WorldWideScience

Sample records for templated protein assembly

  1. Triggered Templated Assembly of Protein Polymersomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, F.; Wolf, de F.A.; Marcelis, A.T.M.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; Stuart, M.A.C.; Leermakers, F.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Trigger the block: Stable biocompatible protein polymersomes can be generated by a triggered templated self-assembly route (see picture). Pluronic L121 vesicles (red core with blue corona) take up a biosynthetic triblock copolymer CSXSXC into their unilamellar shell. In response to changes in pH

  2. DNA origami as a nanoscale template for protein assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzyk, Anton; Laitinen, Kimmo T [Nanoscience Center, Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, PO Box 35, FIN-40014 (Finland); Toermae, Paeivi [Department of Applied Physics, Helsinki University of Technology, PO Box 5100, FIN-02015 (Finland)], E-mail: paivi.torma@hut.fi

    2009-06-10

    We describe two general approaches to the utilization of DNA origami structures for the assembly of materials. In one approach, DNA origami is used as a prefabricated template for subsequent assembly of materials. In the other, materials are assembled simultaneously with the DNA origami, i.e. the DNA origami technique is used to drive the assembly of materials. Fabrication of complex protein structures is demonstrated by these two approaches. The latter approach has the potential to be extended to the assembly of multiple materials with single attachment chemistry.

  3. A Robust and Engineerable Self-Assembling Protein Template for the Synthesis and Patterning of Ordered Nanoparticle Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, R. Andrew; Howard, Jeanie; Zaluzec, Nestor J.; Kagawa, Hiromi K.; Li, Yi-Fen; Paavola, Chad D.; Trent, Jonathan D.

    2004-01-01

    Self-assembling biomolecules that form highly ordered structures have attracted interest as potential alternatives to conventional lithographic processes for patterning materials. Here we introduce a general technique for patterning materials on the nanoscale using genetically modified protein cage structures called chaperonins that self-assemble into crystalline templates. Constrained chemical synthesis of transition metal nanoparticles is specific to templates genetically functionalized with poly-Histidine sequences. These arrays of materials are ordered by the nanoscale structure of the crystallized protein. This system may be easily adapted to pattern a variety of materials given the rapidly growing list of peptide sequences selected by screening for specificity for inorganic materials.

  4. Encapsulation of DNA-templated chromophore assemblies within virus protein nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de la Escosura, Andres; Janssen, Pim G.A.; Schenning, Albertus P.H.J.; Cornelissen, Jeroen Johannes Lambertus Maria; Nolte, Roeland J.M.

    2010-01-01

    A beneficial virus: The hierarchical self-assembly of a three-component system consisting of single-stranded DNA (oligothymines; Tq), chromophores (G), and virus coat proteins (CP) leads to the formation of micrometer-long nanotubes (see picture). Tuning the interaction between the three components

  5. Templated self-assembly of quantum dots from aqueous solution using protein scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, Amy Szuchmacher [Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Soto, Carissa M [Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Wilson, Charmaine D [Geo-Centers, Incorporated, Newton, MA 02459 (United States); Whitley, Jessica L [Geo-Centers, Incorporated, Newton, MA 02459 (United States); Moore, Martin H [Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Sapsford, Kim E [George Mason University, 10910 University Boulevard, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States); Lin, Tianwei [Department of Molecular Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Chatterji, Anju [Department of Molecular Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Johnson, John E [Department of Molecular Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Ratna, Banahalli R [Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2006-10-28

    Short, histidine-containing peptides can be conjugated to lysine-containing protein scaffolds to controllably attach quantum dots (QDs) to the scaffold, allowing for generic attachment of quantum dots to any protein without the use of specially engineered domains. This technique was used to bind quantum dots from aqueous solution to both chicken IgG and cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV), a 30 nm viral particle. These quantum dot-protein assemblies were studied in detail. The IgG-QD complexes were shown to retain binding specificity to their antigen after modification. The CPMV-QD complexes have a local concentration of quantum dots greater than 3000 nmol ml{sup -1}, and show a 15% increase in fluorescence quantum yield over free quantum dots in solution.

  6. Templating Biomineralization: Surface Directed Protein Self-assembly and External Magnetic Field Stimulation of Osteoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, Xiaolan

    Biomineralization is a wide-spread phenomenon in the biological systems, which is the process of mineral formation by organisms through interaction between its organic contents and the inorganic minerals. The process is essential in a broad spectrum of biological phenomena ranging from bone and tooth formation to pathological mineralization under hypoxic conditions or cancerous formations. In this thesis I studied biomineralization at the earliest stages in order to obtain a better understanding of the fundamental principals involved. This knowledge is essential if we want to engineer devices which will increase bone regeneration or prevent unwanted mineral deposits. Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins play an essential role during biomineralization in bone and engineered tissues. In this dissertation, I present an approach to mimic the ECM in vitro to probe the interactions of these proteins with calcium phosphate mineral and with each other. Early stage of mineralization is investigated by mechanical properties of the protein fibers using Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) and Shear Modulation Force Microscopy (SMFM). The development of mineral crystals on the protein matrices is also characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Grazing Incidence X-ray Diffraction (GIXRD). The results demonstrate complementary actions of the two ECM proteins to collect cations and template calcium phosphate mineral, respectively. Magnets have been clinically used as an "induction source" in various bone or orthodontic treatments. However, the mechanism and effects of magnetic fields remain unclear. In this dissertation, I also undertake the present investigation to study the effects of 150 mT static magnetic fields (SMF) on ECM development and cell biomineralization using MC3T3-E1 osteobalst-like cells. Early stage of biomineralization is characterized by SPM, SMFM and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CSLM). Late stage of

  7. Large-Area Protein Patterns Generated by Ordered Binary Colloidal Assemblies as Templates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Gurvinder; Gohri, Vipul; Pillai, Saju

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of binary colloidal assemblies as lithographic masks to generate tunable Au patterns on SiO(2) substrates with dimensions ranging from micrometers to nanometers. Such patterns can be modified with different chemistries to create patterns with well-defined sites for selectiv...

  8. Si-doping bone composite based on protein template-mediated assembly for enhancing bone regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qin; Du, Yingying; Wang, Yifan; Wang, Zhiying; Ma, Jun; Wang, Jianglin; Zhang, Shengmin

    2017-06-01

    Bio-inspired hybrid materials that contain organic and inorganic networks interpenetration at the molecular level have been a particular focus of interest on designing novel nanoscale composites. Here we firstly synthesized a series of hybrid bone composites, silicon-hydroxyapatites/silk fibroin/collagen, based on a specific molecular assembled strategy. Results of material characterization confirmed that silicate had been successfully doped into nano-hydroxyapatite lattice. In vitro evaluation at the cellular level clearly showed that these Si-doped composites were capable of promoting the adhesion and proliferation of rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs), extremely enhancing osteoblastic differentiation of rMSCs compared with silicon-free composite. More interestingly, we found there was a critical point of silicon content in the composition on regulating multiple cell behaviors. In vivo animal evaluation further demonstrated that Si-doped composites enabled to significantly improve the repair of cranial bone defect. Consequently, our current work not only suggests fabricating a potential bone repair materials by integrating element-doping and molecular assembled strategy in one system, but also paves a new way for constructing multi-functional composite materials in the future.

  9. Template Assembly for Detailed Urban Reconstruction

    KAUST Repository

    Nan, Liangliang

    2015-05-04

    We propose a new framework to reconstruct building details by automatically assembling 3D templates on coarse textured building models. In a preprocessing step, we generate an initial coarse model to approximate a point cloud computed using Structure from Motion and Multi View Stereo, and we model a set of 3D templates of facade details. Next, we optimize the initial coarse model to enforce consistency between geometry and appearance (texture images). Then, building details are reconstructed by assembling templates on the textured faces of the coarse model. The 3D templates are automatically chosen and located by our optimization-based template assembly algorithm that balances image matching and structural regularity. In the results, we demonstrate how our framework can enrich the details of coarse models using various data sets.

  10. Virus Assemblies as Templates for Nanocircuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James N Culver; Michael T Harris

    2011-08-31

    The goals of this project were directed at the identification and characterization of bio-mineralization processes and patterning methods for the development of nano scale materials and structures with novel energy and conductive traits. This project utilized a simple plant virus as a model template to investigate methods to attach and coat metals and other inorganic compounds onto biologically based nanotemplates. Accomplishments include: the development of robust biological nanotemplates with enhanced inorganic coating activities; novel coating strategies that allow for the deposition of a continuous inorganic layer onto a bio-nanotemplate even in the absence of a reducing agent; three-dimensional patterning methods for the assemble of nano-featured high aspect ratio surfaces and the demonstrated use of these surfaces in enhancing battery and energy storage applications. Combined results from this project have significantly advanced our understanding and ability to utilize the unique self-assembly properties of biologically based molecules to produce novel materials at the nanoscale level.

  11. Biomimetic self-assembly of apatite hybrid materials: from a single molecular template to bi-/multi-molecular templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Wang, Jianglin; Ai, Xin; Zhang, Shengmin

    2014-01-01

    The self-assembly of apatite and proteins is a critical process to induce the formation of the bones and teeth in vertebrates. Although hierarchical structures and biomineralization mechanisms of the mineralized tissues have been intensively studied, most researches focus on the self-assembly biomimetic route using one single-molecular template, while the natural bone is an outcome of a multi-molecular template co-assembly process. Inspired by such a mechanism in nature, a novel strategy based on multi-molecular template co-assembly for fabricating bone-like hybrid materials was firstly proposed by the authors. In this review article we have summarized the new trends from single-molecular template to bi-/multi-molecular template systems in biomimetic fabrication of apatite hybrid materials. So far, many novel apatite hybrid materials with controlled morphologies and hierarchical structures have been successfully achieved using bi-/multi-molecular template strategy, and are found to have multiple common features in comparison with natural mineralized tissues. The carboxyl, carbonyl and amino groups of the template molecules are identified to initiate the nucleation of calcium phosphate during the assembling process. For bi-/multi-molecular templates, the incorporation of multiple promotion sites for calcium and phosphate ions precisely enables to regulate the apatite nucleation from the early stage. The roles of acidic molecules and the synergetic effects of protein templates have been significantly recognized in recent studies. In addition, a specific attention is paid to self-assembling of apatite nanoparticles into ordered structures on tissue regenerative scaffolds due to their promising clinical applications ranging from implant grafts, coatings to drug and gene delivery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Strongly Coupled Plasmonic Modes on Macroscopic Areas via Template-Assisted Colloidal Self-Assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Hanske, Christoph; Tebbe, Moritz; Kuttner, Christian; Bieber, Vera; Tsukruk, Vladimir V.; Chanana, Munish; K?nig, Tobias A. F.; Fery, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    We present ensembles of surface-ordered nanoparticle arrangements, which are formed by template-assisted self-assembly of monodisperse, protein-coated gold nanoparticles in wrinkle templates. Centimeter-squared areas of highly regular, linear assemblies with tunable line width are fabricated and their extinction cross sections can be characterized by conventional UV/vis/NIR spectroscopy. Modeling based on electrodynamic simulations shows a clear signature of strong plasmonic coupling with an ...

  13. Directed self-assembly graphoepitaxy template generation with immersion lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuansheng; Lei, Junjiang; Andres Torres, J.; Hong, Le; Word, James; Fenger, Germain; Tritchkov, Alexander; Lippincott, George; Gupta, Rachit; Lafferty, Neal; He, Yuan; Bekaert, Joost; Vanderberghe, Geert

    2015-07-01

    We present an optimization methodology for the template designs of subresolution contacts using directed self-assembly (DSA) with graphoepitaxy and immersion lithography. We demonstrate the flow using a 60-nm-pitch contact design in doublet with Monte Carlo simulations for DSA. We introduce the notion of template error enhancement factor (TEEF) to gauge the sensitivity of DSA printing infidelity to template printing infidelity and evaluate optimized template designs with TEEF metrics. Our data show that source mask optimization and inverse lithography technology are critical to achieve sub-80 nm non-L0 pitches for DSA patterns using 193i.

  14. Biomolecular templating of functional hybrid nanostructures using repeat protein scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romera, David; Couleaud, Pierre; Mejias, Sara H; Aires, Antonio; Cortajarena, Aitziber L

    2015-10-01

    The precise synthesis of materials and devices with tailored complex structures and properties is a requisite for the development of the next generation of products based on nanotechnology. Nowadays, the technology for the generation of this type of devices lacks the precision to determine their properties and is accomplished mostly by 'trial and error' experimental approaches. The use of bottom-up approaches that rely on highly specific biomolecular interactions of small and simple components is an attractive approach for the templating of nanoscale elements. In nature, protein assemblies define complex structures and functions. Engineering novel bio-inspired assemblies by exploiting the same rules and interactions that encode the natural diversity is an emerging field that opens the door to create nanostructures with numerous potential applications in synthetic biology and nanotechnology. Self-assembly of biological molecules into defined functional structures has a tremendous potential in nano-patterning and the design of novel materials and functional devices. Molecular self-assembly is a process by which complex 3D structures with specified functions are constructed from simple molecular building blocks. Here we discuss the basis of biomolecular templating, the great potential of repeat proteins as building blocks for biomolecular templating and nano-patterning. In particular, we focus on the designed consensus tetratricopeptide repeats (CTPRs), the control on the assembly of these proteins into higher order structures and their potential as building blocks in order to generate functional nanostructures and materials. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  15. Template-based prediction of protein function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrey, Donald; Chen, T Scott; Deng, Lei; Garzon, Jose Ignacio; Hwang, Howook; Lasso, Gorka; Lee, Hunjoong; Silkov, Antonina; Honig, Barry

    2015-06-01

    We discuss recent approaches for structure-based protein function annotation. We focus on template-based methods where the function of a query protein is deduced from that of a template for which both the structure and function are known. We describe the different ways of identifying a template. These are typically based on sequence analysis but new methods based on purely structural similarity are also being developed that allow function annotation based on structural relationships that cannot be recognized by sequence. The growing number of available structures of known function, improved homology modeling techniques and new developments in the use of structure allow template-based methods to be applied on a proteome-wide scale and in many different biological contexts. This progress significantly expands the range of applicability of structural information in function annotation to a level that previously was only achievable by sequence comparison. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Integrated Nanosystems Templated by Self-assembled Virus Capsids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanopoulos, Nicholas

    This dissertation presents the synthesis and modeling of multicomponent nanosystems templated by self-assembled virus capsids. The design principles, synthesis, analysis, and future directions for these capsid-based materials are presented. Chapter 1 gives an overview of the literature on the application of virus capsids in constructing nanomaterials. The uses of capsids in three main areas are considered: (1) as templates for inorganic materials or nanoparticles; (2) as vehicles for biological applications like medical imaging and treatment; and (3) as scaffolds for catalytic materials. In light of this introduction, an overview of the material in this dissertation is described. Chapters 2-4 all describe integrated nanosystems templated by bacteriophage MS2, a spherical icosahedral virus capsid. MS2 possesses an interior and exterior surface that can be modified orthogonally using bioconjugation chemistry to create multivalent, multicomponent constructs with precise localization of components attached to the capsid proteins. Chapter 2 describes the use of MS2 to synthesize a photocatalytic construct by modifying the internal surface with sensitizing chromophores and the external surface with a photocatalytic porphyrin. The chromophores absorbed energy that the porphyrin could not, and transferred it to the porphyrin via FRET through the protein shell. The porphyrin was then able to utilize the energy to carry out photocatalysis at new wavelengths. In Chapter 3, porphyrins were installed on the interior surface of MS2 and DNA aptamers specific for Jurkat leukemia T cells on the exterior surface. The dual-modified capsids were able to bind to Jurkat cells, and upon illumination the porphyrins generated singlet oxygen to kill them selectively over non-targeted cells. Chapter 4 explores integrating MS2 with DNA origami in order to arrange the capsids at larger length scales. Capsids modified with fluorescent dyes inside and single-stranded DNA outside were able to

  17. Ordered nanoparticle arrays formed on engineered chaperonin protein templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, R. Andrew; Paavola, Chad D.; Howard, Jeanie; Chan, Suzanne L.; Zaluzec, Nestor J.; Trent, Jonathan D.

    2002-01-01

    Traditional methods for fabricating nanoscale arrays are usually based on lithographic techniques. Alternative new approaches rely on the use of nanoscale templates made of synthetic or biological materials. Some proteins, for example, have been used to form ordered two-dimensional arrays. Here, we fabricated nanoscale ordered arrays of metal and semiconductor quantum dots by binding preformed nanoparticles onto crystalline protein templates made from genetically engineered hollow double-ring structures called chaperonins. Using structural information as a guide, a thermostable recombinant chaperonin subunit was modified to assemble into chaperonins with either 3 nm or 9 nm apical pores surrounded by chemically reactive thiols. These engineered chaperonins were crystallized into two-dimensional templates up to 20 microm in diameter. The periodic solvent-exposed thiols within these crystalline templates were used to size-selectively bind and organize either gold (1.4, 5 or 10nm) or CdSe-ZnS semiconductor (4.5 nm) quantum dots into arrays. The order within the arrays was defined by the lattice of the underlying protein crystal. By combining the self-assembling properties of chaperonins with mutations guided by structural modelling, we demonstrate that quantum dots can be manipulated using modified chaperonins and organized into arrays for use in next-generation electronic and photonic devices.

  18. Polymer Directed Protein Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick van Rijn

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein aggregation and protein self-assembly is an important occurrence in natural systems, and is in some form or other dictated by biopolymers. Very obvious influences of biopolymers on protein assemblies are, e.g., virus particles. Viruses are a multi-protein assembly of which the morphology is dictated by poly-nucleotides namely RNA or DNA. This “biopolymer” directs the proteins and imposes limitations on the structure like the length or diameter of the particle. Not only do these bionanoparticles use polymer-directed self-assembly, also processes like amyloid formation are in a way a result of directed protein assembly by partial unfolded/misfolded biopolymers namely, polypeptides. The combination of proteins and synthetic polymers, inspired by the natural processes, are therefore regarded as a highly promising area of research. Directed protein assembly is versatile with respect to the possible interactions which brings together the protein and polymer, e.g., electrostatic, v.d. Waals forces or covalent conjugation, and possible combinations are numerous due to the large amounts of different polymers and proteins available. The protein-polymer interacting behavior and overall morphology is envisioned to aid in clarifying protein-protein interactions and are thought to entail some interesting new functions and properties which will ultimately lead to novel bio-hybrid materials.

  19. Physical controls on directed virus assembly at nanoscale chemical templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, C L; Chung, S; Chatterji, A; Lin, T; Johnson, J E; Hok, S; Perkins, J; De Yoreo, J

    2006-05-10

    Viruses are attractive building blocks for nanoscale heterostructures, but little is understood about the physical principles governing their directed assembly. In-situ force microscopy was used to investigate organization of Cowpea Mosaic Virus engineered to bind specifically and reversibly at nanoscale chemical templates with sub-30nm features. Morphological evolution and assembly kinetics were measured as virus flux and inter-viral potential were varied. The resulting morphologies were similar to those of atomic-scale epitaxial systems, but the underlying thermodynamics was analogous to that of colloidal systems in confined geometries. The 1D templates biased the location of initial cluster formation, introduced asymmetric sticking probabilities, and drove 1D and 2D condensation at subcritical volume fractions. The growth kinetics followed a t{sup 1/2} law controlled by the slow diffusion of viruses. The lateral expansion of virus clusters that initially form on the 1D templates following introduction of polyethylene glycol (PEG) into the solution suggests a significant role for weak interaction.

  20. Strongly coupled plasmonic modes on macroscopic areas via template-assisted colloidal self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanske, Christoph; Tebbe, Moritz; Kuttner, Christian; Bieber, Vera; Tsukruk, Vladimir V; Chanana, Munish; König, Tobias A F; Fery, Andreas

    2014-12-10

    We present ensembles of surface-ordered nanoparticle arrangements, which are formed by template-assisted self-assembly of monodisperse, protein-coated gold nanoparticles in wrinkle templates. Centimeter-squared areas of highly regular, linear assemblies with tunable line width are fabricated and their extinction cross sections can be characterized by conventional UV/vis/NIR spectroscopy. Modeling based on electrodynamic simulations shows a clear signature of strong plasmonic coupling with an interparticle spacing of 1-2 nm. We find evidence for well-defined plasmonic modes of quasi-infinite chains, such as resonance splitting and multiple radiant modes. Beyond elementary simulations on the individual chain level, we introduce an advanced model, which considers the chain length distribution as well as disorder. The step toward macroscopic sample areas not only opens perspectives for a range of applications in sensing, plasmonic light harvesting, surface enhanced spectroscopy, and information technology but also eases the investigation of hybridization and metamaterial effects fundamentally.

  1. Assembling Bare Au Nanoparticles at Positively Charged Templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjie; Zhang, Honghu; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Mallapragada, Surya; Vaknin, David

    2016-05-01

    In-situ X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and grazing incidence X-ray small-angle scattering (GISAXS) reveal that unfunctionalized (bare) gold nanoparticles (AuNP) spontaneously adsorb to a cationic lipid template formed by a Langmuir monolayer of DPTAP (1,2-dihexadecanoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane) at vapor/aqueous interfaces. Analysis of the XRR yields the electron density profile across the charged-interfaces along the surface normal showing the AuNPs assemble with vertical thickness comparable to the particle size. The GISAXS analysis indicates that the adsorbed mono-particle layer exhibits short-range in-plane correlations. By contrast, single-stranded DNA-functionalized AuNPs, while attracted to the positively charged surface (more efficiently with the addition of salt to the solution), display less in-plane regular packing compared to bare AuNPs.

  2. Assembling Bare Au Nanoparticles at Positively Charged Templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wenjie; Zhang, Honghu; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Mallapragada, Surya; Vaknin, David

    2016-05-26

    In-situ X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and grazing incidence X-ray small-angle scattering (GISAXS) reveal that unfunctionalized (bare) gold nanoparticles (AuNP) spontaneously adsorb to a cationic lipid template formed by a Langmuir monolayer of DPTAP (1,2-dihexadecanoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane) at vapor/aqueous interfaces. Analysis of the XRR yields the electron density profile across the chargedinterfaces along the surface normal showing the AuNPs assemble with vertical thickness comparable to the particle size. The GISAXS analysis indicates that the adsorbed mono-particle layer exhibits shortrange in-plane correlations. By contrast, single-stranded DNA-functionalized AuNPs, while attracted to the positively charged surface (more efficiently with the addition of salt to the solution), display less in-plane regular packing compared to bare AuNPs.

  3. Template-assisted fabrication of protein nanocapsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Shelley A.; Liang, Jianyu; Kowalik, Timothy F.

    2009-02-01

    Bionanomaterials have recently begun to spark a great amount of interest and could potentially revolutionize biomedical research. Nanoparticles, nanocapsules, and nanotubular structures are becoming attractive options in drug and gene delivery. The size of the delivery vehicles greatly impacts cellular uptake and makes it highly desirable to precisely control the diameter and length of nanocarriers to make uniform nanoparticles at low cost. Carbon nanotubes have shown great potential within the field of drug and gene delivery. However, their insolubility and cytotoxicity could severely delay FDA approval. A desirable alternative would be to fabricate nanostructures from biomaterials such as proteins, peptides, or liposomes, which are already FDA approved. In this article we demonstrate the preparation of protein nanocapsules with both ends sealed using a template-assisted alternate immersion method combined with controlled cleaving. Glucose oxidase nanocapsules with controllable diameter, wall thickness, and length were fabricated and characterized with SEM and TEM. The biochemical activity of glucose oxidase in the form of nanocapsules after processing was confirmed using UV spectrometry. Our future work will explore proteins suitable for drug encapsulation and cellular uptake and will focus on optimizing the cleaving process to gain precise control over the length of the nanocapsules.

  4. Constructing Asymmetric Polyion Complex Vesicles via Template Assembling Strategy: Formulation Control and Tunable Permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junbo Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A strategy for constructing polyion complex vesicles (PICsomes with asymmetric structure is described. Poly(methylacrylic acid-block-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide modified gold nanoparticles (PMAA-b-PNIPAm-@-Au NPs were prepared and then assembled with poly(ethylene glycol-block-poly[1-methyl-3-(2-methacryloyloxy propylimidazolium bromine] (PEG-b-PMMPImB via polyion complex of PMMA and PMMPImB. After removing the Au NPs template, asymmetric PICsomes composed of a PNIPAm inner-shell, PIC wall, and PEG outer-corona were obtained. These PICsomes have low protein absorption and thermally tunable permeability, provided by the PEG outer-corona and the PNIPAm inner-shell, respectively. Moreover, PICsome size can be tailored by using templates of predetermined sizes. This novel strategy for constructing asymmetric PICsomes with well-defined properties and controllable size is valuable for applications such as drug delivery, catalysis and monitoring of chemical reactions, and biomimetics.

  5. Topological defects in liquid crystals as templates for molecular self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Miller, Daniel S.; Bukusoglu, Emre; de Pablo, Juan J.; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2016-01-01

    Topological defects in liquid crystals (LCs) have been widely used to organize colloidal dispersions and template polymerization, leading to a range of assemblies, elastomers and gels. However, little is understood about molecular-level assembly processes within defects. Here, we report that nanoscopic environments defined by LC topological defects can selectively trigger processes of molecular self-assembly. By using fluorescence microscopy, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy and super-resolution optical microscopy, we observed signatures of molecular self-assembly of amphiphilic molecules in topological defects, including cooperativity, reversibility and controlled growth. We also show that nanoscopic o-rings synthesized from Saturn-ring disclinations and other molecular assemblies templated by defects can be preserved by using photocrosslinkable amphiphiles. Our results reveal that, in analogy to other classes of macromolecular templates such as polymer-surfactant complexes, topological defects in LCs are a versatile class of three-dimensional, dynamic and reconfigurable templates that can direct processes of molecular self-assembly.

  6. Template-based quaternary structure prediction of proteins using enhanced profile-profile alignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tsukasa; Oda, Toshiyuki; Fukasawa, Yoshinori; Tomii, Kentaro

    2017-11-27

    Proteins often exist as their multimeric forms when they function as so-called biological assemblies consisting of the specific number and arrangement of protein subunits. Consequently, elucidating biological assemblies is necessary to improve understanding of protein function. Template-Based Modeling (TBM), based on known protein structures, has been used widely for protein structure prediction. Actually, TBM has become an increasingly useful approach in recent years because of the increased amounts of information related to protein amino acid sequences and three-dimensional structures. An apparently similar situation exists for biological assembly structure prediction as protein complex structures in the PDB increase, although the inference of biological assemblies is not a trivial task. Many methods using TBM, including ours, have been developed for protein structure prediction. Using enhanced profile-profile alignments, we participated in the 12th Community Wide Experiment on the Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP12), as the FONT team (Group # 480). Herein, we present experimental procedures and results of retrospective analyses using our approach for the Quaternary Structure Prediction category of CASP12. We performed profile-profile alignments of several types, based on FORTE, our profile-profile alignment algorithm, to identify suitable templates. Results show that these alignment results enable us to find templates in almost all possible cases. Moreover, we have come to understand the necessity of developing a model selection method that provides improved accuracy. Results also demonstrate that, to some extent, finding templates of protein complexes is useful even for MEDIUM and HARD assembly prediction. © 2017 The Authors Proteins: Structure, Function and Bioinformatics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Supracolloidal Assemblies as Sacrificial Templates for Porous Silk-Based Biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. Hardy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Tissues in the body are hierarchically structured composite materials with tissue-specific properties. Urea self-assembles via hydrogen bonding interactions into crystalline supracolloidal assemblies that can be used to impart macroscopic pores to polymer-based tissue scaffolds. In this communication, we explain the solvent interactions governing the solubility of urea and thereby the scope of compatible polymers. We also highlight the role of solvent interactions on the morphology of the resulting supracolloidal crystals. We elucidate the role of polymer-urea interactions on the morphology of the pores in the resulting biomaterials. Finally, we demonstrate that it is possible to use our urea templating methodology to prepare Bombyx mori silk protein-based biomaterials with pores that human dermal fibroblasts respond to by aligning with the long axis of the pores. This methodology has potential for application in a variety of different tissue engineering niches in which cell alignment is observed, including skin, bone, muscle and nerve.

  8. Templated self-assembly of SiGe quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dais, Christian

    2009-08-19

    This PhD thesis reports on the fabrication and characterization of exact aligned SiGe quantum dot structures. In general, SiGe quantum dots which nucleate via the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode exhibit broad size dispersion and nucleate randomly on the surface. However, to tap the full potential of SiGe quantum dots it is necessary to control the positioning and size of the dots on a nanometer length, e.g. for electronically addressing of individual dots. This can be realized by so-called templated self-assembly, which combines top-down lithography with bottom-up selfassembly. In this process the lithographically defined pits serve as pre-defined nucleation points for the epitaxially grown quantum dots. In this thesis, extreme ultraviolet interference lithography at a wavelength of e=13.4 nm is employed for prepatterning of the Si substrates. This technique allows the precise and fast fabrication of high-resolution templates with a high degree of reproducibility. The subsequent epitaxial deposition is either performed by molecular beam epitaxy or low-pressure chemical vapour deposition. It is shown that the dot nucleation on pre-patterned substrates depends strongly on the lithography parameters, e.g. size and periodicity of the pits, as well as on the epitaxy parameters, e.g. growth temperature or material coverage. The interrelations are carefully analyzed by means of scanning force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements. Provided that correct template and overgrowth parameters are chosen, perfectly aligned and uniform SiGe quantum dot arrays of different period, size as well as symmetry are created. In particular, the quantum dot arrays with the so far smallest period (35 nm) and smallest size dispersion are fabricated in this thesis. Furthermore, the strain fields of the underlying quantum dots allow the fabrication of vertically aligned quantum dot stacks. Combining lateral and vertical dot alignment results in three

  9. HaloTag mediated artificial cellulosome assembly on a rolling circle amplification DNA template for efficient cellulose hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qing; Chen, Wilfred

    2016-05-10

    We report here the generation of four-component artificial cellulosomes onto a DNA scaffold using the self-labeling HaloTag for DNA conjugation. The resulting structures exhibited significantly improved cellulosome assembly as well as cellulose hydrolysis over compatible structures generated using protein scaffolds. Cellulose hydrolysis was further enhanced by 2-fold using the more complex cellulosome structures assembled onto DNA templates generated by rolling circle amplification (RCA). The flexibility to insert additional hybridization sites in a multiplexing manner using RCA should enable the assembly of a larger array of cellulases to better mimic the enzyme diversity of naturally occurring cellulosomes.

  10. Directed self-assembly (DSA) grapho-epitaxy template generation with immersion lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuansheng; Lei, Junjiang; Torres, J. A.; Hong, Le; Word, James; Fenger, Germain; Tritchkov, Alexander; Lippincott, George; Gupta, Rachit; Lafferty, Neal; He, Yuan; Bekaert, Joost; Vanderberghe, Geert

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we present an optimization methodology for the template designs of sub-resolution contacts using directed self-assembly (DSA) with grapho-epitaxy and immersion lithography. We demonstrate the flow using a 60nm-pitch contact design in doublet with Monte Carlo simulations for DSA. We introduce the notion of Template Error Enhancement Factor (TEEF) to gauge the sensitivity of DSA printing infidelity to template printing infidelity, and evaluate optimized template designs with TEEF metrics. Our data shows that SMO is critical to achieve sub-80nm non- L0 pitches for DSA patterns using 193i.

  11. New route for self-assembly of α-lactalbumin nanotubes and their use as templates to grow silver nanotubes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Chun Fu

    Full Text Available Nanotubes are formed by self-assembly of α-lactalbumin milk protein following a different route than established for the hydrolysis which involves V8 enzyme, phosphate buffer and appropriate amounts of calcium at neutral pH. The resulting nanotubes are used as templates for the growth of conductive silver nanotubes. TEM, SEM-EDS, AFM and FTIR are used for characterization.

  12. Self-assembled biomimetic nanoreactors I: Polymeric template

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTaggart, Matt; Malardier-Jugroot, Cecile; Jugroot, Manish

    2015-09-01

    The variety of nanoarchitectures made feasible by the self-assembly of alternating copolymers opens new avenues for biomimicry. Indeed, self-assembled structures allow the development of nanoreactors which combine the efficiency of high surface area metal active centres to the effect of confinement due to the very small cavities generated by the self-assembly process. A novel self-assembly of high molecular weight alternating copolymers is characterized in the present study. The self-assembly is shown to organize into nanosheets, providing a 2 nm hydrophobic cavity with a 1D confinement.

  13. Fabrication of Nanostructures Using Self-Assembled Peptides as Templates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    This chapter evaluates the use of a short-aromatic dipeptide, diphenylalanine, as a template in the fabrication of new nanostructures (nanowires, coaxial nanocables, nanochannels) using materials such as silicon, conducting and non-conducting polymers. Diphenylalanine self-organize into nanostruc......This chapter evaluates the use of a short-aromatic dipeptide, diphenylalanine, as a template in the fabrication of new nanostructures (nanowires, coaxial nanocables, nanochannels) using materials such as silicon, conducting and non-conducting polymers. Diphenylalanine self......-organize into nanostructures (nanotubes, nanofibers or nanospheres) under very mild conditions; some of its properties make them excellent candidates to be use as, for instance, dry-etch masks in a reactive ion etching process for the rapid fabrication of silicon micro and nanowires. Here, the methods used to exploit...

  14. Controlled assembly of SNAP-PNA-fluorophore systems on DNA templates to produce fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Zahra; Hanley, Quentin

    2014-10-15

    The SNAP protein is a widely used self-labeling tag that can be used for tracking protein localization and trafficking in living systems. A model system providing controlled alignment of SNAP-tag units can provide a new way to study clustering of fusion proteins. In this work, fluorescent SNAP-PNA conjugates were controllably assembled on DNA frameworks, forming dimers, trimers, and tetramers. Modification of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) with the O(6)-benzyl guanine (BG) group allowed the generation of site-selective covalent links between PNA and the SNAP protein. The modified BG-PNAs were labeled with fluorescent Atto dyes and subsequently chemo-selectively conjugated to SNAP protein. Efficient assembly into dimer and oligomer forms was verified via size exclusion chromatography (SEC), electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and fluorescence spectroscopy. DNA-directed assembly of homo- and heterodimers of SNAP-PNA constructs induced homo- and hetero-FRET, respectively. Longer DNA scaffolds controllably aligned similar fluorescent SNAP-PNA constructs into higher oligomers exhibiting homo-FRET. The combined SEC and homo-FRET studies indicated the 1:1 and saturated assemblies of SNAP-PNA-fluorophore:DNA formed preferentially in this system. This suggested a kinetic/stoichiometric model of assembly rather than binomially distributed products. These BG-PNA-fluorophore building blocks allow facile introduction of fluorophores and/or assembly directing moieties onto any protein containing SNAP. Template-directed assembly of PNA-modified SNAP proteins may be used to investigate clustering behavior both with and without fluorescent labels, which may find use in the study of assembly processes in cells.

  15. Fabrication of nanostructure via self-assembly of nanowires within the AAO template

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brust Mathias

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe novel nanostructures are fabricated by the spatial chemical modification of nanowires within the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO template. To make the nanowires better dispersion in the aqueous solution, the copper is first deposited to fill the dendrite structure at the bottom of template. During the process of self-assembly, the dithiol compound was used as the connector between the nanowires and nanoparticles by a self-assembly method. The nanostructures of the nano cigars and structure which is containing particles junction are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. These kinds of novel nanostructure will be the building blocks for nanoelectronic and nanophotonic devices.

  16. BioAssemblyModeler (BAM): user-friendly homology modeling of protein homo- and heterooligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapovalov, Maxim V; Wang, Qiang; Xu, Qifang; Andrake, Mark; Dunbrack, Roland L

    2014-01-01

    Many if not most proteins function in oligomeric assemblies of one or more protein sequences. The Protein Data Bank provides coordinates for biological assemblies for each entry, at least 60% of which are dimers or larger assemblies. BioAssemblyModeler (BAM) is a graphical user interface to the basic steps in homology modeling of protein homooligomers and heterooligomers from the biological assemblies provided in the PDB. BAM takes as input up to six different protein sequences and begins by assigning Pfam domains to the target sequences. The program utilizes a complete assignment of Pfam domains to sequences in the PDB, PDBfam (http://dunbrack2.fccc.edu/protcid/pdbfam), to obtain templates that contain any or all of the domains assigned to the target sequence(s). The contents of the biological assemblies of potential templates are provided, and alignments of the target sequences to the templates are produced with a profile-profile alignment algorithm. BAM provides for visual examination and mouse-editing of the alignments supported by target and template secondary structure information and a 3D viewer of the template biological assembly. Side-chain coordinates for a model of the biological assembly are built with the program SCWRL4. A built-in protocol navigation system guides the user through all stages of homology modeling from input sequences to a three-dimensional model of the target complex. http://dunbrack.fccc.edu/BAM.

  17. Directed assembly of conducting polymers on sub-micron templates by electrical fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Jia; Wei, Ming [National Science Foundation (NSF) Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center for High-Rate Nanomanufacturing, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA 01854 (United States); Busnaina, Ahmed [National Science Foundation (NSF) Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center for High-Rate Nanomanufacturing, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Barry, Carol [National Science Foundation (NSF) Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center for High-Rate Nanomanufacturing, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA 01854 (United States); Mead, Joey, E-mail: Joey_Mead@uml.edu [National Science Foundation (NSF) Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center for High-Rate Nanomanufacturing, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA 01854 (United States)

    2013-02-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoscale patterns with dimensions of assembled PANi down to 100 nm were fabricated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use electrophoretic and dielectrophoretic assembly to deposit PANi. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electrophoretic and dielectrophoretic assembly of PANi finished in less than 1 min. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of process parameters on assembly of PANi onto nanoscale pattern was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The assembled PANi can be transferred to other flexible substrates. - Abstract: Patterning of conducting polymer into sub-micron patterns over large areas at high rate and low cost is significant for commercial manufacturing of novel devices. Electrophoretic and dielectrophoretic assembly provide an easily scaled approach with high fabrication rates. In this work, electrophoretic and dielectrophoretic assembly were used to assemble polyaniline (PANi) into multiscale sub-micron size patterns in less than 1 min. The process was controlled by assembly time, amplitude, and frequency of the electric field. Dielectrophoretic assembly is preferable for manufacturing as it reduces damage to the templates used to control the assembly. Using this method, sub-micron patterns with dimensions of the assembled PANi down to 100 nm were fabricated over large areas in short times. The assembled PANi was further transferred to other flexible polymer substrates by a thermoforming process, providing a fast, easily controlled and promising approach for fabrication of nanoscale devices.

  18. Template-directed hierarchical self-assembly of graphene based hybrid structure for electrochemical biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlak, Onur; Tiwari, Atul; Turner, Anthony P F; Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2013-11-15

    A template-directed self-assembly approach, using functionalised graphene as a fundamental building block to obtain a hierarchically ordered graphene-enzyme-nanoparticle bioelectrode for electrochemical biosensing, is reported. An anionic surfactant was used to prepare a responsive, functional interface and direct the assembly on the surface of the graphene template. The surfactant molecules altered the electrostatic charges of graphene, thereby providing a convenient template-directed assembly approach to a free-standing planar sheet of sp(2) carbons. Cholesterol oxidase and cholesterol esterase were assembled on the surface of graphene by intermolecular attractive forces while gold nanoparticles are incorporated into the hetero-assembly to enhance the electro-bio-catalytic activity. Hydrogen peroxide and cholesterol were used as two representative analytes to demonstrate the electrochemical sensing performance of the graphene-based hybrid structure. The bioelectrode exhibited a linear response to H2O2 from 0.01 to 14 mM, with a detection limit of 25 nM (S/N=3). The amperometric response with cholesterol had a linear range from 0.05 to 0.35 mM, sensitivity of 3.14 µA/µM/cm(2) and a detection limit of 0.05 µM. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (Km(app)) was calculated to be 1.22 mM. This promising approach provides a novel methodology for template-directed bio-self-assembly over planar sp(2) carbons of a graphene sheet and furnishes the basis for fabrication of ultra-sensitive and efficient electrochemical biosensors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Porous Materials with Tunable Structure and Mechanical Properties via Templated Layer-by-Layer Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziminska, Monika; Dunne, Nicholas; Hamilton, Andrew R

    2016-08-31

    The deposition of stiff and strong coatings onto porous templates offers a novel strategy for fabricating macroscale materials with controlled architectures at the micro- and nanoscale. Here, layer-by-layer assembly is utilized to fabricate nanocomposite-coated foams with highly customizable properties by depositing polymer-nanoclay coatings onto open-cell foam templates. The compressive mechanical behavior of these materials evolves in a predictable manner that is qualitatively captured by scaling laws for the mechanical properties of cellular materials. The observed and predicted properties span a remarkable range of density-stiffness space, extending from regions of very soft elastomer foams to very stiff, lightweight honeycomb and lattice materials.

  20. Conformational studies of common protein templates in macromolecularly imprinted polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryscio, David R; Fleming, Michael Q; Peppas, Nicholas A

    2012-08-01

    Unlike the molecular imprinting of small molecule templates, molecularly imprinted polymers specific to large templates (>1,500 Da), have achieved limited success to date. Conformational stability of these labile macromolecules is one of the main factors that prevent the direct extension of successful procedures from the small molecule regime. We continue our systematic investigation of the effect of common components in macromolecular MIPs on the conformation of protein templates. Circular dichroism was used to show that frequently employed monomers and crosslinkers induce significant changes in the secondary structures of lysozyme and bovine hemoglobin. The extent to which this change occurs, at ligand concentrations far below what are typically used reported work, is cause for concern and provides as rational explanation for the lack of success in this arena. This is because a change in the template structure prior to polymerization would lead to the binding sites formed during polymerization to be specific to this alternate conformation. Subsequent studies with the macromolecule in its native state and the crosslinked network would not be successful. Using this information as a guide, we offer suggestions as to where work in macromolecular imprinted polymers should focus going forward in order for these antibody mimics to reach their vast potential as a new class of biomedical diagnostic devices.

  1. Modeling the alternative oxidase from the human pathogen Blastocystis using automated hybrid structural template assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Standley DM

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Daron M Standley1, Mark van der Giezen21Laboratory of Systems Immunology, World Premier International Immunology Frontier Research Center, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan; 2Centre for Eukaryotic Evolutionary Microbiology, Biosciences, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter, UKAbstract: Alternative oxidases (AOX of human parasites represent attractive drug targets due to their absence in humans. However, the lack of a structure has prevented structure-based drug design. Moreover, a large helical insertion proves difficult for automated structural modeling efforts. We have used a novel hybrid structural modeling approach to generate a model that is globally consistent with a previous model but based on a phylogenetically closer template and systematic sampling of known fragments in the helical insertion. Our model, in agreement with site-directed mutagenesis studies, clearly assigns E200 as the iron-ligating residue as opposed to the previously suggested E201. Crystallization of AOX from another species has recently been reported suggesting that our blind prediction can be independently validated in the near future.Keywords: homology modeling, protein structure, blind prediction, fragment assembly, active site, parasite, mitosome, hydrogenosome, evolution

  2. Memoir: template-based structure prediction for membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebejer, Jean-Paul; Hill, Jamie R; Kelm, Sebastian; Shi, Jiye; Deane, Charlotte M

    2013-07-01

    Membrane proteins are estimated to be the targets of 50% of drugs that are currently in development, yet we have few membrane protein crystal structures. As a result, for a membrane protein of interest, the much-needed structural information usually comes from a homology model. Current homology modelling software is optimized for globular proteins, and ignores the constraints that the membrane is known to place on protein structure. Our Memoir server produces homology models using alignment and coordinate generation software that has been designed specifically for transmembrane proteins. Memoir is easy to use, with the only inputs being a structural template and the sequence that is to be modelled. We provide a video tutorial and a guide to assessing model quality. Supporting data aid manual refinement of the models. These data include a set of alternative conformations for each modelled loop, and a multiple sequence alignment that incorporates the query and template. Memoir works with both α-helical and β-barrel types of membrane proteins and is freely available at http://opig.stats.ox.ac.uk/webapps/memoir.

  3. Templated electrokinetic directed chemical assembly for the fabrication of close-packed plasmonic metamolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrift, W. J.; Darvishzadeh-Varcheie, M.; Capolino, F.; Ragan, R.

    2017-08-01

    Colloidal self-assembly combined with templated surfaces holds the promise of fabricating large area devices in a low cost facile manner. This directed assembly approach improves the complexity of assemblies that can be achieved with self-assembly while maintaining advantages of molecular scale control. In this work, electrokinetic driving forces, i.e., electrohydrodynamic flow, are paired with chemical crosslinking between colloidal particles to form close-packed plasmonic metamolecules. This method addresses challenges of obtaining uniformity in nanostructure geometry and nanometer scale gap spacings in structures. Electrohydrodynamic flows yield robust driving forces between the template and nanoparticles as well as between nanoparticles on the surface promoting the assembly of close-packed metamolecules. Here, electron beam lithography defined Au pillars are used as seed structures that generate electrohydrodynamic flows. Chemical crosslinking between Au surfaces enables molecular control over gap spacings between nanoparticles and Au pillars. An as-fabricated structure is analyzed via full wave electromagnetic simulations and shown to produce large magnetic field enhancements on the order of 3.5 at optical frequencies. This novel method for directed self-assembly demonstrates the synergy between colloidal driving forces and chemical crosslinking for the fabrication of plasmonic metamolecules with unique electromagnetic properties.

  4. Carbon nanotube-templated assembly of regioregular poly(3-alkylthiophene) in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiahua; Stevens, Eric; He, Youjun; Hong, Kunlun; Ivanov, Ilia

    2016-09-01

    Control of structural heterogeneity by rationally encoding of the molecular assemblies is a key enabling design of hierarchical, multifunctional materials of the future. Here we report the strategies to gain such control using solution- based assembly to construct a hybrid nano-assembly and a network hybrid structure of regioregular poly(3- alkylthiophene) - carbon nanotube (P3AT-CNT). The opto-electronic performance of conjugated polymer (P3AT) is defined by the structure of the aggregate in solution and in the solid film. Control of P3AT aggregation would allow formation of broad range of morphologies with very distinct electro-optical. We utilize interactive templating to confine the assembly behavior of conjugated polymers, replacing poorly controlled solution processing approach. Perfect crystalline surface of the single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT/MWCNT) acts as a template, seeding P3AT aggregation of the surface of the nanotube. The seed continues directional growth through pi-pi stacking leading to the formation of to well-defined P3AT-CNT morphologies, including comb-like nano-assemblies, super- structures and gel networks. Interconnected, highly-branched network structure of P3AT-CNT hybrids is of particular interest to enable efficient, long-range, balanced charge carrier transport. The structure and opto-electionic function of the intermediate assemblies and networks of P3AT/CNT hybrids are characterized by transmission election microscopy and UV-vis absorption.

  5. Dynamic Covalent Assembly of Peptoid-Based Ladder Oligomers by Vernier Templating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Tao; Jung, Jae Hwan; Scott, Timothy F

    2015-12-30

    Dynamic covalent chemistry, in conjunction with template-directed assembly, enables the fabrication of extended nanostructures that are both precise and tough. Here we demonstrate the dynamic covalent assembly of peptoid-based molecular ladders with up to 12 rungs via scandium(III)-catalyzed imine metathesis by employing the principle of Vernier templating, where small precursor units with mismatched numbers of complementary functional groups are coreacted to yield larger structures with sizes determined by the respective precursor functionalities. Owing to their monomer diversity and synthetic accessibility, sequence-specific oligopeptoids bearing dynamic covalent pendant groups were employed as precursors for molecular ladder fabrication. The generated structures were characterized using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry and gel permeation chromatography, confirming successful molecular ladder fabrication.

  6. Self-assembly of polystyrene nanospheres and its applications as templates for plasmonic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shih-Hsin

    Monodispersed colloidal polystyrene spheres have been self-assembled into various structures as templates for the fabrication of different nanostructures. Two unique self-assembly processes have been developed and systematically investigated. A method to make the multi-layer and mono-layer close-packed structure by means of capillary-convective force has been developed. By directly visualizing the self-assembling process using optical microscopy, a mechanism based on the 2-D crystal formation and 3-D repulsive force model has been proposed to explain the process. A vertical deposition technique to produce nanosphere crystal structure with single orientation on hydrophilic glass substrate has also been developed. Using a lithographically patterned substrate with alternating areas of glass and Au, self-assembled crystal structures can be generated on the hydrophobic Au surface. It has been found that the contact angle of the colloid solution on the substrates controls this self-assembly process. Using self-assembled polystyrene nanosphere crystals as templates, Au nanovoid arrays, in which the voids about several hundreds of nanometer in diameter are embedded in a gold film with a thickness less than the void diameter, have been fabricated by templated electrodeposition. In order to use Au nanovoid arrays as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensors on optical fiber tips for in situ and in vivo applications, a new structure has been designed. In such structure, each void has optical openings on both sides of the nanovoid array, one side is mounted to the fiber tip surface for introduction of incident light and collection of scattered light and the other side is for interrogation of analyte molecules in the voids. The effect of structural parameters, including void diameter, Au film thickness, and the bottom hole diameter of the nanovoid arrays on the electric field confinement are investigated using three-dimensional finite difference time domain (FDTD

  7. Template Effect of the Graphene Moiré Lattice on Phthalocyanine Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Néel

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Superstructures of metal-free phthalocyanine (2H-Pc molecules on graphene-covered Ir(111 have been explored by scanning tunnelling microscopy. Depending on the sub-monolayer coverage different molecular assemblies form at the surface. They reflect the transition from a graphene template effect on the 2H-Pc arrangement to molecular superstructures that are mainly governed by the intermolecular coupling.

  8. Template Effect of the Graphene Moiré Lattice on Phthalocyanine Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Néel, Nicolas; Kröger, Jörg

    2017-05-03

    Superstructures of metal-free phthalocyanine (2H-Pc) molecules on graphene-covered Ir(111) have been explored by scanning tunnelling microscopy. Depending on the sub-monolayer coverage different molecular assemblies form at the surface. They reflect the transition from a graphene template effect on the 2H-Pc arrangement to molecular superstructures that are mainly governed by the intermolecular coupling.

  9. Biomolecular Programming of Discrete Nanomaterials for Sensors, Templates and Mimics of Natural Nanoscale Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-17

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0343 BIOMOLECULAR PROGRAMMING OF DISCRETE NANOMATERIALS FOR SENSORS, TEMPLATES AND MIMICS OF NATURAL NANOSCALE ASSEMBLIES...Performance 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 01 Jun 2011 to 31 May 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE BIOMOLECULAR PROGRAMMING OF DISCRETE NANOMATERIALS FOR SENSORS...term use are needed; hence our interest in stabilized but responsive biomolecular materials and conjugates between 2011 and 2016. In terms of melanin

  10. Multivalent Protein Assembly Using Monovalent Self-Assembling Building Blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Petkau-Milroy

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Discotic molecules, which self-assemble in water into columnar supramolecular polymers, emerged as an alternative platform for the organization of proteins. Here, a monovalent discotic decorated with one single biotin was synthesized to study the self-assembling multivalency of this system in regard to streptavidin. Next to tetravalent streptavidin, monovalent streptavidin was used to study the protein assembly along the supramolecular polymer in detail without the interference of cross-linking. Upon self-assembly of the monovalent biotinylated discotics, multivalent proteins can be assembled along the supramolecular polymer. The concentration of discotics, which influences the length of the final polymers at the same time dictates the amount of assembled proteins.

  11. Minimalist Approach to Complexity: Templating the Assembly of DNA Tile Structures with Sequentially Grown Input Strands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Kai Lin; Sleiman, Hanadi F

    2016-07-26

    Given its highly predictable self-assembly properties, DNA has proven to be an excellent template toward the design of functional materials. Prominent examples include the remarkable complexity provided by DNA origami and single-stranded tile (SST) assemblies, which require hundreds of unique component strands. However, in many cases, the majority of the DNA assembly is purely structural, and only a small "working area" needs to be aperiodic. On the other hand, extended lattices formed by DNA tile motifs require only a few strands; but they suffer from lack of size control and limited periodic patterning. To overcome these limitations, we adopt a templation strategy, where an input strand of DNA dictates the size and patterning of resultant DNA tile structures. To prepare these templating input strands, a sequential growth technique developed in our lab is used, whereby extended DNA strands of defined sequence and length may be generated simply by controlling their order of addition. With these, we demonstrate the periodic patterning of size-controlled double-crossover (DX) and triple-crossover (TX) tile structures, as well as intentionally designed aperiodicity of a DX tile structure. As such, we are able to prepare size-controlled DNA structures featuring aperiodicity only where necessary with exceptional economy and efficiency.

  12. Biomimetic Branched Hollow Fibers Templated by Self-assembled Fibrous Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) Structures in Aqueous Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Penghe; Mao, Chuanbin

    2010-01-01

    Branched hollow fibers are common in nature, but to form artificial fibers with a similar branched hollow structure is still a challenge. We discovered that polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) could self-assemble into branched hollow fibers in an aqueous solution after aging the PVP solution for about two weeks. Based on this finding, we demonstrated two approaches by which the self-assembly of PVP into branched hollow fibers could be exploited to template the formation of branched hollow inorganic fibers. First, inorganic material such as silica with high affinity against the PVP could be deposited on the surface of the branched hollow PVP fibers to form branched hollow silica fibers. To extend the application of PVP self-assembly in templating the formation of hollow branched fibers, we then adopted a second approach where the PVP molecules bound to inorganic nanoparticles (using gold nanoparticles as a model) co-self-assemble with the free PVP molecules in an aqueous solution, resulting in the formation of the branched hollow fibers with the nanoparticles embedded in the PVP matrix constituting the walls of the fibers. Heating the resultant fibers above the glass transition temperature of PVP led to the formation of branched hollow gold fibers. Our work suggests that the self-assembly of the PVP molecules in the solution can serve as a general method for directing the formation of branched hollow inorganic fibers. The branched hollow fibers may find potential applications in microfluidics, artificial blood vessel generation, and tissue engineering. PMID:20158250

  13. Engineering Plasmonic Nanocrystal Coupling through Template-Assisted Self-Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greybush, Nicholas J.

    The construction of materials from nanocrystal building blocks represents a powerful new paradigm for materials design. Just as nature's materials orchestrate intricate combinations of atoms from the library of the periodic table, nanocrystal "metamaterials" integrate individual nanocrystals into larger architectures with emergent collective properties. The individual nanocrystal "meta-atoms" that make up these materials are themselves each a nanoscale atomic system with tailorable size, shape, and elemental composition, enabling the creation of hierarchical materials with predesigned structure at multiple length scales. However, an improved fundamental understanding of the interactions among individual nanocrystals is needed in order to translate this structural control into enhanced functionality. The ability to form precise arrangements of nanocrystals and measure their collective properties is therefore essential for the continued development of nanocrystal metamaterials. In this dissertation, we utilize template-assisted self-assembly and spatially-resolved spectroscopy to form and characterize individual nanocrystal oligomers. At the intersection of "top-down" and "bottom-up" nanoscale patterning schemes, template-assisted self-assembly combines the design freedom of lithography with the chemical control of colloidal synthesis to achieve unique nanocrystal configurations. Here, we employ shape-selective templates to assemble new plasmonic structures, including heterodimers of Au nanorods and upconversion phosphors, a series of hexagonally-packed Au nanocrystal oligomers, and triangular formations of Au nanorods. Through experimental analysis and numerical simulation, we elucidate the means through which inter-nanocrystal coupling imparts collective optical properties to the plasmonic assemblies. Our self-assembly and measurement strategy offers a versatile platform for exploring optical interactions in a wide range of material systems and application areas.

  14. Interplay of I-TASSER and QUARK for template-based and ab initio protein structure prediction in CASP10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang

    2014-02-01

    We develop and test a new pipeline in CASP10 to predict protein structures based on an interplay of I-TASSER and QUARK for both free-modeling (FM) and template-based modeling (TBM) targets. The most noteworthy observation is that sorting through the threading template pool using the QUARK-based ab initio models as probes allows the detection of distant-homology templates which might be ignored by the traditional sequence profile-based threading alignment algorithms. Further template assembly refinement by I-TASSER resulted in successful folding of two medium-sized FM targets with >150 residues. For TBM, the multiple threading alignments from LOMETS are, for the first time, incorporated into the ab initio QUARK simulations, which were further refined by I-TASSER assembly refinement. Compared with the traditional threading assembly refinement procedures, the inclusion of the threading-constrained ab initio folding models can consistently improve the quality of the full-length models as assessed by the GDT-HA and hydrogen-bonding scores. Despite the success, significant challenges still exist in domain boundary prediction and consistent folding of medium-size proteins (especially beta-proteins) for nonhomologous targets. Further developments of sensitive fold-recognition and ab initio folding methods are critical for solving these problems. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Construction of energy transfer pathways self-assembled from DNA-templated stacks of anthracene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaura, Rika; Yui, Hiroharu; Someya, Yuu; Ohnishi-Kameyama, Mayumi

    2014-01-05

    We describe optical properties of anthracene stacks formed from single-component self-assembly of thymidylic acid-appended anthracene 2,6-bis[5-(3'-thymidylic acid)pentyloxy] anthracene (TACT) and the binary self-assembly of TACT and complementary 20-meric oligoadenylic acid (TACT/dA20) in an aqueous buffer. UV-Vis and emission spectra for the single-component self-assembly of TACT and the binary self-assembly of TACT/dA20 were very consistent with stacked acene moieties in both self-assemblies. Interestingly, time-resolved fluorescence spectra from anthracene stacks exhibited very different features of the single-component and binary self-assemblies. In the single-component self-assembly of TACT, a dynamic Stokes shift (DSS) and relatively short fluorescence lifetime (τ=0.35ns) observed at around 450nm suggested that the anthracene moieties were flexible. Moreover, a broad emission at 530nm suggested the formation of an excited dimer (excimer). In the binary self-assembly of TACT/dA20, we detected a broad, red-shifted emission component at 534nm with a lifetime (τ=0.4ns) shorter than that observed in the TACT single-component self-assembly. Combining these results with the emission spectrum of the binary self-assembly of TACT/5'-HEX dA20, we concluded that the energy transfer pathway was constructed by columnar anthracene stacks formed from the DNA-templated self-assembly of TACT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Assembly of presynaptic filaments. Factors affecting the assembly of RecA protein onto single-stranded DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thresher, RJ; Christiansen, Gunna; Griffith, JD

    1988-01-01

    We have previously shown that the assembly of RecA protein onto single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) facilitated by SSB protein occurs in three steps: (1) rapid binding of SSB protein to the ssDNA; (2) nucleation of RecA protein onto this template; and (3) co-operative polymerization of additional Rec......A protein to yield presynaptic filaments. Here, electron microscopy has been used to further explore the parameters of this assembly process. The optimal extent of presynaptic filament formation required at least one RecA protein monomer per three nucleotides, high concentrations of ATP (greater than 3 m......M in the presence of 12 mM-Mg2+), and relatively low concentrations of SSB protein (1 monomer per 18 nucleotides). Assembly was depressed threefold when SSB protein was added to one monomer per nine nucleotides. These effects appeared to be exerted at the nucleation step. Following nucleation, RecA protein...

  17. Protein-protein complex structure predictions by multimeric threading and template recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Srayanta; Zhang, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Summary The number of protein-protein complex structures is nearly 6-times smaller than that of tertiary structures in PDB which limits the power of homology-based approaches to complex structure modeling. We present a new threading-recombination approach, COTH, to boost the protein complex structure library by combining tertiary structure templates with complex alignments. The query sequences are first aligned to complex templates using a modified dynamic programming algorithm, guided by ab initio binding-site predictions. The monomer alignments are then shifted to the multimeric template framework by structural alignments. COTH was tested on 500 non-homologous dimeric proteins, which can successfully detect correct templates for half of the cases after homologous templates are excluded, which significantly outperforms conventional homology modeling algorithms. It also shows a higher accuracy in interface modeling than rigid-body docking of unbound structures from ZDOCK although with lower coverage. These data demonstrate new avenues to model complex structures from non-homologous templates. PMID:21742262

  18. Preparation of organothiol self-assembled monolayers for use in templated crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Michael H; Lee, Jonathan R I

    2013-01-01

    Organothiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) have garnered much interest as templates for oriented crystallization of biominerals. While, on the surface, SAM preparation appears to be straightforward, there are many subtleties that may yield films that lack the desired effect on the mineral component in subsequent use for templated mineralization. Herein, we discuss literature that uses organothiol SAMs to understand various principles in biomineralization, to motivate the following discussion of preparation procedures and pitfalls that may arise while working with SAMs. We provide a range of parameters for each element of a SAM-forming process, which have been shown in the literature to produce monolayers suitable for mineralization experiments, and close with a step-by-step procedure, based on findings in the cited literature, that yields functional SAMs with very high fidelity. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Monosaccharide templates for de novo designed 4-alpha-helix bundle proteins: template effects in carboproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brask, Jesper; Dideriksen, J.M.; Nielsen, John

    2003-01-01

    Da 4-alpha-helix bundles by oxime ligation of tetra-aminooxyacetyl functionalized D-galacto-, D-gluco-, and D-altropyranoside templates with an amphiphilic C- terminal hexadecapeptide aldehyde sequence. CD spectroscopy indicated that the choice of template has an effect on the overall structure...

  20. Programming protein self assembly with coiled coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietz, Hendrik; Bornschloegl, Thomas; Heym, Roland; Koenig, Frauke; Rief, Matthias [Physik Department E22, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    The controlled assembly of protein domains into supramolecular structures will be an important prerequisite for the use of functional proteins in future nanotechnology applications. Coiled coils are multimerization motifs whose dimerization properties can be programmed by amino acid sequence. Here, we report programmed supramolecular self-assembly of protein molecules using coiled coils and directly demonstrate its potential on the single molecule level by AFM force spectroscopy. We flanked two different model proteins, Ig27 from human cardiac titin and green fluorescent protein (GFP), by coiled coil binding partners and studied the capability of these elementary building blocks to self-assemble into linear chains. Simple sterical constraints are shown to control the assembly process, providing evidence that many proteins can be assembled with this method. An application for this technique is the design of polyproteins for single molecule force spectroscopy with an integrated force-calibration standard.

  1. Fabrication and characterization of gold nano-wires templated on virus-like arrays of tobacco mosaic virus coat proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wnęk, M.; Górzny, M. Ł.; Ward, M. B.; Wälti, C.; Davies, A. G.; Brydson, R.; Evans, S. D.; Stockley, P. G.

    2013-01-01

    The rod-shaped plant virus tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is widely used as a nano-fabrication template, and chimeric peptide expression on its major coat protein has extended its potential applications. Here we describe a simple bacterial expression system for production and rapid purification of recombinant chimeric TMV coat protein carrying C-terminal peptide tags. These proteins do not bind TMV RNA or form disks at pH 7. However, they retain the ability to self-assemble into virus-like arrays at acidic pH. C-terminal peptide tags in such arrays are exposed on the protein surface, allowing interaction with target species. We have utilized a C-terminal His-tag to create virus coat protein-templated nano-rods able to bind gold nanoparticles uniformly. These can be transformed into gold nano-wires by deposition of additional gold atoms from solution, followed by thermal annealing. The resistivity of a typical annealed wire created by this approach is significantly less than values reported for other nano-wires made using different bio-templates. This expression construct is therefore a useful additional tool for the creation of chimeric TMV-like nano-rods for bio-templating.

  2. Template-based protein structure prediction in CASP11 and retrospect of I-TASSER in the last decade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianyi; Zhang, Wenxuan; He, Baoji; Walker, Sara Elizabeth; Zhang, Hongjiu; Govindarajoo, Brandon; Virtanen, Jouko; Xue, Zhidong; Shen, Hong-Bin; Zhang, Yang

    2016-09-01

    We report the structure prediction results of a new composite pipeline for template-based modeling (TBM) in the 11th CASP experiment. Starting from multiple structure templates identified by LOMETS based meta-threading programs, the QUARK ab initio folding program is extended to generate initial full-length models under strong constraints from template alignments. The final atomic models are then constructed by I-TASSER based fragment reassembly simulations, followed by the fragment-guided molecular dynamic simulation and the MQAP-based model selection. It was found that the inclusion of QUARK-TBM simulations as an intermediate modeling step could help improve the quality of the I-TASSER models for both Easy and Hard TBM targets. Overall, the average TM-score of the first I-TASSER model is 12% higher than that of the best LOMETS templates, with the RMSD in the same threading-aligned regions reduced from 5.8 to 4.7 Å. Nevertheless, there are nearly 18% of TBM domains with the templates deteriorated by the structure assembly pipeline, which may be attributed to the errors of secondary structure and domain orientation predictions that propagate through and degrade the procedures of template identification and final model selections. To examine the record of progress, we made a retrospective report of the I-TASSER pipeline in the last five CASP experiments (CASP7-11). The data show no clear progress of the LOMETS threading programs over PSI-BLAST; but obvious progress on structural improvement relative to threading templates was witnessed in recent CASP experiments, which is probably attributed to the integration of the extended ab initio folding simulation with the threading assembly pipeline and the introduction of atomic-level structure refinements following the reduced modeling simulations. Proteins 2016; 84(Suppl 1):233-246. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Fibril assembly in whey protein mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolder, S.G.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to study fibril assembly in mixtures of whey proteins. The effect of the composition of the protein mixture on the structures and the resulting phase behaviour was investigated. The current work has shown that beta-lactoglobulin is responsible for the fibril assembly

  4. Template-based self-assembly for silicon chips and 01005 surface-mount components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoo, J. H.; Park, Kwang Soon; Baskaran, Rajashree; Böhringer, Karl F.

    2014-04-01

    We present template-based microscale self-assembly as a technique that promotes the electronics industry's initiative towards functional diversification and function densification, demonstrating that our process can improve existing assembly and packaging techniques, and also enable possibilities restricted by current industry methodologies. We first present foundational work that performs part (370 × 370 × 150 µm3) delivery to receptor sites (20 × 10 array) with a stochastic batch delivery process that completes within tens of seconds. The delivery mechanism is statistically characterized and a chemical kinetics inspired model is developed. Based on this understanding, repeatable and programmable 100% yield assembly is achieved in open-loop and feedback-based configurations. The established methodology is adapted to deliver and assemble standard 01 005 format (0.016″ × 0.008″, 0.4 mm × 0.2 mm) monolithic ceramic capacitors and thin-film resistors onto silicon substrates. This process is CMOS compatible and is competitive with capacitors and resistors fabricated through standard foundry processes.

  5. Accuracy of protein-protein binding sites in high-throughput template-based modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petras J Kundrotas

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The accuracy of protein structures, particularly their binding sites, is essential for the success of modeling protein complexes. Computationally inexpensive methodology is required for genome-wide modeling of such structures. For systematic evaluation of potential accuracy in high-throughput modeling of binding sites, a statistical analysis of target-template sequence alignments was performed for a representative set of protein complexes. For most of the complexes, alignments containing all residues of the interface were found. The full interface alignments were obtained even in the case of poor alignments where a relatively small part of the target sequence (as low as 40% aligned to the template sequence, with a low overall alignment identity (<30%. Although such poor overall alignments might be considered inadequate for modeling of whole proteins, the alignment of the interfaces was strong enough for docking. In the set of homology models built on these alignments, one third of those ranked 1 by a simple sequence identity criteria had RMSD<5 A, the accuracy suitable for low-resolution template free docking. Such models corresponded to multi-domain target proteins, whereas for single-domain proteins the best models had 5 Aprotein-protein complexes.

  6. Computational studies on self-assembled paclitaxel structures: templates for hierarchical block copolymer assemblies and sustained drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xin D; Tan, Jeremy P K; Kim, Sung H; Zhang, Li J; Zhang, Ying; Hedrick, James L; Yang, Yi Y; Qian, Yu

    2009-11-01

    Paclitaxel-loaded poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(lactide) (PEO-b-PLA) systems have been observed to assemble into fiber structures with remarkably different properties using different chirality and molecular weight of PLA segments. In this study, dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations were carried out to elaborate the microstructures and properties of pure paclitaxel and paclitaxel-loaded PEO-b-PLA systems. Paclitaxel molecules formed ribbon or fiber like structures in water. With the addition of PEO-b-PDLA, PEO-b-PLLA and their stereocomplex, paclitaxel acted as a template and polymer molecules assembled around the paclitaxel structure to form core/shell structured fibers having a PEO shell. For PEO19-b-PDLA27 and PEO19-b-PLLA27 systems, PLA segments and paclitaxel molecules were distributed homogeneously in the core of fibers based on the hydrophobic interactions. In the stereocomplex formulation, paclitaxel molecules were more concentrated in the inner PLA stereocomplex core, which led to slower release of paclitaxel. By increasing the length of PLA segments (e.g. 8,16,22 and 27), the crystalline structure of paclitaxel was gradually weakened and destroyed, which was further proved by X-ray diffraction studies. All the simulation results agreed well with experimental data, suggesting that the DPD simulations may provide a powerful tool for designing drug delivery systems.

