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Sample records for tempered bearing steel

  1. Enhanced carbide precipitation during tempering of sub-zero Celsius treated AISI 52100 bearing steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Pantleon, Karen; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    A 1.5%Cr, 1%C bearing steel was sub-zero Celsius treated after quenching.Transmission and reflection (synchrotron) X-Ray Diffraction were applied ex-situ at the HZBBESSY II synchrotron facility to quantify the phase fractions of martensite and austenite and determine the stress state in austenite...

  2. Nanoprecipitation in bearing steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrow, A.T.W.; Rivera-Diaz-del-Castillo, P.E.J.

    2011-01-01

    θ-phase is the main hardening species in bearing steels and appears in both martensitically and bainitically hardened microstructures. This work presents a survey of the microstrucural features accompanying nanoprecipitation in bearing steels. Nanoprecipitate structures formed in 1C-1.5Cr wt.% with additions of Cr, Mn, Mo, Si and Ni are studied. The work is combined with thermodynamic calculations and neural networks to predict the expected matrix composition, and whether this will transform martensitically or bainitically. Martensite tetragonality, composition and the amount of retained austenite are related to hardness and the type of nanoprecipitate structures in martensitic grades. The θ-phase volume fraction, the duration of the bainite to austenite transformation and the amount of retained austenite are related to hardness and a detailed quantitative description of the precipitate nanostructures. Such description includes compositional studies using energy-dispersive spectroscopy, which shows that nanoprecipitate formation takes place under paraequilibrium. Special attention is devoted to a novel two-step bainite tempering process which shows maximum hardness; we prove that this is the most effective process for incorporating solute into the precipitates, which are finer than those resulting from one-step banitic transformation processes.

  3. On choice of tempered steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govorov, A.A.; Pan'shin, I.F.; Rakhmanov, V.I.

    1978-01-01

    For the purpose of developing a graphical method for choosing structural steels, a change in the propagation work of a crack and in the critical temperature of brittleness of 40, 40Kh, 40KhN, and 40KhNM steels, was examined depending on the hardness after hardening and tempering. A diagram enabling to choose the grade of steel for making an article of known dimensions according to the preset values of its mechanical properties has been plotted. The developed selection scheme takes into account the hardenability of steels and the influence of the hardness after thermal treatment on the cold-shortness of steel

  4. Ultra low carbon bainitic (ULCB) steels after quenching and tempering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lis, A.K.; Lis, J.; Kolan, C.; Jeziorski, L.

    1998-01-01

    The mechanical and Charpy V impact strength properties of new advanced ultra low carbon bainitic (ULBC) steels after water quenching and tempering (WQT) have been investigated. Their chemical compositions are given. The nine continuous cooling transformation diagrams (CCT) of the new ULCB steel grades have been established. The CCT diagrams for ULCB N i steels containing 9% Ni - grade 10N9 and 5% Ni - grade HN5MVNb are given. The comparison between CCT diagrams of 3.5%Ni + 1.5%Cu containing steels grade HSLA 100 and HN3MCu is shown. The effect of the increase in carbon and titanium contents in the chemical composition of ULCB M n steels 04G3Ti, 06G3Ti and 09G3Ti on the kinetics of phase transformations during continuous cooling is presented by the shifting CCT diagrams. The Charpy V impact strength and brittle fracture occurence curves are shown. The effect of tempering temperature on tensile properties of WQT HN3MCu steel is shown and Charpy V impact strength curves after different tempering conditions are shown. The optimum tempering temperatures region of HN3MCu steel for high Charpy V impact toughness at law temperatures - 80 o C(193 K) and -120 o C(153 K) is estimated. The effect of tempering temperature on mechanical properties of HN5MVNb steel is given. The low temperature impact Charpy V toughness of HN5MVNb steel is shown. The optimum range of tempering temperature during 1 hour for high toughness of WQT HN5MVNb steel is given. HN3MCu and HN5MVNb steels after WQT have high yield strength YS≥690 MPa and high Charpy V impact toughness KV≥80 J at -100 o C (173K) and KCV≥50 J/cm 2 at - 120 o C (153K) so they may be used for cryogenic applications

  5. Study on tempering behaviour of AISI 410 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Gopa; Das, C.R.; Albert, S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K.; Thomas Paul, V.; Panneerselvam, G.; Dasgupta, Arup

    2015-01-01

    Martensitic stainless steels find extensive applications due to their optimum combination of strength, hardness and wear-resistance in tempered condition. However, this class of steels is susceptible to embrittlement during tempering if it is carried out in a specific temperature range resulting in significant reduction in toughness. Embrittlement of as-normalised AISI 410 martensitic stainless steel, subjected to tempering treatment in the temperature range of 673–923 K was studied using Charpy impact tests followed by metallurgical investigations using field emission scanning electron and transmission electron microscopes. Carbides precipitated during tempering were extracted by electrochemical dissolution of the matrix and identified by X-ray diffraction. Studies indicated that temper embrittlement is highest when the steel is tempered at 823 K. Mostly iron rich carbides are present in the steel subjected to tempering at low temperatures of around 723 K, whereas chromium rich carbides (M 23 C 6 ) dominate precipitation at high temperature tempering. The range 773–823 K is the transition temperature range for the precipitates, with both Fe 2 C and M 23 C 6 types of carbides coexisting in the material. The nucleation of Fe 2 C within the martensite lath, during low temperature tempering, has a definite role in the embrittlement of this steel. Embrittlement is not observed at high temperature tempering because of precipitation of M 23 C 6 carbides, instead of Fe 2 C, preferentially along the lath and prior austenite boundaries. Segregation of S and P, which is widely reported as one of the causes for temper embrittlement, could not be detected in the material even through Auger electron spectroscopy studies. - Highlights: • Tempering behaviour of AISI 410 steel is studied within 673–923 K temperature range. • Temperature regime of maximum embrittlement is identified as 773–848 K. • Results show that type of carbide precipitation varies with

  6. Study on tempering behaviour of AISI 410 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Gopa, E-mail: gopa_mjs@igcar.gov.in [Metallurgy & Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Das, C.R.; Albert, S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K.; Thomas Paul, V. [Metallurgy & Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Panneerselvam, G. [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Dasgupta, Arup [Metallurgy & Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)

    2015-02-15

    Martensitic stainless steels find extensive applications due to their optimum combination of strength, hardness and wear-resistance in tempered condition. However, this class of steels is susceptible to embrittlement during tempering if it is carried out in a specific temperature range resulting in significant reduction in toughness. Embrittlement of as-normalised AISI 410 martensitic stainless steel, subjected to tempering treatment in the temperature range of 673–923 K was studied using Charpy impact tests followed by metallurgical investigations using field emission scanning electron and transmission electron microscopes. Carbides precipitated during tempering were extracted by electrochemical dissolution of the matrix and identified by X-ray diffraction. Studies indicated that temper embrittlement is highest when the steel is tempered at 823 K. Mostly iron rich carbides are present in the steel subjected to tempering at low temperatures of around 723 K, whereas chromium rich carbides (M{sub 23}C{sub 6}) dominate precipitation at high temperature tempering. The range 773–823 K is the transition temperature range for the precipitates, with both Fe{sub 2}C and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} types of carbides coexisting in the material. The nucleation of Fe{sub 2}C within the martensite lath, during low temperature tempering, has a definite role in the embrittlement of this steel. Embrittlement is not observed at high temperature tempering because of precipitation of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides, instead of Fe{sub 2}C, preferentially along the lath and prior austenite boundaries. Segregation of S and P, which is widely reported as one of the causes for temper embrittlement, could not be detected in the material even through Auger electron spectroscopy studies. - Highlights: • Tempering behaviour of AISI 410 steel is studied within 673–923 K temperature range. • Temperature regime of maximum embrittlement is identified as 773–848 K. • Results show that type of

  7. Influence of tempering temperature on mechanical properties of cast steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Golański

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of research on the influence of tempering temperature on structure and mechanical properties of bainite hardened cast steel: G21CrMoV4 – 6 (L21HMF and G17CrMoV5 – 10 (L17HMF. Investigated cast steels were taken out from internal frames of steam turbines serviced for long time at elevated temperatures. Tempering of the investigated cast steel was carried out within the temperature range of 690 ÷ 730 C (G21CrMoV4 – 6 and 700 ÷ 740 C (G17CrMoV5 – 10. After tempering the cast steels were characterized by a structure of tempered lower bainite with numerous precipitations of carbides. Performed research of mechanical properties has shown that high temperatures of tempering of bainitic structure do not cause decrease of mechanical properties beneath the required minimum.oo It has also been proved that high-temperature tempering (>720 oC ensures high impact energy at the 20% decrease of mechanical properties.

  8. Influence of titanium on the tempering structure of austenitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghuezaiel, M.J.

    1985-10-01

    The microstructure of titanium-stabilized and initially deformed (approximately 20%) austenitic stainless steels used in structures of fast neutrons reactors has been studied after one hour duration annealings (500 0 C) by X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, microhardness and transmission electron microscopy. The studied alloys were either of industrial type CND 17-13 (0.23 to 0.45 wt% Ti) or pure steels (18% Cr, 14% Ni, 0 or 0.3 wt% Ti). During tempering, the pure steels presented some restauration before recristallization. In the industrial steels, only recristallization occurred, and this only in the most deformed steel. Precipitation does not occur in the titanium-free pure steel. In industrial steels, many intermetallic phases are formed when recristallization starts [fr

  9. Hardness of H13 Tool Steel After Non-isothermal Tempering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, E.; Kohli, A.; Poirier, D. R.

    2018-04-01

    A direct method to calculate the tempering response of a tool steel (H13) that exhibits secondary hardening is presented. Based on the traditional method of presenting tempering response in terms of isothermal tempering, we show that the tempering response for a steel undergoing a non-isothermal tempering schedule can be predicted. Experiments comprised (1) isothermal tempering, (2) non-isothermal tempering pertaining to a relatively slow heating to process-temperature and (3) fast-heating cycles that are relevant to tempering by induction heating. After establishing the tempering response of the steel under simple isothermal conditions, the tempering response can be applied to non-isothermal tempering by using a numerical method to calculate the tempering parameter. Calculated results are verified by the experiments.

  10. Effects of tempering on internal friction of carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyos, J.J.; Ghilarducci, A.A.; Salva, H.R.; Chaves, C.A.; Velez, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Time tempering dependent microstructure of two steels is studied by internal friction. → Internal friction indicates the interactions of dislocations with carbon and carbides. → Internal friction detects the first stage of tempering. → Precipitation hardening is detected by the decrease in the background. - Abstract: Two steels containing 0.626 and 0.71 wt.% carbon have been studied to determine the effects of tempering on the microstructure and the internal friction. The steels were annealed at 1093 K, quenched into water and tempered for 60 min at 423 K, 573 K and 723 K. The increase of the tempering time diminishes the martensite tetragonality due to the redistribution of carbon atoms from octahedrical interstitial sites to dislocations. Internal friction spectrum is decomposed into five peaks and an exponential background, which are attributed to the carbide precipitation and the dislocation relaxation process. Simultaneous presence of peaks P1 and P2 indicates the interaction of dislocations with the segregated carbon and carbide precipitate.

  11. The possibility of tribopair lifetime extending by welding of quenched and tempered stainless steel with quenched and tempered carbon steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Marušić

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the conditions of tribocorrosion wear, extending of parts lifetime could be achieved by using stainless steel,which is hardened to sufficiently high hardness. In the tribosystem bolt/ bushing shell/link plate of the bucket elevator transporter conveyor machine, the previously quenched and tempered martensitic stainless steel for bolts is hardened at ≈47 HRC and welded with the quenched and tempered high yield carbon steel for bolts. Additional material, based on Cr-Ni-Mo (18/8/6 is used. The microstructure and hardness of welded samples are tested. On the tensile tester, resistance of the welded joint is tested with a simulated experiment. Dimensional control of worn tribosystem elements was performed after six months of service.

  12. Prediction of hardness in pieces of quenched and tempered steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanzon, Rodolfo Carlos; Rodriguez, Augusto; Sanchez, Arlington Ricardo

    2006-01-01

    This presentation describes the first stage of a work plan to obtain a simple software, for predicting properties at certain points of a quenched and tempered piece. In this first stage, this prediction is limited to cylindrical pieces made with steels whose chemical composition is within a certain range. The methodology basically consists of obtaining , from experimental data, a mathematical tool able to predict the hardness value, for Jominy test piece ends made with this type of steel. This meant beginning with the analysis of the usual forms of theoretical calculation of Jominy curves of quenched samples, which resulted in a proposal to modify the Just equation. Two different mathematical methods were then developed, that could predict hardness values in tempered Jominy test pieces. One, based on the determination of polynomic equations, that reproduces the loss of hardness at points along the test piece, base on the quenching value and as a function of the tempering temperature. The other one, which uses the lineal multidimensional interpolation method, because of its ease of application, has been selected as the mathematical tool to use in the software under development. At this stage of the work, the relationship between the points on the piece and those on the Jominy test pieces is carried out by the Lamont method and the representative variable of the temperature/time combination for the tempering process itself, is obtained with software based on the Hollomon and Jaffe expression. Data is needed to define: a) chemical composition and grain size of the steel used, b) diameter of the piece, c) 'H G ' severity of the quenching medium d) temperature and time of the tempering. The work's second stage continued with the addition of hardness values measured in Jominy test pieces made with other steels. The chemical composition and grain size data of each steel introduced are converted by the software into one more variable, using the concept of ideal critical

  13. 46 CFR 54.25-25 - Welding of quenched and tempered steels (modifies UHT-82).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding of quenched and tempered steels (modifies UHT-82... ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-25 Welding of quenched and tempered steels (modifies UHT-82). (a) The qualification of welding procedures, welders, and...

  14. Influence of tempering on mechanical properties of ferritic martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Y. B.; Han, C. H.; Choi, B. K.; Lee, D. W.; Kim, T. K.; Jeong, Y. H.; Cho, S.

    2012-01-01

    In the mid-1980s research programs for development of low activation materials began. This is based on the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Guidelines (10CFR part 61) that were developed to reduce long-lived radioactive isotopes, which allows nuclear reactor waste to be disposed of by shallow land burial when removed from service. Development of low activation materials is also key issue in nuclear fusion systems, as the structural components can became radioactive due to nuclear transmutation caused by exposure to high dose neutron irradiation. Reduced-activation ferritic martensitic (RAFM) steels have been developed in the leading countries in nuclear fusion technology, and are now being considered as primary candidate material for the test blanket module (TBM) in the international thermonuclear experiment reactor (ITER). RAFM steels developed so far (e.g., EUROFER 97 and F82H) meet the requirement for structural application in the ITER. However, if such alloys are used in the DEMO or commercial fusion reactor is still unclear, as the reactors are designed to operate under much severe conditions (i.e., higher outlet coolant temperature and neutron fluences). Such harsh operating conditions lead to development of RAFM steels with better creep and irradiation resistances. Mechanical properties of RAFM steels are strongly affected by microstructural features including the distribution, size and type of precipitates, dislocation density and grain size. For a given composition, such microstructural characteristics are determined mainly by thermo-mechanical process employed to fabricate the final product, and accordingly a final heat treatment, i.e., tempering is the key step to control the microstructure and mechanical properties. In the present work, we investigated mechanical properties of the RAFM steels with a particular attention being paid to effects of tempering on impact and creep properties

  15. Effects of heat treatment influencing factors on microstructure and mechanical properties of a low-carbon martensitic stainless bearing steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shaohong; Yuan, Xiaohong; Jiang, Wen; Sun, Hudai; Li, Jun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Zhao, Kunyu, E-mail: zhaokunyu.kmust@gmail.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Yang, Maosheng [Department of Structural Materials, Central Iron and Steel Research Institute, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2014-05-01

    The effects of different heat treatment parameters and cryogenic treatment (−75 °C) on microstructural changes and mechanical properties of a low-carbon martensitic stainless bearing steel were investigated. These analyses were performed via the optical microscope (OM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The obtained results showed that the execution of cryogenic treatment on quenched and tempered bearing steel increases hardness, tensile strength and decreases toughness with the increment of cryogenic treatment and tempering cycles. This paper also showed that the cryogenic cycle's treatment incorporating tempering can refine the martensite laths resulting in improvement of tensile strength. In addition, cryogenic treatment further reduces the retained austenite content but it cannot make retained austenite transform into martensite completely even tempering at high temperature.

  16. Effects of heat treatment influencing factors on microstructure and mechanical properties of a low-carbon martensitic stainless bearing steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Shaohong; Yuan, Xiaohong; Jiang, Wen; Sun, Hudai; Li, Jun; Zhao, Kunyu; Yang, Maosheng

    2014-01-01

    The effects of different heat treatment parameters and cryogenic treatment (−75 °C) on microstructural changes and mechanical properties of a low-carbon martensitic stainless bearing steel were investigated. These analyses were performed via the optical microscope (OM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The obtained results showed that the execution of cryogenic treatment on quenched and tempered bearing steel increases hardness, tensile strength and decreases toughness with the increment of cryogenic treatment and tempering cycles. This paper also showed that the cryogenic cycle's treatment incorporating tempering can refine the martensite laths resulting in improvement of tensile strength. In addition, cryogenic treatment further reduces the retained austenite content but it cannot make retained austenite transform into martensite completely even tempering at high temperature

  17. Method to Predict Tempering of Steels Under Non-isothermal Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, D. R.; Kohli, A.

    2017-05-01

    A common way of representing the tempering responses of steels is with a "tempering parameter" that includes the effect of temperature and time on hardness after hardening. Such functions, usually in graphical form, are available for many steels and have been applied for isothermal tempering. In this article, we demonstrate that the method can be extended to non-isothermal conditions. Controlled heating experiments were done on three grades in order to verify the method.

  18. Corrosion fatigue in nitrocarburized quenched and tempered steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khani, M. Karim; Dengel, D.

    1996-05-01

    In order to investigate the fatigue strength and fracture mechanism of salt bath nitrocarburized steels, specimens of the steels SAE 4135 and SAE 4140, in a quenched and tempered state, and additionally in a salt bath nitrocarburized and oxidizing cooled state as well as in a polished (after the oxidizing cooling) and renewed oxidized state, were subjected to comparative rotating bending fatigue tests in inert oil and 5 pct NaCl solution. In addition, some of the quenched and tempered specimens of SAE 4135 material were provided with an approximately 50-μm-thick electroless Ni-P layer, in order to compare corrosion fatigue behavior between the Ni-P layer and the nitride layers. Long-life corrosion fatigue tests of SAE 4135 material were carried out under small stresses in the long-life range up to 108 cycles with a test frequency of 100 Hz. Fatigue tests of SAE 4140 material were carried out in the range of finite life (low-cycle range) with a test frequency of 13 Hz. The results show that the 5 pct NaCl environment drastically reduced fatigue life, but nitrocarburizing plus oxidation treatment was found to improve the corrosion fatigue life over that of untreated and Ni-P coated specimens. The beneficial effect of nitrocarburizing followed by oxidation treatment on cor-rosion fatigue life results from the protection rendered by the compound layer by means of a well-sealed oxide layer, whereby the pores present in the compound layer fill up with oxides. The role of inclusions in initiating fatigue cracks was investigated. It was found that under corrosion fatigue conditions, the fatigue cracks started at cavities along the interfaces of MnS inclusions and matrix in the case of quenched and tempered specimens. The nitrocarburized specimens, however, showed a superposition of pitting corrosion and corrosion fatigue in which pores and nonmetallic inclusions in the compound layer play a predominant role concerning the formation of pits in the substrate.

  19. Tempering of Mn and Mn-Si-V dual-phase steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speich, G. R.; Schwoeble, A. J.; Huffman, G. P.

    1983-06-01

    Changes in the yield behavior, strength, and ductility of a Mn and a Mn-Si-V d11Al-phase (ferrite-martensite) steel were investigated after tempering one hour at 200 to 600 °C. The change in yield behavior was complex in both steels with the yield strength first increasing and then decreasing as the tempering temperature was increased. This complex behavior is attributed to a combination of factors including carbon segregation to dislocations, a return of discontinuous yielding, and the relief of resid11Al stresses. In contrast, the tensile strength decreased continuously as the tempering temperature was increased in a manner that could be predicted from the change in hardness of the martensite phase using a simple composite strengthening model. The initial tensile ductility (total elongation) of the Mn-Si-V steel was much greater than that of the Mn steel. However, upon tempering up to 400 °C, the ductility of the Mn-Si-V decreased whereas that of the Mn steel increased. As a result, both steels had similar ductilities after tempering at 400 °C or higher temperatures. These results are attributed to the larger amounts of retained austenite in the Mn-Si-V steel (9 pct) compared to the Mn steel (3 pct) and its contribution to tensile ductility by transforming to martensite during plastic straining. Upon tempering at 400 °C, the retained austenite decomposes to bainite and its contribution to tensile ductility is eliminated.

  20. Antimicrobial Cu-bearing stainless steel scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Qiang; Ren, Ling; Li, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Shuyuan; Sercombe, Timothy B.; Yang, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Copper-bearing stainless steel scaffolds with two different structures (Body Centered Cubic and Gyroid labyrinth) at two solid fractions (25% and 40%) were fabricated from both 316L powder and a mixture of 316L and elemental Cu powder using selective laser melting, and relative 316L scaffolds were served as control group. After processing, the antimicrobial testing demonstrated that the 316L-Cu scaffolds presented excellent antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, and the cell viability assay indicated that there was no cytotoxic effect of 316L-Cu scaffolds on rat marrow mesenchymal stem cells. As such, these have the potential to reduce implant-associated infections. The Cu was also found to homogeneously distribute within the microstructure by scanning electronic microcopy. The addition of Cu would not significantly affect its strength and stiffness compared to 316L scaffold, and the stiffness of all the scaffolds (3-20GPa) is similar to that of bone and much less than that of bulk stainless steel. Consequently, fabrication of such low stiffness porous structures, especially coupled with the addition of antimicrobial Cu, may provide a new direction for medical stainless steels. - Highlights: • 316L-Cu scaffolds were fabricated by using selective laser melting (SLM). • 316L-Cu scaffolds showed satisfied antimicrobial activities. • 316L-Cu scaffolds have no cytotoxic effect on normal cells. • Other properties of 316L-Cu scaffolds were similar to 316L scaffolds. • 316L-Cu scaffolds have the potential to be used in orthopedic applications.

  1. Antimicrobial Cu-bearing stainless steel scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qiang, E-mail: mfqwang@163.com [School of Stomatology, China Medical University, Shenyang 110002 (China); Ren, Ling [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Li, Xiaopeng [School of Mechanical and Chemical Engineering, The University of Western Australia (Australia); Zhang, Shuyuan [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Sercombe, Timothy B., E-mail: tim.sercombe@uwa.edu.au [School of Mechanical and Chemical Engineering, The University of Western Australia (Australia); Yang, Ke, E-mail: kyang@imr.ac.cn [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)

    2016-11-01

    Copper-bearing stainless steel scaffolds with two different structures (Body Centered Cubic and Gyroid labyrinth) at two solid fractions (25% and 40%) were fabricated from both 316L powder and a mixture of 316L and elemental Cu powder using selective laser melting, and relative 316L scaffolds were served as control group. After processing, the antimicrobial testing demonstrated that the 316L-Cu scaffolds presented excellent antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, and the cell viability assay indicated that there was no cytotoxic effect of 316L-Cu scaffolds on rat marrow mesenchymal stem cells. As such, these have the potential to reduce implant-associated infections. The Cu was also found to homogeneously distribute within the microstructure by scanning electronic microcopy. The addition of Cu would not significantly affect its strength and stiffness compared to 316L scaffold, and the stiffness of all the scaffolds (3-20GPa) is similar to that of bone and much less than that of bulk stainless steel. Consequently, fabrication of such low stiffness porous structures, especially coupled with the addition of antimicrobial Cu, may provide a new direction for medical stainless steels. - Highlights: • 316L-Cu scaffolds were fabricated by using selective laser melting (SLM). • 316L-Cu scaffolds showed satisfied antimicrobial activities. • 316L-Cu scaffolds have no cytotoxic effect on normal cells. • Other properties of 316L-Cu scaffolds were similar to 316L scaffolds. • 316L-Cu scaffolds have the potential to be used in orthopedic applications.

  2. Effect of Tempering and Baking on the Charpy Impact Energy of Hydrogen-Charged 4340 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, K.; Lee, E. W.; Frazier, W. E.; Niji, K.; Battel, G.; Tran, A.; Iriarte, E.; Perez, O.; Ruiz, H.; Choi, T.; Stoyanov, P.; Ogren, J.; Alrashaid, J.; Es-Said, O. S.

    2015-01-01

    Tempered AISI 4340 steel was hydrogen charged and tested for impact energy. It was found that samples tempered above 468 °C (875 °F) and subjected to hydrogen charging exhibited lower impact energy values when compared to uncharged samples. No significant difference between charged and uncharged samples tempered below 468 °C (875 °F) was observed. Neither exposure nor bake time had any significant effect on impact energy within the tested ranges.

  3. Internal strains after recovery of hardness in tempered martensitic steels for fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunelli, L.; Gondi, P.; Montanari, R.; Coppola, R.

    1991-03-01

    After tempering, with recovery of hardness, MANET steels present internal strains; these residual strains increase with quenching rate prior to tempering, and they remain after prolonged tempering times. On account of their persistence, after thermal treatments which lead to low dislocation and sub-boundary densities, the possibility has been considered that the high swelling resistance of MANET is connected with these centres of strain, probably connected with the formation, in ferrite, of Cr-enriched and contiguous Cr-depleted zones which may act as sinks for interstitials. Comparative observations on the internal strain behaviour of cold worked 316L stainless steel appear consistent with this possibility.

  4. Effect of tempering time on the ballistic performance of a high strength armour steel

    OpenAIRE

    Jena, Pradipta Kumar; Senthil P., Ponguru; K., Siva Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The investigation describes and analyses the effect of tempering time on the mechanical and ballistic performance of a high strength armour steel. The steel is subjected to tempering at 300 °C for 2, 24 and 48 h. A marginal variation in strength and hardness is observed with increase in tempering time, whereas ductility and Charpy impact values are found to be decreasing. Ballistic performance of the samples are evaluated by impacting 7.62 mm and 12.7 mm armour piercing projectiles at 0° angl...

  5. Wear behavior of tempered and borided tool steels under various conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Haidary, T. J.; Faleh, M. N.

    2000-01-01

    . Tool steel 61CrV5, 50 NiCr13 and X1000Cr MoV51 were used in the first stage of this investigation. They have been treated as follows: boriding, boriding and tempering and hardening and tempering. The wear tests were conducted under fixed conditions (150 N/mm 2 , 0.48m/sec) with and without lubricant. The wear rate and coefficient of friction of 61Cr Si V5 steel have been studied in the second stage hoping to find the influence of working conditions on these parameters and then to compare these results with the case of hardening and tempering which is the usual case in the actual working field. The study gives a good indication about the improvement achieved in boriding and tempering cases (∼ 30%) as compared with hardening tempering cases in dry sliding conditions -∼5% with lubricating ones. (authors). 13 refs., 19 figs., 1 table

  6. Quantitative consideration for the tempering effect during multi-pass thermal cycle in HAZ of low-alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Lina; Nakabayashi, Yuma; Saida, Kazuyoshi; Mochizuki, Masahito; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi; Kameyama, Masashi; Hirano, Shinro; Chigusa, Naoki

    2011-01-01

    A new Thermal Cycle Tempering Parameter (TCTP) to deal with the tempering effect during multi-pass thermal cycles has been proposed by extending Larson-Miller parameter (LMP). Experimental result revealed that the hardness in synthetic HAZ of the low alloy steel subjected to multi tempering thermal cycles has a good linear relationship with TCTP. By using this relationship, the hardness of the low-alloy steel reheated with tempering thermal cycles can be predicted when the original hardness is known. (author)

  7. A Novel Methods for Fracture Toughness Evaluation of Tool Steels with Post-Tempering Cryogenic Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona Sola

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cryogenic treatments are usually carried out immediately after quenching, but their use can be extended to post tempering in order to improve their fracture toughness. This research paper focuses on the influence of post-tempering cryogenic treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of tempered AISI M2, AISI D2, and X105CrCoMo18 steels. The aforementioned steels have been analysed after tempering and tempering + cryogenic treatment with scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction for residual stress measurements, and micro- and nano-indentation to determine Young’s modulus and plasticity factor measurement. Besides the improvement of toughness, a further aim of the present work is the investigation of the pertinence of a novel technique for characterizing the fracture toughness via scratch experiments on cryogenically-treated steels. Results show that the application of post-tempering cryogenic treatment on AISI M2, AISI D2, and X105CrCoMo18 steels induce precipitation of fine and homogeneously dispersed sub-micrometric carbides which do not alter hardness and Young’s modulus values, but reduce residual stresses and increase fracture toughness. Finally, scratch test proved to be an alternative simple technique to determine the fracture toughness of cryogenically treated steels.

  8. Tempering Behavior of TiC-Reinforced SKD11 Steel Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ji-In; Kim, Seong Hoon; Heo, Yoon-Uk; Kim, Dae Ha; Hwang, Keum-Cheol; Suh, Dong-Woo

    2018-03-01

    TiC-reinforced SKD11 steel matrix composite, fabricated by a pressure infiltration casting, undergoes monotonic decrease in hardness as tempering temperature increases. Element mappings by TEM-EDS and thermodynamic calculation indicate that remarkable redistribution of V between the reinforcement and the steel matrix occurs by partial dissolution and re-precipitation of MC carbides upon casting process. The absence of secondary hardening is led by the enrichment of V in the reinforcement that reduces the V content in the steel matrix; this reduction in V content makes the precipitation of fine VC sluggish during the tempering.

  9. Effect of tempering upon the tensile properties of a nanostructured bainitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasan, H.S. [University of Technology, Baghdad (Iraq); Peet, M.J., E-mail: mjp54@cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Avettand-Fènoël, M-N. [Unité Matériaux Et Transformations (UMET) UMR CNRS 8207, Université, Lille 1, 59655 Villeneuve D' ASCQ (France); Bhadeshia, H.K.D.H. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-06

    The tensile properties of a nanostructured carbide-free bainitic steel formed at 200–250 °C are compared against those after tempering sufficiently to remove the retained austenite. Although significant ductility is observed following tempering, a comparison of tempered and untempered samples shows that it is in fact reduced when a comparison is made at identical strength. The shape of the stress–strain curves shows clear evidence that the capacity for work hardening is reduced with the loss of austenite. The nanostructure of the steel transformed at 250 °C is examined by transmission electron microscopy, to compare the as-transformed to the tempered structure. In this case after tempering at 500 °C the energy absorbed during the tensile test is lower, due to the lower strength. Reduction of strength is caused by the slight coarsening of the bainite plates, and lower dislocation density after tempering. Considering the formation of carbide particles in high strength steel, impressive ductility is exhibited even in the tempered condition.

  10. Effect of tempering upon the tensile properties of a nanostructured bainitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, H.S.; Peet, M.J.; Avettand-Fènoël, M-N.; Bhadeshia, H.K.D.H.

    2014-01-01

    The tensile properties of a nanostructured carbide-free bainitic steel formed at 200–250 °C are compared against those after tempering sufficiently to remove the retained austenite. Although significant ductility is observed following tempering, a comparison of tempered and untempered samples shows that it is in fact reduced when a comparison is made at identical strength. The shape of the stress–strain curves shows clear evidence that the capacity for work hardening is reduced with the loss of austenite. The nanostructure of the steel transformed at 250 °C is examined by transmission electron microscopy, to compare the as-transformed to the tempered structure. In this case after tempering at 500 °C the energy absorbed during the tensile test is lower, due to the lower strength. Reduction of strength is caused by the slight coarsening of the bainite plates, and lower dislocation density after tempering. Considering the formation of carbide particles in high strength steel, impressive ductility is exhibited even in the tempered condition

  11. Investigation on tempering of granular bainite in an offshore platform steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Yanlei; Jia, Tao; Zhang, Xiangjun [The State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, P.O. Box 105, No. 11, Lane 3, Wenhua Road, HePing District, Shenyang 110819 (China); Liu, Zhenyu, E-mail: zyliu@mail.neu.edu.cn [The State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, P.O. Box 105, No. 11, Lane 3, Wenhua Road, HePing District, Shenyang 110819 (China); Misra, R.D.K. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, 500 W. University Avenue, El Paso, TX 79968-0521 (United States)

    2015-02-25

    Granular bainite, where M-A constituents dispersed in bainitic ferrite matrix usually presents at the half thickness region in thermo-mechanically processed heavy gauge offshore platform steel. In the present work, the decomposition of M-A constituents during tempering at 600 °C was firstly revealed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, which primarily involves the precipitation of cementite, recovery and recrystallization of highly dislocated ferrite matrix. Then, the effect of tempering on mechanical properties was investigated by tempering at different temperature for 60 min. Results indicated that, at tempering temperature of 500–600 °C, large quantity of micro-alloying carbides precipitated and partially compensated the loss of strength mainly due to the decomposition of M-A constituents. Compared with the as-rolled state, the decomposition of M-A constituents and softening of bainitic ferrite matrix after tempering have resulted in higher density of microvoids and substantial plastic deformation before impact failure.

