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Sample records for temporomandibular parte iii

  1. Temporomandibular disorders and bruxism. Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevilj, R; Mehulic, K; Dundjer, A

    2007-01-01

    Correct functioning of the entire stomatognathic system is achieved by a compatible relationship of all its parts. Four determinants, by their mutual harmonious activity, dictate the function of the entire system: the teeth, periodontium with supporting structure, muscles, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and CNS. In such a complex system a disorder of any integrative part causes disturbances also in other parts of the system. Changed functions can arise through organic disorder, and also iatrogenically by inadequate conservative, prosthetic, surgical or orthodontic therapy. For this reason it is often difficult to recognise the primary cause. The first responses of the system to the disorder are adaptive mechanisms which occur within one or more integrative parts, and depending on their intensity and duration symptoms grow more prominent. Tissue response can be ortho- or parafunctional. Attempts are made to exclude psychoemotional influences and the obstacle eliminated by either abrasion, clenching or grinding of the teeth. If the obstacle is not eliminated by abrasion, the cause of such functional disorder becomes the trigger for parafunctional activity. From a review of the relevant literature it can be concluded that parafunctional activity is caused by changed occlusion, with determined psychological habits of the patient and specific tissue response of the stomatognathic system. Therefore, therapy of these disorders is made more difficult and includes a multidisciplinary approach.

  2. Workshop 96. Part III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    Part III of the proceedings contain 155 contributions in various fields of science and technology including nuclear engineering, environmental science, and biomedical engineering. Out of these, 10 were selected to be inputted in INIS. (P.A.).

  3. Workshop 96. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    Part III of the proceedings contain 155 contributions in various fields of science and technology including nuclear engineering, environmental science, and biomedical engineering. Out of these, 10 were selected to be inputted in INIS. (P.A.)

  4. Is temporomandibular pain in chronic whiplash-associated disorders part of a more widespread pain syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visscher, Corine; Hofman, Nico; Mes, Carola; Lousberg, Richel; Naeije, Machiel

    2005-01-01

    The prevalence of temporomandibular disorders in patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorder is a controversial issue that may be influenced by the widespread pain character and psychologic distress frequently observed in patients with chronic pain. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of temporomandibular disorder pain, widespread pain, and psychologic distress in persons with chronic whiplash-associated disorder pain, using a controlled, single blind study design. The prevalence of temporomandibular disorder pain in the chronic whiplash-associated disorder pain group was compared with 2 control groups: a chronic neck pain group and a no neck pain group. From 65 persons, a standardized oral history was taken, a physical examination of the neck and the masticatory system was performed, widespread pain was investigated by tender point palpation, and psychologic distress was measured with a questionnaire (SCL-90). Because the recognition of temporomandibular disorder pain and neck pain remains a matter of debate, 3 well-defined classification systems were used: one based on the oral history, a second on a combination of oral history and pain on active movements and palpation, and a third one based on a combination of oral history and function tests. Irrespective of the classification system used, the chronic whiplash-associated disorder pain group more often suffered from temporomandibular disorder pain (0.001neck pain group. Moreover, patients with whiplash-associated disorder showed more psychologic distress (0.000disorder suggests that the higher prevalence of temporomandibular disorder pain in these patients is part of a more widespread chronic pain disorder.

  5. A radiographic study of temporomandibular joints in skeletal class III malocclusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Eun; Kim, Kae Duk

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the differences between the position of the mandibular condyles in temporomandibular joints of patients presenting with normal occlusion and skeletal class III malocclusion. Forty-two subjects with normal occlusion and thirty-seven subjects exhibiting skeletal class III malocclusion prior to orthodontic treatment were included in the study. Transcranial radiographs of each subject were taken at centric occlusion and 1 inch mouth opening. The positional relationship between the mandibular condyles with articular fossae and articular eminences at two positional states were evaluated and analyzed statistically. The mandibular condyles of the skeletal class III malocclusion group were found to be located more anteriorly from the center of the articular fossae compared to the normal occlusion group in centric occlusion. The mandibular condyles of the skeletal Class III malocclusion group were located more superiorly from the middle of articular height than those of the normal occlusion group in centric occlusion. However, these differences were not statistically significant. At 1 inch mouth opening, the mandibular condyles of the skeletal class III malocclusion group were placed more posteriorly from the articular eminences than those of the normal occlusion group. The mean angle of the articular eminence posterior slope were 56.51 .deg. ± 6.29 .deg. in the normal occlusion group and 60.37 .deg. ± 6.26 .deg. in the skeletal Class III malocclusion group. The mandibular condyles of the skeletal Class III malocclusion group were placed more anteriorly at centric occlusion and more posteriorly at 1 inch mouth opening when compared with those of the normal occlusion group.

  6. A radiographic study of temporomandibular joints in skeletal class III malocclusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Eun; Kim, Kae Duk [Chosun University College of Medicine, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-06-15

    To investigate the differences between the position of the mandibular condyles in temporomandibular joints of patients presenting with normal occlusion and skeletal class III malocclusion. Forty-two subjects with normal occlusion and thirty-seven subjects exhibiting skeletal class III malocclusion prior to orthodontic treatment were included in the study. Transcranial radiographs of each subject were taken at centric occlusion and 1 inch mouth opening. The positional relationship between the mandibular condyles with articular fossae and articular eminences at two positional states were evaluated and analyzed statistically. The mandibular condyles of the skeletal class III malocclusion group were found to be located more anteriorly from the center of the articular fossae compared to the normal occlusion group in centric occlusion. The mandibular condyles of the skeletal Class III malocclusion group were located more superiorly from the middle of articular height than those of the normal occlusion group in centric occlusion. However, these differences were not statistically significant. At 1 inch mouth opening, the mandibular condyles of the skeletal class III malocclusion group were placed more posteriorly from the articular eminences than those of the normal occlusion group. The mean angle of the articular eminence posterior slope were 56.51 .deg. {+-} 6.29 .deg. in the normal occlusion group and 60.37 .deg. {+-} 6.26 .deg. in the skeletal Class III malocclusion group. The mandibular condyles of the skeletal Class III malocclusion group were placed more anteriorly at centric occlusion and more posteriorly at 1 inch mouth opening when compared with those of the normal occlusion group.

  7. Evaluation of temporomandibular disorders in Class III patients treated with mandibular cervical headgear and fixed appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Diego; Oberti, Giovanni; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2008-03-01

    Our aim in this study was to evaluate the prevalence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in Class III patients treated with mandibular cervical headgear (MCH) and fixed appliances. The sample of 75 patients included 25 patients with no previous orthodontic treatment, 25 Class I patients who had undergone orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances and without extractions, and 25 patients with dentoskeletal Class III disharmonies treated with MCH and fixed appliances. The Helkimo index was used to test the prevalence of TMD symptoms in the 3 groups. The prevalence rates of the Helkimo index in the 3 groups were compared with the z score on proportions. No statistically significant differences in the prevalence rates of the Helkimo index scores in the 3 groups were found (P = .367). Most subjects in the 3 groups had an Helkimo index of zero (66.7%). Subjects with Class III malocclusions treated with MCH and fixed appliances do not have greater prevalence of TMD symptoms than do Class I subjects treated with fixed appliances or untreated subjects.

  8. Standards in neurosonology. Part III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Wojczal

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents standards related to ultrasound imaging of the cerebral vasculature and structures. The aim of this paper is to standardize both the performance and description of ultrasound imaging of the extracranial and intracranial cerebral arteries as well as a study of a specific brain structure, i.e. substantia nigra hyperechogenicity. The following aspects are included in the description of standards for each ultrasonographic method: equipment requirements, patient preparation, study technique and documentation as well as the required elements of ultrasound description. Practical criteria for the diagnosis of certain pathologies in accordance with the latest literature were also presented. Furthermore, additional comments were included in some of the sections. Part I discusses standards for the performance, documentation and description of different ultrasound methods (Duplex, Doppler. Part II and III are devoted to standards for specific clinical situations (vasospasm, monitoring after the acute stage of stroke, detection of a right-to-left shunts, confirmation of the arrest of the cerebral circulation, an assessment of the functional efficiency of circle of Willis, an assessment of the cerebrovascular vasomotor reserve as well as the measurement of substantia nigra hyperechogenicity.

  9. Temporomandibular disorders in growing patients after treatment of class II and III malocclusion with orthopaedic appliances: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Silva, Antonio; Carnevali-Arellano, Romano; Venegas-Aguilera, Matías; Tobar-Reyes, Julio; Palomino-Montenegro, Hernán

    2018-05-01

    To determine if the use of orthopaedic appliances in growing patients applied to correct Class II and III malocclusion is related to the development of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). A systematic review was conducted between 1960 and July 2017, based on electronic databases: PubMed, Cochrane Library, Embase, Medline, Scopus, EBSCOhost, Scielo, Lilacs and Bireme. Controlled clinical trials (CCTs) and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were identified. The articles were selected and analyzed by two authors independently. The quality of the evidence was determined according to the guidelines of the Cochrane Risk Bias Assessment Tool and the Cochrane Quality Study Guide. Seven articles were included, four CCTs and three RCTs. The studies were grouped according to malocclusion treatment in (a) class II appliances (n = 4) and (b) class III appliances (n = 3). The quality of evidence was low due to the high risk of bias, independent of the association reported. All studies concluded that the use of orthopaedic appliances would not contribute to the development of TMD. The quality of evidence available is insufficient to establish definitive conclusions, since the studies were very heterogeneous and presented a high risk of bias. However, it is suggested that the use of orthopaedic appliances to correct class II and III malocclusion in growing patients would not be considered as a risk factor for the development of TMD. High-quality RCTs are required to draw any definitive conclusions.

  10. Drilling miniature holes, Part III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1978-07-01

    Miniature components for precision electromechanical mechanisms such as switches, timers, and actuators typically require a number of small holes. Because of the precision required, the workpiece materials, and the geometry of the parts, most of these holes must be produced by conventional drilling techniques. The use of such techniques is tedious and often requires considerable trial and error to prevent drill breakage, minimize hole mislocation and variations in hole diameter. This study of eight commercial drill designs revealed that printed circuit board drills produced better locational and size repeatability than did other drills when centerdrilling was not used. Boring holes 1 mm in dia, or less, as a general rule did not improve hole location in brass or stainless steel. Hole locations of patterns of 0.66-mm holes can be maintained within 25.4-..mu..m diametral positional tolerance if setup misalignments can be eliminated. Size tolerances of +- 3.8 ..mu..m can be maintained under some conditions when drilling flat plates. While these levels of precision are possible with existing off-the-shelf drills, they may not be practical in many cases.

  11. Neuroscience in Nazi Europe Part III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeidman, Lawrence A; Kondziella, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    In Part I, neuroscience collaborators with the Nazis were discussed, and in Part II, neuroscience resistors were discussed. In Part III, we discuss the tragedy regarding european neuroscientists who became victims of the Nazi onslaught on “non-Aryan” doctors. Some of these unfortunate...... of neuroscience, we pay homage and do not allow humanity to forget, lest this dark period in history ever repeat itself....

  12. Temporomandibular joint ankylosis as part of the clinical spectrum of Carey-Fineman-Ziter syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasetti, Martina; Mazzoleni, Fabio; Novelli, Giorgio; Iascone, Maria; Bozzetti, Alberto; Selicorni, Angelo

    2016-08-01

    The Carey-Finema-Ziter syndrome (CFZS, MIM 254940) is an apparently autosomal recessively inherited disorder consisting of the combination of non-progressive congenital myopathy with Moebius and Pierre Robin sequence, facial anomalies and growth delay. Mental development has been described as normal or delayed. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is the immobility of the joint caused by ankylotic fusion of the mandible to the cranial base or zygoma. It is a serious and disabling condition that may cause problems in mastication, digestion, speech, appearance, and oral hygiene. Most often is a true ankylosis of the TMJ but other pathological mechanisms are described (i.e., the fusion of the coronoid process to temporal bone or with the zygoma, or a variety of soft tissues disorders like Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva). Here we report a 2-year-old girl fitting with a clinical diagnosis of CFZS associated with a limited mouth opening in which temporomandibular joint ankylosis was suspected. Because it has been postulated that many clinical features in CFZS may only be secondary effects of brainstem anomalies and muscle weakness during development, the limited opening of the mouth observed in our patient could represent a rare clinical feature of CFZS itself. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The postnatal development of the temporal part of the human temporomandibular joint. A quantitative study on skulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibbets, J M; Dijkman, G E

    1997-12-01

    The morphology of the temporal part of the human temporomandibular joint (TMJ) changes drastically during postnatal development. The glenoid fossa will acquire its characteristic S shape and a tubercle will develop. The combined results of the literature and of this study allow a reconstruction of the actual growth processes. The roof of the glenoid fossa appears to enlarge forward by remodeling while sagittal and vertical growth is mainly achieved by deposition at the top of the tubercle. These latter changes result in a steeper slope of the eminence and take place in 3 phases, parallelling the eruption of the first incisors, the permanent first molars and the permanent second molars. While the zygomatic arch thickens by deposition at all surfaces, it also remodels downward relative to the external meatus. As a result, the neonate anulus occupies a lower position relative to this arch than does the adult meatus.

  14. Introduction to Part III: Application of LCA in Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Ralph K.

    2018-01-01

    While Part II of this book presents the theoretical foundation and methodology of LCA, Part III is dedicated to a comprehensive discussion of how this methodology has been adapted and applied in practice. The chapters of Part III provide an easily readable and accessible introduction to different...

  15. Comparison of temporomandibular joint and ramus morphology between class II and class III cases before and after bi-maxillary osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iguchi, Ran; Yoshizawa, Kunio; Moroi, Akinori; Tsutsui, Takamitsu; Hotta, Asami; Hiraide, Ryota; Takayama, Akihiro; Tsunoda, Tatsuya; Saito, Yuki; Sato, Momoko; Baba, Nana; Ueki, Koichiro

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare changes in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and ramus morphology between class II and III cases before and after sagittal split ramus osteotomy (SSRO) and Le Fort I osteotomy. The subjects were 39 patients (78 sides) who underwent bi-maxillary surgery. They consisted of 2 groups (18 class II cases and 21 class III cases), and were selected randomly from among patients who underwent surgery between 2012 and 2016. The TMJ disc tissue and joint effusion were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the TMJ space, condylar height, ramus height, ramus inclination and condylar square were assessed by computed tomography (CT), pre- and post-operatively. The number of joints with anterior disc displacement in class II was significantly higher than that in class III (p bi-maxillary surgery. The findings of the numerical analysis also demonstrated that reduction of condylar volume occurred frequently in class II, although TMJ disc position classification did not change significantly, as previously reported. Copyright © 2017 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Splint therapy for disc displacement with reduction of the temporomandibular joint. Part I: Modified mandibular splint therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, I-Yueh; Wu, Ju-Hui; Kao, Yu-Hsun; Chen, Chao-Ming; Chen, Chun-Ming; Yang, Yi-Hsin

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this preliminary study were to present a modified mandibular splint together with a treatment regimen and to evaluate their effects on the treatment of reciprocal joint sounds of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The study participants were recruited from 312 consecutive patients in the temporomandibular disorder clinic of a medical center in Taiwan from January 2003 to December 2003. From among these, 59 cases with typical reciprocal clicking were selected for this study. All pa...

  17. The temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, W.

    1984-01-01

    Whilst the temporomandibular joint is in many ways unique, it is subject to all the diseases and disorders found in joints in other parts of the human skeleton. By far the most common disorder is injury, followed by arthropathy, acute and chronic dislocations, ankylosis, and in rare instances, neoplasms. The diagnosis and management of the temporomandibular joint are the primary responsibility of the oral surgeon. Nevertheless, this anatomical region is an area in which the cooperation of medical and dental disciplines may be required for the satisfactory conclusion of treatment. The more so when the disease process involves either associated psychosomatic illness or malignancy. The mainstay of the diagnosis is a careful radiological examination of the joint. There exists a delicate relationship between the dentition, the muscles of mastication, and the temporomandibular articulation, which is controlled by arthrokinetic reflex activity of the branches of the 5th cranial nerve. Imbalance between one or more of the components of this integrated system frequently leads to disturbances in function. Pain-dysfunction disorders constitute the larger part of temporomandibular joint disturbances generally encountered

  18. Cubby : Multiscreen Desktop VR Part III

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Djajadiningrat, J.P.; Gribnau, M.W.

    2000-01-01

    In this month's final episode of our 'Cubby: Multiscreen Desktop VR' trilogy we explain how you read the InputSprocket driver from part II, how you use it as input for the cameras from part I and how you calibrate the input device so that it leads to the correct head position.

  19. Effects of orthognathic surgery for class III malocclusion on signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders and on pressure pain thresholds of the jaw muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farella, M; Michelotti, A; Bocchino, T; Cimino, R; Laino, A; Steenks, M H

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this longitudinal study was to determine the effects of orthognathic surgery on signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and on pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) of the jaw muscles. Fourteen consecutive class III patients undergoing pre-surgical orthodontic treatment were treated by combined Le Fort I osteotomy and bilateral sagittal ramus osteotomy. The clinical examination included the assessment of signs and symptoms of TMD and the assessment of PPTs of the masseter and temporalis muscles. Anamnestic, clinical and algometric data were collected during five sessions over a 1-year period. Seven out of 14 patients presented with disc displacement with reduction at baseline, whereas four patients (two of them were new cases) did so at the end of follow up (p>0.05). None of the patients were diagnosed with myofascial pain of the jaw muscles at the beginning or end of follow up. PPTs of the masseter and temporalis muscles did not change significantly from baseline values throughout the whole study period. The occurrence of signs and symptoms of TMD fluctuates with an unpredictable pattern after orthognathic surgery for class III malocclusions.

  20. Warship Radar Signatures (Ship Survivability Part III-A)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galle, L.F.; Heemskerk, H.J.M.; Ewijk, L.J. van

    2000-01-01

    Radar Cross Section (RCS) management is of paramount importance for a warships's survivability. In this first part of the paper (Part III-A), the operational benefits of low RCS will be explained. Basic RCS theory, measurement and simulation techniques will be addressed. The RCS of representative

  1. Some Aspects of Facial Nerve Paralysis. Part III. Complications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some Aspects of Facial Nerve Paralysis. Part III. Complications, Prognosis and management. ... It should be possible to set a definite prognosis within 2 weeks after the onset of facial paralysis, and in many cases even sooner. In the prognosis of facial paralysis the aetiological and time factors involved, the completeness of ...

  2. Splint therapy for disc displacement with reduction of the temporomandibular joint. Part I: Modified mandibular splint therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Yueh Huang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this preliminary study were to present a modified mandibular splint together with a treatment regimen and to evaluate their effects on the treatment of reciprocal joint sounds of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ. The study participants were recruited from 312 consecutive patients in the temporomandibular disorder clinic of a medical center in Taiwan from January 2003 to December 2003. From among these, 59 cases with typical reciprocal clicking were selected for this study. All participants were treated with a modified mandibular splint and then followed up for 6 months. Successful treatment was defined as leading to the disappearance of the joint sounds of TMJ, as described by patients. Based on clinical evaluation, the overall success rate was 71.2% (42/59 with minimal temporary complications. Patients with clicking at less than 3.5 cm of interincisal opening had a success rate of 92.5%, which was higher than the success rate of patients with clicking at a mouth opening of 3.5 cm or more. This study showed that a modified mandibular splint can be used to treat reciprocal clicking of the TMJ effectively and encouraged us to conduct further study on the efficacy of this splint to treat disc displacement with reduction of TMJ using magnetic resonance imaging examination.

  3. Temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westesson, P.L.; Hatala, M.; Tallents, R.H.; Katzberg, R.W.; Musgrave, M.; Levitt, S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper determines the frequency of MR signs of abnormal temporomandibular joints (TMJs) in asymptomatic volunteers. Forty-two volunteers with 84 clinically normal TMJs were imaged in the sagittal and coronal planes with surface coil MR imaging. Sagittal closed and open and coronal closed views were obtained bilaterally in all volunteers. The images were classified as normal (superior disk position) or abnormal (disk displacement of degenerative joint disease). Eighteen joints in 11 volunteers were abnormal; 12 had disk displacement with reduction and six had disk displacement without reduction, with associated degenerative joint disease in three of the six. Asymptomatic internal derangement and degenerative joint disease occur in about one-fourth of asymptomatic volunteers

  4. Intra-articular vs. systemic administration of etanercept in antigen-induced arthritis in the temporomandibular point. Part I: histological effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyengaard Jens R

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Temporomandibular joint (TMJ arthritis in children causes alterations in craniomandibular growth. This abnormal growth may be prevented by an early anti-inflammatory intervention. We have previously shown that intra-articular (IA corticosteroid reduces TMJ inflammation, but causes concurrent mandibular growth inhibition in young rabbits. Blockage of TNF-α has already proven its efficacy in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis not responding to standard therapy. In this paper we evaluate the effect of IA etanercept compared to subcutaneous etanercept in antigen-induced TMJ-arthritis in rabbits on histological changes using histomorphometry and stereology. This article presents the data and discussion on the anti-inflammatory effects of systemic and IA etanercept. In Part II the data on the effects of systemic and IA etanercept on facial growth are presented. Methods Forty-two rabbits (10 weeks old pre-sensitized with ovalbumin and locally induced inflammation in the temporomandibular joints were divided into three groups: a placebo group receiving IA saline injections in both joints one week after arthritis induction (n = 14, an IA etanercept group receiving 0.1 mg/kg etanercept per joint one week after arthritis induction (n = 14 and a systemic etanercept group receiving 0.8 mg/kg etanercept weekly throughout the 12-week study (n = 14. Arthritis was maintained by giving four inductions three weeks apart. Additional IA saline or etanercept injections were also given one week after the re-inductions. Histomorphometric and unbiased stereological methods (optical fractionator were used to assess and estimate the inflammation in the joints. Results The histomorphometry showed synovial proliferation in all groups. The plasma cell count obtained by the optical fractionator was significantly reduced when treating with systemic etanercept but not with IA etanercept. Semi-quantitative assessments of synovial proliferation and

  5. Solar neutrino oscillation parameters after SNO Phase-III and SAGE Part-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Ping; Liu Qiuyu

    2009-01-01

    We analyse the recently published results from solar neutrino experiments SNO Phase-III and SAGE Part-III and show their constraints on solar neutrino oscillation parameters, especially for the mixing angle θ 12 . Through a global analysis using all existing data from SK, SNO, Ga and Cl radiochemical experiments and long base line reactor experiment KamLAND , we obtain the parameters Δm 12 2 =7.684 -0.208 +0.212 x 10 -5 eV 2 , tan 2 θ 12 =0.440 -0.057 +0.059 . We also find that the discrepancy between the KamLAND and solar neutrino results can be reduced by choosing a small non-zero value for the mixing angle θ 13 . (authors)

  6. Gnathological splint therapy in temporomandibular joint disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Gnanashanmugham, K.; Saravanan, B.; Sukumar, M. R.; Tajir, T. Faisal

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) forms an integral functional part of stomatognathic system. Position, shape, structure and function of teeth have an influence on the proper functioning and health of TMJ. But a problem associated with TMJ is often neglected, and treatment for it is mostly restricted to palliative therapy. A proper understanding of the underlying cause of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) is necessary to device a proper treatment plan. Etiology of TMDs varies from idiopathic...

  7. 12 CFR Appendix III to Part 27 - Fair Housing Lending Inquiry/Application Log Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fair Housing Lending Inquiry/Application Log Sheet III Appendix III to Part 27 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FAIR HOUSING HOME LOAN DATA SYSTEM Pt. 27, App. III Appendix III to Part 27—Fair Housing Lending...

  8. [Tinnitus and temporomandibular joint: State of the art].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lina-Granade, G; Truy, E; Ionescu, E; Garnier, P; Thai Van, H

    2016-12-01

    Tinnitus has been described in temporomandibular joint dysfunction for a long time. Yet, other disorders, such as hearing loss, stress, anxiety and depression, play a major role in the pathophysiology of tinnitus. Temporomandibular joint dysfunctions seem to increase the risk of tinnitus in patients with other predisposing factors. Especially somatosensory tinnitus, which is characterized by sound modulations with neck or mandible movements, is frequently associated with temporomandibular joint dysfunction, but it is not pathognomonic of such a disorder. In such cases, functional therapy of the temporomandibular joint should be part of the multidisciplinary rehabilitation of patients with tinnitus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. MR imaging of the temporomandibular joint. Part 2. Effect of flip angle on MR imaging with FLASH sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Maya; Sasano, Takashi; Higano, Shuichi; Takahashi, Shoki; Kurihara, Noriko

    1998-01-01

    In our previous study on MR imaging of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), fast low angle shot (FLASH) showed the highest image contrast between disc and surrounding TMJ tissues compared with those of 4 other sequences (i,e., fast imaging with steady precession (FISP), conventional T1-weighted spin echo (SE) and fast spin echo (FSE, TR/TE/ETL: 1100/12/3, 3000/15/7)). Furthermore, FLASH also received a high score on visual evaluation including the position and contour of the disc, and the border between the disc and surrounding tissues. Therefore, we concluded that FLASH was the most suitable sequence for evaluating the TMJ disc. However, the image contrast and signal intensity on MR imaging with gradient echo pulse sequence are affected by flip angle. Consequently, in this report, to find the most suitable flip angle for MR scanning of the TMJ using a FLASH sequence (TR/TE: 450/11), ten TMJs of 5 volunteers were experimentally imaged with various flip angles from 10 degrees to 70 degrees at an interval of 10 degrees between 10 to 70. The image contrast and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) between the disc and surrounding tissues were compared. In addition, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of phantoms was also calculated using the same imaging parameters. Visual evaluation including position and contour of the disc, and the border between the disc and surrounding tissues, was also performed by 4 radiologists. As the flip angle increased, imaging contrast decreased while SNR increased. Images with flip angles between 30 and 60 degrees demonstrated high CNR. On visual evaluation, images using flip angles between 30 and 50 degrees received high scores. In conclusion, FLASH sequence with a flip angle between 30 and 50 degrees was considered most suitable for evaluating the TMJ disc based on the results of visual assessment and analysis of three major components of image diagnostic quality: image contrast, CNR and SNR. (author)

  10. [Temporo-mandibular joint. Morpho-functional considerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scutariu, M D; Indrei, Anca

    2004-01-01

    The temporo-mandibular joint is distinguished from most other synovial joints of the body by two features: 1. the two jointed components carry teeth whose position and occlusion introduce a very strong influence on the movements of the temporo-mandibular joint and 2. its articular surfaces are not covered by hyaline cartilage, but by a dense, fibrous tissue. This paper describes the parts of the temporo-mandibular joint: the articular surfaces (the condylar process of the mandible and the glenoid part of the temporal bone), the fibrocartilaginous disc which is interposed between the mandibular and the temporal surface, the fibrous capsule of the temporo-mandibular joint and the ligaments of this joint. All these parts present a very strong adaptation at the important functions of the temporo-mandibular joint.

  11. Thallium (III) salts utilization in organic synthesis. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferraz, H.M.C.

    1989-01-01

    The utilizations of thallium (III) salts in organic synthesis with carbonylic and acitylenic substrates are presented. The reactions of carbonylic substra3ts with kitones and the oxidation reactions of acetylenic substrates are shown. Others reactions including thallium (III) salts and non aromatic unsatured substracts, as cleasage of ethers and epoxide using thallium trinitrate, hydrazones treatments with thallium triacetates, etc, are also mentioned. (C.G.C.) [pt

  12. Temporomandibular disorders and tension-type headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongini, Franco

    2007-12-01

    Pathologies currently defined as temporomandibular disorders may be different in nature. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders and craniofacial and cervical myogenous pain (MP) are distinct pathologies but may be superimposed and share some etiologic factors. Tension-type headache (TTH) may often be associated with craniofacial and cervical pain, and the same pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment may be efficacious for both. Psychiatric comorbidity (depression and/or anxiety disorder) is less frequent in sheer TMJ disorders, compared with MP and TTH. A screening for the presence of an underlying psychiatric disorder should be part of the clinical evaluation in patients suffering from headache and facial pain.

  13. Temporomandibular Joint Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Baby Bottle Tooth Decay? Pacifiers Have Negative and Positive Effects What is Dental Amalgam (Silver Filling)? Check Menstrual Calendar for Tooth Extraction Temporomandibular Joint Disorder Learn what those dental words mean. Check out how your teeth and mouth ...

  14. Tanzania 1895-1920 : Part III: 1914-1920s

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietz, A.J.

    2016-01-01

    An earlier version of this African Postal Heritage Paper was published as African Studies Centre Leiden Working Paper 119 / 2015: "A postal history of the First World War in Africa and its aftermath - German colonies; III Deutsch Ostafrika / German East Africa", written by Ton Dietz.

  15. Inteligencia Artificial y Neurología. (III Parte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Camacho Pinto

    1987-04-01

    Full Text Available

    De acuerdo con mi anuncio esta III Parte estaría constituida por los mecanismos cerebrales susceptibles de extrapolación tal como fueron enumerados por mí: control de input-output para realizar conductas, y de inteligencia y aprendizaje, de los cuales por razón de espacio sólo se publica la mitad en esta edición de Medicina. Se trata de una presentación esquemática, auncuando ahora encuentro quizás más atractivo el enfoque de J’urgen Ruech expuesto en el Capítulo Comunicación y Psiquiatría de la obra extensa de Freedman (1 así: Input = percepción; análisis de datos = reconocimiento; procesamiento de datos = pensamiento; almacenamiento de datos = memoria; output = expresión y acción. A mi modo de ver se completaría este encuadre funcional con el tópico aprendizaje, proceso contiguo al de la memoria. Antes de entrar en materia hago unas consideraciones preliminares. En la primera me refiero a otro enfoque del concepto de LA. no incluido anteriormente. Se trata de Schank Roger y Hunter Larry (2 para quienes las indagaciones a que conduce el trasegar acerca de lA son las más atrevidas de nuestra existencia: ¿cuál es la naturaleza de la mente, qué pasa cuando estamos pensando, sintiendo, viendo o entendiendo? ¿Es posible comprender cómo trabaja nuestra mente realmente? Preguntas milenarias en cuyas respuestas no se ha registrado progreso. La lA ofrece una nueva herramienta para avanzar en este sentido: el computador.

    Las teorías sobre la mente han consistido en procesos descriptivos. Y los planteamientos iníciales hechos sobre lA por los investigadores han sido enfocados hacia lo que ellos mismos consideraron como manifestaciones de alta inteligencia: problemas matemáticos, ajedrez, rompecabezas complejos, etc.; gran cantidad de energía fue dedicada y se encontraron técnicas computacionales exitosas. Pero se comprendió que las técnicas desarrolladas no eran las mismas que emplea el cerebro, por lo cual se

  16. Irradiated uranium reprocessing, Final report - I-IV, Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gal, I.

    1961-12-01

    This third part of the final report include the following: Annex 5 - device for opening the cover; Annex 6 - inner part of the device for sampling of the radioactive solution; Annex 7 - outer part of the device for sampling of the radioactive solution; Annex 8 - pneumatic taps [sr

  17. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation...) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. III Appendix III to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation Suppose that a manufacturer called Mizer...

  18. 29 CFR Appendix III to Part 1918 - The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory.... 1918, App. III Appendix III to Part 1918—The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory) Note: This appendix is non-mandatory and provides an explanation of the mechanics in the correct spotting of...

  19. Antipsychotics and Sexual Dysfunction: Sexual Dysfunction - Part III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar Mysore Nagaraj

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Satisfying sexual experience is an essential part of a healthy and enjoyable life for most people. Antipsychotic drugs are among the various factors that affect optimal sexual functioning. Both conventional and novel antipsychotics are associated with significant sexual side effects. This review has presented various studies comparing different antipsychotic drugs. Dopamine antagonism, increased serum prolactin, serotonergic, adrenergic and cholinergic mechanisms are all proposed to be the mechanisms for sexual dysfunction. Drug treatment for this has not given satisfactory long-term results. Knowledge of the receptor pharmacology of an individual antipsychotic will help to determine whether it is more or less likely to cause sexual side effects and its management.

  20. Relation of the otological symptoms in the temporomandibular dysfunctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machado, Ilza Maria

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The temporomandibular joint dysfunctions (TMJ include several clinical problems which wrap the masticatory muscle, the joint itself and structures associated to the ear region. Objective: To analyze the relation between temporomandibular dysfunction and otological symptoms. Method: Were part of a retrospective study 20 women with mean age of 22, 38 years. This study was realized by a multidisciplinary team that wrapped otorhinolaryngologist, speech therapist and orthodontist. The participants were submitted to the filling of a questionnaire that addressed questions about otological symptoms and later they were submitted to an otoscopy exam and a clinical examination of the temporomandibular joint. Results: Eighty-five per cent had simultaneously temporomandibular dysfunction with otological symptoms complaints. The otological symptoms more mentioned were auricular plenitude (50%, tinnitus (35%, and dizziness (10%. Conclusion: The results showed high percentage between DTMs and otological symptoms. Other researches with a larger sample are suggested with the aim of confirm the correlation between DTM and otological symptoms.

  1. Radiobiology in clinical radiation therapy - Part III: Normal tissue damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, Elizabeth L.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: This is the third part of a course designed for residents in radiation oncology preparing for their boards. This part of the course will focus on the mechanisms underlying damage in normal tissues. Although conventional wisdom long held that killing and depletion of a critical cell(s) in a tissue was responsible for the later expression of damage, histopathologic changes in normal tissue can now be explained and better understood in terms of the new molecular biology. The concept that depletion of a single cell type is responsible for the observed histopathologic changes in normal tissues has been replaced by the hypothesis that damage results from the interaction of many different cell systems, including epithelial, endothelial, macrophages and fibroblasts, via the production of specific autocrine, paracrine and endocrine growth factors. A portion of this course will discuss the clinical and experimental data on the production and interaction of those cytokines and cell systems considered to be critical to tissue damage. It had long been suggested that interindividual differences in radiation-induced normal tissue damage was genetically regulated, at least in part. Both clinical and experimental data supported this hypothesis but it is the recent advances in human and mouse molecular genetics which have provided the tools to dissect out the genetic component of normal tissue damage. These data will be presented and related to the potential to develop genetic markers to identify sensitive individuals. The impact on clinical outcome of the ability to identify prospectively sensitive patients will be discussed. Clinically it is well-accepted that the volume of tissue irradiated is a critical factor in determining tissue damage. A profusion of mathematical models for estimating dose-volume relationships in a number of organs have been published recently despite the fact that little data are available to support these models. This course will review the

  2. 18 CFR 410.1 - Basin regulations-Water Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations. 410.1 Section 410.1 Conservation of... CODE AND ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL-PART III WATER QUALITY REGULATIONS § 410.1 Basin regulations—Water Code and Administrative Manual—Part III Water Quality Regulations. (a) The Water Code of the Delaware River...

  3. Multidisciplinary treatment in a patient with temporomandibular disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alexandre Camara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult patients with a multitude of problems require seamless integration of interdisciplinary protocols. This article presents a case of an adult female who reported with temporomandibular disorders, a crossbite and a Class III skeletal pattern. An interdisciplinary approach using expansion and surgery was used to treat the condition, followed by an esthetic/restorative protocol, achieving excellent results.

  4. Temporomandibular disorders and migraine headache

    OpenAIRE

    Demarin, Vida; Bašić Kes, Vanja

    2010-01-01

    Migraine headache and temporomandibular disorders show significant overlap in the area or distribution of pain, the gender prevalence and age distribution. Temporomandibular disorders may cause headaches per se, worsen existent primary headaches, and add to the burden of headache disorders. The patients with combined migraine and tension-type headaches had a higher prevelance of temporomandibular disorders. Evidence supporting a close relationship include the increased masticatory...

  5. International Working Group on Past Reactors Thirteenth Annual Meeting. Summary Report. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-04-01

    The Thirteenth Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors was held at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria from 9 to 11 April 1980. The Summary Report (Part I) contains the Minutes of the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part II) contains the papers which review the national programme in the field of LMFBRs and other presentations at the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part III) contains the discussions on the review of the national programmes

  6. Trastornos temporomandibulares en pacientes con maloclusiones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Soto Cantero

    Full Text Available Introducción: existe una prevalencia de trastornos oclusales en gran medida relacionados con la presencia de disfunción temporomandibular. Objetivo: determinar el grado de disfunción temporomandibular según el Índice de Maglione en correspondencia con la prevalencia de maloclusiones en el área de salud del policlínico "Turcios Lima". Métodos: se realizó un estudio observacional descriptivo, de corte transversal, en la consulta de ortodoncia, de junio del 2008 a junio del 2009. De un universo constituido por los 280 pacientes que acudieron al servicio de ortodoncia en el período señalado con presencia de maloclusiones, se seleccionó una muestra de 84 pacientes por muestreo aleatorio simple, teniendo en cuenta los criterios de inclusión y exclusión realizados por criterios de expertos. Resultados: presentaban disfunción temporomandibular 74 pacientes y dentro de ellos 44 (52,4 % tenían disfunción grado II (Moderada. El 97 % de los pacientes con relación molar de clase II, presentaban disfunción temporomandibular. El 42,9 % de los pacientes con una maloclusión, presentaban disfunción grado I. El 60 % de los pacientes con dos maloclusiones presentaban disfunción grado II y el 66,7 % de los pacientes con tres maloclusiones, presentaban disfunción grado III. La mayor cantidad de pacientes tuvieron disfunción grado II (Moderada. Conclusiones: el mayor por ciento de los pacientes con disfunciones presentó una clase II molar y a medida que aumentó el número de maloclusiones aumentó también la severidad de la disfunción.

  7. Gnathological splint therapy in temporomandibular joint disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Gnanashanmugham

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint (TMJ forms an integral functional part of stomatognathic system. Position, shape, structure and function of teeth have an influence on the proper functioning and health of TMJ. But a problem associated with TMJ is often neglected, and treatment for it is mostly restricted to palliative therapy. A proper understanding of the underlying cause of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD is necessary to device a proper treatment plan. Etiology of TMDs varies from idiopathic reasons to systemic disorders. The option of Gnathological splint is a conservative, safe and an effective mode of therapy for TMDs caused by occlusal discrepancies (fulcrum/interferences. This article presents a case report of a patient with TMD caused by occlusal discrepancy

  8. HISTORY OF SURGERY TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. G. Sysolyatin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the main stages of the historical development of the temporo-mandibular joint surgery. It was shown the evolution of treatments for diseases and injuries of joints. It summarizes the main work of domestic and foreign authors that influenced the development of surgery of the temporo-mandibular joint. 

  9. ATWS: a reappraisal. Part III. Frequency of anticipated transients. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leverenz, F.L. Jr.; Koren, J.M.; Erdmann, R.C.; Lellouche, G.S.

    1978-07-01

    The document is Part III of the Institute study of the ATWS question. The frequencies of the various events which have led to a reactor scram are documented from the nuclear power plant records. Some of these events, in the absence of scram, could lead to undesirable system response and are the ''transients of significance'' which comprise the anticipated transients of the ATWS question

  10. Temporomandibular joint motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, M.; Kawamura, Y.; Matsuda, T.; Itou, S.; Odori, T.; Ishii, Y.; Torizuka, K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates MR imaging with the therapeutic effect after splint therapy in internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Fifteen patients (19 TMJs) with internal derangement of the TMJ and five normal volunteers (10 TMJs) were examined with sagittal T1-weighted spin-echo and gradient recalled acquisition in a steady state (GRASS) MR imaging. MR studies of the patients undergoing splint therapy were performed with an without splints. Pseudodynamic images of TMJ motion provide information that was not available from spin-echo T1-weighted images

  11. Temporomandibular disorders and headaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff-Radford, Steven B; Bassiur, Jennifer P

    2014-05-01

    Headache and temporomandibular disorders should be treated together but separately. If there is marked limitation of opening, imaging of the joint may be necessary. The treatment should then include education regarding limiting jaw function, appliance therapy, instruction in jaw posture, and stretching exercises, as well as medications to reduce inflammation and relax the muscles. The use of physical therapies, such as spray and stretch and trigger point injections, is helpful if there is myofascial pain. Tricyclic antidepressants and the new-generation antiepileptic drugs are effective in muscle pain conditions. Arthrocentesis and/or arthroscopy may help to restore range of motion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Temporomandibular Disorders and Headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff-Radford, Steven B; Abbott, Jeremy J

    2016-08-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and primary headaches can be perpetual and debilitating musculoskeletal and neurological disorders. The presence of both can affect up to one-sixth of the population at any one time. Initially, TMDs were thought to be predominantly musculoskeletal disorders, and migraine was thought to be solely a cerebrovascular disorder. The further understanding of their pathophysiology has helped to clarify their clinical presentation. This article focuses on the role of the trigeminal system in associating TMD and migraine. By discussing recent descriptions of prevalence, diagnosis, and treatment of headache and TMD, we will further elucidate this relationship. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Market Analysis and Consumer Impacts Source Document. Part III. Consumer Behavior and Attitudes Toward Fuel Efficient Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-01

    This source document on motor vehicle market analysis and consumer impacts consists of three parts. Part III consists of studies and reviews on: consumer awareness of fuel efficiency issues; consumer acceptance of fuel efficient vehicles; car size ch...

  14. Japanese contributions to IAEA INTOR workshop, phase two A, part 2, chapter III: impurity control (engineering)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Masahiro; Miki, Nobuharu; Shibutani, Yoji; Fujimura, Kaoru; Adachi, Jun-ichi; Sato, Kosuke; Fujii, Masaharu; Yamazaki, Seiichiro; Itoh, Shin-ichi.

    1985-07-01

    This report corresponds to the second half of Chapter III of Japanese contribution report to IAEA INTOR Workshop, Phase Two A, Part 2. Data base assessment are made on candidate materials for the divertor, limiter, and the first wall. Engineering trade-off studies are made for the high-recycling and low temperature conditions. The studies include material considerations, configuration, thermohydraulic and stress analysis, disruption, lifetime analysis, and tritium permeation. (author)

  15. Eleventh annual meeting, Bologna, Italy, 17-20 April 1978. Summary report. Part III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1978-09-01

    The Summary Report - Part III of the Eleventh Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors - contains the discussions on the commercialization LMFBRs according to national plans, mostly related to technology of fuel fabrication, PHENIX fuel pins testing, heterogeneous cores, in service inspection of fuel elements, regulations and licensing, and related OECD activities. Most of the discussions were related to the existing reactors: BR-10, BN-600, BN-350, BN-1600, RAPSODIE and PHENIX.

  16. Eleventh annual meeting, Bologna, Italy, 17-20 April 1978. Summary report. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    The Summary Report - Part III of the Eleventh Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors - contains the discussions on the commercialization LMFBRs according to national plans, mostly related to technology of fuel fabrication, PHENIX fuel pins testing, heterogeneous cores, in service inspection of fuel elements, regulations and licensing, and related OECD activities. Most of the discussions were related to the existing reactors: BR-10, BN-600, BN-350, BN-1600, RAPSODIE and PHENIX

  17. Tenth annual meeting, Vienna, Austria, 29 March - 1 April 1977. Summary report. Part III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1977-11-01

    The Summary Report - Part III of the Tenth Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors - contains the discussions on the commercial development of FBRs according to national plans, mostly related to technology problems of containment design, fuel fabrication, fuel failures, sodium pressure, fuel-sodium interaction, computer codes needed for licensing. Most of the discussions were related to the existing reactors: BN-600, BN-350, BN-1600, BOR-60, RAPSODIE, PHENIX.

  18. Tenth annual meeting, Vienna, Austria, 29 March - 1 April 1977. Summary report. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    The Summary Report - Part III of the Tenth Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors - contains the discussions on the commercial development of FBRs according to national plans, mostly related to technology problems of containment design, fuel fabrication, fuel failures, sodium pressure, fuel-sodium interaction, computer codes needed for licensing. Most of the discussions were related to the existing reactors: BN-600, BN-350, BN-1600, BOR-60, RAPSODIE, PHENIX

  19. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 266 - Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride III Appendix III to Part 266 Protection of Environment... to Part 266—Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride Terrain...

  20. Differences Regarding Branded HA in Italy, Part 2: Data from Clinical Studies on Knee, Hip, Shoulder, Ankle, Temporomandibular Joint, Vertebral Facets, and Carpometacarpal Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliore, A.; Bizzi, E.; De Lucia, O.; Delle Sedie, A.; Tropea, S.; Bentivegna, M.; Mahmoud, A.; Foti, C.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The aim of the current study is to collect scientific data on all branded hyaluronic acid (HA) products in Italy that are in use for intra-articular (IA) injection in osteoarthritis (OA) compared with that reported in the leaflet. METHODS An extensive literature research was performed for all articles reporting data on the IA use of HA in OA. Selected studies were taken into consideration only if they are related to products based on HAs that are currently marketed in Italy with the specific joint indication for IA use in patients affected by OA. RESULTS Sixty-two HA products are marketed in Italy: 30 products are indicated for the knee but only 8 were proved with some efficacy; 9 products were effective for the hip but only 6 had hip indication; 7 products proved to be effective for the shoulder but only 3 had the indication; 5 products proved effective for the ankle but only one had the indication; 6 products were effective for the temporomandibular joint but only 2 had the indication; only 2 proved effective for vertebral facet joints but only 1 had the indication; and 5 products proved effective for the carpometacarpal joint but only 2 had the indication. CONCLUSIONS There are only a few products with some evidences, while the majority of products remain without proof. Clinicians and regulators should request postmarketing studies from pharmaceuticals to corroborate with that reported in the leaflet and to gather more data, allowing the clinicians to choose the adequate product for the patient. PMID:27279754

  1. Temporomandibular joint movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, M.; Itou, S.; Ishii, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Kawamura, Y.; Matsuda, T.; Hayashi, N.; Ishii, J.

    1992-01-01

    Ten temporomandibular joints (TMJs) of 5 healthy volunteers and 19 TMJs of internal derangements in 16 patients with splint therapy were examined with MR imaging. T1-weighted images were obtained only in the closed mouth position, and gradient recalled acquisition in steady state (GRASS) images were obtained in active opening and closing phases, allowing a pseudodynamic display of TMJ movement. All patients received protrusive splint treatment. The usefulness of MR imaging to assess the efficacy of splint therapy was evaluated. Corrected disk position with the splint in place was clearly demonstrated in 9 TMJs, corresponding with elimination of reciprocal clicking. Ten other TMJs of anterior disk displacement without reduction showed uncorrected disk position by the splint. This information could confirm the therapeutic efficacy, or suggest other treatment alternatives. GRASS MR imaging can provide accurate and physiologic information about disk function in initial and follow-up assessment of protrusive splint therapy. (orig.)

  2. Temporomandibular joint arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hyung Sik; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Myoung Joon; Jun, Young Hwan; Chang, Duk Soo; Jung, Don Young; Jung, In Won

    1988-01-01

    The stress and occlusion disturbance are very important etiologic factors in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain dysfunction syndromes. Authors performed TMJ arthrograms in the patients with TMJ problem such as pain, click sound, limited motion and locking, etc. The following results noted: 1. The arthrographic findings of 22 TMJ were analyzed. a) Normal: 6 cases b) Anterior disc displacement with rediction: 6 cases · Early reduction: 2 cases · Intermediate reduction: 3 cases · Late reduction: 1 case c) Anterior disc displacement without reduction: 6 cases · Two cases had adhesion between the posterior portion of disc and the posterior surfaces of the articular eminence. 2. Among 22 cases, the clinical findings of 16 cases (73%) were compatible with arthrographic findings. 6 cases showed disparity between them.

  3. Building human resources capability in health care: a global analysis of best practice--Part III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zairi, M

    1998-01-01

    This is the last part of a series of three papers which discussed very comprehensively best practice applications in human resource management by drawing special inferences to the healthcare context. It emerged from parts I and II that high performing organisations plan and intend to build sustainable capability through a systematic consideration of the human element as the key asset and through a continuous process of training, developing, empowering and engaging people in all aspects of organisational excellence. Part III brings this debate to a close by demonstrating what brings about organisational excellence and proposes a road map for effective human resource development and management, based on world class standards. Healthcare human resource professionals can now rise to the challenge and plan ahead for building organisational capability and sustainable performance.

  4. Neuroscience in Nazi Europe Part III: victims of the Third Reich.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidman, Lawrence A; Kondziella, Daniel

    2012-11-01

    In Part I, neuroscience collaborators with the Nazis were discussed, and in Part II, neuroscience resistors were discussed. In Part III, we discuss the tragedy regarding european neuroscientists who became victims of the Nazi onslaught on “non-Aryan” doctors. Some of these unfortunate neuroscientists survived Nazi concentration camps, but most were murdered. We discuss the circumstances and environment which stripped these neuroscientists of their profession, then of their personal rights and freedom, and then of their lives. We include a background analysis of anti-Semitism and Nazism in their various countries, then discuss in depth seven exemplary neuroscientist Holocaust victims; including Germans Ludwig Pick, Arthur Simons, and Raphael Weichbrodt, Austrians Alexander Spitzer and Viktor Frankl, and Poles Lucja Frey and Wladyslaw Sterling. by recognizing and remembering these victims of neuroscience, we pay homage and do not allow humanity to forget, lest this dark period in history ever repeat itself.

  5. Social class, political power, and the state: their implications in medicine--part III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, V

    1977-01-01

    This is the third part of an article on the distribution of power and the nature of the state in Western industrialized societies and their implications in medicine. Parts I and II were published in the preceding issue of this Journal. Part I presented a critique of contemporary theories of the Western system of power; discussed the countervailing pluralist and power of elite theories, as well as those of bureaucratic and professional control; and concluded with an examination of the Marxist theories of economic determinism, structural determinism, and corporate statism. Part II presented a Marxist theory of the role, nature, and characteristics of state intervention. Part III focuses on the mode of that intervention and the reasons for its growth, with an added analysis of the attributes of state intervention in the health sector, and of the dialectical relationship between its growth and the current fiscal crisis of the state. In all three parts, the focus is on Western European countries and on North America, with many examples and categories from the area of medicine.

  6. 10 CFR Appendix III to Part 960 - Application of the System and Technical Guidelines During the Siting Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 960—Application of the System and Technical Guidelines During the Siting Process 1. This appendix... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Application of the System and Technical Guidelines During the Siting Process III Appendix III to Part 960 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE...

  7. The temporomandibular joint in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomaroli, A.; Lener, M.

    1988-01-01

    The first part describes details of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) which are of interest for the examination by computed tomography. In the second part three new planes of reference for scanning of the ventral, middle or dorsal part of the joint are presented. CT examinations were made of 14 TMJ of corpses to identify the medial or ventral parts of the articular disc, medial wall of the articular capsule and medial or triangular recessus to achieve this were scanned the corpses with opened and closed mouth, as well as with closed sets of teeth using a sort of hypomochlion in the molar region to distract the TMJ. More over we applicated different contrast mediums like air and niob. (orig.) [de

  8. Temporomandibular Joint Septic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco Frojo, MD

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary:. Infection of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ is a rare pediatric condition resulting from the introduction of pathogens into the joint by hematogenous seeding, local extension, or trauma. Early recognition of the typical signs and symptoms including fever, trismus, preauricular swelling, and TMJ region tenderness are critical in order to initiate further evaluation and prevent feared complications of fibrosis, ankylosis, abnormal facial structure, or persistence of symptoms. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography with ancillary laboratory analysis including erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, and white blood cell count are beneficial in confirming the suspected diagnosis and monitoring response to therapy. Initial intervention should include empiric parenteral antibiotics, early mandibular mobilization, and joint decompression to provide synovial fluid for analysis including cultures. This report describes a case of TMJ bacterial arthritis in a healthy 6-year-old male who was promptly treated nonsurgically with intravenous antibiotics and localized needle joint decompression with return to normal function after completion of oral antibiotics and physical therapy.

  9. Temporomandibular joint examination reviewed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Guarda Nardini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ it’s a joint closely related to the skull base, the spine, and the jaws; all these anatomical structures must be taken in consideration when evaluating pain involving the tmj. In order to detect patients affected by pathology or dysfunctions of the tmj, physical examination is of great value in orienting the diagnosis. Inspection must consider the symmetry of the body, the dental status and the type of occlusion. Palpation is a way to assess contractiont involving the muscles of the masticatory system and of the neck. Auscultation, based on articular noise provides means to determine whether we are dealing with degeneration of the joint or a dislocation of the intrarticular disc. In order to confirm the diagnosis obtained with the clinical evaluation, it’s useful to perform imaging techniques as opt, tomography and TC of the tmj and electromyokineosiography – index of the mandibular functionality and of the muscles status. MRI and dynamic MRI are among the non invasive exams which give the greatest amount of information, regarding the disc position and the joint degeneration. Arthroscopy is an invasive technique that allows early diagnosis of degeneration and is helpful to reveal early inflammatory processes of the joint.

  10. [Temporo-mandibular ankylosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bénateau, H; Chatellier, A; Caillot, A; Diep, D; Kün-Darbois, J-D; Veyssière, A

    2016-09-01

    Ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint is defined as a permanent constriction of the jaws with less than 30mm mouth opening measured between the incisors, occurring because of bony, fibrous or fibro-osseous fusion. Resulting complications such as speech, chewing, swallowing impediment and deficient oral hygiene may occur. The overall incidence is decreasing but remains significant in some developing countries. The most frequent etiology in developed countries is the post-traumatic ankylosis occurring after condylar fracture. Other causes may be found: infection (decreasing since the advent of antibiotics), inflammation (rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis mainly) and congenital diseases (very rare). Management relies on surgery: resection of the ankylosis block in combination with bilateral coronoidectomy… The block resection may be offset by the interposition temporal fascia flap, a costochondral graft or a TMJ prosthesis according to the loss of height and to the impact on dental occlusion. Postoperative rehabilitation is essential and has to be started early, to be intense and prolonged. Poor rehabilitation is the main cause of ankylosis recurrence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Temporomandibular Joint Regenerative Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Van Bellinghen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The temporomandibular joint (TMJ is an articulation formed between the temporal bone and the mandibular condyle which is commonly affected. These affections are often so painful during fundamental oral activities that patients have lower quality of life. Limitations of therapeutics for severe TMJ diseases have led to increased interest in regenerative strategies combining stem cells, implantable scaffolds and well-targeting bioactive molecules. To succeed in functional and structural regeneration of TMJ is very challenging. Innovative strategies and biomaterials are absolutely crucial because TMJ can be considered as one of the most difficult tissues to regenerate due to its limited healing capacity, its unique histological and structural properties and the necessity for long-term prevention of its ossified or fibrous adhesions. The ideal approach for TMJ regeneration is a unique scaffold functionalized with an osteochondral molecular gradient containing a single stem cell population able to undergo osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation such as BMSCs, ADSCs or DPSCs. The key for this complex regeneration is the functionalization with active molecules such as IGF-1, TGF-β1 or bFGF. This regeneration can be optimized by nano/micro-assisted functionalization and by spatiotemporal drug delivery systems orchestrating the 3D formation of TMJ tissues.

  12. Temporomandibular disorders in adolescents with headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojka, Anna; Żarowski, Marcin; Steinborn, Barbara; Hedzelek, Wiesław; Wiśniewska-Spychała, Beata; Dorocka-Bobkowska, Barbara

    2018-02-01

    Headache is a common complaint in all age groups and is a frequent cause of medical consultations and hospitalization. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of bite and non-bite parafunctions as well as the signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) in adolescents presenting with primary headaches. Parents of adolescents presented with headaches to the Department of Developmental Neurology within a 12-month period were asked to complete a questionnaire developed by the authors of this study. Of the 1000 patients evaluated, 19 females and 21 males, aged 13 to 17 years, met the inclusion criterion - a confirmed clinical diagnosis of migraine or a tension headache according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd edition. The diagnostic algorithm of the study group consisted of a full medical history, an assessment of the occurrence of bite habits and a physical examination based on the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD). Bite and non-bite parafunctions were found in 36 of the study group patients. A significant difference (p = 0.0003) between the number of bite parafunctions and non-bite parafunctions was found in females but not in males. However, bite parafunctions were more frequent in boys compared to girls (p = 0.01). Our findings suggest that it may be useful for pediatricians and neurologists to include TMD dysfunctions as a part of a standard examination of adolescents presenting with persistent headaches.

  13. Temporomandibular disorders in headache patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Christiane-Espinola-Bandeira; Oliveira, José-Luiz-Góes; Jesus, Alan-Chester-Feitosa; Maia, Mila-Leite-de Moraes; de Santana, Jonielly-Costa-Vasconcelos; Andrade, Loren-Suyane-Oliveira; Siqueira Quintans, Jullyana-de Souza; Quintans-Junior, Lucindo-José; Conti, Paulo-César-Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify the frequency of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and its seve-rity in individuals with headache. Study Design: 60 adults divided into three groups of 20 individuals: chronic daily headache (CDH), episodic headache (EH) and a control group without headache (WH). Headache diagnosis was performed according to the criteria of International Headache Society and the signs and symptoms of TMD were achieved by using a clinical exam and an anamnestic questionnaire. The severity of TMD was defined by the temporomandibular index (TMI). Results: The TMD signs and symptoms were always more frequent in individuals with headache, especially report of pain in TMJ area (CDH, n=16; EH, n=12; WH, n=6), pain to palpation on masseter (CDH, n=19; EH, n=16; WH, n=11) which are significantly more frequent in episodic and chronic daily headache. The mean values of temporomandibular and articular index (CDH patients) and muscular index (CDH and EH patients) were statistically higher than in patients of the control group, notably the articular (CDH=0.38; EH=0.25;WH=0.19) and muscular (CDH=0.46; EH=0.51; WH=0.26) indices. Conclusions: These findings allow us to speculate that masticatory and TMJ pain are more common in headache subjects. Besides, it seems that the TMD is more severe in headache patients. Key words:Temporomandibular dysfunction, headache disorders. PMID:22926473

  14. Thermal sensation and comfort models for non-uniform and transient environments: Part III: whole-body sensation and comfort

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Hui; Arens, Edward; Huizenga, Charlie; Han, Taeyoung

    2009-01-01

    A three-part series presents the development of models for predicting the local thermal sensation (Part I) and local thermal comfort (Part II) of different parts of the human body, and also the whole-body sensation and comfort (Part III) that result from combinations of local sensation and comfort. The models apply to sedentary activities in a range of environments: uniform and non-uniform, stable and transient. They are based on diverse findings from the literature and from body-part-specifi...

  15. Actualización terapéutica de los trastornos temporomandibulares Updating on the treatment of temporomandibular disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indira García Martínez

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una revisión bibliográfica con el objetivo de actualizar las diferentes alternativas terapéuticas que se disponen por parte de los profesionales para el tratamiento de los trastornos temporomandibulares, para lo cual los primeros esfuerzos están encaminados al alivio del dolor y al restablecimiento de la función, aunque previamente es necesario un buen diagnóstico y detección de los factores causales, enfatizando que el estrés es un elemento primordial que se debe considerar. La existencia de variados enfoques terapéuticos para los trastornos temporomandibulares queda justificada por la multifactorialidad de la etiología; las 2 alternativas más utilizadas son las férulas oclusales y el tallado selectivo. Se prefiere la fisioterapia a la quimioterapia, como coadyuvante terapéutica de los trastornos temporomandibulares, ya que disminuye el peligro de producir reacciones adversas. Solo se indicará el tratamiento quirúrgico cuando han fracasado los métodos conservadores.A literature review was made to provide updated information on the different therapeutic alternatives at the disposal of dental professionals for the treatment of termporomandibular disorders aimed at relieving pain and re-establish the functioning of the joint. However, it is necessary to firstly make a good diagnosis and then detect the causative factors, emphasizing that stress is a key element to be taken into consideration. The existence of various therapeutical approaches for temporomandibular disorders is due to the multiple factors present in the etiology; the two most used alternatives are occlusal splints and selective carving. Physiotherapy is prefered over chemotherapy, as therapeutic coadjuvant for temporomandibular disorders, because likely occurence of adverse reaction decreases. The surgical treatment will be advised only in the event of failure of standard methods.

  16. Temporomandibular disorder in otolaryngology: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepan, L; Shaw, C-K L; Oue, S

    2017-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorder poses a diagnostic challenge to otolaryngologists as orofacial pain, headache and otology symptoms are very common in temporomandibular disorder, and mimic a number of otolaryngological conditions. Missed diagnosis of temporomandibular disorder can lead to unnecessary investigation and treatment, resulting in further patient suffering. To review the current literature and propose management pathways for otolaryngologists to correctly differentiate temporomandibular disorder from other otolaryngological conditions, and to initiate effective treatment for temporomandibular disorder in collaboration with other health professionals. A systematic review using PubMed and Medline databases was conducted, and data on temporomandibular disorder in conjunction with otolaryngological symptoms were collected for analysis. Of 4155 potential studies, 33 were retrieved for detailed evaluation and 12 met the study criteria. There are questionnaires, examination techniques and radiological investigations presented in the literature to assist with distinguishing between otolaryngological causes of symptoms and temporomandibular disorder. Simple treatment can be initiated by the otolaryngologist. Initial temporomandibular disorder treatment steps can be undertaken by the otolaryngologist, with consideration of referral to dentists, oral and maxillofacial surgeons, or physiotherapists if simple pharmacological treatment or temporomandibular disorder exercise fails.

  17. The Diagnostic Value of Pressure Algometry for Temporomandibular Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Włodzimierz Więckiewicz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine the diagnostic value of pressure algometry in temporomandibular disorders. Two hundred volunteers aged 19.3 to 27.8 (mean 21.50, SD 0.97 participated in this study. An analogue pressure algometer was used for the evaluation of muscle tenderness of the following masticatory muscles: superficial and deep parts of the masseter muscle; anterior and posterior parts of the temporal muscle; and the tissues adjacent to the lateral and dorsal part of the temporomandibular joint capsule. Each patient described the algometry result for the individual components of the masticatory motor system, by selecting each time the intensity of pain on a 100 mm Visual Analogue Scale (VAS ruler. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve, indicating the discriminatory efficiency for asymptomatic subjects and patients with temporomandibular dysfunction according to the dysfunction Di index, was the largest for the mean pain value (AUC = 0.8572; SEM = 0.0531. The 7.4 VAS cut-off point marked 95.3% specificity for this variable in identifying healthy subjects and 58.4% sensitivity in identifying patients with symptoms of dysfunctions (accuracy 68.1%. Assuming comparable sensitivity (74.9% and specificity (74.2% for a diagnostic test, there was test accuracy of 74.5% at the 4.2 VAS cut-off point.

