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Sample records for temporomandibular joint tmj

  1. Spectrum of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Appearances of Juvenile Temporomandibular Joints (TMJ) in Non-Rheumatic Children

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    Tzaribachev, N. (Dept. of Hematology, Oncology, and General Pediatrics, Univ. Children' s Hospital, Eberhard-Karls-Univ., Tuebingen (Germany)). e-mail. tzari@o2online.de; Fritz, J. (Russell H. Morgan Dept. of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)); Horger, M. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-Univ., Tuebingen (Germany))

    2009-12-15

    Background: Temporomandibular joints (TMJ) are frequently involved in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), and gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the only modality for an early diagnosis. However, only very few data exist on the appearance of contrast-enhanced MRI of normal juvenile TMJ. Purpose: To define the spectrum of normal MRI findings of juvenile TMJ, and to assess a possible overlap with findings typical for active synovitis in JIA. Material and Methods: 96 children (192 TMJ), 51 boys and 45 girls with a median age of 7.8 years (range 3-13 years), underwent a head MRI. The presence of autoimmune disease, including JIA, was excluded via chart history, available laboratory findings, and the absence of known typical pathological MRI changes (degree of synovial enhancement, hyperintense signal on T2-weighted images in the synovia or bone marrow, and morphologic changes of the mandibular condyle) of the TMJ affected by JIA. Results: In 90 (94%) children, the TMJ showed no MRI abnormalities compatible with arthritis. In three children (3%), the only abnormal MRI finding was a small bilateral joint effusion. A further three children (3%) had a mild synovial enhancement seen on both axial and coronal MR planes in one child and only in the axial plane in the other two children. Signal hyperintensity on T2-weighted images and other corresponding characteristics of TMJ inflammation were lacking in all these six patients. Conclusion: The vast majority of juvenile TMJ in non-rheumatic children shows no MRI abnormalities. Exceptions, including a discrete enhancement of the synovial membrane (3%) or small joint effusions (3%), can occur in a minority of patients, but none of them are accompanied by other signs of inflammation or morphological changes of the TMJ

  2. Neoplastic lesions of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ): diagnosis, differential diagnosis and intervention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogl, T.J.; Abolmaali, N.; Schedel, H.; Bergh, B.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the effectiveness of diagnostic and interventional radiological techniques for neoplastic lesions of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Material and methods. Modern diagnosis of the TMJ is based on the clinical use of conventional X-ray techniques, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and interventional techniques like biopsies, vascular occlusion and ablation. Results. Conventional X-ray still forms the basic diagnostic procedure applied in open and closed mouth position. CT improves the diagnostic information and serves as the standard diagnostical instrument for cartaliganeous or osseous neoplastic lesions. MRI evaluates soft tissue infiltration in multiplanar techniques and high spatial resolution. Interventional vascular and ablative techniques improve the treatment of neoplastic disorders. (orig.) [de

  3. Identification of inflammatory processes in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) by 99mTc-HMPAO in animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brasileiro, Claudia Borges; Cardoso, Valbert Nascimento; Lima, Carla Flavia de; Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de

    2005-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a synovial joint that represents the junction of mandible with skull. TMJ and mastication muscles are affected by temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). During the last two decades the advances in imaging diagnostic of TMJ have greatly contributed to the assessment of the TMJ disorders. Labelled leukocytes with technetium- 99m hexamethyl propylene amine oxime ( 99m Tc-HMPAO) represent an efficient method that generates images based in physiological and/or biochemical changes related to inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential usefulness of technetium-99m labelled leukocytes scintigraphy in the diagnosis of TMJ inflammatory process applying a rabbit TMJ arthritis model. Arthritis was induced unilaterally with an intra-articular injection of ovalbumin in left ATM. On the contra-lateral side, the same dose of saline was injected. After five days, leukocytes were labeled with HMPAO and 99m Tc-HMPAO TMJ scintigraphic images were made. After twelve days a computed tomography was realized. Scintigraphic images obtained five days after induction of TMJ inflammation showed the localization of inflammatory process. The results were expressed as cpm of activity found in left ATM and contra-lateral side. Significant differences of activity were found between inflamed articulation and contra-lateral side (P = 0,0073). In conclusion, the method of leukocytes labeled with 99m Tc showed to be sensitive in detection of inflammatory disorders of TMJ and can be of great value in early diagnostic of these disorders. (author)

  4. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain revisited with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasali, N.; Cubuk, R.; Aricak, M.; Ozarar, M.; Saydam, B.; Nur, H.; Tuncbilek, N.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We aimed to assess the contrast enhancement patterns of the retrodiscal tissue with dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI) with respect to different temporomandibular joint disc pathologies. Additionally, we questioned the relationship between the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain and the contrast enhancement pattern of the retrodiscal tissue regardless of the TMJ disc position. Materials and methods: 52 joints of 26 patients (4 males and 22 females) who have pain in at least at one of their TMJ were included in this study. For the qualitative analysis, the joints were divided into four groups in terms of their disc positions: normal (1), partially displaced with or without reduction (2), totally dislocated with reduction (3) and totally dislocated without reduction (4). Besides, two different joint groups were constituted, namely the painful group and painless group according to the clinical findings without taking the TMJ disc positions into account. Quantitative analyses were made by means of measuring signal intensity ratios (SI) ratio at the retrodiscal tissue (from internal side and external side of the each joint) using DCE-MRI and these measurements were analyzed with paired samples t test to define the difference between the measurements. At the second stage, the time-dependent arithmetical mean values of the SI ratios were calculated for each joint group and significant differences between the groups were questioned using analysis of variance (ANOVA) test. Besides, painful and painless groups which were classified on the basis of the clinical data were compared according to the mean SI ratios found for each joint and the significant differences between these two groups were assessed by means of Student's T test. The results were assessed in 95% confidence interval where the significance level was p < 0.05. Results: A significant difference was observed between the internal and external contrast enhancement of the joints with partial

  5. Association of bone marrow edema with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis and internal derangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahaj, Aiyesha; Hafeez, Kashif; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail

    2017-01-01

    This study reviewed the dental literature in order to determine the association of bone marrow edema with osteoarthritis and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) internal derangement disorders. A literature search was performed using electronic databases PubMed/Medline (National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland) and Cochrane for articles published during the last 15 years (January 2000-December 2014). A predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria were used for filtering the scientific papers. Research articles fulfilling the basic inclusion criteria were included in the review. The reviewed studies showed that bone marrow edema is found in painful joints with osteoarthritis in a majority of cases. A few cases with no pain or significant degenerative changes are reported to have a bone marrow edema pattern as well. Bone marrow edema, increased fluid level, and pain are associated with osteoarthritis in the majority of patients reporting TMJ arthritis. Degenerative and disc displacement conditions are multifactorial and require further investigations. Magnetic resonance imaging can be employed to detect bone marrow edema even in the absence of pain and clinical symptoms in the patients of internal derangements.

  6. Identification of inflammatory processes in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) by {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO in animal model; Identificacao de processos inflamatorios na articulacao temporomandibular por {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO em modelo animal

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    Brasileiro, Claudia Borges; Cardoso, Valbert Nascimento; Lima, Carla Flavia de; Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares]. E-mail: campos@nuclear.ufmg.br

    2005-07-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a synovial joint that represents the junction of mandible with skull. TMJ and mastication muscles are affected by temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). During the last two decades the advances in imaging diagnostic of TMJ have greatly contributed to the assessment of the TMJ disorders. Labelled leukocytes with technetium- 99m hexamethyl propylene amine oxime ({sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO) represent an efficient method that generates images based in physiological and/or biochemical changes related to inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential usefulness of technetium-99m labelled leukocytes scintigraphy in the diagnosis of TMJ inflammatory process applying a rabbit TMJ arthritis model. Arthritis was induced unilaterally with an intra-articular injection of ovalbumin in left ATM. On the contra-lateral side, the same dose of saline was injected. After five days, leukocytes were labeled with HMPAO and {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO TMJ scintigraphic images were made. After twelve days a computed tomography was realized. Scintigraphic images obtained five days after induction of TMJ inflammation showed the localization of inflammatory process. The results were expressed as cpm of activity found in left ATM and contra-lateral side. Significant differences of activity were found between inflamed articulation and contra-lateral side (P = 0,0073). In conclusion, the method of leukocytes labeled with {sup 99m}Tc showed to be sensitive in detection of inflammatory disorders of TMJ and can be of great value in early diagnostic of these disorders. (author)

  7. Neoplastic lesions of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ): diagnosis, differential diagnosis and intervention; Neoplasien des Temporomandibulargelenks (TMG). Diagnostik, Differenzialdiagnostik und Intervention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, T.J.; Abolmaali, N.; Schedel, H.; Bergh, B. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Maeurer, J. [Radiologische Praxis am Prinzregentenplatz, Muenchen (Germany)

    2001-09-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the effectiveness of diagnostic and interventional radiological techniques for neoplastic lesions of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Material and methods. Modern diagnosis of the TMJ is based on the clinical use of conventional X-ray techniques, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and interventional techniques like biopsies, vascular occlusion and ablation. Results. Conventional X-ray still forms the basic diagnostic procedure applied in open and closed mouth position. CT improves the diagnostic information and serves as the standard diagnostical instrument for cartaliganeous or osseous neoplastic lesions. MRI evaluates soft tissue infiltration in multiplanar techniques and high spatial resolution. Interventional vascular and ablative techniques improve the treatment of neoplastic disorders. (orig.) [German] Zielsetzung. Vorstellung der Wertigkeit bildgebender Verfahren fuer die diagnostische und interventionelle Radiologie des Temporomandibulargelenks (TMG). Material und Methodik. Die moderne Radiologie des TMG basiert auf dem Einsatz der konventionellen Roentgendiagnostik, der Computertomographie (CT) und der Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT), sowie interventioneller Verfahren wie der Biopsie, vaskulaerer Embolisationsverfahren und tumorablativer Verfahren. Ergebnisse. Als Basisdiagnostik dient die konventionelle Diagnostik in offener und geschlossener Mundposition der Erfassung von Funktionsstoerungen sowie ossaerer Destruktionen. Die CT erweitert das diagnostische Spektrum und verbessert die Differenzialdiagnostik fuer ossifizierende Prozesse. Der Einsatz der MRT erlaubt die Erfassung der Weichteilinfiltration sowie der Gelenkstrukturen. Vaskulaere interventionelle Verfahren dienen der praetherapeutischen Okklusion bzw. der palliativen Tumortherapie in Form der okklusiven Embolisation, der Chemoembolisation, oder auch der Tumorablation. (orig.)

  8. Maresin 1 Inhibits TRPV1 in Temporomandibular Joint-Related Trigeminal Nociceptive Neurons and TMJ Inflammation-Induced Synaptic Plasticity in the Trigeminal Nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chul-Kyu Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the trigeminal system, disruption of acute resolution processing may lead to uncontrolled inflammation and chronic pain associated with the temporomandibular joint (TMJ. Currently, there are no effective treatments for TMJ pain. Recently, it has been recognized that maresin 1, a newly identified macrophage-derived mediator of inflammation resolution, is a potent analgesic for somatic inflammatory pain without noticeable side effects in mice and a potent endogenous inhibitor of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1 in the somatic system. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the analgesic actions of maresin 1 on TMJ pain are unclear in the trigeminal system. Here, by performing TMJ injection of a retrograde labeling tracer DiI (a fluorescent dye, I showed that maresin 1 potently inhibits capsaicin-induced TRPV1 currents and neuronal activity via Gαi-coupled G-protein coupled receptors in DiI-labeled trigeminal nociceptive neurons. Further, maresin 1 blocked TRPV1 agonist-evoked increases in spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current frequency and abolished TMJ inflammation-induced synaptic plasticity in the trigeminal nucleus. These results demonstrate the potent actions of maresin 1 in regulating TRPV1 in the trigeminal system. Thus, maresin 1 may serve as a novel endogenous inhibitor for treating TMJ-inflammatory pain in the orofacial region.

  9. Association between condylar morphology and inflammation in experimental temporomandibular joint TMJ arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper Dahl; Stoustrup, Peter bangsgaard; Küseler, Annelise

    not previously been investigated. Aim: We studied the effects of antigen-induced arthritis on the bony structures in rabbit mandibular condylar development, in particular the morphological changes and the bone micro-architecture. Materials and Methods: Included were juvenile rabbits with ovalbumin-induced TMJ...... arthritis treated with intraarticular saline, intra-articular etanercept (an anti-TNF-α drug) or subcutaneous etanercept. One TMJ from each animal was scanned using micro-computed tomography and structural parameters were calculated. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the mandibular condyle were scored...... blindly by two independent observers as normal or abnormal. TMJs were stratified for condylar morphology and evaluated against data on inflammation, trabecular structural parameters, and overall mandibular growth. Mineral apposition rate was measured using fluorochrome labelling. Results and discussion...

  10. Determination of the spatial movement of the temporomandibular joints (tmj joint heads in patients with muscle and joint dysfunction according to computed tomography (ct

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    Аркадий Максимович Боян

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Computed tomography (CT is the one of most objective diagnostic methods of TMJ MJD it allows define amplitudes of joint heads movement in sagittal projections to detect an asymmetry of TMJ elements location.Aim of research. Assessment of location of mandibular joint heads and determination of its spatial position in patients with TMJ MJD before treatment and after it using CT.Materials and methods. 50 patients 28-62 years old, 37 women and 13 men who underwent computed tomography (CT of TMJ were under observation.The results of observation were analyzed in details.The studies were carried out using cone-radial computed tomographic scanner «Vatech Pax uni 3d». CT of TMJ was carried out in habitual occlusion before the start of treatment and after removal of TMJ MJD symptoms and complaints. At the study there were measured the width of joint fissure in front, upper and back segments according to N.A. Rabuhina methodology in N.E. Androsova and so-authors modification. Statistical analysis of the data received was carried out using «Statistics» (Statsoft, Inc program.Results. The results of TMJ CT in patients before the start of treatment demonstrated that the sizes of TMJ joint fissure were different. The width of the upper segment of TMJ joint fissure in patients before the start of treatment was reliably less (≤0,001 comparing with an analogous parameter in the group of patients after treatment that indicates the upper location of mandibular head in TMJ with reducing the height of the lower segment of face.So the data of study of the joint fissure width received using TMJ CT demonstrate formation of specific outlines of joint fissure at displacement of mandible and consequently joint head. Information about the joint fissure parameters allows rationally plan and realize orthopedic treatment and the necessary rehabilitation measures in patients with TMJ MJD.Conclusions. The studies demonstrated that the displacements of mandibular joint

  11. Temporomandibular joint motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, M.; Kawamura, Y.; Matsuda, T.; Itou, S.; Odori, T.; Ishii, Y.; Torizuka, K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates MR imaging with the therapeutic effect after splint therapy in internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Fifteen patients (19 TMJs) with internal derangement of the TMJ and five normal volunteers (10 TMJs) were examined with sagittal T1-weighted spin-echo and gradient recalled acquisition in a steady state (GRASS) MR imaging. MR studies of the patients undergoing splint therapy were performed with an without splints. Pseudodynamic images of TMJ motion provide information that was not available from spin-echo T1-weighted images

  12. Reconstrucción de la articulación temporomandibular (ATM: prótesis aloplástica Reconstruction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ: alloplastic prostheses

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    C. Goizueta Adame

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available La incapacidad de desarrollar sistemas inertes eficaces para la sustitución completa de la articulación temporo-mandibular durante décadas ha generado una variedad de soluciones biológicas para un problema biomecánico. Los injertos autólogos no ofrecen garantías en funcionalidad, simetría, o estabilidad oclusal; resultan técnicamente más complejos y tienen mayor potencial morbilidad. El paciente candidato a reconstrucción completa de la ATM debe contar con la posibilidad de una prótesis si otras opciones fracasan. La reconstrucción aloplástica garantiza estabilidad oclusal, técnica sencilla y reproducible, estancia hospitalaria predecible y baja tasa de complicaciones con los sistemas protésicos actuales. Siempre van a existir pacientes en los que ésta sea la única opción, por lo tanto es primordial la medición de la magnitud de las fuerzas implicadas en la mecánica de la ATM para poder diseñar prótesis en base a modelos fiables como en otras articulaciones en las que ya han resuelto el problema.Incapabability to develop effective inert systems to total temporomandibular joint substitution during decades has genered several biologic solutions for a biomecanic question. Autologous grafts don´t offer security in functioning, simmetry, or oclusal estability; its have more coplex technique and more potencial morbility. Alloplastic reconstruction guarantees oclusal stability, single and reproducible technique, predictable time in hospital, and low morbility with actual prosthetic systems. Patients whos prostheses is only one option are going to exist always, so that it is primordial measures of magnitude of implicated strenghts in TMJ mecanic to can design prosthesis based on reliable models like others articulations which have just resolved the question.

  13. A prospective, single-centre study on patient outcomes following temporomandibular joint replacement using a custom-made Biomet TMJ prosthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Esben; Thygesen, T.

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the clinical variables in 61 patients following total alloplastic temporomandibular joint reconstruction (TJR) in which the Biomet Microfixation Patient-Patient-Matched TMJ Implant was used. All patients were classified using the Wilkes classification. The visual analogue scale...... score for jaw pain intensity, the maximum inter-incisal opening (MK)), and the frequency of adverse events were recorded during follow-up; the mean follow-up was 14.2 8.6 months. Significant improvements were found in the MIO (P follow-up. Additionally, a significant...

  14. Gnathological splint therapy in temporomandibular joint disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Gnanashanmugham, K.; Saravanan, B.; Sukumar, M. R.; Tajir, T. Faisal

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) forms an integral functional part of stomatognathic system. Position, shape, structure and function of teeth have an influence on the proper functioning and health of TMJ. But a problem associated with TMJ is often neglected, and treatment for it is mostly restricted to palliative therapy. A proper understanding of the underlying cause of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) is necessary to device a proper treatment plan. Etiology of TMDs varies from idiopathic...

  15. Temporomandibular joint arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hyung Sik; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Myoung Joon; Jun, Young Hwan; Chang, Duk Soo; Jung, Don Young; Jung, In Won

    1988-01-01

    The stress and occlusion disturbance are very important etiologic factors in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain dysfunction syndromes. Authors performed TMJ arthrograms in the patients with TMJ problem such as pain, click sound, limited motion and locking, etc. The following results noted: 1. The arthrographic findings of 22 TMJ were analyzed. a) Normal: 6 cases b) Anterior disc displacement with rediction: 6 cases · Early reduction: 2 cases · Intermediate reduction: 3 cases · Late reduction: 1 case c) Anterior disc displacement without reduction: 6 cases · Two cases had adhesion between the posterior portion of disc and the posterior surfaces of the articular eminence. 2. Among 22 cases, the clinical findings of 16 cases (73%) were compatible with arthrographic findings. 6 cases showed disparity between them.

  16. PATHOLOGY OF TEMPOROMANDIBULAR-JOINT INTERNAL DERANGEMENT AND OSTEOARTHROSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEBONT, LGM; STEGENGA, B

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthrosis and disk displacement seem to be strongly related, but they may also represent mutually independent temporomandibular disorders. This paper presents relevant aspects of normal physiology and degeneration of synovial joints, aspects of normal

  17. Acupuncture Therapy on Temporomandibular Joint Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Nai-nian; HUANG Ming-juan

    2005-01-01

    @@ Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) syndrome, an commonly and frequently encountered disease, is characterized by motor dysfunction of mandibular joint and snapping articular surface as major complaints, and then tinnitus, facial pain and occasional headache, most patients got limited mouth open and pain inside the joints or masseter muscle. The authors of this article have treated 68cases of TMJ syndrome since 2001.

  18. Temporomandibular Joint Regenerative Medicine

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    Xavier Van Bellinghen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The temporomandibular joint (TMJ is an articulation formed between the temporal bone and the mandibular condyle which is commonly affected. These affections are often so painful during fundamental oral activities that patients have lower quality of life. Limitations of therapeutics for severe TMJ diseases have led to increased interest in regenerative strategies combining stem cells, implantable scaffolds and well-targeting bioactive molecules. To succeed in functional and structural regeneration of TMJ is very challenging. Innovative strategies and biomaterials are absolutely crucial because TMJ can be considered as one of the most difficult tissues to regenerate due to its limited healing capacity, its unique histological and structural properties and the necessity for long-term prevention of its ossified or fibrous adhesions. The ideal approach for TMJ regeneration is a unique scaffold functionalized with an osteochondral molecular gradient containing a single stem cell population able to undergo osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation such as BMSCs, ADSCs or DPSCs. The key for this complex regeneration is the functionalization with active molecules such as IGF-1, TGF-β1 or bFGF. This regeneration can be optimized by nano/micro-assisted functionalization and by spatiotemporal drug delivery systems orchestrating the 3D formation of TMJ tissues.

  19. Temporomandibular joint examination reviewed

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    L. Guarda Nardini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ it’s a joint closely related to the skull base, the spine, and the jaws; all these anatomical structures must be taken in consideration when evaluating pain involving the tmj. In order to detect patients affected by pathology or dysfunctions of the tmj, physical examination is of great value in orienting the diagnosis. Inspection must consider the symmetry of the body, the dental status and the type of occlusion. Palpation is a way to assess contractiont involving the muscles of the masticatory system and of the neck. Auscultation, based on articular noise provides means to determine whether we are dealing with degeneration of the joint or a dislocation of the intrarticular disc. In order to confirm the diagnosis obtained with the clinical evaluation, it’s useful to perform imaging techniques as opt, tomography and TC of the tmj and electromyokineosiography – index of the mandibular functionality and of the muscles status. MRI and dynamic MRI are among the non invasive exams which give the greatest amount of information, regarding the disc position and the joint degeneration. Arthroscopy is an invasive technique that allows early diagnosis of degeneration and is helpful to reveal early inflammatory processes of the joint.

  20. Nonsurgical Management of Pediatric Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrivani, Steven John; Khawaja, Shehryar Nasir; Bavia, Paula Furlan

    2018-02-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are a subgroup of craniofacial pain problems involving the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), masticatory muscles, and associated head and neck musculoskeletal structures. These disorders are subclassified into TMJ articular disorders and masticatory muscle disorders. Patients with TMD most commonly present with pain, restricted or asymmetric mandibular motion, and TMJ sounds during mandibular movements. The prevalence tends to increase with age. Management of TMJ articular disorders consists of a combination of patient education, home-care plan, biobehavioral therapy, physical therapy, orthotic jaw appliance therapy, pharmacotherapy, and/or surgery. The goal is to increase function, reduce pain, and improve quality of life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Quantitative 3D ultrashort time-to-echo (UTE) MRI and micro-CT (μCT) evaluation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condylar morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiger, Daniel [Sapienza University of Rome, Department of Radiological, Oncological and Pathological Sciences, Rome (Italy); Bae, Won C.; Statum, Sheronda; Du, Jiang; Chung, Christine B. [University of California-San Diego, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Temporomandibular dysfunction involves osteoarthritis of the TMJ, including degeneration and morphologic changes of the mandibular condyle. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of novel 3D-UTE MRI versus micro-CT (μCT) for quantitative evaluation of mandibular condyle morphology. Nine TMJ condyle specimens were harvested from cadavers (2 M, 3 F; age 85 ± 10 years, mean ± SD). 3D-UTE MRI (TR = 50 ms, TE = 0.05 ms, 104-μm isotropic-voxel) was performed using a 3-T MR scanner and μCT (18-μm isotropic-voxel) was also performed. MR datasets were spatially registered with a μCT dataset. Two observers segmented bony contours of the condyles. Fibrocartilage was segmented on the MR dataset. Using a custom program, bone and fibrocartilage surface coordinates, Gaussian curvature, volume of segmented regions, and fibrocartilage thickness were determined for quantitative evaluation of joint morphology. Agreement between techniques (MRI vs. μCT) and observers (MRI vs. MRI) for Gaussian curvature, mean curvature, and segmented volume of the bone were determined using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) analysis. Between MRI and μCT, the average deviation of surface coordinates was 0.19 ± 0.15 mm, slightly higher than the spatial resolution of MRI. Average deviation of the Gaussian curvature and volume of segmented regions, from MRI to μCT, was 5.7 ± 6.5 % and 6.6 ± 6.2 %, respectively. ICC coefficients (MRI vs. μCT) for Gaussian curvature, mean curvature, and segmented volumes were 0.892, 0.893, and 0.972, respectively. Between observers (MRI vs. MRI), the ICC coefficients were 0.998, 0.999, and 0.997, respectively. Fibrocartilage thickness was 0.55 ± 0.11 mm, as previously described in the literature for grossly normal TMJ samples. 3D-UTE MR quantitative evaluation of TMJ condyle morphology ex-vivo, including surface, curvature, and segmented volume, shows high correlation against μCT and between observers. In addition, UTE MRI allows

  2. Imaging of the temporomandibular joint: An update

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Asim; K; Bag; Santhosh; Gaddikeri; Aparna; Singhal; Simms; Hardin; Benson; D; Tran; Josue; A; Medina; Joel; K; Curé

    2014-01-01

    Imaging of the temporomandibular joint(TMJ) is continuously evolving with advancement of imaging technologies. Many different imaging modalities are currently used to evaluate the TMJ. Magnetic resonance imaging is commonly used for evaluation of the TMJ due to its superior contrast resolution and its ability to acquire dynamic imaging for demonstration of the functionality of the joint. Computed tomography and ultrasound imaging have specific indication in imaging of the TMJ. This article focuses on state of the art imaging of the temporomandibular joint. Relevant normal anatomy and biomechanics of movement of the TMJ are discussed for better understanding of many TMJ pathologies. Imaging of internal derangements is discussed in detail. Different arthropathies and commontumors are also discussed in this article.

  3. [Whiplash lesions and temporomandibular joint disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gola, R; Richard, O; Guyot, L; Cheynet, F

    2004-11-01

    Attributing dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) to whiplash injury is a difficult problem to solve. TMJ disorders do not seem to be secondary to direct articular trauma but rather caused by a postural disorder of the cervical spine. Occlusal disorders and stress further complicate the picture. Four clinical cases illustrate a new hypothetical approach.

  4. Synovial osteochondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemnon, Jorge; Nemnon, Marcelo; Staffieri, Roberto; Villavicencio, C.; Marconi, G.; Masjoan, Diego

    2004-01-01

    Synovial osteochondromatosis (SO) is a meta plastic process by which synovial mesenchymal cells transform into chondroblasts and chondrocytes. This disease affects most frequently the knee, the hip, the elbow, and uncommonly the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The authors present 2 cases of synovial osteochondromatosis of the TMJ. (author)

  5. Temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westesson, P.L.; Hatala, M.; Tallents, R.H.; Katzberg, R.W.; Musgrave, M.; Levitt, S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper determines the frequency of MR signs of abnormal temporomandibular joints (TMJs) in asymptomatic volunteers. Forty-two volunteers with 84 clinically normal TMJs were imaged in the sagittal and coronal planes with surface coil MR imaging. Sagittal closed and open and coronal closed views were obtained bilaterally in all volunteers. The images were classified as normal (superior disk position) or abnormal (disk displacement of degenerative joint disease). Eighteen joints in 11 volunteers were abnormal; 12 had disk displacement with reduction and six had disk displacement without reduction, with associated degenerative joint disease in three of the six. Asymptomatic internal derangement and degenerative joint disease occur in about one-fourth of asymptomatic volunteers

  6. Temporomandibular Joint Septic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco Frojo, MD

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary:. Infection of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ is a rare pediatric condition resulting from the introduction of pathogens into the joint by hematogenous seeding, local extension, or trauma. Early recognition of the typical signs and symptoms including fever, trismus, preauricular swelling, and TMJ region tenderness are critical in order to initiate further evaluation and prevent feared complications of fibrosis, ankylosis, abnormal facial structure, or persistence of symptoms. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography with ancillary laboratory analysis including erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, and white blood cell count are beneficial in confirming the suspected diagnosis and monitoring response to therapy. Initial intervention should include empiric parenteral antibiotics, early mandibular mobilization, and joint decompression to provide synovial fluid for analysis including cultures. This report describes a case of TMJ bacterial arthritis in a healthy 6-year-old male who was promptly treated nonsurgically with intravenous antibiotics and localized needle joint decompression with return to normal function after completion of oral antibiotics and physical therapy.

  7. Developing low-dose C-arm CT imaging for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder in interventional radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiaowei; Cahill, Anne Marie [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Felice, Marc [University of Pennsylvania, Environmental Health and Radiation Safety, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Johnson, Laura [Computed Tomography Division, Siemens Healthcare Sector, Shanghai (China); Sarmiento, Marily [Siemens Medical Solutions, Angiography and X-ray Division, Hoffman Estates, IL (United States)

    2011-04-15

    Manufacturers have provided C-arm CT imaging technologies for applications in interventional radiology in recent years. However, clinical imaging protocols and radiation doses have not been well studied or reported. The purpose of this study is to develop low-dose settings for clinically acceptable CT imaging of temporomandibular joint in interventional radiology suites, using a C-arm imaging angiography system. CT scans were performed with a flat-panel digital C-arm angiographic system on a 5-year-old anthropomorphic phantom. The CTDI was determined for various rotation times, dose settings and Cu filter selections. The CTDI values were compared with those of conventional low-dose CT for the same phantom. The effectiveness of using Cu filters to reduce dose was also investigated. Images were reviewed by a senior radiologist for clinical acceptance. The manufacturer's default setting gave an equivalent CTDI of 4.8 mGy. Optimizing the dose settings and adding copper filtration reduced the radiation dose by 94%. This represents a 50% reduction from conventional CT. Use of Cu filters and low-dose settings significantly reduced radiation dose from that of standard settings. This phantom study process successfully guided the clinical implementation of low-dose studies for all ages at our institution. (orig.)

  8. Rheumatoid arthritis affecting temporomandibular joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandeep Sodhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic, systemic, autoimmune inflammatory disorder that is characterized by joint inflammation, erosive properties and symmetric multiple joint involvement. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ is very rare to be affected in the early phase of the disease, thus posing diagnostic challenges for the dentist. Conventional radiographs fail to show the early lesions due to its limitations. More recently cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT has been found to diagnose the early degenerative changes of TMJ and hence aid in the diagnosis of the lesions more accurately. Our case highlights the involvement of TMJ in RA and the role of advanced imaging (CBCT in diagnosing the bony changes in the early phase of the disease.

  9. Temporomandibular joint arthrography: normal anatomy and technique of examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duvoisin, B.; Schnyder, P.; Klaus, E.; Jacques, B.

    1990-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction is common. This entity is most often consecutive to internal derangements of the TMJ, which are not recognizable on plain films and tomograms. TMJ arthrography has proved a valuable tool in diagnosing these abnormalities. The technique of examination and normal arthrographic anatomy are reviewed. (author) [pt

  10. [Temporo-mandibular joints and orthognathic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouletreau, P

    2016-09-01

    Temporo-Mandibular Joints (TMJ) and orthognathic surgery are closely linked. In the past, some authors have even described (with mixed results) the correction of some dysmorphosis through direct procedures on the TMJs. Nowadays, performing orthognathic surgery involves the TMJ in three different occasions: (1) TMJ disorders potentially responsible for dento-maxillary dysmorphosis, (2) effects of orthognathic surgery on TMJs, and (3) condylar positioning methods in orthognathic surgery. These three chapters are developed in order to focus on the close relationships between TMJ and orthognathic surgery. Some perspectives close this article. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Temporomandibular joint movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, M.; Itou, S.; Ishii, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Kawamura, Y.; Matsuda, T.; Hayashi, N.; Ishii, J.

    1992-01-01

    Ten temporomandibular joints (TMJs) of 5 healthy volunteers and 19 TMJs of internal derangements in 16 patients with splint therapy were examined with MR imaging. T1-weighted images were obtained only in the closed mouth position, and gradient recalled acquisition in steady state (GRASS) images were obtained in active opening and closing phases, allowing a pseudodynamic display of TMJ movement. All patients received protrusive splint treatment. The usefulness of MR imaging to assess the efficacy of splint therapy was evaluated. Corrected disk position with the splint in place was clearly demonstrated in 9 TMJs, corresponding with elimination of reciprocal clicking. Ten other TMJs of anterior disk displacement without reduction showed uncorrected disk position by the splint. This information could confirm the therapeutic efficacy, or suggest other treatment alternatives. GRASS MR imaging can provide accurate and physiologic information about disk function in initial and follow-up assessment of protrusive splint therapy. (orig.)

  12. Temporomandibular joint involvement in psoriatic arthritis | Okkesim ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Psoriasis is a chronic, papulosquamous, and an inflammatory skin disease. It has been found that between 5% and 24% of patients develop psoriatic arthritis (PA) at the same time after or even prior to skin findings. The involvement of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare condition. In this report, a-46-year-old male ...

  13. Synovial osteochondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint; Osteocondromatosis sinovial en la articulacion temporomandibular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemnon, Jorge; Nemnon, Marcelo; Staffieri, Roberto; Villavicencio, C; Marconi, G; Masjoan, Diego [Fundacion Villavicencio, Rosario (Argentina). Diagnostico Medico

    2004-07-01

    Synovial osteochondromatosis (SO) is a meta plastic process by which synovial mesenchymal cells transform into chondroblasts and chondrocytes. This disease affects most frequently the knee, the hip, the elbow, and uncommonly the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The authors present 2 cases of synovial osteochondromatosis of the TMJ. (author)

  14. Gnathological splint therapy in temporomandibular joint disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Gnanashanmugham

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint (TMJ forms an integral functional part of stomatognathic system. Position, shape, structure and function of teeth have an influence on the proper functioning and health of TMJ. But a problem associated with TMJ is often neglected, and treatment for it is mostly restricted to palliative therapy. A proper understanding of the underlying cause of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD is necessary to device a proper treatment plan. Etiology of TMDs varies from idiopathic reasons to systemic disorders. The option of Gnathological splint is a conservative, safe and an effective mode of therapy for TMDs caused by occlusal discrepancies (fulcrum/interferences. This article presents a case report of a patient with TMD caused by occlusal discrepancy

  15. [Temporomandibular joint, occlusion and bruxism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orthlieb, J D; Ré, J P; Jeany, M; Giraudeau, A

    2016-09-01

    Temporomandibular joint and dental occlusion are joined for better and worse. TMJ has its own weaknesses, sometimes indicated by bad functional habits and occlusal disorders. Occlusal analysis needs to be addressed simply and clearly. The term "malocclusion" is not reliable to build epidemiological studies, etiologic mechanisms or therapeutic advice on this "diagnosis". Understanding the impact of pathogenic malocclusion is not just about occlusal relationships that are more or less defective, it requires to locate them within the skeletal framework, the articular and behavioural context of the patient, and above all to assess their impact on the functions of the masticatory system. The TMJ-occlusion couple is often symbiotic, developing together in relation to its environment, compensating for its own shortcomings. However, a third partner may alter this relationship, such as bruxism, or more generally oral parafunctions, trauma or an interventionist practitioner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Four years of experience with temporamandibular joint (TMJ) arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte Filho, D.L.; Wagner, R.

    1990-01-01

    The imaging investigation of the internal derangements of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has been recently enriched with state of the art tools, such as CT and MRI. However these equipments are not widely available in our country. In addition, some lesions such as perforation of the MJ meniscus, are not demonstrated by either one of these methods, been fairly easily showed by arthorography. The purpose of this paper is to show our experience with 386 arthrograms performed in 193 patients. Our results are compatible with those of the literature. In the last group of 176 patients, we have abandonned the local anesthesia procedure, with good advantages. Arthrography is a very usefull method in the evaluation of TMJ and should be more used in our country. (author)

  17. Temporomandibular Joint Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Baby Bottle Tooth Decay? Pacifiers Have Negative and Positive Effects What is Dental Amalgam (Silver Filling)? Check Menstrual Calendar for Tooth Extraction Temporomandibular Joint Disorder Learn what those dental words mean. Check out how your teeth and mouth ...

  18. Computed tomography and treatment of chronic temporomandibular joint arthritis in a sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warmerdam, E.P.L.; Weeren, P.R. van

    1996-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging and treatment of destructive right temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthritis in a sheep are discussed. Computed tomography (CT) appears to be an attractive technique for imaging TMJ lesions in sheep. Surgical curettage of a deformed TMJ can result in functional recovery

  19. Osteoarthrosis of Temporomandibular Joint Related to the Defects of Posterior Dentition: A Retrospective Study

    OpenAIRE

    Jitka Levorová; Vladimír Machoň; Anasuya Guha; René Foltán

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthrosis (OA) of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a progressive degenerative disease, gradually affecting cartilage, synovial membrane and bone structures. OA of TMJ clinically manifests with joint noises, pain and restricted mouth opening. In late stages, it results in severe damage of TMJ structures and development of ankylosis. Osteoarthrosis is a multifactorial disease; the occurrence is associated with TMJ overloading. The cohort included 619 patients [538 women (87%) and 81 men (1...

  20. The temporomandibular joint in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomaroli, A.; Lener, M.

    1988-01-01

    The first part describes details of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) which are of interest for the examination by computed tomography. In the second part three new planes of reference for scanning of the ventral, middle or dorsal part of the joint are presented. CT examinations were made of 14 TMJ of corpses to identify the medial or ventral parts of the articular disc, medial wall of the articular capsule and medial or triangular recessus to achieve this were scanned the corpses with opened and closed mouth, as well as with closed sets of teeth using a sort of hypomochlion in the molar region to distract the TMJ. More over we applicated different contrast mediums like air and niob. (orig.) [de

  1. Three-dimensional temporomandibular joint modeling and animation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascone, Piero; Rinaldi, Fabrizio; Pagnoni, Mario; Marianetti, Tito Matteo; Tedaldi, Massimiliano

    2008-11-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) temporomandibular joint (TMJ) model derives from a study of the cranium by 3D virtual reality and mandibular function animation. The starting point of the project is high-fidelity digital acquisition of a human dry skull. The cooperation between the maxillofacial surgeon and the cartoonist enables the reconstruction of the fibroconnective components of the TMJ that are the keystone for comprehension of the anatomic and functional features of the mandible. The skeletal model is customized with the apposition of the temporomandibular ligament, the articular disk, the retrodiskal tissue, and the medial and the lateral ligament of the disk. The simulation of TMJ movement is the result of the integration of up-to-date data on the biomechanical restrictions. The 3D TMJ model is an easy-to-use application that may be run on a personal computer for the study of the TMJ and its biomechanics.

  2. Ankylosis of temporomandibular joint in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das U

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Temporomandibular joint (TMJ ankylosis or hypomobility involves fusion of the mandibular condyle to the base of the skull. It is a major clinical problem that affects many patients suffering from facial trauma, infection, or systemic disease. The treatment of TMJ ankylosis poses a significant challenge because of technical difficulties and a high incidence of recurrence. Case Report: This report describes a case of a 4-year-old boy with inability to open mouth, diagnosed with unilateral right bony TMJ ankylosis. The surgical approach consisted of gap arthroplasty followed by vigorous physiotherapy. Conclusion: A detailed history, clinical and functional examination, radiographic examination facilitating correct diagnosis followed by immediate surgical intervention, and physiotherapy can help us to restore physical, psychological, and emotional health of the child patient.

  3. Temporomandibular joint arthrocentesis for internal derangement with disc displacement without reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Darpan; Jain, Megha; Deshpande, Ashwini; Singh, Ajita; Jaiswal, Jagdish

    2015-06-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc derangement is defined as a malpositioning of the articular disc relative to the condyle and eminence. Arthrocentesis of the TMJ is a minimally invasive chair side procedure for the patients with TMJ internal derangement. This case report presents convincing results to keep arthrocentesis as an imperative procedure to relieve such patients of their acute symptoms. TMJ dynamics has also been discussed for an in-depth understanding of the pathology in cases with internal derangement.

  4. [Diagnosis of temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction caused by occlusion pathology and treatment of such patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semkin, V A; Rabukhina, N A; Kravchenko, D V

    2007-01-01

    Patients with temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction need complex treatment that includes prosthetic treatment in intrajoint relation stabilization. In cases of TMJ pathology it is necessary to examine patients and make axiography, function analysis, MPI-analysis, magnetic resonance tomography and zonography of TMJ, electromyography of the masticatory muscles. The authors examined 47 patients with TMJ dysfunction, 43 of them had occlusion pathology. We managed to eliminate the dysfunction symptoms and to receive stable result of the treatment in all the patients.

  5. Osseous temporomandibular joint abnormalities in rheumatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larheim, T.A.; Kolbenstvedt, A.; Rikshospitalet, Oslo

    1990-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was compared with hypocycloidal tomography in 30 joints of 15 adults with rheumatic disease. CT included 1.5 mm thick axial scans (at 1.0 mm intervals) with reformatted oblique sagittal and oblique coronal sections. Multisection (at 2.0 mm intervals) tomography included oblique sagittal and occasionally, oblique coronal sections. CT demonstrated bone abnormalities in 21 and tomography in 20 joints, indicating high agreement between the imaging modalities regarding number of abnormal TMJs. Bone structures were, however, better visualized by multiplanar CT due to superior contrast and spatial resolution particularly in the most lateral and medial parts of the joint, indicating superiority of CT for depicting subtle bony TMJ abnormalities in patients with rheumatic disease. (orig.)

  6. Long-standing temporomandibular joint dislocation: A rare experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil Malik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-standing temporomandibular joint (TMJ dislocations persist for more than a month are most challenging to treat. The management of such condition varies widely, from closed reduction to complicated surgical procedures. The choice of an appropriate methodology is questionable. At present, there are no standard rules or conventions for the ideal strategy in different circumstances. This paper attempts to present the experience of managing two cases of long-standing TMJ dislocations.

  7. The temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, W.

    1984-01-01

    Whilst the temporomandibular joint is in many ways unique, it is subject to all the diseases and disorders found in joints in other parts of the human skeleton. By far the most common disorder is injury, followed by arthropathy, acute and chronic dislocations, ankylosis, and in rare instances, neoplasms. The diagnosis and management of the temporomandibular joint are the primary responsibility of the oral surgeon. Nevertheless, this anatomical region is an area in which the cooperation of medical and dental disciplines may be required for the satisfactory conclusion of treatment. The more so when the disease process involves either associated psychosomatic illness or malignancy. The mainstay of the diagnosis is a careful radiological examination of the joint. There exists a delicate relationship between the dentition, the muscles of mastication, and the temporomandibular articulation, which is controlled by arthrokinetic reflex activity of the branches of the 5th cranial nerve. Imbalance between one or more of the components of this integrated system frequently leads to disturbances in function. Pain-dysfunction disorders constitute the larger part of temporomandibular joint disturbances generally encountered

  8. Severe bony ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint on one side and contralateral adhesion: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Ji Young; Kim, Seong Gon; Choi, Hang Moon; Kim, Hyun Jung

    2015-01-01

    Bony fusion between the mandibular condyle and skull base involves temporomandibular joint (TMJ) bony ankylosis. This condition might originate from trauma, infection, or systemic disease. TMJ adhesion can develop after synovial damage. Both TMJ ankylosis and adhesion lead to functional impairment and pain. Here, we present a case of a 50-year-old female who had bony ankylosis of the right TMJ and adhesion of the left TMJ. She had otitis media in the right ear. A large mass in the right TMJ was observed on computed tomograph. Magnetic resonance image showed a large fused bone mass with normal bone marrow in the right TMJ and flattening of the condyle with a thin disk in the left TMJ. Gap arthroplasty with temporal fascia was performed on the right TMJ, and discectomy, high condylectomy, and coronoidectomy were performed on the left TMJ. During a 2-year follow-up after surgery, the patient had no recurrence

  9. Severe bony ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint on one side and contralateral adhesion: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ji Young [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Jeju National University Hospital, Jeju National University School of Medicine, Jeju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seong Gon; Choi, Hang Moon [School of Dentistry, Gangneung-Wonju National University, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Jung [Dept. of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Jeju National University School of Medicine, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Bony fusion between the mandibular condyle and skull base involves temporomandibular joint (TMJ) bony ankylosis. This condition might originate from trauma, infection, or systemic disease. TMJ adhesion can develop after synovial damage. Both TMJ ankylosis and adhesion lead to functional impairment and pain. Here, we present a case of a 50-year-old female who had bony ankylosis of the right TMJ and adhesion of the left TMJ. She had otitis media in the right ear. A large mass in the right TMJ was observed on computed tomograph. Magnetic resonance image showed a large fused bone mass with normal bone marrow in the right TMJ and flattening of the condyle with a thin disk in the left TMJ. Gap arthroplasty with temporal fascia was performed on the right TMJ, and discectomy, high condylectomy, and coronoidectomy were performed on the left TMJ. During a 2-year follow-up after surgery, the patient had no recurrence.

  10. Arthrocentesis as initial treatment for temporomandibular joint arthropathy : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, L. M.; Huddleston Slater, J. J. R.; Stegenga, B.

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness of arthrocentesis compared to conservative treatment as initial treatment with regard to temporomandibular joint pain and mandibular movement. Patients and methods: In this randomized controlled trial, 80 patients with arthralgia of the TMJ (classified

  11. Tinnitus with temporomandibular joint disorders: a specific entity of tinnitus patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vielsmeier, Veronika; Kleinjung, Tobias; Strutz, Jürgen; Bürgers, Ralf; Kreuzer, Peter Michael; Langguth, Berthold

    2011-11-01

    Tinnitus is frequently associated with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction. However, the nature of the relationship is not fully understood. Here the authors compared 30 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of temporomandibular joint dysfunction and tinnitus to a group of 61 patients with tinnitus but without any subjective complaints of TMJ dysfunction with respect to clinical and demographic characteristics. Case-control study. Tertiary referral center. Tinnitus patients with and without TMJ dysfunction presenting at the Department of Prosthetic Dentistry and th: Tinnitus Clinic at the University of Regensburg. Tinnitus patients with TMJ disorder had better hearing function (P neck movements (P = .001). Classical risk factors for tinnitus (age, male gender, hearing loss) are less relevant in tinnitus patients with TMJ disorder, suggesting a causal role of TMJ pathology in the generation and maintenance of tinnitus. Based on this finding, treatment of TMJ disorder may represent a causally oriented treatment strategy for tinnitus.

  12. Temporomandibular joint fibrocartilage degeneration from unilateral dental splints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Sarah E; Lowe, Jesse R; Tudares, Mauro A; Gold, Michael S; Almarza, Alejandro J

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which altered loading in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), as might be associated with a malocclusion, drives degeneration of articulating surfaces in the TMJ. We therefore sought to quantify the effects of altered joint loading on the mechanical properties and biochemical content and distribution of TMJ fibrocartilage in the rabbit. Altered TMJ loading was induced with a 1mm splint placed unilaterally over the maxillary and mandibular molars for 6 weeks. At that time, TMJ fibrocartilage was assessed by compression testing, biochemical content (collagen, glycosaminoglycan (GAG), DNA) and distribution (histology), for both the TMJ disc and the condylar fibrocartilage. There were no changes in the TMJ disc for any of the parameters tested. The condylar fibrocartilage from the splinted animals was significantly stiffer and the DNA content was significantly lower than that in control animals. There was significant remodeling in the condylar fibrocartilage layers as manifested by a change in GAG and collagen II distribution and a loss of defined cell layers. A connection between the compressive properties of TMJ condylar fibrocartilage after 6 weeks of splinting and the changes in histology was observed. These results suggest a change in joint loading leads to condylar damage, which may contribute to pain associated with at least some forms of TMJ disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Temporomandibular joint involvement in rheumatoid arthritis patients: association between clinical and tomographic data

    OpenAIRE

    Cordeiro, Patrícia C. F; Guimaraes, Josemar P; de Souza, Viviane A; Dias, Isabela M; Silva, Jesca N. N; Devito, Karina L; Bonato, Leticia L

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation and synovial hyperplasia, which usually affects multiple joints. The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) becomes susceptible to the development of changes resulting from RA. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of TMD and degenerative bone changes in TMJ in patients diagnosed with RA (rheumatoid arthritis). The Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/ TMD) questio...

  14. Radiographic study on temporomandibular joint Arthrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Dong Soo [Dept. of Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University , Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1980-11-15

    The author analysed the routine radiographic changes and clinical symptoms of 205 cases of temporomandibular joint arthrosis. The clinical symptoms of the patients were classified and the morphological changes of condylar head, articular eminence, and articular fossa were analyzed and discussed from radiographic view point. The positional change of condylar head and articular fossa relation in TMJ arthrosis were observed. The frequencies of coincidence between the site of complaints and the site of the abnormal images which could be detected were examined. The results were obtained as follows; 1. Bone erosion, deformity, marginal proliferation and sclerosis were selected from many abnormal images as the radiographic diagnostic criteria of TMJ arthritic lesions. 2. Abnormal radiographic findings were revealed in 150 cases (73.9%) of 205 total TMJ arthrosis cases and site with abnormal findings coincided with the site of complaints in 105 cases (70.7%) of 150 cases and coincidence rates were higher above fourth decades than below third decades. 3. Sclerosis of the abnormal radiographic findings could be found more often below third decades than above fourth decades. 4. The positional changes of condylar head were revealed in 176 cases (85.9%) of 205 total cases. 5. Pain complaints were revealed in 170 cases(82.9%) and clicking sounds were revealed in 120 cases (58.6%) of clinical symptoms of TMJ arthrosis. 6. No tendency was found so far the differential diagnosis between pain dysfunction syndrome and osteoarthrosis of TMJ.

  15. Radiographic study on temporomandibular joint Arthrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Dong Soo

    1980-01-01

    The author analysed the routine radiographic changes and clinical symptoms of 205 cases of temporomandibular joint arthrosis. The clinical symptoms of the patients were classified and the morphological changes of condylar head, articular eminence, and articular fossa were analyzed and discussed from radiographic view point. The positional change of condylar head and articular fossa relation in TMJ arthrosis were observed. The frequencies of coincidence between the site of complaints and the site of the abnormal images which could be detected were examined. The results were obtained as follows; 1. Bone erosion, deformity, marginal proliferation and sclerosis were selected from many abnormal images as the radiographic diagnostic criteria of TMJ arthritic lesions. 2. Abnormal radiographic findings were revealed in 150 cases (73.9%) of 205 total TMJ arthrosis cases and site with abnormal findings coincided with the site of complaints in 105 cases (70.7%) of 150 cases and coincidence rates were higher above fourth decades than below third decades. 3. Sclerosis of the abnormal radiographic findings could be found more often below third decades than above fourth decades. 4. The positional changes of condylar head were revealed in 176 cases (85.9%) of 205 total cases. 5. Pain complaints were revealed in 170 cases(82.9%) and clicking sounds were revealed in 120 cases (58.6%) of clinical symptoms of TMJ arthrosis. 6. No tendency was found so far the differential diagnosis between pain dysfunction syndrome and osteoarthrosis of TMJ.

  16. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TEMPOROMANDIBULAR-JOINT MOBILITY AND PERIPHERAL JOINT MOBILITY RECONSIDERED

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, P.U.; DEBONT, L.G.M.; VANDERWEELE, L.T.; Boering, G.

    The purpose of this paper was to study the relationship between temporomandibular joint (TMJ) mobility and mobility of joints and to study the general character of joint mobility in 83 subjects, 55 females and 28 males (mean age 26.7, range 13-46 years). The subjects were recruited from the

  17. Osseous osteoarthritic-like changes and joint mobility of the temporomandibular joints and upper cervical spine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnesen, Liselotte; Petersson, Arne; Wiese, Mie

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare 1) temporomandibular joint (TMJ) mobility between patients with and without reduced upper cervical spine (UCS) mobility and with and without TMJ osseous osteoarthritic-like changes, and 2) UCS osseous changes between patients with and without TMJ osseous osteoarthritic......-like changes and with and without reduced UCS mobility. STUDY DESIGN: The study comprised 39 patients without pain from TMJ or UCS and with obstructive sleep apnea, 15 women (age range 26-72 years, mean 56.0) and 24 men (age range 27-71 years, mean 49.8). The range of motion (ROM) of the mandible and UCS...

  18. Temporo-mandibular joint kinetics and chewing cycles in children. A 3-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodin, C; Lodetti, G; Marinone, M G

    2002-01-01

    To report the temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) kinetics and masticatory function in healthy children. Temporo-mandibular joint palpation and electrognathographic registrations of chewing cycles were repeated for 3 years in order to evaluate changes. Healthy children without systemic pathologies, decayed cavities and previous dental treatment. Electrognathographic (EGN) registration of masticatory cycles and TMJ palpation were carried out on 52 patients (mean age: 5 years 8 months, range: 5 years 1 month, 6 years 8 months), by two university researchers, once a year for 3 consecutive years. TMJ palpation, differentiated TMJ synchronism (simultaneous bilateral opening movement) and TMJ asynchronism (not simultaneous bilateral opening movement), TMJ subluxation and click were observed. Electrognathographic registrations differentiated normal and abnormal jaw chewing cycles, and narrow and large cycles. Temporo-mandibular joint asynchronism was evident in 34 of 52 patients in the primary dentition, in 42 of 52 patients after the eruption of the first permanent molar, and in 31 of 52 patients after the eruption of the permanent incisors. TMJ subluxation increased during the full period of observation. Three temporomandibular clicks appeared after the eruption of the permanent incisors. Altered mastication was not always associated with TMJ disorders. In children, normal chewing cycles can coexist with occlusal discrepancies, cranio-facial growth and TMJ alterations.

  19. Temporomandibular joint formation requires two distinct hedgehog-dependent steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Patricia; Joo, Brian W; Hu, Jimmy K; Tran, Pamela V; Calicchio, Monica L; O'Connell, Daniel J; Maas, Richard L; Tabin, Clifford J

    2009-10-27

    We conducted a genetic analysis of the developing temporo-mandibular or temporomandi-bular joint (TMJ), a highly specialized synovial joint that permits movement and function of the mammalian jaw. First, we used laser capture microdissection to perform a genome-wide expression analysis of each of its developing components. The expression patterns of genes identified in this screen were examined in the TMJ and compared with those of other synovial joints, including the shoulder and the hip joints. Striking differences were noted, indicating that the TMJ forms via a distinct molecular program. Several components of the hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway are among the genes identified in the screen, including Gli2, which is expressed specifically in the condyle and in the disk of the developing TMJ. We found that mice deficient in Gli2 display aberrant TMJ development such that the condyle loses its growth-plate-like cellular organization and no disk is formed. In addition, we used a conditional strategy to remove Smo, a positive effector of the Hh signaling pathway, from chondrocyte progenitors. This cell autonomous loss of Hh signaling allows for disk formation, but the resulting structure fails to separate from the condyle. Thus, these experiments establish that Hh signaling acts at two distinct steps in disk morphogenesis, condyle initiation, and disk-condyle separation and provide a molecular framework for future studies of the TMJ.

  20. Temporomandibular Joint: MRT Diagnostics; Temporomandibulargelenk: MRT-Diagnostik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kress, B. [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg (Germany). Abteilung Neuroradiologie; Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg (Germany). Neurologische Klinik; Schmitter, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg (Germany). Poliklinik fuer zahnaerztliche Prothetik; Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg (Germany). Abteilung Neuroradiologie

    2005-09-01

    MRI of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) requires 1.5 T. The radiologist must be familiar with the anatomy and pathology of the TMJ. This review gives a description of MRI protocols for the TMJ, and MRI anatomy and pathology of the TMJ (open and closed mouth) by means of MR images and drawings. Diagnosing of the TMJ related diseases depends on standardized clinical and MR examinations. Therefore close interdisciplinary cooperation between dentist and radiologist is necessary. (orig.) [German] Magnetresonanztomographie bei Kiefergelenkbeschwerden erfordert neben guter technischer Ausstattung Kenntnisse der Anatomie und Pathologie des Kiefergelenks. Diese Uebersicht stellt neben MRT-Protokollen die Anatomie und die pathologischen Befunde des Kiefergelenks bei geoeffnetem und geschlossenem Mund anhand von Abbildungen und Graphiken systematisch dar. Bildgebende Diagnostik des Kiefergelenks gruendet sich auf eine standardisierte klinische und magnetresonanztomographische Untersuchung und erfordert eine enge interdisziplinaere Kooperation zwischen Zahnmedizin und Radiologie. (orig.)

  1. Chronic hematic cyst of the temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orhan, K.; Delilbasi, C.; Nishiyama, H.; Furukawa, S.; Mitsunobu, K.

    2005-01-01

    Hematic cyst refers to accumulation of blood or blood breakdown products in a non epithelium-lined fibrous tissue capsule. Hepatic cyst is a term often used for deeply placed, incompletely resorbed hematoma hemorrhagic cyst, which may remain unchanged and unidentified for long periods of time. Trauma is the major causative factor, although it is often vague or totally uncalled by the patient. Chronic hematic cysts are uncommon lesions those can present diagnostic challenge. In this article we report a first case of a chronic hematic cyst of the temporomandibular joint TMJ. (author)

  2. Osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint organ and its relationship to disc displacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegenga, B

    2001-01-01

    To overcome disagreements with regard to the relationship between disc displacement and osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), the evidence for suggested disease mechanisms and clinical course of these disorders is reviewed. The TMJ behaves as a complex organ in which biochemical and

  3. Temporo-mandibular joint dislocation: an unusual complication of transoesophageal echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantharam, Brijesh; Chahal, Navtej; Stephens, Nigel; Senior, Roxy

    2010-03-01

    Temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation is an unusual complication of transoesophageal echocardiography (TEE). We report a rare case of bilateral TMJ dislocation in an 84-year-old man prior to DC cardioversion (DCCV) for atrial flutter. Shortly after TEE and DCCV, the patient complained of bilateral facial pain. An orthopantomogram revealed bilateral TMJ dislocation. A closed reduction was performed by maxillo-facial surgeons under intravenous anaesthesia. Although very uncommon, the physician should be aware of the complication and its management.

  4. Temporomandibular joint dislocation due to acute propranolol intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Aghabiklooei

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abbas Aghabiklooei1, Homan Elahi2, Babak Mostafazadeh31Department of Medical Toxicology and Forensic Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 2Firouzgar Hospital, Department of ENT, Tehran, Iran; 3Department of Medical Toxicology and Forensic Medicine, Shaheed Beheshty University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IranAbstract: Temporomandibular joint (TMJ dislocation has not previously been reported as a complication of beta-blocker toxicity. We are reporting two cases of TMJ dislocation resulted from acute severe intoxication with pure propranolol (PPL for the first time. Bilateral TMJ dislocation happened in two patients who were admitted to intensive care unit with diagnosis of severe acute PPL toxicity. Clinical diagnosis of TMJ dislocation was obtained by physical examination. Successful reduction was performed for both patients without subsequent recurrence in two weeks following hospital discharge. Both of our subjects had no previous history of lower jaw dislocation. There was not any risk factor for dislocation such as convulsion during admission period, recent face trauma, or oral manipulation by the medical team. This study showed that TMJ dislocation may occur after severe acute PPL toxicity probably due to spastic contraction of the lateral pterygoid muscle. This is against previously mentioned hypothesis that stated masseteric muscles contraction as the main cause of a bilateral dislocated TMJ.Keywords: propranolol, toxicity, temporomandibular joint dislocation

  5. Temporo-mandibular joint disease in ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, C; Wojtulewski, J A; Bacon, P A; Winstock, D

    1975-01-01

    The occurrence of temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) disease in ankylosing spondylitis is not widely recognized and its incidence is disputed. Seventy-nine patients attending two routine rheumatology clinics were therefore examined by dental surgeon and nine (11-5 per cent) were considered to have specific TMJ involvement. These patients were older than the remainder, and had more extensive spinal and peripheral joint disease. Symptoms were mild and the predominant clinical feature was restricted mouth opening, which could present considerable difficulties during emergency anaesthesia. Bilateral condylectomy was undertaken in one patient with some benefit. Images PMID:1124959

  6. [Comparative evolution surgical accesses to temporo-mandibular joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sysoliatin, P G; Novikov, A I; Sysoliatin, S P; Bobylev, N G; Brega, I N

    2007-01-01

    In experiment on 30 corpses of adult people criteria of an operational wound (depth of a wound, a corner of operational action, an axis of operational action, a corner of an inclination of operational action) were studied at preauricularis, intrauricularis, intrauriculo-temporalis and posterior mandibullaris access to temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ). New surgical intrauriculo-temporalis access to the joint is substantrated. On the basis of the analysis of 289 operations at 268 patients the indications to a choice of surgical access were developed at various diseases and damages of TMJ.

  7. MR imaging of the juvenile temporomandibular joint before orthodontic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lieberman, J.M.; Hans, M.G.; Rozencweig, G.; Goldberg, J.S.; Bellon, E.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper determines the prevalence of internal derangement (ID) of the temporomandibular joint (TM) in a population of children prior to orthodontic therapy. Thirty-two children, aged 7-15 years, with a variety of orthodontic disorders underwent both MR imaging and physical examination to assess ID of the TMJ. With MR imaging, the disks were graded as normal, borderline anterior displaced, or anterior displaced. Fifty-nine TMJs in 32 patients were successfully imaged. Five TMJ MR examinations could not be interpreted because of patient motion. Fifty seven of the 59 joints (97%) were normal. One disk (1.7%) was anterior displaced, and one (1.7%) was considered borderline

  8. Asymmetric uptake of Tc-99m HDP on temporomandibular joints may predict prognosis of temporomandibular joint disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Mi; Lee, Won Woo; Yun, PiI Young; Kim, Young Kyun; Kim, Sang Eun

    2007-01-01

    There is no reliable predictor for therapeutic efficacy for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disease. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the usefulness of Tc-99m HDP bone scan in the pre-therapeutic assessment of prognosis for TMJ disease. Between January 2005 and July 2007, 94 patients (M: F=18: 76; mean age, 33.4±14.0 y) with TMJ disease who underwent pre-therapeutic bone scan were enrolled. Planar bone scan images were obtained at right and left lateral skull areas 3 hours post Tc-99m HDP injection (dose=1295 MBq). TMJ uptake of Tc-99m HDP was quantitated using 13X13 pixel-square region-of-interest over TMJ and parietal skull area as background. TMJ uptake ratio was calculated as; (TMJ background) / background. Asymmetric indices for involved TMJ uptake (Al invovle ) were defined as; TMJ uptake ratio of involved/non-involved joint. Asymmetric indices for greater TMJ uptake regardless of disease involvement (AI greater ) were defined as; TMJ uptake ratio of greater/smaller TMJ uptake. Splint therapy was applied to all patients with mean duration of 7 months (range; 3-34 months). Therapeutic efficacy was dichotomised as improved or non-improved in consideration of mandibular movement, TMJ noise, pain, and tenderness. Seventy-six patients experienced improvement, whereas 18 patients non-improvement. There was no significant difference between improved versus non-improved patients regarding TMJ uptake ratio of involved joint (2.92±0.82 vs. 2.91±0.66), and AI invovle (1.16±0.22 vs. 1.10±0.12) (p>0.05, t-test). However, AI greater was significantly higher in improved patients than non-improved patients (1.20±0.19 vs. 1.13±0.09, p<0.05, t-test). Regardless of disease involvement of TMJ disease, asymmetricities of Tc-99m HDP uptake were more frequently found in improved group after splint therapy. Tc-99m HDP bone scan can predict the efficacy of splint therapy in TMJ disease

  9. Asymmetric uptake of Tc-99m HDP on temporomandibular joints may predict prognosis of temporomandibular joint disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Mi; Lee, Won Woo; Yun, PiI Young; Kim, Young Kyun; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    There is no reliable predictor for therapeutic efficacy for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disease. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the usefulness of Tc-99m HDP bone scan in the pre-therapeutic assessment of prognosis for TMJ disease. Between January 2005 and July 2007, 94 patients (M: F=18: 76; mean age, 33.4{+-}14.0 y) with TMJ disease who underwent pre-therapeutic bone scan were enrolled. Planar bone scan images were obtained at right and left lateral skull areas 3 hours post Tc-99m HDP injection (dose=1295 MBq). TMJ uptake of Tc-99m HDP was quantitated using 13X13 pixel-square region-of-interest over TMJ and parietal skull area as background. TMJ uptake ratio was calculated as; (TMJ background) / background. Asymmetric indices for involved TMJ uptake (Al{sub invovle}) were defined as; TMJ uptake ratio of involved/non-involved joint. Asymmetric indices for greater TMJ uptake regardless of disease involvement (AI{sub greater}) were defined as; TMJ uptake ratio of greater/smaller TMJ uptake. Splint therapy was applied to all patients with mean duration of 7 months (range; 3-34 months). Therapeutic efficacy was dichotomised as improved or non-improved in consideration of mandibular movement, TMJ noise, pain, and tenderness. Seventy-six patients experienced improvement, whereas 18 patients non-improvement. There was no significant difference between improved versus non-improved patients regarding TMJ uptake ratio of involved joint (2.92{+-}0.82 vs. 2.91{+-}0.66), and AI{sub invovle} (1.16{+-}0.22 vs. 1.10{+-}0.12) (p>0.05, t-test). However, AI{sub greater} was significantly higher in improved patients than non-improved patients (1.20{+-}0.19 vs. 1.13{+-}0.09, p<0.05, t-test). Regardless of disease involvement of TMJ disease, asymmetricities of Tc-99m HDP uptake were more frequently found in improved group after splint therapy. Tc-99m HDP bone scan can predict the efficacy of splint therapy in TMJ disease.

  10. Pseudodynamic MR imaging of temporomandibular joint disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Ehara, Shigeru

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has now been established as a procedure of choice in the evaluation of TMJ disorders. In this study, we evaluated the dynamics of TMJ motion on MR imaging, which resembles arthrography. Sixty-eight TMJs in 38 symptomatic patients and one healthy volunteer were examined using pseudodynamic images with gradient echo sequences using a 0.5 Tesla MR unit and 8 cm circular planar surface coil. For depiction of each compartment of the meniscus, the optimum sequence was 200/15/2 (TR/TE/excitations) with 50 deg or 60 deg flip angle in gradient refocused acquisition in steady-state (GRASS) sequences. Three contiguous slices on sagittal MR images were routinely obtained at 14-18 different phases of the opening cycle and displayed in closed-loop cine fashion. Internal derangement was observed in 57% of 68 joints. The most common type was anterior meniscal displacement without reduction. Sideway and rotational displacements, observed in 10% each, were noted on both sagittal multislice images and axial reference images. As a pseudodynamic MR technique, jaw movement specifically designed to check bite procedure to adjust splints is useful for detecting the exact time of meniscal redisplacement on the second click. After conservative therapy for arthrosis, pseudodynamic MR provided information on changes in the meniscus and condylar relationship. Pseudodynamic MR with multiple phases is suitable for evaluating subtle motion abnormality of the meniscus and for post-therapeutic monitoring. (author)

  11. Pseudodynamic MR imaging of temporomandibular joint disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Ehara, Shigeru (Iwate Medical Coll., Morioka (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-09-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has now been established as a procedure of choice in the evaluation of TMJ disorders. In this study, we evaluated the dynamics of TMJ motion on MR imaging, which resembles arthrography. Sixty-eight TMJs in 38 symptomatic patients and one healthy volunteer were examined using pseudodynamic images with gradient echo sequences using a 0.5 Tesla MR unit and 8 cm circular planar surface coil. For depiction of each compartment of the meniscus, the optimum sequence was 200/15/2 (TR/TE/excitations) with 50 deg or 60 deg flip angle in gradient refocused acquisition in steady-state (GRASS) sequences. Three contiguous slices on sagittal MR images were routinely obtained at 14-18 different phases of the opening cycle and displayed in closed-loop cine fashion. Internal derangement was observed in 57% of 68 joints. The most common type was anterior meniscal displacement without reduction. Sideway and rotational displacements, observed in 10% each, were noted on both sagittal multislice images and axial reference images. As a pseudodynamic MR technique, jaw movement specifically designed to check bite procedure to adjust splints is useful for detecting the exact time of meniscal redisplacement on the second click. After conservative therapy for arthrosis, pseudodynamic MR provided information on changes in the meniscus and condylar relationship. Pseudodynamic MR with multiple phases is suitable for evaluating subtle motion abnormality of the meniscus and for post-therapeutic monitoring. (author).