  12. Evaluation of temper embrittlement of martensitic and ferritic-martensitic steels by acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Yusho; Takahashi, Hideaki; Shoji, Tetsuo

    1987-01-01

    Martensitic (HT-9) and ferritic-martensitic steels (9Cr-2Mo) are considered as fusion first wall materials. In this investigation in order to understand the sensitivity of temper embrittlement in these steels under actual service condition, fracture toughness testing was made by use of acoustic emission technique. The temper embrittlement was characterized in terms of fracture toughness. The fracture toughness of these steels under 500 deg C, 100 hrs, and 1000 hrs heat treatment was decreased and their changes in micro-fracture process have been observed. The fracture toughness changes by temper embrittlement was discussed by the characteristic of AE, AE spectrum analysis and fractographic investigation. The relation between micro-fracture processes and AE has been clarified. (author)

  13. Influence of Mo addition on the tempered properties of 13Cr martensitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Byong Ho; Ahn, Yong Sik

    1998-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of Mo addition on the mechanical properties of 13Cr-0.2C martensitic stainless steel, tensile test and Charpy V-notch test were performed after tempering at the temperature range of 200∼700 .deg. C following austenitizing at 1100 .deg. C. The yield strength and hardness of the steel were increased with the increase of Mo content at all tempering conditions, because Mo causes retardation of precipitation and coarsening of carbides and solid solution strengthening of matrix. Except 500 .deg. C of tempering temperature, the Charpy impact energy was significantly increased with Mo content and showed the highest value at 1.5 wt% addition. The increase of impact energy of the steel containing Mo is thought to be caused by δ-ferrite formed in the tempered martensitic matrix. At 500 .deg. C tempering, Charpy impact energy was decreased drastically due to temper embrittlement and it was not possible to prevent it even though Mo was added up to 1.5 wt%

  14. Effect of microalloying elements on microstructure and properties of quenched and tempered constructional steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qingshen; Huang, Leqing; Di, Guobiao; Wang, Yanfeng; Yang, Yongda; Ma, Changwen

    2017-09-01

    The effects of microalloying elements Nb, V and Ti on microstructure and properties of quenched and tempered steel were studied. Results showed that the addition of microalloying elements led to the formation of bainite and increased strength, while the austenization and ferrite transformation temperature was barely affected, i.e. 10°C. Microalloying elements shortened the incubation time for bainite transformation by refinement of austenite grain, and decreased the hardenability by forming carbides and therefore reducing the carbon content of super-cooled austenite. Either of them promoted the bainite transformation. The better tempering stability was ascribed to the as hot-rolled bainite microstructure and secondary carbide precipitation during tempering.

  15. On the tempered martensite embrittlement in AISI 4140 low alloy steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darwish, F.A. (Dept. of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Catholic Univ., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)); Pereira, L.C.; Gatts, C. (Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Federal Univ., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)); Graca, M.L. (Materials Div., Technical Aerospace Center, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil))

    1991-02-01

    In the present investigation the Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) technique was used to determine local carbon and phosphorus concentrations on the fracture surfaces of as-quenched and quenched-and-tempered (at 350deg C) AISI 4140 steel specimens austenitized at low and high temperatures. The AES results were rationalized to conclude that, although carbide growth as well as phosphorus segregation are expected to contribute to tempered martensite embrittlement, carbide precipitation on prior austenite grain boundaries during tempering is seen to be the microstructural change directly responsible for the occurrence of the referred embrittlement phenomenon. (orig.).

  16. Effect of tempering on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a medium carbon bainitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, J. [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Zhang, F.C., E-mail: zfc@ysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Equipment and Technology of Cold Strip Rolling, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Yang, X.W. [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Lv, B. [College of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Wu, K.M. [International Research Institute for Steel Technology, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-16

    The effect of tempering on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a medium carbon bainitic steel has been investigated through optical microscopy, electron back-scattered diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses. A nano-level microstructure containing plate-like bainitic ferrite and film-like retained austenite is obtained by isothermal transformation at Ms+10 °C followed by tempering within 240–450 °C. Results show that the sample tempered at 340 °C occupies the optimal balance of strength and toughness by maintaining a certain level of plasticity; samples tempered at 320 °C and 360 °C with low and high yield ratio come second. The microstructure of the steel is not sensitive to tempering temperatures before 360 °C. When the temperature is increased to 450 °C, the significantly coarsened bainitic ferrite plate and the occurrence of a small quantity of carbide precipitation account for its low toughness. The amount of retained austenite increases with the tempering temperature before 400 °C, followed by decreasing with further increase in the temperature. This behavior is related to the competition between retained austenite further transforming into bainite and decomposing into carbide during tempering.

  17. Tribological performance of hard carbon coatings on 440C bearing steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kustas, F M; Misra, M S; Shepard, D F; Froechtenigt, J F [Martin Marietta Astronautics Group, Denver, CO (United States)

    1991-11-01

    Hard carbon coatings such as amorphous carbon, diamond and diamond-like carbon have received considerable attention for tribological applications owing to their high hardness, high modulus and desirable surface properties. Unfortunately, most of the deposition techniques induce high substrate temperatures that would temper traditional bearing steels and reduce the substrate load-carrying capability. Therefore, to effectively use these desirable coatings, a lower temperature deposition technique is required. Ion beam deposition can provide essentially ambient temperature conditions, accurate control of process parameters and good coating-substrate adhesion. To use these attributes, a test program was initiated to deposit mass-analyzed, high purity C{sup +} and CH{sub 4}{sup +} ions on molybdenum and 440C bearing steel for subsequent characterization by Raman spectroscopy and friction-wear tests. Results for a coating deposited from a carbon monoxide source showed an amorphous carbon-microcrystalline graphtie structure which exhibited very high microhardness and a three fold reduction in coefficient of friction for unlubricated tests compared to untreated 440C steel. In addition, incrementally increasing the applied load (by up to a factor of 5) resulted in progressively lower coefficients of friction, which conforms to solid lubrication theory. End-of-travel wear debris and some limited coating delamination were observed within thinner areas of the coating. Therefore an amorphous carbon-graphite coating applied to 440C steel at ambient temperature exhibits solid lubricating film characteristics with high load-carrying capability. (orig.).

  18. Synchrotron micro-diffraction analysis of the microstructure of cryogenically treated high performance tool steels prior to and after tempering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, N.; Cavallaro, G.P. [Applied Centre for Structural and Synchrotron Studies, Mawson Lakes Blvd, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, South Australia 5095 (Australia); Gerson, A.R., E-mail: Andrea.Gerson@unisa.edu.au [Applied Centre for Structural and Synchrotron Studies, Mawson Lakes Blvd, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, South Australia 5095 (Australia)

    2010-10-15

    The phase transformation and strain changes within cryogenically (-196 deg. C) treated high performance tool steels (AISI H13) before and after tempering have been examined using both laboratory XRD and synchrotron micro-diffraction. The martensitic unit cell was found to have very low tetragonality as expected for low carbon steel. Tempering resulted in the diffusion of excess carbon out of the martensite phase and consequent unit cell shrinkage. In addition on tempering the martensite became more homogeneous as compared to the same samples prior to tempering. For cryogenically treated samples, the effect was most pronounced for the rapidly cooled sample which was the least homogenous sample prior to tempering but was the most homogenous sample after tempering. This suggests that the considerable degree of disorder resulting from rapid cryogenic cooling results in the beneficial release of micro-stresses on tempering thus possibly resulting in the improved wear resistance and durability observed for cryogenically treated tool steels.

  19. Synchrotron micro-diffraction analysis of the microstructure of cryogenically treated high performance tool steels prior to and after tempering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, N.; Cavallaro, G.P.; Gerson, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    The phase transformation and strain changes within cryogenically (-196 deg. C) treated high performance tool steels (AISI H13) before and after tempering have been examined using both laboratory XRD and synchrotron micro-diffraction. The martensitic unit cell was found to have very low tetragonality as expected for low carbon steel. Tempering resulted in the diffusion of excess carbon out of the martensite phase and consequent unit cell shrinkage. In addition on tempering the martensite became more homogeneous as compared to the same samples prior to tempering. For cryogenically treated samples, the effect was most pronounced for the rapidly cooled sample which was the least homogenous sample prior to tempering but was the most homogenous sample after tempering. This suggests that the considerable degree of disorder resulting from rapid cryogenic cooling results in the beneficial release of micro-stresses on tempering thus possibly resulting in the improved wear resistance and durability observed for cryogenically treated tool steels.

  20. ballistic performance of a quenched and tempered steel against

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    was investigated. Low alloy steel ... obliquity obliquity with a projectile velocity with a projectile velocity with a projectile .... quenching on low carbon and alloyed steel [5, 15]. Several studies .... Mars 190, Mars 240, Mars 270, Creusot-Loire,.

  1. Wear of liquid nitrogen-cooled 440C bearing steels in an oxygen environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Dilip K.; Verma, Ravi

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents up-to-date findings of the research being conducted to understand the mechanism of sliding wear in unlubricated 440C bearing steels under oxidative conditions. A sliding wear test rig has been designed and built with a cylinder-on-flat geometry. The equipment is capable of testing specimens under high axial loads and sliding speeds in a simulated LOX environment. Samples of 440C steel, quenched and tempered to a hardness of Rc 56, were tested under a load of 890 N and a sliding speed of 2.05 m/sec for total sliding distances of up to 5.54 km. Flash temperatures during these tests were measured with an IR camera and a fast digital recorder. Microstructural and microanalytical data from the worn surfaces and the debris particles are analyzed extensively, along with wear rates, flash temperatures, surface profiles, hardnesses, and residual stresses, in the context of oxidation and wear theories.

  2. Microstructural characterisation of a P91 steel normalised and tempered at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurtado-Norena, C.; Danon, C.A.; Luppo, M.I.; Bruzzoni, P.

    2015-01-01

    9%Cr-1%Mo martensitic-ferritic steels are used in power plant components with operating temperatures of around 600 deg. C because of their good mechanical properties at high temperature as well as good oxidation resistance. These steels are generally used in the normalised and tempered condition. This treatment results in a structure of tempered lath martensite where the precipitates are distributed along the lath interfaces and within the martensite laths. The characterisation of these precipitates is of fundamental importance because of their relationship with the creep behaviour of these steels in service. In the present work, the different types of precipitates found in these steels have been studied on specimens in different metallurgical conditions. The techniques used in this investigation were X-ray diffraction with synchrotron light, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive microanalysis and transmission electron microscopy. (authors)

  3. Quantifying the effects of tempering on individual phase properties of DP980 steel with nanoindentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, G.; Zhang, F.; Ruimi, A.; Field, D. P.; Sun, X.

    2016-06-01

    We conduct a series of thermal and mechanical testing on a commercial dual phase (DP) 980 steel in order to quantify the effects of tempering on its individual phase properties. Tempering treatment is conducted at 250 °C and 400 °C for 60 minutes each. Ferrite and martensite grains are distinguished using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and scanning probe microscopy (SPM), and the martensite volume fractions (MVF) are determined based on the image quality (IQ) map. Multi-scale indentation tests combined with a newly developed inverse method are used to obtain the individual phase flow properties in each tempered DP980 sample. The results show that, i) tempering significantly reduces martensite yield strength, while it only slightly reduces the ferrite yield strength; ii) tempering temperature has a more significant influence on the work hardening exponent of ferrite than that of martensite; iii) the elastic modulus of martensite is consistently higher than that of ferrite. As a validation, a simple rule of mixtures is used to verify the above-predicted individual phase flow stresses with the experimentally obtained overall true stress vs. true strain curves. The methodology and the corresponding results shown in this study can help guide the selection of tempering parameters in optimizing the mechanical properties of DP steels for their intended applications.

  4. Mechanism of Secondary Hardening in Rapid Tempering of Dual-Phase Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Dulal Chandra; Nayak, Sashank S.; Biro, Elliot; Gerlich, Adrian P.; Zhou, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Dual-phase steel with ferrite-martensite-bainite microstructure exhibited secondary hardening in the subcritical heat affected zone during fiber laser welding. Rapid isothermal tempering conducted in a Gleeble simulator also indicated occurrence of secondary hardening at 773 K (500 °C), as confirmed by plotting the tempered hardness against the Holloman-Jaffe parameter. Isothermally tempered specimens were characterized by analytic transmission electron microscopy and high-angle annular dark-field imaging. The cementite (Fe3C) and TiC located in the bainite phase of DP steel decomposed upon rapid tempering to form needle-shaped Mo2C (aspect ratio ranging from 10 to 25) and plate-shaped M4C3 carbides giving rise to secondary hardening. Precipitation of these thermodynamically stable and coherent carbides promoted the hardening phenomenon. However, complex carbides were only seen in the tempered bainite and were not detected in the tempered martensite. The martensite phase decomposed into ferrite and spherical Fe3C, and interlath-retained austenite decomposed into ferrite and elongated carbide.

  5. Electromagnetic nondestructive evaluation of tempering process in AISI D2 tool steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahrobaee, Saeed; Kashefi, Mehrdad

    2015-05-01

    The present paper investigates the potential of using eddy current technique as a reliable nondestructive tool to detect microstructural changes during the different stages of tempering treatment in AISI D2 tool steel. Five stages occur in tempering of the steel: precipitation of ɛ carbides, formation of cementite, retained austenite decomposition, secondary hardening effect and spheroidization of carbides. These stages were characterized by destructive methods, including dilatometry, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopic observations, and hardness measurements. The microstructural changes alter the electrical resistivity/magnetic saturation, which, in turn, influence the eddy current signals. Two EC parameters, induced voltage sensed by pickup coil and impedance point detected by excitation coil, were evaluated as a function of tempering temperature to characterize the microstructural features, nondestructively. The study revealed that a good correlation exists between the EC parameters and the microstructural changes.

  6. Tempering response to different morphologies of martensite in tensile deformation of dual-phase steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, E.; Manzoor, T.; Sarwar, M.; Arif, M.; Hussain, N.

    2011-01-01

    A low alloy steel containing 0.2% C was heat treated with three cycles of heat treatments with the aim to acquire different morphologies of martensite in dual phase microstructure. Microscopic examination revealed that the morphologies consisting of grain boundary growth, scattered laths and bulk form of martensite were obtained. These morphologies have their distinct patterns of distribution in the matrix (ferrite). In tensile properties observations the dual phase steel with bulk morphology of martensite showed minimum of ductility but high tensile strength as compared to other two morphologies. This may be due to poor alignments of bulk martensite particles along tensile axes during deformation. Tempering was employed with various holding times at 550 deg. C to induce ductility in the heat treated material. The tempering progressively increased the ductility by increasing holding time. However, tempering response to strengths and ductilities was different to all three morphologies of martensite. (author)

  7. Characterization of Nanometric-Sized Carbides Formed During Tempering of Carbide-Steel Cermets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matus K.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article of this paper is to present issues related to characterization of nanometric-sized carbides, nitrides and/or carbonitrides formed during tempering of carbide-steel cermets. Closer examination of those materials is important because of hardness growth of carbide-steel cermet after tempering. The results obtained during research show that the upswing of hardness is significantly higher than for high-speed steels. Another interesting fact is the displacement of secondary hardness effect observed for this material to a higher tempering temperature range. Determined influence of the atmosphere in the sintering process on precipitations formed during tempering of carbide-steel cermets. So far examination of carbidesteel cermet produced by powder injection moulding was carried out mainly in the scanning electron microscope. A proper description of nanosized particles is both important and difficult as achievements of nanoscience and nanotechnology confirm the significant influence of nanocrystalline particles on material properties even if its mass fraction is undetectable by standard methods. The following research studies have been carried out using transmission electron microscopy, mainly selected area electron diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The obtained results and computer simulations comparison were made.

  8. Strain-tempering of low carbon martensite steel wire by rapid heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torisaka, Yasunori; Kihara, Junji

    1978-01-01

    In the production of prestressed concrete steel wires, a series of the cold drawing-patenting process are performed to improve the strength. In order to reduce cyclic process, the low carbon martensite steel wire which can be produced only by the process of hot rolling and direct quench has been investigated as strain-tempering material. When strain-tempering is performed on the low carbon martensite steel wire, stress relaxation (Re%) increases and mechanical properties such as total elongation, reduction of area, ultimate tensile strength and proof stress decrease remarkably by annealing. In order to shorten the heating time, the authors performed on the steel wire the strain-tempering with a heating time of 1.0 s using direct electrical resistance heating and examined the effects of rapid heating on the stress relaxation and the mechanical properties. Stress relaxation decreases without impairment of the mechanical properties up to a strain-tempering temperature of 573 K. Re(%) after 10.8 ks is 0% at the testing temperature 301 K, 0.49% at 363 K and 1.39% at 433 K. (auth.)

  9. On the Nature of Internal Interfaces in Tempered Martensite Ferritic Steels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dronhofer, A.; Pešička, J.; Dlouhý, Antonín; Eggeler, G.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. 5 (2003), s. 511-520 ISSN 0044-3093 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/99/1172 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : Tempered martensite ferritic steels * martensite variants * orientation imaging Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 0.637, year: 2003

  10. Analysis of mechanical properties of steel 1045 plasma nitriding: with and without tempering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machado, N.T.B.; Passos, M.L.M. dos; Riani, J.C.; Recco, A.A.C.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possibility of tempering during the nitriding of AISI 1045 steel. The objective was to evaluate the possibility of eliminating this phase, with the nitriding properties remaining unaltered. For this, three parameter samples were compared: quenched, tempered and nitrided for 2h; quenching and nitrided for 2h and quenching and nitrided for 4h. The analysis techniques used for characterizing the samples before and after nitriding were optical microscopy, hardness Rockwell C (HRC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD). Results showed that phase γ is the most favorable of all parameters tested. The hardness assays showed that samples with different initial hardness (with and without tempering) and even nitriding time showed similar mechanical properties. This fact suggests that the tempering process occurred parallel to the nitriding process. (author)

  11. Comparison of the segregation behavior between tempered martensite and tempered bainite in Ni-Cr-Mo high strength low alloy RPV steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Gyu; Kim, Min Chul; Kim, Hyung Jun; Lee, Bong Sang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    SA508 Gr.4N Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel has an superior fracture toughness and strength, compared to commercial Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy RPV steel SA508 Gr.3. Higher strength and fracture toughness of low alloy steels could be obtained by adding Ni and Cr. So several were performed on researches on SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel for a RPV application. The operation temperature and term of a reactor pressure vessel is more than 300 .deg. C and over 40 years. Therefore, in order to apply the SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel for a reactor pressure vessel, the resistance of thermal embrittlement in the high temperature range including temper embrittlement is required. S. Raoul reported that the susceptibility to temper embrittlement was increasing a function of the cooling rate in SA533 steel, which suggests the martensitic microstructures resulting from increased cooling rates are more susceptible to temper embrittlement. However, this result has not been proved yet. So the comparison of temper embrittlement behavior was made between martensitic microstructure and bainitic microstructure with a viewpoint of boundary features in SA508 Gr.4N, which have mixture of tempered bainite/martensite. We have compared temper embrittlement behaviors of SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel with changing volume fraction of martensite. The mechanical properties of these low alloy steels were evaluated after a long-term heat treatment. Then, the the segregated boundaries were observed and segregation behavior was analyzed by AES. In order to compare the misorientation distributions of model alloys, grain boundary structures were measured with EBSD

  12. Time-dependent temper embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steel: Correlation between microstructural evolution and mechanical properties during tempering at 650 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chuanwei; Han, Lizhan; Yan, Guanghua; Liu, Qingdong; Luo, Xiaomeng; Gu, Jianfeng, E-mail: gujf@sjtu.edu.cn

    2016-11-15

    The microstructural evolution of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel and its effect on the mechanical properties during tempering at 650 °C were studied to reveal the time-dependent toughness and temper embrittlement. The results show that the toughening of the material should be attributed to the decomposition of the martensite/austenite constituents and uniform distribution of carbides. When the tempering duration was 5 h, the strength of the investigated steel decreased to strike a balance with the material impact toughness that reached a plateau. As the tempering duration was further increased, the material strength was slightly reduced but the material impact toughness deteriorated drastically. This time-dependent temper embrittlement is different from traditional temper embrittlement, and it can be partly attributed to the softening of the matrix and the broadening of the ferrite laths. Moreover, the dimensions and distribution of the grain carbides are the most important factors of the impact toughness. - Highlights: • The fracture mechanism of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels under impact load was investigated. • The Charpy V-notch impact test and the hinge model were employed for the study. • Grain boundary carbides play a key role in the impact toughness and fracture toughness. • The dependence of the deterioration of impact toughness on tempering time was analyzed for the first time.

  13. The Kinetics of Phase Transformations During Tempering in Laser Melted High Chromium Cast Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M. Y.; Wang, Y.; Han, B.

    2012-06-01

    The precipitation of secondary carbides in the laser melted high chromium cast steels during tempering at 300-650 °C for 2 h in air furnace was characterized and the present phases was identified, by using transmission electron microscopy. Laser melted high chromium cast steel consists of austenitic dendrites and interdendritic M23C6 carbides. The austenite has such a strong tempering stability that it remains unchanged at temperature below 400 °C and the secondary hardening phenomenon starts from 450 °C to the maximum value of 672 HV at 560 °C. After tempering at 450 °C fine M23C6 carbides precipitate from the supersaturated austenite preferentially. In addition, the dislocation lines and slip bands still exist inside the austenite. While tempering at temperature below 560 °C, the secondary hardening simultaneously results from the martensite phase transformation and the precipitation of carbides as well as dislocation strengthening within a refined microstructure. Moreover, the formation of the ferrite matrix and large quality of coarse lamellar M3C carbides when the samples were tempered at 650 °C contributes to the decrease of hardness.

  14. Effect of microstructure on the susceptibility of a 533 steel to temper embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raoul, S.; Marini, B.; Pineau, A.

    1998-01-01

    In ferritic steels, brittle fracture usually occurs at low temperature by cleavage. However the segregation of impurities (P, As, Sn etc..) along prior γ grain boundaries can change the brittle fracture mode from transgranular to intergranular. In quenched and tempered steels, this segregation is associated with what is called the temper-embrittlement phenomenon. The main objective of the present study is to investigate the influence of the as-quenched microstructure (lower bainite or martensite) on the susceptibility of a low alloy steel (A533 cl.1) to temper-embrittlement. Dilatometric tests were performed to determine the continous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagram of the material and to measure the critical cooling rate (V c ) for a martensitic quench. Then subsized Charpy V-notched specimens were given various cooling rates from the austenitization temperature to obtain a wide range of as-quenched microstructures, including martensite and bainite. These specimens were subsequently given a heat treatment to develop temper embrittlement and tested to measure the V-notch fracture toughness at -50 C. The fracture surfaces were examined by SEM. It is shown that martensitic microstructures are more susceptible to intergranular embrittlement than bainitic microstructures. These observed microstructural influences are briefly discussed. (orig.)

  15. Effect of microstructure on the susceptibility of a 533 steel to temper embrittlement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raoul, S.; Marini, B. [CEA Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Service de Recherches Metallurgiques Appliquees; Pineau, A. [CNRS, Evry (France). Centre de Materiaux

    1998-11-01

    In ferritic steels, brittle fracture usually occurs at low temperature by cleavage. However the segregation of impurities (P, As, Sn etc..) along prior {gamma} grain boundaries can change the brittle fracture mode from transgranular to intergranular. In quenched and tempered steels, this segregation is associated with what is called the temper-embrittlement phenomenon. The main objective of the present study is to investigate the influence of the as-quenched microstructure (lower bainite or martensite) on the susceptibility of a low alloy steel (A533 cl.1) to temper-embrittlement. Dilatometric tests were performed to determine the continous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagram of the material and to measure the critical cooling rate (V{sub c}) for a martensitic quench. Then subsized Charpy V-notched specimens were given various cooling rates from the austenitization temperature to obtain a wide range of as-quenched microstructures, including martensite and bainite. These specimens were subsequently given a heat treatment to develop temper embrittlement and tested to measure the V-notch fracture toughness at -50 C. The fracture surfaces were examined by SEM. It is shown that martensitic microstructures are more susceptible to intergranular embrittlement than bainitic microstructures. These observed microstructural influences are briefly discussed. (orig.) 11 refs.

  16. Electromagnetic nondestructive evaluation of tempering process in AISI D2 tool steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahrobaee, Saeed; Kashefi, Mehrdad

    2015-01-01

    The present paper investigates the potential of using eddy current technique as a reliable nondestructive tool to detect microstructural changes during the different stages of tempering treatment in AISI D2 tool steel. Five stages occur in tempering of the steel: precipitation of ε carbides, formation of cementite, retained austenite decomposition, secondary hardening effect and spheroidization of carbides. These stages were characterized by destructive methods, including dilatometry, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopic observations, and hardness measurements. The microstructural changes alter the electrical resistivity/magnetic saturation, which, in turn, influence the eddy current signals. Two EC parameters, induced voltage sensed by pickup coil and impedance point detected by excitation coil, were evaluated as a function of tempering temperature to characterize the microstructural features, nondestructively. The study revealed that a good correlation exists between the EC parameters and the microstructural changes. - Highlights: • D2 steel parts were tempered at 200-650 °C to produce various microstructures. • Precipitation of ε and Fe 3 C carbides and spheroidization of carbides were detected. • Retained austenite decomposition and secondary hardening effect were determined. • Variations of electrical resistivity (ρ) and magnetic saturation (Bs) were studied. • Combined effects of ρ and Bs on the EC outputs were evaluated

  17. Electromagnetic nondestructive evaluation of tempering process in AISI D2 tool steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahrobaee, Saeed, E-mail: saeed.kahrobaee@yahoo.com; Kashefi, Mehrdad, E-mail: m-kashefi@um.ac.ir

    2015-05-15

    The present paper investigates the potential of using eddy current technique as a reliable nondestructive tool to detect microstructural changes during the different stages of tempering treatment in AISI D2 tool steel. Five stages occur in tempering of the steel: precipitation of ε carbides, formation of cementite, retained austenite decomposition, secondary hardening effect and spheroidization of carbides. These stages were characterized by destructive methods, including dilatometry, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopic observations, and hardness measurements. The microstructural changes alter the electrical resistivity/magnetic saturation, which, in turn, influence the eddy current signals. Two EC parameters, induced voltage sensed by pickup coil and impedance point detected by excitation coil, were evaluated as a function of tempering temperature to characterize the microstructural features, nondestructively. The study revealed that a good correlation exists between the EC parameters and the microstructural changes. - Highlights: • D2 steel parts were tempered at 200-650 °C to produce various microstructures. • Precipitation of ε and Fe{sub 3}C carbides and spheroidization of carbides were detected. • Retained austenite decomposition and secondary hardening effect were determined. • Variations of electrical resistivity (ρ) and magnetic saturation (Bs) were studied. • Combined effects of ρ and Bs on the EC outputs were evaluated.

  18. Fracture-tough, corrosion-resistant bearing steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Gregory B.

    1990-01-01

    The fundamental principles allowing design of stainless bearing steels with enhanced toughness and stress corrosion resistance has involved both investigation of basic phenomena in model alloys and evaluation of a prototype bearing steel based on a conceptual design exercise. Progress in model studies has included a scanning Auger microprobe (SAM) study of the kinetics of interfacial segregation of embrittling impurities which compete with the kinetics of alloy carbide precipitation in secondary hardening steels. These results can define minimum allowable carbide precipitation rates and/or maximum allowable free impurity contents in these ultrahigh strength steels. Characterization of the prototype bearing steel designed to combine precipitated austenite transformation toughening with secondary hardening shows good agreement between predicted and observed solution treatment response including the nature of the high temperature carbides. An approximate equilibrium constraint applied in the preliminary design calculations to maintain a high martensitic temperature proved inadequate, and the solution treated alloy remained fully austenitic down to liquid nitrogen temperature rather than transforming above 200 C. The alloy can be martensitically transformed by cryogenic deformation, and material so processed will be studied further to test predicted carbide and austenite precipitation behavior. A mechanistically-based martensitic kinetic model was developed and parameters are being evaluated from available kinetic data to allow precise control of martensitic temperatures of high alloy steels in future designs. Preliminary calculations incorporating the prototype stability results suggest that the transformation-toughened secondary-hardening martensitic-stainless design concept is still viable, but may require lowering Cr content to 9 wt. pct. and adding 0.5 to 1.0 wt. pct. Al. An alternative design approach based on strain-induced martensitic transformation during

  19. Sigma phases in an 11%Cr ferritic/martensitic steel with the normalized and tempered condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yinzhong, E-mail: shenyz@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zhou, Xiaoling; Shi, Tiantian; Huang, Xi [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Shang, Zhongxia [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Liu, Wenwen; Ji, Bo; Xu, Zhiqiang [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2016-12-15

    At the present time 9–12% Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels with target operating temperatures up to 650 °C and higher are being developed in order to further increase thermal efficiency so as to reduce coal consumption and air pollution. An 11% Cr F/M steel was prepared by reference to the nominal chemical composition of SAVE12 steel with an expected maximum use temperature of 650 °C. The precipitate phases of the 11% Cr F/M steel normalized at 1050 °C for 0.5 h and tempered at 780 °C for 1.5 h were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Except for Cr-/Cr-Fe-Co-rich M{sub 23}C{sub 6}, Nb-/V-/Ta-Nb-/Nd-rich MX, Fe-rich M{sub 5}C{sub 2}, Co-rich M{sub 3}C and Fe-Co-rich M{sub 6}C phases previously identified in the steel, two types of sigma phases consisting of σ-FeCr and σ-FeCrW were found to be also present in the normalized and tempered steel. Identified σ-FeCr and σ-FeCrW phases have a simple tetragonal crystal structure with estimated lattice parameters a/c = 0.8713/0.4986 and 0.9119/0.5053 nm, respectively. The compositions in atomic pct of the observed sigma phases were determined to be approximately 50Fe-50Cr for the σ-FeCr, and 30Fe-55Cr-10W in addition to a small amount of Ta, Co and Mn for the σ-FeCrW. The sigma phases in the steel exhibit various blocky morphologies, and appear to have a smaller amount compared with the dominant phases Cr-rich M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and Nb-/V-/Ta-Nb-rich MX of the steel. The σ-FeCr phase in the steel was found to precipitate at δ-ferrite/martensite boundaries, suggesting that δ-ferrite may rapidly induce the formation of sigma phase at δ-ferrite/martensite boundaries in high Cr F/M steels containing δ-ferrite. The formation mechanism of sigma phases in the steel is also discussed in terms of the presence of δ-ferrite, M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitation, precipitation/dissolution of M{sub 2}X, and steel composition. - Highlights: •Precipitate phases in normalized and tempered 11%Cr F/M steel are

  20. Studying on tempering transformation and internal friction for low carbon bainitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Weijuan, E-mail: liweijuan826@163.com; Cai, Mingyu; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Junwei; Zhao, Shengshi; Shao, Peiying

    2017-01-02

    The changes of microstructure during the process of tempering transformation were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction and internal friction (IF) for low carbon bainite steel. The yield strength of the steel was tested after tempering transformation. The results showed that the microstructures of the experimental steel in rolled state were composed of lath bainite and granular bainite with a little Mo{sub 2}C and NbC precipitates. The lath width of bainite increased continuously with the tempering time. More cell structures with different orientations were formed in bainite laths. Furthermore, poly-gonization gradually began in some laths. The microstructure of granular bainite increased and was coarsened when it devoured the lath bainite continuously. The dislocation density of the bainitic ferrite decreased continuously as Mo{sub 2}C and NbC precipitations were further increasing. The peak value of Snoek decreased continuously in internal friction-temperature spectrum. The peak value of SKK at the surface decreased at first and then increased. The peak value of SKK at the center decreased firstly and then had little change. Besides, the yield strength of the steel increased firstly and then decreased.

  1. Studying on tempering transformation and internal friction for low carbon bainitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Weijuan; Cai, Mingyu; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Junwei; Zhao, Shengshi; Shao, Peiying

    2017-01-01

    The changes of microstructure during the process of tempering transformation were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction and internal friction (IF) for low carbon bainite steel. The yield strength of the steel was tested after tempering transformation. The results showed that the microstructures of the experimental steel in rolled state were composed of lath bainite and granular bainite with a little Mo 2 C and NbC precipitates. The lath width of bainite increased continuously with the tempering time. More cell structures with different orientations were formed in bainite laths. Furthermore, poly-gonization gradually began in some laths. The microstructure of granular bainite increased and was coarsened when it devoured the lath bainite continuously. The dislocation density of the bainitic ferrite decreased continuously as Mo 2 C and NbC precipitations were further increasing. The peak value of Snoek decreased continuously in internal friction-temperature spectrum. The peak value of SKK at the surface decreased at first and then increased. The peak value of SKK at the center decreased firstly and then had little change. Besides, the yield strength of the steel increased firstly and then decreased.

  2. The Mechanism of High Ductility for Novel High-Carbon Quenching-Partitioning-Tempering Martensitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shengwei; Liu, Yu; Hao, Qingguo; Wang, Ying; Chen, Nailu; Zuo, Xunwei; Rong, Yonghua

    2015-09-01

    In this article, a novel quenching-partitioning-tempering (Q-P-T) process was applied to treat Fe-0.6C-1.5Mn-1.5Si-0.6Cr-0.05Nb hot-rolled high-carbon steel and the microstructures including retained austenite fraction and the average dislocation densities in both martensite and retained austenite were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. The Q-P-T steel exhibits high strength (1950 MPa) and elongation (12.4 pct). Comparing with the steel treated by traditional quenching and tempering (Q&T) process, the mechanism of high ductility for high-carbon Q-P-T steel is revealed as follows. Much more retained austenite existing in Q-P-T steel than in Q&T one remarkably enhances the ductility by the following two effects: the dislocation absorption by retained austenite effect and the transformation-induced plasticity effect. Besides, lower dislocation density in martensite matrix produced by Q-P-T process plays an important role in the improvement of ductility. However, some thin plates of twin-type martensite embedded in dislocation-type martensite matrix in high-carbon Q-P-T steel affect the further improvement of ductility.