  18. Osseous temporomandibular joint abnormalities in rheumatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larheim, T.A.; Kolbenstvedt, A.; Rikshospitalet, Oslo

    1990-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was compared with hypocycloidal tomography in 30 joints of 15 adults with rheumatic disease. CT included 1.5 mm thick axial scans (at 1.0 mm intervals) with reformatted oblique sagittal and oblique coronal sections. Multisection (at 2.0 mm intervals) tomography included oblique sagittal and occasionally, oblique coronal sections. CT demonstrated bone abnormalities in 21 and tomography in 20 joints, indicating high agreement between the imaging modalities regarding number of abnormal TMJs. Bone structures were, however, better visualized by multiplanar CT due to superior contrast and spatial resolution particularly in the most lateral and medial parts of the joint, indicating superiority of CT for depicting subtle bony TMJ abnormalities in patients with rheumatic disease. (orig.)

  19. Experimental occlusal interferences. Part III. Mandibular rotations induced by a rigid interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassouli, N M; Christensen, L V

    1995-10-01

    A rigid intercuspal interference (minimum mean height of 0.24 mm) was placed on either the right or left mandibular second premolar and first molar of 12 subjects. During brisk and forceful biting on the interference, rotational electrognathography measured maximum torque of the right and left mandibular condyles in the frontal and horizontal planes of orientation. All subjects showed frontal plan upward rotation (mean of 0.7 degrees) of the mandibular condyle contralateral to the interference. In 33% of the subjects there was no horizontal plane backward rotation. In 58% of the subjects there was horizontal plane backward rotation (mean of 0.5 degrees) of the mandibular condyle ipsilateral to the interference, and in one subject (8%) there was backward horizontal plane rotation (0.1 degree) of the mandibular condyle contralateral to the interference. It was inferred that the masseter muscle, ipsilateral to the interference, generated negative work in order to decelerate frontal plane 'unseating' of the mandibular condyle ipsilateral to the interference. It was inferred that the masseter muscle, contralateral to the interference, produced positive work in order to accelerate frontal plane 'seating' of the mandibular condyle contralateral to the interference. Finally, it was speculated that the impact forces of frontal plane 'seating' of the mandibular condyle, contralateral to the interference, might lead to 'vacuum sticking' of the temporomandibular joint disc because of the formation of negative hydrostatic pressures.

  20. Physiotherapy and low back pain - part iii: outcomes research utilising the biosychosocial model: psychosocial outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. D. Bardin

    2003-02-01

    has evolved that necessitates the use of a biopsychosocial model, focusing on illness rather than disease and incorporating the biological, psychological and social aspects that are important to understand and to study LBP in its chronic form. Traditional outcome measures that measure elements within the biological component are limited to assess the spectrum of impacts caused by chronic low back pain (CLBP and the validity, reliability and sensitivity of some of these measures has been questioned.Few physiologic tests of spine function are clinically meaningful to patients, objective physical findings can be absent, and in CLBP disability and activity intolerance are often disproportional to the original injury. Biological outcomes should be complemented by outcomes of the psychosocial aspects of back pain that measure the considerable functional and emotional impact on the quality of life of patients experiencing low back dysfunction. Outcomes research is an analysis of clinical practice as it actually occurs and can  make a valuable contribution to understanding the multidimensional impact of LBP. Psychosocial aspects of the biopsychosocial model for outcomes research are discussed in part III: functional status/disability, psychological impairment, patient satisfaction, health related quality of life

  1. A Structural Molar Volume Model for Oxide Melts Part III: Fe Oxide-Containing Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibodeau, Eric; Gheribi, Aimen E.; Jung, In-Ho

    2016-04-01

    As part III of this series, the model is extended to iron oxide-containing melts. All available experimental data in the FeO-Fe2O3-Na2O-K2O-MgO-CaO-MnO-Al2O3-SiO2 system were critically evaluated based on the experimental condition. The variations of FeO and Fe2O3 in the melts were taken into account by using FactSage to calculate the Fe2+/Fe3+ distribution. The molar volume model with unary and binary model parameters can be used to predict the molar volume of the molten oxide of the Li2O-Na2O-K2O-MgO-CaO-MnO-PbO-FeO-Fe2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 system in the entire range of compositions, temperatures, and oxygen partial pressures from Fe saturation to 1 atm pressure.

  2. Temporomandibular disorders after whiplash injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasch, Helge; Hjorth, Tine; Svensson, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Aims: Whiplash injury to the neck, is often considered a significant risk factor for development of temporomandibular disorders (TMD), and has been proposed to produce internal derangements of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Few studies however have examined TMD-related pain in acute whiplash...... patients compared with a matched control group. The aim of the present study was to assess pain and sensorimotor function in the craniofacial region in an unselected group of patients sustaining a motor vehicle accident involving a rear collision. Methods: Prospectively, 19 acute whiplash patients exposed...... obtained at each visit. Results: One whiplash patient and I ankle-injury patient bad jaw pain at the first visit. Palpation scores of the TMJ and the summated palpation scores only tended to be higher in patients sustaining a whiplash injury than in ankle-injury controls at the first visit. However, MPQ...

  3. Temporomandibular disorders in headache patients

    OpenAIRE

    Mello, Christiane-Espinola-Bandeira; Oliveira, José-Luiz-Góes; Jesus, Alan-Chester-Feitosa; Maia, Mila-Leite-de Moraes; de Santana, Jonielly-Costa-Vasconcelos; Andrade, Loren-Suyane-Oliveira; Siqueira Quintans, Jullyana-de Souza; Quintans-Junior, Lucindo-José; Conti, Paulo-César-Rodrigues; Bonjardim, Leonardo-Rigoldi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify the frequency of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and its seve-rity in individuals with headache. Study Design: 60 adults divided into three groups of 20 individuals: chronic daily headache (CDH), episodic headache (EH) and a control group without headache (WH). Headache diagnosis was performed according to the criteria of International Headache Society and the signs and symptoms of TMD were achieved by using a clinical exam and an anamnestic quest...

  4. The headache of temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virdee, J

    2018-03-01

    This article endeavours to revise the key guidance and evidence on temporomandibular disorders (TMD), with a particular focus on myofascial pain. It highlights the important role that primary care dental practitioners play in providing holistic care during the patient's journey to manage this painful condition. I hope to give an insight into my own personal experiences to highlight the challenges patients can face in seeking appropriate support.

  5. MR diagnosis of temporomandibular arthrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suenaga, Shigeaki [Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Dentistry

    1996-09-01

    This review described lesions of articular disk and its surrounding tissues revealed by MR examination in temporomandibular arthrosis, and problems and limits of the examination. Apparatus and imaging methods: Spin echo method was generally used and gradient echo method was alternatively used. Author`s apparatus was 1.5 tesla Signa, Advantage type, equipped with surface coil for temporomandibular joint. Imaging conditions were T1-weighted spin echo method, T2-weighted fast spin echo method, spoiled GRASS (gradient recalled acquisition in the steady state) method and GRASS method. MR findings of articular disk: MR images of normal and abnormal temporomandibular joint were presented together with computed radiographic findings. The role of dynamic imaging was described for evaluation and analysis of the joint functioning. MR findings of surrounding tissues of the disk: Dynamic MRI of the tissues was found useful to see whether the cause of pain was present inside or outside of the articular capsule. Joint effusion could not be fully imaged in T2-weighted conditions. (K.H.)

  6. MR diagnosis of temporomandibular arthrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suenaga, Shigeaki

    1996-01-01

    This review described lesions of articular disk and its surrounding tissues revealed by MR examination in temporomandibular arthrosis, and problems and limits of the examination. Apparatus and imaging methods: Spin echo method was generally used and gradient echo method was alternatively used. Author's apparatus was 1.5 tesla Signa, Advantage type, equipped with surface coil for temporomandibular joint. Imaging conditions were T1-weighted spin echo method, T2-weighted fast spin echo method, spoiled GRASS (gradient recalled acquisition in the steady state) method and GRASS method. MR findings of articular disk: MR images of normal and abnormal temporomandibular joint were presented together with computed radiographic findings. The role of dynamic imaging was described for evaluation and analysis of the joint functioning. MR findings of surrounding tissues of the disk: Dynamic MRI of the tissues was found useful to see whether the cause of pain was present inside or outside of the articular capsule. Joint effusion could not be fully imaged in T2-weighted conditions. (K.H.)

  7. Acuity and case management: a healthy dose of outcomes, part III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Diane L; Craig, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    This is the third of a 3-part series presenting 2 effective applications--acuity and dosage--that describe how the business case for case management (CM) can be made. In Part I, dosage and acuity concepts were explained as client need-severity, CM intervention-intensity, and CM activity-dose prescribed by amount, frequency, duration, and breadth of activities. Concepts were presented that related the practice of CM to the use of evidence-based practice (EBP), knowledge, and methods and the development of instruments that measure and score pivotal CM actions. Part I also featured a specific exemplar, the CM Acuity Tool, and described how to use acuity to identify and score the complexity of a CM case. Part II further explained dosage and 2 acuity instruments, the Acuity Tool and AccuDiff. Part III presents linkage to EBP and practical applications. The information contained in the 3-part series applies to all CM practice settings and contains ideas and recommendations useful to CM generalists, specialists, supervisors, and business and outcomes managers. The Acuity Tools Project was developed from frontline CM practice in one large, national telephonic CM company. Dosage: A literature search failed to find research into dosage of a behavioral intervention. The Huber-Hall model was developed and tested in a longitudinal study of CM models in substance abuse treatment and reported in the literature. Acuity: A structured literature search and needs assessment launched the development of the suite of acuity tools. A gap analysis identified that an instrument to assign and measure case acuity specific to CM activities was needed. Clinical experts, quality specialists, and business analysts (n = 7) monitored the development and testing of the tools, acuity concepts, scores, differentials, and their operating principles and evaluated the validity of the acuity tools' content related to CM activities. During the pilot phase of development, interrater reliability testing of

  8. Traumatic injuries of the temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puig, S.; Krestan, C.; Lomoschitz, F.; Robinson, S.; Glaser, C.; Staudenherz, A.

    2001-01-01

    Injuries of the temporomandibular joint are mostly due to injuries or fractures of the mandibular condyle. Fractures of the skull base involving the temporomandibular joint are rare. Classification of fractures refers to their anatomical positions and the presence or absence of a luxation. Further, it is important whether the fracture is intra- or extra-capsular. The primary imaging method should be orthopantomography. As for therapy planning, especially surgery, also evaluation of soft tissue is necessary, computed tomography is the imaging method of choice. For diagnosis of complications or internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint, magnetic resonance imaging is to be recommended. (orig.) [de

  9. Trastornos temporomandibulares en adictos al qat

    OpenAIRE

    Orlando Guerra Cobián; Raúl J Pupo Triguero; Humberto Sarracent Pérez; Kirenia M Rabilero Salgado

    2012-01-01

    Introducción: los trastornos temporomandibulares se asocian frecuentemente al hábito de masticar qat, pero se carece de estudios que detallan sus particularidades, por lo que se realiza este trabajo, con los objetivos de determinar la prevalencia de trastornos temporomandibulares en pacientes adictos al qat, identificar los hallazgos clínicos- radiográficos asociados y clasificar los trastornos temporomandibulares presentes en la población estudiada. Métodos: se realizó un estudio prospectivo...

  10. Providing for energy efficiency in homes and small buildings. Part III. Determining which practices are most effective and installing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-06-01

    The training program is designed to educate students and individuals in the importance of conserving energy and to provide for developing skills needed in the application of energy-saving techniques that result in energy-efficient buildings. A teacher guide and student workbook are available to supplement the basic manual. Subjects covered in Part III are: determining which practices are most efficient and economical; installing energy-saving materials; and improving efficiency of equipment.

  11. Technical Reports (Part I). End of Project Report, 1968-1971, Volume III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western Nevada Regional Education Center, Lovelock.

    The pamphlets included in this volume are technical reports prepared as outgrowths of the Student Information Systems of the Western Nevada Regional Education Center (WN-REC) funded by a Title III (Elementary and Secondary Education Act) grant. These reports describe methods of interpreting the printouts from the Student Information System;…

  12. [The temporo-mandibular articulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargaud, J; Vinkka-Puhakka, H

    2004-04-01

    The standing posture of humans has created both morphological and functional adaptations in the temporo-mandibular joint and the masticatory function. This biped state is the one of the most important characteristic of human evolution. It is furthermore the agent determining most of the functional changes in the whole body. This survey will be carried out in several levels including, a descriptive anatomy, biomechanics, radiological imaging, functioning in the articulation of TMJ. The descriptive anatomic picture will be obtained by the traditional dissection techniques. 20 TMJ joints are dissected from 10 cadavers: 7 cadavers, 65-75 year old, 3 cadavers, 60-65 year old. The x-rays are lateral view and the subjects of the radiological imaging are young's, adults and olds: 1, 3 y-old Male; 1, 7 y-old Female; 1, 14 y-old Female; 10, 19-23 y-old Male; 1, 26 y-old Female; 1, 34 y-old Male; 1, 75 y-old Female. The anatomic elements in the TMJ well resembled the ones described in the literature of the capsule, the ligament, the masticator muscles (masseter, temporal, medial and lateral pterygoids). The temporo-mandibular ligament proved to be difficult to separate from the capsule in some of the specimens. Sometimes it was not always found after a dissection.

  13. Chronic Temporomandibular Pain Treatment Using Sodium Diclofenac

    OpenAIRE

    Kurita Varoli, Fernando; Sato, Sandra; Sucena Pita, Murillo; do Nascimento, Cássio; Pedrazzi, Vinícius

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluate spontaneous pain after and before administration of sodium diclofenac, isolated or associated to carisoprodol, acetaminophen and caffeine, in chronic temporomandibular disorders (TMD) patients. Were selected eighteen volunteers, both men and women, between 35-70 years of age (mean age 50 years). The inclusion criteria was masticatory muscle pain, and the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) was used on the diagnose. The selection of treatm...

  14. Temporomandibular disorders, facial pain, and headaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Steven D

    2012-05-01

    Headaches and facial pain are common in the general population. In many cases, facial pain can be resultant from temporomandibular joint disorders. Studies have identified an association between headaches and temporomandibular joint disorders suggesting the possibility of shared pathophysiologic mechanisms of these 2 maladies. The aim of this paper is to elucidate potential commonalities of these disorders and to provide a brief overview of an examination protocol that may benefit the headache clinician in daily practice. © 2012 American Headache Society.

  15. The Temporomandibular Joint Pain Dysfunction Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Speck, John E.

    1988-01-01

    When a patient complains of headache, neckache, or earache and these are associated with noisy temporomandibular joint function, restricted opening or increased pain when chewing, a temporomandibular joint or masticatory muscle disorder should be considered in the differential diagnosis, because signs and symptoms of these disorders are common in all age groups. This article indicates the more common etiological contributions, that is, microtrauma, repeated microtrauma, muscle hyperactivity, ...

  16. Cervical Musculoskeletal Impairments and Temporomandibular Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Susan Armijo-Olivo; David Magee

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The study of cervical muscles and their significance in the development and perpetuation of Temporomandibular Disorders has not been elucidated. Thus this project was designed to investigate the association between cervical musculoskeletal impairments and Temporomandibular Disorders. Material and Methods A sample of 154 subjects participated in this study. All subjects underwent a series of physical tests and electromyographic assessment (i.e. head and neck posture, maxima...

  17. Trastornos temporomandibulares en adictos al qat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Guerra Cobián

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: los trastornos temporomandibulares se asocian frecuentemente al hábito de masticar qat, pero se carece de estudios que detallan sus particularidades, por lo que se realiza este trabajo, con los objetivos de determinar la prevalencia de trastornos temporomandibulares en pacientes adictos al qat, identificar los hallazgos clínicos- radiográficos asociados y clasificar los trastornos temporomandibulares presentes en la población estudiada. Métodos: se realizó un estudio prospectivo, descriptivo, de corte transversal, en una muestra de 352 pacientes, del total de pacientes adictos, atendidos en el Departamento de Cirugía, Colegio Dental. Ibb,Yemen en el periodo octubre 2010-abril 2011. Se determinaron los hallazgos clínicos y radiográficos presentes, y se diagnosticó el tipo de trastorno temporomandibular. Resultados: se evidenció que estaban afectados por trastornos temporomandibulares el 55,7 % de los pacientes. Se encontró dolor articular agudo en 14,1 % y aplanamiento condilar anterior en 35,6 %. Conclusiones: los trastornos temporomandibulares afectaron más de la mitad de la población estudiada, adicta al qat. Los desórdenes en la relación cóndilo-disco fueron los más encontrados (41 %. El aplanamiento condilar anterior dominó en el análisis radiográfico.

  18. Fracture toughness of A533B Part III - variability of A533B fracture toughness as determined from Charpy data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druce, S.G.; Eyre, B.L.

    1978-08-01

    This is the final part of a series of three reports examining the upper shelf fracture toughness of A533B Class 1 pressure vessel steel. Part I (AERE R 8968) critically reviews the current elasto plastic fracture mechanics methodologies employed to characterise toughness following extensive yielding and Part II (AERE R 8969) examines several sources of fracture mechanics data pertinent to A533B Class 1 in the longitudinal (RW) orientation. Part III is a review of the effects of (i) position and orientation within the plate (ii) welding processes and post weld heat treatment and (iii) neutron irradiation as measured by Charpy impact testing. It is concluded that the upper shelf factor energy is dependent on orientation and position and can be reduced by welding, extended post weld heat treatments and neutron irradiation. Neutron irradiation effects are known to be strongly dependent on composition and metallurgical conditions, but an explanation for the variability following extended post weld treatments has yet to be resolved. (author)

  19. Eighth annual meeting, Vienna, Austria, 15-18 April 1975. Summary report. Part III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1976-01-01

    The Summary Report of the Eighth Annual Meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors contains the minutes of the meeting (Part 1); papers which review the national programmes in the field of LMFBRs (Part 2) and the discussions on the review of national programmes (Part 3). The agenda of the meeting involved design, construction, operating experiences of demonstration fast power reactors, reprocessing of spent fuel from LMFBRs, reliability of decay heat removal systems, fuel failure mechanisms, safety of LMFBRs.

  20. Eighth annual meeting, Vienna, Austria, 15-18 April 1975. Summary report. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The Summary Report of the Eighth Annual Meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors contains the minutes of the meeting (Part 1); papers which review the national programmes in the field of LMFBRs (Part 2) and the discussions on the review of national programmes (Part 3). The agenda of the meeting involved design, construction, operating experiences of demonstration fast power reactors, reprocessing of spent fuel from LMFBRs, reliability of decay heat removal systems, fuel failure mechanisms, safety of LMFBRs

  1. Three-dimensional (3D) analysis of the temporomandibular joint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kitai, N.; Kreiborg, S.; Murakami, S.

    Symposium Orthodontics 2001: Where are We Now? Where are We Going?, three-dimensional analysis, temporomandibular joint......Symposium Orthodontics 2001: Where are We Now? Where are We Going?, three-dimensional analysis, temporomandibular joint...

  2. Patients profiles and outcomes of care in temporomandibular disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, N.

    2018-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are a frequent disease in general population. Patients with TMDs may have orofacial pain, jaw functional limitation and joint sounds, which may negatively affect patients’ physical and psychological wellbeing. Temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ OA) and

  3. PATHOLOGY OF TEMPOROMANDIBULAR-JOINT INTERNAL DERANGEMENT AND OSTEOARTHROSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEBONT, LGM; STEGENGA, B

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthrosis and disk displacement seem to be strongly related, but they may also represent mutually independent temporomandibular disorders. This paper presents relevant aspects of normal physiology and degeneration of synovial joints, aspects of normal

  4. Thermal sensation and comfort models for non-uniform and transient environments, part III: Whole-body sensation and comfort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hui; Arens, Edward; Huizenga, Charlie [Center for the Built Environment, UC Berkeley (United States); Han, Taeyoung [General Motors Company (United States)

    2010-02-15

    A three-part series presents the development of models for predicting the local thermal sensation (Part I) and local thermal comfort (Part II) of different parts of the human body, and also the whole-body sensation and comfort (Part III) that result from combinations of local sensation and comfort. The models apply to sedentary activities in a range of environments: uniform and non-uniform, stable and transient. They are based on diverse findings from the literature and from body-part-specific human subject tests in a climate chamber. They were validated against a test of automobile passengers. The series is intended to present the models' rationale, structure, and coefficients, so that others can test them and develop them further as additional empirical data becomes available. A) The whole-body (overall) sensation model has two forms, depending on whether all of the body's segments have sensations effectively in the same direction (e.g warm or cool), or whether some segments have sensations opposite to those of the rest of the body. For each, individual body parts have different weights for warm versus cool sensations, and strong local sensations dominate the overall sensation. If all sensations are near neutral, the overall sensation is close to the average of all body sensations. B) The overall comfort model also has two forms. Under stable conditions, people evaluate their overall comfort by a complaint-driven process, meaning that when two body parts are strongly uncomfortable, no matter how comfortable the other body parts might be, the overall comfort will be near the discomfort level of the two most uncomfortable parts. When the environmental conditions are transient, or people have control over their environments, overall comfort is better than that of the two most uncomfortable body parts. This can be accounted for by adding the most comfortable vote to the two most uncomfortable ones. (author)

  5. Rheumatoid arthritis affecting temporomandibular joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandeep Sodhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic, systemic, autoimmune inflammatory disorder that is characterized by joint inflammation, erosive properties and symmetric multiple joint involvement. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ is very rare to be affected in the early phase of the disease, thus posing diagnostic challenges for the dentist. Conventional radiographs fail to show the early lesions due to its limitations. More recently cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT has been found to diagnose the early degenerative changes of TMJ and hence aid in the diagnosis of the lesions more accurately. Our case highlights the involvement of TMJ in RA and the role of advanced imaging (CBCT in diagnosing the bony changes in the early phase of the disease.

  6. [Temporomandibular joint, occlusion and bruxism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orthlieb, J D; Ré, J P; Jeany, M; Giraudeau, A

    2016-09-01

    Temporomandibular joint and dental occlusion are joined for better and worse. TMJ has its own weaknesses, sometimes indicated by bad functional habits and occlusal disorders. Occlusal analysis needs to be addressed simply and clearly. The term "malocclusion" is not reliable to build epidemiological studies, etiologic mechanisms or therapeutic advice on this "diagnosis". Understanding the impact of pathogenic malocclusion is not just about occlusal relationships that are more or less defective, it requires to locate them within the skeletal framework, the articular and behavioural context of the patient, and above all to assess their impact on the functions of the masticatory system. The TMJ-occlusion couple is often symbiotic, developing together in relation to its environment, compensating for its own shortcomings. However, a third partner may alter this relationship, such as bruxism, or more generally oral parafunctions, trauma or an interventionist practitioner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Temporomandibular disorder in chronic migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Latysheva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: For many years, temporomandibular disorder (TMD has been studied primarily by dentists and maxillofacial surgeons. However, new data is emerging that TMD is comorbid with various types of headache; however this association has not been studied in detail. Aim: To analyze TMD prevalence and clinical structure in patients with migraine. Materials and methods: We assessed 84 patients with chronic migraine (CM and 42 patients with episodic migraine (EM. TMD was diagnosed according to the Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders: Clinical Protocol and Assessment Instruments 2014. We also performed subgroup analysis for low-frequency EM (less than 4 headache days per month, LFEM vs. high-frequency EM and CM (over 10 headache days per month, HFEM + CM. Results: In both groups, myofascial pain was the most prevalent form of TMD. The prevalence of TMD was higher in CM as compared to EM (52.4% vs. 28.6%, correspondingly, р = 0.02. Even more evident differences were observed between LFEM and HFEM + CM (18.2% vs. 51.6%, correspondingly, р < 0.009. The difference was significant for painrelated TMD only. The prevalence of bruxism was comparable across LFEM and HFEM + CM (18% vs. 30.5%, correspondingly, р = 0.3 and significantly lower than TMD prevalence in HFEM + CM (30.5% vs. 51.6%, correspondingly, p = 0.005. The anxiety level in patients with and without TMD was also comparable (8.1 ± 4.1 vs. 8.3 ± 4.7, correspondingly, р = 0.8. Conclusion: CM patients have a high prevalence of pain-related TMD (52.4%. The prevalence of TMD in LFEM is comparable to that in the general population. The presence of bruxism or anxiety cannot be associated with a high TMD prevalence in our patients. In CM, pain in the masticatory muscles may be caused by anti-nociceptive dysfunction, mirroring central sensitization and disrupted descending modulation of pain.

  8. PIO I-II tendencies. Part 2. Improving the pilot modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan URSU

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The study is conceived in two parts and aims to get some contributions to the problem ofPIO aircraft susceptibility analysis. Part I, previously published in this journal, highlighted the mainsteps of deriving a complex model of human pilot. The current Part II of the paper considers a properprocedure of the human pilot mathematical model synthesis in order to analyze PIO II typesusceptibility of a VTOL-type aircraft, related to the presence of position and rate-limited actuator.The mathematical tools are those of semi global stability theory developed in recent works.

  9. Active Control of Low-Speed Fan Tonal Noise Using Actuators Mounted in Stator Vanes: Part III Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.; Remington, Paul J.; Walker, Bruce E.

    2003-01-01

    A test program to demonstrate simplification of Active Noise Control (ANC) systems relative to standard techniques was performed on the NASA Glenn Active Noise Control Fan from May through September 2001. The target mode was the m = 2 circumferential mode generated by the rotor-stator interaction at 2BPF. Seven radials (combined inlet and exhaust) were present at this condition. Several different error-sensing strategies were implemented. Integration of the error-sensors with passive treatment was investigated. These were: (i) an in-duct linear axial array, (ii) an induct steering array, (iii) a pylon-mounted array, and (iv) a near-field boom array. The effect of incorporating passive treatment was investigated as well as reducing the actuator count. These simplified systems were compared to a fully ANC specified system. Modal data acquired using the Rotating Rake are presented for a range of corrected fan rpm. Simplified control has been demonstrated to be possible but requires a well-known and dominant mode signature. The documented results here in are part III of a three-part series of reports with the same base title. Part I and II document the control system and error-sensing design and implementation.

  10. EFSUMB Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS), Part III - Abdominal Treatment Procedures (Long Version)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, Christoph F; Lorentzen, T.; Appelbaum, L.

    2016-01-01

    The third part of the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS) assesses the evidence for ultrasound-guided and assisted interventions in abdominal treatment procedures. Recommendations for clinical practice ar...

  11. EFSUMB Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS), Part III - Abdominal Treatment Procedures (Short Version)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, Christoph F; Lorentzen, T.; Appelbaum, L.

    2016-01-01

    The third part of the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound assesses the evidence for ultrasound-guided and assisted interventions in abdominal treatment procedures. Recommendations for clinical practice are presen...

  12. Temporomandibular joint involvement caused by Borrelia Burgdorferi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesnicar, Gorazd; Zerdoner, Danijel

    2007-12-01

    Lyme borreliosis is an endemic disease in Slovenia with an incidence of around 150 patients per 100,000 inhabitants. Although the large joints are most typically affected in Lyme borreliosis, there are also periods of disease activity with arthritis or arthralgias involving smaller joints, including the temporo-mandibular joint. During the years between 2000 and 2003, two patients with Lyme borreliosis affecting the temporo-mandibular joints were treated. The patients presented with fatigue and pain in diverse muscle groups accompanied by arthralgia, which was most pronounced in the temporomandibular joint area. None of the patients were febrile or had joint effusions. Both patients were examined by means of biochemical and serological examinations for Borrelia burgdorferi using ELISA assay and Western blot test (both for IgM and IgG), plain radiographs, MR and CT scans, and scinti-scan of the temporo-mandibular joints They both had positive serum markers for an acute B. burgdorferi infection and were treated with intravenous ceftriaxone. None of the patients had clinical or laboratory signs of chronic Lyme disease activity two and four years following therapy, respectively. Roentgenographic and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the temporo-mandibular joints had not shown any persistent sign of acute inflammation. There are only few reports of patients with manifest temporo-mandibular joint involvement of Lyme borreliosis in the literature. This report emphasizes the importance of differential diagnosis of acute temporo-mandibular joint arthralgia, of early diagnosis of Lyme borreliosis, and of the necessity for prompt antibiotic treatment.

  13. Antibacterianos de acción sistémica: Parte III. Sulfonamidas y tetraciclinas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Cué Brugueras

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: Se presenta la tercera parte de una revisión bibliográfica sobre los antibacterianos de elección, en la cual se abordan los grupos sulfonamidas y tetraciclinas; además, se incluye un cuadro resumen con los antibióticos tratados en las tres partes, así como sus vías de administración y nombres comerciales que se utilizan en Cuba. Se hacen algunas consideraciones sobre la manera de enfrentar la gran variedad de antibióticos y el costo de la antibióticoterapia por parte de los países en vías de desarrollo, tomando como referencia algunas recomendaciones hechas por la OPS/OMSSummary: The third part of a bibliographic review on the elective antibacterials in which the groups of sulfonamides and tetracyclines are approached is presented. It is also included a summary picture with the antibiotics dealt with in the three parts, the routes of administration, and the trade names used in Cuba. Some considerations are made on the way to face the wide range of antibiotics and the cost of antibiotic therapy in the developing countries, taking into account some recommendations made by the PAHO/WHO

  14. Transport properties of gaseous ions over a wide energy range. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, H.W.; Thackston, M.G.; McDaniel, E.W.; Mason, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper updates and extends in scope our two previous papers entitled ''Transport Properties of Gaseous Ions over a Wide Energy Range.'' The references to the earlier publications (referred to as ''Part I'' and ''Part II'') are I, H. W. Ellis, R. Y. Pai, E. W. McDonald, E. A. Mason, and L. A. Viehland, ATOMIC DATA AND NUCLEAR DATA TABLES 17, 177--210 (19876); and II, H. W. Ellis, E. W. McDaniel, D. L. Albritton, L. A. Veihland, S. L. Lin, and E. A. Mason, ATOMIC DATA AND NUCLEAR DATA TABLES 22, 179--217 (1978). Parts I and II contained compilations of experimental data on ionic mobilities and diffusion coefficients (both longitudinal and transverse) for ions in neutral gase (almost exclusively at room temperature) in an externally applied electric field

  15. Functional disorders of the temporomandibular joints: Internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Ling; Wang, Ding-Han; Yang, Mu-Chen; Hsu, Wun-Eng; Hsu, Ming-Lun

    2018-04-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is one of the most complex joints of the human body. Due to its unique movement, in terms of combination of rotation and translator movement, disc of the joint plays an important role to maintain its normal function. In order to sustain the normal function of the TMJ, disc must be kept in proper position as well as maintain normal shape in all circumstances. Once the disc is not any more in its normal position during function of the joint, disturbance of the joint can be occurred which will lead to subsequent distortion of the disc. Shape of the disc can be influenced by many factors i.e.: abnormal function or composition of the disc itself. Etiology of the internal derangement of the disc remains controversial. Multifactorial theory has been postulated in most of previous manuscripts. Disc is composed of mainly extracellular matrix. Abnormal proportion of collagen type I & III may also leads to joint hypermobility which may be also a predisposing factor of this disorder. Thus it can be recognized as local manifestation of a systemic disorder. Different treatment modalities with from conservative treatment to surgical intervention distinct success rate have been reported. Recently treatment with extracellular matrix injection becomes more and more popular to strengthen the joint itself. Since multifactorial in character, the best solution of the treatment modalities should be aimed to resolve possible etiology from different aspects. Team work may be indication to reach satisfied results. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  16. Theoretical analysis of nuclear reactors (Phase III), I-V, Part III, Reactor poisoning; Razrada metoda teorijske analize nuklearnih reaktora (III faza) I-IV, III Deo, Zatrovanje reaktora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pop-Jordanov, J [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1963-01-15

    Report on calculation of poisoning in experimental and power reactor includes four parts. Part one describes the influence of poisoning on the physical parameters of a reactor. part two includes transformation of differential equations for iodine and xenon. It was needed for easier solution of of differential equation using the analog computer. This calculation was done for RA reactor operating at 5 MW power. The RA reactor was used an example of calculation by the proposed method. Part four shows the application of the method for calculating the Calder Hall power reactor.

  17. The energy balance experiment EBEX-2000. Part III: Behaviour and quality of the radiation measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kohsiek, W.; Liebethal, C.; Foken, T.; Vogt, R.; Oncley, S.P.; Bernhofer, C.; Debruin, H.A.R.

    2007-01-01

    An important part of the Energy Balance Experiment (EBEX-2000) was the measurement of the net radiation and its components. Since the terrain, an irrigated cotton field, could not be considered homogeneous, radiation measurements were made at nine sites using a variety of radiation instruments,

  18. Broadcasting Stations of the World; Part III. Frequency Modulation Broadcasting Stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreign Broadcast Information Service, Washington, DC.

    This third part of "Broadcasting Stations of the World", which lists all reported radio broadcasting and television stations, with the exception of those in the United States which broadcast on domestic channels, covers frequency modulation broadcasting stations. It contains two sections: one indexed alphabetically by country and city, and the…

  19. CBIOS Science Sessions - 2016 - Part I and III National Symposium on Nanoscience and Biomedical Nanotechnology - Proceedings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Monteiro Rodrigues, et al.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available CBiOS Science Sessions - 2016 – Part 1 New methods to explore efficacy and safety of natural origin products; Stefânia Duz Delsin Effectiveness of Hypopressive Exercises in women with pelvic floor dysfunctions; Beatriz Navarro Brazález Indoor air quality in baby rooms: a study about VOC levels; Raquel Rodrigues dos Santos, Ana Sofia Fernandes e Liliana Mendes A medicinal chemistry approach for the development of novel anti-tumor agentes; Maria M. M. Santos Isolation, modelling and phytosome forms of antibacterial and anti-proliferative compounds from Plectranthus spp; Diogo Matias Intellectual Property – Patenting Propriedade Intelectual – Patenteamento Rui Gomes Biomarkers in wastewater; Álvaro Lopes A Contribution for a Better Comprehension of Donkey Dentistry: the Importance of Dental Care; João Brandão Rodrigues Characterization of Lusitano’s Pure Blood Pressure Centers using two pressure plates; Pequito M.; Gomes-Costa M.; Prazeres J.; Bragança M.; Roupa I.; Fonseca R.G.; Abrantes J. Application of photoplethysmography to monitor heart rate in dogs; Rui Assunção, Henrique Silva, João Requicha, Luis Lobo, Luis Monteiro Rodrigues Looking into the oscillatory properties of the laser Doppler flowmetry signal in human microcirculation; Henrique Silva, Hugo Ferreira, Marie-Ange Renault, Alain-Pierre Gadeau, Julia Buján, LM Rodrigues III Symposium of Nanoscience and Biomedical Nanotechnology – Proceedings April 15/04/2016 Lisboa - Universidade Lusófona Honor Commitee /Comissão de Honra Magnífico Reitor da Universidade Lusófona, Mário Moutinho Presidente do Conselho de Administração da Universidade Lusófona, Manuel de Almeida Damásio Sr. Bastonário da Ordem dos Engenheiros, Carlos Matias Ramos Sr. Bastonário da Ordem dos Médicos, José Silva Vice-presidente do Conselho de Enfermagem, Maria José Costa Dias Presidente da Associação Nacional de Farmácias, Paulo Cleto Duarte Presidente da Sociedade Portuguesa de Ci

  20. LHC Beam Dump Design Study - Part III : Off-normal operating conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, L; Ross, M; Sala, P

    2000-01-01

    The LHC beam dump design study has been preliminarily substantiated by energy deposition simulations (Part I) and heat transfer analyses (Part II). The present report is devoted to the abnormal operating conditions induced by a malfunction of the beam diluters. A general approach to the analysis of off-normal operation is presented, which is derived from standard design norms adopted in the nuclear industry. Attention is focused mainly on the carbon core, which is longitudinally split into segments of different density in order to better distribute the deposited energy. The maximum energy density it absorbs decreases by at least 33%, compared to a uniform standard density carbon core. This structure may sustain any partial sweep failure without major damage, up to the ultimate beam intensity and energy. To minimise the risks inherent in a fully unswept beam, a sacrificial graphite mandrel will be placed on the core axis, surrounded by a thick high strength carbon-carbon composite tube. With this arrangement, ...

  1. Normal and sonographic anatomy of selected peripheral nerves. Part III: Peripheral nerves of the lower limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalska, Berta; Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona

    2012-06-01

    The ultrasonographic examination is currently increasingly used in imaging peripheral nerves, serving to supplement the physical examination, electromyography and magnetic resonance imaging. As in the case of other USG imaging studies, the examination of peripheral nerves is non-invasive and well-tolerated by patients. The typical ultrasonographic picture of peripheral nerves as well as the examination technique have been discussed in part I of this article series, following the example of the median nerve. Part II of the series presented the normal anatomy and the technique for examining the peripheral nerves of the upper limb. This part of the article series focuses on the anatomy and technique for examining twelve normal peripheral nerves of the lower extremity: the iliohypogastric and ilioinguinal nerves, the lateral cutaneous nerve of the thigh, the pudendal, sciatic, tibial, sural, medial plantar, lateral plantar, common peroneal, deep peroneal and superficial peroneal nerves. It includes diagrams showing the proper positioning of the sonographic probe, plus USG images of the successively discussed nerves and their surrounding structures. The ultrasonographic appearance of the peripheral nerves in the lower limb is identical to the nerves in the upper limb. However, when imaging the lower extremity, convex probes are more often utilized, to capture deeply-seated nerves. The examination technique, similarly to that used in visualizing the nerves of upper extremity, consists of locating the nerve at a characteristic anatomic reference point and tracking it using the "elevator technique". All 3 parts of the article series should serve as an introduction to a discussion of peripheral nerve pathologies, which will be presented in subsequent issues of the "Journal of Ultrasonography".

  2. Burnout in boiling heat transfer. Part III. High-quality forced-convection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergles, A.E.

    1979-01-01

    This is the final part of a review of burnout during boiling heat transfer. The status of burnout in high-quality forced-convection systems is reviewed, and recent developments are summarized in detail. A general guide to the considerable literature is given. Parametric effects and correlations for water in circular and noncircular ducts are presented. Other topics discussed include transients, steam-generator applications, correlations for other fluids, fouling, and augmentation

  3. PIO I-II tendencies case study. Part 1. Mathematical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian TOADER

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, a study is performed from the perspective of giving a method to reduce the conservatism of the well known PIO (Pilot-Induced Oscillation criteria in predicting the susceptibility of an aircraft to this very harmful phenomenon. There are three interacting components of a PIO – the pilot, the vehicle, and the trigger (in fact, the hazard. The study, conceived in two parts, aims to underline the importance of human pilot model involved in analysis. In this first part, it is shown, following classical sources, how the LQG theory of control and estimation is used to obtain a complex model of human pilot. The approach is based on the argument, experimentally proved, that the human behaves “optimally” in some sense, subject to his inherent psychophysical limitations. The validation of such model is accomplished based on the experimental model of a VTOL-type aircraft. Then, the procedure of inserting typical saturation nonlinearities in the open loop transfer function is presented. A second part of the paper will illustrate PIO tendencies evaluation by means of a grapho-analytic method.

  4. Building Worlds and Learning Astronomy on Facebook Part III: Testing, Launch, and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harold, J.; Hines, D.; Vidugiris, E.; Goldman, K. H.

    2015-11-01

    James Harold (SSI), Dean Hines (STScI/SSI) and a team at the National Center for Interactive Learning at the Space Science Institute are developing Starchitect, an end-to-end stellar and planetary evolution game for the Facebook platform. Supported by NSF and NASA, and based in part on a prototype presented at ASP several years ago, Starchitect uses the “sporadic play” model of games such as Farmville, where players might only take actions a few times a day, but may continue playing for months. This paper is an update to a presentation at last year's ASP conference.

  5. RADIOGRAPHIC EXAMINATION OF TEMPOROMANDIBULAR DISORDERS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heru Suryonegoro

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The temporomandibular joint has a very important role in the stomatognathic system. Its main function is for the opening and closing movement, mastication, and speech. It is located anterior to the ear. The temporomandibular joint connects maxilla and mandible through the articular fossa, hence the slightest change that happens would cause serious matters such as pain, exiting, speech disorder, difficulty in opening and closing movement, headache, and even trismus. In a child or an adolescent, the symptoms are often vague; everything is interpreted as “pain”. This is probably why temporomandibular disorder are often undetected by dentists. Therefore, patience and accuracy is needed to determine the actual disorder through means of clinical and radiographic examination. The radiographic examination suitable for child is the transcranial projection. This projection is believed to be more accurate amongst other projection for child patients.

  6. National Energy Board 1992-93 estimates part III expenditure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This Expenditure Plan is designed to be used as a reference document. As such, it contains several levels of detail to respond to the various needs of its audience. This Plan is divided into two sections. Section 1 presents an overview of the Program including a description, information on its background, objectives and planning perspective as well as performance information that forms the basis for the resources requested. Section 2 provides further information on costs and resources as well as special analyses that the reader may require to understand the Program more fully. Section 1 is preceded by details of Spending Authorities from Part 2 of the Estimates and Volume 2 of the Public Accounts. This is to provide continuity with other Estimates documents and to help in assessing the Program's financial performance over the past year. The format and organization of the document should be regarded as transitional. For the most part the document is organized to be consistent with the program structure approved for the National Energy Board. 16 figs

  7. National Energy Board 1992-93 estimates part III expenditure plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    This Expenditure Plan is designed to be used as a reference document. As such, it contains several levels of detail to respond to the various needs of its audience. This Plan is divided into two sections. Section 1 presents an overview of the Program including a description, information on its background, objectives and planning perspective as well as performance information that forms the basis for the resources requested. Section 2 provides further information on costs and resources as well as special analyses that the reader may require to understand the Program more fully. Section 1 is preceded by details of Spending Authorities from Part 2 of the Estimates and Volume 2 of the Public Accounts. This is to provide continuity with other Estimates documents and to help in assessing the Program`s financial performance over the past year. The format and organization of the document should be regarded as transitional. For the most part the document is organized to be consistent with the program structure approved for the National Energy Board. 16 figs.

  8. Professional karate-do and mixed martial arts fighters present with a high prevalence of temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonotto, Daniel; Namba, Eli Luis; Veiga, Danielle Medeiros; Wandembruck, Fernanda; Mussi, Felipe; Afonso Cunali, Paulo; Ribeiro Rosa, Edvaldo Antonio; Azevedo-Alanis, Luciana Reis

    2016-08-01

    Facial trauma in sports has been associated with temporomandibular disorders. Because of the intensity and duration of training needed for elite-level competitions, high-performance athletes can have two to five times more traumatic injuries than recreational athletes. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of temporomandibular disorders in high-performance martial arts fighters and compare it with the prevalence in recreational athletes and non-athletes. The Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders was used to diagnose and classify professional karate-do practitioners (group I; n = 24), amateur karate-do practitioners (group II; n = 17), high-performance mixed martial arts fighters (group III; n = 13), and non-athletes (n = 28). The groups were compared with the chi-square test and tested for the difference between two proportions using a significance level of 5% (P 0.05). A diagnosis of arthralgia from disk displacement was made more frequently in groups I (45.8%; P = 0.013) and III (38.5%; P = 0.012) than in group IV (7.1%). The chronic pain associated with TMD was low intensity and low disability. While there was a high prevalence of temporomandibular disorders in the professional athletes in our study, the prevalence of the condition in recreational athletes was similar to that in individuals who did not practice martial arts. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Two-loop renormalization in the standard model, part III. Renormalization equations and their solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Actis, S.; Passarino, G.

    2006-12-01

    In part I and II of this series of papers all elements have been introduced to extend, to two loops, the set of renormalization procedures which are needed in describing the properties of a spontaneously broken gauge theory. In this paper, the final step is undertaken and finite renormalization is discussed. Two-loop renormalization equations are introduced and their solutions discussed within the context of the minimal standard model of fundamental interactions. These equations relate renormalized Lagrangian parameters (couplings and masses) to some input parameter set containing physical (pseudo-)observables. Complex poles for unstable gauge and Higgs bosons are used and a consistent setup is constructed for extending the predictivity of the theory from the Lep1 Z-boson scale (or the Lep2 WW scale) to regions of interest for LHC and ILC physics. (orig.)

  10. Two-loop renormalization in the standard model, part III. Renormalization equations and their solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Actis, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Passarino, G. [Torino Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica Teorica; INFN, Sezione di Torino (Italy)

    2006-12-15

    In part I and II of this series of papers all elements have been introduced to extend, to two loops, the set of renormalization procedures which are needed in describing the properties of a spontaneously broken gauge theory. In this paper, the final step is undertaken and finite renormalization is discussed. Two-loop renormalization equations are introduced and their solutions discussed within the context of the minimal standard model of fundamental interactions. These equations relate renormalized Lagrangian parameters (couplings and masses) to some input parameter set containing physical (pseudo-)observables. Complex poles for unstable gauge and Higgs bosons are used and a consistent setup is constructed for extending the predictivity of the theory from the Lep1 Z-boson scale (or the Lep2 WW scale) to regions of interest for LHC and ILC physics. (orig.)

  11. Study of irradiated bone: Part III. /sup 99m/Tc pyrophosphate autoradiographic changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, M.A.; Corriveau, O.; Casarett, G.W.; Weber, D.A.

    1978-01-01

    The macroautoradiographic and microautoradiographic localization of /sup 99m/Tc-pyrophosphate (/sup 99m/TcPPi) was studied in x-irradiated bone of rabbits up to one year post-irradiation. In cortical bone, /sup 99m/TcPPi was concentrated on bone surfaces near vasculature. Both forming and resorbing bone surfaces were comparably labeled at 2 hrs post-injection. Uptake on the surface of sites of haversian bone remodeling was observed to be at least part of the increased /sup 99m/TcPPi observed in irradiated bone in camera images. In irradiated trabecular bone 12 months following irradiation, a patchy decrease in /sup 99m/TcPPi uptake was correlated with localized decreases in vasculature

  12. Atomic Energy Control Board 1991-92 estimates part III expenditure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This Expenditure Plan is designed to be used as a reference document. As such, it contains several levels of detail to respond to the various needs of its audience. This Plan is divided into two sections. Section 1 presents an overview of the Program including a description, information on its background, objectives and planning perspective as well as performance information that forms the basis for the resources requested. Section 2 provides further information on costs and resources as well as special analyses that the reader may require to understand the Program more fully. Section 1 is preceded by details of Spending Authorities from Part 2 of the Estimates and Volume 2 of the Public Accounts. This is to provide continuity with other Estimates documents and to help in assessing the Program's financial performance over the past year. 22 figs

  13. Atomic Energy Control Board 1991-92 estimates part III expenditure plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-12-31

    This Expenditure Plan is designed to be used as a reference document. As such, it contains several levels of detail to respond to the various needs of its audience. This Plan is divided into two sections. Section 1 presents an overview of the Program including a description, information on its background, objectives and planning perspective as well as performance information that forms the basis for the resources requested. Section 2 provides further information on costs and resources as well as special analyses that the reader may require to understand the Program more fully. Section 1 is preceded by details of Spending Authorities from Part 2 of the Estimates and Volume 2 of the Public Accounts. This is to provide continuity with other Estimates documents and to help in assessing the Program`s financial performance over the past year. 22 figs.

  14. Atomic Energy Control Board 1992-93 estimates part III expenditure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This Expenditure Plan is designed to be used as a reference document. As such, it contains several levels of detail to respond to the various needs of its audience. This Plan is divided into two sections. Section 1 presents an overview of the Program including a description, information on its background, objectives and planning perspective as well as performance information that forms the basis for the resources requested. Section 2 provides further information on costs and resources as well as special analyses that the reader may require to understand the Program more fully. Section 1 is preceded by details of Spending Authorities from Part 2 of the Estimates and Volume 2 of the Public Accounts. This is to provide continuity with other Estimates documents and to help in assessing the Program's financial performance over the past year. 7 refs., 21 figs

  15. Atomic Energy Control Board 1992-93 estimates part III expenditure plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    This Expenditure Plan is designed to be used as a reference document. As such, it contains several levels of detail to respond to the various needs of its audience. This Plan is divided into two sections. Section 1 presents an overview of the Program including a description, information on its background, objectives and planning perspective as well as performance information that forms the basis for the resources requested. Section 2 provides further information on costs and resources as well as special analyses that the reader may require to understand the Program more fully. Section 1 is preceded by details of Spending Authorities from Part 2 of the Estimates and Volume 2 of the Public Accounts. This is to provide continuity with other Estimates documents and to help in assessing the Program`s financial performance over the past year. 7 refs., 21 figs.

  16. Notes on the Birds of Central Oaxaca, Part III: Hirundinidae to Fringillidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M. Forcey

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Notas sobre las aves de Oaxaca central, parte II: Hirundinidae a Fringillidae Se reportan nuevos datos que amplían y clarifican nuestro conocimiento del estatus y distribución de 112 especies de aves en la región central del Estado de Oaxaca. Las observaciones se realizaron abarcando partes de los distritos de Centro, Etla, Ixtlan, Tlacolula, y Zaachila dentro de 35 km alrededor de la Ciudad de Oaxaca. El reporte se basa en observaciones tomadas durante 752 días, comprendidos entre diciembre 1996 y mayo 2002. Los principales hábitats del área son de pino-encino (incluyendo zonas pequeñas de pino-encino-oyamel y pino-encino mezclado con pastizales, matorral de encino, matorral subtropical, vegetación riparia, y vegetación secundaria, campos agrícolas y otros (incluyendo áreas urbanas, jardines, y parques. Las siguientes especies se reportan por primera vez en la zona: Progne sinaloae (registro nuevo en el estado de Oaxaca, Thryothorus felix, Hylocichla mustelina, Vermivora pinus, Vermivora chrysoptera, Dendroica pensylvanica, Dendroica magnolia, Dendroica fusca, Dendroica graciae, Oporornis philadelphia, Wilsonia canadensis, y Spiza americana.Además, las siguientes nueve especies se han reportado solamente en los Conteos Navideños o por registros únicos: Tachycineta bicolor, Dumetella carolinensis, Vermivora peregrina, Dendroica dominica, Dendroica discolor, y Piranga erythrocephala (en temporada de reproducción. Se reportan datos de la reproducción de 43 especies, 18 de los cuales no se habían registrado en estado reproductivo antes en esta zona. De estos 43, 39 se pueden agrupar como reproduciéndose en los meses de abril a julio.

  17. Nonsurgical Management of Pediatric Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrivani, Steven John; Khawaja, Shehryar Nasir; Bavia, Paula Furlan

    2018-02-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are a subgroup of craniofacial pain problems involving the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), masticatory muscles, and associated head and neck musculoskeletal structures. These disorders are subclassified into TMJ articular disorders and masticatory muscle disorders. Patients with TMD most commonly present with pain, restricted or asymmetric mandibular motion, and TMJ sounds during mandibular movements. The prevalence tends to increase with age. Management of TMJ articular disorders consists of a combination of patient education, home-care plan, biobehavioral therapy, physical therapy, orthotic jaw appliance therapy, pharmacotherapy, and/or surgery. The goal is to increase function, reduce pain, and improve quality of life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Radiodiagnosis of occlusal temporomandibular joint dysfunctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundert, M.

    1980-01-01

    The diagnostic value of conventional oblique-lateral transcranial standard projections for radiography of the temporomandibular joints is limited by various anatomical factors and the projection geometry. Improved results are obtained by individualization of the projection. The author describes a method for determining the individually optimum oblique-lateral projection, a method which is based on pre-exposure fluoroscopy of the temporomandibular joint with an electronic image intensifier system incorporating a television chain. The method has been employed as routine practice for 15 years; it has been modified several times and enables documentation studies to be made with an unusually high degree of reproducibility with respect to beam projection. (Auth.)

  19. Dental occlusion and temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, J Caitlin; Hannah, Andrew; Nagar, Nathan

    2017-10-27

    Data sourcesMedline, Scopus and Google Scholar.Study selectionTwo reviewers selected studies independently. English language clinical studies assessing the association between temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and features of dental occlusion were considered.Data extraction and synthesisStudy quality was assessed based on the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS) and a narrative synthesis was presented.ResultsIn all 25 studies (17 case-control, eight comparative) were included. Overall there was a high variability between occlusal features and TMD diagnosis. Findings were consistent with a lack of clinically relevant association between TMD and dental occlusion. Only two studies were associated with TMD in the majority (≥50%) of single variable analyses in patient populations. Only mediotrusive interferences are associated with TMD in the majority of multiple variable analyses.ConclusionsThe findings support the absence of a disease-specific association, there is no ground to hypothesise a major role for dental occlusion in the pathophysiology of TMDs. Dental clinicians are thus encouraged to move forward and abandon the old-fashioned gnathological paradig.

  20. Magnetic resonance in temporomandibular articulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte Filho, D.L.; Ferreira, R.

    1994-01-01

    Dysfunction of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is extremely common, mainly in women. The indication of imaging study of TMJ is the evaluation of its internal derangements, since disc dislocation is treated by different way than other intrinsic mechanical conditions and of the painful myofacial dysfunction, as well where there is no anatomic lesion. The patients, who do not improve with the clinical approach, should be referred to imaging evaluation, in order to rule out mechanical disorder. When the patient is supposed to be operated upon, imaging of the contralateral TMJ is necessary. The presence of a thick and stiff disc perforated with adhesion to the mandibular condyle will change the surgical management. The plain x-ray film is able to demonstrate the bone outlines and joint space but it is not able to show the soft articular tissues. Arthrography is very reliable to demonstrate perforation. However it is an invasive method and demands skilled radiographer radiologist. MRI has shown to be reliable method and it is becoming to be progressively used in routine investigation of TMJ. Nevertheless, MRI still has some limitations concerning to disc perforation. (author). 16 refs, 9 figs

  1. Trastornos temporomandibulares en adictos al qat Temporomandibular disorders in qat addicted people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Guerra Cobián

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: los trastornos temporomandibulares se asocian frecuentemente al hábito de masticar qat, pero se carece de estudios que detallan sus particularidades, por lo que se realiza este trabajo, con los objetivos de determinar la prevalencia de trastornos temporomandibulares en pacientes adictos al qat, identificar los hallazgos clínicos- radiográficos asociados y clasificar los trastornos temporomandibulares presentes en la población estudiada. Métodos: se realizó un estudio prospectivo, descriptivo, de corte transversal, en una muestra de 352 pacientes, del total de pacientes adictos, atendidos en el Departamento de Cirugía, Colegio Dental. Ibb,Yemen en el periodo octubre 2010-abril 2011. Se determinaron los hallazgos clínicos y radiográficos presentes, y se diagnosticó el tipo de trastorno temporomandibular. Resultados: se evidenció que estaban afectados por trastornos temporomandibulares el 55,7 % de los pacientes. Se encontró dolor articular agudo en 14,1 % y aplanamiento condilar anterior en 35,6 %. Conclusiones: los trastornos temporomandibulares afectaron más de la mitad de la población estudiada, adicta al qat. Los desórdenes en la relación cóndilo-disco fueron los más encontrados (41 %. El aplanamiento condilar anterior dominó en el análisis radiográfico.Introduction: the temporomandibular disorders has been associated frequently to the habit of chewing qat, but in previous studies, there are lack of specific details of this problem, for this reason this study is carried out ,to determine it prevalence, to identify clinical and radiografical findings associated , and to classify the temporomandibular disorders observed in the sample. Methods: a cross-sectional, descriptive and prospective study was done, in a sample of 352 patients of the total qat addicted patients which came to the Department of surgery, Dentistry College .Ibb Yemen October2010-April 2011. The clinical and radiographical findings were

  2. Relação entre bruxismo e o grau de sintomatologia de disfunção temporomandibular The relationship between the bruxism and the severity of symptoms in the temporomandibular disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cíntia Corrêa Blini

    2010-06-01

    jaw dysfunction and its association with the level of temporomandibular symptoms. METHODS: 28 women, with ages between 19 and 56 years, who had temporomandibular jaw dysfunction and had not been submitted to a preview treatment, made part of this study. All subjects answered a questionnaire written by Fonseca et al (1994 entitled Anamnesic Index, that enabled us to classify temporomandibular jaw symptoms level and also to check the symptoms of this oral parafunction behavioral bruxism; the subjects were submitted an odontological evaluation, that was composed by an exam of masticatory muscles, though the digital touch in the oral and extra-oral muscles, examination in the temporomandibular joint and a teeth examination. The results were analyzed in a descriptive form, and in order to check the relationship between the severity level of temporomandibular dysfunction with the bruxism occurrence Independent Square-Qui test and the Fisher test were used with a statistic significance of 5%. RESULTS: it was observed the parafuntional habit was presented in 50% of the cases with temporomandibular dysfunction. It wasn't possible a relationship between bruxism and the level of symptoms in temporomandibular jaw dysfunction, by Anamnesic Index. CONCLUSION: the results of this study suggest that subjects with symptoms of temporomandibular jaw dysfunction must be asked and evaluated about bruxism, regardless of the level of temporomandibular dysfunction. Besides this, it is important to investigate the diagnosis and the treatment of bruxism also in patients without temporomandibular jaw dysfunction in order to prevent development of lesions in the temporomandibular joints and the other structures of the stomatognatic system.

  3. [Trigeminal motor paralysis and dislocation of the temporo-mandibular joints].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkawa, S; Yoshida, T; Ohsumi, Y; Tabuchi, M

    1996-07-01

    A 64-year-old woman with diabetes mellitus was admitted to our hospital with left hemiparesis of sudden onset. A brain MRI demonstrated a cerebral infarction in the ventral part of the right lower pons. When left hemiparesis worsened, she had dislocation of the temporo-mandibular joints repeatedly. Then, her lower jaw deviated to the right when she opened her mouth. Also, there was decreased contraction of the right masseter when she clenched her teeth. These findings suggest that there was trigeminal motor paralysis on the right side resulting from involvement of the intrapontine trigeminal motor nerve. She has no history of dislocation of the temporo-mandibular joints. An X-ray film showed that the temporo-mandibular joints were intact. Thus, it is possible that deviation of the lower jaw was the cause of this dislocation. We suspect that dislocation of the temporo-mandibular joints may occur as a complication of unilateral trigeminal motor paralysis. This has not been reported to our knowledge.

  4. Circuit modeling of the electrical impedance: part III. Disuse following bone fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiffman, C A

    2013-01-01

    Multifrequency measurements of the electrical impedance of muscle have been extended to the study of disuse following bone fracture, and analyzed using the five-element circuit model used earlier in the study of the effects of disease. Eighteen subjects recovering from simple fractures on upper or lower limbs were examined (ten males, eight females, aged 18–66). Muscles on uninjured contralateral limbs were used as comparison standards, and results are presented in terms of the ratios p(injured)/p(uninjured), where p stands for the circuit parameter r 1 , r 2 , r 3 , 1/c 1 or 1/c 2 . These are strikingly similar to the diseased-to-healthy ratios for patients with neuromuscular disease, reported in part I of this series. In particular, r 1 is virtually unaffected and the ratios for r 2 , r 3 , 1/c 1 and 1/c 2 can be as large as in serious disease. Furthermore, the same pattern of relationships between the parameters is found, suggesting that there is a common underlying mechanism for the impedance changes. Atrophy and fibrosis are examined as candidates for that mechanism, but it is argued that their effects are too small to explain the observed changes. Fundamental considerations aside, the sensitivity, reproducibility and technical simplicity of the technique recommend its use for in-flight assessments of muscles during orbital or interplanetary missions. (paper)

  5. The Systemic Theory of Living Systems and Relevance to CAM: the Theory (Part III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Olalde Rangel

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Western medical science lacks a solid philosophical and theoretical approach to disease cognition and therapeutics. My first two articles provided a framework for a humane medicine based on Modern Biophysics. Its precepts encompass modern therapeutics and CAM. Modern Biophysics and its concepts are presently missing in medicine, whether orthodox or CAM, albeit they probably provide the long sought explanation that bridges the abyss between East and West. Key points that differentiate Systemic from other systems' approaches are ‘Intelligence’, ‘Energy’ and the objective ‘to survive’. The General System Theory (GST took a forward step by proposing a departure from the mechanistic biological concept—of analyzing parts and processes in isolation—and brought us towards an organismic model. GST examines the system's components and results of their interaction. However, GST still does not go far enough. GST assumes ‘Self-Organization’ as a spontaneous phenomenon, ignoring a causative entity or central controller to all systems: Intelligence. It also neglects ‘Survive’ as the directional motivation common to any living system, and scarcely assigns ‘Energy’ its true inherent value. These three parameters, Intelligence, Energy and Survive, are vital variables to be considered, in our human quest, if we are to achieve a unified theory of life.

  6. Dispersion of a Passive Scalar Fluctuating Plume in a Turbulent Boundary Layer. Part III: Stochastic Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marro, Massimo; Salizzoni, Pietro; Soulhac, Lionel; Cassiani, Massimo

    2018-01-01

    We analyze the reliability of the Lagrangian stochastic micromixing method in predicting higher-order statistics of the passive scalar concentration induced by an elevated source (of varying diameter) placed in a turbulent boundary layer. To that purpose we analyze two different modelling approaches by testing their results against the wind-tunnel measurements discussed in Part I (Nironi et al., Boundary-Layer Meteorology, 2015, Vol. 156, 415-446). The first is a probability density function (PDF) micromixing model that simulates the effects of the molecular diffusivity on the concentration fluctuations by taking into account the background particles. The second is a new model, named VPΓ, conceived in order to minimize the computational costs. This is based on the volumetric particle approach providing estimates of the first two concentration moments with no need for the simulation of the background particles. In this second approach, higher-order moments are computed based on the estimates of these two moments and under the assumption that the concentration PDF is a Gamma distribution. The comparisons concern the spatial distribution of the first four moments of the concentration and the evolution of the PDF along the plume centreline. The novelty of this work is twofold: (i) we perform a systematic comparison of the results of micro-mixing Lagrangian models against experiments providing profiles of the first four moments of the concentration within an inhomogeneous and anisotropic turbulent flow, and (ii) we show the reliability of the VPΓ model as an operational tool for the prediction of the PDF of the concentration.