  12. High-resolution computed tomography of the osseous temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larheim, T.A.; Kolbenstvedt, A.; Rikshospitalet, Oslo

    1984-01-01

    A standardized CT procedure for examination of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) with axial and coronal scanning as well as reformatted coronal and sagittal sections, was performed on 32 adults. These included subjects with normal TMJ and patients suffering from muscular dysfunction/disc displacement, arthrosis or rheumatoid arthritis. Some normal CT appearances simulating disease were presented. Axial CT scanning appeared to be the most useful method for demonstrating osseous abnormalities of the TMJ. The diagnostic information was occasionally supplemented by the coronal scanning, which may be difficult to perform on patients with neck stiffness. Reformatted coronal or sagittal sections mostly confirmed TMJ abnormality and supplemented the findings at axial scans in about one third of the patients. (orig.)

  13. Effusion in magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nah, Kyung Soo [Pusan National University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the distribution and frequency of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) effusion in magnetic resonance (MR) images of patients with disc displacements. On T2 weighted MR images of 148 TMJs taken from 74 patients presenting with TMJ pain and dysfunction, we assessed the cases showing TMJ effusion, defined as an amount of fluid that exceeded the maximum amount seen in a control group of asymptomatic volunteers. The amount of TMJ fluid was graded as: I (none or minimal), II (moderate), III (marked), and IV (extensive), according to a standard set by a reference. Disc displacement categories were also recorded. Of the 148 TMJs examined in this study, 52 joints (35.1%) presented with joint effusion, 24 (16.2%) showing bilateral joint effusion. 38 joints showed upper joint space effusion, and 3 showed lower joint space effusion, and 11 showed both upper and lower joint space effusion. 96 joints (64.9%) had grade I joint fluid, 27 (18.2%) grade II, 15 (10.1%) grade III, and 10 (6.8%) grade IV. 80.0% of the joints presenting with grade IV effusion showed disc displacement without reduction. Joint effusion was found not only in upper, but also in lower joint spaces. The higher the effusion grade, the greater the frequency of disc displacement without reduction.

  14. Effusion in magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nah, Kyung Soo

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the distribution and frequency of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) effusion in magnetic resonance (MR) images of patients with disc displacements. On T2 weighted MR images of 148 TMJs taken from 74 patients presenting with TMJ pain and dysfunction, we assessed the cases showing TMJ effusion, defined as an amount of fluid that exceeded the maximum amount seen in a control group of asymptomatic volunteers. The amount of TMJ fluid was graded as: I (none or minimal), II (moderate), III (marked), and IV (extensive), according to a standard set by a reference. Disc displacement categories were also recorded. Of the 148 TMJs examined in this study, 52 joints (35.1%) presented with joint effusion, 24 (16.2%) showing bilateral joint effusion. 38 joints showed upper joint space effusion, and 3 showed lower joint space effusion, and 11 showed both upper and lower joint space effusion. 96 joints (64.9%) had grade I joint fluid, 27 (18.2%) grade II, 15 (10.1%) grade III, and 10 (6.8%) grade IV. 80.0% of the joints presenting with grade IV effusion showed disc displacement without reduction. Joint effusion was found not only in upper, but also in lower joint spaces. The higher the effusion grade, the greater the frequency of disc displacement without reduction.

  15. Roentgenographic study of the temporomandibular joint in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Ho Jung; You, Dong Soo

    1984-01-01

    For the study of the temporomandibular joint in rheumatoid arthritis 30 patients were selected who were diagnosis as rheumatoid arthritis through the clinical, radiographic examination and laboratory finding. Temporoman dibular joint involvement was evaluated through the clinical, radiographic examination. The results were as follows; 1. TMJ was involved in 15 patients of 30 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. (50% involvement). 2. Duration of rheumatoid arthritis was more longer in patients with TMJ involvement than in patients without TMJ involvement. 3. Osseous changes in TMJ were in order of frequency erosion, flattening, osteophyte, sclerosis, deformity, and most common involved site was mandibular condyle. 4. Most common positional change of condyle was forward position in centric occlusion, and restricted movement of condyle in 1 inch mouth opening. 5. TMJ involvement of rheumatoid arthritis was almost bilateral. 6. Main symptoms of TMJ were pain, stiffness, tenderness, limitation of mouth opening, crepitation. 7. There was not the case of ankylosis. 8. There was statistically insignificant correlation between mandibular deviation and TMJ involvement, but some cases showed severe deviation on mouth opening.

  16. MR findings of the temporomandibular joint with crepitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Tsukasa; Yamamoto, Mika; Yamaga, Takayoshi; Takahashi, Koji; Masuda, Saeko; Tagaya, Atsuko; Michi, Ken-ichi; Okano, Tomohiro

    1997-01-01

    Crepitus is an important sign for diagnosis of arthrosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The presence of crepitus can be evaluated by the listening test previously proposed by our group. However, TMJ can be diagnosed by MR imaging showing the disc position and related findings including bony changes and joint effusion. This study investigated the relationship between the presence of crepitus and pathology of the joint. Fourteen joints with crepitus diagnosed by the listening test were examined in this study. TMJ was categorized into four types based on findings on double spin echo MR images. The results were as follows: Of fourteen joints with crepitus, five (36%) were showed as normal superior disc position. The remaining 9 joints (64%) were diagnosed with disc displacement, of which, 6 showed reduction, one was without reduction and 2 without reduction were associated with arthrosis. Statistical analysis using the data obtained here and other data showed that the joints with crepitus tended to show disk displacement. There was no significant difference between the degree of certainty about the presence of the crepitus and the distribution of joint pathology. Joint effusion was observed only in the joints with displacement. These results indicated that TMJ with crepitus is associated with varied joint pathology. (author)

  17. MR findings of the temporomandibular joint with crepitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sano, Tsukasa; Yamamoto, Mika; Yamaga, Takayoshi; Takahashi, Koji; Masuda, Saeko; Tagaya, Atsuko; Michi, Ken-ichi; Okano, Tomohiro [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Dentistry

    1997-06-01

    Crepitus is an important sign for diagnosis of arthrosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The presence of crepitus can be evaluated by the listening test previously proposed by our group. However, TMJ can be diagnosed by MR imaging showing the disc position and related findings including bony changes and joint effusion. This study investigated the relationship between the presence of crepitus and pathology of the joint. Fourteen joints with crepitus diagnosed by the listening test were examined in this study. TMJ was categorized into four types based on findings on double spin echo MR images. The results were as follows: Of fourteen joints with crepitus, five (36%) were showed as normal superior disc position. The remaining 9 joints (64%) were diagnosed with disc displacement, of which, 6 showed reduction, one was without reduction and 2 without reduction were associated with arthrosis. Statistical analysis using the data obtained here and other data showed that the joints with crepitus tended to show disk displacement. There was no significant difference between the degree of certainty about the presence of the crepitus and the distribution of joint pathology. Joint effusion was observed only in the joints with displacement. These results indicated that TMJ with crepitus is associated with varied joint pathology. (author)

  18. A study of the temporomandibular joint during bruxism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commisso, María S; Martínez-Reina, Javier; Mayo, Juana

    2014-06-01

    A finite element model of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and the human mandible was fabricated to study the effect of abnormal loading, such as awake and asleep bruxism, on the articular disc. A quasilinear viscoelastic model was used to simulate the behaviour of the disc. The viscoelastic nature of this tissue is shown to be an important factor when sustained (awake bruxism) or cyclic loading (sleep bruxism) is simulated. From the comparison of the two types of bruxism, it was seen that sustained clenching is the most detrimental activity for the TMJ disc, producing an overload that could lead to severe damage of this tissue.

  19. MR of 2270 TMJs: prevalence of radiographic presence of otomastoiditis in temporomandibular joint disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orhan, Kaan [Department of Oral Diagnosis and Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Ankara University, 06500 Besevler, Ankara (Turkey)]. E-mail: call53@yahoo.com; Nishiyama, Hideyoshi [Department of Oral Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Tadashi, Sasaki [Department of Oral Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Shumei, Murakami [Department of Oral Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Furukawa, Souhei [Department of Oral Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    Objective: : The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence of radiographic presence of otomastoiditis while examining temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders in magnetic resonance images (MRI) in a series of 2270 temporomandibular joint magnetic resonance images and to examine the relationship between otomastoiditis and TMJ disorders. Materials and methods: : 2270 temporomandibular joint magnetic resonance images and patients' data were retrospectively investigated. Magnetic resonance images were obtained from the patients who referred to Osaka University Dental Hospital Outpatient Clinic with TMJ complaints for the last four years (from January 1998 to January 2003). The patients, who were diagnosed as otomastoiditis based on their temporomandibular joint magnetic resonance images, were sent to Osaka University Hospital Department of Otolaryngology for a medical consultation in order to have their pathologies certified following their MR process. Age and sex were recorded for all patients and for otomastoiditis cases; location of the disease, symptoms of patients and TMJ findings were noted as well. Results: : Seven patients were diagnosed as acute otomastoiditis and one patient diagnosed as chronic active otitis media with cholesteatoma in the series of 2270 MR, which were representing a prevalence of 0.39%. Neurilemoma diagnosed in left mastoid process in one patient. The final diagnoses of all patients were made after medical consultation. Conclusion: : While examining temporomandibular joint magnetic resonance images; it is not only important to examine just the TMJ structures, but also to look at the nearby anatomical features to check evidence for inflammatory disease.

  20. MR of 2270 TMJs: prevalence of radiographic presence of otomastoiditis in temporomandibular joint disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orhan, Kaan; Nishiyama, Hideyoshi; Tadashi, Sasaki; Shumei, Murakami; Furukawa, Souhei

    2005-01-01

    Objective: : The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence of radiographic presence of otomastoiditis while examining temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders in magnetic resonance images (MRI) in a series of 2270 temporomandibular joint magnetic resonance images and to examine the relationship between otomastoiditis and TMJ disorders. Materials and methods: : 2270 temporomandibular joint magnetic resonance images and patients' data were retrospectively investigated. Magnetic resonance images were obtained from the patients who referred to Osaka University Dental Hospital Outpatient Clinic with TMJ complaints for the last four years (from January 1998 to January 2003). The patients, who were diagnosed as otomastoiditis based on their temporomandibular joint magnetic resonance images, were sent to Osaka University Hospital Department of Otolaryngology for a medical consultation in order to have their pathologies certified following their MR process. Age and sex were recorded for all patients and for otomastoiditis cases; location of the disease, symptoms of patients and TMJ findings were noted as well. Results: : Seven patients were diagnosed as acute otomastoiditis and one patient diagnosed as chronic active otitis media with cholesteatoma in the series of 2270 MR, which were representing a prevalence of 0.39%. Neurilemoma diagnosed in left mastoid process in one patient. The final diagnoses of all patients were made after medical consultation. Conclusion: : While examining temporomandibular joint magnetic resonance images; it is not only important to examine just the TMJ structures, but also to look at the nearby anatomical features to check evidence for inflammatory disease

  1. Prolotherapy: A new hope for temporomandibular joint pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Vijay Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common cause of orofacial pain is the Temporomandibular Joint Disorder (TMD, a collective term used to describe a group of medical disorders causing temporomandibular joint (TMJ pain and dysfunction. As the causes of TMD are varied and run the gamut from mechanical issues, such as disc degeneration and dislocation or erosion of the fibrocartilaginous surfaces of the condyle, fossa, and articular eminence, the treatment approaches for the chronic TMJ case are also quite varied. As surgery is considered a last resort for TMD, it is common for sufferers to seek out alternatives and one of the alternative treatments is ′Prolotherapy,′ which is also known as Regenerative Injection Therapy. This article provides an overview of this new alternative therapy.

  2. A study of the temporomandibular joint during bruxism

    OpenAIRE

    Commisso Cuñarro, María Soledad; Martínez Reina, Francisco Javier; Mayo Nuñez, Juana María

    2014-01-01

    A finite element model of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and the human mandible was fabricated to study the effect of abnormal loading, such as awake and asleep bruxism, on the articular disc. A quasilinear viscoelastic model was used to simulate the behaviour of the disc. The viscoelastic nature of this tissue is shown to be an important factor when sustained (awake bruxism) or cyclic loading (sleep bruxism) is simulated. From the comparison of the two types of bruxism, it was seen that s...

  3. MRI of the temporomandibular joint in patients with rheumatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okochi, Kiyoshi; Ida, Mizue; Ohbayashi, Naoto

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the MRI findings of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in patients with rheumatic disease. The characteristic MRI findings of the TMJs in rheumatic patients were considered the obscurity of temporal posterior attachment (TPA) visualization and the presence of osseous changes of the condyle. As for the osseous changes, nearly 50% of the condyles had erosive changes and 20% showed severe bone destruction. (author)

  4. Evaluation of body posture in individuals with internal temporomandibular joint derangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munhoz, Wagner Cesar; Marques, Amélia Pasqual; de Siqueira, José Tadeu Tesseroli

    2005-10-01

    Temporomandibular dysfunctions (TMD) comprise a great number of disruptions that may affect the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), the masticatory muscles, or both. TMJ internal derangement is a specific type of TMD, of which the etiology and physiopathology are broadly unknown, but have been suggested to be linked to head, neck, and body posture factors. This study aimed at verifying possible relationships between body posture and TMJ internal derangements (TMJ-id), by comparing 30 subjects presenting typical TMJ-id signs to 20 healthy subjects. Subjects' clinical evaluations included anamnesis, stomatognatic system evaluation, and plotting analysis on body posture photographs. No statistically significant differences were found between the groups. Results do not support the assertion that body posture plays a role in causing or enhancing TMD; however, these results should be cautiously considered because of the small number of subjects evaluated and the many posture variables submitted to statistical procedures that lead to high standard deviations.

  5. Functional disorders of the temporomandibular joints: Internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Ling; Wang, Ding-Han; Yang, Mu-Chen; Hsu, Wun-Eng; Hsu, Ming-Lun

    2018-04-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is one of the most complex joints of the human body. Due to its unique movement, in terms of combination of rotation and translator movement, disc of the joint plays an important role to maintain its normal function. In order to sustain the normal function of the TMJ, disc must be kept in proper position as well as maintain normal shape in all circumstances. Once the disc is not any more in its normal position during function of the joint, disturbance of the joint can be occurred which will lead to subsequent distortion of the disc. Shape of the disc can be influenced by many factors i.e.: abnormal function or composition of the disc itself. Etiology of the internal derangement of the disc remains controversial. Multifactorial theory has been postulated in most of previous manuscripts. Disc is composed of mainly extracellular matrix. Abnormal proportion of collagen type I & III may also leads to joint hypermobility which may be also a predisposing factor of this disorder. Thus it can be recognized as local manifestation of a systemic disorder. Different treatment modalities with from conservative treatment to surgical intervention distinct success rate have been reported. Recently treatment with extracellular matrix injection becomes more and more popular to strengthen the joint itself. Since multifactorial in character, the best solution of the treatment modalities should be aimed to resolve possible etiology from different aspects. Team work may be indication to reach satisfied results. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  6. Psychoneuroimmunological disorders and temporomandibular joint pain: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjani Shetty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychoneuroimmunology characterizes a disease entity that combines psychological components, central nervous system regulation, and immunology, to explain the etiological complexity of a disease. Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs include a heterogeneous group of painful conditions that involve the temporomandibular joint (TMJ, muscles of mastication, and the adjacent anatomic structures. This review focuses on the psychoneuroimmunological diseases and disorders that mimic the symptoms of TMDs. The differentiation of these disorders is of great significance to the oral physician - differentiating and diagnosing the cause of TMJ pain and treating it effectively to benefit the patient.The literature for this review was taken from Medline/PubMed, other indexed journals, standard text books, and online material.

  7. Evaluation relationship between temporomandibular joint disorder and headache: A review literature

    OpenAIRE

    Farzaneh Aghahosseini; Nafiseh Sheykhbahaei

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: Headache is among the most common complaints in patients suffering from temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD). Thus, it seems that evaluation of patients with headache in terms of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders is necessary. In people with TMD, parafunctional activities play an important etiologic role. Considering the high prevalence of bruxism and TMDs in patients with headache, assessment the accuracy and severity of this association can play a key role in d...

  8. [Bilateral chronic dislocation of the temporomandibular joints and Meige syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzul, L; Henoux, M; Marion, F; Corre, P

    2015-04-01

    Chronic dislocation of the temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) is rare. It occurs when an acute dislocation is left untreated, in certain situations, including severe illness, neurologic or psychiatric diseases or prolonged oral intubation. A 79 years old woman, with Meige syndrome, suffered from bilateral dislocation of the TMJ for over 1 year. Surgical repositioning of the mandibular condyles and temporal bone eminectomy were performed. At the 18 postoperative months control, no recurrence has been noted. Treatment of chronic TMJ dislocations often requires a surgical procedure. Manual reduction, even under general anaesthesia, often fails because of severe muscular spasm and periarticular fibrotic changes. The management of this disorder is still controversial. We review available surgical procedures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Temporomandibular joint ankylosis in child: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul J Hegde

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ is an intracapsular union of the disc-condyle complex to the temporal articular surface that restricts mandibular movements, including the fibrous adhesions or bony fusion between condyle, disc, glenoid fossa, and eminence. It is a serious and disabling condition that may cause problems in mastication, digestion, speech, appearance, and hygiene. Case Report: This report describes a case of a 12-year-old girl with inability to open her mouth, diagnosed with unilateral right bony TMJ ankylosis. The surgical approach consisted of gap arthroplasty with interpositional temporalis muscle flap followed by vigorous physiotherapy. Conclusion: The treatment of TMJ ankylosis poses a significant challenge because of technical difficulties and a high incidence of recurrence. Its treatment includes the orthodontist, oral and maxillofacial surgeon, pediatric dentist, and psychologist and physical therapist as part of the healthcare team.

  10. Interpositional Gap Arthroplasty by Versatile Pedicled Temporalis Myofascial Flap in the Management of Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis- A Case Series Study

    OpenAIRE

    Aneja, Vikas; Raval, Rushik; Bansal, Anupam; Kumawat, Vinod; Kaur, Jasleen; Shaikh, Ahemer Arif

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) ankylosis is a situation in which the mandibular condyle is fused to the glenoid fossa by bone or fibrous tissue. The management of TMJ ankylosis has a complicated chore and it is challenging for the maxillofacial surgeon because of technical hitches and high rate of re-ankylosis. Interpositional gap arthroplasty is one of the modalities for its management. A range of inter-positional materials have been used to avert recurrence after gap arthroplasty in TMJ anky...

  11. Alteration of Cartilage Degeneration and Inflammation Markers in Temporomandibular Joint Osteoarthritis Occurs Proportionally

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Lukas M.; Kuijer, Roel; Slater, James J. R. Huddleston; Stegenga, Boudewijn

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: There is a growing interest in markers for cartilage degradation in synovial joints because of their potential diagnostic and prognostic value. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify valuable degradation markers for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis (OA) by comparing

  12. [Application of joint reconstruction with autogenous coronoid process graft to treat temporomandibular joint ankylosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qing-tiao; Huang, Xuan-ping; Jiang, Xian-fang; Yang, Yuan-yuan; Li, Hua; Lin, Xi

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate the clinical effect of joint reconstruction by using autogenous coronoid process graft to treat temporomandibular joint(TMJ) ankylosis. Nine cases of TMJ ankylosis from September 2008 to September 2010 were surgically treated by joint reconstruction with autogenous coronoid process graft, using autogenous articular disc or prosthodontic membrane as interpositional material. Mouth opening, occlusion and cone beam CT(CBCT) were used for evaluation before and after surgery. Satisfactory mouth opening was achieved in all patients and no one got occlusal changes or reankylosis during follow-up. CBCT showed that coronoid process graft reached bone union with the ramus and turned to be round. It is effective to cure TMJ ankylosis through joint reconstruction with autogenous coronoid process graft.

  13. Minimally invasive surgical treatment for temporomandibular joint in patients with various rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Drobyshev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint (TMJ involvement occurs in patients with different rheumatic diseases (RDs. Pain, limitation of mouth opening can lead to significant problems in both oral hygiene and when eating. Conservative treatments for TMJ lesions are not always effective. Objective: to evaluate the efficiency of minimally invasive surgical interventions (TMJ arthrocentesis and arthroscopy in patients with RDs. Patients and methods. The investigation enrolled 64 patients with different RDs (43 with rheumatoid arthritis, 11 with psoriatic arthritis, 8 with systemic lupus erythematosus, and 2 with ankylosing spondylitis who were divided into three groups in relation to the severity of TMJ involvement in accordance with the Wilkes classification. All the patients underwent TMJ magnetic resonance imaging at baseline and 6 months after treatment. Also at baseline, 14 days, and 1, 6, and 12 months after surgery, the investigators assessed TMJ pain intensity by visual analogue scale and the parameters of mandibular movements. Patients with Wilkes stages IV and V TMJ involvement underwent arthroscopic intervention into the TMJ and those with III stage received TMJ arthrocentesis with arthrolavage. Results and discussion. After surgical treatment, all the groups were noted to have a significant decrease in TMJ pain intensity compared with the baseline level; moreover, the severity of TMJ pain most significantly decreased on day 7 after surgery. Later on, positive changes remained within subsequent follow-up months. There were data similar in the higher degree of mouth opening. The results of surgical treatment in patients with Wilkes stage V TMJ involvement were worse than in those with stages III and IV. Conclusion. Minimally invasive TMJ surgery in patients with RDs is effective and associated with the low frequency of postoperative complications and exacerbations of RDs. The efficiency of minimally invasive TMJ surgery is higher in patients with the

  14. Post-traumatic changes of the temporo-mandibular joint by bone scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, S.A.; Rood, J.P.; Testa, H.J.

    1988-01-01

    13 patients who sustained mandibular trauma were investigated with radiographs and scintiscans. The scintiscans showed abnormal uptake of radiopharmaceutical in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In patients with a long history of traumatic arthrosis, there was more positive correlation between the scintiscans, and clinical symptoms and histology than between radiographs, and symptoms and histology. In patients with mandibular body fractures and no TMJ symptoms, the scans showed abnormal uptake in the TMJ in 7/8 joints, in the absence of radiographic abnormality. The significance of the abnormal uptake and the value of scintigraphy is discussed.

  15. Post-traumatic changes of the temporo-mandibular joint by bone scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, S.A.; Rood, J.P.; Testa, H.J.

    1988-01-01

    13 patients who sustained mandibular trauma were investigated with radiographs and scintiscans. The scintiscans showed abnormal uptake of radiopharmaceutical in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In patients with a long history of traumatic arthrosis, there was more positive correlation between the scintiscans, and clinical symptoms and histology than between radiographs, and symptoms and histology. In patients with mandibular body fractures and no TMJ symptoms, the scans showed abnormal uptake in the TMJ in 7/8 joints, in the absence of radiographic abnormality. The significance of the abnormal uptake and the value of scintigraphy is discussed. (author)

  16. MRI-based stereolithographic models of the temporomandibular joint: technical innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undt, G; Wild, K; Reuther, G; Ewers, R

    2000-10-01

    A new technique of manufacturing dual-colour stereolithographic models of hard and soft tissues of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is presented. Sagittal T1/PD weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images of joints with and without disc displacement were obtained in the closed and open mouth positions. Individual interactive contour identification of bony structures and the articular disc followed by binary interpolation provided the data for the generation of acrylic TMJ models. Three dimensional in vivo visualization of the articular disc in relation to bony structures in the closed and open mouth positions allows a new perception of normal and pathological TMJ anatomy.

  17. Dual joint space arthrography in temporomandibular joint disorders: Comparison with single inferior joint space arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hyung Sik; Chang, Duk Soo; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Woo Sun; Sung, Jung Ho; Jun, Young Hwan [Capital Armed Forces General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-02-15

    The temporomandibular joint(TMJ) is really a complex of two synovial space separated by fibrocartilaginous disc. Single inferior joint space arthrography is commonly performed for evaluation of TMJ disorders, which is known to be superior in demonstrating joint dynamics. But it reveals only the inferior surface of the disc. Therefore, dual space arthrography is superior to demonstrate the soft tissue anatomic feature of the joint such as disc position and shape. Authors performed 83 TMJ arthrograms in TMJ problems. Initially, the inferior joint space was done and then the superior space was sequentially contrasted. The follow results were noted: 1. In all cases, dual space arthrography revealed accurate disc shape and positions. 2. Concordant findings between the two techniques: 68 cases (82%). Discordance between the two techniques: 15 cases (18%) 3. Possible causes of discordance between inferior and dual space arthrography. a) Normal varians of anterior recess: 3 cases b) Posterior disc displacement: 4 cases c) Influence of the patient's head position change :4 cases d) False perforation: 2 cases e) Reduction change: 2 cases 4. In 5 cases with anterior displacement, dual space arthrography gave additional findings such as adhesion within the superior space, which could not be evaluated by single inferior space.

  18. Modified mandibular splint therapy for disc displacement with reduction of the temporomandibular joint

    OpenAIRE

    Ju-Hui Wu; Yu-Hsun Kao; Chao-Ming Chen; Ching-Wei Shu; Chun-Ming Chen; I-Yueh Huang

    2013-01-01

    Occlusal splints are a standard method to treat disc displacement with reduction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). They can be classified into three major groups on the basis of function: stabilization splints, distraction splints (pivot), and anterior repositioning splints. The aim of this paper is to introduce a modified mandibular splint, the Kaohsuing Medical University splint, and its associated treatment regimen for management of disc displacement with reduction of the TMJ. The key ...

  19. Bifid mandibular condyle with temporomandibular joint ankylosis: report of two cases and review of literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulati, Ajay; Virmani, V.; Ramanathan, S.; Khandelwal, N. [Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, PGIMER, Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Chandigarh (India); Verma, L. [Gian Sagar Dental College and Hospital, Department of Pedodontics, Patiala (India)

    2009-10-15

    Bifid mandibular condyle is an uncommon entity with a controversial etiology. It can be developmental or acquired and rarely may be associated with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis. Although the patient may be asymptomatic, the radiologist should be aware of this entity and its clinical implications. We report two cases of BMC, one developmental and the other secondary to trauma. Both were diagnosed using computed tomography, which additionally revealed the associated ankylosis of TMJ in both the patients. (orig.)

  20. Bifid mandibular condyle with temporomandibular joint ankylosis: report of two cases and review of literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulati, Ajay; Virmani, V.; Ramanathan, S.; Khandelwal, N.; Verma, L.

    2009-01-01

    Bifid mandibular condyle is an uncommon entity with a controversial etiology. It can be developmental or acquired and rarely may be associated with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis. Although the patient may be asymptomatic, the radiologist should be aware of this entity and its clinical implications. We report two cases of BMC, one developmental and the other secondary to trauma. Both were diagnosed using computed tomography, which additionally revealed the associated ankylosis of TMJ in both the patients. (orig.)

  1. Airway Management in a Mental Retardation Patient with Temporo-mandibular Joint Ankylosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rauf GÜL

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ ankylosis makes it impossible orotracheal intubation for general anesthesia because of limited mouth opening. We applied a nasotracheal intubation via fiberoptic bronchoscopy (FOB guidance on a 36 years old mental retarded (MR patient with bilateral TMJ, having extremely limited mouth opening. As a result, nasotracheal intubation via FOB is reliable technique on even mental retarded patients with extremely limited opening.

  2. A comparison of clinical symptoms and magnetic resonance images in temporomandibular joint disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae [Kyunghee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-06-15

    To determine the relationship between clinical symptoms and magnetic resonance (MR) images in patients presenting with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders. This study was based on 172 joints in 86 patients presenting with TMJ disorders. Joint pain and sound during jaw opening and closing movements were recorded, and the possible relationship between disc positions and bony changes of the condylar head and the articular fossa in MR images in the oblique sagittal planes were examined. Data were analyzed by Chi-square test. There was no statistically significant relationship between clinical symptoms and MR images in the patients with TMJ disorders. In the patient with TMJ disorders, joint pain and sound could not be specific clinical symptoms that are related with MR image findings, and asymptomatic joint did not necessarily imply that the joints are normal according to MR image findings.

  3. Treating TMJ: Less Is Often Best | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and often goes away by itself. Illustration: NIDCR What is TMJ? Temporomandibular joint and muscle disorders, commonly called TMJ, are a group of painful conditions affecting the muscles controlling jaw movement. Injury plays a role in some ...

  4. Computed tomographic findings in dogs and cats with temporomandibular joint disorders: 58 cases (2006–2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzi, Boaz; Cissell, Derek D.; Verstraete, Frank J. M.; Kass, Philip H.; DuRaine, Grayson D.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe CT findings in dogs and cats with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders. Design Retrospective case-series. Animals 41 dogs and 17 cats. Procedures Medical records and CT images of the skull were reviewed for dogs and cats that were examined at a dentistry and oral surgery specialty practice between 2006 and 2011. Results Of 142 dogs and 42 cats evaluated, 41 dogs and 17 cats had CT findings consistent with a TMJ disorder. In dogs, the most common TMJ disorder was osteoarthritis; however, in most cases, there were other TMJ disorders present in addition to osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis was more frequently identified at the medial aspect rather than the lateral aspect of the TMJ, whereas the frequency of osteoarthritic involvement of the dorsal and ventral compartments did not differ significantly. In cats, fractures were the most common TMJ disorder, followed by osteoarthritis. Clinical signs were observed in all dogs and cats with TMJ fractures, dysplasia, ankylosis, luxation, and tumors; however, only 4 of 15 dogs and 2 of 4 cats with osteoarthritis alone had clinical signs. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance Results indicated that TMJ disorders are frequently present in combination. Osteoarthritis was the most common TMJ disorder in dogs and the second most common TMJ disorder in cats. Computed tomography should be considered as a tool for the diagnosis of TMJ disorders in dogs and cats with suspected orofacial disorders and pain. PMID:23234284

  5. An epidemiological study of temporomandibular joint ankylosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vinay Kumar; Mehrotra, Divya; Malhotra, Seema; Kumar, Sandeep; Agarwal, Girdhar Gopal; Pal, Uma Shanker

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) forms the very cornerstone of craniofacial integrity and its ankylosis in a growing child may cause problems in daily food intake, speech, appearance, and oral hygiene is affected to a major extent. It is one of the common acquired pathologies afflicting the skeleton. It is also the most overlooked and under-managed problem in children. Materials and Methods: A house to house survey was conducted between 2010 and 2011 in rural and urban areas of Lucknow. A total of 21,720 children aged between 3-15 years from 9090 houses comprising a representative sample were included. Results: Ten TMJ ankylosis cases were identified in 21,720 children. Of these, six were bilateral and four were unilateral. Male to female ratio was 1:9, with most patients (70.0%) being in the 10-15 years’ age group (mean age was 11.1 years ± 3.34). The most common cause of ankylosis was trauma for 90.0% of cases. The majority of patients (70%) were reporting the condition for the first time, with 30% patients having had previous treatment. Conclusion: TMJ ankylosis is an acquired condition in most of the cases. Birth/childhood trauma would be the major causative factor. Knowledge amongst parents, providers of health about this entity was poor. Initial management of the causative factor was poor. Mere knowledge among the general population and healthcare providers can result in primary prevention and also secondary prevention along with its successful definitive treatment. PMID:23251054

  6. Assessment of treatment response to splint therapy and evaluation of TMJ function using joint vibration analysis in patients exhibiting TMJ disc displacement with reduction: A clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Devi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context, Aim, and Objectives: Diagnosis of temporomandibular joint (TMJ disc displacement with reduction (DDR is difficult. Literature combining different subjective parameters of TMJ function with an objective evaluation of TMJ function using joint vibration analysis (JVA is limited. Hence, the study was planned to diagnose temporomandibular disorder accurately, to do a subjective and objective evaluation of TMJ function, and to assess the effectiveness of different types of splint therapy over the conventional anterior repositioning appliance (ARA group. Design: Single-blind, randomized, comparative clinical trial conducted in thirty patients, 18–55 years of age, allocated to three groups, i.e., ARA conventional group, centric stabilization splint (CSS, and Soft splint (SS groups. Subjects and Methods: Preoperative values of comfortable mouth opening (CMO in mm, maximum mouth opening (MMO in mm, TMJ clicking and tenderness (grading 0–3, visual analog scale pain score (0–10 cm, and total energy (TE integral values of both TMJs using JVA were recorded. Postoperative values were taken at the time of delivery of splint at 1st, 2nd, 6th, and 10th week. Statistical Analysis and Results: Intergroup comparison – Kruskal–Wallis test showed no statistically significant difference in CMO, MMO, and TE values of right TMJs among three groups at any point. No significant difference was seen in TMJ clicking and tenderness among groups at any point of time except at 10 weeks and at 2 weeks, respectively, by Chi-square test. Intragroup comparison - Wilcoxon signed-rank test showed the significance of difference (P < 0.05* in postoperative visits for CMO, MMO, pain score, and TE values. Clinical effect size, extent, consistency, and percentage of cases showing improvement were maximum for CSS group. Conclusions: The study concludes that the use of JVA for diagnosis along with history and clinical examination increases the accuracy of the diagnosis of

  7. Imaging diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). MR imaging of the disk of the temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Tsukasa; Yamamoto, Mika; Sakuma, Katsuya

    2001-01-01

    Since its introduction in the 1980s, magnetic resonance imaging has become the preferred method for diagnosing soft tissue abnormalities of temporomandibular joint (TMJ). MR imaging is non-invasive and more accurate than arthorography. In addition, it requires less operator skill and is well tolerated by patients. We are usually taking MR images of the TMJ with the fast spin echo technique that can simultaneously obtain both T2-weighted and proton density images. The purpose of this study was to determine the utility of T2-weighed and proton density images for diagnosing the disk status in TMJ, comparing the results with those obtained by T1-weighted images. We studied 104 TMJs in 52 patients with both T2-weighted and proton density images, and 80 TMJs in 40 patients with only T1-weighted images. The joints were evaluated by two oral radiologists who looked at three aspects of the joints-disk displacement, disk reduction and disk shape - giving ratings of good'' or ''fair'' in each category. Ratings of ''good'' were significant higher in all three categories in T2-weighted and proton density images than in T1-weighted images (p<0.01). Based on these results, we conclude that T2-weighted and proton density images taken with the fast spin echo technique are useful for diagnosing the disk status of the TMJ. (author)

  8. Comparison of three radiographic methods in screening of temporomandibular joint involvement in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenoenen, M.; Kilpinen, E.

    1990-01-01

    Fifty-three randomly selected subjects with psoriatic arthritis (PA) were examined radiographically by means of orthopantomography, transcranial radiography, and transmaxillary radiography. Two examiners graded the radiographic signs of flattening, osteophytes, erosion, and sclerosis. The findings obtained were then compared to determine the best technique for screening of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) bone changes. Together the techniques showed definite (24%) and possible (6%) changes, suggesting TMJ involvement in 31 of 106 joints. In all projections, radiographic signs suggesting TMJ involvement were most frequent in the condyle. Erosion in the condyle was the most frequent finding. Agreement with regard to definite changes in the condyle was found in only one-third to half of the cases. It is concluded that in radiography of the TMJ in subjects with PA, a combination of radiographic techniques should be used to obtain maximum information. However, orthopantomography is well suited for screening of TMJ involvement in subjects with PA. 30 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Estrogen receptors in the temporomandibular joint of the baboon (Papio cynocephalus): an autoradiographic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aufdemorte, T.B.; Van Sickels, J.E.; Dolwick, M.F.; Sheridan, P.J.; Holt, G.R.; Aragon, S.B.; Gates, G.A.

    1986-04-01

    Using an autoradiographic method, the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) complex of five aged female baboons was studied for the presence of receptors for estradiol-17 beta. The study was performed in an effort to learn more of the pathophysiology of this joint and in an attempt to provide a scientific basis to explain the reported preponderance of women who seek and undergo treatment for signs and symptoms referable to the TMJ. This experiment revealed that the TMJ complex contains numerous cells with receptors for estrogen, particularly the articular surface of the condyle, articular disk, and capsule. Muscles of mastication contained relatively fewer receptors. As a result, one may postulate a role for the sex steroid hormones in the maintenance, repair, and/or pathogenesis of the TMJ. Additional studies are necessary to fully determine the significance of hormone receptors in this site and any correlation between diseases of the TMJ and the endocrine status of affected patients.

  10. Estrogen receptors in the temporomandibular joint of the baboon (Papio cynocephalus): an autoradiographic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aufdemorte, T.B.; Van Sickels, J.E.; Dolwick, M.F.; Sheridan, P.J.; Holt, G.R.; Aragon, S.B.; Gates, G.A.

    1986-01-01

    Using an autoradiographic method, the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) complex of five aged female baboons was studied for the presence of receptors for estradiol-17 beta. The study was performed in an effort to learn more of the pathophysiology of this joint and in an attempt to provide a scientific basis to explain the reported preponderance of women who seek and undergo treatment for signs and symptoms referable to the TMJ. This experiment revealed that the TMJ complex contains numerous cells with receptors for estrogen, particularly the articular surface of the condyle, articular disk, and capsule. Muscles of mastication contained relatively fewer receptors. As a result, one may postulate a role for the sex steroid hormones in the maintenance, repair, and/or pathogenesis of the TMJ. Additional studies are necessary to fully determine the significance of hormone receptors in this site and any correlation between diseases of the TMJ and the endocrine status of affected patients

  11. Efficacy of Temporomandibular Joint Arthrocentesis with Sodium Hyaluronate in the Management of Temporomandibular Joint Disorders: A Prospective Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorrela, Harsha; Prameela, J; Srinivas, G; Reddy, B Vijay Baskar; Sudhir, Mvs; Arakeri, Gururaj

    2017-12-01

    This study was designed to investigate the efficacy of the temporomandibular joint arthrocentesis with and without injection of sodium hyaluronate (SH) in the treatment of temporomandibular joint disorders. A total of sixty two TMJs in 34 males and 28 females aged 20-65 years comprised the study material. The patients' complaints were limited mouth opening, TMJ pain, and joint noises during function. Patients were randomly divided into 2 groups in which arthrocentesis plus intra-articular injection of sodium hyaluronate was performed in 1 group and only arthrocentesis was performed in the other group. Both groups contained patients with disc displacement with reduction and without reduction. Clinical evaluation of the patients was done before the procedure, immediately after the procedure, at 1 week and 1, 3 and 6 months postoperatively. Intensity of TMJ pain was assessed using visual analog scales. Maximal mouth opening and lateral jaw movements also were recorded at each follow-up visit. Both techniques increased maximal mouth opening, lateral movements, and function, while reducing TMJ pain and noise. Although patients benefitted from both techniques, arthrocentesis with injection of SH seemed to be superior to arthrocentesis alone.

  12. Automated quantification and analysis of facial asymmetry in children with arthritis in the temporomandibular joint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darvann, Tron A.; Hermann, Nuno V.; Demant, Sune

    2011-01-01

    We present an automated method of spatially detailed 3D asymmetry quantification of face surfaces obtained in a stereophotogrammetric system, and the method was applied to a population of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) who have involvement of one temporomandibular joint (TMJ). ...

  13. Cost effectiveness of arthrocentesis as initial treatment for temporomandibular joint arthralgia: A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, L.M.; Stant, A.D.; Quik, E.H.; Huddleston Slater, J.J.R.; Stegenga, B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the cost effectiveness of arthrocentesis as initial treatment compared to care as usual (CAU) for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthralgia. Materials and methods: 80 patients were randomly allocated to arthrocentesis as initial treatment (n = 40) or CAU (n = 40).

  14. Influence of serotonin on the analgesic effect of granisetron on temporomandibular joint arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ülle Voog

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available THE influence of circulating serotonin (5-HT on the effects of intra-articular administration of granisetron on temporomandibular joint (TMJ pain was investigated in 11 patients with chronic polyarthritides. An analgesic effect superior to placebo has been shown previously.

  15. Dislocation of temporo-mandibular joint - an uncommon circumstance of occurrence: vaginal delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bouazzaoui, Abderrahim; Labib, Smael; Derkaoui, Ali; Adnane Berdai, Mohammed; Bendadi, Azzeddine; Harandou, Mustapha

    2010-06-25

    Dislocation of temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) is an infrequent disease but still spectacular. This disease consists of a permanent, to some extent complete disruption of the temporo-mandibular joint. These dislocations often occur in a context of yawning, and less frequently after a burst of laughing or relatively mild facial trauma (slap, punch on the chin). We report a case of TMJ occurring in an uncommon circumstance: vaginal delivery. A woman aged 24-years with no special past medical history; primipara was admitted in the Department of Maternity of the University Hospital Hassan II of Fez for an imminent delivery of a twin pregnancy. Ten minutes after admission, the patient delivered vaginally with episiotomy. She gave birth to twins weighing 2800 g and 2400 g. During labour, and due to efforts of crying, the patient developed a sudden and immediate loss of function of the temporo-mandibular joint, with difficulty of speaking, the mouth permanently opened and with the chin lowered and thrown forward. The examination found an empty glenoid fossa of the temporo-mandibular joint in both sides. The diagnosis of dislocation of the TMJ was established. A CT scan of facial bones was done, objectifying a bilateral dislocation of TMJ. The reduction of this dislocation was performed in the operating room under sedation.

  16. Temporomandibular Joint Prosthesis - 3D-CT Reconstruction before and after Treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feltlová, E.; Dostálová, T.; Kašparová, M.; Daněk, J.; Hliňáková, P.; Hubáček, M.; Nedoma, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2010), s. 15-19 ISSN 1801-5603 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : dentistry * maxillofacial surgery * partial TMJ prosthesis * three-dimensional computed tomography * magnetic resonance imaging * temporomandibular joint Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://www.ejbi.cz/articles/201012/50/1.html

  17. Dislocation of temporo-mandibular joint - an uncommon circumstance of occurrence: vaginal delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abderrahim El Bouazzaoui

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Dislocation of temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ is an infrequent disease but still almost spectacular. This disease consists of a permanent, to some extent complete disruption of the temporo-mandibular joint. These dislocations often occurs in a context of yawning, and less frequently after a burst of laughing or relatively mild facial trauma (slap, punch on the chin.We report a case of TMJ occurring in an uncommon circumstance : vaginal delivery. A young woman aged 24-years with no special past medical history; primipara was admitted in the Department of Maternity of the University Hospital Hassan II of Fez for an imminent delivery of a twin pregnancy. Obstetrical analgesia was not possible so the parturient cried in a strong manner during labour. Ten minutes after admission, the patient delivered vaginally with episiotomy. She gave birth to twins weighing 2800g and 2400g. During labour, and effort of crying, the patient presented a sudden and immediate loss of function of the temporo-mandibular joint, with difficulty of speaking, the mouth permanently opened, with the chin lowered and thrown forward. The examination found an emptiness of the glenoid fossa of the temporo-mandibular joint in both sides. The diagnosis of dislocation of the TMJ has established. Performance of special radiologic screening to study the TM was technically not possible. A CT scan of facial bones has been achieved so objectifying a bilateral dislocation of TMJ. The reduction of this dislocation was performed in the operating room under sedation

  18. Patients profiles and outcomes of care in temporomandibular disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, N.

    2018-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are a frequent disease in general population. Patients with TMDs may have orofacial pain, jaw functional limitation and joint sounds, which may negatively affect patients’ physical and psychological wellbeing. Temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ OA) and

  19. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC APPEARANCE OF THE TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT IN 1018 ASYMPTOMATIC HORSES: A MULTI-INSTITUTION STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmalt, James L; Kneissl, Sibylle; Rawlinson, Jennifer E; Zwick, Timo; Zekas, Lisa; Ohlerth, Stefanie; Bienert-Zeit, Astrid

    2016-05-01

    Published descriptions of nonseptic arthritis of the equine temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are rare and large studies investigating variations in the TMJ for asymptomatic horses are lacking. The objectives of this cross-sectional, retrospective, multi-institutional study were to describe anatomical variations in the TMJ detected using computed tomography (CT) in an equid population asymptomatic for TMJ disease and determine whether these variations were associated with patient signalment, reason for CT examination, or CT slice width. Medical records at eight hospitals were searched for horses that had head/neck CT scans and no clinical signs of TMJ disease. Age, breed, sex, clinical presentation, and CT slice width data were recorded. Alterations in CT contour and density of the mandibular condyles, mandibular fossae, and TMJ intra-articular discs were described for each horse. Generalized logistic regression was used to test associations between anatomical variations and horse age. A total of 1018 horses were sampled. Anatomical variations were found in TMJ CT images for 40% of horses and 29% of joints. These were dichotomous with regard to age. Horses horses commonly had spherical hypodensities within the mandibular condyles consistent with bone cysts; and hyperdense regions of the intra-articular disc consistent with dystrophic mineralization. Findings indicated that TMJ anatomic variations were common in CT images of younger and older horses asymptomatic for TMJ disease. Future studies are needed to more definitively characterize these CT variations using gross pathology and histopathology. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  20. Oral splint for temporomandibular joint disorders with revolutionary fluid system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Srivastava

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint (TMJ diseases and disorders refer to a complex and poorly understood set of conditions, manifested by pain in the area of the jaw and associated muscles and limitations in the ability to make the normal movements of speech, facial expression, eating, chewing, and swallowing. The conventional soft occlusal splint therapy is a much safer and effective mode of a conservative line of therapy in comparison to the surgical therapy for temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD. The purpose of this article is to review the Aqualizer TM , an hydrostatic oral splint, as accurate, effective treatment and differential diagnostic tool in TMD that allow treating the patient′s pain quickly and accurately saving valuable treatment time. The review article has been prepared doing a literature review from the world-wide web and pubmed/medline.

  1. Temporomandibular joint MR images: Incidental head and neck findings and pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orhan, Kaan; Avsever, Hakan; Aksoy, Seçil; Seki, Umut; Bozkurt, Poyzan

    2017-10-17

    To report the number and frequency of incidental findings (IFs) detected during magnetic resonance (MR) imaging screening of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and to define related diseases. Bilateral TMJ MR images in the sagittal and coronal sections, from 518 patients with TMJ symptoms were evaluated retrospectively. Patients who were diagnosed with IFs were sent for consultation and clarification of the findings. Patient age, gender, IFs, locations, and diseases were classified and noted.  Results: Seventy-eight (15%) patients were diagnosed with 117 IFs. Of them, 43 were diagnosed with a single IF, and 35 were diagnosed with more than one IF. The most frequent locations were paranasal sinuses and mastoid air cells. The most frequent diseases were inflammatory and cystic lesions.  Discussion: While examining TMJ MR images, it is important to check for evidence of IFs or pathologies that may have mimicked signs and symptoms of TMJ disorders.

  2. High-resolution ultrasonography in assessing temporomandibular joint disc position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talmaceanu, Daniel; Lenghel, Lavinia Manuela; Bolog, Nicolae; Popa Stanila, Roxana; Buduru, Smaranda; Leucuta, Daniel Corneliu; Rotar, Horatiu; Baciut, Mihaela; Baciut, Grigore

    2018-02-04

    The purpose of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of high-resolution ultrasonography (US) in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc displacements. A number of 74 patients (148 TMJs) with signs and symptoms of TMJ disorders, according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders, were included in this study. All patients received US and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of both TMJs 1 to 5 days after the clinical examination. MRI examinations were performed using 1.5 T MRI equipment (Siemens Avanto, Siemens, Erlangen). Ultrasonographic examination was performed on a Hitachi EUB 8500 (Hitachi Medical Corp., Tokyo, Japan) scanner with L 54 M6.5-13 MHz linear transducer. MRI depicted 68 (45.95%) normal joints, 47 (31.76%) with disc displacement with reduction, 33 (22.3%) with disc displacement without reduction and 34 (22.97%) with degenerative changes. US detected 78 (52.7%) normal joints, 37 (25%) with disc displacement with reduction, 33 (22.3%) with disc displacement without reduction and 21 (14.19%) with degenerative changes. Compared to MRI, US showed a sensitivity of 93.1%, specificity of 87.88%, accuracy of 90.32%, a positive predictive value of 87.1% and a negative predictive value of 93.55% for overall diagnosis of disc displacement. The Youden index was 0.81. Based on our results, high-resolution ultrasonography showed high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy in the diagnosis of TMJ disc displacement. It could be a valuable imaging technique in assessing TMJ disc position. The diagnostic value of high-resolution ultrasonography depends strictly on the examiner's skills and on the equipment used.

  3. EFFECTIVENESS OF ROCABADO'S TECHNIQUE FOR SUBJECTS WITH TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT DYSFUNCTION - A SINGLE BLIND STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niha Siraj Mulla

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background:A temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction or TMD is a group of conditions characterized by pain in the muscles of mastication, the temporo-mandiblar joint or both. Rocabado has described techniques includes the Rocabado’s manipulation and Rocabado’s exercises which have both been individually advocated for treatment of TMD. The purpose of study is to determine the effectiveness of Rocabado’s techniques on TMJ dysfunction symptoms, pain, TMJ Range of Motion (ROM and jaw functional limitation for subjects with temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction. Method: Pre to post test experimental study design, subjects with temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction randomized into two groups with 15 subjects into each group with total of 30 subjects in Study and control group, respectively. The study group received the Rocabado’s technique which consisted of Rocabado’s non-thrust TMJ manipulation and Rocabado’s exercises along with conventional TMJ exercises and the control group received only conventional TMJ exercises. The exercises were performed for 6 times per each session, six times in a day, one session under supervision and remaining five sessions by the subject at home for 6 days in a week for duration of 2 weeks. The outcome measurements such as VAS for pain, TMJ ROM, Fonseca’s questionnaire rating for TMJ dysfunction symptoms and jaw function limitation score (JFLS was measured before and after two weeks of intervention. Results: Comparative analysis, using Independent ‘t’ test and Mann Whitney U- test found that the means of VAS, TMJ ROM, Fonseca’s questionnaire and JFLS scores showed statistically significant difference (p <0.05 when the pre-intervention means and post-intervention means were compared between two groups. Conclusion: It is concluded that Rocabado’s technique found to have statistically and clinically significant added effect with conventional TMJ exercises shown greater percentage of improvements obtained

  4. Evaluation of the Efficacy of Different Concentrations of Dextrose Prolotherapy in Temporomandibular Joint Hypermobility Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Rawand; Güngörmüş, Metin; Mollaoğlu, Nur

    2018-03-12

    The aim of this study was to compare and evaluate the efficacy of different concentrations of dextrose prolotherapy for the treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) hypermobility. A prospective, randomized clinical trial including patients with subluxation or dislocation was performed. The study comprised 40 patients. Patients were randomly divided into 4 groups: control group, 10% dextrose, 20% dextrose, and 30% dextrose group. Patients in all groups received injections into 4 different areas of each TMJ in 4 sessions at monthly intervals. Visual analog scale of TMJ pain intensity, maximum mouth opening (MMO), joint sounds, and frequency of luxations were recorded preoperatively and postoperatively after 1 month of last injection. The collected data were then statistically analyzed. Each group showed postoperatively significant improvement in TMJ pain, significant decrease in both MMO and joint sound. Besides that, TMJ locking was not observed in any patient during the follow-up period. There were no statistically significant differences throughout the study intervals between the groups. It was concluded that there was no significant difference between control group and dextrose groups and there is no superiority of any concentration of dextrose over the others in TMJ prolotherapy, and all treatment procedures were efficient in improvement of clinical symptoms related to TMJ hypermobility. If dextrose is used as a proliferant, it can be said that 10% dextrose can be sufficient in TMJ hypermobility treatment.

  5. [Intra-articular injections of hyaluronic acid for anterior disc displacement of temporomandibular joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, X

    2017-03-09

    Anterior disc displacement (ADD) of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is regarded as one of the major findings in temporomandibular disorders (TMD). It is related to joint noise, pain, mandibular dysfunction, degenerative change and osteoarthritis. In the mean time, the pathological changes were found in synovial membrane and synovial fluid. Hyaluronic acid is a principal component of the synovial fluid which plays an important role in nutrition, lubrication, anti-inflammation and cartilage repair. The synthesis, molecule weight, and concentration of hyaluronic acid are decreased during TMD and cause TMJ degenerative changes. The clinical conditions, pathological changes, the mechanism of action for hyaluronic acid and the treatment of anterior disc displacement of TMJ are discussed in this article.

  6. Treatment of tophaceous pseudogout with custom-fitted temporomandibular joint: a two-staged approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Pellecchia, DDS

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Tophaceous pseudogout, a variant of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition, is a relatively rare juxta-articular disease. It is a metabolic condition, in which patients develop pseudo-tumoral calcifications associated with peri-articular structures secondary to calcium pyrophosphate deposition into joints with fibrocartilage rather than hyaline cartilage. These lesions are reported in the knee, wrist, pubis, shoulder, and temporomandibular joint (TMJ and induce a histocytic foreign body giant cell reaction. We report a case of tophaceous pseudogout affecting the left TMJ with destruction of the condyle and glenoid and middle cranial fossa that was reconstructed with a TMJ Concepts (Ventura, CA custom-fitted prosthesis in a 2-staged surgical approach using a silicone spacer. The surgical management using a patient-specific TMJ is a viable option when the fossa or condylar component has been compromised due to breakdown of bone secondary to a pathologic process. Our case describes and identifies the lesion and its rare occurrence in the region of the temporomandibular region. The successful management of tophaceous pseudogout of the TMJ must include a thorough patient workup including the involvement of other joints as well as the modification of bone of the glenoid fossa and condylar relationship of the TMJ.

  7. Management of temporo-mandibular joint ankylosis in growing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashikiran, N D; Reddy, S V V; Patil, R; Yavagal, C

    2005-03-01

    Although temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is one of the most common pathologies afflicting the facial skeleton, it is also the most overlooked and under-managed problem in children. The TMJ forms the very cornerstone of cranio-facial integrity and hence its ankylosis in growing children adversely affects the growth and development of the jaws and occlusion. Impairment of speech, difficulty in mastication, poor oral hygiene, rampant caries and acute compromise of the airway pose a severe psychologic burden on the tender minds of children. The aim of this article is to present an overview of efficient management strategies, based on a case report, so as to increase its awareness among all dental surgeons involved in the treatment of children.

  8. Management of temporo-mandibular joint ankylosis in growing children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashikiran N

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Although temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ ankylosis is one of the most common pathologies afflicting the facial skeleton, it is also the most overlooked and under-managed problem in children. The TMJ forms the very cornerstone of cranio-facial integrity and hence its ankylosis in growing children adversely affects the growth and development of the jaws and occlusion. Impairment of speech, difficulty in mastication, poor oral hygiene, rampant caries and acute compromise of the airway pose a severe psychologic burden on the tender minds of children. The aim of this article is to present an overview of efficient management strategies, based on a case report, so as to increase its awareness among all dental surgeons involved in the treatment of children.

  9. Effect of Surgery First Orthognathic Approach on the Temporomandibular Joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelo, Sandro; Saponaro, Gianmarco; De Angelis, Paolo; Gasparini, Giulio; Garagiola, Umberto; Moro, Alessandro

    2018-05-01

    Correction of severe malocclusions with skeletal discrepancies requires orthodontic treatment in combination with orthognathic surgery. Even though conventional orthognathic surgery (COS) is a common and well-accepted approach its influence on the signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) is still debated. Recently with the introduction of surgery first approach, a different timing for the management of dentoskeletal imbalances has been proposed. The present study is aimed at assessing the relationship between surgery first approach and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders. The study sample consisted of 24 patients who were selected to be treated with surgery first approach. Clinical follow-ups after surgery were performed every week for the first month, at 3 months, 6 months, and at 1 year. A radiological follow-up was performed at 1 week and at 1 year after the operation with a panorex and a latero-lateral teleradiograph. To assess the effect of surgery first approach on the TMDs signs and symptoms, a clinical assessment was performed 4 days before surgery (T1), 6 months after surgery (T2), and 1 year postoperatively (T3). The results of the authors' study show that pain assessment revealed a general improvement of this symptom in correspondence to TMJ and masticatory muscles except in the masseter and neck region. Also joint noises, TMJ functioning, migraine, and headache underwent a considerable improvement. Surgery first approach is an innovative orthognathic procedure and, by undergoing surgery first approach, patients with pre-existing TMJ dysfunction may experience a significant improvement or even resolution of the TMDs signs and symptoms.

  10. MR diagnosis of temporomandibular joint. A study of joint effusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneda, Takashi; Yamashiro, Mitsuaki; Ozawa, Kaoru; Suzuki, Hiromi; Okada, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu

    1998-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the relationship between correlation of MR joint effusion of the temporomandibular joint and disk position, to evaluate the relationship between joint effusion and aging, and to assess the frequency of MR joint effusion of bilateral temporomandibular joints. The temporomandibular joints of 192 patients with clinical symptoms of temporomandibular joint disorders were imaged bilaterally using high field, surface-coil MR imaging. Oblique sagittal and coronal proton density-weighted and T2-weighted images were obtained. Imaging findings of joint effusion were correlated with disk position, aging, and bilateral temporomandibular joints. MR showed effusion in 4% of the joints with normal superior disk position, 36% of the joints with disk displacement with reduction, and 45% of the joints with disk displacement without reduction. There were significant differences in the incidence of joint effusion between normal disk position and anterior disk displacement with or without reduction. Younger patients less than 40 years were significant higher the incidence of joint effusion than those of older patients. A significant association was seen between joint effusion and aging. MR showed effusion in 17% of the unilateral temporomandibular joint, 24% of the bilateral temporomandibular joints. There was no significant difference between unilateral and bilateral case. These results indicated that joint effusion using MR imaging was associated with varied temporomandibular joint pathologic states. (author)

  11. Scleroderma and the temporomandibular joint: reconstruction in 2 variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacIntosh, Robert Bruce; Shivapuja, Prasanna-Kumar; Naqvi, Rabia

    2015-06-01

    This article reviews the pathophysiology of scleroderma (systemic sclerosis [SSc]) and its destructive effects on the mandible in general and the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in particular. It discusses the considerations of operating on patients with devastating chronic disease and presents 2 cases of TMJ reconstruction in patients with the diagnosis. Two patients with different degrees of SSc involvement underwent TMJ reconstruction with costochondral grafts. The patients represent the surgical considerations pertinent to this disease and different outcomes as determined by the variance in severity of their afflictions. The 2 patients tolerated the surgeries well and exhibited improvement in function in the long-term. One patient thrives and continues to do well despite her SSc approximately 10 years postoperatively; the second patient died of her disease approximately 9 years after her initial surgical care. The experience with these 2 cases showed that patients with SSc can safely undergo TMJ reconstruction with anticipated good results, but that the overall severity of the disease remains paramount in determining the feasibility of corrective surgery under this diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Splint therapy for disc displacement with reduction of the temporomandibular joint. Part I: Modified mandibular splint therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, I-Yueh; Wu, Ju-Hui; Kao, Yu-Hsun; Chen, Chao-Ming; Chen, Chun-Ming; Yang, Yi-Hsin

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this preliminary study were to present a modified mandibular splint together with a treatment regimen and to evaluate their effects on the treatment of reciprocal joint sounds of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The study participants were recruited from 312 consecutive patients in the temporomandibular disorder clinic of a medical center in Taiwan from January 2003 to December 2003. From among these, 59 cases with typical reciprocal clicking were selected for this study. All pa...

  13. Outcomes of office-based temporomandibular joint arthroscopy: a 5-year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossameldin, R H; McCain, J P

    2018-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthroscopy is a minimally invasive surgical approach for intra-articular TMJ diseases. Office-based arthroscopy using the smallest TMJ scope allows for good visualization, as well as the ability to lavage the joint in an office setting. This study aimed to assess the efficacy of an office-based TMJ arthroscopic technique. A retrospective evaluation of 363 patients with a TMJ disorder was performed. These patients underwent office-based arthroscopy using the OnPoint 1.2mm Scope System (Biomet Microfixation, Jacksonville, FL, USA) in Florida, USA, from July 2007. The following outcomes of the procedure were assessed: improvement in painless range of mandibular motion, pain on loading, and functional jaw pain; these were evaluated using a visual analog scale (VAS) over an average follow-up period of 263.81±142.1 days. The statistical analysis was performed using IBM SPSS Statistics version 20. Statistically significant improvements in TMJ pain and function, and other variables (P=0.001) were shown following TMJ arthroscopic lysis and lavage. Office-based arthroscopy using the OnPoint System was demonstrated to be a safe and efficient procedure for the treatment of patients with TMJ disorders as the first level of the algorithm of care. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Radiodiagnostics of the temporomandibular joint of disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ondrasovicova, J.; Jenca, A.

    2008-01-01

    Temporomandibularis disorders have a multifactorial etiology with very variable clinical symptoms. On the X-ray image can see the configuration of the joint structures correctly or TMJ disorders ( luxation, subluxation, arthrosis). (authors)

  15. Positional and morphologic changes of the temporomandibular joint disc using magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Hyoun Suk; Cho, Su Beom; Koh, Kwang Joon

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate displacement and morphologic changes of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc in patient with internal derangement using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). One hundred and forty five MR images of TMJs in 73 patients were evaluated. Positional and morphologic changes of the TMJ disc were assessed. Lateral or medial disc displacement was also evaluated on cornal images. Among 63 discs with anterior disc displacement, 37 discs were assessed as a biconcave disc and 21 as a deformed disc. Rotational disc displacement was observed in 35 disc. Anteromedial disc displacement was observed in 29 discs, and anterolateral direction in 6 discs. Among 35 rotational displacement, 5 biconcave discs and 21 deformed discs were observed. Rotational and sideways displacement of TMJ discs were found to be common and an important aspect of internal derangement. This study also suggests that sagittal and coronal images of the TMJ have complementary abilities for an assessment of joint abnormality

  16. Bony ankylosis of temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byeong Do; Yoon, Young Nam; Um, Ki Doo; Ra, Jong Ill; Lee, Wan [School of Dentistry, Wonkwang University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-06-15

    Ankylosis of joint is defined as limited movement due to infection, trauma, or surgical procedure. A 59-year-old female with a chief complaint of limited movements during mouth opening had a positive history of trauma to her right TMJ area about 5 years ago. From that time, progressive mouth opening limitation and intermittent pain have occurred. At the time of admission the patient showed mandibular deviation to the right side during mouth opening, with a maximum opening limited to 5 mm. On plain radiographs, right condylar enlargement and joint space reduction by newly formed bony tissues were observed. CT scans showed right condylar enlargement, cortical sclerosis, and thickening of the condyle, articular fossa and articular eminence.

  17. Dynamic 3 T MRI of temporomandibular joint in diagnosing a stuck disk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Sureka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is the imaging modality of choice in the evaluation of internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ. Dynamic MRI including the open and close mouth views in sagittal plane determine the exact position of articular disk and thus help to evaluate the joint for internal derangement. We also highlight the role of dynamic MRI of TMJ in diagnosis of stuck disk in a 17-year-old male who presented with symptoms of pain and difficulty in opening the mouth.

  18. CT of the temporomandibular joint: The conservative approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jend, H.H.; Jend-Rossmann, I.; Heller, M.

    1986-01-01

    Until recently, CT investigation of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders has been regarded as a sophisticated procedure. A method of investigation was developed that allows easy evaluation of axial scans. The method was evaluated in a series of 65 joints with arthrographically diagnosed internal derangements. In anterior disk displacement CT findings led to an identical diagnosis in 56 of 65 joints (sensitivity, 86%). In clinically asymptomatic joints investigated for other reasons, only one of 12 showed signs of internal derangement on CT (specificity, 92%). This conservative approach to CT evaluation of internal derangement seems to be as accurate as more sophisticated methods. It is easy to perform, requires no additional manpower or computer time, and has a very good reproducibility

  19. Experimental model of temporomandibular joint arthritis induced by zymozan in rats and the study of the role of nitric oxide

    OpenAIRE

    HellÃada Vasconcelos Chaves

    2006-01-01

    Temproromandibular disfunction (TMD) is related to a masticatory system disfunction which can include the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), the masticatory muscles and/or other related structures. TMJ inflammatory disorders are one of the major pathology of TMD afecting a great number of patients. Although TMJÂs inflammation and pain are important cinical entities, their mechanisms are poorly understood. The purpose of the study is to propose an experimetnal model of TMJÂs arthritis to study its...

  20. Congenital Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis: Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Chin Taw Cheong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital temporomandibular joint (TMJ ankylosis is an uncommon condition that presents itself at or soon after birth in the absence of acquired factors that could have contributed to the ankylosis such as infection and trauma. The experience of managing one such case is reported in light of a review of the literature on this condition. Key management principles include adequate removal of the ankylotic mass, costochondral grafting, and post-op physiotherapy. Most patients reported in the literature with the condition experienced relapse. This echoes our own experience where there was recurrence of the ankylosis. However, after removal of the ankylotic mass, the patient maintains a satisfactory maximal incisal opening (MIO till the present day. The additional challenges faced in the congenital form in addition to the already complex management of acquired paediatric temporomandibular joint ankylosis are (1 much earlier insult to the TMJ, (2 reduced opportunity for neuromuscular development of the muscles of mastication, and (3 reduced compliance with postoperative physiotherapy programmes due to the younger age of these patients.

