION: Although therapeutic exercises are considered effective in the management of muscular TMD, the development of randomized clinical trials is necessary, since many existing studies are still based on the clinical experience of professionals.

  8. Occlusal Grinding Pattern during Sleep Bruxism and Temporomandibular Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeni Wijaya

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sleep Bruxism is a significant etiology of temporomandibular disorder (TMD and causes many dental or oral problems such as tooth wear or facet. There is no study analyzing the relationship between sleep bruxism and TMD. Objective: To investigate any relationship between occlusal grinding pattern during sleep bruxism and temporomandibular disorder. Methods: A cross-sectional study involving 30 sleep bruxism patients attended the Faculty Dentistry Universitas Indonesia Teaching Hospital (RSGMP FKG UI. Completion of 2 forms of ID-TMD index and questionnaire from American Academy of Sleep Medicine were done. BruxChecker was fabricated and used for two nights to record the occlusal grinding pattern. The occlusal grinding pattern was categorized into laterotrusive grinding (LG and mediotrusive side. Further divisons of LG were: incisor-canine (IC, incisor-caninepremolar (ICP and incisor-canine-premolar-molar (ICPM. Mediotrusive side was classified as mediotrusive contact (MC and mediotrusive grinding (MG. Results: It was found that occlusal grinding pattern in non-TMD subjects were IC+MC, in subjects with mild TMD were ICP+MG and in subjects with moderate TMD were ICP+MG and ICPM+MG. TMJ was more significantly affected by ICP and ICPM grinding pattern than that of IC. Conclusion: There was a significant relationship between occlusal grinding pattern during sleep bruxism and TMD.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v20i2.149

  9. Association between painful temporomandibular disorders, sleep bruxism and tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovana Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present cross-sectional study was designed to investigate the association between sleep bruxism (SB, tinnitus and temporomandibular disorders (TMD. The sample consisted of 261 women (mean age of 37.0 years. The Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders were used to classify TMD and self-reported tinnitus. SB was diagnosed by clinical criteria proposed by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. The results showed an association between painful TMD and tinnitus (OR = 7.3; 95%CI = 3.50-15.39; p < 0.001. With regard to SB, the association was of lower magnitude (OR = 1.9; 95%CI = 1.16-3.26; p < 0.0163. When the sample was stratified by the presence of SB and painful TMD, only SB showed no association with tinnitus. The presence of painful TMD without SB was significantly associated with tinnitus (OR = 6.7; 95%CI = 2.64-17.22; p < 0.0001. The concomitant presence of painful TMD and SB was associated with a higher degree of tinnitus severity (OR = 7.0; 95%CI = 3.00-15.89; p < 0.0001. It may be concluded that there is an association between SB, painful TMD and self-reported tinnitus; however, no relationship of a causal nature could be established.

  10. Quality of life and general health in patients with temporomandibular disorders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Resende, Camila Maria Bastos Machado de; Alves, Arthur César de Medeiros; Coelho, Lidiane Thomaz; Alchieri, Joõo Carlos; Roncalli, Angelo Giuseppe; Barbosa, Gustavo Augusto Seabra

    2013-01-01

    .... Among 150 patients reporting TMD symptoms, 43 were included in the present study. Fonseca's anamnestic index was used for initial screening while axis I of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC-TMD...

  11. Dysfunctional Patients with Temporomandibular Disorders: Evaluating the Efficacy of a Tailored Treatment Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, Dennis C.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Forty-eight dysfunctional patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) were randomly assigned to treatments consisting of an intraoral appliance, stress management, and either nondirective supportive counseling or cognitive therapy. Results support tailored treatment of dysfunctional TMD. (KW)

  12. Influence of tinnitus on pain severity and quality of life in patients with temporomandibular disorders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Calderon, Patrícia dos Santos; Hilgenberg, Priscila Brenner; Rossetti, Leylha Maria Nunes; Laurenti, João Vítor El Hetti; Conti, Paulo César Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the relationship among pain intensity and duration, presence of tinnitus and quality of life in patients with chronic temporomandibular disorders (TMD...

  13. Towards Establishing a Standardized Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scoring System for Temporomandibular Joints in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolend, Mirkamal A; Twilt, Marinka; Cron, Randy Q

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The temporomandibular joints (TMJs) are frequently affected in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Early detection is challenging, as major variation is present in scoring TMJ pathology on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Consensus-driven development and validation...

  14. Isolated Arthritis of the Temporomandibular Joint as the Initial Manifestation of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hügle, Boris; Spiegel, Lynn; Hotte, Julia

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe characteristics of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) presenting with isolated arthritis of the temporomandibular joints (TMJ). METHODS: Patients with JIA with isolated TMJ arthritis from 4 large tertiary pediatric rheumatology centers were included. Demograp...

  15. Association between condylar asymmetry and temporomandibular disorders using 3D-CT

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yáñez-Vico, Rosa-María; Iglesias-Linares, Alejandro; Torres-Lagares, Daniel; Gutiérrez-Pérez, José-Luis; Solano-Reina, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Using reconstructed three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) models, the purpose of this study was to analyze and compare mandibular condyle morphology in patients with and without temporomandibular disorder (TMD...

  16. Facial skeleton remodeling due to temporomandibular joint degeneration: an imaging study of 100 patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schellhas, KP; Piper, MA; Omlie, MR

    1990-01-01

    .... All had been investigated clinically and with radiography, tomography, and high- field surface-coil MR imaging to determine the presence or absence and extent of temporomandibular joint degeneration...

  17. Cervical spine signs and symptoms: perpetuating rather than predisposing factors for temporomandibular disorders in women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bevilaqua-Grossi, Débora; Chaves, Thaís Cristina; de Oliveira, Anamaria Siriani

    2007-01-01

    ... and the severity of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and vice-versa. One hundred women (aged 18-26 years) clinically diagnosed with TMD signs and symptoms and cervical spine disorders were randomly selected from a sample of college students...

  18. Occlusion and temporomandibular function among subjects with mandibular distal extension removable partial dentures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creugers, N.H.J.; Witter, D.J.; Spijker, A. van 't; Gerritsen, A.E.; Kreulen, C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To quantify effects on occlusion and temporomandibular function of mandibular distal extension removable partial dentures in shortened dental arches. Methods. Subjects wearing mandibular extension removable partial dentures (n = 25) were compared with subjects with shortened dental arches

  19. Quantitative measurements of the articular areas of mandibular condyles with temporomandibular joint disorders using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohi, Kaori; Igarashi, Chinami; Sugisaki, Masashi; Osano, Takashi; Sato, Yohei; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Ohkubo, Chikahiro

    2016-03-01

    The authors sought to clarify the variation in the condylar anterior functional surface (AFS) of patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders using quantitative measurements by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MR images of 68 joints (2 males, 32 females) were used. The subjects were classified into three groups: with/without defects of cortical bone groups and a combination group without defects. The AFS was measured as the length between the protrusive point and the apex of the condyle on MRI (4-mm-thick slices), and the quad value of the length was defined as the area on the slice. The summed quad values of all slices were used as the AFS area. Differences in the areas among the three groups were compared by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). The non-defect group had significantly larger AFS areas than the defect group. Quantitative measurement on MR images clarified the changes in the condylar sagittal appearance.

  20. Diagnosis of retrodiscal tissue in painful temporomandibular joint (TMJ) by fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) signal intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Migiwa; Otonari-Yamamoto, Mika; Sano, Tsukasa; Fujikura, Mamiko; Wakoh, Mamoru

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of the present study is to analyze the fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) signal intensity of the retrodiscal tissue in a painful temporomandibular joint (TMJ), and to develop a diagnostic system based on FLAIR data. The study was based on 33 joints of 17 patients referred for MR imaging of the TMJ. Regions of interest were placed over retrodiscal tissue and gray matter (GM) on FLAIR images. Using signal intensities of GM as reference points, signal intensity ratios (SIR) of retrodiscal tissue were calculated. SIRs in painful TMJ were compared with those in painless TMJ. Wilcoxon's Rank Sum Test was used to analyze the difference in SIRs between the painful and painless groups (Ppainful joints than in painless joints. FLAIR sequences provide a high signal in patients having painful TMJ, and it suggests that retrodiscal tissue in painful TMJ contains elements such as protein.

  1. Recognition of Temporomandibular Disorders : validity and outcome of three screening questions (3Q/TMD)

    OpenAIRE

    Lövgren, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Background Pain and dysfunction in the temporomandibular region (Temporomandibular Disorders, TMD) are common conditions in the general population with an estimated treatment need of 5-15% in the general population. However, in Sweden, traceable performed treatments are significantly lower. The reasons for this indicated under-treatment are not known. To easily detect patients with a potential TMD related condition, three screening questions, 3Q/TMD, have been introduced. The aim with this p...

  2. Quality of life and general health in patients with temporomandibular disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Resende, Camila Maria Bastos Machado de; Alves,Arthur César de Medeiros; Coelho, Lidiane Thomaz; Alchieri, João Carlos; Roncalli,Ângelo Giuseppe; Barbosa,Gustavo Augusto Seabra

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to associate minor psychiatric disorders (general health) and quality of life with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in patients diagnosed with different TMD classifications and subclassifications with varying levels of severity. Among 150 patients reporting TMD symptoms, 43 were included in the present study. Fonseca's anamnestic index was used for initial screening while axis I of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC-TMD) was used f...

  3. Electromyography and asymmetry index of masticatory muscles in undergraduate students with temporomandibular disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Hotta, Gisele Harumi; Oliveira, Ana Izabela Sobral de; de Oliveira, Anamaria Siriani; Pedroni, Cristiane Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    Aim:To compare the electromyographic activity and the asymmetry index among degrees of severity of temporomandibular disorders (TMD).Methods:Surface electromyography (EMG) of the right and left masseter and temporalis muscles was performed in 126 undergraduate students at rest and at maximal voluntary contraction. Three measurements were performed for five seconds of maximal contraction and mandibular rest. The degree of temporomandibular dysfunction was identified according to the Fonseca an...

  4. Detection of degenerative disease of the temporomandibular joint by bone scintigraphy: concise communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, H.A.; Bloom, C.Y.

    1980-10-01

    Nine patients with facial pain were evaluated with limited bone scans. The scintigrams correlated with microscopy in all patients, although radiographs correlated with microscopy in only five patients. The degenerative disease process in the temporomandibular joint was more extensive in the patients with radiographic and scintigraphic abnormalities than in those with scintigraphic abnormalities alone. The limited bone scan appears useful in detecting early degenerative changes in the temporomandibular joint.

  5. Electronic System for Data Record and Automatic Diagnosis Assessment in the Temporomandibular Joint Disorders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hippmann, R.; Nagy, Miroslav; Dostálová, T.; Zvárová, Jana; Seydlová, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 1 (2011), s. 11-16 ISSN 1801-5603 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : temporomandibular joint * temporomandibular joint disorders * DentCross * electronic health record * AAOP classification Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science http://www.ejbi.eu/images/2011-1/Hippmann_en.pdf

  6. Relationship between pain and effusion on magnetic resonance imaging in temporomandibular disorder patients

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Ha-Na; Kim, Kyoung-A; Koh, Kwang-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to find the relationship between pain and joint effusion using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients. Materials and Methods The study subjects included 232 TMD patients. The inclusion criteria in this study were the presence of spontaneous pain or provoked pain on one or both temporomandibular joints (TMJs). The provoked pain was divided into three groups: pain on palpation (G1), pain on mouth opening (G2), and pain on m...

  7. Efficacy of splint therapy for the management of temporomandibular disorders: a meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Chao; Wu, Jun-Yi; Deng, Dong-Lai; He, Bing-Yang; TAO, YUAN; Niu, Yu-Ming; Deng, Mo-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are a group of clinical problems affecting temporomandibular joint (TMJ), myofascial muscles and other related structures. Splint therapy is the most commonly used approach to treatment of TMD, but its effectiveness is remains unclear. We therefore conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the effectiveness of splint therapy for TMD in adults. The electronic databases PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and ClinicalTrials.gov were searched for reports published up ...

  8. Symptomatology and frequent temporomandibular disorders in edentulous elderlyaccording to research diagnostic criteria (rdc/tmd).

    OpenAIRE

    Arcos, Dagoberto; Nilo, Cristián; Frugone Zambra, Raúl

    2016-01-01

    Pain in the muscles of mastication, limited opening, asymmetric jaw movement, and sounds in the TMJ, among others symptoms are some clinical characteristics of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). It is a complain in subjects of both sexes, different ages and occlusal conditions. Objective: To determine the most frequent pathology and temporomandibular symptomatology in elderly edentulous patients. Materials and Methods: 30 consecutive subjects,25 female and five men older than 65 ys (70.8±5.7)...

  9. Movements of temporomandibular condyles during swallowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čimić, Samir; Šimunković, Sonja Kraljević; Gospić, Renata Kevilj; Badel, Tomislav; Dulčić, Nikša; Ćatić, Amir

    2015-03-01

    There have been studies that investigated mandibular movements and positioning during swallowing, but the results were inconsistent, and still the exact position of the condyles during swallowing is unknown. The purpose of this investigation was to study the kinematics of the mandible and the condyles, and to determine the actual movement paths and position of mandible and condyles during the process of swallowing. The study was performed on a sample of 44 dental students. Measurements were done with an electronic axiograph. After non-occlusing attachment was fixed in the mouth, every subject swallowed for five times from the rest position. The final swallowing position of the left and the right condyles was measured in the sagittal plane. The final swallowing position of the sagittal incisal point was measured in sagittal, frontal and horizontal plane, and data was statistically analyzed. The condyles showed average movement toward posterior (left 0.17 mm, SD 0.28, right 0.16 mm, SD 0.25) and superior (left 0.14 mm, SD 0.20, right 0.14 mm, SD 0.23). Anterior and/or inferior position had 20% of participants. The average sagittal incisal point movement during swallowing was toward anterior (0.30 mm, SD 0.53) and superior (0.81 mm, SD 0.84). The mean mandibular lateral movement was 0.1 mm (SD 0.1). The results of the study suggest that retrusion during swallowing is not the rule, although on average there is a slight tendency of condylar movement toward posterior. Swallowing can be used as auxiliary method for determining vertical dimension of occlusion.

  10. Women with more severe degrees of temporomandibular disorder exhibit an increase in temperature over the temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibai-Filho, Almir Vieira; Costa, Ana Cláudia de Souza; Packer, Amanda Carine; de Castro, Ester Moreira; Rodrigues-Bigaton, Delaine

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to correlate the degree of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) severity and skin temperatures over the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and masseter and anterior temporalis muscles. This blind cross-sectional study involved 60 women aged 18-40 years. The volunteers were allocated to groups based on Fonseca anamnestic index (FAI) score: no TMD, mild TMD, moderate TMD, and severe TMD (n = 15 each). All volunteers underwent infrared thermography for the determination of skin temperatures over the TMJ, masseter and anterior temporalis muscles. The Shapiro-Wilk test was used to determine the normality of the data. The Kruskal-Wallis test, followed by Dunn's test, was used for comparisons among groups according to TMD severity. Spearman's correlation coefficients were calculated to determine the strength of associations among variables. Weak, positive, significant associations were found between FAI score and skin temperatures over the left TMJ (rs = 0.195, p = 0.009) and right TMJ (rs = 0.238, p = 0.001). Temperatures over the right and left TMJ were significantly higher in groups with more severe TMD (p < 0.05). FAI score was associated with skin temperature over the TMJ, as determined by infrared thermography, in this sample. Women with more severe TMD demonstrated a bilateral increase in skin temperature.

  11. Efficacy of Temporomandibular Joint Arthrocentesis with Sodium Hyaluronate in the Management of Temporomandibular Joint Disorders: A Prospective Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorrela, Harsha; Prameela, J; Srinivas, G; Reddy, B Vijay Baskar; Sudhir, Mvs; Arakeri, Gururaj

    2017-12-01

    This study was designed to investigate the efficacy of the temporomandibular joint arthrocentesis with and without injection of sodium hyaluronate (SH) in the treatment of temporomandibular joint disorders. A total of sixty two TMJs in 34 males and 28 females aged 20-65 years comprised the study material. The patients' complaints were limited mouth opening, TMJ pain, and joint noises during function. Patients were randomly divided into 2 groups in which arthrocentesis plus intra-articular injection of sodium hyaluronate was performed in 1 group and only arthrocentesis was performed in the other group. Both groups contained patients with disc displacement with reduction and without reduction. Clinical evaluation of the patients was done before the procedure, immediately after the procedure, at 1 week and 1, 3 and 6 months postoperatively. Intensity of TMJ pain was assessed using visual analog scales. Maximal mouth opening and lateral jaw movements also were recorded at each follow-up visit. Both techniques increased maximal mouth opening, lateral movements, and function, while reducing TMJ pain and noise. Although patients benefitted from both techniques, arthrocentesis with injection of SH seemed to be superior to arthrocentesis alone.

  12. The use of superficial heat for treatment of temporomandibular disorders: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlan, Renata Maria Moreira Moraes; Giovanardi, Raquel Safar; Britto, Ana Teresa Brandão de Oliveira e; Oliveira e Britto, Denise Brandão de

    2015-01-01

    To perform an integrative review of scientific bibliographic production on the use of superficial heat treatment for temporomandibular disorders. Research strategy : Literature review was accomplished on PubMed, LiLACS, SciELO, Bireme, Web of Science, and BBO databases. The following descriptors were used: hot temperature, hyperthermia induced, heat transference, temporomandibular joint, temporomandibular joint disorders, temporomandibular joint dysfunction syndrome, and their equivalents in Portuguese and Spanish. Articles that addressed the superficial heat for the treatment of temporomandibular disorders, published in English, Spanish, or Portuguese, between 1980 and 2013. The following data were collected: technique of applying superficial heat, duration of application, stimulated body area, temperature of the stimulus, frequency of application, and benefits. initially, 211 studies were found, but just 13 contemplated the proposed selection criteria. Data were tabulated and presented in chronological order. Several techniques for superficial heat application on treatment of temporomandibular disorders were found in the literature. The moist heat was the most widely used technique. Many studies suggested the application of heat for at least 20 minutes once a day. Most authors recommended the application of heat in facial and cervical regions. The heat treatment resulted in significant relief of pain, reduced muscle tension, improved function of the mandible, and increased mouth opening.