  7. Dispersion of a Passive Scalar Fluctuating Plume in a Turbulent Boundary Layer. Part III: Stochastic Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marro, Massimo; Salizzoni, Pietro; Soulhac, Lionel; Cassiani, Massimo

    2018-06-01

    We analyze the reliability of the Lagrangian stochastic micromixing method in predicting higher-order statistics of the passive scalar concentration induced by an elevated source (of varying diameter) placed in a turbulent boundary layer. To that purpose we analyze two different modelling approaches by testing their results against the wind-tunnel measurements discussed in Part I (Nironi et al., Boundary-Layer Meteorology, 2015, Vol. 156, 415-446). The first is a probability density function (PDF) micromixing model that simulates the effects of the molecular diffusivity on the concentration fluctuations by taking into account the background particles. The second is a new model, named VPΓ, conceived in order to minimize the computational costs. This is based on the volumetric particle approach providing estimates of the first two concentration moments with no need for the simulation of the background particles. In this second approach, higher-order moments are computed based on the estimates of these two moments and under the assumption that the concentration PDF is a Gamma distribution. The comparisons concern the spatial distribution of the first four moments of the concentration and the evolution of the PDF along the plume centreline. The novelty of this work is twofold: (i) we perform a systematic comparison of the results of micro-mixing Lagrangian models against experiments providing profiles of the first four moments of the concentration within an inhomogeneous and anisotropic turbulent flow, and (ii) we show the reliability of the VPΓ model as an operational tool for the prediction of the PDF of the concentration.

  8. A Study of Future Communications Concepts and Technologies for the National Airspace System-Part III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponchak, Denise S.; Apaza, Rafael D.; Wichgersm Joel M.; Haynes, Brian; Roy, Aloke

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is investigating current and anticipated wireless communications concepts and technologies that the National Airspace System (NAS) may need in the next 50 years. NASA has awarded three NASA Research Announcements (NAR) studies with the objective to determine the most promising candidate technologies for air-to-air and air-to-ground data exchange and analyze their suitability in a post-NextGen NAS environment. This paper will present progress made in the studies and describe the communications challenges and opportunities that have been identified as part of the study. NASA's NextGen Concepts and Technology Development (CTD) Project integrates solutions for a safe, efficient and high-capacity airspace system through joint research efforts and partnerships with other government agencies. The CTD Project is one of two within NASA's Airspace Systems Program and is managed by the NASA Ames Research Center. Research within the CTD Project is in support the 2011 NASA Strategic Plan Sub-Goal 4.1: Develop innovative solutions and advanced technologies, through a balanced research portfolio, to improve current and future air transportation. The focus of CTD is on developing capabilities in traffic flow management, dynamic airspace configuration, separation assurance, super density operations and airport surface operations. Important to its research is the development of human/automation information requirements and decisionmaking guidelines for human-human and human-machine airportal decision-making. Airborne separation, oceanic intrail climb/descent and interval management applications depend on location and intent information of surrounding aircraft. ADS-B has been proposed to provide the information exchange, but other candidates such as satellite-based receivers, broadband or airborne internet, and cellular communications are possible candidate's.

  9. Ultrasound assessment of selected peripheral nerve pathologies. Part III: Injuries and postoperative evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Kowalska

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The previous articles of the series devoted to ultrasound diagnostics of peripheral nerves concerned the most common nerve pathologies, i.e. entrapment neuropathies. The aim of the last part of the series is to present ultrasound possibilities in the postoperative control of the peripheral nerves as well as in the diagnostics of the second most common neuropathies of peripheral nerves, i.e. posttraumatic lesions. Early diagnostics of posttraumatic changes is of fundamental importance for the course of treatment and its long-term effects. It aids surgeons in making treatment decisions (whether surgical or conservative. When surgical treatment is necessary, the surgeon, based on US findings, is able to plan a given type of operative method. In certain cases, may even abandon the corrective or reconstructive surgery of the nerve trunk (when there are extensive defects of the nerve trunks and instead, proceed with muscle transfers. Medical literature proposes a range of divisions of the kinds of peripheral nerve injuries depending on, among others, the mechanism or degree of damage. However, the most important issue in the surgeon-diagnostician communication is a detailed description of stumps of the nerve trunks, their distance and location. In the postoperative period, ultrasound is used for monitoring the operative or conservative treatment effects including the determination of the causes of a persistent or recurrent neuropathy. It facilitates decision-making concerning a repeated surgical procedure or assuming a wait-and-see attitude. It is a difficult task for a diagnostician and it requires experience, close cooperation with a clinician and knowledge concerning surgical techniques. Apart from a static assessment, a dynamic assessment of possible adhesions constitutes a crucial element of postoperative examination. This feature distinguishes ultrasound scanning from other methods used in the diagnostics of peripheral neuropathies.

  10. PACE. A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Part III: Being an Entrepreneur. Unit F: Managing Human Resources. Research and Development Series No. 194 C-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This three-part curriculum for entrepreneurship education is primarily for postsecondary level, including four-level colleges and adult education, but it can be adapted for special groups or vocational teacher education. The emphasis of the eight instructional units in Part III is operating a business. Unit F focuses on proper management of human…

  11. PACE. A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Part III: Being an Entrepreneur. Unit A: Managing the Business. Research and Development Series No. 194 C-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This three-part curriculum for entrepreneurship education is primarily for postsecondary level, including four-year colleges and adult education, but it can be adapted for special groups or vocational teacher education. The emphasis of the eight instructional units in Part III is operating a business. Unit A focuses on the management process. It…

  12. PACE. A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Part III: Being an Entrepreneur. Unit B: Financial Management. Research and Development Series No. 194 C-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This three-part curriculum for entrepreneurship education is primarily for postsecondary level, including four-year colleges and adult education, but it can be adapted for special groups or vocational teacher education. The emphasis of the eight instructional units in Part III is operating a business. Unit B focuses on good financial management…

  13. PACE. A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Part III: Being an Entrepreneur. Unit H: Business Protection. Research and Development Series No. 194 C-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This three-part curriculum for entrepreneurship education is primarily for postsecondary level, including four-year colleges and adult education, but it can be adapted for special groups or vocational teacher education. The emphasis of the eight instructional units in part III is operating a business. Unit H focuses on business protection. It…

  14. PACE. A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Part III: Being an Entrepreneur. Unit G: Community Relations. Research and Development Series No. 194 C-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This three-part curriculum for entrepreneurship education is primarily for postsecondary level, including four-year colleges and adult education, but it can be adapted for special groups of vocational teacher education. The emphasis of the eight instructional units in Part III is operating a business. Unit G focuses on community relations. It…

  15. PACE. A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Part III: Being an Entrepreneur. Unit E: Successful Selling. Research and Development Series No. 194 C-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This three-part curriculum for entrepreneurship education is primarily for postsecondary level, including four-year colleges and adult education, but it can be adapted for special groups or vocational teacher education. The emphasis of the eight instructional units in Part III is operating a business. Unit E focuses on personal (face-to-face)…

  16. PACE. A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Part III: Being an Entrepreneur. Unit D: Marketing Management. Research and Development Series No. 194 C-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This three-part curriculum for entrepreneurship education is primarily for postsecondary level, including four-year colleges and adult education, but it can be adapted for special groups or vocational teacher education. The emphasis of the eight instructional units in Part III is operating a business. Unit D focuses on market management. It…

  17. Electronics and telecommunications in Poland, issues and perspectives: Part III. Innovativeness, applications, economy, development scenarios, politics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modelski, Józef; Romaniuk, Ryszard

    2010-09-01

    important role of ET is combined with the existence in the society of an adequate infrastructure which recreates the full development cycle of high technology embracing: people, institutions, finances and logistics, in this also science, higher education, education, continuous training, dissemination and outreach, professional social environment, legal basis, political support and lobbying, innovation structures, applications, industry and economy. The digest of chosen development tendencies in ET was made here from the academic perspective, in a wider scale and on this background the national one, trying to situate this branch in the society, determine its changing role to build a new technical infrastructure of a society based on knowledge, a role of builder of many practical gadgets facilitating life, a role of a big future integrator of today's single bricks into certain more useful unity. This digest does not have a character of a systematic analysis of ET. It is a kind of an arbitrary utterance of the authors inside their field of competence. The aim of this paper is to take an active part in the discussion of the academic community in this country on the development strategy of ET, choice of priorities for cyclically rebuilding economy, in competitive environments. The review paper was initiated by the Committee of Electronics and Telecommunications of Polish Academy of Sciences and was published in Polish as introductory chapter of a dedicated expertise, printed in a book format. This version makes the included opinions available for a wider community.

  18. Acupuncture Therapy on Temporomandibular Joint Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Nai-nian; HUANG Ming-juan

    2005-01-01

    @@ Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) syndrome, an commonly and frequently encountered disease, is characterized by motor dysfunction of mandibular joint and snapping articular surface as major complaints, and then tinnitus, facial pain and occasional headache, most patients got limited mouth open and pain inside the joints or masseter muscle. The authors of this article have treated 68cases of TMJ syndrome since 2001.

  19. [Whiplash lesions and temporomandibular joint disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gola, R; Richard, O; Guyot, L; Cheynet, F

    2004-11-01

    Attributing dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) to whiplash injury is a difficult problem to solve. TMJ disorders do not seem to be secondary to direct articular trauma but rather caused by a postural disorder of the cervical spine. Occlusal disorders and stress further complicate the picture. Four clinical cases illustrate a new hypothetical approach.

  20. Synovial osteochondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemnon, Jorge; Nemnon, Marcelo; Staffieri, Roberto; Villavicencio, C.; Marconi, G.; Masjoan, Diego

    2004-01-01

    Synovial osteochondromatosis (SO) is a meta plastic process by which synovial mesenchymal cells transform into chondroblasts and chondrocytes. This disease affects most frequently the knee, the hip, the elbow, and uncommonly the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The authors present 2 cases of synovial osteochondromatosis of the TMJ. (author)

  1. Temporomandibular joint involvement in psoriatic arthritis | Okkesim ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Psoriasis is a chronic, papulosquamous, and an inflammatory skin disease. It has been found that between 5% and 24% of patients develop psoriatic arthritis (PA) at the same time after or even prior to skin findings. The involvement of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare condition. In this report, a-46-year-old male ...

  2. Temporomandibular dysfunction and headache disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speciali, José G; Dach, Fabíola

    2015-02-01

    It has been well established that primary headaches (especially migraine, chronic migraine, and tension-type headache) and temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) are comorbid diseases, with the presence of one of them in a patient increasing the prevalence of the others. The relationship between the 2 diseases may involve the sharing of common physiopathological aspects. Studies about the treatment of this disease association have shown that a simultaneous therapeutic approach to the 2 diseases is more effective than the separate treatment of each. As a consequence, specialists in orofacial pain are now required to know the criteria for the diagnosis of headaches, and headache physicians are required to know the semiologic aspects of orofacial pain. Nevertheless, a headache may be attributed to TMD, instead be an association of 2 problems - TMD and primary headaches - in these cases a secondary headache, described in item 11.7 of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, is still a controversial topic. Attempts to determine the existence of this secondary headache with a specific or suggestive phenotype have been frustrated. The conclusion that can be reached based on the few studies published thus far is that this headache has a preferential unilateral or bilateral temporal location and migraine-like or tension-type headache-like clinical characteristics. In the present review, we will consider the main aspects of the TMD-headache relationship, that is, comorbidity of primary headaches and TMD and clinical aspects of the headaches attributed to TMD from the viewpoint of the International Headache Society and of a group of specialists in orofacial pain. This paper aims to explore our understanding of the association between TMD and headaches in general and migraine in particular. © 2015 American Headache Society.

  3. Cervical Musculoskeletal Impairments and Temporomandibular Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, David

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The study of cervical muscles and their significance in the development and perpetuation of Temporomandibular Disorders has not been elucidated. Thus this project was designed to investigate the association between cervical musculoskeletal impairments and Temporomandibular Disorders. Material and Methods A sample of 154 subjects participated in this study. All subjects underwent a series of physical tests and electromyographic assessment (i.e. head and neck posture, maximal cervical muscle strength, cervical flexor and extensor muscles endurance, and cervical flexor muscle performance) to determine cervical musculoskeletal impairments. Results A strong relationship between neck disability and jaw disability was found (r = 0.82). Craniocervical posture was statistically different between patients with myogenous Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) and healthy subjects. However, the difference was too small (3.3º) to be considered clinically relevant. Maximal cervical flexor muscle strength was not statistically or clinically different between patients with TMD and healthy subjects. No statistically significant differences were found in electromyographic activity of the sternocleidomastoid or the anterior scalene muscles in patients with TMD when compared to healthy subjects while executing the craniocervical flexion test (P = 0.07). However, clinically important effect sizes (0.42 - 0.82) were found. Subjects with TMD presented with reduced cervical flexor as well as extensor muscle endurance while performing the flexor and extensor muscle endurance tests when compared to healthy individuals. Conclusions Subjects with Temporomandibular Disorders presented with impairments of the cervical flexors and extensors muscles. These results could help guide clinicians in the assessment and prescription of more effective interventions for individuals with Temporomandibular Disorders. PMID:24422022

  4. Cervical Musculoskeletal Impairments and Temporomandibular Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Armijo-Olivo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The study of cervical muscles and their significance in the development and perpetuation of Temporomandibular Disorders has not been elucidated. Thus this project was designed to investigate the association between cervical musculoskeletal impairments and Temporomandibular Disorders. Material and Methods: A sample of 154 subjects participated in this study. All subjects underwent a series of physical tests and electromyographic assessment (i.e. head and neck posture, maximal cervical muscle strength, cervical flexor and extensor muscles endurance, and cervical flexor muscle performance to determine cervical musculoskeletal impairments. Results: A strong relationship between neck disability and jaw disability was found (r = 0.82. Craniocervical posture was statistically different between patients with myogenous Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD and healthy subjects. However, the difference was too small (3.3º to be considered clinically relevant. Maximal cervical flexor muscle strength was not statistically or clinically different between patients with TMD and healthy subjects. No statistically significant differences were found in electromyographic activity of the sternocleidomastoid or the anterior scalene muscles in patients with TMD when compared to healthy subjects while executing the craniocervical flexion test (P = 0.07. However, clinically important effect sizes (0.42 - 0.82 were found. Subjects with TMD presented with reduced cervical flexor as well as extensor muscle endurance while performing the flexor and extensor muscle endurance tests when compared to healthy individuals. Conclusions: Subjects with Temporomandibular Disorders presented with impairments of the cervical flexors and extensors muscles. These results could help guide clinicians in the assessment and prescription of more effective interventions for individuals with Temporomandibular Disorders.

  5. Augmented reality environment for temporomandibular joint motion analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, A; Ploder, O; Zuniga, J; Undt, G; Ewers, R

    1996-01-01

    The principles of interventional video tomography were applied for the real-time visualization of temporomandibular joint movements in an augmented reality environment. Anatomic structures were extracted in three dimensions from planar cephalometric radiographic images. The live-image fusion of these graphic anatomic structures with real-time position data of the mandible and the articular fossa was performed with a see-through, head-mounted display and an electromagnetic tracking system. The dynamic fusion of radiographic images of the temporomandibular joint to anatomic temporomandibular joint structures in motion created a new modality for temporomandibular joint motion analysis. The advantages of the method are its ability to accurately examine the motion of the temporomandibular joint in three dimensions without restraining the subject and its ability to simultaneously determine the relationship of the bony temporomandibular joint and supporting structures (ie, occlusion, muscle function, etc) during movement before and after treatment.

  6. Workshop 95. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    Out of 140 short communications presented in the proceedings, 13 have been inputted into INIS. The topics covered include lifetime control in semiconductor devices by ion irradiation, single crystal scintillation detectors, environmental monitoring, diffusion and sorption of radionuclides in soils, accelerator driven reactors, radioactive waste disposal, digital reactor control systems and research reactors. (Z.S.)

  7. Workshop 95. Part III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    Out of 140 short communications presented in the proceedings, 13 have been inputted into INIS. The topics covered include lifetime control in semiconductor devices by ion irradiation, single crystal scintillation detectors, environmental monitoring, diffusion and sorption of radionuclides in soils, accelerator driven reactors, radioactive waste disposal, digital reactor control systems and research reactors. (Z.S.).

  8. Radiographic appearance of the normal temporomandibular joint in newborns and small children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larheim, T.A.

    1981-01-01

    The radiographic anatomy of the normal temporomandibular joint in newborns and children up to 4 years of age was investigated, partly on specimens, obtained at autopsy, with methods corresponding to clinical procedures, and partly on patients. A rather flat mandibular fossa and immature mandibular head were found at birth, whereas a well-developed articular tubercle and an adult-like radiographic appearance of the joint were found at about one year of age. No evident changes of the radiographic anatomy seemed to occur from one to 4 years of age. A striking similarity was observed between the dystrophic temporomandibular joint in patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and micrognathia and the normal radiographic appearance in the first months of life, indicating an early involvement of this joint in patients developing micrognathia. (Auth.)

  9. Association between clinical and cone-beam computed tomography findings in patients with temporomandibular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahrokh Imanimoghaddam

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: The aim of this study was to assess the association between the clinical and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT findings in relation to bony changes in patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD. METHODS: According to the research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorder (RDC/TMD, forty-one patients with type II TMD (42 TM joints and type III TMD (40 TM joints were recruited for this study. Condylar position and bony changes including flattening, sclerosis, osteophytes, resorption, and erosion of joint were evaluated by CBCT and compared with clinical findings. Data were analyzed by SPSS software. RESULTS: Condylar flattening, sclerosis, resorption, and erosion were not significantly associated with joint/masticatory muscles pain or crepitus sound. The vertical or horizontal position of the condyle showed no significant relationship with the clinical findings. Condylar osteophyte was significantly associated with pain in masticatory muscles and crepitus (P = 0.030 and P = 0.010, respectively. There was no association between the condylar range of motion and pain in joint or masticatory muscles. CONCLUSION: Condylar osteophyte was significantly associated with both masticatory muscles pain and crepitus sound. No significant relationship was found between the other temporomandibular joint (TMJ radiographic and clinical findings in patients with TMD.

  10. Temporomandibular joint osteochondromatosis: an unusual cause of preauricular swelling.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Phelan, Eimear

    2012-02-01

    We report an unusual and rare cause of preauricular swelling and review the most recent literature concerning synovial osteochondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint. We report the clinical and radiologic findings of a case of synovial osteochondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint that presented as preauricular swelling in a female patient. This disease typically affects large joints; fewer than 100 cases reported in the literature affect the temporomandibular joint. This case illustrates that disorders of the temporomandibular joint should also be included in the differential diagnosis of patients who present with a preauricular mass.

  11. Effusion in magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nah, Kyung Soo [Pusan National University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the distribution and frequency of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) effusion in magnetic resonance (MR) images of patients with disc displacements. On T2 weighted MR images of 148 TMJs taken from 74 patients presenting with TMJ pain and dysfunction, we assessed the cases showing TMJ effusion, defined as an amount of fluid that exceeded the maximum amount seen in a control group of asymptomatic volunteers. The amount of TMJ fluid was graded as: I (none or minimal), II (moderate), III (marked), and IV (extensive), according to a standard set by a reference. Disc displacement categories were also recorded. Of the 148 TMJs examined in this study, 52 joints (35.1%) presented with joint effusion, 24 (16.2%) showing bilateral joint effusion. 38 joints showed upper joint space effusion, and 3 showed lower joint space effusion, and 11 showed both upper and lower joint space effusion. 96 joints (64.9%) had grade I joint fluid, 27 (18.2%) grade II, 15 (10.1%) grade III, and 10 (6.8%) grade IV. 80.0% of the joints presenting with grade IV effusion showed disc displacement without reduction. Joint effusion was found not only in upper, but also in lower joint spaces. The higher the effusion grade, the greater the frequency of disc displacement without reduction.

  12. Effusion in magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nah, Kyung Soo

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the distribution and frequency of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) effusion in magnetic resonance (MR) images of patients with disc displacements. On T2 weighted MR images of 148 TMJs taken from 74 patients presenting with TMJ pain and dysfunction, we assessed the cases showing TMJ effusion, defined as an amount of fluid that exceeded the maximum amount seen in a control group of asymptomatic volunteers. The amount of TMJ fluid was graded as: I (none or minimal), II (moderate), III (marked), and IV (extensive), according to a standard set by a reference. Disc displacement categories were also recorded. Of the 148 TMJs examined in this study, 52 joints (35.1%) presented with joint effusion, 24 (16.2%) showing bilateral joint effusion. 38 joints showed upper joint space effusion, and 3 showed lower joint space effusion, and 11 showed both upper and lower joint space effusion. 96 joints (64.9%) had grade I joint fluid, 27 (18.2%) grade II, 15 (10.1%) grade III, and 10 (6.8%) grade IV. 80.0% of the joints presenting with grade IV effusion showed disc displacement without reduction. Joint effusion was found not only in upper, but also in lower joint spaces. The higher the effusion grade, the greater the frequency of disc displacement without reduction.

  13. Temporomandibular joint ankylosis in child: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul J Hegde

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ is an intracapsular union of the disc-condyle complex to the temporal articular surface that restricts mandibular movements, including the fibrous adhesions or bony fusion between condyle, disc, glenoid fossa, and eminence. It is a serious and disabling condition that may cause problems in mastication, digestion, speech, appearance, and hygiene. Case Report: This report describes a case of a 12-year-old girl with inability to open her mouth, diagnosed with unilateral right bony TMJ ankylosis. The surgical approach consisted of gap arthroplasty with interpositional temporalis muscle flap followed by vigorous physiotherapy. Conclusion: The treatment of TMJ ankylosis poses a significant challenge because of technical difficulties and a high incidence of recurrence. Its treatment includes the orthodontist, oral and maxillofacial surgeon, pediatric dentist, and psychologist and physical therapist as part of the healthcare team.

  14. Diagnosis and treatment of temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauer, Robert L; Semidey, Michael J

    2015-03-15

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are a heterogeneous group of musculoskeletal and neuromuscular conditions involving the temporomandibular joint complex, and surrounding musculature and osseous components. TMD affects up to 15% of adults, with a peak incidence at 20 to 40 years of age. TMD is classified as intra-articular or extra-articular. Common symptoms include jaw pain or dysfunction, earache, headache, and facial pain. The etiology of TMD is multifactorial and includes biologic, environmental, social, emotional, and cognitive triggers. Diagnosis is most often based on history and physical examination. Diagnostic imaging may be beneficial when malocclusion or intra-articular abnormalities are suspected. Most patients improve with a combination of noninvasive therapies, including patient education, self-care, cognitive behavior therapy, pharmacotherapy, physical therapy, and occlusal devices. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and muscle relaxants are recommended initially, and benzodiazepines or antidepressants may be added for chronic cases. Referral to an oral and maxillofacial surgeon is indicated for refractory cases.

  15. Imaging of the temporomandibular joint: An update

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Asim; K; Bag; Santhosh; Gaddikeri; Aparna; Singhal; Simms; Hardin; Benson; D; Tran; Josue; A; Medina; Joel; K; Curé

    2014-01-01

    Imaging of the temporomandibular joint(TMJ) is continuously evolving with advancement of imaging technologies. Many different imaging modalities are currently used to evaluate the TMJ. Magnetic resonance imaging is commonly used for evaluation of the TMJ due to its superior contrast resolution and its ability to acquire dynamic imaging for demonstration of the functionality of the joint. Computed tomography and ultrasound imaging have specific indication in imaging of the TMJ. This article focuses on state of the art imaging of the temporomandibular joint. Relevant normal anatomy and biomechanics of movement of the TMJ are discussed for better understanding of many TMJ pathologies. Imaging of internal derangements is discussed in detail. Different arthropathies and commontumors are also discussed in this article.

  16. Elasto-dynamic analysis of a gear pump-Part III: Experimental validation procedure and model extension to helical gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucchi, E.; Dalpiaz, G.

    2015-01-01

    This work concerns external gear pumps for automotive applications, which operate at high speed and low pressure. In previous works of the authors (Part I and II, [1,2]), a non-linear lumped-parameter kineto-elastodynamic model for the prediction of the dynamic behaviour of external gear pumps was presented. It takes into account the most important phenomena involved in the operation of this kind of machine. The two main sources of noise and vibration are considered: pressure pulsation and gear meshing. The model has been used in order to foresee the influence of working conditions and design modifications on vibration generation. The model's experimental validation is a difficult task. Thus, Part III proposes a novel methodology for the validation carried out by the comparison of simulations and experimental results concerning forces and moments: it deals with the external and inertial components acting on the gears, estimated by the model, and the reactions and inertial components on the pump casing and the test plate, obtained by measurements. The validation is carried out comparing the level of the time synchronous average in the time domain and the waterfall maps in the frequency domain, with particular attention to identify system resonances. The validation results are satisfactory globally, but discrepancies are still present. Moreover, the assessed model has been properly modified for the application to a new virtual pump prototype with helical gears in order to foresee gear accelerations and dynamic forces. Part IV is focused on improvements in the modelling and analysis of the phenomena bound to the pressure evolution around the gears in order to achieve results closer to the measured values. As a matter of fact, the simulation results have shown that a variable meshing stiffness has a notable contribution on the dynamic behaviour of the pump but this is not as important as the pressure phenomena. As a consequence, the original model was modified with the

  17. Comprehensive treatment of temporomandibular joint disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navrátil, Leos; Navratil, Vaclav; Hajkova, Simona; Hlinakova, Petra; Dostalova, Tatjana; Vranová, Jana

    2014-01-01

    Changing lifestyles, decreasing physical activity, which is increasing the number of degenerative joint diseases of various etiology, and certain dental procedures are increasing the number of patients complaining of pain in their temporomandibular joints. The aim of the study was to assess the benefits of comprehensive physiotherapy sessions in order to decrease the number of temporomandibular joint problems, thereby improving the patient's quality of life. An examination by a dentist determined each patient's treatment plan, which consisted of a medical exam, physical therapy and education. Each form of treatment was applied 10 times at intervals of 7-14 days. The main goal of the therapeutic physical education was to redress the muscle imbalance in the mandibular joint. This was achieved by restoring balance between the masticatory muscles, along with releasing the spastic shrouds found in the masticatory muscles. The aim of education was to teach the patient exercises focused on the temporomandibular joint and masticatory muscles. The intensity of the exercises and their composition were individually adjusted and adapted to their current state. Physical therapy consisted of the application of pulsed magnetic therapy, laser therapy, and non-invasive positive thermotherapy. The above procedure was conducted on a therapeutic group of 24 patients (3 men and 20 women). In the course of therapy, there were no complications, and all patients adhered to the prescribed regime. None reported any side effects. The mean treatment duration was 123 +/- 66 days. The outcome of the therapy was evaluated as described in the methodology, the degree of pain affecting the joint, and the opening ability of the mouth. In both parameters, there was a significant decline in patient pain. In a study devoted to tactics of rehabilitation treatment for temporomandibular joint disorders, the need for comprehensive long-term therapy, involving education, and learning proper chewing habits

  18. Temporomandibular Disorders: The Habitual Chewing Side Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana-Mora, Urbano; López-Cedrún, José; Mora, María J.; Otero, Xosé L.; Santana-Penín, Urbano

    2013-01-01

    Background Temporomandibular disorders are the most common cause of chronic orofacial pain, but, except where they occur subsequent to trauma, their cause remains unknown. This cross-sectional study assessed chewing function (habitual chewing side) and the differences of the chewing side and condylar path and lateral anterior guidance angles in participants with chronic unilateral temporomandibular disorder. This is the preliminary report of a randomized trial that aimed to test the effect of a new occlusal adjustment therapy. Methods The masticatory function of 21 randomly selected completely dentate participants with chronic temporomandibular disorders (all but one with unilateral symptoms) was assessed by observing them eat almonds, inspecting the lateral horizontal movement of the jaw, with kinesiography, and by means of interview. The condylar path in the sagittal plane and the lateral anterior guidance angles with respect to the Frankfort horizontal plane in the frontal plane were measured on both sides in each individual. Results Sixteen of 20 participants with unilateral symptoms chewed on the affected side; the concordance (Fisher’s exact test, P = .003) and the concordance-symmetry level (Kappa coefficient κ = 0.689; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.38 to 0.99; P = .002) were significant. The mean condylar path angle was steeper (53.47(10.88) degrees versus 46.16(7.25) degrees; P = .001), and the mean lateral anterior guidance angle was flatter (41.63(13.35) degrees versus 48.32(9.53) degrees P = .036) on the symptomatic side. Discussion The results of this study support the use of a new term based on etiology, “habitual chewing side syndrome”, instead of the nonspecific symptom-based “temporomandibular joint disorders”; this denomination is characterized in adults by a steeper condylar path, flatter lateral anterior guidance, and habitual chewing on the symptomatic side. PMID:23593156

  19. Temporomandibular disorders: the habitual chewing side syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urbano Santana-Mora

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Temporomandibular disorders are the most common cause of chronic orofacial pain, but, except where they occur subsequent to trauma, their cause remains unknown. This cross-sectional study assessed chewing function (habitual chewing side and the differences of the chewing side and condylar path and lateral anterior guidance angles in participants with chronic unilateral temporomandibular disorder. This is the preliminary report of a randomized trial that aimed to test the effect of a new occlusal adjustment therapy. METHODS: The masticatory function of 21 randomly selected completely dentate participants with chronic temporomandibular disorders (all but one with unilateral symptoms was assessed by observing them eat almonds, inspecting the lateral horizontal movement of the jaw, with kinesiography, and by means of interview. The condylar path in the sagittal plane and the lateral anterior guidance angles with respect to the Frankfort horizontal plane in the frontal plane were measured on both sides in each individual. RESULTS: Sixteen of 20 participants with unilateral symptoms chewed on the affected side; the concordance (Fisher's exact test, P = .003 and the concordance-symmetry level (Kappa coefficient κ = 0.689; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.38 to 0.99; P = .002 were significant. The mean condylar path angle was steeper (53.47(10.88 degrees versus 46.16(7.25 degrees; P = .001, and the mean lateral anterior guidance angle was flatter (41.63(13.35 degrees versus 48.32(9.53 degrees P = .036 on the symptomatic side. DISCUSSION: The results of this study support the use of a new term based on etiology, "habitual chewing side syndrome", instead of the nonspecific symptom-based "temporomandibular joint disorders"; this denomination is characterized in adults by a steeper condylar path, flatter lateral anterior guidance, and habitual chewing on the symptomatic side.

  20. Factores de riesgo asociados a trastornos temporomandibulares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth de la Torre Rodríguez

    Full Text Available Introducción: los trastornos temporomandibulares conforman un conjunto de condiciones músculo-esqueléticas que afectan la articulación temporomandibular, músculos de la masticación y estructuras anatómicas adyacentes; complejas y moldeadas por diversos factores de riesgo interactuantes. Resulta de gran valor el conocimiento de los mismos para poder actuar sobre ellos e impedir la aparición y/o agravamiento de la enfermedad. Objetivo: caracterizar a la población objeto de estudio según las variables sociodemográficas: edad y sexo, factores precipitantes, hábitos parafuncionales y trastornos oclusales. Métodos: se realizó un estudio observacional, descriptivo, de corte transversal, en el Hospital Clinicoquirúrgico Universitario «Miguel Enríquez», en una población constituida por 181 pacientes que acudieron a la Consulta Multidisciplinaria de Atención Integral de la articulación temporomandibular en el período comprendido de enero del 2010 a enero del 2012. Resultados: del total de pacientes, 133 pertenecían al sexo femenino, para un 73 %. El grupo de edades de 25-35 años estuvo representado por 45 pacientes para un 24 %. En el 79 % se observó bruxismo, en el 24 % interposición lingual en tanto que el 52 % presentó dientes ausentes no restituidos. Conclusiones: el sexo predominante fue el femenino y el grupo de edades más representado es el de 25-35 años. El factor predisponente que más se observó fue los dientes ausentes no restituidos protésicamente. El factor precipitante que predominó fue el bruxismo y no se observaron factores perpetuantes de los trastornos temporomandibulares.

  1. The Feasibility of Administering a Practical Clinical Examination in Podiatry at a College of Podiatric Medicine: Results of a Field Trial Under Simulated Part III Test Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    And Others; Valletta, Michael

    1978-01-01

    The results of a practical clinical examination in podiatric medicine administered to fourth-year students are presented. The examination could become the prototype of a Part III practical clinical examination under the auspices of the National Board of Podiatry Examiners. Its feasibility is established and problems and issues are discussed.…

  2. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (83rd, Phoenix, Arizona, August 9-12, 2000). Miscellaneous, Part III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Miscellaneous, part III section of the proceedings contains the following 11 papers: "The Relationship between Health and Fitness Magazine Reading and Eating-Disordered Weight-Loss Methods among High School Girls" (Steven R. Thomsen, Michelle M. Weber, and Lora Beth Brown); "A Practical Exercise for Teaching Ethical Decision…

  3. Temporomandibular disorders dysfunction in headache patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Christiane-Espinola-Bandeira; Oliveira, José-Luiz-Góes; Jesus, Alan-Chester-Feitosa; Maia, Mila-Leite-de Moraes; de Santana, Jonielly-Costa-Vasconcelos; Andrade, Loren-Suyane-Oliveira; Quintans, Jullyana-de Souza Siqueira; Quintans-Junior, Lucindo-José; Conti, Paulo-César-Rodrigues; Bonjardim, Leonardo-Rigoldi

    2012-11-01

    To identify the frequency of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and its severity in individuals with headache. 60 adults divided into three groups of 20 individuals: chronic daily headache (CDH), episodic headache (EH) and a control group without headache (WH). Headache diagnosis was performed according to the criteria of International Headache Society and the signs and symptoms of TMD were achieved by using a clinical exam and an anamnestic questionnaire. The severity of TMD was defined by the temporomandibular index (TMI). The TMD signs and symptoms were always more frequent in individuals with headache, especially report of pain in TMJ area (CDH, n=16; EH, n=12; WH, n=6), pain to palpation on masseter (CDH, n=19; EH, n=16; WH, n=11) which are significantly more frequent in episodic and chronic daily headache. The mean values of temporomandibular and articular index (CDH patients) and muscular index (CDH and EH patients) were statistically higher than in patients of the control group, notably the articular (CDH=0.38; EH=0.25;WH=0.19) and muscular (CDH=0.46; EH=0.51; WH=0.26) indices. These findings allow us to speculate that masticatory and TMJ pain are more common in headache subjects. Besides, it seems that the TMD is more severe in headache patients.

  4. Expression of CGRP in the temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caviedes Bucheli, Javier; Medina Buitrago, Diana Marcela

    2002-01-01

    The presence and content of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is evaluated in the hyperplastic retrodiscal tissue of the temporomandibular joint in patients with joint degenerative disease by radioimmunoassay. Study population has included 8 female patients in pre-menopausic status, without to be pregnant, without to be lactating for a year and with diagnostic of joint degenerative disease (osteoarthrosis). Pain levels are registered with visual analog scale, where 0 is absence of pain and 16 acute pain. A bone degeneration is classified as mild, moderate and severe, according to findings of nuclear magnetic resonance. The 15 retrodiscal hyperplastic tissue samples are taken from patients undergoing to open surgery of temporomandibular joint. The specimens were placed in plastic blocks with freezing medium and are stored at -70 degrees celsius until neuropeptide extraction by radioimmunoassay with kit for CGRP. A directly proportional relationship is established between the degree of bone degeneration and neuropeptide expression and between the osteoarthrosis classification with analogue visual scale. Findings have shown definitive correlation between pain levels and expression of neuropeptide. CGRP is expressed in the retrodiscal tissue of temporomandibular joint in human with joint degenerative disease and is directly related with levels osteoarthrosis and pain [es

  5. Bone structure of the temporo-mandibular joint in the individuals aged 18-25.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parafiniuk, M; Gutsch-Trepka, A; Trepka, S; Sycz, K; Wolski, S; Parafiniuk, W

    1998-01-01

    Osteohistometric studies were performed in 15 female and 15 male cadavers aged 18-25. Condyloid process and right and left acetabulum of the temporo-mandibular joint have been studied. Density has been investigated using monitor screen linked with microscope (magnification 80x). Density in the spongy part of the condyloid process was 26.67-26.77%; in the subchondrial layer--72.13-72.72%, and in the acetabular wall 75.03-75.91%. Microscopic structure of the bones of the temporo-mandibular joint revealed no differences when compared with images of compact and cancellous bone shown in the histology textbooks. Sex and the side of the body had no influence on microscopic image and proportional bone density. Isles of chondrocytes in the trabeculae of the spongy structure of the condyloid process were found in 4 cases and isles of the condensed bone resembling the compact pattern in 7 cases.

  6. Diagnostic criteria for headache attributed to temporomandibular disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffman, Eric; Ohrbach, Richard; List, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We assessed and compared the diagnostic accuracy of two sets of diagnostic criteria for headache secondary to temporomandibular disorders (TMD).......We assessed and compared the diagnostic accuracy of two sets of diagnostic criteria for headache secondary to temporomandibular disorders (TMD)....

  7. MR diagnosis of temporomandibular joint. A study of joint effusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneda, Takashi; Yamashiro, Mitsuaki; Ozawa, Kaoru; Suzuki, Hiromi; Okada, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu

    1998-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the relationship between correlation of MR joint effusion of the temporomandibular joint and disk position, to evaluate the relationship between joint effusion and aging, and to assess the frequency of MR joint effusion of bilateral temporomandibular joints. The temporomandibular joints of 192 patients with clinical symptoms of temporomandibular joint disorders were imaged bilaterally using high field, surface-coil MR imaging. Oblique sagittal and coronal proton density-weighted and T2-weighted images were obtained. Imaging findings of joint effusion were correlated with disk position, aging, and bilateral temporomandibular joints. MR showed effusion in 4% of the joints with normal superior disk position, 36% of the joints with disk displacement with reduction, and 45% of the joints with disk displacement without reduction. There were significant differences in the incidence of joint effusion between normal disk position and anterior disk displacement with or without reduction. Younger patients less than 40 years were significant higher the incidence of joint effusion than those of older patients. A significant association was seen between joint effusion and aging. MR showed effusion in 17% of the unilateral temporomandibular joint, 24% of the bilateral temporomandibular joints. There was no significant difference between unilateral and bilateral case. These results indicated that joint effusion using MR imaging was associated with varied temporomandibular joint pathologic states. (author)

  8. Air quality and climate change, Topic 3 of the Model Inter-Comparison Study for Asia Phase III (MICS-Asia III) - Part 1: Overview and model evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Meng; Han, Zhiwei; Liu, Zirui; Li, Meng; Xin, Jinyuan; Tao, Zhining; Li, Jiawei; Kang, Jeong-Eon; Huang, Kan; Dong, Xinyi; Zhuang, Bingliang; Li, Shu; Ge, Baozhu; Wu, Qizhong; Cheng, Yafang; Wang, Yuesi; Lee, Hyo-Jung; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Fu, Joshua S.; Wang, Tijian; Chin, Mian; Woo, Jung-Hun; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Zifa; Carmichael, Gregory R.

    2018-04-01

    Topic 3 of the Model Inter-Comparison Study for Asia (MICS-Asia) Phase III examines how online coupled air quality models perform in simulating high aerosol pollution in the North China Plain region during wintertime haze events and evaluates the importance of aerosol radiative and microphysical feedbacks. A comprehensive overview of the MICS-Asia III Topic 3 study design, including descriptions of participating models and model inputs, the experimental designs, and results of model evaluation, are presented. Six modeling groups from China, Korea and the United States submitted results from seven applications of online coupled chemistry-meteorology models. Results are compared to meteorology and air quality measurements, including data from the Campaign on Atmospheric Aerosol Research Network of China (CARE-China) and the Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in East Asia (EANET). The correlation coefficients between the multi-model ensemble mean and the CARE-China observed near-surface air pollutants range from 0.51 to 0.94 (0.51 for ozone and 0.94 for PM2.5) for January 2010. However, large discrepancies exist between simulated aerosol chemical compositions from different models. The coefficient of variation (SD divided by the mean) can reach above 1.3 for sulfate in Beijing and above 1.6 for nitrate and organic aerosols in coastal regions, indicating that these compositions are less consistent from different models. During clean periods, simulated aerosol optical depths (AODs) from different models are similar, but peak values differ during severe haze events, which can be explained by the differences in simulated inorganic aerosol concentrations and the hygroscopic growth efficiency (affected by varied relative humidity). These differences in composition and AOD suggest that future models can be improved by including new heterogeneous or aqueous pathways for sulfate and nitrate formation under hazy conditions, a secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation chemical

  9. Synovial osteochondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint; Osteocondromatosis sinovial en la articulacion temporomandibular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemnon, Jorge; Nemnon, Marcelo; Staffieri, Roberto; Villavicencio, C; Marconi, G; Masjoan, Diego [Fundacion Villavicencio, Rosario (Argentina). Diagnostico Medico

    2004-07-01

    Synovial osteochondromatosis (SO) is a meta plastic process by which synovial mesenchymal cells transform into chondroblasts and chondrocytes. This disease affects most frequently the knee, the hip, the elbow, and uncommonly the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The authors present 2 cases of synovial osteochondromatosis of the TMJ. (author)

  10. A Main Steam Safety Valve (MSSV) With Fixed Blowdown According to ASME Section III,Part NC-7512

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Follmer, Bernhard; Schnettler, Armin

    2002-01-01

    In 1986, the NRC issued the Information Notice (IN) 86-05 'Main Steam Safety Valve test failures and ring setting adjustments'. Shortly after this IN was issued, the Code was revised to require that a full flow test has to be performed on each CL.2 MSSV by the manufacturer to verify that the valve was adjusted so that it would reach full lift and thus full relieving capacity and would re-close at a pressure as specified in the valve Design Specification. In response to the concern discussed in the IN, the Westinghouse Owners Group (WOG) performed extensive full flow testing on PWR MSSVs and found that each valve required a unique setting of a combination of two rings in order to achieve full lift at accumulation of 3% and re-closing at a blowdown of 5%. The Bopp and Reuther MSSV type SiZ 2507 has a 'fixed blowdown' i.e. without any adjusting rings to adjust the 'blowdown' so that the blowdown is 'fixed'. More than 1000 pieces of this type are successfully in nuclear power plants in operation. Many of them since about 25 years. Therefore it can be considered as a proven design. It is new that an optimization of this MSSV type SiZ 2507 fulfill the requirements of part NC-7512 of the ASME Section III although there are still no adjusting rings in the flow part. In 2000, for the Qinshan Candu unit 1 and 2 full flow tests were performed with 32 MSSV type SiZ 2507 size 8'' x 12'' at 51 bar saturated steam in only 6 days. In all tests the functional performance was very stable. It was demonstrated by recording the signals lift and system pressure that all valves had acceptable results to achieve full lift at accumulation of 3% and to re-close at blowdown of 5%. This is an advantage which gives a reduction in cost for flow tests and which gives more reliability after maintenance work during outage compared to the common MSSV design with an individual required setting of the combination of the two rings. The design of the type SiZ 2507 without any adjusting rings in the

  11. A Young Patient with Temporomandibular Joint Osteoarthritis: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Alajbeg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a case of a young patient who sought help because of pain in the right temporomandibular joint (TMJ. She also reported increasing of pain during chewing. Clinical examination revealed limited mouth opening with uncorrected deviation to the ipsilateral side. Palpation of the lateral pole of the right condyle discovered crepitus, and maximum assisted opening elicited a report of “familiar pain”. The diagnosis of osteoarthritis of the TMJ (RDC / TMD criteria, Axis I, Group III was confirmed by CBCT of TMJ. There is no “gold standard” for the management of TMD, but the need for TMD treatment has to be based on precise indications related to the presence of pain, limitation in function of the lower jaw and signs of degenerative joint disease. Conservative, reversible therapeutic procedures are considered as the first choice for TMD treatment and their task is to improve the function of the entire masticatory system. In this case patient was treated with the combination of physical therapy and stabilization splint, in order to reduce the pain and restore the normal function of the lower jaw. At 6 months’ follow-up symptoms have almost completely disappeared, while 3 years later, the patient still has no significant subjective symptoms. In the present case non-invasive therapy was sufficient to bring, otherwise recurrent nature of osteoarthritis, in complete remission and keep it like that for years.

  12. Primary headaches interfere with the efficacy of temporomandibular disorders management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porporatti, André Luís; Costa, Yuri Martins; Conti, Paulo César Rodrigues; Bonjardim, Leonardo Rigoldi; Calderon, Patrícia dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate the influence of Primary Headache (PH) on efficacy of a Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) conservative therapy and its association with the presence of self-reported parafunctional habits. Sample was composed of 400 medical records, divided into four groups: I) Muscular TMD (n = 64); II) Muscular TMD+PH (n = 48); III) Muscular TMD+Articular TMD (n = 173); IV) Muscular TMD+Articular TMD+PH (n = 115). All groups had undergone a TMD therapy for three months with a stabilization appliance and counseling for habits and behavioral changes, with no specific headache management. Current pain intensity and existence or not of self-reported bruxism were assessed. Repeated measures ANOVA and Chi-Square test followed by Odds were used for statistical analysis, with a significance level of 5%. results of this study showed that: (1) A conservative therapy with stabilization appliance and counseling for habits and behavioral changes was effective in the TMD pain relief; (2) Groups with an additional diagnosis of PH had worsened the pain improvement significantly; and (3) no association between the presence of self-reported bruxism and PH was found. this study could elucidate the important effect that headache may have on the TMD management.

  13. Primary headaches interfere with the efficacy of temporomandibular disorders management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luís PORPORATTI

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate the influence of Primary Headache (PH on efficacy of a Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD conservative therapy and its association with the presence of self-reported parafunctional habits. SAMPLE AND METHODS: Sample was composed of 400 medical records, divided into four groups: I Muscular TMD (n=64; II Muscular TMD+PH (n=48; III Muscular TMD+Articular TMD (n=173; IV Muscular TMD+Articular TMD+PH (n=115. All groups had undergone a TMD therapy for three months with a stabilization appliance and counseling for habits and behavioral changes, with no specific headache management. Current pain intensity and existence or not of self-reported bruxism were assessed. Repeated measures ANOVA and Chi-Square test followed by Odds were used for statistical analysis, with a significance level of 5%. RESULTS: results of this study showed that: (1 A conservative therapy with stabilization appliance and counseling for habits and behavioral changes was effective in the TMD pain relief; (2 Groups with an additional diagnosis of PH had worsened the pain improvement significantly; and (3 no association between the presence of self-reported bruxism and PH was found. CONCLUSIONS: this study could elucidate the important effect that headache may have on the TMD management.

  14. Muscle disorders and dentition-related aspects in temporomandibular disorders: controversies in the most commonly used treatment modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerjes Waseem

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This review explores the aetiology of temporomandibular disorders and discusses the controversies in variable treatment modalities. Pathologies of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ and its' associated muscles of mastication are jointly termed temporomandibular disorders (TMDs. TMDs present with a variety of symptoms which include pain in the joint and its surrounding area, jaw clicking, limited jaw opening and headaches. It is mainly reported by middle aged females who tend to recognize the symptoms more readily than males and therefore more commonly seek professional help. Several aetiological factors have been acknowledged including local trauma, bruxism, malocclusion, stress and psychiatric illnesses. The Research Diagnostic Criteria of the Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD is advanced to other criteria as it takes into consideration the socio-psychological status of the patient. Several treatment modalities have been recommended including homecare practices, splint therapy, occlusal adjustment, analgesics and the use of psychotropic medication; as well as surgery, supplementary therapy and cognitive behavioural therapy. Although splint therapy and occlusal adjustment have been extensively used, there is no evidence to suggest that they can be curative; a number of evidence-based trials have concluded that these appliances should not be suggested as part of the routine care. Surgery, except in very rare cases, is discouraged since it is the most invasive alternative; recent studies have shown healthier outcome with cognitive behavioural therapy.

  15. Assessment of the relationship between stress and temporomandibular joint disorder in female students before university entrance exam (Konkour exam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mottaghi

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: The parallel increase of temporomandibular disorders and anxiety between the two stages can suggest a possible relationship between anxiety and temporomandibular disorders. Therefore, the effect of anxiety in triggering temporomandibular disorder symptoms is probable.

  16. Temporomandibular disorders, headaches and chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrzewska, Joanna M

    2015-03-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are a major cause of non-dental orofacial pain with a suggested prevalence of 3% to 5% in the general population. TMDs present as unilateral or bilateral pain centered round the pre-auricular area and can be associated with clicking and limitation in jaw movements. It is important to ascertain if there are other comorbid factors such as headaches, widespread chronic pain and mood changes. A biopsychosocial approach is crucial with a careful explanation and self-care techniques encouraged.

  17. Association between headache and temporomandibular disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouelhuda, Amira Mokhtar; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Kim, Sang-Yun; Kim, Young-Kyun

    2017-12-01

    Headaches are one of the most common conditions associated with temporomandibular disorder (TMD). In the present paper, we evaluated the relationship between headache and TMD, determined whether headache influences the symptoms of TMD, and reported two cases of TMD accompanied by headache. Our practical experience and a review of the literature suggested that headache increases the frequency and intensity of pain parameters, thus complicating dysfunctional diseases in both diagnostic and treatment phases. Therefore, early and multidisciplinary treatment of TMD is necessary to avoid the overlap of painful events that could result in pain chronicity.

  18. Chronic hematic cyst of the temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orhan, K.; Delilbasi, C.; Nishiyama, H.; Furukawa, S.; Mitsunobu, K.

    2005-01-01

    Hematic cyst refers to accumulation of blood or blood breakdown products in a non epithelium-lined fibrous tissue capsule. Hepatic cyst is a term often used for deeply placed, incompletely resorbed hematoma hemorrhagic cyst, which may remain unchanged and unidentified for long periods of time. Trauma is the major causative factor, although it is often vague or totally uncalled by the patient. Chronic hematic cysts are uncommon lesions those can present diagnostic challenge. In this article we report a first case of a chronic hematic cyst of the temporomandibular joint TMJ. (author)

  19. [Temporo-mandibular joints and orthognathic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouletreau, P

    2016-09-01

    Temporo-Mandibular Joints (TMJ) and orthognathic surgery are closely linked. In the past, some authors have even described (with mixed results) the correction of some dysmorphosis through direct procedures on the TMJs. Nowadays, performing orthognathic surgery involves the TMJ in three different occasions: (1) TMJ disorders potentially responsible for dento-maxillary dysmorphosis, (2) effects of orthognathic surgery on TMJs, and (3) condylar positioning methods in orthognathic surgery. These three chapters are developed in order to focus on the close relationships between TMJ and orthognathic surgery. Some perspectives close this article. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. [Operative treatment of traumatic fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spinal column: Part III: Follow up data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhold, M; Knop, C; Beisse, R; Audigé, L; Kandziora, F; Pizanis, A; Pranzl, R; Gercek, E; Schultheiss, M; Weckbach, A; Bühren, V; Blauth, M

    2009-03-01

    In this third and final part, the Spine Study Group (AG WS) of the German Trauma Association (DGU) presents the follow-up (NU) data of its second, prospective, internet-based multicenter study (MCS II) for the treatment of thoracic and lumbar spinal injuries including 865 patients from 8 trauma centers. Part I described in detail the epidemiologic data of the patient collective and the subgroups, whereas part II analyzed the different methods of treatment and radiologic findings. The study period covered the years 2002 to 2006 including a 30-month follow-up period from 01.01.2004 until 31.05.2006. Follow-up data of 638 (74%) patients were collected with a new internet-based database system and analyzed. Results in part III will be presented on the basis of the same characteristic treatment subgroups (OP, KONS, PLASTIE) and surgical treatment subgroups (Dorsal, Ventral, Kombi) in consideration of the level of injury (thoracic spine, thoracolumbar junction, lumbar spine). After the initial treatment and discharge from hospital, the average duration of subsequent inpatient rehabilitation was 4 weeks, which lasted significantly longer in patients with persistent neurologic deficits (mean 10.9 weeks) or polytraumatized patients (mean 8.6 weeks). Following rehabilitation on an inpatient basis, subsequent outpatient rehabilitation lasted on average 4 months. Physical therapy was administered significantly longer to patients with neurologic deficits (mean 8.7 months) or type C injuries (mean 8.6 months). The level of injury had no influence of the duration of the inpatient or outpatient rehabilitation. A total of 382 (72.2%) patients who were either operated from posterior approach only or in a combined postero-anterior approach had an implant removal after an average 12 months. During the follow-up period 56 (8.8%) patients with complications were registered and of these 18 (2.8%) had to have surgical revision. The most common complications reported were infection, loss

  1. Expression of CGRP in the temporomandibular joint; Expresion de CGRP en la articulacion temporomandibular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caviedes Bucheli, Javier [Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Facultad de Odontologia, Bogota, D.C. (Colombia); Medina Buitrago, Diana Marcela [Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogota, D.C. (Colombia)

    2002-07-01

    The presence and content of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is evaluated in the hyperplastic retrodiscal tissue of the temporomandibular joint in patients with joint degenerative disease by radioimmunoassay. Study population has included 8 female patients in pre-menopausic status, without to be pregnant, without to be lactating for a year and with diagnostic of joint degenerative disease (osteoarthrosis). Pain levels are registered with visual analog scale, where 0 is absence of pain and 16 acute pain. A bone degeneration is classified as mild, moderate and severe, according to findings of nuclear magnetic resonance. The 15 retrodiscal hyperplastic tissue samples are taken from patients undergoing to open surgery of temporomandibular joint. The specimens were placed in plastic blocks with freezing medium and are stored at -70 degrees celsius until neuropeptide extraction by radioimmunoassay with kit for CGRP. A directly proportional relationship is established between the degree of bone degeneration and neuropeptide expression and between the osteoarthrosis classification with analogue visual scale. Findings have shown definitive correlation between pain levels and expression of neuropeptide. CGRP is expressed in the retrodiscal tissue of temporomandibular joint in human with joint degenerative disease and is directly related with levels osteoarthrosis and pain [Spanish] La presencia y el contenido del peptido relacionado con el gen de la calcitonina (CGRP) es evaluado en el tejido retrodiscal hiperplasico de la articulacion temporomandibular en pacientes con enfermedad degenerativa articular mediante radioinmunoensayo. La poblacion del estudio ha incluido 8 pacientes de genero femenino en estado premenopausico, sin estar embarazada, sin estar lactando por un ano y con diagnostico de enfermedad degenerativa articular (osteoartrosis). Los niveles de dolor son registrados con escala visual analoga, donde 0 es ausencia de dolor y 16 dolor agudo. Una

  2. Treatment of temporomandibular disorder using occlusal splint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Dahlan

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patient suffering from occlusal abnormality is usually detected months or even years when the acute patient visits a dentist, and generally the patient does not receive direct treatment upon his complaints since minimum information is available on this type of treatment. In general, the dentist provides medication only or conducts incorrect selective grinding where in fact, the patient does not feel better from the previous conditions. Purpose: The objective of this study is to discuss the treatment on the dysfunctional temporomandibular joint followed by orofacial pain caused by occlusal disorder using occlusal splint. Case: In this case, a forty three years old male having trouble with the joint on the left jaw followed by orofacial pain caused by occlusal disorder. Case Management: Initial treatment with occlusal splint makes the patient comfortable and recovers from his complaints since the patient could restructure the chewing muscles. This treatment will be more successful if the dentist has the knowledge to use and choose occlusal splint method properly. Occlusal Splint could be used as a supporting therapy and consideration as one of the therapies to avoid the unwanted side effects. The use of occlusal splint is meant as an alternative of the main therapy in overcoming the problem of occlusal splint. Conclusion: Finally, therapy with occlusal splint is very effective as an alternative treatment to handle the dysfunction of temporomandibular joint caused by occlusion.

  3. Field Surveys, IOC Valleys. Volume III, Part II. Cultural Resources Survey, Pine and Wah Wah Valleys, Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    including horse, camel, mammoth, Ertm E-TR-48-III-II 20 musk ox, and certain species of bison, goat, and bear, which had previously inhabited the marsh and...34 - - -9,$.. 𔄃 Im I I I Si to * Location lype/Contents Affiliation 42B@644 rid e over cr ek - P/J depression, cleared areas, Fr elon (f4-5-18-92) ground

  4. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3940 Total temporomandibular joint... implanted in the human jaw to replace the mandibular condyle and augment the glenoid fossa to functionally...

  5. Tomographic study of temporomandibular joints before orthodontic treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Ki Jeong [Kyung Hee Univ. College of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-15

    To determine whether there is a relationship between abnormal temporomandibular joint radiographic findings and age or gender in a sample of preorthodontic patients. Individualized corrected sagittal tomographs of 188 temporomandibular joints in 94 preorthodontic patients, aged 11 to 29 years, were taken and viewed by an observer blinded to clinical records. The study population was divided into 2 aged groups (11-15 years and 16-29 years) for comparative purpose. Temporomandibular joint radiographic findings were classified as normal or abnormal. There was no difference in ratio of abnormal to normal findings between the both aged groups. The frequency of osseous abnormalities was similar with that of abnormalities of condylar position. Abnormalities in CP and JS were most frequent in all aged groups. There is no significant difference between ages or genders for temporomandibular joint radiographic abnormalities.

  6. MRI of the internal derangement of temporomandibular joint: Comparison with arthrographic and operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mi Hye; Kim, Dong Ik; Kim, Hyung Gon; Suh, Jung Ho; Jung, Tae Sub

    1993-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed the MRI findings of 100 temporomandibular joints in 78 patients who had complained temporomandibular joint dysfunction. MRI findings were classified according to Wilke's staging criteria. And these findings were compared with arthographic findings in 22 joint and surgical findings in 44 joints. According to Wilke's staging, they were classified into 6 stages of abnormality: stage 0 (33 cases), stage I (19 cases), stage II (10 cases), stage III (18 cases), stage IV (6 cases), stage V (14 cases). Among the 22 cases in which arthography and MRI were done, both studies were well correlated in 10 joints. In 7 joints, MRI was superior to arthography, which correctly demonstrated the meniscal displacement in 2 joints and meniscal deformity in 5 joints. In 5 joints, arthography was superior to MR, which demonstrated the perforation (1 joint), adhesion (2 joints) and recapture of meniscus (2 joints). Compared with surgical findings, MRI correctly demonstrated the displacement of meniscus in all 44 joints. However, in case of the 10 meniscal perforation, MRI demonstrated the meniscal discontinuity in only 4 joints. Retrospective MR findings in 10 proven cases were the defect in posterior attachment in 4, far anterior meniscal displacement without recapture in 8, condylar spur in 4, and close bone to bone contact in 1. In conclusion, MRI as a primary diagnostic modality of temporomandibular joint derangement, is superior for the grading of displacement and deformity of meniscus but inferior for the evaluation of perforation, adhesion and recapture of meniscus to conventional arthrography. In case of the suspected meniscal perforation, arthrographic correlation is recommended preoperatively

  7. A Case of Chondrosarcoma Arising in the Temporomandibular Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsutomu Nomura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chondrosarcoma is a malignant tumor originating in cartilaginous cells. And there are only few reports of the case of chondrosarcoma in temporomandibular joint. We discuss a case of chondrosarcoma in temporomandibular joint in a 28-year-old man. Tumor was in contact with the dura, but en bloc resection was performed. After surgical resection of the tumor, face defect was reconstructed by rectus abdominis-free flap. And there is no recurrence after ten years from the resection.

  8. Radiographic analysis of temporomandibular joint arthrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Dong Soo [Department of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-11-15

    The author analysed the bone changes, the positional relationships between condylar head and articular fossa, and the interrelationship between the bone changes and the abnormal position of condylar head, from 1,036 radiographs of 259 patients with temporomandibular joint arthrosis, which were obtained by the oblique-lateral transcranial projection and orthopantomograms. The results were as follows: 1. Among the radiographic bone changes of the temporomandibular joint arthrosis, deformity was 36..90% (217 cases), sclerosis 34.18% (201 cases), erosive change 25.58% (152 cases) and marginal proliferation 3.06% (18 cases) respectively. 2. In the positional changes between condylar head and articular fossa, the downward positioning of condylar head in centric occlusion was most frequent (36.90%), of which frequency was significantly higher than forward positioning (11.22%) and backward positioning (4.76%) in same condition. Also, radiographs showed that the enlargement of articular space showed higher frequency than its narrowing. In the opening position of mouth, the restrict ed movement of condylar head within articular fossa was most frequent (35.03%). The forward positioning and the downward positioning was 15.65% and 9.52% respectively. Also, radiographs revealed that the incomplete movement or no positional change of condylar head was most frequent. 3. In the interrelationship between bone changes and abnormal position of condylar head, deformity was 42.79% in the cases of downward positioning of condylar head in centric occlusion and 37.50% in those of normal positioning of condylar head in same condition. This revealed that deformity was most frequent bone change in above condylar positionings. However, erosive change was 34.62% in the cases of downward positioning of condylar head in centric occlusion and 33 .33% in those of forward positioning. In opening position of condylar head, and deformity in the cases of norma l positioning, forward positioning and

  9. Radiographic analysis of temporomandibular joint arthrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Dong Soo

    1984-01-01

    The author analysed the bone changes, the positional relationships between condylar head and articular fossa, and the interrelationship between the bone changes and the abnormal position of condylar head, from 1,036 radiographs of 259 patients with temporomandibular joint arthrosis, which were obtained by the oblique-lateral transcranial projection and orthopantomograms. The results were as follows: 1. Among the radiographic bone changes of the temporomandibular joint arthrosis, deformity was 36..90% (217 cases), sclerosis 34.18% (201 cases), erosive change 25.58% (152 cases) and marginal proliferation 3.06% (18 cases) respectively. 2. In the positional changes between condylar head and articular fossa, the downward positioning of condylar head in centric occlusion was most frequent (36.90%), of which frequency was significantly higher than forward positioning (11.22%) and backward positioning (4.76%) in same condition. Also, radiographs showed that the enlargement of articular space showed higher frequency than its narrowing. In the opening position of mouth, the restrict ed movement of condylar head within articular fossa was most frequent (35.03%). The forward positioning and the downward positioning was 15.65% and 9.52% respectively. Also, radiographs revealed that the incomplete movement or no positional change of condylar head was most frequent. 3. In the interrelationship between bone changes and abnormal position of condylar head, deformity was 42.79% in the cases of downward positioning of condylar head in centric occlusion and 37.50% in those of normal positioning of condylar head in same condition. This revealed that deformity was most frequent bone change in above condylar positionings. However, erosive change was 34.62% in the cases of downward positioning of condylar head in centric occlusion and 33 .33% in those of forward positioning. In opening position of condylar head, and deformity in the cases of norma l positioning, forward positioning and

  10. Correlation between headache and temporomandibular joint dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Menezes, Mariana Sampaio; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; Biasotto-Gonzalez, Daniela Aparecida

    2008-01-01

    A relação entre disfunções temporomandibulares (DTM) e os diferentes tipos de cefaléias ainda não está bem compreendida, mas a dor de cabeça é provavelmente o sintoma mais comum da DTM. O objetivo deste estudo foi correlacionar cefaléia com o índice clínico de Fonseca de avaliação da DTM. Participaram 160 voluntários estudantes da Universidade Nove de Julho na faixa dos 18 aos 36 anos, sendo 80 mulheres e 80 homens. Foram aplicados dois questionários: o índice clínico de Fonseca e um question...

