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Sample records for temporal artery readings

  1. Temporal Processing and Reading Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Share, David L.; Jorm, Anthony F.; Maclean, Rod; Matthews, Russell

    2002-01-01

    Examines the hypothesis that early auditory temporal processing deficits cause later specific reading disability by impairing phonological processing. Suggests that auditory temporal deficits in dyslexics may be associated with dysphasic-type symptoms observed by Tallal and her colleagues in specific language-impaired populations, but do not cause…

  2. Traumatic aneurysm of the superficial temporal artery: case report.

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    Fox, J T; Cordts, P R; Gwinn, B C

    1994-04-01

    Traumatic aneurysms of the temporal artery are uncommon, with less than 200 cases reported in the literature. A case resulting from a head injury from playing a popular new survival game known as "paintball" is presented here. A general review of the literature on traumatic temporal artery aneurysms is provided, as well as information on this new form of recreation and safety recommendations for "paintball" players.

  3. Occipital artery to middle cerebral artery bypass in cases of unavailable superficial temporal artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Tsukasa; Mikami, Takeshi; Suzuki, Hime; Hirano, Toru; Kimura, Yusuke; Komatsu, Katusya; Akiyama, Yukinori; Wanibuchi, Masahiko; Mikuni, Nobuhiro

    2018-01-22

    In neurosurgery, extracranial-to-intracranial (EC-IC) bypass surgery is necessary for patients who have undergone surgery in which the superficial temporal artery (STA) was already used for a different bypass procedure or was damaged. Here, we report our experience with EC-IC bypass using the occipital artery (OA) in cases in which the STA is unavailable, and discuss the technical considerations and pitfalls. Five patients with ischemic-onset moyamoya disease and atherosclerotic disease were included. Two patterns of skin incisions were planned according to the OA pathway and recipient artery location. In one method, a skin incision is made above the OA and a craniotomy is performed under this incision after OA dissection. In the other method, a skin incision is made above the OA to enable its dissection and a craniotomy is performed via a separate skin incision. No major perioperative complications developed in any of the five cases, and bypass patency was confirmed in all patients. There was a significant difference between the pre- and postoperative asymmetry ratio of the mean transit time values. OA-to- middle cerebral artery (MCA) bypass is a simple and effective method in patients in whom the STA was already used or was damaged by previous intracranial revascularization or a craniotomy. This procedure could be an alternative to STA-MCA bypass in patients without an available STA. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Associations Between Spatial and Temporal Contrast Sensitivity and Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brussee, Tamara; van den Berg, Thomas J T P; van Nispen, Ruth M A; van Rens, Ger H M B

    2017-03-01

    To gain insight into the association between optical and neural components of contrast sensitivity (CS), operationalized as spatial CS (optical and neural) or temporal CS (solely neural), and reading speed in a clinical sample of healthy adults of various ages. Furthermore, precision and agreement of the two methods were assessed. The Mars test and the temporal CS implementation of the C-Quant device were used to measure spatial CS and temporal CS, respectively. Tests were performed with 71 normally sighted adults: mean age 55 (range 18-86) years. Pearson's correlation analyses were performed between spatial CS or temporal CS, and reading speed and partial correlations controlled for age are presented. Precision of the measurement was defined by the coefficient of repeatability and repeated measures standard deviations. Differences between spatial CS and temporal CS values were determined with 95% limits of agreement. A correlation was found between reading speed and both spatial CS (r = 0.470; P reading speed indicating that, besides optical components, neural aspects may be important in defining reading speed. The stronger correlation between spatial CS and reading speed is suggested to reflect a deterioration of both optical and neural factors with increasing age. The coefficients of repeatability for spatial CS and temporal CS found in the present study are in agreement with previous research, and the difference found between the two methods might be attributed to the psychometric differences between the methods.

  5. Reading in children with temporal lobe epilepsy: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lah, Suncica; Castles, Anne; Smith, Mary Lou

    2017-03-01

    Children with epilepsy have higher rates of reading difficulties compared to the general population. Reading difficulties are associated with lower academic attainments, higher school drop-out rates, greater risk of unemployment, lower income, and poorer adjustment. We examined the literature dealing with reading in children with the most common type of focal epilepsy, temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), in relation to: presence of reading difficulties, contributing factors, and efficacy of treatments for reading difficulties. We searched databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and PubMed) for studies published before September 2016. Included studies (i) reported on a group of children with TLE, (ii) used a standardized reading test or included a control group, (iii) involved original research published in peer reviewed journals in the English language. Of 2018 citations obtained through literature searches, six met inclusion criteria. Reading accuracy and/or reading comprehension were assessed using different tests. All but one study found statistical evidence of reading difficulties in children with TLE. Only two studies examined relations between cognitive deficits and reading. One found that memory contributed to reading accuracy and comprehension. Another found evidence of a small decline in reading accuracy, which was not associated with a decline in memory post-surgery. Several studies were underpowered, giving false negative findings and not allowing relations between epilepsy factors, underlying cognitive deficits, and reading to be adequately examined. No study examined efficacy of reading intervention in this patient population. We showed that reading difficulties that are present in children with TLE are under researched, yet they have significant functional consequences through childhood and into adulthood. There is an urgent need to identify risk factors and investigate efficacy of treatments for reading difficulties in children with TLE, as this will enable

  6. Reading without the left ventral occipito-temporal cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seghier, Mohamed L.; Neufeld, Nicholas H.; Zeidman, Peter; Leff, Alex P.; Mechelli, Andrea; Nagendran, Arjuna; Riddoch, Jane M.; Humphreys, Glyn W.; Price, Cathy J.

    2012-01-01

    The left ventral occipito-temporal cortex (LvOT) is thought to be essential for the rapid parallel letter processing that is required for skilled reading. Here we investigate whether rapid written word identification in skilled readers can be supported by neural pathways that do not involve LvOT. Hypotheses were derived from a stroke patient who acquired dyslexia following extensive LvOT damage. The patient followed a reading trajectory typical of that associated with pure alexia, re-gaining the ability to read aloud many words with declining performance as the length of words increased. Using functional MRI and dynamic causal modelling (DCM), we found that, when short (three to five letter) familiar words were read successfully, visual inputs to the patient’s occipital cortex were connected to left motor and premotor regions via activity in a central part of the left superior temporal sulcus (STS). The patient analysis therefore implied a left hemisphere “reading-without-LvOT” pathway that involved STS. We then investigated whether the same reading-without-LvOT pathway could be identified in 29 skilled readers and whether there was inter-subject variability in the degree to which skilled reading engaged LvOT. We found that functional connectivity in the reading-without-LvOT pathway was strongest in individuals who had the weakest functional connectivity in the LvOT pathway. This observation validates the findings of our patient’s case study. Our findings highlight the contribution of a left hemisphere reading pathway that is activated during the rapid identification of short familiar written words, particularly when LvOT is not involved. Preservation and use of this pathway may explain how patients are still able to read short words accurately when LvOT has been damaged. PMID:23017598

  7. Reading without the left ventral occipito-temporal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seghier, Mohamed L; Neufeld, Nicholas H; Zeidman, Peter; Leff, Alex P; Mechelli, Andrea; Nagendran, Arjuna; Riddoch, Jane M; Humphreys, Glyn W; Price, Cathy J

    2012-12-01

    The left ventral occipito-temporal cortex (LvOT) is thought to be essential for the rapid parallel letter processing that is required for skilled reading. Here we investigate whether rapid written word identification in skilled readers can be supported by neural pathways that do not involve LvOT. Hypotheses were derived from a stroke patient who acquired dyslexia following extensive LvOT damage. The patient followed a reading trajectory typical of that associated with pure alexia, re-gaining the ability to read aloud many words with declining performance as the length of words increased. Using functional MRI and dynamic causal modelling (DCM), we found that, when short (three to five letter) familiar words were read successfully, visual inputs to the patient's occipital cortex were connected to left motor and premotor regions via activity in a central part of the left superior temporal sulcus (STS). The patient analysis therefore implied a left hemisphere "reading-without-LvOT" pathway that involved STS. We then investigated whether the same reading-without-LvOT pathway could be identified in 29 skilled readers and whether there was inter-subject variability in the degree to which skilled reading engaged LvOT. We found that functional connectivity in the reading-without-LvOT pathway was strongest in individuals who had the weakest functional connectivity in the LvOT pathway. This observation validates the findings of our patient's case study. Our findings highlight the contribution of a left hemisphere reading pathway that is activated during the rapid identification of short familiar written words, particularly when LvOT is not involved. Preservation and use of this pathway may explain how patients are still able to read short words accurately when LvOT has been damaged. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Higher magnification microsurgical repair of donor artery dissection in superficial temporal artery to middle cerebral artery anastomosis--technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Nobuhisa; Shibata, Takashi; Kamiyama, Hironaga; Tomita, Takahiro; Okamoto, Soushi; Kubo, Michiya; Horie, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    Donor artery dissection is a known cause of technical failure in microvascular anastomosis. A method for detection and direct repair of donor artery dissection before superficial temporal artery (STA) to middle cerebral artery (MCA) anastomosis is described using a high magnification operating microscope (maximum 50.4× magnification). Before STA-MCA anastomosis, the stump of the STA is stained using methylrosaniline chloride (pyoctaninum blue) and is observed under higher magnifications. Microsurgical suturing of the arterial dissection is performed before the anastomosis procedure under the high magnification microscope. This method was used in two patients with symptomatic hemodynamic cerebrovascular occlusive disease. Postoperative angiography revealed good patency and no complications occurred. This method may be useful for detection and direct repair of arterial dissection in small vessel walls before STA-MCA anastomosis.

  9. Associations Between Spatial and Temporal Contrast Sensitivity and Reading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brussee, Tamara; van den Berg, Thomas J T P; van Nispen, Ruth M A; van Rens, Ger H M B

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To gain insight into the association between optical and neural components of contrast sensitivity (CS), operationalized as spatial CS (optical and neural) or temporal CS (solely neural), and reading speed in a clinical sample of healthy adults of various ages. Furthermore, precision and

  10. Treatment for Alexia With Agraphia Following Left Ventral Occipito-Temporal Damage: Strengthening Orthographic Representations Common to Reading and Spelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rising, Kindle; Rapcsak, Steven Z.; Beeson, Pélagie M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Damage to left ventral occipito-temporal cortex can give rise to written language impairment characterized by pure alexia/letter-by-letter (LBL) reading, as well as surface alexia and agraphia. The purpose of this study was to examine the therapeutic effects of a combined treatment approach to address concurrent LBL reading with surface alexia/agraphia. Method Simultaneous treatment to address slow reading and errorful spelling was administered to 3 individuals with reading and spelling impairments after left ventral occipito-temporal damage due to posterior cerebral artery stroke. Single-word reading/spelling accuracy, reading latencies, and text reading were monitored as outcome measures for the combined effects of multiple oral re-reading treatment and interactive spelling treatment. Results After treatment, participants demonstrated faster and more accurate single-word reading and improved text-reading rates. Spelling accuracy also improved, particularly for untrained irregular words, demonstrating generalization of the trained interactive spelling strategy. Conclusion This case series characterizes concomitant LBL with surface alexia/agraphia and demonstrates a successful treatment approach to address both the reading and spelling impairment. PMID:26110814

  11. Multiple routes from occipital to temporal cortices during reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Fiona M; Seghier, Mohamed L; Leff, Alex P; Thomas, Michael S C; Price, Cathy J

    2011-06-01

    Contemporary models of the neural system that supports reading propose that activity in a ventral occipitotemporal area (vOT) drives activity in higher-order language areas, for example, those in the posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) and anterior superior temporal sulcus (aSTS). We used fMRI with dynamic causal modeling (DCM) to investigate evidence for other routes from visual cortex to the left temporal lobe language areas. First we identified activations in posterior inferior occipital (iO) and vOT areas that were more activated for silent reading than listening to words and sentences; and in pSTS and aSTS areas that were commonly activated for reading relative to false-fonts and listening to words relative to reversed words. Second, in three different DCM analyses, we tested whether visual processing of words modulates activity from the following: (1) iO→vOT, iO→pSTS, both, or neither; (2) vOT→pSTS, iO→pSTS, both or neither; and (3) pSTS→aSTS, vOT→aSTS, both, or neither. We found that reading words increased connectivity (1) from iO to both pSTS and vOT; (2) to pSTS from both iO and vOT; and (3) to aSTS from both vOT and pSTS. These results highlight three potential processing streams in the occipitotemporal cortex: iO→pSTS→aSTS; iO→vOT→aSTS; and iO→vOT→pSTS→aSTS. We discuss these results in terms of cognitive models of reading and propose that efficient reading relies on the integrity of all these pathways.

  12. Map reading, navigating from maps, and the medial temporal lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urgolites, Zhisen J; Kim, Soyun; Hopkins, Ramona O; Squire, Larry R

    2016-12-13

    We administered map-reading tasks in which participants navigated an array of marks on the floor by following paths on hand-held maps that made up to nine turns. The burden on memory was minimal because the map was always available. Nevertheless, because the map was held in a fixed position in relation to the body, spatial computations were continually needed to transform map coordinates into geographical coordinates as participants followed the maps. Patients with lesions limited to the hippocampus (n = 5) performed similar to controls at all path lengths (experiment 1). They were also intact at executing single moves to an adjacent location, even when trials began by facing in a direction that put the map coordinates and geographical coordinates into conflict (experiment 2). By contrast, one patient with large medial temporal lobe (MTL) lesions performed poorly overall in experiment 1 and poorly in experiment 2 when trials began by facing in the direction that placed the map coordinates and geographical coordinates in maximal conflict. Directly after testing, all patients were impaired at remembering factual details about the task. The findings suggest that the hippocampus is not needed to carry out the spatial computations needed for map reading and navigating from maps. The impairment in map reading associated with large MTL lesions may depend on damage in or near the parahippocampal cortex.

  13. Epithelioid hemangioendothelioma of the temporal artery presenting as temporal arteritis: Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salem Alowami

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Hemangioendotheliomas are classified as epithelioid hemangioendothelioma(EHE, retiform hemangioendothelioma, composite hemanioendothelioma, Kaposiform hemangioendothelioma (with or without Kasabach-Merritt syndrome, and Spindle cell hemangioendothelioma. The latter two types of hemangioendotheliomas usually follow a benign course, in contrast to the other types of hemangioendotheliomas, which are considered as a low grade malignant sarcoma with unpredictable prognosis. EHE's are rare tumors, mostly described in organs particularly the lungs and liver. Though endothelial in origin, EHE's reported to originate from small sized arteries are extremely rare. We report a very rare case of EHE arising from the temporal artery showing a peculiar presentation.

  14. Posterior auricular artery-middle cerebral artery bypass: a rare superficial temporal artery variant with well-developed posterior auricular artery-case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokugawa, Joji; Nakao, Yasuaki; Kudo, Kentaro; Iimura, Koji; Esaki, Takanori; Yamamoto, Takuji; Mori, Kentaro

    2014-01-01

    The posterior auricular artery (PAA) is one of the branches of the external carotid artery, but is usually too small for use as a donor artery for middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory revascularization. An extremely unusual case of PAA-MCA anastomosis was performed in a patient requiring MCA territory revascularization because the superficial temporal artery (STA) parietal branch was absent and the PAA was large enough. A 65-year-old man developed mild motor weakness in the right extremities caused by multiple small infarctions. Single photon emission computed tomography (CT) revealed deterioration of the vascular reserve capacity in the left MCA area. Cerebral angiography showed severe stenosis in the C2 portion of the left internal carotid artery, absence of the parietal branch of the left STA, and a well-developed PAA extending to the parietal area. The patient underwent STA (frontal branch)-MCA and PAA-MCA double anastomosis, and has suffered no stroke or transient ischemic attack. The STA with no bifurcation is known as a rare variation. The PAA also occurs with size variations but well-developed PAA is thought to be extremely rare. PAA can be used as a donor artery for MCA territory revascularization if the vessel size is suitable. Preoperative evaluation of the anatomy is mandatory for harvesting the arteries.

  15. The reading ability of good and poor temporal processors among a group of college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Agnes; Lovegrove, Bill

    2008-05-01

    In this study, we examined whether good auditory and good visual temporal processors were better than their poor counterparts on certain reading measures. Various visual and auditory temporal tasks were administered to 105 undergraduates. They read some phonologically regular pseudowords and irregular words that were presented sequentially in the same ("word" condition) and in different ("line" condition) locations. Results indicated that auditory temporal acuity was more relevant to reading, whereas visual temporal acuity was more relevant to spelling. Good auditory temporal processors did not have the advantage in processing pseudowords, even though pseudoword reading correlated significantly with auditory temporal processing. These results suggested that some higher cognitive or phonological processes mediated the relationship between auditory temporal processing and pseudoword reading. Good visual temporal processors did not have the advantage in processing irregular words. They also did not process the line condition more accurately than the word condition. The discrepancy might be attributed to the use of normal adults and the unnatural reading situation that did not fully capture the function of the visual temporal processes. The distributions of auditory and visual temporal processing abilities were co-occurring to some degree, but they maintained considerable independence. There was also a lack of a relationship between the type and severity of reading deficits and the type and number of temporal deficits.

  16. Intraoperative Evaluation of Reverse Bypass Using a Naturally Formed "Bonnet" Superficial Temporal Artery: Technical Note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagm, Alhusain; Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Hasegawa, Takatoshi; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2016-04-01

    In reverse bypass that used a naturally formed "bonnet" superficial temporal artery, intraoperative volume flow measurement quantifies flow augmentation after revascularization, confirms flow preservation, and identifies inadvertent vessel compromise. A 75-year-old man presented with transient ischemic attacks attributed to right internal carotid artery stenosis. He underwent successful reverse bypass via a naturally formed "bonnet" superficial temporal artery middle cerebral artery bypass. As the result of proper intraoperative volume flow evaluation, a successful reverse bypass was achieved. Modification of the intraoperative stroke risk and prediction of the long-term patency after reverse bypass can be achieved by meticulous intraoperative blood flow evaluation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Anterior temporal artery tap to identify systemic interference using short-separation NIRS measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sood, Mehak; Jindal, Utkarsh; Chowdhury, Shubhajit Roy

    2015-01-01

    that are also affected by tDCS. An approach may be to use short optode separations to measure systemic hemodynamic fluctuations occurring in the superficial layers which can then be used as regressors to remove the systemic contamination. Here, we demonstrate that temporal artery tap may be used to better...... change in the mean rSO2 better correlated with the corresponding percent change in log-transformed mean-power of EEG within 0.5 Hz-11.25 Hz frequency band after removing the systemic contamination using the temporal artery tap method. Based on our findings, we propose that anterior temporal artery tap...

  18. Increased angiotensin II type 1 receptor expression in temporal arteries from patients with giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimitrijevic, Ivan; Malmsjö, Malin; Andersson, Christina

    2009-01-01

    immunohistochemical study of temporal arteries using archival formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue. PARTICIPANTS: Ten patients with GCA and 10 control patients, who were clinically suspected of having GCA but were diagnosed as not having GCA, were included. METHODS: Immunohistochemistry, using anti-AT(1) and anti......-AT(2) antibodies, was performed on formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded temporal arteries. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: AT(1) and AT(2) receptor immunostaining intensity was quantified. RESULTS: Hematoxylin-eosin-stained sections of temporal arteries from patients with GCA showed intimal hyperplasia......, internal elastic lamina degeneration, and band-shaped infiltrates of inflammatory cells, including lymphocytes, histocytes, and multinucleated giant cells. AT(1) receptor staining was primarily observed in the medial layer of the temporal arteries and was higher in the patients with GCA than in the control...

  19. A review of specialties performing temporal artery biopsies in Ontario: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micieli, Jonathan A; Micieli, Robert; Margolin, Edward A

    2015-01-01

    Temporal artery biopsy is the gold standard for the diagnosis of giant cell arteritis, but the numbers and types of surgical specialists performing temporal artery biopsies are unknown. The goal of this study was to determine which surgical specialists performed temporal artery biopsies and how geographic location influenced this trend over a period of 10 years. This retrospective cohort study included all physicians practising in Ontario from 2002 to 2013. Using comprehensive physician services data from the IntelliHEALTH Medical Services database, physicians performing temporal artery biopsies were identified by the Ontario Health Insurance Plan billing code submitted for remuneration. Physicians were categorized by specialty and geographic Local Health Integration Unit. A total of 9958 patients underwent a temporal artery biopsy during the study period: the biopsies were performed by 11 different subspecialties. The number of patients undergoing a temporal artery biopsy declined over the 10-year study period. Most procedures were performed by general surgeons (38.1%), followed by ophthalmologists (31.0%) and plastic surgeons (23.6%). Ophthalmologists performed more temporal artery biopsies per person compared with general surgeons, but significantly more general surgeons performed at least 1 biopsy. There was significant variation based on geographic location: plastic surgeons performed the most biopsies in regions with a population of more than 1 million people, and general surgeons performed most of the biopsies in rural areas. Geographic location heavily influenced which specialty was most likely to perform temporal artery biopsies. General surgery, ophthalmology and plastic surgery emerged as leaders in this area, and their residency programs should include formal training in this procedure in their curricula.

  20. Assymetry of temporal artery diameters during spontaneous attacks of cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thue H; Tfelt-Hansen, Peer; Iversen, Helle K

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cluster headache is characterized by strictly unilateral head pain associated with symptoms of cranial autonomic features. Transcranial Doppler studies showed in most studies a bilateral decreased blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the...... = .67). CONCLUSIONS: What was observed is most likely a general pain-induced arterial vasoconstriction (confer the decrease in diameter on the pain-free side) with an unchanged superficial temporal artery on the pain side because of some vasodilator influence....

  1. Calciphylaxis: Temporal Artery Calcification Preceding Widespread Skin Lesions and Penile Necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manzoor A. Shah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporal artery calciphylaxis has rarely been described in chronic kidney disease patients on dialysis. We report a case of 72-year-old Caucasian man with multiple comorbidities and end-stage renal disease on dialysis who presented with temporal artery calcification leading to bilateral loss of vision followed by extensive skin lesions including one on glans penis. While on peritoneal dialysis, he developed anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, had no improvement on high dose steroids, and temporal artery biopsy showed marked calcification without any evidence of vasculitis. Few weeks later on hemodialysis, he developed widespread cutaneous lesions on extremities and penile necrosis with skin biopsy revealing calciphylaxis. On literature review of calciphylaxis in chronic kidney disease, we found only four cases of temporal artery calciphylaxis leading to anterior ischemic optic neuropathy and blindness. We believe this is the first case in which the rare temporal artery calciphylaxis and the uncommon penile necrosis are being described together. The objective is to emphasize the need to recognize this condition early in the CKD patients on dialysis presenting with visual symptoms as the different treatment strategies may help prevent complete loss of vision and also modify or prevent a full blown calciphylaxis.

  2. Posterior Auricular Artery-Middle Cerebral Artery Bypass: A Rare Superficial Temporal Artery Variant with Well-developed Posterior Auricular Artery—Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    TOKUGAWA, Joji; NAKAO, Yasuaki; KUDO, Kentaro; IIMURA, Koji; ESAKI, Takanori; YAMAMOTO, Takuji; MORI, Kentaro

    2014-01-01

    The posterior auricular artery (PAA) is one of the branches of the external carotid artery, but is usually too small for use as a donor artery for middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory revascularization. An extremely unusual case of PAA-MCA anastomosis was performed in a patient requiring MCA territory revascularization because the superficial temporal artery (STA) parietal branch was absent and the PAA was large enough. A 65-year-old man developed mild motor weakness in the right extremities caused by multiple small infarctions. Single photon emission computed tomography (CT) revealed deterioration of the vascular reserve capacity in the left MCA area. Cerebral angiography showed severe stenosis in the C2 portion of the left internal carotid artery, absence of the parietal branch of the left STA, and a well-developed PAA extending to the parietal area. The patient underwent STA (frontal branch)-MCA and PAA-MCA double anastomosis, and has suffered no stroke or transient ischemic attack. The STA with no bifurcation is known as a rare variation. The PAA also occurs with size variations but well-developed PAA is thought to be extremely rare. PAA can be used as a donor artery for MCA territory revascularization if the vessel size is suitable. Preoperative evaluation of the anatomy is mandatory for harvesting the arteries. PMID:24140773

  3. Temporal artery biopsy is not required in all cases of suspected giant cell arteritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quinn, Edel Marie

    2012-07-01

    Temporal artery biopsy (TAB) is performed during the diagnostic workup for giant cell arteritis (GCA), a vasculitis with the potential to cause irreversible blindness or stroke. However, treatment is often started on clinical grounds, and TAB result frequently does not influence patient management. The aim of this study was to assess the need for TAB in cases of suspected GCA.

  4. Temporal Resolution Ability in Students with Dyslexia and Reading and Writing Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaubet, Juliana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The Gaps-in-Noise (GIN test assesses the hearing ability of temporal resolution. The development of this ability can be considered essential for learning how to read. Objective Identify temporal resolution in individuals diagnosed with reading and writing disorders compared with subjects with dyslexia. Methods A sample of 26 subjects of both genders, age 10 to 15 years, included 11 diagnosed with dyslexia and 15 diagnosed with reading and writing disorders. Subjects did not display otologic, neurologic, and/or cognitive diseases. A control group of 30 normal-hearing subjects was formed to compare thresholds and percentages obtained from the GIN test. The responses were obtained considering two measures of analysis: the threshold gap and the percentage of correct gap. Results The threshold was lower in the GIN for the typical group than for the other groups. There was no difference between groups with dyslexia and with reading and writing disorders. The GIN results of the typical group revealed a higher percentage of correct answer than in the other groups. No difference was obtained between the groups with dyslexia and with reading and writing disorders. Conclusion The GIN test identified a difficulty in auditory ability of temporal resolution in individuals with reading and writing disorders and in individuals with dyslexia in a similar way.

  5. Temporal resolution ability in students with dyslexia and reading and writing disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaubet, Juliana; Pereira, Liliane; Perez, Ana Paula

    2014-04-01

    Introduction The Gaps-in-Noise (GIN) test assesses the hearing ability of temporal resolution. The development of this ability can be considered essential for learning how to read. Objective Identify temporal resolution in individuals diagnosed with reading and writing disorders compared with subjects with dyslexia. Methods A sample of 26 subjects of both genders, age 10 to 15 years, included 11 diagnosed with dyslexia and 15 diagnosed with reading and writing disorders. Subjects did not display otologic, neurologic, and/or cognitive diseases. A control group of 30 normal-hearing subjects was formed to compare thresholds and percentages obtained from the GIN test. The responses were obtained considering two measures of analysis: the threshold gap and the percentage of correct gap. Results The threshold was lower in the GIN for the typical group than for the other groups. There was no difference between groups with dyslexia and with reading and writing disorders. The GIN results of the typical group revealed a higher percentage of correct answer than in the other groups. No difference was obtained between the groups with dyslexia and with reading and writing disorders. Conclusion The GIN test identified a difficulty in auditory ability of temporal resolution in individuals with reading and writing disorders and in individuals with dyslexia in a similar way.

  6. Anterior Temporal Artery-to-Anterior Cerebral Artery Bypass: Anatomic Feasibility of a Novel Intracranial-Intracranial Revascularization Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meybodi, Ali Tayebi; Lawton, Michael T; Griswold, Dylan; Mokhtari, Pooneh; Payman, Andre; Yousef, Sonia; Tabani, Halima; Benet, Arnau

    2017-03-01

    Complex aneurysms of the anterior cerebral artery (ACA) may require a bypass procedure as part of their surgical management. Most current bypass paradigms recommend technically demanding side-to-side anastomosis of pericallosal arteries or use of interposition grafts, which involve longer ischemia times. The purpose of this study is to assess the feasibility of an anterior temporal artery (ATA) to ACA end-to-side bypass. Fourteen cadaveric specimens (17 ATAs) were prepared for surgical simulation. The cisternal course of the ATA was freed from perforating branches and arachnoid. The M3-M4 junction of the ATA was cut, and the artery was mobilized to the interhemispheric fissure. The feasibility of ATA bypass to the precommunicating and postcommunicating ACA was assessed in relation to the cisternal length and branching pattern of the middle cerebral artery. Successful anastomosis was feasible in 14 ATAs (82%). Three ATAs did not reach the ACA. These ATAs were branching distally and originated from the M3 (opercular) middle cerebral artery. In specimens where bypass was not feasible, the average cisternal length of the ATA was significantly shorter than the rest. ATA-ACA bypass is anatomically feasible and may be a useful alternative to other revascularization techniques in selected patients. It is technically simpler than A3-A3 in situ bypass. ATA-ACA bypass can be performed through the same pterional exposure used for the ACA aneurysms, sparing the patient an additional interhemispheric approach, required for the A3-A3 anastomosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. CT perfusion assessment of Moyamoya syndrome before and after direct revascularization (superficial temporal artery to middle cerebral artery bypass)

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    Chen, Yueqin [Hospital of Qingdao University, Department of Radiology, Qingdao (China); Hospital of Jining Medical College, CT Department, Jining (China); Xu, Wenjian [Hospital of Qingdao University, Department of Radiology, Qingdao (China); Guo, Xiang; Shi, Zhitao; Sun, Zhanguo; Wang, Jiehuan [Hospital of Jining Medical College, CT Department, Jining (China); Gao, Lingyun [Hospital of Jining Medical College, MR Department, Jining (China); Jin, Feng [Hospital of Jining Medical College, Department of Neurosurgery, Jining (China); Chen, Weijian; Yang, Yunjun [Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Department of Radiology, Wenzhou (China)

    2016-01-15

    To evaluate the utility of CT perfusion (CTP) for the assessment of superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) anastomosis in patients with Moyamoya syndrome (MMS). Twenty-four consecutive MMS patients, who underwent unilateral STA-MCA bypass surgery, received CTP before and after surgery. The relative perfusion parameter values of surgical hemispheres before treatment were compared with post-treatment values. All patients underwent CT angiography (CTA) before and after surgery in order to confirm the patency of bypass. The follow-up CTA after surgery clearly demonstrated 20 (20/24, 83.3 %) bypass arteries, whereas four (16.7 %) bypass arteries were occluded or very small. Postoperative rMTT and rTTP values (P < 0.05) of the surgical side were significantly lower than pre-operation. In patients (n = 20) with bypass patency, postoperative rCBF, rMTT and rTTP values (P < 0.05) of the surgical side were significantly improved. However, the differences of all parameters were not significant (P > 0.05) in the patients (n = 4) without bypass patency after revascularization. This study demonstrates that CTP can provide a crucial quantitative assessment of cerebral haemodynamic changes in MMS before and after STA-MCA anastomosis. (orig.)

  8. Hemodynamic study of superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery bypass in treatment of severe internal carotid artery or middle cerebral artery stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui LIU

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the value of dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion-weighted imaging (DSC-PWI in superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA bypass and to provide radiological evidence for hemodynamic changes in STA-MCA bypass in the treatment of severe internal carotid artery (ICA and MCA stenosis and/or occlusion.  Methods A total of 76 cases (65 males and 11 females with average age of 55 who underwent STA-MCA bypass from January 2011 to February 2016 were included. Routine MRI and DSC-PWI were performed within one month before operation and within one week after operation. Hemodynamic changes [relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF, relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV, relative mean transit time (rMTT and relative time to peak (rTTP] of MCA blood supplying area at basal ganglia section (proximal end and centrum semiovale section (distal end were compared before and after operation.  Results Compared with before operation, rCBF was significantly increased after operation at ipsilateral basal ganglia section (proximal end, P = 0.000 and centrum semiovale section (distal end, P = 0.001. rCBV at basal ganglia section was significantly increased after operation (P = 0.021, while rCBV at centrum semiovale section had no significant difference compared with before operation (P = 0.844. rMTT (P = 0.000, 0.000 and rTTP (P = 0.000, 0.000 at ipsilateral basal ganglia section and centrum semiovale section were significantly reduced after operation.  Conclusions STA-MCA bypass can improve cerebral blood perfusion of MCA blood supplying area. DSC-PWI could assess the hemodynamics of ischemic area, so it is the optimal noninvasive technology to evaluate the curative effect of bypass and observe cerebral hemodynamic changes dynamically. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.06.010

  9. [Diagnostic value of clinical signs in giant cell arteritis: analysis of 415 temporal artery biopsy findings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strady, Christophe; Arav, Eric; Strady, Alain; Jaussaud, Roland; Beguinot, Isabelle; Rouger, Christine; Pluot, Michel; Remy, Gérard

    2002-02-01

    The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) has proposed a list of criteria for diagnosis of giant cell arteritis in order to guide clinical research by differentiating it from other vasculitis. The aim of this retrospective investigation, based on the findings of 415 temporal artery biopsies was to assess the diagnostic value of these criteria in the daily clinical setting. The demographic, clinical and biological characteristics of patients with positive (confirmed cases of giant cell arteritis) or negative (controls) histopathological temporal artery biopsy findings were analyzed using downward step-by-step logistic regression analysis. This analysis enabled investigators to list signs with inherent diagnostic value. Based their odds-ratio, these factors were used to determine a clinical score for giant cell arteritis. A score of over 7 - out of a maximum score of 32 - enables the diagnosis for giant cell arteritis with the best possible compromise between a sensitivity of 75.7% and a specificity of 72.2%. ACR criteria had a sensitivity of 97.5% and a specificity of 78.9% when used in our patient group. Our study results are original in that the control group was composed of patients in whom the diagnosis of giant cell arteritis had been suggested but refuted by the absence of histopathological findings on the temporal artery biopsy. This pragmatic attitude in selecting the control group may explain the difference observed with the ACR criteria in terms of sensitivity and specificity. Further research is needed to develop a diagnostic method for giant cell arteritis without resorting to temporal artery biopsy.

  10. Coronary artery visibility in free-breathing young children on non-gated chest CT: impact of temporal resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridoux, Alexandre; Hutt, Antoine; Faivre, Jean-Baptiste; Pagniez, Julien; Remy, Jacques; Remy-Jardin, Martine [CHRU et Universite de Lille, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette (EA 2694), 59037 Lille Cedex (France); Flohr, Thomas [Siemens Healthcare, Department of Research and Development in CT, Forchheim (Germany); Duhamel, Alain [Universite de Lille, Department of Biostatistics, Lille (France)

    2015-11-15

    Dual-source CT allows scanning of the chest with high pitch and high temporal resolution, which can improve the detection of proximal coronary arteries in infants and young children when scanned without general anesthesia, sedation or beta-blockade. To compare coronary artery visibility between higher and standard temporal resolution. We analyzed CT images in 93 children who underwent a standard chest CT angiographic examination with reconstruction of images with a temporal resolution of 75 ms (group 1) and 140 ms (group 2). The percentage of detected coronary segments was higher in group 1 than in group 2 when considering all segments (group 1: 27%; group 2: 24%; P = 0.0004) and proximal segments (group 1: 37%; group 2: 32%; P = 0.0006). In both groups, the highest rates of detection were observed for the left main coronary artery (S1) (group 1: 65%; group 2: 58%) and proximal left anterior descending coronary artery (S2) (group 1: 43%; group 2: 42%). Higher rates of detection were seen in group 1 for the left main coronary artery (P = 0.03), proximal right coronary artery (P = 0.01), proximal segments of the left coronary artery (P = 0.02) and proximal segments of the left and right coronary arteries (P = 0.0006). Higher temporal resolution improved the visibility of proximal coronary arteries in pediatric chest CT. (orig.)

  11. Internal Maxillary Artery to Upper Posterior Circulation Bypass Using a Superficial Temporal Artery Graft: Surgical Anatomy and Feasibility Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayebi Meybodi, Ali; Lawton, Michael T; Rodriguez Rubio, Roberto; Yousef, Sonia; Guo, Xiaoming; Feng, Xuequan; Benet, Arnau

    2017-11-01

    Revascularization of the upper posterior circulation (UPC), including the superior cerebellar artery (SCA) and posterior cerebral artery (PCA), may be necessary as part of the surgical treatment of complex UPC aneurysms or vertebrobasilar insufficiency. The existing bypass options have relative advantages and disadvantages. However, the use of a superficial temporal artery graft (STAg) in a bypass from the internal maxillary artery (IMA) to the UPC has not been previously assessed. We studied the surgical anatomy and assessed the technical feasibility of the IMA-STAg-UPC bypass. Fourteen cadaver heads were studied. The STAg was harvested proximally from about 15 mm below the zygomatic arch. The IMA was exposed through the lateral triangle of the middle fossa. The IMA-STAg-UPC bypass was completed using a subtemporal approach. The bypass was successfully performed in all specimens. The average length of the STAg from the donor to the recipient was 46.4 mm for the s2 SCA, and 49.5 mm for the P2 PCA. The average distal diameter of the STAg was 2.3 mm. More than 83% of STAgs had a diameter of ≥2 mm distally. At the point of anastomosis, the average diameter of the SCA was 1.9 mm, and the average diameter of the PCA was 3.0 mm. The proposed bypass is anatomically feasible and provides a suitable caliber match between the bypass components. Our results provide the anatomic basis for clinical assessment of the bypass in tackling complex lesions of the vertebrobasilar system requiring revascularization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Incidental internal carotid artery calcifications on temporal bone CT in children

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    Koch, Bernadette; Jones, Blaise [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Blackham, Aaron [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2007-02-15

    Incidental internal carotid artery (ICA) calcifications are occasionally noted on CT images of the brain and temporal bone. In adults, incidental calcifications have been correlated with increased incidence of hypercholesterolemia, cardiac disease, diabetes and carotid stenosis. To determine the incidence of incidental calcifications of the carotid siphon on temporal bone CT in children. We retrospectively reviewed 24 months of consecutive temporal bone CT examinations in children aged 18 years and younger. CT examinations on 663 patients were reviewed and the presence or absence of ICA calcifications was ranked as absent, questionable or definitive. In patients in whom definitive calcifications were identified, hospital charts were reviewed for evidence of diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hyperlipidemia and chronic renal disease as potential causes of early atherosclerosis. Of the 663 patients, 25% had definitive calcifications within the wall of the ICA: 6% of children younger than 2 years and 28% of children 12-19 years of age. Incidentally noted ICA calcifications are a common finding on temporal bone CT in children, most likely a physiologic response to turbulent flow at natural bends in the artery rather than secondary to underlying disease predisposing to early atherosclerotic calcification. (orig.)

  13. Superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery bypass surgery in a pediatric giant intracranial aneurysm presenting as migraine-like episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goedee, H S; Depauw, P R A M; vd Zwam, B; Temmink, A H

    2009-02-01

    Aneurysms of the intracranial arteries in the pediatric population are reportedly rare. There is a male predominance, association with connective tissue disorders, as well as bacterial, mycotic infections, and trauma. Common sites of presentation are the internal carotid artery bifurcation, posterior circulation, and distal segment of middle cerebral artery. Clinical manifestations can vary from seizures and subarachnoidal hemorrhage to headache, irritability, lethargy, vomiting, or focal motor deficits. Current treatment modalities encompass endovascular or surgical approach. We present a case report on an 11-year-old girl with migraine-like episodes due to an underlying giant fusiform middle cerebral artery aneurysm treated successfully with two superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery bypasses.

  14. Arterialización venosa temporal del pie diabético Temporal venous arterialization of the diabetic foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Lengua

    2010-01-01

    ón en el pie diabético es posible, eficaz y durable, gracias, posiblemente, a la inducción de una neoarteriogénesis y neoangiogénesis, que mantiene los beneficios aun después de que el puente se haya ocluido (función temporal.Background: The first idea of surgeons (1902 to avoid amputations due to ischemia was to deviate the arterial flow to the venous system using an arteriovenous fistula between adjacent vessels; however, the results were unreliable. Since then, sympathectomies, endarterectomies and bypasses have been created, and more recently, other medical, surgical, and endovascular advances have been used. However, amputations continue to be performed worldwide mainly in diabetic patients. The arterialization of the foot veins, based on the old idea of inverted blood flow, is a new possibility for these patients who, otherwise, could lose their limbs. Objective: To demonstrate that arterialization of the foot veins in diabetic patients with neuroischemic lesions, usually infected (diabetic foot, is an effective and long-lasting method, even though the bypass only works temporally. Patients and method: From January 2000 to February 2009, 59 patients with diabetic foot were threated by means of arterialization of the foot veins. An early death was not included in the analysis. Of the 58 remaining patients, 44 were male and 14 were female. Their mean age was 71 years old: (53-91 years. Fifty-four of them were classified as being Fontaine IV and four were IIIB. The arterialization was conducted using an inverted venous graft proximally anastomized to an artery presenting good flow (external iliac, femoral or popliteal arteries distally in the internal marginal vein of the foot, eliminating the valves of the foot arch veins. Results: Of the 58 patients who underwent arterialization, 12 failed due to early thrombosis, having amputated limbs, and 46 succeeded (79%: six at short-term, 12 at medium-term, and 28 at long-term. In the groups who were considered to have

  15. Small-vessel vasculitis surrounding an uninflamed temporal artery: a new diagnostic criterion for polymyalgia rheumatica?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatelain, Denis; Duhaut, Pierre; Loire, Robert; Bosshard, Sylvie; Pellet, Hélène; Piette, Jean-Charles; Sevestre, Henri; Ducroix, Jean-Pierre

    2008-08-01

    To assess the prevalence and clinical significance of small-vessel vasculitis (SVV) surrounding an uninflamed temporal artery (TA) in patients diagnosed as having giant cell (temporal) arteritis (GCA) and/or polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR). Patients with GCA and/or PMR (n = 490) were included in this multicenter prospective study. Slides of TA biopsy specimens were reviewed by 2 pathologists who were blinded with regard to clinical information. SVV was defined as aggregates of mononuclear inflammatory cells surrounding a capillary, distant from an uninflamed temporal artery. Clinical and biologic data of patients in the SVV group (n = 35) were compared with data of patients with biopsy-proven GCA (n = 280) and with negative TA biopsy findings (n = 175). SVV was diagnosed in 18 women and 17 men (mean +/- SD age 74.5 +/- 9.4 years). The group of patients with SVV had a higher proportion of men than in the entire GCA series, had systemic symptoms, headache, jaw claudication, and an abnormal temporal artery less frequently at clinical examination, but had symptoms of PMR more often than patients in the biopsy-proven GCA group (P = 2.6 x 10(-7), odds ratio 9.17 [95% confidence interval 3.44-24.4]). Levels of inflammation markers were significantly lower in the SVV group. Patients in the SVV group had fever less frequently than patients in the group with negative TA biopsy findings, but otherwise shared the same clinical (including PMR symptoms) and biologic features. Eighteen of the 94 patients with pure PMR (19%) had SVV. SVV is often neglected by pathologists, and appears to be strongly associated with PMR symptoms in patients with a clinical diagnosis of GCA and/or PMR. However, SVV as a new diagnostic criterion for PMR must be assessed in prospective studies.

  16. No detection of varicella-zoster virus in temporal arteries of patients with giant cell arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratore, Francesco; Croci, Stefania; Tamagnini, Ione; Zerbini, Alessandro; Bellafiore, Salvatore; Belloni, Lucia; Boiardi, Luigi; Bisagni, Alessandra; Pipitone, Nicolò; Parmeggiani, Maria; Cavazza, Alberto; Salvarani, Carlo

    2017-10-01

    Data on the presence of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in temporal arteries of patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA) are controversial. We analyzed VZV infection in temporal arteries from Italian patients with temporal artery biopsy (TAB)-positive GCA, TAB-negative GCA, and controls. A total of 79 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) TABs performed between 2009 and 2012 at a single institution from 34 TAB-positive GCA patients, 15 TAB-negative GCA patients, and 30 controls were retrieved. Six 5-μm sections of all FFPE TABs were cut. The first section was analyzed by immunohistochemistry using mouse monoclonal anti-VZVgE IgG1 antibody. DNA was extracted from the remaining five sections and analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the presence of VZV DNA. For 10 of the 34 TAB-positive GCA patients, an additional 2-mm piece of frozen TAB was available. DNA was extracted from the entire 2-mm length frozen specimen and analyzed by PCR for the presence of VZV DNA. Thirty additional 5-μm sections were cut from the FFPE TABs of these 10 patients and analyzed by immunohistochemistry for the presence of VZV antigen. Immunohistochemical analysis detected VZV antigen in 1/34 (3%) TAB-positive GCA, 0/15 TAB-negative GCA, and 0/30 controls, and in none of the 300 sections cut from the 10 FFPE TABs positive for GCA for which the frozen specimens were available. DNA obtained from all TABs was amplifiable. VZV DNA was neither found in any of the FFPE TABs nor found in frozen TABs. Our data do not support in Italian patients a possible role for VZV infection in the etiopathogenesis of GCA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Aplasia Cutis Congenita Associated With Aplasia of the Superficial Temporal Artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Matthew Seung Suk; Choi, Jong Hwan; Ki, Sae Hwi; Jun, Yong Hoon

    2016-06-01

    Aplasia cutis congenita with or without congenital anomalies is a rare congenital disorder most commonly involving the skin of the scalp, as well as the skull and dura.The etiology is uncertain, and several theories, including vascular accident intrauterine period, vascular anomaly, intrauterine infection, teratogen, and aminiotic adhesion, have been proposed. One theory is that lesions of the scalp are usually caused by vascular anomalies.The authors report on a patient with aplasia cutis congenita presenting with a huge skin and skull defect combined with aplasia of the superficial temporal artery, which was thought to be the etiology.

  18. Successful Treatment of Two Cases of Squamous Cell Carcinoma on the Ear with Intra-Arterial Administration of Peplomycin through a Superficial Temporal Artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Haga

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC is the second most common non-melanoma skin cancer and tends to develop in sun-exposed cosmetic areas, including the ear. In this report, we describe two cases of SCC on the ear successfully treated with intra-arterial administration of peplomycin through a superficial temporal artery. In addition to this selective chemotherapy, we administered oral tegafur, which achieved complete remission of the tumor. These findings suggest that intra-arterial administration of peplomycin with tegafur is one of the optimal therapies for the treatment of SCC developing on the ear.

  19. MRI in giant cell (temporal) arteritis; Magnetresonanztomografie der Arteriitis temporalis Horton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bley, T.A.; Uhl, M.; Frydrychowicz, A.; Langer, M. [Uniklinik Freiburg (Germany). Roentgendiagnostik; Markl, M. [Uniklinik Freiburg (Germany). Roentgendiagnostik - Medizinische Physik

    2007-07-15

    Giant cell (temporal) arteritis is a diagnostic challenge. Blindness is a dreaded complication, especially if high-dose steroid treatment is delayed. With an optimized MR protocol, noninvasive diagnosis of giant cell arteritis is facilitated. Submillimeter in-plane resolution makes it possible to distinguish healthy segments from inflamed segments. The lumen and arterial wall can be depicted in high detail. Post-contrast high-resolution MRI visualizes the superficial cranial arteries bilaterally and simultaneously, allowing assessment of the cranial involvement pattern. In combination with MR angiography of the aortic arch and supra-aortic arteries, the extracranial involvement pattern can be demonstrated in a single comprehensive MR examination assessing the cranial, cervical and thoracic vasculature. Good diagnostic image quality can be achieved at 1.5 Tesla and at 3 Tesla. However, due to higher signal-to-noise ratios, image quality seems to be superior at 3 Tesla. Over the course of successful long-term treatment, MR signs of mural inflammation decrease significantly and eventually vanish entirely. In contrast to color-coded Duplex sonography, which is a comparatively cost-efficient imaging modality, acquisition of high-resolution MRI is almost independent of the investigator's expertise. Compared to positron emission tomography with 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose, which is a very sensitive whole-body screening tool for detecting extracranial involvement of large vessel vasculitis, MRI allows visualization and assessment of both the superficial cranial arteries in high detail and the extracranial large artery involvement in the same investigation. (orig.)

  20. Treatment for Alexia with Agraphia Following Left Ventral Occipito-Temporal Damage: Strengthening Orthographic Representations Common to Reading and Spelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Esther S.; Rising, Kindle; Rapcsak, Steven Z.; Beeson, Pélagie M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Damage to left ventral occipito-temporal cortex can give rise to written language impairment characterized by pure alexia/letter-by-letter (LBL) reading, as well as surface alexia and agraphia. The purpose of this study was to examine the therapeutic effects of a combined treatment approach to address concurrent LBL reading with surface…

  1. Surgical Technique for High-Flow Internal Maxillary Artery to Middle Cerebral Artery Bypass Using a Superficial Temporal Artery Interposition Graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xuequan; Meybodi, Ali Tayebi; Rincon-Torroella, Jordina; El-Sayed, Ivan H; Lawton, Michael T; Benet, Arnau

    2017-04-01

    Extracranial-to-intracranial high-flow bypass often requires cranial, cervical, and graft site incisions. The internal maxillary artery (IMA) has been proposed as a donor to decrease invasiveness, but its length is insufficient for direct intracranial bypass. We report interposition of a superficial temporal artery (STA) graft for high-flow IMA to middle cerebral artery (MCA) bypass using a middle fossa approach. To assess the feasibility of an IMA-STA graft-MCA bypass using a new middle fossa approach. Twelve specimens were studied. A 7.5-cm STA graft was obtained starting 1.5 cm below the zygomatic arch. The calibers of STA were measured. After a pterional craniotomy, the IMA was isolated inside the infratemporal fossa through a craniectomy within the lateral triangle (lateral to the posterolateral triangle) in the middle fossa and transposed for proximal end-to-end anastomosis to the STA. The Sylvian fissure was split exposing the insular segment of the MCA, and an STA-M2 end-to-side anastomosis was completed. Finally, the length of graft vessel was measured. Average diameters of the proximal and distal STA ends were 2.3 ± 0.2 and 2.0 ± 0.1 mm, respectively. At the anastomosis site, the diameter of the IMA was 2.4 ± 0.6 mm, and the MCA diameter was 2.3 ± 0.3 mm. The length of STA graft required was 56.0 ± 5.9 mm. The STA can be used as an interposition graft for high-flow IMA-MCA bypass if the STA is obtained 1.5 cm below the zygomatic arch and the IMA is harvested through the proposed approach. This procedure may provide an efficient and less invasive alternative for high-flow EC-IC bypass.

  2. MRI displays involvement of the temporalis muscle and the deep temporal artery in patients with giant cell arteritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veldhoen, Simon; Bley, Thorsten A. [University Medical Center Wuerzburg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Klink, Thorsten [Inselspital - University Medical Center Bern, Department of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, Bern (Switzerland); Geiger, Julia [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Freiburg (Germany); University Children' s Hospital Zuerich, Division of Radiology, Zuerich (Switzerland); Vaith, Peter; Glaser, Cornelia [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Freiburg (Germany); Ness, Thomas [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Ophthalmology, Freiburg (Germany); Duwendag, Dirk [University Medical Center Kiel, Department of Ophthalmology, Kiel (Germany); Both, Marcus [University Medical Center Kiel, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Kiel (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    To assess deep temporal artery and temporalis muscle involvement in patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA). Ninety-nine patients who received magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and superficial temporal artery biopsy (TAB) were included in this study. Patients with positive TAB (n = 61) were defined as GCA patients, those with negative TAB (n = 38) as the GCA-negative reference group. Contrast-enhanced T1w-images were acquired utilizing 1.5 T and 3 T MRI. Two radiologists assessed the images. Mural contrast-hyperenhancement and wall thickening of the deep temporal artery and hyperenhancement of the muscle were defined as inflammation. MRI results were correlated with jaw claudication in 70 patients. The two observers found temporalis muscle involvement in 19.7 % (n = 12) and 21.3 % (n = 13) of GCA patients. It occurred bilaterally in 100 %. Specificities were 92/97 % and sensitivities were 20/21 %. Deep temporal artery involvement was found in 34.4 % (n = 21) and 49.2 % (n = 30) and occurred bilaterally in 80/90.5 %. Specificities were 84/95 % and sensitivities were 34/49 %. Both structures were affected simultaneously in 18/21.3 %. Jaw claudication correlated moderately with inflammation of the temporalis muscle (r = 0.31; p < 0.05) and the deep temporal artery (r = 0.38; p = 0.01). MRI visualizes changes in the temporalis muscle and the deep temporal artery in GCA. Moderate correlation of clinical symptoms with MRI results was observed. circle Approximately 20 % of GCA patients presented with temporalis muscle inflammation. (orig.)

