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Sample records for temporal fine structure

  1. Processing of temporal fine structure as a function of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grose, John H; Mamo, Sara K

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the processing of temporal fine structure diminishes with age, even in the presence of relatively normal audiometric hearing. Temporal fine structure processing was assessed by measuring the discrimination of interaural phase differences (IPDs). The hypothesis was that IPD discrimination is more acute in middle-aged observers than in older observers but that acuity in middle-aged observers is nevertheless poorer than in young adults. Two experiments were undertaken. The first measured discrimination of 0- and π-radian interaural phases as a function of carrier frequency. The stimulus was a 5-Hz sinusoidally amplitude-modulated tone in which, in the signal waveform, the interaural phase of the carrier was inverted during alternate modulation periods. The second experiment measured IPD discrimination at fixed frequencies. The stimulus was a pair of tone pulses in which, in the signal, the trailing pulse contained an IPD. A total of 39 adults with normal audiograms ≤2000 Hz participated in this study, of which 15 were younger, 12 middle aged, and 12 older. Experiment 1 showed that the highest carrier frequency at which a π-radian IPD could be discriminated from the diotic, 0-radian standard was significantly lower in middle-aged listeners than young adults, and still lower in older listeners. Experiment 2 indicated that middle-aged listeners were less sensitive to IPDs than young adults at all but the lowest frequencies tested. Older listeners, as a group, had the poorest thresholds. These results suggest that deficits in temporal fine structure processing are evident in the presenescent auditory system. This adds to the accumulating evidence that deficiencies in some aspects of auditory temporal processing emerge relatively early in the aging process. It is possible that early-emerging temporal processing deficits manifest themselves in challenging speech in noise environments.

  2. Influence of musical training on sensitivity to temporal fine structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Srikanta K; Panda, Manasa R; Raj, Swapna

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to extend the findings that temporal fine structure encoding is altered in musicians by examining sensitivity to temporal fine structure (TFS) in an alternative (non-Western) musician model that is rarely adopted--Indian classical music. The sensitivity to TFS was measured by the ability to discriminate two complex tones that differed in TFS but not in envelope repetition rate. Sixteen South Indian classical (Carnatic) musicians and 28 non-musicians with normal hearing participated in this study. Musicians have significantly lower relative frequency shift at threshold in the TFS task compared to non-musicians. A significant negative correlation was observed between years of musical experience and relative frequency shift at threshold in the TFS task. Test-retest repeatability of thresholds in the TFS tasks was similar for both musicians and non-musicians. The enhanced performance of the Carnatic-trained musicians suggests that the musician advantage for frequency and harmonicity discrimination is not restricted to training in Western classical music, on which much of the previous research on musical training has narrowly focused. The perceptual judgments obtained from non-musicians were as reliable as those of musicians.

  3. [The role of temporal fine structure in tone recognition and music perception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Q; Gu, X; Liu, B

    2017-11-07

    The sound signal can be decomposed into temporal envelope and temporal fine structure information. The temporal envelope information is crucial for speech perception in quiet environment, and the temporal fine structure information plays an important role in speech perception in noise, Mandarin tone recognition and music perception, especially the pitch and melody perception.

  4. Distorted Tonotopic Coding of Temporal Envelope and Fine Structure with Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Henry, Kenneth S; Kale, Sushrut; Heinz, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    People with cochlear hearing loss have substantial difficulty understanding speech in real-world listening environments (e.g., restaurants), even with amplification from a modern digital hearing aid. Unfortunately, a disconnect remains between human perceptual studies implicating diminished sensitivity to fast acoustic temporal fine structure (TFS) and animal studies showing minimal changes in neural coding of TFS or slower envelope (ENV) structure. Here, we used general system-identification...

  5. Distorted Tonotopic Coding of Temporal Envelope and Fine Structure with Noise-Induced Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Kenneth S; Kale, Sushrut; Heinz, Michael G

    2016-02-17

    People with cochlear hearing loss have substantial difficulty understanding speech in real-world listening environments (e.g., restaurants), even with amplification from a modern digital hearing aid. Unfortunately, a disconnect remains between human perceptual studies implicating diminished sensitivity to fast acoustic temporal fine structure (TFS) and animal studies showing minimal changes in neural coding of TFS or slower envelope (ENV) structure. Here, we used general system-identification (Wiener kernel) analyses of chinchilla auditory nerve fiber responses to Gaussian noise to reveal pronounced distortions in tonotopic coding of TFS and ENV following permanent, noise-induced hearing loss. In basal fibers with characteristic frequencies (CFs) >1.5 kHz, hearing loss introduced robust nontonotopic coding (i.e., at the wrong cochlear place) of low-frequency TFS, while ENV responses typically remained at CF. As a consequence, the highest dominant frequency of TFS coding in response to Gaussian noise was 2.4 kHz in noise-overexposed fibers compared with 4.5 kHz in control fibers. Coding of ENV also became nontonotopic in more pronounced cases of cochlear damage. In apical fibers, more classical hearing-loss effects were observed, i.e., broadened tuning without a significant shift in best frequency. Because these distortions and dissociations of TFS/ENV disrupt tonotopicity, a fundamental principle of auditory processing necessary for robust signal coding in background noise, these results have important implications for understanding communication difficulties faced by people with hearing loss. Further, hearing aids may benefit from distinct amplification strategies for apical and basal cochlear regions to address fundamentally different coding deficits. Speech-perception problems associated with noise overexposure are pervasive in today's society, even with modern digital hearing aids. Unfortunately, the underlying physiological deficits in neural coding remain

  6. Role of Binaural Temporal Fine Structure and Envelope Cues in Cocktail-Party Listening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Jayaganesh; Mason, Christine R; Streeter, Timothy M; Best, Virginia; Roverud, Elin; Kidd, Gerald

    2016-08-03

    While conversing in a crowded social setting, a listener is often required to follow a target speech signal amid multiple competing speech signals (the so-called "cocktail party" problem). In such situations, separation of the target speech signal in azimuth from the interfering masker signals can lead to an improvement in target intelligibility, an effect known as spatial release from masking (SRM). This study assessed the contributions of two stimulus properties that vary with separation of sound sources, binaural envelope (ENV) and temporal fine structure (TFS), to SRM in normal-hearing (NH) human listeners. Target speech was presented from the front and speech maskers were either colocated with or symmetrically separated from the target in azimuth. The target and maskers were presented either as natural speech or as "noise-vocoded" speech in which the intelligibility was conveyed only by the speech ENVs from several frequency bands; the speech TFS within each band was replaced with noise carriers. The experiments were designed to preserve the spatial cues in the speech ENVs while retaining/eliminating them from the TFS. This was achieved by using the same/different noise carriers in the two ears. A phenomenological auditory-nerve model was used to verify that the interaural correlations in TFS differed across conditions, whereas the ENVs retained a high degree of correlation, as intended. Overall, the results from this study revealed that binaural TFS cues, especially for frequency regions below 1500 Hz, are critical for achieving SRM in NH listeners. Potential implications for studying SRM in hearing-impaired listeners are discussed. Acoustic signals received by the auditory system pass first through an array of physiologically based band-pass filters. Conceptually, at the output of each filter, there are two principal forms of temporal information: slowly varying fluctuations in the envelope (ENV) and rapidly varying fluctuations in the temporal fine

  7. Preferred Compression Speed for Speech and Music and Its Relationship to Sensitivity to Temporal Fine Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Brian C J; Sęk, Aleksander

    2016-09-07

    Multichannel amplitude compression is widely used in hearing aids. The preferred compression speed varies across individuals. Moore (2008) suggested that reduced sensitivity to temporal fine structure (TFS) may be associated with preference for slow compression. This idea was tested using a simulated hearing aid. It was also assessed whether preferences for compression speed depend on the type of stimulus: speech or music. Twenty-two hearing-impaired subjects were tested, and the stimulated hearing aid was fitted individually using the CAM2A method. On each trial, a given segment of speech or music was presented twice. One segment was processed with fast compression and the other with slow compression, and the order was balanced across trials. The subject indicated which segment was preferred and by how much. On average, slow compression was preferred over fast compression, more so for music, but there were distinct individual differences, which were highly correlated for speech and music. Sensitivity to TFS was assessed using the difference limen for frequency at 2000 Hz and by two measures of sensitivity to interaural phase at low frequencies. The results for the difference limens for frequency, but not the measures of sensitivity to interaural phase, supported the suggestion that preference for compression speed is affected by sensitivity to TFS. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Preferred Compression Speed for Speech and Music and Its Relationship to Sensitivity to Temporal Fine Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian C. J. Moore

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Multichannel amplitude compression is widely used in hearing aids. The preferred compression speed varies across individuals. Moore (2008 suggested that reduced sensitivity to temporal fine structure (TFS may be associated with preference for slow compression. This idea was tested using a simulated hearing aid. It was also assessed whether preferences for compression speed depend on the type of stimulus: speech or music. Twenty-two hearing-impaired subjects were tested, and the stimulated hearing aid was fitted individually using the CAM2A method. On each trial, a given segment of speech or music was presented twice. One segment was processed with fast compression and the other with slow compression, and the order was balanced across trials. The subject indicated which segment was preferred and by how much. On average, slow compression was preferred over fast compression, more so for music, but there were distinct individual differences, which were highly correlated for speech and music. Sensitivity to TFS was assessed using the difference limen for frequency at 2000 Hz and by two measures of sensitivity to interaural phase at low frequencies. The results for the difference limens for frequency, but not the measures of sensitivity to interaural phase, supported the suggestion that preference for compression speed is affected by sensitivity to TFS.

  9. Dual-carrier processing to convey temporal fine structure cues: Implications for cochlear implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apoux, Frédéric; Youngdahl, Carla L.; Yoho, Sarah E.; Healy, Eric W.

    2015-01-01

    Speech intelligibility in noise can be degraded by using vocoder processing to alter the temporal fine structure (TFS). Here it is argued that this degradation is not attributable to the loss of speech information potentially present in the TFS. Instead it is proposed that the degradation results from the loss of sound-source segregation information when two or more carriers (i.e., TFS) are substituted with only one as a consequence of vocoder processing. To demonstrate this segregation role, vocoder processing involving two carriers, one for the target and one for the background, was implemented. Because this approach does not preserve the speech TFS, it may be assumed that any improvement in intelligibility can only be a consequence of the preserved carrier duality and associated segregation cues. Three experiments were conducted using this “dual-carrier” approach. All experiments showed substantial sentence intelligibility in noise improvements compared to traditional single-carrier conditions. In several conditions, the improvement was so substantial that intelligibility approximated that for unprocessed speech in noise. A foreseeable and potentially promising implication for the dual-carrier approach involves implementation into cochlear implant speech processors, where it may provide the TFS cues necessary to segregate speech from noise. PMID:26428784

  10. A correlational method to concurrently measure envelope and temporal fine structure weights: effects of age, cochlear pathology, and spectral shaping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogerty, Daniel; Humes, Larry E

    2012-09-01

    The speech signal may be divided into spectral frequency-bands, each band containing temporal properties of the envelope and fine structure. This study measured the perceptual weights for the envelope and fine structure in each of three frequency bands for sentence materials in young normal-hearing listeners, older normal-hearing listeners, aided older hearing-impaired listeners, and spectrally matched young normal-hearing listeners. The availability of each acoustic property was independently varied through noisy signal extraction. Thus, the full speech stimulus was presented with noise used to mask six different auditory channels. Perceptual weights were determined by correlating a listener's performance with the signal-to-noise ratio of each acoustic property on a trial-by-trial basis. Results demonstrate that temporal fine structure perceptual weights remain stable across the four listener groups. However, a different weighting typography was observed across the listener groups for envelope cues. Results suggest that spectral shaping used to preserve the audibility of the speech stimulus may alter the allocation of perceptual resources. The relative perceptual weighting of envelope cues may also change with age. Concurrent testing of sentences repeated once on a previous day demonstrated that weighting strategies for all listener groups can change, suggesting an initial stabilization period or susceptibility to auditory training.

  11. The role of temporal fine structure information for the low pitch of high-frequency complex tones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santurette, Sébastien; Dau, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    in their waveforms, rather than envelope maxima. Moreover, envelope cues did not take over as the absolute frequency or rank of the lowest component was raised and TFS cues thus became less effective. Instead, the low pitch became less salient. This suggests that complex pitch perception does not rely on envelope......The fused low pitch evoked by complex tones containing only unresolved high-frequency components demonstrates the ability of the human auditory system to extract pitch using a temporal mechanism in the absence of spectral cues. However, the temporal features used by such a mechanism have been...... amplitude fluctuations, or temporal fine structure (TFS), of the conveyed signal can be processed. Using a pitch-matching paradigm, the present study found that the low pitch of inharmonic transposed tones with unresolved components was consistent with the timing between the most prominent TFS maxima...

  12. Temporal Fine-Structure Coding and Lateralized Speech Perception in Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Locsei, Gusztav; Pedersen, Julie Hefting; Laugesen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between speech perception performance in spatially complex, lateralized listening scenarios and temporal fine-structure (TFS) coding at low frequencies. Young normal-hearing (NH) and two groups of elderly hearing-impaired (HI) listeners with mild or moderate...... gains to the stimuli, which were presented over headphones. The target and masker streams were lateralized to the same or to opposite sides of the head by introducing 0.7-ms interaural time differences between the ears. TFS coding was assessed by measuring frequency discrimination thresholds...

  13. Hyper-temporal LiDAR for tracking fine-scale changes in vegetation structure, phenology, and physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magney, T. S.; Vierling, L. A.; Eitel, J.; Greaves, H.

    2015-12-01

    Vegetation three-dimensional (3-D) structure is inherently dynamic - plants alter both the allocation of resources within the canopy and branch/shoot morphology at short time-steps to acclimate to local environmental conditions and maximize photosynthetic potential. However, 3-D structure is often ignored in ecological studies because it is difficult to characterize using traditional field methods. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) is a rapidly maturing technique to complement and enhance traditional field methods for quantifying 3-D geometric properties of ecosystems. Two major limitations of TLS include the low temporal resolution that often exists between each data acquisition, and the relatively high cost of such systems (entry level systems cost >$40,000 USD) that puts this method out of reach for many potential users. Consequently, TLS is currently limited as a mainstream method for capturing 3-D geometric ecosystem dynamics. Over the last several years, we have been developing a field-ready autonomously operating terrestrial laser scanner (ATLS) capable of monitoring fine-scale changes in vegetation structure on a daily time-step. We will present an overview of recent findings using the ATLS to track changes in vegetation structure in low-stature ecosystems - from cropping system dynamics to Arctic tundra phenology. Further, we will discuss the potential for laser intensity return information from both an ATLS and TLS to track changes in plant phenology and physiology (Chlorophyll content, photoprotective mechanisms, moisture) that occur simultaneously - or prior to - changes in vegetation structure. Our results suggest that fine-scale mapping of plant structure, phenology, and physiology using information from TLS and ATLS could provide new insights into vegetation dynamics in space and time.

  14. A Nonlinear Transmission Line Model of the Cochlea With Temporal Integration Accounts for Duration Effects in Threshold Fine Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verhey, Jesko L.; Mauermann, Manfred; Epp, Bastian

    2017-01-01

    For normal-hearing listeners, auditory pure-tone thresholds in quiet often show quasi periodic fluctuations when measured with a high frequency resolution, referred to as threshold fine structure. Threshold fine structure is dependent on the stimulus duration, with smaller fluctuations for short ...

  15. Decoding Temporal Structure in Music and Speech Relies on Shared Brain Resources but Elicits Different Fine-Scale Spatial Patterns

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abrams, Daniel A; Bhatara, Anjali; Ryali, Srikanth; Balaban, Evan; Levitin, Daniel J; Menon, Vinod

    2011-01-01

    .... Although the same manipulation of temporal structure elicited brain activation level differences of similar magnitude for both music and speech stimuli, multivariate classification analysis revealed...

  16. The Low Pitch of High-Frequency Complex Tones Relies on Temporal Fine Structure Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santurette, Sébastien; Dau, Torsten

    2010-01-01

    structure (TFS) cues has been a matter of debate. It is also controversial up to which frequency TFS information remains available, and to what extent envelope cues become dominant as frequency increases. Using a pitch-matching paradigm, this study investigated whether the pitch of transposed tones...... the envelope rate fenv), or whether (C) no salient pitch is evoked (random matches). Six musically-trained normal-hearing subjects matched the fundamental pitch of a broadband pulse train to that of transposed tones with carrier frequencies fc = [3, 4, 5, 6, 7] kHz and envelope rates fenv = [fc/11.5, fc/14...

  17. Temporal Fine-Structure Coding and Lateralized Speech Perception in Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Listeners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gusztáv Lőcsei

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the relationship between speech perception performance in spatially complex, lateralized listening scenarios and temporal fine-structure (TFS coding at low frequencies. Young normal-hearing (NH and two groups of elderly hearing-impaired (HI listeners with mild or moderate hearing loss above 1.5 kHz participated in the study. Speech reception thresholds (SRTs were estimated in the presence of either speech-shaped noise, two-, four-, or eight-talker babble played reversed, or a nonreversed two-talker masker. Target audibility was ensured by applying individualized linear gains to the stimuli, which were presented over headphones. The target and masker streams were lateralized to the same or to opposite sides of the head by introducing 0.7-ms interaural time differences between the ears. TFS coding was assessed by measuring frequency discrimination thresholds and interaural phase difference thresholds at 250 Hz. NH listeners had clearly better SRTs than the HI listeners. However, when maskers were spatially separated from the target, the amount of SRT benefit due to binaural unmasking differed only slightly between the groups. Neither the frequency discrimination threshold nor the interaural phase difference threshold tasks showed a correlation with the SRTs or with the amount of masking release due to binaural unmasking, respectively. The results suggest that, although HI listeners with normal hearing thresholds below 1.5 kHz experienced difficulties with speech understanding in spatially complex environments, these limitations were unrelated to TFS coding abilities and were only weakly associated with a reduction in binaural-unmasking benefit for spatially separated competing sources.

  18. Temporal Fine-Structure Coding and Lateralized Speech Perception in Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lőcsei, Gusztáv; Pedersen, Julie H; Laugesen, Søren; Santurette, Sébastien; Dau, Torsten; MacDonald, Ewen N

    2016-09-05

    This study investigated the relationship between speech perception performance in spatially complex, lateralized listening scenarios and temporal fine-structure (TFS) coding at low frequencies. Young normal-hearing (NH) and two groups of elderly hearing-impaired (HI) listeners with mild or moderate hearing loss above 1.5 kHz participated in the study. Speech reception thresholds (SRTs) were estimated in the presence of either speech-shaped noise, two-, four-, or eight-talker babble played reversed, or a nonreversed two-talker masker. Target audibility was ensured by applying individualized linear gains to the stimuli, which were presented over headphones. The target and masker streams were lateralized to the same or to opposite sides of the head by introducing 0.7-ms interaural time differences between the ears. TFS coding was assessed by measuring frequency discrimination thresholds and interaural phase difference thresholds at 250 Hz. NH listeners had clearly better SRTs than the HI listeners. However, when maskers were spatially separated from the target, the amount of SRT benefit due to binaural unmasking differed only slightly between the groups. Neither the frequency discrimination threshold nor the interaural phase difference threshold tasks showed a correlation with the SRTs or with the amount of masking release due to binaural unmasking, respectively. The results suggest that, although HI listeners with normal hearing thresholds below 1.5 kHz experienced difficulties with speech understanding in spatially complex environments, these limitations were unrelated to TFS coding abilities and were only weakly associated with a reduction in binaural-unmasking benefit for spatially separated competing sources. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. Decoding temporal structure in music and speech relies on shared brain resources but elicits different fine-scale spatial patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Daniel A; Bhatara, Anjali; Ryali, Srikanth; Balaban, Evan; Levitin, Daniel J; Menon, Vinod

    2011-07-01

    Music and speech are complex sound streams with hierarchical rules of temporal organization that become elaborated over time. Here, we use functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure brain activity patterns in 20 right-handed nonmusicians as they listened to natural and temporally reordered musical and speech stimuli matched for familiarity, emotion, and valence. Heart rate variability and mean respiration rates were simultaneously measured and were found not to differ between musical and speech stimuli. Although the same manipulation of temporal structure elicited brain activation level differences of similar magnitude for both music and speech stimuli, multivariate classification analysis revealed distinct spatial patterns of brain responses in the 2 domains. Distributed neuronal populations that included the inferior frontal cortex, the posterior and anterior superior and middle temporal gyri, and the auditory brainstem classified temporal structure manipulations in music and speech with significant levels of accuracy. While agreeing with previous findings that music and speech processing share neural substrates, this work shows that temporal structure in the 2 domains is encoded differently, highlighting a fundamental dissimilarity in how the same neural resources are deployed.

  20. Characterization of DPOAE fine structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reuter, Karen; Hammershøi, Dorte

    2005-01-01

    The distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) fine structure is revealed, when measuring DPOAE with a very fine frequency resolution. It is characterized by consistent maxima and minima with notches of up to 20 dB depth. The fine structure is known also from absolute hearing thresholds...

  1. Emphasis of spatial cues in the temporal fine structure during the rising segments of amplitude-modulated sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Mathias; Marquardt, Torsten; Salminen, Nelli H; McAlpine, David

    2013-09-10

    The ability to locate the direction of a target sound in a background of competing sources is critical to the survival of many species and important for human communication. Nevertheless, brain mechanisms that provide for such accurate localization abilities remain poorly understood. In particular, it remains unclear how the auditory brain is able to extract reliable spatial information directly from the source when competing sounds and reflections dominate all but the earliest moments of the sound wave reaching each ear. We developed a stimulus mimicking the mutual relationship of sound amplitude and binaural cues, characteristic to reverberant speech. This stimulus, named amplitude modulated binaural beat, allows for a parametric and isolated change of modulation frequency and phase relations. Employing magnetoencephalography and psychoacoustics it is demonstrated that the auditory brain uses binaural information in the stimulus fine structure only during the rising portion of each modulation cycle, rendering spatial information recoverable in an otherwise unlocalizable sound. The data suggest that amplitude modulation provides a means of "glimpsing" low-frequency spatial cues in a manner that benefits listening in noisy or reverberant environments.

  2. Effects of spectral smearing and temporal fine-structure distortion on the fluctuating-masker benefit for speech at a fixed signal-to-noise ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Joshua G. W.; Brungart, Douglas S.

    2011-01-01

    Normal-hearing listeners receive less benefit from momentary dips in the level of a fluctuating masker for speech processed to degrade spectral detail or temporal fine structure (TFS) than for unprocessed speech. This has been interpreted as evidence that the magnitude of the fluctuating-masker benefit (FMB) reflects the ability to resolve spectral detail and TFS. However, the FMB for degraded speech is typically measured at a higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) to yield performance similar to normal speech for the baseline (stationary-noise) condition. Because the FMB decreases with increasing SNR, this SNR difference might account for the reduction in FMB for degraded speech. In this study, the FMB for unprocessed and processed (TFS-removed or spectrally smeared) speech was measured in a paradigm that adjusts word-set size, rather than SNR, to equate stationary-noise performance across processing conditions. Compared at the same SNR and percent-correct level (but with different set sizes), processed and unprocessed stimuli yielded a similar FMB for four different fluctuating maskers (speech-modulated noise, one opposite-gender interfering talker, two same-gender interfering talkers, and 16-Hz interrupted noise). These results suggest that, for these maskers, spectral or TFS distortions do not directly impair the ability to benefit from momentary dips in masker level. PMID:21786913

  3. Emphasis of spatial cues in the temporal fine structure during the rising segments of amplitude-modulated sounds II: single-neuron recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquardt, Torsten; Stange, Annette; Pecka, Michael; Grothe, Benedikt; McAlpine, David

    2014-01-01

    Recently, with the use of an amplitude-modulated binaural beat (AMBB), in which sound amplitude and interaural-phase difference (IPD) were modulated with a fixed mutual relationship (Dietz et al. 2013b), we demonstrated that the human auditory system uses interaural timing differences in the temporal fine structure of modulated sounds only during the rising portion of each modulation cycle. However, the degree to which peripheral or central mechanisms contribute to the observed strong dominance of the rising slope remains to be determined. Here, by recording responses of single neurons in the medial superior olive (MSO) of anesthetized gerbils and in the inferior colliculus (IC) of anesthetized guinea pigs to AMBBs, we report a correlation between the position within the amplitude-modulation (AM) cycle generating the maximum response rate and the position at which the instantaneous IPD dominates the total neural response. The IPD during the rising segment dominates the total response in 78% of MSO neurons and 69% of IC neurons, with responses of the remaining neurons predominantly coding the IPD around the modulation maximum. The observed diversity of dominance regions within the AM cycle, especially in the IC, and its comparison with the human behavioral data suggest that only the subpopulation of neurons with rising slope dominance codes the sound-source location in complex listening conditions. A comparison of two models to account for the data suggests that emphasis on IPDs during the rising slope of the AM cycle depends on adaptation processes occurring before binaural interaction. PMID:24554782

  4. Observations of substorm fine structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. L. Lazutin

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available Particle and magnetic field measurements on the CRRES satellite were used, together with geosynchronous satellites and ground-based observations, to investigate the fine structure of a magnetospheric substorm on February 9, 1991. Using the variations in the electron fluxes, the substorm activity was divided into several intensifications lasting about 3–15 minutes each. The two main features of the data were: (1 the intensifications showed internal fine structure in the time scale of about 2 minutes or less. We call these shorter periods activations. Energetic electrons and protons at the closest geosynchronous spacecraft (1990 095 were found to have comparable activation structure. (2 The energetic (>69 keV proton injections were delayed with respect to electron injections, and actually coincided in time with the end of the intensifications and partial returns to locally more stretched field line configuration. We propose that the energetic protons could be able to control the dynamics of the system locally be quenching the ongoing intensification and possibly preparing the final large-scale poleward movement of the activity. It was also shown that these protons originated from the same intensification as the preceeding electrons. Therefore, the substorm instability responsible for the intensifications could introduce a negative feedback loop into the system, creating the observed fine structure with the intensification time scales.Key words. Magnetospheric Physics (Storms and substorms.

  5. Laboratory frequency metrology and the search for a temporal variation of the fine structure constant a on a cosmological time scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salumbides, E.; Hannemann, S.; Reinhold, E.; Labazan, E.; Witte, S.; Zinkstok, R.; Eikema, K.; Ubachs, W.

    2005-01-01

    The issue of the possibility of a temporal variation of the fundamental constants has been put high on the agenda of modern physics, now that accurately calibrated spectra of quasars become available. Such data allow for a comparison between the physical constants underlying the spectra fo today and

  6. Temporal Linear System Structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willigenburg, van L.G.; Koning, de W.L.

    2008-01-01

    Piecewise constant rank systems and the differential Kalman decomposition are introduced in this note. Together these enable the detection of temporal uncontrollability/unreconstructability of linear continuous-time systems. These temporal properties are not detected by any of the four conventional

  7. Spatial and temporal variability in urban fine particulate matter concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Jonathan I; Hanna, Steven R

    2011-01-01

    Identification of hot spots for urban fine particulate matter (PM(2.5)) concentrations is complicated by the significant contributions from regional atmospheric transport and the dependence of spatial and temporal variability on averaging time. We focus on PM(2.5) patterns in New York City, which includes significant local sources, street canyons, and upwind contributions to concentrations. A literature synthesis demonstrates that long-term (e.g., one-year) average PM(2.5) concentrations at a small number of widely-distributed monitoring sites would not show substantial variability, whereas short-term (e.g., 1-h) average measurements with high spatial density would show significant variability. Statistical analyses of ambient monitoring data as a function of wind speed and direction reinforce the significance of regional transport but show evidence of local contributions. We conclude that current monitor siting may not adequately capture PM(2.5) variability in an urban area, especially in a mega-city, reinforcing the necessity of dispersion modeling and methods for analyzing high-resolution monitoring observations. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Fine Structure of Herman Rings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagella, Nuria; Henriksen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    We study the geometric structure of the boundary of Herman rings in a model family of Blaschke products of degree 3 (up to quasiconformal deformation). Shishikura’s quasiconformal surgery relates the Herman ring to the Siegel disk of a quadratic polynomial. By studying the regularity properties...... of the maps involved, we transfer McMullen’s results on the fine local geometry of Siegel disks to the Herman ring setting....

  9. Temporal structures in shell models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okkels, F.

    2001-01-01

    The intermittent dynamics of the turbulent Gledzer, Ohkitani, and Yamada shell-model is completely characterized by a single type of burstlike structure, which moves through the shells like a front. This temporal structure is described by the dynamics of the instantaneous configuration of the shell...

  10. Temporal Structures in Shell Models

    OpenAIRE

    Okkels, Fridolin

    2000-01-01

    The intermittent dynamics of the turbulent GOY shell-model is characterised by a single type of burst-like structure, which moves through the shells like a front. This temporal structure is described by the dynamics of the instantaneous configuration of the shell-amplitudes revealing a approximative chaotic attractor of the dynamics.

  11. Molecular Eigensolution Symmetry Analysis and Fine Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William G. Harter

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spectra of high-symmetry molecules contain fine and superfine level cluster structure related to J-tunneling between hills and valleys on rovibronic energy surfaces (RES. Such graphic visualizations help disentangle multi-level dynamics, selection rules, and state mixing effects including widespread violation of nuclear spin symmetry species. A review of RES analysis compares it to that of potential energy surfaces (PES used in Born-Oppenheimer approximations. Both take advantage of adiabatic coupling in order to visualize Hamiltonian eigensolutions. RES of symmetric and D2 asymmetric top rank-2-tensor Hamiltonians are compared with Oh spherical top rank-4-tensor fine-structure clusters of 6-fold and 8-fold tunneling multiplets. Then extreme 12-fold and 24-fold multiplets are analyzed by RES plots of higher rank tensor Hamiltonians. Such extreme clustering is rare in fundamental bands but prevalent in hot bands, and analysis of its superfine structure requires more efficient labeling and a more powerful group theory. This is introduced using elementary examples involving two groups of order-6 (C6 and D3~C3v, then applied to families of Oh clusters in SF6 spectra and to extreme clusters.

  12. Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, J.J.

    1985-03-01

    Measurements of the Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) from the S(1s) core level of a c(2 x 2)S/Ni(001) are analyzed to determine the spacing between the S overlayer and the first and second Ni layers. ARPEFS is a type of photoelectron diffraction measurement in which the photoelectron kinetic energy is swept typically from 100 to 600 eV. By using this wide range of intermediate energies we add high precision and theoretical simplification to the advantages of the photoelectron diffraction technique for determining surface structures. We report developments in the theory of photoelectron scattering in the intermediate energy range, measurement of the experimental photoemission spectra, their reduction to ARPEFS, and the surface structure determination from the ARPEFS by combined Fourier and multiple-scattering analyses. 202 refs., 67 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Facilitating Fine Grained Data Provenance using Temporal Data Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huq, M.R.; Wombacher, Andreas; Apers, Peter M.G.

    2010-01-01

    E-science applications use fine grained data provenance to maintain the reproducibility of scientific results, i.e., for each processed data tuple, the source data used to process the tuple as well as the used approach is documented. Since most of the e-science applications perform on-line

  14. The fine structure of the ionosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Angelo, N.; Michelsen, Poul

    1967-01-01

    We consider in this note the excitation of ion-acoustic waves by vertical gradients of density in the ionosphere. The conclusion is reached that the fine structure of the ionosphere is probably affected by the resulting instability, as comparison with observations seems to indicate. Recently, Liu...... and Yeh [1966] have examined the excitation of low-frequency imcompressible waves in an inhomogeneous ionosphere. They find that, below the F-region maximum, there may exist instabilities, the growth rate being given approximately by grho'/rhonu, where g is the gravity, rho is the plasma density, rho......' is its height gradients, and nu is the ion-neutral collision frequency. We have examined the stability of the ionosphere against growth of low-frequency quasielectrostatic waves, taking into account the compressibility of the plasma....

  15. Fine-Scale Genetic Structure in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sini Kerminen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Coupling dense genotype data with new computational methods offers unprecedented opportunities for individual-level ancestry estimation once geographically precisely defined reference data sets become available. We study such a reference data set for Finland containing 2376 such individuals from the FINRISK Study survey of 1997 both of whose parents were born close to each other. This sampling strategy focuses on the population structure present in Finland before the 1950s. By using the recent haplotype-based methods ChromoPainter (CP and FineSTRUCTURE (FS we reveal a highly geographically clustered genetic structure in Finland and report its connections to the settlement history as well as to the current dialectal regions of the Finnish language. The main genetic division within Finland shows striking concordance with the 1323 borderline of the treaty of Nöteborg. In general, we detect genetic substructure throughout the country, which reflects stronger regional genetic differences in Finland compared to, for example, the UK, which in a similar analysis was dominated by a single unstructured population. We expect that similar population genetic reference data sets will become available for many more populations in the near future with important applications, for example, in forensic genetics and in genetic association studies. With this in mind, we report those extensions of the CP + FS approach that we found most useful in our analyses of the Finnish data.

  16. Cell fine structure and function - Past and present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Moran, H.

    1970-01-01

    Electron microscopic studies of nerve membrane fine structure, discussing cell membrane multienzyme and macromolecular energy and information transduction, protein synthesis and nucleic acids interrelations

  17. An Einstein-Cartan Fine Structure Constant Definition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stone R. A. Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The fine structure constant definition given in Stone R.A. Jr. Progress in Physics, 2010, v.1, 11-13 is compared to an Einstein-Cartan fine structure constant definition. It is shown that the Einstein-Cartan definition produces the correct pure theory value, just not the measure value. To produce the measured value, the pure theory Einstein-Cartan fine structure constant requires only the new variables and spin coupling of the fine structure constant definition in [1].

  18. Fine structure of charge exchange lines observed in laboratory plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ida, K.; Nishimura, S. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan); Kondo, K.

    1997-01-01

    The influence of the fine structure of charge exchange lines appears only at the plasma edge or in the recombining phase where the ion temperature is low enough. The observed spectra in Li III and C VI are consistent with the sum of fine-structure components populated by statistical weights (assuming complete l-mixing) not by direct charge exchange cross sections. Some discrepancy was observed in the intensity ratio of fine-structure components between the observation and calculation for C VI in the recombining phase. The fine-structure of charge exchange lines gives an apparent Doppler shift in plasma rotation velocity measurement using charge exchange spectroscopy. (author)

  19. Cosmological constant, fine structure constant and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Hao; Zou, Xiao-Bo; Li, Hong-Yu; Xue, Dong-Ze [Beijing Institute of Technology, School of Physics, Beijing (China)

    2017-01-15

    In the present work, we consider the cosmological constant model Λ ∝ α{sup -6}, which is well motivated from three independent approaches. As is well known, the hint of varying fine structure constant α was found in 1998. If Λ ∝ α{sup -6} is right, it means that the cosmological constant Λ should also be varying. Here, we try to develop a suitable framework to model this varying cosmological constant Λ ∝ α{sup -6}, in which we view it from an interacting vacuum energy perspective. Then we consider the observational constraints on these models by using the 293 Δα/α data from the absorption systems in the spectra of distant quasars. We find that the model parameters can be tightly constrained to the very narrow ranges of O(10{sup -5}) typically. On the other hand, we can also view the varying cosmological constant model Λ ∝ α{sup -6} from another perspective, namely it can be equivalent to a model containing ''dark energy'' and ''warm dark matter'', but there is no interaction between them. We find that this is also fully consistent with the observational constraints on warm dark matter. (orig.)

  20. Cosmological Constant, Fine Structure Constant and Beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Hao; Li, Hong-Yu; Xue, Dong-Ze

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we consider the cosmological constant model $\\Lambda\\propto\\alpha^{-6}$, which is well motivated from three independent approaches. As is well known, the evidence of varying fine structure constant $\\alpha$ was found in 1998. If $\\Lambda\\propto\\alpha^{-6}$ is right, it means that the cosmological constant $\\Lambda$ should be also varying. In this work, we try to develop a suitable framework to model this varying cosmological constant $\\Lambda\\propto\\alpha^{-6}$, in which we view it from an interacting vacuum energy perspective. We propose two types of models to describe the evolutions of $\\Lambda$ and $\\alpha$. Then, we consider the observational constraints on these models, by using the 293 $\\Delta\\alpha/\\alpha$ data from the absorption systems in the spectra of distant quasars, and the data of type Ia supernovae (SNIa), cosmic microwave background (CMB), baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO). We find that the model parameters can be tightly constrained to the narrow ranges of ${\\cal O}(10^{-5})$ t...

  1. A five-dimensional model of varying fine structure constant

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A five-dimensional model of varying fine structure constant. J P MBELEK. Service d'Astrophysique, C.E. Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex, France. Abstract. The cosmological variation of the fine structure constant « is explored from an effective theory, under the form of an improved version of the 5D Kaluza-Klein theory.

  2. InAs Band-Edge Exciton Fine Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-29

    modulated by the excitation rate of the nanocrystals, fine-structure broadening is fundamental to the photophysics of nanocrystals and most likely... CdTe ) exhibited the same effective band-edge fine structure, with similar acoustic phonon energies. These extracted relaxation rates are consistent

  3. FINE THERMOHALINE STRUCTURE OF THE COLOMBIAN PACIFIC OCEAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villegas Nancy

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The present document shows strata classification of the Colombian Pacific Ocean - COLUMBIAN PACIFIC OCEAN, done by first time according its fine thermohaline structure, based on temperature and salinity fields analysis. Layers, where different mechanisms of fine structure predominate, were determined and everywhere in the area a stable stratification was observed, although conditions for not stability as a result of the double diffusion were present.

  4. Acoustic Agglomeration Process of Fine Particles in a Resonance Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chen-hao; Zhang, Jian; Zhao, Yun; Liang, Jie

    2017-07-01

    It was proved that the acoustic agglomeration technology has a good application prospect in the removal of fine particles. In this paper, a removal system of acoustic agglomeration is constructed by the acoustic resonance structure. With the finite element simulation model, the effect and condition of sound pressure level (SPL) increment of high intensity sound in the resonance structure are defined. In the experiment, the contrast of the sampling weight and particle size distribution changes of fine particles was compared under different operating conditions to examine the effect of acoustic agglomeration on the removal efficiency of fine particles. The results show the SPL increment of 10dB is obtained with SPL 145-165 dB when the working frequency is changed from 400 to 2000 Hz. Under the action of acoustic agglomeration, fine particles in the aerosol were significantly reduced, and the removal effect is markedly improved with the increase of SPL.

  5. Fine-temporal forecasting of outbreak probability and severity: Ross River virus in Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koolhof, I S; Bettiol, S; Carver, S

    2017-10-01

    Health warnings of mosquito-borne disease risk require forecasts that are accurate at fine-temporal resolutions (weekly scales); however, most forecasting is coarse (monthly). We use environmental and Ross River virus (RRV) surveillance to predict weekly outbreak probabilities and incidence spanning tropical, semi-arid, and Mediterranean regions of Western Australia (1991-2014). Hurdle and linear models were used to predict outbreak probabilities and incidence respectively, using time-lagged environmental variables. Forecast accuracy was assessed by model fit and cross-validation. Residual RRV notification data were also examined against mitigation expenditure for one site, Mandurah 2007-2014. Models were predictive of RRV activity, except at one site (Capel). Minimum temperature was an important predictor of RRV outbreaks and incidence at all predicted sites. Precipitation was more likely to cause outbreaks and greater incidence among tropical and semi-arid sites. While variable, mitigation expenditure coincided positively with increased RRV incidence (r 2 = 0·21). Our research demonstrates capacity to accurately predict mosquito-borne disease outbreaks and incidence at fine-temporal resolutions. We apply our findings, developing a user-friendly tool enabling managers to easily adopt this research to forecast region-specific RRV outbreaks and incidence. Approaches here may be of value to fine-scale forecasting of RRV in other areas of Australia, and other mosquito-borne diseases.

  6. Spatial, temporal, and interspecies patterns in fine particulate matter in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhart, Kristi A; Malm, William C; Ashbaugh, Lowell L

    2005-11-01

    The Big Bend Regional Aerosol and Visibility Observational (BRAVO) field study was conducted from July to October 1999 and was followed by several years of modeling and data analyses to examine the causes of haze at Big Bend National Park TX (BBNP). During BRAVO, daily speciated fine (diameter data. The spatial, temporal, and interspecies patterns in these data are examined here to qualitatively investigate source regions and source types influencing the fine particulate concentrations in Texas with an emphasis on sources of sulfates, the largest contributor to fine mass and light extinction. Peak values of particulate sulfur (S) varied spatially and seasonally. Maximum S was in Northeast Texas during the summer, whereas peak S at BBNP was in the fall. Sulfate acidity at BBNP also varied by month. Sources of Se were evident in Northeast Texas and from the Carbón I and II plants. High S episodes at BBNP during BRAVO had several different trace element characteristics. Carbon concentrations at BBNP during BRAVO were probably mostly urban-related, with arrival from the Houston area likely. The Houston artificial tracer released during the second half of BRAVO was highly correlated with some carbon fractions. There was evidence of the influence of African dust at sites throughout Texas during the summer. Patterns in several trace elements were also examined. Vanadium was associated with air masses from Mexico. Lead concentrations in southern Texas have dropped dramatically over the past several years.

  7. A five-dimensional model of varying fine structure constant

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    dimensional model of varying fine structure constant. J P Mbelek. Cosmology Volume 62 Issue 3 March 2004 pp 741-743. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/pram/062/03/0741-0743 ...

  8. Distortion product otoacoustic emission fine structure of symphony orchestra musicians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reuter, Karen; Hammershøi, Dorte

    losses than puretone audiometry. The distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) fine structure is obtained when the ear is stimulated by dual tone stimuli using a high frequency resolution. It is characterized by quasi-periodic variations across frequency, as it can be observed in the hearing...

  9. Distortion product otoacoustic emission fine structure of symphony orchestra musicians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reuter, Karen; Hammershøi, Dorte

    2006-01-01

    losses than pure-tone audiometry. The distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) fine structure is obtained when the ear is stiumulated by dual tone stimuli using a high frequency resolution. It is characterized by quasi-periodic variations across frequency, as it can be observed in the hearing...

  10. An approach for generating synthetic fine temporal resolution solar radiation time series from hourly gridded datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Perry

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A tool has been developed to statistically increase the temporal resolution of solar irradiance time series. Fine temporal resolution time series are an important input into the planning process for solar power plants, and lead to increased understanding of the likely short-term variability of solar energy. The approach makes use of the spatial variability of hourly gridded datasets around a location of interest to make inferences about the temporal variability within the hour. The unique characteristics of solar irradiance data are modelled by classifying each hour into a typical weather situation. Low variability situations are modelled using an autoregressive process which is applied to ramps of clear-sky index. High variability situations are modelled as a transition between states of clear sky conditions and different levels of cloud opacity. The methods have been calibrated to Australian conditions using 1 min data from four ground stations for a 10 year period. These stations, together with an independent dataset, have also been used to verify the quality of the results using a number of relevant metrics. The results show that the method generates realistic fine resolution synthetic time series. The synthetic time series correlate well with observed data on monthly and annual timescales as they are constrained to the nearest grid-point value on each hour. The probability distributions of the synthetic and observed global irradiance data are similar, with Kolmogorov-Smirnov test statistic less than 0.04 at each station. The tool could be useful for the estimation of solar power output for integration studies.

  11. Breed locally, disperse globally: fine-scale genetic structure despite landscape-scale panmixia in a fire-specialist.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer C Pierson

    Full Text Available An exciting advance in the understanding of metapopulation dynamics has been the investigation of how populations respond to ephemeral patches that go 'extinct' during the lifetime of an individual. Previous research has shown that this scenario leads to genetic homogenization across large spatial scales. However, little is known about fine-scale genetic structuring or how this changes over time in ephemeral patches. We predicted that species that specialize on ephemeral habitats will delay dispersal to exploit natal habitat patches while resources are plentiful and thus display fine-scale structure. To investigate this idea, we evaluated the effect of frequent colonization of ephemeral habitats on the fine-scale genetic structure of a fire specialist, the black-backed woodpecker (Picoides arcticus and found a pattern of fine-scale genetic structure. We then tested for differences in spatial structure between sexes and detected a pattern consistent with male-biased dispersal. We also detected a temporal increase in relatedness among individuals within newly burned forest patches. Our results indicate that specialist species that outlive their ephemeral patches can accrue significant fine-scale spatial structure that does not necessarily affect spatial structure at larger scales. This highlights the importance of both spatial and temporal scale considerations in both sampling and data interpretation of molecular genetic results.

  12. Temporally resolved refractive index structure parameter measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksson, Markus; Forsling, Robin

    2017-09-01

    The refractive index structure parameter is the most common measure of optical turbulence. It is defined as a statistical quantity for the Kolmogorov spectrum energy cascade of turbulent eddies of different sizes. As such it is formally assumed to be constant in time and space. However, the large scale variation with the diurnal cycle, with altitude or with terrain characteristics is well known. The ensemble average in the definition of the refractive index structure parameter is thus assumed to be applied over a restricted region in space and time. The question of how large volume is needed to determine the refractive index structure parameter and on how short temporal scales it can vary has not received significant attention. To study the temporal variation we have used two independent measurement systems to measure the path-averaged refractive index structure parameter over a 171 m path at 1 m above ground with higher than 1 Hz temporal resolution. One measurement system uses the differential angle-of-arrival of an array of LEDs. The other system measures the scintillation of a single path laser beam using a photon counting system, with time correlation of picosecond pulses for simultaneous measurement of signal and background and with temporal autocorrelation-based variance determination to separate turbulence related scintillations from shot noise. The data shows excellent agreement between the two measurement systems on second level temporal variation, giving confidence in that the measured values show true variation of the refractive index structure parameter. Large scale variation of up to two orders of magnitude can be coupled to solar insolation on this partly cloudy day. High frequency variations that are consistent between the systems used show factor two changes at time scales below one second.

  13. Agent Based Modeling: Fine-Scale Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Pertussis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, D. A.

    2017-10-01

    In epidemiology, spatial and temporal variables are used to compute vaccination efficacy and effectiveness. The chosen resolution and scale of a spatial or spatio-temporal analysis will affect the results. When calculating vaccination efficacy, for example, a simple environment that offers various ideal outcomes is often modeled using coarse scale data aggregated on an annual basis. In contrast to the inadequacy of this aggregated method, this research uses agent based modeling of fine-scale neighborhood data centered around the interactions of infants in daycare and their families to demonstrate an accurate reflection of vaccination capabilities. Despite being able to prevent major symptoms, recent studies suggest that acellular Pertussis does not prevent the colonization and transmission of Bordetella Pertussis bacteria. After vaccination, a treated individual becomes a potential asymptomatic carrier of the Pertussis bacteria, rather than an immune individual. Agent based modeling enables the measurable depiction of asymptomatic carriers that are otherwise unaccounted for when calculating vaccination efficacy and effectiveness. Using empirical data from a Florida Pertussis outbreak case study, the results of this model demonstrate that asymptomatic carriers bias the calculated vaccination efficacy and reveal a need for reconsidering current methods that are widely used for calculating vaccination efficacy and effectiveness.

  14. Quintessential Nature of the Fine-Structure Constant

    OpenAIRE

    Sherbon, Michael

    2015-01-01

    7 pages; International audience; An introduction is given to the geometry and harmonics of the Golden Apex in the Great Pyramid, with the metaphysical and mathematical determination of the fine-structure constant of electromagnetic interactions. Newton's gravitational constant is also presented in harmonic form and other fundamental physical constants are then found related to the quintessential geometry of the Golden Apex in the Great Pyramid.

  15. Fine structure of the exciton electroabsorption in semiconductor superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monozon, B.S., E-mail: borismonozon@mail.ru [Physics Department, Marine Technical University, 3 Lotsmanskaya Str., 190008 St.Petersburg (Russian Federation); Schmelcher, P. [Zentrum für Optische Quantentechnologien, The Hamburg Centre for Ultrafast Imaging, Universität Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    Wannier-Mott excitons in a semiconductor layered superlattice (SL) are investigated analytically for the case that the period of the superlattice is much smaller than the 2D exciton Bohr radius. Additionally we assume the presence of a longitudinal external static electric field directed parallel to the SL axis. The exciton states and the optical absorption coefficient are derived in the tight-binding and adiabatic approximations. Strong and weak electric fields providing spatially localized and extended electron and hole states, respectively, are studied. The dependencies of the exciton states and the exciton absorption spectrum on the SL parameters and the electric field strength are presented in an explicit form. We focus on the fine structure of the ground quasi-2D exciton level formed by the series of closely spaced energy levels adjacent from the high frequencies. These levels are related to the adiabatically slow relative exciton longitudinal motion governed by the potential formed by the in-plane exciton state. It is shown that the external electric fields compress the fine structure energy levels, decrease the intensities of the corresponding optical peaks and increase the exciton binding energy. A possible experimental study of the fine structure of the exciton electroabsorption is discussed.

  16. Automatic detection and extraction of ultra-fine bright structure observed with new vacuum solar telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Linhua

    2017-02-01

    Solar magnetic structures exhibit a wealth of different spatial and temporal scales. Presently, solar magnetic element is believed to be the ultra-fine magnetic structure in the lower solar atmospheric layer, and the diffraction limit of the largest-aperture solar telescope (New Vacuum Solar Telescope; NVST) of China is close to the spatial scale of magnetic element. This implies that modern solar observations have entered the era of high resolution better than 0.2 arc-second. Since the year of 2011, the NVST have successfully established and obtained huge observational data. Moreover, the ultra-fine magnetic structure rooted in the dark inter-graunlar lanes can be easily resolved. Studies on the observational characteristics and physical mechanism of magnetic bright points is one of the most important aspects in the field of solar physics, so it is very important to determine the statistical and physical parameters of magnetic bright points with the feature extraction techniques and numerical analysis approaches. For identifying such ultra-fine magnetic structure, an automatically and effectively detection algorithm, employed the Laplacian transform and the morphological dilation technique, is proposed and examined. Then, the statistical parameters such as the typical diameter, the area distribution, the eccentricity, and the intensity contrast are obtained. And finally, the scientific meaning for investigating the physical parameters of magnetic bright points are discussed, especially for understanding the physical processes of solar magnetic energy transferred from the photosphere to the corona.

  17. Altered structural connectome in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSalvo, Matthew N; Douw, Linda; Tanaka, Naoaki; Reinsberger, Claus; Stufflebeam, Steven M

    2014-03-01

    To study differences in the whole-brain structural connectomes of patients with left temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and healthy control subjects. This study was approved by the institutional review board, and all individuals gave signed informed consent. Sixty-direction diffusion-tensor imaging and magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient-echo (MP-RAGE) magnetic resonance imaging volumes were analyzed in 24 patients with left TLE and in 24 healthy control subjects. MP-RAGE volumes were segmented into 1015 regions of interest (ROIs) spanning the entire brain. Deterministic white matter tractography was performed after voxelwise tensor calculation. Weighted structural connectivity matrices were generated by using the pairwise density of connecting fibers between ROIs. Graph theoretical measures of connectivity networks were compared between groups by using linear models with permutation testing. Patients with TLE had 22%-45% reduced (P < .01) distant connectivity in the medial orbitofrontal cortex, temporal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, and precuneus, compared with that in healthy subjects. However, local connectivity, as measured by means of network efficiency, was increased by 85%-270% (P < .01) in the medial and lateral frontal cortices, insular cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, precuneus, and occipital cortex in patients with TLE as compared with healthy subjects. This study suggests that TLE involves altered structural connectivity in a network that reaches beyond the temporal lobe, especially in the default mode network.

  18. Automatic sleep spindle detection: benchmarking with fine temporal resolution using open science tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Christian; Nielsen, Tore

    2015-01-01

    Sleep spindle properties index cognitive faculties such as memory consolidation and diseases such as major depression. For this reason, scoring sleep spindle properties in polysomnographic recordings has become an important activity in both research and clinical settings. The tediousness of this manual task has motivated efforts for its automation. Although some progress has been made, increasing the temporal accuracy of spindle scoring and improving the performance assessment methodology are two aspects needing more attention. In this paper, four open-access automated spindle detectors with fine temporal resolution are proposed and tested against expert scoring of two proprietary and two open-access databases. Results highlight several findings: (1) that expert scoring and polysomnographic databases are important confounders when comparing the performance of spindle detectors tested using different databases or scorings; (2) because spindles are sparse events, specificity estimates are potentially misleading for assessing automated detector performance; (3) reporting the performance of spindle detectors exclusively with sensitivity and specificity estimates, as is often seen in the literature, is insufficient; including sensitivity, precision and a more comprehensive statistic such as Matthew's correlation coefficient, F1-score, or Cohen's κ is necessary for adequate evaluation; (4) reporting statistics for some reasonable range of decision thresholds provides a much more complete and useful benchmarking; (5) performance differences between tested automated detectors were found to be similar to those between available expert scorings; (6) much more development is needed to effectively compare the performance of spindle detectors developed by different research teams. Finally, this work clarifies a long-standing but only seldomly posed question regarding whether expert scoring truly is a reliable gold standard for sleep spindle assessment.

  19. Fine-grained stimulus representations in body selective areas of human occipito-temporal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspari, Natalie; Popivanov, Ivo D; De Mazière, Patrick A; Vanduffel, Wim; Vogels, Rufin; Orban, Guy A; Jastorff, Jan

    2014-11-15

    Neurophysiological and functional imaging studies have investigated the representation of animate and inanimate stimulus classes in monkey inferior temporal (IT) and human occipito-temporal cortex (OTC). These studies proposed a distributed representation of stimulus categories across IT and OTC and at the same time highlighted category specific modules for the processing of bodies, faces and objects. Here, we investigated whether the stimulus representation within the extrastriate (EBA) and the fusiform (FBA) body areas differed from the representation across OTC. To address this question, we performed an event-related fMRI experiment, evaluating the pattern of activation elicited by 200 individual stimuli that had already been extensively tested in our earlier monkey imaging and single cell studies (Popivanov et al., 2012, 2014). The set contained achromatic images of headless monkey and human bodies, two sets of man-made objects, monkey and human faces, four-legged mammals, birds, fruits, and sculptures. The fMRI response patterns within EBA and FBA primarily distinguished bodies from non-body stimuli, with subtle differences between the areas. However, despite responding on average stronger to bodies than to other categories, classification performance for preferred and non-preferred categories was comparable. OTC primarily distinguished animate from inanimate stimuli. However, cluster analysis revealed a much more fine-grained representation with several homogeneous clusters consisting entirely of stimuli of individual categories. Overall, our data suggest that category representation varies with location within OTC. Nevertheless, body modules contain information to discriminate also non-preferred stimuli and show an increasing specificity in a posterior to anterior gradient. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Urban, Forest, and Agricultural AIS Data: Fine Spectral Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderbilt, V. C.

    1985-01-01

    Spectra acquired by the Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS) near Lafayette, IN, Ely, MN, and over the Stanford University campus, CA were analyzed for fine spectral structure using two techniques: the ratio of radiance of a ground target to the radiance of a standard and also the correlation coefficient of radiances at adjacent wavelengths. The results show ramp like features in the ratios. These features are due to the biochemical composition of the leaf and to the optical scattering properties of its cuticle. The size and shape of the ramps vary with ground cover.

  1. Fine structure study on low concentration zinc substituted hydroxyapatite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Wei [Advanced Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Ma, Jun, E-mail: caltary@gmail.com [Advanced Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Wang, Jianglin [Advanced Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhang, Shengmin, E-mail: smzhang@mail.hust.edu.cn [Advanced Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); China-Korea Center for Biomaterials and Nano-biotechnology, Life Science Building, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074 (China); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2012-12-01

    The fine structure of zinc substituted hydroxyapatite was studied using experimental analysis and first-principles calculations. The synthetic hydroxyapatite nanoparticles containing low Zn concentration show rod-like morphology. The crystallite sizes and unit-cell volumes tended to decrease with the increased Zn concentration according to X-ray diffraction patterns. The Zn K-edge X-ray absorption spectra and fitting results suggest that the hydroxyapatite doped with 0.1 mole% zinc is different in the zinc coordination environments compared with that containing more zinc. The density function theory calculations were performed on zinc substituted hydroxyapatite. Two mechanisms included replacing calcium by zinc and inserting zinc along the hydroxyl column and were investigated, and the related substitution energies were calculated separately. It is found that the substitution energies are negative and lowest for inserting zinc between the two oxygen atoms along the hydroxyl column (c-axis). Combined with the spectral analysis, it is suggested that the inserting mechanism is favored for low concentration zinc substituted hydroxyapatite. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigate the fine structure of hydroxyapatite with low content of Zn. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XANES spectra are similar but a little different at low zinc content. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zinc ions influence hydroxyapatite crystal formation and lattice parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Formation energies are calculated according to plane-wave density function theory. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low content of zinc prefers to locate at hydroxyl column in hydroxyapatite lattice.

  2. QED Based Calculation of the Fine Structure Constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lestone, John Paul [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-13

    Quantum electrodynamics is complex and its associated mathematics can appear overwhelming for those not trained in this field. Here, semi-classical approaches are used to obtain a more intuitive feel for what causes electrostatics, and the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron. These intuitive arguments lead to a possible answer to the question of the nature of charge. Virtual photons, with a reduced wavelength of λ, are assumed to interact with isolated electrons with a cross section of πλ2. This interaction is assumed to generate time-reversed virtual photons that are capable of seeking out and interacting with other electrons. This exchange of virtual photons between particles is assumed to generate and define the strength of electromagnetism. With the inclusion of near-field effects the model presented here gives a fine structure constant of ~1/137 and an anomalous magnetic moment of the electron of ~0.00116. These calculations support the possibility that near-field corrections are the key to understanding the numerical value of the dimensionless fine structure constant.

  3. Black Holes and Quantum Theory: The Fine Structure Constant Connection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The new dynamical theory of space is further confirmed by showing that the effective “black hole” masses M BH in 19 spherical star systems, from globular clusters to galaxies, with masses M , satisfy the prediction that M BH = α 2 M , where α is the fine structure constant. As well the necessary and unique generalisations of the Schr ̈ odinger and Dirac equations permit the first derivation of gravity from a deeper theory, showing that gravity is a quantum effect of quantum matter interacting with the dynamical space. As well the necessary generalisation of Maxwell’s equations displays the observed light bending effects. Finally it is shown from the generalised Dirac equation where the spacetime mathematical formalism, and the accompanying geodesic prescription for matter trajectories, comes from. The new theory of space is non-local and we see many parallels between this and quantum theory, in addition to the fine structure constant manifesting in both, so supporting the argument that space is a quantum foam system, as implied by the deeper information-theoretic theory known as Process Physics. The spatial dynamics also provides an explanation for the “dark matter” effect and as well the non-locality of the dynamics provides a mechanism for generating the uniformity of the universe, so explaining the cosmological horizon problem.

  4. Fine-scale temporal recovery, reconstruction and evolution of a post-supereruption magmatic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Simon J.; Wilson, Colin J. N.; Allan, Aidan S. R.; Schipper, C. Ian

    2015-07-01

    Supereruptions (>1015 kg ≈ 450 km3 of ejected magma) have received much attention because of the challenges in explaining how and over what time intervals such large volumes of magma are accumulated, stored and erupted. However, the processes that follow supereruptions, particularly those focused around magmatic recovery, are less fully documented. We present major and trace-element data from whole-rock, glass and mineral samples from eruptive products from Taupo volcano, New Zealand, to investigate how the host magmatic system reestablished and evolved following the Oruanui supereruption at 25.4 ka. Taupo's young eruptive units are precisely constrained chronostratigraphically, providing uniquely fine-scale temporal snapshots of a post-supereruption magmatic system. After only ~5 kyr of quiescence following the Oruanui eruption, Taupo erupted three small volume (~0.1 km3) dacitic pyroclastic units from 20.5 to 17 ka, followed by another ~5-kyr-year time break, and then eruption of 25 rhyolitic units starting at ~12 ka. The dacites show strongly zoned minerals and wide variations in melt-inclusion compositions, consistent with early magma mixing followed by periods of cooling and crystallisation at depths of >8 km, overlapping spatially with the inferred basal parts of the older Oruanui silicic mush system. The dacites reflect the first products of a new silicic system, as most of the Oruanui magmatic root zone was significantly modified in composition or effectively destroyed by influxes of hot mafic magmas following caldera collapse. The first rhyolites erupted between 12 and 10 ka formed through shallow (4-5 km depth) cooling and fractionation of melts from a source similar in composition to that generating the earlier dacites, with overlapping compositions for melt inclusions and crystal cores between the two magma types. For the successively younger rhyolite units, temporal changes in melt chemistry and mineral phase stability are observed, which reflect the

  5. The Fine Structure of Equity-Index Option Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben G.; Bondarenko, Oleg; Todorov, Viktor

    We analyze the high-frequency dynamics of S&P 500 equity-index option prices by constructing an assortment of implied volatility measures. This allows us to infer the underlying fine structure behind the innovations in the latent state variables driving the movements of the volatility surface....... In particular, we focus attention on implied volatilities covering a wide range of moneyness (strike/underlying stock price), which load differentially on the different latent state variables. We conduct a similar analysis for high-frequency observations on the VIX volatility index as well as on futures written...... on it. We find that the innovations in the risk-neutral intensity of the negative jumps in the S&P 500 index over small time scales are best described via non-Gaussian shocks, i.e., jumps. On the other hand, the innovations over small time scales of the diffusive volatility are best modeled as Gaussian...

  6. Measurement of the Running of the Fine-Structure Constant

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M.; Adriani, O.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Ambrosi, G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, Valery P.; Angelescu, T.; Anselmo, F.; Arefev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Baksay, L.; Balandras, A.; Ball, R.C.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Barone, L.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Bhattacharya, S.; Biasini, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brigljevic, V.; Brochu, F.; Buffini, A.; Buijs, A.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Button, A.; Cai, X.D.; Campanelli, Mario; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.M.; Casaus, J.; Castellini, G.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Cesaroni, F.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chaturvedi, U.K.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Civinini, C.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colijn, A.P.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; Cotorobai, F.; Cozzoni, B.; de la Cruz, B.; Csilling, A.; Cucciarelli, S.; Dai, T.S.; van Dalen, J.A.; D'Alessandro, R.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Degre, A.; Deiters, K.; della Volpe, D.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; van Dierendonck, D.; Di Lodovico, F.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Dominguez, A.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Dufournaud, D.; Duinker, P.; Duran, I.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Erne, F.C.; Extermann, P.; Fabre, M.; Faccini, R.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Ferroni, F.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisk, I.; Forconi, G.; Fredj, L.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M.; Gau, S.S.; Gentile, S.; Gheordanescu, N.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; van Gulik, R.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hasan, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, Alain; Hidas, P.; Hirschfelder, J.; Hirstius, A.; Hofer, H.; Holzner, G.; Hoorani, H.; Hou, S.R.; Iashvili, I.; Jin, B.N.; Jones, Lawrence W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Khan, R.A.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, D.; Kim, D.H.; Kim, J.K.; Kim, S.C.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D.; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopp, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Krenz, W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Lee, H.J.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Leonardi, Emanuele; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Lubelsmeyer, K.; Luci, C.; Luckey, David; Lugnier, L.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Maity, M.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mangeol, D.; Marchesini, P.; Marian, G.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Massaro, G.G.G.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; von der Mey, M.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Molnar, P.; Monteleoni, B.; Moulik, T.; Muanza, G.S.; Muheim, F.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musy, M.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Niessen, T.; Nisati, A.; Kluge, Hannelies; Oh, Y.D.; Organtini, G.; Oulianov, A.; Palomares, C.; Pandoulas, D.; Paoletti, S.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Park, H.K.; Park, I.H.; Pascale, G.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petersen, B.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pieri, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Postema, H.; Pothier, J.; Produit, N.; Prokofev, D.O.; Prokofev, D.; Quartieri, J.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, M.A.; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Raspereza, A.; Raven, G.; Razis, P.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; van Rhee, T.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Robohm, A.; Rodin, J.; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rubio, J.A.; Ruschmeier, D.; Rykaczewski, H.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Sanders, M.P.; Sarakinos, M.E.; Schafer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schmidt-Kaerst, S.; Schmitz, D.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Schwering, G.; Sciacca, C.; Sciarrino, D.; Seganti, A.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Smith, B.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stone, A.; Stone, H.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Sztaricskai, T.; Tang, X.W.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Uchida, Y.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Vicinanza, D.; Viertel, G.; Villa, S.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobev, I.; Vorobov, A.A.; Vorvolakos, A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wallraff, W.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, A.; Weber, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wilkens, H.; Wu, S.X.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Ye, J.B.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, A.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zichichi, A.; Zilizi, G.; Zoller, M.

    2000-01-01

    Small-angle Bhabha scattering data recorded at the Z resonance and large-angleBhabha scattering data recorded at $\\sqrt{s} = 189$ \\textrm{Ge\\kern -0.1em V} bythe L3 detector at LEP are used to measure the running of the effective fine-structure constant for spacelike momentum transfers. The results are\\begin{eqnarray*} \\alpha^{-1}(-2.1 \\mathrm{Ge\\kern -0.1em V}^{2}) - \\alpha^{-1}(-6.25 \\mathrm{Ge\\kern -0.1em V}^{2}) & = & 0.78 \\pm 0.26 \\\\ \\alpha^{-1}(-12.25 \\mathrm{Ge\\kern -0.1em V}^{2}) - \\alpha^{-1}(-3434 \\mathrm{Ge\\kern -0.1em V}^{2}) & = & 3.80 \\pm 1.29, \\\\\\end{eqnarray*}in agreement with theoretical predictions.

  7. Phase structure of a surface model with many fine holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koibuchi, H

    2008-07-01

    We study the phase structure of a surface model by using the canonical Monte Carlo simulation technique on triangulated, fixed connectivity, and spherical surfaces with many fine holes. The size of a hole is assumed to be of the order of lattice spacing (or bond length) and hence can be negligible compared to the surface size in the thermodynamic limit. We observe in the numerical data that the model undergoes a first-order collapsing transition between the smooth phase and the collapsed phase. Moreover the Hasudorff dimension H remains in the physical bound, i.e., H model in this paper and the previous one with many holes, whose size is of the order of the surface size, because the previous surface model with large-sized holes has only the collapsing transition and no transition of surface fluctuations.

  8. Imaging spectroscopy of solar radio burst fine structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontar, E P; Yu, S; Kuznetsov, A A; Emslie, A G; Alcock, B; Jeffrey, N L S; Melnik, V N; Bian, N H; Subramanian, P

    2017-11-15

    Solar radio observations provide a unique diagnostic of the outer solar atmosphere. However, the inhomogeneous turbulent corona strongly affects the propagation of the emitted radio waves, so decoupling the intrinsic properties of the emitting source from the effects of radio wave propagation has long been a major challenge in solar physics. Here we report quantitative spatial and frequency characterization of solar radio burst fine structures observed with the Low Frequency Array, an instrument with high-time resolution that also permits imaging at scales much shorter than those corresponding to radio wave propagation in the corona. The observations demonstrate that radio wave propagation effects, and not the properties of the intrinsic emission source, dominate the observed spatial characteristics of radio burst images. These results permit more accurate estimates of source brightness temperatures, and open opportunities for quantitative study of the mechanisms that create the turbulent coronal medium through which the emitted radiation propagates.