  3. Hydrogen induced cold cracking studies on armour grade high strength, quenched and tempered steel weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magudeeswaran, G.; Balasubramanian, V. [Centre for Materials Joining Research (CEMAJOR), Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Annamalai University, Annamalai Nagar 608 002, Tamil Nadu (India); Madhusudhan Reddy, G. [Metal Joining Section, Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory (DMRL), Kanchanbagh (P.O.) Hyderabad 560 058 Andhra Pradesh (India)

    2008-04-15

    Quenched and tempered (Q and T) steels are prone to hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) in the heat affected zone after welding. The use of austenitic stainless steel (ASS) consumables to weld the above steel was the only available remedy because of higher solubility for hydrogen in austenitic phase. The use of stainless steel consumables for a non-stainless steel base metal is not economical. Hence, alternate consumables for welding Q and T steels and their vulnerability to HIC need to be explored. Recent studies proved that low hydrogen ferritic (LHF) steel consumables can be used to weld Q and T steels, which can give very low hydrogen levels in the weld deposits. In this investigation an attempt has been made to study the influence of welding consumables and welding processes on hydrogen induced cold cracking of armour grade Q and T steel welds by implant testing. Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and flux cored arc welding (FCAW) processes were used for making welds using ASS and LHF welding consumables. ASS welds made using FCAW process offered a higher resistance to HIC than all other welds considered in this investigation. (author)

  4. Microstructural characteristics of steel rebar submitted to the process of self - tempering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreto, M.F.O.

    2014-01-01

    Every day the construction industry seeks new alternatives to maximize use of the materials provided new tools for structural design of the new techniques in welding rods. In this sense, this work proposes to study the mechanical properties of steel rebar self-tempering for civil construction, choosing the bars from 6.3 to 25.4 mm in diameter for the study. The cooling process of rebar, after rolling, known as self-tempering produces a rebar with excellent mechanical properties and low cost to the plant, they put the rebar shall be composed of concentric layers with different mechanical properties among themselves. To study the influence of these layers on the mechanical behavior of rebar microstructural characterization was made by means of electron microscopy analysis of transmitted light and scanning of all samples. From the results it was found that only the bars 20 and 25mm diameter had a heat treatment for self-tempering relevant. (author)

  5. Quantifying the effects of tempering on individual phase properties of DP980 steel with nanoindentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, G. [Physical and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA (United States); Zhang, F. [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, WA (United States); Ruimi, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A& M University, Doha (Qatar); Field, D.P. [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, WA (United States); Sun, X., E-mail: xin.sun@pnnl.gov [Physical and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-06-14

    Tempering treatment is conducted on a commercial dual phase (DP) 980 steel at 250 °C and 400 °C for 60 min each. Ferrite and martensite grains are distinguished using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and scanning probe microscopy (SPM), and the martensite volume fractions (MVF) are determined based on the image quality (IQ) map. Indentation tests combined with a newly developed inverse method are used to obtain the individual phase flow properties in each sample. The results show that, i) tempering significantly reduces martensite yield strength, while it slightly reduces the ferrite yield strength; ii) tempering temperature has a more significant influence on the work hardening exponent of ferrite than that of martensite. As a validation, a simple rule-of-mixtures is used to verify the above-predicted individual phase flow stresses with the experimentally obtained overall true stress vs. true strain curves.

  6. Effect of high temperature tempering on the mechanical properties and microstructure of the modified 410 martensitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabruri, Efendi; Pasaribu, Rahmat Ramadhan; Sugandi, Moh. Tri; Sunardi

    2018-05-01

    This paper reports the influence of high tempering temperature and holding time on the mechanical properties and microstructure of the recently modified 410 martensitic stainless steel. The modified steel was prepared by induction melting followed by hot forging, quenching and tempering. The hardness and tensile strength of the steels decreased with increasing tempering temperature from 600 to 700 °C and with increasing holding time from 1 to 6 h. Based on microstructural images, it was observed the coarsening of lath martensite and of the metal carbides as well. However, a relatively high hardness and strength were still exibited by this steel after tempering at a such high temperature of 600-700 °C. The partition of Mo into the carbides identified by EDS analysis may correlate with this situation.

  7. Effect of tempering temperature on microstructure and sliding wear property of laser quenched 4Cr13 steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouyang, J.H.; Pei, Y.T.; Li, X.D.; Lei, T.C.

    1994-01-01

    4Cr13 martensite stainless steel was quenched by a CO2 laser and tempered for 2 h at different temperatures in the range 200 °C to 550 °C. The microstructure of treated layer was observed by SEM, XRD and TEM. Tempering leads to the decomposition of a large number of retained austenites in laser

  8. Oxidation of ultra low carbon and silicon bearing steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez, Lucia [CTM - Technologic Centre, Materials Technology Area, Manresa, Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: lucia.suarez@ctm.com.es; Rodriguez-Calvillo, Pablo [CTM - Technologic Centre, Materials Technology Area, Manresa, Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: pablo.rodriguez@ctm.com.es; Houbaert, Yvan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ghent (Belgium)], E-mail: Yvan.Houbaert@UGent.be; Colas, Rafael [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (Mexico)], E-mail: rcolas@mail.uanl.mx

    2010-06-15

    Oxidation tests were carried out in samples from an ultra low carbon and two silicon bearing steels to determine the distribution and morphology of the oxide species present. The ultra low carbon steel was oxidized for short periods of time within a chamber designed to obtain thin oxide layers by controlling the atmosphere, and for longer times in an electric furnace; the silicon steels were reheated only in the electric furnace. The chamber was constructed to study the behaviour encountered during the short period of time between descaling and rolling in modern continuous mills. It was found that the oxide layers formed on the samples reheated in the electric furnace were made of different oxide species. The specimens treated in the chamber had layers made almost exclusively of wustite. Selected oxide samples were studied by scanning electron microscopy to obtain electron backscattered diffraction patterns, which were used to identify the oxide species in the layer.

  9. Laser surface pretreatment of 100Cr6 bearing steel – Hardening effects and white etching zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buling, Anna; Sändker, Hendrik; Stollenwerk, Jochen; Krupp, Ulrich; Hamann-Steinmeier, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Laser surface pretreatment of the bearing steel 100Cr6 is performed. • Microstructural changes of the surface are examined by light microscopy and SEM. • Topographical changes are observed using white light interferometry. • Micro-hardness testing show the existence of very hard white etching zones (WEZ). • WEZ are attributed to near-surface reaustenitization and rapid quenching. • Dark etching zones (DEZ) are found at the laser path edges after laser pretreatment. - Abstract: In order to achieve a surface pretreatment of the bearing steel 100Cr6 (1–1.5 wt.% Cr) a laser-based process was used. The obtained modification may result in an optimization of the adhesive properties of the surface with respect to an anticorrosion polymer coating on the basis of PEEK (poly-ether-ether-ketone), which is applied on the steel surface by a laser melting technique. This work deals with the influence of the laser-based pretreatment regarding the surface microstructure and the micro-hardness of the steel, which has been examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), light microscopy and automated micro-hardness testing. The most suitable parameter set for the laser-based pretreatment leads to the formation of very hard white etching zones (WEZ) with a thickness of 23 μm, whereas this pretreatment also induces topographical changes. The occurrence of the white etching zones is attributed to near-surface re-austenitization and rapid quenching. Moreover, dark etching zones (DEZ) with a thickness of 32 μm are found at the laser path edges as well as underneath the white etching zones (WEZ). In these areas, the hardness is decreased due to the formation of oxides as a consequence of re-tempering.

  10. Laser surface pretreatment of 100Cr6 bearing steel – Hardening effects and white etching zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buling, Anna, E-mail: a.buling@hs-osnabrueck.de [Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science, University of Applied Sciences, 49009 Osnabrück (Germany); Sändker, Hendrik; Stollenwerk, Jochen [Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT, Steinbachstrasse 15, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Krupp, Ulrich; Hamann-Steinmeier, Angela [Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science, University of Applied Sciences, 49009 Osnabrück (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Laser surface pretreatment of the bearing steel 100Cr6 is performed. • Microstructural changes of the surface are examined by light microscopy and SEM. • Topographical changes are observed using white light interferometry. • Micro-hardness testing show the existence of very hard white etching zones (WEZ). • WEZ are attributed to near-surface reaustenitization and rapid quenching. • Dark etching zones (DEZ) are found at the laser path edges after laser pretreatment. - Abstract: In order to achieve a surface pretreatment of the bearing steel 100Cr6 (1–1.5 wt.% Cr) a laser-based process was used. The obtained modification may result in an optimization of the adhesive properties of the surface with respect to an anticorrosion polymer coating on the basis of PEEK (poly-ether-ether-ketone), which is applied on the steel surface by a laser melting technique. This work deals with the influence of the laser-based pretreatment regarding the surface microstructure and the micro-hardness of the steel, which has been examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), light microscopy and automated micro-hardness testing. The most suitable parameter set for the laser-based pretreatment leads to the formation of very hard white etching zones (WEZ) with a thickness of 23 μm, whereas this pretreatment also induces topographical changes. The occurrence of the white etching zones is attributed to near-surface re-austenitization and rapid quenching. Moreover, dark etching zones (DEZ) with a thickness of 32 μm are found at the laser path edges as well as underneath the white etching zones (WEZ). In these areas, the hardness is decreased due to the formation of oxides as a consequence of re-tempering.

  11. Strain-rate behavior in tension of the tempered martensitic reduced activation steel Eurofer97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadoni, Ezio; Dotta, Matteo; Forni, Daniele [University of Applied Sciences of Southern Switzerland, P.O. Box 105, CH-6952 Canobbio (Switzerland); Spaetig, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.spatig@psi.ch [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association Euratom-Confederation Suisse, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2011-07-31

    The tensile properties of the high-chromium tempered martensitic reduced activation steel Eurofer97 were determined from tests carried out over a wide range of strain-rates on cylindrical specimens. The quasi-static tests were performed with a universal electro-mechanical machine, whereas a hydro-pneumatic machine and a JRC-split Hopkinson tensile bar apparatus were used for medium and high strain-rates respectively. This tempered martensitic stainless steel showed significant strain-rate sensitivity. The constitutive behavior was investigated within a framework of dislocations dynamics model using Kock's approach. The parameters of the model were determined and then used to predict the deformation range of the tensile deformation stability. A very good agreement between the experimental results and predictions of the model was found.

  12. Strain-rate behavior in tension of the tempered martensitic reduced activation steel Eurofer97

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadoni, Ezio; Dotta, Matteo; Forni, Daniele; Spaetig, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The tensile properties of the high-chromium tempered martensitic reduced activation steel Eurofer97 were determined from tests carried out over a wide range of strain-rates on cylindrical specimens. The quasi-static tests were performed with a universal electro-mechanical machine, whereas a hydro-pneumatic machine and a JRC-split Hopkinson tensile bar apparatus were used for medium and high strain-rates respectively. This tempered martensitic stainless steel showed significant strain-rate sensitivity. The constitutive behavior was investigated within a framework of dislocations dynamics model using Kock's approach. The parameters of the model were determined and then used to predict the deformation range of the tensile deformation stability. A very good agreement between the experimental results and predictions of the model was found.

  13. TEM characterization on new 9% Cr advanced steels thermomechanical treated after tempering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, P.; Hoffmann, J.; Rieth, M.; Roldán, M.; Gómez-Herrero, A.

    2018-03-01

    Phase transformation on new six reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels (RAFMs) was investigated to provide the basis for the design and development of advanced steels to maintain adequate strength and creep resistance above 500 °C. The new alloys are designed to increase the amount of fine MX precipitates and reduce coarse M23C6 carbides through alloy composition refinement and the application of thermomechanical treatments. The microstructural investigations by TEM have shown M23C6, M2X, and MX precipitation after tempering at 700 °C/2h with low dislocation recovery, while at 825 °C/2h the martensite developed to subgrain formation and growth. At this stage, only M23C6 and MX were detected. Preliminary results demonstrate that it is feasible to produce fine MX strengthened particles dispersed in the matrix with further optimization of tempering treatments.

  14. Modification of Low-Alloy Steel Surface by High-Temperature Gas Nitriding Plus Tempering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Dongling; Li, Minsong; Ding, Hongzhen; Qiu, Wanqi; Luo, Chengping

    2018-02-01

    The low-alloy steel was nitrided in a pure NH3 gas atmosphere at 640 660 °C for 2 h, i.e., high-temperature gas nitriding (HTGN), followed by tempering at 225 °C, which can produce a high property surface coating without brittle compound (white) layer. The steel was also plasma nitriding for comparison. The composition, microstructure and microhardness of the nitrided and tempered specimens were examined, and their tribological behavior investigated. The results showed that the as-gas-nitrided layer consisted of a white layer composed of FeN0.095 phase (nitrided austenite) and a diffusional zone underneath the white layer. After tempering, the white layer was decomposed to a nano-sized (α-Fe + γ'-Fe4N + retained austenite) bainitic microstructure with a high hardness of 1150HV/25 g. Wear test results showed that the wear resistance and wear coefficient yielded by the complex HTGN plus tempering were considerably higher and lower, respectively, than those produced by the conventional plasma nitriding.

  15. Study of tempering process of a DIN 1.2714 steel modified by niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Carlos A.S. de.

    1985-01-01

    The carbides precipitaton in a DIN 1.2714 steel modified by niobium are studied. Three austenitizing temperatures (1200, 960 and 860 0 C) after homogenization at 1200 0 C are used; and the precipitation behavior of the carbides on tempering at 600 0 C with respect to time is studied. These precipitates were characterized through the X-ray fluorescence and diffraction and by carbon extraction replica techniques for transmission electron microscope. (M.J.C.) [pt

  16. Appropriate welding conditions of temper bead weld repair for SQV2A pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, R.; Matsuda, F.; Brziak, P.; Lomozik, M.

    2004-01-01

    Temper bead welding technique is one of the most important repair welding methods for large structures for which it is difficult to perform the specified post weld heat treatment. In this study, appropriate temper bead welding conditions to improve the characteristics of heat affected zone (HAZ) are studied using pressure vessel steel SQV2A corresponding to ASTM A533 Type B Class 1. Thermal/mechanical simulator is employed to give specimens welding thermal cycles from single to quadruple cycle. Charpy absorbed energy and hardness of simulated CGHAZ by first cycle were degraded as compared with base metal. Improvability of these degradations by subsequent cycles is discussed and appropriate temper bead thermal cycles are clarified. When the peak temperature lower than Ac1 and near Ac1 in the second thermal cycle is applied to CGAHZ by first thermal cycle, the characteristics of CGHAZ improve enough. When the other peak temperatures (that is, higher than Ac1) in the second thermal cycle are applied to the CGHAZ, third or more thermal cycle temper bead process should be applied to improve the properties. Appropriate weld condition ranges are selected based on the above results. The validity of the selected ranges is verified by the temper bead welding test. (orig.)

  17. Metallurgical/Alloy Optimization of High Strength and Wear Resistant Structural Quench and Tempered Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalheim, Douglas G.; Peimao, Fu; Linhao, Gu; Yongqing, Zhang

    Structural steels with yield strength requirements greater or equal to 690 MPa can be produced through controlled recrystallization hot rolling coupled with precipitation strengthening or purposeful heat treatment through quench and tempering (Q&T). High strength structural steel and wear/abrasion resistant requirements greater or equal to 360 Brinell hardness (BHN) are produced by the development of microstructures of tempered lower bainite and/or martensite through the Q&T process. While these Q&T microstructures can produce very high strengths and hardness levels making them ideal for 690 MPa plus yield strength or wear/abrasion resistant applications, they lack toughness/ductility and hence are very brittle and prone to cracking. While tempering the microstructures helps in improving the toughness/ductility and reducing the brittleness, strength and hardness can be sacrificed. In addition, these steels typically consist of alloy designs containing boron with carbon equivalents (CE) greater than 0.50 to achieve the desired microstructures. The higher CE has a negative influence on weldability.

  18. Effect of joint design on ballistic performance of quenched and tempered steel welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakrishnan, M.; Balasubramanian, V.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Traditional usage of austenitic stainless steel filler for armour steel welding shows poor ballistic performance. • Earlier efforts show dubious success on ballistic resistance of armour steel joints. • Comparative evaluation of equal/unequal joint design on ballistic performance. • Effect of joint design covers the main aspects of successful bullet stoppage. - Abstract: A study was carried out to evaluate the effect of joint design on ballistic performance of armour grade quenched and tempered steel welded joints. Equal double Vee and unequal double Vee joint configuration were considered in this study. Targets were fabricated using 4 mm thick tungsten carbide hardfaced middle layer; above and below which austenitic stainless steel layers were deposited on both sides of the hardfaced interlayer in both joint configurations. Shielded metal arc welding process was used to deposit for all layers. The fabricated targets were evaluated for its ballistic performance and the results were compared in terms of depth of penetration on weld metal. From the ballistic test results, it was observed that both the targets successfully stopped the bullet penetration at weld center line. Of the two targets, the target made with unequal double Vee joint configuration offered maximum resistance to the bullet penetration at weld metal location without any bulge at the rear side. The higher volume of austenitic stainless steel front layer and the presence of hardfaced interlayer after some depth of soft austenitic stainless steel front layer is the primary reason for the superior ballistic performance of this joint

  19. Plastic flow properties and fracture toughness characterization of unirradiated and irradiated tempered martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spaetig, P.; Bonade, R.; Odette, G.R.; Rensman, J.W.; Campitelli, E.N.; Mueller, P.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the plastic flow properties at low and high temperature of the tempered martensitic steel Eurofer97. We show that below room temperature, where the Peierls friction on the screw dislocation is active, it is necessary to modify the usual Taylor's equation between the flow stress and the square root of the dislocation density and to include explicitly the Peierls friction stress in the equation. Then, we compare the fracture properties of the Eurofer97 with those of the F82H steel. A clear difference of the fracture toughness-temperature behavior was found in the low transition region. The results indicate a sharper transition for Eurofer97 than for the F82H. Finally, the shift of the median toughness-temperature curve of the F82H steel was determined after two neutron irradiations performed in the High Flux Reactor in Petten

  20. Physical metallurgy of BATMAN II Ti-bearing martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilloni, L.; Attura, F.; Calza-Bini, A.; Santis, G. de; Filacchioni, G.

    1998-01-01

    Seven laboratory experimental casts of 7-9% Cr Ti-bearing martensitic steels were obtained via VIM process. Plates of 25 mm thickness were produced by hot rolling. On each cast CCT diagrams and critical temperatures were determined. Several austenitizing treatments were performed to study the grain size evolution. The effect of microstructure on impact properties were finally investigated. This paper discusses the role of chemical composition on microstructural and physical properties and shows the beneficial effect either of low-temperature austenitizing or double-austenitizing steps on impact properties. (orig.)

  1. Precipitation reactions in a beryllium-bearing stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, M.J.; Heiple, C.R.

    1980-01-01

    Precipitation reactions in a beryllium-bearing stainless steel alloy have been studied by TEM and electron diffraction for ageing temperatures between 400 0 and 900 0 C. The nominal composition of the alloy was 38% Ni - 21% Cr - 1% Mn - 0.5% Be - Bal Fe. Specimens were solutionized for one hour at 1150 0 C and water quenched. The ageing reaction was studied by hardness measurements for times between 0.5 and 16 hours. The TEM specimens dicussed herein were made from samples aged one hour

  2. Carbide characterization in a Nb-microalloyed advanced ultrahigh strength steel after quenching-partitioning-tempering process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, X.D.; Xu, W.Z.; Guo, Z.H.; Wang, L.; Rong, Y.H.

    2010-01-01

    Based on the observations of scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, four kinds of carbides were identified in a Nb-microalloyed steel after quenching-partitioning-tempering treatment. In addition to transitional epsilon carbide that usually forms in silicon-free carbon steel, other three types of niobium carbides (NbC) formed at various treatment stages respectively. They are incoherent NbC inclusion that nucleated at solidification mainly, fine NbC that nucleated in lath martensite at tempering stage and regular polygonal NbC that nucleated in austenite before quenching. Their formation mechanisms on steel were discussed briefly based on thermodynamics.

  3. Effect of heat treatment and plastic deformation on the structure and the mechanical properties of nitrogen-bearing 04N9Kh2A steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinov, V. M.; Bannykh, O. A.; Lukin, E. I.; Kostina, M. V.; Blinov, E. V.

    2014-11-01

    The effect of the conditions of heat treatment and plastic deformation on the structure and the mechanical properties of low-carbon martensitic nickel steel (9 wt % Ni) with an overequilibrium nitrogen content is studied. The limiting strain to failure of 04N9Kh2A steel is found to be 40% at a rolling temperature of 20°C and 80% at a rolling temperature of 900°C. Significant strengthening of the steel (σ0.2 = 1089 MPa) is obtained after rolling at a reduction of 40% at 20°C. The start and final temperatures of the α → γ transformation on heating and those of the γ → α transformation on cooling are determined by dilatometry. The specific features of the formation of the steel structure have been revealed as functions of the annealing and tempering temperatures. Electron-microscopic studies show that, after quenching from 850°C and tempering at 600°C for 1 h, the structure contains packet martensite with thin interlayers of retained austenite between martensite crystals. The strength of the nitrogen-bearing 04N9Kh2A steel after quenching from 850 and 900°C, cooling in water, and subsequent tempering at 500°C for 1 h is significantly higher than that of carboncontaining 0H9 steel used in cryogenic engineering.

  4. On cobalt effect on structural and phase transformations during tempering carbon-containing steels of Fe-Ni-Mo system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakhshtadt, A.G.; Khovova, O.M.; Kan, A.V.; Perkas, M.D.; Kudryavtsev, A.N.; Rodionov, Yu.L.

    1990-01-01

    Methods of resistometry, colorimetry, X-ray diffraction chemical and electrochemical phase analyses, Moessbauer spectroscopy and field-ion mass spectrometry are used to study the nature of precipitation hardening of carbon containing Fe-Ni-Mo martensitic steels. Cobalt contribution to formation of phase composition and structural state of steels during tempering is analyzed. Realization conditions of effective combined (carbide-intermetallide) hardening of the investigated system steels are determined

  5. Overlapping phase transformations on tempering of a low-alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valencia Morales, E; Galeano Alvarez, N.J; Vega Leiva, J; Castellanos L M; Villar C E; Antiquera Munoz J; Hernandez R J

    2006-01-01

    The kinetics of precipitation of the primary and independent carbides during tempering of a low-alloy steel are characterized by the application of the Kinetic Theory of the Overlapping Phase Transformations(KTOPT). It is based on the Avrami model and considers two simultaneous precipitation processes. The present set-up allows us to calculate the exponent of the Avrami equation for simultaneous reactions at different rates. Only the dilatometry curves on tempering are required. According to this new formulation, the treatment of the dilatometry records showed different mechanisms of nucleation and growth of the primary and independent carbides. These results are in agreement with the thin foil electron micrographs and hardness tests of the thermally treated samples (au)

  6. Effect of tempering on microstructure and tensile properties of niobium modified martensitic 9Cr heat resistant steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, A., E-mail: anupmetal@gmail.com; Bandyopadhay, T.K.

    2015-01-03

    The effect of tempering on the microstructure of niobium modified 8.8 wt% chromium steel has been evaluated. Steel has been prepared using the conventional melting and casting route. Homogenization and forging is done at 1100 °C. Dilatometric study shows that the Ac{sub 1}, Ac{sub 3} and M{sub s} temperatures are 800, 855, and 131 °C, respectively. Initial cast and forged microstructures consist of martensite/ferrite. The samples are subsequently tempered at 500–800 °C for various intervals of time (1–5 h). The microstructure of the tempered sample is analyzed using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) is used to identify the precipitate. Nanometer-sized precipitates (50–200 nm) are observed after tempering at 700 °C for 1 h. Niobium rich MC type carbide precipitates and chromium rich M{sub 23}C{sub 6} type precipitates are observed after tempering at 700 °C. Tensile strength decreases with increasing tempering temperature. Maximum tensile strength of 920 MPa is observed after tempering at 700 °C and maximum elongation of ∼11% is observed after tempering at 750 °C.

  7. Effect of tempering temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a reactor pressure vessel steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, C.W.; Han, L.Z.; Luo, X.M.; Liu, Q.D.; Gu, J.F., E-mail: gujf@sjtu.edu.cn

    2016-08-15

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel were investigated after tempering at different temperatures ranging from 580 to 700 °C for 5 h. With increasing tempering temperature, the impact toughness, which is qualified by Charpy V-notch total absorbed energy, initially increases from 142 to 252 J, and then decreases to 47 J, with a maximum value at 650 °C, while the ultimate tensile strength varies in exactly the opposite direction. Comparing the microstructure and fracture surfaces of different specimens, the variations in toughness and strength with the tempering temperature were generally attributed to the softening of the bainitic ferrite, the agminated Fe{sub 3}C carbides that resulted from decomposition of martensite/austenite (M/A) constituents, the precipitation of Mo{sub 2}C carbides, and the newly formed M/A constituents at the grain boundaries. Finally, the correlation between the impact toughness and the volume fraction of the M/A constituents was established, and the fracture mechanisms for the different tempering conditions are explained. - Highlights: • The dependence of the deterioration of impact toughness on tempering temperature has been analysed. • The instrumented Charpy V-notch impact test has been employed to study the fracture mechanism. • The influence of M/A constituents on different fracture mechanisms based on the hinge model has been demonstrated. • A correlation between the mechanical properties and the amount of M/A constituents has been established.

  8. Variations of microstructure and properties of 690 MPa grade low carbon bainitic steel after tempering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Rui [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan Shandong 250061 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan Shandong 250061 (China); Li, Shengli, E-mail: lishengli@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan Shandong 250061 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan Shandong 250061 (China); Li, Zhenshun; Tian, Lei [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan Shandong 250061 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan Shandong 250061 (China)

    2012-12-15

    The variations of microstructure, mechanical properties and electrical resistivity of 690 MPa grade low carbon bainitic steel tempered at different temperatures were investigated with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and double-arm Bridge. The results show that the appearance of granular bainite, decomposition of retained austenite, variations of dislocation density and solid solution of microalloying elements are the main reasons for variations of mechanical properties and electrical resistivity. Electrical resistivity reflects the solution content of microalloying elements and variations of dislocation density, which can be used as a fast and effective way to analyze the microstructure of materials.

  9. Study of Surface Wear and Damage Induced by Dry Sliding of Tempered AISI 4140 Steel against Hardened AISI 1055 Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Elhadi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In industry, the sliding mechanical systems are subject to friction and wear phenomena. These phenomena can be the origin of a reduction of the efficiency of the mechanical system even to be responsible for its incapacity. Generally, the materials of the parts which are moving relative (tribological couple of these systems are low alloy steels and carbon steels, thanks to their good mechanical and tribological properties. The present work aimed to study, the surface wear and damage induced by dry sliding of hard carbon steel AISI 1055 (disc against tempered low alloy steel AISI 4140 (pin with different hardness and applied loads was investigated. The results revealed that the interaction between the applied load and pin hardness result in complex thermo-mechanical behaviour of the worn surfaces. When a lower hardness pin is used, the main wear mechanisms observed on the discs were abrasion, adhesion, and oxidation. When a higher hardness pin is used, the wear of the discs is governed by delamination, oxidation, and plastic deformation. In particular, third-body wear occurs at high applied load resulting in higher wear rate of high hardness pins compared to low hardness pins.

  10. Effect of Aluminum Alloying on the Hot Deformation Behavior of Nano-bainite Bearing Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z. N.; Dai, L. Q.; Chu, C. H.; Zhang, F. C.; Wang, L. W.; Xiao, A. P.

    2017-12-01

    Interest in using aluminum in nano-bainite steel, especially for high-carbon bearing steel, is gradually growing. In this study, GCr15SiMo and GCr15SiMoAl steels are introduced to investigate the effect of Al alloying on the hot deformation behavior of bearing steel. Results show that the addition of Al not only notably increases the flow stress of steel due to the strong strengthening effect of Al on austenite phase, but also accelerates the strain-softening rates for its increasing effect on stacking fault energy. Al alloying also increases the activation energy of deformation. Two constitutive equations with an accuracy of higher than 0.99 are proposed. The constructed processing maps show the expanded instability regions for GCr15SiMoAl steel as compared with GCr15SiMo steel. This finding is consistent with the occurrence of cracking on the GCr15SiMoAl specimens, revealing that Al alloying reduces the high-temperature plasticity of the bearing steel. On the contrary, GCr15SiMoAl steel possesses smaller grain size than GCr15SiMo steel, manifesting the positive effect of Al on bearing steel. Attention should be focused on the hot working process of bearing steel with Al.

  11. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Laser Clad and Post-cladding Tempered AISI H13 Tool Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telasang, Gururaj; Dutta Majumdar, Jyotsna; Wasekar, Nitin; Padmanabham, G.; Manna, Indranil

    2015-05-01

    This study reports a detailed investigation of the microstructure and mechanical properties (wear resistance and tensile strength) of hardened and tempered AISI H13 tool steel substrate following laser cladding with AISI H13 tool steel powder in as-clad and after post-cladding conventional bulk isothermal tempering [at 823 K (550 °C) for 2 hours] heat treatment. Laser cladding was carried out on AISI H13 tool steel substrate using a 6 kW continuous wave diode laser coupled with fiber delivering an energy density of 133 J/mm2 and equipped with a co-axial powder feeding nozzle capable of feeding powder at the rate of 13.3 × 10-3 g/mm2. Laser clad zone comprises martensite, retained austenite, and carbides, and measures an average hardness of 600 to 650 VHN. Subsequent isothermal tempering converted the microstructure into one with tempered martensite and uniform dispersion of carbides with a hardness of 550 to 650 VHN. Interestingly, laser cladding introduced residual compressive stress of 670 ± 15 MPa, which reduces to 580 ± 20 MPa following isothermal tempering. Micro-tensile testing with specimens machined from the clad zone across or transverse to cladding direction showed high strength but failure in brittle mode. On the other hand, similar testing with samples sectioned from the clad zone parallel or longitudinal to the direction of laser cladding prior to and after post-cladding tempering recorded lower strength but ductile failure with 4.7 and 8 pct elongation, respectively. Wear resistance of the laser surface clad and post-cladding tempered samples (evaluated by fretting wear testing) registered superior performance as compared to that of conventional hardened and tempered AISI H13 tool steel.

  12. Optimization and testing results of Zr-bearing ferritic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Lizhen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yang, Ying [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tyburska-Puschel, Beata [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Sridharan, K. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The mission of the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program is to develop crosscutting technologies for nuclear energy applications. Advanced structural materials with superior performance at elevated temperatures are always desired for nuclear reactors, which can improve reactor economics, safety margins, and design flexibility. They benefit not only new reactors, including advanced light water reactors (LWRs) and fast reactors such as sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) that is primarily designed for management of high-level wastes, but also life extension of the existing fleet when component exchange is needed. Developing and utilizing the modern materials science tools (experimental, theoretical, and computational tools) is an important path to more efficient alloy development and process optimization. Ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels are important structural materials for nuclear reactors due to their advantages over other applicable materials like austenitic stainless steels, notably their resistance to void swelling, low thermal expansion coefficients, and higher thermal conductivity. However, traditional FM steels exhibit a noticeable yield strength reduction at elevated temperatures above ~500°C, which limits their applications in advanced nuclear reactors which target operating temperatures at 650°C or higher. Although oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels have shown excellent high-temperature performance, their extremely high cost, limited size and fabricability of products, as well as the great difficulty with welding and joining, have limited or precluded their commercial applications. Zirconium has shown many benefits to Fe-base alloys such as grain refinement, improved phase stability, and reduced radiation-induced segregation. The ultimate goal of this project is, with the aid of computational modeling tools, to accelerate the development of a new generation of Zr-bearing ferritic alloys to be fabricated using conventional

  13. Effect of quenching and tempering process on sulfide stress cracking susceptibility in API-5CT-C110 casing steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, M.; Wang, C.H.; Dai, Y.C.; Li, X.; Cao, G.H. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Special Steel & Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advanced Ferrometallurgy & School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, 149 Yanchang Road, Shanghai 200072 (China); Russell, A.M. [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Ames Laboratory of the U.S.D.O.E., and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-2300 (United States); Liu, Y.H.; Dong, X.M. [Tube & Pipe Department, Baosteel Research Institute, Baoshan Iron & Steel Co., Ltd, Shanghai 201900 (China); Zhang, Z.H., E-mail: zhzhang@baosteel.com [Tube & Pipe Department, Baosteel Research Institute, Baoshan Iron & Steel Co., Ltd, Shanghai 201900 (China)

    2017-03-14

    Three quenching and tempering processes performed on API-5CT-C110 casing steel produced tempered martensite structures and similar mechanical properties but distinct sulfide stress cracking (SSC) behavior as evaluated by Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) testing. An as-quenched specimen tempered at 690 °C for two hours showed superior SSC behavior compared to another specimen tempered at 715 °C for one hour. The latter contained a larger fraction of low-angle boundaries (LABs) and higher values of kernel average misorientation (KAM) than those in the former. Moreover, one more quenching and tempering on the former specimen would produce better SSC resistance with a decrease in the fraction of LABs and the values of KAM. Since dislocations trap hydrogen more strongly than grain boundaries, the specimen with higher KAM values, as well as higher dislocation density, would trap more hydrogen atoms and lead to greater SSC.