  3. fMRI brain response during sentence reading comprehension in children with benign epilepsy with centro-temporal spikes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malfait, D; Tucholka, A; Mendizabal, S; Tremblay, J; Poulin, C; Oskoui, M; Srour, M; Carmant, L; Major, P; Lippé, S

    2015-11-01

    Children with benign epilepsy with centro-temporal spikes (BECTS) often have language problems. Abnormal epileptic activity is found in central and temporal brain regions, which are involved in reading and semantic and syntactic comprehension. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we examined reading networks in BECTS children with a new sentence reading comprehension task involving semantic and syntactic processing. Fifteen children with BECTS (age=11y 1m ± 16 m; 12 boys) and 18 healthy controls (age=11 y 8m ± 20 m; 11 boys) performed an fMRI reading comprehension task in which they read a pair of syntactically complex sentences and decided whether the target sentence (the second sentence in the pair) was true or false with respect to the first sentence. All children also underwent an exhaustive neuropsychological assessment. We demonstrated weaknesses in several cognitive domains in BECTS children. During the sentence reading fMRI task, left inferior frontal regions and bilateral temporal areas were activated in BECTS children and healthy controls. However, additional brain regions such as the left hippocampus and precuneus were activated in BECTS children. Moreover, specific activation was found in the left caudate and putamen in BECTS children but not in healthy controls. Cognitive results and accuracy during the fMRI task were associated with specific brain activation patterns. BECTS children recruited a wider network to perform the fMRI sentence reading comprehension task, with specific activation in the left dorsal striatum. BECTS cognitive performance differently predicted functional activation in frontal and temporal regions compared to controls, suggesting differences in brain network organisation that contribute to reading comprehension. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The role of the left anterior temporal lobe in exception word reading: reconciling patient and neuroimaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Maximiliano A; Joubert, Sven; Ferré, Perrine; Belleville, Sylvie; Ansaldo, Ana Inés; Joanette, Yves; Rouleau, Isabelle; Brambati, Simona Maria

    2012-05-01

    Semantic dementia (SD) is a neurodegenerative disease that occurs following the atrophy of the anterior temporal lobes (ATLs). It is characterised by the degradation of semantic knowledge and difficulties in reading exception words (surface dyslexia). This disease has highlighted the role of the ATLs in the process of exception word reading. However, imaging studies in healthy subjects have failed to detect activation of the ATLs during exception word reading. The aim of the present study was to test whether the functional brain regions that mediate exception word reading in normal readers overlap those brain regions atrophied in SD. In Study One, we map the brain regions of grey matter atrophy in AF, a patient with mild SD and surface dyslexia profile. In Study Two, we map the activation pattern associated with exception word compared to pseudoword reading in young, healthy participants using fMRI. The results revealed areas of significant activation in healthy subjects engaged in the exception word reading task in the left anterior middle temporal gyrus, in a region observed to be atrophic in the patient AF. These results reconcile neuropsychological and functional imaging data, revealing the critical role of the left ATL in exception word reading. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Low concentrations of lithium and cyclooxygenase inhibitors enhance endothelin-1 (ET-1)-induced contractions in human temporal artery, but not in porcine ophthalmic artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakken, I J; Vincent, M B; White, L R; Cappelen, J; Skaanes, K O; Sjaastad, O

    1992-11-01

    Endothelins are a recently discovered group of potent vasoconstrictor peptides synthesized by endothelial cells and other tissues in various species, which seem to participate in the regulation of vascular tonus. Abnormalities in vasoactivity in the head may be an important event in headache pathophysiology, although the mechanisms responsible for such constrictions and/or dilations are not known. The endothelium and its constrictor peptide, endothelin, may play a key role in such mechanisms. Of the various drugs used in the treatment of headache, lithium is an accepted treatment for cluster headache, and indomethacin is the drug of choice for the associated condition chronic paroxysmal hemicrania. The mechanism of action of these drugs in these headaches is not known. Due to the possible involvement of endothelin in headache disorders, the objective of this study was to verify the effects of lithium and cyclooxygenase inhibitors (indomethacin, acetylsalicylic acid and naproxen) on endothelin-1 (ET-1)-induced contractions in isolated human temporal arteries and porcine ophthalmic arteries. It was found that all drugs increased the (ET-1)-induced contractions in human temporal arteries. Conversely, there were no significant changes induced by the drugs in porcine ophthalmic arteries. These results are consistent with the variation of activity often seen in different vascular beds and between species. The potential importance of such reactions for the understanding of vascular changes putatively involved in headache development and treatment is discussed.

  6. Relationship of daily arterial blood pressure monitoring readings and arterial stiffness profile in male patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease combined with arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karoli N.A.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine correlation between arterial blood pressure daily rhythm and daily profile of arterial stiffness in male patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and arterial hypertension. Materials et methods: Prospective investigation comprised 45 male patients with COPD and arterial hypertension. Individuals of 40 years younger and 80 years elder, patients with diabetes, stroke, angina pectoris, or heart infarction, vascular diseases, and exacerbation of chronic disease, bronchial and pulmonary diseases of other etiology were excluded from the analyses. Comparison group included 47 patients with essential arterial hypertension and without chronic respiratory diseases closely similar on general parameters with patients from main clinical series. Twenty-four-hour arterial blood pressure monitoring (ABPM and daily arterial stiffness monitoring were performed using BPLab® MnSDP-2 apparatus (Petr Telegin, Russian Federation. Results: Patients with COPD combined with arterial hypertension with raised arterial stiffness measures prevail over individuals in essential hypertension group. There is pathological alteration of the ABPM circadian rhythm and raised «Pressure load» values in raised arterial stiffness group. Conclusion: We found ABPM raised parameters in patients with COPD and arterial hypertension. It confirms necessity of ABPM in daily arterial stiffness assessment in patients with COPD.

  7. Disruption of Spelling-to-Sound Correspondence Mapping during Single-Word Reading in Patients with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledoux, Kerry; Gordon, Barry

    2011-01-01

    Processing and/or hemispheric differences in the neural bases of word recognition were examined in patients with long-standing, medically-intractable epilepsy localized to the left (N = 18) or right (N = 7) temporal lobe. Participants were asked to read words that varied in the frequency of their spelling-to-sound correspondences. For the right…

  8. A common left occipito-temporal dysfunction in developmental dyslexia and acquired letter-by-letter reading?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Richlan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We used fMRI to examine functional brain abnormalities of German-speaking dyslexics who suffer from slow effortful reading but not from a reading accuracy problem. Similar to acquired cases of letter-by-letter reading, the developmental cases exhibited an abnormal strong effect of length (i.e., number of letters on response time for words and pseudowords.Corresponding to lesions of left occipito-temporal (OT regions in acquired cases, we found a dysfunction of this region in our developmental cases who failed to exhibit responsiveness of left OT regions to the length of words and pseudowords. This abnormality in the left OT cortex was accompanied by absent responsiveness to increased sublexical reading demands in phonological inferior frontal gyrus (IFG regions. Interestingly, there was no abnormality in the left superior temporal cortex which--corresponding to the onological deficit explanation--is considered to be the prime locus of the reading difficulties of developmental dyslexia cases.The present functional imaging results suggest that developmental dyslexia similar to acquired letter-by-letter reading is due to a primary dysfunction of left OT regions.

  9. Temporal artery biopsy in the diagnosis of giant cell arteritis: Bigger is not always better.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Marios; Kaptanis, Sarantos; Kokkori-Steinbrecher, Aikaterini; Floros, Nikolaos; Schuster, Frauke; Hübner, Gunnar

    2017-09-01

    Accurate early giant cell arteritis (GCA) diagnosis can be established through temporal artery biopsy (TAB). We herein investigate the relationship between specimen length and positive TAB result in a tertiary-care hospital in Germany during a 8-year period. Secondarily, we studied the relationships of specific epidemiological and laboratory parameters with positive TABs. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all patients with suspected GCA, who underwent TAB in our institution. The total sample consisted of 116 patients with a mean age of 76.1 (SD 7.7) years. Mean specimen length post-fixation was 0.94 cm (SD 0.49). The TAB(+) group consisted of 64 patients (55.2%). The specimen length was comparable in the two groups (0.96 cm vs 0.91 cm, p = 0.581). Twenty six TAB(+) patients (41%) had a post-fixation specimen longer than 1 cm, comparable with the respective percentage in the TAB(-) group (42%, p = 1). All laboratory tests performed were statistically significantly different in the two groups. We conclude that TAB length is not associated with the TAB diagnostic yield in patients with clinical suspicion of GCA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Management of middle meningeal and superficial temporal artery hemorrhage from total temporomandibular joint replacement surgery with a gelatin-based hemostatic agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cillo, Joseph E; Sinn, Douglas; Truelson, John M

    2005-03-01

    Complications associated with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) replacement surgery may include injury to nerves, blood vessels, and otologic structures. Vascular injuries can be associated with trauma to the carotid artery and its terminal branches, the superficial temporal artery, and the internal maxillary artery. Suggested management to control hemorrhage has included uniand bipolar electrocautery, laser ablation, local anesthetics with vasoconstrictors, direct pressure, embolization, and ligation. In this case report, the iatrogenic injury to both the middle meningeal and superficial temporal arteries during total TMJ replacement surgery controlled by using a gelatin-based hemostatic agent is discussed.

  11. Altered temporal correlations in resting-state connectivity fluctuations in children with reading difficulties detected via MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, S I; Laskaris, N A; Simos, P G; Micheloyannis, S; Fletcher, J M; Rezaie, R; Papanicolaou, A C

    2013-12-01

    In this study we investigate systematic patterns of rapidly changing sensor-level interdependencies in resting MEG data obtained from 23 children experiencing reading difficulties (RD) and 27 non-impaired readers (NI). Three-minute MEG time series were band-passed and subjected to blind source separation (BSS) prior to estimating sensor interdependencies using the weighted phase synchronization measure (wPLI). Dynamic sensor-level network properties were then derived for two network metrics (global and local efficiency). The temporal decay of long-range temporal correlations in network metrics (LRTC) was quantified using the scaling exponent (SE) in detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) plots. Having established the reliability of SE estimates as robust descriptors of network dynamics, we found that RD students displayed significantly reduced (a) overall sensor-level network organization across all frequency bands (global efficiency), and (b) temporal correlations between sensors covering the left temporoparietal region and the remaining sensors in the β3 band (local efficiency). Importantly, both groups displayed scale-free global network connectivity dynamics. The direct application of DFA to MEG signals failed to reveal significant group differences. Results are discussed in relation to prior evidence for disrupted temporoparietal functional circuits for reading in developmental reading disability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Temporal Relationship between Arterial Stiffening and Blood Pressure Is Modified by Methotrexate Treatment in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Woodman

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The temporal relationship between arterial stiffness and blood pressure (BP may vary depending on age and other clinical and demographic factors. Since both BP and arterial stiffness are also affected by inflammatory processes, we examined the temporal arterial stiffness-BP relationship in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA treated with either methotrexate (MTX, an anti-rheumatic agent shown to reduce cardiovascular risk in meta-analyses, or other disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs.Methods: Measurements of clinic and 24-h peripheral and central systolic and diastolic BP (SBP and DBP, and pulse wave velocity (PWV were assessed in RA patients on stable treatment with either MTX ± other DMARDs (MTX group, n = 41, age 61 ± 14 years, 73% females or other DMARDs (non-MTX group, n = 18, age 65 ± 13 years, 89% females. Measurements were performed at baseline and after 8 months. The temporal relationships were examined using cross-lagged path analysis with models that included age, sex, body mass index, prednisolone, and folic acid use and 28-joint disease activity score.Results: There were significant differences in the temporal arterial stiffness-BP relationships between those in the MTX and DMARD groups. A higher PWV at baseline caused a significant increase in 6 out of 8 different measures of SBP at 8 months amongst those treated with DMARDs (standardized β, range = 0.54–0.66, p < 0.003 for each and 3 out of 8 different measures of DBP (standardized β, range = 0.52–0.61, p < 0.003 for each but was not associated with either SBP or DBP at 8 months amongst those treated with MTX. The difference in the effect of baseline PWV on 8-month BP between the 2 groups was also significant (p < 0.003 for 4 measures including clinic peripheral SBP (β = 7.0, 95% CI = 2.8–11.1 mmHg per 1 m/s higher baseline PWV; p < 0.001.Conclusions: Higher arterial stiffness preceded increases in BP in subjects with RA treated with DMARDs

  13. Effect of reading on blood flow changes in the posterior cerebral artery in early blind and sighted people--A transcranial Doppler study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viski, Sandor; Orgovan, David; Szabo, Katalin; Rosengarten, Bernhard; Csiba, Laszlo; Olah, Laszlo

    2016-04-15

    Neuroimaging studies proved that Braille reading resulted in visual cortex activation in blind people, however, very few data are available about the measure of flow increase in these subjects. Therefore, we investigated the flow response in the posterior cerebral artery (PCA) of eleven early blind and ten sighted subjects induced by reading Braille and print, respectively. Two experimental protocols were used in both groups: PCA flow velocity during reading was compared to the resting phase and "NLC" phase (volunteers "read" non-lexical characters; e.g. .,-.:,-.:...,). The use of these experimental protocols allowed to investigate separately the effect of "light stimulus+print reading" versus "print reading alone" in sighted, and "hand/finger movement+Braille reading" versus "Braille reading alone" in blind subjects. The flow response in the PCA evoked by "Braille reading alone" in blind (10.5±4.5%) and "print reading alone" in sighted subjects (8.1±3.5%) was similar. The flow increase induced by "hand/finger movement+Braille reading" and by "Braille reading alone" did not differ in blind people, however, "light stimulus+print reading" in sighted subjects caused higher PCA flow increase (25.9±6.9%) than "print reading alone" (8.1±3.5%). The similar PCA flow response induced by Braille and print reading alone suggested a similar degree of occipital cortex activation in blind and sighted subjects. In sighted people, the 3-times higher flow velocity increase induced by "light stimulus+print reading" compared with "print reading alone" indicated that 2/3 of PCA flow increase during reading was due to the light stimulus and only 1/3 of flow response was caused by reading alone. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Association between histological features in temporal artery biopsies and clinical features of patients with giant cell arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuer, Gabriel S; Nesher, Ronit; Reinus, Konstantin; Nesher, Gideon

    2013-06-01

    In most cases of giant cell arteritis (GCA) the diagnosis is confirmed by temporal artery biopsy. Aside from the diagnostic purpose, histological parameters may serve as prognostic markers. To review positive temporal artery biopsies ofGCA in an attempt to correlate various histological parameters with clinical features, disease complications and outcome. Positive biopsies from 65 GCA patients were randomly selected for review by a single pathologist. In each biopsy the following parameters were scored: intensity and location of the inflammatory infiltrate, presence of giant cells and other cell types, fragmentation and calcification of the internal elastic lamina, intimal thickening, and presence of luminal thrombus. Clinical data were obtained from the patients' charts. Intensity of the initial systemic inflammatory reaction (ISIR) at the time of diagnosis was scored by the presence of five parameters: fever, anemia, thrombocytosis, leukocytosis, and sedimentation rate >100 mm/hr. In cases with bilateral positive biopsy (n=27), there was good correlation between the two sides regarding intensity of inflammation (r= 0.65, P< 0.001), location of the infiltrate (r= 0.7, P< 0.001), degree of intimal thickening (r= 0.54, P 0.001), and presence of giant cells (r= 0.83, P< 0.001). The rate of corticosteroid discontinuation tended to be quicker in patients with inflammatory infiltrates confined mainly to the adventitia, but other histological parameters did not affect this rate. Inflammatory infiltrates confined to the adventitia were associated with more neuro-ophthalmic ischemic manifestations, weak/moderate ISIR at the time of diagnosis, and faster rate of corticosteroid discontinuation. No association was found between other temporal artery biopsy histological parameters and clinical features of GCA patients.

  15. Reading Ahead: Adult Music Students' Eye Movements in Temporally Controlled Performances of a Children's Song

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penttinen, Marjaana; Huovinen, Erkki; Ylitalo, Anna-Kaisa

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, education majors minoring in music education (n = 24) and music performance majors (n =14) read and performed the original version and melodically altered versions of a simple melody in a given tempo. Eye movements during music reading and piano performances were recorded. Errorless trials were analyzed to explore the…

  16. Thermochemoradiation Therapy Using Superselective Intra-arterial Infusion via Superficial Temporal and Occipital Arteries for Oral Cancer With N3 Cervical Lymph Node Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsudo, Kenji, E-mail: mitsudo@yokohama-cu.ac.jp [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan); Koizumi, Toshiyuki; Iida, Masaki; Iwai, Toshinori; Oguri, Senri [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan); Yamamoto, Noriyuki [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Itoh, Yoshiyuki [Department of Radiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Kioi, Mitomu; Hirota, Makoto; Tohnai, Iwai [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the therapeutic results and histopathological effects of treatment with thermochemoradiation therapy using superselective intra-arterial infusion via the superficial temporal and occipital arteries for N3 cervical lymph node metastases of advanced oral cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 2005 and September 2010, 9 patients with N3 cervical lymph node metastases of oral squamous cell carcinoma underwent thermochemoradiation therapy using superselective intra-arterial infusion with docetaxel (DOC) and cisplatin (CDDP). Treatment consisted of hyperthermia (2-8 sessions), superselective intra-arterial infusions (DOC, total 40-60 mg/m{sup 2}; CDDP, total 100-150 mg/m{sup 2}) and daily concurrent radiation therapy (total, 40-60 Gy) for 4-6 weeks. Results: Six of 9 patients underwent neck dissection 5-8 weeks after treatment. In four of these 6 patients, all metastatic lymph nodes, including those at N3, were grade 3 (non-viable tumor cells present) or grade 4 (no tumor cells present) tumors, as classified by the system by Shimosato et al (Shimosato et al Jpn J Clin Oncol 1971;1:19-35). In 2 of these 6 patients, the metastatic lymph nodes were grade 2b (destruction of tumor structures with a small amount of residual viable tumor cells). The other 3 patients did not undergo neck dissection due to distant metastasis after completion of thermochemoradiation therapy (n=2) and refusal (n=1). The patient who refused neck dissection underwent biopsy of the N3 lymph node and primary sites and showed grade 3 cancer. During follow-up, 5 patients were alive without disease, and 4 patients died due to pulmonary metastasis (n=3) and noncancer-related causes (n=1). Five-year survival and locoregional control rates were 51% and 88%, respectively. Conclusions: Thermochemoradiation therapy using intra-arterial infusion provided good histopathologic effects and locoregional control rates in patients with N3 metastatic lymph nodes. However, patients with N3

  17. Direct Anastomosis Using Occipital Artery for Additional Revascularization in Moyamoya Disease After Combined Superficial Temporal Artery-Middle Cerebral Artery and Indirect Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazumata, Ken; Kamiyama, Hiroyasu; Saito, Hisayasu; Maruichi, Katsuhiko; Ito, Masaki; Uchino, Haruto; Nakayama, Naoki; Kuroda, Satoshi; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2017-04-01

    The posterior cerebral artery (PCA) is involved in approximately 30% of moyamoya disease (MMD) cases. However, there have been insufficient reports describing revascularization techniques in the posterior portion of the brain, particularly of direct anastomosis. To perform a technical assessment in patients with MMD who underwent either occipital artery (OA)-PCA bypass or OA-middle cerebral artery (MCA) bypass. A total of 428 revascularization procedures in 368 patients were retrospectively assessed by reviewing clinical charts and radiological data. Ten patients (3.5%) were treated with direct bypass after the anterior revascularization with a median interval of 30 months (range, 5 months-16 years). Seven patients were bypass and in 8 hemispheres with an OA-PCA bypass. Patency of the direct bypass was confirmed on angiogram in 7 of 7 patients who underwent conventional angiogram performed within 1 year after the surgery. None of the 10 patients demonstrated cerebral infarctions after the posterior revascularization. In MMD, symptomatic PCA regression after anterior revascularization was found predominantly in children and young adults. Direct anastomosis in the posterior portion of the brain can be successfully achieved and is effective in preventing ischemic events.

  18. Diagnostic performance of colour duplex ultrasonography along with temporal artery biopsy in suspicion of giant cell arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncato, Christophe; Allix-Béguec, Caroline; Brottier-Mancini, Elisabeth; Gombert, Bruno; Denis, Guillaume

    2017-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is a vasculitis that occurs in older adults, affecting vessels of medium and large caliber. GCA diagnosis is a challenge for general practitioners and specialists. The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyse performances of temporal artery biopsy (TAB) and colour duplex ultrasonography (CDU) for GCA diagnosis. All patients with suspicion of GCA and who underwent both TAB and CDU between April 2009 and March 2014 were included in the study. A positive CDU examination was defined by halos on both superficial temporal arteries. Patients were classified based on the physician final diagnosis. Among the 42 eligible patients, 12 had an alternative diagnosis and 30 were diagnosed with GCA. Sensitivities were 77% and 80% for TAB and CDU examinations, respectively. Specificities were 100% for both tests. Twenty-nine (96.7%) patients with GCA had their diagnosis confirmed either by CDU and/or by TAB. Time lengths between the first medical examination and results of TAB and CDU were 15 and 4.2 days (p<0.001), respectively. Our study suggests that in suspected GCA, CDU may be used as first line examination followed by TAB in case of CDU negative results. Such algorithm needs to be further assessed in a multicentre prospective study.

  19. Timing Childhoods: An Alternative Reading of Children's Development through Philosophy of Time, Temporality, Place and Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesar, Marek

    2016-01-01

    This article argues that the denial of development can be a productive space and a liberating time for children in the current outcomes-driven times. The author offers an alternative reading of childhood, considering children's development differently through various philosophical theorizations of events, which emerge through utilizing philosophy…

  20. Assessment of Hyperperfusion by Brain Perfusion SPECT in Transient Neurological Deterioration after Superficial Temporal Artery-Middle Cerebral Artery Anastomosis Surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Won; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Lee, Sang Mi; Eo, Jae Sun; Oh, Chang Wan; Lee, Won Woo; Paeng, Jin Chul; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-08-15

    Transient neurological deterioration (TND) is one of the complications after extracranial-intracranial bypass surgery, and it has been assumed to be caused by postoperative transient hyperperfusion. This study was performed to evaluate the relationship between TND and preoperative and postoperative cerebral perfusion status on brain perfusion SPECT following superficial temporal artery.middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) anastomosis surgery. A total of 60 STA-MCA anastomosis surgeries of 56 patients (mean age: 50{+-}16 yrs; M:F=29:27; atherosclerotic disease: 33, moyamoya disease: 27) which were done between September 2003 and July 2006 were enrolled. The resting cerebral perfusion and cerebral vascular reserve (CVR) after acetazolamide challenge were measured before and 10 days after surgery using 99mTc-ethylcysteinate dimer (ECD) SPECT. Moreover, the cerebral perfusion was measured on the third postoperative day. With the use of the statistical parametric mapping and probabilistic brain atlas, the counts for the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory were calculated for each image, and statistical analyses were performed. In 6 of 60 cases (10%), TND occurred after surgery. In all patients, the preoperative cerebral perfusion of affected MCA territory was significantly lower than that of contralateral side (p=0.002). The cerebral perfusion on the third and tenth day after surgery was significantly higher than preoperative cerebral perfusion (p=0.001, p=0.02). In TND patients, basal cerebral perfusion and CVR on preoperative SPECT were significantly lower than those of non-TND patients (p=0.01, p=0.05). Further, the increases in cerebral perfusion on the third day after surgery were significant higher than those in other patients (p=0.008). In patients with TND, the cerebral perfusion ratio of affected side to contralateral side on third postoperative day was significantly higher than that of other patients (p=0.002). However, there was no significant difference of

  1. Superficial temporal artery: the "C" shape half-buttonhole configuration as it courses over the zygomatic arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Mary In-Ping Huang; Galvin, Leo; Gonzalez, L Fernando

    2016-05-01

    To describe the course and configuration of the superficial temporal artery (STA) around the zygomatic arch. Volume rendered 3D reconstructions of computed tomography angiography of 25 healthy patients were performed and analyzed at Duke University Hospitals. The STA coursed over the zygomatic arch or over the condylar process of the mandible in all cases (25/25 pts, 100 %). The STA courses over the posterior zygomatic arch in 23/25 pts (92 %), creating a characteristic "C" shape half-buttonhole configuration as it embraces the arch. When the STA travels posterior to the zygomatic arch, there is no C shape configuration (2/25 pts, 8 %). The STA bifurcates distal to the zygomatic arch in 24/25 pts (96 %). The "C" shape half-buttonhole configuration is a useful identifying characteristic of the most common course of the STA-over the posterior zygomatic arch before it bifurcates.

  2. Postoperative Dilatation of Superficial Temporal Artery Associated with Transient Neurologic Symptoms After Direct Bypass Surgery for Moyamoya Angiopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Daizo; Okazaki, Takahito; Matsushige, Toshinori; Shinagawa, Katsuhiro; Ichinose, Nobuhiko; Sakamoto, Shigeyuki; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2017-10-01

    In moyamoya angiopathy, transient neurologic symptoms (TNS) are occasionally observed after superficial temporal artery (STA)-middle cerebral artery direct bypass surgery. The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between TNS and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging as well as perform a perfusion study. We reviewed 52 hemispheres in 33 consecutive patients with moyamoya angiopathy. TNS were defined as reversible neurologic dysfunction without any apparent intracranial infarction or hemorrhage. All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging and single-photon emission computed tomography before and within 5 days after surgery. Maximum diameter of STA on time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography and the dilatation ratio of STA were calculated. The presence of signal changes on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images and regional cerebral blood flow were also evaluated. TNS were observed in 13 of 52 (25%) cases 1-16 days after surgery. The mean preoperative STA dilatation, postoperative STA dilatation, and dilatation ratio of STA were 1.33 mm ± 0.27, 1.67 mm ± 0.30, and 29.31% ± 28.13%. Postoperative intraparenchymal cortical hyperintensity lesions and high-intensity signals in the cortex sulci (ivy sign) were detected in 24 (46.2%) cases and 29 (55.8%) cases, respectively. Univariate analyses demonstrated no association between TNS and postoperative signal change on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images as well as cerebral blood flow. Only >1.5-fold dilatation of STA was significantly correlated with TNS (P dilatation was correlated with TNS after direct bypass surgery for moyamoya angiopathy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Optimal temporal windows and dose-reducing strategy for coronary artery bypass graft imaging with 256-slice CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Kun-Mu [Department of Radiology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, 95 Wen Chang Road, Shih Lin District, Taipei 111, Taiwan. (China); Lee, Yi-Wei [Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Guan, Yu-Xiang [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Liang-Kuang [Department of Radiology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, 95 Wen Chang Road, Shih Lin District, Taipei 111, Taiwan. (China); School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Law, Wei-Yip, E-mail: m002325@ms.skh.org.tw [Department of Radiology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, 95 Wen Chang Road, Shih Lin District, Taipei 111, Taiwan. (China); Su, Chen-Tau, E-mail: m005531@ms.skh.org.tw [Department of Radiology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, 95 Wen Chang Road, Shih Lin District, Taipei 111, Taiwan. (China); School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2013-12-11

    Objective: To determine the optimal image reconstruction windows in the assessment of coronary artery bypass grafts (CABGs) with 256-slice computed tomography (CT), and to assess their associated optimal pulsing windows for electrocardiogram-triggered tube current modulation (ETCM). Methods: We recruited 18 patients (three female; mean age 68.9 years) having mean heart rate (HR) of 66.3 beats per minute (bpm) and a heart rate variability of 1.3 bpm for this study. A total of 36 CABGs with 168 segments were evaluated, including 12 internal mammary artery (33.3%) and 24 saphenous vein grafts (66.7%). We reconstructed 20 data sets in 5%-step through 0–95% of the R–R interval. The image quality of CABGs was assessed by a 5-point scale (1=excellent to 5=non-diagnostic) for each segment (proximal anastomosis, proximal, middle, distal course of graft body, and distal anastomosis). Two reviewers discriminated optimal reconstruction intervals for each CABG segment in each temporal window. Optimal windows for ETCM were also evaluated. Results: The determined optimal systolic and diastolic reconstruction intervals could be divided into 2 groups with threshold HR=68. The determined best reconstruction intervals for low heart rate (HR<68) and high heart rate (HR>68) were 76.0±2.5% and 45.0±0% respectively. Average image quality scores were 1.7±0.6 with good inter-observer agreement (Kappa=0.79). Image quality was significantly better for saphenous vein grafts versus arterial grafts (P<0.001). The recommended windows of ETCM for low HR, high HR and all HR groups were 40–50%, 71–81% and 40–96% of R-R interval, respectively. The corresponding dose savings were about 60.8%, 58.7% and 22.7% in that order. Conclusions: We determined optimal reconstruction intervals and ETCM windows representing a good compromise between radiation and image quality for following bypass surgery using a 256-slice CT.

  4. No evidence of parvovirus B19, Chlamydia pneumoniae or human herpes virus infection in temporal artery biopsies in patients with giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helweg-Larsen, J; Tarp, B; Obel, N

    2002-01-01

    using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). METHODS: Thirty temporal artery biopsies from 30 patients suspected of having GCA within a period of 1 yr were examined. Thirteen patients had classical GCA, two had biopsy-negative GCA, 10 patients had polymyalgia rheumatica and five patients had other...... conditions. DNA was extracted from frozen biopsies and PCR was used to amplify genes from Chlamydia pneumoniae, parvovirus B19 and each of the eight human herpes viruses: herpes simplex viruses HSV-1 and 2, Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, varicella zoster virus and human herpes viruses HHV-6, -7 and -8....... RESULTS: In all 30 biopsies, PCR was negative for DNAs of parvovirus B19, each of the eight human herpes viruses and C. pneumoniae. CONCLUSIONS: We found no evidence of DNA from parvovirus B19, human herpes virus or C. pneumoniae in any of the temporal arteries. These agents do not seem to play a unique...

  5. Functional Brachyury binding sites establish a temporal read-out of gene expression in the Ciona notochord.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavanya Katikala

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The appearance of the notochord represented a milestone in Deuterostome evolution. The notochord is necessary for the development of the chordate body plan and for the formation of the vertebral column and numerous organs. It is known that the transcription factor Brachyury is required for notochord formation in all chordates, and that it controls transcription of a large number of target genes. However, studies of the structure of the cis-regulatory modules (CRMs through which this control is exerted are complicated in vertebrates by the genomic complexity and the pan-mesodermal expression territory of Brachyury. We used the ascidian Ciona, in which the single-copy Brachyury is notochord-specific and CRMs are easily identifiable, to carry out a systematic characterization of Brachyury-downstream notochord CRMs. We found that Ciona Brachyury (Ci-Bra controls most of its targets directly, through non-palindromic binding sites that function either synergistically or individually to activate early- and middle-onset genes, respectively, while late-onset target CRMs are controlled indirectly, via transcriptional intermediaries. These results illustrate how a transcriptional regulator can efficiently shape a shallow gene regulatory network into a multi-tiered transcriptional output, and provide insights into the mechanisms that establish temporal read-outs of gene expression in a fast-developing chordate embryo.

  6. Early and noninvasive evaluation using superficial temporal artery duplex ultrasonography after indirect bypass for adult ischemic moyamoya disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Sayaka; Abe, Hiroshi; Katsuta, Toshiro; Fukuda, Kenji; Ogata, Toshiyasu; Miki, Koichi; Inoue, Tooru

    2017-03-01

    The validity of indirect bypass for adult patients with moyamoya disease is still debatable. Some patients are poor responders to indirect bypass, and additive intervention is occasionally required in these cases. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the development of collateral circulation as early as possible postoperatively. Fifteen adult patients (>17 years old) with moyamoya disease (22 affected sides) who underwent encephalo-duro-arterio-synangiosis (EDAS) at Fukuoka University Hospital from April 2008 to August 2014 were included. All patients had ischemic symptoms of at least one hemisphere. Superficial temporal artery duplex ultrasonography (STDU) was performed before and 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Digital subtraction angiography was performed 1 year after the operation to evaluate the development of collateral circulation. Hemispheres exhibiting collateral formation of more than one-third of the MCA distribution were defined as good responders, and those with less than one-third were defined as poor responders. EDAS induced the formation of well-developed collaterals in 17 of 22 affected sides (77.3%) of adult patients with ischemic moyamoya disease. Regardless of the degree of collateral formation, the ischemic event subsided eventually with time in all patients. In good responders, the pulsatility index obtained by STDU showed a drastic decrease 3 months after the operation, while it did not change significantly in poor responders. Absence of this decrease in the pulsatility index along with no change in the flow velocity reliably indicated poor responders. Neovascularization after EDAS can be evaluated noninvasively in early phase using STDU.

  7. Image quality of mean temporal arterial and mean temporal portal venous phase images calculated from low dose dynamic volume perfusion CT datasets in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, X. [Radiology Department, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); Henzler, T., E-mail: thomas.henzler@medma.uni-heidelberg.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University (Germany); Gawlitza, J.; Diehl, S. [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University (Germany); Wilhelm, T. [Department of Surgery, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University (Germany); Schoenberg, S.O. [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University (Germany); Jin, Z.Y.; Xue, H.D. [Radiology Department, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); Smakic, A. [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: Dynamic volume perfusion CT (dVPCT) provides valuable information on tissue perfusion in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and pancreatic cancer. However, currently dVPCT is often performed in addition to conventional CT acquisitions due to the limited morphologic image quality of dose optimized dVPCT protocols. The aim of this study was to prospectively compare objective and subjective image quality, lesion detectability and radiation dose between mean temporal arterial (mTA) and mean temporal portal venous (mTPV) images calculated from low dose dynamic volume perfusion CT (dVPCT) datasets with linearly blended 120-kVp arterial and portal venous datasets in patients with HCC and pancreatic cancer. Materials and methods: All patients gave written informed consent for this institutional review board–approved HIPAA compliant study. 27 consecutive patients (18 men, 9 women, mean age, 69.1 years ± 9.4) with histologically proven HCC or suspected pancreatic cancer were prospectively enrolled. The study CT protocol included a dVPCT protocol performed with 70 or 80 kVp tube voltage (18 spiral acquisitions, 71.2 s total acquisition times) and standard dual-energy (90/150 kVpSn) arterial and portal venous acquisition performed 25 min after the dVPCT. The mTA and mTPV images were manually reconstructed from the 3 to 5 best visually selected single arterial and 3 to 5 best single portal venous phases dVPCT dataset. The linearly blended 120-kVp images were calculated from dual-energy CT (DECT) raw data. Image noise, SNR, and CNR of the liver, abdominal aorta (AA) and main portal vein (PV) were compared between the mTA/mTPV and the linearly blended 120-kVp dual-energy arterial and portal venous datasets, respectively. Subjective image quality was evaluated by two radiologists regarding subjective image noise, sharpness and overall diagnostic image quality using a 5-point Likert Scale. In addition, liver lesion detectability was performed for each liver

  8. Greater repertoire and temporal variability of cross-frequency coupling (CFC modes in resting-state neuromagnetic recordings among children with reading difficulties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavros I Dimitriadis

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available AbstractCross-frequency, phase-to-amplitude coupling (PAC between neuronal oscillations at rest may serve as the substrate that supports information exchange between functionally specialized neuronal populations both within and between cortical regions. The study utilizes novel algorithms to identify prominent instantaneous modes of cross-frequency coupling and their temporal stability in resting state magnetoencephalography (MEG data from 23 students experiencing severe reading difficulties (RD and 27 age-matched non-impaired readers (NI.Phase coherence estimates were computed in order to identify the prominent mode of PAC interaction for each sensor, sensor pair, and pair of frequency bands (from δ to γ at successive temporal segments of the continuous MEG record. The degree of variability in the characteristic frequency-pair PACf1-f2 modes over time was also estimated. Results revealed a wider repertoire of prominent PAC interactions in RD as compared to NI students, suggesting an altered functional substrate for information exchange between neuronal assemblies in the former group. Moreover, RD students showed significant variability in PAC modes over time. This temporal instability of PAC values was particularly prominent: (a within and between right hemisphere temporal and occipitotemporal sensors and, (b between left hemisphere frontal, temporal, and occipitotemporal sensors and corresponding right hemisphere sites. Altered modes of neuronal population coupling may help account for extant data revealing reduced, task-related neurophysiological and hemodynamic activation in left hemisphere regions involved in the reading network in RD. Moreover, the spatial distribution of pronounced instability of cross-frequency coupling modes in this group may provide an explanation for previous reports suggesting the presence of inefficient compensatory mechanisms to support reading.

  9. Greater Repertoire and Temporal Variability of Cross-Frequency Coupling (CFC) Modes in Resting-State Neuromagnetic Recordings among Children with Reading Difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, Stavros I; Laskaris, Nikolaos A; Simos, Panagiotis G; Fletcher, Jack M; Papanicolaou, Andrew C

    2016-01-01

    Cross-frequency, phase-to-amplitude coupling (PAC) between neuronal oscillations at rest may serve as the substrate that supports information exchange between functionally specialized neuronal populations both within and between cortical regions. The study utilizes novel algorithms to identify prominent instantaneous modes of cross-frequency coupling and their temporal stability in resting state magnetoencephalography (MEG) data from 25 students experiencing severe reading difficulties (RD) and 27 age-matched non-impaired readers (NI). Phase coherence estimates were computed in order to identify the prominent mode of PAC interaction for each sensor, sensor pair, and pair of frequency bands (from δ to γ) at successive time windows of the continuous MEG record. The degree of variability in the characteristic frequency-pair PAC(f1-f2) modes over time was also estimated. Results revealed a wider repertoire of prominent PAC interactions in RD as compared to NI students, suggesting an altered functional substrate for information exchange between neuronal assemblies in the former group. Moreover, RD students showed significant variability in PAC modes over time. This temporal instability of PAC values was particularly prominent: (a) within and between right hemisphere temporo-parietal and occipito-temporal sensors and, (b) between left hemisphere frontal, temporal, and occipito-temporal sensors and corresponding right hemisphere sites. Altered modes of neuronal population coupling may help account for extant data revealing reduced, task-related neurophysiological and hemodynamic activation in left hemisphere regions involved in the reading network in RD. Moreover, the spatial distribution of pronounced instability of cross-frequency coupling modes in this group may provide an explanation for previous reports suggesting the presence of inefficient compensatory mechanisms to support reading.

  10. Analysis of Varicella-Zoster Virus in Temporal Arteries Biopsy Positive and Negative for Giant Cell Arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Maria A; White, Teresa; Khmeleva, Nelly; Rempel, April; Boyer, Philip J; Bennett, Jeffrey L; Haller, Andrea; Lear-Kaul, Kelly; Kandasmy, Balasurbramaniyam; Amato, Malena; Wood, Edward; Durairaj, Vikram; Fogt, Franz; Tamhankar, Madhura A; Grossniklaus, Hans E; Poppiti, Robert J; Bockelman, Brian; Keyvani, Kathy; Pollak, Lea; Mendlovic, Sonia; Fowkes, Mary; Eberhart, Charles G; Buttmann, Mathias; Toyka, Klaus V; Meyer-ter-Vehn, Tobias; Petursdottir, Vigdis; Gilden, Don

    2015-11-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is the most common systemic vasculitis in elderly individuals. Diagnosis is confirmed by temporal artery (TA) biopsy, although biopsy results are often negative. Despite the use of corticosteroids, disease may progress. Identification of causal agents will improve outcomes. Biopsy-positive GCA is associated with TA infection by varicella-zoster virus (VZV). To analyze VZV infection in TAs of patients with clinically suspected GCA whose TAs were histopathologically negative and in normal TAs removed post mortem from age-matched individuals. A cross-sectional study for VZV antigen was performed from January 2013 to March 2015 using archived, deidentified, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded GCA-negative, GCA-positive, and normal TAs (50 sections/TA) collected during the past 30 years. Regions adjacent to those containing VZV were examined by hematoxylin-eosin staining. Immunohistochemistry identified inflammatory cells and cell types around nerve bundles containing VZV. A combination of 17 tertiary referral centers and private practices worldwide contributed archived TAs from individuals older than 50 years. Presence and distribution of VZV antigen in TAs and histopathological changes in sections adjacent to those containing VZV were confirmed by 2 independent readers. Varicella-zoster virus antigen was found in 45 of 70 GCA-negative TAs (64%), compared with 11 of 49 normal TAs (22%) (relative risk [RR] = 2.86; 95% CI, 1.75-5.31; P Varicella-zoster virus antigen was frequently found in perineurial cells expressing claudin-1 around nerve bundles. Of 45 GCA-negative participants whose TAs contained VZV antigen, 1 had histopathological features characteristic of GCA, and 16 (36%) showed adventitial inflammation adjacent to viral antigen; no inflammation was seen in normal TAs. In patients with clinically suspected GCA, prevalence of VZV in their TAs is similar independent of whether biopsy results are negative or positive pathologically

  11. [Spatio-Temporal Bioelectrical Brain Activity Organization during Reading Syntagmatic and Paradigmatic Collocations by Students with Different Foreign Language Proficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolova, L V; Cherkasova, A S

    2015-01-01

    Texts or words/pseudowords are often used as stimuli for human verbal activity research. Our study pays attention to decoding processes of grammatical constructions consisted of two-three words--collocations. Russian and English collocation sets without any narrative were presented to Russian-speaking students with different English language skill. Stimulus material had two types of collocations: paradigmatic and syntagmatic. 30 students (average age--20.4 ± 0.22) took part in the study, they were divided into two equal groups depending on their English language skill (linguists/nonlinguists). During reading brain bioelectrical activity of cortex has been registered from 12 electrodes in alfa-, beta-, theta-bands. Coherent function reflecting cooperation of different cortical areas during reading collocations has been analyzed. Increase of interhemispheric and diagonal connections while reading collocations in different languages in the group of students with low knowledge of foreign language testifies of importance of functional cooperation between the hemispheres. It has been found out that brain bioelectrical activity of students with good foreign language knowledge during reading of all collocation types in Russian and English is characterized by economization of nervous substrate resources compared to nonlinguists. Selective activation of certain cortical areas has also been observed (depending on the grammatical construction type) in nonlinguists group that is probably related to special decoding system which processes presented stimuli. Reading Russian paradigmatic constructions by nonlinguists entailed increase between left cortical areas, reading of English syntagmatic collocations--between right ones.

  12. Numerical study of spatial-temporal evolution of the secondary flow in the models of a common carotid artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakov A. Gataulin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A numerical study of the secondary flow in two geometrically different models of a common carotid artery has been carried out. One of the models (Model 1 is characterized by a statistically averaged curvature, and the second one (Model 2 is attributed to the maximal curvature of the artery. It was shown that the most intensive swirl occurred at the phase of flow rate decreasing, the maximum values of the swirl parameters were observed at the interface of the cervical and thoracic segments of the artery. This interface is the place where the Dean vortices are transformed into a single vortex forming a swirling flow. The swirl intensity averaged over the systole and characterized by the ratio of the maximal values of the axial and circumferential velocities was evaluated as 0.20 for Model 1 and 0.25 for Model 2. Generally, it was in accordance with the data of clinical measurements.

  13. Comparison of auscultatory and oscillometric BP readings in children with obesity and the effect on diagnosing arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca-Reyes, Salvador; Romero-Velarde, Enrique; Torres-Gudiño, Edith; Illescas-Zarate, Daniel; Forsyth-MacQuarrie, Avril M

    2017-02-23

    The level of agreement between two blood pressure (BP) reading methods, auscultatory vs oscillometric, was examined using a mercury sphygmomanometer and an electronic device in children and adolescents with different levels of obesity. The readings were compared to see their impact on the diagnosis of pre-hypertension/hypertension. Blood pressure readings were taken in children with obesity (body mass index ≥ 95th percentile) and severe obesity (≥120% 95th percentile). We used the Bland-Altman analysis and Intraclass Correlation Coefficient to determine the agreement between measurements. The mercury sphygmomanometer readings were lower than those obtained with the electronic device for both systolic and diastolic BP (p=0.01 and 0.001, respectively). The average systolic and diastolic BP differences between the oscillometric vs first mercury reading were 4.2/10.2mm Hg, respectively. A large difference was observed between the BP measurement methods. The ICC showed regular to moderate reliability for the systolic BP (.595) but poor for the diastolic BP (.330). Screening using the first of three mercury measurements showed that 10.4% of the children and adolescents had BPs within the pre-hypertension/hypertension range. This was reduced to 5.2% when the three mercury readings were averaged. Large discrepancies were observed in both the systolic and diastolic BP. These differences are not clinically acceptable to consider the two instrument interchangeable. The electronic device readings were higher and they overestimated the diagnosis of hypertension. Copyright © 2017 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  14. The usefulness of the ivy sign on fluid-attenuated intensity recovery images in improved brain hemodynamic changes after superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery anastomosis in adult patients with moyamoya disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Keun; Yoon, Byul Hee; Chung, Seung Young; Park, Moon Sun; Kim, Seong Min; Lee, Do Sung

    2013-10-01

    MR perfusion and single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) are well known imaging studies to evaluate hemodynamic change between prior to and following superficial temporal artery (STA)-middle cerebral artery (MCA) anastomosis in moyamoya disease. But their side effects and invasiveness make discomfort to patients. We evaluated the ivy sign on MR fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images in adult patients with moyamoya disease and compared it with result of SPECT and MR perfusion images. We enrolled twelve patients (thirteen cases) who were diagnosed with moyamoya disease and underwent STA-MCA anastomosis at our medical institution during a period ranging from September of 2010 to December of 2012. The presence of the ivy sign on MR FLAIR images was classified as Negative (0), Minimal (1), and Positive (2). Regions were classified into four territories: the anterior cerebral artery (ACA), the anterior MCA, the posterior MCA and the posterior cerebral artery. Ivy signs on preoperative and postoperative MR FLAIR were improved (8 and 4 in the ACA regions, 13 and 4 in the anterior MCA regions and 19 and 9 in the posterior MCA regions). Like this result, the cerebrovascular reserve (CVR) on SPECT was significantly increased in the sum of CVR in same regions after STA-MCA anastomosis. After STA-MCA anastomosis, ivy signs were decreased in the cerebral hemisphere. As compared with conventional diagnostic modalities such as SPECT and MR perfusion images, the ivy sign on MR FLAIR is considered as a useful indicator in detecting brain hemodynamic changes between preoperatively and postoperatively in adult moyamoya patients.

  15. Temporal profile of the effects of intracisternal injection of magnesium sulfate solution on vasodilation of spastic cerebral arteries in the canine SAH model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Kentaro; Miyazaki, Masahiro; Hara, Yasukazu; Aiko, Yasuhisa; Yamamoto, Takuji; Nakao, Yasuaki; Esaki, Takanori

    2011-01-01

    the temporal profiles of the effects of intracisternal injection of magnesium sulfate (MgSO(4)) on vasodilation and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) magnesium ion (Mg(2+)) concentration were investigated in the canine subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) model. cerebral vasospasm was induced using the two-hemorrhage model in seven female beagles. On day 7, 0.5 ml/kg of 15 mmol/l MgSO(4) in Ringer solution was injected into the cerebellomedullary cistern. Angiography was performed on day 1 (before SAH), and before and 1, 3, and 6 h after the intracisternal injection on day 7. CSF Mg(2+) was measured at the same time. the diameters of the basilar artery (BA), vertebral artery (VA), and superior cerebellar artery (SCA) before the intracisternal injection on day 7 were 0.59 ± 0.15, 0.41 ± 0.17, and 0.35 ± 0.17 mm, respectively, and were significantly decreased (p < 0.01) compared with the baseline diameters on day 1. The BA diameters at 1 h (0.74 ± 0.16 mm) and 3 h (0.73 ± 0.13 mm), the VA diameter at 1 h (0.64 ± 0.14 mm), and the SCA diameter at 3 h (0.54 ± 0.08 mm) after the injection were significantly increased (p < 0.05). The CSF Mg(2+) concentration was significantly increased (p < 0.01) at 1 h (3.59 ± 0.76 mEq/l) and 3 h (2.00 ± 0.31 mEq/l) after the injection compared with the baseline value (1.35 ± 0.23 mEq/l). the reversible effect of intracisternal MgSO(4) solution injection on the spastic artery depends on maintenance of the optimal CSF Mg(2+) concentration.

  16. Ability of non-invasive intermittent blood pressure monitoring and a continuous non-invasive arterial pressure monitor (CNAP™) to provide new readings in each 1-min interval during elective caesarean section under spinal anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, T; Telec, N; Dennis, A; Griffiths, J; Buettner, A

    2012-03-01

    We compared the ability of automated non-invasive intermittent oscillometric blood pressure monitoring with a new device, CNAP(TM) (continuous non-invasive arterial pressure) to provide a new blood pressure reading in each 1-min interval between spinal anaesthesia and delivery during caesarean section. We also compared the accuracy of continuous non-invasive arterial pressure readings with non-invasive blood pressure measurements before spinal anaesthesia. Fifty-nine women participated. The non-invasive and continuous non-invasive monitors displayed new blood pressure readings in a mean of 82% (11%) and 83% (13%) (p = 0.97) of the one-minute intervals between spinal anaesthesia and delivery, respectively. Continuous non-invasive arterial pressure was more likely to fail on two or more consecutive minutes (p=0.001). From the pre-spinal readings, the mean bias, defined as non-invasive-continuous non-invasive arterial pressure, and limits of agreement (±2SD mean bias) for systolic, diastolic and mean blood pressure respectively were +1.3 (±26.0), -2.9 (±21.8) and +2.6 (±20.4) mmHg. The new monitor has disadvantages compared with conventional non-invasive intermittent blood pressure monitoring. Anaesthesia © 2012 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  17. Reading words and other people: A comparison of exception word, familiar face and affect processing in the left and right temporal variants of primary progressive aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binney, Richard J; Henry, Maya L; Babiak, Miranda; Pressman, Peter S; Santos-Santos, Miguel A; Narvid, Jared; Mandelli, Maria Luisa; Strain, Paul J; Miller, Bruce L; Rankin, Katherine P; Rosen, Howard J; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa

    2016-09-01

    Semantic variant primary progressive aphasia (svPPA) typically presents with left-hemisphere predominant rostral temporal lobe (rTL) atrophy and the most significant complaints within the language domain. Less frequently, patients present with right-hemisphere predominant temporal atrophy coupled with marked impairments in processing of famous faces and emotions. Few studies have objectively compared these patient groups in both domains and therefore it is unclear to what extent the syndromes overlap. Clinically diagnosed svPPA patients were characterized as left- (n = 21) or right-predominant (n = 12) using imaging and compared along with 14 healthy controls. Regarding language, our primary focus was upon two hallmark features of svPPA; confrontation naming and surface dyslexia. Both groups exhibited naming deficits and surface dyslexia although the impairments were more severe in the left-predominant group. Familiarity judgments on famous faces and affect processing were more profoundly impaired in the right-predominant group. Our findings suggest that the two syndromes overlap significantly but that early cases at the tail ends of the continuum constitute a challenge for current clinical criteria. Correlational neuroimaging analyses implicated a mid portion of the left lateral temporal lobe in exception word reading impairments in line with proposals that this region is an interface between phonology and semantic knowledge. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Spatio-Temporal Progression of Cortical Activity Related to Continuous Overt and Covert Speech Production in a Reading Task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan S Brumberg

    Full Text Available How the human brain plans, executes, and monitors continuous and fluent speech has remained largely elusive. For example, previous research has defined the cortical locations most important for different aspects of speech function, but has not yet yielded a definition of the temporal progression of involvement of those locations as speech progresses either overtly or covertly. In this paper, we uncovered the spatio-temporal evolution of neuronal population-level activity related to continuous overt speech, and identified those locations that shared activity characteristics across overt and covert speech. Specifically, we asked subjects to repeat continuous sentences aloud or silently while we recorded electrical signals directly from the surface of the brain (electrocorticography (ECoG. We then determined the relationship between cortical activity and speech output across different areas of cortex and at sub-second timescales. The results highlight a spatio-temporal progression of cortical involvement in the continuous speech process that initiates utterances in frontal-motor areas and ends with the monitoring of auditory feedback in superior temporal gyrus. Direct comparison of cortical activity related to overt versus covert conditions revealed a common network of brain regions involved in speech that may implement orthographic and phonological processing. Our results provide one of the first characterizations of the spatiotemporal electrophysiological representations of the continuous speech process, and also highlight the common neural substrate of overt and covert speech. These results thereby contribute to a refined understanding of speech functions in the human brain.