  11. Ankylosis of temporomandibular joint in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das U

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Temporomandibular joint (TMJ ankylosis or hypomobility involves fusion of the mandibular condyle to the base of the skull. It is a major clinical problem that affects many patients suffering from facial trauma, infection, or systemic disease. The treatment of TMJ ankylosis poses a significant challenge because of technical difficulties and a high incidence of recurrence. Case Report: This report describes a case of a 4-year-old boy with inability to open mouth, diagnosed with unilateral right bony TMJ ankylosis. The surgical approach consisted of gap arthroplasty followed by vigorous physiotherapy. Conclusion: A detailed history, clinical and functional examination, radiographic examination facilitating correct diagnosis followed by immediate surgical intervention, and physiotherapy can help us to restore physical, psychological, and emotional health of the child patient.

  12. The effect of orthognathic surgery on the temporomandibular joint and oral function: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Te Veldhuis, E C; Te Veldhuis, A H; Bramer, W M; Wolvius, E B; Koudstaal, M J

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to examine the effect of orthognathic surgery (OS) on the temporomandibular joint and oral function. Electronic databases were systematically searched for studies published until October 2015. Articles were assessed against predefined inclusion criteria. The included papers were divided into four groups based on the type of OS performed. The following items were recorded: quality of evidence using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based medicine (CEBM) criteria, number of patients, presence/absence of controls, mean age at treatment, follow-up time, clinical examination findings, bite force, use of the Helkimo Index and Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders, imaging findings, and patient questionnaire results. A total of 4669 articles were identified; 76 relevant articles were included in the review. These studies assessed a total 3399 patients and 380 controls, with a mean age of 25.4 years. The great variety of OS techniques, examination techniques, diagnostic criteria, and imaging techniques used in the articles studied, as well as the quality of the study designs, made it difficult to compare studies and to draw conclusions. However, looking at the different aspects studied in general, it can be stated that OS seems to have little or no harmful effect on the TMJ and oral function (level of evidence: levels II, III, and IV). Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Temporomandibular disorders: Old ideas and new concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, Thomas; Jensen, Rigmor Højland

    2017-06-01

    Background Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) is an umbrella term for pain and dysfunction involving the masticatory muscles and the temporomandibular joints (TMJs). TMD is the most common orofacial pain condition. Its prominent features include regional pain in the face and preauricular area, limitations in jaw movement, and noise from the TMJs during jaw movements. TMD affects up to 15% of adults and 7% of adolescents. Chronic pain is the overwhelming reason that patients with TMD seek treatment. TMD can associate with impaired general health, depression, and other psychological disabilities, and may affect the quality of life of the patient. Assessment Evaluations indicate that the recently published Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (DC/TMD) are reliable and valid. These criteria cover the most common types of TMD, which include pain-related disorders (e.g., myalgia, headache attributable to TMD, and arthralgia) as well as disorders associated with the TMJ (primarily disc displacements and degenerative disease). As peripheral mechanisms most likely play a role in the onset of TMD, a detailed muscle examination is recommended. The persistence of pain involves more central factors, such as sensitization of the supraspinal neurons and second-order neurons at the level of the spinal dorsal horn/trigeminal nucleus, imbalanced antinociceptive activity, and strong genetic predisposition, which also is included in DC/TMD. Conclusion The etiology is complex and still not clearly understood, but several biological and psychosocial risk factors for TMD have been identified. Several studies indicate that patients with TMD improve with a combination of noninvasive therapies, including behavior therapy, pharmacotherapy, physical therapy, and occlusal appliances. More stringently designed studies, however, are needed to assess treatment efficacy and how to tailor treatment to the individual patient.

  14. Headache and temporomandibular disorders: evidence for diagnostic and behavioural overlap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaros, A G; Urban, D; Locke, J

    2007-06-01

    To assess the diagnostic and behavioural overlap of headache patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD), individuals recruited from the general population with self-described headaches were compared with non-headache controls. The examination and diagnostic procedures in the Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC) for TMD were applied to both sets of subjects by a blinded examiner. Following their examination, subjects used experience sampling methods to obtain data on pain, tooth contact, masticatory muscle tension, emotional states and stress. Results showed that a significantly higher proportion of the headache patients received an RDC/TMD diagnosis of myofascial pain than non-headache controls. Headache patients also reported significantly more frequent and intense tooth contact, more masticatory muscle tension, more stress and more pain in the face/head and other parts of the body than non-headache controls. These results are similar to those reported for TMD patients and they suggest that headache patients and TMD patients overlap considerably in diagnosis and oral parafunctional behaviours.

  15. Association between temporomandibular disorders and abnormal head postures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Francisco FAULIN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the possible correlation between the prevalence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD and different head postures in the frontal and sagittal planes using photographs of undergraduate students in the School of Dentistry at the Universidade de Brasília - UnB, Brazil. In this nonrandomized, cross-sectional study, the diagnoses of TMD were made with the Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC/TMD axis I. The craniovertebral angle was used to evaluate forward head posture in the sagittal plane, and the interpupillary line was used to measure head tilt in the frontal plane. The measurements to evaluate head posture were made using the Software for the Assessment of Posture (SAPO. Students were divided into two study groups, based on the presence or absence of TMD. The study group comprised 46 students and the control group comprised 80 students. Data about head posture and TMD were analyzed with the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, version 13. Most cases of TMD were classified as degenerative processes (group III, followed by disk displacement (group II and muscle disorders (group I. There was no sex predominance for the type of disorder. No association was found between prevalence rates for head postures in the frontal plane and the occurrence of TMD. The same result was found for the association of TMD diagnosis with craniovertebral angle among men and women, and the group that contained both men and women. Abnormal head postures were common among individuals both with and without TMD. No association was found between head posture evaluated in the frontal and sagittal planes and TMD diagnosis with the use of RDC/TMD.

  16. RA reactor safety analysis, Part II - Accident analysis; Analiza sigurnosti rada Reaktora RA I-III, Deo II - Analiza akcidenta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raisic, N; Radanovic, Lj; Milovanovic, M; Afgan, N; Kulundzic, P [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1963-02-15

    This part of the RA reactor safety analysis includes analysis of possible accidents caused by failures of the reactor devices and errors during reactor operation. Two types of accidents are analyzed: accidents resulting from uncontrolled reactivity increase, and accidents caused by interruption of cooling.

  17. [Blood-brain barrier part III: therapeutic approaches to cross the blood-brain barrier and target the brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, N; Miller, F; Cazaubon, S; Couraud, P-O

    2010-03-01

    Over the last few years, the blood-brain barrier has come to be considered as the main limitation for the treatment of neurological diseases caused by inflammatory, tumor or neurodegenerative disorders. In the blood-brain barrier, the close intercellular contact between cerebral endothelial cells due to tight junctions prevents the passive diffusion of hydrophilic components from the bloodstream into the brain. Several specific transport systems (via transporters expressed on cerebral endothelial cells) are implicated in the delivery of nutriments, ions and vitamins to the brain; other transporters expressed on cerebral endothelial cells extrude endogenous substances or xenobiotics, which have crossed the cerebral endothelium, out of the brain and into the bloodstream. Recently, several strategies have been proposed to target the brain, (i) by by-passing the blood-brain barrier by central drug administration, (ii) by increasing permeability of the blood-brain barrier, (iii) by modulating the expression and/or the activity of efflux transporters, (iv) by using the physiological receptor-dependent blood-brain barrier transport, and (v) by creating new viral or chemical vectors to cross the blood-brain barrier. This review focuses on the illustration of these different approaches. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Schinus terebinthifolius countercurrent chromatography (Part III): Method transfer from small countercurrent chromatography column to preparative centrifugal partition chromatography ones as a part of method development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    das Neves Costa, Fernanda; Hubert, Jane; Borie, Nicolas; Kotland, Alexis; Hewitson, Peter; Ignatova, Svetlana; Renault, Jean-Hugues

    2017-03-03

    Countercurrent chromatography (CCC) and centrifugal partition chromatography (CPC) are support free liquid-liquid chromatography techniques sharing the same basic principles and features. Method transfer has previously been demonstrated for both techniques but never from one to another. This study aimed to show such a feasibility using fractionation of Schinus terebinthifolius berries dichloromethane extract as a case study. Heptane - ethyl acetate - methanol -water (6:1:6:1, v/v/v/v) was used as solvent system with masticadienonic and 3β-masticadienolic acids as target compounds. The optimized separation methodology previously described in Part I and II, was scaled up from an analytical hydrodynamic CCC column (17.4mL) to preparative hydrostatic CPC instruments (250mL and 303mL) as a part of method development. Flow-rate and sample loading were further optimized on CPC. Mobile phase linear velocity is suggested as a transfer invariant parameter if the CPC column contains sufficient number of partition cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Normal and sonographic anatomy of selected peripheral nerves. Part III: Peripheral nerves of the lower limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Kowalska

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The ultrasonographic examination is currently increasingly used in imaging peripheral nerves, serving to supplement the physical examination, electromyography and magnetic resonance imaging. As in the case of other USG imaging studies, the examination of peripheral nerves is non-invasive and well-tolerated by patients. The typical ultrasonographic picture of peripheral nerves as well as the examination technique have been discussed in part I of this article series, following the example of the median nerve. Part II of the series presented the normal anatomy and the technique for examining the peripheral nerves of the upper limb. This part of the article series focuses on the anatomy and technique for examining twelve normal peripheral nerves of the lower extremity: the iliohypogastric and ilioinguinal nerves, the lateral cutaneous nerve of the thigh, the pudendal, sciatic, tibial, sural, medial plantar, lateral plantar, common peroneal, deep peroneal and superficial peroneal nerves. It includes diagrams showing the proper positioning of the sonographic probe, plus USG images of the successively discussed nerves and their surrounding structures. The ultrasonographic appearance of the peripheral nerves in the lower limb is identical to the nerves in the upper limb. However, when imaging the lower extremity, convex probes are more often utilized, to capture deeply-seated nerves. The examination technique, similarly to that used in visualizing the nerves of upper extremity, consists of locating the nerve at a characteristic anatomic reference point and tracking it using the “elevator technique”. All 3 parts of the article series should serve as an introduction to a discussion of peripheral nerve pathologies, which will be presented in subsequent issues of the “Journal of Ultrasonography”.

  20. Organizational Infrastructure in the Collegiate Athletic Training Setting, Part III: Benefits of and Barriers in the Medical and Academic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, Christianne M.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Goodman, Ashley

    2017-01-01

    Context: Academic and medical models are emerging as alternatives to the athletics model, which is the more predominant model in the collegiate athletic training setting. Little is known about athletic trainers' (ATs') perceptions of these models. Objective: To investigate the perceived benefits of and barriers in the medical and academic models. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: National Collegiate Athletic Association Divisions I, II, and III. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 16 full-time ATs (10 men, 6 women; age = 32 ± 6 years, experience = 10 ± 6 years) working in the medical (n = 8) or academic (n = 8) models. Data Collection and Analysis: We conducted semistructured telephone interviews and evaluated the qualitative data using a general inductive approach. Multiple-analyst triangulation and peer review were completed to satisfy data credibility. Results: In the medical model, role congruency and work-life balance emerged as benefits, whereas role conflict, specifically intersender conflict with coaches, was a barrier. In the academic model, role congruency emerged as a benefit, and barriers were role strain and work-life conflict. Subscales of role strain included role conflict and role ambiguity for new employees. Role conflict stemmed from intersender conflict with coaches and athletics administrative personnel and interrole conflict with fulfilling multiple overlapping roles (academic, clinical, administrative). Conclusions: The infrastructure in which ATs provide medical care needs to be evaluated. We found that the medical model can support better alignment for both patient care and the wellbeing of ATs. Whereas the academic model has perceived benefits, role incongruence exists, mostly because of the role complexity associated with balancing teaching, patient-care, and administrative duties. PMID:27977302

  1. Organizational Infrastructure in the Collegiate Athletic Training Setting, Part III: Benefits of and Barriers in the Medical and Academic Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, Christianne M; Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Goodman, Ashley

    2017-01-01

     Academic and medical models are emerging as alternatives to the athletics model, which is the more predominant model in the collegiate athletic training setting. Little is known about athletic trainers' (ATs') perceptions of these models.  To investigate the perceived benefits of and barriers in the medical and academic models.  Qualitative study.  National Collegiate Athletic Association Divisions I, II, and III.  A total of 16 full-time ATs (10 men, 6 women; age = 32 ± 6 years, experience = 10 ± 6 years) working in the medical (n = 8) or academic (n = 8) models.  We conducted semistructured telephone interviews and evaluated the qualitative data using a general inductive approach. Multiple-analyst triangulation and peer review were completed to satisfy data credibility.  In the medical model, role congruency and work-life balance emerged as benefits, whereas role conflict, specifically intersender conflict with coaches, was a barrier. In the academic model, role congruency emerged as a benefit, and barriers were role strain and work-life conflict. Subscales of role strain included role conflict and role ambiguity for new employees. Role conflict stemmed from intersender conflict with coaches and athletics administrative personnel and interrole conflict with fulfilling multiple overlapping roles (academic, clinical, administrative).  The infrastructure in which ATs provide medical care needs to be evaluated. We found that the medical model can support better alignment for both patient care and the wellbeing of ATs. Whereas the academic model has perceived benefits, role incongruence exists, mostly because of the role complexity associated with balancing teaching, patient-care, and administrative duties.

  2. Association between otalgia, tinnitus, vertigo and hypoacusia, with temporomandibular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Guedes Pereira de Alencar Junior

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Because nonespecific symptoms and signs are associated with others well-established in the temporomandibular disorders, it is difficult for the clinician to decide what symptoms and signs should be considered during the diagnosis and the treatment plan. Therefore, the aim of this literature review was to evaluate the prevalence of aural symptoms (otalgias, tinnitus, dizziness and deafness in patients with orofacial pain. Although several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the association between aural symptoms and temporomandibular disorders, the results of the previous studies differed in magnitude. For this reason, it is difficult to establish the prevalence of these aural symptoms concomitantly with temporomandibular disorders. Moreover, such relationship does not necessarily imply a cause-effect relationship. Because of the diagnosis complexity, different treatments must be considered, so the nonespecific symptoms of temporomandibular disorders can be effectively controlled as well. It is crucial for the the clinician to be aware of the possible etiology of aural symptoms, so he should determine if such symptoms may be associated with temporomandibular disorders and thus include them in the treatment.

  3. Algunas consideraciones sobre los trastornos temporomandibulares Some considerations on the temporomandibular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ileana Grau León

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una revisión documental mediante revistas, libros, tesis y otros documentos en formato electrónico acerca de la epidemiología de los trastornos de la articulación temporomandibular, con el objetivo de actualizar el material existente y ampliar nuestros conocimientos sobre esta alteración. En nuestro país se han llevado a cabo en las 2 últimas décadas, varios estudios epidemiológicos sobre los trastornos temporomandibulares (TTM y se ha hecho un esfuerzo notable por esclarecer su causa. De forma general, se acepta la idea de que el origen de los disturbios funcionales del sistema estomatognático es multifactorial, pero a pesar de que tanto en niños como en adultos la prevalencia de los trastornos temporomandibulares (TTM ha sido alta, no se ha evidenciado un factor causal predominante. La literatura alude que estas disfunciones afectan a un porcentaje muy elevado de la población mundial (80 %, con una edad media de 34 años y una proporción de 3 mujeres por cada hombre. Este dato es muy interesante, porque los estudios precisan que las mujeres de edades comprendidas entre los 25 y los 35 años presentan trastornos temporomandibulares (TTM con más asiduidad.A documental review of different sources was carried out to study the disfunctions of temporal mandibular joint (TMJ with the objective of updating and enlarge our knowledge of this disorder. In or country in the last two decades several epidemiological studies about the temporal mandibular joint dysfunction were carried out. In a general wade the idea about of the origin of the functional problems of the stomatognatic system is multifactioral. But although, in children as well as in adults the prevalence of temporal mandibular dysfunction (DTM has been high, a casual predominant factor has not been evidenced. Literature states that this dysfunction affect a very high percentage of the world populations, 80 % , the mean age 34 years old and the proportion 3 woman for

  4. Influência do tratamento das desordens temporomandibulares na dor e na postura global

    OpenAIRE

    Azato, Flaviane Keiko; Castillo, Daisilene Baena; Coelho, Tulio Marcos Kalife; Taciro, Charles; Pereira, Paulo Zarate; Zomerfeld, Valquiria; Silva, Marcela Galdina da; Insarraulde, Elizeu; Vinholi, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: A disfunção temporomandibular é uma síndrome clínica que acomete principalmente músculos mastigatórios e articulações temporomandibulares. Como a articulação temporomandibular está diretamente relacionada à região cervical e escapular por meio de cadeias musculares, alterações posturais da coluna podem acarretar distúrbios de articulação temporomandibular, e vice-versa. A relação entre a postura corporal e a disfunção temporomandibular pode estabelecer uma forma de ...

  5. New 20-cm radio-continuum study of the small Magellanic cloud - part III: Compact Hii regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong G.F.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present and discuss a new catalogue of 48 compact Hii regions in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC and a newly created deep 1420 MHz (λ=20 cm radio-continuum image of the N19 region located in the southwestern part of the SMC. The new images were created by merging 1420 MHz radiocontinuum archival data from the Australian Telescope Compact Array. The majority of these detected radio compact Hii regions have rather flat spectral indices which indicates, as expected, that the dominant emission mechanism is of thermal nature.

  6. Mammalian Toxicity of Munition Compounds. Phase II. Effects of Multiple Doses. Part III. 2,6-Dinitrotoluene

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-07-01

    and the neuromuscular effects in these dogs were not due to hypocalcemia . The lowest serum calcium concen- tration in these dogs was 4.2 meq/liter...motor end plate might produce a local hypocalcemia . Such a mechanism is purely speculative. Qualitatively and quantitavely, most of the effects of 2,6...I ýNw,- -MIM I/ MIDWEST RESEARCH INS14ITUTE H0q .3L I LU -_ MAMMALIAN TOXICITY OF MUNITIONS COMPOUlNDSPHASE II: EFFECTS OF MiULTIPLE DOSES C* •PART

  7. A-Part Gel, an adhesion prophylaxis for abdominal surgery: a randomized controlled phase I-II safety study [NCT00646412].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Reinhold; Baumann, Petra; Schmoor, Claudia; Odermatt, Erich K; Wente, Moritz N; Jauch, Karl-Walter

    2015-01-01

    Intra-abdominal surgical intervention can cause the development of intra-peritoneal adhesions. To reduce this problem, different agents have been tested to minimize abdominal adhesions; however, the optimal adhesion prophylaxis has not been found so far. Therefore, the A-Part(®) Gel was developed as a barrier to diminish postsurgical adhesions; the aim of this randomized controlled study was a first evaluation of its safety and efficacy. In this prospective, controlled, randomized, patient-blinded, monocenter phase I-II study, 62 patients received either the hydrogel A-Part-Gel(®) as an anti-adhesive barrier or were untreated after primary elective median laparotomy. Primary endpoint was the occurrence of peritonitis and/or wound healing impairment 28 ± 10 days postoperatively. As secondary endpoints anastomotic leakage until 28 days after surgery, adverse events and adhesions were assessed until 3 months postoperatively. A lower rate of wound healing impairment and/or peritonitis was observed in the A-Part Gel(®) group compared to the control group: (6.5 vs. 13.8 %). The difference between the two groups was -7.3%, 90 % confidence interval [-20.1, 5.4 %]. Both treatment groups showed similar frequency of anastomotic leakage but incidence of adverse events and serious adverse events were slightly lower in the A-Part Gel(®) group compared to the control. Adhesion rates were comparable in both groups. A-Part Gel(®) is safe as an adhesion prophylaxis after abdominal wall surgery but no reduction of postoperative peritoneal adhesion could be found in comparison to the control group. This may at least in part be due to the small sample size as well as to the incomplete coverage of the incision due to the used application. NCT00646412.

  8. Dental compensation for skeletal Class III malocclusion by isolated extraction of mandibular teeth. Part 1: Occlusal situation 12 years after completion of active treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Bernd; Schenk-Kazan, Sarah

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to statistically evaluate the outcomes achieved by isolated extraction of mandibular teeth (second premolars or first molars) for Class III compensation. Part A of the study dealt with the quality of outcomes at the end of active treatment, using weighted Peer Assessment Rating (PAR) scores determined on the basis of casts for 25 (14 female and 11 male) consecutive patients aged 16 ± 1.7 years at the time of debonding. These results were compared to the scores in a randomly selected control group of 25 (14 female and 11 male) patients who were 14.7 ± 1.9 years old at debonding. Part B evaluated the long-term stability of the outcomes based on 12 (all of them female) patients available for examination after a mean of 11.8 years. The mean weighted PAR scores obtained in both study parts were analyzed for statistical differences using a two-tailed paired Student's t-test at a significance level of p ≤ 0.05. Mean weighted PAR scores of 4.76 ± 3.94 and 3.92 ± 3.44 were obtained in the Class III extraction group and the control group, respectively, at the end of active treatment. This difference was not significant (p = 0.49). Among the 12 longitudinal patients, the mean score increased from 4 ± 3.46 at debonding to 6.25 ± 3.67 by the end of the 11.8-year follow-up period. This difference was significant (p = 0.0008). Treatment of Class III anomalies by isolated extraction of lower premolars or molars can yield PAR scores similar to those achieved by standard therapies. These scores, while increasing significantly, remained at a clinically acceptable level over 11.8 years. Hence this treatment modality--intended for cases that border on requiring orthognathic surgery--may also be recommended from a long-term point of view.

  9. A patient's view on the location of the temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koole, Paul; Zonnenberg, Adriaan J J; Mulder, Jan

    2018-03-25

    Objective A survey was held to establish whether laypeople knew the location of their temporomandibular joint. Methods A sample of 61 participants, visiting their dental office for a routine check-up, was given a three-question survey of whether they knew the location of their temporomandibular joint and could point to this location. Results Thirty-eight participants answered the question affirmatively. Only 13 pointed to the correct location. Of these, six participants received consultation for TMD in the past, three participants were healthcare providers, and four participants actually had knowledge of the exact location. Out of 23 participants who did not know the location, one accidently designated the correct position. Conclusion The location of the temporomandibular joint is not a well-known site for many patients. In the presence of orofacial pain, it seems advisable to let the patient designate and record the site of the pain on a drawing on the patient chart.

  10. Use of rumination and activity monitoring for the identification of dairy cows with health disorders: Part III. Metritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stangaferro, M L; Wijma, R; Caixeta, L S; Al-Abri, M A; Giordano, J O

    2016-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate (1) the performance of an automated health-monitoring system (AHMS) to identify cows with metritis based on an alert system (health index score, HIS) that combines rumination time and physical activity; (2) the number of days between the first HIS alert and clinical diagnosis (CD) of metritis by farm personnel; and (3) the daily rumination time, physical activity, and HIS patterns around CD. In this manuscript, the overall performance of HIS to detect cows with all disorders of interest in this study [ketosis, displaced abomasum, indigestion (companion paper, part I), mastitis (companion paper, part II), and metritis] is also reported. Holstein cattle (n=1,121; 451 nulliparous and 670 multiparous) were fitted with a neck-mounted electronic rumination and activity monitoring tag (HR Tags, SCR Dairy, Netanya, Israel) from at least -21 to 80 d in milk (DIM). Raw data collected in 2-h periods were summarized per 24 h as daily rumination and activity. An HIS (0 to 100 arbitrary units) was calculated daily for individual cows with an algorithm that used rumination and activity. A positive HIS outcome was defined as an HIS of cows (n=459) at -11±3, -4±3, 0, 3±1, 7±1, 14±1, and 28±1 DIM. The overall sensitivity of HIS was 55% for all cases of metritis (n=349), but it was greater for cows with metritis and another disorder (78%) than for cows with metritis only (53%). Cows diagnosed with metritis and flagged based on HIS had substantial alterations in their rumination, activity, and HIS patterns around CD, alterations of blood markers of metabolic and health status around calving, reduced milk production, and were more likely to exit the herd than cows not flagged based on the HIS and cows without disease, suggesting that cows flagged based on the HIS had a more severe episode of metritis. Including all disorders of interest for this study, the overall sensitivity was 59%, specificity was 98%, positive predictive value was

  11. Controlled production of camembert-type cheeses: part III role of the ripening microflora on free fatty acid concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq-Perlat, Marie-Noëlle; Corrieu, Georges; Spinnler, Henry-Eric

    2007-05-01

    Phenomena generating FFAs, important flavour precursors, are significant in cheese ripening. In Camembert-like cheeses, it was intended to establish the relationships between the dynamics of FFA concentrations changes and the succession of ripening microflora during ripening. Experimental Camembert-type cheeses were prepared in duplicate from pasteurised milk inoculated with Kluyveromyces lactis, Geotrichum candidum, Penicillium camemberti, and Brevibacterium aurantiacum under aseptic conditions. For each cheese and each cheesy medium, concentrations of FFAs with odd-numbered carbons, except for 9:0 and 13:0, did not change over time. For long-chain FFAs, concentrations varied with the given cheese part (rind or core). K. lactis produced only short or medium-chain FFAs during its growth and had a minor influence on caproic, caprylic, capric, and lauric acids in comparison with G. candidum, the most lipolytic of the strains used here. It generated all short or medium-chain FFAs (4:0-12:0) during its exponential and slowdown growth periods and only long-chain ones (14:0-18:0) during its stationary phase. Pen. camemberti produced more long-chain FFAs (14:0-18:0) during its sporulation. Brev. aurantiacum did not generate any FFAs. The evidence of links between specific FFAs and the growth of a given microorganism is shown.

  12. On the radiation exposure in temporomandibular joint examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rother, U.; Hildebrandt, K.H.

    1979-01-01

    The radiation exposure caused by standardized examinations of the temporomandibular joint has been determined with the aid of 660 exposures of an Alderson phantom. Comparative examinations were performed with the classic contact technique according to Parma to elucidate the results obtained. The lowest surface exposure was observed in contact examinations of the temporomandibular joint. Application of a flat cone led to a 13-fold reduction in surface exposure compared to contact examinations according to Parma. Furthermore, radiation exposure strongly decreased from the irradiation field to the adjacent area if a cone (flat cone and ear cone) was used. (author)

  13. Evaluation of aural manifestations in temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhy, O A; Koutb, A R; Abdel-Baki, F A; Ali, T M; El Raffa, I Z; Khater, A H

    2004-08-01

    Thirty patients with temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction were selected to investigate the changes in otoacoustic emissions before and after conservative treatment of their temporo-mandibular joints. Pure tone audiometry, transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE), distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) as well as a tinnitus questionnaire were administered to all patients before and after therapy. Therapy was conservative in the form of counselling, physiotherapy, anti-inflammatory agents, muscle relaxants, and occlusal splints. Results indicated insignificant changes in the TEOAEs, whereas there were significant increases in distortion product levels at most of the frequency bands. These results were paralleled to subjective improvement of tinnitus.

  14. The application of magnetic resonance imaging in temporomandibular joint pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehmedov, E.T.; Qahramanov, E.T.

    2007-01-01

    The diseases and damages of temporomandibular joint have compleceted diagnostic unlike other bone-joint pathologies. In 2005 for the first time in history it was implemented the magnetic resonance imaging in diagnostics of patients with with temporomandibular joints pathology. The current researches are in place till today. Being the golden standart the application of magnetic resonance tomography has a great role in differential diagnostics of the chronic arthritis, sclerosanse, deformanse arthrosis and arthrosis with internal derancement. This method guaranteed the correct valuation of the bone, disc and muscle structures of the joint and therefore brought full clearance into the problem

  15. Pseudodynamic MR imaging of temporomandibular joint disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Ehara, Shigeru

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has now been established as a procedure of choice in the evaluation of TMJ disorders. In this study, we evaluated the dynamics of TMJ motion on MR imaging, which resembles arthrography. Sixty-eight TMJs in 38 symptomatic patients and one healthy volunteer were examined using pseudodynamic images with gradient echo sequences using a 0.5 Tesla MR unit and 8 cm circular planar surface coil. For depiction of each compartment of the meniscus, the optimum sequence was 200/15/2 (TR/TE/excitations) with 50 deg or 60 deg flip angle in gradient refocused acquisition in steady-state (GRASS) sequences. Three contiguous slices on sagittal MR images were routinely obtained at 14-18 different phases of the opening cycle and displayed in closed-loop cine fashion. Internal derangement was observed in 57% of 68 joints. The most common type was anterior meniscal displacement without reduction. Sideway and rotational displacements, observed in 10% each, were noted on both sagittal multislice images and axial reference images. As a pseudodynamic MR technique, jaw movement specifically designed to check bite procedure to adjust splints is useful for detecting the exact time of meniscal redisplacement on the second click. After conservative therapy for arthrosis, pseudodynamic MR provided information on changes in the meniscus and condylar relationship. Pseudodynamic MR with multiple phases is suitable for evaluating subtle motion abnormality of the meniscus and for post-therapeutic monitoring. (author)

  16. Orthodontics is temporomandibular disorder-neutral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredini, Daniele; Stellini, Edoardo; Gracco, Antonio; Lombardo, Luca; Nardini, Luca Guarda; Siciliani, Giuseppe

    2016-07-01

    To assess if subjects with a clinical diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) have a similar prevalence of orthodontic history as a population of TMD-free individuals and to assess if those subjects who have a history of ideal orthodontics have fewer symptoms than those with a history of nonideal orthodontics. Two groups of age- and sex-matched individuals belonging to either a study ("TMD") or a control group were recruited. Subjects who underwent orthodontic treatment were classified as having a history of ideal or nonideal orthodontics based on the current presence of normal values in five reference occlusal features. The correlation with a history of orthodontic treatment was not clinically significant for any of the TMD diagnoses (ie, muscle pain, joint pain, disc displacement, arthrosis), with Phi (Φ) coefficient values within the -0.120 to 0.058 range. Within the subset of patients with a history of orthodontics, the correlation of ideal or nonideal orthodontic treatment with TMD diagnoses was, in general, not clinically relevant or was weakly relevant. Findings confirmed the substantial absence of clinically significant effects of orthodontics as far as TMD is concerned. The very low correlation values of a negative or positive history of ideal or nonideal orthodontics with the different TMD diagnoses suggest that orthodontic treatment could not have a true role for TMD.

  17. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes Macías, Juan Francisco; Sánchez Prieto, Martín

    2007-01-01

    Synovial Chondromatosis (SC) is a disease whose etiology is unknown, can be defined as a benign synovial process characterized by the formation of metaplastic cartilaginous nodes inside connective tissue of articular surfaces, is considered an active metaplastic phenomenon better than a neoplastic process; it presents a greater preference to affect women who constitute almost 70% of reported cases, the age range is wide and oscillates between 18-75 years (average 44.6 years). Between the main clinical findings are: pain, crackle, volume augmentation and a limited buccal opening. SC is an unusual state and the reports in the English literature are no more than 75 cases, only 66 of those where histologically verified, most of those were affecting great joints like hip, knee and shoulder, but if SC is not frequent in this sites, is even more infrequent on temporomandibular joint. The aim of this paper is to report a clinical case and at the same time to realize a brief review of the literature.

  18. Sleep bruxism and myofascial temporomandibular disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphael, Karen G.; Sirois, David A.; Janal, Malvin N.; Wigren, Pia E.; Dubrovsky, Boris; Nemelivsky, Lena V.; Klausner, Jack J.; Krieger, Ana C.; Lavigne, Gilles J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Many dentists believe that sleep bruxism (SB) is a pathogenic factor in myofascial temporomandibular disorder (TMD), but almost all supportive data rely on patients’ self-reports rather than on direct observation. Methods The authors administered a structured self-report interview to determine whether a large and well-characterized sample of patients with myofascial TMD (124 women) experienced SB more often than did matched control participants (46 women). The authors then used data from a two-night laboratory-based polysomnographic (PSG) study to determine whether the case participants exhibited more SB than the control participants. Results The results of independent sample t tests and χ2 analyses showed that, although self-reported rates of SB were significantly higher in case participants (55.3 percent) than in control participants (15.2 percent), PSG-based measures showed much lower and statistically similar rates of SB in the two groups (9.7 percent and 10.9 percent, respectively). Grinding noises were common in both case participants (59.7 percent) and control participants (78.3 percent). Conclusions Most case participants did not exhibit SB, and the common belief that SB is a sufficient explanation for myofascial TMD should be abandoned. Clinical Implications Although other reasons to consider treating SB may exist, misplaced concern about SB’s sustaining or exacerbating a chronic myofascial TMD condition should not be used to justify SB treatment. PMID:23115152

  19. Radiographic study on temporomandibular joint Arthrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Dong Soo [Dept. of Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University , Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1980-11-15

    The author analysed the routine radiographic changes and clinical symptoms of 205 cases of temporomandibular joint arthrosis. The clinical symptoms of the patients were classified and the morphological changes of condylar head, articular eminence, and articular fossa were analyzed and discussed from radiographic view point. The positional change of condylar head and articular fossa relation in TMJ arthrosis were observed. The frequencies of coincidence between the site of complaints and the site of the abnormal images which could be detected were examined. The results were obtained as follows; 1. Bone erosion, deformity, marginal proliferation and sclerosis were selected from many abnormal images as the radiographic diagnostic criteria of TMJ arthritic lesions. 2. Abnormal radiographic findings were revealed in 150 cases (73.9%) of 205 total TMJ arthrosis cases and site with abnormal findings coincided with the site of complaints in 105 cases (70.7%) of 150 cases and coincidence rates were higher above fourth decades than below third decades. 3. Sclerosis of the abnormal radiographic findings could be found more often below third decades than above fourth decades. 4. The positional changes of condylar head were revealed in 176 cases (85.9%) of 205 total cases. 5. Pain complaints were revealed in 170 cases(82.9%) and clicking sounds were revealed in 120 cases (58.6%) of clinical symptoms of TMJ arthrosis. 6. No tendency was found so far the differential diagnosis between pain dysfunction syndrome and osteoarthrosis of TMJ.

  20. Pseudodynamic MR imaging of temporomandibular joint disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Ehara, Shigeru (Iwate Medical Coll., Morioka (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-09-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has now been established as a procedure of choice in the evaluation of TMJ disorders. In this study, we evaluated the dynamics of TMJ motion on MR imaging, which resembles arthrography. Sixty-eight TMJs in 38 symptomatic patients and one healthy volunteer were examined using pseudodynamic images with gradient echo sequences using a 0.5 Tesla MR unit and 8 cm circular planar surface coil. For depiction of each compartment of the meniscus, the optimum sequence was 200/15/2 (TR/TE/excitations) with 50 deg or 60 deg flip angle in gradient refocused acquisition in steady-state (GRASS) sequences. Three contiguous slices on sagittal MR images were routinely obtained at 14-18 different phases of the opening cycle and displayed in closed-loop cine fashion. Internal derangement was observed in 57% of 68 joints. The most common type was anterior meniscal displacement without reduction. Sideway and rotational displacements, observed in 10% each, were noted on both sagittal multislice images and axial reference images. As a pseudodynamic MR technique, jaw movement specifically designed to check bite procedure to adjust splints is useful for detecting the exact time of meniscal redisplacement on the second click. After conservative therapy for arthrosis, pseudodynamic MR provided information on changes in the meniscus and condylar relationship. Pseudodynamic MR with multiple phases is suitable for evaluating subtle motion abnormality of the meniscus and for post-therapeutic monitoring. (author).

  1. Radiographic study on temporomandibular joint Arthrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Dong Soo

    1980-01-01

    The author analysed the routine radiographic changes and clinical symptoms of 205 cases of temporomandibular joint arthrosis. The clinical symptoms of the patients were classified and the morphological changes of condylar head, articular eminence, and articular fossa were analyzed and discussed from radiographic view point. The positional change of condylar head and articular fossa relation in TMJ arthrosis were observed. The frequencies of coincidence between the site of complaints and the site of the abnormal images which could be detected were examined. The results were obtained as follows; 1. Bone erosion, deformity, marginal proliferation and sclerosis were selected from many abnormal images as the radiographic diagnostic criteria of TMJ arthritic lesions. 2. Abnormal radiographic findings were revealed in 150 cases (73.9%) of 205 total TMJ arthrosis cases and site with abnormal findings coincided with the site of complaints in 105 cases (70.7%) of 150 cases and coincidence rates were higher above fourth decades than below third decades. 3. Sclerosis of the abnormal radiographic findings could be found more often below third decades than above fourth decades. 4. The positional changes of condylar head were revealed in 176 cases (85.9%) of 205 total cases. 5. Pain complaints were revealed in 170 cases(82.9%) and clicking sounds were revealed in 120 cases (58.6%) of clinical symptoms of TMJ arthrosis. 6. No tendency was found so far the differential diagnosis between pain dysfunction syndrome and osteoarthrosis of TMJ.

  2. Temporomandibular Joint Anatomy Assessed by CBCT Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Caruso

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Since cone beam computed tomography (CBCT has been used for the study of craniofacial morphology, the attention of orthodontists has also focused on the mandibular condyle. The purpose of this brief review is to summarize the recent 3D CBCT images of mandibular condyle. Material and Methods. The eligibility criteria for the studies are (a studies aimed at evaluating the anatomy of the temporomandibular joint; (b studies performed with CBCT images; (c studies on human subjects; (d studies that were not clinical case-reports and clinical series; (e studies reporting data on children, adolescents, or young adults (data from individuals with age ≤ 30 years. Sources included PubMed from June 2008 to June 2016. Results. 43 full-text articles were initially screened for eligibility. 13 full-text articles were assessed for eligibility. 11 articles were finally included in qualitative synthesis. The main topics treated in the studies are the volume and surface of the mandibular condyle, the bone changes on cortical surface, the facial asymmetry, and the optimum position of the condyle in the glenoid fossa. Conclusion. Additional studies will be necessary in the future, constructed with longitudinal methodology, especially in growing subjects. The limits of CBCT acquisitions are also highlighted.

  3. Review: Psychological intervention in temporomandibular disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Araneda

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD frecuently present psychological and psychiatric problems. These patients often show increased somatization, depression, anxiety, stress reaction and catastrophism, wich plays a role in the predisposition, initiation and perpetuation of TMD and treatment response. This review presents thaerapeutic options that compromise the psychological axis of patients with TMD, wich primarily seek to reduce the anxiety and the emotional stress present, modify different perceptions of pain and coping. There are different posibilities, within wich are: patient education, identifying situations that increase the tension to avoid them, teaching relaxation techniques such as biofeedback, hipnosis and yoga. As for psychological treatment, the most common for chronic orofacial pain is cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT. The appropriate and effective psychological intervention can reduce TMD pain, decreasing the probability that the symptoms become more complex. Within psychological treatment options for TMD, conservative standard treatment (education, self-instruction, avoidance of painful movements, soft diet, even the shortest, may be sufficient in the short term for most patients with TMD, especially in cases of acute conditions. The addition of CBT, by a specialist, gives coping skills that will add to the effectiveness, especially in chronic cases, obtaining better results in the long term.

  4. Long-Term Symptoms Onset and Heterotopic Bone Formation around a Total Temporomandibular Joint Prosthesis: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Guarda-Nardini

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The literature on total alloplastic temporomandibular joint (TMJ reconstructions is encouraging, and studies on total alloplastic TMJ replacements outcomes showed acceptable improvements in terms of both pain levels and jaw function. Nevertheless, some adverse events, such as heterotopic bone formation around the implanted prosthesis, may occur. In consideration of that, the present manuscript describes a case of heterotopic bone formation around a total temporomandibular joint prosthesis, which occurred several years after the implant. Methods: The present manuscript describes a case of heterotopic bone formation around a total TMJ prosthesis, which occurred several years after the implant in patients, who previously underwent multiple failed TMJ surgeries. Results: Ten years after the surgical TMJ replacement to solve an ankylotic bone block, the patient came to our attention again referring a progressive limitation in mouth opening. A computerized tomography showed evidence of marked heterotopic bone formation in the medial aspects of the joint, where a new-born ankylotic block occupied most part of the gap created by resecting the coronoid process at the time of the TMJ prosthesis insertion. Conclusions: Despite this adverse event has been sometimes described in the literature, this is the first case in which its occurrence happened several years after the temporomandibular joint replacement. It can be suggested that an accurate assessment of pre-operative risk factors for re-ankylosis (e.g., patients with multiple failed temporomandibular joint surgeries and within-intervention prevention (e.g., strategies to keep the bone interfaces around the implant separated should be better standardized and define in future studies.

  5. The Relationship between Osseous Changes of the Temporomandibular Joint and RDC/TMD Groups in CBCT Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahrokh Imanimoghaddam

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD are the most common disorders of the jaw, and despite their clinical importance, they are not completely understood. This study was aimed to evaluate the changes of temporomandibular joint (TMJ on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT images in disc displacement vs. osteoarthritis of the TMJ. Methods: In this study, 45 patients, including 37 women and 8 men (13-89 years of age, were examined. The patients were selected based on RDC/TMD criteria and group I disorders were excluded from the study. Accordingly, group II consisted of 43 joints with jaw clicking or displaced discs, and group III comprised 46 joints with crepitus. CBCT images in sagittal, coronal, and axial sections were examined to assess osseous changes in terms of flattening, sclerosis, erosion, resorption, and osteophyte formation. Data were analyzed using statistical tests including the chi-square, Mann-Whitney, and Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests with the confidence interval of 95%. Results: Mann-Whitney test for the comparison of mean age between groups II and III was not statistically significant (p value=0.06. A significant differences was found between two (RDC/TMD groups according to the prevalence of condylar erosion, resorption, and osteophyte (p

  6. Evaluation of pump pulsation in respirable size-selective sampling: Part III. Investigation of European standard methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo, Jhy-Charm; Lee, Eun Gyung; Lee, Larry A; Kashon, Michael L; Harper, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Lee et al. (Evaluation of pump pulsation in respirable size-selective sampling: part I. Pulsation measurements. Ann Occup Hyg 2014a;58:60-73) introduced an approach to measure pump pulsation (PP) using a real-world sampling train, while the European Standards (EN) (EN 1232-1997 and EN 12919-1999) suggest measuring PP using a resistor in place of the sampler. The goal of this study is to characterize PP according to both EN methods and to determine the relationship of PP between the published method (Lee et al., 2014a) and the EN methods. Additional test parameters were investigated to determine whether the test conditions suggested by the EN methods were appropriate for measuring pulsations. Experiments were conducted using a factorial combination of personal sampling pumps (six medium- and two high-volumetric flow rate pumps), back pressures (six medium- and seven high-flow rate pumps), resistors (two types), tubing lengths between a pump and resistor (60 and 90 cm), and different flow rates (2 and 2.5 l min(-1) for the medium- and 4.4, 10, and 11.2 l min(-1) for the high-flow rate pumps). The selection of sampling pumps and the ranges of back pressure were based on measurements obtained in the previous study (Lee et al., 2014a). Among six medium-flow rate pumps, only the Gilian5000 and the Apex IS conformed to the 10% criterion specified in EN 1232-1997. Although the AirChek XR5000 exceeded the 10% limit, the average PP (10.9%) was close to the criterion. One high-flow rate pump, the Legacy (PP=8.1%), conformed to the 10% criterion in EN 12919-1999, while the Elite12 did not (PP=18.3%). Conducting supplemental tests with additional test parameters beyond those used in the two subject EN standards did not strengthen the characterization of PPs. For the selected test conditions, a linear regression model [PPEN=0.014+0.375×PPNIOSH (adjusted R2=0.871)] was developed to determine the PP relationship between the published method (Lee et al., 2014a) and the EN methods

  7. Analysis of Chronic Temporomandibular Disorders Based on the Latest Diagnostic Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svechtarov V.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to analyze the distribution of the most common diagnoses observed in patients with chronic temporomandibular disorders, based on the new diagnostic criteria (DC/TMD adopted in 2014. The previous Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC/TMD adopted in 1992, consisted of three main groups of eight diagnostic subgroups and is currently transformed into two main groups and twelve subgroups, respectively. All subgroups correspond to the nomenclature of the ICD-10. The new clinical diagnostic indices are also modified. The analysis showed a prevalence of Pain-Related TMD compared with that of intra-articular disorders in ratio 57.89% to 42.10%. In Pain-Related TMD arthralgia was represented in 55% of cases; local myalgia - in 12%, myofascial pain - in 18%, myofascial pain with referral - in 14%, headache attributed to TMD - in 1%. In Intra-articular TMD disc displacement with reduction was found in 23% of the cases, disc displacement with reduction with intermittent locking - in 3%, disc displacement without reduction with limited opening - in 25%, disc displacement without reduction and without limited opening - in 8%. Degenerative diseases were found in 14.28%, and hypermobility and subluxations - in 26.98%. These analyzes differ and can only partly be compared with previous analyzes based on RDC system. The changes in the diagnostic criteria require new clinical studies in order to refine the picture of temporomandibular pathology in accordance with the modern views on the matter.

  8. Sensory innervation of the temporomandibular joint in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreessen, D; Halata, Z; Strasmann, T

    1990-01-01

    The sensory innervation of the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) of 8 STR/IN mice was investigated by means of light and electron microscopy. Through the cutting of complete semithin sections in series it was possible to investigate the joints thoroughly. Additionally, one joint with its nerve supply was reconstructed three-dimensionally with a computerized three-dimensional programme. The reconstruction was based on one complete semithin section series. The joint's nerve supply originates from the nervus auriculotemporalis and additionally from motor branches of the n. mandibularis: n. massetericus, n. pterygoideus lateralis and the nn. temporales posteriores. The greatest number of nerve fibres and endings is located in the dorsolateral part of the joint capsule. They lie only in the stratum fibrosum and subsynovially. Neither the stratum synoviale nor the discus articularis contain any nerve fibres or endings, whereas the peri-articular loose connective tissue is richly innervated. The only type of nerve ending observed within the joint was the free nerve ending, which is assumed to serve not only as a nociceptor but also as a polymodal mechanoreceptor. Merely within the insertion of the musculus pterygoideus lateralis at the collum mandibulae single stretch receptors of the Ruffini type were observed. Ultrastructurally, they correspond to those described in the cat's knee joint. Neither lamellated nor nerve endings of the Golgi or Pacini type were observed in the joint or in the peri-articular connective tissue. The unexpected paucity of nerve fibres and endings in the TMJ itself of the mouse suggests that the afferent information from the joint is less important for position sense and movement than the afferent information from muscles, tendons and periodontal ligaments.

  9. Management strategies to effect change in intensive care units: lessons from the world of business. Part III. Effectively effecting and sustaining change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershengorn, Hayley B; Kocher, Robert; Factor, Phillip

    2014-03-01

    Reaping the optimal rewards from any quality improvement project mandates sustainability after the initial implementation. In Part III of this three-part ATS Seminars series, we discuss strategies to create a culture for change, improve cooperation and interaction between multidisciplinary teams of clinicians, and position the intensive care unit (ICU) optimally within the hospital environment. Coaches are used throughout other industries to help professionals assess and continually improve upon their practice; use of this strategy is as of yet infrequent in health care, but would be easily transferable and potentially beneficial to ICU managers and clinicians alike. Similarly, activities focused on improving teamwork are commonplace outside of health care. Simulation training and classroom education about key components of successful team functioning are known to result in improvements. In addition to creating an ICU environment in which individuals and teams of clinicians perform well, ICU managers must position the ICU to function well within the hospital system. It is important to move away from the notion of a standalone ("siloed") ICU to one that is well integrated into the rest of the institution. Creating a "pull-system" (in which participants are active in searching out needed resources and admitting patients) can help ICU managers both provide better care for the critically ill and strengthen relationships with non-ICU staff. Although not necessary, there is potential upside to creating a unified critical care service to assist with achieving these ends.

  10. Orofacial pain, jaw function, and temporomandibular disorders in adult women with a history of juvenile chronic arthritis or persistent juvenile chronic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakke, M.; Zak, M.; Jensen, B.L.

    2001-01-01

    Orofacial pain, jaw function, temporomandibular disorders, adult women persistent juvenil chronic arthritis......Orofacial pain, jaw function, temporomandibular disorders, adult women persistent juvenil chronic arthritis...

  11. Expanding the taxonomy of the diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peck, C.C.; Goulet, J-P; Lobbezoo, F.; Schiffman, E.L.; Alstergren, P.; Anderson, G.C.; De Leeuw, R.; Jensen, R.; Michelotti, A.; Ohrbach, R.; Petersson, A.; List, T.

    2014-01-01

    There is a need to expand the current temporomandibular disorders' (TMDs) classification to include less common but clinically important disorders. The immediate aim was to develop a consensus-based classification system and associated diagnostic criteria that have clinical and research utility for

  12. Diagnostic accuracy of temporomandibular disorder pain tests: a multicenter study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, C.M.; Naeije, M.; de Laat, A.; Michelotti, A.; Nilner, M.; Craane, B.; Ekberg, E.; Farella, M.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2009-01-01

    AIMS: To estimate the diagnostic accuracy of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) clinical examination and of the dynamic/static tests for the recognition of TMD pain. Since the diagnosis of TMD pain is especially complicated in persistent orofacial pain

  13. [Clinical application of artificial condylar process for reconstructing temporomandibular joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiangdao; Shao, Zhanying; Wang, Fasheng; Duan, Yi

    2012-01-01

    To assess the feasibility and clinical outcomes of artificial condylar process in reconstruction of the temporomandibular joint. Between January 2005 and January 2010, the reconstructions of the temporomandibular joints with artificial condylar process were performed in 10 cases (11 sides, including 7 left sides and 4 right sides). There were 7 males and 3 females with an average age of 50 years (range, 40-68 years). Mandibular condyle defects were caused by mandible tumor in 7 patients with a mean disease duration of 15 months (range, 9-24 months) and by bilateral condylar fractures in 3 patients with the disease duration of 2, 3, and 2 days respectively. According to Neff classification, there were type M and A in 1 case, type M and B in 1 case, and type M in one side and subcondylar fracture in the other side in 1 case. Incisions in all patients healed by first intention, and no complication occurred. All cases were followed up 1 to 4 years, showed facial symmetry and good occluding relation, and the mouth opening was 22-38 mm (mean, 30 mm). No temporomandibular joint clicking or pain and no recurrence of tumor were observed. Most of the artificial condylar process were in good position except 1 deviated from the correct angle slightly. All the patients could have diet normally. The results of temporomandibular joint reconstruction after tumor resection with artificial condylar process are good, but the clinical outcome for intracapsular condylar fracture is expected to be further verified.

  14. Expanding the taxonomy of the diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peck, C C; Goulet, J-P; Lobbezoo, F

    2014-01-01

    There is a need to expand the current temporomandibular disorders' (TMDs) classification to include less common but clinically important disorders. The immediate aim was to develop a consensus-based classification system and associated diagnostic criteria that have clinical and research utility f...

  15. Fibromyalgia syndrome and temporomandibular disorders with muscular pain. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Fernández, Ana Maria; Jiménez-Castellanos, Emilio; Iglesias-Linares, Alejandro; Bueso-Madrid, Débora; Fernández-Rodríguez, Ana; de Miguel, Manuel

    2017-03-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) refer to a group of clinical picture affecting the masticatory muscles and temporomandibular joint that are characterized by muscular or joint pain, dysfunction (limited or altered functions) and joint noises, as well as other associated symptoms, such as tension headaches, otalgia, dizziness, tinnitus, and others. Fibromyalgia (FM) is a syndrome of unknown etiology involving generalized chronic pain accompanied, in a high percentage of cases, by other symptoms such as asthenia, anxiety, depression, sleep disturbances, and other less frequent symptoms, such as temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Data were compiled by two experienced examiners following a specific form. An electronic search was carried out in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PUBMED, and SCOPUS electronic databases (up to April 2016, unrestricted by date or language). Comparative clinical studies with patients with both clinical pictures involving the study of pathogenic processes. Fibromyalgia and temporomandibular disorders with muscle pain both have profiles that affect the muscular system and therefore share many epidemiological, clinical, and physiopathological symptoms. Because of this, we are led to think that there is, if not a common etiology, at least a common pathogenesis. This article revises the physiopathological processes of both clinical pictures in an attempt to determine their similarities and likenesses. This would undoubtedly help in providing a better therapeutic approach.

  16. The relationship between temporomandibular dysfunction and head and cervical posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheus, Ricardo Alves; Ramos-Perez, Flávia Maria de Moraes; Menezes, Alynne Vieira; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Haiter-Neto, Francisco; Bóscolo, Frab Norberto; de Almeida, Solange Maria

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the possibility of any correlation between disc displacement and parameters used for evaluation of skull positioning in relation to the cervical spine: craniocervical angle, suboccipital space between C0-C1, cervical curvature and position of the hyoid bone in individuals with and without symptoms of temporomandibular dysfunction. The patients were evaluated following the guidelines set forth by RDC/TMD. Evaluation was performed by magnetic resonance imaging for establishment of disc positioning in the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) of 30 volunteer patients without temporomandibular dysfunction symptoms and 30 patients with symptoms. Evaluation of skull positioning in relation to the cervical spine was performed on lateral cephalograms achieved with the individual in natural head position. Data were submitted to statistical analysis by Fisher's exact test at 5% significance level. To measure the degree of reproducibility/agreements between surveys, the kappa (K) statistics was used. Significant differences were observed between C0-C1 measurement for both symptomatic (p=0.04) and asymptomatic (p=0.02). No statistical differences were observed regarding craniocervical angle, C1-C2 and hyoid bone position in relation to the TMJs with and without disc displacement. Although statistically significant difference was found in the C0-C1 space, no association between these and internal temporomandibular joint disorder can be considered. Based on the results observed in this study, no direct relationship could be determined between the presence of disc displacement and the variables assessed.

  17. The relationship between forward head posture and temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W Y; Okeson, J P; Lindroth, J

    1995-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between forward head posture and temporomandibular disorder symptoms. Thirty-three temporomandibular disorder patients with predominant complaints of masticatory muscle pain were compared with an age- and gender-matched control group. Head position was measured from photographs taken with a plumb line drawn from the ceiling to the lateral malleolus of the ankle and with a horizontal plane that was perpendicular to the plumb line and that passed through the spinous process of the seventh cervical vertebra. The distances from the plumb line to the ear, to the seventh vertebra, and to the shoulder were measured. Two angles were also measured: (1) ear-seventh cervical vertebra-horizontal plane and (2) eye-ear-seventh cervical vertebra. The only measurement that revealed a statistically significant difference was angle ear-seventh cervical vertebra-horizontal plane. This angle was smaller in the patients with temporomandibular disorders than in the control subjects. In other words, when evaluating the ear position with respect to the seventh cervical vertebra, the head was positioned more forward in the group with temporomandibular disorders than in the control group (P < .05).

  18. Temporomandibular Joint Disorders – A Few Interesting Experiences to Share

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Chattopadhyay

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint disorders rarely present in a very direct way. Often, the complaints are far away from the joint itself, making the diagnosis difficult. But a high index of suspicion and a good clinical idea often clinches the diagnosis in many cases of otalgia with apparently no definitive finding.

  19. The relationship between temporomandibular dysfunction and head and cervical posture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Alves Matheus

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the possibility of any correlation between disc displacement and parameters used for evaluation of skull positioning in relation to the cervical spine: craniocervical angle, suboccipital space between C0-C1, cervical curvature and position of the hyoid bone in individuals with and without symptoms of temporomandibular dysfunction. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The patients were evaluated following the guidelines set forth by RDC/TMD. Evaluation was performed by magnetic resonance imaging for establishment of disc positioning in the temporomandibular joints (TMJs of 30 volunteer patients without temporomandibular dysfunction symptoms and 30 patients with symptoms. Evaluation of skull positioning in relation to the cervical spine was performed on lateral cephalograms achieved with the individual in natural head position. Data were submitted to statistical analysis by Fisher's exact test at 5% significance level. To measure the degree of reproducibility/agreements between surveys, the kappa (K statistics was used. RESULTS: Significant differences were observed between C0-C1 measurement for both symptomatic (p=0.04 and asymptomatic (p=0.02. No statistical differences were observed regarding craniocervical angle, C1-C2 and hyoid bone position in relation to the TMJs with and without disc displacement. Although statistically significant difference was found in the C0-C1 space, no association between these and internal temporomandibular joint disorder can be considered. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the results observed in this study, no direct relationship could be determined between the presence of disc displacement and the variables assessed.

  20. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease: an integrative literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taysa Vannoska de Almeida Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Temporomandibular joint dysfunction is a set of disorders involving the masticatory muscles, temporomandibular joint and associated structures. It is known that the progression of motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease is an indication that these people are more prone to the development of this dysfunction. Thus, this study aims to investigate the signs and symptoms of temporomandibular dysfunction in people with Parkinson's disease. The search was performed in the databases: MEDLINE/ PubMed, LILACs, CINAHL, SCOPUS, Web of Science and PEDro, without timing or language restriction. Specific descriptors were used for each database and keywords, evaluated by the instruments: Critical Appraisal Skill Program and Agency for Health care and Research and Quality. A total of 4,209 articles were found but only 5 were included. After critical analysis of the methodology of the articles, one did not reach the minimum score required by the evaluation instruments, thus, it was excluded. The selected articles addressed, as signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint dysfunction, the following: myofascial pain, bruxism, limitation of mouth opening, dislocation of the articular disc and asymmetry in the distribution of occlusal contacts. Further studies are needed in order to determine the relationship between cause and effect of the analyzed variables, so as to contribute to more specific and effective therapeutic interventions.

  1. Case-Based Learning for Orofacial Pain and Temporomandibular Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Glenn T.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    The use of interactive computer-based simulation of cases of chronic orofacial pain and temporomandibular joint disfunction patients for clinical dental education is described. Its application as a voluntary study aid in a third-year dental course is evaluated for effectiveness and for time factors in case completion. (MSE)

  2. Voice-supported Electronic Health Record for Temporomandibular Joint Disorders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hippmann, R.; Dostálová, T.; Zvárová, Jana; Nagy, Miroslav; Seydlová, M.; Hanzlíček, Petr; Kříž, P.; Šmídl, L.; Trmal, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 2 (2010), s. 168-172 ISSN 0026-1270 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : electronic health record * structured data entry * dentistry * temporomandibular joint disorder Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science Impact factor: 1.472, year: 2010

  3. Temporomandibular joint arthrography: normal anatomy and technique of examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duvoisin, B.; Schnyder, P.; Klaus, E.; Jacques, B.

    1990-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction is common. This entity is most often consecutive to internal derangements of the TMJ, which are not recognizable on plain films and tomograms. TMJ arthrography has proved a valuable tool in diagnosing these abnormalities. The technique of examination and normal arthrographic anatomy are reviewed. (author) [pt

  4. Extracción de cromo con disolventes orgánicos. III parte. Aplicación al tratamiento de residuos polimetálicos industriales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Juan, D.

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of Primene 81R as extraction agent of chromium present in solid wastes containing nickel, iron and copper has been studied. The waste was leached with a sulphuric acid solution up to pH 3 and oxidation of Cr(III to Cr(VI with Caro acid was also studied. Because of the negative result of oxidation, the treatment was applied on Cr(III directly. Extraction/scrubbing/stripping process was studied in the leach. The composition of organic phase used in the extraction step was 10 % v/v Primene 81R, 10 % isodecanol and kerosene. All the iron, 91 % Cr, 10 % Ni and large part of the copper contained in the initial leach solution are recovered in the organic phase. In the scrubbing stage (with a sulphuric acid solution at pH 1,4, all the copper and nickel and 30 % Cr go to the washing liquor, while all the iron and 70 % Cr remained in the organic phase. In the stripping stage (with a 2N NH4OH or 2N NaOH solution all the iron and chromium are recovered as a precipitate of highly absorbent hydroxides. After the treatment mentioned, 63 % Cr and 100 % Fe are recovered as a mixture of hydroxides, and 28 % of the initial chromium, all the nickel and the copper are found in the washing liquor.

    Se estudia la aplicación del Primene 81R como agente de extracción del cromo presente en residuos sólidos que poseen níquel, hierro y cobre. El residuo se lixivió con disolución de ácido sulfúrico hasta pH 3 y se investigó la oxidación del Cr(III a Cr(VI con ácido de Caro. Ante el nulo resultado en la oxidación, se actuó directamente sobre el Cr(III. Se estudió el proceso de extracción/lavado/reextracción sobre la lejía de lixiviación. La fase orgánica empleada en la extracción estaba constituida por 10 % v/v de Primene 81R, 10 % de isodecanol y queroseno. En la fase orgánica se recupera todo el hierro, el 91 % Cr, el 10 % Ni y gran parte del cobre contenidos en la lejía de partida. En la etapa de lavado (con disolución de

  5. Headache Exacerbates Pain Characteristics in Temporomandibular Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Yuri Martins; Alves da Costa, Dayse Regina; de Lima Ferreira, Ana Paula; Porporatti, André Luís; Svensson, Peter; Rodrigues Conti, Paulo César; Bonjardim, Leonardo Rigoldi

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of headache in adults with masticatory myofascial pain (MMP) on the outcome variables clinical pain (ie, self-reported pain intensity and pressure pain sensitivity), sleep quality, and pain catastrophizing. A total of 97 patients with MMP were diagnosed with co-existing headache (MMPH group, n = 50) or without headache (MMP group, n = 47) according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD). The outcome parameters were the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI); the Catastrophizing Thoughts subscale of the Pain-Related Self-Statement Scale (PRSS-C); pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) of the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles; and self-reported facial pain intensity measured on a 0- to 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS). Student t test for independent samples (α = 1.2%) and factorial analysis of variance (ANOVA) (α = 5%) were used to analyze the data. The MMPH group showed significantly impaired sleep quality (mean ± standard deviation [SD] PSQI score 9.1 ± 3.5) compared with the MMP group (7.2 ± 3.4; P = .008). Subscale scores on the PRSS-C were significantly higher in the MMPH (2.1 ± 1.2) than in the MMP group (1.6 ± 1.4, uncorrected P = .048). Also, the PPTs (kgf/cm²) of the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles were significantly lower in the MMPH group (1.52 ± 0.53; 1.29 ± 0.43, respectively) than in the MMP group (2.09 ± 0.73; 1.70 ± 0.68, respectively; P headache patients had lower PPTs in the anterior temporalis muscle (P = .041) in comparison with non-headache patients. Co-existence of headache further exacerbates clinical characteristics in patients with painful TMD, which implies involvement of common mechanisms and pathways of vulnerability in these patients.