  14. Effect of test temperature on the fatigue strength of the 12GN2MFAYu tempered steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goritskij, V.M.; Terent'ev, V.F.; Bobyleva, L.A.

    1979-01-01

    The cyclic strength, variation of dislocation structure and fractography of specimen fractures were investigated depending on testing temperature. The specimens were tested at temperatures of 20, 350, 450, 550 deg C. The increase of testing temperature, according to the experimental data obtained, is accompanied by an insignificant reduction of fatigue strength. The testing temperature in the range from 350 to 550 deg C has a weak effect on the fatigue strength of the quenched and tempered steel. A change in the dislocation structure occurs under all tested temperatures in the 12 GN2MFAYu steel during fatigue. The intensity of the rearrangement of dislocation structure increases as the testing temperature increases to 550 deg C causing a decrease of the limited life-time at increased stress amplitudes

  15. Structure and properties of the tool steel after electron beam treatment and following tempering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozyr', I.G.; Borodin, R.V.; Voropaev, A.V.; Potapov, V.G.

    1998-01-01

    The possibility of changing the surface structure of chromium tool steel has been considered. The given properties were reached through the surface remelting by electron beam with following tempering of strengthened layer. The found distinguished zones with different structure and properties are formed as the result of this treatment. It is shown that for hipereutectoid steel the thermal furnace annealing at 300 deg C is necessary for strengthened surface layer forming after electron beam remelting. The same result can be had by means of short-term heating with electronic beam up to higher temperatures, but is not higher A 1 . The evaluation of temperature fields was carried out by numerical solution of nonstationary heat conductivity equation

  16. A transmission Kikuchi diffraction study of cementite in a quenched and tempered steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleh, Ahmed A., E-mail: asaleh@uow.edu.au [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Casillas, Gilberto [Electron Microscopy Centre, University of Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Pereloma, Elena V. [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Electron Microscopy Centre, University of Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Carpenter, Kristin R. [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Plate Mill: Manufacturing, BlueScope Steel Ltd., Port Kembla, NSW 2505 (Australia); Killmore, Christopher R. [Research & Development: Sales & Marketing, BlueScope Steel Ltd., Port Kembla, NSW 2505 (Australia); Gazder, Azdiar A. [Electron Microscopy Centre, University of Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia)

    2016-04-15

    This is the first transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) study to report the indexing of nano-sized cementite as distinct structures and its orientation relationship with the body-centered cubic matrix in a quenched and tempered steel. Crystallographic analysis via TKD and selected area diffraction returned the well-known Bagaryatskii and Isaichev orientation relationships. However, the indexing of nano-sized cementite via TKD was sensitive to the thickness of the electron transparent region such that TEM remains the most precise method to characterise such precipitates. - Highlights: • Nano-sized cementite in a QT steel has been investigated by TKD and TEM. • Cementite has been indexed as distinct structures via TKD. • Crystallographic analysis returned the Bagaryatskii and Isaichev ORs. • Success of TKD is sensitive to the thickness of the electron transparent region. • TEM remains the most precise technique to characterise nano-sized precipitates.

  17. A transmission Kikuchi diffraction study of cementite in a quenched and tempered steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleh, Ahmed A.; Casillas, Gilberto; Pereloma, Elena V.; Carpenter, Kristin R.; Killmore, Christopher R.; Gazder, Azdiar A.

    2016-01-01

    This is the first transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) study to report the indexing of nano-sized cementite as distinct structures and its orientation relationship with the body-centered cubic matrix in a quenched and tempered steel. Crystallographic analysis via TKD and selected area diffraction returned the well-known Bagaryatskii and Isaichev orientation relationships. However, the indexing of nano-sized cementite via TKD was sensitive to the thickness of the electron transparent region such that TEM remains the most precise method to characterise such precipitates. - Highlights: • Nano-sized cementite in a QT steel has been investigated by TKD and TEM. • Cementite has been indexed as distinct structures via TKD. • Crystallographic analysis returned the Bagaryatskii and Isaichev ORs. • Success of TKD is sensitive to the thickness of the electron transparent region. • TEM remains the most precise technique to characterise nano-sized precipitates.

  18. Effect of twice quenching and tempering on the mechanical properties and microstructures of SCRAM steel for fusion application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong Xuesong; Yang Feng; Zou Xingrong [State Key Laboratory of Mould Technology, Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Suo Jinping, E-mail: jpsuo@yahoo.com.cn [State Key Laboratory of Mould Technology, Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2012-11-15

    The effect of twice quenching and tempering on the mechanical properties and microstructures of SCRAM steel was investigated. The results from tensile tests showed that whether twice quenching and tempering processes(1253 K/0.5 h/W.C(water cool) + 1033 K/2 h/A.C(air cool) + 1233 K/0.5 h/W.C + 1033 K/2 h/A.C named after 2Q and 2TI, and 1253 K/0.5 h/W.C + 1033 K/2 h/A.C + 1233 K/0.5 h/W.C + 1013 K/2 h/A.C named after 2Q and 2TII)increased strength of steel or not depended largely on the second tempering temperature compared to quenching and tempering process(1253 K/0.5 h/W.C + 1033 K/2 h/A.C named after 1Q and 1T). Charpy V-notch impact tests indicated that twice quenching and tempering processes reduced the ductile brittle transition temperature (DBTT). Microstructure inspection revealed that the prior austenitic grain size and martensite lath width were refined after twice quenching and tempering treatments. Precipitate growth was inhibited by a slight decrease of the second tempering temperature from 1033 to 1013 K. The finer average size of precipitates is considered to be the main possible reason for the higher strength and lower DBTT of 2Q and 2TII compared with 2Q and 2TI.

  19. Effect of magnetic field on the carbide precipitation during tempering of a molybdenum-containing steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, T.P.; Li, Y.; Zhang, J.J.; Wu, K.M.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of a high magnetic field on the carbide precipitation during the tempering of an Fe–2.8C–3.0Mo(wt%) steel was investigated. As-quenched steels were tempered at 200 °C for various times with and without the presence of 12-T magnetic field. The applied field effectively promoted the precipitation of the relatively high-temperature monoclinic χ-Fe 5 C 2 carbide, compared to the usual ε-Fe 2 C and η-Fe 2 C carbides precipitated without magnetic field. It is believed that the effect of applying a magnetic field is due to the reduction in the Gibbs free energy of the relatively higher magnetization phase. The denser distributions of the metastable carbides are attributed to the increased nucleation rate due to additional transformation force. The dispersed precipitation strengthening compensated for the decrease of hardness due to the loss of supersaturation of carbon atoms in the matrix. - Highlights: ► Applied field promoted the precipitation of χ-Fe 5 C 2 carbide. ► Promotion of the transition carbide was attributed to its higher magnetization. ► Increase in hardness was counterbalanced by the reduction in carbon content.

  20. Effect of Tempering Temperature and Time on the Corrosion Behaviour of 304 and 316 Austenitic Stainless Steels in Oxalic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Ayo S. Afolabi; Johannes H. Potgieter; Ambali S. Abdulkareem; Nonhlanhla Fungura

    2011-01-01

    The effect of different tempering temperatures and heat treatment times on the corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steels in oxalic acid was studied in this work using conventional weight loss and electrochemical measurements. Typical 304 and 316 stainless steel samples were tempered at 150oC, 250oC and 350oC after being austenized at 1050oC for 10 minutes. These samples were then immersed in 1.0M oxalic acid and their weight losses were measured at every five days for 30 days. The r...

  1. In-situ analysis of redistribution of carbon and nitrogen during tempering of low interstitial martensitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niessen, F.; Villa, M.; Danoix, F.

    2018-01-01

    The redistribution of C and N during tempering of X4CrNiMo16-5-1 martensitic stainless steel containing 0.034 wt% C and 0.032 wt% N was studied using in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atom probe tomography (APT). The unit cell volume of martensite decreased continuously during...... tempering. APT showed that this volume decrease is accounted entirely for by segregation of the interstitial atoms, implying that in low interstitial martensitic stainless steel stress relaxation only contributes negligibly to changes in the martensite unit cell volume....

  2. Fire resistance of a steel plate reinforced concrete bearing wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodaira, Akio; Kanchi, Masaki; Fujinaka, Hideo; Akita, Shodo; Ozaki, Masahiko

    2003-01-01

    Samples from a steel plate reinforced concrete bearing wall composed of concrete slab sandwiched between studded steel plates, were subjected to loaded fire resistance tests. There were two types of specimens: some were 1800 mm high while the rest were 3000 mm high ; thickness and width were the same for all specimens, at 200 mm and 800 mm, respectively. Under constant load conditions, one side of each specimen was heated along the standard fire-temperature curve. The results enabled us to approximate the relationship between the ratio of working load to concrete strength N/(Ac x c σ b) and the fire resistance time (t: minutes), as equation (1) for the 1800 mm - high specimen, and equation (2) for the 3000 mm - high specimen. N/(Ac x c σ b) = 2.21 x (1/t) 0.323 (1), .N/(Ac x c σ b) 2.30 x (1/t) 0.378 (2) In addition, the temperature of the unheated side of the specimens was 100degC at 240 minutes of continuous heating, clearly indicating that there was sufficient heat insulation. (author)

  3. Development of small punch tests for ductile-brittle transition temperature measurement of temper embrittled Ni-Cr steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baik, J.M.; Kameda, J.; Buck, O.

    1983-01-01

    Small punch tests were developed to determine the ductile-brittle transition temperature of nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) steels having various degrees of temper embrittlement and various microstructures. It was found that the small punch test clearly shows the ductile-brittle transition behavior of the temper-embrittled steels. The measured values were compared with those obtained from Charpy impact and uniaxial tensile tests. The effects of punch tip shape, a notch, and the strain rate on the ductile-brittle transition behavior were examined. It was found that the combined use of a notch, high strain rates, and a small punch tip strongly affects the ductile-brittle transition behavior. Considerable variations in the data were observed when the small punch tests were performed on coarse-grained steels. Several factors controlling embrittlement measurements of steels are discussed in terms of brittle fracture mechanisms

  4. Creep behavior of double tempered 8% Cr-2% WVTa martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Manabu; Shinozuka, Kei; Esaka, Hisao; Nowell, Matthew M.

    2006-01-01

    Creep testing was carried out at around 650degC for a martensitic 8Cr-2WVTa steel (F82H), which is a candidate alloy for the first wall of the fusion reactors of the Tokamak type. Rupture strength of the double tempered steel (F82HD) is lightly higher than that of simple tempered steel (F82HS). On the other hand, creep rate of F82HD is obviously smaller than that of F82HS in acceleration creep, though creep strain of F82HD in transition creep, where creep rate decreases with increasing strain, is larger than that of F82HS. Hardness of the crept H82HD decreases with increasing creep strain, which corresponded with the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation. On the contrary, X-ray diffraction and electron back-scattered diffraction pattern measurements show that fine sub-grains are created during transition creep. The creep curves were analyzed using an exponential type creep equation and the apparent activation energy, the activation volume and the pre-exponential factor were calculated as a function of creep strain. Then, these parameters were converted into two parameters, i.e. equivalent obstacle spacing (EOS) and mobile dislocation density parameter (MDDP). While EOS decreases with increasing creep strain, MDDP increases with increasing strain during transition creep. The decrease in EOS and the increase in either EOS or MDDP are rate-controlling factors in transition and acceleration creep, respectively. On the other hand, in case of F82HS, EOS increases and MDDP decreases during transition creep. In this case, the decrease in MDDP controls the creep rate during transition creep of F82HS. It is concluded that both EOS and MDDP are representative parameters of the change in substructure during creep. (author)

  5. Tempering of martensitic steel for fasteners: Effects of micro-alloying on microstructure and mechanical property evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Öhlund, C.E.I.C.

    2015-01-01

    The research presented in this thesis aims to deepen our understanding of the effect of micro-alloying on the microstructure and mechanical property evolution during tempering of martensitic steel for fasteners. The ongoing trend of engine down-sizing has led to the need for stronger and more temperature resistant fasteners than currently available according to international standards. A new martensitic fastener steel called KNDS4 has been developed, that combines higher strength with improve...

  6. Characteristic of retained austenite decomposition during tempering and its effect on impact toughness in SA508 Gr.3 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Guanghua; Han, Lizhan; Li, Chuanwei; Luo, Xiaomeng; Gu, Jianfeng, E-mail: gujf@sjtu.edu.cn

    2017-01-15

    Retained austenite(RA) usually presents in the quenched Nuclear Pressure-Vessel SA508 Gr.3 steel. In the present work, the characteristic of RA decomposition and its effect on the impact toughness were investigated by microstructure observation, dilatometric experiments and Charpy impact tests. The results show that the RA transformed into martensite and bainite during tempering at 230 °C and 400 °C respectively, while mixture of long rod carbides and ferrite formed at 650 °C. The long rod carbides formed from RA decomposition decrease the critical cleavage stress for initiation of micro-cracks, and deteriorate the impact toughness of the steel. Pre-tempering at a low temperature such as 230 °C or 400 °C leading to the decomposition of RA into martensite or baintie can eliminate the deterioration of the toughness caused by direct decomposition into long rod carbides. The absorbed energy indicate that pre-tempering at 400 °C can drive dramatically improvement in the toughness of the steel. - Highlights: • The products of RA decomposition were localization observed by SEM and TEM. • Decomposition characteristic of RA were revealed during tempering at different temperature. • Impact toughness was dramatically improved by pre-tempering treatment.

  7. Tempering of martensitic steel for fasteners : Effects of micro-alloying on microstructure and mechanical property evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Öhlund, C.E.I.C.

    2015-01-01

    The research presented in this thesis aims to deepen our understanding of the effect of micro-alloying on the microstructure and mechanical property evolution during tempering of martensitic steel for fasteners. The ongoing trend of engine down-sizing has led to the need for stronger and more

  8. Behavior of quenched and tempered steels under high strain rate compression loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, L.W.; Seifert, K.; Abdel-Malek, S.

    1997-01-01

    Two quenched and tempered steels were tested under compression loading at strain rates of ε = 2.10 2 s -1 and ε = 2.10 3 s -1 . By applying the thermal activation theory, the flow stress at very high strain rates of 10 5 to 10 6 s -1 is derived from low temperature and high strain rate tests. Dynamic true stress - true strain behaviour presents, that stress increases with increasing strain until a maximum, then it decreases. Because of the adiabatic process under dynamic loading the maximum flow stress will occur at a lower strain if the strain rate is increased. Considering strain rate, strain hardening, strain rate hardening and strain softening, a constitutive equation with different additive terms is successfully used to describe the behaviour of material under dynamic compression loading. Results are compared with other models of constitutive equations. (orig.)

  9. Microstructural parameters and yielding in a quenched and tempered Cr-Mo-V pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toerroenen, Kari

    1979-01-01

    In this work the plastic deformation behaviour of a Cr-Mo-V pressure vessel steel is studied at ambient and low temperatures. To produce a wide range of microstructures, different austenitizing, quenching and tempering treatments are performed. The microstructures, including grain and dislocation structures as well as carbides, are evaluated. A qualitative model is proposed for the martensitic and bainitic transformations explaining the morphology and crystallography of the transformation products. Based on microstructural observations of undeformed and deformed materials, as well as the tensile test results, the role of various obstacles to dislocation motion in plastic deformation is evaluated. Finally the strength increment, its temperature dependence and the effect due to combinations of various obstacles are analyzed. The results are intended to serve as basis for further fracture behaviour analyses. (author)

  10. Rapid Tempering of Martensitic Stainless Steel AISI420: Microstructure, Mechanical and Corrosion Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi-Khazaei, Bijan; Mollaahmadi, Akbar

    2017-04-01

    In this research, the effect of rapid tempering on the microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel has been investigated. At first, all test specimens were austenitized at 1050 °C for 1 h and tempered at 200 °C for 1 h. Then, the samples were rapidly reheated by a salt bath furnace in a temperature range from 300 to 1050 °C for 2 min and cooled in air. The tensile tests, impact, hardness and electrochemical corrosion were carried out on the reheated samples. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study the microstructure and fracture surface. To investigate carbides, transmission electron microscopy and also scanning electron microscopy were used. X-ray diffraction was used for determination of the retained austenite. The results showed that the minimum properties such as the tensile strength, impact energy, hardness and corrosion resistance were obtained at reheating temperature of 700 °C. Semi-continuous carbides in the grain boundaries were seen in this temperature. Secondary hardening phenomenon was occurred at reheating temperature of 500 °C.

  11. Effect of welding processes and consumables on fatigue crack growth behaviour of armour grade quenched and tempered steel joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Magudeeswaran

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Quenched and Tempered (Q&T steels are widely used in the construction of military vehicles due to its high strength to weight ratio and high hardness. These steels are prone to hydrogen induced cracking (HIC in the heat affected zone (HAZ after welding. The use of austenitic stainless steel (ASS consumables to weld the above steel was the only available remedy because of higher solubility for hydrogen in austenitic phase. The use of stainless steel consumables for a non-stainless steel base metal is not economical. Hence, alternate consumables for welding Q&T steels and their vulnerability to HIC need to be explored. Recent studies proved that low hydrogen ferritic steel (LHF consumables can be used to weld Q&T steels, which can give very low hydrogen levels in the weld deposits. The use of ASS and LHF consumables will lead to distinct microstructures in their respective welds. This microstructural heterogeneity will have a drastic influence in the fatigue crack growth resistance of armour grade Q&T steel welds. Hence, in this investigation an attempt has been made to study the influence of welding consumables and welding processes on fatigue crack growth behaviour of armour grade Q&T Steel joints. Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW and Flux cored arc welding (FCAW were used for fabrication of joints using ASS and LHF consumables. The joints fabricated by SMAW process using LHF consumable exhibited superior fatigue crack growth resistance than all other joints.

  12. Residual stresses determination by neutron diffraction in a 100Cr6 chromium steel bearing ring

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rogante, M.; Martinat, G.; Mikula, Pavol; Vrána, Miroslav

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 5 (2013), s. 275-281 ISSN 0023-432X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(XE) LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : 100Cr6 steel * rings * martensitic hardening * tempering * residual stress es * neutron diffraction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.546, year: 2013

  13. Effect of Nb Addition to Ti-Bearing Super Martensitic Stainless Steel on Control of Austenite Grain Size and Strengthening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoping; Langelier, Brian; Gault, Baptiste; Subramanian, Sundaresa

    2017-05-01

    The role of Nb in normalized and tempered Ti-bearing 13Cr5Ni2Mo super martensitic stainless steel is investigated through in-depth characterization of the bimodal chemistry and size of Nb-rich precipitates/atomic clusters and Nb in solid solution. Transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography are used to analyze the samples and clarify precipitates/atom cluster interactions with dislocations and austenite grain boundaries. The effect of 0.1 wt pct Nb addition on the promotion of (Ti, Nb)N-Nb(C,N) composite precipitates, as well as the retention of Nb in solution after cooling to room temperature, are analyzed quantitatively. (Ti, Nb)N-Nb(C,N) composite precipitates with average diameters of approximately 24 ± 8 nm resulting from epitaxial growth of Nb(C,N) on pre-existing (Ti,Nb)N particles, with inter-particle spacing on the order of 205 ± 68 nm, are found to be associated with mean austenite grain size of 28 ± 10 µm in the sample normalized at 1323 K (1050 °C). The calculated Zener limiting austenite grain size of 38 ± 13 µm is in agreement with the experimentally observed austenite grain size distribution. 0.08 wt pct Nb is retained in the as-normalized condition, which is able to promote Nb(C, N) atomic clusters at dislocations during tempering at 873 K (600 °C) for 2 hours, and increases the yield strength by 160 MPa, which is predicted to be close to maximum increase in strengthening effect. Retention of solute Nb before tempering also leads to it preferentially combing with C and N to form Nb(C, N) atom clusters, which suppresses the occurrence of Cr- and Mo-rich carbides during tempering.

  14. Phase structures and morphologies of tempered CA6NM stainless steel welded by hybrid laser-arc process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirakhorli, F., E-mail: Fatemeh.mirakhorli.1@ens.etsmtl.ca [École de Technologie Supérieure, Montréal, Québec H3C 1K3 (Canada); National Research Council Canada – Aerospace, Montréal, Québec H3T 2B2 (Canada); Cao, X., E-mail: Xinjin.cao@cnrc-nrc.gc.ca [National Research Council Canada – Aerospace, Montréal, Québec H3T 2B2 (Canada); Pham, X-T., E-mail: Tan.pham@etsmtl.ca [École de Technologie Supérieure, Montréal, Québec H3C 1K3 (Canada); Wanjara, P., E-mail: Priti.wanjara@cnrc-nrc.gc.ca [National Research Council Canada – Aerospace, Montréal, Québec H3T 2B2 (Canada); Fihey, J.L., E-mail: jean-luc.fihey@etsmtl.ca [École de Technologie Supérieure, Montréal, Québec H3C 1K3 (Canada)

    2017-01-15

    The post-weld tempered microstructure of hybrid laser-arc welded CA6NM, a cast low carbon martensitic stainless steel, was investigated. The microstructural evolutions from the fusion zone to the base metal were characterized in detail using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and microhardness techniques. The fusion zone, in its post-weld tempered condition, consisted of tempered lath martensite, residual delta-ferrite with various morphologies, reversed austenite and chromium carbides. The reversed austenite, which can be detected through both EBSD and XRD techniques, was found to be finely dispersed along the martensite lath boundaries, particularly at triple junctions. Based on the EBSD analysis, the orientation relationship between the reversed austenite and the adjacent martensite laths seemed to follow the Kurdjumov-Sachs (K-S) model. The results also revealed the presence of the reversed austenite in the different regions of the heat affected zone after post-weld tempering. The microindentation hardness distribution was measured, and correlated to the evolution of the corresponding microstructure across the welds. - Highlights: •The EBSD analysis was performed on hybrid laser-arc welded CA6NM. •The FZ consisted of tempered lath martensite, reversed austenite, carbides and δ ferrite after tempering. •The reversed γ was formed along the α′ lath boundaries, particularly at triple junctions.

  15. Study of copper precipitation behavior in a Cu-bearing austenitic antibacterial stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Ling; Nan, Li; Yang, Ke

    2011-01-01

    Copper (Cu) precipitation behavior in a type 304 Cu-bearing austenitic antibacterial stainless steel was studied by analyses of variations in micro-hardness, electrical resistivity, electrochemical impedance and lattice constant of the steel, complemented with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation, showing more or less changes on these properties of the steel with different aging time. It was found that both micro-hardness and electrical resistivity measurements were relatively sensitive and accurate to reflect the Cu precipitation behavior in the experimental steel, indicating the beginning and finishing points of the precipitation, which are more simple and effective to be used for development of the new type of antibacterial stainless steels.

  16. Experimental study and simulation of cyclic softening of tempered martensite ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giroux, P.-F.

    2011-01-01

    The present work focuses on the high temperature mechanical behaviour of 9% Cr tempered martensite steels, considered as potential candidates for structural components in the next Generation IV nuclear power plants. Already used for energy production in fossil power plants, they are sensitive to softening during high-temperature cycling and creep-fatigue. This phenomenon is coupled to a pronounced microstructural degradation: mainly vanishing of subgrain boundaries and decrease in dislocation density. This study aims at (i) linking the macroscopic cyclic softening of 9% Cr steels and their microstructural evolution during cycling and (ii) proposing a physically-based modelling of deformation mechanisms in order to predict the macroscopic mechanical behaviour of these steels during cycling. Mechanical study includes uniaxial tensile and cyclic test at 550 C performed on a Grade 92 steel (9Cr-0,5Mo-1,8W-V-Nb). The effect of both strain amplitude and rate on mechanical behaviour is studied. Examination of tensile specimens suggests that the physical mechanism responsible for slight measured softening is mainly the necking phenomenon and the evolution of mean subgrain size, which increases by more than 15 % compared to the as-received state. The evolution of the macroscopic stress during cycling shows that cyclic softening is due to the decrease in kinematic stress. TEM observations highlights that the mean subgrain size increases by 60 to 100 % while the dislocation density decreases by more than 50 % during cycling, compared to the as-received state. A self-consistent homogenization model based on crystalline elasto-visco-plasticity and dislocation densities, predicting the mechanical behaviour of the material and its microstructural evolution during deformation is proposed. This model takes some of the main physical deformation mechanisms into account and only the two parameters of crystalline visco-plasticity should be adjusted (the effective activation energy and

  17. Precipitation behavior and martensite lath coarsening during tempering of T/P92 ferritic heat-resistant steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lin-qing; Zhang, Dan-tian; Liu, Yong-chang; Ning, Bao-qun; Qiao, Zhi-xia; Yan, Ze-sheng; Li, Hui-jun

    2014-05-01

    Tempering is an important process for T/P92 ferritic heat-resistant steel from the viewpoint of microstructure control, as it facilitates the formation of final tempered martensite under serving conditions. In this study, we have gained deeper insights on the mechanism underlying the microstructural evolution during tempering treatment, including the precipitation of carbides and the coarsening of martensite laths, as systematically analyzed by optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The chemical composition of the precipitates was analyzed using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Results indicate the formation of M3C (cementite) precipitates under normalized conditions. However, they tend to dissolve within a short time of tempering, owing to their low thermal stability. This phenomenon was substantiated by X-ray diffraction analysis. Besides, we could observe the precipitation of fine carbonitrides (MX) along the dislocations. The mechanism of carbon diffusion controlled growth of M23C6 can be expressed by the Zener's equation. The movement of Y-junctions was determined to be the fundamental mechanism underlying the martensite lath coarsening process. Vickers hardness was estimated to determine their mechanical properties. Based on the comprehensive analysis of both the micro-structural evolution and hardness variation, the process of tempering can be separated into three steps.

  18. Precipitation Behavior of Carbides in H13 Hot Work Die Steel and Its Strengthening during Tempering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angang Ning

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The properties of carbides, such as morphology, size, and type, in H13 hot work die steel were studied with optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction, and energy dispersive X-ray analysis; their size distribution and quantity after tempering, at different positions within the ingot, were analyzed using Image-Pro Plus software. Thermodynamic calculations were also performed for these carbides. The microstructures near the ingot surface were homogeneous and had slender martensite laths. Two kinds of carbide precipitates have been detected in H13: (1 MC and M6C, generally smaller than 200 nm; and (2 M23C6, usually larger than 200 nm. MC and M6C play the key role in precipitation hardening. These are the most frequent carbides precipitating at the halfway point from the center of the ingot, and the least frequent at the surface. From the center of the ingot to its surface, the size and volume fraction of the carbides decrease, and the toughness improves, while the contribution of the carbides to the yield strength increases.

  19. Analysis of bearing steel exposed to rolling contact fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, K. T.; Fæster, Søren; Natarajan, Anand

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this work is to characterize fatigue damage in roller bearings under conditions of high load and slippage. A test rig constructed for rolling contact fatigue tests of rings is described, and test results are presented for rings taken from two spherical roller bearings. The prepar...

  20. Microstructural, mechanical and tribological investigation of 30CrMnSiNi2A ultra-high strength steel under various tempering temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan Hafeez, Muhammad; Farooq, Ameeq

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the research was to investigate the variation in microstructural, mechanical and tribological characteristics of 30CrMnSiNi2A ultra-high strength steel as a function of tempering temperatures. Steel was quenched at 880 °C and tempered at five different tempering temperatures ranging from 250 °C to 650 °C. Optical microscopy and pin on disc tribometer was used to evaluate the microstructural and wear properties. Results show that characteristics of 30CrMnSiNi2A are highly sensitive to tempering temperatures. Lathe and plate shaped martensite obtained by quenching transform first into ε-carbide, second cementite, third coarsened and spheroidized cementite and finally into recovered ferrite and austenite. Hardness, tensile and yield strengths decreased while elongation increased with tempering temperatures. On the other hand, wear rate first markedly decreased and then increased. Optimum amalgamation of characteristics was achieved at 350 °C.

  1. Influence of precipitation behavior on mechanical properties and hydrogen induced cracking during tempering of hot-rolled API steel for tubing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Joonoh, E-mail: mjo99@kims.re.kr [Ferrous Alloy Department, Advanced Metallic Materials Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwondae-ro, Seongsan-gu, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jongmin; Han, Seong-Kyung; Huh, Sungyul; Kim, Seong-Ju [Sheet Products Design Team, Technical Research Center, Hyundai Steel Company, 1480 Bukbusaneop-ro, Dangjin, Chungnam 343-823 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Tae-Ho [Ferrous Alloy Department, Advanced Metallic Materials Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwondae-ro, Seongsan-gu, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    Precipitation behavior and its effect on hydrogen embrittlement during tempering process of hot-rolled API steel designed with 0.4 wt% Cr and 0.25 wt% Mo were investigated. The base steel was normalized and then tempered at 650 °C for up to 60 min. The precipitation behavior of the examined steel was explored using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, and it was found that the precipitation sequence during tempering at 650 °C were as follows: MX+M{sub 3}C→MX→MX+M{sub 7}C{sub 3}+M{sub 23}C{sub 6}. The change of particle fraction was measured by electrolytic extraction technique. At the early stage of tempering, the particle fraction greatly decreased due to dissolution of M{sub 3}C particle, and increased after 10 min by the precipitation of M{sub 7}C{sub 3} and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} particles. The particle fraction showed a peak at 30 min tempering and decreased again due to the dissolution of M{sub 7}C{sub 3} particle. Vickers hardness tests of base steel and tempered samples were carried out, and then the hardness was changed by accompanying with the change of particle fraction. The sensitivity of hydrogen embrittlement was evaluated through hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) tests, and the results clearly proved that HIC resistance of tempered samples was better than that of base steel due to the formation of tempered martensite, and then the HIC resistance changed depending on the precipitation behavior during tempering, i.e., the precipitation of coarse M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and M{sub 7}C{sub 3} particles deteriorated the HIC resistance.

  2. Influence of precipitation behavior on mechanical properties and hydrogen induced cracking during tempering of hot-rolled API steel for tubing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Joonoh; Choi, Jongmin; Han, Seong-Kyung; Huh, Sungyul; Kim, Seong-Ju; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Tae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Precipitation behavior and its effect on hydrogen embrittlement during tempering process of hot-rolled API steel designed with 0.4 wt% Cr and 0.25 wt% Mo were investigated. The base steel was normalized and then tempered at 650 °C for up to 60 min. The precipitation behavior of the examined steel was explored using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, and it was found that the precipitation sequence during tempering at 650 °C were as follows: MX+M_3C→MX→MX+M_7C_3+M_2_3C_6. The change of particle fraction was measured by electrolytic extraction technique. At the early stage of tempering, the particle fraction greatly decreased due to dissolution of M_3C particle, and increased after 10 min by the precipitation of M_7C_3 and M_2_3C_6 particles. The particle fraction showed a peak at 30 min tempering and decreased again due to the dissolution of M_7C_3 particle. Vickers hardness tests of base steel and tempered samples were carried out, and then the hardness was changed by accompanying with the change of particle fraction. The sensitivity of hydrogen embrittlement was evaluated through hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) tests, and the results clearly proved that HIC resistance of tempered samples was better than that of base steel due to the formation of tempered martensite, and then the HIC resistance changed depending on the precipitation behavior during tempering, i.e., the precipitation of coarse M_2_3C_6 and M_7C_3 particles deteriorated the HIC resistance.

  3. Morphology, crystallography, and crack paths of tempered lath martensite in a medium-carbon low-alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chengduo; Qiu, Hai; Kimura, Yuuji; Inoue, Tadanobu

    2016-01-01

    The tempered lath martensite and its crack propagation have significant influence on the ductility and toughness of the warm tempformed medium-carbon steel. The martensitic microstructures of these medium-carbon steels are transformed from twinned austenite and the orientation relationship of lath martensite (α′) with prior austenite (γ) is distinctive. In the present paper we investigate the microstructure and fracture mode of a quenched and tempered 0.4%C-2%Si-1%Cr-1%Mo steel using electron backscatter diffraction technique. The results showed that the orientation relationship between γ and α′ is Greninger-Troiano (G-T) relationship. A single γ grain was divided into 4 packets and each packet was subdivided into 3 blocks. The misorientation angles between adjacent blocks were ~54.3° or ~60.0° in a packet. Most γ grains were twins sharing a {111} γ plane. There were 7 packets in a twinned γ grain and the twin boundaries were in a special packet. Besides the common packet, there were three packets in each twin. Being different from the cleavage fracture along the {001} planes in conventional martensitic steels, both cleavage and intergranular cracks were present in our medium-carbon steel. The former was in the larger blocks and it propagated along the {001}, {011}, and {112} planes. The latter propagated along the block, packet, or prior austenite boundaries. The intergranular cracks were generally in the fine block region. These results suggested that the block size is the key factor in controlling the brittle fracture mode of lath martensitic steel.