  19. Spatio-Temporal Progression of Cortical Activity Related to Continuous Overt and Covert Speech Production in a Reading Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumberg, Jonathan S; Krusienski, Dean J; Chakrabarti, Shreya; Gunduz, Aysegul; Brunner, Peter; Ritaccio, Anthony L; Schalk, Gerwin

    2016-01-01

    How the human brain plans, executes, and monitors continuous and fluent speech has remained largely elusive. For example, previous research has defined the cortical locations most important for different aspects of speech function, but has not yet yielded a definition of the temporal progression of involvement of those locations as speech progresses either overtly or covertly. In this paper, we uncovered the spatio-temporal evolution of neuronal population-level activity related to continuous overt speech, and identified those locations that shared activity characteristics across overt and covert speech. Specifically, we asked subjects to repeat continuous sentences aloud or silently while we recorded electrical signals directly from the surface of the brain (electrocorticography (ECoG)). We then determined the relationship between cortical activity and speech output across different areas of cortex and at sub-second timescales. The results highlight a spatio-temporal progression of cortical involvement in the continuous speech process that initiates utterances in frontal-motor areas and ends with the monitoring of auditory feedback in superior temporal gyrus. Direct comparison of cortical activity related to overt versus covert conditions revealed a common network of brain regions involved in speech that may implement orthographic and phonological processing. Our results provide one of the first characterizations of the spatiotemporal electrophysiological representations of the continuous speech process, and also highlight the common neural substrate of overt and covert speech. These results thereby contribute to a refined understanding of speech functions in the human brain.

  20. Spatio-Temporal Progression of Cortical Activity Related to Continuous Overt and Covert Speech Production in a Reading Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumberg, Jonathan S.; Krusienski, Dean J.; Chakrabarti, Shreya; Gunduz, Aysegul; Brunner, Peter; Ritaccio, Anthony L.; Schalk, Gerwin

    2016-01-01

    How the human brain plans, executes, and monitors continuous and fluent speech has remained largely elusive. For example, previous research has defined the cortical locations most important for different aspects of speech function, but has not yet yielded a definition of the temporal progression of involvement of those locations as speech progresses either overtly or covertly. In this paper, we uncovered the spatio-temporal evolution of neuronal population-level activity related to continuous overt speech, and identified those locations that shared activity characteristics across overt and covert speech. Specifically, we asked subjects to repeat continuous sentences aloud or silently while we recorded electrical signals directly from the surface of the brain (electrocorticography (ECoG)). We then determined the relationship between cortical activity and speech output across different areas of cortex and at sub-second timescales. The results highlight a spatio-temporal progression of cortical involvement in the continuous speech process that initiates utterances in frontal-motor areas and ends with the monitoring of auditory feedback in superior temporal gyrus. Direct comparison of cortical activity related to overt versus covert conditions revealed a common network of brain regions involved in speech that may implement orthographic and phonological processing. Our results provide one of the first characterizations of the spatiotemporal electrophysiological representations of the continuous speech process, and also highlight the common neural substrate of overt and covert speech. These results thereby contribute to a refined understanding of speech functions in the human brain. PMID:27875590

  1. Biopsia de la arteria temporal: revisión de indicaciones y técnica quirúrgica para cirujanos plásticos Temporal artery biopsy: review of indications and surgical technique for plastic surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rodríguez Lorenzo

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available La arteritis de células gigantes (ACG es una vasculitis que presenta complicaciones graves si no es diagnosticada y tratada precozmente con corticoides a altas dosis. La biopsia de la arteria temporal (BAT es la técnica diagnóstica estandarizada utilizada para confirmar la enfermedad. Se trata de una técnica sencilla y con poca morbilidad. No obstante, en la actualidad existe una controversia sobre su indicación en pacientes con sospecha clínica de arteritis sin síntomas craneales debido a la baja tasa de positividad de la biopsia. Presentamos en este trabajo una serie de 28 pacientes en los que se realizaron 30 BAT con el objetivo de revisar las indicaciones y describir la técnica quirúrgica utilizada.Giant cell arteritis is a vasculitis that presents serious complications if it is not diagnosed and treated prematurely with corticosteroids to high dose. The temporal artery biopsy is the gold estandar technique of diagnosis used to confirm the disease. It is a simple technique with little morbidity. Nevertheless, currently there is a controversy on its indication in patients with clinical suspicion of arteritis without craneal symptoms because of the downward rate of positiveness of the biopsy. We present in this work a serie of 28 patients in which 30 biopsies were carried out with the objective to review the indications and to describe the surgical technique utilized.

  2. Reading, listening and memory-related brain activity in children with early-stage temporal lobe epilepsy of unknown cause-an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankinen, Katariina; Ipatti, Pieta; Harila, Marika; Nikkinen, Juha; Paakki, Jyri-Johan; Rytky, Seppo; Starck, Tuomo; Remes, Jukka; Tokariev, Maksym; Carlson, Synnöve; Tervonen, Osmo; Rantala, Heikki; Kiviniemi, Vesa

    2015-09-01

    The changes in functional brain organization associated with paediatric epilepsy are largely unknown. Since children with epilepsy are at risk of developing learning difficulties even before or shortly after the onset of epilepsy, we assessed the functional organization of memory and language in paediatric patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) at an early stage in epilepsy. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) response to four cognitive tasks measuring reading, story listening, memory encoding and retrieval in a population-based group of children with TLE of unknown cause (n = 21) and of normal intelligence and a healthy age and gender-matched control group (n = 21). Significant BOLD response differences were found only in one of the four tasks. In the story listening task, significant differences were found in the right hemispheric temporal structures, thalamus and basal ganglia. Both activation and deactivation differed significantly between the groups, activation being increased and deactivation decreased in the TLE group. Furthermore, the patients with abnormal electroencephalograms (EEGs) showed significantly increased activation bilaterally in the temporal structures, basal ganglia and thalamus relative to those with normal EEGs. The patients with normal interictal EEGs had a significantly stronger deactivation than those with abnormal EEGs or the controls, the differences being located outside the temporal structures. Our results suggest that TLE entails a widespread disruption of brain networks. This needs to be taken into consideration when evaluating learning abilities in patients with TLE. The thalamus seems to play an active role in TLE. The changes in deactivation may reflect neuronal inhibition. Copyright © 2015 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Spontaneous confabulation, temporal context confusion and reality monitoring: a study of three patients with anterior communicating artery aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Martha S; Cipolotti, Lisa; Shallice, Tim

    2010-11-01

    Spontaneous confabulation involves the production of false or distorted memories, and is commonly associated with ventromedial prefrontal damage. One influential theory proposes that the critical deficit is a failure to suppress currently irrelevant memory traces that intrude into ongoing thinking (Schnider & Ptak, 1999). In this study, we report experimental investigations with three spontaneously confabulating patients aimed at exploring this account. Using Schnider and Ptak's (1999) continuous recognition paradigm, we replicated their experimental results with our patients. However, our data suggest that the critical impairment might be more generalized than a failure to suppress currently irrelevant memories. First, a temporal source monitoring task failed to show that previous memory traces intrude into the present. Second, a reality monitoring task revealed that confabulating patients had a tendency to misidentify imagined events as real, a result that cannot be explained in terms of temporal confusion. This error was specific to confabulating patients and was not shared by non-confabulating ACoA patients. Our data therefore suggest a more generalized impairment in source monitoring, not only on the basis of temporality or current relevance, but across a range of contextual domains, including information used to distinguish real memories from imaginings.

  4. Temporal evolution of vasospasm and clinical outcome after intra-arterial vasodilator therapy in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

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    Laleh Daftari Besheli

    Full Text Available Intra-arterial (IA vasodilator therapy is one of the recommended treatments to minimize the impact of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage-induced cerebral vasospasm refractory to standard management. However, its usefulness and efficacy is not well established. We evaluated the effect IA vasodilator therapy on middle cerebral artery blood flow and on discharge outcome. We reviewed records for 115 adults admitted to Neurointensive Care Unit to test whether there was a difference in clinical outcome (discharge mRS in those who received IA infusions. In a subset of 19 patients (33 vessels treated using IA therapy, we tested whether therapy was effective in reversing the trends in blood flow. All measures of MCA blood flow increased from day -2 to -1 before infusion (maximum Peak Systolic Velocity (PSV 232.2±9.4 to 262.4±12.5 cm/s [p = 0.02]; average PSV 202.1±8.5 to 229.9±10.9 [p = 0.02]; highest Mean Flow Velocity (MFV 154.3±8.3 to 172.9±10.5 [p = 0.10]; average MFV 125.5±6.3 to 147.8±9.5 cm/s, [p = 0.02] but not post-infusion (maximum PSV 261.2±14.6 cm/s [p = .89]; average PSV 223.4±11.4 [p = 0.56]; highest MFV 182.9±12.4 cm/s [p = 0.38]; average MFV 153.0±10.2 cm/s [p = 0.54]. After IA therapy, flow velocities were consistently reduced (day X infusion interaction p<0.01 for all measures. However, discharge mRS was higher in IA infusion group, even after adjusting for sex, age, and admission grades. Thus, while IA vasodilator therapy was effective in reversing the vasospasm-mediated deterioration in blood flow, clinical outcomes in the treated group were worse than the untreated group. There is need for a prospective randomized controlled trial to avoid potential confounding effect of selection bias.

  5. Geo-epidemiology of temporal artery biopsy-positive giant cell arteritis in Australia and New Zealand: is there a seasonal influence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smit, Elisabeth; Clarke, Linda; Sanfilippo, Paul G; Merriman, Tony R; Brown, Matthew A; Hill, Catherine L; Hewitt, Alex W

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies, although inconclusive, have suggested possible associations of environmental risk factors with the development of giant cell arteritis (GCA). We aim to investigate seasonal influence on the incidence of GCA across Australia and New Zealand. In establishing an international study to investigate the molecular aetiology of GCA, archived temporal artery biopsy (TAB) specimens primarily from Australia and New Zealand were obtained. Demographic details including age, sex and date of TAB were collected from collaborating pathology departments. The season in which GCA was diagnosed was determined and compared with previous reports investigating the association between environmental risk factors and GCA. Our study comprises data from 2224 TAB-positive patients with GCA; 2099 of which were from patients in Australia and New Zealand. The mean age at time of diagnosis was 76.4 years of age. The female-to-male ratio was 2.2:1. We noted equal distribution of the incidence rate across all four seasons (530-580 cases diagnosed every quarter). Statistical analysis of seasonal variation by Poisson regression and cosinor methods showed no incidence preponderance across seasons. Our results do not support a seasonal component contributing to the onset of disease. Our literature search identifies no consistent environmental risk factor in association with GCA. This is the largest GCA data set reported outside of Europe. Our results demonstrate equal distribution of the incidence rate across all four seasons. In contrast to some earlier reports, we did not identify evidence of a seasonal component contributing to the onset of disease.

  6. Temporal Trends and Geographic Variation of Lower Extremity Amputation in Patients with Peripheral Artery Disease: Results from U.S. Medicare 2000–2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, W. Schuyler; Patel, Manesh R.; Dai, David; Subherwal, Sumeet; Stafford, Judith; Calhoun, Sarah; Peterson, Eric D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We sought to characterize temporal trends, patient-specific factors and geographic variation associated with amputation in patients with lower extremity peripheral artery disease (LE PAD) during the study period. Background Amputation represents the end stage failure for those with LE PAD and little is known about the rates and geographic variation in use of LE amputation. Methods Using data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2008, we examined national patterns of LE amputation among patients 65 years or older with PAD. Multivariable logistic regression was used to adjust regional results for other patient demographic and clinical factors. Results Among 2,730,742 older patients with identified PAD, the overall rate of LE amputation declined from 7,258 per 100,000 PAD patients to 5,790 per 100,000 (p amputation. The adjusted odds ratio of LE amputation per year between 2000 and 2008 was 0.95 (95% CI, 0.95-0.95, pamputation rates decreased significantly among PAD patients. There however remains significant patient and geographic variation in amputation rates across the United States. PMID:23103040

  7. Aspectos prosódicos temporais da leitura de escolares com dislexia do desenvolvimento Temporal prosodic aspects of reading in students with developmental dyslexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Mendonça Alves

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar, do ponto de vista fonético, por meio de medidas acústicas e perceptivas, os aspectos prosódicos temporais presentes na leitura em voz alta de escolares com e sem dislexia, a fim de identificar diferenças de desempenho entre os dois tipos de leitores que possam apontar para características peculiares da dislexia. MÉTODOS: Gravação da leitura de um texto por 40 escolares (entre nove e 14 anos, cursando da 3ª à 5ª série, sendo 10 disléxicos (grupo clínico e 30 escolares sem queixas de alterações de aprendizagem (grupo não-clínico. Os dados foram analisados perceptivamente e acusticamente, utilizando-se o programa WinPitch. As seguintes medidas foram realizadas: duração e localização das pausas, tempo total de elocução, taxa de elocução, tempo de articulação e taxa de articulação. RESULTADOS: Em comparação com o grupo não-clínico, o grupo clínico apresentou maior número de pausas e pausas mais longas; os valores obtidos para as taxas de elocução e de articulação indicaram respectivamente menor velocidade de leitura e uma lentidão na produção de cada gesto articulatório. CONCLUSÃO: As dificuldades identificadas no processamento da leitura pelas crianças com dislexia dificultam a organização prosódica na leitura de um texto.PURPOSE: To analyze the temporal prosodic aspect in loud reading of students with and without dyslexia from the phonetic point of view through acoustic and perceptual evaluation, in order to identify differences in performance between the two types of readers that may point to particular characteristics of dyslexia. METHODS: Forty students from 3rd to 5th grades with ages ranging from nine to 14 years, ten dyslexic (clinical group and 30 without any complaints of learning deficits (non-clinical group were recorded during loud reading of a text. Data were perceptually and acoustically analyzed using the software WinPitch. The following measures were taken: pause

  8. Asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis treated with medical therapy alone: temporal trends and implications for risk assessment and the design of future studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadar, Nira; Raman, Gowri; Moorthy, Denish; O'Donnell, Thomas F; Thaler, David E; Feldmann, Edward; Lau, Joseph; Kitsios, Georgios D; Dahabreh, Issa J

    2014-01-01

    The rate of adverse clinical outcomes among patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis receiving medical therapy alone can be used to guide clinical decision-making and to inform future research. We aimed to investigate temporal changes in the incidence rate of clinical outcomes among patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis receiving medical therapy alone and to explore the implications of these changes for the design of future comparative studies. We searched MEDLINE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, US Food and Drug Administration documents, and reference lists of included studies (last search: December 31, 2012). We selected prospective cohort studies of medical therapy for asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis and we extracted information on study characteristics, risk of bias, and outcomes. We performed meta-analyses to estimate summary incidence rates, meta-regressions to assess trends over time, and simulations to explore sample size requirements for the design of future studies comparing new treatments against medical therapy. The main outcomes of interest were ipsilateral stroke, any stroke, cardiovascular death, death, and myocardial infarction. We identified 41 studies of medical therapy for patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis (last recruitment year: 1978-2009). The summary incidence rate of ipsilateral carotid territory stroke (25 studies) was 1.7 per 100 person-years. This incidence rate was significantly lower in recent studies (last recruitment year from 2000 onwards) as compared to studies that ended recruitment earlier (1.0 vs. 2.3 events per 100 person-years; p studies), cardiovascular death (6 studies), death (13 studies), and myocardial infarction (5 studies) were 2.7, 4.1, 4.6, and 1.8 per 100 person-years, respectively. Simulations showed that future studies would need to enroll large numbers of patients with a relatively high incidence rate under medical therapy, and evaluate interventions with large effect

  9. The Role of Ultrasound Compared to Biopsy of Temporal Arteries in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Giant Cell Arteritis (TABUL): a diagnostic accuracy and cost-effectiveness study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luqmani, Raashid; Lee, Ellen; Singh, Surjeet; Gillett, Mike; Schmidt, Wolfgang A; Bradburn, Mike; Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Diamantopoulos, Andreas P; Forrester-Barker, Wulf; Hamilton, William; Masters, Shauna; McDonald, Brendan; McNally, Eugene; Pease, Colin; Piper, Jennifer; Salmon, John; Wailoo, Allan; Wolfe, Konrad; Hutchings, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is a relatively common form of primary systemic vasculitis, which, if left untreated, can lead to permanent sight loss. We compared ultrasound as an alternative diagnostic test with temporal artery biopsy, which may be negative in 9-61% of true cases. OBJECTIVE To compare the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of ultrasound with biopsy in diagnosing patients with suspected GCA. DESIGN Prospective multicentre cohort study. SETTING Secondary care. PARTICIPANTS A total of 381 patients referred with newly suspected GCA. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Sensitivity, specificity and cost-effectiveness of ultrasound compared with biopsy or ultrasound combined with biopsy for diagnosing GCA and interobserver reliability in interpreting scan or biopsy findings. RESULTS We developed and implemented an ultrasound training programme for diagnosing suspected GCA. We recruited 430 patients with suspected GCA. We analysed 381 patients who underwent both ultrasound and biopsy within 10 days of starting treatment for suspected GCA and who attended a follow-up assessment (median age 71.1 years; 72% female). The sensitivity of biopsy was 39% [95% confidence interval (CI) 33% to 46%], which was significantly lower than previously reported and inferior to ultrasound (54%, 95% CI 48% to 60%); the specificity of biopsy (100%, 95% CI 97% to 100%) was superior to ultrasound (81%, 95% CI 73% to 88%). If we scanned all suspected patients and performed biopsies only on negative cases, sensitivity increased to 65% and specificity was maintained at 81%, reducing the need for biopsies by 43%. Strategies combining clinical judgement (clinician's assessment at 2 weeks) with the tests showed sensitivity and specificity of 91% and 81%, respectively, for biopsy and 93% and 77%, respectively, for ultrasound; cost-effectiveness (incremental net monetary benefit) was £485 per patient in favour of ultrasound with both cost savings and a small health gain. Inter

  10. The Accuracy of the CNAP® Device Compared with Invasive Radial Artery Measurements for Providing Continuous Noninvasive Arterial Blood Pressure Readings at a Medical Intensive Care Unit: A Method-Comparison Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolle, Karl-Heinz; Schmid, Martin; Prettenthaler, Helga; Weger, Christian

    2015-12-01

    In cases of intensive care unit (ICU) patients without an arterial line, noninvasive continuous blood pressure monitoring could be very beneficial. The CNAP® monitor (CNSystems Medizintechnik AG) provides noninvasive, beat-to-beat blood pressure (BP) estimates using the volume clamp method to measure finger arterial pressure calibrated to brachial pressure values. The aim of this study was to compare noninvasive BP estimates of the CNAP monitor with invasive blood pressure (IBP) measurements obtained via a radial arterial catheter in unselected medical ICU patients under routine clinical conditions. In 40 adult patients, IBP and noninvasive CNAP blood pressure (CBP) were measured simultaneously for 30 minutes. Bland-Altman analysis accounting for repeated measurements revealed accuracy and precision of CBP toward IBP. Percentage errors were calculated using the summary measures method and tested for interchangeability. Trending analysis was assessed using 4-quadrant plots and polar plots, whereby each reported statistical calculation used the sample size of n = 40 patients. A total of 7200 measurement pairs of CBP and IBP were analyzed. For mean arterial pressure, accuracy ± precision resulted in 4.6 ± 6.7 mm Hg (limits of agreement -8.7 to 17.8 mm Hg) with a percentage error of 6.77% (95% confidence interval [CI], 6.57%-6.97%). Trending analysis of 3-minute intervals showed a concordance rate of 94.6% (95% CI, 94.0%-95.2%; exclusion zone 10%) and a polar concordance rate of 99.50% (95% CI, 99.48%-99.52%) for changes lying within 10% limits. The CNAP device provided feasible estimates of BP in unselected medical ICU patients under routine clinical conditions. Mean arterial pressure met interchangeability criteria for accuracy toward radial arterial pressure, as well as for percentage error, and showed good trending capabilities according to the Critchley predefined criteria.

  11. Arterial responses during migraine headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Helle Klingenberg; Nielsen, T H; Olesen, J

    1990-01-01

    The superficial temporal artery has been thought to be the main focus of pain during migraine attacks, but its diameter has never been measured directly. The use of a new, high-resolution ultrasound machine to measure arterial size in 25 migraine patients with unilateral head pain showed...... that the lumen was wider on the painful than on the non-painful side during a migraine attack. The diameters of both radial arteries and the temporal artery on the non-painful side were smaller during than between attacks. The generalised vasoconstriction was not shared by the temporal artery on the affected...... side, which suggests a local vasodilatory response. The findings suggest that cephalic arteries may play a role in migraine pathogenesis....

  12. Teaching Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Richard R.

    2013-01-01

    "Teaching Reading" uncovers the interactive processes that happen when people learn to read and translates them into a comprehensive easy-to-follow guide on how to teach reading. Richard Day's revelations on the nature of reading, reading strategies, reading fluency, reading comprehension, and reading objectives make fascinating…

  13. Vascularização temporária de membros isquêmicos por meio de shunt arteriomedular: trabalho experimental Temporary vascularization on ischemic limbs through arterial-medullar shunt: an experimental work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo André Poerschke

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: Os autores idealizaram um shunt temporário entre a artéria femoral e o canal medular de ossos longos para manter a viabilidade dos membros agudamente isquêmicos, enquanto não é possível estabelecer um tratamento definitivo. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a perviedade de shunts temporários arteriomedulares e a perfusão dos membros, durante duas horas em cães de experimentação, que tiveram a artéria femoral ligada. MÉTODOS: Alocaram-se aleatoriamente dois grupos, com três cães no Grupo Controle e seis no Grupo Intervenção. Os controles tiveram a artéria femoral comum direita ligada. O Grupo Intervenção, além da ligadura da artéria, recebeu um shunt. Após duas horas, realizou-se a medida de pH dos membros isquêmicos; avaliação do fluxo arterial por meio de um sonar Doppler; avaliação da coloração do sangramento na extremidade distal do membro e foram retirados em bloco torácico os pulmões para análise anatomopatológica. RESULTADOS: A média do pH do sangue capilar das extremidades do membros no Grupo Controle foi de 6,97 (±0,39; no Grupo Intervenção o pH foi de 7,25 (±0,46, com pBACKGROUND: The authors idealized a temporary shunt between the femoral artery and the medullar canal on long bones to keep the viability of acutely ischemic limbs, while waiting for a definitive treatment. OBJECTIVE: To assess the flow on temporary shunts between the femoral artery and the marrow canal of the tibia during two hours in experimental dogs, which had the femoral artery interrupted. METHODS: Two groups with three dogs on the Control Group and six on the Intervention Group were allocated at random. The controls had the right femoral common artery interrupted. The Intervention Group received a shunt between the iliac external artery and the medullar canal of the right tibia in addition. After two hours, the measure of the pH, blood coloration, blood flow in sonar Doppler on the ischemic limbs were performed. The lungs were

  14. Neural activations correlated with reading speed during reading novels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimaki, Norio; Munetsuna, Shinji; Sasaki, Toyofumi; Hayakawa, Tomoe; Ihara, Aya; Wei, Qiang; Terazono, Yasushi; Murata, Tsutomu

    2009-12-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure neural activations in subjects instructed to silently read novels at ordinary and rapid speeds. Among the 19 subjects, 8 were experts in a rapid reading technique. Subjects pressed a button to turn pages during reading, and the interval between turning pages was recorded to evaluate the reading speed. For each subject, we evaluated activations in 14 areas and at 2 instructed reading speeds. Neural activations decreased with increasing reading speed in the left middle and posterior superior temporal area, left inferior frontal area, left precentral area, and the anterior temporal areas of both hemispheres, which have been reported to be active for linguistic processes, while neural activation increased with increasing reading speed in the right intraparietal sulcus, which is considered to reflect visuo-spatial processes. Despite the considerable reading speed differences, correlation analysis showed no significant difference in activation dependence on reading speed with respect to the subject groups and instructed reading speeds. The activation reduction with speed increase in language-related areas was opposite to the previous reports for low reading speeds. The present results suggest that subjects reduced linguistic processes with reading speed increase from ordinary to rapid speed.

  15. Exposure to Road, Railway, and Aircraft Noise and Arterial Stiffness in the SAPALDIA Study: Annual Average Noise Levels and Temporal Noise Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foraster, Maria; Eze, Ikenna C; Schaffner, Emmanuel; Vienneau, Danielle; Héritier, Harris; Endes, Simon; Rudzik, Franziska; Thiesse, Laurie; Pieren, Reto; Schindler, Christian; Schmidt-Trucksäss, Arno; Brink, Mark; Cajochen, Christian; Marc Wunderli, Jean; Röösli, Martin; Probst-Hensch, Nicole

    2017-09-07

    The impact of different transportation noise sources and noise environments on arterial stiffness remains unknown. We evaluated the association between residential outdoor exposure to annual average road, railway, and aircraft noise levels, total noise intermittency (IR), and total number of noise events (NE) and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) following a cross-sectional design. We measured baPWV (meters/second) in 2,775 participants (49-81 y old) at the second follow-up (2010-2011) of the Swiss Cohort Study on Air Pollution and Lung and Heart Diseases in Adults (SAPALDIA). We assigned annual average road, railway, and aircraft noise levels (Ldensource), total day- and nighttime NEtime and IRtime (percent fluctuation=0%, none or constant noise; percent fluctuation=100%, high fluctuation) at the most exposed façade using 2011 Swiss noise models. We applied multivariable linear mixed regression models to analyze associations. Medians [interquartile ranges (IQRs)] were baPWV=13.4 (3.1) m/s; Ldenair (57.6% exposed)=32.8 (8.0) dB; Ldenrail (44.6% exposed)=30.0 (8.1) dB; Ldenroad (99.7% exposed): 54.2 (10.6) dB; NEnight=123 (179); NEday=433 (870); IRnight=73% (27); and IRday=63.8% (40.3). We observed a 0.87% (95% CI: 0.31, 1.43%) increase in baPWV per IQR of Ldenrail, which was greater with IRnight>80% or with daytime sleepiness. We observed a nonsignificant positive association between Ldenroad and baPWV in urban areas and a negative tendency in rural areas. NEnight, but not NEday, was associated with baPWV. Associations were independent of the other noise sources and air pollution. Long-term exposure to railway noise, particularly in an intermittent nighttime noise environment, and to nighttime noise events, mainly related to road noise, may affect arterial stiffness, a major determinant of cardiovascular disease. Ascertaining noise exposure characteristics beyond average noise levels may be relevant to better understand noise-related health

  16. Reading Faster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nation, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the visual nature of the reading process as it relates to reading speed. It points out that there is a physical limit on normal reading speed and beyond this limit the reading process will be different from normal reading where almost every word is attended to. The article describes a range of activities for developing…

  17. READING THEORIES AND READING COMPREHENSION

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Novary Ngabut

    2015-01-01

    In this article several reading theories in their relations to reading comprehension teachers and lecturers of English need to know are reviewed. At the theory level, three other Models of Reading, namely Bottom-Up, Top-Down, and Interactive are previously discussed to the Schema Theory. In reviewing the reading comprehension, the history of reading instruction, types and purposes of reading, and cognitive reading skills are discussed. Finally, it reviews six variables involved in the compreh...

  18. Temporal assessment of splenic function in patients who have undergone percutaneous image-guided splenic artery embolization in the setting of trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirasteh, Ali; Snyder, Laura L; Lin, Roger; Rosenblum, David; Reed, Steven; Sattar, Abdus; Passalacqua, Matthew; Prologo, J David

    2012-01-01

    The role of transcatheter splenic arterial embolization (SAE) in the nonoperative management of splenic injury is evolving. The purpose of this study is to evaluate patients who have undergone SAE for laboratory markers of hyposplenism in the years after their procedure. Thirty-four subjects who had undergone SAE as part of nonoperative management of splenic trauma during a period of 10 years were included. A blood sample was collected from each patient for complete blood count and smear analysis for peripheral markers of hyposplenism (as indicated by Howell-Jolly bodies [HJBs]). Sample size and power analysis was performed, and likelihoods for various true prevalences were calculated. The average time interval from procedure to follow-up was 4.4 years. No participants had peripheral markers of hyposplenism or abnormalities in cell count on follow-up. Phagocytic function of the spleen in patients who have undergone SAE is preserved, as evidenced by the absence of HJBs on follow-up peripheral blood smears. Copyright © 2012 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Temporal Concurrent Constraint Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valencia, Frank Dan

    Concurrent constraint programming (ccp) is a formalism for concurrency in which agents interact with one another by telling (adding) and asking (reading) information in a shared medium. Temporal ccp extends ccp by allowing agents to be constrained by time conditions. This dissertation studies...

  20. Reading Comics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, Carol L.

    2008-01-01

    Many adults, even librarians who willingly add comics to their collections, often dismiss the importance of comics. Compared to reading "real" books, reading comics appears to be a simple task and compared to reading no books, reading comics might be preferable. After all, comics do have words, but the plentiful pictures seem to carry most of the…

  1. Reading between eye saccades.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Blais

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Skilled adult readers, in contrast to beginners, show no or little increase in reading latencies as a function of the number of letters in words up to seven letters. The information extraction strategy underlying such efficiency in word identification is still largely unknown, and methods that allow tracking of the letter information extraction through time between eye saccades are needed to fully address this question. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The present study examined the use of letter information during reading, by means of the Bubbles technique. Ten participants each read 5,000 five-letter French words sampled in space-time within a 200 ms window. On the temporal dimension, our results show that two moments are especially important during the information extraction process. On the spatial dimension, we found a bias for the upper half of words. We also show for the first time that letter positions four, one, and three are particularly important for the identification of five-letter words. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings are consistent with either a partially parallel reading strategy or an optimal serial reading strategy. We show using computer simulations that this serial reading strategy predicts an absence of a word-length effect for words from four- to seven letters in length. We believe that the Bubbles technique will play an important role in further examining the nature of reading between eye saccades.

  2. Reading between eye saccades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blais, Caroline; Fiset, Daniel; Arguin, Martin; Jolicoeur, Pierre; Bub, Daniel; Gosselin, Frédéric

    2009-07-30

    Skilled adult readers, in contrast to beginners, show no or little increase in reading latencies as a function of the number of letters in words up to seven letters. The information extraction strategy underlying such efficiency in word identification is still largely unknown, and methods that allow tracking of the letter information extraction through time between eye saccades are needed to fully address this question. The present study examined the use of letter information during reading, by means of the Bubbles technique. Ten participants each read 5,000 five-letter French words sampled in space-time within a 200 ms window. On the temporal dimension, our results show that two moments are especially important during the information extraction process. On the spatial dimension, we found a bias for the upper half of words. We also show for the first time that letter positions four, one, and three are particularly important for the identification of five-letter words. Our findings are consistent with either a partially parallel reading strategy or an optimal serial reading strategy. We show using computer simulations that this serial reading strategy predicts an absence of a word-length effect for words from four- to seven letters in length. We believe that the Bubbles technique will play an important role in further examining the nature of reading between eye saccades.

  3. Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 60. Read More Carotid artery disease Carotid artery surgery Recovering after stroke Risks of tobacco Smoking - tips on how to quit Stent Stroke ...

  4. The psychophysiology of reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarenza, Giuseppe A; Di Pietro, Sara F; Casarotto, Silvia

    2014-11-01

    Early identification of dyslexia would be fundamental to prevent the negative consequences of delayed treatment in the social, psychological and occupational domains. Movement-related potentials of dyslexic children are characterized by inadequate ability to program movements and reduced capacity to evaluate their performance and to correct their errors. Reading-related potentials recorded during different reading conditions elicit a series of positive and negative components with specific functional meaning and with a characteristic spatial-temporal pattern. These reading-related potentials, when analyzed with sLORETA, show significantly different patterns of activation when comparing self-paced reading aloud to passive viewing of single letters. Comparison of fMRI and sLORETA during both tasks showed that the cortical region with the widest inter-modality similarities is the middle-superior temporal lobe during self-paced reading aloud. Neuropsychological studies have shown the existence of clinical subtypes of dyslexia; these studies have been confirmed by the results of ICA applied to the EEG. Dyslexia can be defined as a disorder of programming and integrating ideokinetic elements, associated with a deficiency in the fast processing and integration of sensory information, with reduced efficiency of error systems analysis. Each of these phenomena occurs at different levels of the central nervous system and at different times. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Topics / Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting What Is Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) ... multiple coronary arteries during one surgery. Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Figure A shows the location of the ...

  6. Coronary artery anatomy and variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malagò, Roberto; Pezzato, Andrea; Barbiani, Camilla; Alfonsi, Ugolino; Nicolì, Lisa; Caliari, Giuliana; Pozzi Mucelli, Roberto

    2011-12-01

    Variants and congenital anomalies of the coronary arteries are usually asymptomatic, but may present with severe chest pain or cardiac arrest. The introduction of multidetector CT coronary angiography (MDCT-CA) allows the detection of significant coronary artery stenosis. Improved performance with isotropic spatial resolution and higher temporal resolution provides a valid alternative to conventional coronary angiography (CCA) in many patients. MDCT-CA is now considered the ideal tool for three-dimensional visualization of the complex and tortuous anatomy of the coronary arteries. With multiplanar and volume-rendered reconstructions, MDCT-CA may even outperform CCA in determining the relative position of vessels, thus providing a better view of the coronary vascular anatomy. The purpose of this review is to describe the normal anatomy of the coronary arteries and their main variants based on MDCT-CA with appropriate reconstructions.

  7. Coronary artery anatomy and variants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malago, Roberto; Pezzato, Andrea; Barbiani, Camilla; Alfonsi, Ugolino; Nicoli, Lisa; Caliari, Giuliana; Pozzi Mucelli, Roberto [Policlinico G.B. Rossi, University of Verona, Department of Radiology, Verona (Italy)

    2011-12-15

    Variants and congenital anomalies of the coronary arteries are usually asymptomatic, but may present with severe chest pain or cardiac arrest. The introduction of multidetector CT coronary angiography (MDCT-CA) allows the detection of significant coronary artery stenosis. Improved performance with isotropic spatial resolution and higher temporal resolution provides a valid alternative to conventional coronary angiography (CCA) in many patients. MDCT-CA is now considered the ideal tool for three-dimensional visualization of the complex and tortuous anatomy of the coronary arteries. With multiplanar and volume-rendered reconstructions, MDCT-CA may even outperform CCA in determining the relative position of vessels, thus providing a better view of the coronary vascular anatomy. The purpose of this review is to describe the normal anatomy of the coronary arteries and their main variants based on MDCT-CA with appropriate reconstructions. (orig.)

  8. Bilingual Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garganta, Soledad; Ramirez, Inez

    This report discusses the importance of bilingual reading instruction for limited English speaking ability (LESA) students, and careful testing of their language dominance and reading levels. Bilingual students, and English- and Spanish-dominant students from the Fabens Independent School District, Grades K-13, were tested for the data reported…

  9. Coronary Arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... animations for grades K-6. The Coronary Arteries Coronary Circulation The heart muscle, like every other organ or ... the heart by its own vascular system, called coronary circulation. The aorta (the main blood supplier to the ...

  10. Polymyalgia rheumatica and temporal arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epperly, T D; Moore, K E; Harrover, J D

    2000-08-15

    Polymyalgia rheumatica and temporal arteritis are closely related inflammatory conditions that affect different cellular targets in genetically predisposed persons. Compared with temporal arteritis, polymyalgla rheumatica is much more common, affecting one in 200 persons older than 50 years. Temporal arteritis, however, is more dangerous and can lead to sudden blindness. The diagnosis of polymyalgia rheumatica is based on the presence of a clinical syndrome consisting of fever, nonspecific somatic complaints, pain and stiffness in the shoulder and pelvic girdles, and an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Temporal arteritis typically presents with many of the same findings as polymyalgia rheumatica, but patients also have headaches and tenderness to palpation over the involved artery. Arterial biopsy usually confirms the diagnosis of temporal arteritis. Early diagnosis and treatment of polymyalgia rheumatica or temporal arteritis can dramatically improve patients' lives and return them to previous functional status. Corticosteroid therapy provides rapid and dramatic improvement of the clinical features of both conditions. Therapy is generally continued for six to 24 months. Throughout treatment, clinical condition is assessed periodically. Patients are instructed to see their physician immediately if symptoms recur or they develop new headache, jaw claudication or visual problems.

  11. Arterial stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ursula Quinn

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of biomechanical properties of arteries have become an important surrogate outcome used in epidemiological and interventional cardiovascular research. Structural and functional differences of vessels in the arterial tree result in a dampening of pulsatility and smoothing of blood flow as it progresses to capillary level. A loss of arterial elastic properties results a range of linked pathophysiological changes within the circulation including increased pulse pressure, left ventricular hypertrophy, subendocardial ischaemia, vessel endothelial dysfunction and cardiac fibrosis. With increased arterial stiffness, the microvasculature of brain and kidneys are exposed to wider pressure fluctuations and may lead to increased risk of stroke and renal failure. Stiffening of the aorta, as measured by the gold-standard technique of aortic Pulse Wave Velocity (aPWV, is independently associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes across many different patient groups and in the general population. Therefore, use of aPWV has been proposed for early detection of vascular damage and individual cardiovascular risk evaluation and it seems certain that measurement of arterial stiffness will become increasingly important in future clinical care. In this review we will consider some of the pathophysiological processes that result from arterial stiffening, how it is measured and factors that may drive it as well as potential avenues for therapy. In the face of an ageing population where mortality from atheromatous cardiovascular disease is falling, pathology associated with arterial stiffening will assume ever greater importance. Therefore, understanding these concepts for all clinicians involved in care of patients with cardiovascular disease will become vital.

  12. Arterial stiffness and cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoxuan; Lyu, Peiyuan; Ren, Yanyan; An, Jin; Dong, Yanhong

    2017-09-15

    damages the cerebral microcirculation, which causes various phenomena associated with cerebral small vessel diseases (CSVDs), such as white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), cerebral microbleeds (CMBs), and lacunar infarctions (LIs). The mechanisms underlying the relationship between arterial stiffness and cognitive impairment may also be associated with reductions in white matter and gray matter integrity, medial temporal lobe atrophy and Aβ protein deposition. Engaging in more frequent physical exercise; increasing flavonoid and long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid consumption; increasing tea, nitrite, dietary calcium and vitamin D intake; losing weight and taking medications intended to improve insulin sensitivity; quitting smoking; and using antihypertensive drugs and statins are early interventions and lifestyle changes that may be effective in preventing arterial stiffness and thus preventing cognitive impairment. Arterial stiffness is a sensitive predictor of cognitive impairment, and arterial stiffness severity has the potential to serve as an indicator used to facilitate treatments designed to prevent or delay the onset and progression of dementia in elderly individuals. Early treatment of arterial stiffness is beneficial and recommended. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Does E-Reading Enhance Reading Fluency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Rahima S.; Taqi, Hanan A.; Dashti, Abdulmohsin A.; Sadeq, Taiba M.

    2015-01-01

    Extensive reading is reading as much as possible, for one's own pleasure, at a difficulty level at which one can read smoothly and quickly. In the domain of reading, this paper investigates the effect of extensive reading from e-books, through utilizing a number of downloadable reading application programs on the students' e-devices, as opposed to…

  14. How Reading Volume Affects Both Reading Fluency and Reading Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allington, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    Long overlooked, reading volume is actually central to the development of reading proficiencies, especially in the development of fluent reading proficiency. Generally no one in schools monitors the actual volume of reading that children engage in. We know that the commonly used commercial core reading programs provide only material that requires…

  15. Project Temporalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tryggestad, Kjell; Justesen, Lise; Mouritsen, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore how animals can become stakeholders in interaction with project management technologies and what happens with project temporalities when new and surprising stakeholders become part of a project and a recognized matter of concern to be taken...... into account. Design/methodology/approach – The paper is based on a qualitative case study of a project in the building industry. The authors use actor-network theory (ANT) to analyze the emergence of animal stakeholders, stakes and temporalities. Findings – The study shows how project temporalities can...... multiply in interaction with project management technologies and how conventional linear conceptions of project time may be contested with the emergence of new non-human stakeholders and temporalities. Research limitations/implications – The study draws on ANT to show how animals can become stakeholders...

  16. The role of reading time complexity and reading speed in text comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallot, Sebastian; O'Brien, Beth A; Haussmann, Anna; Kloos, Heidi; Lyby, Marlene S

    2014-11-01

    Reading speed is commonly used as an index of reading fluency. However, reading speed is not a consistent predictor of text comprehension, when speed and comprehension are measured on the same text within the same reader. This might be due to the somewhat ambiguous nature of reading speed, which is sometimes regarded as a feature of the reading process, and sometimes as a product of that process. We argue that both reading speed and comprehension should be seen as the result of the reading process, and that the process of fluent text reading can instead be described by complexity metrics that quantify aspects of the stability of the reading process. In this article, we introduce complexity metrics in the context of reading and apply them to data from a self-paced reading study. In this study, children and adults read a text silently or aloud and answered comprehension questions after reading. Our results show that recurrence metrics that quantify the degree of temporal structure in reading times yield better prediction of text comprehension compared to reading speed. However, the results for fractal metrics are less clear. Furthermore, prediction of text comprehension is generally strongest and most consistent across silent and oral reading when comprehension scores are normalized by reading speed. Analyses of word length and word frequency indicate that the observed complexity in reading times is not a simple function of the lexical properties of the text, suggesting that text reading might work differently compared to reading of isolated word or sentences. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  17. Pathway evidence of how musical perception predicts word-level reading ability in children with reading difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogo-Moreira, Hugo; Brandão de Ávila, Clara Regina; Ploubidis, George B; de Jesus Mari, Jair

    2013-01-01

    To investigate whether specific domains of musical perception (temporal and melodic domains) predict the word-level reading skills of eight- to ten-year-old children (n = 235) with reading difficulties, normal quotient of intelligence, and no previous exposure to music education classes. A general-specific solution of the Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA), which underlies a musical perception construct and is constituted by three latent factors (the general, temporal, and the melodic domain), was regressed on word-level reading skills (rate of correct isolated words/non-words read per minute). General and melodic latent domains predicted word-level reading skills.

  18. Occlusive Peripheral Arterial Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... but also to the worsening of the disease. Obstructive peripheral arterial disease most commonly develops in the arteries of the legs, including the two branches of the aorta (iliac arteries), main arteries of the thighs (femoral arteries), of ... arterial disease may also develop in the part ...

  19. Current themes in neuroimaging studies of reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Cathy J

    2013-05-01

    This editorial provides a summary of the highlights from 11 new papers that have been published in a special issue of Brain and Language on the neurobiology of reading. The topics investigate reading mechanisms in both adults and children. Several of the findings illustrate how responses in the left ventral occipito-temporal cortex, and other reading areas, change with learning, expertise and the task: In the early stages of reading acquisition, learning/expertise increases activation in reading areas as well as in an attentionally-controlled, learning circuit. In later stages, expertise and efficiency decrease activation within the reading network and increase anatomical connectivity. Special interest is given to a white matter tract (the vertical occipital fasciculus) that projects dorsally from the left occipito-temporal cortex to the posterior parietal lobe. This observation fits with a magnetoencephalography study showing how activity in the angular gyrus is influenced by early occipito-temporal activity; with angular gyrus activity contributing to inferior frontal activity. Overall, the papers within the special issue illustrate the wide range of different techniques that can be used to reveal the functional anatomy of reading and the time course of activity within the different reading pathways. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Pediatric nonaortic arterial aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Frank M; Eliason, Jonathan L; Ganesh, Santhi K; Blatt, Neal B; Stanley, James C; Coleman, Dawn M

    2016-02-01

    Pediatric arterial aneurysms are extremely uncommon. Indications for intervention remain poorly defined and treatments vary. The impetus for this study was to better define the contemporary surgical management of pediatric nonaortic arterial aneurysms. A retrospective analysis was conducted of 41 children with 61 aneurysms who underwent surgical treatment from 1983 to 2015 at the University of Michigan. Arteries affected included: renal (n = 26), femoral (n = 7), iliac (n = 7), superior mesenteric (n = 4), brachial (n = 3), carotid (n = 3), popliteal (n = 3), axillary (n = 2), celiac (n = 2), ulnar (n = 2), common hepatic (n = 1), and temporal (n = 1). Intracranial aneurysms and aortic aneurysms treated during the same time period were not included in this study. Primary outcomes analyzed were postoperative complications, mortality, and freedom from reintervention. The study included 27 boys and 14 girls, with a median age of 9.8 years (range, 2 months-18 years) and a weight of 31.0 kg (range, 3.8-71 kg). Multiple aneurysms existed in 14 children. Obvious factors that contributed to aneurysmal formation included: proximal juxta-aneurysmal stenoses (n = 14), trauma (n = 12), Kawasaki disease (n = 4), Ehlers-Danlos type IV syndrome (n = 1), and infection (n = 1). Preoperative diagnoses were established using arteriography (n = 23), magnetic resonance angiography (n = 6), computed tomographic arteriography (n = 5), or ultrasonography (n = 7), and confirmed during surgery. Indications for surgery included risk of expansion and rupture, potential thrombosis or embolization of aneurysmal thrombus, local soft tissue and nerve compression, and secondary hypertension in the case of renal artery aneurysms. Primary surgical techniques included: aneurysm resection with reanastomsis, reimplantation, or angioplastic closure (n = 16), interposition (n = 10) or bypass grafts (n = 2), ligation (n = 9), plication (n = 8), endovascular occlusion (n = 3), and nephrectomy (n = 4) in

  1. Reading Disorders:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaber, Emma

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the relationship between eating disorders and reading behaviors, arguing that there is a meaningful difference in a minority of readers' approach to and understanding of anorexia life-writing, and of literary texts more broadly. To illuminate this distinction, this article begins by considering the reported deleterious influence of Marya Hornbacher’s anorexia memoir, Wasted, elaborating the ways Hornbacher offers a positive presentation of anorexia nervosa that may, intentionally or not, induce certain readers to “try it” themselves. This is followed by an exploration of how Hornbacher’s own reading praxis is implicated in a discursive feedback loop around anorexia narratives. It concludes with a discussion of disordered reading attitudes in relation to the emergence of the “pro-anorexia” phenomenon. PMID:28569728

  2. Reading Rembrandt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bal, Mieke

    2006-01-01

    Reading Rembrandt: Beyond the Word-Image Opposition explores the potential for an interdisciplinary methodology between visual art and literature. In a series of close analyses of works by "Rembrandt" - works as we see them today, through all the ways of seeing and commenting that precede - and

  3. Reading Letters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Sofie

    2012-01-01

    In our everyday life we constantly encounter a diversity of reading matters, including display types on traffic signage, printed text in novels, newspaper headlines, or our own writing on a computer screen. All these conditions place different demands on the typefaces applied. The book discusses...

  4. Does Extensive Reading Promote Reading Speed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Mu

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown a wide range of learning benefits accruing from extensive reading. Not only is there improvement in reading, but also in a wide range of language uses and areas of language knowledge. However, few research studies have examined reading speed. The existing literature on reading speed focused on students' reading speed without…

  5. The effect of sumatriptan on cephalic arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amin, Faisal Mohammad; Asghar, Mohammad Sohail; Ravneberg, Julie W

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To explore a possible differential effect of sumatriptan on extracerebral versus cerebral arteries, we examined the superficial temporal (STA), middle meningeal (MMA), extracranial internal carotid (ICAextra), intracranial internal carotid (ICAintra), middle cerebral (MCA) and basilar arteries...... (BA). METHODS: The arterial circumferences were recorded blindly using high-resolution magnetic resonance angiography before and after subcutaneous sumatriptan injection (6 mg) in 18 healthy volunteers. RESULTS: We found significant constrictions of MMA (16.5%), STA (16.4%) and ICAextra (15.2%) ( P...

  6. EMPOWERING THE READING READABILITY

    OpenAIRE

    Handoko Handoko

    2014-01-01

    A general assumption about reading is that students improve their reading ability by reading a lot. This research was conducted to explain the use of extensive reading and aimed to figure out its implementation in improving students’ reading readability by using the class action research technique. The data of this research relates to the students ‘reading progress shown in their reading reports: spoken and written summary, reading comprehension and vocabulary mastery and their participation....

  7. The arterial blood supply of the temporomandibular joint: an anatomical study and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuccia, Antonino Marco; Caradonna, Carola; Caradonna, Domenico; Anastasi, Giuseppe; Milardi, Demetrio; Favaloro, Angelo; De Pietro, Anita; Angileri, Tommaso Maurizio; Caradonna, Luigi; Cutroneo, Giuseppina

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze three-dimensional images of the arterial supply to the temporomandibular joint. Ten patients (five men and five women, mean age 36 years) without signs or symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, who underwent contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) scanning with intravenous contrast, were studied. The direct volume rendering technique of CT images was used, and a data set of images to visualize the vasculature of the human temporomandibular joint in three dimensions was created. After elaboration of the data through post-processing, the arterial supply of the temporomandibular joint was studied. The analysis revealed the superficial temporal artery, the anterior tympanic artery, the deep temporal artery, the auricular posterior artery, the transverse facial artery, the middle meningeal artery, and the maxillary artery with their branches as the main arterial sources for the lateral and medial temporomandibular joint. The direct volume rendering technique was found to be successful in the assessment of the arterial supply to the temporomandibular joint. The superficial temporal artery and maxillary artery ran along the lateral and medial sides of the condylar neck, suggesting that these arteries are at increased risk during soft-tissue procedures such as an elective arthroplasty of the temporomandibular joint.

  8. The arterial blood supply of the temporomandibular joint: an anatomical study and clinical implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuccia, Antonino Marco; Caradonna, Carola; Caradonna, Domenico [Dept. of Surgical and Oncological Disciplines, University of Palermo, Palermo (Italy); Anastasi, Giuseppe; Milardi, Demetrio; Favaloro, Angelo; Caradonna, Luigi; Cutroneo, Giuseppina [Biomorphology and Biotechnologies, University of Messina, Messina (Italy); De Pietro, Anita; Angileri, Tommaso Maurizio [Villa Santa Teresa, Diagnostica per Immagini, Palermo (Italy)

    2013-03-15

    The aim of this study was to analyze three-dimensional images of the arterial supply to the temporomandibular joint. Ten patients (five men and five women, mean age 36 years) without signs or symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, who underwent contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) scanning with intravenous contrast, were studied. The direct volume rendering technique of CT images was used, and a data set of images to visualize the vasculature of the human temporomandibular joint in three dimensions was created. After elaboration of the data through post-processing, the arterial supply of the temporomandibular joint was studied. The analysis revealed the superficial temporal artery, the anterior tympanic artery, the deep temporal artery, the auricular posterior artery, the transverse facial artery, the middle meningeal artery, and the maxillary artery with their branches as the main arterial sources for the lateral and medial temporomandibular joint. The direct volume rendering technique was found to be successful in the assessment of the arterial supply to the temporomandibular joint. The superficial temporal artery and maxillary artery ran along the lateral and medial sides of the condylar neck, suggesting that these arteries are at increased risk during soft-tissue procedures such as an elective arthroplasty of the temporomandibular joint.

