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Sample records for temporomandibular joint disorders

  1. Temporomandibular joint disorder (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugashvili, G; Menabde, G; Janelidze, M; Chichua, Z; Amiranashvili, I

    2013-02-01

    Etiopathogenesis and clinical management of TMJD integrates a number of medical disciplines. In particular, dentistry, oral - facial surgery, neurology, rheumatology and so on. Nowadays there is no unified strategy for the management of this disease. Most cases of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) respond to simple treatment and the prognosis is good. Symptoms usually remit with simple care. In cases of secondary involvement of temporomandibular joint (TMJ), the prognosis depends on the primary disease. A comprehensive, chronological history and physical and examination of the patient, including dental history and examination, is essential to diagnose the specific condition to decide further investigations, if any, and to provide specific treatment. in severe cases, a joint consultation of a dentist, neurologist and rheumatologist is needed.

  2. Temporomandibular Joint Disorders and Orofacial Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mansur; Schiffman, Eric L

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) affect 5% to 12% of the United States population. This article discusses common conditions related to temporomandibular joints, including disc displacements, inflammatory disturbances, loose joint bodies, traumatic disturbances, and developmental conditions. Also addressed are the appropriate imaging modalities and diagnostic criteria for TMD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical view of the temporomandibular joint disorder.

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    Badel, Tomislav; Ćimić, Samir; Munitić, Mirna; Zadravec, Dijana; Kes, Vanja Bašić; Šimunković, Sonja Kraljević

    2014-12-01

    Temporomandibular pain has a musculoskeletal origin because it occurs as a consequence of masticatory muscle function disorder and temporomandibular joint disorder. Most common diagnoses of disorders are disc displacement and osteoarthritis, but their comorbidity can also occur. Pain is the most common symptom, where chronic temporomandibular pain may con- tribute to the occurrence of psychological disorders in the patient population. Splint is the most widespread dental method of treatment but other, noninvasive methods of musculoskeletal pain treatment are also recommended. Electronic axiography is used for visualization of mandibular movements, in particular pathologic sounds in the joints. Mental health, although not so obvious in dental practice, can influence the need of a multidisciplinary approach to the patient with disorder of the temporomandibular joint.

  4. Gnathological splint therapy in temporomandibular joint disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Gnanashanmugham

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint (TMJ forms an integral functional part of stomatognathic system. Position, shape, structure and function of teeth have an influence on the proper functioning and health of TMJ. But a problem associated with TMJ is often neglected, and treatment for it is mostly restricted to palliative therapy. A proper understanding of the underlying cause of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD is necessary to device a proper treatment plan. Etiology of TMDs varies from idiopathic reasons to systemic disorders. The option of Gnathological splint is a conservative, safe and an effective mode of therapy for TMDs caused by occlusal discrepancies (fulcrum/interferences. This article presents a case report of a patient with TMD caused by occlusal discrepancy

  5. Comprehensive treatment of temporomandibular joint disorders.

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    Navrátil, Leos; Navratil, Vaclav; Hajkova, Simona; Hlinakova, Petra; Dostalova, Tatjana; Vranová, Jana

    2014-01-01

    Changing lifestyles, decreasing physical activity, which is increasing the number of degenerative joint diseases of various etiology, and certain dental procedures are increasing the number of patients complaining of pain in their temporomandibular joints. The aim of the study was to assess the benefits of comprehensive physiotherapy sessions in order to decrease the number of temporomandibular joint problems, thereby improving the patient's quality of life. An examination by a dentist determined each patient's treatment plan, which consisted of a medical exam, physical therapy and education. Each form of treatment was applied 10 times at intervals of 7-14 days. The main goal of the therapeutic physical education was to redress the muscle imbalance in the mandibular joint. This was achieved by restoring balance between the masticatory muscles, along with releasing the spastic shrouds found in the masticatory muscles. The aim of education was to teach the patient exercises focused on the temporomandibular joint and masticatory muscles. The intensity of the exercises and their composition were individually adjusted and adapted to their current state. Physical therapy consisted of the application of pulsed magnetic therapy, laser therapy, and non-invasive positive thermotherapy. The above procedure was conducted on a therapeutic group of 24 patients (3 men and 20 women). In the course of therapy, there were no complications, and all patients adhered to the prescribed regime. None reported any side effects. The mean treatment duration was 123 +/- 66 days. The outcome of the therapy was evaluated as described in the methodology, the degree of pain affecting the joint, and the opening ability of the mouth. In both parameters, there was a significant decline in patient pain. In a study devoted to tactics of rehabilitation treatment for temporomandibular joint disorders, the need for comprehensive long-term therapy, involving education, and learning proper chewing habits

  6. Temporomandibular joint: disorders, treatments, and biomechanics.

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    Ingawalé, Shirish; Goswami, Tarun

    2009-05-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a complex, sensitive, and highly mobile joint. Millions of people suffer from temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in USA alone. The TMD treatment options need to be looked at more fully to assess possible improvement of the available options and introduction of novel techniques. As reconstruction with either partial or total joint prosthesis is the potential treatment option in certain TMD conditions, it is essential to study outcomes of the FDA approved TMJ implants in a controlled comparative manner. Evaluating the kinetics and kinematics of the TMJ enables the understanding of structure and function of normal and diseased TMJ to predict changes due to alterations, and to propose more efficient methods of treatment. Although many researchers have conducted biomechanical analysis of the TMJ, many of the methods have certain limitations. Therefore, a more comprehensive analysis is necessary for better understanding of different movements and resulting forces and stresses in the joint components. This article provides the results of a state-of-the-art investigation of the TMJ anatomy, TMD, treatment options, a review of the FDA approved TMJ prosthetic devices, and the TMJ biomechanics.

  7. Nomenclature and classification of temporomandibular joint disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegenga, B.

    2010-01-01

    P>Currently, there are basically two approaches to classification, one based on structural and one on positional changes occurring within the joint. Despite the increase in knowledge of pathologic changes occurring within the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), the disc still seems to be a central issue

  8. Oral splint for temporomandibular joint disorders with revolutionary fluid system

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Srivastava, Rahul; Jyoti, Bhuvan; Devi, Parvathi

    2013-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) diseases and disorders refer to a complex and poorly understood set of conditions, manifested by pain in the area of the jaw and associated muscles and limitations in the ability to make the normal...

  9. Pseudodynamic MR imaging of temporomandibular joint disorders

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    Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Ehara, Shigeru (Iwate Medical Coll., Morioka (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-09-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has now been established as a procedure of choice in the evaluation of TMJ disorders. In this study, we evaluated the dynamics of TMJ motion on MR imaging, which resembles arthrography. Sixty-eight TMJs in 38 symptomatic patients and one healthy volunteer were examined using pseudodynamic images with gradient echo sequences using a 0.5 Tesla MR unit and 8 cm circular planar surface coil. For depiction of each compartment of the meniscus, the optimum sequence was 200/15/2 (TR/TE/excitations) with 50 deg or 60 deg flip angle in gradient refocused acquisition in steady-state (GRASS) sequences. Three contiguous slices on sagittal MR images were routinely obtained at 14-18 different phases of the opening cycle and displayed in closed-loop cine fashion. Internal derangement was observed in 57% of 68 joints. The most common type was anterior meniscal displacement without reduction. Sideway and rotational displacements, observed in 10% each, were noted on both sagittal multislice images and axial reference images. As a pseudodynamic MR technique, jaw movement specifically designed to check bite procedure to adjust splints is useful for detecting the exact time of meniscal redisplacement on the second click. After conservative therapy for arthrosis, pseudodynamic MR provided information on changes in the meniscus and condylar relationship. Pseudodynamic MR with multiple phases is suitable for evaluating subtle motion abnormality of the meniscus and for post-therapeutic monitoring. (author).

  10. Orthodontics for treating temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders.

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    Luther, Friedy; Layton, Stephen; McDonald, Fraser

    2010-07-07

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) relate to discomfort of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The disorder is multifactorial with a degree of psychogenic influence varying throughout an individual's life with phases of symptoms affecting the quality of life. In an attempt to treat this complex group of disorders many treatment modalities have been identified some of which are also considered in other Cochrane reviews. The disorder also has a normal cycle of events appearing to spontaneously improve without treatment. To establish the effectiveness of orthodontic intervention in reducing symptoms in patients with TMD (compared with any control group receiving no treatment, placebo treatment or reassurance) and to establish if active orthodontic intervention leads to TMD. The Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched. Handsearching of orthodontic journals and other related journals was undertaken in keeping with the Cochrane Collaboration handsearching programme. No language restrictions were applied. Authors of any studies were identified, as were experts offering legal advice, and contacted to identify unpublished trials. Most recent search: 13th April 2010. All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) including quasi-randomised trials assessing orthodontic treatment for TMD were included. Studies with adults aged equal to or above 18 years old with clinically diagnosed TMD were included. There were no age restrictions for prevention trials provided the follow-up period extended into adulthood. The inclusion criteria required reports to state their diagnostic criteria for TMD at the start of treatment and for participants to exhibit two or more of the signs and/or symptoms. The treatment group included treatment with appliances that could induce stable orthodontic tooth movement. Patients receiving splints for 8 to 12 weeks and studies involving surgical intervention (direct exploration/surgery of the joint and

  11. Mouse genetic models for temporomandibular joint development and disorders.

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    Suzuki, A; Iwata, J

    2016-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a synovial joint essential for hinge and sliding movements of the mammalian jaw. Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) are dysregulations of the muscles or the TMJ in structure, function, and physiology, and result in pain, limited mandibular mobility, and TMJ noise and clicking. Although approximately 40-70% adults in the USA have at least one sign of TMD, the etiology of TMD remains largely unknown. Here, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of TMD in mouse models. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Global body posture evaluation in patients with temporomandibular joint disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliza Tiemi Saito

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To identify the relationship between anterior disc displacement and global posture (plantar arches, lower limbs, shoulder and pelvic girdle, vertebral spine, head and mandibles. Common signs and symptoms of anterior disc displacement were also identified. INTRODUCTION: Global posture deviations cause body adaptation and realignment, which may interfere with the organization and function of the temporomandibular joint. METHODS: Global posture evaluation was performed in a group of 10 female patients (20 to 30 years of age with temporomandibular joint disc displacement and in a control group of 16 healthy female volunteers matched for age, weight and height. Anterior disc displacement signs, symptoms and the presence of parafunctional habits were also identified through interview. RESULTS: Patients with disc displacement showed a higher incidence of pain in the temporomandibular joint area, but there were no differences in parafunctional habits between the groups. In the disc displacement group, postural deviations were found in the pelvis (posterior rotation, lumbar spine (hyperlordosis, thoracic spine (rectification, head (deviation to the right and mandibles (deviation to the left with open mouth. There were no differences in the longitudinal plantar arches between the groups. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest a close relationship between body posture and temporomandibular disorder, though it is not possible to determine whether postural deviations are the cause or the result of the disorder. Hence, postural evaluation could be an important component in the overall approach to providing accurate prevention and treatment in the management of patients with temporomandibular disorder.

  13. Voice-supported Electronic Health Record for Temporomandibular Joint Disorders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hippmann, R.; Dostálová, T.; Zvárová, Jana; Nagy, Miroslav; Seydlová, M.; Hanzlíček, Petr; Kříž, P.; Šmídl, L.; Trmal, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 2 (2010), s. 168-172 ISSN 0026-1270 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : electronic health record * structured data entry * dentistry * temporomandibular joint disorder Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science Impact factor: 1.472, year: 2010

  14. Arthrocentesis and lavage for treating temporomandibular joint disorders.

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    Guo, Chunlan; Shi, Zongdao; Revington, Peter

    2009-10-07

    Temporomandibular joint disorders are important oral health problems, reducing the quality of life of sufferers. It has been estimated that approximately 20% to 30% of the adult population will experience temporomandibular joint dysfunction. Arthrocentesis and lavage has been used to treat temporomandibular joint disorders for about 10 years, but the clinical effectiveness of the therapy has not been summarized in the form of a systematic review. To assess the effectiveness and complications of arthrocentesis and lavage for the treatment of temporomandibular joint disorders compared with controlled interventions. The Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (to August 2009), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 3), MEDLINE (1950 to August 2009), EMBASE (1980 to August 2009), OpenSIGLE (to August 2009), CBMdisc (1981 to 2007 (in Chinese)) and Chinese Medical Library were searched. All the Chinese professional journals in the oral health field were handsearched and conference proceedings consulted. There was no language restriction. All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) (including quasi-randomised clinical trials) aiming to test the therapeutic effects of arthrocentesis and lavage for treating temporomandibular joint disorders. Two review authors independently extracted data, and three review authors independently assessed the risk of bias of included trials. The first authors of the selected articles were contacted for additional information. Two trials, at unclear to high risk of bias, were included in the review. The two trials, including 81 patients with temporomandibular joint disorders, compared arthrocentesis with arthroscopy. No statistically significant difference was found between the interventions in terms of pain. However, a statistically significant difference in favour of arthroscopy was found in maximum incisal opening (MIO) (weighted mean difference of -5.28 (95% confidence interval (CI) -7.10 to -3.46)).Mild and transient adverse reactions

  15. Skeletal pattern in subjects with temporomandibular joint disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almăşan, Oana Cristina; Băciuţ, Mihaela; Almăşan, Horea Artimoniu; Bran, Simion; Lascu, Liana; Iancu, Mihaela; Băciuţ, Grigore

    2013-02-21

    To establish the skeletal pattern in subjects with malocclusions and temporomandibular disorders (TMD); to assess the relationship between craniofacial skeletal structures and TMD in subjects with malocclusions. Sixty-four subjects with malocclusions, over 18 years of age, were included in the study. Temporomandibular disorders were clinically assessed according to the Helkimo Anamnestic Index. Subjects underwent a lateral cephalogram. Subjects were grouped according to the sagittal skeletal pattern (ANB angle) into class I, II and III. Parametric Student tests with equal or unequal variations were used (variations were previously tested with Levene test). Twenty-four patients with TMD (experimental sample); 40 patients without TMD (control group); interincisal angle was higher in class I and II (p < 0.05) experimental subjects; overjet was larger in experimental subjects; midline shift and Wits appraisal were broader in the experimental group in all three classes. In class III subjects, the SNB angle was higher in the experimental group (p = 0.01). Joint noises followed by reduced mandible mobility, muscular pain and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain were the most frequent symptoms in subjects with TMD and malocclusions. Temporomandibular joint status is an important factor to consider when planning orthodontic treatment in patients with severe malocclusions; midline shift, large overjet and deep overbite have been associated with signs and symptoms of TMD.

  16. IncobotulinumtoxinA Injection for Temporomandibular Joint Disorder.

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    Patel, Amit A; Lerner, Michael Z; Blitzer, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) involves dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint and associated muscles of mastication causing pain with chewing, limitation of jaw movement, and pain. While the exact pathophysiology of TMD is not completely understood, it is thought that hyperfunction of the muscles of mastication places stress on the temporomandibular joint, leading to degeneration of the joint and associated symptoms. We hypothesize that chemodenervation of the muscles of mastication with IncobotulinumtoxinA (Xeomin) will decrease the stress on the temporomandibular joint and improve pain associated with temporomandibular joint and muscle disorder (TMJD). Twenty patients were randomized to IncobotulinumtoxinA (170 units) or saline injection of the masticatory muscles. Patient-reported pain scale (0-10) was recorded at 4-week intervals following injection for 16 weeks. Patients who received saline injection initially were assessed for reduction in pain at the first 4-week interval and if still had significant pain were rolled over into the IncobotulinumtoxinA arm. Preinjection pain scores were similar between patients. While there was a statistically significant reduction in pain score in the placebo group one month, there was an overall larger drop in average pain scores in those patients injected with IncobotulinumtoxinA initially. All patients initially injected with placebo crossed over into the IncobotulinumtoxinA group. Similar results were seen when examining the composite masticatory muscle tenderness scores. There was no significant change in usage of pain medication. We demonstrate utility of IncobotulinumtoxinA in treating patients with TMD with pain despite pain medication usage and other conventional treatments.

  17. Nasal obstruction may alleviate bruxism related temporomandibular joint disorders.

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    Bektas, Devrim; Cankaya, Mustafa; Livaoglu, Murat

    2011-02-01

    Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is a collective term used to identify a group of musculoskeletal conditions of the temporomandibular region. Bruxism is a non-functional activity characterized by repeated tooth clenching or grinding in an unconscious manner. Over the time bruxism may lead to TMD by the uploading it causes. Nasal obstruction is a common complaint that necessitates mouth breathing when severe. The treatment of bruxism is frequently performed by oral appliances, which induce occlusal disengagement and relax jaw musculature and therefore reduce the force on the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). We believe that nasal obstruction may indirectly have a preemptive and therapeutic effect on sleep bruxism related TMD by causing mouth breathing. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Oral splint for temporomandibular joint disorders with revolutionary fluid system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Srivastava

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint (TMJ diseases and disorders refer to a complex and poorly understood set of conditions, manifested by pain in the area of the jaw and associated muscles and limitations in the ability to make the normal movements of speech, facial expression, eating, chewing, and swallowing. The conventional soft occlusal splint therapy is a much safer and effective mode of a conservative line of therapy in comparison to the surgical therapy for temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD. The purpose of this article is to review the Aqualizer TM , an hydrostatic oral splint, as accurate, effective treatment and differential diagnostic tool in TMD that allow treating the patient′s pain quickly and accurately saving valuable treatment time. The review article has been prepared doing a literature review from the world-wide web and pubmed/medline.

  19. Temporomandibular Joint Disorders as a Cause of Aural Fullness

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Yongxin

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) are often associated with aural manifestations. However, it is not clear whether aural fullness could be induced by TMD. The purpose was to investigate the TMD and effectiveness of TMD treatments in patients with mainly or exclusively aural fullness complaint. Methods One hundred and twelve patients, who had aural fullness as the main or sole complaint, presented to the Otolaryngology Department, PLA Army General Hospital, Beijing, China, bet...

  20. Psychoneuroimmunological disorders and temporomandibular joint pain: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjani Shetty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychoneuroimmunology characterizes a disease entity that combines psychological components, central nervous system regulation, and immunology, to explain the etiological complexity of a disease. Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs include a heterogeneous group of painful conditions that involve the temporomandibular joint (TMJ, muscles of mastication, and the adjacent anatomic structures. This review focuses on the psychoneuroimmunological diseases and disorders that mimic the symptoms of TMDs. The differentiation of these disorders is of great significance to the oral physician - differentiating and diagnosing the cause of TMJ pain and treating it effectively to benefit the patient.The literature for this review was taken from Medline/PubMed, other indexed journals, standard text books, and online material.

  1. Diagnosis of temporomandibular joint disorders: indication of imaging exams.

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    Ferreira, Luciano Ambrosio; Grossmann, Eduardo; Januzzi, Eduardo; de Paula, Marcos Vinicius Queiroz; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the different imaging tests and their appropriate indications is crucial to establish the diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders, especially in patients with overlapping signs and symptoms. To present and assess the main diagnostic imaging tests for temporomandibular disorders and rationally discuss their indication criteria, advantages, and disadvantages. Literature review in the Web of Knowledge, PubMed and SciELO databases, as well as manual search for relevant publications in reference lists of the selected articles. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were considered the gold standard assessments for the temporomandibular joint to evaluate hard and soft tissues, respectively. Each diagnostic method exhibited distinct sensitivity and specificity for the different subtypes of joint dysfunction. Selecting an evaluation examination based on its accuracy, safety, and clinical relevance is a rational decision that can help lead to an accurate diagnosis and an optimum treatment plan. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. A clinical study of temporomandibular joint disorders by using arthrography

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    Lee, Seung Hyun; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Kyunghee University, (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to prove the relationship between arthrographic and clinical features in temporomandibular joint disorders. In order to carry out this study, ninety-eight arthrographic examinations of temporomandibular joints were performed in eighty-two patients who had the temporomandibular joint disorders. As the arthrographic examination, the cases were classified in three groups, disk displacement with reduction, disk displacement without reduction, within normal limit. After this, the cases were clinically examined, and the results were compared and analyzed in each other group. The obtained results were as follows: 1. As the classification by arthrographic examination, three groups (disc displacement with reduction, disc displacement without reduction, within normal limit) were 41%, 54%, 5% of total cases in this study, respectively. 2. The third decade (65%) was most frequent in this study. The average age of each group (disc displacement with reduction, disc displacement without reduction, within normal limit) was 24, 28, 21, and disc displacement without reduction group was higher than any other group. 3. In the chief complaint, pain was the most frequent in all three groups. Joint sound was also frequent in disc displacement with reduction group, but in disc displacement without reduction group, limitation of mouth opening was more frequent. 4. Of the various pain, the movement pain was most frequent (61%) in this study. In joint sound, click (63%) was the most frequent in disc displacement with reduction group, but sound history (42%) and no sound (31%) were more frequent in disc displacement without reduction group. 5. The average maximum opening of each group (disc displacement with reduction, disc displacement without reduction, within normal limit) was 44 mm, 32.9 mm, 44 mm, and disc displacement without reduction group was less than any other group. 6. The masticatory disturbance of each group (disc displacement with reduction, disc

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging-based temporomandibular joint space evaluation in temporomandibular disorders

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    Nah, Kyung Soo [Pusan National Univ. College of Dentistry, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    Disc and condylar position were observed on MRIs of temporomandibular joint disorder patients and condylar position agreement between MRI and tranascranal radiography was evaluated. MRI and transcranial radiographs of both TM joints from 67 patients with temporomandibular disorder were used. On MRI, the position and shape of disc and condylar position as anterior, middle, posterior was evaluated at medial, center, and lateral views. On transcranial radiographs, condylar position was evaluated using the shortest distance from condyle to fossa in anterior, superior, and posterior directions. 1. On MRI, 96 joints (71.6%) of 134 had anterior disc dispalcement with reduction and 38 joints (28.4%) without reduction. 2. Fourteen (14.6%) of 96 reducible joints showed anterior condylar position. 19 (19.8%) showed central position, 63 joints (65.6%) showed posterior position. Two joints (5.3%) of 38 non-reducible joints showed anterior condylar position, while 9 (23.7%) showed central position, and 27 (71.1%)-posterior position. 3. In 85 joints (63.4%) of 134, the transcranial condylar position agreed with that of the central MRI view, 10 joints (7.5%) with that of medial, 16 joints (11.6%) with that of lateral, and 23 joints (17.2%) disagreed with that of MRI. On MRI, most of the reducible and non-reducible joints showed posterior condylar position. Transcranial radiographs taken with machine designed for TMJ had better agreement of condylar position with that of MRI. Extremely narrow joint spaces or very posterior condylar positions observed on transcranial radiographs had a little more than fifty percent agreement with those of MRIs.

  4. Temporomandibular Joint Disorders as a Cause of Aural Fullness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yongxin

    2017-09-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) are often associated with aural manifestations. However, it is not clear whether aural fullness could be induced by TMD. The purpose was to investigate the TMD and effectiveness of TMD treatments in patients with mainly or exclusively aural fullness complaint. One hundred and twelve patients, who had aural fullness as the main or sole complaint, presented to the Otolaryngology Department, PLA Army General Hospital, Beijing, China, between January 2010 and January 2015. Patients' medical history indicated that they had previously been diagnosed and treated for otitis media or sensorineural hearing loss but without positive results. Patients were subjected to pure tone audiometry and acoustic immittance screening using GSI-61 clinical audiometer and GSI TympStar middle ear analyzer respectively. Patients were examined by questionnaire, X-ray and/or computed tomography scan of temporomandibular joint. TMD was categorized according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD). Patients were then treated for TMD. All the patients showed normal eardrum and type A tympanogram. The patients of 60.7% (68/112) were classified as group I TMD disorders (muscle disorders), 34.8% (39/112) were group II (disc displacements), and 4.5% (5/112) were group III (arthralgia, osteoarthritis, and osteoarthrosis). Aural fullness was completely resolved or significantly improved in 67 and 34 patients respectively following treatments aimed at improving TMD, with a combined effectiveness of 90.2% (101/112). TMD treatments are especially effective (94.1%) in group I TMD. TMD as a potential cause of aural fullness should be considered in otolaryngology practice.

  5. Temporomandibular joint disorders' impact on pain, function, and disability.

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    Chantaracherd, P; John, M T; Hodges, J S; Schiffman, E L

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the association between more advanced stages of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) intra-articular disorders ("TMJ intra-articular status"), representing a transition from normal joint structure to TMJ disc displacement with and without reduction (DDwR and DDwoR) to degenerative joint disease (DJD), and patient-reported outcomes of jaw pain, function, and disability ("TMD impact"). This cross-sectional study included 614 cases from the RDC/TMD Validation Project with at least one temporomandibular disorder (TMD) diagnosis. TMJ intra-articular status was determined by 3 blinded, calibrated radiologists using magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography as one of normal joint structure, DDwR, DDwoR, or DJD, representing the subject's most advanced TMJ diagnosis. TMD impact was conceptualized as a latent variable consisting of 1) pain intensity (Characteristic Pain Index from the Graded Chronic Pain Scale [GCPS]), 2) jaw function (Jaw Functional Limitation Scale), and 3) disability (Disability Points from GCPS). A structural equation model estimated the association of TMJ intra-articular status with the latent measure TMD impact as a correlation coefficient in all TMD cases (n = 614) and in cases with a TMD pain diagnosis (n = 500). The correlations between TMJ intra-articular status and TMD impact were 0.05 (95% confidence interval [CI], -0.04 to 0.13) for all TMD cases and 0.07 (95% CI, -0.04 to 0.17) for cases with a pain diagnosis, which are neither statistically significant nor clinically relevant. Conceptualizing worsening of TMJ intra-articular disorders as 4 stages and characterizing impact from TMD as a composite of jaw pain, function, and disability, this cross-sectional study found no clinically significant association. Models of TMJ intra-articular status other than ours (normal structure → DDwR → DDwoR → DJD) should be explored. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  6. Effects of several temporomandibular disorders on the stress distributions of temporomandibular joint: a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhan; Qian, Yingli; Zhang, Yuanli; Fan, Yubo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate stress distributions in the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) for comparison with healthy TMJs. A model of mandible and normal TMJs was developed according to CT images. The interfaces between the discs and the articular cartilages were treated as contact elements. Nonlinear cable elements were used to simulate disc attachments. Based on this model, seven models of various TMDs were established. The maximum stresses of the discs with anterior, posterior, medial and lateral disc displacement (ADD, PDD, MDD and LDD) were 12.09, 9.33, 10.71 and 6.07 times magnitude of the identically normal disc, respectively. The maximum stresses of the posterior articular eminences in ADD, PDD, MDD, LDD, relaxation of posterior attachments and disc perforation models were 21, 59, 46, 21, 13 and 15 times greater than the normal model, respectively. TMDs could cause increased stresses in the discs and posterior articular eminences.

  7. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PRIMARY TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT DISORDERS AND CERVICAL SPINE DYSFUNCTION

    OpenAIRE

    Reggars, John W.

    1994-01-01

    The co-existence of primary temporomandibular disorders and cervical spine dysfunction is well documented. This paper reviews the anatomy and function of the temporomandibular joint and its primary disorders with particular reference to their possible effects an the cervical spine.

  8. Can pterygoid plate asymmetry be linked to temporomandibular joint disorders ?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero, Maria Eugenia; Jacobs, Reinhilde [OIC, OMFS IMPATH Research Group, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Leuven and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Beltran, Jorge [Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Post-Graduate School, Universidad Privada Cayetano Heredia, Lima (Peru); Laat, Antoon [Stomatology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dept. of Oral Health Sciences, KU Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-06-15

    This study was performed to evaluate the relationship between pterygoid plate asymmetry and temporomandibular joint disorders. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images of 60 patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) involving pain were analyzed and compared with images of 60 age- and gender-matched controls. Three observers performed linear measurements of the lateral pterygoid plates. Statistically significant differences were found between measurements of the lateral pterygoid plates on the site that had pain and the contralateral site (p<0.05). The average length of the lateral pterygoid plates (LPPs) in patients with TMD was 17.01±3.64 mm on the right side and 16.21±3.51 mm on the left side, and in patients without TMD, it was 11.86±1.97 mm on the right side and 11.98±1.85 mm on the left side. Statistically significant differences in the LPP length, measured on CBCT, were found between patients with and without TMD (p<0.05). The inter-examiner reliability obtained in this study was very high for all the examiners (0.99, 95% confidence interval: 0.98-0.99). Within the limits of the present study, CBCT lateral pterygoid plate measurements at the side with TMD were found to be significantly different from those on the side without TMD. More research is needed to explore potential etiological correlations and implications for treatment.

  9. Temporomandibular disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, Thomas; Jensen, Rigmor Højland

    2017-01-01

    Background Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) is an umbrella term for pain and dysfunction involving the masticatory muscles and the temporomandibular joints (TMJs). TMD is the most common orofacial pain condition. Its prominent features include regional pain in the face and preauricular area......, limitations in jaw movement, and noise from the TMJs during jaw movements. TMD affects up to 15% of adults and 7% of adolescents. Chronic pain is the overwhelming reason that patients with TMD seek treatment. TMD can associate with impaired general health, depression, and other psychological disabilities......, and arthralgia) as well as disorders associated with the TMJ (primarily disc displacements and degenerative disease). As peripheral mechanisms most likely play a role in the onset of TMD, a detailed muscle examination is recommended. The persistence of pain involves more central factors, such as sensitization...

  10. Association of Temporomandibular Joint Pain According to Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Temporomandibular Disorder Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahara, Namiaki; Nakagawa, Satoshi; Sumikura, Kanako; Kabasawa, Yuji; Sakamoto, Ichiro; Harada, Hiroyuki

    2017-09-01

    This study investigated the associations between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and pain in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The study included 646 TMJs of 323 consecutive patients with temporomandibular disorders; of these, 222 (34.4%) had TMJ pain whereas 424 (65.6%) had no TMJ pain. MRIs were used to evaluate disc position, osteoarthritis, joint fluid, and bone marrow edema. Internal derangement was classified as normal, anterior disc displacement with reduction, and anterior disc displacement without reduction (ADDWOR); condylar morphology was classified as normal, moderate bony change, and severe bony change. The odds ratio (OR) for each MRI variable for nonpainful versus painful TMJs was computed using logistic regression analysis. Compared with joints with normal disc position, the OR of those with ADDWOR was 2.74 (P pain. Similarly, compared with joints with normal condylar morphology, the OR of those with severe bony change was 4.62 (P = .02) for TMJ pain. In addition, the risk of TMJ pain increased by 2.37 in joints with joint fluid (P joints with bone marrow edema (P = .006). The risk of TMJ pain increased significantly with ADDWOR in combination with severe bony change, joint fluid, and bone marrow edema. These results suggest an association between TMJ pain and ADDWOR, severe bony change, joint fluid, and bone marrow edema. Thus, combining various MRI variables may improve the diagnostic accuracy of TMJ pain. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A new surgical classification for temporomandibular joint disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitroulis, G

    2013-02-01

    The role of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) surgery is ill-defined, so a universal classification is needed to collate the evidence required to justify the surgical interventions undertaken to treat TMJ disorders. The aim of this article is to introduce a new classification that divides TMJ disorders into 5 categories of escalating degrees of joint disease that can be applied to TMJ surgery. Using a category scale from 1 to 5, with category 1 being normal, and category 5 referring to catastrophic changes to the joint, the new classification will provide the basis for enhanced quantitative and descriptive data collection that can be used in the field of TMJ surgery research and clinical practice. It is hoped that this new classification will form the basis of what will eventually become the universal standard surgical classification of TMJ disorders that will be adopted by both researchers and clinicians so that ultimately, the role of TMJ surgery will be based on evidence rather than conjecture. Copyright © 2012 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Temporomandibular Joint Disorders in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chun Lin

    2007-12-01

    Conclusion: There was a high prevalence of TMD in RA patients. The severity of TMD variably correlated with RA severity. Clinically, a high score of hand-joint space narrowing may serve as an early indicator of RA patients at risk of severe TMD. This may facilitate early management and prevent the functional impairment of the temporomandibular joint.

  13. Electronic Health Record for Temporomandibular Joint Disorders – Support in Therapeutic Process

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hippmann, R.; Nagy, Miroslav; Dostálová, T.; Zvárová, Jana; Seydlová, M.; Feltlová, E.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2010), s. 27-32 ISSN 1801-5603 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : electronic health record * automatic speech recognition * dental cross * temporomandibular joint * temporomandibular joint disorders * structured data entry * dentistry * data model * text-to-speech system * Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science http://www.ejbi.org/en/ejbi/article/25-en-electronic-health-record-for-temporomandibular-joint-disorders-support-in-therapeutic-process.html

  14. Women with more severe degrees of temporomandibular disorder exhibit an increase in temperature over the temporomandibular joint

    OpenAIRE

    Dibai-Filho, Almir Vieira; Costa, Ana Cláudia de Souza; Packer, Amanda Carine; de Castro, Ester Moreira; Rodrigues-Bigaton, Delaine

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of the present study was to correlate the degree of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) severity and skin temperatures over the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and masseter and anterior temporalis muscles. Materials and methods: This blind cross-sectional study involved 60 women aged 18–40 years. The volunteers were allocated to groups based on Fonseca anamnestic index (FAI) score: no TMD, mild TMD, moderate TMD, and severe TMD (n = 15 each). All volunteers underwent infrared t...

  15. The severity of temporomandibular joint disorder by teeth loss in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indry Herdiyani

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint dysfunction is a term that covers a number of clinical problems that involves masticatory muscles, temporomandibular joints, and related structures, or both. Loss of tooth was an etiology of temporomandibular joint dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to obtain the description of temporomandibular joint dysfunction level that caused by tooth loss of elderly in three nursing home Bandung. This was a descriptive study using the survey method of the elderly in three nursing home Bandung. A total of 34 people consist 6 males and 28 females. The subjects were examined by symptoms of temporomandibular joint dysfunction and the dysfunction level was assessed by Helkimo Clinical Dysfunction Index. The result of this study shows that elderly in Nursing Home Bandung have mild dysfunction level was 7 (14.71%, moderate dysfunction level was 22 (64.71%, and severe dysfunction level is 5 (20.58%. It can be concluded that loss of the teeth is one of the etiologies of temporomandibular joint disorder. Based on the research conducted, it can be concluded that all elderly with teeth loss will have the temporomandibular joint disorder and the most severity happens based on teeth loss by using the Helkimo Clinical Disfunction Index score was the moderate disorder.

  16. Involvement of temporomandibular joint in systemic joint disorders: A clinical and radiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D B Gandhi Babu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many reports on the involvement of temporomandibular joint in certain specific joint diseases, in medical and dental literature. However, not many comprehensive studies have been undertaken to study the involvement of TMJ in systemic joint disorders to establish the cause and effect relationship between the two. This report aims to study the involvement of TMJ in patients affected with systemic joint diseases. A total of 106 patients have been examined; 55 suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (R.A and the rest suffering from related arthropathies. The results are significant and useful in the diagnosis and management of TMJ. in patients suffering from various arthropathies.

  17. Dual joint space arthrography in temporomandibular joint disorders: Comparison with single inferior joint space arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hyung Sik; Chang, Duk Soo; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Woo Sun; Sung, Jung Ho; Jun, Young Hwan [Capital Armed Forces General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-02-15

    The temporomandibular joint(TMJ) is really a complex of two synovial space separated by fibrocartilaginous disc. Single inferior joint space arthrography is commonly performed for evaluation of TMJ disorders, which is known to be superior in demonstrating joint dynamics. But it reveals only the inferior surface of the disc. Therefore, dual space arthrography is superior to demonstrate the soft tissue anatomic feature of the joint such as disc position and shape. Authors performed 83 TMJ arthrograms in TMJ problems. Initially, the inferior joint space was done and then the superior space was sequentially contrasted. The follow results were noted: 1. In all cases, dual space arthrography revealed accurate disc shape and positions. 2. Concordant findings between the two techniques: 68 cases (82%). Discordance between the two techniques: 15 cases (18%) 3. Possible causes of discordance between inferior and dual space arthrography. a) Normal varians of anterior recess: 3 cases b) Posterior disc displacement: 4 cases c) Influence of the patient's head position change :4 cases d) False perforation: 2 cases e) Reduction change: 2 cases 4. In 5 cases with anterior displacement, dual space arthrography gave additional findings such as adhesion within the superior space, which could not be evaluated by single inferior space.

  18. [Metastases in the temporomandibular joint: a review from 1954 to 2013. Rare causes for temporomandibular disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretzl, Christine; Lübbers, Heinz-Theo; Grätz, Klaus W; Kruse, Astrid L

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic lesions make up approximately 1% of all oral cancers.A comparatively rare location is the temporomandibular joint.Leading symptoms can be misdirecting, especially in the beginning,because they are frequently similar or even identical to those occurring in temporomandibular disorders. Therefore it can be quite difficult to confirm the diagnosis of a TMJ metastasis.delayed initiation of therapy and thus a poor prognosis are often the results. A review of the literature from 1954 to 2013 was realized and the published cases between 1954 and January 2013 were evaluated.The results were analyzed according to gender distribution, age,first symptoms, location of the primary tumor, as well as to the occurrence of malignancies in the patients' medical history. The research identified sixty-six patients. Tumors of the lung and breast were the main starting points of the metastatic spread. The histopathological workup showed above all the diagnosis of an adenocarcinoma. In all of the cases, unspecific symptoms led to the diagnosis of a metastatic disease. In the case of nonspecific TMJ affection, diagnostics should consider less-frequent diagnoses, such as the presence of metastasis.A clinical differentiation by additional symptoms like swelling, unexplained weight loss and night sweats, as well as a tumor disease in the past or failure of conservative treatment can provide additional indications. If there is reasonable suspicion,extended medical imaging and diagnostic measures must be performed to allow early treatment initiation and a better prognosis.

  19. Imaging the temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katzberg, R.W.; Manzione, J.V.; Westesson, P.L.

    1988-01-01

    This book encompasses all imaging modalities as they apply to the Temporomandibular Joint and its disorders. The volume employs correlative line drawings to elaborate on diagnostic images. It helps teach methods of TMJ imaging and describes findings identified by different imaging modalities to both radiologists and dental clinicians.

  20. Electronic System for Data Record and Automatic Diagnosis Assessment in the Temporomandibular Joint Disorders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hippmann, R.; Nagy, Miroslav; Dostálová, T.; Zvárová, Jana; Seydlová, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 1 (2011), s. 11-16 ISSN 1801-5603 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : temporomandibular joint * temporomandibular joint disorders * DentCross * electronic health record * AAOP classification Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science http://www.ejbi.eu/images/2011-1/Hippmann_en.pdf

  1. Radiological Evaluation of Temporomandibular Joint Disorders Followed by Clinical Symptoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Tae Won; You Dong Soo [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-11-15

    The authors analyzed the clinical findings, radiological findings and their correlations in the temporomandibular joint disorders. 1. The most prevalent age group was in the first decade, then the second decade and the third decade. Female were more common with a ratio of 3.4 : 1. 2. The most common clinical findings was the pain on open mouth position (42.43%), then came the clicking and limitation of mouth opening. 3. The most common bone change on the condyle side was the erosion, then came the flattening, the osteopyte and the sclerosis in that orders. 4. In the case of the crepitus, the coarse crepitus showed more radiological change than the fine crepitus. 5. In the case of the mouth opening limitation, the evaluation of the translatory movement by transcranial projection was in accordance with the clinical evaluation. 6. The correlation between the clinical symptom and the condylar position within the mandibular fossa was not present and in the case of diagnosis of disc displacement, the transcranial projection seemed not to be able to substitute for the arthrography. 7. Radiographically, the most prevalent age group which showed the bone change was in the first, the second and the third decade. And the bone change seemed to have no relationship with aging.

  2. Efficacy of Temporomandibular Joint Arthrocentesis with Sodium Hyaluronate in the Management of Temporomandibular Joint Disorders: A Prospective Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorrela, Harsha; Prameela, J; Srinivas, G; Reddy, B Vijay Baskar; Sudhir, Mvs; Arakeri, Gururaj

    2017-12-01

    This study was designed to investigate the efficacy of the temporomandibular joint arthrocentesis with and without injection of sodium hyaluronate (SH) in the treatment of temporomandibular joint disorders. A total of sixty two TMJs in 34 males and 28 females aged 20-65 years comprised the study material. The patients' complaints were limited mouth opening, TMJ pain, and joint noises during function. Patients were randomly divided into 2 groups in which arthrocentesis plus intra-articular injection of sodium hyaluronate was performed in 1 group and only arthrocentesis was performed in the other group. Both groups contained patients with disc displacement with reduction and without reduction. Clinical evaluation of the patients was done before the procedure, immediately after the procedure, at 1 week and 1, 3 and 6 months postoperatively. Intensity of TMJ pain was assessed using visual analog scales. Maximal mouth opening and lateral jaw movements also were recorded at each follow-up visit. Both techniques increased maximal mouth opening, lateral movements, and function, while reducing TMJ pain and noise. Although patients benefitted from both techniques, arthrocentesis with injection of SH seemed to be superior to arthrocentesis alone.

  3. Antioxidant capacity of synovial fluid in the temporomandibular joint correlated with radiological morphology of temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimaru, Kyoko; Ohba, Seigo; Yoshimura, Hitoshi; Matsuda, Shinpei; Ishimaru, Jun-Ichi; Sano, Kazuo

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the correlation between the antioxidant capacity of synovial fluid and radiological findings of intra-articular structures in patients with disorders of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). We recruited 21 patients (9 men and 12 women, aged 18-84 years of age) with such disorders, excluding myofascial pain and dysfunction syndrome, or other muscular disorders. The clinical variables recorded included age, sex, interincisal distance, and visual analogue pain scores (VAS). Radiological findings were obtained from diagnostic arthrogram and cone-beam computed tomography (CT). The antioxidant capacity of the synovial fluid was measured by chemiluminescence. Eleven patients were radiologically diagnosed with closed lock, and the remaining 10 with no closed lock. An anchored intra-articular disc was most often seen on cone-beam CT (n=19) followed by perforated disc (n=7), osteoarthrosis (n=7), and anterior disc displacement without reduction (n=5). Although there were no significant differences between antioxidant capacity and age, sex, VAS, or any findings on cone-beam CT, antioxidant capacity was significantly decreased in the patients with closed lock compared with those who did not have closed lock (p=0.02). The results suggest an association between the oxidative stress of the synovial fluid and closed-lock in disorders of the TMJ. Copyright © 2014 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Temporomandibular joint disorder in systemic sclerosis: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebbi, Raja; Khalifa, Hanen Ben; Dhidah, Monia

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis have several effects on the orofacial region such as widening of the periodontal ligament space, xerostomia and bone resorption of the mandible. We report a case of systemic sclerosis with temporomandibular joint involvement in a 45-year-old female patient accompanied by severe limited mouth opening and pain in the right and left preauricular regions and tenderness in masseter muscles with a morning stiffness of jaws.Magnetic resonance imaging showed a resorption of mandibular condylar process, with disk and joint abnormalities. PMID:28292126

  5. Diagnosis and treatment of temporomandibular disorders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gauer, Robert L; Semidey, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are a heterogeneous group of musculoskeletal and neuromuscular conditions involving the temporomandibular joint complex, and surrounding musculature and osseous components...

  6. Magnetic resonance evidence of joint effusion in patients with temporomandibular joint disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Jee Young; Kim, Kee Deog; Park, Chang Seo [Yonsei Univ. College of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to find the relationship among the joint status, pain and effusion in patients with temporomandibular joint disorders. Materials included 406 patients (812 joints) with clinical records and bilateral TMJ MRIs in TMJ clinic, Yongdong Severance Hospital. All joints were classified in 4 groups in MR images according to the disc status of joint; normal disc position, disc displacement with reduction (DDsR), and also 2 groups according to the bony status of joint; normal bony structure and osteoarthrosis. MR evidence of joint effusion was categorized in 4 groups according to its amount. To determine the relationship between joint pain and joint effusion, 289 patients with unilateral TMJ symptoms were selected from total materials. Joint effusion was found 8.0% in normal disc position, 32.6% in DDcR, and 59.2% in DDsR (83.1% in early state and 23.1% in late stage). Joint effusion was found 39.7% in osteoarthrosis and 35.0% in normal bony structure. Joint effusion was more found in the painful joints (49.8%) than in the painless joints (22.4%) (p<0.001). Joint effusion in the early stage of DDsR only was more found significantly in painful joints (91.9%) than in painless joints (62.1%) (p<0.001). MR evidence of joint effusion might be related to disc displacement regardless of the presence of osteoarthrosis, and the early stage of DDsR was found more frequently combined with joint effusion and joint pain.

  7. Assessment of the relationship between stress and temporomandibular joint disorder in female students before university entrance exam (Konkour exam).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottaghi, Ahmad; Razavi, S Mohammad; Pozveh, Elham Zamani; Jahangirmoghaddam, Milad

    2011-12-01

    Temporomandibular joint is one of the most complicated joints of the body and plays an important role in the head and neck system. One of the factors affecting the temporomandibular joint and lead to temporomandibular disorder is anxiety with all the events causing it. The aim of this study was to determine a relationship between anxiety and temporomandibular disorders. In this prospective study, subjects were randomly selected. One hundred and thirty pre-university students in Isfahan were evaluated with Ketel's test of anxiety, exam stress test and temporomandibular disorder questionnaires. The evaluation was done in two stages 10 months and 1 month prior to the university entrance exam (Konkour), clinical assessments consisted of masticatory muscles and sternocleidomastoid muscle palpation, temporomandibular joint palpation for pain and noise and its movement, and mouth opening limitations. The Wilcoxon rank test and paired t-test were used to analyze the data and the P value under 0.05 was considered significant. The level of anxiety and occurrence of temporomandibular disorders were increased between two stages and had the highest level in the second stage. There was a significant increase between two stages (P<0.001). The parallel increase of temporomandibular disorders and anxiety between the two stages can suggest a possible relationship between anxiety and temporomandibular disorders. Therefore, the effect of anxiety in triggering temporomandibular disorder symptoms is probable.

  8. MR of 2270 TMJs: prevalence of radiographic presence of otomastoiditis in temporomandibular joint disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orhan, Kaan [Department of Oral Diagnosis and Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Ankara University, 06500 Besevler, Ankara (Turkey)]. E-mail: call53@yahoo.com; Nishiyama, Hideyoshi [Department of Oral Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Tadashi, Sasaki [Department of Oral Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Shumei, Murakami [Department of Oral Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Furukawa, Souhei [Department of Oral Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    Objective: : The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence of radiographic presence of otomastoiditis while examining temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders in magnetic resonance images (MRI) in a series of 2270 temporomandibular joint magnetic resonance images and to examine the relationship between otomastoiditis and TMJ disorders. Materials and methods: : 2270 temporomandibular joint magnetic resonance images and patients' data were retrospectively investigated. Magnetic resonance images were obtained from the patients who referred to Osaka University Dental Hospital Outpatient Clinic with TMJ complaints for the last four years (from January 1998 to January 2003). The patients, who were diagnosed as otomastoiditis based on their temporomandibular joint magnetic resonance images, were sent to Osaka University Hospital Department of Otolaryngology for a medical consultation in order to have their pathologies certified following their MR process. Age and sex were recorded for all patients and for otomastoiditis cases; location of the disease, symptoms of patients and TMJ findings were noted as well. Results: : Seven patients were diagnosed as acute otomastoiditis and one patient diagnosed as chronic active otitis media with cholesteatoma in the series of 2270 MR, which were representing a prevalence of 0.39%. Neurilemoma diagnosed in left mastoid process in one patient. The final diagnoses of all patients were made after medical consultation. Conclusion: : While examining temporomandibular joint magnetic resonance images; it is not only important to examine just the TMJ structures, but also to look at the nearby anatomical features to check evidence for inflammatory disease.

  9. Long-term evaluation of single-puncture temporomandibular joint arthrocentesis in patients with unilateral temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şentürk, M F; Yıldırım, D; Bilgir, E; Fındık, Y; Baykul, T

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term effects of the single-puncture arthrocentesis (SPA) technique. Forty-two patients with unilateral temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs) were treated by SPA. Thirty-eight of these patients completed 1-24 months of follow-up (short-term group) and 21 completed 11 months or longer of follow-up (long-term group). The two groups were evaluated statistically for pain (visual analogue scale), maximum mouth opening, lateral excursion, and protrusion. Both follow-up duration groups showed significant improvements when compared to baseline levels for almost all of the outcome variables (P<0.05). Single puncture temporomandibular joint arthrocentesis is an effective treatment method over both the short and long term. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. COMPUTED-TOMOGRAPHY IN DIFFERENTIAL-DIAGNOSIS OF TEMPOROMANDIBULAR-JOINT DISORDERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEBONT, LGM; VANDERKUIJL, B; STEGENGA, B; VENCKEN, LM; BOERING, G

    Computed tomography (CT) has great potential for imaging intra- and extracapsular hard-tissue abnormality of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). CT is not the best method of imaging disk position and form. For differential diagnosis of TMJ disorders, CT is especially successful in bony lesions. The

  11. Temporomandibular disorders in patients with craniocervical dystonia

    OpenAIRE

    Costa,André L.; Campos, Lidiane S.; Marcondes C. França Jr.; Anelyssa D'Abreu

    2011-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders are a set of musculoskeletal dysfunctions within the masticatory system, with multiple etiologies. Objective: Since craniocervical dystonia can involye the same neuromuscular structure as the temporomandibular joint, we sought to assess the correlation between temporomandibular disorders and craniocervical dystonia. Method: We applied the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders to 42 patients with craniocervical dystonia, in order to identify o...

  12. Evaluation of extraarticular consequences of Temporomandibular joint disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh. Jafari

    1994-07-01

    Full Text Available Temporo Mandibular Joint disorders are the most important ethiologic factor for chronic orofacial pain and have a relatively new place in scientific researches and clinical studies in dentistry. Since dentists can play an important role in diagnosis and treatment of these disorders, routine dental examination should include functional examination of osteomatognatic apparatus.

  13. A comparison of clinical symptoms and magnetic resonance images in temporomandibular joint disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae [Kyunghee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-06-15

    To determine the relationship between clinical symptoms and magnetic resonance (MR) images in patients presenting with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders. This study was based on 172 joints in 86 patients presenting with TMJ disorders. Joint pain and sound during jaw opening and closing movements were recorded, and the possible relationship between disc positions and bony changes of the condylar head and the articular fossa in MR images in the oblique sagittal planes were examined. Data were analyzed by Chi-square test. There was no statistically significant relationship between clinical symptoms and MR images in the patients with TMJ disorders. In the patient with TMJ disorders, joint pain and sound could not be specific clinical symptoms that are related with MR image findings, and asymptomatic joint did not necessarily imply that the joints are normal according to MR image findings.

  14. Radiographic evaluation of cervical spine of subjects with temporomandibular joint internal disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner Cesar Munhoz; Amélia Pasqual Marques; José Tadeu Tesseroli de Siqueira

    2004-01-01

    Although the etiopathophysiology of internal temporomandibular joint internal disorders (TMJ ID) is still unknown, it has been suggested that head and body posture could be related to its initial onset, development and perpetuation. The purpose of the present study was to observe the relationship between cervical spine X-ray abnormalities and TMJ ID. This investigation evaluated 30 subjects with internal TMJ disorder symptoms (test group) and 20 healthy subjects (control group). Subjects were...

  15. [Temporomandibular joint disc surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potier, J; Maes, J-M; Nicot, R; Dumousseau, T; Cotelle, M; Ferri, J

    2016-09-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders are a common disease and may be responsible for major functional and painful repercussions. Treatment is not consensual. The literature highlights the role of conservative treatments (physiotherapy, analgesics, splints) in a first attempt. Minimally invasive surgical techniques (arthroscopy, arthrocentesis) have developed rapidly in recent decades. They have proven effective and reliable, especially in patients suffering from irreducible or reducible anterior disc dislocation or presenting with arthopathies. The goal of our work was to make an update about disk surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Cytopathologic diagnosis on joint lavage fluid for patients with temporomandibular joint disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Toshinari; Kumagai, Akiko; Aomura, Tomoyuki; Javed, Fawad; Sugiyama, Yoshiki; Mizuki, Harumi; Takeda, Yasunori

    2014-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders (TMD) are usually diagnosed based on the patient's clinical findings and the results of image investigations; however, understanding of the inflammatory process in TMJ is difficult. In addition, many of the TMJ disease types share common principal symptoms. Therefore, TMJ diseases in the early stage can be misdiagnosed with TMD. It is hypothesized that cytopathologic examination of the joint lavage fluids is useful in interpreting the TMD-associated inflammatory process from a cellular aspect. The aim of this study was to assess the TMJ lavage fluid cytopathologically in TMD patients. Thirty-nine patients, clinically diagnosed as TMD, were included in the present study. Clinical symptoms of the patients were recorded. Forty-four samples of TMJ lavage fluid were collected and paraffin-embedded cell sections were made by cell block tissue array method. Cytologic conditions in upper articular cavity of TMJ were cytopathologically diagnosed and were compared with the clinical symptoms of each patient. Cell components were detected in 22 of the 44 analyzed joint lavage fluids. There was a correlation between cytopathologic findings and clinical symptoms. Variety of cytopathology and inflammatory conditions in patients with similar clinical symptoms were also found. The results suggested that cytopathologic examination of the joint lavage fluids from TMD patients is helpful for gaining an understanding of the inner local conditions of TMJ at the cellular level. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Comparison of the T2 relaxation time of the temporomandibular joint articular disk between patients with temporomandibular disorders and asymptomatic volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakimoto, N; Shimamoto, H; Chindasombatjaroen, J; Tsujimoto, T; Tomita, S; Hasegawa, Y; Murakami, S; Furukawa, S

    2014-07-01

    T2 relaxation time is a quantitative MR imaging parameter used to detect degenerated cartilage in the knee and lumbar intervertebral disks. We measured the T2 relaxation time of the articular disk of the temporomandibular joint in patients with temporomandibular disorders and asymptomatic volunteers to demonstrate an association between T2 relaxation time and temporomandibular disorder MR imaging findings. One hundred forty-four patients with temporomandibular disorders and 17 volunteers were enrolled in this study. An 8-echo spin-echo sequence for measuring the T2 relaxation times was performed in the closed mouth position, and the T2 relaxation time of the entire articular disk was measured. Patients were classified according to the articular disk location and function, articular disk configuration, presence of joint effusion, osteoarthritis, and bone marrow abnormalities. The T2 relaxation time of the entire articular disk was 29.3 ± 3.8 ms in the volunteer group and 30.7 ± 5.1 ms in the patient group (P = .177). When subgroups were analyzed, however, the T2 relaxation times of the entire articular disk in the anterior disk displacement without reduction group, the marked or extensive joint effusion group, the osteoarthritis-positive group, and the bone marrow abnormality-positive group were significantly longer than those in the volunteer group (P temporomandibular joint in patients with progressive temporomandibular disorders were longer than those of healthy volunteers. © 2014 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  18. Clinical Aspects of Temporomandibular Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZDEN, Asiye Nehir

    2014-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders are common problems in populations presenting signs and symptoms of muscle and joint pain on palpation, limitations in mandibular motion, joint sounds, pain and locking on mandibular function as well as dental, periodontal, occlusal and psychosocial variables. Problems that involve the temporomandibular joint and related structures include myofacial pain-dysfunction, various internal disarrangements of the joint space and degenerative joint diseases. T...

  19. Imaging diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). MR imaging of the disk of the temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sano, Tsukasa; Yamamoto, Mika; Sakuma, Katsuya [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Dentistry] [and others

    2001-03-01

    Since its introduction in the 1980s, magnetic resonance imaging has become the preferred method for diagnosing soft tissue abnormalities of temporomandibular joint (TMJ). MR imaging is non-invasive and more accurate than arthorography. In addition, it requires less operator skill and is well tolerated by patients. We are usually taking MR images of the TMJ with the fast spin echo technique that can simultaneously obtain both T2-weighted and proton density images. The purpose of this study was to determine the utility of T2-weighed and proton density images for diagnosing the disk status in TMJ, comparing the results with those obtained by T1-weighted images. We studied 104 TMJs in 52 patients with both T2-weighted and proton density images, and 80 TMJs in 40 patients with only T1-weighted images. The joints were evaluated by two oral radiologists who looked at three aspects of the joints-disk displacement, disk reduction and disk shape - giving ratings of good'' or ''fair'' in each category. Ratings of ''good'' were significant higher in all three categories in T2-weighted and proton density images than in T1-weighted images (p<0.01). Based on these results, we conclude that T2-weighted and proton density images taken with the fast spin echo technique are useful for diagnosing the disk status of the TMJ. (author)

  20. Temporomandibular disorders in patients with craniocervical dystonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André L. Costa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular disorders are a set of musculoskeletal dysfunctions within the masticatory system, with multiple etiologies. OBJECTIVE: Since craniocervical dystonia can involve the same neuromuscular structure as the temporomandibular joint, we sought to assess the correlation between temporomandibular disorders and craniocervical dystonia. METHOD: We applied the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders to 42 patients with craniocervical dystonia, in order to identify orofacial pain and temporomandibular characteristics on the day of botulinum toxin injection. RESULTS: Twenty-two patients (52.3% reported temporomandibular joint pain; 24 (57.1%, joint sounds; 20 (47.6%, masticatory muscle pain; and 21 (50%, diminished jaw mobility. The patients with oromandibular dystonia presented temporomandibular disorders more frequently than did patients with other types of craniocervical dystonia (p<0.001. CONCLUSION: Temporomandibular disorders occur frequently in patients with oromandibular dystonia. Further studies should address the proper treatment of temporomandibular disorders associated with dystonia.

  1. Evaluation of occlusal factors in patients with temporomandibular joint disorder

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    Max Dória Costa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and the relation between the main occlusal factors and the temporomandibular disorder (TMD. METHODS: We analyzed 100 patients (50 diagnosed with TMD and 50 asymptomatic volunteers, control group through a questionnaire that classified TMD as absent, mild, moderate and severe. Then, an evaluation was made of intraoral occlusal factors: Absence of posterior teeth, wear facets, overjet, overbite, open bite, posterior crossbite, sagittal relationship (Class I, II and III, centric relation discrepancy for maximum intercuspation, anterior guidance and balancing occlusal interference. The c² examined the association between TMD and considered occlusal variables. RESULTS: The prevalence of studied occlusal factors was higher in patients with moderate and severe TMD. Statistically significant results were found on: Absence of five or more posterior teeth, overbite and overjet greater than 5 mm, edge-to-edge bite, posterior crossbite, Class II and III, the absence of effective anterior guide and balancing side interferences. CONCLUSIONS: Indeed, it is concluded that there is a relationship between TMD and occlusal factors, however it can not be told to what extent these factors are predisposing, precipitating or perpetuating the disease. Therefore, despite its multifactorial etiology, one can not neglect the occlusal analysis of these patients.OBJETIVO: o presente estudo teve como objetivo verificar a prevalência e relação dos principais fatores oclusais com a disfunção temporomandibular. MÉTODOS: foram analisados 100 pacientes (50 com diagnóstico de DTM e 50 voluntários assintomáticos, grupo controle através de um questionário para classificação do grau de DTM, em ausente, leve, moderada e severa. Em seguida, foi realizada uma avaliação intrabucal dos fatores oclusais ausência de dentes posteriores, facetas de desgaste, overjet, overbite, mordida aberta anterior, mordida

  2. The Role of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation in the Management of Temporomandibular Joint Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awan, Kamran Habib; Patil, Shankargouda

    2015-12-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) constitutes of a group of diseases that functionally affect the masticatory system, including the muscles of mastication and temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A number of etiologies with specific treatment have been identified, including the transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). The current paper presents a literature review on the use of TENS in the management of TMD patients. Temporomandibular joint disorder is very common disorder with approximately 75% of people showing some signs, while more than quarter (33%) having at least one symptom. An attempt to treat the pain should be made whenever possible. However, in cases with no defined etiology, starting with less intrusive and reversible techniques is prescribed. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation is one such treatment modality, i.e. useful in the management of TMD. It comprises of controlled exposure of electrical current to the surface of skin, causing hyperactive muscles relaxation and decrease pain. Although the value of TENS to manage chronic pain in TMD patients is still controversial, its role in utilization for masticatory muscle pain is significant. However, an accurate diagnosis is essential to minimize its insufficient use. Well-controlled randomized trials are needed to determine the utilization of TENS in the management of TMD patients.

  3. MR diagnosis of temporomandibular joint. A study of joint effusion

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    Kaneda, Takashi; Yamashiro, Mitsuaki; Ozawa, Kaoru; Suzuki, Hiromi; Okada, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu [Nihon Univ., Matsudo, Chiba (Japan). School of Dentistry

    1998-03-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the relationship between correlation of MR joint effusion of the temporomandibular joint and disk position, to evaluate the relationship between joint effusion and aging, and to assess the frequency of MR joint effusion of bilateral temporomandibular joints. The temporomandibular joints of 192 patients with clinical symptoms of temporomandibular joint disorders were imaged bilaterally using high field, surface-coil MR imaging. Oblique sagittal and coronal proton density-weighted and T2-weighted images were obtained. Imaging findings of joint effusion were correlated with disk position, aging, and bilateral temporomandibular joints. MR showed effusion in 4% of the joints with normal superior disk position, 36% of the joints with disk displacement with reduction, and 45% of the joints with disk displacement without reduction. There were significant differences in the incidence of joint effusion between normal disk position and anterior disk displacement with or without reduction. Younger patients less than 40 years were significant higher the incidence of joint effusion than those of older patients. A significant association was seen between joint effusion and aging. MR showed effusion in 17% of the unilateral temporomandibular joint, 24% of the bilateral temporomandibular joints. There was no significant difference between unilateral and bilateral case. These results indicated that joint effusion using MR imaging was associated with varied temporomandibular joint pathologic states. (author)

  4. PATHOLOGY OF TEMPOROMANDIBULAR-JOINT INTERNAL DERANGEMENT AND OSTEOARTHROSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEBONT, LGM; STEGENGA, B

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthrosis and disk displacement seem to be strongly related, but they may also represent mutually independent temporomandibular disorders. This paper presents relevant aspects of normal physiology and degeneration of synovial joints, aspects of normal

  5. Prevalence of temporomandibular joint disorder symptoms in Cibodas Maribaya Village Bandung District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erna Kurnikasari

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint disorder is a stomatognathic system disorder causing mandibular function disturbance that clinically shows the following symptoms: clicking, crepitation, limited mouth opening, pain in masticatory muscles, pain in the jaw area, deviated mouth opening, ringing ear, pain around ear area, and headache. Experts stated that the prevalence of joint disorder was high. A study was conducted to the people of Cibodas Maribaya Village Bandung District who came to the Community Work event with results showing that the prevalence of clicking was 34 people or 32.4%, the deviation was found in 36 people or 34.3%, muscle pain was found in 28 people or 26.7%, a headache was found in 35 people or 33.3%, ear disorders was found in 23 people or 21.9%.

  6. Women with more severe degrees of temporomandibular disorder exhibit an increase in temperature over the temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibai-Filho, Almir Vieira; Costa, Ana Cláudia de Souza; Packer, Amanda Carine; de Castro, Ester Moreira; Rodrigues-Bigaton, Delaine

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to correlate the degree of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) severity and skin temperatures over the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and masseter and anterior temporalis muscles. This blind cross-sectional study involved 60 women aged 18-40 years. The volunteers were allocated to groups based on Fonseca anamnestic index (FAI) score: no TMD, mild TMD, moderate TMD, and severe TMD (n = 15 each). All volunteers underwent infrared thermography for the determination of skin temperatures over the TMJ, masseter and anterior temporalis muscles. The Shapiro-Wilk test was used to determine the normality of the data. The Kruskal-Wallis test, followed by Dunn's test, was used for comparisons among groups according to TMD severity. Spearman's correlation coefficients were calculated to determine the strength of associations among variables. Weak, positive, significant associations were found between FAI score and skin temperatures over the left TMJ (rs = 0.195, p = 0.009) and right TMJ (rs = 0.238, p = 0.001). Temperatures over the right and left TMJ were significantly higher in groups with more severe TMD (p < 0.05). FAI score was associated with skin temperature over the TMJ, as determined by infrared thermography, in this sample. Women with more severe TMD demonstrated a bilateral increase in skin temperature.

  7. Assessment of the relationship between stress and temporomandibular joint disorder in female students before university entrance exam (Konkour exam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mottaghi

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: The parallel increase of temporomandibular disorders and anxiety between the two stages can suggest a possible relationship between anxiety and temporomandibular disorders. Therefore, the effect of anxiety in triggering temporomandibular disorder symptoms is probable.