  7. Engineering of protein assemblies within cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tien K; Ueno, Takafumi

    2018-01-06

    Recent achievements in development of protein assembles within cells have extended biosupramolecular composites into a new era with versatile applications in the fields of biomaterial and biotechnology. Using methods with biological and physicochemical routes has made this era of research more interesting and challenging. Further advances in protein engineering have facilitated efficient fabrication of supramolecular complexes within living cells. Here, we provide a review of recent efforts to engineer protein assemblies within cells and describe the promising properties of these assemblies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Self-assembled plasmonic templates produced by microwave annealing: applications to surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotopoulos, N. T.; Kalfagiannis, N.; Vasilopoulos, K. C.; Pliatsikas, N.; Kassavetis, S.; Vourlias, G.; Karakassides, M. A.; Patsalas, P.

    2015-05-01

    Perhaps the simplest method for creating metal nanoparticles on a substrate is by driving their self-assembly with the thermal annealing of a thin metal film. By properly tuning the annealing parameters one hopes to discover a recipe that allows the pre-determined design of the NP arrangement. However, thermal treatment is known for detrimental effects and is not really the manufacturer’s route of choice when it comes to large-scale applications. An alternative method is the use of microwave annealing, a method that has never been applied for metal processing, due to the high reflectance of microwave radiation at the surface of a metal. However, in this work we challenge the widely used nanostructuring methods by proving the microwave’s annealing ability to produce plasmonic templates, out of extremely thin metal films, by simply using a domestic microwave oven apparatus. We show that this process is generic and independent of the deposition method used for the metal and we further quantify the suitability of these plasmonic templates for use in surface-enhanced Raman scattering applications.

  9. Self-Assembling Protein Microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Niroshan; Hainsworth, Eugenie; Bhullar, Bhupinder; Eisenstein, Samuel; Rosen, Benjamin; Lau, Albert Y.; C. Walter, Johannes; LaBaer, Joshua

    2004-07-01

    Protein microarrays provide a powerful tool for the study of protein function. However, they are not widely used, in part because of the challenges in producing proteins to spot on the arrays. We generated protein microarrays by printing complementary DNAs onto glass slides and then translating target proteins with mammalian reticulocyte lysate. Epitope tags fused to the proteins allowed them to be immobilized in situ. This obviated the need to purify proteins, avoided protein stability problems during storage, and captured sufficient protein for functional studies. We used the technology to map pairwise interactions among 29 human DNA replication initiation proteins, recapitulate the regulation of Cdt1 binding to select replication proteins, and map its geminin-binding domain.

  10. Directly Addressable Sub-3 nm Gold Nanogaps Fabricated by Nanoskiving Using Self-Assembled Monolayers as Templates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pourhossein, Parisa; Chiechi, Ryan C.

    This paper describes the fabrication of electrically addressable, high-aspect-ratio (>10000:1) nanowires of gold with square cross sections of 100 nm on each side that are separated by gaps of 1.7-2.2 nm which were defined using self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) as templates. We fabricated these

  11. S-Layer Protein Self-Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pum, Dietmar; Toca-Herrera, Jose Luis; Sleytr, Uwe B.

    2013-01-01

    Crystalline S(urface)-layers are the most commonly observed cell surface structures in prokaryotic organisms (bacteria and archaea). S-layers are highly porous protein meshworks with unit cell sizes in the range of 3 to 30 nm, and thicknesses of ~10 nm. One of the key features of S-layer proteins is their intrinsic capability to form self-assembled mono- or double layers in solution, and at interfaces. Basic research on S-layer proteins laid foundation to make use of the unique self-assembly properties of native and, in particular, genetically functionalized S-layer protein lattices, in a broad range of applications in the life and non-life sciences. This contribution briefly summarizes the knowledge about structure, genetics, chemistry, morphogenesis, and function of S-layer proteins and pays particular attention to the self-assembly in solution, and at differently functionalized solid supports. PMID:23354479

  12. A Dynamic Combinatorial Approach for Identifying Side Groups that Stabilize DNA-Templated Supramolecular Self-Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Paolantoni

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available DNA-templated self-assembly is an emerging strategy for generating functional supramolecular systems, which requires the identification of potent multi-point binding ligands. In this line, we recently showed that bis-functionalized guanidinium compounds can interact with ssDNA and generate a supramolecular complex through the recognition of the phosphodiester backbone of DNA. In order to probe the importance of secondary interactions and to identify side groups that stabilize these DNA-templated self-assemblies, we report herein the implementation of a dynamic combinatorial approach. We used an in situ fragment assembly process based on reductive amination and tested various side groups, including amino acids. The results reveal that aromatic and cationic side groups participate in secondary supramolecular interactions that stabilize the complexes formed with ssDNA.

  13. Self-Assembling Protein Materials for Metal Nanoparticle Templation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Cohn, and Adam Goulburn. I have had no shortage of support inside classrooms and laboratories, which has been paralleled by the support of my...them to dry. Then were closed completely, inverted , and incubated at 37 °C overnight in a Yamato general purpose incubator IC400 (Yamato Scientific...minutes half covered to allow them to dry. Then were closed completely, inverted , and incubated at 37 °C overnight. Colonies were initially grown on

  14. A Template-Based Protein Structure Reconstruction Method Using Deep Autoencoder Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiou; Lyu, Qiang; Cheng, Jianlin

    2016-12-01

    Protein structure prediction is an important problem in computational biology, and is widely applied to various biomedical problems such as protein function study, protein design, and drug design. In this work, we developed a novel deep learning approach based on a deeply stacked denoising autoencoder for protein structure reconstruction. We applied our approach to a template-based protein structure prediction using only the 3D structural coordinates of homologous template proteins as input. The templates were identified for a target protein by a PSI-BLAST search. 3DRobot (a program that automatically generates diverse and well-packed protein structure decoys) was used to generate initial decoy models for the target from the templates. A stacked denoising autoencoder was trained on the decoys to obtain a deep learning model for the target protein. The trained deep model was then used to reconstruct the final structural model for the target sequence. With target proteins that have highly similar template proteins as benchmarks, the GDT-TS score of the predicted structures is greater than 0.7, suggesting that the deep autoencoder is a promising method for protein structure reconstruction.

  15. A de novo designed monomeric, compact three helix bundle protein on a carbohydrate template

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malik, Leila; Nygård, Jesper; Christensen, Niels Johan

    2015-01-01

    proteins, so called carboproteins. The hypothesis is that the template pre-organizes the secondary structure elements and directs the formation of a tertiary structure, thus achieving structural economy in the combination of peptide, linker, and template. We speculate that the structural information from...... the template could facilitate protein folding. Here we report the design and synthesis of 3-helix bundle carboproteins on deoxy-hexopyranosides. The carboproteins were analyzed by CD, AUC, SAXS, and NMR, which revealed the formation of the first compact, and folded monomeric carboprotein distinctly different...

  16. Template Syntheses, Crystal Structures and Supramolecular Assembly of Hexaaza Macrocyclic Copper(II) Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Taehyung; Kim, Ju Chang [Pukyong National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lough, Alan J. [Univ. of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2013-06-15

    Two new hexaaza macrocyclic copper(II) complexes were prepared by a template method and structurally characterized. In the solid state, they were self-assembled by intermolecular interactions to form the corresponding supramolecules 1 and 2, respectively. In the structure of 1, the copper(II) macrocycles are bridged by a tp ligand to form a macrocyclic copper(II) dimer. The dimer extends its structure by intermolecular forces such as hydrogen bonds and C-H···π interactions, resulting in the formation of a double stranded 1D supramolecule. In 2, the basic structure is a monomeric copper(II) macrocycle with deprotonated imidazole pendants. An undulated 1D hydrogen bonded array is achieved through hydrogen bonds between imidazole pendants and secondary amines, where the imidazole pendants act as a hydrogen bond acceptor. The 1D hydrogen bonded supramolecular chain is supported by C-H···π interactions between the methyl groups of acetonitrile ligands and imidazole pendants of the copper(II) macrocycles. In both complexes, the introduction of imidazoles to the macrocycle as a pendant plays an important role for the formation of supramolecules, where they act as intermolecular hydrogen bond donors and/or acceptors, C-H···π and π-π interactions.

  17. Template-Guided Self-Assembly of Discrete Optoplasmonic Molecules and Extended Optoplasmonic Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhard Björn M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The integration of metallic and dielectric building blocks into optoplasmonic structures creates new electromagnetic systems in which plasmonic and photonic modes can interact in the near-, intermediate- and farfield. The morphology-dependent electromagnetic coupling between the different building blocks in these hybrid structures provides a multitude of opportunities for controlling electromagnetic fields in both spatial and frequency domain as well as for engineering the phase landscape and the local density of optical states. Control over any of these properties requires, however, rational fabrication approaches for well-defined metal-dielectric hybrid structures. Template-guided self-assembly is a versatile fabrication method capable of integrating metallic and dielectric components into discrete optoplasmonic structures, arrays, or metasurfaces. The structural flexibility provided by the approach is illustrated by two representative implementations of optoplasmonic materials discussed in this review. In optoplasmonic atoms or molecules optical microcavities (OMs serve as whispering gallery mode resonators that provide a discrete photonic mode spectrum to interact with plasmonic nanostructures contained in the evanescent fields of the OMs. In extended hetero-nanoparticle arrays in-plane scattered light induces geometry-dependent photonic resonances that mix with the localized surface plasmon resonances of the metal nanoparticles.We characterize the fundamental electromagnetic working principles underlying both optoplasmonic approaches and review the fabrication strategies implemented to realize them.

  18. Templated Synthesis of Magnetic Nanoparticles through the Self-Assembly of Polymers and Surfactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vo Thu An Nguyen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of superparamagnetic nanoparticles (NPs for various technological applications continues to be an interesting research topic. The successful application of superparamagnetic NPs to each specific area typically depends on the achievement of high magnetization for the nanocrystals obtained, which is determined by their average size and size distribution. The size dispersity of magnetic NPs (MNPs is markedly improved when, during the synthesis, the nucleation and growth steps of the reaction are well-separated. Tuning the nucleation process with the assistance of a hosting medium that encapsulates the precursors (such as self-assembled micelles, dispersing them in discrete compartments, improves control over particle formation. These inorganic-organic hybrids inherit properties from both the organic and the inorganic materials, while the organic component can also bring a specific functionality to the particles or prevent their aggregation in water. The general concept of interest in this review is that the shape and size of the synthesized MNPs can be controlled to some extent by the geometry and the size of the organic templates used, which thus can be considered as molds at the nanometer scale, for both porous continuous matrices and suspensions.

  19. Synthesis of Inorganic Nanocomposites by Selective Introduction of Metal Complexes into a Self-Assembled Block Copolymer Template

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Wakayama

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Inorganic nanocomposites have characteristic structures that feature expanded interfaces, quantum effects, and resistance to crack propagation. These structures are promising for the improvement of many materials including thermoelectric materials, photocatalysts, and structural materials. Precise control of the inorganic nanocomposites’ morphology, size, and chemical composition is very important for these applications. Here, we present a novel fabrication method to control the structures of inorganic nanocomposites by means of a self-assembled block copolymer template. Different metal complexes were selectively introduced into specific polymer blocks of the block copolymer, and subsequent removal of the block copolymer template by oxygen plasma treatment produced hexagonally packed porous structures. In contrast, calcination removal of the block copolymer template yielded nanocomposites consisting of metallic spheres in a matrix of a metal oxide. These results demonstrate that different nanostructures can be created by selective use of processes to remove the block copolymer templates. The simple process of first mixing block copolymers and magnetic nanomaterial precursors and then subsequently removing the block copolymer template enables structural control of magnetic nanomaterials, which will facilitate their applicability in patterned media, including next-generation perpendicular magnetic recording media.

  20. Monosaccharide templates for de novo designed 4-alpha-helix bundle proteins: template effects in carboproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brask, Jesper; Dideriksen, J.M.; Nielsen, John

    2003-01-01

    De novo design and total chemical synthesis of proteins provide powerful approaches to critically test our understanding of protein folding, structure, and stability. The 4-alpha-helix bundle is a frequently studied structure in which four amphiphilic alpha-helical peptide strands form...

  1. Hollow colloidal particles by emulsion templating, from synthesis to self-assembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoldesi, C.I.

    2006-01-01

    This research was focused on developing a new method to prepare hollow colloidal particles in the micrometer range, based on emulsion templating, characterization of both the templates and the resulting particles from physical and chemical viewpoint, and fabrication of materials based on such

  2. Quantitative Three-Dimensional Characterization of Block Copolymer Directed Self-Assembly on Combined Chemical and Topographical Prepatterned Templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal-Peretz, Tamar; Ren, Jiaxing; Xiong, Shisheng; Khaira, Gurdaman; Bowen, Alec; Ocola, Leonidas E; Divan, Ralu; Doxastakis, Manolis; Ferrier, Nicola J; de Pablo, Juan; Nealey, Paul F

    2017-02-28

    Characterization of the three-dimensional (3D) structure in directed self-assembly (DSA) of block copolymers is crucial for understanding the complex relationships between the guiding template and the resulting polymer structure so DSA could be successfully implemented for advanced lithography applications. Here, we combined scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) tomography and coarse-grain simulations to probe the 3D structure of P2VP-b-PS-b-P2VP assembled on prepatterned templates using solvent vapor annealing. The templates consisted of nonpreferential background and raised guiding stripes that had PS-preferential top surfaces and P2VP-preferential sidewalls. The full 3D characterization allowed us to quantify the shape of the polymer domains and the interface between domains as a function of depth in the film and template geometry and offered important insights that were not accessible with 2D metrology. Sidewall guiding was advantageous in promoting the alignment and lowering the roughness of the P2VP domains over the sidewalls, but incommensurate confinement from the increased topography could cause roughness and intermittent dislocations in domains over the background region at the bottom of the film. The 3D characterization of bridge structures between domains over the background and breaks within domains on guiding lines sheds light on possible origins of common DSA defects. The positional fluctuations of the PS/P2VP interface between domains showed a depth-dependent behavior, with high levels of fluctuations near both the free surface of the film and the substrate and lower fluctuation levels in the middle of the film. This research demonstrates how 3D characterization offers a better understanding of DSA processes, leading to better design and fabrication of directing templates.

  3. Effect of Using Suboptimal Alignments in Template-Based Protein Structure Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Kihara, Daisuke

    2010-01-01

    Computational protein structure prediction remains a challenging task in protein bioinformatics. In the recent years, the importance of template-based structure prediction is increasing due to the growing number of protein structures solved by the structural genomics projects. To capitalize the significant efforts and investments paid on the structural genomics projects, it is urgent to establish effective ways to use the solved structures as templates by developing methods for exploiting remotely related proteins that cannot be simply identified by homology. In this work, we examine the effect of employing suboptimal alignments in template-based protein structure prediction. We showed that suboptimal alignments are often more accurate than the optimal one, and such accurate suboptimal alignments can occur even at a very low rank of the alignment score. Suboptimal alignments contain a significant number of correct amino acid residue contacts. Moreover, suboptimal alignments can improve template-based models when used as input to Modeller. Finally, we employ suboptimal alignments for handling a contact potential in a probabilistic way in a threading program, SUPRB. The probabilistic contacts strategy outperforms the partly thawed approach which only uses the optimal alignment in defining residue contacts and also the reranking strategy, which uses the contact potential in reranking alignments. The comparison with existing methods in the template-recognition test shows that SUPRB is very competitive and outperform existing methods. PMID:21058297

  4. Target guided synthesis using DNA nano-templates for selectively assembling a G-quadruplex binding c-MYC inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Deepanjan; Saha, Puja; Das, Tania; Dash, Jyotirmayee

    2017-07-01

    The development of small molecules is essential to modulate the cellular functions of biological targets in living system. Target Guided Synthesis (TGS) approaches have been used for the identification of potent small molecules for biological targets. We herein demonstrate an innovative example of TGS using DNA nano-templates that promote Huisgen cycloaddition from an array of azide and alkyne fragments. A G-quadruplex and a control duplex DNA nano-template have been prepared by assembling the DNA structures on gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles. The DNA nano-templates facilitate the regioselective formation of 1,4-substituted triazole products, which are easily isolated by magnetic decantation. The G-quadruplex nano-template can be easily recovered and reused for five reaction cycles. The major triazole product, generated by the G-quadruplex inhibits c-MYC expression by directly targeting the c-MYC promoter G-quadruplex. This work highlights that the nano-TGS approach may serve as a valuable strategy to generate target-selective ligands for drug discovery.

  5. An in situ self-assembly template strategy for the preparation of hierarchical-pore metal-organic frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hongliang; Li, Jian-Rong; Wang, Keke; Han, Tongtong; Tong, Minman; Li, Liangsha; Xie, Yabo; Yang, Qingyuan; Liu, Dahuan; Zhong, Chongli

    2015-01-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have recently emerged as a new type of nanoporous materials with tailorable structures and functions. Usually, MOFs have uniform pores smaller than 2 nm in size, limiting their practical applications in some cases. Although a few approaches have been adopted to prepare MOFs with larger pores, it is still challenging to synthesize hierarchical-pore MOFs (H-MOFs) with high structural controllability and good stability. Here we demonstrate a facile and versatile method, an in situ self-assembly template strategy for fabricating stable H-MOFs, in which multi-scale soluble and/or acid-sensitive metal-organic assembly (MOA) fragments form during the reactions between metal ions and organic ligands (to construct MOFs), and act as removable dynamic chemical templates. This general strategy was successfully used to prepare various H-MOFs that show rich porous properties and potential applications, such as in large molecule adsorption. Notably, the mesopore sizes of the H-MOFs can be tuned by varying the amount of templates. PMID:26548441

  6. An in situ self-assembly template strategy for the preparation of hierarchical-pore metal-organic frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hongliang; Li, Jian-Rong; Wang, Keke; Han, Tongtong; Tong, Minman; Li, Liangsha; Xie, Yabo; Yang, Qingyuan; Liu, Dahuan; Zhong, Chongli

    2015-11-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have recently emerged as a new type of nanoporous materials with tailorable structures and functions. Usually, MOFs have uniform pores smaller than 2 nm in size, limiting their practical applications in some cases. Although a few approaches have been adopted to prepare MOFs with larger pores, it is still challenging to synthesize hierarchical-pore MOFs (H-MOFs) with high structural controllability and good stability. Here we demonstrate a facile and versatile method, an in situ self-assembly template strategy for fabricating stable H-MOFs, in which multi-scale soluble and/or acid-sensitive metal-organic assembly (MOA) fragments form during the reactions between metal ions and organic ligands (to construct MOFs), and act as removable dynamic chemical templates. This general strategy was successfully used to prepare various H-MOFs that show rich porous properties and potential applications, such as in large molecule adsorption. Notably, the mesopore sizes of the H-MOFs can be tuned by varying the amount of templates.

  7. Assembly-driven activation of the AIM2 foreign-dsDNA sensor provides a polymerization template for downstream ASC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrone, Seamus R.; Matyszewski, Mariusz; Yu, Xiong; Delannoy, Michael; Egelman, Edward H.; Sohn, Jungsan

    2015-07-01

    AIM2 recognizes foreign dsDNA and assembles into the inflammasome, a filamentous supramolecular signalling platform required to launch innate immune responses. We show here that the pyrin domain of AIM2 (AIM2PYD) drives both filament formation and dsDNA binding. In addition, the dsDNA-binding domain of AIM2 also oligomerizes and assists in filament formation. The ability to oligomerize is critical for binding dsDNA, and in turn permits the size of dsDNA to regulate the assembly of the AIM2 polymers. The AIM2PYD oligomers define the filamentous structure, and the helical symmetry of the AIM2PYD filament is consistent with the filament assembled by the PYD of the downstream adaptor ASC. Our results suggest that the role of AIM2PYD is not autoinhibitory, but generating a structural template by coupling ligand binding and oligomerization is a key signal transduction mechanism in the AIM2 inflammasome.

  8. Water droplets as template for next-generation self-assembled poly-(etheretherketone) with cardo membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugliuzza, Annarosa; Aceto, Marianna Carmela; Macedonio, Francesca; Drioli, Enrico

    2008-08-28

    Next generation PEEK-WC membranes have been fabricated by using an innovative self-assembly technique. Patterned architectures have been achieved via a solvent-reduced and water-assisted process, resulting in honeycomb packed geometry. The membranes exhibit monodisperse pores with size and shape comparable to those left by templating water droplets. Influencing factors for the formation of self-assembled poly-(etheretherketone) with Cardo [PEEK-WC] membranes have been evaluated, identifying the critical parameters for nucleation, growth, and propagation of the droplet-mobile arrays through the overall films. Structure-transport relationships have been discussed according to the results achieved from the implementation of membrane distillation processes, yielding indication about the suitability of self-assembled PEEK-WC films to work as interfaces in contactor operations.

  9. High resolution patterning of nanoparticles by evaporative self-assembly enabled by in situ creation and mechanical lift-off of a polymer template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demko, Michael T.; Choi, Sun; Zohdi, Tarek I.; Pisano, Albert P.

    2011-12-01

    High-resolution patterning of nanostructured materials into open templates is limited by the processes of creation and removal of the necessary template. In this work, a process for forming a micropatterned template from cellulose acetate polymer in situ on the substrate is demonstrated. Nanoparticles are patterned by evaporative self-assembly, and the template is removed by mechanical means. The process is demonstrated by patterning zinc oxide nanoparticles on silicon and cyclic olefin copolymer substrates and by creating a highly sensitive ultraviolet light detector.

  10. A Two-Piece Derivative of a Group I Intron RNA as a Platform for Designing Self-Assembling RNA Templates to Promote Peptide Ligation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Tanaka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multicomponent RNA-peptide complexes are attractive from the viewpoint of artificial design of functional biomacromolecular systems. We have developed self-folding and self-assembling RNAs that serve as templates to assist chemical ligation between two reactive peptides with RNA-binding capabilities. The design principle of previous templates, however, can be applied only to limited classes of RNA-binding peptides. In this study, we employed a two-piece derivative of a group I intron RNA from the Tetrahymena large subunit ribosomal RNA (LSU rRNA as a platform for new template RNAs. In this group I intron-based self-assembling platform, modules for the recognition of substrate peptides can be installed independently from modules holding the platform structure. The new self-assembling platform allows us to expand the repertoire of substrate peptides in template RNA design.

  11. DNA-directed assembly of protein microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yew Chung; Wan, Guoqiang; Ng, Jin Kiat; Ajikumar, Parayil Kumaran; Too, Heng-Phon

    2008-05-01

    Microarray technology has made it possible to simultaneously study the abundance, interactions, and functions of potentially tens of thousands of biological molecules. From its earliest use in DNA microarrays, where only nucleic acids were captured and detected on the arrays, applications of microarrays now extend to those involving biomolecules such as antibodies, proteins, peptides, and carbohydrates. In contrast to the relative robustness of DNA microarrays, the use of such chemically diverse biomolecules on microarray formats presents many challenges in their fabrication as well as application. Among the many methods that have been proposed to overcome these challenges, DNA-directed assembly (DDA) has emerged as a promising strategy for the high sensitivity and multiplexed capture and detection of various analytes. In this review, we explore the challenges faced during the design, fabrication, and utilization of protein microarrays and highlight how DDA strategies, together with other recent advances in the field, are accelerating the development of platforms available for protein microarray applications.

  12. "Bis-Click" Ligation of DNA: Template-Controlled Assembly, Circularisation and Functionalisation with Bifunctional and Trifunctional Azides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haozhe; Seela, Frank

    2017-03-08

    Ligation and circularisation of oligonucleotides containing terminal triple bonds was performed with bifunctional or trifunctional azides. Both reactions are high yielding. Template-assisted bis-click ligation of two individual non-complementary oligonucleotide strands was accomplished to yield heterodimers exclusively. In this context, the template fulfils two functions: it accelerates the ligation reaction and controls product assembly (heterodimer vs. homodimer formation). Intermolecular bis-click circularisation of one oligonucleotide strand took place without template assistance. For construction of oligonucleotides with terminal triple bonds in the nucleobase side chain, 7- or 5-functionalised 7-deaza-dA and dU residues were used. These oligonucleotides are directly accessible by solid-phase synthesis. When trifunctional azides were employed instead of bifunctional linkers, functionalisation of the remaining azido group was performed with small molecules such as 1-ethynyl pyrene, biotin propargyl amide or with ethynylated oligonucleotides. By this means, branched DNA was constructed. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Characterization and Application of DNA-templated Silver Nanoclusters and Polarized Spectroscopy of Self-Assembled Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carro-Temboury, Miguel R.

    In this thesis two different systems are investigated envisioning their potential applications: DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) and ionic self-assembled (ISA) nanostructures based on azo-dyes. Mainly Visible-NIR spectroscopy was used to probe electronic transitions with absorbance...... due to their reduced cost, high achievable degree of supramolecular order, and potential application in molecular electronics. The degree of order is related to the performance of molecular devices. Ionic Self-Assembled (ISA) materials formed by surfactant chains and azo-dyes featuring long range...... of the azo-dyes. An absorption band in the visible spectrum was measured using the tilted plate method and the stretched polymer-film method. Adapting the theory from the literature and using computational tools, the average angle between absorption transition moment of the azo dyes and the normal...

  14. Application of oligonucleotide as a template for the assembly of nucleoamphiphile bearing azobenzene at the air-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruta, Osamu; Ijiro, Kuniharu

    2007-03-01

    In order to assemble amphiphilic adenine having azobenzene, C12AzoC5Ade (AzoAde), at the air-water interface based on the molecular recognition of DNA, we prepared aqueous linear oligothymidylic acids, dTn (n = 4, 6, 8, 10, 30), subphase as templates. Surface pressure-area (pi-A) isotherms and UV-Vis reflection absorption spectra of AzoAde were measured to investigate the effect of chain length of the oligothymidylic acid on the molecular recognition by forming a complementary A-T base pair. It was showed that AzoAde did not form a stable monolayer on the dT4 subphase and remained monomeric state. While AzoAde provided expanded monolayers and formed J-aggregates of azobenzene moieties on the dTn (n > 4) subphases even at the low molecular density. We also investigated the molecular recognition of template oligonucleotides by comparing dT30 with dA30, indicating that AzoAde had not a specific interaction with dA30 at the air-water interface due to base mismatching. The AzoAde monolayer on the dA30 subphase gave H-aggregate from monomeric state by compressing it. On the other hand, it remained J-aggregated state on dT30 subphase regardless of compression. It was, therefore, suggested that the linear oligothymidylic acids, dT, (n > 4), acted as templates for assembling AzoAde at the air-water interface.

  15. Templated self-assembly of ZnO films on monolayer patterns with nanoscale resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauermann, Luciana Pitta; Gerstel, Peter; Bill, Joachim; Walheim, Stefan; Huang, Cheng; Pfeifer, Joerg; Schimmel, Thomas

    2010-03-16

    Lithographically defined self-growing ZnO films were prepared by a bioinspired chemical bath deposition technique (CBD). We observed a high selectivity of ZnO deposition: Teflon-like per-fluoro-decyl-trichlorosilane (FDTS) monolayers repelled ZnO primary particles, whereas amino-functionalized areas of the substrate were selectively covered by a highly anisotropic, oriented, and compact ZnO film with a thickness of 50 nm. The size of the primary particles in our methanol-based solution was approximately 2.5 nm. On the amino substrate they formed agglomerates not larger than 30 nm. Monolayer patterns made by polymer blend lithography were templated with an edge resolution of 30 nm. By using a specialized derivative of microcontact printing, we prepared layout-defined silane templates, which reliably determined the growth of a layout-defined, patterned oxide film with submicrometer lateral resolution.

  16. Colloidal Templating at a Cholesteric-Oil Interface: Assembly Guided by an Array of Disclination Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lintuvuori, J. S.; Pawsey, A. C.; Stratford, K.; Cates, M. E.; Clegg, P. S.; Marenduzzo, D.

    2013-05-01

    We simulate colloids (radius R˜1μm) trapped at the interface between a cholesteric liquid crystal and an immiscible oil at which the helical order (pitch p) in the bulk conflicts with the orientation induced at the interface, stabilizing an ordered array of disclinations. For a weak anchoring strength W of the director field at the colloidal surface, this creates a template, favoring particle positions either on top of or midway between defect lines, depending on α=R/p. For small α, optical microscopy experiments confirm this picture, but for larger α no templating is seen. This may stem from the emergence at moderate W of a rugged energy landscape associated with defect reconnections.

  17. Self-assembled peptide template directed synthesis of one-dimensional inorganic nanostructures and their applications

    OpenAIRE

    Acar, Handan

    2012-01-01

    Ankara : The Materials Science and Nanotechnology Program of the Graduate School of Engineering and Sciences of Bilkent University, 2012. Thesis (Ph. D.) -- Bilkent University, 2012. Includes bibliographical references. Engineering at the nano scale has been an active area of science and technology over the last decade. Inspired by nature, synthesis of functional inorganic materials using synthetic organic templates constitutes the theme of this thesis. Developing organic te...

  18. Prediction of homoprotein and heteroprotein complexes by protein docking and template-based modeling: A CASP-CAPRI experiment

    KAUST Repository

    Lensink, Marc F.

    2016-04-28

    We present the results for CAPRI Round 30, the first joint CASP-CAPRI experiment, which brought together experts from the protein structure prediction and protein-protein docking communities. The Round comprised 25 targets from amongst those submitted for the CASP11 prediction experiment of 2014. The targets included mostly homodimers, a few homotetramers, and two heterodimers, and comprised protein chains that could readily be modeled using templates from the Protein Data Bank. On average 24 CAPRI groups and 7 CASP groups submitted docking predictions for each target, and 12 CAPRI groups per target participated in the CAPRI scoring experiment. In total more than 9500 models were assessed against the 3D structures of the corresponding target complexes. Results show that the prediction of homodimer assemblies by homology modeling techniques and docking calculations is quite successful for targets featuring large enough subunit interfaces to represent stable associations. Targets with ambiguous or inaccurate oligomeric state assignments, often featuring crystal contact-sized interfaces, represented a confounding factor. For those, a much poorer prediction performance was achieved, while nonetheless often providing helpful clues on the correct oligomeric state of the protein. The prediction performance was very poor for genuine tetrameric targets, where the inaccuracy of the homology-built subunit models and the smaller pair-wise interfaces severely limited the ability to derive the correct assembly mode. Our analysis also shows that docking procedures tend to perform better than standard homology modeling techniques and that highly accurate models of the protein components are not always required to identify their association modes with acceptable accuracy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Using iterative fragment assembly and progressive sequence truncation to facilitate phasing and crystal structure determination of distantly related proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Virtanen, Jouko; Xue, Zhidong; Tesmer, John J G; Zhang, Yang

    2016-05-01

    Molecular replacement (MR) often requires templates with high homology to solve the phase problem in X-ray crystallography. I-TASSER-MR has been developed to test whether the success rate for structure determination of distant-homology proteins could be improved by a combination of iterative fragmental structure-assembly simulations with progressive sequence truncation designed to trim regions with high variation. The pipeline was tested on two independent protein sets consisting of 61 proteins from CASP8 and 100 high-resolution proteins from the PDB. After excluding homologous templates, I-TASSER generated full-length models with an average TM-score of 0.773, which is 12% higher than the best threading templates. Using these as search models, I-TASSER-MR found correct MR solutions for 95 of 161 targets as judged by having a TFZ of >8 or with the final structure closer to the native than the initial search models. The success rate was 16% higher than when using the best threading templates. I-TASSER-MR was also applied to 14 protein targets from structure genomics centers. Seven of these were successfully solved by I-TASSER-MR. These results confirm that advanced structure assembly and progressive structural editing can significantly improve the success rate of MR for targets with distant homology to proteins of known structure.

  20. Wetting driven self-assembly as a new approach to template-guided fabrication of metal nanopatterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Devasish; Maoz, Rivka; Sagiv, Jacob

    2007-06-01

    Wetting driven self-assembly (WDSA) of appropriate materials in their liquid state on organic monolayer nanopatterns consisting of wettable (lyophilic) surface features surrounded by a nonwettable (lyophobic) monolayer background is shown to provide the basis of a versatile new approach to template-guided fabrication of metal nanopatterns. Monolayer nanopatterns with planned distributions of lyophilic/lyophobic surface regions are conveniently generated by constructive nanolithography upon local electrochemical oxidation of the top -CH3 groups of a highly ordered OTS (n-octadecyltrichlorosilane) monolayer self-assembled on silicon to -COOH (Adv. Mater. 2000, 12, 725-731). Retraction of such a patterned monolayer from a liquid that does not wet its nonpolar -CH3 surface (lyophobic) results in selective, site-defined immobilization of nanosized volumes of the liquid on the locally generated polar -COOH groups (lyophilic). Examples are given of WDSA of organic materials that offer further options for post-assembly chemical processing, such as nonvolatile low-melting olefins, acids, or thiols, the former being in situ reacted to generate polar functions like -COOH or -SH. Loading surface patterns created in this manner with silver or gold ions followed by further chemical processing results in elemental metal nanoparticles generated within the ion-binding organic material, which thus functions as a guiding template for planned metal deposition at predefined surface sites. WDSA is particularly versatile, as any nonvolatile material with appropriate melting temperature and surface wetting characteristics or solubility in a liquid displaying such properties may in principle be utilized to fabricate potentially useful surface nanostructures.

  1. Directed Supramolecular Surface Assembly of SNAP-tag Fusion Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uhlenheuer, D.A.; Wasserberg, D.; Haase, C.; Nguyen, Hoang D.; Schenkel, J.H.; Huskens, Jurriaan; Ravoo, B.J.; Jonkheijm, Pascal; Brunsveld, Luc

    2012-01-01

    Supramolecular assembly of proteins on surfaces and vesicles was investigated by site-selective incorporation of a supramolecular guest element on proteins. Fluorescent proteins were site-selectively labeled with bisadamantane by SNAP-tag technology. The assembly of the bisadamantane functionalized

  2. Self-assembled supramolecular networks at interfaces: Molecular immobilization and recognition using nanoporous templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Zeng, Qingdao; Wang, Chen

    2011-10-01

    In this review a series of organic-based open porous networks are discussed, in which hydrogen bonds play an important role in network formation. Using these open networks as molecular templates: 1) a wealth of functional guest species can be immobilized; 2) fullerene molecules can be separated and recognized; 3) photoisomerization reactions can be observed by STM; 4) 1D molecular arrays can be constructed; and 5) heterogeneous bilayer structures can be formed. It is envisioned that these supramolecular networks might be developed into a new family of useful soft frameworks for studies toward shape-selective catalysis, molecular recognition and host-guest supramolecular chemistry.

  3. Self-assembly of chiral coordination polymers and macrocycles: a metal template effect on the polymer-macrocycle equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchell, Tara J; Puddephatt, Richard J

    2005-05-16

    The self-assembly of racemic and enantiopure binaphthyl-bis(amidopyridyl) ligands 1,1'-C(20)H(12){NHC(=O)-4-C(5)H(4)N}(2), 1, and 1,1'-C(20)H(12){NHC(=O)-3-C(5)H(4)N}(2), 2, with mercury(II) halides (HgX(2); X = Cl, Br, I) to form extended metal-containing arrays is described. It is shown that the self-assembly can lead to homochiral or heterochiral polymers or macrocycles, through self-recognition or self-discrimination of the ligand units, and the primary materials can further self-assemble through hydrogen bonding between amide substituents. In addition, the formation of macrocycles or polymers can be influenced by the presence or absence of excess mercury(II) halide, through a template effect, and mercury(II) halide inclusion complexes may be formed. In one case, an unusual polymeric compound was obtained, with 1 guest HgX(2) molecule for every 12 mercury halide units in the polymer.

  4. Constructing of DNA vectors with controlled nanosize and single dispersion by block copolymer coating gold nanoparticles as template assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Junbo, E-mail: Lijunbo@haust.edu.cn [Henan University of Science and Technology, School of Chemical Engineering and Pharmaceutics (China); Wu, Wenlan [Henan University of Science and Technology, School of Medicine (China); Gao, Jiayu; Liang, Ju; Zhou, Huiyun; Liang, Lijuan [Henan University of Science and Technology, School of Chemical Engineering and Pharmaceutics (China)

    2017-03-15

    Synthesized vectors with nanoscale size and stable colloid dispersion are highly desirable for improving gene delivery efficiency. Here, a core-shell template particle was constructed with polyethylene glycol-b-poly1-(3-aminopropyl)-3-(2-methacryloyloxy propylimidazolium bromine) (PEG-b-PAMPImB) coating gold nanoparticles (PEG-b-PAMPImB-@-Au NPs) for loading DNA and delivering in vitro. Data from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) suggest that these nanoplexes, by forming an electrostatic complex with DNA at the inner PAMPImB shell, offer steric protection for the outer PEG corona leading to single dispersion and small size. Notably, higher colloid stability and lower cytotoxicity were achieved with these nanoplexes when compared with PAMPImB monolayer-coated gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). Confocal laser scanning microscopy and intracellular trafficking TEM further indicate that the nanoplexes can translocate across the cell membrane and partly enter the nucleus for high efficient expression. Thus, template assembly represents a promising approach to control the size and colloid stability of gene vectors and ensure safety and efficiency of DNA delivery.

  5. Constructing of DNA vectors with controlled nanosize and single dispersion by block copolymer coating gold nanoparticles as template assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junbo; Wu, Wenlan; Gao, Jiayu; Liang, Ju; Zhou, Huiyun; Liang, Lijuan

    2017-03-01

    Synthesized vectors with nanoscale size and stable colloid dispersion are highly desirable for improving gene delivery efficiency. Here, a core-shell template particle was constructed with polyethylene glycol- b-poly1-(3-aminopropyl)-3-(2-methacryloyloxy propylimidazolium bromine) (PEG- b-PAMPImB) coating gold nanoparticles (PEG- b-PAMPImB-@-Au NPs) for loading DNA and delivering in vitro. Data from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) suggest that these nanoplexes, by forming an electrostatic complex with DNA at the inner PAMPImB shell, offer steric protection for the outer PEG corona leading to single dispersion and small size. Notably, higher colloid stability and lower cytotoxicity were achieved with these nanoplexes when compared with PAMPImB monolayer-coated gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). Confocal laser scanning microscopy and intracellular trafficking TEM further indicate that the nanoplexes can translocate across the cell membrane and partly enter the nucleus for high efficient expression. Thus, template assembly represents a promising approach to control the size and colloid stability of gene vectors and ensure safety and efficiency of DNA delivery.

  6. Direct assembly of in situ templated CdSe quantum dots via crystalline lamellae structure of polyamide 66

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheval, Nicolas; Brooks, Richard [University of Nottingham, Division of Materials, Mechanics and Structures, Faculty of Engineering (United Kingdom); Fahmi, Amir, E-mail: Amir.Fahmi@hochschule-Rhein-waal.de [Rhein-Waal University of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Technology and Bionics (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    A simple concept is proposed for templating in situ synthesised CdSe quantum dots (QDs) into an organised nano-pattern using the crystalline lamellae structure of polyamide 66 (PA66). The morphology obtained for PA66 and the hybrid material on Si/SiO{sub x} solid substrate was characterised by means of atomic force microscope. Controlling the PA66 concentration in solution and the organic-inorganic interactions are found to be the keys factors to direct the assembly of CdSe QDs along the PA66 linear crystalline structure. This simple approach could be opened a new avenue for a large spectrum of innovative high-tech applications.

  7. Electron-beam patterned self-assembled monolayers as templates for Cu electrodeposition and lift-off

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe She

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs of 4'-methylbiphenyl-4-thiol (MBP0 adsorbed on polycrystalline gold substrates served as templates to control electrochemical deposition of Cu structures from acidic solution, and enabled the subsequent lift-off of the metal structures by attachment to epoxy glue. By exploiting the negative-resist behaviour of MBP0, the SAM was patterned by means of electron-beam lithography. For high deposition contrast a two-step procedure was employed involving a nucleation phase around −0.7 V versus Cu2+/Cu and a growth phase at around −0.35 V versus Cu2+/Cu. Structures with features down to 100 nm were deposited and transferred with high fidelity. By using substrates with different surface morphologies, AFM measurements revealed that the roughness of the substrate is a crucial factor but not the only one determining the roughness of the copper surface that is exposed after lift-off.

  8. Template-based modeling and ab initio refinement of protein oligomer structures using GALAXY in CAPRI round 30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hasup; Baek, Minkyung; Lee, Gyu Rie; Park, Sangwoo; Seok, Chaok

    2017-03-01

    Many proteins function as homo- or hetero-oligomers; therefore, attempts to understand and regulate protein functions require knowledge of protein oligomer structures. The number of available experimental protein structures is increasing, and oligomer structures can be predicted using the experimental structures of related proteins as templates. However, template-based models may have errors due to sequence differences between the target and template proteins, which can lead to functional differences. Such structural differences may be predicted by loop modeling of local regions or refinement of the overall structure. In CAPRI (Critical Assessment of PRotein Interactions) round 30, we used recently developed features of the GALAXY protein modeling package, including template-based structure prediction, loop modeling, model refinement, and protein-protein docking to predict protein complex structures from amino acid sequences. Out of the 25 CAPRI targets, medium and acceptable quality models were obtained for 14 and 1 target(s), respectively, for which proper oligomer or monomer templates could be detected. Symmetric interface loop modeling on oligomer model structures successfully improved model quality, while loop modeling on monomer model structures failed. Overall refinement of the predicted oligomer structures consistently improved the model quality, in particular in interface contacts. Proteins 2017; 85:399-407. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Synthesis of Coordination Polymer Nanoparticles using Self-Assembled Block Copolymers as Template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Birgit

    2017-12-22

    Nowadays there is a high demand in specialized functional materials, for example, for applications as sensors in biomedicine. For the realization of such applications, nanostructures and the integration in a composite matrix are indispensable. Coordination polymers and networks, for example, with spin crossover properties, are a highly promising family of switchable materials in which the switching process can be triggered by various external stimuli. An overview over different strategies for the synthesis of nanoparticles of such systems is given. A special focus is set on the use of block copolymer micelles as templates for the synthesis of nanocomposites. The block copolymer defines the final size and shape of the nanoparticle core. Additionally it allows a further functionalization of the obtained nanoparticles by variation of the polymer blocks and an easy deposition of the composite material on surfaces. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Supramolecular Gel-Templated In Situ Synthesis and Assembly of CdS Quantum Dots Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lili; He, Jie; Wang, Xiaoliang; Li, Dawei; He, Haibing; Ren, Lianbing; Jiang, Biwang; Wang, Yong; Teng, Chao; Xue, Gi; Tao, Huchun

    2017-01-01

    Although many studies have attempted to develop strategies for spontaneously organizing nanoparticles (NPs) into three-dimensional (3D) geometries, it remains a fascinating challenge. In this study, a method for in situ synthesis and self-assembly of a CdS quantum dots (QDs) gel using a Cd supramolecular gel as a scaffold was demonstrated. During the QDs formation process, the Cd ions that constituted the Cd gels served as the precursors of the CdS QDs, and the oleic acid (OA) that ligated with the Cd in the supramolecular gels was capped on the surface of the CdS QDs in the form of carboxylate. The OA-stabilized CdS QDs were in situ synthesized in the entangled self-assembled fibrillar networks (SAFIN) of the Cd gels through reactions between the gelator and H2S. As a result, the QDs exactly replicated the framework of the SAFIN in the CdS QD gels instead of simply assembling along the SAFIN of the supramolecular gels. Moreover, the CdS QDs showed extraordinary sensitivity in the fluorescence detection of IO4 - anions. The facile one-step method developed here is a new approach to assembling nanostructured materials into 3D architectures and has general implications for the design of low molecular mass gelators to bring desired functionality to the developed supramolecular gels.

  11. Template-Directed Self-Assembly of Alkanethiol Monolayers: Selective Growth on Preexisting Monolayer Edges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharpe, R.B.A.; Burdinski, Dirk; Huskens, Jurriaan; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.; Reinhoudt, David; Poelsema, Bene

    2007-01-01

    Self-assembled monolayers were investigated for their suitability as two-dimensional scaffolds for the selective growth of alkanethiol edge structures. Heterostructures with chemical contrast could be grown, whose dimensions were governed by both the initial pattern sizes and the process time.

  12. Properties of Fibrillar Protein Assemblies and their Percolating Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerman, C.

    2004-01-01

    Properties of Fibrillar Protein Assemblies and their Percolating Networks. PhD thesis, Wageningen University, The Netherlands Keywords: bovine serum albumin, complex fluids, excluded volume, fibrils, gels, innovation, b-lactoglobulin, ovalbumin, percolation, proteins, rheology, rheo-optics,

  13. Tetrahymena dynamin-related protein 6 self-assembles ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Usha P Kar

    2017-12-30

    Dec 30, 2017 ... Self-assembly on target membranes is one of the important properties of all dynamin family proteins. Drp6, a dynamin- related protein in Tetrahymena, controls nuclear remodelling and undergoes cycles of assembly/disassembly on the nuclear envelope. To elucidate the mechanism of Drp6 function, we ...

  14. Self-assembled plasmonic templates produced by microwave annealing: applications to surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Panagiotopoulos, NT; Kalfagiannis, N.; Vasilopoulos, KC; Pliatsikas, N; Kassavetis, S; Vourlias, G.; Karakassides, MA; Patsalas, P.

    2015-01-01

    Perhaps the simplest method for creating metal nanoparticles on a substrate is by driving their self-assembly with the thermal annealing of a thin metal film. By properly tuning the annealing parameters one hopes to discover a recipe that allows the pre-determined design of the NP arrangement. However, thermal treatment is known for detrimental effects and is not really the manufacturer's route of choice when it comes to large-scale applications. An alternative method is the use of microwave ...

  15. Block copolymer templated self-assembly of disk-shaped molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragones, J. L.; Alexander-Katz, A.

    2017-08-01

    Stacking of disk-shaped organic molecules is a promising strategy to develop electronic and photovoltaic devices. Here, we investigate the capability of a soft block copolymer matrix that microphase separates into a cylindrical phase to direct the self-assembly of disk-shaped molecules by means of molecular simulations. We show that two disk molecules confined in the cylinder domain experience a depletion force, induced by the polymer chains, which results in the formation of stacks of disks. This entropic interaction and the soft confinement provided by the matrix are both responsible for the structures that can be self-assembled, which include slanted or columnar stacks. In addition, we evidence the transmission of stresses between the different minority domains of the microphase, which results in the establishment of a long-ranged interaction between disk molecules embedded in different domains; this interaction is of the order of the microphase periodicity and may be exploited to direct assembly of disks at larger scales.

  16. Massive integration of diverse protein quality assessment methods to improve template based modeling in CASP11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Renzhi; Bhattacharya, Debswapna; Adhikari, Badri; Li, Jilong; Cheng, Jianlin

    2016-09-01

    Model evaluation and selection is an important step and a big challenge in template-based protein structure prediction. Individual model quality assessment methods designed for recognizing some specific properties of protein structures often fail to consistently select good models from a model pool because of their limitations. Therefore, combining multiple complimentary quality assessment methods is useful for improving model ranking and consequently tertiary structure prediction. Here, we report the performance and analysis of our human tertiary structure predictor (MULTICOM) based on the massive integration of 14 diverse complementary quality assessment methods that was successfully benchmarked in the 11th Critical Assessment of Techniques of Protein Structure prediction (CASP11). The predictions of MULTICOM for 39 template-based domains were rigorously assessed by six scoring metrics covering global topology of Cα trace, local all-atom fitness, side chain quality, and physical reasonableness of the model. The results show that the massive integration of complementary, diverse single-model and multi-model quality assessment methods can effectively leverage the strength of single-model methods in distinguishing quality variation among similar good models and the advantage of multi-model quality assessment methods of identifying reasonable average-quality models. The overall excellent performance of the MULTICOM predictor demonstrates that integrating a large number of model quality assessment methods in conjunction with model clustering is a useful approach to improve the accuracy, diversity, and consequently robustness of template-based protein structure prediction. Proteins 2016; 84(Suppl 1):247-259. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Templated assembly of photoswitches significantly increases the energy-storage capacity of solar thermal fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharski, Timothy J; Ferralis, Nicola; Kolpak, Alexie M; Zheng, Jennie O; Nocera, Daniel G; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2014-05-01

    Large-scale utilization of solar-energy resources will require considerable advances in energy-storage technologies to meet ever-increasing global energy demands. Other than liquid fuels, existing energy-storage materials do not provide the requisite combination of high energy density, high stability, easy handling, transportability and low cost. New hybrid solar thermal fuels, composed of photoswitchable molecules on rigid, low-mass nanostructures, transcend the physical limitations of molecular solar thermal fuels by introducing local sterically constrained environments in which interactions between chromophores can be tuned. We demonstrate this principle of a hybrid solar thermal fuel using azobenzene-functionalized carbon nanotubes. We show that, on composite bundling, the amount of energy stored per azobenzene more than doubles from 58 to 120 kJ mol(-1), and the material also maintains robust cyclability and stability. Our results demonstrate that solar thermal fuels composed of molecule-nanostructure hybrids can exhibit significantly enhanced energy-storage capabilities through the generation of template-enforced steric strain.

  18. Templated assembly of photoswitches significantly increases the energy-storage capacity of solar thermal fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharski, Timothy J.; Ferralis, Nicola; Kolpak, Alexie M.; Zheng, Jennie O.; Nocera, Daniel G.; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2014-05-01

    Large-scale utilization of solar-energy resources will require considerable advances in energy-storage technologies to meet ever-increasing global energy demands. Other than liquid fuels, existing energy-storage materials do not provide the requisite combination of high energy density, high stability, easy handling, transportability and low cost. New hybrid solar thermal fuels, composed of photoswitchable molecules on rigid, low-mass nanostructures, transcend the physical limitations of molecular solar thermal fuels by introducing local sterically constrained environments in which interactions between chromophores can be tuned. We demonstrate this principle of a hybrid solar thermal fuel using azobenzene-functionalized carbon nanotubes. We show that, on composite bundling, the amount of energy stored per azobenzene more than doubles from 58 to 120 kJ mol-1, and the material also maintains robust cyclability and stability. Our results demonstrate that solar thermal fuels composed of molecule-nanostructure hybrids can exhibit significantly enhanced energy-storage capabilities through the generation of template-enforced steric strain.

  19. Precise Coating of a Wide Range of DNA Templates by a Protein Polymer with a DNA Binding Domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernandez-Garcia, Armando; Estrich, Nicole A.; Werten, Marc W.T.; Maarel, van der Johan R.C.; Labean, Thomas H.; Wolf, de Frits A.; Cohen Stuart, Martien A.; Vries, de Renko

    2017-01-01

    Emerging DNA-based nanotechnologies would benefit from the ability to modulate the properties (e.g., solubility, melting temperature, chemical stability) of diverse DNA templates (single molecules or origami nanostructures) through controlled, self-assembling coatings. We here introduce a DNA

  20. LoopIng: a template-based tool for predicting the structure of protein loops.

    KAUST Repository

    Messih, Mario Abdel

    2015-08-06

    Predicting the structure of protein loops is very challenging, mainly because they are not necessarily subject to strong evolutionary pressure. This implies that, unlike the rest of the protein, standard homology modeling techniques are not very effective in modeling their structure. However, loops are often involved in protein function, hence inferring their structure is important for predicting protein structure as well as function.We describe a method, LoopIng, based on the Random Forest automated learning technique, which, given a target loop, selects a structural template for it from a database of loop candidates. Compared to the most recently available methods, LoopIng is able to achieve similar accuracy for short loops (4-10 residues) and significant enhancements for long loops (11-20 residues). The quality of the predictions is robust to errors that unavoidably affect the stem regions when these are modeled. The method returns a confidence score for the predicted template loops and has the advantage of being very fast (on average: 1 min/loop).www.biocomputing.it/loopinganna.tramontano@uniroma1.itSupplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  1. Assembly of new polyoxometalate–templated metal–organic frameworks based on flexible ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Na; Mu, Bao; Lv, Lei; Huang, Rudan, E-mail: huangrd@bit.edu.cn

    2015-03-15

    Four new polyoxometalate(POM)–templated metal–organic frameworks based on flexible ligands, namely, [Cu{sub 6}(bip){sub 12}(PMo{sup VI}{sub 12}O{sub 40}){sub 2}(PMo{sup V}Mo{sup VI}{sub 11}O{sub 40}O{sub 2})]·8H{sub 2}O(1), [Cu{sup I}{sub 3}Cu{sup II}{sub 3}(bip){sub 12}(PMo{sup VI}{sub 12}O{sub 40}){sub 2}(PMo{sup V}{sub 12}O{sub 34})]·8H{sub 2}O(2), [Ni{sub 6}(bip){sub 12}(PMo{sup VI}{sub 12}O{sub 40})(PMo{sup VI}{sub 11}Mo{sup V}O{sub 40}){sub 2}]Cl·6H{sub 2}O(3), [Co{sup II}{sub 3}Co{sup III}{sub 2}(H{sub 2}bib){sub 2}(Hbib){sub 2}(PW{sub 9}O{sub 34}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]·6H{sub 2}O(4) (bip=1,3-bis(imidazolyl)propane, bib=1,4-bis(imidazolyl)butane) have been obtained under hydrothermal condition and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses, elemental analyses, and thermogravimetric (TG) analyses. The studies of single crystal X-ray indicate that compounds 1–3 crystallize in the trigonal space group P-3, and compound 4 crystallizes in the triclinic space group P-1. Compounds 1 and 3 represent 3D frameworks, and POMs as the guest molecules are incorporated into the cages which are composed of the ligands and metals, while compounds 2 and 4 show 3D frameworks by hydrogen bonds. This compounds provide new examples of host–guest compounds based on flexible bis(imidazole) ligands. In addition, the electrochemical property and the catalytic property of compound 1 have also been investigated. - Graphical abstract: Four inorganic–organic hybrid compounds based polyoxometalates (POMs) and flexible ligands, namely, have been obtained under hydrothermal conditions and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses, elemental analyses, IR spectra, and thermogravimetric (TG) analyses. Compounds 1–3 are new examples of host–guest compounds based on flexible bis(imidazole) ligands and POMs as the guest molecules are incorporated into the cages which are composed of the ligands and metals. - Highlights: • Polyoxometalate–templated

  2. Assemblies of copper bis(triazole) coordination polymers using the same keggin polyoxometalate template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ai-xiang; Ying, Jun; Peng, Jun; Sha, Jing-quan; Pang, Hai-jun; Zhang, Peng-peng; Chen, Yuan; Zhu, Min; Su, Zhong-min

    2009-01-05

    Four inorganic-organic hybrid compounds, [Cu(I)(4)(bte)(4)(SiW(12)O(40))] (1), [Cu(II)(2)(bte)(4)(SiW(12)O(40))].4H(2)O (2) [bte = 1,2-bis(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)ethane], [Cu(I)(4)(btb)(2)(SiW(12)O(40))].2H(2)O (3), and [Cu(II)(2)(btb)(4)(SiW(12)O(40))].2H(2)O (4) [btb = 1,4-bis(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)butane], were hydrothermally synthesized through use of the same Keggin polyoxometalate as the template and tuning the molar ratio of the bis(triazole) ligand to the Cu(II) ion. The ratio of the bis(triazole) ligand to Cu(II) has a crucial influence on the structures of this series. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses indicate that compound 1 is constructed by tetranuclear ring-connecting chains and polymerized [Cu(bte)](+) chains, between which SiW(12) anions are inserted to form a three-dimensional (3D) structure. Compound 2 shows a (4(4).6(2)) two-dimensional grid sheet. The discrete SiW(12) anions are sandwiched by the sheets, just like "hamburgers". Compound 3 presents channel-like [Cu(2)(btb)](2+) polymerized chains, which are further connected by SiW(12) anions to construct a 3D framework. Compound 4 exhibits a (6(6)) 3D Cu-btb framework with hexagonal channels, into which the tetradentate SiW(12) anions are incorporated. The thermal stabilities of the compounds are discussed.

  3. Enhancing charge-storage capacity of non-volatile memory devices using template-directed assembly of gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Raju Kumar; Krishnamoorthy, Sivashankar; Kusuma, Damar Yoga; Lee, Pooi See; Srinivasan, M. P.

    2012-03-01

    We demonstrate the controlled fabrication of aggregates of gold nanoparticles as a means of enhancing the charge-storage capacity of metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) devices by up to 300% at a low biasing voltage of +/-4 V. Aggregates of citrate stabilized gold nanoparticles were obtained by directed electrostatic self-assembly onto an underlying nanopattern of positively charged centers. The underlying nanopatterns consist of amine functionalized gold nanoparticle arrays formed using amphiphilic diblock copolymer reverse micelles as templates. The hierarchical self-organization leads to a twelve-fold increase in the number density of the gold nanoparticles and therefore significantly increases the charge storage centers for the MIS device. The MIS structure showed counterclockwise C-V hysteresis curves indicating a good memory effect. A memory window of 1 V was obtained at a low biasing voltage of +/-4 V. Furthermore, C-t measurements conducted after applying a charging bias of 4 V showed that the charge was retained beyond 20 000 s. The proposed strategy can be readily adapted for fabricating next generation solution processible non-volatile memory devices.We demonstrate the controlled fabrication of aggregates of gold nanoparticles as a means of enhancing the charge-storage capacity of metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) devices by up to 300% at a low biasing voltage of +/-4 V. Aggregates of citrate stabilized gold nanoparticles were obtained by directed electrostatic self-assembly onto an underlying nanopattern of positively charged centers. The underlying nanopatterns consist of amine functionalized gold nanoparticle arrays formed using amphiphilic diblock copolymer reverse micelles as templates. The hierarchical self-organization leads to a twelve-fold increase in the number density of the gold nanoparticles and therefore significantly increases the charge storage centers for the MIS device. The MIS structure showed counterclockwise C-V hysteresis curves

  4. Invitro Synthesis of Barley Endosperm Proteins on Wild Type and Mutant Templates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, A.; Ingversen, J.

    1976-01-01

    Membrane bound and free polyribosomes were isolated from 20 day old barley endosperms. Sucrose gradient analysis revealed distinct polysomal peaks up to heptamers. The isolated polysomes were active in a cell-free protein synthesizing system employing wheat germ extract. SDS-polyacrylamide gel...... electrophoresis showed that proteins with molecular weights ranging from 200,000 to 10,000 daltons were synthesized. A substantial part of the polypeptides coded for by the template associated with the membrane bound polysomes was identified as hordeins by their solubility in 55% isopropanol and by their co......-migration with native hordein on SDS-polyacrylamide gels. Membrane bound endosperm polysomes from a barley mutant defective in hordein synthesis produced in the cell-free protein synthesizing system only a small amount of hordein. Conversely membrane bound polysomes from the endosperm of a mutant giving rise...

  5. From Extraction of Local Structures of Protein Energy Landscapes to Improved Decoy Selection in Template-Free Protein Structure Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Akhter

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the essential role that the three-dimensional conformation of a protein plays in regulating interactions with molecular partners, wet and dry laboratories seek biologically-active conformations of a protein to decode its function. Computational approaches are gaining prominence due to the labor and cost demands of wet laboratory investigations. Template-free methods can now compute thousands of conformations known as decoys, but selecting native conformations from the generated decoys remains challenging. Repeatedly, research has shown that the protein energy functions whose minima are sought in the generation of decoys are unreliable indicators of nativeness. The prevalent approach ignores energy altogether and clusters decoys by conformational similarity. Complementary recent efforts design protein-specific scoring functions or train machine learning models on labeled decoys. In this paper, we show that an informative consideration of energy can be carried out under the energy landscape view. Specifically, we leverage local structures known as basins in the energy landscape probed by a template-free method. We propose and compare various strategies of basin-based decoy selection that we demonstrate are superior to clustering-based strategies. The presented results point to further directions of research for improving decoy selection, including the ability to properly consider the multiplicity of native conformations of proteins.

  6. Ab Initio Protein Structure Assembly Using Continuous Structure Fragments and Optimized Knowledge-based Force Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dong; Zhang, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Ab initio protein folding is one of the major unsolved problems in computational biology due to the difficulties in force field design and conformational search. We developed a novel program, QUARK, for template-free protein structure prediction. Query sequences are first broken into fragments of 1–20 residues where multiple fragment structures are retrieved at each position from unrelated experimental structures. Full-length structure models are then assembled from fragments using replica-exchange Monte Carlo simulations, which are guided by a composite knowledge-based force field. A number of novel energy terms and Monte Carlo movements are introduced and the particular contributions to enhancing the efficiency of both force field and search engine are analyzed in detail. QUARK prediction procedure is depicted and tested on the structure modeling of 145 non-homologous proteins. Although no global templates are used and all fragments from experimental structures with template modeling score (TM-score) >0.5 are excluded, QUARK can successfully construct 3D models of correct folds in 1/3 cases of short proteins up to 100 residues. In the ninth community-wide Critical Assessment of protein Structure Prediction (CASP9) experiment, QUARK server outperformed the second and third best servers by 18% and 47% based on the cumulative Z-score of global distance test-total (GDT-TS) scores in the free modeling (FM) category. Although ab initio protein folding remains a significant challenge, these data demonstrate new progress towards the solution of the most important problem in the field. PMID:22411565

  7. Generation of Transparent Oxygen Evolution Electrode Consisting of Regularly Ordered Nanoparticles from Self-Assembly Cobalt Phthalocyanine as a Template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziani, Ahmed; Shinagawa, Tatsuya; Stegenburga, Liga; Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2016-11-30

    The decoration of (photo)electrodes for efficient photoresponse requires the use of electrocatalysts with good dispersion and high transparency for efficient light absorption by the photoelectrode. As a result of the ease of thermal evaporation and particulate self-assembly growth, the phthalocyanine molecular species can be uniformly deposited layer-by-layer on the surface of substrates. This structure can be used as a template to achieve a tunable amount of catalysts, high dispersion of the nanoparticles, and transparency of the catalysts. In this study, we present a systematic study of the structural and optical properties, surface morphologies, and electrochemical oxygen evolution reaction (OER) performance of cobalt oxide prepared from a phthalocyanine metal precursor. Cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc) films with different thicknesses were deposited by thermal evaporation on different substrates. The films were annealed at 400 °C in air to form a material with the cobalt oxide phase. The final Co oxide catalysts exhibit high transparency after thermal treatment. Their OER measurements demonstrate well expected mass activity for OER. Thermally evaporated and treated transition metal oxide nanoparticles are attractive for the functionalization of (photo)anodes for water oxidation.

  8. Novel Silica Nanotubes Using a Library of Carbohydrate Gel Assemblies as Templates for Sol-Gel Transcription in Binary Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jong Hwa [Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Shim Sung [Gyeongsang National University, Chinju (Korea, Republic of); Shinkai, Seiji [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Iwaura, Rika; Shimizu, Toshimi [Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2004-01-15

    Sugar-based gelator p-dodecanoyl-aminophenyl-{beta}-D-aldopyranosides (1-3) have been shown to self-assemble in the presence of p-aminophenyl aldopyranosides. The hydrogel 1+4 showed the double-helical structure with 3-25 nm outer diameters, which is quite different from that of 1. The gel 2+5 revealed twisted ribbon structure with 30-50 nm in widths and a few micrometers of length whereas the gel 3+4 revealed the single and the bundled fiber structures. The difference in these gel supramolecular structures has successfully been transcribed into silica structures by sol-gel polymerization of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS), resulting in the doublehelical, the twisted-ribbon, the single and the multiple (lotus-shaped) hollow fiber structures. These results indicate that novel silica structures can be created by transcription of various superstructures formed in binary gels through the hydrogen-bonding interaction, and the amino group of the p-aminophenyl aldopyranosides acts as an efficient driving force to create novel silica nanotubes. Furthermore, electron energy-loss spectroscopy (ELLS) provided strong evidence for the inner hollow structure of the double-helical silica nanotube. This is a novel and successful example that a variety of new silica structures can be created using a library of carbohydrate gel fibers as their templates

  9. Generation of Transparent Oxygen Evolution Electrode Consisting of Regularly Ordered Nanoparticles from Self-Assembly Cobalt Phthalocyanine as a Template

    KAUST Repository

    Ziani, Ahmed

    2016-11-04

    The decoration of (photo)electrodes for efficient photoresponse requires the use of electrocatalysts with good dispersion and high transparency for efficient light absorption by the photoelectrode. As a result of the ease of thermal evaporation and particulate self-assembly growth, the phthalocyanine molecular species can be uniformly deposited layer-by-layer on the surface of substrates. This structure can be used as a template to achieve a tunable amount of catalysts, high dispersion of the nanoparticles, and transparency of the catalysts. In this study, we present a systematic study of the structural and optical properties, surface morphologies, and electrochemical oxygen evolution reaction (OER) performance of cobalt oxide prepared from a phthalocyanine metal precursor. Cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc) films with different thicknesses were deposited by thermal evaporation on different substrates. The films were annealed at 400 °C in air to form a material with the cobalt oxide phase. The final Co oxide catalysts exhibit high transparency after thermal treatment. Their OER measurements demonstrate well expected mass activity for OER. Thermally evaporated and treated transition metal oxide nanoparticles are attractive for the functionalization of (photo)anodes for water oxidation.

  10. Ice-templated Self-assembly of VOPO4–Graphene Nanocomposites for Vertically Porous 3D Supercapacitor Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang Hoon; Lee, Young-Woo; Lee, Seung Woo; Ha, Jeong Sook; Lee, Sang-Soo; Son, Jeong Gon

    2015-01-01

    A simple ice-templated self-assembly process is used to prepare a three-dimensional (3D) and vertically porous nanocomposite of layered vanadium phosphates (VOPO4) and graphene nanosheets with high surface area and high electrical conductivity. The resulting 3D VOPO4–graphene nanocomposite has a much higher capacitance of 527.9 F g−1 at a current density of 0.5 A g−1, compared with ~247 F g−1 of simple 3D VOPO4, with solid cycling stability. The enhanced pseudocapacitive behavior mainly originates from vertically porous structures from directionally grown ice crystals and simultaneously inducing radial segregation and forming inter-stacked structures of VOPO4–graphene nanosheets. This VOPO4–graphene nanocomposite electrode exhibits high surface area, vertically porous structure to the separator, structural stability from interstacked structure and high electrical conductivity, which would provide the short diffusion paths of electrolyte ions and fast transportation of charges within the conductive frameworks. In addition, an asymmetric supercapacitor (ASC) is fabricated by using vertically porous VOPO4–graphene as the positive electrode and vertically porous 3D graphene as the negative electrode; it exhibits a wide cell voltage of 1.6 V and a largely enhanced energy density of 108 Wh kg−1. PMID:26333591

  11. Principles of assembly reveal a periodic table of protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnert, Sebastian E; Marsh, Joseph A; Hernández, Helena; Robinson, Carol V; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2015-12-11

    Structural insights into protein complexes have had a broad impact on our understanding of biological function and evolution. In this work, we sought a comprehensive understanding of the general principles underlying quaternary structure organization in protein complexes. We first examined the fundamental steps by which protein complexes can assemble, using experimental and structure-based characterization of assembly pathways. Most assembly transitions can be classified into three basic types, which can then be used to exhaustively enumerate a large set of possible quaternary structure topologies. These topologies, which include the vast majority of observed protein complex structures, enable a natural organization of protein complexes into a periodic table. On the basis of this table, we can accurately predict the expected frequencies of quaternary structure topologies, including those not yet observed. These results have important implications for quaternary structure prediction, modeling, and engineering. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. RNA Seeds Higher-Order Assembly of FUS Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob C. Schwartz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The abundant nuclear RNA binding protein FUS binds the C-terminal domain (CTD of RNA polymerase II in an RNA-dependent manner, affecting Ser2 phosphorylation and transcription. Here, we examine the mechanism of this process and find that RNA binding nucleates the formation of higher-order FUS ribonucleoprotein assemblies that bind the CTD. Both the low-complexity domain and the arginine-glycine rich domain of FUS contribute to assembly. The assemblies appear fibrous by electron microscopy and have characteristics of β zipper structures. These results support the emerging view that the pathologic protein aggregation seen in neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis may occur via the exaggeration of functionally important assemblies of RNA binding proteins.