  13. Otological symptoms and audiometric findings in patients with temporomandibular disorders: Costen's syndrome revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effat, K G

    2016-12-01

    Otological symptoms (otalgia, subjective hearing loss, blocked ear sensation, tinnitus and vertigo) associated with temporomandibular disorders are documented features of Costen's syndrome. However, the origin of these symptoms and the causes of hearing loss are unknown. This study aimed to characterise hearing loss in a large number of patients with temporomandibular disorders. The causes of these symptoms were explored in patients with otological symptoms and normal audiometric findings. A prospective case study and literature review were performed. The audiometric features of 104 temporomandibular disorder patients were compared with those of 110 control participants. A large proportion of temporomandibular disorder patients had several otological symptoms. Twenty-five per cent of unilateral or bilateral temporomandibular disorder patients had either unilateral (ipsilateral) or bilateral hearing loss; respectively, which was usually mild (p = 0.001). Hearing loss was predominantly sensorineural. The main cause of otological symptoms (apart from otalgia) and of audiometric findings in temporomandibular disorder patients is postulated to be an altered middle-ear to inner-ear pressure equilibrium.

  14. How can precision medicine be applied to temporomandibular disorders and its comorbidities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilentz, Joan B; Cowley, Allen W

    2017-01-01

    The Eighth Scientific Meeting of The TMJ Association, Ltd. was held in Bethesda, Maryland, September 11-13, 2016. As in the past, the meeting was cosponsored by components of the National Institutes of Health with speakers invited to review the state of temporomandibular disorder science and propose recommendations to further progress. The theme of precision medicine, which aims to tailor disease treatment and prevention to match the characteristics of an individual patient (genetic, epigenetic, environmental, lifestyle) underscored the current consensus that temporomandibular disorders are no longer viewed as local conditions of jaw pain and dysfunction. Rather, they represent a complex family of biopsychosocial disorders that can progress to chronic pain, most often accompanied by one or more other chronic pain conditions. Temporomandibular disorders and these comorbidities, called chronic overlapping pain conditions, predominantly or exclusively affect women in their childbearing years and reflect central nervous system sensitization. Presenters at the meeting included leaders in temporomandibular disorder and pain research, temporomandibular disorder patients and advocates, and experts in other fields or in the use of technologies that could facilitate the development of precision medicine approaches in temporomandibular disorders.

  15. Involvement of NK-1 and NK-2 tachykinin receptor mechanisms in jaw muscle activity reflexy evoked by inflammatory irritant application to the rat temporomandibular joint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakke, M.; Hu, J.W.; Sessle, B.J.

    1998-01-01

    neurokinin receptors, CP-99,994,MEN-10,376, mustard oil, temporomandibular joint, masticatory muscle activity......neurokinin receptors, CP-99,994,MEN-10,376, mustard oil, temporomandibular joint, masticatory muscle activity...

  16. Ocorrência de sinais e sintomas de disfunção temporomandibular em músicos Occurrence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular dysfunction in musicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Stechman Neto

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar a prevalência de sinais e sintomas de disfunção temporomandibular em grupos de músicos profissionais, intérpretes de instrumentos de sopro e de cordas. MÉTODOS: Participaram 92 músicos, com idades entre 18 e 58 anos. Foram entrevistados 70 músicos intérpretes de instrumentos de sopro (76,08% e 22 músicos intérpretes de instrumentos de cordas (23,91% pertencentes à Orquestra Sinfônica do Paraná, à Banda da Polícia Militar do Paraná ou à Banda do Exército. Foi realizada entrevista que constou de questões referentes à identificação, tempo de prática do instrumento e presença de sinais, sintomas e hábitos relacionados às disfunções temporomandibulares. Comparou-se as respostas dos músicos por meio do teste de diferença de proporções. RESULTADOS: Trinta e nove músicos (42,3% percebem que rangem e/ou apertam os dentes, 23 (25% reportaram sentir dor na articulação temporomandibular, 39 músicos (42% relataram escutar ruídos na articulação temporomandibular, 37 (40% sensação de plenitude auricular e 33 (35% presença de zumbido. Não houve diferença significativa entre os instrumentistas de sopro e de corda no que se refere à presença de sinais e sintomas de disfunção temporomandibular. CONCLUSÃO: A somatória dos fatores apresentados coloca os praticantes de determinados instrumentos musicais como um grupo suscetível a apresentar sinais e sintomas de disfunção temporomandibular, incluindo sintomas auditivos, podendo tal prática ser considerada tanto um fator desencadeante, quanto um fator agravante ou perpetuador de um problema já existente.PURPOSE: To verify the prevalence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular dysfunction in groups of professional musicians, interpreters of brass and string instruments. METHODS: Ninety two musicians, with ages varying from 18 to 58 years, participated on the study. Seventy musicians who played brass instruments (76.08% and 22 musicians who

  17. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... en español Blog About OnSafety CPSC Stands for Safety The Tipping Point Home > 60 Seconds of Safety (Videos) > The Tipping Point The Tipping Point by ... danger death electrical fall furniture head injury product safety television tipover tv Watch the video in Adobe ...

  18. National Wetlands Inventory Points

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Wetland point features (typically wetlands that are too small to be as area features at the data scale) mapped as part of the National Wetlands Inventory (NWI). The...

  19. Serum cortisol level and disc displacement disorders of the temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, S-L; Wu, S-L; Tsai, C-C; Ko, S-Y; Yang, J-W

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are a significant public health problem, affecting approximately 5-12% of the population. This retrospective cross-sectional study investigated the relationship between 8 AM serum cortisol levels (8ASC) and disc displacement disorders (DDD) of TMD. One hundred and forty patients with DDD were recruited. Among them, 60 patients comprised the case group of disc displacement without reduction with limited opening (DDWORWLO, age 37·7 ± 17·22), and 80 were 'other DDD' for the control group (age 36·4 ± 13·08). The independent variables included domains of demography, history, malocclusion, comorbid symptoms, comorbid TMD and 8ASC. Data were analysed with the chi-square test, logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Results of multiple logistic regression showed that 8ASC was the only factor significantly related to DDWORWLO (P = 0·006). Receiver operating characteristic analysis of DDWORWLO and 8ASC indicated an area under the curve of 0·669, standard error of 0·049 and P value of 0·001. The adequate cut-off point of 8ASC was 12·45 (μg dL(-1) ), with sensitivity of 0·636, and specificity of 0·729. 8 AM serum cortisol level can be used as a clinical clue to differentiate DDWORWLO from other DDD. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. A new method for three-dimensional reconstruction and animation of the temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, M; Gallo, L M; Airoldi, R L; Palla, S

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this project was to develop a new method for the three-dimensional reconstruction and animation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Magnetic resonance (MR) tomograms of the TMJ were combined, using an extraorally placed reference system, with jaw motion data, recorded with six degrees of freedom, by means of the opto-electronic tracking system Jaws-3D. The three-dimensional reconstruction of the TMJ was calculated and animated on a graphics workstation by means of kinematic transformations. A subject without any past or present history of myoarthropathies of the masticatory system, performed jaw opening and closing and chewed chewing gum. The animation provided a three-dimensional visualisation of the movements of the entire condyle within the fossa. The condyle-fossa distance was computed for every condylar point and represented by shading the surface of the condyle with pseudo-colours. The position of the minimum distance between condyle and fossa was calculated and displayed in a plane graph representing the condylar surface.

  1. The influence of cranio-cervical rehabilitation in patients with myofascial temporomandibular pain disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halmova, K; Holly, D; Stanko, P

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to prove the causality between the craniocervical dysfunction and myofascial pain in the head and neck and to demonstrate the clinical value and usefulness of physiotherapy as one of the therapeutic options for myofascial pain. The group of patients diagnosed with myofascial dysfunctional pain syndrome contained 98 patients out of which 79 patients (81 %) were females and 19 patients (19 %) were males. The majority of the patients were aged between 26 and 35 years; the total age range was 14-77 years with the average of 38 years. Observed patients were subdivided into three groups. Standard therapeutic methods aimed at the temporomandibular joint were provided to the patients of the first group. The second group of the patients received therapy aimed at cervical muscles only. Complex rehabilitation was applied in the third group of patients. The most frequent method used in the evaluation of chronic musculoskeletal pain in clinical studies is the visual analogue scale (VAS). According to our results, all three groups of patients saw an improvement in pain perception, but the overall subjective remission of painful sensations in the third group took place in as many as 88 % of patients. In this group, there was a significant decrease in the tenderness of trigger points in the trapezius and sternocleidomastoid muscles. It was proved that a combination of simple relaxing and stretching exercises of cervical muscles with a standard method used in the therapy of masticatory muscles is significantly more efficient (Fig. 5, Ref. 18).

  2. Achieved Competencies and Satisfaction in Temporomandibular Disorders and Orofacial Pain Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Sara; Dawson, Andreas; Ekberg, Ewa Carin

    2016-01-01

    To assess dental students' achieved competencies and perceived satisfaction with their temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and orofacial pain education and to compare these with the results of their final examination in TMD and orofacial pain. Dental students from two consecutive classes (2011/2012 and 2012/2013) at the Department of Orofacial Pain and Jaw Function at the dental school in Malmö, Sweden completed two self-evaluations, one at the beginning of semester seven and one at the end of semester eight. The questionnaire that they were given concerned achieved competencies and satisfaction with education in TMD and orofacial pain. Items focused on anatomy, physiology, and clinical training. Students estimated their competence and satisfaction on a numeric rating scale and described their idea of treating TMD and orofacial pain patients on a verbal rating scale. Outcome variables were tested with paired samples t test for differences over time and independent samples t test for between-class comparisons; both were adjusted for multiple testing with Bonferroni correction. Significant improvement in all items was observed for achieved competencies and satisfaction in both classes between semester seven and semester eight (P .05). This study has shown that expansion in undergraduate TMD and orofacial pain education at the dental school in Malmö has allowed all students to develop the same level of competence, independent of prior experience. The study also pointed out that continuous evaluation and enhancement of TMD and orofacial pain education in undergraduate dental education is beneficial.

  3. Distributed Uplink Resource Allocation in Cognitive Radio Networks -- Part II: Equilibria and Algorithms for Joint Access Point Selection and Power Allocation

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Mingyi; Barrera, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    In the first part of this paper, we have studied solely the spectrum sharing aspect of the above problem, and proposed algorithms for the CUs in the single AP network to efficiently share the spectrum. In this second part of the paper, we build upon our previous understanding of the single AP network, and formulate the joint spectrum decision and spectrum sharing problem in a multiple AP network into a non-cooperative game, in which the feasible strategy of a player contains a discrete variable (the AP/spectrum decision) and a continuous vector (the power allocation among multiple channels). The structure of the game is hence very different from most non-cooperative spectrum management game proposed in the literature. We provide characterization of the Nash Equilibrium (NE) of this game, and present a set of novel algorithms that allow the CUs to distributively and efficiently select the suitable AP and share the channels with other CUs. Finally, we study the properties of the proposed algorithms as well as t...

  4. Craniocervical posture analysis in patients with temporomandibular disorder Análise da postura cranio-cervical em pacientes com disfunção temporomandibular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DH Iunes

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare head positioning and cervical spine alignment between individuals with and without temporomandibular disorders (TMDs, by means of positional evaluation using photographs, radiographs and visual observation, and to investigate whether the type of TMD influences head posture and cervical spine positioning. METHODS: Ninety randomly chosen women were diagnosed using the research diagnostic criteria for TMDs (RDC/TMD by a trained examiner and were divided into three groups: Group 1, with a diagnosis of myofascial dysfunction (group I of RDC axis I; Group 2, with mixed TMD (groups I, II and III of RDC axis I; and Control, without TMD. Following this, the participants were photographed in frontal and lateral views by a single examiner. To produce these photos, the following anatomical points were marked out on the skin: occipital protuberance, C4, C7, acromioclavicular joint and sternoclavicular joint. From these points, different angles were analyzed by means of the ALCimagem-2000 application. These same photos were then evaluated qualitatively (visual evaluation. Next, lateral teleradiography and radiography of the cervical spine was requested. The examiner was blind when analyzing the images. To compare the results, the chi-squared test and analysis of variance were used, with significance levels of 5%. RESULTS: Regardless of the method used, the results revealed that head and cervical spine posture did not differ between the groups with and without TMD, independent of the diagnostic group. CONCLUSION: The posture of individuals with myogenic or arthrogenous TMD does not differ from the posture of individuals without TMD. The presence of TMD does not influence the head and cervical spine posture.OBJETIVO: Comparar o posicionamento da cabeça e o alinhamento da coluna cervical em indivíduos com e sem DTM, por meio da avaliação postural por fotografias, radiografias e por observação visual e verificar se o tipo de DTM

  5. Is There an Association Between Temporomandibular Joint Effusion and Arthralgia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawaja, Shehryar N; Crow, Heidi; Mahmoud, Ruba F G; Kartha, Krishnan; Gonzalez, Yoly

    2017-02-01

    The literature on joint effusion (JE) and its association with clinical and radiologic variables in patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) is inconsistent and is characterized by multiple methodologic limitations. The primary aim of this investigation was to evaluate the association between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) identified JE and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthralgia. The secondary aim of this investigation was to determine the association between JE and other clinical and MRI-identified soft tissue characteristics. A retrospective cohort study was conducted. Clinical and soft tissue imaging assessments were carried out according to the Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders guidelines. The dependent variable was JE and the primary independent variable was arthralgia. The secondary independent variables were TMJ pain-associated characteristics and MRI-identified variables. When applicable, Pearson χ2 or t test was used to determine the statistical associations between JE and clinical characteristics and between JE and MRI-identified variables. Furthermore, generalized estimating equation (GEE) modeling was conducted to determine which of the independent clinical and MRI-identified variables were associated with JE. Data for 158 participants, representing 312 joints, were extracted. The mean age of the female sample (59.4%) was 31 ± 11.1 years and that of the male sample (40.6%) was 29.8 ± 9.7 years. No association was found between JE and arthralgia. However, statistically significant associations were found between JE and lateral disc rotation (P = .001) and between JE and disc position in the coronal and sagittal planes (P = .001). The GEE model suggested that disc displacement with reduction (odds ratio = 2.5) was a statistically relevant contributing factor for JE in the absence of degenerative joint disease. Results associated JE with the position of the disc in the sagittal plane. No association was found between

  6. Abordagem terapêutica nas desordens temporo-mandibulares: técnicas de fisioterapia associadas ao tratamento odontológico

    OpenAIRE

    Alves-Rezende, Maria Cristina Rosifini [UNESP; Bertoz, André Pinheiro Magalhães [UNESP; Aguiar, Sandra Maria Herondina Coelho Ávila de [UNESP; Alves-rezende, Luis Guilherme Rosifini; Alves-rezende, Ana Laura Rosifini; Montanher, Ingrid da Silva; Ruiz, Magnum Amaral Ferreira; Vargas, Joyce Maria; Felipe, Rogéria Aparecida Agos [UNESP; Pires, Maria Flávia Araújo [UNESP

    2012-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are related to discomfort in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). These diseases are multifactorial and treatment usually requires a combination of different approaches because each patient presents with different and usually complex needs. It is necessary to know how each expert should plan for a successful treatment. Los trastornos temporomandibulares (TTM) se relacionan con malestar en la articulación temporomandibular (ATM). Son trastornos de origen mult...

  7. Somatosensory profiles in subgroups of patients with myogenic temporomandibular disorders and Fibromyalgia Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfau, Doreen B; Rolke, Roman; Nickel, Ralf; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Daublaender, Monika

    2009-12-15

    Some patients with myofascial pain from temporomandibular disorders (TMD) report pain in extra-trigeminal body regions. Our aim was to distinguish TMD as regional musculoskeletal pain syndrome (n=23) from a widespread pain syndrome (FMS; n=18) based on patients' tender point scores, pain drawings and quantitative sensory testing (QST) profiles. Referenced to 18 age- and gender-matched healthy subjects significant group differences for cold, pressure and pinprick pain thresholds, suprathreshold pinprick sensitivity and mechanical detection thresholds were found. Pain sensitivity in TMD patients ranged between those of FMS patients and healthy controls. The group of TMD patients was inhomogeneous with respect to their tender point count with an insensitive group (n=12) resembling healthy controls and a sensitive TMD group (n=9) resembling FMS patients. Nevertheless sensitive TMD patients did not fulfil diagnostic criteria for FMS in regard to widespread pain as shown by their pain drawings. TMD subgroups did not differ with respect to psychological parameters. The sensitive subgroup was more sensitive compared to healthy controls and to insensitive TMD patients in regard to their QST profile over all test areas as well as to their tenderness over orofacial muscles and trigeminal foramina. However, sensitive TMD patients had a short pain duration arguing against a transition from TMD to FMS over time. Data rather suggest an overlap in pathophysiology with FMS, e.g. a disturbance of central pain processing, in this subgroup of TMD patients. Those patients could be identified on the basis of their tender point count as an easy practicable screening tool.

  8. Effect of Lengthy Root Canal Therapy Sessions on Temporomandibular Joint and Masticatory Muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safoora Sahebi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Trauma is one of the major factors associated with temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD. These disorders result from macro-trauma or micro-trauma. Macro-trauma might be iatrogenic; for example, from intubation procedures, third molar extraction procedures, and lengthy dental appointments. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of lengthy root canal therapy (more than 2 hours on TMJ and its supporting structures. Materials and methods. Eighty patients whose root canal therapy session lasted more than 2 hours were examined for the status of TMJ and masticatory muscles. After one week the second part of the examination was carried out for TMJ problems and pain and tenderness levels of masticatory muscles. Data was analyzed using Wilcoxon statistical test. Results. Women showed more pain compared to men. There was a significant increase in pain in the external acoustic meatus examination one week after root canal therapy. Patients who were treated for their posterior teeth suffered more pain than those who were treated for the anteriors and premolars. Other aspects of the examination were not affected significantly by lengthy root canal therapy. Conclusion. Lengthy dental treatments can harm TMJ and masticatory muscles and wide opening of the mouth during such appointments can worsen the situation. Therefore, it is wise to break the appointment into shorter intervals and let the patients rest during treatment to close their mouth to prevent iatrogenic damage to TMJ.