  6. An epidemiological study of temporomandibular joint ankylosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vinay Kumar; Mehrotra, Divya; Malhotra, Seema; Kumar, Sandeep; Agarwal, Girdhar Gopal; Pal, Uma Shanker

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) forms the very cornerstone of craniofacial integrity and its ankylosis in a growing child may cause problems in daily food intake, speech, appearance, and oral hygiene is affected to a major extent. It is one of the common acquired pathologies afflicting the skeleton. It is also the most overlooked and under-managed problem in children. Materials and Methods: A house to house survey was conducted between 2010 and 2011 in rural and urban areas of Lucknow. A total of 21,720 children aged between 3-15 years from 9090 houses comprising a representative sample were included. Results: Ten TMJ ankylosis cases were identified in 21,720 children. Of these, six were bilateral and four were unilateral. Male to female ratio was 1:9, with most patients (70.0%) being in the 10-15 years’ age group (mean age was 11.1 years ± 3.34). The most common cause of ankylosis was trauma for 90.0% of cases. The majority of patients (70%) were reporting the condition for the first time, with 30% patients having had previous treatment. Conclusion: TMJ ankylosis is an acquired condition in most of the cases. Birth/childhood trauma would be the major causative factor. Knowledge amongst parents, providers of health about this entity was poor. Initial management of the causative factor was poor. Mere knowledge among the general population and healthcare providers can result in primary prevention and also secondary prevention along with its successful definitive treatment. PMID:23251054

  7. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction in various rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.J. Aceves-Avila

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular disorder (TMD is an inclusive term in which those conditions disturbing the masticatory function are embraced. It has been estimated that 33% of the population have signs of TMD, but less than 5% of the population will require treatment. The objective of this study was to measure the frequency of TMD in rheumatoid arthritis (RA, osteoarthrosis (OA, ankylosing spondylitis (AS and systemic lupus erythematosus, and to define the limitations in everyday’s life that patients perceive when present. A six-month survey of consecutive outpatients in a rheumatology clinic in a teaching hospital in Mexico was carried out. We defined TMD as: 1 the presence of pain; 2 difficulty on mouth opening, chewing or speaking; 3 the presence of non-harmonic movements of the temporomaxilar joints. All three characteristics had to be present. Z test was used to define differences between proportions. We present the results of 171 patients. Overall, 50 patients had TMD according to our operational definition (29.24%. Up to 76% of the sample had symptoms associated with the condition. TMD is more frequent in OA and in AS (29.24% vs 38% OA, P=0.009; 39% AS; P=0.005. We found no association between the severity of TMD and the request for specific attention for the discomfort produced by the condition. Only 8 of 50 (16% patients with TMD had requested medical help for their symptoms, and they were not the most severe cases. TMD is more frequent in RA and OA. Although it may produce severe impairment, patients seem to adapt easily.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging-based temporomandibular joint space evaluation in temporomandibular disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nah, Kyung Soo [Pusan National Univ. College of Dentistry, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    Disc and condylar position were observed on MRIs of temporomandibular joint disorder patients and condylar position agreement between MRI and tranascranal radiography was evaluated. MRI and transcranial radiographs of both TM joints from 67 patients with temporomandibular disorder were used. On MRI, the position and shape of disc and condylar position as anterior, middle, posterior was evaluated at medial, center, and lateral views. On transcranial radiographs, condylar position was evaluated using the shortest distance from condyle to fossa in anterior, superior, and posterior directions. 1. On MRI, 96 joints (71.6%) of 134 had anterior disc dispalcement with reduction and 38 joints (28.4%) without reduction. 2. Fourteen (14.6%) of 96 reducible joints showed anterior condylar position. 19 (19.8%) showed central position, 63 joints (65.6%) showed posterior position. Two joints (5.3%) of 38 non-reducible joints showed anterior condylar position, while 9 (23.7%) showed central position, and 27 (71.1%)-posterior position. 3. In 85 joints (63.4%) of 134, the transcranial condylar position agreed with that of the central MRI view, 10 joints (7.5%) with that of medial, 16 joints (11.6%) with that of lateral, and 23 joints (17.2%) disagreed with that of MRI. On MRI, most of the reducible and non-reducible joints showed posterior condylar position. Transcranial radiographs taken with machine designed for TMJ had better agreement of condylar position with that of MRI. Extremely narrow joint spaces or very posterior condylar positions observed on transcranial radiographs had a little more than fifty percent agreement with those of MRIs.

  9. Prevalence of the different Axis I clinical subtypes in a sample of patients with orofacial pain and temporomandibular disorders in the Andalusian Healthcare Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Aguilera, Antonio; Blanco-Aguilera, Elena; Serrano-del-Rosal, Rafael; Biedma-Velázquez, Lourdes; Rodríguez-Torronteras, Alejandro; Segura-Saint-Gerons, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Background The main objective of this paper is to analyze the prevalence of each of the different clinical subtypes of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in a sample of patients with this pathology. In addition, a second objective was to analyze their distribution according to gender. Material and Methods To this end, the results of 1603 patients who went to the Unit of Temporomandibular Disorders in the Córdoba Healthcare District because they suffered from this pathology were analyzed. In order to diagnose them, the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) were applied, analyzing the different Axis I subtypes (myopathy, discopathy and arthropathy) and obtaining the combined Axis I for each patient and the relation of all these variables according to gender. The null-hypothesis test confirmed the lack of connection between the gender variable and the different subtypes in the clinical analysis, and between the former and the combined Axis I of the RDC/TMD. Results The prevalence was high for the muscle disorders subtype in general, showing an 88.7% prevalence, while the presence of discopathies or arthropathies was much lower. Among discopathies, the most frequent ones were disc displacements with reduction, with 39.7% and 42.8% for the left and right temporomandibular joints (TMJ), respectively, while the prevalence of arthropathies was 26.3% for the right TMJ and 32.9% for the left TMJ. The bivariate analysis on the connection with gender reveals a p≥ 0.05 value for the muscle and arthralgia subtypes. Conclusions The patients seen at the TMD Unit where mostly middle-aged women whose main clinical axis subtype was the muscle disorder subtype. For their part, both discopathies and arthropathies, although present, are much less prevalent. Key words:RDCTMD, axis I, orofacial pain, temporomandibular disorders, gender. PMID:26615508

  10. Milliped Miscellany — Part III

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeekel, C.A.W.

    1956-01-01

    MATERIAL: Eritrea: Gula (15° 36’ N., 38° 21’ E.), 500 m., 19 July 1953, Coll. W. J. STOWER, 1 ♂ (holotype). COLOUR : Head, except the lower portion of the clypeus and a sharply demarcated spot at the medio-posterior side of the antennal sockets which are yellowish, very dark brown. Antennae and legs

  11. Tarski Geometry Axioms. Part III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coghetto Roland

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article, we continue the formalization of the work devoted to Tarski’s geometry - the book “Metamathematische Methoden in der Geometrie” by W. Schwabhäuser, W. Szmielew, and A. Tarski. After we prepared some introductory formal framework in our two previous Mizar articles, we focus on the regular translation of underlying items faithfully following the abovementioned book (our encoding covers first seven chapters. Our development utilizes also other formalization efforts of the same topic, e.g. Isabelle/HOL by Makarios, Metamath or even proof objects obtained directly from Prover9. In addition, using the native Mizar constructions (cluster registrations the propositions (“Satz” are reformulated under weaker conditions, i.e. by using fewer axioms or by proposing an alternative version that uses just another axioms (ex. Satz 2.1 or Satz 2.2.

  12. Workshop 97. Part III. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-12-01

    This volume of the Proceedings covers the following branches of science and technology: power systems and electrical engineering, electronics and measuring and communication engineering, optics, quantum electronics and photonics, microelectronics, and biomedical engineering. Out of the contributions, 2 have been input to INIS. (P.A.)

  13. ASIST 2003: Part III: Posters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proceedings of the ASIST Annual Meeting, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Twenty-three posters address topics including access to information; metadata; personal information management; scholarly information communication; online resources; content analysis; interfaces; Web queries; information evaluation; informatics; information needs; search effectiveness; digital libraries; diversity; automated indexing; e-commerce;…

  14. MicroVent (part III)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreau, Jerome Le; Heiselberg, Per Kvols; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    This study aims at using the InVentilate unit in the cooling case, without heat recovery. It results in a relatively low inlet air temperature. Different solutions have been tested to decrease the risk of draught in the occupied zone: ‐ Using a mixer (2 designs) ‐ Using an inlet grille ‐ Using...

  15. Do bruxism and temporomandibular disorders have a cause-and-effect relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobbezoo, F; Lavigne, G J

    1997-01-01

    Controversy continues to exist over the putative role of bruxism in the etiology of temporomandibular disorders. A commonly held concept is that bruxism leads to signs and symptoms characteristic of one or more of the subdiagnoses of temporomandibular disorders, while another hypothesis suggests that bruxism is a temporomandibular disorder itself that sometimes coexists with other forms of temporomandibular disorders. Following a thorough review of the literature in this article, it is concluded that the relationship between bruxism and temporomandibular disorders is still unclear. Future research should examine longitudinal epidemiologic and clinical/experimental data to establish or refute a cause-and-effect relationship. In doing so, the existence of various sub-groups of temporomandibular disorders should be taken into account, and sleep-related bruxism should be discriminated from its daytime variant.

  16. Pattern analysis of patients with temporomandibular disorders resulting from unilateral mastication due to chronic periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the present study was to perform a pattern analysis in patients with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) resulting from unilateral mastication due to chronic periodontitis. Methods Thirty participants with signs or symptoms of TMD who engaged in unilateral mastication due to periodontitis-related discomfort (test group) were selected. Another 30 subjects exhibiting signs or symptoms of TMD resulting from unilateral mastication not due to chronic periodontitis (control group) were also recruited. An interview-based questionnaire was administered, and an examination of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) with determination of periodontal status was performed. Results The duration of unilateral mastication was significantly longer in the control group than in the test group. There was a significant negative correlation between the duration of unilateral mastication and the Community Periodontal Index score. Using the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD) axis I algorithms, all the subjects were assigned to 3 main groups. The test group exhibited significantly a higher diagnostic distribution of group III (arthralgia, osteoarthritis, or osteoarthrosis), and in both the test and control groups, the number of diagnoses was larger for the non-chewing side. The control group showed a significantly higher diagnostic distribution of group I (myofacial pain), and in both the test and control groups, the number of diagnoses was larger for the chewing side. Conclusions The results of the present study indicate that unilateral mastication due to chronic periodontitis could induce not only pain but also structural TMJ changes if adequate treatment is not administered and supported within a short time from the onset of the condition. Therefore, immediate treatment of chronic periodontitis is recommended to prevent not only the primary progress of periodontal disease, but also secondary TMJ-related problems. Furthermore, subjects who have suffered chronic

  17. Effect of protraction facemask on the temporomandibular joint: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xinqi; Cen, Xiao; Liu, Jun

    2018-03-12

    The aim of this study was to assess the influence of protraction facemask (PFM) on temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of skeletal Class III malocclusion patients. Literature searches were carried out electronically in five English and three Chinese databases (Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PubMed, Embase, MEDLINE (via Ovid), Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and VIP Database). The date of the most recent search was 22 March 2017. Randomized controlled trials, controlled clinical trials, cohort studies, and before-after studies comparing the effect of PFM and other treatments on TMJ were included. The data were collected and extracted by three authors. The risk of bias in the RCTs was assessed in accordance with the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. For the nonrandomized studies, the risk of bias was judged with Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. For the 261 articles identified, 13 studies with 522 participants were included for the final qualitative analysis. Three studies were graded as high value of evidence, while seven studies and the other three studies were graded as moderate value and low value respectively. According to the available evidence, PFM contributed to the significant increase of CondAx-SBL and the significant decrease of CondAx-ML. Thin-plate spline (TPS) analysis showed a horizontal compression in condyles. Condyles tended to move superiorly and posteriorly. Concerning the occurrence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD), PFM was not involved in aggravating TMJ symptoms and signs. Clinical evidence suggests that PFM might contribute to the morphologic adaptation of TMJs and displacement of condyles, and PFM may well be not a risk factor for the development of TMD.

  18. Disfunções temporomandibulares: sinais, sintomas e abordagem multidisciplinar Temporomandibular Disorders: signs, symptoms and multidisciplinary approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Del Cistia Donnarumma

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: verificar perfil, queixa e principais sinais e sintomas de uma amostra de pacientes com disfunção temporomandibular que estiveram ou estão em tratamento ortodôntico e observar a ocorrência de atendimentos multidisciplinares. MÉTODOS: foram coletados dados de 125 prontuários em uma clínica odontológica da cidade de Sorocaba e os itens analisados nos prontuários foram: sexo, idade, profissão, queixa, três principais sinais e sintomas dos pacientes e se houve encaminhamento para avaliação fonoaudiológica, fisioterápica e psicológica. RESULTADOS: predominância feminina, sendo 107 mulheres (85,6% e 18 homens (14,4%. Média de idade de 35 anos, sendo a menor idade 14 anos e a maior 74 anos. Relação da disfunção temporomandibular com as profissões: 43 (34,4% eram profissionais com vínculo empregatício. Queixa trazida pelo paciente: dor na região da articulação temporomandibular e masseter: 86 - (68,8%. Três principais sinais e sintomas observados na avaliação ortodôntica: dor na região da articulação temporomandibular e masseter: 98 - 78,4%; estalos unilaterais: 55 - 44% e travamento: 23 - 18,4%. Conduta de encaminhamentos: fonoaudiologia 59 (47,2%; fisioterapia 40 (32% e psicologia 53 (42,4%. CONCLUSÃO: na amostra pesquisada, a prevalência de casos de disfunção temporomandibular foi maior no sexo feminino, com queixa de dor. Os principais sinais e sintomas foram: dor, estalo unilateral e travamento e houve encaminhamento para atendimentos multidisciplinares nas áreas de Fonoaudiologia, Fisioterapia e Psicologia.PURPOSE: to check the main signs and symptoms of a sample of patients with temporomandibular dysfunction that were or are under orthodontic treatment and observe if there was a possible multidisciplinary treatment. METHODS: data from 125 medical records collected in a orthodontic clinic located in Sorocaba and the analyzed items were: gender, age, profession, complains, three main signs and

  19. Does playing a musical instrument impose a risk for temporomandibular disorders? A review of literature: Stellt das Spielen eines Instruments ein Risiko für kraniomandibuläre Dysfunktionen dar? Eine Übersichtsarbeit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Selms, M.K.A.; Attallah, M.M.; Visscher, C.M.; Ahlberg, J.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2015-01-01

    Playing a musical instrument that loads the masticatory system, such as the violin or oboe, has been suggested to be part of the group of etiological factors for temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). In 2014, a review of literature was published that explicitly focused on the possible association

  20. Reflecting Equity and Diversity. Part I: Guidelines and Procedure for Evaluating Bias in Instructional Materials. Part II: Bias Awareness Training Worksheets. Part III: Bias Awareness and Procedure Training Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebermeyer, Jim; Edmond, Mary, Ed.

    Reflecting a need to prepare students for working in diverse organizations, this document was developed to increase school officials' awareness of bias in instructional materials and help them select bias-free materials. A number of the examples illustrate situations dealing with diversity in the workplace. The guide is divided into three parts:…

  1. Chondromalacia as pathological finding in arthroscopy of the temporomandibular joint: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Granizo, Rafael; Correa-Muñoz, Diana Carolina

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the arthroscopic findings of chondromalacia and its relation with the internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A total of 161 patients (299 TMJs) who underwent arthroscopy were included in the study. The TMJs were evaluated objectively under arthroscopic vision, and 4 groups of patients were established according to the degree of involvement, degree I, II, III and IV. Statistical analyses were conducted using logistic regression models (P chondromalacia and 66 (41%) in 88 joints exhibited some degree of chondromalacia (44 patients unilaterally and 22 bilaterally). Of the 88 joints with chondromalacia, 14 (15.9%) had chondromalacia degree I, 12 (13.6%) chondromalacia degree II, 20 (22.7%) chondromalacia degree III and 42 (47.7%) chondromalacia degree IV. The chondromalacia was more significantly found in patients with ADDwR and discal perforation (P Chondromalacia degree IV was a significant finding in cases of ADDwoR (P = 0.000619). Chondromalacia of the TMJ is a common finding in patients with internal derangement even at the early stages. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Self-reported aural symptoms, headache and temporomandibular disorders in Japanese young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, Rahena; Morita, Manabu; Ekuni, Disuke; Hassan, Nur Mohammad Monsur; Furuta, Michiko; Yamanaka, Reiko; Matsuka, Yoshizo; Wilson, David

    2013-02-06

    To investigate the associations of aural symptoms, headache and depression with the presence of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) symptoms in a young adult population in Japan. A personal interview survey was conducted on first-year university students (n = 1,930) regarding symptoms of TMD, aural problems, headache, shoulder pain and depression. Logistic regression was applied to assess the associations of these problems with the presence of TMD symptoms after controlling for age and gender. Among the 1,930 students, 543 students exhibited TMD symptoms and were classified into 7 groups: clicking only (Group I, n = 319), pain in the TMJ only (Group II, n = 21), difficulty in mouth opening only (Group III, n = 18), clicking and pain (Group IV, n = 29), clicking and difficulty in mouth opening (Group V, n = 48), difficulty in mouth opening and pain (Group VI, n = 11), and combination of three symptoms (Group VII, n = 97). The control group (n = 1,387) were subjects without any TMD symptoms. After adjusting for age and gender, a strong association was observed between TMD symptoms (Group II and IV) and tinnitus (OR = 12.1 and 13.2, respectively). TMD symptoms (Group I, II and III) were also associated with vertigo and headache. Otalgia and depression were significantly associated with the presence of clicking only. TMD symptoms were significantly correlated to aural symptoms and headache. A functional evaluation of the stomatognathic system should be considered in subjects with unexplained aural symptoms and headache.

  3. Artifacts in MRI of the temporomandibular joint caused by dental alloys: a phantom study at 1.5 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fellner, C.; Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen; Behr, M.; Fellner, F.; Held, P.; Handel, G.; Feuerbach, S.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The influence of dental alloys on MRI of the temporomandibular joint was studied using a phantom model for this joint. Methods: At 1,5 T, 15 dental alloys and 14 of their most important components were investigated acquiring sagittal (FOV: 150 mm) and transverse (FOV: 250 mm) T 1 -weighted SE additionally. The artifacts were assessed qualitatively as well as quantitatively, and the samples were subdivided into four artifact categories. Results: Ag, Cu, Ga, In, Ti, Sn, Zn, amalgan, the precious alloys, the Au-Pd and Ag-Pd alloys showed no artifacts (category I). Minimal artifacts below 10 mm on transverse images (category II) were found for Cr, Pd, Pt and for the Ni-Cr alloy. Mn and the remaining non-precious alloys induced artifacts up to 30 mm (category III). Significant artifacts - more than 30 mm - (category IV) were to be more susceptible for artifacts than T 1 -weighted SE and FLASH techniques. Conclusions: In contrast to dental alloys for fixed prosthodontics, Ni-Cr- or 18/8 wires used for orthodontic bands can influence not only the image quality, but also the diagnostic reliability of MRI of the temporomandibular joint. (orig.) [de

  4. Headache children with temporomandibular disorders have several types of pain and other symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljeström, M-R; Le Bell, Y; Anttila, P; Aromaa, M; Jämsä, T; Metsähonkala, L; Helenius, H; Viander, S; Jäppilä, E; Alanen, P; Sillanpää, M

    2005-11-01

    The aim was to investigate the association between temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and overall muscle tenderness, depressive symptoms, sleep difficulties, headache frequency and related symptoms in children with primary headache in comparison with controls. Based on an unselected population sample of 1135 Finnish schoolchildren classified according to the type of headache at age 12, altogether 297 children aged 13-14 from different headache groups and healthy controls were randomly selected for an interview and clinical examinations. Children with migraine had more TMD signs than children with nonmigrainous headaches or healthy controls. High TMD total scores were associated with palpation tenderness in other parts of the body and with frequent headache attacks. We conclude that children with overall headache, migraine in particular, and high total TMD scores showed an increased overall tenderness to muscle palpation and multiply manifested hypersensitivity pain.

  5. Reemplazo articular temporomandibular debido a queratoquiste odontogénico Temporomandibular joint replacement because of odontogenic keratocyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Angel Peñón Vivas

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Existen disímiles condiciones que hacen necesario el reemplazo articular temporomandibular; dentro de las más frecuentes se encuentran la anquilosis, la osteoatrosis, estadíos avanzados del Síndrome de disfunción temporomandibular, daño articular postrauma y procesos neoplásicos o tumorales. Los queratoquistes odontógenos que se agrupan para su estudio dentro de los quistes odontogénicos del desarrollo, representan cerca del 7 al 10 por ciento de todos los quistes maxilo-mandibulares. Se dice que tienen dos picos de incidencia entre la segunda y tercera década de vida y entre los 50 y 60 años de edad, con una ligera predilección por el sexo masculino. Aparece más frecuentemente en la región del tercer molar de la mandíbula con extensión a la rama ascendente El presente trabajo tuvo como objetivo mostrar el caso de un paciente masculino de 57 años de edad en el que fue necesario el reemplazo articular temporomandibular debido a un queratoquiste odontogénico que involucraba la totalidad de la rama mandibular derecha, incluyendo el proceso condíleo y coronoideo, así como el ángulo hasta el tercio posterior del cuerpo mandibular. Tras un año de realizada la intervención quirúrgica la evolución del paciente fue satisfactoria.Temporomandibular joint replacement is required in a variety of conditions. Among the most frequent are ankylosis, osteoarthrosis, advanced stages of the temporomandibular dysfunction syndrome, post-traumatic joint damage, and neoplastic or tumoral processes. Odontogenic keratocysts, which are classified as developmental odontogenic cysts for study purposes, constitute 7-10 per cent of all maxillomandibular cysts. Two peaks have been identified in their incidence: between the second and third decades of life, and between 50 and 60 years of age, with a slight predominance of the male sex. They are most common in the third molar area of the mandibule, with expansion to the ascending branch. A case is

  6. Oral splint for temporomandibular joint disorders with revolutionary fluid system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Srivastava

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint (TMJ diseases and disorders refer to a complex and poorly understood set of conditions, manifested by pain in the area of the jaw and associated muscles and limitations in the ability to make the normal movements of speech, facial expression, eating, chewing, and swallowing. The conventional soft occlusal splint therapy is a much safer and effective mode of a conservative line of therapy in comparison to the surgical therapy for temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD. The purpose of this article is to review the Aqualizer TM , an hydrostatic oral splint, as accurate, effective treatment and differential diagnostic tool in TMD that allow treating the patient′s pain quickly and accurately saving valuable treatment time. The review article has been prepared doing a literature review from the world-wide web and pubmed/medline.

  7. VESTIBULAR SCHWANNOMA (ACOUSTIC NEUROMA) MIMICKING TEMPOROMANDIBULAR DISORDERS: A CASE REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisi, Maurício A.; Selaimen, Caio M. P.; Chaves, Karen D.; Bisi, Melissa C.; Grossi, Márcio L.

    2006-01-01

    Approximately 6 to 16% of patients with trigeminal neuralgia symptoms present intracranial tumors, the most common being the vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma). Some symptoms reported by patients include hearing loss, tinnitus, headaches, vertigo and trigeminal disturbances. An increased muscle response in the surrounding head and neck musculature may also be observed, which mimics signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders. In these cases, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proved to be a useful tool in tumor diagnosis. The differential diagnosis between myofascial and neuralgic pain is important, as both may present similar characteristics, while being of different origin, and demanding special treatment approaches. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the relationship among trigeminal neuralgia symptoms, intracranial tumors and temporomandibular dysfunction by presenting a clinical case. PMID:19089251

  8. Psychoneuroimmunological disorders and temporomandibular joint pain: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjani Shetty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychoneuroimmunology characterizes a disease entity that combines psychological components, central nervous system regulation, and immunology, to explain the etiological complexity of a disease. Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs include a heterogeneous group of painful conditions that involve the temporomandibular joint (TMJ, muscles of mastication, and the adjacent anatomic structures. This review focuses on the psychoneuroimmunological diseases and disorders that mimic the symptoms of TMDs. The differentiation of these disorders is of great significance to the oral physician - differentiating and diagnosing the cause of TMJ pain and treating it effectively to benefit the patient.The literature for this review was taken from Medline/PubMed, other indexed journals, standard text books, and online material.

  9. Parapharyngeal space tumors: another consideration for otalgia and temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosskopf, Courtney C; Kuperstein, Arthur S; O'Malley, Bert W; Sollecito, Thomas P

    2013-05-01

    Parapharyngeal space (PPS) tumors are rare, accounting for 0.5% of all head and neck neoplasms. PPS tumors are difficult to diagnose due to limited presenting signs and symptoms and because of their location deep within the neck. A 60-year-old woman presented with complaints of otalgia, which appeared to be consistent with a temporomandibular disorder (TMD). Due to disproportionate symptoms, an MRI of the temporomandibular joints was ordered. The MRI revealed a mass within the PPS, which was later diagnosed as a mucoepidermoid carcinoma. A literature search failed to reveal otalgia, and facial pain, thought to be related to a TMD, as the primary presenting symptoms of a PPS neoplasm. Patients presenting with disproportionate signs and symptoms of a TMD should be evaluated with advanced imaging to rule out occult pathology. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Patients' Priorities and Attitudes Towards Their Temporo-Mandibular Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, Martin; Ray-Chaudhuri, Arijit; Khawaja, Noman

    2015-08-01

    The diagnosis and appropriate management of temporo-mandibular disorders (TMDs) remains controversial. Current scientific evidence highlights the importance of psychosocial factors in sufferers and the reducing emphasis on occlusal or dental/prosthetic factors. This paper describes the findings of a survey of 211 patients reporting pain from their temporo-mandibular joint area and associated structures. This article offers busy primary dental care practitioners a cost effective questionnaire for obtaining relevant information from patients about the history of their condition and highlights what patients hope to achieve through the management of their disorder. It also emphasises the importance of communicating effectively with patients and offers practical tips for the management of TMDs in primary care.

  11. Three-dimensional temporomandibular joint modeling and animation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascone, Piero; Rinaldi, Fabrizio; Pagnoni, Mario; Marianetti, Tito Matteo; Tedaldi, Massimiliano

    2008-11-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) temporomandibular joint (TMJ) model derives from a study of the cranium by 3D virtual reality and mandibular function animation. The starting point of the project is high-fidelity digital acquisition of a human dry skull. The cooperation between the maxillofacial surgeon and the cartoonist enables the reconstruction of the fibroconnective components of the TMJ that are the keystone for comprehension of the anatomic and functional features of the mandible. The skeletal model is customized with the apposition of the temporomandibular ligament, the articular disk, the retrodiskal tissue, and the medial and the lateral ligament of the disk. The simulation of TMJ movement is the result of the integration of up-to-date data on the biomechanical restrictions. The 3D TMJ model is an easy-to-use application that may be run on a personal computer for the study of the TMJ and its biomechanics.

  12. Statistical approaches to orofacial pain and temporomandibular disorders research

    CERN Document Server

    Manfredini, Daniele; Nardini, Luca Guarda; Carrozzo, Eleonora; Salmaso, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the biostatistical methods utilized to interpret and analyze dental research in the areas of orofacial pain and temporomandibular disorders. It will guide practitioners in these fields who would like to interpret research findings or find examples on the design of clinical investigations. After an introduction dealing with the basic issues, the central sections of the textbook are dedicated to the different types of investigations in sight of specific goals researchers may have. The final section contains more elaborate statistical concepts for expert professionals. The field of orofacial pain and temporomandibular disorders is emerging as one of the most critical areas of clinical research in dentistry. Due to the complexity of clinical pictures, the multifactorial etiology, and the importance of psychosocial factors in all aspects of the TMD practice, clinicians often find it hard to appraise their modus operandi, and researchers must constantly increase their knowledge in epidemiology and ...

  13. Prolotherapy: A new hope for temporomandibular joint pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Vijay Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common cause of orofacial pain is the Temporomandibular Joint Disorder (TMD, a collective term used to describe a group of medical disorders causing temporomandibular joint (TMJ pain and dysfunction. As the causes of TMD are varied and run the gamut from mechanical issues, such as disc degeneration and dislocation or erosion of the fibrocartilaginous surfaces of the condyle, fossa, and articular eminence, the treatment approaches for the chronic TMJ case are also quite varied. As surgery is considered a last resort for TMD, it is common for sufferers to seek out alternatives and one of the alternative treatments is ′Prolotherapy,′ which is also known as Regenerative Injection Therapy. This article provides an overview of this new alternative therapy.

  14. Temporomandibular joint - normal features and disc displacements: magnetic resonance imaging; Articulacao temporomandibular - aspectos normais e deslocamentos de disco: imagem por ressonancia magnetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Ana Carolina Araujo; Sarmento, Viviane Almeida; Campos, Paulo Sergio Flores; Gonzalez, Maria Olivia Dias [Bahia Univ., Salvador, BA (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia]. E-mail: ana_carolinaramos@hotmail.com

    2004-12-01

    Disc displacement of the temporomandibular joint has been defined as an abnormal relationship between the articular disc and the mandibular condyle, fossa and articular eminence. Disc displacements may occur without immediate interference in the function of the joint. Magnetic resonance imaging shows high diagnostic accuracy in the determination of articular disc position and has been indicated as the diagnostic method of choice for soft tissue abnormalities of the temporomandibular joint. The aim of this study is to review the literature including the normal features and different types of disc displacement of the temporomandibular joint as well as the imaging findings, emphasizing the role of magnetic resonance imaging. (author)

  15. Temporomandibular Disorders and Headache: A Retrospective Analysis of 1198 Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Di Paolo, Carlo; D'Urso, Anna; Papi, Piero; Di Sabato, Francesco; Rosella, Daniele; Pompa, Giorgio; Polimeni, Antonella

    2017-01-01

    Aim. Headache is one of the most common diseases associated with Temporomandibular Disorders (TMDs). The aim of this study was to evaluate, retrospectively, if headache influences TMD’s symptoms. Material and Methods. A total sample of 1198 consecutive TMD patients was selected. After a neurological examination, a diagnosis of headache, according to the latest edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, was performed in 625 subjects. Patients were divided into two group...

  16. A study of the temporomandibular joint during bruxism

    OpenAIRE

    Commisso Cuñarro, María Soledad; Martínez Reina, Francisco Javier; Mayo Nuñez, Juana María

    2014-01-01

    A finite element model of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and the human mandible was fabricated to study the effect of abnormal loading, such as awake and asleep bruxism, on the articular disc. A quasilinear viscoelastic model was used to simulate the behaviour of the disc. The viscoelastic nature of this tissue is shown to be an important factor when sustained (awake bruxism) or cyclic loading (sleep bruxism) is simulated. From the comparison of the two types of bruxism, it was seen that s...

  17. Temporomandibular joint space in children without joint disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larheim, T.A.

    1981-01-01

    Bilateral assessment of the temporomandibular joint space in children without joint disease is reported. Twenty-eight children were examined with conventional radiography and 23 with tomography. High prevalence of asymmetric joint spaces with both techniques indicated that great care should be taken when using narrowing or widening of the joint space as a diagnostic criterion in children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Other signs, such as restricted translation of the mandibular head, and clinical symptoms should be evaluated. (Auth.)

  18. MRI of the temporomandibular joint in patients with rheumatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okochi, Kiyoshi; Ida, Mizue; Ohbayashi, Naoto

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the MRI findings of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in patients with rheumatic disease. The characteristic MRI findings of the TMJs in rheumatic patients were considered the obscurity of temporal posterior attachment (TPA) visualization and the presence of osseous changes of the condyle. As for the osseous changes, nearly 50% of the condyles had erosive changes and 20% showed severe bone destruction. (author)

  19. Craniocervical posture analysis in patients with temporomandibular disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Iunes,DH; Carvalho,LCF; Oliveira,AS; Bevilaqua-Grossi,D

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare head positioning and cervical spine alignment between individuals with and without temporomandibular disorders (TMDs), by means of positional evaluation using photographs, radiographs and visual observation, and to investigate whether the type of TMD influences head posture and cervical spine positioning. METHODS: Ninety randomly chosen women were diagnosed using the research diagnostic criteria for TMDs (RDC/TMD) by a trained examiner and were divided into three groups:...

  20. Temporomandibular Myofacial Pain Treated with Botulinum Toxin Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niv Mor

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the diagnoses and treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMD and outlines of the role of botulinum toxin (BoNT in the treatment of myofacial TMD. This manuscript includes a brief history of the use of BoNT in the treatment of pain, the mechanism of action of BoNT, and the techniques for injections, adverse effects and contraindications when using BoNT to treat mayofacial pain caused by TMD.

  1. Long-standing temporomandibular joint dislocation: A rare experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil Malik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-standing temporomandibular joint (TMJ dislocations persist for more than a month are most challenging to treat. The management of such condition varies widely, from closed reduction to complicated surgical procedures. The choice of an appropriate methodology is questionable. At present, there are no standard rules or conventions for the ideal strategy in different circumstances. This paper attempts to present the experience of managing two cases of long-standing TMJ dislocations.

  2. Imaging diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). MR imaging of the disk of the temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Tsukasa; Yamamoto, Mika; Sakuma, Katsuya

    2001-01-01

    Since its introduction in the 1980s, magnetic resonance imaging has become the preferred method for diagnosing soft tissue abnormalities of temporomandibular joint (TMJ). MR imaging is non-invasive and more accurate than arthorography. In addition, it requires less operator skill and is well tolerated by patients. We are usually taking MR images of the TMJ with the fast spin echo technique that can simultaneously obtain both T2-weighted and proton density images. The purpose of this study was to determine the utility of T2-weighed and proton density images for diagnosing the disk status in TMJ, comparing the results with those obtained by T1-weighted images. We studied 104 TMJs in 52 patients with both T2-weighted and proton density images, and 80 TMJs in 40 patients with only T1-weighted images. The joints were evaluated by two oral radiologists who looked at three aspects of the joints-disk displacement, disk reduction and disk shape - giving ratings of good'' or ''fair'' in each category. Ratings of ''good'' were significant higher in all three categories in T2-weighted and proton density images than in T1-weighted images (p<0.01). Based on these results, we conclude that T2-weighted and proton density images taken with the fast spin echo technique are useful for diagnosing the disk status of the TMJ. (author)

  3. Psychological stress associated with aphthous ulcers and temporomandibular disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslam, A.; Hassan, S.H.; Khan, D.A.; Chaudhary, M.A.G.

    2017-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of stress as an etiological factor for aphthous ulcers and temporomandibular disorders. Study Design: Cross sectional descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Armed Forces Institute of Dentistry Rawalpindi, from Oct 2015 to May 2016. Material and Methods: Two groups of patients were selected. Group I included 119 patients presenting with Aphthous Ulcers while group II had 64 subjects with complaints of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). After a thorough history, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) was used to assess stress in the patients. AHADS-A score of 7 was taken as significant anxiety while a HADS-D score of 7 depicted significant depression. Both groups were then subjected to laboratory examinations. Serum cortisol levels were assessed for both groups while Serum Folate, Ferritin and Vitamin B12 level for group I only. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 21 to calculate descriptive statistics including mean and standard deviations as well as frequencies and percentages. Relationship between HADS score and serum cortisol levels was assessed using Pearson's correlation coefficient. A p-value<0.05 was considered significant. Results: For TMDs, 53 (82.8%) patients were found positive for stress while for aphthous ulcers, 61 (51.3%) were positive for stress. The correlation between HADS score and serum cortisol levels was found significant for both groups at a p=<0.001. Conclusions: Patients showed a high prevalence of stress as an etiological factor for aphthous ulcers and temporomandibular disorders in a local setting. (author)

  4. Traumatic injuries of the temporomandibular joint; Die traumatischen Kiefergelenkverletzungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puig, S.; Krestan, C.; Lomoschitz, F.; Robinson, S. [Vienna Univ. (Austria). Zentrales Inst. fuer Radiodiagnostik; Glaser, C. [Vienna Univ. (Austria). Klinik fuer Zahn-, Mund- und Kieferheilkunde; Staudenherz, A. [Vienna Univ. (Austria). Universitaetsklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2001-09-01

    Injuries of the temporomandibular joint are mostly due to injuries or fractures of the mandibular condyle. Fractures of the skull base involving the temporomandibular joint are rare. Classification of fractures refers to their anatomical positions and the presence or absence of a luxation. Further, it is important whether the fracture is intra- or extra-capsular. The primary imaging method should be orthopantomography. As for therapy planning, especially surgery, also evaluation of soft tissue is necessary, computed tomography is the imaging method of choice. For diagnosis of complications or internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint, magnetic resonance imaging is to be recommended. (orig.) [German] Die Verletzungen des Kiefergelenks gehen zumeist mit einer Verletzung oder Fraktur des Kieferkoepfchens bzw. des Kiefergelenkfortsatzes einher. Frakturen der Schaedelbasis unter Beteiligung der Kiefergelenkpfanne sind selten. Unterschieden werden die Frakturen des Gelenkfortsatzes nach anatomischer Lokalisation und danach, ob eine Luxation vorhanden ist oder nicht. Weiter ist von Bedeutung, ob der Frakturspalt intraoder extrakapsulaer verlaeuft. Die primaere Bildgebung sollte mittels Orthopantomographie erfolgen. Da fuer eine weitere operative Behandlung auch die etwaige Verletzung der Weichteile von Bedeutung ist, bietet sich die Computertomographie als bildgebende diagnostische Methode an. Zur Abklaerung von Komplikationen bzw. des so genannten ''internal derangement'' ist die Magnetresonanztomographie zu empfehlen. (orig.)

  5. [Diagnosis and treatment of temporo-mandibular disorders in orthodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocquet, Emmanuelle; Moreau, Alexis; Danguy, Michel; Danguy, Chantal

    2010-03-01

    Orthodontists are fully prepared to treat the problems of occlusion that they are called upon to deal with every day. On the other hand temporo-mandibular joint disorders present more obscure difficulties from the point of view of detection and diagnosis as well the management of their treatment. That is why a profound understanding of the anatomical and physiological functioning of the temporo-mandibular joint has become indispensable for today's orthodontists who are now asked to detect and diagnose an assortment of TMJ disturbances whose etiology may vary greatly. By performing a rigorous diagnostic procedure, based on a thorough clinical examination supported by careful axiographic and radiological studies, of temporo-mandibular malfunctioning and its underlying etiological causes, which are primarily dento-alveolar and occlusal in nature, orthodontists will be able to adopt an appropriate therapeutic approach that might be purely orthodontic or multi-disciplinary and carried out with the collaboration of specialists in occlusion, oral surgery, and even osteopathy. EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2010.

  6. Prevalence of Temporomandibular Disorders in an Adult Brazilian Community Population Using the Research Diagnostic Criteria (Axes I and II) for Temporomandibular Disorders (The Maringá Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Progiante, Patrícia Saram; Pattussi, Marcos Pascoal; Lawrence, Herenia P; Goya, Suzana; Grossi, Patrícia Krieger; Grossi, Márcio Lima

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and comorbid factors (sleep bruxism and headaches). This study was a cross-sectional population survey in the city of Maringá, state of Paraná, Brazil. Axes I and II of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD) were used for assessment of TMD signs and symptoms. The population was users of the Brazilian public health system (SUS), of both sexes, between the ages of 20 and 65 years, and not seeking treatment for TMD. The selected population (N = 1,643) was composed mostly of (a) women (65.9%), (b) married or single individuals (90.6%), (c) Caucasians (70.1%), (d) individuals aged 32.7 ± 10.3 years, (e) individuals earning a medium income (75.1%), and (f) those who had completed a high school education or higher (79.9%). According to the chronic pain grade classification (CPG) in the RDC/TMD Axis II, 36.2% of the population had some degree of TMD pain (CPG I to IV); however, only 5.1% had severe limitation due to pain (CPG III or IV). In the RDC/TMD Axis I diagnoses, 29.5% presented with muscle disorders (group I), 7.9% with disk displacements (group II), and 39.1% with other joint disorders (group III). Headaches were present in 67.9% and awake and sleep bruxism in 30% and 33.4% of the population, respectively. The prevalence of signs and symptoms of TMD was high in this population, but with low disability; however, the proportion of patients in need of treatment was much lower.

  7. Temporomandibular joint involvement as a positive clinical prognostic factor in necrotising external otitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeheskeli, E; Eta, R Abu; Gavriel, H; Kleid, S; Eviatar, E

    2016-05-01

    Necrotising otitis externa is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. This study investigated whether temporomandibular joint involvement had any prognostic effect on the course of necrotising otitis externa in patients who had undergone hyperbaric oxygen therapy after failed medical and sometimes surgical therapy. A retrospective case series was conducted of patients in whom antibiotic treatment and surgery had failed, who had been hospitalised for further treatment and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Twenty-three patients with necrotising otitis externa were identified. The temporomandibular joint was involved in four patients (17 per cent); these patients showed a constant gradual improvement in C-reactive protein and were eventually discharged free of disease, except one patient who was lost to follow up. Four patients (16 per cent) without temporomandibular joint involvement died within 90 days of discharge, while all patients with temporomandibular joint involvement were alive. Three patients (13 per cent) without temporomandibular joint involvement needed recurrent hospitalisation including further hyperbaric oxygen therapy; no patients with temporomandibular joint involvement required such treatment. Patients with temporomandibular joint involvement had lower rates of recurrent disease and no mortality. Therefore, we suggest considering temporomandibular joint involvement as a positive prognostic factor in necrotising otitis externa management.

  8. The cost-effectiveness of TheraBite® as treatment for acute myogenic temporomandibular disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heres Diddens, A.; Kraaijenga, S.; Coupe, V.; Hilgers, F.; van der Molen, L.; Smeele, L.; Retèl, V.P.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is a very common and costly pain problem concerning the temporomandibular joint. A previous study has shown that for the treatment of acute myogenic TMD, TheraBite® (TB) offers a faster and greater effect than usual care consisting of physical therapy

  9. Radiographic Study on the Bony Changes of Mandibular Condyle Head in Temporomandibular Disorder Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Moo Soon; You, Dong Soo

    1989-01-01

    The author has studied radiographic bony changes of mandibular condyle head in temporomandibular disorder patients using Oblique lateral transcranial projection, Orthopantomography, and Tomography. The bony change types and the frequencies of occurrence and the incidences of bony changes in three different radiographic techniques were examined. The coincidences of body change types between the Oblique lateral transcranial projection and the lateral part of Tomogram, the Orthopantomogram and the medial part of Tomogram were also examined. The results were as follows: 1. The mean age of patients was 31.7 years and under 40 years were 24 patients, women were 27 patients, men were 4 patients. 2. The observable cases of bony changes in all three radiographic techniques were 19 cases (50%) of 38 cases and the observable cases of bony changes in only Tomography were 5 cases (13.2%). 3. The most frequent radiographic bony change type was osteophyte and next orders were flattening, erosion, concavity. 4. The positional incidences of bony changes in Tomogram were 31 cases in lateral part and 27 cases in central part. 5. The coincidence of bony change types between the oblique lateral transcranial projection and the lateral part of Tomogram was 80%, and the coincidence between the Orthopantomogram and the medial part of Tomogram was 76.9%.

  10. Distracción mandibular y articulación temporomandibular Mandibular distraction and the temporomandibular joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Monje Gil

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Los pacientes con deformidades craneofaciales requieren generalmente multiples y, a veces, complejos procedimientos quirurgicos para reconstruir tejidos blandos y duros alterados. Un avance importante en cirugía reconstructiva es el alargamiento de la mandibula por distracción que tiene la ventaja de una cirugía menos agresiva que determinados tipos de osteotomías. Con esta técnica una osteotomía bicortical se hace en distintas zonas de la mandibula colocandose el distractor hasta alcanzar los efectos deseados. Aunque las fuerzas aplicadas se han mostrado eficaces para alargar la mandíbula, sus efectos en segmentos proximales y distales, incluyendo la articulación temporomandibular no han sido analizados sistemáticamente. En este artículo se repasa trabajos experimentales y clínicos en los que se detalla la relación entre distracción mandibular y articulación temporomandibular.Abstract: Patients with severe craniofacial abnormalities often require multiple and complex surgical procedures to reconstruct maldeveloped hard and soft tissues of the maxillofacial complex. An important advance in reconstructive surgery is mandibular lengthening by gradual distraction, which takes advantage to be less agressive surgery than some osteotomies. With this technique, a bicortical osteotomy is made at the angle of the deficient mandible, and an expansion appliance is placed across the osteotomy line. Although the applied forces have been shown to lengthen the mandible effectively in the region of the application, their effects on the proximal and distal mandibular segments, including the temporomandibular joint region, have not been analyzed systematically. In this article, we study several experimental and clinical papers where it describes the relationship between mandibular distraction and temporomandibular joint.

  11. Temporomandibular disorders and bruxism in childhood and adolescence: review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Taís de Souza; Miyakoda, Luana Sayuri; Pocztaruk, Rafael de Liz; Rocha, Camila Pinhata; Gavião, Maria Beatriz Duarte

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this article was to review the literature about temporomandibular disorders and bruxism and their relationships in children and adolescents. The literature was searched using Medline, ISI, Cochrane Library, Scielo and the Internet, from March 1970 to the end of June 2007. The inclusion criteria were: they evaluated a possible association between TMD and bruxism, and they dealt with child and/or adolescent samples. Furthermore, interim reports, related Internet sites and chapters in textbooks were considered. From 64 records found, 30 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The prevalence of temporomandibular disorders in children and adolescent varies widely in the literature. Temporomandibular disorders are often defined on the basis of signs and symptoms, of which the most common are: temporomandibular joint sounds, impaired movement of the mandible, limitation in mouth opening, preauricular pain, facial pain, headaches and jaw tenderness on function, having mainly a mild character, fluctuation and progression to severe pain and dysfunction is rare. One of the possible causal factors suggested that temporomandibular disorders in children is a functional mandibular overload variable, mainly bruxism. Bruxism, defined as the habitual nonfunctional forceful contact between occlusal tooth surfaces, is involuntary, excessive grinding, clenching or rubbing of teeth during nonfunctional movements of the masticatory system. Its etiology is still controversial but the multifactorial cause has been attributed, including pathophysiologic, psychologic and morphologic factors. Moreover, in younger children, bruxism may be a consequence of the masticatory neuromuscular system immaturity. Complications include dental attrition, headaches, temporomandibular disorders and masticatory muscle soreness. Some studies have linked oral parafunctional habits to disturbances and diseases of the temporomandibular joint, mainly bruxism, suggesting its association with temporomandibular

  12. Theoretical analysis of nuclear reactors (Phase II), I-V, Part III, Reactor poisoning; Razrada metoda teorijske analize nuklearnih reaktora (II faza) I-V, III Deo, Zatrovanje reaktora, II faza

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pop-Jordanov, J [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1962-10-15

    This phase is dealing with influence of all the fission products except Xe{sup 135} on the reactivity of a reactor, usually named as reactor poisoning. The first part of the report is a review of methods for calculation of reactor poisoning. The second part shows the most frequently used method for calculation of cross sections and yields of pseudo products (for thermal neutrons). The system of equations was adopted dependent on the conditions of the available computer system. It is described in part three. Detailed method for their application is described in part four and results obtained are presented in part five.

  13. The removal of toxic metals from liquid effluents by ion exchange resins. Part IV: Chromium(III)/H+ /Lewatit SP112

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alguacil, F.J.

    2017-01-01

    This investigation presented results on the removal of chromium(III), from aqueous solution in the 0-5 pH range, using Lewatit SP112 cationic exchange resin. Several aspects affecting the ion exchange process were evaluated, including: the influence of the stirring speed, temperature, pH of the solution, resin dosage and aqueous ionic strength. The selectivity of the system was tested against the presence of other metals in the aqueous solution, whereas the removal of chromium(III) from solutions was compared with results obtained using multiwalled carbon nanotubes as adsorbents. From the batch experimental data, best fit of the results is obtained with the Langmuir model, whereas the ion exchange process is best explained by the pseudo-second order model, moreover, experimental data responded well to the film-diffusion controlled model. Elution of the chromium(III) loaded into the resin is well accomplished by the use of sodium hydroxide solutions. [es

  14. Extracción de cromo con disolventes orgánicos. III parte. Aplicación al tratamiento de residuos polimetálicos industriales

    OpenAIRE

    de Juan, D.; Meseguer, V.; Lozano, L. J.

    1998-01-01

    The use of Primene 81R as extraction agent of chromium present in solid wastes containing nickel, iron and copper has been studied. The waste was leached with a sulphuric acid solution up to pH 3 and oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI) with Caro acid was also studied. Because of the negative result of oxidation, the treatment was applied on Cr(III) directly. Extraction/scrubbing/stripping process was studied in the leach. The composition of organic phase used in the extraction step was 10 % v/v Pr...

  15. RA Reactor operation and maintenance (I-IX), Part III, Task 3.08/04-02 Refurbishment of the electrical equipment; Pogon i odrzavanje reaktora RA (I-IX), III Deo, Zadatak 3.08/04-02 Remont elektro opreme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zecevic, V; Nikolic, M; Poznanovic, B; Rajic, M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Reaktor RA, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1963-12-15

    This volume contains detailed action plan for repair of electrical equipment of the RA reactor, the list of electrical equipment parts which were either repaired or exchanged for improvement of their performance. Detailed work describing the repair and maintenance work done of the listed equipment is part of this report. Equipment related to dosimetry and control systems are included as well.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nah, Kyung Soo

    1999-01-01

    To find out the best imaging parameters for the diagnosis of disc in MRI imaging. Compare the diagnostic quality of the disc among the T1, PD and T2 images of same patients (12 joints, 223 images) by visual (I-IV grades) and gray level measurement (pre- and infra-discal area) method. PD images showed best results with 43.7% of the images belonging to grade III (good) and with statistically significant higher difference of the gray levels at pre- and infra-discal areas. But there were no grade IV (excellent) images. PD images are best method among T1, PD and T2 images in diagnosing the disc but since there were no excellent images further imaging parameters should be studied for better images.

  17. The arterial blood supply of the temporomandibular joint: an anatomical study and clinical implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuccia, Antonino Marco; Caradonna, Carola; Caradonna, Domenico [Dept. of Surgical and Oncological Disciplines, University of Palermo, Palermo (Italy); Anastasi, Giuseppe; Milardi, Demetrio; Favaloro, Angelo; Caradonna, Luigi; Cutroneo, Giuseppina [Biomorphology and Biotechnologies, University of Messina, Messina (Italy); De Pietro, Anita; Angileri, Tommaso Maurizio [Villa Santa Teresa, Diagnostica per Immagini, Palermo (Italy)

    2013-03-15

    The aim of this study was to analyze three-dimensional images of the arterial supply to the temporomandibular joint. Ten patients (five men and five women, mean age 36 years) without signs or symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, who underwent contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) scanning with intravenous contrast, were studied. The direct volume rendering technique of CT images was used, and a data set of images to visualize the vasculature of the human temporomandibular joint in three dimensions was created. After elaboration of the data through post-processing, the arterial supply of the temporomandibular joint was studied. The analysis revealed the superficial temporal artery, the anterior tympanic artery, the deep temporal artery, the auricular posterior artery, the transverse facial artery, the middle meningeal artery, and the maxillary artery with their branches as the main arterial sources for the lateral and medial temporomandibular joint. The direct volume rendering technique was found to be successful in the assessment of the arterial supply to the temporomandibular joint. The superficial temporal artery and maxillary artery ran along the lateral and medial sides of the condylar neck, suggesting that these arteries are at increased risk during soft-tissue procedures such as an elective arthroplasty of the temporomandibular joint.

  18. The severity of temporomandibular joint disorder by teeth loss in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indry Herdiyani

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint dysfunction is a term that covers a number of clinical problems that involves masticatory muscles, temporomandibular joints, and related structures, or both. Loss of tooth was an etiology of temporomandibular joint dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to obtain the description of temporomandibular joint dysfunction level that caused by tooth loss of elderly in three nursing home Bandung. This was a descriptive study using the survey method of the elderly in three nursing home Bandung. A total of 34 people consist 6 males and 28 females. The subjects were examined by symptoms of temporomandibular joint dysfunction and the dysfunction level was assessed by Helkimo Clinical Dysfunction Index. The result of this study shows that elderly in Nursing Home Bandung have mild dysfunction level was 7 (14.71%, moderate dysfunction level was 22 (64.71%, and severe dysfunction level is 5 (20.58%. It can be concluded that loss of the teeth is one of the etiologies of temporomandibular joint disorder. Based on the research conducted, it can be concluded that all elderly with teeth loss will have the temporomandibular joint disorder and the most severity happens based on teeth loss by using the Helkimo Clinical Disfunction Index score was the moderate disorder.

  19. [Self-assembly tissue engineering fibrocartilage model of goat temporomandibular joint disc].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hong; Li, Zhen-Qiang; Bi, Yan-Da

    2011-06-01

    To construct self-assembly fibrocartilage model of goat temporomandibular joint disc and observe the biological characteristics of the self-assembled fibrocartilage constructs, further to provide a basis for tissue engineering of the temporomandibular joint disc and other fibrocartilage. Cells from temporomandibular joint discs of goats were harvested and cultured. 5.5 x 10(6) cells were seeded in each agarose well with diameter 5 mm x depth 10 mm, daily replace of medium, cultured for 2 weeks. One day after seeding, goat temporomandibular joint disc cells in agarose wells were gathered and began to self-assemble into a disc-shaped base, then gradually turned into a round shape. When cultured for 2 weeks, hematoxylin-eosin staining was conducted and observed that cells were round and wrapped around by the matrix. Positive Safranin-O/fast green staining for glycosaminoglycans was observed throughout the entire constructs, and picro-sirius red staining was examined and distribution of numerous type I collagen was found. Immunohistochemistry staining demonstrated brown yellow particles in cytoplasm and around extracellular matrix, which showed self-assembly construct can produce type I collagen as native temporomandibular joint disc tissue. Production of extracellular matrix in self-assembly construct as native temporomandibular joint disc tissue indicates that the use of agarose wells to construct engineered temporomandibular joint disc will be possible and practicable.

  20. Voz e disfunção temporomandibular em professores Voice and temporomandibular joint disorders in teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilza Maria Machado

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: verificar a presença e possível correlação entre alteração vocal e DTM, em professores, a partir de dados de avaliação autorreferida, fonoaudiológica, otorrinolaringológica e odontológica. MÉTODOS: participaram deste estudo, 29 professores de uma escola de rede pública do ensino fundamental e médio do município de Sorocaba - SP. Os professores responderam questionário para levantamento de alteração vocal, e de disfunção temporomandibular (DTM. Foram realizadas quatro avaliações: perceptivo-auditiva; otorrinolaringológica; motricidade orofacial e odontológica. A menção a três ou mais sintomas no questionário determinou "presença" de queixa de voz e de DTM. As avaliações: perceptivo-auditiva e otorrinolaringológica concluíram a "ausência" e "presença" de alteração de voz e de laringe. Nas avaliações da motricidade orofacial e odontológica foi considerada DTM quando registrados três ou mais sinais e/ou sintomas, sendo indispensável à presença de dor. Na análise estatística dos dados, foram empregados: teste de Igualdade de Duas Proporções, teste exato de Fisher e de concordância Kappa. RESULTADOS: dentre os participantes, 82,8% fizeram autorreferência à alteração vocal e 62,1% de sintomas de DTM; 51,7% apresentaram alteração de voz na avaliação otorrinolaringológica e 65,5%, alteração de DTM na avaliação odontológica. Na comparação da avaliação de alteração de voz e DTM foi registrada correlação significante presente na avaliação perceptivo-auditiva da voz e de motricidade orofacial para DTM, e com tendência a significância na aplicação do questionário. CONCLUSÃO: os resultados apontam na direção de confirmar a presença de alteração de voz e DTM no grupo de professores pesquisado e correlação entre os mesmos.PURPOSE: to check the presence and possible correlation between vocal disorders and temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJD in teachers, from self

  1. Desordem Temporomandibular: relações entre sintomas otológicos e orofaciais Temporomandibular Disorder: relationship between otologic and orofacial symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Maria de Felício

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Os sintomas otológicos são freqüentes em pacientes com desordem temporomandibular, e estudos são necessários para elucidar os mecanismos envolvidos. OBJETIVO: O objetivo desse estudo clínico foi investigar a associação de sintomas otológicos (otalgia, zumbido e plenitude auricular com os achados audiológicos, os outros sinais/sintomas relacionados à desordem temporomandibular, e os hábitos parafuncionais orais. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Prospectivo clínico. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: 27 pacientes com desordem temporomandibular, da Clínica de Oclusão da Faculdade de Odontologia de Ribeirão Preto da Universidade de São Paulo, responderam um questionário sobre sinais, sintomas e hábitos orais, e passaram por avaliações otorrinolaringológica e audiológica. Os dados foram analisados pelos testes Binomial, Exato de Fisher e correlação produto-momento de Pearson. O índice de significância adotado foi pThe otologic symptoms are frequents in temporomandibular disorder patients, and studies are needed to elucidate the involved mechanisms. AIM: The objective of the present study was to investigate the association of otology symptoms (otalgia, tinnitus, ear fullness with otologic findings, the other temporomandibular disorder signs and symptoms, and parafunctional habits. STUDY DESIGN: Clinical prospective. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 27 temporomandibular patients from Occlusion Clinic of the Dental School of Ribeirão Preto – University of Sao Paulo, answered a questionnaire which included questions about signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder and parafunctional habits; they were submitted to otorhinolaryngological and audiologic examination. The data obtained were analyzed through Binomial Test, Exact Test of Fisher and Pearson Correlation, with p value < 0.05. RESULTS: Otologic symptoms were presented in 88.88% of the patients (59.26% presented otalgia, 74.07 tinnitus and 74.07% ear fullness. There was no significance between the

  2. Prevalence of temporomandibular disorders in patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grozdinska, Alina; Hofmann, Elisabeth; Schmid, Matthias; Hirschfelder, Ursula

    2018-05-17

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), also known as Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT), is a degenerative inflammatory disease with high prevalence among women and has been associated with fibromyalgia and widespread chronic pain. The goal was to determine the frequency of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in patients with HT. In all, 119 women (age 19-60 years) were divided into a study (52 women diagnosed with HT) and a control (67 healthy individuals, of which 15 were excluded) group. Serum concentrations of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free triiodothyronine (fT3), free thyroxine (fT4), anti-thyroglobulin (Tg) and anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibody levels were measured. The temporomandibular jaw and muscles were examined using the German Society of Functional Diagnostics and Therapy guidelines. The Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) was used to assess TMD. Standardized questionnaires, incorporating epidemiological criteria, state and treatment of the thyroid disease, Helkimo Index (HI), and Fonseca Anamnestic Index (FAI), were filled out by all patients. The two groups did not differ in terms of demographic parameters or mandibular jaw mobility. Significantly higher levels of anti-TPO and anti-Tg were attested in all subjects of the HT group. Markedly elevated prevalence of TMD was found in the HT group. Muscle pain and stiffness were found in 45 (86.5%) subjects of the HT group (p < 0.001), of whom 33 (63.4%) also had disc displacement with reposition (p < 0.001). Whereas 50% of the control group showed no TMD symptoms, all subjects in the HT group had symptoms. A significantly elevated prevalence of TMD was found in patients with HT. Thus, patients with TMD who do not respond to therapy should be referred for thyroid diagnostic workup.

  3. Superluminous Devices Versus Low-Level Laser for Temporomandibular Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sveshtarov Vasil

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to compare the pain intensity reduction between the mean radiation doses per session of gallium-aluminum-arsenide (GaAIAs laser with superluminous diodes (SLD in four of the most common pain-related chronic temporomandibular disorders (TMD - local myalgia, myofascial pain, myofascial pain with a referral, and arthralgia. This study was implemented on 124 patients with pain-related temporomandibular disorders according to the DC/TMD criteria. We applied trigger point oriented near-infrared laser (785 nm, 100 s, 8 J/cm2 and SLD cluster sessions (the cluster is composed of 49 SLDs with a combination of visible red (633 nm and infrared (880 nm diodes, 200 mW, 300 s, 8 J/cm2 for the temporomandibular joints and the affected muscles. Patients were evaluated at the start of the treatment, and after the 6th session of combined phototherapy. The pain intensity scores were measured according to the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS. Our results show that the most statistically manifested pain reduction is found for the SLD dose, р = 0,000118, followed by the overall dose (laser plus SLD; р = 0,001031, and the laser dose; р = 0,030942 (ANOVA dispersion analyses. Consequently, it can be concluded that myalgia is better treated through lower doses of red light compared to infrared laser doses because SLDs combine the prooxidative effect of photons with 633 nm wavelength, a large area of exposure, sufficient tissue penetration, and some positive warming thermal impact of the SLD clusters.

  4. Orotracheal intubation and temporomandibular disorder: a longitudinal controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Branco Battistella

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: To determine the incidence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder in elective surgery patients who underwent orotracheal intubation. METHODS: This was a longitudinal controlled study with two groups. The study group included patients who underwent orotracheal intubation and a control group. We used the American Academy of Orofacial Pain questionnaire to assess the temporomandibular disorder signs and symptoms one-day postoperatively (T1, and the patients' baseline status prior to surgery (T0 was also recorded. The same questionnaire was used after three months (T2. The mouth opening amplitude was measured at T1 and T2. We considered a pvalue of less than 0.05 to be significant. RESULTS: We included 71 patients, with 38 in the study group and 33 in the control. There was no significant difference between the groups in age (study group: 66.0 [52.5-72.0]; control group: 54.0 [47.0-68.0]; p = 0.117 or in their belonging to the female gender (study group: 57.9%; control group: 63.6%; p = 0.621. At T1, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups in the incidence of mouth opening limitation (study group: 23.7% vs. control group: 18.2%;p = 0.570 or in the mouth opening amplitude (study group: 45.0 [40.0-47.0] vs. control group: 46.0 [40.0-51.0];p = 0.278. At T2 we obtained similar findings. There was no significant difference in the affirmative response to all the individual questions in the American Academy of Orofacial Pain questionnaire. CONCLUSIONS: In our population, the incidence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder of muscular origin was not different between the groups.