  13. Engineering Globular Protein Vesicles through Tunable Self-Assembly of Recombinant Fusion Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yeongseon; Choi, Won Tae; Heller, William T; Ke, Zunlong; Wright, Elizabeth R; Champion, Julie A

    2017-09-01

    Vesicles assembled from folded, globular proteins have potential for functions different from traditional lipid or polymeric vesicles. However, they also present challenges in understanding the assembly process and controlling vesicle properties. From detailed investigation of the assembly behavior of recombinant fusion proteins, this work reports a simple strategy to engineer protein vesicles containing functional, globular domains. This is achieved through tunable self-assembly of recombinant globular fusion proteins containing leucine zippers and elastin-like polypeptides. The fusion proteins form complexes in solution via high affinity binding of the zippers, and transition through dynamic coacervates to stable hollow vesicles upon warming. The thermal driving force, which can be tuned by protein concentration or temperature, controls both vesicle size and whether vesicles are single or bi-layered. These results provide critical information to engineer globular protein vesicles via self-assembly with desired size and membrane structure. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Studying protein assembly with reversible Brownian dynamics of patchy particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Heinrich C. R. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Heidelberg University, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Schwarz, Ulrich S., E-mail: ulrich.schwarz@bioquant.uni-heidelberg.de [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Heidelberg University, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); BioQuant, Heidelberg University, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-05-14

    Assembly of protein complexes like virus shells, the centriole, the nuclear pore complex, or the actin cytoskeleton is strongly determined by their spatial structure. Moreover, it is becoming increasingly clear that the reversible nature of protein assembly is also an essential element for their biological function. Here we introduce a computational approach for the Brownian dynamics of patchy particles with anisotropic assemblies and fully reversible reactions. Different particles stochastically associate and dissociate with microscopic reaction rates depending on their relative spatial positions. The translational and rotational diffusive properties of all protein complexes are evaluated on-the-fly. Because we focus on reversible assembly, we introduce a scheme which ensures detailed balance for patchy particles. We then show how the macroscopic rates follow from the microscopic ones. As an instructive example, we study the assembly of a pentameric ring structure, for which we find excellent agreement between simulation results and a macroscopic kinetic description without any adjustable parameters. This demonstrates that our approach correctly accounts for both the diffusive and reactive processes involved in protein assembly.

  15. Hierarchical self-assembly of designed 2x2-alpha-helix bundle proteins on Au(111) surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wackerbarth, Hainer; Tofteng, A.P.; Jensen, K.J.

    2006-01-01

    -helix bundle protein and its template were studied by X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS), electrochemical methods, and electrochemical in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (in situ STM). XPS showed that the cyclo-DTT opens on adsorption to a gold surface with the integrity of the 2 x 2- R-helix bundle...... proteins retained. The surface properties of the DTT and 2 x 2- R-helix bundle protein adlayer were characterized by interfacial capacitance and impedance techniques. Reductive desorption was used to determine the coverage of the adlayers, giving values of 65 and 16 mu C cm(-2) for DTT and 2 x 2-helix......-DTT) template. The protein was de novo designed to self-assemble in solution to form a 4-alpha-helix bundle, whereas the disulfide moiety enables the formation of a self-assembled monolayer on a Au(111) surface by opening of the disulfide, thus giving rise to a two-step self-assembly process. The 2 x 2-alpha...

  16. Self-assembly of 2,3-dihydroxycholestane steroids into supramolecular organogels as a soft template for the in-situ generation of silicate nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelsztein, Valeria C; Mac Cormack, Andrea S; Ciarlantini, Matías

    2013-01-01

    Summary Supramolecular gels are an important and interesting class of soft materials that show great potential for many applications. Most of them have been discovered serendipitously, and understanding the supramolecular self-assembly that leads to the formation of the gel superstructure is the key to the directed design of new organogels. We report herein the organogelating property of four stereoisomers of the simple steroid 2,3-dihydroxycholestane. Only the isomer with the trans-diaxial hydroxy groups had the ability to gelate a broad variety of liquids and, thus, to be a super-organogelator for hydrocarbons. The scope of solvent gelation was analysed with regard to two solvent parameters, namely the Kamlet–Taft and the Hansen solubility parameters. The best correlation was observed with the Hansen approach that revealed the existence of two clear gelation zones. We propose a general model of self-assembly through multiple intermolecular hydrogen bonds between the 1,2-dihydroxy system, which is based on experimental data and computational simulations revealing the importance of the di-axial orientation of the hydroxy groups for the one-dimensional self-assembly. Under controlled conditions, the fibrillar superstructure of the organogel was successfully used as a template for the in-situ sol–gel polymerization of tetraethoxysilane and the further preparation of silica nanotubes. We propose that the driving forces for templating are hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions between the anionic silicate intermediate species and the self-assembled fibrillar network. PMID:24062849

  17. Self-assembly of 2,3-dihydroxycholestane steroids into supramolecular organogels as a soft template for the in-situ generation of silicate nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria C. Edelsztein

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Supramolecular gels are an important and interesting class of soft materials that show great potential for many applications. Most of them have been discovered serendipitously, and understanding the supramolecular self-assembly that leads to the formation of the gel superstructure is the key to the directed design of new organogels. We report herein the organogelating property of four stereoisomers of the simple steroid 2,3-dihydroxycholestane. Only the isomer with the trans-diaxial hydroxy groups had the ability to gelate a broad variety of liquids and, thus, to be a super-organogelator for hydrocarbons. The scope of solvent gelation was analysed with regard to two solvent parameters, namely the Kamlet–Taft and the Hansen solubility parameters. The best correlation was observed with the Hansen approach that revealed the existence of two clear gelation zones. We propose a general model of self-assembly through multiple intermolecular hydrogen bonds between the 1,2-dihydroxy system, which is based on experimental data and computational simulations revealing the importance of the di-axial orientation of the hydroxy groups for the one-dimensional self-assembly. Under controlled conditions, the fibrillar superstructure of the organogel was successfully used as a template for the in-situ sol–gel polymerization of tetraethoxysilane and the further preparation of silica nanotubes. We propose that the driving forces for templating are hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions between the anionic silicate intermediate species and the self-assembled fibrillar network.

  18. Fluid-flow-templated self-assembly of calcium carbonate tubes in the laboratory and in biomineralization: The tubules of the watering-pot shells, Clavagelloidea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Silvana S S; Cartwright, Julyan H E; Checa, Antonio G; Sainz-Díaz, C Ignacio

    2016-10-01

    We show with laboratory experiments that self-assembled mineral tube formation involving precipitation around a templating jet of fluid - a mechanism well-known in the physical sciences from the tubular growth of so-called chemical gardens - functions with carbonates, and we analyse the microstructures and compositions of the precipitates. We propose that there should exist biological examples of fluid-flow-templated tubes formed from carbonates. We present observational and theoretical modelling evidence that the complex structure of biomineral calcium carbonate tubules that forms the 'rose' of the watering-pot shells, Clavagelloidea, may be an instance of this mechanism in biomineralization. We suggest that this is an example of self-organization and self-assembly processes in biomineralization, and that such a mechanism is of interest for the production of tubes as a synthetic biomaterial. The work discussed in the manuscript concerns the self-assembly of calcium carbonate micro-tubes and nano-tubes under conditions of fluid flow together with chemical reaction. We present the results of laboratory experiments on tube self-assembly together with theoretical calculations. We show how nature may already be making use of this process in molluscan biomineralization of the so-called watering-pot shells, and we propose that we may be able to take advantage of the formation mechanism to produce synthetic biocompatible micro- and nano-tubes. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Proteins evolve on the edge of supramolecular self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Seisdedos, Hector; Empereur-Mot, Charly; Elad, Nadav; Levy, Emmanuel D.

    2017-08-01

    The self-association of proteins into symmetric complexes is ubiquitous in all kingdoms of life. Symmetric complexes possess unique geometric and functional properties, but their internal symmetry can pose a risk. In sickle-cell disease, the symmetry of haemoglobin exacerbates the effect of a mutation, triggering assembly into harmful fibrils. Here we examine the universality of this mechanism and its relation to protein structure geometry. We introduced point mutations solely designed to increase surface hydrophobicity among 12 distinct symmetric complexes from Escherichia coli. Notably, all responded by forming supramolecular assemblies in vitro, as well as in vivo upon heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Remarkably, in four cases, micrometre-long fibrils formed in vivo in response to a single point mutation. Biophysical measurements and electron microscopy revealed that mutants self-assembled in their folded states and so were not amyloid-like. Structural examination of 73 mutants identified supramolecular assembly hot spots predictable by geometry. A subsequent structural analysis of 7,471 symmetric complexes showed that geometric hot spots were buffered chemically by hydrophilic residues, suggesting a mechanism preventing mis-assembly of these regions. Thus, point mutations can frequently trigger folded proteins to self-assemble into higher-order structures. This potential is counterbalanced by negative selection and can be exploited to design nanomaterials in living cells.

  20. Protein-directed self-assembly of a fullerene crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kook-Han; Ko, Dong-Kyun; Kim, Yong-Tae; Kim, Nam Hyeong; Paul, Jaydeep; Zhang, Shao-Qing; Murray, Christopher B.; Acharya, Rudresh; Degrado, William F.; Kim, Yong Ho; Grigoryan, Gevorg

    2016-04-01

    Learning to engineer self-assembly would enable the precise organization of molecules by design to create matter with tailored properties. Here we demonstrate that proteins can direct the self-assembly of buckminsterfullerene (C60) into ordered superstructures. A previously engineered tetrameric helical bundle binds C60 in solution, rendering it water soluble. Two tetramers associate with one C60, promoting further organization revealed in a 1.67-Å crystal structure. Fullerene groups occupy periodic lattice sites, sandwiched between two Tyr residues from adjacent tetramers. Strikingly, the assembly exhibits high charge conductance, whereas both the protein-alone crystal and amorphous C60 are electrically insulating. The affinity of C60 for its crystal-binding site is estimated to be in the nanomolar range, with lattices of known protein crystals geometrically compatible with incorporating the motif. Taken together, these findings suggest a new means of organizing fullerene molecules into a rich variety of lattices to generate new properties by design.

  1. Role of Human Cytomegalovirus Tegument Proteins in Virion Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rebecca Marie; Kosuri, Srivenkat; Kerry, Julie Anne

    2014-01-01

    Like other herpesviruses, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) contains a unique proteinaceous layer between the virion envelope and capsid, termed the tegument. Upon infection, the contents of the tegument layer are delivered to the host cell, along with the capsid and the viral genome, where they facilitate the initial stages of virus replication. The tegument proteins also play important roles in virion assembly and this dual nature makes them attractive potential targets for antiviral therapies. While our knowledge regarding tegument protein function during the initiation of infection has been the subject of intense study, their roles in assembly are much less well understood. In this review, we will focus on recent studies that highlight the functions of HCMV tegument proteins during assembly, and pose key questions for further investigation. PMID:24509811

  2. Self-assembly of model proteins into virus capsids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wołek, Karol; Cieplak, Marek

    2017-11-01

    We consider self-assembly of proteins into a virus capsid by the methods of molecular dynamics. The capsid corresponds either to SPMV or CCMV and is studied with and without the RNA molecule inside. The proteins are flexible and described by the structure-based coarse-grained model augmented by electrostatic interactions. Previous studies of the capsid self-assembly involved solid objects of a supramolecular scale, e.g. corresponding to capsomeres, with engineered couplings and stochastic movements. In our approach, a single capsid is dissociated by an application of a high temperature for a variable period and then the system is cooled down to allow for self-assembly. The restoration of the capsid proceeds to various extent, depending on the nature of the dissociated state, but is rarely complete because some proteins depart too far unless the process takes place in a confined space.

  3. Spectromicroscopy of self-assembled protein clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schonschek, O.; Hormes, J.; Herzog, V. [Univ. of Bonn (Germany)

    1997-04-01

    The aim of this project is to use synchrotron radiation as a tool to study biomedical questions concerned with the thyroid glands. The biological background is outlined in a recent paper. In short, Thyroglobulin (TG), the precursor protein of the hormone thyroxine, forms large (20 - 500 microns in diameter) clusters in the extracellular lumen of thyrocytes. The process of the cluster formation is still not well understood but is thought to be a main storage mechanism of TG and therefore thyroxine inside the thyroid glands. For human thyroids, the interconnections of the proteins inside the clusters are mainly disulfide bondings. Normally, sulfur bridges are catalyzed by an enzyme called Protein Disulfide Bridge Isomerase (PDI). While this enzyme is supposed to be not present in any extracellular space, the cluster formation of TG takes place in the lumen between the thyrocytes. A possible explanation is the autocatalysis of TG.

  4. Functional assembly of protein fragments induced by spatial confinement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsheng Yu

    Full Text Available Natural proteins are often confined within their local microenvironments, such as three-dimensional confinement in organelles or two-dimensional confinement in lipid rafts on cytoplasmic membrane. Spatial confinement restricts proteins' entropic freedom, forces their lateral interaction, and induces new properties that the same proteins lack at the soluble state. So far, the phenomenon of environment-induced protein functional alteration still lacks a full illustration. We demonstrate here that engineered protein fragments, although being non-functional in solution, can be re-assembled within the nanometer space to give the full activity of the whole protein. Specific interaction between hexahistidine-tag (His-tag and NiO surface immobilizes protein fragments on NiO nanoparticles to form a self-assembled protein "corona" on the particles inside the nanopores of mesoporous silica. Site-specific assembly forces a shoulder-by-shoulder orientation and promotes fragment-fragment interaction; this interaction together with spatial confinement of the mesopores results in functional re-assembly of the protein half fragments. To our surprise, a single half fragment of luciferase (non-catalytic in solution exhibited luciferase activity when immobilized on NiO in the mesopores, in the absence of the complimentary half. This shows for the first time that spatial confinement can induce the folding of a half fragment, reconstitute the enzyme active site, and re-gain the catalytic capability of the whole protein. Our work thereby highlights the under-documented notion that aside from the chemical composition such as primary sequence, physical environment of a protein also determines its function.

  5. Platinum and palladium nanotubes based on genetically engineered elastin-mimetic fusion protein-fiber templates: synthesis and application in lithium-O₂ batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Guilue; Truong, Thi Hong Anh; Tan, Huiteng; Ang, Huixiang; Zhang, Wenyu; Xu, Chen; Rui, Xianghong; Hu, Zhaolong; Fong, Eileen; Yan, Qingyu

    2014-09-01

    The coupling of proteins with self-assembly properties and proteins that are capable of recognizing and mineralizing specific inorganic species is a promising strategy for the synthesis of nanoscale materials with controllable morphology and functionality. Herein, GPG-AG3 protein fibers with both of these properties were constructed and served as templates for the synthesis of Pt and Pd nanotubes. The protein fibers of assembled GPG-AG3 were more than 10 μm long and had diameters of 20-50 nm. The as-synthesized Pt and Pd nanotubes were composed of dense layers of ~3-5 nm Pt and Pd nanoparticles. When tested as cathodes in lithium-O2 batteries, the porous Pt nanotubes showed low charge potentials of 3.8 V, with round-trip efficiencies of about 65% at a current density of 100 mA g(-1). © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Development of a Feature and Template-Assisted Assembler and Application to the Analysis of a Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Genotyping Microarray.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger W Barrette

    Full Text Available Several RT-PCR and genome sequencing strategies exist for the resolution of Foot-and-Mouth Disease virus (FMDV. While these approaches are relatively straightforward, they can be vulnerable to failure due to the unpredictable nature of FMDV genome sequence variations. Sequence independent single primer amplification (SISPA followed by genotyping microarray offers an attractive unbiased approach to FMDV characterization. Here we describe a custom FMDV microarray and a companion feature and template-assisted assembler software (FAT-assembler capable of resolving virus genome sequence using a moderate number of conserved microarray features. The results demonstrate that this approach may be used to rapidly characterize naturally occurring FMDV as well as an engineered chimeric strain of FMDV. The FAT-assembler, while applied to resolving FMDV genomes, represents a new bioinformatics approach that should be broadly applicable to interpreting microarray genotyping data for other viruses or target organisms.

  7. Self-formation of highly aligned metallic, semiconducting and single chiral single-walled carbon nanotubes assemblies via a crystal template method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawai, Hideki; Hasegawa, Kai; Yanagi, Kazuhiro, E-mail: yanagi-kazuhiro@tmu.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Oyane, Ayako [Nanosystem Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan); Naitoh, Yasuhisa [Nanosystem Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8564 (Japan)

    2014-09-01

    The fabrication of an aligned array of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with a single chiral state has been a significant challenge for SWCNT applications as well as for basic science research. Here, we developed a simple, unique technique to produce assemblies in which metallic, semiconducting, and single chiral state SWCNTs were densely and highly aligned. We utilized a crystal of surfactant as a template on which mono-dispersed SWCNTs in solution self-assembled. Micro-Raman measurements and scanning electron microscopy measurements clearly showed that the SWCNTs were highly and densely aligned parallel to the crystal axis, indicating that approximately 70% of the SWCNTs were within 7° of being parallel. Moreover, the assemblies exhibited good field effect transistor characteristics with an on/off ratio of 1.3 × 10{sup 5}.

  8. Kinetic Effects on Self-Assembly and Function of Protein-Polymer Bioconjugates in Thin Films Prepared by Flow Coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Dongsook [Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave Cambridge MA 02142 USA; Huang, Aaron [Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave Cambridge MA 02142 USA; Olsen, Bradley D. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave Cambridge MA 02142 USA

    2016-11-04

    The self-assembly of nanostructured globular protein arrays in thin films is demonstrated using protein–polymer block copolymers based on a model protein mCherry and the polymer poly(oligoethylene glycol acrylate) (POEGA). Conjugates are flow coated into thin films on a poly(ethylene oxide) grafted Si surface, forming self-assembled cylindrical nanostructures with POEGA domains selectively segregating to the air–film interface. Long-range order and preferential arrangement of parallel cylinders templated by selective surfaces are demonstrated by controlling relative humidity. Long-range order increases with coating speed when the film thicknesses are kept constant, due to reduced nucleation per unit area of drying film. Fluorescence emission spectra of mCherry in films prepared at <25% relative humidity shows a small shift suggesting that proteins are more perturbed at low humidity than high humidity or the solution state.

  9. Protein Flexibility Facilitates Quaternary Structure Assembly and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Joseph A.; Teichmann, Sarah A.

    2014-01-01

    The intrinsic flexibility of proteins allows them to undergo large conformational fluctuations in solution or upon interaction with other molecules. Proteins also commonly assemble into complexes with diverse quaternary structure arrangements. Here we investigate how the flexibility of individual protein chains influences the assembly and evolution of protein complexes. We find that flexibility appears to be particularly conducive to the formation of heterologous (i.e., asymmetric) intersubunit interfaces. This leads to a strong association between subunit flexibility and homomeric complexes with cyclic and asymmetric quaternary structure topologies. Similarly, we also observe that the more nonhomologous subunits that assemble together within a complex, the more flexible those subunits tend to be. Importantly, these findings suggest that subunit flexibility should be closely related to the evolutionary history of a complex. We confirm this by showing that evolutionarily more recent subunits are generally more flexible than evolutionarily older subunits. Finally, we investigate the very different explorations of quaternary structure space that have occurred in different evolutionary lineages. In particular, the increased flexibility of eukaryotic proteins appears to enable the assembly of heteromeric complexes with more unique components. PMID:24866000

  10. Coronavirus envelope (E) protein remains at the site of assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkatagopalan, Pavithra [The Biodesign Institute, Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); Microbiology Graduate Program, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); Daskalova, Sasha M. [The Biodesign Institute, Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Chemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); Lopez, Lisa A. [The Biodesign Institute, Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); Molecular and Cellular Biology Graduate Program, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); Dolezal, Kelly A. [The Biodesign Institute, Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); Microbiology Graduate Program, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); Hogue, Brenda G., E-mail: Brenda.Hogue@asu.edu [The Biodesign Institute, Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) assemble at endoplasmic reticulum Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC) membranes and egress from cells in cargo vesicles. Only a few molecules of the envelope (E) protein are assembled into virions. The role of E in morphogenesis is not fully understood. The cellular localization and dynamics of mouse hepatitis CoV A59 (MHV) E protein were investigated to further understanding of its role during infection. E protein localized in the ERGIC and Golgi with the amino and carboxy termini in the lumen and cytoplasm, respectively. E protein does not traffic to the cell surface. MHV was genetically engineered with a tetracysteine tag at the carboxy end of E. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) showed that E is mobile in ERGIC/Golgi membranes. Correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM) confirmed the presence of E in Golgi cisternae. The results provide strong support that E proteins carry out their function(s) at the site of budding/assembly. - Highlights: • Mouse hepatitis coronavirus (MHV-CoV) E protein localizes in the ERGIC and Golgi. • MHV-CoV E does not transport to the cell surface. • MHV-CoV can be genetically engineered with a tetracysteine tag appended to E. • First FRAP and correlative light electron microscopy of a CoV E protein. • Live-cell imaging shows that E is mobile in ERGIC/Golgi membranes.

  11. Sequential assembly of centromeric proteins in male mouse meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Teresa Parra

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The assembly of the mitotic centromere has been extensively studied in recent years, revealing the sequence and regulation of protein loading to this chromosome domain. However, few studies have analyzed centromere assembly during mammalian meiosis. This study specifically targets this approach on mouse spermatocytes. We have found that during prophase I, the proteins of the chromosomal passenger complex Borealin, INCENP, and Aurora-B load sequentially to the inner centromere before Shugoshin 2 and MCAK. The last proteins to be assembled are the outer kinetochore proteins BubR1 and CENP-E. All these proteins are not detected at the centromere during anaphase/telophase I and are then reloaded during interkinesis. The loading sequence of the analyzed proteins is similar during prophase I and interkinesis. These findings demonstrate that the interkinesis stage, regularly overlooked, is essential for centromere and kinetochore maturation and reorganization previous to the second meiotic division. We also demonstrate that Shugoshin 2 is necessary for the loading of MCAK at the inner centromere, but is dispensable for the loading of the outer kinetochore proteins BubR1 and CENP-E.

  12. Proximity hybridization-regulated catalytic DNA hairpin assembly for electrochemical immunoassay based on in situ DNA template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Fuyi [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu Normal University, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of New Drug Research and Clinical Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, School of Pharmacy, Xuzhou Medical College, 221004, Xuzhou (China); Yao, Yao; Luo, Jianjun; Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Yu; Yin, Dengyang [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of New Drug Research and Clinical Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, School of Pharmacy, Xuzhou Medical College, 221004, Xuzhou (China); Gao, Fenglei, E-mail: jsxzgfl@sina.com [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of New Drug Research and Clinical Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, School of Pharmacy, Xuzhou Medical College, 221004, Xuzhou (China); Wang, Po, E-mail: wangpo@jsnu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu Normal University, Xuzhou 221116 (China)

    2017-05-29

    Novel hybridization proximity-regulated catalytic DNA hairpin assembly strategy has been proposed for electrochemical immunoassay based on in situ DNA template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles as signal label. The DNA template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles were characterized with atomic force microscopic and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The highly efficient electrocatalysis by DNA template synthesized Pd nanoparticles for NaBH{sub 4} oxidation produced an intense detection signal. The label-free electrochemical method achieved the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) with a linear range from 10{sup −15} to 10{sup −11} g mL{sup −1} and a detection limit of 0.43 × 10{sup −15} g mL{sup −1}. Through introducing a supersandwich reaction to increase the DNA length, the electrochemical signal was further amplified, leading to a detection limit of 0.52 × 10{sup −16} g mL{sup −1}. And it rendered satisfactory analytical performance for the determination of CEA in serum samples. Furthermore, it exhibited good reproducibility and stability; meanwhile, it also showed excellent specificity due to the specific recognition of antigen by antibody. Therefore, the DNA template synthesized Pd nanoparticles based signal amplification approach has great potential in clinical applications and is also suitable for quantification of biomarkers at ultralow level. - Graphical abstract: A novel label-free and enzyme-free electrochemical immunoassay based on proximity hybridization-regulated catalytic DNA hairpin assemblies for recycling of the CEA. - Highlights: • A novel enzyme-free electrochemical immunosensor was developed for detection of CEA. • The signal amplification was based on catalytic DNA hairpin assembly and DNA-template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles. • The biosensor could detect CEA down to 0.52 × 10{sup −16} g mL{sup −1} level with a dynamic range spanning 5 orders of magnitude.

  13. Rigidity analysis of protein biological assemblies and periodic crystal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background We initiate in silico rigidity-theoretical studies of biological assemblies and small crystals for protein structures. The goal is to determine if, and how, the interactions among neighboring cells and subchains affect the flexibility of a molecule in its crystallized state. We use experimental X-ray crystallography data from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). The analysis relies on an effcient graph-based algorithm. Computational experiments were performed using new protein rigidity analysis tools available in the new release of our KINARI-Web server http://kinari.cs.umass.edu. Results We provide two types of results: on biological assemblies and on crystals. We found that when only isolated subchains are considered, structural and functional information may be missed. Indeed, the rigidity of biological assemblies is sometimes dependent on the count and placement of hydrogen bonds and other interactions among the individual subchains of the biological unit. Similarly, the rigidity of small crystals may be affected by the interactions between atoms belonging to different unit cells. We have analyzed a dataset of approximately 300 proteins, from which we generated 982 crystals (some of which are biological assemblies). We identified two types of behaviors. (a) Some crystals and/or biological assemblies will aggregate into rigid bodies that span multiple unit cells/asymmetric units. Some of them create substantially larger rigid cluster in the crystal/biological assembly form, while in other cases, the aggregation has a smaller effect just at the interface between the units. (b) In other cases, the rigidity properties of the asymmetric units are retained, because the rigid bodies did not combine. We also identified two interesting cases where rigidity analysis may be correlated with the functional behavior of the protein. This type of information, identified here for the first time, depends critically on the ability to create crystals and biological assemblies

  14. Toward Modular Analysis of Supramolecular Protein Assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaehoon; Kim, Jin-Gyun; Yun, Giseok; Lee, Phill-Seung; Kim, Do-Nyun

    2015-09-08

    Despite recent advances in molecular simulation technologies, analysis of high-molecular-weight structures is still challenging. Here, we propose an automated model reduction procedure aiming to enable modular analysis of these structures. It employs a component mode synthesis for the reduction of finite element protein models. Reduced models may consist of real biological subunits or artificial partitions whose dynamics is described using the degrees of freedom at the substructural interfaces and a small set of dominant vibrational modes only. Notably, the proper number of dominant modes is automatically determined using a novel estimator for eigenvalue errors without calculating the reference eigensolutions of the full model. The performance of the proposed approach is thoroughly investigated by analyzing 50 representative structures including a crystal structure of GroEL and an electron density map of a ribosome.

  15. Structure and assembly of scalable porous protein cages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Eita; Böhringer, Daniel; van de Waterbeemd, Michiel; Leibundgut, Marc; Zschoche, Reinhard; Heck, Albert J. R.; Ban, Nenad; Hilvert, Donald

    2017-03-01

    Proteins that self-assemble into regular shell-like polyhedra are useful, both in nature and in the laboratory, as molecular containers. Here we describe cryo-electron microscopy (EM) structures of two versatile encapsulation systems that exploit engineered electrostatic interactions for cargo loading. We show that increasing the number of negative charges on the lumenal surface of lumazine synthase, a protein that naturally assembles into a ~1-MDa dodecahedron composed of 12 pentamers, induces stepwise expansion of the native protein shell, giving rise to thermostable ~3-MDa and ~6-MDa assemblies containing 180 and 360 subunits, respectively. Remarkably, these expanded particles assume unprecedented tetrahedrally and icosahedrally symmetric structures constructed entirely from pentameric units. Large keyhole-shaped pores in the shell, not present in the wild-type capsid, enable diffusion-limited encapsulation of complementarily charged guests. The structures of these supercharged assemblies demonstrate how programmed electrostatic effects can be effectively harnessed to tailor the architecture and properties of protein cages.

  16. Physical principles of filamentous protein self-assembly kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Liu, Lucie X.; Meisl, Georg; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2017-04-01

    The polymerization of proteins and peptides into filamentous supramolecular structures is an elementary form of self-organization of key importance to the functioning biological systems, as in the case of actin biofilaments that compose the cellular cytoskeleton. Aberrant filamentous protein self-assembly, however, is associated with undesired effects and severe clinical disorders, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, which, at the molecular level, are associated with the formation of certain forms of filamentous protein aggregates known as amyloids. Moreover, due to their unique physicochemical properties, protein filaments are finding extensive applications as biomaterials for nanotechnology. With all these different factors at play, the field of filamentous protein self-assembly has experienced tremendous activity in recent years. A key question in this area has been to elucidate the microscopic mechanisms through which filamentous aggregates emerge from dispersed proteins with the goal of uncovering the underlying physical principles. With the latest developments in the mathematical modeling of protein aggregation kinetics as well as the improvement of the available experimental techniques it is now possible to tackle many of these complex systems and carry out detailed analyses of the underlying microscopic steps involved in protein filament formation. In this paper, we review some classical and modern kinetic theories of protein filament formation, highlighting their use as a general strategy for quantifying the molecular-level mechanisms and transition states involved in these processes.

  17. Self-assembly studies of native and recombinant fibrous proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Donna Lucille

    The structure of silk proteins consists of alternating amorphous (glycine-rich) and ordered crystalline regions (poly(alanine) and poly(glycine-alanine) repeats), where the organized regions are typically beta-sheet assemblies. In collagen, the basic helical repeat (glycine-proline-hydroxyproline and variants on this repeat) drives hierarchical assembly. Three polypeptide chains form left-handed poly-proline II-like helices, these three chains then self-assemble to form a right-handed triple helix. The focus of this thesis is on these proteins and defined variations thereof to reveal features of fibrous protein self-assembly. The amino acid sequences of native silk and collagen and their respective assembly environments have been systematically manipulated. Spider silk protein, based on the consensus sequence of Nephila clavipes dragline-silk, was genetically engineered to include methionines flanking the beta-sheet forming polyalanine regions. These methionines could be selectively oxidized and reduced, altering the bulkiness and charge of a methionine-based sulfoxide group to control beta-sheet formation by steric hindrance. A second version of the sterical trigger included a recognition site for Protein Kinase A allowing for the selective phosphorylation of a serine. Patterning a monolayer of precursor "director" molecules on length scales ranging from nanometer- to micrometer-length scales simplifies the interpretation of supramolecular assembly. Utilizing the atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based technique of dip-pen nanolithography, thiolated collagen and a collagen-like peptide were patterned at 30--50 nm line widths on evaporated gold surfaces. These are the largest molecules thus far positively printed on a surface at such small-length scales. The method preserved the triple helical structure and biological activity of collagen and even fostered the formation of characteristic higher-levels of structural organization. Nanopatterns were also achieved for

  18. Coronavirus envelope (E) protein remains at the site of assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatagopalan, Pavithra; Daskalova, Sasha M; Lopez, Lisa A; Dolezal, Kelly A; Hogue, Brenda G

    2015-04-01

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) assemble at endoplasmic reticulum Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC) membranes and egress from cells in cargo vesicles. Only a few molecules of the envelope (E) protein are assembled into virions. The role of E in morphogenesis is not fully understood. The cellular localization and dynamics of mouse hepatitis CoV A59 (MHV) E protein were investigated to further understanding of its role during infection. E protein localized in the ERGIC and Golgi with the amino and carboxy termini in the lumen and cytoplasm, respectively. E protein does not traffic to the cell surface. MHV was genetically engineered with a tetracysteine tag at the carboxy end of E. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) showed that E is mobile in ERGIC/Golgi membranes. Correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM) confirmed the presence of E in Golgi cisternae. The results provide strong support that E proteins carry out their function(s) at the site of budding/assembly. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A protein interaction map of the kalimantacin biosynthesis assembly line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Uytterhoeven

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial secondary metabolite kalimantacin is produced by a hybrid polyketide/ non-ribosomal peptide system in Pseudomonas fluorescens BCCM_ID9359. In this study, the kalimantacin biosynthesis gene cluster is analyzed by yeast two-hybrid analysis, creating a protein-protein interaction map of the entire assembly line. In total, 28 potential interactions were identified, of which 13 could be confirmed further. These interactions include the dimerization of ketosynthase domains, a link between assembly line modules 9 and 10, and a specific interaction between the trans-acting enoyl reductase BatK and the carrier proteins of modules 8 and 10. These interactions reveal fundamental insight into the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites.This study is the first to reveal interactions in a complete biosynthetic pathway. Similar future studies could build a strong basis for engineering strategies in such clusters.

  20. Protein linguistics - a grammar for modular protein assembly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimona, Mario

    2006-01-01

    The correspondence between biology and linguistics at the level of sequence and lexical inventories, and of structure and syntax, has fuelled attempts to describe genome structure by the rules of formal linguistics. But how can we define protein linguistic rules? And how could compositional semantics improve our understanding of protein organization and functional plasticity?

  1. Self-assembly of 3D neat porous carbon aerogels with NaCl as template and flux for sodium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuxiang; Zhang, Zhian; Lai, Yanqing; Shi, Xiaodong; Li, Junming; Chen, Xiaobin; Zhang, Kai; Li, Jie

    2017-08-01

    3D porous carbons have shown great potential in electrochemical energy storage. However, traditional template assisted methods suffer from complicated synthesis processes as well as the difficulty of removing template. In this paper, 3D neat porous carbon aerogels have been designed and synthesized by a green and novel way via self-assembly of hydrogel with NaCl as the template and the flux during in-situ polymerization and carbonization. NaCl can be easily recovered with simple recrystallization in the end of synthesis. The as-synthesized 3D porous carbon aerogels display excellent structural stability, large specific surface area (1665.5 m2 g-1), porous structure centered at microporous (0.71 nm and 1.24 nm) and macropores for ionic diffusion and electrolyte transport, as well as large interlayer spacings (0.386 nm) for sodium storage. When employed as anode materials for sodium-ions batteries, the electrodes exhibit high reversible specific capacity of 287 mAh g-1 at 50 mA g-1 after 100 cycles, superior cycling stability of 154 mAh g-1 at 500 mA g-1 after 1000 cycles as well as excellent rate capability of 139 mAh g-1 at 1000 mA g-1. This work inspires a new strategy in the fabrication of advanced carbon structures for sodium-ion batteries and other applications.

  2. Symmetry based assembly of a 2 dimensional protein lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulos, Sandra; Agah, Sayeh; Jallah, Nikardi; Faham, Salem; van Raaij, Mark J.

    2017-04-18

    The design of proteins that self-assemble into higher order architectures is of great interest due to their potential application in nanotechnology. Specifically, the self-assembly of proteins into ordered lattices is of special interest to the field of structural biology. Here we designed a 2 dimensional (2D) protein lattice using a fusion of a tandem repeat of three TelSAM domains (TTT) to the Ferric uptake regulator (FUR) domain. We determined the structure of the designed (TTT-FUR) fusion protein to 2.3 Å by X-ray crystallographic methods. In agreement with the design, a 2D lattice composed of TelSAM fibers interdigitated by the FUR domain was observed. As expected, the fusion of a tandem repeat of three TelSAM domains formed 21 screw axis, and the self-assembly of the ordered oligomer was under pH control. We demonstrated that the fusion of TTT to a domain having a 2-fold symmetry, such as the FUR domain, can produce an ordered 2D lattice. The TTT-FUR system combines features from the rotational symmetry matching approach with the oligomer driven crystallization method. This TTT-FUR fusion was amenable to X-ray crystallographic methods, and is a promising crystallization chaperone.

  3. Localizing frustration in native proteins and protein assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreiro, Diego U.; Hegler, Joseph A.; Komives, Elizabeth A.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2007-01-01

    We propose a method of quantifying the degree of frustration manifested by spatially local interactions in protein biomolecules. This method of localization smoothly generalizes the global criterion for an energy landscape to be funneled to the native state, which is in keeping with the principle of minimal frustration. A survey of the structural database shows that natural proteins are multiply connected by a web of local interactions that are individually minimally frustrated. In contrast, highly frustrated interactions are found clustered on the surface, often near binding sites. These binding sites become less frustrated upon complex formation. PMID:18077414

  4. Prions on the run: How extracellular vesicles serve as delivery vehicles for self-templating protein aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu; Hossinger, André; Göbbels, Sarah; Vorberg, Ina M

    2017-03-04

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are actively secreted, membrane-bound communication vehicles that exchange biomolecules between cells. EVs also serve as dissemination vehicles for pathogens, including prions, proteinaceous infectious agents that cause transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) in mammals. Increasing evidence accumulates that diverse protein aggregates associated with common neurodegenerative diseases are packaged into EVs as well. Vesicle-mediated intercellular transmission of protein aggregates can induce aggregation of homotypic proteins in acceptor cells and might thereby contribute to disease progression. Our knowledge of how protein aggregates are sorted into EVs and how these vesicles adhere to and fuse with target cells is limited. Here we review how TSE prions exploit EVs for intercellular transmission and compare this to the transmission behavior of self-templating cytosolic protein aggregates derived from the yeast prion domain Sup 35 NM. Artificial NM prions are non-toxic to mammalian cell cultures and do not cause loss-of-function phenotypes. Importantly, NM particles are also secreted in association with exosomes that horizontally transmit the prion phenotype to naive bystander cells, a process that can be monitored with high accuracy by automated high throughput confocal microscopy. The high abundance of mammalian proteins with amino acid stretches compositionally similar to yeast prion domains makes the NM cell model an attractive model to study self-templating and dissemination properties of proteins with prion-like domains in the mammalian context.

  5. Inactivation of Template-Directed Misfolding of Infectious Prion Protein by Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ning; Price, Luke M.; Braithwaite, Shannon L.; Balachandran, Aru; Belosevic, Miodrag

    2012-01-01

    Misfolded prions (PrPSc) are well known for their resistance to conventional decontamination processes. The potential risk of contamination of the water environment, as a result of disposal of specified risk materials (SRM), has raised public concerns. Ozone is commonly utilized in the water industry for inactivation of microbial contaminants and was tested in this study for its ability to inactivate prions (263K hamster scrapie = PrPSc). Treatment variables included initial ozone dose (7.6 to 25.7 mg/liter), contact time (5 s and 5 min), temperature (4°C and 20°C), and pH (pH 4.4, 6.0, and 8.0). Exposure of dilute suspensions of the infected 263K hamster brain homogenates (IBH) (0.01%) to ozone resulted in the in vitro destruction of the templating properties of PrPSc, as measured by the protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) assay. The highest levels of prion inactivation (≥4 log10) were observed with ozone doses of 13.0 mg/liter, at pH 4.4 and 20°C, resulting in a CT (the product of residual ozone concentration and contact time) value as low as 0.59 mg · liter−1 min. A comparison of ozone CT requirements among various pathogens suggests that prions are more susceptible to ozone degradation than some model bacteria and protozoa and that ozone treatment may be an effective solution for inactivating prions in water and wastewater. PMID:22138993

  6. Protein-directed self-assembly of a fullerene crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kook-Han; Ko, Dong-Kyun; Kim, Yong-Tae; Kim, Nam Hyeong; Paul, Jaydeep; Zhang, Shao-Qing; Murray, Christopher B.; Acharya, Rudresh; DeGrado, William F.; Kim, Yong Ho; Grigoryan, Gevorg

    2016-01-01

    Learning to engineer self-assembly would enable the precise organization of molecules by design to create matter with tailored properties. Here we demonstrate that proteins can direct the self-assembly of buckminsterfullerene (C60) into ordered superstructures. A previously engineered tetrameric helical bundle binds C60 in solution, rendering it water soluble. Two tetramers associate with one C60, promoting further organization revealed in a 1.67-Å crystal structure. Fullerene groups occupy periodic lattice sites, sandwiched between two Tyr residues from adjacent tetramers. Strikingly, the assembly exhibits high charge conductance, whereas both the protein-alone crystal and amorphous C60 are electrically insulating. The affinity of C60 for its crystal-binding site is estimated to be in the nanomolar range, with lattices of known protein crystals geometrically compatible with incorporating the motif. Taken together, these findings suggest a new means of organizing fullerene molecules into a rich variety of lattices to generate new properties by design. PMID:27113637

  7. Protein complexes are under evolutionary selection to assemble via ordered pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Joseph A; Hernández, Helena; Hall, Zoe; Ahnert, Sebastian E; Perica, Tina; Robinson, Carol V; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2013-04-11

    Is the order in which proteins assemble into complexes important for biological function? Here, we seek to address this by searching for evidence of evolutionary selection for ordered protein complex assembly. First, we experimentally characterize the assembly pathways of several heteromeric complexes and show that they can be simply predicted from their three-dimensional structures. Then, by mapping gene fusion events identified from fully sequenced genomes onto protein complex assembly pathways, we demonstrate evolutionary selection for conservation of assembly order. Furthermore, using structural and high-throughput interaction data, we show that fusion tends to optimize assembly by simplifying protein complex topologies. Finally, we observe protein structural constraints on the gene order of fusion that impact the potential for fusion to affect assembly. Together, these results reveal the intimate relationships among protein assembly, quaternary structure, and evolution and demonstrate on a genome-wide scale the biological importance of ordered assembly pathways. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Small angle x-ray scattering: Instrument development and studies of protein aggregation, cellulose hydrolysis, and the production of nanoporous metals using surfactact templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banuelos, Jose Leobardo

    Small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) was used to obtain structural insights into protein aggregation, the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose, and the structural evolution of surfactant-templated nanoporous palladium and platinum systems during their synthesis. SAXS is bulk technique that allows probing the nanometer-scale morphology, interactions, density, and distribution of a variety of nonperiodic systems in the solid, liquid, or gaseous state. A 10-meter Small Angle Scattering camera, originally at ORNL, was assembled. During its re-commissioning, several upgrades were made including new data acquisition software built using National Instrument's Labview development environment, as well as portability to use analysis tools in wide use in scattering community. The Multiple Energy Diffractometer Using Small, medium and wide Angles (MEDUSA) was designed and built, its development will be discussed. The ability of proteins to change their conformation in response to changes in pressure, temperature, the presence of other molecular species, and ionic concentration in the solvents they are found, is a remarkable phenomenon that allows living cells to function properly. When proteins irreversibly unfold or mis-fold and aggregate this gives rise to severely debilitating diseases such as Alzheimer's and prion diseases. Protein aggregation was measured using SAXS on aqueous solutions of bovine serum albumin, myoglobin, and cellulase enzymes. Understanding how cellulose can be broken down into fermentable sugars is an important step in the development of strategies for producing alternative energy from biomass. The enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose was studied using both small angle neutron scattering and SAXS. One result from these investigations was finding supporting evidence that nanopores within the cellulose fibril matrix allow biologically active enzymes access to digest parts of the fibers. The production of mesoporous materials for hydrogen storage applications was

  9. Controlling the self-assembly of protein polymers via heterodimer-forming modules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Domeradzka, Natalia Eliza

    2016-01-01

    Supramolecular assemblies formed by protein polymers are attractive candidates for future biomaterials. Ideally, one would like to be able to define the nanostructure, in which the protein polymers should self-assemble, and then design protein polymer sequences that assemble exactly into such

  10. Selective protein patterning based on the micro-structured organosilane self-assembled monolayer by vacuum ultraviolet light lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sung-Hyuk; Yamaguchi, Munehiro; Nishimura, Okio; Mie, Yasuhiro; Tamura, Tomohiro; Kim, Byung-Woo; Suzuki, Masaaki

    2009-12-01

    We have succeeded to immobilize fluorescent proteins selectively using a micro-structured organosilane self-assembled monolayer as a template. An organosilane layer with amino terminal group was formed on a thermally oxidized Si wafer by liquid-phase method and then was pattern-etched by vacuum ultraviolet light (VUV). The second organosilane layer with thiol terminal group was deposited on the etched area by chemical vapor surface modification method (CVSM). These micro-structured organosilane layer containing two reactive terminal groups were chemically modified using bi-functional linkers. Two kinds of fluorescent protein, Enhanced Cyan Fluorescent Protein (ECFP) and R-phycoerythrin were selectively immobilized on the chemically modified surface.

  11. Filovirus proteins for antiviral drug discovery: Structure/function of proteins involved in assembly and budding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Baptiste; Reynard, Olivier; Volchkov, Viktor; Decroly, Etienne

    2018-02-01

    There are no approved medications for the treatment of Marburg or Ebola virus infection. In two previous articles (Martin et al., 2016, Martin et al., 2017), we reviewed surface glycoprotein and replication proteins structure/function relationship to decipher the molecular mechanisms of filovirus life cycle and identify antiviral strategies. In the present article, we recapitulate knowledge about the viral proteins involved in filovirus assembly and budding. First we describe the structural data available for viral proteins associated with virus assembly and virion egress and then, we integrate the structural features of these proteins in the functional context of the viral replication cycle. Finally, we summarize recent advances in the development of innovative antiviral strategies to target filovirus assembly and egress. The development of such prophylactic or post-exposure treatments could help controlling future filovirus outbreaks. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Self-Assembly of Protein Nanostructures to Enhance Biosensor Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Bradley; Dong, Xuehui; Obermeyer, Allie

    The Langmuir adsorption isotherm predicts that the number of bound species on a surface at a given concentration will be directly proportional to the number of binding sites on the surface. Therefore, the number of binding events in a biosensor may be increased at a given analyte concentration if the surface density of binding domains is increased. Here, we demonstrate the formation of block copolymers where one block is a human IgG antibody or a nanobody and self-assemble these molecules into nanostructured films with a high density of binding sites. The type of nanostructure formed and the rate of transport through the protein-polymer layers are explored as a function of coil fraction of the protein-polymer conjugate block copolymers, showing optima for transport and assembly that depend upon the identity of the protein. For small enough analytes, binding to the antibodies and nanobodies is linear with film thickness, indicating that the entire film is accessible. Consistent with the enhanced number of binding sites and the prediction of the Langmuir isotherm, the films improve sensitivity by several orders of magnitude relative to chemisorbed protein layers used in current sensor designs. Current research is integrating this new material technology into prototype sensors. Work supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Reesearch (AFOSR).

  13. Formation of charge-nanopatterned templates with flexible geometry via layer by layer deposition of polyelectrolytes for directed self-assembly of gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayin, Mustafa; Dahint, Reiner

    2017-03-01

    Nanostructure formation via self-assembly processes offers a fast and cost-effective approach to generate surface patterns on large lateral scale. In particular, if the high precision of lithographic techniques is not required, a situation typical of many biotechnological and biomedical applications, it may be considered as the method of choice as it does not require any sophisticated instrumentation. However, in many cases the variety and complexity of the surface structures accessible with a single self-assembly based technique is limited. Here, we report on a new approach which combines two different self-assembly strategies, colloidal lithography and layer-by-layer deposition of polyelectrolytes, in order to significantly expand the spectrum of accessible patterns. In particular, flat and donut-like charge-patterned templates have been generated, which facilitate subsequent deposition of gold nanoparticles in dot, grid, ring, out-of-ring and circular patch structures. Potential applications are e.g. in the fields of biofunctional interfaces with well-defined lateral dimensions, optical devices with tuned properties, and controlled three-dimensional material growth.

  14. Mitochondrial Band-7 family proteins: scaffolds for respiratory chain assembly?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernadette eGehl

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The band-7 protein family comprises a diverse set of membrane-bound proteins characterised by the presence of a conserved domain. The exact function of this band-7 domain remains elusive, but examples from animal and bacterial stomatin-type proteins demonstrate binding to lipids and the ability to assemble into membrane-bound oligomers that form putative scaffolds. Some members, such as prohibitins and human stomatin-like protein 2 (HsSLP2, localise to the mitochondrial inner membrane where they function in cristae formation and hyperfusion. In Arabidopsis, the band-7 protein family has diversified and includes plant-specific members. Mitochondrial-localised members include prohibitins (AtPHBs and two stomatin-like proteins (AtSLP1 and -2. Studies into PHB function in plants have demonstrated an involvement in root meristem proliferation and putative scaffold formation for mAAA proteases, but it remains unknown how these roles are achieved at the molecular level. In this minireview we summarise the current status of band-7 protein functions in Arabidopsis, and speculate how the mitochondrial members might recruit specific lipids to form microdomains that could shape the organisation and functioning of the respiratory chain.

  15. Engineering self-assembled bioreactors from protein microcompartments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, David [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-10-12

    The goals of this research are to understand how organisms such as bacteria segregate certain metabolic processes inside of specific structures, or “microcompartments,” in the cell and apply this knowledge to develop novel engineered microcompartments for use in nanotechnology and metabolic engineering. For example, in some bacteria, self-assembling protein microcompartments called carboxysomes encapsulate the enzymes involved in carbon fixation, enabling the cell to utilize carbon dioxide more effectively than if the enzymes were free in the cell. The proposed research will determine how structures such as carboxysomes assemble and function in bacteria and develop a means for creating novel, synthetic microcompartments for optimizing production of specific energy-rich compounds.

  16. Eye patches: Protein assembly of index-gradient squid lenses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, J.; Townsend, J. P.; Dodson, T. C.; Heiney, P. A.; Sweeney, A. M.

    2017-08-10

    A parabolic relationship between lens radius and refractive index allows spherical lenses to avoid spherical aberration. We show that in squid, patchy colloidal physics resulted from an evolutionary radiation of globular S-crystallin proteins. Small-angle x-ray scattering experiments on lens tissue show colloidal gels of S-crystallins at all radial positions. Sparse lens materials form via low-valence linkages between disordered loops protruding from the protein surface. The loops are polydisperse and bind via a set of hydrogen bonds between disordered side chains. Peripheral lens regions with low particle valence form stable, volume-spanning gels at low density, whereas central regions with higher average valence gel at higher densities. The proteins demonstrate an evolved set of linkers for self-assembly of nanoparticles into volumetric materials.

  17. The nature of protein interactions governing globular protein-polymer block copolymer self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Christopher N; Kim, Minkyu; Thomas, Carla S; Chang, Dongsook; Sanoja, Gabriel E; Okwara, Chimdimma U; Olsen, Bradley D

    2014-04-14

    The effects of protein surface potential on the self-assembly of protein-polymer block copolymers are investigated in globular proteins with controlled shape through two approaches: comparison of self-assembly of mCherry-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) bioconjugates with structurally homologous enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-PNIPAM bioconjugates, and mutants of mCherry with altered electrostatic patchiness. Despite large changes in amino acid sequence, the temperature-concentration phase diagrams of EGFP-PNIPAM and mCherry-PNIPAM conjugates have similar phase transition concentrations. Both materials form identical phases at two different coil fractions below the PNIPAM thermal transition temperature and in the bulk. However, at temperatures above the thermoresponsive transition, mCherry conjugates form hexagonal phases at high concentrations while EGFP conjugates form a disordered micellar phase. At lower concentration, mCherry shows a two-phase region while EGFP forms homogeneous disordered micellar structures, reflecting the effect of changes in micellar stability. Conjugates of four mCherry variants with changes to their electrostatic surface patchiness also showed minimal change in phase behavior, suggesting that surface patchiness has only a small effect on the self-assembly process. Measurements of protein/polymer miscibility, second virial coefficients, and zeta potential show that these coarse-grained interactions are similar between mCherry and EGFP, indicating that coarse-grained interactions largely capture the relevant physics for soluble, monomeric globular protein-polymer conjugate self-assembly.

  18. The vaccinia virus E6 protein influences virion protein localization during virus assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Condit, Richard C., E-mail: condit@mgm.ufl.edu; Moussatche, Nissin

    2015-08-15

    Vaccinia virus mutants in which expression of the virion core protein gene E6R is repressed are defective in virion morphogenesis. E6 deficient infections fail to properly package viroplasm into viral membranes, resulting in an accumulation of empty immature virions and large aggregates of viroplasm. We have used immunogold electron microscopy and immunofluorescence confocal microscopy to assess the intracellular localization of several virion structural proteins and enzymes during E6R mutant infections. We find that during E6R mutant infections virion membrane proteins and virion transcription enzymes maintain a normal localization within viral factories while several major core and lateral body proteins accumulate in aggregated virosomes. The results support a model in which vaccinia virions are assembled from at least three substructures, the membrane, the viroplasm and a “pre-nucleocapsid”, and that the E6 protein is essential for maintaining proper localization of the seven-protein complex and the viroplasm during assembly. - Highlights: • Mutation of E6 disrupts association of viral membranes with viral core proteins • Mutation of E6 does not perturb viral membrane biosynthesis • Mutation of E6 does not perturb localization of viral transcription enzymes • Mutation of E6 causes mis-localization and aggregation of viral core proteins • Vaccinia assembly uses three subassemblies: membranes, viroplasm, prenucleocapsid.

  19. G protein-coupled receptors self-assemble in dynamics simulations of model bilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Periole, Xavier; Huber, Thomas; Marrink, Siewert-Jan; Sakmar, Thomas P.

    2007-01-01

    Many integral membrane proteins assemble to form oligomeric structures in biological membranes. In particular, seven-transmembrane helical G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) appear to self-assemble constitutively in membranes, but the mechanism and physiological role of this assembly are unknown.

  20. Investigation of biomacromolecular assembly: replacement occurring on proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hong-Wen; Hu, Zhang-Jun; Zhao, Jian-Fu

    2003-07-01

    The non-chemical bond interaction between small molecule and macromolecule coming from the electrostatic attraction obeys the Langmuir assembly. The interaction of 1,5-di(2-hydroxyl-5-sulfophenyl-)-3-cyanoformazan (DSPCF) and three kinds of proteins: bovine serum albumin (BSA), α-globulins (Gb) and ovalbumin (OVA) at pH 1.83 has been investigated and then sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) was added to replace the DSPCF binding in protein. The microsurface adsorption-spectral correction (MSASC) technique and the break point approach were both used to characterize the aggregates. Results showed that the products: SDBS 99BSA, SDBS 50OVA and SDBS 25Gb at 30 °C and SDBS 90BSA, SDBS 40OVA and SDBS 20Gb at 40 °C are formed.

  1. Membrane protein architects: the role of the BAM complex in outer membrane protein assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Timothy J; Scott-Tucker, Anthony; Overduin, Michael; Henderson, Ian R

    2009-03-01

    The folding of transmembrane proteins into the outer membrane presents formidable challenges to Gram-negative bacteria. These proteins must migrate from the cytoplasm, through the inner membrane and into the periplasm, before being recognized by the beta-barrel assembly machinery, which mediates efficient insertion of folded beta-barrels into the outer membrane. Recent discoveries of component structures and accessory interactions of this complex are yielding insights into how cells fold membrane proteins. Here, we discuss how these structures illuminate the mechanisms responsible for the biogenesis of outer membrane proteins.

  2. Construction of an energy transfer system in the bio-nanocup space by heteromeric assembly of gp27 and gp5 proteins isolated from bacteriophage T4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshiyama, Tomomi; Ueno, Takafumi; Kanamaru, Shuji; Arisaka, Fumio; Watanabe, Yoshihito

    2009-06-21

    Protein assemblies, such as viruses and ferritins, have been employed as useful molecular templates for the accumulation of organic and inorganic compounds to construct bio-nanomaterials. While several methods for conjugation of heterofunctional molecules with protein assemblies have been reported, it remains difficult to control their fixation sites in the assemblies. In this article, we demonstrate the three-dimensional arrangement of different types of fluorescent probes using the heteromeric self-assembly of (gp27-gp5)(3) which is the component protein of bacteriophage T4 (gp: gene product). The composites exhibited fluorescence resonance energy transfer from fluorescein to tetramethylrhodamine dyes immobilized in the bio-nanocup space. The alternation of the donor and acceptor positions induced fluorescence self-quenching by the formation of ground-state complexes of the acceptors. These results indicate that the site-specific conjugation method using the bio-nanocup space of the heteromeric protein assembly has potential for the integration of several types of functional molecules in protein nanospaces.

  3. The assembly domain of the small capsid protein of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitler, Dale; Capuano, Christopher M; Henson, Brandon W; Pryce, Erin N; Anacker, Daniel; McCaffery, J Michael; Desai, Prashant J

    2012-11-01

    Self-assembly of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus capsids occurs when six proteins are coexpressed in insect cells using recombinant baculoviruses; however, if the small capsid protein (SCP) is omitted from the coinfection, assembly does not occur. Herein we delineate and identify precisely the assembly domain and the residues of SCP required for assembly. Hence, six residues, R14, D18, V25, R46, G66, and R70 in the assembly domain, when changed to alanine, completely abolish or reduce capsid assembly.

  4. Combining Protein Cages and Polymers: from Understanding Self-Assembly to Functional Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maassen, Stan Joris; van der Ham, A.M.; Cornelissen, Jeroen Johannes Lambertus Maria

    2016-01-01

    Protein cages, such as viruses, are well-defined biological nanostructures which are highly symmetrical and monodisperse. They are found in various shapes and sizes and can encapsulate or template non-native materials. Furthermore, the proteins can be chemically or genetically modified giving them

  5. Investigation on manganese-doped ZnSe QDs prepared from self-assembled template of reverse micelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu Qi, E-mail: chwchi@gmail.co [Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518060 (China); Heckler, Tracy; Wang Jun; Mei, Bing C.; Mountziaris, T.J. [University of Massachusetts-Amherst, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)

    2010-08-15

    Compound semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots, QDs) of manganese-doped zinc selenide (ZnMnSe) were prepared at room temperature in a reverse micelle template consisting of poly (ethylene)-poly (propylene)-poly (ethylene) (PEO-PPO-PEO) block copolymer, p-xylene, and water. The nanocrystals showed a distinct photoluminescence (PL) peak of Mn{sup 2+} at the wavelength of 585 nm. Based on a gradual increase in the PL intensity from Mn relative to ZnSe, a three-stage surface diffusion process was proposed for this room temperature doping process with an initial surface adsorption and subsequent lattice incorporation until saturation of the dopant. This slow diffusion is unique and cannot be easily observed in the regular hot-injection method. QDs of larger size require higher annealing temperature. Consequently, room temperature synthesis may provide insufficient energy to anneal QDs of larger size and result in more defects in crystals. Accordingly, a decrease in PL intensity was observed for QDs with larger crystal sizes owing to more defects in those QDs. Complete doping of manganese ion into ZnSe QDs is much faster for QDs of smaller sizes. Furthermore, the overall PL intensity of the ZnMnSe nanocrystals increased significantly due to surface stabilization by the surrounding PEO-PPO-PEO block copolymer. Moreover, the PL at 585 nm was also observed for ZnMnSe prepared with different Mn valence state. This method has the potential to reveal the diffusion mechanism experimentally upon further investigation.

  6. Roles of aromatic side chains and template effects of the hydrophobic cavity of a self-assembled peptide nanoarchitecture for anisotropic growth of gold nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomizaki, Kin-ya; Kishioka, Kohei; Kobayashi, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Akitsugu; Yamada, Naoki; Kataoka, Shunsuke; Imai, Takahito; Kasuno, Megumi

    2015-11-15

    decreasing the mole fraction of [Ant(6)]-RU006 against the total concentration of [Ant(6)]-RU006 and [Phe(6)]-RU006: absorption spectra similar to that for RU006 were obtained. Differences in the redox properties of the anthracene and naphthalene moieties scarcely affected morphology. We propose that construction of an appropriate hydrophobic cavity is important for templating gold nanocrystal architectures by peptide self-assembly. This mechanism would be applicable for developing simple, low toxicity, mild synthetic methods for constructing metallic nanomaterials for therapeutic use. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Altered Escherichia coli membrane protein assembly machinery allows proper membrane assembly of eukaryotic protein vitamin K epoxide reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatahet, Feras; Blazyk, Jessica L; Martineau, Eugenie; Mandela, Eric; Zhao, Yongxin; Campbell, Robert E; Beckwith, Jonathan; Boyd, Dana

    2015-12-08

    Functional overexpression of polytopic membrane proteins, particularly when in a foreign host, is often a challenging task. Factors that negatively affect such processes are poorly understood. Using the mammalian membrane protein vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKORc1) as a reporter, we describe a genetic selection approach allowing the isolation of Escherichia coli mutants capable of functionally expressing this blood-coagulation enzyme. The isolated mutants map to components of membrane protein assembly and quality control proteins YidC and HslV. We show that changes in the VKORc1 sequence and in the YidC hydrophilic groove along with the inactivation of HslV promote VKORc1 activity and dramatically increase its expression level. We hypothesize that such changes correct for mismatches in the membrane topogenic signals between E. coli and eukaryotic cells guiding proper membrane integration. Furthermore, the obtained mutants allow the study of VKORc1 reaction mechanisms, inhibition by warfarin, and the high-throughput screening for potential anticoagulants.

  8. Multiscale modeling and simulation of microtubule-motor-protein assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tong; Blackwell, Robert; Glaser, Matthew A.; Betterton, M. D.; Shelley, Michael J.

    2015-12-01

    Microtubules and motor proteins self-organize into biologically important assemblies including the mitotic spindle and the centrosomal microtubule array. Outside of cells, microtubule-motor mixtures can form novel active liquid-crystalline materials driven out of equilibrium by adenosine triphosphate-consuming motor proteins. Microscopic motor activity causes polarity-dependent interactions between motor proteins and microtubules, but how these interactions yield larger-scale dynamical behavior such as complex flows and defect dynamics is not well understood. We develop a multiscale theory for microtubule-motor systems in which Brownian dynamics simulations of polar microtubules driven by motors are used to study microscopic organization and stresses created by motor-mediated microtubule interactions. We identify polarity-sorting and crosslink tether relaxation as two polar-specific sources of active destabilizing stress. We then develop a continuum Doi-Onsager model that captures polarity sorting and the hydrodynamic flows generated by these polar-specific active stresses. In simulations of active nematic flows on immersed surfaces, the active stresses drive turbulent flow dynamics and continuous generation and annihilation of disclination defects. The dynamics follow from two instabilities, and accounting for the immersed nature of the experiment yields unambiguous characteristic length and time scales. When turning off the hydrodynamics in the Doi-Onsager model, we capture formation of polar lanes as observed in the Brownian dynamics simulation.

  9. Multiscale modeling and simulation of microtubule-motor-protein assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tong; Blackwell, Robert; Glaser, Matthew A; Betterton, M D; Shelley, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules and motor proteins self-organize into biologically important assemblies including the mitotic spindle and the centrosomal microtubule array. Outside of cells, microtubule-motor mixtures can form novel active liquid-crystalline materials driven out of equilibrium by adenosine triphosphate-consuming motor proteins. Microscopic motor activity causes polarity-dependent interactions between motor proteins and microtubules, but how these interactions yield larger-scale dynamical behavior such as complex flows and defect dynamics is not well understood. We develop a multiscale theory for microtubule-motor systems in which Brownian dynamics simulations of polar microtubules driven by motors are used to study microscopic organization and stresses created by motor-mediated microtubule interactions. We identify polarity-sorting and crosslink tether relaxation as two polar-specific sources of active destabilizing stress. We then develop a continuum Doi-Onsager model that captures polarity sorting and the hydrodynamic flows generated by these polar-specific active stresses. In simulations of active nematic flows on immersed surfaces, the active stresses drive turbulent flow dynamics and continuous generation and annihilation of disclination defects. The dynamics follow from two instabilities, and accounting for the immersed nature of the experiment yields unambiguous characteristic length and time scales. When turning off the hydrodynamics in the Doi-Onsager model, we capture formation of polar lanes as observed in the Brownian dynamics simulation.

  10. Engineering Protein Self-Assembly: A New Approach for the Design of Octahedral Cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cougnon, Fabien B L

    2016-12-14

    A new symmetry-based approach allowed the self-assembly of an octahedral protein nanostructure. C3 trimeric and C4 tetrameric oligomerization domains can be combined in an engineered protein to direct assembly into a desired object. This work might provide the basis for a more general and flexible strategy to control protein self-assembly. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Flexible micro-supercapacitor based on in-situ assembled graphene on metal template at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, ZK; Lin, ZY; Li, LY; Song, B; Moon, KS; Bai, SL; Wong, CP

    2014-11-01

    Graphene based micro-supercapacitors (MSCs) have been extensively studied in recent years; however, few of them report room temperature fabricating methods for flexible MSC. Here we developed a convenient procedure based on simultaneous self-assembly and reduction of graphene oxide (GO) on Cu/Au interdigit at room temperature. The as-produced MSC shows a specific areal capacitance of 0.95 mF cm(-2) and maintains 98.3% after 11,000 cycles of charge and discharge. Extremely small relaxation time constants of 1.9 ms in aqueous electrolyte and 4.8 ms in gelled electrolyte are achieved. Also the device shows great flexibility and retains 93.5% of the capacitance after 5000 times of bending and twisting tests. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Self-assembling protein nanoparticles in the design of vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacinto López-Sagaseta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For over 100 years, vaccines have been one of the most effective medical interventions for reducing infectious disease, and are estimated to save millions of lives globally each year. Nevertheless, many diseases are not yet preventable by vaccination. This large unmet medical need demands further research and the development of novel vaccines with high efficacy and safety. Compared to the 19th and early 20th century vaccines that were made of killed, inactivated, or live-attenuated pathogens, modern vaccines containing isolated, highly purified antigenic protein subunits are safer but tend to induce lower levels of protective immunity. One strategy to overcome the latter is to design antigen nanoparticles: assemblies of polypeptides that present multiple copies of subunit antigens in well-ordered arrays with defined orientations that can potentially mimic the repetitiveness, geometry, size, and shape of the natural host-pathogen surface interactions. Such nanoparticles offer a collective strength of multiple binding sites (avidity and can provide improved antigen stability and immunogenicity. Several exciting advances have emerged lately, including preclinical evidence that this strategy may be applicable for the development of innovative new vaccines, for example, protecting against influenza, human immunodeficiency virus, and respiratory syncytial virus. Here, we provide a concise review of a critical selection of data that demonstrate the potential of this field. In addition, we highlight how the use of self-assembling protein nanoparticles can be effectively combined with the emerging discipline of structural vaccinology for maximum impact in the rational design of vaccine antigens.

  13. The mitochondrial DNA helicase TWINKLE can assemble on a closed circular template and support initiation of DNA synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jemt, E.; Farge, G.A.; Backstrom, S.; Holmlund, T.; Gustafsson, C. M.; Falkenberg, M.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA replication is performed by a simple machinery, containing the TWINKLE DNA helicase, a single-stranded DNA-binding protein, and the mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ. In addition, mitochondrial RNA polymerase is required for primer formation at the origins of DNA replication. TWINKLE

  14. Analysis of a Polycomb Group Protein Defines Regions That Link Repressive Activity on Nucleosomal Templates to In Vivo Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Ian F. G.; Emmons, Richard B.; Francis, Nicole J.; Wild, Brigitte; Müller, Jürg; Kingston, Robert E.; Wu, Chao-ting

    2005-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) genes propagate patterns of transcriptional repression throughout development. The products of several such genes are part of Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1), which inhibits chromatin remodeling and transcription in vitro. Genetic and biochemical studies suggest the product of the Posterior sex combs (Psc) gene plays a central role in both PcG-mediated gene repression in vivo and PRC1 activity in vitro. To dissect the relationship between the in vivo and in vitro activities of Psc, we identified the lesions associated with 11 genetically characterized Psc mutations and asked how the corresponding mutant proteins affect Psc activity on nucleosomal templates in vitro. Analysis of both single-mutant Psc proteins and recombinant complexes containing mutant protein revealed that Psc encodes at least two functions, complex formation and the inhibition of remodeling and transcription, which require different regions of the protein. There is an excellent correlation between the in vivo phenotypes of mutant Psc alleles and the structure and in vitro activities of the corresponding proteins, suggesting that the in vitro activities of PRC1 reflect essential functions of Psc in vivo. PMID:16024794

  15. Interface-defect-mediated photocatalysis of mesocrystalline ZnO assembly synthesized in-situ via a template-free hydrothermal approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Wang, Cuicui; Chen, Qifeng; Ren, Baosheng; Guan, Ruifang; Cao, Xiaofeng; Yang, Xiaopeng; Duan, Ran

    2017-08-01

    Both architecture construction and defects engineering of photocatalysts are highly vital in the photocatalytic activity. We report herein that the interface-defect-mediated photocatalytic activity of pompon-like ZnO (P-ZnO) mesocrystal photocatalyst synthesized via an aqueous approach, in the presence of sodium citrate without any other organic templates. The microstructure and defects of the diverse ZnO photocatalysts were examined with various techniques. The results indicated that the P-ZnO assemblies were composed of mesocrystal nanosheets exposed high energy (002) facet with high crystallinity. More importantly, the defects located at the interfaces among the nanocrystals in ZnO mesocrystals played an important role in the photocatalytic activity than that of interstitial zinc vacancies in bulk, which was confirmed by photocatalytic degradation of organic pollutants, such as methylene blue (MB) and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP). The results showed that the P-ZnO exhibited higher photocatalytic activity than that of the nanosized ZnO (N-ZnO), which could be attributed to not only the unique mesocrystal structure and high energy (002) facet exposed, but also the defects located at interfaces among nanocrystals in ZnO mesocrystals. In addition, the formation mechanism of the P-ZnO was investigated via a time-dependent method. It was found that the formation of P-ZnO hierarchical architecture assembled with ZnO mesocrystals involved a nonclassical crystallization growth and Ostwald Ripening process. This study provides a perspective on the improvement in photocatalytic activity via adjusting the bulk and interface defects and construction of hierarchical architectures of semiconductors.