  9. Masticatory muscle and temporomandibular joint pain in Croatian war veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhac, Ivone; Tariba, Petra; Kovac, Zoran; Simonić-Kocijan, Suncana; Lajnert, Vlatka; Mesić, Vesna Fugosić; Kuis, Davor; Braut, Vedrana

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and intensity of masticatory muscle and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain in Croatian war veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The examined group consisted of 100 Croatian war veterans, in whom PTSD had previously been diagnosed. Patients were compared with 92 subjects who had not taken part in the war and in whom PTSD was excluded by psychiatric examination. The clinical examination consisted of palpation of the masticatory muscles, the prominent neck musculature, and TMJ. The examination technique used and the definition of items were previously tested for reliability and validity. 93% of the subjects with PTSD had masticatory muscle tenderness compared to 45.65% of the subjects in the control group (chi2 = 51.46, p TMJ tenderness compared to 3.26% of subjects in the control group (chi2 = 66.23, p TMJ in both groups was the left posterior capsule; in the PTSD group 38% and in subjects in the control group 2.17% of cases. The most painful location was the left posterior capsule in 28% of subjects with PTSD, while not one subject in the control group reported severe painful sensitivity. The very high frequency and intensity of pain in subjects with PTSD confirms the effect of stress on muscle and joint sensitivity, i.e. perception of pain.

  10. Evidence of accessibility and utility of point-of-care diagnostics as an integral part of prevention of mother-to-child transmission services: systematic scoping review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoba, Juliet; Hangulu, Lydia; Mashamba-Thompson, Tivani Phosa

    2017-11-04

    Point-of-care (POC) testing has been shown to help improve healthcare access in resource-limited settings. However, there is paucity of evidence on accessibility of POC testing for prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) in resource-limited settings. We propose to conduct a systematic scoping review to map the evidence on POC testing services for PMTCT. A scoping review framework, proposed by Arksey and O'Malley, will guide the study. A comprehensive literature search will be performed in the following electronic databases: PubMed, Science Direct, Cochrane Central, Google Scholar and databases within EBSCOhost (Medline and CINAHL). The primary research articles published in peer-reviewed journals and grey articles addressing our question will be included. One reviewer will conduct title screening and the results will be exported to endnote library. Two independent reviewers will perform abstract, then full article screening in parallel. The same process shall be employed to extract data from eligible studies. Data analysis will involve a narrative summary of included studies and thematic content analysis aided by NVIVO software V.11. The mixed methods assessment tool will be used to assess the quality of studies that will be included. Ethical approval is not applicable to this study. The study findings will be disseminated through publication in a peer-reviewed journal and presentations at conferences related to syphilis, HIV, PMTCT, bacterial infections and POC diagnostics. CRD42017056267. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. Synovial sarcoma of the temporomandibular joint and infratemporal fossa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Fuminori; Kishimoto, Seiji

    2014-12-01

    Synovial sarcoma in the head and neck region is rare, and is difficult to resect with adequate safety margins because of its anatomical complexity. We herein report our experiences with synovial sarcoma in this region, and review the literature regarding the management of such cases. We retrospectively examined four cases of synovial sarcoma arising from the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) area and infratemporal fossa. Only one patient remains alive without disease, while the other three patients have died. The local control of these tumors has improved because of the progress in the surgical operation methods, while it is expected that there is still a high rate of deaths due to distant metastasis increase. The development of strong chemotherapy is needed for the use after the initial treatment and surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of Condylar Elastic Properties to Temporomandibular Joint Stress

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    Min Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Mandibular condyle plays an important role in the growth and reconstruction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ. We aimed to obtain orthotropic elastic parameters of the condyle using a continuous-wave ultrasonic technique and to observe the effects of condylar elastic parameters on stress distribution of the TMJ using finite element analysis (FEA. Using the ultrasonic technique, all nine elastic parameters were obtained, which showed that the mandibular condyle was orthotropic. With the condyle defined as orthotropic, the occlusal stress was transferred fluently and uniformly from the mandible to the TMJ. The stress distribution in the isotropic model showed stepped variation among different anatomical structures with higher stress values in the cartilage and condyle than in the orthotropic model. We conclude that anisotropy has subtle yet significant effects on stress distribution of the TMJ and could improve the reality of simulations.

  13. Probable Correlation between Temporomandibular Dysfunction and Vertigo in the Elderly

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    Marchiori, Luciana Lozza de Moraes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Temporomandibular disorder (TMD covers a variety of clinical problems, and some epidemiologic studies have tried to indicate mechanisms of interaction and association between vertigo and TMD, but this topic still is controversial. Objective To assess the presence of vertigo in elderly patients associated with TMD. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted with the inclusion of elderly individuals who lived independently. TMD was assessed by dental evaluation and vertigo was verified by medical history. Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square and relative risk. Results There was a significant association (p = 0.0256 between the TMD and vertigo (odds ratio = 2.3793. Conclusion These results highlighted the importance of identifying risk factors for vertigo that can be modified through specific interventions, which is essential to prevent future episodes, as well as managing the process of rehabilitation of elderly patients in general.

  14. Jacob's disease associated with temporomandibular joint dysfunction: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capote, Ana; Rodríguez, Francisco J; Blasco, Ana; Muñoz, Mario F

    2005-01-01

    Jacob's disease is regarded a rare condition in which a joint formation is established between an enlarged mandibular coronoid process and the inner aspect of the zygomatic body. Chronic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disk displacement has been proposed as etiological factor of coronoid process enlargement. We present a 23-year-old woman with long-standing TMJ dysfunction and restricted interincisal opening, who developed a progressive zygomatic asymmetry. The patient underwent treatment by intraoral coronoidectomy and homolateral TMJ arthroscopy in the same surgery. The histopathological diagnosis of the coronoid sample was cartilage-capped exostoses with presence of articular fibrous cartilage. Although the low prevalence of this entity, it should be considered as a possible diagnosis in patients with progressive limitation of mouth opening, although a TMJ syndrome may be present as a cause of this entity.

  15. Use of Magnetic Neurostimulator Appliance in Temporomandibular Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Rossiti Florian

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular disorder (TMD is ranked the second leading cause of orofacial pain after toothache, and there is no effective standard treatment for all cases. Therefore, much research has been conducted in the therapeutic areas of TMD, such as acupuncture and electrotherapy, for this purpose. The aim of this research was to evaluate application of the neuromagnetic stimulator device Haihua model CD-9, used within the precepts of acupuncture in treating TMD-related pain symptoms and limited mouth opening. Analysis and discussion of this study were based on pain intensity index and range of mouth-opening evaluation before and after each session. Nine patients diagnosed with muscle TMD, referred by the surgery sector of Center Dental Specialties (CEO – I in Piracicaba-São Paulo participated in this research. Considering the simplicity of the technique and good results obtained, use of this device is suggested as an additional therapeutic tool for relief of TMD symptoms.

  16. Is the masticatory function changed in patients with temporomandibular disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Carolina Almeida; Melchior, Melissa de Oliveira; Magri, Laís Valencise; Mestriner, Wilson; Mazzetto, Marcelo Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) often complain and have limitation in masticatory function, which can be affected by a complex interaction of factors. The aim of this study was analyze the masticatory function in patients with TMD using surface electromyography (EMG) and masticatory efficiency (ME). Twenty-seven patients with TMD and 25 considered control (n), aged between 18 and 60 years, paired by age and gender, were evaluated according to RDC/TMD. In both groups were performed: EMG with chewing gum, clinical evaluation of habitual chewing with stuffed cookie (CE) (number of chewing strokes and time) and analysis of ME with fuchsin beads. Nonparametric statistical analyses were used (Mann-Whitney) for comparisons between groups, with 5% significance level. For all variables, the TMD group showed higher values than the control, with statistical significance for ME (pmasticatory function.

  17. Is orthodontic treatment a risk factor for temporomandibular disorders?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Magnusson

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The possibility that orthodontic treatment in childhood might be a risk factor for the development of temporomandibular disorders (TMD later in life has been an issue of great controversy in dental literature. OBJECTIVE: To determine a possible negative or positive correlation between orthodontic treatment and TMD by presenting the results and conclusions from a number of key-papers dealing with this subject. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: According to current knowledge, there is no scientific evidence to support that orthodontic treatment is a risk factor for the development of TMD. On the other hand, there is some evidence to support that a proper orthodontic treatment performed in childhood might have a positive effect upon the functional status of the masticatory system later in life.

  18. Comparative clinical study of light analgesic effect on temporomandibular disorder (TMD) using red and infrared led therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panhoca, Vitor Hugo; Lizarelli, Rosane de Fatima Zanirato; Nunez, Silvia Cristina; Pizzo, Renata Campi de Andrade; Grecco, Clovis; Paolillo, Fernanda Rossi; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador

    2015-02-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been widely applied in pain relief in several clinical situations, including temporomandibular disorders (TMD). However, the effects of LED therapy on TMD has not been investigated. This study aims to evaluate the effects of red and infrared LEDs on: (1) tissue temperature in ex vivo and (2) pain relief and mandibular range of motion in patients with TMD. Thirty patients between 18 and 40 years old were included and randomly assigned to three groups. The two experimental groups were: the red LED (630 ± 10 nm) group and the infrared LED (850 ± 10 nm) group. The irradiation parameters were 150 mW, 300 mW/cm(2), 18 J/cm(2), and 9 J/point. The positive control group received an infrared laser (780 nm) with 70 mW, 1.7 W/cm(2), 105 J/cm(2), and 4.2 J/point. LED and laser therapies were applied bilaterally to the face for 60 s/point. Five points were irradiated: three points around the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), one point for the temporalis, and one near the masseter. Eight sessions of phototherapy were performed, twice a week for 4 weeks. Pain induced by palpating the masseter muscle and mandibular range of motion (maximum oral aperture) were measured at baseline, immediately after treatment, 7 days after treatment, and 30 days after treatment. There was an increase in tissue temperature during both the red and the infrared LED irradiation in ex vivo. There was a significant reduction of pain and increase of the maximum oral aperture for all groups (p ≥ 0.05). There was no significant difference in pain scores and maximum oral aperture between groups at baseline or any periods after treatment (p ≥ 0.05). The current study showed that red and infrared LED therapy can be useful in improving outcomes related to pain relief and orofacial function for TMD patients. We conclude that LED devices constitute an attractive alternative for LLLT.

  19. Map of debris flows caused by rainfall during 1996 in parts of the Reedsport and Deer Head Point quadrangles, Douglas County, southern Coast Range, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Jeffrey A.; Michael, John A.; Burgos, Marianela Mercado

    2011-01-01

    This 1:12,000-scale map shows an inventory of debris flows caused by rainfall during 1996 in a 94.4 km2 area in the southern Coast Range of Oregon. This map and associated digital data are part of a larger U.S. Geological Survey study of debris flows in the southern Coast Range. Available evidence indicates that the flows were triggered by a rain storm that occurred between November 17 and 19. The closest rain gage in the Coast Range (Goodwin Peak) recorded 245 mm during the storm. Maximum rainfall intensity during the storm was 13.2 mm/hr on November 18. Debris flows were photogrammetrically mapped from 1:12,000-scale aerial photographs flown in May, 1997. The inventory is presented on imagery derived from LiDAR data acquired in 2008. We classified mapped debris flows into four categories based on the type of debris-flow activity: (1) discrete slide source areas, (2) predominantly erosion, (3) predominantly transport or mixed erosion and deposition, and (4) predominantly deposition. Locations of woody-debris jams are also shown on the map. The area encompassed by debris flows is 2.1 percent of the 94.4 km2 map area.

  20. Relação entre disfunção temporomandibular e alterações auditivas The relationship among temporomandibular dysfunction and hearing alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela de Campos Barreto

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available TEMA: o equilíbrio das estruturas e funções do sistema estomatognático depende do adequado funcionamento da Articulação Temporomandibular, e esta, por sua vez, precisa da oclusão dental correta para a realização das funções ao movimentar a mandíbula. O desequilíbrio muscular ou estrutural da Articulação Temporomandibular poderá acarretar em uma disfunção dessa articulação e causar sinais e sintomas diversos como manifestações auditivas do tipo zumbido e otalgia. OBJETIVO: realizou-se a revisão de literatura das áreas de fonoaudiologia, otorrinolaringologia e odontologia com pesquisas em bases de dados, artigos e livros, sendo selecionadas as literaturas de 1992 a 2008 relacionadas ao tema do trabalho, a fim de associar sintomas audiológicos com a Disfunção Temporomandibular e apontar a importância da atuação multiprofissional, dando ênfase à atuação fonoaudiológica, em tal disfunção. CONCLUSÃO: várias são as hipóteses que tentam explicar a relação existente entre a Disfunção Temporomandibular e as alterações auditivas. Verificamos que há um vínculo entre o sistema estomatognático e o sistema auditivo. Contudo, mais importante que somente associar os sistemas estomatognático e auditivo, a equipe multiprofissional envolvida na assistência à pacientes com Disfunção Temporomandibular, precisa ter conhecimento a respeito da anatomia e fisiologia da Articulação Temporomandibular, de suas disfunções, causas e consequências, sendo capaz de distinguir a terapêutica eficiente para cada disfunção e, por fim, analisar a conduta com encaminhamentos adequados para a evolução do caso.BACKGROUND: the balance referring to the structures and functions of the stomatognatic system depends on the appropriate functioning of the Temporomandibular Joint, and this one, needs the correct teeth occlusion for accomplishing the functional needs when moving the jaw. The muscle or structural unbalance of the

  1. Is there a link between tinnitus and temporomandibular disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buergers, Ralf; Kleinjung, Tobias; Behr, Michael; Vielsmeier, Veronika

    2014-03-01

    The frequent concurrence of tinnitus and temporomandibular joint and masticatory muscle disorders (TMD) has led to the assumption that a possible relationship exists between these 2 conditions. The present prospective clinical study was conducted to assess the possible association between tinnitus and TMD and to investigate the effect of stomatognathic therapy on tinnitus distress. The prevalence of TMD and tinnitus was investigated in a consecutive series of 951 patients at the Department of Prosthetic Dentistry at the University Medical Center Regensburg, Germany. Patients with TMD and simultaneous tinnitus were included in the prospective clinical trial (n=25). Baseline examination comprised a detailed functional analysis, diagnosis of temporomandibular joint and masticatory muscle disorder, and a tinnitus questionnaire. All the participants received individual dental functional therapy (oral splints, physiotherapy). The effects of functional therapy on TMD and tinnitus symptoms were examined 3 to 5 months after the initiation of dental functional therapy. Means (standard deviations) were calculated, and 1-way ANOVA was used to investigate statistical differences (α=.05). The differences of the 2 binary outcomes were compared with the Pearson χ(2) test, and the relative risk was calculated. Prevalence of tinnitus was found to be 8 times higher in participants with TMD (30 of 82 [36.6%]) than in participants without TMD (38 of 869 [4.4%]). All the participants with unilateral TMD and unilateral tinnitus showed these conditions on the same side. Stomatognathic therapy improved tinnitus symptoms in 11 of 25 participants (44%). The results of this study and the prospective clinical trial showed a significant correlation between tinnitus and TMD. The observed treatment outcome suggests that dental functional therapy may have a positive effect on TMD-related tinnitus. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier

  2. Clinical Signs and Subjective Symptoms of Temporomandibular Disorders in Instrumentalists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jae Young; Kwon, Jeong Seung; Lee, Debora H; Bae, Jung Hee; Kim, Seong Taek

    2016-11-01

    Most of the reports on instrumentalists' experiences of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) have been reported not by clinical examinations but by subjective questionnaires. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical signs and subjective symptoms of TMD in a large number of instrumentalists objectively. A total of 739 musicians from a diverse range of instrument groups completed a TMD questionnaire. Among those who reported at least one symptom of TMD, 71 volunteers underwent clinical examinations and radiography for diag-nosis. Overall, 453 participants (61.3%) reported having one or more symptoms of TMD. The most frequently reported symptom was a clicking or popping sound, followed by temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain, muscle pain, crepitus, and mouth opening limitations. Compared with lower-string instrumentalists, a clicking or popping sound was about 1.8 and 2 times more frequent in woodwind and brass instrumentalists, respectively. TMJ pain was about 3.2, 2.8, and 3.2 times more frequent in upper-string, woodwind, and brass instrumentalists, respectively. Muscle pain was about 1.5 times more frequent in instrumentalists with an elevated arm position than in those with a neutral arm position. The most frequent diagnosis was myalgia or myofascial pain (MFP), followed by disc displacement with reduction. Myalgia or MFP was 4.6 times more frequent in those practicing for no less than 3.5 hours daily than in those practicing for less than 3.5 hours. The results indicate that playing instruments can play a contributory role in the development of TMD.