  8. Recent Tissue Engineering Advances for the Treatment of Temporomandibular Joint Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryaei, Ashkan; Vapniarsky, Natalia; Hu, Jerry C; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2016-12-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are among the most common maxillofacial complaints and a major cause of orofacial pain. Although current treatments provide short- and long-term relief, alternative tissue engineering solutions are in great demand. Particularly, the development of strategies, providing long-term resolution of TMD to help patients regain normal function, is a high priority. An absolute prerequisite of tissue engineering is to understand normal structure and function. The current knowledge of anatomical, mechanical, and biochemical characteristics of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and associated tissues will be discussed, followed by a brief description of current TMD treatments. The main focus is on recent tissue engineering developments for regenerating TMJ tissue components, with or without a scaffold. The expectation for effectively managing TMD is that tissue engineering will produce biomimetic TMJ tissues that recapitulate the normal structure and function of the TMJ.

  9. Intra-articular injections with corticosteroids and sodium hyaluronate for treating temporomandibular joint disorders: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Eduardo Machado; Daniel Bonotto; Paulo Afonso Cunali

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In some cases, conservative treatment of internal derangements of the Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) is considered little responsive. Thus, it is necessary to accomplish treatments that aim at reducing pain and improve patients' functions who present arthrogenic temporomandibular disorders. OBJECTIVE: This study, by means of a systematic review of the literature, aimed to analyze the effectiveness of intra-articular injections with corticosteroids and sodium hyaluronate for treat...

  10. Local application of Aqua Titan improves symptoms of temporomandibular joint muscle disorder: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, K; Tsukimura, N; Ishizuka, T; Kohinata, K; Yonehara, Y; Honda, K

    2015-04-01

    Aqua Titan (AT), comprising microscopic titanium particles dispersed in water, has been reported to have beneficial effects on muscle tissue. This study investigated the effects of local application of AT on symptoms in patients with muscle disorders of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) compared to patients with joint disorders of the TMJ. Sixteen patients with unilateral masseter muscle pain during motion (muscle disorder group) and six patients with unilateral TMJ pain during motion (joint disorder group) applied an AT-permeated patch over the painful area every night for 2 weeks. Symptoms were evaluated clinically at the initial visit and 1 and 2 weeks later. Clinical symptoms in the joint disorder group showed no tendency towards improvement after 2 weeks. In contrast, mouth opening range with/without pain, visual analogue scale (VAS) scores for pain during mouth opening and eating, and activities of daily living (ADL) scores in the muscle disorder group were improved significantly after 2 weeks. Multiple comparison tests in the muscle disorder group showed significant improvements in the VAS for eating and ADL score after 1 week. These results suggest that the AT patch has a potential supplementary role in the treatment of patients with muscle disorders of the TMJ. Copyright © 2014 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Reevaluating Antidepressant Selection in Patients With Bruxism and Temporomandibular Joint Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Royce; Sun, Ye-Ming

    2017-05-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) is a broad pain disorder that refers to several conditions affecting the temporomandibular joint of the jaw and the muscles of mastication. As with most pain disorders, a high prevalence of depression and anxiety is associated with TMD. Research has shown that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), the first-line drug therapy for major depressive disorder, may not be suitable for TMD patients because SSRIs can induce teeth-grinding, otherwise known as bruxism. This is problematic because bruxism is believed to further exacerbate TMD. Therefore, the purpose of this literature review is to better understand the mechanism of SSRI-induced bruxism, as well as discuss alternative antidepressant options for treating depression and anxiety in patients with bruxism and TMD. Alternative classes of antidepressants reviewed include serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, atypical antidepressants, and monoamine oxidase inhibitors. Findings indicate that dopamine agonists and buspirone are currently the most effective medications to treat the side effects of SSRI-induced bruxism, but results regarding the effectiveness of specific antidepressants that avoid bruxism altogether remain inconclusive.

  12. Platelet-rich plasma for the therapeutic management of temporomandibular joint disorders: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousnaki, M; Bakopoulou, A; Koidis, P

    2018-02-01

    This systematic review aimed to investigate whether intra-articular injections of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) are beneficial for the treatment of degenerative temporomandibular disorders, such as temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA) and disc displacement with osteoarthritic lesions, when compared to other treatments, such as injections of hyaluronic acid (HA) or saline. An electronic search of the MEDLINE and Scopus databases was performed using combinations of the terms "temporomandibular" and "platelet rich plasma", to identify studies reported in English and published up until May 2017. A hand-search of relevant journals and the reference lists of selected articles was also performed. The initial screening identified 153 records, of which only six fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were included in this review. Of these studies, three compared PRP with HA, while three compared PRP with Ringer's lactate or saline. Four of the studies found PRP injections to be superior in terms of improvements in mandibular range of motion and pain intensity up to 12 months after treatment, while the remaining two studies found similar results for the different treatments. There is slight evidence for the potential benefits of intra-articular injections of PRP in patients with TMJ-OA. However, a standardized protocol for PRP preparation and application needs to be established. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Temporomandibular Joint Pain Dysfunction Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Speck, John E.

    1988-01-01

    When a patient complains of headache, neckache, or earache and these are associated with noisy temporomandibular joint function, restricted opening or increased pain when chewing, a temporomandibular joint or masticatory muscle disorder should be considered in the differential diagnosis, because signs and symptoms of these disorders are common in all age groups. This article indicates the more common etiological contributions, that is, microtrauma, repeated microtrauma, muscle hyperactivity, ...

  14. Parotid Lymphadenopathy Is Associated With Joint Effusion in Non-Neoplastic Temporomandibular Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraoka, Hirotaka; Kaneda, Takashi; Kawashima, Yusuke; Hirahara, Naohisa; Fukuda, Taiga; Muramatsu, Teruaki; Ito, Kotaro

    2017-03-01

    Lymphadenopathy often occurs in the setting of inflammation, with or without infection. We sought to elucidate any association of parotid lymphadenopathy with joint effusion in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders. We performed a retrospective cohort study. We analyzed the magnetic resonance imaging studies of patients with suspected TMJ disorders performed from April 2006 to March 2007. The degree of joint effusion was graded on sagittal T2-weighted spin echo images according to a commonly used system. On axial short T1-weighted short inversion recovery images, the number and short-axis diameter of the parotid lymph nodes were recorded. We performed analyses of the cluster-correlated data using the Mann-Whitney U test and Spearman's correlation coefficients. P disorders were analyzed from 201 patients during the study period. The number and size of the parotid lymph nodes identified was significantly greater in the patients with TMJ effusion (P disorders. These findings indicate that lymphadenopathy should be considered as an inflammation condition commonly associated with joint effusion in TMJ disorders. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Management of temporomandibular joint disorders caused by complication of teeth extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endang Syamsuddin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Complicated tooth extractions may lead to various post-extraction complications, including Temporomandibular Joint Disorders (TMD. Despite of the rare incidence, a delayed treatment of the TMD will cause more problems in the future as well as increased morbidity rate. The purpose of the current study was to elaborate the symptoms as well as the management of TMD as a post tooth extraction complication. The types of TMD as a post tooth extraction complication includes dislocated condyle, osteoarthritis, fracture condyle and disc displacement. These type of complications may resulted from an extensive opening of the mouth as well as an over pressure on the mandible during tooth extraction. In relation to this, some of the TMD symptoms that might cause a certain level of interference for patients may include pain, limited mouth opening and joint sounds, with pain and limited mouth opening as the initial symptoms. The first measure of the pain management would be warm light compress around the TMJ followed by a soft diet for food intake. A definitive treatment should then be based on the diagnosis of the TMD. It is concluded that TMD may occur as a complication of a tooth extraction that initiated by pain and limited mouth opening. Immediate treatment would be pain relieve and load reduction of the Temporomandibular Joint by employing soft diet and mandibular movement restriction.

  16. Computed tomographic findings in dogs and cats with temporomandibular joint disorders: 58 cases (2006-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzi, Boaz; Cissell, Derek D; Verstraete, Frank J M; Kass, Philip H; DuRaine, Grayson D; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2013-01-01

    To describe CT findings in dogs and cats with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders. Retrospective case series. 41 dogs and 17 cats. Medical records and CT images of the skull were reviewed for dogs and cats that were examined at a dentistry and oral surgery specialty practice between 2006 and 2011. Of 142 dogs and 42 cats evaluated, 41 dogs and 17 cats had CT findings consistent with a TMJ disorder. In dogs, the most common TMJ disorder was osteoarthritis; however, in most cases, there were other TMJ disorders present in addition to osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis was more frequently identified at the medial aspect rather than the lateral aspect of the TMJ, whereas the frequency of osteoarthritic involvement of the dorsal and ventral compartments did not differ significantly. In cats, fractures were the most common TMJ disorder, followed by osteoarthritis. Clinical signs were observed in all dogs and cats with TMJ fractures, dysplasia, ankylosis, luxation, and tumors; however, only 4 of 15 dogs and 2 of 4 cats with osteoarthritis alone had clinical signs. Results indicated that TMJ disorders were frequently present in combination. Osteoarthritis was the most common TMJ disorder in dogs and the second most common TMJ disorder in cats. Computed tomography should be considered as a tool for the diagnosis of TMJ disorders in dogs and cats with suspected orofacial disorders and signs of pain. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2013;242:69-75).

  17. Computed tomographic findings in dogs and cats with temporomandibular joint disorders: 58 cases (2006–2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzi, Boaz; Cissell, Derek D.; Verstraete, Frank J. M.; Kass, Philip H.; DuRaine, Grayson D.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe CT findings in dogs and cats with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders. Design Retrospective case-series. Animals 41 dogs and 17 cats. Procedures Medical records and CT images of the skull were reviewed for dogs and cats that were examined at a dentistry and oral surgery specialty practice between 2006 and 2011. Results Of 142 dogs and 42 cats evaluated, 41 dogs and 17 cats had CT findings consistent with a TMJ disorder. In dogs, the most common TMJ disorder was osteoarthritis; however, in most cases, there were other TMJ disorders present in addition to osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis was more frequently identified at the medial aspect rather than the lateral aspect of the TMJ, whereas the frequency of osteoarthritic involvement of the dorsal and ventral compartments did not differ significantly. In cats, fractures were the most common TMJ disorder, followed by osteoarthritis. Clinical signs were observed in all dogs and cats with TMJ fractures, dysplasia, ankylosis, luxation, and tumors; however, only 4 of 15 dogs and 2 of 4 cats with osteoarthritis alone had clinical signs. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance Results indicated that TMJ disorders are frequently present in combination. Osteoarthritis was the most common TMJ disorder in dogs and the second most common TMJ disorder in cats. Computed tomography should be considered as a tool for the diagnosis of TMJ disorders in dogs and cats with suspected orofacial disorders and pain. PMID:23234284

  18. Treatment of a case of skeletal class II malocclusion with temporomandibular joint disorder using miniscrew anchorage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaku, Masato; Koseki, Hiroyuki; Kawazoe, Aki; Abedini, Sara; Kojima, Shunichi; Motokawa, Masahide; Ohtani, Junji; Fujita, Tadashi; Kawata, Toshitsugu; Tanne, Kazuo

    2011-04-01

    At the present time, there are no reports in the literature on the treatment of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) by intrusion of molars using mini-screws. This case report describes the treatment for a female patient, aged 19 years seven months, with a TMD and an excessive lower anterior facial height. Overjet and overbite were +5.0 mm and +0.5 mm, respectively. The patient had a history of orthodontic treatment in which her first premolars were all extracted. During the first orthodontic treatment, a clockwise mandibular rotation was observed as a result of the increase of posterior dentoalveolar height. She had temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain during mouth opening and complained of difficulty in eating due to masticatory dysfunction. The pretreatment Schuller views of both TMJ showed a posterior condyle position. In order to correct the overjet, molar relationship and the mandibular condyle position, a miniscrew was inserted into the palatal region of the upper first molar to intrude the upper posterior teeth. As the upper molars were intruded, the overjet was decreased, and a class I molar relationship was achieved by a counterclockwise mandibular rotation. After one year of treatment, an acceptable occlusion was achieved, and the condyle moved into centric position in the glenoid fossa. The patient's teeth continued to be stable, and she had no pain in TMJ after a retention period of three years. The result of this treatment showed that molar intrusion using miniscrew anchorage is effective for treatment of a TMD patient with a posterior condyle position.

  19. Value of cone-beam computed tomography in the process of diagnosis and management of disorders of the temporomandibular joint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, E. W. J.; Dijkstra, P. U.; Stegenga, B.; de Bont, L. G. M.; Spijkervet, F. K. L.

    The objective of this study was to assess the value of cone-beam computed tomographic (CT) images in the primary diagnosis and management of 128 outpatients with disorders of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Before a diagnosis was made and treatment planned, the history was taken, physical

  20. Temporomandibular Joint Disorders in Patients With Different Facial Morphology. A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredini, Daniele; Segù, Marzia; Arveda, Niki; Lombardo, Luca; Siciliani, Giuseppe; Alessandro Rossi; Guarda-Nardini, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The present article aimed to review systematically the literature on the relation between facial skeletal structures and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders. A systematic search in the dental and medical literature was performed to identify all studies of humans assessing the relation between TMJ disorders and facial morphology. Articles were included based on study design, irrespective of TMJ disorder (eg, disc displacement, osteoarthrosis, or unspecified), skeletal features, diagnostic strategies (e.g., imaging techniques or clinical assessment), and population (eg, demographic features of participants) under investigation. The selected articles were assessed according to a format based on patients, problem, and population, intervention, comparison, and outcome and quality was evaluated based on the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Thirty-four articles were included in the review, 27 of which concerned adult samples and 7 concerned adolescent samples. Quality was generally moderate. The articles dealt with the relation between facial morphology and the following TMJ disorders, assessed clinically or by magnetic resonance (MR): disc displacement (n = 20), osteoarthritis or osteoarthrosis (n = 8), and temporomandibular disorder signs and symptoms (n = 6). The different approaches featuring the various investigations and the presence of some potential methodologic biases complicated a summary of the findings. Most studies reported that some features related to the vertical dimension of the face might help distinguish patients with potential TMJ disc displacement or MR-detected signs of osteoarthrosis from those without TMJ disorders. The quality of the available literature is not adequate to provide an evidence base on the topic. Despite the heterogeneity of design and findings of the reviewed articles, it seems reasonable to suggest that skeletal Class II profiles and hyperdivergent growth patterns are likely associated with an increased frequency of TMJ disc

  1. Temporomandibular joint examination reviewed

    OpenAIRE

    L. Guarda Nardini

    2011-01-01

    The temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) it’s a joint closely related to the skull base, the spine, and the jaws; all these anatomical structures must be taken in consideration when evaluating pain involving the tmj. In order to detect patients affected by pathology or dysfunctions of the tmj, physical examination is of great value in orienting the diagnosis. Inspection must consider the symmetry of the body, the dental status and the type of occlusion. Palpation is a way to assess contractiont inv...

  2. Temporomandibular disorders: evaluation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rossi, Scott S; Greenberg, Martin S; Liu, Frederick; Steinkeler, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Temporomandibular disorders remain a common cause of visits to primary care physicians, internists, pediatricians, and emergency departments. Advances in the clinical diagnosis, radiographic imaging, and classification of these disorders have improved long-term management. There are several types of disorders of the masticatory muscles and the temporomandibular joint as well as associated structures and each may have a complex cause, clinical course, and response to therapy. Host susceptibility plays a role at several stages of these disorders. Future research offers greater possibility in defining this heterogeneous group of disorders and providing more focused and effective treatment strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Management of temporomandibular joint degenerative disorders with human amniotic membrane: Hypothesis of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarda-Nardini, Luca; Trojan, Diletta; Paolin, Adolfo; Manfredini, Daniele

    2017-07-01

    Approaches providing the positioning of human amniotic membrane (HAM) within the intra-articular space of arthritic TMJs have never been investigated. This contrasts with the increasing amount of evidence suggesting the potential positive effects of HAM on a number of surgical conditions, even included the interpositional arthroplasty for TMJ ankylosis. Thus, the possible usefulness of HAM to restore joint functions in severely damaged TMJs could be hypothesized. Based on these premises, the clinical research question "Is human amniotic membrane positioning effective to reduce symptoms and restore jaw function in patients with severe inflammatory-degenerative disorders of the temporomandibular joint?" has been addressed by performing a systematic review of the literature. Out of potential 11988 and 8883 citations in the PubMed and Scopus databases, respectively, only five were of possible interest for inclusion in the review, but none of them addressed specifically the clinical research question. Thus, the hypothetical background for usefulness was discussed. The benefits of HAM positioning in TMJs with severe inflammatory-degenerative disorders could be related with its anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial and analgesic properties as well as its low immunogenicity. Studies in which HAM is positioned within the joint space of patients with severe TMJ degeneration, either as a disc-replacing film during major surgeries for discectomy and arthroplasty or as an injectable solution that can be needle-inserted after an arthrocentesis procedure, should be designed to test the hypothesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Temporomandibular Joint Disorders: A Review of Etiology, Clinical Management, and Tissue Engineering Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Meghan K.; MacBarb, Regina F.; Wong, Mark E.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiology reports state temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) affect up to 25% of the population, yet their etiology and progression are poorly understood. As a result, treatment options are limited and fail to meet the long-term demands of the relatively young patient population. TMD are a class of degenerative musculoskeletal conditions associated with morphological and functional deformities. In up to 70% of cases, TMD are accompanied by malpositioning of the TMJ disc, termed “internal derangement.” Though onset is not well characterized, correlations between internal derangement and osteoarthritic change have been identified. Due to the complex and unique nature of each TMD case, diagnosis requires patient-specific analysis accompanied by various diagnostic modalities. Likewise, treatment requires customized plans to address the specific characteristics of each patient’s disease. In the mechanically demanding and biochemically active environment of the TMJ, therapeutic approaches capable of restoring joint functionality while responding to changes in the joint have become a necessity. Capable of integration and adaptation in the TMJ, one such approach, tissue engineering, carries significant potential in the development of repair and replacement tissues. The following review presents a synopsis of etiology, current treatment methods, and the future of tissue engineering for repairing and/or replacing diseased joint components, specifically the mandibular condyle and TMJ disc. Preceding the current trends in tissue engineering is an analysis of native tissue characterization, toward identifying tissue engineering objectives and validation metrics for restoring healthy and functional structures of the TMJ. PMID:24278954

  5. Arthrocentesis and Temporomandibular Joint Disorders: Clinical and Radiological Results of a Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo De Riu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We evaluated the efficacy of arthrocentesis in the treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ disorders. Material and Methods. In this prospective clinical case series, 30 consecutive patients with TMJ disorders underwent arthrocentesis using saline and sodium hyaluronate injections. Outcome measures were TMJ pain, maximum mouth opening (MMO, joint noises, and anatomical changes in the TMJ architecture. Patients were evaluated using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI at the beginning of treatment and 60 days after the last arthrocentesis. Pretreatment and posttreatment clinical parameters were compared using paired and unpaired t-tests, and McNemar’s test was used to evaluate CBCT and MRI changes (. Results. At 1-year follow-up examinations, visual analogue scale scores indicated that pain was reduced significantly and mean postoperative MMO was increased significantly. CBCT findings showed no significant change, and MRI showed only slight reductions in inflammatory signs. Conclusions. Within the limitations of this study, we can conclude that arthrocentesis is a simple, minimally invasive procedure with a relatively low risk of complications and significant clinical benefits in patients with TMJ disorders. This trial is registered with NCT01903512.

  6. Temporomandibular Joint Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamimi, Dania; Jalali, Elnaz; Hatcher, David

    2018-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is an anatomically and biomechanically complex structure. Understanding how this structure grows and functions is essential to accurate radiographic evaluation. This article discusses the anatomy, function, and growth and development of the TMJ and how growth changes can affect the morphology of the craniofacial structures. Accordingly, the radiographic appearance of the entities that may alter the TMJ are discussed, including developmental, degenerative, inflammatory, and traumatic changes. Both osseous imaging and soft tissue imaging are shown. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The association between temporomandibular disorders and joint hypermobility syndrome: a nationwide population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ting-Han; Yuh, Da-Yo; Wu, Yung-Tsan; Cheng, Wan-Chien; Lin, Fu-Gong; Shieh, Yi-Shing; Fu, Earl; Huang, Ren-Yeong

    2015-11-01

    This study aims to investigate the risk factors of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs), including disc or non-disc-related disorders, and joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) retrospectively and to analyze the factors by estimating the magnitude of the association between the two conditions using a nationwide population-based dataset. A total of 975,788 eligible patients' de-identified data were obtained from a representative database composed of one million of Taiwan's population since 2004 to 2008. All associated factors, such as gender, age, facial trauma, and psychosis, which correlated with TMDs and JHS were examined. Multiple logistic regression modeling adjusted for confounding variables to determine the odds ratio of variables that made an important contribution to TMDs and JHS. For all TMDs patients, only 1.47% patients had disc-related disorders. For all JHS patients, only 3.85% patients are diagnosed with concomitant TMDs. Statistically significant association was observed between joint hypermobility and TMDs. Furthermore, the prevalence of JHS patients shows significant difference within TMD subgroups, in which 9.52% of JHS patients have disc disorders and 90.48% of JHS patients do not. All associated factors, such as gender, age, JHS, facial trauma, and psychosis, had a significant impact on the TMDs. Interestingly, patients with TMJ articular disc disorders are 6.7 times more likely to be diagnosed with JHS compared to patients without disc-related disorders. Our results confirm that there is a significant positive association between TMDs and JHS, highlighting that patients with disc-related TMDs are more likely to experience JHS than patients with TMDs without disc disorders. Individuals with TMD associated with JHS should be carefully evaluated by inter-disciplinary specialists as these factors may eventually have impact on the prognosis of TMDs and JHS.

  8. Clinical effectiveness of laser acupuncture in the treatment of temporomandibular joint disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Feng; Lin, Jung-Chih; Yang, Hui-Wen; Lee, Yu-Hsien; Yu, Chuan-Hang

    2014-08-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) is a general term for diseases of the temporomandibular joint and orofacial muscles. In this study, we tested whether laser acupuncture was effective for the treatment of TMD. Twenty patients with TMD were treated with diode K-Laser (wavelength 800 nm, energy density 100.5 J/cm(2)) once a week at four acupuncture points including three standard ipsilateral local points (ST6, ST7, Ashi point) and one contralateral distal point (LI4). A 10-cm visual analogue scale (0 no pain and 10 the most severe pain) was used for measuring the pain intensity before and after the treatment. Seventeen out of 20 patients (85%) showed various degrees of pain relief after laser acupuncture treatment. The average pain score was 6.3 ± 1.6 before treatment and 2.5 ± 2.2 after treatment. Significant pain relief after laser acupuncture treatment was achieved (p = 0.0003, Wilcoxon signed rank test). The 17 patients showed an average pain relief of 63 ± 31%. There were six patients who showed no TMD symptoms after an average of four treatments of laser acupuncture. The other 11 patients showed partial relief of TMD symptoms after treatment. Although the pain was still present, it was less and was acceptable. No side effects were reported in any patients during or after laser acupuncture treatments. Laser acupuncture may be an alternative treatment modality for TMD because it is non-invasive, results in partial or total relief of pain, and has no side effects. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Evaluation of the relationship between the occlusion parameters and symptoms of the temporomandibular joint disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzingutė, Agnė; Pileičikienė, Gaivilė; Baltrušaitytė, Aušra; Skirbutis, Gediminas

    2017-01-01

    The aetiology of temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) is multifactorial, whereas occlusal disharmony is one of the predisposing factors. Researchers still discuss the relation between occlusion and TMD. The study aims to investigate the relation between static occlusal parameters and TMD clinical symptoms using T-Scan II analysis system. The sample consisted of 44 persons divided into the treatment group of 20 TMD patients and the control group of 24 subjects without TMD. The main task of T-Scan II computerized occlusal analysis system was to record every patient's occlusion and estimate static occlusal parameters: centre of occlusal force, asymmetry index of maximum occlusal force and occlusion time. These results were compared between groups, data related to patients' complaints and clinical symptoms. The analysis was carried out using Mann-Whitney U, Kruskal-Wallis and Chi-square tests. Averages of the centre of occlusal force in TMD subjects were 6.55 ± 0.99 mm, in the control group - 5.88 ± 0.69 mm; the asymmetry index of maximum occlusal force averages: 15.90 ± 2.71 and 12.93 ± 1.88; occlusion time: 0.281 ± 0.036 s and 0.236 ± 0.022 s, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences between two groups but they were found in the centre of occlusal force and the asymmetry index in the two groups (p occlusion parameters. Values of the centre of the occlusal force distance and the asymmetry index of occlusal force in TMD patients with pain in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) were significantly higher than in the control group.

  10. Diagnostic MR imagings of temporomandibular joint disorders by 1. 5 tesla superconducting magnet

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    Murakami, Ken-ichiro; Tsuda, Yoshitugu; Moriya, Hiroyuki; Segami, Natsuki; Konishi, Junji; Iizuka, Tadahiko (Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1991-01-01

    For diagnostic imaging of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders, 1.5 tesla superconducting magnet system was applied in 65 patients with 75 joints. MR imaging was performed with GE-Signa 1.5 tesla MR imaging system with the body coil used as the transmitter and 3 inch surface coil as the receiver. For detecting T{sub 1} weighted images, the following parameters were used; TR: 1000, TE: 25, Excitation: 1. Data matrix: 256 x 128, FOV: 8 cm, Slice thickness: 3 mm. For taking T{sub 2} weighted images, TR: 2200, TE:80 was used. For anatomical interpretation of TMJ, 3-mm thick images with a 1-mm interspace sagittal multiplane with TR: 1000/TE: 25 sequence was useful, and additional coronal images were beneficial for examining condylar morphology as well as mediolateral disk position. T{sub 2} weighted imaging obtained the joint effusion suspected of intra-articular inflammation. These findings suggest that MR imaging is useful in the detection and evaluation of TMJ patho-morphology. (author).

  11. The Role of Botulinum Toxin A in Treatment of Temporomandibular Joint Disorders: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataran, Rana; Bahramian, Ayla; Jamali, Zahra; Pishahang, Vahid; Sadeghi Barzegani, Homayoon; Sarbakhsh, Parvin; Yazdani, Javad

    2017-09-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs) usually present with symptoms and signs such as pain, mandibular movement, dysfunction, or joint sounds. Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) is a biologic toxin which inhibits skeletal muscle through hindering the production of acetylcholine in the nerve endings. This toxin is used for the treatment of hyperactivity of lateral pterygoid muscle and TMD symptoms. This comprehensive review aimed to evaluate the effect of BTX-A injections in the lateral pterygoid muscle on treatment of TMDs symptoms. In this study, online databases including Scopus, Medline, Ebsco, Cochrane, EMBASE, and Google scholar were searched for the keywords "pterygoid muscle" and "Onabotulinumtoxin A". Twenty-four articles were eligible to be enrolled in the study. In 4 interventional studies and 20 descriptive studies, BTX-A was used for the treatment of TMDs. The dosage and number of injections were different in each study; however, the injection methods were relatively similar. Regardless of the type, number of injections, and dosage, injection of BTX-A in lateral pterygoid seems effective in reducing the click sound and other TMJ-related muscle disorders such as pain, hyperactivity, and dysfunction.

  12. Dentists' knowledge of occlusal splint therapy for bruxism and temporomandibular joint disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candirli, C; Korkmaz, Y T; Celikoglu, M; Altintas, S H; Coskun, U; Memis, S

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate dentist's approaches to the use of splint therapy for myofascial pain, bruxism, and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders and to assessment of treatment modalities. A 12-item questionnaire was developed to determine dentists' knowledge of TMJ disorders and approaches for occlusal splint treatments. The researchers spoke with each dentist included in the study at his/her clinic or by telephone to assess their immediate knowledge and approach to the TMJ disorders. Chi-squared test was performed to analyze the values. The confidence interval was set as 95%. A total of 370 dentists working in Turkey were participated in this study. The most common splint application reason for occlusal splint treatment was bruxism (77.8%) while TMJ pain was very rare (%1.4). The use of hard splint ratios for 0-5 years of professional experience was 57.0%, 42.4.0%, and 26.8% for the experience of 5-15 years and over 15 years groups, respectively (P < 0.001). While the dentists' with sufficient knowledge soft splint application rates were 11.6%, hard splint application rates were 43.4% for the dentists with sufficient knowledge. Occlusion adjustment rate of dentists who practice in all three groups was under 16.0%. The knowledge of the dentists about TMJ disorders and occlusal splint therapy were found to be insufficient. Their knowledge decreased with increasing experience.

  13. Nonsurgical Management of Pediatric Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrivani, Steven John; Khawaja, Shehryar Nasir; Bavia, Paula Furlan

    2018-02-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are a subgroup of craniofacial pain problems involving the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), masticatory muscles, and associated head and neck musculoskeletal structures. These disorders are subclassified into TMJ articular disorders and masticatory muscle disorders. Patients with TMD most commonly present with pain, restricted or asymmetric mandibular motion, and TMJ sounds during mandibular movements. The prevalence tends to increase with age. Management of TMJ articular disorders consists of a combination of patient education, home-care plan, biobehavioral therapy, physical therapy, orthotic jaw appliance therapy, pharmacotherapy, and/or surgery. The goal is to increase function, reduce pain, and improve quality of life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Rheumatoid arthritis affecting temporomandibular joint

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    Amandeep Sodhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic, systemic, autoimmune inflammatory disorder that is characterized by joint inflammation, erosive properties and symmetric multiple joint involvement. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ is very rare to be affected in the early phase of the disease, thus posing diagnostic challenges for the dentist. Conventional radiographs fail to show the early lesions due to its limitations. More recently cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT has been found to diagnose the early degenerative changes of TMJ and hence aid in the diagnosis of the lesions more accurately. Our case highlights the involvement of TMJ in RA and the role of advanced imaging (CBCT in diagnosing the bony changes in the early phase of the disease.

  15. [Tinnitus and temporomandibular joint: State of the art].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lina-Granade, G; Truy, E; Ionescu, E; Garnier, P; Thai Van, H

    2016-12-01

    Tinnitus has been described in temporomandibular joint dysfunction for a long time. Yet, other disorders, such as hearing loss, stress, anxiety and depression, play a major role in the pathophysiology of tinnitus. Temporomandibular joint dysfunctions seem to increase the risk of tinnitus in patients with other predisposing factors. Especially somatosensory tinnitus, which is characterized by sound modulations with neck or mandible movements, is frequently associated with temporomandibular joint dysfunction, but it is not pathognomonic of such a disorder. In such cases, functional therapy of the temporomandibular joint should be part of the multidisciplinary rehabilitation of patients with tinnitus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Stakeholder engagement analysis - a bioethics dilemma in patient-targeted intervention: patients with temporomandibular joint disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkhordarian, Andre; Demerjian, Gary; Jan, Allison; Sama, Nateli; Nguyen, Mia; Du, Angela; Chiappelli, Francesco

    2015-01-20

    Modern health care in the field of Medicine, Dentistry and Nursing is grounded in fundamental philosophy and epistemology of translational science. Recently in the U.S major national initiatives have been implemented in the hope of closing the gaps that sometimes exist between the two fundamental components of translational science, the translational research and translational effectiveness. Subsequent to these initiatives, many improvements have been made; however, important bioethical issues and limitations do still exist that need to be addressed. One such issue is the stakeholder engagement and its assessment and validation. Federal, state and local organizations such as PCORI and AHRQ concur that the key to a better understanding of the relationship between translational research and translational effectiveness is the assessment of the extent to which stakeholders are actively engaged in the translational process of healthcare. The stakeholder engagement analysis identifies who the stakeholders are, maps their contribution and involvement, evaluates their priorities and opinions, and accesses their current knowledge base. This analysis however requires conceptualization and validation from the bioethics standpoint. Here, we examine the bioethical dilemma of stakeholder engagement analysis in the context of the person-environment fit (PE-fit) theoretical model. This model is an approach to quantifying stakeholder engagement analysis for the design of patient-targeted interventions. In our previous studies of Alzheimer patients, we have developed, validated and used a simple instrument based on the PE-fit model that can be adapted and utilized in a much less studied pathology as a clinical model that has a wide range of symptoms and manifestations, the temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD). The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is the jaw joint endowed with sensory and motor innervations that project from within the central nervous system and its dysfunction can

  17. Temporomandibular joint examination reviewed

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    L. Guarda Nardini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ it’s a joint closely related to the skull base, the spine, and the jaws; all these anatomical structures must be taken in consideration when evaluating pain involving the tmj. In order to detect patients affected by pathology or dysfunctions of the tmj, physical examination is of great value in orienting the diagnosis. Inspection must consider the symmetry of the body, the dental status and the type of occlusion. Palpation is a way to assess contractiont involving the muscles of the masticatory system and of the neck. Auscultation, based on articular noise provides means to determine whether we are dealing with degeneration of the joint or a dislocation of the intrarticular disc. In order to confirm the diagnosis obtained with the clinical evaluation, it’s useful to perform imaging techniques as opt, tomography and TC of the tmj and electromyokineosiography – index of the mandibular functionality and of the muscles status. MRI and dynamic MRI are among the non invasive exams which give the greatest amount of information, regarding the disc position and the joint degeneration. Arthroscopy is an invasive technique that allows early diagnosis of degeneration and is helpful to reveal early inflammatory processes of the joint.

  18. TEMPOROMANDIBULAR-JOINT OSTEOARTHROSIS AND TEMPOROMANDIBULAR-JOINT HYPERMOBILITY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DIJKSTRA, PU; DEBONT, LGM; DELEEUW, R; STEGENGA, B; BOERING, G

    1993-01-01

    For studying the relationship between condylar hypermobility of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and osteoarthrosis (OA), 13 patients with bilateral condylar hypermobility were evaluated clinically and radiographically, 30 years after non-surgical treatment. The evaluation included range of motion,

  19. Temporomandibular joint osteochondromatosis: an unusual cause of preauricular swelling.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Phelan, Eimear

    2012-02-01

    We report an unusual and rare cause of preauricular swelling and review the most recent literature concerning synovial osteochondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint. We report the clinical and radiologic findings of a case of synovial osteochondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint that presented as preauricular swelling in a female patient. This disease typically affects large joints; fewer than 100 cases reported in the literature affect the temporomandibular joint. This case illustrates that disorders of the temporomandibular joint should also be included in the differential diagnosis of patients who present with a preauricular mass.

  20. Voz e disfunção temporomandibular em professores Voice and temporomandibular joint disorders in teachers

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    Ilza Maria Machado

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: verificar a presença e possível correlação entre alteração vocal e DTM, em professores, a partir de dados de avaliação autorreferida, fonoaudiológica, otorrinolaringológica e odontológica. MÉTODOS: participaram deste estudo, 29 professores de uma escola de rede pública do ensino fundamental e médio do município de Sorocaba - SP. Os professores responderam questionário para levantamento de alteração vocal, e de disfunção temporomandibular (DTM. Foram realizadas quatro avaliações: perceptivo-auditiva; otorrinolaringológica; motricidade orofacial e odontológica. A menção a três ou mais sintomas no questionário determinou "presença" de queixa de voz e de DTM. As avaliações: perceptivo-auditiva e otorrinolaringológica concluíram a "ausência" e "presença" de alteração de voz e de laringe. Nas avaliações da motricidade orofacial e odontológica foi considerada DTM quando registrados três ou mais sinais e/ou sintomas, sendo indispensável à presença de dor. Na análise estatística dos dados, foram empregados: teste de Igualdade de Duas Proporções, teste exato de Fisher e de concordância Kappa. RESULTADOS: dentre os participantes, 82,8% fizeram autorreferência à alteração vocal e 62,1% de sintomas de DTM; 51,7% apresentaram alteração de voz na avaliação otorrinolaringológica e 65,5%, alteração de DTM na avaliação odontológica. Na comparação da avaliação de alteração de voz e DTM foi registrada correlação significante presente na avaliação perceptivo-auditiva da voz e de motricidade orofacial para DTM, e com tendência a significância na aplicação do questionário. CONCLUSÃO: os resultados apontam na direção de confirmar a presença de alteração de voz e DTM no grupo de professores pesquisado e correlação entre os mesmos.PURPOSE: to check the presence and possible correlation between vocal disorders and temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJD in teachers, from self

  1. Current status of temporomandibular joint disorders and the therapeutic system derived from a series of biomechanical, histological, and biochemical studies

    OpenAIRE

    Kazuo Tanne; Yuki Okamoto; Shao-Ching Su; Tomomi Mitsuyoshi; Yuki Asakawa-Tanne; Kotaro Tanimoto

    2015-01-01

    This article was designed to report the current status of temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs) and the therapeutic system on the basis of a series of clinical, biomechanical, histological and biochemical studies in our research groups. In particular, we have focused on the association of degenerative changes of articular cartilage in the mandibular condyle and the resultant progressive condylar resorption with mechanical stimuli acting on the condyle during the stomatognathic function. In...

  2. Temporomandibular joint health status in war veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottaghi, Ahmad; Zamani, Elham

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJD) in the Iran/Iraq war veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. A total of 120 subjects in the age range of 27 to 55 years were included; it included case group (30 war veterans with PTSD) and three control groups (30 patients with PTSD who had not participated in the War, 30 healthy war veterans, and 30 healthy subjects who had not participated in the War). All subjects underwent a clinical TMJ examination that involved the clinical assessment of the TMJ signs and symptoms. The groups of veterans had high prevalence of TMJD signs and symptoms vs. other groups; history of Trauma to joint was significantly higher in subjects who had participated in the war compare with subjects who had not participated in the war (P = 0.0006). Furthermore, pain in palpation of masseter, temporal, pterygoideus, digastric, and sternocleidomastoid muscles in the groups of veterans was significantly greater than other groups (P TMJ functional status than the control subjects.

  3. Masticatory muscle and temporomandibular joint pain in Croatian war veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhac, Ivone; Tariba, Petra; Kovac, Zoran; Simonić-Kocijan, Suncana; Lajnert, Vlatka; Mesić, Vesna Fugosić; Kuis, Davor; Braut, Vedrana

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and intensity of masticatory muscle and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain in Croatian war veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The examined group consisted of 100 Croatian war veterans, in whom PTSD had previously been diagnosed. Patients were compared with 92 subjects who had not taken part in the war and in whom PTSD was excluded by psychiatric examination. The clinical examination consisted of palpation of the masticatory muscles, the prominent neck musculature, and TMJ. The examination technique used and the definition of items were previously tested for reliability and validity. 93% of the subjects with PTSD had masticatory muscle tenderness compared to 45.65% of the subjects in the control group (chi2 = 51.46, p TMJ tenderness compared to 3.26% of subjects in the control group (chi2 = 66.23, p TMJ in both groups was the left posterior capsule; in the PTSD group 38% and in subjects in the control group 2.17% of cases. The most painful location was the left posterior capsule in 28% of subjects with PTSD, while not one subject in the control group reported severe painful sensitivity. The very high frequency and intensity of pain in subjects with PTSD confirms the effect of stress on muscle and joint sensitivity, i.e. perception of pain.

  4. Temporomandibular Joint Septic Arthritis

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    Gianfranco Frojo, MD

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary:. Infection of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ is a rare pediatric condition resulting from the introduction of pathogens into the joint by hematogenous seeding, local extension, or trauma. Early recognition of the typical signs and symptoms including fever, trismus, preauricular swelling, and TMJ region tenderness are critical in order to initiate further evaluation and prevent feared complications of fibrosis, ankylosis, abnormal facial structure, or persistence of symptoms. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography with ancillary laboratory analysis including erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, and white blood cell count are beneficial in confirming the suspected diagnosis and monitoring response to therapy. Initial intervention should include empiric parenteral antibiotics, early mandibular mobilization, and joint decompression to provide synovial fluid for analysis including cultures. This report describes a case of TMJ bacterial arthritis in a healthy 6-year-old male who was promptly treated nonsurgically with intravenous antibiotics and localized needle joint decompression with return to normal function after completion of oral antibiotics and physical therapy.

  5. Comparison of static MRI and pseudo-dynamic MRI in temporomandibular joint disorder patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin Ho; Yun, Kyoung In [Eulji Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, In Woo; Choi, Hang Moon; Park, Moon Soo [Kangnung National Univ. College of Dentistry, Kangnung (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to elevate comparison of static MRI and pseudo-dynamic (cine) MRI in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder patients. In this investigation, 33 patients with TMJ disorders were examined using both conventional static MRI and pseudo-dynamic MRI. Multiple spoiled gradient recalled acquisition in the steady state (SPGR) images were obtained when mouth opened and closed. Proton density weighted images were obtained at the closed and open mouth position in static MRI. Two oral and maxillofacial radiologists evaluated location of the articular disk, movement of condyle and bony change respectively and the posterior boundary of articular disk was obtained. No statistically significant difference was found in the observation of articular disk position, mandibular condylar movement and posterior boundary of articular disk using static MRI and pseudo-dynamic MRI (P>0.05). Statistically significant difference was noted in bony changes of condyle using static MRI and pseudo-dynamic MRI (P<0.05). This study showed that pseudo-dynamic MRI didn't make a difference in diagnosing internal derangement of TMJ in comparison with static MRI. But it was considered as an additional method to be supplemented in observing bony change.

  6. The methodological quality of systematic reviews comparing temporomandibular joint disorder surgical and non-surgical treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasconcelos Belmiro CE

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJD are multifactor, complex clinical problems affecting approximately 60–70% of the general population, with considerable controversy about the most effective treatment. For example, reports claim success rates of 70% and 83% for non-surgical and surgical treatment, whereas other reports claim success rates of 40% to 70% for self-improvement without treatment. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to (1 identify systematic reviews comparing temporomandibular joint disorder surgical and non-surgical treatment, (2 evaluate their methodological quality, and (3 evaluate the evidence grade within the systematic reviews. Methods A search strategy was developed and implemented for MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, LILACS, and Brazilian Dentistry Bibliography databases. Inclusion criteria were: systematic reviews (± meta-analysis comparing surgical and non-surgical TMJD treatment, published in English, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, or German between the years 1966 and 2007(up to July. Exclusion criteria were: in vitro or animal studies; narrative reviews or editorials or editorial letters; and articles published in other languages. Two investigators independently selected and evaluated systematic reviews. Three different instruments (AMSTAR, OQAQ and CASP were used to evaluate methodological quality, and the results averaged. The GRADE instrument was used to evaluate the evidence grade within the reviews. Results The search strategy identified 211 reports; of which 2 were systematic reviews meeting inclusion criteria. The first review met 23.5 ± 6.0% and the second met 77.5 ± 12.8% of the methodological quality criteria (mean ± sd. In these systematic reviews between 9 and 15% of the trials were graded as high quality, and 2 and 8% of the total number of patients were involved in these studies. Conclusion The results indicate that in spite of the widespread impact of TMJD, and the multitude of

  7. Temporomandibular joint arthrography

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    Choi, Hyung Sik; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Myoung Joon; Jun, Young Hwan; Chang, Duk Soo; Jung, Don Young; Jung, In Won [Capital Armed Forces General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-04-15

    The stress and occlusion disturbance are very important etiologic factors in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain dysfunction syndromes. Authors performed TMJ arthrograms in the patients with TMJ problem such as pain, click sound, limited motion and locking, etc. The following results noted: 1. The arthrographic findings of 22 TMJ were analyzed. a) Normal: 6 cases b) Anterior disc displacement with rediction: 6 cases {center_dot} Early reduction: 2 cases {center_dot} Intermediate reduction: 3 cases {center_dot} Late reduction: 1 case c) Anterior disc displacement without reduction: 6 cases {center_dot} Two cases had adhesion between the posterior portion of disc and the posterior surfaces of the articular eminence. 2. Among 22 cases, the clinical findings of 16 cases (73%) were compatible with arthrographic findings. 6 cases showed disparity between them.

  8. Usefulness of quantitative SPECT in unilateral temporomandibular joint disorder: correlation with signs and symptoms

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    Kim, Ho Sung; Jeong, Jong Cheol; Kim, Keon Jung; Choi, Jae Sun; Sung, Dae Kyung; Lee, Gye Huyk; Kim, Jong Ho [Gachon Medical College, Gil Medical Center, Inchon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-07-01

    The aims of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of Conventional Radiography (CR). Radionuclide Angiography (RNA). Planar Scintigraphy (PS) and Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) for the evaluation of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder; and to show whether technetium-99m-MDP uptake on quantitative SPECT correlated with the symptom and/or signs. Three Phase Bone Scintigraphy (TPBS) and SPECT of both TMJ were performed in 51 patients (M : F = 10 : 41 mean age= 30.4 :28.6, respectively) with unilateral TMJ disorder after an intravenous injection of 25 mCi (925 MBq) of 99mTc-MDP. Data were analyzed by creating three regions of interest (ROIs) over designated areas both on the PS and SPECT: Lesion (L). Non-lesion(NL) which is contralateral to L and Background (BG). L/ NL and L/BG (=[(L-BG)/500,000] x 100 (%)] ratios were calculated for each patients. L/NL ratios on SPECT were compared according to the symptom/signs or not. There was a fair correlation of L/N values between three slice-and seven slice-added SPECT images (r=0.5124, p=0.006, y=0.5588 + 0.5414X). The percentages of symptoms or signs were: pain (76.5%), mouth opening limitation (49.0%), joint sound (39.2%), discomfort (43.1%), headache(27.5%), neck stiffness (21.6%), closed lock (5.9%) / tenderness (47.1%), joint click (54.9%) and limitation of maximum mouth opening (45.1%). The Sensitive of SPECT(86.3%) was better than PS(66.7%), RNA(27.5%), and CR(26.3%). According to the presence of symptom/sign or not, comparative analysis of L/NL ratios on SPECT showed a fair correlation in pain (1.16 : 1.11) mouth opening limitation (1.21 : 1.09), joint sound (1.19 : 1.08), discomfort (1.22 : 1.09), headache (1.19: 1.13), tenderness (1.16 : 1.14) and limitation of maximum mouth opening (1.16 : 1.13), but little correlation in neck stiffness (1.12 : 1.15), closed lock (1.06 : 1.15), dislocation (1.08 : 1.15) joint click (1.12 : 1.18). In conclusion, quantitative SPECT is the noninvasive

  9. Efficacy of musculoskeletal manual approach in the treatment of temporomandibular joint disorder: A systematic review with meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Wagner Rodrigues; Blasczyk, Juscelino Castro; Aparecida Furlan de Oliveira, Micaele; Lagôa Gonçalves, Karina Ferreira; Bonini-Rocha, Ana Clara; Dugailly, Pierre-Michel; de Oliveira, Ricardo Jacó

    2016-02-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) requires a complex diagnostic and therapeutic approach, which usually involves a multidisciplinary management. Among these treatments, musculoskeletal manual techniques are used to improve health and healing. To assess the effectiveness of musculoskeletal manual approach in temporomandibular joint disorder patients. A systematic review with meta-analysis. During August 2014 a systematic review of relevant databases (PubMed, The Cochrane Library, PEDro and ISI web of knowledge) was performed to identify controlled clinical trials without date restriction and restricted to the English language. Clinical outcomes were pain and range of motion focalized in temporomandibular joint. The mean difference (MD) or standard mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and overall effect size were calculated at every post treatment. The PEDro scale was used to demonstrate the quality of the included studies. From the 308 articles identified by the search strategy, 8 articles met the inclusion criteria. The meta-analysis showed a significant difference (p manual techniques when compared to other conservative treatments for TMD. Musculoskeletal manual approaches are effective for treating TMD. In the short term, there is a larger effect regarding the latter when compared to other conservative treatments for TMD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Botulinum toxin therapy for temporomandibular joint disorders: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y-W; Chiu, Y-W; Chen, C-Y; Chuang, S-K

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to undertake a systematic review to assess the efficacy of botulinum toxin therapy (BTX) for temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs). A comprehensive search of major databases through PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane CENTRAL was conducted to locate all relevant articles published from inception to October 2014. Eligible studies were selected based on inclusion criteria and included English language, peer-reviewed publications of randomized controlled trials comparing BTX versus any alternative intervention or placebo. Quality assessment and data extraction were done according to the Cochrane risk of bias tool and recommendations. The entire systematic search and selection process was done independently by two reviewers. Five relevant study trials were identified, involving 117 participants. Two trials revealed a significant between-group difference in myofascial pain reduction, another trial that compared BTX with fascial manipulation showed equal efficacy of pain relief on TMDs, while the remaining two trials showed no significant difference between the BTX and placebo groups. Because of considerable variations in study methods and evaluation of results, a meta-analysis could not be performed. Based on this review, no consensus could be reached on the therapeutic benefits of BTX on TMDs. A more rigorous design of trials should be carried out in future studies. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Detection of Mycoplasma salivarium and Mycoplasma fermentans in synovial fluids of temporomandibular joints of patients with disorders in the joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, T; Shibata, K; Yoshikawa, T; Dong, L; Hasebe, A; Domon, H; Kobayashi, T; Totsuka, Y

    1998-11-01

    Thirty-six synovial fluid samples of temporomandibular joints were obtained from 33 patients with pain and anterior disk displacement (closed lock) in the joints. DNAs were prepared from the samples and amplified by a PCR-based assay specific for Mycoplasma salivarium or Mycoplasma fermentans. Of the 36 samples, five (14%), three (8%), and 19 (53%) were positive for M. salivarium, M. fermentans and both, respectively.

  12. Engineering Alloplastic Temporomandibular Joint Replacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinno, Hani; Tahiri, Youssef; Gilardino, Mirko; Bobyn, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are part of a heterogeneous group of pathologies that manifest with a constellation of signs and symptoms. They are the most frequent cause of chronic orofacial pain and are prevalent in 12% of the general population. Despite the debilitating nature of these disorders, there is no standardization for treatment of the diseased temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In this review, we present an overview of the functional anatomy of the TMJ and the engineering concepts that must be understood to better understand the indications for surgical management, the types of available treatments and the requirements for reconstruction. A comparison is made of the clinical outcomes with autogenous versus alloplastic reconstruction, including a history of alloplastic materials and the design features of currently available implants. Emphasis is made on material selection, modulus, stiffness, notch sensitivity and modularity. For the treatment of TMD, engineered TMJ alloplastic replacements have had considerable promise with additional room for improvement using new materials and recent design concepts. PMID:22363183

  13. Evaluation of meniscus displacement of the temporomandibular joint by MR imaging. Correlation with clinical symptoms of TMJ disorders

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    Toyoda, Nagataka; Asada, Koichi; Naohara, Hiroaki; Jibiki, Masato; Ishibashi, Katsunori; Kobayashi, Kaoru [Tsurumi Univ., Yokohama (Japan). School of Dental Medicine

    1996-04-01

    MR imaging is useful in the diagnosis of bilateral internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint. This study was performed to investigate the correlation between clinical symptoms and displacement of the bilateral articular disk in patients with temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJD). A series of 170 patients who had signs and symptoms of TMJDs (TMJ pain, TMJ sound, trismus) were examined bilaterally by MR imaging. One hundred twenty-six patients had only unilateral symptoms, but 55 (44%) of them showed bilateral disk displacement. Among 93 patients with unilateral TMJ pain, 89% showed disk displacement (22 TMJs with reduction, 61 TMJs without reduction) on the symptomatic side, and 44% showed disk displacement on the asymptomatic side. Among 53 patients with unilateral TMJ sound, 96% showed disk displacement (28 TMJs with reduction, 23 TMJs without reduction) on the symptomatic side, and 53% showed disk displacement on the asymptomatic side. In patients with severe trismus (interincisal opening distance <39 mm), unilateral or bilateral disk displacement without reduction was frequently found. The results indicate that examinations by MR imaging are important for the diagnosis of internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint. (author).

  14. Non-surgical treatment of sports-related temporomandibular joint disorders in basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhtaroğullari, Mehmet; Demiralp, Burak; Ertan, Atila

    2004-12-01

    In this study, 18 basketball players (11 female, seven male; age range 14-32 years) with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) problems who had a history of sport injuries related to head or jaw region were evaluated and the results of the treatment were presented. A standardized functional examination of the masticatory system was performed including measurement of maximal jaw movements, recording of joint sounds, pain on movement of the jaw as well as tenderness to palpation of the both TMJ or masticatory muscles. Patients were also evaluated periodontally. Diagnosis was made according the criteria, described by Okeson, and appropriate treatment was applied using different kind of splints. At the end of treatment only one patient continued with right TMJ reduction with slight pain. Except for that patient, none of the patients had pain after treatment. The maximum opening of the jaws and the maximal jaw movements were statistically increased after treatment. Patients with TMJ problems also showed periodontal problems, most likely due to inadequate oral hygiene because of the limited jaw movements and pain. Periodontal parameters including probing depth (PD), Plaque index (PI), and Sulcus Bleeding Index (SBI) improved after treatment. Sports-related TMJ injuries may result in complex problems such as pain, TMJ sounds, limitation in maximal jaw movements and maximum opening of the mouth, difficulty in chewing. With the appropriate diagnosis this could be treated non-surgically in 6-8 months. This study also showed that the TMJ disorders may cause periodontal problems, which may affect all teeth and also the general health of the athlete.

  15. Signs and Symptoms of Temporomandibular Joint Disorders Related to the Degree of Mouth Opening and Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanavaros Panagiotis

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The temporomandibular joint is a unique bi-condylar joint involved in mastication and speech. Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD have a range of symptoms, including aural symptoms, and are present in approximately 75% of normal populations. The present study examined the relationship between signs and symptoms of TMD and mouth opening, gender, joint and aural symptoms, and hearing loss. Methods The study involved 464 healthy Greek university students (156 men and 308 women with a mean age of 19.6 years. Age, gender and maximum mouth opening was recorded. Mouth opening was measured using Vernier calipers. An anamnestic questionnaire was used to stratify the subjects into four groups based on TMD severity. Aural symptoms and an audiogram were recorded for each subject too. Data were analyzed using multifactor ANOVA, chi-square, t-test, Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results The overall incidence of TMD signs and symptoms was 73.3%. The incidence and severity was greater in females than males (p-value 0.0001 Conclusions TMD signs and symptoms were more common and severe in females than males. TMD severity is correlated with the degree of mouth opening and the number of aural symptoms. The absence or presence of mild TMD are associated with normal audiograms while moderate and severe TMD are related to hearing loss in median and low tones respectively. Bruxism, joint ankylosis, joint pain and ear itching were more common in TMD than non-TMD patients.

  16. [Temporomandibular joint, occlusion and bruxism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orthlieb, J D; Ré, J P; Jeany, M; Giraudeau, A

    2016-09-01

    Temporomandibular joint and dental occlusion are joined for better and worse. TMJ has its own weaknesses, sometimes indicated by bad functional habits and occlusal disorders. Occlusal analysis needs to be addressed simply and clearly. The term "malocclusion" is not reliable to build epidemiological studies, etiologic mechanisms or therapeutic advice on this "diagnosis". Understanding the impact of pathogenic malocclusion is not just about occlusal relationships that are more or less defective, it requires to locate them within the skeletal framework, the articular and behavioural context of the patient, and above all to assess their impact on the functions of the masticatory system. The TMJ-occlusion couple is often symbiotic, developing together in relation to its environment, compensating for its own shortcomings. However, a third partner may alter this relationship, such as bruxism, or more generally oral parafunctions, trauma or an interventionist practitioner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Temporomandibular Disorders and Physical Therapy Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ilke Coskun Benlidayi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular disorders are comprised of clinical problems associated with masticatory muscles, temporomandibular joint and neighboring tissues. The frequency of temporomandibular disorders is high among premenopausal women. Patient education and behavioral therapy, occlusal splints, pharmacological agents, intra-articular and surgical approaches and physical therapy methods are used in the treatment of temporomandibular disorders. Physical therapy approaches include exercise (passive stretching, resistive and posture exercises, superficial heat and cold applications, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, therapeutic ultrasound, trigger point injections, acupuncture and laser. In this article, temporomandibular disorders were reviewed and physical therapy methods used for treatment were discussed in detail. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2015; 24(4.000: 542-554

  18. Temporomandibular joint disorder complaints in tinnitus: further hints for a putative tinnitus subtype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Vielsmeier

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Tinnitus is considered to be highly heterogeneous with respect to its etiology, its comorbidities and the response to specific interventions. Subtyping is recommended, but it remains to be determined which criteria are useful, since it has not yet been clearly demonstrated whether and to which extent etiologic factors, comorbid states and interventional response are related to each other and are thus applicable for subtyping tinnitus. Analyzing the Tinnitus Research Initiative Database we differentiated patients according to presence or absence of comorbid temporomandibular joint (TMJ disorder complaints and compared the two groups with respect to etiologic factors. METHODS: 1204 Tinnitus patients from the Tinnitus Research Initiative (TRI Database with and without subjective TMJ complaints were compared with respect to demographic, tinnitus and audiological characteristics, questionnaires, and numeric ratings. Data were analysed according to a predefined statistical analysis plan. RESULTS: Tinnitus patients with TMJ complaints (22% of the whole group were significantly younger, had a lower age at tinnitus onset, and were more frequently female. They could modulate or mask their tinnitus more frequently by somatic maneuvers and by music or sound stimulation. Groups did not significantly differ for tinnitus duration, type of onset (gradual/abrupt, onset related events (whiplash etc., character (pulsatile or not, hyperacusis, hearing impairment, tinnitus distress, depression, quality of life and subjective ratings (loudness etc.. CONCLUSION: Replicating previous work in tinnitus patients with TMJ complaints, classical risk factors for tinnitus like older age and male gender are less relevant in tinnitus patients with TMJ complaints. By demonstrating group differences for modulation of tinnitus by movements and sounds our data further support the notion that tinnitus with TMJ complaints represents a subgroup of tinnitus with clinical

  19. Comparison between occlusal findings in the intercuspal position and temporomandibular joint magnetic resonance imaging findings in temporomandibular disorders patients

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    Sakurai, Naoki; Kohno, Shoji; Kobayashi, Fukiko [Niigata Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences

    2001-08-01

    This study investigated the relation between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and occlusal condition of the intercuspal position in temporomandibular disorders (TMD) patients. Thirty TMD patients, and 29 control subjects, were selected for this study. Occlusal contracts and occlusal bite force in the intercuspal position were determined with occlusal registration strips, black silicon (bite checker), and Dental Prescale 50 H type R (pressure sensitive sheet), respectively. The subjects were divided into three groups based on MRI assessments: disk displacement with reduction (DDWR), disk displacement without reduction (DDWOR), and normal subjects. The number of teeth with occlusal contract in the intercuspal position of the DDWOR TMD patients group was lower than in the normal control group. The number of teeth with occlusal contact on the anterior teeth showed a similar tendency. The total occlusal bite force in the intercuspal position in the DDWOR TMD patients group was lower than in the DDWR control group and the normal control group. The occlusal bite force on anterior teeth in the intercuspal position showed a similar tendency. The ratio between anterior teeth and molars occlusal bite force in the intercuspal position in the DDWOR TMD patients group was lower than in the normal control group. There is some relation between MRI findings and occlusal condition of the intercuspal position in TMD patients. (author)

  20. Evaluation of occlusal splint therapy in temporomandibular joint disorder patients using real-time ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telkar, Swaroop; Khan, Mubeen K; Shukla, Anil Kumar; Dodamani, Arun; Yalsangi, Shilpa; Telkar, Deepti

    2010-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of occlusal splint therapy by determining the cross-sectional dimension of masseter muscle using ultrasound in patients with temporomandibular joint disc displacement with reduction. Twenty-seven patients aged between 20 and 40 years were included in the study. A detailed history was obtained, and a comprehensive clinical examination was carried out. Subjective assessment with structured pro forma was performed pre-occlusal and post-occlusal splint therapy. The objective measurement of the bilateral masseter muscle thickness was recorded using real-time ultrasonography before and after splint therapy. The mean ultrasound thickness of the masseter muscle in the pre-clenching state before splint therapy was 9.45 mm (SD 1.39), and the post-clenching state was 13.15 mm (SD 2.23). After splint therapy, the mean thickness in the pre-clenching state was 9.14 mm (SD 1.31), and the post-clenching state was 12.78 mm (SD 2.23; P<0.001). Ultrasonographic measurements of the masseter muscle in patients with temporomandibular joint disc displacement with reduction can be a useful tool to assess the effectiveness of occlusal splint therapy. Such conservative measures can significantly reduce masticatory muscle tenderness, especially of the temporalis and masseter. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. The intravoxel incoherent motion MRI of lateral pterygoid muscle: a quantitative analysis in patients with temporomandibular joint disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngamsom, Supak; Nakamura, Shin; Sakamoto, Junichiro; Kotaki, Shinya; Tetsumura, Akemi; Kurabayashi, Tohru

    2017-07-01

    To quantitatively evaluate diffusion and perfusion status of lateral pterygoid muscle (LPM) in patients with temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) by intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) imaging and to correlate with findings on temporomandibular joints (TMJs) by conventional MRI. 42 patients with TMD underwent MRI. To assess IVIM parameters, diffusion-weighted imaging was obtained by spin-echo-based single-shot echoplanar imaging. Regions of interest were created on all diffusion-weighted images of the superior belly of the lateral pterygoid (SLP) and inferior belly of the lateral pterygoid (ILP) at b-values 0-500 s mm-2. Then, IVIM parameters, diffusion (D) and perfusion (f) were calculated using biexponential fittings. The correlation of these values with conventional MRI findings on TMJs was investigated. For SLP, the f parameter in TMJs with anterior disc displacement without reduction was significantly higher than that in normal ones (p = 0.015). It was also significantly higher in TMJs with joint effusion than in those without (p = 0.016). On the other hand, for both SLP and ILP, the D parameter significantly increased in TMJs with osteoarthritis compared with those without (p = 0.015 and p = 0.022, respectively). Pathological changes of LPM in patients with TMD may be quantitatively evaluated by IVIM parameters.

  2. Quantitative measurements of the articular areas of mandibular condyles with temporomandibular joint disorders using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohi, Kaori; Igarashi, Chinami; Sugisaki, Masashi; Osano, Takashi; Sato, Yohei; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Ohkubo, Chikahiro

    2016-03-01

    The authors sought to clarify the variation in the condylar anterior functional surface (AFS) of patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders using quantitative measurements by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MR images of 68 joints (2 males, 32 females) were used. The subjects were classified into three groups: with/without defects of cortical bone groups and a combination group without defects. The AFS was measured as the length between the protrusive point and the apex of the condyle on MRI (4-mm-thick slices), and the quad value of the length was defined as the area on the slice. The summed quad values of all slices were used as the AFS area. Differences in the areas among the three groups were compared by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). The non-defect group had significantly larger AFS areas than the defect group. Quantitative measurement on MR images clarified the changes in the condylar sagittal appearance.

  3. Clinical, magnetic-resonance imaging and surgical findings in patients with temporomandibular joint disorders - a survey of 47 patients

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    Raustia, A.M. (Dept. of Prosthodontics and Stomatognathic Physiology, Inst. of Dentistry, Oulu Univ., Aapistie (Finland)); Pyhtinen, J. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, University Central Hospital, Oulu (Finland)); Pernu, H. (Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Inst. of Dentistry, Oulu Univ. (Finland))

    1994-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and correlate the clinical, magnetic-resonance imaging (MRI), and surgical findings in 47 patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders. 51 TMJs (24 right, 27 left) were operated on, because 4 patients underwent treatment of both TMJs. The best correlation between MRI and surgical findings was noted in connection with position of the disk. This was surgically confirmed altogether in 88% of cases (45/51). The clinical diagnosis was confirmed by surgical findings in 75% of cases of anterior dislocation of the disk with reduction and 89% of cases of anterior dislocation of the disk without reduction. Bone changes noted by MRI were confirmed by surgery in 71% of cases. MRI was excellent especially relating to disk position and changes in disk morphology. The results show also that there are findings using MRI, e.g. of joint effusion, which cannot be confirmed during surgery. (orig.)