  5. Auditory characteristics of individuals with temporomandibular dysfunctions and dentofacial deformities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiane Totta

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether there is any relationship between otological as well as vestibular symptoms, audiological findings and type of temporomandibular disorder (articular, muscular and mixed; and to check the distribution of the temporomandibular disorders (TMD dysfunction degree in the research population. METHODS: A retrospective study involving 30 patients of both sexes, aged between 18 and 49 years old, diagnosed with TMD and dentofacial deformities, who were subject to clinical evaluation (muscle palpation, auscultation of temporomandibular joint during mandibular motion and measurement of jaw movement, audiological testing (pure tone audiometry and immittance testing and two questionnaires, one on otological and vestibular symptoms and the other on TMD anamnesis. Based on both the anamnesis questionnaire and the clinical assessment, the subjects were divided according to the type and degree of TMD dysfunction (mild, moderate and severe, and compared regarding the occurrence of auditory signs and symptoms, vestibular symptoms and audiological findings according to TMD type. RESULTS: The anamnesis questionnaire demonstrated higher prevalence (83.33% of severe TMD. Subjects with mixed TMD had more complaints about hypoacusis than those with muscular TMD (p < 0.05. The results showed no change in either audiological and immittance testing for all assessed individuals. CONCLUSION: Otological symptoms are present in subjects with TMD and dentofacial deformities, regardless of the classification of TMD (articular, muscular or mixed. Those with mixed TMD may have higher incidence of complaints about hypoacusis than subjects with muscular TMD. Further studies are needed to investigate the relationship between otological symptoms and the different types of TMD.

  6. A clinical study of temporomandibular joint disorders by using arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prove the relationship between arthrographic and clinical features in temporomandibular joint disorders. In order to carry out this study, ninety-eight arthrographic examinations of temporomandibular joints were performed in eighty-two patients who had the temporomandibular joint disorders. As the arthrographic examination, the cases were classified in three groups, disk displacement with reduction, disk displacement without reduction, within normal limit. After this, the cases were clinically examined, and the results were compared and analyzed in each other group. The obtained results were as follows ; 1. As the classification by arthrographic examination, three groups (disc displacement with reduction, disc displacement without reduction, within normal limit) were 41%, 54%, 5% of total cases in this study, respectively. 2. The third decade (65%) was most frequent in this study. The average age of each group (disc displacement with reduction, disc displacement without reduction, within normal limit) was 24, 28, 21, and disc displacement without reduction group was higher than any other group. 3. In the chief complaint, pain was the most frequent in all three groups. Joint sound was also frequent in disc displacement with reduction group, but in disc displacement without reduction group, limitation of mouth opening was more frequent. 4. Of the various pain, the movement pain was most frequent (61%) in this study. In joint sound, click (63%) was the most frequent in disc displacement with reduction group, but sound history (42%) and no sound (31%) were more frequent in disc displacement without reduction group. 5. The average maximum opening of each group (disc displacement with reduction, disc displacement without reduction, within normal limit) was 44 mm, 32.9 mm, 44 mm, and disc displacement without reduction group was less than any other group. 6. The masticatory disturbance of each group (disc displacement with reduction, disc

  7. Craniocervical posture analysis in patients with temporomandibular disorder Análise da postura cranio-cervical em pacientes com disfunção temporomandibular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DH Iunes

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare head positioning and cervical spine alignment between individuals with and without temporomandibular disorders (TMDs, by means of positional evaluation using photographs, radiographs and visual observation, and to investigate whether the type of TMD influences head posture and cervical spine positioning. METHODS: Ninety randomly chosen women were diagnosed using the research diagnostic criteria for TMDs (RDC/TMD by a trained examiner and were divided into three groups: Group 1, with a diagnosis of myofascial dysfunction (group I of RDC axis I; Group 2, with mixed TMD (groups I, II and III of RDC axis I; and Control, without TMD. Following this, the participants were photographed in frontal and lateral views by a single examiner. To produce these photos, the following anatomical points were marked out on the skin: occipital protuberance, C4, C7, acromioclavicular joint and sternoclavicular joint. From these points, different angles were analyzed by means of the ALCimagem-2000 application. These same photos were then evaluated qualitatively (visual evaluation. Next, lateral teleradiography and radiography of the cervical spine was requested. The examiner was blind when analyzing the images. To compare the results, the chi-squared test and analysis of variance were used, with significance levels of 5%. RESULTS: Regardless of the method used, the results revealed that head and cervical spine posture did not differ between the groups with and without TMD, independent of the diagnostic group. CONCLUSION: The posture of individuals with myogenic or arthrogenous TMD does not differ from the posture of individuals without TMD. The presence of TMD does not influence the head and cervical spine posture.OBJETIVO: Comparar o posicionamento da cabeça e o alinhamento da coluna cervical em indivíduos com e sem DTM, por meio da avaliação postural por fotografias, radiografias e por observação visual e verificar se o tipo de DTM

  8. A study of the temporomandibular joint during bruxism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commisso, María S; Martínez-Reina, Javier; Mayo, Juana

    2014-06-01

    A finite element model of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and the human mandible was fabricated to study the effect of abnormal loading, such as awake and asleep bruxism, on the articular disc. A quasilinear viscoelastic model was used to simulate the behaviour of the disc. The viscoelastic nature of this tissue is shown to be an important factor when sustained (awake bruxism) or cyclic loading (sleep bruxism) is simulated. From the comparison of the two types of bruxism, it was seen that sustained clenching is the most detrimental activity for the TMJ disc, producing an overload that could lead to severe damage of this tissue.

  9. Clinical assessment of patients with orofacial pain and temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Ilanit; Greenberg, Martin S

    2013-07-01

    Accurate diagnosis of chronic pain disorders of the mouth, jaws, and face is frequently complex. It is common for patients with chronic orofacial pain to consult multiple clinicians and receive ineffective treatment before a correct diagnosis is reached. This problem is a significant public health concern. Clinicians can minimize error by starting the diagnostic procedure with a careful, accurate history and thorough head and neck examination followed by a thoughtfully constructed differential diagnosis. The possibility that the patient has symptoms of a life-threatening underlying disease rather than a more common dental, sinus, or temporomandibular disorder must always be considered. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Artrosis en la articulación temporo-mandibular

    OpenAIRE

    Muñoz, Pablo Nicolás

    2017-01-01

    Se presenta un caso clínico de una paciente de 70 años que acusa dolor orofacialsimétrico y dolor local a nivel de la articulación temporo-mandibular (ATM) derecha. La exploración clínica muestra disminución del rango de movimiento articular, crepitación a la auscultación, y puntos gatillos miofascialesa nivel de la musculatura masticatoria. El estudio radiológico confirma artrosis en la ATM y se termina concluyendo que la sintomatología es provocada, principalmente, por el síndrome de dolor ...

  11. Temporo-mandibular joint disease in ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, C; Wojtulewski, J A; Bacon, P A; Winstock, D

    1975-01-01

    The occurrence of temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) disease in ankylosing spondylitis is not widely recognized and its incidence is disputed. Seventy-nine patients attending two routine rheumatology clinics were therefore examined by dental surgeon and nine (11-5 per cent) were considered to have specific TMJ involvement. These patients were older than the remainder, and had more extensive spinal and peripheral joint disease. Symptoms were mild and the predominant clinical feature was restricted mouth opening, which could present considerable difficulties during emergency anaesthesia. Bilateral condylectomy was undertaken in one patient with some benefit. Images PMID:1124959

  12. [Comparative evolution surgical accesses to temporo-mandibular joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sysoliatin, P G; Novikov, A I; Sysoliatin, S P; Bobylev, N G; Brega, I N

    2007-01-01

    In experiment on 30 corpses of adult people criteria of an operational wound (depth of a wound, a corner of operational action, an axis of operational action, a corner of an inclination of operational action) were studied at preauricularis, intrauricularis, intrauriculo-temporalis and posterior mandibullaris access to temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ). New surgical intrauriculo-temporalis access to the joint is substantrated. On the basis of the analysis of 289 operations at 268 patients the indications to a choice of surgical access were developed at various diseases and damages of TMJ.

  13. MR imaging of the juvenile temporomandibular joint before orthodontic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lieberman, J.M.; Hans, M.G.; Rozencweig, G.; Goldberg, J.S.; Bellon, E.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper determines the prevalence of internal derangement (ID) of the temporomandibular joint (TM) in a population of children prior to orthodontic therapy. Thirty-two children, aged 7-15 years, with a variety of orthodontic disorders underwent both MR imaging and physical examination to assess ID of the TMJ. With MR imaging, the disks were graded as normal, borderline anterior displaced, or anterior displaced. Fifty-nine TMJs in 32 patients were successfully imaged. Five TMJ MR examinations could not be interpreted because of patient motion. Fifty seven of the 59 joints (97%) were normal. One disk (1.7%) was anterior displaced, and one (1.7%) was considered borderline

  14. Geology of quadrangles H-12, H-13, and parts of I-12 and I-13, (zone III) in northeastern Santander Department, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Dwight Edward; Goldsmith, Richard; Cruz, Jaime B.; Restrepo, Hernan A.

    1974-01-01

    A program of geologic mapping and mineral investigation in Colombia was undertaken cooperatively by the Colombian Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Geologico-Mineras (formerly known as the Inventario Minero Nacional), and the U. S. Geological Survey; by the Government of Colombia and the Agency for International Development, U. S. Department of State. The purpose was to study, and evaluate mineral resources (excluding of petroleum, coal, emeralds, and alluvial gold) of four selected areas, designated Zones I to IV, that total about 70,000 km2. The work in Zone III, in the Cordillera Oriental, was done from 1965 to 1968. The northeast trend of the Cordillera Oriental of Colombia swings abruptly to north-northwest in the area of this report, and divides around the southern end of the Maracaibo Basin. This section of the Cordillera Oriental is referred to as the Santander Massif. Radiometric age determinations indicate that the oldest rocks of the Santander massif are Precambrian and include high-grade gneiss, schist, and migmatite of the Bucaramanga Formation. These rocks were probably part of the Precambrian Guayana Shield. Low- to medium-grade metamorphic rocks of late Precambrian to Ordovician age .include phyllite, schist, metasiltstone, metasandstone, and marble of the Silgara Formation, a geosynclinal series of considerable extent in the Cordillera Oriental and possibly the Cordillera de Merida of Venezuela. Orthogneiss ranging from granite to tonalite is widely distributed in the high- and medium-grade metamorphic rocks of the central core of the massif and probably represents rocks of two ages, Precambrian and Ordovician to Early Devonian. Younger orthogneiss and the Silgara are overlain by Middle Devonian beds of the Floresta Formation which show a generally low but varying degree of metamorphism. Phyllite and argillite are common, and infrequent marble and other calcareous beds are fossiliferous. Except for recrystallization in limestones of !the

  15. Electronic Health Record for Temporomandibular Joint Disorders – Support in Therapeutic Process

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hippmann, R.; Nagy, Miroslav; Dostálová, T.; Zvárová, Jana; Seydlová, M.; Feltlová, E.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2010), s. 27-32 ISSN 1801-5603 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : electronic health record * automatic speech recognition * dental cross * temporomandibular joint * temporomandibular joint disorders * structured data entry * dentistry * data model * text-to-speech system * Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science http://www.ejbi.org/en/ejbi/article/25-en- electronic - health - record -for-temporomandibular-joint-disorders-support-in-therapeutic-process.html

  16. Self-reported aural symptoms, headache and temporomandibular disorders in Japanese young adults

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    Akhter Rahena

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate the associations of aural symptoms, headache and depression with the presence of temporomandibular disorder (TMD symptoms in a young adult population in Japan. Methods A personal interview survey was conducted on first-year university students (n = 1,930 regarding symptoms of TMD, aural problems, headache, shoulder pain and depression. Logistic regression was applied to assess the associations of these problems with the presence of TMD symptoms after controlling for age and gender. Results Among the 1,930 students, 543 students exhibited TMD symptoms and were classified into 7 groups: clicking only (Group I, n = 319, pain in the TMJ only (Group II, n = 21, difficulty in mouth opening only (Group III, n = 18, clicking and pain (Group IV, n = 29, clicking and difficulty in mouth opening (Group V, n = 48, difficulty in mouth opening and pain (Group VI, n = 11, and combination of three symptoms (Group VII, n = 97. The control group (n = 1,387 were subjects without any TMD symptoms. After adjusting for age and gender, a strong association was observed between TMD symptoms (Group II and IV and tinnitus (OR = 12.1 and 13.2, respectively. TMD symptoms (Group I, II and III were also associated with vertigo and headache. Otalgia and depression were significantly associated with the presence of clicking only. Conclusions TMD symptoms were significantly correlated to aural symptoms and headache. A functional evaluation of the stomatognathic system should be considered in subjects with unexplained aural symptoms and headache.

  17. Minimally invasive surgical treatment for temporomandibular joint in patients with various rheumatic diseases

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    A. Yu. Drobyshev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint (TMJ involvement occurs in patients with different rheumatic diseases (RDs. Pain, limitation of mouth opening can lead to significant problems in both oral hygiene and when eating. Conservative treatments for TMJ lesions are not always effective. Objective: to evaluate the efficiency of minimally invasive surgical interventions (TMJ arthrocentesis and arthroscopy in patients with RDs. Patients and methods. The investigation enrolled 64 patients with different RDs (43 with rheumatoid arthritis, 11 with psoriatic arthritis, 8 with systemic lupus erythematosus, and 2 with ankylosing spondylitis who were divided into three groups in relation to the severity of TMJ involvement in accordance with the Wilkes classification. All the patients underwent TMJ magnetic resonance imaging at baseline and 6 months after treatment. Also at baseline, 14 days, and 1, 6, and 12 months after surgery, the investigators assessed TMJ pain intensity by visual analogue scale and the parameters of mandibular movements. Patients with Wilkes stages IV and V TMJ involvement underwent arthroscopic intervention into the TMJ and those with III stage received TMJ arthrocentesis with arthrolavage. Results and discussion. After surgical treatment, all the groups were noted to have a significant decrease in TMJ pain intensity compared with the baseline level; moreover, the severity of TMJ pain most significantly decreased on day 7 after surgery. Later on, positive changes remained within subsequent follow-up months. There were data similar in the higher degree of mouth opening. The results of surgical treatment in patients with Wilkes stage V TMJ involvement were worse than in those with stages III and IV. Conclusion. Minimally invasive TMJ surgery in patients with RDs is effective and associated with the low frequency of postoperative complications and exacerbations of RDs. The efficiency of minimally invasive TMJ surgery is higher in patients with the

  18. Air quality and climate change, Topic 3 of the Model Inter-Comparison Study for Asia Phase III (MICS-Asia IIIPart 1: Overview and model evaluation

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    M. Gao

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Topic 3 of the Model Inter-Comparison Study for Asia (MICS-Asia Phase III examines how online coupled air quality models perform in simulating high aerosol pollution in the North China Plain region during wintertime haze events and evaluates the importance of aerosol radiative and microphysical feedbacks. A comprehensive overview of the MICS-Asia III Topic 3 study design, including descriptions of participating models and model inputs, the experimental designs, and results of model evaluation, are presented. Six modeling groups from China, Korea and the United States submitted results from seven applications of online coupled chemistry–meteorology models. Results are compared to meteorology and air quality measurements, including data from the Campaign on Atmospheric Aerosol Research Network of China (CARE-China and the Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in East Asia (EANET. The correlation coefficients between the multi-model ensemble mean and the CARE-China observed near-surface air pollutants range from 0.51 to 0.94 (0.51 for ozone and 0.94 for PM2.5 for January 2010. However, large discrepancies exist between simulated aerosol chemical compositions from different models. The coefficient of variation (SD divided by the mean can reach above 1.3 for sulfate in Beijing and above 1.6 for nitrate and organic aerosols in coastal regions, indicating that these compositions are less consistent from different models. During clean periods, simulated aerosol optical depths (AODs from different models are similar, but peak values differ during severe haze events, which can be explained by the differences in simulated inorganic aerosol concentrations and the hygroscopic growth efficiency (affected by varied relative humidity. These differences in composition and AOD suggest that future models can be improved by including new heterogeneous or aqueous pathways for sulfate and nitrate formation under hazy conditions, a secondary organic aerosol (SOA

  19. Therapeutic exercises for the control of temporomandibular disorders

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    Alberto da Rocha Moraes

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Temporomandibular disorder (TMD is a multifactorial disease. For this reason, it is difficult to obtain an accurate and correct diagnosis. In this context, conservative treatments, including therapeutic exercises classified as stretching, relaxation, coordination, strengthening and endurance, are oftentimes prescribed. OBJECTIVE: Thus, the aim of the present article was to conduct a literature review concerning the types of exercises available and the efficacy for the treatment of muscular TMD. METHODS: The review included researches carried out between 2000 and 2010, indexed on Web of Science, PubMed, LILACS and BBO. Moreover, the following keywords were used: Exercise, physical therapy, facial pain, myofascial pain syndrome, and temporomandibular joint dysfunction syndrome. Studies that did not consider the subject "TMD and exercises", used post-surgery exercises and did not use validated criteria for the diagnosis of TMD (RDC/TMD were not included. RESULTS: The results comprised seven articles which proved therapeutic exercises to be effective for the treatment of muscular TMD. However, these studies are seen as limited, since therapeutic exercises were not applied alone, but in association with other conservative procedures. In addition, they present some drawbacks such as: Small samples, lack of control group and no detailed exercise description which should have included intensity, repetition, frequency and duration. CONCLUSION: Although therapeutic exercises are considered effective in the management of muscular TMD, the development of randomized clinical trials is necessary, since many existing studies are still based on the clinical experience of professionals.

  20. Posterior crossbite and temporomandibular disorders (TMDs): need for orthodontic treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thilander, Birgit; Bjerklin, Krister

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this work was to update the bibliography regarding the concept of 'temporomandibular disorder (TMD)' and 'posterior crossbite' and try to find out if there is any association between some special signs/symptoms of TMD and type of posterior crossbite. A literature search from 1970 to 2009, due to specified criterion, resulted in 14 publications that were found to be relevant for the present systematic review. An association between TMD and posterior crossbite (Yes-group) was reported as often as absence of such a relationship (No-group). The samples in the two groups showed similarities as well as differences with respect to number, gender, and age. Most articles reported only on 'presence' or 'absence' of crossbite and only few on type of crossbite opposite to a thorough account of clinical signs and symptoms of TMD. This review seems, however, to state that a functional posterior crossbite (mandibular guidance with midline deviation) is associated with headache, temporomandibular joint and muscular pain, and clicking. As evident from the discussion, such type needs orthodontic treatment to rehabilitate the asymmetric muscular activity between the crossbite and non-crossbite sides and the changed condyle/temporal relationship caused by mandibular deviation. Whether this treatment also will avoid future TMD problems can be answered only after clinical follow-up studies have been performed.

  1. Obesity as a risk factor for temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordani, P C; Campi, L B; Circeli, G Z; Visscher, C M; Bigal, M E; Gonçalves, D A G

    2017-01-01

    We conducted a clinical cross-sectional study to evaluate the association between obesity and the presence of painful temporomandibular disorders (TMD), controlling for age, gender, presence of migraine, depression, non-specific somatic symptoms and obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) in an adult population. A total of 299 individuals (76·6% women) with a mean age of 36·8 ± 12·8 years were evaluated. TMD were classified using the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD). Depression and non-specific somatic symptoms were scored by the Symptom Checklist-90, while pain and disability was rated by the Graded Chronic Pain Scale. Bioimpedanciometry (BIA) was used to assess obesity through total body fat percentage. Migraine was diagnosed according to the criteria of the International Classification of Headache Disorders-2 (ICHD-2). OSAS was classified according to the Berlin Questionnaire. We performed univariate and multivariate models, chi-square tests and odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). In the single regression analysis, TMD-pain was significantly associated with total body fat percentage (P = 0·01). In the multivariate analysis, migraine, age, non-specific somatic symptoms and OSAS showed to be stronger predictors of TMD-pain, and obesity did not retain in the regression model. The initial association found between obesity and TMD-pain is lost when it was corrected for gender, migraine, non-specific somatic symptoms and OSAS. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, José Gustavo Dala Déa; Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa Pedron; Navarro, Ricardo de Lima; Conti, Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira; Conti, Marcio Rodrigues de Almeida; Marchiori, Luciana Lozza de Moraes; Fernandes, Karen Barros Parron

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the prevalence of Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) in the elderly and its association with palpation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), masticatory and cervical muscles as well as the presence of headache and joint noises. The sample consisted of 200 elderly of both genders (mean age: 69.2±5.7 years). The clinical evaluation of TMD signs and symptoms was divided into three stages: an anamnestic questionnaire, a TMJ evaluation, and a muscular examination. The results were analyzed through descriptive statistics as well as using χ2 and the tendency tests. The presence of TMD was observed in 61% of the sample (mild: 43.5%, moderate: 13%, severe: 4.5%). A significantly greater prevalence of TMD was found for females (72.4%) compared with that for men (41.1%) (pheadaches and the presence of TMD (p=0.0001). The association between the presence of joint noises and sensitivity to TMJ palpation was not significant. The elderly presented high TMD prevalence, mostly in females, with mild severity and related to TMJ and masticatory/cervical muscles palpation. Thus, the accomplishment of a detailed clinical examination to investigate the presence of such disorders is essential and it must not be neglected during the treatment of elderly patients.

  3. The relationship of temporomandibular disorders with headaches: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkan, Nilüfer Cakir; Ozkan, Fatih

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to retrospectively analyze the incidence of the concurrent existence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and headaches. Forty patients (36 female, 4 male, mean age: 29.9±9.6 years) clinically diagnosed with TMD were screened. Patient records were analyzed regarding: range of mouth opening, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) noises, pain on palpation of the TMJ and masticatory muscles and neck and upper back muscles, and magnetic resonance imaging of the TMJ. According to patient records, a total of 40 (66.6%) patients were diagnosed with TMD among 60 patients with headache. Thirty-two (53%) patients had TMJ internal derangement (ID), 8 (13%) patients had only myofascial pain dysfunction (MPD) and 25 (41.6%) patients had concurrent TMJ ID/MPD. There were statistically significant relationships between the number of tender masseter muscles and MPD patients (p=0.04) and between the number of tender medial pterygoid muscles and patients with reducing disc displacement (RDD) (p=0.03). The TMJ and associated orofacial structures should be considered as possible triggering or perpetuating factors for headaches, especially tension-type. There might be a significant connection between TMD and headache. However, most medical and dental practitioners are unaware of this relationship. Therefore, a careful evaluation of the TMJ and associated orofacial structures is required for a correct interpretation of the craniofacial pain in headache patients, and these patients should be managed with a multidisciplinary approach.

  4. Headache attributed to temporomandibular disorders and masticatory myofascial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Kazuhiko; Shinozaki, Takahiro; Okada-Ogawa, Akiko; Matsukawa, Yumiko; Dezawa, Ko; Nakaya, Yuka; Chen, Jui-Yen; Noma, Noboru; Oka, Shunichi; Iwata, Koichi; Imamura, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the temporal association between temporomandibular disorders (TMD)-related symptoms and headache during TMD treatment for patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for headache attributed to TMD (HATMD) specified in the Diagnostic criteria for TMD (DC/TMD) and International classification of headache disorders (ICHD)-3 beta. The study enrolled 34 patients with HATMD induced by masticatory myofascial pain but not by temporomandibular arthralgia. Facial pain intensity, the pressure pain threshold of pericranial muscles, and maximum unassisted opening of the jaw were assessed at an initial examination and before and after physical therapy. The intensity and frequency of headache episodes and tooth contact ratio were also recorded before and after the intervention. Headache intensity and frequency significantly decreased, and these reductions were temporally related to improvements in facial pain intensity, maximum unassisted opening, and pressure pain threshold during TMD treatment. Linear regression analysis showed significant correlations between facial pain intensity and headache intensity and between tooth contact ratio and pressure pain threshold. Among patients who fulfilled the DC/TMD and ICHD-3 beta diagnostic criteria for HATMD, headache improved during TMD treatment, and the improvement was temporally related to amelioration of TMD symptoms. These findings suggest that sensitization in the central and peripheral nervous systems is responsible for HATMD. (J Oral Sci 58, 195-204, 2016).

  5. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in women and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Claudia Lúcia Pimenta; Silva, Marco Antônio Moreira Rodrigues da; Felício, Cláudia Maria de

    2016-01-01

    Women are more likely to present temporomandibular disorders (TMD); however, studies comparing genders in Brazilian samples are rare. To analyze the proportion of men and women, as well as the association between gender and age, problem duration, and TMD symptoms in patients admitted to an university clinic for treatment. Interview and assessment data of protocols from 1,000 patients diagnosed with TMD were collected and analyzed and then divided into two groups, male (n = 177) and female (n = 823). The exploratory analysis was based on contingency tables and χ2 test was carried out. Subsequently, the logistic regression model was used and the odds ratios (OR) concerning the evaluated comparisons were calculated. Females were more prevalent in the sample, and mean ages and TMD duration were similar between the groups, with higher occurrence in young adults (19 to 40 years old). The OR values showed an association between the female gender and the signs/symptoms of pain in the temporomandibular joint, pain in the facial muscles, neck and shoulders, headache, fatigue in the muscles of mastication, otologic symptoms, and dysphonia. Women had two times higher chances of presenting these symptoms than men. In the sample of Brazilian patients with TMD, the number of women who presented a higher prevalence of painful symptoms was greater, followed by otologic symptoms and complaints of dysphonia. The prevalence of joint noise was similar in both studied groups.

  6. Mandibular function, temporomandibular disorders, and headache in prematurely born children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsson, Liselotte; Ekberg, Ewacarin; Nilner, Maria; Bondemark, Lars

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate mandibular function, signs, and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and headache in prematurely born 8- to 10-year-old children, and to compare the findings with matched full-term born controls. Seventy-three preterm children were selected from the Medical Birth Register--one group comprising 36 extremely preterm children born before the 29th gestational week, the other group 37 very preterm children born during gestational weeks 29 to 32. The preterm children were compared with a control group of 41 full-term children matched for gender, age, nationality, and living area. The subjective symptoms of TMD and headache were registered using a questionnaire. Mandibular function, signs, and symptoms of TMD and headache were registered. TMD diagnoses were set per Research Diagnostic Criteria for temporomandibular disorders (RDC/TMD). No significant differences between groups or gender were found for TMD diagnoses according to RDC/TMD or for headache. The preterm children had smaller mandibular movement capacity than the full-term control group, but when adjusting for weight, height, and head circumference mostly all group differences disappeared. Prematurely born children of 8 to 10 years of age did not differ from full-term born children when considering diagnoses according to RDC/TMD, signs, and symptoms of TMD or headache.

  7. Diagnostic criteria for headache attributed to temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, Eric; Ohrbach, Richard; List, Thomas; Anderson, Gary; Jensen, Rigmor; John, Mike T; Nixdorf, Donald; Goulet, Jean-Paul; Kang, Wenjun; Truelove, Ed; Clavel, Al; Fricton, James; Look, John

    2012-07-01

    We assessed and compared the diagnostic accuracy of two sets of diagnostic criteria for headache secondary to temporomandibular disorders (TMD). In 373 headache subjects with TMD, a TMD headache reference standard was defined as: self-reported temple headache, consensus diagnosis of painful TMD and replication of the temple headache using TMD-based provocation tests. Revised diagnostic criteria for Headache attributed to TMD were selected using the RPART (recursive partitioning and regression trees) procedure, and refined in half of the data set. Using the remaining half of the data, the diagnostic accuracy of the revised criteria was compared to that of the International Headache Society's International Classification of Headache Diseases (ICHD)-II criteria A to C for Headache or facial pain attributed to temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder. Relative to the TMD headache reference standard, ICHD-II criteria showed sensitivity of 84% and specificity of 33%. The revised criteria for Headache attributed to TMD had sensitivity of 89% with improved specificity of 87% (p headache that is changed with jaw movement, function or parafunction and (2) provocation of that headache by temporalis muscle palpation or jaw movement. Having significantly better specificity than the ICHD-II criteria A to C, the revised criteria are recommended to diagnose headache secondary to TMD.

  8. Association between painful temporomandibular disorders, sleep bruxism and tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovana Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present cross-sectional study was designed to investigate the association between sleep bruxism (SB, tinnitus and temporomandibular disorders (TMD. The sample consisted of 261 women (mean age of 37.0 years. The Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders were used to classify TMD and self-reported tinnitus. SB was diagnosed by clinical criteria proposed by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. The results showed an association between painful TMD and tinnitus (OR = 7.3; 95%CI = 3.50-15.39; p < 0.001. With regard to SB, the association was of lower magnitude (OR = 1.9; 95%CI = 1.16-3.26; p < 0.0163. When the sample was stratified by the presence of SB and painful TMD, only SB showed no association with tinnitus. The presence of painful TMD without SB was significantly associated with tinnitus (OR = 6.7; 95%CI = 2.64-17.22; p < 0.0001. The concomitant presence of painful TMD and SB was associated with a higher degree of tinnitus severity (OR = 7.0; 95%CI = 3.00-15.89; p < 0.0001. It may be concluded that there is an association between SB, painful TMD and self-reported tinnitus; however, no relationship of a causal nature could be established.

  9. Congenital Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis: Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Chin Taw Cheong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital temporomandibular joint (TMJ ankylosis is an uncommon condition that presents itself at or soon after birth in the absence of acquired factors that could have contributed to the ankylosis such as infection and trauma. The experience of managing one such case is reported in light of a review of the literature on this condition. Key management principles include adequate removal of the ankylotic mass, costochondral grafting, and post-op physiotherapy. Most patients reported in the literature with the condition experienced relapse. This echoes our own experience where there was recurrence of the ankylosis. However, after removal of the ankylotic mass, the patient maintains a satisfactory maximal incisal opening (MIO till the present day. The additional challenges faced in the congenital form in addition to the already complex management of acquired paediatric temporomandibular joint ankylosis are (1 much earlier insult to the TMJ, (2 reduced opportunity for neuromuscular development of the muscles of mastication, and (3 reduced compliance with postoperative physiotherapy programmes due to the younger age of these patients.

  10. Occlusal Grinding Pattern during Sleep Bruxism and Temporomandibular Disorder

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    Yeni Wijaya

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sleep Bruxism is a significant etiology of temporomandibular disorder (TMD and causes many dental or oral problems such as tooth wear or facet. There is no study analyzing the relationship between sleep bruxism and TMD. Objective: To investigate any relationship between occlusal grinding pattern during sleep bruxism and temporomandibular disorder. Methods: A cross-sectional study involving 30 sleep bruxism patients attended the Faculty Dentistry Universitas Indonesia Teaching Hospital (RSGMP FKG UI. Completion of 2 forms of ID-TMD index and questionnaire from American Academy of Sleep Medicine were done. BruxChecker was fabricated and used for two nights to record the occlusal grinding pattern. The occlusal grinding pattern was categorized into laterotrusive grinding (LG and mediotrusive side. Further divisons of LG were: incisor-canine (IC, incisor-caninepremolar (ICP and incisor-canine-premolar-molar (ICPM. Mediotrusive side was classified as mediotrusive contact (MC and mediotrusive grinding (MG. Results: It was found that occlusal grinding pattern in non-TMD subjects were IC+MC, in subjects with mild TMD were ICP+MG and in subjects with moderate TMD were ICP+MG and ICPM+MG. TMJ was more significantly affected by ICP and ICPM grinding pattern than that of IC. Conclusion: There was a significant relationship between occlusal grinding pattern during sleep bruxism and TMD.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v20i2.149

  11. [Bruxism, temporo-mandibular dysfunction and botulinum toxin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikhani, L; Dichamp, J

    2003-07-01

    Tooth grinding and tooth clenching are unvoluntary mainly nocturnal habits that result in an hypertrophy of masseter and temporalis muscles with an unbalance between opening and closing muscles of the jaw and lead to an alteration of mandibular condyles movements and to hyper pressure in the temporo-mandibular joints (TMJ) which can generate severe pain. Intra muscular injections of botulinum toxin permit to restablish the balance between closing and opening muscles, to relieve pain, to treat masseteric hypertrophy with improvement of face outline and to recover a normal cinetic of temporo-mandibular joints. Moreover, botulinum toxin injections permit to quit habits of tooth grinding and clenching and one single session of injections is curative for 2/3 of the patients. There are no side effects apart from slight diffusion to superficial muscles of the face resulting in a "fixed" smile for about 6 to 8 weeks. So injections of botulinum toxin in masseter and temporalis muscles are an efficient treatment of bruxism and TMJ dysfunction, cheap with no lasting side effect.

  12. Temporomandibular joint formation requires two distinct hedgehog-dependent steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Patricia; Joo, Brian W; Hu, Jimmy K; Tran, Pamela V; Calicchio, Monica L; O'Connell, Daniel J; Maas, Richard L; Tabin, Clifford J

    2009-10-27

    We conducted a genetic analysis of the developing temporo-mandibular or temporomandi-bular joint (TMJ), a highly specialized synovial joint that permits movement and function of the mammalian jaw. First, we used laser capture microdissection to perform a genome-wide expression analysis of each of its developing components. The expression patterns of genes identified in this screen were examined in the TMJ and compared with those of other synovial joints, including the shoulder and the hip joints. Striking differences were noted, indicating that the TMJ forms via a distinct molecular program. Several components of the hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway are among the genes identified in the screen, including Gli2, which is expressed specifically in the condyle and in the disk of the developing TMJ. We found that mice deficient in Gli2 display aberrant TMJ development such that the condyle loses its growth-plate-like cellular organization and no disk is formed. In addition, we used a conditional strategy to remove Smo, a positive effector of the Hh signaling pathway, from chondrocyte progenitors. This cell autonomous loss of Hh signaling allows for disk formation, but the resulting structure fails to separate from the condyle. Thus, these experiments establish that Hh signaling acts at two distinct steps in disk morphogenesis, condyle initiation, and disk-condyle separation and provide a molecular framework for future studies of the TMJ.

  13. Motion Artifact in the MR imaging of temporomandibular disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamamura, Kiyoharu; Miyajima, Hisashi; Nihei, Yoshinobu; Nemoto, Ryuichi; Ohno, Tomoya

    1997-01-01

    Recently, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is indispensable for the diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Motion Artifacts of MRI occur more frequently than in other conventional methods, because it takes a long time to obtain the images. This paper reported on Motion Artifacts on MRI. MRI studies of 232 temporomandibular joints were performed in 116 patients with TMD by using a 0.5-T magnetic resonance (MR) scanner, with spin echo sequence: protondensity-weighted. And we took MRI slices at opening phase and closing phase. So 232 slices were gathered and we evaluated clinically the incidence of Motion Artifacts, that is to say, double and multiple images and other factors. The 103 slices in 56 patients showed Motion Artifacts. There is no significant difference between sexes. By age group, those in their teens were most frequent, followed by those in their fifties, forties, thirties and twenties. Also the same results were obtained for double image and multiple image. Incidence of Motion Artifact was most frequent at the opening phase. There is no significant difference between double and multiple image. (author)

  14. Can pterygoid plate asymmetry be linked to temporomandibular joint disorders ?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero, Maria Eugenia; Jacobs, Reinhilde [OIC, OMFS IMPATH Research Group, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Leuven and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Beltran, Jorge [Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Post-Graduate School, Universidad Privada Cayetano Heredia, Lima (Peru); Laat, Antoon [Stomatology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dept. of Oral Health Sciences, KU Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-06-15

    This study was performed to evaluate the relationship between pterygoid plate asymmetry and temporomandibular joint disorders. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images of 60 patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) involving pain were analyzed and compared with images of 60 age- and gender-matched controls. Three observers performed linear measurements of the lateral pterygoid plates. Statistically significant differences were found between measurements of the lateral pterygoid plates on the site that had pain and the contralateral site (p<0.05). The average length of the lateral pterygoid plates (LPPs) in patients with TMD was 17.01±3.64 mm on the right side and 16.21±3.51 mm on the left side, and in patients without TMD, it was 11.86±1.97 mm on the right side and 11.98±1.85 mm on the left side. Statistically significant differences in the LPP length, measured on CBCT, were found between patients with and without TMD (p<0.05). The inter-examiner reliability obtained in this study was very high for all the examiners (0.99, 95% confidence interval: 0.98-0.99). Within the limits of the present study, CBCT lateral pterygoid plate measurements at the side with TMD were found to be significantly different from those on the side without TMD. More research is needed to explore potential etiological correlations and implications for treatment.

  15. Temporomandibular joint dislocation due to acute propranolol intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Aghabiklooei

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abbas Aghabiklooei1, Homan Elahi2, Babak Mostafazadeh31Department of Medical Toxicology and Forensic Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 2Firouzgar Hospital, Department of ENT, Tehran, Iran; 3Department of Medical Toxicology and Forensic Medicine, Shaheed Beheshty University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IranAbstract: Temporomandibular joint (TMJ dislocation has not previously been reported as a complication of beta-blocker toxicity. We are reporting two cases of TMJ dislocation resulted from acute severe intoxication with pure propranolol (PPL for the first time. Bilateral TMJ dislocation happened in two patients who were admitted to intensive care unit with diagnosis of severe acute PPL toxicity. Clinical diagnosis of TMJ dislocation was obtained by physical examination. Successful reduction was performed for both patients without subsequent recurrence in two weeks following hospital discharge. Both of our subjects had no previous history of lower jaw dislocation. There was not any risk factor for dislocation such as convulsion during admission period, recent face trauma, or oral manipulation by the medical team. This study showed that TMJ dislocation may occur after severe acute PPL toxicity probably due to spastic contraction of the lateral pterygoid muscle. This is against previously mentioned hypothesis that stated masseteric muscles contraction as the main cause of a bilateral dislocated TMJ.Keywords: propranolol, toxicity, temporomandibular joint dislocation

  16. Arthrocentesis as initial treatment for temporomandibular joint arthropathy : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, L. M.; Huddleston Slater, J. J. R.; Stegenga, B.

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness of arthrocentesis compared to conservative treatment as initial treatment with regard to temporomandibular joint pain and mandibular movement. Patients and methods: In this randomized controlled trial, 80 patients with arthralgia of the TMJ (classified

  17. Occlusion and Temporomandibular Function among Subjects with Mandibular Distal Extension Removable Partial Dentures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creugers, N.H.J.; Witter, D.J.; Spijker, A. van 't; Gerritsen, A.E.; Kreulen, C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To quantify effects on occlusion and temporomandibular function of mandibular distal extension removable partial dentures in shortened dental arches. Methods. Subjects wearing mandibular extension removable partial dentures (n = 25) were compared with subjects with shortened dental arches

  18. Evaluation relationship between temporomandibular joint disorder and headache: A review literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Aghahosseini

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: Bruxism and temporomandibular disorders are the two main contributing factors in initiation and perpetuation of headache. Treatment of these two phenomena would be effective in the treatment of headache.

  19. Synovial membrane involvement in osteoarthritic temporomandibular joints - A light microscopic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkgraaf, LC; Liem, RSB; deBont, LGM

    Objective. To study the light microscopic characteristics of the synovial membrane of osteoarthritic temporomandibular joints to evaluate synovial membrane involvement in the osteoarthritic process. Study design. Synovial membrane biopsies were obtained during unilateral arthroscopy in 40 patients.

  20. CLASSIFICATION OF TEMPOROMANDIBULAR-JOINT OSTEOARTHROSIS AND INTERNAL DERANGEMENT .2. SPECIFIC DIAGNOSTIC-CRITERIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STEGENGA, B; DEBONT, LGM; BOERING, G

    Separate entities of temporomandibular joint osteoarthrosis and internal derangement are operationally defined. Criteria are based on an analysis of the diagnostic significance of symptoms and signs, principles of synovial joint pathology in general, and on therapeutic considerations. The primary

  1. Efficacy of Temporomandibular Joint Arthrocentesis with Sodium Hyaluronate in the Management of Temporomandibular Joint Disorders: A Prospective Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorrela, Harsha; Prameela, J; Srinivas, G; Reddy, B Vijay Baskar; Sudhir, Mvs; Arakeri, Gururaj

    2017-12-01

    This study was designed to investigate the efficacy of the temporomandibular joint arthrocentesis with and without injection of sodium hyaluronate (SH) in the treatment of temporomandibular joint disorders. A total of sixty two TMJs in 34 males and 28 females aged 20-65 years comprised the study material. The patients' complaints were limited mouth opening, TMJ pain, and joint noises during function. Patients were randomly divided into 2 groups in which arthrocentesis plus intra-articular injection of sodium hyaluronate was performed in 1 group and only arthrocentesis was performed in the other group. Both groups contained patients with disc displacement with reduction and without reduction. Clinical evaluation of the patients was done before the procedure, immediately after the procedure, at 1 week and 1, 3 and 6 months postoperatively. Intensity of TMJ pain was assessed using visual analog scales. Maximal mouth opening and lateral jaw movements also were recorded at each follow-up visit. Both techniques increased maximal mouth opening, lateral movements, and function, while reducing TMJ pain and noise. Although patients benefitted from both techniques, arthrocentesis with injection of SH seemed to be superior to arthrocentesis alone.

  2. Efficacy of splint therapy for the management of temporomandibular disorders: a meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Chao; Wu, Jun-Yi; Deng, Dong-Lai; He, Bing-Yang; Tao, Yuan; Niu, Yu-Ming; Deng, Mo-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are a group of clinical problems affecting temporomandibular joint (TMJ), myofascial muscles and other related structures. Splint therapy is the most commonly used approach to treatment of TMD, but its effectiveness is remains unclear. We therefore conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the effectiveness of splint therapy for TMD in adults. The electronic databases PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and ClinicalTrials.gov were searched for reports published up ...

  3. Temporomandibular disorders – validity of clinical diagnostics compared to magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    BADEL, TOMISLAV; MAROTTI, MILJENKO; SAVIĆ PAVIČIN, IVANA; DULČIĆ, NIKŠA; ZADRAVEC, DIJANA; KERN, JOSIPA

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Orthopedic examination techniques of the musculoskeletal system contribute to the successful diagnostics of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The purpose of this study is to determine the validity of TMD clinical diagnostics by comparing the findings of manual functional analysis (MFA) and the results of MRI of temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The diagnostic significance of limited mouth opening and pain upon passive mouth opening were taken into consideration. M...

  4. Evaluation relationship between temporomandibular joint disorder and headache: A review literature

    OpenAIRE

    Farzaneh Aghahosseini; Nafiseh Sheykhbahaei

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: Headache is among the most common complaints in patients suffering from temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD). Thus, it seems that evaluation of patients with headache in terms of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders is necessary. In people with TMD, parafunctional activities play an important etiologic role. Considering the high prevalence of bruxism and TMDs in patients with headache, assessment the accuracy and severity of this association can play a key role in d...

  5. Temporomandibular Disorders and Parafunctional Habits in Children and Adolescence: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    B. Seraj; R. Ahmadi; M. Mirkarimi; S. Ghadimi; M. Beheshti

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to review the existing literature about temporomandibular disorders(TMD) and parafunctional habits (bruxism) and their relationship in children and adolescents,which is still controversial. TMD is a collective term used to identify a group ofmusculoskeletal conditions of the temporomandibular region. Bruxism defined as the habitual nonfunctional forceful contact between occlusal tooth surfaces. Some studies have linked oral parafunctional habits to TMD, whereas others...

  6. Detection of degenerative disease of the temporomandibular joint by bone scintigraphy: concise communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, H.A.; Bloom, C.Y.

    1980-01-01

    Nine patients with facial pain were evaluated with limited bone scans. The scintigrams correlated with microscopy in all patients, although radiographs correlated with microscopy in only five patients. The degenerative disease process in the temporomandibular joint was more extensive in the patients with radiographic and scintigraphic abnormalities than in those with scintigraphic abnormalities alone. The limited bone scan appears useful in detecting early degenerative changes in the temporomandibular joint

  7. Electronic System for Data Record and Automatic Diagnosis Assessment in the Temporomandibular Joint Disorders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hippmann, R.; Nagy, Miroslav; Dostálová, T.; Zvárová, Jana; Seydlová, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 1 (2011), s. 11-16 ISSN 1801-5603 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : temporomandibular joint * temporomandibular joint disorders * DentCross * electronic health record * AAOP classification Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science http://www.ejbi.eu/images/2011-1/Hippmann_en.pdf

  8. Temporomandibular joint involvement in rheumatoid arthritis patients: association between clinical and tomographic data

    OpenAIRE

    Cordeiro, Patrícia C. F; Guimaraes, Josemar P; de Souza, Viviane A; Dias, Isabela M; Silva, Jesca N. N; Devito, Karina L; Bonato, Leticia L

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation and synovial hyperplasia, which usually affects multiple joints. The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) becomes susceptible to the development of changes resulting from RA. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of TMD and degenerative bone changes in TMJ in patients diagnosed with RA (rheumatoid arthritis). The Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/ TMD) questio...

  9. PACE. A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Part III: Being an Entrepreneur. Unit C: Keeping the Business Records. Research and Development Series No. 194 C-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This three-part curriculum for entrepreneurship education is primarily for postsecondary level, including four-year colleges and adult education, but can be adapted for special groups or vocational teacher education. The emphasis of the eight instructional units in Part II is operating a business. Unit C focuses on record keeping. It introduces…

  10. Peatlands as Filters for Polluted Mine Water?—A Case Study from an Uranium-Contaminated Karst System in South Africa—Part III: Quantifying the Hydraulic Filter Component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Winde

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available As Part III of a four-part series on the filter function of peat for uranium (U, this paper focuses on the hydraulic component of a conceptual filter model introduced in Part II. This includes the quantification of water flow through the wetland as a whole, which was largely unknown and found to be significantly higher that anticipated. Apart from subaquatic artesian springs associated with the underlying karst aquifer the higher flow volumes were also caused by plumes of polluted groundwater moving laterally into the wetland. Real-time, quasi-continuous in situ measurements of porewater in peat and non-peat sediments indicate that rising stream levels (e.g., during flood conditions lead to the infiltration of stream water into adjacent peat deposits and thus allow for a certain proportion of flood water to be filtered. However, changes in porewater quality triggered by spring rains may promote the remobilization of possibly sorbed U.

  11. The Effect of early physiotherapy on the recovery of mandibular function after orthognathic surgery for Class III correction: part I--jaw-motion analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Terry Te-Yi; Ko, Ellen Wen-Ching; Huang, Chiung Shing; Chen, Yu-Ray

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to compare the mandibular range of motion in Class III patients with and without early physiotherapy after orthognathic surgery (OGS). This study consisted of 63 Class III patients who underwent 2-jaw OGS. The experimental group comprised 31 patients who received early systematic physical rehabilitation. The control group consisted of 32 patients who did not have physical rehabilitation. Twelve variables of 3-dimensional (3D) jaw-motion analysis (JMA) were recorded before surgery (T1) and 6 weeks (T2) and 6 months (T3) after surgery. A 2-sample t test was conducted to compare the JMA results between the two groups at different time points. At T2, the JMA data were measured to be 77.5%-145.7% of presurgical values in the experimental group, and 60.3%-90.6% in the control group. At T3, the measurements were 112.2%-179.2% of presurgical values in the experimental group, and 77.6%-157.2% in the control group. The patients in the experimental group exhibited more favorable recovery than did those in the control group, from T1 to T2 and T1 to T3. However, after termination of physiotherapy, no significant difference in the extent of recovery was observed between groups up to 6 months after OGS. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Superfund TIO videos. Set A. Regulatory overview - CERCLA's relationship to other programs: RCRA, Title III, UST, CWA, SDWA. Part 1. Audio-Visual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The videotape is divided into five sections. Section 1 provides definitions and historical information on both the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The four types of RCRA regulatory programs - Subtitles C, D, I, and J - are described. Treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) and recycling facilities are also discussed. Section 2 discusses the history behind the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (Title III). The four major provisions of Title III, which are emergency planning, emergency release notification, community right-to-know reporting, and the toxic chemical release inventory are covered. Section 3 outlines the UST program covering notification, record keeping, and the UST Trust Fund. Section 4 outlines the six major provisions of the Clean Water Act (CWA): water quality, pretreatment, prevention of oil and hazardous substance discharges, responses to oil and hazardous substance discharges, discharges of hazardous substances into the ocean, and dredge and fill. Section 5 explains the purpose, regulations, and standards of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). Specific issues such as underground injection, sole source aquifers, and lead contamination are discussed

  13. Evaluation of C-Reactive Protein Level in Patients with Pain Form of Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Pihut

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint dysfunction is a functional disorder concerned with the abnormal functioning of the muscles of the stomatognathic system and temporomandibular joints involved in the dynamic movements of the jaw and surrounding structures. The aim of the study was to compare the level of C-reactive protein in patients with pain and painless forms of temporomandibular joint dysfunction. Materials and methods. The study group consisted of 72 patients who reported to the prosthetic treatment because of temporomandibular joint dysfunction. The study group included 36 patients with pain form of dysfunction, and the control group included 36 patients with painless form of disorder. Each patient underwent specialized examination of functional disorders in order to diagnose the type of dysfunction and was commissioned to carry out a study of the blood test concerned with evaluation of the C-reactive protein (CRP level in the same analytical laboratory. The results of the investigation were subjected to statistical analysis. The research obtained approval from the Ethics Committee of the Jagiellonian University (KBET/125/L/2013. Level of Evidence for primary research was established as type V. Results. The mean values of C-reactive protein levels in both groups were in the normal range and did not differ statistically significantly, which indicates the fact that the pain form of the temporomandibular joint disorders is not associated with inflammation of the soft tissues of the joint. Conclusion. Painful form of the temporomandibular joint dysfunctions is not connected with the inflammation of joints.

  14. Preliminary optical coherence tomography investigation of the temporo-mandibular joint disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mărcăuteanu, Corina; Demjan, Enikö; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda; Motoc, Adrian; Lighezan, Rodica; Vasile, Liliana; Hughes, Mike; Bradu, Adrian; Dobre, George; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2010-02-01

    Aim and objectives. The morphology and position of the temporo-mandibular disc are key issues in the diagnosis and treatment of arthrogenous temporo-mandibular disorders. Magnetic resonance imaging and arthroscopy are used today to identify: flattening of the pars posterior of the disc, perforation and/or adhesions in the pars intermedia of the disc and disc displacements. The present study proposes the investigation of the temporo-mandibular joint disc by optical coherence tomography (OCT). Material and methods. 8 human temporo-mandibular joint discs were harvested from dead subjects, under 40 year of age, and conserved in formalin. They had a normal morphology, with a thicker pars posterior (2,6 mm on the average) and a thinner pars intermedia (1mm on the average). We investigated the disc samples using two different OCT systems: an en-face OCT (time domain (TD)-OCT) system, working at 1300 nm (C-scan and B-scan mode) and a spectral OCT system (a Fourier domain (FD)-OCT) system , working at 840 nm (B-scan mode). Results. The OCT investigation of the temporo-mandibular joint discs revealed a homogeneous microstructure. The longer wavelength of the TD-OCT offers a higher penetration depth (2,5 mm in air), which is important for the analysis of the pars posterior, while the FD-OCT is much faster. Conclusions: OCT is a promising imaging method for the microstructural characterization of the temporo-mandibular disc.

  15. Assessment of the relationship between stress and temporomandibular joint disorder in female students before university entrance exam (Konkour exam).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottaghi, Ahmad; Razavi, S Mohammad; Pozveh, Elham Zamani; Jahangirmoghaddam, Milad

    2011-12-01

    Temporomandibular joint is one of the most complicated joints of the body and plays an important role in the head and neck system. One of the factors affecting the temporomandibular joint and lead to temporomandibular disorder is anxiety with all the events causing it. The aim of this study was to determine a relationship between anxiety and temporomandibular disorders. In this prospective study, subjects were randomly selected. One hundred and thirty pre-university students in Isfahan were evaluated with Ketel's test of anxiety, exam stress test and temporomandibular disorder questionnaires. The evaluation was done in two stages 10 months and 1 month prior to the university entrance exam (Konkour), clinical assessments consisted of masticatory muscles and sternocleidomastoid muscle palpation, temporomandibular joint palpation for pain and noise and its movement, and mouth opening limitations. The Wilcoxon rank test and paired t-test were used to analyze the data and the P value under 0.05 was considered significant. The level of anxiety and occurrence of temporomandibular disorders were increased between two stages and had the highest level in the second stage. There was a significant increase between two stages (Ptemporomandibular disorders and anxiety between the two stages can suggest a possible relationship between anxiety and temporomandibular disorders. Therefore, the effect of anxiety in triggering temporomandibular disorder symptoms is probable.

  16. Presentation of safety after closure of the repository for spent nuclear fuel. Main report of the project SR-Site. Part III; Redovisning av saekerhet efter foerslutning av slutfoervaret foer anvaent kaernbraensle. Huvudrapport fraan projekt SR-Site. Del III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of the safety assessment SR-Site is to investigate whether a safe repository for spent nuclear fuel by KBS-3 type can be constructed at Forsmark in Oesthammar in Sweden. The location of the Forsmark has been selected based on results of several surveys from surface conditions at depth in Forsmark and in Laxemar in Oskarshamn. The choice of location is not justified in SR-Site Report, but in other attachments to SKB's permit applications. SR-Site Report is an important part of SKB's permit applications to construct and operate a repository for spent nuclear fuel at Forsmark in Oesthammar. The purpose of the report in the applications is to show that a repository at Forsmark is safe after closure

  17. Safety analysis of RA reactor operation, I-II, Part I - RA reactor technical and operation characteristics; Analiza sigurnosti rada reaktora RA - I-III, I deo - Tehnicke i pogonske karakteristike reaktora RA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raisic, N [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1963-02-15

    RA research reactor is a thermal, heavy water moderated system with graphite reflector having nominal power 6.5 MW. The 2% enriched metal uranium fuel in the reactor core produces mean thermal neutron flux of 2.9 10{sup 13} neutrons/cm{sup 2} s, and maximum neutron flux 5.5 10{sup 13} neutrons/cm{sup 2} s. main components of the reactor described in this report are: rector core, reflector, biological shield, heavy water cooling system, ordinary water cooling system, helium system, reactor control system, reactor safety system, dosimetry system, power supply system, and fuel transport system. Detailed reactor properties and engineering drawings of all the system are part of this volume.

  18. Richard III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Palle Schantz

    2017-01-01

    Kort analyse af Shakespeares Richard III med fokus på, hvordan denne skurk fremstilles, så tilskuere (og læsere) langt henad vejen kan føle sympati med ham. Med paralleller til Netflix-serien "House of Cards"......Kort analyse af Shakespeares Richard III med fokus på, hvordan denne skurk fremstilles, så tilskuere (og læsere) langt henad vejen kan føle sympati med ham. Med paralleller til Netflix-serien "House of Cards"...

  19. Rise, fall and resurrection of chromosome territories: a historical perspective Part II. Fall and resurrection of chromosome territories during the 1950s to 1980s. Part III. Chromosome territories and the functional nuclear architecture: experiments and m

    OpenAIRE

    T Cremer; C Cremer

    2009-01-01

    Part II of this historical review on the progress of nuclear architecture studies points out why the original hypothesis of chromosome territories from Carl Rabl and Theodor Boveri (described in part I) was abandoned during the 1950s and finally proven by compelling evidence forwarded by laser-uvmicrobeam studies and in situ hybridization experiments. Part II also includes a section on the development of advanced light microscopic techniques breaking the classical Abbe limit written for reade...

  20. Combustion chemistry and flame structure of furan group biofuels using molecular-beam mass spectrometry and gas chromatography - Part III: 2,5-Dimethylfuran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togbé, Casimir; Tran, Luc-Sy; Liu, Dong; Felsmann, Daniel; Oßwald, Patrick; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Sirjean, Baptiste; Fournet, René; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Kohse-Höinghaus, Katharina

    2014-03-01

    This work is the third part of a study focusing on the combustion chemistry and flame structure of furan and selected alkylated derivatives, i.e. furan in Part I, 2-methylfuran (MF) in Part II, and 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF) in the present work. Two premixed low-pressure (20 and 40 mbar) flat argon-diluted (50%) flames of DMF were studied with electron-ionization molecular-beam mass spectrometry (EI-MBMS) and gas chromatography (GC) under two equivalence ratios (φ=1.0 and 1.7). Mole fractions of reactants, products, and stable and radical intermediates were measured as a function of the distance to the burner. Kinetic modeling was performed using a reaction mechanism that was further developed in the present series, including Part I and Part II. A reasonable agreement between the present experimental results and the simulation is observed. The main reaction pathways of DMF consumption were derived from a reaction flow analysis. Also, a comparison of the key features for the three flames is presented, as well as a comparison between these flames of furanic compounds and those of other fuels. An a priori surprising ability of DMF to form soot precursors (e.g. 1,3-cyclopentadiene or benzene) compared to less substituted furans and to other fuels has been experimentally observed and is well explained in the model.

  1. Combustion chemistry and flame structure of furan group biofuels using molecular-beam mass spectrometry and gas chromatography – Part III: 2,5-Dimethylfuran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togbé, Casimir; Tran, Luc-Sy; Liu, Dong; Felsmann, Daniel; Oßwald, Patrick; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Sirjean, Baptiste; Fournet, René; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Kohse-Höinghaus, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    This work is the third part of a study focusing on the combustion chemistry and flame structure of furan and selected alkylated derivatives, i.e. furan in Part I, 2-methylfuran (MF) in Part II, and 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF) in the present work. Two premixed low-pressure (20 and 40 mbar) flat argon-diluted (50%) flames of DMF were studied with electron-ionization molecular-beam mass spectrometry (EI-MBMS) and gas chromatography (GC) under two equivalence ratios (φ=1.0 and 1.7). Mole fractions of reactants, products, and stable and radical intermediates were measured as a function of the distance to the burner. Kinetic modeling was performed using a reaction mechanism that was further developed in the present series, including Part I and Part II. A reasonable agreement between the present experimental results and the simulation is observed. The main reaction pathways of DMF consumption were derived from a reaction flow analysis. Also, a comparison of the key features for the three flames is presented, as well as a comparison between these flames of furanic compounds and those of other fuels. An a priori surprising ability of DMF to form soot precursors (e.g. 1,3-cyclopentadiene or benzene) compared to less substituted furans and to other fuels has been experimentally observed and is well explained in the model. PMID:24518851

  2. Temporomandibular Joint: MRT Diagnostics; Temporomandibulargelenk: MRT-Diagnostik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kress, B. [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg (Germany). Abteilung Neuroradiologie; Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg (Germany). Neurologische Klinik; Schmitter, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg (Germany). Poliklinik fuer zahnaerztliche Prothetik; Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg (Germany). Abteilung Neuroradiologie

    2005-09-01

    MRI of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) requires 1.5 T. The radiologist must be familiar with the anatomy and pathology of the TMJ. This review gives a description of MRI protocols for the TMJ, and MRI anatomy and pathology of the TMJ (open and closed mouth) by means of MR images and drawings. Diagnosing of the TMJ related diseases depends on standardized clinical and MR examinations. Therefore close interdisciplinary cooperation between dentist and radiologist is necessary. (orig.) [German] Magnetresonanztomographie bei Kiefergelenkbeschwerden erfordert neben guter technischer Ausstattung Kenntnisse der Anatomie und Pathologie des Kiefergelenks. Diese Uebersicht stellt neben MRT-Protokollen die Anatomie und die pathologischen Befunde des Kiefergelenks bei geoeffnetem und geschlossenem Mund anhand von Abbildungen und Graphiken systematisch dar. Bildgebende Diagnostik des Kiefergelenks gruendet sich auf eine standardisierte klinische und magnetresonanztomographische Untersuchung und erfordert eine enge interdisziplinaere Kooperation zwischen Zahnmedizin und Radiologie. (orig.)

  3. Use of Magnetic Neurostimulator Appliance in Temporomandibular Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Rossiti Florian

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular disorder (TMD is ranked the second leading cause of orofacial pain after toothache, and there is no effective standard treatment for all cases. Therefore, much research has been conducted in the therapeutic areas of TMD, such as acupuncture and electrotherapy, for this purpose. The aim of this research was to evaluate application of the neuromagnetic stimulator device Haihua model CD-9, used within the precepts of acupuncture in treating TMD-related pain symptoms and limited mouth opening. Analysis and discussion of this study were based on pain intensity index and range of mouth-opening evaluation before and after each session. Nine patients diagnosed with muscle TMD, referred by the surgery sector of Center Dental Specialties (CEO – I in Piracicaba-São Paulo participated in this research. Considering the simplicity of the technique and good results obtained, use of this device is suggested as an additional therapeutic tool for relief of TMD symptoms.

  4. CT of the temporomandibular joint: The conservative approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jend, H.H.; Jend-Rossmann, I.; Heller, M.

    1986-01-01

    Until recently, CT investigation of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders has been regarded as a sophisticated procedure. A method of investigation was developed that allows easy evaluation of axial scans. The method was evaluated in a series of 65 joints with arthrographically diagnosed internal derangements. In anterior disk displacement CT findings led to an identical diagnosis in 56 of 65 joints (sensitivity, 86%). In clinically asymptomatic joints investigated for other reasons, only one of 12 showed signs of internal derangement on CT (specificity, 92%). This conservative approach to CT evaluation of internal derangement seems to be as accurate as more sophisticated methods. It is easy to perform, requires no additional manpower or computer time, and has a very good reproducibility

  5. [Clinical evaluation and psychological aspects of temporomandibular joint disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coessens, P; De Boever, J A

    1997-01-01

    Establishing the patient's clinical diagnosis depends on gathering as much information of the patient and his or her signs and symptoms as possible. This information can be gathered from history, physical and psychological examination, diagnostic analysis. It is also important to look upon pain as a disorder and to consider the relationship between pain and psychological factors. The differential diagnosis is constructed through a biopsychological model of illness rather than through a more traditional biomedical model of disease. To arrive at a consistently accurate clinical diagnosis in patients with TMJ and craniofacial pain, the technique of clinical diagnosis must be well defined, reliable and include examination of the head and the neck, cranial nerves and the stomatognathic system. The craniomandibular index provides a standardized examination of the stomatognathic system that has been tested on validity and reliability. This chapter focuses on the techniques of history taking clinical and psychological examination and diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular joint disorders and muscle pain.

  6. Orofacial myofunctional disorder in subjects with temporomandibular disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Cláudia Lúcia Pimenta; Da Silva, Marco Antônio M Rodrigues; de Felício, Cláudia Maria

    2009-10-01

    To determine the frequency and degree of orofacial myofunctional disorder (OMD) in a sample of patients with temporomandibular disorder (TMD), the dental records of 240 patients with a diagnosis of TMD were reviewed. Mean patient age and mean TMD duration, gender frequency, complaints, and signs and symptoms were calculated. The results showed that the sample studied was quite characteristic of a TMD group. The presence of the following signs/symptoms was significant: muscular pain, TMJ pain, joint noise, at least one otologic symptom, headache, and neck and shoulder pain. Most subjects presented some degree of OMD, with grade high prevailing over grade low. The importance of evaluating the stomatognathic structures and functions during the clinical examination of patients with TMD is emphasized.