  9. Dynamic membrane structure induces temporal pattern formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippoldt, J; Händel, C; Dietrich, U; Käs, J A

    2014-10-01

    The understanding of temporal pattern formation in biological systems is essential for insights into regulatory processes of cells. Concerning this problem, the present work introduces a model to explain the attachment/detachment cycle of MARCKS and PKC at the cell membrane, which is crucial for signal transduction processes. Our model is novel with regard to its driving mechanism: Structural changes within the membrane fuel an activator-inhibitor based global density oscillation of membrane related proteins. Based on simulated results of our model, phase diagrams were generated to illustrate the interplay of MARCKS and PKC. They predict the oscillatory behavior in the form of the number of peaks, the periodic time, and the damping constant depending on the amounts of MARCKS and PKC, respectively. The investigation of the phase space also revealed an unexpected intermediate state prior to the oscillations for high amounts of MARCKS in the system. The validation of the obtained results was carried out by stability analysis, which also accounts for further enhanced understanding of the studied system. It was shown, that the occurrence of the oscillating behavior is independent of the diffusion and the consumption of the reactants. The diffusion terms in the used reaction-diffusion equations only act as modulating terms and are not required for the oscillation. The hypothesis of our work suggests a new mechanism of temporal pattern formation in biological systems. This mechanism includes a classical activator-inhibitor system, but is based on the modifications of the membrane structure, rather than a reaction-diffusion system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. FINE STRUCTURE OF THE HUMAN OVUM IN THE PRONUCLEAR STAGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboni, Luciano; Mishell, Daniel R.; Bell, James H.; Baca, Manuel

    1966-01-01

    A penetrated ovum was recovered from the oviduct of a 33 year old surgical patient who had had sexual intercourse 26 hr before the operation. The ovum was in the pronuclear stage. The ooplasmic organelles were mainly represented by mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum components, and Golgi elements. Small vesicles were found in the space between the two sheets of the pronuclear envelope. These vesicles appeared to be morphologically similar to the ER vesicles in the ooplasm and were considered to be involved in pronuclear development. Numerous annulate lamellae were seen in the ooplasm as well as in the pronuclei. Ooplasmic crystalloids were also observed. These were thought to represent cytoplasmic yolk. Remnants of the penetrating spermatozoon were found in close relation to one of the pronuclei. The fine structure of the first and second polar body is also described. The nuclear complement of the first polar body consisted of isolated chromosomes, whereas the second polar body contained a membrane-bounded nucleus. In consideration of the possibility that polar body fertilization may take place, these differences in nuclear organization could be of importance. Other recognizable differences between the two polar bodies were presence of dense cortical granules and microvilli in the first polar body, and absence of these structures in the second. These dissimilarities were considered to be related to the organization of the egg cytoplasm at the time of polar body separation. PMID:6008199

  11. Waves and Fine Structure in Expanding Laser-Produced Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collette, Andrew; Gekelman, Walter

    2009-11-01

    The behavior of expanding dense plasmas has long been a topic of interest in space plasma research, particularly in the case of expansion within a magnetized background. Previous laser-plasma experiments at the UCLA Large Plasma Device have observed the creation of strong (δBB > 50%) diamagnetic cavities, along with large-scale wave activity and hints of fine-scale structure. A new series of experiments conducted recently at the LaPD performs direct measurement of the fields inside the expanding plasma via a novel 2D probe drive system. This system combines small-scale (0.5mm-1mm) magnetic and electric field probes with high-accuracy vacuum ceramic motors, to allow measurement of the plasma volume over a 2000-point grid at 1mm resolution. The data reveal both coherent high-amplitude waves associated with the formation of these magnetic features, and complicated small-scale structure in both the magnetic field and floating potential. In addition, we will present correlation techniques using multiple independent B and E field probes. This reveals behavior of turbulent, non-phase-locked phenomena. Both the case of a single expanding plasma and two colliding plasmas were studied.

  12. Ultrasensitive Laser Spectroscopy in Solids: Statistical Fine Structure and Single-Molecule Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-03-28

    the measurement. Keywords: Statistical fine structure, Atomic properties, Single molecule detection, Molecule properties, Laser spectroscopy of solids, Instrumentation, Pentacene in p-terphenyl, Organic compounds, Near field.

  13. Fine-structure processing, frequency selectivity and speech perception in hearing-impaired listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strelcyk, Olaf; Dau, Torsten

    2008-01-01

    Hearing-impaired people often experience great difficulty with speech communication when background noise is present, even if reduced audibility has been compensated for. Other impairment factors must be involved. In order to minimize confounding effects, the subjects participating in this study...... consisted of groups with homogeneous, symmetric audiograms. The perceptual listening experiments assessed the intelligibility of full-spectrum as well as low-pass filtered speech in the presence of stationary and fluctuating interferers, the individual's frequency selectivity and the integrity of temporal...... modulation were obtained. In addition, these binaural and monaural thresholds were measured in a stationary background noise in order to assess the persistence of the fine-structure processing to interfering noise. Apart from elevated speech reception thresholds, the hearing impaired listeners showed poorer...

  14. Understanding the fine structure of intermediate materials of maize starches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wenfang; Zhang, Binjia; Li, Jiangtao; Zhao, Siming; Niu, Meng; Jia, Caihua; Xiong, Shanbai

    2017-10-15

    Here we concern the molecular fine structure of intermediate material (IM) fraction in regular maize starch (RMS) and Starpro 40 maize starch (S40). IM had a branching degree and a molar mass (Mw) somewhere between amylopectin (AP) and amylose (AM). Compared with AP, IM had more extra-long (Fr I) and long (Fr II) chains and fb3-chains (degree of polymerization (DP)>36), with a higher average chain length (CL). Also, IM contained less A-chains but more B-chains (both BS-chains with DP 3-25 and BL-chains with DP≥26), accompanied by longer B- and BL-chains, total internal chains (TICL) and average internal chains (ICL), and a similar average external chain length (ECL). Furthermore, relative to RMS-IM, the IM of S40 (with higher apparent amylose content than RMS) showed increases in relatively-long chains, e.g., Fr II, fb3-chains and BL-chains, but reductions in Mw, relatively-short chains (those with DP 6-12, etc.). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Fine structure of seminiferous tubules in antarctic seals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, A A; Erickson, A W; Seal, U S

    1977-03-09

    The fine structure of seminiferous tubules from 5 crabeater, 2 leopard and 2 Ross seals showed that during the nonbreeding season the tubules were essentially similar in possessing spermatogenic and Sertoli cells. However, the tubules of leopard and Ross seals had more primary and secondary spermatocytes and spermatids than the crabeater seals. In general, the tubules were devoid of spermatozoa. The spermatids showed stages of maturation such as Golgi phase of acrosome formation, acrosomal cap formation and condensation of nuclei. Some spermatids degenerated in tubules. Both maturing and degenerating spermatids were closely associated with Sertoli cells. Junctional complexes with plaques of filaments were observed between Sertoli cells and the spermatogenic cells. Sertoli cells, irregular and polygonal, contained highly convoluted nuclei, strands of rough endoplasmic reticulum, smooth endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi complexes, small mitochondria, variable amounts of lipid droplets, lysosomes, lipofuscin granules and highly plicated plasma membranes. In brief, the spermatogenic activity had practically ceased in the testes and the animals probably secreted low levels of testosterone during the nonbreeding season.

  16. Bumblebee Homing: The Fine Structure of Head Turning Movements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert Boeddeker

    Full Text Available Changes in flight direction in flying insects are largely due to roll, yaw and pitch rotations of their body. Head orientation is stabilized for most of the time by counter rotation. Here, we use high-speed video to analyse head- and body-movements of the bumblebee Bombus terrestris while approaching and departing from a food source located between three landmarks in an indoor flight-arena. The flight paths consist of almost straight flight segments that are interspersed with rapid turns. These short and fast yaw turns ("saccades" are usually accompanied by even faster head yaw turns that change gaze direction. Since a large part of image rotation is thereby reduced to brief instants of time, this behavioural pattern facilitates depth perception from visual motion parallax during the intersaccadic intervals. The detailed analysis of the fine structure of the bees' head turning movements shows that the time course of single head saccades is very stereotypical. We find a consistent relationship between the duration, peak velocity and amplitude of saccadic head movements, which in its main characteristics resembles the so-called "saccadic main sequence" in humans. The fact that bumblebee head saccades are highly stereotyped as in humans, may hint at a common principle, where fast and precise motor control is used to reliably reduce the time during which the retinal images moves.

  17. Fine structural properties of natural and synthetic glycogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, Hiroki; Kajiura, Hideki; Furuyashiki, Takashi; Kakutani, Ryo; Kuriki, Takashi

    2009-03-31

    Glycogen, highly branched (1-->4)(1-->6)-linked alpha-d-glucan, can be extracted from natural sources such as animal tissues or shellfish (natural source glycogen, NSG). Glycogen can also be synthesized in vitro from glucose-1-phosphate using the cooperative action of alpha-glucan phosphorylase (GP, EC 2.4.1.1) and branching enzyme (BE, EC 2.4.1.18), or from short-chain amylose by the cooperative action of BE and amylomaltase (AM, EC 2.4.1.25). It has been shown that enzymatically synthesized glycogen (ESG) has structural and physicochemical properties similar to those of NSG. In this study, the fine structures of ESG and NSG were analyzed using isoamylase and alpha-amylase. Isoamylase completely hydrolyzed the alpha-1,6 linkages of ESG and NSG. The unit-chain distribution (distribution of degrees of polymerization (DP) of alpha-1,4 linked chains) of ESG was slightly narrower than that of NSG. alpha-Amylase treatment revealed that initial profiles of hydrolyses of ESG and NSG were almost the same: both glycogens were digested slowly, compared with starch. The final products from NSG by alpha-amylase hydrolysis were glucose, maltose, maltotriose, branched oligosaccharides with DP4, and highly branched macrodextrin molecules with molecular weights of up to 10,000. When ESG was digested with excess amounts of alpha-amylase, much larger macrodextrins (molecular weight>10(6)) were detected. In contrast, oligosaccharides with DP 4-7 could not be detected from ESG. These results suggest that the alpha-1,6 linkages in ESG molecules are more regularly distributed than those in NSG molecules.

  18. A study of the fine structure, enzyme activities and pattern of 14CO2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A detailed study of selected grasses has been made with respect to fine structures characteristics, enzyme activities associated with C-4 and C-3 pathway photosynthesis, and short term carbon dioxide-14 incorporation experiments. A good correlation was obtained between the fine structure, the carbon pathway and the ...

  19. METHODS OF RECEIVING OF FINE-GRAINED STRUCTURE OF CASTINGS AT CRYSTALLIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. K. Tolochko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with methods for fine-grained structure of ingots during crystallization depending on the used foundry technologies. It is shown that by using modern scientific and technological advances may improve the traditional and the development of new casting processes, providing production of cast parts with over fine-grained structure and enhanced properties.

  20. Fine-Scale Structure Design for 3D Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panetta, Francis Julian

    Modern additive fabrication technologies can manufacture shapes whose geometric complexities far exceed what existing computational design tools can analyze or optimize. At the same time, falling costs have placed these fabrication technologies within the average consumer's reach. Especially for inexpert designers, new software tools are needed to take full advantage of 3D printing technology. This thesis develops such tools and demonstrates the exciting possibilities enabled by fine-tuning objects at the small scales achievable by 3D printing. The thesis applies two high-level ideas to invent these tools: two-scale design and worst-case analysis. The two-scale design approach addresses the problem that accurately simulating--let alone optimizing--the full-resolution geometry sent to the printer requires orders of magnitude more computational power than currently available. However, we can decompose the design problem into a small-scale problem (designing tileable structures achieving a particular deformation behavior) and a macro-scale problem (deciding where to place these structures in the larger object). This separation is particularly effective, since structures for every useful behavior can be designed once, stored in a database, then reused for many different macroscale problems. Worst-case analysis refers to determining how likely an object is to fracture by studying the worst possible scenario: the forces most efficiently breaking it. This analysis is needed when the designer has insufficient knowledge or experience to predict what forces an object will undergo, or when the design is intended for use in many different scenarios unknown a priori. The thesis begins by summarizing the physics and mathematics necessary to rigorously approach these design and analysis problems. Specifically, the second chapter introduces linear elasticity and periodic homogenization. The third chapter presents a pipeline to design microstructures achieving a wide range of

  1. Modeling Temporal Evolution and Multiscale Structure in Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlau, Tue; Mørup, Morten; Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard

    2013-01-01

    -point model to account for the temporal evolution of each vertex. We demonstrate that our model is able to infer time-varying multiscale structure in synthetic as well as three real world time-evolving complex networks. Our modeling of the temporal evolution of hierarchies brings new insights......Many real-world networks exhibit both temporal evolution and multiscale structure. We propose a model for temporally correlated multifurcating hierarchies in complex networks which jointly capture both effects. We use the Gibbs fragmentation tree as prior over multifurcating trees and a change...

  2. Modelling and visualizing fine-scale linkage disequilibrium structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, David

    2013-01-01

    or statistically dependent. Current efforts to understand the genetic basis of complex phenotypes are based on the existence of such associations, making study of the extent and distribution of linkage disequilibrium central to this endeavour. The objective of this paper is to develop methods to study fine...

  3. Fine-structure energy levels, oscillator strengths and lifetimes of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The energies of the various levels are fine-tuned with respect to the experimental results by making small adjustments to the diagonal elements of the Hamiltonian matrices [7]. Using accurate energy separations, we have also calculated the transition probabilities and lifetimes of excited levels. The relativistic effects are ...

  4. The Temporal Organization of Syllabic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Jason A.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation develops analytical tools which enable rigorous evaluation of competing syllabic parses on the basis of temporal patterns in speech production data. The data come from the articulographic tracking of fleshpoints on target speech organs, e.g., tongue, lips, jaw, in experiments with native speakers of American English and Moroccan…

  5. Distortion product otoacoustic emission fine structure as an early hearing loss predictor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reuter, Karen; Hammershøi, Dorte

    2006-01-01

    Otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) are a promising method to monitor early noise-induced hearing losses. When distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) are obtained with a high-frequency resolution, a ripple structure across frequency can be seen, called DPOAE fine structure. In this study DPOAE...... fine structures are obtained from 74 normal-hearing humans using primary levels of L1/L2=65/45 dB. The subjects belong to groups with different ages and exposure histories. A classification algorithm is developed, which quantifies the fine structure by the parameter's ripple place, ripple width, ripple...... and vary from subject to subject within groups. The results do not indicate that the DPOAE fine structure alters with the state of hearing, as it is suggested in the literature. The data analysis is still in process at this stage.  ...

  6. Fine-Scale Temporal Resolution of Sediment Source by Be-7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubblefield, A. P.; Whiting, P. J.; Fondran, C. L.; Matisoff, G.

    2005-05-01

    Understanding of erosional processes occurring at fine scales (cm) and over short time periods (min) in agricultural settings is essential for efforts to minimize landscape scarring, conserve surface nutrients, and reduce off-site impacts. Cosmogenic and fallout radionuclides have been successfully used in a variety of settings to determine sediment source and sediment transport processes. In this study we used the short-lived radionuclide Be-7 (t1/2= 53 d) to investigate erosional processes occurring during runoff from a 4 m by 9 m erosion plot. The plot was established in a 9.8% slope no-till corn field at the USDA ARS Deep Loess Research Station in Treynor, Iowa. Before and after the rainfall, fine resolution soil profiles were collected to determine the distribution of radionuclides and soil nutrients with depth. Be-7 was concentrated near the soil surface. Prior to the rainfall event, rare earth tagged soil particles were applied in three discrete strips, 0.5 m wide, along the contour. Forty runoff samples were collected during the course of a 5.7 cm thunderstorm event. Runoff efficiency was 25% and sediment yield was 0.234 kg m-2. Be-7 activities in runoff varied with hydrologic conditions and rainfall intensity, ranging from 0.06-0.6 Bq gm-1. Dominant erosional processes observed were rain splash erosion, overland flow and rill transport. Be-7 rich sediment was delivered at times corresponding corresponded to peaks in rainfall intensity, onset of overland flow, and development of hydrologic connectivity. Sediment had lower Be-7 activity during peak sediment delivery, probably due to dilution by large volumes of Be-7 poor sediment derived from deeper rill erosion. Soil tagged with the rare earth elements Ho, Tb, and Eu showed downslope movement in interrill areas, supporting conclusion of rain splash and sheetflow erosive mechanisms.

  7. Spatiotemporal modeling with temporal-invariant variogram subgroups to estimate fine particulate matter PM2.5 concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chu-Chih; Wu, Chang-Fu; Yu, Hwa-Lung; Chan, Chang-Chuan; Cheng, Tsun-Jen

    2012-07-01

    Short-term exposure estimation of daily air pollution levels incorporating geographic information system (GIS) into spatiotemporal modeling remains a great challenge for assessing corresponding acute adverse health effects. Due to daily meteorological effects on the dispersion of pollutants, explanatory spatial covariables and their coefficients may not be the same as in classical land-use regression (LUR) modeling for long-term exposure. In this paper, we propose a two-stage spatiotemporal model for daily fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentration prediction: first, daily nonlinear temporal trends are estimated through a generalized additive model, and second, GIS covariates are used to predict spatial variation in the temporal trend-removed residuals. To account for spatial dependence on meteorological conditions, the dates of the study period are divided by the sill of the daily empirical variogram into approximately temporal-invariant subgroups. Within each subgroup, daily PM2.5 estimations are obtained by combining the temporal and spatial parts of the estimations from the two stages. The proposed method is applied to the modeling of spatiotemporal PM2.5 concentrations observed at 18 ambient air monitoring stations in Taipei metropolitan area during 2006-2008. The results showed that the PM2.5 concentrations decreased whereas the relative humidity and wind speed increased with the sill subgroups, which may be due to the effects of daily meteorological conditions on the dispersions of the particles. Also, the covariates and their coefficients of the LUR models varied with subgroups and had in general higher adjusted R-squares and smaller root mean square errors in prediction than those of a single overall LUR model.

  8. Fine resolution mapping of population age-structures for health and development applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegana, V A; Atkinson, P M; Pezzulo, C; Sorichetta, A; Weiss, D; Bird, T; Erbach-Schoenberg, E; Tatem, A J

    2015-04-06

    The age-group composition of populations varies considerably across the world, and obtaining accurate, spatially detailed estimates of numbers of children under 5 years is important in designing vaccination strategies, educational planning or maternal healthcare delivery. Traditionally, such estimates are derived from population censuses, but these can often be unreliable, outdated and of coarse resolution for resource-poor settings. Focusing on Nigeria, we use nationally representative household surveys and their cluster locations to predict the proportion of the under-five population in 1 × 1 km using a Bayesian hierarchical spatio-temporal model. Results showed that land cover, travel time to major settlements, night-time lights and vegetation index were good predictors and that accounting for fine-scale variation, rather than assuming a uniform proportion of under 5 year olds can result in significant differences in health metrics. The largest gaps in estimated bednet and vaccination coverage were in Kano, Katsina and Jigawa. Geolocated household surveys are a valuable resource for providing detailed, contemporary and regularly updated population age-structure data in the absence of recent census data. By combining these with covariate layers, age-structure maps of unprecedented detail can be produced to guide the targeting of interventions in resource-poor settings.

  9. Fine structure of high-power microwave-induced resistance oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qianhui; Zudov, Michael; Dmitriev, Ivan; Baldwin, Kirk; Pfeiffer, Loren; West, Ken; Smet, Jurgen

    We report on a pronounced fine structure of microwave-induced resistance oscillations (MIRO) in an ultra-clean two-dimensional electron gas. This fine structure is manifested by additional sharp extrema residing beside the primary ones and, according to theoretical considerations, originates from multiphoton-assisted scattering off short-range impurities. Unique properties of the fine structure allow us to access all experimental parameters, including microwave power, and to separate different contributions to photoresistance. Finally, we demonstrate that the fine structure can be used to quantitatively assess the correlation properties of the disorder potential. The work at the University of Minnesota was funded by the NSF Grant No. DMR-1309578. The work at Princeton University was funded by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation through the EPiQS initiative Grant GBMF4420, and by the NSF MRSEC Grant DMR-1420541.

  10. The existence of the fine electronic structure in LaCoO3

    OpenAIRE

    Ropka, Z.; Radwanski, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    We argue that in LaCoO3 exists the fine electronic structure associated with the atomic-like states of the Co3+ ions and caused by the crystal-field and intra-atomic spin-orbit interactions. This low-energy fine electronic structure has to be taken into account for any meaningful analysis of electronic and magnetic properties of LaCoO3.

  11. Temporal and Spatial Variations in Fine and Coarse Particles in Seoul, Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghim, Young Sung

    2015-01-01

    Concentrations of fine (PM2.5) and coarse particles (PM10 -2.5), whose diameters are less 2.5 µm, and between 2.5 and 10 µm, respectively, at ambient air monitoring stations in Seoul between 2002 and 2008 were analyzed. Effects of Asian dust are mainly manifested as concentration spikes of PM10 - 2.5 but were considerable on PM2.5 levels in 2002 when Asian dust storms were the strongest. Excluding the effects of Asian dust, annual average PM2.5 showed a downward trend. Despite a similarity in year - to - year variations, PM10- 2.5, mostly affected by fugitive dust emissions, and CO and NO2, primarily affected by motor vehicle emissions, did not show a decrease. PM2.5 along with CO and NO2 had the highest values during the morning rush hour. PM10 - 2.5 peak lagged about one hour behind that of PM2.5 because of fugitive dust emissions despite an increasing mixing height. On high PM2.5 days, PM2. 5 peaks occurred two hours later than usual as the effects of secondary formation became more important. A test for the spatial variabilities shows that PM10 - 2.5, which is known to be greatly influenced by local effects, is lower in its correlation coeffic ient and higher in its coefficient of divergence (COD, which serves as an indicator for spatial variability) than PM2.5, albeit that the difference between the two is small. The average COD of PM2.5 among monitoring stations was about 0.2 but was lowered t o 0.13 when considering high PM2.5 days only, which signifies that spatial uniformity increases significantly.

  12. Temporal Dependency and the Structure of Early Looking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messinger, Daniel S; Mattson, Whitney I; Todd, James Torrence; Gangi, Devon N; Myers, Nicholas D; Bahrick, Lorraine E

    2017-01-01

    Although looking time is used to assess infant perceptual and cognitive processing, little is known about the temporal structure of infant looking. To shed light on this temporal structure, 127 three-month-olds were assessed in an infant-controlled habituation procedure and presented with a pre-recorded display of a woman addressing the infant using infant-directed speech. Previous individual look durations positively predicted subsequent look durations over a six look window, suggesting a temporal dependency between successive infant looks. The previous look duration continued to predict the subsequent look duration after accounting for habituation-linked declines in look duration, and when looks were separated by an inter-trial interval in which no stimulus was displayed. Individual differences in temporal dependency, the strength of associations between consecutive look durations, are distinct from individual differences in mean infant look duration. Nevertheless, infants with stronger temporal dependency had briefer mean look durations, a potential index of stimulus processing. Temporal dependency was evident not only between individual infant looks but between the durations of successive habituation trials (total looking within a trial). Finally, temporal dependency was evident in associations between the last look at the habituation stimulus and the first look at a novel test stimulus. Thus temporal dependency was evident across multiple timescales (individual looks and trials comprised of multiple individual looks) and persisted across conditions including brief periods of no stimulus presentation and changes from a familiar to novel stimulus. Associations between consecutive look durations over multiple timescales and stimuli suggest a temporal structure of infant attention that has been largely ignored in previous work on infant looking.

  13. Fine-scale temporal variation in marine extracellular enzymes of coastal southern California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven D Allison

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular enzymes are functional components of marine microbial communities that contribute to nutrient remineralization by catalyzing the degradation of organic substrates. Particularly in coastal environments, the magnitude of variation in enzyme activities across timescales is not well characterized. Therefore, we established the MICRO time series at Newport Pier, California, to assess enzyme activities and other ocean parameters at high temporal resolution in a coastal environment. We hypothesized that enzyme activities would vary most on daily to weekly timescales, but would also show repeatable seasonal patterns. In addition, we expected that activities would correlate with nutrient and chlorophyll concentrations, and that most enzyme activity would be bound to particles. We found that 34-48% of the variation in enzyme activity occurred at timescales <30 days. 28-56% of the variance in seawater nutrient concentrations, chlorophyll concentrations, and ocean currents also occurred on this timescale. Only the enzyme β-glucosidase showed evidence of a repeatable seasonal pattern, with elevated activities in the spring months that correlated with spring phytoplankton blooms in the Southern California Bight. Most enzyme activities were weakly but positively correlated with nutrient concentrations (r = 0.24-0.31 and upwelling (r = 0.29-0.35. For the enzymes β-glucosidase and leucine aminopeptidase, most activity was bound to particles. However, 81.2% of alkaline phosphatase and 42.8% of N-acetyl-glucosaminidase activity was freely dissolved. These results suggest that enzyme-producing bacterial communities and nutrient dynamics in coastal environments vary substantially on short timescales (<30 days. Furthermore, the enzymes that degrade carbohydrates and proteins likely depend on microbial communities attached to particles, whereas phosphorus release may occur throughout the water column.

  14. Fine-tuning structural RNA alignments in the twilight zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schirmer Stefanie

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A widely used method to find conserved secondary structure in RNA is to first construct a multiple sequence alignment, and then fold the alignment, optimizing a score based on thermodynamics and covariance. This method works best around 75% sequence similarity. However, in a "twilight zone" below 55% similarity, the sequence alignment tends to obscure the covariance signal used in the second phase. Therefore, while the overall shape of the consensus structure may still be found, the degree of conservation cannot be estimated reliably. Results Based on a combination of available methods, we present a method named planACstar for improving structure conservation in structural alignments in the twilight zone. After constructing a consensus structure by alignment folding, planACstar abandons the original sequence alignment, refolds the sequences individually, but consistent with the consensus, aligns the structures, irrespective of sequence, by a pure structure alignment method, and derives an improved sequence alignment from the alignment of structures, to be re-submitted to alignment folding, etc.. This circle may be iterated as long as structural conservation improves, but normally, one step suffices. Conclusions Employing the tools ClustalW, RNAalifold, and RNAforester, we find that for sequences with 30-55% sequence identity, structural conservation can be improved by 10% on average, with a large variation, measured in terms of RNAalifold's own criterion, the structure conservation index.

  15. Pulsed EM Field Response of a Thin, High-Contrast, Finely Layered Structure With Dielectric and Conductive Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Hoop, A.T.; Jiang, L.

    2009-01-01

    The response of a thin, high-contrast, finely layered structure with dielectric and conductive properties to an incident, pulsed, electromagnetic field is investigated theoretically. The fine layering causes the standard spatial discretization techniques to solve Maxwell's equations numerically to

  16. The Anthropic Principle and numerical coincidences involving the cosmological, gravitational and fine structure constants

    CERN Document Server

    Eaves, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    Christian Beck has proposed a set of Shannon-Khinchin axioms to derive a formula for the cosmological constant, {\\Lambda}. We discuss this result in relation to numerical coincidences involving the measured values of {\\Lambda} and the gravitational and fine structure constants, G and {\\alpha}. The empirical formulae that inter-relate the three constants suggest that the measured values of G and {\\Lambda} are consistent with the apparent anthropic fine-tuning of {\\alpha}.

  17. Fine-scale hydrodynamics influence the spatio-temporal distribution of harbour porpoises at a coastal hotspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. R.; Hosegood, P.; Wynn, R. B.; De Boer, M. N.; Butler-Cowdry, S.; Embling, C. B.

    2014-11-01

    The coastal Runnelstone Reef, off southwest Cornwall (UK), is characterised by complex topography and strong tidal flows and is a known high-density site for harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena); a European protected species. Using a multidisciplinary dataset including: porpoise sightings from a multi-year land-based survey, Acoustic Doppler Current Profiling (ADCP), vertical profiling of water properties and high-resolution bathymetry; we investigate how interactions between tidal flow and topography drive the fine-scale porpoise spatio-temporal distribution at the site. Porpoise sightings were distributed non-uniformly within the survey area with highest sighting density recorded in areas with steep slopes and moderate depths. Greater numbers of sightings were recorded during strong westward (ebbing) tidal flows compared to strong eastward (flooding) flows and slack water periods. ADCP and Conductivity Temperature Depth (CTD) data identified fine-scale hydrodynamic features, associated with cross-reef tidal flows in the sections of the survey area with the highest recorded densities of porpoises. We observed layered, vertically sheared flows that were susceptible to the generation of turbulence by shear instability. Additionally, the intense, oscillatory near surface currents led to hydraulically controlled flow that transitioned from subcritical to supercritical conditions; indicating that highly turbulent and energetic hydraulic jumps were generated along the eastern and western slopes of the reef. The depression and release of isopycnals in the lee of the reef during cross-reef flows revealed that the flow released lee waves during upslope currents at specific phases of the tidal cycle when the highest sighting rates were recorded. The results of this unique, fine-scale field study provide new insights into specific hydrodynamic features, produced through tidal forcing, that may be important for creating predictable foraging opportunities for porpoises at a

  18. 2fl-f2 DPOAE fine structure for 12 symphony orchestra musicians before and after rehearsal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reuter, Karen; Hammershøi, Dorte

    2005-01-01

    and analyzed for 12 symphony orchestra musicians using the same measurement parameters as in the previous study. Only musicians, without known hearing problems, participated in the study. The purpose of this study was to analyze the DPOAE fine structure characteristics in this group of exposed test subjects......The distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) fine structure is revealed, when measuring DPOAE with a very fine frequency resolution. It is characterized by consistent maxima and minima with notches of up to 20 dB depth. The fine structure is known also from absolute hearing thresholds......, and it has been suggested that the fine structures correlate with hearing level. In a previous study the prevalence and character of distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) fine structure was analyzed for 40 young, normal-hearing subjects. In this study the DPOAE fine structure was determined...

  19. Fine structure of endogenous stages of Eimeria turcicus developing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1988-05-06

    ANDERSEN, A.,. HUTCHINSON, W.M. & SlIM, J. Chr. 1977b. Ultrastructural studies on the endogenous development of. Eimeria brunetti IV. Formation and structure of the oocyst wall. Acta path. microbiol. scand. Sect. B 85: 201-211.

  20. Structural connectivity differences in left and right temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, Pierre; Dinkelacker, Vera; Valabregue, Romain; Thivard, Lionel; Leclerc, Xavier; Baulac, Michel; Sammler, Daniela; Colliot, Olivier; Lehéricy, Stéphane; Samson, Séverine; Dupont, Sophie

    2014-10-15

    Our knowledge on temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with hippocampal sclerosis has evolved towards the view that this syndrome affects widespread brain networks. Diffusion weighted imaging studies have shown alterations of large white matter tracts, most notably in left temporal lobe epilepsy, but the degree of altered connections between cortical and subcortical structures remains to be clarified. We performed a whole brain connectome analysis in 39 patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy and unilateral hippocampal sclerosis (20 right and 19 left) and 28 healthy subjects. We performed whole-brain probabilistic fiber tracking using MRtrix and segmented 164 cortical and subcortical structures with Freesurfer. Individual structural connectivity graphs based on these 164 nodes were computed by mapping the mean fractional anisotropy (FA) onto each tract. Connectomes were then compared using two complementary methods: permutation tests for pair-wise connections and Network Based Statistics to probe for differences in large network components. Comparison of pair-wise connections revealed a marked reduction of connectivity between left TLE patients and controls, which was strongly lateralized to the ipsilateral temporal lobe. Specifically, infero-lateral cortex and temporal pole were strongly affected, and so was the perisylvian cortex. In contrast, for right TLE, focal connectivity loss was much less pronounced and restricted to bilateral limbic structures and right temporal cortex. Analysis of large network components revealed furthermore that both left and right hippocampal sclerosis affected diffuse global and interhemispheric connectivity. Thus, left temporal lobe epilepsy was associated with a much more pronounced pattern of reduced FA, that included major landmarks of perisylvian language circuitry. These distinct patterns of connectivity associated with unilateral hippocampal sclerosis show how a focal pathology influences global network architecture, and how

  1. Connecting traces of galaxy evolution: the missing core mass-morphological fine structure relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfini, P.; Bitsakis, T.; Zezas, A.; Duc, P.-A.; Iodice, E.; González-Martín, O.; Bruzual, G.; González Sanoja, A. J.

    2018-01-01

    Deep exposure imaging of early-type galaxies (ETGs) are revealing the second-order complexity of these objects, which have been long considered uniform, dispersion-supported spheroidals. 'Fine structure' features (e.g. ripples, plumes, tidal tails, rings) as well as depleted stellar cores (i.e. central light deficits) characterize a number of massive ETG galaxies, and can be interpreted as the result of galaxy-galaxy interactions. We discuss how the time-scale for the evolution of cores and fine structures are comparable, and hence it is expected that they develop in parallel after the major interaction event which shaped the ETG. Using archival data, we compare the 'depleted stellar mass' (i.e. the mass missing from the depleted stellar core) against the prominence of the fine structure features, and observe that they correlate inversely. This result confirms our expectation that, while the supermassive black hole (SMBH) binary (constituted by the SMBHs of the merger progenitors) excavates the core via three-body interactions, the gravitational potential of the newborn galaxy relaxes, and the fine structures fade below detection levels. We expect the inverse correlation to hold at least within the first Gyr from the merger which created the SMBH binary; after then, the fine structure evolves independently.

  2. Fine structure of sprites and proposed global observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mende, S.B; Frey, H.U.; Rairden, R.l.

    2002-01-01

    In order to understand sprite processes we, have to explain the phenomena from spatial scales of a few meters to the scale of thunderstorm cells. The intricate small-scale vertical structuring of sprites or the so called beads are particularly difficult to understand. From a two-station triangula...

  3. Statistical learning of temporal community structure in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schapiro, Anna C; Turk-Browne, Nicholas B; Norman, Kenneth A; Botvinick, Matthew M

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus is involved in the learning and representation of temporal statistics, but little is understood about the kinds of statistics it can uncover. Prior studies have tested various forms of structure that can be learned by tracking the strength of transition probabilities between adjacent items in a sequence. We test whether the hippocampus can learn higher-order structure using sequences that have no variance in transition probability and instead exhibit temporal community structure. We find that the hippocampus is indeed sensitive to this form of structure, as revealed by its representations, activity dynamics, and connectivity with other regions. These findings suggest that the hippocampus is a sophisticated learner of environmental regularities, able to uncover higher-order structure that requires sensitivity to overlapping associations. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Cosmological constraints on variations of the fine structure constant at the epoch of recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menegoni, E.; Galli, S.; Archidiacono, M.; Calabrese, E.; Melchiorri, A.

    2013-12-01

    In this brief work we investigate any possible variation of the fine structure constant at the epoch of recombination. The recent measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropies at arcminute angular scales performed by the ACT and SPT experiments are probing the damping regime of Cosmic Microwave Background fluctuations. We study the role of a mechanism that could affect the shape of the Cosmic Microwave Background angular fluctuations at those scales, namely a change in the recombination process through variations in the fine structure constant α.

  5. Temporal correlations and structural memory effects in break junction measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magyarkuti, A.; Lauritzen, K. P.; Balogh, Z.; Nyáry, A.; Mészáros, G.; Makk, P.; Solomon, G. C.; Halbritter, A.

    2017-03-01

    We review data analysis techniques that can be used to study temporal correlations among conductance traces in break junction measurements. We show that temporal histograms are a simple but efficient tool to check the temporal homogeneity of the conductance traces, or to follow spontaneous or triggered temporal variations, like structural modifications in trained contacts, or the emergence of single-molecule signatures after molecule dosing. To statistically analyze the presence and the decay time of temporal correlations, we introduce shifted correlation plots. Finally, we demonstrate that correlations between the opening and subsequent closing traces may indicate structural memory effects in atomic-sized metallic and molecular junctions. Applying these methods on measured and simulated gold metallic contacts as a test system, we show that the surface diffusion induced flattening of the broken junctions helps to produce statistically independent conductance traces at room temperature, whereas at low temperature repeating tendencies are observed as long as the contacts are not closed to sufficiently high conductance setpoints. Applying opening-closing correlation analysis on Pt-CO-Pt single-molecule junctions, we demonstrate pronounced contact memory effects and recovery of the molecule for junctions breaking before atomic chains are formed. However, if chains are pulled the random relaxation of the chain and molecule after rupture prevents opening-closing correlations.

  6. Modelling sequences and temporal networks with dynamic community structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Tiago P; Rosvall, Martin

    2017-09-19

    In evolving complex systems such as air traffic and social organisations, collective effects emerge from their many components' dynamic interactions. While the dynamic interactions can be represented by temporal networks with nodes and links that change over time, they remain highly complex. It is therefore often necessary to use methods that extract the temporal networks' large-scale dynamic community structure. However, such methods are subject to overfitting or suffer from effects of arbitrary, a priori-imposed timescales, which should instead be extracted from data. Here we simultaneously address both problems and develop a principled data-driven method that determines relevant timescales and identifies patterns of dynamics that take place on networks, as well as shape the networks themselves. We base our method on an arbitrary-order Markov chain model with community structure, and develop a nonparametric Bayesian inference framework that identifies the simplest such model that can explain temporal interaction data.The description of temporal networks is usually simplified in terms of their dynamic community structures, whose identification however relies on a priori assumptions. Here the authors present a data-driven method that determines relevant timescales for the dynamics and uses it to identify communities.

  7. Food Web Structure in Temporally-Forced Ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMeans, Bailey C; McCann, Kevin S; Humphries, Murray; Rooney, Neil; Fisk, Aaron T

    2015-11-01

    Temporal variation characterizes many of Earth's ecosystems. Despite this, little is known about how food webs respond to regular variation in time, such as occurs broadly with season. We argue that season, and likely any periodicity, structures food webs along a temporal axis in an analogous way to that previously recognized in space; predators shift their diet as different resource compartments and trophic levels become available through time. These characteristics are likely (i) central to ecosystem function and stability based on theory, and (ii) widespread across ecosystem types based on empirical observations. The temporal food web perspective outlined here could provide new insight into the ecosystem-level consequences of altered abiotic and biotic processes that might accompany globally changing environments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. INTRINSIC FINE-SCALE STRUCTURE IN COMPLEX MATERIALS: BEYOND GLOBAL CRYSTALLOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. MIGLIORI; ET AL

    2000-12-01

    Many important classes of materials owe their interesting properties to structures and patterns produced by local atomic deviations from ideal crystallographic positions. The pattern scale may vary from a few atomic spacings to many microns. In a macroscopic sample these deviations may still average to an ideal lattice while retaining the intrinsic fine-scale structures, or a phase transition may create a pattern of variants of a new crystallographic structure. We have carried out experiments on the formation of fine-scale structures in a range of materials, particularly those produced by phase transitions. We have used Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy for elastic properties and dissipation, neutron pair-distribution function, and electronic transport measurements to characterize samples. We have carried out extensive dynamical modeling based on Ginzberg-Landau formalisms to simulate the development and appearance of the structures. Our results highlight the importance of long-range strain fields and the intrinsic unstable equilibrium features of the materials studied.

  9. Perception of complex sounds by the green treefrog, Hyla cinerea: envelope and fine-structure cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, A M; Buxbaum, R C; Mirin, M P

    1993-09-01

    1. The envelope periodicity of communication signals is an important feature distinguishing advertisement and aggressive calls for the green treefrog (Hyla cinerea). Envelope periodicity, a cue for periodicity pitch perception in humans, is affected by the fine-structure of the signal, a cue for timbre perception in humans. The present study examined perception of two acoustic features affecting waveform fine-structure--harmonic structure and phase structure--in male green treefrogs. 2. We analyzed evoked vocal responses of male green treefrogs living in laboratory arenas to playbacks of digitally-generated signals resembling either conspecific advertisement or aggressive calls in their first harmonic periodicity. Systematic changes in the harmonic structure of these signals were achieved by varying the harmonic relations between frequency components in the signals, and changes in phase structure were achieved by varying the starting phases of harmonically-related components. 3. Calling was significantly influenced by the first harmonic periodicity of the signals. Males vocalized more to signals with the periodicity of the advertisement than the aggressive call. There were no differences in response to harmonic and inharmonic signals with similar spectral content. Phase structure did not significantly influence vocal responses. 4. These results suggest that the fine-structure ("timbre") of complex acoustic signals is not a significant feature guiding behavior tested using a communication response in this species.

  10. Clonal growth and fine-scale genetic structure in tanoak (Notholithocarpus densiflorus: Fagaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard S. Dodd; Wasima Mayer; Alejandro Nettel; Zara. Afzal-Rafii

    2013-01-01

    The combination of sprouting and reproduction by seed can have important consequences on fine-scale spatial distribution of genetic structure (SGS). SGS is an important consideration for species’ restoration because it determines the minimum distance among seed trees to maximize genetic diversity while not prejudicing locally adapted genotypes. Local environmental...

  11. Fine structure of the subradular organ of Lepidochitona cinereus (L), (Mollusca, Polyplacophora).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, P R

    1975-10-13

    Electron microscopy of the subradular organ of the chiton Lepidochitona cinereus (L) reveals at least three cell types, microvillous, ciliated and mucus-secreting, situated in a single epithelium. The base of the epithelium is abundantly innervated and supplied with muscle cells. The fine structure is consistent with a chemosensory function for the subradular organ.

  12. Elucidation of the chemical fine structure of polysaccharides from soybean and maize kernel cell walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, M.M.H.

    2000-01-01

    The subject of this thesis was the elucidation of the chemical fine structure of polysaccharides from cell walls of soybean and maize kernel. The two species investigated represent different taxonomic groups, soybean belonging to the dicotyledonous and maize to the monocotyledonous plants.

  13. Fine structure of the oesophageal and gastric glands of the red ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ultrastructural and cytochemical study of the gastric epithelium in a freshwater teleostean fish (Perca ftuviatitis). Tissue & Ce(( 10: 23 - 37. PORTER, K.R. 1972. Herpetology. Saunders, Philadelphia. REBOLLEDO, I.M. & VIAL, J.D. 1979. Fine structure of the oxynticopeptic cell in the gastric glands of an elasmobranch species.

  14. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure investigation of nitrogen stabilized expanded austenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette; Christiansen, Thomas; Ståhl, Kenny

    2010-01-01

    As-delivered austenitic stainless steel and nitrogen stabilized expanded austenite, both fully nitrided and denitrided (in H2), were investigated with Cr, Fe and Ni extended X-ray absorption fine structure. The data shows pronounced short-range ordering of Cr and N. For the denitrided specimen...

  15. The architecture and fine structure of gill filaments in the brown ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The architecture and fine structure of gill filaments in the brown mussel, Perna perna. MA Gregory' and R.C, George. Electron Microscope Unit' and Department of Zoology, University of Durban-Westville, Private Bag X54001, Durban, 4000,. South Africa. TP. McClurg. CSIR, Division of Water, Environment and Forestry ...

  16. ESR Fine Structure of Manganese Ions in Zeolite A Detects Strong Variations of the Coordination Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, D.E. de; Weckhuysen, B.M.; Bein, T.

    1996-01-01

    The electron spin resonance spectra of Mn 2+ exchanged zeolite A have been investigated as a function of the monovalent co-cation (K + ,Na + ,Li + ,Cs + ,or NH4 + ), Mn 2+ content, recording frequency, and temperature. Three new Mn 2+ species are observed with a well-resolved fine structure; this

  17. Simulations of fine structures on the zero field steps of Josephson tunnel junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuermann, M.; Chi, C. C.; Pedersen, Niels Falsig

    1986-01-01

    are generated by the interaction of the bias current with the fluxon at the junction edges. On the first zero field step, the voltages of successive fine structures are given by Vn=[h-bar]/2e(2omegap/n), where n is an even integer. Applied Physics Letters is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  18. The plasma processes of some solar radio burst and their fine structures on the time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Z.-J.; Lu, Q.-K.; Fu, Q.-J.; Yan, Y.

    2003-04-01

    We present three special solar radio bursts or fine structures on the frequency band of 1.00-7.60Ghz. Firstly, we study the type III burst pair, which was recorded by spectrometer 1.00-2.00GHz at National Astronomical Observatory of China on Jan. 05, 1994. A plausible model might be thought that this event could be the observational evidence of two electron beams traveling bi-directions simultanuously due to the acceleration of magnetic reconnection in the corona. Secondly, a fine structure of microwave type IV bursts is microwave type M-burst on May 03 1999. Partial N-burst, which is a fine structure of solar III-V bursts recorded on August 251999 by both separated spectrometers 4.50-7.50 GHz at Purple Mountain observatory and 5.20-7.60GHz at NAO respectively, is the third phenomenon studied here. As the N-burst documented before, the last two fine structures are thought to the new observational evidences of electron beam reflected by magnetic mirror in the corona.

  19. Page 1 CHEMISTRY OF THE THAZOLES Part V. Fine Structure and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1952-09-25

    (Department of Chemotherapy, Haffkine Institute, Parel, Bombay). (Received September 25, 1952). 1. INTRODUCTION. THE thiazole ring system from the point of view of fine structure remains the least studied of the heterocyclic compounds. None of the customary physical or physico-chemical measurements which give us ...

  20. Collisional excitation of CH2 rotational/fine-structure levels by helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagdigian, P. J.; Lique, F.

    2018-02-01

    Accurate determination of the abundance of CH2 in interstellar media relies on both radiative and collisional rate coefficients. We investigate here the rotational/fine-structure excitation of CH2 induced by collisions with He. We employ a recoupling technique to generate fine-structure-resolved cross-sections and rate coefficients from close coupling spin-free scattering calculations. The calculations are based on a recent, high-accuracy CH2-He potential energy surface computed at the coupled clusters level of theory. The collisional cross-section calculations are performed for all fine-structure transitions among the first 22 and 24 energy levels of ortho- and para-CH2, respectively, and for temperatures up to 300 K. As a first application, we simulate the excitation of CH2 in typical molecular clouds. The excitation temperatures of the CH2 lines are found to be small at typical densities of molecular clouds, showing that the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium approach has to be used to analyse interstellar spectra. We also found that the fine-structure lines connected with the 404 - 313 and 505 - 414 rotational transitions show possible maser emissions so that they can be easily seen in emission. These calculations show that CH2 may have to be detected mainly through absorption spectra.

  1. Chronology and Ideology. Temporal Structuring in Israeli Historical Documentary Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosmat Garami

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines two major Israeli historic-documentary television series, Pillar of Fire (POF, product of the 1970's, and Revival (RL, product of the 1990's.The series deal with the Zionist enterprise and its realization. The research applies Gerard Genette's central narratological typology to the series' temporal structures, through the categories of Order, Duration and Frequency. Findings show that while POF's classic, linear, , historicist structure serves its celebration of the Zionist narrative, RL employs a unique, complex  , multi-dimensional structure, which enables its historical multivocality, and supports its critical presentation of the cyclical Arab-Israeli Conflict and revisionism of Israeli history.

  2. Fine structures of the capsules of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli K1.

    OpenAIRE

    Amako, K; Meno, Y; Takade, A

    1988-01-01

    The fine structures of the capsules of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli were determined by the rapid-freezing technique. The capsular layer was seen as a densely packed accumulation of fine fibers. The thickness of the capsule was approximately 160 nm in K. pneumoniae and less than 10 nm in E. coli K1. Two layers were observed in the Klebsiella capsule in which the arrangements of the fibers were different. The inner layer of the capsule was formed by a palisade of thick and dense b...

  3. Imaging structural and functional brain networks in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Boris C.; Hong, SeokJun; Bernasconi, Andrea; Bernasconi, Neda

    2013-01-01

    Early imaging studies in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) focused on the search for mesial temporal sclerosis, as its surgical removal results in clinically meaningful improvement in about 70% of patients. Nevertheless, a considerable subgroup of patients continues to suffer from post-operative seizures. Although the reasons for surgical failure are not fully understood, electrophysiological and imaging data suggest that anomalies extending beyond the temporal lobe may have negative impact on outcome. This hypothesis has revived the concept of human epilepsy as a disorder of distributed brain networks. Recent methodological advances in non-invasive neuroimaging have led to quantify structural and functional networks in vivo. While structural networks can be inferred from diffusion MRI tractography and inter-regional covariance patterns of structural measures such as cortical thickness, functional connectivity is generally computed based on statistical dependencies of neurophysiological time-series, measured through functional MRI or electroencephalographic techniques. This review considers the application of advanced analytical methods in structural and functional connectivity analyses in TLE. We will specifically highlight findings from graph-theoretical analysis that allow assessing the topological organization of brain networks. These studies have provided compelling evidence that TLE is a system disorder with profound alterations in local and distributed networks. In addition, there is emerging evidence for the utility of network properties as clinical diagnostic markers. Nowadays, a network perspective is considered to be essential to the understanding of the development, progression, and management of epilepsy. PMID:24098281

  4. Fine-structure energy levels, oscillator strengths and lifetimes in Cu XVI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, G. P.; Msezane, A. Z.

    2011-05-01

    We have performed large-scale CIV3 calculations of excitation energies from ground state for 69 fine-structure levels as well as of oscillator strengths and radiative decay rates for all electric-dipole-allowed and intercombination transitions among the fine-structure levels of the terms belonging to the (1s22s22p6)3s23p2, 3s3p3, 3p4, 3s23p3d, 3s23p4s, 3s23p4p, 3s23p4d, and 3s23p4f configurations of Cu XVI. These states are represented by very extensive configuration-interaction (CI) wave functions obtained with the computer code CIV3 of Hibbert. The important relativistic effects in intermediate coupling are incorporated by means of the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. Small adjustments to the diagonal elements of the Hamiltonian matrices have been made so that the energy splittings are as close as possible to the energy values of those from the National Institute for Standards and Technology. The mixing among several fine-structure levels is found to be very strong. From our radiative decay rates we have also calculated radiative lifetimes of the fine-structure levels. Our calculated lifetime for the high spin level 3s3p3(5S2) is found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental value of Trabert et al (1988 J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 5 2173). In this calculation, we also predict new data for several fine-structure levels where no other theoretical and/or experimental results are available. ).

  5. Fine-structure energy levels, oscillator strengths and lifetimes in Al-like chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, G. P.; Msezane, A. Z.

    2014-01-01

    We have performed large scale calculations of excitation energies from ground state for 97 fine-structure levels as well as of oscillator strengths and radiative rates for all electric-dipole-allowed and intercombination transitions among the fine-structure levels of the terms belonging to the (1 s 22 s 22 p 6)3 s 23 p, 3 s3 p 2, 3 s 23 d, 3 p 3, 3 s3 p3 d, 3 p 23 d, 3 s3 d 2, 3 s 24 s, 3 s 24 p, 3 s 24 d, 3 s 24 f and 3 s3 p4 s configurations of Al-like chromium. These states are represented by very extensive configuration-interaction wave functions obtained with the configuration-interaction version 3 computer code of Hibbert. The important relativistic effects in intermediate coupling are included through the Breit-Pauli approximation. Small adjustments to the diagonal elements of Hamiltonian matrices have been made so that energy splittings are as close as possible to the energy values of the National Institute of Standards and Technology. From the radiative rates, we have also calculated radiative lifetimes of fine-structure levels. Generally, the calculated excitation energies, oscillator strengths and the radiative rates are found to be in good agreement with those obtained from other sophisticated calculations. However, significant differences between present calculated lifetimes and those from the calculation of Fischer and co-workers for a few fine-structure levels are noted and discussed. Also the present calculated lifetime for level 3 s 24 s(2 S 0.5) is found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental value given by Thornbury and co-workers. With this calculation, we also predict new data for several fine-structure levels, where no other theoretical and/or experimental results are available.

  6. The second spectrum of niobium: I. Accurate fine structure study of even-parity levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouazza, Safa

    2013-03-01

    For the first time, a parametric analysis of the fine and hyperfine structure for even-parity levels of Nb II, involving 17 configurations, has been performed. The interpretation has been carried out based on a linked-parameter method of level-fitting calculations in a large multiconfiguration basis. The sets of fine structure parameters, the leading eigenvector percentages of levels, as well as their calculated magnetic Landé g-factors are newly given. Furthermore, we confirm on the whole the validity of the attributions to term designations, previously proposed. The single-electron hyperfine structure parameters are determined in their entirety for 93Nb II for the model space (4d + 5s)4 with a good accuracy and confirmed by ab initio calculations. Finally, a complete list of the predicted magnetic hyperfine structure constants A of all levels of this model space was generated.

  7. FS4, FS4-p, and FSP: a 4-month crossover study of 3 fine structure sound-coding strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riss, Dominik; Hamzavi, Jafar-Sasan; Blineder, Michaela; Honeder, Clemens; Ehrenreich, Isabella; Kaider, Alexandra; Baumgartner, Wolf-Dieter; Gstoettner, Wolfgang; Arnoldner, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    coding strategies over their previous default FSP (FSP, N = 13; FS4, N = 13; FS4-p, N = 7). In summary, FS4 and FS4-p offer new and further options in audio processor fitting, with similar levels of speech understanding in noise as FSP. This is an interesting result, given that the strategies' presentation of temporal fine structure differs from FSP. At the end of the study, 20 of 33 subjects chose either FS4 or FS4-p over their previous default strategy FSP.

  8. Topological map of the Hofstadter butterfly: Fine structure of Chern numbers and Van Hove singularities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naumis, Gerardo G., E-mail: naumis@fisica.unam.mx [Departamento de Física–Química, Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000 México, Distrito Federal (Mexico); Department of Physics and Astronomy, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Escuela Superior de Física y Matemáticas, ESIA-Zacatenco, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México D.F. (Mexico)

    2016-04-29

    The Hofstadter butterfly is a quantum fractal with a highly complex nested set of gaps, where each gap represents a quantum Hall state whose quantized conductivity is characterized by topological invariants known as the Chern numbers. Here we obtain simple rules to determine the Chern numbers at all scales in the butterfly fractal and lay out a very detailed topological map of the butterfly by using a method used to describe quasicrystals: the cut and projection method. Our study reveals the existence of a set of critical points that separates orderly patterns of both positive and negative Cherns that appear as a fine structure in the butterfly. This fine structure can be understood as a small tilting of the projection subspace in the cut and projection method and by using a Chern meeting formula. Finally, we prove that the critical points are identified with the Van Hove singularities that exist at every band center in the butterfly landscape. - Highlights: • Use a higher dimensional approach to build a topological map of the Hofstadter butterfly. • There is a fine structure of Chern numbers around each rational flux. • Van Hove singularities are limiting points for topological sequences of the fine flux.

  9. Determining the velocity fine structure by a laser anemometer with fixed orientation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristensen, Leif; Kirkegaard, P.; Mikkelsen, Torben

    2011-02-15

    We have studied the velocity structure functions and spectra which can be determined by a CW-laser anemometer and a (pulsed) lidar anemometer. We have found useful theoretical expressions for both types of anemometers and compared their filtering of the along-beam turbulent velocity. The purpose has been to establish a basis for remote determining of turbulence fine-structure in terms of the rate of dissipation of specific kinetic energy in the atmospheric boundary layer. (Author)

  10. Fine Structure Zonal Flow Excitation by Beta-induced Alfven Eigenmode

    CERN Document Server

    Qiu, Zhiyong; Zonca, Fulvio

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear excitation of low frequency zonal structure (LFZS) by beta-induced Alfven eigenmode (BAE) is investigated using nonlinear gyrokinetic theory. It is found that electrostatic zonal flow (ZF), rather than zonal current, is preferentially excited by finite amplitude BAE. In addition to the well-known meso-scale radial envelope structure, ZF is also found to exhibit fine radial structure due to the localization of BAE with respect to mode rational surfaces. Specifically, the zonal electric field has an even mode structure at the rational surface where radial envelope peaks.

  11. Electronic fine structure and recombination dynamics in single InAs quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seguin, R.

    2008-01-28

    In the work at hand single InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) are examined via cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. A thorough analysis of the spectra leads to an unambiguous assignment of the lines to the decay of specific excitonic complexes. A special aspect of the Coulomb interaction, the exchange interaction, gives rise to a fine structure in the initial and final states of an excitonic decay. This leads to a fine structure in the emission spectra that again is unique for every excitonic complex. The exchange interaction is discussed in great detail in this work.QDs of different sizes are investigated and the influence on the electronic properties is monitored. Additionally, the structure is modified ex situ by a thermal annealing process. The changes of the spectra under different annealing temperatures are traced. Finally, recombination dynamics of different excitonic complexes are examined by performing time-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. (orig.)

  12. Exciton fine structure splitting in InP quantum dots in GaInP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellström, C; Seifert, W; Pryor, C; Samuelson, L; Pistol, M-E

    2007-07-25

    We have investigated the electronic structure of excitons in InP quantum dots in GaInP. The exciton is theoretically expected to have four states. Two of the states are allowed to optically decay to the ground (vacuum) state in the dipole approximation. We see these two lines in photoluminescence (PL) experiments and find that the splitting between the lines (the fine structure splitting) is 150(± 30) µeV. The lines were perpendicularly polarized. We verified that the lines arise from neutral excitons by using correlation spectroscopy. The theoretical calculations show that the polarization of the emission lines are along and perpendicular to the major axis of elongated dots. The fine structure splitting depends on the degree of elongation of the dots and is close to zero for dots of cylindrical symmetry, despite the influence of the piezoelectric polarization, which is included in the calculation.

  13. A closer look at dynamic speckles and the use of their fine-structure for object measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanson, Steen Grüner; Iversen, Theis F.Q.; Jakobsen, Michael Linde

    2010-01-01

    The possibility to “dress up” the speckles and thereby providing them with a fine structure will be discussed. As these speckles arise from scattering off solid targets, the dynamics of the speckles and their inherent fine structure might vary, providing information on different aspects of the su...

  14. Data from: Fine-scale spatial genetic structure in the frankincense tree Boswellia papyrifera (Del.) Hochst. and implications for conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekele, A.A.; Duminil, J.; Wouters, T.C.A.E.; Bongers, F.; Smulders, M.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The file "Data fine-scale structure of Boswellia papyrifera TGGE paper.xlsx" contains the microsatellite data used in the study " Fine-scale spatial genetic structure in the frankincense tree Boswellia papyrifera (Del.) Hochst. and implications for conservation", by A. B. Addisalem, J. Duminil, D.

  15. Estimations of cosmological parameters from the observational variation of the fine structure constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Zhong-Xu; Liu, Xian-Ming; Zhang, Zhi-Song; Zhang, Tong-Jie

    2013-12-01

    We present constraints on the quintessence scalar field model from observational data of the variation of the fine structure constant obtained from the Keck telescope and VLT. Within the theoretical frame proposed by Bekenstein, the constraints on the parameters of the quintessence scalar field model are obtained. Considering the prior of Ωm0 as WMAP 7 suggests, we obtain various results from different samples. Based on these results, we also calculate the probability density function of the coupling constant ζ. The best-fit values show a consistent relationship between ζ and the different experimental results. In our work, we test two different potential models, namely, the inverse power law potential and the exponential potential. The results show that both the large value of the parameters in the potential and the strong coupling can cause a variation in the fine structure constant.

  16. Fine structural analysis of the stinger in venom apparatus of the scorpion Euscorpius mingrelicus (Scorpiones: Euscorpiidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Yigit

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the morphology, histology and fine structure of the stinger, a part of the venom apparatus of Euscorpius mingrelicus (Kessler, 1874 (Scorpiones: Euscorpiidae were studied by light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The stinger, located at the end section of the telson, is sickle-shaped. The venom is ejected through a pair of venom pores on its subterminal portion. Both venom ducts extend along the stinger without contact with each other since they are separated by connective tissue cells. The stinger cuticle is composed of two layers. Additionally, there are many pore canals and some hemolymph vessels in the cuticle. This work constitutes the first histological and fine structure study on Euscorpius mingrelicus stinger.

  17. Solar Cycle Fine Structure and Surface Rotation from Ca II K-Line Time Series Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scargle, Jeff; Keil, Steve; Worden, Pete

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of three and a half decades of data from the NSO/AFRL/Sac Peak K-line monitoring program yields evidence for four components to the variation: (a) the solar cycle, with considerable fine structure and a quasi-periodicity of 122.4 days; (b) a stochastic process, faster than (a) and largely independent of it, (c) a quasi-periodic signal due to rotational modulation, and of course (d) observational errors (shown to be quite small). Correlation and power spectrum analyses elucidate periodic and aperiodic variation of these chromospheric parameters. Time-frequency analysis is especially useful for extracting information about differential rotation, and in particular elucidates the connection between its behavior and fine structure of the solar cycle on approximately one-year time scales. These results further suggest that similar analyses will be useful at detecting and characterizing differential rotation in stars from stellar light-curves such as those being produced at NASA's Kepler observatory.

  18. Fine-structure energy levels and radiative rates in Si-like chlorine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, G. P.; Tayal, Vikas; Msezane, A. Z.

    2012-01-01

    Excitation energies and radiative rates for electric dipole (E1) transitions among the 86 fine-structure levels belonging to the configurations (1 s 22 s 22 p 6)3 s 23 p 2, 3 s3 p 3, 3 s 23 p3 d, 3 p 4, 3 s 23 p4 s, 3 s 23 p4 p, 3 s3 p 2(2 S)4 s, 3 s3 p 2(2 P)4 s, 3 s3 p 2(4 P)4 s, 3 s3 p 2(2 D)4 s, 3 s 23 p4 d and 3 s 23 p4 f of Cl IV are calculated using extensive configuration-interaction (CI) wave functions obtained with the CIV3 computer code of Hibbert. The relativistic effects in intermediate coupling are incorporated by means of the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. In order to keep the calculated energy splittings close to the energy values of the National Institute for Standards and Technology, we have made small adjustments to the diagonal elements of the Hamiltonian matrices. Our calculated energy levels, including their orderings, are in excellent agreement with the available NIST values. The mixing among several fine-structure levels is found to be very strong. From our radiative rates we have also calculated radiative lifetimes of the fine-structure levels. Significant differences between our calculated lifetimes and those from a sophisticated calculation for a few low lying levels are noted and discussed. In this calculation, we also predict new data for several fine-structure levels where no other theoretical and/or experimental results are available.

  19. The 16th International Conference on X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS16)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunwaldt, J.-D.; Hagelstein, M.; Rothe, J.

    2016-05-01

    This preface of the proceedings volume of the 16th International Conference on X- ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS16) gives a glance on the five days of cutting-edge X-ray science which were held in Karlsruhe, Germany, August 23 - 28, 2015. In addition, several satellite meetings took place in Hamburg, Berlin and Stuttgart, a Sino-German workshop, three data analysis tutorials as well as special symposia on industrial catalysis and XFELs were held at the conference venue.

  20. Fine structures in Fe3Al alloy layer of a new hot dip aluminized steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The fine structure in the Fe–Al alloy layer of a new hot dip aluminized steel (HDA) was examined by means of X-ray diffractometry (XRD), electron diffraction technique, etc. The test results indicated that the Fe–Al alloy layer of the new aluminized steel mainly composed of Fe3Al, FeAl and -Fe (Al) solid solution. There was ...

  1. New Constraints on Spatial Variations of the Fine Structure Constant from Clusters of Galaxies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan De Martino

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We have constrained the spatial variation of the fine structure constant using multi-frequency measurements of the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect of 618 X-ray selected clusters. Although our results are not competitive with the ones from quasar absorption lines, we improved by a factor 10 and ∼2.5 previous results from Cosmic Microwave Background power spectrum and from galaxy clusters, respectively.

  2. ESR Fine Structure of Manganese Ions in Zeolite A Detects Strong Variations of the Coordination Environment

    OpenAIRE

    De Vos, D.E.; Weckhuysen, B.M.; Bein, T.

    1996-01-01

    The electron spin resonance spectra of Mn 2+ exchanged zeolite A have been investigated as a function of the monovalent co-cation (K + ,Na + ,Li + ,Cs + ,or NH4 + ), Mn 2+ content, recording frequency, and temperature. Three new Mn 2+ species are observed with a well-resolved fine structure; this allows for the first time a direct quantitative determination of the zero-field splitting (ZFS) parameters in zeolites. In hydrated zeolites, three ESR active Mn 2+ species are observed, characterize...

  3. Dirac relation and renormalization group equations for electric and magnetic fine structure constants

    CERN Document Server

    Laperashvili, L V

    1999-01-01

    The quantum field theory describing electric and magnetic charges and revealing a dual symmetry was developed in the Zwanziger formalism. The renormalization group (RG) equations for both fine structure constants - electric $\\alpha $ and magnetic $\\tilde \\alpha $ - were obtained. It was shown that the Dirac relation is valid for the renormalized $\\alpha $ and $\\tilde perturbatively only in the small region: $0.25 \\stackrel{<}{\\sim} \\alpha, relation: $\\alpha {\\tilde \\alpha} = \\frac 14 $.

  4. Atomic oxygen fine-structure splittings with tunable far-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Lyndon R.; Evenson, Kenneth M.; Matsushima, Fusakazu; Nelis, Thomas; Robinson, Ruth L.

    1991-01-01

    Fine-structure splittings of atomic oxygen (O-16) in the ground state have been accurately measured using a tunable far-infrared spectrometer. The 3P0-3pl splitting is 2,060,069.09 (10) MHz, and the 3Pl-3P2 splitting is 4,744,777.49 (16) MHz. These frequencies are important for measuring atomic oxygen concentration in earth's atmosphere and the interstellar medium.

  5. Current Work to Improve Precision in Measurements of Helium Fine Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan Rezaeian, Nima; Shiner, David

    2013-06-01

    With the recent improvement on the 23P Helium fine structure calculation by Pachucki and the quest for finding the most precise value for α, spectroscopic measurement of the helium atom has a great advantage to find this primary constant. Distinctively, the 32 GHz atomic fine structure of 23P J2 to J0 interval with uncertainty of 100Hz leads a factor of three better than the best current value of α and an impulsion to the theory to evaluate the largest term of order mα8 is our ambition. This measurement not only tests the quantum electrodynamics, but also establishes the fine structure constant α with uncertainty of 1.6 ppb. The electron g-factor measurement of α, even though, is by far more accurate at 0.37 ppb, our end result would be a examination to the best alternative atom recoil measurements with different approach. To reach on this level of accuracy, we implement our frequency selector with precision better than 1 to 100 along with laser cooling mechanism to enhance the signal to noise ratio by increasing the signal strength. This work is supported by NSF grant.

  6. Atomistic theory of excitonic fine structure in InAs/InP nanowire quantum dot molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świderski, M.; Zieliński, M.

    2017-03-01

    Nanowire quantum dots have peculiar electronic and optical properties. In this work we use atomistic tight binding to study excitonic spectra of artificial molecules formed by a double nanowire quantum dot. We demonstrate a key role of atomistic symmetry and nanowire substrate orientation rather than cylindrical shape symmetry of a nanowire and a molecule. In particular for [001 ] nanowire orientation we observe a nonvanishing bright exciton splitting for a quasimolecule formed by two cylindrical quantum dots of different heights. This effect is due to interdot coupling that effectively reduces the overall symmetry, whereas single uncoupled [001 ] quantum dots have zero fine structure splitting. We found that the same double quantum dot system grown on [111 ] nanowire reveals no excitonic fine structure for all considered quantum dot distances and individual quantum dot heights. Further we demonstrate a pronounced, by several orders of magnitude, increase of the dark exciton optical activity in a quantum dot molecule as compared to a single quantum dot. For [111 ] systems we also show spontaneous localization of single particle states in one of nominally identical quantum dots forming a molecule, which is mediated by strain and origins from the lack of the vertical inversion symmetry in [111 ] nanostructures of overall C3 v symmetry. Finally, we study lowering of symmetry due to alloy randomness that triggers nonzero excitonic fine structure and the dark exciton optical activity in realistic nanowire quantum dot molecules of intermixed composition.