  1. A Young Patient with Temporomandibular Joint Osteoarthritis: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Alajbeg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a case of a young patient who sought help because of pain in the right temporomandibular joint (TMJ. She also reported increasing of pain during chewing. Clinical examination revealed limited mouth opening with uncorrected deviation to the ipsilateral side. Palpation of the lateral pole of the right condyle discovered crepitus, and maximum assisted opening elicited a report of “familiar pain”. The diagnosis of osteoarthritis of the TMJ (RDC / TMD criteria, Axis I, Group III was confirmed by CBCT of TMJ. There is no “gold standard” for the management of TMD, but the need for TMD treatment has to be based on precise indications related to the presence of pain, limitation in function of the lower jaw and signs of degenerative joint disease. Conservative, reversible therapeutic procedures are considered as the first choice for TMD treatment and their task is to improve the function of the entire masticatory system. In this case patient was treated with the combination of physical therapy and stabilization splint, in order to reduce the pain and restore the normal function of the lower jaw. At 6 months’ follow-up symptoms have almost completely disappeared, while 3 years later, the patient still has no significant subjective symptoms. In the present case non-invasive therapy was sufficient to bring, otherwise recurrent nature of osteoarthritis, in complete remission and keep it like that for years.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging-based temporomandibular joint space evaluation in temporomandibular disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nah, Kyung Soo [Pusan National Univ. College of Dentistry, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    Disc and condylar position were observed on MRIs of temporomandibular joint disorder patients and condylar position agreement between MRI and tranascranal radiography was evaluated. MRI and transcranial radiographs of both TM joints from 67 patients with temporomandibular disorder were used. On MRI, the position and shape of disc and condylar position as anterior, middle, posterior was evaluated at medial, center, and lateral views. On transcranial radiographs, condylar position was evaluated using the shortest distance from condyle to fossa in anterior, superior, and posterior directions. 1. On MRI, 96 joints (71.6%) of 134 had anterior disc dispalcement with reduction and 38 joints (28.4%) without reduction. 2. Fourteen (14.6%) of 96 reducible joints showed anterior condylar position. 19 (19.8%) showed central position, 63 joints (65.6%) showed posterior position. Two joints (5.3%) of 38 non-reducible joints showed anterior condylar position, while 9 (23.7%) showed central position, and 27 (71.1%)-posterior position. 3. In 85 joints (63.4%) of 134, the transcranial condylar position agreed with that of the central MRI view, 10 joints (7.5%) with that of medial, 16 joints (11.6%) with that of lateral, and 23 joints (17.2%) disagreed with that of MRI. On MRI, most of the reducible and non-reducible joints showed posterior condylar position. Transcranial radiographs taken with machine designed for TMJ had better agreement of condylar position with that of MRI. Extremely narrow joint spaces or very posterior condylar positions observed on transcranial radiographs had a little more than fifty percent agreement with those of MRIs.

  3. Chondrosarcoma of the temporomandibular joint: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Kyu-Young; Yoon, Hye-Jung; Lee, Jae-Il; Hong, Sam-Pyo; Hong, Seong-Doo

    2016-07-01

    Chondrosarcoma is the second most common sarcoma arising in the bone, but it rarely involves the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). To date, 30 cases of TMJ chondrosarcoma have been reported in the English literature, and the authors report an additional case arising from a cystic lesion in a 60-year-old female patient. The clinical and radiological diagnosis of the lesion was initially synovial cyst, and periodic check-ups were done after aspiration of the lesion. After three years, the patient perceived swelling of the lesion, and surgical excision was performed. The final diagnosis was grade I chondrosarcoma. When clinicians detect a cystic lesion in the radiographic imaging of the TMJ, chondrosarcoma should be included in the differential diagnosis. In addition, computed tomography (CT) as well as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is recommended for the accurate diagnosis and proper preoperative planning in TMJ chondrosarcoma.

  4. Incidentally found and unexpected tumors discovered by MRI examination for temporomandibular joint arthrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagi, Yoshinobu; Asaumi, Jun-ichi E-mail: asaumi@md.okayama-u.ac.jp; Maki, Yuu; Murakami, Jun; Hisatomi, Miki; Matsuzaki, Hidenobu; Konouchi, Hironobu; Honda, Yosutoshi; Kishi, Kanji

    2003-07-01

    We examined the frequency of incidentally found or unexpected tumors discovered at the time of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) region for patients with suspicion of TMJ arthrosis. Five MR images (T1-weighted transverse scout image and proton density and T2-weighted oblique sagittal images at the open and closed mouth) were acquired. In 2776 MRI examinations of TMJ arthrosis, two tumors were discovered. They consisted of an adenoid cystic carcinoma in the deep portion of the parotid gland, and a malignant tumor extending from the infratemporal fossa to the parapharyngeal space. The rate of incidentally founded or unexpected tumors in TMJ examinations was low (0.072%), but the two tumors found were malignant tumors, and therefore, scout image should be carefully examined, not only used for positing the slice.

  5. Autologous blood injection to the temporomandibular joint: magnetic resonance imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candirili, Celal; Yuece, Serdar; Cavus, Umut Yuecel; Akin, Kayihan; Cakir, Banu [Fatih University Hospital, Ankara (Turkmenistan)

    2012-03-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the autologous blood injection (ABI) for chronic recurrent temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). ABI was applied to 14 patients who had chronic recurrent TMJ dislocation. MRIs of the patients were taken and compared before and one month after the injection. All of the patients had no dislocations of their TMJs on clinical examination one month after the injection. In the pre-injection, unilateral or bilateral TMJ dislocations were observed on MRIs in all patients. One month after the injection, TMJ dislocations were not observed in MRI evaluation of any patients. A significant structural change that caused by ABI was not observed. The procedure was easy to perform and it caused no foreign body reaction. However, it was unclear how the procedure prevented the dislocation.

  6. Incidentally found and unexpected tumors discovered by MRI examination for temporomandibular joint arthrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagi, Yoshinobu; Asaumi, Jun-ichi; Maki, Yuu; Murakami, Jun; Hisatomi, Miki; Matsuzaki, Hidenobu; Konouchi, Hironobu; Honda, Yosutoshi; Kishi, Kanji

    2003-01-01

    We examined the frequency of incidentally found or unexpected tumors discovered at the time of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) region for patients with suspicion of TMJ arthrosis. Five MR images (T1-weighted transverse scout image and proton density and T2-weighted oblique sagittal images at the open and closed mouth) were acquired. In 2776 MRI examinations of TMJ arthrosis, two tumors were discovered. They consisted of an adenoid cystic carcinoma in the deep portion of the parotid gland, and a malignant tumor extending from the infratemporal fossa to the parapharyngeal space. The rate of incidentally founded or unexpected tumors in TMJ examinations was low (0.072%), but the two tumors found were malignant tumors, and therefore, scout image should be carefully examined, not only used for positing the slice

  7. Histochemistry for studying structure and function of the articular disc of the human temporomandibular joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kiga

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The articular disc of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ is composed of fibrocartilage, and the extracellular matrix of this disc is composed mainly of collagen, glycosaminoglycan and proteoglycans. Research on the changes that occur in the composition of the articular disc of the TMJ is necessary for understanding the basis of the pathological process of internal derangement (ID, and a number of reports have been published in recent years on the application of refined histochemical techniques to investigate the structure and function of the TMJ. The direction of future TMJ disc studies should be towards obtaining more evidence to support previous results, and should hopefully be of practical use in terms of prevention and cure of ID.

  8. Association between temporomandibular joint symptoms, signs, and clinical diagnosis using the RDC/TMD and radiographic findings in temporomandibular joint tomograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, Mie; Svensson, Peter; Bakke, Merete; List, Thomas; Hintze, Hanne; Petersson, Arne; Knutsson, Kerstin; Wenzel, Ann

    2008-01-01

    To identify associations between clinical symptoms of temporomandibular joint disorders and radiographic findings. Two hundred four adult patients (156 women, 48 men, mean age 40 years) with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain/sounds or changes in mandibular motion were examined according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD). Bilateral sagittal corrected TMJ tomograms in closed and open positions were assessed for the presence of flattening, erosion, osteophytes, and sclerosis in the joint components and the range of mandibular motion. Logistic regression analyses were performed with the radiographic findings as the dependent variables and the following clinical variables as independent variables: opening pattern, maximal jaw opening, TMJ sounds, number of painful muscle/TMJ sites, duration of pain, presence of arthritic disease, depression and somatization scores, graded chronic pain, and age and gender. Coarse crepitus on opening/closing (odds ratio [OR] > or = 3.12), on lateral excursions (odds ratio > or = 4.06), and on protrusion (OR > or = 5.30) was associated with increased risk of degenerative findings in tomograms. A clinical diagnosis of osteoarthritis increased the risk of radiographic findings (OR > or = 2.95) and so did increasing age (OR > or = 1.03 per year) and the female gender (OR > or = 2.36). Maximal assisted opening and maximal opening without pain (position (OR > or = 2.60). No other significant associations were observed. Age, gender, and coarse crepitus, but no pain-related variables, were associated with increased risk of degenerative findings in TMJ tomograms. Maximal opening < 40 mm was associated with a posterior condyle-to-articular tubercle relation on opening.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of the equine temporomandibular joint anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, M J; Agut, A; Soler, M; López-Albors, O; Arredondo, J; Querol, M; Latorre, R

    2010-04-01

    In human medicine, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the 'gold standard' imaging procedure to assess the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). However, there is no information regarding MRI evaluation of equine TMJ. To describe the normal sectional MRI anatomy of equine TMJ by using frozen and plastinated anatomical sections as reference; and determine the best imaging planes and sequences to visualise TMJ components. TMJs from 6 Spanish Purebred horse cadavers (4 immature and 2 mature) underwent MRI examination. Spin-echo T1-weighting (SE T1W), T2*W, fat-suppressed (FS) proton density-weighting (PDW) and fast spin-echo T2-weighting (FSE T2W) sequences were obtained in oblique sagittal, transverse and dorsal planes. Anatomical sections were procured on the same planes for a thorough interpretation. The oblique sagittal and transverse planes were the most informative anatomical planes. SE T1W images showed excellent spatial resolution and resulted in superior anatomic detail when comparing to other sequences. FSE T2W sequence provided an acceptable anatomical depiction but T2*W and fat-suppressed PDW demonstrated higher contrast in visualisation of the disc, synovial fluid, synovial pouches and articular cartilage. The SE T1W sequence in oblique sagittal and transverse plane should be the baseline to identify anatomy. The T2*W and fat-suppressed PDW sequences enhance the study of the articular cartilage and synovial pouches better than FSE T2W. The information provided in this paper should aid clinicians in the interpretation of MRI images of equine TMJ and assist in the early diagnosis of those problems that could not be diagnosed by other means.

  10. Osteoarthrosis of Temporomandibular Joint Related to the Defects of Posterior Dentition: A Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitka Levorová

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthrosis (OA of temporomandibular joint (TMJ is a progressive degenerative disease, gradually affecting cartilage, synovial membrane and bone structures. OA of TMJ clinically manifests with joint noises, pain and restricted mouth opening. In late stages, it results in severe damage of TMJ structures and development of ankylosis. Osteoarthrosis is a multifactorial disease; the occurrence is associated with TMJ overloading. The cohort included 619 patients [538 women (87% and 81 men (13%, with average age 40.6 years (age range 8–89 years] with TMJ disorder, who were examined in the year 2014 in Department of Dental Medicine, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University and General University Hospital in Prague, Czech Republic. The aim of this retrospective study was to analyse, if the lack of posterior teeth (supporting teeth zones is the main etiologic factor of osteoarthrosis of TMJ. Diagnosis of OA was established on the clinical signs and the panoramic X-ray signs. Simultaneously other etiologic factors of OA were assessed. The presence of OA changes on X-ray had 171 patients (i.e. 27.6% of the total number of 619. 17.5% from these patients with OA had defect in posterior dentition. Other aetiological factors (stress, skeletal or vertebrogenous disorders showed higher incidence of OA changes on X-ray. Defect of posterior dentition is not negligible, but it is not the main aetiological factor for osteoarthrosis of TMJ.

  11. Traumatic injuries of the temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puig, S.; Krestan, C.; Lomoschitz, F.; Robinson, S.; Glaser, C.; Staudenherz, A.

    2001-01-01

    Injuries of the temporomandibular joint are mostly due to injuries or fractures of the mandibular condyle. Fractures of the skull base involving the temporomandibular joint are rare. Classification of fractures refers to their anatomical positions and the presence or absence of a luxation. Further, it is important whether the fracture is intra- or extra-capsular. The primary imaging method should be orthopantomography. As for therapy planning, especially surgery, also evaluation of soft tissue is necessary, computed tomography is the imaging method of choice. For diagnosis of complications or internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint, magnetic resonance imaging is to be recommended. (orig.) [de

  12. MRI and CBCT image registration of temporomandibular joint: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saleh, Mohammed A Q; Alsufyani, Noura A; Saltaji, Humam; Jaremko, Jacob L; Major, Paul W

    2016-05-10

    The purpose of the present review is to systematically and critically analyze the available literature regarding the importance, applicability, and practicality of (MRI), computerized tomography (CT) or cone-beam CT (CBCT) image registration for TMJ anatomy and assessment. A systematic search of 4 databases; MEDLINE, EMBASE, EBM reviews and Scopus, was conducted by 2 reviewers. An additional manual search of the bibliography was performed. All articles discussing the magnetic resonance imaging MRI and CT or CBCT image registration for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) visualization or assessment were included. Only 3 articles satisfied the inclusion criteria. All included articles were published within the last 7 years. Two articles described MRI to CT multimodality image registration as a complementary tool to visualize TMJ. Both articles used images of one patient only to introduce the complementary concept of MRI-CT fused image. One article assessed the reliability of using MRI-CBCT registration to evaluate the TMJ disc position and osseous pathology for 10 temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients. There are very limited studies of MRI-CT/CBCT registration to reach a conclusion regarding its accuracy or clinical use in the temporomandibular joints.

  13. Management of temporomandibular joint ankylosis with combination of gap arthroplasty surgery and physiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Ramadhanty

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ ankylosis is a union of the articular surface of the temporal bone to the disc-condyle complex that restricts mandibular movements due to either a fibrous or bony union between the head of the condyle and the glenoid fossa. Common etiological factors are trauma, infection, and pathology in the joint or systemic diseases. The diagnosis of TMJ ankylosis is established through physical and clinical evaluation, and imaging examination. Currently, the surgical techniques used to treat TMJ ankylosis are gap arthroplasty, interpositional arthroplasty, joint reconstruction, and distraction osteogenesis. Purpose. To provide overview about management of temporomandibular joint ankylosis with gap arthroplasty combined with physiotherapy post surgery. Case. A 12-year-old female patient came to Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery with complaint of opening mouth restriction, which occured since one year prior to admission. After complete physical and radiographic examination, patient then was diagnosed with TMJ ankylosis due to neglected odontogenic infection. The treatment was performed with gap arthroplasty under general anesthesia. Patient then underwent physiotherapy after the surgery, including application of heat on the affected region and exercises to open and close mouth. Discussion. Ankylosis of TMJ is an uncommon case that results in chronic and severe limited mouth opening. The critical factor of successful treatment of TMJ ankylosis is early detection, correct surgery approach, implementation of an intensive physiotherapy program, and a good post-operative conduct. Therefore on this patient, gap arthroplasty was the chosen surgery approach followed by intensive physiotherapy. Conclusion.Management goal in TMJ ankylosis is  to increase the patient’s mandibular function, correct associated facial deformity, decrease pain, and prevent reankylosis. Careful surgical technique and subsequent atten

  14. Effect of platelet-rich plasma on fibrocartilage, cartilage, and bone repair in temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kütük, Nükhet; Baş, Burcu; Soylu, Emrah; Gönen, Zeynep Burçin; Yilmaz, Canay; Balcioğlu, Esra; Özdamar, Saim; Alkan, Alper

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore the potential use of platelet-rich-plasma (PRP) in the treatment of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA). Surgical defects were created bilaterally on the condylar fibrocartilage, hyaline cartilage, and bone to induce an osteoarthritic TMJ in rabbits. PRP was applied to the right joints of the rabbits (PRP group), and the left joints received physiologic saline (control group). After 4 weeks, the rabbits were sacrificed for histologic and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examinations. The data were analyzed statistically. The new bone regeneration was significantly greater in the PRP group (P fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage was greater in the PRP group, no statistically significant difference was found between the 2 groups. SEM showed better ultrastructural architecture of the collagen fibrils in the PRP group. PRP might enhance the regeneration of bone in TMJ-OA. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Nanostructured diamond film deposition on curved surfaces of metallic temporomandibular joint implant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fries, Marc D; Vohra, Yogesh K [Department of Physics, University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2002-10-21

    Microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition of nanostructured diamond films was carried out on curved surfaces of Ti-6Al-4V alloy machined to simulate the shape of a temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dental implant. Raman spectroscopy shows that the deposited films are uniform in chemical composition along the radius of curvature of the TMJ condyle. Thin film x-ray diffraction reveals an interfacial carbide layer and nanocrystalline diamond grains in this coating. Nanoindentation hardness measurements show an ultra-hard coating with a hardness value of 60{+-}5 GPa averaged over three samples. (rapid communication)

  16. Radiographic changes in the condyle of the temporomandibular joint in psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenoenen, M.; Helsinki Univ.

    1987-01-01

    One hundred and ten patients with psoriatic arthritis (PA) and 100 matched control patients were examined by using orthopantomography to discover radiographic changes in the condyle of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). 31% of the PA patients and 13% of the control patients had radiographic changes in the condyle of the TMJ. The most common radiographic finding in PA patients was unilateral erosion of the condyle. Of the radiographic changes in the PA group, cortical erosions correlated negatively with age, whereas osteophytes correlated positively with the duration of PA. (orig.)

  17. A Joint Less Ordinary: Intriguing Roles for Hedgehog Signalling in the Development of the Temporomandibular Synovial Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Kubiak

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights the essential role of Hedgehog (Hh signalling in the developmental steps of temporomandibular joint (TMJ formation. We review evidence for intra- and potentially inter-tissue Hh signaling as well as Glioma-Associated Oncogene Homolog (GLI dependent and independent functions. Morphogenesis and maturation of the TMJ’s individual components and the general landscape of Hh signalling is also covered. Comparison of the appendicular knee and axial TMJ also reveals interesting differences and similarities in their mechanisms of development, chondrogenesis and reliance on Hh signalling.

  18. A Joint Less Ordinary: Intriguing Roles for Hedgehog Signalling in the Development of the Temporomandibular Synovial Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiak, Malgorzata; Ditzel, Mark

    2016-01-01

    This review highlights the essential role of Hedgehog (Hh) signalling in the developmental steps of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) formation. We review evidence for intra- and potentially inter-tissue Hh signaling as well as Glioma-Associated Oncogene Homolog (GLI) dependent and independent functions. Morphogenesis and maturation of the TMJ’s individual components and the general landscape of Hh signalling is also covered. Comparison of the appendicular knee and axial TMJ also reveals interesting differences and similarities in their mechanisms of development, chondrogenesis and reliance on Hh signalling. PMID:29615589

  19. BMPRIA mediated signaling is essential for temporomandibular joint development in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuping Gu

    Full Text Available The central importance of BMP signaling in the development and homeostasis of synovial joint of appendicular skeleton has been well documented, but its role in the development of temporomandibular joint (TMJ, also classified as a synovial joint, remains completely unknown. In this study, we investigated the function of BMPRIA mediated signaling in TMJ development in mice by transgenic loss-of- and gain-of-function approaches. We found that BMPRIA is expressed in the cranial neural crest (CNC-derived developing condyle and glenoid fossa, major components of TMJ, as well as the interzone mesenchymal cells. Wnt1-Cre mediated tissue specific inactivation of BmprIa in CNC lineage led to defective TMJ development, including failure of articular disc separation from a hypoplastic condyle, persistence of interzone cells, and failed formation of a functional fibrocartilage layer on the articular surface of the glenoid fossa and condyle, which could be at least partially attributed to the down-regulation of Ihh in the developing condyle and inhibition of apoptosis in the interzone. On the other hand, augmented BMPRIA signaling by Wnt1-Cre driven expression of a constitutively active form of BmprIa (caBmprIa inhibited osteogenesis of the glenoid fossa and converted the condylar primordium from secondary cartilage to primary cartilage associated with ectopic activation of Smad-dependent pathway but inhibition of JNK pathway, leading to TMJ agenesis. Our results present unambiguous evidence for an essential role of finely tuned BMPRIA mediated signaling in TMJ development.

  20. The Temporomandibular Joint Pain Dysfunction Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Speck, John E.

    1988-01-01

    When a patient complains of headache, neckache, or earache and these are associated with noisy temporomandibular joint function, restricted opening or increased pain when chewing, a temporomandibular joint or masticatory muscle disorder should be considered in the differential diagnosis, because signs and symptoms of these disorders are common in all age groups. This article indicates the more common etiological contributions, that is, microtrauma, repeated microtrauma, muscle hyperactivity, ...

  1. OK-432 (Picibanil) sclerotherapy for recurrent dislocation of the temporomandibular joint in elderly edentulous patients: Case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Kazuhiro; Abe, Takae; Fujiwara, Toshikatsu

    2007-09-01

    Dislocation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a thorny problem not only for a patient but also a doctor. Especially for the elderly edentulous patients, it is very hard to treat the condition although there are many surgical and non-surgical procedures. We successfully treated it in two elderly edentulous patients by injection of OK-432 as a sclerosing agent.

  2. Immunohistochemical evaluation of neuroreceptors in healthy and pathological temporo-mandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favia, Gianfranco; Corsalini, Massimo; Di Venere, Daniela; Pettini, Francesco; Favia, Giorgio; Capodiferro, Saverio; Maiorano, Eugenio

    2013-01-01

    A study was performed on the articular disk and periarticular tissues of the temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) with immunohistochemical techniques to give evidence to the presence of neuroreceptors (NRec) in these sites. The study was carried out on tissue samples obtained from 10 subjects without TMJ disease and from 7 patients with severe TMJ arthritis and arthrosis. We use antibodies directed against following antigens: Gliofibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP), Leu-7, Myelin Basic Protein (MBP), Neurofilaments 68 kD (NF), Neuron Specific Enolase (NSE), S-100 protein (S-100) and Synaptophysin (SYN). This study revealed that Ruffini's-like, Pacini's-like and Golgi's-like receptors can be demonstrated in TMJ periarticular tissues and that free nervous endings are present in the subsynovial tissues but not within the articular disk. We observed elongated cytoplamic processes of chondrocytes that demonstrated strong S-100 immunoreactivity but they were unreactive with all other antibodies. These cytoplamic processes were more abundant and thicker in the samples obtained from patients with disease TMJ. The results of this study confirm that different Nrec are detectable in TMJ periarticular tissues but they are absent within the articular disk. In the latter site, only condrocytic processes are evident, especially in diseased TMJ, and they might have been confused with nervous endings in previous morphological studies. Nevertheless the absence of immunoreactivity for NF, NSE and SYN proves that they are not of neural origin.

  3. Orofacial symptoms related to temporomandibular joint arthritis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: smallest detectable difference in self-reported pain intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoustrup, Peter; Kristensen, Kasper D; Verna, Carlalberta; Küseler, Annelise; Herlin, Troels; Pedersen, Thomas K

    2012-12-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammation in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) may lead to mandibular growth disturbances and interfere with optimal joint and muscle function. Orofacial symptoms are common clinical findings in relation to TMJ arthritis in adolescence. Knowledge about their clinical manifestation is important for TMJ arthritis diagnosis, treatment choice, and outcome evaluation. The aim of our prospective observational study was to evaluate and describe the frequency, the main complaints, and the localization of TMJ arthritis-related orofacial symptoms. The smallest detectable differences (SDD) for minimal, average, and maximal pain were estimated. Thirty-three patients with JIA and arthritis-related orofacial symptoms in relation to 55 affected TMJ were included in our questionnaire study (mean age 14.11 yrs). Calculation of the SDD was based on a duplicate assessment 45 min after the first questionnaire was completed. The majority of the patients had common orofacial symptoms during mastication and maximal mouth opening procedures. Persistent orofacial symptoms were rare. The TMJ area in combination with the masseter muscle region was the orofacial region where symptoms were most common. The SDD for minimal, average, and maximal pain were between 10 and 14 mm on a visual analog scale. Our study offers new knowledge about TMJ arthritis-related orofacial symptoms that may aid diagnosis and clinical decision-making. We suggest that TMJ arthritis-related orofacial symptoms could be understood as products of the primary TMJ inflammation in combination with secondary myogenic and functional issues.

  4. Temporomandibular joint involvement caused by Borrelia Burgdorferi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesnicar, Gorazd; Zerdoner, Danijel

    2007-12-01

    Lyme borreliosis is an endemic disease in Slovenia with an incidence of around 150 patients per 100,000 inhabitants. Although the large joints are most typically affected in Lyme borreliosis, there are also periods of disease activity with arthritis or arthralgias involving smaller joints, including the temporo-mandibular joint. During the years between 2000 and 2003, two patients with Lyme borreliosis affecting the temporo-mandibular joints were treated. The patients presented with fatigue and pain in diverse muscle groups accompanied by arthralgia, which was most pronounced in the temporomandibular joint area. None of the patients were febrile or had joint effusions. Both patients were examined by means of biochemical and serological examinations for Borrelia burgdorferi using ELISA assay and Western blot test (both for IgM and IgG), plain radiographs, MR and CT scans, and scinti-scan of the temporo-mandibular joints They both had positive serum markers for an acute B. burgdorferi infection and were treated with intravenous ceftriaxone. None of the patients had clinical or laboratory signs of chronic Lyme disease activity two and four years following therapy, respectively. Roentgenographic and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the temporo-mandibular joints had not shown any persistent sign of acute inflammation. There are only few reports of patients with manifest temporo-mandibular joint involvement of Lyme borreliosis in the literature. This report emphasizes the importance of differential diagnosis of acute temporo-mandibular joint arthralgia, of early diagnosis of Lyme borreliosis, and of the necessity for prompt antibiotic treatment.

  5. Crosslinking of fibrinogen and fibronectin by free radicals : A possible initial step in adhesion formation in osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkgraaf, LC; Zardeneta, G; Cordewener, FW; Liem, RSB; Schmitz, JP; de Bont, LGM; Milam, SB

    Purpose: Adhesion formation in osteoarthritis (OA) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) typically results in a sustained limitation of joint movement. We propose the hypothesis that free-radical-mediated crosslinking of proteins underlies this adhesion formation in affected joints. Free radicals may

  6. Eminectomy for Habitual Luxation of the Temporomandibular Joint with Sedation and Local Anesthesia: A Case Series

    OpenAIRE

    Iwanaga, Joe; Nakamura, Yoshiaki; Kusukawa, Jingo; Tubbs, R. Shane

    2016-01-01

    Eminectomy which is one of the popular and most effective treatments for habitual temporomandibular joint luxation was first described by Myrhaug in 1951. There are few reports which described eminectomy being performed under local anesthesia and conscious sedation. We present a case series of habitual luxation of the TMJ treated by eminectomy performed under local anesthesia and conscious sedation and general anesthesia. Five patients were examined and found to have recurrent luxation of the...

  7. Pigmented villonodular synovitis of the temporomandibular joint with intracranial extension: A case series and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaee, Michael; Oh, Taemin; Sun, Matthew Z; Parsa, Andrew T; McDermott, Michael W; El-Sayed, Ivan H; Bloch, Orin

    2015-08-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a rare proliferative disorder of the synovial membrane. PVNS generally affects large joints but occasionally involves the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), with occasional extension into the middle cranial fossa. The purpose of this study was to report our experience with PVNS along with a focused literature review. Patients with PVNS of the TMJ treated at the University of California - San Francisco from 2007 to 2013 were reviewed. A PubMed search was performed to identify additional cases. Five patients underwent surgical resection, with 1 recurrence at 61 months. A literature review identified 58 patients, 19 of which had intracranial involvement. Interestingly, intracranial extension was more common in men. Intracranial extension was not associated with an increased rate of recurrence. PVNS of the TMJ is a rare entity associated with excellent outcomes, even with intracranial extension. Management should consist of maximal resection, with radiotherapy reserved for extensive or recurrent lesions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Roller-coaster Ride to, Relief From TMJ | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on a roller coaster ride, seeking relief from temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder, which causes pain and, sometimes, dysfunction in the jaw joint and muscles of the neck, head, and face. She has endured: excruciating pain ...

  9. [Inferior hemiarthroplasty of the temporo-mandibular joint with articulated condylar prosthesis type Stryker].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucur, A; Dincă, O; Totan, C; Ghită, V

    2007-01-01

    The optimal reconstruction of the mandible and of the temporo-mandibular joint after mandibular hemi-resection with disarticulation is still controversial in literature. This paperwork presents our experience on four cases in the reconstruction of the mandible together with the inferior arthroplasty of the temporo-mandibular joint, after the resection of extended benign tumors of the mandible, based on fibular free vascularized grafts having attached a Stryker titanium condylar prosthesis reconstructing the inferior segment of the temporo-mandibular joint. Our results for the this technique were excellent, with a functional rehabilitation very close to normal. After reviewing the various techniques and their arguments in literature, with accent on the TMJ reconstruction, we consider this method to be optimal for the reconstruction of mandibular defects in patients with neoplastic conditions.

  10. Long-Term Symptoms Onset and Heterotopic Bone Formation around a Total Temporomandibular Joint Prosthesis: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Guarda-Nardini

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The literature on total alloplastic temporomandibular joint (TMJ reconstructions is encouraging, and studies on total alloplastic TMJ replacements outcomes showed acceptable improvements in terms of both pain levels and jaw function. Nevertheless, some adverse events, such as heterotopic bone formation around the implanted prosthesis, may occur. In consideration of that, the present manuscript describes a case of heterotopic bone formation around a total temporomandibular joint prosthesis, which occurred several years after the implant. Methods: The present manuscript describes a case of heterotopic bone formation around a total TMJ prosthesis, which occurred several years after the implant in patients, who previously underwent multiple failed TMJ surgeries. Results: Ten years after the surgical TMJ replacement to solve an ankylotic bone block, the patient came to our attention again referring a progressive limitation in mouth opening. A computerized tomography showed evidence of marked heterotopic bone formation in the medial aspects of the joint, where a new-born ankylotic block occupied most part of the gap created by resecting the coronoid process at the time of the TMJ prosthesis insertion. Conclusions: Despite this adverse event has been sometimes described in the literature, this is the first case in which its occurrence happened several years after the temporomandibular joint replacement. It can be suggested that an accurate assessment of pre-operative risk factors for re-ankylosis (e.g., patients with multiple failed temporomandibular joint surgeries and within-intervention prevention (e.g., strategies to keep the bone interfaces around the implant separated should be better standardized and define in future studies.

  11. Comorbidity of internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint and silent dysfunction of the cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiesch-Scholz, M; Fink, M; Tschernitschek, H

    2003-04-01

    The aim of this evaluation was to examine correlations between internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and cervical spine disorder (CSD). A prospective controlled clinical study was carried out. Thirty patients with signs and symptoms of internal derangement but without any subjective neck problems and 30 age- and gender-matched control subjects without signs and symptoms of internal derangement were examined. The investigation of the temporomandibular system was carried out using a 'Craniomandibular Index'. Afterwards an examiner-blinded manual medical investigation of the craniocervical system was performed. This included muscle palpation of the cervical spine and shoulder girdle as well as passive movement tests of the cervical spine, to detect restrictions in the range of movement as well as segmental intervertebral dysfunction. The internal derangement of the TMJ was significantly associated with 'silent' CSD (t-test, P temporomandibular system exhibited significantly more often pain on pressure of the neck muscles than patients without muscle tenderness of the temporomandibular system (t-test, P < 0.05). As a result of the present study, for patients with internal derangement of the TMJ an additional examination of the craniocervical system should be recommended.

  12. A comparative study of three-dimensional reconstructive images of temporomandibular joint using computed tomogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Suk Young; Koh, Kwang Joon

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the spatial relationship of temporomandibular joint and to an aid in the diagnosis of temporomandibular disorder. For this study, three-dimensional images of normal temporomandibular joint were reconstructed by computer image analysis system and three-dimensional reconstructive program integrated in computed tomography. The obtained results were as follows : 1. Two-dimensional computed tomograms had the better resolution than three dimensional computed tomograms in the evaluation of bone structure and the disk of TMJ. 2. Direct sagittal computed tomograms and coronal computed tomograms had the better resolution in the evaluation of the disk of TMJ. 3. The positional relationship of the disk could be visualized, but the configuration of the disk could not be clearly visualized on three-dimensional reconstructive CT images. 4. Three-dimensional reconstructive CT images had the smoother margin than three-dimensional images reconstructed by computer image analysis system, but the images of the latter had the better perspective. 5. Three-dimensional reconstructive images had the better spatial relationship of the TMJ articulation, and the joint space were more clearly visualized on dissection images.

  13. Cancer risk among patients with finger and hand joint and temporo-mandibular joint prostheses in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryzek, J P; Mellemkjaer, L; McLaughlin, J K; Blot, W J; Olsen, J H

    1999-05-31

    The use of artificial joint implants has risen greatly over the past years. However, few investigations of the cancer risk associated with implants have been performed. We investigated cancer risk in patients with finger and hand joint and temporo-mandibular (TMJ) joint implants. A nationwide cohort in Denmark of patients with finger and hand joint prostheses (n = 858) or TMJ implants (n = 389) was followed from January 1, 1977, to December 31, 1995, to evaluate any potential cancer risks subsequent to receiving these implants. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for all cancers were 1.0 (95% CI = 0.8-1.2) for the finger and hand joint cohort and 1.1 (95% CI = 0.8-1.7) for the TMJ cohort. A significant risk for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was found in the finger and hand joint cohort (SIR = 3.8, 95% CI = 1.5-7.8). When the finger and hand joint cohort was stratified by diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, the excess risk was seen only in the group with rheumatoid arthritis. This is consistent with past studies, which have found an association between rheumatoid arthritis and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Our results provide evidence that the cancer risk for patients with finger and hand joint prostheses and TMJ implants is similar to that for the general population.

  14. The effect of intra-articular injection of ultracain in the temporomandibular joint in patients with preauricular pain - A randomized prospective double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjakkes, Geerten-Has E.; TenVergert, Elisabeth M.; de Bont, Lambert G. M.; Stegenga, Boudewijn

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the distinguishing ability of intraarticular anesthesia from placebo in orofacial pain patients with pain located in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) region, aiming at a validation of intra-articular anesthesia injection as a diagnostic test of pain in the TMJ region.

  15. Three-dimensional (3D) analysis of the temporomandibular joint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kitai, N.; Kreiborg, S.; Murakami, S.

    Symposium Orthodontics 2001: Where are We Now? Where are We Going?, three-dimensional analysis, temporomandibular joint......Symposium Orthodontics 2001: Where are We Now? Where are We Going?, three-dimensional analysis, temporomandibular joint...

  16. [Clinical evaluation and psychological aspects of temporomandibular joint disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coessens, P; De Boever, J A

    1997-01-01

    Establishing the patient's clinical diagnosis depends on gathering as much information of the patient and his or her signs and symptoms as possible. This information can be gathered from history, physical and psychological examination, diagnostic analysis. It is also important to look upon pain as a disorder and to consider the relationship between pain and psychological factors. The differential diagnosis is constructed through a biopsychological model of illness rather than through a more traditional biomedical model of disease. To arrive at a consistently accurate clinical diagnosis in patients with TMJ and craniofacial pain, the technique of clinical diagnosis must be well defined, reliable and include examination of the head and the neck, cranial nerves and the stomatognathic system. The craniomandibular index provides a standardized examination of the stomatognathic system that has been tested on validity and reliability. This chapter focuses on the techniques of history taking clinical and psychological examination and diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular joint disorders and muscle pain.

  17. Radiographic evaluation of cervical spine of subjects with temporomandibular joint internal disorder Avaliação radiográfica da coluna cervical de indivíduos com distúrbios internos da articulação temporomandibular

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner Cesar Munhoz; Amélia Pasqual Marques; José Tadeu Tesseroli de Siqueira

    2004-01-01

    Although the etiopathophysiology of internal temporomandibular joint internal disorders (TMJ ID) is still unknown, it has been suggested that head and body posture could be related to its initial onset, development and perpetuation. The purpose of the present study was to observe the relationship between cervical spine X-ray abnormalities and TMJ ID. This investigation evaluated 30 subjects with internal TMJ disorder symptoms (test group) and 20 healthy subjects (control group). Subjects were...

  18. Comparison of MRI findings with clinical symptoms in temporomandibular joint internal derangement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Ki Jeong [Chonbuk National University College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-06-15

    To determine the clinical correlation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of temporomandibular joint internal derangements. The MR images of 150 TMJs in 75 patients were analyzed. The clinical symptoms were pain in the pre auricular area and masticatory muscles and TMJ sounds. There was a statistically significant relationship between the MRI diagnoses of different types of disc displacements and clinical findings of pain, clicking, and crepitus. The risk of TMJ pain was increased when the disc displacement without reduction occurred at the same time in combination with the osteoarthrosis and effusion. Regardless of the results, the data indicate that each of these MR imaging variables may not be regarded as the unique and dominant factor in defining TMJ pain occurrence.

  19. Influence of serotonin on the analgesic effect of granisetron on temporomandibular joint arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voog, Ulle; Alstergren, Per; Leibur, Edvitar; Kallikorm, Riina; Kopp, Sigvard

    2004-01-01

    The influence of circulating serotonin (5-HT) on the effects of intra-articular administration of granisetron on temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain was investigated in 11 patients with chronic polyarthritides. An analgesic effect superior to placebo has been shown previously. The change in TMJ movement pain intensity was negatively correlated to circulating 5-HT; that is, the higher the 5-HT before injection, the greater the reduction of pain intensity. The resting pain intensity reduction was not related to 5-HT. In conclusion, this study indicates a stronger short-term analgesic effect on TMJ movement pain by intra-articular administration of the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist granisetron in patients with high levels of circulating 5-HT. PMID:15770056

  20. Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features of the Temporomandibular Joint in Two Normal Camels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Arencibia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance (MR image features of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ and associated structures in two mature dromedary camels were obtained with a third-generation equipment CT and a superconducting magnet RM at 1.5 Tesla. Images were acquired in sagittal and transverse planes. Medical imaging processing with imaging software was applied to obtain postprocessing CT and MR images. Relevant anatomic structures were identified and labelled. The resulting images provided excellent anatomic detail of the TMJ and associated structures. Annotated CT and MR images from this study are intended as an anatomical reference useful in the interpretation for clinical CT and MR imaging studies of the TMJ of the dromedary camels.

  1. Successful Function-Preserving Therapy for Chondroblastoma of the Temporal Bone Involving the Temporomandibular Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junkichi Yokoyama

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a case involving a late diagnosis of chondroblastoma of the temporal skull base involving the temporomandibular joint (TMJ. Following an initial misdiagnosis and unsuccessful treatment over a period of 5 years, the patient was referred to our department for further evaluation and possible surgical intervention for occlusal abnormalities, trismus, clicking of the TMJ, and hearing impairment. Based on preoperative immunochemical studies showing positive reaction of multinucleated giant cells for S-100 protein, the final diagnosis was chondroblastoma. The surgical approach – postauricular incision and total parotidectomy, with complete removal of the temporal bone, including the TMJ via the extended middle fossa – was successful in preserving facial nerves and diminishing clinical manifestations. This study highlights a misdiagnosed case in an effort to underline the importance of medical examinations and accurate differential diagnosis in cases involving any tumor mass in the temporal bone.

  2. Temporomandibular joint involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: treatment with an orthodontic appliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gattinara

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and purpose: About 65% of children suffering from juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA shows a more or less marked involvement of temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ with altered mandibular growth, resorption of the condyles, occlusary instability, reduced chewing ability and facial dysmorphia. The purpose of our study is to prevent and to treat the progressive evolution of JIA on craniofacial growth and morphology with a functional appliance; surgery should be considered only in so far as the adequacy of TMJ movement is concemed. Methods: From 1992 until now 72 children with proved JIA and TMJ involvement have been treated (50 females, 22 males, aged 6 to 16 years old. TMJ involvement was bilateral in 61% and unilateral in 39% of patients. A diagnostic workup was carried out involving tomograms of TMJ and cephalometric radiograph and analysis. The authors used a bimaxillary activator in the attempt to modify the unfavourable growth pattern and provide a gradual ante-rotation of the jaw. Results: Almost all JIA patients showed satisfactory long term results, easing of pain, reduced skeletal discrepancy, increased function and good facial profile. Conclusions: The long term results of this study indicate that orthopaedic therapy might control the vicious circle of the malocclusion in children with JIA, preventing exacerbation of mandibular clockwise rotation. Surgical intervention for the improvement of TMJ function should be considered only if a severe restricted state is imminent.

  3. Overexpression of Shox2 Leads to Congenital Dysplasia of the Temporomandibular Joint in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xihai Li

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Our previous study reported that inactivation of Shox2 led to dysplasia and ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ, and that replacing Shox2 with human Shox partially rescued the phenotype with a prematurely worn out articular disc. However, the mechanisms of Shox2 activity in TMJ development remain to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the molecular and cellular basis for the congenital dysplasia of TMJ in Wnt1-Cre; pMes-stop Shox2 mice. We found that condyle and glenoid fossa dysplasia occurs primarily in the second week after the birth. The dysplastic TMJ of Wnt1-Cre; pMes-stop Shox2 mice exhibits a loss of Collagen type I, Collagen type II, Ihh and Gli2. In situ zymography and immunohistochemistry further demonstrate an up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, MMP9 and MMP13, accompanied by a significantly increased cell apoptosis. In addition, the cell proliferation and expressions of Sox9, Runx2 and Ihh are no different in the embryonic TMJ between the wild type and mutant mice. Our results show that overexpression of Shox2 leads to the loss of extracellular matrix and the increase of cell apoptosis in TMJ dysplasia by up-regulating MMPs and down-regulating the Ihh signaling pathway.

  4. Periodontal Ligament Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Increase Proliferation and Glycosaminoglycans Formation of Temporomandibular Joint Derived Fibrochondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianli Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ disorders are common disease in maxillofacial surgery. The aim of this study is to regenerate fibrocartilage with a mixture of TMJ fibrochondrocytes and periodontal ligament derived mesenchymal stem cells (PD-MSCs. Materials and Methods. Fibrochondrocytes and PD-MSC were cocultured (ratio 1 : 1 for 3 weeks. Histology and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs assay were performed to examine the deposition of GAG. Green florescent protein (GFP was used to track PD-MSC. Conditioned medium of PD-MSCs was collected to study the soluble factors. Gene expression of fibrochondrocytes cultured in conditioned medium was tested by quantitative PCR (qPCR. Results. Increased proliferation of TMJ-CH was observed in coculture pellets when compared to monoculture. Enhanced GAG production in cocultures was shown by histology and GAG quantification. Tracing of GFP revealed the fact that PD-MSC disappears after coculture with TMJ-CH for 3 weeks. In addition, conditioned medium of PD-MSC was also shown to increase the proliferation and GAG deposition of TMJ-CH. Meanwhile, results of qPCR demonstrated that conditioned medium enhanced the expression levels of matrix-related genes in TMJ-CH. Conclusions. Results from this study support the mechanism of MSC-chondrocyte interaction, in which MSCs act as secretor of soluble factors that stimulate proliferation and extracellular matrix deposition of chondrocytes.

  5. CT imaging in the surgical treatment of one-sided extraarticular temporomandibular joint ankylosis; Uso da tomografia computadorizada no planejamento cirurgico da anquilose temporomandibular extra-articular unilateral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villamizar, Lenin A.; Ghirelli, Carolina de Oliveira; Baroni, Carina Outi; Ferro, Daniel; Pinto, Ana Carolina Brandao de Campos Fonseca, E-mail: carinaouti@yahoo.com.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia. Dept. de Cirurgia

    2012-07-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is characterized by difficulty to open the mouth. The ankylosis may be articular when TJM is involved and extra-articular when other factors lead to a restriction of chewing movements without TJM involvement. Case report of one patient with unilateral ankylosis and his surgical planning through the tomography imaging. CT imaging helps preoperative planning because it can locate the exact point of injury and can make the difference between the true and false ankylosis of the TJM. (author)

  6. Temporomandibular joint ankylosis in ankylosing spondylitis: A case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishtha Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ankylosing spondylitis (AS is a chronic systemic inflammatory disorder. It primarily affects the axial skeleton through involvement of the peripheral joint scan occurs. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ involvement in AS varies from 4% to 35%. Here, we present a case of a 35-year-old male, follow-up of AS from last 8 years on nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, presented with fresh complaints of painfully restricted movements of jaw during swallowing. Computer tomography of patient demonstrates articular cartilage changes with disc and joint abnormalities.

  7. Radiodiagnosis of occlusal temporomandibular joint dysfunctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundert, M.

    1980-01-01

    The diagnostic value of conventional oblique-lateral transcranial standard projections for radiography of the temporomandibular joints is limited by various anatomical factors and the projection geometry. Improved results are obtained by individualization of the projection. The author describes a method for determining the individually optimum oblique-lateral projection, a method which is based on pre-exposure fluoroscopy of the temporomandibular joint with an electronic image intensifier system incorporating a television chain. The method has been employed as routine practice for 15 years; it has been modified several times and enables documentation studies to be made with an unusually high degree of reproducibility with respect to beam projection. (Auth.)

  8. Efficacy of Arthrocentesis with Injection of Hyaluronic Acid in the Treatment of Internal Derangement of Temporomandibular Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramila Shakya

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study was designed to find out the effect of arthrocentesis with injection hyaluronic acid in thetreatment of internal derangement of temporomandibular joint (TMJ ID for the restoration of TMJ function. The studyincluded 25 patients, aged 13 to 50 years with symptoms of TMJ pain and clicking during function and limited mouthopening. TMJ ID was assessed with clinical examination and conformed with MRI. Arthrocentesis was done withinsertion of two 21gauze needles in the upper joint compartment and joint lavaged with 200 ml of ringer’s lactate solutionand at the end 1ml of hyaluronic acid was injected. Intensity of TMJ pain and clicking was assessed using visual analogscale, maximum mouth opening, lateral jaw movement and protrusion were assessed with millimeter scale. All theparameters were measured before the procedure , immediately after the procedure then after 2 weeks, 1 month , 3 monthsand 6 months procedure. During 6 months follow-up, clinical examination and comparison of the results showed 84%reduction in TMJ pain, 92% improvement in mouth opening and clicking disappear in 80% of patients.Key words: TMJ pain; clicking; internal derangement; arthrocentesis; hyaluronic acid.DOI: 10.3329/bsmmuj.v3i1.5509BSMMU J 2010; 3(1: 18-22

  9. Laterality of proprioception in the orofacial muscles and temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frayne, Ellie; Coulson, Susan; Adams, Roger; Croxson, Glen; Waddington, Gordon

    2016-12-02

    Laterality of function in the orofacial musculature suggests there may be side-to-side asymmetry of proprioceptive acuity in lip movement compared to the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In the present work, 14 young adults were tested for acuity of lip and TMJ closure movements onto plugs varying from 5 to 8mm without visual feedback. Testing was conducted on both left and right sides, using the same psychophysical task and stimuli. Results showed superior proprioceptive acuity at the lips, with no significant side effect. However, there was side-to-side asymmetry in the correlations between proprioceptive performance for the two anatomical structures, with performance on the right side strongly correlated but not on the left. This is consistent with the need for coordination between structures during chewing. When acuity at different points in the stimulus range was examined, the right side lips were better with small stimuli. Overall, results support enhanced use-specific proprioception. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Management of pain secondary to temporomandibular joint syndrome with peripheral nerve stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Lopez, Manuel J; Fernandez-Baena, Mariano; Aldaya-Valverde, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint syndrome, or Costen syndrome, is a clinically diagnosed disorder whose most common symptoms include joint pain and clicking, difficulty opening the mouth, and temporomandibular joint discomfort. The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is supplied by the auriculotemporal nerve, a collateral branch of the mandibular nerve (the V3 branch of the trigeminal nerve). The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness and safety of permanent peripheral nerve stimulation to relieve TMJ pain. This case series is a prospective study. Pain Unit of a regional universitary hospital. The study included 6 female patients with temporomandibular pain lasting from 2 to 8 years that did not respond to intraarticular local anesthetic and corticoid injections. After a positive diagnostic block test, the patients were implanted with quadripolar or octapolar leads in the affected preauricular region for a 2-week stimulation test phase, after which the leads were connected to a permanent implanted pulse generator. Results of the visual analog scale, SF-12 Health Survey, Brief Pain Inventory, and drug intake were recorded at baseline and at 4, 12, and 24 weeks after the permanent implant. Five out of 6 patients experienced pain relief exceeding 80% (average 72%) and received a permanent implant. The SF-12 Health Survey results were very positive for all specific questions, especially items concerning the physical component. Patients reported returning to normal physical activity and rest at night. Four patients discontinued their analgesic medication and 1 patient reduced their gabapentin dose by 50%. Sample size; impossibility of placebo control. Patients affected with TMJ syndrome who do not respond to conservative treatments may find a solution in peripheral nerve stimulation, a simple technique with a relatively low level of complications.

  11. Arthrocentesis and Temporomandibular Joint Disorders: Clinical and Radiological Results of a Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo De Riu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We evaluated the efficacy of arthrocentesis in the treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ disorders. Material and Methods. In this prospective clinical case series, 30 consecutive patients with TMJ disorders underwent arthrocentesis using saline and sodium hyaluronate injections. Outcome measures were TMJ pain, maximum mouth opening (MMO, joint noises, and anatomical changes in the TMJ architecture. Patients were evaluated using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI at the beginning of treatment and 60 days after the last arthrocentesis. Pretreatment and posttreatment clinical parameters were compared using paired and unpaired t-tests, and McNemar’s test was used to evaluate CBCT and MRI changes (. Results. At 1-year follow-up examinations, visual analogue scale scores indicated that pain was reduced significantly and mean postoperative MMO was increased significantly. CBCT findings showed no significant change, and MRI showed only slight reductions in inflammatory signs. Conclusions. Within the limitations of this study, we can conclude that arthrocentesis is a simple, minimally invasive procedure with a relatively low risk of complications and significant clinical benefits in patients with TMJ disorders. This trial is registered with NCT01903512.

  12. 3-D sonography for diagnosis of disk dislocation of the temporomandibular joint compared with MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landes, Constantin A; Goral, Wojciech A; Sader, Robert; Mack, Martin G

    2006-05-01

    This study determines the value of three-dimensional (3-D) sonography for the assessment of disk dislocation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Sixty-eight patients (i.e.,136 TMJ) with clinical dysfunction were examined by 272 sonographic 3-D scans. An 8- to 12.5-MHz transducer, angulated by step-motor, was used after picking a volume box on 2-D scan; magnetic resonance imaging followed immediately. Every TMJ was scrutinized in closed- and open-mouth position for normal or dislocated disk position. Fifty-three patients had complete data sets, i.e., 106 TMJ, 212 examinations. Sonographic examination took 5 min, with 74% specificity (62% closed-mouth; 85% open-mouth); sensitivity 53% (62/43%); accuracy 70% (62/77%); positive predictive value 49% (57/41%); and negative predictive value 77% (67/86%). This study encourages more research on the diagnostic capacity of 3-D TMJ sonography, with the advantage of multidimensional joint visualization. Although fair in specificity and negative predictive value, sensitivity and accuracy may ameliorate with future higher-sound frequency, real-time 3-D viewing and automated image analysis.

  13. Quantification of disc displacement in internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arayasantiparb, Raweewan; Tsuchimochi, Makoto

    2010-02-01

    Many measures have been developed to determine the extent of disc displacement in internal derangements of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) using magnetic resonance imaging. The purpose of this study was to develop a quantitative method of analyzing disc position and to evaluate the positions of the disc in internal derangements of the TMJ (group 1, with reduction; group 2, without reduction). Magnetic resonance images of 150 TMJs in 20 healthy volunteers and 55 patients with internal derangements were evaluated. The anatomical points of interest of the TMJ, including the anterior (DA) and posterior (DP) points of the disc, were marked on parasagittal magnetic resonance images of the TMJ disc taken in both the closed- and the open-mouth positions. All points were recorded using an x-y coordinate system, with reference to a referral line. In the closed-mouth position, the DP in patients in group 1 was situated in a more-anterior direction than the DP in volunteers. The DP in group 2 was located further anterior and inferior than the DP in group 1. However, the position of the DA did not differ between group 1 and group 2. In the open-mouth position, the DP was displaced anteroinferiorly to a greater extent in group 2 than in group 1 (one-way ANOVA, followed by Scheffe's test; P displaced TMJ discs revealed no significant difference. In conclusion, most of our results quantitatively support previously reported findings in imaging, surgical, and histopathological studies of TMJ internal derangement. We suggest that our measure of disc position of the TMJ would be useful to assess the status and response to treatment of internal derangements of the TMJ.

  14. A tomographic study of positional and bony changes in the temporomandibular joint following orthognathic surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Nam Kyu; Kim Min Suk; Koh, Kwang Joon

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to aid in the evaluation of prognosis of temporomandibular joint following orthognathic surgery. For this study, 20 patients (40 TMJ) who undergone orthognathic surgery were examined. Preoperative and postoperative tomograms of TMJ were taken. And the subjects were divided into 3 groups according to postoperative periods. The obtained results were as follows : 1. There were no significant differences between preoperative and postoperative changes in joint spaces in each group and between groups (P<0.05). 2. There were no significant differences between preoperative and postoperative ratio of joint spaces (P<0.05).3. There were no significant differences between preoperative and postoperative changes in the range of motion of condylar head (P<0.05). 4. The bony changes of condylar head were observed in 14 (35%) condyles (6 erosion, 2 flattening, 5 double contour, 1 osteophyte).

  15. A tomographic study of positional and bony changes in the temporomandibular joint following orthognathic surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Nam Kyu; Kim Min Suk; Koh, Kwang Joon [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Chonpook National University, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to aid in the evaluation of prognosis of temporomandibular joint following orthognathic surgery. For this study, 20 patients (40 TMJ) who undergone orthognathic surgery were examined. Preoperative and postoperative tomograms of TMJ were taken. And the subjects were divided into 3 groups according to postoperative periods. The obtained results were as follows : 1. There were no significant differences between preoperative and postoperative changes in joint spaces in each group and between groups (P<0.05). 2. There were no significant differences between preoperative and postoperative ratio of joint spaces (P<0.05).3. There were no significant differences between preoperative and postoperative changes in the range of motion of condylar head (P<0.05). 4. The bony changes of condylar head were observed in 14 (35%) condyles (6 erosion, 2 flattening, 5 double contour, 1 osteophyte).

  16. Temporomandibular joint involvement in a cohort of patients with Juvenile Idiopatic Arthritis and evaluation of the effect induced by functional orthodontic appliance: clinical and radiographic investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portelli, M; Matarese, G; Militi, A; Logiudice, G; Nucera, R; Lucchese, A

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the study was to assess possible correlations between the clinical parameters of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthritis and pathologic MRI findings of the TMJ in patients affected by juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), and the effect of a functional orthodontic therapy on the evolution of TMJ disorders. A prospective clinical and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) investigation was conducted on a sample of 53 patients (41 female, 12 male) with JIA, treated for 24 months with an Andresen appliance. The involvement of TMJ was defined by clinical and radiological signs. NMR assessments were performed in closed and maximum opening mouth position before (T0) and at the end of functional orthodontic therapy (T1). Fifteen patients showed physical and radiologic TMJ abnormalities. Changes were not uniformly distributed among the different JIA subtypes. Patients with poliarticular JIA (≥5 peripheral joints affected) showed more destructive bony changes. No correlation existed between clinical symptoms and NMR alterations. Approximately one half of the patients experienced significant improvement of the TMJ and muscular pain using the Andresen appliance. The prevalence of TMJ involvement in patients suffering of JIA, and the improvement of TMJ and muscular pain associated with the use of functional appliance found in the present study, suggest an alert for TMJ dysfunction in patients with JIA and demonstrate the utility of functional orthodontic therapy in preventing the morbidities associated with TMJ arthritis in JIA.

  17. Multidirectional pseudodynamic studies of the bilateral temporomandibular joint diseases with 0.2-Tesla MR imaging unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Makoto; Ehara, Shigeru; Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu; Sugisawa, Miyoshi; Iwahana, Hideaki; Kuboya, Yasuo.

    1996-01-01

    Sagittal and coronal images of the bilateral temporomandibular joint (TMJ) simultaneously have been obtained to evaluate displacement of the meniscus in nine patients with TMJ clicking using a 0.2-Tesla permanent magnetic unit. The obtained images were displayed in closed loop cine fashion and recorded on videotapes. Anterior displacement of meniscus was seen on sagittal images in 5 of 9 paients. In the other four patients, no anterior displacement was observed, but in three of them, medial and lateral displacement on coronal images were shown in the closed position. Even using the 0.2-Tesla unit, simultaneous pseudodynamic display of the bilateral TMJ in sagittal and coronal planes was useful for evaluating internal derangement of the TMJ. This technique not only saves time but provides accurate evaluation of meniscal position and motion. (H.O.)

  18. Is dextrose prolotherapy superior to placebo for the treatment of temporomandibular joint hypermobility? A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cömert Kiliç, S; Güngörmüş, M

    2016-07-01

    A randomized clinical trial involving adult patients with bilateral temporomandibular joint (TMJ) hypermobility referred for treatment was implemented. The sample comprised 30 consecutive patients, who were divided randomly into two groups. The TMJ hypermobility was treated with either saline (placebo group) or dextrose injections (study group). The solution was injected into five different TMJ areas in three sessions at monthly intervals. The predictor variable was the treatment technique. The outcome variables were visual analogue scale (VAS) evaluations and maximum inter-incisal opening (MIO). Outcome variables were recorded preoperatively and at 12 months postoperatively. Descriptive and bivariate statistics were computed, and significance was set at a P-value of dextrose prolotherapy is no more effective than placebo treatment for any of the outcome variables of TMJ hypermobility assessed. Copyright © 2016 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterization of degenerative changes in the temporomandibular joint of the bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) and siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, M K; Arzi, B; Vapniarsky-Arzi, N; Athanasiou, K A

    2013-11-01

    The articulation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is composed of the temporal bone dorsally, the mandibular condyle ventrally and a fibrous articular disc. The TMJ disc plays an essential role in distributing load between the two articular surfaces. Degeneration of the disc in the presence of joint pathology has been shown in man; however, TMJ pathology has not been documented previously in tigers (Panthera tigris). The mandibular condyle and TMJ disc of a Bengal tiger (P. tigris tigris) and a Siberian tiger (P. tigris altaica) were evaluated grossly and the TMJ disc was characterized biochemically and mechanically. Characterization of the TMJ disc verified region- and direction-dependent biochemical and mechanical properties, reflective of the functional demands on the joint. Degenerative joint disease was observed in both cases and this was more severe in the Siberian tiger. Simultaneous evaluation of joint pathology, biochemical composition and mechanical properties of the TMJ disc revealed a loss in functional properties (tensile anisotropy) of the disc as joint pathology advanced from moderate to severe. TMJ degeneration may compromise the ability of the animal to eat and thrive and may be a factor contributing to the endangered status of these species. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [A primary application and evaluation of temporomandibular joint replacement with stock prosthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-hu; Chen, Min-jie; Qiu, Ya-ting; Yang, Chi

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of total joint replacement in treatment of temporomandibular joint(TMJ) osteoarthropathy with stock prostheses. Six female patients involving 10 joints (2 unilateral and 4 bilateral), with an average age of 59 years old, were involved in this study. Three patients (5 joints) were diagnosed as internal derangement in V stage depending on MRI, 3D-CT findings and clinical characteristics. The other 3 patients (5 joints) had histories of failed temporomandibular joint operation using costochondral graft or temporalis fascial flap. The maximal mouth opening was 1.9 cm on average (range, 1.0 to 2.9cm). All the joints were replaced with Biomet standard prosthesis under general anesthesia. The follow-up period was from 7 to 49 months (average, 17.5 months). All the operations were successfully performed. Heterotopic ossification happened in a bilateral case 1 year postoperatively. One patient with bilateral joint disease complained of severe uncomfortable feeling in the region of the ears and the temples, although there was no significant positive signs according to an ENT examination. Pain relief of the joint and mouth opening improvement were significant in 4 patients. No failure was noted secondary to infection or loosening of the prostheses. The occlusal relationship kept stable postoperatively in all cases. Total TMJ joint replacement with standard prosthesis is a good choice for TMJ reconstruction. It can significantly reduce joint pain and the mouth opening limitation resulted from osteoarthritis. Long-term result remains to be evaluated based on a long-term follow-up.

  1. Choosing sheep (Ovis aries) as animal model for temporomandibular joint research: Morphological, histological and biomechanical characterization of the joint disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelo, D F; Morouço, P; Alves, N; Viana, T; Santos, F; González, R; Monje, F; Macias, D; Carrapiço, B; Sousa, R; Cavaco-Gonçalves, S; Salvado, F; Peleteiro, C; Pinho, M

    2016-12-01

    Preclinical trials are essential to the development of scientific technologies. Remarkable molecular and cellular research has been done using small animal models. However, significant differences exist regarding the articular behavior between these models and humans. Thus, large animal models may be more appropriate to perform trials involving the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The aim of this work was to make a morphological (anatomic dissection and white light 3D scanning system), histological (TMJ in bloc was removed for histologic analysis) and biomechanical characterization (tension and compression tests) of sheep TMJ comparing the obtained results with human data. Results showed that sheep processus condylaris and fossa mandibularis are anatomically similar to the same human structures. TMJ disc has an elliptical perimeter, thinner in the center than in periphery. Peripheral area acts as a ring structure supporting the central zone. The disc cells display both fibroblast and chondrocyte-like morphology. Marginal area is formed by loose connective tissue, with some chondrocyte-like cells and collagen fibers in diverse orientations. Discs obtained a tensile modulus of 3.97±0.73MPa and 9.39±1.67MPa, for anteroposterior and mediolateral assessment. The TMJ discs presented a compressive modulus (E) of 446.41±5.16MPa and their maximum stress value (σmax) was 18.87±1.33MPa. Obtained results suggest that these animals should be considered as a prime model for TMJ research and procedural training. Further investigations in the field of oromaxillofacial surgery involving TMJ should consider sheep as a good animal model due to its resemblance of the same joint in humans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. A retrospective analysis of the headache associated with temporomandibular joint disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungari, C; Quarato, D; Gennaro, P; Riccardi, E; Agrillo, A; Mitro, V; Cascino, F; Reale, G; Rinna, C; Filiaci, F

    2012-11-01

    Headache is a common symptom, that can be extremely disabling, affecting 26 million of patients only in Italy. ICHD-II has reported two categories: "primary headaches" and "secondary headaches". Temporomandibular joint disorders can lead to a secondary headaches. We want to evaluate the prevalence and clinical features of headache among a series of patients having temporomandibular joint disorders and we illustrate the evolution of headache following medical treatament of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders. This is a retrospective study carried out on chart review of 426 consecutive patients with various degrees of temporomandibular disorders and treated with medical devices from 2007 to 2011. Headache was reported by 73 patients (17.14%). Headache was observed in 36 of 51 patients with lock and in 32 out of 130 patients with mandibular deflections (Table I). The remaining 5 patients with headache had articular noise. Headache is not a rare finding in a population with temporomandibular dysfunctions and is more often a tension-type rather than trigeminal headache.

  3. Expression of CGRP in the temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caviedes Bucheli, Javier; Medina Buitrago, Diana Marcela

    2002-01-01

    The presence and content of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is evaluated in the hyperplastic retrodiscal tissue of the temporomandibular joint in patients with joint degenerative disease by radioimmunoassay. Study population has included 8 female patients in pre-menopausic status, without to be pregnant, without to be lactating for a year and with diagnostic of joint degenerative disease (osteoarthrosis). Pain levels are registered with visual analog scale, where 0 is absence of pain and 16 acute pain. A bone degeneration is classified as mild, moderate and severe, according to findings of nuclear magnetic resonance. The 15 retrodiscal hyperplastic tissue samples are taken from patients undergoing to open surgery of temporomandibular joint. The specimens were placed in plastic blocks with freezing medium and are stored at -70 degrees celsius until neuropeptide extraction by radioimmunoassay with kit for CGRP. A directly proportional relationship is established between the degree of bone degeneration and neuropeptide expression and between the osteoarthrosis classification with analogue visual scale. Findings have shown definitive correlation between pain levels and expression of neuropeptide. CGRP is expressed in the retrodiscal tissue of temporomandibular joint in human with joint degenerative disease and is directly related with levels osteoarthrosis and pain [es

  4. Impalement of an unusual foreign body on the temporomandibular joint causing severe trismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Ryohei; Kubota, Kosei; Furudate, Ken; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Kon, Takao; Tamura, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Wataru

    2016-12-01

    A penetrating injury by a foreign body is comparatively common in the oral and maxillofacial region. On the other hand, injury to the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) by a foreign object is very rare. The TMJ is an anatomically narrow space surrounded by hard bony processes. An unusual case of trauma with severe trismus caused by a foreign body that impaled the TMJ is reported. A 55-year-old man presented with a 5 × 1-cm laceration to the right cheek caused by a flying object propelled during the use of a lawn mower. The edge of the foreign body had a metallic wire, which became imbedded in the wound. His jaw opening was severely limited. Computed tomography revealed that the foreign body was 3 mm in diameter and was impaled on the articular capsule. The object was successfully removed, and the wound and interior of the TMJ were irrigated. Rehabilitation of mouth opening was started on postoperative day 3. On day 9, mouth opening had improved to 35 mm, and he was discharged. After 1 year, mouth opening was 45 mm with no sign of any TMJ disorders. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Effect of Lengthy Root Canal Therapy Sessions on Temporomandibular Joint and Masticatory Muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safoora Sahebi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Trauma is one of the major factors associated with temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD. These disorders result from macro-trauma or micro-trauma. Macro-trauma might be iatrogenic; for example, from intubation procedures, third molar extraction procedures, and lengthy dental appointments. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of lengthy root canal therapy (more than 2 hours on TMJ and its supporting structures. Materials and methods. Eighty patients whose root canal therapy session lasted more than 2 hours were examined for the status of TMJ and masticatory muscles. After one week the second part of the examination was carried out for TMJ problems and pain and tenderness levels of masticatory muscles. Data was analyzed using Wilcoxon statistical test. Results. Women showed more pain compared to men. There was a significant increase in pain in the external acoustic meatus examination one week after root canal therapy. Patients who were treated for their posterior teeth suffered more pain than those who were treated for the anteriors and premolars. Other aspects of the examination were not affected significantly by lengthy root canal therapy. Conclusion. Lengthy dental treatments can harm TMJ and masticatory muscles and wide opening of the mouth during such appointments can worsen the situation. Therefore, it is wise to break the appointment into shorter intervals and let the patients rest during treatment to close their mouth to prevent iatrogenic damage to TMJ.

  6. Sensitivity of quantitative UTE MRI to the biomechanical property of the temporomandibular joint disc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Won C.; Biswas, Reni; Statum, Sheronda; Sah, Robert L.; Chung, Christine B.