  4. The use of low level laser therapy in the treatment of temporomandibular joint disorders. Review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herranz-Aparicio, Judit; Vázquez-Delgado, Eduardo; Arnabat-Domínguez, Josep; España-Tost, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) have been identified as the most important cause of pain in the facial region. The low level laser therapy (LLLT) has demonstrated to have an analgesic, anti-inflammatory and biostimulating effects. The LLLT is a noninvasive, quick and safe, non-pharmaceutical intervention that may be beneficial for patients with TMDs. However the clinical efficiency of LLLT in the treatment of this kind of disorders is controversial. Objectives: Literature review in reference to the use of LLLT in the treatment of TMDs, considering the scientific evidence level of the published studies. Material and Methods: A MEDLINE and COCHRANE database search was made for articles. The keywords used were “temporomandibular disorders” and “low level laser therapy” or “phototherapy” and by means of the Boolean operator “AND”. The search provided a bank of 35 articles, and 16 relevant articles were selected to this review. These articles were critically analyzed and classified according to their level of scientific evidence. This analysis produced 3 literature review articles and 13 are clinical trials. The SORT criteria (Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy) was used to classify the articles. Results: Only one article presented an evidence level 1, twelve presented an evidence level 2, and three presented an evidence level 3. According to the principle of evidence-based dentistry, currently there is a scientific evidence level B in favor of using LLLT for treatment of TMDs. Discussion and conclusions: Publications on the use of LLLT for treatment of TMDs are limited making difficult to compare the different studies due to the great variability of the studied variables and the selected laser parameters. The great majority of the studies concluded that the results should be taken with caution due to the methodological limitations. Key words:Low level laser therapy; phototherapy; temporomandibular joint disorders. PMID:23722130

  5. Non-neoplastic disorders of the temporomandibular joint; Nonneoplastische Arthropathien des Kiefergelenks

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    Lomoschitz, F.; Krestan, C.; Robinson, S.; Czerny, C.; Imhof, H. [Vienna Univ. (Austria). Zentrales Inst. fuer Radiodiagnostik

    2001-09-01

    The pathologic conditions that involve the TMJ are similar to those conditions that involve other joints in the body. Therefore, many of the radiologic characteristics are also similar. Nevertheless, because of the complex structure and function of this small joint, it is essential to know the variety of diseases that can involve the temporomandibular joint. It is also important to understand that functionally both TMJ's act as a single unit and that any alteration in function caused by a pathologic process on one side may lead to dysfunction on the contralateral side. It is essential that the radiologist is familiar with the principles of TMJ function as well as TMJ pathology. (orig.) [German] Die Krankheitsbilder, die zu einer Mitbeteiligung der Kiefergelenke fuehren, unterscheiden sich prinzipiell nicht von jenen, welche die uebrigen Gelenke im Koerper betreffen. Aus diesem Grund sind auch die radiologischen Veraenderungen im Prinzip aehnlich. Aufgrund der komplexen Morphologie und Funktion des Kiefergelenks ist es jedoch wichtig, die Vielfalt von Erkrankungen zu kennen, welche zu morphologischen und funktionellen Veraenderungen am Kiefergelenk fuehren koennen. Durch die funktionelle Einheit beider Kiefergelenke kann jede einseitige Erkrankung in weiterer Folge auch zur Dysfunktion der kontralateralen Seite fuehren. Der Radiologe sollte mit den Prinzipien der Funktionen sowie mit der Vielfalt der pathologischen Veraenderungen der Kiefergelenke vertraut sein. (orig.)

  6. Temporomandibular Joint Anatomy and Derangements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahadır Odabaş

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint (TMJ is a diartrodial joint which is located just before the outer ear way and between the mandibular fossa and mandibular condyle. TMJ has rotation and translation movements. Approximately the 30-50 percent of the population has joint click. Most of the patients which have TMJ click may suffer from disc displacement. By the presence of disharmony between TMJ and occlusion and masticatory muscles, natural balance disappears. Therefore the function of the craniomandibular system and the factors that affects dysfunction must be considered when treatment planning is built.

  7. Temporomandibular Disorders and Headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff-Radford, Steven B; Abbott, Jeremy J

    2016-08-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and primary headaches can be perpetual and debilitating musculoskeletal and neurological disorders. The presence of both can affect up to one-sixth of the population at any one time. Initially, TMDs were thought to be predominantly musculoskeletal disorders, and migraine was thought to be solely a cerebrovascular disorder. The further understanding of their pathophysiology has helped to clarify their clinical presentation. This article focuses on the role of the trigeminal system in associating TMD and migraine. By discussing recent descriptions of prevalence, diagnosis, and treatment of headache and TMD, we will further elucidate this relationship. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cephalometric deviations present in children and adolescents with temporomandibular joint disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Vilaça Willeman Bastos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Temporomandibular disorders (TMD have proved to be a risk factor for developing hyperdivergent facial growth patterns. OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were: (1 Assess differences between the cephalometric measurements in children with articular TMD and a control group, before and after mandibular growth peak according to cervical vertebral maturation; and (2 Identify a predictive model capable of differentiating patients with TMD and control group patients based on early cephalometric characteristics. METHOD: The study included children and adolescents with maximum age of 17 years, divided into experimental group (n=30 diagnosed with articular TMD-according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD for children and adolescents-subdivided according to growth stage, called pre-peak (n=17 and post-peak (n=13 and control group (n = 30, matched by gender, skeletal maturity stage of the cervical vertebrae and classification of malocclusion. Lateral cephalometric and craniofacial structures were traced and their relations divided into: Cranial base, maxilla, mandible, intermaxillary relations, vertical skeletal relations and dental relations. Differences between the means for each variable were evaluated by applying the statistical Student t test for independent samples. RESULTS: The means of the variables analyzed in the pre-peak showed no statistically significant differences. However, analysis of post-peak showed that the experimental group displayed decreased SNA and SNB and increased SN.Gn and 1.NB (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: It was possible to identify a predictive model able to differentiate patients with TMD and asymptomatic controls from early cephalometric characteristics.

  9. Intra-articular injections with corticosteroids and sodium hyaluronate for treating temporomandibular joint disorders: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Eduardo; Bonotto, Daniel; Cunali, Paulo Afonso

    2013-01-01

    In some cases, conservative treatment of internal derangements of the Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) is considered little responsive. Thus, it is necessary to accomplish treatments that aim at reducing pain and improve function in patients who present arthrogenic temporomandibular disorders. This study, by means of a systematic review of the literature, aimed to analyze the effectiveness of intra-articular injections with corticosteroids and sodium hyaluronate for treating internal derangements of the TMJ. Carry out a research in the following databases: MEDLINE, Cochrane, EMBASE, Pubmed, Lilacs, and BBO, considering publications issued between 1966 and October 2010, focusing on randomized or quasi-randomized controlled clinical trials, single or double-blind. After applying the inclusion criteria we collected 9 articles, 7 of which were randomized controlled double-blind clinical trials and 2 randomized controlled single-blind clinical trials. After analyzing the literature, it was found that intra-articular injection with corticosteroids and sodium hyaluronate seems to be an effective method for treating internal derangements of the TMJ. However, further randomized controlled clinical trials, with representative samples and longer follow-up time must be carried out in order to assess the real effectiveness of this technique.

  10. Intra-articular injections with corticosteroids and sodium hyaluronate for treating temporomandibular joint disorders: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Machado

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In some cases, conservative treatment of internal derangements of the Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ is considered little responsive. Thus, it is necessary to accomplish treatments that aim at reducing pain and improve patients' functions who present arthrogenic temporomandibular disorders. OBJECTIVE: This study, by means of a systematic review of the literature, aimed to analyze the effectiveness of intra-articular injections with corticosteroids and sodium hyaluronate for treating internal derangements of the TMJ. METHODS: Carry out a research in the following databases: MEDLINE, Cochrane, EMBASE, Pubmed, Lilacs, and BBO, considering publications issued between 1966 and October of 2010, focusing on randomized or quasi-randomized controlled clinical trials, single or double-blind. RESULTS: After applying the inclusion criteria we collected 9 articles, 7 of which were randomized controlled double-blind clinical trials and 2 randomized controlled single-blind clinical trials. CONCLUSION: After analyzing the literature, it was found that intra-articular injection with corticosteroids and sodium hyaluronate seems to be an effective method for treating internal derangements of the TMJ. However, further randomized controlled clinical trials, with representative samples and longer follow-up time must be carried out in order to assess the real effectiveness of this technique.

  11. Prevalence of Chronic Periodontitis, Bruxism and Temporomandibular Joint Disorders in Patients with Fibromyalgia Syndrome

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    Hatice Balcı Yüce

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Chronic periodontitis is a world-wide infectious and inflammatory disease and may have a relationship with other inflammatory diseases such as fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS. The aim of this study was to determine whether the prevalence of periodontitis is increased in individuals with FMS or not. Materials and Methods: Sixty-four patients with FMS and 70 systemically healthy individuals were included in the present study. Fibromyalgia patients did not have any other systemically disease. All subjects had at least 20 functioning teeth and underwent detailed oral and radiographic examination, in addition, bruxism and temporomandibular joint (TMJ examinations were performed. All clinical attachment levels, plaque and gingival indices were recorded. Results: Fibromyalgia patients tend to have higher gingival index scores than healthy individuals. There was a significant difference in the presence of bruxism between the study groups (p0.05. Conclusion: We found that the prevalence of periodontitis was not changed in FMS patients but was increased in healthy subjects above age 45.

  12. RADIOGRAPHIC EXAMINATION OF TEMPOROMANDIBULAR DISORDERS IN CHILDREN

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    Heru Suryonegoro

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The temporomandibular joint has a very important role in the stomatognathic system. Its main function is for the opening and closing movement, mastication, and speech. It is located anterior to the ear. The temporomandibular joint connects maxilla and mandible through the articular fossa, hence the slightest change that happens would cause serious matters such as pain, exiting, speech disorder, difficulty in opening and closing movement, headache, and even trismus. In a child or an adolescent, the symptoms are often vague; everything is interpreted as “pain”. This is probably why temporomandibular disorder are often undetected by dentists. Therefore, patience and accuracy is needed to determine the actual disorder through means of clinical and radiographic examination. The radiographic examination suitable for child is the transcranial projection. This projection is believed to be more accurate amongst other projection for child patients.

  13. Serum cortisol level and disc displacement disorders of the temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, S-L; Wu, S-L; Tsai, C-C; Ko, S-Y; Yang, J-W

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are a significant public health problem, affecting approximately 5-12% of the population. This retrospective cross-sectional study investigated the relationship between 8 AM serum cortisol levels (8ASC) and disc displacement disorders (DDD) of TMD. One hundred and forty patients with DDD were recruited. Among them, 60 patients comprised the case group of disc displacement without reduction with limited opening (DDWORWLO, age 37·7 ± 17·22), and 80 were 'other DDD' for the control group (age 36·4 ± 13·08). The independent variables included domains of demography, history, malocclusion, comorbid symptoms, comorbid TMD and 8ASC. Data were analysed with the chi-square test, logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Results of multiple logistic regression showed that 8ASC was the only factor significantly related to DDWORWLO (P = 0·006). Receiver operating characteristic analysis of DDWORWLO and 8ASC indicated an area under the curve of 0·669, standard error of 0·049 and P value of 0·001. The adequate cut-off point of 8ASC was 12·45 (μg dL(-1) ), with sensitivity of 0·636, and specificity of 0·729. 8 AM serum cortisol level can be used as a clinical clue to differentiate DDWORWLO from other DDD. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Arthroscopy for temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigon, Marcelo; Pereira, Ligia M; Bortoluzzi, Marcelo C; Loguercio, Alessandro D; Ramos, Adilson Luiz; Cardoso, Jefferson R

    2011-05-11

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are considered a collection of disorders involving many organic, psychological and psychosocial factors. They can involve the masticatory muscles or the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and associated structures, or both. It is estimated that 40% to 75% of the population displays at least one sign of the disease and 33% of the population reports at least one symptom. Arthroscopy has been used to reduce signs and symptoms of patients with TMD but the effectiveness has still not been totally explained. To assess the effectiveness of arthroscopy for the management of signs and symptoms in patients with TMDs. The Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register (to 23 December 2010), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, Issue 4, 2010), MEDLINE via OVID (1950 to 23 December 2010), EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 23 December 2010), LILACS via BIREME Virtual Health Library (1982 to 23 December 2010), Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED) via OVID (1985 to 23 December 2010), CINAHL via EBSCO (1980 to 23 December 2010). There were no restrictions regarding the language or date of publication. Randomized controlled clinical trials of arthroscopy for treating TMDs were included. Two review authors independently extracted data, and three review authors independently assessed the risk of bias of included trials. The authors of the selected articles were contacted for additional information. Seven randomized controlled trials (n = 349) met the inclusion criteria. All studies were either at high or unclear risk of bias. The outcome pain was evaluated after 6 months in two studies. No statistically significant differences were found between the arthroscopy versus nonsurgical groups (standardized mean difference (SMD) = 0.004; 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.46 to 0.55, P = 0.81). Two studies, analyzed pain 12 months after surgery (arthroscopy and arthrocentesis) in 81 patients. No statistically

  15. Association Between Harmful Oral Habits and Sign and Symptoms of Temporomandibular Joint Disorders Among Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motghare, Vaibhav; Kumar, Jayaprakash; Kamate, Shivalingesh; Kushwaha, Sumedha; Anand, Richa; Gupta, Neha; Gupta, Bhuvandeep; Singh, Ishan

    2015-08-01

    Temporomandibular disorder (TDM) is defined as a heterogenous group of psychophysiological disorders commonly characterised by orofacial pain, chewing dysfunction or both. Various Epidemiological studies had shown occurrence of TMD in all age groups including children. Also research had shown that non nutritional oral habits to be associated with TMD. Present study aimed to find whether harmful oral habits are associated with sign and symptoms of TMD among adolescents in Greater Noida. Schools in Gautam Buddha district and descriptive study. Cross sectional study was carried out among 240 adolescents (10 - 19 years) studying in schools of Greater Noida. Study population were selected by random sampling to whom screening questionnaires recommended by American Academy of Orofacial Pain (AAOP) were distributed. Patient history and clinical examination was used to determine harmful oral habits. Data analysis was done in SPSS version 21 and Chi-square test was applied. Sixty one participants (25.4%) displayed no sign and symptoms of TMD, 34 (14.2%) responded affirmatively to atleast one item on the questionnaire and 108(46%) gave at least three affirmative responses. Headache, Neckpain and Toothache were most frequent reported sign and symptoms of TMD (46.2%). There was statistically significant association between gender and sign and symptoms of TMD on three items of the questionnaire (p Grinding of teeth (p = 0.01) and sign and symptoms of TMD. A statistically significant association was found between nail biting, lip/ object biting and grinding of teeth with signs and/or symptoms of TMD. Thus there is need for preventive dental treatment and community dental education so that young adults realize importance of early diagnosis and treatment of TMJ disorders.

  16. Temporomandibular joint in rheumatoid arthritis

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    Syrjaenen, S.M.

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was investigated clinically and by orthopantomography in 110 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in 73 control subjects. Clinical symptoms in the TMJ were established in 34% of the RA patients and in 18% of the controls. Radiographic abnormalities were found in 60% of the RA patients compared with 15% in the controls. No single radiographic abnormality was characteristic of joint involvement by RA. The most common radiologic features in RA patients were changes in the morphology of the condylar head and articular eminentia, marginal irregularities, reduced mobility, and an anterior position of the condylar head. No abnormalities were encountered in the early stage of the disease, which at least in part could be attributed to the inherent limitations of orthopantomography. The incidence of joint lesions increased with duration of the RA. (orig.).

  17. Temporomandibular Joint, Closed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NIDCR Home Oral Health Diseases and Conditions Gum Disease TMJ Disorders Oral Cancer Dry Mouth Burning Mouth Tooth Decay See All Oral Complications of Systemic Diseases Cancer Treatment Developmental Disabilities Diabetes Heart Disease HIV/ ...

  18. Temporomandibular Joint, Open

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NIDCR Home Oral Health Diseases and Conditions Gum Disease TMJ Disorders Oral Cancer Dry Mouth Burning Mouth Tooth Decay See All Oral Complications of Systemic Diseases Cancer Treatment Developmental Disabilities Diabetes Heart Disease HIV/ ...

  19. [Temporo-mandibular joints and orthognathic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouletreau, P

    2016-09-01

    Temporo-Mandibular Joints (TMJ) and orthognathic surgery are closely linked. In the past, some authors have even described (with mixed results) the correction of some dysmorphosis through direct procedures on the TMJs. Nowadays, performing orthognathic surgery involves the TMJ in three different occasions: (1) TMJ disorders potentially responsible for dento-maxillary dysmorphosis, (2) effects of orthognathic surgery on TMJs, and (3) condylar positioning methods in orthognathic surgery. These three chapters are developed in order to focus on the close relationships between TMJ and orthognathic surgery. Some perspectives close this article. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. An Overall Look for Temporomandibular Joint Pathologies and Imaging

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    Hakan Eren

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint (TMJ complex is one of the most complex joint which connects the mandible to the skull. This kind of joint system has ability to perform complex and bilateral movements. Because, TMJ has a complicated anatomy, there is a need for a thorough investigation to find the correct cause of TMJ disorders, as well as knowing the TMJ anatomy. Anatomical structures of TMJ contain hard tissues and soft tissues. Soft tissues consist of joint capsule, ligaments, articular disc, muscles and tendons. A healthy joint is connected to proper and compatible function of all these anatomical structures. Temporomandibular disorder (TMD is a term used for any problems that affecting the temporomandibular joint. Possible causes for TMD are injury to the TMJ or related anatomical structures, clenching the teeth or bruxism, dislocation of the disc, presence of osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis in the TMJ, emotional stress, aging, etc. The most common TMJ disorders are pain dysfunction syndrome, internal derangement, arthritis, and traumas. Radiographic imaging is an important element in the correct diagnosis. Because of the anatomic complexity of the temporomandibular joint and its proximity to the temporal bone, mastoid air cells, and auditory structures, imaging of the joint structures should also be investigated. Therefore, careful clinical and radiological examinations are essential in the evaluation of TMJ. In this review, TMJ anatomy, Imaging methods, the classification of various pathologies and radiological techniques, are discussed.

  1. Naturalistic changes in insomnia symptoms and pain in temporomandibular joint disorder: a cross-lagged panel analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quartana, Phillip J; Wickwire, Emerson M; Klick, Brendan; Grace, Edward; Smith, Michael T

    2010-05-01

    An increasing number of prospective studies suggest a bi-directional association between the pain and sleep quality. Few of these investigations have controlled for synchronous correlations, an important source of extraneous variance in lagged associations, which may have confounded conclusions of prior investigations. Despite high rates of insomnia in temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD), no studies have examined temporal associations between naturalistic fluctuations in insomnia and pain in TMD. We conducted cross-lagged panel analysis to examine reciprocal temporal associations between 1-month changes in insomnia symptom severity and self-reported pain over 3 months among 53 TMD patients. This rigorous analytic strategy represents a comprehensive method to explore possible reciprocal temporal associations between insomnia and pain that controls for both auto- and synchronous correlations. Analyses revealed that initial-month increases in insomnia were associated with next-month increases in average daily pain, but not vice versa. The direction of the effect was such that initial-month increases in insomnia symptom severity were associated with next-month increases in average daily pain. These data suggest that naturally occurring fluctuations in insomnia symptom severity are prospectively associated with fluctuations in daily pain experience for persons with TMD. Potential mechanisms by which insomnia might influence pain in TMD and therapeutic implications of these findings are discussed. Copyright 2010 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The association between Occlusion Time and Temporomandibular Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldini, Alberto; Nota, Alessandro; Cozza, Paola

    2015-02-01

    Recently, some published studies show there is a multifactorial origin for Temporomandibular Disorders, but the dental occlusion's contribution to the development of Temporomandibular Disorders, and how it may influence the adaptive capacity of the Stomatognathic system, it's still unclear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the correlation between the Occlusion Time and Temporomandibular Disorders. A total of 54 patients were enrolled in the study (24 males and 30 females, mean age 27.94 ± 8.21 years). The TMD group (8 males and 10 females) consisted of subjects who presented with at least 1 of the following signs of Temporomandibular Disorders: Temporomandibular Joint sounds (clicking or crepitation), Temporomandibular Joint locking episodes, limited mandibular opening, painful limitation of mandibular movements, pain to palpation of the Temporomandibular Joint or of the masticatory muscles. The control group (16 males and 20 females) presented as free from Temporomandibular Disorders. The T-Scan III computerized occlusal analysis system was to record the subjects' Occlusion. Times during eight mandibular opening-closing movements. The two-ways ANOVA test analyzed the variations for group and sex, showing that the TMD group mean Occlusion Time (0.64 ± 0.21s) was statistically significantly longer than the control group mean Occlusion Time (0.45 ± 0.17s) (pTMJ problems has to be carefully considered as adjunctive instrumental device. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Tuberculosis of the temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assouan, C; Anzouan, K; Nguessan, N D; Millogo, M; Horo, K; Konan, E; Zwetyenga, N

    2014-04-01

    Extrapulmonary and extra-spinal tuberculosis (TB) is rare, even in countries where the disease is endemic. Ten percent of these localizations are cervico-facial. Involvement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is very unusual. We present the features of such a case. We looked for patients managed for TMJ TB in 2 Maxillofacial Surgery departments and in 1 Pneumology & Phthisiology Department since 1992. The second part of the study was a literature review. One case was found in our departments and 15 other cases were found in published data. Most patients were women with mean age of 39.9 years (5 to 68). Pre-auricular swelling was the predominant functional sign, often without fever or change in the health status. The biological and radiological abnormalities were non-specific (osteolysis, joint pinching, etc.). No lung involvement was observed. The joint recovered its normal function after appropriate management. Tuberculosis of the TMJ is difficult to diagnose given its rarity and the non-specific nature of clinical and paraclinical signs. It must be considered in the differential diagnosis for common diseases of the TMJ whether TB is endemic or not. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Temporomandibular joint diagnostics using CBCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamsson, A-K; Kristensen, M; Arvidsson, L Z

    2015-01-01

    The present review will give an update on temporomandibular joint (TMJ) imaging using CBCT. It will focus on diagnostic accuracy and the value of CBCT compared with other imaging modalities for the evaluation of TMJs in different categories of patients; osteoarthritis (OA), juvenile OA, rheumatoid arthritis and related joint diseases, juvenile idiopathic arthritis and other intra-articular conditions. Finally, sections on other aspects of CBCT research related to the TMJ, clinical decision-making and concluding remarks are added. CBCT has emerged as a cost- and dose-effective imaging modality for the diagnostic assessment of a variety of TMJ conditions. The imaging modality has been found to be superior to conventional radiographical examinations as well as MRI in assessment of the TMJ. However, it should be emphasized that the diagnostic information obtained is limited to the morphology of the osseous joint components, cortical bone integrity and subcortical bone destruction/production. For evaluation of soft-tissue abnormalities, MRI is mandatory. There is an obvious need for research on the impact of CBCT examinations on patient outcome. PMID:25369205

  5. Unfavourable results in temporomandibular joint ankylosis surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, Mukund; Munoli, Amarnath V.

    2013-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is a debilitating condition usually afflicting children and young adults. Treatment is surgical, i.e., release of the ankylosed joint/s with or without interposition arthroplasty and correction of secondary deformities (mandibular retrusion and asymmetry) This article deals with identifying potential setbacks in TMJ ankylosis surgery and preventing them. PMID:24501459

  6. Value of cone-beam computed tomography in the process of diagnosis and management of disorders of the temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, E W J; Dijkstra, P U; Stegenga, B; de Bont, L G M; Spijkervet, F K L

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the value of cone-beam computed tomographic (CT) images in the primary diagnosis and management of 128 outpatients with disorders of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Before a diagnosis was made and treatment planned, the history was taken, physical examination made, and the orthopantomogram studied. After assessment of the cone-beam CT, the oral and maxillofacial surgeon (specialist or resident) was allowed to revise the provisional primary diagnosis and management. The degree of certainty was rated by the clinician before and after the cone-beam CT had been assessed. The primary diagnosis was changed in 32 patients (25%), additional diagnostic procedures were changed in 57 (45%), and the treatment was changed in 15 (12%) (in 4 the treatment was changed to a (minimally) invasive procedure). A total of 74 patients (58%) had their diagnosis and management changed after the cone-beam CT had been assessed. Changes in diagnosis and management were clinically relevant in 9/32 and 9/61 patients, respectively. The clinician's certainty about the primary diagnosis increased after the cone-beam CT had been assessed in 57 patients. Logistic regression analysis showed that the odds in favour of changes in primary diagnosis and management increased when limited mandibular function was a primary symptom, the patient was taking medication for pain, and the articular eminence could not be assessed on OPT. Assessment of cone-beam CT led to changes in primary diagnosis and management in more than half the patients with disorders of the TMJ. Copyright © 2013 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Temporomandibular joint computed tomography: development of a direct sagittal technique

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    van der Kuijl, B.; Vencken, L.M.; de Bont, L.G.; Boering, G. (Univ. of Groningen, (Netherlands))

    1990-12-01

    Radiology plays an important role in the diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders. Different techniques are used with computed tomography offering simultaneous imaging of bone and soft tissues. It is therefore suited for visualization of the articular disk and may be used in patients with suspected internal derangements and other disorders of the temporomandibular joint. Previous research suggests advantages to direct sagittal scanning, which requires special positioning of the patient and a sophisticated scanning technique. This study describes the development of a new technique of direct sagittal computed tomographic imaging of the temporomandibular joint using a specially designed patient table and internal light visor positioning. No structures other than the patient's head are involved in the imaging process, and misleading artifacts from the arm or the shoulder are eliminated. The use of the scanogram allows precise correction of the condylar axis and selection of exact slice level.

  8. Management of the Temporomandibular Joint after Ablative Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Bredell, Marius; Grätz, Klaus; Obwegeser, Joachim; Gujer, Astrid Kruse

    2014-01-01

    Management of the temporomandibular joint in ablative head and neck surgery is controversial with no standardized approach. The aim of the study was to establish risk-based guidelines for the management of the temporomandibular joint after ablative surgery.

  9. Signs and symptoms of Temporomandibular Disorders in the elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Camacho, José Gustavo Dala Déa; Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa Pedron; Navarro, Ricardo de Lima; Conti, Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira; Conti, Marcio Rodrigues de Almeida; Marchiori, Luciana Lozza de Moraes; Fernandes, Karen Barros Parron

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the prevalence of Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) in the elderly and its association with palpation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), masticatory and cervical muscles as well as the presence of headache and joint noises. Methods: The sample consisted of 200 elderly of both genders (mean age: 69.2±5.7 years). The clinical evaluation of TMD signs and symptoms was divided into three stages: an anamnestic questionnaire, a TMJ evaluation, and a muscular ...

  10. Signs and symptoms of Temporomandibular Disorders in the elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Camacho,José Gustavo Dala Déa; Oltramari-Navarro,Paula Vanessa Pedron; Navarro,Ricardo de Lima; Conti,Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira; Conti,Marcio Rodrigues de Almeida; Marchiori,Luciana Lozza de Moraes; Fernandes,Karen Barros Parron

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the prevalence of Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) in the elderly and its association with palpation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), masticatory and cervical muscles as well as the presence of headache and joint noises. Methods: The sample consisted of 200 elderly of both genders (mean age: 69.2±5.7 years). The clinical evaluation of TMD signs and symptoms was divided into three stages: an anamnestic questionnaire, a TMJ evaluation, and a musc...

  11. Loose bodies of the temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Q.N.; Katzberg, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    We report a series of four patients presenting with symptoms of temporomandibular joint pain and dysfunction, and manifesting calcified loose bodies within the temporomandibular joint. Tomographic and arthrotomographic findings are described. Surgical confirmation was obtained in two patients and the histopathology in one demonstrated that the loose body was calcified cartilage surrounded by synovial tissue. The synovial tissue of the joint space was normal in all four cases by arthrotomography and at surgery in two patients. The findings suggest that these cases may be examples of osteochondrosis dissecans.

  12. Clinical survey of the patients with temporomandibular joint disorders, using Research Diagnostic Criteria (Axis II) for TMD: preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Kyun; Kim, Su-Gwan; Im, Jae-Hyung; Yun, Pil-Young

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the nonspecific physical and psychological symptoms in patients who suffered from temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) using the Research Diagnosis Criteria (Axis II) for TMD diagnosis (RDC/TMD). A total of 317 patients were included (M: 75, F: 242). The signs and symptoms of physical, psychological and behavioral factors were evaluated using questionnaires in the RDC/TMD. The patients were examined through clinical and radiological method and diagnosed by the same investigator. Patients were divided into 3 different groups such as: the osteoarthritis group (group 1), the internal derangement (group 2) and the myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome group (MPDS, group 3). In the analysis of depression and vegetative symptoms, patients in the internal derangement group revealed a high ratio of 'normal'. In patients with MPDS, they appeared to suffer highly. According to nonspecific physical symptoms, there have been tendencies of a higher ratio of 'severe' patients with MPDS. In subjects aged 25 years or younger, the internal derangement group was the greatest, while the osteoarthritis group was the greatest for subjects over 40-years old. In the evaluation of depression and vegetative symptoms, the internal derangement group showed a relative normal value while the MPDS group showed a serious extent in comparison. According to the result of this study, MPDS group showed more severe depressive and nonspecific physical symptoms than internal derangement group. When making TMD diagnosis and treatment, it is thought to be important to analyze psychometric properties and nonspecific physical symptoms. Copyright © 2011 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. ALLOPLASTIC RECONSTRUCTION OF THE TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rushil R. DANG

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint reconstruction (TMJR is often necessary for patients with severe and/or refractory TMJ disease who have failed conservative treatment. TMJR aids to improve masticatory function and is associated with improved quality of life outcomes. Currently, alloplastic reconstruction is considered as the treatment of choice in most severe TMJ disorders due to its many advantages inclusive but not limited to early mobilization, stable longterm results, and significant improvement in jaw function. Broadly speaking, two types of TMJR prostheses are available for reconstruction: 1 stock, and, 2 custommade prostheses. The purpose of this article is to provide the reader with a brief overview of the basic principles and fundamentals of TMJR while referencing pertinent existing literature.

  14. The essential role of the otolaryngologist in the diagnosis and management of temporomandibular joint and chronic oral, head, and facial pain disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Howard A; Davila, Laura J

    2014-04-01

    This article clarifies the current state of knowledge of chronic oral, head, and facial pain (COHFP) conditions with the inclusion of temporomandibular joint disorders as just one component of the variety of conditions that can cause head and facial pain. Obtaining an accurate diagnosis in a timely manner is extremely important because COHFP symptoms can be caused by a variety of pathologic conditions that can be inflammatory, degenerative, neurologic, neoplastic, or systemic in origin. The essential role of the specialty of otolaryngology in the diagnosis and management of patients with these complex COHFP conditions is emphasized. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Physical therapy for temporomandibular joint anterior disc displacement without reduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, B

    2017-03-09

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) anterior disc displacement without reduction (ADDwoR) is a common type of temporomandibular joint disorders. Most patients experience limited mouth opening and joint pain at the same time. The standpoint of physical therapy is the function of the joint instead of the displaced disc. The treatment aims to make symptoms disappeared and joint function regained through 3M techniques, including modality, manual and movement. For ADDwoR patients with limited mouth opening within 2 month, manual therapy may reposition disc and the following splint and movement therapy can maintain disc-condyle relationship. Even so, restoring anatomical relationship is not the end of physical therapy. Enhanced health education and multidisciplinary cooperation are important for successful management of the ADDwoR patients.

  16. Painful Temporomandibular Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, G.D.; Ohrbach, R.; Greenspan, J.D.; Fillingim, R.B.; Bair, E.; Sanders, A.E.; Dubner, R.; Diatchenko, L.; Meloto, C.B.; Smith, S.; Maixner, W.

    2016-01-01

    In 2006, the OPPERA project (Orofacial Pain: Prospective Evaluation and Risk Assessment) set out to identify risk factors for development of painful temporomandibular disorder (TMD). A decade later, this review summarizes its key findings. At 4 US study sites, OPPERA recruited and examined 3,258 community-based TMD-free adults assessing genetic and phenotypic measures of biological, psychosocial, clinical, and health status characteristics. During follow-up, 4% of participants per annum developed clinically verified TMD, although that was a “symptom iceberg” when compared with the 19% annual rate of facial pain symptoms. The most influential predictors of clinical TMD were simple checklists of comorbid health conditions and nonpainful orofacial symptoms. Self-reports of jaw parafunction were markedly stronger predictors than corresponding examiner assessments. The strongest psychosocial predictor was frequency of somatic symptoms, although not somatic reactivity. Pressure pain thresholds measured at cranial sites only weakly predicted incident TMD yet were strongly associated with chronic TMD, cross-sectionally, in OPPERA’s separate case-control study. The puzzle was resolved in OPPERA’s nested case-control study where repeated measures of pressure pain thresholds revealed fluctuation that coincided with TMD’s onset, persistence, and recovery but did not predict its incidence. The nested case-control study likewise furnished novel evidence that deteriorating sleep quality predicted TMD incidence. Three hundred genes were investigated, implicating 6 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) as risk factors for chronic TMD, while another 6 SNPs were associated with intermediate phenotypes for TMD. One study identified a serotonergic pathway in which multiple SNPs influenced risk of chronic TMD. Two other studies investigating gene-environment interactions found that effects of stress on pain were modified by variation in the gene encoding catechol O

  17. THE ROLE OF TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT DYSFUNCTION AND OCCLUSAL DISORDERS IN THE PATHOPHYSIOLOGY OF SOMATOGENIC COCHLEAR AND VESTIBULAR SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Boldin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: Temporomandibular joint (TMJ dysfunction and occlusion abnormalities can cause cochlear and vestibular disorders. This issue is at the crossroads of several disciplines: otoneurology, physiotherapy, dentistry, medical rehabilitation and posturology, which often makes it difficult to timely diagnose them and delays the onset of treatment. Aim: To assess the role of abnormal dental occlusion and TMJ disorders in the pathophysiology and clinical manifestation of cochleovestibular syndrome. Materials and methods: We examined 300 subjects with clinical signs of cochleovestibular syndrome, asymmetry of occlusion and/or TMJ dysfunction (the main group, 55 patients with signs of TMJ structural and functional disorders and occlusal disorders without a cochleovestibular syndrome (the reference group, and 35 healthy volunteers (the control group. All patients were examined by a neurologist, an ENT specialist, a dentist and a physiotherapist. A series of additional investigations of the brachiocephalic vessels, cervical spine, TMJ, auditory and vestibular function, premature tooth contacts were performed. Results: The main group patients had high values of TMJ dysfunction in the Hamburg test (5.85 vs 2.2 in the reference group and higher proportions of patients with moderate and severe TMJ dysfunction (n = 243, 81% and n = 13, 23.7%, respectively. The functional muscle test parameters and the results of manual muscle testing in the main group patients were significantly different from those in the control group (р < 0.05, whereas most values obtained in the reference group did not differ significantly (р > 0.05. Patients with cochleoves-tibular syndrome had 2 to 3-fold higher rates of vertebrogenic dysfunctions than those from the reference group. The video nystamography technique detected the positional cervical nystagmus in 100% (n = 300 of patients from the main group, whereas there were no nystagmus in those from the reference group

  18. Temporomandibular joint involvement in psoriatic arthritis | Okkesim ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Psoriasis is a chronic, papulosquamous, and an inflammatory skin disease. It has been found that between 5% and 24% of patients develop psoriatic arthritis (PA) at the same time after or even prior to skin findings. The involvement of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare condition. In this report, a-46-year-old male ...

  19. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis and the temporomandibular joint

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yasser Mohammed

    e Pediatric Immunology Units, Ain Shams University hospitals, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt. Received 1 October 2011; accepted 23 November 2011. Available online 1 February 2012. KEYWORDS. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis;. Temporomandibular joint;. Magnetic resonance imaging. Abstract ...

  20. Anterior bilateral temporomandibular joint dislocation: an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anterior dislocation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) though an infrequent presentation at the emergency department; often demands an immediate reduction to relieve discomfort and prevent adverse long-term sequelae. A simple and effective technique to reduce the dislocation is successfully demonstrated by putting ...

  1. Prosthodontic Management of Temporomandibular Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Kaur, Harsimran; Datta, Kusum

    2012-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are examined from a biopsychosocial or illness perspective. It is considered that TMD share features with many common chronic pain conditions. Functional disturbances of the masticatory system can be as complicated as the system itself. Although numerous treatments have been advocated, the complex nature of TMD requires a multidisciplinary team. Effective treatment selection begins with a thorough understanding of the disorder & its etiology. However, the mul...

  2. TEMPOROMANDIBULAR DISORDERS IN SCUBA DIVERS DURING DIVING CERTIFICATION TRAINING PROGRAMME

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZTÜRK, Özmen; Tek, Mustafa; Seven, Hüseyin

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The design of a diving regulator's mouth-piece is known to increase the risk of a temporomandibular disorder (TMD) in SCUBA divers. The total weight of a diving regulator is reflected directly on the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) causing articular and periarticular problems. In this study, the prevalence of TMD in SCUBA divers having a training for diving certification is investigated. We also aimed to determine the factors that lead to TMD, and clarify the observation that there i...

  3. Diagnosis and treatment of temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauer, Robert L; Semidey, Michael J

    2015-03-15

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are a heterogeneous group of musculoskeletal and neuromuscular conditions involving the temporomandibular joint complex, and surrounding musculature and osseous components. TMD affects up to 15% of adults, with a peak incidence at 20 to 40 years of age. TMD is classified as intra-articular or extra-articular. Common symptoms include jaw pain or dysfunction, earache, headache, and facial pain. The etiology of TMD is multifactorial and includes biologic, environmental, social, emotional, and cognitive triggers. Diagnosis is most often based on history and physical examination. Diagnostic imaging may be beneficial when malocclusion or intra-articular abnormalities are suspected. Most patients improve with a combination of noninvasive therapies, including patient education, self-care, cognitive behavior therapy, pharmacotherapy, physical therapy, and occlusal devices. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and muscle relaxants are recommended initially, and benzodiazepines or antidepressants may be added for chronic cases. Referral to an oral and maxillofacial surgeon is indicated for refractory cases.

  4. Application of the subtraction technique to the radiological diagnosis of temporomandibular joint disorders. On the fundamental studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, Tohru; Tanaka, Toshio; Imaizumi, Satoru; Imaizumi, Eiichi; Yoshihara, Junya; Ohtani, Masatoshi

    1985-02-01

    The oblique lateral transcranial projection (OLTP) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is widely used for the diagnosis of TMJ disease. The OLTP is a simple and valuable technique for the lateral projection of the TMJ, but is sometimes reveals a complex radiographic findings due to the overlapping of the pars petrosa and the mastoid process to the TMJ. We have recently applied a photographic subtraction technique to the OLTP for reduction of the complex radiographic findings in the OLTP. The purpose of this study is to know the value of the photographic subtraction technique in the OLTP fundamentally. The results obtained are as follows: 1) The shape of the condyle was clearly demonstrated by the subtraction technique. 2) Diagnostic ability on disease of the condyle was increased by applying the subtraction technique. 3) Location of the condyle in the fossa was easily detected by the subtraction technique. (author).

  5. [Temporomandibular joint septic arthritis with secondary condylar resorption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constant, M; Nicot, R; Maes, J-M; Raoul, G; Ferri, J

    2016-09-01

    Septic arthritis are serious infections rarely observed for the temporomandibular joint. They are mainly hematogenous or transmitted by contiguity. Our patient presents the case of an infection of the temporomandibular joint by maxillary sinusitis of dental origin further complicated by cerebral abscess and empyema. Initial treatment consisted of an endonasal and intraoral drainage, intravenous empirical antibiotic therapy, a close clinicoradiological monitoring, and rehabilitation following a long-term active physiotherapy. Furthermore, the patient reported the onset of a dental articulation disorder with a left side premature contact and right lateral open bite, corresponding to a significant left condylar resorption. This infectious disease is very rare for temporomandibular location; however, its general and functional outcome is determined by the precocity of the treatment. It is important to know the diagnosis and the associated symptoms even if they are not very specifically described. It is essential to consider the diagnosis when facing atypical pain of the temporomandibular joint associated with trismus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease: an integrative literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taysa Vannoska de Almeida Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Temporomandibular joint dysfunction is a set of disorders involving the masticatory muscles, temporomandibular joint and associated structures. It is known that the progression of motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease is an indication that these people are more prone to the development of this dysfunction. Thus, this study aims to investigate the signs and symptoms of temporomandibular dysfunction in people with Parkinson's disease. The search was performed in the databases: MEDLINE/ PubMed, LILACs, CINAHL, SCOPUS, Web of Science and PEDro, without timing or language restriction. Specific descriptors were used for each database and keywords, evaluated by the instruments: Critical Appraisal Skill Program and Agency for Health care and Research and Quality. A total of 4,209 articles were found but only 5 were included. After critical analysis of the methodology of the articles, one did not reach the minimum score required by the evaluation instruments, thus, it was excluded. The selected articles addressed, as signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint dysfunction, the following: myofascial pain, bruxism, limitation of mouth opening, dislocation of the articular disc and asymmetry in the distribution of occlusal contacts. Further studies are needed in order to determine the relationship between cause and effect of the analyzed variables, so as to contribute to more specific and effective therapeutic interventions.

  7. Comparison of joint pain in patients diagnosed with and without articular disc displacement without reduction based on the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Masanori; Honda, Kosuke; Hasegawa, Yoko; Hasegawa, Makoto; Urade, Masahiro

    2013-07-01

    We compared joint pain (JP) in patients diagnosed with and without articular disc displacement without reduction (ADD) based on the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) and identified the characteristics of each JP. Fifty-eight patients with restricted mouth opening and pain in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and with a magnetic resonance imaging diagnosis of ADD were selected. Diagnosis of ADD + JP and nonADD + JP was made with the use of the RDC/TMD. A multiple regression analysis of the data disclosed a positive correlation between range of motion on maximum assisted mouth opening and visual analog scale (VAS) (severity of JP) in the ADD + JP group, and between chronic pain grade (CPG) and VAS in the nonADD + JP group. A significant difference was observed between ADD + JP and nonADD + JP groups in CPG; CPG was higher in the nonADD + JP than in the ADD + JP group. It is suggested that JP related and unrelated to ADD can indicate different types of disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Temporomandibular disorders: the habitual chewing side syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana-Mora, Urbano; López-Cedrún, José; Mora, María J; Otero, Xosé L; Santana-Penín, Urbano

    2013-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders are the most common cause of chronic orofacial pain, but, except where they occur subsequent to trauma, their cause remains unknown. This cross-sectional study assessed chewing function (habitual chewing side) and the differences of the chewing side and condylar path and lateral anterior guidance angles in participants with chronic unilateral temporomandibular disorder. This is the preliminary report of a randomized trial that aimed to test the effect of a new occlusal adjustment therapy. The masticatory function of 21 randomly selected completely dentate participants with chronic temporomandibular disorders (all but one with unilateral symptoms) was assessed by observing them eat almonds, inspecting the lateral horizontal movement of the jaw, with kinesiography, and by means of interview. The condylar path in the sagittal plane and the lateral anterior guidance angles with respect to the Frankfort horizontal plane in the frontal plane were measured on both sides in each individual. Sixteen of 20 participants with unilateral symptoms chewed on the affected side; the concordance (Fisher's exact test, P = .003) and the concordance-symmetry level (Kappa coefficient κ = 0.689; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.38 to 0.99; P = .002) were significant. The mean condylar path angle was steeper (53.47(10.88) degrees versus 46.16(7.25) degrees; P = .001), and the mean lateral anterior guidance angle was flatter (41.63(13.35) degrees versus 48.32(9.53) degrees P = .036) on the symptomatic side. The results of this study support the use of a new term based on etiology, "habitual chewing side syndrome", instead of the nonspecific symptom-based "temporomandibular joint disorders"; this denomination is characterized in adults by a steeper condylar path, flatter lateral anterior guidance, and habitual chewing on the symptomatic side.

  9. Temporomandibular disorders: the habitual chewing side syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urbano Santana-Mora

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Temporomandibular disorders are the most common cause of chronic orofacial pain, but, except where they occur subsequent to trauma, their cause remains unknown. This cross-sectional study assessed chewing function (habitual chewing side and the differences of the chewing side and condylar path and lateral anterior guidance angles in participants with chronic unilateral temporomandibular disorder. This is the preliminary report of a randomized trial that aimed to test the effect of a new occlusal adjustment therapy. METHODS: The masticatory function of 21 randomly selected completely dentate participants with chronic temporomandibular disorders (all but one with unilateral symptoms was assessed by observing them eat almonds, inspecting the lateral horizontal movement of the jaw, with kinesiography, and by means of interview. The condylar path in the sagittal plane and the lateral anterior guidance angles with respect to the Frankfort horizontal plane in the frontal plane were measured on both sides in each individual. RESULTS: Sixteen of 20 participants with unilateral symptoms chewed on the affected side; the concordance (Fisher's exact test, P = .003 and the concordance-symmetry level (Kappa coefficient κ = 0.689; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.38 to 0.99; P = .002 were significant. The mean condylar path angle was steeper (53.47(10.88 degrees versus 46.16(7.25 degrees; P = .001, and the mean lateral anterior guidance angle was flatter (41.63(13.35 degrees versus 48.32(9.53 degrees P = .036 on the symptomatic side. DISCUSSION: The results of this study support the use of a new term based on etiology, "habitual chewing side syndrome", instead of the nonspecific symptom-based "temporomandibular joint disorders"; this denomination is characterized in adults by a steeper condylar path, flatter lateral anterior guidance, and habitual chewing on the symptomatic side.

  10. Pharmacotherapeutic agents used in temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal Kucuk, B; Tolunay Kaya, S; Karagoz Motro, P; Oral, K

    2014-11-01

    Depending on the source and character, pharmacotherapy is one of the most commonly used methods to treat temporomandibular disorders in addition to the use of appliances, physiotherapy, behavioral therapy, and surgical interventions. To decide on the appropriate treatment approach for the treatment of temporomandibular disorders, pharmacotherapeutics should be understood in great detail. As for other pain treatments, pharmacotherapy can be used as a monotherapy or combined with other treatment options in temporomandibular disorders. The aim of the present review is to overview the primary analgesics and myorelaxants used in temporomandibular disorders. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Temporomandibular Joint Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health information you need from the Academy of General Dentistry Tuesday, November 7, 2017 About | Contact InfoBites Quick ... Statement | Terms and Conditions © 1996-2017 Academy of General Dentistry. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Epidemiology and natural progression of articular temporomandibular disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deBont, LGM; Dijkgraaf, LC; Stegenga, B

    The reported prevalence of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) differs from study to study, probably because of methodologic errors and lack of standardized definitions of TMDs and their characteristics. Classification of TMDs should be in accordance with classification of synovial joint disorders as

  13. Análise da sintomatologia em pacientes com disfunções intra-articulares da articulação temporomandibular Analysis of symptomatology in patients with intra-articular disorders of the temporomandibular joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvio Henrique de Paula DONEGÁ

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Foi realizado estudo analisando a sintomatologia em pacientes com disfunções intra-articulares da articulação temporomandibular. A queixa mais citada foi de dor na região pré-auricular (40,7%. Sintomatologia dolorosa articular (63,2% e ruídos articulares (83,3% foram os achados mais comuns ao exame clínico. Os ruídos articulares mais freqüentes foram os estalos (66,6%. Dor muscular ocorreu, em especial, nos músculos pterigóideo medial e lateral e na inserção do temporal. Houve decréscimo na amplitude para a protrusão dentre os movimentos mandibulares máximosThe study analyzed the symptomatology in patients with intra-articular disorders of the temporomandibular joint. The most frequent complaint was pain in the preauricular region (40.7%. Articular pain (63.2% and articular sounds (83.3% were the most common findings during clinical examination. Muscular pain occurred particularly in the medial and lateral pterygoid muscles and at the insertion of the temporalis muscle. The most frequent articular sound was clicking (66.6%. There was a decrease in extent of protrusion among the mandibular border positions.

  14. Analysis by computed tomography of bone changes in the mandibular head and mandibular fossa in relation to clinical findings in patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamamoto, Yoshioki; Nakajima, Tamio; Hayashi, Takafumi [Niigata Univ. (Japan). School of Dentistry

    1994-12-01

    Bone changes in the mandibular head and mandibular fossa in 33 patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders were studied with axial computed tomography in relation to clinical findings to clarify possible factors leading to bone changes in this phenomenon. Bone changes of the mandibular head were observed in 45 (68%) of the 66 TMJs. The mandibular head was juxtaposed to the mandibular fossa in 13 (29%) of the 45 joints in centric occlusion and in 29 joints (64%) in the anterior position on CT, whereas the mandibular head with no pathological bone change was juxtaposed to the mandibular fossa in none of the 21 joints in centric occlusion and in only 1 joint (5%) in the anterior position. In the two groups of patients with and without juxtaposition of the mandibular head and mandibular fossa with bone changes, the incidence of the initial symptoms such as pain, crepitus, and difficulty in opening the mouth was increased compared with the symptoms at presentation. However, the former group had severer symptoms than the latter group. These findings suggest that bony degeneration of the TMJ is accelerated by juxtaposition of the head and fossa. (author).

  15. Current status of temporomandibular joint disorders and the therapeutic system derived from a series of biomechanical, histological, and biochemical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo Tanne

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article was designed to report the current status of temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs and the therapeutic system on the basis of a series of clinical, biomechanical, histological and biochemical studies in our research groups. In particular, we have focused on the association of degenerative changes of articular cartilage in the mandibular condyle and the resultant progressive condylar resorption with mechanical stimuli acting on the condyle during the stomatognathic function. In a clinical aspect, the nature and prevalence of TMDs, association of malocclusion with TMDs, association of condylar position with TMDs, association of craniofacial morphology with TMDs, and influences of TMDs, TMJ-osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA in particular, were examined. In a biomechanical aspect, the nature of stress distribution in the TMJ from maximum clenching was analyzed with finite element method. In addition, the pattern of stress distribution was examined in association with varying vertical discrepancies of the craniofacial skeleton and friction between the articular disk and condyle. The results demonstrated an induction of large compressive stresses in the anterior and lateral areas on the condyle by the maximum clenching and the subsequent prominent increases in the same areas of the mandibular condyle as the vertical skeletal discrepancy became more prominent. Increase of friction at the articular surface was also indicated as a cause of larger stresses and the relevant disk displacement, which further induced an increase in stresses in the tissues posterior to the disks, indicating an important role of TMJ disks as a stress absorber. In a histological or biological aspect, increase in TMJ loading simulated by vertical skeletal discrepancy, which has already been revealed by the preceding finite element analysis or represented by excessive mouth opening, produced a decrease in the thickness of cartilage layers, an increase in the numbers of

  16. Trastornos temporomandibulares en adictos al qat Temporomandibular disorders in qat addicted people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Guerra Cobián

    2012-12-01

    recorded and the temporomandibular disorders were classified. Results: 55.7% of patients were affected of temporomandibular disorders. Acute Joint pain (14.1 and anterior condylar flattening (35.6% were the most frequents. Conclusions: the Temporomandibular disorders affected more than half of the population of studied qat addicted population, with prevalence of disorders in the disc-condyle relation (41%.The anterior condylar flattening was very evident.

  17. Influence of generalized joint hypermobility on temporomandibular joint and dental occlusion: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodelli, Lais; Pacheco, Andrielle de Bitencourt; Missau, Taiane Secretti; Silva, Ana Maria Toniolo da; Corrêa, Eliane Castilhos Rodrigues

    To evaluate the dental occlusion and temporomandibular joint in women with and without generalized joint hypermobility. Generalized joint hypermobility was assessed by the Beighton score. Individuals were divided into two groups: with and without hypermobility. The Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders was used to evaluate the temporomandibular joint. Dental occlusion was assessed according to Angle classification, overjet and overbite measures, presence of open bite or crossbite, pattern of disocclusion, and occlusal interference. Forty-three women participated voluntarily in the study: 17 in the group with hypermobility and 26 in the group without hypermobility. The frequencies of joint noise and deviation during mouth opening were greater in the hypermobility group (52.9% vs. 38.5% and 76.5% vs. 50%, respectively), but without statistical significance. None of the volunteers presented ideal occlusion and no significant difference was found in Angle Class between the groups. The hypermobility group presented a higher percentage of changes in occlusion (29.4% of overbite, 47.1% of overjet, and 17.6% of crossbite), with crossbite showing statistical difference between the groups. Hypermobility does not influence occlusion and range of mandibular motion in the women assessed. Nevertheless, the higher percentage of articular noise and uncorrected deviation during mouth opening shown by the group with hypermobility, even without statistical difference, may constitute evidence of correlation between hypermobility and temporomandibular disorder.

  18. Masticatory function and temporomandibular disorders in patients with dentofacial deformities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamsson, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    About 30% of individuals in the Swedish population will at some stage during life have treatment with orthodontic appliances. In more severe cases, when orthodontic treatment is not considered sufficient enough to correct the malocclusion, the orthodontic treatment is combined with orthognathic surgery. For these cases, a satisfying jaw relation is achieved by surgically moving the maxilla and/or the mandible into a pre-planned position. Patients due to be treated with orthognathic surgery often suffer from an impaired masticatory function, symptoms from the masticatory muscles or temporomandibular joints (temporomandibular disorders), headaches as well as dissatisfaction with their facial aesthetics. Since orthognathic treatment is expensive, in many cases arduous to the patient and not without complications, it is important to assess the treatment outcome and if this is satisfying for the patients. Previous studies that have examined the outcome after orthognathic treatment have had diverging study designs and have come to different conclusions with regard to both temporomandibular disorders and masticatory function. The overall aim of this thesis was to assess and compare the frequencies of temporomandibular disorders and the masticatory function in patients with dentofacial deformities before and after orthognathic treatment. THE THESIS IS BASED ON THE FOLLOWING STUDIES: Paper I is a systematic literature review aiming to, in an evidence-based approach, answer the question whether orthognathic treatment affects the prevalence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders. The review encompasses the period from January 1966 to April 2006 and was further extended to May 2013 in the frame story of this thesis. CONCLUSIONS IN PAPER I AND THE COMPLEMENTARY SURVEY: There is insufficient scientific evidence for a decrease of sub diagnoses of temporomandibular disorders after orthognathic treatment. There is limited scientific evidence for a reduction of

  19. Prevalence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders and their association with young university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Cunha Matheus Rodrigues Garcia

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To verify the prevalence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder and their association with joint noise, joint hypermobility, occlusal interference, orthodontic treatment and bruxism in a specific population composed of young university students. Methods: One hundred and seventeen (117 volunteers (mean age of 22 years were selected from the undergraduate course in Dentistry at the School of Dentistry of the “Centro Universitário Hermínio Ometto” (Araras, São Paulo, Brazil. The volunteers answered a questionnaire and were submitted to clinical and electrovibratography exams. Afterwards, the volunteers were classified as either having temporomandibular disorder or not, considering the presence of painful sensitivity in the temporomandibular joint and/or presence of joint noise. The prevalenceof the studied factors was calculated together with the association between each factor, and the presence of temporomandibular disorderwas analyzed by the Chi-square test. Results: The prevalence of temporomandibular disorder in the evaluated sample was 42.9% and significant association was found between temporomandibular disorder and joint noise (p<0.05; and between temporomandibular disorder and bruxism (p<0.05. Conclusion: The results suggest that patients with presence of precisely diagnosed bruxism and joint noise should be monitored with regard to the appearance of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder.

  20. The Evaluation of Head and Craniocervical Posture among Patients with and without Temporomandibular Joint Disorders- A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saddu, Shweta Channavir; Dyasanoor, Sujatha; Valappila, Nidhin J; Ravi, Beena Varma

    2015-08-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are the most common non-dental cause of orofacial pain with a multifactorial aetiology. To evaluate the head and craniocervical posture between individuals with and without TMD and its sub types by photographic and radiographic method. Thirty four TMD patients diagnosed according to Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD's (RDC/TMD) and were divided into 2 groups: Group I (muscle disorder), Group II (disc displacement). Control group comprised of 34 age and sex matched subjects without TMD. Lateral view photographs were taken and the head posture angle was measured. Craniocervical posture was assessed on lateral skull radiograph with two angles (Craniocervical Angle, Cervical Curvature Angle) and two distances (Suboccipital Space, Atlas-Axis Distance). To compare the results, t-test was used with significance level of 0.05. Head posture showed no statistical significant difference (p > 0.05) between Group I, II and control group in both photographic and radiographic methods. The cervical curvature angle showed significant difference (p = 0.045) in Group I only. Atlas-Axis Distance was statistically significant in Group II (p = 0.001). The present study confirmed that there is a negative association of head posture and TMD whereas, cervical lordosis was present in Group I only.

  1. The arterial blood supply of the temporomandibular joint: an anatomical study and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuccia, Antonino Marco; Caradonna, Carola; Caradonna, Domenico; Anastasi, Giuseppe; Milardi, Demetrio; Favaloro, Angelo; De Pietro, Anita; Angileri, Tommaso Maurizio; Caradonna, Luigi; Cutroneo, Giuseppina

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze three-dimensional images of the arterial supply to the temporomandibular joint. Ten patients (five men and five women, mean age 36 years) without signs or symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, who underwent contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) scanning with intravenous contrast, were studied. The direct volume rendering technique of CT images was used, and a data set of images to visualize the vasculature of the human temporomandibular joint in three dimensions was created. After elaboration of the data through post-processing, the arterial supply of the temporomandibular joint was studied. The analysis revealed the superficial temporal artery, the anterior tympanic artery, the deep temporal artery, the auricular posterior artery, the transverse facial artery, the middle meningeal artery, and the maxillary artery with their branches as the main arterial sources for the lateral and medial temporomandibular joint. The direct volume rendering technique was found to be successful in the assessment of the arterial supply to the temporomandibular joint. The superficial temporal artery and maxillary artery ran along the lateral and medial sides of the condylar neck, suggesting that these arteries are at increased risk during soft-tissue procedures such as an elective arthroplasty of the temporomandibular joint.

  2. The arterial blood supply of the temporomandibular joint: an anatomical study and clinical implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuccia, Antonino Marco; Caradonna, Carola; Caradonna, Domenico [Dept. of Surgical and Oncological Disciplines, University of Palermo, Palermo (Italy); Anastasi, Giuseppe; Milardi, Demetrio; Favaloro, Angelo; Caradonna, Luigi; Cutroneo, Giuseppina [Biomorphology and Biotechnologies, University of Messina, Messina (Italy); De Pietro, Anita; Angileri, Tommaso Maurizio [Villa Santa Teresa, Diagnostica per Immagini, Palermo (Italy)

    2013-03-15

    The aim of this study was to analyze three-dimensional images of the arterial supply to the temporomandibular joint. Ten patients (five men and five women, mean age 36 years) without signs or symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, who underwent contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) scanning with intravenous contrast, were studied. The direct volume rendering technique of CT images was used, and a data set of images to visualize the vasculature of the human temporomandibular joint in three dimensions was created. After elaboration of the data through post-processing, the arterial supply of the temporomandibular joint was studied. The analysis revealed the superficial temporal artery, the anterior tympanic artery, the deep temporal artery, the auricular posterior artery, the transverse facial artery, the middle meningeal artery, and the maxillary artery with their branches as the main arterial sources for the lateral and medial temporomandibular joint. The direct volume rendering technique was found to be successful in the assessment of the arterial supply to the temporomandibular joint. The superficial temporal artery and maxillary artery ran along the lateral and medial sides of the condylar neck, suggesting that these arteries are at increased risk during soft-tissue procedures such as an elective arthroplasty of the temporomandibular joint.

  3. Temporomandibular disorder: otologic implications and its relationship to sleep bruxism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Bruno Gama; Freitas, Jaciel Leandro de Melo; Barbosa, André Cavalcanti da Silva; Gueiros, Maria Cecília Scheidegger Neves; Gomes, Simone Guimarães Farias; Rosenblatt, Aronita; Júnior, Arnaldo de França Caldas

    2017-08-23

    Temporomandibular disorder is an umbrella term for various clinical problems affecting the muscles of mastication, temporomandibular joint and associated structures. This disorder has a multifactor etiology, with oral parafunctional habits considered an important co-factor. Among such habits, sleep bruxism is considered a causal agent involved in the initiation and/or perpetuation of temporomandibular disorder. That condition can result in pain otologic symptoms. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between temporomandibular disorder and both otologic symptoms and bruxism. A total of 776 individuals aged 15 years or older from urban areas in the city of Recife (Brazil) registered at Family Health Units were examined. The diagnosis of temporomandibular disorder was determined using Axis I of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for temporomandibular disorders, addressing questions concerning myofascial pain and joint problems (disk displacement, arthralgia, osteoarthritis and osteoarthrosis). Four examiners had previously undergone training and calibration exercises for the administration of the instrument. Intra-examiner and inter-examiner agreement was determined using the Kappa statistic. Individuals with a diagnosis of at least one of these conditions were classified as having temporomandibular disorder. The diagnosis of otologic symptoms and bruxism was defined using the same instrument and a clinical exam. Among the individuals with temporomandibular disorder, 58.2% had at least one otologic symptom and 52% exhibited bruxism. Statistically significant associations were found between the disorder and both otologic symptoms and bruxism (p<0.01 for both conditions; OR=2.12 and 2.3 respectively). Otologic symptoms and bruxism maintained statistical significance in the binary logistic regression analysis, which demonstrated a 1.7 fold and twofold greater chance of such individuals have temporomandibular disorder, respectively. The logistic

  4. Clinical signs and symptoms of tinnitus in temporomandibular joint disorders: A pilot study comparing patients and non-patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amisha Kanji

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tinnitus is one of the otologic symptoms commonly reported to be associated with temporomandibular disorder (TMD, and questions regarding its nature and cause continue to plague the clinical and research community.Objectives: The current pilot study aimed to investigate the clinical signs and symptoms of presenting tinnitus in a group of individuals with TMD (group A, and compare them with a group with tinnitus but without TMD (group B. Twenty participants were included in the study, 10 from each group.Methods: All participants underwent basic audiological as well as ear, nose and throat (ENT evaluations to establish group A and group B. For tinnitus assessment, all participants completed a tinnitus survey questionnaire, and their tinnitus was evaluated using tinnitus matching procedures.Results: Findings revealed clinically relevant differences in attributes of tinnitus in patients with and without TMD. Most of the participants in group A matched their tinnitus to a 6 000 Hz tone or noise, at lower intensity levels than participants in group B, although these results were not statistically significant. Participants in group A associated their tinnitus with a single sound whereas some participants in group B associated it with more than one sound. More participants in group B reported the duration of their tinnitus as constant.Conclusions: Tinnitus may occur in patients with TMD, and be of high frequency. This highlights the importance of thorough assessment for patients with tinnitus as this might have implications for diagnosis and management.

  5. Stem Cells for Temporomandibular Joint Repair and Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shipin; Yap, Adrian U J; Toh, Wei Seong

    2015-10-01

    Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) represent a heterogeneous group of musculoskeletal and neuromuscular conditions involving the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), masticatory muscles and/or associated structures. They are a major cause of non-dental orofacial pain. As a group, they are often multi-factorial in nature and have no common etiology or biological explanations. TMD can be broadly divided into masticatory muscle and TMJ disorders. TMJ disorders are characterized by intra-articular positional and/or structural abnormalities. The most common type of TMJ disorders involves displacement of the TMJ articular disc that precedes progressive degenerative changes of the joint leading to osteoarthritis (OA). In the past decade, progress made in the development of stem cell-based therapies and tissue engineering have provided alternative methods to attenuate the disease symptoms and even replace the diseased tissue in the treatment of TMJ disorders. Resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been isolated from the synovia of TMJ, suggesting an important role in the repair and regeneration of TMJ. The seminal discovery of pluripotent stem cells including embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have provided promising cell sources for drug discovery, transplantation as well as for tissue engineering of TMJ condylar cartilage and disc. This review discusses the most recent advances in development of stem cell-based treatments for TMJ disorders through innovative approaches of cell-based therapeutics, tissue engineering and drug discovery.

  6. Temporomandibular Disorders in Psoriasis Patients with and without Psoriatic Arthritis: An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crincoli, Vito; Di Comite, Mariasevera; Di Bisceglie, Maria Beatrice; Fatone, Laura; Favia, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic, remitting and relapsing inflammatory disorder, involving the skin, nails, scalp and mucous membranes, that impairs patients' quality of life to varying degrees. Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic seronegative, inflammatory arthritis, usually preceded by psoriasis. Temporomandibular disorders is a generic term referred to clinical conditions involving the jaw muscles and temporomandibular joint. The aim of this study was to assess symptoms and signs of temporomandibular disorders in psoriasis patients with and without psoriatic arthritis. The study group included 112 patients (56 men, 56 women; median age 49.7±12 years) with psoriasis, 25 of them were affected by psoriatic arthritis. A group of 112 subjects without psoriasis (56 men, 56 women; median age 47.7±17 years) served as controls. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders were evaluated according to the standardized Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders. Psoriasis patients were subgrouped according to the presence/absence of psoriatic arthritis and by gender, to assess the prevalence of traditional symptoms and signs of temporomandibular disorders. Patients with psoriasis, and to an even greater extent those with psoriatic arthritis, were more frequently affected by symptoms and signs of temporomandibular disorders, including an internal temporomandibular joint opening derangement than healthy subjects. A statistically significant increase in symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, in opening derangement, bruxism and sounds of temporomandibular joint was found in patients with psoriatic arthritis as compared with psoriasis patients without arthritis and controls. psoriasis seems to play a role in temporomandibular joint disorders, causing an increase in orofacial pain and an altered chewing function.