  4. The Potential of Self-Tempered Martensite and Bainite in Improving the Fatigue Strength of Thermomechanically Processed Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krupp Ulrich

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to a two-stage hardening and tempering process, the definition of optimized cooling routes after hot working of low-alloy Cr steel allows the adjustments of high-strength microstructures with a sufficient degree of ductility at the same time without any additional heat-treatment. While compressed air cooling after hot forging of micro-alloyed steel grades leads to the formation of lower bainite with finedispersed cementite platelets, quenching by water spray down to the martensite start temperature results in the formation of martensite, that is self-tempered during the subsequent slow-cooling in air. The precipitation of nano-sized cementite precipitates result in superior mechanical properties with respect to impact and tensile testing. Cyclic deformation and crack propagation tests being carried out using resonance testing (100Hz and ultrasonic fatigue testing (20kHz systems revealed a pronounced increase in fatigue strength by about 150MPa of the self-tempered martensite condition as compared to the bainitic modification. For the latter one, a steady decrease of the fatigue strength is observed rather than the existence of a real fatigue limit.

  5. Effect of heavy tempering on microstructure and yield strength of 28CrMo48VTiB martensitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu; Gu, Shunjie; Wang, Qian; Wang, Huibin; Wang, Qingfeng; Zhang, Fucheng

    2018-02-01

    The 28CrMo48VTiB martensitic steel for sulfide stress cracking (SSC) resistance oil country tubular goods (OCTG) of C110 grade was thermally processed through quenching at 890 °C and tempering at 600 °C-720 °C for 30-90 min. The microstructures of all samples were characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray diffractometry (XRD). Also, the tensile properties were measured. The results indicated that the yield strength (YS) decreased as both the tempering temperature and duration increased, due to the coarsening of martensitic packet/block/lath structures, the reduction of dislocation density, as well as the increase of both the volume fraction and average diameter of the precipitates. The martensitic lath width was the key microstructural parameter controlling the YS of this heavily-tempered martensitic steel, whereas the corresponding relationship was in accordance with the Langford-Cohen model. Furthermore, the martensitic structure boundary and the solid solution strengthening were the two most significant factors dominating the YS, in comparison with the dislocation and precipitation strengthening.

  6. Effects of the carbides precipitation on the hydrogen diffusion in a low carbon steel quenched and tempered

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luppo, M.I.; Ovejero Garcia, J.

    1996-01-01

    Hydrogen diffusivity through steels at room temperature has been known to deviate considerably from the expected Arrhenius relation. This deviation is due to the attractive interactions between dissolved hydrogen and trapping sites (imperfections in the steel lattice). In a previous work it was shown that the apparent diffusion coefficients attain a minimum value in a fresh martensite and diffusivity increases in the same material tempered at 453 k during six hours. In order to explain this difference, the variation of hydrogen trapping sites with the tempering time, at the mentioned temperature, was studied by means of hydrogen permeation tests. Carbides precipitation was followed by means of the extraction replica technique using transmission electron microscopy. The hydrogen diffusivity obtained by the hydrogen permeation tests attained a minimum value in the quenched specimens and increased with increasing tempering time up to reach a constant value between three and six hours. This change in the hydrogen diffusivity was attributed to the trapping sites decrease promoted by carbides precipitation and their precipitation kinetics was described by an Avrami equation. (author). 4 refs., 4 figs

  7. Effects of various treatments on the serviceability of water-immersed carbon-steel ball bearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wensel, R.G.

    1977-06-01

    Carbon-steel ball bearings employing various coatings, surface treatments, lubricants and ball and separator materials were tested under conditions simulating those in the NPD/Bruce type fuelling machine heads. The effects of the treatments on operating torques and wear and corrosion rates were studied. Sealed bearings lubricated with Dow FS 3451 (a fluorosilicone grease) gave the best performance in terms of these parameters. (author)

  8. Numerical investigation by finite element simulation of the bail punch test: application to tempered martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campitelli, E.; Spatig, P.; Bertsch, J.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Over the years, the small ball punch test technique has been used to evaluate conventional tensile properties of a variety of materials. The development and use of this type of small specimen techniques is indispensable for an efficient use of the limited irradiation volume of the future fusion material intense neutron source. Up to now, empirical correlations between features of the load-displacement curves of the ball punch test and the mechanical properties, such as the yield stress or the ultimate tensile stress, are established on materials in the unirradiated condition. These correlations are believed to be applicable to irradiated materials and they have been very often used to estimate the irradiation hardening. However, it is well known that the overall constitutive behavior of the materials is generally affected by neutron irradiation. Therefore, there is a need to quantify the effect of the constitutive behavior on the correlations. In this paper, we employ a 3D non-linear finite element model for the ball punch test to address these effects of the irradiation-induced changes on the ball punch test curve. We apply first the model on the tempered martensitic steel EUROFER97 in the unirradiated condition with variations in the post-yield behavior, either in the low strain domain ( 10%). The effects on the ball punch test load deflection curve are outlined. Second, we study the effects of the irradiation hardening on the same constitutive behaviors as those used for the unirradiated condition. We show that that the usual correlations must be considered with great care on irradiated materials since strong variation on the strain-hardening may lead to erroneous estimation of the irradiation hardening. We also propose a novel approach to calibrate the yield stress to features of the ball punch test curve that decreases the uncertainty related to the post-yield behavior and that, as a consequence, makes the technique more

  9. Effect of Tempering Temperature on the Microstructure and Properties of Fe-2Cr-Mo-0.12C Pressure Vessel Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi-wen; Li, Chang-sheng; Peng, Huan; Chen, Jie; Zhang, Jian

    2018-03-01

    To obtain the high-temperature strength and toughness of the medium-high-temperature-pressure steel, the microstructure evolution and mechanical properties of Fe-2Cr-Mo-0.12C steel subjected to three different tempering temperatures after being normalized were investigated. The results show that the microstructure of the sample, tempered in the range 675-725 °C for 50 min, did not change dramatically, yet the martensite/austenite constituents decomposed, and the bainite lath merged together and transformed into polygonal ferrite. At the same time, the precipitate size increased with an increase in tempering temperature. With the increase in the tempering temperature from 675 to 725 °C, the impact absorbed energy of the Fe-2Cr-Mo-0.12C steel at -40 °C increased from 257 to 325 J, and the high-temperature yield strength decreased; however, the high-temperature ultimate tensile strength tempered at 700 °C was outstanding (422-571 MPa) at different tested temperatures. The variations of the properties were attributed to the decomposition of M/A constituents and the coarsening of the precipitates. Fe-2Cr-Mo-0.12C steel normalized at 930 °C and tempered at 700 °C was found to have the best combination of ductility and strength.

  10. Investigation of the Microstructural Changes and Hardness Variations of Sub-Zero Treated Cr-V Ledeburitic Tool Steel Due to the Tempering Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurči, Peter; Dománková, Mária; Ptačinová, Jana; Pašák, Matej; Kusý, Martin; Priknerová, Petra

    2018-03-01

    The microstructure and tempering response of Cr-V ledeburitic steel Vanadis 6 subjected to sub-zero treatment at - 196 °C for 4 h have been examined with reference to the same steel after conventional heat treatment. The obtained experimental results infer that sub-zero treatment significantly reduces the retained austenite amount, makes an overall refinement of microstructure, and induces a significant increase in the number and population density of small globular carbides with a size 100-500 nm. At low tempering temperatures, the transient M3C-carbides precipitated, whereas their number was enhanced by sub-zero treatment. The presence of chromium-based M7C3 precipitates was evidenced after tempering at the temperature of normal secondary hardening; this phase was detected along with the M3C. Tempering above 470 °C converts almost all the retained austenite in conventionally quenched specimens while the transformation of retained austenite is rather accelerated in sub-zero treated material. As a result of tempering, a decrease in the population density of small globular carbides was recorded; however, the number of these particles retained much higher in sub-zero treated steel. Elevated hardness of sub-zero treated steel can be referred to more completed martensitic transformation and enhanced number of small globular carbides; this state is retained up to a tempering temperature of around 500 °C in certain extent. Correspondingly, lower as-tempered hardness of sub-zero treated steel tempered above 500 °C is referred to much lower contribution of the transformation of retained austenite, and to an expectedly lower amount of precipitated alloy carbides.

  11. Stålplader gav dobbelt bæreevne (Steel plates doubled the load bearing capacity)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jan Broch

    1999-01-01

    Abstract from an examination of motor road bridge beams reinforced with steel plates on the sides and bottom. The plates doubled the load bearing capacity of the beams.......Abstract from an examination of motor road bridge beams reinforced with steel plates on the sides and bottom. The plates doubled the load bearing capacity of the beams....

  12. Calculation and design of steel bearing structure for wind turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bešević Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wind represents directed movement of the air and is caused by differences in atmospheric pressure which are caused by uneven heating of air masses. Global and local winds can be distinguished. Global winds have high altitude, while local winds occur in the ground layer of the atmosphere. Given that the global wings have high altitude they cannot be used as propellant for wind generators, but they should be known for their effects on the winds in the lower atmosphere. Modern wind turbines are made with a horizontal axle that has a system for the swiveling axis in the horizontal plane for tracking wind direction changes. They can have different number of blades, but for larger forces three blades are commonly used because they provide the greatest efficiency. Rotor diameter of these turbines depends on the strength and it ranges from 30 m for the power of 300 kW to 115 m for the power of 5 MW. Wind turbines are mounted on vertical steel tower which can be high even more than 100 m. Depending on the diameter of the turbine rotor, column is usually built as steel conical and less often as a steel-frame. This study includes analysis and design of steel tower for wind generator made by manufacturer Vestas, type V112 3MW HH 119 (power 3.2 MW for the construction of wind farm 'Kovačica'.

  13. Cryogenic properties of V-bearing austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nohara, Kiyohiko

    1985-01-01

    A new type austenitic stainless steel which is expected as the cryogenic structural material for superconducting magnets has been developed. This steel is that vanadium was added to SUS 316 stainless steel of low carbon and high nitrogen, which has the sufficient strength and toughness at 4 K, and maintains the stable nonmagnetic state. This is applicable both to the solution state and the state of carrying out age hardening heat treatment for precipitating Nb 3 Sn subsequent to it. Accordingly, this material can be applied to the sheath material for nuclear fusion and the manufacture of superconducting magnets by Wind and React process besides the candidate material of superconducting magnets for nuclear fusion. This phenomenon is due to the fact that vanadium carbide precipitates in crystal grains before chrome carbide precipitates at grain boundaries, thus the precipitation of chrome carbide is suppressed. In this experiment, the effect of vanadium addition on the cryogenic properties of SUS 316 stainless steel was examined. The experimental method and the results of the effects of vanadium and nitrogen, solution treatment and precipitation aging, and the measurement of magnetism are reported. (Kako, I.)

  14. Visualization of hydrogen gas evolution during deformation and fracture in SCM 440 steel with different tempering conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horikawa, Keitaro, E-mail: horikawa@me.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Science and Bioengineering, School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka 560-8531 (Japan); Ando, Nobuaki; Kobayashi, Hidetoshi [Department of Mechanical Science and Bioengineering, School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka 560-8531 (Japan); Urushihara, Wataru [Surface Design and Corrosion Research Section, Materials Research Laboratory, Kobe Steel, Ltd., Kobe 651-2271 (Japan)

    2012-02-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We visualize emission sites of hydrogen atoms on the microstructures during deformation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrogen atoms are emitted from slip lines and inclusions when deformed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show the sequence of hydrogen gas evolution during deformation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrogen evolution amount will increase if the steels with high strength are tested. - Abstract: In the present study, the hydrogen gas evolution behavior was investigated in SCM 440 steel by using a hydrogen microprint technique (HMT) and a testing machine equipped with a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) in a ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) atmosphere. SCM 440 steels prepared by varying the tempering temperature over the range 200-700 Degree-Sign C were evaluated in order to elucidate the relationship between the hydrogen gas evolution and the tempered microstructures in the deformation. Cathodic hydrogen charging was carried out with a current density of 100 A/m{sup 2} for 1 h at room temperature. For comparison, a tensile specimen was prepared without hydrogen charging. The HMT showed that silver particles, which are indicative of the hydrogen emission sites, were present mainly in the matrix as well as on the slip lines after the deformation. It is believed that the silver particles on the slip lines represent the effect of hydrogen transportation due to mobile dislocations. In addition, accumulation of silver particles around non-metallic inclusions such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was also identified. This tendency was observed for different tempering conditions. From the relationship between the stress-strain curves and the hydrogen evolution, determined by using QMS under a UHV atmosphere, it was found that the hydrogen gas evolution behavior varied with the deformation stage.

  15. Visualization of hydrogen gas evolution during deformation and fracture in SCM 440 steel with different tempering conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horikawa, Keitaro; Ando, Nobuaki; Kobayashi, Hidetoshi; Urushihara, Wataru

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We visualize emission sites of hydrogen atoms on the microstructures during deformation. ► Hydrogen atoms are emitted from slip lines and inclusions when deformed. ► We show the sequence of hydrogen gas evolution during deformation. ► Hydrogen evolution amount will increase if the steels with high strength are tested. - Abstract: In the present study, the hydrogen gas evolution behavior was investigated in SCM 440 steel by using a hydrogen microprint technique (HMT) and a testing machine equipped with a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) in a ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) atmosphere. SCM 440 steels prepared by varying the tempering temperature over the range 200–700 °C were evaluated in order to elucidate the relationship between the hydrogen gas evolution and the tempered microstructures in the deformation. Cathodic hydrogen charging was carried out with a current density of 100 A/m 2 for 1 h at room temperature. For comparison, a tensile specimen was prepared without hydrogen charging. The HMT showed that silver particles, which are indicative of the hydrogen emission sites, were present mainly in the matrix as well as on the slip lines after the deformation. It is believed that the silver particles on the slip lines represent the effect of hydrogen transportation due to mobile dislocations. In addition, accumulation of silver particles around non-metallic inclusions such as Al 2 O 3 was also identified. This tendency was observed for different tempering conditions. From the relationship between the stress–strain curves and the hydrogen evolution, determined by using QMS under a UHV atmosphere, it was found that the hydrogen gas evolution behavior varied with the deformation stage.

  16. Boundary lubrication of bearing steel in water-based lubricants with functional additives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Y.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the effect of additives on boundary lubrication of bearing steel for water-based lubrication systems. The oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion and the water-glycol based liquid were selected as the base fluids for research. Sulfur compounds, nitrogen heterocycles and graphene

  17. Application of concrete filled steel bearing wall to inner concrete structure fro PWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimoto, Hisashi; Tanaka, Mamoru; Inoue, Kunio; Fukihara, Masaaki; Akiyama, Hiroshi.

    1992-01-01

    'Concrete filled steel bearing wall', applied to the inner concrete structure for PWR nuclear power plant, was developed for rationalization of construction procedure at site. It was concluded through preliminary studies that this new type of wall, where concrete is placed between steel plates, is best suited for the strength members of the above structure, due to the high strength and ductility of surface steel plates and the confinement effect of filled concrete. To verify the behavior from the elastic range to the inelastic range, the ultimate strength and the failure mechanism, and to clarify experimentally the structural integrity of the inner concrete structure, which was composed of a concrete filled steel bearing wall, against seismic lateral loads, horizontal loading tests using a 1/10th scale model of the inner concrete structure for PWR nuclear power plant were conducted. As a result of the tests, the inner concrete structure composed of a concrete filled steel bearing wall appeared to have a larger load carrying capacity and a higher ductility as compared with that composed of a reinforced concrete wall. (author)

  18. Main factors causing intergranular and quasi-cleavage fractures at hydrogen-induced cracking in tempered martensitic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Ami; Doshida, Tomoki; Hagihara, Yukito; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Takai, Kenichi

    2018-05-01

    Though intergranular (IG) and quasi-cleavage (QC) fractures have been widely recognized as typical fracture modes of the hydrogen-induced cracking in high-strength steels, the main factor has been unclarified yet. In the present study, the hydrogen content dependence on the main factor causing hydrogen-induced cracking has been examined through the fracture mode transition from QC to IG at the crack initiation site in the tempered martensitic steels. Two kinds of tempered martensitic steels were prepared to change the cohesive force due to the different precipitation states of Fe3C on the prior γ grain boundaries. A high amount of Si (H-Si) steel has a small amount of Fe3C on the prior austenite grain boundaries. Whereas, a low amount of Si (L-Si) steel has a large amount of Fe3C sheets on the grain boundaries. The fracture modes and initiations were observed using FE-SEM (Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscope). The crack initiation sites of the H-Si steel were QC fracture at the notch tip under various hydrogen contents. While the crack initiation of the L-Si steel change from QC fracture at the notch tip to QC and IG fractures from approximately 10 µm ahead of the notch tip as increasing in hydrogen content. For L-Si steels, two possibilities are considered that the QC or IG fracture occurred firstly, or the QC and IG fractures occurred simultaneously. Furthermore, the principal stress and equivalent plastic strain distributions near the notch tip were calculated with FEM (Finite Element Method) analysis. The plastic strain was the maximum at the notch tip and the principle stress was the maximum at approximately 10 µm from the notch tip. The position of the initiation of QC and IG fracture observed using FE-SEM corresponds to the position of maximum strain and stress obtained with FEM, respectively. These findings indicate that the main factors causing hydrogen-induced cracking are different between QC and IG fractures.

  19. Improved superheater tubing material - Ti and Nb bearing austenitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, K.; Mimino, T.; Minegishi, I.

    1975-01-01

    A newly developed 18 Cr-8 Ni stainless steel modified with small amounts of Ti and Nb has considerably high stress-rupture strength and is considered to be suitable for superheater material for power boilers. Data for stress-rupture and creep for long times, the strength of welded joints, the changes of characteristics due to exposure to high temperatures, etc., are presented and discussed. Some investigations after trial services indicate that the experimental data are applicable to actual applications. (author)

  20. Variations in the microstructure and properties of Mn-Ti multiple-phase steel with high strength under different tempering temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dazhao; Li, Xiaonan; Cui, Tianxie; Li, Jianmin; Wang, Yutian; Fu, Peimao

    2015-03-01

    There are few relevant researches on coils by tempering, and the variations of microstructure and properties of steel coil during the tempering process also remain unclear. By using thermo-mechanical control process(TMCP) technology, Mn-Ti typical HSLA steel coils with yield strength of 920 MPa are produced on the 2250 hot rolling production line. Then, the samples are taken from the coils and tempered at the temperatures of 220 °C, 350 °C, and 620 °C respectively. After tempering the strength, ductility and toughness of samples are tested, and meanwhile microstructures are investigated. Precipitates initially emerge inside the ferrite laths and the density of the dislocation drops. Then, the lath-shaped ferrites begin to gather, and the retained austenite films start to decompose. Finally, the retained austenite films are completely decomposed into coarse and short rod-shape precipitates composed of C and Ti compounds. The yield strength increases with increasing tempering temperature due to the pinning effect of the precipitates, and the dislocation density decreases. The yield strength is highest when the steel is tempered at 220 °C because of pinning of the precipitates to dislocations. The total elongation increases in all samples because of the development of ferrites during tempering. The tensile strength and impact absorbed energy decline because the effect of impeding crack propagation weakens as the retained austenite films completely decompose and the precipitates coarsen. This paper clarifies the influence of different tempering temperatures on phase transformation characteristics and process of Mn-Ti typical multiphase steels, as well as its resulting performance variation rules.

  1. Effects of Tempering Temperature and Path on the Microstructural and Mechanical Properties of ASTM Gr.92 Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, C. H.; Baek, J. H.; Kim, S. H.; Lee, C. B.; Kim, Y. K.; Hong, S. I.

    2009-01-01

    SFR (Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor) is one of the prospective nuclear reactor for the next generation (Gen-IV) systems. The fuel claddings in the SFR are subject to a high fast nuclear irradiation and a high temperature. Fuel technology is a key aspect of an SFR system, with implications for reactor safety, reactor operations, fuel reprocessing technology, and overall system economics. ASTM Gr.92 steel has been considered as the one of the main candidate fuel cladding materials in the design of SFR in that it has higher thermal conductivity as well as dimensional stability under irradiation when compared as austenitic stainless steel. The changes in microstructure and heat-treatment varying M 23 C 6 , MX, M 2 X, and precipitation by ASTM Gr.92 steels to improve high temperature mechanical properties is the attention. According to several researchers, it plays an important role in the mechanical properties of precipitates V, Nb, Cr, C, N as a form of MX and M 2 X precipitates. These fine precipitates formed in the sub- grain by preventing the movement of dislocations in high-temperature mechanical properties will contribute effectively. This study investigated the effects of tempering temperature and heat-treatment path on microstructure and mechanical properties of ASTM Gr.92 steels

  2. The hot working characteristics of a boron bearing and a conventional low carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stumpf, Waldo; Banks, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Constitutive hot working constants were determined for an 11 ppm boron low carbon strip steel and compared from 875 to 1140 deg. C and strain rates of 0.001-2.5 s -1 to a high nitrogen low carbon strip steel. The boron steel showed a different hot working behaviour than the conventional steel with the steady state flow stress about 50-60% higher, the peak strain more than 50% higher and the eventual ferrite grain size about 40% smaller, if compared at the same temperature compensated strain rates or Z values. This difference persisted where the soaking temperature before compression was varied between 1140 and 1250 deg. C, proving that undissolved AlN in the boron-bearing steel was not responsible. With systematically varied linear cooling rates after hot working, the final ferrite grain size in the boron steel is finer and is independent of the two Z values applied during hot working. Retarded softening by dynamic recrystallisation during hot working in the boron containing steel is probably caused by boron solute drag of moving grain boundaries

  3. Hydrogen embrittlement property of a 1700-MPa-class ultrahigh-strength tempered martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Songjie; Zhang Boping [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30 Xueyuan Road, Hidian Zone, Beijing 100083 (China); Akiyama, Eiji; Yuuji, Kimura; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki [Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Uno, Nobuyoshi, E-mail: AKIYAMA.Eiji@nims.go.j [Nippon Steel and Sumikin Metal Products Co, Ltd, SA Bldg., 17-12 Kiba 2-chome, Koto-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    The hydrogen embrittlement property of a prototype 1700-MPa-class ultrahigh-strength steel (NIMS17) containing hydrogen traps was evaluated using a slow strain rate test (SSRT) after cathodic hydrogen precharging, cyclic corrosion test (CCT) and atmospheric exposure. The hydrogen content in a fractured specimen was measured after SSRT by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). The relationship between fracture stress and hydrogen content for the hydrogen-precharged specimens showed that the fracture stress of NIMS17 steel was higher, at a given hydrogen content, than that of conventional AISI 4135 steels with tensile strengths of 1300 and 1500 MPa. This suggests better resistance of NIMS17 steel to hydrogen embrittlement. However, hydrogen uptake to NIMS17 steel under CCT and atmospheric exposure decreased the fracture stress. This is because of the stronger hydrogen uptake to the steel containing hydrogen traps than to the AISI 4135 steels. Although NIMS17 steel has a higher strength level than AISI 4135 steel with a tensile strength of 1500 MPa, the decrease in fracture stress is similar between these steels.

  4. Hydrogen embrittlement property of a 1700-MPa-class ultrahigh-strength tempered martensitic steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songjie Li, Eiji Akiyama, Kimura Yuuji, Kaneaki Tsuzaki, Nobuyoshi Uno and Boping Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The hydrogen embrittlement property of a prototype 1700-MPa-class ultrahigh-strength steel (NIMS17 containing hydrogen traps was evaluated using a slow strain rate test (SSRT after cathodic hydrogen precharging, cyclic corrosion test (CCT and atmospheric exposure. The hydrogen content in a fractured specimen was measured after SSRT by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS. The relationship between fracture stress and hydrogen content for the hydrogen-precharged specimens showed that the fracture stress of NIMS17 steel was higher, at a given hydrogen content, than that of conventional AISI 4135 steels with tensile strengths of 1300 and 1500 MPa. This suggests better resistance of NIMS17 steel to hydrogen embrittlement. However, hydrogen uptake to NIMS17 steel under CCT and atmospheric exposure decreased the fracture stress. This is because of the stronger hydrogen uptake to the steel containing hydrogen traps than to the AISI 4135 steels. Although NIMS17 steel has a higher strength level than AISI 4135 steel with a tensile strength of 1500 MPa, the decrease in fracture stress is similar between these steels.

  5. Hydrogen embrittlement property of a 1700-MPa-class ultrahigh-strength tempered martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Songjie; Zhang Boping; Akiyama, Eiji; Yuuji, Kimura; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki; Uno, Nobuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    The hydrogen embrittlement property of a prototype 1700-MPa-class ultrahigh-strength steel (NIMS17) containing hydrogen traps was evaluated using a slow strain rate test (SSRT) after cathodic hydrogen precharging, cyclic corrosion test (CCT) and atmospheric exposure. The hydrogen content in a fractured specimen was measured after SSRT by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). The relationship between fracture stress and hydrogen content for the hydrogen-precharged specimens showed that the fracture stress of NIMS17 steel was higher, at a given hydrogen content, than that of conventional AISI 4135 steels with tensile strengths of 1300 and 1500 MPa. This suggests better resistance of NIMS17 steel to hydrogen embrittlement. However, hydrogen uptake to NIMS17 steel under CCT and atmospheric exposure decreased the fracture stress. This is because of the stronger hydrogen uptake to the steel containing hydrogen traps than to the AISI 4135 steels. Although NIMS17 steel has a higher strength level than AISI 4135 steel with a tensile strength of 1500 MPa, the decrease in fracture stress is similar between these steels.

  6. Structure–property relationship in a 960 MPa grade ultrahigh strength low carbon niobium–vanadium microalloyed steel: The significance of high frequency induction tempering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Z.J.; Fang, Y.P.; Han, G.; Guo, H.; Misra, R.D.K.; Shang, C.J.

    2014-01-01

    The present study describes the microstructure and precipitation behavior in an ultra-high strength low carbon niobium–vanadium microalloyed steel that was processed by quenching and high frequency induction tempering. Ultrahigh yield strength of ∼1000 MPa with high elongation of ∼15% and high low temperature toughness of 55 J (half thickness) at −40 °C was obtained after quenching from austenitization at 900 °C for 30 min, and tempering at 600 °C for 15 min by induction reheating with a reheating rate of ∼50 °C/s. While the yield strength increase on tempering was similar for both induction reheating and conventional reheating (electrical resistance reheating), there was ∼100% increase in low temperature toughness in induction reheated steel compared to the conventional reheating process. The underlying reason for the increase in toughness was attributed to the transformation of cementite film observed in conventional reheating and tempering to nanoscale cementite in induction reheating and tempering. The precipitation of nanoscale carbides is believed to significantly contribute to ultra-high strength, good ductility, and high toughness in the high frequency induction reheating and tempering process

  7. Lanthana-bearing nanostructured ferritic steels via spark plasma sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasebani, Somayeh [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Charit, Indrajit, E-mail: icharit@uidaho.edu [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Wu, Yaqiao; Burns, Jatuporn; Allahar, Kerry N.; Butt, Darryl P. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University, Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Cole, James I. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Alsagabi, Sultan F. [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    A lanthana-containing nanostructured ferritic steel (NFS) was processed via mechanical alloying (MA) of Fe-14Cr-1Ti-0.3Mo-0.5La{sub 2}O{sub 3} (wt.%) and consolidated via spark plasma sintering (SPS). In order to study the consolidation behavior via SPS, sintering temperature and dwell time were correlated with microstructure, density, microhardness and shear yield strength of the sintered specimens. A bimodal grain size distribution including both micron-sized and nano-sized grains was observed in the microstructure of specimens sintered at 850, 950 and1050 °C for 45 min. Significant densification occurred at temperatures greater than 950 °C with a relative density higher than 98%. A variety of nanoparticles, some enriched in Fe and Cr oxides and copious nanoparticles smaller than 10 nm with faceted morphology and enriched in La and Ti oxides were observed. After SPS at 950 °C, the number density of Cr–Ti–La–O-enriched nanoclusters with an average radius of 1.5 nm was estimated to be 1.2 × 10{sup 24} m{sup −3}. The La + Ti:O ratio was close to 1 after SPS at 950 and 1050 °C; however, the number density of nanoclusters decreased at 1050 °C. With SPS above 950 °C, the density improved but the microhardness and shear yield strength decreased due to partial coarsening of the grains and nanoparticles.

  8. Coarsening behavior of lath and its effect on creep rates in tempered martensitic 9Cr-W steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, F.

    2004-01-01

    The coarsening behavior of martensite lath has been investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy for tempered martensitic 9 wt.% Cr-(0, 1, 2, 4 wt.%) W steels during creep at 823-923 K. During creep, the recovery of excess dislocations, the agglomeration of carbides and the coarsening of laths take place. The coarsening of laths with absorbing excess dislocations is the major process in the creep acceleration. The coarsening rate of lath decreases with increasing W concentration, which is correlated with the rate of Ostwald ripening of M 23 C 6 carbides. The progressive local-coalescence of two adjacent laths boundaries near the Y-junction causes the movement of Y-junction, resulting in the coarsening of lath

  9. Comparison of tungsten carbide and stainless steel ball bearings for grinding single maize kernels in a reciprocating grinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reciprocating grinders can grind single maize kernels by shaking the kernel in a vial with a ball bearing. This process results in a grind quality that is not satisfactory for many experiments. Tungesten carbide ball bearings are nearly twice as dense as steel, so we compared their grinding performa...

  10. Structure–mechanical property relationship in a high strength low carbon alloy steel processed by two-step intercritical annealing and intercritical tempering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, W.H. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Beijing (China); Laboratory for Excellence in Advanced Steel Research, Center for Structural and Functional Materials, Institute for Material Research and Innovation, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, P.O. Box 44130, Lafayette, LA 70503 (United States); Wang, X.L. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Beijing (China); Venkatsurya, P.K.C. [Laboratory for Excellence in Advanced Steel Research, Center for Structural and Functional Materials, Institute for Material Research and Innovation, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, P.O. Box 44130, Lafayette, LA 70503 (United States); Guo, H. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Beijing (China); Shang, C.J., E-mail: cjshang@ustb.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Beijing (China); Misra, R.D.K. [Laboratory for Excellence in Advanced Steel Research, Center for Structural and Functional Materials, Institute for Material Research and Innovation, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, P.O. Box 44130, Lafayette, LA 70503 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The influence of annealing and tempering temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties was investigated in a low carbon alloy steel that was processed by a two-step intercritical annealing and intercritical tempering heat treatment. In general, the microstructure of the processed steel comprises intercritical lath-like ferrite, bainitic/martensitic lath and acicular-type retained austenite. The lower intercritical annealing temperature resulted in lower fraction of intercritical ferrite with finer grain size and consequently higher strength. On the other hand, the intercritical tempering temperature significantly influenced retained austenite content and precipitation. High fraction of retained austenite was obtained at a temperature slightly above Ac{sub 1} temperature and retained austenite content decreased with increase in tempering temperature. This behavior is attributed to the competition between the enrichment of Mn and Ni and the fraction of reversed austenite. Fine niobium carbide precipitates of size ∼2–6 nm and copper precipitates of size range ∼10–30 nm were obtained. The optimal intercritical annealing and tempering temperatures to obtain the product of tensile strength and elongation % of ∼30 GPa% were 780 °C and 660 °C, respectively and the volume fraction of retained austenite was ∼29%.