  3. Expanding the taxonomy of the diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, C C; Goulet, J-P; Lobbezoo, F; Schiffman, E L; Alstergren, P; Anderson, G C; de Leeuw, R; Jensen, R; Michelotti, A; Ohrbach, R; Petersson, A; List, T

    2014-01-01

    There is a need to expand the current temporomandibular disorders' (TMDs) classification to include less common but clinically important disorders. The immediate aim was to develop a consensus-based classification system and associated diagnostic criteria that have clinical and research utility for less common TMDs. The long-term aim was to establish a foundation, vis-à-vis this classification system, that will stimulate data collection, validity testing and further criteria refinement. A working group [members of the International RDC/TMD Consortium Network of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), members of the Orofacial Pain Special Interest Group (SIG) of the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP), and members from other professional societies] reviewed disorders for inclusion based on clinical significance, the availability of plausible diagnostic criteria and the ability to operationalise and study the criteria. The disorders were derived from the literature when possible and based on expert opinion as necessary. The expanded TMDs taxonomy was presented for feedback at international meetings. Of 56 disorders considered, 37 were included in the expanded taxonomy and were placed into the following four categories: temporomandibular joint disorders, masticatory muscle disorders, headache disorders and disorders affecting associated structures. Those excluded were extremely uncommon, lacking operationalised diagnostic criteria, not clearly related to TMDs, or not sufficiently distinct from disorders already included within the taxonomy. The expanded TMDs taxonomy offers an integrated approach to clinical diagnosis and provides a framework for further research to operationalise and test the proposed taxonomy and diagnostic criteria. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Radiologic Study of Meniscus Perforations in the Temporomandibular Joint

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    Kim, Kee Duck; Park, Chang Seo [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-08-15

    Thirty-nine patients (forty-four joints) who had been diagnosed as having meniscus perforation of the temporomandibular joint by inferior joint space arthrography and had been treated by surgical procedures were evaluated retrospectively. Information of clinical findings, arthrotomographic findings and surgical findings was collected on a standardized form and evaluated. The results were as follows: 1. On the 34 patients of 38 joints which were surgically confirmed perforation of meniscus or its attachments of the temporomandibular joint, there were 29 females and 5 males (5.8:1). The average age was 36 years (range 17 to 70). 2. The common clinical findings of group that had meniscus displacement without reduction and with perforation were pain on the affected joint and limitation of mouth opening. In the group showing meniscus displacement with reduction and with perforation the common clinical findings were pain and clicking on the affected joint. 3. 32 joints (84.2%) were arthrotomographically anterior meniscus displacement without reduction and with perforation, 6 joints (15.8%) showed anterior meniscus displacement with reduction and with perforation. 4. Joints categorized arthrotomographically as having meniscus displacement without reduction and with perforation were less likely to have full translation of the condyle in comparison with the normal or meniscus displacement with reduction and with perforation groups (p<0.05) 5. The arthrographic findings of 44 joints having meniscus perforation were compared with surgical findings, there were 6 false positive findings of meniscus perforation, the reliability of arthrographic findings of meniscus perforation was a 86.4% correlation with surgical findings. 6. On the site of perforations of 38 joints which were surgically confirmed perforation of meniscus or its attachments, twenty-three of perforations (60.5%) were in location at the junction of the meniscus and posterior attachment, fourteen (36.9%) were

  5. Influence of arthrocentesis irrigation volume at temporomandibular disorder treatment

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    Maysa Nogueira De Barros Melo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Temporomandibular disorder (TMD treatment varies from conservative therapy to invasive procedures such as arthrocentesis. The procedure is simple and has speed, low cost, low morbidity and good patient acceptance. Literature variations, however, have been found about the type and volume of the solution used for the irrigation of temporomandibular joint (TMJ. Subjects and Methods: The aim of this study was to compare the results provided by two different volumes of 0.9% saline solution (100 ml and 250 ml used in arthrocentesis technique for TMD treatment. It included patients unresponsive to conservative treatment. Preoperative (T0 and postoperative evaluations were performed at T1 (30th day, T2 (60th day, and T3 (90th day, in which maximal mouth opening (MMO, pain, and the presence or absence of joint sounds were recorded. Patients were randomized into two groups: 1 – submitted to arthrocentesis using 100 ml of 0.9% saline solution in TMJ and 2 – arthrocentesis performed using 250 ml of 0.9% saline solution in each TMJ. Data were submitted to descriptive and comparative analyses for each parameter per group and between groups. The effect size was calculated according to Cohen test. Minimum detectable change (MDC was obtained and the sensibility was calculated. A statistical significance of 5% was established. Group 1 obtained increase in MMO and decrease in pain (statistically significant; in Group 2, pain decreased significantly. In Group 1, clicking decreased significantly. No statistical differences were found between groups (P = 0.333. MMO and pain results exceeded MDC, and sensibility was good. Conclusion: In conclusion, arthrocentesis is effective in TMD symptoms' relief, without statistical difference between the volumes used.

  6. [Study of self-reported health of people living near point sources of environmental pollution: a review. Second part: analysis of results and perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniau, C; Dor, F; Eilstein, D; Lefranc, A; Empereur-Bissonnet, P; Dab, W

    2013-08-01

    Epidemiological studies have investigated the health impacts of local sources of environmental pollution using as an outcome variable self-reported health, reflecting the overall perception interviewed people have of their own health. This work aims at analyzing the advantages and the results of this approach. This second part presents the results of the studies. Based on a literature review (51 papers), this article presents an analysis of the contribution of self-reported health to epidemiological studies investigating local sources of environmental pollution. It discusses the associations between self-reported health and exposure variables, and other risk factors that can influence health reporting. Studies using self-reported health showed that local sources can be associated with a wide range of health outcomes, including an impact on mental health and well-being. The perception of pollution, especially sensory information such as odors, affects self-reported health. Attitudes referring to beliefs, worries and personal behaviors concerning the source of pollution have a striking influence on reported health. Attitudes can be used to estimate the reporting bias in a biomedical approach, and also constitute the main explanatory factors in biopsychosocial studies taking into account not only the biological, physical, and chemical factors but also the psychological and social factors at stake in a situation of environmental exposure. Studying self-reported health enables a multifactorial approach to health in a context of environmental exposure. This approach is most relevant when conducted within a multidisciplinary framework involving human and social sciences to better understand psychosocial factors. The relevance of this type of approach used as an epidemiological surveillance tool to monitor local situations should be assessed with regard to needs for public health management of these situations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. TEMPOROMANDIBULAR PAIN DYSFUNCTION SYNDROME IN PATIENTS ATTENDING LAGOS UNIVERSITY TEACHING HOSPITAL, LAGOS, NIGERIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eweka, O M; Ogundana, O M; Agbelusi, G A

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome (TMJPDS) is the most common temporomandibular disorder. This condition presents with symptoms of pain, restricted jaw movement and joint noise. Other symptoms include otalgia, headache, neck pain and trismus. To determine the pattern of Temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome patients managed at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria. A descriptive study of patients with signs and symptoms of Temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome attending the Oral Medicine Clinic of Lagos University Teaching Hospital. Twenty-one patients with Temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome were enrolled into the study, out of which 10(48%) were females and 11(52%) were males. The age range was 23-81years with a mean of 45.2 ± 18.9 years. Majority of the patients 20(95.2%) complained of pain around the joint, in the pre-auricular region, in the muscles of mastication and the ear. While 7(35%) complained of clicking sounds, 10(47.6%) complained of pain on mouth opening and during mastication only. In all 5(23.8%) had impaired movement of the jaws, mouth opening was normal in 18(85.7%) but reduced in 3(14.3%) patients. Over half of patients 12(57%) experienced clicking sounds, there was tenderness around the temporomandibular joint in 16(76.2%) cases, pain in the ear of 7(33.3%) patients and 13(61.9%) people presented with tenderness of the muscles of mastication. Conservative management of all the cases resulted in resolution of the symptoms. Temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome has diverse clinical presentation and though distressing, it responds to prompt and effective conservative management.

  8. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in adolescents Sinais e sintomas de disfunção temporomandibular em adolescentes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Rigoldi Bonjardim

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to verify the prevalence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD in adolescents and its relationship to gender. The sample comprised 217 subjects, aged 12 to 18. The subjective symptoms and clinical signs of TMD were evaluated, using, respectively, a self-report questionnaire and the Craniomandibular Index, which has 2 subscales; the Dysfunction Index and the Palpation Index. The results of muscle tenderness showed great variability (0.9-32.25%. In relation to the temporomandibular joint, tenderness of the superior, dorsal and lateral condyle regions occurred in 10.6%, 10.6% and 7.83%, respectively, of the sample. Joint sound during opening was present in 19.8% of the sample and during closing in 14.7%. The most prevalent symptoms were joint sounds (26.72% and headache (21.65%. There was no statistical difference between genders (p > 0.05, except for the tenderness of the lateral pterygoid muscles, which presented more prevalence in girls. In conclusion, clinical signs and symptoms of TMD can occur in adolescents; however, gender influence was not perceived.O objetivo deste estudo foi verificar a prevalência de sinais e sintomas de disfunção temporomandibular (DTM em adolescentes e sua relação com o gênero. A amostra foi constituída de 217 voluntários, com idade entre 12 e 18 anos. Os sintomas subjetivos e os sinais clínicos de DTM foram avaliados usando-se, respectivamente, um questionário e o "Craniomandibular Index", o qual possui 2 subescalas: "Dysfunction Index" e "Palpation Index". Os resultados para sensibilidade muscular mostraram grande variabilidade (0,9-32,25%. Com relação à articulação temporomandibular, a sensibilidade à palpação nas regiões superior, dorsal e lateral do côndilo ocorreu, respectivamente, em 10,6%, 10,6% e 7,83% da amostra. A prevalência do ruído articular no movimento de abertura foi de 19,8% e no fechamento, 14,7%. Os sintomas relatados mais

  9. Fixed Points

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 5. Fixed Points - From Russia with Love - A Primer of Fixed Point Theory. A K Vijaykumar. Book Review Volume 5 Issue 5 May 2000 pp 101-102. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  10. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... OnSafety CPSC Stands for Safety The Tipping Point Home > 60 Seconds of Safety (Videos) > The Tipping Point ... 24 hours a day. For young children whose home is a playground, it’s the best way to ...

  11. Long-term oral appliance therapy in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome : a controlled study on temporomandibular side effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doff, Michiel H. J.; Veldhuis, Steffanie K. B.; Hoekema, Aarnoud; Slater, James J. R. Huddleston; Wijkstra, P. J.; de Bont, Lambert G. M.; Stegenga, Boudewijn

    The objective of this study was to assess variations in the occurrence of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and the risk of developing pain and function impairment of the temporomandibular complex in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) patients treated with either an oral appliance (mandibular

  12. Evaluation of the research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders for the recognition of an anterior disc displacement with reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naeije, M.; Kalaykova, S.; Visscher, C.M.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this Focus Article is to review critically the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) for the recognition of an anterior disc displacement with reduction (ADDR) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). This evaluation is based upon the experience gained

  13. Influence of gag reflex on dental attendance, dental anxiety, self-reported temporomandibular disorders and prosthetic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akarslan, Z Z; Yıldırım Biçer, A Z

    2013-12-01

    To assess the influence of gag reflex severity, assessed according to the short form of the patient part of Gagging Problem Assessment Questionnaire (GPA-pa SF), on the dental attendance, dental anxiety, self-reported temporomandibular disorder (TMD) symptoms and presence of prosthetic restorations among patients requiring prosthodontic treatment in Turkey. A total of 505 patients (305 women; mean age: 46·35 years, SD: 28·2 years) undergoing dental examination were administered a questionnaire containing questions regarding their age, gender, education level, dental attendance, TMD symptoms (limitation in jaw opening, muscle pain, pain/sounds in the temporomandibular jaw), the Turkish version of the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS) and the GPA-pa SF. Subsequently, any prosthetic restoration was recorded by a dentist. Descriptive statistics, one-way analysis of variance (anova) and the chi-square test were used for statistical analysis. Differences were found between GPA-pa SF scores 0, 1 and 2 for education level (P = 0·001), MDAS scores (P = 0·003), self-reported TMD (P = 0·000) and prosthesis wear (P = 0·000), but not for attendance patterns (P = 0·826). Patients with gag reflex had lower education levels, higher levels of dental anxiety, more self-reported TMD symptoms and fewer fixed or removable prosthetic restorations than patients without gag reflex. Gag reflex has impacts on dental anxiety, self-reported TMD and prosthetic restorations, but not on dental attendance patterns, according to the results of the GPA-pa SF. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. MR of 2270 TMJs: prevalence of radiographic presence of otomastoiditis in temporomandibular joint disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orhan, Kaan [Department of Oral Diagnosis and Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Ankara University, 06500 Besevler, Ankara (Turkey)]. E-mail: call53@yahoo.com; Nishiyama, Hideyoshi [Department of Oral Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Tadashi, Sasaki [Department of Oral Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Shumei, Murakami [Department of Oral Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Furukawa, Souhei [Department of Oral Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    Objective: : The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence of radiographic presence of otomastoiditis while examining temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders in magnetic resonance images (MRI) in a series of 2270 temporomandibular joint magnetic resonance images and to examine the relationship between otomastoiditis and TMJ disorders. Materials and methods: : 2270 temporomandibular joint magnetic resonance images and patients' data were retrospectively investigated. Magnetic resonance images were obtained from the patients who referred to Osaka University Dental Hospital Outpatient Clinic with TMJ complaints for the last four years (from January 1998 to January 2003). The patients, who were diagnosed as otomastoiditis based on their temporomandibular joint magnetic resonance images, were sent to Osaka University Hospital Department of Otolaryngology for a medical consultation in order to have their pathologies certified following their MR process. Age and sex were recorded for all patients and for otomastoiditis cases; location of the disease, symptoms of patients and TMJ findings were noted as well. Results: : Seven patients were diagnosed as acute otomastoiditis and one patient diagnosed as chronic active otitis media with cholesteatoma in the series of 2270 MR, which were representing a prevalence of 0.39%. Neurilemoma diagnosed in left mastoid process in one patient. The final diagnoses of all patients were made after medical consultation. Conclusion: : While examining temporomandibular joint magnetic resonance images; it is not only important to examine just the TMJ structures, but also to look at the nearby anatomical features to check evidence for inflammatory disease.

  15. Anxiety and personality traits in patients with muscle related temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallegama, R W; Ranasinghe, A W; Weerasinghe, V S; Sitheeque, M A M

    2005-10-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that muscle related temporomandibular disorder patients with cervical muscle pain exhibit greater degree of psychological distress compared with patients without cervical muscle pain and controls. Thirty-eight muscle related temporomandibular disorder patients including 10 patients with cervical muscle pain and 41 healthy individuals as controls participated in the study. State and trait anxiety levels were assessed with the Spielberger's state and trait anxiety inventory. Personality traits (extroversion, neuroticism, psychoticism and social desirability) were assessed using the Eysenck's personality questionnaire, and the pain intensities described over the muscles were recorded using a 100 mm visual analogue scale. The muscle related temporomandibular disorder patients, in general, exhibited significantly higher degrees of neuroticism and trait anxiety. The patients with cervical muscle pain demonstrated a significantly higher level of psychoticism compared with the patients without cervical muscle pain and the controls and a significantly higher state anxiety level than the controls. They also demonstrated higher pain intensities in masseter and temporalis muscles compared with patients without cervical muscle pain. It has been suggested that either subjects with psychological distress are prone to temporomandibular disorders, or psychological distress is a manifestation of existing chronic pain conditions. The present findings demand further investigations and broader approach in management, as muscle related temporomandibular disorder patients with cervical muscle pain were both physically and psychologically compromised to a greater degree compared with patients without cervical muscle pain.

  16. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Point by CPSC Blogger September 22, 2009 appliance child Childproofing CPSC danger death electrical fall furniture head ... see news reports about horrible accidents involving young children and furniture, appliance and tv tip-overs. The ...

  17. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Point by CPSC Blogger September 22, 2009 appliance child Childproofing CPSC danger death electrical fall furniture head ... TV falls with about the same force as child falling from the third story of a building. ...

  18. Evaluation of mandibular condylar bony changes in temporomandibular disorders using Polytome-U images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nah, Kyung Soo [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-08-15

    The author examined bone changes from 1274 polytomographic images of 182 temporomandibular joints which showed symptoms of temporomandibular disorder and the following results were obtained; 1. The number of temporomandibular joints which showed bone changes were 64 (35.2%) among 182 joints. 2. The age and sex distribution of 64 joints which had bone changes showed the prevalence of female (90.6%) and third decade (25.0%) followed by fourth (21.2%) and second decade (17.2%). 3. The 252 images which showed bone changes consisted of 56 images from lateral side (22.2%), 118 images from center (46.8%) and 78 images from medial side (30.9%). 4. The most frequently observed bone changes were flattening (22.7%) followed by sclerosis (19.3%) and cortical unsharpness (19.3%)

  19. The posterior segment of the temporomandibular joint capsule and its anatomic relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mérida-Velasco, J Ramón; Rodríguez, J Francisco; de la Cuadra, Crótida; Peces, M Dolores; Mérida, J Antonio; Sánchez, Indalecio

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work was to clarify the arrangement of the posterior segment of the temporomandibular joint capsule and its pertinent relationships. The temporomandibular region was dissected bilaterally in 20 adult cadavers. Natural stained latex was injected into 16 cadavers through the external carotid artery to facilitate the dissection of the arterial vessels. The posterior segment of the joint capsule is made up of the so-called "bilaminar zone" of the articular disc. The upper internal portion of the posterior segment of the capsule was reinforced by the discomalleolar ligament. The retroarticular space was filled with loose connective tissue and the anterior branches of the anterior tympanic artery were distributed throughout the posterior segment of the joint capsule. The posterior segment of the temporomandibular joint capsule corresponds to the bilaminar zone of the articular disc. The structures of the retroarticular space are extracapsular.