  16. Control of Partial Coalescence of Self-Assembled Metal Nano-Particles across Lyotropic Liquid Crystals Templates towards Long Range Meso-Porous Metal Frameworks Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumée, Ludovic F; Lemoine, Jean-Baptiste; Ancel, Alice; Hameed, Nishar; He, Li; Kong, Lingxue

    2015-10-26

    The formation of purely metallic meso-porous metal thin films by partial interface coalescence of self-assembled metal nano-particles across aqueous solutions of Pluronics triblock lyotropic liquid crystals is demonstrated for the first time. Small angle X-ray scattering was used to study the influence of the thin film composition and processing conditions on the ordered structures. The structural characteristics of the meso-structures formed demonstrated to primarily rely on the lyotropic liquid crystal properties while the nature of the metal nano-particles used as well as the their diameters were found to affect the ordered structure formation. The impact of the annealing temperature on the nano-particle coalescence and efficiency at removing the templating lyotropic liquid crystals was also analysed. It is demonstrated that the lyotropic liquid crystal is rendered slightly less thermally stable, upon mixing with metal nano-particles and that low annealing temperatures are sufficient to form purely metallic frameworks with average pore size distributions smaller than 500 nm and porosity around 45% with potential application in sensing, catalysis, nanoscale heat exchange, and molecular separation.

  17. Probing the Composition, Assembly and Activity of Protein Molecular Machines using Native Mass Spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waterbeemd, M.J. van de

    2017-01-01

    Native mass spectrometry and mass spectrometry in general, are powerful analytical tools for studying proteins and protein complexes. Native mass spectrometry may provide accurate mass measurements of large macromolecular assemblies enabling the investigation of their composition and stoichiometry.

  18. Flexible, Symmetry-Directed Approach To Assembling Protein Cages (Publisher’s Version Open Access)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    and eHoward Hughes Medical Institute, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 Edited by David Baker, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, and...widespread in nature and confers new biological properties. Engineered protein assemblies have potential applica- tions in nanotechnology and medicine...assemble into the desired structure. Here we demonstrate a simple, generalizable approach to assemble proteins into cage-like structures that uses short

  19. Solution scattering studies on a virus capsid protein as a building block for nanoscale assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Comellas Aragones, M.; Comellas-Aragones, Marta; Sikkema, Friso D.; Delaittre, Guillaume; Terry, Ann E.; King, Stephen M.; Visser, Dirk; Heenan, Richard K.; Nolte, Roeland J.M.; Cornelissen, Jeroen Johannes Lambertus Maria; Feiters, Martin C.

    2011-01-01

    Self-assembled protein cages are versatile building blocks in the construction of biomolecular nanostructures. Because of the defined assembly behaviour the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) protein is often used for such applications. Here we report a detailed solution scattering study of the

  20. Feasible synthesis of protein-templated zinc phosphate-supported Pt nanoparticle with enhanced electrocatalysis for methanol oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yingpan; Ji, Hongfei; Wang, Minghua; He, Linghao; Song, Ruirui; Zhang, Zhihong

    2017-11-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA)-templated zinc phosphate (Zn3(PO4)2@BSA) was synthesized by a feasible self-assembly method and applied as support for platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs). The possible formation mechanism of Zn3(PO4)2@BSA nanocomposite was investigated using time-dependent experiments. We found that Zn3(PO4)2@BSA nanocomposite was transformed from its nanoplate counterpart. Furthermore, the amount of the precursor H2PtCl6 used in the formation of PtNP@Zn3(PO4)2@BSA plays an important role in the electrocatalytic activity of the developed PtNP@Zn3(PO4)2@BSA electrocatalyst. Results showed that the deposition of Pt onto the surface of Zn3(PO4)2@BSA nanocomposite with 150 μL of H2PtCl6 produced the most uniformly distributed Pt NPs, with an average size of approximately 2 nm. The as-prepared novel PtNP@Zn3(PO4)2@BSA electrocatalyst exhibits considerably enhanced electrocatalytic activity and stability for methanol oxidation compared with multi-walled carbon nanotube-supported Pt NP electrocatalyst. The introduction of Zn3(PO4)2@BSA nanocomposite as new support material demonstrated a new strategy that can potentially accelerate electrode reactions toward methanol oxidation.

  1. Resorcinol-templated head-to-head photodimerization of a thiophene in the solid state and unusual edge-to-face stacking in a discrete hydrogen-bonded assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Kristin M; Sumrak, Joseph C; MacGillivray, Leonard R

    2014-02-21

    A head-to-head photodimerization of a β-substituted thiophene stacked face-to-face in the solid state using a ditopic hydrogen-bond-donor template is reported. The face-to-face stacking is attributed to contributions of intertemplate forces, which contrasts an assembly wherein the same thiophenes stack edge-to-face yet maintain a discrete hydrogen-bonded structure.

  2. ECM protein nanofibers and nanostructures engineered using surface-initiated assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanski, John M; Jallerat, Quentin; Feinberg, Adam W

    2014-04-17

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) in tissues is synthesized and assembled by cells to form a 3D fibrillar, protein network with tightly regulated fiber diameter, composition and organization. In addition to providing structural support, the physical and chemical properties of the ECM play an important role in multiple cellular processes including adhesion, differentiation, and apoptosis. In vivo, the ECM is assembled by exposing cryptic self-assembly (fibrillogenesis) sites within proteins. This process varies for different proteins, but fibronectin (FN) fibrillogenesis is well-characterized and serves as a model system for cell-mediated ECM assembly. Specifically, cells use integrin receptors on the cell membrane to bind FN dimers and actomyosin-generated contractile forces to unfold and expose binding sites for assembly into insoluble fibers. This receptor-mediated process enables cells to assemble and organize the ECM from the cellular to tissue scales. Here, we present a method termed surface-initiated assembly (SIA), which recapitulates cell-mediated matrix assembly using protein-surface interactions to unfold ECM proteins and assemble them into insoluble fibers. First, ECM proteins are adsorbed onto a hydrophobic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surface where they partially denature (unfold) and expose cryptic binding domains. The unfolded proteins are then transferred in well-defined micro- and nanopatterns through microcontact printing onto a thermally responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PIPAAm) surface. Thermally-triggered dissolution of the PIPAAm leads to final assembly and release of insoluble ECM protein nanofibers and nanostructures with well-defined geometries. Complex architectures are possible by engineering defined patterns on the PDMS stamps used for microcontact printing. In addition to FN, the SIA process can be used with laminin, fibrinogen and collagens type I and IV to create multi-component ECM nanostructures. Thus, SIA can be used to engineer

  3. Report Template

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Anders; Laurent, Alexis; Owsianiak, Mikołaj

    2017-01-01

    To ensure consistent reporting of life cycle assessment (LCA), we provide a report template. The report includes elements of an LCA study as recommended but the ILCD Handbook. Illustrative case study reported according to this template is presented in Chap. 39 ....

  4. Fragment-Based Drug Design Facilitated by Protein-Templated Click Chemistry : Fragment Linking and -Optimization of Inhibitors of the Aspartic Protease Endothiapepsin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mondal, Milon; Unver, M. Yagiz; Pal, Asish; Bakker, Matthijs; Berrier, Stephan R.; Hirsch, Anna K H

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need for the development of efficient methodologies that accelerate drug discovery. We demonstrate that the strategic combination of fragment linking/optimization and protein-templated click chemistry is an efficient and powerful method that accelerates the hit-identification

  5. Protein capable of self-assembly at a hydrophobic-hydrophilic interface and uses threof

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woesten, Herman Abel Bernard; Claessen, Dennis; Faber, Onno Herben; Meijer, Wilhelmus Gerardus; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2001-01-01

    The invention relates to a hydrophobin-like protein capable of self-assembly at a hydrophobic-hydrophilic interface. The protein according to the present invention belongs to a new class of protein and is an at least partially purified protein comprising a polypeptide having at least 40 % identity

  6. Self-assembly of peptide-amphiphile forming helical nanofibers and in situ template synthesis of uniform mesoporous single wall silica nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Sahnawaz; Mondal, Julfikar Hassan; Behera, Nibedita; Das, Debapratim

    2013-11-19

    A lysine based peptide amphiphile (PA) is designed and synthesized for efficient water immobilization. The PA with a minimum gelation concentration (MGC) of 1% w/v in water shows prolonged stability and can also efficiently immobilize aqueous mixtures of some other organic solvents. The presence of a free amine induced pH dependency of the gelation as the PA could form hydrogel at a pH range of 1-8 but failed to do so above that pH. Various spectroscopic and microscopic experiments such as steady state fluorescence, NMR, IR, CD, and FESEM reveal the presence of hydrophobic interaction, hydrogen bond, and π-π stacking interaction in the self-assembly process. The self-aggregation has been correlated with the design of the molecule to show the involvement of supramolecular forces and the hierarchical pathway. While the L analogue formed left-handed helical nanofibers, the other enantiomer showed opposite helicity. Interestingly the equimolar mixture of the isomers failed to form any fibrous aggregate. Although fibers formed at a subgel concentration, no helical nature was observed at this stage. The length and thickness of the fibers increased with increase in the gelator concentration. The nanofibers formed by the gelator are used as a template to prepare mesoporous single wall silica nanotubes (SWSNTs) in situ in plain water without the requirement of any organic solvent as well as any external hydrolyzing agent. The SWSNTs formed are open at both ends, are few micrometers in length, and have an average diameter of ~10 nm. The BET isotherm showed a type IV hysteresis loop suggesting mesoporous nature of the nanotubes.

  7. Protein nanotubes comprised of an alternate layer-by-layer assembly using a polycation as an electrostatic glue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xue; Lu, Gang; Tsuchida, Eishun; Komatsu, Teruyuki

    2008-01-01

    We present the synthesis and structure of various protein nanotubes comprised of an alternate layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly using a polycation as an electrostatic glue. The nanotubes were fabricated by sequential LbL depositions of positively charged polycations and negatively charged proteins into a porous polycarbonate (PC) membrane, followed by release of the cylindrical core by quick dissolution of the template with CH(2)Cl(2). This procedure provides a variety of protein nanotubes without interlayer cross-linking. The three-cycle depositions of poly-L-arginine (PLA) and human serum albumin (HSA, M(w)=66.5 kDa) into the porous PC template (pore diameter, D(p)=400 nm) yielded well-defined (PLA/HSA)(3) nanotubes with an outer diameter of 419+/-29 nm and a wall thickness of 46+/-8 nm, revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations. The outer diameter of the tubules can be controlled by the pore size of the template (200-800 nm), whereas the wall thickness is always constant, independent of the D(p) value. The (PEI/HSA)(3) (PEI: polyethylenimine) nanotubes showed a slightly thin wall of 39+/-5 nm. CD spectra of the multilayered (PEI/HSA)(n) film on a flat quartz plate suggested that the secondary structure of HSA between the polycations was almost the same as that in aqueous solution. The three-cycle LbL depositions of PLA and ferritin (M(w)=460 kDa) or myoglobin (Mb, M(w)=1.7 kDa) into the porous PC membrane also gave cylindrical hollow structures. The wall thickness of the (PLA/ferritin)(3) and (PLA/Mb)(3) nanotubes were 55+/-5 nm and 31+/-4 nm; it depends on the globular size of the protein (ferritin>HSA>Mb). The individual ferritin molecule was clearly seen in the tubular walls by SEM and TEM measurements.

  8. A mutation in the catalytic subunit of yeast telomerase alters primer-template alignment while promoting processivity and protein-DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bairley, Robin C B; Guillaume, Gina; Vega, Leticia R; Friedman, Katherine L

    2011-12-15

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein complex that is required for maintenance of linear chromosome ends (telomeres). In yeast, the Est2 protein reverse transcribes a short template region of the TLC1 RNA using the chromosome terminus to prime replication. Yeast telomeres contain heterogeneous G(1-3)T sequences that arise from incomplete reverse transcription of the TLC1 template and alignment of the DNA primer at multiple sites within the template region. We have previously described mutations in the essential N-terminal TEN domain of Est2p that alter telomere sequences. Here, we demonstrate that one of these mutants, glutamic acid 76 to lysine (est2-LT(E76K)), restricts possible alignments between the DNA primer and the TLC1 template. In addition, this mutant exhibits increased processivity in vivo. Within the context of the telomerase enzyme, the Est2p TEN domain is thought to contribute to enzyme processivity by mediating an anchor-site interaction with the DNA primer. We show that binding of the purified TEN domain (residues 1-161) to telomeric DNA is enhanced by the E76K mutation. These results support the idea that the anchor-site interaction contributes to telomerase processivity and suggest a role for the anchor site of yeast telomerase in mediating primer-template alignment within the active site.

  9. Heme-Protein Active Site Models via Self-Assembly in Water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiammengo, R.; Wojciechowski, Kamil; Crego Calama, Mercedes; Figoli, A.; Wessling, Matthias; Reinhoudt, David; Timmerman, P.

    2003-01-01

    Water-soluble models of heme-protein active sites are obtained via the self-assembly of cationic porphyrins 1 and tetrasulfonato calix[4]arene 2 (K1·2 = 105 M-1). Selective binding of ligands either outside or inside the cavity of assemblies 1·2 via coordination to the zinc center has been observed.

  10. Symmetry of Charge Partitioning in Collisional and UV Photon-Induced Dissociation of Protein Assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamara, Sem|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/411923110; Dyachenko, Andrey|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/371569583; Fort, Kyle L|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412516489; Makarov, Alexander A; Scheltema, Richard A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/328673056; Heck, Albert J R|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/105189332

    2016-01-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry can provide structural information on intact protein assemblies, generating mass fingerprints indicative of the stoichiometry and quaternary arrangement of the subunits. However, in such experiments, collision-induced dissociation yields restricted information due to

  11. GPCR-SSFE: A comprehensive database of G-protein-coupled receptor template predictions and homology models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kreuchwig Annika

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs transduce a wide variety of extracellular signals to within the cell and therefore have a key role in regulating cell activity and physiological function. GPCR malfunction is responsible for a wide range of diseases including cancer, diabetes and hyperthyroidism and a large proportion of drugs on the market target these receptors. The three dimensional structure of GPCRs is important for elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying these diseases and for performing structure-based drug design. Although structural data are restricted to only a handful of GPCRs, homology models can be used as a proxy for those receptors not having crystal structures. However, many researchers working on GPCRs are not experienced homology modellers and are therefore unable to benefit from the information that can be gleaned from such three-dimensional models. Here, we present a comprehensive database called the GPCR-SSFE, which provides initial homology models of the transmembrane helices for a large variety of family A GPCRs. Description Extending on our previous theoretical work, we have developed an automated pipeline for GPCR homology modelling and applied it to a large set of family A GPCR sequences. Our pipeline is a fragment-based approach that exploits available family A crystal structures. The GPCR-SSFE database stores the template predictions, sequence alignments, identified sequence and structure motifs and homology models for 5025 family A GPCRs. Users are able to browse the GPCR dataset according to their pharmacological classification or search for results using a UniProt entry name. It is also possible for a user to submit a GPCR sequence that is not contained in the database for analysis and homology model building. The models can be viewed using a Jmol applet and are also available for download along with the alignments. Conclusions The data provided by GPCR-SSFE are useful for investigating

  12. The β-Barrel Outer Membrane Protein Assembly Complex of Neisseria meningitidis▿

    OpenAIRE

    Volokhina, Elena B.; Beckers, Frank; Tommassen, Jan; Bos, Martine P.

    2009-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved protein Omp85 is required for outer membrane protein (OMP) assembly in gram-negative bacteria and in mitochondria. Its Escherichia coli homolog, designated BamA, functions with four accessory lipoproteins, BamB, BamC, BamD, and BamE, together forming the β-barrel assembly machinery (Bam). Here, we addressed the composition of this machinery and the function of its components in Neisseria meningitidis, a model organism for outer membrane biogenesis studies. Analysi...

  13. Protein Viability on Au Nanoparticles during an Electrospray and Electrostatic-Force-Directed Assembly Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun Mao

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the protein viability on Au nanoparticles during an electrospray and electrostatic-force-directed assembly process, through which Au nanoparticle-antibody conjugates are assembled onto the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs to fabricate carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNTFET biosensors. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and field-effect transistor (FET measurements have been used to investigate the antibody activity after the nanoparticle assembly. Upon the introduction of matching antigens, the colored reaction from the ELISA and the change in the electrical characteristic of the CNTFET device confirm that the antibody activity is preserved during the assembly process.

  14. ϕX174 Procapsid Assembly: Effects of an Inhibitory External Scaffolding Protein and Resistant Coat Proteins In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherwa, James E; Tyson, Joshua; Bedwell, Gregory J; Brooke, Dewey; Edwards, Ashton G; Dokland, Terje; Prevelige, Peter E; Fane, Bentley A

    2017-01-01

    During ϕX174 morphogenesis, 240 copies of the external scaffolding protein D organize 12 pentameric assembly intermediates into procapsids, a reaction reconstituted in vitro In previous studies, ϕX174 strains resistant to exogenously expressed dominant lethal D genes were experimentally evolved. Resistance was achieved by the stepwise acquisition of coat protein mutations. Once resistance was established, a stimulatory D protein mutation that greatly increased strain fitness arose. In this study, in vitro biophysical and biochemical methods were utilized to elucidate the mechanistic details and evolutionary trade-offs created by the resistance mutations. The kinetics of procapsid formation was analyzed in vitro using wild-type, inhibitory, and experimentally evolved coat and scaffolding proteins. Our data suggest that viral fitness is correlated with in vitro assembly kinetics and demonstrate that in vivo experimental evolution can be analyzed within an in vitro biophysical context. Experimental evolution is an extremely valuable tool. Comparisons between ancestral and evolved genotypes suggest hypotheses regarding adaptive mechanisms. However, it is not always possible to rigorously test these hypotheses in vivo We applied in vitro biophysical and biochemical methods to elucidate the mechanistic details that allowed an experimentally evolved virus to become resistant to an antiviral protein and then evolve a productive use for that protein. Moreover, our results indicate that the respective roles of scaffolding and coat proteins may have been redistributed during the evolution of a two-scaffolding-protein system. In one-scaffolding-protein virus assembly systems, coat proteins promiscuously interact to form heterogeneous aberrant structures in the absence of scaffolding proteins. Thus, the scaffolding protein controls fidelity. During ϕX174 assembly, the external scaffolding protein acts like a coat protein, self-associating into large aberrant spherical

  15. Ergodicity and model quality in template-restrained canonical and temperature/Hamiltonian replica exchange coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karczyńska, Agnieszka S; Czaplewski, Cezary; Krupa, Paweł; Mozolewska, Magdalena A; Joo, Keehyoung; Lee, Jooyoung; Liwo, Adam

    2017-12-05

    Molecular simulations restrained to single or multiple templates are commonly used in protein-structure modeling. However, the restraints introduce additional barriers, thus impairing the ergodicity of simulations, which can affect the quality of the resulting models. In this work, the effect of restraint types and simulation schemes on ergodicity and model quality was investigated by performing template-restrained canonical molecular dynamics (MD), multiplexed replica-exchange molecular dynamics, and Hamiltonian replica exchange molecular dynamics (HREMD) simulations with the coarse-grained UNRES force field on nine selected proteins, with pseudo-harmonic log-Gaussian (unbounded) or Lorentzian (bounded) restraint functions. The best ergodicity was exhibited by HREMD. It has been found that non-ergodicity does not affect model quality if good templates are used to generate restraints. However, when poor-quality restraints not covering the entire protein are used, the improved ergodicity of HREMD can lead to significantly improved protein models. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Self-Assembly in the Ferritin Nano-Cage Protein Superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Protein self-assembly, through specific, high affinity, and geometrically constraining protein-protein interactions, can control and lead to complex cellular nano-structures. Establishing an understanding of the underlying principles that govern protein self-assembly is not only essential to appreciate the fundamental biological functions of these structures, but could also provide a basis for their enhancement for nano-material applications. The ferritins are a superfamily of well studied proteins that self-assemble into hollow cage-like structures which are ubiquitously found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Structural studies have revealed that many members of the ferritin family can self-assemble into nano-cages of two types. Maxi-ferritins form hollow spheres with octahedral symmetry composed of twenty-four monomers. Mini-ferritins, on the other hand, are tetrahedrally symmetric, hollow assemblies composed of twelve monomers. This review will focus on the structure of members of the ferritin superfamily, the mechanism of ferritin self-assembly and the structure-function relations of these proteins.

  17. An amphipathic alpha-helix controls multiple roles of brome mosaic virus protein 1a in RNA replication complex assembly and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Liu

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Brome mosaic virus (BMV protein 1a has multiple key roles in viral RNA replication. 1a localizes to perinuclear endoplasmic reticulum (ER membranes as a peripheral membrane protein, induces ER membrane invaginations in which RNA replication complexes form, and recruits and stabilizes BMV 2a polymerase (2a(Pol and RNA replication templates at these sites to establish active replication complexes. During replication, 1a provides RNA capping, NTPase and possibly RNA helicase functions. Here we identify in BMV 1a an amphipathic alpha-helix, helix A, and use NMR analysis to define its structure and propensity to insert in hydrophobic membrane-mimicking micelles. We show that helix A is essential for efficient 1a-ER membrane association and normal perinuclear ER localization, and that deletion or mutation of helix A abolishes RNA replication. Strikingly, mutations in helix A give rise to two dramatically opposite 1a function phenotypes, implying that helix A acts as a molecular switch regulating the intricate balance between separable 1a functions. One class of helix A deletions and amino acid substitutions markedly inhibits 1a-membrane association and abolishes ER membrane invagination, viral RNA template recruitment, and replication, but doubles the 1a-mediated increase in 2a(Pol accumulation. The second class of helix A mutations not only maintains efficient 1a-membrane association but also amplifies the number of 1a-induced membrane invaginations 5- to 8-fold and enhances viral RNA template recruitment, while failing to stimulate 2a(Pol accumulation. The results provide new insights into the pathways of RNA replication complex assembly and show that helix A is critical for assembly and function of the viral RNA replication complex, including its central role in targeting replication components and controlling modes of 1a action.

  18. Tetrahymena dynamin related protein 6 self assembles independent ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    eluted as small oligomeric forms. Absence of any peak in the void volume suggests that human dynamin 1 does not form self-assembled structure under high ionic strength condition. Supplementary figure 3: Size exclusion chromatography profile of Drp6-R414A. His6-Drp6-. R414A expressed and purified from bacteria ...

  19. Adeno-associated Virus (AAV) Assembly-Activating Protein Is Not an Essential Requirement for Capsid Assembly of AAV Serotypes 4, 5, and 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earley, Lauriel F; Powers, John M; Adachi, Kei; Baumgart, Joshua T; Meyer, Nancy L; Xie, Qing; Chapman, Michael S; Nakai, Hiroyuki

    2017-02-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have made great progress in their use for gene therapy; however, fundamental aspects of AAV's capsid assembly remain poorly characterized. In this regard, the discovery of assembly-activating protein (AAP) sheds new light on this crucial part of AAV biology and vector production. Previous studies have shown that AAP is essential for assembly; however, how its mechanistic roles in assembly might differ among AAV serotypes remains uncharacterized. Here, we show that biological properties of AAPs and capsid assembly processes are surprisingly distinct among AAV serotypes 1 to 12. In the study, we investigated subcellular localizations and assembly-promoting functions of AAP1 to -12 (i.e., AAPs derived from AAV1 to -12, respectively) and examined the AAP dependence of capsid assembly processes of these 12 serotypes using combinatorial approaches that involved immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy, barcode-Seq (i. e., a high-throughput quantitative method using DNA barcodes and a next-generation sequencing technology), and quantitative dot blot assays. This study revealed that AAP1 to -12 are all localized in the nucleus with serotype-specific differential patterns of nucleolar association; AAPs and assembled capsids do not necessarily colocalize; AAPs are promiscuous in promoting capsid assembly of other serotypes, with the exception of AAP4, -5, -11, and -12; assembled AAV5, -8, and -9 capsids are excluded from the nucleolus, in contrast to the nucleolar enrichment of assembled AAV2 capsids; and, surprisingly, AAV4, -5, and -11 capsids are not dependent on AAP for assembly. These observations highlight the serotype-dependent heterogeneity of the capsid assembly process and challenge current notions about the role of AAP and the nucleolus in capsid assembly. Assembly-activating protein (AAP) is a recently discovered adeno-associated virus (AAV) protein that promotes capsid assembly and provides new opportunities

  20. Bone-like nanocomposites based on self-assembled protein-based matrices with Ca2+ capturing capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Lin; Huang, Jie; Luo, Dongmei; Chen, Zhenhua; Li, Xudong

    2010-09-01

    In the present work, bone-like nanocomposites have been successfully synthesized based on the mineralization of self-assembled protein-based microgels. Such mircogels were achieved by the in vitro reconstitution of collagen monomeric solutions in the presence of alginate in a microemulsion system. Microstructural observations revealed that the collagen-alginate composite beads possessed a nanofibrous three dimensional (3D) interconnected porous microstructure. The obtained microgels were pre-incubated in calcium-containing solution to capture Ca(2+) ions, and subsequently immersed in phosphate-containing solution to initiate the formation of hydroxyapatite (HA) by an alternative incubating procedure. It was observed that a substantial amount of bone-like apatite nanocrystals were orderly and homogeneously deposited throughout the porous fibrillar networks. Herein, the collagen-alginate composite microgels served as a mineralization template for the synthesis of HA-polymer nanocomposites, which could be ideal vehicles potentially for cell carriers, bone repair and proteins and drugs delivery in tissue regeneration.

  1. Nonequilibrium synthesis and assembly of hybrid inorganic-protein nanostructures using an engineered DNA binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Haixia; Choe, Woo-Seok; Thai, Corrine K; Sarikaya, Mehmet; Traxler, Beth A; Baneyx, François; Schwartz, Daniel T

    2005-11-09

    We show that a protein with no intrinsic inorganic synthesis activity can be endowed with the ability to control the formation of inorganic nanostructures under thermodynamically unfavorable (nonequilibrium) conditions, reproducing a key feature of biological hard-tissue growth and assembly. The nonequilibrium synthesis of Cu(2)O nanoparticles is accomplished using an engineered derivative of the DNA-binding protein TraI in a room-temperature precursor electrolyte. The functional TraI derivative (TraIi1753::CN225) is engineered to possess a cysteine-constrained 12-residue Cu(2)O binding sequence, designated CN225, that is inserted into a permissive site in TraI. When TraIi1753::CN225 is included in the precursor electrolyte, stable Cu(2)O nanoparticles form, even though the concentrations of [Cu(+)] and [OH(-)] are at 5% of the solubility product (K(sp,Cu2O)). Negative control experiments verify that Cu(2)O formation is controlled by inclusion of the CN225 binding sequence. Transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction reveal a core-shell structure for the nonequilibrium nanoparticles: a 2 nm Cu(2)O core is surrounded by an adsorbed protein shell. Quantitative protein adsorption studies show that the unexpected stability of Cu(2)O is imparted by the nanomolar surface binding affinity of TraIi1753::CN225 for Cu(2)O (K(d) = 1.2 x 10(-)(8) M), which provides favorable interfacial energetics (-45 kJ/mol) for the core-shell configuration. The protein shell retains the DNA-binding traits of TraI, as evidenced by the spontaneous organization of nanoparticles onto circular double-stranded DNA.

  2. Molecular Dissection of the Forces Responsible for Viral Capsid Assembly and Stabilization by Decoration Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Shannon; Yang, Qin; De Angeles, Rolando; Chang, Jenny R; Ortega, Marcos; Davis, Christal; Catalano, Carlos Enrique

    2017-02-07

    Complex double-stranded DNA viruses utilize a terminase enzyme to package their genomes into a preassembled procapsid shell. DNA packaging triggers a major conformational change in the proteins assembled into the shell and most often subsequent addition of a decoration protein that is required to stabilize the structure. In bacteriophage λ, DNA packaging drives a procapsid expansion transition to afford a larger but fragile shell. The gpD decoration protein adds to the expanded shell as trimeric spikes at each of the 140 three-fold axes. The spikes provide mechanical strength to the shell such that it can withstand the tremendous internal forces generated by the packaged DNA in addition to environmental insults. Hydrophobic, electrostatic, and aromatic-proline noncovalent interactions have been proposed to mediate gpD trimer spike assembly at the expanded shell surface. Here, we directly examine each of these interactions and demonstrate that hydrophobic interactions play the dominant role. In the course of this study, we unexpectedly found that Trp308 in the λ major capsid protein (gpE) plays a critical role in shell assembly. The gpE-W308A mutation affords a soluble, natively folded protein that does not further assemble into a procapsid shell, despite the fact that it retains binding interactions with the scaffolding protein, the shell assembly chaparone protein. The data support a model in which the λ procapsid shell assembles via cooperative interaction of monomeric capsid proteins, as observed in the herpesviruses and phages such as P22. The significance of the results with respect to capsid assembly, maturation, and stability is discussed.

  3. Kinetic Controlled Tag-Catcher Interactions for Directed Covalent Protein Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lee Ling; Hoon, Shawn S; Wong, Fong T

    2016-01-01

    Over the last few years, a number of different protein assembly strategies have been developed, greatly expanding the toolbox for controlling macromolecular assembly. One of the most promising developments is a rapid protein ligation approach using a short polypeptide SpyTag and its partner, SpyCatcher derived from Streptococcus pyogenes fibronectin-binding protein, FbaB. To extend this technology, we have engineered and characterized a new Tag-Catcher pair from a related fibronectin-binding protein in Streptococcus dysgalactiae. The polypeptide Tag, named SdyTag, was constructed based on the native Cna protein B-type (CnaB) domain and was found to be highly unreactive to SpyCatcher. SpyCatcher has 320-fold specificity for its native SpyTag compared to SdyTag. Similarly, SdyTag has a 75-fold specificity for its optimized Catcher, named SdyCatcherDANG short, compared to SpyCatcher. These Tag-Catcher pairs were used in combination to demonstrate specific sequential assembly of tagged proteins in vitro. We also demonstrated that the in vivo generation of circularized proteins in a Tag-Catcher specific manner where specific Tags can be left unreacted for use in subsequent ligation reactions. From the success of these experiments, we foresee the application of SdyTags and SpyTags, not only, for multiplexed control of protein assembly but also for the construction of novel protein architectures.

  4. Kinetic Controlled Tag-Catcher Interactions for Directed Covalent Protein Assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Ling Tan

    Full Text Available Over the last few years, a number of different protein assembly strategies have been developed, greatly expanding the toolbox for controlling macromolecular assembly. One of the most promising developments is a rapid protein ligation approach using a short polypeptide SpyTag and its partner, SpyCatcher derived from Streptococcus pyogenes fibronectin-binding protein, FbaB. To extend this technology, we have engineered and characterized a new Tag-Catcher pair from a related fibronectin-binding protein in Streptococcus dysgalactiae. The polypeptide Tag, named SdyTag, was constructed based on the native Cna protein B-type (CnaB domain and was found to be highly unreactive to SpyCatcher. SpyCatcher has 320-fold specificity for its native SpyTag compared to SdyTag. Similarly, SdyTag has a 75-fold specificity for its optimized Catcher, named SdyCatcherDANG short, compared to SpyCatcher. These Tag-Catcher pairs were used in combination to demonstrate specific sequential assembly of tagged proteins in vitro. We also demonstrated that the in vivo generation of circularized proteins in a Tag-Catcher specific manner where specific Tags can be left unreacted for use in subsequent ligation reactions. From the success of these experiments, we foresee the application of SdyTags and SpyTags, not only, for multiplexed control of protein assembly but also for the construction of novel protein architectures.

  5. Acid-induced assembly of a reconstituted silk protein system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabai, A. Pasha; Weigandt, Katie M.; Blair, Daniel L.

    2017-08-01

    Silk cocoons are reconstituted into an aqueous suspension, and protein stability is investigated by comparing the protein's response to hydrochloric acid and sodium chloride. Aggregation occurs for systems mixed with hydrochloric acid, while sodium chloride over the same range of concentrations does not cause aggregation. We measure the structures present on the protein and aggregate length scales in these solutions using both optical and small-angle neutron scattering, while mass spectrometry techniques shed light on a possible mechanism for aggregate formation. We find that the introduction of acid modulates the aggregate size and pervaded volume of the protein, an effect that is not observed with salt.

  6. Distinctive Roles for Periplasmic Proteases in the Maintenance of Essential Outer Membrane Protein Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltes, Garner R; Martin, Nicholas R; Park, Eunhae; Sutterlin, Holly A; Silhavy, Thomas J

    2017-10-15

    Outer membrane protein (OMP) biogenesis in Escherichia coli is a robust process essential to the life of the organism. It is catalyzed by the β-barrel assembly machine (Bam) complex, and a number of quality control factors, including periplasmic chaperones and proteases, maintain the integrity of this trafficking pathway. Little is known, however, about how periplasmic proteases recognize and degrade OMP substrates when assembly is compromised or whether different proteases recognize the same substrate at distinct points in the assembly pathway. In this work, we use well-defined assembly-defective mutants of LptD, the essential lipopolysaccharide assembly translocon, to show that the periplasmic protease DegP degrades substrates with assembly defects that prevent or impair initial contact with Bam, causing the mutant protein to accumulate in the periplasm. In contrast, another periplasmic protease, BepA, degrades a LptD mutant substrate that has engaged the Bam complex and formed a nearly complete barrel. Furthermore, we describe the role of the outer membrane lipoprotein YcaL, a protease of heretofore unknown function, in the degradation of a LptD substrate that has engaged the Bam complex but is stalled at an earlier step in the assembly process that is not accessible to BepA. Our results demonstrate that multiple periplasmic proteases monitor OMPs at distinct points in the assembly process.IMPORTANCE OMP assembly is catalyzed by the essential Bam complex and occurs in a cellular environment devoid of energy sources. Assembly intermediates that misfold can compromise this essential molecular machine. Here we demonstrate distinctive roles for three different periplasmic proteases that can clear OMP substrates with folding defects that compromise assembly at three different stages. These quality control factors help ensure the integrity of the permeability barrier that contributes to the intrinsic resistance of Gram-negative organisms to many antibiotics

  7. Coronavirus nucleocapsid proteins assemble constitutively in high molecular oligomers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cong, Yingying; Kriegenburg, Franziska; de Haan, Cornelis A. M.; Reggiori, Fulvio

    2017-01-01

    Coronaviruses (CoV) are enveloped viruses and rely on their nucleocapsid N protein to incorporate the positive-stranded genomic RNA into the virions. CoV N proteins form oligomers but the mechanism and relevance underlying their multimerization remain to be fully understood. Using in vitro pull-down

  8. The outer membrane protein assembly machinery of Neisseria meningitidis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volokhina, E.B.

    2009-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria are characterized by a cell envelope consisting of an inner membrane (IM) and an outer membrane (OM), which are separated by the peptidoglycan-containing periplasm. While the integral IM proteins are alpha-helical, all but one known integral OM proteins (OMPs) are

  9. Self-assembling peptides form nanodiscs that stabilize membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midtgaard, Søren Roi; Pedersen, Martin Cramer; Kirkensgaard, Jacob Judas Kain

    2014-01-01

    -ray scattering (SAXS) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) supported by coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. The detailed structure of the discs was determined in unprecedented detail and it was found that they adopt a discoidal structure very similar to the ApoA1 based nanodiscs. We furthermore...... show that, like the ApoA1 and derived nanodiscs, these peptide discs can accommodate and stabilize a membrane protein. Finally, we exploit their dynamic properties and show that the 18A discs may be used for transferring membrane proteins and associated phospholipids directly and gently......New methods to handle membrane bound proteins, e.g. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), are highly desirable. Recently, apoliprotein A1 (ApoA1) based lipoprotein particles have emerged as a new platform for studying membrane proteins, and it has been shown that they can self...

  10. Spotlight: assembly of protein complexes by integrating graph clustering methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Chia-Hao; Chen, Shu-Hwa; Chen, Chun-Yu; Hsiung, Chao A; Ho, Chin-Wen; Ko, Ming-Tat; Lin, Chung-Yen

    2013-04-10

    As is generally assumed, clusters in protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks perform specific, crucial functions in biological systems. Various network community detection methods have been developed to exploit PPI networks in order to identify protein complexes and functional modules. Due to the potential role of various regulatory modes in biological networks, a single method may just apply a single graph property and neglect communities highlighted by other network properties. This work presents a novel integration method to capture protein modules/protein complexes by multiple network features detected by different algorithms. The integration method is further implemented in a web-based platform with a highly effective interactive network analyzer. Conventionally adopted methods with different perspectives on network community detection (e.g., CPM, FastGreedy, HUNTER, MCL, LE, SpinGlass, and WalkTrap) are also executed simultaneously. Analytical results indicate that the proposed method performs better than the conventional ones. The proposed approach can capture the transcription and RNA splicing machineries from the yeast protein network. Meanwhile, proteins that are highly associated with each other, yet not described in both machineries are also identified. In sum, a protein that is closely connected to components of a known module or a complex in the network view implies the functional association among them. Importantly, our method can detect these unique network features, thus facilitating efforts to discover unknown components of functional modules/protein complexes. Spotlight is freely accessible at http://hub.iis.sinica.edu.tw/spotlight. Video clips for a quick view of usage are available in the website online help page. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Protein self-assembly following in situ expression in artificial and mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migas, Urszula M; Quinn, Michelle K; McManus, Jennifer J

    2017-05-22

    The self-assembly of proteins has been widely studied in controlled in vitro conditions, and more recently in biological environments. The self-assembly of proteins in biology can be a feature of the pathogenesis of protein condensation disease, or can occur during normal physiological function, for example during the formation of intracellular non-membrane bound organelles. To determine the mechanisms for the assembly process fully, controlled in vitro experiments using purified protein solutions are often required. However, making direct connections between insights gathered from controlled experiments and those in complex biological environments remains a challenge. Using the P23T mutant of human γD-crystallin, a protein associated with congenital cataract, we have demonstrated that the equilibrium solubility boundary and solution behavior measured using phase diagrams of purified protein solutions is consistent with the assembly of the protein expressed in cell-free expression medium in artificial cells (without fluorescent labelling) and condensates formed in mammalian cells, thereby directly connecting in vitro measurements with those performed under physiological conditions.

  12. New insights into subcomplex assembly and modifications of centrosomal proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habermann Karin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This review provides a brief overview of the recent work on centrosome proteomics, protein complex identification and functional characterization with an emphasis on the literature of the last three years. Proteomics, genetic screens and comparative genomics studies in different model organisms have almost exhaustively identified the molecular components of the centrosome. However, much knowledge is still missing on the protein-protein interactions, protein modifications and molecular changes the centrosome undergoes throughout the cell cycle and development. The dynamic nature of this large multi-protein complex is reflected in the variety of annotated subcellular locations and biological processes of its proposed components. Some centrosomal proteins and complexes have been studied intensively in different organisms and provided detailed insight into centrosome functions. For example, the molecular, structural and functional characterization of the γ-Tubulin ring complex (γ-TuRC and the the discovery of the Augmin/HAUS complex has advanced our understanding of microtubule (MT capture, nucleation and organization. Surprising findings revealed new functions and localizations of proteins that were previously regarded as bona fide centriolar or centrosome components, e.g. at the kinetochore or in the nuclear pore complex regulating MT plus end capture or mRNA processing. Many centrosome components undergo posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation, SUMOylation and ubiquitylation that are critical in modulating centrosome function and biology. A wealth of information has recently become available driven by new developments in technologies such as mass spectrometry, light and electron microscopy providing more detailed molecular and structural definition of the centrosome and particular roles of proteins throughout the cell cycle and development.

  13. Synthesis of selective agonists for the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor with in situ click-chemistry on acetylcholine-binding protein templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, John G; Gomez, Kimberly; Grimster, Neil; Dufouil, Mikael; Nemecz, Akos; Fotsing, Joseph R; Ho, Kwok-Yiu; Talley, Todd T; Sharpless, K Barry; Fokin, Valery V; Taylor, Palmer

    2012-10-01

    The acetylcholine-binding proteins (AChBPs), which serve as structural surrogates for the extracellular domain of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), were used as reaction templates for in situ click-chemistry reactions to generate a congeneric series of triazoles from azide and alkyne building blocks. The catalysis of in situ azide-alkyne cycloaddition reactions at a dynamic subunit interface facilitated the synthesis of potentially selective compounds for nAChRs. We investigated compound sets generated in situ with soluble AChBP templates through pharmacological characterization with α7 and α4β2 nAChRs and 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3A receptors. Analysis of activity differences between the triazole 1,5-syn- and 1,4-anti-isomers showed a preference for the 1,4-anti-triazole regioisomers among nAChRs. To improve nAChR subtype selectivity, the highest-potency building block for α7 nAChRs, i.e., 3α-azido-N-methylammonium tropane, was used for additional in situ reactions with a mutated Aplysia californica AChBP that was made to resemble the ligand-binding domain of the α7 nAChR. Fourteen of 50 possible triazole products were identified, and their corresponding tertiary analogs were synthesized. Pharmacological assays revealed that the mutated binding protein template provided enhanced selectivity of ligands through in situ reactions. Discrete trends in pharmacological profiles were evident, with most compounds emerging as α7 nAChR agonists and α4β2 nAChR antagonists. Triazoles bearing quaternary tropanes and aromatic groups were most potent for α7 nAChRs. Pharmacological characterization of the in situ reaction products established that click-chemistry synthesis with surrogate receptor templates offered novel extensions of fragment-based drug design that were applicable to multisubunit ion channels.

  14. Conformational Changes in the Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein Are Consistent with a Role for Allostery in Virus Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Packianathan, Charles; Katen, Sarah P.; Dann, III, Charles E.; Zlotnick, Adam (Indiana)

    2010-01-12

    In infected cells, virus components must be organized at the right place and time to ensure assembly of infectious virions. From a different perspective, assembly must be prevented until all components are available. Hypothetically, this can be achieved by allosterically controlling assembly. Consistent with this hypothesis, here we show that the structure of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein dimer, which can spontaneously self-assemble, is incompatible with capsid assembly. Systematic differences between core protein dimer and capsid conformations demonstrate linkage between the intradimer interface and interdimer contact surface. These structures also provide explanations for the capsid-dimer selectivity of some antibodies and the activities of assembly effectors. Solution studies suggest that the assembly-inactive state is more accurately an ensemble of conformations. Simulations show that allostery supports controlled assembly and results in capsids that are resistant to dissociation. We propose that allostery, as demonstrated in HBV, is common to most self-assembling viruses.

  15. Programming molecular self-assembly of intrinsically disordered proteins containing sequences of low complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Joseph R.; Carroll, Nick J.; Rubinstein, Michael; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; López, Gabriel P.

    2017-06-01

    Dynamic protein-rich intracellular structures that contain phase-separated intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) composed of sequences of low complexity (SLC) have been shown to serve a variety of important cellular functions, which include signalling, compartmentalization and stabilization. However, our understanding of these structures and our ability to synthesize models of them have been limited. We present design rules for IDPs possessing SLCs that phase separate into diverse assemblies within droplet microenvironments. Using theoretical analyses, we interpret the phase behaviour of archetypal IDP sequences and demonstrate the rational design of a vast library of multicomponent protein-rich structures that ranges from uniform nano-, meso- and microscale puncta (distinct protein droplets) to multilayered orthogonally phase-separated granular structures. The ability to predict and program IDP-rich assemblies in this fashion offers new insights into (1) genetic-to-molecular-to-macroscale relationships that encode hierarchical IDP assemblies, (2) design rules of such assemblies in cell biology and (3) molecular-level engineering of self-assembled recombinant IDP-rich materials.

  16. Nuclear actin and protein 4.1: Essential interactions during nuclear assembly in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, Sharon Wald; Chen, Cynthia; Penman, Sheldon; Heald, Rebecca

    2003-06-11

    Structural protein 4.1, which has crucial interactions within the spectin-actin lattice of the human red cell membrane skeleton, also is widely distributed at diverse intracellular sites in nucleated cells. We previously showed that 4.1 is essential for assembly of functional nuclei in vitro and that the capacity of 4.1 to bind actin is required. Here we report that 4.1 and actin colocalize in mammalian cell nuclei using fluorescence microscopy and, by higher resolution cell whole mount electron microscopy, are associated on nuclear filaments. We also devised a cell-free assay using Xenopus egg extract containing fluorescent actin to follow actin during nuclear assembly. By directly imaging actin under non-perturbing conditions, the total nuclear actin population is retained and is visualized in situ relative to intact chromatin. We detected actin initially when chromatin and nuclear pores began assembling. As the nuclear lamina assembled, but preceding DNA synthesis, a discrete actin network formed throughout the nucleus. Protein 4.1 epitopes also were detected when actin began to accumulate in nuclei, producing a diffuse coincident pattern. As nuclei matured, actin was detected both coincident with and also independent of 4.1 epitopes. To test whether acquisition of nuclear actin is required for nuclear assembly, the actin inhibitor latrunculin A was added to Xenopus egg extracts during nuclear assembly. Latrunculin A strongly perturbed nuclear assembly and produced distorted nuclear structures containing neither actin nor protein 4.1. Our results suggest that actin as well as 4.1 is necessary for nuclear assembly and that 4.1-actin interactions may be critical.

  17. Dynamic protein assemblies in homologous recombination with single DNA molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, A.H.

    2007-01-01

    What happens when your DNA breaks? This thesis describes experimental work on the single-molecule level focusing on the interaction between DNA and DNA-repair proteins, in particular bacterial RecA and human Rad51, involved in homologous recombination. Homologous recombination and its central event

  18. Orthogonal Protein Assembly on DNA Nanostructures Using Relaxases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagredo, Sandra; Pirzer, Tobias; Aghebat Rafat, Ali; Goetzfried, Marisa A; Moncalian, Gabriel; Simmel, Friedrich C; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2016-03-18

    DNA-binding proteins are promising reagents for the sequence-specific modification of DNA-based nanostructures. Here, we investigate the utility of a series of relaxase proteins-TrwC, TraI, and MobA-for nanofunctionalization. Relaxases are involved in the conjugative transfer of plasmids between bacteria, and bind to their DNA target sites via a covalent phosphotyrosine linkage. We study the binding of the relaxases to two standard DNA origami structures-rodlike six-helix bundles and flat rectangular origami sheets. We find highly orthogonal binding of the proteins with binding yields of 40-50 % per binding site, which is comparable to other functionalization methods. The yields differ for the two origami structures and also depend on the position of the binding sites. Due to their specificity for a single-stranded DNA target, their orthogonality, and their binding properties, relaxases are a uniquely useful addition to the toolbox available for the modification of DNA nanostructures with proteins. © 2016 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  19. Across-proteome modeling of dimer structures for the bottom-up assembly of protein-protein interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Surabhi; Brylinski, Michal

    2017-05-12

    Deciphering complete networks of interactions between proteins is the key to comprehend cellular regulatory mechanisms. A significant effort has been devoted to expanding the coverage of the proteome-wide interaction space at molecular level. Although a growing body of research shows that protein docking can, in principle, be used to predict biologically relevant interactions, the accuracy of the across-proteome identification of interacting partners and the selection of near-native complex structures still need to be improved. In this study, we developed a new method to discover and model protein interactions employing an exhaustive all-to-all docking strategy. This approach integrates molecular modeling, structural bioinformatics, machine learning, and functional annotation filters in order to provide interaction data for the bottom-up assembly of protein interaction networks. Encouragingly, the success rates for dimer modeling is 57.5 and 48.7% when experimental and computer-generated monomer structures are employed, respectively. Further, our protocol correctly identifies 81% of protein-protein interactions at the expense of only 19% false positive rate. As a proof of concept, 61,913 protein-protein interactions were confidently predicted and modeled for the proteome of E. coli. Finally, we validated our method against the human immune disease pathway. Protein docking supported by evolutionary restraints and machine learning can be used to reliably identify and model biologically relevant protein assemblies at the proteome scale. Moreover, the accuracy of the identification of protein-protein interactions is improved by considering only those protein pairs co-localized in the same cellular compartment and involved in the same biological process. The modeling protocol described in this communication can be applied to detect protein-protein interactions in other organisms and pathways as well as to construct dimer structures and estimate the confidence of protein

  20. Self-Assembly of Protein Monolayers Engineered for Improved Monoclonal Immunoglobulin G Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy H. Lakey

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial outer membrane proteins, along with a filling lipid molecule can be modified to form stable self-assembled monolayers on gold. The transmembrane domain of Escherichia coli outer membrane protein A has been engineered to create a scaffold protein to which functional motifs can be fused. In earlier work we described the assembly and structure of an antibody-binding array where the Z domain of Staphylococcus aureus protein A was fused to the scaffold protein. Whilst the binding of rabbit polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG to the array is very strong, mouse monoclonal IgG dissociates from the array easily. This is a problem since many immunodiagnostic tests rely upon the use of mouse monoclonal antibodies. Here we describe a strategy to develop an antibody-binding array that will bind mouse monoclonal IgG with lowered dissociation from the array. A novel protein consisting of the scaffold protein fused to two pairs of Z domains separated by a long flexible linker was manufactured. Using surface plasmon resonance the self-assembly of the new protein on gold and the improved binding of mouse monoclonal IgG were demonstrated.

  1. CALM, a clathrin assembly protein, influences cell surface GluR2 abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harel, Asaff; Mattson, Mark P; Yao, Pamela J

    2011-03-01

    The clathrin assembly protein, CALM, promotes the assembly of clathrin-coated vesicles. In a previous study, we showed that CALM controls the level of the synaptic vesicle protein VAMP2 at the plasma membrane by regulating VAMP2 endocytosis. Here, we provide evidence that CALM also influences the cell surface level of the AMPA receptor subunit GluR2. Although mechanistic details as well as the physiological relevance of CALM and GluR2 in the neuron have yet to be established, CALM-mediated trafficking could function as a component of a dedicated system for controlling postsynaptic abundance of GluR2.

  2. Prediction of phenotypes of missense mutations in human proteins from biological assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qiong; Xu, Qifang; Dunbrack, Roland L

    2013-02-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most frequent variation in the human genome. Nonsynonymous SNPs that lead to missense mutations can be neutral or deleterious, and several computational methods have been presented that predict the phenotype of human missense mutations. These methods use sequence-based and structure-based features in various combinations, relying on different statistical distributions of these features for deleterious and neutral mutations. One structure-based feature that has not been studied significantly is the accessible surface area within biologically relevant oligomeric assemblies. These assemblies are different from the crystallographic asymmetric unit for more than half of X-ray crystal structures. We find that mutations in the core of proteins or in the interfaces in biological assemblies are significantly more likely to be disease-associated than those on the surface of the biological assemblies. For structures with more than one protein in the biological assembly (whether the same sequence or different), we find the accessible surface area from biological assemblies provides a statistically significant improvement in prediction over the accessible surface area of monomers from protein crystal structures (P = 6e-5). When adding this information to sequence-based features such as the difference between wildtype and mutant position-specific profile scores, the improvement from biological assemblies is statistically significant but much smaller (P = 0.018). Combining this information with sequence-based features in a support vector machine leads to 82% accuracy on a balanced dataset of 50% disease-associated mutations from SwissVar and 50% neutral mutations from human/primate sequence differences in orthologous proteins. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Physical modeling of geometrically confined disordered protein assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, David

    2015-08-01

    The transport of cargo across the nuclear membrane is highly selective and accomplished by a poorly understood mechanism involving hundreds of nucleoporins lining the inside of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Currently, there is no clear picture of the overall structure formed by this collection of proteins within the pore, primarily due to their disordered nature and uncertainty regarding the properties of individual nucleoporins. We first study the defining characteristics of the amino acid sequences of nucleoporins through bioinformatics techniques, although bioinformatics of disordered proteins is especially challenging given high mutation rates for homologous proteins and that functionality may not be strongly related to sequence. Here we have performed a novel bioinformatic analysis, based on the spatial clustering of physically relevant features such as binding motifs and charges within disordered proteins, on thousands of FG motif containing nucleoporins (FG nups). The biophysical mechanism by which the critical FG nups regulate nucleocytoplasmic transport has remained elusive, yet our analysis revealed a set of highly conserved spatial features in the sequence structure of individual FG nups, such as the separation, localization, and ordering of FG motifs and charged residues along the protein chain. These sequence features are likely conserved due to a common functionality between species regarding how FG nups functionally regulate traffic, therefore these results constrain current models and eliminate proposed biophysical mechanisms responsible for regulation of nucleocytoplasmic traffic in the NPC which would not result in such a conserved amino acid sequence structure. Additionally, this method allows us to identify potentially functionally analogous disordered proteins across distantly related species. To understand the physical implications of the sequence features on structure and dynamics of the nucleoporins, we performed coarse-grained simulations

  4. Ceruloplasmin: Macromolecular Assemblies with Iron-Containing Acute Phase Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samygina, Valeriya R.; Sokolov, Alexey V.; Bourenkov, Gleb; Petoukhov, Maxim V.; Pulina, Maria O.; Zakharova, Elena T.; Vasilyev, Vadim B.; Bartunik, Hans; Svergun, Dmitri I.

    2013-01-01

    Copper-containing ferroxidase ceruloplasmin (Cp) forms binary and ternary complexes with cationic proteins lactoferrin (Lf) and myeloperoxidase (Mpo) during inflammation. We present an X-ray crystal structure of a 2Cp-Mpo complex at 4.7 Å resolution. This structure allows one to identify major protein–protein interaction areas and provides an explanation for a competitive inhibition of Mpo by Cp and for the activation of p-phenylenediamine oxidation by Mpo. Small angle X-ray scattering was employed to construct low-resolution models of the Cp-Lf complex and, for the first time, of the ternary 2Cp-2Lf-Mpo complex in solution. The SAXS-based model of Cp-Lf supports the predicted 1∶1 stoichiometry of the complex and demonstrates that both lobes of Lf contact domains 1 and 6 of Cp. The 2Cp-2Lf-Mpo SAXS model reveals the absence of interaction between Mpo and Lf in the ternary complex, so Cp can serve as a mediator of protein interactions in complex architecture. Mpo protects antioxidant properties of Cp by isolating its sensitive loop from proteases. The latter is important for incorporation of Fe3+ into Lf, which activates ferroxidase activity of Cp and precludes oxidation of Cp substrates. Our models provide the structural basis for possible regulatory role of these complexes in preventing iron-induced oxidative damage. PMID:23843990

  5. Coordination of Hepatitis C Virus Assembly by Distinct Regulatory Regions in Nonstructural Protein 5A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Zayas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV nonstructural protein (NS5A is a RNA-binding protein composed of a N-terminal membrane anchor, a structured domain I (DI and two intrinsically disordered domains (DII and DIII interacting with viral and cellular proteins. While DI and DII are essential for RNA replication, DIII is required for assembly. How these processes are orchestrated by NS5A is poorly understood. In this study, we identified a highly conserved basic cluster (BC at the N-terminus of DIII that is critical for particle assembly. We generated BC mutants and compared them with mutants that are blocked at different stages of the assembly process: a NS5A serine cluster (SC mutant blocked in NS5A-core interaction and a mutant lacking the envelope glycoproteins (ΔE1E2. We found that BC mutations did not affect core-NS5A interaction, but strongly impaired core-RNA association as well as virus particle envelopment. Moreover, BC mutations impaired RNA-NS5A interaction arguing that the BC might be required for loading of core protein with viral RNA. Interestingly, RNA-core interaction was also reduced with the ΔE1E2 mutant, suggesting that nucleocapsid formation and envelopment are coupled. These findings argue for two NS5A DIII determinants regulating assembly at distinct, but closely linked steps: (i SC-dependent recruitment of replication complexes to core protein and (ii BC-dependent RNA genome delivery to core protein, triggering encapsidation that is tightly coupled to particle envelopment. These results provide a striking example how a single viral protein exerts multiple functions to coordinate the steps from RNA replication to the assembly of infectious virus particles.

  6. Clathrin assembly proteins AP180 and CALM in the embryonic rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Catherine M; Cheng, Aiwu; Mughal, Mohamed R; Mattson, Mark P; Yao, Pamela J

    2010-09-15

    Clathrin-coated vesicles are known to play diverse and pivotal roles in cells. The proper formation of clathrin-coated vesicles is dependent on, and highly regulated by, a large number of clathrin assembly proteins. These assembly proteins likely determine the functional specificity of clathrin-coated vesicles, and together they control a multitude of intracellular trafficking pathways, including those involved in embryonic development. In this study, we focus on two closely related clathrin assembly proteins, AP180 and CALM (clathrin assembly lymphoid myeloid leukemia protein), in the developing embryonic rat brain. We find that AP180 begins to be expressed at embryonic day 14 (E14), but only in postmitotic cells that have acquired a neuronal fate. CALM, on the other hand, is expressed as early as E12, by both neural stem cells and postmitotic neurons. In vitro loss-of-function studies using RNA interference (RNAi) indicate that AP180 and CALM are dispensable for some aspects of embryonic neurogenesis but are required for the growth of postmitotic neurons. These results identify the developmental stage of AP180 and CALM expression and suggest that each protein has distinct functions in neural development.

  7. Origin of the Reflectin Gene and Hierarchical Assembly of Its Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhe; Cai, Tiantian; Liu, Zhongmin; Dou, Yunfeng; Hu, Xuesong; Zhang, Peng; Sun, Xin; Li, Hongwei; Kuang, Yao; Zhai, Qiran; Ruan, Hao; Li, Xuanxuan; Li, Zeyang; Zhu, Qihui; Mai, Jingeng; Wang, Qining; Lai, Luhua; Ji, Jianguo; Liu, Haiguang; Xia, Bin; Jiang, Taijiao; Luo, Shu-Jin; Wang, Hong-Wei; Xie, Can

    2017-09-25

    Cephalopods, the group of animals including octopus, squid, and cuttlefish, have remarkable ability to instantly modulate body coloration and patterns so as to blend into surrounding environments [1, 2] or send warning signals to other animals [3]. Reflectin is expressed exclusively in cephalopods, filling the lamellae of intracellular Bragg reflectors that exhibit dynamic iridescence and structural color change [4]. Here, we trace the possible origin of the reflectin gene back to a transposon from the symbiotic bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri and report the hierarchical structural architecture of reflectin protein. Intrinsic self-assembly, and higher-order assembly tightly modulated by aromatic compounds, provide insights into the formation of multilayer reflectors in iridophores and spherical microparticles in leucophores and may form the basis of structural color change in cephalopods. Self-assembly and higher-order assembly in reflectin originated from a core repeating octapeptide (here named protopeptide), which may be from the same symbiotic bacteria. The origin of the reflectin gene and assembly features of reflectin protein are of considerable biological interest. The hierarchical structural architecture of reflectin and its domain and protopeptide not only provide insights for bioinspired photonic materials but also serve as unique "assembly tags" and feasible molecular platforms in biotechnology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The effect of zinc on amyloid β-protein assembly and toxicity: A mechanistic investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomonov, Inna; Sagi, Irit

    2014-10-01

    Neurotoxic assemblies of amyloid β-protein (Aβ) are widely believed to be the cause for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Therefore, understanding the factors and mechanisms that control, modulate, and inhibit formation of these assemblies is crucial for the development of therapeutic intervention of AD. This information also can contribute significantly to our understanding of the mechanisms of other amyloidosis diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, type 2 diabetes, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's disease) and prion diseases (e.g. Mad Cow disease). We have developed a multidisciplinary experimental strategy to study structural and dynamic mechanistic aspects that underlie the Aβ assembly process. Utilizing this strategy, we explored the molecular basis leading to the perturbation of the Aβ assembly process by divalent metal ions, mainly Zn2+ ions. Using Zn2+ as reaction physiological relevant probes, it was demonstrated that Zn2+ rapidly (milliseconds) induce self-assembly of Aβ aggregates and stabilize them in a manner that prevents formation of Aβ fibrils. Importantly, the early-formed intermediates are substantially more neurotoxic than fibrils. Our results suggest that relevant Aβ modulators should be targeted against the rapidly evolved intermediate states of Aβ assembly. The design of such modulators is challenging, as they have to compete with different natural mediators (such as Zn2+) of Aβ aggregation, which diverse Aβ assemblies in both specific and nonspecific manners.

  9. A Structure-Based Assembly Screen of Protein Cage Libraries in Living Cells: Experimentally Repacking a Protein-Protein Interface To Recover Cage Formation in an Assembly-Frustrated Mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, Thomas A; Ardejani, Maziar S; Fu, Jing; Newland, Stephanie H; Zhang, Yu; Orner, Brendan P

    2018-01-17

    Cage proteins, which assemble into often highly symmetric hollow nanoscale capsules, have great potential in applications as far reaching as drug delivery, hybrid nanomaterial engineering, and catalysis. In addition, they are promising model systems for understanding how cellular nanostructures are constructed through protein-protein interactions, and they are beginning to be used as scaffolds for synthetic biology approaches. Recently, there has been renewed interest in the engineering of protein cages, and in support of these strategies, we have recently described a fluorescence-based assay for protein cage assembly that is specific for certain oligomerization states and symmetry-related protein-protein interfaces. In this work, we expand this assay to living cells and a high-throughput assay for screening protein cage libraries using flow cytometry. As a proof of principle, we apply this technique to the screening of libraries of a double-alanine mutant of the mini-ferritin, DNA-binding protein from starved cells (Dps). This mutant, due to disruption of key protein-protein interactions, is unable to assemble into a cage. Randomization of residues surrounding the double mutation afforded a repacked interface and proteins with recovered cage formation, demonstrating the strength and utility of this approach.

  10. A Protein Involved in the Assembly of an Extracellular Calcium Storage Matrix*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, Lilah; Shechter, Assaf; Tom, Moshe; Yudkovski, Yana; Weil, Simy; Aflalo, Eliahu David; Pamuru, Ramachandra Reddy; Khalaila, Isam; Bentov, Shmuel; Berman, Amir; Sagi, Amir

    2010-01-01

    Gastroliths, the calcium storage organs of crustaceans, consist of chitin-protein-mineral complexes in which the mineral component is stabilized amorphous calcium carbonate. To date, only three proteins, GAP 65, gastrolith matrix protein (GAMP), and orchestin, have been identified in gastroliths. Here, we report a novel protein, GAP 10, isolated from the gastrolith of the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus and specifically expressed in its gastrolith disc. The encoding gene was cloned by partial sequencing of the protein extracted from the gastrolith matrix. Based on an assembled microarray cDNA chip, GAP 10 transcripts were found to be highly (12-fold) up-regulated in premolt gastrolith disc and significantly down-regulated in the hypodermis at the same molt stage. The deduced protein sequence of GAP 10 lacks chitin-binding domains and does not show homology to known proteins in the GenBankTM data base. It does, however, have an amino acid composition that has similarity to proteins extracted from invertebrate and ascidian-calcified extracellular matrices. The GAP 10 sequence contains a predicted signal peptide and predicted phosphorylation sites. In addition, the protein is phosphorylated and exhibits calcium-binding ability. Repeated daily injections of GAP 10 double strand RNA to premolt C. quadricarinatus resulted in a prolonged premolt stage and in the development of gastroliths with irregularly rough surfaces. These findings suggest that GAP 10 may be involved in the assembly of the gastrolith chitin-protein-mineral complex, particularly in the deposition of amorphous calcium carbonate. PMID:20150428

  11. Review the role of terminal domains during storage and assembly of spider silk proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisoldt, Lukas; Thamm, Christopher; Scheibel, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    Fibrous proteins in nature fulfill a wide variety of functions in different structures ranging from cellular scaffolds to very resilient structures like tendons and even extra-corporal fibers such as silks in spider webs or silkworm cocoons. Despite their different origins and sequence varieties many of these fibrous proteins share a common building principle: they consist of a large repetitive core domain flanked by relatively small non-repetitive terminal domains. Amongst protein fibers, spider dragline silk shows prominent mechanical properties that exceed those of man-made fibers like Kevlar. Spider silk fibers assemble in a spinning process allowing the transformation from an aqueous solution into a solid fiber within milliseconds. Here, we highlight the role of the non-repetitive terminal domains of spider dragline silk proteins during storage in the gland and initiation of the fiber assembly process. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Assembly of the giant protein projectin during myofibrillogenesis in Drosophila indirect flight muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bounaix Christophe

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Projectin is a giant modular protein of Drosophila muscles and a key component of the elastic connecting filaments (C-filaments, which are involved in stretch activation in insect Indirect Flight Muscles. It is comparable in its structure to titin, which has been implicated as a scaffold during vertebrate myofibrillogenesis. Methods We performed immunofluorescence studies on Drosophila pupal tissue squashes and isolated myofibrils to identify the pattern of appearance and assembly for projectin and several other myofibrillar proteins, using both wild type and mutant fly stocks. Results and conclusions In the first step of assembly, projectin immunolocalization appears as random aggregates colocalizing with α-actinin, kettin and Z(210, as well as, F-actin. In the second step of assembly, all these proteins become localized within discrete bands, leading ultimately to the regularly spaced I-Z-I regions of myofibrils. This assembly process is not affected in myosin heavy chain mutants, indicating that the anchoring of projectin to the thick filament is not essential for the assembly of projectin into the developing myofibrils. In the actin null mutation, KM88, the early step involving the formation of the aggregates takes place despite the absence of the thin filaments. All tested Z-band proteins including projectin are present and are colocalized over the aggregates. This supports the idea that interactions of projectin with other Z-band associated proteins are sufficient for its initial assembly into the forming myofibrils. In KM88, though, mature Z-bands never form and projectin I-Z-I localization is lost at a later stage during pupal development. In contrast, treatment of adult myofibrils with calpain, which removes the Z-bands, does not lead to the release of projectin. This suggests that after the initial assembly with the Z-bands, projectin also establishes additional anchoring points along the thick and/or thin

  13. Self-assembling of amyloid-like proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sales, E.M.; Barbosa, L.R.S.; Itri, R. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil); Damalio, J.C.P.; Araujo, A.P.U. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP-SC), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Spinozzi, F.; Mariani, P. [Universita Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona (Italy)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Septins are proteins from the GTP-binding family and participate in cell division cycle performing functions such as secretion and cytoskeletal division. They can also be found in neurodegenerative conditions as Alzheimers and Parkinson's diseases, forming highly organized fiber-like aggregates known as amyloids. In this work, we used small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) to investigate the formation and time evolution of septins aggregates under the influence of temperature and concentration. The SAXS measurements were performed with the GTPase domain of human Septin 2 (SEPT2G) at 0.5 and 1 mg/mL and temperatures between 4 and 45 deg C. At 0.5 mg/mL and 4 deg C, the protein self-aggregates as a dimer, being stable over one hour of observation. When the temperature was increased to 15 deg C, the results demonstrate that cylinder-like aggregates are formed and coexist with some dimer population and a small amount of larger aggregates. However, the number of very large aggregates increases with time concomitantly with the decrease of cylinder amount in the solution. At 37 deg C cylinder-like aggregates are not longer present in solution, whereas a significant amount of dimers decreases from 50% to 20% in less than 1 hour. At 45 deg C such an effect is even more accentuated: the percentage of dimers is only 6% in solution into a favor of 94% of very larger aggregates. When we analyze the protein at 1 mg/mL, at 4 deg C cylinder-like aggregates (36 nm-long and 12 nm-cross section) are already formed, coexisting with dimers and, as occurred for lower concentration, the two populations remained unchanged over one hour of observation. Out results also indicate that the dimensions of these cylinders increase with the concentration and the percentage of cylinders and larger aggregates are higher than those found for 0.5 mg/mL. In conclusion, our results showed the coexistence of dimers of SEPT2G with small fibers and larger aggregates in solution that evolve

  14. The Plant TPX2 Protein Regulates Prospindle Assembly before Nuclear Envelope Breakdown

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, J.W.; Pieuchot, L.; Evrard, J.L.; Janski, N.; Bergdoll, M.; Ronde, de D.