  11. Structure–mechanical property relationship in a high strength low carbon alloy steel processed by two-step intercritical annealing and intercritical tempering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, W.H.; Wang, X.L.; Venkatsurya, P.K.C.; Guo, H.; Shang, C.J.; Misra, R.D.K.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of annealing and tempering temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties was investigated in a low carbon alloy steel that was processed by a two-step intercritical annealing and intercritical tempering heat treatment. In general, the microstructure of the processed steel comprises intercritical lath-like ferrite, bainitic/martensitic lath and acicular-type retained austenite. The lower intercritical annealing temperature resulted in lower fraction of intercritical ferrite with finer grain size and consequently higher strength. On the other hand, the intercritical tempering temperature significantly influenced retained austenite content and precipitation. High fraction of retained austenite was obtained at a temperature slightly above Ac 1 temperature and retained austenite content decreased with increase in tempering temperature. This behavior is attributed to the competition between the enrichment of Mn and Ni and the fraction of reversed austenite. Fine niobium carbide precipitates of size ∼2–6 nm and copper precipitates of size range ∼10–30 nm were obtained. The optimal intercritical annealing and tempering temperatures to obtain the product of tensile strength and elongation % of ∼30 GPa% were 780 °C and 660 °C, respectively and the volume fraction of retained austenite was ∼29%

  12. Microstructural evolution of a 2.25Cr - 1 Mo steel during austenitization and temper: austenite grain growth, carbide precipitation sequence and effects on mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depinoy, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    This work aims at optimizing tensile and toughness properties of a 2.25Cr - 1Mo steel by controlling its microstructure through heat treatments. To this aim, phase transformations during austenitization, quenching and tempering have to be understood. Quantitative microstructural analyses were performed by means of SEM, TEM and XRD to characterize and model metallurgical evolution of the steel at each step of the heat treatment. The evolution of austenite during the austenitization stage, and its influence on the resulting as-quenched microstructure were thoroughly investigated. Austenite grain growth was modelled in order to understand its mechanisms, including the limited growth phenomenon observed at lower temperatures. The effect of austenitization conditions on further decomposition of austenite and on mechanical properties after quenching + tempering was experimentally determined. An optimal austenitization condition was selected and applied to study the tempering stage. Carbide precipitation was studied for various tempering temperatures and amounts of time. M3C carbides precipitate first, followed by M2C and M7C3; M23C6 are the equilibrium carbides. The influence of carbide precipitation on mechanical properties was studied. Tensile properties are closely linked to the tempering conditions in the range investigated, while impact toughness remains stable. (author) [fr

  13. Influence of chloride ion concentration on the corrosion behavior of Al-bearing TRIP steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Taib Heakal, F.; Tantawy, N.S.; Shehta, O.S.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Systematic increase of chloride concentration has a critical influence on TRIP steel corrosion. → TRIP microalloyed with Nb and Cr showed lower corrosion rate and smaller threshold Cl - value. → Increasing Al content by 220 times in the TRIP deteriorates its corrosion behavior. → Impedance results and surface examinations confirmed the obtained results. - Abstract: The effect of a systematic increase of chloride ion concentration on the electrochemical corrosion behavior of two types of Al-bearing TRIP steels (T 1 and T 2 ) was studied in aqueous NaCl solutions. Several electrochemical techniques were used comprising open circuit potential measurements, potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Chloride concentration has a critical influence on the corrosion rate of the two tested steel samples. For both steels the corrosion rate first increased with increasing chloride content up to a certain critical concentration (CC), and then decreased in solution with chloride level higher than the threshold value. TRIP steel T 1 microalloyed with Nb and Cr as compared to steel T 2 not containing these two elements, exhibited lower corrosion rate and smaller CC value, indicating better corrosion resistance to chloride attack, albeit the Al content in T 2 is 220 times higher than that in T 1 . This is because Nb alloyed with TRIP steel likely enhances the formation on the surface of a stable rust layer enriched with other passivating elements Al, Cu, Cr and Ni, which has higher corrosion resistance and hence improve greatly the passive performance of the TRIP sample. The ac impedance data are in good agreement with the OCP and dc polarization measurements. Surface examinations via scanning electron microscope confirmed well the obtained results.

  14. Influence of chloride ion concentration on the corrosion behavior of Al-bearing TRIP steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Taib Heakal, F., E-mail: fakihaheakal@yahoo.com [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza 12613 (Egypt); Tantawy, N.S. [Chemistry Department, Girl' s College for Arts, Science and Education, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); Shehta, O.S. [Physical Chemistry Department, National Research Centre, Dokki, Giza (Egypt)

    2011-10-17

    Highlights: {yields} Systematic increase of chloride concentration has a critical influence on TRIP steel corrosion. {yields} TRIP microalloyed with Nb and Cr showed lower corrosion rate and smaller threshold Cl{sup -} value. {yields} Increasing Al content by 220 times in the TRIP deteriorates its corrosion behavior. {yields} Impedance results and surface examinations confirmed the obtained results. - Abstract: The effect of a systematic increase of chloride ion concentration on the electrochemical corrosion behavior of two types of Al-bearing TRIP steels (T{sub 1} and T{sub 2}) was studied in aqueous NaCl solutions. Several electrochemical techniques were used comprising open circuit potential measurements, potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Chloride concentration has a critical influence on the corrosion rate of the two tested steel samples. For both steels the corrosion rate first increased with increasing chloride content up to a certain critical concentration (CC), and then decreased in solution with chloride level higher than the threshold value. TRIP steel T{sub 1} microalloyed with Nb and Cr as compared to steel T{sub 2} not containing these two elements, exhibited lower corrosion rate and smaller CC value, indicating better corrosion resistance to chloride attack, albeit the Al content in T{sub 2} is 220 times higher than that in T{sub 1}. This is because Nb alloyed with TRIP steel likely enhances the formation on the surface of a stable rust layer enriched with other passivating elements Al, Cu, Cr and Ni, which has higher corrosion resistance and hence improve greatly the passive performance of the TRIP sample. The ac impedance data are in good agreement with the OCP and dc polarization measurements. Surface examinations via scanning electron microscope confirmed well the obtained results.

  15. Possibilities for using higher-tensile, water quenched and tempered AlSiMn fine-grained structural steel for reactor containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallner, F.

    1976-01-01

    On water quenching and tempering of weldable AlSiMn structural steels, particularly the grain refining process is made use of, i.e. that measure with the poorest influence on the weldability of steel. Precipitation hardening due to water quenching is, on subsequent tempering, set off to a large extent by means of precipitation resp. coagulation of iron carbides. Minimum yield points up to 580 N/mm 2 and, simultaneously, good viscosity can be obtained by means of water quenching from austeritic temperature and tempering between 550 0 C and 650 0 C, depending on tempering temperatures and sheet thickness. In the paper at hand, results are given, obtained from tests and experience with the steel Aldur 50/65 (the first figure indicates minimum yield points, the second one minimum tensile strength on sheet thickness up to 30 mm). These results are assumed to be essential, also in connection with the construction and working conditions of nuclear power plants. (orig./RW) [de

  16. Effect of Microstructures and Tempering Heat Treatment on the Mechanical Properties of 9Cr-2W Reduced-Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Min-Gu; Kang, Nam Hyun; Moon, Joonoh; Lee, Tae-Ho; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Kim, Hyoung Chan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of microstructures (martensite, ferrite, or mixed ferrite and martensite) on the mechanical properties. Of particular interest was the Charpy impact results for 9Cr-2W reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels. Under normalized conditions, steel with martensitic microstructure showed superior tensile strength and Charpy impact results. This may result from auto-tempering during the transformation of martensite. On the other hand, both ferrite, and ferrite mixed with martensite, showed unusually poor Charpy impact results. This is because the ferrite phases, and coarse M_23C_6 carbides at the ferrite-grain boundaries acted as cleavage crack propagation paths, and as preferential initiation sites for cleavage cracks, respectively. After the tempering heat treatment, although tensile strength decreased, the energy absorbed during the Charpy impact test drastically increased for martensite, and ferrite mixed with martensite. This was due to the tempered martensite. On the other hand, there were no distinctive differences in tensile and Charpy impact properties of steel with ferrite microstructure, when comparing normalized and tempered conditions.

  17. Mean Stress Effect on the Axial Fatigue Strength of DIN 34CrNiMo6 Quenched and Tempered Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Pallarés-Santasmartas

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study consists of a theoretical and experimental investigation of the effect of axial mean stresses on the high cycle fatigue behaviour of DIN 34CrNiMo6 high strength steel in quenched and tempered conditions. The axial S-N curves under 4 different stresses ratios were obtained. Experimental results show that increasing the value of the tension mean stresses gradually reduces the axial stress amplitude the material can withstand without failure. Moreover, the compressive mean stresses show a beneficial effect in terms of the axial fatigue strength, resulting in a non-symmetrical Haigh diagram. A historic review of the axial mean stress effect is presented, showing the shape of the Haigh diagrams for ductile metals and presenting the most-known empirical and physical theories. The results for this steel are compared with the physical theories of Findley based on the critical plane; the Froustey’s and Marin’s methods, based on energetic theories; and the Crossland invariants method based on the Gough’s theory of fatigue damage. Taking into account the experimental results, a physical fatigue function based on energetic considerations is proposed. Its application to the fatigue case with mean stresses can be interpreted in terms of a balance of elastic energies of distortion and volume change. Macro-analyses of specimen fracture appearance were conducted in order to obtain the fracture characteristics for different mean stress values.

  18. The influence of remelting parameters of the electric arc and conventional tempering on the tribological resistance of high speed steel HS 6-5-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dziedzic

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The present thesis depicts the results of the research of tribological high speed steel HS 6-5-2 remelted with the electric arc. Steel was remelted with different parameters. The amperage of electric arc was changed, the scanning speed was changed and the single, overlapping remeltings were used. There was also the influence of conventional tempering defined, which was conducted after remelting on the tribological resistance of hardened steel. For the previously mentioned processing variants, the intensity of tribological wear was defined and the linear wear were presented, and the friction coefficients. The type of tribological wear was also given, present during the friction, technically dry, of the hardened steel. The lower intensity of tribological wear was received for the single remelting by electric arc of 50 and 70A. Using the overlapping remeltings for the strengening of the surface layer of the high speed steel HS 6-5-2 causes the increase of the intensity of tribological wear in comparison to the steel with the single remelting. The conventional tempering leads to the decrease of the intensity of tribological wear.

  19. Microstructure Charaterization of a Hardened and Tempered Tool Steel: from Macro to Nano Scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højerslev, Christian; Somers, Marcel A. J.; Carstensen, Jesper V.

    2002-01-01

    The microstructure of a conventionally heat treated PM AISI M3:2 tool steel, was characterised by a combination of light optical and electron microscopy, covering the range from micro to nano scale. Dilatometry and X-ray diffractometry were used for an overall macro characterisation of the phases...

  20. Measurement of carbon activity in sodium and steel and the behaviour of carbon-bearing species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajendran Pillai, S.; Ranganathan, R.; Mathews, C.K.

    1988-01-01

    Carburization or decarburization of structural materials in a sodium system depends on the local differences in carbon activity. The behaviour of carbon-bearing species in sodium influences its carbon activity. In order to understand the behaviour of carbon in these systems, an electrochemical carbon meter was fabricated in our laboratory. The original version of this meter was capable of operating in the temperature range of 850-980 K. Studies are carried out to extend this lower limit of temperature. Employing the carbon meter, experiments were carried out to understand the behaviour of carbon-bearing species. Gas equilibration experiments were also carried out with the same view. A new method for measuring the carbon activity in steels are described which employs the carbon meter. A review on these investigations and the conclusions reached on the behaviour of carbon in fast reactor loops are described

  1. Modelling of thermal stresses in bearing steel structure generated by electrical current impulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birjukovs, M.; Jakovics, A.; Holweger, W.

    2018-05-01

    This work is the study of one particular candidate for white etching crack (WEC) initiation mechanism in wind turbine gearbox bearings: discharge current impulses flowing through bearing steel with associated thermal stresses and material fatigue. Using data/results from previously published works, the authors develop a series of models that are utilized to simulate these processes under various conditions/local microstructure configurations, as well as to verify the results of the previous numerical studies. Presented models show that the resulting stresses are several orders of magnitude below the fatigue limit/yield strength for the parameters used herein. Results and analysis of models provided by Scepanskis, M. et al. also indicate that certain effects predicted in their previous work resulted from a physically unfounded assumption about material thermodynamic properties and numerical model implementation issues.

  2. The influences of impurity content, tensile strength, and grain size on in-service temper embrittlement of CrMoV steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheruvu, N.S.; Seth, B.B.

    1989-01-01

    The influences of impurity levels, grain size, and tensile strength on in-service temper embrittlement of CrMoV steels have been investigated. The samples for this study were taken from steam turbine CrMoV rotors which had operated for 15 to 26 years. The effects of grain size and tensile strength on embrittlement susceptibility were separated by evaluating the embrittlement behavior of two rotor forgings made from the same ingot after an extended step-cooling treatment. Among the residual elements in the steels, only P produces a significant embrittlement. The variation of P and tensile strength has no effect on in-service temper embrittlement susceptibility, as measured by the shift in fracture appearance transition temperature (FATT). However, the prior austenite grain size plays a major role in service embrittlement. The fine grain steels with a grain size of ASTM No. 9 or higher are virtually immune to in-service embrittlement. In steels having duplex grain sizes, embrittlement susceptibility is controlled by the size of coarser grains. For a given steel chemistry, the coarse grain steel is more susceptible to in-service embrittlement, and a decrease in ASTM grain size number from 4 to 0/1 increases the shift in FATT by 61 degrees C (10/10 degrees F). It is demonstrated that long-term service embrittlement can be simulated, except in very coarse grain steels, by using the extended step-cooling treatment. The results of step-cooling studies show that the coarse grain rotor steels take longer time during service to reach a fully embrittled state than the fine grain rotor steels

  3. In Situ Investigation of the Evolution of Lattice Strain and Stresses in Austenite and Martensite During Quenching and Tempering of Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, M.; Niessen, F.; Somers, M. A. J.

    2018-01-01

    Energy dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction was applied to investigate in situ the evolution of lattice strains and stresses in austenite and martensite during quenching and tempering of a soft martensitic stainless steel. In one experiment, lattice strains in austenite and martensite were...... measured in situ in the direction perpendicular to the sample surface during an austenitization, quenching, and tempering cycle. In a second experiment, the sin2ψ method was applied in situ during the austenite-to-martensite transformation to distinguish between macro- and phase-specific micro......-stresses and to follow the evolution of these stresses during transformation. Martensite formation evokes compressive stress in austenite that is balanced by tensile stress in martensite. Tempering to 748 K (475 °C) leads to partial relaxation of these stresses. Additionally, data reveal that (elastic) lattice strain...

  4. Effect of double quenching and tempering heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a novel 5Cr steel processed by electro-slag casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jian; Yu, Hao; Zhou, Tao; Song, Chenghao; Zhang, Kai

    2014-01-01

    The effect of double quenching and tempering (DQT) treatment as well as conventional high temperature quenching and tempering (CQT) treatment on the microstructures and mechanical properties of low carbon 5Cr martensitic as cast steel produced by electroslag casting was investigated. The microstructure changes were characterized by optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The characteristics of carbides precipitated during tempering were analyzed on both carbon extraction replica and thin foil samples by TEM. The mechanical performance was evaluated by Vickers hardness test, tensile test, and Charpy V-notch impact test at ambient temperature. The results of microstructure study indicated that DQT treatment led to a finer microstructure than that of CQT. The carbides of the tempered samples were identified as M 7 C 3 . The carbides along the prior austenite grain boundaries nucleated directly while those within the laths should be transformed from cementite which formed at the early tempering stage. Compared with CQT condition, yield strength slightly increased after DQT treatment, and impact toughness improved a lot. The strengthening mechanisms were analyzed and it was found that grain refining and precipitation strengthening were mainly responsible for the increase of strength. The superior toughness of DQT condition was attributed to the finer microstructure resulting in more frequent deflections of the cleavage crack and the smaller size of carbides along the prior austenite boundaries. EBSD analysis showed that both martensitic block and packet of low carbon 5Cr tempered martensitic steel could hinder crack propagation, while the latter was more effective

  5. Effect of double quenching and tempering heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a novel 5Cr steel processed by electro-slag casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jian, E-mail: healygo@163.com; Yu, Hao, E-mail: yuhao@ustb.edu.cn; Zhou, Tao, E-mail: zhoutao130984@163.com; Song, Chenghao, E-mail: songchenghao28@126.com; Zhang, Kai, E-mail: zhangkai8901@126.com

    2014-12-01

    The effect of double quenching and tempering (DQT) treatment as well as conventional high temperature quenching and tempering (CQT) treatment on the microstructures and mechanical properties of low carbon 5Cr martensitic as cast steel produced by electroslag casting was investigated. The microstructure changes were characterized by optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The characteristics of carbides precipitated during tempering were analyzed on both carbon extraction replica and thin foil samples by TEM. The mechanical performance was evaluated by Vickers hardness test, tensile test, and Charpy V-notch impact test at ambient temperature. The results of microstructure study indicated that DQT treatment led to a finer microstructure than that of CQT. The carbides of the tempered samples were identified as M{sub 7}C{sub 3}. The carbides along the prior austenite grain boundaries nucleated directly while those within the laths should be transformed from cementite which formed at the early tempering stage. Compared with CQT condition, yield strength slightly increased after DQT treatment, and impact toughness improved a lot. The strengthening mechanisms were analyzed and it was found that grain refining and precipitation strengthening were mainly responsible for the increase of strength. The superior toughness of DQT condition was attributed to the finer microstructure resulting in more frequent deflections of the cleavage crack and the smaller size of carbides along the prior austenite boundaries. EBSD analysis showed that both martensitic block and packet of low carbon 5Cr tempered martensitic steel could hinder crack propagation, while the latter was more effective.

  6. Finite element modeling and experimental study of brittle fracture in tempered martensitic steels for thermonuclear fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, P. F.

    2009-10-01

    The present report studies the brittle fracture in high-chromium reduced activation tempered martensitic steels foreseen as structural materials for thermonuclear fusion reactors. Developing the adequate materials that can withstand the severe irradiation conditions of the burning plasma in a fusion reactor is one of the major challenges to be solved in order to make profit from the great advantages of thermonuclear fusion as an energy source. High-chromium tempered martensitic steels such as F82H and the most advanced version Eurofer97 are among the main candidate materials for structural applications in future fusion power plants due to low irradiation-induced swelling, good mechanical and thermal properties, and reasonably fast radioactive decay. Drawback of this kind of steels is irradiation embrittlement, which is manifested by a ductile-to-brittle transition temperature shift to higher temperatures after irradiation. The laboratory specimen fracture data has to be transferred to real components in order to assess the performance of these steels in the different operating and transient conditions they could find during the operation life of a fusion reactor. The specimen geometry effects and specimen size effects on measured fracture toughness need to be properly understood, taken into account and predicted with an appropriate model. The microstructure of Eurofer97 and F82H has been characterized and compared by means of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in order to identify microstructural features that could play a role in the measured fracture toughness. Both steels have similar but slightly different chemical composition and final heat treatments but the prior austenitic grain size measured in F82H is approximately 8 times larger than in Eurofer97. The alloying element tantalum is added to stabilize the austenite grain size. In Eurofer97 it forms carbides of an

  7. Structure and corrosion properties of Cr coating deposited on aerospace bearing steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangfang; Zhang, Fengxiang; Zheng, Lijing; Zhang, Hu

    2017-11-01

    The corrosion protection of chromium coating deposited on aerospace bearing steels by using the Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc deposition- Metal Evaporation Vacuum Arc duplex technique (MEVVA-FCVA) had been investigated. The protection efficiency of chromium coating on different substrate materials had also been evaluated. The chromium coating was mainly composed of nanocrystallineα-Cr in a range of 50-200 nm. The orientation distributions of α-Cr film on substrates with different composition had a certain difference to each other. Electrochemical experimental results indicated that the chromium coating significantly improved the corrosion resistance of experimental bearing steels in 3.5% NaCl solution. The protective efficiency of chromium films were all over 98%. The corrosion resistance of chromium coating was influenced by the chemical composition of substrate material. The chromium coatings on higher Cr-containing substrate displayed lower corrosion current density and more positive corrosion potential. The increase of passive film thickness and the formation of a mass of chromium oxide and hydroxide on the surface are responsible for the improved corrosion properties.

  8. On size and geometry effects on the brittle fracture of ferritic and tempered martensitic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odette, G. R.; Chao, B. L.; Lucas, G. E.

    1992-09-01

    A finite element computation of nonsingular crack tip fields was combined with a weakest link statistics model of cleavage fracture. Model predictions for three point bend specimens with various widths and crack depth to width ratios are qualitatively consistent with a number of trends observed in a 12 Cr martensitic stainless steel. The toughness “benefits” of small sizes and shallow cracks are primarily reflected in strain limits rather than net section stress capacities, which is significant to fusion structures subject to large secondary stresses.

  9. Carbide Precipitation in 2.25 Cr-1 Mo Bainitic Steel: Effect of Heating and Isothermal Tempering Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dépinoy, Sylvain; Toffolon-Masclet, Caroline; Urvoy, Stéphane; Roubaud, Justine; Marini, Bernard; Roch, François; Kozeschnik, Ernst; Gourgues-Lorenzon, Anne-Françoise

    2017-05-01

    The effect of the tempering heat treatment, including heating prior to the isothermal step, on carbide precipitation has been determined in a 2.25 Cr-1 Mo bainitic steel for thick-walled applications. The carbides were identified using their amount of metallic elements, morphology, nucleation sites, and diffraction patterns. The evolution of carbide phase fraction, morphology, and composition was investigated using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, as well as thermodynamic calculations. Upon heating, retained austenite into the as-quenched material decomposes into ferrite and cementite. M7C3 carbides then nucleate at the interface between the cementite and the matrix, triggering the dissolution of cementite. M2C carbides precipitate separately within the bainitic laths during slow heating. M23C6 carbides precipitate at the interfaces (lath boundaries or prior austenite grain boundaries) and grow by attracting nearby chromium atoms, which results in the dissolution of M7C3 and, depending on the temperature, coarsening, or dissolution of M2C carbides, respectively.

  10. High Load Ratio Fatigue Strength and Mean Stress Evolution of Quenched and Tempered 42CrMo4 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertini, Leonardo; Le Bone, Luca; Santus, Ciro; Chiesi, Francesco; Tognarelli, Leonardo

    2017-08-01

    The fatigue strength at a high number of cycles with initial elastic-plastic behavior was experimentally investigated on quenched and tempered 42CrMo4 steel. Fatigue tests on unnotched specimens were performed both under load and strain controls, by imposing various levels of amplitude and with several high load ratios. Different ratcheting and relaxation trends, with significant effects on fatigue, are observed and discussed, and then reported in the Haigh diagram, highlighting a clear correlation with the Smith-Watson-Topper model. High load ratio tests were also conducted on notched specimens with C (blunt) and V (sharp) geometries. A Chaboche model with three parameter couples was proposed by fitting plain specimen cyclic and relaxation tests, and then finite element analyses were performed to simulate the notched specimen test results. A significant stress relaxation at the notch root became clearly evident by reporting the numerical results in the Haigh diagram, thus explaining the low mean stress sensitivity of the notched specimens.

  11. Crystallography of [0 1 1]/54.7 deg. lath boundary and cementite in tempered 0.2C steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Fugao; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki

    2005-01-01

    The crystallographic structures of the [0 1 1]/54.7 deg. lath boundary and the intralath and interlath cementite precipitates in a 0.2C steel tempered at 400 deg C have been observed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and discussed in terms of the O-lattice model. The [0 1 1]/54.7 deg lath boundary which is composed of one Kurdjumov-Sachs variant (α1) and one Nishiyama-Wasserman variant (α2) is likely to facet on the (0 12 7) α1 //(5 19 14) α2 irrational plane. The O-lattice analysis indicated that the facet coincides with a plane with a high density of O-points. Intralath cementite obeys the Isaichev orientation relationship (OR) with ferrite and has a habit plane of (1 0 1) θ //(1 2 1) α . Interlath cementite precipitating on the [0 1 1]/54.7 deg boundary maintains a strict Bagaryatskii OR with the ferrite on one side of the boundary and has a (1 0 0) θ habit plane

  12. Hydrogen solubility, diffusivity and trapping in a tempered Fe–C–Cr martensitic steel under various mechanical stress states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frappart, S.; Feaugas, X.; Creus, J.; Thebault, F.; Delattre, L.; Marchebois, H.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Engineering elasticity is divided into three mechanical behaviours. ► Apparent diffusion coefficient is affected in the generalized plasticity domain. ► Plasticity increases irreversibly trapped H related to dislocation creation. ► A local elastic distortion seems to affect hydrogen lattice concentration. ► Elastic field around precipitates seems to be reversible trapping sites. - Abstract: Electrochemical permeation test under stress conditions was carried out to determine the consequences of lattice distortion and defects on hydrogen solubility, diffusivity and trapping in a quenched and tempered martensitic steel. We focused our attention within the “engineering” elastic domain which can be divided into three domains: elasticity, micro-plasticity and generalized plasticity. The local elastic distortion associated with hydrogen atoms in lattice sites and residual vacancies seems to affect hydrogen lattice concentration. The hydrogen trapped in elastic fields shows a complex behaviour as a function of stress related to a possible internal relaxation of stresses around precipitates with the occurrence of plasticity. The plastic deformation caused a substantial increase of irreversible trapping sites in relation with the dislocation multiplication. Apparent diffusion coefficient decreased in this deformation domain in agreement with classical trapping models.

  13. Monotonic and Cyclic Behavior of DIN 34CrNiMo6 Tempered Alloy Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Branco

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at studying the monotonic and cyclic plastic deformation behavior of DIN 34CrNiMo6 high strength steel. Monotonic and low-cycle fatigue tests are conducted in ambient air, at room temperature, using standard 8-mm diameter specimens. The former tests are carried out under position control with constant displacement rate. The latter are performed under fully-reversed strain-controlled conditions, using the single-step test method, with strain amplitudes lying between ±0.4% and ±2.0%. After the tests, the fracture surfaces are examined by scanning electron microscopy in order to characterize the surface morphologies and identify the main failure mechanisms. Regardless of the strain amplitude, a softening behavior was observed throughout the entire life. Total strain energy density, defined as the sum of both tensile elastic and plastic strain energies, was revealed to be an adequate fatigue damage parameter for short and long lives.

  14. New elements to understand hydrogen diffusion and trapping mechanisms in quenched and tempered HSLA martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frappart, S.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen Embrittlement is a complex phenomenon responsible of metal degradation. It mainly depends on the material (chemical composition, heat treatment), the environment or the mechanical state. The main goal of this study is to give new elements to understand hydrogen diffusion and trapping mechanisms in High Strength Low Alloy martensitic steels used in the field of 'Oil and Gas' applications and nuclear industry. In this way, the purpose is to identify hydrogen trapping sites related to microstructural features as a basis for a better knowledge concerning hydrogen embrittlement. Thus, accurate electrochemical permeation set-up (with or without a mechanical state) were developed as well as a procedure to thoroughly analyze experimental data. An original approach on how to interpret electrochemical permeation results has been therefore performed. Afterward, the effect of different critical parameters has been assessed i.e. the membrane thickness, the surface state of the detection side as well as the microstructure and the mechanical state. The relationship between physical parameters associated to diffusion and trapping with the microstructure evolution will give rise to a first thought 'toward the embrittlement'

  15. Microstructure evolution and mechanical properties of X12CrMoWVNbN10-1-1 steel during quenching and tempering process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingang Tao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of heat treatments was investigated on the microstructure evolution and mechanical properties of X12CrMoWVNbN10-1-1 steel. The as-received steel was austenitized at 1080 °C for 16 h and cooled in furnace, following tempered in two steps, i.e. at 570 °C for 18 h and then at 690 °C for 24 h. The austenitized sample had a typical lath martensite structure with some retained austenite and no delta ferrite was observed after austenitization. After the first tempering at 570 °C, there was no retained austenite remained but it resulted in the forming of precipitates, such as Cr-rich M7C3, Cr-rich M23C6, Cr-rich M2N, Nb-rich MN, and the subgrain, as well as the reduction in dislocation density. However, microstructure observation after secondary tempering proved the further arrangement of dislocation, subgrain growth and the coarsening of precipitates. Hardness and impact tests were carried out for establishing a correlation between microstructure and mechanical properties. Finally, a careful fractographic analysis of impact samples had been done using SEM and EDS.

  16. The effect of single and double quenching and tempering heat treatments on the microstructure and mechanical properties of AISI 4140 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khani Sanij, M.H.; Ghasemi Banadkouki, S.S.; Mashreghi, A.R.; Moshrefifar, M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► DQT heat treatment consists of two stages of quenching and tempering. ► The DQT considerably improves ductility and toughness of AISI 4140 steel. ► The improvement of toughness in the DQT is due to finer austenite grains. ► The DQT decreases impurities concentration at the prior austenite grain boundaries. ► The increase of toughness is also associated with uniform distribution of impurity. -- Abstract: This investigation is concerned to evaluate the effect of double quenching and tempering (DQT) with conventional quenching and tempering (CQT) heat treatment processes on microstructure and mechanical behavior of a commercially developed hot rolled AISI 4140 type steel. Comparison of microstructure and mechanical properties of DQT and CQT heat treated specimens have been established in details. Optical and scanning electron microscopies have been used to follow impurity concentration and microstructural changes, and their relation to the associated mechanical properties. The results indicate that the improvement of mechanical properties particularly impact toughness of DQT heat treated specimens is much higher than that of the CQT condition, and this observation is rationalized in terms of finer austenite grain size developed in the DQT condition providing much finer martensitic packets within the grains and a lower level of impurity concentration of sulfur (S) and phosphorus (P) near the prior austenite grain boundaries as well.

  17. In-situ investigation of martensite formation in AISI 52100 bearing steel at sub-zero Celsius temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Pantleon, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Martensite formation in AISI 52100 bearing steel at sub-zero Celsius temperature was investigated with Vibrating Sample Magnetometry. The investigation reports the stabilization of retained austenite in quenched samples during storage at room temperature and reveals the thermally activated nature...

  18. Effect of groove design on mechanical and metallurgical properties of quenched and tempered low alloy abrasion resistant steel welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Varun; Shahi, A.S.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Effect of weld groove design on Q and T steel welded joints is investigated. • Groove design influences heat dissipation characteristics of welded joints. • Double-V groove joint possesses maximum yield strength and UTS. • C-groove joint possesses highest impact energy, both at room temperature and 0 °C. • A wide variation in microhardness exists across different zone of the weldments. - Abstract: Experimental investigations were carried out to study the influence of three different groove designs on mechanical and metallurgical properties of 15 mm thick Q and T (quenched and tempered) steel welded joints. Welding heat input variation corresponding to each joint configuration was kept to a minimal such that the objective of investigating, exclusively, the effect of varied weld volume on the mechanical and metallurgical performance of these joints could be accomplished. Mechanical performance of these joints was evaluated by subjecting them to transverse tensile testing, and Charpy V-notch impact testing of the weld zones at room temperature and 0 °C. The results of this study reveal that among all types of groove formations used for welding, double-V groove joint possessed maximum YS (yield strength) and UTS (ultimate tensile strength), besides maximum strength ratio (YS/UTS) that was followed by U-groove joint and C-groove joint, respectively. However, weld zone tested individually, for the cover as well as the root pass of the C-groove joint possessed highest CVN (Charpy V-notch) values, both at room temperature and 0 °C. Extensive microhardness studies of these weldments showed a wide variation in the microhardness values of the weld zone and the HAZ (heat affected zone). It was concluded that each groove formation/design exerted a significant influence on the heat dissipation characteristics of these joints, which is evident from different morphological features as revealed through optical microscopy. Scanning electron microscopic

  19. On the grain boundary hardening in a B-bearing 304 austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, X.X.

    1999-01-01

    The precipitates, (Cr,Fe) 23 (C,B) 6 carbides and (Cr,Fe) 2 B borides, formed along the grain boundaries in a 304 austenitic stainless steel containing boron of 33 ppm after solution treatment at 1100 C for 1 h followed by isothermal ageing for 0.5 h at temperatures ranging from 750 to 1050 C have been identified. The influence of these precipitates on the grain boundary hardening has been investigated by means of micro-Vickers hardness measurements. It is found that the degree of grain boundary hardening below 900 C decreases, while it increases above 900 C with increasing ageing temperature. The dissolution of (Cr,Fe) 23 (C,B) 6 carbides and the precipitation of (Cr,Fe) 2 B borides are associated with the changes of grain boundary hardening in this B-bearing 304 austenitic stainless steel between 750 and 1100 C. The non-equilibrium boron segregation enhances the grain boundary hardening when the ageing temperature is above 900 C. (orig.)

  20. Latest Development and Application of Nb-Bearing High Strength Pipeline Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongqing; Shang, Chengjia; Guo, Aimin; Zheng, Lei; Niu, Tao; Han, Xiulin

    In order to solve the pollution problem emerging in China recently, China's central government is making great efforts to raise the percentage of natural gas consumption in the China's primary energy mix, which needs to construct big pipelines to transport natural gas from the nation's resource-rich western regions to the energy-starved east, as well as import from the Central Asia and Russia. With this mainstream trend, high strength, high toughness, heavy gauge, and large diameter pipeline steels are needed to improve the transportation efficiency. This paper describes the latest progresses in Nb-bearing high strength pipeline steels with regard to metallurgical design, development and application, including X80 coil with a thickness up to 22.0mm, X80 plate with a diameter as much as 1422mm, X80 plate with low-temperature requirements and low-Mn sour service X65 for harsh sour service environments. Moreover, based on widely accepted TMCP and HTP practices with low carbon and Nb micro-alloying design, this paper also investigated some new metallurgical phenomena based on powerful rolling mills and heavy ACC equipment.

  1. A compression and shear loading test of concrete filled steel bearing wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Hiroshi; Sekimoto, Hisashi; Fukihara, Masaaki; Nakanishi, Kazuo; Hara, Kiyoshi.

    1991-01-01

    Concrete-filled steel bearing walls called SC structure which are the composite structure of concrete and steel plates have larger load-carrying capacity and higher ductility as compared with conventional RC structures, and their construction method enables the rationalization of construction procedures at sites and the shortening of construction period. Accordingly, the SC structures have become to be applied to the inner concrete structures of PWR nuclear power plants, and subsequently, it is planned to apply them to the auxiliary buildings of nuclear power plants. The purpose of this study is to establish a rational design method for the SC structures which can be applied to the auxiliary buildings of nuclear power plants. In this study, the buckling strength of surface plates and the ultimate strength of the SC structure were evaluated with the results of the compression and shear tests which have been carried out. The outline of the study and the tests, the results of the compression test and the shear test and their evaluation are reported. Stud bolts were effective for preventing the buckling of surface plates. The occurrence of buckling can be predicted analytically. (K.I.)