  20. Botulinum toxin for treating muscular temporomandibular disorders: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Machado

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study, through a systematic literature review, aims to analyze the effectiveness of Botulinum Toxin as a treatment for masticatory myofascial pain and muscles temporomandibular disorders (TMD. METHODS: Survey in research bases: MEDLINE, Cochrane, EMBASE, Pubmed, Lilacs and BBO, between the years of 1966 and April 2011, with focus in randomized or quasi-randomized controlled clinical trials, blind or double-blind. RESULTS: After applying the inclusion criteria, 4 articles comprised the final sample: 3 were double-blind randomized controlled clinical trials and 1 was single-blind randomized controlled clinical trial. CONCLUSIONS: According to the literature, there is lack of evidence about the real effectiveness of botulinum toxin in the treatment of masticatory myofascial pain and muscular TMD. Thus, further randomized controlled clinical trials, with representative samples and longer follow-up time, to assess the real effectiveness of the technique are needed.OBJETIVO: este trabalho, por meio de uma revisão sistemática da literatura, teve como objetivo analisar a efetividade da toxina botulínica como tratamento para dor miofascial mastigatória e disfunções temporomandibulares (DTM musculares. MÉTODOS: pesquisa nas bases de dados Medline, Cochrane, Embase, Pubmed, Lilacs e BBO, no período entre 1966 e abril de 2011, com enfoque em estudos clínicos controlados randomizados ou quase-randomizados, cegos ou duplo-cegos. RESULTADOS: após a aplicação dos critérios de inclusão, chegou-se a 4 artigos, sendo que 3 eram estudos clínicos controlados randomizados duplo-cego e 1 era estudo clínico controlado randomizado simples-cego. CONCLUSÕES: pela análise da literatura, verificou-se um número reduzido de evidências significativas sobre a real efetividade da toxina botulínica no tratamento da dor miofascial e de DTM musculares. Assim, são necessários novos estudos clínicos controlados randomizados, com amostras

  1. Prevalencia de trastornos temporomandibulares en el adulto mayor institucionalizado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenia Masiel Criado Mora

    Full Text Available Introducción: los trastornos temporomandibulares (TTM son una serie de signos y síntomas buco faciales de etiología multifactorial. En Cuba existen varias investigaciones que tratan sobre los TTM %sobre todo en jóvenes dentados% no conociéndose amplias referencias de este tipo de estudio en el adulto mayor. Objetivo: identificar la prevalencia de TTM en los adultos mayores institucionalizados, los signos y síntomas más frecuentes según edad y sexo. Métodos: se realizó un estudio descriptivo transversal en 113 adultos mayores de ambos sexos, institucionalizados en dos hogares de ancianos de la Habana, de marzo a abril de 2012. Se aplicó una encuesta donde se recogió sexo, edad, signos y síntomas. Las manifestaciones clínicas evaluadas fueron: la presencia de dolor muscular, dificultad al movimiento de abertura y cierre, dolor articular, dolor muscular articular, ruidos articulares, limitación de la abertura bucal, limitación de los movimientos de lateralidad y propulsión, desviación de la mandíbula. Resultados: el 40,70 % de los adultos mayores estudiados, presentaron afectación en la articulación temporomandibular. Los ruidos articulares fue el síntoma con mayor predominio en todos los grupos etarios (76,08 %, afectando al 82,35 % de los hombres y al 72,41 % de las mujeres. Seguido por el dolor muscular que se manifestó en el 52,17 % de los afectados, con mayor porcentaje en mujeres (58,62 % que en hombres (41,17 %. La dificultad para realizar los movimientos de abertura y cierre se detectó en el 28,26 % de los afectados con mayor prevalencia en el sexo femenino (34,48 % que en el masculino (17,14 %. Conclusiones. se observó una elevada prevalencia de TTM en los adultos mayores estudiados. Los signos y síntomas más frecuentes por edad y sexo fueron los ruidos articulares y el dolor muscular y la dificultad para realizar los movimientos de abertura y cierre.

  2. Pressure pain threshold and oral health-related quality of life implications of patients with alloplastic temporomandibular joint replacement--a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsen, Sabine S; Reich, Rudolf H; Teschke, Marcus

    2012-11-01

    Alloplastic total temporomandibular joint replacement (TJR) for end-stage disease, congenital disorders, and after ablative surgery has been shown improve function and to decrease pain. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pain pressure threshold (PPT) and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) in patients undergoing alloplastic TJR. Subjects requiring TJR from May 2007 through February 2011 were enrolled in the study. The PPT and OHRQoL were measured preoperatively and 2, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. The primary predictor variable was postoperative time (preoperatively and 2, 6, and 12 months postoperatively). The primary outcome variables were the PPT and OHRQoL. Seventeen subjects requiring TJR were enrolled in and completed the required 12-month follow-up. There was no difference in the PPT at any time point. There was a significant improvement in the OHRQoL domain of psychological discomfort (P = .04) at 12 months. Facial pain intensity, temporomandibular joint pain, mandibular function, and diet were also significantly improved at 12 months (P = .001). Alloplastic TJR appears to decrease pain, improve function and diet, and decrease psychological discomfort. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cervical flexion-rotation test and physiological range of motion - A comparative study of patients with myogenic temporomandibular disorder versus healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Tzvika; Dvir, Zeevi; Reiter, Shoshana; Winocur, Ephraim

    2017-02-01

    Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) refer to several common clinical disorders which involve the masticatory muscles, the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and the adjacent structures. Although neck signs and symptoms are found with higher prevalence in TMD patients compared to the overall population, whether limitation of cervical mobility is an additional positive finding in this cohort is still an open question. To compare the physiological cervical range of motion (CROM) and the extent of rotation during cervical flexion (flexion-rotation test, FRT) in people with TMD (muscular origin) and healthy control subjects. The range of motion of the neck and FRT was measured in 20 women with myogenic TMD and 20 age matched healthy controls. Women with myogenic TMD had significantly lower FRT scores compared to their matched healthy women. No difference was found between groups in CROM in any of the planes of movement. The FRT was positive (less than 32°) in 90% of the TMD participants versus 5% in the healthy control but the findings were not correlated with TMD severity. The results point out a potential involvement of the upper cervical joints (c1-c2) in women with myogenic TMD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of Mandibular Advancement Device Therapy on the Signs and Symptoms of Temporomandibular Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritva Näpänkangas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Mandibular advancement device therapy is effectively used in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea, but also several side effects in the masticatory system have been reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate the subjective symptoms and clinical signs of temporomandibular disorders connected to mandibular advancement device therapy. Material and Methods: The material consisted of 15 patients (9 men and 6 women, mean age 51.1 years, range 21 to 70 years diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. Subjective symptoms and clinical temporomandibular disorders (TMD signs were recorded at the beginning of the treatment (baseline and at 1-month, 3-month, 6-month and 24-month follow-ups. The degree of TMD was assessed using the anamnestic (Ai and the clinical dysfunction index (Di of Helkimo. For assessing the effect of TMD the patients were divided in discontinuing and continuing groups. Results: According to Ai and Di, the severity of TMD remained unchanged during the follow-up in most of the patients. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ crepitation was found more frequently in discontinuing patients at all follow-ups. The difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05 at the six-month follow-up. Masticatory muscle pain during palpation was a frequent clinical sign at the baseline and during the follow-up period but the difference between discontinuing and continuing patients was not significant. Conclusions: It seems that signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders do not necessarily increase during long-term mandibular advancement device therapy. However, it seems that patients with clinically assessed temporomandibular joint crepitation may discontinue their mandibular advancement device therapy due to temporomandibular disorders.

  5. Psychoeducation Program on Strategies for Coping with Stress in Patients with Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Biegańska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lack of educational projects in the available literature was an inspiration to develop a psychoeducational program. The objective was to provide patients with basic information on the contribution of stressors in the occurrence of temporomandibular joint dysfunction and educate on methods for coping with stress most commonly used in psychology. In the course of three meetings, patients are familiarised with the issue of experienced stress as a potential source of psychosomatic illnesses (in particular, temporomandibular joint dysfunction. Preliminary patients’ opinions, expressed through self-report methods, indicate significant usefulness of the developed psychoeducational program for the process of treatment and the quality of patients’ lives.

  6. Psychoeducation program on strategies for coping with stress in patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biegańska, Joanna; Pihut, M

    2014-01-01

    Lack of educational projects in the available literature was an inspiration to develop a psychoeducational program. The objective was to provide patients with basic information on the contribution of stressors in the occurrence of temporomandibular joint dysfunction and educate on methods for coping with stress most commonly used in psychology. In the course of three meetings, patients are familiarised with the issue of experienced stress as a potential source of psychosomatic illnesses (in particular, temporomandibular joint dysfunction). Preliminary patients' opinions, expressed through self-report methods, indicate significant usefulness of the developed psychoeducational program for the process of treatment and the quality of patients' lives.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography of the temporomandibular joint: beyond dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Marcelo de Mattos; Machado, Karina Freitas Soares [Clinica Axial Centro de Imagem, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Radiologia; Mascarenhas, Marcelo Henrique [Associacao Brasileira de Odontologia de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Curso de Especializacao em Disfuncao Temporomandibular e Dor Orofacial

    2008-09-15

    Several diseases should be considered in the differential diagnosis of disorders affecting the temporomandibular joints. Internal derangement is the main condition responsible for pain related to this joint. Clinical signs may, though, be quite non-specific, and many other conditions present with similar and not infrequently indistinguishable signs and symptoms. In the present study, the authors describe several non-dysfunctional conditions affecting the temporomandibular joints through computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, emphasizing the importance of these imaging methods in the diagnosis of inflammatory, neoplastic and traumatic diseases of this region. Considering that clinical presentations are frequently non-specific, radiologists play a critical role in the differential diagnosis. (author)

  8. Interference of Different Types of Mastication on Static Balance in Individuals without Temporomandibular Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Cid Andre Fidelis de Paula; Politti, Fabiano; El Hage, Yasmin; de Sousa, Dowglas Fernando Magalhães; Amorin, Cesar Ferreira; Gonzalez, Tabajara de Oliveira; Biasotto-Gonzalez, Daniela Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    This study was to determine whether non-habitual (isotonic) bilateral and unilateral mastication with eyes open and eyes closed exerts an influence on static balance in individuals without temporomandibular disorder (TMD). An observational, cross-sectional study was conducted involving 20 volunteers aged 20 to 40 years without temporomandibular disorder. Static balance was assessed with the individuals in a quiet standing position on a force plate performing different types of mastication under six separate conditions. Significant differences (p center of pressure with eyes closed (p static balance.

  9. Influence of the presence of Temporomandibular Disorders on postural balance in the elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa Pedron; Yoshie, Marjorie Takei; Silva, Rubens Alexandre da; Conti, Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira; Navarro, Ricardo de Lima; Marchiori, Luciana Lozza do Moraes; Fernandes, Karen Barros Parron

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose To investigate the influence of the presence of Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) on postural balance in elderly individuals. Methods The study sample consisted of 150 elderly: 103 women (67.7±5.0 years) and 47 men (69.3±5.5 years). Evaluation of the presence and severity of TMD included an anamnesis questionnaire, an evaluation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), and a muscular examination, which allowed the division of the elderly into 2 groups: G1 (experimental, n=95),...

  10. Disfunción temporomandibular y tratamiento de la maloclusión de clase II

    OpenAIRE

    Pozo Canales, Esteban

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCCIÓN: La disfunción temporomandibular (DTM) es un conjunto de entidades que afecta a la articulación temporomandibular (ATM), musculatura y los tejidos que los rodean. La maloclusión de clase II establece una posición adelantada de la arcada superior con respecto a la inferior. Está caracterizada por retrognatismo mandibular, prognatismo maxilar, o la combinación de ambas. El objetivo de este estudio es establecer la relación entre el tratamiento de la clase II y la disfunción temporo...

  11. Tratmiento fisioterápico en las principales disfunciones de la articulación temporomandibular.

    OpenAIRE

    Gutiérrez Hidalgo, Virginia

    2017-01-01

    Introducción. Las disfunciones de la articulación temporomandibular (DTM) comprenden un conjunto de afecciones músculo-esqueléticas relacionadas entre sí que afectan a la articulación temporomandibular (ATM), a los músculos de la masticación y a las estructuras asociadas. Entre las disfunciones más frecuentes se encuentran el dolor miofascial y los desplazamientos discales. El dolor orofacial es el síntoma más común por el que se requiere tratamiento; afecta a la calidad de vida de las person...

  12. Anquilosis de la articulación temporomandibular: una revisión de la literatura

    OpenAIRE

    D.; Molina; Aguayo, P.; C. Ulloa; V. Iturriaga; T. Bornhardt; Saavedra, M

    2013-01-01

    La anquilosis de la articulación temporomandibular (ATM) corresponde a un trastorno temporomandibular clasificado dentro de la hipomovilidad mandibular crónica. La literatura define anquilosis como una inmovilidad anormal de la mandíbula, desorden que lleva a una restricción de la apertura bucal con reducción parcial de los movimientos mandibulares o una completa inmovilidad de la mandíbula. El objetivo del presente artículo es realizar una revisión en cuanto a la clasificación, epidemiología...

  13. Tratamiento fisioterapéutico en el abordaje del trastorno temporomandibular

    OpenAIRE

    Mera Costoya, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Diseño: El siguiente trabajo consta de revisiones sistemáticas, estudios retrospectivos y estudios randomizados controlados. Realizados en pacientes mayores de 18 años con diagnóstico de trastorno temporomandibular. Antecedentes: El trastorno temporomandibular es una dolencia que afecta a más del 25% total de la población y un trastorno para el que no se tiene la evidencia Objetivos: El objetivo de esta revisión es encontrar los métodos más efectivos para el tratami...

  14. Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders: Evaluation of Psychometric Properties of the Axis II Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohrbach, Richard; Turner, Judith A.; Sherman, Jeffrey J.; Mancl, Lloyd A.; Truelove, Edmond L.; Schiffman, Eric L.; Dworkin, Samuel F.

    2011-01-01

    AIMS To evaluate the psychometric properties of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) biobehavioral (Axis II) screening instruments. METHODS Participants with Axis I TMD diagnoses (n=626) completed the Axis II instruments (Depression, Nonspecific Physical Symptoms, Graded Chronic Pain) and other instruments assessing psychological distress, pain, and disability at three study sites. Internal consistency, temporal stability, and convergent/discriminant validity of the Axis II measures were assessed. To assess criterion validity of Depression and Nonspecific Physical Symptoms instruments as screeners, 170 participants completed a structured psychiatric diagnostic interview. RESULTS The Axis II instruments showed very good-excellent internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.80 – 0.95). Their convergent (correlation range 0.3–0.9) and discriminant (range 0.0–0.6) validity were generally supported, although Nonspecific Physical Symptoms was more strongly associated with depressive than with somatic symptoms. Temporal stability was high for characteristic pain intensity (Lin’s correlation concordance coefficient [CCC] = 0.91), interference (CCC = 0.89), and chronic pain grade (weighted kappa = 0.87), and fair-good for Depression and Nonspecific Physical Symptoms (CCC = 0.63 – 0.78). The Depression instrument normal vs moderate-severe cut-point was good at identifying current-year DSM-IV depression and dysthymia diagnoses (sensitivity 87%, specificity 53%). Nonspecific Physical Symptoms did not have high utility for detecting psychiatric disorders (sensitivity 86%, specificity 31%). CONCLUSION The Axis-II Depression and Graded Chronic Pain instruments have clinically relevant and acceptable psychometric properties for reliability and validity and utility as instruments for identifying TMD patients with high levels of distress, pain, and disability that can interfere with treatment response and course of Axis I disorders

  15. Self-management programmes in temporomandibular disorders: results from an international Delphi process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, J; Al-Baghdadi, M; Baad-Hansen, L; Breckons, M; Goulet, J P; Lobbezoo, F; List, T; Michelotti, A; Nixdorf, D R; Peck, C C; Raphael, K; Schiffman, E; Steele, J G; Story, W; Ohrbach, R

    2016-12-01

    Self-management (SM) programmes are commonly used for initial treatment of patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The programmes described in the literature, however, vary widely with no consistency in terminology used, components of care or their definitions. The aims of this study were therefore to construct an operationalised definition of self-management appropriate for the treatment of patients with TMD, identify the components of that self-management currently being used and create sufficiently clear and non-overlapping standardised definitions for each of those components. A four-round Delphi process with eleven international experts in the field of TMD was conducted to achieve these aims. In the first round, the participants agreed upon six principal concepts of self-management. In the remaining three rounds, consensus was achieved upon the definition and the six components of self-management. The main components identified and agreed upon by the participants to constitute the core of a SM programme for TMD were as follows: education; jaw exercises; massage; thermal therapy; dietary advice and nutrition; and parafunctional behaviour identification, monitoring and avoidance. This Delphi process has established the principal concepts of self-management, and a standardised definition has been agreed with the following components for use in clinical practice: education; self-exercise; self-massage; thermal therapy; dietary advice and nutrition; and parafunctional behaviour identification, monitoring and avoidance. The consensus-derived concepts, definitions and components of SM offer a starting point for further research to advance the evidence base for, and clinical utility of, TMD SM. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The impact of tinnitus on the quality of life in patients with temporomandibular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacerda, Adriana Bender Moreira de; Facco, Caroline; Zeigelboim, Bianca Simone; Cristoff, Killian; Stechman, José; Fonseca, Vinícius Ribas

    2016-07-22

    The most common otological symptoms in patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are ear fullness, tinnitus and ear pain. To evaluate the impact of tinnitus on the quality of life for patients with TMD. This is a quantitative, cross-sectional retrospective study. The sample consisted of 19 individuals with TMD, 17 (89.47%) females and 2 (10.53%) male, mean age 53.5 years. Data collection consisted of: anamnesis, pure tone audiometry, acuphenometry and application of the Portuguese version of the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (Brazilian THI). 63.12% had had tinnitus for less than five years, and 15.79% had tinnitus that sounded like whistling, rain and/or a cricket. There was a predominance of laterality in the right ear (42.11%). 52.63% of the subjects reported that their tinnitus is continuous, while 31.58% stated that it lasts for days, and 47.37% report that it is common. The audiometry revealed mean audiometric thresholds above 25 dB HL in the high frequencies (3000, 4000, 6000 and 8000 Hz) bilaterally. In acuphenometry, the average loudness of the tinnitus was 21 dB SL the right ear and 17.85 dB SL in the left ear, and the average tinnitus pitch was 3775 Hz in the right ear and 3750 Hz in the left ear. The total THI score was 37.8 points. It appears that there is significant correlation between the THI scale, time of tinnitus duration and its occurrence. Tinnitus reported in patients with TMD caused moderate impact on quality of life and can be seen in the presence of background noise although daily activities can still be performed.