    2008-01-01

    The Targeting Protein for Xklp2 (TPX2) is a central regulator of spindle assembly in vertebrate cells. The absence or excess of TPX2 inhibits spindle formation. We have defined a TPX2 signature motif that is present once in vertebrate sequences but twice in plants. Plant TPX2 is predominantly

  15. Clathrin Assembly Regulated by Adaptor Proteins in Coarse-Grained Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giani, M.; den Otter, Wouter K.; Briels, Willem J.

    2016-01-01

    The assembly of clathrin triskelia into polyhedral cages during endocytosis is regulated by adaptor proteins (APs). We explore how APs achieve this by developing coarse-grained models for clathrin and AP2, employing a Monte Carlo click interaction, to simulate their collective aggregation behavior.

  16. Anchoring of histidine-tagged proteins to molecular printboards : self-assembly, thermodynamic modeling, and patterning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ludden, Manon J W; Mulder, Alart; Schulze, Katrin; Subramaniam, Vinod; Tampé, Robert; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the multivalent binding of hexahistidine (His6)-tagged proteins to beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) by using the nickel(II) complex of a hetero-divalent orthogonal adamantyl nitrilotriacetate linker (4) is described. Nonspecific interactions were suppressed

  17. Self-assembled chiral helical nanofibers by amphiphilic dipeptide derived from d- or l-threonine and application as a template for the synthesis of Au and Ag nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Han; Xin, Xia; Sun, Jichao; Zhao, Liupeng; Shen, Jinglin; Song, Zhaohua; Yuan, Shiling

    2016-12-15

    The discovery of a class of self-assembling peptides that spontaneously undergo self-organization into well-ordered structures opened a new avenue for molecular fabrication of biological materials. In this paper, the structure controlled helical nanofibers were prepared by two artificial β-sheet dipeptides with long alkyl chains derived from l- and d-threonine (Thr) and sodium hydroxide (NaOH). These helical nanofibers have been characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), circular dichroism (CD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). It was demonstrated that the helicity of the nanofibers could be easily controlled by changing the chirality of the constituent amino acids in the peptide species (d- or l-threonine). Moreover, the hydrogen bonding interactions between the amide groups as well as the hydrophobic interactions among the alkyl chains play important roles in the self-assembly process. It also can be observed that with the passage of time, the hydrogen bonding interactions between the individual nanofiber induced the conversion from nanofibers to nanobelts. Particularly, gold and silver nanoparticles performed good catalytic ability were synthesized using the assembled nanofibers as template. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A kinetic approach to the sequence–aggregation relationship in disease-related protein assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barz, Bogdan; Wales, David J.; Strodel, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    It is generally accepted that oligomers of aggregating proteins play an important role in the onset of neurodegenerative diseases. While in silico aggregation studies of full length amyloidogenic proteins are computationally expensive, the assembly of short protein fragments derived from these proteins with similar aggregating properties has been extensively studied. In the present work molecular dynamics simulations are performed to follow peptide aggregation on the microsecond time scale. By defining aggregation states we identify transition networks, disconnectivity graphs and first passage time distributions to describe the kinetics of the assembly process. This approach unravels differences in the aggregation into hexamers of two peptides with different primary structures. The first is GNNQQNY, a hydrophilic fragment from the prion protein Sup35, and the second is KLVFFAE, a fragment from amyloid β-protein, with a hydrophobic core delimited by two charged amino acids. The assembly of GNNQQNY suggests a mechanism of monomer addition, with a bias towards parallel peptide pairs and a gradual increase in the amount of β-strand content. For KLVFFAE a mechanism involving dimers rather than monomers is revealed, involving a generally higher β-strand content and a transition towards a larger number of antiparallel peptide pairs during the rearrangement of the hexamer. The differences observed for the aggregation of the two peptides suggests the existence of a sequence–aggregation relationship. PMID:24401100

  19. Nanoscale Control of Amyloid Self-Assembly Using Protein Phase Transfer by Host-Guest Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Tae Su; Lee, Hong Hee; Ko, Young Ho; Jeong, Kwang Seob; Kim, Kimoon; Kim, Hugh I

    2017-07-18

    Amyloid fibrils have recently been highlighted for their diverse applications as functional nanomaterials in modern chemistry. However, tight control to obtain a targeted fibril length with low heterogeneity has not been achieved because of the complicated nature of amyloid fibrillation. Herein, we demonstrate that fibril assemblies can be homogeneously manipulated with desired lengths from ~40 nm to ~10 μm by a phase transfer of amyloid proteins based on host-guest chemistry. We suggest that host-guest interactions with cucurbit[6]uril induce a phase transfer of amyloid proteins (human insulin, human islet amyloid polypeptide, hen egg lysozyme, and amyloid-β 1-40 & 1-42) from the soluble state to insoluble state when the amount of cucurbit[6]uril exceeds its solubility limit in solution. The phase transfer of the proteins kinetically delays the nucleation of amyloid proteins, while the nuclei formed in the early stage are homogeneously assembled to fibrils. Consequently, supramolecular assemblies of amyloid proteins with heterogeneous kinetics can be controlled by protein phase transfer based on host-guest interactions.

  20. Analyses of Coronavirus Assembly Interactions with Interspecies Membrane and Nucleocapsid Protein Chimeras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Lili; Hurst-Hess, Kelley R; Koetzner, Cheri A; Masters, Paul S

    2016-05-01

    The coronavirus membrane (M) protein is the central actor in virion morphogenesis. M organizes the components of the viral membrane, and interactions of M with itself and with the nucleocapsid (N) protein drive virus assembly and budding. In order to further define M-M and M-N interactions, we constructed mutants of the model coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) in which all or part of the M protein was replaced by its phylogenetically divergent counterpart from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV). We were able to obtain viable chimeras containing the entire SARS-CoV M protein as well as mutants with intramolecular substitutions that partitioned M protein at the boundaries between the ectodomain, transmembrane domains, or endodomain. Our results show that the carboxy-terminal domain of N protein, N3, is necessary and sufficient for interaction with M protein. However, despite some previous genetic and biochemical evidence that mapped interactions with N to the carboxy terminus of M, it was not possible to define a short linear region of M protein sufficient for assembly with N. Thus, interactions with N protein likely involve multiple linearly discontiguous regions of the M endodomain. The SARS-CoV M chimera exhibited a conditional growth defect that was partially suppressed by mutations in the envelope (E) protein. Moreover, virions of the M chimera were markedly deficient in spike (S) protein incorporation. These findings suggest that the interactions of M protein with both E and S protein are more complex than previously thought. The assembly of coronavirus virions entails concerted interactions among the viral structural proteins and the RNA genome. One strategy to study this process is through construction of interspecies chimeras that preserve or disrupt particular inter- or intramolecular associations. In this work, we replaced the membrane (M) protein of the model coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus with its counterpart from a

  1. SARS coronavirus nsp1 protein induces template-dependent endonucleolytic cleavage of mRNAs: viral mRNAs are resistant to nsp1-induced RNA cleavage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Huang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available SARS coronavirus (SCoV nonstructural protein (nsp 1, a potent inhibitor of host gene expression, possesses a unique mode of action: it binds to 40S ribosomes to inactivate their translation functions and induces host mRNA degradation. Our previous study demonstrated that nsp1 induces RNA modification near the 5'-end of a reporter mRNA having a short 5' untranslated region and RNA cleavage in the encephalomyocarditis virus internal ribosome entry site (IRES region of a dicistronic RNA template, but not in those IRES elements from hepatitis C or cricket paralysis viruses. By using primarily cell-free, in vitro translation systems, the present study revealed that the nsp1 induced endonucleolytic RNA cleavage mainly near the 5' untranslated region of capped mRNA templates. Experiments using dicistronic mRNAs carrying different IRESes showed that nsp1 induced endonucleolytic RNA cleavage within the ribosome loading region of type I and type II picornavirus IRES elements, but not that of classical swine fever virus IRES, which is characterized as a hepatitis C virus-like IRES. The nsp1-induced RNA cleavage of template mRNAs exhibited no apparent preference for a specific nucleotide sequence at the RNA cleavage sites. Remarkably, SCoV mRNAs, which have a 5' cap structure and 3' poly A tail like those of typical host mRNAs, were not susceptible to nsp1-mediated RNA cleavage and importantly, the presence of the 5'-end leader sequence protected the SCoV mRNAs from nsp1-induced endonucleolytic RNA cleavage. The escape of viral mRNAs from nsp1-induced RNA cleavage may be an important strategy by which the virus circumvents the action of nsp1 leading to the efficient accumulation of viral mRNAs and viral proteins during infection.

  2. Evolutionary Conservation in Biogenesis of β-Barrel Proteins Allows Mitochondria to Assemble a Functional Bacterial Trimeric Autotransporter Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Thomas; Oberhettinger, Philipp; Schütz, Monika; Holzer, Katharina; Ramms, Anne S.; Linke, Dirk; Autenrieth, Ingo B.; Rapaport, Doron

    2014-01-01

    Yersinia adhesin A (YadA) belongs to a class of bacterial adhesins that form trimeric structures. Their mature form contains a passenger domain and a C-terminal β-domain that anchors the protein in the outer membrane (OM). Little is known about how precursors of such proteins cross the periplasm and assemble into the OM. In the present study we took advantage of the evolutionary conservation in the biogenesis of β-barrel proteins between bacteria and mitochondria. We previously observed that upon expression in yeast cells, bacterial β-barrel proteins including the transmembrane domain of YadA assemble into the mitochondrial OM. In the current study we found that when expressed in yeast cells both the monomeric and trimeric forms of full-length YadA were detected in mitochondria but only the trimeric species was fully integrated into the OM. The oligomeric form was exposed on the surface of the organelle in its native conformation and maintained its capacity to adhere to host cells. The co-expression of YadA with a mitochondria-targeted form of the bacterial periplasmic chaperone Skp, but not with SurA or SecB, resulted in enhanced levels of both forms of YadA. Taken together, these results indicate that the proper assembly of trimeric autotransporter can occur also in a system lacking the lipoproteins of the BAM machinery and is specifically enhanced by the chaperone Skp. PMID:25190806

  3. Protein Structure Determination by Assembling Super-Secondary Structure Motifs Using Pseudocontact Shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilla, Kala Bharath; Otting, Gottfried; Huber, Thomas

    2017-03-07

    Computational and nuclear magnetic resonance hybrid approaches provide efficient tools for 3D structure determination of small proteins, but currently available algorithms struggle to perform with larger proteins. Here we demonstrate a new computational algorithm that assembles the 3D structure of a protein from its constituent super-secondary structural motifs (Smotifs) with the help of pseudocontact shift (PCS) restraints for backbone amide protons, where the PCSs are produced from different metal centers. The algorithm, DINGO-PCS (3D assembly of Individual Smotifs to Near-native Geometry as Orchestrated by PCSs), employs the PCSs to recognize, orient, and assemble the constituent Smotifs of the target protein without any other experimental data or computational force fields. Using a universal Smotif database, the DINGO-PCS algorithm exhaustively enumerates any given Smotif. We benchmarked the program against ten different protein targets ranging from 100 to 220 residues with different topologies. For nine of these targets, the method was able to identify near-native Smotifs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Active protein aggregates induced by terminally attached self-assembling peptide ELK16 in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Bihong

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, it has been gradually realized that bacterial inclusion bodies (IBs could be biologically active. In particular, several proteins including green fluorescent protein, β-galactosidase, β-lactamase, alkaline phosphatase, D-amino acid oxidase, polyphosphate kinase 3, maltodextrin phosphorylase, and sialic acid aldolase have been successfully produced as active IBs when fused to an appropriate partner such as the foot-and-mouth disease virus capsid protein VP1, or the human β-amyloid peptide Aβ42(F19D. As active IBs may have many attractive advantages in enzyme production and industrial applications, it is of considerable interest to explore them further. Results In this paper, we report that an ionic self-assembling peptide ELK16 (LELELKLK2 was able to effectively induce the formation of cytoplasmic inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli (E. coli when attached to the carboxyl termini of four model proteins including lipase A, amadoriase II, β-xylosidase, and green fluorescent protein. These aggregates had a general appearance similar to the usually reported cytoplasmic inclusion bodies (IBs under transmission electron microscopy or fluorescence confocal microscopy. Except for lipase A-ELK16 fusion, the three other fusion protein aggregates retained comparable specific activities with the native counterparts. Conformational analyses by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed the existence of newly formed antiparallel beta-sheet structures in these ELK16 peptide-induced inclusion bodies, which is consistent with the reported assembly of the ELK16 peptide. Conclusions This has been the first report where a terminally attached self-assembling β peptide ELK16 can promote the formation of active inclusion bodies or active protein aggregates in E. coli. It has the potential to render E. coli and other recombinant hosts more efficient as microbial cell factories for protein production. Our observation might

  5. A viral scaffolding protein triggers portal ring oligomerization and incorporation during procapsid assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motwani, Tina; Lokareddy, Ravi K.; Dunbar, Carmen A.; Cortines, Juliana R.; Jarrold, Martin F.; Cingolani, Gino; Teschke, Carolyn M.

    2017-01-01

    Most double-stranded DNA viruses package genetic material into empty precursor capsids (or procapsids) through a dodecameric portal protein complex that occupies 1 of the 12 vertices of the icosahedral lattice. Inhibiting incorporation of the portal complex prevents the formation of infectious virions, making this step an excellent target for antiviral drugs. The mechanism by which a sole portal assembly is selectively incorporated at the special vertex is unclear. We recently showed that, as part of the DNA packaging process for bacteriophage P22, the dodecameric procapsid portal changes conformation to a mature virion state. We report that preformed dodecameric rings of P22 portal protein, as opposed to portal monomers, incorporate into nascent procapsids, with preference for the procapsid portal conformation. Finally, a novel role for P22 scaffolding protein in triggering portal ring formation from portal monomers is elucidated and validated by incorporating de novo assembled portal rings into procapsids. PMID:28782023

  6. Reactive oxygen species promote heat shock protein 90-mediated HBV capsid assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yoon Sik, E-mail: yumshak@naver.com; Seo, Hyun Wook, E-mail: suruk@naver.com; Jung, Guhung, E-mail: drjung@snu.ac.kr

    2015-02-13

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and has been associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). ROS are also an important factor in HCC because the accumulated ROS leads to abnormal cell proliferation and chromosome mutation. In oxidative stress, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and glutathione (GSH) function as part of the defense mechanism. Hsp90 prevents cellular component from oxidative stress, and GSH acts as antioxidants scavenging ROS in the cell. However, it is not known whether molecules regulated by oxidative stress are involved in HBV capsid assembly. Based on the previous study that Hsp90 facilitates HBV capsid assembly, which is an important step for the packing of viral particles, here, we show that ROS enrich Hsp90-driven HBV capsid formation. In cell-free system, HBV capsid assembly was facilitated by ROS with Hsp90, whereas it was decreased without Hsp90. In addition, GSH inhibited the function of Hsp90 to decrease HBV capsid assembly. Consistent with the result of cell-free system, ROS and buthionine sulfoximine (BS), an inhibitor of GSH synthesis, increased HBV capsid formation in HepG2.2.15 cells. Thus, our study uncovers the interplay between ROS and Hsp90 during HBV capsid assembly. - Highlights: • We examined H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and GSH modulate HBV capsid assembly. • H{sub 2}O{sub 2} facilitates HBV capsid assembly in the presence of Hsp90. • GSH inhibits function of Hsp90 in facilitating HBV capsid assembly. • H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and GSH induce conformation change of Hsp90.

  7. The Survival of Motor Neuron Protein Acts as a Molecular Chaperone for mRNP Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul G. Donlin-Asp

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a motor neuron disease caused by reduced levels of the survival of motor neuron (SMN protein. SMN is part of a multiprotein complex that facilitates the assembly of spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs. SMN has also been found to associate with mRNA-binding proteins, but the nature of this association was unknown. Here, we have employed a combination of biochemical and advanced imaging methods to demonstrate that SMN promotes the molecular interaction between IMP1 protein and the 3′ UTR zipcode region of β-actin mRNA, leading to assembly of messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP complexes that associate with the cytoskeleton to facilitate trafficking. We have identified defects in mRNP assembly in cells and tissues from SMA disease models and patients that depend on the SMN Tudor domain and explain the observed deficiency in mRNA localization and local translation, providing insight into SMA pathogenesis as a ribonucleoprotein (RNP-assembly disorder.

  8. The TATA-binding protein participates in TFIIIB assembly on tRNA genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Huet, J.; Sentenac, A

    1992-01-01

    The TATA-binding protein TBP has been recently recognized as a general class III transcription factor. Using the gel shift assay to monitor initiation complex assembly on a yeast tRNA gene, we show that TBP is required for the TFIIIC-dependent assembly of TFIIIB. TFIIIB depleted of TBP by a simple chromatographic step does not bind stably to the TFIIIC-tDNA complex. Addition of yeast or human recombinant TBP allows the formation of a TFIIIB-TBP-TFIIIC-tDNA complex. The presence of TBP in the ...

  9. An In Vitro Assay for Outer Membrane Protein Assembly by the BAM Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman-Hernandez, Giselle; Bernstein, Harris D

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of a biochemical process it is often essential to reconstitute the reaction in vitro using the minimal set of factors required to drive the reaction to completion. Here, we describe a method to reconstitute the folding and membrane integration of bacterial outer membrane (OM) proteins that have a characteristic β-barrel structure. In this method the BAM complex, a heteroligomer that catalyzes the membrane integration of β-barrel proteins, is first purified and inserted into small lipid vesicles. Denatured OM proteins are then assembled and integrated into the vesicles in the presence of a molecular chaperone called SurA.

  10. Engineered Bacterial Metal-binding Proteins for Nanoscale Self-assembly and heavy Metal Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall Sedlak, Ruth Amanda

    Implementing biological principles in material synthesis and assembly is one way to expand our abilities to efficiently assemble nanoscale materials and devices. Specifically, recent advances in identifying peptides that bind inorganic materials with high affinity and specificity has spurred investigation of protein models for nanoscale inorganic assembly. This dissertation presents the results of my studies of several E. coli proteins engineered to bind inorganic materials through simple peptide motifs. I demonstrate that these proteins modulate the self-assembly of DNA-based nanostructures and can introduce heavy metal tolerance into metal-sensitive bacteria. Chapter 2 explores use of the engineered F plasmid DNA relaxase/helicase TraI for the self-assembly of complex DNA-protein-gold nanostructures. The full-length protein is engineered with a gold binding motif at an internal permissive site (TraI369GBP1-7x), while a truncated version of TraI is engineered with the same gold binding motif at the C-terminus (TraI361GBP1-7x). Both constructs bind gold nanoparticles while maintaining their DNA binding activity, and transmission electron microscopy reveals TraI369GBP1-7x utilizes its non-specific DNA binding activity to decorate single-stranded and double-stranded DNA with gold nanoparticles. The self assembly principles demonstrated in this work will be fundamental to constructing higher ordered hybrid nanostructures through DNA-protein-nanoparticle interactions. Chapter 3 studies the effects of expressing inorganic binding peptides within cells. I identified a silver binding peptide that, when fused to the periplasmic maltose binding protein, protects E. coli from silver toxicity in batch culture and reduces silver ions to silver nanoparticles within the bacterial periplasm. Engineered metal-ion tolerant microorganisms such as this E. coli could potentially be used in applications ranging from remediation to interrogation of biomolecule-metal interactions in vivo

  11. Cytoplasmic Motifs in the Nipah Virus Fusion Protein Modulate Virus Particle Assembly and Egress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Gunner P; Contreras, Erik M; Dabundo, Jeffrey; Henderson, Bryce A; Matz, Keesha M; Ortega, Victoria; Ramirez, Alfredo; Park, Arnold; Aguilar, Hector C

    2017-05-15

    Nipah virus (NiV), a paramyxovirus in the genus Henipavirus, has a mortality rate in humans of approximately 75%. While several studies have begun our understanding of NiV particle formation, the mechanism of this process remains to be fully elucidated. For many paramyxoviruses, M proteins drive viral assembly and egress; however, some paramyxoviral glycoproteins have been reported as important or essential in budding. For NiV the matrix protein (M), the fusion glycoprotein (F) and, to a much lesser extent, the attachment glycoprotein (G) autonomously induce the formation of virus-like particles (VLPs). However, functional interactions between these proteins during assembly and egress remain to be fully understood. Moreover, if the F-driven formation of VLPs occurs through interactions with host cell machinery, the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of F is a likely interactive domain. Therefore, we analyzed NiV F CT deletion and alanine mutants and report that several but not all regions of the F CT are necessary for efficient VLP formation. Two of these regions contain YXXØ or dityrosine motifs previously shown to interact with cellular machinery involved in F endocytosis and transport. Importantly, our results showed that F-driven, M-driven, and M/F-driven viral particle formation enhanced the recruitment of G into VLPs. By identifying key motifs, specific residues, and functional viral protein interactions important for VLP formation, we improve our understanding of the viral assembly/egress process and point to potential interactions with host cell machinery.IMPORTANCE Henipaviruses can cause deadly infections of medical, veterinary, and agricultural importance. With recent discoveries of new henipa-like viruses, understanding the mechanisms by which these viruses reproduce is paramount. We have focused this study on identifying the functional interactions of three Nipah virus proteins during viral assembly and particularly on the role of one of these proteins, the fusion

  12. Classification of self-assembling protein nanoparticle architectures for applications in vaccine design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indelicato, G.; Burkhard, P.; Twarock, R.

    2017-04-01

    We introduce here a mathematical procedure for the structural classification of a specific class of self-assembling protein nanoparticles (SAPNs) that are used as a platform for repetitive antigen display systems. These SAPNs have distinctive geometries as a consequence of the fact that their peptide building blocks are formed from two linked coiled coils that are designed to assemble into trimeric and pentameric clusters. This allows a mathematical description of particle architectures in terms of bipartite (3,5)-regular graphs. Exploiting the relation with fullerene graphs, we provide a complete atlas of SAPN morphologies. The classification enables a detailed understanding of the spectrum of possible particle geometries that can arise in the self-assembly process. Moreover, it provides a toolkit for a systematic exploitation of SAPNs in bioengineering in the context of vaccine design, predicting the density of B-cell epitopes on the SAPN surface, which is critical for a strong humoral immune response.

  13. Super-resolution imaging of ESCRT-proteins at HIV-1 assembly sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Prescher

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The cellular endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT machinery is involved in membrane budding processes, such as multivesicular biogenesis and cytokinesis. In HIV-infected cells, HIV-1 hijacks the ESCRT machinery to drive HIV release. Early in the HIV-1 assembly process, the ESCRT-I protein Tsg101 and the ESCRT-related protein ALIX are recruited to the assembly site. Further downstream, components such as the ESCRT-III proteins CHMP4 and CHMP2 form transient membrane associated lattices, which are involved in virus-host membrane fission. Although various geometries of ESCRT-III assemblies could be observed, the actual membrane constriction and fission mechanism is not fully understood. Fission might be driven from inside the HIV-1 budding neck by narrowing the membranes from the outside by larger lattices surrounding the neck, or from within the bud. Here, we use super-resolution fluorescence microscopy to elucidate the size and structure of the ESCRT components Tsg101, ALIX, CHMP4B and CHMP2A during HIV-1 budding below the diffraction limit. To avoid the deleterious effects of using fusion proteins attached to ESCRT components, we performed measurements on the endogenous protein or, in the case of CHMP4B, constructs modified with the small HA tag. Due to the transient nature of the ESCRT interactions, the fraction of HIV-1 assembly sites with colocalizing ESCRT complexes was low (1.5%-3.4%. All colocalizing ESCRT clusters exhibited closed, circular structures with an average size (full-width at half-maximum between 45 and 60 nm or a diameter (determined using a Ripley's L-function analysis of roughly 60 to 100 nm. The size distributions for colocalizing clusters were narrower than for non-colocalizing clusters, and significantly smaller than the HIV-1 bud. Hence, our results support a membrane scission process driven by ESCRT protein assemblies inside a confined structure, such as the bud neck, rather than by large lattices

  14. Layer-by-layer assembled polyaspartamide nanocapsules for pH-responsive protein delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xin; Wang, Jingjing; Wang, Yanming; Wang, Yinong; Gao, Hui; Wu, Guolin

    2013-08-01

    Biodegradable shell cross-linked nanocapsules were prepared via layer-by-layer assembly of PADH (tertiary amine and hydrazide grafted polyaspartamide) and PACA (carboxyl and aldehyde grafted polyaspartamide) on silica spheres. Both of the polyaspartamide derivatives are water-soluble and biodegradable polymers with a protein-like structure, and obtained by aminolysis reaction of polysuccinimide. The latter is prepared by thermal polycondensation of aspartic acid. Dynamic light scattering and zeta potential measurements were used to analyze the layer-by-layer assembly process. Bovine serum albumin (BSA), as a model protein, was entrapped in the nanocapsules via electrostatic adsorption. Nanocapsules encapsulating BSA were prepared via layer-by-layer assembly on protein-entrapping amino-functionalized silica spheres, hydrazone cross-linking and silica core removal. The BSA release profiles exhibited a pH-dependent behavior. BSA release rate increased significantly as the ambient pH dropped from the physiological pH to acidic. Cell viability study suggests that the obtained polymeric nanocapsules have good biocompatibility. These kinds of novel composite nanocapsules may offer a promising delivery system for proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Novel Soluble Dietary Fiber-Tannin Self-Assembled Film: A Promising Protein Protective Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guo-Bin; Xu, Juan; Zheng, Hua; Feng, Ying; Zhang, Wen-Wen; Li, Kun; Ge, Shuang-shuang; Li, Kai; Zhang, Hong

    2015-06-24

    In this experiment, a natural promising protein protective film was fabricated through soluble dietary fiber (SDF)-tannin nanocluster self-assembly. FT-IR, XRD, and DSC tests were employed to investigate the interaction between the SDF and tannins before and after cross-linking induced by calcium ion. On the other hand, referring to the SEM and TEM results, the self-assembly process of the protein protective film could be indicated as follows: first, calcium ion, with its cross-ability, served as the "nucleus"; SDF and tannins were combined to prepare the nanoscale SDF-tannin clusters; then, the clusters were homogeneously deposited on the surface of protein to form a protective film by self-assembling hydrogen bond between tannin component of clusters as "adhesive" and protein in aqueous solutions under very mild conditions. Film thickness could also be controlled by tannin of different concentrations ranging from 114 to 1384 μm. Antibacterial test and in vitro cytotoxicity test proved that the film had a broad spectrum of antimicrobial properties and excellent cell biocompatibility, respectively, which might open up new applications in the food preservation and biomedical fields.

  16. Design and self-assembly of simple coat proteins for artificial viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Garcia, Armando; Kraft, Daniela J.; Janssen, Anne F. J.; Bomans, Paul H. H.; Sommerdijk, Nico A. J. M.; Thies-Weesie, Dominique M. E.; Favretto, Marco E.; Brock, Roland; de Wolf, Frits A.; Werten, Marc W. T.; van der Schoot, Paul; Stuart, Martien Cohen; de Vries, Renko

    2014-09-01

    Viruses are among the simplest biological systems and are highly effective vehicles for the delivery of genetic material into susceptible host cells. Artificial viruses can be used as model systems for providing insights into natural viruses and can be considered a testing ground for developing artificial life. Moreover, they are used in biomedical and biotechnological applications, such as targeted delivery of nucleic acids for gene therapy and as scaffolds in material science. In a natural setting, survival of viruses requires that a significant fraction of the replicated genomes be completely protected by coat proteins. Complete protection of the genome is ensured by a highly cooperative supramolecular process between the coat proteins and the nucleic acids, which is based on reversible, weak and allosteric interactions only. However, incorporating this type of supramolecular cooperativity into artificial viruses remains challenging. Here, we report a rational design for a self-assembling minimal viral coat protein based on simple polypeptide domains. Our coat protein features precise control over the cooperativity of its self-assembly with single DNA molecules to finally form rod-shaped virus-like particles. We confirm the validity of our design principles by showing that the kinetics of self-assembly of our virus-like particles follows a previous model developed for tobacco mosaic virus. We show that our virus-like particles protect DNA against enzymatic degradation and transfect cells with considerable efficiency, making them promising delivery vehicles.

  17. The proteasome maturation protein POMP increases proteasome assembly and activity in psoriatic lesional skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieba, Barbara A; Henry, Laurent; Lacroix, Matthieu; Jemaà, Mohamed; Lavabre-Bertrand, Thierry; Meunier, Laurent; Coux, Olivier; Stoebner, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2017-10-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome pathway is involved in the pathogenesis of psoriasis and proteasome subunits are increased in lesional psoriatic skin. Recent works have highlighted that proteasome levels can be regulated through modulation of proteasome assembly notably by the proteasome maturation protein POMP. To investigate whether proteasome assembly and POMP expression are modified in psoriatic skin. Proteasome assembly as well as expression of proteasome regulators were assessed in non-lesional and lesional psoriatic skin using native gel electrophoresis and western blots respectively. The protein and mRNA expression levels of POMP were compared by western blots, immunohistochemistry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The role of POMP in keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation was assessed by silencing POMP gene expression by RNA interference in human immortalized keratinocyte HaCaT cells. Both 20S and 26S proteasomes (and their respective proteolytic activities) as well as the main proteasome regulators are increased in lesional psoriatic skin. POMP binds to 20S precursor complexes and is overexpressed in lesional epidermal psoriatic skin, supporting that POMP-mediated proteasome assembly is increased in psoriatic skin. POMP silencing inhibited HaCaT cell proliferation and induced apoptosis through the inhibition of the proteasome assembly. Moreover POMP partial depletion decreased the expression of the differentiation markers keratin 10 and involucrin during the [Ca2+]-induced HaCaT cells differentiation. Altogether these results establish a potential role for POMP and proteasome assembly in psoriasis pathogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Controlled assembly of artificial protein-protein complexes via DNA duplex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płoskoń, Eliza; Wagner, Sara C; Ellington, Andrew D; Jewett, Michael C; O'Reilly, Rachel; Booth, Paula J

    2015-03-18

    DNA-protein conjugates have found a wide range of applications. This study demonstrates the formation of defined, non-native protein-protein complexes via the site specific labeling of two proteins of interest with complementary strands of single-stranded DNA in vitro. This study demonstrates that the affinity of two DNA-protein conjugates for one another may be tuned by the use of variable lengths of DNA allowing reversible control of complex formation.

  19. A highly controllable protein self-assembly system with morphological versatility induced by reengineered host-guest interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiumei; Bai, Yushi; Huang, Zupeng; Si, Chengye; Dong, Zeyuan; Luo, Quan; Liu, Junqiu

    2017-06-14

    Manipulating proteins to self-assemble into highly ordered nanostructures not only provides insights into the natural protein assembly process but also allows access to advanced biomaterials. Host-guest interactions have been widely used in the construction of artificial protein assemblies in recent years. CB[8] can selectively associate with two tripeptide Phe-Gly-Gly (FGG) tags with an extraordinarily high binding affinity (Kter = 1.5 × 10(11) M(-2)). However, the FGG tags utilized before are all fixed to the N-termini via genetic fusion; this spatial limitation greatly confined the availability of the CB[8]/FGG pair in the construction of more sophisticated protein nanostructures. Here we first designed and synthesized a maleimide-functionalized Phe-Gly-Gly tag as a versatile site-specific protein modification tool; this designed tag can site-selectively introduce desired guest moieties onto protein surfaces for host-guest driven protein assembly. When regulating the self-assembly process of proteins and CB[8], the constructed protein nanosystem can exhibit distinctive morphological diversities ranging from nanorings, nanospirals, nanowires to superwires. This work developed a new strategy for site-specific protein modification of the CB[8] binding tag and provides a possible direction for the construction of 'smart', dynamic self-assembly systems.

  20. Perl Template Toolkit

    CERN Document Server

    Chamberlain, Darren; Cross, David; Torkington, Nathan; Diaz, tatiana Apandi

    2004-01-01

    Among the many different approaches to "templating" with Perl--such as Embperl, Mason, HTML::Template, and hundreds of other lesser known systems--the Template Toolkit is widely recognized as one of the most versatile. Like other templating systems, the Template Toolkit allows programmers to embed Perl code and custom macros into HTML documents in order to create customized documents on the fly. But unlike the others, the Template Toolkit is as facile at producing HTML as it is at producing XML, PDF, or any other output format. And because it has its own simple templating language, templates

  1. Towards understanding of Nipah virus attachment protein assembly and the role of protein affinity and crowding for membrane curvature events.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stachowiak, Jeanne C.; Hayden, Carl C.; Negrete, Oscar.; Davis, Ryan Wesley; Sasaki, Darryl Y

    2013-10-01

    Pathogenic viruses are a primary threat to our national security and to the health and economy of our world. Effective defense strategies to combat viral infection and spread require the development of understanding of the mechanisms that these pathogens use to invade the host cell. We present in this report results of our research into viral particle recognition and fusion to cell membranes and the role that protein affinity and confinement in lipid domains plays in membrane curvature in cellular fusion and fission events. Herein, we describe 1) the assembly of the G attachment protein of Nipah virus using point mutation studies to define its role in viral particle fusion to the cell membrane, 2) how lateral pressure of membrane bound proteins induce curvature in model membrane systems, and 3) the role of membrane curvature in the selective partitioning of molecular receptors and specific affinity of associated proteins.

  2. Computational 3D imaging to quantify structural components and assembly of protein networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgharzadeh, Pouyan; Özdemir, Bugra; Reski, Ralf; Röhrle, Oliver; Birkhold, Annette I

    2018-03-15

    Traditionally, protein structures have been described by the secondary structure architecture and fold arrangement. However, the relatively novel method of 3D confocal microscopy of fluorescent-protein-tagged networks in living cells allows resolving the detailed spatial organization of these networks. This provides new possibilities to predict network functionality, as structure and function seem to be linked at various scales. Here, we propose a quantitative approach using 3D confocal microscopy image data to describe protein networks based on their nano-structural characteristics. This analysis is constructed in four steps: (i) Segmentation of the microscopic raw data into a volume model and extraction of a spatial graph representing the protein network. (ii) Quantifying protein network gross morphology using the volume model. (iii) Quantifying protein network components using the spatial graph. (iv) Linking these two scales to obtain insights into network assembly. Here, we quantitatively describe the filamentous temperature sensitive Z protein network of the moss Physcomitrella patens and elucidate relations between network size and assembly details. Future applications will link network structure and functionality by tracking dynamic structural changes over time and comparing different states or types of networks, possibly allowing more precise identification of (mal) functions or the design of protein-engineered biomaterials for applications in regenerative medicine. Protein networks are highly complex and dynamic structures that play various roles in biological environments. Analyzing the detailed spatial structure of these networks may lead to new insight into biological functions and malfunctions. Here, we propose a tool set that extracts structural information at two scales of the protein network and allows therefore to address questions such as "how is the network built?" or "how networks grow?". Copyright © 2018 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by

  3. Catalytic diversity in self-propagating peptide assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omosun, Tolulope O.; Hsieh, Ming-Chien; Childers, W. Seth; Das, Dibyendu; Mehta, Anil K.; Anthony, Neil R.; Pan, Ting; Grover, Martha A.; Berland, Keith M.; Lynn, David G.

    2017-08-01

    The protein-only infectious agents known as prions exist within cellular matrices as populations of assembled polypeptide phases ranging from particles to amyloid fibres. These phases appear to undergo Darwinian-like selection and propagation, yet remarkably little is known about their accessible chemical and biological functions. Here we construct simple peptides that assemble into well-defined amyloid phases and define paracrystalline surfaces able to catalyse specific enantioselective chemical reactions. Structural adjustments of individual amino acid residues predictably control both the assembled crystalline order and their accessible catalytic repertoire. Notably, the density and proximity of the extended arrays of enantioselective catalytic sites achieve template-directed polymerization of new polymers. These diverse amyloid templates can now be extended as dynamic self-propagating templates for the construction of even more complex functional materials.

  4. Incorporation of a Metal Oxide Interlayer using a Virus-Templated Assembly for Synthesis of Graphene-Electrode-Based Organic Photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Man; Kim, Wanjung; Kim, Young Hun; Kim, Jung Kyu; Jang, Ji-Ryang; Choe, Woo-Seok; Park, Jong Hyeok; Yoo, Pil J

    2015-07-20

    Transition metal oxide (TMO) thin films have been exploited as interlayers for charge extraction between electrodes and active layers in organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices. Additionally, graphene-electrode-based OPVs have received considerable attention as a means to enhance device stability. However, the film deposition process of a TMO thin-film layer onto the graphene electrode is highly restricted owing to the hydrophobic nature of the graphene surface; thus, the preparation of the device should rely on a vacuum process that is incompatible with solution processing. In this study, we present a novel means for creating a thin tungsten oxide (WO3 ) interlayer on a graphene electrode by employing an engineered biotemplate of M13 viruses, whereby nondestructive functionalization of the graphene and uniform synthesis of a WO3 thin interlayer are concurrently achieved. As a result, the incorporated virus-templated WO3 interlayer exhibited solar-conversion efficiency that was 20 % higher than that of conventional OPVs based on the use of a (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) ( PSS) interlayer. Notably, bilayer-structured OPVs with synergistically integrated WO3 /PEDOT:PSS achieved >60 % enhancement in device performance. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Assembly of crosslinked oxo-cyanoruthenate and zirconium oxide bilayers: Application in electrocatalytic films based on organically modified silica with templated pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowska, Iwona A.; Sek, Jakub P.; Mehdi, B. Layla; Kulesza, Pawel J.; Cox, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Electrochemical deposition of crosslinked oxo-cyanoruthenate, Ru-O/CN-O, from a mixture of RuCl3 and K4Ru(CN)6 is known to yield a film on glassy carbon that promotes oxidations by a combination of electron and oxygen transfer. Layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition of this species and of a film formed by cycling of the electrode potential in a ZrO2 solution systematically increases the number of catalytically active sites of the Ru-O/CN-O on the electrode. The evaluation of the electrocatalytic activity was by cyclic voltammetric oxidation of cysteine at pH 2. Plots of the anodic peak current vs. the square root of scan rate were indicative of linear diffusion control of this oxidation, even in the absence of ZrO2, but the slopes of these linear plots increased with bilayer number, n, of (ZrO2 | Ru-O/CN-O)n. The latter observation is hypothesized to be due to an increased number of active sites for a given geometric electrode area, but proof required further study. To optimize utilization of the catalyst and to provide a size-exclusion characteristic to the electrode, the study was extended to LbL deposition of the composite in 50-nm pores of an organically modified silica film deposited by electrochemically assisted sol-gel processing using surface-bound poly(styrene sulfonate) nanospheres as a templating agent. PMID:24683266

  6. Functional analysis of the accessory protein TapA in Bacillus subtilis amyloid fiber assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Diego; Vlamakis, Hera; Losick, Richard; Kolter, Roberto

    2014-04-01

    Bacillus subtilis biofilm formation relies on the assembly of a fibrous scaffold formed by the protein TasA. TasA polymerizes into highly stable fibers with biochemical and morphological features of functional amyloids. Previously, we showed that assembly of TasA fibers requires the auxiliary protein TapA. In this study, we investigated the roles of TapA sequences from the C-terminal and N-terminal ends and TapA cysteine residues in its ability to promote the assembly of TasA amyloid-like fibers. We found that the cysteine residues are not essential for the formation of TasA fibers, as their replacement by alanine residues resulted in only minor defects in biofilm formation. Mutating sequences in the C-terminal half had no effect on biofilm formation. However, we identified a sequence of 8 amino acids in the N terminus that is key for TasA fiber formation. Strains expressing TapA lacking these 8 residues were completely defective in biofilm formation. In addition, this TapA mutant protein exhibited a dominant negative effect on TasA fiber formation. Even in the presence of wild-type TapA, the mutant protein inhibited fiber assembly in vitro and delayed biofilm formation in vivo. We propose that this 8-residue sequence is crucial for the formation of amyloid-like fibers on the cell surface, perhaps by mediating the interaction between TapA or TapA and TasA molecules.

  7. Surface modification and modulation in microstructures: controlling protein adsorption, monolayer desorption and micro-self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhringer, Karl F.

    2003-07-01

    The surface-to-volume ratio increases with decreasing scale, thus, controlling and changing the surface properties of microstructures can be a powerful tool in the design, fabrication and use of microsystems. This paper overviews several recent projects that utilize the modulation of surfaces from hydrophobic to hydrophilic and vice versa, or from protein adsorbing to non-fouling, with applications in biomedical microdevices and self-assembling microelectromechanical systems.

  8. Folding induced supramolecular assembly into pH-responsive nanorods with a protein repellent shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otter, R; Klinker, K; Spitzer, D; Schinnerer, M; Barz, M; Besenius, P

    2018-01-04

    We report the synthesis of ABA' triblock peptide-polysarcosine-peptide conjugates featuring two complementary phenylalanine-histidine pentapeptide strands A/A'. These sequences encode for antiparallel β-sheet formation into folded conjugates, which promote the self-assembly into polysarcosine-shielded core-shell nanorods. These do not cause aggregation of serum proteins in human blood plasma underlining an enhanced stability.

  9. A Self-Assembling Protein Hydrogel Technology for Enzyme Incorporation onto Electrodes in Biofuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-26

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2015-0369 A Self-Assembling Protein Hydrogel Technology for Enzyme Incorporation onto Electrodes in Biofuel Cells (YIP) Zhilei Chen...Incorporation Onto Electrodes in Biofuel Cells 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER C12-00857 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-12-1-0330 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...activity enzyme immobilization on electrodes in enzymatic biofuel cells. Enzymatic biofuel cells hold great potential for providing flexible, compact

  10. Self-assembling peptide and protein nanodiscs for studies of membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midtgaard, Søren Roi

    membrane proteins. A minimalistic approach was tested where the ApoA1 protein was mimicked my small amphipathic helical peptides. The resulting discs were very similar to ApoA1 based discs in size and in their ability to stabilize incorporated membrane proteins. Furthermore, due to their enhanced dynamical......Particles containing both lipids and proteins (so-called lipoproteins) are vital to study. They are selfassembling particles that, in the human body, are responsible for the transport of lipids and cholesterol. Due to the increasing problems of obesity and related illnesses in the world, obtaining...... for working with lipoprotein particles are their potential in the study membrane proteins. Membrane proteins are responsible for most of the transport in and out of cells and signaling between cells. As an example G-protein coupled receptors, a class of membrane proteins, are the third largest class...

  11. Prediction of homoprotein and heteroprotein complexes by protein docking and template-based modeling : A CASP-CAPRI experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lensink, Marc F.; Velankar, Sameer; Kryshtafovych, Andriy; Huang, Shen You; Schneidman-Duhovny, Dina; Sali, Andrej; Segura, Joan; Fernandez-Fuentes, Narcis; Viswanath, Shruthi; Elber, Ron; Grudinin, Sergei; Popov, Petr; Neveu, Emilie; Lee, Hasup; Baek, Minkyung; Park, Sangwoo; Heo, Lim; Rie Lee, Gyu; Seok, Chaok; Qin, Sanbo; Zhou, Huan Xiang; Ritchie, David W.; Maigret, Bernard; Devignes, Marie Dominique; Ghoorah, Anisah; Torchala, Mieczyslaw; Chaleil, Raphaël A G; Bates, Paul A.; Ben-Zeev, Efrat; Eisenstein, Miriam; Negi, Surendra S.; Weng, Zhiping; Vreven, Thom; Pierce, Brian G.; Borrman, Tyler M.; Yu, Jinchao; Ochsenbein, Françoise; Guerois, Raphaël; Vangone, Anna|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/370549694; Garcia Lopes Maia Rodrigues, João|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/330827391; van Zundert, Gydo|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/338775285; Nellen, Mehdi; Xue, Li|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413576817; Karaca, Ezgi|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/315554789; Melquiond, Adrien S J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/31412277X; Visscher, Koen; Kastritis, Panagiotis L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/315886668; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/113691238; Xu, Xianjin; Qiu, Liming; Yan, Chengfei; Li, Jilong; Ma, Zhiwei; Cheng, Jianlin; Zou, Xiaoqin; Shen, Yang; Peterson, Lenna X.; Kim, Hyung Rae; Roy, Amit; Han, Xusi; Esquivel-Rodriguez, Juan; Kihara, Daisuke; Yu, Xiaofeng; Bruce, Neil J.; Fuller, Jonathan C.; Wade, Rebecca C.; Anishchenko, Ivan; Kundrotas, Petras J.; Vakser, Ilya A.; Imai, Kenichiro; Yamada, Kazunori; Oda, Toshiyuki; Nakamura, Tsukasa; Tomii, Kentaro; Pallara, Chiara; Romero-Durana, Miguel; Jiménez-García, Brian; Moal, Iain H.; Férnandez-Recio, Juan; Joung, Jong Young; Kim, Jong Yun; Joo, Keehyoung; Lee, Jooyoung; Kozakov, Dima; Vajda, Sandor; Mottarella, Scott; Hall, David R.; Beglov, Dmitri; Mamonov, Artem; Xia, Bing; Bohnuud, Tanggis; Del Carpio, Carlos A.; Ichiishi, Eichiro; Marze, Nicholas; Kuroda, Daisuke; Roy Burman, Shourya S.; Gray, Jeffrey J.; Chermak, Edrisse; Cavallo, Luigi; Oliva, Romina; Tovchigrechko, Andrey; Wodak, Shoshana J.

    2016-01-01

    We present the results for CAPRI Round 30, the first joint CASP-CAPRI experiment, which brought together experts from the protein structure prediction and protein-protein docking communities. The Round comprised 25 targets from amongst those submitted for the CASP11 prediction experiment of 2014.

  12. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ribosomal Protein L26 Is Not Essential for Ribosome Assembly and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiano, Reyes; Gamalinda, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Ribosomal proteins play important roles in ribosome biogenesis and function. Here, we study the evolutionarily conserved L26 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which assembles into pre-60S ribosomal particles in the nucle(ol)us. Yeast L26 is one of the many ribosomal proteins encoded by two functional genes. We have disrupted both genes; surprisingly, the growth of the resulting rpl26 null mutant is apparently identical to that of the isogenic wild-type strain. The absence of L26 minimally alters 60S ribosomal subunit biogenesis. Polysome analysis revealed the appearance of half-mers. Analysis of pre-rRNA processing indicated that L26 is mainly required to optimize 27S pre-rRNA maturation, without which the release of pre-60S particles from the nucle(ol)us is partially impaired. Ribosomes lacking L26 exhibit differential reactivity to dimethylsulfate in domain I of 25S/5.8S rRNAs but apparently are able to support translation in vivo with wild-type accuracy. The bacterial homologue of yeast L26, L24, is a primary rRNA binding protein required for 50S ribosomal subunit assembly in vitro and in vivo. Our results underscore potential differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic ribosome assembly. We discuss the reasons why yeast L26 plays such an apparently nonessential role in the cell. PMID:22688513

  13. Architects of assembly: roles of Flaviviridae non-structural proteins in virion morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Catherine L; Jones, Christopher T; Rice, Charles M

    2008-09-01

    Viruses of the Flaviviridae family, including hepatitis C, dengue and bovine viral diarrhoea, are responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recent advances in our understanding of virion assembly have uncovered commonalities among distantly related members of this family. We discuss the emerging hypothesis that physical virion components are not alone in forming the infectious particle, but that non-structural proteins are intimately involved in orchestrating morphogenesis. Pinpointing the roles of Flaviviridae proteins in virion production could reveal new avenues for antiviral therapeutics.

  14. PRISM-EM: template interface-based modelling of multi-protein complexes guided by cryo-electron microscopy density maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzu, Guray; Keskin, Ozlem; Nussinov, Ruth; Gursoy, Attila

    2016-10-01

    The structures of protein assemblies are important for elucidating cellular processes at the molecular level. Three-dimensional electron microscopy (3DEM) is a powerful method to identify the structures of assemblies, especially those that are challenging to study by crystallography. Here, a new approach, PRISM-EM, is reported to computationally generate plausible structural models using a procedure that combines crystallographic structures and density maps obtained from 3DEM. The predictions are validated against seven available structurally different crystallographic complexes. The models display mean deviations in the backbone of EM was further tested on different benchmark sets; the accuracy was evaluated with respect to the structure of the complex, and the correlation with EM density maps and interface predictions were evaluated and compared with those obtained using other methods. PRISM-EM was then used to predict the structure of the ternary complex of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein trimer, the ligand CD4 and the neutralizing protein m36.

  15. Self-assembling peptide and protein nanodiscs for studies of membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midtgaard, Søren Roi

    of proteins encoded by the human genome. G-protein coupled receptors mediate the majority of hormone and neurotransmitter signals as well as being responsible for perception of light, smell and taste in the human body, and a number of Nobel prizes has been awarded based on their study. Structural...... membrane proteins. A minimalistic approach was tested where the ApoA1 protein was mimicked my small amphipathic helical peptides. The resulting discs were very similar to ApoA1 based discs in size and in their ability to stabilize incorporated membrane proteins. Furthermore, due to their enhanced dynamical...

  16. Self-Assembly of Large Amyloid Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgley, Devin M.

    Functional amyloids found throughout nature have demonstrated that amyloid fibers are potential industrial biomaterials. This work introduces a new "template plus adder" cooperative mechanism for the spontaneous self-assembly of micrometer sized amyloid fibers. A short hydrophobic template peptide induces a conformation change within a highly alpha-helical adder protein to form beta-sheets that continue to assemble into micrometer sized amyloid fibers. This study utilizes a variety of proteins that have template or adder characteristics which suggests that this mechanism may be employed throughout nature. Depending on the amino acid composition of the proteins used the mixtures form amyloid fibers of a cylindrical ( 10 mum diameter, 2 GPa Young's modulus) or tape (5- 10 mum height, 10-20 mum width and 100-200 MPa Young's modulus) morphology. Processing conditions are altered to manipulate the morphology and structural characteristics of the fibers. Spectroscopy is utilized to identify certain amino acid groups that contribute to the self-assembly process. Aliphatic amino acids (A, I, V and L) are responsible for initiating conformation change of the adder proteins to assemble into amyloid tapes. Additional polyglutamine segments (Q-blocks) within the protein mixtures will form Q hydrogen bonds to reinforce the amyloid structure and form a cylindrical fiber of higher modulus. Atomic force microscopy is utilized to delineate the self-assembly of amyloid tapes and cylindrical fibers from protofibrils (15-30 nm width) to fibers (10-20 mum width) spanning three orders of magnitude. The aliphatic amino acid content of the adder proteins' alpha-helices is a good predictor of high density beta-sheet formation within the protein mixture. Thus, it is possible to predict the propensity of a protein to undergo conformation change into amyloid structures. Finally, Escherichia coli is genetically engineered to express a template protein which self-assembles into large amyloid

  17. Modular assembly of synthetic proteins that span the plasma membrane in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qudrat, Anam; Truong, Kevin

    2016-12-09

    To achieve synthetic control over how a cell responds to other cells or the extracellular environment, it is important to reliably engineer proteins that can traffic and span the plasma membrane. Using a modular approach to assemble proteins, we identified the minimum necessary components required to engineer such membrane-spanning proteins with predictable orientation in mammalian cells. While a transmembrane domain (TM) fused to the N-terminus of a protein is sufficient to traffic it to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an additional signal peptidase cleavage site downstream of this TM enhanced sorting out of the ER. Next, a second TM in the synthetic protein helped anchor and accumulate the membrane-spanning protein on the plasma membrane. The orientation of the components of the synthetic protein were determined through measuring intracellular Ca2+ signaling using the R-GECO biosensor and through measuring extracellular quenching of yellow fluorescent protein variants by saturating acidic and salt conditions. This work forms the basis of engineering novel proteins that span the plasma membrane to potentially control intracellular responses to extracellular conditions.

  18. Heat shock protein-90-beta facilitates enterovirus 71 viral particles assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Robert Y.L., E-mail: yuwang@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Research Center for Emerging Viral Infections, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333 Taiwan (China); Kuo, Rei-Lin [Research Center for Emerging Viral Infections, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Biotechnology and Laboratory Science and Graduate Program of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Ma, Wei-Chieh [Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333 Taiwan (China); Huang, Hsing-I [Research Center for Emerging Viral Infections, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Biotechnology and Laboratory Science and Graduate Program of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Yu, Jau-Song [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Molecular Medicine Research Center, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Yen, Sih-Min [Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333 Taiwan (China); Huang, Chi-Ruei [Research Center for Emerging Viral Infections, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333 Taiwan (China); Shih, Shin-Ru [Research Center for Emerging Viral Infections, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Biotechnology and Laboratory Science and Graduate Program of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China)

    2013-09-01

    Molecular chaperones are reported to be crucial for virus propagation, but are not yet addressed in Human Enterovirus 71 (EV71). Here we describe the specific association of heat shock protein-90-beta (Hsp90β), but not alpha form (Hsp90α), with EV71 viral particles by the co-purification with virions using sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation, and by the colocalization with viral particles, as assessed by immunogold electron microscopy. The reduction of the Hsp90β protein using RNA interference decreased the correct assembly of viral particles, without affecting EV71 replication levels. Tracking ectopically expressed Hsp90β protein associated with EV71 virions revealed that Hsp90β protein was transmitted to new host cells through its direct association with infectious viral particles. Our findings suggest a new antiviral strategy in which extracellular Hsp90β protein is targeted to decrease the infectivity of EV71 and other enteroviruses, without affecting the broader functions of this constitutively expressed molecular chaperone. - Highlights: • Hsp90β is associated with EV71 virion and is secreted with the release virus. • Hsp90β effects on the correct assembly of viral particles. • Viral titer of cultured medium was reduced in the presence of geldanamycin. • Viral titer was also reduced when Hsp90β was suppressed by siRNA treatment. • The extracellular Hsp90β was also observed in other RNA viruses-infected cells.

  19. Monitoring of Enzymatic Proteolysis Using Self-Assembled Quantum Dot-Protein Substrate Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron R. Clapp

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We have previously utilized hybrid semiconductor quantum dot- (QD- peptide substrates for monitoring of enzymatic proteolysis. In this report, we expand on this sensing strategy to further monitor protein-protease interactions. We utilize QDs self-assembled with multiple copies of dye-labeled proteins as substrates for the sensing of protease activity. Detection of proteolysis is based on changes in the rate of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET between the QDs and the proximal dye-labeled proteins following protein digestion by added enzyme. Our study focused on two representative proteolytic enzymes: the cysteine protease papain and the serine protease endoproteinase K. Analysis of the enzymatic digestion allowed us to estimate minimal values for the enzymatic activities of each enzyme used. Mechanisms of enzymatic inhibition were also inferred from the FRET data collected in the presence of inhibitors. Potential applications of this technology include drug discovery assays and in vivo cellular monitoring of enzymatic activity.

  20. RECOVERY ACT - Thylakoid Assembly and Folded Protein Transport by the Tat Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabney-Smith, Carole [Miami Univ., Oxford, OH (United States)

    2016-07-18

    Assembly of functional photosystems complete with necessary intrinsic (membrane-bound) and extrinsic proteins requires the function of at least 3 protein transport pathways in thylakoid membranes. Our research focuses on one of those pathways, a unique and essential protein transport pathway found in the chloroplasts of plants, bacteria, and some archaebacteria, the Twin arginine translocation (Tat) system. The chloroplast Tat (cpTat) system is thought to be responsible for the proper location of ~50% of thylakoid lumen proteins, several of which are necessary for proper photosystem assembly, maintenance, and function. Specifically, cpTat systems are unique because they transport fully folded and assembled proteins across ion tight membranes using only three membrane components, Tha4, Hcf106, and cpTatC, and the protonmotive force generated by photosynthesis. Despite the importance of the cpTat system in plants, the mechanism of transport of a folded precursor is not well known. Our long-term goal is to investigate the role protein transport systems have on organelle biogenesis, particularly the assembly of membrane protein complexes in thylakoids of chloroplasts. The objective of this proposal is to correlate structural changes in the membrane-bound cpTat component, Tha4, to the mechanism of translocation of folded-precursor substrates across the membrane bilayer by using a cysteine accessibility and crosslinking approach. Our central hypothesis is that the precursor passes through a proteinaceous pore of assembled Tha4 protomers that have undergone a conformational or topological change in response to transport. This research is predicated upon the observations that Tha4 exists in molar excess in the membrane relative to the other cpTat components; its regulated assembly to the precursor-bound receptor; and our data showing oligomerization of Tha4 into very large complexes in response to transport. Our rationale for these studies is that understanding cp

  1. Evolutionary conservation in biogenesis of β-barrel proteins allows mitochondria to assemble a functional bacterial trimeric autotransporter protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Thomas; Oberhettinger, Philipp; Schütz, Monika; Holzer, Katharina; Ramms, Anne S; Linke, Dirk; Autenrieth, Ingo B; Rapaport, Doron

    2014-10-24

    Yersinia adhesin A (YadA) belongs to a class of bacterial adhesins that form trimeric structures. Their mature form contains a passenger domain and a C-terminal β-domain that anchors the protein in the outer membrane (OM). Little is known about how precursors of such proteins cross the periplasm and assemble into the OM. In the present study we took advantage of the evolutionary conservation in the biogenesis of β-barrel proteins between bacteria and mitochondria. We previously observed that upon expression in yeast cells, bacterial β-barrel proteins including the transmembrane domain of YadA assemble into the mitochondrial OM. In the current study we found that when expressed in yeast cells both the monomeric and trimeric forms of full-length YadA were detected in mitochondria but only the trimeric species was fully integrated into the OM. The oligomeric form was exposed on the surface of the organelle in its native conformation and maintained its capacity to adhere to host cells. The co-expression of YadA with a mitochondria-targeted form of the bacterial periplasmic chaperone Skp, but not with SurA or SecB, resulted in enhanced levels of both forms of YadA. Taken together, these results indicate that the proper assembly of trimeric autotransporter can occur also in a system lacking the lipoproteins of the BAM machinery and is specifically enhanced by the chaperone Skp. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Integrating top-down and self-assembly in the fabrication of peptide and protein-based biomedical materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Katherine H; Tejeda-Montes, Esther; Poch, Marta; Mata, Alvaro

    2011-09-01

    The capacity to create an increasing variety of bioactive molecules that are designed to assemble in specific configurations has opened up tremendous possibilities in the design of materials with an unprecedented level of control and functionality. A particular challenge involves guiding such self-assembling interactions across scales, thus precisely positioning individual molecules within well-organized, highly-ordered structures. Such hierarchical control is essential if peptides and proteins are to serve as both structural and functional building blocks of biomedical materials. To achieve this goal, top-down techniques are increasingly being used in combination with self-assembling systems to reproducibly manipulate, localize, orient and assemble peptides and proteins to form organized structures. In this tutorial review we provide insight into how both standard and novel top-down techniques are being used in combination with peptide or protein self-assembly to create a new generation of functional materials. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  3. Influence of template fill in graphoepitaxy DSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doise, Jan; Bekaert, Joost; Chan, Boon Teik; Hong, SungEun; Lin, Guanyang; Gronheid, Roel

    2016-03-01

    Directed self-assembly (DSA) of block copolymers (BCP) is considered a promising patterning approach for the 7 nm node and beyond. Specifically, a grapho-epitaxy process using a cylindrical phase BCP may offer an efficient solution for patterning randomly distributed contact holes with sub-resolution pitches, such as found in via and cut mask levels. In any grapho-epitaxy process, the pattern density impacts the template fill (local BCP thickness inside the template) and may cause defects due to respectively over- or underfilling of the template. In order to tackle this issue thoroughly, the parameters that determine template fill and the influence of template fill on the resulting pattern should be investigated. In this work, using three process flow variations (with different template surface energy), template fill is experimentally characterized as a function of pattern density and film thickness. The impact of these parameters on template fill is highly dependent on the process flow, and thus pre-pattern surface energy. Template fill has a considerable effect on the pattern transfer of the DSA contact holes into the underlying layer. Higher fill levels give rise to smaller contact holes and worse critical dimension uniformity. These results are important towards DSA-aware design and show that fill is a crucial parameter in grapho-epitaxy DSA.

  4. Assembly of membrane-bound protein complexes: detection and analysis by single molecule diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, Brian P; Knight, Jefferson D; Falke, Joseph J

    2012-02-28

    Protein complexes assembled on membrane surfaces regulate a wide array of signaling pathways and cell processes. Thus, a molecular understanding of the membrane surface diffusion and regulatory events leading to the assembly of active membrane complexes is crucial to signaling biology and medicine. Here we present a novel single molecule diffusion analysis designed to detect complex formation on supported lipid bilayers. The usefulness of the method is illustrated by detection of an engineered, heterodimeric complex in which two membrane-bound pleckstrin homology (PH) domains associate stably, but reversibly, upon Ca(2+)-triggered binding of calmodulin (CaM) to a target peptide from myosin light chain kinase (MLCKp). Specifically, when a monomeric, fluorescent PH-CaM domain fusion protein diffusing on a supported bilayer binds a dark MLCKp-PH domain fusion protein, the heterodimeric complex is observed to diffuse nearly 2-fold more slowly than the monomer because both of its twin PH domains can simultaneously bind to the viscous bilayer. In a mixed population of monomers and heterodimers, the single molecule diffusion analysis resolves, identifies and quantitates the rapidly diffusing monomers and slowly diffusing heterodimers. The affinity of the CaM-MLCKp interaction is measured by titrating dark MLCKp-PH construct into the system, while monitoring the changing ratio of monomers and heterodimers, yielding a saturating binding curve. Strikingly, the apparent affinity of the CaM-MLCKp complex is ~10(2)-fold greater in the membrane system than in solution, apparently due to both faster complex association and slower complex dissociation on the membrane surface. More broadly, the present findings suggest that single molecule diffusion measurements on supported bilayers will provide an important tool for analyzing the 2D diffusion and assembly reactions governing the formation of diverse membrane-bound complexes, including key complexes from critical signaling

  5. EV71 3D Protein Binds with NLRP3 and Enhances the Assembly of Inflammasome Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Pin; Pan, Pan; Zhang, Yecheng; Wu, Kailang; Liu, Yingle; Wu, Jianguo

    2017-01-01

    Activation of NLRP3 inflammasome is important for effective host defense against invading pathogen. Together with apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing CARD domain (ASC), NLRP3 induces the cleavage of caspase-1 to facilitate the maturation of interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), an important pro-inflammatory cytokine. IL-1β subsequently plays critical roles in inflammatory responses by activating immune cells and inducing many secondary pro-inflammatory cytokines. Although the role of NLRP3 inflammasome in immune response is well defined, the mechanism underlying its assembly modulated by pathogen infection remains largely unknown. Here, we identified a novel mechanism by which enterovirus 71 (EV71) facilitates the assembly of NLRP3 inflammasome. Our results show that EV71 induces production and secretion of IL-1β in macrophages and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) through activation of NLRP3 inflammasome. EV71 replication and protein synthesis are required for NLRP3-mediated activation of IL-1β. Interestingly, EV71 3D protein, a RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) was found to stimulate the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome, the cleavage of pro-caspase-1, and the release of IL-1β through direct binding to NLRP3. More importantly, 3D interacts with NLRP3 to facilitate the assembly of inflammasome complex by forming a 3D-NLRP3-ASC ring-like structure, resulting in the activation of IL-1β. These findings demonstrate a new role of 3D as an important player in the activation of inflammatory response, and identify a novel mechanism underlying the modulation of inflammasome assembly and function induced by pathogen invasion. PMID:28060938

  6. Code Generation with Templates

    CERN Document Server

    Arnoldus, Jeroen; Serebrenik, A

    2012-01-01

    Templates are used to generate all kinds of text, including computer code. The last decade, the use of templates gained a lot of popularity due to the increase of dynamic web applications. Templates are a tool for programmers, and implementations of template engines are most times based on practical experience rather than based on a theoretical background. This book reveals the mathematical background of templates and shows interesting findings for improving the practical use of templates. First, a framework to determine the necessary computational power for the template metalanguage is presen

  7. Creation of artificial cellulosomes on DNA scaffolds by zinc finger protein-guided assembly for efficient cellulose hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qing; Madan, Bhawna; Tsai, Shen-Long; DeLisa, Matthew P; Chen, Wilfred

    2014-02-11

    For the first time, artificial cellulosome structures were created on DNA scaffolds based on zinc finger protein (ZFP)-guided assembly. These resulting two-component cellulosome structures exhibited enhancement in cellulose hydrolysis compared to the non-complexed mixture depending on the number of CBMs and cellulases assembled.

  8. Insights into the variability of nucleated amyloid polymerization by a minimalistic model of stochastic protein assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eugène, Sarah, E-mail: Sarah.Eugene@inria.fr; Doumic, Marie, E-mail: Philippe.Robert@inria.fr, E-mail: Marie.Doumic@inria.fr [INRIA de Paris, 2 Rue Simone Iff, CS 42112, 75589 Paris Cedex 12 (France); Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Université Pierre et Marie Curie, UMR 7598, Laboratoire Jacques-Louis Lions, F-75005 Paris (France); Xue, Wei-Feng, E-mail: W.F.Xue@kent.ac.uk [School of Biosciences, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NJ (United Kingdom); Robert, Philippe, E-mail: Philippe.Robert@inria.fr [INRIA de Paris, 2 Rue Simone Iff, CS 42112, 75589 Paris Cedex 12 (France)

    2016-05-07

    Self-assembly of proteins into amyloid aggregates is an important biological phenomenon associated with human diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease. Amyloid fibrils also have potential applications in nano-engineering of biomaterials. The kinetics of amyloid assembly show an exponential growth phase preceded by a lag phase, variable in duration as seen in bulk experiments and experiments that mimic the small volumes of cells. Here, to investigate the origins and the properties of the observed variability in the lag phase of amyloid assembly currently not accounted for by deterministic nucleation dependent mechanisms, we formulate a new stochastic minimal model that is capable of describing the characteristics of amyloid growth curves despite its simplicity. We then solve the stochastic differential equations of our model and give mathematical proof of a central limit theorem for the sample growth trajectories of the nucleated aggregation process. These results give an asymptotic description for our simple model, from which closed form analytical results capable of describing and predicting the variability of nucleated amyloid assembly were derived. We also demonstrate the application of our results to inform experiments in a conceptually friendly and clear fashion. Our model offers a new perspective and paves the way for a new and efficient approach on extracting vital information regarding the key initial events of amyloid formation.

  9. Structural basis for ebolavirus matrix assembly and budding; protein plasticity allows multiple functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornholdt, Zachary A.; Noda, Takeshi; Abelson, Dafna M.; Halfmann, Peter; Wood, Malcolm; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2014-01-01

    Summary Proteins, particularly viral proteins, can be multifunctional, but the mechanism(s) behind this trait are not fully understood. Here, we illustrate through multiple crystal structures, biochemistry and cellular microscopy that VP40 rearranges into different structures, each with a distinct function required for the ebolavirus life cycle. A butterfly-shaped VP40 dimer trafficks to the cellular membrane. There, electrostatic interactions trigger rearrangement of the polypeptide into a linear hexamer. These hexamers construct a multi-layered, filamentous matrix structure that is critical for budding and resembles tomograms of authentic virions. A third structure of VP40, formed by a different rearrangement, is not involved in virus assembly, but instead uniquely binds RNA to regulate viral transcription inside infected cells. These results provide a functional model for ebolavirus matrix assembly and the other roles of VP40 in the virus life cycle, and demonstrate how a single, wild-type, unmodified polypeptide can assemble into different structures for different functions. PMID:23953110

  10. A tractable genotype-phenotype map modelling the self-assembly of protein quaternary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbury, Sam F; Johnston, Iain G; Louis, Ard A; Ahnert, Sebastian E

    2014-06-06

    The mapping between biological genotypes and phenotypes is central to the study of biological evolution. Here, we introduce a rich, intuitive and biologically realistic genotype-phenotype (GP) map that serves as a model of self-assembling biological structures, such as protein complexes, and remains computationally and analytically tractable. Our GP map arises naturally from the self-assembly of polyomino structures on a two-dimensional lattice and exhibits a number of properties: redundancy (genotypes vastly outnumber phenotypes), phenotype bias (genotypic redundancy varies greatly between phenotypes), genotype component disconnectivity (phenotypes consist of disconnected mutational networks) and shape space covering (most phenotypes can be reached in a small number of mutations). We also show that the mutational robustness of phenotypes scales very roughly logarithmically with phenotype redundancy and is positively correlated with phenotypic evolvability. Although our GP map describes the assembly of disconnected objects, it shares many properties with other popular GP maps for connected units, such as models for RNA secondary structure or the hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice model for protein tertiary structure. The remarkable fact that these important properties similarly emerge from such different models suggests the possibility that universal features underlie a much wider class of biologically realistic GP maps.