  2. Effect of main inclusions on crack initiation in bearing steel in the very high cycle fatigue regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Chao; Bao, Yan-ping; Gan, Peng; Wang, Min; He, Jin-shan

    2018-06-01

    This work aims to investigate the effect of main inclusions on crack initiation in bearing steel in the very high cycle fatigue (VHCF) regime. The size and type of inclusions in the steel were quantitatively analyzed, and VHCF tests were performed. Some fatigue cracks were found to be initiated in the gaps between inclusions (Al2O3, MgO-Al2O3) and the matrix, while other cracks originated from the interior of inclusions (TiN, MnS). To explain the related mechanism, the tessellated stresses between inclusions and the matrix were calculated and compared with the yield stress of the matrix. Results revealed that the inclusions could be classified into two types under VHCF; of these two, only one type could be regarded as holes. Findings in this research provide a better understanding of how inclusions affect the high cycle fatigue properties of bearing steel.

  3. Effect of microstructure on the impact toughness and temper embrittlement of SA508Gr.4N steel for advanced pressure vessel materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhengdong; He, Xikou; Qiao, Shibin; Xie, Changsheng

    2018-01-09

    The effect of microstructure on the impact toughness and the temper embrittlement of a SA508Gr.4N steel was investigated. Martensitic and bainitic structures formed in this material were examined via scanning electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) analysis. The martensitic structure had a positive effect on both the strength and toughness. Compared with the bainitic structure, this structure consisted of smaller blocks and more high-angle grain boundaries (HAGBs). Changes in the ultimate tensile strength and toughness of the martensitic structure were attributed to an increase in the crack propagation path. This increase resulted from an increased number of HAGBs and refinement of the sub-structure (block). The AES results revealed that sulfur segregation is higher in the martensitic structure than in the bainitic structure. Therefore, the martensitic structure is more susceptible to temper embrittlement than the bainitic structure.

  4. Development of Low Carbon Niobium Bearing High Strength F-B Dual Phase Steel with High Hole Expansion Property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Xia, Ming-sheng; Xiong, Zi-liu; Du, Yan-bing; Qiao, Zhi-ming; Zhang, Hong-bo

    In the study a low carbon niobium bearing high strength F-B dual phase automobile steel with high hole expansion property has been investigated. Steels of different chemical composition have been investigated by simulation experiments of controlled rolling and cooling process to study the influences of chemical elements, especially for C,Nb and Ti, and cooling pattern on the mechanical properties, flangeability and microstructure of strips. So-called 3-stages cooling pattern was adopted in simulation experiments, combining ultra fast cooling in first stage, air cooling in middle stage and fast cooling in the last stage, and at the end of run-out table the temperature of rolled pieces drop to below Bs point. Optical microstructure and SEM morphology have been observed. Results indicate that it is possible to obtain dual phase microstructure of polygonal ferrite plus bainite in adopting 3-stages cooling pattern. The low temperature coiling method using 3-step controlled cooling pattern after hot rolling is effective to produce low carbon Nb bearing steel with high balance of strength-ductility-flangeability, in addition, higher carbon content of steel tend to be detrimental to flangeability of steel, due to much carbide precipitation at ferrite boundary. Based on the results of simulation experiments mill trial has been carried out and hot rolled high strength steel with tensile strength higher as 600Mpa and hole expansion ratio higher as 100% has been developed successfully.

  5. Laboratory Simulation of Rolling Contact Fatigue Cracks in Wind Turbine Bearings Using Hydrogen Infused 100Cr6 Bearing Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janakiraman, Shravan; West, Ole; Klit, Peder

    Premature fatigue failure is observed in rolling element bearings used in wind turbine components. It is believed that decomposed hydrogen from the lubricant diffuses into the surface of the bearing inner ring making it susceptible to failure. An attempt is made to simulate the formation of these...

  6. Coarsening of (Fe, Cr)23C6 carbide phase on the tempering of 14Kh17N2 chromium-nickel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Psarev, V.I.

    2002-01-01

    Paper lists the results of computer analysis of distribution according to sizes (Fe, Cr) 23 C 6 microparticles resulting from 14Kh17N2 steel tempering under 700 Deg C. Data were obtained at the maximum beneficial magnification of a light microscope. The mentioned curves of distribution densities are characterized by more reliable run from most permissible sizes of dispersed particles. Application of general rules of distributions and of previously elaborated procedure to identify experimental histograms with theoretical distributions enables to derive valuable information on dynamics of coarsening of a disperse phase in this case, as well [ru

  7. Differences in the cyclic deformation behaviour of quenched and tempered steel 42 CrMo 4 (AISI 4140) due to stress- and strain-control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze, V.; Lang, K.-H.; Voehringer, O.; Macherauch, E.

    1998-01-01

    Cyclic stress-strain-curves and Manson-Coffin-plots of quenched and tempered steel 42 CrMo 4 (AISI 4140) strongly depend on whether they are determined under stress- or total-strain-control. At total-strain-controlled experiments, this is caused on the one hand by comparatively high initial stress-amplitudes which lead to distinctive cyclic work softening. On the other hand, the occuring differences in the evolution of inhomogeneous deformation patterns at both types of loading, which can be recorded by means of photoelasticity and microscopy, lead to differently distributed plastic deformations and to different integral values of plastic strain. (orig.)

  8. In Situ Investigation of the Evolution of Lattice Strain and Stresses in Austenite and Martensite During Quenching and Tempering of Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, M.; Niessen, F.; Somers, M. A. J.

    2018-01-01

    Energy dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction was applied to investigate in situ the evolution of lattice strains and stresses in austenite and martensite during quenching and tempering of a soft martensitic stainless steel. In one experiment, lattice strains in austenite and martensite were measured in situ in the direction perpendicular to the sample surface during an austenitization, quenching, and tempering cycle. In a second experiment, the sin2 ψ method was applied in situ during the austenite-to-martensite transformation to distinguish between macro- and phase-specific micro-stresses and to follow the evolution of these stresses during transformation. Martensite formation evokes compressive stress in austenite that is balanced by tensile stress in martensite. Tempering to 748 K (475 °C) leads to partial relaxation of these stresses. Additionally, data reveal that (elastic) lattice strain in austenite is not hydrostatic but hkl dependent, which is ascribed to plastic deformation of this phase during martensite formation and is considered responsible for anomalous behavior of the 200 γ reflection.

  9. Microstructural stability of a self-ion irradiated lanthana-bearing nanostructured ferritic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasebani, Somayeh; Charit, Indrajit; Burns, Jatuporn; Price, Lloyd M.; M Univ., College Station, TX; Shao, Lin; M Univ., College Station, TX

    2015-01-01

    Thermally stable nanofeatures with high number density are expected to impart excellent high temperature strength and irradiation stability in nanostructured ferritic steels (NFSs) which have potential applications in advanced nuclear reactors. A lanthana-bearing NFS (14LMT) developed via mechanical alloying and spark plasma sintering was used in this study. The sintered samples were irradiated by Fe 2+ ions to 10, 50 and 100 dpa at 30 °C and 500 °C. Microstructural and mechanical characteristics of the irradiated samples were studied using different microscopy techniques and nanoindentation, respectively. Overall morphology and number density of the nanofeatures remained unchanged after irradiation. Average radius of nanofeatures in the irradiated sample (100 dpa at 500 °C) was slightly reduced. A notable level of irradiation hardening and enhanced dislocation activity occurred after ion irradiation except at 30 °C and ≥50 dpa. Other microstructural features like grain boundaries and high density of dislocations also provided defect sinks to assist in defect removal.

  10. Precipitation-Induced Changes in Microstrain and Its Relation with Hardness and Tempering Parameter in 17-4 PH Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, S.; Manojkumar, R.; Jayakumar, T.; Das, C. R.; Rao, B. P. C.

    2016-06-01

    17-4 PH (precipitation hardening) stainless steel is a soft martensitic stainless steel strengthened by aging at appropriate temperature for sufficient duration. Precipitation of copper particles in the martensitic matrix during aging causes coherency strains which improves the mechanical properties, namely hardness and strength of the matrix. The contributions to X-ray diffraction (XRD) profile broadening due to coherency strains caused by precipitation and crystallite size changes due to aging are separated and quantified using the modified Williamson-Hall approach. The estimated normalized mean square strain and crystallite size are used to explain the observed changes in hardness. Microstructural changes observed in secondary electron images are in qualitative agreement with crystallite size changes estimated from XRD profile analysis. The precipitation kinetics in the age-hardening regime and overaged regime are studied from hardness changes and they follow the Avrami kinetics and Wilson's model, respectively. In overaged condition, the hardness changes are linearly correlated to the tempering parameter (also known as Larson-Miller parameter). Similar linear variation is observed between the normalized mean square strain (determined from XRD line profile analysis) and the tempering parameter, in the incoherent regime which is beyond peak microstrain conditions.

  11. Plasma nitriding and simultaneous tempering of VF 800AT tool steel; Nitretacao por plasma com revenimento simultaneo do aco ferramenta VF 800AT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prass, Andre Ricardo; Fontana, Luis Cesar; Recco, Abel Andre Candido, E-mail: prass.andrericardo@gmail.com, E-mail: luis.fontana@udesc.br, E-mail: abel.recco@udesc.br [Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina (UDESC), Joinville, SC (Brazil)

    2017-04-15

    Plasma nitriding of tool steels improves the surface hardness due to formation of diffusion zone and/or compound layer. The process parameters such as temperature, gas composition and dwell time, allow to control the layer thickness, the microstructure, the crystalline phases and the type of layer (for example white layer or diffusion zone). This paper discusses an alternative procedure for the heat treatment of tempering and surface treatment, both in plasma or combining conventional heat treatment with subsequent plasma nitriding. Carrying out both treatments in plasma could enable reduction in manufacturing costs, lower energy consumption and less time for tools manufacturing. Samples of VF800AT steel were treated and characterized (at surface and core of samples) through the following technique: X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, micro-hardness profile and Rockwell C measurement. Temperature measurements during the plasma treatment, show that arise thermal gradient between the surface and the core of the samples. In this work, it was observed that the surface was up to 7% hotter than the core of sample, during the plasma treatment with temperature of magnitude about 5 x 10{sup 2} °C. This thermal gradient seems inherent to the plasma process, so that it can produce different microstructure, hardness and crystalline phases between core and edge of samples. However, when two tempering operations are prior carried out in a muffle furnace and the third tempering treatment is subsequently carried out simultaneously with the plasma nitriding, it is observed that the microstructure, the crystalline phases, hardness and micro hardness (in both, edge and core) are similar to treatments done in conventional mode cycle (in muffle furnace) with subsequent plasma nitriding. (author)

  12. Improvement of the corrosion property of Cr4Mo4V bearing steel using plasma immersion ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.Y.; Chu, P.K.

    1997-01-01

    The working conditions of aerospace bearings such as engine bearings are quite harsh and prolonging the life span of these components is thus very important to the aerospace industry. Previous results have shown that the main failure mechanism of aerospace bearings is corrosion, and enhancing their corrosion resistance is a key. Cr4Mo4V, which is equivalent to AISI M50 bearing steel, is usually used in aerospace bearings in China. In this study, Cr4Mo4V components are treated in a new generation plasma immersion ion implanter in which ion implantation and sputter deposition can be carried out in the same chamber without breaking vacuum. Three treatment processes involving Cr, Mo, and N are evaluated. Our test results indicate that Cr is the main element enhancing the corrosion resistance and the addition of nitrogen improves the properties further. The non line-of-sight advantage of PIII is important to the processing of complex-shaped samples such as engine bearings. (orig.)

  13. Plasma nitriding of AISI 52100 ball bearing steel and effect of heat ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ††National Engineering Industries Pvt. Ltd., Jaipur 302 006, India. MS received 26 April ... hardened and tempered with spheroidized carbides is the most commonly used mate- ... because they are polluting the environment. Plasma nitrid-.

  14. TRIP aided deformation of a near-Ni-free, Mn–N bearing duplex stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jeom Yong; Ji, Jung Hoon; Hwang, Si Woo; Park, Kyung-Tae

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Development of a lean alloyed (near-Ni-free) TRIP aided duplex STS. ► In situ characterization of SIM transformation with strain at the same area of the sample. ► The KAM distribution evolution of the constituent phases with strain. - Abstract: A near-Ni-free, Mn–N bearing duplex stainless steel (D-SS) that shows transformation induced plasticity was developed. The present D-SS exhibited an excellent strength–ductility combination over 1000 MPa tensile strength and 50% elongation. An analysis of the element partitioning during annealing revealed that the stacking fault energy of austenite was low enough for a strain induced martensite (SIM) transformation to occur. The strain hardening rate began to increase at ∼10% strain with the same manner of SIM fraction. The TEM and EBSD analyses showed that not only the ε martensite band intersections but the austenite grain boundaries acted as the SIM nucleation sites. The SIM transformation was saturated because of the austenite grain refinement and the corresponding austenite stabilization. The austenite grain refinement was caused by the mutual impingement of growing SIM and as a result by the engulfment of remaining austenite by SIM. The deformation behavior of the present D-SS was characterized by analyzing the kernel average misorientation (KAM) of the constituent phases with strain. The KAM distribution of austenite, ferrite and SIM exhibited different characteristics. The average KAM of austenite and ferrite increased as the strain increased, but its increasing rate of austenite was higher than that of ferrite. These KAM characteristics were discussed along with the dislocation glide modes of austenite and ferrite. By contrast, the average KAM of SIM was insensitive to strain and higher than that of the other two phases.

  15. Evaluation of the increased load bearing capacity of steel beams strengthened with pre-stressed FRP laminates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bennati

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We analyse the problem of a simply supported steel beam subjected to uniformly distributed load, strengthened with a pre-stressed fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP laminate. We assume that the laminate is first put into tension, then bonded to the beam bottom surface, and finally fixed at both its ends by suitable connections. The beam and laminate are modelled according to classical beam theory. The adhesive is modelled as a cohesive interface with a piecewise linear constitutive law defined over three intervals (elastic response, softening response, debonding. The model is described by a set of differential equations with suitable boundary conditions. An analytical solution to the problem is determined, including explicit expressions for the internal forces and interfacial stresses. As an application, we consider the standard IPE series for the steel beam and the Sika® CarboDur® system for the adhesive and laminate. For each considered cross section, we first carry out a preliminary design of the unstrengthened steel beam. Then, we imagine to apply the FRP strengthening and calculate the loads corresponding to the elastic limit states in the steel beam, adhesive, and laminate. Lastly, we take into account the ultimate limit state corresponding to the plasticisation of the mid-span steel cross section and evaluate the increased load bearing capacity of the strengthened beam

  16. Laboratory procedure for sizing and electroless nickel plating assembled steel bearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, R.R.; Petit, G.S.

    1976-01-01

    The bearing is placed in a holder and degreased in methyl chloroform. The entire bearing is etched in hydrochloric acid and sized in an ammonium bifluoride-hydrogen peroxide solution (NH 4 F.HF--H 2 O 2 ). The bearing is removed from the holder, activated in hydrochloric acid and plated with 0.001 in. of nickel in a plating tumbler immersed in a heated electroless nickel plating bath. The bearing is water-rinsed and air-dried

  17. Role of tempering temperature on the hydrogen diffusion in a 34CrMo4 martensitic steel and the related embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moli-Sanchez, L.

    2012-01-01

    The evaluation of the Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) of high strength steels remains a major issue for the development of hydrogen (H) applications for the energy. A better understanding of the phenomena involved in the HE (role of the environment, the H-microstructure and H-plasticity interactions) is crucial in the 'H economy'. The aim of this study is to characterize the H behaviour in tempered martensitic steels (34CrMo 4 ). A particular interest was put on the determination of the microstructural defects (dislocations, interfaces, precipitates...) that control the H absorption, diffusion, desorption and trapping and the related HE sensibility. The combined use of electrochemical permeation technique and H isotopic tracers (deuterium and tritium) (TDS, SIMS and β-counting) allowed the characterization of the H behaviour in the microstructures. The kinetics of H absorption/desorption, related with trapping phenomena on microstructural defects, give access to the density of trapping sites and the occupancy ratio associated to each defects population. The comparison of mechanical tests (pre-hydrogenated and in situ hydrogenated tests) evidenced the major role of diffusible H in the HE mechanisms thanks to the H-plasticity interactions that promote the H segregation at some microstructural defects. A detailed analysis of the results allows to suggest some recommendations concerning the type of microstructure (dislocations densities, precipitates coherency...) to be favoured during the elaboration processes or heat treatments of martensitic steels in order to increase their HE resistance. (author) [fr

  18. MICROTOUGH - calculation of characteristic upper shelf fracture toughness values from microstructural parameters for high strength structural steels with normalized or quenched and tempered microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muenstermann, S.; Dahl, W.; Langenberg, P.; Deimel, P.; Sattler, E.

    2004-01-01

    In modern applications, high strength steels are often utilised to increase the load bearing capacity of components. For safe design it is also necessary that these steels have an adequate fracture toughness. The mechanical properties of high strength structural steels are a result of the production process. In consequence, they are strongly related to the microstructure. Therefore, the aim of the research work in the Microtough project is to develop and apply a new method of quantitative correlation between microstructural parameters and characteristic fracture toughness values. This correlation will on the one hand help for the design of new structural steels with high toughness. On the other hand, it shall allow to characterise the fracture toughness of steel without performing expensive fracture mechanics tests. The research work is carried out in the full temperature range from lower to upper shelf. As both RWTH Aachen University and MPA Uni Stuttgart concentrate on ductile fracture behaviour in their research work, the focus of the presentation lies in the upper shelf. (orig.)

  19. Use of the gapped bead-on-plate test to investigate hydrogen induced cracking of flux cored arc welds of a quenched and tempered steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Liang; Dunne, Druce; Davidson, Len

    2014-01-01

    Gapped bead-on-plate (G-BOP) testing of flux cored arc welds was conducted to assess the susceptibility to hydrogen induced cold cracking (HICC) of weld metal deposited on a high strength quenched and tempered steel. For preheat temperatures higher than 40°C, no weld metal cracking was observed using a shielding gas consisting of argon with 20% carbon dioxide. In contrast, the no-crack condition was not achieved for a shielding gas consisting of argon-5% carbon dioxide for preheat temperatures lower than 100°C. This extraordinary difference in weld metal HICC resistance indicates that, in general, the shielding gas mixture can exert a major influence on weld metal transverse cold cracking behaviour

  20. Thermomechanical Processing of Fe-6.9Al-2Cr-0.88C Steel: Intercritical Annealing Followed by Quench Tempering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahat, Ahmed Ismail Zaky; Mohamed, Masoud Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    A hot forged Fe-0.88 pct C-6.9 pct Al steel was intercritically annealed at temperatures in the range of 1173 K to 1283 K (900 °C to 1010 °C), and subsequently tempered at 623 K (350 °C) to enhance the mechanical properties by microstructure modification. Room temperature compression tests were carried out to evaluate the influence of the intercritical annealing temperature on the mechanical properties. A substructure was present in the microstructure after each intercritical annealing treatment. The substructure was absent after annealing at 1263 K (990 °C) and higher temperatures. Over-aging occurred when the annealing temperature was increased to 1283 K (1010 °C). A remarkable increase in strength and ductility was achieved after annealing at 1263 K (990 °C).

  1. Development of next generation tempered and ODS reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinkle, S. J.; Boutard, J. L.; Hoelzer, D. T.; Kimura, A.; Lindau, R.; Odette, G. R.; Rieth, M.; Tan, L.; Tanigawa, H.

    2017-09-01

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels are currently the most technologically mature option for the structural material of proposed fusion energy reactors. Advanced next-generation higher performance steels offer the opportunity for improvements in fusion reactor operational lifetime and reliability, superior neutron radiation damage resistance, higher thermodynamic efficiency, and reduced construction costs. The two main strategies for developing improved steels for fusion energy applications are based on (1) an evolutionary pathway using computational thermodynamics modelling and modified thermomechanical treatments (TMT) to produce higher performance reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels and (2) a higher risk, potentially higher payoff approach based on powder metallurgy techniques to produce very high strength oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels capable of operation to very high temperatures and with potentially very high resistance to fusion neutron-induced property degradation. The current development status of these next-generation high performance steels is summarized, and research and development challenges for the successful development of these materials are outlined. Material properties including temperature-dependent uniaxial yield strengths, tensile elongations, high-temperature thermal creep, Charpy impact ductile to brittle transient temperature (DBTT) and fracture toughness behaviour, and neutron irradiation-induced low-temperature hardening and embrittlement and intermediate-temperature volumetric void swelling (including effects associated with fusion-relevant helium and hydrogen generation) are described for research heats of the new steels.

  2. Nano-copper-bearing stainless steel promotes fracture healing by accelerating the callus evolution process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang L

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Lei Wang,1,* Guoyuan Li,1,* Ling Ren,2,* Xiangdong Kong,1 Yugang Wang,1 Xiuguo Han,1 Wenbo Jiang,3 Kerong Dai,1 Ke Yang,2 Yongqiang Hao11Shanghai Key Laboratory of Orthopaedic Implants, Department of Orthopaedics, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai JiaoTong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 2Special Materials and Device Research Department, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang, 3Medical 3D Printing Innovation Research Center, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai JiaoTong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Treatment for fractures requires internal fixation devices, which are mainly produced from stainless steel or titanium alloy without biological functions. Therefore, we developed a novel nano-copper-bearing stainless steel with nano-sized copper-precipitation (317L-Cu SS. Based on previous studies, this work explores the effect of 317L-Cu SS on fracture healing; that is, proliferation, osteogenic differentiation, osteogenesis-related gene expression, and lysyl oxidase activity of human bone mesenchymal stem cells were detected in vitro. Sprague–Dawley rats were used to build an animal fracture model, and fracture healing and callus evolution were investigated by radiology (X-ray and micro-CT, histology (H&E, Masson, and safranin O/fast green staining, and histomorphometry. Further, the Cu2+ content and Runx2 level in the callus were determined, and local mechanical test of the fracture was performed to assess the healing quality. Our results revealed that 317L-Cu SS did not affect the proliferation of human bone mesenchymal stem cells, but promoted osteogenic differentiation and the expression of osteogenesis-related genes. In addition, 317L-Cu SS upregulated the lysyl oxidase activity. The X-ray and micro-CT results showed that the callus evolution efficiency and fracture healing speed were

  3. Improvement of the corrosion and tribological properties of CSS-42L aerospace bearing steel using carbon ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Fangfang; Zhou, Chungen; Zheng, Lijing, E-mail: zhenglijing@buaa.edu.cn; Zhang, Hu

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • The corrosion and tribological properties of an aerospace bearing steel CSS-42L was investigated. • Carbon ion implantation was conducted and an amorphous layer formed at the near surface of CSS-42L steel. • The enhanced Cr diffusion and the decreased free electrons are contributed to the improvement of corrosion properties. • The external hard layer has positive effect on the wear resistance. - Abstract: The aerospace bearings steel CSS-42L was ion implanted by carbon with implantation fluxes of 5 × 10{sup 16} ions cm{sup −2}. The composition, microstructure and hardness of the carbon implanted samples were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and nanoindentation tests. The corrosion and tribological properties were also evaluated in the present work. The results shown that carbon implantation produced an amorphous layer and graphitic bounds formed at the near surface of CSS-42L steel. In the electrochemical test, the carbon implanted samples suggested lower current densities and corrosion rates. Carbon ion implanted samples shown a relative Cr-enrichment at the surface as compared with nonimplanted samples. The improved corrosion resistance is believed to be related to the formed amorphous layer, the enhancement of Cr diffusion in the carbon implantation layer which contributed the formation of passive film on the surface, the decrease of free electrons which caused by the increase of carbon fraction. The external hard layer had positive effect on the wear resistance, reducing strongly the friction coefficient about 30% and the abrasive-adhesive mechanism present in the unimplanted samples was not modified by the implantation process.

  4. The mechanical properties and microstructures of vanadium bearing high strength dual phase steels processed with continuous galvanizing line simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yu

    For galvanized or galvannealed steels to be commercially successful, they must exhibit several attributes: (i) easy and inexpensive processing in the hot mill, cold mill and on the coating line, (ii) high strength with good formability and spot weldability, and (iii) good corrosion resistance. At the beginning of this thesis, compositions with a common base but containing various additions of V or Nb with or without high N were designed and subjected to Gleeble simulations of different galvanizing(GI), galvannealing(GA) and supercooling processing. The results revealed the phase balance was strongly influenced by the different microalloying additions, while the strengths of each phase were somewhat less affected. Our research revealed that the amount of austenite formed during intercritical annealing can be strongly influenced by the annealing temperature and the pre-annealing conditions of the hot band (coiling temperature) and cold band (% cold reduction). In the late part of this thesis, the base composition was a low carbon steel which would exhibit good spot weldability. To this steel were added two levels of Cr and Mo for strengthening the ferrite and increasing the hardenability of intercritically formed austenite. Also, these steels were produced with and without the addition of vanadium in an effort to further increase the strength. Since earlier studies revealed a relationship between the nature of the starting cold rolled microstructure and the response to CGL processing, the variables of hot band coiling temperature and level of cold reduction prior to annealing were also studied. Finally, in an effort to increase strength and ductility of both the final sheet (general formability) and the sheared edges of cold punched holes (local formability), a new thermal path was developed that replaced the conventional GI ferrite-martensite microstructure with a new ferrite-martensite-tempered martensite and retained austenite microstructure. The new

  5. Boundary and sub-boundary hardening in tempered martensitic 9Cr steel during long-term creep at 650 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Fujio [National Institute for Materials Science, Sengen, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    The boundary and sub-boundary hardening is shown to be the most important strengthening mechanism in creep of the 9% Cr steel base metal and welded joints. The addition of boron reduces the coarsening rate of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides along boundaries near prior austenite grain boundaries during creep, enhancing the boundary and sub-boundary hardening. This improves long-term creep strength of base metal. The enhancement of boundary and sub-boundary hardening is significantly reduced in fine-grained region of Ac{sub 3} HAZ simulated specimens of conventional steel P92. In NIMS 9Cr boron steel welded joints, the grain size and distribution of carbonitrides are substantially the same between the HAZ and base metal, where fine carbonitrides are distributed along the lath and block boundaries as well as along prior austenite grain boundaries. This is essential for the suppression of Type IV fracture in NIMS 9% Cr boron steel welded joints. Newly alloy-designed 9Cr steel with 160 ppm boron and 85 ppm nitrogen exhibits much higher creep rupture strength of base metal than P92 and also no Tpe-IV fracture in welded joints at 650 C. (orig.)

  6. Effect of hot rolling on the structure and the mechanical properties of nitrogen-bearing austenitic-martensitic 14Kh15AN4M steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannykh, O. A.; Betsofen, S. Ya.; Lukin, E. I.; Blinov, V. M.; Voznesenskaya, N. M.; Tonysheva, O. A.; Blinov, E. V.

    2016-04-01

    The effect of the rolling temperature and strain on the structure and the properties of corrosionresistant austenitic-martensitic 14Kh15AN4M steel is studied. The steel is shown to exhibit high ductility: upon rolling in the temperature range 700-1100°C at a reduction per pass up to 80%, wedge steel specimens are uniformly deformed along and across the rolling direction without cracking and other surface defects. Subsequent cold treatment and low-temperature tempering ensure a high hardness of the steel (50-56 HRC). Austenite mainly contributes to the hardening upon rolling in the temperature range 700-800°C at a reduction of 50-70%, and martensite makes the main contribution at higher temperatures and lower strains. Texture does not form under the chosen deformation conditions, which indicates dynamic recrystallization with the nucleation and growth of grains having no preferential orientation.

  7. Effect of cobalt on microstructure and creep deformation behaviour of tempered martensitic 9% Cr steel for USC power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helis, L.; Toda, Y.; Abe, F. [NIMS, Tsukuba (Japan). Structural Metals Center; Hara, T. [NIMS, Tsukuba (Japan). Advanced Nano Characterization Center; Miyazaki, H. [NIMS, Tokyo (Japan). Materials Data Sheet Station

    2008-07-01

    Four ingots with chemical composition 9Cr-3W-0/5Co-0.2V-0.05Nb-0.08C-0.05N, varying in the amount of Co addition were studied. Creep tests were conducted at temperature of 923K. Steels with 3% and 5% Co showed creep resistance superior to those with 1% and 0% Co at stresses above 140MPa. On the other hand 5% Co steel showed a significant deterioration in long term creep properties at 80MPa. Calculation by Thermo-Calc. suggested and observation of microstructure before the creep test confirmed the presence of about 6% and 0.4% of delta-ferrite in Co free and 1% Co steel, respectively. ICP mass spectrometry measurement showed that the amount of precipitation in steels after heat treatment increased with increase in Co addition, especially significant gap was found between 1% and 3% Co steels. Distribution of precipitation was studied by SEM and TEM. Particles of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and MX carbonitrides preferentially precipitated around prior austenitic grain boundaries. Density of precipitation around these boundaries was found to depend on prior austenitic grain size, which is affected by the presence of anti o-ferrite and precipitation at normalizing temperature. Particles of Laves phase precipitated in the microstructure during the creep tests at 923K at all stresses. Its precipitation at the early stage was also enhanced by the addition of Co. It is known that creep properties of steels with fine grain deteriorate faster than those with coarse grains, due to the faster recovering during the keep at high temperatures. Combination of larger prior austenitic grains and higher precipitation contributes to the prolonged life of steels with higher amount of Co after testing at 923K and 160MPa. Deterioration in long term creep strength of steels with high amount of Co can be attributed to the precipitation Cr(V,Nb)N particles known as Z-phase, which is associated with dissolution of MX carbonitrides. (orig.)

  8. Analysis of 14C-bearing compounds released by the corrosion of irradiated steel using accelerator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetković, B Z; Salazar, G; Kunz, D; Szidat, S; Wieland, E

    2018-06-25

    The combination of ion chromatography (IC) with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was developed to determine the speciation of 14C-(radiocarbon) bearing organic compounds in the femto to pico molar concentration range. The development of this compound-specific radiocarbon analysis (CSRA) of carboxylic acids is reported and the application of the method on a leaching solution from neutron-irradiated steel is demonstrated. The background and the dynamic range of the AMS-based method were quantified. On using 14C-labelled standards, the measurements demonstrate the repeatability of the analytical method and the reproducible recovery of the main target carboxylic acids (i.e., acetate, formate, malonate, and oxalate). The detection limit was determined to be in the mid fmol 14C per L level while the dynamic range of the analytical method covers three orders of magnitude from the low fmol to the mid pmol 14C per L level. Cross contamination was found to be negligible during IC fractionation and was accounted for during eluate processing and 14C detection by AMS. The 14C-bearing carboxylates released from an irradiated steel nut into an alkaline leaching solution were analysed using the CSRA-based analytical method with the aim to check the applicability of the approach and develop appropriate sample preparation. The concentrations of 14C-bearing formate and acetate, the main organic corrosion products, were at a low pmol 14C per L level for convenient dimensions of the alkaline leaching experiment which demonstrates that compound-specific 14C AMS is an extremely sensitive analytical method for analysing 14C-bearing compounds. The content of total organic 14C in solution (TO14C) determined by the direct measurement of an aliquot of the leaching solution agrees well with the sum of the 14C concentrations of the individual carboxylates within the uncertainty of the data. Furthermore, the TO14C content is in good agreement with the calculated value using the corrosion rate

  9. EFFECT OF PLASMA CUTTING PARAMETERS UPON SHAPES OF BEARING CURVE OF C45 STEEL SURFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Skoczylas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of studies on the effect of plasma cutting technological parameters upon the shape of bearing curves and the parameters of the curve. The topography of surface formed by plasma cutting were analyzed. For measuring surface roughness and determining the bearing curve the appliance T8000 RC120 – 400 by Hommel-Etamic was used together with software.

  10. Cleanliness of Ti-bearing Al-killed ultra-low-carbon steel during different heating processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jian-long; Bao, Yan-ping; Wang, Min

    2017-12-01

    During the production of Ti-bearing Al-killed ultra-low-carbon (ULC) steel, two different heating processes were used when the converter tapping temperature or the molten steel temperature in the Ruhrstahl-Heraeus (RH) process was low: heating by Al addition during the RH decarburization process and final deoxidation at the end of the RH decarburization process (process-I), and increasing the oxygen content at the end of RH decarburization, heating and final deoxidation by one-time Al addition (process-II). Temperature increases of 10°C by different processes were studied; the results showed that the two heating processes could achieve the same heating effect. The T.[O] content in the slab and the refining process was better controlled by process-I than by process-II. Statistical analysis of inclusions showed that the numbers of inclusions in the slab obtained by process-I were substantially less than those in the slab obtained by process-II. For process-I, the Al2O3 inclusions produced by Al added to induce heating were substantially removed at the end of decarburization. The amounts of inclusions were substantially greater for process-II than for process-I at different refining stages because of the higher dissolved oxygen concentration in process-II. Industrial test results showed that process-I was more beneficial for improving the cleanliness of molten steel.