  9. Temporal naturalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolin, Lee

    2015-11-01

    Two people may claim both to be naturalists, but have divergent conceptions of basic elements of the natural world which lead them to mean different things when they talk about laws of nature, or states, or the role of mathematics in physics. These disagreements do not much affect the ordinary practice of science which is about small subsystems of the universe, described or explained against a background, idealized to be fixed. But these issues become crucial when we consider including the whole universe within our system, for then there is no fixed background to reference observables to. I argue here that the key issue responsible for divergent versions of naturalism and divergent approaches to cosmology is the conception of time. One version, which I call temporal naturalism, holds that time, in the sense of the succession of present moments, is real, and that laws of nature evolve in that time. This is contrasted with timeless naturalism, which holds that laws are immutable and the present moment and its passage are illusions. I argue that temporal naturalism is empirically more adequate than the alternatives, because it offers testable explanations for puzzles its rivals cannot address, and is likely a better basis for solving major puzzles that presently face cosmology and physics. This essay also addresses the problem of qualia and experience within naturalism and argues that only temporal naturalism can make a place for qualia as intrinsic qualities of matter.

  10. Carotid artery surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotid endarterectomy; CAS surgery; Carotid artery stenosis - surgery; Endarterectomy - carotid artery ... results of stenting versus endarterectomy for carotid-artery stenosis. N Engl J Med . 2016;374(11):1021- ...

  11. Carotid Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... head with blood. If you have carotid artery disease, the arteries become narrow or blocked, usually because ... other substances found in the blood. Carotid artery disease is serious because it can block the blood ...

  12. Coronary artery disease (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... through these arteries is critical for the heart. Coronary artery disease usually results from the build-up of fatty material and plaque, a condition called atherosclerosis. As the coronary arteries narrow, the flow of blood to the ...

  13. Peripheral arterial line (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A peripheral arterial line is a small, short plastic catheter placed through the skin into an artery of the arm or leg. The purpose of a peripheral arterial line is to allow continuous monitoring of blood pressure ...

  14. Subcortical Differentiation of Stop Consonants Relates to Reading and Speech-in-Noise Perception

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jane Hornickel; Erika Skoe; Trent Nicol; Steven Zecker; Nina Kraus; Michael M. Merzenich

    2009-01-01

    Children with reading impairments have deficits in phonological awareness, phonemic categorization, speech-in-noise perception, and psychophysical tasks such as frequency and temporal discrimination...

  15. Music Training Increases Phonological Awareness and Reading Skills in Developmental Dyslexia: A Randomized Control Trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Flaugnacco, Elena; Lopez, Luisa; Terribili, Chiara; Montico, Marcella; Zoia, Stefania; Schön, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    .... Within this framework, we test the hypothesis that music training, by improving temporal processing and rhythm abilities, improves phonological awareness and reading skills in children with dyslexia...

  16. What’s the Story? The Tale of Reading Fluency Told at Speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Christopher F. A.; Gaab, Nadine

    2012-01-01

    Fluent readers process written text rapidly and accurately, and comprehend what they read. Historically, reading fluency has been modeled as the product of discrete skills such as single word decoding. More recent conceptualizations emphasize that fluent reading is the product of competency in, and the coordination of, multiple cognitive sub-skills (a multi-componential view). In this study, we examined how the pattern of activation in core reading regions changes as the ability to read fluently is manipulated through reading speed. We evaluated 13 right-handed adults with a novel fMRI task assessing fluent sentence reading and lower-order letter reading at each participant’s normal fluent reading speed, as well as constrained (slowed) and accelerated reading speeds. Comparing fluent reading conditions with rest revealed regions including bilateral occipito-fusiform, left middle temporal, and inferior frontal gyral clusters across reading speeds. The selectivity of these regions’ responses to fluent sentence reading was shown by comparison with the letter reading task. Region of interest analyses showed that at constrained and accelerated speeds these regions responded significantly more to fluent sentence reading. Critically, as reading speed increased, activation increased in a single reading-related region: occipital/fusiform cortex (left > right). These results demonstrate that while brain regions engaged in reading respond selectively during fluent reading, these regions respond differently as the ability to read fluently is manipulated. Implications for our understanding of reading fluency, reading development, and reading disorders are discussed. PMID:21954000

  17. What's the story? The tale of reading fluency told at speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Christopher F A; Gaab, Nadine

    2012-11-01

    Fluent readers process written text rapidly and accurately, and comprehend what they read. Historically, reading fluency has been modeled as the product of discrete skills such as single word decoding. More recent conceptualizations emphasize that fluent reading is the product of competency in, and the coordination of, multiple cognitive sub-skills (a multi-componential view). In this study, we examined how the pattern of activation in core reading regions changes as the ability to read fluently is manipulated through reading speed. We evaluated 13 right-handed adults with a novel fMRI task assessing fluent sentence reading and lower-order letter reading at each participant's normal fluent reading speed, as well as constrained (slowed) and accelerated reading speeds. Comparing fluent reading conditions with rest revealed regions including bilateral occipito-fusiform, left middle temporal, and inferior frontal gyral clusters across reading speeds. The selectivity of these regions' responses to fluent sentence reading was shown by comparison with the letter reading task. Region of interest analyses showed that at constrained and accelerated speeds these regions responded significantly more to fluent sentence reading. Critically, as reading speed increased, activation increased in a single reading-related region: occipital/fusiform cortex (left > right). These results demonstrate that while brain regions engaged in reading respond selectively during fluent reading, these regions respond differently as the ability to read fluently is manipulated. Implications for our understanding of reading fluency, reading development, and reading disorders are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Reading for Pleasure: A Reading Resource Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battles, Jane; Tambuscio, Colleen

    1991-01-01

    A reading resource room was developed for 59 deaf and hard-of-hearing secondary-level students, to improve vocabulary and reading skills and encourage reading for pleasure. Books of interest to teenagers with limited reading levels were located from several publishing companies and were arranged in a space with shelves and comfortable seating.…

  19. Reading Together: A Successful Reading Fluency Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Chase; Mohr, Kathleen A. J.; Rasinski, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    The article describes a reading fluency intervention called Reading Together that combines the method of repeated readings (Samuels, 1979) and the Neurological Impress Method (Heckelman, 1969). Sixteen volunteers from various backgrounds were recruited and trained to deliver the Reading Together intervention to struggling readers in third through…

  20. Slow Reading: Reading along "Lectio" Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badley, K. Jo-Ann; Badley, Ken

    2011-01-01

    The medieval monastic movement preserved and developed reading practices--lectio--from ancient Greek pedagogy as a slow, mindful approach to reading for formation. This ancient way of reading, now better known as lectio divina, challenges the fast, pragmatic reading so characteristic of our time. We propose that the present moment may be ripe for…

  1. Pleasure Reading and Reading Rate Gains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beglar, David; Hunt, Alan

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of (a) the amount of pleasure reading completed, (b) the type of texts read (i.e., simplified or unsimplified books), and (c) the level of simplified texts read by 14 Japanese university students who made the largest reading rate gains over one academic year. The findings indicated that the participants who made…

  2. The grounding of temporal metaphors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Vicky T; Desai, Rutvik H

    2016-03-01

    Grounded cognition suggests that the processing of conceptual knowledge cued by language relies on the sensory-motor regions. Does temporal language similarly engage brain areas involved in time perception? Participants read sentences that describe the temporal extent of events with motion verbs (The hours crawled until the release of the news) and their static controls. Comparison conditions were fictive motion (The trail crawled until the end of the hills) and literal motion (The caterpillar crawled towards the top of the tree), along with their static controls. Several time sensitive locations, identified using a meta-analysis, showed activation specific to temporal metaphors, including in the left insula, right claustrum, and bilateral posterior superior temporal sulci. Fictive and literal motion contrasts did not show this difference. Fictive motion contrast showed activation in a conceptual motion sensitive area of the left posterior inferior temporal sulcus (ITS). These data suggest that language of time is at least partially grounded in experiential time. In addition, motion semantics has different consequences for events and objects: temporal events become animate, while static entities become motional. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Radial Artery Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Fedakar

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Upper limb aneurysms are less frequently seen than the other aneurysm. Radial arterial aneurysm is usually associated with the trauma. Interventional procedures can cause pseudoaneurysm at the radial artery puncture sites. Radial artery aneurysm may cause the thromboembolic events at the fingers and the hand. We present a case of isolated radial arterial aneurysm with idiopathic origin.

  4. Single umbilical artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanthi Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The umbilical cord usually contains two arteries and one vein. The vein carries the oxygenated blood from the placenta to the fetus. The arteries carry the deoxygenated blood and the waste products from the fetus to the placenta. Occasionally, primary agenesis or secondary atrophy of one of the arteries occurs resulting in single umbilical artery.

  5. Single umbilical artery

    OpenAIRE

    Shanthi Ramesh; Sangeetha Hariprasath; Gunasekaran Anandan; P John Solomon; Vijayakumar, V.

    2015-01-01

    The umbilical cord usually contains two arteries and one vein. The vein carries the oxygenated blood from the placenta to the fetus. The arteries carry the deoxygenated blood and the waste products from the fetus to the placenta. Occasionally, primary agenesis or secondary atrophy of one of the arteries occurs resulting in single umbilical artery.

  6. Single umbilical artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Shanthi; Hariprasath, Sangeetha; Anandan, Gunasekaran; Solomon, P John; Vijayakumar, V

    2015-04-01

    The umbilical cord usually contains two arteries and one vein. The vein carries the oxygenated blood from the placenta to the fetus. The arteries carry the deoxygenated blood and the waste products from the fetus to the placenta. Occasionally, primary agenesis or secondary atrophy of one of the arteries occurs resulting in single umbilical artery.

  7. How interindividual differences in brain anatomy shape reading accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachia, Arnaud; Roell, Margot; Mangin, Jean-François; Sun, Zhong Yi; Jobert, Antoinette; Braga, Lucia; Houde, Olivier; Dehaene, Stanislas; Borst, Grégoire

    2017-09-15

    The capacity to read develops throughout intensive academic learning and training. Several studies have investigated the impact of reading on the brain, and particularly how the anatomy of the brain changes with reading acquisition. In the present study, we investigated the converse issue, namely whether and how reading acquisition is constrained by the anatomy of the brain. Using multimodal MRI, we found that (a) the pattern (continuous or interrupted sulcus) of the posterior part of the left lateral occipito-temporal sulcus (OTS) hosting the visual word form area (VWFA) predicts reading skills in adults; that (b) this effect is modulated by the age of reading acquisition; and that (c) the length of the OTS sulcal interruption is associated with reading skills. Because the sulcal pattern is determined in utero, our findings suggest that individual difference in reading skills can be traced back to early stages of brain development in addition to the well-established socioeconomic and educational factors.

  8. Auditory Temporal Processing as a Specific Deficit among Dyslexic Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fostick, Leah; Bar-El, Sharona; Ram-Tsur, Ronit

    2012-01-01

    The present study focuses on examining the hypothesis that auditory temporal perception deficit is a basic cause for reading disabilities among dyslexics. This hypothesis maintains that reading impairment is caused by a fundamental perceptual deficit in processing rapid auditory or visual stimuli. Since the auditory perception involves a number of…

  9. Could Specific Braille Reading Difficulties Result from Developmental Dyslexia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veispak, Anneli; Ghesquiere, Pol

    2010-01-01

    A proportion of children with visual impairments have specific reading difficulties that cannot be easily explained. This article reviews the data on problems with braille reading and interprets them from the framework of the temporal-processing deficit theory of developmental dyslexia.

  10. Pre-Reading Skills and Environmental Awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Andrea

    1984-01-01

    Provides examples to show how various pre-reading skills can be taught using the student's familiar environment. These skills include form perception, motor control, visual copying, visual recall, completion and closure, visual rhythm, visual sequencing, temporal sequencing, and visual/auditory discrimination. (JN)

  11. Teaching Adults to Read with Reading Apprenticeship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesmeister, Michele Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Many adult students have basic reading skills, but they are inexperienced readers who need to learn skills beyond the basics to equip them for success in college and career. How do educators face such adults with optimism and an eagerness to help improve specific reading skills so that these students can read and understand a variety of materials?…

  12. Cosmetology Reading Strategies. 1980 Vocational Reading Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, L. Jay; And Others

    Cosmetology Reading Strategies is one of five instructional guides in the Reading Strategies in Vocational Education Series. Developed to assist teachers working with students considered disadvantaged because of reading deficiency, the guide contains several strategies, suitable for adaptation, specifically related to cosmetology instruction. Each…

  13. Enhancing academic reading skills through extensive reading ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study applied a reading comprehension pre-test and post-test design, as well as three-minute reading speed preand post-tests. Using SPSS statistical analysis, three paired-samples t-tests were administered and the progress from the reading speed pre-test to the post-test was found to be significant. Study results ...

  14. Developing Students' Reading Ability through Extensive Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fanshao

    2009-01-01

    A good reading competence is a necessity for those studying English for academic and occupational purposes. Based on the results of previous research, theory and practice on L2 Extensive Reading, this paper analyses current situation for teaching and learning reading in our Chinese universities and proposes practical applications of extensive…

  15. Dialogic Reading Aloud to Promote Extensive Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, George M.

    2016-01-01

    How can teachers motivate students to read extensively in a second language? One strategy is for teachers to read aloud to students to promote the joys of reading generally, to build students' language skills and to introduce students to specific authors, book series, genres, websites, etc. This article begins by discussing why teachers might want…

  16. EMPOWERING THE READING READABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handoko Handoko

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A general assumption about reading is that students improve their reading ability by reading a lot. This research was conducted to explain the use of extensive reading and aimed to figure out its implementation in improving students’ reading readability by using the class action research technique. The data of this research relates to the students ‘reading progress shown in their reading reports: spoken and written summary, reading comprehension and vocabulary mastery and their participation. The strategy was evolved in the continuity of reading. Students were encouraged to read extensively in and outside class. The findings indicated that the implementation could improve students’ reading readability.This attainment demonstrated that students’ reading readabilityis frosted through the continuity of reading. Other facts showed that students enjoyed reading. Students’ curiosity was also a significant factor. Their high curiosity explained why students continued reading though they realized that materials they read were difficult enough. Students’ self-confidence was also built as they were required to write a retelling story and to share their previous reading. Instead of their retelling and summarizing, students felt to be appreciated as readers. This appreciation indirectly helped students to improve the reading fondness.

  17. Feasibility Study of Ex Ovo Chick Chorioallantoic Artery Model for Investigating Pulsatile Variation of Arterial Geometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kweon-Ho Nam

    Full Text Available Despite considerable research efforts on the relationship between arterial geometry and cardiovascular pathology, information is lacking on the pulsatile geometrical variation caused by arterial distensibility and cardiomotility because of the lack of suitable in vivo experimental models and the methodological difficulties in examining the arterial dynamics. We aimed to investigate the feasibility of using a chick embryo system as an experimental model for basic research on the pulsatile variation of arterial geometry. Optical microscope video images of various arterial shapes in chick chorioallantoic circulation were recorded from different locations and different embryo samples. The high optical transparency of the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM allowed clear observation of tiny vessels and their movements. Systolic and diastolic changes in arterial geometry were visualized by detecting the wall boundaries from binary images. Several to hundreds of microns of wall displacement variations were recognized during a pulsatile cycle. The spatial maps of the wall motion harmonics and magnitude ratio of harmonic components were obtained by analyzing the temporal brightness variation at each pixel in sequential grayscale images using spectral analysis techniques. The local variations in the spectral characteristics of the arterial wall motion were reflected well in the analysis results. In addition, mapping the phase angle of the fundamental frequency identified the regional variations in the wall motion directivity and phase shift. Regional variations in wall motion phase angle and fundamental-to-second harmonic ratio were remarkable near the bifurcation area. In summary, wall motion in various arterial geometry including straight, curved and bifurcated shapes was well observed in the CAM artery model, and their local and cyclic variations could be characterized by Fourier and wavelet transforms of the acquired video images. The CAM artery model with

  18. From word reading to multisentence comprehension: Improvements in brain activity in children with autism after reading intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Murdaugh, Donna L.; Maximo, Jose O.; Cordes, Claire E.; O'Kelley, Sarah E.; Kana, Rajesh K.

    2017-01-01

    Background Children with ASD show a unique reading profile characterized by decoding abilities equivalent to verbal abilities, but with lower comprehension skills. Neuroimaging studies have found recruitment of regions primarily associated with visual processing (e.g., fusiform gyrus and medial parietal cortex), but reduced activation in frontal and temporal regions, when reading in adults with ASD. The purpose of this study was to assess neural changes associated with an intense reading inte...

  19. Foundations of reading comprehension in children with intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wingerden, Evelien; Segers, Eliane; van Balkom, Hans; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge about predictors for reading comprehension in children with intellectual disabilities (ID) is still fragmented. This study compared reading comprehension, word decoding, listening comprehension, and reading related linguistic and cognitive precursor measures in children with mild ID and typically developing controls. Moreover, it was explored how the precursors related to reading achievement. Children with mild ID and typical controls were assessed on reading comprehension, decoding, language comprehension, and linguistic (early literacy skills, vocabulary, grammar) and cognitive (rapid naming, phonological short-term memory, working memory, temporal processing, nonverbal reasoning) precursor measures. It was tested to what extent variations in reading comprehension could be explained from word decoding, listening comprehension and precursor measures. The ID group scored significantly below typical controls on all measures. Word decoding was at or above first grade level in half the ID group. Reading comprehension in the ID group was related to word decoding, listening comprehension, early literacy skills, and temporal processing. The reading comprehension profile of children with mild ID strongly resembles typical early readers. The simple view of reading pertains to children with mild ID, with additional influence of early literacy skills and temporal processing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Temporality of Power and the Power of Temporality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costas, Jana; Grey, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    This paper extends existing understandings of power, resistance and subjectivity in professional service organizations by developing an analysis of how these relate to temporality. Drawing in particular on Hoy’s reading of the Foucauldian account of temporality, we conceive of disciplinary power...... regimes and resistance as inherently future-oriented, or, to use Ybema’s term, postalgic. In moving beyond the extant research focus on self-disciplined and/or counter-resistant professional selves, we draw attention to the imaginary future self as an employee response to disciplinary power. In contrast...... to the future orientation of disciplinary power, this response envisages the future as a discontinuous break with the present which we examine as a form of resistant postalgia. Building on in-depth qualitative data gathered at two professional service firms, we explain how imaginary future selves can shed new...

  1. Reading charts in ophthalmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radner, W

    2017-08-01

    A new generation of logarithmic reading charts has sparked interest in standardized reading performance analyses. Such reading charts have been developed according to the standards of the International Council of Ophthalmology. The print size progression in these calibrated charts is in accordance with the mathematical background of EN ISO 8596. These reading charts are: the Bailey-Lovie Word Reading Chart, the Colenbrander English Continuous Text Near Vision Cards, the Oculus Reading Probe II, the MNREAD Charts, the SKread Charts, and the RADNER Reading Charts. The test items used for these reading charts differ among the charts and are standardized to various extents. The Bailey-Lovie Charts, MNREAD Charts, SKread Charts, and RADNER Charts are also meant to measure reading speed and allow determination of further reading parameters such as reading acuity, reading speed based on reading acuity, critical print size, reading score, and logMAR/logRAD ratio. Such calibrated reading charts have already provided valuable insights into the reading performance of patients in many research studies. They are available in many languages and thus facilitate international communication about near visual performance. In the present review article, the backgrounds of these modern reading charts are presented, and their different levels of test-item standardization are discussed. Clinical research studies are mentioned, and a discussion about the immoderately high number of reading acuity notations is included. Using the logReading Acuity Determination ([logRAD] = reading acuity equivalent of logMAR) measure for research purposes would give reading acuity its own identity as a standardized reading parameter in ophthalmology.

  2. [Effects of reading, exercise and exercise combined with reading on intraocular pressure for patients sustaining primary glaucoma (open angle) or ocular hypertension, both clinically controlled with topic medication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Alice Maria Corrêa; Lima, Núbia Vanessa dos Anjos; Santos, Regina Cândida Ribeiro dos; Pereira, Marco César Araújo; Santos, Procópio Miguel dos

    2007-01-01

    To check intraocular pressure (IOP) in individuals using prostaglandin, prostamide or beta-blocker analogues, who sustain either primary open angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension after reading, exercise or exercise combined with reading. 40 individuals (79 eyes), subdivided in to five groups: G1 (with arterial hypertension and either glaucoma or ocular hypertension, all users of prostaglandin or prostamide analogues); G2 (with arterial hypertension and either glaucoma or ocular hypertension, all users of beta-blockers); G3 (not sustaining arterial hypertension but suffering from either glaucoma or ocular hypertension, all users of prostaglandin or prostamide analogues); G4 (not sustaining arterial hypertension but suffering from either glaucoma or ocular hypertension, all users of beta-blockers) and G5 (not sustaining arterial hypertension and also not suffering from either glaucoma or ocular hypertension) had their intraocular pressure checked before and after undergoing reading, exercise, and exercise combined with reading. Each type of test was conducted in a different day, always in the afternoon. No significant statistical difference has been noticed between the initial and final intraocular pressure mean in the different groups, when reading, performing exercises or exercises combined with reading. To read and to work out--either separately or jointly--does not pose an aggravating factor to the intraocular pressure of patients with primary open glaucoma or ocular hypertension, using prostaglandin, prostamide or beta-blocker analogues.

  3. Anomalous left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the left coronary artery arising from the pulmonary artery; ALCAPA; ALCAPA syndrome; Bland-White-Garland syndrome; ... children with ALCAPA, the LCA originates from the pulmonary artery. The pulmonary artery is the major blood ...

  4. Phonetic detail and lateralization of reading-related inner speech and of auditory and somatosensory feedback processing during overt reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kell, Christian A; Darquea, Maritza; Behrens, Marion; Cordani, Lorenzo; Keller, Christian; Fuchs, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Phonetic detail and lateralization of inner speech during covert sentence reading as well as overt reading in 32 right-handed healthy participants undergoing 3T fMRI were investigated. The number of voiceless and voiced consonants in the processed sentences was systematically varied. Participants listened to sentences, read them covertly, silently mouthed them while reading, and read them overtly. Condition comparisons allowed for the study of effects of externally versus self-generated auditory input and of somatosensory feedback related to or independent of voicing. In every condition, increased voicing modulated bilateral voice-selective regions in the superior temporal sulcus without any lateralization. The enhanced temporal modulation and/or higher spectral frequencies of sentences rich in voiceless consonants induced left-lateralized activation of phonological regions in the posterior temporal lobe, regardless of condition. These results provide evidence that inner speech during reading codes detail as fine as consonant voicing. Our findings suggest that the fronto-temporal internal loops underlying inner speech target different temporal regions. These regions differ in their sensitivity to inner or overt acoustic speech features. More slowly varying acoustic parameters are represented more anteriorly and bilaterally in the temporal lobe while quickly changing acoustic features are processed in more posterior left temporal cortices. Furthermore, processing of external auditory feedback during overt sentence reading was sensitive to consonant voicing only in the left superior temporal cortex. Voicing did not modulate left-lateralized processing of somatosensory feedback during articulation or bilateral motor processing. This suggests voicing is primarily monitored in the auditory rather than in the somatosensory feedback channel. Hum Brain Mapp 38:493-508, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Low level termination of external carotid artery and its clinical significance: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surekha Devadasa Shetty

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The external carotid arterial system is a complex vascular system providing nourishment to the territorial areas of the head and neck. The branches of the external carotid artery are the key landmarks for adequate exposure and appropriate placement of cross-clamps on the carotid arteries during carotid endarterectomy. Knowledge of anatomical variation of the external carotid artery is important in head and neck surgeries. Variations in the branching pattern of the external carotid artery are well known and documented. We report a rare case of low-level termination of the external carotid artery. It terminated by dividing into maxillary and superficial temporal arteries deep into the posterior belly of the digastric muscle, one inch below the angle of the mandible. The occipital and posterior auricular arteries arose from a common trunk given off by the external carotid artery. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2015; 4(3.000: 160-163

  6. Using Speed Reading and Extensive Reading Activities to Improve Students’ Reading Fluency

    OpenAIRE

    Sri Wardani

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: This study examines the implementation of Speed Reading and Extensive Reading activities to improve students’ reading fluency of students. Using a Classroom Action Research, Speed Reading and Extensive Reading activities was applied in 2 cycles with 2 x 45 minutes per week. Speed Reading and Extensive Reading activities were taught using three phase techniques: Pre-Reading, Whilst-Reading, and Post-Reading. Speed Reading was implemented through some techniques including scanning, sk...

  7. Reading Assessment: Looking Ahead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afflerbach, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I focus on three areas of reading assessment that I believe to be crucial for students' reading development: developing comprehensive formative assessments, assessing the wide array of factors that contribute to students' reading development, and fostering student independence by helping students learn to use reading assessment on…

  8. Eye Movements during Silent and Oral Reading in a Regular Orthography: Basic Characteristics and Correlations with Childhood Cognitive Abilities and Adolescent Reading Skills

    OpenAIRE

    Magdalena Krieber; Bartl-Pokorny, Katrin D.; Pokorny, Florian B.; Dajie Zhang; Karin Landerl; Christof Körner; Franz Pernkopf; Thomas Pock; Christa Einspieler; Marschik, Peter B.

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to define differences between silent and oral reading with respect to spatial and temporal eye movement parameters. Eye movements of 22 German-speaking adolescents (14 females; mean age = 13;6 years;months) were recorded while reading an age-appropriate text silently and orally. Preschool cognitive abilities were assessed at the participants' age of 5;7 (years;months) using the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children. The participants' reading speed and reading compreh...

  9. Bilateral renal artery variation

    OpenAIRE

    Üçerler, Hülya; Üzüm, Yusuf; İkiz, Z. Aslı Aktan

    2015-01-01

    Each kidney is supplied by a single renal artery, although renal artery variations are common. Variations of the renal arteryhave become important with the increasing number of renal transplantations. Numerous studies describe variations in renalartery anatomy. Especially the left renal artery is among the most critical arterial variations, because it is the referred side forresecting the donor kidney. During routine dissection in a formalin fixed male cadaver, we have found a bilateral renal...

  10. 501 reading comprehension questions

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This updated edition offers the most extensive and varied practice for all types of questions students might face on standardized and in-class tests. With this guide, students will learn to develop expert reading strategies, understand how to read faster and with greater comprehension, overcome reading anxiety, and increase appreciation of reading for pleasure. This book's step-by-step approach provides graduated coverage that moves from the basics to more advanced reading.

  11. Language differences in the brain network for reading in naturalistic story reading and lexical decision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojuan; Yang, Jianfeng; Yang, Jie; Mencl, W Einar; Shu, Hua; Zevin, Jason David

    2015-01-01

    Differences in how writing systems represent language raise important questions about whether there could be a universal functional architecture for reading across languages. In order to study potential language differences in the neural networks that support reading skill, we collected fMRI data from readers of alphabetic (English) and morpho-syllabic (Chinese) writing systems during two reading tasks. In one, participants read short stories under conditions that approximate natural reading, and in the other, participants decided whether individual stimuli were real words or not. Prior work comparing these two writing systems has overwhelmingly used meta-linguistic tasks, generally supporting the conclusion that the reading system is organized differently for skilled readers of Chinese and English. We observed that language differences in the reading network were greatly dependent on task. In lexical decision, a pattern consistent with prior research was observed in which the Middle Frontal Gyrus (MFG) and right Fusiform Gyrus (rFFG) were more active for Chinese than for English, whereas the posterior temporal sulcus was more active for English than for Chinese. We found a very different pattern of language effects in a naturalistic reading paradigm, during which significant differences were only observed in visual regions not typically considered specific to the reading network, and the middle temporal gyrus, which is thought to be important for direct mapping of orthography to semantics. Indeed, in areas that are often discussed as supporting distinct cognitive or linguistic functions between the two languages, we observed interaction. Specifically, language differences were most pronounced in MFG and rFFG during the lexical decision task, whereas no language differences were observed in these areas during silent reading of text for comprehension.

  12. Artery Bypass Grafting

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unknown

    nary artery disease (CAD) was coronary artery bypass graft (CAB G) using a segment of saphenous vein interposed between the ascend- ing aorta and the coronary artery distal to the obstructing lesion. This was performed by David Sabiston of Duke University in 1962. With the use of the recently developed technique of ...

  13. Carotid artery surgery - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... right- and left-internal carotid arteries, and the right- and left-external carotid arteries. The carotid arteries deliver oxygen-rich blood from the heart to both the head and brain. Review Date 6/1/2015 Updated by: Daniel ...

  14. Techniques for Non-Invasive Monitoring of Arterial Blood Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes S. Meidert

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Since both, hypotension and hypertension, can potentially impair the function of vital organs such as heart, brain, or kidneys, monitoring of arterial blood pressure (BP is a mainstay of hemodynamic monitoring in acutely or critically ill patients. Arterial BP can either be obtained invasively via an arterial catheter or non-invasively. Non-invasive BP measurement provides either intermittent or continuous readings. Most commonly, an occluding upper arm cuff is used for intermittent non-invasive monitoring. BP values are then obtained either manually (by auscultation of Korotkoff sounds or palpation or automatically (e.g., by oscillometry. For continuous non-invasive BP monitoring, the volume clamp method or arterial applanation tonometry can be used. Both techniques enable the arterial waveform and BP values to be obtained continuously. This article describes the different techniques for non-invasive BP measurement, their advantages and limitations, and their clinical applicability.

  15. Techniques for Non-Invasive Monitoring of Arterial Blood Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meidert, Agnes S; Saugel, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Since both, hypotension and hypertension, can potentially impair the function of vital organs such as heart, brain, or kidneys, monitoring of arterial blood pressure (BP) is a mainstay of hemodynamic monitoring in acutely or critically ill patients. Arterial BP can either be obtained invasively via an arterial catheter or non-invasively. Non-invasive BP measurement provides either intermittent or continuous readings. Most commonly, an occluding upper arm cuff is used for intermittent non-invasive monitoring. BP values are then obtained either manually (by auscultation of Korotkoff sounds or palpation) or automatically (e.g., by oscillometry). For continuous non-invasive BP monitoring, the volume clamp method or arterial applanation tonometry can be used. Both techniques enable the arterial waveform and BP values to be obtained continuously. This article describes the different techniques for non-invasive BP measurement, their advantages and limitations, and their clinical applicability.

  16. Spatial and temporal attention in developmental dyslexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena eRuffino

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Although the dominant view posits that developmental dyslexia (DD arises from a deficit in phonological processing, emerging evidence suggest that DD could result from a more basic cross-modal letter-to-speech sound integration deficit. Letters have to be precisely selected from irrelevant and cluttering letters by rapid orienting of visual attention before the correct letter-to-speech sound integration applies. In the present study the time-course of spatial attention was investigated measuring target detection reaction times (RTs in a cuing paradigm, while temporal attention was investigated by assessing impaired identification of the first of two sequentially presented masked visual objects. Spatial and temporal attention were slower in dyslexic children with a deficit in pseudoword reading (N=14 compared to chronological age (N=43 and to dyslexics without a deficit in pseudoword reading (N=18, suggesting a direct link between visual attention efficiency and phonological decoding skills. Individual differences in these visual attention mechanisms were specifically related to pseudoword reading accuracy in dyslexics. The role of spatial and temporal attention in the graphemic parsing process might be related to a basic oscillatory temporal sampling dysfunction.

  17. Spontaneous renal artery dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Santhosh G; Pillai, Unnikrishnan; Vaidyan, Philip B; Ishiyama, Takaaki

    2010-01-01

    Isolated spontaneous dissection of renal arteries or its branches are extremely rare. Most cases of renal artery dissection are associated with underlying pathology of the renal arteries. We report a case of spontaneous dissection of the left main renal artery and infarction of the left kidney with positive antiphospholipid antibody. Extensive work up of the patient including imaging studies confirmed the diagnosis of SRAD. Antiphospholipid antibodies may have a role in the pathogenesis of arterial dissection by causing endothelial dysfunction. This is a first literature report.

  18. What Oral Text Reading Fluency Can Reveal about Reading Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veenendaal, Nathalie J.; Groen, Margriet A.; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2015-01-01

    Text reading fluency--the ability to read quickly, accurately and with a natural intonation--has been proposed as a predictor of reading comprehension. In the current study, we examined the role of oral text reading fluency, defined as text reading rate and text reading prosody, as a contributor to reading comprehension outcomes in addition to…

  19. Pathway evidence of how musical perception predicts word-level reading ability in children with reading difficulties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Cogo-Moreira

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether specific domains of musical perception (temporal and melodic domains predict the word-level reading skills of eight- to ten-year-old children (n = 235 with reading difficulties, normal quotient of intelligence, and no previous exposure to music education classes. METHOD: A general-specific solution of the Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA, which underlies a musical perception construct and is constituted by three latent factors (the general, temporal, and the melodic domain, was regressed on word-level reading skills (rate of correct isolated words/non-words read per minute. RESULTS: General and melodic latent domains predicted word-level reading skills.

  20. Eye Movements during Silent and Oral Reading in a Regular Orthography: Basic Characteristics and Correlations with Childhood Cognitive Abilities and Adolescent Reading Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieber, Magdalena; Bartl-Pokorny, Katrin D; Pokorny, Florian B; Zhang, Dajie; Landerl, Karin; Körner, Christof; Pernkopf, Franz; Pock, Thomas; Einspieler, Christa; Marschik, Peter B

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to define differences between silent and oral reading with respect to spatial and temporal eye movement parameters. Eye movements of 22 German-speaking adolescents (14 females; mean age = 13;6 years;months) were recorded while reading an age-appropriate text silently and orally. Preschool cognitive abilities were assessed at the participants' age of 5;7 (years;months) using the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children. The participants' reading speed and reading comprehension at the age of 13;6 (years;months) were determined using a standardized inventory to evaluate silent reading skills in German readers (Lesegeschwindigkeits- und -verständnistest für Klassen 6-12). The results show that (i) reading mode significantly influenced both spatial and temporal characteristics of eye movement patterns; (ii) articulation decreased the consistency of intraindividual reading performances with regard to a significant number of eye movement parameters; (iii) reading skills predicted the majority of eye movement parameters during silent reading, but influenced only a restricted number of eye movement parameters when reading orally; (iv) differences with respect to a subset of eye movement parameters increased with reading skills; (v) an overall preschool cognitive performance score predicted reading skills at the age of 13;6 (years;months), but not eye movement patterns during either silent or oral reading. However, we found a few significant correlations between preschool performances on subscales of sequential and simultaneous processing and eye movement parameters for both reading modes. Overall, the findings suggest that eye movement patterns depend on the reading mode. Preschool cognitive abilities were more closely related to eye movement patterns of oral than silent reading, while reading skills predicted eye movement patterns during silent reading, but less so during oral reading.

  1. Eye Movements during Silent and Oral Reading in a Regular Orthography: Basic Characteristics and Correlations with Childhood Cognitive Abilities and Adolescent Reading Skills.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Krieber

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to define differences between silent and oral reading with respect to spatial and temporal eye movement parameters. Eye movements of 22 German-speaking adolescents (14 females; mean age = 13;6 years;months were recorded while reading an age-appropriate text silently and orally. Preschool cognitive abilities were assessed at the participants' age of 5;7 (years;months using the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children. The participants' reading speed and reading comprehension at the age of 13;6 (years;months were determined using a standardized inventory to evaluate silent reading skills in German readers (Lesegeschwindigkeits- und -verständnistest für Klassen 6-12. The results show that (i reading mode significantly influenced both spatial and temporal characteristics of eye movement patterns; (ii articulation decreased the consistency of intraindividual reading performances with regard to a significant number of eye movement parameters; (iii reading skills predicted the majority of eye movement parameters during silent reading, but influenced only a restricted number of eye movement parameters when reading orally; (iv differences with respect to a subset of eye movement parameters increased with reading skills; (v an overall preschool cognitive performance score predicted reading skills at the age of 13;6 (years;months, but not eye movement patterns during either silent or oral reading. However, we found a few significant correlations between preschool performances on subscales of sequential and simultaneous processing and eye movement parameters for both reading modes. Overall, the findings suggest that eye movement patterns depend on the reading mode. Preschool cognitive abilities were more closely related to eye movement patterns of oral than silent reading, while reading skills predicted eye movement patterns during silent reading, but less so during oral reading.

  2. Eye Movements during Silent and Oral Reading in a Regular Orthography: Basic Characteristics and Correlations with Childhood Cognitive Abilities and Adolescent Reading Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieber, Magdalena; Bartl-Pokorny, Katrin D.; Pokorny, Florian B.; Zhang, Dajie; Landerl, Karin; Körner, Christof; Pernkopf, Franz; Pock, Thomas; Einspieler, Christa; Marschik, Peter B.

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to define differences between silent and oral reading with respect to spatial and temporal eye movement parameters. Eye movements of 22 German-speaking adolescents (14 females; mean age = 13;6 years;months) were recorded while reading an age-appropriate text silently and orally. Preschool cognitive abilities were assessed at the participants’ age of 5;7 (years;months) using the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children. The participants’ reading speed and reading comprehension at the age of 13;6 (years;months) were determined using a standardized inventory to evaluate silent reading skills in German readers (Lesegeschwindigkeits- und -verständnistest für Klassen 6–12). The results show that (i) reading mode significantly influenced both spatial and temporal characteristics of eye movement patterns; (ii) articulation decreased the consistency of intraindividual reading performances with regard to a significant number of eye movement parameters; (iii) reading skills predicted the majority of eye movement parameters during silent reading, but influenced only a restricted number of eye movement parameters when reading orally; (iv) differences with respect to a subset of eye movement parameters increased with reading skills; (v) an overall preschool cognitive performance score predicted reading skills at the age of 13;6 (years;months), but not eye movement patterns during either silent or oral reading. However, we found a few significant correlations between preschool performances on subscales of sequential and simultaneous processing and eye movement parameters for both reading modes. Overall, the findings suggest that eye movement patterns depend on the reading mode. Preschool cognitive abilities were more closely related to eye movement patterns of oral than silent reading, while reading skills predicted eye movement patterns during silent reading, but less so during oral reading. PMID:28151950

  3. Assessment of the Temporopolar Artery as a Donor Artery for Intracranial-Intracranial Bypass to the Middle Cerebral Artery: Anatomic Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayebi Meybodi, Ali; Lawton, Michael T; Griswold, Dylan; Mokhtari, Pooneh; Payman, Andre; Tabani, Halima; Yousef, Sonia; Kola, Olivia; Benet, Arnau

    2017-08-01

    Intracranial-intracranial bypass is a valuable cerebral revascularization option. Despite several advantages, one of the main shortcomings of the intracranial-intracranial bypass is the possibility of ischemic complications of the donor artery. However, when sacrificed, the temporopolar artery (TPA) is not associated with major neurologic deficits. We sought to define the role of TPA as a donor for revascularization of the middle cerebral artery (MCA). Pterional craniotomy was performed on 14 specimens. The TPA was released from arachnoid trabecula, and the small twigs to the temporal lobe were cut. The feasibility of side-to-side and end-to-side bypass to the farthest arterial targets on insular, opercular, and cortical MCA branches was assessed. The distance of the bypass point was measured in reference to limen insulae. A total of 15 TPAs were assessed (1 specimen had 2 TPAs). The average cisternal length of the TPA was 37.3 mm. For side-to-side bypass, the TPA was a poor candidate as an intracranial donor, except for the cortical orbitofrontal artery, which was reached in 87% of cases. However, the end-to-side bypass was successfully completed for most arteries (87%-100%) on the anterior frontal operculum and more than 50% of the cortical or opercular middle and posterior temporal arteries. There was no correlation between the TPA's cisternal length and maximum bypass reach. When of favorable diameter, the TPA is a competent donor for intracranial-intracranial bypass to MCA branches at the anterior insula, and anterior frontal and middle temporal opercula (arteries anterior to the precentral gyrus coronal plane). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Oral Reading Intonation and Reading Comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlin, Andrea

    A study investigated whether fluency in oral reading, as indicated by proper intonation, could be used as a measure of college students' reading comprehension. The study was designed to look at the three features of intonation--pitch, stress, and juncture--separately and in combination to determine whether any one or a combination of all the…

  5. Lights, Camera, Read! Arizona Reading Program Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizona State Dept. of Library, Archives and Public Records, Phoenix.

    This document is the manual for the Arizona Reading Program (ARP) 2003 entitled "Lights, Camera, Read!" This theme spotlights books that were made into movies, and allows readers to appreciate favorite novels and stories that have progressed to the movie screen. The manual consists of eight sections. The Introduction includes welcome…

  6. To read or not to read

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, Suzanne Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    There is a widely held belief that reading (story)books makes us smarter and helps promote success in life. Does scientific evidence support this notion? The three meta-analyses in this thesis comprise 146 studies between 1988 and 2010 (N=10,308 participants) that addressed the role of book reading

  7. Towards General Temporal Aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boehlen, Michael H.; Gamper, Johann; Jensen, Christian Søndergaard

    2008-01-01

    Most database applications manage time-referenced, or temporal, data. Temporal data management is difficult when using conventional database technology, and many contributions have been made for how to better model, store, and query temporal data. Temporal aggregation illustrates well the problem...

  8. [A scientific reading method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, D

    1999-09-01

    To provide high quality services, nursing professionals must be prepared to update their knowledge constantly. To achieve this, various methods are available such as courses, conferences and research projects. All of these methods share one essential intellectual activity, scientific reading. Scientific reading is a complex and demanding activity that requires more than basic reading skills. Many nurses find it boring and arduous, probably because it gives them no pleasure, but especially because they lack a method. In this article, the author proposes a scientific reading method consisting of three stages: an overview approach to the text, a superficial reading, and an in-depth reading of the text. This method is simple, easy to use, and entirely appropriate for scientific reading. The author hopes that this method will give more nurses the desire to read and use scientific literature in the practice of their profession.

  9. Do You Read How I Read? Systematic Individual Differences in Semantic Reliance amongst Normal Readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woollams, Anna M; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A; Madrid, Gaston; Patterson, Karalyn E

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which meaning is involved in reading aloud has proven an area of longstanding debate, and current computational models differ on this dimension. The connectionist triangle model proposes that normal individuals rely on semantic information for correct reading of words with atypical spelling-sound relationships, but to varying degrees. This proposed individual difference would account for the varying stage of decline at which patients with semantic dementia first show the reading impairment known as surface dyslexia. Recent neuroimaging data has provided validation of this view, showing that individual differences in degree of semantic reliance during exception word reading predict the amount of activation in left anterior temporal regions associated with semantic processing. This study aimed to establish the cognitive correlates of individual differences in semantic reliance during exception word reading. Experiment 1 used a subgrouping approach with 32 participants and found larger imageability and semantic priming effects specifically for exception word reading amongst high relative to low semantic reliance readers. High semantic reliance readers also tended to read nonwords more slowly than low semantic reliance readers. A second experiment used a regression approach with 129 readers and confirmed the relationship of degree of semantic reliance both to imageability effects in exception word reading and speed of nonword reading. Further, while the performance of the higher semantic readers revealed no significant association with semantic processing tasks, there was a negative relationship with rhyme processing tasks. We therefore speculate that differences in phonological abilities may be responsible for varying degrees of semantic reliance in reading aloud. This proposal accords with the results of functional imaging showing that higher semantic reliance during exception word reading corresponds to lower activation in left pre-central gyrus, an

  10. Do you read how I read? Systematic individual differences in semantic reliance amongst normal readers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M. Woollams

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The extent to which meaning is involved in reading aloud has proven an area of longstanding debate, and current computational models differ on this dimension. The connectionist triangle model proposes that normal individuals rely on semantic information for correct reading of words with atypical spelling-sound relationships, but to varying degrees. This proposed individual difference would account for the varying stage of decline at which patients with semantic dementia first show the reading impairment known as surface dyslexia. Recent neuroimaging data has provided validation of this view, showing individual differences in degree of semantic reliance during exception word reading predicts the amount of activation in left anterior temporal regions associated with semantic processing. This study aimed to establish the cognitive correlates of individual differences in semantic reliance during exception word reading. Experiment 1 used a subgrouping approach with 32 participants and found larger imageability and semantic priming effects specifically for exception word reading amongst high relative to low semantic reliance readers. High semantic reliance readers also tended to read nonwords more slowly than low semantic reliance readers. A second experiment used a regression approach with 129 readers and confirmed the relationship of degree of semantic reliance both to imageability effects in exception word reading and speed of nonword reading. Further, while the performance of the higher semantic readers revealed no significant association with semantic processing tasks, there was a negative relationship with rhyme processing tasks. We therefore speculate that differences in phonological abilities may be responsible for varying degrees of semantic reliance in reading aloud. This proposal accords with the results of functional imaging showing that higher semantic reliance during exception word reading corresponds to lower activation in left

  11. Painful chewing and blindness: signs and symptoms of temporal arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, D T; Voytovich, M C; Allen, J C

    2000-12-01

    This case report illustrates the need to consider temporal arteritis in the differential diagnosis of jaw or tooth pain. This disease affects the cranial arteries, more frequently in women and usually in those older than age 60 years, causing jaw pain, visual symptoms, headache, scalp pain and sometimes blindness. A 71-year-old man had jaw pain that increased with chewing and speaking, scalp tenderness and dimming vision. A temporal artery biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of temporal arteritis. Treatment with decreasing amounts of oral steroids over 23 months was successful in relieving his signs and symptoms and in saving his vision. Patients with this disease may seek care from their dentist first. Jaw or tooth pain is the most reliable clinical symptom in the diagnosis of temporal arteritis. Diagnosis and timely referral for treatment with oral steroids can prevent blindness.

  12. Triangulation of the neurocomputational architecture underpinning reading aloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Paul; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A; Woollams, Anna M

    2015-07-14

    The goal of cognitive neuroscience is to integrate cognitive models with knowledge about underlying neural machinery. This significant challenge was explored in relation to word reading, where sophisticated computational-cognitive models exist but have made limited contact with neural data. Using distortion-corrected functional MRI and dynamic causal modeling, we investigated the interactions between brain regions dedicated to orthographic, semantic, and phonological processing while participants read words aloud. We found that the lateral anterior temporal lobe exhibited increased activation when participants read words with irregular spellings. This area is implicated in semantic processing but has not previously been considered part of the reading network. We also found meaningful individual differences in the activation of this region: Activity was predicted by an independent measure of the degree to which participants use semantic knowledge to read. These characteristics are predicted by the connectionist Triangle Model of reading and indicate a key role for semantic knowledge in reading aloud. Premotor regions associated with phonological processing displayed the reverse characteristics. Changes in the functional connectivity of the reading network during irregular word reading also were consistent with semantic recruitment. These data support the view that reading aloud is underpinned by the joint operation of two neural pathways. They reveal that (i) the ATL is an important element of the ventral semantic pathway and (ii) the division of labor between the two routes varies according to both the properties of the words being read and individual differences in the degree to which participants rely on each route.

  13. Reading sentences in Serbian: Effects of alphabet and reading mode in self-paced reading task

    OpenAIRE

    Vejnović Dušan; Jovanović Tamara

    2012-01-01

    The study examined the influence of alphabet (Cyrillic vs. Latin) and reading mode (silent reading vs. reading aloud) on sentence reading speed in Serbian. Entire-sentence and single-word reading times were obtained from the moving window paradigm in the self-paced sentence reading task. Sentences printed in Latin took less time for reading than sentences printed in Cyrillic and silent reading was more rapid than reading aloud. Single-word processing results followed the pattern observe...

  14. testicular artery arising from an aberrant right renal artery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2017-08-17

    Aug 17, 2017 ... Correspondence to Dr. Emmanuel Henry Suluba, Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine,. Muhimbili University of Health and ... vein, left colic artery and the descending colon. Both right and left testicular arteries as ... anatomy of the vessels such as testicular arteries, ovarian arteries, renal arteries and.

  15. Acute radiographic workup of blunt temporal bone trauma: maxillofacial versus temporal bone CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempewolf, Ryan; Gubbels, Sam; Hansen, Marlan R

    2009-03-01

    To evaluate the radiographic workup of blunt temporal bone trauma and determine the utility of maxillofacial computed tomography (CT) versus temporal bone CT in identifying carotid canal fractures. Retrospective review. The charts of 227 patients evaluated at a level I trauma center receiving a temporal bone CT for blunt head trauma within 48 hours of admission were reviewed. Acute evaluation findings and complications were noted. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive (NPV) value were calculated for maxillofacial CT's ability to identify carotid canal fractures compared to temporal bone CT. One hundred forty fractures were found. Physical exam findings of blood in the external auditory canal as the sole finding, and blood in the external auditory canal with associated hemotympanum were significantly associated with absence and presence of fracture respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of maxillofacial CT for identifying carotid canal fractures, when compared to temporal bone CT, were 90.3% and 94.4% respectively (NPV > 95%). Only 6% of all patients either did have or should have had their management changed based on the temporal bone CT findings. All of these changes were regarding further workup for blunt carotid artery injury. A combination of helical computed tomography and physical exam findings can allow for judicious use of temporal bone CTs when no maxillofacial CT is indicated. Temporal bone CTs rarely change acute management. But when they do, it is in regard to the need for further workup of possible vascular injury. Lastly, maxillofacial CTs are adequate for identifying carotid canal fractures.