  7. Bloch oscillations of ultracold atoms and measurement of the fine structure constant; Oscillations de Bloch d'atomes ultrafroids et mesure de la constante de structure fine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clade, P

    2005-10-15

    From a measurement of the recoil velocity of an atom absorbing a photon, it is possible to deduce a determination of the ratio h/m between the Planck constant and the mass of the atoms and then to deduce a value of the fine structure constant alpha. To do this measurement, we use the technique of Bloch oscillations, which allows us to transfer a large number of recoils to atoms. A velocity sensor, based on velocity selective Raman transition, enables us to measure the momentum transferred to the atoms. A measurement with a statistical uncertainty of 4.4 10{sup -9}, in conjunction with a careful study of systematic effects (5 10{sup -9}), has led us to a determination of alpha with an uncertainty of 6.7 10{sup -9}: {alpha}{sup -1}(Rb) = 137.03599878 (91). This uncertainty is similar to the uncertainty of the best determinations of alpha based on atom interferometry. (author)

  8. Quantitative analysis of structural neuroimaging of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memarian, Negar; Thompson, Paul M; Engel, Jerome; Staba, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is the most common of the surgically remediable drug-resistant epilepsies. MRI is the primary diagnostic tool to detect anatomical abnormalities and, when combined with EEG, can more accurately identify an epileptogenic lesion, which is often hippocampal sclerosis in cases of MTLE. As structural imaging technology has advanced the surgical treatment of MTLE and other lesional epilepsies, so too have the analysis techniques that are used to measure different structural attributes of the brain. These techniques, which are reviewed here and have been used chiefly in basic research of epilepsy and in studies of MTLE, have identified different types and the extent of anatomical abnormalities that can extend beyond the affected hippocampus. These results suggest that structural imaging and sophisticated imaging analysis could provide important information to identify networks capable of generating spontaneous seizures and ultimately help guide surgical therapy that improves postsurgical seizure-freedom outcomes. PMID:24319498

  9. How spatio-temporal habitat connectivity affects amphibian genetic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Alexander G.; Schlichting, P; Billerman, S; Jesmer, B; Micheletti, S; Fortin, M.-J.; Funk, W.C.; Hapeman, P; Muths, Erin L.; Murphy, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneous landscapes and fluctuating environmental conditions can affect species dispersal, population genetics, and genetic structure, yet understanding how biotic and abiotic factors affect population dynamics in a fluctuating environment is critical for species management. We evaluated how spatio-temporal habitat connectivity influences dispersal and genetic structure in a population of boreal chorus frogs (Pseudacris maculata) using a landscape genetics approach. We developed gravity models to assess the contribution of various factors to the observed genetic distance as a measure of functional connectivity. We selected (a) wetland (within-site) and (b) landscape matrix (between-site) characteristics; and (c) wetland connectivity metrics using a unique methodology. Specifically, we developed three networks that quantify wetland connectivity based on: (i) P. maculata dispersal ability, (ii) temporal variation in wetland quality, and (iii) contribution of wetland stepping-stones to frog dispersal. We examined 18 wetlands in Colorado, and quantified 12 microsatellite loci from 322 individual frogs. We found that genetic connectivity was related to topographic complexity, within- and between-wetland differences in moisture, and wetland functional connectivity as contributed by stepping-stone wetlands. Our results highlight the role that dynamic environmental factors have on dispersal-limited species and illustrate how complex asynchronous interactions contribute to the structure of spatially-explicit metapopulations.

  10. Generating spatial precipitation ensembles: impact of temporal correlation structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Rakovec

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Sound spatially distributed rainfall fields including a proper spatial and temporal error structure are of key interest for hydrologists to force hydrological models and to identify uncertainties in the simulated and forecasted catchment response. The current paper presents a temporally coherent error identification method based on time-dependent multivariate spatial conditional simulations, which are conditioned on preceding simulations. A sensitivity analysis and real-world experiment are carried out within the hilly region of the Belgian Ardennes. Precipitation fields are simulated for pixels of 10 km × 10 km resolution. Uncertainty analyses in the simulated fields focus on (1 the number of previous simulation hours on which the new simulation is conditioned, (2 the advection speed of the rainfall event, (3 the size of the catchment considered, and (4 the rain gauge density within the catchment. The results for a sensitivity analysis show for typical advection speeds >20 km h−1, no uncertainty is added in terms of across ensemble spread when conditioned on more than one or two previous hourly simulations. However, for the real-world experiment, additional uncertainty can still be added when conditioning on a larger number of previous simulations. This is because for actual precipitation fields, the dynamics exhibit a larger spatial and temporal variability. Moreover, by thinning the observation network with 50%, the added uncertainty increases only slightly and the cross-validation shows that the simulations at the unobserved locations are unbiased. Finally, the first-order autocorrelation coefficients show clear temporal coherence in the time series of the areal precipitation using the time-dependent multivariate conditional simulations, which was not the case using the time-independent univariate conditional simulations. The presented work can be easily implemented within a hydrological calibration and data assimilation

  11. A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study Reveals Local Brain Structural Alterations associated With Ambient Fine Particles in older women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Casanova

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Exposure to ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5: PM with aerodynamic diameters <2.5µm has been linked with cognitive deficits in older adults. Using fine-grained voxel-wise analyses, we examined whether PM2.5 exposure also affects brain structure.Methods: Brain MRI data were obtained from 1,365 women (aged 71-89 in the Women’s Health Initiative Memory Study and local brain volumes were estimated using RAVENS (regional analysis of volumes in normalized space. Based on geocoded residential locations and air monitoring data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, we employed a spatiotemporal model to estimate long-term (3-year average exposure to ambient PM2.5 preceding MRI scans. Voxel-wise linear regression models were fit separately to gray matter (GM and white matter (WM maps to analyze associations between brain structure and PM2.5 exposure, with adjustment for potential confounders. Results: Increased PM2.5 exposure was associated with smaller volumes in both cortical GM and subcortical WM areas. For GM, associations were clustered in the bilateral superior, middle, and medial frontal gyri. For WM, the largest clusters were in the frontal lobe, with smaller clusters in the temporal, parietal, and occipital lobes. No statistically significant associations were observed between PM2.5 exposure and hippocampal volumes. Conclusions: Long-term PM2.5 exposures may accelerate loss of both GM and WM in older women. While our previous work linked WM decreased volumes to PM2.5 air pollution, this is the first neuroimaging study reporting associations between air pollution exposure and smaller volumes of cortical GM. Our data support the hypothesized synaptic neurotoxicity of airborne particles.

  12. Extracting the Textual and Temporal Structure of Supercomputing Logs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, S; Singh, I; Chandra, A; Zhang, Z; Bronevetsky, G

    2009-05-26

    Supercomputers are prone to frequent faults that adversely affect their performance, reliability and functionality. System logs collected on these systems are a valuable resource of information about their operational status and health. However, their massive size, complexity, and lack of standard format makes it difficult to automatically extract information that can be used to improve system management. In this work we propose a novel method to succinctly represent the contents of supercomputing logs, by using textual clustering to automatically find the syntactic structures of log messages. This information is used to automatically classify messages into semantic groups via an online clustering algorithm. Further, we describe a methodology for using the temporal proximity between groups of log messages to identify correlated events in the system. We apply our proposed methods to two large, publicly available supercomputing logs and show that our technique features nearly perfect accuracy for online log-classification and extracts meaningful structural and temporal message patterns that can be used to improve the accuracy of other log analysis techniques.

  13. Making News by Structuring Time: A Temporal Analysis on Infographic Production in News Organization

    OpenAIRE

    Pai-Lin Cheng

    2016-01-01

    How can organization be able to accomplish its mission of gathering information just in time? As a temporal organization, news media employ temporal structuring strategies to integrate institutional and individual efforts to have the work done before the deadline. This researcher conducted a field research on infographic designers of daily newspapers to observe: (1) how temporal structures of regulate the infographic designers; (2) how designers interact the temporal structures and develo...

  14. Temporal structure of neuronal population oscillations with empirical model decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Xiaoli [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China)]. E-mail: xiaoli.avh@gmail.com

    2006-08-07

    Frequency analysis of neuronal oscillation is very important for understanding the neural information processing and mechanism of disorder in the brain. This Letter addresses a new method to analyze the neuronal population oscillations with empirical mode decomposition (EMD). Following EMD of neuronal oscillation, a series of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) are obtained, then Hilbert transform of IMFs can be used to extract the instantaneous time frequency structure of neuronal oscillation. The method is applied to analyze the neuronal oscillation in the hippocampus of epileptic rats in vivo, the results show the neuronal oscillations have different descriptions during the pre-ictal, seizure onset and ictal periods of the epileptic EEG at the different frequency band. This new method is very helpful to provide a view for the temporal structure of neural oscillation.

  15. pH-dependent effects of 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) on proliferation, endocytosis, fine structure and DNP resistance in Tetrahymena

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Jytte R.

    1995-01-01

    Biologi, 2,4-dinitrophenol, pH-dependence, fine structure, cell proliferation, phagocytosis, Tetrahymena pyriformis......Biologi, 2,4-dinitrophenol, pH-dependence, fine structure, cell proliferation, phagocytosis, Tetrahymena pyriformis...

  16. Fine structure of abscission zones : III. Cytoplasmic changes in abscising pedicels of tobacco and tomato flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, T E; Valdovinos, J G

    1968-09-01

    Changes in the cells comprising the abscission zones of Lycopersicon esculentum and Nicotiana tabacum flower pedicels were observed, apparently associated with the separation of the flowers from the plants. Special attention is devoted to changes which occurred in the fine structure of intracellular components of the abscission cells. Microbodies with crystalloid cores in cells comprising the abscission tissue of the pedicels were observed to undergo structural changes. These changes occurred prior to the cell-wall degradation which resulted in cell separation. At the time of cell separation, the number of microbodies present in the abscission cells was greatly diminished. The changes in the fine structure of the crystalloid core may represent the release of latent enzymes into an active form which then induces cell separation in the abscission tissue. Other structures in the cells in which changes occurred are the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the nucleolus. Prior to, and during cell-wall disintegration, an abundance of rough ER was observed within the abscission cells. The occurrence of rough ER may represent an increase in the synthesis of protein for export from the cells of the abscission region and/or for the synthesis of certain enzymes associated with the degradation of cell walls in the abscission zone itself. In some abscission cells, prior to the cell-separation phase, nucleoli were observed which appeared as though they had segregated spatially. In such cases, the amorphous zone was the only nucleolar component observed. The possible significance of these observations is discussed.

  17. Accurate Electron Affinity of Iron and Fine Structures of Negative Iron ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaolin; Luo, Zhihong; Li, Jiaming; Ning, Chuangang

    2016-05-03

    Ionization potential (IP) is defined as the amount of energy required to remove the most loosely bound electron of an atom, while electron affinity (EA) is defined as the amount of energy released when an electron is attached to a neutral atom. Both IP and EA are critical for understanding chemical properties of an element. In contrast to accurate IPs and structures of neutral atoms, EAs and structures of negative ions are relatively unexplored, especially for the transition metal anions. Here, we report the accurate EA value of Fe and fine structures of Fe(-) using the slow electron velocity imaging method. These measurements yield a very accurate EA value of Fe, 1235.93(28) cm(-1) or 153.236(34) meV. The fine structures of Fe(-) were also successfully resolved. The present work provides a reliable benchmark for theoretical calculations, and also paves the way for improving the EA measurements of other transition metal atoms to the sub cm(-1) accuracy.

  18. Lack of sex-biased dispersal promotes fine-scale genetic structure in alpine ungulates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roffler, Gretchen H.; Talbot, Sandra L.; Luikart, Gordon; Sage, George K.; Pilgrim, Kristy L.; Adams, Layne G.; Schwartz, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying patterns of fine-scale genetic structure in natural populations can advance understanding of critical ecological processes such as dispersal and gene flow across heterogeneous landscapes. Alpine ungulates generally exhibit high levels of genetic structure due to female philopatry and patchy configuration of mountain habitats. We assessed the spatial scale of genetic structure and the amount of gene flow in 301 Dall’s sheep (Ovis dalli dalli) at the landscape level using 15 nuclear microsatellites and 473 base pairs of the mitochondrial (mtDNA) control region. Dall’s sheep exhibited significant genetic structure within contiguous mountain ranges, but mtDNA structure occurred at a broader geographic scale than nuclear DNA within the study area, and mtDNA structure for other North American mountain sheep populations. No evidence of male-mediated gene flow or greater philopatry of females was observed; there was little difference between markers with different modes of inheritance (pairwise nuclear DNA F ST = 0.004–0.325; mtDNA F ST = 0.009–0.544), and males were no more likely than females to be recent immigrants. Historical patterns based on mtDNA indicate separate northern and southern lineages and a pattern of expansion following regional glacial retreat. Boundaries of genetic clusters aligned geographically with prominent mountain ranges, icefields, and major river valleys based on Bayesian and hierarchical modeling of microsatellite and mtDNA data. Our results suggest that fine-scale genetic structure in Dall’s sheep is influenced by limited dispersal, and structure may be weaker in populations occurring near ancestral levels of density and distribution in continuous habitats compared to other alpine ungulates that have experienced declines and marked habitat fragmentation.

  19. Right hemispheric contributions to fine auditory temporal discriminations: high-density electrical mapping of the duration mismatch negativity (MMN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierfilippo De Sanctis

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available That language processing is primarily a function of the left hemisphere has led to the supposition that auditory temporal discrimination is particularly well-tuned in the left hemisphere, since speech discrimination is thought to rely heavily on the registration of temporal transitions. However, physiological data have not consistently supported this view. Rather, functional imaging studies often show equally strong, if not stronger, contributions from the right hemisphere during temporal processing tasks, suggesting a more complex underlying neural substrate. The mismatch negativity (MMN component of the human auditory evoked-potential (AEP provides a sensitive metric of duration processing in human auditory cortex and lateralization of MMN can be readily assayed when sufficiently dense electrode arrays are employed. Here, the sensitivity of the left and right auditory cortex for temporal processing was measured by recording the MMN to small duration deviants presented to either the left or right ear. We found that duration deviants differing by just 15% (i.e. rare 115 ms tones presented in a stream of 100 ms tones elicited a significant MMN for tones presented to the left ear (biasing the right hemisphere. However, deviants presented to the right ear elicited no detectable MMN for this separation. Further, participants detected significantly more duration deviants and committed fewer false alarms for tones presented to the left ear during a subsequent psychophysical testing session. In contrast to the prevalent model, these results point to equivalent if not greater right hemisphere contributions to temporal processing of small duration changes.

  20. INFLUENCE OF FINE-DISPERSED BORON CARBIDE ON THE STRUCTURE AND CHARACTERISTICS OF IRON-BORON ALLOY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. F. Nevar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of boron carbide as fine-dispersed material input into the melt on structure morphology, founding, technological and exploitation characterisstics of cast iron-boron material is shown.

  1. Online temporally consistent indoor depth video enhancement via static structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Lu; Ngan, King Ngi; Lim, Chern-Loon; Li, Songnan

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method to online enhance the quality of a depth video based on the intermediary of a so-called static structure of the captured scene. The static and dynamic regions of the input depth frame are robustly separated by a layer assignment procedure, in which the dynamic part stays in the front while the static part fits and helps to update this structure by a novel online variational generative model with added spatial refinement. The dynamic content is enhanced spatially while the static region is otherwise substituted by the updated static structure so as to favor the long-range spatiotemporal enhancement. The proposed method both performs long-range temporal consistency on the static region and keeps necessary depth variations in the dynamic content. Thus, it can produce flicker-free and spatially optimized depth videos with reduced motion blur and depth distortion. Our experimental results reveal that the proposed method is effective in both static and dynamic indoor scenes and is compatible with depth videos captured by Kinect and time-of-flight camera. We also demonstrate that excellent performance can be achieved by the proposed method in comparison with the existing spatiotemporal approaches. In addition, our enhanced depth videos and static structures can act as effective cues to improve various applications, including depth-aided background subtraction and novel view synthesis, showing satisfactory results with few visual artifacts.

  2. Recognition Memory is Improved by a Structured Temporal Framework During Encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thavabalasingam, Sathesan; O'Neil, Edward B; Zeng, Zheng; Lee, Andy C H

    2015-01-01

    In order to function optimally within our environment, we continuously extract temporal patterns from our experiences and formulate expectations that facilitate adaptive behavior. Given that our memories are embedded within spatiotemporal contexts, an intriguing possibility is that mnemonic processes are sensitive to the temporal structure of events. To test this hypothesis, in a series of behavioral experiments we manipulated the regularity of interval durations at encoding to create temporally structured and unstructured frameworks. Our findings revealed enhanced recognition memory (d') for stimuli that were explicitly encoded within a temporally structured vs. unstructured framework. Encoding information within a temporally structured framework was also associated with a reduction in the negative effects of proactive interference and was linked to greater recollective recognition memory. Furthermore, rhythmic temporal structure was found to enhance recognition memory for incidentally encoded information. Collectively, these results support the possibility that we possess a greater capacity to learn and subsequently remember temporally structured information.

  3. Recognition memory is improved by a structured temporal framework during encoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathesan eThavabalasingam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to function optimally within our environment, we continuously extract temporal patterns from our experiences and formulate expectations that facilitate adaptive behavior. Given that our memories are embedded within spatiotemporal contexts, an intriguing possibility is that mnemonic processes are sensitive to the temporal structure of events. To test this hypothesis, in a series of behavioral experiments we manipulated the regularity of interval durations at encoding to create temporally structured and unstructured frameworks. Our findings revealed enhanced recognition memory (d’ for stimuli that were explicitly encoded within a temporally structured versus unstructured framework. Encoding information within a temporally structured framework was also associated with a reduction in the negative effects of proactive interference and was linked to greater recollective recognition memory. Furthermore, rhythmic temporal structure was found to enhance recognition memory for incidentally encoded information. Collectively, these results support the possibility that we possess a greater capacity to learn and subsequently remember temporally structured information.

  4. Regular variation of the fine structure of statistical distributions as a consequence of cosmophysical agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shnoll, S E; Zenchenko, T A; Zenchenko, K I; Pozharskii, E V; Kolombet, V A [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Biophysics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushchino, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Konradov, Alexander A [Institute for Biochemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2000-02-28

    Considered is the statistical ground of the certainty of cosmophysical effects on the fine structure of distributions governing the results of measurements in various physical processes. We show that the previously discussed effects of synchronous variations of histogram shapes in independent processes, and the periodical occurrence of histograms of a particular shape, do not depend on the form of the integral distribution. The adequacy of visual (expert) estimation when comparing the shapes of histograms as an alternative to the standard statistical methods is justified. (letters to the editors)

  5. Development of a compact beam intensity monitor for micro X-ray absorption fine structure measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Hayakawa, S; Oshima, M; Hirokawa, T

    2001-01-01

    A compact beam intensity monitor detecting an X-ray excited sample current from a thin metal foil was developed for micro X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements. By utilizing gas amplification caused by the ejected photoelectrons or Auger electrons, the monitor can achieve better sensitivity than what can be realized with the ionization chamber. Fluctuation of the beam intensity through the pinhole of 10 mu m was precisely measured by using this monitor, and the XAFS spectrum from a Ni thin foil was successfully measured with adequate normalization.

  6. Evolution of the fine-structure constant in runaway dilaton models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.J.A.P. Martins

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We study the detailed evolution of the fine-structure constant α in the string-inspired runaway dilaton class of models of Damour, Piazza and Veneziano. We provide constraints on this scenario using the most recent α measurements and discuss ways to distinguish it from alternative models for varying α. For model parameters which saturate bounds from current observations, the redshift drift signal can differ considerably from that of the canonical ΛCDM paradigm at high redshifts. Measurements of this signal by the forthcoming European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT, together with more sensitive α measurements, will thus dramatically constrain these scenarios.

  7. The fine structure levels for ground states of negative ions of nitrogen and phosphorus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyla Özdemir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The fine structure levels for negative ions (anions of nitrogen and phosphorus have been investigated using multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock method within the framework of Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian (MCHF+BP. Nitrogen and phosphorus have half-filled outer shell in ground state 1s22s22p3 4S and 1s22s22p33s23p3 4S, respectively. It has been stated in most works that the negative ion of nitrogen is instable whereas the negative ion of phosphorus is stable. The results obtained have been compared with other works.

  8. Fine Structure and Instability of the Ml-a Locus in Barley

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, Roger P.; Ellingboe, Albert H.

    1985-01-01

    There are many naturally occurring variants at the Ml-a locus in barley that confer resistance to the powdery mildew fungus Erysiphe graminis f. sp. hordei. Since the Ml-a locus is bracketed by Hor-1 and Hor-2, genes that encode storage proteins in the endosperm, the Ml-a locus is amenable to fine structure analysis. Rare susceptible recombinants, as judged by exchange of flanking markers, were recovered in F3 families from the Ml-a10 x Ml-a1, Ml-a1 x Ml-a15 and Ml-a6 x Ml-a13 crosses. Some...

  9. Ground-based and spaceborn observations of the type II burst with developed fine structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorovskyy, V.; Melnik, V.; Konovalenko, A.; Brazhenko, A.; Rucker, H.; Stanislavskyy, A.; Panchenko, M.

    2012-09-01

    The combination of two huge ground-based radio telescopes (UTR-2 and URAN-2) operated in decameter wavelengths with three spatially separated spacecrafts (SOHO, STEREO-A and STEREO-B) equipped with white light coronagraphs, UV telescopes and decameter-hectometer band radio telescopes created a unique opportunity to investigate the high energy solar transients, such as CMEs and their manifestations in radio bands - type II bursts. In this paper we made detailed analysis of the powerful and complex event occurred on 7 June 2011 consisted of Halo-CME and type II burst with rich fine structure.

  10. Three-dimensional fine-scale genetic structure of the neotropical epiphytic orchid, Laelia rubescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapnell, Dorset W; Hamrick, J L; Nason, John D

    2004-05-01

    Epiphytic plants occupy three-dimensional space, which allows more individuals to be closely clustered spatially than is possible for populations occupying two dimensions. The unique characteristics of epiphytes can act in concert to influence the fine-scale genetic structure of their populations which can, in turn, influence mating patterns and other population phenomena. Three large populations of Laelia rubescens (Orchidaceae) in the Costa Rican seasonal dry forest were sampled at two levels of intensity to determine: (i) whether individual clusters contain more than one genotype, and (ii) the spatial distribution and fine-scale genetic structure of genotypes within populations. Samples were assayed for their multilocus allozyme genotypes and spatial autocorrelation analyses were performed. High levels of genetic diversity, high genotypic diversity and low among-population variation were found. In the larger clusters, multiple genets per cluster were common with discrete clusters containing up to nine genotypes. Spatial autocorrelation analyses indicated significant positive genetic structure at distances of

  11. Fine-scale population structure of blue whale wintering aggregations in the Gulf of California.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Costa-Urrutia

    Full Text Available Population differentiation in environments without well-defined geographical barriers represents a challenge for wildlife management. Based on a comprehensive database of individual sighting records (1988-2009 of blue whales from the winter/calving Gulf of California, we assessed the fine-scale genetic and spatial structure of the population using individual-based approaches. Skin samples of 187 individuals were analyzed for nine microsatellite loci. A single population with no divergence among years and months and no isolation by distance (Rxy = 0.1-0.001, p>0.05 were found. We ran two bayesian clustering methods using Structure and Geneland softwares in two different ways: 1 a general analysis including all individuals in which a single cluster was identified with both softwares; 2 a specific analysis of females only in which two main clusters (Loreto Bay and northern areas, and San Jose-La Paz Bay area were revealed by Geneland program. This study provides information indicating that blue whales wintering in the Gulf of California are part of a single population unit and showed a fine-scale structure among females, possibly associated with their high site fidelity, particularly when attending calves. It is likely that the loss of genetic variation is minimized by male mediated gene flow, which may reduce the genetic drift effect. Opportunities for kin selection may also influence calf survival and, in consequence, have a positive impact on population demography in this small and endangered population.

  12. Fine-scale population structure of blue whale wintering aggregations in the Gulf of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Urrutia, Paula; Sanvito, Simona; Victoria-Cota, Nelva; Enríquez-Paredes, Luis; Gendron, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Population differentiation in environments without well-defined geographical barriers represents a challenge for wildlife management. Based on a comprehensive database of individual sighting records (1988-2009) of blue whales from the winter/calving Gulf of California, we assessed the fine-scale genetic and spatial structure of the population using individual-based approaches. Skin samples of 187 individuals were analyzed for nine microsatellite loci. A single population with no divergence among years and months and no isolation by distance (Rxy = 0.1-0.001, p>0.05) were found. We ran two bayesian clustering methods using Structure and Geneland softwares in two different ways: 1) a general analysis including all individuals in which a single cluster was identified with both softwares; 2) a specific analysis of females only in which two main clusters (Loreto Bay and northern areas, and San Jose-La Paz Bay area) were revealed by Geneland program. This study provides information indicating that blue whales wintering in the Gulf of California are part of a single population unit and showed a fine-scale structure among females, possibly associated with their high site fidelity, particularly when attending calves. It is likely that the loss of genetic variation is minimized by male mediated gene flow, which may reduce the genetic drift effect. Opportunities for kin selection may also influence calf survival and, in consequence, have a positive impact on population demography in this small and endangered population.

  13. Fine and Superfine Structure of the Decameter-Hectometer Type II Burst on 7 June 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorovskyy, V. V.; Melnik, V. N.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Panchenko, M.; Poedts, S.; Mykhaylov, V. A.

    2015-07-01

    The characteristics of a type II burst with a herringbone structure observed both with ground-based radio telescopes (UTR-2 and URAN-2) and space-borne spectrometers (STEREO-A and B) are discussed. The burst was recorded on 7 June 2011 in the frequency band 3 - 33 MHz. It was characterized by extremely rich fine structure. Statistical analysis of more than 300 herringbone sub-bursts constituting the burst was performed separately for the positively (reverse) and negatively (forward) drifting sub-bursts. The sense and the degree of circular polarization of the herringbone sub-bursts were measured in a wide frequency band (16 - 32 MHz). A second-order fine frequency structure of the herringbone sub-bursts was observed and studied for the first time. Using STEREO/COR1 and SOHO/LASCO-C2 images, we determined the direction and radial speed of the coronal mass ejection responsible for the studied type II burst. The possible location of the type II burst source on the flank of the shock was found.

  14. Spatio-temporal structure of hooded gull flocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yomosa, Makoto; Mizuguchi, Tsuyoshi; Hayakawa, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    We analyzed the spatio-temporal structure of hooded gull flocks with a portable stereo camera system. The 3-dimensional positions of individuals were reconstructed from pairs of videos. The motions of each individual were analyzed, and both gliding and flapping motions were quantified based on the velocity time series. We analyzed the distributions of the nearest neighbor's position in terms of coordinates based on each individual's motion. The obtained results were consistent with the aerodynamic interaction between individuals. We characterized the leader-follower relationship between individuals by a delay time to mimic the direction of a motion. A relation between the delay time and a relative position was analyzed quantitatively, which suggested the basic properties of the formation flight that maintains order in the flock.

  15. Spatio-temporal structure of hooded gull flocks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Yomosa

    Full Text Available We analyzed the spatio-temporal structure of hooded gull flocks with a portable stereo camera system. The 3-dimensional positions of individuals were reconstructed from pairs of videos. The motions of each individual were analyzed, and both gliding and flapping motions were quantified based on the velocity time series. We analyzed the distributions of the nearest neighbor's position in terms of coordinates based on each individual's motion. The obtained results were consistent with the aerodynamic interaction between individuals. We characterized the leader-follower relationship between individuals by a delay time to mimic the direction of a motion. A relation between the delay time and a relative position was analyzed quantitatively, which suggested the basic properties of the formation flight that maintains order in the flock.

  16. Imaging structural and functional brain networks in temporal lobe epilepsy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bernhardt, Boris C; Hong, Seokjun; Bernasconi, Andrea; Bernasconi, Neda

    2013-01-01

    Early imaging studies in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) focused on the search for mesial temporal sclerosis, as its surgical removal results in clinically meaningful improvement in about 70% of patients...

  17. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure studies of GaN epilayers doped with Er

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katchkanov, V.; Mosselmans, J. F. W.; O'Donnell, K. P.; Nogales, E.; Hernandez, S.; Martin, R. W.; Steckl, A.; Lee, D. S.

    2006-05-01

    The structural properties of Er doped GaN epilayers were studied by means of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measured at the Er L III and Ga K-edges. The samples were doped with Er in-situ during growth by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The Ga local structure was found to be the same in all samples studied. Er L III-edge EXAFS showed that when growth conditions were gradually changed from Ga-rich to Ga-poor, an increase in Er concentration from 0.15 at.% to 0.64 at.% is accompanied by the sequential formation of ErGaN, ErGaN clusters with locally high Er content and finally a pure ErN component. This study indicates that Er incorporation into GaN is enhanced under Ga-poor conditions, at the expense of the formation of Er-rich clusters and ErN precipitates.

  18. Modeling the Structure and Composition of Nanoparticles by Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine-Structure Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Yevick, Aaron; Cooper, Chana; Vasic, Relja

    2011-07-01

    Many metal clusters in the 1-nm size range are catalytically active, and their enhanced reactivity is often attributed to their size, structure, morphology, and details of alloying. Synchrotron sources provide a wide range of opportunities for studying catalysis. Among them, extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy is the premier method for investigating structure and composition of nanocatalysts. In this review, we summarize common methods of EXAFS analysis for geometric and compositional characterization of nanoparticles. We discuss several aspects of the experiments and analyses that are critical for reliably modeling EXAFS data. The most important are sample homogeneity, the width of the size and compositional distribution functions, and accounting for multiple-scattering contributions to EXAFS. We focus on the contribution of structural disorder and structural/compositional heterogeneity to the accuracy of three-dimensional modeling.

  19. Fine structure of Tibetan kefir grains and their yeast distribution, diversity, and shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Man; Wang, Xingxing; Sun, Guowei; Qin, Bing; Xiao, Jinzhou; Yan, Shuling; Pan, Yingjie; Wang, Yongjie

    2014-01-01

    Tibetan kefir grains (TKGs), a kind of natural starter for fermented milk in Tibet, China, host various microorganisms of lactic acid bacteria, yeasts, and occasionally acetic acid bacteria in a polysaccharide/protein matrix. In the present study, the fine structure of TKGs was studied to shed light on this unusual symbiosis with stereomicroscopy and thin sections. The results reveal that TKGs consist of numerous small grain units, which are characterized by a hollow globular structure with a diameter between 2.0 and 9.0 mm and a wall thickness of approximately 200 µm. A polyhedron-like net structure, formed mainly by the bacteria, was observed in the wall of the grain units, which has not been reported previously to our knowledge. Towards the inside of the grain unit, the polyhedron-like net structures became gradually larger in diameter and fewer in number. Such fine structures may play a crucial role in the stability of the grains. Subsequently, the distribution, diversity, and shift of yeasts in TKGs were investigated based on thin section, scanning electron microscopy, cloning and sequencing of D1/D2 of the 26S rRNA gene, real-time quantitative PCR, and in situ hybridization with specific fluorescence-labeled oligonucleotide probes. These show that (i) yeasts appear to localize on the outer surface of the grains and grow normally together to form colonies embedded in the bacterial community; (ii) the diversity of yeasts is relatively low on genus level with three dominant species--Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Kluyveromyces marxianus, and Yarrowia lipolytica; (iii) S. cerevisiae is the stable predominant yeast species, while the composition of Kluyveromyces and Yarrowia are subject to change over time. Our results indicate that TKGs are relatively stable in structure, and culture conditions to some extent shape the microbial community and interaction in kefir grains. These findings pave the way for further study of the specific symbiotic associations between S

  20. Fine structure of Tibetan kefir grains and their yeast distribution, diversity, and shift.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Lu

    Full Text Available Tibetan kefir grains (TKGs, a kind of natural starter for fermented milk in Tibet, China, host various microorganisms of lactic acid bacteria, yeasts, and occasionally acetic acid bacteria in a polysaccharide/protein matrix. In the present study, the fine structure of TKGs was studied to shed light on this unusual symbiosis with stereomicroscopy and thin sections. The results reveal that TKGs consist of numerous small grain units, which are characterized by a hollow globular structure with a diameter between 2.0 and 9.0 mm and a wall thickness of approximately 200 µm. A polyhedron-like net structure, formed mainly by the bacteria, was observed in the wall of the grain units, which has not been reported previously to our knowledge. Towards the inside of the grain unit, the polyhedron-like net structures became gradually larger in diameter and fewer in number. Such fine structures may play a crucial role in the stability of the grains. Subsequently, the distribution, diversity, and shift of yeasts in TKGs were investigated based on thin section, scanning electron microscopy, cloning and sequencing of D1/D2 of the 26S rRNA gene, real-time quantitative PCR, and in situ hybridization with specific fluorescence-labeled oligonucleotide probes. These show that (i yeasts appear to localize on the outer surface of the grains and grow normally together to form colonies embedded in the bacterial community; (ii the diversity of yeasts is relatively low on genus level with three dominant species--Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Kluyveromyces marxianus, and Yarrowia lipolytica; (iii S. cerevisiae is the stable predominant yeast species, while the composition of Kluyveromyces and Yarrowia are subject to change over time. Our results indicate that TKGs are relatively stable in structure, and culture conditions to some extent shape the microbial community and interaction in kefir grains. These findings pave the way for further study of the specific symbiotic

  1. Study on the coordination structure of pt sorbed on bacterial cells using x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuya Tanaka

    Full Text Available Biosorption has been intensively investigated as a promising technology for the recovery of precious metals from solution. However, the detailed mechanism responsible for the biosorption of Pt on a biomass is not fully understood because of a lack of spectroscopic studies. We applied X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy to elucidate the coordination structure of Pt sorbed on bacterial cells. We examined the sorption of Pt(II and Pt(IV species on bacterial cells of Bacillus subtilis and Shewanella putrefaciens in NaCl solutions. X-ray absorption near-edge structure and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS of Pt-sorbed bacteria suggested that Pt(IV was reduced to Pt(II on the cell's surface, even in the absence of an organic material as an exogenous electron donor. EXAFS spectra demonstrated that Pt sorbed on bacterial cells has a fourfold coordination of chlorine ions, similar to PtCl42-, which indicated that sorption on the protonated amine groups of the bacterial cells. This work clearly demonstrated the coordination structure of Pt sorbed on bacterial cells. The findings of this study will contribute to the understanding of Pt biosorption on biomass, and facilitate the development of recovery methods for rare metals using biosorbent materials.

  2. Coupling Fine-Scale Root and Canopy Structure Using Ground-Based Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brady S. Hardiman

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ecosystem physical structure, defined by the quantity and spatial distribution of biomass, influences a range of ecosystem functions. Remote sensing tools permit the non-destructive characterization of canopy and root features, potentially providing opportunities to link above- and belowground structure at fine spatial resolution in functionally meaningful ways. To test this possibility, we employed ground-based portable canopy LiDAR (PCL and ground penetrating radar (GPR along co-located transects in forested sites spanning multiple stages of ecosystem development and, consequently, of structural complexity. We examined canopy and root structural data for coherence (i.e., correlation in the frequency of spatial variation at multiple spatial scales ≤10 m within each site using wavelet analysis. Forest sites varied substantially in vertical canopy and root structure, with leaf area index and root mass more becoming even vertically as forests aged. In all sites, above- and belowground structure, characterized as mean maximum canopy height and root mass, exhibited significant coherence at a scale of 3.5–4 m, and results suggest that the scale of coherence may increase with stand age. Our findings demonstrate that canopy and root structure are linked at characteristic spatial scales, which provides the basis to optimize scales of observation. Our study highlights the potential, and limitations, for fusing LiDAR and radar technologies to quantitatively couple above- and belowground ecosystem structure.

  3. Fine- and hyperfine structure investigations of even configuration system of atomic terbium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanska, D.; Elantkowska, M.; Ruczkowski, J.; Furmann, B.

    2017-03-01

    In this work a parametric study of the fine structure (fs) and the hyperfine structure (hfs) for the even-parity configurations of atomic terbium (Tb I) is presented, based in considerable part on the new experimental results. Measurements on 134 spectral lines were performed by laser induced fluorescence (LIF) in a hollow cathode discharge lamp; on this basis, the hyperfine structure constants A and B were determined for 52 even-parity levels belonging to the configurations 4f85d6s2, 4f85d26s or 4f96s6p; in all the cases those levels were involved in the transitions investigated as the lower levels. For 40 levels the hfs was examined for the first time, and for the remaining 12 levels the new measurements supplement our earlier results. As a by-product, also preliminary values of the hfs constants for 84 odd-parity levels were determined (the investigations of the odd-parity levels system in the terbium atom are still in progress). This huge amount of new experimental data, supplemented by our earlier published results, were considered for the fine and hyperfine structure analysis. A multi-configuration fit of 7 configurations was performed, taking into account second-order of perturbation theory, including the effects of closed shell-open shell excitations. Predicted values of the level energies, as well as of magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole hyperfine structure constants A and B, are quoted in cases when no experimental values are available. By combining our experimental data with our own semi-empirical procedure it was possible to identify correctly the lower and upper level of the line 544.1440 nm measured by Childs with the use of the atomic-beam laser-rf double-resonance technique (Childs, J Opt Soc Am B 9;1992:191-6).

  4. Fine-scale population genetic structure in a fission-fusion society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archie, Elizabeth A; Maldonado, Jésus E; Hollister-Smith, Julie A; Poole, Joyce H; Moss, Cynthia J; Fleischer, Robert C; Alberts, Susan C

    2008-06-01

    Nonrandom patterns of mating and dispersal create fine-scale genetic structure in natural populations - especially of social mammals - with important evolutionary and conservation genetic consequences. Such structure is well-characterized for typical mammalian societies; that is, societies where social group composition is stable, dispersal is male-biased, and males form permanent breeding associations in just one or a few social groups over the course of their lives. However, genetic structure is not well understood for social mammals that differ from this pattern, including elephants. In elephant societies, social groups fission and fuse, and males never form permanent breeding associations with female groups. Here, we combine 33 years of behavioural observations with genetic information for 545 African elephants (Loxodonta africana), to investigate how mating and dispersal behaviours structure genetic variation between social groups and across age classes. We found that, like most social mammals, female matrilocality in elephants creates co-ancestry within core social groups and significant genetic differentiation between groups (Phi(ST) = 0.058). However, unlike typical social mammals, male elephants do not bias reproduction towards a limited subset of social groups, and instead breed randomly across the population. As a result, reproductively dominant males mediate gene flow between core groups, which creates cohorts of similar-aged paternal relatives across the population. Because poaching tends to eliminate the oldest elephants from populations, illegal hunting and poaching are likely to erode fine-scale genetic structure. We discuss our results and their evolutionary and conservation genetic implications in the context of other social mammals.

  5. Fine-grained parallel RNAalifold algorithm for RNA secondary structure prediction on FPGA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Fei; Dou, Yong; Zhou, Xingming; Yang, Xuejun; Xu, Jiaqing; Zhang, Yang

    2009-01-30

    In the field of RNA secondary structure prediction, the RNAalifold algorithm is one of the most popular methods using free energy minimization. However, general-purpose computers including parallel computers or multi-core computers exhibit parallel efficiency of no more than 50%. Field Programmable Gate-Array (FPGA) chips provide a new approach to accelerate RNAalifold by exploiting fine-grained custom design. RNAalifold shows complicated data dependences, in which the dependence distance is variable, and the dependence direction is also across two dimensions. We propose a systolic array structure including one master Processing Element (PE) and multiple slave PEs for fine grain hardware implementation on FPGA. We exploit data reuse schemes to reduce the need to load energy matrices from external memory. We also propose several methods to reduce energy table parameter size by 80%. To our knowledge, our implementation with 16 PEs is the only FPGA accelerator implementing the complete RNAalifold algorithm. The experimental results show a factor of 12.2 speedup over the RNAalifold (ViennaPackage - 1.6.5) software for a group of aligned RNA sequences with 2981-residue running on a Personal Computer (PC) platform with Pentium 4 2.6 GHz CPU.

  6. The variation of the fine-structure constant from disformal couplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Bruck, Carsten; Mifsud, Jurgen; Nunes, Nelson J.

    2015-12-01

    We study a theory in which the electromagnetic field is disformally coupled to a scalar field, in addition to a usual non-minimal electromagnetic coupling. We show that disformal couplings modify the expression for the fine-structure constant, α. As a result, the theory we consider can explain the non-zero reported variation in the evolution of α by purely considering disformal couplings. We also find that if matter and photons are coupled in the same way to the scalar field, disformal couplings itself do not lead to a variation of the fine-structure constant. A number of scenarios are discussed consistent with the current astrophysical, geochemical, laboratory and the cosmic microwave background radiation constraints on the cosmological evolution of α. The models presented are also consistent with the current type Ia supernovae constraints on the effective dark energy equation of state. We find that the Oklo bound in particular puts strong constraints on the model parameters. From our numerical results, we find that the introduction of a non-minimal electromagnetic coupling enhances the cosmological variation in α. Better constrained data is expected to be reported by ALMA and with the forthcoming generation of high-resolution ultra-stable spectrographs such as PEPSI, ESPRESSO, and ELT-HIRES. Furthermore, an expected increase in the sensitivity of molecular and nuclear clocks will put a more stringent constraint on the theory.

  7. Fine-scale population structure in a deep-sea teleost (orange roughy, Hoplostethus atlanticus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Jens; Shephard, Samuel; Coughlan, James; Trueman, Clive N.; Rogan, Emer; Cross, Tom F.

    2011-06-01

    Microsatellite and otolith chemistry variability were analysed to assess fine scale genetic structure in the deep-sea teleost orange roughy ( Hoplostethus atlanticus). The Porcupine Bank located on the continental shelf west of Ireland, comprises a complex system of mounds and flat areas that are broken up by canyons. Orange roughy form spawning aggregations on mounds and flat areas, and were heavily fished until the resource was depleted. By analysing adults in spawning condition and juvenile orange roughy from six mounds and one flat area, shallow but significant genetic population structure was evident ( FST=0.0031, Dest across loci=0.0306 and G-test). Most of the structure was accounted for by inclusion of a sample from the flats (six of ten significant pairwise FST estimates and G-tests, and five of the highest Dest estimates included the flat sample). While the flat sample contributed most to the genetic structure, there was still significant (albeit weaker) structure among mound samples. The observed structure was supported by otolith analyses. Fish caught as late juveniles in either the flat or mound areas showed consistent differences in chemistry at the otolith core throughout the initial 10 years of growth, which could indicate site fidelity. We hypothesise that seafloor topographic structures (mounds and flats) may provide discrete spawning areas for orange roughy and that the limited gene flow between these spawning areas is insufficient to counteract genetic drift.

  8. Splittings, Satellites and Fine Structure in the Soft X-ray Spectroscopy of the Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, J. G.; Yu, S. -W.; Chung, B. W.

    2013-06-14

    Perhaps the most demanding and powerful actinide spectroscopy is that using soft X-ray and VUV photons. Because of the relatively low energy and fairly small sampling depths of these photons and the corresponding electrons, it is necessary to use un-encapsulated samples with highly cleaned and well-prepared surfaces. This causes a myriad of sample containment problems for these radioactive materials. Despite these hindrances and difficulties, the soft-X-ray and ultra-violet spectroscopy of the actinides can provide an amazing level of detailed information, particularly having to do with 5f electronic structure. In this paper, the splittings, satellites and fine structure of the following actinide soft X-ray spectroscopies will be discussed: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy; X-ray absorption spectroscopy; and inverse photoelectron spectroscopy, including Bremstrahlung isochromat spectroscopy and resonant inverse photoelectron spectroscopy.

  9. The eversible tentacle organs of Polyommatus caterpillars (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae): Morphology, fine structure, sensory supply and functional aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnatzy, W; Jatho, M; Kleinteich, T; Gorb, S N; Hustert, R

    2017-11-01

    In their late (3rd and 4th) larval stages, caterpillars of the myrmecophilous lycaenid (Lepidoptera) species Polyommatus coridon and Polyommatus icarus, possess on their 8th abdominal segment two eversible so called tentacle organs (TOs). Previous histological and behavioural results have proposed that the TOs may release a volatile substance that elicits "excited runs" in attendant ants. In our study we investigated for the first time the temporal in- and eversion pattern of TOs. Using nerve tracing, Micro-CT, light- and electron microscopy techniques we studied (i) the histology of the 8th abdominal segment, (ii) the fine structure of the cuticular and cellular apparatus of the TOs, (iii) the attachment sites of the retractor muscle of each TO and (iv) the fine structure of the long slender tentacle hairs which are exposed to the outside, when the TOs are everted and fold back into the TO-sac during inversion. Our data show that the tentacle hairs are typical insect mechanoreceptors, each innervated by a small bipolar sensory cell with a tubular body in the tip of the outer dendritic segment. The latter is enclosed by a cuticular sheath previously called the "internal cuticular duct" and misinterpreted in earlier studies as the space, where the tentacle hairs actively secrete fluids. However, we found no glandular structures nearby or in the wall of the TO-sac. Also we did not reveal any conspicuous signs of secretory activity in one of the enveloping cells belonging to a tentacle hair. Although highly unusual features for an insect mechanoreceptor are: (a) the hair-shaft lumen of tentacle hairs contains flocculent material as well small vesicles and (b) the thin cuticular wall of the hair-shaft and its spines possess few tiny pores. Our data do not support the assumption of previous studies that volatile substances are released via the tentacle organs during their interactions with ants which in turn are supposed to cause excited runs in ants. Copyright © 2017

  10. Fine spectral structures in Jovian decametric radio emission observed by ground-based radio telescope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchenko, M.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Shaposhnikov, V. E.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Rucker, H. O.

    2014-04-01

    Jupiter with the largest planetary magnetosphere in the solar system emits intense coherent non-thermal radio emission in a wide frequency range. This emission is a result of a complicated interaction between the dynamic Jovian magnetosphere and energetic particles supplying the free energy from planetary rotation and the interaction between Jupiter and the Galilean moons. Decametric radio emission (DAM) is the strongest component of Jovian radiation observed in a frequency range from few MHz up to 40 MHz. This emission is generated via cyclotron maser mechanism in sources located along Jovian magnetic field lines. Depending on the time scales the Jovian DAMexhibits different complex spectral structures. We present the observations of the Jovian decametric radio emission using the large ground-based radio telescope URAN- 2 (Poltava, Ukraine) operated in the decametric frequency range. This telescope is one of the largest low frequency telescopes in Europe equipped with high performance digital radio spectrometers. The antenna array of URAN-2 consists of 512 crossed dipoles with an effective area of 28 000m2 and beam pattern size of 3.5 x 7 deg. (at 25 MHz). The instrument enables continuous observations of the Jovian radio during long period of times. Jovian DAM was observed continuously since Sep. 2012 (depending on Jupiter visibility) with relatively high time-frequency resolution (4 kHz - 100ms) in the broad frequency range (8-32MHz). We have detected a big amount of the fine spectral structures in the dynamic spectra of DAM such as trains of S-bursts, quasi-continuous narrowband emission, narrow-band splitting events and zebra stripe-like patterns. We analyzed mainly the fine structures associated with non-Io controlled DAM. We discuss how the observed narrowband structures which most probably are related to the propagation of the decametric radiation in the Jupiter's ionosphere can be used to study the plasma parameters in the inner Jovian magnetosphere.

  11. Observational study on the fine structure and dynamics of a solar jet. II. Energy release process revealed by spectral analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaue, Takahito; Tei, Akiko; Asai, Ayumi; Ueno, Satoru; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Shibata, Kazunari

    2018-01-01

    We report on a solar jet phenomenon associated with the C5.4 class flare on 2014 November 11. The data of the jet was provided by the Solar Dynamics Observatory, the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) aboard Hinode, and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph and Domeless Solar Telescope (DST) at Hida Observatory, Kyoto University. These plentiful data enabled us to present this series of papers to discuss all the processes of the observed phenomena, including energy storage, event trigger, and energy release. In this paper, we focus on the energy release process of the observed jet, and mainly describe our spectral analysis on the Hα data of DST to investigate the internal structure of the Hα jet and its temporal evolution. This analysis reveals that in the physical quantity distributions of the Hα jet, such as line-of-sight velocity and optical thickness, there is a significant gradient in the direction crossing the jet. We interpret this internal structure as the consequence of the migration of the energy release site, based on the idea of ubiquitous reconnection. Moreover, by measuring the horizontal flow of the fine structures in the jet, we succeeded in deriving the three-dimensional velocity field and the line-of-sight acceleration field of the Hα jet. The analysis result indicates that part of the ejecta in the Hα jet experienced additional acceleration after it had been ejected from the lower atmosphere. This secondary acceleration was found to occur in the vicinity of the intersection between the trajectories of the Hα jet and the X-ray jet observed by Hinode/XRT. We propose that a fundamental cause of this phenomenon is magnetic reconnection involving the plasmoid in the observed jet.

  12. Temporal and spatial distributions of summer-time ground-level fine particulate matters in Baltimore-DC region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Greenwald, R.; Sarnat, J.; Hu, X.; Kewada, P.; Morales, Y.; Goldman, G.; Redman, J.; Russell, A. G.

    2011-12-01

    Environmental epidemiological studies have established a robust association between chronic exposure to ambient level fine particulate matters (PM2.5) and adverse health effects such as COPD, cardiorespiratory diseases, and premature death. Population exposure to PM2.5 has historically been estimated using ground measurements which are often sparse and unevenly distributed. There has been much interest as well as suspicion in both the air quality management and research communities regarding the value of satellite retrieved AOD as particle air pollution indicators. A critical step towards the future use of satellite aerosol products in air quality monitoring and management is to better understand the AOD-PM2.5 association. The existing EPA and IMPROVE networks are insufficient to validate AOD-estimated PM2.5 surface especially when higher resolution satellite products become available in the near future. As part of DISCOVER-AQ mission, we deployed 15 portable filter-based samplers alongside of ground-based sun photometers of the Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Network (DRAGON) in July 2011. Gravimetric analyses were conducted to estimate 24h PM2.5 mass concentrations, using Teflon filters and Personal Environmental Monitors (PEMs) operated at a flow rate of 4 LPM. Pre- and post-sampling filters were weighed at our weigh room laboratory facilities at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Our objectives are (1) to examine if AOD measured by ground-based sun-photometers with the support from ground-based lidars can provide the fine scale spatial heterogeneity observed by ground PM monitors, and (2) whether PM2.5 levels estimated by satellite AOD agree with this true PM2.5 surface. Study design, instrumentation, and preliminary results of measured PM2.5 spatial patterns in July 2011 will be presented as well as discussion of further data analysis and model development.

  13. A pipeline of spatio-temporal filtering for predicting the laterality of self-initiated fine movements from single trial readiness potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Zeid, Elias; Rezazadeh Sereshkeh, Alborz; Chau, Tom

    2016-12-01

    Objective. In recent years, the readiness potential (RP), a type of pre-movement neural activity, has been investigated for asynchronous electroencephalogram (EEG)-based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). Since the RP is attenuated for involuntary movements, a BCI driven by RP alone could facilitate intentional control amid a plethora of unintentional movements. Previous studies have attempted single trial classification of RP via spatial and temporal filtering methods, or by combining the RP with event-related desynchronization. However, RP feature extraction remains challenging due to the slow non-oscillatory nature of the potential, its variability among participants and the inherent noise in EEG signals. Here, we propose a participant-specific, individually optimized pipeline of spatio-temporal filtering (PSTF) to improve RP feature extraction for laterality prediction. Approach. PSTF applies band-pass filtering on RP signals, followed by Fisher criterion spatial filtering to maximize class separation, and finally temporal window averaging for feature dimension reduction. Optimal parameters are simultaneously found by cross-validation for each participant. Using EEG data from 14 participants performing self-initiated left or right key presses as well as two benchmark BCI datasets, we compared the performance of PSTF to two popular methods: common spatial subspace decomposition, and adaptive spatio-temporal filtering. Main results. On the BCI benchmark data sets, PSTF performed comparably to both existing methods. With the key press EEG data, PSTF extracted more discriminative features, thereby leading to more accurate (74.99% average accuracy) predictions of RP laterality than that achievable with existing methods. Significance. Naturalistic and volitional interaction with the world is an important capacity that is lost with traditional system-paced BCIs. We demonstrated a significant improvement in fine movement laterality prediction from RP features alone. Our

  14. In situ structural investigation of iron phthalocyanine monolayer adsorbed on electrode surface by X-ray absorption fine structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Hyun [Konkuk Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ohta, Toshiaki [Tokyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Kwag, Gwang Hoon [Kumho Petrochemical Co., Taejon(Korea, Republic of)

    2000-06-01

    Structural changes of an iron phthalocyanine (FePC) monolayer induced by adsorption and externally applied potential on high area carbon surface have been investigated in situ by iron K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) in 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Fine structures shown in the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) for microcrystalline FePC decreased upon adsorption and further diminished under electrochemical conditions. Fe(II)PC(-2) showed a 1s{yields}4p transition as poorly resolved shoulder to the main absorption edge rather than a distinct peak and a weak 1s{yields}3d transition. The absorption edge position measured at half maximum was shifted from 7121.8 eV for Fe(II)PC(-2) to 7124.8 eV for [Fe(III)PC(-2)]{sup +} as well as the 1s{yields}3d pre-edge peak being slightly enhanced. However, essentially no absorption edge shift was observed by the 1-electron reduction of Fe(II)PC(-2), indicating that the species formed is [Fe(II)PC(-3)]{sup -}. Structural parameters were obtained by analyzing extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) oscillations with theoretical phases and amplitudes calculated from FEFF 6.01 using multiple-scattering theory. When applied to the powder FePC, the average iron-to-phthalocyanine nitrogen distance, d(Fe-N{sub p}) and the coordination number were found to be 1.933 A and 3.2, respectively, and these values are the same, within experimental error, as those reported (1.927 A and 4). Virtually no structural changes were found upon adsorption except for the increased Debye-Waller factor of 0.005 A{sup 2} from 0.003 A{sup 2}. Oxidation of Fe(II)PC(-2) to [Fe(III)PC(-2)]{sup +} yielded an increased d(Fe-N{sub p}) (1.98 A) and Debye-Waller factor (0.005 A{sup 2}). The formation of [Fe(II)PC(-3)]{sup -}, however, produced a shorter d(Fe-N{sub p}) of 1.91 A, the same as that of crystalline FePC within experimental error, and about the same Debye-Waller factor (0.006 A{sup 2})

  15. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure study of mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes having analogous structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, Abhijeet; Shrivastava, B. D.; Srivastava, Krishna; Prasad, J.

    2013-02-01

    X-ray absorption fine structure spectra have been studied at the Cu K-edge in five mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes, viz., [Cu(L-glu)(bipy)] 1, [Cu(L-glu)(phen) (H2O)].3H2O 2, [Cu(L-tyro)(bipy)(ClO4)].2H2O 3, [Cu(L-phen)(bipy)(H2O)] (ClO4) 4, and [Cu(L-tyro)(phen)(H2O)] (ClO4).1.5H2O 5 (where L-glu = L-glutamate dianion, L-tyro = L-tyrosinate anion, bipy = 2,2'-bipyridine, and phen =1,10-phenanthroline), having essentially the same structure. The crystallographic data are available for all the complexes using which five theoretical models have been generated. Firstly, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data of each complex has been analyzed using its own theoretical model and the results obtained are found to be comparable with the crystallographic results. Then, the EXAFS data of each complex has been analyzed using the theoretical models of the remaining four of these complexes. For each complex, the structural parameters obtained by fitting EXAFS data with theoretical models of the four remaining complexes have been found to be comparable with those obtained by fitting its own theoretical model. Thus, it has been found that if the crystal structure is not available for a complex, then the crystal structure of similar or analogous complex can be used satisfactorily for generating the theoretical model for the EXAFS data analysis of that complex, even if different ligands are attached to the central metal atom. On the basis of EXAFS data analysis, the coordination geometries around the central metal ions in these complexes have been depicted.

  16. Fine structure of the mineralized teeth of the chiton Acanthopleura echinata (Mollusca: Polyplacophora).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wealthall, Rosamund J; Brooker, Lesley R; Macey, David J; Griffin, Brendan J

    2005-08-01

    The major lateral teeth of the chiton Acanthopleura echinata are composite structures composed of three distinct mineral zones: a posterior layer of magnetite; a thin band of lepidocrocite just anterior to this; and apatite throughout the core and anterior regions of the cusp. Biomineralization in these teeth is a matrix-mediated process, in which the minerals are deposited around fibers, with the different biominerals described as occupying architecturally discrete compartments. In this study, a range of scanning electron microscopes was utilized to undertake a detailed in situ investigation of the fine structure of the major lateral teeth. The arrangement of the organic and biomineral components of the tooth is similar throughout the three zones, having no discrete borders between them, and with crystallites of each mineral phase extending into the adjacent mineral zone. Along the posterior surface of the tooth, the organic fibers are arranged in a series of fine parallel lines, but just within the periphery their appearance takes on a "fish scale"-like pattern, reflective of the cross section of a series of units that are overlaid, and offset from each other, in adjacent rows. The units are approximately 2 microm wide and 0.6 microm thick and comprise biomineral plates separated by organic fibers. Two types of subunits make up each "fish scale": one is elongate and curved and forms a trough, in which the other, rod-like unit, is nestled. Adjacent rod and trough units are aligned into large sheets that define the fracture plane of the tooth. The alignment of the plates of rod-trough units is complex and exhibits extreme spatial variation within the tooth cusp. Close to the posterior surface the plates are essentially horizontal and lie in a lateromedial plane, while anteriorly they are almost vertical and lie in the posteroanterior plane. An understanding of the fine structure of the mineralized teeth of chitons, and of the relationship between the organic and

  17. Cerium Levels in Fine and Coarse Airborne Particulate Matter in El Paso, Texas—A Geospatial and Temporal Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, M. A.; Ziwu, E.; Clague, J. W.; Pingitore, N. E., Jr.

    2016-12-01

    Known for use as mischmetal in metallurgical processing and as an industrial polishing vehicle, cerium dioxide (CeO2) or ceria is increasingly important in the global nanotechnology sector as a catalyst and diesel fuel additive. Investigations of the release, fate, and environmental and human health effects of CeO2 nanoparticles released into the air are particularly evident in Europe, where nano-ceria is used as a mileage extender and soot particle emission inhibitor in diesel fuel. Here we present an extensive (>2500 samples) data set of Ce analyses in air samples collected over 1-week continuous periods at 8 sites in El Paso, TX, USA at various times during the years 2006-2009. Nano-ceria was not approved for on-road vehicle use during this time frame, so these data establish a local baseline for potential diesel-associated emissions should approval be granted for nano-ceria use in the future. Dichotomous collectors provided simultaneous separate samples of the PMfine (<2.5 µm) and PMcoarse(2.5 - 10 µm) fractions. For all sites, more Ce was measured (by XRF) in the PMcoarse than in the PMfine, with typical Ce concentrations of 2 ng m-3 for the coarse and 1 ng m-3 for the fine. Following the general observation that coarse PM is of geologic origin and fine is anthropogenic, it appears that the majority of atmospheric Ce in El Paso is of natural origin. Further supporting this view, there was no consistent trend for higher airborne Ce values at sampling stations in the urban core, where vehicular or industrial releases would be greater relative to more rural sites. No seasonal trend was obvious in the multi-year data set, as might be expected for anthropogenic releases trapped by winter inversions. Note, however, that the dry desert and windy conditions in El Paso produce unusually high levels of ambient coarse PM. Although we have not yet identified the compounds of airborne Ce, our findings indirectly suggest that anthropogenic nano-ceria is not the dominant

  18. Fine reservoir structure modeling based upon 3D visualized stratigraphic correlation between horizontal wells: methodology and its application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenghua, Ou; Chaochun, Li; Siyuan, Huang; Sheng, James J.; Yuan, Xu

    2017-12-01

    As the platform-based horizontal well production mode has been widely applied in petroleum industry, building a reliable fine reservoir structure model by using horizontal well stratigraphic correlation has become very important. Horizontal wells usually extend between the upper and bottom boundaries of the target formation, with limited penetration points. Using these limited penetration points to conduct well deviation correction means the formation depth information obtained is not accurate, which makes it hard to build a fine structure model. In order to solve this problem, a method of fine reservoir structure modeling, based on 3D visualized stratigraphic correlation among horizontal wells, is proposed. This method can increase the accuracy when estimating the depth of the penetration points, and can also effectively predict the top and bottom interfaces in the horizontal penetrating section. Moreover, this method will greatly increase not only the number of points of depth data available, but also the accuracy of these data, which achieves the goal of building a reliable fine reservoir structure model by using the stratigraphic correlation among horizontal wells. Using this method, four 3D fine structure layer models have been successfully built of a specimen shale gas field with platform-based horizontal well production mode. The shale gas field is located to the east of Sichuan Basin, China; the successful application of the method has proven its feasibility and reliability.

  19. Variations of the fine-structure constant α in exotic singularity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dąbrowski, Mariusz P.; Denkiewicz, Tomasz; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Vielzeuf, P. E.

    2014-06-01

    Various classes of exotic singularity models have been studied as possible mimic models for the observed recent acceleration of the Universe. Here we further study one of these classes and, under the assumption that they are phenomenological toy models for the behavior of an underlying scalar field that also couples to the electromagnetic sector of the theory, obtain the corresponding behavior of the fine-structure constant α for particular choices of model parameters that have been previously shown to be in reasonable agreement with cosmological observations. We then compare this predicted behavior with available measurements of α, thus constraining this putative coupling to electromagnetism. We find that values of the coupling that would provide a good fit to spectroscopic measurements of α are in more than three-sigma tension with local atomic clock bounds. Future measurements by ESPRESSO and ELT-HIRES will provide a definitive test of these models.

  20. Strain-driven growth of GaAs(111) quantum dots with low fine structure splitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yerino, Christopher D.; Jung, Daehwan; Lee, Minjoo Larry, E-mail: minjoo.lee@yale.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Simmonds, Paul J. [Departments of Physics and Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho 83725 (United States); Liang, Baolai; Huffaker, Diana L. [California NanoSystems Institute and Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Schneider, Christian; Unsleber, Sebastian; Vo, Minh; Kamp, Martin [Technische Physik, Physikalisches Institut and Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen-Research Center for Complex Material Systems, Universität Würzburg, Am Hubland, D-97074 Würzburg (Germany); Höfling, Sven [Technische Physik, Physikalisches Institut and Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen-Research Center for Complex Material Systems, Universität Würzburg, Am Hubland, D-97074 Würzburg (Germany); SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews, KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-22

    Symmetric quantum dots (QDs) on (111)-oriented surfaces are promising candidates for generating polarization-entangled photons due to their low excitonic fine structure splitting (FSS). However, (111) QDs are difficult to grow. The conventional use of compressive strain to drive QD self-assembly fails to form 3D nanostructures on (111) surfaces. Instead, we demonstrate that (111) QDs self-assemble under tensile strain by growing GaAs QDs on an InP(111)A substrate. Tensile GaAs self-assembly produces a low density of QDs with a symmetric triangular morphology. Coherent, tensile QDs are observed without dislocations, and the QDs luminescence at room temperature. Single QD measurements reveal low FSS with a median value of 7.6 μeV, due to the high symmetry of the (111) QDs. Tensile self-assembly thus offers a simple route to symmetric (111) QDs for entangled photon emitters.

  1. Fisher matrix forecasts for astrophysical tests of the stability of the fine-structure constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, C. S.; Silva, T. A.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Leite, A. C. O.

    2017-07-01

    We use Fisher Matrix analysis techniques to forecast the cosmological impact of astrophysical tests of the stability of the fine-structure constant to be carried out by the forthcoming ESPRESSO spectrograph at the VLT (due for commissioning in late 2017), as well by the planned high-resolution spectrograph (currently in Phase A) for the European Extremely Large Telescope. Assuming a fiducial model without α variations, we show that ESPRESSO can improve current bounds on the Eötvös parameter-which quantifies Weak Equivalence Principle violations-by up to two orders of magnitude, leading to stronger bounds than those expected from the ongoing tests with the MICROSCOPE satellite, while constraints from the E-ELT should be competitive with those of the proposed STEP satellite. Should an α variation be detected, these measurements will further constrain cosmological parameters, being particularly sensitive to the dynamics of dark energy.

  2. Fisher matrix forecasts for astrophysical tests of the stability of the fine-structure constant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.S. Alves

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We use Fisher Matrix analysis techniques to forecast the cosmological impact of astrophysical tests of the stability of the fine-structure constant to be carried out by the forthcoming ESPRESSO spectrograph at the VLT (due for commissioning in late 2017, as well by the planned high-resolution spectrograph (currently in Phase A for the European Extremely Large Telescope. Assuming a fiducial model without α variations, we show that ESPRESSO can improve current bounds on the Eötvös parameter—which quantifies Weak Equivalence Principle violations—by up to two orders of magnitude, leading to stronger bounds than those expected from the ongoing tests with the MICROSCOPE satellite, while constraints from the E-ELT should be competitive with those of the proposed STEP satellite. Should an α variation be detected, these measurements will further constrain cosmological parameters, being particularly sensitive to the dynamics of dark energy.

  3. Fine structure of kinetin-treated protonema and kinetin-induced gametophore buds in Funaria hygrometrica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Młodzianowski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Besides occasional hypertrophy of grana and disintegration of stroma thylakoids occurring in some chloroplasts, no significant changes were found in ultrastructure of typical protonema cells treated for six days with kinetin. On the other hand, the fine structure of cells in kinetin--induced gametophore buds differed much from that of the protonema cells and showed characteristics of cells of with high metabolic activity and high division rates. The results indicate that cytokinins enhance development and differentiation in the protonema by activating only some of its cells, whereas the others remain unchanged or show symptoms of destruction and ageing. This is supported by the fact that in the presence of chloramphenicol, which prevents bud induction, kinetin acts synergistically with the inhibitor in producing degeneration and destruction of chloroplasts.

  4. Nearest-neighbour distribution of distances in crystals from extended X-ray absorption fine structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornasini, P.; Grisenti, R.; Dapiaggi, M.; Agostini, G.; Miyanaga, T.

    2017-07-01

    Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) is a powerful probe of the distribution of nearest-neighbour distances around selected atomic species. We consider here the effect of vibrational disorder in crystals. The potential of EXAFS for the accurate evaluation of the coefficient of bond thermal expansion and its temperature dependence is discussed, with the aim of stimulating and facilitating the comparison with the results from total scattering experiments. The meaning of the distribution asymmetry in crystals and its connection with the effective potential anharmonicity and the bond expansion is quantitatively explored by comparing the results for a number of different systems. The extent of the relative atomic vibrations perpendicular to the bond direction and the perpendicular to parallel anisotropy are correlated with the extent of lattice negative thermal expansion as well as with the ionic mobility in superionic crystals.