    2014-01-01

    To quantify MR properties of discs from cadaveric human temporomandibular joints (TMJ) using quantitative conventional and ultrashort time-to-echo magnetic resonance imaging (UTE MRI) techniques and to corroborate regional variation in the MR properties with that of biomechanical indentation stiffness. This study was exempt from the institutional review board approval. Cadaveric (four donors, two females, 74 ± 10.7 years) TMJs were sliced (n = 14 slices total) sagittally and imaged using quantitative techniques of conventional spin echo T2 (SE T2), UTE T2*, and UTE T1rho. The discs were then subjected to biomechanical indentation testing, which is performed by compressing the tissue with the blunt end of a small solid cylinder. Regional variations in MR and indentation stiffness were correlated. TMJ of a healthy volunteer was also imaged to show in vivo feasibility. Using the ME SE T2 and the UTE T1rho techniques, a significant (each p 2 = 0.42) than SE T2 (R 2 = 0.19) or UTE T2* (R 2 = 0.02, p = 0.1) techniques. The UTE T1rho technique, applicable in vivo, facilitated quantitative evaluation of TMJ discs and showed a high sensitivity to biomechanical softening of the TMJ discs. With additional work, the technique may become a useful surrogate measure for loss of biomechanical integrity of TMJ discs reflecting degeneration. (orig.)

  7. Effect of Lengthy Root Canal Therapy Sessions on Temporomandibular Joint and Masticatory Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahebi, Safoora; Moazami, Fariborz; Afsa, Masoomeh; Nabavi Zade, Mohammad Reza

    2010-01-01

    Background and aims Trauma is one of the major factors associated with temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD). These disorders result from macro-trauma or micro-trauma. Macro-trauma might be iatrogenic; for example, from intuba-tion procedures, third molar extraction procedures, and lengthy dental appointments. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of lengthy root canal therapy (more than 2 hours) on TMJ and its supporting structures. Materials and methods Eighty patients whose root canal therapy session lasted more than 2 hours were examined for the status of TMJ and masticatory muscles. After one week the second part of the examination was carried out for TMJ problems and pain and tenderness levels of masticatory muscles. Data was analyzed using Wilcoxon statistical test. Results Women showed more pain compared to men. There was a significant increase in pain in the external acoustic meatus examination one week after root canal therapy. Patients who were treated for their posterior teeth suffered more pain than those who were treated for the anteriors and premolars. Other aspects of the examination were not affected significantly by lengthy root canal therapy. Conclusion Lengthy dental treatments can harm TMJ and masticatory muscles and wide opening of the mouth during such appointments can worsen the situation. Therefore, it is wise to break the appointment into shorter intervals and let the patients rest during treatment to close their mouth to prevent iatrogenic damage to TMJ. PMID:22991607

  8. Dentists' knowledge of occlusal splint therapy for bruxism and temporomandibular joint disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candirli, C; Korkmaz, Y T; Celikoglu, M; Altintas, S H; Coskun, U; Memis, S

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate dentist's approaches to the use of splint therapy for myofascial pain, bruxism, and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders and to assessment of treatment modalities. A 12-item questionnaire was developed to determine dentists' knowledge of TMJ disorders and approaches for occlusal splint treatments. The researchers spoke with each dentist included in the study at his/her clinic or by telephone to assess their immediate knowledge and approach to the TMJ disorders. Chi-squared test was performed to analyze the values. The confidence interval was set as 95%. A total of 370 dentists working in Turkey were participated in this study. The most common splint application reason for occlusal splint treatment was bruxism (77.8%) while TMJ pain was very rare (%1.4). The use of hard splint ratios for 0-5 years of professional experience was 57.0%, 42.4.0%, and 26.8% for the experience of 5-15 years and over 15 years groups, respectively (P < 0.001). While the dentists' with sufficient knowledge soft splint application rates were 11.6%, hard splint application rates were 43.4% for the dentists with sufficient knowledge. Occlusion adjustment rate of dentists who practice in all three groups was under 16.0%. The knowledge of the dentists about TMJ disorders and occlusal splint therapy were found to be insufficient. Their knowledge decreased with increasing experience.

  9. Oral rehabilitation of a patient with temporomandibular joint ankylosis caused by ankylosing spondylitis: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brkić Zlata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Ankylosing spondylitis (AS/Morbus Bechterew is a chronic inflammatory rheumatoid disease. The temporomandibular joint (TMJ dysfunction is involved in 4–35% of AS cases, and is correlated to the severity and extension of AS. Even though AS-caused TMJ ankylosis is exceptional, one should have high index of suspicion of TMJ ankylosis in AS for an early detection, because it is an extremely serious and disabling condition that causes problems with mastication, swallowing, digestion, speech, appearance and poor oral hygiene with heavy caries. Case report. A 54-year-old male patient sought medical attention at the Department of Periodontology and Oral Medicine, Clinic for Dentistry at the Military Medical Academy, Belgrade, Serbia, with the chief complaint of pain in the area of the upper left canine in the presence of limited mouth opening. The treatment plan consisted of upper left canine management and rehabilitation of the remaining teeth in the frontal and the premolar region in both, the upper and lower jaw. Even though molar region needed to be treated, unfortunately it was not in the treatment plan because ankylosis of TMJ made the treatment impossible. Conclusions. The patients with AS-caused TMJ ankylosis are considered a diagnostic challenge to routine dentistry. Accent should be given to early diagnosis and multidisciplinary approach in the treatment of the AS patients towards the favorable disease course and outcome.

  10. Experience of Orthodontic Treatment and Symptoms of Temporomandibular Joint in South Korean Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sang-Hee; Park, Shin-Goo

    2018-01-01

    No epidemiological studies have targeted the association between experience of orthodontic treatment and symptoms of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in a large adult population. In this study, we investigated whether experience of orthodontic treatment is associated with symptoms of TMJ in adults. We used data from the Fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES V), conducted in 2011. Trained dentists asked subjects to report their experience of orthodontic treatment and symptoms of TMJ. Overall, 5936 subjects aged over 19 yr were included in this study (2528 males). The data were analyzed using the chi-square test and multiple logistic regression tests. The group with experience of orthodontic treatment had more symptoms of TMJ than the group without orthodontic experience. After adjusting for all covariates (i.e., age, sex, marital status, income, education, stress, teeth injury, and occupation), the adjusted odds ratio was 2.53 (95%CI 1.74-3.67). Experience of orthodontic treatment could be related to increased symptoms of TMJ.

  11. Comprehensive treatment of temporomandibular joint disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navrátil, Leos; Navratil, Vaclav; Hajkova, Simona; Hlinakova, Petra; Dostalova, Tatjana; Vranová, Jana

    2014-01-01

    Changing lifestyles, decreasing physical activity, which is increasing the number of degenerative joint diseases of various etiology, and certain dental procedures are increasing the number of patients complaining of pain in their temporomandibular joints. The aim of the study was to assess the benefits of comprehensive physiotherapy sessions in order to decrease the number of temporomandibular joint problems, thereby improving the patient's quality of life. An examination by a dentist determined each patient's treatment plan, which consisted of a medical exam, physical therapy and education. Each form of treatment was applied 10 times at intervals of 7-14 days. The main goal of the therapeutic physical education was to redress the muscle imbalance in the mandibular joint. This was achieved by restoring balance between the masticatory muscles, along with releasing the spastic shrouds found in the masticatory muscles. The aim of education was to teach the patient exercises focused on the temporomandibular joint and masticatory muscles. The intensity of the exercises and their composition were individually adjusted and adapted to their current state. Physical therapy consisted of the application of pulsed magnetic therapy, laser therapy, and non-invasive positive thermotherapy. The above procedure was conducted on a therapeutic group of 24 patients (3 men and 20 women). In the course of therapy, there were no complications, and all patients adhered to the prescribed regime. None reported any side effects. The mean treatment duration was 123 +/- 66 days. The outcome of the therapy was evaluated as described in the methodology, the degree of pain affecting the joint, and the opening ability of the mouth. In both parameters, there was a significant decline in patient pain. In a study devoted to tactics of rehabilitation treatment for temporomandibular joint disorders, the need for comprehensive long-term therapy, involving education, and learning proper chewing habits

  12. Molecular aspects in inflammatory events of temporomandibular joint: Microarray-based identification of mediators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Ogura

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Synovial inflammation (synovitis frequently accompanies intracapsular pathologic conditions of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ such as internal derangement (ID and/or osteoarthritis (OA, and is suggested to be associated with symptom severity. To identify the putative factors associated with synovitis, we investigated interleukin (IL-1β- and/or tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α-responsive genes of fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS from patients with ID and/or OA of TMJ using microarray analysis. In this review, we first summarize the FLS of TMJ and the signaling pathways of IL-1β and TNF-α. Next, we show the up-regulated genes in FLS after stimulation with IL-1β or TNF-α, and summarize the gene functions based on recent studies. Among the top 10 up-regulated factors, molecules such as IL-6 and cycrooxygense-2 have been well characterized and investigated in the inflammatory responses and tissue destruction associated with joint diseases such as RA and OA, but the roles of some molecules remain unclear. The FLS reaction can lead to the synthesis and release of a wide variety of inflammatory mediators. Some of these mediators are detected in joint tissues and synovial fluids under intracapsular pathologic conditions, and may represent potential targets for therapeutic interventions in ID and/or OA of TMJ.

  13. MR imaging evaluation of the temporomandibular joint following cervical extension-flexion injury (whiplash)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shellock, F.G.; Pressman, B.D.; Schames, J.; Schames, M.; Meeks, T.

    1990-01-01

    To determine abnormalities of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) associated with cervical extension-flexion injury (whiplash) with use of MR imaging. Sixteen patients (32 joints) with TMJ syndrome-related symptoms after whiplash injuries from automobile accidents were evaluated by MR imaging. None of the patients had direct trauma to the jaw, mouth, or face. T1-weighted closed- and opened-mouth views were obtained in the sagittal plane, and closed-mouth views were obtained in the coronal plane. T2-weighted closed-mouth views obtained in the sagittal plane were also obtained to optimize identification of fluid/edema. Fourteen (87%) of 16 patients had one or more of the following TMJ abnormalities: 11 (34%) had anterior displacement of the disk with reduction and 2 (6%) had anterior displacement of the disk without reduction. On T2-weighted images, 17 TMJs (53%) had joint fluid and 5 (16%) had fluid localized to the capsule and/or pterygoid muscle. These data demonstrated a high incidence of TMJ abnormalities related to whiplash injury. The predominant finding was associated fluid/edema, suggesting that T2-weighted images are particularly useful for the evaluation of patients who present with whiplash injury

  14. Sensory innervation of the temporomandibular joint in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreessen, D; Halata, Z; Strasmann, T

    1990-01-01

    The sensory innervation of the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) of 8 STR/IN mice was investigated by means of light and electron microscopy. Through the cutting of complete semithin sections in series it was possible to investigate the joints thoroughly. Additionally, one joint with its nerve supply was reconstructed three-dimensionally with a computerized three-dimensional programme. The reconstruction was based on one complete semithin section series. The joint's nerve supply originates from the nervus auriculotemporalis and additionally from motor branches of the n. mandibularis: n. massetericus, n. pterygoideus lateralis and the nn. temporales posteriores. The greatest number of nerve fibres and endings is located in the dorsolateral part of the joint capsule. They lie only in the stratum fibrosum and subsynovially. Neither the stratum synoviale nor the discus articularis contain any nerve fibres or endings, whereas the peri-articular loose connective tissue is richly innervated. The only type of nerve ending observed within the joint was the free nerve ending, which is assumed to serve not only as a nociceptor but also as a polymodal mechanoreceptor. Merely within the insertion of the musculus pterygoideus lateralis at the collum mandibulae single stretch receptors of the Ruffini type were observed. Ultrastructurally, they correspond to those described in the cat's knee joint. Neither lamellated nor nerve endings of the Golgi or Pacini type were observed in the joint or in the peri-articular connective tissue. The unexpected paucity of nerve fibres and endings in the TMJ itself of the mouse suggests that the afferent information from the joint is less important for position sense and movement than the afferent information from muscles, tendons and periodontal ligaments.

  15. Functional surgery of the temporomandibular joint with conscious sedation for "closed lock" using eminectomy as a treatment: a case series.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stassen, Leo F

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this case series study was to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using local anesthesia and conscious sedation (CS) rather than general anesthesia (GA) for performing functional surgery on patients suffering from temporomandibular joint (TMJ) closed lock, using the eminectomy procedure. Performing this procedure using CS allows functional assessment of the TMJ meniscus at the time of surgery. The objectives of this study were to determine if this surgery is possible under CS, to determine the benefits of being able to see the meniscus in action, and to investigate the patients\\' acceptability for this form of anesthesia.

  16. Facial morphology in children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and moderate to severe temporomandibular joint involvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hsieh, Yuh-Jia; Darvann, Tron Andre; Hermann, Nuno V.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aims of this study were to (1) assess lateral facial morphology in children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and moderate to severe temporomandibular joint (TMJ) involvement, (2) compare the lateral facial morphology of these subjects with and without TMJ...... morphologies between the groups. Lateral projections of oriented 3D photographs were superimposed on the lateral cephalograms. The results of the lateral 3D photographic analysis were correlated with those of lateral cephalometric analysis. Results: Group 3 showed the most severe growth disturbances, including...

  17. Towards Establishing a Standardized Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scoring System for Temporomandibular Joints in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolend, Mirkamal A; Twilt, Marinka; Cron, Randy Q

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The temporomandibular joints (TMJs) are frequently affected in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Early detection is challenging, as major variation is present in scoring TMJ pathology on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Consensus-driven development and validation...... of a MRI scoring system for TMJs has important clinical utility in timely improvement of diagnosis, and serving as an outcome measure. We report on a multi-institutional collaboration towards developing a TMJ MRI scoring system for JIA. METHODS: Seven readers independently assessed MRI scans from 21...... preferable for assessing minor joint changes over time. Eight items were considered sufficiently reliable and/or important for integration into the consensus scoring system: bone marrow edema and enhancement (avICC=0.57-0.61; %SDD=±45-63% prior to re-defining), condylar flattening (0.95-0.96; ±23...

  18. Protocol for concomitant temporomandibular joint custom-fitted total joint reconstruction and orthognathic surgery utilizing computer-assisted surgical simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movahed, Reza; Teschke, Marcus; Wolford, Larry M

    2013-12-01

    Clinicians who address temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pathology and dentofacial deformities surgically can perform the surgery in 1 stage or 2 separate stages. The 2-stage approach requires the patient to undergo 2 separate operations and anesthesia, significantly prolonging the overall treatment. However, performing concomitant TMJ and orthognathic surgery (CTOS) in these cases requires careful treatment planning and surgical proficiency in the 2 surgical areas. This article presents a new treatment protocol for the application of computer-assisted surgical simulation in CTOS cases requiring reconstruction with patient-fitted total joint prostheses. The traditional and new CTOS protocols are described and compared. The new CTOS protocol helps decrease the preoperative workup time and increase the accuracy of model surgery. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Temporomandibular joint space in children without joint disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larheim, T.A.

    1981-01-01

    Bilateral assessment of the temporomandibular joint space in children without joint disease is reported. Twenty-eight children were examined with conventional radiography and 23 with tomography. High prevalence of asymmetric joint spaces with both techniques indicated that great care should be taken when using narrowing or widening of the joint space as a diagnostic criterion in children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Other signs, such as restricted translation of the mandibular head, and clinical symptoms should be evaluated. (Auth.)

  20. Temporomandibular joint osteochondromatosis: an unusual cause of preauricular swelling.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Phelan, Eimear

    2012-02-01

    We report an unusual and rare cause of preauricular swelling and review the most recent literature concerning synovial osteochondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint. We report the clinical and radiologic findings of a case of synovial osteochondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint that presented as preauricular swelling in a female patient. This disease typically affects large joints; fewer than 100 cases reported in the literature affect the temporomandibular joint. This case illustrates that disorders of the temporomandibular joint should also be included in the differential diagnosis of patients who present with a preauricular mass.

  1. TMJ ankylosis: Management with reconstruction and interpositional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is a very desolating structural condition that involves fusion of the 1 mandibular condyle to the base of the skull. It causes difficulty in mastication and breathing.Trauma and Infections are usually responsible.If trauma occurs in young age,it leads to disturbance in growth & facial ...

  2. A personalized 3D-printed prosthetic joint replacement for the human temporomandibular joint: From implant design to implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackland, David C; Robinson, Dale; Redhead, Michael; Lee, Peter Vee Sin; Moskaljuk, Adrian; Dimitroulis, George

    2017-05-01

    Personalized prosthetic joint replacements have important applications in cases of complex bone and joint conditions where the shape and size of off-the-shelf components may not be adequate. The objective of this study was to design, test and fabricate a personalized 3D-printed prosthesis for a patient requiring total joint replacement surgery of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The new 'Melbourne' prosthetic TMJ design featured a condylar component sized specifically to the patient and fixation screw positions that avoid potential intra-operative damage to the mandibular nerve. The Melbourne prosthetic TMJ was developed for a 58-year-old female recipient with end-stage osteoarthritis of the TMJ. The load response of the prosthesis during chewing and a maximum-force bite was quantified using a personalized musculoskeletal model of the patient's masticatory system developed using medical images. The simulations were then repeated after implantation of the Biomet Microfixation prosthetic TMJ, an established stock device. The maximum condylar stresses, screw stress and mandibular stress at the screw-bone interface were lower in the Melbourne prosthetic TMJ (259.6MPa, 312.9MPa and 198.4MPa, respectively) than those in the Biomet Microfixation device (284.0MPa, 416.0MPa and 262.2MPa, respectively) during the maximum-force bite, with similar trends also observed during the chewing bite. After trialing surgical placement and evaluating prosthetic TMJ stability using cadaveric specimens, the prosthesis was fabricated using 3D printing, sterilized, and implanted into the female recipient. Six months post-operatively, the prosthesis recipient had a normal jaw opening distance (40.0 mm), with no complications identified. The new design features and immediate load response of the Melbourne prosthetic TMJ suggests that it may provide improved clinical and biomechanical joint function compared to a commonly used stock device, and reduce risk of intra-operative nerve damage

  3. Augmented reality environment for temporomandibular joint motion analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, A; Ploder, O; Zuniga, J; Undt, G; Ewers, R

    1996-01-01

    The principles of interventional video tomography were applied for the real-time visualization of temporomandibular joint movements in an augmented reality environment. Anatomic structures were extracted in three dimensions from planar cephalometric radiographic images. The live-image fusion of these graphic anatomic structures with real-time position data of the mandible and the articular fossa was performed with a see-through, head-mounted display and an electromagnetic tracking system. The dynamic fusion of radiographic images of the temporomandibular joint to anatomic temporomandibular joint structures in motion created a new modality for temporomandibular joint motion analysis. The advantages of the method are its ability to accurately examine the motion of the temporomandibular joint in three dimensions without restraining the subject and its ability to simultaneously determine the relationship of the bony temporomandibular joint and supporting structures (ie, occlusion, muscle function, etc) during movement before and after treatment.

  4. Assessment of the Temporomandibular Joint Function in Young Adults without Complaints from the Masticatory System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrat, Wojciech; Sierpińska, Teresa; Radke, John

    2018-01-01

    Objective of the study was to evaluate the clinical status of the masticatory system in young adults with full permanent dentition and no stomatognathic system complaints. The study involved 186 randomly selected people with full dental arches with normal occlusal conditions corresponding to Angle's Class I aged 18 - 21 years with an average age of 19 years. Subjects were clinically examined and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) vibrations were recorded during open-wide and close movements using BioJVA. Then, patients were categorized into groups according to Piper's classification system. The TMJs of the subjects were categorized according to the values of the vibration energy and the Piper protocol. This detected 33.4% of the joints with loosened ligaments, subluxation in 8.28%, initial signs of disc dysfunction in 5.08% and disc displacement without locking in 1.6 %. Median frequency differed significantly (p vibrations. However, a subset of people manifested higher vibrations that may indicate an early stage of TMJ dysfunction. Median Frequency was an important parameter for detecting initial symptoms of TMJ dysfunction. Peak Frequency was an important characteristic parameter for detecting TMJ subluxation.

  5. Functional anatomy of the equine temporomandibular joint: Collagen fiber texture of the articular surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, K; Schulz-Kornas, E; Arzi, B; Failing, K; Vogelsberg, J; Staszyk, C

    2016-11-01

    In the last decade, the equine masticatory apparatus has received much attention. Numerous studies have emphasized the importance of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in the functional process of mastication. However, ultrastructural and histological data providing a basis for biomechanical and histopathological considerations are not available. The aim of the present study was to analyze the architecture of the collagen fiber apparatus in the articular surfaces of the equine TMJ to reveal typical morphological features indicating biomechanical adaptions. Therefore, the collagen fiber alignment was visualized using the split-line technique in 16 adult warmblood horses without any history of TMJ disorders. Within the central two-thirds of the articular surfaces of the articular tubercle, the articular disc and the mandibular head, split-lines ran in a correspondent rostrocaudal direction. In the lateral and medial aspects of these articular surfaces, the split-line pattern varied, displaying curved arrangements in the articular disc and punctual split-lines in the bony components. Mediolateral orientated split-lines were found in the rostral and caudal border of the articular disc and in the mandibular fossa. The complex movements during the equine chewing cycle are likely assigned to different areas of the TMJ. The split-line pattern of the equine TMJ is indicative of a relative movement of the joint components in a preferential rostrocaudal direction which is consigned to the central aspects of the TMJ. The lateral and medial aspects of the articular surfaces provide split-line patterns that indicate movements particularly around a dorsoventral axis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Tinnitus and temporomandibular joint: State of the art].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lina-Granade, G; Truy, E; Ionescu, E; Garnier, P; Thai Van, H

    2016-12-01

    Tinnitus has been described in temporomandibular joint dysfunction for a long time. Yet, other disorders, such as hearing loss, stress, anxiety and depression, play a major role in the pathophysiology of tinnitus. Temporomandibular joint dysfunctions seem to increase the risk of tinnitus in patients with other predisposing factors. Especially somatosensory tinnitus, which is characterized by sound modulations with neck or mandible movements, is frequently associated with temporomandibular joint dysfunction, but it is not pathognomonic of such a disorder. In such cases, functional therapy of the temporomandibular joint should be part of the multidisciplinary rehabilitation of patients with tinnitus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Transcranial radiograph and magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of osseous changes of the temporomandibular joint

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    Cho, Soo Beom; Koh, Kwang Joon [School of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-06-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of transcranial radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in the assessment of osseous changes of the condylar head and articular eminence. Osseous changes of the TMJ were evaluated in forty-three patients. Osseous changes of the condylar head and articular eminence were observed in 41 joints and 64 joints, respectively on transcranial radiographs, and 48 joints and 59 joints, respectively on MRI. The flattening, sclerosis, erosion, and osteophyte formation of the condylar heads were observed in 36.6%, 43.9%, 12.2%, and 7.3%, respectively on transcranial radiographs compared with 35.4%, 20.8%, 37.5%, and 6.3%, respectively on MRI. While, the flattening, sclerosis, and erosion of the articular eminences were observed in 26.6%, 67.2%, and 6.2%, respectively on transcranial radiographs compared with 32.2%, 59.3%, and 8.5%, respectively on MRI. There were no statistical differences between transcranial radiographs and MRI scans in the detection of osseous changes of the TMJ. However, MRI scans were superior to the transcranial radiographs in the detection of erosion of the condylar head (p<0.01).

  8. [Application of temporomandibular joint dics reduction in the operation of condylar sagittal fracture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenli, Zeng; Wuchao, Zhou; Jingkun, Zhang; Yisen, Shao; Weihong, Xi

    2017-10-01

    To explore the selection of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc reduction and fixation methods in condylar sagittal fracture surgery. A total of 36 patients with condylar fractures were chosen. The follow-up period was more 6 months. All 36 cases of condylar sagittal fracture were fixed with long screw. In the operation, the displaced joint disc was repositioned and fixed. The fixed method included direct suture (22 cases) and anchorage (14 cases). Clinical followups were performed before surgery and 1 month, 3 months, 6 months and 1 year after surgery. Clinicians recorded data related to the Fricton craniomandibular index (CMI) and evaluated the postoperative joint function during followup before surgery and 6 months after surgery. In both groups, function of TMJ significantly improved after surgery. The CMI decreased from 0.213±0.162 and 0.273±0.154 to 0.059±0.072 and 0.064±0.068 (P0.05) before or after surgery. Both methods could effectively improve the dysfunction of the TMJ caused by trauma. The selection of joint disc reduction and fixation methods is based on the displacement and damage degree of the joint disc.

  9. Transcranial radiograph and magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of osseous changes of the temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Soo Beom; Koh, Kwang Joon

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of transcranial radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in the assessment of osseous changes of the condylar head and articular eminence. Osseous changes of the TMJ were evaluated in forty-three patients. Osseous changes of the condylar head and articular eminence were observed in 41 joints and 64 joints, respectively on transcranial radiographs, and 48 joints and 59 joints, respectively on MRI. The flattening, sclerosis, erosion, and osteophyte formation of the condylar heads were observed in 36.6%, 43.9%, 12.2%, and 7.3%, respectively on transcranial radiographs compared with 35.4%, 20.8%, 37.5%, and 6.3%, respectively on MRI. While, the flattening, sclerosis, and erosion of the articular eminences were observed in 26.6%, 67.2%, and 6.2%, respectively on transcranial radiographs compared with 32.2%, 59.3%, and 8.5%, respectively on MRI. There were no statistical differences between transcranial radiographs and MRI scans in the detection of osseous changes of the TMJ. However, MRI scans were superior to the transcranial radiographs in the detection of erosion of the condylar head (p<0.01).

  10. [Temporo-mandibular joint. Morpho-functional considerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scutariu, M D; Indrei, Anca

    2004-01-01

    The temporo-mandibular joint is distinguished from most other synovial joints of the body by two features: 1. the two jointed components carry teeth whose position and occlusion introduce a very strong influence on the movements of the temporo-mandibular joint and 2. its articular surfaces are not covered by hyaline cartilage, but by a dense, fibrous tissue. This paper describes the parts of the temporo-mandibular joint: the articular surfaces (the condylar process of the mandible and the glenoid part of the temporal bone), the fibrocartilaginous disc which is interposed between the mandibular and the temporal surface, the fibrous capsule of the temporo-mandibular joint and the ligaments of this joint. All these parts present a very strong adaptation at the important functions of the temporo-mandibular joint.

  11. Splint therapy for disc displacement with reduction of the temporomandibular joint. Part I: Modified mandibular splint therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Yueh Huang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this preliminary study were to present a modified mandibular splint together with a treatment regimen and to evaluate their effects on the treatment of reciprocal joint sounds of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ. The study participants were recruited from 312 consecutive patients in the temporomandibular disorder clinic of a medical center in Taiwan from January 2003 to December 2003. From among these, 59 cases with typical reciprocal clicking were selected for this study. All participants were treated with a modified mandibular splint and then followed up for 6 months. Successful treatment was defined as leading to the disappearance of the joint sounds of TMJ, as described by patients. Based on clinical evaluation, the overall success rate was 71.2% (42/59 with minimal temporary complications. Patients with clicking at less than 3.5 cm of interincisal opening had a success rate of 92.5%, which was higher than the success rate of patients with clicking at a mouth opening of 3.5 cm or more. This study showed that a modified mandibular splint can be used to treat reciprocal clicking of the TMJ effectively and encouraged us to conduct further study on the efficacy of this splint to treat disc displacement with reduction of TMJ using magnetic resonance imaging examination.

  12. Single-needle temporomandibular joint arthrocentesis with hyaluronic acid injections. Preliminary data after a five-injection protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredini, D; Guarda-Nardini, L; Ferronato, G

    2009-10-01

    The classical technique for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthrocentesis provides a double access to the joint space, which may lead to patient's postoperatory discomfort. For this reason, a less invasive, single-needle approach has been recently described, and the present investigation reports findings on a case series of patients with TMJ osteoarthritis treated with hyaluronic acid injections following a single needle arthrocentesis. METHODS. Fourteen consecutive patients with a diagnosis of TMJ osteoarthritis according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporo-mandibular Disorders were treated with a cycle of five weekly injections of hyaluronic acid after arthrocentesis. A number of subjective (pain at rest and mastication, masticatory efficiency, functional limitation, subjective efficacy of treatment, tolerability of treatment) and objective (maximum assisted and unassited mouth opening, protrusive and laterotrusive movements) outcome variables were assessed before and after the treatment period. At the end of the five-injection protocol, significant improvements were showed in almost all the subjective outcome variables. Tolerability of the treatment was good on a four-point ordinal scale since the time of the first injection. The present investigation suggested that the single needle technique for TMJ hyaluronic injection following arthrocentesis in osteoarthritic joints may have promising applications in the clinical setting, which have to be confirmed with future studies.

  13. Management of Chronic Recurrent Dislocation of Temporomandibular Joint Using 'U' Shaped Graft: A New Restrictive Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadre, Kiran; Singh, Divya; Gadre, Pushkar; Halli, Rajshekhar

    2017-06-01

    Numerous procedures have been described for the treatment of chronic recurrent dislocation of the temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ), either in the form of enhancement or restriction of the condylar movement, with their obvious merits and demerits. We present a new technique of using U shaped iliac bone graft to restrict the condylar movement and its advantages over the conventional techniques.We have used this technique successfully in 8 cases where Dautrey's procedure had failed with follow up period of 2 years. No patient complained of recurrent dislocation postoperatively. This a very simple and effective technique where other procedures have failed.

  14. Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease presenting as a pseudotumor of the temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, A.; Teruel, J.; Pont, J.; Velayos, A.; Trull, J.; Lopez, E.

    1997-01-01

    We report a case of a 66-year-old white woman with calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition disease. The patient related a 2-month history of swelling with tenderness over the left pre-auricular region. A CT scan suggested a synovial chondromatosis. Surgical removal was done and histologic study showed CPPD crystals. This disease rarely involves the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and is not usually considered in the differential diagnosis. To our knowledge, only 14 cases have been reported in the literature. (orig.)

  15. Modified mandibular splint therapy for disc displacement with reduction of the temporomandibular joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Hui Wu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Occlusal splints are a standard method to treat disc displacement with reduction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ. They can be classified into three major groups on the basis of function: stabilization splints, distraction splints (pivot, and anterior repositioning splints. The aim of this paper is to introduce a modified mandibular splint, the Kaohsuing Medical University splint, and its associated treatment regimen for management of disc displacement with reduction of the TMJ. The key points for fabrication of the KMU splint include the occlusal surface of the mandibular splint must be indented and average bite elevation 1.5 mm vertically. The patient should wear it 24 hours a day for the first 4 weeks, then wear it while eating and sleeping for the next 2 weeks, and wear it only while sleeping for the last 2 weeks. Patients must understand that the success of treatment depends on their compliance with the regimen.

  16. Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis as a Complication of Neonatal Septic Arthritis; Report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor J. Al-Saadi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint (TMJ ankylosis as a complication of neonatal septic arthritis is rarely reported in the literature. We report two clinical cases of unilateral TMJ ankylosis occurring in paediatric patients subsequent to neonatal septic arthritis. The first case was a 15-month-old male infant who presented to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Muscat, Oman, in May 2010. According to the published English scientific literature, he is the youngest person yet to be diagnosed with this condition. The second case was a five-year-old female who presented to the Al-Nahda Hospital, Muscat, Oman, in October 2011. Both cases presented with facial asymmetry and trismus. They subsequently underwent gap arthroplasty and interpositional temporalis muscle and fascia grafts which resulted in an immediate improvement in mouth opening. Postoperatively, the patients underwent active jaw physiotherapy which was initially successful. Both patients were followed up for a minimum of two years following their surgeries.

  17. Internal derangements of the temporomandibular joint: findings in the pediatric age group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katzberg, R.W.; Tallents, R.H.; Hayakawa, K.; Miller, T.L.; Goske, M.J.; Wood, B.P.

    1985-01-01

    Findings in 31 pediatric patients with pain and dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are reported. The average age was 14 years and the average duration of symptoms was 21.4 months. Internal derangements were found in 29 patients (94%) and degenerative arthritis in 13 (42%). In 12 patients (39%), the problem could be traced to an injury to the jaw. Secondary condylar hypoplasia was associated with the meniscal abnormality in 3 patients (10%). Further awareness of internal derangements of the TMJ in the pediatric population should permit greater recognition of their etiology. It is important that threatment be initiated as soon as possible, not only to minimize the development of osseous disease in young adults but also to prevent facial growth deformities

  18. Can skull form predict the shape of the temporomandibular joint? A study using geometric morphometrics on the skulls of wolves and domestic dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curth, Stefan; Fischer, Martin S; Kupczik, Kornelius

    2017-11-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) conducts and restrains masticatory movements between the mammalian cranium and the mandible. Through this functional integration, TMJ morphology in wild mammals is strongly correlated with diet, resulting in a wide range of TMJ variations. However, in artificially selected and closely related domestic dogs, dietary specialisations between breeds can be ruled out as a diversifying factor although they display an enormous variation in TMJ morphology. This raises the question of the origin of this variation. Here we hypothesise that, even in the face of reduced functional demands, TMJ shape in dogs can be predicted by skull form; i.e. that the TMJ is still highly integrated in the dog skull. If true, TMJ variation in the dog would be a plain by-product of the enormous cranial variation in dogs and its genetic causes. We addressed this hypothesis using geometric morphometry on a data set of 214 dog and 60 wolf skulls. We digitized 53 three-dimensional landmarks of the skull and the TMJ on CT-based segmentations and compared (1) the variation between domestic dog and wolf TMJs (via principal component analysis) and (2) the pattern of covariation of skull size, flexion and rostrum length with TMJ shape (via regression of centroid size on shape and partial least squares analyses). We show that the TMJ in domestic dogs is significantly more diverse than in wolves: its shape covaries significantly with skull size, flexion and rostrum proportions in patterns which resemble those observed in primates. Similar patterns in canids, which are carnivorous, and primates, which are mostly frugivorous imply the existence of basic TMJ integration patterns which are independent of dietary adaptations. However, only limited amounts of TMJ variation in dogs can be explained by simple covariation with overall skull geometry. This implies that the final TMJ shape is gained partially independently of the rest of the skull. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Gmb

  19. Temporomandibular joint disorder complaints in tinnitus: further hints for a putative tinnitus subtype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Vielsmeier

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Tinnitus is considered to be highly heterogeneous with respect to its etiology, its comorbidities and the response to specific interventions. Subtyping is recommended, but it remains to be determined which criteria are useful, since it has not yet been clearly demonstrated whether and to which extent etiologic factors, comorbid states and interventional response are related to each other and are thus applicable for subtyping tinnitus. Analyzing the Tinnitus Research Initiative Database we differentiated patients according to presence or absence of comorbid temporomandibular joint (TMJ disorder complaints and compared the two groups with respect to etiologic factors. METHODS: 1204 Tinnitus patients from the Tinnitus Research Initiative (TRI Database with and without subjective TMJ complaints were compared with respect to demographic, tinnitus and audiological characteristics, questionnaires, and numeric ratings. Data were analysed according to a predefined statistical analysis plan. RESULTS: Tinnitus patients with TMJ complaints (22% of the whole group were significantly younger, had a lower age at tinnitus onset, and were more frequently female. They could modulate or mask their tinnitus more frequently by somatic maneuvers and by music or sound stimulation. Groups did not significantly differ for tinnitus duration, type of onset (gradual/abrupt, onset related events (whiplash etc., character (pulsatile or not, hyperacusis, hearing impairment, tinnitus distress, depression, quality of life and subjective ratings (loudness etc.. CONCLUSION: Replicating previous work in tinnitus patients with TMJ complaints, classical risk factors for tinnitus like older age and male gender are less relevant in tinnitus patients with TMJ complaints. By demonstrating group differences for modulation of tinnitus by movements and sounds our data further support the notion that tinnitus with TMJ complaints represents a subgroup of tinnitus with clinical

  20. Diagnostic studies on the internal derangement of temporomandibular joint in MR imaging (MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tange, Kazuhisa

    1991-01-01

    The T1 and T2 relaxation times of the phantom were measured in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using the headcoil and the surface coil for the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The purpose of this study on the phantom was to investigate the feature of the surface coil for TMJ (TMJ-coil). Two spin echo (TR=2,000 msec, TE=30 msec and TR=2,000 msec, TE=80 msec) and one inversion recovery (TR=2,000 msec, TI=500 msec) pulse sequence with a 256 x 256 matrix and two excitations were used, and the T1 and T2 values were obtained by the ROI (region of interest) in the maps of T1 and T2. As a result of the phantom study, I acquired the knowledge that I have to set an object on the center of the TMJ-coil with a distance more than 3 cm. With the TMJ-coil, measurements of T1 and T2 relaxation times of meniscus and lateral pterygoid muscle were performed on 30 normal volunteers and 30 patients who had been diagnosed internal derangement of the TMJ. The 30 patients were classified into two groups; one composed of 15 patients diagnosed as meniscal displacement with reduction (group MDWR) and the other was of 15 patients diagnosed as meniscal displacement without reduction (group MDWOR). Between the volunteers and patients, there was a significant decrease in T1 and T2 relaxation times of meniscus and T1 relaxation times of lateral pterygoid muscle. There was no significant difference between group MDWR and group MDWOR. There was no significant difference in sex or age, either. The more long-term the patients were, the more the T1 relaxation times decreased. The decrease in T1 and T2 relaxation times of meniscus probably represented water loss. The decrease in T1 and T2 relaxation times of lateral pterygoid muscle was slight compared with that of meniscus. (author)

  1. A radiographic study on the condylar position in temporomandibular joint dysfunction patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, Seo Howan; Kim, Jae Duck

    1987-01-01

    The author obtained the transcranial-oblique lateral radiograms from 78 patients (26 male, 52 female) with temporom andibular dysfunction problem. And then, the author analyzed the dimensional changes of the TMJ space on centric occlusion, horizontal condylar movement and antero-posterior positional relationship of condyle to the articular eminence on 2.54 cm mouth opening with clicking, TMJ pain and mouth opening limitation respectively, which were the symptoms of the temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction problem, and compared these data with control group. The results were as follow: 1. In centric occlusion, anterior and posterior TMJ space of experimental group was slightly lesser than those of the control group, also superior TMJ space of experimental group was significantly lesser than that of the control group. (p 2. In 2.54 cm mouth opening, the condylar horizontal movement and the antero-posterior positional relationship to the articular eminence were significantly lesser than those of the control group. (p 3. Examined experimental group, the degree of condylar horizontal movement of affected side was lesser than that of the normal side in 2.54 cm mouth opening.

  2. Eminectomy for Habitual Luxation of the Temporomandibular Joint with Sedation and Local Anesthesia: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Iwanaga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Eminectomy which is one of the popular and most effective treatments for habitual temporomandibular joint luxation was first described by Myrhaug in 1951. There are few reports which described eminectomy being performed under local anesthesia and conscious sedation. We present a case series of habitual luxation of the TMJ treated by eminectomy performed under local anesthesia and conscious sedation and general anesthesia. Five patients were examined and found to have recurrent luxation of the TMJ. The age of patients ranged from 18 to 93 years. Bilateral eminectomy of the TMJ was performed for two patients, and unilateral eminectomy was performed for three patients. Two were examined under intravenous propofol sedation and local anesthesia, while three patients were examined under general anesthesia. One patient died from ileus one month after surgery. The follow-up period except for the case that died from ileus ranged from 12 to 33 months. No recurrent dislocation of the TMJ has been identified. Based on our experience and two other series in the literature, eminectomy with sedation and local anesthesia can be considered and might be a good option in elderly patients.

  3. Pigmented villonodular synovitis of the temporomandibular joint: MR findings in four cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyoung Won; Han, Moon Hee E-mail: hanmh@radcom.snu.ac.kr; Park, Sun-Won; Kim, Se Hyung; Lee, Hyun Ju; Jae, Hwan Jun; Kang, Joon Won; Chang, Kee Hyun

    2004-03-01

    Objective: Although it is a rare condition, pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) may involve temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The purpose of this study was to describe magnetic resonance (MR) findings of PVNS of the TMJ. Methods and material: Between April 1992 and August 2000, four patients (two men and two women, 22-58-year-old) who had histologically proven diagnoses of PVNS in their TMJ were found in our institution. Their MR findings were reviewed retrospectively, and were correlated with pathologic findings. Results: In all four patients, MR images invariably showed profound hypointensity on both T1- and T2-weighted sequences. This finding was seen diffusely and homogeneously throughout the lesion, and was considered to be due to paramagnetic effect attributed to heavy hemosiderin pigmentation, which was revealed by histopathological examination. MR images also showed aggressive nature of the lesions with adjacent skull base destruction and intracranial extension in two of them. Conclusion: As is the case in the other anatomic site, PVNS of the TMJ can be confidently diagnosed on MR imaging on the basis of the presence of hemosiderin. MR imaging also plays a pivotal role in surgical planning by precise and detailed localization of the lesion.

  4. Chewing movements altered in the presence of temporomandibular joint internal derangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radke, John C; Kull, Robert S; Sethi, Manminder S

    2014-07-01

    The objectives were to find specific factors that are mathematically distinct between the chewing timings, movement pattern shapes, variability, and movement velocities of: (1) normal asymptomatic subjects and (2) a group of subjects with verified temporomandibular joint (TMJ) internal derangements. Left- and right-sided chewing movement recordings of 28 subjects (34.5 ± 14.0 years) were randomly selected from a large database of patients exhibiting verified unilateral or bilateral TMJ internal derangements. The chewing movements of an age- and gender-matched control group of 20 asymptomatic subjects (32.5 ± 11.6 years, P>0.60) with verified normal TMJ function were also recorded. Means and standard deviations of the opening, closing, turning point, terminal chewing position, and velocity patterns were calculated. A two-tailed Student's t-test with unequal variances was used to compare the parameters between the two groups (alpha = 0.05). The dysfunctional group functioned significantly slower and with greater variability than the control group. The vertical dimension was consistently smaller in the dysfunctional group (Pchewing position was significantly less precise in the dysfunctional group (vertical: Pchewing patterns than the control group. The functional pattern of mastication appears to be significantly altered in the presence of an internal derangement of the TMJ.

  5. Assessment of temporomandibular joint dysfunction in condylar fracture of the mandible using the Helkimo index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Suhas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Condylar fractures of the mandible are functionally important fractures as the condyle of the mandible being a part of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ and can lead to TMJ dysfunction if not properly treated. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of a total of 33 treated patients with fracture of the mandibular condyle who underwent examination as per the Helkimo index. Their dysfunction was quantified and clinicoepidemiological characteristics were assessed. It was found that majority of our patients were young males involved in a two-wheeler accident. All patients underwent intermaxillary fixation as the minimum treatment and 30% underwent open reduction and internal fixation in addition. Results: There was no statistically significant association between the degree of clinical dysfunction and factors such as age, mechanism of injury, type of condyle fracture, presence of other mandible fractures, and surgical procedure. However, dislocation of the mandibular condyle was found to be a negative prognostic factor and all these patients had some degree of dysfunction. Conclusion: The overall prevalence of TMJ dysfunction according to the Helkimo index was 90%. About 61% of patients had mild dysfunction (Di1 and 30% had moderate dysfunction (Di2. None of the patients had severe dysfunction. To conclude, the Helkimo index is a simple, effective, inexpensive, reliable screening index to assess TMJ dysfunction in condylar fractures of mandible.

  6. Temporomandibular joint involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: clinical predictors of magnetic resonance imaging signs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argyropoulou, Maria I.; Margariti, Persefoni N.; Astrakas, Loukas; Kosta, Paraskevi [Medical School University of Ioannina, Department of Radiology, Ioannina (Greece); Karali, Aikaterini; Alfandaki, Sapfo; Siamopoulou, Antigoni [University of Ioannina, Department of Child Health, Medical School, Ioannina (Greece)

    2009-03-15

    The aim of the study was to define clinical predictors of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Forty-six patients, aged 2.08-36.7 years, with JIA (oligoartitular 18, polyarticular 17, systemic type 11) were examined with standard plain and contrast-enhanced sequences. Of 88 TMJs examined, an abnormal condyle was observed in 32%, flattened articular eminence in 27%, flattened articular disk in 17%, intra-articular fluid in 10%, enhancing pannus in 45% and restricted condylar motion in 9%. Logistic regression analysis revealed that for abnormal condyle and flattened articular eminence, independent predictors were type of JIA (P < 0.015), age at onset (P < 0.038), and duration of disease activity (P < 0.001). Plots of the logistic regression models showed that TMJ involvement approached certainty for systemic sooner than for the other JIA types. Pannus was present with probability >0.5 when the disease started before 4 years of age. In conclusion, the systemic type of JIA, young age at onset and long duration of activity are risk factors for TMJ damage. MRI of the TMJ should be performed in patients who are less than 4 years of age at the onset of JIA, and in those with the systemic type, whatever the age of onset. (orig.)

  7. Radiographic evaluation of cervical spine of subjects with temporomandibular joint internal disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munhoz, Wagner Cesar; Marques, Amélia Pasqual; Siqueira, José Tadeu Tesseroli de

    2004-01-01

    Although the etiopathophysiology of internal temporomandibular joint internal disorders (TMJ ID) is still unknown, it has been suggested that head and body posture could be related to its initial onset, development and perpetuation. The purpose of the present study was to observe the relationship between cervical spine X-ray abnormalities and TMJ ID. This investigation evaluated 30 subjects with internal TMJ disorder symptoms (test group) and 20 healthy subjects (control group). Subjects were submitted to clinical and radiographic evaluation. Clinical evaluation comprised anamnesis and stomatognathic system physical examination. Radiographic evaluation comprised analysis of lateral cervical spine X-rays by three physical therapists and tracing on the same images. The test group presented twice as much cervical spine hyperlordosis as the control group (20.7% versus 10.5%), but almost half of rectification prevalence (41.4 versus 79.0%, p = 0.03). After that, the test group was divided into three subgroups according to TMJ dysfunction severity, evaluated by Helkimo's index. These subgroups were not significantly different, but the subgroup with more severe TMD showed a tendency to cervical spine hyperlordosis prevalence. Results showed a tendency for subjects with more severe TMD to exhibit cervical spine hyperlordosis. Nevertheless, studies with a larger number of subjects suffering from severe TMD are encouraged in order to corroborate the present findings.

  8. [Condylar hyperplasia: qualitative and quantitative study of temporomandibular joints remodeling before and after condylectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojare, Camille; Wojcik, Thomas; Coussens, Camille; Ferri, Joël; Pertuzon, Bruno; Raoul, Gwénaël

    2014-06-01

    This retrospective study aimed to evaluate bone remodeling of temporo-mandibular joints (TMJ) using computed tomography (CT) before and after condylectomy for condylar hyperplasia. TMJ bone remodeling was studied by comparing the pre and postoperative CT scan of ten patients. Qualitative evaluation was performed by two-dimensional analysis. Three-dimensional analysis superimpositions were done after digital condylar units isolation. Condylar volume modifications were measured and compared on both sides. Lastly, before and after surgery, we studied the radio-clinic correlations. After surgery, all the operated condyles developed a new cortical bone. We noticed also a thickening of the glenoid fossa. Surgical condylectomy leaded to a 43.5% volume reduction on the operated side and 2.14% on the controlateral side. On the controlateral side, most of abnormalities seen preoperatively disappeared after surgery. For two patients, the condylar resection took away over 80% of the initial volume. For these patients, we observed major radiologic modifications on the controlateral TMJ associated with symptoms of dysfunction. These problems did not worsen their quality of life. Both TMJ presented with bone remodelling after condylectomy. In condylar hyperplasia, condylectomy provides orthopaedic results on dysmorphia and removal of the pathological prechondroblastic zone. In the future, an earlier detection of this pathology may help the surgeon to treat in childhood. This would limit surgical excision and would avoid important dysmorphia. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2014.

  9. [Effect of different oxygen tension on the cytoskeleton remodeling of goat temporomandibular joint disc cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaolan, He; Guangjie, Bao; Linglu, Sun; Xue, Zhang; Shanying, Bao; Hong, Kang

    2017-08-01

    Objective The effect of different oxygen tensions on the cytoskeleton remodeling of goat temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc cells were investigated. Methods Goat TMJ disc cells were cultured under normoxia (21% O₂) and hypoxia (2%, 4%, and 8% O₂). Toluidine blue, picrosirius red, and type Ⅰ collagen immunocytochemical staining were performed to observe the changes in cell phenotype under different oxygen levels. Immunofluorescent staining and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis were then performed to identify actin, tubulin, and vimentin in the cultured disc cells. Results TMJ disc cells still displayed fibroblast characteristics under different oxygen levels and their cytoskeletons had regular arrangement. The fluorescence intensities of actin and vimentin were lowest at 4% O₂(P0.05). Actin mRNA levels were considerably decreased at 2% O₂ and 4% O₂ in hypoxic conditions, while actin mRNA expression was highest in 21% O₂. Tubulin mRNA levels considerably increased at 2% O₂, while tubulin mRNA expression was lowest in 8% O₂ (Plevels among these oxygen levels (Poxygen tensions, and 2% O₂ may be the optimal oxygen level required to proliferate TMJ disc cells.

  10. MRI of the temporomandibular joint. Technique, results, indications; Magnetresonanztomographie des Temporomandibulargelenkes: Untersuchungstechnik, Ergebnisse, Indikationsstellung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, T.J.; Abolmaali, N. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2001-11-01

    An optimized examination protocol for the MRI evaluation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is presented. The MRI protocol is based on an optimized coil technology, sequence design, and a programmed examination protocol for diagnostics of the TMJ. Depending on the clinical findings, MRI provides an all-in-one diagnostic protocol for the diagnosis of degenerative, inflammatory and tumorous lesions of the TMJ. MRI using an optimized examination protocol should become the primary examination protocol for diseases of the TMJ. (orig.) [German] Vorstellung der optimierten Untersuchungstechnik zur magnetresonanztomographischen (MRT) Evaluation des Temporomandibulargelenkes (TMG) und Darstellung der Ergebnisse und Indikationsstellung. Es werden die Spulentechnik, das Sequenzdesign, die Schichtorientierung und der programmierte Untersuchungsablauf in Abhaengigkeit von der klinischen Fragestellung praesentiert. In Abhaengigkeit von der klinischen Symptomatik stellt die MRT das primaere bildgebende Verfahren zur Diagnostik und Therapiekontrolle degenerativer, entzuendlicher und tumoroeser Prozesse des TMG dar. In Einzelfaellen muessen ergaenzend weitere radiologische Techniken wie die Orthopantomographie, die direkte Arthrographie und die Computertomographie zum Einsatz kommen. Die optimierte MRT des TMG erfordert eine dedizierte Untersuchungstechnik sowie spezielle Kenntnisse in der Beurteilung der akquirierten Bilder. (orig.)

  11. A new three-dimensional, print-on-demand temporomandibular prosthetic total joint replacement system: Preliminary outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitroulis, George; Austin, Stephen; Sin Lee, Peter Vee; Ackland, David

    2018-05-16

    The aim of this study is to present the preliminary clinical data on the OMX Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) Prosthetic total joint replacement system. A prospective, cohort, clinical study was undertaken of consecutive adult patients with Category 5 end-stage joint disease who were implanted with the OMX TMJ prosthesis between May 2015 and April 2017. A total of 50 devices were implanted in 38 patients, with 12 patients receiving bilateral prosthetic joints. There were 31 females and 7 males in this cohort, who ranged in age from 20 to 66 years, with a mean of 43.8 years (±14.0 years). Ten of the 50 prosthetic joints (20%) were fully customized, while the remaining were patient matched using virtual planning software. Based on a mean follow-up period of 15.3 months (range 12-24 months) following the TMJ total joint replacement, preliminary results suggest the OMX TMJ prosthesis has made a positive impact on clinical outcomes, with a mean 74.4% reduction in joint pain levels and significant improvements (p < 0.05) in jaw function as measured by the visual analogue scales for mouth opening (30.8%), diet (77.1%), and function (59.2%). No device failures were reported during the study period. This study suggests that the print-on-demand OMX TMJ prosthesis, designed for rapid delivery of both patient-matched and fully customize devices, represents a safe, reliable and versatile implantable joint replacement system for the treatment of category 5 end-stage TMJ disease. Copyright © 2018 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Radiodiagnostics of the temporomandibular joint of disorders; Radiodiagnostika ochoreni TMK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ondrasovicova, J; Jenca, A [Klinika stomatologie a maxilofacialnej chirurgie, Lekarska fakulta, Univerzita Pavla Jozefa Safarika a Fakultna nemocnica L. Pasteura, Kosice (Slovakia)

    2008-06-15

    Temporomandibularis disorders have a multifactorial etiology with very variable clinical symptoms. On the X-ray image can see the configuration of the joint structures correctly or TMJ disorders ( luxation, subluxation, arthrosis). (authors)

  13. Temporomandibular joint ankylosis as part of the clinical spectrum of Carey-Fineman-Ziter syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasetti, Martina; Mazzoleni, Fabio; Novelli, Giorgio; Iascone, Maria; Bozzetti, Alberto; Selicorni, Angelo

    2016-08-01

    The Carey-Finema-Ziter syndrome (CFZS, MIM 254940) is an apparently autosomal recessively inherited disorder consisting of the combination of non-progressive congenital myopathy with Moebius and Pierre Robin sequence, facial anomalies and growth delay. Mental development has been described as normal or delayed. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is the immobility of the joint caused by ankylotic fusion of the mandible to the cranial base or zygoma. It is a serious and disabling condition that may cause problems in mastication, digestion, speech, appearance, and oral hygiene. Most often is a true ankylosis of the TMJ but other pathological mechanisms are described (i.e., the fusion of the coronoid process to temporal bone or with the zygoma, or a variety of soft tissues disorders like Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva). Here we report a 2-year-old girl fitting with a clinical diagnosis of CFZS associated with a limited mouth opening in which temporomandibular joint ankylosis was suspected. Because it has been postulated that many clinical features in CFZS may only be secondary effects of brainstem anomalies and muscle weakness during development, the limited opening of the mouth observed in our patient could represent a rare clinical feature of CFZS itself. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. {sup 99m}Tc-labeled-1-thio-{beta}-D-glucose as a new tool to temporomandibular joint inflammatory disorders diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges Brasileiro, Claudia, E-mail: cbbrasileiro@gmail.co [Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear-PCA, Escola de Engenharia, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG)-Avenida Presidente Antonio Carlos, 6627, CEP: 31270-100 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Fonseca Pacheco, Cinthia Mara da, E-mail: cinthia@newtonpaiva.b [Faculdade de Ciencias Biologicas e da Saude, Centro Universitario Newton Paiva-Avenida Silva Lobo, 1730, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Martins Queiroz-Junior, Celso, E-mail: cmqj@yahoo.com.b [Departamento de Clinica, Patologia e Cirurgia Odontologica, Faculdade de Odontologia, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG)-Avenida Presidente Antonio Carlos, 6627, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Flavia de Lima, Carla, E-mail: carla.flavia@terra.com.b [Nucleo de Diagnostico Cardiovascular (ECOGRAF)-Rua dos Otoni, 881, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Batista da Silva, Juliana, E-mail: silvajb@cdtn.b [Unidade de Pesquisa e Producao de Radiofarmacos, Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN)-Avenida Presidente Antonio Carlos, 6627, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Passos Ribeiro de Campos, Tarcisio, E-mail: campos@nuclear.ufmb.b [Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear-PCA, Escola de Engenharia, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG)-Avenida Presidente Antonio Carlos, 6627, CEP: 31270-100 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2010-12-15

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate early detection of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammatory changes based on 1-thio-{beta}-D-glucose radiolabeled with technetium-99m. Method: The method applied a TMJ inflammation model in rats followed by radiopharmaceutical synthesis, intravenous administration of {sup 99m}Tc-1-TG and kinetic scintigraphy imaging. Results: Results show a significant difference of {sup 99m}Tc-1-TG uptake between inflamed TMJ and the control joint. The biodistribution of {sup 99m}Tc-1-TG by images showed the kidneys' excretion. Conclusion: As conclusion, {sup 99m}Tc-1-TG is a helpful tool in TMJ inflammatory process detection.

  15. [Custom-made implant for complex facial reconstruction: A case of total replacement of temporo-mandibular joint, zygomatic arch and malar bone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillier, D; Moris, V; See, L-A; Girodon, M; Wajszczak, B-L; Zwetyenga, N

    2017-02-01

    Total prosthetic replacement of the temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) has become a common procedure, but it is usually limited to the TMJ itself. We report about one case of complex prosthetic joint reconstruction extending to the neighbouring bony structures. A 57-year-old patient, operated several times for a cranio-facial fibrous dysplasia, presented with a recurring TMJ ankylosis and a complexe latero-facial bone loss on the right side. We performed a reconstruction procedure including the TMJ, the zygomatic arch and the malar bone by mean of custom made composite prosthesis (chrome-cobalt-molybdenum-titanium and polyethylene). Five years postoperatively, mouth opening, nutrition, pain and oral hygiene were significantly improved. Nowadays technical possibilities allow for complex facial alloplastic reconstructions with good medium term results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Histological fate of abdominal dermis-fat grafts implanted in the temporomandibular joint of the rabbit following condylectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitroulis, G; Slavin, J; Morrison, W

    2011-02-01

    The histological fate of abdominal dermis-fat grafts implanted into the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) following condylectomy was studied. 21 rabbits underwent left TMJ discectomies and condylectomies; 6 were controls (Group A; no graft used); 15 (Group B) had autogenous abdominal grafts transplanted into the left TMJ. Animals were killed after 4, 12 and 20 weeks. Specimens of the TMJ were histologically and histomorphometrically evaluated. At 4 weeks, fat necrosis was clear in all specimens. The dermis component survived and formed cysts with no necrosis. By 12 weeks, viable fat deposits appeared with no evidence of necrotic fat. At 20 weeks, large amounts of viable fat were present in Group B specimens. Group A had no fat, although the missing condyles regenerated. In the presence of viable fat, Group B showed little condyle regeneration 20 weeks after condylectomy. Non-vascularised fat grafts do not survive transplantation, but stimulate neoadipogenesis. The fate of the dermis component of the graft is independent of the fat component. Fat in the joint space disrupts the regeneration of a new condylar head. Neoadipogensis inhibits growth of new bone and cartilage. This has clinical implications for TMJ ankylosis management and preventing heterotopic bone formation around prosthetic joints. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Signaling in Trigeminal Ganglion Contributes to Mechanical Hypersensitivity in Masseter Muscle During Temporomandibular Joint Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Reio; Shinoda, Masamichi; Honda, Kuniya; Urata, Kentaro; Lee, Jun; Maruno, Mitsuru; Soma, Kumi; Okada, Shinji; Gionhaku, Nobuhito; Iwata, Koichi

    To determine the involvement of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) signaling in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) in the mechanical hypersensitivity of the masseter muscle during temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammation. A total of 55 male Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Following injection of Complete Freund's Adjuvant into the TMJ, the mechanical sensitivities of the masseter muscle and the overlying facial skin were measured. Satellite glial cell (SGC) activation and TNFα expression in the TG were investigated immunohistochemically, and the effects of their inhibition on the mechanical hypersensitivity of the masseter muscle were also examined. Student t test or two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance followed by Bonferroni multiple comparisons test were used for statistical analyses. P < .05 was considered to reflect statistical significance. Mechanical allodynia in the masseter muscle was induced without any inflammatory cell infiltration in the muscle after TMJ inflammation. SGC activation and an increased number of TNFα-immunoreactive cells were induced in the TG following TMJ inflammation. Intra-TG administration of an inhibitor of SGC activity or of TNFα-neutralizing antibody depressed both the increased number of TG cells encircled by activated SGCs and the mechanical hypersensitivity of the masseter following TMJ inflammation. These findings suggest that persistent masseter hypersensitivity associated with TMJ inflammation was mediated by SGC-TG neuron interactions via TNFα signaling in the TG.

  18. Interpositional Gap Arthroplasty by Versatile Pedicled Temporalis Myofascial Flap in the Management of Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis- A Case Series Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aneja, Vikas; Raval, Rushik; Bansal, Anupam; Kumawat, Vinod; Kaur, Jasleen; Shaikh, Ahemer Arif

    2016-10-01

    Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) ankylosis is a situation in which the mandibular condyle is fused to the glenoid fossa by bone or fibrous tissue. The management of TMJ ankylosis has a complicated chore and it is challenging for the maxillofacial surgeon because of technical hitches and high rate of re-ankylosis. Interpositional gap arthroplasty is one of the modalities for its management. A range of inter-positional materials have been used to avert recurrence after gap arthroplasty in TMJ ankylosis. The aim of this series was to evaluate the effectiveness of the temporomyofacial flap in the treatment of TMJ ankylosis as an interpositional gap arthroplasty. A total of 10 cases with unilateral TMJ ankylosis were treated by interpositional gap arthroplasty by pedicled temporalis myofacial flap and evaluated with a follow-up of 6 months to 5 years (Mean 3.3 years) for the functional stability of TMJ. All the patients were successfully treated. There were no signs of recurrence in any patients up to last follow up visit. The result showed that temporalis myofascial flap is a preferable choice for inter-positional gap arthroplasty which proves its versatility as an inter-positional material.

  19. Histologic effects of mandibular protrusion splints in antigen-induced TMJ arthritis in rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    von Bremen, Julia; K?hler, Kernt; Siudak, Krystyna; Zahner, Daniel; Ruf, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    Background Although it is common clinical practice to treat children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) with functional appliances, the scientific evidence for this is limited. The aim of this study was to study the histologic effects of mandibular protrusion splints in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthritis in rabbits. Methods Twenty-eight ten-week old New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into four groups: AO (TMJ arthritis, no splint), AS (TMJ arthritis, mandibular splint ...

  20. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction and orthognathic surgery: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoul Gwénael

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Relations between maxillo-mandibular deformities and TMJ disorders have been the object of different studies in medical literature and there are various opinions concerning the alteration of TMJ dysfunction after orthognathic surgery. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate TMJ disorders changes before and after orthognathic surgery, and to assess the risk of creating new TMJ symptoms on asymptomatic patients. Methods A questionnaire was sent to 176 patients operated at the Maxillo-Facial Service of the Lille's 2 Universitary Hospital Center (Chairman Pr Joël Ferri from 01.01.2006 to 01.01.2008. 57 patients (35 females and 22 males, age range from 16 to 65 years old, filled the questionnaire. The prevalence and the results on pain, sounds, clicking, joint locking, limited mouth opening, and tenseness were evaluated comparing different subgroups of patients. Results TMJ symptoms were significantly reduced after treatment for patients with pre-operative symptoms. The overall subjective treatment outcome was: improvement for 80.0% of patients, no change for 16.4% of patients, and an increase of symptoms for 3.6% of them. Thus, most patients were very satisfied with the results. However the appearance of new onset of TMJ symptoms is common. There was no statistical difference in the prevalence of preoperative TMJ symptoms and on postoperative results in class II compared to class III patients. Conclusions These observations demonstrate that: there is a high prevalence of TMJ disorders in dysgnathic patients; most of patients with preoperative TMJ signs and symptoms can improve TMJ dysfunction and pain levels can be reduced by orthognathic treatment; a percentage of dysgnathic patients who were preoperatively asymptomatic can develop TMJ disorders after surgery but this risk is low.

  1. The effect of acute unilateral inflammation of the equine temporomandibular joint on the kinematics of mastication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, T T; Carmalt, J L; Treen, T T; Lanovaz, J L

    2016-07-01

    Diseases of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are well reported in man and some domestic animals other than the horse. The pathophysiology of equine TMJ disease and the effects of disease on the kinematics of mastication are unknown. To determine whether transient unilateral inflammation of the equine TMJ results in alterations in the masticatory cycle. An experimental controlled study utilising 6 horses of various ages with normal dentition. Each horse was equipped with an optical motion tracking (kinematic) system. Horses were observed chewing grass hay over 3 min intervals. Regardless of the initial side of the power stroke in the masticatory cycle, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was injected in the left TMJ in each horse and the horses were reassessed after 6 h. Four horses developed effusion of the injected TMJs; 2 of these also began quidding. All horses injected on the original side of the power stroke switched sides while the 2 injected on the contralateral side did not. All horses developed reduced vertical pitch (vertical opening) of the mandible. Overall, rostrocaudal movement of the mandible did not change; however, the timing of this movement relative to the phase of the masticatory cycle did. Injection with LPS did not affect the amount of lateral movement of the mandible. Injection of LPS into the TMJ significantly altered the masticatory cycle compared with baseline values representing avoidance behaviour due to inflammation of the joint, despite which the horses continued to eat using the contralateral mandible. Lipopolysaccharide administration also led to quidding and a loss of feed efficiency (in some individuals). © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  2. Treatment Effects of Maxillary Flat Occlusal Splints for Painful Clicking of the Temporomandibular Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Wen Chang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Existing therapies for symptoms related to painful clicking of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ have rarely met with complete success and predicting prognosis remains difficult. Few studies have reported the efficacy of maxillary flat occlusal splints (MFOSs for the treatment of painful clicking of the TMJ, and few studies have evaluated the predisposing factors that influence the clinical outcomes of MFOSs. The aim of this study was to investigate the treatment efficacy of MFOSs for painful clicking of the TMJ, and to determine the factors influencing TMJ therapy with MFOSs. We conducted a retrospective study of 109 patients suffering from unilateral clicking concurrent with preauricular area pain for at least 2 months between 2004 and 2008. Seventy-five patients were treated with an MFOS, while 34 patients did not receive MFOS therapy. Clicking score, pain-free maximal mouth opening, pain score, duration of the clicking sounds, age and bruxism were recorded during treatment and involved into the reviews. The degree of joint clicking was determined by a stethoscope placed in the anterolateral area of the external auditory canal and was divided into four grades. Data were analyzed using a Mann-Whitney U test, Fisher's exact test, and Student's t test. Results showed statistically significant differences in treatment outcomes between the MFOS-treated and control groups in clicking index, maximal mouth opening, pain and complete remission rates of symptoms within 1 year. Furthermore, for patients treated with MFOS, there were statistically significant differences in the clinical outcomes between those with a high clicking index and those with a low index before treatment. Factors significantly correlated with successful outcomes of MFOS included nocturnal bruxism, patient age and duration of clicking. MFOSs can be used to treat patients with painful clicking of the TMJ and related symptoms. The severity of clicking, bruxism, age and duration of

  3. [Analysis of factors related to the number of mesenchymal stem cells derived from synovial fluid of the temporomandibular joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y P; Zheng, Y H; Zhang, Z G

    2017-06-09

    Objective: To analyze related factors on the number of mesenchymal stem cells in the synovial fluid of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and provide an research basis for understanding of the source and biological role of mesenchymal stem cells derived from synovial fluid in TMJ. Methods: One hundred and twenty-two synovial fluid samples from 91 temporomandibular disorders (TMD) patients who visited in Department of TMJ Center, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Hospital of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University from March 2013 to December 2013 were collected in this study, and 6 TMJ synovial fluid samples from 6 normal volunteers who were studying in the North Campus of Sun Yat-sen University were also collected, so did their clinical information. Then the relation between the number of mesenchymal stem cells derived from synovial fluid and the health status of the joints, age of donor, disc perforation, condylar bony destruction, blood containing and visual analogue scale score of pain were investigated using Mann-Whitney U test and Spearman rank correlation test. Results: The number of mesenchymal stem cells derived from synovial fluid had no significant relation with visual analogue scale score of pain ( r= 0.041, P= 0.672), blood containing ( P= 0.063), condylar bony destruction ( P= 0.371). Linear correlation between the number of mesenchymal stem cells derived from synovial fluid and age of donor was very week ( r= 0.186, P= 0.043). The number of mesenchymal stem cells up-regulated when the joint was in a disease state ( P= 0.001). The disc perforation group had more mesenchymal stem cells in synovial fluid than without disc perforation group ( P= 0.042). Conclusions: The number of mesenchymal stem cells derived from synovial fluid in TMJ has no correlation with peripheral blood circulation and condylar bony destruction, while has close relation with soft tissue structure damage of the joint.