  16. ELLs' Perceptions of Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Rachael M.

    2012-01-01

    This research investigated reading support and book preferences of fourth grade English language learners (ELLs) who were struggling readers. This qualitative research focused on three case studies. Interviews were conducted to explore ELLs' perceptions on reading motivation, reading programs, and types of support they received. Descriptions of…

  17. Reading to Learn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Phillip; Wardrip, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Science teachers expect high school students to know how to read, understand, and learn from texts at the core of the curriculum. But though students learn to read in grade school, many do not know how to "read to learn" science. And science teachers are often too busy teaching science to actively help students increase their science reading…

  18. Time for Reading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, William R.

    1989-01-01

    Reading for pleasure and enlightenment is a critical, and endangered, element in a well-informed citizenry. As a basis for intellectual growth, reading is threatened by media misuse and lack of encouragement of recreational reading. Solutions include emphasis on integrated skills, improved time allocation, and cooperation among parents, teachers,…

  19. Reading and Empathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreary, John J.; Marchant, Gregory J.

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between reading and empathy was explored. Controlling for GPA and gender, reading variables were hypothesized as related to empathy; the relationship was expected to differ for males and females. For the complete sample, affective components were related to GPA but not reading. Perspective taking was related to reading…

  20. Reading for Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winograd, Peter

    Designed to give parents an overview of reading and some suggestions on how they can help their children, this guide has been used in parent classes and workshops throughout Illinois since 1976. The nine sections of the guide cover the following areas: a general definition of reading, some causes of reading difficulty, various techniques used in…

  1. Perceptual Issues in Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Jerome

    Perception has become an important term in recent literature on reading problems and their solutions. However, the relationship between perception and reading has not been clarified. Tests of visual perception often focus on skills such as copying geometric designs which have little or nothing to do with reading skills or readiness. Researchers…

  2. ELLs' Perceptions of Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Rachael M.

    2017-01-01

    This research investigated reading support and book preferences of fourth grade English language learners (ELLs) who were struggling readers. This qualitative research focused on three case studies. Interviews were conducted to explore ELLs' perceptions on reading motivation, reading programs, and types of support they received. Descriptions of…

  3. Reading as a Whole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Constance

    Underlying virtually all of the basal reading series available in the United States today is the assumption that learning to read is a skill-by-skill and word-by-word process. This part-to-whole approach to teaching reading is based on principles of behavioral psychology and "scientific management" developed a half century ago and treats…

  4. Family Reading Night

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Darcy; Greenfeld, Marsha; Epstein, Joyce

    2007-01-01

    This book offers clear and practical guidelines to help engage families in student success. It shows families how to conduct a successful Family Reading Night at their school. Family Night themes include Scary Stories, Books We Love, Reading Olympics, Dr. Seuss, and other themes. Family reading nights invite parents to come to school with their…

  5. Coordinating Supplemental Reading Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeney, Theresa A.

    2008-01-01

    Although supplemental reading services are meant to improve reading achievement of struggling readers and students with reading disabilities, without concerted effort to ensure communication and coordination with in-school instruction, they may fall short of their desired mark. To promote learning, it is critical that any services provided outside…

  6. Free Voluntary Reading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakup Çetin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Doubtless to say, the contribution of reading skill to first and second language acquisition is enormous. From one‟s speaking and writing we can more or less conclude how much s/he has read. We can list the characteristics of good readers as follows: rich vocabulary knowledge advanced reading comprehension, accurate grammar usage, broad general knowledge, correct spelling and punctuation, writing ability, and so on. If reading is so powerful, why cannot we promote reading books in our society, particularly among young people? The fact that we are imposed to read books which we think are necessary or compulsory rather than the ones which we would like to read voluntarily, is the main reason why many of us are not able to develop a life-time reading habit. Since compulsory books, such as teacher-selected books are outside one‟s interest; they are destined to be forgotten sometime, or they suffer form shallow reading, or they are mostly returned to their place on the shelf after browsing the initial pages. However, if people of all ages, especially children would read self-selected books they enjoy, they would be surprised to notice the great change inside them. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to revitalize free voluntary reading by referring to Krashen‟s well-known hypotheses. Also, it aims to revive the reader‟s belief in free voluntary reading with theoretical and practical examples

  7. Reading in Bilingual Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modiano, Nancy

    In a bilingual education program, reading should be introduced in the child's stronger language. Reading in the second language should be delayed until the child has become fully literate in the first language. Ideally that point should be determined for each child individually. The relative emphasis given to reading in each language is based on…

  8. Duplicated middle cerebral artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Jesus; Machado, Calixto; Scherle, Claudio; Hierro, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Duplicated middle cerebral artery (DMCA) is an anomalous vessel arising from the internal carotid artery. The incidence DMCA is relatively law, and an association between this anomaly and cerebral aneurysms has been documented. There is a controversy whether DMCA may have perforating arteries. This is an important fact to consider in aneurysm surgery. We report the case of a 34-year-old black woman who suffered a subarachnoid hemorrhage and the angiography a left DMCA, and an aneurysm in an inferior branch of the main MCA. The DMCA and the MCA had perforating arteries. The aneurysm was clipped without complications. The observation of perforating arteries in our patient confirms that the DMCA may have perforating arteries. This is very important to be considered in cerebral aneurysms surgery. Moreover, the DMCA may potentially serve as a collateral blood supply to the MCA territory in cases of MCA occlusion. PMID:22140405

  9. Multivessel coronary artery thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanei, Yumiko; Janardhanan, Rajesh; Fox, John T; Gowda, Ramesh M

    2009-02-01

    Simultaneous thrombosis of multiple epicardial coronary arteries is an uncommon clinical finding in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). We describe a 37-year-old male present with inferior wall STEMI who was found to have large thrombi in both the right coronary artery (RCA) and the left anterior descending artery (LAD). We reviewed 23 patients with multivessel thrombosis in acute myocardial infarction in the literature. The mean age of patients was 53 +/- 14 years (32-82 years); 74% were males, and most patients had multiple risk factors for coronary artery disease. The LAD (78%) and RCA (87%) were the arteries involved for most patients. Aspiration thrombectomy was used in 3 cases. Though it is rare, STEMI with multiple culprit arteries can occur, and it is crucial to recognize this condition to determine the proper treatment, since most of these patients are critically ill.

  10. Developmental relations between reading comprehension and reading strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Muijselaar, M.M.L.; Swart, N.M.; Steenbeek-Planting, E.G.; Droop, W.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.; de Jong, P.F.

    2017-01-01

    We examined the developmental relations between knowledge of reading strategies and reading comprehension in a longitudinal study of 312 Dutch children from the beginning of fourth grade to the end of fifth grade. Measures for reading comprehension, reading strategies, reading fluency, vocabulary, and working memory were administered. A structural equation model was constructed to estimate the unique relations between reading strategies and reading comprehension, while controlling for reading...

  11. Child-centered reading intervention: See, talk, dictate, read, write!

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammet BAŞTUĞ; Gonca DEMİRTAŞ

    2016-01-01

    Poor reading achievement of children in elementary schools has been one of the major concerns in education. The aim of this study is to examine the effectiveness of a child-centered reading intervention in eliminating the reading problems of a student with poor reading achievement. The research was conducted with a student having difficulty in reading. A reading intervention was designed that targeted multiple areas of reading and aimed to improve reading skills through the use of multiple s...

  12. Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Leary, D P

    2010-01-01

    Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome is a rare abnormality of the anatomical relationship between the popliteal artery and adjacent muscles or fibrous bands in the popliteal fossa. The following is a case report of a 19 year old female, in whom popliteal artery entrapment syndrome was diagnosed, and successfully treated surgically. A review of literature is also presented and provides details on how PAES is classified, diagnosed both clinically and radiologically, and treated surgically.

  13. Celiac Artery Compression Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Muqeetadnan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac artery compression syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by episodic abdominal pain and weight loss. It is the result of external compression of celiac artery by the median arcuate ligament. We present a case of celiac artery compression syndrome in a 57-year-old male with severe postprandial abdominal pain and 30-pound weight loss. The patient eventually responded well to surgical division of the median arcuate ligament by laparoscopy.

  14. Cost-effective prediction of reading difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Steve M; Hogben, John H

    2004-08-01

    This study addressed 2 questions: (a) Can preschoolers who will fail at reading be more efficiently identified by targeting those at highest risk for reading problems? and (b) will auditory temporal processing (ATP) improve the accuracy of identification derived from phonological processing and oral language ability? A sample of 227 preschoolers was screened for Performance IQ and was tested on phonological awareness (PA). The upper and lower quartiles of the PA distribution were selected as being at lowest and highest risk, respectively, for reading failure. Children with good and poor PA were tested on ATP, phonological short-term memory, rapid automatized naming, oral language, receptive vocabulary, and 2 measures of listening comprehension. Reading outcomes were measured at the end of Year 2. Only 1 child in the good-PA group became a poor reader by the end of Year 2, confirming that being in the top quartile for PA predicts positive reading outcomes. Discriminant analysis using the authors' test battery within the poor-PA group identified poor readers with sensitivity of.91 and specificity of.84, but ATP did not improve classification accuracy afforded by phonological and oral language. A brief screening procedure was formulated using only PA, phonological short-term memory, and demographic variables, with which 80% of children with poor PA who are at risk of reading problems can be identified. Further refinements of this screening procedure would increase accuracy of identification at the cost of only a small increment in required testing time.

  15. Renal Branch Artery Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Zarah; Thisted, Ebbe; Andersen, Ulrik Bjørn

    2017-01-01

    Renovascular hypertension is a common cause of pediatric hypertension. In the fraction of cases that are unrelated to syndromes such as neurofibromatosis, patients with a solitary stenosis on a branch of the renal artery are common and can be diagnostically challenging. Imaging techniques...... that perform well in the diagnosis of main renal artery stenosis may fall short when it comes to branch artery stenosis. We report 2 cases that illustrate these difficulties and show that a branch artery stenosis may be overlooked even by the gold standard method, renal angiography....

  16. Atherosclerotic femoral artery aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levi-Mazloum, Niels Donald; Schroeder, T V

    1996-01-01

    Based on a clinical suspicion of an increase in the proportion of deep femoral aneurysms, we reviewed the case records of patients who underwent reconstructive procedures for femoral aneurysms to investigate if this could be confirmed and explained by selection of patient or modality of diagnosis...... femoral artery and 3 the deep femoral artery. The proportion of deep femoral aneurysm was therefore 3/17 = 18%. Previous series report that aneurysms of the profunda femoris artery occurs in only 1% to 2.6% of all femoral artery aneurysms. No explanation was found for this significant increase (p

  17. Braille Reading Is Less Efficient Than Visual Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Leon E.; And Others

    The reading performances of fifteen blind readers and fifteen sighted readers were compared by evaluating the reading performances of each reader reading at instructional level from Lippincott's "Basic Reading Series" and from Form A of the "Gray Oral Reading Test." Nine matched pairs of subjects read at grade one first reader level and six pairs…

  18. What oral text reading fluency can reveal about reading comprehension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenendaal, N.J.; Groen, M.A.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2015-01-01

    Text reading fluency – the ability to read quickly, accurately and with a natural intonation – has been proposed as a predictor of reading comprehension. In the current study, we examined the role of oral text reading fluency, defined as text reading rate and text reading prosody, as a contributor

  19. Reading Logs: Integrating Extensive Reading with Writing Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyutaya, Tatiana

    2011-01-01

    Extensive reading motivates learners to read a large number of texts on a wide range of topics because the students themselves select the reading material based upon its relevance to their interests, knowledge, and experience. Students read texts that match their language level, and they choose the time and place to read. Extensive reading "is…

  20. Upper lip reconstruction using a pedicel superficial temporal artery flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad M. Al-Qattan

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: We demonstrate that the pedicle flap is much simpler than the free flap and is adequate for reconstruction of partial upper lip defects. We also demonstrate a good cosmetic and functional outcome; and highlight several technical points to ensure a satisfactory outcome.

  1. Teachers Sourcebook for Extensive Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, George; Farrell, Thomas S. C.

    2012-01-01

    The best way for students to learn to read and to come to love reading is--surprise, surprise--by reading in quantity. Unfortunately, many of today's students read far too little. This lack of time spent reading is particularly unfortunate, as reading constitutes a bedrock skill, essential in all subject areas. Thus, we teachers need to devote…

  2. Semantics of Temporal Models with Multiple Temporal Dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraft, Peter; Sørensen, Jens Otto

    Semantics of temporal models with multi temporal dimensions are examined progressing from non-temporal models unto uni-temporal, and further unto bi- and tri-temporal models. An example of a uni-temporal model is the valid time model, an example of a bi-temporal model is the valid time/transactio...

  3. Vascularization of the facial bones by the facial artery: implications for full face allotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharb, Bahar Bassiri; Rampazzo, Antonio; Kutz, Joseph E; Bright, Linda; Doumit, Gaby; Harter, Thomas B

    2014-05-01

    The maxillary artery is recognized as the main vascular supply of the facial bones; nonetheless, clinical evidence supports a codominant role for the facial artery. This study explores the extent of the facial skeleton within a facial allograft that can be harvested based on the facial artery. Twenty-three cadaver heads were used in this study. In 12 heads, the facial, superficial temporal, and maxillary arteries were injected. In one head, facial artery angiography was performed. Ten facial allografts were raised. The soft tissues were dissected to show the arterial anastomotic connections. Radiographs and computed tomographic scans were obtained. Constant anastomosis between the facial, inferior alveolar, and infraorbital arteries at the mental and infraorbital foramina were found. The facial artery vascularized the homolateral mandibular symphysis, body, and ramus. The condylar and coronoid processes were vascularized in 67 percent of the allografts. The homolateral maxilla was contrasted in all allografts. The alveolar and palatine processes contained the contrast in 83 percent of specimens. The maxillary process of the zygomatic bone was perfused in all allografts, followed by the body, frontal (83 percent), and temporal processes (67 percent). The nasal lateral wall and septum were vascularized in 83 percent of the allografts. The medial and lateral orbital walls and the orbital floor were stained in all specimens. The zygomatic process of the temporal bone was the least perfused bone. A composite allograft containing 90 to 95 percent of the facial bones can be based on bilateral facial arteries.

  4. Brain bases of reading fluency in typical reading and impaired fluency in dyslexia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna A Christodoulou

    Full Text Available Although the neural systems supporting single word reading are well studied, there are limited direct comparisons between typical and dyslexic readers of the neural correlates of reading fluency. Reading fluency deficits are a persistent behavioral marker of dyslexia into adulthood. The current study identified the neural correlates of fluent reading in typical and dyslexic adult readers, using sentences presented in a word-by-word format in which single words were presented sequentially at fixed rates. Sentences were presented at slow, medium, and fast rates, and participants were asked to decide whether each sentence did or did not make sense semantically. As presentation rates increased, participants became less accurate and slower at making judgments, with comprehension accuracy decreasing disproportionately for dyslexic readers. In-scanner performance on the sentence task correlated significantly with standardized clinical measures of both reading fluency and phonological awareness. Both typical readers and readers with dyslexia exhibited widespread, bilateral increases in activation that corresponded to increases in presentation rate. Typical readers exhibited significantly larger gains in activation as a function of faster presentation rates than readers with dyslexia in several areas, including left prefrontal and left superior temporal regions associated with semantic retrieval and semantic and phonological representations. Group differences were more extensive when behavioral differences between conditions were equated across groups. These findings suggest a brain basis for impaired reading fluency in dyslexia, specifically a failure of brain regions involved in semantic retrieval and semantic and phonological representations to become fully engaged for comprehension at rapid reading rates.

  5. Patient's Perception About Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelminda Maria Bulhões Mendonça

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: The diagnosis of coronary artery disease referred for heart surgery has an important psychological component. The purpose of this study was to access the difficulties experienced by individuals awaiting coronary artery bypass grafting and to determine strategies that facilitate adaptation to a new lifestyle, modified by the disease. METHODS: A qualitative, exploratory study involving patients admitted to a university teaching hospital in the city of Salvador, Bahia, Brazil, awaiting coronary artery bypass grafting. Semi-structured interviews were performed in accordance with a previously defined script based on the study objective. Each transcription was read in its entirety to verify the representativeness, homogeneity and pertinence of the data obtained (pre-analysis, followed by separation of categories of analysis. RESULTS: The descriptions of this study show that patients admitted to the completion of coronary artery bypass grafting experience a wide range of psychological difficulties, considering that surgery acquires interpretations that vary according to individuals' subjectivity. The patients recognized the benefit of being able to discuss their feelings as a means of diminishing their fear and anxiety. CONCLUSION: Helping patients find resources to confront more positively the daily hospitalization is an important aspect for the health care professionals who assist them. This goal can be achieved through modification of the biomedical model of care for a biopsychosocial view. The investment of time and attention is of fundamental importance and aims to overcome existing deficiencies that interfere with the outcome of patients after cardiac surgery.

  6. Heritability of cilioretinal arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taarnhøj, Nina Charlotte; Munch, Inger C; Kyvik, Kirsten O

    2005-01-01

    of healthy monozygotic and dizygotic twins were examined using digital fundus photography and visual assessment of grayscale fundus photographs and color transparencies to detect the presence of cilioretinal arteries. RESULTS: Cilioretinal arteries were present in 45.1% of participants and 28.8% of eyes...

  7. Peripheral artery disease - legs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the legs, feet, and toes Painful, non-bleeding sores on the feet or toes (most often black) that are slow ... block small arteries Coronary artery disease Impotence Open sores ... (gangrene) The affected leg or foot may need to be amputated

  8. Carotid Artery Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that look for inherited genetic markers linked to disease, and imaging tests that produce pictures of the inside of the body. These ... a risk factor. Risk factors for carotid artery disease include: age high blood pressure diabetes tobacco smoking high cholesterol coronary artery disease (CAD) obesity ...

  9. Dose-dependent headache response and dilatation of limb and extracranial arteries after three doses of 5-isosorbide-mononitrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Helle Klingenberg; Nielsen, T H; Garre, K

    1992-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the ability of different doses of isosorbide-5-mononitrate (5-ISMN) to cause dilatation of medium sized and small arteries, and to examine the intensity and duration of any headache produced. Ten healthy volunteers each received 3 doses of 5-ISMN...... and placebo on separate days. The diameters of the radial and superficial temporal arteries were repeatedly measured with high frequency ultrasound and pain was scored using a 10 point verbal scale. A clear dose-relationship was found for plasma concentrations and headache, and for changes in the diameter...... of the temporal artery, but not for the radial artery. It is concluded that headache after 5-ISMN is caused by arterial dilatation or by mechanisms responsible for the arterial dilatation. Ultrasound monitoring of arterial diameters is an important and sensitive tool in the evaluation of nitrates and other...

  10. BILATERAL DUPLICATION OF RENAL ARTERIES

    OpenAIRE

    Prajkta A Thete; Mehera Bhoir; M.V.Ambiye

    2014-01-01

    Routine dissection of a male cadaver revealed the presence of bilateral double renal arteries. On the right side the accessory renal artery originated from the abdominal aorta just above the main renal artery. On the left side the accessory renal artery originated from the abdominal aorta about 1 cm above the main renal artery. Knowledge of the variations of renal vascular anatomy has importance in exploration and treatment of renal trauma, renal transplantation, renal artery embolization, su...

  11. Differential cognitive and perceptual correlates of print reading versus braille reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veispak, Anneli; Boets, Bart; Ghesquière, Pol

    2013-01-01

    The relations between reading, auditory, speech, phonological and tactile spatial processing are investigated in a Dutch speaking sample of blind braille readers as compared to sighted print readers. Performance is assessed in blind and sighted children and adults. Regarding phonological ability, braille readers perform equally well compared to print readers on phonological awareness, better on verbal short-term memory and significantly worse on lexical retrieval. The groups do not differ on speech perception or auditory processing. Braille readers, however, have more sensitive fingers than print readers. Investigation of the relations between these cognitive and perceptual skills and reading performance indicates that in the group of braille readers auditory temporal processing has a longer lasting and stronger impact not only on phonological abilities, which have to satisfy the high processing demands of the strictly serial language input, but also directly on the reading ability itself. Print readers switch between grapho-phonological and lexical reading modes depending on the familiarity of the items. Furthermore, the auditory temporal processing and speech perception, which were substantially interrelated with phonological processing, had no direct associations with print reading measures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Underlying Skills of Oral and Silent Reading Fluency in Chinese: Perspective of Visual Rapid Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Kwok, Rosa K W; Liu, Menglian; Liu, Hanlong; Huang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Reading fluency is a critical skill to improve the quality of our daily life and working efficiency. The majority of previous studies focused on oral reading fluency rather than silent reading fluency, which is a much more dominant reading mode that is used in middle and high school and for leisure reading. It is still unclear whether the oral and silent reading fluency involved the same underlying skills. To address this issue, the present study examined the relationship between the visual rapid processing and Chinese reading fluency in different modes. Fifty-eight undergraduate students took part in the experiment. The phantom contour paradigm and the visual 1-back task were adopted to measure the visual rapid temporal and simultaneous processing respectively. These two tasks reflected the temporal and spatial dimensions of visual rapid processing separately. We recorded the temporal threshold in the phantom contour task, as well as reaction time and accuracy in the visual 1-back task. Reading fluency was measured in both single-character and sentence levels. Fluent reading of single characters was assessed with a paper-and-pencil lexical decision task, and a sentence verification task was developed to examine reading fluency on a sentence level. The reading fluency test in each level was conducted twice (i.e., oral reading and silent reading). Reading speed and accuracy were recorded. The correlation analysis showed that the temporal threshold in the phantom contour task did not correlate with the scores of the reading fluency tests. Although, the reaction time in visual 1-back task correlated with the reading speed of both oral and silent reading fluency, the comparison of the correlation coefficients revealed a closer relationship between the visual rapid simultaneous processing and silent reading. Furthermore, the visual rapid simultaneous processing exhibited a significant contribution to reading fluency in silent mode but not in oral reading mode. These

  13. Exploring the Relationship between Adolescent's Reading Skills, Reading Motivation and Reading Habits

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeown, Sarah P.; Duncan, Lynne G.; Griffiths, Yvonne M.; Stothard, Sue E.

    2015-01-01

    The present study examines the extent to which adolescents' reading affect (reading motivation) and behaviour (reading habits) predict different components of reading (word reading, comprehension, summarisation and text reading speed) and also adds to the limited research examining group differences (gender, age, ability) in adolescents' reading…

  14. Training for developing reading comprehension and reading for learning

    OpenAIRE

    Pribac, Tina

    2015-01-01

    Understanding a readed text is the aim of reading at school. A reader reads to understand the meaning of a readed text and possibly use acquired informations in new sizuations. Student books and other written material is commonly used at schools. Reading comprehension difficulties lead toward loweer grades and consequently, to learning insuccess. Among students whit reading comprehension difficulties are some whit lacks in specific learning areas, such as difficulties at reading and writt...

  15. Motivational reading on education, meaningful reading realisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Qafa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study I will present some ideas on today’s educational practice for motivation, the realization of the meaningful reading. There is a special place for the methodical ranking of the reading process, starting in school. Main requests of this reading, consist of the deep meaning of the subject, exploration of the idea, and other elements of the subject, implementation of the technique’s rules of the expressive reading, such as breathing, voice, diction, intonation, spelling, stoppages, logical emphasizes, emotional expressions, temper, timber, gesticulations, and mimic. There is also highlighted the fact that the used method comes from the pupils’ results and depends on the capability and level of the teacher, from the programming’s scale, the tools that are put into disposition, the age and the level of the pupils, and from the environment that the teacher creates during courses. At the end there are some practical guidelines for the realization of the expressive reading in the literature subject.

  16. Improve your reading

    CERN Document Server

    Fry, Ron

    2012-01-01

    Help your students discover the practical solution to their reading frustrations, with Improve Your Reading. Written by bestselling author and education advocate Ron Fry, this book avoids gimmicks and tricks in favor of proven strategies that will help your students better retain and comprehend what they've read in any textbook, in any course, at any academic level. Endlessly adaptable to each student's individual learning needs, the text focuses on fundamental skills students can carry beyond the classroom.

  17. Predicting Future Reading Problems Based on Pre-reading Auditory Measures: A Longitudinal Study of Children with a Familial Risk of Dyslexia

    OpenAIRE

    Law, Jeremy M.; Vandermosten, Maaike; Ghesquière, Pol; Wouters, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This longitudinal study examines measures of temporal auditory processing in pre-reading children with a family risk of dyslexia. Specifically, it attempts to ascertain whether pre-reading auditory processing, speech perception, and phonological awareness (PA) reliably predict later literacy achievement. Additionally, this study retrospectively examines the presence of pre-reading auditory processing, speech perception, and PA impairments in children later found to be literacy impair...

  18. Ambulatory arterial stiffness index and its role in assessing arterial stiffness in dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenjin; Zhou, Jiajun; Chen, Jianping; Meng, Meijuan; Li, Xiurong; Gao, Chaoqing; Zhou, Jianmei; Wang, Liang; Sun, Zhuxing; Chu, Hong; Fan, Wei; Bai, Youwei; Yang, Junwei

    2017-06-01

    Ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) is a parameter derived from ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) readings. It is calculated as 1 minus the linear slope of DBP on SBP. We tested its value in assessing arterial stiffness in dialysis patients. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of the baseline data from a cohort study. A total of 344 patients on maintenance hemodialysis from six tertiary hospitals were included. All patients underwent ABP monitoring and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) measurement. Clinical determinants of AASI were analyzed, and the ability of AASI for assessing arterial stiffness was compared with ambulatory pulse pressure (PP). Multiple regression analysis revealed that ambulatory PP (β = 0.003), current smoker (β = -0.069), age (β = 0.003) and ambulatory SBP (β = 0.001) were independent determinants of AASI. Ambulatory PP correlates better with cfPWV than AASI (r = 0.28 for AASI and 0.59 for PP; P for difference: <0.001). When cfPWV was treated as a categorical variable, receiver operating characteristic curve analysis also showed a more potent predictive value of PP over AASI (area under the curve: 0.64 for AASI, 0.80 for PP; P for difference: <0.001). Net reclassification improvement and integrated discrimination improvement analysis demonstrated no added predictive value of AASI to PP (net reclassification improvement = -2.2%, P = 0.26; integrated discrimination improvement = 0.001, P = 0.51). Sensitivity analysis in patients with more ABP readings (≥49) yielded similar results. For dialysis patients, AASI has very limited value in assessing arterial stiffness, whether used alone or added to PP. Our results suggest that this index should not be used as a surrogate marker of arterial stiffness for dialysis patients in future practice and studies.

  19. Reading disorders and dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulme, Charles; Snowling, Margaret J

    2016-12-01

    We review current knowledge about the nature of reading development and disorders, distinguishing between the processes involved in learning to decode print, and the processes involved in reading comprehension. Children with decoding difficulties/dyslexia experience deficits in phoneme awareness, letter-sound knowledge and rapid automatized naming in the preschool years and beyond. These phonological/language difficulties appear to be proximal causes of the problems in learning to decode print in dyslexia. We review data from a prospective study of children at high risk of dyslexia to show that being at family risk of dyslexia is a primary risk factor for poor reading and children with persistent language difficulties at school entry are more likely to develop reading problems. Early oral language difficulties are strong predictors of later difficulties in reading comprehension. There are two distinct forms of reading disorder in children: dyslexia (a difficulty in learning to translate print into speech) and reading comprehension impairment. Both forms of reading problem appear to be predominantly caused by deficits in underlying oral language skills. Implications for screening and for the delivery of robust interventions for language and reading are discussed.

  20. Reading network in dyslexia: Similar, yet different.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldie, Karen E; Wilson, Anna J; Roberts, Reece P; Moreau, David

    2017-11-01

    Dyslexia is a developmental disorder characterized by reading and phonological difficulties, yet important questions remain regarding its underlying neural correlates. In this study, we used partial least squares (PLS), a multivariate analytic technique, to investigate the neural networks used by dyslexics while performing a word-rhyming task. Although the overall reading network was largely similar in dyslexics and typical readers, it did not correlate with behavior in the same way in the two groups. In particular, there was a positive association between reading performance and both right superior temporal gyrus and bilateral insula activation in dyslexic readers but a negative correlation in typical readers. Together with differences in lateralization unique to dyslexics, this suggests that the combination of poor reading performance with high insula activity and atypical laterality is a consistent marker of dyslexia. These findings emphasize the importance of understanding right-hemisphere activation in dyslexia and provide promising directions for the remediation of reading disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Time and space in reading – the interplay between pleasure and comprehension in a reading task Time and space in reading – the interplay between pleasure and comprehension in a reading task

    OpenAIRE

    Vilson Jose Leffa

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the correlation between comprehension and pleasure in a reading task. While comprehension is defined here within a spatial dimension, including the reader’s ability to relate the text being read to other texts, pleasure is seen as the reader’s reaction to the text, in a more temporal perspective. To test the hypotheses that there is a positive correlation between them, 67 students from 5th grade to university level were asked to read a text and answer a comprehens...

  2. Assisted Reading with Digital Audiobooks for Students with Reading Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Kelli J.; Whitten, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the efficacy of assisted reading with digital audiobooks with the traditional practice of sustained silent reading (SSR) in terms of reading fluency and reading attitude with upper elementary students with reading disabilities. Treatment group participants selected authentic children's literature and engaged…

  3. Developmental relations between reading comprehension and reading strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muijselaar, M.M.L.; Swart, N.M.; Steenbeek-Planting, E.G.; Droop, W.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.; Jong, P.F. de

    2017-01-01

    We examined the developmental relations between knowledge of reading strategies and reading comprehension in a longitudinal study of 312 Dutch children from the beginning of fourth grade to the end of fifth grade. Measures for reading comprehension, reading strategies, reading fluency, vocabulary,

  4. Developmental Relations Between Reading Comprehension and Reading Strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muijselaar, M.; Swart, N.M.; Steenbeek-Planting, E.G,.; Droop, M.; Verhoeven, L.; de Jong, P.F.

    2017-01-01

    We examined the developmental relations between knowledge of reading strategies and reading comprehension in a longitudinal study of 312 Dutch children from the beginning of fourth grade to the end of fifth grade. Measures for reading comprehension, reading strategies, reading fluency, vocabulary,

  5. Developmental Relations between Reading Comprehension and Reading Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muijselaar, Marloes M. L.; Swart, Nicole M.; Steenbeek-Planting, Esther G.; Droop, Mienke; Verhoeven, Ludo; de Jong, Peter F.

    2017-01-01

    We examined the developmental relations between knowledge of reading strategies and reading comprehension in a longitudinal study of 312 Dutch children from the beginning of fourth grade to the end of fifth grade. Measures for reading comprehension, reading strategies, reading fluency, vocabulary, and working memory were administered. A structural…

  6. Coronary Artery Bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadri Ceberut

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ancient schwannoma is a rare variant of neural tumors though rarely seen in the thorax. The combination with coronary artery diseases is also rare. Here we describe a 66 year-old male who had undergone one-stage combined surgery for thoracic ancient schwannomas removal and coronary artery disease. The masses were, respectively, 13 cm in the middle mediastinum and 5 cm in diameter originating from the intercostal nerve. The tumors were successfully removed using sternotomy, and then a coronary artery bypass grafting was performed. Here we discuss this rare tumor in relation to the relevant literature.

  7. The surgical challenge of carotid artery and Fallopian canal dehiscence in chronic ear disease: a pitfall for endoscopic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauna, H F; Monsanto, R C; Schachern, P A; Costa, S S; Kwon, G; Paparella, M M; Cureoglu, S

    2017-04-01

    Endoscopic procedures are becoming common in middle ear surgery. Inflammation due to chronic ear disease can cause bony erosion of the carotid artery and Fallopian canals, making them more vulnerable during surgery. The objective of this study was to determine whether or not chronic ear disease increases dehiscence of the carotid artery and Fallopian canals. Comparative human temporal bone study. Otopathology laboratory. We selected 78 temporal bones from 55 deceased donors with chronic otitis media or cholesteatoma and then compared those two groups with a control group of 27 temporal bones from 19 deceased donors with no middle ear disease. We analysed the middle ear, carotid artery canal and Fallopian canal, looking for signs of dehiscence of its bony coverage, using light microscopy. We found an increased incidence in dehiscence of the carotid artery and Fallopian canals in temporal bones with chronic middle ear disease. The size of the carotid artery canal dehiscence was larger in the middle ear-diseased groups, and its bony coverage, when present, was also thinner compared to the control group. Dehiscence of the carotid artery canal was more frequently located closer to the promontory. The incidence of Fallopian canal dehiscence was significantly higher in temporal bones from donors older than 18 years with chronic middle ear disease. The increased incidence of the carotid artery and Fallopian canal dehiscence in temporal bones with chronic middle ear disease elevates the risk of adverse events during middle ear surgery. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. N-acetylcysteine enhances nitroglycerin-induced headache and cranial arterial responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Helle Klingenberg

    1992-01-01

    The effects of N-acetylcysteine, a sulfhydryl group donor, on nitroglycerin-induced headache and dilation of temporal and radial arteries were investigated in 11 healthy volunteers. Nitroglycerin, 0.06 microgram/kg/min, was infused for 20 minutes immediately after and 120 minutes after pretreatment...... response (median headache score, 3 versus 1), and the headache retained its vascular characteristics. Temporal artery dilation was also potentiated by N-acetylcysteine, 139% +/- 3% versus 127% +/- 3% of baseline, whereas the radial artery was unaffected. The potentiation was most pronounced after the first...... nitroglycerin infusion (12% versus 4.5% compared with placebo). A prolonged dilation of the temporal artery was observed only after the first nitroglycerin infusion, when high levels of N-acetylcysteine were present....

  9. Brain activation profiles during the early stages of reading acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simos, Panagiotis G; Fletcher, Jack M; Foorman, Barbara R; Francis, David J; Castillo, Eduardo M; Davis, Robert N; Fitzgerald, Michele; Mathes, Patricia G; Denton, Carolyn; Papanicolaou, Andrew C

    2002-03-01

    In the present study, we demonstrate for the first time the presence of an aberrant brain mechanism for reading in children who have just started acquiring reading skills. Children who, at the end of kindergarten, are found to be at risk for developing reading problems display markedly different activation profiles than children who have, at this stage, already mastered important prereading skills. This aberrant profile is characterized by the lack of engagement of the left-hemisphere superior temporal region, an area normally involved in converting print into sound, and an increase in activation in the corresponding right-hemisphere region. This finding is consistent with current cognitive models of reading acquisition and dyslexia, pointing to the critical role of phonologic awareness skills in learning to read.

  10. Page mode reading with simulated scotomas: oculo-motor patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherlen, Anne-Catherine; Bernard, Jean-Baptiste; Calabrese, Aurélie; Castet, Eric

    2008-08-01

    This study investigated the relationship between reading speed and oculo-motor parameters when normally sighted observers had to read single sentences with an artificial macular scotoma. Using multiple regression analysis, our main result shows that two significant predictors, number of saccades per sentence followed by average fixation duration, account for 94% of reading speed variance: reading speed decreases when number of saccades and fixation duration increase. The number of letters per forward saccade (L/FS), which was measured directly in contrast to previous studies, is not a significant predictor. The results suggest that, independently of the size of saccades, some or all portions of a sentence are temporally integrated across an increasing number of fixations as reading speed is reduced.

  11. Microbubble ultrasound contrast in the assessment of hepatic artery patency following liver transplantation: role in reducing frequency of hepatic artery arteriography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Paul S; Shaw, Ashley S; Ellis, Stephen M; Karani, John B; Ryan, Suzanne M

    2004-01-01

    We prospectively evaluated the role of microbubble ultrasound contrast for detection of hepatic artery thrombosis following liver transplantation. The hepatic artery of adult liver transplant recipients with suspected thrombosis on surveillance Doppler ultrasound (US) were re-examined by a second observer. In patients with no hepatic spectral Doppler signal the microbubble contrast agent Levovist was used. The presence or absence of flow following microbubble contrast was evaluated against arteriography or repeated Doppler US findings. A total of 794 surveillance Doppler US examinations were performed in 231 patients. Hepatic artery flow was demonstrated in 759 of 794 (95.6%) examinations. Microbubble ultrasound contrast was administered in 31 patients (35 studies) with suspected hepatic artery thrombosis. Following microbubble US contrast the hepatic artery could not be demonstrated in 13 of 35 (37.1%) studies (12 patients). Eight patients had arteriography: there was hepatic artery thrombosis in 7 patients and 1 patient had a patent, highly attenuated artery. Detection of a patent hepatic artery increased from 759 of 794 (95.6%) to 781 of 794 (98.4%) with the addition of microbubble contrast. Upon independent reading of the data, the degree of operator confidence in the assessment of the hepatic artery patency prior to microbubble contrast was 4.7 (CI 1.92-7.5) but rose to 8.45 (CI 7.06-9.84) following microbubble contrast ( pUltrasound microbubble contrast media may reduce the need for invasive arteriography in the assessment of suspected hepatic artery thrombosis.

  12. Reading epilepsy from the dominant temporo-occipital region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavaret, Martine; Guedj, Eric; Koessler, Laurent; Trébuchon-Da Fonseca, Agnès; Aubert, Sandrine; Mundler, Olivier; Chauvel, Patrick; Bartolomei, Fabrice

    2010-07-01

    Reading epilepsy is a rare form of epilepsy, classified among idiopathic, age- and localisation-related (partial) epilepsies as a reflex epilepsy syndrome. Seizures usually consist of myoclonic jerks restricted to the jaw. However, distinct ictal features including visual symptoms and paroxysmal a- or dyslexia are described in some patients. The anatomical substrate of ictogenesis in reading epilepsy remains poorly understood. The authors report here the case of a primary reading epilepsy for which ictal semiology was characterised by visual symptoms and dyslexia, investigated by MRI, interictal high-resolution EEG and PET, ictal video-EEG and SPECT. Brain MRI was normal. Interictal high-resolution EEG was performed with 64 scalp channels, a realistic head model and different algorithms to solve the inverse problem. Interictal source localisations highlighted the left occipito-temporal junction. Interictal PET demonstrated bilateral occipito-temporal hypometabolism with left-sided predominance. Ictal EEG showed a rhythmic discharge in left temporo-parieto-occipital junction channels, with left occipito-temporal predominance. MRI fusion of the coregistered subtraction between ictal and interictal SPECT individualised relative hyperperfusion affecting (a) the left occipito-parietal junction area, (b) the left lateral middle and inferior temporal gyri and (c) the left inferior frontal area. Besides reading-induced myoclonic jerks of the jaw, a second variant of reading epilepsy exists with clearly partial seizures manifested by visual symptoms and a- or dyslexia. These seizures originate from the occipito-temporal region of the dominant hemisphere, corresponding to the posterior part of the neural network that underlies the function of reading.

  13. Anatomy of renal arterial supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamanarong, K; Prachaney, P; Utraravichien, A; Tong-Un, T; Sripaoraya, K

    2004-05-01

    A thorough knowledge of the variations of the renal artery has grown in importance with the increasing numbers of renal transplants, vascular reconstructions, and various surgical and radiologic techniques. The literature indicates that multiple renal arteries are found in 9- 76% of cadavers. The purpose of this study is to establish the incidence and characteristics of variations of renal arteries in Thais. A total of 267 Thai cadavers were dissected in the anatomy laboratory. The anatomical findings included: a single hilar artery in 82% of cases; double renal arteries in 17% of cases (one hilar artery with an upper polar artery occurred in 7%; two hilar arteries in 7%, and one hilar artery combined with one lower polar artery in 3%); and triple renal arteries occurred in 1% (two hilar arteries with one upper polar artery in 0.4% and two hilar arteries with one lower polar artery in 0.6%). In preparation for interventions, such as living renal donation, vascular reconstruction, renovascular hypertension, or radical nephrectomy, the results indicate that preoperative renal imaging is necessary and that operative techniques with attention to multiple renal arteries should be considered. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Assistive Technologies for Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffin, Tiece M.

    2012-01-01

    Twenty-first century teachers working with diverse readers are often faced with the question of how to integrate technology in reading instruction that meets the needs of the techno-generation. Are today's teachers equipped with the knowledge of how to effectively use Assistive Technologies (AT) for reading? This position paper discusses AT for…

  15. Reading, Writing, and Understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Vicki A.

    2002-01-01

    Describes how secondary-school content-area teachers can improve student comprehension of text material by incorporating reading and writing strategies into their classroom instruction. Illustrates relationships among reading, writing, and understanding. Suggests framework for staff-development program. (Contains 14 references.) (PKP)

  16. Superheroes and Summer Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Ron; Buckner, Joyce

    1980-01-01

    To combat summer learning loss among remedial readers, teachers and consultants in the Omaha, Nebraska, Title I program designed a series of comic-book reading units and mailed them to students' homes. Parents were pleased with the project and it appeared that less reading skill had been lost by September. (SJL)

  17. How Knowledge Powers Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemov, Doug

    2017-01-01

    Recent research shows that reading comprehension relies heavily on prior knowledge. Far more than generic "reading skills" like drawing inferences, making predictions, and knowing the function of subheads, how well students learn from a nonfiction text depends on their background knowledge of the text's subject matter. And in a cyclical…

  18. Teaching Reading in Homeschool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yambo, Idalia

    This paper discusses the home-schooling trend and identifies reading instructional methods used by home-schooling parents. Interviews were conducted with 5 home-schooling families of children ranging in age from 1 to 14 years. Parents reported that they began reading instruction with their child at about age 5 and agreed that instruction in…

  19. Teaching Grammar and Reading

    OpenAIRE

    高棹, 聰子

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore what effectiveness of teaching grammar would be expected in reading, analyzing the statistical data. The data show the lack of the students' motivation and their reluctance about reading the whole passage. In conclusion, we should think out the problems caused by methodology as well as course design.

  20. Lippincott Basic Reading Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monterey Peninsula Unified School District, Monterey, CA.

    This program, included in "Effective Reading Programs...," serves 459 students in grades 1-3 at 15 elementary schools. The program employs a diagnostic-prescriptive approach to instruction in a nongraded setting through the use of the Lippincott Basic Reading program. When a child enters the program, he is introduced to a decoding…

  1. Toddler Reading Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Food Shopping Healthy Drinks for Kids Toddler Reading Time KidsHealth > For Parents > Toddler Reading Time Print A A A What's in this article? ... Kids make big leaps in vocabulary during this time, and learn about letters, shapes, colors, weather, animals, ...

  2. Read Like a Scientist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawyer, Kirsten K. N.; Johnson, Heather J.

    2017-01-01

    Scientists read, and so should students. Unfortunately, many high school teachers overlook science texts as a way to engage students in the work of scientists. This article addresses how to help students develop literacy skills by strategically reading a variety of science texts. Unfortunately, most science teachers aren't trained to teach…

  3. Novel Reading Maturity Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Carol

    Designed to assess the maturity level of the novels which students read, the Novel Reading Maturity Scale (NRMS) is based on the notion that fiction of high quality is characterized by a number of themes or topics. The list of 22 topics in NRMS came from a survey of several guides on books for teenagers. To explore the reliability of the scale,…

  4. Read across the City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Carl A., II; Satterlee, Karen L.

    2001-01-01

    Describes a cooperative project between several year-round elementary schools in Indianapolis (Indiana) to promote reading, based on the National Education Association's campaign using Dr. Seuss books. Discusses planning with library media specialists, activities that included writing about reading, volunteers and funding, and evaluation. (LRW)

  5. Television and Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaughnessy, Michael F.

    While the influence of television on reading has only been minimally researched, it is obvious that the more television watching children do, the less time is spent on reading. Over 10 years, the cumulative effects of television viewing can be devastating. Watching television is a passive, receptive activity. Children also watch MTV, rent movies,…

  6. Effective Beginning Reading Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressley, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Argues that the National Reading Panel is too narrow in its presentation of scientifically valid reading research. Presents a sample of practices that enjoy support but were ignored by the panel and qualitative research that was out of bounds because of the methodological guidelines of the panel. Concludes that most of the cutting edge of the…

  7. READING--A THINKING PROCESS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    STAUFFER, RUSSELL G.

    IN ORDER TO TEACH READING AS A THINKING PROCESS, TEACHERS SHOULD BELIEVE THAT CHILDREN CAN THINK AND CAN BE TAUGHT TO READ CRITICALLY, EVEN AT A VERY YOUNG AGE. THREE ASPECTS OF THE READING-THINKING PROCESS INCLUDE DECLARATION OF PURPOSES, REASONING, AND JUDGMENT. THE NATURE OF THE PURPOSES DETERMINES WHAT IS TO BE READ AND HOW IT IS TO BE READ.…

  8. Combined interventional and surgical treatment of tandem middle cerebral artery embolus and internal carotid artery occlusion: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkel, Mark B; Renfrow, Jaclyn J; Singh, Jasmeet; Garg, Nitin; Wolfe, Stacey Q

    2017-11-17

    Tandem internal carotid artery (ICA) origin occlusion and middle cerebral artery (MCA) thromboembolism is a life-threatening condition with poor neurological outcome. The authors report on a patient presenting with acute ischemic stroke from a tandem ICA and MCA occlusion with penumbra. Emergency MCA mechanical thrombectomy was performed through percutaneous cervical ICA access due to the inability to cross the cervical carotid occlusion. Emergency carotid endarterectomy to reperfuse the poorly collateralized hemisphere and repair the ICA access site was performed 2 hours after completion of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) infusion. This case illustrates the shortest reported interval between tPA infusion and open surgical intervention for carotid revascularization, as well as the role of direct carotid artery access for mechanical thrombectomy. The authors also describe the use of a temporizing femoral artery-to-ICA shunt to maintain cerebral perfusion in the setting of ICA occlusion.

  9. Small arteries can be accurately studied in vivo, using high frequency ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, T H; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg; Tfelt-Hansen, P

    1993-01-01

    We have validated measurements of diameters of the superficial temporal artery and other small arteries in man with a newly developed 20 MHz ultrasound scanner with A, B and M-mode imaging. The diameter of a reference object was 1.202 mm vs. 1.205 mm as measured by stereomicroscopy (nonsignifican......-gauge plethysmography (nonsignificant). Pulsations were 4.6% in the radial artery. We conclude that high frequency ultrasound provides an accurate and reproducible measure of the diameter of small and medium sized human arteries in vivo....

  10. Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... don't help, you may need coronary artery bypass surgery. The surgery creates a new path for ... narrowed area or blockage. This allows blood to bypass (get around) the blockage. Sometimes people need more ...

  11. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension What Is Pulmonary Hypertension? To understand pulmonary hypertension (PH) it helps to understand how blood ows throughout your body. While the heart is one organ, it ...

  12. Coronary artery spasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blocker or a long-acting nitrate long-term. Beta-blockers are another type of medicine that is used with other coronary artery problems. However, beta-blockers may make this problem worse. They should be ...

  13. Peripheral Arterial Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) happens when there is a narrowing of the blood vessels outside of your heart. The cause of ... smoking. Other risk factors include older age and diseases like diabetes, high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, ...

  14. Arterial bypass leg - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... presentations/100155.htm Arterial bypass leg - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  15. Mesenteric artery ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001156.htm Mesenteric artery ischemia To use the sharing features on this page, ... be removed. Outlook (Prognosis) The outlook for chronic mesenteric ischemia is good after a successful surgery. However, it ...

  16. Carotid Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart. It also helps you lose weight, control diabetes and reduce stress. Limit alcohol. Control chronic conditions. Managing conditions such as diabetes and high blood pressure helps protect your arteries. ...

  17. Altered patterns of directed connectivity within the reading network of dyslexic children and their relation to reading dysfluency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žarić, Gojko; Correia, João M; Fraga González, Gorka; Tijms, Jurgen; van der Molen, Maurtis W; Blomert, Leo; Bonte, Milene

    2017-02-01

    Reading is a complex cognitive skill subserved by a distributed network of visual and language-related regions. Disruptions of connectivity within this network have been associated with developmental dyslexia but their relation to individual differences in the severity of reading problems remains unclear. Here we investigate whether dysfunctional connectivity scales with the level of reading dysfluency by examining EEG recordings during visual word and false font processing in 9-year-old typically reading children (TR) and two groups of dyslexic children: severely dysfluent (SDD) and moderately dysfluent (MDD) dyslexics. Results indicated weaker occipital to inferior-temporal connectivity for words in both dyslexic groups relative to TRs. Furthermore, SDDs exhibited stronger connectivity from left central to right inferior-temporal and occipital sites for words relative to TRs, and for false fonts relative to both MDDs and TRs. Importantly, reading fluency was positively related with forward and negatively with backward connectivity. Our results suggest disrupted visual processing of words in both dyslexic groups, together with a compensatory recruitment of right posterior brain regions especially in the SDDs during word and false font processing. Functional connectivity in the brain's reading network may thus depend on the level of reading dysfluency beyond group differences between dyslexic and typical readers. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Science Fiction: Serious Reading, Critical Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigo, Diane; Moore, Michael T.

    2004-01-01

    Science fiction deserves a greater respect, serious and critical reading and a better place in high school literature classes. Some of the science fiction books by Isaac Asimov, Alfred Bester, Ray Bradbury and Octavia L. Butler and various activities for incorporating science fiction into the English language arts instruction classroom are…

  19. Integrating Reading and Writing through Extensive Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeongyeon

    2016-01-01

    This study explores whether an extensive reading (ER) approach can enhance L2 learners' writing performance in an English for Academic Purposes context. Two classes were compared in terms of writing improvement after one semester: a 'traditional' writing class primarily focused on writing practice and grammar instruction, and an ER class in which…

  20. To Read or Not to Read

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-07-01

    primary purpose of raising the literacy of Navy recruits who have difficulty absorbing military training because of a readingl dis- ability. TIhe desired...intelligent decisions, and read with a high jegree of understanding. Navy school curricula are designed to teach the skil !. needed to operate, maintain

  1. TEACHING READING USING MAGAZINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henny Uswatun Hasanah

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Teaching is a process of communication. It has to be created through the way of teaching and exchanging the message or information by every teacher and student. The message can be knowledge, skills, ideas, experiences, and many others. Through the process of communication, the people can receive the message or information. To avoid misunderstanding in the process of communication, media are needed in the process of teaching. Magazine can be other alternative as reading material in the classroom. Magazine as reading material has appeal for the students. To make the students get information from magazine, the teacher can ask the students to observe table of content and giving the students training to use it. Like, what is done on text book. Distinguishing informative reading material with fictive reading, important to know students in reading magazine. Like analyzing advertisements to detect propaganda.

  2. A middle mesenteric artery

    OpenAIRE

    Milnerowicz, Stanislaw; Milnerowicz, Artur; Taboła, Renata

    2012-01-01

    In 114 cases of the transverse colon isolated from cadavers (50 male, 64 female), anatomical examinations of the arterial system of the colon were performed. Arteriograms were obtained after dissecting and contrasting the colonic vessels with Mixobar contrast. In one case, on arteriography of the colon with its mesentery isolated from a 55-year-old male cadaver, a rare anatomical variant was found. The third mesenteric artery originated directly from the aorta—halfway between the superior and...

  3. Branch Retinal Artery Occlusion following Dental Extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Tevfik Oğurel; Zafer Onaran; Reyhan Oğurel; Nurgül Örnek; Nesrin Büyüktortop Gökçınar; Kemal Örnek

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To describe a case of branch retinal artery occlusion following dental extraction and to point out the ophthalmic complications of dental procedures to ophthalmologists and dentists. Case. A 51-year-old woman was referred to our clinic with painless sudden visual loss in her left eye after tooth extraction two days ago. In her left eye the best corrected visual acuity was 6/30 and fundus examination revealed peripapillary flame-shaped hemorrhages and pale retina in the upper temporal arc...

  4. Coronary artery fistulas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Subbotin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery fistulas are classified as abnormalities of termination and referred to as major congenital anomalies. Most coronary artery fistulas are small, unaccompanied by clinical symptoms, and diagnosed by echocardiography or coronarography performed for an unrelated cause. Such fistulas usually do not cause any complications and can spontaneously resolve. However, larger fistulas are usually >3 tones the size of a normal caliber of a coronary artery and may give rise to clinical symptoms in these cases. The clinical symptoms of coronary artery fistulas may mimic those of various heart diseases depending on which chamber a fistula drains into. Most fistulas are congenital. Congenital coronary artery fistulas may occur as an isolated malformation or be concurrent with other cardiac anomalies, more frequently with critical pulmonary stenosis or atresia with an intact interventricular septum and pulmonary stenoses, Fallot's tetralogy, aortic coarctation, and left heart hypoplasia. When choosing a treatment modality, one should take into account the number of fistula communications, the feeding vessel, localization of drainage, degree of myocardial damage, and hemodynamic relevance of the shunt caused by the presence of a fistula. The goal of treatment is to obliterate a fistula by preserving normal coronary blood flow. The risk for persisting fistula should be balanced with the potential risk of complications related to a procedure of coronarography and fistula occlusion. Percutaneous transcatheter coil occlusion of coronary artery fistulas is the modality of choice in children with the suitable anatomy of fistula communications and without concomitant congenital heart diseases.

  5. Reading Ability and Reading Engagement in Older Adults With Glaucoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Angeline M.; van Landingham, Suzanne W.; Massof, Robert W.; Rubin, Gary S.; Ramulu, Pradeep Y.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We evaluated the impact of glaucoma-related vision loss on reading ability and reading engagement in 10 reading activities. Methods. A total of 63 glaucoma patients and 59 glaucoma suspect controls self-rated their level of reading difficulty for 10 reading items, and responses were analyzed using Rasch analysis to determine reading ability. Reading engagement was assessed by asking subjects to report the number of days per week they engaged in each reading activity. Reading restriction was determined as a decrement in engagement. Results. Glaucoma subjects more often described greater reading difficulty than controls for all tasks except puzzles (P reading tasks involved puzzles, books, and finances, while the least difficult reading tasks involved notes, bills, and mail. In multivariable weighted least squares regression models of Rasch-estimated person measures of reading ability, less reading ability was found for glaucoma patients compared to controls (β = −1.60 logits, P reading ability was associated with more severe visual field (VF) loss (β = −0.68 logits per 5-dB decrement in better-eye VF mean deviation [MD], P reading on 18% fewer days (P = 0.003) and newspaper reading on 10% fewer days (P = 0.008). No statistically significant reading restriction was observed for other reading activities (P > 0.05). Conclusions. Glaucoma patients have less reading ability and engage less in a variety of different reading activities, particularly those requiring sustained reading. Future work should evaluate the mechanisms underlying reading disability in glaucoma to determine how patients can maintain reading ability and engagement. PMID:25052992

  6. Inductive Temporal Logic Programming

    OpenAIRE

    Kolter, Robert

    2009-01-01

    We study the extension of techniques from Inductive Logic Programming (ILP) to temporal logic programming languages. Therefore we present two temporal logic programming languages and analyse the learnability of programs from these languages from finite sets of examples. In first order temporal logic the following topics are analysed: - How can we characterize the denotational semantics of programs? - Which proof techniques are best suited? - How complex is the learning task? In propositional ...