  7. Temporomandibular Disorders in Psoriasis Patients with and without Psoriatic Arthritis: An Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crincoli, Vito; Di Comite, Mariasevera; Di Bisceglie, Maria Beatrice; Fatone, Laura; Favia, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Psoriasis is a chronic, remitting and relapsing inflammatory disorder, involving the skin, nails, scalp and mucous membranes, that impairs patients' quality of life to varying degrees. Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic seronegative, inflammatory arthritis, usually preceded by psoriasis. Temporomandibular disorders is a generic term referred to clinical conditions involving the jaw muscles and temporomandibular joint. The aim of this study was to assess symptoms and signs of temporomandibular disorders in psoriasis patients with and without psoriatic arthritis. METHODS: The study group included 112 patients (56 men, 56 women; median age 49.7±12 years) with psoriasis, 25 of them were affected by psoriatic arthritis. A group of 112 subjects without psoriasis (56 men, 56 women; median age 47.7±17 years) served as controls. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders were evaluated according to the standardized Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders. Psoriasis patients were subgrouped according to the presence/absence of psoriatic arthritis and by gender, to assess the prevalence of traditional symptoms and signs of temporomandibular disorders. RESULTS: Patients with psoriasis, and to an even greater extent those with psoriatic arthritis, were more frequently affected by symptoms and signs of temporomandibular disorders, including an internal temporomandibular joint opening derangement than healthy subjects. A statistically significant increase in symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, in opening derangement, bruxism and sounds of temporomandibular joint was found in patients with psoriatic arthritis as compared with psoriasis patients without arthritis and controls. CONCLUSIONS: psoriasis seems to play a role in temporomandibular joint disorders, causing an increase in orofacial pain and an altered chewing function. PMID:26019683

  8. Orofacial pain and temporomandibular disorders: the impact on oral health and quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo César Rodrigues Conti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many conditions may cause painful symptoms in orofacial structures. Among the chronic conditions that affect this area, temporomandibular disorders are the most common. Temporomandibular Disorder is a collective term that includes a number of clinical complaints involving the masticatory muscles, the Temporomandibular Joint and associated structures. In some cases, these complaints can be associated with depression, catastrophizing behavior and impact on quality of life. The present study aims to explain the relationship between Temporomandibular Disorders and pain chronification and their relation to a variety of psychosocial and behavioral comorbid conditions. The mechanisms of pain conduction and suggestions for management are also addressed.

  9. Orofacial pain and temporomandibular disorders: the impact on oral health and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Paulo César Rodrigues; Pinto-Fiamengui, Lívia Maria Sales; Cunha, Carolina Ortigosa; Conti, Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira

    2012-01-01

    Many conditions may cause painful symptoms in orofacial structures. Among the chronic conditions that affect this area, temporomandibular disorders are the most common. Temporomandibular Disorder is a collective term that includes a number of clinical complaints involving the masticatory muscles, the Temporomandibular Joint and associated structures. In some cases, these complaints can be associated with depression, catastrophizing behavior and impact on quality of life. The present study aims to explain the relationship between Temporomandibular Disorders and pain chronification and their relation to a variety of psychosocial and behavioral comorbid conditions. The mechanisms of pain conduction and suggestions for management are also addressed.

  10. Temporomandibular disorders. Part 2: conservative management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Stephen M; Brismée, Jean-Michel; Sizer, Phillip S; Courtney, Carol A

    2014-01-01

    Appropriate management of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) requires an understanding of the underlying dysfunction associated with the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and surrounding structures. A comprehensive examination process, as described in part 1 of this series, can reveal underlying clinical findings that assist in the delivery of comprehensive physical therapy services for patients with TMD. Part 2 of this series focuses on management strategies for TMD. Physical therapy is the preferred conservative management approach for TMD. Physical therapists are professionally well-positioned to step into the void and provide clinical services for patients with TMD. Clinicians should utilize examination findings to design rehabilitation programs that focus on addressing patient-specific impairments. Potentially appropriate plan of care components include joint and soft tissue mobilization, trigger point dry needling, friction massage, therapeutic exercise, patient education, modalities, and outside referral. Management options should address both symptom reduction and oral function. Satisfactory results can often be achieved when management focuses on patient-specific clinical variables. PMID:24976744

  11. Temporomandibular disorders: what to teach in dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, J F; Mosby, E L

    1990-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorders continue to be a nemesis for health professionals and for patients who are afflicted. The medical/dental student must be taught to recognize this often complex disorder and be able to interact with the various disciplines within the medical/dental profession to provide the care needed. This article discusses problems and a possible approach for establishing continuity of format for classifying TM disorders so students can be taught to recognize them.

  12. Surgical Management of Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis in Ankylosing Spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M. Felstead

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Relatively few patients develop such severe degenerative temporomandibular joint (TMJ disease that they require total joint replacement. Current indications include those conditions involving condylar bone loss such as degenerative (osteoarthritis or inflammatory joint disease (ankylosing spondylitis, rheumatoid, and psoriatic. Ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ secondary to ankylosing spondylitis remains an under investigated entity. We aim to provide an overview of treatment objectives, surgical procedures, and our experience with total TMJ replacement for this condition.

  13. On surgical intervention in the temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmark, G

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to evaluate the indications for and the results of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) surgery in patients with long-standing severe orofacial pain and dysfunction as well as in patients with fractures of the condylar neck. The patients with long-standing pain and dysfunction had had symptoms for a mean time of 4 years, had been treated conservatively for a mean time of 2.5 years, and had undergone numerous conservative treatment methods without improvement except for a minor increase in mouth opening capacity. The indications for surgery were strict; only 1% or less of all the patients referred to the departments with a diagnosis of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) were prescribed surgery, which was considered to be the only remaining option. The TMJ surgery reduced pain, sleeping problems, and analgesic consumption and improved mouth opening capacity. The procedure showed low morbidity except for a facial nerve disturbance in three patients. Postoperatively, the bite force was observed to be normalised, and the radiographic examination showed moderate to severe osteoarthrotic changes. These changes, though extensive, were considered to be the normal outcome of diskectomy and without clinical significance, even though they resembled degenerative joint disease. In study V, surgery was performed on patients with a clear diagnosis of anterior disk displacement (ADD) with or without reduction. The preoperative pain and mouth opening capacity were markedly improved as well as other subjective symptoms. Although surgical morbidity was low, some radiographic changes were clearly detectable. In agreement with earlier reports, patients with a distinct diagnosis of ADD with or without reduction were clearly helped by diskectomy. In cases of ADD with or without reduction, it can be concluded that unsuccessful conservative treatment should not exceed 3-6 months but be discontinued in favour of the documented advantages of surgery in these cases. Patients

  14. Atypical temporomandibular joint pain: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmer, Charles G; Wold, Courtney C; Stoll, Ethan M; Dolwick, M Franklin

    2014-12-01

    Atypical temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain can consist of an unusual intensity, location or set of pain descriptors that do not match what is traditionally observed for TMJ capsular pain, disc displacements or arthritic conditions. Presented in this case report is an atypical pain report regarding a unilateral TMJ pain as the chief complaint. An overview of typical vs atypical TMJ pain is also reviewed to highlight unusual signs and symptoms so that the clinician can identify these atypical presentations and pursue further diagnostic approaches. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Bony ankylosis of temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byeong Do; Yoon, Young Nam; Um, Ki Doo; Ra, Jong Ill; Lee, Wan [School of Dentistry, Wonkwang University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-06-15

    Ankylosis of joint is defined as limited movement due to infection, trauma, or surgical procedure. A 59-year-old female with a chief complaint of limited movements during mouth opening had a positive history of trauma to her right TMJ area about 5 years ago. From that time, progressive mouth opening limitation and intermittent pain have occurred. At the time of admission the patient showed mandibular deviation to the right side during mouth opening, with a maximum opening limited to 5 mm. On plain radiographs, right condylar enlargement and joint space reduction by newly formed bony tissues were observed. CT scans showed right condylar enlargement, cortical sclerosis, and thickening of the condyle, articular fossa and articular eminence.

  16. [Frequency of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint disorders, vertical orthodontic anomalies and their relationships based on screening of a large population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madléna, Melinda; Fejérdy, Pál; Kaán, Miklós; Hermann, Péter

    2015-03-01

    Altogether 4606 volunteers (2923 vomen, 1683 men) participated in the representative national epidemiological study to screen the alterations of temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The characteristic clinical signs and subjective complaints according to TMJ were evaluated by medical history taking and physical examination. Regarding the orthodontic anomalies, the vertical abnormalities (deep bite and open bite) were specifically noted. Clinical signs showing functional problems of TMJ were found in 45.19% of the screened population, mainly in the group of 35-44 year olds. The frequency of clicking and crepitation of TMJ was significantly higher in women compared to men (p disorders was found in the South-Transdanubian region, the lowest rate in the Middle-Transdanubian region, between these regions it was a significant difference regarding the frequency of deviation/deflexion (p < 0.05). Of the vertical abnormalities, deep bite occured most frequently in the 35-44 ys old age group. The prevalence of deep bite was higher among males than females in the whole screened population, but the difference was not statistically significant. Significant relationship was detected between deep bite and TMJ pain, deep bite and noises in the joint in the majority of the population. The most frequent anomaly in the South-Transdanubian region was deep bite, while the open bite occured most frequently in south middle part of Hungary. Conclusion: the Hungarian population needs well organized specific programs to improve the oral health including TMJ and orthodontic aspects.

  17. Influence of orthodontic treatment on temporomandibular disorders. A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-González, Felipe J; Cañigral, Aránzazu; López-Caballo, José L; Brizuela, Aritza; Moreno-Hay, Isabel; Del Río-Highsmith, Jaime; Vega, José A

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this literature systematic review was to evaluate the possible association between malocclusions, orthodontic treatment and development of temporomandibular disorders. A search was carried out on PubMed-Medline database from January 2000 to August 2013 using the keywords "orthodontics and temporomandibular disorders", "orthodontics and facial pain" and "malocclusion and temporomandibular disorders". Human studies included in the study were those assessing signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in relation to orthodontic treatment. A search was carried out on PubMed-Medline database from January 2000 to August 2013 using the keywords "orthodontics and temporomandibular disorders", "orthodontics and facial pain" and "malocclusion and temporomandibular disorders". Human studies included in the study were those assessing signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in relation to orthodontic treatment. The search strategy resulted in 61 articles. After selection according to the inclusion/exclusion criteria 9 articles qualified for the final analysis. The articles which linked orthodontics and development of temporomandibular disorders showed very discrepant results. Some indicated that orthodontic treatment could improve signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, but none of them obtained statistically significant differences. According to the authors examined, there is no evidence for a cause-effect relationship between orthodontic treatment and temporomandibular disorders, or that such treatment might improve or prevent them. More longitudinal studies are needed to verify any possible interrelationship. Key words:Malocclusion and temporomandibular disorders, orthodontics and facial pain, orthodontics and temporomandibular disorders, temporomandibular disorders, temporomandibular dysfunction.

  18. Temporomandibular disorders: the habitual chewing side syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Santana-Mora, Urbano; López-Cedrún, José; Mora, María J; Otero, Xosé L; Santana-Penín, Urbano

    2013-01-01

    .... This cross-sectional study assessed chewing function (habitual chewing side) and the differences of the chewing side and condylar path and lateral anterior guidance angles in participants with chronic unilateral temporomandibular disorder...

  19. Temporomandibular joint disorders treated with articular injection: the effectiveness of plasma rich in growth factors-Endoret.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomello, Maurizio; Giacomello, Alberto; Mortellaro, Carmen; Gallesio, Giorgia; Mozzati, Marco

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis treatment through articular injections of plasma rich in growth factors (PGRF)-Endoret. Thirteen patients (median age, 47.64 y; SD, 7.51; range, 40-64 y; male-female ratio, 2:11) with osteoarthritis of TMJ associated to chronic pain have been selected. They were treated with articular injections of PRGF-Endoret, measuring the maximum mouth opening and pain level before the first injection (t0), 30 days after just before the second (t1), and after 6 months (t2). Data were analyzed using the paired Student's t-test data. The visual analogue scale score at t0 is 7.69 (range, 4-10; SD, 1.9), whereas that at t1 is 1.54 (range, 0-5; SD, 1.74) and that at t2 is 0.23 (range, 0-2; SD, 0.65). These differences in the results are statistically highly significant (P < 0.0001 comparison t0-t1 and t0-t2 and P < 0.01 comparison t1-t2). In terms of maximum mouth opening, it reduced from 30.15 mm at t0 (range, 26-40 mm; SD, 4.44) to 37.54 mm at t1 (range, 31-51 mm; SD, 5.10), with an increase of 7.38 mm (range, 4-11 mm; SD, 2.02) and a highly significant difference (P < 0.0001). At t2, it was 39.54 mm (range, 34-51; SD, 4.55) with an increase of 9.38 mm (range, 5-12 mm; SD, 2.21) compared with t0 and that of 2.00 mm compared with t1. Both differences in the results are statistically significant (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.01, respectively). The articular injections of PRGF-Endoret represent a very efficient method to control pain and to improve the TMJ mobility.

  20. Fibromyalgia syndrome and temporomandibular disorders with muscular pain. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Fernández, Ana Maria; Jiménez-Castellanos, Emilio; Iglesias-Linares, Alejandro; Bueso-Madrid, Débora; Fernández-Rodríguez, Ana; de Miguel, Manuel

    2017-03-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) refer to a group of clinical picture affecting the masticatory muscles and temporomandibular joint that are characterized by muscular or joint pain, dysfunction (limited or altered functions) and joint noises, as well as other associated symptoms, such as tension headaches, otalgia, dizziness, tinnitus, and others. Fibromyalgia (FM) is a syndrome of unknown etiology involving generalized chronic pain accompanied, in a high percentage of cases, by other symptoms such as asthenia, anxiety, depression, sleep disturbances, and other less frequent symptoms, such as temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Data were compiled by two experienced examiners following a specific form. An electronic search was carried out in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PUBMED, and SCOPUS electronic databases (up to April 2016, unrestricted by date or language). Comparative clinical studies with patients with both clinical pictures involving the study of pathogenic processes. Fibromyalgia and temporomandibular disorders with muscle pain both have profiles that affect the muscular system and therefore share many epidemiological, clinical, and physiopathological symptoms. Because of this, we are led to think that there is, if not a common etiology, at least a common pathogenesis. This article revises the physiopathological processes of both clinical pictures in an attempt to determine their similarities and likenesses. This would undoubtedly help in providing a better therapeutic approach.

  1. Cervical Musculoskeletal Impairments and Temporomandibular Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Susan Armijo-Olivo; David Magee

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The study of cervical muscles and their significance in the development and perpetuation of Temporomandibular Disorders has not been elucidated. Thus this project was designed to investigate the association between cervical musculoskeletal impairments and Temporomandibular Disorders. Material and Methods A sample of 154 subjects participated in this study. All subjects underwent a series of physical tests and electromyographic assessment (i.e. head and neck posture, maxima...

  2. A comparative study on the impact of intra-articular injections of hyaluronic acid, tenoxicam and betametazon on the relief of temporomandibular joint disorder complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gencer, Zeliha Kapusuz; Özkiriş, Mahmut; Okur, Aylin; Korkmaz, Murat; Saydam, Levent

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of intra-articular injections of three different agents with well known anti-inflammatory properties. Between April 2010 and January 2013 a total of 100 patients who were diagnosed as temporomandibular joint disorder in the Department of Otolaryngology at Bozok University School of Medicine were prospectively studied. Patients with symptoms of jaw pain, limited or painful jaw movement, clicking or grating within the joint, were evaluated with temporomandibular CT to investigate the presence of cartilage or capsule degeneration. In the study group there were 55 female and 45 male patients who were non-responders to conventional anti-inflammatory treatment for TMJ complaints. The patients were randomly divided into four groups consisting of a control group and three different groups who underwent intra-articular injection of one given anti-inflammatory agent for each group. We injected saline solution to intra-articular space in the control group. Of three anti-inflammatory agents including hyaluronic acid (HA, Hyalgan intra-articular injection, Sodium hyaluronate 10 mg/ml, 2 ml injection syringe, Bilim Pharmaceutical Company, Istanbul, Turkey); betamethasone (CS, Diprospan flacon, 7.0 mg betamethasone/1 ml, Schering-Plough Pharmaceutical Company, Istanbul, Turkey) and; tenoxicam (TX, Tilcotil flacon, 20 mg tenoxicam/ml, Roche Pharmaceutical Company, Istanbul, Turkey) were administered intra-articularly under, ultrasonographic guidance. Following the completion of injections the, changes in subjective symptoms were compared with visual analogue scales, (VAS) scores at 1st and 6th weeks' follow-up visits between four groups. The HA group did significantly better pain relief scores compared to the, other groups at 1st and 6th weeks (p 0.05). We found that HA produced better pain relief scores when compared to the other anti-inflammatory agents studied. The main disadvantage of HA is its relatively higher cost

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography of the temporomandibular joint: beyond dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Marcelo de Mattos; Machado, Karina Freitas Soares [Clinica Axial Centro de Imagem, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Radiologia; Mascarenhas, Marcelo Henrique [Associacao Brasileira de Odontologia de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Curso de Especializacao em Disfuncao Temporomandibular e Dor Orofacial

    2008-09-15

    Several diseases should be considered in the differential diagnosis of disorders affecting the temporomandibular joints. Internal derangement is the main condition responsible for pain related to this joint. Clinical signs may, though, be quite non-specific, and many other conditions present with similar and not infrequently indistinguishable signs and symptoms. In the present study, the authors describe several non-dysfunctional conditions affecting the temporomandibular joints through computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, emphasizing the importance of these imaging methods in the diagnosis of inflammatory, neoplastic and traumatic diseases of this region. Considering that clinical presentations are frequently non-specific, radiologists play a critical role in the differential diagnosis. (author)

  4. Radiographic analysis of temporomandibular joint arthrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Dong Soo [Department of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-11-15

    The author analysed the bone changes, the positional relationships between condylar head and articular fossa, and the interrelationship between the bone changes and the abnormal position of condylar head, from 1,036 radiographs of 259 patients with temporomandibular joint arthrosis, which were obtained by the oblique-lateral transcranial projection and orthopantomograms. The results were as follows: 1. Among the radiographic bone changes of the temporomandibular joint arthrosis, deformity was 36..90% (217 cases), sclerosis 34.18% (201 cases), erosive change 25.58% (152 cases) and marginal proliferation 3.06% (18 cases) respectively. 2. In the positional changes between condylar head and articular fossa, the downward positioning of condylar head in centric occlusion was most frequent (36.90%), of which frequency was significantly higher than forward positioning (11.22%) and backward positioning (4.76%) in same condition. Also, radiographs showed that the enlargement of articular space showed higher frequency than its narrowing. In the opening position of mouth, the restrict ed movement of condylar head within articular fossa was most frequent (35.03%). The forward positioning and the downward positioning was 15.65% and 9.52% respectively. Also, radiographs revealed that the incomplete movement or no positional change of condylar head was most frequent. 3. In the interrelationship between bone changes and abnormal position of condylar head, deformity was 42.79% in the cases of downward positioning of condylar head in centric occlusion and 37.50% in those of normal positioning of condylar head in same condition. This revealed that deformity was most frequent bone change in above condylar positionings. However, erosive change was 34.62% in the cases of downward positioning of condylar head in centric occlusion and 33 .33% in those of forward positioning. In opening position of condylar head, and deformity in the cases of norma l positioning, forward positioning and

  5. Diagnostic group differences in temporomandibular joint energy densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, L M; Iwasaki, L R; Gonzalez, Y M; Liu, H; Marx, D B; Nickel, J C

    2015-04-01

    Cartilage fatigue, due to mechanical work, may account for precocious development of degenerative joint disease in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). This study compared energy densities (mJ/mm³) in TMJs of three diagnostic groups. Sixty-eight subjects (44 women, 24 men) gave informed consent. Diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders (DC/TMD) and imaging were used to group subjects according to presence of jaw muscle or joint pain (+P) and bilateral disk displacement (+DD). Subjects (+P+DD, n=16; -P+DD, n=16; and -P-DD, n=36) provided cone-beam computed tomography and magnetic resonance images, and jaw-tracking data. Numerical modeling was used to determine TMJ loads (Fnormal). Dynamic stereometry was used to characterize individual-specific data of stress-field dynamics during 10 symmetrical jaw-closing cycles. These data were used to estimate tractional forces (Ftraction). Energy densities were then calculated as W/Q (W=work done or mechanical energy input=tractional force×distance of stress-field translation, Q=volume of cartilage). anova and Tukey-Kramer post hoc analyses tested for intergroup differences. Mean±standard error energy density for the +P+DD group was 12.7±1.5 mJ/mm³ and significantly greater (all adjusted ppain and disk displacement. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Temporomandibular disorders: Old ideas and new concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, Thomas; Jensen, Rigmor Højland

    2017-06-01

    Background Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) is an umbrella term for pain and dysfunction involving the masticatory muscles and the temporomandibular joints (TMJs). TMD is the most common orofacial pain condition. Its prominent features include regional pain in the face and preauricular area, limitations in jaw movement, and noise from the TMJs during jaw movements. TMD affects up to 15% of adults and 7% of adolescents. Chronic pain is the overwhelming reason that patients with TMD seek treatment. TMD can associate with impaired general health, depression, and other psychological disabilities, and may affect the quality of life of the patient. Assessment Evaluations indicate that the recently published Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (DC/TMD) are reliable and valid. These criteria cover the most common types of TMD, which include pain-related disorders (e.g., myalgia, headache attributable to TMD, and arthralgia) as well as disorders associated with the TMJ (primarily disc displacements and degenerative disease). As peripheral mechanisms most likely play a role in the onset of TMD, a detailed muscle examination is recommended. The persistence of pain involves more central factors, such as sensitization of the supraspinal neurons and second-order neurons at the level of the spinal dorsal horn/trigeminal nucleus, imbalanced antinociceptive activity, and strong genetic predisposition, which also is included in DC/TMD. Conclusion The etiology is complex and still not clearly understood, but several biological and psychosocial risk factors for TMD have been identified. Several studies indicate that patients with TMD improve with a combination of noninvasive therapies, including behavior therapy, pharmacotherapy, physical therapy, and occlusal appliances. More stringently designed studies, however, are needed to assess treatment efficacy and how to tailor treatment to the individual patient.

  7. Internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint; Internal Derangement des Temporomandibulargelenks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krestan, C.; Lomoschitz, F.; Puig, S.; Robinson, S. [Vienna Univ. (Austria). Zentrales Inst. fuer Radiodiagnostik

    2001-09-01

    Internal Derangement is one of the most common disorders of the Temporomandibular joint. It is defined as an abnormal anatomical relationship between the discus articularis and the other structures of the temporomandibular joint. More than 2/3 of patients with clinical symptoms of the temporomandibular joint have an internal derangement. The most frequent finding in internal derangement is an anterior dislocation of the disc with reduction after mouth opening. In more severe cases a complete anterior dislocation is found without reduction of the disc. Internal derangement is a risk factor for developing osteoarthritis with remodeling of the condylus and the fossa mandibularis. The most important modalities of radiologic diagnosis are arthrography, CT and MRI. The diagnosis of craniofacial dysfunction has been improved dramatically by modern imaging techniques, which have become essential tools for primary diagnostic and evaluation after conservative or surgical therapy. MRI has become the gold standard. (orig.) [German] Das Internal Derangement ist eine der haeufigsten Erkrankungen des Temporomandibulargelenks. Es ist definiert als eine abnorme anatomische Beziehung des Discus articularis zu den uebrigen gelenkbildenden Strukturen. Bei mehr als 2/3 der Patienten mit Kiefergelenkbeschwerden kann ein Internal Derangement nachgewiesen werden. Die haeufigste Form ist die Ventralverlagerung des Diskus bei erhaltener Reduktion waehrend der Mundoeffnung. Bei schwereren Formen kommt es zu totalen Ventralverlagerungen ohne Reduktion. Das Internal Derangement beguenstigt die Entwicklung einer Arthrose mit entsprechenden Veraenderungen am Caput mandibulae sowie an der Fossa mandibularis. Die Palette der bildgebenden Diagnostik reicht von der Arthrographie ueber die CT zur MRT. Durch die modernen Schnittbildverfahren wurde die Abklaerung der kraniofazialen Dysfunktion revolutioniert und sind heute essentieller Bestandteil der Initialdiagnostik sowie der Verlaufsbeurteilung

  8. [Functional state of the masticatory system in healthy individuals (control group) and in patients with temporomandibular joint disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourné, L

    1997-01-01

    The functional status of the masticatory system was investigated in a sample of 68 self-defined controls without any treatment need and 82 craniomandibular disorder patients. Among the parameters investigated were measures of mandibular mobility, the presence of joint noises and palpation tenderness of 17 muscle and 3 TMJ sites. These data allowed for calculation of Fricton's Craniomandibular Index (CMI) and Helkimo's Clinical Dysfunction Index (Di). Several socalled signs of dysfunction were found in the normal control group: 38% of the joints had some kind of noise and several muscle sites were tender to palpation (splenius capitis muscle 50%, anterior masseter and temporal muscle 45%, insertion of the trapezius muscle 40%). In addition, according to Helkimo's Di. 90% of the controls would be classified as having mild to moderate dysfunction. The high prevalence of positive signs in the control sample calls for a less rigid definition of what is called a normal craniomandibular status and refutes the a priori establishment of a narrow set of criteria for normality. Some parameters showed a highly statistically significant difference among the control and patient group (p palpation points and the CMI and Di.

  9. Temporomandibular Joint Disorders’ Impact on Pain, Function, and Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantaracherd, P.; John, M.T.; Hodges, J.S.; Schiffman, E.L.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the association between more advanced stages of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) intra-articular disorders (“TMJ intra-articular status”), representing a transition from normal joint structure to TMJ disc displacement with and without reduction (DDwR and DDwoR) to degenerative joint disease (DJD), and patient-reported outcomes of jaw pain, function, and disability (“TMD impact”). This cross-sectional study included 614 cases from the RDC/TMD Validation Project with at least one temporomandibular disorder (TMD) diagnosis. TMJ intra-articular status was determined by 3 blinded, calibrated radiologists using magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography as one of normal joint structure, DDwR, DDwoR, or DJD, representing the subject’s most advanced TMJ diagnosis. TMD impact was conceptualized as a latent variable consisting of 1) pain intensity (Characteristic Pain Index from the Graded Chronic Pain Scale [GCPS]), 2) jaw function (Jaw Functional Limitation Scale), and 3) disability (Disability Points from GCPS). A structural equation model estimated the association of TMJ intra-articular status with the latent measure TMD impact as a correlation coefficient in all TMD cases (n = 614) and in cases with a TMD pain diagnosis (n = 500). The correlations between TMJ intra-articular status and TMD impact were 0.05 (95% confidence interval [CI], −0.04 to 0.13) for all TMD cases and 0.07 (95% CI, −0.04 to 0.17) for cases with a pain diagnosis, which are neither statistically significant nor clinically relevant. Conceptualizing worsening of TMJ intra-articular disorders as 4 stages and characterizing impact from TMD as a composite of jaw pain, function, and disability, this cross-sectional study found no clinically significant association. Models of TMJ intra-articular status other than ours (normal structure → DDwR → DDwoR → DJD) should be explored. PMID:25572112

  10. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3940 Total temporomandibular joint... implanted in the human jaw to replace the mandibular condyle and augment the glenoid fossa to functionally...

  11. Ultrastructural characteristics of the synovial membrane in osteoarthritic temporomandibular joints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkgraaf, LC; Liem, RSB; deBont, LGM

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: This study analyzed the ultrastructural characteristics of the synovial membrane in various stages of osteoarthritis (OA) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), and developed a classification of this involvement based on these morphologic characteristics. Patients and Methods: Synovial

  12. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction in Moebius syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Blasio, A; Cassi, D; Di Blasio, C; Gandolfini, M

    2013-12-01

    Moebius syndrome is a rare condition characterised by bilateral facial and abducens nerve paralysis. In the present study, it was investigated the effect of the long term facial muscles hypoactivity on temporomandibular joint movements development. Accordingly with Terzis classification (Terzis, 2003), a wide sample of A type and B type Moebius patients was investigated for mandibular range of movements. Moebius patients were compared with a sample of healthy subjects. Both type A and type B Moebius patients develop a severe articular movement reduction, especially during mouth opening. A highly significant difference was found between Moebius patients and the healthy group. No difference was found between A and B Moebius sub-samples. The authors stress the importance of an early adequate rehabilitation of Moebius patients, in order to avoid the limitation of TMJ movement range.

  13. Ankylosis of temporomandibular joint in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das U

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Temporomandibular joint (TMJ ankylosis or hypomobility involves fusion of the mandibular condyle to the base of the skull. It is a major clinical problem that affects many patients suffering from facial trauma, infection, or systemic disease. The treatment of TMJ ankylosis poses a significant challenge because of technical difficulties and a high incidence of recurrence. Case Report: This report describes a case of a 4-year-old boy with inability to open mouth, diagnosed with unilateral right bony TMJ ankylosis. The surgical approach consisted of gap arthroplasty followed by vigorous physiotherapy. Conclusion: A detailed history, clinical and functional examination, radiographic examination facilitating correct diagnosis followed by immediate surgical intervention, and physiotherapy can help us to restore physical, psychological, and emotional health of the child patient.

  14. Temporomandibular joint pain-dysfunction syndrome in patients from “Guillermo Tejas” polyclinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delarays Ossani Pérez Alfonso

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: when the physiological levels of the components of the temporomandibular joint are altered by any risk factor, there can appear functional and structural disorders with their corresponding clinical repercussions, which are part of the temporomandibular joint pain-dysfunction syndrome.Objective: to characterize clinically and epidemiologically those patients suffering from temporomandibular joint pain-dysfunction syndrome of “Guillermo Tejas” polyclinic in Las Tunas municipality, from November, 2012 to October, 2014.Methods: a descriptive study was carried out in patients from 12 to 20 years old who came to the dental clinic of the above mentioned polyclinic and time period. The universe consisted of 135 patients who entered the service and the sample was comprised 75 patients diagnosed with temporomandibular joint pain-dysfunction syndrome.Results: females were the most representative ones; regarding age, the groups of 18, 19 and 20 years old patients prevailed. The most frequent para-functional habits were unilateral mastication and bruxism. The prevailing associated factors were occlusal disharmonies. The joint noise and mandibular deviation were the most frequent symptoms and signs.Conclusions: it was possible to characterize clinically and epidemiologically those patients suffering from temporomandibular joint pain-dysfunction syndrome, more frequently found in those older than 18 years old.

  15. Causes of persistent joint pain after arthrocentesis of temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Kosuke; Yasukawa, Yoko; Fujiwara, Masanori; Abe, Tetsuya; Urade, Masahiro

    2011-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to elucidate the factors responsible for the failure of arthrocentesis to cure persistent joint pain in patients with nonreducing articular disc displacement in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Thirty-six patients with internal derangement of the TMJ were selected. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to examine the configuration and position of the articular discs, cortical changes, and bone marrow abnormalities in the condyle and the presence of joint effusion. Arthrocentesis was then performed, and the patients were followed for 6 weeks. The results were then classified as poor or improved. The effects of arthrocentesis did not depend on the configuration of the disc, disc position and motion, or bone marrow abnormalities. Joints with no or minimal amounts of joint effusion achieved a good response to arthrocentesis. Joints with erosive cortical changes of the condyle were less responsive to arthrocentesis. Persistent joint pain after arthrocentesis is generally associated with extensive amounts of joint effusion or erosive cortical changes of the condyle. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Dental occlusion and temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, J Caitlin; Hannah, Andrew; Nagar, Nathan

    2017-10-27

    Data sourcesMedline, Scopus and Google Scholar.Study selectionTwo reviewers selected studies independently. English language clinical studies assessing the association between temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and features of dental occlusion were considered.Data extraction and synthesisStudy quality was assessed based on the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS) and a narrative synthesis was presented.ResultsIn all 25 studies (17 case-control, eight comparative) were included. Overall there was a high variability between occlusal features and TMD diagnosis. Findings were consistent with a lack of clinically relevant association between TMD and dental occlusion. Only two studies were associated with TMD in the majority (≥50%) of single variable analyses in patient populations. Only mediotrusive interferences are associated with TMD in the majority of multiple variable analyses.ConclusionsThe findings support the absence of a disease-specific association, there is no ground to hypothesise a major role for dental occlusion in the pathophysiology of TMDs. Dental clinicians are thus encouraged to move forward and abandon the old-fashioned gnathological paradig.

  17. CBCT analysis of bony changes associated with temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaat, Wael; Al Bayatti, Saad; Al Kawas, Sausan

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare cone-beam computerized tomography (CBCT) findings and joint space measurement in temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and non-TMD joints, and to correlate these findings with the clinical diagnosis. The study was conducted on patients diagnosed with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis or closed lock according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMDs (Group IIb, IIc, and III). CBCT and clinical records of non-TMD patients who sought treatment for purposes other than TMD were used retrospectively as a control. The following radiographic criteria were assessed: flattening, osteophyte, Ely's cyst, condylar surface irregularities, and joints' space measurements. Osteoarthritic joints had significantly more condylar irregularities (P50.0), osteophytes (P50.0), and condylar flattening (P50.003) than non-TMD joints. Osteoarthritic joints had significantlymore superior surface irregularities (P50.0) and osteophytes (P50.006) than closed lock joints.Non-TMDjoints had significantlymore joint space (5.64+1.88) compared with osteoarthritic joints (4.57+1.97), (P50.025). The correlation among TMD, osteophytes, and flattening of the condylar surface was statistically significant (r50.331, Pv0.000). Cone-beam computerized tomography findings are significantly associated with the clinical diagnosis of TMD. Osteophytes and flattening of the condylar surface are common features of TMD.

  18. Temporomandibular disorders and bruxism in childhood and adolescence: review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Taís de Souza; Miyakoda, Luana Sayuri; Pocztaruk, Rafael de Liz; Rocha, Camila Pinhata; Gavião, Maria Beatriz Duarte

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this article was to review the literature about temporomandibular disorders and bruxism and their relationships in children and adolescents. The literature was searched using Medline, ISI, Cochrane Library, Scielo and the Internet, from March 1970 to the end of June 2007. The inclusion criteria were: they evaluated a possible association between TMD and bruxism, and they dealt with child and/or adolescent samples. Furthermore, interim reports, related Internet sites and chapters in textbooks were considered. From 64 records found, 30 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The prevalence of temporomandibular disorders in children and adolescent varies widely in the literature. Temporomandibular disorders are often defined on the basis of signs and symptoms, of which the most common are: temporomandibular joint sounds, impaired movement of the mandible, limitation in mouth opening, preauricular pain, facial pain, headaches and jaw tenderness on function, having mainly a mild character, fluctuation and progression to severe pain and dysfunction is rare. One of the possible causal factors suggested that temporomandibular disorders in children is a functional mandibular overload variable, mainly bruxism. Bruxism, defined as the habitual nonfunctional forceful contact between occlusal tooth surfaces, is involuntary, excessive grinding, clenching or rubbing of teeth during nonfunctional movements of the masticatory system. Its etiology is still controversial but the multifactorial cause has been attributed, including pathophysiologic, psychologic and morphologic factors. Moreover, in younger children, bruxism may be a consequence of the masticatory neuromuscular system immaturity. Complications include dental attrition, headaches, temporomandibular disorders and masticatory muscle soreness. Some studies have linked oral parafunctional habits to disturbances and diseases of the temporomandibular joint, mainly bruxism, suggesting its association with temporomandibular

  19. Modified stethoscope for auscultation of temporomandibular joint sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagar, Sanjiv Rajender Singh; Turakiya, Viral; Pakhan, Ashok J; Jaggi, Nitin; Kalra, Amit; Vaidya, Vidya

    2014-04-01

    Purpose of this study was to modify the stethoscope which can auscultate the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) sounds more precisely than conventional stethoscope, and fabrication of stethoscope compatible software which analyses the auscultated sound and gives documentary evidence of that analysis in the form of graph. The conventional stethoscope was modified by attaching a custom made soundscope with a recording device which can be placed in external auditory meatus (EAM) for auscultation of TMJ sounds. When this small and smooth end of custom made soundscope of modified stethoscope is placed in EAM & connected with specially developed software it records the TMJ sounds & analyzes them in form of graph. Fabrication of modified stethoscope with software records the auscultated sound as a sound wave in form of graph and analyses this sound wave graph to give graphic evidence of prominent intensity at prominent frequency as spectrum analysis graph, and duration of that sound as a sound length graph. The use of modified stethoscope with software increases the accuracy of auscultation of TMJ sounds without any patient's discomfort and helps in diagnosis of TMJ disorders. The modified stethoscope with software for auscultation of TMJ sounds results in more precise auscultation & analysis of TMJ for sounds even of low intensity & frequency. How to cite the article: Dagar SR, Turakiya V, Pakhan AJ, Jaggi N, Kalra A, Vaidya V. Modified stethoscope for auscultation of temporomandibular joint sounds. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(2):40-4.

  20. Relationship between pain and effusion on magnetic resonance imaging in temporomandibular disorder patients

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Ha-Na; Kim, Kyoung-A; Koh, Kwang-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to find the relationship between pain and joint effusion using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients. Materials and Methods The study subjects included 232 TMD patients. The inclusion criteria in this study were the presence of spontaneous pain or provoked pain on one or both temporomandibular joints (TMJs). The provoked pain was divided into three groups: pain on palpation (G1), pain on mouth opening (G2), and pain on m...

  1. Temporomandibular joint replacement: a New Zealand perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, B; Buchanan, J; Cliff, J

    2014-05-01

    Alloplastic total temporomandibular joint replacement (TMJ TJR) has been performed in New Zealand utilizing the TMJ Concepts patient-fitted system since 2000. The data analysed in this study were collected retrospectively from questionnaires sent to all maxillofacial surgeons in New Zealand who had implanted TMJ Concepts devices between 2000 and 2011. A total of 63 devices were implanted in 42 patients (13 males, 29 females) during this 12-year period. The primary indication for TMJ TJR was end-stage joint disease resulting from ankylosis and arthritis. The mean age of the patients was 47 years (range 7-80 years). The most common complication reported was transient facial nerve impairment in 4.8% of the patients. Objective results, measured as the maximal incisional opening, improved by a mean of 17.3mm (PTMJ TJR using the TMJ Concepts prosthesis is a reliable treatment option for the management of end-stage TMJ disease. Copyright © 2013 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes Macías, Juan Francisco; Sánchez Prieto, Martín

    2007-01-01

    Synovial Chondromatosis (SC) is a disease whose etiology is unknown, can be defined as a benign synovial process characterized by the formation of metaplastic cartilaginous nodes inside connective tissue of articular surfaces, is considered an active metaplastic phenomenon better than a neoplastic process; it presents a greater preference to affect women who constitute almost 70% of reported cases, the age range is wide and oscillates between 18-75 years (average 44.6 years). Between the main clinical findings are: pain, crackle, volume augmentation and a limited buccal opening. SC is an unusual state and the reports in the English literature are no more than 75 cases, only 66 of those where histologically verified, most of those were affecting great joints like hip, knee and shoulder, but if SC is not frequent in this sites, is even more infrequent on temporomandibular joint. The aim of this paper is to report a clinical case and at the same time to realize a brief review of the literature.

  3. Psychological aspects of temporomandibular disorders – literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berger Marcin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular disorders (TMD constitute a group of clinical problems involving the masticatory muscles, the temporomandibular joint and associated structures. An etiological connection of TMD with psychological factors was proposed as early as the 1980’s. Indeed, the interdependence of psychological and health aspects in the patient’s treatment, place light upon the more important variables contributing to the various mental disorders that may accompany TMD. Current literature suggests a close relationship between TMD and selected psychological factors, such as personality traits, stress, depression, anxiety, and catastrophizing. Of note, anxiety-depressive disorders, somatisation and catastrophizing contribute to chronic TMD, mainly in the form of myofascial pain. Hence, knowledge of the influence of psychological factors affecting TMD, enables the identification of patients with an increased risk of chronic painful TMD.

  4. Is There an Association Between Temporomandibular Joint Effusion and Arthralgia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawaja, Shehryar N; Crow, Heidi; Mahmoud, Ruba F G; Kartha, Krishnan; Gonzalez, Yoly

    2017-02-01

    The literature on joint effusion (JE) and its association with clinical and radiologic variables in patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) is inconsistent and is characterized by multiple methodologic limitations. The primary aim of this investigation was to evaluate the association between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) identified JE and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthralgia. The secondary aim of this investigation was to determine the association between JE and other clinical and MRI-identified soft tissue characteristics. A retrospective cohort study was conducted. Clinical and soft tissue imaging assessments were carried out according to the Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders guidelines. The dependent variable was JE and the primary independent variable was arthralgia. The secondary independent variables were TMJ pain-associated characteristics and MRI-identified variables. When applicable, Pearson χ2 or t test was used to determine the statistical associations between JE and clinical characteristics and between JE and MRI-identified variables. Furthermore, generalized estimating equation (GEE) modeling was conducted to determine which of the independent clinical and MRI-identified variables were associated with JE. Data for 158 participants, representing 312 joints, were extracted. The mean age of the female sample (59.4%) was 31 ± 11.1 years and that of the male sample (40.6%) was 29.8 ± 9.7 years. No association was found between JE and arthralgia. However, statistically significant associations were found between JE and lateral disc rotation (P = .001) and between JE and disc position in the coronal and sagittal planes (P = .001). The GEE model suggested that disc displacement with reduction (odds ratio = 2.5) was a statistically relevant contributing factor for JE in the absence of degenerative joint disease. Results associated JE with the position of the disc in the sagittal plane. No association was found between

  5. Outcomes of temporomandibular joint arthroscopy in patients with painful but otherwise normal joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitroulis, George

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this retrospective clinical study was to assess the clinical outcomes of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthroscopy in patients who presented with category 1 normal joints. The null hypothesis being tested was that patients with normal joints do not respond to TMJ arthroscopy. The clinical records of 116 patients who had undergone TMJ arthroscopy by the author from 2010 to 2013 were retrieved and individually analysed for inclusion in this retrospective, cohort clinical study. The inclusion criteria used to select patients for this study were those who had arthroscopically proven category 1 normal joints, free of intra-articular pathology. Of the 14 patients who were found to have normal joints, only 10 could be contacted for a follow-up survey. Despite the fact that all patients were informed that no joint pathology was found, six out of the 10 patients reported improvement in their temporomandibular disorder (TMD) symptoms that lasted for more than 6 months following TMJ arthroscopy. The results of this investigation indicate that we can reject the null hypothesis, and that patients with normal TMJs do indeed respond to TMJ arthroscopy. What this limited study has highlighted is the pervasive effects of the placebo that all surgeons need to keep in mind when formulating treatment plans for patients with TMD. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Self-reported temporomandibular joint disorder symptoms, oral health, and quality of life of children in kindergarten through grade 5: Do sex, race, and socioeconomic background matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglehart, Marita R; Patel, Manan H; Widmalm, Sven-Erik; Briskie, Daniel M

    2016-02-01

    The authors' objectives were to determine the percentage of children in kindergarten through grade 5 who reported symptoms of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMJD); to assess whether sex, race, and socioeconomic background mattered; and to explore the relationships between TMJD and children's oral health and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL). The research team conducted face-to-face interviews with 8,302 children in kindergarten through grade 5 (51% female, 49% male; 53% African American, 42% white). They conducted oral health screenings with 7,439 children. Overall, 23.6% of the children reported pain when chewing tough food, and 18.8% reported pain when opening their mouth wide; 23.2% reported hearing a sound (clicking) when opening their mouth wide. Female students were more likely than male students and African American children were more likely than white children to report TMJD symptoms. The prevalence of TMJD symptoms did not correlate with whether the children had a need for oral health care services or whether they had an abscess or carious teeth with pulpal involvement. TMJD symptoms were associated significantly with children's OHRQoL. Considerable percentages of 4- to 12-year-old children reported TMJD symptoms, with girls and African American children being more likely than their counterparts to be affected. Experiencing TMJD symptoms was associated significantly with poorer OHRQoL. Dental practitioners need to be aware that substantial percentages of kindergarten and elementary school-aged children experience TMJD symptoms. Taking a dental history and conducting an oral examination, therefore, should include assessments of the signs and symptoms of TMJD; treatment recommendations should be provided for affected children. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Differences in suprathreshold heat pain responses and self-reported sleep quality between patients with temporomandibular joint disorder and healthy controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro-Dasilva, M.C.; Goodin, B.R.; Fillingim, R.B.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine differences in heat pain threshold (HPTh) and heat pain tolerance (HPTo) between temporomandibular joint disorder (TMJD) patients and healthy controls. Using suprathreshold heat pain, this study also examined between-group (i.e. TMJD vs. healthy controls) differences in hyperalgesia and temporal summation (TS) of heat pain. Lastly, whether between-group differences in these heat pain outcomes were mediated by self-reported sleep quality was also tested. A total of 119 participants (41% TMJD) completed the current study. HPTh and HPTo responses were assessed at the ventral forearm with an ascending method of limits, while hyperalgesia and TS responses were assessed at the dorsal forearm at temperatures of 46, 48 and 50 °C. Prior to completion of heat pain procedures, participants completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Significant between-group differences in HPTh and HPTo were not observed. TMJD patients demonstrated significantly greater hyperalgesia than healthy controls at 46 °C only, but there were no differences for TS. Furthermore, TMJD patients reported significantly poorer sleep quality compared with healthy controls. Data analysis revealed a significant simple mediation effect whereby the presence of TMJD was strongly associated with poorer self-reported sleep quality, which, in turn, was related to enhanced hyperalgesia at 46 °C. These findings support the hypothesis that the thermal hyperalgesia demonstrated by TMJD patients may be related to poor quality of their self-reported sleep. The ability of interventions that improve sleep quality to also affect pain sensitivity is currently the topic of ongoing investigation. PMID:22344627

  8. Osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint organ and its relationship to disc displacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegenga, B

    2001-01-01

    To overcome disagreements with regard to the relationship between disc displacement and osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), the evidence for suggested disease mechanisms and clinical course of these disorders is reviewed. The TMJ behaves as a complex organ in which biochemical and

  9. Prevalence of temporomandibular disorder signs in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurbuz, O; Alatas, G; Kurt, E

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) signs in a group of institutionalized patients with schizophrenia. Three hundred thirty-nine patients with schizophrenia were examined and compared with 107 age-matched and gender-matched control subjects. TMD signs were evaluated according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria to assess temporomandibular joint pain to palpation, limitation of maximum mouth opening, alteration of mouth opening pathway (deviation/deflection) and temporomandibular joint noises. In addition, tooth wear was recorded for the assessment of bruxism. The prevalence of any TMD signs was observed higher (P = 0.001) in the patients with schizophrenia (284/339, 83.7%) than in the controls (72/107, 67.3%). The prevalence of more than one TMD sign was also significantly higher (P = 0.03) in the patients with schizophrenia (131/339, 38.6%) than in the controls (29/107, 27.1%). Significant differences between the two groups were apparent for joint pain on palpation (P = 0.006), deflection (P = 0.006) and joint sounds (P = 0.002). Severe tooth wear was evident in 39.2% of the patients with schizophrenia compared with 21.2% in the control group (P = 0.001). The finding of the present study showed that, compared to control population, chronically hospitalized patients with schizophrenia seem to be more prone to the development of TMD signs and severe tooth wear and bruxism.

  10. Temporomandibular Joint Anatomy Assessed by CBCT Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Caruso

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Since cone beam computed tomography (CBCT has been used for the study of craniofacial morphology, the attention of orthodontists has also focused on the mandibular condyle. The purpose of this brief review is to summarize the recent 3D CBCT images of mandibular condyle. Material and Methods. The eligibility criteria for the studies are (a studies aimed at evaluating the anatomy of the temporomandibular joint; (b studies performed with CBCT images; (c studies on human subjects; (d studies that were not clinical case-reports and clinical series; (e studies reporting data on children, adolescents, or young adults (data from individuals with age ≤ 30 years. Sources included PubMed from June 2008 to June 2016. Results. 43 full-text articles were initially screened for eligibility. 13 full-text articles were assessed for eligibility. 11 articles were finally included in qualitative synthesis. The main topics treated in the studies are the volume and surface of the mandibular condyle, the bone changes on cortical surface, the facial asymmetry, and the optimum position of the condyle in the glenoid fossa. Conclusion. Additional studies will be necessary in the future, constructed with longitudinal methodology, especially in growing subjects. The limits of CBCT acquisitions are also highlighted.

  11. Bilateral synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guijarro-Martínez, Raquel; Puche Torres, Miguel; Marqués Mateo, Mariano; Solís García, Ignacio; Miragall Alba, Luis; Iglesias Gimilio, María Eugenia; Pérez-Herrezuelo Hermosa, Gonzalo; Pascual Gil, José Vicente

    2011-06-01

    To report an exceptional case of bilateral synovial chondromatosis (SC) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and discuss diagnostic approaches, treatment options and follow-up data. A 38-year-old woman presented with left preauricular swelling. Initial imaging studies revealed TMJ effusion only. Six years later, synovial calcifications were detected in the left TMJ; the right TMJ space was widened and presented incipient calcium deposits. Open arthrotomy of the left TMJ was performed, with removal of multiple cartilaginous loose bodies and complete synovectomy. Periodic controls proved the asynchronic development of intra-articular bodies in the right TMJ. SC is a metaplastic arthropathy that is uncommon in the TMJ. Bilaterality is exceptional. Diagnosis is often delayed due to the non-specific symptoms, progressive developmental stages and clinicians' lack of awareness of the condition. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is particularly helpful in defining disease extension, excluding a possible tumour and detecting internal derangement. Definitive diagnosis requires arthroscopic or open examination and histopathological analysis. Recurrences are infrequent after arthrotomy, removal of loose bodies and complete synovectomy. SC is an uncommon condition in the TMJ. Bilateral involvement is extremely rare. MRI is effective for diagnosis and postoperative follow-up. Complete synovectomy usually yields an excellent prognosis. Copyright © 2010 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Radiographic study on temporomandibular joint Arthrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Dong Soo [Dept. of Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University , Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1980-11-15

    The author analysed the routine radiographic changes and clinical symptoms of 205 cases of temporomandibular joint arthrosis. The clinical symptoms of the patients were classified and the morphological changes of condylar head, articular eminence, and articular fossa were analyzed and discussed from radiographic view point. The positional change of condylar head and articular fossa relation in TMJ arthrosis were observed. The frequencies of coincidence between the site of complaints and the site of the abnormal images which could be detected were examined. The results were obtained as follows; 1. Bone erosion, deformity, marginal proliferation and sclerosis were selected from many abnormal images as the radiographic diagnostic criteria of TMJ arthritic lesions. 2. Abnormal radiographic findings were revealed in 150 cases (73.9%) of 205 total TMJ arthrosis cases and site with abnormal findings coincided with the site of complaints in 105 cases (70.7%) of 150 cases and coincidence rates were higher above fourth decades than below third decades. 3. Sclerosis of the abnormal radiographic findings could be found more often below third decades than above fourth decades. 4. The positional changes of condylar head were revealed in 176 cases (85.9%) of 205 total cases. 5. Pain complaints were revealed in 170 cases(82.9%) and clicking sounds were revealed in 120 cases (58.6%) of clinical symptoms of TMJ arthrosis. 6. No tendency was found so far the differential diagnosis between pain dysfunction syndrome and osteoarthrosis of TMJ.

  13. Effect of turban use on temporomandibular joint problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, S; Avcu, N

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of daily turban wear on temporomandibular joint (TMJ) problems. This cross-sectional study was carried out on 249 female patients. Of these, 119 patients were using turban daily, while 130 patients did not use. Patients were asked questions to ascertain the signs of TMJ problems. Thereafter, the TMJ region was examined clinically. Cross-tabulations and Chi-square statistics were computed in accordance with Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. To investigate the association between continuous turban wear and temporomandibular disorder symptoms, logistic regression analysis was performed. Limited mouth opening, deviation, pain on TMJ palpation and mouth opening were not affected with turban usage. However, turban users more frequently demonstrated pain during palpation of the masticatory muscles than non-users (P = 0.001). Duration of the turban usage did not affect clinical examination findings except pain on masticatory muscles during palpation (P = 0.001). Complaint of pain on masticatory muscles are more frequently seen among the turban users.

  14. Temporomandibular disorders, head and orofacial pain: cervical spine considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Steve

    2007-01-01

    Head and orofacial pain originates from dental, neurologic, musculoskeletal, otolaryngologic, vascular, metaplastic, or infectious disease. It is treated by many health care practitioners, such as dentists, oral surgeons, and physicians. The article focuses on the nonpathologic involvement of the musculoskeletal system as a source of head and orofacial pain. The areas of the musculoskeletal system that are reviewed include the temporomandibular joint and muscles of mastication--collectively referred to as temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and cervical spine disorders. The first part of the article highlights the role of physical therapy in the treatment of TMDs. The second part discusses cervical spine considerations in the management of TMDs and head and orofacial symptoms. It concludes with and overview of the evaluation and treatment of the cervical spine.

  15. A relationship between amount of joint effusion, disk displacement and presence of pain in the temporomandibular joint: MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Ho; Suh, Kyung Jin; Kim, Keon Woo and others [Kyungpook National Univ. College of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-01-01

    To correlate MR findings of amount of temporomandibular joint effusion with joint pain and disk displacement. In 57 patients, 114 temporomandibular joints with symptoms of disorder (presence of clinical pain) were imaged. Closed and open mouth sagittal spin echo (SE) T1-weighted images (WI) and fast spin echo (FSE) T2-WI were obtained. We classified the amount of joint effusion into grades. Joint effusion was classified as either Grade 1, 2 or 3, as follours : in sagittal FSE T2-WI, a long diameter of joint effusion shorter than 1/3 of the diameter of the convex margin of temporal eminence was grade 1 ; longer than 2/3 was grade 3 ; between grade 1 and 3 was grade 2. Disk displacement was classified as either with or without reduction in the open mouth position. These findings were correlated with one another and statistically analyzed. In 29 cases with joint pain (37%) and in 34 cases without pain (63%) there was no evidence of joint effusion ; there were, however, more grade 1 joint effusion cases with pain (14; 60.9%) than without pain (9; 39.1%). Cases of joint pain increased in proportion to grade of joint effusion, which was statistically significant (p < 0.05). In joints without disk displacement, the largest grouping was that which showed no effusion (39; 72.2%) ; no joints showed grade 3 effusion. Cases of joint effusion decreased in proportion to grade of effusion. In joints with disk displacement, cases of joint effusion tended to increase in proportion to the grade of effusion. MR findings of amount of temporomandibular joint effusion correlate with joint pain and anterior disk displacement.

  16. Cervical Musculoskeletal Impairments and Temporomandibular Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Armijo-Olivo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The study of cervical muscles and their significance in the development and perpetuation of Temporomandibular Disorders has not been elucidated. Thus this project was designed to investigate the association between cervical musculoskeletal impairments and Temporomandibular Disorders. Material and Methods: A sample of 154 subjects participated in this study. All subjects underwent a series of physical tests and electromyographic assessment (i.e. head and neck posture, maximal cervical muscle strength, cervical flexor and extensor muscles endurance, and cervical flexor muscle performance to determine cervical musculoskeletal impairments. Results: A strong relationship between neck disability and jaw disability was found (r = 0.82. Craniocervical posture was statistically different between patients with myogenous Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD and healthy subjects. However, the difference was too small (3.3º to be considered clinically relevant. Maximal cervical flexor muscle strength was not statistically or clinically different between patients with TMD and healthy subjects. No statistically significant differences were found in electromyographic activity of the sternocleidomastoid or the anterior scalene muscles in patients with TMD when compared to healthy subjects while executing the craniocervical flexion test (P = 0.07. However, clinically important effect sizes (0.42 - 0.82 were found. Subjects with TMD presented with reduced cervical flexor as well as extensor muscle endurance while performing the flexor and extensor muscle endurance tests when compared to healthy individuals. Conclusions: Subjects with Temporomandibular Disorders presented with impairments of the cervical flexors and extensors muscles. These results could help guide clinicians in the assessment and prescription of more effective interventions for individuals with Temporomandibular Disorders.

  17. Cervical musculoskeletal impairments and temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armijo-Olivo, Susan; Magee, David

    2013-01-01

    The study of cervical muscles and their significance in the development and perpetuation of Temporomandibular Disorders has not been elucidated. Thus this project was designed to investigate the association between cervical musculoskeletal impairments and Temporomandibular Disorders. A sample of 154 subjects participated in this study. All subjects underwent a series of physical tests and electromyographic assessment (i.e. head and neck posture, maximal cervical muscle strength, cervical flexor and extensor muscles endurance, and cervical flexor muscle performance) to determine cervical musculoskeletal impairments. A strong relationship between neck disability and jaw disability was found (r = 0.82). Craniocervical posture was statistically different between patients with myogenous Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) and healthy subjects. However, the difference was too small (3.3º) to be considered clinically relevant. Maximal cervical flexor muscle strength was not statistically or clinically different between patients with TMD and healthy subjects. No statistically significant differences were found in electromyographic activity of the sternocleidomastoid or the anterior scalene muscles in patients with TMD when compared to healthy subjects while executing the craniocervical flexion test (P = 0.07). However, clinically important effect sizes (0.42 - 0.82) were found. Subjects with TMD presented with reduced cervical flexor as well as extensor muscle endurance while performing the flexor and extensor muscle endurance tests when compared to healthy individuals. Subjects with Temporomandibular Disorders presented with impairments of the cervical flexors and extensors muscles. These results could help guide clinicians in the assessment and prescription of more effective interventions for individuals with Temporomandibular Disorders.

  18. Critical assessment of temporomandibular joint clicking in diagnosing anterior disc displacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobs, Giedre; Bernhardt, Olaf; Kocher, Thomas; Meyer, Georg

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare temporomandibular joint (TMJ) findings from clinical examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for diagnosing anterior disc displacement. 114 subjects with at least one sign of temporomandibular disorders (tenderness/pain on palpation of the joints or muscles, TMJ sounds, pain or deviation during maximum mouth opening (active/passive)) and 193 controls underwent MRI after proper history taking and assessment of clinical symptoms. 464 joints with no disk displacement (NDD), 114 joints with reducible displaced disk (RDD), and 36 joints with permanently displaced disk (PDD) were confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The results suggest that anterior disc displacement of the TMJ can not be diagnosed with considerable accuracy through the use of clinical examination only.

  19. Orthodontics is temporomandibular disorder-neutral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredini, Daniele; Stellini, Edoardo; Gracco, Antonio; Lombardo, Luca; Nardini, Luca Guarda; Siciliani, Giuseppe

    2016-07-01

    To assess if subjects with a clinical diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) have a similar prevalence of orthodontic history as a population of TMD-free individuals and to assess if those subjects who have a history of ideal orthodontics have fewer symptoms than those with a history of nonideal orthodontics. Two groups of age- and sex-matched individuals belonging to either a study ("TMD") or a control group were recruited. Subjects who underwent orthodontic treatment were classified as having a history of ideal or nonideal orthodontics based on the current presence of normal values in five reference occlusal features. The correlation with a history of orthodontic treatment was not clinically significant for any of the TMD diagnoses (ie, muscle pain, joint pain, disc displacement, arthrosis), with Phi (Φ) coefficient values within the -0.120 to 0.058 range. Within the subset of patients with a history of orthodontics, the correlation of ideal or nonideal orthodontic treatment with TMD diagnoses was, in general, not clinically relevant or was weakly relevant. Findings confirmed the substantial absence of clinically significant effects of orthodontics as far as TMD is concerned. The very low correlation values of a negative or positive history of ideal or nonideal orthodontics with the different TMD diagnoses suggest that orthodontic treatment could not have a true role for TMD.

  20. {sup 99m}Tc-labeled-1-thio-{beta}-D-glucose as a new tool to temporomandibular joint inflammatory disorders diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges Brasileiro, Claudia, E-mail: cbbrasileiro@gmail.co [Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear-PCA, Escola de Engenharia, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG)-Avenida Presidente Antonio Carlos, 6627, CEP: 31270-100 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Fonseca Pacheco, Cinthia Mara da, E-mail: cinthia@newtonpaiva.b [Faculdade de Ciencias Biologicas e da Saude, Centro Universitario Newton Paiva-Avenida Silva Lobo, 1730, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Martins Queiroz-Junior, Celso, E-mail: cmqj@yahoo.com.b [Departamento de Clinica, Patologia e Cirurgia Odontologica, Faculdade de Odontologia, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG)-Avenida Presidente Antonio Carlos, 6627, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Flavia de Lima, Carla, E-mail: carla.flavia@terra.com.b [Nucleo de Diagnostico Cardiovascular (ECOGRAF)-Rua dos Otoni, 881, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Batista da Silva, Juliana, E-mail: silvajb@cdtn.b [Unidade de Pesquisa e Producao de Radiofarmacos, Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN)-Avenida Presidente Antonio Carlos, 6627, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Passos Ribeiro de Campos, Tarcisio, E-mail: campos@nuclear.ufmb.b [Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear-PCA, Escola de Engenharia, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG)-Avenida Presidente Antonio Carlos, 6627, CEP: 31270-100 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2010-12-15

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate early detection of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammatory changes based on 1-thio-{beta}-D-glucose radiolabeled with technetium-99m. Method: The method applied a TMJ inflammation model in rats followed by radiopharmaceutical synthesis, intravenous administration of {sup 99m}Tc-1-TG and kinetic scintigraphy imaging. Results: Results show a significant difference of {sup 99m}Tc-1-TG uptake between inflamed TMJ and the control joint. The biodistribution of {sup 99m}Tc-1-TG by images showed the kidneys' excretion. Conclusion: As conclusion, {sup 99m}Tc-1-TG is a helpful tool in TMJ inflammatory process detection.

  1. [Update on current care guideline: temporomandibular disorders (TMD)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are common. Usual symptoms are joint noises and pain, pain in masticatory muscles, difficulties in jaw movements and headache. Treatment of TMD includes information on the background and good response to treatment of these disorders. The patient is advised on self-care routines, including relaxing the lower jaw, massaging the masticatory muscles and hot or cold packs on painful sites. Pharmacotherapy consists of paracetamol or anti-inflammatory analgesics. Occlusal appliances, physiotherapy, cognitive therapies and acupuncture are recommended. Complicated cases not responding to treatment are referred to specialized care.

  2. The use of superficial heat for treatment of temporomandibular disorders: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlan, Renata Maria Moreira Moraes; Giovanardi, Raquel Safar; Britto, Ana Teresa Brandão de Oliveira e; Oliveira e Britto, Denise Brandão de

    2015-01-01

    To perform an integrative review of scientific bibliographic production on the use of superficial heat treatment for temporomandibular disorders. Research strategy : Literature review was accomplished on PubMed, LiLACS, SciELO, Bireme, Web of Science, and BBO databases. The following descriptors were used: hot temperature, hyperthermia induced, heat transference, temporomandibular joint, temporomandibular joint disorders, temporomandibular joint dysfunction syndrome, and their equivalents in Portuguese and Spanish. Articles that addressed the superficial heat for the treatment of temporomandibular disorders, published in English, Spanish, or Portuguese, between 1980 and 2013. The following data were collected: technique of applying superficial heat, duration of application, stimulated body area, temperature of the stimulus, frequency of application, and benefits. initially, 211 studies were found, but just 13 contemplated the proposed selection criteria. Data were tabulated and presented in chronological order. Several techniques for superficial heat application on treatment of temporomandibular disorders were found in the literature. The moist heat was the most widely used technique. Many studies suggested the application of heat for at least 20 minutes once a day. Most authors recommended the application of heat in facial and cervical regions. The heat treatment resulted in significant relief of pain, reduced muscle tension, improved function of the mandible, and increased mouth opening.