  4. Osteoarthritis of the temporo-mandibular joint in free-living Soay sheep on St Kilda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Colin; Watt, Kathryn; Nussey, Daniel H; Pemberton, Josephine M; Pilkington, Jill G; Herman, Jeremy S; Timmons, Zena L; Clements, Dylan N; Scott, Philip R

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative disease of synovial joints with the potential to cause pathology and welfare issues in both domestic and wild ruminants. Previous work has identified OA of the elbow joint in domestic sheep, but the prevalence of OA of the jaw and in particular the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has not been previously reported. Following up a previous report of a single case of TMJ OA in a free-living population of Soay sheep on St Kilda in the Outer Hebrides, an archive of 2736 jaw bones collected from this population between 1985 and 2010 was surveyed. Evidence of TMJ OA was found in 35 sheep. Of these, 15 cases were unilateral (11 right side, 4 left side) and the remaining 20 were bilateral. TMJ pathology was much more common in females than males: only 3/35 cases were in males, with overall prevalence at 2.3% for females and 0.2% in males. Radiographic examination of TMJ with OA revealed extensive bone re-modelling with osteophytosis, particularly of the condyle of the mandible. There was a highly significant age-dependence in TMJ OA incidence among age classes: 30/35 cases occurred in geriatric sheep (aged 7 years or more; 11.1% prevalence within this age class), four in adults (2-6 years old; 0.9% prevalence), one in yearlings (0.3% prevalence) and none in lambs. The low incidence in males was confounded by sex differences in longevity: while 18% of females sampled died in the geriatric age class, only 2% of males did so. Although the low prevalence of the pathology limited the ability to test its association with other traits, it was possible to examine relationships with reproductive performance measures amongst geriatric females with and without TMJ OA. Although there were trends towards lower fecundity and lower lamb birth weight in the breeding season prior to death, these were not statistically significant. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Decreased Temporomandibular Joint Range of Motion in a Model of Early Osteoarthritis in the Rabbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Sarah E.; Tudares, Mauro A.; Tashman, Scott; Almarza, Alejandro J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Analysis of mandibular biomechanics could help with understanding the mechanisms of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders (TMJDs), such as osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA), by investigating the effects of injury or disease on TMJ movement. The objective of the present study was to determine the functional kinematic implications of mild TMJ-OA degeneration caused by altered occlusion from unilateral splints in the rabbit. Materials and Methods Altered occlusion of the TMJ was mechanically induced in rabbits by way of a unilateral molar dental splint (n = 3). TMJ motion was assessed using 3-dimensional (3D) skeletal kinematics twice, once before and once after 6 weeks of splint placement with the splints removed, after allowing 3 days of recovery. The relative motion of the condyle to the fossa and the distance between the incisors were tracked. Results An overall decrease in the range of joint movement was observed at the incisors and in the joint space between the condyle and fossa. The incisor movement decreased from 7.0 ± 0.5 mm to 6.2 ± 0.5 mm right to left, from 5.5 ± 2.2 mm to 4.6 ± 0.8 mm anterior to posterior, and from 13.3 ± 1.8 mm to 11.6 ± 1.4 mm superior to inferior (P < .05). The total magnitude of the maximum distance between the points on the condyle and fossa decreased from 3.6 ± 0.8 mm to 3.1 ± 0.6 mm for the working condyle and 2.8 ± 0.4 mm to 2.5 ± 0.4 mm for the balancing condyle (P < .05). The largest decreases were seen in the anteroposterior direction for both condyles. Conclusion Determining the changes in condylar movement might lead to a better understanding of the early predictors in the development of TMJ-OA and determining when the symptoms become a chronic, irreversible problem. PMID:25889371

  6. The development of interpretation for temporomandibular joint roentgenograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Dong Soo; Ahn, Pyung Kyu; Park, Tae Won

    1984-01-01

    The authors analyzed the morphological change of bone structure from 3,140 radiographs (1570 joints) of 785 patients with temporomandibular joint arthrosis, which were obtained by the oblique lateral transcranial projection and orthopantomographs. The interrelation of bone change and clinical symptoms duration of the disease were examined. Also, the bone changes of articular eminence, condyle, articular fossa were examined according to positional change of the condyle in the mouth open and close state. The results were as follows. 1. In the 785 patients with TMJ arthrosis, 782 patients (99.62%) show the positional change of the condyle. Among them 691 patients (88.03%) show the bone change. 2. In TMJ arthrosis patients with bone changes 451 patients (65.27%) showed both the condylar positional changes and bone changes bilaterally. 198 patients (28.65%) show the condylar positional changes bilaterally and bone changes unilaterally. 3. The bone changes in the TMJ arthrosis were in order of frequency eburnation (647 cases, 32.8%), erosion (548 cases , 27.79%), flattening (418 cases, 21.20%), deformity (138 cases, 6.99%), sclerosis (115 cases, 5.83%), marginal proliferation (106 cases, 5.38%). The region of bone change in TMJ arthrosis with condylar positional changes were in order of frequency the articular eminence (43.97%) condylar head (38.64%), articular fossa (17.39%). 4. In the patients with bone changes, their clinical symptoms were pain (44.34%), clicking sound (33.5%), limitation of mouth opening (22.52%). In the patients complaining pain the most frequent bone change was erosion (28.60%), in the patients complaining clicking sound, eburnation (28.97%) in the patients complaining the limitation, eburnation (29.40%). Also in the patients with the duration below 1 year most common bone change was eburnation. 5. The most common condylar positional change was downward position (39.94%) in closed state, restricted movement of condyle (30.07%) in open state. The

  7. The development of interpretation for temporomandibular joint roentgenograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Dong Soo; Ahn, Pyung Kyu; Park, Tae Won [Department of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-11-15

    The authors analyzed the morphological change of bone structure from 3,140 radiographs (1570 joints) of 785 patients with temporomandibular joint arthrosis, which were obtained by the oblique lateral transcranial projection and orthopantomographs. The interrelation of bone change and clinical symptoms duration of the disease were examined. Also, the bone changes of articular eminence, condyle, articular fossa were examined according to positional change of the condyle in the mouth open and close state. The results were as follows. 1. In the 785 patients with TMJ arthrosis, 782 patients (99.62%) show the positional change of the condyle. Among them 691 patients (88.03%) show the bone change. 2. In TMJ arthrosis patients with bone changes 451 patients (65.27%) showed both the condylar positional changes and bone changes bilaterally. 198 patients (28.65%) show the condylar positional changes bilaterally and bone changes unilaterally. 3. The bone changes in the TMJ arthrosis were in order of frequency eburnation (647 cases, 32.8%), erosion (548 cases , 27.79%), flattening (418 cases, 21.20%), deformity (138 cases, 6.99%), sclerosis (115 cases, 5.83%), marginal proliferation (106 cases, 5.38%). The region of bone change in TMJ arthrosis with condylar positional changes were in order of frequency the articular eminence (43.97%) condylar head (38.64%), articular fossa (17.39%). 4. In the patients with bone changes, their clinical symptoms were pain (44.34%), clicking sound (33.5%), limitation of mouth opening (22.52%). In the patients complaining pain the most frequent bone change was erosion (28.60%), in the patients complaining clicking sound, eburnation (28.97%) in the patients complaining the limitation, eburnation (29.40%). Also in the patients with the duration below 1 year most common bone change was eburnation. 5. The most common condylar positional change was downward position (39.94%) in closed state, restricted movement of condyle (30.07%) in open state. The

  8. A study on usefulness of CT arthrography for the temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Shumei [Osaka Univ. (Japan). School of Dentistry

    1992-06-01

    In the field of orthopedics, CT arthrography has been utilized for the shoulder and the knee joints diagnosis. In this study, CT arthrography was applied to the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and the usefulness of this method was evaluated experimentally and clinically. In the experimental study, CT, CT arthrography and arthrotomogtaphy were compared each other with serial section from human autopsy specimen. It was confirmed that arthrography was indispensable for diagnosis of the location and configuration of the articular disk. In the sagittal section, CT arthrography was almost equal to arthrotomography. But in the coronal section, CT arthrography proved to be advantageous to arthrotomography, because there were various blur images on the arthrotomographic images from the complex bony structures of the skull. In the clinical study, coronal CT arthrography was applied for the patients with internal derangements of the TMJ. The mesio-lateral displacement of the disk (62%), perforation of the attachment (23%), and the intra-articular adhesion (70%) could be diagnosed. BY CT arthrography, the mesio-lateral displacement of the disk was more clearly diagnosed and the intra-articular adhesions were proved with higher rate than by the arthrotomography. From this study, it was concluded that CT arthrography has an important role in diagnosis of the TMJ soft tissue. (author) 51 refs.

  9. Quality of life: patient-reported outcomes after total replacement of the temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunjur, J; Niziol, R; Matthews, N S

    2016-09-01

    Since publication of the UK guidelines on total replacement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in 2008 by the British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (BAOMS), pain scores, mouth opening, and diet have been used as markers of success. We have looked at quality of life (QoL) as another. We analysed the data from a single surgeon on patients who had had joints replaced and devised a questionnaire to find out about the subjective, functional, psychological, and social aspects of TMJ disease. A total of 18 patients who had the same operation were included (mean (range) age 50 (33 - 73) years, mean (range) follow up 30 (18 - 48) months). Jaw function and facial aesthetics had improved, and patients needed less analgesia. Overall, they reported a better QoL with improvements in mood and social interaction, and the activities of daily life were easier. The NHS uses QoL questionnaires to measure success in fields such as orthopaedic surgery, but currently we know of no nationally accepted questionnaire that measures success after total replacement of the TMJ. Copyright © 2016 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cinematic study of temporomandibular joint motion using ultra-fast magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manière-Ezvan, A; Havet, T; Franconi, J M; Quémar, J C; de Certaines, J D

    1999-10-01

    Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are usually performed to study the opening/closing movements of the mandible and have up to now been pseudodynamic step-by-step images simulating condylar motion by post-processing reconstruction. The aim of this study was: 1. to optimize a TMJ cine-imaging method to give a better clinical result than the step-by-step methods; 2. to develop an ultra-fast MRI Gradient Echo (GE) sequence for this purpose; and 3. to analyze condylar movements in the sagittal, coronal and para-axial planes during border mandibular displacements and chewing. Both TM joints were studied in six asymptomatic volunteers. The method involved a compromise between in-plane resolution, slice thickness, signal-to-noise ratio and time resolution. Routine clinical use was found to be a GE pulse sequence providing three images per second with an isometric voxel resolution of approximately two millimeters in ridge. This did not allow visualization of the disk. Using this sequence enabled real and simultaneous condylar displacement observation in the three planes of space and therefore contributed to a better functional diagnosis of pathologic TMJ motions.

  11. Temporomandibular Joint Involvement in Association With Quality of Life, Disability, and High Disease Activity in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frid, Paula; Nordal, Ellen; Bovis, Francesca; Giancane, Gabriella; Larheim, Tore A; Rygg, Marite; Pires Marafon, Denise; De Angelis, Donato; Palmisani, Elena; Murray, Kevin J; Oliveira, Sheila; Simonini, Gabriele; Corona, Fabrizia; Davidson, Joyce; Foster, Helen; Steenks, Michel H; Flato, Berit; Zulian, Francesco; Baildam, Eileen; Saurenmann, Rotraud K; Lahdenne, Pekka; Ravelli, Angelo; Martini, Alberto; Pistorio, Angela; Ruperto, Nicolino

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the demographic, disease activity, disability, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) differences between children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and their healthy peers, and between children with JIA with and without clinical temporomandibular joint (TMJ) involvement and its determinants. This study is based on a cross-sectional cohort of 3,343 children with JIA and 3,409 healthy peers, enrolled in the Pediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation HRQOL study or in the methotrexate trial. Potential determinants of TMJ involvement included demographic, disease activity, disability, and HRQOL measures selected through univariate and multivariable logistic regression. Clinical TMJ involvement was observed in 387 of 3,343 children with JIA (11.6%). Children with TMJ involvement, compared to those without, more often had polyarticular disease course (95% versus 70%), higher Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score (odds ratio [OR] 4.6), more disability, and lower HRQOL. Children with TMJ involvement experienced clearly more disability and lower HRQOL compared to their healthy peers. The multivariable analysis showed that cervical spine involvement (OR 4.6), disease duration >4.4 years (OR 2.8), and having more disability (Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index >0.625) (OR 1.6) were the most important determinants for TMJ involvement. Clinical TMJ involvement in JIA is associated with higher disease activity, higher disability, and impaired HRQOL. Our findings indicate the need for dedicated clinical and imaging evaluation of TMJ arthritis, especially in children with cervical spine involvement, polyarticular course, and longer disease duration. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  12. Sensitivity of quantitative UTE MRI to the biomechanical property of the temporomandibular joint disc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Won C.; Biswas, Reni; Statum, Sheronda [University of California-San Diego, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Sah, Robert L. [University of California-San Diego, Department of Bioengineering, La Jolla, CA (United States); Chung, Christine B. [University of California-San Diego, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); VA San Diego Healthcare System, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-09-15

    To quantify MR properties of discs from cadaveric human temporomandibular joints (TMJ) using quantitative conventional and ultrashort time-to-echo magnetic resonance imaging (UTE MRI) techniques and to corroborate regional variation in the MR properties with that of biomechanical indentation stiffness. This study was exempt from the institutional review board approval. Cadaveric (four donors, two females, 74 ± 10.7 years) TMJs were sliced (n = 14 slices total) sagittally and imaged using quantitative techniques of conventional spin echo T2 (SE T2), UTE T2*, and UTE T1rho. The discs were then subjected to biomechanical indentation testing, which is performed by compressing the tissue with the blunt end of a small solid cylinder. Regional variations in MR and indentation stiffness were correlated. TMJ of a healthy volunteer was also imaged to show in vivo feasibility. Using the ME SE T2 and the UTE T1rho techniques, a significant (each p < 0.0001) inverse relation between MR and indentation stiffness properties was observed for the data in the lower range of stiffness. However, the strength of correlation was significantly higher (p < 0.05) for UTE T1rho (R{sup 2} = 0.42) than SE T2 (R{sup 2} = 0.19) or UTE T2* (R{sup 2} = 0.02, p = 0.1) techniques. The UTE T1rho technique, applicable in vivo, facilitated quantitative evaluation of TMJ discs and showed a high sensitivity to biomechanical softening of the TMJ discs. With additional work, the technique may become a useful surrogate measure for loss of biomechanical integrity of TMJ discs reflecting degeneration. (orig.)

  13. Accurate 3D kinematic measurement of temporomandibular joint using X-ray fluoroscopic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Takaharu; Matsumoto, Akiko; Sugamoto, Kazuomi; Matsumoto, Ken; Kakimoto, Naoya; Yura, Yoshiaki

    2014-04-01

    Accurate measurement and analysis of 3D kinematics of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is very important for assisting clinical diagnosis and treatment of prosthodontics and orthodontics, and oral surgery. This study presents a new 3D kinematic measurement technique of the TMJ using X-ray fluoroscopic images, which can easily obtain the TMJ kinematic data in natural motion. In vivo kinematics of the TMJ (maxilla and mandibular bone) is determined using a feature-based 2D/3D registration, which uses beads silhouette on fluoroscopic images and 3D surface bone models with beads. The 3D surface models of maxilla and mandibular bone with beads were created from CT scans data of the subject using the mouthpiece with the seven strategically placed beads. In order to validate the accuracy of pose estimation for the maxilla and mandibular bone, computer simulation test was performed using five patterns of synthetic tantalum beads silhouette images. In the clinical applications, dynamic movement during jaw opening and closing was conducted, and the relative pose of the mandibular bone with respect to the maxilla bone was determined. The results of computer simulation test showed that the root mean square errors were sufficiently smaller than 1.0 mm and 1.0 degree. In the results of clinical application, during jaw opening from 0.0 to 36.8 degree of rotation, mandibular condyle exhibited 19.8 mm of anterior sliding relative to maxillary articular fossa, and these measurement values were clinically similar to the previous reports. Consequently, present technique was thought to be suitable for the 3D TMJ kinematic analysis.

  14. Clinical study of internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint with closed lock, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriya, Yoshiyuki; Murakami, Ken-ichiro; Fujimura, Kazuma; Yokoyama, Tadaaki; Nose, Masahiro; Miyaki, Katsuaki; Segami, Natsuki; Iizuka, Tadahiko

    1990-01-01

    Fifty-three closed lock cases of internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) were studied on the correlation between disk configuration at MR imaging and nine clinical parameters composed of opening degree, age, clicking and locking duration, visual analogue scale of pain (VAS), pain score, jaw dysfunction score, life activity limited score, and TMJ X-ray photo findings. Disk configuration and degree of anterior disk displacement were assessed on MR imaging in closed mouth position: the antero-posterior length of disk and the distance from condyle to anterior and posterior portion of disk were measured, respectively. Duration of clicking and locking were not correlated with MR index except that there was a strong correlation between clicking duration and the distance from condyle to anterior portion of the disk at MR imaging. Opening degree was related to the disk deformity and the access of posterior portion of the disk to condyle. Disk configuration and degree of anterior disk displacement were not correlated with TMJ pain, but jaw dysfunction was related to the disk deformity and the distance from posterior portion of the disk to condyle. TMJ X-ray photo findings were not correlated with clicking duration (below 3 years), locking duration (below 30 weeks), opening degree and disk configuration at MR imaging. In evaluation of factors related to opening degree in 53 patients with closed lock by means of multiple regression analysis, age, locking and clicking duration, TMJ pain, life activity limited score were more strongly correlated to opening degree than the others. (author)

  15. Temporomandibular Joint Idiopathic Condylar Resorptions – A CBCT based case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper Dahl; Schmidt, Bjarke Hjalting; Stoustrup, Peter Bangsgaard

    Aim: To describe condylar deformation in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in subjects with idiopathic condylar resorptions (ICR) and compare these changes to a healthy control group. Materials and method: CBCT scans were analyzed using anatomical points on the skull to create a reference line....... Subsequently, anatomical structures were identified on the mandible to measure the condylar axial angle, the condylar neck angle as well as the condylar width, length, and height in 25 patients with ICR and 25 controls (50 joints in each group). Secondly, cross sections of the TMJs were evaluated for deformity...... %), cavitation defect (22 %), and flattering (22 %). In the control group condylar flattening was seen in 2 %. More than 70 % of the joints with deformity changes evaluated in the sagittal and the coronal plane respectively showed deformity changes along the entire condylar surface. Conclusion: The results...

  16. Dislocation of the temporomandibular joint meniscus: contrast arthrography vs. computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J.R.; Christiansen, E.; Sauser, D.; Hasso, A.N.; Hinshaw, D.B. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A prospective study to determine the accuracy of computed tomography (CT) for the diagnosis of dislocation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) meniscus was made by performing both CT and contrast arthrography on 18 joints suspected of meniscus dislocation. Arthography rather than surgery was chosen as the quality standard for comparing CT findings, as not all patients undergoing the studies underwent surgery. The results of each test were reported independently by the radiologist who obtained either all of the arthograms or all of the CT scans. For dislocation of the meniscus, there were excellent agreement between the two methods. CT seems to be nearly as accurate as arthrography for showing meniscus dislocation, is performed with lower x-ray exposure, and is noninvasive. Arthrograpy discloses more detailed information about the joint meniscus, such as perforation and maceration, and should continue to be used when this kind of information is clinically important

  17. Functional profile of patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction under physiotherapy treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrezza Pinheiro Bezerra de Menezes Kinote

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the functional profile of patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJD receiving physical therapy. Methods: A cross-sectional study carried with 21 patients receiving physiotherapy care during the year of 2007 at the Center for Integrated Medical Care (Núcleo de Atenção Médica Integrada - NAMI, in Fortaleza-CE, Brazil. Those were submitted to anamnesis (age, presence of pain, affected sites and parafunctional habits and functional assessment (presence of trigger points, movement amplitude and postural evaluation. Results: The age varied from 16 to 56 years, with an average of 31.3 ± 14.85 and female gender was the most affected with 17 (81.0% patients. Of the assessed patients, 13 (61.9% presented pain of moderate intensity, with an average of 5.4 ± 0.50. The most common sites of pain were the temporomandibular joint (TMJ, reported by 15 (71.4%,and cervical region, reported by 13 (61.9% patients. We found that 13 (61.9% assessed patients reported clenching as parafunctional habit. Significant limitation of mouth opening and movements of the cervical region were observed when compared to normal values (p <0.05. The most painful muscles on palpation were upper trapezius (n=19, medial pterygoid (n=15 and the masseter (n=15. The TMJ presented strong pain (degree 3 on palpation in 3 (14.3% patients. In postural assessment, 10 (47.6% had cervical hyperlordosis, 7 (33% had forward head posture and 7 (33% had raised shoulders. Conclusion: Patients with TMJD receiving physical therapy present limitations in TMJ and cervical movement, pain, presence of trigger points and postural changes at a more compromised and symptomatic stage of this dysfunction. In view of this, it becomes necessary to provide early evaluation and treatment with physical therapy.

  18. Functional profile of patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction under physiotherapy treatment -

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrezza Pinheiro Bezerra de Menezes Kinote

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the functional profile of patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJD receiving physical therapy. Methods: A cross-sectional study carried with 21 patients receiving physiotherapy care during the year of 2007 at the Center for Integrated Medical Care (Núcleo de Atenção Médica Integrada - NAMI, in Fortaleza-CE, Brazil. Those were submitted to anamnesis (age, presence of pain, affected sites and parafunctional habits and functional assessment (presence of trigger points, movement amplitude and postural evaluation. Results: The age varied from 16 to 56 years, with an average of 31.3 ± 14.85 and female gender was the most affected with 17 (81.0% patients. Of the assessed patients, 13 (61.9% presented pain of moderate intensity, with an average of 5.4 ± 0.50. The most common sites of pain were the temporomandibular joint (TMJ, reported by 15 (71.4%, and cervical region, reported by 13 (61.9% patients. We found that 13 (61.9% assessed patients reported clenching as parafunctional habit. Significant limitation of mouth opening and movements of the cervical region were observed when compared to normal values (p <0.05. The most painful muscles on palpation were upper trapezius (n=19, medial pterygoid (n=15 and the masseter (n=15. The TMJ presented strong pain (degree 3 on palpation in 3 (14.3% patients. In postural assessment, 10 (47.6% had cervical hyperlordosis, 7 (33% had forward head posture and 7 (33% had raised shoulders. Conclusion: Patients with TMJD receiving physical therapy present limitations in TMJ and cervical movement, pain, presence of trigger points and postural changes at a more compromised and symptomatic stage of this dysfunction. In view of this, it becomes necessary to provide early evaluation and treatment with physical therapy.

  19. Radiographic analysis of temporomandibular joint arthrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Dong Soo [Department of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-11-15

    The author analysed the bone changes, the positional relationships between condylar head and articular fossa, and the interrelationship between the bone changes and the abnormal position of condylar head, from 1,036 radiographs of 259 patients with temporomandibular joint arthrosis, which were obtained by the oblique-lateral transcranial projection and orthopantomograms. The results were as follows: 1. Among the radiographic bone changes of the temporomandibular joint arthrosis, deformity was 36..90% (217 cases), sclerosis 34.18% (201 cases), erosive change 25.58% (152 cases) and marginal proliferation 3.06% (18 cases) respectively. 2. In the positional changes between condylar head and articular fossa, the downward positioning of condylar head in centric occlusion was most frequent (36.90%), of which frequency was significantly higher than forward positioning (11.22%) and backward positioning (4.76%) in same condition. Also, radiographs showed that the enlargement of articular space showed higher frequency than its narrowing. In the opening position of mouth, the restrict ed movement of condylar head within articular fossa was most frequent (35.03%). The forward positioning and the downward positioning was 15.65% and 9.52% respectively. Also, radiographs revealed that the incomplete movement or no positional change of condylar head was most frequent. 3. In the interrelationship between bone changes and abnormal position of condylar head, deformity was 42.79% in the cases of downward positioning of condylar head in centric occlusion and 37.50% in those of normal positioning of condylar head in same condition. This revealed that deformity was most frequent bone change in above condylar positionings. However, erosive change was 34.62% in the cases of downward positioning of condylar head in centric occlusion and 33 .33% in those of forward positioning. In opening position of condylar head, and deformity in the cases of norma l positioning, forward positioning and

  20. Radiographic analysis of temporomandibular joint arthrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Dong Soo

    1984-01-01

    The author analysed the bone changes, the positional relationships between condylar head and articular fossa, and the interrelationship between the bone changes and the abnormal position of condylar head, from 1,036 radiographs of 259 patients with temporomandibular joint arthrosis, which were obtained by the oblique-lateral transcranial projection and orthopantomograms. The results were as follows: 1. Among the radiographic bone changes of the temporomandibular joint arthrosis, deformity was 36..90% (217 cases), sclerosis 34.18% (201 cases), erosive change 25.58% (152 cases) and marginal proliferation 3.06% (18 cases) respectively. 2. In the positional changes between condylar head and articular fossa, the downward positioning of condylar head in centric occlusion was most frequent (36.90%), of which frequency was significantly higher than forward positioning (11.22%) and backward positioning (4.76%) in same condition. Also, radiographs showed that the enlargement of articular space showed higher frequency than its narrowing. In the opening position of mouth, the restrict ed movement of condylar head within articular fossa was most frequent (35.03%). The forward positioning and the downward positioning was 15.65% and 9.52% respectively. Also, radiographs revealed that the incomplete movement or no positional change of condylar head was most frequent. 3. In the interrelationship between bone changes and abnormal position of condylar head, deformity was 42.79% in the cases of downward positioning of condylar head in centric occlusion and 37.50% in those of normal positioning of condylar head in same condition. This revealed that deformity was most frequent bone change in above condylar positionings. However, erosive change was 34.62% in the cases of downward positioning of condylar head in centric occlusion and 33 .33% in those of forward positioning. In opening position of condylar head, and deformity in the cases of norma l positioning, forward positioning and

  1. Correlation between direction and severity of temporomandibular joint disc displacement and reduction ability during mouth opening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litko, M; Berger, M; Szkutnik, J; Różyło-Kalinowska, I

    2017-12-01

    The most common temporomandibular joint (TMJ) internal derangement is an abnormal relationship of the disc with respect to the mandibular condyle, articular eminence and glenoid fossa-disc displacement. The aim of our study was to analyse the correlation between partial/complete disc displacement in the intercuspal position (IP) and its reduction in the open-mouth position (OMP) in both oblique sagittal and coronal planes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with temporomandibular disorders. Multisection MRI analysis of 382 TMJs was conducted in 191 patients with disc displacement according to the RDC/TMD criteria (148 women, 43 men; aged 14-60 years). The disc position was evaluated on all oblique sagittal and coronal images in the IP and the OMP. Univariate logistic regression analysis showed that the severity of disc displacement in the sagittal plane is a statistically significant predictor of reduction ability during mouth opening (B = 3.118; P displacement in both planes is also a significant predictor of disc reduction in OMP (B = 2.200; P displacement in IP, in both sagittal and coronal planes. Multisection analysis of all MR images allows distinguishing the correct disc position from disc displacement and can improve the ability to distinguish between various stages of TMJ internal derangement. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Augmented Indian hedgehog signaling in cranial neural crest cells leads to craniofacial abnormalities and dysplastic temporomandibular joint in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ling; Gu, Shuping; Ye, Wenduo; Song, Yingnan; Chen, YiPing

    2016-04-01

    Extensive studies have pinpointed the crucial role of Indian hedgehog (Ihh) signaling in the development of the appendicular skeleton and the essential function of Ihh in the formation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In this study, we have investigated the effect of augmented Ihh signaling in TMJ development. We took a transgenic gain-of-function approach by overexpressing Ihh in the cranial neural crest (CNC) cells using a conditional Ihh transgenic allele and the Wnt1-Cre allele. We found that Wnt1-Cre-mediated tissue-specific overexpression of Ihh in the CNC lineage caused severe craniofacial abnormalities, including cleft lip/palate, encephalocele, anophthalmos, micrognathia, and defective TMJ development. In the mutant TMJ, the glenoid fossa was completely absent, whereas the condyle and the articular disc appeared relatively normal with slightly delayed chondrocyte differentiation. Our findings thus demonstrate that augmented Ihh signaling is detrimental to craniofacial development, and that finely tuned Ihh signaling is critical for TMJ formation. Our results also provide additional evidence that the development of the condyle and articular disc is independent of the glenoid fossa.

  3. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of the fibrocartilage disc of the temporomandibular joint--a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittschieler, Elisabeth; Szomolanyi, Pavol; Schmid-Schwap, Martina; Weber, Michael; Egerbacher, Monika; Traxler, Hannes; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2014-12-01

    To 1) test the feasibility of delayed Gadolinium-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage (dGEMRIC) at 3 T in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and 2) to determine the optimal delay for measurements of the TMJ disc after i.v. contrast agent (CA) administration. MRI of the right and left TMJ of six asymptomatic volunteers was performed at 3 T using a dedicated coil. 2D inversion recovery (2D-IR) sequences were performed at 4 time points covering 120 minutes and 3D gradient-echo (3D GRE) dual flip-angle sequences were performed at 14 time points covering 130 minutes after the administration of 0.2 mmol/kg of Gd-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid ion (Gd-DTPA)(2-), i.e., 0.4 mL of Magnevist™ per kg body weight. Pair-wise tests were used to assess differences between pre-and post-contrast T1 values. 2D-IR sequences showed a statistically significant drop (pfibrocartilage disc of the TMJ. The recommended measurement time for dGEMRIC in the TMJ after i.v. CA administration is from 60 to 120 minutes. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of the fibrocartilage disc of the temporomandibular joint – a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittschieler, Elisabeth; Szomolanyi, Pavol; Schmid-Schwap, Martina; Weber, Michael; Egerbacher, Monika; Traxler, Hannes; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2014-01-01

    Objective To 1) test the feasibility of delayed Gadolinium-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage (dGEMRIC) at 3 T in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and 2) to determine the optimal delay for measurements of the TMJ disc after i.v. contrast agent (CA) administration. Design MRI of the right and left TMJ of six asymptomatic volunteers was performed at 3 T using a dedicated coil. 2D inversion recovery (2D-IR) sequences were performed at 4 time points covering 120 minutes and 3D gradient-echo (3D GRE) dual flip-angle sequences were performed at 14 time points covering 130 minutes after the administration of 0.2 mmol/kg of Gd-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid ion (Gd-DTPA)2-, i.e., 0.4 mL of Magnevist™ per kg body weight. Pair-wise tests were used to assess differences between pre-and post-contrast T1 values. Results 2D-IR sequences showed a statistically significant drop (p fibrocartilage disc of the TMJ. The recommended measurement time for dGEMRIC in the TMJ after i.v. CA administration is from 60 to 120 minutes. PMID:25131629

  5. Evaluation of the mechanism and principles of management of temporomandibular joint dislocation. Systematic review of literature and a proposed new classification of temporomandibular joint dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinbami, Babatunde O

    2011-06-15

    Virtually all the articles in literature addressed only a specific type of dislocation. The aim of this review was to project a comprehensive understanding of the pathologic processes and management of all types of dislodgement of the head of the mandibular condyle from its normal position in the glenoid fossa. In addition, a new classification of temporomandibular joint dislocation was also proposed. A thorough computer literature search was done using the Medline, Cochrane library and Embase database. Key words like temporo-mandibular joint dislocation were used for the search. Additional manual search was done by going through published home-based and foreign articles. Case reports/series, and original articles that documented the type of dislocation, number of cases treated in the series and original articles. Treatment done and outcome of treatment were included in the study. A total of 128 articles were reviewed out which 79 were found relevant. Of these, 26 were case reports, 17 were case series and 36 were original articles. 79 cases were acute dislocations, 35 cases were chronic protracted TMJ dislocations and 311 cases were chronic recurrent TMJ dislocations. Etiology was predominantly trauma in 60% of cases and other causes contributed about 40%. Of all the cases reviewed, only 4 were unilateral dislocation. Various treatment modalities are outlined in this report as indicated for each type of dislocation. The more complex and invasive method of treatment may not necessarily offer the best option and outcome of treatment, therefore conservative approaches should be exhausted and utilized appropriately before adopting the more invasive surgical techniques.

  6. Evaluation of the mechanism and principles of management of temporomandibular joint dislocation. Systematic review of literature and a proposed new classification of temporomandibular joint dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinbami Babatunde O

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Virtually all the articles in literature addressed only a specific type of dislocation. The aim of this review was to project a comprehensive understanding of the pathologic processes and management of all types of dislodgement of the head of the mandibular condyle from its normal position in the glenoid fossa. In addition, a new classification of temporomandibular joint dislocation was also proposed. Method and materials A thorough computer literature search was done using the Medline, Cochrane library and Embase database. Key words like temporo-mandibular joint dislocation were used for the search. Additional manual search was done by going through published home-based and foreign articles. Case reports/series, and original articles that documented the type of dislocation, number of cases treated in the series and original articles. Treatment done and outcome of treatment were included in the study. Result A total of 128 articles were reviewed out which 79 were found relevant. Of these, 26 were case reports, 17 were case series and 36 were original articles. 79 cases were acute dislocations, 35 cases were chronic protracted TMJ dislocations and 311 cases were chronic recurrent TMJ dislocations. Etiology was predominantly trauma in 60% of cases and other causes contributed about 40%. Of all the cases reviewed, only 4 were unilateral dislocation. Various treatment modalities are outlined in this report as indicated for each type of dislocation. Conclusion The more complex and invasive method of treatment may not necessarily offer the best option and outcome of treatment, therefore conservative approaches should be exhausted and utilized appropriately before adopting the more invasive surgical techniques.

  7. Comparison of static MRI and pseudo-dynamic MRI in temporomandibular joint disorder patients

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    Lee, Jin Ho; Yun, Kyoung In [Eulji Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, In Woo; Choi, Hang Moon; Park, Moon Soo [Kangnung National Univ. College of Dentistry, Kangnung (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to elevate comparison of static MRI and pseudo-dynamic (cine) MRI in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder patients. In this investigation, 33 patients with TMJ disorders were examined using both conventional static MRI and pseudo-dynamic MRI. Multiple spoiled gradient recalled acquisition in the steady state (SPGR) images were obtained when mouth opened and closed. Proton density weighted images were obtained at the closed and open mouth position in static MRI. Two oral and maxillofacial radiologists evaluated location of the articular disk, movement of condyle and bony change respectively and the posterior boundary of articular disk was obtained. No statistically significant difference was found in the observation of articular disk position, mandibular condylar movement and posterior boundary of articular disk using static MRI and pseudo-dynamic MRI (P>0.05). Statistically significant difference was noted in bony changes of condyle using static MRI and pseudo-dynamic MRI (P<0.05). This study showed that pseudo-dynamic MRI didn't make a difference in diagnosing internal derangement of TMJ in comparison with static MRI. But it was considered as an additional method to be supplemented in observing bony change.

  8. Temporomandibular joint involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: clinical predictors of magnetic resonance imaging signs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argyropoulou, Maria I.; Margariti, Persefoni N.; Astrakas, Loukas; Kosta, Paraskevi; Karali, Aikaterini; Alfandaki, Sapfo; Siamopoulou, Antigoni

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to define clinical predictors of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Forty-six patients, aged 2.08-36.7 years, with JIA (oligoartitular 18, polyarticular 17, systemic type 11) were examined with standard plain and contrast-enhanced sequences. Of 88 TMJs examined, an abnormal condyle was observed in 32%, flattened articular eminence in 27%, flattened articular disk in 17%, intra-articular fluid in 10%, enhancing pannus in 45% and restricted condylar motion in 9%. Logistic regression analysis revealed that for abnormal condyle and flattened articular eminence, independent predictors were type of JIA (P 0.5 when the disease started before 4 years of age. In conclusion, the systemic type of JIA, young age at onset and long duration of activity are risk factors for TMJ damage. MRI of the TMJ should be performed in patients who are less than 4 years of age at the onset of JIA, and in those with the systemic type, whatever the age of onset. (orig.)

  9. Comparison of static MRI and pseudo-dynamic MRI in temporomandibular joint disorder patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jin Ho; Yun, Kyoung In; Park, In Woo; Choi, Hang Moon; Park, Moon Soo

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elevate comparison of static MRI and pseudo-dynamic (cine) MRI in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder patients. In this investigation, 33 patients with TMJ disorders were examined using both conventional static MRI and pseudo-dynamic MRI. Multiple spoiled gradient recalled acquisition in the steady state (SPGR) images were obtained when mouth opened and closed. Proton density weighted images were obtained at the closed and open mouth position in static MRI. Two oral and maxillofacial radiologists evaluated location of the articular disk, movement of condyle and bony change respectively and the posterior boundary of articular disk was obtained. No statistically significant difference was found in the observation of articular disk position, mandibular condylar movement and posterior boundary of articular disk using static MRI and pseudo-dynamic MRI (P>0.05). Statistically significant difference was noted in bony changes of condyle using static MRI and pseudo-dynamic MRI (P<0.05). This study showed that pseudo-dynamic MRI didn't make a difference in diagnosing internal derangement of TMJ in comparison with static MRI. But it was considered as an additional method to be supplemented in observing bony change

  10. Strain rate dependent orthotropic properties of pristine and impulsively loaded porcine temporomandibular joint disk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, M W; Bruno, M J; Iwasaki, L R; Nickel, J C

    2001-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the tensile stress-strain behavior of the porcine temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disk with respect to collagen orientation and strain rate dependency. The apparent elastic modulus, ultimate tensile strength, and strain at maximum stress were measured at three elongation rates (0.5, 50, and 500 mm/min) for dumbbell-shaped samples oriented along either anteroposterior or mediolateral axes of the disks. In order to study the effects of impact-induced fissuring on the mechanical behavior, the same properties were measured along each orientation at an elongation rate of 500 mm/min for disks subjected to impulsive loads of 0.5 N. s. The results suggested a strongly orthotropic nature to the healthy pristine disk. The values for the apparent modulus and ultimate strength were 10-fold higher along the anteroposterior axis (p disks for either orientation (p > 0.05). The results demonstrated the importance of choosing an orthotropic model for the TMJ disk to conduct finite element modeling, to develop failure criteria, and to construct tissue-engineered replacements. Impact-induced fissuring requires further study to determine if the TMJ disk is orthotropic with respect to fatigue.

  11. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3940 Total temporomandibular joint... implanted in the human jaw to replace the mandibular condyle and augment the glenoid fossa to functionally...

  12. Tomographic study of temporomandibular joints before orthodontic treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Ki Jeong [Kyung Hee Univ. College of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-15

    To determine whether there is a relationship between abnormal temporomandibular joint radiographic findings and age or gender in a sample of preorthodontic patients. Individualized corrected sagittal tomographs of 188 temporomandibular joints in 94 preorthodontic patients, aged 11 to 29 years, were taken and viewed by an observer blinded to clinical records. The study population was divided into 2 aged groups (11-15 years and 16-29 years) for comparative purpose. Temporomandibular joint radiographic findings were classified as normal or abnormal. There was no difference in ratio of abnormal to normal findings between the both aged groups. The frequency of osseous abnormalities was similar with that of abnormalities of condylar position. Abnormalities in CP and JS were most frequent in all aged groups. There is no significant difference between ages or genders for temporomandibular joint radiographic abnormalities.

  13. Clinical Utility of bone Scan in the Diagnosis of Temporomandibular disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In Joo; Kang, Yang Ho; Son, Seok Man; Lee, Kyoung Seog; Lee, Jae Bok; Kim, Yong Ki; Seo, Bong Jik; Park, June Sang; Park, June Sang; Ko, Myung Yun; Son, Seong Pyo

    1995-01-01

    Bone scan is a very sensitive diagnostic imaging test for detecting bone and joint disorders. So it might be useful in the diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders of the joint origin. Thus, the effectiveness of bone scan for detecting temporomandibular joint(TMJ) diseases and differentiating the TMJ disc displacement from the TMJ arthritis was evaluated. Bone scan was done in 21 patients with TMJ disc displacement (I3 unilaterally affected, 8 bilaterally affected), 26 patients with TMJ arthritis (23 unilateral, 3 bilateral), and 39 volunteers with no signs, symptoms, or history of TMJ disease TMJ simple uptake rate(SUR) and difference of both TMJ SUR were calculated from the 100,000 count lateral image of head and neck region in 99m Tc MDP bone scan. Transcranial and panorama X-ray examination was also done in all patients. TMJ SUR(%) were 1.67 ±0.606 in TMJs affected with arthritis, 1.350±0.351 in TMJs affected with disc displacement, and 1.084±0.172 in TMJs of controls Significant differences were demonstrated among them(p mean+2SD of controls) in unilateral TMJ arthritis patients were significantly higher than those in patients with unilateral TMJ disc displacement(69.6% and 87% vs 23.1% and 23%). Conclusively, bone scan may help to detect TMJ disease and differentiate TMJ disc displacement from TMJ arthritis.

  14. Prevalence of temporomandibular joint disfunction in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Masitoh

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to get the description on TMJ dysfunction as well as its symptoms including clicking, crepitation, jaw opening restriction and muscle pain in children. Thus the result can be used as an input to the program of TMJ dysfunction prevention and treatment for the children in SDN Sirnasari Village, Ciptasari Pamulihan Subdistrict, Sumedang District. This study is descriptive study using survey technique. The samples for the study are 79 children in elementary school taken by random sampling technique with stratification. TMJ dysfunctions with clicking and crepitation symptoms were detected by palpating and using a stethoscope. Deviation, deflection, and jaw opening restriction symptoms were found out by visual examination. Whereas pain in TMJ supporting muscles was also detected by palpating. The result of the study shows that the number of children developing TMJ dysfunction with symptom of clicking is 34 children (43.03%, crepitation are 4 children (5.06%, deviation are 13 children (16.45%, deflection are 17 children (21.51%, jaw opening restriction are 49 children (62.02%, and pain in TMJ supporting muscles are 69 children (87.34%. From the study, it can be concluded that the highest frequency of TMJ dysfunction symptom in SDN Sirnasari children is a pain in TMJ supporting muscles. It is followed by jaw opening restriction, clicking, deflection, deviation, and the last is crepitation.

  15. The Yucatan Minipig Temporomandibular Joint Disc Structure-Function Relationships Support Its Suitability for Human Comparative Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vapniarsky, Natalia; Aryaei, Ashkan; Arzi, Boaz; Hatcher, David C; Hu, Jerry C; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2017-11-01

    Frequent involvement of the disc in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders warrants attempts to tissue engineer TMJ disc replacements. Physiologically, a great degree of similarity is seen between humans and farm pigs (FPs), but the pig's rapid growth confers a significant challenge for in vivo experiments. Minipigs have a slower growth rate and are smaller than FPs, but minipig TMJ discs have yet to be fully characterized. The objective of this study was to determine the suitability of the minipig for TMJ studies by extensive structural and functional characterization. The properties of minipig TMJ discs closely reproduced previously reported morphological, biochemical, and biomechanical values of human and FP discs. The width/length dimension ratio of the minipig TMJ disc was 1.95 (1.69 for human and 1.94 for FP). The biochemical evaluation revealed, on average per wet weight, 24.3% collagen (22.8% for human and 24.9% for FP); 0.8% glycosaminoglycan (GAG; 0.5% for human and 0.4% for FP); and 0.03% DNA (0.008% for human and 0.02% for FP). Biomechanical testing revealed, on average, compressive relaxation modulus of 50 kPa (37 kPa for human and 32 kPa for FP), compressive instantaneous modulus of 1121 kPa (1315 kPa for human and 1134 kPa for FP), and coefficient of viscosity of 13 MPa·s (9 MPa·s for human and 3 MPa·s for FP) at 20% strain. These properties also varied topographically in accordance to those of human and FP TMJ discs. Anisotropy, quantified by bidirectional tensile testing and histology, again was analogous among minipig, human, and FP TMJ discs. The minipig TMJ's ginglymoarthrodial nature was verified through cone beam computer tomography. Collectively, the similarities between minipig and human TMJ discs support the use of minipig as a relevant model for TMJ research; considering the practical advantages conferred by its growth rate and size, the minipig may be a preferred model over FP.

  16. Comparative study on computed orthopantomography and film radiographic techniques in the radiography of temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Tao; Ning Lixia; Liu Yuai; Li Ningyi; Chen Feng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To compare the computed orthopantomography (COPT) with Shriller radiography(SR), film orthopantomography (FOPT) and other traditional radiographic techniques in the radiography of temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Methods: Ninty-eight cases were randomly divided into 3 groups, and the open and close positions of TMJs of both sides were examined with SR, FOPT, and COPT, respectively. The satisfactory rates of the X-ray pictures were statistically analyzed with Pearson chi-square in SPSS10.0, and the satisfactory rates were analyzed with q test between the groups. Results: One hundred and forty-four of the open and close positions of 144 TMJ pictures of the COPT group, 128 of 128 of the FOPT group, and 6 of 120 of the SR group were satisfactory in the mandible ramus of the TMJ, with satisfactory rate being 100%, 100%, and 5%, respectively (P 0.01), respectively between FOPT and COPT groups. The difference was not statistically significant. The exposure was as follows: COPT, 99-113 mAs; FOPT, 210-225 mAs; and SR, 48-75 mAs. Therefore, COPT and FOPT were superior to SR in the pictures of the mandible ramus, coronoid process, and incisure, but inferior in the joint space pictures. The satisfactory rates of the condylar process and articular tubercle were same in the 3 groups. The exposure of the FOPT group was greater than that of the COPT and SR groups. Conclusion: COPT is superior to SR and FOPT in TMJ radiography, and should be applied widely in the clinic. (authors)

  17. Masticatory muscle and temporomandibular joint pain in Croatian war veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhac, Ivone; Tariba, Petra; Kovac, Zoran; Simonić-Kocijan, Suncana; Lajnert, Vlatka; Mesić, Vesna Fugosić; Kuis, Davor; Braut, Vedrana

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and intensity of masticatory muscle and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain in Croatian war veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The examined group consisted of 100 Croatian war veterans, in whom PTSD had previously been diagnosed. Patients were compared with 92 subjects who had not taken part in the war and in whom PTSD was excluded by psychiatric examination. The clinical examination consisted of palpation of the masticatory muscles, the prominent neck musculature, and TMJ. The examination technique used and the definition of items were previously tested for reliability and validity. 93% of the subjects with PTSD had masticatory muscle tenderness compared to 45.65% of the subjects in the control group (chi2 = 51.46, p < 0.0001). The most frequent painful location in the subjects with PTSD was the left lateral pterygoid site in 88%, and in subjects of the control group the right lateral pterygoid site in 28.26% of cases. The most painful location in the PTSD group was the left lateral pterygoid site in 72%, and in the control group the left posterior digastric in 4.35% of cases. 58% of the subjects with PTSD had TMJ tenderness compared to 3.26% of subjects in the control group (chi2 = 66.23, p < 0.0001). The most frequent painful location of TMJ in both groups was the left posterior capsule; in the PTSD group 38% and in subjects in the control group 2.17% of cases. The most painful location was the left posterior capsule in 28% of subjects with PTSD, while not one subject in the control group reported severe painful sensitivity. The very high frequency and intensity of pain in subjects with PTSD confirms the effect of stress on muscle and joint sensitivity, i.e. perception of pain.

  18. Surgical treatment for temporomandibular joint osteoarthrosis. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robiony, M; Demitri, V; Costa, F; Politi, M

    1998-11-01

    TMJ osteoarthrosis and internal derangements are in close connection, representing a substantial portion of temporomandibular disorders. The authors wish to underline the role of surgery in the treatment of this degenerative disease to improve function and to alleviate pain. A 63 year-old woman suffering from closed-lock with reduced opening movements was accepted in our Department in March, 1995. Clinical and radiological evaluations showed bilateral closed lock and severe TMJ osteoarthrosis. Occlusal, pharmacological and physical therapy were performed for one year, without results. Bilateral condylectomy and diskectomy with arthroplasty were carried out. Immediate muscular rehabilitation after surgery was performed by the patient. Follow-up 3, 6, 12 months after surgery were carried out. Full opening movements and reduction of pain were obtained 20 days after surgery. The patient, followed-up one year after surgery, presented effective mandibular movements and adequate amelioration of clinical picture. TMJ surgery in association with physical therapy represents in selected cases an adequate procedure for the treatment of TMJ degenerative disease.

  19. Trachlight management of succinylcholine-induced subluxation of the Temporo-mandibular joint: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roze des Ordons, Amanda; Townsend, Derek R

    2008-09-01

    We present a case of spontaneous subluxation of the Temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) induced by succinylcholine, to compare our experience with previous cases reported in the literature, and to review the pathophysiology, preoperative screening, and intraoperative management of TMJ instability. A 39-yr-old female with primary hyperparathyroidism and a normal airway examination presented for elective parathyroidectomy. Following induction of anesthesia and the administration of succinylcholine prior to jaw manipulation, her mouth could not be opened, and we suspected spontaneous subluxation of the TMJ. We secured the airway with the use of a Trachlight and, subsequently, reduced the joint. Postoperatively, a history of mild TMJ-related symptoms was elicited. Instability of the TMJ is not uncommon, and has several implications for airway management, highlighting the importance of preoperative screening. Limited mouth opening, due to spontaneous subluxation of the TMJ following succinylcholine-induced muscle relaxation in the absence of airway manipulation, has only twice been reported in the literature. This report highlights how tracheal intubation may be accomplished using the Trachlight, in order to secure the airway prior to reduction of the subluxed joint.

  20. A Case of Chondrosarcoma Arising in the Temporomandibular Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsutomu Nomura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chondrosarcoma is a malignant tumor originating in cartilaginous cells. And there are only few reports of the case of chondrosarcoma in temporomandibular joint. We discuss a case of chondrosarcoma in temporomandibular joint in a 28-year-old man. Tumor was in contact with the dura, but en bloc resection was performed. After surgical resection of the tumor, face defect was reconstructed by rectus abdominis-free flap. And there is no recurrence after ten years from the resection.

  1. Peripheral hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels contribute to inflammation-induced hypersensitivity of the rat temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, R J; Jennings, E A; Ivanusic, J J

    2013-08-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels conduct an inward cation current (Ih ) that contributes to the maintenance of neuronal membrane potential and have been implicated in a number of animal models of neuropathic and inflammatory pain. In the current study, we investigated HCN channel involvement in inflammatory pain of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The contribution of HCN channels to inflammation (complete Freund's adjuvant; CFA)-induced mechanical hypersensitivity of the rat TMJ was tested with injections of the HCN channel blocker ZD7288. Retrograde labelling and immunohistochemistry was used to explore HCN channel expression in sensory neurons that innervate the TMJ. Injection of CFA into the TMJ (n = 7) resulted in a significantly increased mechanical sensitivity relative to vehicle injection (n = 7) (p blocked by co-injection of ZD7288 with the CFA (n = 7). Retrograde labelling and immunohistochemistry experiments revealed expression predominantly of HCN1 and HCN2 channel subunits in trigeminal ganglion neurons that innervate the TMJ (n = 3). No change in the proportion or intensity of HCN channel expression was found in inflamed (n = 6) versus control (n = 5) animals at the time point tested. Our findings suggest a role for peripheral HCN channels in inflammation-induced pain of the TMJ. Peripheral application of a HCN channel blocker could provide therapeutic benefit for inflammatory TMJ pain and avoid side effects associated with activation of HCN channels in the central nervous system. © 2012 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters.

  2. Effect of low-level laser on healing of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Peimani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular disorders (TMD are clinical conditions characterized by pain and sounds of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ. This study was designed to assess the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT on healing of osteoarthritis in rats with TMD.Thirty-two male Wistar rats (250-200 g were housed in standard plastic cages. After injection of Complete Freund's adjuvant into the TMJ, rats were randomly divided into two groups of 16 (case and control and anesthetized; then osteoarthritis was induced via intraarticular injection of 50 µl of Complete Freund's adjuvant; into the bilateral TMJs. In the case group, LLLT was done transcutaneously for 10 minutes daily, starting the day after the confirmation of osteoarthritis. Exposure was performed for 10 minutes at the right side of the TMJ with 880 nm low-level laser with 100 mW power and a probe diameter of 0.8 mm. Control rats were not treated with laser.After three days of treatment the grade of cartilage defects, number of inflammatory cells, angiogenesis, number of cell layers and arthritis in rats in the case group were not significantly different compared with controls (P>0.05. After seven days, the grade of cartilage defects, number of inflammatory cells, number of cell layers, and arthritis in the case group improved compared to controls (P<0.05; angiogenesis in both groups was similar.Treatment of TMD with LLLT after 7 days of irradiation with a wavelength of 880 nm was associated with a greater improvement compared to the control group.

  3. Effect of protraction facemask on the temporomandibular joint: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xinqi; Cen, Xiao; Liu, Jun

    2018-03-12

    The aim of this study was to assess the influence of protraction facemask (PFM) on temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of skeletal Class III malocclusion patients. Literature searches were carried out electronically in five English and three Chinese databases (Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PubMed, Embase, MEDLINE (via Ovid), Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and VIP Database). The date of the most recent search was 22 March 2017. Randomized controlled trials, controlled clinical trials, cohort studies, and before-after studies comparing the effect of PFM and other treatments on TMJ were included. The data were collected and extracted by three authors. The risk of bias in the RCTs was assessed in accordance with the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. For the nonrandomized studies, the risk of bias was judged with Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. For the 261 articles identified, 13 studies with 522 participants were included for the final qualitative analysis. Three studies were graded as high value of evidence, while seven studies and the other three studies were graded as moderate value and low value respectively. According to the available evidence, PFM contributed to the significant increase of CondAx-SBL and the significant decrease of CondAx-ML. Thin-plate spline (TPS) analysis showed a horizontal compression in condyles. Condyles tended to move superiorly and posteriorly. Concerning the occurrence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD), PFM was not involved in aggravating TMJ symptoms and signs. Clinical evidence suggests that PFM might contribute to the morphologic adaptation of TMJs and displacement of condyles, and PFM may well be not a risk factor for the development of TMD.

  4. Innovative Surgical Management of the Synovial Chondromatosis of Temporo-Mandibular Joints: Highly Conservative Surgical Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionna, Franco; Amantea, Massimiliano; Mastrangelo, Filiberto; Ballini, Andrea; Maglione, Maria Grazia; Aversa, Corrado; De Cecio, Rossella; Russo, Daniela; Marrelli, Massimo; Tatullo, Marco

    2016-07-01

    Synovial chondromatosis (SC) is an uncommon disease characterized by a benign nodular cartilaginous proliferation arising from the joint synovium, bursae, or tendon sheaths. Although the temporomandibular joint is rarely affected by neoplastic lesions, SC is the most common neoplastic lesion of this joint. The treatment of this disease consists in the extraoral surgery with a wide removal of the lesion; in this study, the authors described a more conservative intraoral surgical approach. Patient with SC of temporomandibular joint typically refer a limitation in the mouth opening, together with a persistent not physiological mandibular protrusion and an appearance of a neoformation located at the right preauricular region: the authors reported 1 scholar patient. After biopsy of the neoformation, confirming the synovial chondromatosis, the patient underwent thus to the surgical excision of the tumor, via authors' conservative transoral approach, to facilitate the enucleation of the neoformation. The mass fully involved the pterygo-maxillary fossa with involvement of the parotid lodge and of the right TMJ: this multifocal extension suggested for a trans-oral surgical procedure, in the light of the suspicion of a possible malignant nature of the neoplasm. Our intraoral conservative approach to surgery is aimed to reduce the presence of unaesthetic scars in preauricular and facial regions, with surgical results undoubtedly comparable to the traditional surgical techniques much more aggressive. Our technique could be a valid, alternative, and safe approach to treat this rare and complex kind of oncological disease.

  5. An ex vivo study on immunohistochemical localization of MMP-7 and MMP-9 in temporomandibular joint discs with internal derangement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Loreto

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Internal derangement (ID is among the most common disorders of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ. Previous research by our group highlighted a correlation between apoptosis and TMJ ID. Metalloproteinases (MMP-7 and -9 have been shown to play an important role in extracellular matrix ECM homeostasis and, through it, in joint disc remodelling. The immunohistochemical expression of MMP-7 and -9 was investigated in discs from patients with TMJ ID and from healthy donors and compared with the degree of histological tissue degeneration. The collagen fibre arrangement in pathological discs exhibited varying degrees of disruption. New vessels were consistently detected; endothelial cells from these vessels were immunolabelled with both MMP-7 and MMP-9. More or less intense MMP-7 and MMP-9 immunolabelling was detected in the cytoplasm of disc cells from all patients. MMP-7 and MMP-9 immunostaining was significantly different between pathological and normal discs and correlated with the extent of histopathological degeneration. MMP-7 and MMP-9 upregulation in discs from patients with TMJ ID demonstrates their involvement in disc damage in this disorder. A greater understanding of these processes could help identify ways to curb MMP overproduction without affecting their tissue remodelling action. The design of specific inhibitors for these MMPs would not only help to gain insights into the biological roles of MMPs, but would also aid in developing therapeutic interventions for diseases associated with abnormal ECM degradation.

  6. Chondromalacia as pathological finding in arthroscopy of the temporomandibular joint: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Granizo, Rafael; Correa-Muñoz, Diana Carolina

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the arthroscopic findings of chondromalacia and its relation with the internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A total of 161 patients (299 TMJs) who underwent arthroscopy were included in the study. The TMJs were evaluated objectively under arthroscopic vision, and 4 groups of patients were established according to the degree of involvement, degree I, II, III and IV. Statistical analyses were conducted using logistic regression models (P chondromalacia and 66 (41%) in 88 joints exhibited some degree of chondromalacia (44 patients unilaterally and 22 bilaterally). Of the 88 joints with chondromalacia, 14 (15.9%) had chondromalacia degree I, 12 (13.6%) chondromalacia degree II, 20 (22.7%) chondromalacia degree III and 42 (47.7%) chondromalacia degree IV. The chondromalacia was more significantly found in patients with ADDwR and discal perforation (P Chondromalacia degree IV was a significant finding in cases of ADDwoR (P = 0.000619). Chondromalacia of the TMJ is a common finding in patients with internal derangement even at the early stages. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. MR angiography of the TMJ in asymptomatic volunteers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Ritsuo; Ohashi, Yasushi; Westesson, P.L.; Togashi, Hirosuke

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the vascular anatomy of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and surrounding soft tissue non-invasively, we applied magnetic resonance (MR) angiography for delineating the arterial architecture around the TMJ. MR angiograms of the left and right TMJs in asymptomatic volunteers were obtained using 3D/Time-of-flight (TOF) (First Field Echo, TR/TE/FLIP=46 ms/6.8 ms/17 deg) with intravenous contrast. These MR angiograms were compared with experimental angiograms of human TMJ autopsy specimens in order to identify each of the branches of the arteries on the MR angiograms. This study enabled the depiction by MR angiography of arterial vessels around the TMJ region to some degree. In conclusion, MR angiography appears promising as a non-invasive tool to evaluate the vascular anatomy of the TMJ. (author)

  8. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes Macías, Juan Francisco; Sánchez Prieto, Martín

    2007-01-01

    Synovial Chondromatosis (SC) is a disease whose etiology is unknown, can be defined as a benign synovial process characterized by the formation of metaplastic cartilaginous nodes inside connective tissue of articular surfaces, is considered an active metaplastic phenomenon better than a neoplastic process; it presents a greater preference to affect women who constitute almost 70% of reported cases, the age range is wide and oscillates between 18-75 years (average 44.6 years). Between the main clinical findings are: pain, crackle, volume augmentation and a limited buccal opening. SC is an unusual state and the reports in the English literature are no more than 75 cases, only 66 of those where histologically verified, most of those were affecting great joints like hip, knee and shoulder, but if SC is not frequent in this sites, is even more infrequent on temporomandibular joint. The aim of this paper is to report a clinical case and at the same time to realize a brief review of the literature.

  9. Three-dimensional versus two-dimensional sonography of the temporomandibular joint in comparison to MRI

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    Landes, Constantin A. [Oral, Maxillofacial and Plastic Facial Surgery, Frankfurt University Medical Centre, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60596 Frankfurt (Germany)]. E-mail: c.landes@lycos.com; Goral, Wojciech A. [Oral, Maxillofacial and Plastic Facial Surgery, Frankfurt University Medical Centre, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60596 Frankfurt (Germany)]. E-mail: w.goral@gmx.de; Sader, Robert [Oral, Maxillofacial and Plastic Facial Surgery, Frankfurt University Medical Centre, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60596 Frankfurt (Germany)]. E-mail: r.sader@em.uni-frankfurt.de; Mack, Martin G. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt University Medical Centre, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60596 Frankfurt (Germany)]. E-mail: martinmack@arcor.de

    2007-02-15

    Aim: To compare clinical feasibility of static two-dimensional (2D) to three-dimensional (3D) sonography of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in assessment of disk dislocation and joint degeneration compared to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Method: Thirty-three patients, 66 TMJ were prospectively sonographed 2D and 3D (8-12.5 MHz step motor scan), in occlusion and maximum opening with a probe position parallel inferior to the zygomatic arch. Axial 2D images were judged independent from the 3D scans; 3D volumes were cut axial, sagittal, frontal and rotated in real-time. Disk position and joint degeneration were assessed and compared to a subsequent MRI examination. Results: The specific appearance of the disk was hypoechogenic overlying a hyperechogenic condyle in axial (2D) or sagittal and frontal (3D) viewing. Specificity of 2D sonography for disk dislocation was 63%, sensitivity 58%, accuracy 64%, positive predictive value 46%, negative predictive value 73%; for joint degeneration synonymously 59/68/61/38/83%. 3D sonography for disk displacement reached synonymously 68/60/69/51/76%, for joint degeneration 75/65/73/48/86%. 2D sonographic diagnoses of disk dislocation in the closed mouth position and of joint degeneration showed significantly different results from the expected values (MRI) in {chi} {sup 2} testing; 3D diagnoses of disk dislocation in closed mouth position, of joint degeneration, 2D and 3D diagnoses in open mouth position were nonsignificant. Conclusions: Acceptable was the overall negative predictive value, as specificity and accuracy for joint degeneration in 3D. 3D appears superior diagnosing disk dislocation in closed mouth position as for overall joint degeneration. Sensitivity, accuracy and positive predictive value will have to ameliorate with future equipment of higher resolution in real-time 2D and 3D, if sonographic screening shall be clinically applied prior to MRI.

  10. The application of magnetic resonance imaging in temporomandibular joint pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehmedov, E.T.; Qahramanov, E.T.

    2007-01-01

    The diseases and damages of temporomandibular joint have compleceted diagnostic unlike other bone-joint pathologies. In 2005 for the first time in history it was implemented the magnetic resonance imaging in diagnostics of patients with with temporomandibular joints pathology. The current researches are in place till today. Being the golden standart the application of magnetic resonance tomography has a great role in differential diagnostics of the chronic arthritis, sclerosanse, deformanse arthrosis and arthrosis with internal derancement. This method guaranteed the correct valuation of the bone, disc and muscle structures of the joint and therefore brought full clearance into the problem

  11. The role of molecular pain biomarkers in temporomandibular joint internal derangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernberg, M

    2017-06-01

    There is evidence that low-grade inflammation may be responsible for pain and development of degenerative changes in temporomandibular joint internal derangement. This article reviews the current knowledge of the molecular mechanisms behind TMJ internal derangements. A non-systematic search was carried out in PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane library for studies regarding pathophysiological mechanisms behind internal derangements focusing on pain-mediating inflammatory and cartilage-degrading molecules. Recent data suggest that release of cytokines may be the key event for pain and cartilage destruction in TMJ internal derangements. Cytokines promote the release of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and due to hypoxia, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is released. This activates chondrocytes to produce MMPs and reduce their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs) as well as the recruitment of osteoclasts, ultimately leading to cartilage and bone resorption. Also, proteoglycans have an important role in this process. Several cytokines, MMPs, TIMPs and VEGF have been identified in higher concentrations in the TMJ synovial fluid of patients with painful internal derangements and shown to be associated with the degree of degeneration. Other molecules that show elevated levels include hyaluronic acid synthase, disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTs), aggrecan, fibromodulin, biglycan and lumican. Taken together, more or less pronounced inflammation of TMJ structures with release of cytokines, MMPs and other molecular markers that interact in a complex manner may be responsible for tissue degeneration in internal derangements. As internal derangements may be symptom-free, the degree of inflammation, but also other mechanisms, may be important for pain development. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. 18F-NaF PET/CT for the evaluation of temporomandibular joint disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, M S; Park, S H; Kim, Y-K; Yun, P-Y; Lee, W W

    2018-04-01

    To investigate the usefulness of a quantitative parameter (maximum standardised uptake value [SUVmax]) of 18 F-sodium fluoride (NaF) positron-emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) for the evaluation of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder (TMD). Seventy-six TMD patients (male: female=14:62, age=40.3±17.1 years, bilateral: unilateral=40:36) with 152 TMJs were enrolled. The 18 F-NaF PET/CT parameter (SUVmax) was compared with the presence of TMJ arthralgia (arthralgic=86, non-arthralgic=66) and clinical subtypes based on the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD Axis I (TMD osteoarthritis=49, non-TMD osteoarthritis=67, and asymptomatic TMJ=36). Splint therapy was applied to 48 patients for 6 months without considering 18 F-NaF PET/CT findings. Post-splint therapy 18 F-NaF PET/CT was performed in 32 patients and clinical responses to the therapy were classified into improvement (n=33), no change (n=10), or aggravation (n=7) for 50 TMJs excluding asymptomatic TMJs (n=14). SUVmax was significantly greater in arthralgic TMJs than in non-arthralgic TMJs (6.62±3.56 versus 4.32±1.53, pchange in SUVmax was observed in improved (from 6.16±2.68 to 6.09±2.60, p=0.4915) and unchanged (from 6.46±4.19 to 6.77±4.32, p=0.3223) TMJs. 18 F-NaF PET/CT is a useful imaging tool for TMD evaluation because SUVmax showed a fair diagnostic performance for arthralgic TMJ and TMD osteoarthritis, and a correlation with the therapeutic response. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparison between cone beam computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry and Institute of Oral Biology, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    To compare and evaluate the diagnostic ability of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). CBCT and MRI of 46 TMJs of 23 patients with TMJ disorders were evaluated. They were divided into 3 groups according to the position of the articular disc of the TMJ at closed mouth position and the reduction of the disc during open mouth position on MRI: no disc displacement group (NDD), disc displacement with reduction group (DDR), and disc displacement without reduction group (DDWR). With PACS viewing software, position of mandibular condyle in the articular fossa, osseous change of mandibular condyle, shape of articular fossa, and mediolateral and anteroposterior dimensions of mandibular condyle were evaluated on CBCT and MRI. Each value was tested statistically. The position of mandibular condyle in the articular fossa were concentric in the NDD, DDR, and DDWR of CBCT and NDD of MRI. However, condyle was positioned posteriorly in DDR and DDWR of MRI. Flattening, sclerosis and osteophyte of the mandibular condyle were much more apparent on DDR of CBCT than MRI. And the erosion of the condyle was much more apparent on DDWR of MRI than CBCT. Box and Sigmoid types of articular fossa were found most frequently in DDR of MRI. Flattened type was found most frequently in DDR of CBCT and deformed type was found most frequently in DDWR of CBCT. No significant difference in mediolateral and anteroposterior dimensions were shown on CBCT and MRI. Since MRI and CBCT has unique diagnostic imaging ability, both modalities should be used together to supplement each other to evaluate TMJ.