  7. Forecasting Reading Anxiety for Promoting English-Language Reading Performance Based on Reading Annotation Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Ming; Wang, Jung-Ying; Chen, Yong-Ting; Wu, Jhih-Hao

    2016-01-01

    To reduce effectively the reading anxiety of learners while reading English articles, a C4.5 decision tree, a widely used data mining technique, was used to develop a personalized reading anxiety prediction model (PRAPM) based on individual learners' reading annotation behavior in a collaborative digital reading annotation system (CDRAS). In…

  8. Indeterministic Temporal Logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trzęsicki Kazimierz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The questions od determinism, causality, and freedom have been the main philosophical problems debated since the beginning of temporal logic. The issue of the logical value of sentences about the future was stated by Aristotle in the famous tomorrow sea-battle passage. The question has inspired Łukasiewicz’s idea of many-valued logics and was a motive of A. N. Prior’s considerations about the logic of tenses. In the scheme of temporal logic there are different solutions to the problem. In the paper we consider indeterministic temporal logic based on the idea of temporal worlds and the relation of accessibility between them.

  9. The effect of nail polish on pulse oximetry readings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakverdioğlu Yönt, Gülendam; Akin Korhan, Esra; Dizer, Berna

    2014-04-01

    Pulse oximeters utilise the pulsatile nature of arterial blood flow to distinguish it from venous flow and estimate oxygen saturation in arterial blood. Pulse oximetry is primarily used in hospital wards, emergency rooms, intensive care units, operating rooms and home care. The objective of this study is to determine whether the use of nail polish of various colours have an effect on oximeter readings of oxygen saturation value. The sample group of this study is comprised of 40 healthy women. In the first phase of the study, readings were taken on left and right hand fingers, with no nail polish, to determine any differences in oxygen saturation value. In the second phase of the study, 10 different colours of nail polish, namely dark red, yellow, dark blue, green, purple, brown, white, metallic, black and pink, of the same brand were applied. Readings were recorded once oxygen saturation values on the screen became stable. Number and percentage distributions along with Wilcoxon signed ranks and Friedman test were used in the analysis of data. Only red nail polish did not yield statistically significant reading results. We conclude that different nail polish colours cause a clinically significant change in pulse oximeter readings in healthy volunteers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Microsaccades during reading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norick R Bowers

    Full Text Available Recent research has shown that microsaccades contribute to high acuity vision. However, little is known about whether microsaccades also play a role in daily activities, such as reading, that do not involve stimuli at the limit of spatial resolution. While the functions of larger saccades in reading have been extensively examined, microsaccades are commonly regarded as oculomotor noise in this context. We used high-resolution eyetracking and precise gaze localization to investigate fine oculomotor behavior during reading. Our findings show that microsaccade characteristics differ from those measured during sustained fixation: microsaccades are larger in size and primarily leftwards during reading, i.e. they move the line of sight backward on the text. Analysis of how microsaccades shift gaze relative to the text suggests that these movements serve two important functions: (1 a corrective function, by moving the gaze regressively within longer words when the preceding saccade lands too far toward the end of these words, and (2 an exploratory function, by shifting the gaze on adjacent words to gain additional information before the execution of the next saccade. Thus, microsaccades may benefit reading by enhancing the visibility of nearby words. This study highlights the importance of examining fine oculomotor behavior in reading, and calls for further research to investigate the possible roles of microsaccades in reading difficulties.

  11. Microsaccades during reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Norick R; Poletti, Martina

    2017-01-01

    Recent research has shown that microsaccades contribute to high acuity vision. However, little is known about whether microsaccades also play a role in daily activities, such as reading, that do not involve stimuli at the limit of spatial resolution. While the functions of larger saccades in reading have been extensively examined, microsaccades are commonly regarded as oculomotor noise in this context. We used high-resolution eyetracking and precise gaze localization to investigate fine oculomotor behavior during reading. Our findings show that microsaccade characteristics differ from those measured during sustained fixation: microsaccades are larger in size and primarily leftwards during reading, i.e. they move the line of sight backward on the text. Analysis of how microsaccades shift gaze relative to the text suggests that these movements serve two important functions: (1) a corrective function, by moving the gaze regressively within longer words when the preceding saccade lands too far toward the end of these words, and (2) an exploratory function, by shifting the gaze on adjacent words to gain additional information before the execution of the next saccade. Thus, microsaccades may benefit reading by enhancing the visibility of nearby words. This study highlights the importance of examining fine oculomotor behavior in reading, and calls for further research to investigate the possible roles of microsaccades in reading difficulties.

  12. Interruptions disrupt reading comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroughi, Cyrus K; Werner, Nicole E; Barragán, Daniela; Boehm-Davis, Deborah A

    2015-06-01

    Previous research suggests that being interrupted while reading a text does not disrupt the later recognition or recall of information from that text. This research is used as support for Ericsson and Kintsch's (1995) long-term working memory (LT-WM) theory, which posits that disruptions while reading (e.g., interruptions) do not impair subsequent text comprehension. However, to fully comprehend a text, individuals may need to do more than recognize or recall information that has been presented in the text at a later time. Reading comprehension often requires individuals to connect and synthesize information across a text (e.g., successfully identifying complex topics such as themes and tones) and not just make a familiarity-based decision (i.e., recognition). The goal for this study was to determine whether interruptions while reading disrupt reading comprehension when the questions assessing comprehension require participants to connect and synthesize information across the passage. In Experiment 1, interruptions disrupted reading comprehension. In Experiment 2, interruptions disrupted reading comprehension but not recognition of information from the text. In Experiment 3, the addition of a 15-s time-out prior to the interruption successfully removed these negative effects. These data suggest that the time it takes to process the information needed to successfully comprehend text when reading is greater than that required for recognition. Any interference (e.g., an interruption) that occurs during the comprehension process may disrupt reading comprehension. This evidence supports the need for transient activation of information in working memory for successful text comprehension and does not support LT-WM theory. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Attention and reading skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commodari, Elena; Guarnera, Maria

    2005-04-01

    Attention plays a critical role in information processing. Its adequate functioning is required for correct development of complex cognitive abilities and regular scholastic progress. Children with attention deficits often have difficulties in reading, writing, and arithmetic. The present study investigated interactions among reading skills, overall scholastic performance as rated by teachers, and components of attention: visual reaction time, simple immediate span of attention, and selectivity. The sample was 98 students in the first and second years of public junior high school (age range 11-14 years, M = 12.6, SD = 1.2), i.e., with expected already well-established reading. Reading was evaluated using Comprehension, Accuracy, and Speed tests. Overall scholastic performance was obtained by means of teachers' ratings. Simple Reaction Time, Digit Span, and Color-Word Interference, included in a multitask computerized test, assessed attention. Analysis confirmed the hypothesis that the reading skills are strongly predictive of the Scholastic Assessment rated by the teachers. High scholastic ratings were correlated with Reading Speed and Accuracy rather than Reading Comprehension. Poor readers showed worse performances on the Digit Span test which measures simple immediate span of attention. Good and poor readers obtained a similar score on the Color-Word Interference task. This observation seems to contrast with the more common interpretation of this effect, suggesting that reading is an automatic process and, therefore, the semantic dimension overcomes the controlled perceptual one. According to other studies, an alternative explanation is suggested. In conclusion, present results confirm the hypothesis of a strong link among reading speed and accuracy, scholastic assessment as rated by teachers, simple immediate span of attention, and visual reaction time.

  14. Temporal properties of stereopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gheorghiu, E.

    2005-01-01

    The goal of the research presented in this thesis was to investigate temporal properties of disparity processing and depth perception in human subjects, in response to dynamic stimuli. The results presented in various chapters, reporting findings about different temporal aspects of disparity

  15. Temporal Linear System Structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willigenburg, van L.G.; Koning, de W.L.

    2008-01-01

    Piecewise constant rank systems and the differential Kalman decomposition are introduced in this note. Together these enable the detection of temporal uncontrollability/unreconstructability of linear continuous-time systems. These temporal properties are not detected by any of the four conventional

  16. Temporal Photon Differentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Frisvad, Jeppe Revall; Erleben, Kenny

    2010-01-01

    , constituting a temporal smoothing of rapidly changing illumination. In global illumination temporal smoothing can be achieved with distribution ray tracing (Cook et al., 1984). Unfortunately, this, and resembling methods, requires a high temporal resolution as samples has to be drawn from in-between frames. We...... present a novel method which is able to produce high quality temporal smoothing for indirect illumination without using in-between frames. Our method is based on ray differentials (Igehy, 1999) as it has been extended in (Sporring et al., 2009). Light rays are traced as bundles creating footprints, which......The finite frame rate also used in computer animated films is cause of adverse temporal aliasing effects. Most noticeable of these is a stroboscopic effect that is seen as intermittent movement of fast moving illumination. This effect can be mitigated using non-zero shutter times, effectively...

  17. The phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitor cilostazol dilates large cerebral arteries in humans without affecting regional cerebral blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birk, Steffen; Kruuse, Christina Rostrup; Petersen, Kenneth A

    2004-01-01

    in the middle cerebral arteries (VMCA) was measured with transcranial Doppler, and the superficial temporal and radial arteries diameters were measured with ultrasonography. During the 4-hour observation period, there was no effect on systolic blood pressure (P = 0.28), but diastolic blood pressure decreased...

  18. Inter-subject variability in the use of two different neuronal networks for reading aloud familiar words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seghier, M L; Lee, H L; Schofield, T; Ellis, C L; Price, C J

    2008-09-01

    Cognitive models of reading predict that high frequency regular words can be read in more than one way. We investigated this hypothesis using functional MRI and covariance analysis in 43 healthy skilled readers. Our results dissociated two sets of regions that were differentially engaged across subjects who were reading the same familiar words. Some subjects showed more activation in left inferior frontal and anterior occipito-temporal regions while other subjects showed more activation in right inferior parietal and left posterior occipito-temporal regions. To explore the behavioural correlates of these systems, we measured the difference between reading speed for irregularly spelled words relative to pseudowords outside the scanner in fifteen of our subjects and correlated this measure with fMRI activation for reading familiar words. The faster the lexical reading the greater the activation in left posterior occipito-temporal and right inferior parietal regions. Conversely, the slower the lexical reading the greater the activation in left anterior occipito-temporal and left ventral inferior frontal regions. Thus, the double dissociation in irregular and pseudoword reading behaviour predicted the double dissociation in neuronal activation for reading familiar words. We discuss the implications of these results which may be important for understanding how reading is learnt in childhood or re-learnt following brain damage in adulthood.

  19. Time and space in reading – the interplay between pleasure and comprehension in a reading task Time and space in reading – the interplay between pleasure and comprehension in a reading task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilson Jose Leffa

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the correlation between comprehension and pleasure in a reading task. While comprehension is defined here within a spatial dimension, including the reader’s ability to relate the text being read to other texts, pleasure is seen as the reader’s reaction to the text, in a more temporal perspective. To test the hypotheses that there is a positive correlation between them, 67 students from 5th grade to university level were asked to read a text and answer a comprehension/reaction questionnaire. The results showed that there is a positive correlation between comprehension and pleasure. Aspects involving intertextuality, interest and previous knowledge are also discussed. This paper investigates the correlation between comprehension and pleasure in a reading task. While comprehension is defined here within a spatial dimension, including the reader’s ability to relate the text being read to other texts, pleasure is seen as the reader’s reaction to the text, in a more temporal perspective. To test the hypotheses that there is a positive correlation between them, 67 students from 5th grade to university level were asked to read a text and answer a comprehension/reaction questionnaire. The results showed that there is a positive correlation between comprehension and pleasure. Aspects involving intertextuality, interest and previous knowledge are also discussed.

  20. The neural underpinnings of reading skill in deaf adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmorey, Karen; McCullough, Stephen; Weisberg, Jill

    2016-09-01

    We investigated word-level reading circuits in skilled deaf readers (N=14; mean reading age=19.5years) and less skilled deaf readers (N=14; mean reading age=12years) who were all highly proficient users of American Sign Language. During fMRI scanning, participants performed a semantic decision (concrete concept?), a phonological decision (two syllables?), and a false-font control task (string underlined?). No significant group differences were observed with the full participant set. However, an analysis with the 10 most and 10 least skilled readers revealed that for the semantic task (vs. control task), proficient deaf readers exhibited greater activation in left inferior frontal and middle temporal gyri than less proficient readers. No group differences were observed for the phonological task. Whole-brain correlation analyses (all participants) revealed that for the semantic task, reading ability correlated positively with neural activity in the right inferior frontal gyrus and in a region associated with the orthography-semantics interface, located anterior to the visual word form area. Reading ability did not correlate with neural activity during the phonological task. Accuracy on the semantic task correlated positively with neural activity in left anterior temporal lobe (a region linked to conceptual processing), while accuracy on the phonological task correlated positively with neural activity in left posterior inferior frontal gyrus (a region linked to syllabification processes during speech production). Finally, reading comprehension scores correlated positively with vocabulary and print exposure measures, but not with phonological awareness scores. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Reading: Ave Atque Vale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Ann

    1984-01-01

    Although basic literacy will continue to be necessary for survival, mass communications and information technology are bringing about an inevitable and lamentable decline in reading for pleasure and in the love of literature for its own sake. (TE)

  2. What Are Reading Disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disorders may have other learning disabilities, too, including problems with writing or numbers . Visit learning disabilities for more information about these problems. Types of Reading Disorders Dyslexia is a brain- ...

  3. Idioms and Reading Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Peter

    1974-01-01

    Presents the results of a study designed to determine whether idioms cause difficulty for students in the reading and understanding of prose, concluding that methods of teaching idioms should be explored. (RB)

  4. Reading Victorian Sculpture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Dunstan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This introduction reflects on reading sculpture in Victorian culture, and in Victorian studies. How did the Victorians read sculpture? How should we read it today? What might a sculpture connote in different contexts: the home, the street, the gallery, the colony? How broadly should we define what we describe as ‘Victorian sculpture’, in light of nineteenth-century industrial and technological innovation? For the Victorians, as for modern readers of Victorian sculpture, legibility remains a prime preoccupation when addressing these questions. This introduction suggests that Victorian sculpture’s resistance to reading renders it fertile ground for revisiting and reinterpreting individual works, their creators, textual responses to them, and the greater significance of their cumulative cultural imprint.

  5. Sequence Read Archive (SRA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Sequence Read Archive (SRA) stores raw sequencing data from the next generation of sequencing platforms including Roche 454 GS System®, Illumina Genome...

  6. Remembered, read and experienced time in virtual text

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raine Koskimaa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1807-9288.2015v11n1p250 In this article I will scrutinize Screen (2002, by WARDRIP-FRUIN & al., a literary work set and experienced in a CAVE Virtual Reality environment, especially from the perspective of its temporal aspects. There are obvious themes of remembering, forgetting and textually constructing the past in this work, but most notably, Screen emphasizes the temporality of the reading act itself. I will analyze this highly special work in relation to the remembered, read, and bodily experienced time, and thus, attempt to better understand both the notion of fictive time and the temporality of fiction.

  7. Editorial: Summer Reading 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Board

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Photo by Flickr user Moyan_Brenn (CC BY 2.0 Editors from In The Library With The Lead Pipe are taking a break from our regular schedule to share our summer reading favs. Tell us what you’ve been reading these last few months in the comments! Hugh It is, of course, winter where I live. This makes […

  8. Child-Centered Reading Intervention: See, Talk, Dictate, Read, Write!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastug, Muhammet; Demirtas, Gonca

    2016-01-01

    Poor reading achievement of children in elementary schools has been one of the major concerns in education. The aim of this study is to examine the effectiveness of a child-centered reading intervention in eliminating the reading problems of a student with poor reading achievement. The research was conducted with a student having difficulty in…

  9. Exploring Students' Reading Profiles to Guide a Reading Intervention Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boakye, Naomi A. N. Y.

    2017-01-01

    There have been a number of studies on reading interventions to improve students' reading proficiency, yet the majority of these interventions are undertaken with the assumption that students' reading challenges are obvious and generic in nature. The interventions do not take into consideration the diversity in students' reading backgrounds and…

  10. Developing New Reading Assessments to Promote Beginning Reading in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Kim H.; Paris, Scott G.

    2011-01-01

    Effective reading instruction and intervention are rooted in effective assessments of children's developing skills in reading. The article aims to describe the development of new reading assessments to help promote beginning reading in Singapore primary schools. We begin with an introduction to the educational landscape and policies before…

  11. Reconsidering Children's Readings: Insights into the Reading Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Poonam; Feathers, Karen M.

    2012-01-01

    This study highlights the complex reading processes of two primary grade struggling readers. It provides a more complete picture of the readers' use of all parts of a text, verbal and visual, to construct meaning during reading. The oral reading data show that students used various linguistic strategies to read words, and the eye-tracking data…

  12. Impairment of language is related to left parieto-temporal glucose metabolism in aphasic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbe, H; Szelies, B; Herholz, K; Heiss, W D

    1990-02-01

    Twenty-six aphasic patients who had an ischaemic infarct in the territory of the left middle cerebral artery (MCA) were investigated. Cranial computed tomography (CT) showed various lesion sites: infarcts restricted to cortical structures in 12 patients, combined cortical and subcortical infarcts in 7 and isolated subcortical infarcts sparing the left cortex in another 7 cases. 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography revealed remote hypometabolism of the left convexity cortex and of the left basal ganglia, which was extended further than the morphological infarct zone in all cases. Types and degrees of aphasia were classified using the Aachener Aphasie Test (AAT): 10 patients had global aphasia, 2 Broca's, 5 Wernicke's, and 5 amnesic aphasia. Four patients suffered from minimal or residual aphasic symptoms. The AAT results were compared with the regional cerebral metabolic rates of glucose of the left hemisphere. Irrespective of the infarct location all five AAT subtests (Token test, repetition, written language, confrontation naming, auditory and reading comprehension) were closely correlated among each other and with left parieto-temporal metabolic rates, whereas left frontal and left basal ganglia metabolism showed no significant correlation. The close relation between left temporo-parietal functional activity and all five AAT subtests suggests that the different aspects of aphasia tested by AAT can be related to a common disorder of language processing in those areas.

  13. Temporal properties of stereopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghiu, E.

    2005-03-01

    The goal of the research presented in this thesis was to investigate temporal properties of disparity processing and depth perception in human subjects, in response to dynamic stimuli. The results presented in various chapters, reporting findings about different temporal aspects of disparity processing, are based on psychophysical experiments and computational model analysis. In chapter 1 we investigated which processes of binocular depth perception in dynamic random-dot stereograms (DRS), i.e., tolerance for interocular delays and temporal integration of correlation, are responsible for the temporal flexibility of the stereoscopic system. Our results demonstrate that (i) disparities from simultaneous monocular inputs dominate those from interocular delayed inputs; (ii) stereopsis is limited by temporal properties of monocular luminance mechanisms; (iii) depth perception in DRS results from cross-correlation-like operation on two simultaneous monocular inputs that represent the retinal images after having been subjected to a process of monocular temporal integration of luminance. In chapter 2 we examined what temporal information is exploited by the mechanisms underlying stereoscopic motion in depth. We investigated systematically the influence of temporal frequency on binocular depth perception in temporally correlated and temporally uncorrelated DRS. Our results show that disparity-defined depth is judged differently in temporally correlated and uncorrelated DRS above a temporal frequency of about 3 Hz. The results and simulations indicate that: (i) above about 20 Hz, the complete absence of stereomotion is caused by temporal integration of luminance; (ii) the difference in perceived depth in temporally correlated and temporally uncorrelated DRS for temporal frequencies between 20 and 3 Hz, is caused by temporal integration of disparity. In chapter 3 we investigated temporal properties of stereopsis at different spatial scales in response to sustained and

  14. STUDENTS’ READING PRACTICES AND ENVIRONMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiza Johari

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The challenges of reading are indeed apparent in most teaching and learning processes in ESL classrooms. As a result, this study is conducted to resolve the issues of students who seem to find reading to be unbearable. Many of them have limited ability to read well and hence, possess insufficient reading habits to become competent readers, particularly out-of-school context. Besides, poor home literacy environments also contribute to their shortcomings in reading. The main objectives of this study are to identify the students’ reasons for reading as well as to find out their home reading environments (reading backgrounds and habits; reading attitudes and motivation; reading exposure and supports. To identify these, questionnaires were distributed to 120 secondary school students (Form 4: 16 years old from one of the urban schools in Sarawak, Malaysia. The findings indicate that the students read to gain information and knowledge though many chose reading as a hobby as their last choice in explaining their motives of reading. Besides, they preferred non-academic reading materials, mainly lighter forms reading materials such as comics, story books and magazines. Though the students acknowledged the importance of reading in their daily lives, their average reading habits, attitude, motivation, exposure and support within the home domain had suggested otherwise. They mainly read for instrumental purposes while reading for pleasure seemed not to be given priority. Besides, the respondents acknowledge that their parents and themselves did not read much at home. As an implication, it is vital for students to improve their reading perceptions, abilities and practices to achieve personal, societal and national progress. On a final note, parents’ early and continuous efforts to be involved in their children’s literacy events in an out-of-school context are believed to be vital to inculcate positive reading environments, habits and culture

  15. Binocular advantages in reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jainta, Stephanie; Blythe, Hazel I; Liversedge, Simon P

    2014-03-03

    Reading, an essential skill for successful function in today's society, is a complex psychological process involving vision, memory, and language comprehension. Variability in fixation durations during reading reflects the ease of text comprehension, and increased word frequency results in reduced fixation times. Critically, readers not only process the fixated foveal word but also preprocess the parafoveal word to its right, thereby facilitating subsequent foveal processing. Typically, text is presented binocularly, and the oculomotor control system precisely coordinates the two frontally positioned eyes online. Binocular, compared to monocular, visual processing typically leads to superior performance, termed the "binocular advantage"; few studies have investigated the binocular advantage in reading. We used saccade-contingent display change methodology to demonstrate the benefit of binocular relative to monocular text presentation for both parafoveal and foveal lexical processing during reading. Our results demonstrate that denial of a unified visual signal derived from binocular inputs provides a cost to the efficiency of reading, particularly in relation to high-frequency words. Our findings fit neatly with current computational models of eye movement control during reading, wherein successful word identification is a primary determinant of saccade initiation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Endovascular uterine artery interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandan J Das

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous vascular embolization plays an important role in the management of various gynecologic and obstetric abnormalities. Transcatheter embolization is a minimally invasive alternative procedure to surgery with reduced morbidity and mortality, and preserves the patient's future fertility potential. The clinical indications for transcatheter embolization are much broader and include many benign gynecologic conditions, such as fibroid, adenomyosis, and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs, as well as intractable bleeding due to inoperable advanced-stage malignancies. The most well-known and well-studied indication is uterine fibroid embolization. Uterine artery embolization (UAE may be performed to prevent or treat bleeding associated with various obstetric conditions, including postpartum hemorrhage (PPH, placental implantation abnormality, and ectopic pregnancy. Embolization of the uterine artery or the internal iliac artery also may be performed to control pelvic bleeding due to coagulopathy or iatrogenic injury. This article discusses these gynecologic and obstetric indications for transcatheter embolization and reviews procedural techniques and outcomes.

  17. Endovascular uterine artery interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Chandan J; Rathinam, Deepak; Manchanda, Smita; Srivastava, D N

    2017-01-01

    Percutaneous vascular embolization plays an important role in the management of various gynecologic and obstetric abnormalities. Transcatheter embolization is a minimally invasive alternative procedure to surgery with reduced morbidity and mortality, and preserves the patient's future fertility potential. The clinical indications for transcatheter embolization are much broader and include many benign gynecologic conditions, such as fibroid, adenomyosis, and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), as well as intractable bleeding due to inoperable advanced-stage malignancies. The most well-known and well-studied indication is uterine fibroid embolization. Uterine artery embolization (UAE) may be performed to prevent or treat bleeding associated with various obstetric conditions, including postpartum hemorrhage (PPH), placental implantation abnormality, and ectopic pregnancy. Embolization of the uterine artery or the internal iliac artery also may be performed to control pelvic bleeding due to coagulopathy or iatrogenic injury. This article discusses these gynecologic and obstetric indications for transcatheter embolization and reviews procedural techniques and outcomes. PMID:29379246

  18. Ruptured jejunal artery aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Sílvia; Costa, Alexandre; Pereira, Tiago; Maciel, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Visceral artery aneurysms (VAAs), unlike aortic aneurysms, are very rare, but are also a potentially lethal vascular disease. Jejunal artery aneurysms only account for less than 3% of VAAs, but have a 30% risk of rupture, with 20% death rate, presenting with only few and vague symptoms. We report the case of a 76-year-old man presenting at the emergency department (ED) with a crampy epigastric pain and vomiting. An ultrasound performed diagnosed free abdominal fluid and immediate CT scan diagnosed jejunal artery aneurysm spontaneously rupturing, followed by hypovolaemic shock. Emergent surgery was undertaken, and aneurysmectomy, followed by partial enterectomy with primary anastomosis were performed, because of segmentary jejunal ischaemia. The patient's recovery was unremarkable. High level of suspicion, rapid diagnosis capability and prompt surgical or endovascular intervention, as well as an effective teamwork in the ED are critical to avoid the devastating consequences of ruptured VAAs. PMID:23771962

  19. Superficial Femoral Artery Intervention by Single Transpedal Arterial Access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoroso, Nicholas S; Shah, Sooraj; Liou, Michael; Ratcliffe, Justin; Lala, Moinakhtar; Diwan, Ravi; Huang, Yili; Rosero, Hugo; Coppola, John; Bertrand, Olivier F; Kwan, Tak W

    2015-11-01

    Atherosclerotic disease of the superficial femoral artery (SFA) is frequently seen and can be treated with percutaneous interventions, traditionally via femoral artery access. There are limited reports of transpedal artery access for peripheral artery interventions, but none to date describing routine primary transpedal artery approach for SFA stenting. In this preliminary study, we report 4 patients who underwent successful endovascular SFA stenting using a single transpedal artery access via a new ultra-low profile 6 Fr sheath (Glidesheath Slender; Terumo Corporation). All patients underwent successful SFA stenting without complication. Procedure time varied from 51 to 72 minutes. The mean contrast amount used was 56 mL; mean fluoroscopy time was 21 minutes; mean radiation dose was 91 mGy. At 1-month follow-up, duplex ultrasonography showed that all pedal arteries had remained patent. Transpedal artery approach as a primary approach to SFA stenting appears feasible and safe. Comparative trials with standard percutaneous femoral approach are warranted.

  20. IMPROVING STUDENTS’ READING COMPREHENSION THROUGH IINTERACTIVE READ-ALOUD TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edi Santoso

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The present study, entitled Improving Students’ Reading Comprehension through Interactive Read-Aloud, attempts to unlock problems found in teaching and reading comprehension through interactive read-aloud in a Senior High School of Sport (SMAN Olah Raga Lampung, in Metro. The findings revealed that students’ reading comprehension improved through interactive read-aloud. The improvement can be seen from the increase of test results, meaning construction, and motivation. The process of reading activities showed that the teacher’s gesture and body language, 20 questions, explain and guess activities were proven to help the students construct meaning from the given texts. In addition, interactive read-aloud is effective to boost students’ motivation to comprehend the texts.   Key words: Reading comprehension, interactive read-aloud.

  1. Understanding Reading and Reading Difficulties Through Naming Speed Tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Z. Al Dahhan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Although reading is an important and generative skill, it remains controversial how reading skills and reading difficulties develop. Currently, the fields of neuroscience, cognition, and education each have complex models to describe reading and elucidate where in the reading process deficits occur. We suggest that integrating the neural, cognitive, and educational accounts of reading offers the promise of transformative change in understanding reading development and reading difficulties. As a starting point for bridging the gaps among these fields, we used naming speed tasks as the basis for this review because they provide a “microcosm” of the processes involved during reading. We use naming speed tasks to investigate how incorporating cognitive psychology with neuroimaging techniques, under the guidance of educational theories, can further the understanding of learning and instruction, and may lead to the identification of the neural signatures of reading difficulties that might be hidden from view earlier in development.

  2. Isolated celiac artery dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMusto, Paul D; Oberdoerster, Molly M; Criado, Enrique

    2015-04-01

    Spontaneous celiac artery dissection is rare, and its natural history is not well studied. The objective of this study was to review our experience with the evaluation and management of this condition. During the last 8 years, 19 patients (14 men, five women) presented with the diagnosis of spontaneous celiac artery dissection. Each patient's clinical course was retrospectively reviewed, and patients were contacted for assessment of current symptoms. All patients had computed tomography scans documenting a celiac artery dissection without concomitant aortic dissection. Ages ranged from 39 to 76 years. Seven patients presented with abdominal pain, and 12 were diagnosed incidentally. All patients were initially treated with observation because none had threatened end organs. Patients presenting with aspirin or clopidogrel therapy were continued on these medications, but no patients were prescribed any medications due to their dissection. Three patients continued to have abdominal pain and eventually underwent celiac artery stenting. Pain improved after the intervention in all three. One patient with aneurysmal degeneration of the celiac artery underwent surgical repair. No other patients required intervention. Eighteen patients had follow-up within a year of data collection in the clinic or over the phone. The average time from the initial diagnosis to follow-up for the entire cohort was 46 months. None had abdominal or back pain related to the celiac dissection, had lost weight, or had to change their eating habits. Celiac artery dissection can be safely managed initially with observation. If abdominal pain is persistent, endovascular stenting may stabilize or improve the pain, and surgical reconstruction can be done for aneurysmal degeneration or occlusion, both unusual events. Long-term anticoagulation does not appear necessary in these patients. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Reading fiction and reading minds: the role of simulation in the default network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricker, Andrew B.; Dodell-Feder, David; Mitchell, Jason P.

    2016-01-01

    Research in psychology has suggested that reading fiction can improve individuals’ social-cognitive abilities. Findings from neuroscience show that reading and social cognition both recruit the default network, a network which is known to support our capacity to simulate hypothetical scenes, spaces and mental states. The current research tests the hypothesis that fiction reading enhances social cognition because it serves to exercise the default subnetwork involved in theory of mind. While undergoing functional neuroimaging, participants read literary passages that differed along two dimensions: (i) vivid vs abstract and (ii) social vs non-social. Analyses revealed distinct subnetworks of the default network respond to the two dimensions of interest: the medial temporal lobe subnetwork responded preferentially to vivid passages, with or without social content; the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) subnetwork responded preferentially to passages with social and abstract content. Analyses also demonstrated that participants who read fiction most often also showed the strongest social cognition performance. Finally, mediation analysis showed that activity in the dmPFC subnetwork in response to the social content mediated this relation, suggesting that the simulation of social content in fiction plays a role in fiction’s ability to enhance readers’ social cognition. PMID:26342221

  4. Reading fiction and reading minds: the role of simulation in the default network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamir, Diana I; Bricker, Andrew B; Dodell-Feder, David; Mitchell, Jason P

    2016-02-01

    Research in psychology has suggested that reading fiction can improve individuals' social-cognitive abilities. Findings from neuroscience show that reading and social cognition both recruit the default network, a network which is known to support our capacity to simulate hypothetical scenes, spaces and mental states. The current research tests the hypothesis that fiction reading enhances social cognition because it serves to exercise the default subnetwork involved in theory of mind. While undergoing functional neuroimaging, participants read literary passages that differed along two dimensions: (i) vivid vs abstract and (ii) social vs non-social. Analyses revealed distinct subnetworks of the default network respond to the two dimensions of interest: the medial temporal lobe subnetwork responded preferentially to vivid passages, with or without social content; the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) subnetwork responded preferentially to passages with social and abstract content. Analyses also demonstrated that participants who read fiction most often also showed the strongest social cognition performance. Finally, mediation analysis showed that activity in the dmPFC subnetwork in response to the social content mediated this relation, suggesting that the simulation of social content in fiction plays a role in fiction's ability to enhance readers' social cognition. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Reading in Devanagari: Insights from functional neuroimaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandini Chatterjee Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The current study used functional MRI (fMRI to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the neural network underlying visual word recognition in Hindi/Devanagari, an alphasyllabic - partly alphabetic and partly syllabic Indian writing system on which little research has hitherto been carried out. Materials and Methods: Sixteen (5F, 11M neurologically healthy, native Hindi/Devanagari readers aged 21 to 50 named aloud 240 Devanagari words which were either visually linear - had no diacritics or consonant ligatures above or below central plane of text, e.g. फल, वाहन, or nonlinear - had at least one diacritic and/or ligature, e.g. फूल, किरण, and which further included 120 words each of high and low frequency. Words were presented in alternating high and low frequency blocks of 10 words each at 2s/word in a block design, with linear and nonlinear words in separate runs. Word reading accuracy was manually coded, while fMRI images were acquired on a 3T scanner with an 8-channel head-coil, using a T2FNx01-weighted EPI sequence (TR/TE = 2s/35ms. Results: After ensuring high word naming accuracy (M = 97.6%, SD = 2.3, fMRI data analyses (at FDR P < 0.005 revealed that reading Devanagari words elicited robust activations in bilateral occipito-temporal, inferior frontal and precentral regions as well as both cerebellar hemispheres. Other common areas of activation included left inferior parietal and right superior temporal cortices. Primary differences seen between nonlinear and linear word reading networks were in the right temporal areas and cerebellum. Conclusion: Distinct from alphabetic scripts, which are linear in their spatial organization, and recruit a primarily left-lateralized network for word reading, our results revealed a bilateral reading network for Devanagari. We attribute the additional activations in Devanagari to increased visual processing demands arising from the complex visuospatial arrangement of

  6. Popliteal Artery Entrapment Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altintas, Ümit; Helgstrand, Ulf Johan Vilhelm; Hansen, Marc A

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report our experience with popliteal artery entrapment syndrome (PAES) with special emphasis on the applicability of duplex ultrasound scanning (DUS) when diagnosing PAES. In addition to examining the correlation between DUS and intraoperative findings in symptoma......The purpose of this study was to report our experience with popliteal artery entrapment syndrome (PAES) with special emphasis on the applicability of duplex ultrasound scanning (DUS) when diagnosing PAES. In addition to examining the correlation between DUS and intraoperative findings...

  7. Carotid artery stenting; Karotisangioplastie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiehler, Jens [Universitaetsklinikum Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Neuroradiologische Diagnostik und Intervention, Diagnostikzentrum

    2009-09-15

    An ipsilateral stenosis of the internal carotid artery is found in 10 - 15 % of all ischemic strokes and indicates an increased risk of a second stroke. Carotid artery stenting (CAS) is a therapy that is established for many years. CAS reveals complication rates and long-term efficacy comparable to carotid endarterectomy (TEA). Especially younger patients seem to benefit from CAS. Abilities and experiences of the therapist and the choice of the techniques used are critical for patient safety. The efficacy of CAS for treatment of asymptomatic carotid stenosis is probable but still unproven in prospective-randomized trial. (orig.)

  8. Reading Attitudes as a Predictor of Latino Adolescents' Reading Comprehension

    OpenAIRE

    Crosby, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Although literacy skills have been associated with critical academic, social, and economic outcomes, most adolescents in the United States lack basic proficiency in reading comprehension. Experts in the field of adolescent literacy have identified affective components of reading (e.g., reading attitudes) as a critical topic in need of further research. Prior research has found a significant correlation between affective components of reading and reading comprehension, even after controlling...

  9. Detection of positional brachial plexus injury by radial arterial line during spinal exposure before neuromonitoring confirmation: a retrospective case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhengyong; Chen, Leo; Kwon, Paul; Montez, Michele; Voegeli, Thomas; Bueff, Hans

    2012-12-01

    To demonstrate the potential usefulness of radial arterial line monitoring in detection of brachial plexus injury in spinal surgery. Multiple neuromonitoring modalities including SEPs, MEPs and EMG were performed for a posterior thoracicolumbar surgery. Radial arterial line (A-line) was placed on the right wrist for arterial blood pressure monitoring. Reliable ulnar nerve SEPs, hand muscle MEPs and arterial blood pressure readings were obtained after patient was placed in a prone position. A-line malfunction was noted about 15 min after incision. Loss of ulnar nerve SEPs and hand muscle MEPs with a cold hand on the right was noticed when neuromonitoring resumed after spine exposure. SEPs, MEPs, A-line readings and hand temperature returned after modification of the right arm position. Radial arterial line monitoring may help detect positional brachial plexus injury in spinal surgery when continuous neuromonitoring is interrupted during spine exposure in prone position.

  10. Location of the internal carotid artery and ophthalmic artery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yasin Hamarat

    2017-10-06

    Oct 6, 2017 ... There are some published results of OA anatomical studies [18,20-22]. .... right eye) and the depth of intracranial segment of ophthal- mic artery ... internal carotid artery and segments of ophthalmic artery in high tension glaucoma patients. No. of glaucoma patients. Eye. ICA edge, mm. IOA, mm. EOA, mm.

  11. Pulmonary arterial hypertension in children after neonatal arterial switch operation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, Willemijn MH; Elmasry, Ola; Pepplinkhuizen, Shari; Ivy, D Dunbar; Bonnet, Damien; Lévy, Marilyne; Gavilan, Jose Luis; Torrent-Vernetta, Alba; Mendoza, Alberto; Del Cerro, Maria Jesus; Moledina, Shahin; Berger, Rolf M. F.

    OBJECTIVES: Paediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) after neonatal arterial switch operation (ASO) for transposition of the great arteries (TGA) is a clinically recognised entity with an estimated incidence of 0.6%-1.0%. Nevertheless, a clinical characterisation is lacking. We present an

  12. A rare case of Cystic artery arising from Gastroduodenal artery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An uncommon anatomical variation in the origin and course of cystic artery was found during human cadaveric dissection in our laboratory. A blood vessel was seen arising from the gastroduodenal artery about 1 cm distal to its origin from the common hepatic artery. The vessel when traced towards its termination was found ...

  13. Validation of brachial artery pressure reconstruction from finger arterial pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guelen, Ilja; Westerhof, Berend E.; van der Sar, Gertrude L.; van Montfrans, Gert A.; Kiemeneij, Ferdinand; Wesseling, Karel H.; Bos, Willem Jan W.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Measurement of finger artery pressure with Finapres offers noninvasive continuous blood pressure, which, however, differs from brachial artery pressure. Generalized waveform filtering and level correction may convert the finger artery pressure waveform to a brachial waveform. An upper-arm

  14. Reading in a Digital Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Naomi S.

    2017-01-01

    The many advantages of reading digitally also bring with them implications for how we learn differently when we read differently. The author suggests that new contemporary technologies are changing the very notion of what it means to read. Even millennials acknowledge that their attention is more focused when they read print rather than online.…

  15. The Many Fibers of Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leloup, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    How can library media specialists encourage kids to read outside the curriculum and maintain this reading beyond elementary school? What does it take to get children involved in recreational reading and turn their focus to books? At Sycamore Elementary School in Avon, Indiana, library media specialists have organized reading programs which have…

  16. Reading and the Slow Learner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    Advocates of high standards and expectations usually believe that gaps in reading achievement can be eliminated with good teaching, but slow readers need a specially designed reading curriculum. The teacher first needs to use an informal reading inventory to determine the student's reading level. Functioning generally on a higher level than…

  17. Analyzing Student Difficulties in Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    According to this paper, a good reading teacher is able to analyze problems faced by students in reading and remediate that which is necessary. The paper stresses that the reading teacher needs to be a good observer of student reading habits to notice where to intervene to improve the skills and attitudes of the reader. It discusses diagnosis and…

  18. Effective interventions for reading disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, M C; Lecluyse, K; Rock-Faucheux, A

    1992-06-01

    A simple, readily accessible, and inexpensive intervention which produces immediate improvements in the reading comprehension abilities of reading-disabled children has been found. The intervention consists of colored overlays, or overlays which reduce the contrast of printed materials. This intervention produces reading comprehension gains in approximately 80 percent of the reading-disabled children tested.

  19. In Defense of Reading Quizzes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropman, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Many students fail to read the assigned material before class. A failure to read is detrimental to both student learning and course engagement. This paper considers the often-neglected teaching technique of giving frequent quizzes on the reading. Drawing on the author's experiences assigning reading quizzes, together with student opinions…

  20. What Is a Reading Error?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labov, William; Baker, Bettina

    2010-01-01

    Early efforts to apply knowledge of dialect differences to reading stressed the importance of the distinction between differences in pronunciation and mistakes in reading. This study develops a method of estimating the probability that a given oral reading that deviates from the text is a true reading error by observing the semantic impact of the…

  1. When Do Children Read Books?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ours, Jan C.

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the reading of fiction books by 15 year olds in 18 OECD countries. It appears that girls read fiction books more often than boys, whereas boys read comic books more often than girls. Parental education, family structure, and the number of books and televisions at home influence the intensity with which children read fiction…

  2. Towards Temporal Graph Databases

    OpenAIRE

    Campos, Alexander; Mozzino, Jorge; Vaisman, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    In spite of the extensive literature on graph databases (GDBs), temporal GDBs have not received too much attention so far. Temporal GBDs can capture, for example, the evolution of social networks across time, a relevant topic in data analysis nowadays. In this paper we propose a data model and query language (denoted TEG-QL) for temporal GDBs, based on the notion of attribute graphs. This allows a straightforward translation to Neo4J, a well-known GBD. We present extensive examples of the use...

  3. Occlusion of Internal Carotid Artery in Kimura's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomonori Tamaki

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a unique case of Kimura's disease in which cerebral infarction was caused by occlusion of the right internal carotid artery. A 25-year-old man with Kimura's disease was admitted to our hospital because of left hemiparesis. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the head showed infarction in the right frontal and temporal lobes. Cerebral angiography demonstrated right internal carotid artery occlusion affecting the C1 segment, with moyamoya-like collateral vessels arising from the right opthalamic artery. Kimura's disease is a chronic disease characterized by the clinical triad of slowly enlarging subcutaneous masses with lymphoid hyperplasia in the head and neck. It often occurs in young Asian men. In our patient, the pathogenesis of internal carotid artery occlusion was unknown. There have only been a few case reports in which occlusion of the internal carotid artery was associated with autoimmune disease, and no previous cases of internal carotid occlusion associated with Kimura's disease have been reported. We suspected that occlusion of this patient's internal carotid artery may be caused by the autoimmune mechanism that underlies Kimura's disease.

  4. Motor Activity Improves Temporal Expectancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fautrelle, Lilian; Mareschal, Denis; French, Robert; Addyman, Caspar; Thomas, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Certain brain areas involved in interval timing are also important in motor activity. This raises the possibility that motor activity might influence interval timing. To test this hypothesis, we assessed interval timing in healthy adults following different types of training. The pre- and post-training tasks consisted of a button press in response to the presentation of a rhythmic visual stimulus. Alterations in temporal expectancy were evaluated by measuring response times. Training consisted of responding to the visual presentation of regularly appearing stimuli by either: (1) pointing with a whole-body movement, (2) pointing only with the arm, (3) imagining pointing with a whole-body movement, (4) simply watching the stimulus presentation, (5) pointing with a whole-body movement in response to a target that appeared at irregular intervals (6) reading a newspaper. Participants performing a motor activity in response to the regular target showed significant improvements in judgment times compared to individuals with no associated motor activity. Individuals who only imagined pointing with a whole-body movement also showed significant improvements. No improvements were observed in the group that trained with a motor response to an irregular stimulus, hence eliminating the explanation that the improved temporal expectations of the other motor training groups was purely due to an improved motor capacity to press the response button. All groups performed a secondary task equally well, hence indicating that our results could not simply be attributed to differences in attention between the groups. Our results show that motor activity, even when it does not play a causal or corrective role, can lead to improved interval timing judgments. PMID:25806813

  5. Screening for Carotid Artery Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Carotid Artery Stenosis The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) ... final recommendation statement on Screening for Carotid Artery Stenosis. This final recommendation statement applies to adults who ...

  6. Pharmacological modulation of arterial stiffness.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boutouyrie, Pierre

    2011-09-10

    Arterial stiffness has emerged as an important marker of cardiovascular risk in various populations and reflects the cumulative effect of cardiovascular risk factors on large arteries, which in turn is modulated by genetic background. Arterial stiffness is determined by the composition of the arterial wall and the arrangement of these components, and can be studied in humans non-invasively. Age and distending pressure are two major factors influencing large artery stiffness. Change in arterial stiffness with drugs is an important endpoint in clinical trials, although evidence for arterial stiffness as a therapeutic target still needs to be confirmed. Drugs that independently affect arterial stiffness include antihypertensive drugs, mostly blockers of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, hormone replacement therapy and some antidiabetic drugs such as glitazones. While the quest continues for \\'de-stiffening drugs\\

  7. Reading problems in chronic aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, W G; Love, R J

    1983-05-01

    Thirty-five aphasic subjects who were 1 year or longer post onset of brain injury were given a battery of reading tests which was composed of recognition and oral reading tests for letters, words, sentences, and paragraphs, and comprehension tests for sentences and paragraphs. Results indicated a residual reading disorder or alexia in all subjects, with comprehension tests producing the highest error rate, oral reading tests second, and then recognition tests. Reading ability was found to be related to overall language skill, level of education, and oral reading ability. Results are discussed in light of current theories of reading and future research needs.

  8. Relationship between slow visual processing and reading speed in people with macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Allen M Y; Legge, Gordon E; Lawrence, Mary G; Cheung, Sing-Hang; Ruff, Mary A

    2007-10-01

    People with macular degeneration (MD) often read slowly even with adequate magnification to compensate for acuity loss. Oculomotor deficits may affect reading in MD, but cannot fully explain the substantial reduction in reading speed. Central-field loss (CFL) is often a consequence of macular degeneration, necessitating the use of peripheral vision for reading. We hypothesized that slower temporal processing of visual patterns in peripheral vision is a factor contributing to slow reading performance in MD patients. Fifteen subjects with MD, including 12 with CFL, and five age-matched control subjects were recruited. Maximum reading speed and critical print size were measured with rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP). Temporal processing speed was studied by measuring letter-recognition accuracy for strings of three randomly selected letters centered at fixation for a range of exposure times. Temporal threshold was defined as the exposure time yielding 80% recognition accuracy for the central letter. Temporal thresholds for the MD subjects ranged from 159 to 5881 ms, much longer than values for age-matched controls in central vision (13 ms, preading speed (preading speed is consistent with the hypothesis that slower visual processing of letter recognition is one of the factors limiting reading speed in MD subjects.

  9. Liver cirrhosis and arterial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik; Møller, Søren

    2006-01-01

    blood pressure. This review considers the alterations in systemic hemodynamics in patients with cirrhosis in relation to essential hypertension and arterial hypertension of the renal origin. Subjects with arterial hypertension (essential, secondary) may become normotensive during the development...... of cirrhosis, and arterial hypertension is rarely manifested in patients with cirrhosis, even in cases with renovascular disease and high circulating renin activity. There is much dispute as to the understanding of homoeostatic regulation in cirrhotic patients with manifest arterial hypertension. This most...

  10. Pulmonary artery sling: Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Gil Hyun; Lee, Sun Wha; Cha, Sung Ho [Kyunghee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-09-15

    Aberrant left-sided pulmonary artery(pulmonary artery sling) is an uncommon anomaly,which may cause significant respiratory abnormality. We report a case of pulmonary artery sling which is combined with persistent left superior vena cava and dextrocardia. This case were identified by esophagogram and CT and confirmed by MRI and angiography. We consider that MRI is a valuable new method for the diagnosis of aberrant left-sided pulmonary artery.

  11. Reading difficulties in primary progressive aphasia in a regular language-speaking cohort of patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matías-Guiu, Jordi A; Cuetos, Fernando; Cabrera-Martín, María Nieves; Valles-Salgado, María; Moreno-Ramos, Teresa; Carreras, José Luis; Matías-Guiu, Jorge

    2017-07-01

    Reading impairment is an important feature in Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA). The Spanish orthography entails completely regular spelling to sound correspondences, so reading disorders may be different to English. In the current study, reading, phonological and semantic abilities of 35 patients with the three variants of PPA, and 13 healthy volunteers were assessed. Brain metabolism was concomitantly obtained from each participant using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography imaging. Two main patterns of impairment were identified: difficulties in nonwords reading with preservation of exception words in agrammatic and logopenic aphasia, and the inverse pattern in semantic dementia. Left frontal and left parietotemporal regions were associated to nonwords reading, while the anterior temporal lobe was related to reading of exception words. These results support the usefulness of examining reading abilities in the differential diagnosis of PPA variants, and suggest potential types of words that could be used in Spanish to assess these patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Intracranial artery dissection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sikkema, T.; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Eshghi, O.; De Keyser, J.; Brouns, R.; van Dijk, J.M.C.; Luijckx, G. J.

    The aim of this narrative review is to evaluate the pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of intracranial artery dissection (IAD). IAD is a rare and often unrecognized cause of stroke or subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), especially in young adults. Two types of IAD can be

  13. Artery Bypass Grafting

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    development of CABG without CPB as occurring in three stages. Figure 1: The early stage: Grafts were limited to ... This interest led to the development of techniques such as mini- mally invasive direct coronary artery surgery (MIDCAB), surgery ... Diazepam 0.1 rng/kg P0. Cyclimorph 0.lmg/kg IMI on call to theatre. Theatre ...

  14. Peripheral artery bypass - leg

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 25638515 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25638515 . White CJ. Endovascular treatment of peripheral artery disease. In: Creager MA, Beckman JA, Loscalzo J, eds. Vascular Medicine: A Companion to Braunwald's Heart Disease . 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 20. Review Date 1/31/2017 ...

  15. Pulmonary artery aneurysm

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    2). An echocardiogram confirmed pulmonary valvular stenosis with post-stenotic dilatation and pul- monary artery aneurysm formation. The pulmonary valve pressure gradi- ent was > 28 mmHg. The patient set- tled on low-dose diuretic therapy, and following cardiothoracic surgical con- sultation it was decided that no surgi-.

  16. Temporal Lobe Seizure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pregnancy Temporal lobe seizure Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  17. Temporal Lobe Seizure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... functions, including having odd feelings — such as euphoria, deja vu or fear. During a temporal lobe seizure, you ... include: A sudden sense of unprovoked fear A deja vu experience — a feeling that what's happening has happened ...

  18. Multisensory temporal numerosity judgment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Philippi, T.; Erp, J.B.F. van; Werkhoven, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    In temporal numerosity judgment, observers systematically underestimate the number of pulses. The strongest underestimations occur when stimuli are presented with a short interstimulus interval (ISI) and are stronger for vision than for audition and touch. We investigated if multisensory

  19. Neocortical Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercovici, Eduard; Kumar, Balagobal Santosh; Mirsattari, Seyed M.