  11. Sequence Identification, Recombinant Production, and Analysis of the Self-Assembly of Egg Stalk Silk Proteins from Lacewing Chrysoperla carnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Neuenfeldt

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Egg stalk silks of the common green lacewing Chrysoperla carnea likely comprise at least three different silk proteins. Based on the natural spinning process, it was hypothesized that these proteins self-assemble without shear stress, as adult lacewings do not use a spinneret. To examine this, the first sequence identification and determination of the gene expression profile of several silk proteins and various transcript variants thereof was conducted, and then the three major proteins were recombinantly produced in Escherichia coli encoded by their native complementary DNA (cDNA sequences. Circular dichroism measurements indicated that the silk proteins in aqueous solutions had a mainly intrinsically disordered structure. The largest silk protein, which we named ChryC1, exhibited a lower critical solution temperature (LCST behavior and self-assembled into fibers or film morphologies, depending on the conditions used. The second silk protein, ChryC2, self-assembled into nanofibrils and subsequently formed hydrogels. Circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed conformational changes of both proteins into beta sheet rich structures upon assembly. ChryC3 did not self-assemble into any morphology under the tested conditions. Thereby, through this work, it could be shown that recombinant lacewing silk proteins can be produced and further used for studying the fiber formation of lacewing egg stalks.

  12. Sequence Identification, Recombinant Production, and Analysis of the Self-Assembly of Egg Stalk Silk Proteins from Lacewing Chrysoperla carnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuenfeldt, Martin; Scheibel, Thomas

    2017-06-13

    Egg stalk silks of the common green lacewing Chrysoperla carnea likely comprise at least three different silk proteins. Based on the natural spinning process, it was hypothesized that these proteins self-assemble without shear stress, as adult lacewings do not use a spinneret. To examine this, the first sequence identification and determination of the gene expression profile of several silk proteins and various transcript variants thereof was conducted, and then the three major proteins were recombinantly produced in Escherichia coli encoded by their native complementary DNA (cDNA) sequences. Circular dichroism measurements indicated that the silk proteins in aqueous solutions had a mainly intrinsically disordered structure. The largest silk protein, which we named ChryC1, exhibited a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) behavior and self-assembled into fibers or film morphologies, depending on the conditions used. The second silk protein, ChryC2, self-assembled into nanofibrils and subsequently formed hydrogels. Circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed conformational changes of both proteins into beta sheet rich structures upon assembly. ChryC3 did not self-assemble into any morphology under the tested conditions. Thereby, through this work, it could be shown that recombinant lacewing silk proteins can be produced and further used for studying the fiber formation of lacewing egg stalks.

  13. CARTILAGE OLIGOMERIC MATRIX PROTEIN ENHANCES MATRIX ASSEMBLY DURING CHONDROGENESIS OF HUMAN MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haleem-Smith, Hana; Calderon, Raul; Song, Yingjie; Tuan, Rocky S.; Chen, Faye H.

    2011-01-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein/thrombospondin-5 (COMP/TSP5) is an abundant cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) protein that interacts with major cartilage ECM components, including aggrecan and collagens. To test our hypothesis that COMP/TSP5 functions in the assembly of the ECM during cartilage morphogenesis, we have employed mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) chondrogenesis in vitro as a model to examine the effects of COMP over-expression on neo-cartilage formation. Human bone marrow-derived MSCs were transfected with either full-length COMP cDNA or control plasmid, followed by chondrogenic induction in three-dimensional pellet or alginate-hydrogel culture. MSC chondrogenesis and ECM production was estimated based on quantitation of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) accumulation, immunohistochemistry of the presence and distribution of cartilage ECM proteins, and real-time RT-PCR analyis of mRNA expression of cartilage markers. Our results showed that COMP over-expression resulted in increased total sGAG content during the early phase of MSC chondrogenesis, and increased immuno-detectable levels of aggrecan and collagen type II in the ECM of COMP-transfected pellet and alginate cultures, indicating more abundant cartilaginous matrix. COMP transfection did not significantly increase the transcript levels of the early chondrogenic marker, Sox9, or aggrecan, suggesting that enhancement of MSC cartilage ECM was effected at post-transcriptional levels. These findings strongly suggest that COMP functions in mesenchymal chondrogenesis by enhancing cartilage ECM organization and assembly. The action of COMP is most likely mediated not via direct changes in cartilage matrix gene expression but via interactions of COMP with other cartilage ECM proteins, such as aggrecan and collagens, that result in enhanced assembly and retention. PMID:22095699

  14. Interaction of the cyclic-di-GMP binding protein FimX and the Type 4 pilus assembly ATPase promotes pilus assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ruchi; Sliusarenko, Oleksii; Kazmierczak, Barbara I

    2017-08-01

    Type IVa pili (T4P) are bacterial surface structures that enable motility, adhesion, biofilm formation and virulence. T4P are assembled by nanomachines that span the bacterial cell envelope. Cycles of T4P assembly and retraction, powered by the ATPases PilB and PilT, allow bacteria to attach to and pull themselves along surfaces, so-called "twitching motility". These opposing ATPase activities must be coordinated and T4P assembly limited to one pole for bacteria to show directional movement. How this occurs is still incompletely understood. Herein, we show that the c-di-GMP binding protein FimX, which is required for T4P assembly in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, localizes to the leading pole of twitching bacteria. Polar FimX localization requires both the presence of T4P assembly machine proteins and the assembly ATPase PilB. PilB itself loses its polar localization pattern when FimX is absent. We use two different approaches to confirm that FimX and PilB interact in vivo and in vitro, and further show that point mutant alleles of FimX that do not bind c-di-GMP also do not interact with PilB. Lastly, we demonstrate that FimX positively regulates T4P assembly and twitching motility by promoting the activity of the PilB ATPase, and not by stabilizing assembled pili or by preventing PilT-mediated retraction. Mutated alleles of FimX that no longer bind c-di-GMP do not allow rapid T4P assembly in these assays. We propose that by virtue of its high-affinity for c-di-GMP, FimX can promote T4P assembly when intracellular levels of this cyclic nucleotide are low. As P. aeruginosa PilB is not itself a high-affinity c-di-GMP receptor, unlike many other assembly ATPases, FimX may play a key role in coupling T4P mediated motility and adhesion to levels of this second messenger.

  15. Critical role of the fusion protein cytoplasmic tail sequence in parainfluenza virus assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raychel Stone

    Full Text Available Interactions between viral glycoproteins, matrix protein and nucleocapsid sustain assembly of parainfluenza viruses at the plasma membrane. Although the protein interactions required for virion formation are considered to be highly specific, virions lacking envelope glycoprotein(s can be produced, thus the molecular interactions driving viral assembly and production are still unclear. Sendai virus (SeV and human parainfluenza virus type 1 (hPIV1 are highly similar in structure, however, the cytoplasmic tail sequences of the envelope glycoproteins (HN and F are relatively less conserved. To unveil the specific role of the envelope glycoproteins in viral assembly, we created chimeric SeVs whose HN (rSeVhHN or HN and F (rSeVh(HN+F were replaced with those of hPIV1. rSeVhHN grew as efficiently as wt SeV or hPIV1, suggesting that the sequence difference in HN does not have a significant impact on SeV replication and virion production. In sharp contrast, the growth of rSeVh(HN+F was significantly impaired compared to rSeVhHN. rSeVh(HN+Fstail which expresses a chimeric hPIV1 F with the SeV cytoplasmic tail sequence grew similar to wt SeV or rSeVhHN. Further analysis indicated that the F cytoplasmic tail plays a critical role in cell surface expression/accumulation of HN and F, as well as NP and M association at the plasma membrane. Trafficking of nucelocapsids in infected cells was not significantly affected by the origin of F, suggesting that F cytoplasmic tail is not involved in intracellular movement. These results demonstrate the role of the F cytoplasmic tail in accumulation of structural components at the plasma membrane assembly sites.

  16. Nucleosome assembly protein-1 is a linker histone chaperone in Xenopus eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintomi, Keishi; Iwabuchi, Mari; Saeki, Hideaki; Ura, Kiyoe; Kishimoto, Takeo; Ohsumi, Keita

    2005-06-07

    In eukaryotic cells, genomic DNA is primarily packaged into nucleosomes through sequential ordered binding of the core and linker histone proteins. The acidic proteins termed histone chaperones are known to bind to core histones to neutralize their positive charges, thereby facilitating their proper deposition onto DNA to assemble the core of nucleosomes. For linker histones, however, little has been known about the regulatory mechanism for deposition of linker histones onto the linker DNA. Here we report that, in Xenopus eggs, the linker histone is associated with the Xenopus homologue of nucleosome assembly protein-1 (NAP-1), which is known to be a chaperone for the core histones H2A and H2B in Drosophila and mammalian cells [Ito, T., Bulger, M., Kobayashi, R. & Kadonaga, J. T. (1996) Mol. Cell Biol. 16, 3112-3124; Chang, L., Loranger, S. S., Mizzen, C., Ernst, S. G., Allis, C. D. & Annunziato, A. T. (1997) Biochemistry 36, 469-480]. We show that NAP-1 acts as the chaperone for the linker histone in both sperm chromatin remodeling into nucleosomes and linker histone binding to nucleosome core dimers. In the presence of NAP-1, the linker histone is properly deposited onto linker DNA at physiological ionic strength, without formation of nonspecific aggregates. These results strongly suggest that NAP-1 functions as a chaperone for the linker histone in Xenopus eggs.

  17. The microtubule-associated protein ASPM regulates spindle assembly and meiotic progression in mouse oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-Ling; Ma, Wei; Zhu, Yu-Bo; Wang, Chao; Wang, Bing-Yuan; An, Na; An, Lei; Liu, Yan; Wu, Zhong-Hong; Tian, Jian-Hui

    2012-01-01

    The microtubule-associated protein ASPM (abnormal spindle-like microcephaly-associated) plays an important role in spindle organization and cell division in mitosis and meiosis in lower animals, but its function in mouse oocyte meiosis has not been investigated. In this study, we characterized the localization and expression dynamics of ASPM during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation and analyzed the effects of the downregulation of ASPM expression on meiotic spindle assembly and meiotic progression. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that ASPM localized to the entire spindle at metaphase I (MI) and metaphase II (MII), colocalizing with the spindle microtubule protein acetylated tubulin (Ac-tubulin). In taxol-treated oocytes, ASPM colocalized with Ac-tubulin on the excessively polymerized microtubule fibers of enlarged spindles and the numerous asters in the cytoplasm. Nocodazole treatment induced the gradual disassembly of microtubule fibers, during which ASPM remained colocalized with the dynamic Ac-tubulin. The downregulation of ASPM expression by a gene-specific morpholino resulted in an abnormal meiotic spindle and inhibited meiotic progression; most of the treated oocytes were blocked in the MI stage with elongated meiotic spindles. Furthermore, coimmunoprecipitation combined with mass spectrometry and western blot analysis revealed that ASPM interacted with calmodulin in MI oocytes and that these proteins colocalized at the spindle. Our results provide strong evidence that ASPM plays a critical role in meiotic spindle assembly and meiotic progression in mouse oocytes.

  18. The microtubule-associated protein ASPM regulates spindle assembly and meiotic progression in mouse oocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Ling Xu

    Full Text Available The microtubule-associated protein ASPM (abnormal spindle-like microcephaly-associated plays an important role in spindle organization and cell division in mitosis and meiosis in lower animals, but its function in mouse oocyte meiosis has not been investigated. In this study, we characterized the localization and expression dynamics of ASPM during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation and analyzed the effects of the downregulation of ASPM expression on meiotic spindle assembly and meiotic progression. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that ASPM localized to the entire spindle at metaphase I (MI and metaphase II (MII, colocalizing with the spindle microtubule protein acetylated tubulin (Ac-tubulin. In taxol-treated oocytes, ASPM colocalized with Ac-tubulin on the excessively polymerized microtubule fibers of enlarged spindles and the numerous asters in the cytoplasm. Nocodazole treatment induced the gradual disassembly of microtubule fibers, during which ASPM remained colocalized with the dynamic Ac-tubulin. The downregulation of ASPM expression by a gene-specific morpholino resulted in an abnormal meiotic spindle and inhibited meiotic progression; most of the treated oocytes were blocked in the MI stage with elongated meiotic spindles. Furthermore, coimmunoprecipitation combined with mass spectrometry and western blot analysis revealed that ASPM interacted with calmodulin in MI oocytes and that these proteins colocalized at the spindle. Our results provide strong evidence that ASPM plays a critical role in meiotic spindle assembly and meiotic progression in mouse oocytes.

  19. Generation of active protein phosphatase 2A is coupled to holoenzyme assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Hombauer

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A is a prime example of the multisubunit architecture of protein serine/threonine phosphatases. Until substrate-specific PP2A holoenzymes assemble, a constitutively active, but nonspecific, catalytic C subunit would constitute a risk to the cell. While it has been assumed that the severe proliferation impairment of yeast lacking the structural PP2A subunit, TPD3, is due to the unrestricted activity of the C subunit, we recently obtained evidence for the existence of the C subunit in a low-activity conformation that requires the RRD/PTPA proteins for the switch into the active conformation. To study whether and how maturation of the C subunit is coupled with holoenzyme assembly, we analyzed PP2A biogenesis in yeast. Here we show that the generation of the catalytically active C subunit depends on the physical and functional interaction between RRD2 and the structural subunit, TPD3. The phenotype of the tpd3Delta strain is therefore caused by impaired, rather than increased, PP2A activity. TPD3/RRD2-dependent C subunit maturation is under the surveillance of the PP2A methylesterase, PPE1, which upon malfunction of PP2A biogenesis, prevents premature generation of the active C subunit and holoenzyme assembly by counteracting the untimely methylation of the C subunit. We propose a novel model of PP2A biogenesis in which a tightly controlled activation cascade protects cells from untargeted activity of the free catalytic PP2A subunit.

  20. Assembly of SIV virus-like particles containing envelope proteins using a baculovirus expression system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamshchikov, G V; Ritter, G D; Vey, M; Compans, R W

    1995-12-01

    The requirements for SIV particle assembly and envelope incorporation were investigated using a baculovirus expression system. The Pr56gag precursor protein expressed under control of the polyhedrin promoter (pPolh) produced high levels of immature retrovirus-like particles (VLP) upon expression in Sf9 insect cells. To determine the optimal conditions for envelope protein (Env) incorporation into VLP, two recombinant baculoviruses expressing the SIV envelope protein under control of a very late pPolh or a hybrid late/very late capsid/polyhedrin (Pcap/polh) promoter and a recombinant expressing a truncated form of the SIV envelope protein (Envt) under the hybrid Pcap/polh promoter were compared. We have observed that utilization of the earlier hybrid promoter resulted in higher levels of Env expression on the cell surface and its incorporation into budding virus particles. We have also found that the Envt protein is transported to the cell surface of insect cells and incorporated into VLP more efficiently than full-length Env. In addition, we examined the effect of coexpression of the protease furin, which has been implicated in the proteolytic cleavage of the Env precursor gp160 in mammalian cells. Coexpression of furin in insect cells resulted in more efficient proteolytic cleavage into gp120 and gp41, and the cleaved proteins were incorporated into VLP.

  1. A Rationally Designed Connector for Assembly of Protein-Functionalized DNA Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koßmann, Katja J; Ziegler, Cornelia; Angelin, Alessandro; Meyer, Rebecca; Skoupi, Marc; Rabe, Kersten S; Niemeyer, Christof M

    2016-06-16

    We report on the rational engineering of the binding interface of the self-ligating HaloTag protein to generate an optimized linker for DNA nanostructures. Five amino acids positioned around the active-site entry channel for the chlorohexyl ligand (CH) of the HaloTag protein were exchanged for positively charged lysine amino acids to produce the HOB (halo-based oligonucleotide binder) protein. HOB was genetically fused with the enzyme cytochrome P450 BM3, as well as with BMR, the separated reductase domain of BM3. The resulting HOB-fusion proteins revealed significantly improved rates in ligation with CH-modified oligonucleotides and DNA origami nanostructures. These results suggest that the efficient self-assembly of protein-decorated DNA structures can be greatly improved by fine-tuning of the electrostatic interactions between proteins and the negatively charged nucleic acid nanostructures. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Hepatitis C Virus E2 Protein Ectodomain Is Essential for Assembly of Infectious Virions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessia Bianchi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Hepatitis C virus E1 and E2 envelope proteins are the major players in all events required for virus entry into target cells. In addition, the recently developed HCV cell culture system has indicated that E1E2 heterodimer formation is a prerequisite for viral particle production. In this paper, we explored a new genetic approach to construct intergenotypic 2a/1b chimeras, maintaining the structural region of the infectious strain JFH1 and substituting the soluble portion of E1 and/or E2 proteins. This strategy provides useful information on the role of the surface-exposed domain of the envelope proteins in virus morphogenesis and allows comparative analysis of different HCV genotypes. We found that substituting the E2 protein ectodomain region abolishes the production of chimeric infectious particles. Our data indicate that the soluble part of the E2 protein is involved in a genotype-specific interplay with remaining viral proteins that affect the HCV assembly process.

  3. Kinetics and structure during self-assembly of oppositely charged proteins in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatore, Delphine; Croguennec, Thomas; Bouhallab, Saïd; Forge, Vincent; Nicolai, Taco

    2011-05-09

    Self-assembly in aqueous solution of two oppositely charged globular proteins, hen egg white lysozyme (LYS) and bovine calcium-depleted α-lactalbumin (apo α-LA), was investigated at pH 7.5. The aggregation rate of equimolar mixtures of the two proteins was determined using static and dynamic light scattering as a function of the ionic strength (15-70 mM) and protein concentration (0.28-2.8 g/L) at 25 and 45 °C. The morphology of formed supramolecular structures was observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. When the two proteins are mixed, small aggregates were formed rapidly that subsequently grew by collision and fusion. The aggregation process led on larger length scales to irregularly shaped flocs at 25 °C, but to monodisperse homogeneous spheres at 45 °C. Both the initial rate of aggregation and the fraction of proteins that associated decreased strongly with decreasing protein concentration or increasing ionic strength but was independent of the temperature.

  4. Design and characterization of self-assembled fish sarcoplasmic protein-alginate nanocomplexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boutrup Stephansen, Karen; Mattebjerg, Maria Ahlm; Wattjes, Jasper

    2015-01-01

    Macrostructures based on natural polymers are subject to large attention, as the application range is wide within the food and pharmaceutical industries. In this study we present nanocomplexes (NCXs) made from electrostatic self-assembly between negatively charged alginate and positively charged...... fish sarcoplasmic proteins (FSP), prepared by bulk mixing. A concentration screening revealed that there was a range of alginate and FSP concentrations where stable NCXs with similar properties were formed, rather than two exact concentrations. The size of the NCXs was 293 +/- 3 nm, and the zeta...

  5. Integrated Self-Assembly of the Mms6 Magnetosome Protein to Form an Iron-Responsive Structure

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    Marit Nilsen-Hamilton

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A common feature of biomineralization proteins is their self-assembly to produce a surface consistent in size with the inorganic crystals that they produce. Mms6, a small protein of 60 amino acids from Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1 that promotes the in vitro growth of superparamagnetic magnetite nanocrystals, assembles in aqueous solution to form spherical micelles that could be visualized by TEM and AFM. The results reported here are consistent with the view that the N and C-terminal domains interact with each other within one polypeptide chain and across protein units in the assembly. From studies to determine the amino acid residues important for self-assembly, we identified the unique GL repeat in the N-terminal domain with additional contributions from amino acids in other positions, throughout the molecule. Analysis by CD spectroscopy identified a structural change in the iron-binding C-terminal domain in the presence of Fe3+. A change in the intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan in the N-terminal domain showed that this structural change is transmitted through the protein. Thus, self-assembly of Mms6 involves an interlaced structure of intra- and inter-molecular interactions that results in a coordinated structural change in the protein assembly with iron binding.

  6. Human surfactant protein A2 gene mutations impair dimmer/trimer assembly leading to deficiency in protein sialylation and secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Song

    Full Text Available Surfactant protein A2 (SP-A2 plays an essential role in surfactant metabolism and lung host defense. SP-A2 mutations in the carbohydrate recognition domain have been related to familial pulmonary fibrosis and can lead to a recombinant protein secretion deficiency in vitro. In this study, we explored the molecular mechanism of protein secretion deficiency and the subsequent biological effects in CHO-K1 cells expressing both wild-type and several different mutant forms of SP-A2. We demonstrate that the SP-A2 G231V and F198S mutants impair the formation of dimmer/trimer SP-A2 which contributes to the protein secretion defect. A deficiency in sialylation, but not N-linked glycosylation, is critical to the observed dimmer/trimer impairment-induced secretion defect. Furthermore, both mutant forms accumulate in the ER and form NP-40-insoluble aggregates. In addition, the soluble mutant SP-A2 could be partially degraded through the proteasome pathway but not the lysosome or autophagy pathway. Intriguingly, 4-phenylbutyrate acid (4-PBA, a chemical chaperone, alleviates aggregate formation and partially rescued the protein secretion of SP-A2 mutants. In conclusion, SP-A2 G231V and F198S mutants impair the dimmer/trimer assembly, which contributes to the protein sialylation and secretion deficiency. The intracellular protein mutants could be partially degraded through the proteasome pathway and also formed aggregates. The treatment of the cells with 4-PBA resulted in reduced aggregation and rescued the secretion of mutant SP-A2.

  7. Complex assembly behavior during the encapsulation of green fluorescent protein analogs in virus derived protein capsules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minten, Inge J.; Nolte, Roeland J.M.; Cornelissen, Jeroen Johannes Lambertus Maria

    2010-01-01

    Enzymes encapsulated in nanocontainers are a better model of the conditions inside a living cell than free enzymes in solution. In a first step toward the encapsulation of multiple enzymes inside the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) capsid, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was attached

  8. Fragile X mental retardation protein stimulates ribonucleoprotein assembly of influenza A virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhuo; Cao, Mengmeng; Guo, Yang; Zhao, Lili; Wang, Jingfeng; Jia, Xue; Li, Jianguo; Wang, Conghui; Gabriel, Gülsah; Xue, Qinghua; Yi, Yonghong; Cui, Sheng; Jin, Qi; Wang, Jianwei; Deng, Tao

    2014-02-01

    The ribonucleoprotein (RNP) of the influenza A virus is responsible for the transcription and replication of viral RNA in the nucleus. These processes require interplay between host factors and RNP components. Here, we report that the Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) targets influenza virus RNA synthesis machinery and facilitates virus replication both in cell culture and in mice. We demonstrate that FMRP transiently associates with viral RNP and stimulates viral RNP assembly through RNA-mediated interaction with the nucleoprotein. Furthermore, the KH2 domain of FMRP mediates its association with the nucleoprotein. A point mutation (I304N) in the KH2 domain, identified from a Fragile X syndrome patient, disrupts the FMRP-nucleoprotein association and abolishes the ability of FMRP to participate in viral RNP assembly. We conclude that FMRP is a critical host factor used by influenza viruses to facilitate viral RNP assembly. Our observation reveals a mechanism of influenza virus RNA synthesis and provides insights into FMRP functions.

  9. Combing and self-assembly phenomena in dry films of Taxol-stabilized microtubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Franck

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractMicrotubules are filamentous proteins that act as a substrate for the translocation of motor proteins. As such, they may be envisioned as a scaffold for the self-assembly of functional materials and devices. Physisorption, self-assembly and combing are here investigated as a potential prelude to microtubule-templated self-assembly. Dense films of self-assembled microtubules were successfully produced, as well as patterns of both dendritic and non-dendritic bundles of microtubules. They are presented in the present paper and the mechanism of their formation is discussed.

  10. Unraveling protein-protein interactions in clathrin assemblies via atomic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Albert J; Lafer, Eileen M; Peng, Jennifer Q; Smith, Paul D; Nossal, Ralph

    2013-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM), single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS), and single particle force spectroscopy (SPFS) are used to characterize intermolecular interactions and domain structures of clathrin triskelia and clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs). The latter are involved in receptor-mediated endocytosis (RME) and other trafficking pathways. Here, we subject individual triskelia, bovine-brain CCVs, and reconstituted clathrin-AP180 coats to AFM-SMFS and AFM-SPFS pulling experiments and apply novel analytics to extract force-extension relations from very large data sets. The spectroscopic fingerprints of these samples differ markedly, providing important new information about the mechanism of CCV uncoating. For individual triskelia, SMFS reveals a series of events associated with heavy chain alpha-helix hairpin unfolding, as well as cooperative unraveling of several hairpin domains. SPFS of clathrin assemblies exposes weaker clathrin-clathrin interactions that are indicative of inter-leg association essential for RME and intracellular trafficking. Clathrin-AP180 coats are energetically easier to unravel than the coats of CCVs, with a non-trivial dependence on force-loading rate. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Protein degradation corrects for imbalanced subunit stoichiometry in OST complex assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Susanne; Wahlander, Asa; Selevsek, Nathalie; Otto, Claudia; Ngwa, Elsy Mankah; Poljak, Kristina; Frey, Alexander D; Aebi, Markus; Gauss, Robert

    2015-07-15

    Protein degradation is essential for cellular homeostasis. We developed a sensitive approach to examining protein degradation rates in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by coupling a SILAC approach to selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry. Combined with genetic tools, this analysis made it possible to study the assembly of the oligosaccharyl transferase complex. The ER-associated degradation machinery compensated for disturbed homeostasis of complex components by degradation of subunits in excess. On a larger scale, protein degradation in the ER was found to be a minor factor in the regulation of protein homeostasis in exponentially growing cells, but ERAD became relevant when the gene dosage was affected, as demonstrated in heterozygous diploid cells. Hence the alleviation of fitness defects due to abnormal gene copy numbers might be an important function of protein degradation. © 2015 Mueller et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  12. Human cytomegalovirus exploits interferon-induced transmembrane proteins to facilitate morphogenesis of the virion assembly compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Maorong; Xuan, Baoqin; Shan, Jiaoyu; Pan, Deng; Sun, Yamei; Shan, Zhao; Zhang, Jinping; Yu, Dong; Li, Bin; Qian, Zhikang

    2015-03-01

    Recently, interferon-induced transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) have been identified to be key effector molecules in the host type I interferon defense system. The invasion of host cells by a large range of RNA viruses is inhibited by IFITMs during the entry step. However, the roles of IFITMs in DNA virus infections have not been studied in detail. In this study, we report that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a large human DNA virus, exploits IFITMs to facilitate the formation of the virion assembly compartment (vAC) during infection of human fibroblasts. We found that IFITMs were expressed constitutively in human embryonic lung fibroblasts (MRC5 cells). HCMV infection inhibited IFITM protein accumulation in the later stages of infection. Overexpression of an IFITM protein in MRC5 cells slightly enhanced HCMV production and knockdown of IFITMs by RNA interference reduced the virus titer by about 100-fold on day 8 postinfection, according to the findings of a virus yield assay at a low multiplicity of infection. Virus gene expression and DNA synthesis were not affected, but the typical round structure of the vAC was not formed after the suppression of IFITMs, thereby resulting in defective virion assembly and the production of less infectious virion particles. Interestingly, the replication of herpes simplex virus, a human herpesvirus that is closely related to HCMV, was not affected by the suppression of IFITMs in MRC5 cells. These results indicate that IFITMs are involved in a specific pathway required for HCMV replication. HCMV is known to repurpose the interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) viperin and tetherin to facilitate its replication. Our results expand the range of ISGs that can be exploited by HCMV for its replication. This is also the first report of a proviral function of IFITMs in DNA virus replication. In addition, whereas previous studies showed that IFITMs modulate virus entry, which is a very early stage in the virus life cycle, we identified a new

  13. Protein imprinted polymer using acryloyl-β-cyclodextrin and acrylamide as monomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Qin, Lei; Chen, Run-Run; He, Xi-Wen; Li, Wen-You; Zhang, Yu-Kui

    2010-02-01

    A novel protein imprinted polymer was prepared using acryloyl-β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and acrylamide as monomers on the surface of silica gel. The bovine hemoglobin was used as template and β-CD was allowed to self-assemble with the template protein through hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interaction. Polymerization was carried out in the presence of acrylamide as an assistant monomer, which resulted in a novel protein imprinted polymer. After removing the template, imprinted cavities with the shape and spatial distribution of functional groups were formed. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) cytochrome c (Cyt) and lysozyme (Lyz) were employed as non-template proteins to test the imprinting effect and the specific binding of bovine hemoglobin to the polymer. The results of the adsorption experiments indicated that such protein imprinted polymer, which was synthesized with β-CD and acrylamide as monomers, could selectively recognize the template protein.

  14. Creating nanopatterns of His-tagged proteins on surfaces by nanoimprint lithography using specific NiNTA-histidine interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maury, Pascale; Escalante, Maryana; Péter, Mária; Reinhoudt, David N; Subramaniam, Vinod; Huskens, Jurriaan

    Directed assembly of the DsRed FT protein is demonstrated on self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on silicon substrates patterned by nanoimprint lithography. Initially, the DsRed protein is attached using electrostatic interactions on both topographical (polymer) templates with an amino

  15. A role for mitogen-activated protein kinase in the spindle assembly checkpoint in XTC cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X M; Zhai, Y; Ferrell, J E

    1997-04-21

    The spindle assembly checkpoint prevents cells whose spindles are defective or chromosomes are misaligned from initiating anaphase and leaving mitosis. Studies of Xenopus egg extracts have implicated the Erk2 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase) in this checkpoint. Other studies have suggested that MAP kinases might be important for normal mitotic progression. Here we have investigated whether MAP kinase function is required for mitotic progression or the spindle assembly checkpoint in vivo in Xenopus tadpole cells (XTC). We determined that Erk1 and/or Erk2 are present in the mitotic spindle during prometaphase and metaphase, consistent with the idea that MAP kinase might regulate or monitor the status of the spindle. Next, we microinjected purified recombinant XCL100, a Xenopus MAP kinase phosphatase, into XTC cells in various stages of mitosis to interfere with MAP kinase activation. We found that mitotic progression was unaffected by the phosphatase. However, XCL100 rendered the cells unable to remain arrested in mitosis after treatment with nocodazole. Cells injected with phosphatase at prometaphase or metaphase exited mitosis in the presence of nocodazole-the chromosomes decondensed and the nuclear envelope re-formed-whereas cells injected with buffer or a catalytically inactive XCL100 mutant protein remained arrested in mitosis. Coinjection of constitutively active MAP kinase kinase-1, which opposes XCL100's effects on MAP kinase, antagonized the effects of XCL100. Since the only known targets of MAP kinase kinase-1 are Erk1 and Erk2, these findings argue that MAP kinase function is required for the spindle assembly checkpoint in XTC cells.

  16. Encapsulation of Aconitine in Self-Assembled Licorice Protein Nanoparticles Reduces the Toxicity In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Li-jing; Gao, Guan-zhen; Shen, Yong; Zhou, Jian-wu; Rao, Ping-fan

    2015-11-01

    Many herbal medicines and compositions are clinically effective but challenged by its safety risks, i.e., aconitine (AC) from aconite species. The combined use of Radix glycyrrhizae (licorice) with Radix aconite L. effectively eliminates toxicity of the later while increasing efficacy. In this study, a boiling-stable 31-kDa protein (namely GP) was purified from licorice and self-assembled into nanoparticles (206.2 ± 2.0 nm) at pH 5.0, 25 °C. The aconitine-encapsulated GP nanoparticles (238.2 ± 1.2 nm) were prepared following the same procedure and tested for its toxicity by intraperitoneal injection on ICR mouse ( n = 8). Injection of GP-AC nanoparticles and the mixed licorice-aconite decoction, respectively, caused mild recoverable toxic effects and no death, while the aconitine, particle-free GP-AC mixture and aconite decoction induced sever toxic effects and 100 % death. Encapsulation of poisonous alkaloids into self-assembled herbal protein nanoparticles contributes to toxicity attenuation of combined use of herbs, implying a prototype nanostructure and a universal principle for the safer clinical applications of herbal medicines.

  17. Involvement of the conserved adaptor protein Alix in actin cytoskeleton assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shujuan; Wang, Ruoning; Zhou, Xi; He, Guangan; Koomen, John; Kobayashi, Ryuji; Sun, Le; Corvera, Joe; Gallick, Gary E; Kuang, Jian

    2006-11-10

    The conserved adaptor protein Alix, also called AIP1 or Hp95, promotes flattening and alignment of cultured mammalian fibroblasts; however, the mechanism by which Alix regulates fibroblast morphology is not understood. Here we demonstrate that Alix in WI38 cells, which require Alix expression for maintaining typical fibroblast morphology, associates with filamentous actin (F-actin) and F-actin-based structures lamellipodia and stress fibers. Reducing Alix expression by small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreases F-actin content and inhibits stress fiber assembly. In cell-free systems, Alix directly interacts with F-actin at both the N-terminal Bro1 domain and the C-terminal proline-rich domain. In Alix immunoprecipitates from WI38 cell lysates, actin is the most abundant partner protein of Alix. In addition, the N-terminal half of the middle region of Alix binds cortactin, an activator of the ARP2/3 complex-mediated initiation of actin polymerization. Alix is required for lamellipodial localization of cortactin. The C-terminal half of the middle region of Alix interacts with alpha-actinin, a key factor that bundles F-actin in stress fibers. Alix knockdown decreases the amount of alpha-actinin that associates with F-actin. These findings establish crucial involvement of Alix in actin cytoskeleton assembly.

  18. How to build functional thylakoid membranes: from plastid transcription to protein complex assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyska, Dagmar; Meierhoff, Karin; Westhoff, Peter

    2013-02-01

    Chloroplasts are the endosymbiotic descendants of cyanobacterium-like prokaryotes. Present genomes of plant and green algae chloroplasts (plastomes) contain ~100 genes mainly encoding for their transcription-/translation-machinery, subunits of the thylakoid membrane complexes (photosystems II and I, cytochrome b (6) f, ATP synthase), and the large subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. Nevertheless, proteomic studies have identified several thousand proteins in chloroplasts indicating that the majority of the plastid proteome is not encoded by the plastome. Indeed, plastid and host cell genomes have been massively rearranged in the course of their co-evolution, mainly through gene loss, horizontal gene transfer from the cyanobacterium/chloroplast to the nucleus of the host cell, and the emergence of new nuclear genes. Besides structural components of thylakoid membrane complexes and other (enzymatic) complexes, the nucleus provides essential factors that are involved in a variety of processes inside the chloroplast, like gene expression (transcription, RNA-maturation and translation), complex assembly, and protein import. Here, we provide an overview on regulatory factors that have been described and characterized in the past years, putting emphasis on mechanisms regulating the expression and assembly of the photosynthetic thylakoid membrane complexes.

  19. Structure and self-assembly of the calcium binding matrix protein of human metapneumovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyrat, Cedric; Renner, Max; Harlos, Karl; Huiskonen, Juha T; Grimes, Jonathan M

    2014-01-07

    The matrix protein (M) of paramyxoviruses plays a key role in determining virion morphology by directing viral assembly and budding. Here, we report the crystal structure of the human metapneumovirus M at 2.8 Å resolution in its native dimeric state. The structure reveals the presence of a high-affinity Ca²⁺ binding site. Molecular dynamics simulations (MDS) predict a secondary lower-affinity site that correlates well with data from fluorescence-based thermal shift assays. By combining small-angle X-ray scattering with MDS and ensemble analysis, we captured the structure and dynamics of M in solution. Our analysis reveals a large positively charged patch on the protein surface that is involved in membrane interaction. Structural analysis of DOPC-induced polymerization of M into helical filaments using electron microscopy leads to a model of M self-assembly. The conservation of the Ca²⁺ binding sites suggests a role for calcium in the replication and morphogenesis of pneumoviruses. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Correlation profiling of brain sub-cellular proteomes reveals co-assembly of synaptic proteins and subcellular distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pandya, N.J. (Nikhil J.); Koopmans, F. (Frank); J.A. Slotman (Johan A.); Paliukhovich, I. (Iryna); A.B. Houtsmuller (Adriaan); A.B. Smit (August); Li, K.W. (Ka Wan)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractProtein correlation profiling might assist in defining co-assembled proteins and subcellular distribution. Here, we quantified the proteomes of five biochemically isolated mouse brain cellular sub-fractions, with emphasis on synaptic compartments, from three brain regions, hippocampus,

  1. INTERFACIAL SELF-ASSEMBLY OF A HYDROPHOBIN INTO AN AMPHIPATHIC PROTEIN MEMBRANE MEDIATES FUNGAL ATTACHMENT TO HYDROPHOBIC SURFACES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOSTEN, HAB; SCHUREN, FHJ; WESSELS, JGH

    1994-01-01

    The SC3p hydrophobin of Schizophyllum commune is a small hydrophobic protein (100-101 amino acids with eight cysteine residues) that self-assembles at a water/air interface and coats aerial hyphae with an SDS-insoluble protein membrane, at the outer side highly hydrophobic and with a typical rodlet

  2. Self-assembling polymeric nanoparticles for enhanced intra-articular anti-inflammatory protein delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmire, Rachel Elisabeth

    Osteoarthritis (OA) affects 26 million Americans, or approximately 14% of the adult population. The incidence of OA is predicted to dramatically increase in the next 20 years as the US grows older and the rate of obesity continues to increase. There are currently no clinical interventions that cure OA. Current biomaterial delivery systems exhibit several limitations. First, most drug-delivery particles are hydrophobic, which is not optimal for hydrophilic protein encapsulation. Second, hydrophobic particles, such as PLGA, could cause wear damage to the already-fragile OA cartilage structure. Additionally, these particles usually suffer from non-specific protein adsorption, which causes increased phagocytosis and can lead to increased inflammation. New therapies that increase the effectiveness of OA treatments or reverse OA disease progression will greatly decrease the economic costs and individual pain associated with this disease. The goal of this thesis was to develop a new drug-delivering material to deliver anti-inflammatory protein for treating OA. Our central hypothesis for this work is that a controlled release/presentation system will more effectively deliver anti-inflammatory protein therapies to the OA joint. The primary goal of this work was to synthesize a block copolymer that could self-assemble into injectable, sub-micron-scale particles and would allow an anti-inflammatory protein, IL-1ra, to be tethered to its surface for efficient protein delivery. The block copolymer incorporated an oligo-ethylene monomer for tissue compatibility and non-fouling behavior, a 4-nitrophenol group for efficient protein tethering, and cyclohexyl methacrylate, a hydrophobic monomer, for particle stability. We engineered the copolymer and tested it in both in vitro culture experiments and an in vivo model to evaluate protein retention in the knee joint. The rationale for this project was that the rational design and synthesis of a new drug- and protein

  3. YsxC, an essential protein in Staphylococcus aureus crucial for ribosome assembly/stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Lara Jorge

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial growth and division requires a core set of essential proteins, several of which are still of unknown function. They are also attractive targets for the development of new antibiotics. YsxC is a member of a family of GTPases highly conserved across eubacteria with a possible ribosome associated function. Results Here, we demonstrate by the creation of a conditional lethal mutant that ysxC is apparently essential for growth in S. aureus. To begin to elucidate YsxC function, a translational fusion of YsxC to the CBP-ProteinA tag in the staphylococcal chromosome was made, enabling Tandem Affinity Purification (TAP of YsxC-interacting partners. These included the ribosomal proteins S2, S10 and L17, as well as the β' subunit of the RNA polymerase. YsxC was then shown to copurify with ribosomes as an accessory protein specifically localizing to the 50 S subunit. YsxC depletion led to a decrease in the presence of mature ribosomes, indicating a role in ribosome assembly and/or stability in S. aureus. Conclusions In this study we demonstrate that YsxC of S. aureus localizes to the ribosomes, is crucial for ribosomal stability and is apparently essential for the life of S. aureus.

  4. The Solution Assembly of Biological Molecules Using Ion Mobility Methods: From Amino Acids to Amyloid β-Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleiholder, Christian; Bowers, Michael T

    2017-06-12

    Ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) methods are increasingly used to study noncovalent assemblies of peptides and proteins. This review focuses on the noncovalent self-assembly of amino acids and peptides, systems at the heart of the amyloid process that play a central role in a number of devastating diseases. Three different systems are discussed in detail: the 42-residue peptide amyloid-β42 implicated in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease, several amyloid-forming peptides with 6-11 residues, and the assembly of individual amino acids. We also discuss from a more fundamental perspective the processes that determine how quickly proteins and their assemblies denature when the analyte ion has been stripped of its solvent in an IMS-MS measurement and how to soften the measurement so that biologically meaningful data can be recorded.

  5. Protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions in domain-assembly : Lessons from giant unilamellar vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kahya, Nicoletta

    Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs) provide a key model membrane system to study lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interactions, which are relevant to vital cellular processes, by (single-molecule) optical microscopy. Here, we review the work on reconstitution techniques for membrane proteins and other

  6. Foot-and-mouth disease virus capsid proteins; analysis of protein processing, assembly and utility as vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belsham, Graham

    precursor enhances the yield of processed capsid proteins and their assembly into empty capsid particles within mammalian cells. Such particles can potentially form the basis of a vaccine but they may only have the same properties as the current inactivated vaccines. We have expressed the FMDV P1-2A alone...... or with FMDV 3Cpro using a “single cycle” alphavirus vector based on Semliki Forest virus (SFV). Cattle vaccinated with these rSFV-FMDV vectors alone, produced anti-FMDV antibodies but the immune response was insufficient to give protection against FMDV challenge. However, vaccination with these vectors primed...... a much stronger immune response against FMDV post-challenge. In subsequent experiments, cattle were sequentially vaccinated with a rSFV-FMDV followed by recombinant FMDV empty capsid particles, or vice versa, prior to challenge. Animals given a primary vaccination with the rSFV-FMDV vector...

  7. The interplay of primer-template DNA phosphorylation status and single-stranded DNA binding proteins in directing clamp loaders to the appropriate polarity of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayner, Jaclyn N; Douma, Lauren G; Bloom, Linda B

    2014-01-01

    Sliding clamps are loaded onto DNA by clamp loaders to serve the critical role of coordinating various enzymes on DNA. Clamp loaders must quickly and efficiently load clamps at primer/template (p/t) junctions containing a duplex region with a free 3'OH (3'DNA), but it is unclear how clamp loaders target these sites. To measure the Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae clamp loader specificity toward 3'DNA, fluorescent β and PCNA clamps were used to measure clamp closing triggered by DNA substrates of differing polarity, testing the role of both the 5'phosphate (5'P) and the presence of single-stranded binding proteins (SSBs). SSBs inhibit clamp loading by both clamp loaders on the incorrect polarity of DNA (5'DNA). The 5'P groups contribute selectivity to differing degrees for the two clamp loaders, suggesting variations in the mechanism by which clamp loaders target 3'DNA. Interestingly, the χ subunit of the E. coli clamp loader is not required for SSB to inhibit clamp loading on phosphorylated 5'DNA, showing that χ·SSB interactions are dispensable. These studies highlight a common role for SSBs in directing clamp loaders to 3'DNA, as well as uncover nuances in the mechanisms by which SSBs perform this vital role. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Structural assembly of two-domain proteins by rigid-body docking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blundell Tom L

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modelling proteins with multiple domains is one of the central challenges in Structural Biology. Although homology modelling has successfully been applied for prediction of protein structures, very often domain-domain interactions cannot be inferred from the structures of homologues and their prediction requires ab initio methods. Here we present a new structural prediction approach for modelling two-domain proteins based on rigid-body domain-domain docking. Results Here we focus on interacting domain pairs that are part of the same peptide chain and thus have an inter-domain peptide region (so called linker. We have developed a method called pyDockTET (tethered-docking, which uses rigid-body docking to generate domain-domain poses that are further scored by binding energy and a pseudo-energy term based on restraints derived from linker end-to-end distances. The method has been benchmarked on a set of 77 non-redundant pairs of domains with available X-ray structure. We have evaluated the docking method ZDOCK, which is able to generate acceptable domain-domain orientations in 51 out of the 77 cases. Among them, our method pyDockTET finds the correct assembly within the top 10 solutions in over 60% of the cases. As a further test, on a subset of 20 pairs where domains were built by homology modelling, ZDOCK generates acceptable orientations in 13 out of the 20 cases, among which the correct assembly is ranked lower than 10 in around 70% of the cases by our pyDockTET method. Conclusion Our results show that rigid-body docking approach plus energy scoring and linker-based restraints are useful for modelling domain-domain interactions. These positive results will encourage development of new methods for structural prediction of macromolecules with multiple (more than two domains.

  9. IMMUNOBLOT ANALYSIS OF PROTEINS ASSOCIATED WITH SELF-ASSEMBLED MONOLAYER SURFACES OF DEFINED CHEMISTRIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Rena M.; Shankar, Sucharita P.; Brash, John L.; Babensee, Julia E.

    2011-01-01

    Intact and fragmented proteins, eluted from self assembled monolayer (SAM) surfaces of alkanethiols of different chemistries (-CH3, -OH, -COOH, -NH2 ), following exposure to human plasma (HP) or human serum (HS), were examined using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and immunoblotting techniques. The SAM surfaces were incubated for 1 hour with 10% (v/v) sterile-filtered heat-inactivated (h.i.) HS or 1% (v/v) sterile-filtered h.i. HP preparations [both in phosphate buffered saline (PBS)]. Adsorbed proteins were eluted using 10% SDS/2.3% dithioerythritol for characterization of protein profiles. The type of incubating medium may be an important determinant of adsorbed protein profiles, since some variations were observed in eluates from filtered versus control unfiltered h.i. 10% HS or 1% HP. Albumin and apolipoprotein A1 were consistently detected in both filtered h.i 10% HS and 1% HP eluates from all SAM surfaces and from control tissue culture-treated polystyrene (TCPS). Interestingly, Factor H and Factor I, antithrombin, prothrombin, high molecular weight kininogen (HMWK) and IgG were present in eluates from OH, COOH and NH2 SAM surfaces and in eluates from TCPS, but not in eluates from CH3 SAM surfaces, following exposure to filtered h.i. 10% HS. These results suggest that CH3 SAM surfaces were the least pro-inflammatory of all SAM surfaces. Overall, similar trends were observed in the profiles of proteins eluted from surfaces exposed to filtered 10% HS or 1% HP. However the unique profiles of adsorbed proteins on different SAM surface chemistries may be related to their differential interactions with cells, including immune/inflammatory cells. PMID:21509932

  10. Co-evolution of transcriptional silencing proteins and the DNA elements specifying their assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver A Zill

    Full Text Available Co-evolution of transcriptional regulatory proteins and their sites of action has been often hypothesized but rarely demonstrated. Here we provide experimental evidence of such co-evolution in yeast silent chromatin, a finding that emerged from studies of hybrids formed between two closely related Saccharomyces species. A unidirectional silencing incompatibility between S. cerevisiae and S. bayanus led to a key discovery: asymmetrical complementation of divergent orthologs of the silent chromatin component Sir4. In S. cerevisiae/S. bayanus interspecies hybrids, ChIP-Seq analysis revealed a restriction against S. cerevisiae Sir4 associating with most S. bayanus silenced regions; in contrast, S. bayanus Sir4 associated with S. cerevisiae silenced loci to an even greater degree than did S. cerevisiae's own Sir4. Functional changes in silencer sequences paralleled changes in Sir4 sequence and a reduction in Sir1 family members in S. cerevisiae. Critically, species-specific silencing of the S. bayanus HMR locus could be reconstituted in S. cerevisiae by co-transfer of the S. bayanus Sir4 and Kos3 (the ancestral relative of Sir1 proteins. As Sir1/Kos3 and Sir4 bind conserved silencer-binding proteins, but not specific DNA sequences, these rapidly evolving proteins served to interpret differences in the two species' silencers presumably involving emergent features created by the regulatory proteins that bind sequences within silencers. The results presented here, and in particular the high resolution ChIP-Seq localization of the Sir4 protein, provided unanticipated insights into the mechanism of silent chromatin assembly in yeast.

  11. Collagen mimetic peptide discs promote assembly of a broad range of natural protein fibers through hydrophobic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuinness, Kenneth; Nanda, Vikas

    2017-07-19

    Collagen mimetic peptides that alone formed two-dimensional nanoscale discs driven by hydrophobic interactions were shown in electron microscopy studies to also co-assemble with natural fibrous proteins to produce discs-on-a-string (DoS) nanostructures. In most cases, peptide discs also facilitated bundling of the protein fibers. This provides insight into how synthetic and natural proteins may be combined to develop multicomponent, multi-dimensional architectures at the nanoscale.

  12. A hydrophobic domain within the small capsid protein of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus is required for assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuano, Christopher M; Grzesik, Peter; Kreitler, Dale; Pryce, Erin N; Desai, Keshal V; Coombs, Gavin; McCaffery, J Michael; Desai, Prashant J

    2014-08-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) capsids can be produced in insect cells using recombinant baculoviruses for protein expression. All six capsid proteins are required for this process to occur and, unlike for alphaherpesviruses, the small capsid protein (SCP) ORF65 is essential for this process. This protein decorates the capsid shell by virtue of its interaction with the capsomeres. In this study, we have explored the SCP interaction with the major capsid protein (MCP) using GFP fusions. The assembly site within the nucleus of infected cells was visualized by light microscopy using fluorescence produced by the SCP-GFP polypeptide, and the relocalization of the SCP to these sites was evident only when the MCP and the scaffold protein were also present - indicative of an interaction between these proteins that ensures delivery of the SCP to assembly sites. Biochemical assays demonstrated a physical interaction between the SCP and MCP, and also between this complex and the scaffold protein. Self-assembly of capsids with the SCP-GFP polypeptide was evident. Potentially, this result can be used to engineer fluorescent KSHV particles. A similar SCP-His6 polypeptide was used to purify capsids from infected cell lysates using immobilized affinity chromatography and to directly label this protein in capsids using chemically derivatized gold particles. Additional studies with SCP-GFP polypeptide truncation mutants identified a domain residing between aa 50 and 60 of ORF65 that was required for the relocalization of SCP-GFP to nuclear assembly sites. Substitution of residues in this region and specifically at residue 54 with a polar amino acid (lysine) disrupted or abolished this localization as well as capsid assembly, whereas substitution with non-polar residues did not affect the interaction. Thus, this study identified a small conserved hydrophobic domain that is important for the SCP-MCP interaction. © 2014 The Authors.

  13. A hydrophobic domain within the small capsid protein of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus is required for assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuano, Christopher M.; Grzesik, Peter; Kreitler, Dale; Pryce, Erin N.; Desai, Keshal V.; Coombs, Gavin; McCaffery, J. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) capsids can be produced in insect cells using recombinant baculoviruses for protein expression. All six capsid proteins are required for this process to occur and, unlike for alphaherpesviruses, the small capsid protein (SCP) ORF65 is essential for this process. This protein decorates the capsid shell by virtue of its interaction with the capsomeres. In this study, we have explored the SCP interaction with the major capsid protein (MCP) using GFP fusions. The assembly site within the nucleus of infected cells was visualized by light microscopy using fluorescence produced by the SCP–GFP polypeptide, and the relocalization of the SCP to these sites was evident only when the MCP and the scaffold protein were also present – indicative of an interaction between these proteins that ensures delivery of the SCP to assembly sites. Biochemical assays demonstrated a physical interaction between the SCP and MCP, and also between this complex and the scaffold protein. Self-assembly of capsids with the SCP–GFP polypeptide was evident. Potentially, this result can be used to engineer fluorescent KSHV particles. A similar SCP–His6 polypeptide was used to purify capsids from infected cell lysates using immobilized affinity chromatography and to directly label this protein in capsids using chemically derivatized gold particles. Additional studies with SCP–GFP polypeptide truncation mutants identified a domain residing between aa 50 and 60 of ORF65 that was required for the relocalization of SCP–GFP to nuclear assembly sites. Substitution of residues in this region and specifically at residue 54 with a polar amino acid (lysine) disrupted or abolished this localization as well as capsid assembly, whereas substitution with non-polar residues did not affect the interaction. Thus, this study identified a small conserved hydrophobic domain that is important for the SCP–MCP interaction. PMID:24824860

  14. Design of self-assembling transmembrane helical bundles to elucidate principles required for membrane protein folding and ion transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joh, Nathan H; Grigoryan, Gevorg; Wu, Yibing; DeGrado, William F

    2017-08-05

    Ion transporters and channels are able to identify and act on specific substrates among myriads of ions and molecules critical to cellular processes, such as homeostasis, cell signalling, nutrient influx and drug efflux. Recently, we designed Rocker, a minimalist model for Zn2+/H+ co-transport. The success of this effort suggests that de novo membrane protein design has now come of age so as to serve a key approach towards probing the determinants of membrane protein folding, assembly and function. Here, we review general principles that can be used to design membrane proteins, with particular reference to helical assemblies with transport function. We also provide new functional and NMR data that probe the dynamic mechanism of conduction through Rocker.This article is part of the themed issue 'Membrane pores: from structure and assembly, to medicine and technology'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  15. Bioinspired synthesis and self-assembly of hybrid organic–inorganic nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Honghu [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-12-17

    Nature is replete with complex organic–inorganic hierarchical materials of diverse yet specific functions. These materials are intricately designed under physiological conditions through biomineralization and biological self-assembly processes. Tremendous efforts have been devoted to investigating mechanisms of such biomineralization and biological self-assembly processes as well as gaining inspiration to develop biomimetic methods for synthesis and self-assembly of functional nanomaterials. In this work, we focus on the bioinspired synthesis and self-assembly of functional inorganic nanomaterials templated by specialized macromolecules including proteins, DNA and polymers. The in vitro biomineralization process of the magnetite biomineralizing protein Mms6 has been investigated using small-angle X-ray scattering. Templated by Mms6, complex magnetic nanomaterials can be synthesized on surfaces and in the bulk. DNA and synthetic polymers have been exploited to construct macroscopic two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) superlattices of gold nanocrystals. Employing X-ray scattering and spectroscopy techniques, the self-assembled structures and the self-assembly mechanisms have been studied, and theoretical models have been developed. Our results show that specialized macromolecules including proteins, DNA and polymers act as effective templates for synthesis and self-assembly of nanomaterials. These bottom-up approaches provide promising routes to fabricate hybrid organic–inorganic nanomaterials with rationally designed hierarchical structures, targeting specific functions.

  16. Protein Phosphatase 1 inactivates Mps1 to ensure efficient Spindle Assembly Checkpoint silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Margarida; Osswald, Mariana; Leça, Nelson; Barbosa, João; Pereira, António J; Maiato, Helder; Sunkel, Claudio E; Conde, Carlos

    2017-05-02

    Faithfull genome partitioning during cell division relies on the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint (SAC), a conserved signaling pathway that delays anaphase onset until all chromosomes are attached to spindle microtubules. Mps1 kinase is an upstream SAC regulator that promotes the assembly of an anaphase inhibitor through a sequential multi-target phosphorylation cascade. Thus, the SAC is highly responsive to Mps1, whose activity peaks in early mitosis as a result of its T-loop autophosphorylation. However, the mechanism controlling Mps1 inactivation once kinetochores attach to microtubules and the SAC is satisfied remains unknown. Here we show in vitro and in Drosophila that Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1) inactivates Mps1 by dephosphorylating its T-loop. PP1-mediated dephosphorylation of Mps1 occurs at kinetochores and in the cytosol, and inactivation of both pools of Mps1 during metaphase is essential to ensure prompt and efficient SAC silencing. Overall, our findings uncover a mechanism of SAC inactivation required for timely mitotic exit.

  17. Multi-colored fibers by self-assembly of DNA, histone proteins, and cationic conjugated polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengyan; Liu, Zhang; Wang, Bing; Feng, Liheng; Liu, Libing; Lv, Fengting; Wang, Yilin; Wang, Shu

    2014-01-07

    The development of biomolecular fiber materials with imaging ability has become more and more useful for biological applications. In this work, cationic conjugated polymers (CCPs) were used to construct inherent fluorescent microfibers with natural biological macromolecules (DNA and histone proteins) through the interfacial polyelectrolyte complexation (IPC) procedure. Isothermal titration microcalorimetry results show that the driving forces for fiber formation are electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions, as well as the release of counterions and bound water molecules. Color-encoded IPC fibers were also obtained based on the co-assembly of DNA, histone proteins, and blue-, green-, or red- (RGB-) emissive CCPs by tuning the fluorescence resonance energy-transfer among the CCPs at a single excitation wavelength. The fibers could encapsulate GFP-coded Escherichia coli BL21, and the expression of GFP proteins was successfully regulated by the external environment of the fibers. These multi-colored fibers show a great potential in biomedical applications, such as biosensor, delivery, and release of biological molecules and tissue engineering. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Host ESCRT proteins are required for bromovirus RNA replication compartment assembly and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Diaz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Positive-strand RNA viruses genome replication invariably is associated with vesicles or other rearranged cellular membranes. Brome mosaic virus (BMV RNA replication occurs on perinuclear endoplasmic reticulum (ER membranes in ~70 nm vesicular invaginations (spherules. BMV RNA replication vesicles show multiple parallels with membrane-enveloped, budding retrovirus virions, whose envelopment and release depend on the host ESCRT (endosomal sorting complexes required for transport membrane-remodeling machinery. We now find that deleting components of the ESCRT pathway results in at least two distinct BMV phenotypes. One group of genes regulate RNA replication and the frequency of viral replication complex formation, but had no effect on spherule size, while a second group of genes regulate RNA replication in a way or ways independent of spherule formation. In particular, deleting SNF7 inhibits BMV RNA replication > 25-fold and abolishes detectable BMV spherule formation, even though the BMV RNA replication proteins accumulate and localize normally on perinuclear ER membranes. Moreover, BMV ESCRT recruitment and spherule assembly depend on different sets of protein-protein interactions from those used by multivesicular body vesicles, HIV-1 virion budding, or tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV spherule formation. These and other data demonstrate that BMV requires cellular ESCRT components for proper formation and function of its vesicular RNA replication compartments. The results highlight growing but diverse interactions of ESCRT factors with many viruses and viral processes, and potential value of the ESCRT pathway as a target for broad-spectrum antiviral resistance.

  19. Profiles of carbohydrate ligands associated with adsorbed proteins on self-assembled monolayers of defined chemistries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Sucharita P; Chen, Inn Inn; Keselowsky, Benjamin G; García, Andrés J; Babensee, Julia E

    2010-03-15

    Conserved protein-carbohydrate-lipid pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) interact with cells of the innate immune system to mediate antigen recognition and internalization and activation of immune cells. We examined if analogous "biomaterial-associated molecular patterns" composed of proteins, specifically their carbohydrate modifications, existed on biomaterials, which can play a role in mediating the innate immune response to biomaterials. To probe for these carbohydrates in the adsorbed protein layer, as directed by the underlying biomaterial chemistry, self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) presenting -CH(3), -OH, -COOH, or -NH(2) were preincubated with serum/plasma, and the presence of carbohydrate ligands of C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) was investigated using lectin probes in an enzyme-linked lectin assay (ELLA). Presentation of CLR ligands was detected on control tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS). Absorbances of mannose or N-acetylglucosamine increased with decreasing incubating serum concentration, whereas absorbances of sialylated epitopes or fucose remained unchanged. Absorbances of alpha-galactose or N-acetylgalactosamine decreased with decreasing incubating serum concentration; beta-galactose was undetectable. Among SAM endgroups, preincubation with 10% serum resulted in differential presentation of CLR ligands: higher alpha-galactose on COOH SAMs than NH(2) or CH(3) SAMs, highest complex mannose on NH(2) SAMs, and higher complex mannose on OH SAMs than CH(3) SAMs. Least sialylated groups were detected on CH(3) SAMs. In summary, biomaterial chemistry may regulate protein adsorption and hence unique presentation of associated carbohydrates. The ultimate goal is to identify the effects of protein glycosylations associated with biomaterials in stimulating innate immune responses. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Expression and cytosolic assembly of the S-layer fusion protein mSbsC-EGFP in eukaryotic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veenhuis Marten

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Native as well as recombinant bacterial cell surface layer (S-layer protein of Geobacillus (G. stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 assembles to supramolecular structures with an oblique symmetry. Upon expression in E. coli, S-layer self assembly products are formed in the cytosol. We tested the expression and assembly of a fusion protein, consisting of the mature part (aa 31–1099 of the S-layer protein and EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein, in eukaryotic host cells, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human HeLa cells. Results Upon expression in E. coli the recombinant mSbsC-EGFP fusion protein was recovered from the insoluble fraction. After denaturation by Guanidine (Gua-HCl treatment and subsequent dialysis the fusion protein assembled in solution and yielded green fluorescent cylindric structures with regular symmetry comparable to that of the authentic SbsC. For expression in the eukaryotic host Saccharomyces (S. cerevisiae mSbsC-EGFP was cloned in a multi-copy expression vector bearing the strong constitutive GPD1 (glyceraldehyde-3-phosophate-dehydrogenase promoter. The respective yeast transfomants were only slightly impaired in growth and exhibited a needle-like green fluorescent pattern. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM studies revealed the presence of closely packed cylindrical structures in the cytosol with regular symmetry comparable to those obtained after in vitro recrystallization. Similar structures are observed in HeLa cells expressing mSbsC-EGFP from the Cytomegalovirus (CMV IE promoter. Conclusion The mSbsC-EGFP fusion protein is stably expressed both in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and in HeLa cells. Recombinant mSbsC-EGFP combines properties of both fusion partners: it assembles both in vitro and in vivo to cylindrical structures that show an intensive green fluorescence. Fusion of proteins to S-layer proteins may be a useful tool for high level expression in yeast and HeLa cells of

  1. Synergic Investigation Of The Self-Assembly Structure And Mechanism Of Retroviral Capsid Proteins By Solid State NMR, Transmission Electron Microscopy And Multiscale simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-29

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2017-0074 Synergic investigation of the self-assembly structure and mechanism of retroviral capsid proteins by solid state NMR...assembly structure and mechanism of retroviral capsid proteins by solid state NMR, transmission electron microscopy and multiscale simulation 5a.  CONTRACT...capsid protein (CA). In vitro, tubular assembly can be obtained with the CA with similar underlying structural properties as the authentic RSV capsid

  2. Integration of Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Data Into Structural Modeling of Proteins And Their Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forster, F.; Webb, B.; Krukenberg, K.A.; Tsuruta, H.; Agard, D.A.; Sali, A.

    2009-05-18

    A major challenge in structural biology is to determine the configuration of domains and proteins in multidomain proteins and assemblies, respectively. All available data should be considered to maximize the accuracy and precision of these models. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) efficiently provides low-resolution experimental data about the shapes of proteins and their assemblies. Thus, we integrated SAXS profiles into our software for modeling proteins and their assemblies by satisfaction of spatial restraints. Specifically, we modeled the quaternary structures of multidomain proteins with structurally defined rigid domains as well as quaternary structures of binary complexes of structurally defined rigid proteins. In addition to SAXS profiles and the component structures, we used stereochemical restraints and an atomic distance-dependent statistical potential. The scoring function is optimized by a biased Monte Carlo protocol, including quasi-Newton and simulated annealing schemes. The final prediction corresponds to the best scoring solution in the largest cluster of many independently calculated solutions. To quantify how well the quaternary structures are determined based on their SAXS profiles, we used a benchmark of 12 simulated examples as well as an experimental SAXS profile of the homotetramer D-xylose isomerase. Optimization of the SAXS-dependent scoring function generally results in accurate models if sufficiently precise approximations for the constituent rigid bodies are available; otherwise, the best scoring models can have significant errors. Thus, SAXS profiles can play a useful role in the structural characterization of proteins and assemblies if they are combined with additional data and used judiciously. Our integration of a SAXS profile into modeling by satisfaction of spatial restraints will facilitate further integration of different kinds of data for structure determination of proteins and their assemblies.

  3. Immobilization of iron storage protein on a gold electrode based on self-assembled monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, Keehoon [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Dongguk University, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: keehoon@dongguk.edu; Park, Mi Jin; Yoon, Hyon Hee [Department of Chemical and Bio Engineering, Kyungwon University, Seongnam 461-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Hyeon [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Dongguk University, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: jihyeon@dongguk.edu

    2008-09-15

    Ferritin is a globular protein consisting of 24 subunits to form a hollow shell and is capable of storing iron in the cavity. Findings that the naturally existing iron core of ferritin can be readily extracted and replaced with a variety of electroactive materials make ferritin suitable for biosensor and biofuel cell applications. The immobilization of ferritin on the electrode surface is essential for various bioelectronic applications. In this work, based on self-assembled monolayers, ferritin was immobilized on a gold electrode through two different methods: chemisorption of thiolated ferritin onto bare gold electrodes and covalent binding of ferritin to succinimidyl alkanedisulfide-modified Au electrodes. Effects of experimental conditions on the ferritin immobilization were investigated. The ferritin immobilized on the gold electrode was characterized by atomic force microscopy and cyclic voltammetry.

  4. Immobilization of iron storage protein on a gold electrode based on self-assembled monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Keehoon; Park, Mi Jin; Yoon, Hyon Hee; Kim, Ji Hyeon

    2008-09-01

    Ferritin is a globular protein consisting of 24 subunits to form a hollow shell and is capable of storing iron in the cavity. Findings that the naturally existing iron core of ferritin can be readily extracted and replaced with a variety of electroactive materials make ferritin suitable for biosensor and biofuel cell applications. The immobilization of ferritin on the electrode surface is essential for various bioelectronic applications. In this work, based on self-assembled monolayers, ferritin was immobilized on a gold electrode through two different methods: chemisorption of thiolated ferritin onto bare gold electrodes and covalent binding of ferritin to succinimidyl alkanedisulfide-modified Au electrodes. Effects of experimental conditions on the ferritin immobilization were investigated. The ferritin immobilized on the gold electrode was characterized by atomic force microscopy and cyclic voltammetry.

  5. Assembly of Modified Ferritin Proteins on Carbon Nanotubes and its Electrocatalytic Activity for Oxygen Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Lillehei, Peter T.; Park, Cheol

    2012-01-01

    Highly effective dispersions of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be made using a commercially available buffer solution. Buffer solutions of 3-(N-morpholino)-propanesulfonic acid (MOPS), which consists of a cyclic ring with nitrogen and oxygen heteroatoms, a charged group, and an alkyl chain greatly enhance the dispersibility and stability of CNTs in aqueous solutions. Additionally, the ability of biomolecules, especially cationized Pt-cored ferritins, to adhere onto the well-dispersed CNTs in the aqueous buffer solution is also improved. This was accomplished without the use of surfactant molecules, which are detrimental to the electrical, mechanical, and other physical properties of the resulting products. The assembled Pt-cored ferritin proteins on the CNTs were used as an electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction

  6. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer in Quantum Dot-Protein Kinase Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Yildiz

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In search of viable strategies to identify selective inhibitors of protein kinases, we have designed a binding assay to probe the interactions of human phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1 with potential ligands. Our protocol is based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET between semiconductor quantum dots (QDs and organic dyes. Specifically, we have expressed and purified the catalytic kinase domain of PDK1 with an N-terminal histidine tag [His6-PDK1(ΔPH]. We have conjugated this construct to CdSe-ZnS core-shell QDs coated with dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA and tested the response of the resulting assembly to a molecular dyad incorporating an ATP ligand and a BODIPY chromophore. The supramolecular association of the BODIPY-ATP dyad with the His6-PDK1(ΔPH-QD assembly encourages the transfer of energy from the QDs to the BODIPY dyes upon excitation. The addition of ATP results in the displacement of BODIPY-ATP from the binding domain of the His6-PDK1(ΔPH conjugated to the nanoparticles. The competitive binding, however, does not prevent the energy transfer process. A control experiment with QDs, lacking the His6-PDK1(ΔPH, indicates that the BODIPY-ATP dyad adsorbs nonspecifically on the surface of the nanoparticles, promoting the transfer of energy from the CdSe core to the adsorbed BODIPY dyes. Thus, the implementation of FRET-based assays to probe the binding domain of PDK1 with luminescent QDs requires the identification of energy acceptors unable to interact nonspecifically with the surface of the nanoparticles.