  14. Reactive arthritis in relation to internal derangements of the temporomandibular joint: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Bodil; Holmlund, Anders; Wretlind, Bengt; Jalal, Shah; Rosén, Annika

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to find out if reactive arthritis was involved in the aetiology of chronic closed lock of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) by looking for bacterial antigens in the synovial membrane of the TMJ, and by studying the antibody serology and carriage of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) B27 in patients with chronic closed lock. Patients with reciprocal clicking and healthy subjects acted as controls. We studied a total of 43 consecutive patients, 15 with chronic closed lock, 13 with reciprocal clicking, and 15 healthy controls with no internal derangements of the TMJ. Venous blood samples were collected from all subjects for measurement of concentrations of HLA tissue antigen and serology against Chlamydia trachomatis, Yersinia enterocolitica, Salmonella spp., Campylobacter jejuni, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Samples of synovial tissue from patients with closed lock and reciprocal clicking were obtained during discectomy and divided into two pieces, the first of which was tested by strand displacement amplification for the presence of C trachomatis, and the second of which was analysed for the presence of species-specific bacterial DNA using 16s rRNA pan-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). There were no significant differences between the groups in the incidence of antibodies against M pneumoniae, Salmonella spp. or Y enterocolitica. No patient had antibodies towards C trachomatis or C jejuni. We found no bacterial DNA in the synovial fluid from any patient. The HLA B27 antigen was present in 2/15 subjects in both the closed lock and control groups, and none in the reciprocal clicking group. In conclusion, reactive arthritis does not seem to be the mechanism of internal derangement of the TMJ. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. The Relationship between Osseous Changes of the Temporomandibular Joint and RDC/TMD Groups in CBCT Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahrokh Imanimoghaddam

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD are the most common disorders of the jaw, and despite their clinical importance, they are not completely understood. This study was aimed to evaluate the changes of temporomandibular joint (TMJ on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT images in disc displacement vs. osteoarthritis of the TMJ. Methods: In this study, 45 patients, including 37 women and 8 men (13-89 years of age, were examined. The patients were selected based on RDC/TMD criteria and group I disorders were excluded from the study. Accordingly, group II consisted of 43 joints with jaw clicking or displaced discs, and group III comprised 46 joints with crepitus. CBCT images in sagittal, coronal, and axial sections were examined to assess osseous changes in terms of flattening, sclerosis, erosion, resorption, and osteophyte formation. Data were analyzed using statistical tests including the chi-square, Mann-Whitney, and Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests with the confidence interval of 95%. Results: Mann-Whitney test for the comparison of mean age between groups II and III was not statistically significant (p value=0.06. A significant differences was found between two (RDC/TMD groups according to the prevalence of condylar erosion, resorption, and osteophyte (p

  16. Study on the effectiveness of the kinetic method in patients with rheumatic diseases and temporomandibular joint dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havriş, Maria Daniela; Ancuţa, Codrina; Iordache, Cristina; Chirieac, Rodica Marieta

    2012-01-01

    Selecting the appropriate treatment decision is essential for achieving optimal results in the management of algo-dysfunctional syndrome of the temporo-mandibular joint (TMJD). The study aims to decide on the most effective (symptomatic control, preserved motility) kinetic program in patients with TMJ involvement. prospective observational study on 83 consecutive patients with rheumatic diseases and TMJ dysfunction. Clinical assessment (pain, noises, muscle spasm, range of motion, ROM) was performed at baseline and after 3 months of specific kinetic rehabilitation program. Change in clinical parameters and TM3 index was reported, pposture (head, neck and trunk), normal mastication, swallowing and respiration, as well as correction of neuromuscular imbalances in patients with TMJD secondary to rheumatic disorders.

  17. Management of temporomandibular joint disorders caused by complication of teeth extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endang Syamsuddin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Complicated tooth extractions may lead to various post-extraction complications, including Temporomandibular Joint Disorders (TMD. Despite of the rare incidence, a delayed treatment of the TMD will cause more problems in the future as well as increased morbidity rate. The purpose of the current study was to elaborate the symptoms as well as the management of TMD as a post tooth extraction complication. The types of TMD as a post tooth extraction complication includes dislocated condyle, osteoarthritis, fracture condyle and disc displacement. These type of complications may resulted from an extensive opening of the mouth as well as an over pressure on the mandible during tooth extraction. In relation to this, some of the TMD symptoms that might cause a certain level of interference for patients may include pain, limited mouth opening and joint sounds, with pain and limited mouth opening as the initial symptoms. The first measure of the pain management would be warm light compress around the TMJ followed by a soft diet for food intake. A definitive treatment should then be based on the diagnosis of the TMD. It is concluded that TMD may occur as a complication of a tooth extraction that initiated by pain and limited mouth opening. Immediate treatment would be pain relieve and load reduction of the Temporomandibular Joint by employing soft diet and mandibular movement restriction.

  18. Temporomandibular Joint Anatomy Assessed by CBCT Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Caruso

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Since cone beam computed tomography (CBCT has been used for the study of craniofacial morphology, the attention of orthodontists has also focused on the mandibular condyle. The purpose of this brief review is to summarize the recent 3D CBCT images of mandibular condyle. Material and Methods. The eligibility criteria for the studies are (a studies aimed at evaluating the anatomy of the temporomandibular joint; (b studies performed with CBCT images; (c studies on human subjects; (d studies that were not clinical case-reports and clinical series; (e studies reporting data on children, adolescents, or young adults (data from individuals with age ≤ 30 years. Sources included PubMed from June 2008 to June 2016. Results. 43 full-text articles were initially screened for eligibility. 13 full-text articles were assessed for eligibility. 11 articles were finally included in qualitative synthesis. The main topics treated in the studies are the volume and surface of the mandibular condyle, the bone changes on cortical surface, the facial asymmetry, and the optimum position of the condyle in the glenoid fossa. Conclusion. Additional studies will be necessary in the future, constructed with longitudinal methodology, especially in growing subjects. The limits of CBCT acquisitions are also highlighted.

  19. Temporomandibular joint movement; Evaluation of protrusive splint therapy with GRASS MR imaging

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    Maeda, M.; Itou, S.; Ishii, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Kawamura, Y.; Matsuda, T.; Hayashi, N.; Ishii, J. (Dept. of Radiology, Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Fukui Medical School (Japan))

    1992-09-01

    Ten temporomandibular joints (TMJs) of 5 healthy volunteers and 19 TMJs of internal derangements in 16 patients with splint therapy were examined with MR imaging. T1-weighted images were obtained only in the closed mouth position, and gradient recalled acquisition in steady state (GRASS) images were obtained in active opening and closing phases, allowing a pseudodynamic display of TMJ movement. All patients received protrusive splint treatment. The usefulness of MR imaging to assess the efficacy of splint therapy was evaluated. Corrected disk position with the splint in place was clearly demonstrated in 9 TMJs, corresponding with elimination of reciprocal clicking. Ten other TMJs of anterior disk displacement without reduction showed uncorrected disk position by the splint. This information could confirm the therapeutic efficacy, or suggest other treatment alternatives. GRASS MR imaging can provide accurate and physiologic information about disk function in initial and follow-up assessment of protrusive splint therapy. (orig.).

  20. Correlation between internal derangement and osteoarthrosis in the temporomandibular joint using magnetic resonance imaging

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    Song, Haeng Un; Choi, Sun Young; Koh, Kwang Joon [School of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-15

    To evaluate the relationship between internal derangement and osteoarthrosis in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). One hundred and six MR images of TMJs in 53 patients were evaluated. Disc displacements and osseous changes of the TMJs were assessed. Lateral and rotational disc displacements were also evaluated on coronal images. No significant differences in the frequency of osseous changes of the TMJs between disc displacement with reduction and disc displacement without reduction groups were found. The erosion of the condylar head and the sclerosis of the articular eminence were more frequent in the internal derangement group than in the no disc displacement group. The flattening was the most frequently observed osseous change of both the condylar head and articular eminence. The relationship between internal derangement and osteoarthrosis is obscure, but it is thought that both disorders adversely affect each other.

  1. Correlation between internal derangement and osteoarthrosis in the temporomandibular joint using magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Haeng Un; Choi, Sun Young; Koh, Kwang Joon

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between internal derangement and osteoarthrosis in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). One hundred and six MR images of TMJs in 53 patients were evaluated. Disc displacements and osseous changes of the TMJs were assessed. Lateral and rotational disc displacements were also evaluated on coronal images. No significant differences in the frequency of osseous changes of the TMJs between disc displacement with reduction and disc displacement without reduction groups were found. The erosion of the condylar head and the sclerosis of the articular eminence were more frequent in the internal derangement group than in the no disc displacement group. The flattening was the most frequently observed osseous change of both the condylar head and articular eminence. The relationship between internal derangement and osteoarthrosis is obscure, but it is thought that both disorders adversely affect each other.

  2. Magnetization transfer contrast on gradient echo MR imaging of the temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niitsu, M.; Hirohata, H.; Yoshioka, H.; Anno, I.; Campeau, N.G.; Itai, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Thirty-nine temporomandibular joints (TMJ) from 20 patients with suspected internal derangements were imaged by a 1.5 T MR imager. The on-resonance binomial magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) pulse was applied to gradient echo images with a dual receiver coil (9 s/section). With the use of an opening device, a series of sequential images were obtained at increments of mouth opening and closing. The tissue signal intensities with (Ms) and without (Mo) MTC were measured and subjective image analysis was performed. Compared with the standard images, MTC technique provided selective signal suppression of disks. The average of Ms/Mo ratio of the disks (0.56) was lower than that of the retrodiskal pad (0.79) and of the effusion (0.89). With MTC technique, fluid conspicuity was superior to standard image. However, no significant superiority was found in disk definition subjectively. (orig.)

  3. Pathogenesis of post-traumatic ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakeri, Gururaj; Kusanale, Atul; Zaki, Graeme A; Brennan, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    Many factors have been implicated in the development of bony ankylosis following trauma to the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) or ankylosis that recurs after surgical treatment for the condition. Although many reports have been published, to our knowledge very little has been written about the pathogenesis of the process and there are few scientific studies. Over the last 70 years various treatments have been described. Different methods have been used with perceived favourable outcomes although recurrence remains a problem in many cases, and ankylosis presents a major therapeutic challenge. We present a critical review of published papers and discuss the various hypotheses regarding the pathogenesis of the condition. Copyright © 2010 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Diagnostic reliability of 3.0-T MRI for detecting osseous abnormalities of the temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Kunihiko; Amemiya, Toshihiko; Hirai, Shigenori; Hayashi, Yusuke; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Honda, Masahiko; Sisounthone, Johnny; Matsumoto, Kunihito; Honda, Kazuya

    2018-01-01

    We compared the diagnostic reliability of 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detection of osseous abnormalities of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) with that of the gold standard, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Fifty-six TMJs were imaged with CBCT and MRI, and images of condyles and fossae were independently assessed for the presence of osseous abnormalities. The accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of 3.0-T MRI were 0.88, 1.0, and 0.73, respectively, in condyle evaluation and 0.91, 0.75, and 0.95 in fossa evaluation. The McNemar test showed no significant difference (P > 0.05) between MRI and CBCT in the evaluation of osseous abnormalities in condyles and fossae. The present results indicate that 3.0-T MRI is equal to CBCT in the diagnostic evaluation of osseous abnormalities of the mandibular condyle.

  5. Short-term changes in temporomandibular joint function in subjects with cleft lip and palate treated with maxillary distraction osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, K; Otsuka, R; Minato, A; Sato-Wakabayashi, M; Takada, J; Inoue-Arai, M S; Miyamoto, J J; Ono, T; Ohyama, K; Moriyama, K

    2008-05-01

    To investigate the short-term effects of maxillary distraction osteogenesis (DO) on temporomandibular joint (TMJ) function in 21 subjects with cleft lip and palate (CLP). Design - Morphological changes in the maxillofacial region were measured using lateral cephalometric radiographs taken immediately before (pre-DO) and after DO (post-DO) and 1 year after DO (1-year follow-up). A questionnaire was evaluated using a visual analog scale. A chi-square test was used to compare the prevalence of TMJ symptoms between pre-DO and 1-year follow-up. The Spearman correlation coefficient was used to determine the correlation between changes in cephalometric variables and TMJ symptoms in association with maxillary DO. Statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. Results - The ANB (anteroposterior relationship of the maxilla with the mandible) angle and the mandibular plane angle at pre-DO, post-DO, and 1-year follow-up were -4.3 degrees , +5.8 degrees , +4.3 degrees and 32.1 degrees , 33.5 degrees , 33.6 degrees , respectively. The average amounts of anterior and downward movement of the maxilla at post-DO and 1-year follow-up were 8.3, -1.3 and 0.9, 1.1 mm, respectively. The prevalence of TMJ symptoms showed no significant increase in association with maxillary DO. Moreover, there was no significant correlation between changes in cephalometric variables and TMJ symptoms. Conclusion - These results suggest that there was no short-term (i.e., up to 1 year after DO) effect of maxillary DO on TMJ function in subjects with CLP.

  6. [Changes in ingestive behavior during growth affects the functional maturation of temporomandibular joint nociceptive neurons of rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiranuma, Maya

    2013-03-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) loading during development promotes its growth and maintains normal structure/function. Continuous change in diet consistency is related to development and maturation of the peripheral nervous system, including the nociceptive system. However, the functional modulation of TMJ-nociceptive neurons under different ingestive behavior is unclear. We fed growing rats a liquid diet to investigate the effects of low TMJ loading on the response properties of neurons in the trigeminal spinal tract subnucleus caudalis (Sp5C). Forty 2-week-old male rats were used. They were fed chow pellets (n = 20, C group) or a liquid diet (n = 20, LD group) soon after weaning. Firing activities of single sensory units in response to TMJ pressure stimuli were recorded at 4, 5, 7 and 9 weeks. In TMJ-nociceptive neurons, the firing threshold (FT) in the LD group was significantly lower than that in the C group at each recording age. The FT in the C group remained unchanged throughout the recording period, whereas that in the LD group was the highest at 4 weeks, and gradually decreased. On the other hand, the initial firing frequency (IFF) was significantly higher in the LD group than in the C group at each recording age. The IFF in the C group remained unchanged throughout the experimental period, whereas that in the LD group was at its lowest at 4 weeks, and gradually increased. Based on these findings, ingestive behavior that results from continuous changes in the physical consistency of the diet during growth may affect the functional maturation of TMJ-nociceptive neurons.

  7. Effects of chronic sleep deprivation on the extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway in the temporomandibular joint of rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Ma

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To examine the possible involvement and regulatory mechanisms of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK pathway in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ of rats subjected to chronic sleep deprivation (CSD. METHODS: Rats were subjected to CSD using the modified multiple platform method (MMPM. The serum levels of corticosterone (CORT and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH were tested and histomorphology and ultrastructure of the TMJ were observed. The ERK and phospho-ERK (p-ERK expression levels were detected by Western blot analysis, and the MMP-1, MMP-3, and MMP-13 expression levels were detected by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR and Western blotting. RESULTS: The elevated serum CORT and ACTH levels confirmed that the rats were under CSD stress. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE staining and scanning electron microscopy (SEM showed pathological alterations in the TMJ following CSD; furthermore, the p-ERK was activated and the mRNA and protein expression levels of MMP-1, MMP-3, and MMP-13 were upregulated after CSD. In the rats administered with the selective ERK inhibitor U0126, decreased tissue destruction was observed. Phospho-ERK activation was visibly blocked and the MMP-1, MMP-3, and MMP-13 mRNA and protein levels were lower than the corresponding levels in the CSD without U0126 group. CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that CSD activates the ERK pathway and upregulates the MMP-1, MMP-3, and MMP-13 mRNA and protein levels in the TMJ of rats. Thus, CSD induces ERK pathway activation and causes pathological alterations in the TMJ. ERK may be associated with TMJ destruction by promoting the expression of MMPs.

  8. Total antioxidant capacity and total oxidant status of synovial fluids in patients with temporomandibular joint pain and dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etöz, Osman A; Akçay, Hüseyin; Neşelioğlu, Salim; Erel, Özcan; Alkan, Alper

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether a relationship exists between total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and total oxidant status (TOS) of synovial fluids (SFs) of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain patients with pain and dysfunction. Forty-two patients with TMJ pain were included in this study. TAC and TOS values of SFs were measured with a novel colorimetric method. Independent t test and correlations were used to analyze the data. TAC of SFs in patients with TMJ pain and limited mouth opening (LMO; n = 21) were significantly lower (P = 0.03) than patients without LMO (n = 21). TOS of SF was negatively correlated with duration of the disease. There was no correlation between TAC, TOS, and VAS scores of the patients as well as age and maximum mouth opening values. Antioxidant response to oxidative changes (TAC and TOS) in SF decreased as the stage of dysfunction increased. Local administration of antioxidant agents might be considered in management of TMJ pain and dysfunction to prevent possible increased oxidative stress.

  9. A comparative study of the skeletal morphology of the temporo-mandibular joint of children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, F; Liu, Y; Hu, K; Zhao, Y; Kong, L; Zhou, S

    2008-01-01

    The skeletal morphology of the temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) is constantly remodeled. A comparative study was undertaken to determine and characterize the differences in the skeletal morphology of TMJ of children and adults. The study was conducted on 30 children cadavers and 30 adult volunteers. Parameters that could reflect TMJ skeletal morphology were measured with a new technology combining helical computed tomography (CT) scan with multi-planar reformation (MPR) imaging. Significant differences between children cadavers and adults were found in the following parameters (P<0.05): Condylar axis inclination, smallest area of condylar neck/largest area of condylar process, inclination of anterior slope in inner, middle, and outer one-third of condyle, anteroposterior/mediolateral dimension of condyle, length of anterior slope/posterior slope in inner and middle one-third of condyle, anteroposterior dimension of condyle/glenoid fossa, mediolateral dimension of condyle/glenoid fossa, inclination of anterior slope of glenoid fossa, depth of glenoid fossa, and anteroposterior/mediolateral dimension of glenoid fossa. There are significant differences of TMJ skeletal morphology between children and adults.

  10. A comparative study of the skeletal morphology of the temporo-mandibular joint of children and adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng F

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The skeletal morphology of the temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ is constantly remodeled. Aims and Objectives: A comparative study was undertaken to determine and characterize the differences in the skeletal morphology of TMJ of children and adults. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 30 children cadavers and 30 adult volunteers. Parameters that could reflect TMJ skeletal morphology were measured with a new technology combining helical computed tomography (CT scan with multi-planar reformation (MPR imaging. Results: Significant differences between children cadavers and adults were found in the following parameters ( P < 0.05: Condylar axis inclination, smallest area of condylar neck/largest area of condylar process, inclination of anterior slope in inner, middle, and outer one-third of condyle, anteroposterior/mediolateral dimension of condyle, length of anterior slope/posterior slope in inner and middle one-third of condyle, anteroposterior dimension of condyle/glenoid fossa, mediolateral dimension of condyle/glenoid fossa, inclination of anterior slope of glenoid fossa, depth of glenoid fossa, and anteroposterior/mediolateral dimension of glenoid fossa. Conclusion: There are significant differences of TMJ skeletal morphology between children and adults.

  11. Using three-dimensional-computerized tomography as a diagnostic tool for temporo-mandibular joint ankylosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, S Y; Chou, J; Lo, J; Yang, J; Chou, A P; Joe, C J; Chang, R C

    1999-04-01

    Roentgenographic examination has long been a useful diagnostic tool for temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) disease. The methods include TMJ tomography, panoramic radiography and computerized tomography (CT) scan with or without injection of contrast media. Recently, three-dimensional CT (3D-CT), reconstructed from the two-dimensional image of a CT scan to simulate the soft tissue or bony structure of the real target, was proposed. In this report, a case of TMJ ankylosis due to traumatic injury is presented. 3D-CT was employed as one of the presurgical roentgenographic diagnostic tools. The conventional radiographic examination including panoramic radiography and tomography showed lesions in both sides of the mandible. CT scanning further suggested that the right-sided lesion was more severe than that on the left. With 3D-CT image reconstruction the size and extent of the lesions were clearly observable. The decision was made to proceed with an initial surgical approach on the right side. With condylectomy and condylar replacement using an autogenous costochondral graft on the right side, the range of mouth opening improved significantly. In this case report, 3D-CT demonstrates its advantages as a tool for the correct and precise diagnosis of TMJ ankylosis.

  12. Expression of lumican related to CD34 and VEGF in the articular disc of the human temporomandibular joint.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kiga

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Lumican belongs to the small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan (SLRP gene family and has been reported to exist in the cornea, intervertebral disc and tendon. Lumican plays a significant role in the assembly and regulation of collagen fibres. The human temporomandibular joint (TMJ disc is made up of fibrocartilage with an extracellular matrix (ECM composed of collagen and proteoglycans. The existence and behaviour of lumican have not been studied in the human TMJ disc. Therefore, we used immunohistochemical methods to detect lumican, CD34 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and histochemical staining with toluidine blue in 13 human TMJ specimens (10 surgically removed and 3 obtained from autopsy. In both normal and deformed discs we observed staining with toluidine blue. We found that the area of metachromasia inside the deformed disc was uneven and expression of lumican was strong in the areas negative for metachromasia. Staining of VEGF and CD34 inside the deformed disc was seen. We confirmed the expression of lumican in the human TMJ disc and showed that a large number of fibroblastlike cells existed in the area of strong lumican expression. These new findings about the behaviour of lumican suggest that it may play a key role in the generation of a new collagen network by fibroblast-like cells.

  13. Temporomandibular Joint Disorders – A Few Interesting Experiences to Share

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Chattopadhyay

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint disorders rarely present in a very direct way. Often, the complaints are far away from the joint itself, making the diagnosis difficult. But a high index of suspicion and a good clinical idea often clinches the diagnosis in many cases of otalgia with apparently no definitive finding.

  14. Normal magnetic resonance appearances of the temporomandibular joints in children and young adults aged 2-18 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angenete, Oskar W.; Augdal, Thomas A.; Jellestad, Stig; Rygg, Marite; Rosendahl, Karen

    2018-01-01

    Knowledge of normal appearances of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is paramount when assessing the joint for disease in juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Reliable features defining normal TMJs in children are limited. To establish reliable normal standards for the TMJ at magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We included children and young adults aged 2-18 years undergoing a head MRI for reasons not believed to affect the TMJs. We assessed TMJ anatomy and contrast enhancement using a high-resolution 3-D T1-weighted sequence. We noted joint fluid and bone marrow oedema based on a T2-weighted sequence. Three experienced radiologists read all examinations twice in consensus and defined intraobserver consensus agreement. We evaluated the TMJs in 101 children and young adults (45 female), mean age 10.7 years (range 2-18 years). The intraobserver consensus agreement for the assessment of anterior condylar inclination in the sagittal/oblique plane was moderate to good (Cohen κ=0.7 for the right side). Cohen κ for intraobserver consensus agreement for condylar shape in the coronal plane on a 0-2 scale was 0.4 for the right and 0.6 for the left. Intraobserver agreement for measurement of joint space height and assessment of bone marrow oedema was poor. There was a statistically significant increase in anterior inclination by age in the sagittal plane on a 0-2 scale (P<0.0001). Eighty percent of the condyles showed a rounded shape in the coronal plane while 20% showed mild flattening. Thirty-five of 36 right TMJs showed contrast enhancement (mild enhancement in 32 joints, moderate in 3 joints). Subjective assessment of the anterior condylar inclination in the sagittal/oblique plane and condylar flattening in the coronal plane can be considered precise features for describing TMJ anatomy in healthy children. There is an increasing anterior inclination by age. Mild contrast enhancement of the TMJs should be considered a normal finding. (orig.)

  15. Usefulness of dual echo volumetric isotropic turbo spin echo acquisition (VISTA) in MR imaging of the temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimori, Yuko; Tanaka, Shigeko; Naito, Yukari; Nishimura, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Akira; Miki, Yukio; Ohfuji, Satoko; Katsumata, Yasutomo

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the ability to detect the articular disk and joint effusion of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of a method of dual echo volumetric isotropic turbo spin echo acquisition (DE-VISTA) additional fusion images (AFI). DE-VISTA was performed in the 26 TMJ of 13 volunteers and 26 TMJ of 13 patients. Two-dimensional (2D) dual echo turbo spin echo was performed in the 26 TMJ of 13 volunteers. On a workstation, we added proton density-weighted images (PDWI) and T 2 weighted images (T 2 WI) of the DE-VISTA per voxel to reconstruct DE-VISTA-AFI. Two radiologists reviewed these images visually and quantitatively. Visual evaluation of the articular disk was equivalent between DE-VISTA-AFI and 2D-PDWI. The sliding thin-slab multiplanar reformation (MPR) method of DE-VISTA-AFI could detect all articular disks. The ratio of contrast (CR) of adipose tissue by the articular disk to that of the articular disk itself was significantly higher in DE-VISTA-AFI than DE-VISTA-PDWI (P 2 WI but in only 3 of those joints in 2D-T 2 WI. The CR of joint effusion to adipose tissue on DE-VISTA-AFI did not differ significantly from that on DE-VISTA-PDWI. However, using DE-VISTA-T 2 WI in addition to DE-VISTA-PDWI, we could visually identify joint effusion on DE-VISTA-AFI that could not be identified on DE-VISTA-PDWI alone. DE-VISTA-AFI can depict the articular disk and a small amount of joint effusion by the required plane of MPR using the sliding thin-slab MPR method. (author)

  16. Usefulness of quantitative SPECT in unilateral temporomandibular joint disorder: correlation with signs and symptoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ho Sung; Jeong, Jong Cheol; Kim, Keon Jung; Choi, Jae Sun; Sung, Dae Kyung; Lee, Gye Huyk; Kim, Jong Ho

    1998-01-01

    The aims of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of Conventional Radiography (CR). Radionuclide Angiography (RNA). Planar Scintigraphy (PS) and Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) for the evaluation of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder; and to show whether technetium-99m-MDP uptake on quantitative SPECT correlated with the symptom and/or signs. Three Phase Bone Scintigraphy (TPBS) and SPECT of both TMJ were performed in 51 patients (M : F = 10 : 41 mean age= 30.4 :28.6, respectively) with unilateral TMJ disorder after an intravenous injection of 25 mCi (925 MBq) of 99mTc-MDP. Data were analyzed by creating three regions of interest (ROIs) over designated areas both on the PS and SPECT: Lesion (L). Non-lesion(NL) which is contralateral to L and Background (BG). L/ NL and L/BG (=[(L-BG)/500,000] x 100 (%)] ratios were calculated for each patients. L/NL ratios on SPECT were compared according to the symptom/signs or not. There was a fair correlation of L/N values between three slice-and seven slice-added SPECT images (r=0.5124, p=0.006, y=0.5588 + 0.5414X). The percentages of symptoms or signs were: pain (76.5%), mouth opening limitation (49.0%), joint sound (39.2%), discomfort (43.1%), headache(27.5%), neck stiffness (21.6%), closed lock (5.9%) / tenderness (47.1%), joint click (54.9%) and limitation of maximum mouth opening (45.1%). The Sensitive of SPECT(86.3%) was better than PS(66.7%), RNA(27.5%), and CR(26.3%). According to the presence of symptom/sign or not, comparative analysis of L/NL ratios on SPECT showed a fair correlation in pain (1.16 : 1.11) mouth opening limitation (1.21 : 1.09), joint sound (1.19 : 1.08), discomfort (1.22 : 1.09), headache (1.19: 1.13), tenderness (1.16 : 1.14) and limitation of maximum mouth opening (1.16 : 1.13), but little correlation in neck stiffness (1.12 : 1.15), closed lock (1.06 : 1.15), dislocation (1.08 : 1.15) joint click (1.12 : 1.18). In conclusion, quantitative SPECT is the noninvasive

  17. Hypersensitivity to mechanical and intra-articular electrical stimuli in persons with painful temporomandibular joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ayesh, Emad; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Svensson, P

    2007-01-01

    This study tested whether persons with TMJ arthralgia have a modality-specific and site-specific hypersensitivity to somatosensory stimuli assessed by quantitative sensory tests (QST). Forty-three healthy persons and 20 with TMJ arthralgia participated. The QST consisted of: sensory and pain dete...... of sensitization of the TMJs as well as central nociceptive pathways. QST may facilitate a mechanism-based classification of temporomandibular disorders. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Dec...

  18. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction syndrome. A clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passero, P L; Wyman, B S; Bell, J W; Hirschey, S A; Schlosser, W S

    1985-08-01

    We have presented two clinical case reports of patients with TMJ dysfunction syndrome as an example of coordinated treatments between dentists and physical therapists. The clinical profiles of these patients with craniocervical pain were compiled from comprehensive physical therapy and dental-orthopedic evaluations. The significance of the relationship between the rest position of the mandible and forward head posture has been shown by the changes observed after correction of the postural deviations and vertical resting dimensions by dental treatments and physical therapy. Additional research is necessary to determine long-term effects of this combined approach in TMJ dysfunction syndrome.

  19. [Computer-assisted temporomandibular joint reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwetyenga, N; Mommers, X-A; Cheynet, F

    2013-08-02

    Prosthetic replacement of TMJ is gradually becoming a common procedure because of good functional and aesthetic results and low morbidity. Prosthetic models available can be standard or custom-made. Custom-made prosthesis are usually reserved for complex cases, but we think that computer assistance for custom-made prosthesis should be indicated for each case because it gives a greater implant stability and fewer complications. Computer assistance will further enlarge TMJ prosthesis replacement indications. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  20. Comparison of the capsular width measured on ultrasonography and MR image of the temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tae Wan; Yoo, Dong Soo; Han, Won Jeong; Kim, Eun Kyung [Dankook University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-03-15

    To evaluate the reliability and clinical usefulness of ultrasonography in the temporomandibular joint(TMJ). Parasagittal and paracoronal 1.5 T MR images and 7.5 MHz ultrasonography of 40 TMJs in 20 asymptomatic volunteers were obtained. Disc position using MR imaging was evaluated and the distance between the lateral surface of mandibular condyle and the articular capsule using MR image and ultrasonography of 27 TMJs with normal disc position was measured and compared. Intraobserver and interobserver measurements reliability was evaluated by using interclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and measurement error. Also, the distance measured on ultrasonography was compared, according to mouth position and disc position. The normal disc position was found in 27 of 40 asymptomatic joints. At the intraobserver reliability of measurement, ICC at the closed and open mouth position were 0.89 and 0.91. The measurement error was 0.4% and 0.5%. At the interobserver reliability, ICC at the closed and open mouth position, the distances between the lateral surface of mandibular condyle and the articular capsule measured on MR images and ultrasonography were 2.0{+-} 0.7 mm, 1.8{+-}0.5 mm, respectively (p<0.05). On the ultrasonography, the distances at open mouth position were 1.2{+-}0.5 mm (p<0.05). At the TMJ with medially displaced disc, the distances at the closed and open mouth position were 1.3{+-}0.3 mm and 0.9{+-}0.2 mm (p<0.05). The results suggest ultrasonography of TMJ is a reliable imaging technique for assessment of normal disc position.

  1. Facial nerve injury following surgery for temporomandibular joint ankylosis: A prospective clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Gokkulakrishnan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate the incidence and degree of facial nerve damage and time taken for its recovery following surgery for temporomandibular joint (TMJ ankylosis. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 subjects with the TMJ ankylosis with or without history of previous surgery were included in this prospective study. House-Brackmann grading system was used to assess the function of the facial nerve post-operatively. Results: Most of the subjects were in the age range of 13-15 years. Eight subjects had bilateral ankylosis and remaining 22 had unilateral ankylosis. Out of 32 joints in which gap arthroplasty was performed, 4 had Grade 1 injury, 14 had Grade 2 injury, 12 had Grade 3, and 2 with the Grade 4 injury 24 h post-operatively. Whereas, out of 6 cases of interpositional arthroplasty 4 had Grade 1 injury and 2 had Grade 4 injury. According to House-Brackmann grading system, at 24 h, 78.9% patients had different grades of facial nerve injury, which gradually improved and came to normal limits within 1-3 months post-operatively. Comparison of change in the Grade of injury at 3 months follow-up as compared to baseline (24 h showed full recovery in all the cases (100% showing a statistically significant difference from baseline (P < 0.001. Conclusion: When proper care is taken during surgery for TMJ ankylosis, permanent facial nerve injury is rare. However, the incidence and degree of temporary nerve injury could be either due to the heavy retraction causing compression and or stretching of nerve fiber resulting in neuropraxia.

  2. Longitudinal course of temporomandibular joint sounds in Japanese children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torii Kengo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many epidemiological studies of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs in children and adolescents have been performed. However, the results of such studies have varied, and a comprehensive view of the prevalence and severity of symptoms and signs is difficult to obtain. In the present study, temporomandibular joint (TMJ sounds, which are the most common signs and symptoms of TMD, were observed longitudinally, and the need for treatment was evaluated. Methods Seventy individuals in six age groups (5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10 years old at the beginning of the observation period participated in an epidemiological investigation conducted between 1987 and 1992. During each clinical examination, the following parameters were examined: maximum unassisted jaw opening, TMJ clicking, and the coincidence or difference between the midlines of the upper central incisors and the lower central incisors. In addition, the bilateral bite force was recorded, and the numbers of erupted, decayed, and filled teeth were recorded. Results Eight individuals dropped out because they moved. No TMJ dysfunction requiring treatment was observed in this series. TMJ clicking was observed in 30 subjects (48%; however, this symptom was temporary in most of subjects (26 subjects; 42%, and only 3 subjects (5% had persistent clicking (continuing until the end of the observation period. The incidences of clicking were not significantly different among the six groups (x2 = 4.265. Clicking was significantly more common among girls (19 subjects than among boys (11 subjects; P = 0.042. A significantly lower bite force (17 ± 18 kg was recorded for the subjects with persistent clicking, compared with that of the other subjects (8- and 9-year-olds; mixed dentition without persistent clicking (32 ± 17 kg. The persistent clicking began at an age of 11 or 12 years (permanent dentition. Conclusion Most of the clicking observed in the children and adolescents was temporary, and no

  3. Prevalence of temporomandibular joint disorders and neck pain in musicians: a sytematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennatan Ferreira dos Santos

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: The instrumental practice for a long time, the high performance level, the strict technique and the specific shape of each musical instrument can take musicians to overcome their physiological limits, giving a high prevalence of musculoskeletal injuries. Objective: Investigate the prevalence of temporomandibular joint disorder and neck pain in musicians. Methods: Between August and September 2015 were reviewed five databases: LILACS, SciELO, Medline / PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science. The articles were read and evaluated by the criteria of the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE, items, that obtained a percentage above of 50 percent, were considered in the analysis of this work. Results: 15 articles attended the inclusion criteria. Among all musicians the prevalence of TMJ pain ranged from 10 - 81% and the prevalence of neck pain ranged from 29 - 80%. Conclusion: In this study was observed that the musicians showed both, temporomandibular joint disorders and neck pain, watching a high prevalence especially in violinists and the horn players. In the risk factors identified in the literature for the emergence of painful symptoms in musicians, stand out the biomechanical factors involved in maintaining anti-physiologic postures.

  4. A patient's view on the location of the temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koole, Paul; Zonnenberg, Adriaan J J; Mulder, Jan

    2018-03-25

    Objective A survey was held to establish whether laypeople knew the location of their temporomandibular joint. Methods A sample of 61 participants, visiting their dental office for a routine check-up, was given a three-question survey of whether they knew the location of their temporomandibular joint and could point to this location. Results Thirty-eight participants answered the question affirmatively. Only 13 pointed to the correct location. Of these, six participants received consultation for TMD in the past, three participants were healthcare providers, and four participants actually had knowledge of the exact location. Out of 23 participants who did not know the location, one accidently designated the correct position. Conclusion The location of the temporomandibular joint is not a well-known site for many patients. In the presence of orofacial pain, it seems advisable to let the patient designate and record the site of the pain on a drawing on the patient chart.

  5. Prevalence of the types of the petrotympanic fissure in the temporomandibular joint dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cakur, Binali; Sumbullu, Muhammed Akif; Durna, Dogan; Akgul, Hayati Murat

    2011-01-01

    Background Petrotympanic fissure (PTF) is a fissure in the temporal bone that runs from the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) to the tympanic cavity (TC). In PTF, the discomallear ligament (DML) connects the malleus in the tympanic cavity and the articular disc and capsule of the temporomandibular joint. PTF with the DML is a possible cause of aural symptoms related to temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMD). Purpose To investigate the prevalence of different types of PTF in TMD using dental volumetric tomography (DVT) and determine whether PTF type correlates with age. Material and Methods DVT scans in the sagittal planes of PTFs of 134 patients with TMD were examined for the types of PTF present. Three main PTF types were described: wide, tunnel-shaped structure (type 1); tunnel-shaped structure that is wide open in the PTF entrance to the mandibular fossa and gradually thins out in the tympanic cavity (type 2), tunnel-shaped structure that is wide open in the entrance of the mandibular fossa, with a middle region with a flat-shaped tunnel structure and a narrow exit in the tympanic cavity (type 3). Results In DVT scans, PTF types 1, 2 and 3 were seen in 67.2%, 1.5%, and 31.3% of cases, respectively. We found no significant relationship between age or gender and PTF type. Conclusion The low percentage of type 2 PTF and high percentage of type 1 PTF must be taken into consideration during pre-surgical planning related to TMD. However, future well-designed clinical studies involving larger numbers of subjects will be necessary to confirm the findings of this study

  6. Prevalence of the types of the petrotympanic fissure in the temporomandibular joint dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cakur, Binali; Sumbullu, Muhammed Akif; Durna, Dogan; Akgul, Hayati Murat (Dept. of Oral Diagnosis and Oral Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Ataturk Univ., Erzurum (Turkey)), email: bcakur@atauni.edu.tr

    2011-06-15

    Background Petrotympanic fissure (PTF) is a fissure in the temporal bone that runs from the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) to the tympanic cavity (TC). In PTF, the discomallear ligament (DML) connects the malleus in the tympanic cavity and the articular disc and capsule of the temporomandibular joint. PTF with the DML is a possible cause of aural symptoms related to temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMD). Purpose To investigate the prevalence of different types of PTF in TMD using dental volumetric tomography (DVT) and determine whether PTF type correlates with age. Material and Methods DVT scans in the sagittal planes of PTFs of 134 patients with TMD were examined for the types of PTF present. Three main PTF types were described: wide, tunnel-shaped structure (type 1); tunnel-shaped structure that is wide open in the PTF entrance to the mandibular fossa and gradually thins out in the tympanic cavity (type 2), tunnel-shaped structure that is wide open in the entrance of the mandibular fossa, with a middle region with a flat-shaped tunnel structure and a narrow exit in the tympanic cavity (type 3). Results In DVT scans, PTF types 1, 2 and 3 were seen in 67.2%, 1.5%, and 31.3% of cases, respectively. We found no significant relationship between age or gender and PTF type. Conclusion The low percentage of type 2 PTF and high percentage of type 1 PTF must be taken into consideration during pre-surgical planning related to TMD. However, future well-designed clinical studies involving larger numbers of subjects will be necessary to confirm the findings of this study

  7. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction in various rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.J. Aceves-Avila

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular disorder (TMD is an inclusive term in which those conditions disturbing the masticatory function are embraced. It has been estimated that 33% of the population have signs of TMD, but less than 5% of the population will require treatment. The objective of this study was to measure the frequency of TMD in rheumatoid arthritis (RA, osteoarthrosis (OA, ankylosing spondylitis (AS and systemic lupus erythematosus, and to define the limitations in everyday’s life that patients perceive when present. A six-month survey of consecutive outpatients in a rheumatology clinic in a teaching hospital in Mexico was carried out. We defined TMD as: 1 the presence of pain; 2 difficulty on mouth opening, chewing or speaking; 3 the presence of non-harmonic movements of the temporomaxilar joints. All three characteristics had to be present. Z test was used to define differences between proportions. We present the results of 171 patients. Overall, 50 patients had TMD according to our operational definition (29.24%. Up to 76% of the sample had symptoms associated with the condition. TMD is more frequent in OA and in AS (29.24% vs 38% OA, P=0.009; 39% AS; P=0.005. We found no association between the severity of TMD and the request for specific attention for the discomfort produced by the condition. Only 8 of 50 (16% patients with TMD had requested medical help for their symptoms, and they were not the most severe cases. TMD is more frequent in RA and OA. Although it may produce severe impairment, patients seem to adapt easily.

  8. managing temporomandibular joint dislocation in ibadan

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    general anaesthesia, excessive tooth abrasion, severe malocclusion ... Accidents and Emergency unit and the Dental clinic of the UCH Ibadan, ... Case 1: OO is a 45 year old male shoe maker. He .... This was the seventhepisode, the first episode having occurred .... incidence of TMJ dysfunction.2 Condylectomy is another ...

  9. Results of Combined, Single-Session Arthrocentesis and Dextrose Prolotherapy for Symptomatic Temporomandibular Joint Syndrome: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cezairli, Burak; Sivrikaya, Efe Can; Omezli, Mehmet Melih; Ayranci, Ferhat; Seyhan Cezairli, Neslihan

    2017-10-01

    Arthrocentesis and prolotherapy are nonsurgical treatments for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) diseases. This study aimed to evaluate the treatment of hypermobility, pain, and displacement of the TMJ by consecutively performing arthrocentesis and prolotherapy in the same session. In this study, 10 adults with disc displacement and painful, hypermobile TMJ were selected. Arthrocentesis and prolotherapy were consecutively performed using a 30% dextrose solution that was simultaneously injected into five areas: posterior disc attachment, superior joint space, superior and inferior capsular attachments, and stylomandibular ligament. Paired t-test, McNemar test, and chi-square test were used to assess the maximum mouth opening, clicking sounds, pain, and subluxation of the TMJ. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis and parafunctional habits such as teeth clenching and grinding and biting of the cheeks or any other objects and those who had undergone surgery were excluded from this study. A total of 10 participants (36.20 ± 7.06 years old, 7 women and 3 men) received a single treatment session of combined arthrocentesis and prolotherapy at the same office visit. Subluxation frequency and pain significantly decreased after the first week of treatment (p < 0.05). Subluxation also decreased at the 3-month follow-up (p < 0.05). Clicking sound values did not significantly change at any of the follow-up time points. Maximum mouth opening values decreased at all follow-up time points compared to baseline (p < 0.05). A single session of combined arthrocentesis and prolotherapy to treat symptomatic TMJ safely and significantly improved the subluxation and pain after 1 week and subluxation after 3 months compared to baseline status. The maximum mouth opening significantly decreased at all follow-up time points. Future studies assessing multiple treatment sessions are warranted.

  10. On the radiation exposure in temporomandibular joint examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rother, U.; Hildebrandt, K.H.

    1979-01-01

    The radiation exposure caused by standardized examinations of the temporomandibular joint has been determined with the aid of 660 exposures of an Alderson phantom. Comparative examinations were performed with the classic contact technique according to Parma to elucidate the results obtained. The lowest surface exposure was observed in contact examinations of the temporomandibular joint. Application of a flat cone led to a 13-fold reduction in surface exposure compared to contact examinations according to Parma. Furthermore, radiation exposure strongly decreased from the irradiation field to the adjacent area if a cone (flat cone and ear cone) was used. (author)

  11. Evaluation of aural manifestations in temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhy, O A; Koutb, A R; Abdel-Baki, F A; Ali, T M; El Raffa, I Z; Khater, A H

    2004-08-01

    Thirty patients with temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction were selected to investigate the changes in otoacoustic emissions before and after conservative treatment of their temporo-mandibular joints. Pure tone audiometry, transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE), distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) as well as a tinnitus questionnaire were administered to all patients before and after therapy. Therapy was conservative in the form of counselling, physiotherapy, anti-inflammatory agents, muscle relaxants, and occlusal splints. Results indicated insignificant changes in the TEOAEs, whereas there were significant increases in distortion product levels at most of the frequency bands. These results were paralleled to subjective improvement of tinnitus.

  12. MRI and arthrography in the evaluation of TMJ disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Ehara, Shigeru; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu; Kobayakawa, Takafumi.

    1991-01-01

    Arthrosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a noninfectious, noninflammatory condition characterized by joint pain, noise (clicking) and abnormal motion. It contains various disease processes, such as abnormalities in the menisci or masticating muscles, subluxation of the condyle and degenerative joint disease. Analysis of the morphology and dynamics of TMJ by means of imaging modalities has become highly advanced since the development of arthrography in the late 1970s. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become the modality of choice in the evaluation of TMJ owing to the development of surface coils. We retrospectively studied MRI and inferior joint compartment arthrography in the evaluation of TMJ disorders. Nineteen joints of 14 patients included 15 with internal derangement, two with osteoarthrosis and two normal joints. Sagittal MR images were routinely obtained in a resting position and in positions with the mouth half open, and also with the mouth fully open on balanced images. Although perforation of the menisci was difficult to evaluate, MRI and arthrography were equally useful in identifying the shape and position of the meniscus. However, MRI was more reliable in depicting TMJ abnormalities than arthrography. MRI is considered to be the modality of choice in screening arthrosis of TMJ, making the definitive diagnosis of internal derangement and monitoring conservative therapy for arthrosis. (author)

  13. MRI and arthrography in the evaluation of TMJ disorders

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    Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Ehara, Shigeru; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu (Iwate Medical Univ., Morioka (Japan). School of Medicine); Kobayakawa, Takafumi

    1991-08-01

    Arthrosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a noninfectious, noninflammatory condition characterized by joint pain, noise (clicking) and abnormal motion. It contains various disease processes, such as abnormalities in the menisci or masticating muscles, subluxation of the condyle and degenerative joint disease. Analysis of the morphology and dynamics of TMJ by means of imaging modalities has become highly advanced since the development of arthrography in the late 1970s. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become the modality of choice in the evaluation of TMJ owing to the development of surface coils. We retrospectively studied MRI and inferior joint compartment arthrography in the evaluation of TMJ disorders. Nineteen joints of 14 patients included 15 with internal derangement, two with osteoarthrosis and two normal joints. Sagittal MR images were routinely obtained in a resting position and in positions with the mouth half open, and also with the mouth fully open on balanced images. Although perforation of the menisci was difficult to evaluate, MRI and arthrography were equally useful in identifying the shape and position of the meniscus. However, MRI was more reliable in depicting TMJ abnormalities than arthrography. MRI is considered to be the modality of choice in screening arthrosis of TMJ, making the definitive diagnosis of internal derangement and monitoring conservative therapy for arthrosis. (author).

  14. The efficacy of treatment performed for temporomandibular joint patients at dental school of Tehran University of Medical Sciences

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    Sahebi Majid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Temporomandibular joint disorders are common problems among patients referring to dental schools and clinics. However appropriate treatment modalities are performed for the TMD patients in dental school, the results and success rate of these treatments are not studied distinctly. The aims of this study was to determine the treatment performed for temporomandibular patients at the TMJ department of Tehran University dental school in 2010-11 .   Materials and Methods: In a descriptive cross-sectional trial, 85 TMD patients treated at the TMJ department of Tehran University dental school were examined at least 3 months after the treatments. The patients demographic data ,TMD signs and symptoms and the improvements occurred in TMD disorder were determined (complete, partial and no improvement. The patients satisfaction regarding the treatment results were investigated and data were analyzed regarding the presence of different TMD signs and symptoms before and after the treatment using Mann-Whitney U test .   Results: TMJ pain (35 cases, 42.2%, click (33 cases, 39.8% and muscle tenderness (26 cases, 31.3% were the most prevalent obtained signs and symptoms. The mean age of the patients were 32.3 years old while females were the predominant group (72 cases vs.11 one. 44 individuals (53.0% were treated by splint, 11 ones (13.3% with anterior repositioning splint and 17 individuals (92.5% were managed by physiotherapy plus splint. 65 patients (87.3% were satisfied with the results and 16 ones (19.3% were not. After the treatment, patients with TMJ pain (P0.05 .   Conclusion: The results showed that the treatments presented for the TMD patients at Tehran University dental school were successful and most patients received satisfactory treatment.

  15. Stress distribution in the temporo-mandibular joint discs during jaw closing: a high-resolution three-dimensional finite-element model analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savoldelli, Charles; Bouchard, Pierre-Olivier; Loudad, Raounak; Baque, Patrick; Tillier, Yannick

    2012-07-01

    This study aims at analysing the stresses distribution in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) using a complete high-resolution finite element model (FE Model). This model is used here to analyse the stresses distribution in the discs during a closing jaw cycle. In the end, this model enables the prediction of the stress evolution in the TMJ disc submitted to various loadings induced by mandibular trauma, surgery or parafunction. The geometric data for the model were obtained from MRI and CT scans images of a healthy male patient. Surface and volume meshes were successively obtained using a 3D image segmentation software (AMIRA(®)). Bone components of skull and mandible, both of joint discs, temporomandibular capsules and ligaments and dental arches were meshed as separate bodies. The volume meshes were transferred to the FE analysis software (FORGE(®)). Material properties were assigned for each region. Boundary conditions for closing jaw simulations were represented by different load directions of jaws muscles. The von Mises stresses distribution in both joint discs during closing conditions was analyzed. The pattern of von Mises stresses in the TMJ discs is non-symmetric and changed continuously during jaw movement. Maximal stress is reached on the surface disc in areas in contact with others bodies. The three-dimension finite element model of masticatory system will make it possible to simulate different conditions that appear to be important in the cascade of events leading to joint damage.

  16. Natural history of minimal anterior displacements of the temporomandibular joint meniscus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drace, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) often provides more precise localization of the meniscus than other imaging modalities. Previous study of the distribution of meniscus position in a control population showed that anterior displacements of more than 10 0 were more than 2 standard deviations from the mean, but the clinical significance and natural history of minimal displacements remained uncertain. Twenty follow-up MR studies were performed after 1-2 years in subjects with minimal meniscus displacements drawn from an original series of 125 symptomatic patients and 50 asymptomatic volunteers. These were correlated with repeated clinical histories and clinical examinations. A significant increase in the amount of anterior displacement was found in 55% of the originally asymptomatic volunteers with minimal displacements, which was accompanied by new symptoms in 40%. This was seen exclusively among those with a history of orthodontia. Worsening anterior displacements were seen in 50% of the patient population, and 25% had associated worsening symptoms. These findings indicate that detection of even minimal displacements of the TMJ meniscus is necessary and warrants follow-up MR examinations. Routine follow-up MR images should be obtained following malocclusion treatment and after major dental procedures

  17. Chewing side preference - Impact on facial symmetry, dentition and temporomandibular joint and its correlation with handedness

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    Shreyasi Tiwari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Habitual unilateral chewing develops subconsciously and serves as an example for lateral preference. This study aims to assess the possible impact of chewing side preference to facial asymmetry, temporomandibular joint (TMJ and oral hygiene and existence of any link between the preferred chewing side (PCS and handedness. Materials and Methods: A 2-month cross-sectional (observational study was performed on 76 healthy dentate subjects [24 males (31.6% and 52 females (68.4%] with a mean age of 20.8 ± 1.5 years who participated in this study according to the selection criteria. Results: A total of 75 subjects out of 76 (98.6% were observed to have a PCS. Out of them, 38 chewed on their right and 37 on the left side. Of the 74 right-handed subjects, 48.6% chewed on the right, 50% on the left and 1.4% chewed equally on both the sides. Conclusion: Chewing side preference has a detrimental effect on the TMJ of the corresponding side and is also related to lateral facial asymmetry, which suggests that examination and recording of chewing side preference merit consideration in routine dental examination and treatment planning.

  18. A custom-made temporomandibular joint prosthesis for fabrication by selective laser melting: Finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiangliang; Luo, Danmei; Guo, Chuanbin; Rong, Qiguo

    2017-08-01

    A novel and custom-made selective laser melting (SLM) 3D-printed alloplastic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) prosthesis is proposed. The titanium-6aluminium-4vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V) condyle component and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fossa component comprised the total alloplastic TMJ replacement prosthesis. For the condyle component, an optimized tetrahedral open-porous scaffold with combined connection structures, i.e. an inlay rod and an onlay plate, between the prosthesis and remaining mandible was designed. The trajectory of movement of the intact condyle was assessed via kinematic analysis to facilitate the design of the fossa component. The behaviours of the intact mandible and mandible with the prosthesis were compared. The biomechanical behaviour was analysed by assessing the stress distribution on the prosthesis and strain distribution on the mandible. After muscle force was applied, the magnitude of the compressive strain on the condyle neck of the mandible with the prosthesis was lower than that on the condyle neck of the intact mandible, with the exception of the area about the screws; additionally, the magnitude of the strain at the scaffold-bone interface was relatively high. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. A comparative analysis of temporomandibular joint morphology in the African apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Andrea B

    2005-06-01

    A number of researchers have suggested a functional relationship between dietary variation and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) morphology, yet few studies have evaluated TMJ form in the African apes. In this study, I compare TMJ morphology in adults and during ontogeny in Gorilla (G.g. beringei, G.g. graueri, and G.g. gorilla) and Pan (P. paniscus, P. troglodytes troglodytes, P.t. schweinfurthii, and P.t. verus). I test two hypotheses: first, compared to all other African apes, G.g. beringei exhibits TMJ morphologies that would be predicted for a primate that consumes a diet comprised primarily of moderately to very tough, leafy vegetation; and second, all gorillas exhibit the same predicted morphologies compared to Pan. Compared to all adult African apes, G.g. beringei has higher rami and condyles positioned further above the occlusal plane of the mandible, relative to jaw length. Thus, mountain gorillas have the potential to generate relatively more muscle force, more evenly distribute occlusal forces along the postcanine teeth, and generate relatively greater jaw adductor moment. G.g. beringei also exhibits relatively wider mandibular condyles, suggesting these folivorous apes are able to resist relatively greater compressive loads along the lateral and/or medial aspect of the condyle. All gorillas likewise exhibit these same shape differences compared to Pan. These morphological responses are the predicted consequences of intensification of folivory and, as such, provide support for functional hypotheses linking these TMJ morphologies to degree of folivory. The African apes to not, however, demonstrate a systematic pattern of divergence in relative condylar area as a function of intensification of folivory. The ontogenetic trajectories for gorillas are significantly elevated above those of Pan, and to a lesser but still significant degree, mountain gorillas similarly deviate from lowland gorillas (G.g. gorilla and G.g. graueri). Thus, adult shape differences in

  20. Modified Labial Button Technique for Maintaining Occlusion After Caudal Mandibular Fracture/Temporomandibular Joint Luxation in the Cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Alice E; Carmichael, Daniel T

    2016-03-01

    Maxillofacial trauma in cats often results in mandibular symphyseal separation in addition to injuries of the caudal mandible and/or temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Caudal mandibular and TMJ injuries are difficult to access and stabilize using direct fixation techniques, thus indirect fixation is commonly employed. The immediate goals of fixation include stabilization for return to normal occlusion and function with the long-term objective of bony union. Indirect fixation techniques commonly used for stabilization of caudal mandibular and temporomandibular joint fracture/luxation include maxillomandibular fixation (MMF) with acrylic composite, interarcade wiring, tape muzzles, and the bignathic encircling and retaining device (BEARD) technique. This article introduces a modification of the previously described "labial reverse suture through buttons" technique used by Koestlin et al and the "labial locking with buttons" technique by Rocha et al. In cases with minimally displaced subcondylar and pericondylar fractures without joint involvement, the labial button technique can provide sufficient stabilization for healing. Advantages of the modified labial button technique include ease of application, noninvasive nature, and use of readily available materials. The construct can remain in place for a variable of amount of time, depending on its intended purpose. It serves as an alternative to the tape muzzle, which is rarely tolerated by cats. This technique can be easily used in conjunction with other maxillomandibular repairs, such as cerclage wire fixation of mandibular symphyseal separation. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate a modified labial button technique for maintaining occlusion of feline caudal mandibular fractures/TMJ luxations in a step-by-step fashion.

  1. Ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint and mandibular growth disturbance caused by neglected condylar fracture in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endrajana Endrajana

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fractures of the mandibular condyle may lead to complications such as disturbance of occlusal function, internal derangement of the joint, ankylosis and mandibular growth disturbance. When treating young patients with the history of mandible trauma, ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint and mandibular growth disturbance are two most important complications of condyle fracture that should be considered. Purpose: This case report attempts to emphasize the long term complication of neglected condylar fracture in children i.e. ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint and subsequently lead to mandibular growth disturbance. Case: A case of right temporo-mandibular joint ankylosis and mandibular growth disturbance in a 28 years old male patient is presented. He had a history of trauma to the mandible after a traffic accident when he was 8 years old. Since then, he experienced difficulty in mouth opening which eventually developed into severe trismus. Case management: The case was treated surgically with gap and interpositional arthroplasty using Mersilen mesh™. Conclusion: Mandibular fractures involving temporomandibular joint in young children should be examined thoroughly and treated adequately in order to prevent ankylosis of the TMJ and the subsequent mandibular growth disturbance.Latar belakang: Fraktur pada kondilus mandibula dapat menyebabkan beberapa komplikasi berupa: gangguan oklusi, internal derangement sendi, ankilosis serta gangguan pertumbuhan mandibula. Pada perawatan penderita usia muda dengan riwayat trauma pada mandibula, perlu diwaspadai dua macam komplikasi akibat fraktur pada kondilus, yaitu ankilosis sendi temporo mandibula dan adanya gangguan pertumbuhan mandibula. Tujuan: Laporan kasus ini bertujuan untuk menekankan bahwa fraktur kondilus pada anak-anak yang tidak mendapatkan perawatan yang semestinya akan mengakibatkan komplikasi jangka panjang berupa ankilosis sendi temporomandibula yang diikuti dengan

  2. Nontraumatic bifid mandibular condyles in asymptomatic and symptomatic temporomandibular joint subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Bong Hae; Jung, Yun Hoa [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    This study was performed to determine the prevalence of bifid mandibular condyles (BMCs) in asymptomatic and symptomatic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) subjects with no traumatic history, and to assess their impact on clinical and radiographic manifestations of TMJ. A total of 3,046 asymptomatic and 4,378 symptomatic patients were included in the study. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were reviewed for bifid condyles. T-tests were used to compare the frequency of BMCs when stratified by symptom, gender, and side. In BMC patients, the clinical features of pain and noise, osseous changes, and parasagittal positioning of the condyles were compared between the normally shaped condyle side and the BMC side using chi-squared tests. Fifteen (0.49%) asymptomatic and 22 (0.50%) symptomatic patients were found to have BMCs. Among the bilateral cases, the number of condyles were 19 (0.31%) and 25 (0.29%), respectively. No statistically significant differences were found between asymptomatic and symptomatic patients, between female and male patients, or between the right and left sides (p>0.05). Compared with the normally shaped condyle side, the BMC side showed no statistically significant differences in the distribution of pain and noise, parasagittal condylar position, or condylar osseous changes, with the exception of osteophytes. In the symptomatic group, osteophytes were found more frequently on the normally shaped condyle side than the BMC side (p<0.05). BMCs tended to be identified as an incidental finding. The presence of BMC would not lead to any TMJ symptoms or cause osseous changes.

  3. [Clinical application of transport distraction osteogenesis arthroplasty in the treatment of temporomandibular joint bony ankylosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Cheng; Wang, Xing; Yi, Biao; Li, Zi-li; Wang, Xiao-xia

    2013-03-12

    To explore the clinical application of transport distraction osteogenesis arthroplasty (TDOAP) in the treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) bony ankylosis. From December 1999 to December 2011, a total of 73 patients (89 sides of TMJ) underwent TDOAP were included. There were 39 males and 34 females with a mean age of 19.6 years (range: 3 - 60). Among them, 27 patients were recurrence cases and 30 cases were accompanied with micrognathia and obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). The mean preoperative degree of mouth opening was 6.6 mm (range: 1 - 20). After a release of ankylosis, a transport disc was performed and fixed to ramus with a distractor. Distraction began at Days 4 - 8 postoperation. The distraction rhythm and rate were 0.25 mm four times daily. Distraction stopped when planning distance was achieved. And a distractor was maintained in place for 3-6 months after completion of distraction and then removed. Active postoperative training of mouth opening was implemented. The mean distance of distraction was 15.3 mm (range: 12 - 23). The range of mouth opening of 65 patients increased to normal and bone formation in gaps were perfect. The mean follow-up period was 44.8 months (range: 18 - 102). Eight cases were recurrent. And 1/37 over 15 years old and 7/36 under 15 years old had recurrence. TDOAP is an effective treatment for TMJ ankylosis. A pediatric patient, especially recurrent, should be operated after adolescence to decrease recurrence. Micrognathia and OSAHS should be also considered during the treatment of ankylosis.

  4. Nontraumatic bifid mandibular condyles in asymptomatic and symptomatic temporomandibular joint subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Bong Hae; Jung, Yun Hoa

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the prevalence of bifid mandibular condyles (BMCs) in asymptomatic and symptomatic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) subjects with no traumatic history, and to assess their impact on clinical and radiographic manifestations of TMJ. A total of 3,046 asymptomatic and 4,378 symptomatic patients were included in the study. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were reviewed for bifid condyles. T-tests were used to compare the frequency of BMCs when stratified by symptom, gender, and side. In BMC patients, the clinical features of pain and noise, osseous changes, and parasagittal positioning of the condyles were compared between the normally shaped condyle side and the BMC side using chi-squared tests. Fifteen (0.49%) asymptomatic and 22 (0.50%) symptomatic patients were found to have BMCs. Among the bilateral cases, the number of condyles were 19 (0.31%) and 25 (0.29%), respectively. No statistically significant differences were found between asymptomatic and symptomatic patients, between female and male patients, or between the right and left sides (p>0.05). Compared with the normally shaped condyle side, the BMC side showed no statistically significant differences in the distribution of pain and noise, parasagittal condylar position, or condylar osseous changes, with the exception of osteophytes. In the symptomatic group, osteophytes were found more frequently on the normally shaped condyle side than the BMC side (p<0.05). BMCs tended to be identified as an incidental finding. The presence of BMC would not lead to any TMJ symptoms or cause osseous changes.

  5. Effectiveness of digital subtraction radiography in detecting artificially created osteophytes and erosions in the temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocasarac, Husniye Demirturk [Dept. of Comprehensive Dentistry, The University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio (United States); Celenk, Peruze [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Ondokuz Mayis University, Samsun (Turkmenistan)

    2017-06-15

    Erosions and osteophytes are radiographic characteristics that are found in different stages of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis. This study assessed the effectiveness of digital subtraction radiography (DSR) in diagnosing simulated osteophytes and erosions in the TMJ. Five intact, dry human skulls were used to assess the effectiveness of DSR in detecting osteophytes. Four cortical bone chips of varying thicknesses (0.5 mm, 1.0 mm, 1.5 mm, and 2.0 mm) were placed at the medial, central, and lateral aspects of the condyle anterior surface. Two defects of varying depth (1.0 mm and 1.5 mm) were created on the lateral, central, and medial poles of the condyles of 2 skulls to simulate erosions. Panoramic images of the condyles were acquired before and after artificially creating the changes. Digital subtraction was performed with Emago dental image archiving software. Five observers familiar with the interpretation of TMJ radiographs evaluated the images. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the imaging methods. The area under the ROC curve (Az) value for the overall diagnostic accuracy of DSR in detecting osteophytic changes was 0.931. The Az value for the overall diagnostic accuracy of panoramic imaging was 0.695. The accuracy of DSR in detecting erosive changes was 0.854 and 0.696 for panoramic imaging. DSR was remarkably more accurate than panoramic imaging in detecting simulated osteophytic and erosive changes. The accuracy of panoramic imaging in detecting degenerative changes was significantly lower than the accuracy of DSR (P<.05). DSR improved the accuracy of detection using panoramic images.