    2012-01-01

    Complex partial seizures (CPSs) can present with various semiologies, while mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) is a well-recognized cause of CPS, neocortical temporal lobe epilepsy (nTLE) albeit being less common is increasingly recognized as separate disease entity. Differentiating the two remains a challenge for epileptologists as many symptoms overlap due to reciprocal connections between the neocortical and the mesial temporal regions. Various studies have attempted to correctly localize the seizure focus in nTLE as patients with this disorder may benefit from surgery. While earlier work predicted poor outcomes in this population, recent work challenges those ideas yielding good outcomes in part due to better localization using improved anatomical and functional techniques. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the diagnostic workup, particularly the application of recent advances in electroencephalography and functional brain imaging, in neocortical temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:22953057

  20. Massive temporal lobe cholesteatoma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Waidyasekara, Pasan; Dowthwaite, Samuel A; Stephenson, Ellison; Bhuta, Sandeep; McMonagle, Brent

    2015-01-01

    .... There had been no relevant symptoms in the interim until 6 weeks prior to this presentation. Imaging demonstrated a large right temporal lobe mass contiguous with the middle ear and mastoid cavity with features consistent with cholesteatoma...

  1. Massive Temporal Lobe Cholesteatoma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Waidyasekara, Pasan; Dowthwaite, Samuel A; Stephenson, Ellison; Bhuta, Sandeep; McMonagle, Brent

    2015-01-01

    .... There had been no relevant symptoms in the interim until 6 weeks prior to this presentation. Imaging demonstrated a large right temporal lobe mass contiguous with the middle ear and mastoid cavity with features consistent with cholesteatoma...

  2. The Relation between Reading Skills and Eye Movement Patterns in Adolescent Readers: Evidence from a Regular Orthography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Krieber

    Full Text Available Over the past decades, the relation between reading skills and eye movement behavior has been well documented in English-speaking cohorts. As English and German differ substantially with regard to orthographic complexity (i.e. grapheme-phoneme correspondence, we aimed to delineate specific characteristics of how reading speed and reading comprehension interact with eye movements in typically developing German-speaking (Austrian adolescents. Eye movements of 22 participants (14 females; mean age = 13;6 years;months were tracked while they were performing three tasks, namely silently reading words, texts, and pseudowords. Their reading skills were determined by means of a standardized German reading speed and reading comprehension assessment (Lesegeschwindigkeits- und -verständnistest für Klassen 6-12. We found that (a reading skills were associated with various eye movement parameters in each of the three reading tasks; (b better reading skills were associated with an increased efficiency of eye movements, but were primarily linked to spatial reading parameters, such as the number of fixations per word, the total number of saccades and saccadic amplitudes; (c reading speed was a more reliable predictor for eye movement parameters than reading comprehension; (d eye movements were highly correlated across reading tasks, which indicates consistent reading performances. Contrary to findings in English-speaking cohorts, the reading skills neither consistently correlated with temporal eye movement parameters nor with the number or percentage of regressions made while performing any of the three reading tasks. These results indicate that, although reading skills are associated with eye movement patterns irrespective of language, the temporal and spatial characteristics of this association may vary with orthographic consistency.

  3. The Relation between Reading Skills and Eye Movement Patterns in Adolescent Readers: Evidence from a Regular Orthography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieber, Magdalena; Bartl-Pokorny, Katrin D; Pokorny, Florian B; Einspieler, Christa; Langmann, Andrea; Körner, Christof; Falck-Ytter, Terje; Marschik, Peter B

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, the relation between reading skills and eye movement behavior has been well documented in English-speaking cohorts. As English and German differ substantially with regard to orthographic complexity (i.e. grapheme-phoneme correspondence), we aimed to delineate specific characteristics of how reading speed and reading comprehension interact with eye movements in typically developing German-speaking (Austrian) adolescents. Eye movements of 22 participants (14 females; mean age = 13;6 years;months) were tracked while they were performing three tasks, namely silently reading words, texts, and pseudowords. Their reading skills were determined by means of a standardized German reading speed and reading comprehension assessment (Lesegeschwindigkeits- und -verständnistest für Klassen 6-12). We found that (a) reading skills were associated with various eye movement parameters in each of the three reading tasks; (b) better reading skills were associated with an increased efficiency of eye movements, but were primarily linked to spatial reading parameters, such as the number of fixations per word, the total number of saccades and saccadic amplitudes; (c) reading speed was a more reliable predictor for eye movement parameters than reading comprehension; (d) eye movements were highly correlated across reading tasks, which indicates consistent reading performances. Contrary to findings in English-speaking cohorts, the reading skills neither consistently correlated with temporal eye movement parameters nor with the number or percentage of regressions made while performing any of the three reading tasks. These results indicate that, although reading skills are associated with eye movement patterns irrespective of language, the temporal and spatial characteristics of this association may vary with orthographic consistency.

  4. Reading Development in European Portuguese: Relationships between Oral Reading Fluency, Vocabulary and Reading Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Sandra; Querido, Luís; Verhaeghe, Arlette; Marques, Catarina; Araújo, Luísa

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated direct and indirect effects between oral reading fluency, vocabulary and reading comprehension across reading development in European Portuguese. Participants were 329 children attending basic education, from grade 1 to grade 6. The results of path analyses showed that text reading fluency is much more dependent on the…

  5. The Explicit Instruction of Reading Strategies: Directed Reading Thinking Activity vs. Guided Reading Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi Yazdani

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Investigating the efficiencies and deficiencies of reading strategies is one of the noticeable issues in the related theory and research in reading comprehension instruction. This study was to examine the impact of Directed Reading Thinking Activity (DRTA and Guided Reading (GR on reading comprehension. Sixty three Iranian students of grade one in Shahed high school in the city of Bojnourd took part in the study. They were assigned in three groups, one control and two experimental groups. The instruction lasted for ten weeks. This study utilized a pretest posttest control group in quantitative quasi- experimental design. The same reading comprehension test was administered as pre-test and post-test. The results were twofold: First, the instruction of learning strategies could foster reading comprehension skill. Second, while the explicit instruction of both strategies could improve the students' reading comprehension skill, Directed Reading Thinking Activity had a more significant positive effect than Guided Reading.

  6. Device for improving quantification of reading acuity and reading speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexl, Alois K; Schlögel, Horst; Wolfbauer, Michael; Grabner, Günther

    2010-09-01

    To present a new device, the Salzburg Reading Desk (SRD), for the standardized testing of reading acuity and reading speed at a subjectively convenient reading distance (best distance). First, in a systematic experimental setup, testing for validity and reliability was performed at 450 simulated reading distances (90 different test situations, each repeated 5 times) between 16 and 70 cm. The distance read-outs by the SRD software were correlated to the distances measured with a meter ruler. Second, reading distance and reading speed of 27 naturally emmetropic and presbyopic patients were evaluated using the log-scaled Radner Reading Charts implemented in the SRD. In the experimental setup, an overall mean difference of the SRD distance read-out-compared to a standard distance measurement with a meter ruler-of 0.08±0.13 cm was observed. In the presbyopic patients, overall mean reading distance was 49.74±4.43 cm. Patients were able to read with their own subjectively convenient reading distance. A constant mean reading speed of sentences with bigger typeface (between 152.4±22.6 words/minute [wpm] and 157.3±15.8 wpm) was found, but reading speed gradually diminished over time when reading sentences with smaller typeface. The SRD seems to be a valid and reliable device for testing reading acuity at the best reading distance in an experimental setup as well as in clinical use in presbyopic patients. The SRD may be used whenever a detailed comparison of different methods for correcting presbyopia is required. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Anatomical Variation of Equine Internal Maxillary Artery: a Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Andrés Dalmau Barros

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A thematic block is taught in the Veterinary Medicine Program at La Salle University’s Faculty of Agricultural Sciences that is relevant to the basic disciplinary training of future veterinarians. It is the theoretical and practical subject of the anatomy of the head of domestic species, which includes the head of horses. The study is addressed by testing the theory in the exercise of a dissection, and the exploration of the different structures that make up the head. This regional and systematic study includes angiology of the head, where emphasis is made on the branches of the common carotid artery as main vessel that irrigates the head. The common carotid artery ends in the occipital, internal carotid and external carotid arteries; the last one splits into two main terminal branches, namely: the internal maxillary artery and the superficial temporal. Generally, the internal maxillary artery follows a path that is repeated in almost all specimens that are dissected as described by different authors; however, in some cases there may variations in the path of the artery, such as in its branches. The purpose of this work is to inform about a case that arose in a regular class in the anatomy lab during dissection of a horse head where arteries were being studied macroscopically. Dissection showed a variation in the normal path of the internal maxillary artery at the level of lateral pterygoid muscle. The case involves an 11-year old mare that was put down by unqualified personnel outside the campus, and whose head was later severed and sent to the gross anatomy labs of the Veterinary Medicine program at the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences. Given its provenance, it was not possible to know the anamnesis, nor the history of the animal.

  8. Reading through Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhavi Gayathri Raman

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper captures the design of a comprehensive curriculum incorporating the four skills based exclusively on the use of parallel audio-visual and written texts. We discuss the use of authentic materials to teach English to Indian undergraduates aged 18 to 20 years. Specifically, we talk about the use of parallel reading (screen-play and audio-visual texts (Shawshank Redemption, and Life is Beautiful, A Few Good Men and Lion King drawn from popular culture in the classroom as an effective teaching medium. Students were gradually introduced to films based on novels with extracts from the original texts (Schindler’s List, Beautiful Mind for extended reading and writing practice. We found that students began to pay more attention to aspects such as pronunciation, intonational variations, discourse markers and vocabulary items (phrasal verbs, synonyms, homophones, and puns. Keywords: Reading, films, popular culture, ESL classroom, language skills

  9. [Reading research articles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Graaf, Yolanda; Zaat, Joost

    2015-01-01

    Keeping up with the latest developments is not easy, but neither is reading articles on research. There are too many medical journals that contain information that is irrelevant to clinical practice. From this mass of articles you have to decide which are important for your own clinical practice and which are not. Most articles naturally fall into the latter category as spectacular findings with important consequences for medical practice do not occur every week. The most important thing in a research article is the research question. If you begin with this, then you can put aside much scientific literature. The methodology section is essential; reading this can save you a lot of time. In this article we take you step-by-step through the process of reading research articles. The articles in our Methodology series can be used as background information. These articles have been combined in a tablet app, which is available via www.ntvg.nl/methodologie.

  10. Therapeutic effects of reading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustín HIDALGO

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Reading is an act that requires isolation and loneliness, which allows rewriting the narratives through the identification between the reader and the character, the involvement in the fact narrated and singular recreation by every single reader. The act of reading allows stepping aside from reality. The reading as well as the writing perform the therapeutic effect of helping to understand the illness and to know experiences of others patients that can be useful for the accompaniment, overcoming and/or making decisions. There is not a concrete literary that could be universally recommend to every patient, but all the genre can be useful to some patient. However, poetry, novel and autobiographies are frequently referred as the manuscripts that provide help and consolation.

  11. Accurate reading with sequential presentation of single letters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Seow Chiang Price

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Rapid, accurate reading is possible when isolated, single words from a sentence are sequentially presented at a fixed spatial location. We investigated if reading of words and sentences is possible when single letters are rapidly presented at the fovea under user-controlled or automatically-controlled rates. When tested with complete sentences, trained participants achieved reading rates of over 60 words/minute and accuracies of over 90% with the single letter reading (SLR method and naive participants achieved average reading rates over 30 wpm with >90% accuracy. Accuracy declined as individual letters were presented for shorter periods of time, even when the overall reading rate was maintained by increasing the duration of spaces between words. Words in the lexicon that occur more frequently were identified with higher accuracy and more quickly, demonstrating that trained participants have lexical access. In combination, our data strongly suggest that comprehension is possible and that SLR is a practicable form of reading under conditions in which normal scanning of text is not possible, or for scenarios with limited spatial and temporal resolution such as patients with low vision or prostheses.

  12. Oculomotor inhibition of return in normal and mindless reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, John M; Luke, Steven G

    2012-12-01

    Oculomotor inhibition of return (O-IOR) is an increase in saccade latency prior to an eye movement to a recently fixated location, as compared with other locations. To investigate O-IOR in reading, subjects participated in two conditions while their eye movements were recorded: normal reading and mindless reading with words replaced by geometric shapes. We investigated the manifestation of O-IOR in reading and whether it is related to extracting meaning from the text or is an oculomotor phenomenon. The results indicated that fixation durations prior to a saccade returning to the immediately preceding fixated word were longer than those to other words, consistent with O-IOR. Furthermore, fixation durations were longest prior to a saccade that returned the eyes to the specific character position in the word that had previously been fixated and dropped off as the distance between the previously fixated character and landing position increased. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that O-IOR is relatively precise in its application during reading and drops off as a gradient. Both of these results were found for text reading and for mindless reading, suggesting that they are consequences of oculomotor control, and not of language processing. Finally, although these temporal IOR effects were robust, no spatial consequences of IOR were observed: Previously fixated words and characters were as likely to be refixated as new words and characters.

  13. The Explicit Instruction of Reading Strategies: Directed Reading Thinking Activity vs. Guided Reading Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Mehdi Yazdani; Mojtaba Mohammadi

    2015-01-01

    Investigating the efficiencies and deficiencies of reading strategies is one of the noticeable issues in the related theory and research in reading comprehension instruction. This study was to examine the impact of Directed Reading Thinking Activity (DRTA) and Guided Reading (GR) on reading comprehension. Sixty three Iranian students of grade one in Shahed high school in the city of Bojnourd took part in the study. They were assigned in three groups, one control and two experimental groups. T...

  14. Signal Transduction and Gene Regulation in Cerebral Arteries Following Ischemia

    OpenAIRE

    Vikman, Petter

    2006-01-01

    The thesis consideres the molecular events that take place in the cerebral arteries following a stroke. The degree and temporal course of reperfusion following a stroke is pivotal for the survival of the neuronal tissue in the penumbra. Previous investigations have revealed upregulation of contractile receptors, a putative factor in the blood flow reduction following stroke that can could augment cell death. The major aim of the study is achieve a better understanding of the changes that occu...

  15. Selecting Extensive Reading Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George M Jacobs

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This article offers guidance to teachers and students in selecting materials for extensive reading (ER. First, the article explains characteristics of ER and reviews some of the potential gains for students who do ER. Second, the article considers criteria for teachers to bear in mind when selecting ER materials. Third, the article then suggests ways that teachers and students can find ER materials. Fourth, guidance is provided to students for when they select what to read from among the ER materials available to them. Finally, advice is given on integrating ER with course textbooks.

  16. Repeated readings using audiotaped material enhances oral reading in children with reading difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, R; Humphreys, R

    1989-02-01

    The method of repeated readings using audiotaped material was implemented in the present study by having poor readers aged 9-13 years listen to and read audiotaped stories until the passages could be read fluently without the tape. A same-age control group with similar reading difficulties was given an alternative reading program that was similar to that received by the experimental group (with respect to creative writing, spelling, phonics, and vocabulary development), but which differed in terms of passage reading exercises (controls read from basal readers, whereas the experimental group did repeated readings of audiotaped material). Only students in the repeated readings of audiotaped material group showed a significant effect of treatment on oral reading, whereas controls showed significantly larger gains in word attack skills. There were no between-group differences in silent reading, a close comprehension test, or isolated word recognition. The pattern of findings suggested that repeated readings of audiotaped material enhances oral reading ability of students with reading difficulties, but the effects of treatment do not generalize to a wide range of reading measures.

  17. Donor attention to reading materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, S F; Osmond, L; Choquet, K; Yi, Q-L; Goldman, M

    2015-11-01

    Mandatory predonation reading materials inform donors about risk factors for transmissible disease, possible complications of donation and changes to the donation process. We aimed to assess the attention to predonation reading materials and factors which may affect attention. A national survey in 2008 of 18,108 blood donors asked about self-assessed attention to reading the materials. In face-to-face interviews, 441 donors completed additional questions about reading the materials and a literacy test. Qualitative interviews of 27 donors assessed their approach to reading. In the national survey, most of the first-time donors said they read all or most of the materials (90.9% first-time vs. 57.6% repeat donors, P reading them carefully (P read materials carefully, skimmed or did not read, most knew that donors are informed of positive transmissible disease test results (97.1%, 95.5, 98.0 P > 0.05), but fewer recalled seeing the definition of sex (77.2%, 56.9, 24.2 P read materials carefully, skimmed or did not read were compared (P > 0.05). Qualitative interviews showed that donors are reluctant to read any more than necessary and decide based on perceived importance or relevance. Attention to predonation reading materials tends to be better among first-time donors. The effectiveness is limited by low motivation to read, especially for repeat donors, as well as poor literacy. © 2015 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  18. Radiation-induced cerebrovasculopathy of the distal middle cerebral artery and distal posterior cerebral artery. Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Shu; Hamada, Jun-ichiro; Morioka, Motohiro; Kai, Yutaka; Hashiguchi, Akihito; Ushio, Yukitaka [Kumamoto Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-04-01

    A 15-year-old girl underwent partial removal of a pituitary adenoma followed by local irradiation of the brain with a total of 70 Gy through two lateral opposing ports. Twenty years later, she experienced frequent transient ischemic attacks with left sensory disturbance. Cerebral angiography revealed stenoses of the right distal middle cerebral artery (MCA) and the right distal posterior cerebral artery without net-like vessels. There was a severe decrease of vasoreactivity in the right hemisphere. Right superficial temporal artery (STA)-MCA anastomosis was performed. Her neurological deficits were resolved and perfusion reserve capacity had markedly improved 6 months later. We recomment STA-MCA anastomosis in such cases. (author)

  19. Cerebral circulation, neurological and neuropsychological disorders in idiopathic arterial hypotension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Viktorovich Fonyakin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the cerebral circulation in idiopathic arterial hypotension (IAH in relation to neurological and neuropsychological disorders. Patients and methods. Sixty-five patients (mean age 40.2 [8, 14] years with prolonged IAH were examined. Neuropsychological examination was made using the procedure adapted by A.R. Luria; different psychic functions (memory, speech, gnosis, praxis, thinking, attention, counting, writing, and reading were studied. Cerebral hemodynamics was investigated using duplex scanning of the brachiocephalic arteries (BCA, middle cerebral arteries (MCA, internal jugular (IJV and vertebral veins (VV. The patients were assigned to 2 groups: 1 19 (29% patients with somatoform disorders, 2 46 (71% patients with signs of the initial manifestations of chronic cerebrovascular insufficiency. Group 2 patients were older and had a longer history of IAH. Results. In all the patients, cerebral blood supply in the carotid system showed moderately lower arterial blood inflow with a compensatory vascular resistance decrease and balanced venous outflow reduction with increased vascular resistance. Group 2 patients had a substantial (to the lower normal range blood flow decline in the vertebral artery along with increased peripheral resistance in the VV. The degree of neuropsychological derangement was inversely proportional to blood flow velocity in BCA and MCA and to blood outflow in IJV and VV.

  20. Polymyalgia rheumatica and systemic giant cell arteritis. Bioptic findings of the subclavian arteries in a case of aortic arch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giacomo, V; Fraioli, A; Carmenini, G; Schietroma, M; Meloni, F; Grossi, F

    1984-08-01

    A 64 year old woman complained of aches and stiffness of the neck and the shoulders with fever and E.S.R. increase. A nonsteroid anti-inflammatory treatment was unsuccessful. A clinical examination revealed absence of both radial pulses and presence of murmurs at level of the carotids. The angiographic findings confirmed an aortic arch syndrome with severe stenosis of the subclavian and axillary arteries. The diagnostic approach, in spite of a negativity of the temporal artery biopsy, was for systemic giant cell arteries with general manifestations of polymyalgia rheumatica. The biopsies of both subclavian arteries, performed during a surgery revascularization, showed a typical giant cell arteries in acute stage. The histopathological pattern of extratemporal giant cell arteries obtained by means of a surgical biopsy is really uncommon, being the previous reports performed on necroscopic findings only. In addition this case confirms that polymyalgia rheumatica implies a systemic arteries even if the clinical and histopathological signs of temporal arteritis are lacking. Therefore the temporal artery should be only considered as a particular and inconstant localization of this vasculitis.

  1. SchemaOnRead Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    North, Michael J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-09-30

    SchemaOnRead provides tools for implementing schema-on-read including a single function call (e.g., schemaOnRead("filename")) that reads text (TXT), comma separated value (CSV), raster image (BMP, PNG, GIF, TIFF, and JPG), R data (RDS), HDF5, NetCDF, spreadsheet (XLS, XLSX, ODS, and DIF), Weka Attribute-Relation File Format (ARFF), Epi Info (REC), Pajek network (PAJ), R network (NET), Hypertext Markup Language (HTML), SPSS (SAV), Systat (SYS), and Stata (DTA) files. It also recursively reads folders (e.g., schemaOnRead("folder")), returning a nested list of the contained elements.

  2. Reading the Tourist Guidebook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkelsen, Anette; Sørensen, Anders

    2005-01-01

    of information sought, amount of information read and level of involvement displayed, indicating a three-pronged typology of guidebook readers. The guidebook reader typology thus constructed may be regarded as a first step in understanding the effect of guidebooks on tourists’ behaviour and their experience...

  3. Reading about Real Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Sunday

    2015-01-01

    Although students do need hands-on experiences to master key skills in science, technology, and engineering, Cummins asserts, K-12 teachers should also help students understand key STEM concepts by reading, writing, and talking about the work of professional scientists and engineers. Cummins lists high-quality texts that help young people…

  4. Reading and company

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuzmičová, Anežka; Dias, Patrícia; Vogrinčič Čepič, Ana

    2017-01-01

    . Across all six samples included in the study, participants spontaneously attested to varied, and partly surprising, forms of sensitivity to company and social space in their daily efforts to align body with mind for reading. The article reports these emergent trends and discusses their potential...

  5. Teaching Reading Vocabulary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Tom; Dymock, Sue

    2010-01-01

    Would you like your students to be excited when they read a new word and keen to work out its meaning straight away? This book will turn them into word detectives, ready to tackle any new word they come across. And when writing, would you like them to make sentences that have interesting and descriptive words like "shamble," "ravenous" or…

  6. Teaching Reading through Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takala, Marjatta

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses a teaching method called reading through writing (RtW), based on the use of computers rather than handwriting. The pupils use the computers in pairs and decide themselves what they will write about. The use of this method is studied via a questionnaire to 22 teachers and via seven Master's and two Bachelor's theses,…

  7. Readings in risk

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gough, Michael; Glickman, Theodore S

    1990-01-01

    ... from Resources for the Future are distributed worldwide by The Johns Hopkins University Press. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Readings in risk I Theodore S. Glickman and Michael Gough, editors. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references. ISBN 0-915707-55-1 (alk. paper) 1. Technology-Risk assessment. 2. Health risk assessment....

  8. Painless reading comprehension

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, EdD, Darolyn "Lyn"

    2016-01-01

    Reading comprehension gets easier as students learn what kind of reader they are, discover how to keep facts in their head, and much more. Bonus Online Component: includes additional games, including Beat the Clock, a line match game, and a word scramble.

  9. Scaffolding Reading Comprehension Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Ashraf Atta Mohamed Safein

    2017-01-01

    The current study investigates whether English language teachers use scaffolding strategies for developing their students' reading comprehension skills or just for assessing their comprehension. It also tries to demonstrate whether teachers are aware of these strategies or they use them as a matter of habit. A questionnaire as well as structured…

  10. Books for Summer Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phi Delta Kappan, 1991

    1991-01-01

    To help replenish educators' supply of ideas, "Kappan" editors suggest several books for summer reading, including many noncurrent titles not specifically on education such as Peter Novick's "That Noble Dream," Joy Kogawa's "Obasan," Zora Neale Hurston's "Their Eyes Were Watching God," Kate Chopin's "The Awakening," Willa Cather's "My Antonia,"…

  11. Reading Community: Writing Difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubbs, Katherine K.

    Reading the speeches each year of the program chair of the Conference on College Composition and Communication gives the reader a concrete notion of how the field has been perceived and constructed by these leaders in composition. The more recent articles also construct a surprisingly unified and stable identity for the field which is premised on…

  12. Assessment Problems in Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGinitie, Walter H., Ed.

    The papers in this volume deal with a range of assessment problems in reading. The first paper, by Karlin, introduces the general problem of using assessment procedures to guide teaching. The next six papers deal with various aspects of this general problem. Otto discusses the distinction between norm-referenced, standardized achievement tests and…

  13. Waterford Early Reading Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO.

    This paper provides an overview of the Waterford Early Reading Program (WERP), which is designed to shift teaching and learning away from remediation and failure to prevention, early achievement, and sustained growth for every student. WERP includes three levels of instruction: emergent, beginning, and fluent readers. It targets pre-K through…

  14. Reading: Interactions with Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-23

    served the patron, he got a big tip . (4b). After the bartender served the patron, he left a big tip . They found that reading times for the matrix...the filler available at the gap site. (5). The journalists interviewed the skier that the waitress from the village accused of the crime. In the

  15. Reading through Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Madhavi Gayathri; Vijaya

    2016-01-01

    This paper captures the design of a comprehensive curriculum incorporating the four skills based exclusively on the use of parallel audio-visual and written texts. We discuss the use of authentic materials to teach English to Indian undergraduates aged 18 to 20 years. Specifically, we talk about the use of parallel reading (screen-play) and…

  16. Selecting Extensive Reading Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, George M.

    2014-01-01

    This article offers guidance to teachers and students in selecting materials for extensive reading (ER). First, the article explains characteristics of ER and reviews some of the potential gains for students who do ER. Second, the article considers criteria for teachers to bear in mind when selecting ER materials. Third, the article then suggests…

  17. Model Reading Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, Nancy; Dworkin, Yehoash

    The 1978 Summer Reading Institute, which served 58 Washington, D.C., elementary school children, is described in this paper. Major characteristics of the program model are first identified, along with elements that were added to the model in the preplanning stage. Numerous aspects of the program are then described, including the make-up of the…

  18. Intervention for Reading Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catts, Hugh W.; Kamhi, Alan G.

    1987-01-01

    The article provides specific suggestions of how speech language pathologists can use their language expertise in intervention with reading-disabled students. Strategies appropriate for use in individual therapy are discussed and the importance of collaboration with classroom teachers and learning disabilities specialists is stressed. (Author/DB)

  19. Caliber-Persistent Artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Araújo Pinho Costa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Caliber-persistent artery (CPLA of the lip is a common vascular anomaly in which a main arterial branch extends to the surface of the mucous tissue with no reduction in its diameter. It usually manifests as pulsatile papule, is easily misdiagnosed, and is observed more frequently among older people, suggesting that its development may involve a degenerative process associated with aging; CPLA is also characterized by the loss of tone of the adjacent supporting connective tissue. Although the diagnosis is clinical, high-resolution Doppler ultrasound is a useful noninvasive tool for evaluating the lesion. This report describes the case of a 58-year-old male patient who complained of a lesion of the lower lip with bleeding and recurrent ulceration. The patient was successfully treated in our hospital after a diagnosis of CPLA and is currently undergoing a clinical outpatient follow-up with no complaints.

  20. The effect of aging on the brain network for exception word reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provost, Jean-Sebastien; Brambati, Simona M; Chapleau, Marianne; Wilson, Maximiliano A

    2016-11-01

    Cognitive and computational models of reading aloud agree on the existence of two procedures for reading. Pseudowords (e.g., atendier) are correctly read through subword processes only while exception words (e.g., pint) are only correctly read via whole-words processes. Regular words can be correctly read by means of either way. Previous behavioral studies showed that older adults relied more on whole-word processing for reading. The aim of the present fMRI study was to verify whether this larger whole-word reliance for reading in older adults was reflected by changes in the pattern of brain activation. Both young and elderly participants read aloud pseudowords, exception and regular words in the scanner. Behavioral results reproduced those of previous studies showing that older adults made significantly less errors when reading exception words. Neuroimaging results showed significant activation of the left anterior temporal lobe (ATL), a key region implicated in whole-word reading for exception word reading in both young and elderly participants. Critically, ATL activation was also found for regular word reading in the elderly. No differences were observed in the pattern of activation between regular and pseudowords in the young. In conclusion, these results extend evidence on the critical role of the left ATL for exception word reading to elderly participants. Additionally, our study shows for the first time from a developmental point of view that the behavioral changes found in reading during normal aging also have a brain counterpart in the reading network changes that sustain exception and regular word reading in the elderly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Use of Extensive Reading in Teaching Reading

    OpenAIRE

    Ferdila, Raihani

    2014-01-01

    The study investigates benefits of using extensive reading in teaching reading and as well as students' attitudes toward it. A case study design as a part of qualitative research was employed in this study. The data were collected through classroom observation, questionnaire and interview. The participants of this study were a class of second graders in one of the public junior high schools in Bandung. The findings reveal that extensive reading was beneficial in teaching reading. There are fi...

  2. Giant cell temporal arteritis associated with overlying basal cell carcinoma: co-incidence or connection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salem Alowami

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell arteritis is a granulomatous vasculitis of large and medium sized arteries manifesting as temporal arteritis and/or polymyalgia rheumatica. The histological assessment of temporal artery biopsies is frequently encountered in anatomical pathology and has important diagnostic consequences in patients clinically suspected of having giant cell arteritis. We present an intriguing case of giant cell arteritis associated with a Basal cell carcinoma and discuss the ongoing controversy pertaining to the association of giant cell arteritis/polymyalgia rheumatica with malignancy.

  3. A Special Chinese Reading Acceleration Training Paradigm: To Enhance the Reading Fluency and Comprehension of Chinese Children with Reading Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Dai

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available According to a number of studies, use of a Reading Acceleration Program as reading intervention training has been demonstrated to improve reading speed and comprehension level effectively in most languages and countries. The objective of the current study was to provide further evidence of the effectiveness of a Reading Acceleration Program for Chinese children with reading disabilities using a distinctive Chinese reading acceleration training paradigm. The reading acceleration training paradigm is divided into a non-accelerated reading paradigm, a Character-accelerated reading paradigm and a Words-accelerated reading paradigm. The results of training Chinese children with reading disabilities indicate that the acceleration reading paradigm applies to children with Chinese-reading disabilities. In addition, compared with other reading acceleration paradigms, Words- accelerated reading training is more effective in helping children with reading disabilities read at a high speed while maintaining superior comprehension levels.

  4. Developmental, Component-Based Model of Reading Fluency: An Investigation of Predictors of Word-Reading Fluency, Text-Reading Fluency, and Reading Comprehension

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Young-Suk Grace

    2015-01-01

    The primary goal was to expand our understanding of text reading fluency (efficiency or automaticity)—how its relation to other constructs (e.g., word reading fluency and reading comprehension) changes over time and how it is different from word reading fluency and reading comprehension. We examined (1) developmentally changing relations among word reading fluency, listening comprehension, text reading fluency, and reading comprehension; (2) the relation of reading comprehension to text readi...

  5. Temporal network epidemiology

    CERN Document Server

    Holme, Petter

    2017-01-01

    This book covers recent developments in epidemic process models and related data on temporally varying networks. It is widely recognized that contact networks are indispensable for describing, understanding, and intervening to stop the spread of infectious diseases in human and animal populations; “network epidemiology” is an umbrella term to describe this research field. More recently, contact networks have been recognized as being highly dynamic. This observation, also supported by an increasing amount of new data, has led to research on temporal networks, a rapidly growing area. Changes in network structure are often informed by epidemic (or other) dynamics, in which case they are referred to as adaptive networks. This volume gathers contributions by prominent authors working in temporal and adaptive network epidemiology, a field essential to understanding infectious diseases in real society.

  6. The timing and strength of regional brain activation associated with word recognition in children with reading difficulties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roozbeh eRezaie

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The study investigates the relative degree and timing of cortical activation across parietal, temporal, and frontal regions during performance of a continuous visual word recognition task in children who experience reading difficulties (N=44, RD and typical readers (N=40, NI. Minimum norm estimates of regional neurophysiological activity were obtained from magnetoencephalographic recordings. Children with RD showed bilaterally reduced neurophysiological activity in the superior and middle temporal gyri, and increased activity in rostral middle frontal and ventral occipitotemporal cortices, bilaterally. The temporal profile of activity in the RD group, featured near-simultaneous activity peaks in temporal, inferior parietal and prefrontal regions, in contrast to a clear temporal progression of activity among these areas in the NI group. These results replicate and extend previous MEG and fMRI results demonstrating atypical, latency-dependent attributes of the brain circuit involved in word reading in children with reading difficulties.

  7. Impact of the Reading Buddies Program on Reading Level and Attitude Towards Reading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayley Dolman

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective – This research examines the Reading Buddies program at the Grande Prairie Public Library, which took place in July and August of 2011 and 2012. The Reading Buddies program pairs lower elementary students with teen volunteers for reading practice over the summer. The aim of the study was to discover how much impact the program would have on participating children’s reading levels and attitudes towards reading.Methods – During the first and last sessions of the Reading Buddies program, the participants completed the Elementary Reading Attitudes Survey (ERAS and the Graded Word Recognition Lists from the Bader Reading and Language Inventory (6th ed., 2008.Participants were also asked for their grade and sex, and the program coordinator kept track of attendance. Results – There were 37 Reading Buddies participants who completed both the pre- and post-tests for the study. On average, the program had a small positive effect on participants’ reading levels and a small negative effect on their attitudes towards reading. There was a larger range of changes to the ERAS scores than to the reading test scores, but most participants’ scores did not change dramatically on either measure.Conclusions – Although findings are limited by the small size of the data-set, results indicate that many of the Reading Buddies participants maintained their reading level over the summer and had a similar attitude towards reading at the end of the program. On average, reading levels increased slightly and attitudes towards reading were slightly more negative. Many factors could not be taken into account during the study (e.g., the amount of reading done at home. A study with a control group that did not participate in the program could help to assess whether the program helped to combat summer learning loss.

  8. Early Reading Intervention by Means of a Multicomponent Reading Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Ven, M.; de Leeuw, L.; van Weerdenburg, M.; Steenbeek-Planting, E. G.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the effects of an intervention with a multicomponent reading game on the development of reading skills in 60 Dutch primary school children with special educational needs. The game contains evidence-based reading exercises and is based on principles of applied gaming. Using a multiple baseline approach, we tested children's…

  9. Reading for Real: Our Year with Reading Buddies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    When Patricia Ross' high school students at the Phoenix Day School for the Deaf buddied up with elementary school students to improve their reading skills, amazing things happened. As they read to them, Ross' students, who were part of the 2012-2013 Integrated Language Arts and Social Studies program, increased their reading scores and forged…

  10. How do children read words? A focus on reading processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boer, M.

    2014-01-01

    Being able to read is very important in our literate society. Many studies, therefore, have examined children’s reading skills to improve our understanding of reading development. In general, there have been two types of studies. On the one hand, there is a line of research that focuses on the

  11. The Effects of Oral and Silent Reading on Reading Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmel, Naomi; Ness, Molly

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the effects of reading mode (oral and silent) and text genre (narrative and expository) on fourth graders' reading comprehension. While controlling for prior reading ability of 48 participants, we measured comprehension. Using a repeated measured design, data were analyzed using analysis of covariance, paired t-tests, and…

  12. The Importance of Metacognitive Reading Strategy Awareness in Reading Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Mohammad Reza; Ismail, Hairul Nizam; Abdullah, Muhammad Kamarul Kabilan

    2013-01-01

    Metacognitive reading strategy awareness plays a significant role in reading comprehension and educational process. In spite of its importance, metacognitive strategy has long been the ignored skill in English language teaching, research, learning, and assessment. This lack of good metacognitive reading strategy skill is exacerbated by the central…

  13. Clarifying Differences between Reading Skills and Reading Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afflerbach, Peter; Pearson, P. David; Paris, Scott G.

    2008-01-01

    The terms "reading skill" and "reading strategy" are central to how we conceptualize and teach reading. Despite their importance and widespread use, the terms are not consistently used or understood. This article examines the current and historical uses of the terms, defines them, and describes their differences, similarities, and relationships.…

  14. The Relationship between Reading Comprehension Strategies and Reading Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmizi, Fatma Susar

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the relationship between levels of reading comprehension strategy use, reading attitudes, and the amount of reading per year among elementary school students. The study was conducted with 1316 students (649 girls and 667 boys) attending the fourth and fifth grades of 15 elementary schools in Denizli, Turkey.…

  15. Fluency and reading comprehension in students with reading difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Tânia Augusto; Carvalho, Carolina Alves Ferreira de; Kida, Adriana de Souza Batista; Avila, Clara Regina Brandão de

    2011-12-01

    To characterize the performance of students with reading difficulties in decoding and reading comprehension tasks as well as to investigate the possible correlations between them. Sixty students (29 girls) from 3rd to 5th grades of public Elementary Schools were evaluated. Thirty students (Research Group - RG), ten from each grade, were nominated by their teachers as presenting evidences of learning disabilities. The other thirty students were indicated as good readers, and were matched by gender, age and grade to the RG, composing the Comparison Group (CG). All subjects were assessed regarding the parameters of reading fluency (rate and accuracy in words, pseudowords and text reading) and reading comprehension (reading level, number and type of ideas identified, and correct responses on multiple choice questions). The RG presented significantly lower scores than the CG in fluency and reading comprehension. Different patterns of positive and negative correlations, from weak to excellent, among the decoding and comprehension parameters were found in both groups. In the RG, low values of reading rate and accuracy were observed, which were correlated to low scores in comprehension and improvement in decoding, but not in comprehension, with grade increase. In CG, correlation was found between different fluency parameters, but none of them was correlated to the reading comprehension variables. Students with reading and writing difficulties show lower values of reading fluency and comprehension than good readers. Fluency and comprehension are correlated in the group with difficulties, showing that deficits in decoding influence reading comprehension, which does not improve with age increase.

  16. The Effects of the Allain Reading System on Reading Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allain, Althea Saizan

    Five hundred second-grade pupils participated in a study of the effect of the Allain Color Pack reading system on reading achievement. Subjects were divided into equal treatment and control groups; each group was stratified according to low, average, and high reading ability determined on the basis of pretests of vocabulary and comprehension. The…

  17. Fluency Interventions for Developmental Readers: Repeated Readings and Wide Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ari, Omer

    2011-01-01

    Despite recent findings that show fluency deficits in developmental readers, the field of developmental reading remains remiss in fluency instruction. This article provides a summary intended to increase college reading teachers' understanding of reading fluency and fluency instruction. In addition, included are the step-by-step procedures of…

  18. Early reading intervention by means of a multicomponent reading game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ven, M.A.M. van de; Leeuw, L.C. de; Weerdenburg, M.W.C. van; Steenbeek-Planting, E.G.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the effects of an intervention with a multicomponent reading game on the development of reading skills in 60 Dutch primary school children with special educational needs. The game contains evidence-based reading exercises and is based on principles of applied gaming. Using a

  19. Pleasure Reading Cures Readicide and Facilitates Academic Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer, J. Mary; Ponniah, R. Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Pleasure reading is an absolute choice to eradicate readicide, a systematic killing of the love for reading. This paper encompasses the different forms and consequences of readicide which will have negative impact not only on comprehension but also on the prior knowledge of a reader. Reading to score well on tests impedes the desire for reading…

  20. Reading by Design: Two Case Studies of Digital Reading Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowsell, Jennifer; Burke, Anne

    2009-01-01

    The digital reading practices of two middle school students in US and Canadian contexts are examined. Using a multimodal discourse framework, the authors contemplate what digital reading practice is and distinctive practices of reading texts online compared with printed, school-based literacy practices. By focusing on two different genres of…

  1. Preliminary Report on Neuroanatomical Differences Among Reading Disabled, Nonverbally Gifted, and Gifted-Reading Disabled College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilger, Jeffrey W; Bayda, Mollie; Olulade, Olumide A; Altman, Meaghan N; O'Boyle, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Regional comparisons (cortical surface area and thickness) were performed on a well described sample of adults with reading disability alone (RD), nonverbal giftedness alone (G), and reading disability and nonverbal giftedness combined (GRD). These anatomical results are considered in relation to behavioral and functional work previously reported on this sample. GRD-RD regional differences were found in both hemispheres and were more common than GRD-G differences. Regional differences were found in the temporal, parietal, occipital and frontal lobes. While these data are preliminary given the small sample sizes, they suggest future avenues of research on the neurodevelopment of atypical samples.

  2. Vivienda temporal para refugiados

    OpenAIRE

    Amonarraiz Gutiérrez, Ana

    2015-01-01

    El proyecto se centra en el diseño y desarrollo de un espacio destinado a vivienda temporal para dar hogar a personas que han perdido su casa. Este tipo de vivienda es fundamental dentro del proceso de recuperación post-desastre ya que la construcción inmediata de viviendas permanentes es utópica. El objetivo principal es la construcción de una vivienda temporal formada por elementos prefabricados, logrando así una mayor rapidez en su montaje. Esto también permitirá que cualquier component...

  3. Coronary Artery Anomalies in Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian A. Scansen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery anomalies represent a disease spectrum from incidental to life-threatening. Anomalies of coronary artery origin and course are well-recognized in human medicine, but have received limited attention in veterinary medicine. Coronary artery anomalies are best described in the dog, hamster, and cow though reports also exist in the horse and pig. The most well-known anomaly in veterinary medicine is anomalous coronary artery origin with a prepulmonary course in dogs, which limits treatment of pulmonary valve stenosis. A categorization scheme for coronary artery anomalies in animals is suggested, dividing these anomalies into those of major or minor clinical significance. A review of coronary artery development, anatomy, and reported anomalies in domesticated species is provided and four novel canine examples of anomalous coronary artery origin are described: an English bulldog with single left coronary ostium and a retroaortic right coronary artery; an English bulldog with single right coronary ostium and transseptal left coronary artery; an English bulldog with single right coronary ostium and absent left coronary artery with a prepulmonary paraconal interventricular branch and an interarterial circumflex branch; and a mixed-breed dog with tetralogy of Fallot and anomalous origin of all coronary branches from the brachiocephalic trunk. Coronary arterial fistulae are also described including a coronary cameral fistula in a llama cria and an English bulldog with coronary artery aneurysm and anomalous shunting vessels from the right coronary artery to the pulmonary trunk. These examples are provided with the intent to raise awareness and improve understanding of such defects.

  4. Integrating Cultural Pluralism through Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Guang-Lea

    2003-01-01

    Provides practical suggestions for teachers to integrate cultural pluralism in three reading strategies: (1) reading workshops; (2) writing workshops; (3) language experience approaches that make a valuable contribution to students of all cultural backgrounds. (Author/VWL)

  5. Selected Readings in Genetic Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Thomas R.; Robinson, Sandra K.

    1973-01-01

    Describes different sources of readings for understanding issues and concepts of genetic engineering. Broad categories of reading materials are: concerns about genetic engineering; its background; procedures; and social, ethical and legal issues. References are listed. (PS)

  6. Management of iatrogenic pulmonary artery injury during pulmonary artery banding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeti Makhija

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary Artery banding (PAB is limited to selected patients who cannot undergo primary repair due to complex anatomy, associated co-morbidities, as a part of staged univentricular palliation, and for preparing the left ventricle prior to an arterial switch operation. We report a catastrophic iatrogenic complication in which the pulmonary artery was injured during the PAB. We discuss its multi-pronged management.

  7. Management of Iatrogenic Pulmonary Artery Injury during Pulmonary Artery Banding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhija, Neeti; Aggarwal, Shivani; Talwar, Sachin; Ladha, Suruchi; Das, Deepanwita; Kiran, Usha

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary Artery banding (PAB) is limited to selected patients who cannot undergo primary repair due to complex anatomy, associated co-morbidities, as a part of staged univentricular palliation, and for preparing the left ventricle prior to an arterial switch operation. We report a catastrophic iatrogenic complication in which the pulmonary artery was injured during the PAB. We discuss its multi-pronged management. PMID:28701613

  8. Impact of intracranial artery calcification on cerebral hemodynamic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaohong; Wang, Li; Zhong, Jingxin; Ko, Jacky; Shi, Lin; Soo, Yannie; Leung, Thomas; Wong, Ka Sing; Abrigo, Jill; Chen, Xiangyan

    2018-02-09

    Intracranial artery calcification (IAC) has been demonstrated to be correlated with ischemic stroke, cognitive decline, and other vascular events by accumulating evidences from both Western and Asian populations. The proposed study aimed to investigate its potential mechanisms by evaluating the blood flow velocity and pulsatility index (PI) of cerebral arteries. Consecutive ischemic stroke patients admitted to the Prince of Wales Hospital were recruited after excluding those with atrial fibrillation or poor temporal window. Quantitative measurements of IAC severity were assessed on brain CT scans. Transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasonography was performed to evaluate the blood flow velocity of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) and vertebral-basilar artery (VBA). In total, 318 patients were analyzed. Spearman's correlation analysis demonstrated both high MCA systolic flow velocity and high MCA PI were correlated with IAC Agatston score, p VBA velocity/high VBA PI, p ≤ 0.001 individually. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed IAC Agatston score was an independent risk factor for high MCA velocity (OR 1.533; 95% CI 1.235-1.903), high VBA velocity (OR 1.964; 95% CI 1.381-2.794), and high VBA PI (OR 1.200; 95% CI 1.016-1.418), respectively. Heavier IAC might cause generalized artery flow velocity changes and increased pulsatility index, which may indicate high resistance within cerebrovasculature.

  9. Grade-related changes in event-related potentials (ERPs) in primary school children: Differences between two reading tasks.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Licht, R.; Bakker, D.J.; Kok, A.; Bouma, A.

    1992-01-01

    Recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) from the left and right temporal and parietal sites during word reading in 39 boys and 30 girls who were followed over 3 yrs, starting at Grade 1. Task 1 required Ss to read repeatedly presented words; Task 2 consisted of a series of different words, with

  10. An Aberrant Artery Arising From Common Hepatic Artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surekha D. Jadhav

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Common hepatic artery is the branch of celiac trunk which is chief artery of the foregut. Branches of celiac trunk supply the gastrointestinal tract and its associated glands which are derived from foregut. Anatomy and variations of hepatic arterial system have become increasingly important due to increasing number of laparoscopic procedures, oncologic surgical interventions, and organ transplant cases. This case report describes a rare anatomical variation of an aberrant artery arising from common hepatic artery before the origin of gastroduodenal artery and proper hepatic artery.The aberrant artery traversed inferiorly and behind the body of the pancreas which divided into a right and left branches. The right branch ran behind the neck of the pancreas and it ended after giving few branches to head and body of pancreas. However, the left branch gave off branches to the proximal part of the jejunum. The presence of a branch arising directly from the common hepatic artery supplying the pancreas and jejunum is uncommon. Knowledge of such a rare variation is important not only for surgeons but also interventional radiologists and those studying anatomy

  11. So Much to Read, So Little Time: How Do We Read, and Can Speed Reading Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, Keith; Schotter, Elizabeth R; Masson, Michael E J; Potter, Mary C; Treiman, Rebecca

    2016-05-01

    The prospect of speed reading--reading at an increased speed without any loss of comprehension--has undeniable appeal. Speed reading has been an intriguing concept for decades, at least since Evelyn Wood introduced her Reading Dynamics training program in 1959. It has recently increased in popularity, with speed-reading apps and technologies being introduced for smartphones and digital devices. The current article reviews what the scientific community knows about the reading process--a great deal--and discusses the implications of the research findings for potential students of speed-reading training programs or purchasers of speed-reading apps. The research shows that there is a trade-off between speed and accuracy. It is unlikely that readers will be able to double or triple their reading speeds (e.g., from around 250 to 500-750 words per minute) while still being able to understand the text as well as if they read at normal speed. If a thorough understanding of the text is not the reader's goal, then speed reading or skimming the text will allow the reader to get through it faster with moderate comprehension. The way to maintain high comprehension and get through text faster is to practice reading and to become a more skilled language user (e.g., through increased vocabulary). This is because language skill is at the heart of reading speed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Comparison of non-invasive blood pressure monitoring using modified arterial applanation tonometry with intra-arterial measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harju, Jarkko; Vehkaoja, Antti; Kumpulainen, Pekka; Campadello, Stefano; Lindroos, Ville; Yli-Hankala, Arvi; Oksala, Niku

    2018-02-01

    Intermittent non-invasive blood pressure measurement with tourniquets is slow, can cause nerve and skin damage, and interferes with other measurements. Invasive measurement cannot be safely used in all conditions. Modified arterial tonometry may be an alternative for fast and continuous measurement. Our aim was to compare arterial tonometry sensor (BPro®) with invasive blood pressure measurement to clarify whether it could be utilized in the postoperative setting. 28 patients who underwent elective surgery requiring arterial cannulation were analyzed. Patients were monitored post-operatively for 2 h with standard invasive monitoring and with a study device comprising an arterial tonometry sensor (BPro®) added with a three-dimensional accelerometer to investigate the potential impact of movement. Recordings were collected electronically. The results revealed inaccurate readings in method comparison between the devices based on recommendations by Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI). On a Bland-Altman plot, the bias and precision between these two methods was 19.8 ± 16.7 (Limits of agreement - 20.1 to 59.6) mmHg, Spearman correlation coefficient r = 0.61. For diastolic pressure, the difference was 4.8 ± 7.7 (LoA - 14.1 to 23.6) mmHg (r = 0.72), and for mean arterial pressure it was 11.18 ± 11.1 (LoA - 12.1 to 34.2) mmHg (r = 0.642). Our study revealed inaccurate agreement (AAMI) between the two methods when measuring systolic and mean blood pressures during post-operative care. The readings for diastolic pressures were inside the limits recommended by AAMI. Movement increased the failure rate significantly (p invasive blood pressure measurement in these patients.

  13. Temporal event-structure coding in developmental dyslexia: Evidence from explicit and implicit temporal processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliott Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available As an alternative to theories positing visual or phonological deficits it has been suggested that the aetiology of dyslexia takes the form of a temporal processing deficit that may refer to impairment in the functional connectivity of the processes involved in reading. Here we investigated this idea in an experimental task designed to measure simultaneity thresholds. Fifteen children diagnosed with developmental dyslexia, alongside a matched sample of 13 normal readers undertook a series of threshold determination procedures designed to locate visual simultaneity thresholds and to assess the influence of subthreshold synchrony or asynchrony upon these thresholds. While there were no significant differences in simultaneity thresholds between dyslexic and normal readers, indicating no evidence of an altered perception, or temporal quantization of events, the dyslexic readers reported simultaneity significantly less frequently than normal readers, with the reduction largely attributable presentation of a subthreshold asynchrony. The results are discussed in terms of a whole systems approach to maintaining information processing integrity.

  14. Investigating Gender Differences in Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Sarah; Johnston, Rhona

    2010-01-01

    Girls consistently outperform boys on tests of reading comprehension, although the reason for this is not clear. In this review, differences between boys and girls in areas relating to reading will be investigated as possible explanations for consistent gender differences in reading attainment. The review will examine gender differences within the…

  15. Teaching Content Is Teaching Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, E. D., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Every two years the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), "the Nation's Report Card," reports the nation's average reading and math scores in grades 4 and 8. Despite the strong focus on reading under the 2001 No Child Left Behind law, the recent 2009 reading scores were not statistically different from those of 2007, which…

  16. Teaching Reading: Research into Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macalister, John

    2014-01-01

    In pre-service and in-service language teacher education, and in curriculum-related projects in second and foreign language settings, a recurrent issue is the failure to relate the teaching of reading to reading as a meaning-making activity. In this paper, I will consider what current research on second language (L2) reading has actually succeeded…

  17. Reading Processes and Parenting Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreteiro, Rui Manuel; Justo, João Manuel; Figueira, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    Home literacy environment explains between 12 and 18.5% of the variance of children's language skills. Although most authors agree that children whose parents encourage them to read tend to develop better and earlier reading skills, some authors consider that the impact of family environment in reading skills is overvalued. Probably, other…

  18. Reading comprehension in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Laura L; Rutledge, Stefanie

    2014-05-01

    Although individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) self-report reading problems and experience difficulties in cognitive-linguistic functions that support discourse-level reading, prior research has primarily focused on sentence-level processing and auditory comprehension. Accordingly, the authors investigated the presence and nature of reading comprehension in PD, hypothesizing that (a) individuals with PD would display impaired accuracy and/or speed on reading comprehension tests and (b) reading performances would be correlated with cognitive test results. Eleven adults with PD and 9 age- and education-matched control participants completed tests that evaluated reading comprehension; general language and cognitive abilities; and aspects of attention, memory, and executive functioning. The PD group obtained significantly lower scores on several, but not all, reading comprehension, language, and cognitive measures. Memory, language, and disease severity were significantly correlated with reading comprehension for the PD group. Individuals in the early stages of PD without dementia or broad cognitive deficits can display reading comprehension difficulties, particularly for high- versus basic-level reading tasks. These reading difficulties are most closely related to memory, high-level language, and PD symptom severity status. The findings warrant additional research to delineate further the types and nature of reading comprehension impairments experienced by individuals with PD.