  17. Effects of condylar head surface changes on mandibular position in patients with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yoo-Jin; Park, Soo-Byung; Kim, Yong-Il; Ok, Soo-Min; Kim, Seong-Sik; Son, Woo-Sung

    2015-10-01

    This study evaluated condylar surface changes in patients after temporomandibular (TMJ) osteoarthritis (OA) treatment, and used cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) to investigate the relationship between condylar surface and mandibular position changes. Thirty-six patients diagnosed with TMJ OA and receiving non-surgical treatments for TMJ OA were enrolled in this study. Patients were assigned to study groups according to the affected side. Those in the unilateral osteoarthritis (OAU) group (n = 20; 8 males and 12 females; aged 22.0 ± 11.5 years) had a unilateral condyle with TMJ OA, and those in the OAB group had bilateral TMJ OA (n = 16; 1 male and 15 females; aged 25.7 ± 6.4 years). Condylar surface and mandibular position changes were investigated by the superimposition of three-dimensional reconstructed images and CBCT data, respectively. For condylar surface changes, the average absolute deviation was 0.32 ± 0.08 mm for the OA side and 0.18 ± 0.03 mm for the non-OA side, a significant difference between sides (p mandibular position changes, measurement points that moved more than 2 mm were Pog, Me, and Mental foramen in both groups. The study results show that the mandible with both condyles affected moved backward and downward after TMJ OA treatment. In the patient ngroup with unilateral TMJ OA, there was deviation on the affected side and downward movement (p < 0.05). Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical evaluation of the low intensity laser antialgic action of GaAlAs ({lambda}=785 nm) in the treatment of the temporomandibular disorders; Avaliacao clinica da acao antialgica do laser em baixa intensidade de arseneto de galio e aluminio ({lambda}=785 nm) no tratamento das disfuncoes da articulacao temporo-mandibular

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    Sanseverino, Nelly Tichauer Maluf

    2001-07-01

    The therapy with laser emitting low intensity has been currently used in the most diverse fields of medicine as therapeutic conduct for pain. It is a non invasive, painless, non-thermal and aseptic type therapy, without any collateral effects, having a good cost/benefit relationship. However, for the therapy with low-intensity laser to result in positive effects, a correct diagnosis is fundamental, as well as a protocol of adequate application. n odontology, the majority of patients diagnosed with temporomandibular disorders (TMD), present pain and limitations in the movements of the jaw. In this work, a GaAlAs laser emitting low intensity, was used, {lambda}=785 nm, in patients having a dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint with a complaint of pain. Twenty patients were divided into two groups. The group treated received laser therapy in the temporomandibular articulations and in the muscles affected. The dose applied was 45 J/cm{sup 2}, while the ten patients in the control group received 0 J/cm{sup 2}, in a total of nine applications, carried out three times a week, during three weeks. he evaluation of the patients was made through clinical examinations of manual palpation of the masseter, temporal, cervical, posterior neck and sternocleidomastoid muscles, and measurements of opening and laterality of the mouth. The results obtained showed a diminishing of the pain and an increase of the mandibular mobility in the patients treated, when compared to the control group. These results point to this therapy as being an important tool in the treatment of pain in patients with a dysfunction in the TMJ, indicating this therapeutic modality as a co-adjuvant in these treatments. (author)

  19. Temporomandibular Disorders in Burning Mouth Syndrome Patients: An Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsalini, Massimo; Di Venere, Daniela; Pettini, Francesco; Lauritano, Dorina; Petruzzi, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS) is a chronic disease characterized by absence of any lesions and burning of the oral mucosa associated to a sensation of dry mouth and/or taste alterations. The purpose of our study is to estimate signs and symptoms of Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) in patients with BMS and to investigate for the existence of an association between BMS and TMD. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-four BMS patients were enrolled; BMS subtype was established according to the classification of Lamey. After a gnathological evaluation, according to the protocol of the European Academy of Craniomandibular Disorders, patients were classified by RDC/TMD criteria. The data were compared and analyzed using a chi-square test to describe the existence of an association between BMS and TMD. RESULTS: 65.9% the BMS patients showed disorders classified as primary signs and symptoms of TMD according to RDC / TMD criteria, and 72.7% showed parafunctional habits. The chi-square test revealed a statistically significant association (p = 0.035) between BMS and TMD. CONCLUSION: The data suggest that there is a possible relationship not yet well understood between BMS and TMD, may be for neurophatic alterations assumed for BMS that could be also engaged in TMD pathogenesis. PMID:24273452

  20. TEMPOROMANDIBULAR DYSFUNCTION, STRESS AND COMMON MENTAL DISORDER IN UNIVERSITY STUDENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augusto, Viviane Gontijo; Perina, Keity Cristina Bueno; Penha, Daniel Silva Gontijo; Dos Santos, Daiane Carolina Alves; Oliveira, Valéria Aparecida Souza

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) and its association with perceived stress and common mental disorder (CMD) in academic students. This is s transversal observational study conducted at Universidade de Minas Gerais, Divinópolis Unit, in health science courses. To investigate the prevalence of TMD, the anamnestic index by Fonseca was used. Stress was assessed by the perceived stress scale, translated and adapted for the Brazilian population in 2006. To track CMD, we used the Self-Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ-20). Data were analyzed using SPSS version 13.0, adopting a 5% significance level. The prevalence of TMD in the sample was 71.9%, distributed as follows: Light TMD (50.0%), moderate (16.4%) and severe (5.5%), being more frequent among women (76.4%). Common mental disorders were present in 29.9% of participants. The average perceived stress was 30.9. The results of this study allow us to conclude that there is a statistically significant correlation between TMD and variables such as parafunctional habits, perceived stress and CMD. Level of Evidence II, Development of diagnostic criteria on consecutive patients (with universally applied reference "gold" standard).

  1. Headaches and myofascial temporomandibular disorders: overlapping entities, separate managements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, P C R; Costa, Y M; Gonçalves, D A; Svensson, P

    2016-09-01

    There are relevant clinical overlaps between some of the painful temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and headache conditions that may hamper the diagnostic process and treatment. A non-systematic search for studies on the relationship between TMD and headaches was carried out in the following databases: PubMed, Cochrane Library and Embase. Important pain mechanisms contributing to the close association and complex relationship between TMD and headache disorders are as follows: processes of peripheral and central sensitisation which take place in similar anatomical areas, the possible impairment of the descending modulatory pain pathways and the processes of referred pain. In addition, the clinical examination does not always provide distinguishing information to differentiate between headaches and TMD. So, considering the pathophysiology and the clinical presentation of some types of headache and myofascial TMD, such overlap can be considered not only a matter of comorbid relationship, but rather a question of disorders where the distinction lines are sometimes hard to identify. These concerns are certainly reflected in the current classification systems of both TMD and headache where the clinical consequences of diagnosis such as headache attributed to or associated with TMD are uncertain. There are several similarities in terms of therapeutic strategies used to manage myofascial TMD and headaches. Considering all these possible levels of interaction, we reinforce the recommendation for multidisciplinary approaches, by a team of oro-facial pain specialists and a neurologist (headache specialist), to attain the most precise differential diagnosis and initiate the best and most efficient treatment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Reduced thermal threshold in patients with Temporomandibular Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, G F; Chaves, T C; Florencio, L L; Dach, F; Bigal, M E; Bevilaqua-Grossi, D

    2016-06-01

    Many studies have demonstrated the presence of somatosensory modulation changes at different sites in patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) using different modalities. However, the neck area, a well-know condition related to TMD, remains unexplored. To assess the thermal pain threshold in patients with TMD and controls at cephalic and extra-cephalic areas, including the neck. Twenty female patients with TMDs diagnosed by the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD) and twenty age-matched controls underwent a first interview about neck pain and disability (NDI questionnaire). A blinded evaluator assessed the thermal pain threshold for cold (CPT) and heat (HPT) stimuli in accordance with an ascending method of limits of the Quantitative Sensory Testing at the following sites: periorbital, masseter, cervical posterior and ventral forearm. The groups were compared using a t-test with α = 5%. Patients with TMDs reported pain at higher temperature for cold stimuli in all sites (P < 0·05) and at lower temperature for heat stimuli in the right periorbital site (P < 0·05) than controls. Pain and disability due tothis symptom were reported more often in the TMD group (P < 0·05). Patients with TMD have pain modulation changes in the neck area as well, especially for cold stimuli, associated with higher disability and a higher report of neck pain than controls. These findings reinforce the evidence regarding the relationship between TMDs and neck pain. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. [Understanding and treatment strategy for disc displacement of temporomandibular disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, X C

    2017-03-09

    Understanding and treatment strategy for disc displacement of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) were discussed in the present review. It has been strongly recommended by the author that the treatment strategy for disc displacement, one subtype of TMD, should be mainly the reversible conservative treatment methods. The most important goal of treatment for disc displacement is to recover the mobility and function of the joint in order to improve the quality of the patient's life. Comprehensive assessments both from somatic and psychological aspects for each TMD patient are necessary, especially for the patients with chronic pain. Although the role of surgical operative treatments is very limited in the general treatment strategy for TMD, it is still important for a few patients who had definite diagnosis of intra-articular disorders, severe symptoms affecting the quality of patient's life and failed to response to the correct conservative treatments. It should be very careful to treat the TMD patients by surgical operation or irreversible occlusion treatments changing the natural denture of the patient, such as full mouth occlusional reconstruction and extensive adjustment of occlusion.

  4. Effectiveness of two different splints to treat temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksakalli, Sertac; Temucin, Fatih; Pamukcu, Ayca; Ezirganlı, Seref; Kazancioglu, Hakki Oguz; Malkoc, Meral Arslan

    2015-07-01

    Nearly 5% of the the world's population has temporomandibular disorder (TMD) severe enough to make them seek treatment. A third of the total population has at least one TMD symptom. There are different types of splints to treat TMD. In our study, we compared the success of two different appliances [stabilization splint (ss), nociceptive trigeminal inhibition splint (NTI)] by using Fonseca's questionnaire, the OHQoL-UK and visual analog scale (VAS). A total of 40 patients suffering from TMD were included in this study and answered questionnaires twice, at the beginning of the treatment and 3 months later. Regarding TMD alone, 39 patients (97.5%) had some degree of the disorder, 7 of of these cases being mild (17.5%), 15 moderate (37.5%), and 17 severe (42.5%). We analyzed posttreatment changes compared to baseline. Pain complaints decreased in both groups, and the OHQoL-UK revealed better quality of life after treatment. Based on the posttreatment Fonseca's questionnaires, significant changes in the patients' complaints in the group SS (p 0.05). Patients in both groups had fewer TMD complaints after TMJ treatment. According to the Fonseca's questionnaire, the patients' major TMD complaint was clenching-grinding, followed by pain in the craniomandibular joint, or earache.

  5. Psychosocial aspects and temporomandibular disorders in dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Cibele Oliveira de Melo; Peixoto, Raniel Fernandes; Resende, Camila Maria Bastos Machado; Alves, Arthur César de Medeiros; Oliveira, Ângelo Giuseppe Roncalli da; Barbosa, Gustavo Augusto Seabra

    2017-01-01

    Dental students have high levels of anxiety that can affect not only academic performance but also increase the risk for other diseases. It is believed that the increase in the incidence of chronic orofacial pain in temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) may have an impact on the quality of life and general health of subjects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of TMD in dental students and its association with general health, quality of life, and anxiety. Ninety students were evaluated by four questionnaires to determine the prevalence and sever-ity of TMD (Fonseca's questionnaire) and to quantify general health (General Health Questionnaire - GHQ), quality of life (World Health Organization Quality of Life - Brief version - WHOQOL-brief) and anxiety levels (State-Trait Anxiety Index - STAI). Approximately 58.9% of dental students presented TMD. Among the indicators of general health, psychologic stress (P = .010), distrust in their own performance (P = .012), and psychosomatic disorders (P = .020) showed a statistically significant difference with the presence of TMD. The four areas proposed in the questionnaire regarding quality of life, such as physical (P = .016), psychologic (P < .001), social (P = .045), and environmental (P = .017) factors also showed significant differences with the presence of TMD. A high prevalence of TMD was observed in dental students. In addition, some psychologic domains are important psychosocial indicators associated with the presence of TMDs.

  6. Ex vivo thickness measurement of cartilage covering the temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirahmadi, Fereshteh; Koolstra, Jan Harm; Lobbezoo, Frank; van Lenthe, G Harry; Everts, Vincent

    2017-02-08

    Articular cartilage covers the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and provides smooth and nearly frictionless articulation while distributing mechanical loads to the subchondral bone. The thickness of the cartilage is considered to be an indicator of the stage of development, maturation, aging, loading history, and disease. The aim of our study was to develop a method for ex vivo assessment of the thickness of the cartilage that covers the TMJ and to compare that with two other existing methods. Eight porcine TMJ condyles were used to measure cartilage thickness. Three different methods were employed: needle penetration, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), and histology; the latter was considered the gold standard. Histology and micro-CT scanning results showed no significant differences between thicknesses throughout the condyle. Needle penetration produced significantly higher values than histology, in the lateral and anterior regions. All three methods showed the anterior region to be thinner than the other regions. We concluded that overestimated thickness by the needle penetration is caused by the penetration of the needle through the first layer of subchondral bone, in which mineralization is less than in deeper layers. Micro-CT scanning method was found to be a valid method to quantify the thickness of the cartilage, and has the advantage of being non-destructive. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A new surgical classification for temporomandibular joint disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitroulis, G

    2013-02-01

    The role of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) surgery is ill-defined, so a universal classification is needed to collate the evidence required to justify the surgical interventions undertaken to treat TMJ disorders. The aim of this article is to introduce a new classification that divides TMJ disorders into 5 categories of escalating degrees of joint disease that can be applied to TMJ surgery. Using a category scale from 1 to 5, with category 1 being normal, and category 5 referring to catastrophic changes to the joint, the new classification will provide the basis for enhanced quantitative and descriptive data collection that can be used in the field of TMJ surgery research and clinical practice. It is hoped that this new classification will form the basis of what will eventually become the universal standard surgical classification of TMJ disorders that will be adopted by both researchers and clinicians so that ultimately, the role of TMJ surgery will be based on evidence rather than conjecture. Copyright © 2012 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Temporomandibular joint fibrocartilage degeneration from unilateral dental splints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Sarah E; Lowe, Jesse R; Tudares, Mauro A; Gold, Michael S; Almarza, Alejandro J

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which altered loading in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), as might be associated with a malocclusion, drives degeneration of articulating surfaces in the TMJ. We therefore sought to quantify the effects of altered joint loading on the mechanical properties and biochemical content and distribution of TMJ fibrocartilage in the rabbit. Altered TMJ loading was induced with a 1mm splint placed unilaterally over the maxillary and mandibular molars for 6 weeks. At that time, TMJ fibrocartilage was assessed by compression testing, biochemical content (collagen, glycosaminoglycan (GAG), DNA) and distribution (histology), for both the TMJ disc and the condylar fibrocartilage. There were no changes in the TMJ disc for any of the parameters tested. The condylar fibrocartilage from the splinted animals was significantly stiffer and the DNA content was significantly lower than that in control animals. There was significant remodeling in the condylar fibrocartilage layers as manifested by a change in GAG and collagen II distribution and a loss of defined cell layers. A connection between the compressive properties of TMJ condylar fibrocartilage after 6 weeks of splinting and the changes in histology was observed. These results suggest a change in joint loading leads to condylar damage, which may contribute to pain associated with at least some forms of TMJ disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Impact of Temporomandibular Joint Pain in Rheumatoid Arthritis

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    Neveen Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the impact of temporomandibular joint (TMJ pain on daily activities and quality of life in relation to systemic inflammatory activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA, thirty-three consecutive outpatients with RA were included. TMJ pain intensity at rest, on maximum mouth opening, and on chewing was assessed on a 0–10 numerical rating scale. TMJ palpatory tenderness, degree of anterior open bite, the impact of TMJ pain on daily activities and quality of life were also assessed. The systemic inflammatory activity was estimated by the disease activity score 28 (DAS28, blood levels of inflammatory markers and number of painful musculoskeletal regions. TMJ pain at rest, on maximum mouth opening, and on chewing as well as DAS28 was correlated with the impact of the TMJ pain on daily activities and quality of life. Partial correlations showed a significant interaction between TMJ pain on movement and DAS28 that explained the TMJ pain impact on daily activities and quality of life to a significant degree. This study indicates that both current TMJ pain intensity and systemic inflammatory activity play roles in the impact of TMJ pain on daily living and quality of life in RA.

  10. Chronic Temporomandibular Disorders: disability, pain intensity and fear of movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Martínez, Alfonso; Grande-Alonso, Mónica; López-de-Uralde-Villanueva, Ibai; López-López, Almudena; Fernández-Carnero, Josué; La Touche, Roy

    2016-12-01

    The objective was to compare and correlate disability, pain intensity, the impact of headache on daily life and the fear of movement between subgroups of patients with chronic temporomandibular disorder (TMD). A cross-sectional study was conducted in patients diagnosed with chronic painful TMD. Patients were divided into: 1) joint pain (JP); 2) muscle pain (MP); and 3) mixed pain. The following measures were included: Craniomandibular pain and disability (Craniofacial pain and disability inventory), neck disability (Neck Dsiability Index), pain intensity (Visual Analogue Scale), impact of headache (Headache Impact Test 6) and kinesiophobia (Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia-11). A total of 154 patients were recruited. The mixed pain group showed significant differences compared with the JP group or MP group in neck disability (p pain and disability (p pain and disability for the MP group (β = 0.62; p pain group, neck disability (β = 0.40; p pain and disability. Mixed chronic pain patients show greater craniomandibular and neck disability than patients diagnosed with chronic JP or MP. Neck disability predicted the variance of craniofacial pain and disability for patients with MP. Neck disability and kinesiophobia predicted the variance of craniofacial pain and disability for those with chronic mixed pain.

  11. Sustained Inflammation Induces Degeneration of the Temporomandibular Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.D.; Kou, X.X.; Mao, J.J.; Gan, Y.H.; Zhou, Y.H.