  3. A radiographic study on temporomandibular joint trouble

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Byoung Woon; Ahn, Hyung Kyu [Dept. of Dental Radiology, Graduate School, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1979-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the radiographic images of Temporomandibular joint trouble patients. This study included 186 patients with the chief complaints of TMJ pain and dysfunction. Their age ranged from 17 to 68 years. All patients were identified in the department of Dental Radiology at the Infirmary of College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, during the period from Apr. 1978 to Jun. 1979. The author has observed the radiographic variations of two positions of condylar head taken by modified transcranial oblique-lateral projection, which are one in centric occlusion and the other in 1 inch(2.54 cm) mouth open. The results were obtained as follows; 1. In centric occlusion, the distances and positional relationship between the summit of condylar head and the deepest point of articular fossa revealed more or less large variations; Normal range is of 37.9%, anterior displacement of 37.3% and posterior displacement of 22.6%. 2. In the horizontal movement of condylar heads when on 1 inch mouth open, it was revealed that normal range was of 46.5%, anterior displacement of 12.3%, posterior displacement of 41.1%. 3. In the positional interrelationship of both condylar heads when on 1 inch mouth open, it was revealed that symmetry(71.5%) occurred approximately 2.5 times as many as asymmetry. 4. In both centric and 1 inch mouth open, it was showed that almost all estimated figures were greater in male than in female, and in the horizontal movement of condylar head when on 1 inch open, it was showed that hypermobility was dominant in male and hypomobility in female.

  4. Evaluation of the research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders for the recognition of an anterior disc displacement with reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naeije, M.; Kalaykova, S.; Visscher, C.M.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this Focus Article is to review critically the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) for the recognition of an anterior disc displacement with reduction (ADDR) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). This evaluation is based upon the experience gained

  5. Efficacy of splint therapy for the management of temporomandibular disorders: a meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Chao; Wu, Jun-Yi; Deng, Dong-Lai; He, Bing-Yang; TAO, YUAN; Niu, Yu-Ming; Deng, Mo-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are a group of clinical problems affecting temporomandibular joint (TMJ), myofascial muscles and other related structures. Splint therapy is the most commonly used approach to treatment of TMD, but its effectiveness is remains unclear. We therefore conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the effectiveness of splint therapy for TMD in adults. The electronic databases PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and ClinicalTrials.gov were searched for reports published up ...

  6. Neural Mechanisms of Temporomandibular Joint and Masticatory Muscle Pain: A Possible Role for Peripheral Glutamate Receptor Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David K Lam

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present review is to correlate recent knowledge of the role of peripheral ionotropic glutamate receptors in the temporomandibular joint and muscle pain from animal and human experimental pain models with findings in patients. Chronic pain is common, and many people suffer from chronic pain conditions involving deep craniofacial tissues such as temporomandibular disorders or fibromyalgia. Animal and human studies have indicated that the activation of peripheral ionotropic glutamate receptors in deep craniofacial tissues may contribute to muscle and temporomandibular joint pain and that sex differences in the activation of glutamate receptors may be involved in the female predominance in temporomandibular disorders and fibromyalgia. A peripheral mechanism involving autocrine and/or paracrine regulation of nociceptive neuronal excitability via injury or inflammation-induced release of glutamate into peripheral tissues that may contribute to the development of craniofacial pain is proposed.

  7. Temporomandibular disorders in fibromyalgia patients: are there different pain onset?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujarra, Fábio J C; Kaziyama, Helena Hideko Seguchi; Siqueira, Silvia Regina D T de; Yeng, Lin Tchia; Camparis, Cinara M; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Siqueira, José Tadeu Tesseroli de

    2016-03-01

    To identify temporomandibular disorders (TMD) symptoms in two groups of fibromyalgia patients according to the temporal relation between the onset of facial pain (FP) and generalized body pain (GBP). CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY DESIGN: Fifty-three consecutive women with fibromyalgia and FP were stratified according to the onset of orofacial pain: Group-A (mean age 47.30 ± 14.20 years old), onset of FP preceded GBP; Group-B (mean age 51.33 ± 11.03 years old), the FP started concomitant or after GBP. Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders and the Visual Analogue Scale. Myofascial pain with mouth opening limitation (p = 0.038); right disc displacement with reduction (p = 0.012) and jaw stiffness (p = 0.004) were predominant in Group A. Myofascial pain without mouth opening limitation (p = 0.038) and numbness/burning were more common in Group B. All patients had temporomandibular joint symptoms, mainly muscle disorders. The prevalence of myofascial pain with limited mouth opening and right TMJ disc displacement with reduction were higher in Group A.

  8. [Quality of life in patients with temporomandibular disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segù, M; Lobbia, S; Canale, C; Collesano, V

    2003-06-01

    Oral disorders have a psycho-social impact on the quality of life, that can be measured with instruments as the Oral Health Impact Profile questionnaire (OHIP). Using the OHIP, we evaluated if and how the orofacial pain can affect the quality of life in temporomandibular disorders (TMD) patients. A transversal case-control study was carried out. Study subjects were patients referred to the Section of Prosthetic Dentistry and Temporomandibular Disorders of the University of Pavia (Italy). Subjects were recruited sequentially until the target of 124. The controls were 61 "pain free" subjects, who were recruited from the same clinic. In analyzing the data, the chi squared test was used for categorical data, and t test and one-way analysis of variance were used for numerical scores. The subjects in this study were predominantly females (83.9%). The mean age of subjects was 35.1 years (standard deviation= 14.0). The most frequently reported symptoms were pain in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) (87.1%). The data showed that orofacial pain had an important impact on daily life (pquality of life of TMD patients.

  9. Analysis of pain in the rabbit temporomandibular joint after unilateral splint placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Sarah E; Tudares, Mauro A; Gold, Michael S; Almarza, Alejandro J

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether behavioral, anatomical, and physiologic endpoints widely used to infer the presence of pain in rodent models of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) were applicable to the rabbit model of TMD associated with altered joint loading. Unilateral molar dental splints were used to alter temporomandibular joint (TMJ) loading. Changes in nociceptive threshold were assessed with a mechanical probing of the TMJ region on nine splinted and three control rabbits. Fos-like immunoreacitivty in the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis was assessed with standard immunohistochemical techniques from three splinted and six control animals. Retrogradely labeled TMJ afferents were studied with patch-clamp electrophysiologic techniques from three splinted and three control animals. Remodeling of TMJ condyles was assessed by histologic investigations of three splinted and three control animals. A Student t test or a Mann-Whitney U test was used with significance set at P joint degeneration. These compensatory changes may reflect pain-adaption processes that many patients with TMJ disorders experience.

  10. Neural Mechanisms of Temporomandibular Joint and Masticatory Muscle Pain: A Possible Role for Peripheral Glutamate Receptor Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, David K.; Sessle, Barry J; Cairns, Brian E.; Hu, James W.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present review is to correlate recent knowledge of the role of peripheral ionotropic glutamate receptors in the temporomandibular joint and muscle pain from animal and human experimental pain models with findings in patients. Chronic pain is common, and many people suffer from chronic pain conditions involving deep craniofacial tissues such as temporomandibular disorders or fibromyalgia. Animal and human studies have indicated that the activation of peripheral ionotropic gl...

  11. Preclinical Animal Models for Temporomandibular Joint Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almarza, Alejandro J; Brown, Bryan N; Arzi, Boaz; Ângelo, David Faustino; Chung, William; Badylak, Stephen F; Detamore, Michael

    2018-01-02

    There is a paucity of in vivo studies that investigate the safety and efficacy of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) tissue regeneration approaches, in part due to the lack of established animal models. Review of disease models for study of TMJ is presented herein with an attempt to identify relevant preclinical animal models for TMJ tissue engineering, with emphasis on the disc and condyle. Although degenerative joint disease models have been mainly performed on mice, rats, and rabbits, preclinical regeneration approaches must employ larger animal species. There remains controversy regarding the preferred choice of larger animal models between the farm pig, minipig, goat, sheep, and dog. The advantages of the pig and minipig include their well characterized anatomy, physiology, and tissue properties. The advantages of the sheep and goat are their easier surgical access, low cost per animal, and its high tissue availability. The advantage of the dog is that the joint space is confined, so migration of interpositional devices should be less likely. However, each species has limitations as well. For example, the farm pig has continuous growth until about 18 months of age, and difficult surgical access due to the zygomatic arch covering the lateral aspect of joint. The minipig is not widely available and somewhat costly. The sheep and the goat are herbivores, and their TMJs mainly function in translation. The dog is a carnivore, and the TMJ is a hinge joint that can only rotate. Although no species provides the gold standard for all preclinical TMJ tissue engineering approaches, the goat and sheep have emerged as the leading options, with the minipig as the choice when cost is less of a limitation; and with the dog and farm pig serving as acceptable alternatives. Finally, naturally occurring TMJ disorders in domestic species may be harnessed on a preclinical trial basis as a clinically relevant platform for translation.

  12. Temporomandibular joint dislocation in an epileptic and mentally ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation is defined as an excessive forward movement of the condyle beyond the articular eminence with complete separation of articular surfaces and fixation in that position.' Theories regarding the pathogenesis of TMJ dislocation propose laxity of TMJ ligaments or capsule, excessive ...

  13. Groningen temporomandibular joint prosthesis. Development and first clinical application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loon, JP; de Bont, LGM; Stegenga, B; Spijkervet, FKL; Verkerke, GJ

    Patients with a severely degenerated temporomandibular joint (TMJ) may benefit from an alloplastic TMJ replacement. The aim of the study was to develop a safe and properly functioning TMJ prosthesis. The design was based on imitation of anterior condylar translation by an inferiorly located centre

  14. Inflammatory and degenerative disease in the temporomandibular joint

    OpenAIRE

    Gynther, Göran W.

    1996-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthroscopy is an established technique withhigh diagnostic accuracy regarding synovitis and degenerative changes of the articularfibrocartilage and disk. However, so far no studies have been done to correlate themacroscopic and histologic findings with each arthroscopic criterion. Thereforepatients with TMJ internal derangement (ID) were investigated by arthroscopy andarthrotomy (with biopsy) and the findings were compared with observations usinglight microscopy...

  15. Temporomandibular joint dislocation in Nairobi | Sang | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Despite the diverse conservative and surgical modalities for the management of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation and the controversy that surrounds them, very little has been done within the East-African setup in terms of highlighting and provoking greater interest in the epidemiology and ...

  16. Biomechanical modeling of open locks of the human temporomandibular joint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuijt, M.; Koolstra, J.H.; Lobbezoo, F.; Naeije, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with hypermobility of the temporomandibular joint may have problems closing their mouth after opening widely. In the worst case, the mandibular condyles become trapped in front of the articular eminences and the jaw muscles cannot reposition them into the fossae (open lock). The

  17. Design and wear testing of a temporomandibular joint prosthesis articulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loon, JP; Verkerke, GJ; de Vries, MP; de Bont, LGM

    As part of the development of a total temporomandibular joint prosthesis, a prosthesis articulation was designed. The articulation consists of a spherical head (ball) of the mandibular part, rotating against an enveloping ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) disc with a flat cranial

  18. The analysis of temporomandibular disorder based on RDC/TMD Axis I revision 2010 in dentistry students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmi Rikmasari

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Temporomandibular joint disorders is a pathologic conditions as a caused of musculoskeletal pain and dysfunction syndrome in stomatognathic system. This disorder was suffered in the population and affected the quality of life. This study was done to know how was the condition of temporomandibular joint disorders in the student of Faculty of Dentistry Universitas Padjadjaran population. Another objective of this study was the diagnosis classification of revised RDC-TMD Axis I could be applicated in Indonesian population, and to calibrate the diagnostic. Methods: The research sample was 65, with 43 female and 22 male. Result: The result showed that 50% of the student of Faculty of Dentistry Universitas Padjadjaran minimally suffered one diagnosis of temporomandibular joint disorders; with the most disorder was disc displacement with reduction, in left or right joint, followed by myofacial pain with limited opening. Conclusion: The conclusion of this research there was a high percentage of temporomandibular joint disorders in student population based on Revised Research Diagnosis Criteria for Temporomandibular Joint Disorders 2010, with the most disorder were disc displacement with reduction. So, it was important to socialize this sign and symptom of these disorders to community.

  19. A Mastication Mechanism Designed for Testing Temporomandibular Joint Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan J. Frayne

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of temporomandibular joint implants has involved simplified mechanical tests that apply pure vertical forces or pure rotational movements to the implant. The aim of this study was to develop a biological based mastication mechanism and conduct preliminary testing of a novel temporomandibular joint implant. The mechanism was designed to mimic temporomandibular joint loads by performing compression and anterior/posterior translation. Pilot testing was performed on six implant/joint specimens for seven consecutive hours, completing approximately 22,000 cycles at a frequency of approximately 1 Hz. Each cycle had a joint compression phase (67.3 N over 0.15 s followed by a translation phase (8.67 N over 0.43 s that was similar to joint loads/motions that have been reported in vivo. This new mastication mechanism incorporates both anatomical and mechanical variability. The use of biological specimens is an important approach that can help bridge the gap between traditional synthetic implant materials/mechanical testing and in vivo testing.

  20. Evaluation of mandibular condylar bony changes in temporomandibular disorders using Polytome-U images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nah, Kyung Soo [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-08-15

    The author examined bone changes from 1274 polytomographic images of 182 temporomandibular joints which showed symptoms of temporomandibular disorder and the following results were obtained; 1. The number of temporomandibular joints which showed bone changes were 64 (35.2%) among 182 joints. 2. The age and sex distribution of 64 joints which had bone changes showed the prevalence of female (90.6%) and third decade (25.0%) followed by fourth (21.2%) and second decade (17.2%). 3. The 252 images which showed bone changes consisted of 56 images from lateral side (22.2%), 118 images from center (46.8%) and 78 images from medial side (30.9%). 4. The most frequently observed bone changes were flattening (22.7%) followed by sclerosis (19.3%) and cortical unsharpness (19.3%)

  1. A clinical study of temporomandibular disorder. The value of bone scintigraphy as an aid to diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiura, Masashi [Nippon Dental Univ. (Japan). School of Dentistry at Niigata

    2000-07-01

    Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is still not defined with respect to the point of an entity, terminological problems, and clinical classification and gradings. Moreover, diagnostic problems of internal deranegement and osteodeformity at the temporomandibular joint such as type IV and mechanism of bone remodeling at condylar head are also still not clear. In this investigation, we tried to classify the severity and progressive grading according to the symptoms and objective laboratory data taken from soft tissues such as muscles related to mastication, discs and ligaments, and hard tissues such as condylar head and temporal bone changes around the temporomandibular joint. Preliminary diagnostic clinical tool of the assessment of temporomandibular joint by maens of bone scintigraphy was attributed to the additional diagnostic procedure and research for the bone remodeling for the temporomandibular disorder because this can be defined between subjective and objective symptoms in this disorder. Bone scintigraphy will solve many problems concerning undefined degenerative bone changes in TMD, enable more accurate diagnosis, and the selection of treatment and prognosis in future investigation. Also, it is believed single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) nuclear bone imaging is a highly accurate diagnostic method for craniomandibular disorders. (author)

  2. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TEMPOROMANDIBULAR-JOINT MOBILITY AND PERIPHERAL JOINT MOBILITY RECONSIDERED

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, P.U.; DEBONT, L.G.M.; VANDERWEELE, L.T.; Boering, G.

    The purpose of this paper was to study the relationship between temporomandibular joint (TMJ) mobility and mobility of joints and to study the general character of joint mobility in 83 subjects, 55 females and 28 males (mean age 26.7, range 13-46 years). The subjects were recruited from the

  3. Temporomandibular joint ankylosis in ankylosing spondylitis: A case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishtha Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ankylosing spondylitis (AS is a chronic systemic inflammatory disorder. It primarily affects the axial skeleton through involvement of the peripheral joint scan occurs. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ involvement in AS varies from 4% to 35%. Here, we present a case of a 35-year-old male, follow-up of AS from last 8 years on nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, presented with fresh complaints of painfully restricted movements of jaw during swallowing. Computer tomography of patient demonstrates articular cartilage changes with disc and joint abnormalities.

  4. Diagnostic criteria for headache attributed to temporomandibular disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffman, Eric; Ohrbach, Richard; List, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We assessed and compared the diagnostic accuracy of two sets of diagnostic criteria for headache secondary to temporomandibular disorders (TMD).......We assessed and compared the diagnostic accuracy of two sets of diagnostic criteria for headache secondary to temporomandibular disorders (TMD)....

  5. Periodontal Ligament Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Increase Proliferation and Glycosaminoglycans Formation of Temporomandibular Joint Derived Fibrochondrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Jianli Zhang; Fujun Guo; Jianqiang Mi; Zhiye Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders are common disease in maxillofacial surgery. The aim of this study is to regenerate fibrocartilage with a mixture of TMJ fibrochondrocytes and periodontal ligament derived mesenchymal stem cells (PD-MSCs). Materials and Methods. Fibrochondrocytes and PD-MSC were cocultured (ratio 1 : 1) for 3 weeks. Histology and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) assay were performed to examine the deposition of GAG. Green florescent protein (GFP) was used to track ...

  6. Psycho-education programme for temporomandibular disorders: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Maaytah Mohammed

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs are by far the most predominant condition affecting the temporomandibular joint (TMJ, however many patients have mild self-limiting symptoms and should not be referred for specialist care. The aim of this pilot study was to develop a simple, cost-effective management programme for TMDs using CD-ROM. 41 patients (age 18–70 participated in this study, patients were divided into three groups: the 1st group were involved in an attention placebo CD-ROM (contain anatomical information about the temporomandibular system, the 2nd group received information on CD-ROM designed to increase their control and self efficacy, while the 3rd group received the same programme of the 2nd group added to it an introduction to self-relaxing techniques followed by audio tape of progressive muscle relaxation exercises. Each of the groups was asked to complete a number of questionnaires on the day of initial consultation and six weeks afterwards. Results The two experimental groups (2nd & 3rd were equally effective in reducing pain, disability and distress, and both were more effective than the attention placebo group (1st, however the experimental groups appeared to have improved at follow-up relative to the placebo-group in terms of disability, pain and depressed mood. Conclusion This pilot study demonstrates the feasibility and acceptability of the design. A full, randomized, controlled trial is required to confirm the efficacy of the interventions developed here.

  7. The Diagnostic Value of Pressure Algometry for Temporomandibular Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Włodzimierz Więckiewicz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine the diagnostic value of pressure algometry in temporomandibular disorders. Two hundred volunteers aged 19.3 to 27.8 (mean 21.50, SD 0.97 participated in this study. An analogue pressure algometer was used for the evaluation of muscle tenderness of the following masticatory muscles: superficial and deep parts of the masseter muscle; anterior and posterior parts of the temporal muscle; and the tissues adjacent to the lateral and dorsal part of the temporomandibular joint capsule. Each patient described the algometry result for the individual components of the masticatory motor system, by selecting each time the intensity of pain on a 100 mm Visual Analogue Scale (VAS ruler. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve, indicating the discriminatory efficiency for asymptomatic subjects and patients with temporomandibular dysfunction according to the dysfunction Di index, was the largest for the mean pain value (AUC = 0.8572; SEM = 0.0531. The 7.4 VAS cut-off point marked 95.3% specificity for this variable in identifying healthy subjects and 58.4% sensitivity in identifying patients with symptoms of dysfunctions (accuracy 68.1%. Assuming comparable sensitivity (74.9% and specificity (74.2% for a diagnostic test, there was test accuracy of 74.5% at the 4.2 VAS cut-off point.

  8. Vertical Craniofacial Morphology and its Relation to Temporomandibular Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavia, Paula Furlan; Rodrigues Garcia, Renata Cunha Matheus

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the association between craniofacial morphology and temporomandibular disorders in adults. The influence of different craniofacial morphologies on painful temporomandibular disorders was also evaluated. A total of 200 subjects were selected, including 100 with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and 100 without TMD (control), diagnosed by research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders. All subjects were submitted to lateral cephalometric radiographs, and classified as brachyfacial, mesofacial, or dolichofacial by Ricketts' analysis. Data were analysed by Tukey-Kramer and Chi-square tests. No association between craniofacial morphology and TMD was found (P = 0.6622). However, brachyfacial morphology influences the presence of painful TMD (P = 0.0077). Craniofacial morphology is not related to temporomandibular disorders in general.

  9. Joint Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    A joint is where two or more bones come together, like the knee, hip, elbow, or shoulder. Joints can be damaged by many types of injuries or diseases, including Arthritis - inflammation of a joint. It causes pain, stiffness, and swelling. Over time, ...

  10. Symptom reporting in temporomandibular joint clicking; Some theoretical considerations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruijt, R.; Hoogstraten, J.

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of research on psychological aspects of temporomandibular disorders suggests that self-reports of symptoms do not constitute reliable instruments for the measurement of physiological processes. In TMJ clicking, the actual physiological signal can be measured and compared with self-reports

  11. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, José Gustavo Dala Déa; Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa Pedron; Navarro, Ricardo de Lima; Conti, Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira; Conti, Marcio Rodrigues de Almeida; Marchiori, Luciana Lozza de Moraes; Fernandes, Karen Barros Parron

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the prevalence of Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) in the elderly and its association with palpation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), masticatory and cervical muscles as well as the presence of headache and joint noises. The sample consisted of 200 elderly of both genders (mean age: 69.2±5.7 years). The clinical evaluation of TMD signs and symptoms was divided into three stages: an anamnestic questionnaire, a TMJ evaluation, and a muscular examination. The results were analyzed through descriptive statistics as well as using χ2 and the tendency tests. The presence of TMD was observed in 61% of the sample (mild: 43.5%, moderate: 13%, severe: 4.5%). A significantly greater prevalence of TMD was found for females (72.4%) compared with that for men (41.1%) (ppalpation of the TMJ (p=0.0168), of masticatory muscles (pmuscles (pTMJ palpation was not significant. The elderly presented high TMD prevalence, mostly in females, with mild severity and related to TMJ and masticatory/cervical muscles palpation. Thus, the accomplishment of a detailed clinical examination to investigate the presence of such disorders is essential and it must not be neglected during the treatment of elderly patients.

  12. Expanding the taxonomy of the diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, C C; Goulet, J-P; Lobbezoo, F; Schiffman, E L; Alstergren, P; Anderson, G C; de Leeuw, R; Jensen, R; Michelotti, A; Ohrbach, R; Petersson, A; List, T

    2014-01-01

    There is a need to expand the current temporomandibular disorders' (TMDs) classification to include less common but clinically important disorders. The immediate aim was to develop a consensus-based classification system and associated diagnostic criteria that have clinical and research utility for less common TMDs. The long-term aim was to establish a foundation, vis-à-vis this classification system, that will stimulate data collection, validity testing and further criteria refinement. A working group [members of the International RDC/TMD Consortium Network of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), members of the Orofacial Pain Special Interest Group (SIG) of the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP), and members from other professional societies] reviewed disorders for inclusion based on clinical significance, the availability of plausible diagnostic criteria and the ability to operationalise and study the criteria. The disorders were derived from the literature when possible and based on expert opinion as necessary. The expanded TMDs taxonomy was presented for feedback at international meetings. Of 56 disorders considered, 37 were included in the expanded taxonomy and were placed into the following four categories: temporomandibular joint disorders, masticatory muscle disorders, headache disorders and disorders affecting associated structures. Those excluded were extremely uncommon, lacking operationalised diagnostic criteria, not clearly related to TMDs, or not sufficiently distinct from disorders already included within the taxonomy. The expanded TMDs taxonomy offers an integrated approach to clinical diagnosis and provides a framework for further research to operationalise and test the proposed taxonomy and diagnostic criteria. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Algunas consideraciones sobre los trastornos temporomandibulares Some considerations on the temporomandibular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ileana Grau León

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una revisión documental mediante revistas, libros, tesis y otros documentos en formato electrónico acerca de la epidemiología de los trastornos de la articulación temporomandibular, con el objetivo de actualizar el material existente y ampliar nuestros conocimientos sobre esta alteración. En nuestro país se han llevado a cabo en las 2 últimas décadas, varios estudios epidemiológicos sobre los trastornos temporomandibulares (TTM y se ha hecho un esfuerzo notable por esclarecer su causa. De forma general, se acepta la idea de que el origen de los disturbios funcionales del sistema estomatognático es multifactorial, pero a pesar de que tanto en niños como en adultos la prevalencia de los trastornos temporomandibulares (TTM ha sido alta, no se ha evidenciado un factor causal predominante. La literatura alude que estas disfunciones afectan a un porcentaje muy elevado de la población mundial (80 %, con una edad media de 34 años y una proporción de 3 mujeres por cada hombre. Este dato es muy interesante, porque los estudios precisan que las mujeres de edades comprendidas entre los 25 y los 35 años presentan trastornos temporomandibulares (TTM con más asiduidad.A documental review of different sources was carried out to study the disfunctions of temporal mandibular joint (TMJ with the objective of updating and enlarge our knowledge of this disorder. In or country in the last two decades several epidemiological studies about the temporal mandibular joint dysfunction were carried out. In a general wade the idea about of the origin of the functional problems of the stomatognatic system is multifactioral. But although, in children as well as in adults the prevalence of temporal mandibular dysfunction (DTM has been high, a casual predominant factor has not been evidenced. Literature states that this dysfunction affect a very high percentage of the world populations, 80 % , the mean age 34 years old and the proportion 3 woman for

  14. Psychosocial Profiles of Temporomandibular Disorder Pain Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kothari, Simple Futarmal; Baad-Hansen, Lene; Svensson, Peter

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: To propose a visual method to screen and assess psychosocial functioning in temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain patients in comparison with age- and gender-matched healthy controls by forming individual profiles and to evaluate the association between psychosocial profiles and quantitative...... scores were analyzed with t tests. T scores of psychosocial parameters and z scores of QST parameters were correlated using Spearman's correlation (ρ). RESULTS: Most (96.6%) TMD pain patients exhibited one or more parameters indicative of psychosocial distress, with psychological disability scores being...

  15. [Synovial chondromatosis in the temporomandibular joint: report of 2 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xin; Feng, Yuan-Yong; Bu, Ling-Xue; Song, Kai; Gao, Qian-Qian; Shang, Wei

    2016-10-01

    The clinical manifestations, radiographic findings, intraoperative view, histopathologic features of synovial chondromatosis(SC) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) were summarized in 2 cases. Preoperative symptoms included preauricular pain(2/2), swelling(2/2) and limitation of mouth opening (0/2). X-ray findings showed widened joint space. The articular surface destructed and irregular stippled calcifications were seen in the infratemporal fossa by CT scan in one case. MRI showed multiple small nodular formations in the articular cavity. There was no malocclusion and limitation of mouth opening after surgery. As a rare disease of the temporomandibular joint, SC often exists in superior spaces. The clinical manifestations lack specificity. Detection of calcified loose bodies on radiography was helpful to diagnosis, while final diagnosis was dependent on histopathologic examination with characteristic cartilaginous nodules in the synovial membrane.

  16. Dimensions and geometry of the temporomandibular joint and masseter muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurowski, R; Gosek, M; Aleksandrowicz, R

    1976-01-01

    The bio-engineering team presents its suggestion of a method for the measurement of the temporomandibular joint and masseter muscles in order to determine the parameters necessary for exact sciences and indispensable for unified and objective cognitive studies. Ten formalin-fixed human cadavers served for the studies. The preparations were prepared by the modified method of anatomical procedure. Linear and angular measurements of temporomandibular joint and masseter muscles were carried out with the use of the three-dimensional Cartesian system of OXYZ coordinates in relation to frontal, sagittal and horizontal planes. The physiological cross-sections of the masseter, temporal, lateral and medial pterygoid muscles were also determined. The collected data make it possible to develop a mathematical three-dimensioned model of the osseo-articulo-muscular system of the mastication organ.

  17. Rationale of arthroscopic surgery of the temporomandibular joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, KenIchiro

    2013-01-01

    Arthroscopic surgery has been widely used for treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) internal derangements and diseases for the last 40 years. Although 626 articles have been hit by Pubmed search in terms of “TMJ arthroscopic surgery”, this review article is described based on distinguished publishing works and on my experiences with TMJ arthroscopic surgery and related research with an aim to analyse the rationale of arthroscopic surgeries of the temporomandibular joint. With arthrocentesis emerging as an alternative, less invasive, treatment for internal derangement with closed lock, the primary indication of arthroscopic surgery seems to be somewhat limited. However, the value of endoscopic inspection and surgery has its position for both patient and physician with its long-term reliable results. PMID:25737901

  18. Keys to an open lock : Subject specific biomechanical modelling of luxations of the human temporomandibular joint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuijt, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis, the aims are to: • increase the understanding of the interplay of morphological aspects, such as joint shape and muscle orientation, in open locks of the human temporomandibular joint. • increase the understanding of the biomechanics behind open locks of the temporomandibular joint.

  19. Diagnostic index of three-dimensional osteoarthritic changes in temporomandibular joint condylar morphology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gomes, Liliane R; Gomes, Marcelo; Jung, Bryan; Paniagua, Beatriz; Ruellas, Antonio C; Gonçalves, João Roberto; Styner, Martin A; Wolford, Larry; Cevidanes, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    ...) osteoarthritic morphological variations among 169 temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condyles. Cone-beam computed tomography scans were acquired from 69 subjects with long-term TMJ osteoarthritis (OA...

  20. Current concepts in the pathogenesis of traumatic temporomandibular joint ankylosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis can be classified into fibrous, fibro-osseous and bony ankylosis. It is still a huge challenge for oral and maxillofacial surgeons due to the technical difficulty and high incidence of recurrence. The poor outcome of disease may be partially attributed to the limited understanding of its pathogenesis. The purpose of this article was to comprehensively review the literature and summarise results from both human and animal studies related to the genesis of TMJ ankylosis. PMID:25189735

  1. Temporomandibular joint dislocation in an 18-month-old child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaeson Mohanan Painatt

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint (TMJ dislocation in children is extremely rare. In our case, an 18-month-old child presented with a history of inability to close her mouth. To confirm the clinical diagnosis, a computed tomogram was taken. Clinical examination and X-ray of the TMJ revealed bilateral TMJ dislocation. Bilateral TMJ reduction was achieved manually after giving analgesia and procedural sedation. This is one of the few case reports of an acute dislocation in a toddler.

  2. Management of the temporomandibular joint after ablative surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredell, Marius; Grätz, Klaus; Obwegeser, Joachim; Gujer, Astrid Kruse

    2014-12-01

    Management of the temporomandibular joint in ablative head and neck surgery is controversial with no standardized approach. The aim of the study was to establish risk-based guidelines for the management of the temporomandibular joint after ablative surgery. Analysis of all patients' records receiving ablative surgery involving the temporomandibular joint in the Department of Cranio-Maxillofacial and Oral Surgery, University Hospital of Zürich, from 2001 to 2012, was performed, identifying 15 patients and 14 reconstructive procedures. A literature search was done identifying all relevant literature on current approaches. Applicable cohorts were constructed, and relevant risks were extrapolated. Evaluated studies are not uniform in their reporting with nonhomogeneous patient groups. A diverse approach is used in the management of these patients with complications such as infection, ankylosis, limited mouth opening, plate penetration in the skull base, and plate loosening. Risk factors for complications appear to be radiation, costochondral graft, disk loss, and plate use alone. Clinical data suggest use of a plate with metal condyle reconstructions and previous radiation therapy as potential risks factors. Employing literature evidence and cumulated clinical data, a risk-based flowchart was developed to assist surgical decision making. Risk factors such as radiation, disk preservation, and soft tissue conditions are important complication-associated factors when planning surgery. Free vascularized fibula grafts appear to have the least complications that must be weighed against donor site morbidity.

  3. Radiologic Study of Meniscus Perforations in the Temporomandibular Joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kee Duck; Park, Chang Seo [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-08-15

    Thirty-nine patients (forty-four joints) who had been diagnosed as having meniscus perforation of the temporomandibular joint by inferior joint space arthrography and had been treated by surgical procedures were evaluated retrospectively. Information of clinical findings, arthrotomographic findings and surgical findings was collected on a standardized form and evaluated. The results were as follows: 1. On the 34 patients of 38 joints which were surgically confirmed perforation of meniscus or its attachments of the temporomandibular joint, there were 29 females and 5 males (5.8:1). The average age was 36 years (range 17 to 70). 2. The common clinical findings of group that had meniscus displacement without reduction and with perforation were pain on the affected joint and limitation of mouth opening. In the group showing meniscus displacement with reduction and with perforation the common clinical findings were pain and clicking on the affected joint. 3. 32 joints (84.2%) were arthrotomographically anterior meniscus displacement without reduction and with perforation, 6 joints (15.8%) showed anterior meniscus displacement with reduction and with perforation. 4. Joints categorized arthrotomographically as having meniscus displacement without reduction and with perforation were less likely to have full translation of the condyle in comparison with the normal or meniscus displacement with reduction and with perforation groups (p<0.05) 5. The arthrographic findings of 44 joints having meniscus perforation were compared with surgical findings, there were 6 false positive findings of meniscus perforation, the reliability of arthrographic findings of meniscus perforation was a 86.4% correlation with surgical findings. 6. On the site of perforations of 38 joints which were surgically confirmed perforation of meniscus or its attachments, twenty-three of perforations (60.5%) were in location at the junction of the meniscus and posterior attachment, fourteen (36.9%) were

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging in elderly patients with temporomandibular disorders. Comparison with other age groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yura, Shinya; Mabuchi, Akiko; Izumiyama, Yuri; Deyama, Ayako; Totsuka, Yasunori; Inoue, Nobuo [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Graduate School of Dental Medicine

    2002-12-01

    To estimate the incidence of disc displacement, disc deformity, and bone changes of the temporomandibular joint in elderly patients with temporomandibular disorders, 55 elderly patients (110 joints) were examined by magnetic resonance imaging. The ages of the patients ranged from 65 to 89 years (average, 70 years). They consisted of 13 men and 42 women. Normal disc position was found in 40 joints (36.4%), anterior disc displacement with reduction in 17 joints (15.5%), and anterior disc displacement without reduction in 53 joints (48.2%) on magnetic resonance imaging. Thirty-eight (71.6%) of the 53 joints with anterior disc displacement without reduction had disc deformity and 33 (62.3%) had bone changes. The frequency of bone changes in the elderly group was higher than that in the younger group. Women had a higher incidence of bone changes than men. (author)

  5. Effusion in magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nah, Kyung Soo [Pusan National University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the distribution and frequency of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) effusion in magnetic resonance (MR) images of patients with disc displacements. On T2 weighted MR images of 148 TMJs taken from 74 patients presenting with TMJ pain and dysfunction, we assessed the cases showing TMJ effusion, defined as an amount of fluid that exceeded the maximum amount seen in a control group of asymptomatic volunteers. The amount of TMJ fluid was graded as: I (none or minimal), II (moderate), III (marked), and IV (extensive), according to a standard set by a reference. Disc displacement categories were also recorded. Of the 148 TMJs examined in this study, 52 joints (35.1%) presented with joint effusion, 24 (16.2%) showing bilateral joint effusion. 38 joints showed upper joint space effusion, and 3 showed lower joint space effusion, and 11 showed both upper and lower joint space effusion. 96 joints (64.9%) had grade I joint fluid, 27 (18.2%) grade II, 15 (10.1%) grade III, and 10 (6.8%) grade IV. 80.0% of the joints presenting with grade IV effusion showed disc displacement without reduction. Joint effusion was found not only in upper, but also in lower joint spaces. The higher the effusion grade, the greater the frequency of disc displacement without reduction.

  6. Actualización terapéutica de los trastornos temporomandibulares Updating on the treatment of temporomandibular disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indira García Martínez

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una revisión bibliográfica con el objetivo de actualizar las diferentes alternativas terapéuticas que se disponen por parte de los profesionales para el tratamiento de los trastornos temporomandibulares, para lo cual los primeros esfuerzos están encaminados al alivio del dolor y al restablecimiento de la función, aunque previamente es necesario un buen diagnóstico y detección de los factores causales, enfatizando que el estrés es un elemento primordial que se debe considerar. La existencia de variados enfoques terapéuticos para los trastornos temporomandibulares queda justificada por la multifactorialidad de la etiología; las 2 alternativas más utilizadas son las férulas oclusales y el tallado selectivo. Se prefiere la fisioterapia a la quimioterapia, como coadyuvante terapéutica de los trastornos temporomandibulares, ya que disminuye el peligro de producir reacciones adversas. Solo se indicará el tratamiento quirúrgico cuando han fracasado los métodos conservadores.A literature review was made to provide updated information on the different therapeutic alternatives at the disposal of dental professionals for the treatment of termporomandibular disorders aimed at relieving pain and re-establish the functioning of the joint. However, it is necessary to firstly make a good diagnosis and then detect the causative factors, emphasizing that stress is a key element to be taken into consideration. The existence of various therapeutical approaches for temporomandibular disorders is due to the multiple factors present in the etiology; the two most used alternatives are occlusal splints and selective carving. Physiotherapy is prefered over chemotherapy, as therapeutic coadjuvant for temporomandibular disorders, because likely occurence of adverse reaction decreases. The surgical treatment will be advised only in the event of failure of standard methods.

  7. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in women and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Claudia Lúcia Pimenta; Silva, Marco Antônio Moreira Rodrigues da; Felício, Cláudia Maria de

    2016-01-01

    Women are more likely to present temporomandibular disorders (TMD); however, studies comparing genders in Brazilian samples are rare. To analyze the proportion of men and women, as well as the association between gender and age, problem duration, and TMD symptoms in patients admitted to an university clinic for treatment. Interview and assessment data of protocols from 1,000 patients diagnosed with TMD were collected and analyzed and then divided into two groups, male (n = 177) and female (n = 823). The exploratory analysis was based on contingency tables and χ2 test was carried out. Subsequently, the logistic regression model was used and the odds ratios (OR) concerning the evaluated comparisons were calculated. Females were more prevalent in the sample, and mean ages and TMD duration were similar between the groups, with higher occurrence in young adults (19 to 40 years old). The OR values showed an association between the female gender and the signs/symptoms of pain in the temporomandibular joint, pain in the facial muscles, neck and shoulders, headache, fatigue in the muscles of mastication, otologic symptoms, and dysphonia. Women had two times higher chances of presenting these symptoms than men. In the sample of Brazilian patients with TMD, the number of women who presented a higher prevalence of painful symptoms was greater, followed by otologic symptoms and complaints of dysphonia. The prevalence of joint noise was similar in both studied groups.

  8. Temporomandibular disorders in scuba divers-an increased risk during diving certification training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztürk, Ozmen; Tek, Mustafa; Seven, Hüseyin

    2012-11-01

    The design of a diving regulator's mouthpiece increases the risk of a temporomandibular disorder (TMD) in scuba divers. The total weight of a diving regulator is reflected directly on the temporomandibular joint, causing articular and periarticular disorders. In the current study, the prevalence of TMD in scuba divers triggered during diving certification training is investigated. We also aimed to determine the factors that lead to TMD during diving training and clarify the observation that there is an increased incidence of TMD in inexperienced divers. The study was held between 2006 and 2011. Ninety-seven divers were referred with the complaint of pain around temporomandibular area. The divers were classified according to their diving experience. Symptoms and signs of TMD were graded. Fourteen divers were diagnosed with TMD. Temporomandibular disorder was seen more frequently in inexperienced divers than in experienced divers (P = 0.0434). The most prevalent symptom was an increased effort for mouthpiece gripping. Temporomandibular joint tenderness and trigger point activation were the mostly seen physical signs. Thirteen divers had an improvement with therapy. The increased effort for stabilizing the mouthpiece is a recognized factor in TMD development. Attention must be paid to an association of scuba diving with TMDs, especially in inexperienced divers having a scuba certification training.

  9. Temporomandibular joint ankylosis fixation technique with ultra thin silicon sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G S Kalra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Temporomandibular joint ankylosis is a highly distressing condition in which the joint space is obliterated by scar tissue and the patient has an inability to open the mouth. Different autogenous and alloplastic interposition materials have been used after the resection of the ankylotic bone to achieve desirable and long lasting results. The recurrence of disease is most distressing for both patients and surgeon. We have been using ultra thin silicon sheet as our preferred material for providing proper fixation and cover to the joint. We have been encouraged by good patient compliance, no implant extrusion and favourable outcome. Materials and Methods: The clinical study included 80 patients with temporomandibular joint ankylosis, treated between April 2001 and March 2009. In all patients, temporomandibular joint ankylosis had resulted following trauma. Diagnosis was based on clinical assessment supplemented by radiographic examination consisting of a panoramic radiograph, axial and coronal computer tomography. The technique of using ultra thin silicon sheet covering whole of the joint space fixed with non-absorbable nylon 3-0 suture both medially to medial pterygoid muscle and laterally to periosteum of zygomatic arch was employed in all patients. Results: A total of 80 patients were in this study (59 males and 21 females. The aetiology of temporomandibular joint ankylosis was post-traumatic in all cases. The patients′ age ranged from 5 to 45 years. The disease was unilateral in 61 cases and bilateral in 19 cases. Twelve patients, who had previous surgery done in the form of gap arthroplasty in 6 cases, costochondral graft in 4 cases and temporalis muscle in 2 cases, presented with recurrence on the same side. The pre-op inter-incisal mouth opening ranged from 4 to 12 mm. The intraoperative inter-incisal mouth opening ranged from 28 to 46 mm. An additional procedure was done in 13 patients, including placement of costochondral

  10. [Effect of articular cavity injection for patients with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis at different ages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Li, Gang

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of a course of 5 weeks of joint lavage combined with sodium hyaluronate injection on temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis patients at different ages. Forty-seven patients with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis were selected and divided into 3 groups including young group (65 years old). All the patients underwent a course of 5 weeks of joint lavage combined with sodium hyaluronate injection. Non-assisted maximum opening degree of mouth, the joint pain at rest and during chewing and the joint movement disorders were measured in each group at baseline and 1, 3, 6 months after treatment. The patients were measured for the quality of life at baseline and 6 months after treatment by using OHIP-14 scale. The data was processed by using SPSS 18.0 software package. The qualities of life were significantly improved for each group of patients (P65 years old) were significantly better than those before treatment (Ptemporomandibular joint osteoarthritis is related to the age and the elderly patients can obtain better overall efficacy.

  11. Diagnostic criteria for headache attributed to temporomandibular disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, Eric; Ohrbach, Richard; List, Thomas; Anderson, Gary; Jensen, Rigmor; John, Mike T; Nixdorf, Donald; Goulet, Jean-Paul; Kang, Wenjun; Truelove, Ed; Clavel, Al; Fricton, James; Look, John

    2015-01-01

    Aims We assessed and compared the diagnostic accuracy of two sets of diagnostic criteria for headache secondary to temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Methods In 373 headache subjects with TMD, a TMD headache reference standard was defined as: self-reported temple headache, consensus diagnosis of painful TMD and replication of the temple headache using TMD-based provocation tests. Revised diagnostic criteria for Headache attributed to TMD were selected using the RPART (recursive partitioning and regression trees) procedure, and refined in half of the data set. Using the remaining half of the data, the diagnostic accuracy of the revised criteria was compared to that of the International Headache Society's International Classification of Headache Diseases (ICHD)-II criteria A to C for Headache or facial pain attributed to temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder. Results Relative to the TMD headache reference standard, ICHD-II criteria showed sensitivity of 84% and specificity of 33%. The revised criteria for Headache attributed to TMD had sensitivity of 89% with improved specificity of 87% (p muscle palpation or jaw movement. Conclusion Having significantly better specificity than the ICHD-II criteria A to C, the revised criteria are recommended to diagnose headache secondary to TMD. PMID:22767961

  12. Temporomandibular disorders and functional somatic syndromes: Deliberations for the dentist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Suma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular disorder (TMD is an umbrella term for a collection of disorders affecting the temporomandibular joint (TMJ and associated tissues. TMD is not a rare pathology for the dentist. The most common presenting symptom is pain, which causes the patient seek immediate treatment. Management is dictated by the cause. The most ′famed′ causes include trauma, inflammation, aging, parafunctional habits, infections, neoplasms, and stress; and these are always considered in the differential diagnosis of TMJ pain. There are some less ′famed′ causes of TMD, which are characterized by increased pain sensitivity due to psychosocial factors; these include myofascial pain syndrome and functional somatic syndromes (FSS such as fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome. They present with chronic pain, fatigue, disability, and impairment in ability to perform daily activities. A non-systematic search in the English literature revealed numerous studies describing the occurrence of TMD in these conditions, along with few other oral manifestations. TMD has been even considered to be a part of the FSS by some. In these patients, TMD remains a recurring problem, and adequate management cannot be achieved by traditional treatment protocols. Awareness of these conditions, with correct diagnosis and modification of management protocols accordingly, may resolve this problem.

  13. MR findings of the temporomandibular joint with crepitus

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    Sano, Tsukasa; Yamamoto, Mika; Yamaga, Takayoshi; Takahashi, Koji; Masuda, Saeko; Tagaya, Atsuko; Michi, Ken-ichi; Okano, Tomohiro [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Dentistry

    1997-06-01

    Crepitus is an important sign for diagnosis of arthrosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The presence of crepitus can be evaluated by the listening test previously proposed by our group. However, TMJ can be diagnosed by MR imaging showing the disc position and related findings including bony changes and joint effusion. This study investigated the relationship between the presence of crepitus and pathology of the joint. Fourteen joints with crepitus diagnosed by the listening test were examined in this study. TMJ was categorized into four types based on findings on double spin echo MR images. The results were as follows: Of fourteen joints with crepitus, five (36%) were showed as normal superior disc position. The remaining 9 joints (64%) were diagnosed with disc displacement, of which, 6 showed reduction, one was without reduction and 2 without reduction were associated with arthrosis. Statistical analysis using the data obtained here and other data showed that the joints with crepitus tended to show disk displacement. There was no significant difference between the degree of certainty about the presence of the crepitus and the distribution of joint pathology. Joint effusion was observed only in the joints with displacement. These results indicated that TMJ with crepitus is associated with varied joint pathology. (author)

  14. Management of pain secondary to temporomandibular joint syndrome with peripheral nerve stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Lopez, Manuel J; Fernandez-Baena, Mariano; Aldaya-Valverde, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint syndrome, or Costen syndrome, is a clinically diagnosed disorder whose most common symptoms include joint pain and clicking, difficulty opening the mouth, and temporomandibular joint discomfort. The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is supplied by the auriculotemporal nerve, a collateral branch of the mandibular nerve (the V3 branch of the trigeminal nerve). The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness and safety of permanent peripheral nerve stimulation to relieve TMJ pain. This case series is a prospective study. Pain Unit of a regional universitary hospital. The study included 6 female patients with temporomandibular pain lasting from 2 to 8 years that did not respond to intraarticular local anesthetic and corticoid injections. After a positive diagnostic block test, the patients were implanted with quadripolar or octapolar leads in the affected preauricular region for a 2-week stimulation test phase, after which the leads were connected to a permanent implanted pulse generator. Results of the visual analog scale, SF-12 Health Survey, Brief Pain Inventory, and drug intake were recorded at baseline and at 4, 12, and 24 weeks after the permanent implant. Five out of 6 patients experienced pain relief exceeding 80% (average 72%) and received a permanent implant. The SF-12 Health Survey results were very positive for all specific questions, especially items concerning the physical component. Patients reported returning to normal physical activity and rest at night. Four patients discontinued their analgesic medication and 1 patient reduced their gabapentin dose by 50%. Sample size; impossibility of placebo control. Patients affected with TMJ syndrome who do not respond to conservative treatments may find a solution in peripheral nerve stimulation, a simple technique with a relatively low level of complications.

  15. Comorbidity of internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint and silent dysfunction of the cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiesch-Scholz, M; Fink, M; Tschernitschek, H

    2003-04-01

    The aim of this evaluation was to examine correlations between internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and cervical spine disorder (CSD). A prospective controlled clinical study was carried out. Thirty patients with signs and symptoms of internal derangement but without any subjective neck problems and 30 age- and gender-matched control subjects without signs and symptoms of internal derangement were examined. The investigation of the temporomandibular system was carried out using a 'Craniomandibular Index'. Afterwards an examiner-blinded manual medical investigation of the craniocervical system was performed. This included muscle palpation of the cervical spine and shoulder girdle as well as passive movement tests of the cervical spine, to detect restrictions in the range of movement as well as segmental intervertebral dysfunction. The internal derangement of the TMJ was significantly associated with 'silent' CSD (t-test, P muscle tenderness of the temporomandibular system exhibited significantly more often pain on pressure of the neck muscles than patients without muscle tenderness of the temporomandibular system (t-test, P TMJ an additional examination of the craniocervical system should be recommended.

  16. Evaluation of temporomandibular joint disc displacement as a risk factor for osteoarthrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, I M; Cordeiro, P C de F; Devito, K L; Tavares, M L F; Leite, I C G; Tesch, R de S

    2016-03-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc displacement is a clinical sign often found in patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and associated with TMJ osteoarthrosis. Osteoarthrosis is a degenerative joint disease that may be associated with pain and functional disability. The aim of this study was to evaluate the odds ratio (OR) of joints with disc displacement presenting osteoarthrosis via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analysis. In total, 224 TMJ images from patients with signs and symptoms of a TMD were evaluated. The OR, a measure of association, was used to calculate the likelihood of TMJ disc displacement (with or without reduction) with osteoarthrosis. Joints with anterior disc displacement with reduction (ADDwR) and anterior disc displacement without reduction (ADDwoR) were 2.73- and 8.25-times, respectively, more likely to have osteoarthrosis. A nine-times greater likelihood of osteophyte occurrence was observed in cases of ADDwoR, whereas a lower OR for their occurrence (OR 2.96) was observed in cases of ADDwR. The significant OR of joints with disc displacement presenting osteoarthrosis, particularly in cases of ADDwoR, emphasizes the importance of accurate assessment of changes in disc position, which may be associated with other painful and functional disorders of the TMJ. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Physiotherapy of a displaced disc with reposition of a temporomandibular joint

    OpenAIRE

    BROŽKOVÁ, Aya

    2013-01-01

    The topic of my bachelor thesis is physiotherapy of a displaced disc with reposition of a temporomandibular joint. It is a functional disorder, when the mandible disc is not in a physiological position and creates an obstacle for a condyle movement. When mouth is fully opened the disc does not return to its original position. This moment is characteristic with a clicking sound. Another symptom is inclining of the chin to the disordered site when the mouth is being opened. Main cause of TMD is...

  18. Groningen temporomandibular total joint prosthesis : An 8-year longitudinal follow-up on function and pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurhuis, J.M.; Dijkstra, P.U.; Stegenga, B.; de Bont, L.G.; Spijkervet, F.K.

    2012-01-01

    Total temporomandibular joint replacement is a surgical procedure for patients with severe temporomandibular joint afflictions affecting quality of life, which have not responded beneficially to previous conventional surgery. The aim of this study was to assess the long-term outcome of the Groningen

  19. ANGLE OF MOUTH OPENING MEASUREMENT - RELIABILITY OF A TECHNIQUE FOR TEMPOROMANDIBULAR-JOINT MOBILITY ASSESSMENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, P.U.; DEBONT, L.G.M.; Stegenga, B; Boering, G.

    The maximal interincisal distance added to the vertical overlap is generally used as a measure for temporomandibular joint mobility. However, the length of the mandible also has an influence on this measure. The angle of mouth opening as a measure of temporomandibular joint mobility is independent

  20. Potential Indications for Tissue Engineering in Temporomandibular Joint Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salash, Jean R; Hossameldin, Reem H; Almarza, Alejandro J; Chou, Joli C; McCain, Joseph P; Mercuri, Louis G; Wolford, Larry M; Detamore, Michael S

    2016-04-01

    Musculoskeletal tissue engineering has advanced to the stage where it has the capability to engineer temporomandibular joint (TMJ) anatomic components. Unfortunately, there is a paucity of literature identifying specific indications for the use of TMJ tissue engineering solutions. The objective of this study was to establish an initial set of indications and contraindications for the use of engineered tissues for replacement of TMJ anatomic components. There was consensus among the authors that the management of patients requiring TMJ reconstruction as the result of 1) irreparable condylar trauma, 2) developmental or acquired TMJ pathology in skeletally immature patients, 3) hyperplasia, and 4) documented metal hypersensitivities could be indications for bioengineered condyle and ramus TMJ components. There was consensus that Wilkes stage III internal derangement might be an indication for use of a bioengineered TMJ disc or possibly even a disc-like bioengineered "fossa liner." However, there was some controversy as to whether TMJ arthritic disease (e.g., osteoarthritis) and reconstruction after failed alloplastic devices should be indications. Further research is required to determine whether tissue-engineered TMJ components could be a viable option for such cases. Contraindications for the use of bioengineered TMJ components could include patients with TMJ disorders and multiple failed surgeries, parafunctional oral habits, persistent TMJ infection, TMJ rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosis unless the underlying pathology can be resolved. Biomedical engineers must appreciate the specific indications that might warrant TMJ bioengineered structures, so that they avoid developing technologies in search of problems that might not exist for patients and clinicians. Instead, they should focus on identifying and understanding the problems that need resolution and then tailor technologies to address those specific situations. The aforementioned indications and

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography in the diagnosis of temporomandibular joint internal derangements: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altaf Hussain Chalkoo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of the study was to compare high-resolution ultrasonography (HR-USG with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in the diagnosis of temporomandibular joint (TMJ internal derangements. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 11 subjects with a chief complaint of TMJ discomfort, who were diagnosed as having TMJ internal derangement according to clinical diagnostic criteria (CDC for temporomandibular disorders (TMD. A control group of eight subjects who had no sign of TMJ internal derangement were also examined. Imaging modalities (MRI and HR-USG were performed on all the subjects (cases and controls. Results: Strong agreement was found between MRI and HR-USG in the diagnosis of TMJ internal derangements (k = 0.918, P < 0.001. Conclusion: MRI and HR-USG can be used to define the disc and its displacement.

  2. Influence of the presence of Temporomandibular Disorders on postural balance in the elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa Pedron; Yoshie, Marjorie Takei; Silva, Rubens Alexandre da; Conti, Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira; Navarro, Ricardo de Lima; Marchiori, Luciana Lozza do Moraes; Fernandes, Karen Barros Parron

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose To investigate the influence of the presence of Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) on postural balance in elderly individuals. Methods The study sample consisted of 150 elderly: 103 women (67.7±5.0 years) and 47 men (69.3±5.5 years). Evaluation of the presence and severity of TMD included an anamnesis questionnaire, an evaluation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), and a muscular examination, which allowed the division of the elderly into 2 groups: G1 (experimental, n=95),...

  3. Temporomandibular Lavage Versus Nonsurgical Treatments for Temporomandibular Disorders: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Carl; Goulet, Jean-Paul; El-Ouazzani, Mehdi; Turgeon, Alexis F

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the efficacy of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) lavage (arthrocentesis or arthroscopy) for the treatment of temporomandibular disorders in reducing pain and improving jaw motion. We performed a systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing TMJ lavage with conservative measures. The data sources were MEDLINE, Embase, CENTRAL (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials), Scopus, Web of Science, and reference lists of relevant articles. Two independent reviewers identified RCTs by using controlled vocabulary (MeSH, Emtree) and free text terms. Data extracted from the selected studies included population characteristics, interventions, outcomes, and funding sources. Risk of bias was assessed with the Cochrane Collaboration risk assessment tool for RCTs. Five studies met the inclusion criteria, for a total of 308 patients. Of these studies, 3 were categorized as having a high risk of bias and 2 had a low risk. The summary effect of the 5 studies showed a reduction in pain in the intervention group at 6 months (-0.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.90 to -0.37; P < .00001; I2 = 88%) and 3 months (-0.47; 95% CI, -0.75 to -0.19; P = .001; I2 = 85%). This was not the case at 1 month. No difference in mouth opening was observed at 6 months (-0.21; 95% CI, -1.82 to 1.40; P < .80; I2 = 74%), 3 months (0.20; 95% CI, -1.81 to 2.20; P = .85; I2 = 68%), and 1 month (-1.18; 95% CI, -2.90 to 0.55; P = .18; I2 = 0%). Given the relatively small number of patients included in this meta-analysis, the high risk of bias in 3 studies, and the statistical and clinical heterogeneity of the included studies, the use of TMJ lavage for the treatment of temporomandibular disorders should be recommended with caution because of the lack of strong evidence to support its use. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Motion Artifact in the MR imaging of temporomandibular disorders

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    Tamamura, Kiyoharu; Miyajima, Hisashi; Nihei, Yoshinobu; Nemoto, Ryuichi; Ohno, Tomoya [Ohu Univ., Koriyama, Fukushima (Japan). School of Dentistry

    1997-09-01

    Recently, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is indispensable for the diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Motion Artifacts of MRI occur more frequently than in other conventional methods, because it takes a long time to obtain the images. This paper reported on Motion Artifacts on MRI. MRI studies of 232 temporomandibular joints were performed in 116 patients with TMD by using a 0.5-T magnetic resonance (MR) scanner, with spin echo sequence: protondensity-weighted. And we took MRI slices at opening phase and closing phase. So 232 slices were gathered and we evaluated clinically the incidence of Motion Artifacts, that is to say, double and multiple images and other factors. The 103 slices in 56 patients showed Motion Artifacts. There is no significant difference between sexes. By age group, those in their teens were most frequent, followed by those in their fifties, forties, thirties and twenties. Also the same results were obtained for double image and multiple image. Incidence of Motion Artifact was most frequent at the opening phase. There is no significant difference between double and multiple image. (author)

  5. Temporomandibular disorders. Part 1: anatomy and examination/diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Stephen M; Brismée, Jean-Michel; Sizer, Phillip S; Courtney, Carol A

    2014-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are a heterogeneous group of diagnoses affecting the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and surrounding tissues. A variety of methods for evaluating and managing TMD have been proposed within the physical therapy profession but these sources are not peer-reviewed and lack updates from scientific literature. The dental profession has provided peer-reviewed sources that lack thoroughness with respect to the neuromusculoskeletal techniques utilized by physical therapists. The subsequent void creates the need for a thorough, research informed, and peer-reviewed source regarding TMD evaluation and management for physical therapists. This paper is the first part in a two-part series that seeks to fill the current void by providing a brief but comprehensive outline for clinicians seeking to provide services for patients with TMD. Part one focuses on anatomy and pathology, arthro- and osteokinematics, epidemiology, history taking, and physical examination as they relate to TMD. An appreciation of the anatomical and mechanical features associated with the TMJ can serve as a foundation for understanding a patient’s clinical presentation. Performance of a thorough patient history and clinical examination can guide the clinician toward an improved diagnostic process. PMID:24976743

  6. Therapeutic exercises for the control of temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Alberto da Rocha; Sanches, Monique Lalue; Ribeiro, Eduardo Cotecchia; Guimarães, Antonio Sérgio

    2013-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is a multifactorial disease. For this reason, it is difficult to obtain an accurate and correct diagnosis. In this context, conservative treatments, including therapeutic exercises classified as stretching, relaxation, coordination, strengthening and endurance, are oftentimes prescribed. Thus, the aim of the present article was to conduct a literature review concerning the types of exercises available and the efficacy for the treatment of muscular TMD. The review included researches carried out between 2000 and 2010, indexed on Web of Science, PubMed, LILACS and BBO. Moreover, the following keywords were used: Exercise, physical therapy, facial pain, myofascial pain syndrome, and temporomandibular joint dysfunction syndrome. Studies that did not consider the subject "TMD and exercises", used post-surgery exercises and did not use validated criteria for the diagnosis of TMD (RDC/TMD) were not included. The results comprised seven articles which proved therapeutic exercises to be effective for the treatment of muscular TMD. However, these studies are seen as limited, since therapeutic exercises were not applied alone, but in association with other conservative procedures. In addition, they present some drawbacks such as: Small samples, lack of control group and no detailed exercise description which should have included intensity, repetition, frequency and duration. Although therapeutic exercises are considered effective in the management of muscular TMD, the development of randomized clinical trials is necessary, since many existing studies are still based on the clinical experience of professionals.

  7. The relationship of temporomandibular disorders with headaches: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkan, Nilüfer Cakir; Ozkan, Fatih

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to retrospectively analyze the incidence of the concurrent existence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and headaches. Forty patients (36 female, 4 male, mean age: 29.9±9.6 years) clinically diagnosed with TMD were screened. Patient records were analyzed regarding: range of mouth opening, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) noises, pain on palpation of the TMJ and masticatory muscles and neck and upper back muscles, and magnetic resonance imaging of the TMJ. According to patient records, a total of 40 (66.6%) patients were diagnosed with TMD among 60 patients with headache. Thirty-two (53%) patients had TMJ internal derangement (ID), 8 (13%) patients had only myofascial pain dysfunction (MPD) and 25 (41.6%) patients had concurrent TMJ ID/MPD. There were statistically significant relationships between the number of tender masseter muscles and MPD patients (p=0.04) and between the number of tender medial pterygoid muscles and patients with reducing disc displacement (RDD) (p=0.03). The TMJ and associated orofacial structures should be considered as possible triggering or perpetuating factors for headaches, especially tension-type. There might be a significant connection between TMD and headache. However, most medical and dental practitioners are unaware of this relationship. Therefore, a careful evaluation of the TMJ and associated orofacial structures is required for a correct interpretation of the craniofacial pain in headache patients, and these patients should be managed with a multidisciplinary approach.

  8. Therapeutic exercises for the control of temporomandibular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto da Rocha Moraes

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Temporomandibular disorder (TMD is a multifactorial disease. For this reason, it is difficult to obtain an accurate and correct diagnosis. In this context, conservative treatments, including therapeutic exercises classified as stretching, relaxation, coordination, strengthening and endurance, are oftentimes prescribed. OBJECTIVE: Thus, the aim of the present article was to conduct a literature review concerning the types of exercises available and the efficacy for the treatment of muscular TMD. METHODS: The review included researches carried out between 2000 and 2010, indexed on Web of Science, PubMed, LILACS and BBO. Moreover, the following keywords were used: Exercise, physical therapy, facial pain, myofascial pain syndrome, and temporomandibular joint dysfunction syndrome. Studies that did not consider the subject "TMD and exercises", used post-surgery exercises and did not use validated criteria for the diagnosis of TMD (RDC/TMD were not included. RESULTS: The results comprised seven articles which proved therapeutic exercises to be effective for the treatment of muscular TMD. However, these studies are seen as limited, since therapeutic exercises were not applied alone, but in association with other conservative procedures. In addition, they present some drawbacks such as: Small samples, lack of control group and no detailed exercise description which should have included intensity, repetition, frequency and duration. CONCLUSION: Although therapeutic exercises are considered effective in the management of muscular TMD, the development of randomized clinical trials is necessary, since many existing studies are still based on the clinical experience of professionals.

  9. Effect of Mandibular Advancement Device Therapy on the Signs and Symptoms of Temporomandibular Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritva Näpänkangas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Mandibular advancement device therapy is effectively used in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea, but also several side effects in the masticatory system have been reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate the subjective symptoms and clinical signs of temporomandibular disorders connected to mandibular advancement device therapy. Material and Methods: The material consisted of 15 patients (9 men and 6 women, mean age 51.1 years, range 21 to 70 years diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. Subjective symptoms and clinical temporomandibular disorders (TMD signs were recorded at the beginning of the treatment (baseline and at 1-month, 3-month, 6-month and 24-month follow-ups. The degree of TMD was assessed using the anamnestic (Ai and the clinical dysfunction index (Di of Helkimo. For assessing the effect of TMD the patients were divided in discontinuing and continuing groups. Results: According to Ai and Di, the severity of TMD remained unchanged during the follow-up in most of the patients. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ crepitation was found more frequently in discontinuing patients at all follow-ups. The difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05 at the six-month follow-up. Masticatory muscle pain during palpation was a frequent clinical sign at the baseline and during the follow-up period but the difference between discontinuing and continuing patients was not significant. Conclusions: It seems that signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders do not necessarily increase during long-term mandibular advancement device therapy. However, it seems that patients with clinically assessed temporomandibular joint crepitation may discontinue their mandibular advancement device therapy due to temporomandibular disorders.