  5. Analysis of zirconia films by grazing incidence X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degueldre, C. [LWV, NES, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)]. E-mail: claude.degueldre@psi.ch; Dardenne, K. [INE, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, D-76344 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2005-08-15

    X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) is used in for its non-destructive capability to probe and investigate nano-pores, dislocations or vacancies in zirconia films. XAFS is a powerful analytical tool that allows the collection of information to describe the atomic environment of component elements. This technique was applied in a grazing incidence (GI) mode to investigate layers obtained by zirconia sputtering on stainless steel and by zirconium alloy corrosion utilising the Zr K edge. XAFS analysis identify a decrease of next neighbour numbers of Zr in the corroded samples versus the sputtered samples. This may be due to the density of distortions for given average atom distances suggesting dislocations and defects. The discussion underlines that the technique reveals nano-pores, dislocations, vacancies or defect features difficult to observe using destructive techniques such as analytical electron microscopy. A strong decrease of the Zr next neighbour number is observed for zirconium alloy corrosion layers.

  6. Non-wetting wings and legs of the cranefly aided by fine structures of the cuticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hsuan-Ming S; Watson, Gregory S; Cribb, Bronwen W; Watson, Jolanta A

    2011-03-15

    Non-wetting surfaces are imperative to the survival of terrestrial and semi-aquatic insects as they afford resistance to wetting by rain and other liquid surfaces that insects may encounter. Thus, there is an evolutionary pay-off for these insects to adopt hydrophobic technologies, especially on contacting surfaces such as legs and wings. The cranefly is a weak flier, with many species typically found in wet/moist environments where they lay eggs. Water droplets placed on this insect's wings will spontaneously roll off the surface. In addition, the insect can stand on water bodies without its legs penetrating the water surface. The legs and wings of this insect possess thousands of tiny hairs with intricate surface topographies comprising a series of ridges running longitudinally along the long axis of the hair fibre. Here we demonstrate that this fine hair structure enhances the ability of the hairs to resist penetration into water bodies.

  7. Fine-structural changes in the midgut of old Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton-Erxleben, F.; Miquel, J.; Philpott, D. E.

    1983-01-01

    Senescent fine-structural changes in the midgut of Drosophila melanogaster are investigated. A large number of midgut mitochondria in old flies exhibit nodular cristae and a tubular system located perpendicular to the normal cristae orientation. Anterior intestinal cells show a senescent accumulation of age pigment, either with a surrounding two-unit membrane or without any membrane. The predominant localization of enlarged mitochondria and pigment in the luminal gut region may be related to the polarized metabolism of the intestinal cells. Findings concur with previous observations of dense-body accumulations and support the theory that mitochondria are involved in the aging of fixed post-mitotic cells. Demonstrated by statistical analyses is that mitochondrial size increase is related to mitochondrial variation increase.

  8. X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy of plutonium complexes with bacillus sphaericus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panak, P.J.; Booth, C.H.; Caulder, D.L.; Bucher, J.J.; Shuh, D.K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Chemical Sciences Div., The Glenn T. Seaborg Center, Berkeley, CA (United States); Nitsche, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Chemical Sciences Div., The Glenn T. Seaborg Center, Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California at Berkeley, Dept. of Chemistry, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-07-01

    Knowledge of the plutonium complexes formed with bacterial cells is critical for predicting the influence of microbial interactions on the migration behavior of actinides in the environment. This investigation describes the interaction of plutonium(VI) with cells of the aerobic soil bacteria, Bacillus sphaericus. The studies include the quantification of carboxylate and phosphate functional groups on the cell walls by potentiometric titration and the determination of the plutonium speciation by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). Extended-XAFS (EXAFS) was used to determine the identity of the Pu(VI) interfacial complex with the bacteria, and the Pu(VI) was found primarily bound to phosphate groups on the cell surface. No carboxylate complexation was detected. (orig.)

  9. Impact of heavy hole-light hole coupling on the exciton fine structure in quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsitsishvili, E.

    2017-03-01

    We present analytical results which describe the properties of the exciton ground state in a single semiconductor quantum dot (QD). Calculations are performed within the Luttinger-Kohn and Bir-Pikus Hamiltonian theory. We show in an explicit form that an interplay of the exchange interaction and the heavy hole-light hole coupling, which is due to the in-plane asymmetries of the dot shape and the strain distribution, plays an essential role. For both the bright and dark exciton, this combined effect leads to a dependence of the fine structure splitting and polarizations on the main anisotropy axis direction relative to the dot orientation. Basing on the obtained analytical expressions, we discuss some special cases in details.

  10. 3-Space In-Flow Theory of Gravity: Boreholes, Blackholes and the Fine Structure Constant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available A theory of 3-space explains the phenomenon of gravity as arising from the time-dependence and inhomogeneity of the differential flow of this 3-space. The emergent theory of gravity has two gravitational constants: GN — Newton’s constant, and a dimensionless constant α. Various experiments and astronomical observations have shown that α is the fine structure constant ≈ 1/137. Here we analyse the Greenland Ice Shelf and Nevada Test Site borehole g anomalies, and confirm with increased precision this value of α. This and other successful tests of this theory of gravity, including the supermassive black holes in globular clusters and galaxies, and the “dark-matter” effect in spiral galaxies, shows the validity of this theory of gravity. This success implies that the non-relativistic Newtonian gravity was fundamentally flawed from the beginning, and that this flaw was inherited by the relativistic General Relativity theory of gravity.

  11. 3-Space In-Flow Theory of Gravity: Boreholes, Blackholes and the Fine Structure Constant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available A theory of 3-space explains the phenomenon of gravity as arising from the time-dependence and inhomogeneity of the differential flow of this 3-space. The emergent theory of gravity has two gravitational constants: G - Newton's constant, and a dimensionless constant alpha. Various experiments and astronomical observations have shown that alpha is the fine structure constant ~1/137. Here we analyse the Greenland Ice Shelf and Nevada Test Site borehole g anomalies, and confirm with increased precision this value of alpha. This and other successful tests of this theory of gravity, including the supermassive black holes in globular clusters and galaxies, and the "dark-matter" effect in spiral galaxies, shows the validity of this theory of gravity. This success implies that the non-relativistic Newtonian gravity was fundamentally flawed from the beginning, and that this flaw was inherited by the relativistic General Relativity theory of gravity.

  12. Fine structure of the copulatory apparatus of the tapeworm Tetrabothrius erostris (Cestoda: Tetrabothriidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korneva, Janetta V; Jones, Malcolm K; Kuklin, Vadim V

    2015-05-01

    The organization and fine structure of the complex copulatory apparatus of Tetrabothrius erostris (Tetrabothriidea) is investigated by light and transmission electron microscopy. A diversity of microstructures was found on the surface of genital ducts. The apical surfaces of male gonadoducts possess tubular and blade-like microtriches that have specific structure in each section of the duct. The apical part of the tubular microtriches contains numerous constrictions in the proximal section of the sperm duct; blade-like microtriches of cirrus possess longitudinal striation in the apical part, and their basal part is reinforced with electron-dense strands. Two types of microtriches occur on the surface of cirrus, and their presence may be considered as systematic features. Prostate glands containing granules of medium electron density (up to 130 nm diameter) are localized in the cirrus sac. The genital atrium contains numerous non-ciliated receptors. Paramyosin-like fibers (up to 200 nm) were found in the muscle fibers surrounding the male atrium canal. Microtriches on the surface of the distal region of the male atrial canal are covered by a glycocalyx. Electron-dense, membrane-like structures (up to 40 nm) lie under the apical membrane of the genital atrium and vagina. These structures do not form a continuous layer; its edges turn down and sink into the apical invaginations of epithelium. Hypotheses on the possible ways of copulation in T. erostris based on the observed ultrastructure are discussed.

  13. Optimal fine-scale structures in compliance minimization for a uniaxial load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Robert V; Wirth, Benedikt

    2014-10-08

    We consider the optimization of the topology and geometry of an elastic structure [Formula: see text] subjected to a fixed boundary load, i.e. we aim to minimize a weighted sum of material volume [Formula: see text], structure perimeter [Formula: see text] and structure compliance [Formula: see text] (which is the work done by the load). As a first simple and instructive case, this paper treats the situation of an imposed uniform uniaxial tension load in two dimensions. If the weight ε of the perimeter is small, optimal geometries exhibit very fine-scale structure which cannot be resolved by numerical optimization. Instead, we prove how the minimum energy scales in ε, which involves the construction of a family of near-optimal geometries and thus provides qualitative insights. The construction is based on a classical branching procedure with some features unique to compliance minimization. The proof of the energy scaling also requires an ansatz-independent lower bound, which we derive once via a classical convex duality argument (which is restricted to two dimensions and the uniaxial load) and once via a Fourier-based refinement of the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds for the effective elastic moduli of composite materials. We also highlight the close relation to and the differences from shape optimization with a scalar PDE-constraint and a link to the pattern formation observed in intermediate states of type-I superconductors.

  14. New algorithm improves fine structure of the barley consensus SNP map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endelman Jeffrey B

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The need to integrate information from multiple linkage maps is a long-standing problem in genetics. One way to visualize the complex ordinal relationships is with a directed graph, where each vertex in the graph is a bin of markers. When there are no ordering conflicts between the linkage maps, the result is a directed acyclic graph, or DAG, which can then be linearized to produce a consensus map. Results New algorithms for the simplification and linearization of consensus graphs have been implemented as a package for the R computing environment called DAGGER. The simplified consensus graphs produced by DAGGER exactly capture the ordinal relationships present in a series of linkage maps. Using either linear or quadratic programming, DAGGER generates a consensus map with minimum error relative to the linkage maps while remaining ordinally consistent with them. Both linearization methods produce consensus maps that are compressed relative to the mean of the linkage maps. After rescaling, however, the consensus maps had higher accuracy (and higher marker density than the individual linkage maps in genetic simulations. When applied to four barley linkage maps genotyped at nearly 3000 SNP markers, DAGGER produced a consensus map with improved fine structure compared to the existing barley consensus SNP map. The root-mean-squared error between the linkage maps and the DAGGER map was 0.82 cM per marker interval compared to 2.28 cM for the existing consensus map. Examination of the barley hardness locus at the 5HS telomere, for which there is a physical map, confirmed that the DAGGER output was more accurate for fine structure analysis. Conclusions The R package DAGGER is an effective, freely available resource for integrating the information from a set of consistent linkage maps.

  15. Speech and music perception with the new fine structure speech coding strategy: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnoldner, Christoph; Riss, Dominik; Brunner, Markus; Durisin, Martin; Baumgartner, Wolf-Dieter; Hamzavi, Jafar-Sasan

    2007-12-01

    Taking into account the excellent results with significant improvements in the speech tests and the very high satisfaction of the patients using the new strategy, this first implementation of a fine structure strategy could offer a new quality of hearing with cochlear implants (CIs). This study consisted of an intra-individual comparison of speech recognition, music perception and patient preference when subjects used two different speech coding strategies with a MedEl Pulsar CI: continuous interleaved sampling (CIS) and the new fine structure processing (FSP) strategy. In contrast to envelope-based strategies, the FSP strategy also delivers subtle pitch and timing differences of sound to the user and is thereby supposed to enhance speech perception in noise and increase the quality of music perception. This was a prospective study assessing performance with two different speech coding strategies. The setting was a CI programme at an academic tertiary referral centre. Fourteen post-lingually deaf patients using a MedEl Pulsar CI with a mean CI experience of 0.98 years were supplied with the new FSP speech coding strategy. Subjects consecutively used the two different speech coding strategies. Speech and music tests were performed with the previously fitted CIS strategy, immediately after fitting with the new FSP strategy and 4, 8 and 12 weeks later. The main outcome measures were individual performance and subjective assessment of two different speech processors. Speech and music test scores improved statistically significantly after conversion from CIS to FSP strategy. Twelve of 14 patients preferred the new FSP speech processing strategy over the CIS strategy.

  16. Cultural transmission of tool use combined with habitat specializations leads to fine-scale genetic structure in bottlenose dolphins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kopps, Anna M.; Ackermann, Corinne Y.; Sherwin, William B.; Allen, Simon J.; Bejder, Lars; Kruetzen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Socially learned behaviours leading to genetic population structure have rarely been described outside humans. Here, we provide evidence of fine-scale genetic structure that has probably arisen based on socially transmitted behaviours in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops sp.) in western Shark Bay,

  17. Fine-scale spatio-temporal variation in tiger Panthera tigris diet: Effect of study duration and extent on estimates of tiger diet in Chitwan National Park, Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapfer, Paul M.; Streby, Henry M.; Gurung, B.; Simcharoen, A.; McDougal, C.C.; Smith, J.L.D.

    2011-01-01

    Attempts to conserve declining tiger Panthera tigris populations and distributions have experienced limited success. The poaching of tiger prey is a key threat to tiger persistence; a clear understanding of tiger diet is a prerequisite to conserve dwindling populations. We used unpublished data on tiger diet in combination with two previously published studies to examine fine-scale spatio-temporal changes in tiger diet relative to prey abundance in Chitwan National Park, Nepal, and aggregated data from the three studies to examine the effect that study duration and the size of the study area have on estimates of tiger diet. Our results correspond with those of previous studies: in all three studies, tiger diet was dominated by members of Cervidae; small to medium-sized prey was important in one study. Tiger diet was unrelated to prey abundance, and the aggregation of studies indicates that increasing study duration and study area size both result in increased dietary diversity in terms of prey categories consumed, and increasing study duration changed which prey species contributed most to tiger diet. Based on our results, we suggest that managers focus their efforts on minimizing the poaching of all tiger prey, and that future studies of tiger diet be of long duration and large spatial extent to improve our understanding of spatio-temporal variation in estimates of tiger diet. ?? 2011 Wildlife Biology, NKV.

  18. A theory of self-organized zonal flow with fine radial structure in tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y. Z.; Liu, Z. Y.; Xie, T.; Mahajan, S. M.; Liu, J.

    2017-12-01

    The (low frequency) zonal flow-ion temperature gradient (ITG) wave system, constructed on Braginskii's fluid model in tokamak, is shown to be a reaction-diffusion-advection system; it is derived by making use of a multiple spatiotemporal scale technique and two-dimensional (2D) ballooning theory. For real regular group velocities of ITG waves, two distinct temporal processes, sharing a very similar meso-scale radial structure, are identified in the nonlinear self-organized stage. The stationary and quasi-stationary structures reflect a particular feature of the poloidal group velocity. The equation set posed to be an initial value problem is numerically solved for JET low mode parameters; the results are presented in several figures and two movies that show the spatiotemporal evolutions as well as the spectrum analysis—frequency-wave number spectrum, auto power spectrum, and Lissajous diagram. This approach reveals that the zonal flow in tokamak is a local traveling wave. For the quasi-stationary process, the cycle of ITG wave energy is composed of two consecutive phases in distinct spatiotemporal structures: a pair of Cavitons growing and breathing slowly without long range propagation, followed by a sudden decay into many Instantons that carry negative wave energy rapidly into infinity. A spotlight onto the motion of Instantons for a given radial position reproduces a Blob-Hole temporal structure; the occurrence as well as the rapid decay of Caviton into Instantons is triggered by zero-crossing of radial group velocity. A sample of the radial profile of zonal flow contributed from 31 nonlinearly coupled rational surfaces near plasma edge is found to be very similar to that observed in the JET Ohmic phase [J. C. Hillesheim et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 165002 (2016)]. The theory predicts an interior asymmetric dipole structure associated with the zonal flow that is driven by the gradients of ITG turbulence intensity.

  19. Temporal changes in vegetation of a virgin beech woodland remnant: stand-scale stability with intensive fine-scale dynamics governed by stand dynamic events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor Standovár

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this resurvey study is to check if herbaceous vegetation on the forest floor exhibits overall stability at the stand-scale in spite of intensive dynamics at the scale of individual plots and stand dynamic events (driven by natural fine scale canopy gap dynamics. In 1996, we sampled a 1.5 ha patch using 0.25 m² plots placed along a 5 m × 5 m grid in the best remnant of central European montane beech woods in Hungary. All species in the herbaceous layer and their cover estimates were recorded. Five patches representing different stand developmental situations (SDS were selected for resurvey. In 2013, 306 plots were resurveyed by using blocks of four 0.25 m² plots to test the effects of imperfect relocation. We found very intensive fine-scale dynamics in the herbaceous layer with high species turnover and sharp changes in ground layer cover at the local-scale (< 1 m2. A decrease in species richness and herbaceous layer cover, as well as high species turnover, characterized the closing gaps. Colonization events and increasing species richness and herbaceous layer cover prevailed in the two newly created gaps. A pronounced decrease in the total cover, but low species turnover and survival of the majority of the closed forest specialists was detected by the resurvey at the stand-scale. The test aiming at assessing the effect of relocation showed a higher time effect than the effect of imprecise relocation. The very intensive fine-scale dynamics of the studied beech forest are profoundly determined by natural stand dynamics. Extinction and colonisation episodes even out at the stand-scale, implying an overall compositional stability of the herbaceous vegetation at the given spatial and temporal scale. We argue that fine-scale gap dynamics, driven by natural processes or applied as a management method, can warrant the survival of many closed forest specialist species in the long-run. Nomenclature: Flora Europaea (Tutin et al. 2010 for

  20. Ultrafast time-resolved transient structures of solids and liquids by means of extended X-ray absorption fine structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomov, Ivan V; Rentzepis, Peter M

    2004-01-23

    Detection of ultrafast transient structures and the evolution of ultrafast structural intermediates during the course of reactions has been a long standing goal of chemists and biologists. This article will be restricted to nanosecond, picosecond and shorter time-resolved extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) studies, its aim being to present the progress and problems encounter in measurements and understanding the structure of transients. The recent advances in source technology has stimulated a wide variety of novel experiments using both synchrotrons and smaller laboratory size systems. With more efficient X-ray lenses and detectors many of the previously difficult experiments to perform, because of the exposure time required and weak signals, will now be easily performed. The experimental system for the detection of ultrafast, time-resolved EXAFS spectra of molecules in liquids is described and the method for the analysis of EXAFS spectra to yield transient structures is given. We believe that utilizing our table-top ultrafast X-ray source and the polycapillary optics in conjunction with dispersive spectrometer and charge coupled devices (CCD) we will be able to determine the structure of many reaction intermediates and excited states of chemical and biological molecules in solid and liquid state.

  1. Temporal-spatial analysis of U.S.-Mexico border environmental fine and coarse PM air sample extract activity in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Fredine T; Mitchell, Leah A; Bedrick, Edward; McDonald, Jacob D; Lee, Wen-Yee; Li, Wen-Whai; Olvera, Hector; Amaya, Maria A; Berwick, Marianne; Gonzales, Melissa; Currey, Robert; Pingitore, Nicholas E; Burchiel, Scott W

    2009-07-01

    Particulate matter less than 10 microm (PM10) has been shown to be associated with aggravation of asthma and respiratory and cardiopulmonary morbidity. There is also great interest in the potential health effects of PM2.5. Particulate matter (PM) varies in composition both spatially and temporally depending on the source, location and seasonal condition. El Paso County which lies in the Paso del Norte airshed is a unique location to study ambient air pollution due to three major points: the geological land formation, the relatively large population and the various sources of PM. In this study, dichotomous filters were collected from various sites in El Paso County every 7 days for a period of 1 year. The sampling sites were both distant and near border crossings, which are near heavily populated areas with high traffic volume. Fine (PM2.5) and Coarse (PM10-2.5) PM filter samples were extracted using dichloromethane and were assessed for biologic activity and polycyclic aromatic (PAH) content. Three sets of marker genes human BEAS2B bronchial epithelial cells were utilized to assess the effects of airborne PAHs on biologic activities associated with specific biological pathways associated with airway diseases. These pathways included in inflammatory cytokine production (IL-6, IL-8), oxidative stress (HMOX-1, NQO-1, ALDH3A1, AKR1C1), and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-dependent signaling (CYP1A1). Results demonstrated interesting temporal and spatial patterns of gene induction for all pathways, particularly those associated with oxidative stress, and significant differences in the PAHs detected in the PM10-2.5 and PM2.5 fractions. Temporally, the greatest effects on gene induction were observed in winter months, which appeared to correlate with inversions that are common in the air basin. Spatially, the greatest gene expression increases were seen in extracts collected from the central most areas of El Paso which are also closest to highways and border crossings.

  2. Development of Ultra-Fine-Grained Structure in AISI 321 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiamiyu, A. A.; Szpunar, J. A.; Odeshi, A. G.; Oguocha, I.; Eskandari, M.

    2017-12-01

    Ultra-fine-grained (UFG) structure was developed in AISI 321 austenitic stainless steel (ASS) using cryogenic rolling followed by annealing treatments at 923 K, 973 K, 1023 K, and 1073 K (650 °C, 700 °C, 750 °C, and 800 °C) for different lengths of time. The α'-martensite to γ-austenite reversion behavior and the associated texture development were analyzed in the cryo-rolled specimens after annealing. The activation energy, Q, required for the reversion of α'-martensite to γ-austenite in the steel was estimated to be 80 kJ mol-1. TiC precipitates and unreversed triple junction α'-martensite played major roles in the development of UFG structure through the Zener pinning of grain boundaries. The optimum annealing temperature and time for the development of UFG structure in the cryo-rolled AISI 321 steel are (a) 923 K (650 °C) for approximately 28800 seconds and (b) 1023 K (750 °C) for 600 seconds, with average grain sizes of 0.22 and 0.31 µm, respectively. Annealing at 1023 K (750 °C) is considered a better alternative since the volume fraction of precipitated carbides in specimens annealed at 1023 K (750 °C) are less than those annealed at 923 K (650 °C). More so, the energy consumption during prolonged annealing time to achieve an UFG structure at 923 K (650 °C) is higher due to low phase reversion rate. The hardness of the UFG specimens is 195 pct greater than that of the as-received steel. The higher volume fraction of TiC precipitates in the UFG structure may be an additional source of hardening. Micro and macrotexture analysis indicated {110}〈uvw〉 as the major texture component of the austenite grains in the UFG structure. Its intensity is stronger in the specimen annealed at low temperatures.

  3. Influenza-A Viruses in Ducks in Northwestern Minnesota: Fine Scale Spatial and Temporal Variation in Prevalence and Subtype Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Benjamin R.; Knutsen, Gregory A.; Berdeen, James; Goekjian, Virginia; Poulson, Rebecca; Goyal, Sagar; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Cardona, Carol; Berghaus, Roy D.; Swayne, David E.; Yabsley, Michael J.; Stallknecht, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Waterfowl from northwestern Minnesota were sampled by cloacal swabbing for Avian Influenza Virus (AIV) from July – October in 2007 and 2008. AIV was detected in 222 (9.1%) of 2,441 ducks in 2007 and in 438 (17.9%) of 2,452 ducks in 2008. Prevalence of AIV peaked in late summer. We detected 27 AIV subtypes during 2007 and 31 during 2008. Ten hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes were detected each year (i.e., H1, 3–8, and 10–12 during 2007; H1-8, 10 and 11 during 2008). All neuraminidase (NA) subtypes were detected during each year of the study. Subtype diversity varied between years and increased with prevalence into September. Predominant subtypes during 2007 (comprising ≥5% of subtype diversity) included H1N1, H3N6, H3N8, H4N6, H7N3, H10N7, and H11N9. Predominant subtypes during 2008 included H3N6, H3N8, H4N6, H4N8, H6N1, and H10N7. Additionally, within each HA subtype, the same predominant HA/NA subtype combinations were detected each year and included H1N1, H3N8, H4N6, H5N2, H6N1, H7N3, H8N4, H10N7, and H11N9. The H2N3 and H12N5 viruses also predominated within the H2 and H12 subtypes, respectively, but only were detected during a single year (H2 and H12 viruses were not detected during 2007 and 2008, respectively). Mallards were the predominant species sampled (63.7% of the total), and 531 AIV were isolated from this species (80.5% of the total isolates). Mallard data collected during both years adequately described the observed temporal and spatial prevalence from the total sample and also adequately represented subtype diversity. Juvenile mallards also were adequate in describing the temporal and spatial prevalence of AIV as well as subtype diversity. PMID:21931636

  4. Studies of X-pinch Plasma Fine Structure Using High Resolution Optical and Imaging Spectroscopy Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Romanova, V. M.; Sarkisov, G. S.; Hammer, D. A.; Acton, D. F.; Kalantar, D. H.

    1996-11-01

    An X-pinch is formed by placing two or more fine wires between the output electrodes of a high current pulser so that the wires cross and touch in mid-gap. The predictable position of a neck in the resulting plasma at the wire cross point enables the use of high resolution optical systems for studies of the neck-forming plasma dynamics(D.H. Kalantar and D.A. Hammer, Phys. Rev. Lett 71), 3806 (1993); S.A. Pikuz et al., JQSRT 51, 291 (1994)., as well as high resolution imaging x-ray spectroscopy(A.Ya. Faenov et al., X-ray Sci. & Tech. 5), 323 (1995). for studying the internal structure of the neck. The position of the neck in the relation to the cross-point of the X-pinch wires, the neck structure during pinching, plasma parameters in the vicinity of the neck and in the plasma around of the wires cores were investigating using pulsed lasers. The internal structure of the bright spot near the cross point was studied with spatial resolution better than 10 microns using a time integrated pin-hole camera and the radiation of individual spectral lines of highly charged ions such as He-like Ni and Al. Work supported by Sandia Contact AJ-6400.

  5. Effect of fine-grained components on concrete properties and structure formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zimakova Galina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates the influence of fine-grained components on the synthesis of new formations and structure of cellular concrete. Grain size composition was defined with the aid of a laser diffraction analyzer of particles ANALYSETTE 22 NanoTecplus. The composition of the obtained hydrated phases was studied using electron microscopy and X-ray phase analysis. The introduction of silica and aluminosilicate components with the specific surface area >350 m2/kg enabled to directly influence the mechanism of the hydrated phases formation. Complex hydrated calcium aluminosilicates of the frame structure of zeolite type and non-permanent composition were identified in the hydration products. The formation of the total set of properties is attributed to the morphological features of the hydrated phases, the nature of connections between the crystalline hydrates, and their location in the material structure. X-ray phase analysis showed that ultra-micro-dispersed components have the stimulating impact on the processes of silicate formation. With the increase in the amount of hydrated new formations and decrease in the liquid phase volume the conditions for building of strong crystal intergrowth contacts were created.

  6. Correlative Structural Biology: How to Investigate the Fine Details of Viral Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth R. Wright

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Commentary on Byeon, I.J.; Meng, X.; Jung, J.; Zhao, G.; Yang, R.; Ahn, J.; Shi, J.; Concel, J.; Aiken, C.; Zhang, P.; Gronenborn, A.M. Structural convergence between Cryo-EM and NMR reveals intersubunit interactions critical for HIV-1 capsid function. Cell 2009, 139, 780-790.

  7. Effects of structural connectivity on fine scale population genetic structure of muskrat, Ondatra zibethicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurence, Sophie; Smith, Matthew J; Schulte-Hostedde, Albrecht I

    2013-01-01

    In heterogeneous landscapes, physical barriers and loss of structural connectivity have been shown to reduce gene flow and therefore lead to population structuring. In this study, we assessed the influence of landscape features on population genetic structure and gene flow of a semiaquatic species, the muskrat. A total of 97 muskrats were sampled from three watersheds near Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. We estimated population genetic structure using 11 microsatellite loci and identified a single genetic cluster and no genetic differences were found among the watersheds as a result of high levels of gene flow. At finer scales, we assessed the correlation between individual pairwise genetic distances and Euclidean distance as well as different models of least cost path (LCP). We used a range of cost values for the landscape types in order to build our LCP models. We found a positive relationship between genetic distance and least cost distance when we considered roads as corridors for movements. Open landscapes and urban areas seemed to restrict but not prevent gene flow within the study area. Our study underlines the high-dispersal ability of generalist species in their use of landscape and highlights how landscape features often considered barriers to animal movements are corridors for other species. PMID:24223287

  8. X-ray absorption fine structure study of multinuclear copper(I) thiourea mixed ligand complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, Abhijeet; Shrivastava, B. D.; Srivastava, K.; Prasad, J.; Raghuwanshi, V. S.

    2013-07-01

    X-ray absorption fine structure spectra of five copper(I) thiourea complexes [Cu4(thu)6 (NO3)4 (H2O)4] (1), [Cu4(thu)9 (NO3)4 (H2O)4] (2), [Cu2(thu)6 (SO4) H2O] (3), [Cu2(thu)5 (SO4) (H2O)3] (4), and [Cu(thu)Cl 0.5H2O] (5) have been investigated. Complexes 1 and 3 are supposed to have one type of copper centers in trigonal planar and tetrahedral environment, respectively. Complexes 2 and 4 are supposed to have two types of copper centers, one center having trigonal planar geometry and another center having tetrahedral geometry. The aim of the present work is to show how extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra of these complexes, having different types of coordination environment, can be analyzed to yield the coordination geometry around one type of copper centers present in complexes 1 and 3, and two types of copper centers present in complexes 2 and 4. The crystal structure of complex 5 is unavailable due to inability of growing its single crystals, and hence the coordination geometry of this complex has been determined from EXAFS. The structural parameters determined from the EXAFS spectra have been reported and the coordination geometry has been depicted for the metal centers present in all the five complexes. Also, the chemical shifts have been used to determine the oxidation state of copper in these complexes. The X-ray absorption near edge spectra features have also been correlated with the coordination geometry. Also, the presence of both three and four coordinated Cu(I) centers in complexes 2 and 4 has been suggested from a comparison of the intensity of the feature at 8984 eV with those of 1 and 3. Further, in case of complex 5, the high intensity of peak A at 8986.5 eV is found to correspond to the presence of Cl coordinated to the copper center.

  9. Regulation of the demographic structure in isomorphic biphasic life cycles at the spatial fine scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasco Manuel Nobre de Carvalho da Silva Vieira

    Full Text Available Isomorphic biphasic algal life cycles often occur in the environment at ploidy abundance ratios (Haploid:Diploid different from 1. Its spatial variability occurs within populations related to intertidal height and hydrodynamic stress, possibly reflecting the niche partitioning driven by their diverging adaptation to the environment argued necessary for their prevalence (evolutionary stability. Demographic models based in matrix algebra were developed to investigate which vital rates may efficiently generate an H:D variability at a fine spatial resolution. It was also taken into account time variation and type of life strategy. Ploidy dissimilarities in fecundity rates set an H:D spatial structure miss-fitting the ploidy fitness ratio. The same happened with ploidy dissimilarities in ramet growth whenever reproductive output dominated the population demography. Only through ploidy dissimilarities in looping rates (stasis, breakage and clonal growth did the life cycle respond to a spatially heterogeneous environment efficiently creating a niche partition. Marginal locations were more sensitive than central locations. Related results have been obtained experimentally and numerically for widely different life cycles from the plant and animal kingdoms. Spore dispersal smoothed the effects of ploidy dissimilarities in fertility and enhanced the effects of ploidy dissimilarities looping rates. Ploidy dissimilarities in spore dispersal could also create the necessary niche partition, both over the space and time dimensions, even in spatial homogeneous environments and without the need for conditional differentiation of the ramets. Fine scale spatial variability may be the key for the prevalence of isomorphic biphasic life cycles, which has been neglected so far.

  10. 4f fine-structure levels as the dominant error in the electronic structures of binary lanthanide oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bolong

    2016-04-05

    The ground-state 4f fine-structure levels in the intrinsic optical transition gaps between the 2p and 5d orbitals of lanthanide sesquioxides (Ln2 O3 , Ln = La…Lu) were calculated by a two-way crossover search for the U parameters for DFT + U calculations. The original 4f-shell potential perturbation in the linear response method were reformulated within the constraint volume of the given solids. The band structures were also calculated. This method yields nearly constant optical transition gaps between Ln-5d and O-2p orbitals, with magnitudes of 5.3 to 5.5 eV. This result verifies that the error in the band structure calculations for Ln2 O3 is dominated by the inaccuracies in the predicted 4f levels in the 2p-5d transition gaps, which strongly and non-linearly depend on the on-site Hubbard U. The relationship between the 4f occupancies and Hubbard U is non-monotonic and is entirely different from that for materials with 3d or 4d orbitals, such as transition metal oxides. This new linear response DFT + U method can provide a simpler understanding of the electronic structure of Ln2 O3 and enables a quick examination of the electronic structures of lanthanide solids before hybrid functional or GW calculations. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Determining Orientational Structure of Diamondoid Thiols Attached to Silver Using Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willey, T M; Lee, J I; Fabbri, J D; Wang, D; Nielsen, M; Randel, J C; Schreiner, P R; Fokin, A A; Tkachenko, B A; Fokina, N A; Dahl, J P; Carlson, R K; Terminello, L J; Melosh, N A; van Buuren, T

    2008-10-07

    Near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) is a powerful tool for determination of molecular orientation in self-assembled monolayers and other surface-attached molecules. A general framework for using NEXAFS to simultaneously determine molecular tilt and twist of rigid molecules attached to surfaces is presented. This framework is applied to self-assembled monolayers of higher diamondoid, hydrocarbon molecules with cubic-diamond-cage structures. Diamondoid monolayers chemisorbed on metal substrates are known to exhibit interesting electronic and surface properties. This work compares molecular orientation in monolayers prepared on silver substrates using two different thiol positional isomers of [121]tetramantane, and thiols derived from two different pentamantane structural isomers, [1212]pentamantane and [1(2,3)4]pentamantane. The observed differences in monolayer structure demonstrate the utility and limitations of NEXAFS spectroscopy and the framework. The results also demonstrate the ability to control diamondoid assembly, in particular the molecular orientational structure, providing a flexible platform for the modification of surface properties with this exciting new class of nanodiamond materials.

  12. Local atomic structure in iron copper binary alloys: An extended X-ray absorption fine structure study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuri, G. [LWV, NES, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)]. E-mail: goutam.kuri@psi.ch; Degueldre, C. [LWV, NES, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Bertsch, J. [LWV, NES, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Rothe, J. [INE, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, 76344 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2007-05-31

    Understanding the clustering process and the evolution of the precipitate structure of copper in Fe-Cu system is an important step in the description of material hardening and the embrittlement process normally observed under irradiation conditions. In this work, an extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy characterization of Fe-0.3 wt%Cu and Fe-1.0 wt%Cu binary model alloys has been performed in order to investigate the local structure around Cu and Fe atoms in the matrix. The effect of thermal ageing was studied on one Fe-Cu specimen containing 1.0 wt% Cu annealed at 775 K for a duration of 1 h. The near-neighbour environment of Cu and Fe was examined by determining the best-fit structural parameters after curve fitting to the first-few-shells EXAFS functions. The results provide an indication of the formation of sub-nanometer-size Cu clusters in Fe matrix for the specimens examined. The average structural parameters estimated from the EXAFS data are presented and discussed.

  13. Concentrations of environmental DNA (eDNA) reflect spawning salmon abundance at fine spatial and temporal scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillotson, Michael D.; Kelly, Ryan P.; Duda, Jeff; Hoy, Marshal S.; Kralj, James; Quinn, Thomas P.

    2018-01-01

    Developing fast, cost-effective assessments of wild animal abundance is an important goal for many researchers, and environmental DNA (eDNA) holds much promise for this purpose. However, the quantitative relationship between species abundance and the amount of DNA present in the environment is likely to vary substantially among taxa and with ecological context. Here, we report a strong quantitative relationship between eDNA concentration and the abundance of spawning sockeye salmon in a small stream in Alaska, USA, where we took temporally- and spatially-replicated samples during the spawning period. This high-resolution dataset suggests that (1) eDNA concentrations vary significantly day-to-day, and likely within hours, in the context of the dynamic biological event of a salmon spawning season; (2) eDNA, as detected by species-specific quantitative PCR probes, seems to be conserved over short distances (tens of meters) in running water, but degrade quickly over larger scales (ca. 1.5 km); and (3) factors other than the mere presence of live, individual fish — such as location within the stream, live/dead ratio, and water temperature — can affect the eDNA-biomass correlation in space or time. A multivariate model incorporating both biotic and abiotic variables accounted for over 75% of the eDNA variance observed, suggesting that where a system is well-characterized, it may be possible to predict species' abundance from eDNA surveys, although we underscore that species- and system-specific variables are likely to limit the generality of any given quantitative model. Nevertheless, these findings provide an important step toward quantitative applications of eDNA in conservation and management.

  14. Rotational and Fine Structure of Pseudo-Jahn Molecules with C_1 Symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinjun

    2016-06-01

    It has been found in our previous works that rotational and fine-structure analysis of spectra involving nearly degenerate electronic states may aid in interpretation and analysis of the vibronic structure, specifically in the case of pseudo-Jahn-Teller (pJT) molecules with C_s symmetry. The spectral analysis of pJT derivatives (isopropoxy and cyclohexoxy of a prototypical JT molecule (the methoxy radical) allowed for quantitative determination of various contributions to the energy separation between the nearly degenerate electronic states, including the relativistic spin-orbit (SO) effect, the electrostatic interaction, and their zero-point energy difference. These states are coupled by SO and Coriolis interactions, which can also be determined accurately in rotational and fine structure analysis. Most recently, the spectroscopic model for rotational analysis of pJT molecules has been extended for analysis of molecules with C_1 symmetry, i.e., no symmetry. This model includes the six independently determinable components of the spin-rotation (SR) tensor and the three components of the SO and Coriolis interactions. It has been employed to simulate and fit high-resolution laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra of jet-cooled alkoxy radicals with C_1 symmetry, including the 2-hexoxy and the 2-pentoxy radicals, as well as previously recorded LIF spectrum of the trans-conformer (defined by its OCCC dihedral angle) of the 2-butoxy radical. Although the LIF spectra can be reproduced by using either the SR constants or SO and Coriolis constants, the latter simulation offers results that are physically more meaningful whereas the SR constants have to be regarded as effective constants. Furthermore, we will review the SO and Coriolis constants of alkoxy radicals that have been investigated, starting from the well-studied methoxy radical (CH_3O). J. Liu, D. Melnik, and T. A. Miller, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 094308 (2013) J. Liu and T. A. Miller, J. Phys. Chem. A 118, 11871

  15. Temporal event-structure coding in developmental dyslexia: Evidence from explicit and implicit temporal processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliott Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available As an alternative to theories positing visual or phonological deficits it has been suggested that the aetiology of dyslexia takes the form of a temporal processing deficit that may refer to impairment in the functional connectivity of the processes involved in reading. Here we investigated this idea in an experimental task designed to measure simultaneity thresholds. Fifteen children diagnosed with developmental dyslexia, alongside a matched sample of 13 normal readers undertook a series of threshold determination procedures designed to locate visual simultaneity thresholds and to assess the influence of subthreshold synchrony or asynchrony upon these thresholds. While there were no significant differences in simultaneity thresholds between dyslexic and normal readers, indicating no evidence of an altered perception, or temporal quantization of events, the dyslexic readers reported simultaneity significantly less frequently than normal readers, with the reduction largely attributable presentation of a subthreshold asynchrony. The results are discussed in terms of a whole systems approach to maintaining information processing integrity.

  16. Finely divided methylsilsesquioxane particles with SiO4/2 fragments in structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel A. Averichkin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Results of structural and morphological investigations of methylsilsesquioxane finely divided particles synthesized by hydrolytic co-condensation of in situ alkoxylated methyltrichlorosilane and tetrachlorous silicon are presented. The silica-type hydrophobe particles have been obtained using the abovementioned method with an output of 98.7–99.4 wt% of the load. These particles have been identified as crystalline formations with a lattice period of 5.5–8.0 nm and an interplane distance of 0.92–1.04 nm in the near order. We show that unlike for well-known crystalline methylsilsesquioxanes, introduction of chemically bonded SiO4/2 fragments to the material structure leads to the formation of 2–3 μm-sized spherical particles from the initial 10–15 nm particles; these particles are responsible for the spherical morphology of the surface. A method of extracting siloxane nanoparticles (2.5–280 nm from the reaction products has been described, the behavior of particles in suspension has been studied and particle dimensional parameters have been determined using helium−neon 0.6328 nm laser correlation spectroscopy.

  17. Growth scheme for quantum dots with low fine structure splitting at telecom wavelengths (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Tina; Skiba-Szymanska, Joanna; Stevenson, R. Mark; Varnava, Christiana; Felle, Martin; Huwer, Jan; Farrer, Ian; Krysa, Andrey B.; Spencer, Peter; Ritchie, David A.; Heffernan, Jon; Shields, Andrew J.

    2017-02-01

    Quantum dots based on InAs/InP hold the promise to deliver entangled photons with wavelength suitable for the standard telecom window around 1550 nm, which makes them predestined to be used in future quantum networks applications based on existing fiber optics infrastructure. A prerequisite for the generation of such entangled photons is a small fine structure splitting (FSS) in the quantum dot excitonic eigenstates, as well as the ability to integrate the dot into photonic structures to enhance and direct its emission. Using optical spectroscopy, we show that a growth strategy based on droplet epitaxy can simultaneously address both issues. Contrary to the standard Stranski-Krastanow technique, droplet epitaxy dots do not rely on material strains during growth, which results in a drastic improvement in dot symmetry. As a consequence, the average exciton FSS is reduced by more than a factor 4, which in fact makes all the difference between easily finding a dot with the required FSS and not finding one at all. Furthermore, we demonstrate that droplet epitaxy dots can be grown on the necessary surface (001) for high quality optical microcavities, which increases dot emission count rates by more than a factor of five. Together, these properties make droplet epitaxy quantum dots readily suitable for the generation of entangled photons at telecom wavelengths.

  18. Enhanced reflectance X-ray absorption fine structure sensitivity using a whispering-gallery waveguide

    CERN Document Server

    Chernov, V A; Kovalenko, N V; Zolotarev, K V

    2000-01-01

    A new technique of reflectance X-ray absorption fine structure (REFL-XAFS) utilizing waveguides where X-rays are reflected many times along the waveguide surface is discussed. The multiple total reflection (MTR) phenomenon highly increases X-ray interaction with the waveguide surface and hence offers higher sensitivity compared to conventional (single reflection) REFL-XAFS. On the one hand, this technique is a direct structural method for characterizing waveguides (e.g. capillaries) where the application of other methods is very difficult. On the other hand, the conventional thin wafer can be transformed to a whispering-gallery (WG) waveguide by bending to a curved mirror. Ray tracing calculations demonstrate that the WG waveguide is very suitable for REFL-XAFS measurements. This method was experimentally realized for a cylindrically bent silica wafer with the surface covered with a GeO sub 2 monolayer. The Ge K-edge REFL-XAFS measurements were performed using both MTR and conventional techniques. The MTR tec...

  19. Evidence of Recent Fine-Scale Population Structuring in South American Puma concolor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno H. Saranholi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Habitat loss and fragmentation are considered the major treats to worldwide biodiversity. Carnivores in particular can be more sensitive to landscape modification due to their low occurrence density and large home ranges. Population structuring of Puma concolor has been already reported as a consequence of extensive human activities in the North American continent. Here, we investigated the occurrence of fine-scale population structuring in the South American cougar population, contrasting two conservation areas immersed in a highly human-fragmented landscape dominated by the presence of sugar cane monoculture, roads, and urbanization, including a series of dams in the Tietê River which enlarges its water body. Seven microsatellites were amplified using non-invasive DNA obtained from fecal samples. We conducted genetic clustering analyses using Bayesian and factorial components. We also performed genetic differentiation analyses by fixation indices (Fst and Dest. Two genetic clusters represented by individuals from each area were found, indicating the occurrence of gene flow reduction between the areas. The intense human-induced landscape modification—which includes the Tietê River water body enlargement, imposing physical barriers to the movement of the individuals—could explain the gene flow reduction. Increasing connectivity among the preserved areas can mitigate such effects, and the creation of corridors or further management actions such as individual translocation to ensure gene flow in the highly-modified landscape may be essential for maintaining the genetic and demographic health of the species and its long-term persistence.

  20. Retinal pigment epithelial fine structure in the red-tailed hawk (Buto jamaicensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braekevelt, C R

    1992-03-01

    As part of a comparative morphological study, the fine structure of the retinal epithelium (RPE), choriocapillaris and Bruch's membrane (complexus basalis) has been studied by electron microscopy in the red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis). In this species the RPE consists of a single layer of low cuboidal cells which display numerous basal (scleral) infoldings and extensive apical (vitreal) processes which interdigitate with photoreceptor outer segments. These epithelial cells are joined laterally by a series of basally located tight junctions. Internally SER is the most abundant cell organelle while only small amounts of RER are present. Polysomes are however abundant as are mitochondria. The RPE cell nucleus is large and vesicular. Melanosomes are mainly located in the apical processes of the RPE cells in light-adaptation. Myeloid bodies are large and numerous in light-adaptation and often show ribosomes on their outer border. Bruch's membrane (complexus basalis) shows the typical pentalaminate structure noted in most vertebrates but with only a poorly defined central elastic layer. The endothelium of the choriocapillaris is very thin facing the RPE but is only moderately fenestrated. The choriocapillaris in this species is unusual however in that many of the fenestrae show a double-layered diaphragm.

  1. Synthesis, fine structural characterization, and CO2 adsorption capacity of metal organic frameworks-74.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Abhijit Krishna; Lin, Kuen-Song

    2014-04-01

    Two metal organic frameworks of MOF-74 group (zinc and copper-based) were successfully synthesized, characterized, and evaluated for CO2 adsorption. The both samples such as MOF-74(Zn) and MOF-74(Cu) were characterized with FE-SEM for morphology and particle size, XRD patterns for phase structure, FTIR for organic functional groups, nitrogen adsorption for pore textural properties, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy for fine structural parameters and oxidation states of central metal atoms. CO2 adsorption isotherms of MOF-74 samples were measured in a volumetric adsorption unit at 273 K and pressure up to 1.1 bar. The MOF-74(Zn) and MOF-74(Cu) adsorbents have the pore widths of 8.58 and 8.04 angstroms with the BET specific surface areas of 1,474 and 1,345 m2 g(-1), respectively. CO2 adsorption capacities of MOF-74(Zn) and MOF-74(Cu) were 4.10 and 3.38 mmol x g(-1), respectively measured at 273 K and 1.1 bar. The oxidation state of central atoms in MOF-74(Zn) was Zn(II) confirmed by XANES spectra while MOF-74(Cu) was composed of Cu(I) and Cu(II) central atoms. The bond distances of Zn--O and Cu--O were 1.98 and 1.94 angstroms, respectively.

  2. The morphology and fine structure of the giant interneurons of the wood cricket Nemobius sylvestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insausti, T C; Lazzari, C R; Casas, J

    2011-02-01

    The structural and ultrastructural characteristics of giant interneurons in the terminal abdominal ganglion of the cricket Nemobius sylvestris were investigated by means of cobalt and fluorescent dye backfilling and transmission electron microscopy. The projections of the 8 eight pairs of the biggest ascending interneurons (giant interneurons) are described in detail. The somata of all interneurons analyzed are located contralateral to their axons, which project to the posterior region of the terminal ganglion and arborise in the cercal glomerulus. Neuron 7-1a is an exception, because its arborisation is restricted to the anterior region of the ganglion. The fine structure of giant interneurons shows typical features of highly active cells. We observed striking indentations in the perineural layer, enabling the somata of the giant interneurons to be very close to the haemolymph. The cercal glomerulus exhibits a high diversity of synaptic contacts (i.e. axo-dendritic, axo-axonic, dendro-axonic, and dendro-dendritic), as well as areas of tight junctions. Electrical synapses seem to be present, as well as mixed synapses. The anatomical organization of the giant interneurons is finally discussed in terms of functional implications and on a comparative basis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Fine Structure of Glycosaminoglycans from Fresh and Decellularized Porcine Cardiac Valves and Pericardium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Cigliano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac valves are dynamic structures, exhibiting a highly specialized architecture consisting of cells and extracellular matrix with a relevant proteoglycan and glycosaminoglycan content, collagen and elastic fibers. Biological valve substitutes are obtained from xenogenic cardiac and pericardial tissues. To overcome the limits of such non viable substitutes, tissue engineering approaches emerged to create cell repopulated decellularized scaffolds. This study was performed to determine the glycosaminoglycans content, distribution, and disaccharides composition in porcine aortic and pulmonary valves and in pericardium before and after a detergent-based decellularization procedure. The fine structural characteristics of galactosaminoglycans chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate were examined by FACE. Furthermore, the mechanical properties of decellularized pericardium and its propensity to be repopulated by in vitro seeded fibroblasts were investigated. Results show that galactosaminoglycans and hyaluronan are differently distributed between pericardium and valves and within heart valves themselves before and after decellularization. The distribution of glycosaminoglycans is also dependent from the vascular district and topographic localization. The decellularization protocol adopted resulted in a relevant but not selective depletion of galactosaminoglycans. As a whole, data suggest that both decellularized porcine heart valves and bovine pericardium represent promising materials bearing the potential for future development of tissue engineered heart valve scaffolds.

  4. Low-frequency fine-structure cues allow for the online use of lexical stress during spoken-word recognition in spectrally degraded speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ying-Yee; Jesse, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    English listeners use suprasegmental cues to lexical stress during spoken-word recognition. Prosodic cues are, however, less salient in spectrally degraded speech, as provided by cochlear implants. The present study examined how spectral degradation with and without low-frequency fine-structure information affects normal-hearing listeners' ability to benefit from suprasegmental cues to lexical stress in online spoken-word recognition. To simulate electric hearing, an eight-channel vocoder spectrally degraded the stimuli while preserving temporal envelope information. Additional lowpass-filtered speech was presented to the opposite ear to simulate bimodal hearing. Using a visual world paradigm, listeners' eye fixations to four printed words (target, competitor, two distractors) were tracked, while hearing a word. The target and competitor overlapped segmentally in their first two syllables but mismatched suprasegmentally in their first syllables, as the initial syllable received primary stress in one word and secondary stress in the other (e.g., "'admiral," "'admi'ration"). In the vocoder-only condition, listeners were unable to use lexical stress to recognize targets before segmental information disambiguated them from competitors. With additional lowpass-filtered speech, however, listeners efficiently processed prosodic information to speed up online word recognition. Low-frequency fine-structure cues in simulated bimodal hearing allowed listeners to benefit from suprasegmental cues to lexical stress during word recognition.

  5. Changes in the Fine Structure of Stochastic Distributions as a Consequence of Space-Time Fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shnoll S. E.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This is a survey of the fine structure stochastic distributions in measurements obtained by me over 50 years. It is shown: (1 The forms of the histograms obtained at each geographic point (at each given moment of time are similar with high probability, even if we register phenomena of completely different nature --- from biochemical reactions to the noise in a gravitational antenna, or alpha-decay. (2 The forms of the histograms change with time. The iterations of the same form have the periods of the stellar day (1.436 min, the solar day (1.440 min, the calendar year (365 solar days, and the sidereal year (365 solar days plus 6 hours and 9 min. (3 At the same instants of the local time, at different geographic points, the forms of the histograms are the same, with high probability. (4 The forms of the histograms depend on the locations of the Moon and the Sun with respect to the horizon. (5 All the facts are proof of the dependance of the form of the histograms on the location of the measured objects with respect to stars, the Sun, and the Moon. (6 At the instants of New Moon and the maxima of solar eclipses there are specific forms of the histograms. (7 It is probable that the observed correlations are not connected to flow power changes (the changes of the gravity force --- we did not find the appropriate periods in changes in histogram form. (8 A sharp anisotropy of space was discovered, registered by alpha-decay detectors armed with collimators. Observations at 54 North (the collimator was pointed at the Pole Star showed no day-long periods, as was also the case for observations at 82 North, near the Pole. Histograms obtained by observations with an Easterly-directed collimator were determined every 718 minutes (half stellar day and with observations using a Westerly-directed collimator. (9 Collimators rotating counter-clockwise, in parallel with the celestial equator, gave the probability of changes in histograms as the number of the

  6. Changes in the Fine Structure of Stochastic Distributions as a Consequence of Space-Time Fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shnoll S. E.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This is a survey of the fine structure stochastic distributions in measurements obtained by me over 50 years. It is shown: (1 The forms of the histograms obtained at each geographic point (at each given moment of time are similar with high probability, even if we register phenomena of completely different nature — from biochemical reactions to the noise in a gravitational antenna, or α-decay. (2 The forms of the histograms change with time. The iterations of the same form have the periods of the stellar day (1.436 min, the solar day (1.440 min, the calendar year (365 solar days, and the sidereal year (365 solar days plus 6 hours and 9 min. (3 At the same instants of the local time, at different geographic points, the forms of the histograms are the same, with high probability. (4 The forms of the histograms depend on the locations of the Moon and the Sun with respect to the horizon. (5 All the facts are proof of the dependance of the form of the histograms on the location of the measured objects with respect to stars, the Sun, and the Moon. (6 At the instants of New Moon and the maxima of solar eclipses there are specific forms of the histograms. (7 It is probable that the observed correlations are not connected to flow power changes (the changes of the gravity force — we did not find the appropriate periods in changes in histogram form. (8 A sharp anisotropy of space was discovered, registered by α-decay detectors armed with collimators. Observations at 54◦ North (the collimator was pointed at the Pole Star showed no day-long periods, as was also the case for observations at 82◦ North, near the Pole. Histograms obtained by observations with an Easterly-directed collimator were determined every 718 minutes (half stellar day and with observations using a Westerly-directed collimator. (9 Collimators rotating counter-clockwise, in parallel with the celestial equator, gave the probability of changes in histograms as the number of the

  7. Recovery and fine structure variability of RGII sub-domains in wine (Vitis vinifera Merlot).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffetto, F; Ropartz, D; Zhang, X J; Gilbert, H J; Guillon, F; Ralet, M-C

    2014-10-01

    Rhamnogalacturonan II (RGII) is a structurally complex pectic sub-domain composed of more than 12 different sugars and 20 different linkages distributed in five side chains along a homogalacturonan backbone. Although RGII has long been described as highly conserved over plant evolution, recent studies have revealed variations in the structure of the polysaccharide. This study examines the fine structure variability of RGII in wine, focusing on the side chains A and B obtained after sequential mild acid hydrolysis. Specifically, this study aims to differentiate intrinsic structural variations in these RGII side chains from structural variations due to acid hydrolysis. RGII from wine (Vitis vinifera Merlot) was sequentially hydrolysed with trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) and the hydrolysis products were separated by anion-exchange chromatography (AEC). AEC fractions or total hydrolysates were analysed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The optimal conditions to recover non-degraded side chain B, side chain A and RGII backbone were 0·1 m TFA at 40 °C for 16 h, 0·48 m TFA at 40 °C for 16 h (or 0·1 m TFA at 60 °C for 8 h) and 0·1 m TFA at 60 °C for 16 h, respectively. Side chain B was particularly prone to acid degradation. Side chain A and the RGII GalA backbone were partly degraded by 0·1 m TFA at 80 °C for 1-4 h. AEC allowed separation of side chain B, methyl-esterified side chain A and non-methyl-esterified side chain A. The structure of side chain A and the GalA backbone were highly variable. Several modifications to the RGII structure of wine were identified. The observed dearabinosylation and deacetylation were primarily the consequence of acidic treatment, while variation in methyl-esterification, methyl-ether linkages and oxidation reflect natural diversity. The physiological significance of this variability, however, remains to be determined. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights

  8. Coronal Fine Structure in Dynamic Events Observed by Hi-C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebarger, Amy; Schuler, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    The High-Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) flew aboard a NASA sounding rocket on 2012 July 11 and captured roughly 345 s of high spatial and temporal resolution images of the solar corona in a narrowband 193 Angstrom channel. We have analyzed the fluctuations in intensity of Active Region 11520. We selected events based on a lifetime greater than 11 s (two Hi-C frames) and intensities greater than a threshold determined from the photon and readout noise. We compare the Hi-C events with those determined from AIA. We find that HI-C detects shorter and smaller events than AIA. We also find that the intensity increase in the Hi-C events is approx. 3 times greater than the intensity increase in the AIA events we conclude the events are related to linear sub-structure that is unresolved by AIA

  9. Verbal memory after temporal lobe epilepsy surgery in children: Do only mesial structures matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Nicole; Benifla, Mony; Rutka, James; Smith, Mary Lou

    2017-02-01

    Previous findings have been mixed regarding verbal memory outcome after left temporal lobectomy in children, and there are few studies comparing verbal memory change after lateral versus mesial temporal lobe resections. We compared verbal memory outcome associated with sparing or including the mesial structures in children who underwent left or right temporal lobe resection. We also investigated predictors of postsurgical verbal memory change. We retrospectively assessed verbal memory change approximately 1 year after unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy surgery using a list learning task. Participants included 23 children who underwent temporal lobe surgery with sparing of the mesial structures (13 left), and 40 children who had a temporal lobectomy that included resection of mesial structures (22 left). Children who underwent resection from the left lateral and mesial temporal lobe were the only group to show decline in verbal memory. Furthermore, when we considered language representation in the left temporal resection group, patients with left language representation and spared mesial structures showed essentially no change in verbal memory from preoperative to follow-up, whereas those with left language representation and excised mesial structures showed a decline. Postoperative seizure status had no effect on verbal memory change in children after left temporal lobe surgery. Finally, we found that patients with intact preoperative verbal memory experienced a significant decline compared to those with below average preoperative verbal memory. Our findings provide evidence of significant risk factors for verbal memory decline in children, specific to left mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Children who undergo left temporal lobe surgery that includes mesial structures may be most vulnerable for verbal memory decline, especially when language representation is localized to the left hemisphere and when preoperative verbal memory is intact. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Fine-scale analysis reveals cryptic landscape genetic structure in desert tortoises.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily K Latch

    Full Text Available Characterizing the effects of landscape features on genetic variation is essential for understanding how landscapes shape patterns of gene flow and spatial genetic structure of populations. Most landscape genetics studies have focused on patterns of gene flow at a regional scale. However, the genetic structure of populations at a local scale may be influenced by a unique suite of landscape variables that have little bearing on connectivity patterns observed at broader spatial scales. We investigated fine-scale spatial patterns of genetic variation and gene flow in relation to features of the landscape in desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii, using 859 tortoises genotyped at 16 microsatellite loci with associated data on geographic location, sex, elevation, slope, and soil type, and spatial relationship to putative barriers (power lines, roads. We used spatially explicit and non-explicit Bayesian clustering algorithms to partition the sample into discrete clusters, and characterize the relationships between genetic distance and ecological variables to identify factors with the greatest influence on gene flow at a local scale. Desert tortoises exhibit weak genetic structure at a local scale, and we identified two subpopulations across the study area. Although genetic differentiation between the subpopulations was low, our landscape genetic analysis identified both natural (slope and anthropogenic (roads landscape variables that have significantly influenced gene flow within this local population. We show that desert tortoise movements at a local scale are influenced by features of the landscape, and that these features are different than those that influence gene flow at larger scales. Our findings are important for desert tortoise conservation and management, particularly in light of recent translocation efforts in the region. More generally, our results indicate that recent landscape changes can affect gene flow at a local scale and that their

  11. Causes and consequences of fine-scale population structure in a critically endangered freshwater seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Small, genetically uniform populations may face an elevated risk of extinction due to reduced environmental adaptability and individual fitness. Fragmentation can intensify these genetic adversities and, therefore, dispersal and gene flow among subpopulations within an isolated population is often essential for maintaining its viability. Using microsatellite and mtDNA data, we examined genetic diversity, spatial differentiation, interregional gene flow, and effective population sizes in the critically endangered Saimaa ringed seal (Phoca hispida saimensis), which is endemic to the large but highly fragmented Lake Saimaa in southeastern Finland. Results Microsatellite diversity within the subspecies (HE = 0.36) ranks among the lowest thus far recorded within the order Pinnipedia, with signs of ongoing loss of individual heterozygosity, reflecting very low effective subpopulation sizes. Bayesian assignment analyses of the microsatellite data revealed clear genetic differentiation among the main breeding areas, but interregional structuring was substantially weaker in biparentally inherited microsatellites (FST = 0.107) than in maternally inherited mtDNA (FST = 0.444), indicating a sevenfold difference in the gene flow mediated by males versus females. Conclusions Genetic structuring in the population appears to arise from the joint effects of multiple factors, including small effective subpopulation sizes, a fragmented lacustrine habitat, and behavioural dispersal limitation. The fine-scale differentiation found in the landlocked Saimaa ringed seal is especially surprising when contrasted with marine ringed seals, which often exhibit near-panmixia among subpopulations separated by hundreds or even thousands of kilometres. Our results demonstrate that population structures of endangered animals cannot be predicted based on data on even closely related species or subspecies. PMID:25005257

  12. Spatio-temporal variations in phytoplankton community structure in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OMARI

    2013-09-06

    Sep 6, 2013 ... Spatio-temporal variations of phytoplankton, expressed in terms of species composition and diversity collected at various sampling sites in small water bodies (SWBs) within Lake Victoria basin, Kenya, were investigated monthly from November 2010 to June 2011, in relation to selected physical and.

  13. Spatio-temporal variations in phytoplankton community structure in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OMARI

    2013-09-06

    Sep 6, 2013 ... Spatio-temporal variations of phytoplankton, expressed in terms of species composition and diversity collected at various sampling ... chemical and biological properties of water most often lead to the production of .... Persulfate digestion methods, respectively in the laboratory (APHA,. 2000). Data analysis.

  14. Russian converbs – temporal interpretation and information structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Filiouchkina Krave

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of Russian converb constructions (non-finite verb forms used for adverbial subordination and their interpretations, addressing the question of whether their semantic diversity could be explained in terms of vagueness (i.e. converbs are assumed to have one basic (vague meaning, but may receive additional readings as a result of various linguistic as well as extra-linguistic factors or polysemy (i.e. converb meanings can only be analyzed by listing all the different interpretations as a disjunction. Using compositional semantics, I present a temporal calculus for Russian converb sentences, arguing for a unified account of the semantics of converbs (a temporal overlap relation attributed to the converb suffix ‘-(ja’ and the meaning of temporal anteriority encoded by the converb suffix ‘-v’. I conclude that these temporal meanings are the basic vague meanings of the two converb constructions, even though their realization is subject to constraints imposed by co-text or context.

  15. Spatio-temporal variations in phytoplankton community structure in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spatio-temporal variations of phytoplankton, expressed in terms of species composition and diversity collected at various sampling sites in small water bodies (SWBs) within Lake Victoria basin, Kenya, were investigated monthly from November 2010 to June 2011, in relation to selected physical and chemical water quality ...

  16. QUDeX-MS: hydrogen/deuterium exchange calculation for mass spectra with resolved isotopic fine structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, Joseph P; Liu, Qian; Agar, Jeffrey N

    2014-12-11

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) coupled to mass spectrometry permits analysis of structure, dynamics, and molecular interactions of proteins. HDX mass spectrometry is confounded by deuterium exchange-associated peaks overlapping with peaks of heavy, natural abundance isotopes, such as carbon-13. Recent studies demonstrated that high-performance mass spectrometers could resolve isotopic fine structure and eliminate this peak overlap, allowing direct detection and quantification of deuterium incorporation. Here, we present a graphical tool that allows for a rapid and automated estimation of deuterium incorporation from a spectrum with isotopic fine structure. Given a peptide sequence (or elemental formula) and charge state, the mass-to-charge ratios of deuterium-associated peaks of the specified ion is determined. Intensities of peaks in an experimental mass spectrum within bins corresponding to these values are used to determine the distribution of deuterium incorporated. A theoretical spectrum can then be calculated based on the estimated distribution of deuterium exchange to confirm interpretation of the spectrum. Deuterium incorporation can also be detected for ion signals without a priori specification of an elemental formula, permitting detection of exchange in complex samples of unidentified material such as natural organic matter. A tool is also incorporated into QUDeX-MS to help in assigning ion signals from peptides arising from enzymatic digestion of proteins. MATLAB-deployable and standalone versions are available for academic use at qudex-ms.sourceforge.net and agarlabs.com . Isotopic fine structure HDX-MS offers the potential to increase sequence coverage of proteins being analyzed through mass accuracy and deconvolution of overlapping ion signals. As previously demonstrated, however, the data analysis workflow for HDX-MS data with resolved isotopic fine structure is distinct. QUDeX-MS we hope will aid in the adoption of isotopic fine structure HDX

  17. Stokes shift and fine-structure splitting in CdSe/CdTe invert type-II ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Using the atomistic tight-binding (TB) theory and configuration interaction (CI) description, it is showed that the Stokes shift and fine-structure splitting (FSS) in semiconductor core/shell nanocrystals are predominantly affected by the shell thickness and band profiles. CdSe/CdTe invert type-II and CdTe/CdSe type-II core/shell ...

  18. Variation in beta-glucan fine structure, extractability, and flour slurry viscosity in oats due to genotype and environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effects of genotype and environment on oats on beta-glucan extractability,flour slurry viscosity, and beta-glucan polymer fine structure were tested. Certain environments had unpredictable catastrophic effects on slurry viscosity. Learning the cause of such viscosity loss should be of high priority ...

  19. Fine-scale spatial genetic structure in the frankincense tree Boswellia papyrifera (Del.) Hochst. and implications for conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Addisalem, A.B.; Duminil, J.; Wouters, D.; Bongers, F.; Smulders, M.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The fine-scale genetic structure and how it varies between generations depends on the spatial scale of gene dispersal and other fundamental aspects of species’ biology, such as the mating system. Such knowledge is crucial for the design of genetic conservation strategies. This is particularly

  20. Don't forget the porpoise: acoustic monitoring reveals fine scale temporal variation between bottlenose dolphin and harbour porpoise in Cardigan Bay SAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuuttila, Hanna K; Courtene-Jones, Winnie; Baulch, Sarah; Simon, Malene; Evans, Peter G H

    2017-01-01

    Populations of bottlenose dolphin and harbour porpoise inhabit Cardigan Bay, which was designated a Special Area of Conservation (SAC), with bottlenose dolphin listed as a primary feature for its conservation status. Understanding the abundance, distribution and habitat use of species is fundamental for conservation and the implementation of management. Bottlenose dolphin and harbour porpoise usage of feeding sites within Cardigan Bay SAC was examined using passive acoustic monitoring. Acoustic detections recorded with calibrated T-PODs (acoustic data loggers) indicated harbour porpoise to be present year round and in greater relative abundance than bottlenose dolphin. Fine-scale temporal partitioning between the species occurred at three levels: (1) seasonal differences, consistent between years, with porpoise detections peaking in winter months and dolphin detections in summer months; (2) diel variation, consistent across sites, seasons and years, with porpoise detections highest at night and dolphin detections highest shortly after sunrise; and (3) tidal variation was observed with peak dolphin detections occurring during ebb at the middle of the tidal cycle and before low tide, whereas harbour porpoise detections were highest at slack water, during and after high water with a secondary peak recorded during and after low water. General Additive Models (GAMs) were applied to better understand the effects of each covariate. The reported abundance and distribution of the two species, along with the temporal variation observed, have implications for the design and management of protected areas. Currently, in the UK, no SACs have been formally designated for harbour porpoise while three exist for bottlenose dolphins. Here, we demonstrate a need for increased protection and species-specific mitigation measures for harbour porpoise.