    2012-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) undergoes degenerative changes among patients who suffer from arthritis, and yet the pathogenesis of TMJ osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis is poorly understood. We hypothesized that sustained inflammation in the TMJ induces structural abnormalities, and accordingly characterized the disc and synovium in a novel model with double injections of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA), using behavioral, morphological, cellular, and molecular assessments. Thirty-five days following double CFA injections in seven-week-old female Sprague-Dawley rats, the disc in the CFA-induced inflammation group demonstrated multiple degenerative changes, including marked thickening, opacity, and deformation. The discs in the CFA group further showed significantly greater wet and net weights, and elevated collagen, aggrecan, and total glycosaminoglycan contents. The synovium in the CFA-induced inflammation group showed marked infiltration of mononucleated cells and accumulated sub-synovial adipose tissue. Both the disc and synovium had significantly higher iNOS and IL-1β mRNA expression than controls (saline injections). These findings are consistent with our hypothesis that sustained TMJ inflammation, even within the presently observed 35 days, may be a predisposing factor for structural abnormalities. Insight into TMJ inflammation and degeneration is anticipated to improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of TMJ arthritis and help design clinically relevant strategies for tissue engineering. PMID:22427270

  12. Effusion in magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nah, Kyung Soo [Pusan National University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the distribution and frequency of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) effusion in magnetic resonance (MR) images of patients with disc displacements. On T2 weighted MR images of 148 TMJs taken from 74 patients presenting with TMJ pain and dysfunction, we assessed the cases showing TMJ effusion, defined as an amount of fluid that exceeded the maximum amount seen in a control group of asymptomatic volunteers. The amount of TMJ fluid was graded as: I (none or minimal), II (moderate), III (marked), and IV (extensive), according to a standard set by a reference. Disc displacement categories were also recorded. Of the 148 TMJs examined in this study, 52 joints (35.1%) presented with joint effusion, 24 (16.2%) showing bilateral joint effusion. 38 joints showed upper joint space effusion, and 3 showed lower joint space effusion, and 11 showed both upper and lower joint space effusion. 96 joints (64.9%) had grade I joint fluid, 27 (18.2%) grade II, 15 (10.1%) grade III, and 10 (6.8%) grade IV. 80.0% of the joints presenting with grade IV effusion showed disc displacement without reduction. Joint effusion was found not only in upper, but also in lower joint spaces. The higher the effusion grade, the greater the frequency of disc displacement without reduction.

  13. A prospective study of 138 arthroscopies of the temporomandibular joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Alexandre da Silva

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Internal derangements (ID of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ have a multifactorial etiology and are most often treated conservatively by splints, physical therapy and medications. Only in 2-5% of cases are the treatment surgical, either by arthroscopy or arthrotomy.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate improvement of mouth opening, pain relief during function, position of the articular disk and complications following Arthroscopic Lyse and Lavage (ALL.METHODS: A prospective study of 78 patients (138 TMJs with TMJ ID, 5 males and 73 females, mean age 29.7 years, treated between January 2010 and April 2013, who were refractory to conservative treatment, had limited mouth opening and pain localized to the TMJ during function, and who were submitted to TMJ ALL and followed for a period of 12 months, with periodic reviews.RESULTS: ALL was effective in 93.6% of cases, with 85.3% experiencing improvement in mouth opening and 91.2% in pain reduction during function, 63% improvement in disk position and a rate of complications of 6.2%.CONCLUSION: In this study the ALL exhibited a high rate of success with low morbidity in internal derangements of the TMJ.

  14. Radiological Evaluation of Temporomandibular Joint Disorders Followed by Clinical Symptoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Tae Won; You Dong Soo [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-11-15

    The authors analyzed the clinical findings, radiological findings and their correlations in the temporomandibular joint disorders. 1. The most prevalent age group was in the first decade, then the second decade and the third decade. Female were more common with a ratio of 3.4 : 1. 2. The most common clinical findings was the pain on open mouth position (42.43%), then came the clicking and limitation of mouth opening. 3. The most common bone change on the condyle side was the erosion, then came the flattening, the osteopyte and the sclerosis in that orders. 4. In the case of the crepitus, the coarse crepitus showed more radiological change than the fine crepitus. 5. In the case of the mouth opening limitation, the evaluation of the translatory movement by transcranial projection was in accordance with the clinical evaluation. 6. The correlation between the clinical symptom and the condylar position within the mandibular fossa was not present and in the case of diagnosis of disc displacement, the transcranial projection seemed not to be able to substitute for the arthrography. 7. Radiographically, the most prevalent age group which showed the bone change was in the first, the second and the third decade. And the bone change seemed to have no relationship with aging.

  15. Roentgenographic study of the temporomandibular joint in rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Ho Jung; You, Dong Soo [Department of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-11-15

    For the study of the temporomandibular joint in rheumatoid arthritis 30 patients were selected who were diagnosis as rheumatoid arthritis through the clinical, radiographic examination and laboratory finding. Temporoman dibular joint involvement was evaluated through the clinical, radiographic examination. The results were as follows; 1. TMJ was involved in 15 patients of 30 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. (50% involvement). 2. Duration of rheumatoid arthritis was more longer in patients with TMJ involvement than in patients without TMJ involvement. 3. Osseous changes in TMJ were in order of frequency erosion, flattening, osteophyte, sclerosis, deformity, and most common involved site was mandibular condyle. 4. Most common positional change of condyle was forward position in centric occlusion, and restricted movement of condyle in 1 inch mouth opening. 5. TMJ involvement of rheumatoid arthritis was almost bilateral. 6. Main symptoms of TMJ were pain, stiffness, tenderness, limitation of mouth opening, crepitation. 7. There was not the case of ankylosis. 8. There was statistically insignificant correlation between mandibular deviation and TMJ involvement, but some cases showed severe deviation on mouth opening.

  16. Causes of persistent joint pain after arthrocentesis of temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Kosuke; Yasukawa, Yoko; Fujiwara, Masanori; Abe, Tetsuya; Urade, Masahiro

    2011-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to elucidate the factors responsible for the failure of arthrocentesis to cure persistent joint pain in patients with nonreducing articular disc displacement in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Thirty-six patients with internal derangement of the TMJ were selected. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to examine the configuration and position of the articular discs, cortical changes, and bone marrow abnormalities in the condyle and the presence of joint effusion. Arthrocentesis was then performed, and the patients were followed for 6 weeks. The results were then classified as poor or improved. The effects of arthrocentesis did not depend on the configuration of the disc, disc position and motion, or bone marrow abnormalities. Joints with no or minimal amounts of joint effusion achieved a good response to arthrocentesis. Joints with erosive cortical changes of the condyle were less responsive to arthrocentesis. Persistent joint pain after arthrocentesis is generally associated with extensive amounts of joint effusion or erosive cortical changes of the condyle. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Diclofenac sodium as an alternative treatment of temporomandibular joint pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekberg, E C; Kopp, S; Akerman, S

    1996-06-01

    In a double-blind study, diclofenac sodium (Voltaren), 50 mg two or three times a day, was compared with placebo in 32 patients with pain localized to the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The patients were allocated into two equally large groups. A visual analog scale was used to estimate the pretreatment degree of pain. The treatment effect was assessed as the frequency of joint and muscle pain and by the patients' own evaluation of improvement. The change in the clinical condition was assessed by tenderness to palpation of the TMJ and masticatory muscles and by mandibular mobility. The frequency of TMJ pain showed a greater reduction in the diclofenac group than in the placebo group, and there was a significant reduction of daily TMJ pain in the diclofenac group. The diclofenac group also showed a significant decrease in tenderness to palpation of the masticatory muscles in comparison with the placebo group. The patients with short duration of pain showed the best response to diclofenac. There was no evidence in this study to prove that diclofenac should be used as a primary treatment of TMJ pain, but it could be used as a complement to other treatments of acute TMJ pain.

  18. Effects of orofacial myofunctional therapy on temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Felício, Cláudia Maria; de Oliveira, Melchior Melissa; da Silva, Marco Antonio Moreira Rodrigues

    2010-10-01

    The objectives of the current study were to analyze the effects of orofacial myofunctional therapy (OMT) on the treatment of subjects with associated articular and muscular temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Thirty subjects with associated articular and muscular TMD, according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC/TMD), were randomly divided into groups: 10 were treated with OMT (T group), 10 with an occlusal splint (OS group), and 10 untreated control group with TMD (SC). Ten subjects without TMD represented the asymptomatic group (AC). All subjects had a clinical examination and were interviewed to determine Helkimo's Indexes (Di and Ai), the frequency and severity of signs and symptoms, and orofacial myofunctional evaluation. During the diagnostic phase, there were significant differences between groups T and AC. There were no significant differences between group T and OC and SC groups. During the final phase, groups T and OS presented significant improvement, however, the group T presented better results and differed significantly from group OS regarding the number of subjects classified as Aill; the severity of muscular pain and TMJ pain; the frequency of headache and the muscles and stomatognathic functions. The group T differed significantly from the SC group but no longer differed significantly from the AC group. OMT favored a significant reduction of pain sensitivity to palpation of all muscles studied but not for the TMJs; an increased measure of mandibular range of motion; reduced Helkimo's Di and Ai scores; reduced frequency and severity of signs and symptoms; and increased scores for orofacial myofunctional conditions.

  19. Cervical spine alignment and hyoid bone positioning with temporomandibular disorders.

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    Andrade, A V; Gomes, P F; Teixeira-Salmela, L F

    2007-10-01

    The relationships between temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders and cervical structure dysfunctions have already been demonstrated. The aim of the present study was to investigate functional and structural alterations of the head and neck of 17 individuals with TMJ disorders (TMD group), compared with a control group of 17 asymptomatic subjects in a cross-sectional design. The outcome variables included pain on palpation of the sternocleidomastoideus, superior trapezius and subocciptal muscles, as well as radiographic measures of alignment of the cervical spine and positioning of the hyoid bone. Cervical alignment, determined by measures of the cervical curvature angle, was investigated by the Cobb method. Independent Student t-tests were used to investigate differences between groups for all outcome variables (alpha TMJ disorders, when compared with asymptomatic subjects, presented higher levels of perception of pain in all cervical muscles (P < 0.0001). No significant differences were found between groups for the cervical alignment measures. In the TMD group, the position of the hyoid bone in relation to the cervical spine did not appear to be different from the control group.

  20. Microvascular temporomandibular joint and mandibular ramus reconstruction in hemifacial microsomia.

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    Vilkki, S K; Hukki, J; Nietosvaara, Y; Hurmerinta, K; Suominen, E

    2002-11-01

    Microvascular temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and mandibular ramus reconstruction was performed in a 4-year-old hemifacial microsomia patient with multiple craniofacial and extracranial anomalies (Goldenhar syndrome). Her major craniofacial anomalies included bilateral cleft lip and palate, left macrostomia, left microtia, and complete absence of the left vertical mandibular ramus and TMJ. Most of her other anomalies had been corrected surgically before TMJ and vertical mandibular ramus reconstruction, which was accomplished with a metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint transplantation. The MTP joint was placed in hyperextended position in the skull base inserting the proximal phalanx under the remnants of the zygomatic arch and replacing the vertical mandibular ramus with the metatarsal bone. Straight mouth opening, correction of the midline, and normalized lateral movements of the mandible were accomplished. The graft includes two epiphyseal plates, which should maintain growth of the transplant. During the follow-up period (16 months) the achieved results have been maintained without adverse effects. The present technique appears to be a promising alternative in the treatment of children with Pruzansky type 3 hemifacial microsomia.

  1. Signs of bruxism and temporomandibular disorders among psychiatric patients.

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    Winocur, Ephraim; Hermesh, Hagay; Littner, Dan; Shiloh, Roni; Peleg, Liat; Eli, Ilana

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of bruxism and signs of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) among psychiatric patients compared with a healthy population and to assess the effect of psychiatric medications on the parameters studied. Subjects included 77 psychiatric patients under treatment at 2 psychiatric hospitals in Israel and 50 healthy individuals (control). One experienced calibrated examiner performed the clinical examination (presence of bruxism and signs of TMD). Abnormal attrition was evident in 46.8% of the psychiatric patients compared with 20% in the controls (P prevalence of joint clicks and no association between time of receiving treatment with dopamine antagonists (or any other psychotropic drugs) and TMD signs and symptoms. The higher prevalence of bruxism and signs of TMD in psychiatric patients is a major clinical comorbidity. Whether it is a manifestation of the abnormal central nervous system of psychiatric patients or neuroleptic-induced phenomenon deserves further attention. The exact factors that affect the pain experience in these patients should be evaluated as well.

  2. Occlusal effects on longitudinal bone alterations of the temporomandibular joint.

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    Zhang, J; Jiao, K; Zhang, M; Zhou, T; Liu, X-D; Yu, S-B; Lu, L; Jing, L; Yang, T; Zhang, Y; Chen, D; Wang, M-Q

    2013-03-01

    The pathological changes of subchondral bone during osteoarthritis (OA) development in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the longitudinal alterations of subchondral bone using a rat TMJ-OA model developed in our laboratory. Changes in bone mass were examined by micro-CT, and changes in osteoblast and osteoclast activities were analyzed by real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry, and TRAP staining. Subchondral bone loss was detected from 8 weeks after dental occlusion alteration and reached the maximum at 12 weeks, followed by a repair phase until 32 weeks. Although bone mass increased at late stages, poor mechanical structure and lower bone mineral density (BMD) were found in these rats. The numbers of TRAP-positive cells were increased at 12 weeks, while the numbers of osteocalcin-expressing cells were increased at both 12 and 32 weeks. Levels of mRNA expression of TRAP and cathepsin K were increased at 12 weeks, while levels of ALP and osteocalcin were increased at both 12 and 32 weeks. These findings demonstrated that there is an active bone remodeling in subchondral bone in TMJs in response to alteration in occlusion, although new bone was formed with lower BMD and poor mechanical properties.

  3. Analysis of sagittal condyl inclination in subjects with temporomandibular disorders

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    Dodić Slobodan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacground/Aim. Disturbances of mandibular border movements is considered to be one of the major signs of temporomandibular disorders (TMD. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possible association between disturbances of mandibular border movements and the presence of symptoms of TMD in the young. Methods. This study included two groups of volunteers between 18 and 26 years of age. The study group included 30 examineers with signs (symptoms of TMD, and the control group also included 30 persons without any signs (symptoms of TMD. The presence of TMD was confirmed according to the craniomandibular index (Helkimo. The functional analysis of mandibular movements was performed in each subject using the computer pantograph. Results. The results of this study did not confirm any significant differences between the values of the condylar variables/sagittal condylar inclination, length of the sagital condylar guidance, in the control and in the study group. Conclusion. The study did not confirm significant differences in the length and inclination of the protrusive condylar guidance, as well as in the values of the sagittal condylar inclination between the subjects with the signs and symptoms of TMD and the normal asymptomatic subjects.

  4. Primary headaches interfere with the efficacy of temporomandibular disorders management

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    André Luís PORPORATTI

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate the influence of Primary Headache (PH on efficacy of a Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD conservative therapy and its association with the presence of self-reported parafunctional habits. SAMPLE AND METHODS: Sample was composed of 400 medical records, divided into four groups: I Muscular TMD (n=64; II Muscular TMD+PH (n=48; III Muscular TMD+Articular TMD (n=173; IV Muscular TMD+Articular TMD+PH (n=115. All groups had undergone a TMD therapy for three months with a stabilization appliance and counseling for habits and behavioral changes, with no specific headache management. Current pain intensity and existence or not of self-reported bruxism were assessed. Repeated measures ANOVA and Chi-Square test followed by Odds were used for statistical analysis, with a significance level of 5%. RESULTS: results of this study showed that: (1 A conservative therapy with stabilization appliance and counseling for habits and behavioral changes was effective in the TMD pain relief; (2 Groups with an additional diagnosis of PH had worsened the pain improvement significantly; and (3 no association between the presence of self-reported bruxism and PH was found. CONCLUSIONS: this study could elucidate the important effect that headache may have on the TMD management.

  5. Anquilosis postraumatica unilateral de la articulación temporomandibular

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    Ivan Alberto Manotas Arévalo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available La Anquilosis Temporomandibular en una afección manifestada como la limitación del movimiento del cóndilo articular mandibular dentro de la cavidad glenoide del hueso temporal. Son frecuentes las osificaciones de las estructuras articulares intrínsecas, y en algunos otros casos fibrosis de las estructuras intrínsecas y extrínsecas que impiden la dinámica articular adecuada. Los pacientes afectados, generalmente niños y adultos jóvenes, limitan poco a poco su movilidad articular llegando a la inmovilización total de su mandíbula, con las subsecuentes alteraciones para la ingesta de alimentos sólidos, para la deglución, higiene bucal, erupción dental adecuada y para toda la fisiología bucomaxilar y la estética facial. Su corrección quirúrgica representa un reto pues se debe eliminar la masa osificada articular, reponer la fisiología articular, recuperar la estética facial y evitar la recurrencia.

  6. A Young Patient with Temporomandibular Joint Osteoarthritis: Case Report

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    Iva Alajbeg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a case of a young patient who sought help because of pain in the right temporomandibular joint (TMJ. She also reported increasing of pain during chewing. Clinical examination revealed limited mouth opening with uncorrected deviation to the ipsilateral side. Palpation of the lateral pole of the right condyle discovered crepitus, and maximum assisted opening elicited a report of “familiar pain”. The diagnosis of osteoarthritis of the TMJ (RDC / TMD criteria, Axis I, Group III was confirmed by CBCT of TMJ. There is no “gold standard” for the management of TMD, but the need for TMD treatment has to be based on precise indications related to the presence of pain, limitation in function of the lower jaw and signs of degenerative joint disease. Conservative, reversible therapeutic procedures are considered as the first choice for TMD treatment and their task is to improve the function of the entire masticatory system. In this case patient was treated with the combination of physical therapy and stabilization splint, in order to reduce the pain and restore the normal function of the lower jaw. At 6 months’ follow-up symptoms have almost completely disappeared, while 3 years later, the patient still has no significant subjective symptoms. In the present case non-invasive therapy was sufficient to bring, otherwise recurrent nature of osteoarthritis, in complete remission and keep it like that for years.