  10. A Study on Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Temporomandibular Joint

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    Kim, HYung Sick; Kim, Jae Duck [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-08-15

    Examinations of the temporomandibular joints were performed on a 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance (MR) system. An MR surface receiver coil 3 inch in diameter was placed on plastic frame, the patient's head being placed in the frame so that the coil was pressed against the temporal region. In taking advantage of the magnetic resonance imaging that has been studied briskly till now, author obtained the images of parasagittal and paracoronal planes about the temporomandibular joint by using MPGR (Multi-Planar Gradient Recalled), GRASS (Gradient Recalled Acquisition in the Steady State), and CSMEMP (Contiguous Slice Multiple Echo, Multi-Planar), that differ from the Spin Echo pulse sequence which the previous author used. Five subjects with no symptoms of temporomandibular joint pain and dysfunction were studied. The plane images obtained by these methods were compared with those by Spin Echo pulse sequence. The results were as follows: 1. The optimal repetition times (TR) and echo times (TE) for T.M.J. image were; a. 400 msec and 18 msec in PMGR pulse sequence. b. 40 msec and 12 msec in GRASS pulse sequence. c. 700 msec and 30 msec in CSMEMP pulse sequence. d. 500 msec and 20 msec in Spin Echo pulse sequence. 2. When the MPGR pulse sequence was using, T2-weighted image was obtained in very short time. 3. On the image of the paracoronal plane by GRASS pulse sequence, meniscus showed the moderate signal intensity, and the meniscus and its anteromedial, posterolateral attachments were observed definitely with gray color. 4. The signal intensity of Spin Echo pulse sequence was equal to of CSMEMP pulse sequence, but the image by CSMEMP pulse sequence showed relatively lower level in its resolution.

  11. The useful of the double-contrast arthrograpic CT-MPR of the temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Koichiro; Ando, Akira; Yamada, Hiroyuki [Fujieda Municipal General Hosital, Shizuoka (Japan)] [and others

    1998-08-01

    We performed 35 double-contrast arthrographic computed tomography multiplanar reconstruction (CT-MPR) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and 35 double-contrast arthrotomography of the TMJ in 70 patients of disorder of the TMJ since June 1994 to February 1998. The comparison of double-contrast CT-MPR and double-contrast tomography were examined by 5 radiological technologists and 3 oral surgeons. Those imaging evaluation as 5 grades in the superior joint space, inferior joint space 3 parts of an articular disc were studied. Each scores of CT-MPR was statistically superior to that of tomography (p<0.05). These results suggest that CT-MPR is markedly useful for diagnosis of TMJ disorders. (author)

  12. Condylar position on the lateral individualized corrected tomography in internal derangement of temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Keun Min; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae [College of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-06-15

    To examine the possible relationship between condylar position and disk displacement in the temporomandibular joint. 79 temporomandibular joints in 40 patients having temporomandibular disorders were classified into three categories: no disk displacement (NDD), disk displacement with reduction (DDWR), and disk displacement without reduction (DDWOR). Disk positions were assessed from clinical and MRI findings. The relationship between the three categories and condylar positions was evaluated using lateral individualized corrected tomography. Clinical findings regarding the relationship between condyle and disk positions having anterior, centric, and posterior positions were 27%, 27%, and 46%, respectively, in NDD, 43%, 17%, and 40%, respectively, in DDWR, and 44%, 22%, and 34%, respectively, in DDWOR. There were no significant differences in condylar positions between each of the groups (P>0.05). In the relationship between condyle and disk positions with MRI findings, anterior, centric, and posterior positions were 38%, 38%, and 24%, respectively, in NDD, 29%, 21%, and 50%, respectively, in DDWR, and 44%, 9%, and 47% respectively, in DDWOR. There were significant differences in the condylar positions when MRI was utilized (P<0.05). There was a significant correlation between the condyle and disk positions with MRI findings on lateral individualized corrected tomography.

  13. A study of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis using computed tomographic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massilla Mani, F; Sivasubramanian, S Satha

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to determine the various bony changes in osteoarthritis (OA) of elderly patients who are suffering from temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMD) and to find if all the changes manifesting in generalized OA were presented in temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Thirty TMJs of fifteen elderly patients who were diagnosed with TMD were selected for the study. Patient with TMD were subjected to computerized tomographic (CT) imaging, and the various bony changes in the TMJ were recorded. CT study of TMJ showed that there is a positive evidence of joint involvement in 80% of the cases. In this study, female patients were more commonly affected by OA than the males. The condylar changes (69.93%) are more common than the changes in the articular eminence (6.6%) and condylar fossa (10%). About 56.6% of TMJ in the study was affected by the early manifestations of the OA. CT study showed that there is a positive evidence of TMJ involvement in the elderly patients with TMD. The results show that condylar changes are more common than the changes in the articular eminence and condylar fossa. The study also shows that most of the patients are affected by early TMJ OA; hence, initiating treatment at early stages may prevent the disease progression. Copyright © 2016 Chang Gung University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A rat model of temporomandibular joint pain with histopathologic modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoll, Steven B; Hee, Christopher K; Davis, Martin B; Winkelstein, Beth A

    2010-01-01

    To develop a rat model of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain and to characterize in it the development and temporal response of behavioral hypersensitivity as well as to evaluate if and to what extent a loading protocol is associated with histological changes in the TMJ consistent with osteoarthritic pathology. A novel rat model of TMJ pain was developed using a noninvasive, mechanical loading protocol. Rats were exposed to steady mouth-opening for 7 days (2 N force, 1 hour/day), and mechanical hyperalgesia (increased pain response) was measured during the loading period and for 14 days thereafter. Histological modifications in the joint cartilage were also evaluated. Outcomes for the mouth-opening exposure were compared to age-matched controls. Thresholds for evoking responses were compared using a ranked ANOVA with repeated measures. Increased mechanical hypersensitivity in the temporomandibular region developed during daily loading and persisted even after the termination of the loading protocol. Histologic characterization revealed thinning of the cartilaginous structures of the joint and irregular zonal cellular arrangements in the condylar cartilage of rats subjected to the daily loading protocol. The injury model presented here is the first to demonstrate mechanically-induced behavioral hypersensitivity accompanied by osteoarthritic pathology in the TMJ.

  15. Development of temporomandibular joint arthritis: The use of animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassemi Nejad, Sheida; Kobezda, Tamás; Tar, Ildikó; Szekanecz, Zoltán

    2017-03-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common joint disease affecting roughly one sixth of the human population. It is also the most common arthritis affecting the temporomandibular joint, often leading to severe pain and the inability to masticate. Animal models are essential to investigate the disease in part because they lend themselves to genetic manipulation and various treatments and also because of the lack of availability of human specimens from various stages of the disease. The wide range of osteoarthritis models alone are a proof of its multifactorial origin. Manipulation of collagen, cytokine, matrix metalloproteinase and small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan genes can all have an effect on the development and persistence of arthritis. Surgical models also exist, highlighting the importance of normal anatomy and trauma. Here we review the English literature of murine models of temporomandibular joint arthritis with special attention to the genetic and molecular background of osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2016 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Deficient cytokine control modulates temporomandibular joint pain in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Neveen; Catrina, Anca I; Alyamani, Ahmed O; Mustafa, Hamid; Alstergren, Per

    2015-08-01

    The aim was to investigate how endogenous cytokine control of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) influences temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain in relation to the role of anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPA) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Twenty-six consecutive patients with TMJ RA were included. Temporomandibular joint pain intensity was assessed at rest, on maximum mouth opening, on chewing, and on palpation. Mandibular movement capacity and degree of anterior open bite (a clinical sign of structural destruction of TMJ tissues) were also assessed. Systemic inflammatory activity was assessed using the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28) for rheumatoid arthritis. Samples of TMJ synovial fluid and blood were obtained and analyzed for TNF, its soluble receptor, soluble TNF receptor II (TNFsRII), and ACPA. A high concentration of TNF in relation to the concentration of TNFsRII in TMJ synovial fluid was associated with TMJ pain on posterior palpation on maximum mouth opening. The ACPA concentration correlated significantly to the TNF concentration, but not to the TNFsRII concentration, indicating that increased inflammatory activity is mainly caused by an insufficient increase in anti-inflammatory mediators. This study indicates that TMJ pain on palpation in patients with RA is related to a deficiency in local cytokine control that contributes to increased inflammatory activity, including sensitization to mechanical stimuli over the TMJ. © 2015 Eur J Oral Sci.

  17. A study of the temporomandibular joint during bruxism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commisso, María S; Martínez-Reina, Javier; Mayo, Juana

    2014-06-01

    A finite element model of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and the human mandible was fabricated to study the effect of abnormal loading, such as awake and asleep bruxism, on the articular disc. A quasilinear viscoelastic model was used to simulate the behaviour of the disc. The viscoelastic nature of this tissue is shown to be an important factor when sustained (awake bruxism) or cyclic loading (sleep bruxism) is simulated. From the comparison of the two types of bruxism, it was seen that sustained clenching is the most detrimental activity for the TMJ disc, producing an overload that could lead to severe damage of this tissue.

  18. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulian, M A; Mosby, E L; Chisum, J W

    1989-01-01

    Two cases of synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint are reported. This condition is rare but benign, with only 36 cases reported in the literature to date. Symptoms include tenderness, swelling, and limited range of motion, with deviation to the affected side. Diagnosis is made both from the clinical presentation and histologic examination. The etiology is thought to be cartilaginous foci within the synovial membrane that become detached and proliferate in the synovium as chondrocytes. Treatment includes removal of the "loose bodies" and possible resection of the synovial membrane, condyle, and disk.

  19. Is there a link between tinnitus and temporomandibular disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buergers, Ralf; Kleinjung, Tobias; Behr, Michael; Vielsmeier, Veronika

    2014-03-01

    The frequent concurrence of tinnitus and temporomandibular joint and masticatory muscle disorders (TMD) has led to the assumption that a possible relationship exists between these 2 conditions. The present prospective clinical study was conducted to assess the possible association between tinnitus and TMD and to investigate the effect of stomatognathic therapy on tinnitus distress. The prevalence of TMD and tinnitus was investigated in a consecutive series of 951 patients at the Department of Prosthetic Dentistry at the University Medical Center Regensburg, Germany. Patients with TMD and simultaneous tinnitus were included in the prospective clinical trial (n=25). Baseline examination comprised a detailed functional analysis, diagnosis of temporomandibular joint and masticatory muscle disorder, and a tinnitus questionnaire. All the participants received individual dental functional therapy (oral splints, physiotherapy). The effects of functional therapy on TMD and tinnitus symptoms were examined 3 to 5 months after the initiation of dental functional therapy. Means (standard deviations) were calculated, and 1-way ANOVA was used to investigate statistical differences (α=.05). The differences of the 2 binary outcomes were compared with the Pearson χ(2) test, and the relative risk was calculated. Prevalence of tinnitus was found to be 8 times higher in participants with TMD (30 of 82 [36.6%]) than in participants without TMD (38 of 869 [4.4%]). All the participants with unilateral TMD and unilateral tinnitus showed these conditions on the same side. Stomatognathic therapy improved tinnitus symptoms in 11 of 25 participants (44%). The results of this study and the prospective clinical trial showed a significant correlation between tinnitus and TMD. The observed treatment outcome suggests that dental functional therapy may have a positive effect on TMD-related tinnitus. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier

  20. Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis as a surgical option for severe mouth opening restriction. A case report of a bilateral intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Berrone

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular disorders (TMD are a heterogeneous group of pathologies affecting the temporomandibular joint (TMJ and/or the masticator muscles, characterized by a molteplicity of signs and symptoms, the most common of which are pain localized in the preauricular area and/or in the masticatory muscles; jaw motion abnormalities; articular sounds, such as click and/or crepitus, during mandibular movements (1. A specific etiolpathogenesis is detectable in a minority of cases, since the occurrence of TMD symptoms is often...

  1. Dynamic MR imaging of internal derangements of the temporomandibular joint: correlation with clinical signs and symptoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Young Ah; Chun, Eun Ju; Kim, Yoo Kyung; Yoo, Jeong Hyun; Choi, Hae Young; Kim, Hyun Jin [Ewha Womans Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Eun Chul [Sungkyunkwan Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the correlation between findings of dynamic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and clinical findings in patients with internal derangement of the TMJ. Dynamic MR images of 130 joints of 65 patients (17 men and 48 women aged 14 to 74; mean age, 34) with internal derangement of the TMJ were obtained using a 1.5-T MR imaging system. MR findings of anterior displacement, disc deformity and degenerative change were correlated with clinical findings including joint pain, clicking sound, crepitation and maximal mouth opening (MMO). Among 62 joints with TMJ pain, 32 showed anterior displacement without reduction, 15 showed disc deformity and 19 showed degenerative change. Among 49 joints in which there was a clicking sound, 24, 8 and 12 joints, respectively, showed the above-mentioned findings, while in seven with crepitation, these same findings were evident in five, six and four joints, respectively. Bilateral and unilateral joint disorders were observed in 17 and five patients, respectively, among 22 with MMO less than 30mm and in 11 and 18 of 42 patients with MMO between 30mm and 60mm. On MR imaging, patients with MMO less than 30mm usually showed bilateral joint disorders and those with crepitation showed chronic change. This indicates that there is high association between clinical findings of internal derangement of TMJ and MR findings.

  2. Evaluation of condylar positions in patients with temporomandibular disorders: A cone-beam computed tomography study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imanimoghaddam, Mahrokh; Mahdavi, Pirooze; Bagherpour, Ali; Darijani, Mansoreh; Ebrahimnejad, Hamed [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Oral and Maxillofacial Diseases Research Center, School of Dentistry, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Madani, Azam Sadat [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Oral and Maxillofacial Diseases Research Center, School of Dentistry, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    This study was performed to compare the condylar position in patients with temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs) and a normal group by using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). In the TMD group, 25 patients (5 men and 20 women) were randomly selected among the ones suffering from TMD according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD). The control group consisted of 25 patients (8 men and 17 women) with normal temporomandibular joints (TMJs) who were referred to the radiology department in order to undergo CBCT scanning for implant treatment in the posterior maxilla. Linear measurements from the superior, anterior, and posterior joint spaces between the condyle and glenoid fossa were made through defined landmarks in the sagittal view. The inclination of articular eminence was also determined. The mean anterior joint space was 2.3 mm in the normal group and 2.8 mm in the TMD group, respectively. The results showed that there was a significant correlation between the superior and posterior joint spaces in both the normal and TMD groups, but it was only in the TMD group that the correlation coefficient among the dimensions of anterior and superior spaces was significant. There was a significant correlation between the inclination of articular eminence and the size of the superior and posterior spaces in the normal group. The average dimension of the anterior joint space was different between the two groups. CBCT could be considered a useful diagnostic imaging modality for TMD patients.

  3. Analysis of pain and painless symptoms in temporomandibular joints dysfunction in adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górecka, Małgorzata; Pihut, Małgorzata; Kulesa-Mrowiecka, Małgorzata

    2017-01-01

    Recent years have shown an increase in the number of patients reporting for treatment of pain due to musculoskeletal joint, associated with temporomandibular joint dysfunction. Therefore, studies were undertaken, aimed at analyzing the symptoms of the dysfunction, because of which patients come to the prosthetic treatment. Aim of the thesis: The aim of the study was a retrospective analysis of symptoms of temporomandibular joint dysfunction reported by patients diagnosed with this problem. The research material was a retrospective medical records of 120 patients, aged 19 to 45 years who have taken prosthetic treatment due to temporomandibular joint dysfunction in the Consulting Room in Prosthetics Department in Kraków, from June 2015 to December 2016. During the test patients, in addition to interviewing a physician, completed a personal survey in their own study. The material has been divided into I group of patients who reported pain form of dysfunction and II group, who had no symptoms of pain within the stomatognatic system. The analysis covered type of symptoms, the share of local factors (para-functions) and systemic, as well as the time a er which the patients reported for the treatment of functional disorders since the appearance of the first symptoms. Analysis of the research material showed that the main reason for reporting patients was pain in one or both temporal joints of significant intensity (5 to 8 in VAS scale,) accompanied by acoustic symptoms. A large group of questioners reported problems with the range of jaw movement and head and face pain, as well as subjective symptoms from the auditory, sight, neck, neck and shoulder areas.

  4. Current panorama of temporomandibular disorders' field in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Naila Aparecida de Godoi; Lima, Fernanda Ferruzzi; Conti, Paulo César Rodrigues

    2014-06-01

    In 2012, the recognition of the specialty of Temporomandibular Disorders and Orofacial Pain completed ten years. Given this scenario, it is extremely important to track the current situation of this field of knowledge in Brazil, specifically in the area of research and training. We hope to discuss the importance of the recognition of this specialty and the inclusion of these subjects in undergraduate programs in Dentistry. The objective of this study is to perform a bibliometric survey of researches regarding Temporomandibular Disorders and Orofacial Pain conducted in the country, determine the number of specialization courses in Orofacial Pain and the number of specialists in the field. The bibliometric survey was conducted based on the Dissertations Portal of Coordination for the Improvement of Higher education Personnel (CAPES) and on PubMed. The panorama of the field of Orofacial Pain and Temporomandibular disorders in Brazil was determined by searching on the website of the Brazilian Council of Dentistry. We found 731 theses and dissertations with Temporomandibular Disorders and Orofacial Pain as the main subjects; 81 accredited/recognized Courses on Orofacial Pain and Temporomandibular Dysfunction completed; 8 accredited/recognized Specialization Courses on Orofacial Pain and Temporomandibular Dysfunction still in progress, and 1,064 registered specialists in Orofacial Pain and Temporomandibular Dysfunction in the Brazilian Council of Dentistry. Search in the PUBMED database yielded 576 articles published with the participation of Brazilian researchers as first authors and/or co-authors in the period from 2000 to 2013. From this amount, only 5 were published in Portuguese, while all the others were published in english. We can also notice that the number of published articles increases over time. The number of researches related to temporomandibular disorders has increased over the last ten years, as well as the number of specialization courses and the number

  5. managing temporomandibular joint dislocation in ibadan

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    syndrome (EDS), Marfan's syndrome or muscular dystonias3,5. Factors associated with the onset of ... disorder on Thioridazone (Mellenil) and diazepam had idiopathic TMJ dislocation. Two other patients had a .... condyles. He had reduction using the Hippocrates manouvre and subsequent immobilization with maxillo-.

  6. Congenital Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis: Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Chin Taw Cheong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital temporomandibular joint (TMJ ankylosis is an uncommon condition that presents itself at or soon after birth in the absence of acquired factors that could have contributed to the ankylosis such as infection and trauma. The experience of managing one such case is reported in light of a review of the literature on this condition. Key management principles include adequate removal of the ankylotic mass, costochondral grafting, and post-op physiotherapy. Most patients reported in the literature with the condition experienced relapse. This echoes our own experience where there was recurrence of the ankylosis. However, after removal of the ankylotic mass, the patient maintains a satisfactory maximal incisal opening (MIO till the present day. The additional challenges faced in the congenital form in addition to the already complex management of acquired paediatric temporomandibular joint ankylosis are (1 much earlier insult to the TMJ, (2 reduced opportunity for neuromuscular development of the muscles of mastication, and (3 reduced compliance with postoperative physiotherapy programmes due to the younger age of these patients.

  7. Influence of arthrocentesis irrigation volume at temporomandibular disorder treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maysa Nogueira De Barros Melo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Temporomandibular disorder (TMD treatment varies from conservative therapy to invasive procedures such as arthrocentesis. The procedure is simple and has speed, low cost, low morbidity and good patient acceptance. Literature variations, however, have been found about the type and volume of the solution used for the irrigation of temporomandibular joint (TMJ. Subjects and Methods: The aim of this study was to compare the results provided by two different volumes of 0.9% saline solution (100 ml and 250 ml used in arthrocentesis technique for TMD treatment. It included patients unresponsive to conservative treatment. Preoperative (T0 and postoperative evaluations were performed at T1 (30th day, T2 (60th day, and T3 (90th day, in which maximal mouth opening (MMO, pain, and the presence or absence of joint sounds were recorded. Patients were randomized into two groups: 1 – submitted to arthrocentesis using 100 ml of 0.9% saline solution in TMJ and 2 – arthrocentesis performed using 250 ml of 0.9% saline solution in each TMJ. Data were submitted to descriptive and comparative analyses for each parameter per group and between groups. The effect size was calculated according to Cohen test. Minimum detectable change (MDC was obtained and the sensibility was calculated. A statistical significance of 5% was established. Group 1 obtained increase in MMO and decrease in pain (statistically significant; in Group 2, pain decreased significantly. In Group 1, clicking decreased significantly. No statistical differences were found between groups (P = 0.333. MMO and pain results exceeded MDC, and sensibility was good. Conclusion: In conclusion, arthrocentesis is effective in TMD symptoms' relief, without statistical difference between the volumes used.

  8. Jacob's disease associated with temporomandibular joint dysfunction: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capote, Ana; Rodríguez, Francisco J; Blasco, Ana; Muñoz, Mario F

    2005-01-01

    Jacob's disease is regarded a rare condition in which a joint formation is established between an enlarged mandibular coronoid process and the inner aspect of the zygomatic body. Chronic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disk displacement has been proposed as etiological factor of coronoid process enlargement. We present a 23-year-old woman with long-standing TMJ dysfunction and restricted interincisal opening, who developed a progressive zygomatic asymmetry. The patient underwent treatment by intraoral coronoidectomy and homolateral TMJ arthroscopy in the same surgery. The histopathological diagnosis of the coronoid sample was cartilage-capped exostoses with presence of articular fibrous cartilage. Although the low prevalence of this entity, it should be considered as a possible diagnosis in patients with progressive limitation of mouth opening, although a TMJ syndrome may be present as a cause of this entity.

  9. Diagnostic validity of clinical protocols to assess temporomandibular disk displacement disorders: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pupo, Yasmine Mendes; Pantoja, Leticia Lopes Quirino; Veiga, Flavia Fusco; Stechman-Neto, José; Zwir, Liete Figueiredo; Farago, Paulo Vitor; De Luca Canto, Graziela; Porporatti, André Luís

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic validity of clinical examination protocols compared with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in adults with temporomandibular joint disk displacement disorders. According to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, a systematic review was undertaken using a selection process in 2 phases; 283 different references were identified, and 10 articles were included for qualitative analysis and 7 for meta-analysis. Temporomandibular joint disorders were assessed through clinical diagnosis protocols with the aid of Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders, Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders, or Clinical Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders. The authors searched the following electronic databases: Cochrane, LILACS, PubMed, Science Direct, SCOPUS, and Web of Science. Additional search of gray literature was performed. Selected studies were evaluated by using the Quality Assessment Tool for Diagnostic Accuracy Studies-2. Two subgroups were analyzed: Disk displacement with reduction (DDwR) and disk displacement without reduction (DDwoR). The validity of clinical protocols compared with MRI performed in studies evaluating only DDwR presented sensitivity of 44% (39%-49%) and specificity 51% (46%-57%). In studies evaluating only DDwoR, sensitivity was 22% (16%-30%) and specificity 93% (85%-98%). The area under the curve value for validity of clinical protocols in all studies was 0.63, 0.56 for studies evaluating DDwR and 0.64 for studies evaluating DDwoR. Area under the curve values were considered poor. Clinical examination protocols have poor validity to diagnose DDwR and DDwoR compared with MRI. MRI should be used to increase the diagnostic accuracy when the information provided can influence clinical decisions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Signos, síntomas y alteraciones posturales en pacientes diagnosticados con trastornos de la articulación temporomandibular / Signs, Symptoms, and Postural Changes in Patients Diagnosed with Temporomandibular Joint Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Mera Quintero, Noraelena; Hospital Universitario del Valle “Evaristo García”, Cali; Morales Mutis, Leidy Janeth; Centro de Postura y Movimiento Myriam López, Cali; Ordóñez Gómez, Dany Viviana; Gómez Cabrera, Gloria Cenaida; Fundación Salud, Arte y Cultura, Puerto Asís, Putumayo; Osorio Toro, Sonia; Escuela de Rehabilitación Humana, Programa de Fisioterapia, Universidad del Valle, Cali

    2015-01-01

    Antecedentes: Muchas investigaciones analizan la frecuencia de signos, síntomas y alteraciones posturales de cabeza en pacientes con trastornos de la articulación temporomandibular (TTM); sin embargo, existe controversia en cuanto a las frecuencias encontradas por los diferentes autores. Objetivo: Reportar la frecuencia de signos y síntomas en un grupo de personas con TTM e identificar si existe alguna relación entre los TTM y el balance postural de la cabeza y el cuello en dichos pacientes. ...

  11. Effects of superpulsed low-level laser therapy on temporomandibular joint pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Ida; Gatto, Maria Rosaria; Bonetti, Giulio Alessandri

    2010-09-01

    A randomized double-blind study was conducted to compare the efficacy of superpulsed low-level laser therapy (SLLLT) with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the treatment of pain caused by temporomandibular joint disorders. A total of 99 patients with temporomandibular joint disorders, secondary to disc displacement without reduction or osteoarthritis were randomly divided into 3 groups. Thirty-nine patients received SLLLT in 10 sessions over 2 weeks, 30 patients received ibuprofen 800 mg twice a day for 10 days, and 30 patients received sham laser as placebo in 10 sessions over 2 weeks. Pain intensity was measured by visual analog scale at baseline, 2, 5, 10, and 15 days of treatment. Mandibular function was evaluated by monitoring active and passive mouth openings and right and left lateral motions at baseline, 15 days, and 1 month of treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed at baseline and the end of therapy. Mean visual analog scale pain scores in SLLLT group was significantly lower than in nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug group and control group (P=0.0001) from fifth day up to the end of the observation period. As for active and passive mouth openings and right and left lateral motions, superiority of SLLLT was evident 1 month after treatment (interaction time treatment, P=0.0001). Mandibular function improved in all SLLLT patients proving the effectiveness in the treatment of pain, as demonstrated by a significant improvement in clinical signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint disc displacement without reduction and osteoarthritis at the end of treatment and stability over a period of 1 month.

  12. Temporomandibular disorders and parafunctional oral habits: an anamnestic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa de Oliveira Melchior

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the frequency and severity of the signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD, the frequency of parafunctional oral habits and the correlation between the variables by means of the patients' perception regarding their problem. METHODS: One hundred patients diagnosed with TMD, through a clinical examination of their masticatory system, answered the questions of a previously published protocol concerning the signs and symptoms most frequently reported in the literature. RESULTS: According to the results from the non parametric statistical analysis, the frequency for the following signs and symptoms was significant: Fatigue and muscle pain, joint sounds, tinnitus, ear fullness, headache, chewing impairment and difficulty to yawn (p<0.01 and otalgia (p<0.05. As to the parafunctional oral habits, there was a significant presence of teeth clenching during the day and night (p<0.01 and teeth grinding at night (p<0.05. The variable correlation analysis showed that there was a positive correlation between symptom frequency and severity; age was correlated with the presence of otalgia, cervical pain and teeth sensitivity, besides being correlated with muscle and joint pain severity. Habit frequency was negatively correlated with age. TMD duration was also positively correlated with the symptoms of tinnitus, ear fullness, muscle and joint pain. CONCLUSION: The study results showed that the anamnestic assessment using ProDTMMulti can predict the severity of the TMD case.

  13. [Diagnosis and treatment of the ganglion cysts and synovial cysts arising from the temporomandibular joints].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Juan-hong; Guo, Chuan-bin; Ma, Xu-chen

    2014-02-18

    To give a reference for the early diagnosis and treatment of the cysts arising from the temporomandibular joint. Nine patients finally diagnosed as temporomandibular joint cysts at the Peking University Hospital of Stomatology from May 1998 to August 2013 were selected and reviewed. Their clinical manifestations, imaging features, diagnoses and differential diagnoses, treatments and follow-ups were summarized and discussed. In the 9 patients, 3 were males and 6 females. Their ages ranged from 33 to 62 years with a median age of 39 years; the course of the disease ranged from 2 weeks to 3 years with a median of 4 months. The image examinations were performed with conventional X-ray examinations in 7 cases, CT scans in 8 cases, MRI in 6 cases and ultrasound in one case. Of the 9 cases, 7 were finally diagnosed as ganglion cyst and 2 as synovial cyst. Ganglion cysts mainly presented as the mass of preauricular area or joint area, with no obvious symptoms or only local discomfort, occasionally with pain. The synovial cysts manifested as the painful swelling of preauricular area and limited mouth-opening, accompanying with occlusal disorders. The treatments included surgical resection in 8 cases, repeated arthrocenteses and lavages in one case. The follow-ups were from 3 months to 9 years, one case with recurrence, and the remaining eight cases without recurrence. MRI examinations are very helpful in the early diagnosis and treatment planning of temporomandibular joint cysts. Surgical resection can have good results. Repeated arthrocenteses and lavages also have a good result, which may be an alternative choice for synovial cyst, but more accumulation of clinical experience is further needed.

  14. Utility of bone SPECT in temporomandibular joint pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Dong Hunn; Sung, Mi Sook; Lee, Jung Whee; Chung, Soo Kyo; Shinn, Kyung Sub [College of Medicine, Catholic Univ., Pucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    Temporomandibular (TM) joint pain results from many etiologic factors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of Bone SPECT in patients with TM joint pain. The subjects were 34 patients with TM joint pain. All patients underwent plain radiography, planar bone scan, and Bone SPECT. The intensity of radioisotope uptake at TM joint was graded into three; no increased uptake above the background activity as grade 0, uptake similar to occipital bone as grade I, and uptake similar to maxillary sinus as grade II. Clinical findings and therapeutic methods were reviewed. Twenty-seven patients (80%) out of 34 patients with TM joint pain had increased uptake in bone SPECT. Twenty-one (78%) out of 27 patients had increased uptake in the mandibular condyle and remaining six patients (22%) had uptake in the mandibular and maxillary arch, which proved to be dental problem. Seven patients (21%) out of 34 were grade as 0, four (12%) were grade I, 23 (68%) were grade. II. Four patients with grade I had clicking sound and symptoms which were subsided with medication in all cases. Among 23 patients with grade II, 7 patients had clicking sound and 14 patients underwent medication and decompression therapy. With Planar bone scan, 11 cases (32%) had increased uptake in TM joint area. Plain radiography revealed narrowing, distension, erosion and limitation of TM joint in 16 cases (47%). Bone SPECT can be valuable for screening and managing the patients with TM joint pain. Patients with grade II needed intensive treatment such as joint aspiration. However degree of the radioisotope uptake did not well correlated with clinical symptoms.

  15. Signs of Bruxism and Temporomandibular Disorders among Patients with Bipolar Disorder

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    Gurbuz Ozlem

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: There is an abundance of data regarding temporomandibular disorders (TMD and bruxism specific to patients with bipolar disorder (BD. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of TMD signs in subjects with and without BD. Material and Methods: The case group included 242 adult patients (103 men and 139 women with BD and and the control group included 187 subjects without BD (89 men and 98 women. The case and control groups were compared for the presence of bruxism and the signs of TMD including muscle and temporomandibular joint (TMJ tenderness to palpation, limitation of maximum mouth opening, and TMJ sounds. Results: The frequency of at least one sign of TMD was significantly higher in patients with BD (191 ⁄242, 78.9% than the control group (95 ⁄187, 50.8% (p<0.001. Statistically significant differences were found between the case and control groups in terms of joint pain on palpation (p<0.05, masseter muscle pain on palpation (p<0.01, joint clicks (p<0.001 and limited mouth opening (p<0.001. Bruxism was significantly higher in patients with BD (49.6% than the control group (19.8% (p<0.001. Conclusions: Patients with BD appear to be more prone to having TMD signs and bruxism compared to the control group, but this comorbidity should be better understood by further studies.

  16. Relationship between clinical findings of temporomandibular disorders and magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iizuka, Yasuyuki; Miura, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Fujiro; Kikuchi, Shiori; Konishi, Nobuhiro; Sakamaki, Kimio [Iwate Medical Univ., Morioka (Japan). School of Dentistry

    1996-04-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the relationship between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and clinical findings of patients having symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, and to consider the possibility to grasp the internal derangement of the TMJ from clinical findings. Subjects were 80 patients who visited to ask orthodontic treatment 16 males and 64 females. The average age was 22 years and 4 months. We performed a investigation of both their previous and present illness. In addition, to decide the correct condition concerning the internal derangement of the TMJ, patients were given MRI examinations (G. E. medical system Signa 1.5 Tesla) before orthodontic treatment. Results were as follows: The three symptoms of temporomandibular disorders-noise, pain, and abnormal mandibular movement, were not related to constant disk displacement. It seemed difficult to infer and obtain the diagnosis of the condition of internal derangement of the TMJ only from clinical findings. In a dental clinics having no medical imaging instrument such as MRI, it was, however, considered that the following items will make it possible to define the condition of internal derangements of the TMJ from clinical findings. As to respects concerning clinical findings, it is necessary to consider the previous illness as well as present illness. TMJ noise indicates a higher relationship to the disk displacement in MRI findings. The temporomandibular joint with plural symptoms indicated a higher incidence of disk displacement examined by MR Imaging than that with a single symptom. (author).

  17. Dietary correlates of temporomandibular joint morphology in the great apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terhune, Claire E

    2013-02-01

    Behavioral observations of great apes have consistently identified differences in feeding behavior among species, and these differences have been linked to variation in masticatory form. As the point at which the mandible and cranium articulate, the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is an important component of the masticatory apparatus. Forces are transmitted between the mandible and cranium via the TMJ, and this joint helps govern mandibular range of motion. This study examined the extent to which TMJ form covaries with feeding behavior in the great apes by testing a series of biomechanical hypotheses relating to specific components of joint shape using linear measurements extracted from three-dimensional coordinate data. Results of these analyses found that taxa differ significantly in TMJ shape, particularly in the mandibular fossa. Chimpanzees have relatively more anteroposteriorly elongated joint surfaces, whereas gorillas tend to have relatively anteroposteriorly compressed joints. Orangutans were most commonly intermediate in form between Pan and Gorilla, perhaps reflecting a trade-off between jaw gape and load resistance capabilities. Importantly, much of the observed variation among taxa reflects differences in morphologies that facilitate gape over force production. These data therefore continue to emphasize the unclear relationship between mandibular loading and bony morphology, but highlight the need for further data regarding food material properties, jaw gape, and ingestive/food processing behaviors. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Association between otalgia, tinnitus, vertigo and hypoacusia, with temporomandibular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Guedes Pereira de Alencar Junior

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Because nonespecific symptoms and signs are associated with others well-established in the temporomandibular disorders, it is difficult for the clinician to decide what symptoms and signs should be considered during the diagnosis and the treatment plan. Therefore, the aim of this literature review was to evaluate the prevalence of aural symptoms (otalgias, tinnitus, dizziness and deafness in patients with orofacial pain. Although several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the association between aural symptoms and temporomandibular disorders, the results of the previous studies differed in magnitude. For this reason, it is difficult to establish the prevalence of these aural symptoms concomitantly with temporomandibular disorders. Moreover, such relationship does not necessarily imply a cause-effect relationship. Because of the diagnosis complexity, different treatments must be considered, so the nonespecific symptoms of temporomandibular disorders can be effectively controlled as well. It is crucial for the the clinician to be aware of the possible etiology of aural symptoms, so he should determine if such symptoms may be associated with temporomandibular disorders and thus include them in the treatment.

  19. Effectiveness of osteopathic manipulative treatment versus osteopathy in the cranial field in temporomandibular disorders - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesslbauer, Christina; Vavti, Nadja; Keilani, Mohammad; Mickel, Michael; Crevenna, Richard

    2018-03-01

    manipulative treatment and osteopathy in the cranial field and support the importance of an interdisciplinary collaboration in patients with temporomandibular disorders. Implications for rehabilitation Temporomandibular disorders are the second most prevalent musculoskeletal condition with a negative impact on physical and psychological factors. There are a variety of options to treat temporomandibular disorders. This pilot study demonstrates the reduction of pain, the improvement of temporomandibular joint dysfunction and the positive impact on quality of life after osteopathic manipulative treatment and osteopathy in the cranial field. Our findings support the use of osteopathic manipulative treatment and osteopathy in the cranial field and should encourage further research on osteopathic manipulative treatment and osteopathy in the cranial field in patients with temporomandibular disorders. Rehabilitation experts should consider osteopathic manipulative treatment and osteopathy in the cranial field as a beneficial treatment option for temporomandibular disorders.

  20. Speech evaluation in children with temporomandibular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Aparecida Pizolato

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to evaluate the influence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD on speech in children, and to verify the influence of occlusal characteristics. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Speech and dental occlusal characteristics were assessed in 152 Brazilian children (78 boys and 74 girls, aged 8 to 12 (mean age 10.05 ± 1.39 years with or without TMD signs and symptoms. The clinical signs were evaluated using the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD (axis I and the symptoms were evaluated using a questionnaire. The following groups were formed: Group TMD (n=40, TMD signs and symptoms (Group S and S, n=68, TMD signs or symptoms (Group S or S, n=33, and without signs and symptoms (Group N, n=11. Articulatory speech disorders were diagnosed during spontaneous speech and repetition of the words using the "Phonological Assessment of Child Speech" for the Portuguese language. It was also applied a list of 40 phonological balanced words, read by the speech pathologist and repeated by the children. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, Fisher's exact or Chi-square tests (α=0.05. RESULTS: A slight prevalence of articulatory disturbances, such as substitutions, omissions and distortions of the sibilants /s/ and /z/, and no deviations in jaw lateral movements were observed. Reduction of vertical amplitude was found in 10 children, the prevalence being greater in TMD signs and symptoms children than in the normal children. The tongue protrusion in phonemes /t/, /d/, /n/, /l/ and frontal lips in phonemes /s/ and /z/ were the most prevalent visual alterations. There was a high percentage of dental occlusal alterations. CONCLUSIONS: There was no association between TMD and speech disorders. Occlusal alterations may be factors of influence, allowing distortions and frontal lisp in phonemes /s/ and /z/ and inadequate tongue position in phonemes /t/; /d/; /n/; /l/.

  1. Speech evaluation in children with temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizolato, Raquel Aparecida; Fernandes, Frederico Silva de Freitas; Gavião, Maria Beatriz Duarte

    2011-10-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the influence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) on speech in children, and to verify the influence of occlusal characteristics. Speech and dental occlusal characteristics were assessed in 152 Brazilian children (78 boys and 74 girls), aged 8 to 12 (mean age 10.05 ± 1.39 years) with or without TMD signs and symptoms. The clinical signs were evaluated using the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD) (axis I) and the symptoms were evaluated using a questionnaire. The following groups were formed: Group TMD (n=40), TMD signs and symptoms (Group S and S, n=68), TMD signs or symptoms (Group S or S, n=33), and without signs and symptoms (Group N, n=11). Articulatory speech disorders were diagnosed during spontaneous speech and repetition of the words using the "Phonological Assessment of Child Speech" for the Portuguese language. It was also applied a list of 40 phonological balanced words, read by the speech pathologist and repeated by the children. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, Fisher's exact or Chi-square tests (α=0.05). A slight prevalence of articulatory disturbances, such as substitutions, omissions and distortions of the sibilants /s/ and /z/, and no deviations in jaw lateral movements were observed. Reduction of vertical amplitude was found in 10 children, the prevalence being greater in TMD signs and symptoms children than in the normal children. The tongue protrusion in phonemes /t/, /d/, /n/, /l/ and frontal lips in phonemes /s/ and /z/ were the most prevalent visual alterations. There was a high percentage of dental occlusal alterations. There was no association between TMD and speech disorders. Occlusal alterations may be factors of influence, allowing distortions and frontal lisp in phonemes /s/ and /z/ and inadequate tongue position in phonemes /t/; /d/; /n/; /l/.

  2. Review: Psychological intervention in temporomandibular disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Araneda

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD frecuently present psychological and psychiatric problems. These patients often show increased somatization, depression, anxiety, stress reaction and catastrophism, wich plays a role in the predisposition, initiation and perpetuation of TMD and treatment response. This review presents thaerapeutic options that compromise the psychological axis of patients with TMD, wich primarily seek to reduce the anxiety and the emotional stress present, modify different perceptions of pain and coping. There are different posibilities, within wich are: patient education, identifying situations that increase the tension to avoid them, teaching relaxation techniques such as biofeedback, hipnosis and yoga. As for psychological treatment, the most common for chronic orofacial pain is cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT. The appropriate and effective psychological intervention can reduce TMD pain, decreasing the probability that the symptoms become more complex. Within psychological treatment options for TMD, conservative standard treatment (education, self-instruction, avoidance of painful movements, soft diet, even the shortest, may be sufficient in the short term for most patients with TMD, especially in cases of acute conditions. The addition of CBT, by a specialist, gives coping skills that will add to the effectiveness, especially in chronic cases, obtaining better results in the long term.

  3. Sleep bruxism and myofascial temporomandibular disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphael, Karen G.; Sirois, David A.; Janal, Malvin N.; Wigren, Pia E.; Dubrovsky, Boris; Nemelivsky, Lena V.; Klausner, Jack J.; Krieger, Ana C.; Lavigne, Gilles J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Many dentists believe that sleep bruxism (SB) is a pathogenic factor in myofascial temporomandibular disorder (TMD), but almost all supportive data rely on patients’ self-reports rather than on direct observation. Methods The authors administered a structured self-report interview to determine whether a large and well-characterized sample of patients with myofascial TMD (124 women) experienced SB more often than did matched control participants (46 women). The authors then used data from a two-night laboratory-based polysomnographic (PSG) study to determine whether the case participants exhibited more SB than the control participants. Results The results of independent sample t tests and χ2 analyses showed that, although self-reported rates of SB were significantly higher in case participants (55.3 percent) than in control participants (15.2 percent), PSG-based measures showed much lower and statistically similar rates of SB in the two groups (9.7 percent and 10.9 percent, respectively). Grinding noises were common in both case participants (59.7 percent) and control participants (78.3 percent). Conclusions Most case participants did not exhibit SB, and the common belief that SB is a sufficient explanation for myofascial TMD should be abandoned. Clinical Implications Although other reasons to consider treating SB may exist, misplaced concern about SB’s sustaining or exacerbating a chronic myofascial TMD condition should not be used to justify SB treatment. PMID:23115152

  4. Multimodal physiotherapeutic approach: effects on the temporomandibular disorder diagnosis and severity

    OpenAIRE

    Freire,Ariane Bôlla; Nardi,Angélica Trevisan De; Boufleur,Jalusa; Chiodelli,Laís; Pasinato,Fernanda; Corrêa,Eliane Castilhos Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The temporomandibular disorder (TMD) consists of a set of signs and symptoms that affect the masticatory structures, which may cause joint and/or muscular pain. The physiotherapy approach aims at the pain relief and the functional recovery by means of several modalities.Objective To investigate the effects, short and medium-term, of a multimodal physiotherapeutic approach on TMD diagnosis and severity.Methodology Individuals with diagnosis of TMD, confirmed by the Axis I of the R...

  5. Radiographic evaluation of cervical spine of subjects with temporomandibular joint internal disorder Avaliação radiográfica da coluna cervical de indivíduos com distúrbios internos da articulação temporomandibular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Cesar Munhoz

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Although the etiopathophysiology of internal temporomandibular joint internal disorders (TMJ ID is still unknown, it has been suggested that head and body posture could be related to its initial onset, development and perpetuation. The purpose of the present study was to observe the relationship between cervical spine X-ray abnormalities and TMJ ID. This investigation evaluated 30 subjects with internal TMJ disorder symptoms (test group and 20 healthy subjects (control group. Subjects were submitted to clinical and radiographic evaluation. Clinical evaluation comprised anamnesis and stomatognathic system physical examination. Radiographic evaluation comprised analysis of lateral cervical spine X-rays by three physical therapists and tracing on the same im ages. The test group presented twice as much cervical spine hyperlordosis as the control group (20.7% versus 10.5%, but almost half of rectification prevalence (41.4 versus 79.0%, p = 0.03. After that, the test group was divided into three subgroups according to TMJ dysfunction severity, evaluated by Helkimo's index. These subgroups were not significantly different, but the subgroup with more severe TMD showed a tendency to cervical spine hyperlordosis prevalence. Results showed a tendency for subjects with more severe TMD to exhibit cervical spine hyperlordosis. Nevertheless, studies with a larger number of subjects suffering from severe TMD are encouraged in order to corroborate the present findings.Apesar de a etiofisiopatologia dos distúrbios internos (DI da articulação temporomandibular (ATM ser ainda desconhecida, sugere-se que as posturas de cabeça e corpo estariam associadas a seu desencadeamento, desenvolvimento e sua perpetuação. O objetivo deste estudo foi verificar a relação entre alterações radiográficas de coluna cervical e distúrbios internos da ATM. Este estudo avaliou 30 indivíduos com distúrbios da ATM (grupo teste e 20 saudáveis (grupo controle. Os indiv

  6. The association between oral examination findings and computed tomographic appearance of the equine temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmalt, J L; Simhofer, H; Bienert-Zeit, A; Rawlinson, J E; Waldner, C L

    2017-11-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) forms the junction between the maxilla and mandible. Movement of the jaw and resulting masticatory forces have been extensively studied in the horse; however, less is known about the inter-relationship between this joint and oral and dental pathology. To determine the association between specific oral and dental pathologies and anatomical variations of the TMJ imaged with computed tomography (CT) in horses with asymptomatic TMJs. Retrospective cross-sectional study. Horses (n = 201) from three practices with a complete oral examination and skull or upper cervical CT study were reviewed. Age, breed, sex, clinical presentation, oral examination findings, slice width and practice were recorded. Alterations in contour and density of the mandibular condyle, mandibular fossa and intra-articular disc were also documented. Logistic regression, corrected for clustering by practice, was used to determine whether CT anatomical variations were significantly associated with the oral examination findings. Horses categorised as having abnormal TMJs were older than those with normal TMJ. Horses with periodontal disease were less likely to have abnormal TMJ findings compared with horses with no oral pathology. In contrast, horses with infundibular disease were more likely to have TMJ abnormalities. Due to the cross-sectional nature of the study, it was difficult to establish whether oral pathology preceded TMJ abnormalities. Despite examining over 200 horses of varying ages, the biological significance of the observed associations between oral, or dental disease and anatomically appreciable temporomandibular joint disorders remains uncertain. © 2017 EVJ Ltd.

  7. Case-Based Learning for Orofacial Pain and Temporomandibular Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Glenn T.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    The use of interactive computer-based simulation of cases of chronic orofacial pain and temporomandibular joint disfunction patients for clinical dental education is described. Its application as a voluntary study aid in a third-year dental course is evaluated for effectiveness and for time factors in case completion. (MSE)

  8. Cervical spine alignment and hyoid bone positioning with temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, A V; Gomes, P F; Teixeira-Salmela, L F

    2007-10-01

    The relationships between temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders and cervical structure dysfunctions have already been demonstrated. The aim of the present study was to investigate functional and structural alterations of the head and neck of 17 individuals with TMJ disorders (TMD group), compared with a control group of 17 asymptomatic subjects in a cross-sectional design. The outcome variables included pain on palpation of the sternocleidomastoideus, superior trapezius and subocciptal muscles, as well as radiographic measures of alignment of the cervical spine and positioning of the hyoid bone. Cervical alignment, determined by measures of the cervical curvature angle, was investigated by the Cobb method. Independent Student t-tests were used to investigate differences between groups for all outcome variables (alpha TMJ disorders, when compared with asymptomatic subjects, presented higher levels of perception of pain in all cervical muscles (P < 0.0001). No significant differences were found between groups for the cervical alignment measures. In the TMD group, the position of the hyoid bone in relation to the cervical spine did not appear to be different from the control group.

  9. Assessment of temporomandibular and cervical spine disorders in tinnitus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björne, Assar

    2007-01-01

    In treating patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction it was noticed that tinnitus and vertigo were common in such patients and there was also muscular tension in jaw and neck. During treatment of these patients it was also noted that injection of lidocaine in a jaw muscle (m. pt. lat.) reduced not only their muscular problems but also that the tinnitus was reduced while the local anesthetic was active. Evaluation of 39 patients with disabling tinnitus, and all suffered from tinnitus, revealed that 10 of them had bilateral tinnitus and TMJ disorders revealed that pain in the face, temples or jaw occurred often among these patients. Many of such patients had also symptoms of cervical spine disorders, head, neck and shoulder pain, and limitations in side bending and rotation were also frequent complaints. One-third of these patients could influence tinnitus by jaw movements and 75% could trigger vertigo by head or neck movements. Treatment of jaw and neck disorders in 24 patients with Ménière's disease had a beneficial effect on not only their episodic vertigo but also on their tinnitus and aural fullness. At the 3-year follow-up, intensity of all symptoms were significantly reduced (p<0.001).

  10. [Explanation of some physiological characteristics of homeostasis in elderly patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babich, V V; Ryzhak, G A; Iordanishvili, A K

    2014-01-01

    Most number of patients, particularly adult and older women with temporomandibular disfunction suffers from pain reaction in maxillofacial area. Pain symptom associated with temporomandibular disfunction is followed by some changes of physiological statistics (high sympathetic level). Temporomandibular disfunction in adult and older women is most pronounced and can serve as an indicator of concomitant chronic diseases among patients with endocrine disorder (hypothyroidism), cardiological pathology (arterial hypertension).

  11. Expanding the taxonomy of the diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peck, C.C.; Goulet, J-P; Lobbezoo, F.; Schiffman, E.L.; Alstergren, P.; Anderson, G.C.; De Leeuw, R.; Jensen, R.; Michelotti, A.; Ohrbach, R.; Petersson, A.; List, T.

    2014-01-01

    There is a need to expand the current temporomandibular disorders' (TMDs) classification to include less common but clinically important disorders. The immediate aim was to develop a consensus-based classification system and associated diagnostic criteria that have clinical and research utility for

  12. Expanding the taxonomy of the diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peck, C C; Goulet, J-P; Lobbezoo, F

    2014-01-01

    There is a need to expand the current temporomandibular disorders' (TMDs) classification to include less common but clinically important disorders. The immediate aim was to develop a consensus-based classification system and associated diagnostic criteria that have clinical and research utility f...

  13. Temporomandibular disorders: a report of 124 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins-Júnior, Reynaldo Leite; Palma, Antônio José Garcia; Marquardt, Emilio Jose; Gondin, Thais Monteiro de Barros; Kerber, Florence de Carvalho

    2010-10-14

    This study aims to present both the features of 124 consecutive patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and the results of a reversible, conservative, and low-tech treatment. One hundred fifty-eight records of consecutive patients treated in School of Dentistry at the Univag-University Center in Várzea Grande-MT, Brazil, 124 of whom were considered TMD patients, were examined. The following data were obtained: gender, age, main complaint, diagnosis, co-morbidities, type of treatment performed, and treatment results. The patients who received a successful treatment were contacted for reevaluation four to six years after the conclusion of treatment. Pain was the main complaint for 92.7 percent of the patients. The majority of patients were female (female:male ratio of 4.1:1), with a peak age range between 20 and 30 years. Roughly 59.7 percent of the patients were diagnosed as having a muscular TMD, 12.9 percent as an articular TMD, and 27.4 percent as a mixed TMD. The success rate for treatment was 91.7 percent, and there was a tendency toward the long-term maintenance of good results. The features of the 124 TMD patients treated were similar to those reported in the literature with regard to gender, age, and diagnostic prevalence. Most of the disorders were of a muscular origin, and there was a predominance of women between 20 and 30 years of age. The conservative, reversible, and low-tech treatment success rate for TMD can reach values above 90 percent. Therefore, there is no need for invasive, irreversible, expensive, or high-tech treatments for the majority of patients. The majority of TMD patients can benefit from reversible, conservative, and low-tech treatments such as parafunction control and therapeutic exercises that can be performed by any clinician once an accurate diagnosis has been made.

  14. Towards Establishing a Standardized Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scoring System for Temporomandibular Joints in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolend, Mirkamal A; Twilt, Marinka; Cron, Randy Q

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The temporomandibular joints (TMJs) are frequently affected in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Early detection is challenging, as major variation is present in scoring TMJ pathology on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Consensus-driven development and validation...

  15. Isolated Arthritis of the Temporomandibular Joint as the Initial Manifestation of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hügle, Boris; Spiegel, Lynn; Hotte, Julia

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe characteristics of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) presenting with isolated arthritis of the temporomandibular joints (TMJ). METHODS: Patients with JIA with isolated TMJ arthritis from 4 large tertiary pediatric rheumatology centers were included. Demograp...

  16. Facial skeleton remodeling due to temporomandibular joint degeneration: an imaging study of 100 patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schellhas, KP; Piper, MA; Omlie, MR

    1990-01-01

    .... All had been investigated clinically and with radiography, tomography, and high- field surface-coil MR imaging to determine the presence or absence and extent of temporomandibular joint degeneration...

  17. Synovial sarcoma of the temporomandibular joint and infratemporal fossa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Fuminori; Kishimoto, Seiji

    2014-12-01

    Synovial sarcoma in the head and neck region is rare, and is difficult to resect with adequate safety margins because of its anatomical complexity. We herein report our experiences with synovial sarcoma in this region, and review the literature regarding the management of such cases. We retrospectively examined four cases of synovial sarcoma arising from the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) area and infratemporal fossa. Only one patient remains alive without disease, while the other three patients have died. The local control of these tumors has improved because of the progress in the surgical operation methods, while it is expected that there is still a high rate of deaths due to distant metastasis increase. The development of strong chemotherapy is needed for the use after the initial treatment and surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of Condylar Elastic Properties to Temporomandibular Joint Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Mandibular condyle plays an important role in the growth and reconstruction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ. We aimed to obtain orthotropic elastic parameters of the condyle using a continuous-wave ultrasonic technique and to observe the effects of condylar elastic parameters on stress distribution of the TMJ using finite element analysis (FEA. Using the ultrasonic technique, all nine elastic parameters were obtained, which showed that the mandibular condyle was orthotropic. With the condyle defined as orthotropic, the occlusal stress was transferred fluently and uniformly from the mandible to the TMJ. The stress distribution in the isotropic model showed stepped variation among different anatomical structures with higher stress values in the cartilage and condyle than in the orthotropic model. We conclude that anisotropy has subtle yet significant effects on stress distribution of the TMJ and could improve the reality of simulations.

  19. Temporomandibular joint ankylosis in child: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul J Hegde

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ is an intracapsular union of the disc-condyle complex to the temporal articular surface that restricts mandibular movements, including the fibrous adhesions or bony fusion between condyle, disc, glenoid fossa, and eminence. It is a serious and disabling condition that may cause problems in mastication, digestion, speech, appearance, and hygiene. Case Report: This report describes a case of a 12-year-old girl with inability to open her mouth, diagnosed with unilateral right bony TMJ ankylosis. The surgical approach consisted of gap arthroplasty with interpositional temporalis muscle flap followed by vigorous physiotherapy. Conclusion: The treatment of TMJ ankylosis poses a significant challenge because of technical difficulties and a high incidence of recurrence. Its treatment includes the orthodontist, oral and maxillofacial surgeon, pediatric dentist, and psychologist and physical therapist as part of the healthcare team.

  20. Clinical Signs and Subjective Symptoms of Temporomandibular Disorders in Instrumentalists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jae Young; Kwon, Jeong Seung; Lee, Debora H; Bae, Jung Hee; Kim, Seong Taek

    2016-11-01

    Most of the reports on instrumentalists' experiences of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) have been reported not by clinical examinations but by subjective questionnaires. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical signs and subjective symptoms of TMD in a large number of instrumentalists objectively. A total of 739 musicians from a diverse range of instrument groups completed a TMD questionnaire. Among those who reported at least one symptom of TMD, 71 volunteers underwent clinical examinations and radiography for diag-nosis. Overall, 453 participants (61.3%) reported having one or more symptoms of TMD. The most frequently reported symptom was a clicking or popping sound, followed by temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain, muscle pain, crepitus, and mouth opening limitations. Compared with lower-string instrumentalists, a clicking or popping sound was about 1.8 and 2 times more frequent in woodwind and brass instrumentalists, respectively. TMJ pain was about 3.2, 2.8, and 3.2 times more frequent in upper-string, woodwind, and brass instrumentalists, respectively. Muscle pain was about 1.5 times more frequent in instrumentalists with an elevated arm position than in those with a neutral arm position. The most frequent diagnosis was myalgia or myofascial pain (MFP), followed by disc displacement with reduction. Myalgia or MFP was 4.6 times more frequent in those practicing for no less than 3.5 hours daily than in those practicing for less than 3.5 hours. The results indicate that playing instruments can play a contributory role in the development of TMD.

  1. Ear pain following temporomandibular surgery originating from the temporomandibular joint or the cranial nervous tissue? A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerse, Wouter K; von Piekartz, Harry J M

    2015-02-01

    A patient presenting with local pain and limitation of movement in the temporomandibular region following surgery of the left temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is described. Manual techniques like distraction of the TMJ combined with motor control exercises to restore TMJ function were not sufficient to relieve the patient's symptoms and her orofacial functions. However, during manual assessment and treatment of cranial nervous tissue, in this case the auriculotemporal nerve and its interface, pain was relieved and orofacial functions improved. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Hormonal fluctuations intensify temporomandibular disorder pain without impairing masticatory function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilanova, Larissa Soares; Gonçalves, Thais Marques; Meirelles, Lis; Garcia, Renata Cunha

    2015-01-01

    The influence of hormonal fluctuations on pain and mastication was evaluated in patients with painful temporomandibular disorder (TMD) symptoms. Fifty women were assigned to menstrual cycle and oral contraceptive groups (n = 25). Their TMD was diagnosed by Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders. Pain levels, maximum oclusal force (MOF), and masticatory performance (MP) were measured in all menstrual cycle phases. A lower pain level was observed in the ovulatory phase when compared to menstrual and luteal phases (P = .02). No differences were found regarding MOF (P = .20) or MP (P = .94). Hormonal fluctuations intensify pain in women with symptomatic TMD without impairing mastication.

  3. Detection of degenerative disease of the temporomandibular joint by bone scintigraphy: concise communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, H.A.; Bloom, C.Y.

    1980-10-01

    Nine patients with facial pain were evaluated with limited bone scans. The scintigrams correlated with microscopy in all patients, although radiographs correlated with microscopy in only five patients. The degenerative disease process in the temporomandibular joint was more extensive in the patients with radiographic and scintigraphic abnormalities than in those with scintigraphic abnormalities alone. The limited bone scan appears useful in detecting early degenerative changes in the temporomandibular joint.

  4. Lubricin protects the temporomandibular joint surfaces from degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Adele; Duran, Juanita; Purcell, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a specialized synovial joint essential for the mobility and function of the mammalian jaw. The TMJ is composed of the mandibular condyle, the glenoid fossa of the temporal bone, and a fibrocartilagenous disc interposed between these bones. A fibrous capsule, lined on the luminal surface by the synovial membrane, links these bones and retains synovial fluid within the cavity. The major component of synovial fluid is lubricin, a glycoprotein encoded by the gene proteoglycan 4 (Prg4), which is synthesized by chondrocytes at the surface of the articular cartilage and by synovial lining cells. We previously showed that in the knee joint, Prg4 is crucial for maintenance of cartilage surfaces and for regulating proliferation of the intimal cells in the synovium. Consequently, the objective of this study was to determine the role of lubricin in the maintenance of the TMJ. We found that mice lacking lubricin have a normal TMJ at birth, but develop degeneration resembling TMJ osteoarthritis by 2 months, increasing in severity over time. Disease progression in Prg4-/- mice results in synovial hyperplasia, deterioration of cartilage in the condyle, disc and fossa with an increase in chondrocyte number and their redistribution in clusters with loss of superficial zone chondrocytes. All articular surfaces of the joint had a prominent layer of protein deposition. Compared to the knee joint, the osteoarthritis-like phenotype was more severe and manifested earlier in the TMJ. Taken together, the lack of lubricin in the TMJ causes osteoarthritis-like degeneration that affects the articular cartilage as well as the integrity of multiple joint tissues. Our results provide the first molecular evidence of the role of lubricin in the TMJ and suggest that Prg4-/- mice might provide a valuable new animal model for the study of the early events of TMJ osteoarthritis.

  5. Lubricin protects the temporomandibular joint surfaces from degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adele Hill

    Full Text Available The temporomandibular joint (TMJ is a specialized synovial joint essential for the mobility and function of the mammalian jaw. The TMJ is composed of the mandibular condyle, the glenoid fossa of the temporal bone, and a fibrocartilagenous disc interposed between these bones. A fibrous capsule, lined on the luminal surface by the synovial membrane, links these bones and retains synovial fluid within the cavity. The major component of synovial fluid is lubricin, a glycoprotein encoded by the gene proteoglycan 4 (Prg4, which is synthesized by chondrocytes at the surface of the articular cartilage and by synovial lining cells. We previously showed that in the knee joint, Prg4 is crucial for maintenance of cartilage surfaces and for regulating proliferation of the intimal cells in the synovium. Consequently, the objective of this study was to determine the role of lubricin in the maintenance of the TMJ. We found that mice lacking lubricin have a normal TMJ at birth, but develop degeneration resembling TMJ osteoarthritis by 2 months, increasing in severity over time. Disease progression in Prg4-/- mice results in synovial hyperplasia, deterioration of cartilage in the condyle, disc and fossa with an increase in chondrocyte number and their redistribution in clusters with loss of superficial zone chondrocytes. All articular surfaces of the joint had a prominent layer of protein deposition. Compared to the knee joint, the osteoarthritis-like phenotype was more severe and manifested earlier in the TMJ. Taken together, the lack of lubricin in the TMJ causes osteoarthritis-like degeneration that affects the articular cartilage as well as the integrity of multiple joint tissues. Our results provide the first molecular evidence of the role of lubricin in the TMJ and suggest that Prg4-/- mice might provide a valuable new animal model for the study of the early events of TMJ osteoarthritis.

  6. Temporomandibular joint fibrocartilage degeneration from unilateral dental splints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Sarah E; Lowe, Jesse R; Tudares, Mauro A; Gold, Michael S; Almarza, Alejandro J

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which altered loading in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), as might be associated with a malocclusion, drives degeneration of articulating surfaces in the TMJ. We therefore sought to quantify the effects of altered joint loading on the mechanical properties and biochemical content and distribution of TMJ fibrocartilage in the rabbit. Altered TMJ loading was induced with a 1mm splint placed unilaterally over the maxillary and mandibular molars for 6 weeks. At that time, TMJ fibrocartilage was assessed by compression testing, biochemical content (collagen, glycosaminoglycan (GAG), DNA) and distribution (histology), for both the TMJ disc and the condylar fibrocartilage. There were no changes in the TMJ disc for any of the parameters tested. The condylar fibrocartilage from the splinted animals was significantly stiffer and the DNA content was significantly lower than that in control animals. There was significant remodeling in the condylar fibrocartilage layers as manifested by a change in GAG and collagen II distribution and a loss of defined cell layers. A connection between the compressive properties of TMJ condylar fibrocartilage after 6 weeks of splinting and the changes in histology was observed. These results suggest a change in joint loading leads to condylar damage, which may contribute to pain associated with at least some forms of TMJ disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Microvascular temporomandibular joint and mandibular ramus reconstruction in hemifacial microsomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilkki, S K; Hukki, J; Nietosvaara, Y; Hurmerinta, K; Suominen, E

    2002-11-01

    Microvascular temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and mandibular ramus reconstruction was performed in a 4-year-old hemifacial microsomia patient with multiple craniofacial and extracranial anomalies (Goldenhar syndrome). Her major craniofacial anomalies included bilateral cleft lip and palate, left macrostomia, left microtia, and complete absence of the left vertical mandibular ramus and TMJ. Most of her other anomalies had been corrected surgically before TMJ and vertical mandibular ramus reconstruction, which was accomplished with a metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint transplantation. The MTP joint was placed in hyperextended position in the skull base inserting the proximal phalanx under the remnants of the zygomatic arch and replacing the vertical mandibular ramus with the metatarsal bone. Straight mouth opening, correction of the midline, and normalized lateral movements of the mandible were accomplished. The graft includes two epiphyseal plates, which should maintain growth of the transplant. During the follow-up period (16 months) the achieved results have been maintained without adverse effects. The present technique appears to be a promising alternative in the treatment of children with Pruzansky type 3 hemifacial microsomia.