  19. Reading Aloud in EFL Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kailani, Taiseer Zaid

    1998-01-01

    Highlights the functions of reading aloud and gives reasons for its practice in the foreign-language classroom. Suggests a dual approach for practicing both reading aloud and silent reading. Although specific focus is on English-language teaching in the Arab world, findings are relevant to foreign-language teaching in other countries as well.…

  20. Temporal compressive sensing systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Bryan W.

    2017-12-12

    Methods and systems for temporal compressive sensing are disclosed, where within each of one or more sensor array data acquisition periods, one or more sensor array measurement datasets comprising distinct linear combinations of time slice data are acquired, and where mathematical reconstruction allows for calculation of accurate representations of the individual time slice datasets.

  1. Temporal Concurrent Constraint Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens; Palamidessi, Catuscia; Valencia, Frank Dan

    2002-01-01

    The ntcc calculus is a model of non-deterministic temporal concurrent constraint programming. In this paper we study behavioral notions for this calculus. In the underlying computational model, concurrent constraint processes are executed in discrete time intervals. The behavioral notions studied...

  2. Mesial temporal sclerosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kurt

    2005-07-29

    Jul 29, 2005 ... Introduction. Mesial temporal sclerosis is the commonest cause of partial complex seizures. The aetiology of this condi- tion is controversial, but it is postulat- ed that both acquired and develop- mental processes may be involved. Familial cases have also been reported. Magnetic resonance imaging. (MRI) ...

  3. Temporal bone imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemmerling, Marc [Algemeen Ziekenhuis Sint-Lucas, Gent (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology; Foer, Bert de (ed.) [Sint-Augustinus Ziekenhuis, Wilrijk (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology

    2015-04-01

    Complete overview of imaging of normal and diseased temporal bone. Straightforward structure to facilitate learning. Detailed consideration of newer imaging techniques, including the hot topic of diffusion-weighted imaging. Includes a chapter on anatomy that will be of great help to the novice interpreter of imaging findings. Excellent illustrations throughout. This book provides a complete overview of imaging of normal and diseased temporal bone. After description of indications for imaging and the cross-sectional imaging anatomy of the area, subsequent chapters address the various diseases and conditions that affect the temporal bone and are likely to be encountered regularly in clinical practice. The classic imaging methods are described and discussed in detail, and individual chapters are included on newer techniques such as functional imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging. There is also a strong focus on postoperative imaging. Throughout, imaging findings are documented with the aid of numerous informative, high-quality illustrations. Temporal Bone Imaging, with its straightforward structure based essentially on topography, will prove of immense value in daily practice.

  4. Reading Speed as a Constraint of Accuracy of Self-Perception of Reading Skill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Heekyung; Linderholm, Tracy

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesised that college students take reading speed into consideration when evaluating their own reading skill, even if reading speed does not reliably predict actual reading skill. To test this hypothesis, we measured self-perception of reading skill, self-perception of reading speed, actual reading skill and actual reading speed to…

  5. Triple arterial phase MR imaging with gadoxetic acid using a combination of contrast enhanced time robust angiography, keyhole, and viewsharing techniques and two-dimensional parallel imaging in comparison with conventional single arterial phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jeong Hee; Lee, Jeong Min; Han, Joon Koo [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Mi Hye [Dept. of Radiology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun Ju [Philips Healthcare Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    To determine whether triple arterial phase acquisition via a combination of Contrast Enhanced Time Robust Angiography, keyhole, temporal viewsharing and parallel imaging can improve arterial phase acquisition with higher spatial resolution than single arterial phase gadoxetic-acid enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Informed consent was waived for this retrospective study by our Institutional Review Board. In 752 consecutive patients who underwent gadoxetic acid-enhanced liver MRI, either single (n = 587) or triple (n = 165) arterial phases was obtained in a single breath-hold under MR fluoroscopy guidance. Arterial phase timing was assessed, and the degree of motion was rated on a four-point scale. The percentage of patients achieving the late arterial phase without significant motion was compared between the two methods using the χ2 test. The late arterial phase was captured at least once in 96.4% (159/165) of the triple arterial phase group and in 84.2% (494/587) of the single arterial phase group (p < 0.001). Significant motion artifacts (score ≤ 2) were observed in 13.3% (22/165), 1.2% (2/165), 4.8% (8/165) on 1st, 2nd, and 3rd scans of triple arterial phase acquisitions and 6.0% (35/587) of single phase acquisitions. Thus, the late arterial phase without significant motion artifacts was captured in 96.4% (159/165) of the triple arterial phase group and in 79.9% (469/587) of the single arterial phase group (p < 0.001). Triple arterial phase imaging may reliably provide adequate arterial phase imaging for gadoxetic acid-enhanced liver MRI.

  6. Triple Arterial Phase MR Imaging with Gadoxetic Acid Using a Combination of Contrast Enhanced Time Robust Angiography, Keyhole, and Viewsharing Techniques and Two-Dimensional Parallel Imaging in Comparison with Conventional Single Arterial Phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jeong Hee [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 03080 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 03087 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Min [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 03080 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 03087 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul 03087 (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Mi Hye [Department of Radiology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul 05030 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun Ju [Philips Healthcare Korea, Seoul 04342 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Joon Koo [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 03080 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 03087 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul 03087 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    To determine whether triple arterial phase acquisition via a combination of Contrast Enhanced Time Robust Angiography, keyhole, temporal viewsharing and parallel imaging can improve arterial phase acquisition with higher spatial resolution than single arterial phase gadoxetic-acid enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Informed consent was waived for this retrospective study by our Institutional Review Board. In 752 consecutive patients who underwent gadoxetic acid-enhanced liver MRI, either single (n = 587) or triple (n = 165) arterial phases was obtained in a single breath-hold under MR fluoroscopy guidance. Arterial phase timing was assessed, and the degree of motion was rated on a four-point scale. The percentage of patients achieving the late arterial phase without significant motion was compared between the two methods using the χ{sup 2} test. The late arterial phase was captured at least once in 96.4% (159/165) of the triple arterial phase group and in 84.2% (494/587) of the single arterial phase group (p < 0.001). Significant motion artifacts (score ≤ 2) were observed in 13.3% (22/165), 1.2% (2/165), 4.8% (8/165) on 1st, 2nd, and 3rd scans of triple arterial phase acquisitions and 6.0% (35/587) of single phase acquisitions. Thus, the late arterial phase without significant motion artifacts was captured in 96.4% (159/165) of the triple arterial phase group and in 79.9% (469/587) of the single arterial phase group (p < 0.001). Triple arterial phase imaging may reliably provide adequate arterial phase imaging for gadoxetic acid-enhanced liver MRI.

  7. Communication, Technology, Temporality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Martinez

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a media studies that foregrounds technological objects as communicative and historical agents. Specifically, I take the digital computer as a powerful catalyst of crises in communication theories and certain key features of modernity. Finally, the computer is the motor of “New Media” which is at once a set of technologies, a historical epoch, and a field of knowledge. As such the computer shapes “the new” and “the future” as History pushes its origins further in the past and its convergent quality pushes its future as a predominate medium. As treatment of information and interface suggest, communication theories observe computers, and technologies generally, for the mediated languages they either afford or foreclose to us. My project describes the figures information and interface for the different ways they can be thought of as aspects of communication. I treat information not as semantic meaning, formal or discursive language, but rather as a physical organism. Similarly an interface is not a relationship between a screen and a human visual intelligence, but is instead a reciprocal, affective and physical process of contact. I illustrate that historically there have been conceptions of information and interface complimentary to mine, fleeting as they have been in the face of a dominant temporality of mediation. I begin with a theoretically informed approach to media history, and extend it to a new theory of communication. In doing so I discuss a model of time common to popular, scientific, and critical conceptions of media technologies especially in theories of computer technology. This is a predominate model with particular rules of temporal change and causality for thinking about mediation, and limits the conditions of possibility for knowledge production about communication. I suggest a new model of time as integral to any event of observation and analysis, and that human mediation does not exhaust the

  8. Early MEG markers for reading Chinese phonograms: evidence from radical combinability and consistency effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chun-Hsien; Lee, Chia-Ying; Tzeng, Ovid J-L

    2014-12-01

    Studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging have indicated that activities in the left inferior frontal cortex and left temporoparietal regions are associated with orthographic neighborhood size. To elucidate the temporal dynamics of reading-related cortical activities, we manipulated two types of neighborhood properties for Chinese phonograms, phonetic combinability and consistency. By using source analysis techniques in combination with magnetoencephalography, the results demonstrated a combinability effect in the right fusiform gyrus at ∼ 170 ms, which may reflect perceptual expertise in processing Chinese orthography. During 200 ms to 250 ms, the left anterior insula showed larger activity in reading small combinability characters than in reading large combinability characters, and the left inferior parietal cortex showed greater activity in reading low consistency characters than in reading high consistency characters. These results indicate that the left anterior insula cortex and left inferior parietal cortex may play important roles in the early stages of reading Chinese phonograms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Framing effects in reading: an fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Danelli

    2014-04-01

    Anatomofunctional results (Figure 1 showed that the left occipital, the anterior and posterior temporal regions, and the left intraparietal sulcus were specifically activated when reading targets in a lexical frame. The left posterior inferior temporal and inferior parietal regions were activated in sublexical condition. Finally, reading along the two routes commonly activated the Visual Word Form Area, the premotor cortex, the left frontal areas and the left SMA, suggesting an involvement of these regions in early-input (early orthographic processing and late-output processes (phonological output buffer and articulatory programming. Conclusions: These results represent a new fine-grained description of the neurofunctional correlates of the dual route model partially supporting the recent anatomical investigations in patients with specific forms of acquired dyslexia (Ripamonti, Aggujaro, Molteni, Zonca, Ghirardi, & Luzzatti, 2014.

  10. Reading, writing, rebelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doubinsky, Sebastien

    2017-01-01

    What is reading? What is writing? What connects the two? These questions have been the fertile ground for many literary and philosophical theories, from New Criticism to Deconstruction. This essay does not pretend answering to these two questions, but rather to question the question themselves...... and try to shed a different light of this essential problematic. Choosing not to consider literature as a stable concept, but rather as an ontologically impermanent one, I try to reflect upon the terms that condition our approach of works and of the creation of these works. In a large perspective......, the notions of “reading” and “writing” are examined through the prism of their incarnations as “works”, and the consequences of this identity have on our critical discourse. In order to read critically, one must thus recognize this immanent instability of our notions and definitions, and begin from...

  11. Overlapping neural circuitry for narrative comprehension and proficient reading in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz-Kraus, Tzipi; Vannest, Jennifer J; Holland, Scott K

    2013-11-01

    Narrative comprehension is a perinatal linguistic ability which is more intuitive than reading activity. Whether there are specific shared brain regions for narrative comprehension and reading that are tuned to reading proficiency, even before reading is acquired, is the question of the current study. We acquired fMRI data during a narrative comprehension task at two age points, when children are age 5-7 (K-2nd grade) and later when the same children were age 11 (5th-7th grade). We then examined correlations between this fMRI data and reading and reading comprehension scores from the same children at age 11. We found that greater frontal and supramarginal gyrus (BA 40) activation in narrative comprehension at the age of 5-7 years old was associated with better word reading and reading comprehension scores at the age of 11. A shift towards temporal and occipital activation was found when correlating their narrative comprehension functional data at age 11, with reading scores at the same age point. We suggest that increased reliance on executive functions and auditory-visual networks when listening to stories before reading is acquired, facilitates reading proficiency in older age and may be a biomarker for future reading ability. Children, who rely on use of imagination/visualization as well as auditory processing for narrative comprehension when they reach age 11, also show greater reading abilities. Understanding concordant neural pathways supporting auditory narrative and reading comprehension might be guide for development of effective tools for reading intervention programs. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Optimizing speed reading practice for reading fluency: How many Speed Reading exercises should you do per class?

    OpenAIRE

    Fuisting, Bjorn; Dalton, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Speed Reading has been demonstrated to be an important element in an L2 Reading course for improving reading fluency. However research has not been published on how many sessions of Speed Reading should be done in each class. Is one Speed Reading session enough, or do two per class produce dramatically better gains in reading speed? Does any differential gain remain after controlling for the quantity of Speed Reading text? Examining reading speed gains from two equivalent class samples, the f...

  13. Robots who read grammars

    OpenAIRE

    Macklin-Cordes, Jayden L.; Blackbourne, Nathaniel L.; Bott, Thomas J.; Cook, Jacqueline; Mark Ellison, T.; Hollis, Jordan; Kirlew, Edith E.; Richards, Genevieve C.; Zhao, Sanle; Round, Erich

    2017-01-01

    Robots who read grammarsJayden L. Macklin-Cordes, Nathaniel L. Blackbourne, Thomas J. Bott, Jacqueline Cook, T. Mark Ellison, Jordan Hollis, Edith E. Kirlew, Genevieve C. Richards, Sanle Zhao, Erich R. RoundPoster presented at CoEDL Fest 2017, Alexandra Park Conference Centre, Alexandra Headlands, QLD, Australia. Hosted by the University of Queensland. 6 February 2017.AbstractLinguistic typology has yet to undergo a computational revolution like that seen in other scientific endeavours. Never...

  14. Reading Heidegger after Derrida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Strawser

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This essay attempts to broach the complex difference between Martin Heidegger and Jacques Derrida, It focuses on the fundamental assumptions involved in the reading of Heidegger's Being and Time and Derrida's early "noted" attention to this text. Is Heidegger's early work essentially tainted by "the metaphysics of presence," as Derrida wishes to suggest? After sketching Derrida's interpretation, the author attempts to show how readers of Being and Time need not succumb to Derrida's criticism.

  15. ReadDB Provides Efficient Storage for Mapped Short Reads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gifford David K

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The advent of high-throughput sequencing has enabled sequencing based measurements of cellular function, with an individual measurement potentially consisting of more than 108 reads. While tools are available for aligning sets of reads to genomes and interpreting the results, fewer tools have been developed to address the storage and retrieval requirements of large collections of aligned datasets. We present ReadDB, a network accessible column store database system for aligned high-throughput read datasets. Results ReadDB stores collections of aligned read positions and provides a client interface to support visualization and analysis. ReadDB is implemented as a network server that responds to queries on genomic intervals in an experiment with either the set of contained reads or a histogram based interval summary. Tests on datasets ranging from 105 to 108 reads demonstrate that ReadDB performance is generally within a factor of two of local-storage based methods and often three to five times better than other network-based methods. Conclusions ReadDB is a high-performance foundation for ChIP-Seq and RNA-Seq analysis. The client-server model provides convenient access to compute cluster nodes or desktop visualization software without requiring a shared network filesystem or large amounts of local storage. The client code provides a simple interface for fast data access to visualization or analysis. ReadDB provides a new way to store genome-aligned reads for use in applications where read sequence and alignment mismatches are not needed.

  16. ReadDB provides efficient storage for mapped short reads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfe, P Alexander; Gifford, David K

    2011-07-07

    The advent of high-throughput sequencing has enabled sequencing based measurements of cellular function, with an individual measurement potentially consisting of more than 108 reads. While tools are available for aligning sets of reads to genomes and interpreting the results, fewer tools have been developed to address the storage and retrieval requirements of large collections of aligned datasets. We present ReadDB, a network accessible column store database system for aligned high-throughput read datasets. ReadDB stores collections of aligned read positions and provides a client interface to support visualization and analysis. ReadDB is implemented as a network server that responds to queries on genomic intervals in an experiment with either the set of contained reads or a histogram based interval summary. Tests on datasets ranging from 105 to 108 reads demonstrate that ReadDB performance is generally within a factor of two of local-storage based methods and often three to five times better than other network-based methods. ReadDB is a high-performance foundation for ChIP-Seq and RNA-Seq analysis. The client-server model provides convenient access to compute cluster nodes or desktop visualization software without requiring a shared network filesystem or large amounts of local storage. The client code provides a simple interface for fast data access to visualization or analysis. ReadDB provides a new way to store genome-aligned reads for use in applications where read sequence and alignment mismatches are not needed.

  17. Davies, Florence (1995. Introducing Reading. Davies, Florence (1995. Introducing Reading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Maria Gomes Ferreira

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Arising at a time of unprecedented growth of interest in fostering critical thinking, Introducing Reading offers a clear introduction and thorough account of contemporary developments in the field of reading. While overtly focusing on the special demands of social and human aspects of the reading practice, the issues raised have crucial resonance in the sphere of critical reading. Explicitly addressed to teachers of mother tongue and foreign language contexts, the book claims to elaborate on aspects of reading which have received meager attention to date: individual readers engaged in different real-world reading tasks, the social contexts where such readers engage and interact with texts, and the nature and variety of texts, here regarded as “participants” in the interaction between reader and writer. To this extent, the book successfully reaches the ambitious aim of “socializing and humanizing reading and the teaching of reading” (p. xi. Arising at a time of unprecedented growth of interest in fostering critical thinking, Introducing Reading offers a clear introduction and thorough account of contemporary developments in the field of reading. While overtly focusing on the special demands of social and human aspects of the reading practice, the issues raised have crucial resonance in the sphere of critical reading. Explicitly addressed to teachers of mother tongue and foreign language contexts, the book claims to elaborate on aspects of reading which have received meager attention to date: individual readers engaged in different real-world reading tasks, the social contexts where such readers engage and interact with texts, and the nature and variety of texts, here regarded as “participants” in the interaction between reader and writer. To this extent, the book successfully reaches the ambitious aim of “socializing and humanizing reading and the teaching of reading” (p. xi.

  18. Basic Concepts of Reading Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökhan ARI

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Reading act is performed by connected physiological, psychological and cognitive processes. The operations taking place in these processes are expected to continue for life by being developed with certain strategies. A lot of information is gained with reading skill in education life. Therefore, basic concepts that constitute reading education in teaching and improving reading are important for teachers. The aim of this study is to submit information compiled from the literature about reading education process and which basic concepts are used in reading education. While teaching reading from part to whole, from whole to part and interactional approaches are used. From part to whole approach is at the forefront. Then with interactional approach strategies, both code solving and making sense is improved. Teachers should know the characteristics of bouncing, stopping, turning back, and scanning movements of the eye both in code solving and making sense. The teacher should configure the teaching for the students to gain fluid reading elements by making use of reading out and reading silently. After reading act is acquired; good reader characteristics should be gained by improving asking questions, guessing, summarizing, interpretation skills in integrated readings. Reading skill is improved by studies on the text. Therefore, the students should come across texts that are suitable to their levels, textuality and readability criteria. The vocabulary of children should be improved in a planned way with text-based word and meaning studies. Fluid reading, making sense and interpretation skills of children should be pursued with different evaluation types. In the long term, work should be done to make reading a habit for them.

  19. Building a virtual reality temporal bone dissection simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppersmith, R B; Johnston, R; Moreau, D; Loftin, R B; Jenkins, H

    1997-01-01

    The temporal bone is one of seven bones that comprise the human skull, and has an intimate relationship with many vital structures. Anatomically, its three-dimensional relationships make it one of the most challenging areas for surgeons to understand and master. In addition, the temporal bone contains minute structures that are among the most sophisticated and delicate in the human body. These structures include the cochlea and vestibular organs, which are responsible for hearing and balance; the middle ear, including the ossicles, which conduct acoustic energy to the cochlea; and the facial nerve, which is responsible for controlling the muscles of facial expression, and contributes to the sensation of taste. Additionally, the temporal bone forms a major portion of the skull base, and has intimate relationships to vital structures including the carotid artery, jugular vein, cerebral cortex, brainstem, and cranial nerves. Surgical procedures performed on the temporal bone include: procedures to eradicate chronic and acute infections; procedures to remove malignant and benign tumors within the temporal bone, from the skull base, or from the posterior cranial fossa; procedures to restore the hearing mechanism; procedures to eliminate balance disorders; and procedures to correct congenital anomalies. For surgeons-in-training, and even surgeons-in-practice, mastery of the anatomy of the temporal bone and the many complex approaches necessary to treat patients takes years of focused endeavor. This is typically accomplished through the dissection of human cadaver temporal bones, which are scarce, and require a dedicated laboratory facility. Efforts are currently underway to develop a realistic simulator for temporal bone procedures. Users immersed in the simulator will interact with a three-dimensional temporal bone, derived from patient-specific data, using a haptic interface to simulate traditional surgical procedures. Feedback from experts in otologic surgery will be

  20. Understanding Arteries | Coronary Artery Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery If plaque continues to build up, the space inside the artery narrows. The artery walls become ... Plaque forms within the artery walls, narrowing the space inside and sometimes blocking blood flow. This process ...

  1. Multiresolution Approach for Noncontact Measurements of Arterial Pulse Using Thermal Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekmenev, Sergey Y.; Farag, Aly A.; Miller, William M.; Essock, Edward A.; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    This chapter presents a novel computer vision methodology for noncontact and nonintrusive measurements of arterial pulse. This is the only investigation that links the knowledge of human physiology and anatomy, advances in thermal infrared (IR) imaging and computer vision to produce noncontact and nonintrusive measurements of the arterial pulse in both time and frequency domains. The proposed approach has a physical and physiological basis and as such is of a fundamental nature. A thermal IR camera was used to capture the heat pattern from superficial arteries, and a blood vessel model was proposed to describe the pulsatile nature of the blood flow. A multiresolution wavelet-based signal analysis approach was applied to extract the arterial pulse waveform, which lends itself to various physiological measurements. We validated our results using a traditional contact vital signs monitor as a ground truth. Eight people of different age, race and gender have been tested in our study consistent with Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) regulations and internal review board approval. The resultant arterial pulse waveforms exactly matched the ground truth oximetry readings. The essence of our approach is the automatic detection of region of measurement (ROM) of the arterial pulse, from which the arterial pulse waveform is extracted. To the best of our knowledge, the correspondence between noncontact thermal IR imaging-based measurements of the arterial pulse in the time domain and traditional contact approaches has never been reported in the literature.

  2. Resistant spontaneous coronary artery spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Kudret; Şahin, Alparslan; Yıldız, Süleyman Sezai; Aksan, Gökhan

    2015-10-01

    Coronary artery spasm should always be suspected in patients who have myocardial infarction with normal coronary arteries. This case report presents a 33-year-old woman with anterior myocardial infarction, whose coronary angiograph revealed normal left anterior descending artery and new onset complete occlusion of the circumflex artery at the time of the procedure. Nitroglycerin up to 800 mcg was administered without success. In such resistant cases, when all efforts fail, including prompt recognition and application of vasodilator drugs, retracting the catheter and waiting may play a role.

  3. Multiple Giant Coronary Artery Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usuku, Hiroki; Kojima, Sunao; Kuyama, Naoto; Hanatani, Shinsuke; Araki, Satoshi; Tsujita, Kenichi; Tsunoda, Ryusuke; Fukui, Toshihiro; Hokimoto, Seiji

    2017-01-01

    A 74-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with chest pain and dyspnea associated with ST elevation in leads II, III and aVF. An echocardiogram showed an enlarged mass lesion measuring nearly 80 mm. Coronary angiography showed two giant coronary artery aneurysms (CAAs) in the right coronary artery (RCA). CAAs were also seen in the left main trunk and left anterior descending artery. Computed tomography showed the CAA in the RCA was ruptured into the right atrium. We therefore diagnosed this patient with multiple CAAs, myocardial infarction and coronary artery rupture. He underwent successful surgical excision and coronary bypass surgery. PMID:28768966

  4. Countercurrent aortography via radial artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Hyung Kuk; Lee, Young Chun; Lee, Seung Chul; Jeon, Seok Chol; Joo, Kyung Bin; Lee, Seung Ro; Kim, Soon Yong [College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-06-15

    Countercurrent aortography via radial artery was performed for detection of aortic arch anomalies in 4 infants with congenital heart disease. Author's cases of aortic arch anomalies were 3 cases of PDA, 1 case of coarctation of aorta, and 1 case of occlusion of anastomosis site on subclavian artery B-T shunt. And aberrant origin of the right SCA, interrupted aortic arch, hypoplastic aorta, anomalous origin of the right pulmonary artery from the ascending aorta can be demonstrated by this method. Countercurrent aortography affords an safe and simple method for detection of aortic arch anomalies without retrograde arterial catheterization, especially in small infants or premature babies.

  5. Developmental dyslexia: dysfunction of a left hemisphere reading network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio eRichlan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This mini-review summarizes and integrates findings from recent meta-analyses and original neuroimaging studies on functional brain abnormalities in dyslexic readers. Surprisingly, there is little empirical support for the standard neuroanatomical model of developmental dyslexia, which localizes the primary phonological decoding deficit in left temporo-parietal regions. Rather, recent evidence points to a dysfunction of a left hemisphere reading network, which includes occipito-temporal, inferior frontal, and inferior parietal regions.

  6. The Relationship of Print Reading in Tier I Instruction and Reading Achievement for Kindergarten Students at Risk of Reading Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanzek, Jeanne; Roberts, Greg; Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Kent, Shawn C.

    2014-01-01

    For many students at risk of reading difficulties, effective, early reading instruction can improve reading outcomes and set them on a positive reading trajectory. Thus, response-to-intervention models include a focus on a student's Tier I reading instruction as one element for preventing reading difficulties and identifying students with a…

  7. The Relationship between Reading Self-Efficacy Beliefs, Reading Strategy Use and Reading Comprehension Level of Iranian EFL Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseri, Mahdieh; Zaferanieh, Elaheh

    2012-01-01

    This co-relational study explored the relationship between reading self-efficacy beliefs, reading strategies use and reading comprehension level of Iranian EFL learners. In this study, Michigan reading comprehension test, a self-reported Reading Strategy Use Questionnaire, and a Reading Self-efficacy Questionnaire were administered to eighty…

  8. [Single umbilical artery (SUA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staribratova, D; Belovezhdov, V; Milchev, N; Batashki, I; Apiosjan, Zh

    2010-01-01

    Single umbilical artery (SUA) is the most common abnormality of the umbilical cord. It is associated with an increased incidence of atresia of hollow organs, renal abnormalities, limb reduction defects and spontaneous abortions. The aim of our study is to establish the association of SUA with types of malformations and the corresponding pathology of pregnancy and parturition. Although our investigation is in proof of the association of SUA with anomalies of GIT, CCS and CNS, most of our cases exhibit circulatory disturbances leading to pathology of pregnancy and delivery.

  9. Program Evaluation of the Direct Instruction Reading Interventions: Reading Mastery and Corrective Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Nita M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this program evaluation was to evaluate the Direct Instruction programs, Reading Mastery and Corrective Reading, from SRA McGraw-Hill Publishing Company, which were being used as a school-wide reading intervention. These programs were implemented at a small elementary school in the Piedmont area of North Carolina beginning in the…

  10. Miraculous Readings: Using Fantasy Novels about Reading to Reflect on Reading the Bible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Russell W.

    2009-01-01

    This article reflects on the vivid images of reading presented in several popular fantasy novels, including "The Spiderwick Chronicles," "The Great Good Thing," and "The Neverending Story." It suggests that these images can be used to help children, youth, and adults reflect on the nature of reading and the potential power of reading sacred texts.…

  11. Reading Fluency and Students with Reading Disabilities: How Fast Is Fast Enough to Promote Reading Comprehension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Rollanda E.

    2018-01-01

    The goal of improving reading rate and fluency is to positively impact reading comprehension; however, it is unclear how fast students with learning disabilities (LD) need to read to reap this benefit. The purpose of this research was to identify the point of diminishing return for students who were dysfluent readers. Participants included 337…

  12. Word Reading Efficiency, Text Reading Fluency, and Reading Comprehension among Chinese Learners of English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiangying; Sawaki, Yasuyo; Sabatini, John

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationship among word reading efficiency, text reading fluency, and reading comprehension for adult English as a Foreign Language (EFL) learners. Data from 185 adult Chinese EFL learners preparing to take the Test-of-English-as-a-Foreign-Language[TM] (TOEFL[R]) were analyzed in this study. The participants completed a…

  13. Book Clubs in Developmental Reading: Building Reading Comprehension, Fostering Reading Enjoyment, and Engaging Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Michele

    2012-01-01

    The use of book clubs in college developmental reading classes is an effective way to encourage reluctant readers to build and strengthen reading skills, foster reading enjoyment, and engage students. In addition, book clubs build a sense of community within the classroom as the students converse and share their interpretations of the reading…

  14. Reading to Learn or Learning to Read? Engaging College Students in Course Readings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Mary Margaret; Frese, Kristen M.

    2017-01-01

    Despite instructors' belief that class readings are integral to the learning process, only 20-30% of undergraduate students complete required readings. Failure to complete course reading has been associated with declines in exam and research performance. This article first offers a brief review of the literature on why students do not complete…

  15. The Effects of Extensive Reading on Reading Comprehension, Reading Rate, and Vocabulary Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suk, Namhee

    2017-01-01

    Several empirical studies and syntheses of extensive reading have concluded that extensive reading has positive impacts on language learning in second- and foreign-language settings. However, many of the studies contained methodological or curricular limitations, raising questions about the asserted positive effects of extensive reading. The…

  16. Does IQ affect the functional brain network involved in pseudoword reading in students with reading disability? A magnetoencephalography study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis G Simos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study examined whether individual differences in performance and verbal IQ affect the profiles of reading-related regional brain activation in 127 students experiencing reading difficulties and typical readers. Using magnetoencephalography in a pseudoword read-aloud task, we compared brain activation profiles of students experiencing word-level reading difficulties who did (n=29 or did not (n=36 meet the IQ-reading achievement discrepancy criterion. Typical readers assigned to a lower-IQ (n=18 or a higher IQ (n=44 subgroup served as controls. Minimum norm estimates of regional cortical activity revealed that the degree of hypoactivation in the left superior temporal and supramarginal gyri in both RD subgroups was not affected by IQ. Moreover, IQ did not moderate the positive association between degree of activation in the left fusiform gyrus and phonological decoding ability. We did find, however, that the hypoactivation of the left pars opercularis in RD was restricted to lower-IQ participants. In accordance with previous morphometric and fMRI studies, degree of activity in inferior frontal and inferior parietal regions correlated with IQ across reading ability subgroups. Results are consistent with current views questioning the relevance of IQ measures and IQ-discrepancy criteria in the diagnosis of dyslexia.

  17. Neurally-dissociable cognitive components of reading deficits in subacute stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga eBoukrina

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available According to cognitive models of reading, words are processed by interacting orthographic (spelling, phonological (sound and semantic (meaning information. Despite extensive study of the neural basis of reading in healthy participants, little group data exist on patients with reading deficits from focal brain damage pointing to critical neural systems for reading. Here we report on one such study. We have performed neuropsychological testing and MRI on 11 patients with left-hemisphere stroke (<= 5 weeks post stroke. Patients completed tasks assessing cognitive components of reading such as semantics (matching picture or word choices to a target based on meaning, phonology (matching word choices to a target based on rhyming, and orthography (a two-alternative forced choice of the most plausible nonword. They also read aloud pseudowords and words with high or low levels of usage frequency, imageability, and spelling-sound consistency. As predicted by the cognitive model, when averaged across patients, the influence of semantics was most salient for low-frequency, low-consistency words, when phonological decoding is especially difficult. Qualitative subtraction analyses revealed lesion sites specific to phonological processing. These areas were consistent with those shown previously to activate for phonology in healthy participants, including supramarginal, posterior superior temporal, middle temporal, inferior frontal gyri, and underlying white matter. Notable divergence between this analysis and previous functional imaging is the association of lesions in the mid-fusiform gyrus and anterior temporal lobe with phonological reading deficits. This study represents progress toward identifying brain lesion-deficit relationships in the cognitive components of reading. Such correspondences are expected to help not only better understand the neural mechanisms of reading, but may also help tailor reading therapy to individual neurocognitive deficit

  18. Intraoperative Eptifibatide Administration During Urgent Arterial Bypass in Neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambolija, Vasilije; Mrak, Goran; Lozic, Marin; Ljevak, Josip; Miklic Bublic, Martina; Scap, Miroslav

    2017-07-01

    In some cases when risk of occlusion of a blood vessel is greater than risk of bleeding when patients undergo urgent or unplanned bypass during neurosurgery, the use of eptifibatide may be an option. We describe 2 patients who underwent arterial bypass in whom eptifibatide was used successfully intraoperatively during neurosurgery for prevention of bypass occlusion. The first patient presented with a right middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysm with subocclusive stenosis of the M1 branch. After right-sided osteoplastic frontotemporal craniotomy, the MCA bifurcation was exposed with a bifurcational 6-mm aneurysm with a wide neck. Prebifurcation stenosis was found, with yellow calcification of the vessel wall, and postbifurcation calcification was found on the upper M2 branch. Superficial temporal artery-MCA bypass and occlusion of the MCA aneurysm was done. Before the bypass, continuous intravenous infusion of eptifibatide 1 μg/kg/minute was administered. The patient recovered normally without hemorrhage or neurologic deficit. The second patient presented with a left-sided lateral sphenoid wing meningioma. Left-sided frontotemporal craniotomy was performed, and the tumor was completely removed from the arachnoid layer. The temporal M3 branch was invaded by the meningioma. As there was no flow through the invaded segment of the aforementioned artery, termino-terminal M3 arterial anastomosis was done. Continuous intravenous infusion of eptifibatide 1 μg/kg/minute was administered. Indocyanine green angiography showed normal flow through the anastomosis, and the patient recovered normally. Future studies are needed to test the safety and potential efficacy of eptifibatide in intraoperative settings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The Benefits of Graded Reading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Albay

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Doing large amounts of extensive reading at suitable levels of understanding is a productive tool to increase reading rate, vocabulary, motivation, attitude and general language proficiency. The amount of vocabulary and grammar learners has determines their language proficiency. Extensive reading enables learners to attain competencies in language skills. Graded readers are essential materials for doing extensive reading. They are particularly designed to enable learners practice reading skills and provide an opportunity to reinforce known vocabulary. Through multiple exposures learners become familiar with grammatical structures and vocabulary. Moreover, learners experience how they function in texts and they are motivated to use the vocabulary and structures they have learnt in their communication. Graded readers motivate learners, help them gain reading fluency, enhance their vocabulary and grammar knowledge development. This article defines extensive reading, emphasizes its contributions to language proficiency development and finally stresses out the role of grader readers in language learning.

  20. Anomalous left the pulmonary dilemma coronary artery artery from a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a continuous murmur associated with angina-like attacks in older patients. Autopsy on these patients reveals a grossly dilated left coronary artery with viable anastomoses between the two coro- nary arteries. Finalll' sudden death is reported in 30% of adults with this anomaly.4, ,10 Characteristically, autopsy shows a large.

  1. Arterial occlusion to treat basilar artery dissecting aneurysm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cui, Qing Ke; Liu, Wei Dong; Liu, Peng; Li, Xue Yuan; Zhang, Lian Qun; Ma, Long Jia; Ren, Yun Fei; Wu, Ya Ping; Wang, Zhi Gang

    2015-01-01

    Object: To explore the clinical feasibility of employing occlusion to treat basilar artery dissecting aneurysm. Methods: One patient, male and 46 years old, suffered transient numbness and weakness on the right limbs. Cerebral angiography indicated basilar artery dissecting aneurysm. The patient

  2. Anomalous left the pulmonary dilemma coronary artery artery from a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ; 8: 787-80I. 6. Wilson CL, Dlabal PW, Holeyfield RW, Akins CW, Knauf DG. Anomalous origin of left coronary artery from pulmonary artery: case report and review of. lileralUre concerning teenagers and adults.J Thorac Cardicn'asc SlIrg 1977; ...

  3. Association between internal carotid artery dissection and arterial tortuosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saba, Luca; Piga, Mario [Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria (A.O.U.), Department of Radiology, Monserrato, Cagliari (Italy); Argiolas, Giovanni Maria; Siotto, Paolo [Azienda Ospedaliero Brotzu (A.O.B.), Department of Radiology, di Cagliari (Italy); Sumer, Suna; Wintermark, Max [Neuroradiology Division, Neuroradiology, UVA Department of Radiology, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Raz, Eytan [New York University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Sapienza University of Rome, Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Rome (Italy); Sanfilippo, Roberto; Montisci, Roberto [Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria (A.O.U.), Department of Vascular Surgery, di Cagliari (Italy)

    2014-10-18

    Carotid artery dissection is an important cause of ischemic stroke in all age groups, particularly in young patients. The purpose of this work was to assess whether there is an association between the presence of an internal carotid artery dissection (ICAD) and the arterial tortuosity. This study considered 124 patients (72 males and 52 females; median age 57 years) with CT/MR diagnosis of ICAD of the internal carotid artery were considered in this multi-centric retrospective study. The arterial tortuosity was evaluated and, when present, was categorized as elongation, kinking, or coiling. For each patient, both the right and left sides were considered for a total number of 248 arteries in order to have the same number of cases and controls. Fisher's exact test was applied to test the association between elongation, kinking, coiling, dissection, and the side affected by CAD. Fisher's exact test showed a statistically significant association between the ICAD and kinking (p = 0.0089) and coiling (p = 0.0251) whereas no statistically significant difference was found with arterial vessel elongation (p = 0.444). ICAD was more often seen on the left side compared to the right (p = 0.0001). These results were confirmed using both carotid arteries of the same patient as dependent parameter with p = 0.0012, 0.0129, and 0.3323 for kinking, coiling, and elongation, respectively. The presence of kinking and coiling is associated with ICAD. (orig.)

  4. Simultaneous comparison of thoracic bioimpedance and arterial pulse waveform-derived cardiac output with thermodilution measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschl, M M; Kittler, H; Woisetschläger, C; Siostrzonek, P; Staudinger, T; Kofler, J; Oschatz, E; Bur, A; Gwechenberger, M; Laggner, A N

    2000-06-01

    To compare the accuracy and reliability of thoracic electrical bioimpedance (TEB) and the arterial pulse waveform analysis with simultaneous measurement of thermodilution cardiac output (TD-CO) in critically ill patients. Prospective data collection. Emergency department and critical care unit in a 2,000-bed inner-city hospital. A total of 29 critically ill patients requiring invasive hemodynamic monitoring for clinical management were prospectively studied. Noninvasive cardiac output was simultaneously measured by a TEB device and by analysis of the arterial pulse waveform derived from the finger artery. Invasive cardiac output was determined by the thermodilution technique. A total of 175 corresponding TD-CO and noninvasive hemodynamic measurements were collected in 30-min intervals. They revealed an overall bias of 0.34 L/min/m2 (95% confidence interval, 0.24-0.44 L/min/m2; p 0.50 L/min/m2. The discrepancies of the arterial pulse waveform analysis correlated positively with the magnitude of the cardiac index (r2 = 0.29; p 0.50 L/min/m2. The magnitude of the discrepancies of the TEB was significantly correlated with age (r2 = 0.17; p = .02). Measurements were in phase in 93.2% of all arterial pulse waveform analysis and in 84.9% of all TEB readings (p < .001). The arterial pulse waveform analysis exhibits a greater accuracy and reliability as compared with the TEB with regard to overall bias, number of inaccurate readings, and phase lags. The arterial pulse waveform analysis may be useful for the monitoring of hemodynamic changes. However, both methods fail to be a substitute for the TD-CO because of a substantial percentage of inaccurate readings.

  5. Classification of temporal bone pneumatization based on sigmoid sinus using computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, S.-J. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, National Health Insurance Corporation Ilsan Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, M.H. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Kang-nam Gu, Do-gok Dong, 146-92, Seoul, Republic of Korea 135-720 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J. [Department of Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, W.-S. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Kang-nam Gu, Do-gok Dong, 146-92, Seoul, Republic of Korea 135-720 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, H.-K. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Kang-nam Gu, Do-gok Dong, 146-92, Seoul, Republic of Korea 135-720 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: hoki@yuhs.ac

    2007-11-15

    Aim: To analyse several reference structures using axial computed tomography (CT) imaging of the temporal bone, which may reflect pneumatization of the entire temporal bone by statistical correlation to the actual volume of the temporal bone measured using three-dimensional reconstruction. Materials and methods: One hundred and sixteen temporal bones were studied, comprising 48 with normal findings and 68 sides showing chronic otitis media or temporal bone fracture. After measuring the volume of temporal bone air cells by the volume rendering technique using three-dimensional reconstruction images, classification of temporal bone pneumatization was performed using various reference structures on axial images to determine whether significant differences in the volume of temporal bone air cells could be found between the groups. Results: When the sigmoid sinus at the level of the malleoincudal complex was used in the classification, there were statistically significant differences between the groups that correlated with the entire volume of the temporal bone. Grouping based on the labyrinth and the ascending carotid artery showed insignificant differences in volume. Furthermore, there was no significant correlation between the cross-sectional area of the antrum and the entire volume of the temporal bone. Conclusion: The degree of pneumatization of temporal bone can be estimated easily by the evaluation of the air cells around the sigmoid sinus on axial CT images.

  6. Underlying skills of oral and silent reading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Den Boer, Madelon; van Bergen, Elsje; de Jong, Peter F.

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have examined reading and reading development. The majority of these studies, however, focused on oral reading rather than on the more dominant silent reading mode. Similarly, it is common practice to assess oral reading abilities rather than silent reading abilities in schools and in

  7. The Nature of Children's Motivations for Reading, and Their Relations to Reading Frequency and Reading Performance. Reading Research Report No. 63.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigfield, Allan; And Others

    A study assessed dimensions of children's reading motivations by giving them a revised version of the Motivations for Reading Questionnaire (MRQ). The MRQ is designed to assess 11 possible dimensions of reading motivations, including reading efficacy, several intrinsic and several extrinsic reading motivations, social aspects of reading, and the…

  8. Reading Abilities and Strategies: A Short Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng

    2010-01-01

    This paper gives a short analysis of reading abilities and reading strategies. Much research has been done to investigate the nature of reading, though it's had to exactly define reading abilities and strategies. Different kinds of readings are discussed in this paper and distinctions are made between first language reading and second or foreign…

  9. On the Practice Teaching of English Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yonghong

    2009-01-01

    The main task of practice teaching of English Reading is to train students' independent reading ability and good reading habits. Extra-curricular reading of English literature and English newspapers and magazines plays an active role in improving English reading ability. The principle of selecting reading materials, the scope of selection and the…

  10. Why Reading Fluency Should Be Hot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasinski, Timothy V.

    2012-01-01

    This article explores problems that have surfaced in the teaching of reading fluency and how teachers and reading coaches can resolve those problems. Specific issues addressed include reading fluency being defined as reading fast and instruction that is focused on having students read fast, reading fluency viewed as solely and oral reading…

  11. Impact of childhood epilepsy on reading and phonological processing abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanasse, C M; Béland, R; Carmant, L; Lassonde, M

    2005-09-01

    Although children with epilepsy tend to exhibit more reading difficulties than their classmates, no systematic studies have investigated the relationship between these difficulties and epilepsy. As functional neuroimaging studies have implicated both temporal and frontal lobes in the phonological aspect of reading [K.R. Pugh, B.A. Shaywitz, S.E. Shaywitz, et al. Brain 1996;119:1221-38], seizure activity originating in either region could interfere with phonological processing, whereas generalized seizures would not disturb this function as much. To explore this hypothesis, we compared the metaphonological skills of school-aged children with either temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE), or generalized absence seizures (ABS) with those of healthy controls. While the reading ability of all epileptic children was close to 2 years behind expectations, children with TLE did not differ from the controls on phonological tasks. In contrast, children with FLE exhibited significant deficits, whereas children with ABS showed difficulties restricted to phonemic segmentation. The results suggest that FLE and, to a lesser extent, generalized seizures may interfere with phonological processing, whereas TLE may affect other aspects of reading.

  12. ADHD and temporality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mikka

    According to the official diagnostic manual, ADHD is defined by symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity and patterns of behaviour are characterized as failure to pay attention to details, excessive talking, fidgeting, or inability to remain seated in appropriate situations (DSM-5......). In this paper, however, I will ask if we can understand what we call ADHD in a different way than through the symptom descriptions and will advocate for a complementary, phenomenological understanding of ADHD as a certain being in the world – more specifically as a matter of a phenomenological difference...... in temporal experience and/or rhythm. Inspired by both psychiatry’s experiments with people diagnosed with ADHD and their assessment of time and phenomenological perspectives on mental disorders and temporal disorientation I explore the experience of ADHD as a disruption in the phenomenological experience...

  13. Temporal lobe epilepsy semiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Robert D G

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy represents a multifaceted group of disorders divided into two broad categories, partial and generalized, based on the seizure onset zone. The identification of the neuroanatomic site of seizure onset depends on delineation of seizure semiology by a careful history together with video-EEG, and a variety of neuroimaging technologies such as MRI, fMRI, FDG-PET, MEG, or invasive intracranial EEG recording. Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the commonest form of focal epilepsy and represents almost 2/3 of cases of intractable epilepsy managed surgically. A history of febrile seizures (especially complex febrile seizures) is common in TLE and is frequently associated with mesial temporal sclerosis (the commonest form of TLE). Seizure auras occur in many TLE patients and often exhibit features that are relatively specific for TLE but few are of lateralizing value. Automatisms, however, often have lateralizing significance. Careful study of seizure semiology remains invaluable in addressing the search for the seizure onset zone.

  14. Carotid artery stenosis -- self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000717.htm Carotid artery stenosis - self-care To use the sharing features on ... feel their pulse under your jawline. Carotid artery stenosis occurs when the carotid arteries become narrowed or ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Pulmonary arterial hypertension Pulmonary arterial hypertension Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a progressive disorder characterized by abnormally high ...

  16. Why should I read? - A cross-cultural investigation into adolescents' reading socialisation and reading attitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeder, Peter; Stokmans, Mia

    2013-06-01

    While reading behaviour of adolescents is a frequent object of research, most studies in this field are restricted to a single country. This study investigates reading as a leisure-time activity across social groups from three regions differing in reading tradition as well as in the facilities available for reading. The authors analyse the reading behaviour of a total of 2,173 adolescents in the Netherlands, in Beijing (China), and in Cape Town (South Africa). Taking Icek Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behaviour as a starting point, the authors adjusted it to model the three most important determinants of reading behaviour, namely (1) reading attitude; (2) subjective norms (implicit and explicit social pressure to read); and (3) perceived behavioural control, which includes reading proficiency and appropriateness of the available books (book supply). While they found the adjusted model to fit the Dutch and Beijing situation quite well, it appeared to be inappropriate for the Cape Town situation. Despite considerable cultural and situational differences between the Netherlands and Beijing, the results show a similar pattern for these two environments. The most important determinants turn out to be: the hedonic reading attitude, the implicit norm of family and friends, the attractiveness of the available choice of books, and the perceived reading proficiency.

  17. Improving Reading Skills in Students with Dyslexia: The Efficacy of a Rhythmic Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro eAntonietti

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The core deficit underlying developmental dyslexia (DD has been identified in difficulties in dynamic and rapidly changing auditory information processing, which contribute to the development of impaired phonological representations for words. It has been argued that enhancing basic musical rhythm perception skills in children with DD may have a positive effect on reading abilities because music and language share common mechanisms and thus transfer effects from the former to the latter are expected to occur. A computer-assisted training, called Rhythmic Reading Training (RRT, was designed in which reading exercises are combined with rhythm background. Fourteen junior high school students with DD took part to 9 biweekly individual sessions of 30 minutes in which RRT was implemented. Reading improvements after the intervention period were compared with ones of a matched control group of 14 students with DD who received no intervention. Results indicated that RRT had a positive effect on both reading speed and accuracy, and significant effects were found on short pseudo-words reading speed, long pseudo-words reading speed, high frequency long words reading accuracy, and text reading accuracy. No difference in rhythm perception between the intervention and control group were found. Findings suggest that rhythm facilitates the development of reading skill because of the temporal structure it imposes to word decoding.

  18. Improving reading skills in students with dyslexia: the efficacy of a sublexical training with rhythmic background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonacina, Silvia; Cancer, Alice; Lanzi, Pier Luca; Lorusso, Maria Luisa; Antonietti, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The core deficit underlying developmental dyslexia (DD) has been identified in difficulties in dynamic and rapidly changing auditory information processing, which contribute to the development of impaired phonological representations for words. It has been argued that enhancing basic musical rhythm perception skills in children with DD may have a positive effect on reading abilities because music and language share common mechanisms and thus transfer effects from the former to the latter are expected to occur. A computer-assisted training, called Rhythmic Reading Training (RRT), was designed in which reading exercises are combined with rhythm background. Fourteen junior high school students with DD took part to 9 biweekly individual sessions of 30 min in which RRT was implemented. Reading improvements after the intervention period were compared with ones of a matched control group of 14 students with DD who received no intervention. Results indicated that RRT had a positive effect on both reading speed and accuracy and significant effects were found on short pseudo-words reading speed, long pseudo-words reading speed, high frequency long words reading accuracy, and text reading accuracy. No difference in rhythm perception between the intervention and control group were found. Findings suggest that rhythm facilitates the development of reading skill because of the temporal structure it imposes to word decoding.

  19. Functional MRI in medulloblastoma survivors supports prophylactic reading intervention during tumor treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Ping; Conklin, Heather M; Scoggins, Matthew A; Li, Yimei; Li, Xingyu; Jones, Melissa M; Palmer, Shawna L; Gajjar, Amar; Ogg, Robert J

    2016-03-01

    Development of reading skills is vulnerable to disruption in children treated for brain tumors. Interventions, remedial and prophylactic, are needed to mitigate reading and other learning difficulties faced by survivors. A functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study was conducted to investigate long-term effects of a prophylactic reading intervention administered during radiation therapy in children treated for medulloblastoma. The fMRI study included 19 reading-intervention (age 11.7 ± 0.6 years) and 21 standard-of-care (age 12.1 ± 0.6 years) medulloblastoma survivors, and 21 typically developing children (age 12.3 ± 0.6 years). The survivors were 2.5 [1.2, 5.4] years after completion of tumor therapies and reading-intervention survivors were 2.9 [1.6, 5.9] years after intervention. Five fMRI tasks (Rapid Automatized Naming, Continuous Performance Test using faces and letters, orthographic and phonological processing of letter pairs, implicit word reading, and story reading) were used to probe reading-related neural activation. Woodcock-Johnson Reading Fluency, Word Attack, and Sound Awareness subtests were used to evaluate reading abilities. At the time of fMRI, Sound Awareness scores were significantly higher in the reading-intervention group than in the standard-of-care group (p = 0.046). Brain activation during the fMRI tasks was detected in left inferior frontal, temporal, ventral occipitotemporal, and subcortical regions, and differed among the groups (p reading-intervention group. Standardized reading scores and patterns of brain activation provide evidence of long-term effects of prophylactic reading intervention in children treated for medulloblastoma.

  20. Capsaicin and arterial hypertensive crisis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Patanè, Salvatore; Marte, Filippo; La Rosa, Felice Carmelo; La Rocca, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    ...] . A case has also been reported of an arterial hypertensive crisis in a patient with a large ingestion of peppers and chili peppers the day before [5] . We present a case of an arterial hypertensive crisis in a 19-year-old Italian man with an abundant ingestion of peppers and chili peppers the preceding day. On August 4, 2008, a 19-year-...