  7. Methadone treatment, bruxism, and temporomandibular disorders among male prisoners.

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    Enguelberg-Gabbay, Judith V; Schapir, Lior; Israeli, Yair; Hermesh, Haggai; Weizman, Abraham; Winocur, Ephraim

    2016-06-01

    There is little information on bruxism related to illicit drug use. Prolonged drug use may damage the stomatognathic system via oral motor overactivity. The aim of the present study was to compare the rates of bruxism and temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) between prisoners with and without drug-use disorders, to evaluate the association between methadone treatment and bruxism and to assess the possible relationship between bruxism and pain. The sample included 152 male prisoners, 69 of whom were drug users maintained on methadone. All prisoners were examined by an experienced dentist and completed a questionnaire on their oral habits, with the aim of detecting signs or symptoms of TMD and/or bruxism. Additional data were collected from medical files. The prevalence of sleep bruxism and awake bruxism, but not of TMDs, was significantly higher among drug-user than non-drug user prisoners (52.2% vs. 34.9% for sleep bruxism, 59.7% vs. 30.1% for awake bruxism, and 46.3% vs. 25.6% for TMDs, respectively). Participants with awake bruxism were statistically more sensitive to muscle palpation compared with participants with sleep bruxism [rating scores (mean ± SD): 0.32 ± 0.21 vs. 0.19 ± 0.28, respectively]. An association was found between sleep bruxism and awake bruxism. It seems that there is a direct or an indirect association between methadone maintenance treatment and sleep bruxism or awake bruxism in male prisoners. © 2016 Eur J Oral Sci.

  8. MR findings of the temporomandibular joint with crepitus

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    Sano, Tsukasa; Yamamoto, Mika; Yamaga, Takayoshi; Takahashi, Koji; Masuda, Saeko; Tagaya, Atsuko; Michi, Ken-ichi; Okano, Tomohiro [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Dentistry

    1997-06-01

    Crepitus is an important sign for diagnosis of arthrosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The presence of crepitus can be evaluated by the listening test previously proposed by our group. However, TMJ can be diagnosed by MR imaging showing the disc position and related findings including bony changes and joint effusion. This study investigated the relationship between the presence of crepitus and pathology of the joint. Fourteen joints with crepitus diagnosed by the listening test were examined in this study. TMJ was categorized into four types based on findings on double spin echo MR images. The results were as follows: Of fourteen joints with crepitus, five (36%) were showed as normal superior disc position. The remaining 9 joints (64%) were diagnosed with disc displacement, of which, 6 showed reduction, one was without reduction and 2 without reduction were associated with arthrosis. Statistical analysis using the data obtained here and other data showed that the joints with crepitus tended to show disk displacement. There was no significant difference between the degree of certainty about the presence of the crepitus and the distribution of joint pathology. Joint effusion was observed only in the joints with displacement. These results indicated that TMJ with crepitus is associated with varied joint pathology. (author)

  9. Relationship of Occlusal Schemes with the Occurrence of Temporomandibular Disorders

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    Dina H. Sugiaman

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Masticatory system is a complex functional unit of the body responsible for mastication, speech, and deglutition process. Temporomandibular disorders (TMD is used to describe all functional disturbances of the masticatory system. The etiology of TMD is multifactorial, such as occlusal disharmony and emotional stress. The relationship between occlusion and TMD has been highly debated in dentistry, one of the occlusal factors is the occlusal scheme. Occlusal schemes are defined as bilateral canine guidance, unilateral canine guidance, group function and balanced occlusion. However, studies about the relationship of occlusal schemes and the occurrence of the TMD are still limited and remained controversial. Objective: To investigate the relationship of occlusal schemes witht he occurrence of TMD. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted at the Faculty of Dentistry, Uniiversitas Indonesia. A total of 127 students were included in this study. Subjects were examined based on Clinical Helkimo Index and divided into TMD and non-TMD groups. Subjects were categorized as non-TMD groups if the value of the clinical Helkimo index was 0 and as TMD group when the value ranged between 1-25. Results: Balanced occlusion schemes has a greater risk of TMD occurrence with odds ratio value 5.6 and 95% confidence interval 1.188 to 26.331 (p=0.021. Conclusion: Balanced occlusion has a significant relationship with the occurrence of TMD.

  10. Assessment of temporomandibular and cervical spine disorders in tinnitus patients.

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    Björne, Assar

    2007-01-01

    In treating patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction it was noticed that tinnitus and vertigo were common in such patients and there was also muscular tension in jaw and neck. During treatment of these patients it was also noted that injection of lidocaine in a jaw muscle (m. pt. lat.) reduced not only their muscular problems but also that the tinnitus was reduced while the local anesthetic was active. Evaluation of 39 patients with disabling tinnitus, and all suffered from tinnitus, revealed that 10 of them had bilateral tinnitus and TMJ disorders revealed that pain in the face, temples or jaw occurred often among these patients. Many of such patients had also symptoms of cervical spine disorders, head, neck and shoulder pain, and limitations in side bending and rotation were also frequent complaints. One-third of these patients could influence tinnitus by jaw movements and 75% could trigger vertigo by head or neck movements. Treatment of jaw and neck disorders in 24 patients with Ménière's disease had a beneficial effect on not only their episodic vertigo but also on their tinnitus and aural fullness. At the 3-year follow-up, intensity of all symptoms were significantly reduced (p<0.001).

  11. [Different types of injection in temporomandibular disorders (TMD) treatment].

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    Batifol, D

    2016-09-01

    Intramuscular injections of botulinum toxin of type A (BoNTA) can release tension from masticatory and cervical muscles. Intra-articular injections relieve pain and sometimes diminish joint clicking and locking that occur during mouth opening. Intramuscular injection of BoNTA is performed in our department since 2002. Injected muscles are masseter and temporal muscles. Later on, intra-articular injections of sodium hyaluronate were added, followed on a later stage by intra-articular injections of BoNTA for patients presenting with pain higher than 5/10 on an analogic visual scale. Eighty-five percent of the patients treated with intramuscular BoNTA injection improved. Total or partial pain relief was obtained in 95 % of the patients after intra-articular sodium hyaluronate injections. Seventy-six percent of the 56 patients treated by mean of intra-articular BoNTA injections improved, sometimes with a complete pain relief. These different techniques allow for good results, even if they do not represent a revolution in the treatment of temporomandibular disorders. In the hands of experienced practitioners, they have a low morbidity, are well accepted and are cost-effective. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  12. Temporomandibular disorders and painful comorbidities: clinical association and underlying mechanisms.

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    Costa, Yuri Martins; Conti, Paulo César Rodrigues; de Faria, Flavio Augusto Cardoso; Bonjardim, Leonardo Rigoldi

    2017-03-01

    The association between temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and headaches, cervical spine dysfunction, and fibromyalgia is not artefactual. The aim of this review is to describe the comorbid relationship between TMD and these three major painful conditions and to discuss the clinical implications and the underlying pain mechanisms involved in these relationships. Common neuronal pathways and central sensitization processes are acknowledged as the main factors for the association between TMD and primary headaches, although the establishment of cause-effect mechanisms requires further clarification and characterization. The biomechanical aspects are not the main factors involved in the comorbid relationship between TMD and cervical spine dysfunction, which can be better explained by the neuronal convergence of the trigeminal and cervical spine sensory pathways as well as by central sensitization processes. The association between TMD and fibromyalgia also has supporting evidence in the literature, and the proposed main mechanism underlying this relationship is the impairment of the descending pain inhibitory system. In this particular scenario, a cause-effect relationship is more likely to occur in one direction, that is, fibromyalgia as a risk factor for TMD. Therefore, clinical awareness of the association between TMD and painful comorbidities and the support of multidisciplinary approaches are required to recognize these related conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Role of upper cervical spine in temporomandibular disorders.

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    Raya, Cristian Rodolfo; Plaza-Manzano, Gustavo; Pecos-Martín, Daniel; Ferragut-Garcías, Alejandro; Martín-Casas, Patricia; Gallego-Izquierdo, Tomás; Romero-Franco, Natalia

    2017-08-03

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are prevalent multifactorial pathologies in which the actual role of the cervical region position is controversial. To analyze the relationship between the position of the upper cervical rachis and the symptoms of TMD. Sixty women were recruited to this study. All of them completed a questionnaire and were subjected to a temporomadibular exploration to create two different groups: a TMD Group (n= 30) - women who suffered TMD symptoms according to the evaluation; and a control group (n= 30) - women who were free from TMD symptoms. Two X-ray examinations were performed in all the women: a lateral one and a frontal one with mouth open to assess the C1-C0 distance and the craniocervical angle. ANOVA showed that the TMD and control women had similar C1-C0 distances and craniocervical angles (p> 0.05). Pearson correlation did not indicate any relationship between the craniocervical position and the symptomatology of TMD (r=- 0.070). TMD symptomatology is unrelated to alterations in craniocervical position (C0-C1 distance and craniocervical angle). Women with and without TMD showed a similar prevalence of alteration in the craniocervical position.

  14. The Pursuit of Happiness, Stress and Temporomandibular Disorders

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    D. Marcus

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Mismanaging the pursuit of happiness causes negative psychological effects such as stress and disappointment. The resultant stress often manifests itself as psychological and physical health problems. We explore the problems of measuring happiness according to materialistic wealth and demonstrate that misinterpreting happiness can lead to a stress inducing pursuit. The happiness that human beings pursue is often material-based hedonism whereas eudaimonic happiness has been shown to be a by-product of the pursuit of meaningful activities. Pursuing a predefined happiness, the failure to achieve it and the resistance to it can create stress induced psychosomatic health problems; temporomandibular disorders (TMD are one such example. Masticatory myofascial pain syndrome is a form of TMD that has a strong association to psychological stress. In this paper the research on TMD associated facial pain across different socioeconomic status (SES groups is utilized to compare an objective, stress related physiological disorder with happiness data. We also discuss how the pressures of pursuing socially determined aesthetic happiness such as conforming to society’s expectations of smile and facial aesthetics can drive people to make surgical or orthodontic changes. This review proposes that pursuing happiness has the propensity to cause not only psychological stress but also negative behaviors. We aim to encourage further scientific research that will help to clarify this philosophical pursuit.

  15. Temporomandibular disorders and parafunctional oral habits: an anamnestic study

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    Melissa de Oliveira Melchior

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the frequency and severity of the signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD, the frequency of parafunctional oral habits and the correlation between the variables by means of the patients' perception regarding their problem. METHODS: One hundred patients diagnosed with TMD, through a clinical examination of their masticatory system, answered the questions of a previously published protocol concerning the signs and symptoms most frequently reported in the literature. RESULTS: According to the results from the non parametric statistical analysis, the frequency for the following signs and symptoms was significant: Fatigue and muscle pain, joint sounds, tinnitus, ear fullness, headache, chewing impairment and difficulty to yawn (p<0.01 and otalgia (p<0.05. As to the parafunctional oral habits, there was a significant presence of teeth clenching during the day and night (p<0.01 and teeth grinding at night (p<0.05. The variable correlation analysis showed that there was a positive correlation between symptom frequency and severity; age was correlated with the presence of otalgia, cervical pain and teeth sensitivity, besides being correlated with muscle and joint pain severity. Habit frequency was negatively correlated with age. TMD duration was also positively correlated with the symptoms of tinnitus, ear fullness, muscle and joint pain. CONCLUSION: The study results showed that the anamnestic assessment using ProDTMMulti can predict the severity of the TMD case.

  16. Temporomandibular Disorders and Headache: A Retrospective Analysis of 1198 Patients

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    Carlo Di Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Headache is one of the most common diseases associated with Temporomandibular Disorders (TMDs. The aim of this study was to evaluate, retrospectively, if headache influences TMD’s symptoms. Material and Methods. A total sample of 1198 consecutive TMD patients was selected. After a neurological examination, a diagnosis of headache, according to the latest edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, was performed in 625 subjects. Patients were divided into two groups based on presence/absence of headache: Group with Headache (GwH and Group without Headache (GwoH. Descriptive statistics and Chi-square index were performed. Results. Sociodemographic (gender, marital status, and occupation and functional factors, occlusion (occlusal and skeletal classes, dental formula, and occlusal abnormalities, and familiar pain did not show a statistically significant correlation in either group. Intensity and frequency of neck pain, arthralgia of TMJ, and myalgia showed higher correlation values in GwH. Conclusion. This study is consistent with previous literature in showing a close relationship between headache and TMD. All data underlines that headache makes pain parameters more intense and frequent. Therefore, an early and multidisciplinary treatment of TMDs should be performed in order to avoid the overlay of painful events that could result in pain chronicity.

  17. [Prevalence of temporomandibular disorders in Mexican children with mixed dentition].

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    Ramírez-Caro, Silvia N; Espinosa de Santillana, Irene A; Muñoz-Quintana, Gabriel

    2015-04-01

    Objective To determine and compare with reports in the bibliography, the prevalence of temporomandibular disorders with an instrument validated for Mexican children with mixed dentition. Methods 150 children, from 8 to 12 years of age and of any sex who attended the pediatric stomatology clinic of the BUAP (Meritorious Autonomous University of Puebla) were included and evaluated with the diagnostic criteria for research on TTM (CDI/TTM) by a researcher who had been previously standardized (kappa=0.93). The results contrasted with reports in the bibliography. Results The prevalence of TTM was 20.7%. It was predominantly muscular (77.4%), though 33.3% showed alteration of the mouth-opening pattern, 34% showed joint noises (clicks). The most compromised mandibular function was chewing (6%). These results contrast with reports in the bibliography, specifically in terms of muscle pain sites and headaches, probably explained by different instruments used. Conclusion The prevalence of TTM is in contrast among different studies. It is necessary to place emphasis on the need to evaluate these factors during the childhood and adolescence with validated instruments.

  18. Comparison of the Effects of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation and Low-Level Laser Therapy on Drug-Resistant Temporomandibular Disorders.

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    Rezazadeh, Fahimeh; Hajian, Khadijeh; Shahidi, Shoaleh; Piroozi, Soraya

    2017-09-01

    Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is a clinical term used for clinical signs and symptoms that affect the temporomandibular joints, masticatory muscles, and associated structures. Surgical and non-surgical treatments can be used for management of TMD. Non-surgical route is the main part of the treatment, since clinicians prefer non-aggressive treatment for TMD such as pharmacological and physical therapy. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) are the main procedures in physical therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of TENS and LLLT in treatment of TMD patients who did not respond to pharmacological therapy. This clinical trial was performed on 45 patients who randomly received either TENS or LLLT for 8 sessions. LLLT was applied with diode laser (Ga-Al-As, 980nm, dose 5j/cm(2)) and TENS by using two carbon electrodes with 75 Hz frequency (0.75 msec pulse width). Helkimo index and visual analogue scale (VAS) were measured during the treatment period and throughout the follow-up sessions. Significant reduction in the VAS and Helkimo index was observed in both TENS and LLLT group. There was no significant difference between the two methods during the treatment; however, TENS was more effective in pain reduction in follow-ups. This study justified the use of TENS therapy as well as LLLT in drug-resistant TMD. Both were useful in relieving the pain and muscles tenderness, although, TENS was more effective than LLLT.

  19. Cervical-scapular muscles strength and severity of temporomandibular disorder in women with mechanical neck pain

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    Fernanda Pasinato

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Changes in cervical muscle function have been observed in patients with neck pain (NP and TMD. However, the relationship between TMD severity and neck muscle strength in the presence/absence of NP is unknown. Objective: To determine the prevalence of TMD in women with and without mechanical NP and assess the cervical-scapular muscle strength and its association with TMD severity. Methods: Fifteen volunteers without neck pain (CG and 14 women with mechanical neck pain (NPG took part and were selected by the Neck Disability Index. The diagnosis and severity of TMD were determined by the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD and Temporomandibular Index (TI, respectively. The strength of the upper trapezius muscle, and cervical flexor and extensor muscles was measured by digital hand dynamometer. Results: 64.5% of women with NP and 33.3% without NP were diagnosed with TMD (p = 0.095. The NPG showed lower strength of the cervical flexor (p = 0.044 and extensor (p=0.006 muscles, and higher TI (p = 0.038 than in the CG. It was also verified moderate negative correlation between TI and the strength of dominant (p = 0.046, r = -0.547 and non-dominant (p = 0.007, r = -0.695 upper trapezius, and cervical flexors (p = 0.023, r = -0.606 in the NPG. Conclusion: There was no difference in the prevalence of TMD in women with and without NP. However, women with NP have lower cervical muscle strength - compared to those without NP - which was associated with greater severity of TMD. Thus, in women with NP associated with TMD, it is advisable to assess and address the severity of this dysfunction and identify the cervical-scapular muscles compromise.

  20. Effectiveness of dry needling for the treatment of temporomandibular myofascial pain: a double-blind, randomized, placebo controlled study.

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    Dıraçoğlu, Demirhan; Vural, Meltem; Karan, Ayşe; Aksoy, Cihan

    2012-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that dry needling is more effective than sham dry needling in relieving myofascial pain of the temporomandibular muscles. Fifty-two subjects with established myofascial trigger points were randomized into two groups; study group (N: 26) and placebo group (N: 26). Dry needling was applied using acupuncture needles. Sham dry needling was applied to the placebo group. Pain pressure threshold was measured with pressure algometry, pain intensity was rated using a 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS) and the unassisted jaw opening without pain measurement was performed. Evaluations were done by a physician blinded to the data. Of 52 patients assigned, 50 completed the study. Mean algometric values were significantly higher in the study group when compared to the placebo group (p values being less than 0.05). There were no differences between the two groups in terms of VAS and unassisted jaw-opening without pain values. Dry needling appears to be an effective treatment method in relieving the pain and tenderness of myofascial trigger points.