  7. Management of temporo-mandibular joint ankylosis in growing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashikiran, N D; Reddy, S V V; Patil, R; Yavagal, C

    2005-03-01

    Although temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is one of the most common pathologies afflicting the facial skeleton, it is also the most overlooked and under-managed problem in children. The TMJ forms the very cornerstone of cranio-facial integrity and hence its ankylosis in growing children adversely affects the growth and development of the jaws and occlusion. Impairment of speech, difficulty in mastication, poor oral hygiene, rampant caries and acute compromise of the airway pose a severe psychologic burden on the tender minds of children. The aim of this article is to present an overview of efficient management strategies, based on a case report, so as to increase its awareness among all dental surgeons involved in the treatment of children.

  8. [Bilateral chronic dislocation of the temporomandibular joints and Meige syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzul, L; Henoux, M; Marion, F; Corre, P

    2015-04-01

    Chronic dislocation of the temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) is rare. It occurs when an acute dislocation is left untreated, in certain situations, including severe illness, neurologic or psychiatric diseases or prolonged oral intubation. A 79 years old woman, with Meige syndrome, suffered from bilateral dislocation of the TMJ for over 1 year. Surgical repositioning of the mandibular condyles and temporal bone eminectomy were performed. At the 18 postoperative months control, no recurrence has been noted. Treatment of chronic TMJ dislocations often requires a surgical procedure. Manual reduction, even under general anaesthesia, often fails because of severe muscular spasm and periarticular fibrotic changes. The management of this disorder is still controversial. We review available surgical procedures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. High-resolution computed tomography of the osseous temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larheim, T.A.; Kolbenstvedt, A.; Rikshospitalet, Oslo

    1984-01-01

    A standardized CT procedure for examination of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) with axial and coronal scanning as well as reformatted coronal and sagittal sections, was performed on 32 adults. These included subjects with normal TMJ and patients suffering from muscular dysfunction/disc displacement, arthrosis or rheumatoid arthritis. Some normal CT appearances simulating disease were presented. Axial CT scanning appeared to be the most useful method for demonstrating osseous abnormalities of the TMJ. The diagnostic information was occasionally supplemented by the coronal scanning, which may be difficult to perform on patients with neck stiffness. Reformatted coronal or sagittal sections mostly confirmed TMJ abnormality and supplemented the findings at axial scans in about one third of the patients. (orig.)

  10. Postoperative diagnosis of the temporomandibular joint; Postoperative Kiefergelenkdiagnostik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, S. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Vienna (Austria). Abt. fuer Osteologie; Undt, G. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Mund-, Kiefer- und Gesichtschirurgie, Vienna (Austria)

    2001-09-01

    Postoperative management of patients suffering from symptoms of the temporomandibular joint does not differ considerably from the one of preoperative examination protocols. Knowledge of previous surgery helps to plan patient work-up and to interpret normal postoperative findings (eminectomy, discectomy, susceptibility artefacts from metallic residues..) and typical complications (intraarticular loose bodies, dislocations, avascular necrosis, foreign body granulomatous reactions) appropriately. (orig.) [German] Wie auch in anderen Koerperregionen differiert das Diagnoseprotokoll von prae- und postoperativen Patienten mit Beschwerden des Kiefergelenks nicht wesentlich voneinander. Die Kenntnis des vorangegangenen Eingriffs hilft allerdings, die Untersuchung entsprechend zu planen und den Befund im Kontext richtig zu bewerten, um moegliche Komplikationen (intraartikulaere Fragmente, Dislokationen, avaskulaere Nekrose, Fremdkoerperreaktionen) und zu erwartende Befunde (Eminektomie, Diskektomie, Metallartefakte usw.) richtig zu interpretieren. (orig.)

  11. Management of temporo-mandibular joint ankylosis in growing children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashikiran N

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Although temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ ankylosis is one of the most common pathologies afflicting the facial skeleton, it is also the most overlooked and under-managed problem in children. The TMJ forms the very cornerstone of cranio-facial integrity and hence its ankylosis in growing children adversely affects the growth and development of the jaws and occlusion. Impairment of speech, difficulty in mastication, poor oral hygiene, rampant caries and acute compromise of the airway pose a severe psychologic burden on the tender minds of children. The aim of this article is to present an overview of efficient management strategies, based on a case report, so as to increase its awareness among all dental surgeons involved in the treatment of children.

  12. Appearance of the temporomandibular joint after meniscoplasty on MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conway, W.F.; Hayes, C.W.; Campbell, R.L.; Laskin, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-five postmeniscoplasty temporomandibular joints (TMJs) were studied in 20 patients. In all patients, preoperative MR images showed anteriorly dislocated disks. The patients underwent a similar postoperative MR examination 4-12 months after surgery. Surgical results were classified clinically as either poor, fair, good, or excellent at the time of the follow-up MR imaging. Forty percent of patients had good or excellent clinical results, and 60% had poor or fair results. The good/excellent group all had disks that appeared to be in normal or near normal position. Almost all disks were fixed in position. The degree of condylar translation was variable. The poor/fair group all had postoperative joints with anteriorly dislocated disks that were fixed in place. Recapture of the disk was variable, as was the degree of condylar translation

  13. Standing on shaky ground- US patent-eligibility of isolated DNA and genetic diagnostics after AMP v. USPTO - Part III (unsolved questions & subsequent case law)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minssen, Timo; Nilsson, David

    2012-01-01

    invigorated U.S. debate on patent eligibility, referring inter alia to the 2010 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Bilski v. Kappos and the pending certiorari in Prometheus v. Mayo (1). Before this background, Part I recited the complex procedural history of AMP v. USPTO (2) and summarized the underpinnings...... of the outcome, i.e. the three different opinions of the Federal Circuit judges Lourie, Moore & Bryson who comprised the panel (3). Part II continued the tale with a detailed analysis of the decision's practical implications (4), which is followed by a closer look on the chances for an ultimate Supreme Court...... decision in Prometheus v. Mayo. Part IV, which is to be published in issue 4, will finally offer a broader discussion of the recent US patent-eligibility developments from an innovation policy perspective including brief references to recent European developments (7). This will provide the basis...

  14. Effect of Surgery First Orthognathic Approach on the Temporomandibular Joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelo, Sandro; Saponaro, Gianmarco; De Angelis, Paolo; Gasparini, Giulio; Garagiola, Umberto; Moro, Alessandro

    2018-05-01

    Correction of severe malocclusions with skeletal discrepancies requires orthodontic treatment in combination with orthognathic surgery. Even though conventional orthognathic surgery (COS) is a common and well-accepted approach its influence on the signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) is still debated. Recently with the introduction of surgery first approach, a different timing for the management of dentoskeletal imbalances has been proposed. The present study is aimed at assessing the relationship between surgery first approach and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders. The study sample consisted of 24 patients who were selected to be treated with surgery first approach. Clinical follow-ups after surgery were performed every week for the first month, at 3 months, 6 months, and at 1 year. A radiological follow-up was performed at 1 week and at 1 year after the operation with a panorex and a latero-lateral teleradiograph. To assess the effect of surgery first approach on the TMDs signs and symptoms, a clinical assessment was performed 4 days before surgery (T1), 6 months after surgery (T2), and 1 year postoperatively (T3). The results of the authors' study show that pain assessment revealed a general improvement of this symptom in correspondence to TMJ and masticatory muscles except in the masseter and neck region. Also joint noises, TMJ functioning, migraine, and headache underwent a considerable improvement. Surgery first approach is an innovative orthognathic procedure and, by undergoing surgery first approach, patients with pre-existing TMJ dysfunction may experience a significant improvement or even resolution of the TMDs signs and symptoms.

  15. Temporomandibular disorders after whiplash injury: a controlled, prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasch, Helge; Hjorth, Tine; Svensson, Peter; Nyhuus, Lone; Jensen, Troels S

    2002-01-01

    Whiplash injury to the neck is often considered a significant risk factor for development of temporomandibular disorders (TMD), and has been proposed to produce internal derangements of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Few studies, however, have examined TMD-related pain in acute whiplash patients compared with a matched control group. The aim of the present study was to assess pain and sensorimotor function in the craniofacial region in an unselected group of patients sustaining a motor vehicle accident involving a rear collision. Prospectively, 19 acute whiplash patients exposed to a motor vehicle accident involving a rear collision participated in a study of TMD. The control group consisted of 20 age- and gender-matched ankle-injury patients. Participants were seen within 4 weeks and again at 6 months post-injury. The masticatory system was examined in accordance with the research diagnostic criteria. Participants underwent structured interviews, filled out the McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ), and had their masticatory system examined by a trained dentist, blinded to their diagnosis. Pain detection threshold (PDT) to pressure stimuli, and maximal voluntary occlusal force (MVOF) were obtained at each visit. One whiplash patient and 1 ankle-injury patient had jaw pain at the first visit. Palpation scores of the TMJ and the summated palpation scores only tended to be higher in patients sustaining a whiplash injury than in ankle-injury controls at the first visit. However, MPQ, TMD symptoms and signs, MVOF and PDT were not significantly different in whiplash-injury and ankle-injury patients after 4 weeks and 6 months. TMD pain after whiplash injury and ankle injury is rare, suggesting that whiplash injury is not a major risk factor for the development of TMD problems. Further studies are needed to identify which other factors may contribute to TMD pain.

  16. Temporomandibular disorders, sleep bruxism, and primary headaches are mutually associated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Giovana; Franco, Ana Lúcia; Gonçalves, Daniela Aparecida; Speciali, José Geraldo; Bigal, Marcelo Eduardo; Camparis, Cinara Maria

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the association among temporomandibular disorders (TMD), sleep bruxism, and primary headaches, assessing the risk of occurrence of primary headaches in patients with or without painful TMD and sleep bruxism. The sample consisted of 301 individuals (253 women and 48 men) with ages varying from 18 to 76 years old (average age of 37.5 years). The Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders were used to classify TMD. Sleep bruxism was diagnosed by clinical criteria proposed by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, and primary headaches were diagnosed according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders-II. Data were analyzed by chi-square and odds ratio tests with a 95% confidence interval, and the significance level adopted was .05. An association was found among painful TMD, migraine, and tension-type headache (P headache (3.7; 1.59-8.75). With regard to sleep bruxism, the association was significant only for chronic migraine (3.8; 1.83-7.84). When the sample was stratified by the presence of sleep bruxism and painful TMD, only the presence of sleep bruxism did not increase the risk for any type of headache. The presence of painful TMD without sleep bruxism significantly increased the risk in particular for chronic migraine (30.1; 3.58-252.81), followed by episodic migraine (3.7; 1.46-9.16). The association between painful TMD and sleep bruxism significantly increased the risk for chronic migraine (87.1; 10.79-702.18), followed by episodic migraine (6.7; 2.79-15.98) and episodic tension-type headache (3.8; 1.38-10.69). The association of sleep bruxism and painful TMD greatly increased the risk for episodic migraine, episodic tension-type headache, and especially for chronic migraine.

  17. Expanding the taxonomy of the diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, C C; Goulet, J-P; Lobbezoo, F; Schiffman, E L; Alstergren, P; Anderson, G C; de Leeuw, R; Jensen, R; Michelotti, A; Ohrbach, R; Petersson, A; List, T

    2014-01-01

    There is a need to expand the current temporomandibular disorders' (TMDs) classification to include less common but clinically important disorders. The immediate aim was to develop a consensus-based classification system and associated diagnostic criteria that have clinical and research utility for less common TMDs. The long-term aim was to establish a foundation, vis-à-vis this classification system, that will stimulate data collection, validity testing and further criteria refinement. A working group [members of the International RDC/TMD Consortium Network of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), members of the Orofacial Pain Special Interest Group (SIG) of the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP), and members from other professional societies] reviewed disorders for inclusion based on clinical significance, the availability of plausible diagnostic criteria and the ability to operationalise and study the criteria. The disorders were derived from the literature when possible and based on expert opinion as necessary. The expanded TMDs taxonomy was presented for feedback at international meetings. Of 56 disorders considered, 37 were included in the expanded taxonomy and were placed into the following four categories: temporomandibular joint disorders, masticatory muscle disorders, headache disorders and disorders affecting associated structures. Those excluded were extremely uncommon, lacking operationalised diagnostic criteria, not clearly related to TMDs, or not sufficiently distinct from disorders already included within the taxonomy. The expanded TMDs taxonomy offers an integrated approach to clinical diagnosis and provides a framework for further research to operationalise and test the proposed taxonomy and diagnostic criteria. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Headache associated with temporomandibular disorders among young Brazilian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Ana L; Fernandes, Giovana; Gonçalves, Daniela A G; Bonafé, Fernanda S S; Camparis, Cinara M

    2014-04-01

    To verify whether headaches (HAs) are associated with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in young Brazilian adolescents. From a population sample, 3117 public school children (12 to 14 y) were randomly invited to participate in this study. TMD was assessed according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) Axis I, in addition to questions #3, #4, and #14 of Axis II history questionnaire. HAs were investigated with question #18 of RDC/TMD Axis II. Chronic TMD pain was considered as pain that has persisted for 6 months or more, as proposed by the International Association for the Study of Pain. The statistical analysis consisted of χ tests, odds ratio (OR), and logistic regression models, adopting a significance level of 5%. The sample included 1307 individuals (a response rate of 41.93%), and 56.8% (n=742) were girls. Overall, 330 adolescents (25.2%) were diagnosed with painful TMD and 595 (45.5%) presented with HAs. Individuals presenting with HAs were more likely to present painful TMD (OR=4.94; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.73-6.54, P<0.001), especially combined muscle and joint painful TMD (OR=7.58; 95% CI, 4.77-12.05, P<0.001). HAs also increased the risk to a higher magnitude for chronic TMD pain (OR=6.12; 95% CI, 4.27-8.78, P<0.0001). All estimated ORs remained essentially unchanged after adjusting for sex. HAs were a potential risk factor for TMD in adolescents, and the risk was particularly higher for painful and chronic TMD. When HAs are present in young adolescents, a complete examination is strongly recommended with regard to the presence of painful TMD, and vice versa.

  19. Headache and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder: an epidemiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Daniela A G; Bigal, Marcelo E; Jales, Luciana C F; Camparis, Cinara M; Speciali, José G

    2010-02-01

    A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted to estimate the prevalence of migraine, episodic tension-type headaches (ETTH), and chronic daily headaches (CDH), as well as the presence of symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in the adult population. The potential comorbidity of headache syndromes and TMD has been established mostly based on clinic-based studies. A representative sample of 1230 inhabitants (51.5% women) was interviewed by a validated phone survey. TMD symptoms were assessed through 5 questions, as recommended by the American Academy of Orofacial Pain, in an attempt to classify possible TMD. Primary headaches were diagnosed based on the International Classification of Headache Disorders. When at least 1 TMD symptom was reported, any headache happened in 56.5% vs 31.9% (P headache as the reference, the prevalence of at least 1 TMD symptom was increased in ETTH (prevalence ratio = 1.48, 95% confidence interval = 1.20-1.79), migraine (2.10, 1.80-2.47) and CDH (2.41, 1.84-3.17). At least 2 TMD symptoms also happened more frequently in migraine (4.4, 3.0-6.3), CDH (3.4; 1.5-7.6), and ETTH (2.1; 1.3-3.2), relative to individuals with no headaches. Finally, 3 or more TMD symptoms were also more common in migraine (6.2; 3.8-10.2) than in no headaches. Differences were significant for ETTH (2.7 1.5-4.8), and were numerically but not significant for CDH (2.3; 0.66-8.04). Temporomandibular disorder symptoms are more common in migraine, ETTH, and CDH relative to individuals without headache. Magnitude of association is higher for migraine. Future studies should clarify the nature of the relationship.

  20. Evidence-based review on temporomandibular disorders among musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Selms, M K A; Ahlberg, J; Lobbezoo, F; Visscher, C M

    2017-07-01

    Playing a musical instrument that loads the masticatory system has frequently been linked to temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). Previous literature reviews on this topic do not conform to the current standards of evidence-based medicine. To investigate the effects of playing a musical instrument (i.e. violin/viola and wind instruments) or singing on the presence of TMDs, based on evidence derived from observational studies. Databases of Medline, Web of Science and Google Scholar were searched using MeSH and other relevant terms. For each study, a quality assessment was undertaken using a modified version of the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS). Fifteen relevant papers were identified for inclusion in this review. Of the seven possible points that could be scored with the NOS, the majority of these studies scored under half. Based on the available evidence, the purported relationship between the playing of specific musical instruments and TMDs was not as evident as reported in previous literature reviews. There is limited evidence to conclude that playing a wind instrument is a hazard to the temporomandibular system. Furthermore, there is no available evidence to suggest that vocalists experience more TMDs than controls. The studies that investigated the presence of TMDs among violists and violinists yielded ambiguous outcomes; some studies reported no association between the playing of these instruments and the presence of signs and symptoms of TMDs, whereas in studies where a clinical examination was performed (though of lower methodological quality), an association was found. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  1. Can Preoperative Psychological Assessment Predict Outcomes After Temporomandibular Joint Arthroscopy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouloux, Gary F; Zerweck, Ashley G; Celano, Marianne; Dai, Tian; Easley, Kirk A

    2015-11-01

    Psychological assessment has been used successfully to predict patient outcomes after cardiothoracic and bariatric surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine whether preoperative psychological assessment could be used to predict patient outcomes after temporomandibular joint arthroscopy. Consecutive patients with temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) who could benefit from arthroscopy were enrolled in a prospective cohort study. All patients completed the Millon Behavior Medicine Diagnostic survey before surgery. The primary predictor variable was the preoperative psychological scores. The primary outcome variable was the difference in pain between the pre- and postoperative periods. The Spearman rank correlation coefficient and the Pearson product-moment correlation were used to determine the association between psychological factors and change in pain. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed using a mixed-effects linear model and multiple linear regression. A P value of .05 was considered significant. Eighty-six patients were enrolled in the study. Seventy-five patients completed the study and were included in the final analyses. The mean change in visual analog scale (VAS) pain score 1 month after arthroscopy was -15.4 points (95% confidence interval, -6.0 to -24.7; P psychological factors was identified with univariable correlation analyses. Multivariable analyses identified that a greater pain decrease was associated with a longer duration of preoperative symptoms (P = .054) and lower chronic anxiety (P = .064). This study has identified a weak association between chronic anxiety and the magnitude of pain decrease after arthroscopy for TMD. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of chronic anxiety in the outcome after surgical procedures for the treatment of TMD. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Radiologic Study of Meniscus Perforations in the Temporomandibular Joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kee Duck; Park, Chang Seo

    1990-01-01

    Thirty-nine patients (forty-four joints) who had been diagnosed as having meniscus perforation of the temporomandibular joint by inferior joint space arthrography and had been treated by surgical procedures were evaluated retrospectively. Information of clinical findings, arthrotomographic findings and surgical findings was collected on a standardized form and evaluated. The results were as follows: 1. On the 34 patients of 38 joints which were surgically confirmed perforation of meniscus or its attachments of the temporomandibular joint, there were 29 females and 5 males (5.8:1). The average age was 36 years (range 17 to 70). 2. The common clinical findings of group that had meniscus displacement without reduction and with perforation were pain on the affected joint and limitation of mouth opening. In the group showing meniscus displacement with reduction and with perforation the common clinical findings were pain and clicking on the affected joint. 3. 32 joints (84.2%) were arthrotomographically anterior meniscus displacement without reduction and with perforation, 6 joints (15.8%) showed anterior meniscus displacement with reduction and with perforation. 4. Joints categorized arthrotomographically as having meniscus displacement without reduction and with perforation were less likely to have full translation of the condyle in comparison with the normal or meniscus displacement with reduction and with perforation groups (p<0.05) 5. The arthrographic findings of 44 joints having meniscus perforation were compared with surgical findings, there were 6 false positive findings of meniscus perforation, the reliability of arthrographic findings of meniscus perforation was a 86.4% correlation with surgical findings. 6. On the site of perforations of 38 joints which were surgically confirmed perforation of meniscus or its attachments, twenty-three of perforations (60.5%) were in location at the junction of the meniscus and posterior attachment, fourteen (36.9%) were

  3. High-resolution ultrasonography in assessing temporomandibular joint disc position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talmaceanu, Daniel; Lenghel, Lavinia Manuela; Bolog, Nicolae; Popa Stanila, Roxana; Buduru, Smaranda; Leucuta, Daniel Corneliu; Rotar, Horatiu; Baciut, Mihaela; Baciut, Grigore

    2018-02-04

    The purpose of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of high-resolution ultrasonography (US) in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc displacements. A number of 74 patients (148 TMJs) with signs and symptoms of TMJ disorders, according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders, were included in this study. All patients received US and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of both TMJs 1 to 5 days after the clinical examination. MRI examinations were performed using 1.5 T MRI equipment (Siemens Avanto, Siemens, Erlangen). Ultrasonographic examination was performed on a Hitachi EUB 8500 (Hitachi Medical Corp., Tokyo, Japan) scanner with L 54 M6.5-13 MHz linear transducer. MRI depicted 68 (45.95%) normal joints, 47 (31.76%) with disc displacement with reduction, 33 (22.3%) with disc displacement without reduction and 34 (22.97%) with degenerative changes. US detected 78 (52.7%) normal joints, 37 (25%) with disc displacement with reduction, 33 (22.3%) with disc displacement without reduction and 21 (14.19%) with degenerative changes. Compared to MRI, US showed a sensitivity of 93.1%, specificity of 87.88%, accuracy of 90.32%, a positive predictive value of 87.1% and a negative predictive value of 93.55% for overall diagnosis of disc displacement. The Youden index was 0.81. Based on our results, high-resolution ultrasonography showed high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy in the diagnosis of TMJ disc displacement. It could be a valuable imaging technique in assessing TMJ disc position. The diagnostic value of high-resolution ultrasonography depends strictly on the examiner's skills and on the equipment used.

  4. Occlusal Support and Temporomandibular Disorders Among Elderly Vietnamese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minh Son; Jagomägi, Triin; Nguyen, Toai; Saag, Mare; Voog-Oras, Ülle

    The aim of this study was to analyze the associations between missing teeth, occlusal support, and temporomandibular disorders (TMD) among elderly Vietnamese. The study consisted of 145 TMD and 112 non-TMD (control group) participants aged 65 to 74 years. TMD was evaluated using Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (DC/TMD) Axis I. An occlusal unit (OU) was defined as the cusp of a tooth coupled with the fossa of its antagonist tooth. A premolar pair was counted as one OU and a molar pair as two OUs. Dentition was divided into four occlusal support zones (OSZs) based on occluding pairs of posterior teeth by using Eichner classification: Class A had 4 OSZs, Class B had 1 to 3 OSZs or only anterior teeth, and Class C had no OSZ. The TMD group lost significantly more posterior teeth (mean ± SD 5.1 ± 4.7) than the control group (4.0 ± 3.9, P = .033). The mean ± SD OUs of the TMD and control groups were 5.1 ± 4.6 and 6.0 ± 4.3, respectively, which was nonsignificant (NS). The distribution of Class A (40.7%), Class B (40.0%), and Class C (19.3%) among the TMD group was not significantly different from the control group (50.0%, 38.4%, and 11.6%, respectively, NS). The odds of having TMD were positively associated with total unilateral loss of OUs (OR = 3.4, 95% CI = 1.2-9.4, P = .020) and total bilateral loss of OUs (OR = 2.7, 95% CI = 1.2-6.6, P = .027). Total loss of OSZs on one or both sides of the mouth were found to be predictors of TMD among elderly Vietnamese.

  5. A complex study on the reliability assessment of the containment of a PWR. Part III.- Structural reliability assessment under internal and external loading conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, J.; Schueller, G.I.

    1977-01-01

    The first part of the analysis is concerned with the determination of the failure probability of the steel hull under internal load conditions. Two independent failure criteria are the basis for this calculation; the first one being the ultimate yield which is actually an instability condition and the second one being the fracture condition as described in Part II of the paper. Both the global and the local failure probabilities are investigated. The second part of the analysis is concerned with the external load case of earthquake. As it has already been described in Part I the probability of occurrence of a LOCA, given an earthquake has been considered in connection with the probable damage which the steel hull might experience during the earthquake. In other words the survival probability of the hull with deteriorated resistance is calculated, taking into account the frequencies of occurrence of the various events. The third part of the analysis is concerned with the reliability determination of the reinforced concrete dome structure, which is supposed to protect, the steel hull against external load conditions such as airplane crash and external pressure waves (the latter covering the load case of tornado occurrence). The reliability analysis of the reinforced concrete structure under earthquake loading is performed by utilizing the time-history method. Some aspects of the drawbacks of the response spectra method -when used in a risk analysis- are pointed out. The probability distribution of the concrete strength as determined under intermediate strain rate as described in Part II is utilized in the analysis. Finally the remaining two external load cases are discussed in light of their use in a reliability analysis and with respect to their frequency of occurrence and the probability distribution of their load intensities. The reliability demonstration is performed using the containment structure of the PWR-plant 'Biblis B' which is locate

  6. PARDISEKO III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, H.; Sack, C.

    1975-05-01

    This report gives a detailed description of the latest version of the PARDISEKO code, PARDISEKO III, with particular emphasis on the numerical and programming methods employed. The physical model and its relation to nuclear safety as well as a description and the results of confirming experiments are treated in detail in the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre report KFK-1989. (orig.) [de

  7. Proceedings of the Scientific Meeting and Presentation on Basic Research in Nuclear of the Science and Technology part III : Radioactive Waste Management and Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamsul Abraha; Yateman Arryanto; Sri Jauhari S; Agus Taftazani; Kris Tri Basuki; Djoko Sardjono, Ign.; Sukarsono, R.; Samin; Syarip; Suryadi, MS; Sardjono, Y.; Tri Mardji Atmono; Dwiretnani Sudjoko; Tjipto Sujitno, BA.

    2007-08-01

    The Scientific Meeting and Presentation on Basic Research in Nuclear Science and Technology is a routine activity held by Centre for Accelerator Technology and Material Process, National Nuclear Energy Agency, for monitoring the research activity which achieved in National Nuclear Energy Agency. The Meeting was held in Yogyakarta on July 10, 2007. The proceedings contains papers presented on the meeting about Radioactive Waste Management and Environment and there are 25 papers which have separated index. The proceedings is the third part of the three parts which published in series. (PPIN)

  8. Relação entre disfunção temporomandibular e alterações auditivas The relationship among temporomandibular dysfunction and hearing alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela de Campos Barreto

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available TEMA: o equilíbrio das estruturas e funções do sistema estomatognático depende do adequado funcionamento da Articulação Temporomandibular, e esta, por sua vez, precisa da oclusão dental correta para a realização das funções ao movimentar a mandíbula. O desequilíbrio muscular ou estrutural da Articulação Temporomandibular poderá acarretar em uma disfunção dessa articulação e causar sinais e sintomas diversos como manifestações auditivas do tipo zumbido e otalgia. OBJETIVO: realizou-se a revisão de literatura das áreas de fonoaudiologia, otorrinolaringologia e odontologia com pesquisas em bases de dados, artigos e livros, sendo selecionadas as literaturas de 1992 a 2008 relacionadas ao tema do trabalho, a fim de associar sintomas audiológicos com a Disfunção Temporomandibular e apontar a importância da atuação multiprofissional, dando ênfase à atuação fonoaudiológica, em tal disfunção. CONCLUSÃO: várias são as hipóteses que tentam explicar a relação existente entre a Disfunção Temporomandibular e as alterações auditivas. Verificamos que há um vínculo entre o sistema estomatognático e o sistema auditivo. Contudo, mais importante que somente associar os sistemas estomatognático e auditivo, a equipe multiprofissional envolvida na assistência à pacientes com Disfunção Temporomandibular, precisa ter conhecimento a respeito da anatomia e fisiologia da Articulação Temporomandibular, de suas disfunções, causas e consequências, sendo capaz de distinguir a terapêutica eficiente para cada disfunção e, por fim, analisar a conduta com encaminhamentos adequados para a evolução do caso.BACKGROUND: the balance referring to the structures and functions of the stomatognatic system depends on the appropriate functioning of the Temporomandibular Joint, and this one, needs the correct teeth occlusion for accomplishing the functional needs when moving the jaw. The muscle or structural unbalance of the

  9. [The transverse movement of the temporo-mandibular joint (translation movement) of the dog, also with reference to dysplasia of this joint in the dachshund].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmerhaus, B; Roos, H

    1996-09-01

    Contrary to the accepted opinion, transverse movement is possible in the temporo-mandibular joint of the dog. This movement is arched and is important for mastication. Analysis of transverse movement of the temporo-mandibular joint was done in 20 dog breeds. Accidentally dysplasia of the temporo-mandibular joint was found in the dachshund, a phenomenon which has not been described before.

  10. Effect of Lengthy Root Canal Therapy Sessions on Temporomandibular Joint and Masticatory Muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safoora Sahebi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Trauma is one of the major factors associated with temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD. These disorders result from macro-trauma or micro-trauma. Macro-trauma might be iatrogenic; for example, from intubation procedures, third molar extraction procedures, and lengthy dental appointments. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of lengthy root canal therapy (more than 2 hours on TMJ and its supporting structures. Materials and methods. Eighty patients whose root canal therapy session lasted more than 2 hours were examined for the status of TMJ and masticatory muscles. After one week the second part of the examination was carried out for TMJ problems and pain and tenderness levels of masticatory muscles. Data was analyzed using Wilcoxon statistical test. Results. Women showed more pain compared to men. There was a significant increase in pain in the external acoustic meatus examination one week after root canal therapy. Patients who were treated for their posterior teeth suffered more pain than those who were treated for the anteriors and premolars. Other aspects of the examination were not affected significantly by lengthy root canal therapy. Conclusion. Lengthy dental treatments can harm TMJ and masticatory muscles and wide opening of the mouth during such appointments can worsen the situation. Therefore, it is wise to break the appointment into shorter intervals and let the patients rest during treatment to close their mouth to prevent iatrogenic damage to TMJ.

  11. Effect of Lengthy Root Canal Therapy Sessions on Temporomandibular Joint and Masticatory Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahebi, Safoora; Moazami, Fariborz; Afsa, Masoomeh; Nabavi Zade, Mohammad Reza

    2010-01-01

    Background and aims Trauma is one of the major factors associated with temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD). These disorders result from macro-trauma or micro-trauma. Macro-trauma might be iatrogenic; for example, from intuba-tion procedures, third molar extraction procedures, and lengthy dental appointments. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of lengthy root canal therapy (more than 2 hours) on TMJ and its supporting structures. Materials and methods Eighty patients whose root canal therapy session lasted more than 2 hours were examined for the status of TMJ and masticatory muscles. After one week the second part of the examination was carried out for TMJ problems and pain and tenderness levels of masticatory muscles. Data was analyzed using Wilcoxon statistical test. Results Women showed more pain compared to men. There was a significant increase in pain in the external acoustic meatus examination one week after root canal therapy. Patients who were treated for their posterior teeth suffered more pain than those who were treated for the anteriors and premolars. Other aspects of the examination were not affected significantly by lengthy root canal therapy. Conclusion Lengthy dental treatments can harm TMJ and masticatory muscles and wide opening of the mouth during such appointments can worsen the situation. Therefore, it is wise to break the appointment into shorter intervals and let the patients rest during treatment to close their mouth to prevent iatrogenic damage to TMJ. PMID:22991607

  12. Assessment of temporomandibular joint dysfunction in condylar fracture of the mandible using the Helkimo index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Suhas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Condylar fractures of the mandible are functionally important fractures as the condyle of the mandible being a part of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ and can lead to TMJ dysfunction if not properly treated. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of a total of 33 treated patients with fracture of the mandibular condyle who underwent examination as per the Helkimo index. Their dysfunction was quantified and clinicoepidemiological characteristics were assessed. It was found that majority of our patients were young males involved in a two-wheeler accident. All patients underwent intermaxillary fixation as the minimum treatment and 30% underwent open reduction and internal fixation in addition. Results: There was no statistically significant association between the degree of clinical dysfunction and factors such as age, mechanism of injury, type of condyle fracture, presence of other mandible fractures, and surgical procedure. However, dislocation of the mandibular condyle was found to be a negative prognostic factor and all these patients had some degree of dysfunction. Conclusion: The overall prevalence of TMJ dysfunction according to the Helkimo index was 90%. About 61% of patients had mild dysfunction (Di1 and 30% had moderate dysfunction (Di2. None of the patients had severe dysfunction. To conclude, the Helkimo index is a simple, effective, inexpensive, reliable screening index to assess TMJ dysfunction in condylar fractures of mandible.

  13. Children Who Desperately Want To Read, but Are Not Working at Grade Level: Use Movement Patterns as "Windows" To Discover Why. Part III: The Frontal Midline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corso, Marjorie

    A longitudinal research study observed 30 children between the ages of infancy and elementary age to determine if using large muscle motor patterns to master the three identified midlines that concur with the body planes used in anatomy is reflected in academic classroom learning levels. This third part of the study focused on the frontal midline.…

  14. Temporomandibular disorders and orthodontic treatment need in orthodontically untreated children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Špalj, Stjepan; Šlaj, Martina; Athanasiou, Athanasios E; Žak, Irena; Šimunović, Martina; Šlaj, Mladen

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the association between signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and orthodontic treatment need in orthodontically untreated children and adolescents. One thousand five hundred and ninety-seven subjects aged 11-19 years, without previous orthodontic history, from sixteen randomly selected public schools in Zagreb, Croatia, were examined. Malocclusion characteristics were assessed by using the criteria proposed by Bjork et al., the Dental Aesthetic Index, and the Aesthetic Component of Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need. Data on TMD signs/symptoms and parafunctional behaviour were obtained by means of questionnaire and clinical examination, respectively. Multiple logistic regression models were used for analysis. Twenty-two percent of children and young adolescents had one or more signs of TMD, ranging from 17% in age of 11 years up to 24% in age of 19. There was poor correlation between presence of TMD and orthodontic treatment need. Multiple logistic regression models showed that Class III, crowding and spacing were related to mandibular deflection on opening. Ectopic eruption was related to TMJ clicking, and severely tipped teeth with reduced mouth opening. Headaches presented a positive relationship with reverse overjet and severe rotations, and tooth wear with crowding, spacing and lateral openbite. Age, female gender and parafunctional habits were related to several TMD signs. Although logistic regression models were statistically significant (p < 0.05) malocclusions, parafunctional behaviours, age and gender accounted for less than 20% of the variability in TMD signs/symptoms. TMD signs and symptoms seemed to be poorly related to malocclusions or treatment needs.

  15. A simple, fast, and accurate thermodynamic-based approach for transfer and prediction of gas chromatography retention times between columns and instruments Part III: Retention time prediction on target column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Siyuan; Stevenson, Keisean A J M; Harynuk, James J

    2018-03-27

    This is the third part of a three-part series of papers. In Part I, we presented a method for determining the actual effective geometry of a reference column as well as the thermodynamic-based parameters of a set of probe compounds in an in-house mixture. Part II introduced an approach for estimating the actual effective geometry of a target column by collecting retention data of the same mixture of probe compounds on the target column and using their thermodynamic parameters, acquired on the reference column, as a bridge between both systems. Part III, presented here, demonstrates the retention time transfer and prediction from the reference column to the target column using experimental data for a separate mixture of compounds. To predict the retention time of a new compound, we first estimate its thermodynamic-based parameters on the reference column (using geometric parameters determined previously). The compound's retention time on a second column (of previously determined geometry) is then predicted. The models and the associated optimization algorithms were tested using simulated and experimental data. The accuracy of predicted retention times shows that the proposed approach is simple, fast, and accurate for retention time transfer and prediction between gas chromatography columns. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. TEMPOROMANDIBULAR PAIN DYSFUNCTION SYNDROME IN PATIENTS ATTENDING LAGOS UNIVERSITY TEACHING HOSPITAL, LAGOS, NIGERIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eweka, O M; Ogundana, O M; Agbelusi, G A

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome (TMJPDS) is the most common temporomandibular disorder. This condition presents with symptoms of pain, restricted jaw movement and joint noise. Other symptoms include otalgia, headache, neck pain and trismus. To determine the pattern of Temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome patients managed at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria. A descriptive study of patients with signs and symptoms of Temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome attending the Oral Medicine Clinic of Lagos University Teaching Hospital. Twenty-one patients with Temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome were enrolled into the study, out of which 10(48%) were females and 11(52%) were males. The age range was 23-81years with a mean of 45.2 ± 18.9 years. Majority of the patients 20(95.2%) complained of pain around the joint, in the pre-auricular region, in the muscles of mastication and the ear. While 7(35%) complained of clicking sounds, 10(47.6%) complained of pain on mouth opening and during mastication only. In all 5(23.8%) had impaired movement of the jaws, mouth opening was normal in 18(85.7%) but reduced in 3(14.3%) patients. Over half of patients 12(57%) experienced clicking sounds, there was tenderness around the temporomandibular joint in 16(76.2%) cases, pain in the ear of 7(33.3%) patients and 13(61.9%) people presented with tenderness of the muscles of mastication. Conservative management of all the cases resulted in resolution of the symptoms. Temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome has diverse clinical presentation and though distressing, it responds to prompt and effective conservative management.

  17. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in adolescents Sinais e sintomas de disfunção temporomandibular em adolescentes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Rigoldi Bonjardim

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to verify the prevalence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD in adolescents and its relationship to gender. The sample comprised 217 subjects, aged 12 to 18. The subjective symptoms and clinical signs of TMD were evaluated, using, respectively, a self-report questionnaire and the Craniomandibular Index, which has 2 subscales; the Dysfunction Index and the Palpation Index. The results of muscle tenderness showed great variability (0.9-32.25%. In relation to the temporomandibular joint, tenderness of the superior, dorsal and lateral condyle regions occurred in 10.6%, 10.6% and 7.83%, respectively, of the sample. Joint sound during opening was present in 19.8% of the sample and during closing in 14.7%. The most prevalent symptoms were joint sounds (26.72% and headache (21.65%. There was no statistical difference between genders (p > 0.05, except for the tenderness of the lateral pterygoid muscles, which presented more prevalence in girls. In conclusion, clinical signs and symptoms of TMD can occur in adolescents; however, gender influence was not perceived.O objetivo deste estudo foi verificar a prevalência de sinais e sintomas de disfunção temporomandibular (DTM em adolescentes e sua relação com o gênero. A amostra foi constituída de 217 voluntários, com idade entre 12 e 18 anos. Os sintomas subjetivos e os sinais clínicos de DTM foram avaliados usando-se, respectivamente, um questionário e o "Craniomandibular Index", o qual possui 2 subescalas: "Dysfunction Index" e "Palpation Index". Os resultados para sensibilidade muscular mostraram grande variabilidade (0,9-32,25%. Com relação à articulação temporomandibular, a sensibilidade à palpação nas regiões superior, dorsal e lateral do côndilo ocorreu, respectivamente, em 10,6%, 10,6% e 7,83% da amostra. A prevalência do ruído articular no movimento de abertura foi de 19,8% e no fechamento, 14,7%. Os sintomas relatados mais

  18. Simulación de la fluencia en caliente de un acero microaleado con un contenido medio de carbono. III parte. Ecuaciones constitutivas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabrera, J. M.

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available According to the part 1 of this work the constitutive equations of the hot flow behaviour of a commercial microalloyed steel have been obtained. For this purpose, the uniaxial hot compression tests described in the part 2 were employed. Tests were carried out over a range of 5 orders of magnitude in strain rate and 300 °C of temperature. Experimental results are compared with the theoretical model introduced in the first part of this study. It is concluded that deviations between experimental and theoretical curves are lower than 10 %. It is shown that the classical hiperbolic sine constitutive equation described accurately the experimental behaviour provided that stresses are normalized by the Young's modulus and strain rates by the self-diffusion coefficient. An internal stress must also be introduced in the latter equation when the initial grain size is fine enough.

    Siguiendo el planteamiento teórico efectuado en la I parte de este trabajo, se determinaron las ecuaciones constitutivas del comportamiento a la deformación en caliente de un acero comercial microaleado con un contenido medio de carbono. Para este objetivo se emplearon los ensayos de compresión uniaxial en caliente ya descritos en la II parte, los cuales se efectuaron en un rango de cinco órdenes de magnitud en velocidad de deformación y 300 °C de temperatura. Se comparan los resultados experimentales con el modelo teórico introducido en la I parte y se verifica que el error es inferior al 10 %. Se comprobó que la clásica ecuación del seno hiperbólico podía describir con precisión el comportamiento observado siempre y cuando las tensiones se normalicen por el módulo de Young, las velocidades de deformación por el coeficiente de autodifusión de la austenita, y se considere un efecto adicional sobre la tensión cuando el tamaño de grano inicial sea suficientemente fino.

  19. The effect of early physiotherapy on the recovery of mandibular function after orthognathic surgery for class III correction. Part II: electromyographic activity of masticatory muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ellen Wen-Ching; Teng, Terry Te-Yi; Huang, Chiung Shing; Chen, Yu-Ray

    2015-01-01

    The study was conducted to evaluate the effect of early physical rehabilitation by comparing the differences of surface electromyographic (sEMG) activity in the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles after surgical correction of skeletal class III malocclusion. The prospective study included 63 patients; the experimental groups contained 31 patients who received early systematic physical rehabilitation; the control group (32 patients) did not receive physiotherapy. The amplitude of sEMG in the masticatory muscles reached 72.6-121.3% and 37.5-64.6% of pre-surgical values in the experimental and control groups respectively at 6 weeks after orthognathic surgery (OGS). At 6 months after OGS, the sEMG reached 135.1-233.4% and 89.6-122.5% of pre-surgical values in the experimental and control groups respectively. Most variables in the sEMG examination indicated that recovery of the masticatory muscles in the experimental group was better than the control group as estimated in the early phase (T1 to T2) and the total phase (T1 to T3); there were no significant differences between the mean recovery percentages in the later phase (T2 to T3). Early physical rehabilitative therapy is helpful for early recovery of muscle activity in masticatory muscles after OGS. After termination of physical therapy, no significant difference in recovery was indicated in patients with or without early physiotherapy. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The removal of toxic metals from liquid effluents by ion exchange resins. Part IV: Chromium(III)/H+ /Lewatit SP112; La eliminación de metales tóxicos presentes en efluentes líquidos mediante resinas de cambio iónico. Parte IV: cromo(III)/H+/Lewatit SP112

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alguacil, F.J.

    2017-09-01

    This investigation presented results on the removal of chromium(III), from aqueous solution in the 0-5 pH range, using Lewatit SP112 cationic exchange resin. Several aspects affecting the ion exchange process were evaluated, including: the influence of the stirring speed, temperature, pH of the solution, resin dosage and aqueous ionic strength. The selectivity of the system was tested against the presence of other metals in the aqueous solution, whereas the removal of chromium(III) from solutions was compared with results obtained using multiwalled carbon nanotubes as adsorbents. From the batch experimental data, best fit of the results is obtained with the Langmuir model, whereas the ion exchange process is best explained by the pseudo-second order model, moreover, experimental data responded well to the film-diffusion controlled model. Elution of the chromium(III) loaded into the resin is well accomplished by the use of sodium hydroxide solutions. [Spanish] En este trabajo se presentan los resultados obtenidos en la eliminación de cromo(III) de disoluciones acuosas (pH 0-5) mediante la resina de intercambio catiónico Lewatit SP112. Se han investigado algunas variables que pueden afectar al sistema: influencia de la agitación, temperatura, pH y fuerza iónica del medio acuoso y cantidad de resina; también se ha investigado acerca de la selectividad del sistema cuando otros metales están presentes en el medio acuoso, comparándose los resultados de la eliminación del cromo(III) usando la resina con los resultados obtenidos cuando se emplea otro adsorbente como son los nanotubos de carbono de pared múltiple. Los resultados experimentales indican que la carga del cromo(III) en la resina responde mejor al modelo de Langmuir, mientras que los modelos cinéticos indican que la carga del metal en la resina responde al modelo de pseudo-segundo orden y difusión en la capa límite. La elución del cromo(III) se realiza con disoluciones de hidróxid.

  1. Fermilab III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The total ongoing plans for Fermilab are wrapped up in the Fermilab III scheme, centrepiece of which is the proposal for a new Main Injector. The Laboratory has been awarded a $200,000 Illinois grant which will be used to initiate environmental assessment and engineering design of the Main Injector, while a state review panel recommended that the project should also benefit from $2 million of funding

  2. Fermilab III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1990-09-15

    The total ongoing plans for Fermilab are wrapped up in the Fermilab III scheme, centrepiece of which is the proposal for a new Main Injector. The Laboratory has been awarded a $200,000 Illinois grant which will be used to initiate environmental assessment and engineering design of the Main Injector, while a state review panel recommended that the project should also benefit from $2 million of funding.

  3. Association between condylar morphology and changes in bony microstructure and subsynovial inflammation in experimental temporomandibular joint arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper Dahl; Hauge, Ellen Margrethe; Dalstra, Michel

    2010-01-01

    Association between condylar morphology and changes in bony microstructure and subsynovial inflammation in experimental temporomandibular joint arthritis. 86. Congress of the European Orthodontic Society, Slovenien, 2010.......Association between condylar morphology and changes in bony microstructure and subsynovial inflammation in experimental temporomandibular joint arthritis. 86. Congress of the European Orthodontic Society, Slovenien, 2010....

  4. Evaluation of the research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders for the recognition of an anterior disc displacement with reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naeije, M.; Kalaykova, S.; Visscher, C.M.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this Focus Article is to review critically the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) for the recognition of an anterior disc displacement with reduction (ADDR) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). This evaluation is based upon the experience gained

  5. A clinical study of temporomandibular disorder. The value of bone scintigraphy as an aid to diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiura, Masashi [Nippon Dental Univ. (Japan). School of Dentistry at Niigata

    2000-07-01

    Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is still not defined with respect to the point of an entity, terminological problems, and clinical classification and gradings. Moreover, diagnostic problems of internal deranegement and osteodeformity at the temporomandibular joint such as type IV and mechanism of bone remodeling at condylar head are also still not clear. In this investigation, we tried to classify the severity and progressive grading according to the symptoms and objective laboratory data taken from soft tissues such as muscles related to mastication, discs and ligaments, and hard tissues such as condylar head and temporal bone changes around the temporomandibular joint. Preliminary diagnostic clinical tool of the assessment of temporomandibular joint by maens of bone scintigraphy was attributed to the additional diagnostic procedure and research for the bone remodeling for the temporomandibular disorder because this can be defined between subjective and objective symptoms in this disorder. Bone scintigraphy will solve many problems concerning undefined degenerative bone changes in TMD, enable more accurate diagnosis, and the selection of treatment and prognosis in future investigation. Also, it is believed single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) nuclear bone imaging is a highly accurate diagnostic method for craniomandibular disorders. (author)

  6. A retrospective analysis of the headache associated with temporomandibular joint disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungari, C; Quarato, D; Gennaro, P; Riccardi, E; Agrillo, A; Mitro, V; Cascino, F; Reale, G; Rinna, C; Filiaci, F

    2012-11-01

    Headache is a common symptom, that can be extremely disabling, affecting 26 million of patients only in Italy. ICHD-II has reported two categories: "primary headaches" and "secondary headaches". Temporomandibular joint disorders can lead to a secondary headaches. We want to evaluate the prevalence and clinical features of headache among a series of patients having temporomandibular joint disorders and we illustrate the evolution of headache following medical treatament of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders. This is a retrospective study carried out on chart review of 426 consecutive patients with various degrees of temporomandibular disorders and treated with medical devices from 2007 to 2011. Headache was reported by 73 patients (17.14%). Headache was observed in 36 of 51 patients with lock and in 32 out of 130 patients with mandibular deflections (Table I). The remaining 5 patients with headache had articular noise. Headache is not a rare finding in a population with temporomandibular dysfunctions and is more often a tension-type rather than trigeminal headache.

  7. MR of 2270 TMJs: prevalence of radiographic presence of otomastoiditis in temporomandibular joint disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orhan, Kaan [Department of Oral Diagnosis and Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Ankara University, 06500 Besevler, Ankara (Turkey)]. E-mail: call53@yahoo.com; Nishiyama, Hideyoshi [Department of Oral Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Tadashi, Sasaki [Department of Oral Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Shumei, Murakami [Department of Oral Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Furukawa, Souhei [Department of Oral Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    Objective: : The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence of radiographic presence of otomastoiditis while examining temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders in magnetic resonance images (MRI) in a series of 2270 temporomandibular joint magnetic resonance images and to examine the relationship between otomastoiditis and TMJ disorders. Materials and methods: : 2270 temporomandibular joint magnetic resonance images and patients' data were retrospectively investigated. Magnetic resonance images were obtained from the patients who referred to Osaka University Dental Hospital Outpatient Clinic with TMJ complaints for the last four years (from January 1998 to January 2003). The patients, who were diagnosed as otomastoiditis based on their temporomandibular joint magnetic resonance images, were sent to Osaka University Hospital Department of Otolaryngology for a medical consultation in order to have their pathologies certified following their MR process. Age and sex were recorded for all patients and for otomastoiditis cases; location of the disease, symptoms of patients and TMJ findings were noted as well. Results: : Seven patients were diagnosed as acute otomastoiditis and one patient diagnosed as chronic active otitis media with cholesteatoma in the series of 2270 MR, which were representing a prevalence of 0.39%. Neurilemoma diagnosed in left mastoid process in one patient. The final diagnoses of all patients were made after medical consultation. Conclusion: : While examining temporomandibular joint magnetic resonance images; it is not only important to examine just the TMJ structures, but also to look at the nearby anatomical features to check evidence for inflammatory disease.

  8. A clinical study of temporomandibular disorder. The value of bone scintigraphy as an aid to diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiura, Masashi

    2000-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is still not defined with respect to the point of an entity, terminological problems, and clinical classification and gradings. Moreover, diagnostic problems of internal deranegement and osteodeformity at the temporomandibular joint such as type IV and mechanism of bone remodeling at condylar head are also still not clear. In this investigation, we tried to classify the severity and progressive grading according to the symptoms and objective laboratory data taken from soft tissues such as muscles related to mastication, discs and ligaments, and hard tissues such as condylar head and temporal bone changes around the temporomandibular joint. Preliminary diagnostic clinical tool of the assessment of temporomandibular joint by maens of bone scintigraphy was attributed to the additional diagnostic procedure and research for the bone remodeling for the temporomandibular disorder because this can be defined between subjective and objective symptoms in this disorder. Bone scintigraphy will solve many problems concerning undefined degenerative bone changes in TMD, enable more accurate diagnosis, and the selection of treatment and prognosis in future investigation. Also, it is believed single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) nuclear bone imaging is a highly accurate diagnostic method for craniomandibular disorders. (author)

  9. MR of 2270 TMJs: prevalence of radiographic presence of otomastoiditis in temporomandibular joint disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orhan, Kaan; Nishiyama, Hideyoshi; Tadashi, Sasaki; Shumei, Murakami; Furukawa, Souhei

    2005-01-01

    Objective: : The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence of radiographic presence of otomastoiditis while examining temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders in magnetic resonance images (MRI) in a series of 2270 temporomandibular joint magnetic resonance images and to examine the relationship between otomastoiditis and TMJ disorders. Materials and methods: : 2270 temporomandibular joint magnetic resonance images and patients' data were retrospectively investigated. Magnetic resonance images were obtained from the patients who referred to Osaka University Dental Hospital Outpatient Clinic with TMJ complaints for the last four years (from January 1998 to January 2003). The patients, who were diagnosed as otomastoiditis based on their temporomandibular joint magnetic resonance images, were sent to Osaka University Hospital Department of Otolaryngology for a medical consultation in order to have their pathologies certified following their MR process. Age and sex were recorded for all patients and for otomastoiditis cases; location of the disease, symptoms of patients and TMJ findings were noted as well. Results: : Seven patients were diagnosed as acute otomastoiditis and one patient diagnosed as chronic active otitis media with cholesteatoma in the series of 2270 MR, which were representing a prevalence of 0.39%. Neurilemoma diagnosed in left mastoid process in one patient. The final diagnoses of all patients were made after medical consultation. Conclusion: : While examining temporomandibular joint magnetic resonance images; it is not only important to examine just the TMJ structures, but also to look at the nearby anatomical features to check evidence for inflammatory disease

  10. A Fully Nonmetallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing of Ceramic Composites. Part III; Additive Manufacturing and Characterization of Ceramic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Grady, Joseph E.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Ramsey, Jack; Patterson, Clark; Santelle, Tom

    2015-01-01

    This publication is the third part of a three part report of the project entitled "A Fully Nonmetallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing" funded by NASA Aeronautics Research Institute (NARI). The objective of this project was to conduct additive manufacturing to produce ceramic matrix composite materials and aircraft engine components by the binder jet process. Different SiC powders with median sizes ranging from 9.3 to 53.0 microns were investigated solely and in powder blends in order to maximize powder packing. Various infiltration approaches were investigated to include polycarbosilane (SMP-10), phenolic, and liquid silicon. Single infiltrations of SMP-10 and phenolic only slightly filled in the interior. When the SMP-10 was loaded with sub-micron sized SiC powders, the infiltrant gave a much better result of filling in the interior. Silicon carbide fibers were added to the powder bed to make ceramic matrix composite materials. Microscopy showed that the fibers were well distributed with no preferred orientation on the horizontal plane and fibers in the vertical plane were at angles as much as 45deg. Secondary infiltration steps were necessary to further densify the material. Two to three extra infiltration steps of SMP-10 increased the density by 0.20 to 0.55 g/cc. However, the highest densities achieved were 2.10 to 2.15 g/cc. Mechanical tests consisting of 4 point bend tests were conducted. Samples from the two CMC panels had higher strengths and strains to failure than the samples from the two nonfiber reinforced panels. The highest strengths were from Set N with 65 vol% fiber loading which had an average strength of 66 MPa. Analysis of the fracture surfaces did not reveal pullout of the reinforcing fibers. Blunt fiber failure suggested that there was not composite behavior. The binder jet additive manufacturing method was used to also demonstrate the fabrication of turbine engine vane components of two different designs and sizes. The

  11. Orofacial manual therapy improves cervical movement impairment associated with headache and features of temporomandibular dysfunction: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Piekartz, Harry; Hall, Toby

    2013-08-01

    There is evidence that temporomandibular disorder (TMD) may be a contributing factor to cervicogenic headache (CGH), in part because of the influence of dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint on the cervical spine. The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to determine whether orofacial treatment in addition to cervical manual therapy, was more effective than cervical manual therapy alone on measures of cervical movement impairment in patients with features of CGH and signs of TMD. In this study, 43 patients (27 women) with headache for more than 3-months and with some features of CGH and signs of TMD were randomly assigned to receive either cervical manual therapy (usual care) or orofacial manual therapy to address TMD in addition to usual care. Subjects were assessed at baseline, after 6 treatment sessions (3-months), and at 6-months follow-up. 38 subjects (25 female) completed all analysis at 6-months follow-up. The outcome criteria were: cervical range of movement (including the C1-2 flexion-rotation test) and manual examination of the upper 3 cervical vertebra. The group that received orofacial treatment in addition to usual care showed significant reduction in all aspects of cervical impairment after the treatment period. These improvements persisted to the 6-month follow-up, but were not observed in the usual care group at any point. These observations together with previous reports indicate that manual therapists should look for features of TMD when examining patients with headache, particularly if treatment fails when directed to the cervical spine. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Presentation of safety after closure of the repository for spent nuclear fuel. Main report of the project SR-Site. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the safety assessment SR-Site is to investigate whether a safe repository for spent nuclear fuel by KBS-3 type can be constructed at Forsmark in Oesthammar in Sweden. The location of the Forsmark has been selected based on results of several surveys from surface conditions at depth in Forsmark and in Laxemar in Oskarshamn. The choice of location is not justified in SR-Site Report, but in other attachments to SKB's permit applications. SR-Site Report is an important part of SKB's permit applications to construct and operate a repository for spent nuclear fuel at Forsmark in Oesthammar. The purpose of the report in the applications is to show that a repository at Forsmark is safe after closure

  13. Stochastic foundations of undulatory transport phenomena: generalized Poisson-Kac processes—part III extensions and applications to kinetic theory and transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giona, Massimiliano; Brasiello, Antonio; Crescitelli, Silvestro

    2017-08-01

    This third part extends the theory of Generalized Poisson-Kac (GPK) processes to nonlinear stochastic models and to a continuum of states. Nonlinearity is treated in two ways: (i) as a dependence of the parameters (intensity of the stochastic velocity, transition rates) of the stochastic perturbation on the state variable, similarly to the case of nonlinear Langevin equations, and (ii) as the dependence of the stochastic microdynamic equations of motion on the statistical description of the process itself (nonlinear Fokker-Planck-Kac models). Several numerical and physical examples illustrate the theory. Gathering nonlinearity and a continuum of states, GPK theory provides a stochastic derivation of the nonlinear Boltzmann equation, furnishing a positive answer to the Kac’s program in kinetic theory. The transition from stochastic microdynamics to transport theory within the framework of the GPK paradigm is also addressed.

  14. Stochastic foundations of undulatory transport phenomena: generalized Poisson–Kac processes—part III extensions and applications to kinetic theory and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giona, Massimiliano; Brasiello, Antonio; Crescitelli, Silvestro

    2017-01-01

    This third part extends the theory of Generalized Poisson–Kac (GPK) processes to nonlinear stochastic models and to a continuum of states. Nonlinearity is treated in two ways: (i) as a dependence of the parameters (intensity of the stochastic velocity, transition rates) of the stochastic perturbation on the state variable, similarly to the case of nonlinear Langevin equations, and (ii) as the dependence of the stochastic microdynamic equations of motion on the statistical description of the process itself (nonlinear Fokker–Planck–Kac models). Several numerical and physical examples illustrate the theory. Gathering nonlinearity and a continuum of states, GPK theory provides a stochastic derivation of the nonlinear Boltzmann equation, furnishing a positive answer to the Kac’s program in kinetic theory. The transition from stochastic microdynamics to transport theory within the framework of the GPK paradigm is also addressed. (paper)

  15. Reactor oscillator - I - III, Part III - Electronic device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lolic, B.; Jovanovic, S.

    1961-12-01

    This report describes functioning of the reactor oscillator electronic system. Two methods of oscillator operation were discussed. The first method is so called method of amplitude modulation of the reactor power, and the second newer method is phase method. Both methods are planned for the present reactor oscillator

  16. Prevalencia de trastornos temporomandibulares en el adulto mayor institucionalizado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenia Masiel Criado Mora

    Full Text Available Introducción: los trastornos temporomandibulares (TTM son una serie de signos y síntomas buco faciales de etiología multifactorial. En Cuba existen varias investigaciones que tratan sobre los TTM %sobre todo en jóvenes dentados% no conociéndose amplias referencias de este tipo de estudio en el adulto mayor. Objetivo: identificar la prevalencia de TTM en los adultos mayores institucionalizados, los signos y síntomas más frecuentes según edad y sexo. Métodos: se realizó un estudio descriptivo transversal en 113 adultos mayores de ambos sexos, institucionalizados en dos hogares de ancianos de la Habana, de marzo a abril de 2012. Se aplicó una encuesta donde se recogió sexo, edad, signos y síntomas. Las manifestaciones clínicas evaluadas fueron: la presencia de dolor muscular, dificultad al movimiento de abertura y cierre, dolor articular, dolor muscular articular, ruidos articulares, limitación de la abertura bucal, limitación de los movimientos de lateralidad y propulsión, desviación de la mandíbula. Resultados: el 40,70 % de los adultos mayores estudiados, presentaron afectación en la articulación temporomandibular. Los ruidos articulares fue el síntoma con mayor predominio en todos los grupos etarios (76,08 %, afectando al 82,35 % de los hombres y al 72,41 % de las mujeres. Seguido por el dolor muscular que se manifestó en el 52,17 % de los afectados, con mayor porcentaje en mujeres (58,62 % que en hombres (41,17 %. La dificultad para realizar los movimientos de abertura y cierre se detectó en el 28,26 % de los afectados con mayor prevalencia en el sexo femenino (34,48 % que en el masculino (17,14 %. Conclusiones. se observó una elevada prevalencia de TTM en los adultos mayores estudiados. Los signos y síntomas más frecuentes por edad y sexo fueron los ruidos articulares y el dolor muscular y la dificultad para realizar los movimientos de abertura y cierre.