  1. Reexamination of the effective fine structure constant of graphene as measured in graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Yu; de la Peña, Gilberto A.; Kogar, Anshul; Uchoa, Bruno; Casa, Diego; Gog, Thomas; Fradkin, Eduardo; Abbamonte, Peter

    2016-05-01

    We present a refined and improved study of the influence of screening on the effective fine structure constant of graphene, α*, as measured in graphite using inelastic x-ray scattering. This followup to our previous study [J. P. Reed et al., Science 330, 805 (2010), 10.1126/science.1190920] was carried out with two times better energy resolution, five times better momentum resolution, and an improved experimental setup with lower background. We compare our results to random-phase approximation (RPA) calculations and evaluate the relative importance of interlayer hopping, excitonic corrections, and screening from high energy excitations involving the σ bands. We find that the static, limiting value of α* falls in the range 0.25-0.35, which is higher than our previous result of 0.14, but still below the value expected from RPA. We show the reduced value is not a consequence of interlayer hopping effects, which were ignored in our previous analysis, but of a combination of excitonic effects in the π →π* particle-hole continuum, and background screening from the σ -bonded electrons. We find that σ -band screening is extremely strong at distances of less than a few nanometers, and should be highly effective at screening out short-distance, Hubbard-like interactions in graphene as well as other carbon allotropes.

  2. Restricted gene flow and fine-scale population structuring in tool using New Caledonian crows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutz, C.; Ryder, T. B.; Fleischer, R. C.

    2012-04-01

    New Caledonian crows Corvus moneduloides are the most prolific avian tool users. It has been suggested that some aspects of their complex tool use behaviour are under the influence of cultural processes, involving the social transmission—and perhaps even progressive refinement—of tool designs. Using microsatellite and mt-haplotype profiling of crows from three distinct habitats (dry forest, farmland and beachside habitat), we show that New Caledonian crow populations can exhibit significant fine-scale genetic structuring. Our finding that some sites of differentiated demonstrates considerable potential for genetic and/or cultural isolation of crow groups. Restricted movement of birds between local populations at such small spatial scales, especially across habitat boundaries, illustrates how specific tool designs could be preserved over time, and how tool technologies of different crow groups could diverge due to drift and local selection pressures. Young New Caledonian crows have an unusually long juvenile dependency period, during which they acquire complex tool-related foraging skills. We suggest that the resulting delayed natal dispersal drives population-divergence patterns in this species. Our work provides essential context for future studies that examine the genetic makeup of crow populations across larger geographic areas, including localities with suspected cultural differences in crow tool technologies.

  3. Subaru Telescope limits on cosmological variations in the fine-structure constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Michael T.; Cooksey, Kathy L.

    2017-11-01

    Previous, large samples of quasar absorption spectra have indicated some evidence for relative variations in the fine-structure constant (Δα/α) across the sky. However, they were likely affected by long-range distortions of the wavelength calibration, so it is important to establish a statistical sample of more reliable results from multiple telescopes. Here we triple the sample of Δα/α measurements from the Subaru Telescope which have been `supercalibrated' to correct for long-range distortions. A blinded analysis of the metallic ions in six intervening absorption systems in two Subaru quasar spectra provides no evidence for α variation, with a weighted mean of Δα/α = 3.0 ± 2.8stat ± 2.0sys parts per million (1σ statistical and systematic uncertainties). The main remaining systematic effects are uncertainties in the long-range distortion corrections, absorption profile models, and errors from redispersing multiple quasar exposures on to a common wavelength grid. The results also assume that terrestrial isotopic abundances prevail in the absorbers; assuming only the dominant terrestrial isotope is present significantly lowers Δα/α, though it is still consistent with zero. Given the location of the two quasars on the sky, our results do not support the evidence for spatial α variation, especially when combined with the 21 other recent measurements which were corrected for, or resistant to, long-range distortions. Our spectra and absorption profile fits are publicly available.

  4. The Potamophylax nigricornis group (Trichoptera, Limnephilidae: resolution of phylogenetic species by fine structure analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oláh, J.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Applying the phylogenetic species concept and the sexual selection theory we have reviewed some natal aspects of incipient species and their accelerated evolution. How can we recognise early stages of divergence? Which selection pressures are at work during speciation? Which pathways accelerate the speed of speciation? Which kinds of trait variabilities makes difficult to find initial split criteria? Elaborating the principles of Fine Structure Analysis (FSA and the morphological Initial Split Criteria (ISP it was discovered that the European spring dwelling caddisfly Potamophylax nigricornis doesn’tbelong to a single species. It represents an entire species group with seventeen peripatric species evolving on the southernperipheries of the distributional area. Four new species subgroups have been erected: Potamophylax nigricornis new species subgroup, P. elegantulus new species subgroup, P. horgos new species subgroup, P. simas new species subgroup. Eleven new species have been described: Potamophylax apados sp. nov., P. fules sp. nov., P. fureses sp. nov., P. hasas sp. novov., P. horgos sp. nov., P. kethas sp. nov., P. lemezes sp. nov., P. peremes sp. nov., P. simas sp. nov., P. tuskes sp. nov., P. ureges sp. nov. One Potamophylax sp. nov. has been differentiated and three new species status have been documented:Potamophylax elegantulus (Klapálek stat. n., P. mista (Navás stat. nov., P. testaceus (Zetterstedt stat. nov.

  5. Fine structure and immunocytochemistry of a new chemosensory system in the Chiton larva (Mollusca: Polyplacophora).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haszprunar, Gerhard; Friedrich, Stefan; Wanninger, Andreas; Ruthensteiner, Bernhard

    2002-02-01

    Combined electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry of the larvae of several polyplacophoran species (Chiton olivaceus, Lepidochitona aff. corrugata, Mopalia muscosa) revealed a sensory system new to science, a so-called "ampullary system." The cells of the "ampullary system" are arranged in four symmetrically situated pairs lying dorsolaterally and ventrolaterally in the pretrochal part of the trochophore-like larva and they send axons into the cerebral commissure. They are lost at metamorphosis. The fine structure of these cells strongly resembles that of so-called "ampullary cells" known from various sensory organs of other molluscs, such as the apical complex of gastropod and bivalve larvae, osphradia of vetigastropods, and olfactory organs of cephalopods, and nuchal organs of certain polychaetes. The ampullary cells and their nerves are densely stained by anti-FMRF-amide fluorescence dyes, whereas antiserotonin staining is only weak. While cytological homology of the ampullary cells with those of other organs is probable, the ampullary system as a whole is regarded as a synapomorphy of the Polyplacophora or Chitonida. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Ongoing Work to Improve Precision Laser Spectroscopy of Helium Fine Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Garnet; Currey, Ronnie; Alnasser, Khadijah; Nook, Corey; Khademian, Ali; Shiner, David

    2017-04-01

    Spectroscopy of the 2P triplet levels of helium provides a nice proving ground for various precision experimental techniques. It also provides a sensitive test of atomic theory, quantum electrodynamics and, with the isotope shift determination of the nuclear size, a test of nuclear few-body theory. It can also provide, with improvements, an important input to the value of the fine structure constant, α. Several improvements to our previous experiments are ongoing, including making the study of potential systematic errors more convenient by increasing the count rate. A straight forward increase results from reducing the source-detector separation. This is accomplished by replacing the static high voltage E-field quench plates used for the elimination of the 2S singlet background, with a more reliable and convenient laser to induce the 2S to 2P singlet resonant quenching transition at 2059 nm. We discuss the theory and performance of the 2059 nm cladding-pumped Tm fiber laser we use. The in-house fabricated Tm fiber laser has required several design iterations. Additional 1083 nm fiber lasers are being implemented to improve signal via pumping to a single ms level (+1 or -1). As emphasized by Hessels and co-workers for these laser transitions, non-resonant transition amplitudes often make contributions that must be included in the data analysis at current and future levels of precision. We discuss this and experimental tests of its proper inclusion. This work is supported by NSF award 1404498.

  7. Fine-grained parallelism accelerating for RNA secondary structure prediction with pseudoknots based on FPGA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Fei; Jin, Guoqing

    2014-06-01

    PKNOTS is a most famous benchmark program and has been widely used to predict RNA secondary structure including pseudoknots. It adopts the standard four-dimensional (4D) dynamic programming (DP) method and is the basis of many variants and improved algorithms. Unfortunately, the O(N(6)) computing requirements and complicated data dependency greatly limits the usefulness of PKNOTS package with the explosion in gene database size. In this paper, we present a fine-grained parallel PKNOTS package and prototype system for accelerating RNA folding application based on FPGA chip. We adopted a series of storage optimization strategies to resolve the "Memory Wall" problem. We aggressively exploit parallel computing strategies to improve computational efficiency. We also propose several methods that collectively reduce the storage requirements for FPGA on-chip memory. To the best of our knowledge, our design is the first FPGA implementation for accelerating 4D DP problem for RNA folding application including pseudoknots. The experimental results show a factor of more than 50x average speedup over the PKNOTS-1.08 software running on a PC platform with Intel Core2 Q9400 Quad CPU for input RNA sequences. However, the power consumption of our FPGA accelerator is only about 50% of the general-purpose micro-processors.

  8. Universal Growth Scheme for Quantum Dots with Low Fine-Structure Splitting at Various Emission Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiba-Szymanska, Joanna; Stevenson, R. Mark; Varnava, Christiana; Felle, Martin; Huwer, Jan; Müller, Tina; Bennett, Anthony J.; Lee, James P.; Farrer, Ian; Krysa, Andrey B.; Spencer, Peter; Goff, Lucy E.; Ritchie, David A.; Heffernan, Jon; Shields, Andrew J.

    2017-07-01

    Efficient sources of individual pairs of entangled photons are required for quantum networks to operate using fiber-optic infrastructure. Entangled light can be generated by quantum dots (QDs) with naturally small fine-structure splitting (FSS) between exciton eigenstates. Moreover, QDs can be engineered to emit at standard telecom wavelengths. To achieve sufficient signal intensity for applications, QDs have been incorporated into one-dimensional optical microcavities. However, combining these properties in a single device has so far proved elusive. Here, we introduce a growth strategy to realize QDs with small FSS in the conventional telecom band, and within an optical cavity. Our approach employs ``droplet-epitaxy'' of InAs quantum dots on (001) substrates. We show the scheme improves the symmetry of the dots by 72%. Furthermore, our technique is universal, and produces low FSS QDs by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs emitting at ˜900 nm , and metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy on InP emitting at ˜1550 nm , with mean FSS 4 × smaller than for Stranski-Krastanow QDs.

  9. All-Optical dc Nanotesla Magnetometry Using Silicon Vacancy Fine Structure in Isotopically Purified Silicon Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Simin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We uncover the fine structure of a silicon vacancy in isotopically purified silicon carbide (4H-^{28}SiC and reveal not yet considered terms in the spin Hamiltonian, originated from the trigonal pyramidal symmetry of this spin-3/2 color center. These terms give rise to additional spin transitions, which would be otherwise forbidden, and lead to a level anticrossing in an external magnetic field. We observe a sharp variation of the photoluminescence intensity in the vicinity of this level anticrossing, which can be used for a purely all-optical sensing of the magnetic field. We achieve dc magnetic field sensitivity better than 100  nT/sqrt[Hz] within a volume of 3×10^{-7}mm^{3} at room temperature and demonstrate that this contactless method is robust at high temperatures up to at least 500 K. As our approach does not require application of radio-frequency fields, it is scalable to much larger volumes. For an optimized light-trapping waveguide of 3  mm^{3}, the projection noise limit is below 100  fT/sqrt[Hz].

  10. The excitation of OH by H2 revisited - I: fine-structure resolved rate coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kłos, J.; Ma, Q.; Dagdigian, P. J.; Alexander, M. H.; Faure, A.; Lique, F.

    2017-11-01

    Observations of OH in molecular clouds provide crucial constraints on both the physical conditions and the oxygen and water chemistry in these clouds. Accurate modelling of the OH emission spectra requires the calculation of rate coefficients for excitation of OH by collisions with the most abundant collisional partner in the molecular clouds, namely the H2 molecule. We report here theoretical calculations for the fine-structure excitation of OH by H2 (both para- and ortho-H2) using a recently developed highly accurate potential energy surface. Full quantum close coupling rate coefficients are provided for temperatures ranging from 10 to 150 K. Propensity rules are discussed and the new OH-H2 rate coefficients are compared to the earlier values that are currently used in astrophysical modelling. Significant differences were found: the new rate coefficients are significantly larger. As a first application, we simulate the excitation of OH in typical cold molecular clouds and star-forming regions. The new rate coefficients predict substantially larger line intensities. As a consequence, OH abundances derived from observations will be reduced from the values predicted by the earlier rate coefficients.

  11. Dynamic magnetization models for soft ferromagnetic materials with coarse and fine domain structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zirka, S.E., E-mail: zirka@email.dp.ua [Department of Physics and Technology, Dnepropetrovsk National University, Gagarin 72, 49050 Dnepropetrovsk (Ukraine); Moroz, Y.I. [Department of Physics and Technology, Dnepropetrovsk National University, Gagarin 72, 49050 Dnepropetrovsk (Ukraine); Steentjes, S.; Hameyer, K. [Institute of Electrical Machines, RWTH Aachen University, Schinkelstr. 4, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Chwastek, K. [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Czestochowa University of Technology, al. AK 17, 42-201 Czestochowa (Poland); Zurek, S. [Megger Instruments Ltd., Archcliffe Road, Dover, Kent, CT17 9EN (United Kingdom); Harrison, R.G. [Department of Electronics, Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada K1S 5B6 (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    We consider dynamic models, both numerical and analytical, that reproduce the magnetization field H(B) and the energy loss in ferromagnetic sheet materials with different domain structures. Conventional non-oriented (NO) and grain-oriented (GO) electrical steels are chosen as typical representatives of fine-domain and coarse-domain materials. The commonly-accepted loss separation procedures in these materials are critically analyzed. The use of a well-known simplified (“classical”) expression for the eddy-current loss is identified as the primary source of mistaken evaluations of excess loss in NO steel, in which the loss components can only be evaluated using the Maxwell (penetration) equation. The situation is quite different in GO steel, in which the loss separation is uncertain, but the total dynamic loss is several times higher than that explained by any version (numerical or analytical) of the classical approach. To illustrate the uncertainty of the loss separation in GO steel, we show that the magnetization field, and thus the total loss, in this material can be represented with equal accuracy using either the existing three-component approach or our proposed two-component technique, which makes no distinction between classical eddy-current and excess fields and losses. - Highlights: • Critical analysis of a ferromagnetic-material loss-separation principle. • This is to warn materials-science engineers about the inaccuracies resulting from this principle. • A transient model having a single dynamic component is proposed.

  12. Fine-structure transitions of interstellar atomic sulfur and silicon induced by collisions with helium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lique, F; Kłos, J; Le Picard, S D

    2017-10-02

    Atomic sulfur and silicon are important constituents of the interstellar matter and are both used as tracers of the physical conditions in interstellar shocks and outflows. We present an investigation of the spin-orbit (de-)excitation of S((3)P) and Si((3)P) atoms induced by collisions with helium with the aim to improve the determination of atomic sulfur and silicon abundances in the interstellar medium from S and Si emission spectra. Quantum-mechanical calculations have been performed in order to determine rate coefficients for the fine-structure transitions in the 5-1000 K temperature range. The scattering calculations are based on new highly correlated ab initio potentials. The theoretical results show that the (de-)excitation of Si is much faster than that of S. The rate coefficients deduced from this study are in good agreement with previous experimental and theoretical findings despite some deviations at low temperatures. From the computation of critical densities defined as the ratios between Einstein coefficients and the sum of the relevant collisional de-excitation rate coefficients, we show that local thermodynamic equilibrium conditions are not fulfilled for analyzing S and Si emission spectra observed in the interstellar medium. Hence, the present rate coefficients will be extremely useful for the accurate determination of interstellar atomic sulfur and silicon abundances.

  13. The fine-scale genetic structure and evolution of the Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Kimura, Ryosuke; Nabika, Toru; Isomura, Minoru; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Tabara, Yasuharu; Yamamoto, Ken; Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Liu, Xuanyao; Saw, Woei-Yuh; Mamatyusupu, Dolikun; Yang, Wenjun; Xu, Shuhua; Teo, Yik-Ying; Kato, Norihiro

    2017-01-01

    The contemporary Japanese populations largely consist of three genetically distinct groups-Hondo, Ryukyu and Ainu. By principal-component analysis, while the three groups can be clearly separated, the Hondo people, comprising 99% of the Japanese, form one almost indistinguishable cluster. To understand fine-scale genetic structure, we applied powerful haplotype-based statistical methods to genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism data from 1600 Japanese individuals, sampled from eight distinct regions in Japan. We then combined the Japanese data with 26 other Asian populations data to analyze the shared ancestry and genetic differentiation. We found that the Japanese could be separated into nine genetic clusters in our dataset, showing a marked concordance with geography; and that major components of ancestry profile of Japanese were from the Korean and Han Chinese clusters. We also detected and dated admixture in the Japanese. While genetic differentiation between Ryukyu and Hondo was suggested to be caused in part by positive selection, genetic differentiation among the Hondo clusters appeared to result principally from genetic drift. Notably, in Asians, we found the possibility that positive selection accentuated genetic differentiation among distant populations but attenuated genetic differentiation among close populations. These findings are significant for studies of human evolution and medical genetics.

  14. ;Long-hissler; fine structure within auroral hiss: A review and synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Howard F.; LaBelle, James; Spasojević, Maria

    2017-04-01

    One of the most prominent fine-structures of auroral hiss is the ;long-hissler;, defined here as a dispersed feature embedded within broadband auroral hiss emissions in the frequency range 1-40 kHz and lasting longer than 0.3 s. While theory is limited, there is evidence that hisslers can be used in remote sensing of density characteristics at altitudes of thousands of km. By applying an automatic threshold algorithm to VLF data collected at South Pole 2230-0130 UT daily during June-August 2014, 22 h of auroral hiss are identified on 49 of 93 days analyzed, for an occurrence rate of 9.7% during the applicable MLT interval. From manual inspection of these intervals, 414 groups (trains) of long hisslers are identified on 34 of the 49 days on which hiss occurred. Median lower (upper) frequency bounds of these features are 8 (22) kHz, median frequency-time slope is -10 kHz/s, and median hissler repetition time within a train (hissler period) is 1.2 s. Hissler period and frequency-time slope are inversely related. Data from previous studies are reviewed to provide a comprehensive description of the phenomenon. Contrary to some previous studies, subsequent long hissler features are found to commonly overlap in time, and no evidence is found for an inverse relationship between hissler train duration and geomagnetic activity.

  15. FINE STRUCTURE OF MEMBRANOUS AND MICROFIBRILLAR SYSTEMS IN THE CORTEX OF PARAMECIUM CAUDATUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Richard D.

    1971-01-01

    An electron microscope study of the cortex of Paramecium caudatum has revealed new details pertinent to several unresolved problems. The lateral boundaries of the alveoli do not regularly follow the crests of the polygonal ridges and thus their staining with silver cannot account for the external lattice seen by light microscopists. A granulo-fibrillar material is present, however, within the peaks of the ridges, which would account for the external lattice if so stained. Perforations are present between adjacent alveoli which make the whole mosaic of alveolar sacs within the cell's cortex continuous—both the membranes and the lumen. A microfibrillar system exhibiting a cross-striated pattern lies in the superficial cortex. These bands are inserted at their ends in the epiplasm and have a fine structure and arrangement suggesting a muscular function. The infraciliary lattice is a branching system of fibers with electron-opaque posts at the center of each branching locus. This system is distinct from the striated bands in morphology and in space. The epiplasm is discontinuous along the crests of the ridges, which may account for the pellicles' disposition to tear along these lines. A three-dimensional drawing is presented to show the interrelationships between the above membranous and microfibrillar systems. PMID:4102004

  16. Discovery of Finely Structured Dynamic Solar Corona Observed in the Hi-C Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebarger, A.; Cirtain, J.; Golub, L.; DeLuca, E.; Savage, S.; Alexander, C.; Schuler, T.

    2014-01-01

    In the summer of 2012, the High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) flew aboard a NASA sounding rocket and collected the highest spatial resolution images ever obtained of the solar corona. One of the goals of the Hi-C flight was to characterize the substructure of the solar corona. We therefore examine how the intensity scales from AIA resolution to Hi-C resolution. For each low-resolution pixel, we calculate the standard deviation in the contributing high-resolution pixel intensities and compare that to the expected standard deviation calculated from the noise. If these numbers are approximately equal, the corona can be assumed to be smoothly varying, i.e. have no evidence of substructure in the Hi-C image to within Hi-C's ability to measure it given its throughput and readout noise. A standard deviation much larger than the noise value indicates the presence of substructure. We calculate these values for each low-resolution pixel for each frame of the Hi-C data. On average, 70 percent of the pixels in each Hi-C image show no evidence of substructure. The locations where substructure is prevalent is in the moss regions and in regions of sheared magnetic field. We also find that the level of substructure varies significantly over the roughly 160 s of the Hi-C data analyzed here. This result indicates that the finely structured corona is concentrated in regions of heating and is highly time dependent.

  17. Restricted gene flow and fine-scale population structuring in tool using New Caledonian crows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutz, C; Ryder, T B; Fleischer, R C

    2012-04-01

    New Caledonian crows Corvus moneduloides are the most prolific avian tool users. It has been suggested that some aspects of their complex tool use behaviour are under the influence of cultural processes, involving the social transmission-and perhaps even progressive refinement-of tool designs. Using microsatellite and mt-haplotype profiling of crows from three distinct habitats (dry forest, farmland and beachside habitat), we show that New Caledonian crow populations can exhibit significant fine-scale genetic structuring. Our finding that some sites of crow groups. Restricted movement of birds between local populations at such small spatial scales, especially across habitat boundaries, illustrates how specific tool designs could be preserved over time, and how tool technologies of different crow groups could diverge due to drift and local selection pressures. Young New Caledonian crows have an unusually long juvenile dependency period, during which they acquire complex tool-related foraging skills. We suggest that the resulting delayed natal dispersal drives population-divergence patterns in this species. Our work provides essential context for future studies that examine the genetic makeup of crow populations across larger geographic areas, including localities with suspected cultural differences in crow tool technologies.

  18. The effect of STDP temporal kernel structure on the learning dynamics of single excitatory and inhibitory synapses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yotam Luz

    Full Text Available Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity (STDP is characterized by a wide range of temporal kernels. However, much of the theoretical work has focused on a specific kernel - the "temporally asymmetric Hebbian" learning rules. Previous studies linked excitatory STDP to positive feedback that can account for the emergence of response selectivity. Inhibitory plasticity was associated with negative feedback that can balance the excitatory and inhibitory inputs. Here we study the possible computational role of the temporal structure of the STDP. We represent the STDP as a superposition of two processes: potentiation and depression. This allows us to model a wide range of experimentally observed STDP kernels, from Hebbian to anti-Hebbian, by varying a single parameter. We investigate STDP dynamics of a single excitatory or inhibitory synapse in purely feed-forward architecture. We derive a mean-field-Fokker-Planck dynamics for the synaptic weight and analyze the effect of STDP structure on the fixed points of the mean field dynamics. We find a phase transition along the Hebbian to anti-Hebbian parameter from a phase that is characterized by a unimodal distribution of the synaptic weight, in which the STDP dynamics is governed by negative feedback, to a phase with positive feedback characterized by a bimodal distribution. The critical point of this transition depends on general properties of the STDP dynamics and not on the fine details. Namely, the dynamics is affected by the pre-post correlations only via a single number that quantifies its overlap with the STDP kernel. We find that by manipulating the STDP temporal kernel, negative feedback can be induced in excitatory synapses and positive feedback in inhibitory. Moreover, there is an exact symmetry between inhibitory and excitatory plasticity, i.e., for every STDP rule of inhibitory synapse there exists an STDP rule for excitatory synapse, such that their dynamics is identical.

  19. Temporal genetic structure in a poecilogonous polychaete: the interplay of developmental mode and environmental stochasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Benni Winding; Kesäniemi, Jenni E; Mustonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    variation: species with dispersive planktonic larvae are expected to be more likely to show temporal genetic variation than species with benthic or brooded non-dispersive larvae, due to differences in larval mortality and dispersal ability. We examined temporal genetic structure in populations of Pygospio...

  20. X-RAY ABSORPTION FINE STRUCTURE (XAFS) STUDIES OF SOME COPPER COMPOUNDS AND COMPLEXES OF BIOLOGICAL IMPORTANCE

    OpenAIRE

    Gaur, Abhijeet

    2012-01-01

    In the present thesis, the X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS)spectroscopy has been used to study copper compounds and complexes. Studies have been done using both EXAFS and XANES spectroscopies. Basically, following two types of studies have been made. Firstly, EXAFS study at the K-edge of copper in mixed ligand copper complexes of biological significance have been done to yield useful and important information about the molecular structure of the complexes which are mononuclear, bi...

  1. Repetition suppression in auditory-motor regions to pitch and temporal structure in music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Rachel M; Chen, Joyce L; Hollinger, Avrum; Penhune, Virginia B; Palmer, Caroline; Zatorre, Robert J

    2013-02-01

    Music performance requires control of two sequential structures: the ordering of pitches and the temporal intervals between successive pitches. Whether pitch and temporal structures are processed as separate or integrated features remains unclear. A repetition suppression paradigm compared neural and behavioral correlates of mapping pitch sequences and temporal sequences to motor movements in music performance. Fourteen pianists listened to and performed novel melodies on an MR-compatible piano keyboard during fMRI scanning. The pitch or temporal patterns in the melodies either changed or repeated (remained the same) across consecutive trials. We expected decreased neural response to the patterns (pitch or temporal) that repeated across trials relative to patterns that changed. Pitch and temporal accuracy were high, and pitch accuracy improved when either pitch or temporal sequences repeated over trials. Repetition of either pitch or temporal sequences was associated with linear BOLD decrease in frontal-parietal brain regions including dorsal and ventral premotor cortex, pre-SMA, and superior parietal cortex. Pitch sequence repetition (in contrast to temporal sequence repetition) was associated with linear BOLD decrease in the intraparietal sulcus (IPS) while pianists listened to melodies they were about to perform. Decreased BOLD response in IPS also predicted increase in pitch accuracy only when pitch sequences repeated. Thus, behavioral performance and neural response in sensorimotor mapping networks were sensitive to both pitch and temporal structure, suggesting that pitch and temporal structure are largely integrated in auditory-motor transformations. IPS may be involved in transforming pitch sequences into spatial coordinates for accurate piano performance.

  2. Observations and modeling of the fine structure of loops in the transition region and corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, David

    2017-08-01

    The physical dimensions of loops hold important clues to the coronal heating process. Theoretical arguments universally indicate that coronal heating should operate on very small spatial scales and loops should be unresolvable by current instrumentation. There are a number of observational results, however, that suggest that coronal loops are organized on spatial scales of several hundred km. For example, recent observations from IRIS have discovered a new class of low-lying dynamic loops structures, and it has been argued that they are the long-postulated unresolved fine structures (UFS) that dominate the emission of the solar transition region. Here we show that the properties of the UFS (intensities, lengths, widths, lifetimes) are consistent with 1-D non-equilibrium ionization simulations of an impulsively heated single strand, suggesting that they are resolved, and that the distribution of UFS widths implies that like coronal loops they are also structured on a spatial scale of a few hundred km. Spatial scales of a few hundred kilometers appear to be typical for a range of chromospheric and coronal structures, but it is unclear whether the true distribution of loop widths is normalized around this scale, or whether it extends to much smaller scales - perhaps by a power-law - below the resolution of current instruments. We have extended our previous modeling of the cross-field intensity profiles of coronal loops observed by EIS and AIA, to investigate what the modeled profiles would look like at Hi-C resolution, what they would look like if loops are composed only of < 10km threads, and what they would look like if there is a power-law distribution of loop widths. We find that the models with strands on spatial scales of a few hundred km are most consistent with the data. Very small threads do not produce smooth profiles when their properties are driven by the measured temperatures and densities, and the intensity profiles from the power-law simulations are

  3. Analysis of spatial genetic structure in an expanding Pinus halepensis population reveals development of fine-scale genetic clustering over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troupin, D; Nathan, R; Vendramin, G G

    2006-10-01

    We analysed the change of spatial genetic structure (SGS) of reproductive individuals over time in an expanding Pinus halepensis population. To our knowledge, this is the first empirical study to analyse the temporal component of SGS by following the dynamics of successive cohorts of the same population over time, rather than analysing different age cohorts at a single time. SGS is influenced by various factors including restricted gene dispersal, microenvironmental selection, mating patterns and the spatial pattern of reproductive individuals. Several factors that affect SGS are expected to vary over time and as adult density increases. Using air photo analysis, tree-ring dating and molecular marker analysis we reconstructed the spread of reproductive individuals over 30 years beginning from five initial individuals. In the early stages, genotypes were distributed randomly in space. Over time and with increasing density, fine-scale (< 20 m) SGS developed and the magnitude of genetic clustering increased. The SGS was strongly affected by the initial spatial distribution and genetic variation of the founding individuals. The development of SGS may be explained by fine-scale environmental heterogeneity and possibly microenvironmental selection. Inbreeding and variation in reproductive success may have enhanced SGS magnitude over time.

  4. General asymmetric neutral networks and structure design by genetic algorithms: A learning rule for temporal patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bornholdt, S. [Heidelberg Univ., (Germany). Inst., fuer Theoretische Physik; Graudenz, D. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-07-01

    A learning algorithm based on genetic algorithms for asymmetric neural networks with an arbitrary structure is presented. It is suited for the learning of temporal patterns and leads to stable neural networks with feedback.

  5. Musical intervention enhances infants' neural processing of temporal structure in music and speech

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhao, T Christina; Kuhl, Patricia K

    2016-01-01

    .... The intervention targeted temporal structure learning using triple meter in music (e.g., waltz), which is difficult for infants, and it incorporated key characteristics of typical infant music classes to maximize...

  6. Musical intervention enhances infants' neural processing of temporal structure in music and speech

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhao, T Christina; Kuhl, Patricia K

    2016-01-01

    .... The intervention targeted temporal structure learning using triple meter in music (e.g., waltz), which is difficult for infants, and it incorporated key characteristics of typical infant music classes to maximize learning (e.g...

  7. Dispersal Ability Determines the Role of Environmental, Spatial and Temporal Drivers of Metacommunity Structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Padial, André A.; Ceschin, Fernanda; Declerck, Steven A. J.; De Meester, Luc; Bonecker, Cláudia C.; Lansac-Tôha, Fabio A.; Rodrigues, Liliana; Rodrigues, Luzia C.; Train, Sueli; Velho, Luiz F. M.; Bini, Luis M.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, community ecologists are focusing on the relative importance of local environmental factors and proxies to dispersal limitation to explain spatial variation in community structure. Albeit less explored, temporal processes may also be important in explaining species composition variation in

  8. Ultra-Fine Scale Spatially-Integrated Mapping of Habitat and Occupancy Using Structure-From-Motion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip McDowall

    Full Text Available Organisms respond to and often simultaneously modify their environment. While these interactions are apparent at the landscape extent, the driving mechanisms often occur at very fine spatial scales. Structure-from-Motion (SfM, a computer vision technique, allows the simultaneous mapping of organisms and fine scale habitat, and will greatly improve our understanding of habitat suitability, ecophysiology, and the bi-directional relationship between geomorphology and habitat use. SfM can be used to create high-resolution (centimeter-scale three-dimensional (3D habitat models at low cost. These models can capture the abiotic conditions formed by terrain and simultaneously record the position of individual organisms within that terrain. While coloniality is common in seabird species, we have a poor understanding of the extent to which dense breeding aggregations are driven by fine-scale active aggregation or limited suitable habitat. We demonstrate the use of SfM for fine-scale habitat suitability by reconstructing the locations of nests in a gentoo penguin colony and fitting models that explicitly account for conspecific attraction. The resulting digital elevation models (DEMs are used as covariates in an inhomogeneous hybrid point process model. We find that gentoo penguin nest site selection is a function of the topography of the landscape, but that nests are far more aggregated than would be expected based on terrain alone, suggesting a strong role of behavioral aggregation in driving coloniality in this species. This integrated mapping of organisms and fine scale habitat will greatly improve our understanding of fine-scale habitat suitability, ecophysiology, and the complex bi-directional relationship between geomorphology and habitat use.

  9. Fine Structure of the Core of the Blazar OJ 287-I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveyenko, L. I.; Sivakon', S. S.

    2017-12-01

    The fine structure of the active region, the bulge, of the blazar OJ 287 has been investigated with a resolution of 20 μas (0.1 pc) at a wavelength of 7 mm, the epochs of 2007-2017. The structure and kinematics correspond to a vortex nature. The surrounding matter, the plasma, is transferred to the center along two arms from opposite directions. The emerging excess angular momentum is carried away along the rotation axis by bipolar outflows, rotating coaxial tubes, in a direction X ≈ -120° in the plane of the sky as it is accumulated. The central high-velocity bipolar outflow has a helical shape. The diameters of the low-velocity flows are ø1 ≈ 0.3 and ø2 ≈ 0.65 mas, or 1.4 and 3 pc, respectively. Ring currents whose tangential directions are observed as parallel chains of components are excited in the flow walls. The peak brightness temperature of the nozzle reaches Tb ≈ 1012-1013 K. A "disk" with a diameter ø ≈ 0.5 mas (≈2.2 pc) is observed by the absorption of synchrotron radiation. The disk is inclined to the plane of the sky at an angle of 60° in the jet direction. The fragments are seen from a distance of ˜0.2 mas outside the absorption zone. The jet sizes exceed considerably the counterjet ones. An enhanced supply of plasma from the northern arm gives rise to an independent vortex 0.2 mas away from the central one in the NW direction. As in the first case, the helical central bipolar outflow is surrounded by a low-velocity component ø ≈ 0.28 mas in diameter with built-in ring currents. The jet is ejected in the direction X = -50° in the plane of the sky. The jet orientation changes, X = -130° at a distance of 1 mas. A high activity of the central and two side nozzles spaced 0.22 mas apart in the direction X = -40° is occasionally observed simultaneously. The active region of the blazar is observed through an ionized medium, a screen, whose influence is significant even at a wavelength of 7 mm. The absorption and refraction of the

  10. Fine-scale spatial and temporal plankton distributions in the Southern California Bight: lessons from in situ microscopes and broadband echosounders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briseno-Avena, Christian

    Phytoplankton and zooplankton are important components of marine ecosystems, and play a major role in the biological pump, affecting carbon transport in the global oceans. Their dynamic heterogeneous spatial and temporal distributions require special tools for observing them at the ecological scales relevant to the individual organisms. In this work, I used optic and acoustic methods to study plankton organisms at spatial scales of meters and temporal scales ranging from minutes to months. Using two in situ microscopes I described the fine-scale vertical distribution of phytoplankton and several zooplankton taxa in a coastal location in the Southern California Bight. Highly resolved spatial observations revealed cryptic maxima of fluorescent particles not observed with traditional fluorometers. Furthermore, this high sampling resolution revealed that water density, and not depth, regulated the vertical position, and interactions between observed phytoplankton and zooplankton distributions. Underwater acoustic echosounders can be powerful tools to observe in situ plankton distributions. Interpreting the acoustic echoes, however, requires highly calibrated instruments and ground-truthing experiments to identify the source of acoustic signals. This work presents the description of a novel combination of a broadband, high-frequency (1.5-2.5 MHz) echosounder and a stereoscopic camera --combined, these systems can localize the echo produced by an individual target while simultaneously providing visual identification of the target. This work has provided one of the first comparisons of in situ measured broadband target strength (BTS) and the expected signal using a physical model. The results of this experiment revealed unexpected, important differences between measured and modeled BTS. This system was also used to make in situ observations of individual fragile gelatinous organisms, marine snow particles and phytoplankton, providing evidence of their significant acoustic

  11. A Structure-Based Coarse-Fine Approach for Diversity Tuning in Cellular GAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MORALES-REYES, A.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This article empirically assesses a coarse-fine approach for diversity tuning in cellular Genetic Algorithms (cGAs. The coarse tuning is performed through the constant reconfiguration of the grid while the fine tuning is locally achieved through dynamic anisotropic selection which considers individuals' locations in the local neighborhood. Benchmark problems including continuous, real-world and combinatorial problems are evaluated. The experimental results show an improvement in cGAs performance when compared to having a fixed topology configuration or to independently applying dynamic lattice reconfiguration or dynamic anisotropic.

  12. Iron Age Tools: Electron Impact Excitation of the Fe2+ Fine-structure Levels and Their Diagnostic Utility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yueying; Loch, Stuart; Pindzola, Michael S.; Stancil, Phillip C.; McLaughlin, Brendan; Ballance, Connor

    2017-06-01

    Fine-structure excitation of low-charged ions is an important process in an enormous variety of astrophysical environments. The dipole-forbidden emission lines between fine-structure levels in the ground term are observed in the far infrared (e.g., 22.9, 33.3, 51.7 $\\mu$m) and are typically an important gas cooling mechanism. R-matrix calculations for electron impact excitation (EIE) of Fe2+ were recently performed by Badnell & Ballance (2014), but only down to 1800 K. Here we apply the Breit-Pauli and Dirac R-matrix methods to compute effective collision strengths from 10 K to 2000 K for EIE of Fe2+. We explore density and temperature diagnostics for various line ratios.Badnell, N. R. & Ballance, C. P. 2014, ApJ, 785, 99This work was partially supported by NASA grant NNX15AE47G.

  13. Temporal abiotic variability structures invertebrate communities in agricultural drainage ditches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Whatley, M.H.; Vonk, J.A.; van der Geest, H.G.; Admiraal, W.

    2015-01-01

    Abiotic variability is known to structure lotic invertebrate communities, yet its influence on lentic invertebrates is not clear. This study tests the hypothesis that variability of nutrients and macro-ions are structuring invertebrate communities in agricultural drainage ditches. This was

  14. Temporal change in biological community structure in the Fountain Creek basin, Colorado, 2001-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuellig, Robert E.; Bruce, James F.; Stogner, Sr., Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    In 2001, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Colorado Springs City Engineering, began a study to better understand the relations between environmental characteristics and biological communities in the Fountain Creek basin in order to aide water-resource management and guide future monitoring activities. To accomplish this task, environmental (streamflow, habitat, and water chemistry) and biological (fish and macroinvertebrate) data were collected annually at 24 sites over a 6- or 8-year period (fish, 2003 to 2008; macroinvertebrates, 2001 to 2008). For this report, these data were first analyzed to determine the presence of temporal change in macroinvertebrate and fish community structure among years using nonparametric multivariate statistics. Where temporal change in the biological communities was found, these data were further analyzed using additional nonparametric multivariate techniques to determine which subset of selected streamflow, habitat, or water-chemistry variables best described site-specific changes in community structure relative to a gradient of urbanization. This study identified significant directional patterns of temporal change in macroinvertebrate and fish community structure at 15 of 24 sites in the Fountain Creek basin. At four of these sites, changes in environmental variables were significantly correlated with the concurrent temporal change identified in macroinvertebrate and fish community structure (Monument Creek above Woodmen Road at Colorado Springs, Colo.; Monument Creek at Bijou Street at Colorado Springs, Colo.; Bear Creek near Colorado Springs, Colo.; Fountain Creek at Security, Colo.). Combinations of environmental variables describing directional temporal change in the biota appeared to be site specific as no single variable dominated the results; however, substrate composition variables (percent substrate composition composed of sand, gravel, or cobble) collectively were present in 80 percent of the environmental

  15. Quadrupole-octupole collectivity and fine structure of nuclear rotational spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minkov, Nikolay [Osaka Univ., RCNP, Ibaraki (Japan); Drenska, Svetla [Inst. for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2002-12-01

    We apply a point-symmetry based quadrupole-octupole rotation model to study the collective motion of nuclei with simultaneous presence of octupole and quadrupole deformations. We show that it is capable to reproduce the fine odd-even staggering effects in nuclear octupole bands. (author)

  16. Astronomical constraints on the cosmic evolution of the fine structure constant and possible quantum dimensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carilli, CL; Menten, KM; Stocke, JT; Perlman, E; Vermeulen, R; Briggs, F; de Bruyn, AG; Conway, J; Moore, CP

    2000-01-01

    We present measurements of absorption by the 21 cm hyperfine transition of neutral hydrogen toward radio sources at substantial look-back times. These data are used in combination with observations of rotational transitions of common interstellar molecules to set limits on the evolution of the fine

  17. FAR-INFRARED FINE-STRUCTURE LINE DIAGNOSTICS OF ULTRALUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrah, D.; Petty, S. M.; Harris, K. [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Lebouteiller, V.; Spoon, H. W. W. [Cornell University, CRSR, Space Sciences Building, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Bernard-Salas, J.; Pearson, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Open University, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Rigopoulou, D. [RAL Space, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell, Oxford OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Smith, H. A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); González-Alfonso, E. [Universidad de Alcalá, Departamento de Física y Matemáticas, Campus Universitario, E-28871 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Clements, D. L. [Physics Department, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Efstathiou, A. [School of Sciences, European University Cyprus, Diogenes Street, Engomi, 1516 Nicosia (Cyprus); Cormier, D. [Institut für theoretische Astrophysik, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Afonso, J. [Centro de Astronomia e Astrofísica da Universidade de Lisboa, Observatório Astronómico de Lisboa, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-018 Lisbon (Portugal); Hurley, P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Borys, C. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, MS220-6, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Verma, A. [Oxford Astrophysics, Denys Wilkinson Building, University of Oxford, Keble Rd, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Cooray, A.; Salvatelli, V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)

    2013-10-10

    We present Herschel observations of 6 fine-structure lines in 25 ultraluminous infrared galaxies at z < 0.27. The lines, [O III]52 μm, [N III]57 μm, [O I]63 μm, [N II]122 μm, [O I]145 μm, and [C II]158 μm, are mostly single Gaussians with widths <600 km s{sup –1} and luminosities of 10{sup 7}-10{sup 9} L{sub ☉}. There are deficits in the [O I]63/L{sub IR}, [N II]/L{sub IR}, [O I]145/L{sub IR}, and [C II]/L{sub IR} ratios compared to lower luminosity systems. The majority of the line deficits are consistent with dustier H II regions, but part of the [C II] deficit may arise from an additional mechanism, plausibly charged dust grains. This is consistent with some of the [C II] originating from photodissociation regions or the interstellar medium (ISM). We derive relations between far-IR line luminosities and both the IR luminosity and star formation rate. We find that [N II] and both [O I] lines are good tracers of the IR luminosity and star formation rate. In contrast, [C II] is a poor tracer of the IR luminosity and star formation rate, and does not improve as a tracer of either quantity if the [C II] deficit is accounted for. The continuum luminosity densities also correlate with the IR luminosity and star formation rate. We derive ranges for the gas density and ultraviolet radiation intensity of 10{sup 1} < n < 10{sup 2.5} and 10{sup 2.2} < G{sub 0} < 10{sup 3.6}, respectively. These ranges depend on optical type, the importance of star formation, and merger stage. We do not find relationships between far-IR line properties and several other parameters: active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity, merger stage, mid-IR excitation, and SMBH mass. We conclude that these far-IR lines arise from gas heated by starlight, and that they are not strongly influenced by AGN activity.

  18. Fine-scale structure of the mid-mantle characterised by global stacks of PP precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentham, H. L. M.; Rost, S.; Thorne, M. S.

    2017-08-01

    Subduction zones are likely a major source of compositional heterogeneities in the mantle, which may preserve a record of the subduction history and mantle convection processes. The fine-scale structure associated with mantle heterogeneities can be studied using the scattered seismic wavefield that arrives as coda to or as energy preceding many body wave arrivals. In this study we analyse precursors to PP by creating stacks recorded at globally distributed stations. We create stacks aligned on the PP arrival in 5° distance bins (with range 70-120°) from 600 earthquakes recorded at 193 stations stacking a total of 7320 seismic records. As the energy trailing the direct P arrival, the P coda, interferes with the PP precursors, we suppress the P coda by subtracting a best fitting exponential curve to this energy. The resultant stacks show that PP precursors related to scattering from heterogeneities in the mantle are present for all distances. Lateral variations are explored by producing two regional stacks across the Atlantic and Pacific hemispheres, but we find only negligible differences in the precursory signature between these two regions. The similarity of these two regions suggests that well mixed subducted material can survive at upper and mid-mantle depth. To describe the scattered wavefield in the mantle, we compare the global stacks to synthetic seismograms generated using a Monte Carlo phonon scattering technique. We propose a best-fitting layered heterogeneity model, BRT2017, characterised by a three layer mantle with a background heterogeneity strength (ɛ = 0.8%) and a depth-interval of increased heterogeneity strength (ɛ = 1%) between 1000 km and 1800 km. The scalelength of heterogeneity is found to be 8 km throughout the mantle. Since mantle heterogeneity of 8 km scale may be linked to subducted oceanic crust, the detection of increased heterogeneity at mid-mantle depths could be associated with stalled slabs due to increases in viscosity

  19. Fine structure analysis of biocompatible ceramic materials based hydroxyapatite and metallic biomaterials 316L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anghelina, F.V.; Ungureanu, D.N.; Bratu, V. [Faculty of Materials Engineering and Mechanics, Valahia University of Targoviste, 18-24 Unirii Bd., 130082 (Romania); Popescu, I.N., E-mail: pinicoleta24@yahoo.com [Faculty of Materials Engineering and Mechanics, Valahia University of Targoviste, 18-24 Unirii Bd., 130082 (Romania); Rusanescu, C.O. [Politehnica University, 060042 Bucharest (Romania)

    2013-11-15

    The aim of this paper was to obtain and characterize (surface morphology and fine structure) two types of materials: Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2} hydroxyapatite powder (HAp) as biocompatible ceramic materials and AISI 316L austenitic stainless steels as metallic biomaterials, which are the components of the metal–ceramic composites used for medical implants in reconstructive surgery and prosthetic treatment. The HAp was synthesized by coprecipitation method, heat treated at 200 °C, 800 °C and 1200 °C for 4 h, analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The stainless steel 316L type was made by casting, annealing and machined with a low speed (100 mm/s) in order to obtain a smooth surface and after that has been studied from residual stresses point of view in three polishing regimes conditions: at low speed polishing (150 rpm), at high speed polishing (1500 rpm) and high speed-vibration contact polishing (1500 rpm) using wide angle X-ray diffractions (WAXD). The chemical compositions of AISI 316 steel samples were measured using a Foundry Master Spectrometer equipped with CCD detector for spectral lines and the sparking spots of AISI 316L samples were analyzed using SEM. By XRD the phases of HAp powders have been identified and also the degree of crystallinity and average size of crystallites, and with SEM, we studied the morphology of the HAp. It has been found from XRD analysis that we obtained HAp with a high degree of crystallinity at 800 °C and 1200 °C, no presence of impurity and from SEM analysis we noticed the influence of heat treatment on the ceramic particles morphology. From the study of residual stress profiles of 316L samples were observed that it differs substantially for different machining regimes and from the SEM analysis of sparking spots we revealed the rough surfaces of stainless steel rods necessary for a better adhesion of HAp on it.

  20. Spectral properties of the temporal evolution of brain network structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Zhang, Zhen-Zhen; Ma, Jun; Yang, Yong; Lin, Pan; Wu, Ying

    2015-12-01

    The temporal evolution properties of the brain network are crucial for complex brain processes. In this paper, we investigate the differences in the dynamic brain network during resting and visual stimulation states in a task-positive subnetwork, task-negative subnetwork, and whole-brain network. The dynamic brain network is first constructed from human functional magnetic resonance imaging data based on the sliding window method, and then the eigenvalues corresponding to the network are calculated. We use eigenvalue analysis to analyze the global properties of eigenvalues and the random matrix theory (RMT) method to measure the local properties. For global properties, the shifting of the eigenvalue distribution and the decrease in the largest eigenvalue are linked to visual stimulation in all networks. For local properties, the short-range correlation in eigenvalues as measured by the nearest neighbor spacing distribution is not always sensitive to visual stimulation. However, the long-range correlation in eigenvalues as evaluated by spectral rigidity and number variance not only predicts the universal behavior of the dynamic brain network but also suggests non-consistent changes in different networks. These results demonstrate that the dynamic brain network is more random for the task-positive subnetwork and whole-brain network under visual stimulation but is more regular for the task-negative subnetwork. Our findings provide deeper insight into the importance of spectral properties in the functional brain network, especially the incomparable role of RMT in revealing the intrinsic properties of complex systems.

  1. Temporal Translational Control by a Metastable RNA Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Franch, Thomas; Gerdes, Kenn

    2001-01-01

    Programmed cell death by the hok/sok locus of plasmid R1 relies on a complex translational control mechanism. The highly stable hok mRNA is activated by 3'-end exonucleolytical processing. Removal of the mRNA 3' end releases a 5'-end sequence that triggers refolding of the mRNA. The refolded hok mRNA...... is translatable but can also bind the inhibitory Sok antisense RNA. Binding of Sok RNA leads to irreversible mRNA inactivation by an RNase III-dependent mechanism. A coherent model predicts that during transcription hok mRNA must be refractory to translation and antisense RNA binding. Here we provide genetic...... evidence for the existence of a 5' metastable structure in hok mRNA that locks the nascent transcript in an inactive configuration in vivo. Consistently, the metastable structure reduces the rate of Sok RNA binding and completely blocks hok translation in vitro. Structural analyses of native RNAs strongly...

  2. Temporal structure of consciousness and minimal self in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brice eMartin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The concept of the minimal self refers to the consciousness of oneself as an immediate subject of experience. According to recent studies, disturbances of the minimal self may be a core feature of schizophrenia. They are emphasized in classical psychiatry literature and in phenomenological work. Impaired minimal self experience may be defined as a distortion of one’s first-person experiential perspective as, for example, an ‘altered presence’ during which the sense of the experienced self (‘mineness’ is subtly affected, or ‘altered sense of demarcation’, i.e. a difficulty discriminating the self from the non-self. Little is known, however, about the cognitive basis of these disturbances. In fact, recent work indicates that disorders of the self are not correlated with cognitive impairments commonly found in schizophrenia such as working-memory and attention disorders. In addition, a major difficulty with exploring the minimal self experimentally lies in its definition as being non self-reflexive, and distinct from the verbalized, explicit awareness of an ‘I’.In this paper we shall discuss the possibility that disturbances of the minimal self observed in patients with schizophrenia are related to alterations in time processing. We shall review the literature on schizophrenia and time processing that lends support to this possibility. In particular we shall discuss the involvement of temporal integration windows on different time scales (implicit time processing as well as duration perception disturbances (explicit time processing in disorders of the minimal self. We argue that a better understanding of the relationship between time and the minimal self as well of issues of embodiment require research that looks more specifically at implicit time processing. Some methodological issues will be discussed.

  3. Analysis of spatio-temporal structures of the thermospheric density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Michael; Bloßfeld, Mathis; Erdogan, Eren; Meraner, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    The Earth's upper atmosphere comprising the thermosphere and the ionosphere exhibits a dynamically coupled non-linear system in terms of chemical and physical processes. The system also interacts with the magnetosphere as well as the lower atmosphere. Several stand-alone or coupled models have been developed to reveal the behaviour of atmospheric target parameters and their interactions such as the neutral and charged particle density of the thermosphere from different perspectives which are, for instance, based on pure physical or (semi) empirical models as well as data assimilative approaches combining available models with new set of observations. The thermospheric neutral density, for instance, plays a crucial role within the equation of motion of Earth orbiting objects at low altitudes since the drag force is one of the largest non-gravitational perturbations and a function of the thermospheric integral density. Besides, the density estimation is of critical consideration for re-entry operations, manoeuvre planning, collision avoidance, precise orbit determination (POD) and satellite lifetime planning. There exist several empirical thermospheric models, which have been used in satellite orbit determination, e.g. the JB2008 or the DTM2013 model. They all include different gas species and provide thermospheric temperature and density as functions of the instantaneous position in altitude, latitude and longitude, as well as the local solar time, solar and geomagnetic storm indices and the harmonics of the year's fraction. In this contribution we study the global spatial and temporal behaviour of the thermospheric density provided by the models JB2008 or the DTM2013. Based on these insights we set up a concept for an empirical model of the thermospheric density. In the future step appropriate model parameters will be estimated from high precise satellite laser ranging observations. This work is related to the DFG project INSIGHT (Interactions of Low

  4. Structuring temporal sequences : Comparison of models and factors of complexity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Essens, P.J.M.D.

    1995-01-01

    Two stages for structuring tone sequences have been distinguished by Povel and Essens (1985). In the first, a mental clock segments a sequence into equal time units (clock model); in the second, intervals are specified in terms of subdivisions of these units. The present findings support the clock

  5. Fine structure in the inter-critical heat-affected zone of HQ130 super ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    ponding to the quenched coarse grained region, the fine grained region, the ICHAZ and the sub-critical tempered region. The cooling time (t8/5) from 800°C to 500°C of the simulated HAZ was 5 s ~ 40 s, and the test process was controlled by a computer program. Weld joint was prepared by CO2 gas shielded arc welding.

  6. Generation mechanisms of fundamental rogue wave spatial-temporal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Liming; Zhao, Li-Chen; Yang, Zhan-Ying; Guo, Boling

    2017-08-01

    We discuss the generation mechanism of fundamental rogue wave structures in N-component coupled systems, based on analytical solutions of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation and modulational instability analysis. Our analysis discloses that the pattern of a fundamental rogue wave is determined by the evolution energy and growth rate of the resonant perturbation that is responsible for forming the rogue wave. This finding allows one to predict the rogue wave pattern without the need to solve the N-component coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Furthermore, our results show that N-component coupled nonlinear Schrödinger systems may possess N different fundamental rogue wave patterns at most. These results can be extended to evaluate the type and number of fundamental rogue wave structure in other coupled nonlinear systems.

  7. Exploring the structure and function of temporal networks with dynamic graphlets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulovatyy, Y.; Chen, H.; Milenković, T.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: With increasing availability of temporal real-world networks, how to efficiently study these data? One can model a temporal network as a single aggregate static network, or as a series of time-specific snapshots, each being an aggregate static network over the corresponding time window. Then, one can use established methods for static analysis on the resulting aggregate network(s), but losing in the process valuable temporal information either completely, or at the interface between different snapshots, respectively. Here, we develop a novel approach for studying a temporal network more explicitly, by capturing inter-snapshot relationships. Results: We base our methodology on well-established graphlets (subgraphs), which have been proven in numerous contexts in static network research. We develop new theory to allow for graphlet-based analyses of temporal networks. Our new notion of dynamic graphlets is different from existing dynamic network approaches that are based on temporal motifs (statistically significant subgraphs). The latter have limitations: their results depend on the choice of a null network model that is required to evaluate the significance of a subgraph, and choosing a good null model is non-trivial. Our dynamic graphlets overcome the limitations of the temporal motifs. Also, when we aim to characterize the structure and function of an entire temporal network or of individual nodes, our dynamic graphlets outperform the static graphlets. Clearly, accounting for temporal information helps. We apply dynamic graphlets to temporal age-specific molecular network data to deepen our limited knowledge about human aging. Availability and implementation: http://www.nd.edu/∼cone/DG. Contact: tmilenko@nd.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26072480

  8. Temporal Lobe Structures and Facial Emotion Recognition in Schizophrenia Patients and Nonpsychotic Relatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goghari, Vina M.; MacDonald, Angus W.; Sponheim, Scott R.

    2011-01-01

    Temporal lobe abnormalities and emotion recognition deficits are prominent features of schizophrenia and appear related to the diathesis of the disorder. This study investigated whether temporal lobe structural abnormalities were associated with facial emotion recognition deficits in schizophrenia and related to genetic liability for the disorder. Twenty-seven schizophrenia patients, 23 biological family members, and 36 controls participated. Several temporal lobe regions (fusiform, superior temporal, middle temporal, amygdala, and hippocampus) previously associated with face recognition in normative samples and found to be abnormal in schizophrenia were evaluated using volumetric analyses. Participants completed a facial emotion recognition task and an age recognition control task under time-limited and self-paced conditions. Temporal lobe volumes were tested for associations with task performance. Group status explained 23% of the variance in temporal lobe volume. Left fusiform gray matter volume was decreased by 11% in patients and 7% in relatives compared with controls. Schizophrenia patients additionally exhibited smaller hippocampal and middle temporal volumes. Patients were unable to improve facial emotion recognition performance with unlimited time to make a judgment but were able to improve age recognition performance. Patients additionally showed a relationship between reduced temporal lobe gray matter and poor facial emotion recognition. For the middle temporal lobe region, the relationship between greater volume and better task performance was specific to facial emotion recognition and not age recognition. Because schizophrenia patients exhibited a specific deficit in emotion recognition not attributable to a generalized impairment in face perception, impaired emotion recognition may serve as a target for interventions. PMID:20484523

  9. Musical intervention enhances infants' neural processing of temporal structure in music and speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, T Christina; Kuhl, Patricia K

    2016-05-10

    Individuals with music training in early childhood show enhanced processing of musical sounds, an effect that generalizes to speech processing. However, the conclusions drawn from previous studies are limited due to the possible confounds of predisposition and other factors affecting musicians and nonmusicians. We used a randomized design to test the effects of a laboratory-controlled music intervention on young infants' neural processing of music and speech. Nine-month-old infants were randomly assigned to music (intervention) or play (control) activities for 12 sessions. The intervention targeted temporal structure learning using triple meter in music (e.g., waltz), which is difficult for infants, and it incorporated key characteristics of typical infant music classes to maximize learning (e.g., multimodal, social, and repetitive experiences). Controls had similar multimodal, social, repetitive play, but without music. Upon completion, infants' neural processing of temporal structure was tested in both music (tones in triple meter) and speech (foreign syllable structure). Infants' neural processing was quantified by the mismatch response (MMR) measured with a traditional oddball paradigm using magnetoencephalography (MEG). The intervention group exhibited significantly larger MMRs in response to music temporal structure violations in both auditory and prefrontal cortical regions. Identical results were obtained for temporal structure changes in speech. The intervention thus enhanced temporal structure processing not only in music, but also in speech, at 9 mo of age. We argue that the intervention enhanced infants' ability to extract temporal structure information and to predict future events in time, a skill affecting both music and speech processing.

  10. Musical intervention enhances infants’ neural processing of temporal structure in music and speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, T. Christina; Kuhl, Patricia K.

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with music training in early childhood show enhanced processing of musical sounds, an effect that generalizes to speech processing. However, the conclusions drawn from previous studies are limited due to the possible confounds of predisposition and other factors affecting musicians and nonmusicians. We used a randomized design to test the effects of a laboratory-controlled music intervention on young infants’ neural processing of music and speech. Nine-month-old infants were randomly assigned to music (intervention) or play (control) activities for 12 sessions. The intervention targeted temporal structure learning using triple meter in music (e.g., waltz), which is difficult for infants, and it incorporated key characteristics of typical infant music classes to maximize learning (e.g., multimodal, social, and repetitive experiences). Controls had similar multimodal, social, repetitive play, but without music. Upon completion, infants’ neural processing of temporal structure was tested in both music (tones in triple meter) and speech (foreign syllable structure). Infants’ neural processing was quantified by the mismatch response (MMR) measured with a traditional oddball paradigm using magnetoencephalography (MEG). The intervention group exhibited significantly larger MMRs in response to music temporal structure violations in both auditory and prefrontal cortical regions. Identical results were obtained for temporal structure changes in speech. The intervention thus enhanced temporal structure processing not only in music, but also in speech, at 9 mo of age. We argue that the intervention enhanced infants’ ability to extract temporal structure information and to predict future events in time, a skill affecting both music and speech processing. PMID:27114512

  11. Temporal correlations and structural memory effects in break junction measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magyarkuti, A.; Lauritzen, Kasper Primdal; Balogh, Zoltan Imre

    2017-01-01

    that correlations between the opening and subsequent closing traces may indicate structural memory effects in atomic-sized metallic and molecular junctions. Applying these methods on measured and simulated gold metallic contacts as a test system, we show that the surface diffusion induced flattening of the broken......-molecule junctions, we demonstrate pronounced contact memory effects and recovery of the molecule for junctions breaking before atomic chains are formed. However, if chains are pulled the random relaxation of the chain and molecule after rupture prevents opening-closing correlations....

  12. The Structural Biology of Muscle: Spatial and Temporal Aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Kenneth C.

    Understanding muscle contraction has resulted from the synergy of a ­number of approaches for which structure has provided an integrating framework. Nearly 60 years ago interference and phase contrast light microscopy established the sliding filament model of muscle contraction. A little later H.E. Huxley exploited electron microscopy to visualize the macromolecular architecture of the sarcomere: the thick (myosin) and thin (actin) filaments with connecting myosin cross-bridges. These observations allowed him to outline a structural basis for muscle contraction: a rowing-like progression of the myosin cross-bridges along the actin filament. X-ray fibre diffraction from insect flight muscle first demonstrated that the cross-bridges could indeed take up two configurations that might represent the ends of an active stroke. Later intense X-ray synchrotron radiation allowed the recording of the movements of the cross-bridges during a contraction with high precision. In 1993 Rayments's group ushered in a much more detailed understanding of myosin function by solving the structure of the myosin cross-bridge by X-ray crystallography. It showed that the cross-bridge consists of a large catalytic domain, often called the motor domain, containing the ATP binding site and the actin binding site. At the C-terminus of the motor domain is a long lever arm. The catalytic mechanism is similar to the G-proteins: the active site contains a P-loop and switch 1 and switch 2 elements. The lever arm was later found in two different conformations (so called pre-power-stroke and post-rigor) showing how switch 2 movement is coupled to a swing of the lever arm. Further crystallographic studies coupled with high resolution em reconstructions of decorated actin (the rigor complex) showed how ATP binding sequesters switch 1 thereby opening the large cleft in the motor domain and breaking the strong binding to actin. Conversely, the strong binding to actin causes a movement of switch 1 with

  13. The influence of spatial and temporal rainfall structure on the PMF for small alpine catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeimetz, Fraenz; Receanu, Ramona; Hertig, Jacques-André; Schleiss, Anton

    2014-05-01

    The estimation of the extreme flood, often referred to as the design flood, is an important issue for the safety of dams and other anthropogenic structures. However, it is still related to huge uncertainties. The design flood is considered in Switzerland as 1.5×Q1000. Nowadays, hydrological modeling offers great possibilities for flood estimation, starting from a known precipitation. However, most of the time this precipitation is uniformly distributed, and the influence of its particular spatial or temporal structure is disregarded. This paper aims to shed light on the issue of the influence of spatial and temporal structure of precipitation on the flood hydrograph, not only in terms of concentration time, but also as maximum flow. From an initial spatial distribution point of view, different distributions of the intensity clouds over the watershed are analyzed. The number and shape of these clouds, as well as their initial position, can have a significant influence on the shape of the resulting flood. The paper analyzes the influence of these initial conditions. In the second part of this paper, the influence of a spatio-temporal structure is analyzed. Several precipitation structures are built for long durations of 9, 12 and 24 hours, using as building blocks the spatial distributions up to 6h, for which the used model has already been tested. The goal of this development is to obtain rain structures which are both spatially and temporally closer to these occurring naturally. As opposed to a uniform distribution, these realistic spatio-temporal distributions can lead to variations in the maximum discharge, out of which only the maximum value is retained as the design flood. The precipitation values used as inputs in the model are the PMP (Probable Maximum Precipitation), and thus the obtained flood is the PMF (Probable Maximum Flood). Results are presented for two Swiss alpine catchments and various spatial and temporal rain distributions. These are compared to

  14. Modeling Temporal Structure in Music for Emotion Prediction using Pairwise Comparisons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jens; Jensen, Bjørn Sand; Larsen, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The temporal structure of music is essential for the cognitive processes related to the emotions expressed in music. However, such temporal information is often disregarded in typical Music Information Retrieval modeling tasks of predicting higher-level cognitive or semantic aspects of music...... such as emotions, genre, and similarity. This paper addresses the specific hypothesis whether temporal information is essential for predicting expressed emotions in music, as a prototypical example of a cognitive aspect of music. We propose to test this hypothesis using a novel processing pipeline: 1) Extracting...... choice self-report paradigm, used for eliciting expressed emotions in music. The methods are evaluated using two data sets and show increased predictive performance using temporal information, thus supporting the overall hypothesis....

  15. Temporally invariable bacterial community structure in the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jain, A.; Bandekar, M.; Gomes, J.; Shenoy, D.M.; Meena, R.M.; Naik, H.; Khandeparkar, R.; Ramaiah, N.

    (1993) Viruses in marine planktonic systems. Oceanography 6: 51- 63. Fuhrman JA (2002) Community structure and function in prokaryotic marine plankton. Anton Leeun Int J G 81: 521-527 Grasshoff K, Ehrhardt E, Kremling K, (1983) Methods of Seawater... version: Aquat. Microb. Ecol., vol.73(1); 2014; 51-67 Temporally invariable bacterial community structure in the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone Running page head: Invariable bacterial community structure Arabian Sea Anand Jain1, Mandar Bandekar1...

  16. Temporal structure in cooperative interactions: what does the timing of cheating tell us about its cost?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barker, Jessie; Bronstein, Judith L.

    2016-01-01

    . Focusing on between-species cooperation (mutualism), we hypothesize that the temporal sequence in which exploitation occurs relative to cooperation affects its net costs and argue that this can help explain when and where control mechanisms are observed in nature. Our principal prediction is that when...... readily be extended to cases in which individuals exhibit mixed cooperative-exploitative strategies. We demonstrate that temporal structure should be considered alongside spatial structure as an important process affecting the evolution of cooperation. We also provide testable predictions to guide future...

  17. Hierarchical organization in the temporal structure of infant-direct speech and song.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Simone; Kello, Christopher T

    2017-06-01

    Caregivers alter the temporal structure of their utterances when talking and singing to infants compared with adult communication. The present study tested whether temporal variability in infant-directed registers serves to emphasize the hierarchical temporal structure of speech. Fifteen German-speaking mothers sang a play song and told a story to their 6-months-old infants, or to an adult. Recordings were analyzed using a recently developed method that determines the degree of nested clustering of temporal events in speech. Events were defined as peaks in the amplitude envelope, and clusters of various sizes related to periods of acoustic speech energy at varying timescales. Infant-directed speech and song clearly showed greater event clustering compared with adult-directed registers, at multiple timescales of hundreds of milliseconds to tens of seconds. We discuss the relation of this newly discovered acoustic property to temporal variability in linguistic units and its potential implications for parent-infant communication and infants learning the hierarchical structures of speech and language. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. [Correlation of fine structures of distributions of amplitudes of a photomultiplier dark current fluctuations with the Earth rotations about its axis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, M V; Belousov, L V; Voeĭkov, V L; Zenchenko, K I; Zenchenko, T A; Konradov, A A; Shnol', S E

    2001-01-01

    The fine structures of distributions of photomultiplier dark current fluctuations measured in two laboratories 2000 km distant from other: in the international Institute of Biophysics (Neuss, Germany) and in the Moscow State University (Moscow, Russia) were compared. It is shown that similar forms of appropriate histograms are apparently more often realized at both locations at the same local time. This confirms the previous conclusion that the fine structure of distributions correlates with rotation of the Earth about its axis.

  19. Experimental investigation of the hyperfine spectra of Pr I - lines: discovery of new fine structure levels with low angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamim, K.; Siddiqui, I.; Windholz, L.