  7. Toward a detailed understanding of search trajectories in fragment assembly approaches to protein structure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandathil, Shaun M; Handl, Julia; Lovell, Simon C

    2016-04-01

    Energy functions, fragment libraries, and search methods constitute three key components of fragment-assembly methods for protein structure prediction, which are all crucial for their ability to generate high-accuracy predictions. All of these components are tightly coupled; efficient searching becomes more important as the quality of fragment libraries decreases. Given these relationships, there is currently a poor understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the sampling approaches currently used in fragment-assembly techniques. Here, we determine how the performance of search techniques can be assessed in a meaningful manner, given the above problems. We describe a set of techniques that aim to reduce the impact of the energy function, and assess exploration in view of the search space defined by a given fragment library. We illustrate our approach using Rosetta and EdaFold, and show how certain features of these methods encourage or limit conformational exploration. We demonstrate that individual trajectories of Rosetta are susceptible to local minima in the energy landscape, and that this can be linked to non-uniform sampling across the protein chain. We show that EdaFold's novel approach can help balance broad exploration with locating good low-energy conformations. This occurs through two mechanisms which cannot be readily differentiated using standard performance measures: exclusion of false minima, followed by an increasingly focused search in low-energy regions of conformational space. Measures such as ours can be helpful in characterizing new fragment-based methods in terms of the quality of conformational exploration realized. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Mutations in the Transmembrane Domain and Cytoplasmic Tail of Hendra Virus Fusion Protein Disrupt Virus-Like-Particle Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes-Muñoz, Nicolás; Sun, Weina; Ray, Greeshma; Schmitt, Phuong Tieu; Webb, Stacy; Gibson, Kathleen; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis; Schmitt, Anthony P

    2017-07-15

    Hendra virus (HeV) is a zoonotic paramyxovirus that causes deadly illness in horses and humans. An intriguing feature of HeV is the utilization of endosomal protease for activation of the viral fusion protein (F). Here we investigated how endosomal F trafficking affects HeV assembly. We found that the HeV matrix (M) and F proteins each induced particle release when they were expressed alone but that their coexpression led to coordinated assembly of virus-like particles (VLPs) that were morphologically and physically distinct from M-only or F-only VLPs. Mutations to the F protein transmembrane domain or cytoplasmic tail that disrupted endocytic trafficking led to failure of F to function with M for VLP assembly. Wild-type F functioned normally for VLP assembly even when its cleavage was prevented with a cathepsin inhibitor, indicating that it is endocytic F trafficking that is important for VLP assembly, not proteolytic F cleavage. Under specific conditions of reduced M expression, we found that M could no longer induce significant VLP release but retained the ability to be incorporated as a passenger into F-driven VLPs, provided that the F protein was competent for endocytic trafficking. The F and M proteins were both found to traffic through Rab11-positive recycling endosomes (REs), suggesting a model in which F and M trafficking pathways converge at REs, enabling these proteins to preassemble before arriving at plasma membrane budding sites. IMPORTANCE Hendra virus and Nipah virus are zoonotic paramyxoviruses that cause lethal infections in humans. Unlike that for most paramyxoviruses, activation of the henipavirus fusion protein occurs in recycling endosomal compartments. In this study, we demonstrate that the unique endocytic trafficking pathway of Hendra virus F protein is required for proper viral assembly and particle release. These results advance our basic understanding of the henipavirus assembly process and provide a novel model for the interplay between

  9. Templated Growth of Magnetic Recording Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar, Vignesh

    Current and potential next-generation magnetic recording technologies are based on the writing and reading of bits on a magnetic thin film with a granular microstructure, with grains of the magnetic material surrounded by an amorphous segregant. In order to realize the highest achievable data storage capabilities, there is a need for better control of the magnetic media microstructure, particularly in terms of minimizing grain size and grain boundary thickness distributions. In this work, a guided magnetic media growth is attempted by creating a pre-fabricated template with a specific material and morphology. The template is designed in such a way that, when magnetic media consisting of the magnetic alloy and segregant are sputtered, the sites on the template result in a controlled two-phase growth of magnetic media. The template is fabricated using self-assembling block copolymers, which can be used to fabricate nanostructures with a regular hexagonal lattice of spheres of one block in the other's matrix. These are then used as etch-masks to fabricate the template. In this thesis, we describe the approach used to fabricate these templates and demonstrate the two-phase growth of magnetic recording media. In such an approach, the magnetic grain size is defined by the uniform pitch of the block copolymer pattern, resulting in a uniform microstructure with much better grain size distribution than can be obtained with conventional un-templated media growth. The templated growth technique is also a suitable additive technique for the fabrication of Bit Patterned Media, another potential next-generation technology wherein the magnetic bits are isolated patterned islands. Combining nanoimprint lithography with templated growth, we can generate a long range spatially ordered array of magnetic islands with no etching of the magnetic material.

  10. Interactions of main chain in folding and self assembly of unfolded protein structure: Enquiries with a serine solubilized nonapeptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinshuk Raj Srivastava

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Interactions of the protein main chain are probed for their role in folding and self-assembly. The interactions are assessed with serine nonapeptide Ac-(Ser-Ala4-Ser-NH2 in poly-L and alternating-L,D structure variations. Being a neutral molecule, Serine nonapeptide has been found to display not only folding-unfolding equilibrium, but also association-dissociation equilibrium as a function of solvent and concentration. Thus scrutiny of intra- and inter-molecular interactions have been undertaken in water, methanol, and DMSO solvents. In water, poly-L peptide displays a PPII-helix conformation which unfolds to extended β-conformation with increase of temperature, apparently in a two-state equilibrium. Poly-L peptide at high concentration and on transfer to the low polarity solvent, methanol, displays ordering as a β-hairpin. This implies folding of the peptide by self assembly. Self assembly and ordering possibly as double-stranded β-helix is also evidence for alternating-L,D peptide. Both isomers were observed to be unfolded in high polarity solvent DMSO. Dynamic light scattering suggests that assembly in both isomers may involve large size aggregates. The results have established that folding and self-assembly can be coupled equilibria dependent upon solute structure, concentration, and solvent. The interactions of the protein main chain involved in folding and self assembly of unfolded structure are illuminated and have been discussed.

  11. Nitric oxide and zinc-mediated protein assemblies involved in mu opioid receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Muñoz, María; Garzón, Javier

    2013-12-01

    Opioids are among the most effective analgesics in controlling the perception of intense pain, although their continuous use decreases their potency due to the development of tolerance. The glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor system is currently considered to be the most relevant functional antagonist of morphine analgesia. In the postsynapse of different brain regions the C terminus of the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) associates with NR1 subunits of NMDARs, as well as with a series of signaling proteins, such as neural nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)/nitric oxide (NO), protein kinase C (PKC), calcium and calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) and the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). NO is implicated in redox signaling and PKC falls under the regulation of zinc metabolism, suggesting that these signaling elements might participate in the regulation of MOR activity by the NMDAR. In this review, we discuss the influence of redox signaling in the mechanisms whose plasticity triggers opioid tolerance. Thus, the MOR C terminus assembles a series of signaling proteins around the homodimeric histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 1 (HINT1). The NMDAR NR1 subunit and the regulator of G protein signaling RGSZ2 bind HINT1 in a zinc-independent manner, with RGSZ2 associating with nNOS and regulating MOR-induced production of NO. This NO acts on the RGSZ2 zinc finger, providing the zinc ions that are required for PKC/Raf-1 cysteine-rich domains to simultaneously bind to the histidines present in the HINT1 homodimer. The MOR-induced activation of phospholipase β (PLCβ) regulates PKC, which increases the reactive oxygen species (ROS) by acting on NOX/NADPH, consolidating the long-term PKC activation required to regulate the Raf-1/MAPK cascade and enhancing NMDAR function. Thus, RGSZ2 serves as a Redox Zinc Switch that converts NO signals into Zinc signals, thereby modulating Redox Sensor Proteins like PKCγ and Raf-1. Accordingly, redox-dependent and

  12. Studies on the biosynthesis, assembly and secretion of vitellogenin, an oestrogen-induced multicomponent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penning, T M; Merry, A H; Munday, K A; Akhtar, M

    1977-01-15

    1. The process by which the egg-yolk protein precursor vitellogenin is biosynthesized, assembled and secreted by Xenopus laevis (South African clawed toad) liver was studied. It was previously shown in other laboratories that vitellogenin contains the two egg-yolk proteins lipovitellin (mol.wt. 140 000) and phosvitin (mol.wt. 35 000). 2. Evidence is presented which shows that Xenopus liver microsomal fractions synthesize precursors of vitellogenin. These precursors were solubilized from the membranes with detergent and analysed by sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. This analysis indicated that there is only one precursor polypeptide, and this has mol.wt. approx. 200 000 +/- 20 000. This demonstrates that the egg-yolk proteins are translated as part of this larger polypeptide. 3. Experiments also demonstrate the existence of a microsomal proteinase which is able to cleave the precursor into smaller fragments. The nature of these fragments provided some indirect evidence that phosvitin and lipovitellin light chains are situated together within the precursor molecule. 4. These precursor data fit in well with structural studies on serum vitellogenin, since it has been shown that the latter protein consists of two identical subunits each with a mobility on sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide gels identical with that shown by the microsomal precursor. This indicates that both the intracellular precursor and subunit of vitellogenin have similar (but not necessarily identical) molecular weights. 5. It was also shown that trypsin or chymotrypsin can cleave the serum vitellogenin into leucine- and serine-rich fragments which resemble lipovitellin and phosvitin respectively. Attention is, however, drawn to the fact that the serine-rich fragment is not identical with phosvitin, since it contains eight times more leucine than that expected for the authentic phosvitin molecule [Penning (1976) Ph.D. Thesis, University of Southampton].

  13. A simple and traceless solid phase method simplifies the assembly of large peptides and the access to challenging proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollivier, N; Desmet, R; Drobecq, H; Blanpain, A; Boll, E; Leclercq, B; Mougel, A; Vicogne, J; Melnyk, O

    2017-08-01

    Chemical protein synthesis gives access to well-defined native or modified proteins that are useful for studying protein structure and function. The majority of proteins synthesized up to now have been produced using native chemical ligation (NCL) in solution. Although there are significant advantages to assembling large peptides or proteins by solid phase ligation, reports of such approaches are rare. We report a novel solid phase method for protein synthesis which relies on the chemistry of the acetoacetyl group and ketoxime ligation for the attachment of the peptide to the solid support, and on a tandem transoximation/rearrangement process for the detachment of the target protein. Importantly, we show that the combination of solid phase and solution ligation techniques facilitates the production of a challenging and biologically active protein made of 180 amino acids. We show also that the solid phase method enables the purification of complex peptide segments through a chemoselective solid phase capture/release approach.

  14. Caenorhabditis elegans oocyte meiotic spindle pole assembly requires microtubule severing and the calponin homology domain protein ASPM-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Amy A; Osterberg, Valerie; Christensen, Sara; Price, Meredith; Lu, Chenggang; Chicas-Cruz, Kathy; Lockery, Shawn; Mains, Paul E; Bowerman, Bruce

    2014-04-01

    In many animals, including vertebrates, oocyte meiotic spindles are bipolar but assemble in the absence of centrosomes. Although meiotic spindle positioning in oocytes has been investigated extensively, much less is known about their assembly. In Caenorhabditis elegans, three genes previously shown to contribute to oocyte meiotic spindle assembly are the calponin homology domain protein encoded by aspm-1, the katanin family member mei-1, and the kinesin-12 family member klp-18. We isolated temperature-sensitive alleles of all three and investigated their requirements using live-cell imaging to reveal previously undocumented requirements for aspm-1 and mei-1. Our results indicate that bipolar but abnormal oocyte meiotic spindles assemble in aspm-1(-) embryos, whereas klp-18(-) and mei-1(-) mutants assemble monopolar and apolar spindles, respectively. Furthermore, two MEI-1 functions--ASPM-1 recruitment to the spindle and microtubule severing--both contribute to monopolar spindle assembly in klp-18(-) mutants. We conclude that microtubule severing and ASPM-1 both promote meiotic spindle pole assembly in C. elegans oocytes, whereas the kinesin 12 family member KLP-18 promotes spindle bipolarity.

  15. Caenorhabditis elegans oocyte meiotic spindle pole assembly requires microtubule severing and the calponin homology domain protein ASPM-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Amy A.; Osterberg, Valerie; Christensen, Sara; Price, Meredith; Lu, Chenggang; Chicas-Cruz, Kathy; Lockery, Shawn; Mains, Paul E.; Bowerman, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    In many animals, including vertebrates, oocyte meiotic spindles are bipolar but assemble in the absence of centrosomes. Although meiotic spindle positioning in oocytes has been investigated extensively, much less is known about their assembly. In Caenorhabditis elegans, three genes previously shown to contribute to oocyte meiotic spindle assembly are the calponin homology domain protein encoded by aspm-1, the katanin family member mei-1, and the kinesin-12 family member klp-18. We isolated temperature-sensitive alleles of all three and investigated their requirements using live-cell imaging to reveal previously undocumented requirements for aspm-1 and mei-1. Our results indicate that bipolar but abnormal oocyte meiotic spindles assemble in aspm-1(-) embryos, whereas klp-18(-) and mei-1(-) mutants assemble monopolar and apolar spindles, respectively. Furthermore, two MEI-1 functions—ASPM-1 recruitment to the spindle and microtubule severing—both contribute to monopolar spindle assembly in klp-18(-) mutants. We conclude that microtubule severing and ASPM-1 both promote meiotic spindle pole assembly in C. elegans oocytes, whereas the kinesin 12 family member KLP-18 promotes spindle bipolarity. PMID:24554763

  16. DTM: Deformable Template Matching

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hyungtae; Kwon, Heesung; Robinson, Ryan M.; Nothwang, William D.

    2016-01-01

    A novel template matching algorithm that can incorporate the concept of deformable parts, is presented in this paper. Unlike the deformable part model (DPM) employed in object recognition, the proposed template-matching approach called Deformable Template Matching (DTM) does not require a training step. Instead, deformation is achieved by a set of predefined basic rules (e.g. the left sub-patch cannot pass across the right patch). Experimental evaluation of this new method using the PASCAL VO...

  17. Analysis of uromodulin polymerization provides new insights into the mechanisms regulating ZP domain-mediated protein assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Céline; Santambrogio, Sara; Perucca, Simone; Casari, Giorgio; Rampoldi, Luca

    2009-01-01

    Uromodulin is the most abundant protein secreted in urine, in which it is found as a high-molecular-weight polymer. Polymerization occurs via its zona pellucida (ZP) domain, a conserved module shared by many extracellular eukaryotic proteins that are able to assemble into matrices. In this work, we identified two motifs in uromodulin, mapping in the linker region of the ZP domain and in between protein cleavage and glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchoring sites, which regulate its polymerization. Indeed, mutations in either module led to premature intracellular polymerization of a soluble uromodulin isoform, demonstrating the inhibitory role of these motifs for ZP domain-mediated protein assembly. Proteolytic cleavage separating the external motif from the mature monomer is necessary to release the inhibitory function and allow protein polymerization. Moreover, we report absent or abnormal assembly into filaments of GPI-anchored uromodulin mutated in either the internal or the external motif. This effect is due to altered processing on the plasma membrane, demonstrating that the presence of the two modules has not only an inhibitory function but also can positively regulate protein polymerization. Our data expand previous knowledge on the control of ZP domain function and suggest a common mechanism regulating polymerization of ZP domain proteins.

  18. Molecular assembly of rhodopsin with G protein-coupled receptor kinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuanzheng; Gao, Xiang; Goswami, Devrishi; Hou, Li; Pal, Kuntal; Yin, Yanting; Zhao, Gongpu; Ernst, Oliver P; Griffin, Patrick; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H Eric

    2017-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) play pivotal roles in desensitizing GPCR signaling but little is known about how GRKs recognize and phosphorylate GPCRs due to the technical difficulties in detecting the highly dynamic GPCR/GRK interaction. By combining a genetic approach with multiple biochemical assays, we identified the key determinants for the assembly of the prototypical GPCR rhodopsin with its kinase GRK1. Our work reveals that the regulatory G-protein signaling homology (RH) domain of GRKs is the primary binding site to GPCRs and an active conformation of the GRK1 kinase domain is required for efficient interaction with rhodopsin. In addition, we provide a mechanistic solution for the longstanding puzzle about the gain-of-function Q41L mutation in GRK5. This mutation is in the RH domain and increases the capacity of the GRK mutant to interact with and to desensitize GPCRs. Finally we present the principal architecture of a rhodopsin/GRK complex through negative stain electron microscopy reconstruction. Together, these data define the key components for the rhodopsin/GRK1 interaction and provide a framework for understanding GRK-mediated desensitization of GPCRs. PMID:28524165

  19. Munc18-1 Controls SNARE Protein Complex Assembly during Human Sperm Acrosomal Exocytosis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Facundo; Zanetti, M. Natalia; Mayorga, Luis S.; Tomes, Claudia N.

    2012-01-01

    The spermatozoon is a very specialized cell capable of carrying out a limited set of functions with high efficiency. Sperm are then excellent model cells to dissect fundamental processes such as regulated exocytosis. The secretion of the single dense-core granule of mammalian spermatozoa relies on the same highly conserved molecules and goes through the same stages as exocytosis in other types of cells. In this study, we describe the presence of Munc18-1 in human sperm and show that this protein has an essential role in acrosomal exocytosis. We observed that inactivation of endogenous Munc18-1 with a specific antibody precluded the stabilization of trans-SNARE complexes and inhibited acrosomal exocytosis. Addition of recombinant Munc18-1 blocked secretion by sequestering monomeric syntaxin, an effect that was rescued by α-soluble NSF attachment protein. By electron microscopy, we observed that both the anti-Munc18-1 antibody and recombinant Munc18-1 inhibited the docking of the acrosome to the plasma membrane. In conclusion, our results indicate that Munc18-1 plays a key role in the dynamics of trans-SNARE complex assembly and/or stabilization, a process that is necessary for the docking of the outer acrosomal membrane to the plasma membrane and subsequent fusion pore opening. PMID:23091057

  20. Organization and expression of the Paramecium caudatum gene encoding nucleosome assembly protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, N; Sawatsubashi, S; Ishida, M; Yamauchi, K

    2001-12-12

    The complete genomic and partial complementary DNAs encoding the ciliate Paramecium caudatum nucleosome assembly protein 1 (NAP1) have been sequenced. The nap1 gene is situated 1.2 kbp from the hemoglobin (hb) gene, with the 3' end of both genes facing each other. The nap1 gene contains no introns, and encodes a protein of 369 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular weight of 42,627. The P. caudatum NAP1 amino acid sequence shares only 23-27% identity with NAP1 amino acid sequences from other eukaryotes. Although the nap1 transcript was detected in the P. caudatum cells at both the logarithmic and stationary phases, its level increased during the stationary phase. Southern blot analysis and polymerase chain reaction amplification revealed that the P. caudatum macronucleus has a heterogeneous composition at genomic regions around the nap1 gene. The present studies indicate the nap1 and hb genes are closely arranged in the macronucleus with the intergenic region between their sequences heterogeneously composed.

  1. Structure, Function, Self-Assembly and Origin of Simple Membrane Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins perform such essential cellular functions as transport of ions, nutrients and waste products across cell walls, transduction of environmental signals, regulation of cell fusion, recognition of other cells, energy capture and its conversion into high-energy compounds. In fact, 30-40% of genes in modem organisms codes for membrane proteins. Although contemporary membrane proteins or their functional assemblies can be quite complex, their transmembrane fragments are usually remarkably simple. The most common structural motif for these fragments is a bundle of alpha-helices, but occasionally it could be a beta-barrel. In a series of molecular dynamics computer simulations we investigated self-organizing properties of simple membrane proteins based on these structural motifs. Specifically, we studied folding and insertion into membranes of short, nonpolar or amphiphatic peptides. We also investigated glycophorin A, a peptide that forms sequence-specific dimers, and a transmembrane aggregate of four identical alpha-helices that forms an efficient and selective voltage-gated proton channel was investigated. Many peptides are attracted to water-membrane interfaces. Once at the interface, nonpolar peptides spontaneously fold to a-helices. Whenever the sequence permits, peptides that contain both polar and nonpolar amino also adopt helical structures, in which polar and nonpolar amino acid side chains are immersed in water and membrane, respectively. Specific identity of side chains is less important. Helical peptides at the interface could insert into the membrane and adopt a transmembrane conformation. However, insertion of a single helix is unfavorable because polar groups in the peptide become completely dehydrated upon insertion. The unfavorable free energy of insertion can be regained by spontaneous association of peptides in the membrane. The first step in this process is the formation of dimers, although the most common are aggregates of 4

  2. Interrelationships between yeast ribosomal protein assembly events and transient ribosome biogenesis factors interactions in early pre-ribosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakob, Steffen; Ohmayer, Uli; Neueder, Andreas; Hierlmeier, Thomas; Perez-Fernandez, Jorge; Hochmuth, Eduard; Deutzmann, Rainer; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Tschochner, Herbert; Milkereit, Philipp

    2012-01-01

    Early steps of eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis require a large set of ribosome biogenesis factors which transiently interact with nascent rRNA precursors (pre-rRNA). Most likely, concomitant with that initial contacts between ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) and ribosome precursors (pre-ribosomes) are established which are converted into robust interactions between pre-rRNA and r-proteins during the course of ribosome maturation. Here we analysed the interrelationship between r-protein assembly events and the transient interactions of ribosome biogenesis factors with early pre-ribosomal intermediates termed 90S pre-ribosomes or small ribosomal subunit (SSU) processome in yeast cells. We observed that components of the SSU processome UTP-A and UTP-B sub-modules were recruited to early pre-ribosomes independently of all tested r-proteins. On the other hand, groups of SSU processome components were identified whose association with early pre-ribosomes was affected by specific r-protein assembly events in the head-platform interface of the SSU. One of these components, Noc4p, appeared to be itself required for robust incorporation of r-proteins into the SSU head domain. Altogether, the data reveal an emerging network of specific interrelationships between local r-protein assembly events and the functional interactions of SSU processome components with early pre-ribosomes. They point towards some of these components being transient primary pre-rRNA in vivo binders and towards a role for others in coordinating the assembly of major SSU domains.

  3. Synthesis and electrochemical characterization of myoglobin-antibody protein immobilized self-assembled gold nanoparticles on ITO-glass plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajesh, E-mail: rajesh_csir@yahoo.com [Polymer and Soft Material Section, National Physical Laboratory (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Sharma, Vikash; Mishra, Sujeet K.; Biradar, Ashok M. [Polymer and Soft Material Section, National Physical Laboratory (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India)

    2012-01-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Mb-Ab was covalently bonded to carboxyl groups of the mixed MUA and MPA over self-assembled GNPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This assembly on ITO-glass plate was used as an impedimetric immunosensor for myoglobin detection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High loading of Mb-Ab, on the GNPs results in a wide range of Mb-Ag detection from 0.01 {mu}g to 1.65 {mu}g mL{sup -1} Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The simple method and wide range of Mb-Ag detection makes this advantageous over other methods. - Abstract: We report a protein immobilized self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) on indium-tin-oxide (ITO) coated glass plate. The protein-antibody, Mb-Ab, was covalently immobilized over the self-assembly of GNPs through a mixed SAM of 11-mercapto undecanoic acid (MUA) and 3-mercapto propionic acid (MPA) via carbodiimide coupling reaction using N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N Prime -ethyl carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxy succinimide (NHS). The whole assembly was constructed on 0.25 cm{sup 2} area of ITO-glass plate (Mb-Ab/MUA-MPA/GNPs/APTES/ITO-glass) and an impedimetric study was carried out for its application in myoglobin detection. This prototype assembly was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and electrochemical techniques. The modified electrode showed an increased electron-transfer resistance on coupling with protein antigen, Mb-Ag, in the presence of a redox probe [Fe(CN){sub 6}]{sup 3-/4-}. Its exhibits an electrochemical impedance response to protein myoglobin-antigen, Mb-Ag, concentration in a linear range from 0.01 {mu}g to 1.65 {mu}g mL{sup -1} with a lowest detection limit of 1.4 ng mL{sup -1}.

  4. INTERFACIAL SELF-ASSEMBLY OF A SCHIZOPHYLLUM-COMMUNE HYDROPHOBIN INTO AN INSOLUBLE AMPHIPATHIC PROTEIN MEMBRANE DEPENDS ON SURFACE HYDROPHOBICITY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOSTEN, HAB; RUARDY, TG; VANDERMEI, HC; BUSSCHER, HJ; WESSELS, JGH

    1995-01-01

    Hydrophobins are small secreted fungal proteins rich in hydrophobic amino acids with a characteristic hydropathy pattern and conserved location of eight cysteine residues. It was previously shown that purified SC3p hydrophobin of Schizophyllum commune self-assembles at hydrophilic/hydrophobic

  5. Assembly of spikes into coronavirus particles is mediated by the carboxy-terminal domain of the spike protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Godeke, G J; de Haan, Cornelis A M; Rossen, J W; Vennema, H; Rottier, P J

    The type I glycoprotein S of coronavirus, trimers of which constitute the typical viral spikes, is assembled into virions through noncovalent interactions with the M protein. Here we demonstrate that incorporation is mediated by the short carboxy-terminal segment comprising the transmembrane and

  6. In-capillary self-assembly study of quantum dots and protein using fluorescence coupled capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianhao; Li, Jingyan; Li, Jinchen; Qin, Yuqin; Wang, Cheli; Qiu, Lin; Jiang, Pengju

    2015-07-01

    As a vast number of novel materials in particular inorganic nanoparticles have been invented and introduced to all aspects of life, public concerns about how they might affect our ecosystem and human life continue to arise. Such incertitude roots at a fundamental question of how inorganic nanoparticles self-assemble with biomolecules in solution. Various techniques have been developed to probe the interaction between particles and biomolecules, but very few if any can provide advantages of both rapid and convenient. Herein, we report a systematic investigation on quantum dots (QDs) and protein self-assembly inside a capillary. QDs and protein were injected to a capillary one after another. They were mixed inside the capillary when a high voltage was applied. Online separation and detection were then achieved. This new method can also be used to study the self-assembly kinetics of QDs and protein using the Hill equation, the KD value for the self-assembly of QDs and protein was calculated to be 8.8 μM. The obtained results were compared with the previous out of-capillary method and confirmed the effectiveness of the present method. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Capsid protein expression and adeno-associated virus like particles assembly in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Backovic Ana

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae supports replication of many different RNA or DNA viruses (e.g. Tombusviruses or Papillomaviruses and has provided means for up-scalable, cost- and time-effective production of various virus-like particles (e.g. Human Parvovirus B19 or Rotavirus. We have recently demonstrated that S. cerevisiae can form single stranded DNA AAV2 genomes starting from a circular plasmid. In this work, we have investigated the possibility to assemble AAV capsids in yeast. Results To do this, at least two out of three AAV structural proteins, VP1 and VP3, have to be simultaneously expressed in yeast cells and their intracellular stoichiometry has to resemble the one found in the particles derived from mammalian or insect cells. This was achieved by stable co-transformation of yeast cells with two plasmids, one expressing VP3 from its natural p40 promoter and the other one primarily expressing VP1 from a modified AAV2 Cap gene under the control of the inducible yeast promoter Gal1. Among various induction strategies we tested, the best one to yield the appropriate VP1:VP3 ratio was 4.5 hour induction in the medium containing 0.5% glucose and 5% galactose. Following such induction, AAV virus like particles (VLPs were isolated from yeast by two step ultracentrifugation procedure. The transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that their morphology is similar to the empty capsids produced in human cells. Conclusions Taken together, the results show for the first time that yeast can be used to assemble AAV capsid and, therefore, as a genetic system to identify novel cellular factors involved in AAV biology.

  8. Improving the Accuracy of Fitted Atomic Models in Cryo-EM Density Maps of Protein Assemblies Using Evolutionary Information from Aligned Homologous Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakesh, Ramachandran; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2016-01-01

    Cryo-Electron Microscopy (cryo-EM) has become an important technique to obtain structural insights into large macromolecular assemblies. However the resolution of the density maps do not allow for its interpretation at atomic level. Hence they are combined with high resolution structures along with information from other experimental or bioinformatics techniques to obtain pseudo-atomic models. Here, we describe the use of evolutionary conservation of residues as obtained from protein structures and alignments of homologous proteins to detect errors in the fitting of atomic structures as well as improve accuracy of the protein-protein interfacial regions in the cryo-EM density maps.

  9. The Role of Disordered Ribosomal Protein Extensions in the Early Steps of Eubacterial 50 S Ribosomal Subunit Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youri Timsit

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Although during the past decade research has shown the functional importance of disorder in proteins, many of the structural and dynamics properties of intrinsically unstructured proteins (IUPs remain to be elucidated. This review is focused on the role of the extensions of the ribosomal proteins in the early steps of the assembly of the eubacterial 50 S subunit. The recent crystallographic structures of the ribosomal particles have revealed the picture of a complex assembly pathway that condenses the rRNA and the ribosomal proteins into active ribosomes. However, little is know about the molecular mechanisms of this process. It is thought that the long basic r-protein extensions that penetrate deeply into the subunit cores play a key role through disorder-order transitions and/or co-folding mechanisms. A current view is that such structural transitions may facilitate the proper rRNA folding. In this paper, the structures of the proteins L3, L4, L13, L20, L22 and L24 that have been experimentally found to be essential for the first steps of ribosome assembly have been compared. On the basis of their structural and dynamics properties, three categories of extensions have been identified. Each of them seems to play a distinct function. Among them, only the coil-helix transition that occurs in a phylogenetically conserved cluster of basic residues of the L20 extension appears to be strictly required for the large subunit assembly in eubacteria. The role of a helix-coil transitions in 23 S RNA folding is discussed in the light of the calcium binding protein calmodulin that shares many structural and dynamics properties with L20.

  10. Cryo-EM structure of the bacteriophage T4 portal protein assembly at near-atomic resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lei; Zhang, Xinzheng; Gao, Song; Rao, Prashant A; Padilla-Sanchez, Victor; Chen, Zhenguo; Sun, Siyang; Xiang, Ye; Subramaniam, Sriram; Rao, Venigalla B; Rossmann, Michael G

    2015-07-06

    The structure and assembly of bacteriophage T4 has been extensively studied. However, the detailed structure of the portal protein remained unknown. Here we report the structure of the bacteriophage T4 portal assembly, gene product 20 (gp20), determined by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to 3.6 Å resolution. In addition, analysis of a 10 Å resolution cryo-EM map of an empty prolate T4 head shows how the dodecameric portal assembly interacts with the capsid protein gp23 at the special pentameric vertex. The gp20 structure also verifies that the portal assembly is required for initiating head assembly, for attachment of the packaging motor, and for participation in DNA packaging. Comparison of the Myoviridae T4 portal structure with the known portal structures of φ29, SPP1 and P22, representing Podo- and Siphoviridae, shows that the portal structure probably dates back to a time when self-replicating microorganisms were being established on Earth.

  11. The C. elegans RSA complex localizes protein phosphatase 2A to centrosomes and regulates mitotic spindle assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaitz, Anne-Lore; Srayko, Martin; Dammermann, Alexander; Quintin, Sophie; Wielsch, Natalie; MacLeod, Ian; de Robillard, Quentin; Zinke, Andrea; Yates, John R; Müller-Reichert, Thomas; Shevchenko, Andrei; Oegema, Karen; Hyman, Anthony A

    2007-01-12

    Microtubule behavior changes during the cell cycle and during spindle assembly. However, it remains unclear how these changes are regulated and coordinated. We describe a complex that targets the Protein Phosphatase 2A holoenzyme (PP2A) to centrosomes in C. elegans embryos. This complex includes Regulator of Spindle Assembly 1 (RSA-1), a targeting subunit for PP2A, and RSA-2, a protein that binds and recruits RSA-1 to centrosomes. In contrast to the multiple functions of the PP2A catalytic subunit, RSA-1 and RSA-2 are specifically required for microtubule outgrowth from centrosomes and for spindle assembly. The centrosomally localized RSA-PP2A complex mediates these functions in part by regulating two critical mitotic effectors: the microtubule destabilizer KLP-7 and the C. elegans regulator of spindle assembly TPXL-1. By regulating a subset of PP2A functions at the centrosome, the RSA complex could therefore provide a means of coordinating microtubule outgrowth from centrosomes and kinetochore microtubule stability during mitotic spindle assembly.

  12. BCL::Fold - De Novo Prediction of Complex and Large Protein Topologies by Assembly of Secondary Structure Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakaş, Mert; Woetzel, Nils; Staritzbichler, Rene; Alexander, Nathan; Weiner, Brian E.; Meiler, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Computational de novo protein structure prediction is limited to small proteins of simple topology. The present work explores an approach to extend beyond the current limitations through assembling protein topologies from idealized α-helices and β-strands. The algorithm performs a Monte Carlo Metropolis simulated annealing folding simulation. It optimizes a knowledge-based potential that analyzes radius of gyration, β-strand pairing, secondary structure element (SSE) packing, amino acid pair distance, amino acid environment, contact order, secondary structure prediction agreement and loop closure. Discontinuation of the protein chain favors sampling of non-local contacts and thereby creation of complex protein topologies. The folding simulation is accelerated through exclusion of flexible loop regions further reducing the size of the conformational search space. The algorithm is benchmarked on 66 proteins with lengths between 83 and 293 amino acids. For 61 out of these proteins, the best SSE-only models obtained have an RMSD100 below 8.0 Å and recover more than 20% of the native contacts. The algorithm assembles protein topologies with up to 215 residues and a relative contact order of 0.46. The method is tailored to be used in conjunction with low-resolution or sparse experimental data sets which often provide restraints for regions of defined secondary structure. PMID:23173050

  13. The West Nile virus assembly process evades the conserved antiviral mechanism of the interferon-induced MxA protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoenen, Antje [School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Gillespie, Leah [Department of Microbiology, La Trobe University, Melbourne (Australia); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Morgan, Garry; Heide, Peter van der [Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Khromykh, Alexander [School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Australian Infectious Diseases Research Centre, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Mackenzie, Jason, E-mail: jason.mackenzie@unimelb.edu.au [Department of Microbiology, La Trobe University, Melbourne (Australia); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia)

    2014-01-05

    Flaviviruses have evolved means to evade host innate immune responses. Recent evidence suggests this is due to prevention of interferon production and signaling in flavivirus-infected cells. Here we show that the interferon-induced MxA protein can sequester the West Nile virus strain Kunjin virus (WNV{sub KUN}) capsid protein in cytoplasmic tubular structures in an expression-replication system. This sequestering resulted in reduced titers of secreted WNV{sub KUN} particles. We show by electron microscopy, tomography and 3D modeling that these cytoplasmic tubular structures form organized bundles. Additionally we show that recombinant ER-targeted MxA can restrict production of infectious WNV{sub KUN} under conditions of virus infection. Our results indicate a co-ordinated and compartmentalized WNV{sub KUN} assembly process may prevent recognition of viral components by MxA, particularly the capsid protein. This recognition can be exploited if MxA is targeted to intracellular sites of WNV{sub KUN} assembly. This results in further understanding of the mechanisms of flavivirus evasion from the immune system. - Highlights: • We show that the ISG MxA can recognize the West Nile virus capsid protein. • Interaction between WNV C protein and MxA induces cytoplasmic fibrils. • MxA can be retargeted to the ER to restrict WNV particle release. • WNV assembly process is a strategy to avoid MxA recognition.

  14. Vipp1 is required for basic thylakoid membrane formation but not for the assembly of thylakoid protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aseeva, Elena; Ossenbühl, Friederich; Sippel, Claudia; Cho, Won K; Stein, Bernhard; Eichacker, Lutz A; Meurer, Jörg; Wanner, Gerhard; Westhoff, Peter; Soll, Jürgen; Vothknecht, Ute C

    2007-02-01

    Vipp1 (vesicle inducing protein in plastids 1) is found in cyanobacteria and chloroplasts where it is essential for thylakoid formation. Arabidopsis thaliana mutant plants with a reduction of Vipp1 to about 20% of wild type content become albinotic at an early stage. We propose that this drastic phenotype results from an inability of the remaining Vipp1 protein to assemble into a homo-oligomeric complex, indicating that oligomerization is a prerequisite for Vipp1 function. A Vipp1-ProteinA fusion protein, expressed in the Deltavipp1 mutant background, is able to reinstate oligomerization and restore photoautotrophic growth. Plants containing Vipp1-ProteinA in amounts comparable to Vipp1 in the wild type exhibit a wild type phenotype. However, plants with a reduced amount of Vipp1-ProteinA protein are growth-retarded and significantly paler than the wild type. This phenotype is caused by a decrease in thylakoid membrane content and a concomitant reduction in photosynthetic activity. To the extent that thylakoid membranes are made in these plants they are properly assembled with protein-pigment complexes and are photosynthetically active. This strongly supports a function of Vipp1 in basic thylakoid membrane formation and not in the functional assembly of thylakoid protein complexes. Intriguingly, electron microscopic analysis shows that chloroplasts in the mutant plants are not equally affected by the Vipp1 shortage. Indeed, a wide range of different stages of thylakoid development ranging from wild-type-like chloroplasts to plastids nearly devoid of thylakoids can be observed in organelles of one and the same cell.

  15. Targeting and assembly of components of the TOC protein import complex at the chloroplast outer envelope membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Lynn G L; Paila, Yamuna D; Siman, Steven R; Chen, Yi; Smith, Matthew D; Schnell, Danny J

    2014-01-01

    The translocon at the outer envelope membrane of chloroplasts (TOC) initiates the import of thousands of nuclear encoded preproteins required for chloroplast biogenesis and function. The multimeric TOC complex contains two GTP-regulated receptors, Toc34 and Toc159, which recognize the transit peptides of preproteins and initiate protein import through a β-barrel membrane channel, Toc75. Different isoforms of Toc34 and Toc159 assemble with Toc75 to form structurally and functionally diverse translocons, and the composition and levels of TOC translocons is required for the import of specific subsets of coordinately expressed proteins during plant growth and development. Consequently, the proper assembly of the TOC complexes is key to ensuring organelle homeostasis. This review will focus on our current knowledge of the targeting and assembly of TOC components to form functional translocons at the outer membrane. Our analyses reveal that the targeting of TOC components involves elements common to the targeting of other outer membrane proteins, but also include unique features that appear to have evolved to specifically facilitate assembly of the import apparatus.

  16. Targeting and Assembly of Components of the TOC Protein Import Complex at the Chloroplast Outer Envelope Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn G.L. Richardson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The translocon at the outer envelope membrane of chloroplasts (TOC initiates the import of thousands of nuclear encoded preproteins required for chloroplast biogenesis and function. The multimeric TOC complex contains two GTP-regulated receptors, Toc34 and Toc159, which recognize the transit peptides of preproteins and initiate protein import through a β–barrel membrane channel, Toc75. Different isoforms of Toc34 and Toc159 assemble with Toc75 to form structurally and functionally diverse translocons, and the composition and levels of TOC translocons is required for the import of specific subsets of coordinately expressed proteins during plant growth and development. Consequently, the proper assembly of the TOC complexes is key to ensuring organelle homeostasis. This review will focus on our current knowledge of the targeting and assembly of TOC components to form functional translocons at the outer membrane. Our analyses reveal that the targeting of TOC components involves elements common to the targeting of other outer membrane proteins, but also include unique features that appear to have evolved to specifically facilitate assembly of the import apparatus.

  17. Brittle Culm1, a COBRA-like protein, functions in cellulose assembly through binding cellulose microfibrils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifeng Liu

    Full Text Available Cellulose represents the most abundant biopolymer in nature and has great economic importance. Cellulose chains pack laterally into crystalline forms, stacking into a complicated crystallographic structure. However, the mechanism of cellulose crystallization is poorly understood. Here, via functional characterization, we report that Brittle Culm1 (BC1, a COBRA-like protein in rice, modifies cellulose crystallinity. BC1 was demonstrated to be a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI anchored protein and can be released into cell walls by removal of the GPI anchor. BC1 possesses a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM at its N-terminus. In vitro binding assays showed that this CBM interacts specifically with crystalline cellulose, and several aromatic residues in this domain are essential for binding. It was further demonstrated that cell wall-localized BC1 via the CBM and GPI anchor is one functional form of BC1. X-ray diffraction (XRD assays revealed that mutations in BC1 and knockdown of BC1 expression decrease the crystallite width of cellulose; overexpression of BC1 and the CBM-mutated BC1s caused varied crystallinity with results that were consistent with the in vitro binding assay. Moreover, interaction between the CBM and cellulose microfibrils was largely repressed when the cell wall residues were pre-stained with two cellulose dyes. Treating wild-type and bc1 seedlings with the dyes resulted in insensitive root growth responses in bc1 plants. Combined with the evidence that BC1 and three secondary wall cellulose synthases (CESAs function in different steps of cellulose production as revealed by genetic analysis, we conclude that BC1 modulates cellulose assembly by interacting with cellulose and affecting microfibril crystallinity.

  18. Mechanism of Assembly of a Substrate Transfer Complex during Tail-anchored Protein Targeting*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gristick, Harry B.; Rome, Michael E.; Chartron, Justin W.; Rao, Meera; Hess, Sonja; Shan, Shu-ou; Clemons, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Tail-anchored (TA) proteins, defined as having a single transmembrane helix at their C terminus, are post-translationally targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane by the guided entry of TA proteins (GET) pathway. In yeast, the handover of TA substrates is mediated by the heterotetrameric Get4/Get5 complex (Get4/5), which tethers the co-chaperone Sgt2 to the targeting factor, the Get3 ATPase. Binding of Get4/5 to Get3 is critical for efficient TA targeting; however, questions remain about the formation of the Get3·Get4/5 complex. Here we report crystal structures of a Get3·Get4/5 complex from Saccharomyces cerevisiae at 2.8 and 6.0 Å that reveal a novel interface between Get3 and Get4 dominated by electrostatic interactions. Kinetic and mutational analyses strongly suggest that these structures represent an on-pathway intermediate that rapidly assembles and then rearranges to the final Get3·Get4/5 complex. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the Get3·Get4/5 complex is dominated by a single Get4/5 heterotetramer bound to one monomer of a Get3 dimer, uncovering an intriguing asymmetry in the Get4/5 heterotetramer upon Get3 binding. Ultrafast diffusion-limited electrostatically driven Get3·Get4/5 association enables Get4/5 to rapidly sample and capture Get3 at different stages of the GET pathway. PMID:26451041

  19. Bub3 is a spindle assembly checkpoint protein regulating chromosome segregation during mouse oocyte meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mo Li

    Full Text Available In mitosis, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC prevents anaphase onset until all chromosomes have been attached to the spindle microtubules and aligned correctly at the equatorial metaphase plate. The major checkpoint proteins in mitosis consist of mitotic arrest-deficient (Mad1-3, budding uninhibited by benzimidazole (Bub1, Bub3, and monopolar spindle 1(Mps1. During meiosis, for the formation of a haploid gamete, two consecutive rounds of chromosome segregation occur with only one round of DNA replication. To pull homologous chromosomes to opposite spindle poles during meiosis I, both sister kinetochores of a homologue must face toward the same pole which is very different from mitosis and meiosis II. As a core member of checkpoint proteins, the individual role of Bub3 in mammalian oocyte meiosis is unclear. In this study, using overexpression and RNA interference (RNAi approaches, we analyzed the role of Bub3 in mouse oocyte meiosis. Our data showed that overexpressed Bub3 inhibited meiotic metaphase-anaphase transition by preventing homologous chromosome and sister chromatid segregations in meiosis I and II, respectively. Misaligned chromosomes, abnormal polar body and double polar bodies were observed in Bub3 knock-down oocytes, causing aneuploidy. Furthermore, through cold treatment combined with Bub3 overexpression, we found that overexpressed Bub3 affected the attachments of microtubules and kinetochores during metaphase-anaphase transition. We propose that as a member of SAC, Bub3 is required for regulation of both meiosis I and II, and is potentially involved in kinetochore-microtubule attachment in mammalian oocytes.

  20. Brittle Culm1, a COBRA-Like Protein, Functions in Cellulose Assembly through Binding Cellulose Microfibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baocai; Liu, Xiangling; Yan, Meixian; Zhang, Lanjun; Shi, Yanyun; Zhang, Mu; Qian, Qian; Li, Jiayang; Zhou, Yihua

    2013-01-01

    Cellulose represents the most abundant biopolymer in nature and has great economic importance. Cellulose chains pack laterally into crystalline forms, stacking into a complicated crystallographic structure. However, the mechanism of cellulose crystallization is poorly understood. Here, via functional characterization, we report that Brittle Culm1 (BC1), a COBRA-like protein in rice, modifies cellulose crystallinity. BC1 was demonstrated to be a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored protein and can be released into cell walls by removal of the GPI anchor. BC1 possesses a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) at its N-terminus. In vitro binding assays showed that this CBM interacts specifically with crystalline cellulose, and several aromatic residues in this domain are essential for binding. It was further demonstrated that cell wall-localized BC1 via the CBM and GPI anchor is one functional form of BC1. X-ray diffraction (XRD) assays revealed that mutations in BC1 and knockdown of BC1 expression decrease the crystallite width of cellulose; overexpression of BC1 and the CBM-mutated BC1s caused varied crystallinity with results that were consistent with the in vitro binding assay. Moreover, interaction between the CBM and cellulose microfibrils was largely repressed when the cell wall residues were pre-stained with two cellulose dyes. Treating wild-type and bc1 seedlings with the dyes resulted in insensitive root growth responses in bc1 plants. Combined with the evidence that BC1 and three secondary wall cellulose synthases (CESAs) function in different steps of cellulose production as revealed by genetic analysis, we conclude that BC1 modulates cellulose assembly by interacting with cellulose and affecting microfibril crystallinity. PMID:23990797

  1. Modulation of enamel matrix proteins on the formation and nano-assembly of hydroxyapatite in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Hong, E-mail: tlihong@jnu.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510630 (China); Department of Bioengineering, Clemson University, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Huang Weiya [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510630 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Taizhou, Taizhou University, Zhejiang 317000 (China); Zhang Yuanming [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510630 (China); Xue Bo [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510630 (China); Wen Xuejun [Department of Bioengineering, Clemson University, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Natural enamel has a hierarchically nanoassembled architecture that is regulated by enamel matrix proteins (EMPs) during the formation of enamel crystals. To understand the role of EMPs on enamel mineralization, calcium phosphate (CaP) growth experiments in both the presence and absence of native rat EMPs in a single diffusion system were conducted. The morphology and organization of formed CaP crystals were examined by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), High-Resolution Transmission Microscopy (HRTEM) and Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAED). In the system containing the EMPs, hydroxyapatite (HAP) with hierarchical lamellar nanostructure can be formed and the aligned HAP assembly tightly bundled by 3-4 rod-like nanocrystals like an enamel prism. However, in the absence of EMPs, only a sheet-like structure of octacalcium phosphate (OCP) phase was presented. EMPs promote HAP formation and inhibit the growth of OCP on the (010) plane. It is discussed that the organized Amelogenin/Amorphous Calcium Phosphate might be the precursor to the bundled HAP crystal prism. The study benefits the understanding of biomineralization of tooth enamel. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An aligned hydroxyapatite crystal bundled by rod-like nanosize crystals was obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An organized Amel/ACP would be the precursor of the bundled hydroxyapatite crystal prism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EMPs inhibit the growth of octacalcium phosphate in a defined plane.

  2. Protein immobilization on Ni(II) ion patterns prepared by microcontact printing and dip-pen nanolithography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Chien-Ching; Reinhoudt, David N; Otto, Cees; Velders, Aldrik H; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2010-01-01

    An indirect method of protein patterning by using Ni(II) ion templates for immobilization via a specific metal-protein interaction is described. A nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-terminated self-assembled monolayer (SAM) allows oriented binding of histidine-tagged proteins via complexation with late

  3. Self-Assembling Peptide Amphiphiles for Therapeutic Delivery of Proteins, Drugs, and Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungsoo Seth

    Biomaterials are used to help regenerate or replace the structure and function of damaged tissues. In order to elicit desired therapeutic responses in vivo, biomaterials are often functionalized with bioactive agents, such as growth factors, small molecule drugs, or even stem cells. Therefore, the strategies used to incorporate these bioactive agents in the microstructures and nanostructures of biomaterials can strongly influence the their therapeutic efficacy. Using self-assembling peptide amphiphiles (PAs), this work has investigated supramolecular nanostructures with improved interaction with three types of therapeutic agents: bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) which promotes osteogenic differentiation and bone growth, anti-inflammatory drug naproxen which is used to treat osteo- and rheumatoid arthritis, and neural stem cells that could differentiate into neurons to treat neurodegenerative diseases. For BMP-2 delivery, two specific systems were investigated with affinity for BMP-2: 1) heparin-binding nanofibers that display the natural ligand of the osteogenic protein, and 2) nanofibers that display a synthetic peptide ligand discovered in our laboratory through phage display to directly bind BMP-2. Both systems promoted enhanced osteoblast differentiation of pluripotent C2C12 cells and augmented bone regeneration in two in vivo models, a rat critical-size femur defect model and spinal arthrodesis model. The thesis also describes the use of PA nanofibers to improve the delivery of the anti-inflammatory drug naproxen. To promote a controlled release, naproxen was chemically conjugated to the nanofiber surface via an ester bond that would only be cleaved by esterases, which are enzymes found naturally in the body. In the absence of esterases, the naproxen remained conjugated to the nanofibers and was non-bioactive. On the other hand, in the presence of esterases, naproxen was slowly released and inhibited cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) activity, an enzyme responsible

  4. S-template

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra Bhagchandani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently introduced Yen angle and W angle suggest the use of center of premaxilla (M and mandibular symphysis (G as landmarks for assessing sagittal jaw base discrepancies. These landmarks have been considered to be more stable than traditionally used points A and B. This article is an attempt to develop a simple tool that will enable the clinician to identify the centers of premaxilla and mandibular symphysis and hence the name Simplified template, i.e., S-template. This tool would aid the orthodontist in locating the centroids of maxilla and mandibular symphysis more easily and accurately than prefabricated templates.

  5. Lysosome-associated membrane proteins-1 and -2 (LAMP-1 and LAMP-2) assemble via distinct modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasawa, Kazue; Tomabechi, Yuri; Ikeda, Mariko; Ehara, Haruhiko; Kukimoto-Niino, Mutsuko; Wakiyama, Motoaki; Podyma-Inoue, Katarzyna A; Rajapakshe, Anupama R; Watabe, Tetsuro; Shirouzu, Mikako; Hara-Yokoyama, Miki

    2016-10-21

    Lysosome-associated membrane proteins 1 and 2 (LAMP-1 and LAMP-2) have a large, heavily glycosylated luminal domain composed of two subdomains, and are the most abundant protein components in lysosome membranes. LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 have distinct functions, and the presence of both proteins together is required for the essential regulation of autophagy to avoid embryonic lethality. However, the structural aspects of LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 have not been elucidated. In the present study, we demonstrated that the subdomains of LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 adopt the unique β-prism fold, similar to the domain structure of the dendritic cell-specific-LAMP (DC-LAMP, LAMP-3), confirming the conserved aspect of this family of lysosome-associated membrane proteins. Furthermore, we evaluated the effects of the N-domain truncation of LAMP-1 or LAMP-2 on the assembly of LAMPs, based on immunoprecipitation experiments. We found that the N-domain of LAMP-1 is necessary, whereas that of LAMP-2 is repressive, for the organization of a multimeric assembly of LAMPs. Accordingly, the present study suggests for the first time that the assembly modes of LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 are different, which may underlie their distinct functions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Analysis of self-assembly of S-layer protein slp-B53 from Lysinibacillus sphaericus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Falke, Sven; Drobot, Bjoern; Oberthuer, Dominik; Kikhney, Alexey; Guenther, Tobias; Fahmy, Karim; Svergun, Dmitri; Betzel, Christian; Raff, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    The formation of stable and functional surface layers (S-layers) via self-assembly of surface-layer proteins on the cell surface is a dynamic and complex process. S-layers facilitate a number of important biological functions, e.g., providing protection and mediating selective exchange of molecules and thereby functioning as molecular sieves. Furthermore, S-layers selectively bind several metal ions including uranium, palladium, gold, and europium, some of them with high affinity. Most current research on surface layers focuses on investigating crystalline arrays of protein subunits in Archaea and bacteria. In this work, several complementary analytical techniques and methods have been applied to examine structure-function relationships and dynamics for assembly of S-layer protein slp-B53 from Lysinibacillus sphaericus: (1) The secondary structure of the S-layer protein was analyzed by circular dichroism spectroscopy; (2) Small-angle X-ray scattering was applied to gain insights into the three-dimensional structure in solution; (3) The interaction with bivalent cations was followed by differential scanning calorimetry; (4) The dynamics and time-dependent assembly of S-layers were followed by applying dynamic light scattering; (5) The two-dimensional structure of the paracrystalline S-layer lattice was examined by atomic force microscopy. The data obtained provide essential structural insights into the mechanism of S-layer self-assembly, particularly with respect to binding of bivalent cations, i.e., Mg2+ and Ca2+. Furthermore, the results obtained highlight potential applications of S-layers in the fields of micromaterials and nanobiotechnology by providing engineered or individual symmetric thin protein layers, e.g., for protective, antimicrobial, or otherwise functionalized surfaces.

  7. Chiral recognition and selection during the self-assembly process of protein-mimic macroanions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Panchao; Zhang, Zhi-Ming; Lv, Hongjin; Li, Tao; Haso, Fadi; Hu, Lang; Zhang, Baofang; Basca, John; Wei, Yongge; Gao, Yanqing; Hou, Yu; Li, Yang-Guang; Hill, Craig L.; Wang, En-Bo; Liu, Tianbo

    2015-03-01

    The research on chiral recognition and chiral selection is not only fundamental in resolving the puzzle of homochirality, but also instructive in chiral separation and stereoselective catalysis. Here we report the chiral recognition and chiral selection during the self-assembly process of two enantiomeric wheel-shaped macroanions, [Fe28(μ3-O)8(Tart)16(HCOO)24]20- (Tart=D- or L-tartaric acid tetra-anion). The enantiomers are observed to remain self-sorted and self-assemble into their individual assemblies in their racemic mixture solution. The addition of chiral co-anions can selectively suppress the self-assembly process of the enantiomeric macroanions, which is further used to separate the two enantiomers from their mixtures on the basis of the size difference between the monomers and the assemblies. We believe that delicate long-range electrostatic interactions could be responsible for such high-level chiral recognition and selection.

  8. Unusual Self-Assembly of the Recombinant Chlamydia trachomatis Major Outer Membrane Protein (MOMP)-based Fusion Antigen CTH522 into Protein Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Fabrice; Karlsen, Kasper; Jensen, Pernille

    2018-01-01

    and cysteine-free version of MOMP fused to four variable domains from serovars D-G. In the native state, CTH522 did not exist as a monomer, but showed an unusual self-assembly into nanoparticles with a negative zeta-potential. In contrast to the β-barrel structure of MOMP, native CTH522 contained no well......-defined secondary structural elements, and no thermal transitions were measurable. Chemical unfolding resulted monomers that upon removal of the denaturant self-assembled into higher order structures, comparable to the structure of the native protein. The conformation of CTH522 in nanoparticles is thus not entirely...... random and contains structural elements stabilized via denaturant-disruptable hydrophobic interactions. In conclusion, CTH522 has an unusual quaternary structure of supramolecular self-assemblies....

  9. A fast template periodogram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffman John

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This proceedings contribution presents a novel, non-linear extension to the Lomb-Scargle periodogram that allows periodograms to be generated for arbitrary signal shapes. Such periodograms are already known as “template periodograms” or “periodic matched filters,” but current implementations are computationally inefficient. The “fast template periodogram” presented here improves existing techniques by a factor of ∼a few for small test cases (O(10 observations, and over three orders of magnitude for lightcurves containing O(104 observations. The fast template periodogram scales asymptotically as O(HNf log HNf + H4Nf, where H denotes the number of harmonics required to adequately approximate the template and Nf is the number of trial frequencies. Existing implementations scale as O(NobsNf, where Nobs is the number of observations in the lightcurve. An open source Python implementation is available on GitHub.

  10. A fast template periodogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, John; VanderPlas, Jake; Hartman, Joel; Bakos, Gáspár

    2017-09-01

    This proceedings contribution presents a novel, non-linear extension to the Lomb-Scargle periodogram that allows periodograms to be generated for arbitrary signal shapes. Such periodograms are already known as "template periodograms" or "periodic matched filters," but current implementations are computationally inefficient. The "fast template periodogram" presented here improves existing techniques by a factor of ˜a few for small test cases (O(10) observations), and over three orders of magnitude for lightcurves containing O(104) observations. The fast template periodogram scales asymptotically as O(HNf log HNf + H4Nf), where H denotes the number of harmonics required to adequately approximate the template and Nf is the number of trial frequencies. Existing implementations scale as O(NobsNf), where Nobs is the number of observations in the lightcurve. An open source Python implementation is available on GitHub.

  11. Iron-sulphur cluster assembly in plants: distinct NFU proteins in mitochondria and plastids from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léon, Sébastien; Touraine, Brigitte; Ribot, Cécile; Briat, Jean-François; Lobréaux, Stéphane

    2003-01-01

    Recent results are in favour of a role for NFU-like proteins in Fe-S cluster biogenesis. These polypeptides share a conserved CXXC motif in their NFU domain. In the present study, we have characterized Arabidopsis thaliana NFU1-5 genes. AtNFU proteins are separated into two classes. NFU4 and NFU5 are part of the mitochondrial type, presenting a structural organization similar to Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nfu1p. These proteins complement a Delta isu1 Delta nfu1 yeast mutant and NFU4 mitochondrial localization was confirmed by green fluorescent protein fusion analysis. AtNFU1-3 represent a new class of NFU proteins, unique to plants. These polypeptides are made of two NFU domains, the second having lost its CXXC motif. AtNFU1-3 proteins are more related to Synechocystis PCC6803 NFU-like proteins and are localized to plastids when fused with the green fluorescent protein. NFU2 and/or NFU3 were detected in leaf chloroplasts by immunoblotting. NFU1 and NFU2 are functional NFU capable of restoring the growth of a Delta isu1 Delta nfu1 yeast mutant, when addressed to yeast mitochondria. Furthermore, NFU2 recombinant protein is capable of binding a labile 2Fe-2S cluster in vitro. These results demonstrate the presence of distinct NFU proteins in Arabidopsis mitochondria and plastids. Such results suggest the existence of two different Fe-S assembly machineries in plant cells. PMID:12553879

  12. A simple coarse-grained model for self-assembling silk-like protein fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schor, Marieke; Ensing, Bernd; Bolhuis, Peter G

    2010-01-01

    Collagen-silk-collagen triblock polypeptides can self-assemble at low pH into nanometer thin fibers with a length in the order of micrometers. Previously we predicted, via all-atom simulations, the structure of the folded silk domain to be a beta-roll. In this work we develop a simple coarse-grained model of the silk domain to enable a numerical study of the fiber's properties and formation on a larger length and time scale. As an initial coarse-grained model for the fiber forming protein we chose the model of Brown et al., Proc. Natl. Acad Sci. U.S.A., 2003, 100, 10712-10717. We adapted this model, and optimized its parameters to reproduce the all-atom molecular dynamics simulation structural data. The unknown strength of the attraction between the beads representing the residues is optimized by computing the Potential of Mean Force for unfolding a strand of the beta-roll, using non-equilibrium steered MD simulations in combination with the Jarzynski relation. Using these optimized parameters we observed spontaneous folding of a short peptide. The coarse-grained beta-roll, as well as a much larger stack (a fiber) of beta-rolls, were found to be stable. Moreover, the predicted fiber persistence length is in agreement with experiment. The efficacy of the mapping of a coarse-grained system onto an all-atom simulation is discussed. The approach opens the way for large-scale simulations of fibers, based on molecular structure, and allows investigation of their nucleation, growth, cross-linking mechanism, network dynamics, and rheology.

  13. Relevance of Assembly-Activating Protein for Adeno-associated Virus Vector Production and Capsid Protein Stability in Mammalian and Insect Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Stefanie; Penaud-Budloo, Magalie; Herrmann, Anne-Kathrin; Börner, Kathleen; Fakhiri, Julia; Laketa, Vibor; Krämer, Chiara; Wiedtke, Ellen; Gunkel, Manuel; Ménard, Lucie; Ayuso, Eduard; Grimm, Dirk

    2017-10-15

    The discovery that adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) encodes an eighth protein, called assembly-activating protein (AAP), transformed our understanding of wild-type AAV biology. Concurrently, it raised questions about the role of AAP during production of recombinant vectors based on natural or molecularly engineered AAV capsids. Here, we show that AAP is indeed essential for generation of functional recombinant AAV2 vectors in both mammalian and insect cell-based vector production systems. Surprisingly, we observed that AAV2 capsid proteins VP1 to -3 are unstable in the absence of AAP2, likely due to rapid proteasomal degradation. Inhibition of the proteasome led to an increase of intracellular VP1 to -3 but neither triggered assembly of functional capsids nor promoted nuclear localization of the capsid proteins. Together, this underscores the crucial and unique role of AAP in the AAV life cycle, where it rapidly chaperones capsid assembly, thus preventing degradation of free capsid proteins. An expanded analysis comprising nine alternative AAV serotypes (1, 3 to 9, and rh10) showed that vector production always depends on the presence of AAP, with the exceptions of AAV4 and AAV5, which exhibited AAP-independent, albeit low-level, particle assembly. Interestingly, AAPs from all 10 serotypes could cross-complement AAP-depleted helper plasmids during vector production, despite there being distinct intracellular AAP localization patterns. These were most pronounced for AAP4 and AAP5, congruent with their inability to rescue an AAV2/AAP2 knockout. We conclude that AAP is key for assembly of genuine capsids from at least 10 different AAV serotypes, which has implications for vectors derived from wild-type or synthetic AAV capsids.IMPORTANCE Assembly of adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) is regulated by the assembly-activating protein (AAP), whose open reading frame overlaps with that of the viral capsid proteins. As the majority of evidence was obtained using virus

  14. Papillomavirus L1 major capsid protein self-assembles into virus-like particles that are highly immunogenic.

    OpenAIRE

    Kirnbauer, R.; Booy, F; Cheng, N.; Lowy, D R; Schiller, J T

    1992-01-01

    Infection by certain human papillomavirus types is regarded as the major risk factor in the development of cervical cancer, one of the most common cancers of women worldwide. Analysis of the immunogenic and structural features of papillomavirus virions has been hampered by the inability to efficiently propagate the viruses in cultured cells. For instance, it has not been established whether the major capsid protein L1 alone is sufficient for virus particle assembly. In addition, it is not kno...

  15. On the lipid head group hydration of floating surface monolayers bound to self-assembled molecular protein layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lösche, M.; Erdelen, C.; Rump, E.

    1994-01-01

    with molecular resolution. Emphasis here is placed on the hydration of the lipid head groups in the bound state. For three functionalized lipids with spacers of different lengths between the biotin and their chains it was observed that the head groups were dehydrated in monolayers of the pure lipids, which were...... groups were thus presented further away from the interface, and a hydration layer between the protein and the functionalized interface was observed in the self-assembled supramolecular structures....

  16. Distinct roles for nucleic acid in vitro assembly of purified Mason-Pfizer monkey virus CANC proteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ulbrich, P.; Haubová, Š.; Nermut, M. V.; Hunter, E.; Rumlová, Michaela; Ruml, Tomáš

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 14 (2006), s. 7089-7099 ISSN 0022-538X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4055304; GA ČR(CZ) GP203/03/P094; GA MŠk 1M0520 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : M-PMV * CANC proteins * HIV -1 * in vitro assembly Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 5.341, year: 2006

  17. Self-assembly of virus-like particles of porcine circovirus type 2 capsid protein expressed from Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Xuepeng

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2 is a serious problem to the swine industry and can lead to significant negative impacts on profitability of pork production. Syndrome associated with PCV2 is known as porcine circovirus closely associated with post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS. The capsid (Cap protein of PCV2 is a major candidate antigen for development of recombinant vaccine and serological diagnostic method. The recombinant Cap protein has the ability to self-assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs in vitro, it is particularly opportunity to develop the PV2 VLPs vaccine in Escherichia coli,(E.coli , because where the cost of the vaccine must be weighed against the value of the vaccinated pig, when it was to extend use the VLPs vaccine of PCV2. Results In this report, a highly soluble Cap-tag protein expressed in E.coli was constructed with a p-SMK expression vector with a fusion tag of small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMO. The recombinant Cap was purified using Ni2+ affinity resins, whereas the tag was used to remove the SUMO protease. Simultaneously, the whole native Cap protein was able to self-assemble into VLPs in vitro when viewed under an electron microscope. The Cap-like particles had a size and shape that resembled the authentic Cap. The result could also be applied in the large-scale production of VLPs of PCV2 and could be used as a diagnostic antigen or a potential VLP vaccine against PCV2 infection in pigs. Conclusion we have, for the first time, utilized the SUMO fusion motif to successfully express the entire authentic Cap protein of PCV2 in E. coli. After the cleavage of the fusion motif, the nCap protein has the ability to self-assemble into VLPs, which can be used as as a potential vaccine to protect pigs from PCV2-infection.

  18. An improved design of spiral tube assembly for separation of proteins by high-speed counter-current chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasarathy, Dhweeja; Ito, Yoichiro

    2015-10-30

    A new spiral tube assembly was designed to improve the column capacity and partition efficiency for protein separation. This spiral tube assembly has greater column capacity than the original tubing because of an increase in radial grooves from 4 to 12 to accommodate more spiral layers and 12 narrow spots instead of 4 in each circular loop to interrupt the laminar flow that causes sample band broadening. Standard PTFE tubing (1.6mm ID) and the modified flat-twisted tubing were used as the separation column. The performances of both assemblies were compared for separating three stable test proteins including cytochrome c, myoglobin, and lysozyme using a two phase aqueous-aqueous solvent system composed of polyethylene glycol 1000 (12.5% w/w) and dibasic potassium phosphate (12.5% w/w). All samples were run at 1, 2, 3, and 5mL/min at both 800rpm and 1000rpm. The separation of these three protein samples produced high stationary phase retentions at 1, 2, and 3mL/min, yet separated efficiently at 5mL/min in 40min. After comparing the separation efficiency in terms of the peak resolutions, theoretical plate numbers, and separation times, it was determined that the flat-twisted tubing was more effective in separating these protein samples. In order to validate the efficacy of this novel assembly, a mixture of five protein samples (cytochrome c, myoglobin, ovalbumin, lysozyme, and hemoglobin) were separated, under the optimal conditions established with these three protein samples, at 1mL/min with a revolution speed of 1000rpm. There were high stationary phase retentions of around 60%, with effective separations, demonstrating the efficiency of the flat-twisted spiral tube assembly. The separation time of 6h was a limitation but can potentially be shortened by improving the strength of the column that will permit an increase in revolution speed and flow rate. This novel spiral separation column will allow rapid and efficient separation of mixtures with high yield of the

  19. Assembly of the chloroplast ATP-dependent Clp protease in Arabidopsis is regulated by the ClpT accessory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjögren, Lars L E; Clarke, Adrian K

    2011-01-01

    The ATP-dependent caseinolytic protease (Clp) is an essential housekeeping enzyme in plant chloroplasts. It is by far the most complex of all known Clp proteases, with a proteolytic core consisting of multiple catalytic ClpP and noncatalytic ClpR subunits. It also includes a unique form of Clp protein of unknown function designated ClpT, two of which exist in the model species Arabidopsis thaliana. Inactivation of ClpT1 or ClpT2 significantly reduces the amount of Clp proteolytic core, whereas loss of both proves seedling lethal under autotrophic conditions. During assembly of the Clp proteolytic core, ClpT1 first binds to the P-ring (consisting of ClpP3-6 subunits) followed by ClpT2, and only then does the P-ring combine with the R-ring (ClpP1, ClpR1-4 subunits). Most of the ClpT proteins in chloroplasts exist in vivo as homodimers, which then apparently monomerize prior to association with the P-ring. Despite their relative abundance, however, the availability of both ClpT proteins is rate limiting for the core assembly, with the addition of recombinant ClpT1 and ClpT2 increasing core content up to fourfold. Overall, ClpT appears to regulate the assembly of the chloroplast Clp protease, revealing a new and sophisticated control mechanism on the activity of this vital protease in plants.