  17. Botulinum toxin for treating muscular temporomandibular disorders: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Machado

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study, through a systematic literature review, aims to analyze the effectiveness of Botulinum Toxin as a treatment for masticatory myofascial pain and muscles temporomandibular disorders (TMD. METHODS: Survey in research bases: MEDLINE, Cochrane, EMBASE, Pubmed, Lilacs and BBO, between the years of 1966 and April 2011, with focus in randomized or quasi-randomized controlled clinical trials, blind or double-blind. RESULTS: After applying the inclusion criteria, 4 articles comprised the final sample: 3 were double-blind randomized controlled clinical trials and 1 was single-blind randomized controlled clinical trial. CONCLUSIONS: According to the literature, there is lack of evidence about the real effectiveness of botulinum toxin in the treatment of masticatory myofascial pain and muscular TMD. Thus, further randomized controlled clinical trials, with representative samples and longer follow-up time, to assess the real effectiveness of the technique are needed.OBJETIVO: este trabalho, por meio de uma revisão sistemática da literatura, teve como objetivo analisar a efetividade da toxina botulínica como tratamento para dor miofascial mastigatória e disfunções temporomandibulares (DTM musculares. MÉTODOS: pesquisa nas bases de dados Medline, Cochrane, Embase, Pubmed, Lilacs e BBO, no período entre 1966 e abril de 2011, com enfoque em estudos clínicos controlados randomizados ou quase-randomizados, cegos ou duplo-cegos. RESULTADOS: após a aplicação dos critérios de inclusão, chegou-se a 4 artigos, sendo que 3 eram estudos clínicos controlados randomizados duplo-cego e 1 era estudo clínico controlado randomizado simples-cego. CONCLUSÕES: pela análise da literatura, verificou-se um número reduzido de evidências significativas sobre a real efetividade da toxina botulínica no tratamento da dor miofascial e de DTM musculares. Assim, são necessários novos estudos clínicos controlados randomizados, com amostras

  18. Importance of characteristics and modalities of physical activity and exercise in the management of cardiovascular health in individuals with cardiovascular disease (Part III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhees, L; Rauch, B; Piepoli, M; van Buuren, F; Takken, T; Börjesson, M; Bjarnason-Wehrens, B; Doherty, P; Dugmore, D; Halle, M

    2012-12-01

    The beneficial effect of exercise training and exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation on symptom-free exercise capacity,cardiovascular and skeletal muscle function, quality of life, general healthy lifestyle, and reduction of depressive symptoms and psychosocial stress is nowadays well recognized. However, it remains largely obscure, which characteristics of physical activity (PA) and exercise training--frequency, intensity, time (duration), type (mode), and volume (dose: intensity x duration) of exercise--are the most effective. The present paper, therefore, will deal with these exercise characteristics in the management of individuals with cardiovascular disease, i.e. coronary artery disease and chronic heart failure patients, but also in patients with congenital or valvular heart disease. Based on the current literature, and if sufficient evidence is available, recommendations from the European Association on Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation are formulated regarding frequency, intensity, time and type of PA, and safety aspects during exercise inpatients with cardiovascular disease. This paper is the third in a series of three papers, all devoted to the same theme: the importance of the exercise characteristics in the management of cardiovascular health. Part I is directed to the general population and Part II to individuals with cardiovascular risk factors. In general, PA recommendations and exercise training programmes for patients with coronary artery disease or chronic heart failure need to be tailored to the individual's exercise capacity and risk profile, with the aim to reach and maintain the individually highest fitness level possible and to perform endurance exercise training 30–60 min daily (3–5 days per week) in combination with resistance training 2–3 times a week. Because of the frequently reported dose–response relationship between training effect and exercise intensity, one should seek sufficiently high training intensities

  19. The classification of the finite simple groups, number 7 part III, chapters 7-11 the generic case, stages 3b and 4a

    CERN Document Server

    Gorenstein, Daniel; Solomon, Ronald

    2018-01-01

    The classification of finite simple groups is a landmark result of modern mathematics. The multipart series of monographs which is being published by the AMS (Volume 40.1-40.7 and future volumes) represents the culmination of a century-long project involving the efforts of scores of mathematicians published in hundreds of journal articles, books, and doctoral theses, totaling an estimated 15,000 pages. This part 7 of the series is the middle of a trilogy (Volume 40.5, Volume 40.7, and forthcoming Volume 40.8) treating the Generic Case, i.e., the identification of the alternating groups of degree at least 13 and most of the finite simple groups of Lie type and Lie rank at least 4. Moreover, Volumes 40.4-40.8 of this series will provide a complete treatment of the simple groups of odd type, i.e., the alternating groups (with two exceptions) and the groups of Lie type defined over a finite field of odd order, as well as some of the sporadic simple groups. In particular, this volume completes the construction, be...

  20. Differences between easy- and difficult-to-mill chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) genotypes. Part III: free sugar and non-starch polysaccharide composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Jennifer A; Knights, Edmund J; Campbell, Grant M; Choct, Mingan

    2014-05-01

    Parts I and II of this series of papers identified several associations between the ease of milling and the chemical compositions of different chickpea seed fractions. Non-starch polysaccharides were implicated; hence, this study examines the free sugars and sugar residues. Difficult milling is associated with: (1) lower glucose and xylose residues (less cellulose and xyloglucans) and more arabinose, rhamnose and uronic acid in the seed coat, suggesting a more flexible seed coat that resists cracking and decortication; (2) a higher content of soluble and insoluble non-starch polysaccharide fractions in the cotyledon periphery, supporting a pectic polysaccharide mechanism comprising arabinogalacturonan, homogalacturonan, rhamnogalalcturonan, and glucuronan backbone structures; (3) higher glucose and mannose residues in the cotyledon periphery, supporting a lectin-mediated mechanism of adhesion; and (4) higher arabinose and glucose residues in the cotyledon periphery, supporting a mechanism involving arabinogalactan-proteins. This series has shown that the chemical composition of chickpea does vary in ways that are consistent with physical explanations of how seed structure and properties relate to milling behaviour. Seed coat strength and flexibility, pectic polysaccharide binding, lectins and arabinogalactan-proteins have been implicated. Increased understanding in these mechanisms will allow breeding programmes to optimise milling performance in new cultivars. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Winter ecology of the Porcupine caribou herd, Yukon: Part III, Role of day length in determining activity pattern and estimating percent lying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Russell

    1986-06-01

    Full Text Available Data on the activity pattern, proportion of time spent lying and the length of active and lying periods in winter are presented from a 3 year study on the Porcupine caribou herd. Animals were most active at sunrise and sunset resulting in from one (late fall, early and mid winter to two (early fall and late winter to three (spring intervening lying periods. Mean active/lying cycle length decreased from late fall (298 mm to early winter (238 min, increased to a peak in mid winter (340 min then declined in late winter (305 min and again in spring (240 min. Mean length of the lying period increased throughout the 3 winter months from 56 min m early winter to 114 min in mid winter and 153 min in late winter. The percent of the day animals spent lying decreased from fall to early winter, increased throughout the winter and declined in spring. This pattern was related, in part, to day length and was used to compare percent lying among herds. The relationship is suggested to be a means of comparing quality of winter ranges.

  2. The craniocervical connection: a retrospective analysis of 300 whiplash patients with cervical and temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, M H; Weisberg, J

    2000-07-01

    Because the concept of whiplash as a causative factor for temporomandibular disorders (TMD) is highly controversial, we decided to do a retrospective analysis of patients treated in our office who had sustained whiplash injuries and were treated for cervical and temporomandibular disorders. The records of 300 patients with TMD preceded by a motor vehicle accident were examined retrospectively. The most common presenting symptoms, in order, were: jaw pain, neck pain, post-traumatic headache, jaw fatigue, and severe temporomandibular joint (TMJ) clicking. The most common TMD diagnoses were: masseter trigger points, closing jaw muscle hyperactivity, TMJ synovitis, opening jaw muscle hyperactivity, and advanced TMJ disk derangement. Based primarily on the physical examination, we concluded that the TMJ and surrounding musculature should be examined similarly to other joints, with no preconceived notion that TMD pathology after whiplash is unlikely.

  3. [Diagnosis and classification of headache and temporomandibular disorders, a new opportunity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koole, P; Koole, R

    2011-05-01

    Patients with orofacial pains are generally treated by physicians. A small number of patients are treated for pain in the temporomandibular joint, the masticatory and the neck muscles, by dentists and orofacial surgeons. Among half of the patients being treated in neurological headache clinics, the temporomandibular joint and the masticatory muscles are the source of the pain. In order to achieve better research and a classification, the International Headache Society, consisting largely of neurologists, developed a classification system. A comparable development occurred among oral health specialists. Employing these 2 methods with the same patients leads to different diagnoses and treatments. Both the International Classification of Headache Disorders II and the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders are being revised. This creates the opportunity to establish a single classification for these orofacial pains, preferably within the new International Classification of Headache Disorders.

  4. A pilot study of a chiropractic intervention for management of chronic myofascial temporomandibular disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeVocht, James W; Goertz, Christine M; Hondras, Maria

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Temporomandibular pain has multiple etiologies and a range of therapeutic options. In this pilot study, the authors assessed the feasibility of conducting a larger trial to evaluate chiropractic treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). METHODS: The authors assigned 80...... at baseline and at month 2 and month 6, including use of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders. RESULTS: The authors screened 721 potential participants and enrolled 80 people; 52 participants completed the six-month assessment. The adjusted mean change in current pain over six...... the study design and methodology to be manageable. They gained substantial knowledge to aid in conducting a larger study. AMCT, RIST and self-care should be evaluated in a future comparative effectiveness study. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: This pilot study was a necessary step to prepare for a larger study...

  5. Spinal and temporo-mandibular disorders in male workers of the State Police.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancini, Angela; Tomei, Francesco; Tomei, Gianfranco; Caciari, Tiziana; Capozzella, Assunta; Di Famiani, Manuela; Samperi, Ilaria; Scala, Barbara; Fiaschetti, Maria; Cetica, Carlotta; Ciarrocca, Manuela

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study are to evaluate the prevalence of disorders of the lumbar region and the temporo-mandibular district co-morbidity in drivers and workers of the State Police employed for different office activities. The study population included 103 drivers as cases and 100 police officers as controls. The study was carried out through questionnaire and clinical evaluation of the spine and temporo-mandibular region. At clinical examination, the drivers were found to have a higher prevalence (p temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ), when compared with the controls. The results also showed a higher prevalence (p < 0.05) of co-morbidity in the two districts among the drivers, when compared with the controls. These results confirm that morbidity related to back and TMJ and increase in co-morbidity between the two districts are higher in professional drivers.

  6. [Inferior hemiarthroplasty of the temporo-mandibular joint with articulated condylar prosthesis type Stryker].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucur, A; Dincă, O; Totan, C; Ghită, V

    2007-01-01

    The optimal reconstruction of the mandible and of the temporo-mandibular joint after mandibular hemi-resection with disarticulation is still controversial in literature. This paperwork presents our experience on four cases in the reconstruction of the mandible together with the inferior arthroplasty of the temporo-mandibular joint, after the resection of extended benign tumors of the mandible, based on fibular free vascularized grafts having attached a Stryker titanium condylar prosthesis reconstructing the inferior segment of the temporo-mandibular joint. Our results for the this technique were excellent, with a functional rehabilitation very close to normal. After reviewing the various techniques and their arguments in literature, with accent on the TMJ reconstruction, we consider this method to be optimal for the reconstruction of mandibular defects in patients with neoplastic conditions.

  7. SYNOVIAL CHONDROMATOSIS OF THE TEMPORO-MANDIBULAR JOINT. A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. MALANCHUK

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The study describes a rare clinical case of synovial chondromatosis of the temporo-mandibular joint, in a 53 year-old patient. In the prehospital stage, the patient was examined by additional diagnostic methods – 3D CT and subsequent computer simulation, in view of subsequent surgery. In January 2015, partial synovektomy of the right temporo-mandibular joint with removal of cartilaginous impurities was performed under general anesthesia. After histopathological confirmation of the clinical diagnosis, the patient was discharged in satisfactory condition, with recommendations for further examination and radiological control. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporo-mandibular joint is a disease characterized by impaired formation of cartilage or of intraarticular, cartilaginous, and relatively rare bone impurities. An important role in the diagnosis of joints’ synovial chondromatosis is played by the instrumental research methods, especially X-ray. Surgical treatment is recommended as a function of the prevalence of lesions.

  8. Acid-base titrations by stepwise addition of equal volumes of titrant with special reference to automatic titrations-III Presentation of a fully automatic titration apparatus and of results supporting the theories given in the preceding parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehrsson, L; Ingman, F

    1977-02-01

    This paper forms Part III of a series in which the first two parts describe methods for evaluating titrations performed by stepwise addition of equal volumes of titrant. The great advantage of these methods is that they do not require an accurate calibration of the electrode system. This property makes the methods very suitable for routine work. e.g., in automatic analysis. An apparatus for performing such titrations automatically is presented. Further, results of titrations of monoprotic acids, a diprotic acid, an ampholyte, a mixture of an acid with its conjugate base, and mixtures of two acids with a small difference between the stability constants are given. Most of these titrations cannot be evaluated by the Gran or Hofstee methods but yield results having errors of the order of 0.1% if the methods proposed in Parts I and II of this series are employed. The advantages of the method of stepwise addition of equal volumes of titrant combined with the proposed evaluation methods, in comparison with common methods such as titration to a preset pH, are that all the data are used in the evaluation, permitting a statistical treatment and giving better possibilities for tracing systematic errors.

  9. Relação entre as disfunções temporomandibulares e a postura cervical

    OpenAIRE

    Elias, Millie Bouskela

    2017-01-01

    As disfunções temporomandibulares (DTMs) afetam os músculos da mastigação e/ou a articulação temporomandibular, bem com, estruturas associadas podendo levar ao aparecimento de uma série de sinais e sintomas muito diversos. Devido à íntima relação existente entre os músculos da cabeça e região cervical com o sistema estomatognático, e sendo crescente o número de pacientes com DTMs e concomitantemente com alterações posturais, alguns autores, sugerem a participação da postura cor...

  10. Results of MRI of the temporo-mandibular joint using optimised surface coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, T.; Kellermann, O.; Randzio, J.; Kniha, H.; Requardt, H.; Tiling, R.; Lissner, J.

    1988-11-01

    One hundred temporo-mandibular joints were examined with a super-conducting nuclear resonance tomograph (1.0 Tesla) using various high resolution surface coils. The optimal method proved to be a spin echo sequence with a repetition time of 1,000 msec and an echo period of 28 msec with a 4 mm slice width. There were significant advantages from the non-invasive MRT diagnosis of the temporo-mandibular joints when compared with CT and with arthrography in recognising abnormal discs, changes in the tissues and for post-operative control.

  11. Topical versus systemic diclofenac in the treatment of temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Rienzo Businco, L; Di Rienzo Businco, A; D'Emilia, M; Lauriello, M; Coen Tirelli, G

    2004-10-01

    The most frequent symptom of craniomandibular dysfunction is pain in the preauricular area or in the temporo-mandibular joint, usually localized at the level of the masticatory musculature. Patients sometimes also complain of reflect otalgia, headaches and facial pain. Osteoarthrosis is a frequent degenerative debilitating chronic disorder that can affect the temporomandibular joint. It causes pain and articular rigidity, a reduction in mobility, and radiological alterations are visible in stratigraphy. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of a topically applied non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug that has recently become commercially available (diclofenac sodium in a patented carrier containing dimethyl sulfoxide, that favours transcutaneous absorption) which is commonly used to alleviate pain in knee or elbow joints, versus oral diclofenac, in the treatment of symptoms of temporomandibular joint dysfunction. Dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint was diagnosed in 36 adult patients. The patients were randomized in two age- and gender -matched groups. Group A (18 patients) received oral diclofenac sodium administered after a meal in 50-mg tablets twice a day for 14 days. Group B (18 patients) received 16 mg/ml topical diclofenac (diclofenac topical solution, 10 drops 4 times a day for 14 days). All patients completed a questionnaire at the start and end of therapy. Patients were asked to quantify on a graded visual analogue scale and to reply to questions about the pain and tenderness of the temporomandibular joint and the functional limitation of mouth opening. Patients were also requested to report side-effects of the treatment. All patients showed relief from pain after treatment: the difference between the two groups was not significant (p > 0.05). Post-treatment, 16 patients of group A had epigastralgic symptoms. Three patients treated with topical diclofenac showed a modest irritation of the temporomandibular joint region, and disappeared

  12. [The para-clinic investigation of temporo-mandibular joint changes in patients with acromegaly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morăraşu, C; Burlui, V; Olaru, C; Boza, C; Bortă, C; Morăraşu, G; Brînză, M

    2001-01-01

    The Acromegaly is an endocrinological disease determined by the hypersecretion of STH in a certain period of the body evolution and it causes the hypertrophy of bones in general and of mandible and cranio-facial bones, determining a disorder due to this development of bones, associated with troubles in the activity of muscles and of the phospho-calcium metabolism. This study was made on a group of 33 acromegaly patients. Their temporo-mandibular joint was investigated by ortopantomography, tomography, computer tomography and scintigraphy. All of these exams shows the changes in temporo-mandibular joint due to the cells hyperactivity determined by the hypersecretion of STH.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography of the temporomandibular joint: beyond dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Marcelo de Mattos; Machado, Karina Freitas Soares [Clinica Axial Centro de Imagem, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Radiologia; Mascarenhas, Marcelo Henrique [Associacao Brasileira de Odontologia de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Curso de Especializacao em Disfuncao Temporomandibular e Dor Orofacial

    2008-09-15

    Several diseases should be considered in the differential diagnosis of disorders affecting the temporomandibular joints. Internal derangement is the main condition responsible for pain related to this joint. Clinical signs may, though, be quite non-specific, and many other conditions present with similar and not infrequently indistinguishable signs and symptoms. In the present study, the authors describe several non-dysfunctional conditions affecting the temporomandibular joints through computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, emphasizing the importance of these imaging methods in the diagnosis of inflammatory, neoplastic and traumatic diseases of this region. Considering that clinical presentations are frequently non-specific, radiologists play a critical role in the differential diagnosis. (author)

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography of the temporomandibular joint: beyond dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Marcelo de Mattos; Machado, Karina Freitas Soares; Mascarenhas, Marcelo Henrique

    2008-01-01

    Several diseases should be considered in the differential diagnosis of disorders affecting the temporomandibular joints. Internal derangement is the main condition responsible for pain related to this joint. Clinical signs may, though, be quite non-specific, and many other conditions present with similar and not infrequently indistinguishable signs and symptoms. In the present study, the authors describe several non-dysfunctional conditions affecting the temporomandibular joints through computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, emphasizing the importance of these imaging methods in the diagnosis of inflammatory, neoplastic and traumatic diseases of this region. Considering that clinical presentations are frequently non-specific, radiologists play a critical role in the differential diagnosis. (author)

  15. Temporomandibular Disorders and Headache: A Retrospective Analysis of 1198 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Paolo, Carlo; D'Urso, Anna; Papi, Piero; Di Sabato, Francesco; Rosella, Daniele; Pompa, Giorgio; Polimeni, Antonella

    2017-01-01

    Aim . Headache is one of the most common diseases associated with Temporomandibular Disorders (TMDs). The aim of this study was to evaluate, retrospectively, if headache influences TMD's symptoms. Material and Methods . A total sample of 1198 consecutive TMD patients was selected. After a neurological examination, a diagnosis of headache, according to the latest edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, was performed in 625 subjects. Patients were divided into two groups based on presence/absence of headache: Group with Headache (GwH) and Group without Headache (GwoH). Descriptive statistics and Chi-square index were performed. Results . Sociodemographic (gender, marital status, and occupation) and functional factors, occlusion (occlusal and skeletal classes, dental formula, and occlusal abnormalities), and familiar pain did not show a statistically significant correlation in either group. Intensity and frequency of neck pain, arthralgia of TMJ, and myalgia showed higher correlation values in GwH. Conclusion . This study is consistent with previous literature in showing a close relationship between headache and TMD. All data underlines that headache makes pain parameters more intense and frequent. Therefore, an early and multidisciplinary treatment of TMDs should be performed in order to avoid the overlay of painful events that could result in pain chronicity.

  16. Surgical treatment for temporomandibular joint osteoarthrosis. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robiony, M; Demitri, V; Costa, F; Politi, M

    1998-11-01

    TMJ osteoarthrosis and internal derangements are in close connection, representing a substantial portion of temporomandibular disorders. The authors wish to underline the role of surgery in the treatment of this degenerative disease to improve function and to alleviate pain. A 63 year-old woman suffering from closed-lock with reduced opening movements was accepted in our Department in March, 1995. Clinical and radiological evaluations showed bilateral closed lock and severe TMJ osteoarthrosis. Occlusal, pharmacological and physical therapy were performed for one year, without results. Bilateral condylectomy and diskectomy with arthroplasty were carried out. Immediate muscular rehabilitation after surgery was performed by the patient. Follow-up 3, 6, 12 months after surgery were carried out. Full opening movements and reduction of pain were obtained 20 days after surgery. The patient, followed-up one year after surgery, presented effective mandibular movements and adequate amelioration of clinical picture. TMJ surgery in association with physical therapy represents in selected cases an adequate procedure for the treatment of TMJ degenerative disease.

  17. Temporomandibular Disorders and Headache: A Retrospective Analysis of 1198 Patients

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    Carlo Di Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Headache is one of the most common diseases associated with Temporomandibular Disorders (TMDs. The aim of this study was to evaluate, retrospectively, if headache influences TMD’s symptoms. Material and Methods. A total sample of 1198 consecutive TMD patients was selected. After a neurological examination, a diagnosis of headache, according to the latest edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, was performed in 625 subjects. Patients were divided into two groups based on presence/absence of headache: Group with Headache (GwH and Group without Headache (GwoH. Descriptive statistics and Chi-square index were performed. Results. Sociodemographic (gender, marital status, and occupation and functional factors, occlusion (occlusal and skeletal classes, dental formula, and occlusal abnormalities, and familiar pain did not show a statistically significant correlation in either group. Intensity and frequency of neck pain, arthralgia of TMJ, and myalgia showed higher correlation values in GwH. Conclusion. This study is consistent with previous literature in showing a close relationship between headache and TMD. All data underlines that headache makes pain parameters more intense and frequent. Therefore, an early and multidisciplinary treatment of TMDs should be performed in order to avoid the overlay of painful events that could result in pain chronicity.

  18. Are headache and temporomandibular disorders related? A blinded study.

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    Ballegaard, V; Thede-Schmidt-Hansen, P; Svensson, P; Jensen, R

    2008-08-01

    To investigate overlaps between headache and temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in a clinical headache population and to describe the prevalence of TMD in headache patients, 99 patients referred to a specialized headache centre were diagnosed according to Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD) and classified in headache groups according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, second edition for headache diagnoses in a blinded design. The prevalence of TMD in the headache population was 56.1%. Psychosocial dysfunction caused by TMD pain was observed in 40.4%. No significant differences in TMD prevalence were revealed between headache groups, although TMD prevalence tended to be higher in patients with combined migraine and tension-type headache. Moderate to severe depression was experienced by 54.5% of patients. Patients with coexistent TMD had a significantly higher prevalence of depression-most markedly in patients with combined migraine and tension-type headache. Our studies indicate that a high proportion of headache patients have significant disability because of ongoing chronic TMD pain. The trend to a higher prevalence of TMD in patients with combined migraine and tension-type headache suggests that this could be a risk factor for TMD development. A need for screening procedures and treatment strategies concerning depression in headache patients with coexistent TMD is underlined by the overrepresentation of depression in this group. Our findings emphasize the importance of examination of the masticatory system in headache sufferers and underline the necessity of a multidimensional approach in chronic headache patients.

  19. Temporomandibular disorders and painful comorbidities: clinical association and underlying mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Yuri Martins; Conti, Paulo César Rodrigues; de Faria, Flavio Augusto Cardoso; Bonjardim, Leonardo Rigoldi

    2017-03-01

    The association between temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and headaches, cervical spine dysfunction, and fibromyalgia is not artefactual. The aim of this review is to describe the comorbid relationship between TMD and these three major painful conditions and to discuss the clinical implications and the underlying pain mechanisms involved in these relationships. Common neuronal pathways and central sensitization processes are acknowledged as the main factors for the association between TMD and primary headaches, although the establishment of cause-effect mechanisms requires further clarification and characterization. The biomechanical aspects are not the main factors involved in the comorbid relationship between TMD and cervical spine dysfunction, which can be better explained by the neuronal convergence of the trigeminal and cervical spine sensory pathways as well as by central sensitization processes. The association between TMD and fibromyalgia also has supporting evidence in the literature, and the proposed main mechanism underlying this relationship is the impairment of the descending pain inhibitory system. In this particular scenario, a cause-effect relationship is more likely to occur in one direction, that is, fibromyalgia as a risk factor for TMD. Therefore, clinical awareness of the association between TMD and painful comorbidities and the support of multidisciplinary approaches are required to recognize these related conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Headaches and myofascial temporomandibular disorders: overlapping entities, separate managements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, P C R; Costa, Y M; Gonçalves, D A; Svensson, P

    2016-09-01

    There are relevant clinical overlaps between some of the painful temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and headache conditions that may hamper the diagnostic process and treatment. A non-systematic search for studies on the relationship between TMD and headaches was carried out in the following databases: PubMed, Cochrane Library and Embase. Important pain mechanisms contributing to the close association and complex relationship between TMD and headache disorders are as follows: processes of peripheral and central sensitisation which take place in similar anatomical areas, the possible impairment of the descending modulatory pain pathways and the processes of referred pain. In addition, the clinical examination does not always provide distinguishing information to differentiate between headaches and TMD. So, considering the pathophysiology and the clinical presentation of some types of headache and myofascial TMD, such overlap can be considered not only a matter of comorbid relationship, but rather a question of disorders where the distinction lines are sometimes hard to identify. These concerns are certainly reflected in the current classification systems of both TMD and headache where the clinical consequences of diagnosis such as headache attributed to or associated with TMD are uncertain. There are several similarities in terms of therapeutic strategies used to manage myofascial TMD and headaches. Considering all these possible levels of interaction, we reinforce the recommendation for multidisciplinary approaches, by a team of oro-facial pain specialists and a neurologist (headache specialist), to attain the most precise differential diagnosis and initiate the best and most efficient treatment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Relationship Between Orthodontics and Temporomandibular Disorders: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes Ortega, Ana Carolina Bannwart; Pozza, Daniel Humberto; Rocha Rodrigues, Luciane Lacerda Franco; Guimarães, Antônio Sergio

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the possible relationship between the orthodontic treatment of Class II malocclusion and the development of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). A total of 40 patients was evaluated at four time points: the day before the start of treatment employing bilateral Class II elastics (baseline), as well as at 24 hours, 1 week, and 1 month after the start of treatment. The development of TMD pain complaints in the orofacial region and changes in the range of mouth opening were assessed at these times. Shapiro-Wilk, McNemar, and Friedman tests with 5% significance level were used to analyze the data. The treatment produced pain of a transitory, moderate intensity, but there was no significant change from baseline after 1 month. There were no restrictions in the range of jaw motion or any evidence of limitations in mouth opening. Orthodontic treatment with bilateral Class II elastics does not cause significant orofacial pain or undesirable changes in the range of mouth opening. Furthermore, this modality of orthodontic treatment was not responsible for inducing TMD.

  2. Temporomandibular disorders and parafunctional oral habits: an anamnestic study

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    Melissa de Oliveira Melchior

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the frequency and severity of the signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD, the frequency of parafunctional oral habits and the correlation between the variables by means of the patients' perception regarding their problem. METHODS: One hundred patients diagnosed with TMD, through a clinical examination of their masticatory system, answered the questions of a previously published protocol concerning the signs and symptoms most frequently reported in the literature. RESULTS: According to the results from the non parametric statistical analysis, the frequency for the following signs and symptoms was significant: Fatigue and muscle pain, joint sounds, tinnitus, ear fullness, headache, chewing impairment and difficulty to yawn (p<0.01 and otalgia (p<0.05. As to the parafunctional oral habits, there was a significant presence of teeth clenching during the day and night (p<0.01 and teeth grinding at night (p<0.05. The variable correlation analysis showed that there was a positive correlation between symptom frequency and severity; age was correlated with the presence of otalgia, cervical pain and teeth sensitivity, besides being correlated with muscle and joint pain severity. Habit frequency was negatively correlated with age. TMD duration was also positively correlated with the symptoms of tinnitus, ear fullness, muscle and joint pain. CONCLUSION: The study results showed that the anamnestic assessment using ProDTMMulti can predict the severity of the TMD case.

  3. Circulating Omentin-1 and Chronic Painful Temporomandibular Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Jennifer B; Sanders, Anne E; Wilder, Rebecca S; Essick, Greg K; Slade, Gary D; Hartung, Jane E; Nackley, Andrea G

    To investigate the relationship between omentin-1 levels and painful temporomandibular disorders (TMD). In a case-control design, chronic painful TMD cases (n = 90) and TMD-free controls (n = 54) were selected from participants in the multisite OPPERA study (Orofacial Pain: Prospective Evaluation and Risk Assessment). Painful TMD case status was determined by examination using established Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD). Levels of omentin-1 in stored blood plasma samples were measured by using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Binary logistic regression was used to calculate the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence limits (CLs) for the association between omentin-1 and painful TMD. Models were adjusted for study site, age, sex, and body mass index. The unadjusted association between omentin-1 and chronic painful TMD was statistically nonsignificant (P = .072). Following adjustment for covariates, odds of TMD pain decreased 36% per standard deviation increase in circulating omentin-1 (adjusted OR = 0.64; 95% CL: 0.43, 0.96; P = .031). Circulating levels of omentin-1 were significantly lower in painful TMD cases than controls, suggesting that TMD pain is mediated by inflammatory pathways.

  4. Do women with migraine have higher prevalence of temporomandibular disorders?

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    Maria C Gonçalves

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD, using the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD in women with episodic and chronic migraine (M and CM, as well as in asymptomatic women. METHOD: Sample consisted of 61 women, being 38 with M and 23 with CM, identified from a headache outpatient center; we also investigated 30 women without headaches for at least 3 months (women without headache group - WHG. Assessment of TMD was conducted by a physical therapist who was blind to the headache status. RESULTS: The prevalence of TMD, assessed through the RDC, was 33.3% in the WHG, 86.8% in the M group and 91.3% of the CM group. Differences were significant when comparing M and CM groups with WHG (p0.05 as well as higher risk for TMD [odds ratio (OR=3.15, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.73-5.71 and OR=3.97, 95%CI 1.76-8.94]. CONCLUSION: Women with migraine are more likely to have muscular and articular TMD, suggesting that both disorders might be clinically associated, which demonstrate the importance of physical therapy assessment in the multidisciplinary team.

  5. Relationship of Occlusal Schemes with the Occurrence of Temporomandibular Disorders

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    Dina H. Sugiaman

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Masticatory system is a complex functional unit of the body responsible for mastication, speech, and deglutition process. Temporomandibular disorders (TMD is used to describe all functional disturbances of the masticatory system. The etiology of TMD is multifactorial, such as occlusal disharmony and emotional stress. The relationship between occlusion and TMD has been highly debated in dentistry, one of the occlusal factors is the occlusal scheme. Occlusal schemes are defined as bilateral canine guidance, unilateral canine guidance, group function and balanced occlusion. However, studies about the relationship of occlusal schemes and the occurrence of the TMD are still limited and remained controversial. Objective: To investigate the relationship of occlusal schemes witht he occurrence of TMD. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted at the Faculty of Dentistry, Uniiversitas Indonesia. A total of 127 students were included in this study. Subjects were examined based on Clinical Helkimo Index and divided into TMD and non-TMD groups. Subjects were categorized as non-TMD groups if the value of the clinical Helkimo index was 0 and as TMD group when the value ranged between 1-25. Results: Balanced occlusion schemes has a greater risk of TMD occurrence with odds ratio value 5.6 and 95% confidence interval 1.188 to 26.331 (p=0.021. Conclusion: Balanced occlusion has a significant relationship with the occurrence of TMD.

  6. Laterality of proprioception in the orofacial muscles and temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frayne, Ellie; Coulson, Susan; Adams, Roger; Croxson, Glen; Waddington, Gordon

    2016-12-02

    Laterality of function in the orofacial musculature suggests there may be side-to-side asymmetry of proprioceptive acuity in lip movement compared to the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In the present work, 14 young adults were tested for acuity of lip and TMJ closure movements onto plugs varying from 5 to 8mm without visual feedback. Testing was conducted on both left and right sides, using the same psychophysical task and stimuli. Results showed superior proprioceptive acuity at the lips, with no significant side effect. However, there was side-to-side asymmetry in the correlations between proprioceptive performance for the two anatomical structures, with performance on the right side strongly correlated but not on the left. This is consistent with the need for coordination between structures during chewing. When acuity at different points in the stimulus range was examined, the right side lips were better with small stimuli. Overall, results support enhanced use-specific proprioception. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Temporomandibular disorders in burning mouth syndrome patients: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsalini, Massimo; Di Venere, Daniela; Pettini, Francesco; Lauritano, Dorina; Petruzzi, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS) is a chronic disease characterized by absence of any lesions and burning of the oral mucosa associated to a sensation of dry mouth and/or taste alterations. The purpose of our study is to estimate signs and symptoms of Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) in patients with BMS and to investigate for the existence of an association between BMS and TMD. Forty-four BMS patients were enrolled; BMS subtype was established according to the classification of Lamey. After a gnathological evaluation, according to the protocol of the European Academy of Craniomandibular Disorders, patients were classified by RDC/TMD criteria. The data were compared and analyzed using a chi-square test to describe the existence of an association between BMS and TMD. 65.9% the BMS patients showed disorders classified as primary signs and symptoms of TMD according to RDC / TMD criteria, and 72.7% showed parafunctional habits. The chi-square test revealed a statistically significant association (p = 0.035) between BMS and TMD. The data suggest that there is a possible relationship not yet well understood between BMS and TMD, may be for neurophatic alterations assumed for BMS that could be also engaged in TMD pathogenesis.

  8. Roentgenographic study of the temporomandibular joint in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Ho Jung; You, Dong Soo

    1984-01-01

    For the study of the temporomandibular joint in rheumatoid arthritis 30 patients were selected who were diagnosis as rheumatoid arthritis through the clinical, radiographic examination and laboratory finding. Temporoman dibular joint involvement was evaluated through the clinical, radiographic examination. The results were as follows; 1. TMJ was involved in 15 patients of 30 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. (50% involvement). 2. Duration of rheumatoid arthritis was more longer in patients with TMJ involvement than in patients without TMJ involvement. 3. Osseous changes in TMJ were in order of frequency erosion, flattening, osteophyte, sclerosis, deformity, and most common involved site was mandibular condyle. 4. Most common positional change of condyle was forward position in centric occlusion, and restricted movement of condyle in 1 inch mouth opening. 5. TMJ involvement of rheumatoid arthritis was almost bilateral. 6. Main symptoms of TMJ were pain, stiffness, tenderness, limitation of mouth opening, crepitation. 7. There was not the case of ankylosis. 8. There was statistically insignificant correlation between mandibular deviation and TMJ involvement, but some cases showed severe deviation on mouth opening.

  9. Methadone treatment, bruxism, and temporomandibular disorders among male prisoners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enguelberg-Gabbay, Judith V; Schapir, Lior; Israeli, Yair; Hermesh, Haggai; Weizman, Abraham; Winocur, Ephraim

    2016-06-01

    There is little information on bruxism related to illicit drug use. Prolonged drug use may damage the stomatognathic system via oral motor overactivity. The aim of the present study was to compare the rates of bruxism and temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) between prisoners with and without drug-use disorders, to evaluate the association between methadone treatment and bruxism and to assess the possible relationship between bruxism and pain. The sample included 152 male prisoners, 69 of whom were drug users maintained on methadone. All prisoners were examined by an experienced dentist and completed a questionnaire on their oral habits, with the aim of detecting signs or symptoms of TMD and/or bruxism. Additional data were collected from medical files. The prevalence of sleep bruxism and awake bruxism, but not of TMDs, was significantly higher among drug-user than non-drug user prisoners (52.2% vs. 34.9% for sleep bruxism, 59.7% vs. 30.1% for awake bruxism, and 46.3% vs. 25.6% for TMDs, respectively). Participants with awake bruxism were statistically more sensitive to muscle palpation compared with participants with sleep bruxism [rating scores (mean ± SD): 0.32 ± 0.21 vs. 0.19 ± 0.28, respectively]. An association was found between sleep bruxism and awake bruxism. It seems that there is a direct or an indirect association between methadone maintenance treatment and sleep bruxism or awake bruxism in male prisoners. © 2016 Eur J Oral Sci.

  10. Temporomandibular Disorders and Headache: A Retrospective Analysis of 1198 Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Paolo, Carlo; D'Urso, Anna; Di Sabato, Francesco; Pompa, Giorgio

    2017-01-01

    Aim. Headache is one of the most common diseases associated with Temporomandibular Disorders (TMDs). The aim of this study was to evaluate, retrospectively, if headache influences TMD's symptoms. Material and Methods. A total sample of 1198 consecutive TMD patients was selected. After a neurological examination, a diagnosis of headache, according to the latest edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, was performed in 625 subjects. Patients were divided into two groups based on presence/absence of headache: Group with Headache (GwH) and Group without Headache (GwoH). Descriptive statistics and Chi-square index were performed. Results. Sociodemographic (gender, marital status, and occupation) and functional factors, occlusion (occlusal and skeletal classes, dental formula, and occlusal abnormalities), and familiar pain did not show a statistically significant correlation in either group. Intensity and frequency of neck pain, arthralgia of TMJ, and myalgia showed higher correlation values in GwH. Conclusion. This study is consistent with previous literature in showing a close relationship between headache and TMD. All data underlines that headache makes pain parameters more intense and frequent. Therefore, an early and multidisciplinary treatment of TMDs should be performed in order to avoid the overlay of painful events that could result in pain chronicity. PMID:28420942

  11. Chronic Temporomandibular Disorders: disability, pain intensity and fear of movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Martínez, Alfonso; Grande-Alonso, Mónica; López-de-Uralde-Villanueva, Ibai; López-López, Almudena; Fernández-Carnero, Josué; La Touche, Roy

    2016-12-01

    The objective was to compare and correlate disability, pain intensity, the impact of headache on daily life and the fear of movement between subgroups of patients with chronic temporomandibular disorder (TMD). A cross-sectional study was conducted in patients diagnosed with chronic painful TMD. Patients were divided into: 1) joint pain (JP); 2) muscle pain (MP); and 3) mixed pain. The following measures were included: Craniomandibular pain and disability (Craniofacial pain and disability inventory), neck disability (Neck Dsiability Index), pain intensity (Visual Analogue Scale), impact of headache (Headache Impact Test 6) and kinesiophobia (Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia-11). A total of 154 patients were recruited. The mixed pain group showed significant differences compared with the JP group or MP group in neck disability (p craniomandibular pain and disability (p Neck disability was a significant covariate (37 % of variance) of craniomandibular pain and disability for the MP group (β = 0.62; p neck disability (β = 0.40; p craniomandibular pain and disability. Mixed chronic pain patients show greater craniomandibular and neck disability than patients diagnosed with chronic JP or MP. Neck disability predicted the variance of craniofacial pain and disability for patients with MP. Neck disability and kinesiophobia predicted the variance of craniofacial pain and disability for those with chronic mixed pain.

  12. Assessment of temporomandibular and cervical spine disorders in tinnitus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björne, Assar

    2007-01-01

    In treating patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction it was noticed that tinnitus and vertigo were common in such patients and there was also muscular tension in jaw and neck. During treatment of these patients it was also noted that injection of lidocaine in a jaw muscle (m. pt. lat.) reduced not only their muscular problems but also that the tinnitus was reduced while the local anesthetic was active. Evaluation of 39 patients with disabling tinnitus, and all suffered from tinnitus, revealed that 10 of them had bilateral tinnitus and TMJ disorders revealed that pain in the face, temples or jaw occurred often among these patients. Many of such patients had also symptoms of cervical spine disorders, head, neck and shoulder pain, and limitations in side bending and rotation were also frequent complaints. One-third of these patients could influence tinnitus by jaw movements and 75% could trigger vertigo by head or neck movements. Treatment of jaw and neck disorders in 24 patients with Ménière's disease had a beneficial effect on not only their episodic vertigo but also on their tinnitus and aural fullness. At the 3-year follow-up, intensity of all symptoms were significantly reduced (p<0.001).

  13. Oral splints: the crutches for temporomandibular disorders and bruxism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, T T; Lavigne, G J

    1998-01-01

    Despite the extensive use of oral splints in the treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and bruxism, their mechanisms of action remain controversial Various hypotheses have been proposed to explain their apparent efficacy (i.e., true therapeutic value), including the repositioning of condyle and/or the articular disc, reduction in the electromyographic activity of the masticatory muscles, modification of the patient's "harmful" oral behavior, and changes in the patient's occlusion. Following a comprehensive review of the literature, it is concluded that any of these theories is either poor or inconsistent, while the issue of true efficacy for oral splints remains unsettled. However, the results of a controlled clinical trial lend support to the effectiveness (i.e., the patient's appreciation of the positive changes which are perceived to have occurred during the trial) of the stabilizing splint in the control of myofascial pain. In light of the data supporting their effectiveness but not their efficacy, oral splints should be used as an adjunct for pain management rather than a definitive treatment. For sleep bruxism, it is prudent to limit their use as a habit management aid and to prevent/limit dental damage potentially induced by the disorder. Future research should study the natural history and etiologies of TMD and bruxism, so that specific treatments for these disorders can be developed.

  14. MR findings of the temporomandibular joint with crepitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Tsukasa; Yamamoto, Mika; Yamaga, Takayoshi; Takahashi, Koji; Masuda, Saeko; Tagaya, Atsuko; Michi, Ken-ichi; Okano, Tomohiro

    1997-01-01

    Crepitus is an important sign for diagnosis of arthrosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The presence of crepitus can be evaluated by the listening test previously proposed by our group. However, TMJ can be diagnosed by MR imaging showing the disc position and related findings including bony changes and joint effusion. This study investigated the relationship between the presence of crepitus and pathology of the joint. Fourteen joints with crepitus diagnosed by the listening test were examined in this study. TMJ was categorized into four types based on findings on double spin echo MR images. The results were as follows: Of fourteen joints with crepitus, five (36%) were showed as normal superior disc position. The remaining 9 joints (64%) were diagnosed with disc displacement, of which, 6 showed reduction, one was without reduction and 2 without reduction were associated with arthrosis. Statistical analysis using the data obtained here and other data showed that the joints with crepitus tended to show disk displacement. There was no significant difference between the degree of certainty about the presence of the crepitus and the distribution of joint pathology. Joint effusion was observed only in the joints with displacement. These results indicated that TMJ with crepitus is associated with varied joint pathology. (author)

  15. MR findings of the temporomandibular joint with crepitus

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    Sano, Tsukasa; Yamamoto, Mika; Yamaga, Takayoshi; Takahashi, Koji; Masuda, Saeko; Tagaya, Atsuko; Michi, Ken-ichi; Okano, Tomohiro [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Dentistry

    1997-06-01

    Crepitus is an important sign for diagnosis of arthrosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The presence of crepitus can be evaluated by the listening test previously proposed by our group. However, TMJ can be diagnosed by MR imaging showing the disc position and related findings including bony changes and joint effusion. This study investigated the relationship between the presence of crepitus and pathology of the joint. Fourteen joints with crepitus diagnosed by the listening test were examined in this study. TMJ was categorized into four types based on findings on double spin echo MR images. The results were as follows: Of fourteen joints with crepitus, five (36%) were showed as normal superior disc position. The remaining 9 joints (64%) were diagnosed with disc displacement, of which, 6 showed reduction, one was without reduction and 2 without reduction were associated with arthrosis. Statistical analysis using the data obtained here and other data showed that the joints with crepitus tended to show disk displacement. There was no significant difference between the degree of certainty about the presence of the crepitus and the distribution of joint pathology. Joint effusion was observed only in the joints with displacement. These results indicated that TMJ with crepitus is associated with varied joint pathology. (author)

  16. Temporomandibular joint fibrocartilage degeneration from unilateral dental splints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Sarah E; Lowe, Jesse R; Tudares, Mauro A; Gold, Michael S; Almarza, Alejandro J

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which altered loading in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), as might be associated with a malocclusion, drives degeneration of articulating surfaces in the TMJ. We therefore sought to quantify the effects of altered joint loading on the mechanical properties and biochemical content and distribution of TMJ fibrocartilage in the rabbit. Altered TMJ loading was induced with a 1mm splint placed unilaterally over the maxillary and mandibular molars for 6 weeks. At that time, TMJ fibrocartilage was assessed by compression testing, biochemical content (collagen, glycosaminoglycan (GAG), DNA) and distribution (histology), for both the TMJ disc and the condylar fibrocartilage. There were no changes in the TMJ disc for any of the parameters tested. The condylar fibrocartilage from the splinted animals was significantly stiffer and the DNA content was significantly lower than that in control animals. There was significant remodeling in the condylar fibrocartilage layers as manifested by a change in GAG and collagen II distribution and a loss of defined cell layers. A connection between the compressive properties of TMJ condylar fibrocartilage after 6 weeks of splinting and the changes in histology was observed. These results suggest a change in joint loading leads to condylar damage, which may contribute to pain associated with at least some forms of TMJ disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Inflammatory Cytokines and Sleep Disturbance in Patients with Temporomandibular Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Woon; Chung, Jin Woo

    2016-01-01

    To assess the degree and interrelationship of sleep disturbance and plasma cytokine levels in temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain patients. Forty female TMD patients and 20 age-, sex-, and body mass index (BMI)-matched healthy subjects were enrolled. TMD was diagnosed using the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD. The TMD patients were classified as having low or high disability according to Graded Chronic Pain Scale findings. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) were used to measure sleep quality. Plasma concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured from blood samples collected between 9 am and noon. Statistical analyses included Kruskal-Wallis and one-way analysis of variance tests to compare results between different groups and multivariate general linear models to evaluate the effect of sleep status on cytokine levels. The high-disability group had the highest PSQI and ESS scores (P disability group exhibiting the highest values (P ≤ .001). The plasma cytokine levels were significantly correlated with PSQI scores (P disability level after adjusting for both sleep indices (both P disability, had elevated plasma cytokine levels and increased ESS and PSQI scores suggestive of sleep disturbance.

  18. Scleroderma and the temporomandibular joint: reconstruction in 2 variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacIntosh, Robert Bruce; Shivapuja, Prasanna-Kumar; Naqvi, Rabia

    2015-06-01

    This article reviews the pathophysiology of scleroderma (systemic sclerosis [SSc]) and its destructive effects on the mandible in general and the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in particular. It discusses the considerations of operating on patients with devastating chronic disease and presents 2 cases of TMJ reconstruction in patients with the diagnosis. Two patients with different degrees of SSc involvement underwent TMJ reconstruction with costochondral grafts. The patients represent the surgical considerations pertinent to this disease and different outcomes as determined by the variance in severity of their afflictions. The 2 patients tolerated the surgeries well and exhibited improvement in function in the long-term. One patient thrives and continues to do well despite her SSc approximately 10 years postoperatively; the second patient died of her disease approximately 9 years after her initial surgical care. The experience with these 2 cases showed that patients with SSc can safely undergo TMJ reconstruction with anticipated good results, but that the overall severity of the disease remains paramount in determining the feasibility of corrective surgery under this diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Anquilosis postraumatica unilateral de la articulación temporomandibular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Alberto Manotas Arévalo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available La Anquilosis Temporomandibular en una afección manifestada como la limitación del movimiento del cóndilo articular mandibular dentro de la cavidad glenoide del hueso temporal. Son frecuentes las osificaciones de las estructuras articulares intrínsecas, y en algunos otros casos fibrosis de las estructuras intrínsecas y extrínsecas que impiden la dinámica articular adecuada. Los pacientes afectados, generalmente niños y adultos jóvenes, limitan poco a poco su movilidad articular llegando a la inmovilización total de su mandíbula, con las subsecuentes alteraciones para la ingesta de alimentos sólidos, para la deglución, higiene bucal, erupción dental adecuada y para toda la fisiología bucomaxilar y la estética facial. Su corrección quirúrgica representa un reto pues se debe eliminar la masa osificada articular, reponer la fisiología articular, recuperar la estética facial y evitar la recurrencia.

  20. Cervical-scapular muscles strength and severity of temporomandibular disorder in women with mechanical neck pain

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    Fernanda Pasinato

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Changes in cervical muscle function have been observed in patients with neck pain (NP and TMD. However, the relationship between TMD severity and neck muscle strength in the presence/absence of NP is unknown. Objective: To determine the prevalence of TMD in women with and without mechanical NP and assess the cervical-scapular muscle strength and its association with TMD severity. Methods: Fifteen volunteers without neck pain (CG and 14 women with mechanical neck pain (NPG took part and were selected by the Neck Disability Index. The diagnosis and severity of TMD were determined by the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD and Temporomandibular Index (TI, respectively. The strength of the upper trapezius muscle, and cervical flexor and extensor muscles was measured by digital hand dynamometer. Results: 64.5% of women with NP and 33.3% without NP were diagnosed with TMD (p = 0.095. The NPG showed lower strength of the cervical flexor (p = 0.044 and extensor (p=0.006 muscles, and higher TI (p = 0.038 than in the CG. It was also verified moderate negative correlation between TI and the strength of dominant (p = 0.046, r = -0.547 and non-dominant (p = 0.007, r = -0.695 upper trapezius, and cervical flexors (p = 0.023, r = -0.606 in the NPG. Conclusion: There was no difference in the prevalence of TMD in women with and without NP. However, women with NP have lower cervical muscle strength - compared to those without NP - which was associated with greater severity of TMD. Thus, in women with NP associated with TMD, it is advisable to assess and address the severity of this dysfunction and identify the cervical-scapular muscles compromise.

  1. Masticatory muscle and temporomandibular joint pain in Croatian war veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhac, Ivone; Tariba, Petra; Kovac, Zoran; Simonić-Kocijan, Suncana; Lajnert, Vlatka; Mesić, Vesna Fugosić; Kuis, Davor; Braut, Vedrana

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and intensity of masticatory muscle and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain in Croatian war veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The examined group consisted of 100 Croatian war veterans, in whom PTSD had previously been diagnosed. Patients were compared with 92 subjects who had not taken part in the war and in whom PTSD was excluded by psychiatric examination. The clinical examination consisted of palpation of the masticatory muscles, the prominent neck musculature, and TMJ. The examination technique used and the definition of items were previously tested for reliability and validity. 93% of the subjects with PTSD had masticatory muscle tenderness compared to 45.65% of the subjects in the control group (chi2 = 51.46, p < 0.0001). The most frequent painful location in the subjects with PTSD was the left lateral pterygoid site in 88%, and in subjects of the control group the right lateral pterygoid site in 28.26% of cases. The most painful location in the PTSD group was the left lateral pterygoid site in 72%, and in the control group the left posterior digastric in 4.35% of cases. 58% of the subjects with PTSD had TMJ tenderness compared to 3.26% of subjects in the control group (chi2 = 66.23, p < 0.0001). The most frequent painful location of TMJ in both groups was the left posterior capsule; in the PTSD group 38% and in subjects in the control group 2.17% of cases. The most painful location was the left posterior capsule in 28% of subjects with PTSD, while not one subject in the control group reported severe painful sensitivity. The very high frequency and intensity of pain in subjects with PTSD confirms the effect of stress on muscle and joint sensitivity, i.e. perception of pain.

  2. Is there an association between temporomandibular disorders and playing a musical instrument? A review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attallah, M M; Visscher, C M; van Selms, M K A; Lobbezoo, F

    2014-07-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) have a multifactorial etiology. Among others, parafunctions and oral habits have been suggested as important initiating and perpetuating factors. Playing a musical instrument that loads the masticatory system, like wind instruments and the violin or viola, has been suggested to be part of this group of etiological factors. However, the evidence base for this suggestion is lacking. Therefore, the aim of this study was to review the literature on the possible association between playing a musical instrument and developing and/or having a TMD. A PubMed search, using the query ['Music'(Mesh) AND 'Craniomandibular Disorders'(Mesh)], yielded 19 articles, 14 of which were included in this review. Six of 14 papers had a case-control or pre-test-post-test design; the remaining eight papers were case reports of expert opinions. The former papers were analysed and tabulated according to the PICO (Patient/population-Intervention-Control/comparison-Outcome/results) system; the latter ones were only summarised and tabulated. All articles with a case-control or pre-test-post-test design suggested a possible association between TMD and playing a musical instrument, especially the violin and viola. However, no clear-cut conclusion could be drawn as to whether playing a musical instrument is directly associated with TMD, or only in combination with other factors. More and better research on this topic is needed, as to enable a better counselling and possibly even a better treatment of the suffering musician. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Termo do 1º Consenso em Disfunção Temporomandibular e Dor Orofacial Statement of the 1st Consensus on Temporomandibular Disorders and Orofacial Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Vieira Carrara

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available O Termo do 1º Consenso em Disfunção Temporomandibular e Dor Orofacial* foi criado com o propósito de substituir divergências por evidência científica dentro dessa especialidade da Odontologia. O documento oferece informações claras e fundamentadas para orientar o cirurgião-dentista e demais profissionais de saúde sobre os cuidados demandados pelo paciente, tanto no processo de diagnóstico diferencial quanto na fase de aplicação das terapias de controle da dor e disfunção. O Termo foi aprovado no mês de janeiro de 2010 em reunião realizada durante o Congresso Internacional de Odontologia do Estado de São Paulo e converge o pensamento dos profissionais mais conceituados do Brasil na especialidade Disfunção Temporomandibular e Dor Orofacial.This Statement of the 1st Consensus on Temporomandibular Disorders and Orofacial Pain was created with the purpose of substituting controversies for scientific evidence within this specialty field of dentistry. The document provides clear and well-grounded guidance to dentists and other health professionals about the care required by patients both in the process of differential diagnosis and during the stage when they undergo treatment to control pain and dysfunction. The Statement was approved in January 2010 at a meeting held during the International Dental Congress of São Paulo and draws together the views of Brazil's most respected professionals in the specialty of Temporomandibular Disorders and Orofacial Pain.

  4. CT imaging in the surgical treatment of one-sided extraarticular temporomandibular joint ankylosis; Uso da tomografia computadorizada no planejamento cirurgico da anquilose temporomandibular extra-articular unilateral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villamizar, Lenin A.; Ghirelli, Carolina de Oliveira; Baroni, Carina Outi; Ferro, Daniel; Pinto, Ana Carolina Brandao de Campos Fonseca, E-mail: carinaouti@yahoo.com.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia. Dept. de Cirurgia

    2012-07-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is characterized by difficulty to open the mouth. The ankylosis may be articular when TJM is involved and extra-articular when other factors lead to a restriction of chewing movements without TJM involvement. Case report of one patient with unilateral ankylosis and his surgical planning through the tomography imaging. CT imaging helps preoperative planning because it can locate the exact point of injury and can make the difference between the true and false ankylosis of the TJM. (author)

  5. Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma mimicking temporomandibular disorders: a case report Schwannoma vestibular (neurinoma do acústico imitando desordens temporomandibulares: um relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício A. Bisi

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 6 to 16% of patients with trigeminal neuralgia symptoms present intracranial tumors, the most common being the vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma. Some symptoms reported by patients include hearing loss, tinnitus, headaches, vertigo and trigeminal disturbances. An increased muscle response in the surrounding head and neck musculature may also be observed, which mimics signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders. In these cases, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has proved to be a useful tool in tumor diagnosis. The differential diagnosis between myofascial and neuralgic pain is important, as both may present similar characteristics, while being of different origin, and demanding special treatment approaches. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the relationship among trigeminal neuralgia symptoms, intracranial tumors and temporomandibular dysfunction by presenting a clinical case.Aproximadamente 6 a 16% dos pacientes com sintomas de neuralgia trigeminal apresentam tumores intracranianos, sendo mais comum o schwannoma vestibular (neurinoma do acústico. Alguns sintomas relatados pelos pacientes são perda da audição, zumbido, dores de cabeça, vertigens e distúrbios trigeminais. Uma resposta muscular aumentada na musculatura associada da cabeça e do pescoço também pode ser observada, o que pode mimetizar sinais e sintomas de desordens temporomandibulares. Nestes casos é de grande valia o uso de imagem de ressonância magnética (IRM para detecção de tumores. É importante, também, a diferenciação de dores miofasciais e neurálgicas, pois ambas podem apresentar características semelhantes, mas com origens e tratamentos diferentes. O objetivo desse trabalho foi demonstrar através de relato de caso clínico a associação entre sintomas de neuralgia trigeminal, tumores intracranianos e disfunção temporomandibular.

  6. Arthroscopic management of temporomandibular joint disc perforations and associated advanced chondromalacia by discoplasty and abrasion arthroplasty: a supplemental report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, J H; Stover, J D

    1998-11-01

    This article describes the results of treating temporomandibular joint (TMJ) articular disc perforation and advanced chondromalacia arthroscopically by the use of discoplasty and abrasion arthroplasty. Forty-four joints were treated in 25 patients (23 females and 2 males). Twenty-nine disc perforations were present, 24 joints had grade III chondromalacia (fibrillated cartilage), and 14 joints had grade IV chondromalacia (exposed bone). Surgical procedures included 14 abrasion arthroplasties and 24 motorized shavings or holmium laser vaporizations. Holmium laser discoplasty with mobilization was used in 29 joints. Patients were followed-up for an average of 40.8 months (11 to 74 months). Preoperative pain on the visual analog scale (VAS) (1 to 10 cm) ranged from 5 to 10 cm, with an average of 7.4 cm. Postoperatively, nine patients had no pain and 16 patients had an average VAS of 2.7 cm (range, 1 to 5 cm). Preoperatively, 30 joints had clicking, and 14 joints had crepitation. Postoperatively, 25 joints had no noise, 12 joints had slight intermittent clicking, and seven joints had crepitation. The preoperative range of motion averaged 29.7 mm. Postoperatively, the range of motion averaged 37.7 mm (range, 33 to 42 mm). All patients could masticate a regular diet except hard food after an average of 40.8 months (11 to 74 months). These findings seem to justify the arthroscopic surgical procedures of discoplasty for disc perforations, motorized shaving, or holmium laser vaporization of grade III chondromalacia, and abrasion arthroplasty for bone exposure. The results also question the need for discectomy in the treatment of disc perforation.

  7. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TEMPOROMANDIBULAR-JOINT MOBILITY AND PERIPHERAL JOINT MOBILITY RECONSIDERED

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, P.U.; DEBONT, L.G.M.; VANDERWEELE, L.T.; Boering, G.

    The purpose of this paper was to study the relationship between temporomandibular joint (TMJ) mobility and mobility of joints and to study the general character of joint mobility in 83 subjects, 55 females and 28 males (mean age 26.7, range 13-46 years). The subjects were recruited from the

  8. Effectiveness of Low-Level Laser Therapy in Temporomandibular Joint Disorders: A Placebo-Controlled Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fikáčková, H.; Dostálová, T.; Navrátil, L.; Klaschka, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 4 (2007), s. 297-303 ISSN 1549-5418 Grant - others:GA MZd(CZ) NR8112 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : temporomandibular joint disorder * laser therapy Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 1.230, year: 2007

  9. Automated quantification and analysis of facial asymmetry in children with arthritis in the temporomandibular joint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darvann, Tron A.; Hermann, Nuno V.; Demant, Sune

    2011-01-01

    We present an automated method of spatially detailed 3D asymmetry quantification of face surfaces obtained in a stereophotogrammetric system, and the method was applied to a population of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) who have involvement of one temporomandibular joint (TMJ). ...

  10. Cost effectiveness of arthrocentesis as initial treatment for temporomandibular joint arthralgia: A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, L.M.; Stant, A.D.; Quik, E.H.; Huddleston Slater, J.J.R.; Stegenga, B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the cost effectiveness of arthrocentesis as initial treatment compared to care as usual (CAU) for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthralgia. Materials and methods: 80 patients were randomly allocated to arthrocentesis as initial treatment (n = 40) or CAU (n = 40).

  11. Comorbid Disorders and Sociodemographic Variables in Temporomandibular Pain in the General Dutch Population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, Corine M.; Ligthart, Lannie; Schuller, Annemarie A.; Lobbezoo, Frank; de Jongh, Ad; van Houtem, Caroline M. H. H.; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: (1) To determine the prevalence of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain complaints in the general Dutch population; (2) to investigate its relationship with age, sex, educational attainment, and country of birth; (3) to determine its association with other pain complaints; and (4) to

  12. Atypical Presentation of Zoster Mimicking Headache and Temporomandibular Disorder: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Mohammad Reza; Chamani, Goli

    2016-01-01

    Herpes zoster in the prodromal stage may be mistaken for other diseases characterized by pain in the area of prodrome, such as dental pain. We report on a case of trigeminal herpes zoster, which presented as sudden onset headache and acute temporomandibular pain in the prodromal phase.

  13. Comorbid disorders and sociodemographic variables in temporomandibular pain in the general Dutch population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, C.M.; Ligthart, L.; Schuller, A.A.; Lobbezoo, F.; de Jongh, A.; van Houtem, C.M.H.H.; Boomsma, D.I.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: (1) To determine the prevalence of temporomandibular disorder (TMD)-pain complaints in the general Dutch population; (2) to investigate its relationship with age, sex, educational attainment, and country of birth; (3) to determine its association with other pain complaints; and (4) to

  14. Relationship between bruxism and temporomandibular disorders: a systematic review of literature from 1998 to 2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manfredini, D.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The present paper aims to systematically review the literature on the temporomandibular disorders (TMD)-bruxism relationship published from 1998 to 2008. Study design: A systematic search in the National Library of Medicine's PubMed database was performed to identify all studies on

  15. The Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia for Temporomandibular Disorders (TSK-TMD)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, C.M.; Ohrbach, R.; van Wijk, A.J.; Wilkosz, M.; Naeije, M.

    2010-01-01

    For musculoskeletal disorders like low back pain and fibromyalgia, evidence is growing for fear of movement to play an important role in the development of chronic pain. In temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients, however, this construct has not received any attention yet. Therefore, in this

  16. RADIOGRAPHIC SIGNS OF TEMPOROMANDIBULAR-JOINT OSTEOARTHROSIS AND INTERNAL DERANGEMENT 30 YEARS AFTER NONSURGICAL TREATMENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DELEEUW, R; BOERING, G; STEGENGA, B; DEBONT, LGM

    The aim of this study was to evaluate with radiographs the long-term status of temporomandibular joints that were treated nonsurgically for reducing disk displacement (group 1) or permanent disk displacement (group 2) 30 years ago. Transcranial and transpharyngeal radiographs were made before (T1),

  17. Osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint organ and its relationship to disc displacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegenga, B

    2001-01-01

    To overcome disagreements with regard to the relationship between disc displacement and osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), the evidence for suggested disease mechanisms and clinical course of these disorders is reviewed. The TMJ behaves as a complex organ in which biochemical and

  18. Influence of serotonin on the analgesic effect of granisetron on temporomandibular joint arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ülle Voog

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available THE influence of circulating serotonin (5-HT on the effects of intra-articular administration of granisetron on temporomandibular joint (TMJ pain was investigated in 11 patients with chronic polyarthritides. An analgesic effect superior to placebo has been shown previously.

  19. Differential diagnostics of different nosological forms of the temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kameneva L.A.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Research objective: to carry out differential diagnostics of various nosological forms of a temporal and temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome. Material and methods. On clinical base of orthopedic odontology chair of SamSMU inspection of 244 patients with temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome was performed. Diagnostics was carried out according to the special card of inspection which was developed on orthopedic odontology chair of SamSMU and included subjective, objective and special methods of research. As a result of research it is taped: 71 — an occlusal-articulation dysfunctional syndrome, 44 — a neuromuscular dysfunctional syndrome, 76 patients have a hardly set dislocation of intra joint disk and 53 — a habitual dislocation and a subluxation of a temporomandibular joint. We used Yu.A. Petrosov's classification as it displays most precisely the processes happening at pathology of the intra joint relations. Conclusion: On the basis of the obtained data the table of differential diagnostics of various nosological forms of temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome has been made.

  20. Computed tomography and treatment of chronic temporomandibular joint arthritis in a sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warmerdam, E.P.L.; Weeren, P.R. van

    1996-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging and treatment of destructive right temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthritis in a sheep are discussed. Computed tomography (CT) appears to be an attractive technique for imaging TMJ lesions in sheep. Surgical curettage of a deformed TMJ can result in functional recovery