    2011-10-01

    We present 39 odd and 15 even parity newly discovered fine structure levels of Pr I with low angular momentum: J = 1/2, 3/2 and 5/2. Spectral lines in the range 4200 Å to 7500 Å were experimentally investigated using laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy in a hollow cathode discharge lamp. The levels were discovered by analysis of the recorded hyperfine patterns of the investigated transitions. With the help of these levels, 119 spectral lines were classified directly by laser excitation and 127 lines were classified as fluorescence lines.

  20. Near-edge x-ray-absorption fine-structure spectroscopy investigation of poly(ethylene oxide)-KI complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, X.Q.; Chen, J.M.; Skotheim, T.A. (Department of Applied Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-6000 (US)); Okamoto, Y. (Polytechnic University, 333 Jay Street, Brooklyn, New York 11201); Kirkland, J. (Sachs/Freeman Associates, Inc., 1401 McCormick Drive, Landover, Maryland 20785-5396); denBoer, M.L. (Department of Physics and Astronomy, Hunter College of the City University of New York, 695 Park Avenue, New York, New York 10021)

    1989-10-15

    We have measured the near-edge x-ray-absorption fine-structure spectra of the {ital K} edge of potassium in the polymer-salt complex poly(ethylene oxide)-KI. Changes are observed as a function of temperature due to modifications of the K-ion coordination. Comparison with model systems suggests that the lower activation energy of this ionic conducting polymer complex at elevated temperature ({ital T}{gt}70 {degree}C) is partially due to reduced oxygen complexation of the K ions.

  1. Coxal organs of Lithobius forficatus (Myriapoda, Chilopoda). Fine-structural investigation with special reference to the transport epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, J

    1983-01-01

    In Lithobius forficatus each of the coxae of the four posterior trunk segments bear a pore field with several coxal pores. The surrounding single-layered epithelium is composed of four different cell types: the main epithelial cells having a fine-structural organization of transport cells with deep apical and basal folds of the cell surfaces and plasmalemma-mitochondrial complexes, junctional cells, exocrine glands, and the wall cells of the pore channel. The entire epithelium is separated from the hemolymph by an inner cellular sheath. It is assumed that the coxal organs participate in fluid uptake.

  2. An extended x-ray absorption fine structure study of rare-earth phosphate glasses near the metaphosphate composition

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Ruth; Brennan, Tessa; Cole, Jacqueline M.; Mountjoy, Gavin; Pickup, David M.; Newport, Robert J.; Saunders, George A.

    1999-01-01

    A variable-temperature (79, 145, and 293 K) extended x-ray absorption fine structure study, using rare-earth L-III absorption edges, is reported for phosphate glasses doped with rare-earth elements (R, where R = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, and Er) with compositions close to metaphosphate, R(PO3)(3). The results yield nearest-neighbor R-O distances that demonstrate the lanthanide contraction in a glassy matrix and an R-O coordination intermediate between 6 and 7 for ran-earth ions ...

  3. Theory of strain tuning fine structure splitting in self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianping; Guo, Guang-Can; He, Lixin

    2014-11-01

    We analytically derive the change in exciton fine structure splitting (FSS) under external stresses in self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum dots, using the Bir-Pikus model. We find that the FSS change is mainly due to the strain-induced valence band mixing and valence-conduction band coupling. The exciton polarization angle under strain is determined by the argument of the electron-hole off-diagonal exchange integrals. The theory agrees well with the empirical pseudopotential calculations.

  4. FINE STRUCTURE IN MANHATTAN’S DAYTIME URBAN HEAT ISLAND: A NEW DATASET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Vant-Hull

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A street-level temperature and humidity dataset with high resol ution spatial and temporal components has been created for the island of Manhattan, suitab le for use by the urban health and modelling communities. It cons ists of a set of pedestrian measurements over the course of two summers converted into anomaly maps, and a set of ten light -post mounted installations measuring temperature, relative humidity, and illumination at t hree minute intervals over three months. The quality control and data reduction used to produce the anomaly maps is described, and the relationships between spatial and temporal v ariability are investigated. The data sets are available for down load via the project website.

  5. Eastern Mediterranean Sea Spatial and Temporal Variability of Thermohaline Structure and Circulation Identified from Observational (T, S) Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    MEDITERRANEAN SEA SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIABILITY OF THERMOHALINE STRUCTURE AND CIRCULATION IDENTIFIED FROM OBSERVATIONAL (T, S) PROFILES by Nuri...MEDITERRANEAN SEA SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIABILITY OF THERMOHALINE STRUCTURE AND CIRCULATION IDENTIFIED FROM OBSERVATIONAL (T, S) PROFILES 5. FUNDING NUMBERS...variability of thermohaline structure and circulation were investigated. Surface depth shows high seasonal temperature variability through the year

  6. PREFACE: The 15th International Conference on X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS15)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z. Y.

    2013-04-01

    The 15th International Conference on X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS15) was held on 22-28 July 2012 in Beijing, P. R. China. About 340 scientists from 34 countries attended this important international event. Main hall Figure 1. Main hall of XAFS15. The rapidly increasing application of XAFS to the study of a large variety of materials and the operation of the new SR source led to the first meeting of XAFS users in 1981 in England. Following that a further 14 International Conferences have been held. Comparing a breakdown of attendees according to their national origin, it is clear that participation is spreading to include attendees from more and more countries every year. The strategy of development in China of science and education is increasing quickly thanks to the large investment in scientific and technological research and infrastructure. There are three Synchrotron Radiation facilities in mainland China, Hefei Light Source (HLS) in the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSRL), Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF) in the Institute of High Energy Physics, and Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) in the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics. More than 10000 users and over 5000 proposals run at these facilities. Among them, many teams from the USA, Japan, German, Italy, Russia, and other countries. More than 3000 manuscript were published in SCI journals, including (incomplete) Science (7), Nature (10), Nature Series (7), PNAS (3), JACS (12), Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. (15), Nano Lett. (2), etc. In XAFS15, the participants contributed 18 plenary invited talks, 16 parallel invited talks, 136 oral presentations, 12 special talks, and 219 poster presentations. Wide communication was promoted in the conference halls, the classical banquet restaurant, and the Great Wall. Parallel hallCommunicationPoster room Figure 2. Parallel hallFigure 3. CommunicationFigure 4. Poster room This volume contains 136 invited and contributed papers

  7. Hyper-temporal c-band SAR for baseline woody structural assessments in deciduous savannas

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mathieu, Renaud SA

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ) in generating large-scale woody resources maps. Using airborne LiDAR as calibration, we investigated the relationships between hyper-temporal C-band ASAR data and woody structural parameters, namely total canopy cover (TCC) and total canopy volume (TCV), in a...

  8. Syntactic Structure Building in the Anterior Temporal Lobe during Natural Story Listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Jonathan; Nir, Yuval; Hasson, Uri; Malach, Rafael; Heeger, David J.; Pylkkanen, Liina

    2012-01-01

    The neural basis of syntax is a matter of substantial debate. In particular, the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), or Broca's area, has been prominently linked to syntactic processing, but the anterior temporal lobe has been reported to be activated instead of IFG when manipulating the presence of syntactic structure. These findings are difficult to…

  9. Precise Study of Fine Structure in $^{14}$C Emission from $^{223}$Ra

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    We request 10 shifts in two sessions of beam time at ISOLDE for the production of a $^{223}$Ra source. This source will be used with the superconducting spectrometer SOLENO at Orsay for a precise measurement (good statistics and energy resolution) of the fine stucture in the energy spectrum of $^{14}$C nuclei emitted by $^{223}$Ra, discovered at Orsay in July 1989. The measurement will be devoted to carry out the hindrance factors of the transitions to 15$\\!^-\\!$/2$\\,$ (1.423 MeV) and 5$\\!^+\\!$/2$\\,$ (1.567 MeV) excited states of $^{209}$Pb, which present a particular interest for obtaining spectroscopic information and testing nuclear models.

  10. A longitudinal genetic survey identifies temporal shifts in the population structure of Dutch house sparrows

    OpenAIRE

    Cousseau, L; Husemann, M; Foppen, R.; Vangestel, C.; Lens, L

    2016-01-01

    Dutch house sparrow (Passer domesticus) densities dropped by nearly 50% since the early 1980s, and similar collapses in population sizes have been reported across Europe. Whether, and to what extent, such relatively recent demographic changes are accompanied by concomitant shifts in the genetic population structure of this species needs further investigation. Therefore, we here explore temporal shifts in genetic diversity, genetic structure and effective sizes of seven Dutch house sparrow pop...

  11. Fast two-snapshot structured illumination for temporal focusing microscopy with enhanced axial resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Meng, Yunlong; Lin, Wei; Li, Chenglin; Chen, Shih-chi

    2017-01-01

    We present a new two-snapshot structured light illumination (SLI) reconstruction algorithm for fast image acquisition. The new algorithm, which only requires two mutually {\\pi} phase-shifted raw structured images, is implemented on a custom-built temporal focusing fluorescence microscope (TFFM) to enhance its axial resolution via a digital micromirror device (DMD). First, the orientation of the modulated sinusoidal fringe patterns is automatically identified via spatial frequency vector detec...

  12. A tale of two pectins: Diverse fine structures can result from identical processive PME treatments on similar high DM substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, J L; Kent, L M; Ralet, M-C; Cameron, R G; Williams, M A K

    2017-07-15

    The effects of a processive pectin-methylesterase (PME) treatment on two different pectins, both possessing a high degree of methylesterification (DM), were investigated. While the starting samples were purportedly very similar in fine structure, the intermolecular DM distributions arising from their PME treatments were strikingly different. Herein, a simulation that illuminates the origin of this phenomenon is described. It is concluded that: (1) very different low-DM samples (with the same average DM) can be generated using the same processive PME, simply by a judicious choice of the high DM starting material; (2) observing the intermolecular DM distribution of the products of processive-PME-processing is an extremely sensitive discriminator of the fine structure of high DM starting materials; and (3) for PMEs with unknown action patterns the processive nature of the enzyme is most simply revealed by studying the changes it induces in the intermolecular DM distribution of very-highly-methylesterified homogalacturonans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Direct Observation of the M1 Transition between the Ground Term Fine Structure Levels of W VIII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momoe Mita

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a direct observation of the M1 transition between the fine structure splitting in the 4 f 13 5 s 2 5 p 6 2 F ground term of W VIII. The spectroscopic data of few-times ionized tungsten ions are important for the future ITER diagnostics, but there is a serious lack of data. The present study is part of an ongoing effort to solve this problem. Emission from the tungsten ions produced and trapped in a compact electron beam ion trap is observed with a Czerny–Turner visible spectrometer. Spectra in the EUV range are also observed at the same time to help identify the previously-unreported visible lines. The observed wavelength 574.47 ± 0.03 nm (air, which corresponds to the fine structure splitting of 17,402.5 ± 0.9 cm − 1 , shows reasonable agreement with the previously reported value 17,410 ± 5 cm − 1 obtained indirectly through the analysis of EUV spectra [Ryabtsev et al., Atoms 3 (2015 273].

  14. Direct observation of the M1 transition between the ground state fine structure splitting of W VIII

    CERN Document Server

    Mita, Momoe; Kato, Daiji; Murakami, Izumi; Nakamura, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    We present direct observation of the M1 transition between the fine structure splitting in the 4f13 5s2 5p6 2F ground state of W VIII. The spectroscopic data of few-times ionized tungsten ions are important for the future ITER diagnostics, but there is a serious lack of data. The present study is part of an ongoing effort to solve this lack. Emission from the tungsten ions produced and trapped in a compact electron beam ion trap is observed with a Czerny-Turner visible spectrometer. Spectra in the EUV range are also observed at the same time to help the identification of the previously-unreported visible lines. The observed wavelength 574.47 pm 0.03 nm (air), which corresponds to the fine structure splitting of 17402.5 pm 0.9 cm-1, shows reasonable agreement with the previously reported value 17410 pm 5 cm-1 obtained indirectly through the analysis of EUV spectra [Ryabtsev et al., Atoms 3 (2015) 273].

  15. Time-resolved fine structure mixing of cesium {8}^{2}D induced by helium and argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila, Ricardo C.; Perram, Glen P.; Eshel, Ben

    2017-11-01

    The rates for fine structure mixing and quenching of the moderately excited 8{}2{D}5/2 and 8{}2{D}3/2 states of cesium under collision with argon and the more impulsive helium have been measured, using two-photon pulsed excitation and time-resolved fluorescence techniques. The pressure dependence of the eigenvalues of the rate matrix yields very rapid rate coefficients of 2.6+/- 0.2× {10}-9 {{cm}}3/({{atom}} s) for He and 5.2+/- 0.4× {10}-10 {{cm}}3/({{atom}} s) for Ar, about two–three times faster than for the Cs 7{}2{D}5/2\\rightleftharpoons 7{}2{D}3/2 relaxation. The quenching rates are also rapid, 1.07+/- 0.04× {10}-10 {{cm}}3/({{atom}} s) and 9.5+/- 0.7× {10}-11 {{cm}}3/({{atom}} s) for He and Ar respectively. The rapid fine structure rates are explained by the highly impulsive nature of the collisions, and the large average distance of the valence electron from the nucleus. Quenching rates (intra-multiplet transfer) are likely enhanced by the closely spaced, 9{}2P levels. The observed rates are compared with the predictions from time-dependent perturbation theory.

  16. Gray matter textural heterogeneity as a potential in-vivo biomarker of fine structural abnormalities in Asperger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radulescu, E; Ganeshan, B; Minati, L; Beacher, F D C C; Gray, M A; Chatwin, C; Young, R C D; Harrison, N A; Critchley, H D

    2013-02-01

    Brain imaging studies contribute to the neurobiological understanding of Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC). Herein, we tested the prediction that distributed neurodevelopmental abnormalities in brain development impact on the homogeneity of brain tissue measured using texture analysis (TA; a morphological method for surface pattern characterization). TA was applied to structural magnetic resonance brain scans of 54 adult participants (24 with Asperger syndrome (AS) and 30 controls). Measures of mean gray-level intensity, entropy and uniformity were extracted from gray matter images at fine, medium and coarse textures. Comparisons between AS and controls identified higher entropy and lower uniformity across textures in the AS group. Data reduction of texture parameters revealed three orthogonal principal components. These were used as regressors-of-interest in a voxel-based morphometry analysis that explored the relationship between surface texture variations and regional gray matter volume. Across the AS but not control group, measures of entropy and uniformity were related to the volume of the caudate nuclei, whereas mean gray-level was related to the size of the cerebellar vermis. Similar to neuropathological studies, our study provides evidence for distributed abnormalities in the structural integrity of gray matter in adults with ASC, in particular within corticostriatal and corticocerebellar networks. Additionally, this in-vivo technique may be more sensitive to fine microstructural organization than other more traditional magnetic resonance approaches and serves as a future testable biomarker in AS and other neurodevelopmental disorders.

  17. Relation between fine structure of energy spectra for pulsating aurora electrons and frequency spectra of whistler mode chorus waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Y.; Saito, S.; Seki, K.; Nishiyama, T.; Kataoka, R.; Asamura, K.; Katoh, Y.; Ebihara, Y.; Sakanoi, T.; Hirahara, M.; Oyama, S.; Kurita, S.; Santolik, O.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the origin of the fine structure of the energy spectrum of precipitating electrons for the pulsating aurora (PsA) observed by the low-altitude Reimei satellite. The Reimei satellite achieved simultaneous observations of the optical images and precipitating electrons of the PsA from satellite altitude (~620 km) with resolution of 40 ms. The main modulation of precipitation, with a few seconds, and the internal modulations, with a few hertz, that are embedded inside the main modulations are identified above ~3 keV. Moreover, stable precipitations at ~1 keV are found for the PsA. A "precipitation gap" is discovered between two energy bands. We identify the origin of the fine structure of the energy spectrum for the precipitating electrons using the computer simulation on the wave-particle interaction between electrons and chorus waves. The lower band chorus (LBC) bursts cause the main modulation of energetic electrons, and the generation and collapse of the LBC bursts determines on-off switching of the PsA. A train of rising tone elements embedded in the LBC bursts drives the internal modulations. A close set of upper band chorus (UBC) waves causes the stable precipitations at ~1 keV. We show that a wave power gap around the half gyrofrequency at the equatorial plane in the magnetosphere between LBC and UBC reduces the loss rate of electrons at the intermediate energy range, forming a gap of precipitating electrons in the ionosphere.

  18. Fine-scale spatial genetic structure in predominantly selfing plants with limited seed dispersal: A rule or exception?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei Volis

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Gene flow at a fine scale is still poorly understood despite its recognized importance for plant population demographic and genetic processes. We tested the hypothesis that intensity of gene flow will be lower and strength of spatial genetic structure (SGS will be higher in more peripheral populations because of lower population density. The study was performed on the predominantly selfing Avena sterilis and included: (1 direct measurement of dispersal in a controlled environment; and (2 analyses of SGS in three natural populations, sampled in linear transects at fixed increasing inter-plant distances. We found that in A. sterilis major seed dispersal is by gravity in close (less than 2 m vicinity of the mother plant, with a minor additional effect of wind. Analysis of SGS with six nuclear SSRs revealed a significant autocorrelation for the distance class of 1 m only in the most peripheral desert population, while in the two core populations with Mediterranean conditions, no genetic structure was found. Our results support the hypothesis that intensity of SGS increases from the species core to periphery as a result of decreased within-population gene flow related to low plant density. Our findings also show that predominant self-pollination and highly localized seed dispersal lead to SGS at a very fine scale, but only if plant density is not too high.

  19. Effect of diurnal photosynthetic activity on the fine structure of amylopectin from normal and waxy barley starch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldstein, Avi; Annor, George; Blennow, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    , respectively. Regardless of lighting conditions, no structural effects were found when comparing both the amylopectin side-chain distribution and the internal chain fragments of these amylopectins. However, the diurnally grown NBS and WBS both showed larger amylopectin clusters and these had lower branching...... growing conditions. The amylopectin fine structures were analysed by characterizing its unit chain length profiles after enzymatic debranching as well as its φ,β-limit dextrins and its clusters and building blocks after their partial and complete hydrolysis with α-amylase from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens...... density and longer average chain lengths than clusters derived from plants grown under constant light conditions. Amylopectin clusters from diurnally grown plants also consisted of a greater number of building blocks, and shorter inter-block chain lengths compared to clusters derived from plants grown...

  20. Influence of substrate orientation on exciton fine structure splitting of InAs/InP nanowire quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieliński, Michał

    2012-05-22

    : In this paper, we use an atomistic approach to investigate strain distributions, single particle and many body electronic properties of InAs/InP nanowire quantum dots with substrate orientation varying from [111] to high-index [119], and compared with [001] case. We show that single particle gap for high-index [11k] substrates is increased with respect to [111] and [001] cases, and oscillates with the substrate index due to faceting effects. Surprisingly, the overall shell-like structure of single particle states is preserved even for highly facetted, high-index substrates. On the contrary, we demonstrate that besides two limiting high-symmetry cases, [001] and [111], the bright exciton splitting varies strongly with substrate orientation. For [112]-oriented substrate, the fine structure splitting reaches maximum due to crystal lattice anisotropy despite fully cylindrical isotropic shape of nanowire quantum dot.

  1. Cellular fine structures and histochemical reactions in the tissue of a cypress twig preserved in Baltic amber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, Barbara; Schmitt, Jürgen M.; Tischendorf, Gilbert

    2005-01-01

    A twig of a cypress plant preserved for ca. 45Myr in Baltic amber was analysed by light and electron microscopy. Cross-sections of the whole plant showed an almost intact tissue of the entire stem and leaves, revealing, to our knowledge, the oldest and most highly preserved tissue from an amber inclusion reported so far. The preparations are based on a new technique of internal imbedding, whereby the hollow spaces within the inclusion are filled with synthetic resin which stabilizes the cellular structures during the sectioning procedure. Cytological stains applied to the sections reacted with cell walls and nuclei. A strong green auto-fluorescence of the cuticle and the resin canals in the leaves was observed. Transmission electron micrographs revealed highly preserved fine structures of cell walls, membranes and organelles. The results were compared with taxonomically related recent Glyptostrobus and Juniperus plants. PMID:15695201

  2. Single Cesium Lead Halide Perovskite Nanocrystals at Low Temperature: Fast Single-Photon Emission, Reduced Blinking, and Exciton Fine Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainò, Gabriele; Nedelcu, Georgian; Protesescu, Loredana; Bodnarchuk, Maryna I; Kovalenko, Maksym V; Mahrt, Rainer F; Stöferle, Thilo

    2016-02-23

    Metal-halide semiconductors with perovskite crystal structure are attractive due to their facile solution processability, and have recently been harnessed very successfully for high-efficiency photovoltaics and bright light sources. Here, we show that at low temperature single colloidal cesium lead halide (CsPbX3, where X = Cl/Br) nanocrystals exhibit stable, narrow-band emission with suppressed blinking and small spectral diffusion. Photon antibunching demonstrates unambiguously nonclassical single-photon emission with radiative decay on the order of 250 ps, representing a significant acceleration compared to other common quantum emitters. High-resolution spectroscopy provides insight into the complex nature of the emission process such as the fine structure and charged exciton dynamics.

  3. Analysis of the fine structure of Sn$^{11+...14+}$ ions by optical spectroscopy in an electron beam ion trap

    CERN Document Server

    Windberger, A; Borschevsky, A; Ryabtsev, A; Dobrodey, S; Bekker, H; Eliav, E; Kaldor, U; Ubachs, W; Hoekstra, R; López-Urrutia, J R Crespo; Versolato, O O

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally re-evaluate the fine structure of Sn$^{11+...14+}$ ions. These ions are essential in bright extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) plasma-light sources for next-generation nanolithography, but their complex electronic structure is an open challenge for both theory and experiment. We combine optical spectroscopy of magnetic dipole $M1$ transitions, in a wavelength range covering 260\\,nm to 780\\,nm, with charge-state selective ionization in an electron beam ion trap. Our measurements confirm the predictive power of \\emph{ab initio} calculations based on Fock space coupled cluster theory. We validate our line identification using semi-empirical Cowan calculations with adjustable wavefunction parameters. Available Ritz combinations further strengthen our analysis. Comparison with previous work suggests that line identifications in the EUV need to be revisited.

  4. Cultural transmission of tool use combined with habitat specializations leads to fine-scale genetic structure in bottlenose dolphins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopps, Anna M; Ackermann, Corinne Y; Sherwin, William B; Allen, Simon J; Bejder, Lars; Krützen, Michael

    2014-05-07

    Socially learned behaviours leading to genetic population structure have rarely been described outside humans. Here, we provide evidence of fine-scale genetic structure that has probably arisen based on socially transmitted behaviours in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops sp.) in western Shark Bay, Western Australia. We argue that vertical social transmission in different habitats has led to significant geographical genetic structure of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes. Dolphins with mtDNA haplotypes E or F are found predominantly in deep (more than 10 m) channel habitat, while dolphins with a third haplotype (H) are found predominantly in shallow habitat (less than 10 m), indicating a strong haplotype-habitat correlation. Some dolphins in the deep habitat engage in a foraging strategy using tools. These 'sponging' dolphins are members of one matriline, carrying haplotype E. This pattern is consistent with what had been demonstrated previously at another research site in Shark Bay, where vertical social transmission of sponging had been shown using multiple lines of evidence. Using an individual-based model, we found support that in western Shark Bay, socially transmitted specializations may have led to the observed genetic structure. The reported genetic structure appears to present an example of cultural hitchhiking of mtDNA haplotypes on socially transmitted foraging strategies, suggesting that, as in humans, genetic structure can be shaped through cultural transmission.

  5. Grasping the mechanisms of narratives' incoherence in schizophrenia: an analysis of the temporal structure of patients' life story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allé, M C; Gandolphe, M-C; Doba, K; Köber, C; Potheegadoo, J; Coutelle, R; Habermas, T; Nandrino, J-L; Danion, J-M; Berna, F

    2016-08-01

    Life narratives of patients with schizophrenia are characterized by impaired coherence so that the listener has often difficulties to grasp the life trajectory of the patients. In order to better understand what causes this reduced temporal coherence, we investigated the temporal structure of patients' life narratives through different temporal narrative elements (elaboration of beginnings and endings, local temporal indicators and temporal deviations from a linear order), across two complementary studies. Life narratives were collected by means of two different methods; a free recall in study 1 and a more structured protocol, aiming at reducing the cognitive task demands in study 2. All narratives from the two studies were analyzed using the same validated method. Both studies showed that global temporal coherence is significantly reduced in patients with schizophrenia (ps.02). This is mainly due to their stronger tendency to temporally deviate from a linear temporal order without marking the deviation as such. We also observed significant correlations in the patient groups between global temporal coherence and executive dysfunction (p=.008) or their higher tendency to temporally deviate from a linear temporal order in their life narratives (p<.001). These results shed light on narrative correlates of temporal narrative incoherence in schizophrenia and highlight the central role of executive dysfunction in this incoherence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Estimating the collapse of aggregated fine soil structure in a mountainous forested catchment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouri, Goro; Shinoda, Seirou; Golosov, Valentin; Chalov, Sergey; Shiiba, Michiharu; Hori, Tomoharu; Oki, Taikan

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the relationship of forest soil dryness and antecedent rainfall with suspended sediment (SS) yield due to extreme rainfall events and how this relationship affects the survival of forest plants. Several phenomena contribute to this relationship: increasing evaporation (amount of water vapour discharged from soil) due to increasing air temperature, decreasing moisture content in the soil, the collapse of aggregates of fine soil particles, and the resulting effects on forest plants. To clarify the relationships among climate variation, the collapse of soil particle aggregates, and rainfall-runoff processes, a numerical model was developed to reproduce such aggregate collapse in detail. The validity of the numerical model was confirmed by its application to the granitic mountainous catchment of the Nagara River basin in Japan and by comparison with observational data. The simulation suggests that important problems, such as the collapse of forest plants in response to decreases in soil moisture content and antecedent rainfall, will arise if air temperature continues to increase. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Daily temporal structure in African savanna flower visitation networks and consequences for network sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldock, Katherine C R; Memmott, Jane; Ruiz-Guajardo, Juan Carlos; Roze, Denis; Stone, Graham N

    2011-03-01

    Ecological interaction networks are a valuable approach to understanding plant-pollinator interactions at the community level. Highly structured daily activity patterns are a feature of the biology of many flower visitors, particularly provisioning female bees, which often visit different floral sources at different times. Such temporal structure implies that presence/absence and relative abundance of specific flower-visitor interactions (links) in interaction networks may be highly sensitive to the daily timing of data collection. Further, relative timing of interactions is central to their possible role in competition or facilitation of seed set among coflowering plants sharing pollinators. To date, however, no study has examined the network impacts of daily temporal variation in visitor activity at a community scale. Here we use temporally structured sampling to examine the consequences of daily activity patterns upon network properties using fully quantified flower-visitor interaction data for a Kenyan savanna habitat. Interactions were sampled at four sequential three-hour time intervals between 06:00 and 18:00, across multiple seasonal time points for two sampling sites. In all data sets the richness and relative abundance of links depended critically on when during the day visitation was observed. Permutation-based null modeling revealed significant temporal structure across daily time intervals at three of the four seasonal time points, driven primarily by patterns in bee activity. This sensitivity of network structure shows the need to consider daily time in network sampling design, both to maximize the probability of sampling links relevant to plant reproductive success and to facilitate appropriate interpretation of interspecific relationships. Our data also suggest that daily structuring at a community level could reduce indirect competitive interactions when coflowering plants share pollinators, as is commonly observed during flowering in highly

  8. Fine structure characterization of zero-valent iron nanoparticles for decontamination of nitrites and nitrates in wastewater and groundwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuen-Song Lin et al

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objectives of the present study were to investigate the chemical reduction of nitrate or nitrite species by zero-valent iron nanoparticle (ZVIN in aqueous solution and related reaction kinetics or mechanisms using fine structure characterization. This work also exemplifies the utilization of field emission-scanning electron microscope (FE–SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and x-ray diffraction (XRD to reveal the speciation and possible reaction pathway in a very complex adsorption and redox reaction process. Experimentally, ZVIN of this study was prepared by sodium borohydride reduction method at room temperature and ambient pressure. The morphology of as-synthesized ZVIN shows that the nearly ball and ultrafine particles ranged of 20–50 nm were observed with FE–SEM or TEM analysis. The kinetic model of nitrites or nitrates reductive reaction by ZVIN is proposed as a pseudo first-order kinetic equation. The nitrite and nitrate removal efficiencies using ZVIN were found 65–83% and 51–68%, respectively, based on three different initial concentrations. Based on the XRD pattern analyses, it is found that the quantitative relationship between nitrite and Fe(III or Fe(II is similar to the one between nitrate and Fe(III in the ZVIN study. The possible reason is due to the faster nitrite reduction by ZVIN. In fact, the occurrence of the relative faster nitrite reductive reaction suggested that the passivation of the ZVIN have a significant contribution to iron corrosion. The extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS or x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES spectra show that the nitrites or nitrates reduce to N2 or NH3 while oxidizing the ZVIN to Fe2O3 or Fe3O4 electrochemically. It is also very clear that decontamination of nitrate or nitrite species in groundwater via the in-situ remediation with a ZVIN permeable reactive barrier would be environmentally attractive.

  9. Microsatellite analyses reveal fine-scale genetic structure in grey mouse lemurs (Microcebus murinus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredsted, T; Pertoldi, C; Schierup, MH

    2005-01-01

    Information on genetic structure can be used to complement direct inferences on social systems and behaviour. We studied the genetic structure of the solitary grey mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus), a small, nocturnal primate endemic to western Madagascar, with the aim of getting further insight...... distribution of identical homozygotes was found, supporting the notion that dispersal distance for breeding was shorter than that for foraging, i.e. the breeding neighbourhood size is smaller than the foraging neighbourhood size. In conclusion, we found a more complex population structure than what has been...

  10. Evaluating the spatio-temporal factors that structure network parameters of plant-herbivore interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio López-Carretero

    Full Text Available Despite the dynamic nature of ecological interactions, most studies on species networks offer static representations of their structure, constraining our understanding of the ecological mechanisms involved in their spatio-temporal stability. This is the first study to evaluate plant-herbivore interaction networks on a small spatio-temporal scale. Specifically, we simultaneously assessed the effect of host plant availability, habitat complexity and seasonality on the structure of plant-herbivore networks in a coastal tropical ecosystem. Our results revealed that changes in the host plant community resulting from seasonality and habitat structure are reflected not only in the herbivore community, but also in the emergent properties (network parameters of the plant-herbivore interaction network such as connectance, selectiveness and modularity. Habitat conditions and periods that are most stressful favored the presence of less selective and susceptible herbivore species, resulting in increased connectance within networks. In contrast, the high degree of selectivennes (i.e. interaction specialization and modularity of the networks under less stressful conditions was promoted by the diversification in resource use by herbivores. By analyzing networks at a small spatio-temporal scale we identified the ecological factors structuring this network such as habitat complexity and seasonality. Our research offers new evidence on the role of abiotic and biotic factors in the variation of the properties of species interaction networks.

  11. Determining the Velocity Fine Structure by a Laser Anemometer in VAD operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Leif; Kirkegaard, Peter; Mikkelsen, Torben

    in one direction and measure a time series of the Doppler wind velocity component along the beam. Applying Taylor’s hypothesis the structure function can be calculated. This technique was discussed by Kristensen et al. (2011). Taylor’s hypothesis cannot, however, be used if there is no mean wind......The theoretical basis for determining the dissipation ε, by measuring the velocity structure function with a CW-laser anemometer has been derived in the case of calm wind conditions. If there is a well defined mean wind speed the structure function can be obtained by having the laser beam pointing....... Then it is necessary to “create” a mean wind by turning the laser beam. Since the instrument is not moved the beam will describe a cone which could be a VAD-scanning. In any case the measured velocity components will not be parallel and this implies that the measured structure function will contain a term which...

  12. Structural analysis of strontium in human teeth treated with surface pre-reacted glass-ionomer filler eluate by using extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uo, Motohiro; Wada, Takahiro; Asakura, Kiyotaka

    2017-03-31

    The bioactive effects of strontium released from surface pre-reacted glass-ionomer (S-PRG) fillers may aid in caries prevention. In this study, the local structure of strontium taken up by teeth was estimated by extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis. Immersing teeth into S-PRG filler eluate increased the strontium content in enamel and dentin by more than 100 times. The local structure of strontium in enamel and dentin stored in distilled water was the same as that in synthetic strontium-containing hydroxyapatite (SrHAP). Moreover, the local structure of strontium in enamel and dentin after immersion in the S-PRG filler eluate was also similar to that of SrHAP. After immersion in the S-PRG filler eluate, strontium was suggested to be incorporated into the hydroxyapatite (HAP) of enamel and dentin at the calcium site in HAP.

  13. Fine-Scale Analysis Reveals Cryptic Landscape Genetic Structure in Desert Tortoises

    OpenAIRE

    Latch, Emily K.; William I Boarman; Andrew Walde; Robert C Fleischer

    2011-01-01

    Characterizing the effects of landscape features on genetic variation is essential for understanding how landscapes shape patterns of gene flow and spatial genetic structure of populations. Most landscape genetics studies have focused on patterns of gene flow at a regional scale. However, the genetic structure of populations at a local scale may be influenced by a unique suite of landscape variables that have little bearing on connectivity patterns observed at broader spatial scales. We inves...

  14. Decoding the fine-scale structure of a breast cancer genome and transcriptome

    OpenAIRE

    Volik, Stanislav; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Huang, Guiqing; Stratton, Michael R.; Bignel, Graham; Murnane, John; Brebner, John H.; Bajsarowicz, Krystyna; Paris, Pamela L.; Tao, Quanzhou; Kowbel, David; Lapuk, Anna; Shagin, Dmitri A.; Shagina, Irina A.; Gray, Joe W.

    2006-01-01

    A comprehensive understanding of cancer is predicated upon knowledge of the structure of malignant genomes underlying its many variant forms and the molecular mechanisms giving rise to them. It is well established that solid tumor genomes accumulate a large number of genome rearrangements during tumorigenesis. End Sequence Profiling (ESP) maps and clones genome breakpoints associated with all types of genome rearrangements elucidating the structural organization of tumor genomes. Here we exte...

  15. Contrasting Effects of Vocabulary Knowledge on Temporal and Parietal Brain Structure across Lifespan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Fiona M.; Thomas, Michael S. C.; Filippi, Roberto; Harth, Helen; Price, Cathy J.

    2010-01-01

    Using behavioral, structural, and functional imaging techniques, we demonstrate contrasting effects of vocabulary knowledge on temporal and parietal brain structure in 47 healthy volunteers who ranged in age from 7 to 73 years. In the left posterior supramarginal gyrus, vocabulary knowledge was positively correlated with gray matter density in teenagers but not adults. This region was not activated during auditory or visual sentence processing, and activation was unrelated to vocabulary skills. Its gray matter density may reflect the use of an explicit learning strategy that links new words to lexical or conceptual equivalents, as used in formal education and second language acquisition. By contrast, in left posterior temporal regions, gray matter as well as auditory and visual sentence activation correlated with vocabulary knowledge throughout lifespan. We propose that these effects reflect the acquisition of vocabulary through context, when new words are learnt within the context of semantically and syntactically related words. PMID:19366285

  16. Contrasting effects of vocabulary knowledge on temporal and parietal brain structure across lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Fiona M; Thomas, Michael S C; Filippi, Roberto; Harth, Helen; Price, Cathy J

    2010-05-01

    Using behavioral, structural, and functional imaging techniques, we demonstrate contrasting effects of vocabulary knowledge on temporal and parietal brain structure in 47 healthy volunteers who ranged in age from 7 to 73 years. In the left posterior supramarginal gyrus, vocabulary knowledge was positively correlated with gray matter density in teenagers but not adults. This region was not activated during auditory or visual sentence processing, and activation was unrelated to vocabulary skills. Its gray matter density may reflect the use of an explicit learning strategy that links new words to lexical or conceptual equivalents, as used in formal education and second language acquisition. By contrast, in left posterior temporal regions, gray matter as well as auditory and visual sentence activation correlated with vocabulary knowledge throughout lifespan. We propose that these effects reflect the acquisition of vocabulary through context, when new words are learnt within the context of semantically and syntactically related words.

  17. Step-scan Photoacoustic Fourier Transform and X-rays photoelectron spectroscopy of oil sands fine tailings: new structural insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensebaa, Farid; Majid, Abdul; Deslandes, Yves

    2001-11-01

    The chemical and physical properties of clay suspensions from oil sands have profound effect not only on the bitumen extraction process but also on the tailing treatment and reclamation. Step-scan Photoacoustic Fourier Transform Infrared (S 2PAS-FTIR) has been used to characterize the properties of clay suspensions. The photoacoustic spectral features of the fine solids (FS) fraction were found to vary drastically with the modulation frequency. This is attributed to the increase in the relative amount of bitumen-like matter in the bulk. A similar behavior was observed on the bi-wetted solid (BWS) fraction, in spite of the fact that the variation as a function of the modulation frequency is less significant. No such change is observed on hydrophobic solid (HPS) sample. These observations allow us to refine our pictorial image of the bitumen fraction materials structure.

  18. Fine structure of the CCl3 UV absorption spectrum and CCl3 kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellermann, T.

    1992-01-01

    The UV gas-phase spectrum of CCl3 was recorded in the range 220-300 nm using pulse radiolysis of CHCl3/SF6 or CCl4/Ar gas mixtures. The UV spectrum exhibits a pronounced vibrational fine structure which is assigned to transition into the (C2A1'(3s)) Rydberg state. The vibronic progression has...... a band origin around 250 nm and the spacing of 569 +/- 63 cm-1 is ascribed to excitation of the out-of-plane bending mode. The absorption cross section with a maximum of sigma = (1.02 +/- 0.16) x 10(-17) cm2 molecule-1 at 224.80 +/- 0.16 nm was determined relative to sigma(CH3) and sigma(CH3O2). The rate...

  19. Immunogold fine structural localization of extracellular matrix components in aged human cornea. I. Types I-IV collagen and laminin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, G E; Konstas, A G; Lee, W R

    1991-01-01

    Using the immunogold technique combined with cryoultramicrotomy and London Resin white (LR white) embedding, we studied the fine structural distribution of types I-IV collagen and laminin in corneal tissue from seven enucleated human eyes (age range, 63-78 years). Type II collagen was not identified in any corneal layer. Type I and type III collagen were distributed in a similar fashion in striated collagen fibrils in Bowman's layer and in the stroma. Type IV collagen was located only in the posterior non-banded region of Descemet's membrane. Laminin was identified in subepithelial anchoring plaques and the sub-endothelial region of Descemet's membrane in accordance with its recognized adhesive function.

  20. Zinc cysteine active sites of metalloproteins: A density functional theory and x-ray absorption fine structure study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimakis, Nicholas; Farooqi, Mohammed Junaid; Garza, Emily Sofia; Bunker, Grant

    2008-03-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) and x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy are complementary tools for the biophysical study of active sites in metalloproteins. DFT is used to compute XAFS multiple scattering Debye Waller factors, which are then employed in genetic algorithm-based fitting process to obtain a global fit to the XAFS in the space of fitting parameters. Zn-Cys sites, which serve important functions as transcriptional switches in Zn finger proteins and matrix metalloproteinases, previously have proven intractable by this method; here these limitations are removed. In this work we evaluate optimal DFT nonlocal functionals and basis sets for determining optimal geometries and vibrational densities of states of mixed ligation Zn(His)4-n(Cys)n sites. Theoretical results are compared to experimental XAFS measurements and Raman spectra from the literature and tabulated for use.

  1. Feeling defects in Zircaloy by extended X-ray absorption fine structure and muon spin relaxation analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degueldre, C. [LWV and LMU, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)]. E-mail: claude.degueldre@psi.ch; Conradson, St. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Amato, A. [LWV and LMU, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Campitelli, E. [LWV and LMU, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2006-06-30

    The defects generated by plastic deformation of Zircaloy by cold rolling and the resulting sub-nanoscopic environment are investigated using results provided by extended X-ray fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and muon spin relaxation (MuSR) analysis. EXAFS allows to visualizing the atomic environment as a function of the induced strain. The defects are deduced from the next neighbour number determined shell per shell by the EXAFS analysis. An additional dimension is added with the study of muon properties in the material, namely the possibility of examining different states of the defect centres over the sub-nanometric scale. Muon spin relaxation analysis provides information about the local order around the muon and about possible muon diffusion in the material. Combining these techniques allows to completing the complex picture yields by the defect creation yielded by plastic deformation due to cold rolling in Zircaloy.

  2. Limits on evolution of the fine-structure constant in runaway dilaton models from Sunyaev–Zeldovich observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.F.L. Holanda

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, new bounds on possible variations of the fine structure constant, α, for a class of runaway dilaton models are performed. By considering a possible evolution with redshift, z, such as Δαα=−γln⁡(1+z, where in γ are the physical properties of the model, we constrain this parameter by using a deformed cosmic distance duality relation jointly with gas mass fraction (GMF measurements of galaxy clusters and luminosity distances of type Ia supernovae. The GMF's used in our analyses are from cluster mass data from 82 galaxy clusters in the redshift range 0.12

  3. Statistics of fine dispersion structures events in energetic particle spectra: their origin and role in the outer magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Lutsenko

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Fine Dispersion Structures (FDS in energetic particle spectra in outer magnetosphere were discovered in DOK-2 experiments onboard of Interball-1 and -2 spacecrafts (1995–2000. First results of these studies were published in 2000–2005. It was shown that FDS can be a result of a gradient-curvature drift of ions and electrons around the Earth after their pulse injection from the geotail plasma sheet to some point in the night side of the outer magnetosphere. Since that time hundreds of such events have been examined additionally. They proved to be a rather common phenomenon in the outer Earth's magnetosphere. We present here statistics of FDS observations and properties which confirms our interpretation and clarifies the role of magnetotail plasma sheet and FDS particles in dynamics and replenishment of the outer radiation belt population.

  4. Note: Construction of x-ray scattering and x-ray absorption fine structure beamline at the Pohang Light Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ik-Jae; Yu, Chung-Jong; Yun, Young-Duck; Lee, Chae-Soon; Seo, In Deuk; Kim, Hyo-Yun; Lee, Woul-Woo; Chae, Keun Hwa

    2010-02-01

    A new hard x-ray beamline, 10B KIST-PAL beamline (BL10B), has been designed and constructed at the Pohang Light Source (PLS) in Korea. The beamline, operated by Pohang Accelerator Laboratory-Korean Institute of Science and Technology consortium, is dedicated to x-ray scattering (XRS) and x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) experiments. X rays with photon energies from 4.0 to 16.0 keV are delivered to the experimental station passing a collimating mirror, a fixed-exit double-crystal Si(111) monochromator, and a toroidal mirror. Basic experimental equipment for XAFS measurement, a high resolution diffractometry, an image plate detector system, and a hot stage have been prepared for the station. From our initial commissioning and performance testing of the beamline, it is observed that BL10B beamline can perform XRS and XAFS measurements successfully.

  5. Evidence of the nature of core-level photoemission satellites using angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moler, E.J.; Kellar, S.A.; Huff, W.R.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The authors present a unique method of experimentally determining the angular momentum and intrinsic/extrinsic origin of core-level photoemission satellites by examining the satellite diffraction pattern in the Angle Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) mode. They show for the first time that satellite peaks not associated with chemically differentiated atomic species display an ARPEFS intensity oscillation. They present ARPEFS data for the carbon 1s from ({radical}3x{radical}3)R30 CO/Cu(111) and p2mg(2xl)CO/Ni(110), nitrogen 1s from c(2x2) N{sub 2}/Ni(100), cobalt 1s from p(1x1)Co/Cu(100), and nickel 3p from clean nickel (111). The satellite peaks and tails of the Doniach-Sunjic line shapes in all cases exhibit ARPEFS curves which indicate an angular momentum identical to the main peak and are of an intrinsic nature.

  6. Determining the velocity fine structure by a laser anemometer in VAD operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristensen, Leif; Kirkegaard, P.; Mikkelsen, Torben

    2012-08-15

    The theoretical basis for determining the dissipation {epsilon}, by measuring the velocity structure function with a CW-laser anemometer has been derived in the case of calm wind conditions. If there is a well defined mean wind speed the structure function can be obtained by having the laser beam pointing in one direction and measure a time series of the Doppler wind velocity component along the beam. Applying Taylor's hypothesis the structure function can be calculated. This technique was discussed by Kristensen et al. (2011). Taylor's hypothesis cannot, however, be used if there is no mean wind. Then it is necessary to ''create'' a mean wind by turning the laser beam. Since the instrument is not moved the beam will describe a cone which could be a VAD-scanning. In any case the measured velocity components will not be parallel and this implies that the measured structure function will contain a term which is proportional to the total variance. The theoretical expression for the line-filtered structure function is derived in two equivalent ways, one in physical space and one in wave-number space, of which the last can be reliably evaluated by numerical integration. Also a practical approximate equation, derived in the physical space, is presented. (Author)

  7. Spectroscopic phonon and extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements on 3C-SiC/Si (001) epifilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talwar, Devki N.; Wan, Linyu; Tin, Chin-Che; Lin, Hao-Hsiung; Feng, Zhe Chuan

    2018-01-01

    Comprehensive experimental and theoretical studies are reported to assess the vibrational and structural properties of 3C-SiC/Si (001) epilayers grown by chemical vapor deposition in a vertical reactor configuration. While the phonon features are evaluated using high resolution infrared reflectance (IRR) and Raman scattering spectroscopy (RSS) - the local inter-atomic structure is appraised by synchrotron radiation extended x-ray absorption fine structure (SR-EXAFS) method. Unlike others, our RSS results in the near backscattering geometry revealed markedly indistinctive longitudinal- and transverse-optical phonons in 3C-SiC epifilms of thickness d theory is utilized to explain the observed atypical IRR spectra in 3C-SiC/Si (001) epifilms. High density intrinsic defects present in films and/or epilayer/substrate interface are likely to be responsible for (a) releasing misfit stress/strains, (b) triggering atypical features in IRR spectra, and (c) affecting observed local structural traits in SR-EXAFS.

  8. Mother-offspring distances reflect sex differences in fine-scale genetic structure of eastern grey kangaroos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Wendy J; Garant, Dany; Festa-Bianchet, Marco

    2015-05-01

    Natal dispersal affects life history and population biology and causes gene flow. In mammals, dispersal is usually male-biased so that females tend to be philopatric and surrounded by matrilineal kin, which may lead to preferential associations among female kin. Here we combine genetic analyses and behavioral observations to investigate spatial genetic structure and sex-biased dispersal patterns in a high-density population of mammals showing fission-fusion group dynamics. We studied eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) over 2 years at Wilsons Promontory National Park, Australia, and found weak fine-scale genetic structure among adult females in both years but no structure among adult males. Immature male kangaroos moved away from their mothers at 18-25 months of age, while immature females remained near their mothers until older. A higher proportion of male (34%) than female (6%) subadults and young adults were observed to disperse, although median distances of detected dispersals were similar for both sexes. Adult females had overlapping ranges that were far wider than the maximum extent of spatial genetic structure found. Female kangaroos, although weakly philopatric, mostly encounter nonrelatives in fission-fusion groups at high density, and therefore kinship is unlikely to strongly affect sociality.

  9. Laser Control of Self-Organization Process in Microscopic Region and Fabrication of Fine Microporous Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukimasa Matsumura

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a controlling technique of microporous structure by laser irradiation during self-organization process. Self-organization process is fabrication method of microstructure. Polymer solution was dropped on the substrate at high humid condition. Water in air appears dropping air temperature below the dew point. The honeycomb structure with regularly aligned pores on the film was fabricated by attaching water droplets onto the solution surface. We demonstrate that it was possible to prevent forming pores at the region of laser irradiation and flat surface was fabricated. We also demonstrated that a combination structure with two pore sizes and flat surface was produced by a single laser-pulse irradiation. Our method is a unique microfabrication processing technique that combines the advantages of bottom-up and top-down techniques. This method is a promising technique that can be applied to produce for photonic crystals, biological cell culturing, surface science and electronics fields, and so forth.

  10. Fine structural characterization of chondroitin sulfate in urine of bladder pain syndrome subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccari, Francesca; Buzzega, Dania; Galeotti, Fabio; Volpi, Nicola

    2011-12-01

    Urothelial glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are decreased in bladder pain syndrome (BPS), and urinary GAGs are thought to reflect this deficiency. In previous researches, urine GAG levels were found increased, decreased, or similar between BPS and controls. Additionally, no study is available on the structure characterization of urinary chondroitin sulfate (CS) in BPS patients. CS in the urine of BPS-affected patients and controls has been determined by specific electrophoresis, along with total GAGs and heparan sulfate (HS) percentage, and CS disaccharides have been quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography. No significant differences were obtained for total amount of GAGs, absolute content of CS and HS, and their relative percentages. Moreover, no differences were observed for CS structure confirming similar urine CS composition in BPS subjects and controls. This study found no significant differences of BPS and control urine GAG levels and CS structure to allow use of these parameters as diagnostic markers for BPS diagnosis.

  11. The Fine Art in Structure of John Fowles’ Novel “The French Lieutenant’s Woman”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana Levytska

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the role of descriptive context in the structure of John Fowles’ novel “The French Lieutenant’s Woman”. Based on the intermedial analysis there was analyzed the semiotics of fine art in the novel, in particular an appeal to the Pre-Raphaelite art and the Renaissance painting. It was found that John Fowles’ works tend to use the poetics of different kinds of arts: the writer appeals to painting, operates its sign system, recodes signs of visual art by the language of a literary text, expanding the context of its understanding, interpretation and reception. There were studied intermedial connections of the novel with other works of arts. It was found that in the writer’s novels and stories were presented the most clearly visual arts in terms of their classification for the form of sensory perception. Among the arts in relation to time and space are dominated spatial arts: painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, decorative arts. The study focuses on the fine art, especially painting. The descriptive context is multivariation and multifunctional, it has manifestations on a level with the intermedial citation of painting, ekphrasis in landscape or portrait sketches, paintings of visualizing of characters’ imagination, allusions to works of art, etc., explicitly and implicitly represented in the texts. Intermedial analysis allows us to see the relationship of John Fowles’ novel with the Pre-Raphaelite art. In the character context the descriptive component increases literary, cultural and historical contextual characteristics. Introduced in the structure of a literary text the descriptive context on the semiotic level forms the axiological context. The system of ethical and aesthetic values of different cultural eras is extrapolated through the artistic context. So, the article studies the intermedial novel connections with other works of art. The descriptive context of the novel is manifested at

  12. Thermohaline fine structure in an oceanographic front from seismic reflection profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, W Steven; Páramo, Pedro; Pearse, Scott; Schmitt, Raymond W

    2003-08-08

    We present acoustic images of oceanic thermohaline structure created from marine seismic reflection profiles across the major oceanographic front between the Labrador Current and the North Atlantic Current. The images show that distinct water masses can be mapped, and their internal structure imaged, using low-frequency acoustic reflections from sound speed contrasts at interfaces across which temperature changes. The warm/cold front is characterized by east-dipping reflections generated by thermohaline intrusions in the uppermost 1000 meters of the ocean. Our results imply that marine seismic reflection techniques can provide excellent spatial resolution of important oceanic phenomena, including thermohaline intrusions, internal waves, and eddies.

  13. Analysis of the fine structure of Sn11+-Sn14+ ions by optical spectroscopy in an electron-beam ion trap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windberger, A.; Torretti, F.; Borschevsky, A.; Ryabtsev, A.; Dobrodey, S.; Bekker, H.; Eliav, E.; Kaldor, U.; Ubachs, W.M.G.; Hoekstra, R.; Lopez-Urrutia, J.R.C.; Versolato, O.O.

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally re-evaluate the fine structure of Sn11+-Sn14+ ions. These ions are essential in bright extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) plasma-light sources for next-generation nanolithography, but their complex electronic structure is an open challenge for both theory and experiment. We combine optical

  14. Double imaging with an intensified visible fast camera to visualize the fine structure of turbulent coherent plasma structures (blobs) in TJ-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Cal, E.; Semwal, P.; Martín Aguilera, A.; van Milligen, B.; de Pablos, J. L.; Khan, Z.; Hidalgo, C.

    2014-10-01

    A visible fast camera coupled with an image intensifier was employed to view turbulent coherent plasma structures (blobs) at the gas plume being puffed through a poloidal limiter. The image intensifier amplifies the light intensity thereby allowing the imaging system to be operated at ultra-short exposure times down to 100 ns. The idea behind operating at such low exposure times is to study the features of the turbulent coherent structure at smaller time scales than usual. Possible effects that can distort the blob's characteristics if the camera exposure time is larger than its dynamics are the smoothing effect (averaging of multiple events within the integration time) or the blurring effect (integrating the emission in time during the movement of the blob). This can be especially important when looking for space scales below 1 cm, which we call the fine structure. The image intensifier, however, introduces some grainy noise to the camera image and in the fine structure analysis this noise can sometimes become comparable to the size of the structure itself and may lead to a false interpretation of the image. To distinguish real physical signal from noise we get two simultaneous images with the same view and compare them. We call this the double imaging technique and it allows us to validate the detected blob shape to scales down to a few millimetres, limited by our optical resolution. We have studied the influence of camera exposure time on the blob features and observed that for shorter times more intense bursts are recorded in the TJ-II stellarator. The most intense bursts are smoothed, even using an exposure time of 1 µs. Further, for the low-density electron cyclotron resonance heated (ECRH) plasmas analysed, the detected structures with positive density above the background (blobs) show strong intensity excursions not visible in the negative structures (holes), these however being more numerous at the low-intermediate intensity range. Other results

  15. Fine-scale genetic structure and social organization in female white-tailed deer.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comer, Christopher E.; Kilgo, John C.; D' Angelo, Gino J.; Glenn, Travis C.; Miller, Karl V.

    2005-07-01

    Abstract: Social behavior of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) can have important management implications. The formation of matrilineal social groups among female deer has been documented and management strategies have been proposed based on this well-developed social structure. Using radiocollared (n = 17) and hunter or vehicle-killed (n = 21) does, we examined spatial and genetic structure in white-tailed deer on a 7,000-ha portion of the Savannah River Site in the upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina, USA. We used 14 microsatellite DNA loci to calculate pairwise relatedness among individual deer and to assign doe pairs to putative relationship categories. Linear distance and genetic relatedness were weakly correlated (r = –0.08, P = 0.058). Relationship categories differed in mean spatial distance, but only 60% of first-degree-related doe pairs (full sibling or mother–offspring pairs) and 38% of second-degree-related doe pairs (half sibling, grandmother–granddaughter pairs) were members of the same social group based on spatial association. Heavy hunting pressure in this population has created a young age structure among does, where the average age is <2.5 years, and <4% of does are >4.5 years old. This—combined with potentially elevated dispersal among young does—could limit the formation of persistent, cohesive social groups. Our results question the universal applicability of recently proposed models of spatial and genetic structuring in white-tailed deer, particularly in areas with differing harvest histories.

  16. Fine structures in Fe3Al alloy layer of a new hot dip aluminized steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    *National Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding Production Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology,. Harbin 150001, PR China. †Key Lab of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University,. Jinan 250061, PR China ... electric power and other energy conversion system, etc and has ...

  17. Fine Structure Study of the Plasma Coatings B4C-Ni-P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornienko, E. E.; Bezrukova, V. A.; Kuz’min, V. I.; Lozhkin, V. S.; Tutunkova, M. K.

    2017-12-01

    The article considers structure of coatings formed of the B4C-Ni-P powder. The coatings were deposited using air-plasma spraying with the unit for annular injection of powder. The pipes from steel 20 (0.2 % C) were used as a substrate. The structure and phase composition of the coatings were studied by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry. It is shown that high-density composite coatings consisting of boron carbide particles distributed in the nickel boride metal matrix are formed using air-plasma spraying. The areas with round inclusions characterized by the increased amount of nickel, phosphorus and boron are located around the boron carbide particles. Boron oxides and nickel oxides are also present in the coatings. Thin interlayers with amorphous-crystalline structure are formed around the boron carbide particles. The thickness of these interlayers does not exceed 1 μm. The metal matrix material represents areas with nanocrystalline structure and columnar crystals.

  18. Fine-scale genetic structure and social organization in female white-tailed deer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher E. Comer; John C. Kilgo; Gino J. D' Angelo; Travis C. Glenn; Karl V. Miller

    2005-01-01

    Social behavior of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) can have important management implications. The formation of matrilineal social groups among female deer has been documented and management strategies have been proposed based on this well-developed social structure. Using radiocollared (n = 17) and hunter or vehicle-killed (n = 21) does, we examined spatial...

  19. Uncovering the Fine-Scale Connectivity of Coral Reefs via Lagrangian Coherent Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, T.; Leclair, M.; Ivey, G. N.; Lowe, R.; Zhang, Z.

    2016-02-01

    The resilience of reefs to disturbances largely depends on the effectiveness of reef larvae to restore populations through ocean dispersal. Improving quantitative predictions of reef connectivity has therefore emerged as a priority area of coral reef science. Today, ocean circulation models are increasingly used to drive particle-tracking studies of reef connectivity. While providing useful information, such as the probability of connectivity between individual sites, such approaches typically do not identify the flow structures that control dispersal. Here, we show how novel Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS) methods, specifically developed to reveal key and often hidden flow transport structures, can help to visualize and interpret the connectivity patterns within morphologically complex reef systems. As an example case study, we consider transport within Ningaloo Reef in Western Australia. Our results demonstrate that LCS-based approaches not only support existing techniques for assessing connectivity but also, via the creation of LCS-based Synoptic Flow Maps, provide additional deep insight. These results can aid reef conservation management efforts, by providing quantitative justification for the placement of Marine Protected Areas based on the persistent flow structures that often occur within and surrounding reefs.

  20. Desalination of masonry structures: Fine tuning of pore size distribution of poultices to substrate properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubelli, B.A.; Hees, R.P.J. van

    2010-01-01

    Desalination is a relatively new intervention in the field of conservation of architectural heritage. Especially the desalination of immovable objects, such as masonry structures, is still a trial-error practice. In the field, different desalination materials and methods are used, sometimes with

  1. Outlier SNP markers reveal fine-scale genetic structuring across European hake populations (Merluccius merluccius)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milano, I.; Babbucci, M.; Cariani, A.

    2014-01-01

    Shallow population structure is generally reported for most marine fish and explained as a consequence of high dispersal, connectivity and large population size. Targeted gene analyses and more recently genome-wide studies have challenged such view, suggesting that adaptive divergence might occur...

  2. Fine Mapping of Bone Structure and Strength QTLs in Heterogeneous Stock Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Imranul; Koller, Daniel L.; Cañete, Toni; Blázquez, Gloria; Mont-Cardona, Carme; López-Aumatell, Regina; Martínez-Membrives, Esther; Díaz-Morán, Sira; Tobeña, Adolf; Fernández-Teruel, Alberto; Stridh, Pernilla; Diez, Margarita; Olsson, Tomas; Johannesson, Martina; Baud, Amelie; Econs, Michael J.; Foroud, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that skeletal structure and strength phenotypes vary considerably in heterogeneous stock (HS) rats. These phenotypes were found to be strongly heritable, suggesting that the HS rat model represents a unique genetic resource for dissecting the complex genetic etiology underlying bone fragility. The purpose of this study was to identify and localize genes associated with bone structure and strength phenotypes using 1524 adult male and female HS rats between 17 to 20 weeks of age. Structure measures included femur length, neck width, head width; femur and lumbar spine (L3-5) areas obtained by DXA; and cross-sectional areas (CSA) at the midshaft, distal femur and femoral neck, and the 5th lumbar vertebra measured by CT. In addition, measures of strength of the whole femur and femoral neck were obtained. Approximately 70,000 polymorphic SNPs distributed throughout the rat genome were selected for genotyping, with a mean linkage disequilibrium coefficient between neighboring SNPs of 0.95. Haplotypes were estimated across the entire genome for each rat using a multipoint haplotype reconstruction method, which calculates the probability of descent at each locus from each of the 8 HS founder strains. The haplotypes were then tested for association with each structure and strength phenotype via a mixed model with covariate adjustment. We identified quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for structure phenotypes on chromosomes 3, 8, 10, 12, 17 and 20, and QTLs for strength phenotypes on chromosomes 5, 10 and 11 that met a conservative genome-wide empiric significance threshold (FDR=5%; P<3 × 10−6). Importantly, most QTLs were localized to very narrow genomic regions (as small as 0.3Mb and up to 3 Mb), each harboring a small set of candidate genes, both novel and previously shown to have roles in skeletal development and homeostasis. PMID:26297441

  3. Temporal variation in bat-fruit interactions: Foraging strategies influence network structure over time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata-Mesa, Natalya; Montoya-Bustamante, Sebastián; Murillo-García, Oscar E.

    2017-11-01

    Mutualistic interactions, such as seed dispersal, are important for the maintenance of structure and stability of tropical communities. However, there is a lack of information about spatial and temporal variation in plant-animal interaction networks. Thus, our goal was to assess the effect of bat's foraging strategies on temporal variation in the structure and robustness of bat-fruit networks in both a dry and a rain tropical forest. We evaluated monthly variation in bat-fruit networks by using seven structure metrics: network size, average path length, nestedness, modularity, complementary specialization, normalized degree and betweenness centrality. Seed dispersal networks showed variations in size, species composition and modularity; did not present nested structures and their complementary specialization was high compared to other studies. Both networks presented short path lengths, and a constantly high robustness, despite their monthly variations. Sedentary bat species were recorded during all the study periods and occupied more central positions than nomadic species. We conclude that foraging strategies are important structuring factors that affect the dynamic of networks by determining the functional roles of frugivorous bats over time; thus sedentary bats are more important than nomadic species for the maintenance of the network structure, and their conservation is a must.

  4. Water Quality Sensing and Spatio-Temporal Monitoring Structure with Autocorrelation Kernel Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván P. Vizcaíno

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Pollution on water resources is usually analyzed with monitoring campaigns, which consist of programmed sampling, measurement, and recording of the most representative water quality parameters. These campaign measurements yields a non-uniform spatio-temporal sampled data structure to characterize complex dynamics phenomena. In this work, we propose an enhanced statistical interpolation method to provide water quality managers with statistically interpolated representations of spatial-temporal dynamics. Specifically, our proposal makes efficient use of the a priori available information of the quality parameter measurements through Support Vector Regression (SVR based on Mercer’s kernels. The methods are benchmarked against previously proposed methods in three segments of the Machángara River and one segment of the San Pedro River in Ecuador, and their different dynamics are shown by statistically interpolated spatial-temporal maps. The best interpolation performance in terms of mean absolute error was the SVR with Mercer’s kernel given by either the Mahalanobis spatial-temporal covariance matrix or by the bivariate estimated autocorrelation function. In particular, the autocorrelation kernel provides with significant improvement of the estimation quality, consistently for all the six water quality variables, which points out the relevance of including a priori knowledge of the problem.

  5. Water Quality Sensing and Spatio-Temporal Monitoring Structure with Autocorrelation Kernel Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizcaíno, Iván P; Carrera, Enrique V; Muñoz-Romero, Sergio; Cumbal, Luis H; Rojo-Álvarez, José Luis

    2017-10-16

    Pollution on water resources is usually analyzed with monitoring campaigns, which consist of programmed sampling, measurement, and recording of the most representative water quality parameters. These campaign measurements yields a non-uniform spatio-temporal sampled data structure to characterize complex dynamics phenomena. In this work, we propose an enhanced statistical interpolation method to provide water quality managers with statistically interpolated representations of spatial-temporal dynamics. Specifically, our proposal makes efficient use of the a priori available information of the quality parameter measurements through Support Vector Regression (SVR) based on Mercer's kernels. The methods are benchmarked against previously proposed methods in three segments of the Machángara River and one segment of the San Pedro River in Ecuador, and their different dynamics are shown by statistically interpolated spatial-temporal maps. The best interpolation performance in terms of mean absolute error was the SVR with Mercer's kernel given by either the Mahalanobis spatial-temporal covariance matrix or by the bivariate estimated autocorrelation function. In particular, the autocorrelation kernel provides with significant improvement of the estimation quality, consistently for all the six water quality variables, which points out the relevance of including a priori knowledge of the problem.

  6. Functional and structural correlates of memory in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander James Barnett

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with medial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE often show material-specific memory impairment (verbal for left, visuospatial for right hemisphere which can be exacerbated following surgery aimed at the epileptogenic regions of medial and anterolateral temporal cortex. There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that characterization of structural and functional integrity of these regions using MRI can aid in prediction of post-surgical risk of further memory decline. We investigated the nature of the relationship between structural and functional indices of hippocampal integrity with preoperative memory performance in a group of 26 patients with unilateral mTLE. Structural integrity was assessed using hippocampal volumes, while functional integrity was assessed using hippocampal activation during the encoding of novel scenes. We quantified structural and functional integrity in terms of asymmetry, calculated as (L - R / (L + R. Factor scores for verbal and visual memory were calculated from a clinical database and an asymmetry score (verbal – visual was used to characterize memory performance. We found, as expected, a significant difference between left and right mTLE groups for hippocampal volume asymmetry, with each group showing an asymmetry favoring the unaffected temporal lobe. Encoding activation asymmetry showed a similar pattern, with left mTLE patients showing activation preferential to the right hemisphere and right mTLE patients showing the reverse. Finally, we demonstrated that functional integrity mediated the relationship between structural integrity and memory performance for memory asymmetry, suggesting that even if structural changes are evident, ultimately it is the functional integrity of the tissue that most closely explains behavioral performance. Our findings argue for the incorporation of functional imaging data in clinical protocols aimed at determining the functional integrity of the MTL in surgical planning.

  7. On the relationship between the population of the fine structure levels of the ground electronic state of atomic oxygen and the translational temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, R.; Zygelman, B.; von Esse, F.; Dalgarno, A.

    1994-08-01

    Using a recent calculation of the cross sections for fine structure changing collisions during an encounter between two oxygen atoms in the ground electronic state, we determine the population of the fine structure levels of oxygen as a function of altitude for four model atmospheres representing conditions at 0 deg longitude, 45 deg latitude, at midday and midnight, and high and low solar and geomagnetic activity. We include the effect of electron impacts. The fine structure levels are shown to be in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) at the local neutral atom translational temperature for altitudes up to 350 km and 400 km for midnight and midday, respectively, at low activity, and up to at least 600 km at high activity. At higher altitudes spotaneous emission causes deviation from LTE and overpopulates the lowest (J = 2) level at the expense of the other two levels.

  8. Fine structure of subendocardial (Purkinje) cells of the insect-eating bat (Pipistrellus pipistrellus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayettey, A S; Tagoe, C N; Yates, R D

    1990-01-01

    Subendocardial cells of the right ventricular myocardium of the West African bat, Pipistrellus pipistrellus, were investigated at the ultrastructural level. The prominent features of these cells include a well-developed T-tubule system and numerous mitochondria with closely packed cristae. Additionally, the cells display large stores of lipid bodies. These unusual features confirm that Purkinje cells are heterogeneous in structural detail. From the paucity and poor structure of myofibrils of these cells, it is likely that the T-tubules may have a primary nutritional role in the regulation of electrolytes in an animal in which the cardiac cycle is particularly rapid. The well-developed mitochondria and the large stores of lipid bodies are appropriate for such active cells in which metabolism is probably of the aerobic type. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:2074228

  9. Fine structure at the diffusion welded interface of Fe3Al/Q235 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The interface of Fe3Al/Q235 dissimilar materials joint, which was made by vacuum diffusion welding, combines excellently. There are Fe3Al, FeAl ... All phases are present in sub-grain structure level and there is no obvious brittle phases or micro-defects such as pores and cracks at the interface of Fe3Al/Q235 diffusion joint.