  6. Effectiveness of digital subtraction radiography in detecting artificially created osteophytes and erosions in the temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocasarac, Husniye Demirturk; Celenk, Peruze

    2017-01-01

    Erosions and osteophytes are radiographic characteristics that are found in different stages of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis. This study assessed the effectiveness of digital subtraction radiography (DSR) in diagnosing simulated osteophytes and erosions in the TMJ. Five intact, dry human skulls were used to assess the effectiveness of DSR in detecting osteophytes. Four cortical bone chips of varying thicknesses (0.5 mm, 1.0 mm, 1.5 mm, and 2.0 mm) were placed at the medial, central, and lateral aspects of the condyle anterior surface. Two defects of varying depth (1.0 mm and 1.5 mm) were created on the lateral, central, and medial poles of the condyles of 2 skulls to simulate erosions. Panoramic images of the condyles were acquired before and after artificially creating the changes. Digital subtraction was performed with Emago dental image archiving software. Five observers familiar with the interpretation of TMJ radiographs evaluated the images. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the imaging methods. The area under the ROC curve (Az) value for the overall diagnostic accuracy of DSR in detecting osteophytic changes was 0.931. The Az value for the overall diagnostic accuracy of panoramic imaging was 0.695. The accuracy of DSR in detecting erosive changes was 0.854 and 0.696 for panoramic imaging. DSR was remarkably more accurate than panoramic imaging in detecting simulated osteophytic and erosive changes. The accuracy of panoramic imaging in detecting degenerative changes was significantly lower than the accuracy of DSR (P<.05). DSR improved the accuracy of detection using panoramic images

  7. Overexpression of Indian hedgehog partially rescues short stature homeobox 2-overexpression-associated congenital dysplasia of the temporomandibular joint in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xihai; Liang, Wenna; Ye, Hongzhi; Weng, Xiaping; Liu, Fayuan; Lin, Pingdong; Liu, Xianxiang

    2015-09-01

    The role of short stature homeobox 2 (shox2) in the development and homeostasis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has been well documented. Shox2 is known to be expressed in the progenitor cells and perichondrium of the developing condyle. A previous study by our group reported that overexpression of shox2 leads to congenital dysplasia of the TMJ via downregulation of the Indian hedgehog (Ihh) signaling pathway, which is essential for embryonic disc primordium formation and mandibular condylar growth. To determine whether overexpression of Ihh may rescue the overexpression of shox2 leading to congenital dysplasia of the TMJ, a mouse model in which Ihh and shox2 were overexpressed (Wnt1-Cre; pMes-stop shox2; pMes-stop Ihh mice) was utilized to assess the consequences of this overexpression on TMJ development during post-natal life. The results showed that the developmental process and expression levels of runt-related transcription factor 2 and sex determining region Y-box 9 in the TMJ of the Wnt1-Cre; pMes-stop shox2; pMes-stop Ihh mice were similar to those in wild‑type mice. Overexpression of Ihh rescued shox2 overexpression-associated reduction of extracellular matrix components. However, overexpression of Ihh did not inhibit the shox2 overexpression-associated increase of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) MMP9, MMP13 and apoptosis in the TMJ. These combinatory cellular and molecular defects appeared to account for the observed congenital dysplasia of TMJ, suggesting that overexpression of Ihh partially rescued shox2 overexpression‑associated congenital dysplasia of the TMJ in mice.

  8. Overexpression of Indian hedgehog partially rescues short stature homeobox 2-overexpression-associated congenital dysplasia of the temporomandibular joint in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    LI, XIHAI; LIANG, WENNA; YE, HONGZHI; WENG, XIAPING; LIU, FAYUAN; LIN, PINGDONG; LIU, XIANXIANG

    2015-01-01

    The role of short stature homeobox 2 (shox2) in the development and homeostasis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has been well documented. Shox2 is known to be expressed in the progenitor cells and perichondrium of the developing condyle. A previous study by our group reported that overexpression of shox2 leads to congenital dysplasia of the TMJ via downregulation of the Indian hedgehog (Ihh) signaling pathway, which is essential for embryonic disc primordium formation and mandibular condylar growth. To determine whether overexpression of Ihh may rescue the overexpression of shox2 leading to congenital dysplasia of the TMJ, a mouse model in which Ihh and shox2 were overexpressed (Wnt1-Cre; pMes-stop shox2; pMes-stop Ihh mice) was utilized to assess the consequences of this overexpression on TMJ development during post-natal life. The results showed that the developmental process and expression levels of runt-related transcription factor 2 and sex determining region Y-box 9 in the TMJ of the Wnt1-Cre; pMes-stop shox2; pMes-stop Ihh mice were similar to those in wild-type mice. Overexpression of Ihh rescued shox2 overexpression-associated reduction of extracellular matrix components. However, overexpression of Ihh did not inhibit the shox2 overexpression-associated increase of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) MMP9, MMP13 and apoptosis in the TMJ. These combinatory cellular and molecular defects appeared to account for the observed congenital dysplasia of TMJ, suggesting that overexpression of Ihh partially rescued shox2 overexpression-associated congenital dysplasia of the TMJ in mice. PMID:26096903

  9. A web-based system for neural network based classification in temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Dumast, Priscille; Mirabel, Clément; Cevidanes, Lucia; Ruellas, Antonio; Yatabe, Marilia; Ioshida, Marcos; Ribera, Nina Tubau; Michoud, Loic; Gomes, Liliane; Huang, Chao; Zhu, Hongtu; Muniz, Luciana; Shoukri, Brandon; Paniagua, Beatriz; Styner, Martin; Pieper, Steve; Budin, Francois; Vimort, Jean-Baptiste; Pascal, Laura; Prieto, Juan Carlos

    2018-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the methodological innovations of a web-based system for storage, integration and computation of biomedical data, using a training imaging dataset to remotely compute a deep neural network classifier of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJOA). This study imaging dataset consisted of three-dimensional (3D) surface meshes of mandibular condyles constructed from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. The training dataset consisted of 259 condyles, 105 from control subjects and 154 from patients with diagnosis of TMJ OA. For the image analysis classification, 34 right and left condyles from 17 patients (39.9 ± 11.7 years), who experienced signs and symptoms of the disease for less than 5 years, were included as the testing dataset. For the integrative statistical model of clinical, biological and imaging markers, the sample consisted of the same 17 test OA subjects and 17 age and sex matched control subjects (39.4 ± 15.4 years), who did not show any sign or symptom of OA. For these 34 subjects, a standardized clinical questionnaire, blood and saliva samples were also collected. The technological methodologies in this study include a deep neural network classifier of 3D condylar morphology (ShapeVariationAnalyzer, SVA), and a flexible web-based system for data storage, computation and integration (DSCI) of high dimensional imaging, clinical, and biological data. The DSCI system trained and tested the neural network, indicating 5 stages of structural degenerative changes in condylar morphology in the TMJ with 91% close agreement between the clinician consensus and the SVA classifier. The DSCI remotely ran with a novel application of a statistical analysis, the Multivariate Functional Shape Data Analysis, that computed high dimensional correlations between shape 3D coordinates, clinical pain levels and levels of biological markers, and then graphically displayed the computation results. The findings of this

  10. TMJ disorders and pain: Assessment by contrast-enhanced MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farina, Davide; Bodin, Christiane; Gandolfi, Silvia; De Gasperi, Werner; Borghesi, Andrea; Maroldi, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Though magnetic resonance (MRI) is a widely accepted standard for the assessment of patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders, efforts to correlate symptoms to MRI findings have often given controversial results. Aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between TMJ pain and findings of contrast-enhanced MRI. Thirty-eight consecutive patients with TMJ dysfunction syndrome (study group) were examined with MRI. Protocol included T2 turbo spin-echo sequence, T1 spin-echo sequence, and T2 gradient-echo (acquired with closed jaw, at intermediate and maximal opening). Post-contrast phase was obtained through a fat sat 3D T1 gradient-echo sequence (VIBE). Post-contrast findings in the study group were matched with those obtained in a control group of 33 patients submitted to MRI of the paranasal sinuses. Statistically significant difference was found between condylar medullary bone enhancement in painful TMJ, in painless TMJ and control group. In addition the average thickness of joint soft tissue enhancement in painful TMJ was superior to painless TMJ (p < 0.0001) and to control group. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, the odds ratio that a painful TMJ showed disk displacement, osteoarthrosis, effusion and JST enhancement were 3.05, 3.18, 1.2 and 11.36, respectively. Though not histologically proven, TMJ enhancement could reflect the presence of inflammation in painful joints. Furthermore, the administration of contrast could be of help for the assessment of patients with orofacial pain, particularly when clinical exploration is insufficient to ascribe the pain to TMJ.

  11. TMJ disorders and pain: Assessment by contrast-enhanced MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farina, Davide [Department of Radiology (School of Medicine), University of Brescia, Piazzale Spedali Civili 1, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Bodin, Christiane [Division of Gnathology (School of Dentistry), University of Brescia, Piazzale Spedali Civili 1, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Gandolfi, Silvia [Department of Radiology (School of Medicine), University of Brescia, Piazzale Spedali Civili 1, 25123 Brescia (Italy); De Gasperi, Werner [Division of Gnathology (School of Dentistry), University of Brescia, Piazzale Spedali Civili 1, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Borghesi, Andrea; Maroldi, Roberto [Department of Radiology (School of Medicine), University of Brescia, Piazzale Spedali Civili 1, 25123 Brescia (Italy)

    2009-04-15

    Though magnetic resonance (MRI) is a widely accepted standard for the assessment of patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders, efforts to correlate symptoms to MRI findings have often given controversial results. Aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between TMJ pain and findings of contrast-enhanced MRI. Thirty-eight consecutive patients with TMJ dysfunction syndrome (study group) were examined with MRI. Protocol included T2 turbo spin-echo sequence, T1 spin-echo sequence, and T2 gradient-echo (acquired with closed jaw, at intermediate and maximal opening). Post-contrast phase was obtained through a fat sat 3D T1 gradient-echo sequence (VIBE). Post-contrast findings in the study group were matched with those obtained in a control group of 33 patients submitted to MRI of the paranasal sinuses. Statistically significant difference was found between condylar medullary bone enhancement in painful TMJ, in painless TMJ and control group. In addition the average thickness of joint soft tissue enhancement in painful TMJ was superior to painless TMJ (p < 0.0001) and to control group. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, the odds ratio that a painful TMJ showed disk displacement, osteoarthrosis, effusion and JST enhancement were 3.05, 3.18, 1.2 and 11.36, respectively. Though not histologically proven, TMJ enhancement could reflect the presence of inflammation in painful joints. Furthermore, the administration of contrast could be of help for the assessment of patients with orofacial pain, particularly when clinical exploration is insufficient to ascribe the pain to TMJ.

  12. The effect of orthognathic surgery on the temporomandibular joint and oral function: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Te Veldhuis, E C; Te Veldhuis, A H; Bramer, W M; Wolvius, E B; Koudstaal, M J

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to examine the effect of orthognathic surgery (OS) on the temporomandibular joint and oral function. Electronic databases were systematically searched for studies published until October 2015. Articles were assessed against predefined inclusion criteria. The included papers were divided into four groups based on the type of OS performed. The following items were recorded: quality of evidence using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based medicine (CEBM) criteria, number of patients, presence/absence of controls, mean age at treatment, follow-up time, clinical examination findings, bite force, use of the Helkimo Index and Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders, imaging findings, and patient questionnaire results. A total of 4669 articles were identified; 76 relevant articles were included in the review. These studies assessed a total 3399 patients and 380 controls, with a mean age of 25.4 years. The great variety of OS techniques, examination techniques, diagnostic criteria, and imaging techniques used in the articles studied, as well as the quality of the study designs, made it difficult to compare studies and to draw conclusions. However, looking at the different aspects studied in general, it can be stated that OS seems to have little or no harmful effect on the TMJ and oral function (level of evidence: levels II, III, and IV). Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Clinical application of artificial condylar process for reconstructing temporomandibular joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiangdao; Shao, Zhanying; Wang, Fasheng; Duan, Yi

    2012-01-01

    To assess the feasibility and clinical outcomes of artificial condylar process in reconstruction of the temporomandibular joint. Between January 2005 and January 2010, the reconstructions of the temporomandibular joints with artificial condylar process were performed in 10 cases (11 sides, including 7 left sides and 4 right sides). There were 7 males and 3 females with an average age of 50 years (range, 40-68 years). Mandibular condyle defects were caused by mandible tumor in 7 patients with a mean disease duration of 15 months (range, 9-24 months) and by bilateral condylar fractures in 3 patients with the disease duration of 2, 3, and 2 days respectively. According to Neff classification, there were type M and A in 1 case, type M and B in 1 case, and type M in one side and subcondylar fracture in the other side in 1 case. Incisions in all patients healed by first intention, and no complication occurred. All cases were followed up 1 to 4 years, showed facial symmetry and good occluding relation, and the mouth opening was 22-38 mm (mean, 30 mm). No temporomandibular joint clicking or pain and no recurrence of tumor were observed. Most of the artificial condylar process were in good position except 1 deviated from the correct angle slightly. All the patients could have diet normally. The results of temporomandibular joint reconstruction after tumor resection with artificial condylar process are good, but the clinical outcome for intracapsular condylar fracture is expected to be further verified.

  14. Voice-supported Electronic Health Record for Temporomandibular Joint Disorders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hippmann, R.; Dostálová, T.; Zvárová, Jana; Nagy, Miroslav; Seydlová, M.; Hanzlíček, Petr; Kříž, P.; Šmídl, L.; Trmal, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 2 (2010), s. 168-172 ISSN 0026-1270 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : electronic health record * structured data entry * dentistry * temporomandibular joint disorder Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science Impact factor: 1.472, year: 2010

  15. MR imaging of the temporomandibular joint. Part 2. Effect of flip angle on MR imaging with FLASH sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Maya; Sasano, Takashi; Higano, Shuichi; Takahashi, Shoki; Kurihara, Noriko

    1998-01-01

    In our previous study on MR imaging of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), fast low angle shot (FLASH) showed the highest image contrast between disc and surrounding TMJ tissues compared with those of 4 other sequences (i,e., fast imaging with steady precession (FISP), conventional T1-weighted spin echo (SE) and fast spin echo (FSE, TR/TE/ETL: 1100/12/3, 3000/15/7)). Furthermore, FLASH also received a high score on visual evaluation including the position and contour of the disc, and the border between the disc and surrounding tissues. Therefore, we concluded that FLASH was the most suitable sequence for evaluating the TMJ disc. However, the image contrast and signal intensity on MR imaging with gradient echo pulse sequence are affected by flip angle. Consequently, in this report, to find the most suitable flip angle for MR scanning of the TMJ using a FLASH sequence (TR/TE: 450/11), ten TMJs of 5 volunteers were experimentally imaged with various flip angles from 10 degrees to 70 degrees at an interval of 10 degrees between 10 to 70. The image contrast and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) between the disc and surrounding tissues were compared. In addition, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of phantoms was also calculated using the same imaging parameters. Visual evaluation including position and contour of the disc, and the border between the disc and surrounding tissues, was also performed by 4 radiologists. As the flip angle increased, imaging contrast decreased while SNR increased. Images with flip angles between 30 and 60 degrees demonstrated high CNR. On visual evaluation, images using flip angles between 30 and 50 degrees received high scores. In conclusion, FLASH sequence with a flip angle between 30 and 50 degrees was considered most suitable for evaluating the TMJ disc based on the results of visual assessment and analysis of three major components of image diagnostic quality: image contrast, CNR and SNR. (author)

  16. TMJ surgery following orthognathic surgery: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Politis

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Orthognathic surgery may affect or cause temporomandibular joint (TMJ complaints. This study evaluated the need for TMJ surgery after orthognathic surgery.A retrospective cohort study was carried out on 630 consecutive patients undergoing at least a Le Fort I or bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO. The mean follow-up time was 2,3 years. Clinical, surgical and radiographic findings were collected.Ten of the 630 patients (1.6% had additional arthroscopic TMJ-surgery in one (9 or in both (1 joints because of internal derangement, resistant to conventional therapy. Only 4/10 patients had successful outcomes following arthroscopic surgery. One patient with unsuccessful outcome required multiple additional open TMJ-surgeries, all remaining ineffective to relieve pain and restricted mouth opening. If arthroscopy failed to relieve symptoms (5/10 patients, further conservative management was opted. Arthroscopy seemed effective mainly in patients without pre-existing TMJ complaints.A further five of the 630 patients (0.8% required more treatment because of bilateral postoperative condylar resorption, but none of them required TMJ-surgery.In contrast to patients with bilateral condylar resorption where the skeletal relapse remained the issue of concern, patients with internal derangement/osteoarthrosis exhibited major occlusal changes in one patient only (1/10, leaving the TMJ complaints as the main concern. Keywords: Sagittal split osteotomy, Le Fort I osteotomy, Orthognathic surgery, Condylar remodelling, Condylar resorption, Osteoarthrosis, Internal derangement, Relapse, Arthroscopy

  17. Expression of CGRP in the temporomandibular joint; Expresion de CGRP en la articulacion temporomandibular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caviedes Bucheli, Javier [Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Facultad de Odontologia, Bogota, D.C. (Colombia); Medina Buitrago, Diana Marcela [Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogota, D.C. (Colombia)

    2002-07-01

    The presence and content of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is evaluated in the hyperplastic retrodiscal tissue of the temporomandibular joint in patients with joint degenerative disease by radioimmunoassay. Study population has included 8 female patients in pre-menopausic status, without to be pregnant, without to be lactating for a year and with diagnostic of joint degenerative disease (osteoarthrosis). Pain levels are registered with visual analog scale, where 0 is absence of pain and 16 acute pain. A bone degeneration is classified as mild, moderate and severe, according to findings of nuclear magnetic resonance. The 15 retrodiscal hyperplastic tissue samples are taken from patients undergoing to open surgery of temporomandibular joint. The specimens were placed in plastic blocks with freezing medium and are stored at -70 degrees celsius until neuropeptide extraction by radioimmunoassay with kit for CGRP. A directly proportional relationship is established between the degree of bone degeneration and neuropeptide expression and between the osteoarthrosis classification with analogue visual scale. Findings have shown definitive correlation between pain levels and expression of neuropeptide. CGRP is expressed in the retrodiscal tissue of temporomandibular joint in human with joint degenerative disease and is directly related with levels osteoarthrosis and pain [Spanish] La presencia y el contenido del peptido relacionado con el gen de la calcitonina (CGRP) es evaluado en el tejido retrodiscal hiperplasico de la articulacion temporomandibular en pacientes con enfermedad degenerativa articular mediante radioinmunoensayo. La poblacion del estudio ha incluido 8 pacientes de genero femenino en estado premenopausico, sin estar embarazada, sin estar lactando por un ano y con diagnostico de enfermedad degenerativa articular (osteoartrosis). Los niveles de dolor son registrados con escala visual analoga, donde 0 es ausencia de dolor y 16 dolor agudo. Una

  18. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease: an integrative literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taysa Vannoska de Almeida Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Temporomandibular joint dysfunction is a set of disorders involving the masticatory muscles, temporomandibular joint and associated structures. It is known that the progression of motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease is an indication that these people are more prone to the development of this dysfunction. Thus, this study aims to investigate the signs and symptoms of temporomandibular dysfunction in people with Parkinson's disease. The search was performed in the databases: MEDLINE/ PubMed, LILACs, CINAHL, SCOPUS, Web of Science and PEDro, without timing or language restriction. Specific descriptors were used for each database and keywords, evaluated by the instruments: Critical Appraisal Skill Program and Agency for Health care and Research and Quality. A total of 4,209 articles were found but only 5 were included. After critical analysis of the methodology of the articles, one did not reach the minimum score required by the evaluation instruments, thus, it was excluded. The selected articles addressed, as signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint dysfunction, the following: myofascial pain, bruxism, limitation of mouth opening, dislocation of the articular disc and asymmetry in the distribution of occlusal contacts. Further studies are needed in order to determine the relationship between cause and effect of the analyzed variables, so as to contribute to more specific and effective therapeutic interventions.

  19. A practical approach to interpretation of MRI of the temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moen, Ketil; Hellem, Soelve (Section of Oral Surgery and Oral Medicine, Dept. of Clinical Dentistry, Univ. of Bergen, Bergen (Norway)); Geitung, Jonn Terje (Dept. of Radiology, Haraldsplass Deaconess Univ. Hospital, Bergen (Norway)); Skartveit, Liv (Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Dept. of clinical Dentistry, Univ. of Bergen, Bergen (Norway)), e-mail: liv.skartveit@iko.uib.no

    2010-11-15

    Background: disorders (TMDs) such as pain, joint sounds, and impaired movement are common, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is now the method of choice for diagnostic assessment. Purpose: To describe MR criteria chosen and the amount of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pathology registered when examining MR images from patients referred to a university hospital for imaging of their TMJs. Material and Methods: The TMJs of 152 consecutive patients, 102 women and 40 men, referred for MRI during an 18 month period were imaged with a 1.5 T imaging system. Twelve asymptomatic students, seven women and five men, gave informed consent and acted as a control group. Results: Moderate to extensive disk displacement was registered in 53% of the patients' TMJs, and 38% of the disks were deformed. Degenerative changes registered were flattening of the condyle heads in 50% of the TMJs and erosion of their cortical surfaces in 30%. Osteophytes were present in 31% of the condyles and bone marrow edema in 30%. Marked to extensive effusion in synovial compartments was registered in 39% of the studied TMJs. In the control group, none of the TMJs showed anterior disk displacement, deformed disks or degenerative changes, but 8 of the 24 joints showed marked effusion. A tendency for a higher amount of disk displacement and deformation was seen among young age groups and more degenerative changes in older age groups, but differences among groups were not significant when tested with chi-square analysis. Conclusion: Defined MR criteria that allow for comparative assessment are presented. According to these criteria, a large proportion of the patients referred for MR examination showed morphologic changes indicating TMJ pathology. Keywords Disk displacement, arthrosis

  20. A practical approach to interpretation of MRI of the temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moen, Ketil; Hellem, Soelve; Geitung, Jonn Terje; Skartveit, Liv

    2010-01-01

    Background: disorders (TMDs) such as pain, joint sounds, and impaired movement are common, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is now the method of choice for diagnostic assessment. Purpose: To describe MR criteria chosen and the amount of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pathology registered when examining MR images from patients referred to a university hospital for imaging of their TMJs. Material and Methods: The TMJs of 152 consecutive patients, 102 women and 40 men, referred for MRI during an 18 month period were imaged with a 1.5 T imaging system. Twelve asymptomatic students, seven women and five men, gave informed consent and acted as a control group. Results: Moderate to extensive disk displacement was registered in 53% of the patients' TMJs, and 38% of the disks were deformed. Degenerative changes registered were flattening of the condyle heads in 50% of the TMJs and erosion of their cortical surfaces in 30%. Osteophytes were present in 31% of the condyles and bone marrow edema in 30%. Marked to extensive effusion in synovial compartments was registered in 39% of the studied TMJs. In the control group, none of the TMJs showed anterior disk displacement, deformed disks or degenerative changes, but 8 of the 24 joints showed marked effusion. A tendency for a higher amount of disk displacement and deformation was seen among young age groups and more degenerative changes in older age groups, but differences among groups were not significant when tested with chi-square analysis. Conclusion: Defined MR criteria that allow for comparative assessment are presented. According to these criteria, a large proportion of the patients referred for MR examination showed morphologic changes indicating TMJ pathology. Keywords Disk displacement, arthrosis

  1. A cross-sectional study of the relationship between serum sexual hormone levels and internal derangement of temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madani, A S; Shamsian, A A; Hedayati-Moghaddam, M R; Fathi-Moghadam, F; Sabooni, M R; Mirmortazavi, A; Golmohamadi, M

    2013-08-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are defined as clinical conditions that involve the masticatory muscles, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) or both. The aim of this study was to evaluate serum 17β-oestradiol and progesterone levels in menstruating women affected by internal derangement of the TMJ. A total of 142 women (mean age 30·2 ± 6·7) who referred to medical diagnostic laboratory of Iranian Academic Centre for Education, Culture and Research (ACECR), Mashhad Branch, were enrolled during 2007 and 2008. Forty-seven individuals had disc displacement with reduction (Group IIa) according to Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC)/TMD Axis I diagnosis. Radioimmunoassay was used for the detection of serum 17β-oestradiol and progesterone levels in all 142 subjects. The mean progesterone level was significantly higher in control group (11·6 ± 10·4 ng mL(-1) ) compared to women with TMD (8·4 ± 6·8 ng mL(-1) , P = 0·03). No significant difference was found in two groups regarding 17β-oestradiol level. Lower progesterone level in women with TMD can suggest the more important role of this hormone in the development of the disorder. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Resolution of temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJD) by correcting a lateral head translation posture following previous failed traditional chiropractic therapy: a CBP® case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Jason O; Oakley, Paul A; Moore, Robert R; Ruggeroli, Edward P; Harrison, Deed E

    2018-01-01

    [Purpose] To present the case of the resolution of right temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJD) following the correction of a right lateral head translation posture. [Subject and Methods] A 24 year old female reported facial pain and jaw clicking in the right TMJ. Radiography revealed a 19 mm right head (shift) translation posture. TMJ vibration analysis showed characteristic abnormalities for the right TMJ. The patient was treated with CBP ® technique mirror image ® left sided exercises, and traction methods as well as spinal manipulative therapy (SMT). [Results] After 36 treatments over a 12-week time period, a complete correction of the lateral head posture was achieved corresponding with a complete resolution of jaw pain and clicking. TMJ vibration analysis demonstrated normal right side TMJ characteristics following treatment. [Conclusion] Abnormal head/neck postures, such as lateral head translation, may be an unrealized source of TMJD and may be explained through the 'regional interdependence' model or by how seemingly unrelated anatomy may be associated with a primary complaint.

  3. Diagnostic accuracy of the detection of bone change using panoramic TMJ projection. Comparative study with limited cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, Kazuyuki; Okano, Tomohiro; Kataoka, Ryuta; Honda, Kazuya; Endo, Atsushi; Kaneko, Norikazu; Funahashi, Itsuo

    2008-01-01

    Panoramic temporoman joint (TMJ) projection is one of the alternative methods of conventional radiography, such as transcranial projection, for diagnosing temporomandibular joint disorder. There have been a few reports describing the diagnostic ability of this method. We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of detecting bone change with panoramic TMJ projection. Fifty TMJs in 25 patients were examined. All TMJs were examined by panoramic TMJ projection (Hyper XF) and limited cone-beam CT (3D Accuitomo FPD; 3DX). Two observers evaluated the presence of bone change in the TMJ region using panoramic TMJ projection. One other observer evaluated the limited cone-beam CT for the presence and the pattern of bone changes in the TMJ region as the gold standard. Panoramic TMJ findings were evaluated with regard to sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the panoramic TMJ projection were 0.86, 0.76, and 0.82, respectively. These results and those of previous reports on other radiographic methods for TMJ suggest that panoramic TMJ projection is a useful method of screening for bone change due to TMJ disorder. (author)

  4. On the analysis of condylar path versus real motion of the temporomandibular joint: application for Sicat Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordaß, Bernd; Ruge, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) function using condylar path tracings is a challenge in functionally oriented dentistry. In most cases, reference points on the skin surface over the TMJ region are defined as "arbitrary", "individual" or "kinematic" condylar hinge axis points, which are displayed as "condylar paths" in motion. To what extent these reference points represent the actual condylar paths in each individual patient is ultimately unclear because the geometric relationship of the actual condyle to the selected reference point is usually unknown. Depending on the location of the point on the condyle and the centers of rotation of mandibular movement, these trajectories can vary greatly during combined rotational and sliding movements (eg, opening and closing movements of the mandible); this represents a grid of points located in the vicinity of the TMJ. To record the actual condylar path as the movement trajectory of a given point (eg, the condylar center), technological solutions are needed with which to link the tracing technology with the appropriate imaging technology capable of scanning the condyle, including the points of interest, and displaying them in real dynamic motion. Sicat Function (Sicat, D-Bonn) is such a solution. Sicat Function links cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans (made using the Galileos CBCT scanner; Sirona, Bensheim, Germany) with ultrasound-based, three-dimensional (3D) functional jaw movement recordings of the mandible (made using the JMT+ Jaw Motion Tracker; Sicat, Bonn, Germany). Digital images of the dental arches acquired with the intraoral scanner Cerec system (Sirona) can also be superimposed. This results in the generation of a 3D model of the bony mandible, including the TMJ, which reproduces the 3D real dynamic movement of the condyles simultaneously with that of the condylar paths at defined points (with the condylar centers being a particular point of interest). Sicat Function is an integrated, digital

  5. Temporomandibular disorders and tension-type headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongini, Franco

    2007-12-01

    Pathologies currently defined as temporomandibular disorders may be different in nature. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders and craniofacial and cervical myogenous pain (MP) are distinct pathologies but may be superimposed and share some etiologic factors. Tension-type headache (TTH) may often be associated with craniofacial and cervical pain, and the same pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment may be efficacious for both. Psychiatric comorbidity (depression and/or anxiety disorder) is less frequent in sheer TMJ disorders, compared with MP and TTH. A screening for the presence of an underlying psychiatric disorder should be part of the clinical evaluation in patients suffering from headache and facial pain.

  6. Comparison of temporomandibular joint and ramus morphology between class II and class III cases before and after bi-maxillary osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iguchi, Ran; Yoshizawa, Kunio; Moroi, Akinori; Tsutsui, Takamitsu; Hotta, Asami; Hiraide, Ryota; Takayama, Akihiro; Tsunoda, Tatsuya; Saito, Yuki; Sato, Momoko; Baba, Nana; Ueki, Koichiro

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare changes in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and ramus morphology between class II and III cases before and after sagittal split ramus osteotomy (SSRO) and Le Fort I osteotomy. The subjects were 39 patients (78 sides) who underwent bi-maxillary surgery. They consisted of 2 groups (18 class II cases and 21 class III cases), and were selected randomly from among patients who underwent surgery between 2012 and 2016. The TMJ disc tissue and joint effusion were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the TMJ space, condylar height, ramus height, ramus inclination and condylar square were assessed by computed tomography (CT), pre- and post-operatively. The number of joints with anterior disc displacement in class II was significantly higher than that in class III (p bi-maxillary surgery. The findings of the numerical analysis also demonstrated that reduction of condylar volume occurred frequently in class II, although TMJ disc position classification did not change significantly, as previously reported. Copyright © 2017 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. High-resolution morphologic and ultrashort time-to-echo quantitative magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Won C.; Chang, Eric Y.; Biswas, Reni; Statum, Sheronda; Chung, Christine B. [Veterans Administration San Diego Healthcare System, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Tafur, Monica; Du, Jiang; Healey, Robert [University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Kwack, Kyu-Sung [Ajou University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Wonchon-dong, Yeongtong-gu, Gyeonggi-do, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    To implement high-resolution morphologic and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) using ultrashort time-to-echo (UTE) techniques in cadavers and volunteers. This study was approved by the institutional review board. TMJs of cadavers and volunteers were imaged on a 3-T MR system. High-resolution morphologic and quantitative sequences using conventional and UTE techniques were performed in cadaveric TMJs. Morphologic and UTE quantitative sequences were performed in asymptomatic and symptomatic volunteers. Morphologic evaluation demonstrated the TMJ structures in open- and closed-mouth position. UTE techniques facilitated the visualization of the disc and fibrocartilage. Quantitative UTE MRI was successfully performed ex vivo and in vivo, reflecting the degree of degeneration. There was a difference in the mean UTE T2* values between asymptomatic and symptomatic volunteers. MRI evaluation of the TMJ using UTE techniques allows characterization of the internal structure and quantification of the MR properties of the disc. Quantitative UTE MRI can be performed in vivo with short scan times. (orig.)

  8. Radiation-induced temporo-mandibular joint disorder in post-radiotherapy nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients: assessment and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Vincent W C; Lam, Ying-Na

    2016-06-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is endemic in southern China, and its incidence in Hong Kong is relatively high. Radiotherapy is the mainstay treatment for NPC due to its relatively high radiosensitivity and deep-seated anatomical position, which is not readily accessible by surgery. Although the technique of radiotherapy in NPC has been advancing and offers promising treatment outcome, complications around the irradiation areas are inevitable and the quality of life of the post-radiotherapy patients is often compromised. Trismus, which is defined as the restricted mouth opening or jaw movement due to the disorder of temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ), is one of the possible late complications for radiotherapy of NPC and is found in 5-17% of the post-radiotherapy (post-RT) patients. Trismus at early stage may only affect the speech, but in severe cases nutritional intake and oral hygiene condition may deteriorate seriously. This article reviewed the possible causes of radiation-induced TMJ damage, the various assessments including imaging modalities and possible treatments. The conclusion is that the availability of simple, yet effective examinations for trismus is essential for delaying the progression and restoring TMJ functions. Although there is no absolutely effective treatment for trismus, many supportive, restorative and palliative management are possible under different clinical situations.

  9. CT and MR findings in synovial chondromatosis of the temporo-mandibular joint: our experience and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testaverde, Lorenzo; Perrone, Anna; Caporali, Laura; Ermini, Antonella; Izzo, Luciano; D'Angeli, Ilaria; Impara, Luca; Mazza, Dario; Izzo, Paolo; Marini, Mario

    2011-06-01

    To compare Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance (MR) features and their diagnostic potential in the assessment of Synovial Chondromatosis (SC) of the Temporo-Mandibular Joint (TMJ). Eight patients with symptoms and signs compatible with dysfunctional disorders of the TMJ underwent CT and MR scan. We considered the following parameters: soft tissue involvement (disk included), osteostructural alterations of the joints, loose bodies and intra-articular fluid. These parameters were evaluated separately by two radiologists with a "double blinded method" and then, after agreement, definitive assessment of the parameters was given. CT and MR findings were compared. Histopathological results showed metaplastic synovia in all patients and therefore confirmed diagnosis of SC. MR resulted better than CT in the evaluation of all parameters except the osteostructural alterations of the joints, estimated with more accuracy by CT scan. CT scan is excellent to define bony surfaces of the articular joints and flogistic tissue but it fails in the detection of loose bodies when these are not yet calcified. MR scan therefore is the gold standard when SC is suspected since it can visualize loose bodies at early stage and also evaluate disk condition and eventual extra-articular tissues involvement. The use of T2-weighted images and contrast medium allows identifying intra-articular fluid, estimating its entity and discriminating from sinovial tissue. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. CT and MR findings in synovial chondromatosis of the temporo-mandibular joint: Our experience and review of literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Testaverde, Lorenzo, E-mail: doctor.lot@gmail.com [Department of Radiological Sciences, Policlinico Umberto I, University ' Sapienza' of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00161, Rome (Italy); Perrone, Anna; Caporali, Laura; Ermini, Antonella [Department of Radiological Sciences, Policlinico Umberto I, University ' Sapienza' of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00161, Rome (Italy); Izzo, Luciano; D' Angeli, Ilaria [Department of General Surgery ' Pietro Valdoni' , Policlinico Umberto I, University ' Sapienza' of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00161, Rome (Italy); Impara, Luca; Mazza, Dario [Department of Radiological Sciences, Policlinico Umberto I, University ' Sapienza' of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00161, Rome (Italy); Izzo, Paolo [Department of General Surgery ' Pietro Valdoni' , Policlinico Umberto I, University ' Sapienza' of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00161, Rome (Italy); Marini, Mario [Department of Radiological Sciences, Policlinico Umberto I, University ' Sapienza' of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00161, Rome (Italy)

    2011-06-15

    Objective: To compare Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance (MR) features and their diagnostic potential in the assessment of Synovial Chondromatosis (SC) of the Temporo-Mandibular Joint (TMJ). Materials and methods: Eight patients with symptoms and signs compatible with dysfunctional disorders of the TMJ underwent CT and MR scan. We considered the following parameters: soft tissue involvement (disk included), osteostructural alterations of the joints, loose bodies and intra-articular fluid. These parameters were evaluated separately by two radiologists with a 'double blinded method' and then, after agreement, definitive assessment of the parameters was given. CT and MR findings were compared. Results: Histopathological results showed metaplastic synovia in all patients and therefore confirmed diagnosis of SC. MR resulted better than CT in the evaluation of all parameters except the osteostructural alterations of the joints, estimated with more accuracy by CT scan. Conclusions: CT scan is excellent to define bony surfaces of the articular joints and flogistic tissue but it fails in the detection of loose bodies when these are not yet calcified. MR scan therefore is the gold standard when SC is suspected since it can visualize loose bodies at early stage and also evaluate disk condition and eventual extra-articular tissues involvement. The use of T2-weighted images and contrast medium allows identifying intra-articular fluid, estimating its entity and discriminating from sinovial tissue.

  11. Assessment of Condylar Changes in Patients with Temporomandibular Joint Pain Using Digital Volumetric Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shetty, U.Sh.; Burde, K.N.; Naikmasur, V.G.; Sattur, A.P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the efficiency of DVT in comparison with OPG in the assessment of bony condylar changes in patients of TMJ pain. Methods. 100 temporomandibular joints of 62 patients with the complaint of temporomandibular joint pain were included in the study. DVT and OPG radiographs were taken for all the 100 joints. Three observers interpreted the DVT and OPG radiograph for the bony changes separately for two times with an interval of one week. The bony changes seen in the condyle were given coding from 0 to 6. (0: Normal, 1: Erosion, 2: Flattening, 3: Osteophyte, 4: Sclerosis, 5: Resorption, and 6: other changes). Interobserver and intra observer variability was assessed with one-way Anoka statistics. Z test was used to see the significant difference between OPG and DVT. Results. In the present study the inter examiner reliability for Og and DVT was 0.903 and 0.978, respectively. Intra examiner reliability for OPG and DVT was 0.908 and 0.980, respectively. The most common condylar bony change seen in OPG and DVT was erosion followed by flattening and osteophyte. There was significant difference between OPG and DVT in detecting erosion and osteophytes. The other changes observed in our study were Elys cyst, pointed condyle, and bifid condyle. All the bony changes are more commonly seen in females than males. Conclusion. DVT provides more valid and accurate information on condylar bony changes. The DVT has an added advantage of lesser radiation exposure to the patient and cost effectiveness and could be easily accessible in a dental hospital

  12. Microscopic analysis of the temporomandibular joint in rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus L.) using an occlusal interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Karen; Munerato, Maria Cristina; Ligocki, Anelise; Lauxen, Isabel; de Quadros, Onofre Francisco

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the tissue alterations in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of the New Zealand White rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus L.), after a unilateral occlusal interference insertion on the animal's right side back teeth. A total of 36 animals were used, thirty of which belonged to the experimental group and six to the control group. We established three experimental periods: 24 hours, three days and seven days. The control group animals were divided two by two; each pair followed the same experimental periods of the former one. The experimental group animals were submitted to the use of a 0.3 mm thick metallic cap with a visor. All animals were euthanized, and the TMJs were removed. Using a microscope for examination we observed, in all experimental periods, the presence of intra-articular hemorrhage in the supra- and infra-disk compartments as well as in the retro-disk zone. There were no inflammatory cells detected. The thickness of the condylar fibrocartilage presented significant alterations among the animals of the three experimental groups. In the left TMJs no inflammatory cells were detected. The results suggest that the insertion of a unilateral occlusal interference in rabbit back teeth does not cause any inflammatory intra-articular process within seven days; however, it does cause bilateral intra-articular hemorrhage and a larger compression of the condylar fibrocartilage in the joint opposite the side where the interference is placed. We also concluded that, in order to do research on the temporomandibular joint using animals, it is necessary have an independent (or separate) group of animals as controls.

  13. Assessment of Condylar Changes in Patients with Temporomandibular Joint Pain Using Digital Volumetric Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ujwala Shivarama Shetty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the efficiency of DVT in comparison with OPG in the assessment of bony condylar changes in patients of TMJ pain. Methods. 100 temporomandibular joints of 62 patients with the complaint of temporomandibular joint pain were included in the study. DVT and OPG radiographs were taken for all the 100 joints. Three observers interpreted the DVT and OPG radiograph for the bony changes separately for two times with an interval of one week. The bony changes seen in the condyle were given coding from 0 to 6. (0: Normal, 1: Erosion, 2: Flattening, 3: Osteophyte, 4: Sclerosis, 5: Resorption, and 6: other changes. Interobserver and intraobserver variability was assessed with one-way ANOVA statistics. Z test was used to see the significant difference between OPG and DVT. Results. In the present study the interexaminer reliability for OPG and DVT was 0.903 and 0.978, respectively. Intraexaminer reliability for OPG and DVT was 0.908 and 0.980, respectively. The most common condylar bony change seen in OPG and DVT was erosion followed by flattening and osteophyte. There was significant difference between OPG and DVT in detecting erosion and osteophytes. The other changes observed in our study were Ely’s cyst, pointed condyle, and bifid condyle. All the bony changes are more commonly seen in females than males. Conclusion. DVT provides more valid and accurate information on condylar bony changes. The DVT has an added advantage of lesser radiation exposure to the patient and cost effectiveness and could be easily accessible in a dental hospital.

  14. Radiographic changes of TMJ components with an advancement of TMJ internal derangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurita, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    Internal derangement (ID) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) relates to a mechanical and anatomical disturbance interfering with the smooth joint function. The ID usually develops in a benign and self-limiting fashion and does not always lead to progressing disorders. Radiographically visible degenerative changes occur with advancement of ID. It is thought that most of these changes closely correlate with the self-limiting nature of ID. In this report, a variety of radiographically visible degenerative changes were shown to develop with advancing ID. These changes, including a total and more anterior displacement of the TMJ disk, deviations in configuration of the TMJ disk, resorption of lateral pole of TMJ condyle, regression in horizontal size of the TMJ condyle, and flattening of the articular eminence, developed reflecting each other and might play an important role in an improvement of clinical signs and symptoms in the long run. It is also suggested that most of the acute and destructive radiographically visible degenerative changes were arrested or slowed in those patients whose symptoms and signs were successfully resolved or reduced. (author)

  15. Isolated marginal facial nerve paresis after TMJ discopexy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reychler, H; Mahy, P

    2011-01-01

    Isolated marginal facial nerve paresis after TMJ discopexy: a case report. This is the first report of a transient, isolated marginal facial nerve paresis after temporomandibular joint arthrotomy. The paresis seems to have resulted from a crush lesion by Backhaus forceps, placed transcutaneously during the operation to distract the intra-articular space.

  16. Magnetic resonance tomography of the temporo-mandibular joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katzberg, R.W.; Burgener, F.A.

    1986-01-01

    79 patients aged 6 to 66 years (9 men and 70 women) with abnormalities of the TMJs were examined by magnetic resonance tomography (132 joints) and the results were compared with CT (16 joints) and resonance tomography showed forward luxation of the meniscus in 82 joints (62%). In 34 joints (26%) the meniscus spontaneously resumed normal position when the mouth was open, but in 48 joints (36%) the displacement was permanent. The accuracy of resonance tomography was equal to that of arthrography and superior to CT. It was particularly suitable for follow-up examination after surgery (23 cases) when invasive arthrography would be contraindicated or difficult. Because of the high resolution of the soft tissue components in the TMJ, resonance tomography should be able to diagnose inflammatory and degenerative changes in the meniscus and ligaments. (orig.)

  17. Does Temporomandibular Joint Pathology With or Without Surgical Management Affect the Stability of Counterclockwise Rotation of the Maxillomandibular Complex in Orthognathic Surgery? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Moraissi, Essam Ahmed; Wolford, Larry M

    2017-04-01

    This study was designed to determine the stability of counterclockwise rotation (CCWR) of the maxillomandibular complex (MMC) in orthognathic surgery with or without surgical correction of coexisting temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pathology. The authors implemented a systematic review and meta-analysis. A search of major databases through PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane CENTRAL was performed. Inclusion criteria were studies that analyzed CCWR of the MMC in regard to skeletal stability after orthognathic surgery in patients with or without pre-existing TMJ pathology that was or was not surgically corrected concomitantly. The predictor variables were patients who underwent CCWR of the MMC in the following subgroups: 1) healthy TMJs (presumed healthy based on history, clinical evaluation, and radiographic analysis but without magnetic resonance imaging [MRI] confirmation), 2) no TMJ assessment, 3) untreated TMJ disc displacement (confirmed by MRI), 4) TMJ disc displacement (confirmed by MRI) repositioned using Mitek anchors, and 5) reconstruction with TMJ total joint prosthesis. Outcome variables were surgical relapse for angular and linear measurements. Postsurgical mean changes for the occlusal plane (OP) and linear measurements using a fixed-effects model with a 95% confidence interval were analyzed. A total of 345 patients enrolled in 12 studies were included in this study. There was significant OP relapse and horizontal relapse at the B point and menton for studies with untreated TMJ disc displacement and studies without TMJ assessment (P < .005). There was significant horizontal relapse at the A point for studies with healthy TMJs, without assessment of the TMJs, and with TMJ reconstruction with total joint prostheses (P < .005). There was no significant vertical relapse at the B and A points for all subgroup analyses (P < .005). The result of the meta-analysis suggests that CCWR of the MMC is a stable procedure for patients with healthy TMJs, patients undergoing

  18. Progression of cartilage degradation, bone resorption and pain in rat temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis induced by injection of iodoacetate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Dong Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Osteoarthritis (OA is an important subtype of temporomandibular disorders. A simple and reproducible animal model that mimics the histopathologic changes, both in the cartilage and subchondral bone, and clinical symptoms of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJOA would help in our understanding of its process and underlying mechanism. OBJECTIVE: To explore whether injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA into the upper compartment of rat TMJ could induce OA-like lesions. METHODS: Female rats were injected with varied doses of MIA into the upper compartment and observed for up to 12 weeks. Histologic, radiographic, behavioral, and molecular changes in the TMJ were evaluated by light and electron microscopy, MicroCT scanning, head withdrawal threshold test, real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry, and TUNEL assay. RESULTS: The intermediate zone of the disc loosened by 1 day post-MIA injection and thinned thereafter. Injection of an MIA dose of 0.5 mg or higher induced typical OA-like lesions in the TMJ within 4 weeks. Condylar destruction presented in a time-dependent manner, including chondrocyte apoptosis in the early stages, subsequent cartilage matrix disorganization and subchondral bone erosion, fibrosis, subchondral bone sclerosis, and osteophyte formation in the late stages. Nociceptive responses increased in the early stages, corresponding to severe synovitis. Furthermore, chondrocyte apoptosis and an imbalance between anabolism and catabolism of cartilage and subchondral bone might account for the condylar destruction. CONCLUSIONS: Multi-level data demonstrated a reliable and convenient rat model of TMJOA could be induced by MIA injection into the upper compartment. The model might facilitate TMJOA related researches.

  19. Association between disk position and degenerative bone changes of the temporomandibular joints: an imaging study in subjects with TMD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Daniel; Sylvester, Daniel Cortés; Exss, Eduardo; Marholz, Carlos; Millas, Rodrigo; Moncada, Gustavo

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and relationship between disk position and degenerative bone changes in the temporomandibular joints (TMJ), in subjects with internal derangement (ID). MRI and CT scans of 180 subjects with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) were studied. Different image parameters or characteristics were observed, such as disk position, joint effusion, condyle movement, degenerative bone changes (flattened, cortical erosions and irregularities), osteophytes, subchondral cysts and idiopathic condyle resorption. The present study concluded that there is a significant association between disk displacement without reduction and degenerative bone changes in patients with TMD. The study also found a high probability of degenerative bone changes when disk displacement without reduction is present. No association was found between TMD and condyle range of motion, joint effusion and/or degenerative bone changes. The following were the most frequent morphological changes observed: flattening of the anterior surface of the condyle; followed by erosions and irregularities of the joint surfaces; flattening of the articular surface of the temporal eminence, subchondral cysts, osteophytes; and idiopathic condyle resorption, in decreasing order.

  20. Activation of voltage-gated KCNQ/Kv7 channels by anticonvulsant retigabine attenuates mechanical allodynia of inflammatory temporomandibular joint in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Wen

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs are characterized by persistent orofacial pain and have diverse etiologic factors that are not well understood. It is thought that central sensitization leads to neuronal hyperexcitability and contributes to hyperalgesia and spontaneous pain. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are currently the first choice of drug to relieve TMD pain. NSAIDS were shown to exhibit anticonvulsant properties and suppress cortical neuron activities by enhancing neuronal voltage-gated potassium KCNQ/Kv7 channels (M-current, suggesting that specific activation of M-current might be beneficial for TMD pain. Results In this study, we selected a new anticonvulsant drug retigabine that specifically activates M-current, and investigated the effect of retigabine on inflammation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ induced by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA in rats. The results show that the head withdrawal threshold for escape from mechanical stimulation applied to facial skin over the TMJ in inflamed rats was significantly lower than that in control rats. Administration of centrally acting M-channel opener retigabine (2.5 and 7.5 mg/kg can dose-dependently raise the head withdrawal threshold of mechanical allodynia, and this analgesic effect can be reversed by the specific KCNQ channel blocker XE991 (3 mg/kg. Food intake is known to be negatively associated with TMJ inflammation. Food intake was increased significantly by the administration of retigabine (2.5 and 7.5 mg/kg, and this effect was reversed by XE991 (3 mg/kg. Furthermore, intracerebralventricular injection of retigabine further confirmed the analgesic effect of central retigabine on inflammatory TMJ. Conclusions Our findings indicate that central sensitization is involved in inflammatory TMJ pain and pharmacological intervention for controlling central hyperexcitability by activation of neuronal KCNQ/M-channels may have therapeutic potential for

  1. The frequency range of TMJ sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmalm, S E; Williams, W J; Djurdjanovic, D; McKay, D C

    2003-04-01

    There are conflicting opinions about the frequency range of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) sounds. Some authors claim that the upper limit is about 650 Hz. The aim was to test the hypothesis that TMJ sounds may contain frequencies well above 650 Hz but that significant amounts of their energy are lost if the vibrations are recorded using contact sensors and/or travel far through the head tissues. Time-frequency distributions of 172 TMJ clickings (three subjects) were compared between recordings with one microphone in the ear canal and a skin contact transducer above the clicking joint and between recordings from two microphones, one in each ear canal. The energy peaks of the clickings recorded with a microphone in the ear canal on the clicking side were often well above 650 Hz and always in a significantly higher area (range 117-1922 Hz, P 375 Hz) or in microphone recordings from the opposite ear canal (range 141-703 Hz). Future studies are required to establish normative frequency range values of TMJ sounds but need methods also capable of recording the high frequency vibrations.

  2. Temporomandibular joint dislocation in an epileptic and mentally ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Theories regarding the pathogenesis of TMJ dislocation propose laxity of TMJ ligaments or capsule, excessive activity of the lateral pterygoid muscle (LPM)and erosion of the eminence'. TMJ dislocation can occur in an anterior, posterior, lateral and superior direction'. Clinical presentation of dislocated TMJ includes inability ...

  3. Traumatic injuries of the temporomandibular joint; Die traumatischen Kiefergelenkverletzungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puig, S.; Krestan, C.; Lomoschitz, F.; Robinson, S. [Vienna Univ. (Austria). Zentrales Inst. fuer Radiodiagnostik; Glaser, C. [Vienna Univ. (Austria). Klinik fuer Zahn-, Mund- und Kieferheilkunde; Staudenherz, A. [Vienna Univ. (Austria). Universitaetsklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2001-09-01

    Injuries of the temporomandibular joint are mostly due to injuries or fractures of the mandibular condyle. Fractures of the skull base involving the temporomandibular joint are rare. Classification of fractures refers to their anatomical positions and the presence or absence of a luxation. Further, it is important whether the fracture is intra- or extra-capsular. The primary imaging method should be orthopantomography. As for therapy planning, especially surgery, also evaluation of soft tissue is necessary, computed tomography is the imaging method of choice. For diagnosis of complications or internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint, magnetic resonance imaging is to be recommended. (orig.) [German] Die Verletzungen des Kiefergelenks gehen zumeist mit einer Verletzung oder Fraktur des Kieferkoepfchens bzw. des Kiefergelenkfortsatzes einher. Frakturen der Schaedelbasis unter Beteiligung der Kiefergelenkpfanne sind selten. Unterschieden werden die Frakturen des Gelenkfortsatzes nach anatomischer Lokalisation und danach, ob eine Luxation vorhanden ist oder nicht. Weiter ist von Bedeutung, ob der Frakturspalt intraoder extrakapsulaer verlaeuft. Die primaere Bildgebung sollte mittels Orthopantomographie erfolgen. Da fuer eine weitere operative Behandlung auch die etwaige Verletzung der Weichteile von Bedeutung ist, bietet sich die Computertomographie als bildgebende diagnostische Methode an. Zur Abklaerung von Komplikationen bzw. des so genannten ''internal derangement'' ist die Magnetresonanztomographie zu empfehlen. (orig.)

  4. Correlation between headache and temporomandibular joint dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Menezes, Mariana Sampaio; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; Biasotto-Gonzalez, Daniela Aparecida

    2008-01-01

    A relação entre disfunções temporomandibulares (DTM) e os diferentes tipos de cefaléias ainda não está bem compreendida, mas a dor de cabeça é provavelmente o sintoma mais comum da DTM. O objetivo deste estudo foi correlacionar cefaléia com o índice clínico de Fonseca de avaliação da DTM. Participaram 160 voluntários estudantes da Universidade Nove de Julho na faixa dos 18 aos 36 anos, sendo 80 mulheres e 80 homens. Foram aplicados dois questionários: o índice clínico de Fonseca e um question...

  5. The craniocervical connection: a retrospective analysis of 300 whiplash patients with cervical and temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, M H; Weisberg, J

    2000-07-01

    Because the concept of whiplash as a causative factor for temporomandibular disorders (TMD) is highly controversial, we decided to do a retrospective analysis of patients treated in our office who had sustained whiplash injuries and were treated for cervical and temporomandibular disorders. The records of 300 patients with TMD preceded by a motor vehicle accident were examined retrospectively. The most common presenting symptoms, in order, were: jaw pain, neck pain, post-traumatic headache, jaw fatigue, and severe temporomandibular joint (TMJ) clicking. The most common TMD diagnoses were: masseter trigger points, closing jaw muscle hyperactivity, TMJ synovitis, opening jaw muscle hyperactivity, and advanced TMJ disk derangement. Based primarily on the physical examination, we concluded that the TMJ and surrounding musculature should be examined similarly to other joints, with no preconceived notion that TMD pathology after whiplash is unlikely.

  6. Teaching Dental Students to Understand the Temporomandibular Joint Using MRI: Comparison of Conventional and Digital Learning Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arús, Nádia A; da Silva, Átila M; Duarte, Rogério; da Silveira, Priscila F; Vizzotto, Mariana B; da Silveira, Heraldo L D; da Silveira, Heloisa E D

    2017-06-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate and compare the performance of dental students in interpreting the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans using two learning methods (conventional and digital interactive learning) and to examine the usability of the digital learning object (DLO). The DLO consisted of tutorials about MRI and anatomic and functional aspects of the TMJ. In 2014, dental students in their final year of study who were enrolled in the elective "MRI Interpretation of the TMJ" course comprised the study sample. After exclusions for nonattendance and other reasons, 29 of the initial 37 students participated in the study, for a participation rate of 78%. The participants were divided into two groups: a digital interactive learning group (n=14) and a conventional learning group (n=15). Both methods were assessed by an objective test applied before and after training and classes. Aspects such as support and training requirements, complexity, and consistency of the DLO were also evaluated using the System Usability Scale (SUS). A significant between-group difference in the posttest results was found, with the conventional learning group scoring better than the DLO group, indicated by mean scores of 9.20 and 8.11, respectively, out of 10. However, when the pretest and posttest results were compared, both groups showed significantly improved performance. The SUS score was 89, which represented a high acceptance of the DLO by the users. The students who used the conventional method of learning showed superior performance in interpreting the TMJ using MRI compared to the group that used digital interactive learning.

  7. Management of extra-capsular temporo-mandibular joint ankylosis: does conservative approach to treatment have a role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyanechi, C E; Osunde, O D; Bassey, G O

    2015-06-01

    The conventional management of fibrous extracapsular temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis, a debilitating disease, is associated with surgical complications and financial burden on the patients. To assess the outcome of conservative approach to the management of fibrous extracapsular TMJ ankylosis. This is a prospective study of patients who presented at the Dental and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinic of the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Nigeria, during the period from January 1999 to December 2012 with a history of inability to open the mouth diagnosed as fibrous extracapsular TMJ ankylosis. Twenty-one subjects were treated and their ages ranged from 11 to 22 years with mean at 15.0 years. There were 13 (61.9 %) males and 8 (38.1 %) females with male: female ratio of 1.6:1. The aetiological factor that predisposed to formation of extracapsular TMJ ankylosis was facial trauma. There was no facial asymmetry and the side distribution of the affliction showed that 1 (4.8 %) was bilateral while 20 (95.2 %) were unilateral. Eight cases (38.1 %) were incomplete ankylosis while the rest (n = 13, 61.9 %) were complete. The shorter the duration of fibrous ankylosis and the greater the initial inter-incisal distance before treatment, the better the treatment outcome. The outcome of treatment suggests that the conservative approach to management of this condition was beneficial to these patients because they presented early. However, randomized controlled clinical trials are needed to validate this treatment option.

  8. Bioengineered Temporomandibular Joint Disk Implants: Study Protocol for a Two-Phase Exploratory Randomized Preclinical Pilot Trial in 18 Black Merino Sheep (TEMPOJIMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje, Florencio Gil; González-García, Raúl; Little, Christopher B; Mónico, Lisete; Pinho, Mário; Santos, Fábio Abade; Carrapiço, Belmira; Gonçalves, Sandra Cavaco; Morouço, Pedro; Alves, Nuno; Moura, Carla; Wang, Yadong; Jeffries, Eric; Gao, Jin; Sousa, Rita; Neto, Lia Lucas; Caldeira, Daniel; Salvado, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Background Preclinical trials are essential to test efficacious options to substitute the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disk. The contemporary absence of an ideal treatment for patients with severe TMJ disorders can be related to difficulties concerning the appropriate study design to conduct preclinical trials in the TMJ field. These difficulties can be associated with the use of heterogeneous animal models, the use of the contralateral TMJ as control, the absence of rigorous randomized controlled preclinical trials with blinded outcomes assessors, and difficulties involving multidisciplinary teams. Objective This study aims to develop a new, reproducible, and effective study design for preclinical research in the TMJ domain, obtaining rigorous data related to (1) identify the impact of bilateral discectomy in black Merino sheep, (2) identify the impact of bilateral discopexy in black Merino sheep, and (3) identify the impact of three different bioengineering TMJ discs in black Merino sheep. Methods A two-phase exploratory randomized controlled preclinical trial with blinded outcomes is proposed. In the first phase, nine sheep are randomized into three different surgical bilateral procedures: bilateral discectomy, bilateral discopexy, and sham surgery. In the second phase, nine sheep are randomized to bilaterally test three different TMJ bioengineering disk implants. The primary outcome is the histological gradation of TMJ. Secondary outcomes are imaging changes, absolute masticatory time, ruminant time per cycle, ruminant kinetics, ruminant area, and sheep weight. Results Previous preclinical studies in this field have used the contralateral unoperated side as a control, different animal models ranging from mice to a canine model, with nonrandomized, nonblinded and uncontrolled study designs and limited outcomes measures. The main goal of this exploratory preclinical protocol is to set a new standard for future preclinical trials in oromaxillofacial surgery

  9. Radiologic Study of Meniscus Perforations in the Temporomandibular Joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kee Duck; Park, Chang Seo

    1990-01-01

    Thirty-nine patients (forty-four joints) who had been diagnosed as having meniscus perforation of the temporomandibular joint by inferior joint space arthrography and had been treated by surgical procedures were evaluated retrospectively. Information of clinical findings, arthrotomographic findings and surgical findings was collected on a standardized form and evaluated. The results were as follows: 1. On the 34 patients of 38 joints which were surgically confirmed perforation of meniscus or its attachments of the temporomandibular joint, there were 29 females and 5 males (5.8:1). The average age was 36 years (range 17 to 70). 2. The common clinical findings of group that had meniscus displacement without reduction and with perforation were pain on the affected joint and limitation of mouth opening. In the group showing meniscus displacement with reduction and with perforation the common clinical findings were pain and clicking on the affected joint. 3. 32 joints (84.2%) were arthrotomographically anterior meniscus displacement without reduction and with perforation, 6 joints (15.8%) showed anterior meniscus displacement with reduction and with perforation. 4. Joints categorized arthrotomographically as having meniscus displacement without reduction and with perforation were less likely to have full translation of the condyle in comparison with the normal or meniscus displacement with reduction and with perforation groups (p<0.05) 5. The arthrographic findings of 44 joints having meniscus perforation were compared with surgical findings, there were 6 false positive findings of meniscus perforation, the reliability of arthrographic findings of meniscus perforation was a 86.4% correlation with surgical findings. 6. On the site of perforations of 38 joints which were surgically confirmed perforation of meniscus or its attachments, twenty-three of perforations (60.5%) were in location at the junction of the meniscus and posterior attachment, fourteen (36.9%) were

  10. Condromatosis sinovial de la articulación temporomandibular con extensión a la base de cráneo Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint. A rare case with subcranial extension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Belén Marín Fernández

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available La condromatosis sinovial (CS es una metaplasia cartilaginosa de los remanentes mesenquimales del tejido sinovial de las articulaciones. Es una enfermedad de etiología desconocida y poco frecuente. Puede definirse como un proceso benigno sinovial caracterizado por la formación de nódulos cartilaginosos (cuerpos libres. La CS afecta principalmente a grandes articulaciones sinoviales siendo poco común su aparición en la articulación temporomandibular. La sintomatología predominante es dolor, inflamación, limitación de los movimientos mandibulares, crepitación y laterodesviación mandibular. El diagnóstico se realiza mediante el estudio radiológico y artroscópico de la articulación. El tratamiento adecuado englobaría la extirpación completa de los cuerpos libres y de la sinovial afecta, bien mediante artroscopia o mediante cirugía abierta. Cuando está afectada la articulación temporomandibular las lesiones suelen estar localizadas en la cavidad articular, siendo rara su extensión extraarticular. En este artículo describimos un caso excepcional de condromatosis sinovial con extensión a la fosa craneal media.Synovial chondromatosis (SC is a cartilaginous metaplasia of the mesenchymal remnants of the synovial tissue of joints. It is an uncommon disease of unknown origin. This benign synovial process involves the formation of cartilaginous nodules (loose bodies in the synovium and within the articular space. SC mainly affects large synovial joints, and only very rarely affects the temporomandibular joint (TMJ. The main symptoms are pain, swelling, mouth opening limitation, crepitation, and lateral mandibular deviation. Diagnosis can be made by panoramic radiograph, computed tomography scan, magnetic resonance imaging, and arthroscopy of the TMJ. The main treatment includes complete removal of the loose bodies in conjunction with excision of the affected synovium. It can be performed by arthroscopy or by open surgery. In cases with

  11. Evaluation of the research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders for the recognition of an anterior disc displacement with reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naeije, M.; Kalaykova, S.; Visscher, C.M.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this Focus Article is to review critically the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) for the recognition of an anterior disc displacement with reduction (ADDR) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). This evaluation is based upon the experience gained

  12. Radiological study of the condylar heads in temporomandibular joint arthrosis

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    You, Dong Soo [Department of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-11-15

    The author obtained the oblique lateral transcranial radiograms from 376 patients (114 of male, and 262 of female) with temporomandibular joint arthrosis. After tracing each film, the author analyzed the dimensional changes of the condylar heads with pain, clicking, mouth opening limitation, and masticatory difficulty respectively, which were the chief complaints of the TMJ arthrosis and compared these data with control group. The results were as follows; 1. There was a great predilection for occurrence of the TMJ arthrosis in female (262 cases) over male (114 cases). But there was no significant difference in ratio between the sexes on each symptom. In male, 60 patients (52.6%) had pain, 28 patients (24.6%) had clicking, 21 patients (18.4%) had mouth opening limitation, and 5 patients (4.4%) had masticatory difficulty. In female, 148 patients (56.5%) had pain, 57 patients (21.8%) had clicking, 47 patients (17.9%) had mouth opening limitation, and 10 patients (3.8%) had masticatory difficulty. 2. Examined controlled group, the author analyzed the dimension of W-W', 0-H, 0-A, 0-B on the right side first, and left side second. In male, the dimension of W-W' was 14.52 mm, 14.13 mm; 0-H was 13.92 mm, 13.71 mm; 0-A was 8.91 mm, 9.03 mm and 0-B was 8.67 mm, 8.78 mm. In female, W-W' was 13.77 mm, 13.51 mm; 0-H was 13.42 mm, 13.35 mm; 0-A was 8.92 mm, 9.01 mm and 0-B was 8.59 mm, 8.80 mm. 3. W-W' and 0-H of the experimental group were distinctly lesser than the controlled group. Male with mouth opening limitation show the least (12.70 mm, 13.00 mm) on W-W', but both sexes with pain show the least on 0-H. There was no significant difference between experimental group with clicking and controlled group on 0-H, 0-A, and 0- B. And also there was no difference on 0-B in patients with every symptom except masticatory difficulty. The dimensional changes of the condylar heads with those symptoms were as follows; a) In male patients, complaining of pain, W

  13. Radiological study of the condylar heads in temporomandibular joint arthrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Dong Soo

    1985-01-01

    The author obtained the oblique lateral transcranial radiograms from 376 patients (114 of male, and 262 of female) with temporomandibular joint arthrosis. After tracing each film, the author analyzed the dimensional changes of the condylar heads with pain, clicking, mouth opening limitation, and masticatory difficulty respectively, which were the chief complaints of the TMJ arthrosis and compared these data with control group. The results were as follows; 1. There was a great predilection for occurrence of the TMJ arthrosis in female (262 cases) over male (114 cases). But there was no significant difference in ratio between the sexes on each symptom. In male, 60 patients (52.6%) had pain, 28 patients (24.6%) had clicking, 21 patients (18.4%) had mouth opening limitation, and 5 patients (4.4%) had masticatory difficulty. In female, 148 patients (56.5%) had pain, 57 patients (21.8%) had clicking, 47 patients (17.9%) had mouth opening limitation, and 10 patients (3.8%) had masticatory difficulty. 2. Examined controlled group, the author analyzed the dimension of W-W', 0-H, 0-A, 0-B on the right side first, and left side second. In male, the dimension of W-W' was 14.52 mm, 14.13 mm; 0-H was 13.92 mm, 13.71 mm; 0-A was 8.91 mm, 9.03 mm and 0-B was 8.67 mm, 8.78 mm. In female, W-W' was 13.77 mm, 13.51 mm; 0-H was 13.42 mm, 13.35 mm; 0-A was 8.92 mm, 9.01 mm and 0-B was 8.59 mm, 8.80 mm. 3. W-W' and 0-H of the experimental group were distinctly lesser than the controlled group. Male with mouth opening limitation show the least (12.70 mm, 13.00 mm) on W-W', but both sexes with pain show the least on 0-H. There was no significant difference between experimental group with clicking and controlled group on 0-H, 0-A, and 0- B. And also there was no difference on 0-B in patients with every symptom except masticatory difficulty. The dimensional changes of the condylar heads with those symptoms were as follows; a) In male patients, complaining of pain, W-W' of the right and left

  14. A clinical study of temporomandibular joint disorders by using arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prove the relationship between arthrographic and clinical features in temporomandibular joint disorders. In order to carry out this study, ninety-eight arthrographic examinations of temporomandibular joints were performed in eighty-two patients who had the temporomandibular joint disorders. As the arthrographic examination, the cases were classified in three groups, disk displacement with reduction, disk displacement without reduction, within normal limit. After this, the cases were clinically examined, and the results were compared and analyzed in each other group. The obtained results were as follows ; 1. As the classification by arthrographic examination, three groups (disc displacement with reduction, disc displacement without reduction, within normal limit) were 41%, 54%, 5% of total cases in this study, respectively. 2. The third decade (65%) was most frequent in this study. The average age of each group (disc displacement with reduction, disc displacement without reduction, within normal limit) was 24, 28, 21, and disc displacement without reduction group was higher than any other group. 3. In the chief complaint, pain was the most frequent in all three groups. Joint sound was also frequent in disc displacement with reduction group, but in disc displacement without reduction group, limitation of mouth opening was more frequent. 4. Of the various pain, the movement pain was most frequent (61%) in this study. In joint sound, click (63%) was the most frequent in disc displacement with reduction group, but sound history (42%) and no sound (31%) were more frequent in disc displacement without reduction group. 5. The average maximum opening of each group (disc displacement with reduction, disc displacement without reduction, within normal limit) was 44 mm, 32.9 mm, 44 mm, and disc displacement without reduction group was less than any other group. 6. The masticatory disturbance of each group (disc displacement with reduction, disc

  15. A comparative study between use of arthroscopic lavage and arthrocentesis of temporomandibular joint based on computational fluid dynamics analysis.