  20. Sensitive Western-Blot Analysis of Azide-Tagged Protein Post Translational Modifications Using Thermoresponsive Polymer Self-Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tong; Zhang, Wanjun; Zhang, Zheng; Chen, Mingli; Wang, Jianhua; Qian, Xiaohong; Qin, Weijie

    2018-02-06

    Western-blot (WB) is a powerful analytical technique for protein identification in complex biological samples and has been widely used in biological studies for decades. Detection specificity and sensitivity of WB largely relies on quality of the antibodies and performance of the conjugated HRP. However, the application of WB analysis for the detection of protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) is hampered by the low abundance of protein PTMs and by the limited availability of antibodies that specifically differentiate various kinds of PTMs from their protein substrates. Therefore, new recognition mechanisms and signal amplification strategies for WB analysis of protein PTMs is in high demand. In this work, we prepared a soluble polymer that detects various azide-tagged PTM proteins in WB analysis using triarylphosphine and HRP modified thermoresponsive polymer. Specific and efficient detection of azide-tagged PTM protein is achieved via the bioorthogonal reaction between azide and triarylphosphine. More importantly, the chemiluminiscent signal in the WB analysis is largely amplified by the temperature induced self-assembly of numerous thermoresponsive polymer chains carrying multiple HRPs. As a result, approximately 100 times more sensitive detection than commercial antibodies is achieved by this method using standard PTM proteins. Though, this new reagent does not directly detect native PTMs in cell, tissue or blood samples, it still has important application potential in protein PTM studies, considering the wide availability of azide-tagging techniques to a variety of PTMs.

  1. Phosphatidylcholine affects the role of the sorting and assembly machinery in the biogenesis of mitochondrial β-barrel proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler, Max-Hinderk; Di Bartolomeo, Francesca; Böttinger, Lena; Horvath, Susanne E; Wenz, Lena-Sophie; Daum, Günther; Becker, Thomas

    2015-10-30

    Two protein translocases drive the import of β-barrel precursor proteins into the mitochondrial outer membrane: The translocase of the outer membrane (TOM complex) promotes transport of the precursor to the intermembrane space, whereas the sorting and assembly machinery (SAM complex) mediates subsequent folding of the β-barrel and its integration into the target membrane. The non-bilayer-forming phospholipids phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and cardiolipin (CL) are required for the biogenesis of β-barrel proteins. Whether bilayer-forming phospholipids such as phosphatidylcholine (PC), the most abundant phospholipid of the mitochondrial outer membrane, play a role in the import of β-barrel precursors is unclear. In this study, we show that PC is required for stability and function of the SAM complex during the biogenesis of β-barrel proteins. PC further promotes the SAM-dependent assembly of the TOM complex, indicating a general role of PC for the function of the SAM complex. In contrast to PE-deficient mitochondria precursor accumulation at the TOM complex is not affected by depletion of PC. We conclude that PC and PE affect the function of distinct protein translocases in mitochondrial β-barrel biogenesis. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Structural and functional features of self-assembling protein nanoparticles produced in endotoxin-free Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda, Fabián; Céspedes, María Virtudes; Sánchez-Chardi, Alejandro; Seras-Franzoso, Joaquin; Pesarrodona, Mireia; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus; Vázquez, Esther; Rinas, Ursula; Unzueta, Ugutz; Mamat, Uwe; Mangues, Ramón; García-Fruitós, Elena; Villaverde, Antonio

    2016-04-08

    Production of recombinant drugs in process-friendly endotoxin-free bacterial factories targets to a lessened complexity of the purification process combined with minimized biological hazards during product application. The development of nanostructured recombinant materials in innovative nanomedical activities expands such a need beyond plain functional polypeptides to complex protein assemblies. While Escherichia coli has been recently modified for the production of endotoxin-free proteins, no data has been so far recorded regarding how the system performs in the fabrication of smart nanostructured materials. We have here explored the nanoarchitecture and in vitro and in vivo functionalities of CXCR4-targeted, self-assembling protein nanoparticles intended for intracellular delivery of drugs and imaging agents in colorectal cancer. Interestingly, endotoxin-free materials exhibit a distinguishable architecture and altered size and target cell penetrability than counterparts produced in conventional E. coli strains. These variant nanoparticles show an eventual proper biodistribution and highly specific and exclusive accumulation in tumor upon administration in colorectal cancer mice models, indicating a convenient display and function of the tumor homing peptides and high particle stability under physiological conditions. The observations made here support the emerging endotoxin-free E. coli system as a robust protein material producer but are also indicative of a particular conformational status and organization of either building blocks or oligomers. This appears to be promoted by multifactorial stress-inducing conditions upon engineering of the E. coli cell envelope, which impacts on the protein quality control of the cell factory.

  3. Identifying SARS-CoV membrane protein amino acid residues linked to virus-like particle assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Tzu Tseng

    Full Text Available Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV membrane (M proteins are capable of self-assembly and release in the form of membrane-enveloped vesicles, and of forming virus-like particles (VLPs when coexpressed with SARS-CoV nucleocapsid (N protein. According to previous deletion analyses, M self-assembly involves multiple M sequence regions. To identify important M amino acid residues for VLP assembly, we coexpressed N with multiple M mutants containing substitution mutations at the amino-terminal ectodomain, carboxyl-terminal endodomain, or transmembrane segments. Our results indicate that a dileucine motif in the endodomain tail (218LL219 is required for efficient N packaging into VLPs. Results from cross-linking VLP analyses suggest that the cysteine residues 63, 85 and 158 are not in close proximity to the M dimer interface. We noted a significant reduction in M secretion due to serine replacement for C158, but not for C63 or C85. Further analysis suggests that C158 is involved in M-N interaction. In addition to mutations of the highly conserved 107-SWWSFNPE-114 motif, substitutions at codons W19, W57, P58, W91, Y94 or F95 all resulted in significantly reduced VLP yields, largely due to defective M secretion. VLP production was not significantly affected by a tryptophan replacement of Y94 or F95 or a phenylalanine replacement of W19, W57 or W91. Combined, these results indicate the involvement of specific M amino acids during SARS-CoV virus assembly, and suggest that aromatic residue retention at specific positions is critical for M function in terms of directing virus assembly.

  4. Protein-templated cobaltous phosphate nanocomposites for the highly sensitive and selective detection of platelet-derived growth factor-BB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Linghao; Zhang, Shuai; Ji, Hongfei; Wang, Minghua; Peng, Donglai; Yan, Fufeng; Fang, Shaoming; Zhang, Hongzhong; Jia, Chunxiao; Zhang, Zhihong

    2016-05-15

    We synthesized novel Co3(PO4)2-based nanocomposites with 3D porous architectures via self-assembly; here, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and aptamer were used as organic phases to produce Co3(PO4)2@BSA and Co3(PO4)2@Apt nanocomposites, respectively. The formation mechanism of Co3(PO4)2-based nanocomposites was described based on characterizations of their physio-chemical performance, and the developed nanocomposites were applied as scaffold materials to construct a novel electrochemical aptasensor and detect platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB). The PDGF-BB targeting aptamer must be immobilized onto the Co3(PO4)2@BSA-modified electrode to detect PDGF-BB, whereas Co3(PO4)2@Apt-based aptasensor may be directly used to determine the target protein. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results showed that the developed Co3(PO4)2@BSA- and Co3(PO4)2@Apt-based aptasensors present highly sensitive detection ability toward PDGF-BB. Due to the special nanoflower structure, the Co3(PO4)2@BSA-based aptasensor features a detection limit of 3.7 pg mL(-1); while the limit of detection of the Co3(PO4)2@Apt-based aptasensor is 61.5 pg mL(-1), which is the possible bioactivity loss of the aptamer in Co3(PO4)2@Apt nanocomposite. The two detection limits obtained are still much lower than or comparable with those of previously reported aptasensors. The Co3(PO4)2@BSA- and Co3(PO4)2@Apt-based aptasensors showed high selectivity, stability, and applicability for detecting the desired protein. This finding indicates that the Co3(PO4)2-based nanocomposites could be used as an electrochemical biosensor for various detection procedures in the biomedical field. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Gold nanoparticle assisted assembly of a heme protein for enhancement of long-range interfacial electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Palle Skovhus; Chi, Qijin; Grumsen, Flemming Bjerg

    2007-01-01

    -defined stoichiometry. The systems were investigated in homogeneous solution and at liquid/solid interface. Conjugation of cyt c results in a small but consistent broadening of the nanoparticle plasmon band. This phenomenon can be explained in terms of long-range electronic interactions between the gold nanoparticle...... and characterization of water-soluble gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with core diameter 3-4 nm and their application for the enhancement of long-range interfacial ET of a heme protein. Gold nanoparticles were electrostatically conjugated with cyt c to form nanoparticle-protein hybrid ET systems with well...... and the protein molecule. When the nanoparticle-protein conjugates are assembled on Au(111) surfaces, long-range interfacial ET across a physical distance of over 50 A via the nanoparticle becomes feasible. Moreover, significant enhancement of the interfacial ET rate by more than an order of magnitude compared...

  6. Circular Permutation of a Chaperonin Protein: Biophysics and Application to Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paavola, Chad; Chan, Suzanne; Li, Yi-Fen; McMillan, R. Andrew; Trent, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    We have designed five circular permutants of a chaperonin protein derived from the hyperthermophilic organism Sulfolobus shibatae. These permuted proteins were expressed in E. coli and are well-folded. Furthermore, all the permutants assemble into 18-mer double rings of the same form as the wild-type protein. We characterized the thermodynamics of folding for each permutant by both guanidine denaturation and differential scanning calorimetry. We also examined the assembly of chaperonin rings into higher order structures that may be used as nanoscale templates. The results show that circular permutation can be used to tune the thermodynamic properties of a protein template as well as facilitating the fusion of peptides, binding proteins or enzymes onto nanostructured templates.

  7. Protein Phosphatase 1 inactivates Mps1 to ensure efficient Spindle Assembly Checkpoint silencing

    OpenAIRE

    Moura, Margarida; Osswald, Mariana; Le?a, Nelson; Barbosa, Jo?o; Pereira, Ant?nio J; Maiato, Helder; Sunkel, Claudio E; Conde, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Faithfull genome partitioning during cell division relies on the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint (SAC), a conserved signaling pathway that delays anaphase onset until all chromosomes are attached to spindle microtubules. Mps1 kinase is an upstream SAC regulator that promotes the assembly of an anaphase inhibitor through a sequential multi-target phosphorylation cascade. Thus, the SAC is highly responsive to Mps1, whose activity peaks in early mitosis as a result of its T-loop autophosphorylation....

  8. Protein adsorption and biomimetic mineralization behaviors of PLL-DNA multilayered films assembled onto titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao Wenli [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Feng Bo, E-mail: fengbo@swjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Ni Yuxiang [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Yang Yongli [College of Material Science and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610054 (China); Lu Xiong; Weng Jie [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China)

    2010-11-01

    Titanium and its alloys are frequently used as surgical implants in load bearing situations, such as hip prostheses and dental implants, owing to their biocompatibility, mechanical and physical properties. In this paper, a layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly technique, based on the polyelectrolyte-mediated electrostatic adsorption of poly-L-lysine (PLL) and DNA, was used to the formation of multilayer on titanium surfaces. Then bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorption and biomimetic mineralization of modified surfaces were studied. The chemical composition and wettability of assembled substrates were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), fluorescence microscopy and water contact angle measurement, respectively. The XPS analysis indicated that the layers were assembled successfully through electrostatic attractions. The measurement with ultraviolet (UV) spectrophotometer revealed that the LBL films enhanced ability of BSA adsorption onto titanium. The adsorption quantity of BSA on the surface terminated with PLL was higher than that of the surface terminated with DNA, and the samples of TiOH/P/D/P absorbed BSA most. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that samples of assembled PLL or/and DNA had better bioactivity in inducing HA formation. Thus the assembling of PLL and DNA onto the surface of titanium in turn via a layer-by-layer self-assembly technology can improve the bioactivity of titanium.

  9. Species-specificity of the BamA component of the bacterial outer membrane protein-assembly machinery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena B Volokhina

    Full Text Available The BamA protein is the key component of the Bam complex, the assembly machinery for outer membrane proteins (OMP in gram-negative bacteria. We previously demonstrated that BamA recognizes its OMP substrates in a species-specific manner in vitro. In this work, we further studied species specificity in vivo by testing the functioning of BamA homologs of the proteobacteria Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Bordetella pertussis, Burkholderia mallei, and Escherichia coli in E. coli and in N. meningitidis. We found that no BamA functioned in another species than the authentic one, except for N. gonorrhoeae BamA, which fully complemented a N. meningitidis bamA mutant. E. coli BamA was not assembled into the N. meningitidis outer membrane. In contrast, the N. meningitidis BamA protein was assembled into the outer membrane of E. coli to a significant extent and also associated with BamD, an essential accessory lipoprotein of the Bam complex.Various chimeras comprising swapped N-terminal periplasmic and C-terminal membrane-embedded domains of N. meningitidis and E. coli BamA proteins were also not functional in either host, although some of them were inserted in the OM suggesting that the two domains of BamA need to be compatible in order to function. Furthermore, conformational analysis of chimeric proteins provided evidence for a 16-stranded β-barrel conformation of the membrane-embedded domain of BamA.

  10. Separation of assembly-competent tubulin from brain microtubule protein preparations using a fast-performance liquid chromatography procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roychowdhury, S; Gaskin, F

    1986-05-01

    Fast-performance liquid chromatography was used to purify assembly-competent tubulin from porcine brain microtubule protein prepared by two cycles of assembly-disassembly. Microtubule protein (1-100 mg at 1.5-2.5 mg/ml) in buffer consisting of 0.1 M 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid, 0.5 mM MgCl2, 1 mM EGTA, 0.3 M KCl, and 0.02 mM GTP (pH 6.6) was applied to the Mono Q column (anion exchanger). The microtubule-associated proteins, GTP and GDP, eluted in the void volume. The tubulin fraction eluted at 0.45-0.50 M KCl with 65-80% recovery. The tubulin fraction contained trace enzymatic activities when compared with the starting microtubule protein, i.e., less than 1 versus 60 mU/mg/min of nucleoside diphosphate kinase, 0.2 versus 7.0 nmol/mg/min of Mg-ATPase at pH 6.6, and 0.2 versus 88 mU/mg/min of adenylate kinase. Both the Mono Q-purified tubulin and the pelleted microtubules that were assembled in 0.5 mM [3H]GTP contained 0.77 mol of labeled nucleotide/tubulin dimer. The Mono Q-purified tubulin fraction was competent to assemble, i.e., the critical concentration was 0.1 mg/ml in the presence of 0.03 mM taxol and 1 mM GTP at 37 degrees C. The Mono Q-purified tubulin fraction showed trace high-molecular-weight components, which were removed on Mono S (cation exchanger) columns. Alternatively, microtubule protein in buffer was applied to the Mono S column. Tubulin, trace nontubulin proteins, and several enzymatic activities came off in the void volume. A combination of Mono Q-Mono S or Mono S-Mono Q chromatography resulted in highly purified protein.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. The protein-protein interactions involved in the periplasmic components of the β-barrel assembly machinery (BAM) complex of Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Aulakh, Suraaj Kaur

    2012-01-01

    The β-barrel assembly machinery (BAM) complex plays the essential role of folding and inserting outer membrane proteins (OMPs) into the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. In Escherichia coli, the BAM complex is comprised of five proteins: BamA, BamB, BamC, BamD, and BamE. This thesis project investigates the interactions between the periplasmic components of the BAM complex by analyzing complex formation using gel-filtration chromatography. Results from the interaction studies have id...

  12. Biometric Template Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Nagar

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Biometric recognition offers a reliable solution to the problem of user authentication in identity management systems. With the widespread deployment of biometric systems in various applications, there are increasing concerns about the security and privacy of biometric technology. Public acceptance of biometrics technology will depend on the ability of system designers to demonstrate that these systems are robust, have low error rates, and are tamper proof. We present a high-level categorization of the various vulnerabilities of a biometric system and discuss countermeasures that have been proposed to address these vulnerabilities. In particular, we focus on biometric template security which is an important issue because, unlike passwords and tokens, compromised biometric templates cannot be revoked and reissued. Protecting the template is a challenging task due to intrauser variability in the acquired biometric traits. We present an overview of various biometric template protection schemes and discuss their advantages and limitations in terms of security, revocability, and impact on matching accuracy. A template protection scheme with provable security and acceptable recognition performance has thus far remained elusive. Development of such a scheme is crucial as biometric systems are beginning to proliferate into the core physical and information infrastructure of our society.

  13. Cell-free system for synthesizing membrane proteins cell free method for synthesizing membrane proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laible, Philip D; Hanson, Deborah K

    2013-06-04

    The invention provides an in vitro method for producing proteins, membrane proteins, membrane-associated proteins, and soluble proteins that interact with membrane-associated proteins for assembly into an oligomeric complex or that require association with a membrane for proper folding. The method comprises, supplying intracytoplasmic membranes from organisms; modifying protein composition of intracytoplasmic membranes from organism by modifying DNA to delete genes encoding functions of the organism not associated with the formation of the intracytoplasmic membranes; generating appropriate DNA or RNA templates that encode the target protein; and mixing the intracytoplasmic membranes with the template and a transcription/translation-competent cellular extract to cause simultaneous production of the membrane proteins and encapsulation of the membrane proteins within the intracytoplasmic membranes.

  14. Assembly of HE800 exopolysaccharide produced by a deep-sea hydrothermal bacterium into microgels for protein delivery applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zykwinska, Agata; Marquis, Mélanie; Sinquin, Corinne; Cuenot, Stéphane; Colliec-Jouault, Sylvia

    2016-05-20

    Assembly of biopolymers into microgels is an elegant strategy for bioencapsulation with various potential biomedical applications. Such biocompatible and biodegradable microassemblies are developed not only to protect the encapsulated molecule but also to ensure its sustained local delivery. The present study describes the fabrication of microassemblies from a marine HE800 exopolysaccharide (EPS), which displays a glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-like structure and biological properties. HE800 EPS was assembled, through physical cross-linking with divalent ions, into microgel particles and microfibers using microfluidics. The microparticle morphology was highly affected by the polysaccharide concentration and its molecular weight. A model protein, namely Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) was subsequently encapsulated within HE800 microparticles in one-step process using microfluidics. The protein release was tuned by the microparticle morphology with a lower protein amount released from the most homogeneous structures. Our findings demonstrate the high potential of HE800 EPS based microassemblies as innovative protein microcarriers for further biomedical applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Interactions between Vaccinia Virus IEV Membrane Proteins and Their Roles in IEV Assembly and Actin Tail Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röttger, Sabine; Frischknecht, Friedrich; Reckmann, Inge; Smith, Geoffrey L.; Way, Michael

    1999-01-01

    The intracellular enveloped form of vaccinia virus (IEV) induces the formation of actin tails that are strikingly similar to those seen in Listeria and Shigella infections. In contrast to the case for Listeria and Shigella, the vaccinia virus protein(s) responsible for directly initiating actin tail formation remains obscure. However, previous studies with recombinant vaccinia virus strains have suggested that the IEV-specific proteins A33R, A34R, A36R, B5R, and F13L play an undefined role in actin tail formation. In this study we have sought to understand how these proteins, all of which are predicted to have small cytoplasmic domains, are involved in IEV assembly and actin tail formation. Our data reveal that while deletion of A34R, B5R, or F13L resulted in a severe reduction in IEV particle assembly, IEVs formed by the ΔB5R and ΔF13L deletion strains, but not ΔA34R, were still able to induce actin tails. The ΔA36R deletion strain produced normal amounts of IEV particles, although these were unable to induce actin tails. Using several different approaches, we demonstrated that A36R is a type Ib membrane protein with a large, 195-amino-acid cytoplasmic domain exposed on the surface of IEV particles. Finally, coimmunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that A36R interacts with A33R and A34R but not with B5R and that B5R forms a complex with A34R but not with A33R or A36R. Using extracts from ΔA34R- and ΔA36R-infected cells, we found that the interaction of A36R with A33R and that of A34R with B5R are independent of A34R and A36R, respectively. We conclude from our observations that multiple interactions between IEV membrane proteins exist which have important implications for IEV assembly and actin tail formation. Furthermore, these data suggest that while A34R is involved in IEV assembly and organization, A36R is critical for actin tail formation. PMID:10074134

  16. Isolation of Endogenously Assembled RNA-Protein Complexes Using Affinity Purification Based on Streptavidin Aptamer S1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangchao Dong

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Efficient isolation of endogenously assembled viral RNA-protein complexes is essential for understanding virus replication mechanisms. We have developed an affinity purification strategy based on an RNA affinity tag that allows large-scale preparation of native viral RNA-binding proteins (RBPs. The streptavidin-binding aptamer S1 sequence was inserted into the 3′ end of dengue virus (DENV 5′–3′ UTR RNA, and the DENV RNA UTR fused to the S1 RNA aptamer was expressed in living mammalian cells. This allowed endogenous viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP assembly and isolation of RNPs from whole cell extract, through binding the S1 aptamer to streptavidin magnetic beads. Several novel host DENV RBPs were subsequently identified by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS, including RPS8, which we further implicate in DENV replication. We proposed efficient S1 aptamer-based isolation of viral assembled RNPs from living mammalian cells will be generally applicable to the purification of high- and low-affinity RBPs and RNPs under endogenous conditions.

  17. The meiosis-specific nuclear passenger protein is required for proper assembly of forespore membrane in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaine, Masak; Imada, Kazuki; Numata, Osamu; Nakamura, Taro; Nakano, Kentaro

    2014-10-15

    Sporulation, gametogenesis in yeast, consists of meiotic nuclear division and spore morphogenesis. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the four haploid nuclei produced after meiosis II are encapsulated by the forespore membrane (FSM), which is newly synthesized from spindle pole bodies (SPBs) in the cytoplasm of the mother cell as spore precursors. Although the coordination between meiosis and FSM assembly is vital for proper sporulation, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we identified a new meiosis-specific protein Npg1, and found that it was involved in the efficient formation of spores and spore viability. The accumulation and organization of the FSM was compromised in npg1-null cells, leading to the error-prone envelopment of nuclei. Npg1 was first seen as internuclear dots and translocated to the SPBs before the FSM assembled. Genetic analysis revealed that Npg1 worked in conjunction with the FSM proteins Spo3 and Meu14. These results suggest a possible signaling link from the nucleus to the meiotic SPBs in order to associate the onset of FSM assembly with meiosis II, which ensures the successful partitioning of gametic nuclei. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Nucleic acid encoding a self-assembling split-fluorescent protein system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2015-07-14

    The invention provides a protein labeling and detection system based on self-complementing fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins. The system of the invention is exemplified with various combinations of self-complementing fragments derived from Aequorea victoria Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), which are used to detect and quantify protein solubility in multiple assay formats, both in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Envelope protein requirements for the assembly of infectious virions of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wissink, E.H.J.; Kroese, M.V.; Wijk, van H.A.; Rijsewijk, F.A.M.; Meulenberg, J.J.; Rottier, P.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Virions of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) contain six membrane proteins: the major proteins GP5 and M and the minor proteins GP2a, E, GP3, and GP4. Here, we studied the envelope protein requirements for PRRSV particle formation and infectivity using full-length cDNA

  20. Nucleic acid encoding a self-assembling split-fluorescent protein system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Cabantous, Stephanie [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-06-07

    The invention provides a protein labeling and detection system based on self-complementing fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins. The system of the invention is exemplified with various combinations of self-complementing fragments derived from Aequorea victoria Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), which are used to detect and quantify protein solubility in multiple assay formats, both in vitro and in vivo.

  1. Nucleic acid encoding a self-assembling split-fluorescent protein system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldo, Geoffrey S; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2014-04-01

    The invention provides a protein labeling and detection system based on self-complementing fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins. The system of the invention is exemplified with various combinations of self-complementing fragments derived from Aequorea victoria Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), which are used to detect and quantify protein solubility in multiple assay formats, both in vitro and in vivo.

  2. The Crystal Structure of a Maxi/Mini-Ferritin Chimera Reveals Guiding Principles for the Assembly of Protein Cages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornell, Thomas A. [Department; Division; Srivastava, Yogesh [Genome; Jauch, Ralf [Genome Institute of Singapore, Singapore; Genome; Fan, Rongli [Division; Orner, Brendan P. [Department; Division

    2017-07-19

    Cage proteins assemble into nanoscale structures with large central cavities. They play roles, including those as virus capsids and chaperones, and have been applied to drug delivery and nanomaterials. Furthermore, protein cages have been used as model systems to understand and design protein quaternary structure. Ferritins are ubiquitous protein cages that manage iron homeostasis and oxidative damage. Two ferritin subfamilies have strongly similar tertiary structure yet distinct quaternary structure: maxi-ferritins normally assemble into 24-meric, octahedral cages with C-terminal E-helices centered around 4-fold symmetry axes, and mini-ferritins are 12-meric, tetrahedral cages with 3-fold axes defined by C-termini lacking E-domains. To understand the role E-domains play in ferritin quaternary structure, we previously designed a chimera of a maxi-ferritin E-domain fused to the C-terminus of a mini-ferritin. The chimera is a 12-mer cage midway in size between those of the maxi- and mini-ferritin. The research described herein sets out to understand (a) whether the increase in size over a typical mini-ferritin is due to a frozen state where the E-domain is flipped out of the cage and (b) whether the symmetrical preference of the E-domain in the maxi-ferritin (4-fold axis) overrules the C-terminal preference in the mini-ferritin (3-fold axis). With a 1.99 Å resolution crystal structure, we determined that the chimera assembles into a tetrahedral cage that can be nearly superimposed with the parent mini-ferritin, and that the E-domains are flipped external to the cage at the 3-fold symmetry axes.

  3. AUP1 (Ancient Ubiquitous Protein 1) Is a Key Determinant of Hepatic Very-Low-Density Lipoprotein Assembly and Secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Zamani, Mostafa; Thiele, Christoph; Taher, Jennifer; Amir Alipour, Mohsen; Yao, Zemin; Adeli, Khosrow

    2017-04-01

    AUP1 (ancient ubiquitous protein 1) is an endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein that also localizes to the surface of lipid droplets (LDs), with dual role in protein quality control and LD regulation. Here, we investigated the role of AUP1 in hepatic lipid mobilization and demonstrate critical roles in intracellular biogenesis of apoB100 (apolipoprotein B-100), LD mobilization, and very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) assembly and secretion. APPROACH AND RESULTS: siRNA (short/small interfering RNA) knockdown of AUP1 significantly increased secretion of VLDL-sized apoB100-containing particles from HepG2 cells, correcting a key metabolic defect in these cells that normally do not secrete much VLDL. Secreted particles contained higher levels of metabolically labeled triglyceride, and AUP1-deficient cells displayed a larger average size of LDs, suggesting a role for AUP1 in lipid mobilization. Importantly, AUP1 was also found to directly interact with apoB100, and this interaction was enhanced with proteasomal inhibition. Knockdown of AUP1 reduced apoB100 ubiquitination, decreased intracellular degradation of newly synthesized apoB100, and enhanced extracellular apoB100 secretion. Interestingly, the stimulatory effect of AUP1 knockdown on VLDL assembly was reminiscent of the effect previously observed after MEK-ERK (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-extracellular signal-regulated kinase) inhibition; however, further studies indicated that the AUP1 effect was independent of MEK-ERK signaling. In summary, our findings reveal an important role for AUP1 as a regulator of apoB100 stability, hepatic LD metabolism, and intracellular lipidation of VLDL particles. AUP1 may be a crucial factor in apoB100 quality control, determining the rate at which apoB100 is degraded or lipidated to enable VLDL particle assembly and secretion. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Assembly of proteins and 5 S rRNA to transcripts of the major structural domains of 23 S rRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, P; Phan, H; Johansen, L B

    1998-01-01

    The six major structural domains of 23 S rRNA from Escherichia coli, and all combinations thereof, were synthesized as separate T7 transcripts and reconstituted with total 50 S subunit proteins. Analysis by one and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis demonstrated the presence of at least one......+VI. This indicates that there are two major protein assembly centres located at the ends of the 23 S rRNA, which is consistent with an earlier view that in vitro protein assembly nucleates around proteins L24 and L3. Although similar protein assembly patterns were observed over a range of temperature and magnesium...... approach was used to map the putative binding regions on domain V of protein L9 and the 5 S RNA-L5-L18 complex....

  5. Joomla! 3 template essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Frankowski, Pawel

    2013-01-01

    Using this hands-on, step-by step tutorial filled with practical examples, the readers will be able to create beautiful templates and themes for your websites that will make them stand out from others.This book is written for all of you who wish to create your own unique templates for Joomla! 3.x. This book can be used by Joomla! administrators or visual designers (with no programming experience) or those of you who are used to working with common web developer tools like HTML/CSS editors for coding purposes. You would need basic knowledge of Joomla! and some knowledge of CSS and HTML.

  6. Effect of Terminal Modification on the Molecular Assembly and Mechanical Properties of Protein-Based Block Copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Matthew M; Tokareva, Olena S; Ebrahimi, Davoud; Huang, Wenwen; Ling, Shengjie; Dinjaski, Nina; Li, David; Simon, Marc; Staii, Cristian; Buehler, Markus J; Kaplan, David L; Wong, Joyce Y

    2017-09-01

    Accurate prediction and validation of the assembly of bioinspired peptide sequences into fibers with defined mechanical characteristics would aid significantly in designing and creating materials with desired properties. This process may also be utilized to provide insight into how the molecular architecture of many natural protein fibers is assembled. In this work, computational modeling and experimentation are used in tandem to determine how peptide terminal modification affects a fiber-forming core domain. Modeling shows that increased terminal molecular weight and hydrophilicity improve peptide chain alignment under shearing conditions and promote consolidation of semicrystalline domains. Mechanical analysis shows acute improvements to strength and elasticity, but significantly reduced extensibility and overall toughness. These results highlight an important entropic function that terminal domains of fiber-forming peptides exhibit as chain alignment promoters, which ultimately has notable consequences on the mechanical behavior of the final fiber products. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Translation and Assembly of Radiolabeled Mitochondrial DNA-Encoded Protein Subunits from Cultured Cells and Isolated Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formosa, Luke E; Hofer, Annette; Tischner, Christin; Wenz, Tina; Ryan, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the mitochondrial electron transport chain consists of five multi-subunit membrane complexes responsible for the generation of cellular ATP. Of these, four complexes are under dual genetic control as they contain subunits encoded by both the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes, thereby adding another layer of complexity to the puzzle of respiratory complex biogenesis. These subunits must be synthesized and assembled in a coordinated manner in order to ensure correct biogenesis of different respiratory complexes. Here, we describe techniques to (1) specifically radiolabel proteins encoded by mtDNA to monitor the rate of synthesis using pulse labeling methods, and (2) analyze the stability, assembly, and turnover of subunits using pulse-chase methods in cultured cells and isolated mitochondria.

  8. Role of the HIV-1 Matrix Protein in Gag Intracellular Trafficking and Targeting to the Plasma Membrane for Virus Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruba H Ghanam

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 encodes a polypeptide called Gag that is able to form virus-like particles (VLPs in vitro in the absence of any cellular or viral constituents. During the late phase of the HIV-1 infection, Gag polyproteins are transported to the plasma membrane (PM for assembly. In the past two decades, in vivo, in vitro and structural studies have shown that Gag trafficking and targeting to the PM are orchestrated events that are dependent on multiple factors including cellular proteins and specific membrane lipids. The matrix (MA domain of Gag has been the focus of these studies as it appears to be engaged in multiple intracellular interactions that are suggested to be critical for virus assembly and replication. The interaction between Gag and the PM is perhaps the most understood. It is now established that the ultimate localization of Gag on punctate sites on the PM is mediated by specific interactions between the MA domain of Gag and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5P2, a minor lipid localized on the inner leaflet of the PM. Structure-based studies revealed that binding of PI(4,5P2 to MA induces minor conformational changes, leading to exposure of the myristyl (myr group. Exposure of the myr group is also triggered by binding of calmodulin, enhanced by factors that promote protein self-association like the capsid domain of Gag, and is modulated by pH. Despite the steady progress in defining both the viral and cellular determinants of retroviral assembly and release, Gag’s intracellular interactions and trafficking to its assembly sites in the infected cell are poorly understood. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the structural and functional role of MA in HIV replication.

  9. Footprints of Optimal Protein Assembly Strategies in the Operonic Structure of Prokaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Ewald

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we investigate optimality principles behind synthesis strategies for protein complexes using a dynamic optimization approach. We show that the cellular capacity of protein synthesis has a strong influence on optimal synthesis strategies reaching from a simultaneous to a sequential synthesis of the subunits of a protein complex. Sequential synthesis is preferred if protein synthesis is strongly limited, whereas a simultaneous synthesis is optimal in situations with a high protein synthesis capacity. We confirm the predictions of our optimization approach through the analysis of the operonic organization of protein complexes in several hundred prokaryotes. Thereby, we are able to show that cellular protein synthesis capacity is a driving force in the dissolution of operons comprising the subunits of a protein complex. Thus, we also provide a tested hypothesis explaining why the subunits of many prokaryotic protein complexes are distributed across several operons despite the presumably less precise co-regulation.

  10. Computing layouts with deformable templates

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Chihan

    2014-07-27

    In this paper, we tackle the problem of tiling a domain with a set of deformable templates. A valid solution to this problem completely covers the domain with templates such that the templates do not overlap. We generalize existing specialized solutions and formulate a general layout problem by modeling important constraints and admissible template deformations. Our main idea is to break the layout algorithm into two steps: a discrete step to lay out the approximate template positions and a continuous step to refine the template shapes. Our approach is suitable for a large class of applications, including floorplans, urban layouts, and arts and design. Copyright © ACM.

  11. A simple coarse-grained model for self-assembling silk-like protein fibers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schor, M.; Ensing, B.; Bolhuis, P.G.

    2010-01-01

    Collagen-silk-collagen triblock polypeptides can self-assemble at low pH into nanometer thin fibers with a length in the order of micrometers. Previously we predicted, via all-atom simulations, the structure of the folded silk domain to be a beta-roll. In this work we develop a simple coarse-grained

  12. Tomato spotted wilt virus particle assembly : studying the role of the structural proteins in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snippe, M.

    2006-01-01

    Members of the Bunyaviridae have spherical, enveloped virus particles that acquire their lipid membrane at the Golgi complex. For the animal-infecting bunyaviruses, virus assembly involves budding of ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs) into vacuolised lumen of the Golgi complex, after which the

  13. Programmable Self-Assembly of DNA-Protein Hybrid Hydrogel for Enzyme Encapsulation with Enhanced Biological Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Lan; Chen, Qiaoshu; Liu, Jianbo; Yang, Xiaohai; Huang, Jin; Li, Li; Guo, Xi; Zhang, Jue; Wang, Kemin

    2016-04-11

    A DNA-protein hybrid hydrogel was constructed based on a programmable assembly approach, which served as a biomimetic physiologic matrix for efficient enzyme encapsulation. A dsDNA building block tailored with precise biotin residues was fabricated based on supersandwich hybridization, and then the addition of streptavidin triggered the formation of the DNA-protein hybrid hydrogel. The biocompatible hydrogel, which formed a flower-like porous structure that was 6.7 ± 2.1 μm in size, served as a reservoir system for enzyme encapsulation. Alcohol oxidase (AOx), which served as a representative enzyme, was encapsulated in the hybrid hydrogel using a synchronous assembly approach. The enzyme-encapsulated hydrogel was utilized to extend the duration time for ethanol removal in serum plasma and the enzyme retained 78% activity after incubation with human serum for 24 h. The DNA-protein hybrid hydrogel can mediate the intact immobilization on a streptavidin-modified and positively charged substrate, which is very beneficial to solid-phase biosensing applications. The hydrogel-encapsulated enzyme exhibited improved stability in the presence of various denaturants. For example, the encapsulated enzyme retained 60% activity after incubation at 55 °C for 30 min. The encapsulated enzyme also retains its total activity after five freeze-thaw cycles and even suspended in solution containing organic solvents.

  14. Template Composite Dark Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drach, Vincent; Hietanen, Ari; Pica, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    We present a non perturbative study of SU(2) gauge theory with two fundamental Dirac flavours. We discuss how the model can be used as a template for composite Dark Matter (DM). We estimate one particular interaction of the DM candidate with the Standard Model : the interaction through photon...

  15. The Cadastral Template Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig; Steudler, Daniel; Williamson, Ian P.

    2004-01-01

      While many country reports have been compiled in the area of land administration over the last decade, there has not much attention been given to the basic cadastral issues. As a result, one of the objectives of Working Group 3 ?Cadastre? of the PCGIAP is the establishment of a cadastral template...

  16. Proton-driven assembly of the Rous Sarcoma virus capsid protein results in the formation of icosahedral particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Jae-Kyung; Radjainia, Mazdak; Kingston, Richard L; Mitra, Alok K

    2010-05-14

    In a mature and infectious retroviral particle, the capsid protein (CA) forms a shell surrounding the genomic RNA and the replicative machinery of the virus. The irregular nature of this capsid shell precludes direct atomic resolution structural analysis. CA hexamers and pentamers are the fundamental building blocks of the capsid, however the pentameric state, in particular, remains poorly characterized. We have developed an efficient in vitro protocol for studying the assembly of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) CA that involves mild acidification and produces structures modeling the authentic viral capsid. These structures include regular spherical particles with T = 1 icosahedral symmetry, built from CA pentamers alone. These particles were subject to cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) and image processing, and a pseudo-atomic model of the icosahedron was created by docking atomic structures of the constituent CA domains into the cryo-EM-derived three-dimensional density map. The N-terminal domain (NTD) of CA forms pentameric turrets, which decorate the surface of the icosahedron, while the C-terminal domain (CTD) of CA is positioned underneath, linking the pentamers. Biophysical analysis of the icosahedral particle preparation reveals that CA monomers and icosahedra are the only detectable species and that these exist in reversible equilibrium at pH 5. These same acidic conditions are known to promote formation of a RSV CA CTD dimer, present within the icosahedral particle, which facilitates capsid assembly. The results are consistent with a model in which RSV CA assembly is a nucleation-limited process driven by very weak protein-protein interactions.

  17. Proton-driven Assembly of the Rous Sarcoma Virus Capsid Protein Results in the Formation of Icosahedral Particles*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Jae-Kyung; Radjainia, Mazdak; Kingston, Richard L.; Mitra, Alok K.

    2010-01-01

    In a mature and infectious retroviral particle, the capsid protein (CA) forms a shell surrounding the genomic RNA and the replicative machinery of the virus. The irregular nature of this capsid shell precludes direct atomic resolution structural analysis. CA hexamers and pentamers are the fundamental building blocks of the capsid, however the pentameric state, in particular, remains poorly characterized. We have developed an efficient in vitro protocol for studying the assembly of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) CA that involves mild acidification and produces structures modeling the authentic viral capsid. These structures include regular spherical particles with T = 1 icosahedral symmetry, built from CA pentamers alone. These particles were subject to cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) and image processing, and a pseudo-atomic model of the icosahedron was created by docking atomic structures of the constituent CA domains into the cryo-EM-derived three-dimensional density map. The N-terminal domain (NTD) of CA forms pentameric turrets, which decorate the surface of the icosahedron, while the C-terminal domain (CTD) of CA is positioned underneath, linking the pentamers. Biophysical analysis of the icosahedral particle preparation reveals that CA monomers and icosahedra are the only detectable species and that these exist in reversible equilibrium at pH 5. These same acidic conditions are known to promote formation of a RSV CA CTD dimer, present within the icosahedral particle, which facilitates capsid assembly. The results are consistent with a model in which RSV CA assembly is a nucleation-limited process driven by very weak protein-protein interactions. PMID:20228062

  18. DNA damage response clamp 9-1-1 promotes assembly of ZMM proteins for formation of crossovers and synaptonemal complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Miki; Hayashihara, Kayoko; Grubb, Jennifer T.; Bishop, Douglas K.; Shinohara, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Formation of crossovers between homologous chromosomes during meiosis is positively regulated by the ZMM proteins (also known as SIC proteins). DNA damage checkpoint proteins also promote efficient formation of interhomolog crossovers. Here, we examined, in budding yeast, the meiotic role of the heterotrimeric DNA damage response clamp composed of Rad17, Ddc1 and Mec3 (known as ‘9-1-1’ in other organisms) and a component of the clamp loader, Rad24 (known as Rad17 in other organisms). Cytological analysis indicated that the 9-1-1 clamp and its loader are not required for the chromosomal loading of RecA homologs Rad51 or Dmc1, but are necessary for the efficient loading of ZMM proteins. Interestingly, the loading of ZMM proteins onto meiotic chromosomes was independent of the checkpoint kinase Mec1 (the homolog of ATR) as well as Rad51. Furthermore, the ZMM member Zip3 (also known as Cst9) bound to the 9-1-1 complex in a cell-free system. These data suggest that, in addition to promoting interhomolog bias mediated by Rad51–Dmc1, the 9-1-1 clamp promotes crossover formation through a specific role in the assembly of ZMM proteins. Thus, the 9-1-1 complex functions to promote two crucial meiotic recombination processes, the regulation of interhomolog recombination and crossover formation mediated by ZMM. PMID:25736290

  19. Layer-by-layer assembly of DNA- and protein-containing films on microneedles for drug delivery to the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurer, Eric M; Flessner, Ryan M; Sullivan, Sean P; Prausnitz, Mark R; Lynn, David M

    2010-11-08

    Microneedle patches contain micrometer-scale needles coated with bioactive agents for minimally invasive drug delivery to the skin. In this study, we introduce layer-by-layer approaches to the fabrication of ultrathin DNA- and protein-containing polyelectrolyte films (or "polyelectrolyte multilayers", PEMs) on the surfaces of stainless steel microneedles. DNA-containing PEMs were fabricated on microneedles by the alternating deposition of plasmid DNA and a hydrolytically degradable poly(β-amino ester). Protein-containing PEMs were fabricated using sodium poly(styrene sulfonate) (SPS) and bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase A) conjugated to a synthetic protein transduction domain. Layer-by-layer assembly resulted in ultrathin, uniform, and defect-free coatings on the surfaces of the microneedles, as characterized by fluorescence microscopy. These films eroded and thereby released DNA or protein when incubated in saline or when inserted into porcine cadaver skin and deposited DNA or protein along the edges of microneedle tracks to depths of ∼500 to 600 μm. We conclude that PEM-coated microneedles offer a novel and useful approach to the transdermal delivery of DNA- and protein-based therapeutics and could also prove useful in other applications.

  20. A Binary Bivalent Supramolecular Assembly Platform Based on Cucurbit[8]uril and Dimeric Adapter Protein 14‐3‐3

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vink, Pim J.; Briels, Jeroen M.; Schrader, Thomas; Milroy, Lech‐Gustav

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Interactions between proteins frequently involve recognition sequences based on multivalent binding events. Dimeric 14‐3‐3 adapter proteins are a prominent example and typically bind partner proteins in a phosphorylation‐dependent mono‐ or bivalent manner. Herein we describe the development of a cucurbit[8]uril (Q8)‐based supramolecular system, which in conjunction with the 14‐3‐3 protein dimer acts as a binary and bivalent protein assembly platform. We fused the phenylalanine–glycine–glycine (FGG) tripeptide motif to the N‐terminus of the 14‐3‐3‐binding epitope of the estrogen receptor α (ERα) for selective binding to Q8. Q8‐induced dimerization of the ERα epitope augmented its affinity towards 14‐3‐3 through a binary bivalent binding mode. The crystal structure of the Q8‐induced ternary complex revealed molecular insight into the multiple supramolecular interactions between the protein, the peptide, and Q8. PMID:28510303

  1. Layer-by-Layer Assembly of DNA- and Protein-Containing Films on Microneedles for Drug Delivery to the Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurer, Eric M.; Flessner, Ryan M.; Sullivan, Sean P.

    2010-01-01

    Microneedle patches contain micron-scale needles coated with bioactive agents for minimally invasive drug delivery to the skin. In this study, we introduce layer-by-layer approaches to the fabrication of ultrathin DNA- and protein-containing polyelectrolyte films (or ‘polyelectrolyte multilayers’, PEMs) on the surfaces of stainless steel microneedles. DNA-containing PEMs were fabricated on microneedles by the alternating deposition of plasmid DNA and a hydrolytically degradable poly(β-amino ester). Protein-containing PEMs were fabricated using sodium poly(styrene sulfonate) (SPS) and bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase A) conjugated to a synthetic protein transduction domain. Layer-by-layer assembly resulted in ultrathin, uniform, and defect-free coatings on the surfaces of the microneedles, as characterized by fluorescence microscopy. These films eroded and thereby released DNA or protein when incubated in saline or when inserted into porcine cadaver skin, and deposited DNA or protein along the edges of microneedle tracks to depths of ~500 to 600μm. We conclude that PEM-coated microneedles offer a novel and useful approach to the transdermal delivery of DNA- and protein-based therapeutics and could also prove useful in other applications. PMID:20942396

  2. Genome Report: Identification and Validation of Antigenic Proteins from Pajaroellobacter abortibovis Using De Novo Genome Sequence Assembly and Reverse Vaccinology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan T. Welly

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Epizootic bovine abortion (EBA, or “foothill abortion,” is the leading cause of beef cattle abortion in California and has also been reported in Nevada and Oregon. In the 1970s, the soft-shelled tick Ornithodoros coriaceus, or “pajaroello tick,” was confirmed as the disease-transmitting vector. In 2005, a novel Deltaproteobacterium was discovered as the etiologic agent of EBA (aoEBA, recently named Pajaroellobacter abortibovis. This organism cannot be grown in culture using traditional microbiological techniques; it can only be grown in experimentally-infected severe combined immunodeficient (SCID mice. The objectives of this study were to perform a de novo genome assembly for P. abortibovis and identify and validate potential antigenic proteins as candidates for future recombinant vaccine development. DNA and RNA were extracted from spleen tissue collected from experimentally-infected SCID mice following exposure to P. abortibovis. This combination of mouse and bacterial DNA was sequenced and aligned to the mouse genome. Mouse sequences were subtracted from the sequence pool and the remaining sequences were de novo assembled at 50x coverage into a 1.82 Mbp complete closed circular Deltaproteobacterial genome containing 2250 putative protein-coding sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of P. abortibovis predicts that this bacterium is most closely related to the organisms of the order Myxococcales, referred to as Myxobacteria. In silico prediction of vaccine candidates was performed using a reverse vaccinology approach resulting in the identification and ranking of the top 10 candidate proteins that are likely to be antigenic. Immunologic testing of these candidate proteins confirmed antigenicity of seven of the nine expressed protein candidates using serum from P. abortibovis immunized mice.

  3. Truncated forms of viral VP2 proteins fused to EGFP assemble into fluorescent parvovirus-like particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuento Matti

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS monitors random movements of fluorescent molecules in solution, giving information about the number and the size of for example nano-particles. The canine parvovirus VP2 structural protein as well as N-terminal deletion mutants of VP2 (-14, -23, and -40 amino acids were fused to the C-terminus of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP. The proteins were produced in insect cells, purified, and analyzed by western blotting, confocal and electron microscopy as well as FCS. The non-truncated form, EGFP-VP2, diffused with a hydrodynamic radius of 17 nm, whereas the fluorescent mutants truncated by 14, 23 and 40 amino acids showed hydrodynamic radii of 7, 20 and 14 nm, respectively. These results show that the non-truncated EGFP-VP2 fusion protein and the EGFP-VP2 constructs truncated by 23 and by as much as 40 amino acids were able to form virus-like particles (VLPs. The fluorescent VLP, harbouring VP2 truncated by 23 amino acids, showed a somewhat larger hydrodynamic radius compared to the non-truncated EGFP-VP2. In contrast, the construct containing EGFP-VP2 truncated by 14 amino acids was not able to assemble into VLP-resembling structures. Formation of capsid structures was confirmed by confocal and electron microscopy. The number of fluorescent fusion protein molecules present within the different VLPs was determined by FCS. In conclusion, FCS provides a novel strategy to analyze virus assembly and gives valuable structural information for strategic development of parvovirus-like particles.

  4. Novel Biocatalysts Combining the Special Assembly Properties of S-Layer Proteins and the Functionality of Enzymes of Extremophiles (BIOCAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-14

    Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures) as template. This PCR product was the template for adding the sequence encoding the 20 amino acids...Industrial Biotechnology: Bioprocess , Bioseparation, and Cell Technology Flickinger, M.C. (ed). Hoboken, USA: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 38 Femer-Ortner

  5. A light sensitive self-assembled nanogel as a tecton for protein patterning materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Tomoki; Takara, Masahiro; Mukai, Sada-atsu; Sawada, Shin-ichi; Sasaki, Yoshihiro; Akiyoshi, Kazunari

    2016-01-21

    A self-assembled nanogel is constructed from light-sensitive cholesteryl pullulan (Ls-CHP) by using photo-labile ortho-nitrobenzyl (o-NB) units. The nanogel-based film is obtained by evaporation of an Ls-CHP nanogel solution. Exposure of the resulting nanogel-based film to light with a mask resulted in a patterned film that can encapsulate FITC-insulin.

  6. Synthesis and evaluation of 2-pyridinylpyrimidines as inhibitors of HIV-1 structural protein assembly

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kožíšek, Milan; Štěpánek, Ondřej; Parkan, Kamil; Albinana, C. B.; Pávová, Marcela; Weber, Jan; Kräusslich, H. G.; Konvalinka, Jan; Machara, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 15 (2016), s. 3487-3490 ISSN 0960-894X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-19561S; GA MŠk(CZ) LK11207 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : assay * assembly * capsid * inhibition * pyrimidine Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.454, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0960894X16306503

  7. The correlation between the adsorption of adhesive proteins and cell behaviour on hydroxyl-methyl mixed self-assembled monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrias, Cristina C; Martins, M Cristina L; Almeida-Porada, Graça; Barbosa, Mário A; Granja, Pedro L

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the biological effects of two key cell-adhesive proteins, fibronectin (FN) and vitronectin (VN), upon adsorption onto molecularly-designed model surfaces. Single-component and mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiols on gold with OH and CH(3) terminal groups were prepared at 100%, 65%, 36% and 0% of OH at the surface, to generate a range of surfaces with a simple chemistry and a wettability gradient. FN and VN were adsorbed under non-competitive (single-protein solutions) and competitive (multi-protein solutions) conditions, and compared at different levels: adsorbed amount (radiolabelling), elution, functional presentation of cell-binding domains (ELISA), and role in mediating cell adhesion (antibody-based assay). The observed trends were related to mesenchymal stem cell response in terms of adhesion and overall cell morphology. Under non-competitive conditions, adsorption of both proteins increased with surface hydrophobicity. The presence of competitive proteins significantly decreased the adsorbed amounts, although both proteins were still detected in all SAMs. Adsorption of FN followed a trend similar to that of non-competitive conditions, while adsorption of VN was higher on 100%OH-SAMs. Concerning elution, retention of adsorbed VN was always higher than that of FN. For both proteins, functional presentation of cell-binding domains was more effective on the more hydrophilic 100%OH-SAMs. This fact, coupled to the ability of this type of SAMs to selectively recruit and retain VN in the presence of competitive serum proteins, seems to correlate with the better cell response observed on these surfaces, as compared with hydrophobic 0%OH(100%CH(3))-SAMs.

  8. Alterations of Mitochondrial Protein Assembly and Jasmonic Acid Biosynthesis Pathway in Honglian (HL)-type Cytoplasmic Male Sterility Rice*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gai; Tian, Han; Huang, Yun-Qing; Hu, Jun; Ji, Yan-Xiao; Li, Shao-Qing; Feng, Yu-Qi; Guo, Lin; Zhu, Ying-Guo

    2012-01-01

    It has been suggested that the mitochondrial chimeric gene orfH79 is the cause for abortion of microspores in Honglian cytoplasmic male sterile rice, yet little is known regarding its mechanism of action. In this study, we used a mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics strategy to compare the mitochondrial proteome between the sterile line Yuetai A and its fertile near-isogenic line Yuetai B. We discovered a reduced quantity of specific proteins in mitochondrial complexes in Yuetai A compared with Yuetai B, indicating a defect in mitochondrial complex assembly in the sterile line. Western blotting showed that ORFH79 protein and ATP1 protein, an F1 sector component of complex V, are both associated with large protein complexes of similar size. Respiratory complex activity assays and transmission electron microscopy revealed functional and morphological defects in the mitochondria of Yuetai A when compared with Yuetai B. In addition, we identified one sex determination TASSELSEED2-like protein increased in Yuetai A, leading to the discovery of an aberrant variation of the jasmonic acid pathway during the development of microspores. PMID:23027867

  9. 133 Structural basis for ebolavirus matrix assembly and budding; protein plasticity allows multiple functions

    OpenAIRE

    Bornholdt, Zachary; Noda, Takeshi; Abelson, Dafna; Halfmann, Peter; Wood, Malcolm; Kawaoa, Yoshihiro; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2014-01-01

    Proteins, particularly viral proteins, can be multifunctional, but the mechanism(s) behind this trait are not fully understood. Here, we illustrate through multiple crystal structures, biochemistry and cellular microscopy that the Ebola virus VP40 protein rearranges into different structures, each with a distinct and essential function required for the ebolavirus life cycle. A butterfly-shaped VP40 dimer trafficks to the cellular membrane. There, electrostatic interactions trigger rearrangeme...

  10. Clathrin assembly protein AP180 and CALM differentially control axogenesis and dendrite outgrowth in embryonic hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushlin, Ittai; Petralia, Ronald S; Wu, Fangbai; Harel, Asaff; Mughal, Mohamed R; Mattson, Mark P; Yao, Pamela J

    2008-10-08

    Emerging data suggest that, much like epithelial cells, the polarized growth of neurons requires both the secretory and endocytic pathways. The clathrin assembly proteins AP180 and CALM (clathrin assembly lymphoid myeloid protein) are known to be involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis, but their roles in mammalian neurons and, in particular, in developmental processes before synaptogenesis are unknown. Here we provide evidence that AP180 and CALM play critical roles in establishing the polarity and controlling the growth of axons and dendrites in embryonic hippocampal neurons. Knockdown of AP180 primarily impairs axonal development, whereas reducing CALM levels results in dendritic dystrophy. Conversely, neurons that overexpress AP180 or CALM generate multiple axons. Ultrastructural analysis shows that CALM affiliates with a wider range of intracellular trafficking organelles than does AP180. Functional analysis shows that endocytosis is reduced in both AP180-deficient and CALM-deficient neurons. Additionally, CALM-deficient neurons show disrupted secretory transport. Our data demonstrate previously unknown functions for AP180 and CALM in intracellular trafficking that are essential in the growth of neurons.

  11. Using droplet-on-demand based printing to guide self-assembly in a peptide-protein based bioink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedegaard, Clara; Collin, Estelle; Redondo-Gomez, Carlos; Nguyen, Luong T. H.; Ng, Kee Woei; Castrejon-Pita, Alfonso A.; Castrejon-Pita, J. Rafael; Mata, Alvaro

    2017-11-01

    Tissue engineering aims to capture details of the extracellular matrix (ECM) that stimulate tissue regeneration. Advanced biofabrication techniques have enabled structural complexity, however they are restricted by the choice of material due to stringent printing requirements, leading to a lack of nanoscale control and molecular versatility. In this project, we exploit the dynamics of droplet fluid interactions combined with the co-assembly of peptide amphiphiles (PAs) with biomolecules/proteins to develop a new approach to droplet-based biofabrication. A custom-made droplet generator was developed and used to controllably dispense droplets of PA into a protein solution resulting in gel formation within milliseconds. Taking advantage of the interfacial and inertial forces during the droplet/liquid interaction, it is possible to control the co-assembly kinetics, to give rise to aligned or disordered nanofibers, hydrogel structures of different geometries and sizes, surface topographies, and higher-ordered structures made from multiple hydrogels. The process allows multiple cell types to be spatially distributed on the outside or embedded within the ECM mimetic scaffolds, whilst exhibiting high cell viability (>88%). ERC Starting Grant (STROFUNSCAFF), FP7-PEOPLE-2013-CIG Biomorph and the Royal Society.

  12. Canine parvovirus VP2 protein expressed in silkworm pupae self-assembles into virus-like particles with high immunogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Hao; Hu, Gui-qiu; Wang, Hua-lei; Liang, Meng; Liang, Hongru; Guo, He; Zhao, Pingsen; Yang, Yu-jiao; Zheng, Xue-xing; Zhang, Zhi-fang; Zhao, Yong-kun; Gao, Yu-wei; Yang, Song-tao; Xia, Xian-zhu

    2014-01-01

    The VP2 structural protein of parvovirus can produce virus-like particles (VLPs) by a self-assembly process in vitro, making VLPs attractive vaccine candidates. In this study, the VP2 protein of canine parvovirus (CPV) was expressed using a baculovirus expression system and assembled into parvovirus-like particles in insect cells and pupae. Electron micrographs of VLPs showed that they were very similar in size and morphology when compared to the wild-type parvovirus. The immunogenicity of the VLPs was investigated in mice and dogs. Mice immunized intramuscularly with purified VLPs, in the absence of an adjuvant, elicited CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses and were able to elicit a neutralizing antibody response against CPV, while the oral administration of raw homogenates containing VLPs to the dogs resulted in a systemic immune response and long-lasting immunity. These results demonstrate that the CPV-VLPs stimulate both cellular and humoral immune responses, and so CPV-VLPs may be a promising candidate vaccine for the prevention of CPV-associated disease.

  13. Canine parvovirus VP2 protein expressed in silkworm pupae self-assembles into virus-like particles with high immunogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Feng

    Full Text Available The VP2 structural protein of parvovirus can produce virus-like particles (VLPs by a self-assembly process in vitro, making VLPs attractive vaccine candidates. In this study, the VP2 protein of canine parvovirus (CPV was expressed using a baculovirus expression system and assembled into parvovirus-like particles in insect cells and pupae. Electron micrographs of VLPs showed that they were very similar in size and morphology when compared to the wild-type parvovirus. The immunogenicity of the VLPs was investigated in mice and dogs. Mice immunized intramuscularly with purified VLPs, in the absence of an adjuvant, elicited CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cell responses and were able to elicit a neutralizing antibody response against CPV, while the oral administration of raw homogenates containing VLPs to the dogs resulted in a systemic immune response and long-lasting immunity. These results demonstrate that the CPV-VLPs stimulate both cellular and humoral immune responses, and so CPV-VLPs may be a promising candidate vaccine for the prevention of CPV-associated disease.

  14. A method for rapid production of heteromultimeric protein complexes in plants: assembly of protective bluetongue virus-like particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuenemann, Eva C; Meyers, Ann E; Verwey, Jeanette; Rybicki, Edward P; Lomonossoff, George P

    2013-09-01

    Plant expression systems based on nonreplicating virus-based vectors can be used for the simultaneous expression of multiple genes within the same cell. They therefore have great potential for the production of heteromultimeric protein complexes. This work describes the efficient plant-based production and assembly of Bluetongue virus-like particles (VLPs), requiring the simultaneous expression of four distinct proteins in varying amounts. Such particles have the potential to serve as a safe and effective vaccine against Bluetongue virus (BTV), which causes high mortality rates in ruminants and thus has a severe effect on the livestock trade. Here, VLPs produced and assembled in Nicotiana benthamiana using the cowpea mosaic virus-based HyperTrans (CPMV-HT) and associated pEAQ plant transient expression vector system were shown to elicit a strong antibody response in sheep. Furthermore, they provided protective immunity against a challenge with a South African BTV-8 field isolate. The results show that transient expression can be used to produce immunologically relevant complex heteromultimeric structures in plants in a matter of days. The results have implications beyond the realm of veterinary vaccines and could be applied to the production of VLPs for human use or the coexpression of multiple enzymes for the manipulation of metabolic pathways. © 2013 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. NLG vs. Templates

    CERN Document Server

    Reiter, E R

    1995-01-01

    One of the most important questions in applied NLG is what benefits (or `value-added', in business-speak) NLG technology offers over template-based approaches. Despite the importance of this question to the applied NLG community, however, it has not been discussed much in the research NLG community, which I think is a pity. In this paper, I try to summarize the issues involved and recap current thinking on this topic. My goal is not to answer this question (I don't think we know enough to be able to do so), but rather to increase the visibility of this issue in the research community, in the hope of getting some input and ideas on this very important question. I conclude with a list of specific research areas I would like to see more work in, because I think they would increase the `value-added' of NLG over templates.

  16. Nitrite-Templated Synthesis of Lanthanide-Containing [2]Rotaxanes for Anion Sensing**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langton, Matthew J; Blackburn, Octavia A; Lang, Thomas; Faulkner, Stephen; Beer, Paul D

    2014-01-01

    The first anion-templated synthesis of a lanthanide-containing interlocked molecule is demonstrated by utilizing a nitrite anion to template initial pseudorotaxane formation. Subsequent stoppering of the interpenetrated assembly allows for the preparation of a lanthanide-functionalized [2]rotaxane in high yield. Following removal of the nitrite anion template, the europium [2]rotaxane host is demonstrated to recognize and sense fluoride selectively. PMID:24989322

  17. Templated Native Silk Smectic Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hyoung-Joon (Inventor); Park, Jae-Hyung (Inventor); Valluzzi, Regina (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    One aspect of the present invention relates to a method of preparing a fibrous protein smectic hydrogel by way of a solvent templating process, comprising the steps of pouring an aqueous fibrous protein solution into a container comprising a solvent that is not miscible with water; sealing the container and allowing it to age at about room temperature; and collecting the resulting fibrous protein smectic hydrogel and allowing it to dry. Another aspect of the present invention relates to a method of obtaining predominantly one enantiomer from a racemic mixture, comprising the steps of pouring an aqueous fibrous protein solution into a container comprising a solvent that is not miscible with water; sealing the container and allowing it to age at about room temperature; allowing the enantiomers of racemic mixture to diffuse selectively into the smectic hydrogel in solution; removing the smectic hydrogel from the solution; rinsing predominantly one enantiomer from the surface of the smectic hydrogel; and extracting predominantly one enantiomer from the interior of the smectic hydrogel. The present invention also relates to a smectic hydrogel prepared according to an aforementioned method.

  18. Templating mesoporous zeolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeblad, Kresten; Christensen, Christina Hviid; Kustova, Marina

    2008-01-01

    phase. It is shown that the available templating approaches are quite versatile, and accordingly, it is possible to produce a very wide range of hierarchical zeolite materials. The resulting zeolite materials, featuring noncrystallographic mesopores in addition to the crystallographic micropores......, exhibit significantly enhanced diffusional properties in comparison with purely microporous zeolite materials. These enhanced mass transport properties have been shown in several cases to result in significantly improved catalytic properties in a range of important reactions....

  19. RRE-dependent HIV-1 Env RNA effects on Gag protein expression, assembly and release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Claudia S; Sloan, Rachel; Cylinder, Isabel; Kozak, Susan L; Kabat, David; Barklis, Eric

    2014-08-01

    The HIV-1 Gag proteins are translated from the full-length HIV-1 viral RNA (vRNA), whereas the envelope (Env) protein is translated from incompletely spliced Env mRNAs. Nuclear export of vRNAs and Env mRNAs is mediated by the Rev accessory protein which binds to the rev-responsive element (RRE) present on these RNAs. Evidence has shown there is a direct or indirect interaction between the Gag protein, and the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of the Env protein. Our current work shows that env gene expression impacts HIV-1 Gag expression and function in two ways. At the protein level, full-length Env expression altered Gag protein expression, while Env CT-deletion proteins did not. At the RNA level, RRE-containing Env mRNA expression reduced Gag expression, processing, and virus particle release from cells. Our results support models in which Gag is influenced by the Env CT, and Env mRNAs compete with vRNAs for nuclear export. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Assembly of a protein "brush" by end-grafting titin fragments to liposomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chami, M.; Franke, B.; Mayans, O.; Kreplak, L.

    2011-01-01

    Titin is a giant filamentous protein of striated muscle composed of >300 immunoglobulin-like domains linked in tandem. Here, we demonstrate that a six-immunoglobulin fragment of titin carrying a poly-histidine tag forms a protein "brush" on liposomes containing metallochelating lipids. These

  1. Localization and function of Kinesin-5-like proteins during assembly and maintenance of mitotic spindles in Silvetia compressa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Anne

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kinesin-5 (Eg-5 motor proteins are essential for maintenance of spindle bipolarity in animals. The roles of Kinesin-5 proteins in other systems, such as Arabidopsis, Dictyostelium, and sea urchin are more varied. We are studying Kinesin-5-like proteins during early development in the brown alga Silvetia compressa. Previously, this motor was shown to be needed to assemble a bipolar spindle, similar to animals. This report builds on those findings by investigating the localization of the motor and probing its function in spindle maintenance. Findings Anti-Eg5 antibodies were used to investigate localization of Kinesin-5-like proteins in brown algal zygotes. In interphase zygotes, localization was predominantly within the nucleus. As zygotes entered mitosis, these motor proteins strongly associated with spindle poles and, to a lesser degree, with the polar microtubule arrays and the spindle midzone. In order to address whether Kinesin-5-like proteins are required to maintain spindle bipolarity, we applied monastrol to synchronized zygotes containing bipolar spindles. Monastrol is a cell-permeable chemical inhibitor of the Kinesin-5 class of molecular motors. We found that inhibition of motor function in pre-formed spindles induced the formation of multipolar spindles and short bipolar spindles. Conclusion Based upon these localization and inhibitor studies, we conclude that Kinesin-5-like motors in brown algae are more similar to the motors of animals than those of plants or protists. However, Kinesin-5-like proteins in S. compressa serve novel roles in spindle formation and maintenance not observed in animals.

  2. Pattern Registration Between Spherical Block-Copolymer Domains and Topographical Templates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, J.Y.; Zhang, F.; Smith, H.I.; Vancso, Gyula J.; Ross, C.A.

    2006-01-01

    Pattern registration is achieved in thin films of self-assembling block copolymers by using a topographical template to guide the positions of the polymer domains. The placement accuracy of the polymer domains is related to the edge roughness of the topographical template, and the ultimate placement

  3. Flat Drops, Elastic Sheets, and Microcapsules by Interfacial Assembly of a Bacterial Biofilm Protein, BslA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Gilad; Liu, Wei; Williams, Danielle M; Choo, Youngwoo; Gopinadhan, Manesh; Samudrala, Niveditha; Sarfati, Raphael; Yan, Elsa C Y; Regan, Lynne; Osuji, Chinedum O

    2017-11-28

    Protein adsorption and assembly at interfaces provide a potentially versatile route to create useful constructs for fluid compartmentalization. In this context, we consider the interfacial assembly of a bacterial biofilm protein, BslA, at air-water and oil-water interfaces. Densely packed, high modulus monolayers form at air-water interfaces, leading to the formation of flattened sessile water drops. BslA forms elastic sheets at oil-water interfaces, leading to the production of stable monodisperse oil-in-water microcapsules. By contrast, water-in-oil microcapsules are unstable but display arrested rather than full coalescence on contact. The disparity in stability likely originates from a low areal density of BslA hydrophobic caps on the exterior surface of water-in-oil microcapsules, relative to the inverse case. In direct analogy with small molecule surfactants, the lack of stability of individual water-in-oil microcapsules is consistent with the large value of the hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB number) calculated based on the BslA crystal structure. The occurrence of arrested coalescence indicates that the surface activity of BslA is similar to that of colloidal particles that produce Pickering emulsions, with the stability of partially coalesced structures ensured by interfacial jamming. Micropipette aspiration and flow in tapered capillaries experiments reveal intriguing reversible and nonreversible modes of mechanical deformation, respectively. The mechanical robustness of the microcapsules and the ability to engineer their shape and to design highly specific binding responses through protein engineering suggest that these microcapsules may be useful for biomedical applications.

  4. Capping protein regulatory cycle driven by CARMIL and V-1 may promote actin network assembly at protruding edges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Ikuko; Remmert, Kirsten; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Hammer, John A

    2014-05-13

    Although capping protein (CP) terminates actin filament elongation, it promotes Arp2/3-dependent actin network assembly and accelerates actin-based motility both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, capping protein Arp2/3 myosin I linker (CARMIL) antagonizes CP by reducing its affinity for the barbed end and by uncapping CP-capped filaments, whereas the protein V-1/myotrophin sequesters CP in an inactive complex. Previous work showed that CARMIL can readily retrieve CP from the CP:V-1 complex, thereby converting inactive CP into a version with moderate affinity for the barbed end. Here we further clarify the mechanism of this exchange reaction, and we demonstrate that the CP:CARMIL complex created by complex exchange slows the rate of barbed-end elongation by rapidly associating with, and dissociating from, the barbed end. Importantly, the cellular concentrations of V-1 and CP determined here argue that most CP is sequestered by V-1 at steady state in vivo. Finally, we show that CARMIL is recruited to the plasma membrane and only at cell edges undergoing active protrusion. Assuming that CARMIL is active only at this location, our data argue that a large p