  10. A fine structure genetic analysis evaluating ecoregional adaptability of a Bos taurus breed (Hereford.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H D Blackburn

    Full Text Available Ecoregional differences contribute to genetic environmental interactions and impact animal performance. These differences may become more important under climate change scenarios. Utilizing genetic diversity within a species to address such problems has not been fully explored. In this study Hereford cattle were genotyped with 50K Bead Chip or 770K Bovine Bead Chip to test the existence of genetic structure in five U.S. ecoregions characterized by precipitation, temperature and humidity and designated: cool arid (CA, cool humid (CH, transition zone (TZ, warm arid (WA, and warm humid (WH. SNP data were analyzed in three sequential analyses. Broad genetic structure was evaluated with STRUCTURE, and ADMIXTURE software using 14,312 SNPs after passing quality control variables. The second analysis was performed using principal coordinate analysis with 66 Tag SNPs associated in the literature with various aspects of environmental stressors (e.g., heat tolerance or production (e.g., milk production. In the third analysis TreeSelect was used with the 66 SNPs to evaluate if ecoregional allelic frequencies deviated from a central frequency and by so doing are indicative of directional selection. The three analyses suggested subpopulation structures associated with ecoregions from where animals were derived. ADMIXTURE and PCA results illustrated the importance of temperature and humidity and confirm subpopulation assignments. Comparisons of allele frequencies with TreeSelect showed ecoregion differences, in particular the divergence between arid and humid regions. Patterns of genetic variability obtained by medium and high density SNP chips can be used to acclimatize a temperately derived breed to various ecoregions. As climate change becomes an important factor in cattle production, this study should be used as a proof of concept to review future breeding and conservation schemes aimed at adaptation to climatic events.

  11. Fine mapping and structural analysis of immunodominant IgE allergenic epitopes in chicken egg ovalbumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mine, Yoshinori; Rupa, Prithy

    2003-10-01

    Ovalbumin is a major allergen in hen egg white that causes IgE-mediated food allergic reactions in children. In this study, the immunodominant IgE-binding epitopes of ovalbumin were mapped using arrays of overlapping peptides synthesized on activated cellulose membranes. Pooled human sera from 18 patients with egg allergy were used to probe the membrane. Five distinct regions were found to contain dominant allergic IgE epitopes, these being L38T49, D95A102, E191V200, V243E248 and G251N260. The critical amino acids involved in IgE antibody binding were also determined. These epitopes were composed primarily of hydrophobic amino acids, followed by polar and charged residues and being comprised of beta-sheet and beta-turn structures. One epitope, D95A102, consisted of a single alpha-helix. These results provide useful information on the functional role of amino acid residues to evaluate the structure-function relationships and structural properties of allergic epitopes in ovalbumin. They also provide a strategic approach for engineering ovalbumin to reduce its allergenicity.

  12. Fine-Scale Ecological and Genetic Population Structure of Two Whitefish (Coregoninae) Species in the Vicinity of Industrial Thermal Emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Carly F; Eberts, Rebecca L; Morgan, Thomas D; Boreham, Douglas R; Lance, Stacey L; Manzon, Richard G; Martino, Jessica A; Rogers, Sean M; Wilson, Joanna Y; Somers, Christopher M

    2016-01-01

    Thermal pollution from industrial processes can have negative impacts on the spawning and development of cold-water fish. Point sources of thermal effluent may need to be managed to avoid affecting discrete populations. Correspondingly, we examined fine-scale ecological and genetic population structure of two whitefish species (Coregonus clupeaformis and Prosopium cylindraceum) on Lake Huron, Canada, in the immediate vicinity of thermal effluent from nuclear power generation. Niche metrics using δ13C and δ15N stable isotopes showed high levels of overlap (48.6 to 94.5%) in resource use by adult fish captured in areas affected by thermal effluent compared to nearby reference locations. Isotopic niche size, a metric of resource use diversity, was 1.3- to 2.8-fold higher than reference values in some thermally affected areas, indicative of fish mixing. Microsatellite analyses of genetic population structure (Fst, STRUCTURE and DAPC) indicated that fish captured at all locations in the vicinity of the power plant were part of a larger population extending beyond the study area. In concert, ecological and genetic markers do not support the presence of an evolutionarily significant unit in the vicinity of the power plant. Thus, future research should focus on the potential impacts of thermal emissions on development and recruitment.

  13. Nonlinear Force-Free Extrapolation of Emerging Flux with a Global Twist and Serpentine Fine Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valori, G.; Green, L. M.; Démoulin, P.; Vargas Domínguez, S.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Wallace, A.; Baker, D.; Fuhrmann, M.

    2012-05-01

    We study the flux emergence process in NOAA active region 11024, between 29 June and 7 July 2009, by means of multi-wavelength observations and nonlinear force-free extrapolation. The main aim is to extend previous investigations by combining, as much as possible, high spatial resolution observations to test our present understanding of small-scale (undulatory) flux emergence, whilst putting these small-scale events in the context of the global evolution of the active region. The combination of these techniques allows us to follow the whole process, from the first appearance of the bipolar axial field on the east limb, until the buoyancy instability could set in and raise the main body of the twisted flux tube through the photosphere, forming magnetic tongues and signatures of serpentine field, until the simplification of the magnetic structure into a main bipole by the time the active region reaches the west limb. At the crucial time of the main emergence phase high spatial resolution spectropolarimetric measurements of the photospheric field are employed to reconstruct the three-dimensional structure of the nonlinear force-free coronal field, which is then used to test the current understanding of flux emergence processes. In particular, knowledge of the coronal connectivity confirms the identity of the magnetic tongues as seen in their photospheric signatures, and it exemplifies how the twisted flux, which is emerging on small scales in the form of a sea-serpent, is subsequently rearranged by reconnection into the large-scale field of the active region. In this way, the multi-wavelength observations combined with a nonlinear force-free extrapolation provide a coherent picture of the emergence process of small-scale magnetic bipoles, which subsequently reconnect to form a large-scale structure in the corona.

  14. Structural control of ultra-fine CoPt nanodot arrays via electrodeposition process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodarz, Siggi; Hasegawa, Takashi; Ishio, Shunji; Homma, Takayuki

    2017-05-01

    CoPt nanodot arrays were fabricated by combining electrodeposition and electron beam lithography (EBL) for the use of bit-patterned media (BPM). To achieve precise control of deposition uniformity and coercivity of the CoPt nanodot arrays, their crystal structure and magnetic properties were controlled by controlling the diffusion state of metal ions from the initial deposition stage with the application of bath agitation. Following bath agitation, the composition gradient of the CoPt alloy with thickness was mitigated to have a near-ideal alloy composition of Co:Pt =80:20, which induces epitaxial-like growth from Ru substrate, thus resulting in the improvement of the crystal orientation of the hcp (002) structure from its initial deposition stages. Furthermore, the cross-sectional transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis of the nanodots deposited with bath agitation showed CoPt growth along its c-axis oriented in the perpendicular direction, having uniform lattice fringes on the hcp (002) plane from the Ru underlayer interface, which is a significant factor to induce perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Magnetic characterization of the CoPt nanodot arrays showed increase in the perpendicular coercivity and squareness of the hysteresis loops from 2.0 kOe and 0.64 (without agitation) to 4.0 kOe and 0.87 with bath agitation. Based on the detailed characterization of nanodot arrays, the precise crystal structure control of the nanodot arrays with ultra-high recording density by electrochemical process was successfully demonstrated.

  15. Fine-scale genetic structure analyses suggest further male than female dispersal in mountain gorillas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular studies in social mammals rarely compare the inferences gained from genetic analyses with field information, especially in the context of dispersal. In this study, we used genetic data to elucidate sex-specific dispersal dynamics in the Virunga Massif mountain gorilla population (Gorilla beringei beringei), a primate species characterized by routine male and female dispersal from stable mixed-sex social groups. Specifically, we conducted spatial genetic structure analyses for each sex and linked our genetically-based observations with some key demographic and behavioural data from this population. Results To investigate the spatial genetic structure of mountain gorillas, we analysed the genotypes of 193 mature individuals at 11 microsatellite loci by means of isolation-by-distance and spatial autocorrelation analyses. Although not all males and females disperse, female gorillas displayed an isolation-by-distance pattern among groups and a signal of dispersal at short distances from their natal group based on spatial autocorrelation analyses. In contrast, male genotypes were not correlated with spatial distance, thus suggesting a larger mean dispersal distance for males as compared to females. Both within sex and mixed-sex pairs were on average genetically more related within groups than among groups. Conclusions Our study provides evidence for an intersexual difference in dispersal distance in the mountain gorilla. Overall, it stresses the importance of investigating spatial genetic structure patterns on a sex-specific basis to better understand the dispersal dynamics of the species under investigation. It is currently poorly understood why some male and female gorillas disperse while others remain in the natal group. Our results on average relatedness within and across groups confirm that groups often contain close relatives. While inbreeding avoidance may play a role in driving female dispersal, we note that more detailed dyadic genetic

  16. Temporal genetic population structure and interannual variation in migration behavior of Pacific Lamprey Entosphenus tridentatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Benjamin J.; Wyss, Lance A.; McCoun, Rebecca; Courter, Ian; Schwabe, Lawrence; Peery, Christopher; Schreck, Carl B.; Spice, Erin K.; Docker, Margaret F.

    2017-01-01

    Studies using neutral loci suggest that Pacific lamprey, Entosphenus tridentatus, lack strong spatial genetic population structure. However, it is unknown whether temporal genetic population structure exists. We tested whether adult Pacific lamprey: (1) show temporal genetic population structure; and (2) migrate different distances between years. We non-lethally sampled lamprey for DNA in 2009 and 2010 and used eight microsatellite loci to test for genetic population structure. We used telemetry to record the migration behaviors of these fish. Lamprey were assignable to three moderately differentiated genetic clusters (FST = 0.16–0.24 for all pairwise comparisons): one cluster was composed of individuals from 2009, and the other two contained individuals from 2010. The FST value between years was 0.13 and between genetic clusters within 2010 was 0.20. A total of 372 (72.5%) fish were detected multiple times during their migrations. Most fish (69.9%) remained in the mainstem Willamette River; the remaining 30.1% migrated into tributaries. Eighty-two lamprey exhibited multiple back-and-forth movements among tributaries and the mainstem, which may indicate searching behaviors. All migration distances were significantly greater in 2010, when the amplitude of river discharge was greater. Our data suggest genetic structuring between and within years that may reflect different cohorts.

  17. Possible Fine Structure in the Delayed Neutron Yields in the Resonance Region for Pu-239

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsawa, Takaaki; Hambsch, Franz-Josef; Torii, Takayuki

    2005-05-01

    A method of analysis of fluctuation in the delayed neutron yield on the basis of the multimodal fission model was applied to the low-energy resolved resonances for Pu-239. The present calculation using recent data of the fluctuation of the mode branching ratios for the resolved resonances showed both positive and negative resonance structure in the delayed neutron yield relative to the thermal neutron value. This is in contrast to the U-235 case, for which mainly negative dips of about -3.5% were predicted.

  18. Fine structural analyses of pancreatic acinar cell nuclei from mice fed on genetically modified soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Malatesta

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We carried out ultrastructural morphometrical and immunocytochemical analyses on pancreatic acinar cell nuclei from mice fed on genetically modified (GM soybean, in order to investigate possible structural and molecular modifications of nucleoplasmic and nucleolar constituents.We found a significant lowering of nucleoplasmic and nucleolar splicing factors as well as a perichromatin granule accumulation in GM-fed mice, suggestive of reduced post-transcriptional hnRNA processing and/or nuclear export. This is in accordance to already described zymogen synthesis and processing modifications in the same animals.

  19. Fine fragmentation distribution from structural reactive material casings under explosive loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, William H.; Zhang, Fan; Kim, Kibong

    2017-01-01

    For a full understanding of the contribution to the primary blast wave, the collection and analysis of fragment distribution down to 37 µm from a 3.3 cm I.D., thick structural reactive material (SRM) casing under explosive loading are investigated in a 2.1 m3 closed cylindrical chamber packed with artificially-made pure snow. The fragmentation distributions obtained from three types of SRM casings show that a 75-80% mass fraction is achievable for fragments in a range below 125 µm from specified SRM, consistent with its significantly more enhanced primary blast behaviour.

  20. Decoding the fine-scale structure of a breast cancer genome and transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volik, Stanislav; Raphael, Benjamin J; Huang, Guiqing; Stratton, Michael R; Bignel, Graham; Murnane, John; Brebner, John H; Bajsarowicz, Krystyna; Paris, Pamela L; Tao, Quanzhou; Kowbel, David; Lapuk, Anna; Shagin, Dmitri A; Shagina, Irina A; Gray, Joe W; Cheng, Jan-Fang; de Jong, Pieter J; Pevzner, Pavel; Collins, Colin

    2006-03-01

    A comprehensive understanding of cancer is predicated upon knowledge of the structure of malignant genomes underlying its many variant forms and the molecular mechanisms giving rise to them. It is well established that solid tumor genomes accumulate a large number of genome rearrangements during tumorigenesis. End Sequence Profiling (ESP) maps and clones genome breakpoints associated with all types of genome rearrangements elucidating the structural organization of tumor genomes. Here we extend the ESP methodology in several directions using the breast cancer cell line MCF-7. First, targeted ESP is applied to multiple amplified loci, revealing a complex process of rearrangement and co-amplification in these regions reminiscent of breakage/fusion/bridge cycles. Second, genome breakpoints identified by ESP are confirmed using a combination of DNA sequencing and PCR. Third, in vitro functional studies assign biological function to a rearranged tumor BAC clone, demonstrating that it encodes anti-apoptotic activity. Finally, ESP is extended to the transcriptome identifying four novel fusion transcripts and providing evidence that expression of fusion genes may be common in tumors. These results demonstrate the distinct advantages of ESP including: (1) the ability to detect all types of rearrangements and copy number changes; (2) straightforward integration of ESP data with the annotated genome sequence; (3) immortalization of the genome; (4) ability to generate tumor-specific reagents for in vitro and in vivo functional studies. Given these properties, ESP could play an important role in a tumor genome project.

  1. Fine structure of the pecten oculi of the red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braekevelt, C R

    1991-12-01

    The pecten oculi of the red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) has been examined by light and electron microscopy. In this species the pecten is very large and of the pleated type. It consists of 17-18 accordion folds which are joined apically by a heavily pigmented bridge of tissue which holds the pecten in a fan-like shape, widest at its base. It is situated over the optic nerve head and extends into the vitreous. Within each fold are numerous capillaries, larger supply and drainage vessels and melanocytes. The capillaries are specialized and display extensive microfolds on both the luminal and abluminal borders. The endothelial cell bodies are thin with most organelles present in a paranuclear location. The capillaries are surrounded by thick fibrillar basal laminae which are probably structurally important and which often enclose pericytes. The melanocytes which are most plentiful in the bridge region and peripherally in the pecten, form an incomplete sheath around the capillaries and other blood vessels. These melanocytes are also felt to be fulfilling a structural role within the pecten. The morphology of the pecten of the red-tailed hawk is indicative of a heavy involvement in the transport of materials to the avascular avian retina.

  2. Quantitative analysis of total reflection X-ray fluorescence from finely layered structures using XeRay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Zhiliang [James Franck Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA; Department of Chemistry, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA; Kerr, Daniel [Program in the Biophysical Sciences, Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA; Hwang, Hyeondo Luke [James Franck Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA; Department of Chemistry, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA; Henderson, J. Michael [James Franck Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA; Department of Chemistry, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA; Suwatthee, Tiffany [The College, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA; Slaw, Benjamin R. [James Franck Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA; Department of Chemistry, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA; Cao, Kathleen D. [James Franck Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA; Department of Chemistry, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA; Lin, Binhua [James Franck Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA; Center for Advanced Radiation Sources, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA; Bu, Wei [Center for Advanced Radiation Sources, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA; Lee, Ka Yee C. [James Franck Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA; Department of Chemistry, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA; Center for Advanced Radiation Sources, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA

    2017-03-01

    Total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TXRF) is a widely applicable experimental technique for studying chemical element distributions across finely layered structures at extremely high sensitivity. To promote and facilitate scientific discovery using TXRF, we developed a MATLAB-based software package with a graphical user interface, named XeRay, for quick, accurate, and intuitive data analysis. XeRay lets the user model any layered system, each layer with its independent chemical composition and thickness, and enables fine-tuned data fitting. The accuracy of XeRay has been tested in the analysis of TXRF data from both air/liquid interface and liquid/liquid interfacial studies and has been compared to literature results. In an air/liquid interface study, Ca2+ sequestration was measured at a Langmuir monolayer of 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidic acid (SOPA) on a buffer solution of 1 mM CaCl2 at pH 7.5. Data analysis with XeRay reveals that each 1 nm2 of interfacial area contains 2.38 ± 0.06 Ca2+ ions, which corresponds to a 1:1 ratio between SOPA headgroups and Ca2+ ions, consistent with several earlier reports. For the liquid/liquid interface study of Sr2+ enrichment at the dodecane/surfactant/water interface, analysis using XeRay gives a surface enrichment of Sr2+ at 68+6-568-5+6 Å2 per ion, consistent with the result published for the same dataset.

  3. Temporal and spatial influences incur reconfiguration of Arctic heathland soil bacterial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Richard; Saetnan, Eli R; Scullion, John; Gwynn-Jones, Dylan; Ostle, Nick; Edwards, Arwyn

    2016-06-01

    Microbial responses to Arctic climate change could radically alter the stability of major stores of soil carbon. However, the sensitivity of plot-scale experiments simulating climate change effects on Arctic heathland soils to potential confounding effects of spatial and temporal changes in soil microbial communities is unknown. Here, the variation in heathland soil bacterial communities at two survey sites in Sweden between spring and summer 2013 and at scales between 0-1 m and, 1-100 m and between sites (> 100 m) were investigated in parallel using 16S rRNA gene T-RFLP and amplicon sequencing. T-RFLP did not reveal spatial structuring of communities at scales structuring effects may not confound comparison between plot-scale treatments, temporal change is a significant influence. Moreover, the prominence of two temporally exclusive keystone taxa suggests that the stability of Arctic heathland soil bacterial communities could be disproportionally influenced by seasonal perturbations affecting individual taxa. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. A combined fit of total scattering and extended x-ray absorption fine structure data for local-structure determination in crystalline materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proffen, Thomas E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Krayzman, Victor [NIST; Levin, Igor [NIST; Tucker, Matt [ISIS, UK

    2009-01-01

    Reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) refinements of local structure using a simultaneous fit of X-ray/neutron total scattering and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data were developed to incorporate an explicit treatment of both single- and multiple-scattering contributions to EXAFS. The refinement algorithm, implemented as an extension to the public domain computer software RMCProfile, enables accurate modeling of EXAFS over distances encompassing several coordination shells around the absorbing species. The approach was first tested on Ni, which exhibits extensive multiple scattering in EXAFS, and then applied to perovskite-like SrAl{sub 1/2}Nb{sub 1/2}O{sub 3}. This compound crystal1izes with a cubic double-perovskite structure but presents a challenge for local-structure determination using a total pair-distribution function (PDF) alone because of overlapping peaks of the constituent partial PDFs (e.g. Al-O and Nb-O or Sr-O and O-O). The results obtained here suggest that the combined use of the total scattering and EXAFS data provides sufficient constraints for RMC refinements to recover fine details of local structure in complex perovskites. Among other results, it was found that the probability density distribution for Sr in SrAl{sub 1/2}Nb{sub 1/2}O{sub 3} adopts T{sub d} point-group symmetry for the Sr sites, determined by the ordered arrangement of Al and Nb, as opposed to a spherical distribution commonly assumed in traditional Rietveld refinements.

  5. Evidence of novel fine-scale structural variation at autism spectrum disorder candidate loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedges Dale J

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autism spectrum disorders (ASD represent a group of neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by a core set of social-communicative and behavioral impairments. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain, acting primarily via the GABA receptors (GABR. Multiple lines of evidence, including altered GABA and GABA receptor expression in autistic patients, indicate that the GABAergic system may be involved in the etiology of autism. Methods As copy number variations (CNVs, particularly rare and de novo CNVs, have now been implicated in ASD risk, we examined the GABA receptors and genes in related pathways for structural variation that may be associated with autism. We further extended our candidate gene set to include 19 genes and regions that had either been directly implicated in the autism literature or were directly related (via function or ancestry to these primary candidates. For the high resolution CNV screen we employed custom-designed 244 k comparative genomic hybridization (CGH arrays. Collectively, our probes spanned a total of 11 Mb of GABA-related and additional candidate regions with a density of approximately one probe every 200 nucleotides, allowing a theoretical resolution for detection of CNVs of approximately 1 kb or greater on average. One hundred and sixty-eight autism cases and 149 control individuals were screened for structural variants. Prioritized CNV events were confirmed using quantitative PCR, and confirmed loci were evaluated on an additional set of 170 cases and 170 control individuals that were not included in the original discovery set. Loci that remained interesting were subsequently screened via quantitative PCR on an additional set of 755 cases and 1,809 unaffected family members. Results Results include rare deletions in autistic individuals at JAKMIP1, NRXN1, Neuroligin4Y, OXTR, and ABAT. Common insertion/deletion polymorphisms were detected at several

  6. The Fine Structure of the Longitudinal Machine Impedance Observed with Single Bunches

    CERN Document Server

    Bohl, T; Shaposhnikova, Elena

    1998-01-01

    Using a beam spectrum measurement the detailed structure of the CERN SPS longitudinal machine impedance has been observed over a wide frequency range. Single high intensity proton bunches were injected into the machine with RF off. The spectrum of the unstable bunch modes, produced by the different resonant impedances in the ring, was measured during slow debunching. The maximum mode amplitude as a function of frequency was recorded for many injected bunches. The central frequency of each bunch mode is close to the resonant frequency of the impedance and the width depends upon the bunch length. Using sufficiently long bunches allowed the machine impedance to be seen in detail in the frequency range 100MHz to 4GHz. The low frequency of this range is defined by the initial stable bunch spectrum, and the high frequency by the vacuum chamber cut-off frequency. The dominant peaks in the spectrum have been identified with different impedance sources in the machine - some previously unknown.

  7. Stability of modularity and structural keystone species in temporal cumulative plant- flower-visitor networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont, Yoko; Olesen, Jens Mogens

    2012-01-01

    Modularity is a structural property of ecological networks, which has received much interest, but has been poorly explored. Modules are distinct subsets of species interacting strongly with each other, but sparsely with species outside the subset. Using a series of temporal cumulative networks, we...... investigated the stability of modular organization of pollination networks to temporal scaling. To test for modularity, we used the method ‘functional cartography by simulated annealing’ (Guimera` and Amaral, 2005a,b), a stochastic optimization technique. Modules are detected, and species classified into three...... types of topological roles in a network, based on patterns of within and between-module links: Hubs are highly connected species; peripherals interact with few species, mainly within their own module; and connectors have few interactions, too, but link across modules. We observed interactions between...

  8. Structured Spatio-temporal shot-noise Cox point process models, with a view to modelling forest fires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper; Diaz-Avalos, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Spatio-temporal Cox point process models with a multiplicative structure for the driving random intensity, incorporating covariate information into temporal and spatial components, and with a residual term modelled by a shot-noise process, are considered. Such models are flexible and tractable fo...

  9. Structured spatio-temporal shot-noise Cox point process models, with a view to modelling forest fires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper; Diaz-Avalos, Carlos

    Spatio-temporal Cox point process models with a multiplicative structure for the driving random intensity, incorporating covariate information into temporal and spatial components, and with a residual term modelled by a shot-noise process, are considered. Such models are flexible and tractable fo...

  10. Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Studies of Cu Ion-Containing PAMAMOS Dendrimer Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubeck, Robert; Dvornic, Petar; Fischer, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    There is continuing interest in the development of nanocomposites containing metal ions based on the use of dendrimers as the host matrix. One may utilize functionalized dendrimer interiors to complex the added constituent and serve as a template for the organization of the resulting nanoscale structures. Potential applications of include: catalysts, biotechnology, functional membranes, molecular sensors, etc. We report on recent results obtained using near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) to characterize Cu(2+) covalent interactions in three-dimensionally cross linked dendrimer networks. These networks were made from radially-layered poly(amidoamine-organosilicon), PAMAMOS, dendrimers having generation 4 (G4) polyamidoamine (PAMAM) interiors surrounded by one layer of organosilicon, OS, exterior branch cells. Lower generation homologues (i.e., G1 through G3) were also examined on a more limited basis. The nitrogen and carbonyl moieties contained in the PAMAM dendrimer interior were shown to be highly interactive with metallic cations, in large measure because of the dendrimer geometry. Similar measurements on chemically similar but much less physically constraining hyperbranched polymers indicated very limited interaction with the amine and carbonyl moieties.

  11. Effects of some inhibitors of protein synthesis on the chloroplast fine structure, CO2 fixation and the Hill reaction activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Więckowski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study concerning the effects of chloramphenicol (100 μg ml-1, actidione (10 μg ml-1, 5-bromouracil (190 μg ml-1, actinomycin D (30 μg ml-1 and DL-ethionine (800 μg ml-1 on the chloroplast fine structure, 14CO2 incorporation and the Hill reaction activity was the subject of the experiments presented in this paper. The experiments were conducted on bean seedlings under the conditions when chlorophyll accumulation was inhibited only partially. The results obtained indicate that chloromphenicol is responsible for the reduction of the number of grana per section of plastid and for the formation of numerous vesicles in the stroma. In the presence of actidione, actinomycin D or DL-ethionine the lamellae are poorly differentiated into .stroma and granum regions and there occur disturbances in the typical orientation of lamellae within chloroplasts. Only in the presence of 5-bromouracil the development of chloroplast structure resemble that in control plants. A comparison of the results obtained with those published earlier (Więckowski et al., 1974; Ficek and Więckowski, 1974 shows that such processes as assimilatory pigment accumulation, the rate of CO2 fixation, the Hill reaction activity, and the development of lamellar system are suppressed in a different extent by the inhibitors used.

  12. Electronic fine structure calculation of metal complexes with three-open-shell s, d, and p configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanantoanina, Harry; Daul, Claude

    2017-08-01

    The ligand field density functional theory (LFDFT) algorithm is extended to treat the electronic structure and properties of systems with three-open-shell electron configurations, exemplified in this work by the calculation of the core and semi-core 1s, 2s, and 3s one-electron excitations in compounds containing transition metal ions. The work presents a model to non-empirically resolve the multiplet energy levels arising from the three-open-shell systems of non-equivalent ns, 3d, and 4p electrons and to calculate the oscillator strengths corresponding to the electric-dipole 3d m  → ns 13d m 4p 1 transitions, with n = 1, 2, 3 and m = 0, 1, 2, …, 10 involved in the s electron excitation process. Using the concept of ligand field, the Slater-Condon integrals, the spin-orbit coupling constants, and the parameters of the ligand field potential are determined from density functional theory (DFT). Therefore, a theoretical procedure using LFDFT is established illustrating the spectroscopic details at the atomic scale that can be valuable in the analysis and characterization of the electronic spectra obtained from X-ray absorption fine structure or electron energy loss spectroscopies.

  13. Temporal structure analysis of broadcast tennis video using hidden Markov models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijak, Ewa; Oisel, Lionel; Gros, Patrick

    2003-01-01

    This work aims at recovering the temporal structure of a broadcast tennis video from an analysis of the raw footage. Our method relies on a statistical model of the interleaving of shots, in order to group shots into predefined classes representing structural elements of a tennis video. This stochastic modeling is performed in the global framework of Hidden Markov Models (HMMs). The fundamental units are shots and transitions. In a first step, colors and motion attributes of segmented shots are used to map shots into 2 classes: game (view of the full tennis court) and not game (medium, close up views, and commercials). In a second step, a trained HMM is used to analyze the temporal interleaving of shots. This analysis results in the identification of more complex structures, such as first missed services, short rallies that could be aces or services, long rallies, breaks that are significant of the end of a game and replays that highlight interesting points. These higher-level unit structures can be used either to create summaries, or to allow non-linear browsing of the video.

  14. Effect of Hf on the fine structure of mesophyll cells from Glycine max, Merr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, L.; Miller, G.W.

    1972-04-01

    A series of ultrastructural changes were observed in soybean leaves fumigated with 40 to 50 ppb of hydrogen fluoride. In the cytoplasm the presence of small vacuoles was the first noticeable initial change. The fragmentation of the vacuolar membrane occurred either simultaneously or followed immediately. Lipid-droplet-like globules and numerous vesicles occurred subsequently in the cytoplasm and increased as the injury became more severe. There was a decrease in polysomes and a detachment of ribosome from the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Free ribosome concentration also decreased as the injury became severe. Mitochondrial modifications involving dilation of outer and cristae membranes followed by reduction of both cristae number and matrix electron density and the disappearance of mitochondrial granules were observed in the chlorotic leaves. Electron dense inclusions accumulated in some mitochondria as well. The first noticeable change observed in the chloroplast was the presence of clusters of phytoferritin granules within the stoma after only 2 days of fumigation. Alterations in nuclear structures were observed in later stages of injury. Numerous small electron dense particles were found on various types of membranes in cells of severely chlorotic leaves. They were distributed on outer mitochondrial membranes, endoplasmic reticula, dictyosomes, tonoplasts, plasmalemma, nuclear envelopes, and disintegrating organelles and vesicles, but were never observed on membranes of chloroplasts and microbodies. The presence of fluoride has attracted the attention of many workers primarily in certain industrial areas where the emitted atmospheric fluoride concentrates and is accumulated by plants initiating injury. 6 references.

  15. Species-specific differences in the fine structure of learning walk elements in Cataglyphis ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischmann, Pauline N; Grob, Robin; Wehner, Rüdiger; Rössler, Wolfgang

    2017-07-01

    Cataglyphis desert ants are famous navigators. Like all central place foragers, they are confronted with the challenge to return home, i.e. relocate an inconspicuous nest entrance in the ground, after their extensive foraging trips. When leaving the underground nest for the first time, desert ants perform a striking behavior, so-called learning walks that are well structured. However, it is still unclear how the ants initially acquire the information needed for sky- and landmark-based navigation, in particular how they calibrate their compass system at the beginning of their foraging careers. Using high-speed video analyses, we show that different Cataglyphis species include different types of characteristic turns in their learning walks. Pirouettes are full or partial rotations (tight turns about the vertical body axis) during which the ants frequently stop and gaze back in the direction of the nest entrance during the longest stopping phases. In contrast, voltes are small walked circles without directed stopping phases. Interestingly, only Cataglyphis ant species living in a cluttered, and therefore visually rich, environment (i.e. C. noda and C. aenescens in southern Greece) perform both voltes and pirouettes. They look back to the nest entrance during pirouettes, most probably to take snapshots of the surroundings. In contrast, C. fortis inhabiting featureless saltpans in Tunisia perform only voltes and do not stop during these turns to gaze back at the nest - even if a set of artificial landmarks surrounds the nest entrance. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. PDI Derivative through Fine-Tuning Molecular Structure for Fullerene-Free Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Hua

    2017-08-10

    A perylenediimide (PDI)-based small molecular (SM) acceptor with both an extended π-conjugation and a three dimensional structure concurrently is critical for achieving high performance PDI-based fullerene-free organic solar cells (OSCs). In this work, we designed and synthesized a novel PDI-based SM acceptor possessing both characteristics by fusing PDI units with a spiro core of 4,4’-spirobi[cyclopenta[2,1-b;3,4-b’]dithiophene(SCPDT) through the -position of the thiophene rings. An enhanced strong absorption in the range of 350–520 nm and arisen LUMO energy level of FSP was observed, compared with previous reported acceptor SCPDT-PDI4, in which the PDI units and SCPDT are not fused. OSCs based on PTB7-Th donor and FSP acceptor were fabricated and achieved a power conversion efficiency of up to 8.89% with DPE as an additive. Efficient and complementary photo absorption, favorable phase separation and balanced carrier mobilites in the blend film account for the high photovoltaic performance. This study offers an effective strategy to design high performance PDI-based acceptors.

  17. Fine structure of the bird parasites Trichomonas gallinae and Tetratrichomonas gallinarum from cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlhorn, Heinz; Al-Quraishy, Saleh; Aziza, Amin; Hess, Michael

    2009-09-01

    The trophozoites of Trichomonas gallinae and Tetratrichomonas gallinarum were studied by means of light and electron microscopy after cloning and cultivating them axenically. T. gallinae trophozoites varied in shape reaching from ovoidal to pyriform and had a size of about 7-11 microm. They were provided with four free flagella and a fifth recurrent one, which did not become free at the posterior pole. The nucleus was ovoid, had a size of about 2.5-3 microm, and was situated closely below the basal bodies of the flagella. The axostyle consisted of a row of microtubules running from the region of the apical basal bodies to the posterior end of the cell. In addition to flagellated stages, which contained food vacuoles, hydrogenosomes, a costa-like structure, and glycogen granules besides lacunes of endoplasmic reticulum, spherical, nonflagellated, and cyst-like stages occurred. The trophozoites of T. gallinarum appeared mostly pear-shaped and ranged in size from 6 to 15 microm. They had also four free anterior flagella and a fifth recurrent one, which became free at the posterior pole in contrast to that of T. gallinae. Another clearly visible difference to T. gallinae was the occurrence of a sphere of lacunes of the endoplasmic reticulum surrounding in a regular distance the nucleus with its typical perinuclear membranes. Furthermore, the food vacuoles appeared very large. However, both species clearly differed from the trophozoites of Histomonas meleagridis.

  18. Ultra-fine structural characterization and bioactivity evaluation of TiO2 nanotube layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, JaeMyung; Kwon, TaeYub; Kim, KyoHan

    2008-10-01

    For an application as biomedical materials of high performance with a good biocompatibility, the TiO2 nanotube-type oxide film on Ti substrate has been fabricated by electrochemical method, and the effects of surface characteristics of TiO2 naotube layer have been investigated. The surface morphology of TiO2 nanotube layer depends on factors such as anodizing time, current density, and electrolyte temperature. Moreover, the cell and pore size gradually were increased with the passage of anodizing time. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results indicated that the TiO2 nanotube layer formed in acidic electrolytes was mainly composed of anatase structure containing rutile. From the analysis of chemical states of TiO2 nanotube layer using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Ti2p, P2p and O1s were observed in the nanotubes layer, which were penetrated from the electrolyte into the oxide layer during anodic process. The incorporated phosphate species were found mostly in the forms of HPO4-, PO4-, and PO3-. From the result of biological evaluation in simulated body fluid (SBF) the TiO2 nanotube layer was effective for bioactive property.

  19. GDF9 and BMP15 Expressions and Fine Structure Changes During Folliculogenesis in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagül, Meryem İlkay; Aktaş, Savaş; Coşkun Yılmaz, Banu; Yılmaz, Mustafa; Orekici Temel, Gülhan

    2018-01-20

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is the most frequently seen endocrine disorder in women of reproductive age with a prevalence of about 10%. To investigate the efficiency of growth differentiation factor 9 and bone morphogenetic protein 15 during folliculogenesis in a dehydroepiandrosterone-induced mouse Polycystic ovary syndrome model. Animal experimentation. Mice were divided into 3 groups: control, vehicle and Polycystic ovary syndrome. Polycystic ovary syndrome model mice were developed by the injection of dehydroepiandrosterone dissolved in 0.1 mL of sesame oil. Ovarian tissues were examined for growth differentiation factor 9 and bone morphogenetic protein 15 using immunofluorescent labelling and electron microscopic examinations. The immunoreactivity of growth differentiation factor 9 and bone morphogenetic protein 15 proteins decreased (pPolycystic ovary syndrome group (27.73±8.43 and 24.85±7.03, respectively) compared with the control group (33.72±11.22 and 31.12±11.05, respectively) and vehicle group (33.95±10.75 and 29.99±10.72, respectively). Apoptotic changes were observed in granulosa cells, lipid vacuoles increased in Theca cells and thickening and irregularities were noted in the basal lamina of granulosa cells. An increased electron density in the zona pellucida in some of the multilaminar primary and secondary follicles in the Polycystic ovary syndrome model was also observed at the ultrastructural level. These results suggest that the decrease in the growth differentiation factor 9 and bone morphogenetic protein 15 expression initiated at the primary follicle stage effect the follicle development and zona pellucida structure and may cause subfertility or infertility in Polycystic ovary syndrome.

  20. Evidentials dizque and que in Spanish : Grammaticalization, parameters and the (fine structure of Comp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta Demonte

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study one type of Spanish que (the equivalent to the complementizer “that” that can be shown to belong into the crosslinguistically restricted list of evidentials. In particular, we will claim that it encodes the (most basic marks of nonfirst- hand or indirect (reported evidence. Our point of departure is certain (apparently independent clauses of Spanish headed by an overt complementizer (que. Some tests will be presented that support the idea that that one type of que introducing a well specified subset of root sentences shares most of the properties that have been claimed to characterize reportative evidentials in languages such as Quechua (Faller 2002, 2006. As for the properties of reportative que, it will be further shown that it does not encode any features related to epistemic modality (reliability or (improbability and we will propose that it is better analyzed as an illocutionary operator, affecting the illocutionary force (in line with Faller 2002 among others and not as an epistemic modal (Izvorsky 1997 among others. In order to determine the nature of this reportative element and its origin, we contrast it with an old Spanish form, dizque, which exists nowadays in certain modern American varieties. This particle also has the properties of an evidential but behaves as an epistemic modal. In the last sections, we will propose that both evidential particles (que and dizque are the result of a process of grammaticalization (i.e. ‘upward reanalysis’, or categorial change, of functional material, in the sense of Roberts and Roussou 2003 of the complex structure headed by a communication verb, dicen que “they say that”. We will tentatively describe such process and introduce a hypothesis as to the nature and role of the parameter involved in the claimed reanalysis

  1. TEMPORAL-SPATIAL ANALYSIS OF U.S.- MEXICO BORDER ENVIRONMENTAL FINE AND COARSE PM AIR SAMPLE EXTRACT ACTIVITY IN HUMAN BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    Lauer, Fredine T.; Mitchell, Leah A.; Bedrick, Edward,; Jacob D. McDonald; Lee, Wen-Yee; Li, Wen-Whai; Olvera, Hector; Amaya, Maria A.; Berwick, Marianne; Gonzales, Melissa; Currey, Robert; Nicholas E Pingitore; Burchiel, Scott W.

    2009-01-01

    Particulate matter less than 10 μm (PM10) has been shown to be associated with aggravation of asthma and respiratory and cardiopulmonary morbidity. There is also great interest in the potential health effects of PM 2.5. Particulate matter (PM) varies in composition both spatially and temporally depending on the source, location and seasonal condition. El Paso County which lies in the Paso del Norte airshed is a unique location to study ambient air pollution due to three major points: the geol...

  2. Nanofabrication of tailored surface structures in dielectrics using temporally shaped femtosecond-laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Rueda, Javier; Götte, Nadine; Siegel, Jan; Soccio, Michelina; Zielinski, Bastian; Sarpe, Cristian; Wollenhaupt, Matthias; Ezquerra, Tiberio A; Baumert, Thomas; Solis, Javier

    2015-04-01

    We have investigated the use of tightly focused, temporally shaped femtosecond (fs)-laser pulses for producing nanostructures in two dielectric materials (sapphire and phosphate glass) with different characteristics in their response to pulsed laser radiation. For this purpose, laser pulses shaped by third-order dispersion (TOD) were used to generate temporally asymmetric excitation pulses, leading to the single-step production of subwavelength ablative and subablative surface structures. When compared to previous works on the interaction of tightly focused TOD-shaped pulses with fused silica, we show here that this approach leads to very different nanostructure morphologies, namely, clean nanopits without debris surrounding the crater in sapphire and well-outlined nanobumps and nanovolcanoes in phosphate glass. Although in sapphire the debris-free processing is associated with the much lower viscosity of the melt compared to fused silica, nanobump formation in phosphate glass is caused by material network expansion (swelling) upon resolidification below the ablation threshold. The formation of nanovolcanoes is a consequence of the combined effect of material network expansion and ablation occurring in the periphery and central part of the irradiated region, respectively. It is shown that the induced morphologies can be efficiently controlled by modulating the TOD coefficient of the temporally shaped pulses.

  3. Temporal structure in neuronal activity during working memory in Macaque parietal cortex

    CERN Document Server

    Pesaran, B; Sahami, M; Mitra, P; Andersen, R A

    2000-01-01

    A number of cortical structures are reported to have elevated single unit firing rates sustained throughout the memory period of a working memory task. How the nervous system forms and maintains these memories is unknown but reverberating neuronal network activity is thought to be important. We studied the temporal structure of single unit (SU) activity and simultaneously recorded local field potential (LFP) activity from area LIP in the inferior parietal lobe of two awake macaques during a memory-saccade task. Using multitaper techniques for spectral analysis, which play an important role in obtaining the present results, we find elevations in spectral power in a 50--90 Hz (gamma) frequency band during the memory period in both SU and LFP activity. The activity is tuned to the direction of the saccade providing evidence for temporal structure that codes for movement plans during working memory. We also find SU and LFP activity are coherent during the memory period in the 50--90 Hz gamma band and no consisten...

  4. The use of C-near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy for the elaboration of chemistry in lignocellulosics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucian A. Lucia; Hiroki Nanko; Alan W. Rudie; Doug G. Mancosky; Sue Wirick

    2006-01-01

    The research presented elucidates the oxidation chemistry occurring in hydrogen peroxide bleached kraft pulp fibers by employing carbon near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (C-NEXAFS). C-NEXAFS is a soft x-ray technique that selectively interrogates atomic moieties using photoelectrons (Xrays) of variable energies. The X1A beam line at the National...

  5. Novel visualization studies of lignocellulosic oxidation chemistry by application of C-near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas G. Mancosky; Lucian A. Lucia; Hiroki Nanko; Sue Wirick; Alan W. Rudie; Robert Braun

    2005-01-01

    The research presented herein is the first attempt to probe the chemical nature of lignocellulosic samples by the application of carbon near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (C-NEXAFS). C-NEXAFS is a soft X-ray technique that principally provides selective interrogation of discrete atomic moieties using photoelectrons of variable energies. The X1A beam...

  6. Mapping the structural and functional network architecture of the medial temporal lobe using 7T MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Preya; Bassett, Danielle S; Wisse, Laura E M; Detre, John A; Stein, Joel M; Yushkevich, Paul A; Shinohara, Russell T; Pluta, John B; Valenciano, Elijah; Daffner, Molly; Wolk, David A; Elliott, Mark A; Litt, Brian; Davis, Kathryn A; Das, Sandhitsu R

    2018-02-01

    Medial temporal lobe (MTL) subregions play integral roles in memory function and are differentially affected in various neurological and psychiatric disorders. The ability to structurally and functionally characterize these subregions may be important to understanding MTL physiology and diagnosing diseases involving the MTL. In this study, we characterized network architecture of the MTL in healthy subjects (n = 31) using both resting state functional MRI and MTL-focused T2-weighted structural MRI at 7 tesla. Ten MTL subregions per hemisphere, including hippocampal subfields and cortical regions of the parahippocampal gyrus, were segmented for each subject using a multi-atlas algorithm. Both structural covariance matrices from correlations of subregion volumes across subjects, and functional connectivity matrices from correlations between subregion BOLD time series were generated. We found a moderate structural and strong functional inter-hemispheric symmetry. Several bilateral hippocampal subregions (CA1, dentate gyrus, and subiculum) emerged as functional network hubs. We also observed that the structural and functional networks naturally separated into two modules closely corresponding to (a) bilateral hippocampal formations, and (b) bilateral extra-hippocampal structures. Finally, we found a significant correlation in structural and functional connectivity (r = 0.25). Our findings represent a comprehensive analysis of network topology of the MTL at the subregion level. We share our data, methods, and findings as a reference for imaging methods and disease-based research. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. He/H ratio for Cosmology: Accurate He recombination coefficients including fine structure and singlet-triplet mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, R. P.; Ferland, G. J.; MacAdam, K. B.

    2002-12-01

    The primordial abundance of helium and its subsequent production in stars are primarily determined from recombination lines in HII Regions. Accuracies better than a percent must be obtained to make definitive tests in cosmology. We report the results of a recalculation of the helium recombination process. Our work builds on previous calculations by improving the physical treatment of radiative recombination and subsequent cascades by explicitly including fine structure in the helium transition rates and energies. Transitions which are the result of singlet-triplet mixing are included in this work for the first time. We base our transition rates and energies on the results of Drake which include magnetic and relativistic interactions. Previous methodologies were largely based on variational, hydrogenic or Coulomb approximation calculations that did not include these interactions, thus entailing an unknown degree of inaccuracy. Comparisons with previous calculations are presented along with an assessment of the remaining major uncertainties. This project is supported by the NSF and NASA through grants AST 0071180 and NAG5-8212. G.W.F Drake, Atomic, Molecular, & Optical Physics Handbook, AIP Press, Woodbury New York, 1996.

  8. Fine structures and ion images on fresh frozen dried ultrathin sections by transmission electron and scanning ion microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takaya, K.; Okabe, M.; Sawataishi, M.; Takashima, H.; Yoshida, T

    2003-01-15

    Ion microscopy (IM) of air-dried or freeze-dried cryostat and semi-thin cryosections has provided ion images of elements and organic substances in wide areas of the tissue. For reproducible ion images by a shorter time of exposure to the primary ion beam, fresh frozen dried ultrathin sections were prepared by freezing the tissue in propane chilled with liquid nitrogen, cryocut at 60 nm, mounted on grids and silicon wafer pieces, and freeze-dried. Rat Cowper gland and sciatic nerve, bone marrow of the rat administered of lithium carbonate, tree frog and African toad spleen and buffy coat of atopic dermatitis patients were examined. Fine structures and ion images of the corresponding areas in the same or neighboring sections were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) followed by sector type and time-of-flight type IM. Cells in the buffy coat contained larger amounts of potassium and magnesium while plasma had larger amounts of sodium and calcium. However, in the tissues, lithium, sodium, magnesium, calcium and potassium were distributed in the cell and calcium showed a granular appearance. A granular cell of the tree frog spleen contained sodium and potassium over the cell and magnesium and calcium were confined to granules.

  9. Fine-structure relaxation of O(3P) induced by collisions with He, H and H2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lique, F.; Kłos, J.; Alexander, M. H.; Le Picard, S. D.; Dagdigian, P. J.

    2018-02-01

    The excitation of fine-structure levels of O(3P) by collisions is an important cooling process in the interstellar medium (ISM). We investigate here spin-orbit (de-)excitation of O(3Pj, j = 0, 1, 2) induced by collisions with He, H and H2 based on quantum scattering calculations of the relevant rate coefficients in the 10-1000 K temperature range. The underlying potential energy surfaces are derived from highly correlated abinitio calculations. Significant differences were found with the rate coefficients currently used in astrophysical applications. In particular, our new rate coefficients for collisions with H are up to a factor of 5 lower. Radiative transfer computations allow the assessment of the astrophysical impact of these new rate coefficients. In the case of molecular clouds, the new data are found to increase slightly the flux of the 3P1 → 3P2, while decreasing the flux of the 3P0 → 3P1 line. In the case of atomic clouds, the flux of both lines is predicted to decrease. The new rate coefficients are expected to impact significantly the modelling of cooling in astrophysical environments while also allowing new insights into oxygen chemistry in the ISM.

  10. Exposure to fine particulate matter in the air alters placental structure and the renin-angiotensin system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sônia de Fátima Soto

    Full Text Available Female Wistar rats were exposed to filtered air (F or to concentrated fine particulate matter (P for 15 days. After mating, the rats were divided into four groups and again exposed to F or P (FF, FP, PF, PP beginning on day 6 of pregnancy. At embryonic day 19, the placenta was collected. The placental structure, the protein and gene expression of TGFβ1, VEGF-A, and its receptor Flk-1 and RAS were evaluated by indirect ELISA and quantitative real-time PCR.Exposure to P decreased the placental mass, size, and surface area as well as the TGFβ1, VEGF-A and Flk-1 content. In the maternal portion of the placenta, angiotensin II (AngII and its receptors AT1 (AT1R and AT2 (AT2R were decreased in the PF and PP groups. In the fetal portion of the placenta, AngII in the FP, PF and PP groups and AT2R in the PF and PP groups were decreased, but AT1R was increased in the FP group. VEGF-A gene expression was lower in the PP group than in the FF group.Exposure to pollutants before and/or during pregnancy alters some characteristics of the placenta, indicating a possible impairment of trophoblast invasion and placental angiogenesis with possible consequences for the maternal-fetal interaction, such as a limitation of fetal nutrition and growth.

  11. Fine structure and phylogeny of green algal photobionts in the microfilamentous genus Psoroglaena (Verrucariaceae, lichen-forming ascomycetes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyati, S; Beck, A; Honegger, R

    2007-05-01

    According to the literature the microfilamentous thalli of lichen-forming ascomycetes of the genus Psoroglaena are assumed to harbour vivid green "prochlorophyte" cyanobacterial photobionts. As this would be the first report of terrestrial "prochlorophytes" we investigated the fine structure and two molecular markers (SSU rDNA and rbcL) of the photobionts of P. stigonemoides (Orange) Henssen and P. epiphylla Lücking. Both Psoroglaena spp. had unicellular green algal photobionts, representatives of the Trebouxiophyceae. The photobiont of P. stigonemoides is closely related to the non-symbiotic auxenochlorella protothecoides and to a Chlorella endosymbiont of the freshwater polyp Hydra viridis. The putative photobiont of P. epiphylla may be related to Chlorella luteoviridis, C. saccharophila, and a Pseudochlorella isolate. In contrast to other microfilamentous lichens, which derive their shape from filamentous green algae or cyanobacterial colonies overgrown and ensheathed by the fungal partner, Psoroglaena mycobionts position their unicellular photobiont in uni- or multiseriate rows which strongly resemble the situation in filamentous cyanobacterial colonies.

  12. Fine-scale spatial genetic structure of Dalbergia nigra (Fabaceae), a threatened and endemic tree of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Buzatti, Renata Santiago; Ribeiro, Renata Acácio; de Lemos Filho, José Pires; Lovato, Maria Bernadete

    2012-12-01

    The Atlantic Forest is one of the most diverse ecosystems in the world and considered a hotspot of biodiversity conservation. Dalbergia nigra (Fabaceae) is a tree endemic to the Brazilian Atlantic Forest, and has become threatened due to overexploitation of its valuable timber. In the present study, we analyzed the genetic diversity and fine-scale spatial genetic structure of D. nigra in an area of primary forest of a large reserve. All adult individuals (N = 112) were sampled in a 9.3 ha plot, and genotyped for microsatellite loci. Our results indicated high diversity with a mean of 8.6 alleles per locus, and expected heterozygosity equal to 0.74. The co-ancestry coefficients were significant for distances among trees up to 80 m. The Sp value was equal to 0.017 and indirect estimates of gene dispersal distances ranged from 89 to 144 m. No strong evidence of bottleneck or effects of human-disturbance was found. This study highlights that long-term efforts to protect a large area of Atlantic Forest have been effective towards maintaining the genetic diversity of D. nigra. The results of this study are important towards providing a guide for seed collection for ex-situ conservation and reforestation programmes of this threatened species.

  13. The Fine Structure Constant

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    electromagnetic force between subatomic charged parti- cles, and essentially determines how an atom holds to- gether its electrons. It is however not obvious why this constant has this ..... about α in 1948: “The theoretical interpretation of its numerical value is one of the most important unsolved problems of atomic physics.”

  14. Effect of node attributes on the temporal dynamics of network structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni, Naghmeh; Fotouhi, Babak

    2017-03-01

    Many natural and social networks evolve in time and their structures are dynamic. In most networks, nodes are heterogeneous, and their roles in the evolution of structure differ. This paper focuses on the role of individual attributes on the temporal dynamics of network structure. We focus on a basic model for growing networks that incorporates node attributes (which we call "quality"), and we focus on the problem of forecasting the structural properties of the network in arbitrary times for an arbitrary initial network. That is, we address the following question: If we are given a certain initial network with given arbitrary structure and known node attributes, then how does the structure change in time as new nodes with given distribution of attributes join the network? We solve the model analytically and obtain the quality-degree joint distribution and degree correlations. We characterize the role of individual attributes in the position of individual nodes in the hierarchy of connections. We confirm the theoretical findings with Monte Carlo simulations.

  15. Portable ultrahigh-vacuum sample storage system for polarization-dependent total-reflection fluorescence x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Yoshihide; Nishimura, Yusaku F.; Suzuki, Ryo; Uehara, Hiromitsu; Nimura, Tomoyuki; Beniya, Atsushi; Isomura, Noritake; Asakura, Kiyotaka; Takakusagi, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    A portable ultrahigh-vacuum sample storage system was designed and built to investigate the detailed geometric structures of mass-selected metal clusters on oxide substrates by polarization-dependent total-reflection fluorescence x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (PTRF-XAFS). This ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) sample storage system provides the handover of samples between two different sample manipulating systems. The sample storage system is adaptable for public transportation, facilitat...

  16. Temporal Control over Transient Chemical Systems using Structurally Diverse Chemical Fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jack L-Y; Maiti, Subhabrata; Fortunati, Ilaria; Ferrante, Camilla; Prins, Leonard J

    2017-08-25

    The next generation of adaptive, intelligent chemical systems will rely on a continuous supply of energy to maintain the functional state. Such systems will require chemical methodology that provides precise control over the energy dissipation process, and thus, the lifetime of the transiently activated function. This manuscript reports on the use of structurally diverse chemical fuels to control the lifetime of two different systems under dissipative conditions: transient signal generation and the transient formation of self-assembled aggregates. The energy stored in the fuels is dissipated at different rates by an enzyme, which installs a dependence of the lifetime of the active system on the chemical structure of the fuel. In the case of transient signal generation, it is shown that different chemical fuels can be used to generate a vast range of signal profiles, allowing temporal control over two orders of magnitude. Regarding self-assembly under dissipative conditions, the ability to control the lifetime using different fuels turns out to be particularly important as stable aggregates are formed only at well-defined surfactant/fuel ratios, meaning that temporal control cannot be achieved by simply changing the fuel concentration. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Temporal patterns of prokaryotic abundance, community structure and microbial activity in glacier foreland soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Katrin; Illmer, Paul

    2015-09-01

    To reveal temporal variability of archaeal and bacterial abundance, community structure, as well as microbial biomass and activity, soils of different ages (young, intermediate, mature) were sampled along a glacier foreland in the Austrian Central Alps, at the beginning (summer) and at the end (autumn) of the plant growing season. No significant changes of 16S rRNA gene copy numbers of bacteria or archaea occurred in the young, recently de-glaciated soil. However, in intermediate and mature soils, bacteria were more abundant in autumn than in summer, whereas archaea decreased at the end of the growing season. Bacterial and archaeal community structures were differentially affected by the sampling date. Both soil microbial biomass and microbial activities in intermediate and mature soils significantly increased in autumn. On the contrary, the overall abiotic parameters did not undergo changes during summer. Bacterial communities at young, intermediate, and mature sites formed different clusters, thus reflecting changes according to soil age. Archaeal communities, on the other hand, were mainly influenced by the growing season, at least in young and intermediate soils. Our results indicate that temporal variations of microbial activities, biomass, and abundance in alpine glacier foreland soils distinctly increased along with the age of the soils and highlight the importance of sampling date for ecological studies.

  18. Short-term temporal variability in fish community structure at two western Mediterranean slope locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moranta, Joan; Massutí, Enric; Stefanescu, Constantí; Palmer, Miquel; Morales-Nin, Beatriz

    2008-07-01

    due to the varying presence of a larger proportion of small or large individuals. Depth, geographic area and sampling time were the main factors determining the species composition and structure of deep-sea slope demersal fish assemblages. The effects of short-term temporal variations were observed in both the replacement and the size structure of some dominant and subdominant species throughout the year. The different temporal variation effects observed between the two sub-basins might be related to differences in productivity and its transport to the benthos.

  19. Transition of Temporal Scaling Behavior in Percolation Assisted Shear-branching Structure during Plastic Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jingli; Chen, Cun; Wang, Gang; Liaw, Peter K.

    2017-03-01

    This paper explores the temporal scaling behavior induced shear-branching structure in response to variant temperatures and strain rates during plastic deformation of Zr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG). The data analysis based on the compression tests suggests that there are two states of shear-branching structures: the fractal structure with a long-range order at an intermediate temperature of 223 K and a larger strain rate of 2.5 × 10-2 s-1 the disordered structure dominated at other temperature and strain rate. It can be deduced from the percolation theory that the compressive ductility, ec, can reach the maximum value at the intermediate temperature. Furthermore, a dynamical model involving temperature is given for depicting the shear-sliding process, reflecting the plastic deformation has fractal structure at the temperature of 223 K and strain rate of 2.5 × 10-2 s-1.

  20. Adsorption site and structure determination of c(2x2) N{sub 2}/Ni(100) using angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moler, E.J.; Kellar, S.A.; Huff, W.R.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The authors have determined the atomic spatial structure of c(2x2) N2Ni(100) with Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) from the nitrogen 1s core level using monochromatized x-rays from beamline 6.1 at SSRL and beamline 9.3.2 at the ALS. The chemically shifted N 1s peak intensities were summed together to obtain ARPEFS curves for both nitrogen atoms in the molecule. They used a new, highly-optimized program based on the Rehr-Albers scattering matrix formalism to find the adsorption site and to quantitatively determine the bond-lengths. The nitrogen molecule stands upright at an atop site, with a N-Ni bond length of 2.25(1) {angstrom}, a N-N bond length of 1.10(7) {angstrom}, and a first layer Ni-Ni spacing of 1.76(4) {angstrom}. The shake-up peak shows an identical ARPEFS diffraction pattern, confirming its intrinsic nature and supporting a previous use of this feature to decompose the peak into contributions from the chemically inequivalent nitrogen atoms. Comparison to a previously published theoretical treatment of N-N-Ni and experimental structures of analogous adsorbate systems demonstrates the importance of adsorbate-adsorbate interactions in weakly chemisorbed systems.

  1. Presence of 1/f noise in the temporal structure of psychoacoustic parameters of natural and urban sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming; De Coensel, Bert; Kang, Jian

    2015-08-01

    1/f noise or pink noise, which has been shown to be universal in nature, has also been observed in the temporal envelope of music, speech, and environmental sound. Moreover, the slope of the spectral density of the temporal envelope of music has been shown to correlate well to its pleasing, dull, or chaotic character. In this paper, the temporal structure of a number of instantaneous psychoacoustic parameters of environmental sound is examined in order to investigate whether a 1/f temporal structure appears in various types of sound that are generally preferred by people in everyday life. The results show, to some extent, that different categories of environmental sounds have different temporal structure characteristics. Only a number of urban sounds considered and birdsong, generally, exhibit 1/f behavior on short to medium duration time scales, i.e., from 0.1 s to 10 s, in instantaneous loudness and sharpness, whereas a more chaotic variation is found in birdsong at longer time scales, i.e., of 10 s-200 s. The other sound categories considered exhibit random or monotonic variations in the different time scales. In general, this study shows that a 1/f temporal structure is not necessarily present in environmental sounds that are commonly perceived as pleasant.

  2. Spatio-temporal structure, path characteristics and perceptual grouping in immediate serial spatial recall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo De Lillo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Immediate serial spatial recall measures the ability to retain sequences of locations in short-term memory and is considered the spatial equivalent of digit span. It is tested by requiring participants to reproduce sequences of movements performed by an experimenter or displayed on a monitor. Different organizational factors dramatically affect serial spatial recall but they are often confounded or underspecified. Untangling them is crucial for the characterization of working-memory models and for establishing the contribution of structure and memory capacity to spatial span. We report five experiments assessing the relative role and independence of factors that have been reported in the literature. Experiment 1 disentangled the effects of spatial clustering and path-length by manipulating the distance of items displayed on a touchscreen monitor. Long-path sequences segregated by spatial clusters were compared with short-path sequences not segregated by clusters. Recall was more accurate for sequences segregated by clusters independently from path-length. Experiment 2 featured conditions where temporal pauses were introduced between or within cluster boundaries during the presentation of sequences with the same paths. Thus, the temporal structure of the sequences was either consistent or inconsistent with a hierarchical representation based on segmentation by spatial clusters but the effect of structure could not be confounded with effects of path-characteristics. Pauses at cluster boundaries yielded more accurate recall, as predicted by a hierarchical model. In Experiment 3, the systematic manipulation of sequence structure, path-length and presence of path-crossings of sequences showed that structure explained most of the variance, followed by the presence/absence of path-crossings, and path-length. Experiments 4 and 5 replicated the results of the previous experiments in immersive virtual reality navigation tasks where the viewpoint of the

  3. Assessing the structure and temporal dynamics of seabird communities: the challenge of capturing marine ecosystem complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Rocío; Stowasser, Gabriele; McGill, Rona A R; Bearhop, Stuart; Phillips, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Understanding interspecific interactions, and the influences of anthropogenic disturbance and environmental change on communities, are key challenges in ecology. Despite the pressing need to understand these fundamental drivers of community structure and dynamics, only 17% of ecological studies conducted over the past three decades have been at the community level. Here, we assess the trophic structure of the procellariiform community breeding at South Georgia, to identify the factors that determine foraging niches and possible temporal changes. We collected conventional diet data from 13 sympatric species between 1974 and 2002, and quantified intra- and inter-guild, and annual variation in diet between and within foraging habits. In addition, we tested the reliability of stable isotope analysis (SIA) of seabird feathers collected over a 13-year period, in relation to those of their potential prey, as a tool to assess community structure when diets are diverse and there is high spatial heterogeneity in environmental baselines. Our results using conventional diet data identified a four-guild community structure, distinguishing species that mainly feed on crustaceans; large fish and squid; a mixture of crustaceans, small fish and squid; or carrion. In total, Antarctic krill Euphausia superba represented 32%, and 14 other species a further 46% of the combined diet of all 13 predators, underlining the reliance of this community on relatively few types of prey. Annual variation in trophic segregation depended on relative prey availability; however, our data did not provide evidence of changes in guild structure associated with a suggested decline in Antarctic krill abundance over the past 40 years. Reflecting the differences in δ(15) N of potential prey (crustaceans vs. squid vs. fish and carrion), analysis of δ(15) N in chick feathers identified a three-guild community structure that was constant over a 13-year period, but lacked the trophic cluster representing

  4. The fine structure of marine hydrophysical fields and its influence on the behaviour of plankton: an overview of some experimental and theoretical investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Czesław Druet

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is an overview which presents in brief some of the results of research done in the last 20 years on the structure and dynamics of intermittent fine structure in the euphotic zone of the sea and its effect on the behaviour of marine plankton. The introduction provides a general characterisation of this structure and its relations with the plankton concentration field. Chapter 2 covers turbulent mixing processes in layers of homogeneous fine structure, and discusses the dynamic interactions of these layers and how these affect the behaviour of marine phyto- and zooplankton. The principal conclusions, in brief, are that the current state of knowledge, not only of intermittent fine structure itself and its dynamic transformations, but also of the influence of these processes on the behaviour of marine plankton, is today still a long way from permitting an accurate description of reality. Moreover, both empirical investigations (in situ and in the laboratory and mathematical modelling, despite the quite advanced stage that the latter has reached, need to be continued. For this reason the prime aim of this article is to show up the gaps in our knowledge which future research in this complex, interdisciplinary area of oceanography should attempt to fill.

  5. Discriminant features and temporal structure of nonmanuals in American Sign Language.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Fabian Benitez-Quiroz

    Full Text Available To fully define the grammar of American Sign Language (ASL, a linguistic model of its nonmanuals needs to be constructed. While significant progress has been made to understand the features defining ASL manuals, after years of research, much still needs to be done to uncover the discriminant nonmanual components. The major barrier to achieving this goal is the difficulty in correlating facial features and linguistic features, especially since these correlations may be temporally defined. For example, a facial feature (e.g., head moves down occurring at the end of the movement of another facial feature (e.g., brows moves up, may specify a Hypothetical conditional, but only if this time relationship is maintained. In other instances, the single occurrence of a movement (e.g., brows move up can be indicative of the same grammatical construction. In the present paper, we introduce a linguistic-computational approach to efficiently carry out this analysis. First, a linguistic model of the face is used to manually annotate a very large set of 2,347 videos of ASL nonmanuals (including tens of thousands of frames. Second, a computational approach is used to determine which features of the linguistic model are more informative of the grammatical rules under study. We used the proposed approach to study five types of sentences--Hypothetical conditionals, Yes/no questions, Wh-questions, Wh-questions postposed, and Assertions--plus their polarities--positive and negative. Our results verify several components of the standard model of ASL nonmanuals and, most importantly, identify several previously unreported features and their temporal relationship. Notably, our results uncovered a complex interaction between head position and mouth shape. These findings define some temporal structures of ASL nonmanuals not previously detected by other approaches.

  6. Temporal analysis of genetic structure to assess population dynamics of reintroduced swift foxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullingham, Catherine I; Moehrenschlager, Axel

    2013-12-01

    Reintroductions are increasingly used to reestablish species, but a paucity of long-term postrelease monitoring has limited understanding of whether and when viable populations subsequently persist. We conducted temporal genetic analyses of reintroduced populations of swift foxes (Vulpes velox) in Canada (Alberta and Saskatchewan) and the United States (Montana). We used samples collected 4 years apart, 17 years from the initiation of the reintroduction, and 3 years after the conclusion of releases. To assess program success, we genotyped 304 hair samples, subsampled from the known range in 2000 and 2001, and 2005 and 2006, at 7 microsatellite loci. We compared diversity, effective population size, and genetic connectivity over time in each population. Diversity remained stable over time and there was evidence of increasing effective population size. We determined population structure in both periods after correcting for differences in sample sizes. The geographic distribution of these populations roughly corresponded with the original release locations, which suggests the release sites had residual effects on the population structure. However, given that both reintroduction sites had similar source populations, habitat fragmentation, due to cropland, may be associated with the population structure we found. Although our results indicate growing, stable populations, future connectivity analyses are warranted to ensure both populations are not subject to negative small-population effects. Our results demonstrate the importance of multiple sampling years to fully capture population dynamics of reintroduced populations. Análisis Temporal de la Estructura Genética para Evaluar la Dinámica Poblacional de Zorros (Vulpes velox) Reintroducidos. © 2013 Society for Conservation Biology.