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    Yue Xu

    Full Text Available Arthroscopic lavage and arthrocentesis, performed with different inner-diameter lavage needles, are the current minimally invasive techniques used in temporomandibular joint disc displacement (TMJ-DD for pain reduction and functional improvement. In the current study, we aimed to explore the biomechanical influence and explain the diverse clinical outcomes of these two approaches with computational fluid dynamics. Data was retrospectively analyzed from 78 cases that had undergone arthroscopic lavage or arthrocentesis for TMJ-DD from 2002 to 2010. Four types of finite volume models, featuring irrigation needles of different diameters, were constructed based on computed tomography images. We investigated the flow pattern and pressure distribution of lavage fluid secondary to caliber-varying needles. Our results demonstrated that the size of outflow portal was the critical factor in determining irrigated flow rate, with a larger inflow portal and a smaller outflow portal leading to higher intra-articular pressure. This was consistent with clinical data suggesting that increasing the mouth opening and maximal contra-lateral movement led to better outcomes following arthroscopic lavage. The findings of this study could be useful for choosing the lavage apparatus according to the main complaint of pain, or limited mouth opening, and examination of joint movements.

  16. Distraction of the temporomandibular joint condyle in patients with unilateral non-reducing disc displacement: Fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldız, Melih; Çağatay Dayan, Süleyman; Şakar, Olcay; Sülün, Tonguç

    2017-07-24

    This study investigated the distractive effect of a unilateral pivot splint on patients with unilateral disc displacement without reduction. The study group was comprised of 18 patients who had no history of treatment with removable prosthetic restorations of molars, premolars, or canine teeth, and no previous treatment for temporomandibular disorder. Joint spaces measurements made on magnetic resonance images indicated the affected side to be narrower than the healthy side. Unilateral distraction splints were made for all patients. An ultrasonic motion analyzer was used to measure the vertical shift occurring on the affected side as patients closed their mouths with maximal force with the splint in their mouths. Closing with maximal force on the unilateral distraction splint led to a noticeable downward movement of the affected condyle. The findings of this study indicate that the TMJ condyle of patients with unilateral disc displacement without reduction may be unilaterally distracted if the articular space is narrowed.

  17. The postnatal development of the temporal part of the human temporomandibular joint. A quantitative study on skulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibbets, J M; Dijkman, G E

    1997-12-01

    The morphology of the temporal part of the human temporomandibular joint (TMJ) changes drastically during postnatal development. The glenoid fossa will acquire its characteristic S shape and a tubercle will develop. The combined results of the literature and of this study allow a reconstruction of the actual growth processes. The roof of the glenoid fossa appears to enlarge forward by remodeling while sagittal and vertical growth is mainly achieved by deposition at the top of the tubercle. These latter changes result in a steeper slope of the eminence and take place in 3 phases, parallelling the eruption of the first incisors, the permanent first molars and the permanent second molars. While the zygomatic arch thickens by deposition at all surfaces, it also remodels downward relative to the external meatus. As a result, the neonate anulus occupies a lower position relative to this arch than does the adult meatus.

  18. Quantitative and qualitative comparison of MR imaging of the temporomandibular joint at 1.5 and 3.0 T using an optimized high-resolution protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinner, Georg; Wyss, Michael; Erni, Stefan; Ettlin, Dominik A; Nanz, Daniel; Ulbrich, Erika J; Gallo, Luigi M; Andreisek, Gustav

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To quantitatively and qualitatively compare MRI of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) using an optimized high-resolution protocol at 3.0 T and a clinical standard protocol at 1.5 T. Methods: A phantom and 12 asymptomatic volunteers were MR imaged using a 2-channel surface coil (standard TMJ coil) at 1.5 and 3.0 T (Philips Achieva and Philips Ingenia, respectively; Philips Healthcare, Best, Netherlands). Imaging protocol consisted of coronal and oblique sagittal proton density-weighted turbo spin echo sequences. For quantitative evaluation, a spherical phantom was imaged. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) maps were calculated on a voxelwise basis. For qualitative evaluation, all volunteers underwent MRI of the TMJ with the jaw in closed position. Two readers independently assessed visibility and delineation of anatomical structures of the TMJ and overall image quality on a 5-point Likert scale. Quantitative and qualitative measurements were compared between field strengths. Results: The quantitative analysis showed similar SNR for the high-resolution protocol at 3.0 T compared with the clinical protocol at 1.5 T. The qualitative analysis showed significantly better visibility and delineation of clinically relevant anatomical structures of the TMJ, including the TMJ disc and pterygoid muscle as well as better overall image quality at 3.0 T than at 1.5 T. Conclusions: The presented results indicate that expected gains in SNR at 3.0 T can be used to increase the spatial resolution when imaging the TMJ, which translates into increased visibility and delineation of anatomical structures of the TMJ. Therefore, imaging at 3.0 T should be preferred over 1.5 T for imaging the TMJ. PMID:26371077

  19. Quantitative and qualitative comparison of MR imaging of the temporomandibular joint at 1.5 and 3.0 T using an optimized high-resolution protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoliu, Andrei; Spinner, Georg; Wyss, Michael; Erni, Stefan; Ettlin, Dominik A; Nanz, Daniel; Ulbrich, Erika J; Gallo, Luigi M; Andreisek, Gustav

    2016-01-01

    To quantitatively and qualitatively compare MRI of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) using an optimized high-resolution protocol at 3.0 T and a clinical standard protocol at 1.5 T. A phantom and 12 asymptomatic volunteers were MR imaged using a 2-channel surface coil (standard TMJ coil) at 1.5 and 3.0 T (Philips Achieva and Philips Ingenia, respectively; Philips Healthcare, Best, Netherlands). Imaging protocol consisted of coronal and oblique sagittal proton density-weighted turbo spin echo sequences. For quantitative evaluation, a spherical phantom was imaged. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) maps were calculated on a voxelwise basis. For qualitative evaluation, all volunteers underwent MRI of the TMJ with the jaw in closed position. Two readers independently assessed visibility and delineation of anatomical structures of the TMJ and overall image quality on a 5-point Likert scale. Quantitative and qualitative measurements were compared between field strengths. The quantitative analysis showed similar SNR for the high-resolution protocol at 3.0 T compared with the clinical protocol at 1.5 T. The qualitative analysis showed significantly better visibility and delineation of clinically relevant anatomical structures of the TMJ, including the TMJ disc and pterygoid muscle as well as better overall image quality at 3.0 T than at 1.5 T. The presented results indicate that expected gains in SNR at 3.0 T can be used to increase the spatial resolution when imaging the TMJ, which translates into increased visibility and delineation of anatomical structures of the TMJ. Therefore, imaging at 3.0 T should be preferred over 1.5 T for imaging the TMJ.

  20. Trend of Cadherin-11 expression and its impact on cartilage degradation in the temporomandibular joints of guinea pigs with spontaneous osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mengjie; Lu, Haiping; Yu, Fengyang; Zhou, Yiqun

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to investigate spatial and temporal changes in cadherin-11 (CAD-11) expression and their effects on cartilage degeneration in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of guinea pigs with spontaneous osteoarthritis (OA). Dunkin-Hartley (DH) and Bristol strain 2 (BS2) guinea pigs at ages of 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months were categorized into two groups and analyzed. The bilateral TMJ condyles of DH and BS2 guinea pigs were harvested and fixed. The distribution and expression profiles of CAD-11, collagen type II, and matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3) were detected by immunohistological assays. Histological micrographs of the condyle cartilage were obtained and analyzed. Osteoarthritis can be spontaneously induced by mechanical stress in DH guinea pigs. The main histopathological changes in the TMJ structure and increased expression of MMP-3 occurred within 6-9 months of ages in DH guinea pigs with spontaneous OA. By contrast, minimal to mild cartilage degradations were observed in the TMJ of BS2 guinea pigs even at the age of 12 months. From as early as 3 months of age, the expression levels of CAD-11 were upregulated in the TMJ of DH guinea pigs compared with those in BS2 animals. CAD-11 expression differed between the two groups at 12 months of age. Increased CAD-11 expression within cartilage is associated with the development and progression of OA between the two strains of guinea pigs. Therefore, CAD-11 expression in TMJ could be an important predisposing factor for the development of spontaneous OA. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Temporomandibular joint assessment in patients with articular disc displacement by way of computed tomography - radiological parameters of shape, size and location of mandibular heads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szabelska Anna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Conventional and modern methods of radiological imaging are often used in the diagnosis of temporomandibular joint disorders, and the CT technique is particularly characterized by an excellent visualization of bony structures. The aim of the study was to show the importance and role of CT in the evaluation of TMJ bone structures in both patients with articular disc displacement and in a group of healthy subjects. Both study groups were assessed with the use of the transverse plane. Herein, multi-slice spiral computed tomography was performed in 47 subjects. These individuals were qualified for CT by way of magnetic resonance imaging, due to their being diagnosed with a displacement of their temporomandibular joint disc. The product of our study is presented as a set of tables. These are comparisons of radiological parameters based on the shape, size and location of the mandibular head, in the examined patients, in a control group, and with regard to sex. The results of our work indicate that CT can be successfully used in the imaging of TMJ bone structures, specifically, the condylar process of the mandibular head and the joint socket. However, statistically significant differences of the utilized parameters between patients with articular disc displacement and controls, warrant further analysis of this issue.

  2. Temporomandibular joint involvement as a positive clinical prognostic factor in necrotising external otitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeheskeli, E; Eta, R Abu; Gavriel, H; Kleid, S; Eviatar, E

    2016-05-01

    Necrotising otitis externa is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. This study investigated whether temporomandibular joint involvement had any prognostic effect on the course of necrotising otitis externa in patients who had undergone hyperbaric oxygen therapy after failed medical and sometimes surgical therapy. A retrospective case series was conducted of patients in whom antibiotic treatment and surgery had failed, who had been hospitalised for further treatment and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Twenty-three patients with necrotising otitis externa were identified. The temporomandibular joint was involved in four patients (17 per cent); these patients showed a constant gradual improvement in C-reactive protein and were eventually discharged free of disease, except one patient who was lost to follow up. Four patients (16 per cent) without temporomandibular joint involvement died within 90 days of discharge, while all patients with temporomandibular joint involvement were alive. Three patients (13 per cent) without temporomandibular joint involvement needed recurrent hospitalisation including further hyperbaric oxygen therapy; no patients with temporomandibular joint involvement required such treatment. Patients with temporomandibular joint involvement had lower rates of recurrent disease and no mortality. Therefore, we suggest considering temporomandibular joint involvement as a positive prognostic factor in necrotising otitis externa management.

  3. Dental and Temporomandibular Joint Pathology of the Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winer, J N; Arzi, B; Leale, D M; Kass, P H; Verstraete, F J M

    2016-01-01

    Museum specimens (maxillae and/or mandibles) from 317 polar bears (Ursus maritimus) were examined macroscopically according to predefined criteria and 249 specimens were included in this study. The specimens were acquired between 1906 and 2011. There were 126 specimens (50.6%) from male animals, 93 (37.3%) from female animals and 30 (12.1%) from animals of unknown sex. The ages of the animals ranged from neonate to adult, with 125 adults (50.2%) and 124 young adults (49.8%) included and neonates/juveniles excluded from the study. The number of teeth available for examination was 7,638 (73.5%); 12.3% of teeth were absent artefactually, 0.8% were deemed absent due to acquired tooth loss and 13.4% were absent congenitally. With respect to tooth morphology, 20 teeth (0.26% of available teeth) in 18 specimens (7.2% of available specimens) were small vestigial structures with crowns that were flush with the level of surrounding alveolar bone. One supernumerary tooth and one tooth with enamel hypoplasia were encountered. Persistent deciduous teeth and teeth with an aberrant number of roots were not found. Relatively few teeth (3.7%) displayed attrition/abrasion, 90% of which were the maxillary and mandibular incisor teeth, in 41 polar bears (16.5%). Nearly twice as many adult specimens exhibited attrition/abrasion as those from young adults; significantly more males were affected than females. Dental fractures were noted in 52 polar bears, affecting 20.9% of specimens and 1.3% of the total number of teeth present. More adult polar bears had dental fractures than young adults. There were 21 specimens (8.4%) that displayed overt periapical disease, affecting a total of 24 dental alveoli (0.23%). Some degree of periodontitis was seen in 199 specimens (79.9%); however, only 12.6% of dental alveoli had bony changes indicative of periodontitis. Lesions consistent with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA) were found in 23 specimens (9.2%). TMJ-OA was significantly

  4. Efficacy of pumping manipulation treatment for closed lock of the temporomandibular joint disorder. Correlation between arthrographic findings using limited cone beam X-ray CT for dental use and mouth opening distance in 20 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Kazuya; Uehara, Tamotsu; Arai, Yoshinori; Kashima, Masahiro; Tsukimura, Naoki; Honda, Masahiko; Iwai, Kazuo; Terakado, Masaaki; Shinoda, Koji

    2002-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of pumping manipulation treatment for closed lock of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder using limited cone beam X-ray CT for dental use. The subjects were 20 patients with TMJ closed lock. Arthrography and pumping manipulation treatment were performed, and the correlation between maximal mouth opening and arthrographic findings was examined. Arthrography showed 16 cases of anterior disk displacement, and 4 cases of sideways displacement. Disk configuration showed 15 abnormal cases and 3 cases of disk perforation. Before treatment, mouth opening distance was 24.2 mm and 1 week after treatment it was 34.4 mm. After 3 months this had improved significantly to 41.0 mm. Comparison of mouth opening distance with arthrographic findings showed that disk perforation was significantly different after 3 months. These results suggest that pumping manipulation treatment might be useful in patients with TMJ closed lock without internal derangement or disk perforation. (author)

  5. Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Cartilage Regeneration of TMJ Osteoarthritis

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    Dixin Cui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ OA is a degenerative disease, characterized by progressive cartilage degradation, subchondral bone remodeling, synovitis, and chronic pain. Due to the limited self-healing capacity in condylar cartilage, traditional clinical treatments have limited symptom-modifying and structure-modifying effects to restore impaired cartilage as well as other TMJ tissues. In recent years, stem cell-based therapy has raised much attention as an alternative approach towards tissue repair and regeneration. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, derived from the bone marrow, synovium, and even umbilical cord, play a role as seed cells for the cartilage regeneration of TMJ OA. MSCs possess multilineage differentiation potential, including chondrogenic differentiation as well as osteogenic differentiation. In addition, the trophic modulations of MSCs exert anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects under aberrant conditions. Furthermore, MSCs combined with appropriate scaffolds can form cartilaginous or even osseous compartments to repair damaged tissue and impaired function of TMJ. In this review, we will briefly discuss the pathogenesis of cartilage degeneration in TMJ OA and emphasize the potential sources of MSCs and novel approaches for the cartilage regeneration of TMJ OA, particularly focusing on the MSC-based therapy and tissue engineering.

  6. Temporo-mandibular joint chondrosarcoma: Case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgione, C; Passali, F M; Varakliotis, T; Sibilia, M; Ottaviani, F

    2015-06-01

    Chondrosarcoma is a malignant mesenchymal tumour of cartilaginous origin. It represents 11% of all malignant primary bone tumours, and the pelvis, ribs, femur and humerus are most frequently involved. Chondrosarcoma of the head and neck region is a rare disease, and represents approximately 0.1% of all head and neck neoplasms. This report describes a rare localisation of chondrosarcoma in a 56-year-old man who presented with swelling in the right preauricular area and mild limitation and pain in the mouth opening. Since 1959, just a few cases of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) chondrosarcoma have been described. Computed tomography revealed a large mass (39 x 46 x 40 mm) in the right preauricular and parotid region with morpho-structural alterations of the condyle and an intense periostotic reaction. The tumour was treated by total parotidectomy and condylotomy. The VII cranial nerve was preserved. Histopathologic examination revealed a low grade chondrosarcoma with a 50% proliferation index. At present, the patient is still receiving routine follow-up after radiotherapy and physiotherapy.

  7. Prevalence of Chronic Periodontitis, Bruxism and Temporomandibular Joint Disorders in Patients with Fibromyalgia Syndrome

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    Hatice Balcı Yüce

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Chronic periodontitis is a world-wide infectious and inflammatory disease and may have a relationship with other inflammatory diseases such as fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS. The aim of this study was to determine whether the prevalence of periodontitis is increased in individuals with FMS or not. Materials and Methods: Sixty-four patients with FMS and 70 systemically healthy individuals were included in the present study. Fibromyalgia patients did not have any other systemically disease. All subjects had at least 20 functioning teeth and underwent detailed oral and radiographic examination, in addition, bruxism and temporomandibular joint (TMJ examinations were performed. All clinical attachment levels, plaque and gingival indices were recorded. Results: Fibromyalgia patients tend to have higher gingival index scores than healthy individuals. There was a significant difference in the presence of bruxism between the study groups (p0.05. Conclusion: We found that the prevalence of periodontitis was not changed in FMS patients but was increased in healthy subjects above age 45.

  8. Mechanical properties of human articular disk and its influence on TMJ loading studied with the finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, E; Sasaki, A; Tahmina, K; Yamaguchi, K; Mori, Y; Tanne, K

    2001-03-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the elastic modulus of human temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disk under tension and its influences on TMJ loading. Seven human TMJ disks served as specimens. Continuous tensile stress was applied to each specimen, and the elastic moduli of human TMJ disks were calculated at 2% strain. Furthermore, using a three-dimensional finite element model of the mandible including the TMJ, changes in the TMJ stresses during clenching were evaluated in association of varying elastic moduli of the articular disk determined by the tensile tests. The elastic moduli at 2% strain varied from 27.1 to 65.2 MPa with a mean of 47.1 MPa. A significant correlation was found between the elastic moduli and age (P elastic moduli of the TMJ disk was varied from 25 to 65 MPa. In the TMJ disk, shear stresses in all the areas became larger with greater stiffness. In conclusion, it is shown that the elastic modulus of human TMJ disk is increased with age and that higher stiffness of the disk exerts substantial influences on mechanical loading for the TMJ structures.

  9. Early detection of temporomandibular joint arthritis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis - the role of contrast-enhanced MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalle, Thekla von; Stuber, Tina; Winkler, Peter [Olgahospital Klinikum Stuttgart, Pediatric Radiology, Radiologisches Institut, Stuttgart (Germany); Maier, Jan; Hospach, Toni [Olgahospital Klinikum Stuttgart, Pediatric Rheumatology, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2015-03-01

    Early treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthritis is crucial in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) to prevent permanent functional impairment. As involvement of TMJs is often asymptomatic, contrast-enhanced MRI is regarded as the most sensitive noninvasive diagnostic tool. To evaluate the degree of contrast enhancement in TMJs of children and adolescents with JIA in comparison to normal controls from a previous study. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of 50 children and adolescents with JIA (6.3 to 18 years of age; mean: 12 years) were retrospectively analysed. We assessed morphological abnormalities and postcontrast time-intensity curves of the soft joint tissue and the mandibular condyle. Ratios were calculated to quantify postcontrast signal intensities (SI) in relation to precontrast SI at initial (1 min postcontrast) and maximum (6 min postcontrast) increase. Time-intensity curves followed similar biphasic patterns in normal and pathological joints. In joints with morphological signs of arthritis, mean SI ratios were on average higher than in normal joints of the reference group, but ranges of values widely overlapped. Arthritis: mean initial increase of SI 62% (±2 S.D. 18-105%), mean maximum SI 106% higher than precontrast (±2 S.D. 46-166%). Normal: mean initial increase of SI 49% (±2 S.D. 14- 85%), mean maximum of SI 73% (±2 S.D. 23-123%). Given this considerable overlap of results in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, the degree of contrast enhancement alone did not allow differentiation between TMJs with and without signs of inflammation. Thickening of the soft joint tissue seems to remain the earliest sign to reliably indicate TMJ arthritis. (orig.)

  10. Temporomandibular joint inflammation activates glial and immune cells in both the trigeminal ganglia and in the spinal trigeminal nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin Luc

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glial cells have been shown to directly participate to the genesis and maintenance of chronic pain in both the sensory ganglia and the central nervous system (CNS. Indeed, glial cell activation has been reported in both the dorsal root ganglia and the spinal cord following injury or inflammation of the sciatic nerve, but no data are currently available in animal models of trigeminal sensitization. Therefore, in the present study, we evaluated glial cell activation in the trigeminal-spinal system following injection of the Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA into the temporomandibular joint, which generates inflammatory pain and trigeminal hypersensitivity. Results CFA-injected animals showed ipsilateral mechanical allodynia and temporomandibular joint edema, accompanied in the trigeminal ganglion by a strong increase in the number of GFAP-positive satellite glial cells encircling neurons and by the activation of resident macrophages. Seventy-two hours after CFA injection, activated microglial cells were observed in the ipsilateral trigeminal subnucleus caudalis and in the cervical dorsal horn, with a significant up-regulation of Iba1 immunoreactivity, but no signs of reactive astrogliosis were detected in the same areas. Since the purinergic system has been implicated in the activation of microglial cells during neuropathic pain, we have also evaluated the expression of the microglial-specific P2Y12 receptor subtype. No upregulation of this receptor was detected following induction of TMJ inflammation, suggesting that any possible role of P2Y12 in this paradigm of inflammatory pain does not involve changes in receptor expression. Conclusions Our data indicate that specific glial cell populations become activated in both the trigeminal ganglia and the CNS following induction of temporomandibular joint inflammation, and suggest that they might represent innovative targets for controlling pain during trigeminal nerve sensitization.

  11. Temporomandibular Joint Involvement in Psoriatic Arthritis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Maxillofacial Radiology,. Faculty of Dentistry,. Kirikkale University, Turkey. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons ... Figure 2: Panoramic radiograph revealed bilaterally decreased joint spaces, erosion and the loss of cortical edge on condylar heads. [Downloaded free from ...

  12. CLASSIFICATION OF TEMPOROMANDIBULAR-JOINT OSTEOARTHROSIS AND INTERNAL DERANGEMENT .2. SPECIFIC DIAGNOSTIC-CRITERIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STEGENGA, B; DEBONT, LGM; BOERING, G

    Separate entities of temporomandibular joint osteoarthrosis and internal derangement are operationally defined. Criteria are based on an analysis of the diagnostic significance of symptoms and signs, principles of synovial joint pathology in general, and on therapeutic considerations. The primary

  13. [The transverse movement of the temporo-mandibular joint (translation movement) of the dog, also with reference to dysplasia of this joint in the dachshund].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmerhaus, B; Roos, H

    1996-09-01

    Contrary to the accepted opinion, transverse movement is possible in the temporo-mandibular joint of the dog. This movement is arched and is important for mastication. Analysis of transverse movement of the temporo-mandibular joint was done in 20 dog breeds. Accidentally dysplasia of the temporo-mandibular joint was found in the dachshund, a phenomenon which has not been described before.

  14. Temporomandibular joint disorder in a patient with multiple sclerosis--review of literature with a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badel, Tomislav; Carek, Andreja; Podoreski, Dijana; Pavicin, Ivana Savić; Lovko, Sandra Kocijan

    2010-09-01

    Temporomandibular disorders are a form of musculoskeletal disorders, which reduce the function of stomatognathic system and they are related to some other diseases causing painful conditions and disorders of oral function. The aim of this paper is to describe a one year follow up clinical case of a female patient with comorbid multiple sclerosis and a relatively rare form of articular disc disorder. Primary clinical diagnostics encompassed manual methods of TMJ examination. Definite diagnosis included radiologic examination. Clinical hyperextensive condyle position was palpated bilaterally and subsequently confirmed by a functional panoramic radiograph of TMJ. The anterior displacement of disc with reduction was diagnosed by magnetic resonance and in the right joint there was a disc displacement upon excursive movement. From relevant literature, the relationship of a number of diseases that can be related to functional disorder of the orofacial system, such as multiple sclerosis, has been described from many aspects. Also, apart from the standard classification of one form of anterior displacement of the disc, made primarily by magnetic resonance, cases of disc displacement upon excursive mandibular movement can rarely be found in literature.

  15. Changes in the temporomandibular joint disc and temporal and masseter muscles secondary to bruxism in Turkish patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Garip

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To analyze the relationships between temporalis and masseter muscle hypertrophy and temporomandibular joint (TMJ disc displacement in patients with severe bruxism using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Methods: This retrospective study included 100 patients with severe bruxism, referred to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Marmara and Istanbul Medipol University, Istanbul, Turkey, between January 2015 and December 2016. Patients underwent TMJ MRI with a 1.5-T system in open and closed mouth positions. The masseter and temporalis muscles were measured in the axial plane when the patient’s mouth was closed. Results: At its thinnest, the disc averaged was 1.11±0.24 mm. At their thickest, the masseter averaged was 13.65±2.19 mm and temporalis muscles was 12.98±2.4 mm. Of the discs, 24% were positioned normally, 74% were positioned anteriorly, and 2% were positioned posteriorly. The temporalis muscle was significantly thicker in patients with normally positioned discs than in those with anteriorly positioned discs (p=0.035. Conclusions: The temporalis muscle was significantly thicker in patients with normally positioned discs than in those with anteriorly positioned discs (p=0.035. Additional studies should be conducted to evaluate the relationships between all masticatory and surrounding muscles and disc movements in patients with bruxism.

  16. Gd-DTPA (gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid) in MR imaging of the internal derangement of temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tange, Kazuhisa; Mihara, Manabu; Maeda, Sanae; Iwata, Hiroyuki; Ito, Noboru; Fukaya, Masahiko.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed in five internal derangement of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) patients, before and after intravenous administration of gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) as a contrast agent. MR imaging was performed with a 0.5 tesla unit (VISTA MR; PICKER INTERNATIONAL) using a surface coil. We obtained multiple 5 mm sagital images with open and closed jaw positions. Precontrast proton density images were obtained with a repetition time (TR) of 1,000 msec and an echo time (TE) of 40 msec (TR/TE=1,000/40). Gd-DTPA was administered intravenously in a dose of 0.2 ml per kilogram of body weight. After the injection, postcontrast T1 weighted images (500/20) or postcontrast proton density images (1,000/40) were obtained. In the postcontrast T1 weighted images, the soft tissue surrounding the articular disk was enhanced and it provided helpful information for assessing the disk position. On the other hand, there was no effect of the contrast agent in the postcontrast proton density images. None of the patients experienced allergic reactions or other side effects. Gd-DTPA appeared to be a safe and effective contrast agent for MR imaging with T1 weighted images. However, compared with our usual imaging of the TMJ, the imaging did not indicate greater MR sensitivity for detecting the articular disk by means of Gd-DTPA enhancement. (author)

  17. Long-term side effects on the temporomandibular joints and oro-facial function in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea treated with a mandibular advancement device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knappe, S W; Bakke, M; Svanholt, P

    2017-01-01

    Patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) in long-term treatment with a mandibular advancement device (MAD) to increase the upper airway space may develop changes in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and the oro-facial function due to the protruded jaw position during sleep. The aim was to inv......Patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) in long-term treatment with a mandibular advancement device (MAD) to increase the upper airway space may develop changes in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and the oro-facial function due to the protruded jaw position during sleep. The aim...... was to investigate the influence of long-term MAD treatment on the TMJs, oro-facial function and occlusion. This prospective study included 30 men and 13 women (median age 54) with OSA [Apnoea-Hypopnoea Index (AHI): 7-57]. They were examined with the Nordic Orofacial Test Screening (NOT-S), the Research Diagnostic...... changes in the TMJs, the oro-facial function and the occlusion. However, these changes seemed to be less harmful than previously reported with careful adaptation, control and follow-ups....

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nah, Kyung Soo

    1999-01-01

    To find out the best imaging parameters for the diagnosis of disc in MRI imaging. Compare the diagnostic quality of the disc among the T1, PD and T2 images of same patients (12 joints, 223 images) by visual (I-IV grades) and gray level measurement (pre- and infra-discal area) method. PD images showed best results with 43.7% of the images belonging to grade III (good) and with statistically significant higher difference of the gray levels at pre- and infra-discal areas. But there were no grade IV (excellent) images. PD images are best method among T1, PD and T2 images in diagnosing the disc but since there were no excellent images further imaging parameters should be studied for better images.

  19. Stakeholder engagement analysis - a bioethics dilemma in patient-targeted intervention: patients with temporomandibular joint disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkhordarian, Andre; Demerjian, Gary; Jan, Allison; Sama, Nateli; Nguyen, Mia; Du, Angela; Chiappelli, Francesco

    2015-01-20

    Modern health care in the field of Medicine, Dentistry and Nursing is grounded in fundamental philosophy and epistemology of translational science. Recently in the U.S major national initiatives have been implemented in the hope of closing the gaps that sometimes exist between the two fundamental components of translational science, the translational research and translational effectiveness. Subsequent to these initiatives, many improvements have been made; however, important bioethical issues and limitations do still exist that need to be addressed. One such issue is the stakeholder engagement and its assessment and validation. Federal, state and local organizations such as PCORI and AHRQ concur that the key to a better understanding of the relationship between translational research and translational effectiveness is the assessment of the extent to which stakeholders are actively engaged in the translational process of healthcare. The stakeholder engagement analysis identifies who the stakeholders are, maps their contribution and involvement, evaluates their priorities and opinions, and accesses their current knowledge base. This analysis however requires conceptualization and validation from the bioethics standpoint. Here, we examine the bioethical dilemma of stakeholder engagement analysis in the context of the person-environment fit (PE-fit) theoretical model. This model is an approach to quantifying stakeholder engagement analysis for the design of patient-targeted interventions. In our previous studies of Alzheimer patients, we have developed, validated and used a simple instrument based on the PE-fit model that can be adapted and utilized in a much less studied pathology as a clinical model that has a wide range of symptoms and manifestations, the temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD). The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is the jaw joint endowed with sensory and motor innervations that project from within the central nervous system and its dysfunction can

  20. Semi-quantitative SPECT for anterior dislocation of the disc in the temporo-mandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oesterreich, F.U.; Jend-Rossmann, I.; Jend, H.H.; Triebel, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    SPECT-examination of the TMJ using 99m-Tc-MDP was performed in 43 patients with arthrographically proven anterior dislocation of the disc and in 30 normals. The results were evaluated visually and also in a semi-quantitative manner that took account of relative 99m Tc activity in the TMJ and of the age of the patient. In the presence of arthrographically proven anterior, but reversible, disc dislocation, the semi-quantitative method proved positive in 75% of cases (28 cases). In joints with fixed anterior dislocation (29 cases), bone changes were demonstrated in 26%. Visual evaluation was positive in 50% of reversible, and in 72% of non-reversible dislocations. Semi-quantitative SPECT of the TMJ is excellent for demonstrating bone reaction resulting from TMJ dysfunction and for indicating the severity of the joint abnormality.

  1. Appearance of the temporomandibular joint after meniscoplasty on MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conway, W.F.; Hayes, C.W.; Campbell, R.L.; Laskin, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-five postmeniscoplasty temporomandibular joints (TMJs) were studied in 20 patients. In all patients, preoperative MR images showed anteriorly dislocated disks. The patients underwent a similar postoperative MR examination 4-12 months after surgery. Surgical results were classified clinically as either poor, fair, good, or excellent at the time of the follow-up MR imaging. Forty percent of patients had good or excellent clinical results, and 60% had poor or fair results. The good/excellent group all had disks that appeared to be in normal or near normal position. Almost all disks were fixed in position. The degree of condylar translation was variable. The poor/fair group all had postoperative joints with anteriorly dislocated disks that were fixed in place. Recapture of the disk was variable, as was the degree of condylar translation

  2. The severity of temporomandibular joint disorder by teeth loss in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indry Herdiyani

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint dysfunction is a term that covers a number of clinical problems that involves masticatory muscles, temporomandibular joints, and related structures, or both. Loss of tooth was an etiology of temporomandibular joint dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to obtain the description of temporomandibular joint dysfunction level that caused by tooth loss of elderly in three nursing home Bandung. This was a descriptive study using the survey method of the elderly in three nursing home Bandung. A total of 34 people consist 6 males and 28 females. The subjects were examined by symptoms of temporomandibular joint dysfunction and the dysfunction level was assessed by Helkimo Clinical Dysfunction Index. The result of this study shows that elderly in Nursing Home Bandung have mild dysfunction level was 7 (14.71%, moderate dysfunction level was 22 (64.71%, and severe dysfunction level is 5 (20.58%. It can be concluded that loss of the teeth is one of the etiologies of temporomandibular joint disorder. Based on the research conducted, it can be concluded that all elderly with teeth loss will have the temporomandibular joint disorder and the most severity happens based on teeth loss by using the Helkimo Clinical Disfunction Index score was the moderate disorder.

  3. [Self-assembly tissue engineering fibrocartilage model of goat temporomandibular joint disc].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hong; Li, Zhen-Qiang; Bi, Yan-Da

    2011-06-01

    To construct self-assembly fibrocartilage model of goat temporomandibular joint disc and observe the biological characteristics of the self-assembled fibrocartilage constructs, further to provide a basis for tissue engineering of the temporomandibular joint disc and other fibrocartilage. Cells from temporomandibular joint discs of goats were harvested and cultured. 5.5 x 10(6) cells were seeded in each agarose well with diameter 5 mm x depth 10 mm, daily replace of medium, cultured for 2 weeks. One day after seeding, goat temporomandibular joint disc cells in agarose wells were gathered and began to self-assemble into a disc-shaped base, then gradually turned into a round shape. When cultured for 2 weeks, hematoxylin-eosin staining was conducted and observed that cells were round and wrapped around by the matrix. Positive Safranin-O/fast green staining for glycosaminoglycans was observed throughout the entire constructs, and picro-sirius red staining was examined and distribution of numerous type I collagen was found. Immunohistochemistry staining demonstrated brown yellow particles in cytoplasm and around extracellular matrix, which showed self-assembly construct can produce type I collagen as native temporomandibular joint disc tissue. Production of extracellular matrix in self-assembly construct as native temporomandibular joint disc tissue indicates that the use of agarose wells to construct engineered temporomandibular joint disc will be possible and practicable.

  4. The role of temporomandibular joint dysfunction and occlusal disorders in the pathophysiology of somatogenic cochlear and vestibular syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Boldin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: Temporomandibular joint (TMJ dysfunction and occlusion abnormalities can cause cochlear and vestibular disorders. This issue is at the crossroads of several disciplines: otoneurology, physiotherapy, dentistry, medical rehabilitation and posturology, which often makes it difficult to timely diagnose them and delays the onset of treatment. Aim: To assess the role of abnormal dental occlusion and TMJ disorders in the pathophysiology and clinical manifestation of cochleovestibular syndrome. Materials and methods: We examined 300 subjects with clinical signs of cochleovestibular syndrome, asymmetry of occlusion and/or TMJ dysfunction (the main group, 55 patients with signs of TMJ structural and functional disorders and occlusal disorders without a cochleovestibular syndrome (the reference group, and 35 healthy volunteers (the control group. All patients were examined by a neurologist, an ENT specialist, a dentist and a physiotherapist. A series of additional investigations of the brachiocephalic vessels, cervical spine, TMJ, auditory and vestibular function, premature tooth contacts were performed. Results: The main group patients had high values of TMJ dysfunction in the Hamburg test (5.85 vs 2.2 in the reference group and higher proportions of patients with moderate and severe TMJ dysfunction (n = 243, 81% and n = 13, 23.7%, respectively. The functional muscle test parameters and the results of manual muscle testing in the main group patients were significantly different from those in the control group (р < 0.05, whereas most values obtained in the reference group did not differ significantly (р > 0.05. Patients with cochleoves-tibular syndrome had 2 to 3-fold higher rates of vertebrogenic dysfunctions than those from the reference group. The video nystamography technique detected the positional cervical nystagmus in 100% (n = 300 of patients from the main group, whereas there were no nystagmus in those from the reference group

  5. Temporomandibular disorders after whiplash injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasch, Helge; Hjorth, Tine; Svensson, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Aims: Whiplash injury to the neck, is often considered a significant risk factor for development of temporomandibular disorders (TMD), and has been proposed to produce internal derangements of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Few studies however have examined TMD-related pain in acute whiplash...... patients compared with a matched control group. The aim of the present study was to assess pain and sensorimotor function in the craniofacial region in an unselected group of patients sustaining a motor vehicle accident involving a rear collision. Methods: Prospectively, 19 acute whiplash patients exposed...... obtained at each visit. Results: One whiplash patient and I ankle-injury patient bad jaw pain at the first visit. Palpation scores of the TMJ and the summated palpation scores only tended to be higher in patients sustaining a whiplash injury than in ankle-injury controls at the first visit. However, MPQ...

  6. Electronic Health Record for Temporomandibular Joint Disorders – Support in Therapeutic Process

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hippmann, R.; Nagy, Miroslav; Dostálová, T.; Zvárová, Jana; Seydlová, M.; Feltlová, E.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2010), s. 27-32 ISSN 1801-5603 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : electronic health record * automatic speech recognition * dental cross * temporomandibular joint * temporomandibular joint disorders * structured data entry * dentistry * data model * text-to-speech system * Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science http://www.ejbi.org/en/ejbi/article/25-en- electronic - health - record -for-temporomandibular-joint-disorders-support-in-therapeutic-process.html

  7. The arterial blood supply of the temporomandibular joint: an anatomical study and clinical implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuccia, Antonino Marco; Caradonna, Carola; Caradonna, Domenico [Dept. of Surgical and Oncological Disciplines, University of Palermo, Palermo (Italy); Anastasi, Giuseppe; Milardi, Demetrio; Favaloro, Angelo; Caradonna, Luigi; Cutroneo, Giuseppina [Biomorphology and Biotechnologies, University of Messina, Messina (Italy); De Pietro, Anita; Angileri, Tommaso Maurizio [Villa Santa Teresa, Diagnostica per Immagini, Palermo (Italy)

    2013-03-15

    The aim of this study was to analyze three-dimensional images of the arterial supply to the temporomandibular joint. Ten patients (five men and five women, mean age 36 years) without signs or symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, who underwent contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) scanning with intravenous contrast, were studied. The direct volume rendering technique of CT images was used, and a data set of images to visualize the vasculature of the human temporomandibular joint in three dimensions was created. After elaboration of the data through post-processing, the arterial supply of the temporomandibular joint was studied. The analysis revealed the superficial temporal artery, the anterior tympanic artery, the deep temporal artery, the auricular posterior artery, the transverse facial artery, the middle meningeal artery, and the maxillary artery with their branches as the main arterial sources for the lateral and medial temporomandibular joint. The direct volume rendering technique was found to be successful in the assessment of the arterial supply to the temporomandibular joint. The superficial temporal artery and maxillary artery ran along the lateral and medial sides of the condylar neck, suggesting that these arteries are at increased risk during soft-tissue procedures such as an elective arthroplasty of the temporomandibular joint.

  8. Utility of bone SPECT in temporomandibular joint pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Dong Hunn; Sung, Mi Sook; Lee, Jung Whee; Chung, Soo Kyo; Shinn, Kyung Sub

    1997-01-01

    Temporomandibular (TM) joint pain results from many etiologic factors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of Bone SPECT in patients with TM joint pain. The subjects were 34 patients with TM joint pain. All patients underwent plain radiography, planar bone scan, and Bone SPECT. The intensity of radioisotope uptake at TM joint was graded into three; no increased uptake above the background activity as grade 0, uptake similar to occipital bone as grade I, and uptake similar to maxillary sinus as grade II. Clinical findings and therapeutic methods were reviewed. Twenty-seven patients (80%) out of 34 patients with TM joint pain had increased uptake in bone SPECT. Twenty-one (78%) out of 27 patients had increased uptake in the mandibular condyle and remaining six patients (22%) had uptake in the mandibular and maxillary arch, which proved to be dental problem. Seven patients (21%) out of 34 were grade as 0, four (12%) were grade I, 23 (68%) were grade. II. Four patients with grade I had clicking sound and symptoms which were subsided with medication in all cases. Among 23 patients with grade II, 7 patients had clicking sound and 14 patients underwent medication and decompression therapy. With Planar bone scan, 11 cases (32%) had increased uptake in TM joint area. Plain radiography revealed narrowing, distension, erosion and limitation of TM joint in 16 cases (47%). Bone SPECT can be valuable for screening and managing the patients with TM joint pain. Patients with grade II needed intensive treatment such as joint aspiration. However degree of the radioisotope uptake did not well correlated with clinical symptoms

  9. Relationship between clinical findings of temporomandibular disorders and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizuka, Yasuyuki; Miura, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Fujiro; Kikuchi, Shiori; Konishi, Nobuhiro; Sakamaki, Kimio

    1996-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the relationship between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and clinical findings of patients having symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, and to consider the possibility to grasp the internal derangement of the TMJ from clinical findings. Subjects were 80 patients who visited to ask orthodontic treatment 16 males and 64 females. The average age was 22 years and 4 months. We performed a investigation of both their previous and present illness. In addition, to decide the correct condition concerning the internal derangement of the TMJ, patients were given MRI examinations (G. E. medical system Signa 1.5 Tesla) before orthodontic treatment. Results were as follows: The three symptoms of temporomandibular disorders-noise, pain, and abnormal mandibular movement, were not related to constant disk displacement. It seemed difficult to infer and obtain the diagnosis of the condition of internal derangement of the TMJ only from clinical findings. In a dental clinics having no medical imaging instrument such as MRI, it was, however, considered that the following items will make it possible to define the condition of internal derangements of the TMJ from clinical findings. As to respects concerning clinical findings, it is necessary to consider the previous illness as well as present illness. TMJ noise indicates a higher relationship to the disk displacement in MRI findings. The temporomandibular joint with plural symptoms indicated a higher incidence of disk displacement examined by MR Imaging than that with a single symptom. (author)

  10. Arthropathy of the abnormal temporo-mandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stampfel, G.; Gausch, K.; Waldhart, E.

    1984-05-01

    Arthrography provides accurate information concerning abnormal changes and function of the soft tissue components of the T.M.J. It is superior to all other clinical and radiological methods of examination for elucidating functional abnormalities. The increasing incidence of functional T.M.J. abnormalities and improvements in treatment make arthrography of the T.M.J. of increasing importance. The importance of views in the sagittal plane and of video recordings is stressed. 3 figs.

  11. [Experimental research on temporomandibular joint function in dysgnathic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensel, S

    1990-10-01

    In an experimental study we examined the function of the TMJ of patients with a considerable aberration from ideal dynamic occlusion and with obvious symptoms of frontal dysgnathia. Using a measuring seat for the simultaneous recording of opening and closing movements without occlusal interference and the sounds produced by the TMJ, we could not find any significantly impaired TMJ function compared with an orthognathic control group of similar age.

  12. Arthroscopic management of temporomandibular joint disc perforations and associated advanced chondromalacia by discoplasty and abrasion arthroplasty: a supplemental report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, J H; Stover, J D

    1998-11-01

    This article describes the results of treating temporomandibular joint (TMJ) articular disc perforation and advanced chondromalacia arthroscopically by the use of discoplasty and abrasion arthroplasty. Forty-four joints were treated in 25 patients (23 females and 2 males). Twenty-nine disc perforations were present, 24 joints had grade III chondromalacia (fibrillated cartilage), and 14 joints had grade IV chondromalacia (exposed bone). Surgical procedures included 14 abrasion arthroplasties and 24 motorized shavings or holmium laser vaporizations. Holmium laser discoplasty with mobilization was used in 29 joints. Patients were followed-up for an average of 40.8 months (11 to 74 months). Preoperative pain on the visual analog scale (VAS) (1 to 10 cm) ranged from 5 to 10 cm, with an average of 7.4 cm. Postoperatively, nine patients had no pain and 16 patients had an average VAS of 2.7 cm (range, 1 to 5 cm). Preoperatively, 30 joints had clicking, and 14 joints had crepitation. Postoperatively, 25 joints had no noise, 12 joints had slight intermittent clicking, and seven joints had crepitation. The preoperative range of motion averaged 29.7 mm. Postoperatively, the range of motion averaged 37.7 mm (range, 33 to 42 mm). All patients could masticate a regular diet except hard food after an average of 40.8 months (11 to 74 months). These findings seem to justify the arthroscopic surgical procedures of discoplasty for disc perforations, motorized shaving, or holmium laser vaporization of grade III chondromalacia, and abrasion arthroplasty for bone exposure. The results also question the need for discectomy in the treatment of disc perforation.

  13. Can pterygoid plate asymmetry be linked to temporomandibular joint disorders ?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero, Maria Eugenia; Jacobs, Reinhilde [OIC, OMFS IMPATH Research Group, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Leuven and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Beltran, Jorge [Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Post-Graduate School, Universidad Privada Cayetano Heredia, Lima (Peru); Laat, Antoon [Stomatology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dept. of Oral Health Sciences, KU Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-06-15

    This study was performed to evaluate the relationship between pterygoid plate asymmetry and temporomandibular joint disorders. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images of 60 patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) involving pain were analyzed and compared with images of 60 age- and gender-matched controls. Three observers performed linear measurements of the lateral pterygoid plates. Statistically significant differences were found between measurements of the lateral pterygoid plates on the site that had pain and the contralateral site (p<0.05). The average length of the lateral pterygoid plates (LPPs) in patients with TMD was 17.01±3.64 mm on the right side and 16.21±3.51 mm on the left side, and in patients without TMD, it was 11.86±1.97 mm on the right side and 11.98±1.85 mm on the left side. Statistically significant differences in the LPP length, measured on CBCT, were found between patients with and without TMD (p<0.05). The inter-examiner reliability obtained in this study was very high for all the examiners (0.99, 95% confidence interval: 0.98-0.99). Within the limits of the present study, CBCT lateral pterygoid plate measurements at the side with TMD were found to be significantly different from those on the side without TMD. More research is needed to explore potential etiological correlations and implications for treatment.

  14. Evaluation of C-Reactive Protein Level in Patients with Pain Form of Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Pihut

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint dysfunction is a functional disorder concerned with the abnormal functioning of the muscles of the stomatognathic system and temporomandibular joints involved in the dynamic movements of the jaw and surrounding structures. The aim of the study was to compare the level of C-reactive protein in patients with pain and painless forms of temporomandibular joint dysfunction. Materials and methods. The study group consisted of 72 patients who reported to the prosthetic treatment because of temporomandibular joint dysfunction. The study group included 36 patients with pain form of dysfunction, and the control group included 36 patients with painless form of disorder. Each patient underwent specialized examination of functional disorders in order to diagnose the type of dysfunction and was commissioned to carry out a study of the blood test concerned with evaluation of the C-reactive protein (CRP level in the same analytical laboratory. The results of the investigation were subjected to statistical analysis. The research obtained approval from the Ethics Committee of the Jagiellonian University (KBET/125/L/2013. Level of Evidence for primary research was established as type V. Results. The mean values of C-reactive protein levels in both groups were in the normal range and did not differ statistically significantly, which indicates the fact that the pain form of the temporomandibular joint disorders is not associated with inflammation of the soft tissues of the joint. Conclusion. Painful form of the temporomandibular joint dysfunctions is not connected with the inflammation of joints.

  15. Postoperative diagnosis of the temporomandibular joint; Postoperative Kiefergelenkdiagnostik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, S. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Vienna (Austria). Abt. fuer Osteologie; Undt, G. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Mund-, Kiefer- und Gesichtschirurgie, Vienna (Austria)

    2001-09-01

    Postoperative management of patients suffering from symptoms of the temporomandibular joint does not differ considerably from the one of preoperative examination protocols. Knowledge of previous surgery helps to plan patient work-up and to interpret normal postoperative findings (eminectomy, discectomy, susceptibility artefacts from metallic residues..) and typical complications (intraarticular loose bodies, dislocations, avascular necrosis, foreign body granulomatous reactions) appropriately. (orig.) [German] Wie auch in anderen Koerperregionen differiert das Diagnoseprotokoll von prae- und postoperativen Patienten mit Beschwerden des Kiefergelenks nicht wesentlich voneinander. Die Kenntnis des vorangegangenen Eingriffs hilft allerdings, die Untersuchung entsprechend zu planen und den Befund im Kontext richtig zu bewerten, um moegliche Komplikationen (intraartikulaere Fragmente, Dislokationen, avaskulaere Nekrose, Fremdkoerperreaktionen) und zu erwartende Befunde (Eminektomie, Diskektomie, Metallartefakte usw.) richtig zu interpretieren. (orig.)

  16. Synovial membrane involvement in osteoarthritic temporomandibular joints - A light microscopic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkgraaf, LC; Liem, RSB; deBont, LGM

    Objective. To study the light microscopic characteristics of the synovial membrane of osteoarthritic temporomandibular joints to evaluate synovial membrane involvement in the osteoarthritic process. Study design. Synovial membrane biopsies were obtained during unilateral arthroscopy in 40 patients.

  17. Detection of degenerative disease of the temporomandibular joint by bone scintigraphy: concise communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, H.A.; Bloom, C.Y.

    1980-01-01

    Nine patients with facial pain were evaluated with limited bone scans. The scintigrams correlated with microscopy in all patients, although radiographs correlated with microscopy in only five patients. The degenerative disease process in the temporomandibular joint was more extensive in the patients with radiographic and scintigraphic abnormalities than in those with scintigraphic abnormalities alone. The limited bone scan appears useful in detecting early degenerative changes in the temporomandibular joint

  18. Electronic System for Data Record and Automatic Diagnosis Assessment in the Temporomandibular Joint Disorders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hippmann, R.; Nagy, Miroslav; Dostálová, T.; Zvárová, Jana; Seydlová, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 1 (2011), s. 11-16 ISSN 1801-5603 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : temporomandibular joint * temporomandibular joint disorders * DentCross * electronic health record * AAOP classification Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science http://www.ejbi.eu/images/2011-1/Hippmann_en.pdf

  19. Voz e disfunção temporomandibular em professores Voice and temporomandibular joint disorders in teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilza Maria Machado

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: verificar a presença e possível correlação entre alteração vocal e DTM, em professores, a partir de dados de avaliação autorreferida, fonoaudiológica, otorrinolaringológica e odontológica. MÉTODOS: participaram deste estudo, 29 professores de uma escola de rede pública do ensino fundamental e médio do município de Sorocaba - SP. Os professores responderam questionário para levantamento de alteração vocal, e de disfunção temporomandibular (DTM. Foram realizadas quatro avaliações: perceptivo-auditiva; otorrinolaringológica; motricidade orofacial e odontológica. A menção a três ou mais sintomas no questionário determinou "presença" de queixa de voz e de DTM. As avaliações: perceptivo-auditiva e otorrinolaringológica concluíram a "ausência" e "presença" de alteração de voz e de laringe. Nas avaliações da motricidade orofacial e odontológica foi considerada DTM quando registrados três ou mais sinais e/ou sintomas, sendo indispensável à presença de dor. Na análise estatística dos dados, foram empregados: teste de Igualdade de Duas Proporções, teste exato de Fisher e de concordância Kappa. RESULTADOS: dentre os participantes, 82,8% fizeram autorreferência à alteração vocal e 62,1% de sintomas de DTM; 51,7% apresentaram alteração de voz na avaliação otorrinolaringológica e 65,5%, alteração de DTM na avaliação odontológica. Na comparação da avaliação de alteração de voz e DTM foi registrada correlação significante presente na avaliação perceptivo-auditiva da voz e de motricidade orofacial para DTM, e com tendência a significância na aplicação do questionário. CONCLUSÃO: os resultados apontam na direção de confirmar a presença de alteração de voz e DTM no grupo de professores pesquisado e correlação entre os mesmos.PURPOSE: to check the presence and possible correlation between vocal disorders and temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJD in teachers, from self

  20. Temporomandibular joint - normal features and disc displacements: magnetic resonance imaging; Articulacao temporomandibular - aspectos normais e deslocamentos de disco: imagem por ressonancia magnetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Ana Carolina Araujo; Sarmento, Viviane Almeida; Campos, Paulo Sergio Flores; Gonzalez, Maria Olivia Dias [Bahia Univ., Salvador, BA (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia]. E-mail: ana_carolinaramos@hotmail.com

    2004-12-01

    Disc displacement of the temporomandibular joint has been defined as an abnormal relationship between the articular disc and the mandibular condyle, fossa and articular eminence. Disc displacements may occur without immediate interference in the function of the joint. Magnetic resonance imaging shows high diagnostic accuracy in the determination of articular disc position and has been indicated as the diagnostic method of choice for soft tissue abnormalities of the temporomandibular joint. The aim of this study is to review the literature including the normal features and different types of disc displacement of the temporomandibular joint as well as the imaging findings, emphasizing the role of magnetic resonance imaging. (author)

  1. What Variables Are Associated With the Outcome of Arthroscopic Lysis and Lavage Surgery for Internal Derangement of the Temporomandibular Joint?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeffs, Tyler H; D'Amato, Lindsay N; Khawaja, Shehryar N; Keith, David A; Scrivani, Steven J

    2018-04-26

    Arthroscopic lysis and lavage surgery (AS) is an effective modality that can decrease pain and increase maximum interincisal opening (MIO) in patients with internal derangement (ID) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). However, some patients remain in pain or have limited mandibular range of motion despite AS. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness, prevalence of adverse effects, and predictors of response to TMJ AS in patients with TMJ arthralgia and ID. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using data of patients who had undergone AS by a single surgeon (D.A.K.) from September 2010 to April 2015 in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at Massachusetts General Hospital (Boston, MA). Variables, including demographic data, medical history, and clinical presentation, were extracted and analyzed. Criteria for surgical success were defined as a postoperative MIO of at least 35 mm and a postoperative pain level no higher than 3 on an 11-point Likert-type numeric verbal pain rating scale. Appropriate descriptive and analytic statistics were computed and significance was set at a P value less than .05. Of the 247 participants, 226 (91.5%) were women. The mean age of the sample was 38 ± 15.4 years. Successful surgical outcome was achieved in 62.3% of patients. Based on logistic regression analysis, higher initial mean pain score and concurrent use of benzodiazepines were the only variables that predicted an unsuccessful surgical outcome (P < .001; P = .005). Adverse effects were reported by 13.4% of patients, the most common being postoperative increase in pain (13.4%), temporary malocclusion (1.2%), and temporary paresthesia in the preauricular region (0.4%). The results from this study indicate that in patients with ID of the TMJ unresponsive to noninvasive treatments, high initial pain scores and concurrent use of benzodiazepines are correlated with an unsuccessful outcome after AS. Copyright © 2018. Published by

  2. The relationship of temporomandibular disorders with headaches: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkan, Nilüfer Cakir; Ozkan, Fatih

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to retrospectively analyze the incidence of the concurrent existence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and headaches. Forty patients (36 female, 4 male, mean age: 29.9±9.6 years) clinically diagnosed with TMD were screened. Patient records were analyzed regarding: range of mouth opening, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) noises, pain on palpation of the TMJ and masticatory muscles and neck and upper back muscles, and magnetic resonance imaging of the TMJ. According to patient records, a total of 40 (66.6%) patients were diagnosed with TMD among 60 patients with headache. Thirty-two (53%) patients had TMJ internal derangement (ID), 8 (13%) patients had only myofascial pain dysfunction (MPD) and 25 (41.6%) patients had concurrent TMJ ID/MPD. There were statistically significant relationships between the number of tender masseter muscles and MPD patients (p=0.04) and between the number of tender medial pterygoid muscles and patients with reducing disc displacement (RDD) (p=0.03). The TMJ and associated orofacial structures should be considered as possible triggering or perpetuating factors for headaches, especially tension-type. There might be a significant connection between TMD and headache. However, most medical and dental practitioners are unaware of this relationship. Therefore, a careful evaluation of the TMJ and associated orofacial structures is required for a correct interpretation of the craniofacial pain in headache patients, and these patients should be managed with a multidisciplinary approach.

  3. Investigation of human frontal cortex under noxious thermal stimulation of temporo-mandibular joint using functional near infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yennu, Amarnath; Rawat, Rohit; Manry, Michael T.; Gatchel, Robert; Liu, Hanli

    2013-03-01

    According to American Academy of Orofacial Pain, 75% of the U.S. population experiences painful symptoms of temporo-mandibular joint and muscle disorder (TMJMD) during their lifetime. Thus, objective assessment of pain is crucial for efficient pain management. We used near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) as a tool to explore hemodynamic responses in the frontal cortex to noxious thermal stimulation of temporomadibular joint (TMJ). NIRS experiments were performed on 9 healthy volunteers under both low pain stimulation (LPS) and high pain stimulation (HPS), using a temperature-controlled thermal stimulator. To induce thermal pain, a 16X16 mm2 thermode was strapped onto the right TMJ of each subject. Initially, subjects were asked to rate perceived pain on a scale of 0 to 10 for the temperatures from 41°C to 47°C. For the NIRS measurement, two magnitudes of temperatures, one rated as 3 and another rated as 7, were chosen as LPS and HPS, respectively. By analyzing the temporal profiles of changes in oxy-hemoglobin concentration (HbO) using cluster-based statistical tests, we were able to identify several regions of interest (ROI), (e.g., secondary somatosensory cortex and prefrontal cortex), where significant differences (ppain, a neural-network-based classification algorithm was used. With leave-one-out cross validation from 9 subjects, the two levels of pain were identified with 100% mean sensitivity, 98% mean specificity and 99% mean accuracy to high pain. From the receiver operating characteristics curve, 0.99 mean area under curve was observed.

  4. MR imaging of the temporomandibular joint: comparison between acquisitions at 7.0 T using dielectric pads and 3.0 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Felix P; Spinner, Georg; Del Grande, Filippo; Wyss, Michael; Piccirelli, Marco; Erni, Stefan; Pfister, Pascal; Ho, Michael; Sah, Bert-Ram; Filli, Lukas; Ettlin, Dominik A; Gallo, Luigi M; Andreisek, Gustav; Manoliu, Andrei

    2017-01-01

    To qualitatively and quantitatively compare MRI of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) at 7.0 T using high-permittivity dielectric pads and 3.0 T using a clinical high-resolution protocol. Institutional review board-approved study with written informed consent. 12 asymptomatic volunteers were imaged at 7.0 and 3.0 T using 32-channel head coils. High-permittivity dielectric pads consisting of barium titanate in deuterated suspension were used for imaging at 7.0 T. Imaging protocol consisted of oblique sagittal proton density weighted turbo spin echo sequences. For quantitative analysis, pixelwise signal-to-noise ratio maps of the TMJ were calculated. For qualitative analysis, images were evaluated by two independent readers using 5-point Likert scales. Quantitative and qualitative results were compared using t-tests and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, respectively. TMJ imaging at 7.0 T using high-permittivity dielectric pads was feasible in all volunteers. Quantitative analysis showed similar signal-to-noise ratio for both field strengths (mean ± SD; 7.0 T, 13.02 ± 3.92; 3.0 T, 14.02 ± 3.41; two-sample t-tests, p = 0.188). At 7.0 T, qualitative analysis yielded better visibility of all anatomical subregions of the temporomandibular disc (anterior band, intermediate zone and posterior band) than 3.0 T (Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, p 3.0 T.

  5. Design and clinical outcome of a novel 3D-printed prosthetic joint replacement for the human temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackland, David; Robinson, Dale; Lee, Peter Vee Sin; Dimitroulis, George

    2018-05-11

    Stock prosthetic temporomandibular joint replacements come in limited sizes, and do not always encompass the joint anatomy that presents clinically. The aims of this study were twofold. Firstly, to design a personalized prosthetic total joint replacement for the treatment of a patient's end-stage temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis, to implant the prosthesis into the patient, and assess clinical outcome 12-months post-operatively; and secondly, to evaluate the influence of changes in prosthetic condyle geometry on implant load response during mastication. A 48-year-old female patient with Grade-5 osteoarthritis to the left temporomandibular joint was recruited, and a prosthesis developed to match the native temporomandibular joint anatomy. The prosthesis was 3D printed, sterilized and implanted into the patient, and pain and function measured 12-months post-operatively. The prosthesis load response during a chewing-bite and maximum-force bite was evaluated using a personalized multi-body musculoskeletal model. Simulations were performed after perturbing condyle thickness, neck length and head sphericity. Increases in prosthetic condyle neck length malaligned the mandible and perturbed temporomandibular joint force. Changes in condylar component thickness greatly influenced fixation screw stress response, while a more eccentric condylar head increased prosthetic joint-contact loading. Post-operatively, the prosthetic temporomandibular joint surgery reduced patient pain from 7/10 to 1/10 on a visual analog scale, and increased intercisal opening distance from 22 mm to 38 mm. This study demonstrates effectiveness of a personalized prosthesis that may ultimately be adapted to treat a wide-range of end-stage temporomandibular joint conditions, and highlights sensitivity of prosthesis load response to changes in condylar geometry. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Can Preoperative Psychological Assessment Predict Outcomes After Temporomandibular Joint Arthroscopy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouloux, Gary F; Zerweck, Ashley G; Celano, Marianne; Dai, Tian; Easley, Kirk A

    2015-11-01

    Psychological assessment has been used successfully to predict patient outcomes after cardiothoracic and bariatric surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine whether preoperative psychological assessment could be used to predict patient outcomes after temporomandibular joint arthroscopy. Consecutive patients with temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) who could benefit from arthroscopy were enrolled in a prospective cohort study. All patients completed the Millon Behavior Medicine Diagnostic survey before surgery. The primary predictor variable was the preoperative psychological scores. The primary outcome variable was the difference in pain between the pre- and postoperative periods. The Spearman rank correlation coefficient and the Pearson product-moment correlation were used to determine the association between psychological factors and change in pain. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed using a mixed-effects linear model and multiple linear regression. A P value of .05 was considered significant. Eighty-six patients were enrolled in the study. Seventy-five patients completed the study and were included in the final analyses. The mean change in visual analog scale (VAS) pain score 1 month after arthroscopy was -15.4 points (95% confidence interval, -6.0 to -24.7; P psychological factors was identified with univariable correlation analyses. Multivariable analyses identified that a greater pain decrease was associated with a longer duration of preoperative symptoms (P = .054) and lower chronic anxiety (P = .064). This study has identified a weak association between chronic anxiety and the magnitude of pain decrease after arthroscopy for TMD. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of chronic anxiety in the outcome after surgical procedures for the treatment of TMD. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. A multidisciplinary approach to treating musculoarticular dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint with obvious pain syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Shakhmetova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to investigate the efficiency of an integrated approach to treating craniomandibular dysfunction, by changing the biomechanical tempomandibular joint (TMJ movement pattern via botulinum toxin type A injection into the masticatory muscles.Patients and methods. The investigation enrolled 20 patients aged 18-45 years with clinical signs of muscular-articular dysfunction of the TMJ. Before and after treatment, all the patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the TMJ and masticatory muscles, as well as ultrasonography and surface electromyography (EMG of the masticatory muscles.Results. There was a significant reduction in pain syndrome, an improvement in the relationship of intra-articular TMJ elements, and a change in the structure of the masticatory muscles. The EMG indices were near-normal. Four-six months after treatment, the majority of patients showed an increase in the amplitude of mouth opening (95%, reductions in resting pain (85% and in the frequency of TMJ clicking (90%.Conclusion. The management of patients with severe chronic pain syndrome in the presence of muscular-articular dysfunction of the TMJ requires the participation of an orthodontist to correct malocclusion and a neurologist to treat local myofascial pain syndrome. 

  8. Hallazgos clínico-radiológicos de la articulación temporomandibular en pacientes con artritis reumatoide: Clinicoradiological findings Temporomandibular joint from patients presenting with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisselle M. Chávez Andrade

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Se realiza este estudio con el propósito de describir y evaluar los hallazgos clínico-radiológicos de la articulación temporomandibular (ATM en un grupo de pacientes con diagnóstico de artritis reumatoide (AR. La muestra fue de 61 pacientes, con una edad media de 54 años y 5 meses. Todos fueron interrogados y examinados clínicamente, luego sometidos al examen radiográfico de ambas ATMs, utilizando la técnica de proyección transcraneal, con boca cerrada y en máxima apertura. El estudio recoge los signos y síntomas de la ATM hallados, tales como dolor, tumefacción, luxación, clicking y limitada apertura bucal. El estudio de los aspectos radiográficos indicó cambios en las superficies del cóndilo y la fosa temporal, en la movilidad condilar y espacio articular. Se concluyó que en pacientes con artritis reumatoide es frecuente la presencia de hallazgos clínicos-radiológicos en la articulación temporomandibular y que tanto la edad y género del paciente como el grado de actividad y tiempo de evolución de la enfermedad (AR, son factores que influyen en el estado general de las ATMs.Aim of present paper is to describe and to assess the Clinicoradiological findings of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ in a group of patients diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Sample included 61 patients with a mean age of 54 years and 5 months. All of them were interrogated and clinically examined and then underwent to a radiographic examination of both TMJs, using the transcranial projection technique, with the closed mouth and in maximal opening. Study includes the TMJ syndrome founded such as pain, tumefaction, luxation, clicking, and a limited oral opening. The study of radiographic features showed the presence of changes in condyle surface and temporal fossa, in condylar motility, and articulation space. We conclude that in patients presenting with rheumatoid arthritis is frequent the presence of clinicoradiological findings in the TMJ

  9. [Treatment of temporo-mandibular joint closed-lock using intra-articular injection of mepivacaine with immediate resolution durable in time (six months follow-up)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarda Nardini, L; Tito, R; Beltrame, A

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the value of intra-articular fluid injection under pressure, as a technique suggested for temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) closed-lock treatment, and to determine if there is a persisting lock resolution in time. Twelve patients were studied at our centre, with a diagnosis of TMJ closed-lock, not amenable with conventional therapies. All patients underwent a MRI scan, confirming the presence of anteriorly displaced disk. This technique is based on intra-articular injection of anaesthetic (mepivacaine cloridrate) under pressure, usin