  8. Deglutition and temporomandibular disorders in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizolato, R A; Silva De Freitas Fernandes, F; Beatriz Duarte Gavião, M

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the characteristics of deglutition in children having or not temporomandibular disorders (TMD) or signs and/or symptoms of TMD. The sample comprised 152 children aged from 8 to 12 years (78 males and 74 females, mean age 10.05+/-1.39 years). The clinical signs were evaluated using the axis I of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD) and the symptoms, using a questionnaire. Patients were divided into the following groups: Group TMD (N.=40), signs and symptoms of TMD (Group S and S, N.=68), signs or symptoms of TMD (Group S or S, N.=33) and without signs and symptoms (Group N, N.=11). Characteristics of orofacial structures such as occlusion, tongue, lingual frenulum, lips and mentalis muscle were evaluated. Myofunctional evaluation during deglutition with solid (bread) and liquid (water) was also performed. A high prevalence of abnormal deglutition was found, with similar proportion in groups. Alterations in lips, mentalis muscle and tongue in swallowing was significantly smaller in Group N than in the other groups. The proportions of children with lower lip interposition and lateral tongue thrust, when swallowing liquid, were significantly higher than swallowing solids. There was a smaller proportion of children in Group N with lower lip interposition when swallowing liquids. TMD or presence of signs and/or symptoms of TMD was not associated with an abnormal deglutition. Nevertheless, orofacial myofunctional alterations could be considered influencing factors on TMD, due to the high prevalence of abnormal deglutition pattern. In addition, the abnormal deglutition could be attributed to the malocclusion, mixed dentition phase and orofacial myofunctional characteristics.

  9. [Understanding and treatment strategy for disc displacement of temporomandibular disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, X C

    2017-03-09

    Understanding and treatment strategy for disc displacement of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) were discussed in the present review. It has been strongly recommended by the author that the treatment strategy for disc displacement, one subtype of TMD, should be mainly the reversible conservative treatment methods. The most important goal of treatment for disc displacement is to recover the mobility and function of the joint in order to improve the quality of the patient's life. Comprehensive assessments both from somatic and psychological aspects for each TMD patient are necessary, especially for the patients with chronic pain. Although the role of surgical operative treatments is very limited in the general treatment strategy for TMD, it is still important for a few patients who had definite diagnosis of intra-articular disorders, severe symptoms affecting the quality of patient's life and failed to response to the correct conservative treatments. It should be very careful to treat the TMD patients by surgical operation or irreversible occlusion treatments changing the natural denture of the patient, such as full mouth occlusional reconstruction and extensive adjustment of occlusion.

  10. Effectiveness of two different splints to treat temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksakalli, Sertac; Temucin, Fatih; Pamukcu, Ayca; Ezirganlı, Seref; Kazancioglu, Hakki Oguz; Malkoc, Meral Arslan

    2015-07-01

    Nearly 5% of the the world's population has temporomandibular disorder (TMD) severe enough to make them seek treatment. A third of the total population has at least one TMD symptom. There are different types of splints to treat TMD. In our study, we compared the success of two different appliances [stabilization splint (ss), nociceptive trigeminal inhibition splint (NTI)] by using Fonseca's questionnaire, the OHQoL-UK and visual analog scale (VAS). A total of 40 patients suffering from TMD were included in this study and answered questionnaires twice, at the beginning of the treatment and 3 months later. Regarding TMD alone, 39 patients (97.5%) had some degree of the disorder, 7 of of these cases being mild (17.5%), 15 moderate (37.5%), and 17 severe (42.5%). We analyzed posttreatment changes compared to baseline. Pain complaints decreased in both groups, and the OHQoL-UK revealed better quality of life after treatment. Based on the posttreatment Fonseca's questionnaires, significant changes in the patients' complaints in the group SS (p 0.05). Patients in both groups had fewer TMD complaints after TMJ treatment. According to the Fonseca's questionnaire, the patients' major TMD complaint was clenching-grinding, followed by pain in the craniomandibular joint, or earache.

  11. Low-level laser therapy for temporomandibular disorders (tmd) treatment: a systematic review of randomized trials

    OpenAIRE

    Leite, Priscila; Melo, Nicole; Silva, Pâmela; Montenegro, Robinsom; Bonan, Paulo; Batista, André

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Conducting a systematic review of randomized clinical trials focusing on the efficacy of LLLT on pain control in patients with TMD, diagnosed by the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Search was performed at PubMed/MEDLINE database with the terms: (1) “Laser AND temporomandibular disorders”; (2) “Laser AND temporomandibular disorders AND RDC/TMD”; (3) “Low-level laser therapy AND temporomandibular disorders”; (4) “Low-level laser...

  12. Prevalence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in dental students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushmini Hegde

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs in dental students. Materials and methods: A total of 200 dental students, officially registered at The Oxford Dental College and Hospital, Bengaluru, voluntarily participated in this study- After obtaining the informed consent, the participants were asked to answer the questionnaire to evaluate TMD in undiagnosed cases- Then, examination of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ and associated structures were done. Results: The present study has shown that the prevalence of signs and symptoms were 50.5 and 48% respectively, with no apparent gender difference- Joint sound was the most prevalent sign and TMJ noise being the most common symptom. Among oral parafunctional habits, lip/cheek biting and nail biting were common. Conclusion Signs and symptoms of TMD were present even in nonpatient population, such as dental students. Thorough clinical assessments with standardized test are necessary for the early diagnostic process.

  13. Palpation and pressure pain threshold: reliability and validity in patients with temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Marden B; Guimarães, Josemar P; Guimarães, Franceane C; Neves, Ana Cristina C

    2008-07-01

    This study assessed the interexaminer reliability and validity of palpation (PA) and pressure pain threshold (PPT) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and the masseter and temporalis muscles in patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and asymptomatic controls. Eighty (80) subjects were distributed into two groups: Group 1 consisted of 40 TMD patients with muscular and joint pain selected by RDC/TMD Axis I; and Group 2 (control) with 40 asymptomatic individuals. Training and calibration of examiners was undertaken prior to testing. Mean reliability values were 0.64 and 0.78 (PPT), and 0.59 and 0.75 (PA), for patients and controls, respectively. Results showed statistically significant differences (p<0.001), for PA and PPT among TMD patients compared with the control. The results also showed acceptable specificity values (above 0.90), although sensitivity had low values. The tests had low diagnostic validity to discriminate between patients and controls, with low positive predictive values (PPV).

  14. Temporomandibular joint loads in subjects with and without disc displacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Rei Iwasaki

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The likelihood of development of degenerative joint disease (DJD of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ is related to the integrity of the TMJ disc. Predilection for mechanical failure of the TMJ disc may reflect inter-individual differences in TMJ loads. Nine females and eight males in each of normal TMJ disc position and bilateral disc displacement diagnostic groups consented to participate in our study. Disc position was determined by bilateral magnetic resonance images of the joints. Three-dimensional (3D anatomical geometry of each subject was used in a validated computer-assisted numerical model to calculate ipsilateral and contralateral TMJ loads for a range of biting positions (incisor, canine, molar and angles (1-13. Each TMJ load was a resultant vector at the anterosuperior-most mediolateral midpoint on the condyle and characterized in terms of magnitude and 3D orientation. Analysis of variance (ANOVA was used to test for effects of biting position and angle on TMJ loads. Mean TMJ loads in subjects with disc displacement were 9.5-69% higher than in subjects with normal disc position. During canine biting, TMJ loads in subjects with disc displacement were 43% (ipsilateral condyle, p=0.029 and 49% (contralateral condyle, p=0.015 higher on average than in subjects with normal disc position. Biting angle effects showed that laterally directed forces on the dentition produced ipsilateral joint loads, which on average were 69% higher (p=0.002 compared to individuals with normal TMJ disc position. The data reported here describe large differences in TMJ loads between individuals with disc displacement and normal disc position. The results support future investigations of inter-individual differences in joint mechanics as a variable in the development of DJD of the TMJ.

  15. The feasibility of a clinical trial of pain related to temporomandibular muscle and joint disorders: the results of a survey from the Collaboration on Networked Dental and Oral Research dental practice-based research networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velly, Ana M; Schiffman, Eric L; Rindal, D Brad; Cunha-Cruz, Joana; Gilbert, Gregg H; Lehmann, Maryann; Horowitz, Allan; Fricton, James

    2013-01-01

    The authors conducted a survey to characterize the strategies used by general dentists to manage pain related to temporomandibular muscle and joint disorders (TMJDs) and to assess the feasibility of conducting a randomized controlled trial (RCT) to determine the effectiveness of these strategies. Dentists from three dental practice-based research networks (PBRNs) (The Dental Practice-Based Research Network, Practitioners Engaged in Applied Research and Learning Network and Northwest Practice-based REsearch Collaborative in Evidence-based DENTistry) agreed to participate in this survey. Of 862 dentists surveyed, 654 were general dentists who treated TMJDs; among these, 80.3 percent stated they would participate in a future RCT. Dentists treated an average of three patients with TMJD-related pain per month. Splints or mouthguards (97.6 percent), self-care (85.9 percent) and over-the-counter or prescribed medications (84.6 percent) were the treatments most frequently used. The treatments dentists preferred to compare in an RCT were splint or mouthguard therapy (35.8 percent), self-care (27.4 percent) and medication (17.0 percent). Most general dentists treat TMJD-related pain, and initial reversible care typically is provided. It is feasible to conduct an RCT in a dental PBRN to assess the effectiveness of splint or mouthguard therapy, self-care or medication for the initial management of painful TMJD. There is an opportunity to do an RCT in a dental PBRN, which could lead to the development of evidence-based treatment guidelines for the initial treatment of TMJD-related pain by primary care dentists.

  16. [Efficacy of specific physiotherapy for temporomandibular joint dysfunction of muscular origin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsoulis, J; Richter, M

    2008-02-01

    Little explanation is given to patients with temporomandibular disorders and muscles dysfunction on the mechanism and the expected results of conservative treatment. The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate the efficacy of specific physical therapy prescribed after this explanation was given and also after using a flat occlusal splint adapted only if muscle pain remained after physical therapy. Twenty-seven patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction of muscular origin were evaluated after a mean of six sessions of specialized physical therapy with professionals. Patients were treated by oral and facial massages and were trained for self-reeducation. They were also trained for a specific exercise named the "propulsive/opening maneuver". Every patient was questioned on the subjective evolution of pain and the current maximal pain was evaluated with the Visual Analogical Scale (VAS). Clinical evaluation focused on tenderness of masticator muscles and also assessed the changes in the amplitude of mouth opening. Ninety-three percent of the patients treated by specific physical therapy had a significant reduction of their maximal pain feeling (posteopathy, acupuncture, etc.). Fifty percent of the patients were convinced of the efficacy of the prescribed treatment. Patients who undertake the specific physical therapy and who regularly practice self-physical therapy succeed in relaxing their masticator muscles and in decreasing the level of pain. Explanations given by the doctor concerning the etiology of pain, during temporomandibular joint dysfunction of muscular origin, and the purpose of specific physical therapy increase the capacity of self-relaxation. A flat occlusal splint is indicated for patients who grind their teeth and for those whose pain resists to physical therapy.

  17. Effect of chin-cup treatment on the temporomandibular joint: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurfluh, Monika A; Kloukos, Dimitrios; Patcas, Raphael; Eliades, Theodore

    2015-06-01

    To systematically search the literature and assess the available evidence for the influence of chin-cup therapy on the temporomandibular joint regarding morphological adaptations and appearance of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Electronic database searches of published and unpublished literature were performed. The following electronic databases with no language and publication date restrictions were searched: MEDLINE (via Ovid and PubMed), EMBASE (via Ovid), the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register, and CENTRAL. Unpublished literature was searched on ClinicalTrials.gov, the National Research Register, and Pro-Quest Dissertation Abstracts and Thesis database. The reference lists of all eligible studies were checked for additional studies. Two review authors performed data extraction independently and in duplicate using data collection forms. Disagreements were resolved by discussion or the involvement of an arbiter. From the 209 articles identified, 55 papers were considered eligible for inclusion in the review. Following the full text reading stage, 12 studies qualified for the final review analysis. No randomized clinical trial was identified. Eight of the included studies were of prospective and four of retrospective design. All studies were assessed for their quality and graded eventually from low to medium level of evidence. Based on the reported evidence, chin-cup therapy affects the condylar growth pattern, even though two studies reported no significance changes in disc position and arthrosis configuration. Concerning the incidence of TMD, it can be concluded from the available evidence that chin-cup therapy constitutes no risk factor for TMD. Based on the available evidence, chin-cup therapy for Class III orthodontic anomaly seems to induce craniofacial adaptations. Nevertheless, there are insufficient or low-quality data in the orthodontic literature to allow the formulation of clear statements regarding the influence of chin-cup treatment on

  18. Differential Diagnostics of Pain in the Course of Trigeminal Neuralgia and Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihut, M.; Szuta, M.; Ferendiuk, E.; Zeńczak-Więckiewicz, D.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic oral and facial pain syndromes are an indication for intervention of physicians of numerous medical specialties, while the complex nature of these complaints warrants interdisciplinary diagnostic and therapeutic approach. Oftentimes, lack of proper differentiation of pain associated with pathological changes of the surrounding tissues, neurogenic pain, vascular pain, or radiating pain from idiopathic facial pain leads to improper treatment. The objective of the paper is to provide detailed characterization of pain developing in the natural history of trigeminal neuralgia and temporomandibular joint dysfunction, with particular focus on similarities accounting for the difficulties in diagnosis and treatment as well as on differences between both types of pain. It might seem that trigeminal neuralgia can be easily differentiated from temporomandibular joint dysfunction due to the acute, piercing, and stabbing nature of neuralgic pain occurring at a single facial location to spread along the course of the nerve on one side, sometimes a dozen or so times a day, without forewarning periods. Both forms differ significantly in the character and intensity of pain. The exact analysis of the nature, intensity, and duration of pain may be crucial for the differential diagnostics of the disorders of our interest. PMID:24995309

  19. Signs of temporomandibular disorders in migraine patients: a prospective, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuginski-Barbosa, Juliana; Macedo, Henrique R; Bigal, Marcelo Eduardo; Speciali, José Geraldo

    2010-06-01

    To identify signs of temporomandibular disorders and cervical pain in individuals with episodic and chronic (transformed) migraine (CM), relative to controls without headaches. In this prospective, controlled, double-blind study, we examined 93 individuals divided in 3 groups: episodic migraine EM, (n=31), CM chronic migraine (n=34), and controls without migraine (n=28). We recorded signs of temporomandibular disorders, and of pain in the neck, after the protocol of Helkimo (1974). We calculated the odds ratio (OR) and confidence intervals (CI) of symptoms as a function of headache status. Data from all groups were paired and compared using the chi test. The level of significance was 5% in 2-tailed tests. Relative to controls, participants with EM and CM were significantly more likely to have tenderness in the masticatory muscles [controls=28%, migraine=54%, (OR=3.0, 95% CI=1.1-8.9), CM=73% (OR=6.9, 95% CI=2.3-21.2)], and in the temporomandibular joint [controls=25%, migraine=61%, (OR=4.7, 95% CI=1.5-14.5), CM=61% (OR=4.8, 95% CI=1.6-14.5)]. They were numerically (but nonsignificantly) more likely to have limited lateral jaw movements (CM=34%; EM=26%; NP=18%), joint sounds (CM=44%; EM=29%; NP=28%), and tenderness in neck muscles (CM=64%; EM=51%; NP=35%). In a tertiary care population, individuals with EM and CM are more likely to have tenderness at the temporomandibular joint and on the masticatory muscles, relative to controls. Studies are needed to investigate whether treatment of 1 disorder will improve the other.

  20. MRI of the temporomandibular joint using flip back spin echo technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Ha; Kim, Yun Ju; Kim, Chang Soo; Chung, Chun Phil; Kim, Yang Sook [Maryknoll Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-07-15

    The authors introduced flip back spin echo (FBSE) technique for MR imaging of the temporomandibular joint (TMI) instead of conventional spin echo (SE) technique, and evaluated whether FBSE technique in MRI of TMJ is adequate for the diagnosis of the disorders or not. FBSE T1 parasagital images in closed mouth state and sequential opening and closing mouth states using patient's own finger(s) were obtained, and then FBSE T1 paracoronal images in closed mouth state and STAGE (short tip angle gradient echo) parasagital T2WI were followed. All 30 images of the symptomatic TMJs using FBSE technique were excellent in the visualization of articular discs and their displacement, and we could easily diagnosis the internal derangement. FBSE technique was adequate for the diagnosis of internal derangement of the TMJ, and the modified cine display from images using FBSE technique was advantageous in the diagnosis of the disorders by visualization of the dynamic motion of the TMJ.

  1. Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (DC/TMD) for Clinical and Research Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffman, Eric; Ohrbach, Richard; Truelove, Edmond

    2014-01-01

    .95. Consequently, these empirical results supported the development of revised RDC/TMD Axis I diagnostic algorithms that were subsequently demonstrated to be valid for the most common pain-related TMD and for one temporomandibular joint (TMJ) intra-articular disorder. The original RDC/TMD Axis II instruments were......AIMS: The original Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) Axis I diagnostic algorithms have been demonstrated to be reliable. However, the Validation Project determined that the RDC/TMD Axis I validity was below the target sensitivity of ≥ 0.70 and specificity of ≥ 0...... and symposia, a panel of clinical and basic science pain experts modified the revised RDC/TMD Axis I algorithms by using comprehensive searches of published TMD diagnostic literature followed by review and consensus via a formal structured process. The panel's recommendations for further revision of the Axis I...

  2. Pain detection by clinical questionnaire in patients referred for temporomandibular disorders in a Chilean hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomás Maturana

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine pain frequency by means of a clinical screening questionnaire in patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD referred to the general Hospital of Valdivia (HBV between September and December 2014. Material and method: A descriptive study, which included patients referred to the TMD Unit of the dental service at HBV between September and December 2014, was carried out. A clinical screening questionnaire was applied by an examiner in order to detect painful Temporomandibular Joint Disorders. The variables age, sex, wait time, and presence of related TMD pain were measured. Results: 101 patients were surveyed; 88.17% (84 patients were women. Average age was 33.5 (11-70 years; 66% of patients had mandibular pain or stiffness upon awakening; 80% informed pain related to painful TMD. Conclusion: Most surveyed patients were women. Pain was highly frequent in the surveyed population; its main location was in temporal areas.

  3. Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (DC/TMD) for Clinical and Research Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffman, Eric; Ohrbach, Richard; Truelove, Edmond

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: The original Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) Axis I diagnostic algorithms have been demonstrated to be reliable. However, the Validation Project determined that the RDC/TMD Axis I validity was below the target sensitivity of ≥ 0.70 and specificity of ≥ 0......, assess in further detail jaw functional limitations and psychological distress as well as additional constructs of anxiety and presence of comorbid pain conditions. CONCLUSION: The recommended evidence-based new DC/TMD protocol is appropriate for use in both clinical and research settings. More.......95. Consequently, these empirical results supported the development of revised RDC/TMD Axis I diagnostic algorithms that were subsequently demonstrated to be valid for the most common pain-related TMD and for one temporomandibular joint (TMJ) intra-articular disorder. The original RDC/TMD Axis II instruments were...

  4. Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (DC/TMD) for Clinical and Research Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffman, Eric; Ohrbach, Richard; Truelove, Edmond

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: The original Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) Axis I diagnostic algorithms have been demonstrated to be reliable. However, the Validation Project determined that the RDC/TMD Axis I validity was below the target sensitivity of ≥ 0.70 and specificity of ≥ 0.......95. Consequently, these empirical results supported the development of revised RDC/TMD Axis I diagnostic algorithms that were subsequently demonstrated to be valid for the most common pain-related TMD and for one temporomandibular joint (TMJ) intra-articular disorder. The original RDC/TMD Axis II instruments were...... shown to be both reliable and valid. Working from these findings and revisions, two international consensus workshops were convened, from which recommendations were obtained for the finalization of new Axis I diagnostic algorithms and new Axis II instruments. METHODS: Through a series of workshops...

  5. Predictors for the development of temporomandibular disorders in scuba divers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lobbezoo, F.; van Wijk, A.J.; Klinger, M.C.; Ruiz Vicente, E.; van Dijk, C.J.; Eijkman, M.A.J.

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to determine predictors for the development of complaints of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in a large sample of Dutch scuba divers who were free of any TMD complaints before they started diving actively. Five-hundred and thirty-six scuba divers (mean ± SD age = 40·4 ± 11·9 years;

  6. Temporomandibular disorders in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-06-05

    Jun 5, 2015 ... persisted for longer than 90 days experience a progressive. Temporomandibular disorders in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: A clinical study. C Kurtoglu, M Kurkcu1, Y Sertdemir2, S Ozbek3, CC Gürbüz. Departments of Prosthetic Dentistry and 1Oral Surgery, Faculty of Dentistry, Cukurova University,.

  7. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and craniofacial form

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dibbets, JMH; vanderWeele, LT

    Signs and symptoms attributed to temporomandibular disorder (TMD) were registered in 170 persons at an average age of 12.5 years. One hundred and ten were reexamined at an average age of 26.4 years. Craniofacial form was defined on standardized lateral cephalograms, taken at the time points

  8. Temporomandibular disorders in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The aim of this study is to evaluate the prevalence and type of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Materials and Methods: Fifty‑four patients having RA treatment at Cukurova University in Rheumatology Clinic were enrolled to the study. Demographic and rheumatologic ...

  9. Factors associated with temporomandibular disorders pain in adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandes, G.; van Selms, M.K.A.; Gonçalves, D.A.G.; Lobbezoo, F.; Camparis, C.M.

    2015-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) pain in adolescents, it is important to study the factors associated with its presence. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate potential predictors for TMD pain in adolescents, thereby including a diversity of factors

  10. Diagnostic accuracy of temporomandibular disorder pain tests: a multicenter study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, C.M.; Naeije, M.; de Laat, A.; Michelotti, A.; Nilner, M.; Craane, B.; Ekberg, E.; Farella, M.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2009-01-01

    AIMS: To estimate the diagnostic accuracy of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) clinical examination and of the dynamic/static tests for the recognition of TMD pain. Since the diagnosis of TMD pain is especially complicated in persistent orofacial pain

  11. IL-1β Inhibits TGFβ in the Temporomandibular Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, W.H.; Toothman, J.; Miller, J.H.; Tallents, R.H.; Brouxhon, S.M.; Olschowka, M.E.; Kyrkanides, S.

    2009-01-01

    Similarly to humans, healthy, wild-type mice develop osteoarthritis, including of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), as a result of aging. Pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1β, IL-6, and TNFα, are known to contribute to the development of osteoarthritis, whereas TGFβ has been associated with articular regeneration. We hypothesized that a balance between IL-1β and TGFβ underlies the development of TMJ osteoarthritis, whereby IL-1β signaling down-regulates TGFβ expression as part of disease pathology. Our studies in wild-type mice, as well as the Col1-IL1βXAT mouse model of osteoarthritis, demonstrated an inverse correlation between IL-1β and TGFβ expression in the TMJ. IL-1β etiologically correlated with joint pathology, whereas TGFβ expression associated with IL-1β down-regulation and improvement of articular pathology. Better understanding of the underlying inflammatory processes during disease will potentially enable us to harness inflammation for orofacial tissue regeneration. PMID:19587162

  12. Roentgenographic study of the temporomandibular joint in rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Ho Jung; You, Dong Soo [Department of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-11-15

    For the study of the temporomandibular joint in rheumatoid arthritis 30 patients were selected who were diagnosis as rheumatoid arthritis through the clinical, radiographic examination and laboratory finding. Temporoman dibular joint involvement was evaluated through the clinical, radiographic examination. The results were as follows; 1. TMJ was involved in 15 patients of 30 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. (50% involvement). 2. Duration of rheumatoid arthritis was more longer in patients with TMJ involvement than in patients without TMJ involvement. 3. Osseous changes in TMJ were in order of frequency erosion, flattening, osteophyte, sclerosis, deformity, and most common involved site was mandibular condyle. 4. Most common positional change of condyle was forward position in centric occlusion, and restricted movement of condyle in 1 inch mouth opening. 5. TMJ involvement of rheumatoid arthritis was almost bilateral. 6. Main symptoms of TMJ were pain, stiffness, tenderness, limitation of mouth opening, crepitation. 7. There was not the case of ankylosis. 8. There was statistically insignificant correlation between mandibular deviation and TMJ involvement, but some cases showed severe deviation on mouth opening.

  13. Diclofenac sodium as an alternative treatment of temporomandibular joint pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekberg, E C; Kopp, S; Akerman, S

    1996-06-01

    In a double-blind study, diclofenac sodium (Voltaren), 50 mg two or three times a day, was compared with placebo in 32 patients with pain localized to the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The patients were allocated into two equally large groups. A visual analog scale was used to estimate the pretreatment degree of pain. The treatment effect was assessed as the frequency of joint and muscle pain and by the patients' own evaluation of improvement. The change in the clinical condition was assessed by tenderness to palpation of the TMJ and masticatory muscles and by mandibular mobility. The frequency of TMJ pain showed a greater reduction in the diclofenac group than in the placebo group, and there was a significant reduction of daily TMJ pain in the diclofenac group. The diclofenac group also showed a significant decrease in tenderness to palpation of the masticatory muscles in comparison with the placebo group. The patients with short duration of pain showed the best response to diclofenac. There was no evidence in this study to prove that diclofenac should be used as a primary treatment of TMJ pain, but it could be used as a complement to other treatments of acute TMJ pain.

  14. A Young Patient with Temporomandibular Joint Osteoarthritis: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Alajbeg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a case of a young patient who sought help because of pain in the right temporomandibular joint (TMJ. She also reported increasing of pain during chewing. Clinical examination revealed limited mouth opening with uncorrected deviation to the ipsilateral side. Palpation of the lateral pole of the right condyle discovered crepitus, and maximum assisted opening elicited a report of “familiar pain”. The diagnosis of osteoarthritis of the TMJ (RDC / TMD criteria, Axis I, Group III was confirmed by CBCT of TMJ. There is no “gold standard” for the management of TMD, but the need for TMD treatment has to be based on precise indications related to the presence of pain, limitation in function of the lower jaw and signs of degenerative joint disease. Conservative, reversible therapeutic procedures are considered as the first choice for TMD treatment and their task is to improve the function of the entire masticatory system. In this case patient was treated with the combination of physical therapy and stabilization splint, in order to reduce the pain and restore the normal function of the lower jaw. At 6 months’ follow-up symptoms have almost completely disappeared, while 3 years later, the patient still has no significant subjective symptoms. In the present case non-invasive therapy was sufficient to bring, otherwise recurrent nature of osteoarthritis, in complete remission and keep it like that for years.

  15. Relationship between pain and effusion on magnetic resonance imaging in temporomandibular disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ha-Na; Kim, Kyoung-A; Koh, Kwang-Joon

    2014-12-01

    This study was performed to find the relationship between pain and joint effusion using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients. The study subjects included 232 TMD patients. The inclusion criteria in this study were the presence of spontaneous pain or provoked pain on one or both temporomandibular joints (TMJs). The provoked pain was divided into three groups: pain on palpation (G1), pain on mouth opening (G2), and pain on mastication (G3). MRI examinations were performed using a 1.5-T MRI scanner. T1- and T2-weighted images with para-sagittal and para-coronal images were obtained. According to the T2-weighted image findings, the cases of effusions were divided into four groups: normal, mild (E1), moderate (E2), and marked effusion (E3). A statistical analysis was carried out using the χ(2) test with SPSS (version 12.0, SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Spontaneous pain, provoked pain, and both spontaneous and provoked pain were significantly related to joint effusion in TMD patients (ppalpation of the masticatory muscles and TMJ (G1) was not related to joint effusion in TMD patients (p>0.05). Spontaneous pain was related to the MRI findings of joint effusion; however, among the various types of provoked pain, pain on palpation of the masticatory muscles and TMJ was not related to the MRI findings of joint effusion. These results suggest that joint effusion has a significant influence on the prediction of TMJ pain.

  16. Quality of life and general health in patients with temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resende, Camila Maria Bastos Machado de; Alves, Arthur César de Medeiros; Coelho, Lidiane Thomaz; Alchieri, Joõo Carlos; Roncalli, Angelo Giuseppe; Barbosa, Gustavo Augusto Seabra

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to associate minor psychiatric disorders (general health) and quality of life with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in patients diagnosed with different TMD classifications and subclassifications with varying levels of severity. Among 150 patients reporting TMD symptoms, 43 were included in the present study. Fonseca's anamnestic index was used for initial screening while axis I of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC-TMD) was used for TMD diagnosis (muscle-related, joint-related or muscle and joint-related). Minor psychiatric disorders were evaluated through the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) and quality of life was assessed using the World Health Organization Quality Of Life-Brief Version (WHOQOL-BREF). An association was found between minor psychiatric disorders and TMD severity, except for stress. A stronger association was found with mild TMD. Considering TMD classifications and severity together, only the item "death wish" from the GHQ was related to severe muscle-related TMD (p = 0.049). For quality of life, an association was found between disc displacement with reduction and social domain (p = 0.01). Physical domains were associated with TMD classifications and severity and the association was stronger for muscle and joint-related TMD (p = 0.37) and mild TMD (p = 0.042). It was concluded that patients with TMD require multiple focuses of attention since psychological indicators of general health and quality of life are likely associated with dysfunction.

  17. Quality of life and general health in patients with temporomandibular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Maria Bastos Machado de Resende

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to associate minor psychiatric disorders (general health and quality of life with temporomandibular disorders (TMD in patients diagnosed with different TMD classifications and subclassifications with varying levels of severity. Among 150 patients reporting TMD symptoms, 43 were included in the present study. Fonseca's anamnestic index was used for initial screening while axis I of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC-TMD was used for TMD diagnosis (muscle-related, joint-related or muscle and joint-related. Minor psychiatric disorders were evaluated through the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ and quality of life was assessed using the World Health Organization Quality Of Life-Brief Version (WHOQOL-BREF. An association was found between minor psychiatric disorders and TMD severity, except for stress. A stronger association was found with mild TMD. Considering TMD classifications and severity together, only the item "death wish" from the GHQ was related to severe muscle-related TMD (p = 0.049. For quality of life, an association was found between disc displacement with reduction and social domain (p = 0.01. Physical domains were associated with TMD classifications and severity and the association was stronger for muscle and joint-related TMD (p = 0.37 and mild TMD (p = 0.042. It was concluded that patients with TMD require multiple focuses of attention since psychological indicators of general health and quality of life are likely associated with dysfunction.

  18. Chronic Temporomandibular Disorders: disability, pain intensity and fear of movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Martínez, Alfonso; Grande-Alonso, Mónica; López-de-Uralde-Villanueva, Ibai; López-López, Almudena; Fernández-Carnero, Josué; La Touche, Roy

    2016-12-01

    The objective was to compare and correlate disability, pain intensity, the impact of headache on daily life and the fear of movement between subgroups of patients with chronic temporomandibular disorder (TMD). A cross-sectional study was conducted in patients diagnosed with chronic painful TMD. Patients were divided into: 1) joint pain (JP); 2) muscle pain (MP); and 3) mixed pain. The following measures were included: Craniomandibular pain and disability (Craniofacial pain and disability inventory), neck disability (Neck Dsiability Index), pain intensity (Visual Analogue Scale), impact of headache (Headache Impact Test 6) and kinesiophobia (Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia-11). A total of 154 patients were recruited. The mixed pain group showed significant differences compared with the JP group or MP group in neck disability (p pain and disability (p pain and disability for the MP group (β = 0.62; p pain group, neck disability (β = 0.40; p pain and disability. Mixed chronic pain patients show greater craniomandibular and neck disability than patients diagnosed with chronic JP or MP. Neck disability predicted the variance of craniofacial pain and disability for patients with MP. Neck disability and kinesiophobia predicted the variance of craniofacial pain and disability for those with chronic mixed pain.

  19. Signs of bruxism and temporomandibular disorders among psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winocur, Ephraim; Hermesh, Hagay; Littner, Dan; Shiloh, Roni; Peleg, Liat; Eli, Ilana

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of bruxism and signs of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) among psychiatric patients compared with a healthy population and to assess the effect of psychiatric medications on the parameters studied. Subjects included 77 psychiatric patients under treatment at 2 psychiatric hospitals in Israel and 50 healthy individuals (control). One experienced calibrated examiner performed the clinical examination (presence of bruxism and signs of TMD). Abnormal attrition was evident in 46.8% of the psychiatric patients compared with 20% in the controls (P prevalence of joint clicks and no association between time of receiving treatment with dopamine antagonists (or any other psychotropic drugs) and TMD signs and symptoms. The higher prevalence of bruxism and signs of TMD in psychiatric patients is a major clinical comorbidity. Whether it is a manifestation of the abnormal central nervous system of psychiatric patients or neuroleptic-induced phenomenon deserves further attention. The exact factors that affect the pain experience in these patients should be evaluated as well.

  20. [Different types of injection in temporomandibular disorders (TMD) treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batifol, D

    2016-09-01

    Intramuscular injections of botulinum toxin of type A (BoNTA) can release tension from masticatory and cervical muscles. Intra-articular injections relieve pain and sometimes diminish joint clicking and locking that occur during mouth opening. Intramuscular injection of BoNTA is performed in our department since 2002. Injected muscles are masseter and temporal muscles. Later on, intra-articular injections of sodium hyaluronate were added, followed on a later stage by intra-articular injections of BoNTA for patients presenting with pain higher than 5/10 on an analogic visual scale. Eighty-five percent of the patients treated with intramuscular BoNTA injection improved. Total or partial pain relief was obtained in 95 % of the patients after intra-articular sodium hyaluronate injections. Seventy-six percent of the 56 patients treated by mean of intra-articular BoNTA injections improved, sometimes with a complete pain relief. These different techniques allow for good results, even if they do not represent a revolution in the treatment of temporomandibular disorders. In the hands of experienced practitioners, they have a low morbidity, are well accepted and are cost-effective. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  1. [Prevalence of temporomandibular disorders in Mexican children with mixed dentition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Caro, Silvia N; Espinosa de Santillana, Irene A; Muñoz-Quintana, Gabriel

    2015-04-01

    Objective To determine and compare with reports in the bibliography, the prevalence of temporomandibular disorders with an instrument validated for Mexican children with mixed dentition. Methods 150 children, from 8 to 12 years of age and of any sex who attended the pediatric stomatology clinic of the BUAP (Meritorious Autonomous University of Puebla) were included and evaluated with the diagnostic criteria for research on TTM (CDI/TTM) by a researcher who had been previously standardized (kappa=0.93). The results contrasted with reports in the bibliography. Results The prevalence of TTM was 20.7%. It was predominantly muscular (77.4%), though 33.3% showed alteration of the mouth-opening pattern, 34% showed joint noises (clicks). The most compromised mandibular function was chewing (6%). These results contrast with reports in the bibliography, specifically in terms of muscle pain sites and headaches, probably explained by different instruments used. Conclusion The prevalence of TTM is in contrast among different studies. It is necessary to place emphasis on the need to evaluate these factors during the childhood and adolescence with validated instruments.

  2. Correlations between mandibular asymmetries and temporomandibular disorders (TMD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ippolito, Simona; Ursini, Roberto; Giuliante, Luca; Deli, Roberto

    2014-06-01

    Mandibular asymmetries are the fulcrum of many debates among modern orthodontists and maxillofacial surgeons. The interest is even greater when facial asymmetries are correlated to the development of TMJ symptoms and temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The aim of this study is to investigate how mandibular asymmetries constitute etiological or predisposing factors for the development of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). We considered patients with mandibular asymmetries associated with TMD. Using orthodontic or surgical-orthodontic treatment, patients experienced correction of their TMJ symptoms. Thus, mandibular asymmetries represent a major risk factor for the development of TMD. We studied a sample of 16 subjects aged between 14 and 36-years-old (11 females and 5 males) with mandibular asymmetries (81% structural asymmetry, 19% functional asymmetry). These subjects presented skeletal and dental malocclusions combined with several temporomandibular disorders, mostly due to muscle tension. In 100% of cases, patients received orthodontic treatment. We compared pre- and post-treatment postero-anterior (PA) cephalometric analyses in order to evaluate asymmetry resolution. Comparison of measurements from pre- and post-therapy PA cephalograms showed resolution of mandibular asymmetries after treatment. The treatment resolved mandibular asymmetries and completely eliminated temporomandibular symptoms. Orthodontic treatment of patients presenting mandibular asymmetry enables correction of all TMJ symptoms and TMD. Mandibular symmetries can therefore be considered to constitute etiological or predisposing factors for the development of TMD. Copyright © 2014 CEO. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. The Interface of Mechanics and Nociception in Joint Pathophysiology: Insights From the Facet and Temporomandibular Joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperry, Megan M; Ita, Meagan E; Kartha, Sonia; Zhang, Sijia; Yu, Ya-Hsin; Winkelstein, Beth

    2017-02-01

    Chronic joint pain is a widespread problem that frequently occurs with aging and trauma. Pain occurs most often in synovial joints, the body's load bearing joints. The mechanical and molecular mechanisms contributing to synovial joint pain are reviewed using two examples, the cervical spinal facet joints and the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Although much work has focused on the macroscale mechanics of joints in health and disease, the combined influence of tissue mechanics, molecular processes, and nociception in joint pain has only recently become a focus. Trauma and repeated loading can induce structural and biochemical changes in joints, altering their microenvironment and modifying the biomechanics of their constitutive tissues, which themselves are innervated. Peripheral pain sensors can become activated in response to changes in the joint microenvironment and relay pain signals to the spinal cord and brain where pain is processed and perceived. In some cases, pain circuitry is permanently changed, which may be a potential mechanism for sustained joint pain. However, it is most likely that alterations in both the joint microenvironment and the central nervous system (CNS) contribute to chronic pain. As such, the challenge of treating joint pain and degeneration is temporally and spatially complicated. This review summarizes anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology of these joints and the sensory pain relays. Pain pathways are postulated to be sensitized by many factors, including degeneration and biochemical priming, with effects on thresholds for mechanical injury and/or dysfunction. Initiators of joint pain are discussed in the context of clinical challenges including the diagnosis and treatment of pain.

  4. Association between temporomandibular disorders and pain in other regions of the body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonato, L L; Quinelato, V; De Felipe Cordeiro, P C; De Sousa, E B; Tesch, R; Casado, P L

    2017-01-01

    The pain from temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is often associated with physical symptoms of other chronic pain disorders and comorbidities, such as generalised muscle and joint pain. However, this association is not widely studied. To evaluate the prevalence of comorbid pain in joints, specifically in the knees, hips, ankles, shoulders, wrists and elbows, in individuals with and without TMD. We evaluated 337 patients from a public hospital in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD questionnaire were used for the diagnosis of TMD. To assess the presence of other joint pain, the patients were asked to answer questions considering: the presence of pain in the knee, hip, ankle, shoulder, wrist and elbow joints and time duration of pain. Individuals with TMD are 5·5 times more likely to present with other joint pain compared with those without the disorder. TMD muscle disorders were most associated with a higher number of pain at the other locations. There was a significant association between the presence of pain at the other locations, muscle (P joint disorders (P = pain at the other locations. Individuals with TMD showed a high prevalence of pain in other joints of the body when compared with individuals without the disorder, and knee pain was the most prevalent pain complaint. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Ultrasonographic findings in normal temporomandibular joints Achados ultra-sonográficos em articulações temporomandibulares normais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Melhem Elias

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine some ultrasonographic standards of temporomandibular joints with normally positioned discs. Nineteen patients from 18 to 45 years old (average age: 27.4 years; 16 females and 3 males, with history of orofacial pain, but without clinical or radiological signs of disc displacement, underwent ultrasonography (US and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI for the examination of their joints. In 30 joints, the distance between the most lateral point of the articular capsule and the most lateral point of the mandibular condyle (lateral capsule-condyle distance was measured, as well as the distance between the most anterior point of the articular capsule and the most anterior point of the mandibular condyle (anterior capsule-condyle distance. In the closed-mouth position, the average values found for the lateral capsule-condyle distance were 1.4 mm and 1.6 mm, respectively in the longitudinal (coronal and transverse (axial scans. In the open-mouth position, the average distance was 1.2 mm, in both longitudinal (coronal and transverse (axial scans. The average values found for the anterior capsule-condyle distance were 2.3 mm in the closed-mouth position and 1.1 mm in the open-mouth position, both in transverse (axial scans. Intra-examiner agreement, measured in terms of the intraclass correlation coefficient, varied from 0.83 to 0.93. We believe that this study can contribute to the validation of US as a diagnostic method for temporomandibular joint disorders, provided that the obtained measurements be used in future studies as normal reference values.Este estudo teve o objetivo de determinar alguns padrões ultra-sonográficos de articulações temporomandibulares com discos normalmente posicionados. Dezenove pacientes com 18 a 45 anos de idade (média de 27,4 anos, sendo 16 do sexo feminino e 3 do masculino, com queixa de dor orofacial, mas sem sinais clínicos ou radiológicos de deslocamento do disco, foram

  6. Depressive and anxiety symptoms as risk factors for temporomandibular joint pain: a prospective cohort study in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindler, Stefan; Samietz, Stefanie; Houshmand, Mohammad; Grabe, Hans Jörgen; Bernhardt, Olaf; Biffar, Reiner; Kocher, Thomas; Meyer, Georg; Völzke, Henry; Metelmann, Hans-Robert; Schwahn, Christian

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies have associated depression and temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs). The temporality, however, remains to be clarified. Most patient studies have selected subjects from treatment facilities, whereas in epidemiological studies a clinical examination has not been performed. In this study the 5-year follow-up data of the population-based Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP) were analyzed. To estimate the effect of symptoms of depression and those of anxiety on the risk of TMD pain, the Composite International Diagnostic-Screener (CID-S) and a clinical functional examination with palpation of the temporomandibular joint and the masticatory muscles were used. After exclusion of subjects having joint pain at baseline, a sample of 3,006 Caucasian participants with a mean age of 49 years resulted. Of those, 122 participants had signs of TMD joint pain upon palpation. Subjects with symptoms of depression had an increased risk of TMD joint pain upon palpation (rate ratio: 2.1; 95% confidence interval: 1.5-3.0; P joint and with muscle pain. The diagnosis, prevention, and therapy of TMD pain should also consider symptoms of depression and those of anxiety, and appropriate therapies if necessary. Depressive and anxiety symptoms should be considered as risk factors for TMD pain. Depressive symptoms are specific for joint pain whereas anxiety symptoms are specific for muscle pain, findings that deserve detailed examination. These findings may support decision-making in treating TMD. Copyright © 2012 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Involvement of NK-1 and NK-2 tachykinin receptor mechanisms in jaw muscle activity reflexy evoked by inflammatory irritant application to the rat temporomandibular joint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakke, M.; Hu, J.W.; Sessle, B.J.

    1998-01-01

    neurokinin receptors, CP-99,994,MEN-10,376, mustard oil, temporomandibular joint, masticatory muscle activity......neurokinin receptors, CP-99,994,MEN-10,376, mustard oil, temporomandibular joint, masticatory muscle activity...

  8. EAMJ Jan. Temporomandibular 10.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-01-01

    Jan 1, 2010 ... American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry. Treatment of temporomandibular disorders in children. J. Am. Dent. Assoc. 1990; 120: 265-269. 12. Knibble, A., Carter, J.B. and Frokjer, G.M. Postanaesthetic temporomandibular joint dysfunction. Anesth. Prog. 1989; 36: 21-25. 13. Rastogi, N.K. and Vakharia, ...

  9. Association of Temporomandibular Joint Signs & Symptoms with Dental Fluorosis & Skeletal Manifestations in Endemic Fluoride Areas of Dungarpur District, Rajasthan, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asawa, Kailash; Singh, Anukriti; Bhat, Nagesh; Tak, Mridula; Shinde, Kushal; Jain, Sandeep

    2015-12-01

    Endemic fluorosis resulting from high fluoride concentration in groundwater is a major public health problem. India is among the numerous nations, where fluoride sullied groundwater is creating wellbeing issues. Safe drinking water in rural areas of India is predominantly rely on groundwater sources, which are exceptionally contaminated with fluoride. To investigate the association of temporomandibular joint Signs & Symptoms with Dental Fluorosis & Skeletal Manifestations among people living in Dad, Bokersal & Deotalab villages of Dungarpur District, Rajasthan, India. The study group consisted of 750 subjects who were born & brought up in Dad, Bokersal & Deotalab villages of Dungarpur District, Rajasthan. Temporomandibular joint & Dental fluorosis was assessed by performing type III clinical examination according to WHO guidelines (1997). For the assessment of skeletal manifestations, participants were asked to perform three diagnostic tests: (1)Touching the toes without bending the knees; (2) Touching the chest with the chin; (3) Stretching the arms sideways & folding the arms to touch the back of the head. Chi Square test & Multiple Logistic Regression were applied for statistical analysis. Among the 750 (462 males & 288 females) who participated in the study, 53% had moderate grade of dental fluorosis. The most prominent symptom suggesting Temporomandibular Joint Disorder was the clicking sound affecting 21.4% population.(p>0.001). TMJ Signs & Symptoms were prominent in the age group of 45-54 years & males were highly affected than females. Clinical examination of TMJ in Dental Fluorosis & Skeletal Fluorosis subjects showed a significant association with Dental Fluorosis & Skeletal Fluorosis.

  10. The posterior segment of the temporomandibular joint capsule and its anatomic relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mérida-Velasco, J Ramón; Rodríguez, J Francisco; de la Cuadra, Crótida; Peces, M Dolores; Mérida, J Antonio; Sánchez, Indalecio

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work was to clarify the arrangement of the posterior segment of the temporomandibular joint capsule and its pertinent relationships. The temporomandibular region was dissected bilaterally in 20 adult cadavers. Natural stained latex was injected into 16 cadavers through the external carotid artery to facilitate the dissection of the arterial vessels. The posterior segment of the joint capsule is made up of the so-called "bilaminar zone" of the articular disc. The upper internal portion of the posterior segment of the capsule was reinforced by the discomalleolar ligament. The retroarticular space was filled with loose connective tissue and the anterior branches of the anterior tympanic artery were distributed throughout the posterior segment of the joint capsule. The posterior segment of the temporomandibular joint capsule corresponds to the bilaminar zone of the articular disc. The structures of the retroarticular space are extracapsular.

  11. Laterality of proprioception in the orofacial muscles and temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frayne, Ellie; Coulson, Susan; Adams, Roger; Croxson, Glen; Waddington, Gordon

    2016-12-02

    Laterality of function in the orofacial musculature suggests there may be side-to-side asymmetry of proprioceptive acuity in lip movement compared to the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In the present work, 14 young adults were tested for acuity of lip and TMJ closure movements onto plugs varying from 5 to 8mm without visual feedback. Testing was conducted on both left and right sides, using the same psychophysical task and stimuli. Results showed superior proprioceptive acuity at the lips, with no significant side effect. However, there was side-to-side asymmetry in the correlations between proprioceptive performance for the two anatomical structures, with performance on the right side strongly correlated but not on the left. This is consistent with the need for coordination between structures during chewing. When acuity at different points in the stimulus range was examined, the right side lips were better with small stimuli. Overall, results support enhanced use-specific proprioception. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Ex vivo thickness measurement of cartilage covering the temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirahmadi, Fereshteh; Koolstra, Jan Harm; Lobbezoo, Frank; van Lenthe, G Harry; Everts, Vincent

    2017-02-08

    Articular cartilage covers the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and provides smooth and nearly frictionless articulation while distributing mechanical loads to the subchondral bone. The thickness of the cartilage is considered to be an indicator of the stage of development, maturation, aging, loading history, and disease. The aim of our study was to develop a method for ex vivo assessment of the thickness of the cartilage that covers the TMJ and to compare that with two other existing methods. Eight porcine TMJ condyles were used to measure cartilage thickness. Three different methods were employed: needle penetration, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), and histology; the latter was considered the gold standard. Histology and micro-CT scanning results showed no significant differences between thicknesses throughout the condyle. Needle penetration produced significantly higher values than histology, in the lateral and anterior regions. All three methods showed the anterior region to be thinner than the other regions. We concluded that overestimated thickness by the needle penetration is caused by the penetration of the needle through the first layer of subchondral bone, in which mineralization is less than in deeper layers. Micro-CT scanning method was found to be a valid method to quantify the thickness of the cartilage, and has the advantage of being non-destructive. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Impact of Temporomandibular Joint Pain in Rheumatoid Arthritis

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    Neveen Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the impact of temporomandibular joint (TMJ pain on daily activities and quality of life in relation to systemic inflammatory activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA, thirty-three consecutive outpatients with RA were included. TMJ pain intensity at rest, on maximum mouth opening, and on chewing was assessed on a 0–10 numerical rating scale. TMJ palpatory tenderness, degree of anterior open bite, the impact of TMJ pain on daily activities and quality of life were also assessed. The systemic inflammatory activity was estimated by the disease activity score 28 (DAS28, blood levels of inflammatory markers and number of painful musculoskeletal regions. TMJ pain at rest, on maximum mouth opening, and on chewing as well as DAS28 was correlated with the impact of the TMJ pain on daily activities and quality of life. Partial correlations showed a significant interaction between TMJ pain on movement and DAS28 that explained the TMJ pain impact on daily activities and quality of life to a significant degree. This study indicates that both current TMJ pain intensity and systemic inflammatory activity play roles in the impact of TMJ pain on daily living and quality of life in RA.

  14. Sustained Inflammation Induces Degeneration of the Temporomandibular Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.D.; Kou, X.X.; Mao, J.J.; Gan, Y.H.; Zhou, Y.H.

    2012-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) undergoes degenerative changes among patients who suffer from arthritis, and yet the pathogenesis of TMJ osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis is poorly understood. We hypothesized that sustained inflammation in the TMJ induces structural abnormalities, and accordingly characterized the disc and synovium in a novel model with double injections of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA), using behavioral, morphological, cellular, and molecular assessments. Thirty-five days following double CFA injections in seven-week-old female Sprague-Dawley rats, the disc in the CFA-induced inflammation group demonstrated multiple degenerative changes, including marked thickening, opacity, and deformation. The discs in the CFA group further showed significantly greater wet and net weights, and elevated collagen, aggrecan, and total glycosaminoglycan contents. The synovium in the CFA-induced inflammation group showed marked infiltration of mononucleated cells and accumulated sub-synovial adipose tissue. Both the disc and synovium had significantly higher iNOS and IL-1β mRNA expression than controls (saline injections). These findings are consistent with our hypothesis that sustained TMJ inflammation, even within the presently observed 35 days, may be a predisposing factor for structural abnormalities. Insight into TMJ inflammation and degeneration is anticipated to improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of TMJ arthritis and help design clinically relevant strategies for tissue engineering. PMID:22427270

  15. A prospective study of 138 arthroscopies of the temporomandibular joint

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    Paulo Alexandre da Silva

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Internal derangements (ID of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ have a multifactorial etiology and are most often treated conservatively by splints, physical therapy and medications. Only in 2-5% of cases are the treatment surgical, either by arthroscopy or arthrotomy.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate improvement of mouth opening, pain relief during function, position of the articular disk and complications following Arthroscopic Lyse and Lavage (ALL.METHODS: A prospective study of 78 patients (138 TMJs with TMJ ID, 5 males and 73 females, mean age 29.7 years, treated between January 2010 and April 2013, who were refractory to conservative treatment, had limited mouth opening and pain localized to the TMJ during function, and who were submitted to TMJ ALL and followed for a period of 12 months, with periodic reviews.RESULTS: ALL was effective in 93.6% of cases, with 85.3% experiencing improvement in mouth opening and 91.2% in pain reduction during function, 63% improvement in disk position and a rate of complications of 6.2%.CONCLUSION: In this study the ALL exhibited a high rate of success with low morbidity in internal derangements of the TMJ.

  16. Occlusal effects on longitudinal bone alterations of the temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Jiao, K; Zhang, M; Zhou, T; Liu, X-D; Yu, S-B; Lu, L; Jing, L; Yang, T; Zhang, Y; Chen, D; Wang, M-Q

    2013-03-01

    The pathological changes of subchondral bone during osteoarthritis (OA) development in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the longitudinal alterations of subchondral bone using a rat TMJ-OA model developed in our laboratory. Changes in bone mass were examined by micro-CT, and changes in osteoblast and osteoclast activities were analyzed by real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry, and TRAP staining. Subchondral bone loss was detected from 8 weeks after dental occlusion alteration and reached the maximum at 12 weeks, followed by a repair phase until 32 weeks. Although bone mass increased at late stages, poor mechanical structure and lower bone mineral density (BMD) were found in these rats. The numbers of TRAP-positive cells were increased at 12 weeks, while the numbers of osteocalcin-expressing cells were increased at both 12 and 32 weeks. Levels of mRNA expression of TRAP and cathepsin K were increased at 12 weeks, while levels of ALP and osteocalcin were increased at both 12 and 32 weeks. These findings demonstrated that there is an active bone remodeling in subchondral bone in TMJs in response to alteration in occlusion, although new bone was formed with lower BMD and poor mechanical properties.

  17. Analysis of the cytokine profiles of the synovial fluid in a normal temporomandibular joint: preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Kyun; Kim, Su-Gwan; Kim, Bum-Soo; Lee, Jeong-Yun; Yun, Pil-Young; Bae, Ji-Hyun; Oh, Ji-Su; Ahn, Jong-Mo; Kim, Jae-Sung; Lee, Sook-Young

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the cytokine profiles of the synovial fluid from the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) spaces of normal individuals and temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients. Thirty-four patients with planned orthognathic surgery did not present abnormalities of the TMJ on magnetic resonance images and radiographs and did not show the symptoms identified by the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC-TMD); as a result, they were assigned to the control group. Twenty-two patients who sought treatment for TMD during the same period were assigned to the TMD group. Synovial fluid was collected from superior TMJ spaces, and cytokine expression was analysed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Significant differences were tested using Fisher's exact test (pTMD group, whereas no cytokines were detected in the control group. The most prevalent cytokines in the TMD group were IL-1β, IL-6 and GM-CSF. IL-4 and IL-5 were not detected in either the TMD group or in the control group. None of the cytokines that were detected in patients with TMD were found in the articular spaces of normal individuals. Copyright © 2012 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Diagnostic accuracy of imaging modalities for internal derangements of temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Kaoru; Igarashi, Chinami; Yuasa, Masao; Imanaka, Masahiro; Kondoh, Toshirou [Tsurumi Univ., Yokohama (Japan). School of Dental Medicine

    1998-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and review the diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of imaging diagnosis for temporomandibular disorders. The role of diagnostic imaging is to detect and document specific anatomic abnormalities associated with the signs and symptoms in the temporomandibular joint. Magnetic resonance imaging (MR imaging) can accurately depict disc displacement and disc deformity. MR imaging is our first choice among the various imaging modalities for the patients with clinical signs and symptoms. However, it has been shown that intra-capsular adhesions and perforations of the disc and retrodiscal tissue are sometimes not detected by MR imaging. To improve the diagnostic technique for adhesions and perforations, double-contrast arthrotomography with fluoroscopy should be employed. The irregular surface of the eminences and the glenoid fossae shown by MR imaging and tomography are correlated with subchondral bone exposure by arthroscopy. Erosion of the condyles detected by MR imaging, tomography and rotational panoramic radiography is correlated with subchondral bone exposure detected by arthroscopy. (author). 69 refs.

  19. Expression of β-defensin 4 on temporomandibular joint discs with anterior displacement without reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicurezza, Edoardo; Loreto, Carla; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Almeida, Luis Eduardo; Rusu, Mugurel; Grasso, Carmelo; Leonardi, Rosalia

    2013-12-01

    β-defensin-4 is a member of antimicrobial peptides (APs) of the immunity system. This molecule has antimicrobial activity but it seems to be involved in articular inflammatory processes too, as it happens during osteoarthritic disease (OA). Considering the possible relation existing between (OA) and temporomandibular disorders (TMD), the aim of our study was to evaluate immunohistochemically the presence of β- defensin-4 in pathological temporomandibular joint (TMJ) discs affected by internal derangement without reduction (ADDwoR). Eighteen TMJ-displaced disc specimens were considered in this study and were analysed by immunohistochemical evaluation. They were compared with a control sample of sixteen healthy discs and two scores, intensity of staining (IS) and extent score (ES) were estimated. Findings of our analysis showed a significant difference between control and study sample (P TMJ discs affected by ADDwoR, hypothesing a possible role of this molecule in articular bone disruption. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Laser therapy reduces gelatinolytic activity in the rat trigeminal ganglion during temporomandibular joint inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desiderá, A C; Nascimento, G C; Gerlach, R F; Leite-Panissi, C R A

    2015-07-01

    To investigate whether low-level laser therapy (LLLT) alters the expression and activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) during different stages of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammation in rats. It also evaluated whether LLLT modifies mechanical allodynia and orofacial hyperalgesia. Wistar rats (±250 g) were divided into groups that received saline (SAL) or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA, 50 μl) in the TMJ, and that later underwent LLLT (20 J cm(-2) ) at their TMJ or not (groups SAL, SAL + LLLT, CFA, and CFA + LLLT). LLLT was applied on days 3, 5, 7, and 9 after SAL or CFA. Mechanical allodynia was evaluated on days 1, 3, 5, 7, and 10; orofacial hyperalgesia was assessed on day 10. Gelatin zymography and in situ zymography aided quantification of MMPs in the TG. Low-level laser therapy abolished the reduction in the mechanical orofacial threshold and the increase in orofacial rubbing during the orofacial formalin test induced by CFA. LLLT also decreased the CFA-induced rise in the levels of MMP-9 and MMP-2 as well as the gelatinolytic activity in the TG. Low-level laser therapy could constitute an adjuvant therapy to treat temporomandibular disorders and prevent inflammation-induced alterations in the levels of MMP-2 and MMP-9 and in the gelatinolytic activity in TGs. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc position in patients with TMJ pain assessed by coronal MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhard, L; Giannakopoulos, N N; Rohde, S; Schmitter, M

    2013-01-01

    To assess the position of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc in patients with TMJ pain and compare it with equivalent published data of asymptomatic volunteers. The oblique coronal closed- and open-jaw MR images from 66 patients with TMJ pain were evaluated. Clinical examination followed the research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders. In all coronal images, the transverse condylar axis and the medial and lateral edges of the disc were determined using special software. Inter-rater agreement was calculated [two raters; inter-rater correlation coefficient (ICC)]. The presence of osteoarthrosis (OA) was determined by two independent raters. The influence of OA was estimated in patients (generalized estimation equation model). The results were compared with those of healthy volunteers (t-test). Differences between closed and open jaw in patients were analysed with the Wilcoxon matched-pair test. The ICC was good for the transverse condylar axis (0.987) and the medial edge of the disc (0.799) and fair for the lateral edge (0.355). On average, the disc projected 5.5% to the medial side; laterally, the condyle was partially uncovered by the disc (-16.6%). In the open-jaw position, both the medial and the lateral edges shifted medially (to 17.6% vs -23.6%, Wilcoxon matched-pair test, p pain, the disc seems to be smaller and located less medially than in healthy volunteers. The extent of the medial shift on opening was similar.

  2. Influence of estrogen cycle on temporomandibular joint synovial membrane in rat with deviated mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Giovanna; Hosomichi, Jun; Muramoto, Takeshi; Kanno, Zuisei; Soma, Kunimichi

    2007-03-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are known to be more prevalent and severe in women than in men, especially in those who are in their reproductive age. In those patients reproductive hormones may play a vital role in the host adaptive capacity of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In order to clarify the relationship between TMD prevalence and estrogen cycle, a mandible deviated animal model was carried out, and the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), an essential enzyme in the pathogenesis of inflammatory arthritis, was investigated in the rat's synovial tissue. An appliance was attached to the rat's incisors to produce a lateral deviation of the mandible during the metestrus phase, and the animals were sacrificed in the proestrus and estrus phase, when the estrogen was at the highest and lowest level, respectively. Immunostaining was then performed for 2 consecutive estrous cycles to demonstrate iNOS expression in the synovial membrane of the TMJ. The immunoreactivity for iNOS was more intense in the synovial membrane on the contralateral side in the proestrus phase (estrogen peak phase). These observations suggest that iNOS expression in the synovial membrane with mandibular deviation may be exacerbated in the presence of estrogen.

  3. The Relationship between Osseous Changes of the Temporomandibular Joint and RDC/TMD Groups in CBCT Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahrokh Imanimoghaddam

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD are the most common disorders of the jaw, and despite their clinical importance, they are not completely understood. This study was aimed to evaluate the changes of temporomandibular joint (TMJ on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT images in disc displacement vs. osteoarthritis of the TMJ. Methods: In this study, 45 patients, including 37 women and 8 men (13-89 years of age, were examined. The patients were selected based on RDC/TMD criteria and group I disorders were excluded from the study. Accordingly, group II consisted of 43 joints with jaw clicking or displaced discs, and group III comprised 46 joints with crepitus. CBCT images in sagittal, coronal, and axial sections were examined to assess osseous changes in terms of flattening, sclerosis, erosion, resorption, and osteophyte formation. Data were analyzed using statistical tests including the chi-square, Mann-Whitney, and Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests with the confidence interval of 95%. Results: Mann-Whitney test for the comparison of mean age between groups II and III was not statistically significant (p value=0.06. A significant differences was found between two (RDC/TMD groups according to the prevalence of condylar erosion, resorption, and osteophyte (p

  4. Correlation between internal derangement and osteoarthrosis in the temporomandibular joint using magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Haeng Un; Choi, Sun Young; Koh, Kwang Joon [School of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-15

    To evaluate the relationship between internal derangement and osteoarthrosis in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). One hundred and six MR images of TMJs in 53 patients were evaluated. Disc displacements and osseous changes of the TMJs were assessed. Lateral and rotational disc displacements were also evaluated on coronal images. No significant differences in the frequency of osseous changes of the TMJs between disc displacement with reduction and disc displacement without reduction groups were found. The erosion of the condylar head and the sclerosis of the articular eminence were more frequent in the internal derangement group than in the no disc displacement group. The flattening was the most frequently observed osseous change of both the condylar head and articular eminence. The relationship between internal derangement and osteoarthrosis is obscure, but it is thought that both disorders adversely affect each other.

  5. Does Hypoxia-Reperfusion Injury Occur in Osteoarthritis of the Temporomandibular Joint?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Lukas M.; Slater, James J. R. Huddleston; Leijsma, Martha K.; Stegenga, Boudewijn

    2012-01-01

    Aims: To determine the available evidence in the literature for whether hypoxia-reperfusion injury plays a role in the pathogenesis of joint diseases in general and of osteoarthritis (OA) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in particular. Methods: The electronic databases CENTRAL, PubMed, and

  6. Arthroscopic cauterization of retrodiscal tissue as a successful minimal invasive therapy in habitual temporomandibular joint luxation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ybema, A.; De Bont, L. G. M.; Spijkervet, F. K. L.

    Habitual temporomandibular joint (TMJ) luxation is a serious condition for the patient, and is often managed by extensive open joint surgery. Arthroscopic eminoplasty is an alternative, but this technique could also cause concomitant damage to the articular surface. The aim of this study was to

  7. Replacement of Missing Anterior Teeth in a Patient with Temporomandibular Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satheesh B. Haralur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The loss of anterior teeth leads to extreme psychological trauma, along with functional and esthetic debilitations. Healthy anterior teeth play an important role of protecting the posterior teeth during excursive mandibular movement. Loss of anterior teeth induces posterior interference with extended disocclusion time. Posterior disocclusion is critical to remove the harmful force on the teeth temporomandibular joint and eliminate muscle hypertonicity. Occlusal interference is considered as contributing factor to temporomandibular disorder (TMD symptoms. Prosthesis design should eliminate deleterious tooth contacts. Establishing optimum anterior guidance is a key to establishing harmonious functional occlusion in addition to the correction of the esthetic and phonetic disabilities. This case report explains the steps involved in the rehabilitation of the TMD patient with loss of maxillary anterior teeth.

  8. Role of Auriculotherapy in the Treatment of Temporomandibular Disorders with Anxiety in University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iunes, Denise Hollanda; Chaves, Érika de Cássia Lopes; Moura, Caroline de Castro; Côrrea, Bruna; Carvalho, Leonardo César; Silva, Andreia Maria; de Carvalho, Emília Campos

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of auriculotherapy with mustard seeds in the treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs), anxiety, and electromyographic (EMG) activity in university students. Methodology. The State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC) for TMDs (RDC/TMDs), and electromyography were used in this study of 44 college students with high levels of anxiety and TMDs. The subjects were divided into two groups: an auriculotherapy (AA) group (n = 31) and an AA sham group (n = 13). The mustard seeds were applied to the shenmen, rim, sympathetic, brain stem, and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) points in the AA group and to sham points in the external ear and wrist in the AA sham group. The treatment protocol was 10 sessions (two treatments per week). Results. Anxiety (p Auriculotherapy was effective in the treatment of students with anxiety and TMDs.