  7. Graph Theoretical Analysis of Structural Neuroimaging in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy with and without Psychosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daichi Sone

    Full Text Available Psychosis is one of the most important psychiatric comorbidities in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE, and its pathophysiology still remains unsolved. We aimed to explore the connectivity differences of structural neuroimaging between TLE with and without psychosis using a graph theoretical analysis, which is an emerging mathematical method to investigate network connections in the brain as a small-world system.We recruited 11 TLE patients with unilateral hippocampal sclerosis (HS presenting psychosis or having a history of psychosis (TLE-P group. As controls, 15 TLE patients with unilateral HS without any history of psychotic episodes were also recruited (TLE-N group. For graph theoretical analysis, the normalized gray matter images of both groups were subjected to Graph Analysis Toolbox (GAT. As secondary analyses, each group was compared to 14 age- and gender-matched healthy subjects.The hub node locations were found predominantly in the ipsilateral hemisphere in the TLE-N group, and mainly on the contralateral side in the TLE-P group. The TLE-P group showed significantly higher characteristic path length, transitivity, lower global efficiency, and resilience to random or targeted attack than those of the TLE-N group. The regional comparison in betweenness centrality revealed significantly decreased connectivity in the contralateral temporal lobe, ipsilateral middle frontal gyrus, and bilateral postcentral gyri in the TLE-P group. The healthy subjects showed well-balanced nodes/edges distributions, similar metrics to TLE-N group except for higher small-worldness/modularity/assortativity, and various differences of regional betweenness/clustering.In TLE with psychosis, graph theoretical analysis of structural imaging revealed disrupted connectivity in the contralateral hemisphere. The network metrics suggested that the existence of psychosis can bring vulnerability and decreased efficiency of the whole-brain network. The sharp differences in

  8. Population fragmentation leads to spatial and temporal genetic structure in the endangered Spanish imperial eagle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Cruz, B; Godoy, J A; Negro, J J

    2007-02-01

    The fragmentation of a population may have important consequences for population genetic diversity and structure due to the effects of genetic drift and reduced gene flow. We studied the genetic consequences of the fragmentation of the Spanish imperial eagle (Aquila adalberti) population into small patches through a temporal analysis. Thirty-four museum individuals representing the population predating the fragmentation were analysed for a 345-bp segment of the mitochondrial control region and a set of 10 nuclear microsatellite loci. Data from a previous study on the current population (N = 79) were re-analysed for this subset of 10 microsatellite markers and results compared to those obtained from the historical sample. Three shared mitochondrial haplotypes were found in both populations, although fluctuations in haplotype frequencies and the occurrence of a fourth haplotype in the historical population resulted in lower current levels of haplotype and nucleotide diversity. However, microsatellite markers revealed undiminished levels of nuclear diversity. No evidence for genetic structure was observed for the historical Spanish imperial eagle population, suggesting that the current pattern of structure is the direct consequence of population fragmentation. Temporal fluctuations in mitochondrial and microsatellite allelic frequencies were found between the historical and the current population as well as for each pairwise comparison between historical and current Centro and historical and current Parque Nacional de Doñana nuclei. Our results indicate an ancestral panmictic situation for the species that management policies should aim to restore. A historical analysis like the one taken here provides the baseline upon which the relative role of recent drift in shaping current genetic patterns in endangered species can be evaluated and this knowledge is used to guide conservation actions.

  9. Temporal cohesion of the structural, functional and molecular characteristics of the developing zebrafish heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrone, Gianfranco; Wilson, Kathryn S; Mullins, John J; Tucker, Carl S; Denvir, Martin A

    2015-06-01

    Heart formation is a complex, dynamic and highly coordinated process of molecular, morphogenetic and functional factors with each interacting and contributing to formation of the mature organ. Cardiac abnormalities in early life can be lethal in mammals but not in the zebrafish embryo which has been widely used to study the developing heart. While early cardiac development in the zebrafish has been well characterized, functional changes during development and how these relate to architectural, cellular and molecular aspects of development have not been well described previously. To address this we have carefully characterised cardiac structure, function, cardiomyocyte proliferation and cardiac-specific gene expression between 48 and 120 hpf in the zebrafish. We show that the zebrafish heart increases in volume and changes shape significantly between 48 and 72 hpf accompanied by a 40% increase in cardiomyocyte number. Between 96 and 120 hpf, while external heart expansion slows, there is rapid formation of a mature and extensive trabecular network within the ventricle chamber. While ejection fraction does not change during the course of development other determinants of contractile function increase significantly particularly between 72 and 96 hpf leading to an increase in cardinal vein blood flow. This study has revealed a number of novel aspects of cardiac developmental dynamics with striking temporal orchestration of structure and function within the first few days of development. These changes are associated with changes in expression of developmental and maturational genes. This study provides important insights into the complex temporal relationship between structure and function of the developing zebrafish heart. Copyright © 2015 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Calibration of the fine-structure constant of graphene by time-dependent density-functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindona, A.; Pisarra, M.; Vacacela Gomez, C.; Riccardi, P.; Falcone, G.; Bellucci, S.

    2017-11-01

    One of the amazing properties of graphene is the ultrarelativistic behavior of its loosely bound electrons, mimicking massless fermions that move with a constant velocity, inversely proportional to a fine-structure constant αg of the order of unity. The effective interaction between these quasiparticles is, however, better controlled by the coupling parameter αg*=αg/ɛ , which accounts for the dynamic screening due to the complex permittivity ɛ of the many-valence electron system. This concept was introduced in a couple of previous studies [Reed et al., Science 330, 805 (2010) and Gan et al., Phys. Rev. B 93, 195150 (2016)], where inelastic x-ray scattering measurements on crystal graphite were converted into an experimentally derived form of αg* for graphene, over an energy-momentum region on the eV Å -1 scale. Here, an accurate theoretical framework is provided for αg*, using time-dependent density-functional theory in the random-phase approximation, with a cutoff in the interaction between excited electrons in graphene, which translates to an effective interlayer interaction in graphite. The predictions of the approach are in excellent agreement with the above-mentioned measurements, suggesting a calibration method to substantially improve the experimental derivation of αg*, which tends to a static limiting value of ˜0.14 . Thus, the ab initio calibration procedure outlined demonstrates the accuracy of perturbation expansion treatments for the two-dimensional gas of massless Dirac fermions in graphene, in parallel with quantum electrodynamics.

  11. The UVES Large Program for testing fundamental physics - III. Constraints on the fine-structure constant from three telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, T. M.; Murphy, M. T.; Whitmore, J. B.; Misawa, T.; Centurion, M.; D'Odorico, S.; Lopez, S.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Molaro, P.; Petitjean, P.; Rahmani, H.; Srianand, R.; Wendt, M.

    2014-11-01

    Large statistical samples of quasar spectra have previously indicated possible cosmological variations in the fine-structure constant, α. A smaller sample of higher signal-to-noise ratio spectra, with dedicated calibration, would allow a detailed test of this evidence. Towards that end, we observed equatorial quasar HS 1549+1919 with three telescopes: the Very Large Telescope, Keck and, for the first time in such analyses, Subaru. By directly comparing these spectra to each other, and by `supercalibrating' them using asteroid and iodine-cell tests, we detected and removed long-range distortions of the quasar spectra's wavelength scales which would have caused significant systematic errors in our α measurements. For each telescope we measure the relative deviation in α from the current laboratory value, Δα/α, in three absorption systems at redshifts zabs = 1.143, 1.342 and 1.802. The nine measurements of Δα/α are all consistent with zero at the 2σ level, with 1σ statistical (systematic) uncertainties 5.6-24 (1.8-7.0) parts per million (ppm). They are also consistent with each other at the 1σ level, allowing us to form a combined value for each telescope and, finally, a single value for this line of sight: Δα/α = -5.4 ± 3.3stat ± 1.5sys ppm, consistent with both zero and previous, large samples. We also average all Large Programme results measuring Δα/α = -0.6 ± 1.9stat ± 0.9sys ppm. Our results demonstrate the robustness and reliability at the 3 ppm level afforded by supercalibration techniques and direct comparison of spectra from different telescopes.

  12. Artificial intelligence applied to the automatic analysis of absorption spectra. Objective measurement of the fine structure constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, Matthew B.; Webb, John K.

    2017-06-01

    A new and automated method is presented for the analysis of high-resolution absorption spectra. Three established numerical methods are unified into one `artificial intelligence' process: a genetic algorithm (Genetic Voigt Profile FIT, gvpfit); non-linear least-squares with parameter constraints (vpfit); and Bayesian model averaging (BMA). The method has broad application but here we apply it specifically to the problem of measuring the fine structure constant at high redshift. For this we need objectivity and reproducibility. gvpfit is also motivated by the importance of obtaining a large statistical sample of measurements of Δα/α. Interactive analyses are both time consuming and complex and automation makes obtaining a large sample feasible. In contrast to previous methodologies, we use BMA to derive results using a large set of models and show that this procedure is more robust than a human picking a single preferred model since BMA avoids the systematic uncertainties associated with model choice. Numerical simulations provide stringent tests of the whole process and we show using both real and simulated spectra that the unified automated fitting procedure out-performs a human interactive analysis. The method should be invaluable in the context of future instrumentation like ESPRESSO on the VLT and indeed future ELTs. We apply the method to the zabs = 1.8389 absorber towards the zem = 2.145 quasar J110325-264515. The derived constraint of Δα/α = 3.3 ± 2.9 × 10-6 is consistent with no variation and also consistent with the tentative spatial variation reported in Webb et al. and King et al.

  13. Selenol binds to iron in nitrogenase iron-molybdenum cofactor: An extended x-ray absorption fine structure study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conradson, S.D.; Hodgson, K.O.; Hedman, B. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Burgess, B.K. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Newton, W.E. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States); Cicco, A.Di [Universita degli Studi di Camerino, Camerino (Italy); Filipponi, A. [Universita degli Studi dell`Aquila (Italy); Wu, Z.Y.; Natoli, C.R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Frascati (Italy)

    1994-02-15

    The biological N{sub 2}-fixation reaction is catalyzed by the enzyme nitrogenase. The metal cluster active site of this enzyme, the iron-molybdenum cofactor (FeMoco), can be studied either while bound within the MoFe protein component of nitrogenase or after it has ben extracted into N-methylformamide. The two species are similar but not identical. For example, the addition of thiophenol or selenophenol to isolated FeMoco causes its rather broad S = 3/2 electron paramagnetic resonance signal to sharpen and more closely approach the signal exhibited by protein-bound FeMoco. The nature of this thiol/selenol binding site has been investigated by using Se-K edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) to study selenophenol ligated to FeMoco, and the results are reported here. EXAFS data analysis at the ligand Se-K edge was performed with a set of software, GNXAS, that provides for direct calculation of the theoretical EXAFS signals and least-squares fits to the experimental data. Data analysis results show definitively that the selenol (and by inference thiol) binds to Fe at a distance of 2.4 {angstrom}. In contrast, unacceptable fits are obtained with either Mo or S as the liganded atom (instead of Fe). These results provide quantitative details about an exchangeable thio/selenol binding site on FeMoco in its isolated, solution state and establish an Fe atom as the site of this reaction. Furthermore, the utility of ligand-based EXAFS as a probe of coordination in polynuclear metal clusters is demonstrated.

  14. New clues to the local atomic structure of short-range ordered ferric arsenate from extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikutta, Christian; Mandaliev, Petar N; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2013-04-02

    Short-range ordered ferric arsenate (FeAsO4 · xH2O) is a secondary As precipitate frequently encountered in acid mine waste environments. Two distinct structural models have recently been proposed for this phase. The first model is based on the structure of scorodite (FeAsO4 · 2H2O) where isolated FeO6 octahedra share corners with four adjacent arsenate (AsO4) tetrahedra in a three-dimensional framework (framework model). The second model consists of single chains of corner-sharing FeO6 octahedra being bridged by AsO4 bound in a monodentate binuclear (2)C complex (chain model). In order to rigorously test the accuracy of both structural models, we synthesized ferric arsenates and analyzed their local (absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. We found that both As and Fe K-edge EXAFS spectra were most compatible with isolated FeO6 octahedra being bridged by AsO4 tetrahedra (RFe-As = 3.33 ± 0.01 Å). Our shell-fit results further indicated a lack of evidence for single corner-sharing FeO6 linkages in ferric arsenate. Wavelet-transform analyses of the Fe K-edge EXAFS spectra of ferric arsenates complemented by shell fitting confirmed Fe atoms at an average distance of ∼5.3 Å, consistent with crystallographic data of scorodite and in disagreement with the chain model. A scorodite-type local structure of short-range ordered ferric arsenates provides a plausible explanation for their rapid transformation into scorodite in acid mining environments.

  15. Second-order analysis of structured inhomogeneous spatio-temporal point processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper; Ghorbani, Mohammad

    Statistical methodology for spatio-temporal point processes is in its infancy. We consider second-order analysis based on pair correlation functions and K-functions for first general inhomogeneous spatio-temporal point processes and second inhomogeneous spatio-temporal Cox processes. Assuming......-temporal Gaussian process. Another concerns shot-noise Cox processes with a separable spatio-temporal covariance density. We propose diagnostic procedures for checking hypotheses of second-order spatio-temporal separability, which we apply on simulated and real data (the UK 2001 epidemic foot and mouth disease data)....

  16. Structural and functional correlates of behavioral pattern separation in the hippocampus and medial temporal lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doxey, Christopher R; Kirwan, C Brock

    2015-04-01

    Structures of the medial temporal lobe (MTL) are known to be involved in declarative memory processes. However, little is known about how age-related changes in MTL structures, white matter integrity, and functional connectivity affect pattern separation processes in the MTL. In this study, we used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure the volumes of MTL regions of interest, including hippocampal subfields (dentate gyrus, CA3, CA1, and subiculum) in healthy older and younger adults. Additionally, we used diffusion tensor imaging to measure white matter integrity for both groups. Finally, we used functional MRI to acquire resting functional connectivity measures for both groups. We show that, along with age, the volume of left CA3/dentate gyrus predicts memory performance. Differences in fractional anisotropy and the strength of resting functional connections between the hippocampus and other cortical structures implicated in memory processing were not significant predictors of performance. As previous studies have only hinted, it seems that the size of left CA3/dentate gyrus contributes more to successful discrimination between similar mnemonic representations than other hippocampal sub-fields, MTL structures, and other neuroimaging correlates. Accordingly, the implications of aging and atrophy on lure discrimination capacities are discussed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Understanding structure of urban traffic network based on spatial-temporal correlation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanfang; Jia, Limin; Qin, Yong; Han, Shixiu; Dong, Honghui

    2017-08-01

    Understanding the structural characteristics of urban traffic network comprehensively can provide references for improving road utilization rate and alleviating traffic congestion. This paper focuses on the spatial-temporal correlations between different pairs of traffic series and proposes a complex network-based method of constructing the urban traffic network. In the network, the nodes represent road segments, and an edge between a pair of nodes is added depending on the result of significance test for the corresponding spatial-temporal correlation. Further, a modified PageRank algorithm, named the geographical weight-based PageRank algorithm (GWPA), is proposed to analyze the spatial distribution of important segments in the road network. Finally, experiments are conducted by using three kinds of traffic series collected from the urban road network in Beijing. Experimental results show that the urban traffic networks constructed by three traffic variables all indicate both small-world and scale-free characteristics. Compared with the results of PageRank algorithm, GWPA is proved to be valid in evaluating the importance of segments and identifying the important segments with small degree.

  18. Spatio-Temporal Changes in Structure for a Mediterranean Urban Forest: Santiago, Chile 2002 to 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Escobedo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available There is little information on how urban forest ecosystems in South America and Mediterranean climates change across both space and time. This study statistically and spatially analyzed the spatio-temporal dynamics of Santiago, Chile’s urban forest using tree and plot-level data from permanent plots from 2002 to 2014. We found mortality, ingrowth, and tree cover remained stable over the analysis period and similar patterns were observed for basal area (BA and biomass. However, tree cover increased, and was greater in the highest socioeconomic stratum neighborhoods while it dropped in the medium and low strata. Growth rates for the five most common tree species averaged from 0.12 to 0.36 cm·year−1. Spatially, tree biomass and BA were greater in the affluent, northeastern sections of the city and in southwest peri-urban areas. Conversely, less affluent central, northwest, and southern areas showed temporal losses in BA and biomass. Overall, we found that Santiago’s urban forest follows similar patterns as in other parts of the world; affluent areas tend to have more and better managed urban forests than poorer areas, and changes are primarily influenced by social and ecological drivers. Nonetheless, care is warranted when comparing urban forest structural metrics measured with similar sampling-monitoring approaches across ecologically disparate regions and biomes.

  19. Hyper-Temporal C-Band SAR for Baseline Woody Structural Assessments in Deciduous Savannas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Main

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Savanna ecosystems and their woody vegetation provide valuable resources and ecosystem services. Locally calibrated and cost effective estimates of these resources are required in order to satisfy commitments to monitor and manage change within them. Baseline maps of woody resources are important for analyzing change over time. Freely available, and highly repetitive, C-band data has the potential to be a viable alternative to high-resolution commercial SAR imagery (e.g., RADARSAT-2, ALOS2 in generating large-scale woody resources maps. Using airborne LiDAR as calibration, we investigated the relationships between hyper-temporal C-band ASAR data and woody structural parameters, namely total canopy cover (TCC and total canopy volume (TCV, in a deciduous savanna environment. Results showed that: the temporal filter reduced image variance; the random forest model out-performed the linear model; while the TCV metric consistently showed marginally higher accuracies than the TCC metric. Combinations of between 6 and 10 images could produce results comparable to high resolution commercial (C- & L-band SAR imagery. The approach showed promise for producing a regional scale, locally calibrated, baseline maps for the management of deciduous savanna resources, and lay a foundation for monitoring using time series of data from newer C-band SAR sensors (e.g., Sentinel1.

  20. MRI-based brain structure volumes in temporal lobe epilepsy patients and their unaffected siblings: a preliminary study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Scanlon, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    Investigating the heritability of brain structure may be useful in simplifying complicated genetic studies in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). A preliminary study is presented to determine if volume deficits of candidate brain structures present at a higher rate in unaffected siblings than controls subjects.

  1. NetView: a high-definition network-visualization approach to detect fine-scale population structures from genome-wide patterns of variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuditschko, Markus; Khatkar, Mehar S; Raadsma, Herman W

    2012-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping can be used to infer complex population structures. Fine-scale population structure analysis tracing individual ancestry remains one of the major challenges. Based on network theory and recent advances in SNP chip technology, we investigated an unsupervised network clustering method called Super Paramagnetic Clustering (Spc). When applied to whole-genome marker data it identifies the natural divisions of groups of individuals into population clusters without use of prior ancestry information. Furthermore, we optimised an analysis pipeline called NetView, a high-definition network visualization, starting with computation of genetic distance, followed clustering using Spc and finally visualization of clusters with Cytoscape. We compared NetView against commonly used methodologies including Principal Component Analyses (PCA) and a model-based algorithm, Admixture, on whole-genome-wide SNP data derived from three previously described data sets: simulated (2.5 million SNPs, 5 populations), human (1.4 million SNPs, 11 populations) and cattle (32,653 SNPs, 19 populations). We demonstrate that individuals can be effectively allocated to their correct population whilst simultaneously revealing fine-scale structure within the populations. Analyzing the human HapMap populations, we identified unexpected genetic relatedness among individuals, and population stratification within the Indian, African and Mexican samples. In the cattle data set, we correctly assigned all individuals to their respective breeds and detected fine-scale population sub-structures reflecting different sample origins and phenotypes. The NetView pipeline is computationally extremely efficient and can be easily applied on large-scale genome-wide data sets to assign individuals to particular populations and to reproduce fine-scale population structures without prior knowledge of individual ancestry. NetView can be used on any

  2. A new relativistic Hartree-Fock calculation scheme and its application to the evaluation of fine-structure intervals for nd (n = 3-40) series of sodium

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Liming; Zhu, Yunxia; Zhang, Meng; Tu, Yaoquan

    2011-11-01

    We present a new second-order representation of the relativistic Hartree-Fock equation, which can be solved by the standard Hartree-Fock technique. An alternative reduction for the magnetic part of the Breit interaction is presented in an explicit expression. A corresponding program has been developed, which improves significantly the scaled linear mesh introduced by Herman and Skillman. The structures for a number of atoms and ions are calculated and the agreement of our results with those published is excellent. We evaluate the fine-structure intervals of nd(n = 3-40) Rydberg series for sodium. The inverted fine-structure splitting values are obtained directly as the differences of eigenvalues obtained from a self-consistent field procedure. Taking into account the Gaunt effect enables the accuracy of the calculation to be substantially improved. The complete treatments reproduce very well the inverted fine structures along the Rydberg series and the relative difference between the present results and the experiments does not exceed 4.4%.

  3. (1,3;1,4)-β-Glucan Biosynthesis by the CSLF6 Enzyme: Position and Flexibility of Catalytic Residues Influence Product Fine Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitroff, George; Little, Alan; Lahnstein, Jelle; Schwerdt, Julian G; Srivastava, Vaibhav; Bulone, Vincent; Burton, Rachel A; Fincher, Geoffrey B

    2016-04-05

    Cellulose synthase-like F6 (CslF6) genes encode polysaccharide synthases responsible for (1,3;1,4)-β-glucan biosynthesis in cereal grains. However, it is not clear how both (1,3)- and (1,4)-linkages are incorporated into a single polysaccharide chain and how the frequency and arrangement of the two linkage types that define the fine structure of the polysaccharide are controlled. Through transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, two CSLF6 orthologs from different cereal species were shown to mediate the synthesis of (1,3;1,4)-β-glucans with very different fine structures. Chimeric cDNA constructs with interchanged sections of the barley and sorghum CslF6 genes were developed to identify regions of the synthase enzyme responsible for these differences. A single amino acid residue upstream of the TED motif in the catalytic region was shown to dramatically change the fine structure of the polysaccharide produced. The structural basis of this effect can be rationalized by reference to a homology model of the enzyme and appears to be related to the position and flexibility of the TED motif in the active site of the enzyme. The region and amino acid residue identified provide opportunities to manipulate the solubility of (1,3;1,4)-β-glucan in grains and vegetative tissues of the grasses and, in particular, to enhance the solubility of dietary fibers that are beneficial to human health.

  4. Advanced approach to the local structure reconstruction and theory validation on the example of the W L3-edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure of tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonane, Inga; Anspoks, Andris; Kuzmin, Alexei

    2018-02-01

    Atomistic simulations of the experimental W L3-edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of bcc tungsten at T = 300 K were performed using classical molecular dynamics (MD) and reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) methods. The MD-EXAFS method based on the results of MD simulations allowed us to access the structural information, encoded in EXAFS, beyond the first coordination shell and to validate the accuracy of two interaction potential models—the embedded atom model potential and the second nearest-neighbor modified embedded atom method potential. The RMC-EXAFS method was used for more elaborate analysis of the EXAFS data giving access to thermal disorder effects. The results of both methods suggest that the correlation in atomic motion in bcc tungsten becomes negligible above 8 Å. This fact allowed us to use the EXAFS data to determine not only mean-square relative displacements of atomic W–W pair motion but also mean-square displacements of individual tungsten atoms, which are usually accessible from diffraction data only.

  5. A Separation Algorithm for Sources with Temporal Structure Only Using Second-order Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.G. Wang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Unlike conventional blind source separation (BSS deals with independent identically distributed (i.i.d. sources, this paper addresses the separation from mixtures of sources with temporal structure, such as linear autocorrelations. Many sequential extraction algorithms have been reported, resulting in inevitable cumulated errors introduced by the deflation scheme. We propose a robust separation algorithm to recover original sources simultaneously, through a joint diagonalizer of several average delayed covariance matrices at positions of the optimal time delay and its integers. The proposed algorithm is computationally simple and efficient, since it is based on the second-order statistics only. Extensive simulation results confirm the validity and high performance of the algorithm. Compared with related extraction algorithms, its separation signal-to-noise rate for a desired source can reach 20dB higher, and it seems rather insensitive to the estimation error of the time delay.

  6. Twelve million resolving power on 4.7 T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance instrument with dynamically harmonized cell--observation of fine structure in peptide mass spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Igor A; Nagornov, Konstantin; Vladimirov, Gleb N; Kostyukevich, Yury I; Nikolaev, Eugene N

    2014-05-01

    Resolving power of about 12,000 000 at m/z 675 has been achieved on low field homogeneity 4.7 T magnet using a dynamically harmonized Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT ICR) cell. Mass spectra of the fine structure of the isotopic distribution of a peptide were obtained and strong discrimination of small intensity peaks was observed in case of resonance excitation of the ions of the whole isotopic cluster to the same cyclotron radius. The absence of some peaks from the mass spectra of the fine structure was explained basing on results of computer simulations showing strong ion cloud interactions, which cause the coalescence of peaks with m/z close to that of the highest magnitude peak. The way to prevent peak discrimination is to excite ion clouds of different m/z to different cyclotron radii, which was demonstrated and investigated both experimentally and by computer simulations.

  7. Local Environment sSrrounding S and Cd in CdS:O Thin Film Photovoltaic Materials Probed by X-ray Absorption Fine Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soo,Y.; Sun, W.; Weng, S.; Lin, Y.; Chang, S.; Jang, L.; Wu, X.; Yan, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Local environments surrounding Cd and S in CdS:O thin films have been determined using extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). As indicated by the Cd EXAFS, Cd atoms remain predominantly bonded with S. The S EXAFS and NEXAFS clearly demonstrate the presence of S-O bonds. The oxygen atoms actually combine with S to form SO{sub 3} and SO{sub 4} complexes. Combined with the transmission electron micrograph, these x-ray results suggest formation of oxygen-free CdS nanocrystals and provide an unambiguous explanation for the mystery of increased band gap that appears to violate the band anticrossing model.

  8. State of the art in the determination of the fine structure constant: test of Quantum Electrodynamics and determination of h/m{sub u}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchendira, Rym; Clade, Pierre; Nez, Francois; Biraben, Francois [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, Ecole Normale Superieure, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, CNRS, 4 place Jussieu, 75252, Paris, Cedex 05 (France); Guellati-Khelifa, Saida [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, Ecole Normale Superieure, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, CNRS, 4 place Jussieu, 75252, Paris, Cedex 05 (France); Conservatoire National des Arts et Metiers, 292 rue Saint Martin, 75141, Paris, Cedex 03 (France)

    2013-07-15

    The fine structure constant {alpha} has a particular status in physics. Its precise determination is required to test the quantum electrodynamics (QED) theory. The constant {alpha} is also a keystone for the determination of other fundamental physical constants, especially the ones involved in the framework of the future International System of units. This paper presents Paris experiment, where the fine structure constant is determined by measuring the recoil velocity of a rubidium atom when it absorbs a photon. The impact of the recent improvement of QED calculations of the electron moment anomaly and the recent measurement of the cesium atom recoil at Berkeley will be discussed. The opportunity to provide a precise value of the ratio h/m{sub u} between the Planck constant and the atomic mass constant will be investigated. (copyright 2013 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Spatial-temporal analysis of coherent offshore wind field structures measured by scanning Doppler-lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valldecabres, L.; Friedrichs, W.; von Bremen, L.; Kühn, M.

    2016-09-01

    An analysis of the spatial and temporal power fluctuations of a simplified wind farm model is conducted on four offshore wind fields data sets, two from lidar measurements and two from LES under unstable and neutral atmospheric conditions. The integral length scales of the horizontal wind speed computed in the streamwise and the cross-stream direction revealed the elongation of the structures in the direction of the mean flow. To analyse the effect of the structures on the power output of a wind turbine, the aggregated equivalent power of two wind turbines with different turbine spacing in the streamwise and cross-stream direction is analysed at different time scales under 10 minutes. The fact of considering the summation of the power of two wind turbines smooths out the fluctuations of the power output of a single wind turbine. This effect, which is stronger with increasing spacing between turbines, can be seen in the aggregation of the power of two wind turbines in the streamwise direction. Due to the anti-correlation of the coherent structures in the cross-stream direction, this smoothing effect is stronger when the aggregated power is computed with two wind turbines aligned orthogonally to the mean flow direction.

  10. The spatio-temporal structure of electrostatic turbulence in the WEGA stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsen, Stefan

    2008-03-15

    The main object of this work is to provide a detailed characterisation of electrostatic turbulence in WEGA and to identify the underlying instability mechanism driving turbulence. The spatio-temporal structure of turbulence is studied using multiple Langmuir probes providing a sufficiently high spatial and temporal resolution. Turbulence in WEGA is dominated by drift wave dynamics. The phase shift between density and potential fluctuations is close to zero, fluctuations are mainly driven by the density gradient, and the phase velocity of turbulent structures points in the direction of the electron diamagnetic drift. The structure of turbulence is studied mainly in the plasma edge region inside the last closed flux surface. WEGA can be operated in two regimes differing in the magnetic field strength by almost one order of magnitude (57 mT and 500 mT, respectively). At 57 mT large structures with a poloidal extent comparable to the machine dimensions are observed, whereas at 500 mT turbulent structures are much smaller. The poloidal structure size scales nearly linearly with the inverse magnetic field strength. This scaling may be argued to be related to the drift wave dispersion scale, {rho}{sub s}={radical}(m{sub i}k{sub B}T{sub e})/(qB). However, the structure size remains unchanged when the ion mass is changed by using different discharge gases. Inside the last closed flux surface the poloidal E x B drift in WEGA is negligible. The three-dimensional structure is studied in detail using probes which are toroidally separated but aligned along connecting magnetic field lines. A small but finite parallel wavenumber is found. The ratio between the average parallel and perpendicular wavenumber is in the order of anti {kappa} {sub parallel} / anti {kappa}{sub {theta}} {approx} 10{sup -2}. The parallel phase velocity of turbulent structures is in-between the ion sound velocity and the Alfven velocity. In the parallel dynamics a fundamental difference between the two

  11. Behavior of heptavalent technetium in concentrated triflic acid under alpha-irradiation. Technetium-triflate complex characterized by X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and DFT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denden, Ibtihel; Blain, Guillaume; Fattahi, Massoud [SUBATECH Laboratory, Nantes (France); Roques, Jerome [Paris Sud Univ., Orsay (France). IPN Orsay; Poineau, Frederic [Nevada Univ., Las Vegas, NV (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Solari, Pier Lorenzo [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette (France). DEN/DPC/SEARS; Schlegel, Michel L. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2017-04-01

    The nature of the Tc species produced after the alpha-irradiation of Tc(VII) in concentrated triflic acid has been investigated by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy and first principles calculations. Experimental and theoretical results are consistent with the formation of Tc{sup (V)}O(F{sub 3}CSO{sub 3}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}{sup +}.

  12. A scalable algorithm for structure identification of complex gene regulatory network from temporal expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Shupeng; Rice, Andrew P; Chen, Rui; Wu, Liang; Liu, Ji; Miao, Hongyu

    2017-01-31

    Gene regulatory interactions are of fundamental importance to various biological functions and processes. However, only a few previous computational studies have claimed success in revealing genome-wide regulatory landscapes from temporal gene expression data, especially for complex eukaryotes like human. Moreover, recent work suggests that these methods still suffer from the curse of dimensionality if a network size increases to 100 or higher. Here we present a novel scalable algorithm for identifying genome-wide gene regulatory network (GRN) structures, and we have verified the algorithm performances by extensive simulation studies based on the DREAM challenge benchmark data. The highlight of our method is that its superior performance does not degenerate even for a network size on the order of 10(4), and is thus readily applicable to large-scale complex networks. Such a breakthrough is achieved by considering both prior biological knowledge and multiple topological properties (i.e., sparsity and hub gene structure) of complex networks in the regularized formulation. We also validate and illustrate the application of our algorithm in practice using the time-course gene expression data from a study on human respiratory epithelial cells in response to influenza A virus (IAV) infection, as well as the CHIP-seq data from ENCODE on transcription factor (TF) and target gene interactions. An interesting finding, owing to the proposed algorithm, is that the biggest hub structures (e.g., top ten) in the GRN all center at some transcription factors in the context of epithelial cell infection by IAV. The proposed algorithm is the first scalable method for large complex network structure identification. The GRN structure identified by our algorithm could reveal possible biological links and help researchers to choose which gene functions to investigate in a biological event. The algorithm described in this article is implemented in MATLAB (Ⓡ) , and the source code is

  13. Determination of the temporal structure of femtosecond laser pulses by means of laser-induced air plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nan; Bao, Wen-Xia; Yang, Jing-Hui; Zhu, Xiao-Nong

    2013-05-01

    A new approach is presented to reveal the temporal structure of femtosecond laser pulses by recording the corresponding time-resolved shadowgraphs of the laser-induced air plasma. It is shown that the temporal structures of femtosecond laser pulses, normally not observable by the ordinary intensity autocorrelator, can be detected through intuitively analyzing the ultrafast evolution process of the air plasma induced by the femtosecond laser pulses under examination. With this method, existence of pre- and post-pulses has been clearly unveiled within the time window of ±150 fs in reference with the main 50-fs laser pulses output from a commercial 1-kHz femtosecond laser amplifier. The unique advantage of the proposed method is that it can directly provide valuable information about the pulse temporal structures' effect on the laser-induced ionization or material ablation.

  14. Distinct roles of a tyrosine-associated hydrogen-bond network in fine-tuning the structure and function of heme proteins: two cases designed for myoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Fei; Yuan, Hong; Du, Ke-Jie; You, Yong; Gao, Shu-Qin; Wen, Ge-Bo; Lin, Ying-Wu; Tan, Xiangshi

    2016-10-20

    A hydrogen-bond (H-bond) network, specifically a Tyr-associated H-bond network, plays key roles in regulating the structure and function of proteins, as exemplified by abundant heme proteins in nature. To explore an approach for fine-tuning the structure and function of artificial heme proteins, we herein used myoglobin (Mb) as a model protein and introduced a Tyr residue in the secondary sphere of the heme active site at two different positions (107 and 138). We performed X-ray crystallography, UV-Vis spectroscopy, stopped-flow kinetics, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies for the two single mutants, I107Y Mb and F138Y Mb, and compared to that of wild-type Mb under the same conditions. The results showed that both Tyr107 and Tyr138 form a distinct H-bond network involving water molecules and neighboring residues, which fine-tunes ligand binding to the heme iron and enhances the protein stability, respectively. Moreover, the Tyr107-associated H-bond network was shown to fine-tune both H2O2 binding and activation. With two cases demonstrated for Mb, this study suggests that the Tyr-associated H-bond network has distinct roles in regulating the protein structure, properties and functions, depending on its location in the protein scaffold. Therefore, it is possible to design a Tyr-associated H-bond network in general to create other artificial heme proteins with improved properties and functions.

  15. The ZINGRS Radio Survey: Probing metallicities at high-z with far-IR fine-structure lines and the radio continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferkinhoff, Carl; Higdon, Sarah; Higdon, James L.; Tidwell, Hannah; Rangel, Miguel; Vishwas, Amit; Nikola, Thomas; Stacey, Gordon J.; Brisbin, Drew

    2017-01-01

    The present day Universe is rich in metals that enable efficient cooling of gas in the ISM in order to form stars, create planets and make the building blocks of life as we know it. The Universe did not start in this state - we know that metals had to build up over time with successive generations of stars. Revealing the details of this evolution, however, is challenging and requires probes of metallicity that are not susceptible to dust extinction nor exhibit the degeneracies common to tracers in the visible regime. One possible indicator combines the far-IR fine structure lines with the radio continuum. Recently we have undertaken a multi-band radio continuum survey with the JVLA of high-z galaxies from ZINGRS. These observations will constrain the galaxies’ thermal and nonthermal radio emissions and demonstrate the use of far-IR lines together with radio continuum as a metallicity indicator. ZINGRS, the ZEUS 1 and 2 INvestigated Galaxy Reference Sample, includes ~30 galaxies from z ~ 1 - 4.5 for which the far-IR fine-structure lines (e.g. [CII] 158, [NII] 122, [OIII] 88) have been observed with the ZEUS-1 and 2 instruments. This is the largest collection of far-IR fine-structure line detections at high-z and is ideal for demonstrating the use of this new indicator. Here we describe the theory behind the new indicator, give an overview of ZINGRS, and report on the status of our radio survey.

  16. Introducing close-range photogrammetry for characterizing forest understory plant diversity and surface fuel structure at fine scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin C. Bright; E. Louise Loudermilk; Scott M. Pokswinski; Andrew T. Hudak; Joseph J. O' Brien

    2016-01-01

    Methods characterizing fine-scale fuels and plant diversity can advance understanding of plant-fire interactions across scales and help in efforts to monitor important ecosystems such as longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) forests of the southeastern United States. Here, we evaluate the utility of close-range photogrammetry for measuring fuels and plant...

  17. East Sea Spatial and Temporal Variability of Thermohaline Structure and Circulation Identified From Observational (T, S) Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    VARIABILITY OF THERMOHALINE STRUCTURE AND CIRCULATION IDENTIFIED FROM OBSERVATIONAL (T, S) PROFILES by Hyewon Choi December 2015 Thesis Advisor...the gridded data, seasonal and inter-annual variability of thermohaline structure and circulation of the East Sea were analyzed. Found was a low...unlimited EAST SEA SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIABILITY OF THERMOHALINE STRUCTURE AND CIRCULATION IDENTIFIED FROM OBSERVATIONAL (T, S) PROFILES Hyewon Choi

  18. Integrating Temporal and Spatial Scales: Human Structural Network Motifs Across Age and Region of Interest Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echtermeyer, Christoph; Han, Cheol E.; Rotarska-Jagiela, Anna; Mohr, Harald; Uhlhaas, Peter J.; Kaiser, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Human brain networks can be characterized at different temporal or spatial scales given by the age of the subject or the spatial resolution of the neuroimaging method. Integration of data across scales can only be successful if the combined networks show a similar architecture. One way to compare networks is to look at spatial features, based on fiber length, and topological features of individual nodes where outlier nodes form single node motifs whose frequency yields a fingerprint of the network. Here, we observe how characteristic single node motifs change over age (12–23 years) and network size (414, 813, and 1615 nodes) for diffusion tensor imaging structural connectivity in healthy human subjects. First, we find the number and diversity of motifs in a network to be strongly correlated. Second, comparing different scales, the number and diversity of motifs varied across the temporal (subject age) and spatial (network resolution) scale: certain motifs might only occur at one spatial scale or for a certain age range. Third, regions of interest which show one motif at a lower resolution may show a range of motifs at a higher resolution which may or may not include the original motif at the lower resolution. Therefore, both the type and localization of motifs differ for different spatial resolutions. Our results also indicate that spatial resolution has a higher effect on topological measures whereas spatial measures, based on fiber lengths, remain more comparable between resolutions. Therefore, spatial resolution is crucial when comparing characteristic node fingerprints given by topological and spatial network features. As node motifs are based on topological and spatial properties of brain connectivity networks, these conclusions are also relevant to other studies using connectome analysis. PMID:21811454

  19. Factor structure and construct validity of the temporal experience of pleasure scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Paul M; Cooper, Andrew J; Hall, Phillip J; Smillie, Luke D

    2015-01-01

    Feelings of pleasure felt in the moment of goal attainment (consummatory pleasure) are thought to be dissociable from feelings of desire connected with the motivated approach of goals (anticipatory pleasure). The Temporal Experience of Pleasure Scales (TEPS; Gard, Gard, Kring, & John, 2006) was developed to assess individual differences in these distinct processes. Recently, an independent evaluation of the psychometric characteristics of a Chinese-translated TEPS suggested a more complex factor structure (Chan et al., 2012). This study aimed to reexamine the factor structure and convergent and divergent validity of the TEPS in two previously unexamined multiethnic samples. University students in the United Kingdom (N = 294) completed the TEPS and university students in Australia (N = 295) completed the TEPS as well as a battery of conceptually related questionnaires. A confirmatory factor analysis of Gard et al.'s (2006) 2-factor model produced inadequate fit, which model-modification indexes suggested might be due to item cross-loadings. This issue was examined further using an exploratory factor analysis, which revealed a clear 2-factor solution despite cross-loadings among some items. Finally, mixed evidence for convergent-divergent validity was obtained, in terms of relationships between the TEPS and measures of anhedonia, approach-motivation, and positive emotion.

  20. Detecting Changes in Forest Structure over Time with Bi-Temporal Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Melkas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Changes to stems caused by natural forces and timber harvesting constitute an essential input for many forestry-related applications and ecological studies, especially forestry inventories based on the use of permanent sample plots. Conventional field measurement is widely acknowledged as being time-consuming and labor-intensive. More automated and efficient alternatives or supportive methods are needed. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS has been demonstrated to be a promising method in forestry field inventories. Nevertheless, the applicability of TLS in recording changes in the structure of forest plots has not been studied in detail. This paper presents a fully automated method for detecting changes in forest structure over time using bi-temporal TLS data. The developed method was tested on five densely populated forest plots including 137 trees and 50 harvested trees in point clouds. The present study demonstrated that 90 percent of tree stem changes could be automatically located from single-scan TLS data. These changes accounted for 92 percent of the changed basal area. The results indicate that the processing of TLS data collected at different times to detect tree stem changes can be fully automated.

  1. A longitudinal genetic survey identifies temporal shifts in the population structure of Dutch house sparrows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousseau, L; Husemann, M; Foppen, R; Vangestel, C; Lens, L

    2016-10-01

    Dutch house sparrow (Passer domesticus) densities dropped by nearly 50% since the early 1980s, and similar collapses in population sizes have been reported across Europe. Whether, and to what extent, such relatively recent demographic changes are accompanied by concomitant shifts in the genetic population structure of this species needs further investigation. Therefore, we here explore temporal shifts in genetic diversity, genetic structure and effective sizes of seven Dutch house sparrow populations. To allow the most powerful statistical inference, historical populations were resampled at identical locations and each individual bird was genotyped using nine polymorphic microsatellites. Although the demographic history was not reflected by a reduction in genetic diversity, levels of genetic differentiation increased over time, and the original, panmictic population (inferred from the museum samples) diverged into two distinct genetic clusters. Reductions in census size were supported by a substantial reduction in effective population size, although to a smaller extent. As most studies of contemporary house sparrow populations have been unable to identify genetic signatures of recent population declines, results of this study underpin the importance of longitudinal genetic surveys to unravel cryptic genetic patterns.

  2. Spatio-temporal structure and cycle to cycle variations of an in-cylinder tumbling flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voisine, M. [RENAULT s.a.s., Fluid Engine Department, Lardy (France); Universite de Poitiers, Institut Pprime Department, FTC, CNRS, ENSMA, Teleport 2, 1 Avenue Clement Ader, BP 40109, Futuroscope Chasseneuil (France); Thomas, L.; Boree, J. [Universite de Poitiers, Institut Pprime Department, FTC, CNRS, ENSMA, Teleport 2, 1 Avenue Clement Ader, BP 40109, Futuroscope Chasseneuil (France); Rey, P. [RENAULT s.a.s., Fluid Engine Department, Lardy (France)

    2011-05-15

    The aim of this paper is to make use of PIV and high-speed PIV in a research engine of moderate tumbling ratio in order to analyze both the spatial structure of the flow and its temporal evolution during series of consecutive cycles. Appropriate analyzing tools are introduced, and four different points are addressed: (1) the chain of events driving the generation of the three-dimensional mean tumbling motion is investigated; (2) a Lagrangian analysis of the roll-up of the tumbling jet in individual cycles demonstrates a strong cycle to cycle variation during the compression phase (the rms of the position of the jet front being approximately 10% of the piston stroke); (3) focussing on the ''breakdown'' phase, phase invariant proper orthogonal decomposition enables us to distinguish cycles according to their structure near top dead center (TDC). We show that when the coherent energy of the flow is conserved, there is no increase in the fluctuating kinetic energy; (4) finally, the phase-averaged Reynolds stresses is decomposed into a contribution of the in-cycle coherence and the turbulence carried by the flow states. Approximately 30% of the fluctuating kinetic energy is due to cycle to cycle fluctuations in this chamber near TDC. (orig.)

  3. Microgeographical population structure and adaptation in Atlantic cod Gadus morhua: spatio-temporal insights from gene-associated DNA markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Nina Aagaard; Hemmer-Hansen, Jakob; Loeschcke, V.

    2011-01-01

    populations, indicating long-term temporal adaptive stability driven by strong local selection. In an environmentally dynamic area, on the other hand, patterns of genetic structuring were more variable. Overall, our results not only suggest separation of populations under both evolutionary and ecological...... paradigms, but also illustrate the usefulness of the spatio-temporal approach for making inferences about the dynamics and geographical distribution of adaptive genetic variation in natural populations.......Recent technical advances have stimulated studies on spatial scales of adaptive genetic variation in marine fishes. However, very few studies have combined spatial and temporal sampling to investigate adaptive genetic structuring at local and microgeographical scales, i.e. scales at which neutral...

  4. Development of a sub-cm high resolution ion Doppler tomography diagnostics for fine structure measurement of guide field reconnection in TS-U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Hiroshi; Koike, Hideya; Hatano, Hironori; Hayashi, Takumi; Cao, Qinghong; Himeno, Shunichi; Kaneda, Taishi; Akimitsu, Moe; Sawada, Asuka; Ono, Yasushi

    2017-10-01

    A new type of high-throughput/high-resolution 96CH ion Doppler tomography diagnostics has been developed using ``multi-slit'' spectroscopy technique for detailed investigation of fine structure formation during high guide field magnetic reconnection. In the last three years, high field merging experiment in MAST pioneered new frontiers of reconnection heating: formation of highly peaked structure around X-point in high guide field condition (Bt > 0.3 T), outflow dissipation under the influence of better plasma confinement to form high temperature ring structure which aligns with closed flux surface of toroidal plasma, and interaction between ion and electron temperature profile during transport/confinement phase to form triple peak structure (τeiE 4 ms). To investigate more detailed mechanism with in-situ magnetic measurement, the university of Tokyo starts the upgrade of plasma parameters and spatial resolution of optical diagnostics as in MAST. Now, a new type of high-throughput/high-resolution 96CH ion Doppler tomography diagnostics system construction has been completed and it successfully resolved fine structure of ion heating downstream, aligned with closed flux surface formed by reconnected field. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Numbers 15H05750, 15K14279 and 17H04863.

  5. Disrupted Structural and Functional Networks and Their Correlation with Alertness in Right Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: A Graph Theory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wenyu; Li, Jianping; Chen, Xuemei; Ye, Wei; Zheng, Jinou

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) involves abnormal structural or functional connectivity in specific brain areas. However, limited comprehensive studies have been conducted on TLE associated changes in the topological organization of structural and functional networks. Additionally, epilepsy is associated with impairment in alertness, a fundamental component of attention. In this study, structural networks were constructed using diffusion tensor imaging tractography, and functional networks were obtained from resting-state functional MRI temporal series correlations in 20 right temporal lobe epilepsy (rTLE) patients and 19 healthy controls. Global network properties were computed by graph theoretical analysis, and correlations were assessed between global network properties and alertness. The results from these analyses showed that rTLE patients exhibit abnormal small-world attributes in structural and functional networks. Structural networks shifted toward more regular attributes, but functional networks trended toward more random attributes. After controlling for the influence of the disease duration, negative correlations were found between alertness, small-worldness, and the cluster coefficient. However, alertness did not correlate with either the characteristic path length or global efficiency in rTLE patients. Our findings show that disruptions of the topological construction of brain structural and functional networks as well as small-world property bias are associated with deficits in alertness in rTLE patients. These data suggest that reorganization of brain networks develops as a mechanism to compensate for altered structural and functional brain function during disease progression.

  6. Disrupted Structural and Functional Networks and Their Correlation with Alertness in Right Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: A Graph Theory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyu Jiang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE involves abnormal structural or functional connectivity in specific brain areas. However, limited comprehensive studies have been conducted on TLE associated changes in the topological organization of structural and functional networks. Additionally, epilepsy is associated with impairment in alertness, a fundamental component of attention. In this study, structural networks were constructed using diffusion tensor imaging tractography, and functional networks were obtained from resting-state functional MRI temporal series correlations in 20 right temporal lobe epilepsy (rTLE patients and 19 healthy controls. Global network properties were computed by graph theoretical analysis, and correlations were assessed between global network properties and alertness. The results from these analyses showed that rTLE patients exhibit abnormal small-world attributes in structural and functional networks. Structural networks shifted toward more regular attributes, but functional networks trended toward more random attributes. After controlling for the influence of the disease duration, negative correlations were found between alertness, small-worldness, and the cluster coefficient. However, alertness did not correlate with either the characteristic path length or global efficiency in rTLE patients. Our findings show that disruptions of the topological construction of brain structural and functional networks as well as small-world property bias are associated with deficits in alertness in rTLE patients. These data suggest that reorganization of brain networks develops as a mechanism to compensate for altered structural and functional brain function during disease progression.

  7. Influence of Game Evolution and the Phase of Competition on Temporal Game Structure in High-Level Table Tennis Tournaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Jorge Vieira de Mello; Barbieri, Fabio Augusto; Miyagi, Willian; Malta, Elvis de Souza; Zagatto, Alessandro Moura

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were: a) to investigate the game temporal structure in high-level table tennis competitions; b) to verify the influence of game evolution in international competitions from 2009 to 2012 (World Table Tennis Championships and the Olympic Games) on game temporal structure; c) to compare game temporal structure according to the phase of competition. Comparisons between the three international tournaments demonstrated that rally duration decreased significantly (p < 0.05) during the analyzed period (2009-2012), while the rest time increased (p < 0.05) from 2009 to 2011, but decreased (p < 0.05) from 2011 to 2012. In the competition phase analysis, it was found that rally duration decreased (p < 0.05) in the quarterfinals in relation to the semifinals and finals, while the rest time increased (p < 0.05) from the quarterfinals to semifinals and finals. Based on our findings and previous literature, we concluded that the performance level, game evolution and the competition phase influenced the game temporal structure of table tennis, considering longer rest periods adopted by elite athletes in relation to non-elite athletes, the reduction in rally duration and an increase in rest time over the 2009-2012 period and through the competition phases (quarterfinals to finals).

  8. Influence of Game Evolution and the Phase of Competition on Temporal Game Structure in High-Level Table Tennis Tournaments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leite Jorge Vieira de Mello

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were: a to investigate the game temporal structure in high-level table tennis competitions; b to verify the influence of game evolution in international competitions from 2009 to 2012 (World Table Tennis Championships and the Olympic Games on game temporal structure; c to compare game temporal structure according to the phase of competition. Comparisons between the three international tournaments demonstrated that rally duration decreased significantly (p < 0.05 during the analyzed period (2009-2012, while the rest time increased (p < 0.05 from 2009 to 2011, but decreased (p < 0.05 from 2011 to 2012. In the competition phase analysis, it was found that rally duration decreased (p < 0.05 in the quarterfinals in relation to the semifinals and finals, while the rest time increased (p < 0.05 from the quarterfinals to semifinals and finals. Based on our findings and previous literature, we concluded that the performance level, game evolution and the competition phase influenced the game temporal structure of table tennis, considering longer rest periods adopted by elite athletes in relation to non-elite athletes, the reduction in rally duration and an increase in rest time over the 2009-2012 period and through the competition phases (quarterfinals to finals.

  9. Marine archaeal community structure from Potter Cove, Antarctica : high temporal and spatial dominance of the phylum Thaumarchaeota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernandez, Edgardo A; Piquet, Anouk M.-T.; Lopez, Jose L; Buma, Anita; Mac Cormack, Walter P

    Archaeal communities represent a significant fraction of the Antarctic marine microbial plankton and surely play a relevant role in the proper functioning of the ecosystem. We studied the archaeal community structure in surface water samples from Potter Cove, Antarctica. Temporal and spatial

  10. The temporal structures and functional significance of scale-free brain activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Biyu J; Zempel, John M; Snyder, Abraham Z; Raichle, Marcus E

    2010-05-13

    Scale-free dynamics, with a power spectrum following P proportional to f(-beta), are an intrinsic feature of many complex processes in nature. In neural systems, scale-free activity is often neglected in electrophysiological research. Here, we investigate scale-free dynamics in human brain and show that it contains extensive nested frequencies, with the phase of lower frequencies modulating the amplitude of higher frequencies in an upward progression across the frequency spectrum. The functional significance of scale-free brain activity is indicated by task performance modulation and regional variation, with beta being larger in default network and visual cortex and smaller in hippocampus and cerebellum. The precise patterns of nested frequencies in the brain differ from other scale-free dynamics in nature, such as earth seismic waves and stock market fluctuations, suggesting system-specific generative mechanisms. Our findings reveal robust temporal structures and behavioral significance of scale-free brain activity and should motivate future study on its physiological mechanisms and cognitive implications. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Structure and temporal variation of the phytoplankton of a macrotidal beach from the Amazon coastal zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JISLENE B. MATOS

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The present study aimed to analyze the structure and the temporal variation of the phytoplankton of Ajuruteua beach (Bragança, Pará and to investigate the influence of environmental variables on the dynamics of this community to provide a basis about the trophic state of this environment. Biological, hydrological and hydrodynamic samplings were performed during a nyctemeral cycle in the months of November/08, March/09, June/09 and September/09. We identified 110 taxa, which were distributed among the diatoms (87.3%, dinoflagellates (11.8% and cyanobacteria (0.9%, with the predominance of neritic species, followed by the tychoplankton species. Chlorophyll-a concentrations were the highest during the rainy period (24.5 mg m-3, whereas total phytoplankton density was higher in the dry period (1,255 x 103 cell L-1. However, phytoflagellates density was significantly higher during the rainy period. Cluster Analysis revealed the formation of four groups, which were influenced by the monthly differences in the environmental variables. The Principal Component Analysis indicated salinity and chlorophyll-a as the main variables that explained the components. Spearman correlation analysis supported the influence of these variables on the local phytoplankton community. Overall, the results obtained suggest that rainfall and strong local hydrodynamics play an important role in the dynamic of the phytoplankton of Ajuruteua beach, by influencing both environmental and biological variables.

  12. Instability mechanisms of water in oil nanoemulsions with phospholipids: temporal and morphological structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerling, Jan-Hendrik; de Matos, Maria Betania Carreira; Hildebrandt, Ellen; Dessy, Alberto; Kok, Robbert J; Nirschl, Hermann; Leneweit, Gero

    2017-12-08

    Many food preparations, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics use water in oil (W/O) emulsions stabilized by phospholipids. Moreover, recent technological developments try to produce liposomes or lipid coated capsules from W/O emulsions, but are faced with colloidal instabilities. To explore these instability mechanisms, emulsification by sonication was applied in three cycles and the sample stability was studied for 3 hours after each cycle. Clearly identifiable temporal structures of instability provide evidence about the emulsion morphology: an initial regime of about 10 minutes is shown to be governed by coalescence after which Ostwald ripening dominates. Transport via molecular diffusion in Ostwald ripening is commonly based on the mutual solubility of the two phases and is therefore prohibited in emulsions composed of immiscible phases. However, in the case of water in oil emulsified by phospholipids these form water-loaded reverse micelles in oil which enable Ostwald ripening despite the low solubility of water in oil as is shown for squalene. As is proved for the phospholipid dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), concentrations below the critical aggregation concentration (CAC) form monolayers at the interfaces and smaller droplet sizes. In contrast, phospholipid concentrations above CAC create complex multilayers at the interface with larger droplet sizes. The key factors for stable W/O emulsions in classical or innovative applications are: first, the minimization of the phospholipids' capacity to form reversed micelles; and second the adaption of the initial phospholipid concentration to the water content to enable an optimized coverage of phospholipids at the interfaces for the intended drop size.

  13. Vegetation structure and greenness in Central Africa from Modis multi-temporal data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gond, Valéry; Fayolle, Adeline; Pennec, Alexandre; Cornu, Guillaume; Mayaux, Philippe; Camberlin, Pierre; Doumenge, Charles; Fauvet, Nicolas; Gourlet-Fleury, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    African forests within the Congo Basin are generally mapped at a regional scale as broad-leaved evergreen forests, with the main distinction being between terra-firme and swamp forest types. At the same time, commercial forest inventories, as well as national maps, have highlighted a strong spatial heterogeneity of forest types. A detailed vegetation map generated using consistent methods is needed to inform decision makers about spatial forest organization and their relationships with environmental drivers in the context of global change. We propose a multi-temporal remotely sensed data approach to characterize vegetation types using vegetation index annual profiles. The classifications identified 22 vegetation types (six savannas, two swamp forests, 14 forest types) improving existing vegetation maps. Among forest types, we showed strong variations in stand structure and deciduousness, identifying (i) two blocks of dense evergreen forests located in the western part of the study area and in the central part on sandy soils; (ii) semi-deciduous forests are located in the Sangha River interval which has experienced past fragmentation and human activities. For all vegetation types enhanced vegetation index profiles were highly seasonal and strongly correlated to rainfall and to a lesser extent, to light regimes. These results are of importance to predict spatial variations of carbon stocks and fluxes, because evergreen/deciduous forests (i) have contrasted annual dynamics of photosynthetic activity and foliar water content and (ii) differ in community dynamics and ecosystem processes.

  14. Structural connectivity of the human anterior temporal lobe: a diffusion magnetic resonance imaging study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papinutto, Nico; Galantucci, Sebastiano; Mandelli, Maria Luisa; Gesierich, Benno; Jovicich, Jorge; Caverzasi, Eduardo; Henry, Roland G.; Seeley, William W.; Miller, Bruce L.; Shapiro, Kevin A.; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa

    2016-01-01

    The anterior temporal lobes (ATL) have been implicated in a range of cognitive functions including auditory and visual perception, language, semantic knowledge, and social-emotional processing. However, the anatomical relationships between the ATLs and the broader cortical networks that subserve these functions have not been fully elucidated. Using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and probabilistic tractography, we tested the hypothesis that functional segregation of information in the ATLs is reflected by distinct patterns of structural connectivity to regions outside the ATLs. We performed a parcellation of the ATLs bilaterally based on the degree of connectivity of each voxel with eight ipsilateral target regions known to be involved in various cognitive networks. Six discrete segments within each ATL showed preferential connectivity to one of the ipsilateral target regions, via four major fiber tracts (the uncinate, inferior longitudinal, middle longitudinal, and arcuate fasciculi). Two noteworthy interhemispheric differences were observed: connections between the ATL and orbito-frontal areas were stronger in the right hemisphere, while the consistency of the connection between the ATL and the inferior frontal gyrus through the arcuate fasciculus was greater in the left hemisphere. Our findings support the hypothesis that distinct regions within the ATLs have anatomical connections to different cognitive networks. PMID:26945805

  15. Temporal change in the electromechanical properties of dielectric elastomer minimum energy structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchberger, G., E-mail: erda.buchberger@jku.at; Hauser, B.; Jakoby, B.; Hilber, W. [Institute for Microelectronics and Microsensors, Johannes Kepler University Linz, 4040 Linz (Austria); Schoeftner, J. [Institute of Technical Mechanics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, 4040 Linz (Austria); Bauer, S. [Department of Soft Matter Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, 4040 Linz (Austria)

    2014-06-07

    Dielectric elastomer minimum energy structures (DEMES) are soft electronic transducers and energy harvesters with potential for consumer goods. The temporal change in their electromechanical properties is of major importance for engineering tasks. Therefore, we study acrylic DEMES by impedance spectroscopy and by optical methods for a total time period of approx. 4.5 months. We apply either compliant electrodes from carbon black particles only or fluid electrodes from a mixture of carbon black particles and silicone oil. From the measurement data, the equivalent series capacitances and resistances as well as the bending angles of the transducers are obtained. We find that the equivalent series capacitances change in average between −12 %/1000 h and −4.0 %/1000 h, while the bending angles decrease linearly with slopes ranging from −15 %/1000 h to −7 %/1000 h. Transducers with high initial bending angles and electrodes from carbon black particles show the smallest changes of the electromechanical characteristics. The capacitances decrease faster for DEMES with fluid electrodes. Some DEMES of this type reveal huge and unpredictable fluctuations of the resistances over time due to the ageing of the contacts. Design guidelines for DEMES follow directly from the observed transient changes of their electromechanical performance.

  16. TEMPORAL VARIATION IN THE RED GROUPER, EPINEPHELUS MORIO, DEMOGRAPHIC STRUCTURE FROM SOUTHERN GULF OF MEXICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doralice Caballero-Arango

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the demographic structure of red grouper Epinephelus morio from the southern part of the Gulf of Mexico, were evaluated during periods when total catches, CPUE and annual yields of the specie decreased. Fishery-dependent samples (n = 1887 were obtained between August 1989 and February 2004 from the Campeche Bank, and size-frequency distributions by sex, sex ratios and sizes of sexual maturation and sex change were compared between three periods: P11989-1992 (n = 886; P21996-1998 (n = 413; and P32003-2004 (n = 588. The temporal stability of size-frequency distribution by sex, with males always being larger than females, and the sex ratios always biased towards females, were consistent with this species’ type of sexuality. Size for females and males, as well as sizes at first sexual maturity and at sex reversal all decreased from the oldest period to the more recent one and could be a consequence of the fishing intensity applied to this stock. The reductions in size of females and males associated with a relatively stable sex ratio and the lack of any drastic decrease in the number of males can be explained by this species’ reproductive ecology. Results are discussed regarding the capacity for reproductive resilience of red grouper in response to fishing pressure like that currently experienced by the Campeche Bank stock.

  17. Zooplankton community structure along a pollution gradient at fine geographical scales in river ecosystems: The importance of species sorting over dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wei; Ni, Ping; Chen, Yiyong; Gao, Yangchun; Shan, Baoqing; Zhan, Aibin

    2017-08-01

    The release of anthropogenic pollution into freshwater ecosystems has largely transformed biodiversity and its geographical distribution patterns globally. However, for many communities including ecologically crucial ones such as zooplankton, it is largely unknown how different communities respond to environmental pollution. Collectively, dispersal and species sorting are two competing processes in determining the structure and geographical distribution of zooplankton communities in running water ecosystems such as rivers. At fine geographical scales, dispersal is usually considered as the dominant factor; however, the relative role of species sorting has not been evaluated well, mainly because significant environmental gradients rarely exist along continuously flowing rivers. The Chaobai River in northern China represents a rare system, where a significant environmental gradient exists at fine scales. Here, we employed high-throughput sequencing to characterize complex zooplankton communities collected from the Chaobai River, and tested the relative roles of dispersal and species sorting in determining zooplankton community structure along the pollution gradient. Our results showed distinct patterns of zooplankton communities along the environmental gradient, and chemical pollutant-related factors such as total phosphorus and chlorophyll-a were identified as the major drivers for the observed patterns. Further partial redundancy analyses showed that species sorting overrode the effect of dispersal to shape local zooplankton community structure. Thus, our results reject the dispersal hypothesis and support the concept that species sorting caused by local pollution can largely determine the zooplankton community structure when significant environmental gradients exist at fine geographical scales in highly polluted running water ecosystems. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Surface Structure and Chemical Switching of Thioctic Acid Adsorbed on Au(111) as Observed Using Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meulenberg, R W; van Buuren, T; Vance, A L; Terminello, L J; Willey, T M; Bostedt, C; Fadley, C S

    2004-01-06

    Thioctic acid (alpha-lipoic acid) is a molecule with a large disulfide-containing base, a short alkyl-chain with four CH{sub 2} units, and a carboxyl termination. Self-assembled monolayer (SAM) films of thioctic acid adsorbed on Au(111) have been investigated with near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to determine film quality, bonding and morphology. Using standard preparation protocols for SAMs, that is, dissolving thioctic acid in ethanol and exposing gold to the solution, results in poor films. These films are highly disordered, contain a mixture of carboxyl and carboxylate terminations, have more than monolayer coverage, and exhibit unbound disulfide. Conversely, forming films by dissolving 1 mmol thioctic acid into 5% acetic acid in ethanol (as previously reported with carboxyl-terminated alkyl-thiols) forms ordered monolayers with small amounts of unbound sulfur. NEXAFS indicates tilted over endgroups with the carboxyl group normal on average 38{sup o} from the surface normal. Slight dichroism in other features indicates alkyl chains statistically more upright than prostrate on the surface. Reflection-absorption Fourier transform infrared (RA-FTIR) spectra indicate hydrogen bonding between neighboring molecules. In such well-formed monolayers, a stark reorientation occurs upon deprotonation of the endgroup by rinsing in a KOH solution. The carboxylate plane normal is now about 66{sup o} from sample normal, a much more upright orientation. Data indicate this reorientation may also cause a more upright orientation to the alkyl portion of the molecules.

  19. Fast two-snapshot structured illumination for temporal focusing microscopy with enhanced axial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yunlong; Lin, Wei; Li, Chenglin; Chen, Shih-Chi

    2017-09-18

    We present a new two-snapshot structured light illumination (SLI) reconstruction algorithm for fast image acquisition. The new algorithm, which only requires two mutually π phase-shifted raw structured images, is implemented on a custom-built temporal focusing fluorescence microscope (TFFM) to enhance its axial resolution via a digital micromirror device (DMD). First, the orientation of the modulated sinusoidal fringe patterns is automatically identified via spatial frequency vector detection. Subsequently, the modulated in-focal-plane images are obtained via rotation and subtraction. Lastly, a parallel amplitude demodulation method, derived based on Hilbert transform, is applied to complete the decoding processes. To demonstrate the new SLI algorithm, a TFFM is custom-constructed, where a DMD replaces the generic blazed grating in the system and simultaneously functions as a diffraction grating and a programmable binary mask, generating arbitrary fringe patterns. The experimental results show promising depth-discrimination capability with an axial resolution enhancement factor of 1.25, which matches well with the theoretical estimation, i.e, 1.27. Imaging experiments on pollen grain and mouse kidney samples have been performed. The results indicate that the two-snapshot algorithm presents comparable contrast reconstruction and optical cross-sectioning capability than those adopting the conventional root-mean-square (RMS) reconstruction method. The two-snapshot method can be readily applied to any sinusoidally modulated illumination systems to realize high-speed 3D imaging as less frames are required for each in-focal-plane image restoration, i.e., the image acquisition speed is improved by 2.5 times for any two-photon systems.

  20. Effects of a structured midsole on spatio-temporal variables and running economy in overground running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunsch, Tobias; Kröll, Josef; Stöggl, Thomas; Schwameder, Hermann

    2017-04-01

    Research to enhance running performance has led to the design of a leaf spring-structured midsole shoe (LEAF). In treadmill running, it has been shown that LEAF led to an increased running economy and increased stride length (SL) through a horizontal foot shift during stance compared to a standard foam shoe (FOAM). The purpose of this study was to analyse whether (a) these findings can also be observed in overground running and (b) relations exist between spatio-temporal variables and running economy. Ten male long-distance heel-strike runners ran at their individual 2 mmol/l blood lactate speed with LEAF and FOAM in randomized order. Kinematic data were recorded with an inertial measurement unit synchronized with 2D video. Oxygen consumption was measured using an automated metabolic gas analysis system. Blood lactate was collected after each run. The strike pattern was unaffected by LEAF. SL was increased by 0.9 ± 1.1 cm (95% CI 0.2 to 1.5; p = .040; d z  = 0.76), stride rate (SR) was reduced by -0.4 ± 0.3 strides/min (95% CI -0.6 to -0.1; p = .029; d z  = 0.82) and oxygen consumption tended to be reduced by 1% (-0.4 ± 0.6 ml/min/kg; 95% CI -0.8 to 0.0; p = .082; d z  = 0.62) when running with LEAF compared to FOAM. Changes in oxygen consumption in LEAF were correlated with SL (r = 0.71; p = .022) and SR (r = -0.68; p = .031). It can be concluded that LEAF has the potential to cause small changes in spatio-temporal variables during running. Runners increasing SL and decreasing SR in response to LEAF can achieve small improvements in running economy, which is beneficial in terms of performance.