  9. Comparison of algometry and palpation in the recognition of temporomandibular disorder pain complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visscher, Corine M; Lobbezoo, Frank; Naeije, Machiel

    2004-01-01

    To determine the construct validity of algometry and to compare it with that of palpation, and to compare tenderness of masticatory muscle sites and the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) on palpation and on algometry. Two hundred fifty subjects, 148 with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain complaints, underwent a standardized blinded physical examination that included pain-intensity measures on palpation and pressure pain threshold measures on algometry of masseter muscle sites, temporalis muscle sites, and the TMJ. Logistic regression analysis indicated that the recognition of TMD pain complaints based on pressure algometry was comparable to that of palpation (R2 = 0.22 and R2 = 0.21, respectively). The masseter muscles were most tender to palpation and algometry, followed by the TMJs and the temporalis muscles. Construct validity of algometry in the recognition of TMD pain complaints is comparable to that of palpation, and differences in tenderness on palpation and on algometry are found between masticatory muscle sites and the TMJ.

  10. Reemplazo articular temporomandibular debido a queratoquiste odontogénico Temporomandibular joint replacement because of odontogenic keratocyst

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    Pedro Angel Peñón Vivas

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Existen disímiles condiciones que hacen necesario el reemplazo articular temporomandibular; dentro de las más frecuentes se encuentran la anquilosis, la osteoatrosis, estadíos avanzados del Síndrome de disfunción temporomandibular, daño articular postrauma y procesos neoplásicos o tumorales. Los queratoquistes odontógenos que se agrupan para su estudio dentro de los quistes odontogénicos del desarrollo, representan cerca del 7 al 10 por ciento de todos los quistes maxilo-mandibulares. Se dice que tienen dos picos de incidencia entre la segunda y tercera década de vida y entre los 50 y 60 años de edad, con una ligera predilección por el sexo masculino. Aparece más frecuentemente en la región del tercer molar de la mandíbula con extensión a la rama ascendente El presente trabajo tuvo como objetivo mostrar el caso de un paciente masculino de 57 años de edad en el que fue necesario el reemplazo articular temporomandibular debido a un queratoquiste odontogénico que involucraba la totalidad de la rama mandibular derecha, incluyendo el proceso condíleo y coronoideo, así como el ángulo hasta el tercio posterior del cuerpo mandibular. Tras un año de realizada la intervención quirúrgica la evolución del paciente fue satisfactoria.Temporomandibular joint replacement is required in a variety of conditions. Among the most frequent are ankylosis, osteoarthrosis, advanced stages of the temporomandibular dysfunction syndrome, post-traumatic joint damage, and neoplastic or tumoral processes. Odontogenic keratocysts, which are classified as developmental odontogenic cysts for study purposes, constitute 7-10 per cent of all maxillomandibular cysts. Two peaks have been identified in their incidence: between the second and third decades of life, and between 50 and 60 years of age, with a slight predominance of the male sex. They are most common in the third molar area of the mandibule, with expansion to the ascending branch. A case is

  11. Effect of Watsu therapy on psychological aspects and quality of life of patients with temporomandibular disorder: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Barbosa, Gustavo Augusto Seabra; Rocha,Cibele Oliveira de Melo; RESENDE,Camila Maria Bastos Machado de; SALES,Kelly Verônica de Melo

    2014-01-01

    Watsu therapy is a water relaxation intervention technique performed individually in a warm pool with music and peaceful settings involving harmonious rotational movements, stretching, tractions on the joints and pressures at the points of muscle tension. This study evaluated the effect of Watsu therapy on psychological aspects (anxiety and minor psychiatric disorders) and on the quality of life of a patient with temporomandibular disorders. The patient answered three questionnaires: STAI (St...

  12. Orofacial pain, jaw function, and temporomandibular disorders in adult women with a history of juvenile chronic arthritis or persistent juvenile chronic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakke, M.; Zak, M.; Jensen, B.L.

    2001-01-01

    Orofacial pain, jaw function, temporomandibular disorders, adult women persistent juvenil chronic arthritis......Orofacial pain, jaw function, temporomandibular disorders, adult women persistent juvenil chronic arthritis...

  13. Effect of Surgery First Orthognathic Approach on the Temporomandibular Joint: A Clinical Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelo, Sandro; Saponaro, Gianmarco; De Angelis, Paolo; Gasparini, Giulio; Garagiola, Umberto; Moro, Alessandro

    2018-01-05

    Correction of severe malocclusions with skeletal discrepancies requires orthodontic treatment in combination with orthognathic surgery. Even though conventional orthognathic surgery (COS) is a common and well-accepted approach its influence on the signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) is still debated. Recently with the introduction of surgery first approach, a different timing for the management of dentoskeletal imbalances has been proposed. The present study is aimed at assessing the relationship between surgery first approach and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders. The study sample consisted of 24 patients who were selected to be treated with surgery first approach. Clinical follow-ups after surgery were performed every week for the first month, at 3 months, 6 months, and at 1 year. A radiological follow-up was performed at 1 week and at 1 year after the operation with a panorex and a latero-lateral teleradiograph. To assess the effect of surgery first approach on the TMDs signs and symptoms, a clinical assessment was performed 4 days before surgery (T1), 6 months after surgery (T2), and 1 year postoperatively (T3). The results of the authors' study show that pain assessment revealed a general improvement of this symptom in correspondence to TMJ and masticatory muscles except in the masseter and neck region. Also joint noises, TMJ functioning, migraine, and headache underwent a considerable improvement. Surgery first approach is an innovative orthognathic procedure and, by undergoing surgery first approach, patients with pre-existing TMJ dysfunction may experience a significant improvement or even resolution of the TMDs signs and symptoms.

  14. Temporomandibular disorders in fibromyalgia syndrome: a short-communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Maísa Soares; Pimentel, Marcele Jardim; Rizzatti-Barbosa, Célia Marisa

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a chronic painful syndrome and the coexistence of a painful condition caused by Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) and FMS has been frequently raised for several studies, however, more likely hypothesis is that a set of FMS characteristics may lead to the onset of TMD symptoms and they are not merely coexisting conditions. Therefore, our aim is presenting a review of literature about the relation between fibromyalgia and the signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders. For this purpose, a bibliographic search was performed of the period of 1990-2013, in the Medline, Pubmed, Lilacs and Scielo databases, using the keywords fibromyalgia, temporomandibular disorders and facial pain. Here we present a set of findings in the literature showing that fibromyalgia can lead to TMD symptoms. These studies demonstrated greater involvement of the stomatognathic system in FMS and myogenic disorders of masticatory system are the most commonly found in those patients. FMS appears to have a series of characteristics that constitute predisposing and triggering factors for TMD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Statistical approaches to orofacial pain and temporomandibular disorders research

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    Manfredini, Daniele; Nardini, Luca Guarda; Carrozzo, Eleonora; Salmaso, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the biostatistical methods utilized to interpret and analyze dental research in the areas of orofacial pain and temporomandibular disorders. It will guide practitioners in these fields who would like to interpret research findings or find examples on the design of clinical investigations. After an introduction dealing with the basic issues, the central sections of the textbook are dedicated to the different types of investigations in sight of specific goals researchers may have. The final section contains more elaborate statistical concepts for expert professionals. The field of orofacial pain and temporomandibular disorders is emerging as one of the most critical areas of clinical research in dentistry. Due to the complexity of clinical pictures, the multifactorial etiology, and the importance of psychosocial factors in all aspects of the TMD practice, clinicians often find it hard to appraise their modus operandi, and researchers must constantly increase their knowledge in epidemiology and ...

  16. Indication for and accuracy of CT and MRI of the temporomandibular joint; Indikation und Aussagekraft von Computertomographie und Magnetresonanztomographie des Kiefergelenks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greess, H.; Anders, K. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie

    2005-07-01

    Recurrent pains of the temporomandibular joint represent a frequent symptom with numerous different causes. CT and MRI can reliably show the cause of these disorders and therefore have substituted conventional X-ray imaging. Modern multi-slice-CT (MSCT) allows for examination of the skull base including the mandible in a very short time with thinnest slice collimation (0.75 mm). With 2D- and 3D- reformations reconstructed out of this volume data set in parasagittal, coronal or any other arbitrary slice orientation excellent imaging of fractures and bony changes of arthrosis as well as benign and malignant tumors of the temporomandibular joint can be performed. MRI offers very good soft tissue contrast in order to visualize the intra-articular disc, the ligaments and muscles, as well the possibility to acquire cross sectional images in any user-defined orientation. MRI is the method of choice to diagnose 'internal derangement', particularly displacement of the intra-articular disc and inflammatory disease of the temporomandibular joint. The present paper will provide diagnostic strategies for the use of MSCT or MRI imaging concerning the different causes of disorders to the temporomandibular joint. (orig.)

  17. Manipulative and multimodal therapy for upper extremity and temporomandibular disorders: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantingham, James W; Cassa, Tammy Kay; Bonnefin, Debra; Pribicevic, Mario; Robb, Andrew; Pollard, Henry; Tong, Victor; Korporaal, Charmaine

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to complete a systematic review of manual and manipulative therapy (MMT) for common upper extremity pain and disorders including the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A literature search was conducted using the Cumulative Index of Nursing Allied Health Literature, PubMed, Manual, Alternative, and Natural Therapy Index System (MANTIS), Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), Index to Chiropractic Literature, Google Scholar, and hand search inclusive of literature from January 1983 to March 5, 2012. Search limits included the English language and human studies along with MeSH terms such as manipulation, chiropractic, osteopathic, orthopedic, and physical therapies. Inclusion criteria required an extremity peripheral diagnosis (for upper extremity problems including the elbow, wrist, hand, finger and the (upper quadrant) temporomandibular joint) and MMT with or without multimodal therapy. Studies were assessed using the PEDro scale in conjunction with modified guidelines and systems. After synthesis and considered judgment scoring was complete, evidence grades of "A, B, C and I" were applied. Out of 764 citations reviewed, 129 studies were deemed possibly to probably useful and/or relevant to develop expert consensus. Out of 81 randomized controlled or clinical trials, 35 were included. Five controlled or clinical trials were located and 4 were included. Fifty case series, reports and/or single-group pre-test post-test prospective case series were located with 32 included. There is Fair (B) level of evidence for MMT to specific joints and the full kinetic chain combined generally with exercise and/or multimodal therapy for lateral epicondylopathy, carpal tunnel syndrome, and temporomandibular joint disorders, in the short term. The information from this study will help guide practitioners in the use of MMT, soft tissue technique, exercise, and/or multimodal therapy for the treatment of a variety of upper extremity complaints in the context

  18. Therapeutic outcome assessment in permanent temporomandibular joint disc displacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kropmans, TJB; Dijkstra, PU; Stegenga, B; De Bont, LGM

    In permanent temporomandibular disc displacement (TMJ-DD) outcome studies many authors claim positive effects of arthroscopic surgery, arthrocentesis and physical therapy. This literature review was undertaken to analyse whether the claimed effects are based on acceptable methodology. The recorded

  19. TEMPOROMANDIBULAR DYSFUNCTION, STRESS AND COMMON MENTAL DISORDER IN UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Augusto, Viviane Gontijo; Perina, Keity Cristina Bueno; Penha,Daniel Silva Gontijo; dos Santos, Daiane Carolina Alves; Oliveira, Val?ria Aparecida Souza

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) and its association with perceived stress and common mental disorder (CMD) in academic students. Methods: This is s transversal observational study conducted at Universidade de Minas Gerais, Divinópolis Unit, in health science courses. To investigate the prevalence of TMD, the anamnestic index by Fonseca was used. Stress was assessed by the perceived stress scale, translated and adapted for the Brazilian...

  20. Therapeutic exercises for the control of temporomandibular disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto da Rocha Moraes; Monique Lalue Sanches; Eduardo Cotecchia Ribeiro; Antonio Sérgio Guimarães

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is a multifactorial disease. For this reason, it is difficult to obtain an accurate and correct diagnosis. In this context, conservative treatments, including therapeutic exercises classified as stretching, relaxation, coordination, strengthening and endurance, are oftentimes prescribed. OBJECTIVE: Thus, the aim of the present article was to conduct a literature review concerning the types of exercises available and the efficacy for the treatment...

  1. Magnetic resonance images of patients with temporomandibular disorders: Prevalence and correlation between disk morphology and displacement

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    Amaral, Ruana de Oliveira, E-mail: ruana.amaral@hotmail.com [Faculty of Dentistry, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Damasceno, Naiana Nolasco de Lima, E-mail: naiananolasketi@yahoo.com.br [Faculty of Dentistry, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Azevedo de Souza, Lílian, E-mail: lilianazevedo@msn.com [Faculty of Dentistry, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Devito, Karina Lopes, E-mail: karina.devito@ufjf.edu.br [Faculty of Dentistry, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2013-06-15

    Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), this study aimed to evaluate the morphology of the articular disc of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in patients with temporomandibular disorder (TMD). There were 218 TMJ of 109 assessed patients; 88 were females and 21 males, and all were diagnosed as symptomatic for temporomandibular disorder. The articular disc positions were classified in the normal position and with anterior disc displacement with and without reduction. Regarding the morphology, the discs were classified as follows: biconcave (normal), biplanar, rounded, biconvex, folded, thickening in the posterior band, thickening in the anterior band and hemiconvex. The results indicated that females were the most affected by morphological changes of the articular disc (p = 0.008/Cramer's V = 0.295). There was no statistical significance when correlating the disc morphology with the sides (right and left). There was a significant correlation between the position and morphology of the articular disc (p < 0.001/Cramer's V = 0.609), and in the normal position of the discs presenting biplanar and biconcave morphologies. In TMJ with anterior displacement of the disc with reduction (ADDR), there was a greater correlation with rounded, hemiconvex and biconvex morphologies. Already in the TMJ with displacement without reduction (ADDWR), there was a higher prevalence of folded discs. It can be concluded that morphological changes in the disc are influenced by the type of displacement, and more serious deformations are associated with ADDWR cases.

  2. [Relations between extraction of wisdom teeth and temporomandibular disorders: a case/control study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Florian; Leroux, Agathe; Bertaud, Valérie; Meary, Fleur; Le Padellec, Clément; Refuveille, Laura; Lemaire, Arnaud; Sorel, Olivier; Chauvel-Lebret, Dominique

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of extraction of third molars on the occurrence of temporo-mandibular disorders (TMD). A review of the literature and a case-control study have been conducted. The case-control study compares the frequency of extraction of third molars between the sample with TMD (case) and the sample without TMD (control). The proportion of patients who had undergone extractions of wisdom teeth was higher in the case group than in the control group. The difference was statistically significant when patients had undergone extraction of all four wisdom teeth or when the extraction of four wisdom teeth underwent in one sitting or under general anesthesia. The study of patients in case sample shows that all signs of TMD were more common in patients who had undergone extractions in several sessions and under local anesthesia. The temporomandibular joint sounds are significantly more frequent with local anesthesia. In the case group, 85 to 92% of patients have parafunctions and 5 to 11% have malocclusion. This demonstrates the multifactorial etiology of temporomandibular disorders. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2015.

  3. [Masticatory performance in adults related to temporomandibular disorder and dental occlusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felício, Cláudia Maria de; Melchior, Melissa de Oliveira; Silva, Marco Antônio Moreira Rodrigues da; Celeghini, Renata Maria dos Santos

    2007-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorder and mastication. To compare subjects who present temporomandibular disorders to a control group considering mastication and to analyze the related variables. 20 subjects with temporomandibular disorder (TMD group) and 10 controls--selection based on clinical examination and anamnesis--responded to a questionnaire on the self-perception of pain severity and presence of noise in the temporomandibular joints, muscle pain, otologic symptoms, headaches, and jaw opening difficulties. The subjects were also submitted to a clinical examination regarding the number of teeth and functional occlusion--measurements of jaw opening and jaw lateral excursions, occlusal interferences, occlusal contacts of the working and non-working-side, and mastication evaluation. Mastication was evaluated in terms of time needed to eat a stuffed cookie, number of chewing strokes and type (unilateral or bilateral). The maximum force needed at first to break the cookie, verified with a TA-XT2 Texture Analyzer (Stable Micro Systems), was of 4341.8 g. The groups were compared using variance analysis and the correlations between variables were calculated using the Pearson product-moment test. Most of the control subjects presented bilateral pattern of mastication, whereas the TMD group tended to present the unilateral pattern. Masticatory type scores and laterality measurements were significantly higher in the control group. The TMD group presented higher means in terms of: age, time of chewing, number of chewing strokes and TMD severity. Chewing time and type were positively correlated with TMD severity and negatively correlated with number of occlusal interferences. In the TMD group, chewing differed from the normal physiological standard. The number of occlusal interferences and the severity of TMD were variables correlated to chewing.

  4. Quantifying Temporomandibular Joint Synovitis in Children With Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Cory M; Vakilian, Pouya M; Breen, Micheál; Zurakowski, David; Caruso, Paul; Henderson, Lauren; Nigrovic, Peter A; Kaban, Leonard B; Peacock, Zachary S

    2016-12-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) frequently affects the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) and is often undetected by history, examination, and plain imaging. Qualitative assessment of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance images (MRIs) is currently the standard for diagnosis of TMJ synovitis associated with JIA. The purpose of this study is to apply a quantitative analysis of synovial enhancement to MRIs of patients with and without JIA to establish a disease threshold and sensitivity and specificity for the technique. This is a retrospective case-control study of children (age ≤16 years) who had MRIs with gadolinium including the TMJs. Subjects were divided into a JIA group and a control group. From a coronal T1-weighted image, a ratio (enhancement ratio [ER]) of the average pixel intensity within three 0.2-mm2 regions of interest (ROIs) in the TMJ synovium to that of a 50-mm2 ROI of the longus capitis muscle was calculated. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to determine the sensitivity and specificity. The inter- and intraexaminer reliability was evaluated with Bland-Altman plots and 2-way mixed, absolute agreement intraclass correlation coefficients. There were 187 and 142 TMJs included in the JIA and control groups, respectively. An ER threshold of 1.55 had a sensitivity and specificity for detecting synovitis of 91% and 96%, respectively. The inter- and intraexaminer reliability was excellent. Calculating a ratio of pixel intensity between the TMJ synovium and the longus capitis muscle is a reliable way to quantify synovial enhancement. An ER of 1.55 differentiates normal TMJs from those affected by inflammatory arthritis. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  5. Improved Temporomandibular Joint Position After 3-Dimensional Planned Mandibular Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawh-Martinez, Rajendra; Parsaei, Yassmin; Wu, Robin; Lin, Alexander; Metzler, Philipp; DeSesa, Christopher; Steinbacher, Derek M

    2017-01-01

    Virtual surgical planning (VSP) using computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD-CAM) has been reported to aid in craniofacial reconstruction. The reported improvements have been related mainly to operative performance, with limited evaluations of the position and function of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). This study analyzed the radiographic detail of postoperative outcomes related to the TMJ. Patients who underwent mandibular reconstruction with and without VSP were analyzed. All patients underwent preoperative computed tomography (CT) of their mandible. In the VSP group, CAD-CAM planning was performed preoperatively using CT Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) data. Postoperative CT images from the 2 groups were quantitatively compared to evaluate the TMJ. CT images were digitized for 2- and 3-dimensional analysis using surgical planning software (Materialise, Leuven, Belgium). Anatomic landmarks and cephalometric relations were analyzed. Sixteen patients who underwent traditional planning or VSP for mandibular reconstruction were compared. Two groups (n = 8 each) were compared for positioning of the mandibular condyle in the glenoid fossa. Measurements of superior, anterior, and lateral movements were comparable in the pre- and postoperative groups for the traditional and VSP groups (P mandibular condyle position for traditional planning versus VSP noted decreased percentages of change in superior (22 vs 10%; P mandibular reconstructions (n = 8). Ipsilateral right mandibular reconstructions (n = 6) showed changes in superior (62 vs 15%; P mandibular reconstructions. Evaluation of condyle movements showed differences in the ipsilateral position in the pre- and postoperative groups. VSP resulted in decreased superior and lateral shifts of the ipsilateral condyle and decreased changes in the condylar and condylar neck angles. This work shows that VSP can lead to increased precision in reconstruction leading to preserved normative

  6. [Treatment of temporomandibular joint disc perforation with injection of hyaluronic acid or disc repair].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jinbiao; Long, Xing; Deng, Mohong; Cheng, Yong; Li, Bo

    2014-08-01

    To assess the efficacy of injection of sodium hyaluronate in the treatment of patients with disc perforation by using cone- beam computed tomography (CBCT) and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) function. Twenty- eight patients (38 joints) with disc perforation observed through arthrography who received injection of sodium hyaluronate and other 20 patients (29 joints) who received disc repair were included in this study. Pain (visual analog scale, scores 0 to 100), maximal mouth opening, modified Helkimo's clinical dysfunction index and TMJ examinations with CBCT were obtained before and 3, 9 months after treatment. A statistically significant increase (P joints) of patients after HA injection and 55% (16 of 29 joints) of patients appeared bone remodeling after disc repair. Both injection of hyaluronic acid and disc repair are effective for treatment of temporomandibular joint disc perforation.

  7. Conventional radiographie diagnosis and CT of the temporomandibular joint in myoarthropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huels, A.; Schulte, W.; Walter, E.

    1984-08-01

    Conventional radiogrpahie Diagnosis and CT of the Temporomandibular Joint in Myoarthropathy. - Clinical utilization of the high resolution, thin-slice CT (slice thickness: 1 mm) makes it possible to systemize the bony structure changes of the joint correlated with dysfunctions. Using this technique total evaluations of this complex can be made. - In patients suffering from myoarthropathy, the partially typical changes in both the functional anatomy, as well as in form, structure and topography of specific regions of the joint can be viewed objectively. - The alteration process of the temporomandibular joint is considered causal in connection with muscular disfunctions, which often lay the foundation for chronic pain conditions, in the regions of the face and head. - The broad spectrum of conventional radiogrpahic techniques documents, on one hand, the extremely unfavorable anatomy of the temporomandibular joint with regard to radiography. On the other hand, it also implies a certain amount of diagnostic uncertainty in this region. - Comment is made concerning the informational value as well as the limits of the most important radiologic techniques. It is of utmost importance to evaluate the radiographic findings of the temporomandibular joint in myoarthropathies with a clinical functional analysis, which is easy to carry out.

  8. Differential diagnostics of different nosological forms of the temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kameneva L.A.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Research objective: to carry out differential diagnostics of various nosological forms of a temporal and temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome. Material and methods. On clinical base of orthopedic odontology chair of SamSMU inspection of 244 patients with temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome was performed. Diagnostics was carried out according to the special card of inspection which was developed on orthopedic odontology chair of SamSMU and included subjective, objective and special methods of research. As a result of research it is taped: 71 — an occlusal-articulation dysfunctional syndrome, 44 — a neuromuscular dysfunctional syndrome, 76 patients have a hardly set dislocation of intra joint disk and 53 — a habitual dislocation and a subluxation of a temporomandibular joint. We used Yu.A. Petrosov's classification as it displays most precisely the processes happening at pathology of the intra joint relations. Conclusion: On the basis of the obtained data the table of differential diagnostics of various nosological forms of temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome has been made.

  9. Psychoeducation Program on Strategies for Coping with Stress in Patients with Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Biegańska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lack of educational projects in the available literature was an inspiration to develop a psychoeducational program. The objective was to provide patients with basic information on the contribution of stressors in the occurrence of temporomandibular joint dysfunction and educate on methods for coping with stress most commonly used in psychology. In the course of three meetings, patients are familiarised with the issue of experienced stress as a potential source of psychosomatic illnesses (in particular, temporomandibular joint dysfunction. Preliminary patients’ opinions, expressed through self-report methods, indicate significant usefulness of the developed psychoeducational program for the process of treatment and the quality of patients’ lives.

  10. Psychoeducation program on strategies for coping with stress in patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biegańska, Joanna; Pihut, M

    2014-01-01

    Lack of educational projects in the available literature was an inspiration to develop a psychoeducational program. The objective was to provide patients with basic information on the contribution of stressors in the occurrence of temporomandibular joint dysfunction and educate on methods for coping with stress most commonly used in psychology. In the course of three meetings, patients are familiarised with the issue of experienced stress as a potential source of psychosomatic illnesses (in particular, temporomandibular joint dysfunction). Preliminary patients' opinions, expressed through self-report methods, indicate significant usefulness of the developed psychoeducational program for the process of treatment and the quality of patients' lives.

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Evaluation for Anterior Disc Displacement of the Temporomandibular Joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhongjun; Wang, Mingguo; Ma, Yingwei; Lai, Qingguo; Tong, Dongdong; Zhang, Fenghe; Dong, Lili

    2017-02-08

    BACKGROUND Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the criterion standard imaging technique for visualization of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) region, and is currently considered the optimum modality for comprehensive evaluation in patients with temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD). This study was aimed at finding the value of MRI in pre-clinical diagnosis of TMJ disc displacement. MATERIAL AND METHODS Patients primarily diagnosed as having anterior disc displacement by clinical symptoms and X-ray were selected in the present study. MRI was used to evaluate surrounding anatomical structures and position, as well as morphological and signal intensity change between patients and normal controls. RESULTS Posterior band position was significantly different between the patient group and control group. At the maximum opened-mouth position, the location of disc intermediate zone returned to normal. At closed-mouth position, the thickness of anterior and middle, but not posterior, band increased. The motion range of the condyle in the anterior disc displacement without reduction (ADDWR) patient group was significantly less than the value in the anterior disc displacement with reduction (ADDR) patient group and the control group. Whether at closed-mouth position or maximum opened-mouth position, the exudate volume in the patient group was greater than in the normal group. CONCLUSIONS MRI can be successfully used to evaluate multiple morphological changes at different mouth positions of normal volunteers and patients. The disc-condyle relationship can serve as an important indicator in assessing anterior disc displacement, and can be used to distinguish disc displacement with or without reduction.

  12. Asymmetric uptake of Tc-99m HDP on temporomandibular joints may predict prognosis of temporomandibular joint disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Mi; Lee, Won Woo; Yun, PiI Young; Kim, Young Kyun; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    There is no reliable predictor for therapeutic efficacy for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disease. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the usefulness of Tc-99m HDP bone scan in the pre-therapeutic assessment of prognosis for TMJ disease. Between January 2005 and July 2007, 94 patients (M: F=18: 76; mean age, 33.4{+-}14.0 y) with TMJ disease who underwent pre-therapeutic bone scan were enrolled. Planar bone scan images were obtained at right and left lateral skull areas 3 hours post Tc-99m HDP injection (dose=1295 MBq). TMJ uptake of Tc-99m HDP was quantitated using 13X13 pixel-square region-of-interest over TMJ and parietal skull area as background. TMJ uptake ratio was calculated as; (TMJ background) / background. Asymmetric indices for involved TMJ uptake (Al{sub invovle}) were defined as; TMJ uptake ratio of involved/non-involved joint. Asymmetric indices for greater TMJ uptake regardless of disease involvement (AI{sub greater}) were defined as; TMJ uptake ratio of greater/smaller TMJ uptake. Splint therapy was applied to all patients with mean duration of 7 months (range; 3-34 months). Therapeutic efficacy was dichotomised as improved or non-improved in consideration of mandibular movement, TMJ noise, pain, and tenderness. Seventy-six patients experienced improvement, whereas 18 patients non-improvement. There was no significant difference between improved versus non-improved patients regarding TMJ uptake ratio of involved joint (2.92{+-}0.82 vs. 2.91{+-}0.66), and AI{sub invovle} (1.16{+-}0.22 vs. 1.10{+-}0.12) (p>0.05, t-test). However, AI{sub greater} was significantly higher in improved patients than non-improved patients (1.20{+-}0.19 vs. 1.13{+-}0.09, p<0.05, t-test). Regardless of disease involvement of TMJ disease, asymmetricities of Tc-99m HDP uptake were more frequently found in improved group after splint therapy. Tc-99m HDP bone scan can predict the efficacy of splint therapy in TMJ disease.

  13. Influence of oral stabilization appliances in intra-articular pressure of the temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casares, Guillermo; Thomas, Alejandro; Carmona, Joaquin; Acero, Julio; Vila, Carlos Navarro

    2014-07-01

    This study analyzed the intra-articular pressure in the upper compartment of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) under different functional conditions. The influence of stabilization appliances on intra-articular pressure was studied. Seventy-four joints from 64 patients (55 women and 9 men; mean age: 43.2 ± 11.86 years; range: 19-61 years) with TMJ disorders were examined. Only 50 joints passed the inclusion criteria. Intra-articular pressure was measured using a 21G needle inserted into the joint and connected to a pressure transducer. Pressure was measured with the jaw in the following positions: at rest, maximal mouth opening, clenching in maximal intercuspal position, and clenching with an oral interoclusal appliance. Fifty joints were included in the study (without blood reflux), mean pressure at rest was negative (-6.06 ± 4.55 mmHg); when the mouth was opened to its maximal position the pressure was lower (-26.09 ± 6.42 mmHg). Mean intra-articular pressure was higher in the maximal intercuspal position (58.56 ± 24.90 mmHg). When an interoclusal appliance device was fitted, mean intra-articular pressure reduced its value by 31.24%, which reached a mean value of 40.56 ± 18.84 mmHg (P<0.001). There were no significant differences in sex. The group over 45 years old had higher pressure values in maximal open mouth position than the group of patients under 45 years old (P<0.02). Interoclusal appliances can reduce pressure in the upper compartment of the TMJ and improve functional status of the joint.

  14. Temporomandibular disorders: a review of etiology, clinical management, and tissue engineering strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Meghan K; MacBarb, Regina F; Wong, Mark E; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2013-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are a class of degenerative musculoskeletal conditions associated with morphologic and functional deformities that affect up to 25% of the population, but their etiology and progression are poorly understood and, as a result, treatment options are limited. In up to 70% of cases, TMD are accompanied by malpositioning of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc, termed "internal derangement." Although the onset is not well characterized, correlations between internal derangement and osteoarthritic change have been identified. Because of the complex and unique nature of each TMD case, diagnosis requires patient-specific analysis accompanied by various diagnostic modalities. Likewise, treatment requires customized plans to address the specific characteristics of each patient's disease. In the mechanically demanding and biochemically active environment of the TMJ, therapeutic approaches that can restore joint functionality while responding to changes in the joint have become a necessity. One such approach, tissue engineering, which may be capable of integration and adaptation in the TMJ, carries significant potential for the development of repair and replacement tissues. The following review presents a synopsis of etiology, current treatment methods, and the future of tissue engineering for repairing and/or replacing diseased joint components, specifically the mandibular condyle and TMJ disc. An analysis of native tissue characterization to assist clinicians in identifying tissue engineering objectives and validation metrics for restoring healthy and functional structures of the TMJ is followed by a discussion of current trends in tissue engineering.

  15. Osteoarthrosis of Temporomandibular Joint Related to the Defects of Posterior Dentition: A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levorová, Jitka; Machoň, Vladimír; Guha, Anasuya; Foltán, René

    Osteoarthrosis (OA) of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a progressive degenerative disease, gradually affecting cartilage, synovial membrane and bone structures. OA of TMJ clinically manifests with joint noises, pain and restricted mouth opening. In late stages, it results in severe damage of TMJ structures and development of ankylosis. Osteoarthrosis is a multifactorial disease; the occurrence is associated with TMJ overloading. The cohort included 619 patients [538 women (87%) and 81 men (13%), with average age 40.6 years (age range 8-89 years)] with TMJ disorder, who were examined in the year 2014 in Department of Dental Medicine, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University and General University Hospital in Prague, Czech Republic. The aim of this retrospective study was to analyse, if the lack of posterior teeth (supporting teeth zones) is the main etiologic factor of osteoarthrosis of TMJ. Diagnosis of OA was established on the clinical signs and the panoramic X-ray signs. Simultaneously other etiologic factors of OA were assessed. The presence of OA changes on X-ray had 171 patients (i.e. 27.6% of the total number of 619). 17.5% from these patients with OA had defect in posterior dentition. Other aetiological factors (stress, skeletal or vertebrogenous disorders) showed higher incidence of OA changes on X-ray. Defect of posterior dentition is not negligible, but it is not the main aetiological factor for osteoarthrosis of TMJ.

  16. Osteoarthrosis of Temporomandibular Joint Related to the Defects of Posterior Dentition: A Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitka Levorová

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthrosis (OA of temporomandibular joint (TMJ is a progressive degenerative disease, gradually affecting cartilage, synovial membrane and bone structures. OA of TMJ clinically manifests with joint noises, pain and restricted mouth opening. In late stages, it results in severe damage of TMJ structures and development of ankylosis. Osteoarthrosis is a multifactorial disease; the occurrence is associated with TMJ overloading. The cohort included 619 patients [538 women (87% and 81 men (13%, with average age 40.6 years (age range 8–89 years] with TMJ disorder, who were examined in the year 2014 in Department of Dental Medicine, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University and General University Hospital in Prague, Czech Republic. The aim of this retrospective study was to analyse, if the lack of posterior teeth (supporting teeth zones is the main etiologic factor of osteoarthrosis of TMJ. Diagnosis of OA was established on the clinical signs and the panoramic X-ray signs. Simultaneously other etiologic factors of OA were assessed. The presence of OA changes on X-ray had 171 patients (i.e. 27.6% of the total number of 619. 17.5% from these patients with OA had defect in posterior dentition. Other aetiological factors (stress, skeletal or vertebrogenous disorders showed higher incidence of OA changes on X-ray. Defect of posterior dentition is not negligible, but it is not the main aetiological factor for osteoarthrosis of TMJ.

  17. Outcomes of office-based temporomandibular joint arthroscopy: a 5-year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossameldin, R H; McCain, J P

    2018-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthroscopy is a minimally invasive surgical approach for intra-articular TMJ diseases. Office-based arthroscopy using the smallest TMJ scope allows for good visualization, as well as the ability to lavage the joint in an office setting. This study aimed to assess the efficacy of an office-based TMJ arthroscopic technique. A retrospective evaluation of 363 patients with a TMJ disorder was performed. These patients underwent office-based arthroscopy using the OnPoint 1.2mm Scope System (Biomet Microfixation, Jacksonville, FL, USA) in Florida, USA, from July 2007. The following outcomes of the procedure were assessed: improvement in painless range of mandibular motion, pain on loading, and functional jaw pain; these were evaluated using a visual analog scale (VAS) over an average follow-up period of 263.81±142.1 days. The statistical analysis was performed using IBM SPSS Statistics version 20. Statistically significant improvements in TMJ pain and function, and other variables (P=0.001) were shown following TMJ arthroscopic lysis and lavage. Office-based arthroscopy using the OnPoint System was demonstrated to be a safe and efficient procedure for the treatment of patients with TMJ disorders as the first level of the algorithm of care. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of temporal bone resection on temporomandibular joint function: a quality of life study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Casso, Carmen; Kwhaja, Sadie; Davies, Stephen; Al-Ani, Ziad; Saeed, Shakeel R; Homer, Jarrod J

    2010-01-01

    Temporal bone resection for carcinoma may affect quality of life (QOL) and result in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders. The aims of this study were to 1) assess TMJ function after temporal bone resection, and 2) assess the impact of TMJ dysfunction on QOL. Chart and patient review and QOL study. Tertiary referral center (Manchester Royal Infirmary). Thirty patients who had undergone temporal bone resection were identified. Thirteen patients were alive and were included in the study. All patients were submitted to a clinical examination to identify TMJ disorders and determine facial nerve function, and they all answered the University of Washington QOL (UW-QOL) questionnaire (version 4). Eight patients had TMJ disorders with reduced mobility in either direction and/or significant pain. Main factors affecting QOL were pain (P = 0.001), appearance (P = 0.001), and anxiety (P = 0.000). Neither facial nerve palsy nor TMJ disorders affected QOL. The responses to the UW-QOL questionnaire showed that 69 percent of our patients had a good QOL. A total of 61.53 percent of our patients had TMJ dysfunction presenting as restriction of jaw mobility with or without pain. TMJ dysfunction is present in a significant number of patients after temporal bone resection, resulting in longstanding problems, which should be addressed accordingly. Poor QOL results from ongoing pain and psycho-social disturbance.

  19. VESTIBULAR SCHWANNOMA (ACOUSTIC NEUROMA) MIMICKING TEMPOROMANDIBULAR DISORDERS: A CASE REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisi, Maurício A.; Selaimen, Caio M. P.; Chaves, Karen D.; Bisi, Melissa C.; Grossi, Márcio L.

    2006-01-01

    Approximately 6 to 16% of patients with trigeminal neuralgia symptoms present intracranial tumors, the most common being the vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma). Some symptoms reported by patients include hearing loss, tinnitus, headaches, vertigo and trigeminal disturbances. An increased muscle response in the surrounding head and neck musculature may also be observed, which mimics signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders. In these cases, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proved to be a useful tool in tumor diagnosis. The differential diagnosis between myofascial and neuralgic pain is important, as both may present similar characteristics, while being of different origin, and demanding special treatment approaches. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the relationship among trigeminal neuralgia symptoms, intracranial tumors and temporomandibular dysfunction by presenting a clinical case. PMID:19089251

  20. Clinical Manifestations of pathology of temporomandibular joints and masticatory muscles in patients with teeth occlusion and teeth row disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Lepilin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research is a literature review about the problem of temporomandibular joints and masticatory muscles in patients with teeth occlusion and teeth row disturbances. Teeth occlusion and teeth row disturbances are widespread pathology of maxillofacial area, that can lead to different pathology alterations of masticatory system including musculo-articular dysfunction. Some specialists consider that the key factor of pathogenesis of musculo-articular dysfunction is occlusion disturbances, by the other opinion - discoordination of muscle contraction. Thus occlusive and muscular disorders are leading in pathogenesis and clinic of musculo-articular dysfunction

  1. Assessment of the trabecular structure of mandibular condyles in patients with temporomandibular disorders using fractal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsan, Belde; Köse, Taha Emre; Çene, Erhan; Özcan, İlknur

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in the trabecular structure of the mandibular condyle in patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) using fractal analysis. A total of 100 patients ages 18 to 73 years were clinically assessed using the Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders. The control group was age- and sex-matched with the patient group. Panoramic radiographs were obtained using a Kodak 8000 digital device with 73 kVp and 5 mA fixed parameters. The degree of degeneration in the mandibular condyles was calculated. Regions of interest (84 × 84 pixels) were selected within the cortical boundary of the mandibular condyle, and the fractal dimension (FD) was calculated using ImageJ version 1.48. Radiographic degenerative changes were more frequently present and more severe in the patient group (P temporomandibular joints of the patient group, whereas a nonsignificant decrease in FD was observed in the right temporomandibular joints (P = .073) as degenerative changes increased. Lower FD values were associated with more severe degenerative changes in the patient group. The trabecular structure of condyles in patients with TMD exhibited decreased complexity when erosive and sclerotic changes were evident. As a result, fractal analysis enhanced the use of panoramic radiography in detecting degenerative changes in patients with TMD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Tinnitus and temporomandibular disorders: the knowledge of professionals for primary health care in the city of Curitiba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Paulo Francisco Arant; Stechman, José; Marques, Jair Mendes; Martins, Soriane Kieski; Cristoff, Killian Evandro; Sampaio, Rosane Santos; Massi, Giselle; Hummig, Wagner

    2016-07-22

    The high prevalence of temporomandibular disorders and tinnitus along with the negative effects on the quality of life of affected individuals makes this association a matter of public health. To assess the knowledge of primary health care professionals about the interrelationship between temporomandibular disorders and tinnitus. This was a quantitative cross-sectional study, using a structured, self-administered questionnaire for a group of 54 dental surgeons. The statistical analysis used involved descriptive analyses through absolute and relative frequency distributions. The results showed that the professionals do not, as a routine, examine the temporomandibular joints and masticatory muscles during physical examination. In addition, there was a low percentage of correct answers on questions that assess knowledge. There is a need to inform dentists about the interrelationship between temporomandibular disorders and tinnitus. Furthermore, there is a need to encourage managers to establish teaching and learning tools that support and strengthen the role of dentists in primary health care. In this way, routine visits might minimize these disorders, and thus contribute to the quality of life of the population.

  3. Correlating cone beam CT results with temporomandibular joint pain of osteoarthritic origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palconet, G; Ludlow, J B; Tyndall, D A; Lim, P F

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether bony changes in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis (OA) is correlated with pain and other clinical signs and symptoms. Clinical data and cone beam CT (CBCT) images of 30 patients with TMJ OA were analysed. The criteria of Koyama et al (Koyama J, Nishiyama H, Hayashi T. Follow-up study of condylar bony changes using helical computed tomography in patients with temporomandibular disorder. Dentomaxillofac Radiol 2007; 36: 472-477.) and Ahmad et al [Ahmad M, Hollender L, Anderson Q, Kartha K, Ohrbach R, Truelove EL, et al. Research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders (RDC/TMD): development of image analysis criteria and examiner reliability for image analysis. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod 2009; 107: 844-860.] were used to classify the condyles observed on the CBCT. Clinical measures included self-reported pain, mandibular range of motion, TMJ sound, pain on palpation of the TMJ and masticatory muscles, and pain on jaw function. Generalized linear modelling was used to correlate the clinical and radiographic findings and Spearman's rho was used to correlate the two classification systems. There was poor correlation between the maximum condyle change and pain rating (Koyama: r² = 0.1443, p = 0.3995; Ahmad: r² = 0.0273, p = 0.9490), maximum mouth opening (Koyama: r² = 0.2910, p = 0.0629; Ahmad: r² = 0.2626, p = 0.0951), protrusion (Koyama: r² = 0.0875, p = 0.7001; Ahmad: r² = 0.1658, p = 0.3612), right lateral motion (Koyama: r² = 0.0394, p = 0.9093; Ahmad: r² = 0.0866, p = 0.6877) and left lateral motion (Koyama: r² = 0.0943, p = 0.6494; Ahmad: r² = 0.1704, p = 0.3236). Strong correlation was observed between Koyama et al's and Ahmad et al's classifications for average (r = 0.9216, p TMJ OA.

  4. Prevalence and clinical signs of degenerative temporomandibular joint changes validated by magnetic resonance imaging in a non-patient group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Olaf; Biffar, Reiner; Kocher, Thomas; Meyer, Georg

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate associations between degenerative bony changes of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in a non-patient group. A total of 307 subjects (140 males and 167 females) were selected from the cross-sectional epidemiological study "Study of Health in Pomerania" (SHIP) for this evaluation. A clinical functional examination of the masticatory muscles and the TMJs was performed as well as an MRI examination of the TMJs. Another 77 subjects (25%) exhibited degenerative changes of one or both TMJs in the MRI. Clinical analysis revealed pain on palpation of the masticatory muscles in 113 subjects. Some 39 subjects had pain during palpation of the TMJs. There were significant associations between the MRI confirmed diagnosis of osteoarthrosis and some clinical signs (joint noises, joint palpation pain, reduced mouth opening) and symptoms (reported pain in the jaw and masticatory muscles) of TMD as well as further MRI diagnoses (disc displacement with and without reduction, fibrosis of the posterior ligament). Although there were some associations, clinical examination alone is not sufficient for diagnosing degenerative joint diseases. MRI is a necessary diagnostic adjunct for estimating the prevalence of TMD subgroups in non-patient populations.

  5. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in adolescents Sinais e sintomas de disfunção temporomandibular em adolescentes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Rigoldi Bonjardim

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to verify the prevalence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD in adolescents and its relationship to gender. The sample comprised 217 subjects, aged 12 to 18. The subjective symptoms and clinical signs of TMD were evaluated, using, respectively, a self-report questionnaire and the Craniomandibular Index, which has 2 subscales; the Dysfunction Index and the Palpation Index. The results of muscle tenderness showed great variability (0.9-32.25%. In relation to the temporomandibular joint, tenderness of the superior, dorsal and lateral condyle regions occurred in 10.6%, 10.6% and 7.83%, respectively, of the sample. Joint sound during opening was present in 19.8% of the sample and during closing in 14.7%. The most prevalent symptoms were joint sounds (26.72% and headache (21.65%. There was no statistical difference between genders (p > 0.05, except for the tenderness of the lateral pterygoid muscles, which presented more prevalence in girls. In conclusion, clinical signs and symptoms of TMD can occur in adolescents; however, gender influence was not perceived.O objetivo deste estudo foi verificar a prevalência de sinais e sintomas de disfunção temporomandibular (DTM em adolescentes e sua relação com o gênero. A amostra foi constituída de 217 voluntários, com idade entre 12 e 18 anos. Os sintomas subjetivos e os sinais clínicos de DTM foram avaliados usando-se, respectivamente, um questionário e o "Craniomandibular Index", o qual possui 2 subescalas: "Dysfunction Index" e "Palpation Index". Os resultados para sensibilidade muscular mostraram grande variabilidade (0,9-32,25%. Com relação à articulação temporomandibular, a sensibilidade à palpação nas regiões superior, dorsal e lateral do côndilo ocorreu, respectivamente, em 10,6%, 10,6% e 7,83% da amostra. A prevalência do ruído articular no movimento de abertura foi de 19,8% e no fechamento, 14,7%. Os sintomas relatados mais

  6. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for temporomandibular joint dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Grossmann, Eduardo; Tambara,Joseane Steckel; Grossmann, Thiago Kreutz; SIQUEIRA, José Tadeu Tesseroli de

    2012-01-01

    JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: A disfunção temporomandibular (DTM) é um termo que descreve um grupo de doenças que afetam funcionalmente o aparelho mastigatório, particularmente a musculatura mastigatória e a articulação temporomandibular (ATM). Tem etiologias múltiplas e tratamentos específicos, entre os quais a estimulação elétrica nervosa transcutânea (TENS). O objetivo deste artigo é o de revisar a literatura científica sobre o uso da TENS em pacientes com DTM. CONTEÚDO: Estudos epidemiológic...

  7. Arthroscopy for treating temporomandibular joint disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Roger

    2011-01-01

    The Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Medline Embase, Lilacs, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED) and CINAHL databases were searched. In addition the reference lists of the included articles were checked and 14 journals hand searched. Randomised controlled clinical trials (RCT) of arthroscopy for treating TMDs were included. There were no restrictions regarding the language or date of publication. Two review authors independently extracted data, and three review authors independently assessed the risk of bias of included trials. The authors of the selected articles were contacted for additional information. Pooling of trials was only attempted if at least two trials of comparable protocols, with the same conditions and similar outcome measurements were available. Statistical analysis was performed in accordance with the Cochrane Collaboration guidelines. Seven RCTs (n = 349) met the inclusion criteria. All the studies were either at high or unclear risk of bias. Pain was evaluated after six months in two studies. No statistically significant differences were found between the arthroscopy versus nonsurgical groups (standardised mean difference (SMD) = 0.004; 95% confidence interval (CI) - 0.46 to 0.55, P = 0.81). Two studies analysed pain 12 months after surgery (arthroscopy and arthrocentesis) in 81 patients. No statistically significant differences were found (mean difference (MD) = 0.10; 95% CI -1.46 to 1.66, P = 0.90). Three studies analysed the same outcome in patients who had been submitted to arthroscopic surgery or to open surgery and a statistically significant difference was found after 12 months (SMD = 0.45; 95% CI 0.01 to 0.89, P = 0.05) in favour of open surgery.The two studies compared the maximum interincisal opening in six different clinical outcomes (interincisal opening over 35 mm; maximum protrusion over 5 mm; click; crepitation; tenderness on palpation in the TMJ and the jaw muscles 12 months after arthroscopy and open surgery). The outcome measures did not present statistically significant differences (odds ratio (OR) = 1.00; 95% CI 0.45 to 2.21, P = 1.00). Two studies compared the maximum interincisal opening after 12 months of postsurgical follow-up. A statistically significant difference in favour of the arthroscopy group was observed (MD = 5.28; 95% CI 3.46 to 7.10, P < 0.0001).The two studies compared the mandibular function after 12 months of follow-up with 40 patients evaluated. The outcome measure was mandibular functionality (MFIQ). This difference was not statistically significant (MD = 1.58; 95% CI -0.78 to 3.94, P = 0.19). Both arthroscopy and nonsurgical treatments reduced pain after six months. When compared with arthroscopy, open surgery was more effective at reducing pain after 12 months. Nevertheless, there were no differences in mandibular functionality or in other outcomes in clinical evaluations. Arthroscopy led to greater improvement in maximum interincisal opening after 12 months than arthrocentesis; however, there was no difference in pain.

  8. Association between estrogen levels and temporomandibular disorders: a systematic literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Marcin; Szalewski, Leszek; Bakalczuk, Magdalena; Bakalczuk, Szymon; Szkutnik, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Introduction To evaluate whether the hypothesis that estrogen levels are associated with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in humans can be confirmed or contradicted by available literature. Material and methods A systematic review based on the content of PubMed, Scopus, and Cochrane Library databases was performed. Studies were identified using a combination of key words ‘temporomandibular disorder’ and ‘estrogen’. Nine studies were included into our review. Results The relationship between estrogen levels and TMD was found in seven out of nine reviewed papers. Results from two papers suggest that a high estrogen level is associated with an increased prevalence of TMD. Five additional papers found a relationship between a low estrogen level and an increase in TMD pain. In considering the value of evidence and inconsistencies of results in the reviewed publications, we state that there is weak evidence to support the hypothesis that estrogen levels are associated with TMD. Conclusions Results of reviewed studies were divergent and sometimes contradictory. One possible explanation is that estrogen influences TMD pain processing differently than temporomandibular joints (TMJ) structures, as shown in many animal studies. Estrogen may influence TMD pain processing differently than TMJ structures. We suggest consideration of the dual action of estrogen when planning future studies on its association with TMD. PMID:26848299

  9. Correlation between signs of temporomandibular (TMD) and cervical spine (CSD) disorders in asthmatic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Thaís Cristina; Grossi, Débora Bevilaqua; de Oliveira, Anamaria Siriani; Bertolli, Fabiana; Holtz, Amanda; Costa, Dirceu

    2005-01-01

    Neck accessory respiratory muscles and mouth breathing suggest a direct relationship among asthma, Temporomandibular (TMD) and Cervical Spine (CSD) Disorders. This study was performed to evaluate and correlate TMD, CSD in asthmatic and non-asthmatic. Thirty asthmatic children (7.1 +/- 2.6 years old), 30 non-asthmatic predominantly mouth breathing children (Mouth Breathing Group - MBG) (8.80 +/- 1.61 years) and 30 non-asthmatic predominantly nasal breathing children (Nasal breathing Group - NBG) (9.00 +/- 1.64 years) participated in this study and they were submitted to clinical index to evaluate stomatognathic and cervical systems. Spearman correlation test and Chi-square were used. The level of significance was set at p temporomandibular joint (TMJ), TMJ sounds, pain during cervical extension and rotation, palpatory tenderness of sternocleidomastoids and paravertabrae muscles and a severe reduction in cervical range of motion were observed in AG. Both AG and MBG groups demonstrated palpatory tenderness of posterior TMJ, medial and lateral pterygoid, and trapezius muscles when compared to NBG. Results showed a positive correlation between the severity of TMD and CSD signs in asthmatic children (r = 0.48). No child was considered normal to CSD and cervical mobility. The possible shortening of neck accessory muscles of respiration and mouth breathing could explain the relationship observed between TMD, CSD signs in asthmatic children and emphasize the importance of the assessment of temporomandibular and cervical spine regions in asthmatic children.

  10. Effect of treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in patients with cervicogenic headache: a single-blind, randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Piekartz, Harry; Lüdtke, Kerstin

    2011-01-01

    The present study was comprised of 43 patients (16 men) with cervicogenic headaches for over three months, diagnosed according to the International Classification of Diagnostic Criteria of Headaches (ICDH-II). The patients were randomly assigned to receive either manual therapy for the cervical region (usual care group) or additional manual therapy techniques to the temporomandibular region to additionally influence temporomandibular disorders (TMD). All patients were assessed prior to treatment, after six sessions of treatment, and at a six-month follow-up. The outcome criteria were: intensity of headaches measured on a colored analog scale, the Neck Disability Index (Dutch version), the Conti Anamnestic Questionnaire, noise registration at the mandibular joint using a stethoscope, the Graded Chronic Pain Status (Dutch version), mandibular deviation, range of mouth opening, and pressure/pain threshold of the masticatory muscles. The results indicate in the studied sample of cervicogenic headache patients, 44.1% had TMD. The group that received additional temporomandibular manual therapy techniques showed significantly decreased headache intensities and increased neck function after the treatment period. These improvements persisted during the treatment-free period (follow-up) and were not observed in the usual care group. This trend was also reflected on the questionnaires and the clinical temporomandibular signs. Based on these observations, we strongly believe that treatment of the temporomandibular region has beneficial effects for patients with cervicogenic headaches, even in the long-term.

  11. Executive summary of the Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders for clinical and research applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, Eric; Ohrbach, Richard

    2016-06-01

    In this executive summary, the authors describe a protocol for assessing patients with temporomandibular disorder (TMD). It is based on the Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (DC/TMD) for clinical and research applications. The DC/TMD was developed using published Axis I physical diagnoses for the most common TMDs. Axis I diagnostic criteria were derived from pertinent clinical TMD signs and symptoms. Axis II consists of psychosocial and behavioral questionnaires already in the public domain. A panel of experts vetted and modified the Axis I and Axis II diagnostic protocols. Recommended changes were assessed for diagnostic accuracy by using the Validation Project's data set, which formed the basis for the development of the DC/TMD. Axis I diagnostic criteria for TMD pain-related disorders have acceptable validity and provide definitive diagnoses for pain involving the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and masticatory muscles. Axis I diagnostic criteria for the most common TMJ intra-articular disorders are appropriate for screening purposes only. A definitive diagnosis for TMJ intra-articular disorders requires computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Axis II questionnaires provide valid assessment of psychosocial and behavioral factors that can affect management of TMD. The DC/TMD provides a questionnaire for the pain history in conjunction with validated clinical examination criteria for diagnosing the most common TMDs. In addition, it provides Axis II questionnaires for assessing psychosocial and behavioral factors that may contribute to the onset and perpetuation of the patient's TMD. The DC/TMD is appropriate for use in clinical and research settings to allow for a comprehensive assessment of patients with TMD. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Dislocation of temporo-mandibular joint - an uncommon circumstance of occurrence: vaginal delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abderrahim El Bouazzaoui

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Dislocation of temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ is an infrequent disease but still almost spectacular. This disease consists of a permanent, to some extent complete disruption of the temporo-mandibular joint. These dislocations often occurs in a context of yawning, and less frequently after a burst of laughing or relatively mild facial trauma (slap, punch on the chin.We report a case of TMJ occurring in an uncommon circumstance : vaginal delivery. A young woman aged 24-years with no special past medical history; primipara was admitted in the Department of Maternity of the University Hospital Hassan II of Fez for an imminent delivery of a twin pregnancy. Obstetrical analgesia was not possible so the parturient cried in a strong manner during labour. Ten minutes after admission, the patient delivered vaginally with episiotomy. She gave birth to twins weighing 2800g and 2400g. During labour, and effort of crying, the patient presented a sudden and immediate loss of function of the temporo-mandibular joint, with difficulty of speaking, the mouth permanently opened, with the chin lowered and thrown forward. The examination found an emptiness of the glenoid fossa of the temporo-mandibular joint in both sides. The diagnosis of dislocation of the TMJ has established. Performance of special radiologic screening to study the TM was technically not possible. A CT scan of facial bones has been achieved so objectifying a bilateral dislocation of TMJ. The reduction of this dislocation was performed in the operating room under sedation

  13. Long-term followup of temporomandibular joint involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Twilt (Marinka); A.J.M. Schulten; F. Verschure (Femke); L. Wisse (Lauke); B. Prahl-Andersen (Birte); L.W.A. van Suijlekom-Smit (Lisette)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractObjective. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) involvement is a frequent feature in cross-sectional prevalence studies among patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). In this followup study, patients were reviewed after 5 years to study the course of TMJ involvement in relation to

  14. Long-term followup of temporomandibular joint involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Twilt, M.; Schulten, A.J.M.; Verschure, F.; Wisse, L.; Prahl-Andersen, B.; van Suijlekom-Smit, L.W.A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) involvement is a frequent feature in cross-sectional prevalence studies among patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). In this followup study, patients were reviewed after 5 years to study the course of TMJ involvement in relation to disease

  15. Groningen temporomandibular total joint prosthesis: an 8-year longitudinal follow-up on function and pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuurhuis, Jennifer M; Dijkstra, Pieter U; Stegenga, Boudewijn; de Bont, Lambert G M; Spijkervet, Fred K L

    2012-12-01

    Total temporomandibular joint replacement is a surgical procedure for patients with severe temporomandibular joint afflictions affecting quality of life, which have not responded beneficially to previous conventional surgery. The aim of this study was to assess the long-term outcome of the Groningen temporomandibular joint (TMJ) prosthesis in patients with chronic pain and mutilated temporomandibular joints following multiple surgical procedures, with respect to prosthesis failure, the patient's postoperative level of satisfaction and longitudinal changes in maximum mouth opening, functional mandibular impairment and pain. Eight female patients were studied in whom Groningen TMJ prostheses were inserted, two unilaterally and six bilaterally. The Groningen TMJ prosthesis was mechanically successful during 8 years of follow-up in seven out of eight patients with a disc dislocation being seen in one patient (7%). Patients were satisfied, despite the limited improvement of the maximum mouth opening, and pain scores. Although the decline of MFIQ scores during 8 years of follow-up was significant compared to baseline (p=0.027), the effects of the prosthesis on maximum mouth opening, function and pain were limited. This may be due to persistent chronic pain and the adverse effects of multiple previous surgical procedures. Copyright © 2012 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Disc displacement within the human temporomandibular joint: a systematic review of a 'noisy annoyance'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naeije, M.; te Veldhuis, A.H.; te Veldhuis, E.C.; Visscher, C.M.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2013-01-01

    To describe the scientific literature about the diagnosis, prevalence, aetiology, natural course and possible treatment modalities of disc displacements within the temporomandibular (TM) joint. PubMed was searched for specific indexing terms. The search yielded 1211 papers. After screening according

  17. Biofeedback and Relaxation Therapy for Chronic Temporomandibular Joint Pain: Predicting Successful Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funch, Donna P.; Gale, Elliot N.

    1984-01-01

    Randomly assigned 57 patients with chronic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain to receive either relaxation or biofeedback therapy. Successful patients in the relaxation condition tended to be younger and had experienced TMJ pain for a shorter period of time than the successful biofeedback patients. (BH)

  18. Temporomandibular Joint Prosthesis - 3D-CT Reconstruction before and after Treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feltlová, E.; Dostálová, T.; Kašparová, M.; Daněk, J.; Hliňáková, P.; Hubáček, M.; Nedoma, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2010), s. 15-19 ISSN 1801-5603 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : dentistry * maxillofacial surgery * partial TMJ prosthesis * three-dimensional computed tomography * magnetic resonance imaging * temporomandibular joint Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://www.ejbi.cz/articles/201012/50/1.html

  19. Temporomandibular Joint and its Two-Dimensional and Three-Dimensional Modelling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hliňáková, P.; Dostálová, T.; Daněk, Josef; Nedoma, Jiří; Hlaváček, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 6 (2010), s. 1256-1268 ISSN 0378-4754 Grant - others:GA MZd(CZ) NS9902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504; CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : dentistry * temporomandibular joint * mathematical modelling * contact problem * finite element method Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry Impact factor: 0.812, year: 2010

  20. Cost effectiveness of arthrocentesis as initial treatment for temporomandibular joint arthralgia: A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, L.M.; Stant, A.D.; Quik, E.H.; Huddleston Slater, J.J.R.; Stegenga, B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the cost effectiveness of arthrocentesis as initial treatment compared to care as usual (CAU) for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthralgia. Materials and methods: 80 patients were randomly allocated to arthrocentesis as initial treatment (n = 40) or CAU (n = 40).

  1. Loading of a unilateral temporomandibular joint prosthesis : A three-dimensional mathematical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loon, JP; Falkenstrom, CH; de Bont, LGM; Verkerke, GJ

    1998-01-01

    The load on the prosthetic side and the influence of the design on the remaining natural contralateral TMJ must be known before a unilateral temporomandibular joint (TMJ) prosthesis can be developed. The aim of the present study was to determine the maximum loading of the TMJ prosthetic side and the

  2. A short-term study in sheep with the Groningen temporomandibular joint prosthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loon, JP; de Bont, LGM; Spijkervet, FKL; Verkerke, GJ; Liem, RSB

    2000-01-01

    As part of the pre-clinical testing process of a newly developed temporomandibular joint (TMJ) prosthesis, animal experiments were performed. In 14 sheep, the right TMJ was replaced by the developed TMJ prosthesis. The prosthesis consisted of a skull part, a mandibular part and an intervening

  3. Chronic temporomandibular joint pain: two cases of osteoid osteoma and a review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deferm, J.T.; Steens, S.C.A.; Vriens, D.; Bekers, E.M.; Kalaykova, S.I.; Borstlap, W.A.

    2017-01-01

    Osteoid osteoma is a benign bone tumour with self-limiting growth potential occurring in any part of the body. Two rare cases of a pathologically proven osteoid osteoma invading the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are reported herein. This article also reviews the cases of osteoid osteoma of the

  4. Voice-related disability of Iranian patients with temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Negin; Sahebi, Majid; Saki, Nader; Hosseinzadeh Nik, Tahereh; Shaterzadeh Yazdi, Mohammad Jafar; Nikakhlagh, Soheila; Soltani, Majid; Naderifar, Ehsan; Derakhshandeh, Vita; Javadipour, Shiva; Mahmoodi-Bakhtiari, Behrooz

    2014-11-01

    The relationship between handicaps because of voice disorders and temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) severity was examined. Fifty-two Persian women with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) were examined by two dentists in separate sessions and the assessment protocol of the Dentistry Clinic of Tehran University of Medical Sciences was filled by both dentists and finally they gave their opinion separately about the existence of TMD and categorized the severity of TMD as mild, moderate, and severe. To assess perceived disability resulting from voice disorders in TMD patients, the voice handicap index (VHI) questionnaire was used. The total score of VHI in 80.8% of patients with TMD was equal to or more than 14.5. A significant positive relationship was found between the severity of TMD and the total score of VHI (P = 0.000, r = 0.79). It seems that a comprehensive voice assessment should be included in the evaluation of TMD, and considering different effects of voice disorders on patients' lives, a complete voice evaluation including voice-related disability is necessary to understand the nature of pathophysiology of TMD. Copyright © 2014 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Relationship between pain and effusion on magnetic resonance imaging in temporomandibular disorder patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ha-Na; Kim, Kyoung-A

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to find the relationship between pain and joint effusion using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients. Materials and Methods The study subjects included 232 TMD patients. The inclusion criteria in this study were the presence of spontaneous pain or provoked pain on one or both temporomandibular joints (TMJs). The provoked pain was divided into three groups: pain on palpation (G1), pain on mouth opening (G2), and pain on mastication (G3). MRI examinations were performed using a 1.5-T MRI scanner. T1- and T2-weighted images with para-sagittal and para-coronal images were obtained. According to the T2-weighted image findings, the cases of effusions were divided into four groups: normal, mild (E1), moderate (E2), and marked effusion (E3). A statistical analysis was carried out using the χ2 test with SPSS (version 12.0, SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Results Spontaneous pain, provoked pain, and both spontaneous and provoked pain were significantly related to joint effusion in TMD patients (ppain, pain on palpation of the masticatory muscles and TMJ (G1) was not related to joint effusion in TMD patients (p>0.05). Conclusion Spontaneous pain was related to the MRI findings of joint effusion; however, among the various types of provoked pain, pain on palpation of the masticatory muscles and TMJ was not related to the MRI findings of joint effusion. These results suggest that joint effusion has a significant influence on the prediction of TMJ pain. PMID:25473637

  6. Relationship between pain and effusion on magnetic resonance imaging in temporomandibular disorder patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ha Na; Kim, Kyoung A; Koh, Kwang Joon [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry and Institute of Oral Bioscience, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    This study was performed to find the relationship between pain and joint effusion using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients. The study subjects included 232 TMD patients. The inclusion criteria in this study were the presence of spontaneous pain or provoked pain on one or both temporomandibular joints (TMJs). The provoked pain was divided into three groups: pain on palpation (G1), pain on mouth opening (G2), and pain on mastication (G3). MRI examinations were performed using a 1.5-T MRI scanner. T1- and T2-weighted images with para-sagittal and para-coronal images were obtained. According to the T2-weighted image findings,