  11. Microstructure and mechanical properties of a Ti-microalloyed low-carbon stainless steel treated by quenching-partitioning-tempering process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, S.T., E-mail: xst-2007@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Liu, Z.Y. [State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Wang, Z. [Research Institute, Baoshan Iron & Steel Co. Ltd., Shanghai 201900 (China); Wang, G.D. [State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2016-06-15

    Quenching-partitioning-tempering (Q-P-T) process was used to treat a Ti-microalloyed low-carbon stainless steel after cold rolling. In addition to martensite, ferrite and retained austenite, TiN, coarse TiC, fine TiC, (Fe,Cr){sub 3}C and ultra-fine TiC precipitates were formed after the Q-P-T treatment. Based on field emission-scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations, thermodynamic, crystallographic and statistical analyses were used to reveal the precipitation behaviors of these particles. The effects of partitioning-tempering (P-T) temperature and time on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Q-P-T treated specimens were specially studied. The coarsening and spheroidization of (Fe,Cr){sub 3}C particles during P-T stage were obviously retarded by large Cr addition. The retained austenite was obtained significantly with appropriate P-T parameters. The precipitation of ultra-fine TiC particles in the martensite during the P-T stage at 500 °C induced a secondary hardening. - Highlights: • Some fine TiC with 30–70 nm precipitated in austenite during partial austenization. • A part of fine TiC had K-S OR with martensite after Q-P-T treatment. • A part of fine TiC had a OR specially deviating from K-S OR with martensite. • Coarsening and spheroidization of (Fe,Cr){sub 3}C were retarded during P-T stage. • Ultra-fine TiC with < 10 nm precipitated in martensite during P-T stage at 500 °C.

  12. Microstructural characteristics of steel rebar submitted to the process of self - tempering; Caracterizacao microestrutural de superficies e interfaces de vergalhoes de aco auto-revenidos utilizando Microscopia Eletronica de Varredura (MEV) e analise quimica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreto, M.F.O., E-mail: matheusfob@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), MG (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Every day the construction industry seeks new alternatives to maximize use of the materials provided new tools for structural design of the new techniques in welding rods. In this sense, this work proposes to study the mechanical properties of steel rebar self-tempering for civil construction, choosing the bars from 6.3 to 25.4 mm in diameter for the study. The cooling process of rebar, after rolling, known as self-tempering produces a rebar with excellent mechanical properties and low cost to the plant, they put the rebar shall be composed of concentric layers with different mechanical properties among themselves. To study the influence of these layers on the mechanical behavior of rebar microstructural characterization was made by means of electron microscopy analysis of transmitted light and scanning of all samples. From the results it was found that only the bars 20 and 25mm diameter had a heat treatment for self-tempering relevant. (author)

  13. Development of high strength hot rolled low carbon copper-bearing steel containing nanometer sized carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phaniraj, M.P. [High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Young-Min [High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joonho [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Goo, Nam Hoon [Sheet Product Design Group, Hyundai Steel Co., North Industrial Street 1400, 343-823, DangJin 343-823 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong-Ik; Suh, Jin-Yoo; Jung, Woo-Sang [High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Jae-Hyeok, E-mail: jhshim@kist.re.kr [High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, In-Suk, E-mail: insukchoi@kist.re.kr [High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-01

    A low carbon ferritic steel was alloyed with Ti, Mo and Cu with the intention of achieving greater increment in strength by multiple precipitate strengthening. The steel is hot rolled and subjected to interrupted cooling to enable precipitation of Ti–Mo carbides and copper. Thermodynamic calculations were carried out to determine equilibrium phase fractions at different temperatures. Microstructure characterization using transmission electron microscopy and composition analysis revealed that the steel contains ~5 nm size precipitates of (Ti,Mo)C. Precipitation kinetics calculations using MatCalc software showed that mainly body centered cubic copper precipitates of size < 5nm form under the cooling conditions in the present study. The steel has the high tensile strength of 853 MPa and good ductility. The yield strength increases by 420 MPa, which is more than that achieved in hot rolled low carbon ferritic steels with only copper precipitates or only carbide precipitates. The precipitation and strengthening contribution of copper and (Ti,Mo)C precipitates and their effect on the work hardening behavior is discussed.

  14. Microstructure – Toughness relationships in sub-zero treated and tempered Vanadis 6 steel compared to conventional treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ptačinová, J.; Sedlická, V.; Hudáková, M.; Dlouhý, Ivo; Jurči, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 702, AUG (2017), s. 241-258 ISSN 0921-5093 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2015069 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Ledeburitic steel * Sub-zero treatment * Microstructure * Carbide particles effect * Fracture toughness * Fracture surface roughness Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy OBOR OECD: Material s engineering Impact factor: 3.094, year: 2016 https://www. science direct.com/ science /article/pii/S0921509317308936

  15. Curvilinear steel elements in load-bearing structures of high-rise building spatial frames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibragimov Alexander

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of curvilinear elements in load-bearing metal structures of high-rise buildings supposes ensuring of their bearing capacity and serviceability. There may exist a great variety of shapes and orientations of such structural elements. In particular, it may be various flat curves of an open or closed oval profile such as circular or parabolic arch or ellipse. The considered approach implies creating vast internal volumes without loss in the load-bearing capacity of the frame. The basic concept makes possible a wide variety of layout and design solutions. The presence of free internal spaces of large volume in "skyscraper" type buildings contributes to resolving a great number of problems, including those of communicative nature. The calculation results confirm the basic assumptions.

  16. Curvilinear steel elements in load-bearing structures of high-rise building spatial frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibragimov, Alexander; Danilov, Alexander

    2018-03-01

    The application of curvilinear elements in load-bearing metal structures of high-rise buildings supposes ensuring of their bearing capacity and serviceability. There may exist a great variety of shapes and orientations of such structural elements. In particular, it may be various flat curves of an open or closed oval profile such as circular or parabolic arch or ellipse. The considered approach implies creating vast internal volumes without loss in the load-bearing capacity of the frame. The basic concept makes possible a wide variety of layout and design solutions. The presence of free internal spaces of large volume in "skyscraper" type buildings contributes to resolving a great number of problems, including those of communicative nature. The calculation results confirm the basic assumptions.

  17. Tensile and impact behaviour of BATMAN II steels, Ti-bearing reduced activation martensitic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filacchioni, G.; Casagrande, E.; De Angelis, U.; De Santis, G.; Ferrara, D.; Pilloni, L.

    Two series of Reduced Activation Ferrous alloys (RAF) have been produced and studied by Casaccia's Laboratories. These martensitic alloys are named BATMAN steels. They are among the few presently developed RAF materials to exploit Ti as a carbide forming and grain size stabilizing element instead of Ta. In this work their mechanical properties are illustrated.

  18. Re-austenitisation of chromium-bearing pressure vessel steels during the weld thermal cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunne, Druce; Li, Huijun; Jones, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Steels with chromium contents between 0.5 and 12 wt% are commonly used for fabrication of creep resistant pressure vessels (PV) for the power generation industry. Most of these steels are susceptible to Type IV creep failure in the intercritical and/ or grain refined regions of the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the parent metal. The re-austenitisation process plays a central role in establishing the transformed microstructures and the creep resistance of the various sub-zones of the HAZ. The high alloy content and the presence of alloy-rich carbides in the as-supplied parent plate can significantly retard the kinetics of transformation to austenite, resulting in both incomplete austenitisation and inhomogeneous austenite. Overlapping weld thermal cycles in multi-pass welds add further complexity to the progressive development of microstructure over the course of the welding process. In order to clarify structural evolution, thermal simulation has been used to study the effects of successive thermal cycles on the structures and properties of the HAZ of 2.25Cr-1Mo steel. The results showed that, before post-weld heat treatment (PWHT), the HAZ microstructures and properties, particularly in doubly reheated sub-zones, were highly heterogeneous and differed markedly from those of the base steel. It is concluded that close control of the thermal cycle by pre-heat, weld heat input and post-heat is necessary to obtain a heat affected zone with microstructures and properties compatible with those of the base plate.

  19. Thermodynamics of inclusion formation and its influence on the corrosion behavior of Cu bearing duplex stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Soon-Hyeok; Kim, Soon-Tae; Lee, In-Sung; Park, Yong-Soo; Park, Joo-Hyun; Kim, Kwang-Tae; Kim, Ji-Soo

    2011-01-01

    To elucidate the thermodynamics of inclusion formation and its influence on the corrosion behavior of Cu bearing duplex stainless steels, potentiodynamic and potentiostatic polarization tests, a SEM-EDS analysis of inclusions, and thermodynamic calculations of the formation of inclusions were carried out. While the resistance to general corrosion of the noble copper contained alloy-1.5Cu in a deaerated 2 M H 2 SO 4 was higher than that of the alloy-BASE, the resistance to pitting corrosion of copper contained alloy-1.5Cu in a deaerated 0.5 N HCl + 1 N NaCl and 30 mass% NaCl was lower than that of the alloy-BASE due to an increase of interface areas between inclusions and matrix acting as preferential pit initiation sites. The thermodynamic calculation for the formation of Cr-containing oxide inclusions was in good agreement with the experimental results. (author)

  20. The Influence of the Induced Ferrite and Precipitates of Ti-bearing Steel on the Ductility of Continuous Casting Slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Guoyu; Cheng, Guoguang; Hou, Zibing

    2015-11-01

    In order to investigate the loss of the ductility of Ti-bearing ship plate steel under 1000 °C, where the ductility begins to reduce rapidly, so the hot ductility of Ti-bearing ship plate steel has been obtained using the Gleeble 1500 thermal-mechanical simulator and also the studies about the effect of grain boundary ferrite films and precipitates containing Ti on the ductility has been carried out. The result showed that the TiN particles precipitating at 950 °C with a larger size and smaller volume fraction cannot effectively suppress the occurrence of recrystallization and the ductility still retains at a high level, although R.A. value presents a certain degree of decline compared with 1000 °C. A large number of smaller Ti(C,N) particles precipitate at 900 °C and can induce the formation of a very small amount of fine grain boundary ferrite, which deteriorates the adhesion strength of the grain boundary, so the R.A. value rapidly reduces to less than 50%. When the temperature falls to close Ae3 (827 °C), the amount of the grain boundary ferrite films increase due to the ferrite phase transformation, but the ferrite film thickness becomes more uneven at the same time, which results in the increase of strain concentration and plays a leading role in causing the decrease of ductility, so the R.A. value has been kept less than 40% as the temperature cooling to 800 °C from 850 °C. When the temperature further decreases, the ductility starts to recover due to the increase of average ferrite film thickness to a greater degree which greatly reduces the strain concentration of the grain boundary.

  1. Characteristics of oxide scale formed on Cu-bearing austenitic stainless steel during early stages of high temperature oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swaminathan, Srinivasan, E-mail: swaminathan@kist.re.kr [Metallurgy & Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136 791 (Korea, Republic of); Krishna, Nanda Gopala [Metallurgy & Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Kim, Dong-Ik, E-mail: dongikkim@kist.re.kr [High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136 791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • Initial oxidation characteristics of Cu-bearing austenitic stainless steel at 650 °C were studied. • Strong segregation and oxidation of Mn and Nb were found in the entire oxide scale. • Surface coverage by metallic Cu-rich precipitates increases with exposure time. • Chemical heterogeneity of oxide scale revealed initial oxidation to be non-selective. • Fe-Cr and Mn-Cr mixed oxides were realized along with binary oxides of Fe, Cr and Mn. - Abstract: Oxide scale evolution on Cu-bearing austenitic stainless steel 304H at 650 °C, in ambient air, for exposure times 100, 300, 500 and 1000 h, has been investigated. Surface morphology and chemistry of the oxide scale grown were examined using SEM/EDX and XPS. The oxidation kinetics was determined by measuring the weight change using an electronic balance. At the initial stage, up to 500 h of exposure time, the oxidation rate was rapid due to surface reactions governed primarily by oxygen ingress, and then, dropped to a low rate after prolonged oxidation for 1000 h. The diffusion of reactants through the initially formed oxide scale limits the oxidation rate at longer times, thus, the progress of reaction followed the parabolic kinetics. The formed oxide scale was enriched significantly with segregation and subsequent oxidation of Nb, and finely dispersed metallic Cu particles. Within the time frame of oxidation, the oxide scale was mainly composed of mixed oxides such as FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} and MnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} along with the binary oxides of Fe, Cr and Mn. Moreover, the precipitation fraction of Cu-rich particles on the oxide scale increased markedly with increase of exposure times. The chemical heterogeneity of oxide scale suggests that the oxidation occurred in a non-selective manner.

  2. Cleanliness distribution of high-carbon chromium bearing steel billets and growth behavior of inclusions during solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, C.; Bao, Y.; Lin, L.

    2017-01-01

    Variation of cleanliness and distribution of inclusions in thickness and width direction of highcarbon chromium bearing steel billets has been studied using total oxygen and nitrogen analysis and SEM/EDS, and the growth behavior of inclusions during solidification was studied with the help of solidification model. The region wit h relatively high total oxygen contents in the cross profile of billets is between inner arc side 3/16 and outer arc side 1/4; between left edge side 5/16 and right edge side 5/16. The formation sequence of inclusions is MgO-Al2O3 > TiN > MnS. MnS could wrap MgO-Al2O3 and reduces the damage to steel matrix caused by the latter, but generally could not effectively wrap TiN. Besides, TiN could wrap MgO-Al2O3 before MnS, which would weaken the protective capacity of MnS. Moreover, compared with MgO-Al2O3 inclusions, the sizes of TiN inclusions are generally larger. Thus the control of TiN inclusions should be strengthened. In hickness direction, the maximum size regions of TiN and MnS inclusions are inner arc side 1/3 and outer arc side 1/3; in width direction, the regions are edge side 1/3. During bearing processing, these regions and the regions with high total oxygen content should be avoided. [es

  3. A study of the evolution of rust on Mo–Cu-bearing fire-resistant steel submitted to simulated atmospheric corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Long; Zhang Sixun; Dong Junhua; Ke Wei

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The rusting evolution of a Mo–Cu-bearing fire-resistant steel in a simulated industrial atmosphere was investigated. ► The rusting evolution of the steel is related to the rust composition, structure, and electrochemical characteristics. ► Increased content of α-FeOOH and decreased γ-FeOOH and Fe 3 O 4 indicate the enhanced resistance of the rust. ► Mo and Cu are involved in the formation of molybdate and Cu(I)-bearing compounds in the rust. - Abstract: The corrosion evolution of a Mo–Cu-bearing fire-resistant steel in a simulated industrial atmosphere was investigated by corrosion weight gain, XRD, EPMA, XPS, and polarization curves. The results indicate that the corrosion kinetics is closely related to the rust composition and electrochemical properties. As the corrosion proceeds, the relative content of γ-FeOOH and Fe 3 O 4 decreases and α-FeOOH increases, and the rust layer becomes compact and adherent to steel substrate. Molybdenum and copper enrich in the inner rust layer, especially at the bottom of the corrosion nest, forming non-soluble molybdate and Cu(I)-bearing compounds responsible for enhanced corrosion resistance of the rust layer.

  4. Use of Homogeneously-Sized Carbon Steel Ball Bearings to Study Microbially-Influenced Corrosion in Oil Field Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voordouw, Gerrit; Menon, Priyesh; Pinnock, Tijan; Sharma, Mohita; Shen, Yin; Venturelli, Amanda; Voordouw, Johanna; Sexton, Aoife

    2016-01-01

    Microbially-influenced corrosion (MIC) contributes to the general corrosion rate (CR), which is typically measured with carbon steel coupons. Here we explore the use of carbon steel ball bearings, referred to as beads (55.0 ± 0.3 mg; Ø = 0.238 cm), for determining CRs. CRs for samples from an oil field in Oceania incubated with beads were determined by the weight loss method, using acid treatment to remove corrosion products. The release of ferrous and ferric iron was also measured and CRs based on weight loss and iron determination were in good agreement. Average CRs were 0.022 mm/yr for eight produced waters with high numbers (10(5)/ml) of acid-producing bacteria (APB), but no sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Average CRs were 0.009 mm/yr for five central processing facility (CPF) waters, which had no APB or SRB due to weekly biocide treatment and 0.036 mm/yr for 2 CPF tank bottom sludges, which had high numbers of APB (10(6)/ml) and SRB (10(8)/ml). Hence, corrosion monitoring with carbon steel beads indicated that biocide treatment of CPF waters decreased the CR, except where biocide did not penetrate. The CR for incubations with 20 ml of a produced water decreased from 0.061 to 0.007 mm/yr when increasing the number of beads from 1 to 40. CRs determined with beads were higher than those with coupons, possibly also due to a higher weight of iron per unit volume used in incubations with coupons. Use of 1 ml syringe columns, containing carbon steel beads, and injected with 10 ml/day of SRB-containing medium for 256 days gave a CR of 0.11 mm/yr under flow conditions. The standard deviation of the distribution of residual bead weights, a measure for the unevenness of the corrosion, increased with increasing CR. The most heavily corroded beads showed significant pitting. Hence the use of uniformly sized carbon steel beads offers new opportunities for screening and monitoring of corrosion including determination of the distribution of corrosion rates, which allows

  5. Assessment of Bearing Capacity and Stiffness in New Steel Sets Used for Roadway Support in Coal Mines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renshu Yang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available There is high demand for roadway support in coal mines for the swelling soft rocks. As high strength steel sets can be taken as an effective alternative to control large deformation in this type of rocks, based on an original set, three new sets, including a floor beam set, a roof and floor beams set, and a roof and floor beams and braces set, are proposed in this research. In order to examine the strengths of new sets, four scaled sets of one original set, and three new sets, have been manufactured and tested in loading experiments. Results indicated that three new sets all exhibited higher strength than the original set. In experiments, the roof beam in set plays a significant effect on top arch strengthening, while the floor beam plays significant effect on bottom arch strengthening. The maximum bearing capacity and stiffness of the top arch with roof beam are increased to 1.63 times and 3.06 times of those in the original set, and the maximum bearing capacity and stiffness of the bottom arch with floor beam are increased to 1.44 times and 3.55 times of those in original set. Based on the roof and floor beams, two more braces in the bottom arch also play a significant effect in bottom corners strengthening, but extra braces play little role in top arch strengthening. These new sets provide more choices for roadway support in swelling soft rocks.

  6. Effect of M{sub 3}C on the precipitation behavior of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} phase during early stage of tempering in T91 ferritic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chenxi; Liu, Yongchang; Zhang, Dantian; Ning, Baoqun; Yan, Zesheng [School of Material Science and Engineering, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Advanced Jointing Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China)

    2011-12-15

    Tempered martensitic structure is the service condition of T91 ferritic steel after adopting the austenitizing followed by tempering. Needle-like M{sub 3}C particles are precipitated during air cooling after austenization, while the precipitation of M{sub 3}C is suppressed during the water cooling. The effect of existence of M{sub 3}C on the precipitation behaviors of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} during the early stage of tempering, as nucleation site, number density and size distribution, was investigated by means of TEM observation. The TEM results indicate that, upon the same tempering time, the size of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} is smaller and its number density is higher in the sample pre-existing M{sub 3}C than in the sample without M{sub 3}C. This can be explained that existence of M{sub 3}C results in more M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitates forming inside of grain, where a relatively low self-diffusion coefficient of alloy element leads to M{sub 23}C{sub 6} hardly coarsening. However, with the prolongation of tempering time, this effect becomes weaken. Microhardness results indicate that the existence of M{sub 3}C phase results in the increase of hardness after tempering due to the precipitation of finer and denser M{sub 23}C{sub 6} particles. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Testing of unlubricated water-immersed carbon-steel ball bearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wensel, R.G.

    1977-07-01

    Wear data for untreated, chemically oxidized, autoclave oxidized, and hard chromium plated ball bearings operating in water at different radial loads, speeds and water temperatures are presented. Results were highly variable, even for replicated tests, making wear results difficult to interpret. Within the ranges used in these tests, load, speed and water temperature had no consistent effect on wear rate or operating torque. One treatment, the Du-Lite process, resulted in a significant reduction in wear rate. All oxide-forming treatments studied, resulted in improved corrosion resistance. (author)

  8. Quasicrystalline and crystalline precipitation during isothermal tempering in a 12Cr-9Ni-4Mo maraging stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, P.; Stigenberg, A.H.; Nilsson, J.O.

    1995-01-01

    A thorough microstructural investigation has been performed on a high strength maraging steel of the type 12%Cr-9%Ni-4%Mo-2%Cu-1%Ti. The major precipitate formed during isothermal aging at 475 C is a quasicrystalline phase possessing icosahedral symmetry termed R'-phase with a typical chemical composition of 48%Mo-33%Fe-13%Cr-2%Ni-4%Si. At 550 C the major precipitate is trigonal R-phase with a typical composition of 45%Mo-31%Fe-18%Cr-4%Ni-2%Si. At 550 C also Laves phase with a composition of 48%Mo-35%Fe-13%Cr-2%Ni-2%Si could be observed. At both 475 and 550 C an ordered phase termed L-phase precipitated. This minority phase has an ordered face centered cubic (f.c.c.) structure of type L1 0 . Its composition is typically 9%Fe-4%Cr-52%Ni-15%Mo.-16%Ti-4%Al. R'-phase formed at 475 C transformed to R-phase and Laves phase during aging at 550 C. In an analogous manner, R-phase and Laves phase formed at 550 C transformed to R'-phase during subsequent aging at 475 C. This transformation was rationalized by a strong similarity in crystal structure between quasicrystalline R'-phase of icosahedral symmetry and Frank-Kasper phases such as R-phase and Laves phase

  9. Determination of bearing steel heat treatment with the use of the acoustic emission method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Z. Wozniak

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A study on the control of an extremely important stage of the martensitic-bainitic austempering and obtaining the M-B structure in the 100CrMnSi6-4 steel with the use of the acoustic emission (AE has been undertaken. In order to enrich retained austenite with carbon, steels are austempered at appropriately low temperatures. A martensitic transformation, resulting from diffusionless and displacive transformation is associated with significant AE signs. The strain energy produced during growth due to the shape change is reduced by plastic deformation. Predominant source of (AE is the movement of dislocations in order to relieve internal stresses.The heat treatment was performed in a modern, purpose-constructed device which simultaneously records acoustic emission effects. The signals were recorded with the use of an AE analyzer 20–800 kHz, and they were received by means of a broadband piezoelectric transducer with the use of a specialist card with a sampling frequency of 1200 kHz. The results regarding a correlation of austempering temperature and the maximum number of AE events and dilatometric results have been presented. This parameter can be used for precise Ms temperature estimation. Basing on microstructural investigations, it has been found that previously formed martensite with midrib morphology also accelerates the bainitic transformation.

  10. Determination of bearing steel heat treatment with the use of the acoustic emission method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.Z. Woźniak

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A study on the control of an extremely important stage of the martensitic-bainitic austempering and obtaining the M-B structure in the 100CrMnSi6-4 steel with the use of the acoustic emission (AE has been undertaken. In order to enrich retained austenite with carbon,steels are austempered at appropriately low temperatures. A martensitic transformation, resulting from diffusionless and displacive transformation is associated with significant AE signs. The strain energy produced during growth due to the shape change is reduced by plastic deformation. Predominant source of (AE is the movement of dislocations in order to relieve internal stresses.The heat treatment was performed in a modern, purpose-constructed device which simultaneously records acoustic emission effects. The signals were recorded with the use of an AE analyzer 20–800 kHz, and they were received by means of a broadband piezoelectric transducer with the use of a specialist card with a sampling frequency of 1200 kHz. The results regarding a correlation of austempering temperature and the maximum number of AE events and dilatometric results have been presented. This parameter can be used for precise Ms temperatureestimation. Basing on microstructural investigations, it has been found that previously formed martensite with midrib morphology alsoaccelerates the bainitic transformation.

  11. Effects of the carbides precipitation on the hydrogen diffusion in a low carbon steel quenched and tempered; Efectos de la precipitacion de carburos sobre la difusion del hidrogeno en un acero de bajo carbono templado y revenido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luppo, M I; Ovejero Garcia, J [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, San Martin (Argentina). Unidad de Actividad Materiales

    1997-12-31

    Hydrogen diffusivity through steels at room temperature has been known to deviate considerably from the expected Arrhenius relation. This deviation is due to the attractive interactions between dissolved hydrogen and trapping sites (imperfections in the steel lattice). In a previous work it was shown that the apparent diffusion coefficients attain a minimum value in a fresh martensite and diffusivity increases in the same material tempered at 453 k during six hours. In order to explain this difference, the variation of hydrogen trapping sites with the tempering time, at the mentioned temperature, was studied by means of hydrogen permeation tests. Carbides precipitation was followed by means of the extraction replica technique using transmission electron microscopy. The hydrogen diffusivity obtained by the hydrogen permeation tests attained a minimum value in the quenched specimens and increased with increasing tempering time up to reach a constant value between three and six hours. This change in the hydrogen diffusivity was attributed to the trapping sites decrease promoted by carbides precipitation and their precipitation kinetics was described by an Avrami equation. (author). 4 refs., 4 figs.

  12. A new corrosion resistant, martensitic stainless steel for improved performance in miniature bearings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomasello, C.M.; Maloney, J.L.; Materkowski, J.P. [Latrobe Steel Co., Latrobe, PA (United States); Ward, P.C. [MPB Corp., Keene, NH (United States)

    1998-12-31

    A new alloy, 440 N-DUR{trademark} has been developed which will provide the corrosion resistance of 440C with improved carbide size and distribution for noiseless miniature precision bearing operation. The alloy may be through hardened to achieve a minimum hardness of 60 HRC. Its nominal composition is 0.65 wt.% C, 14.5 wt.% Cr, 0.30 wt.% Si, 0.45 wt.% Mn and 0.10 wt.% N{sub 2}. The development of the alloy is a result of a factorial experimental design including 17 alloy variants. The optimum alloy provides a combination of the best carbide structure, corrosion resistance and heat treat response. The addition of nitrogen combined with this carbon and chromium content improves the alloy`s hardenability and corrosion resistance. The alloy successfully withstands copper sulfate exposure and is currently being tested in several bearing applications. It also has great potential to outperform 440C and other corrosion resistant alloys for other ambient and low temperature applications because of its improved microstructure and heat treat response.

  13. Analytical and experimental investigation of microstructural alterations in bearing steel in rolling contact fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobasher Moghaddam, Sina

    Rolling Contact Fatigue (RCF) is one the most common failure modes in bearings. RCF is usually associated with particular microstructural alterations. Such alterations (i.e. white etching cracks, butterflies, etc.) which lead to RCF failure are known to be among the most concerning matters to bearing industry. In the current work, an analytical as well as experimental approaches are used to investigate "butterfly wing" formation, crack initiation and propagation from inclusions. A new damage evolution equation coupled with a FE model is employed to account for the effect of mean stresses and alternating stresses simultaneously to investigate butterfly formation. The proposed damage evolution law matches experimentally observed butterfly orientation, shape, and size successfully. The model is used to obtain S-N results for butterfly formation at different Hertzian load levels. The results corroborate well with the experimental data available in the open literature. The model is used to predict debonding at the inclusion/matrix interface and the most vulnerable regions for crack initiation on butterfly/matrix interface. A new variable called butterfly formation index (BFI) is introduced to manifest the dependence of wing formation on depth. The value of critical damage inside the butterfly wings was obtained experimentally and was then used to simulate damage evolution. Voronoi tessellation was used to develop the FEM domains to capture the effect of microstructural randomness on butterfly wing formation, crack initiation and propagation. Then, the effects of different inclusion characteristics such as size, depth, and stiffness on RCF life are studied. The results show that stiffness of an inclusion and its location has a significant effect on the RCF life: stiffer inclusions and inclusions located at the depth of maximum shear stress reversal are more detrimental to the RCF life. Stress concentrations are not significantly affected by inclusion size for the cases

  14. Temper Tantrums

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nine Steps to More Effective Parenting How Can Parents Discipline Without Spanking? Delayed Speech or Language Development Talking to Your Child's Preschool Teacher Your Child's Habits Separation Anxiety Breath-Holding Spells Train Your Temper View ...

  15. Investigating the process of white etching crack initiation in bearing steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gould, Benjamin; Greco, Aaron

    2016-04-01

    White etching cracks (WECs) have been identified as a dominant mode of premature failure within wind turbine gearbox bearings. Though WECs have been reported in the field for over a decade, the conditions leading to WECs, and the process by which this failure culminates, are both highly debated. In previously published work, the generation of WECs on a benchtop scale was linked to sliding at the surface of the test sample, it was also postulated that the generation of WECs was dependent on the cumulative energy that had been applied to the sample over the entirety of the test. In this paper, a three ring on roller bench top test rig is used to systematically alter the cumulative energy that a sample experiences through changes in normal load, sliding, and run time, in an attempt to correlate cumulative energy with the formation of WECs. It was determined that, in the current test setup, the presence of WECs can be predicted by this energy criterion. The authors then used this information to study the process by which WECs initiate. Lastly, it was found that, under the current testing conditions, the formation of a dark etching microstructure precedes the formation of a crack, and a crack precedes the formation of white etching microstructure.

  16. Influence of processing medium on frictional wear properties of ball bearing steel prepared by laser surface melting coupled with bionic principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Hong; Wang Chengtao; Guo Qingchun; Yu Jiaxiang; Wang Mingxing; Liao Xunlong; Zhao Yu; Ren Luquan

    2010-01-01

    Coupling with bionic principles, an attempt to improve the wear resistance of ball bearing steel (GCr15) with biomimetic units on the surface was made using a pulsed Nd: YAG laser. Air and water film was employed as processing medium, respectively. The microstructures of biomimeitc units were examined by scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction was used to describe the microstructure and identify the phases as functions of different mediums as well as water film with different thicknesses. The results indicated that the microstructure zones in the biomimetic specimens processed with water film were more refined and had better wear resistance increased by 55.8% in comparison with that processed in air; a significant improvement in microhardness was achieved by laser surface melting. The application of water film provided considerable microstructural changes and much more regular grain shape in biomimetic units, which played a key role in improving the wear resistance of ball bearing steel.

  17. Design of Online Spheroidization Process for 1.0C-1.5Cr Bearing Steel and Microstructure Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen-Xing; Li, Chang-Sheng; Ren, Jin-Yi; Li, Bin-Zhou; Suh, Dong-Woo

    2018-02-01

    Using thermo-mechanical control process, the online spheroidization annealing process of 1.0C-1.5Cr bearing steel was designed. Apart from intercritical online spheroidization (IS), a novel subcritical online spheroidization (SS) process was proposed, which is characterized by water-cooling to around 773 K (500 °C) after the final rolling pass, and then directly reheating to 973 K (700 °C) for isothermal holding. Compared with the results from the traditional offline spheroidization (TS) process, the size of spheroidized carbides is similar in both the TS and IS processes, whereas it is much smaller in the SS process. After spheroidization annealing, microstructure evolution during austenitization and quenching treatment was examined. It is shown that the refining of spheroidized carbides accelerates the dissolution of carbides during the austenitizing process, and decreases the size of undissolved carbides. In addition, the SS process can obtain finer prior austenite grain after quenching, which contributes to the enhancement of final hardness.

  18. Investigations on femtosecond laser modified micro-textured surface with anti-friction property on bearing steel GCr15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lijun; Ding, Ye; Cheng, Bai; He, Jiangtao; Wang, Genwang; Wang, Yang

    2018-03-01

    This work puts forward femtosecond laser modification of micro-textured surface on bearing steel GCr15 in order to reduce frictional wear and enhance load capacity during its application. Multi pulses femtosecond laser ablation experiments are established for the confirmation of laser spot radius as well as single pulse threshold fluence and pulse incubation coefficient of bulk material. Analytical models are set up in combination with hydrodynamics lubrication theory. Corresponding simulations are carried out on to explore influences of surface and cross sectional morphology of textures on hydrodynamics lubrication effect based on Navier-Stokes (N-S) equation. Technological experiments focus on the impacts of femtosecond laser machining variables, like scanning times, scanning velocity, pulse frequency and scanning gap on morphology of grooves as well as realization of optimized textures proposed by simulations, mechanisms of which are analyzed from multiple perspectives. Results of unidirectional rotating friction tests suggest that spherical texture with depth-to-width ratio of 0.2 can significantly improve tribological properties at low loading and velocity condition comparing with un-textured and other textured surfaces, which also verifies the accuracy of simulations and feasibility of femtosecond laser in modification of micro-textured surface.

  19. Atomic scale characterization of white etching area and its adjacent matrix in a martensitic 100Cr6 bearing steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y.J., E-mail: y.li@mpie.de [Max-Planck Institut für Eisenforschung, Max-Planck-Str. 1, Düsseldorf D-40237 (Germany); Center for Interface-Dominated High Performance Materials, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Bochum 44780 (Germany); Herbig, M.; Goto, S. [Max-Planck Institut für Eisenforschung, Max-Planck-Str. 1, Düsseldorf D-40237 (Germany); Raabe, D., E-mail: d.raabe@mpie.de [Max-Planck Institut für Eisenforschung, Max-Planck-Str. 1, Düsseldorf D-40237 (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    Atom probe tomography was employed to characterize the microstructure and C distribution in the white etching area (WEA) of a martensitic 100Cr6 bearing steel subjected to rolling contact fatigue. Different from its surrounding matrix where a plate-like martensitic structure prevails, the WEA exhibits equiaxed grains with a uniform grain size of about 10 nm. Significant C grain boundary enrichment (>7.5at.%) and an overall higher C concentration than the nominal value are observed in the WEA. These results suggest that the formation of WEA results from severe local plastic deformation that causes dissolution of carbides and the redistribution of C. - Highlights: •APT has been applied to characterize the microstructure of white etching area (WEA). •Quantitative analyses of C distribution indicate that carbides are dissolved on the WEA. •WEA contains equiaxed grains with a uniform grain size of 10 nm. •C segregation at grain boundaries stabilizes the nanosized grain structure. •Formation of WEA is explained by severe local plastic deformation introduced by cyclic contact loading.

  20. Tribological Response of Heat Treated AISI 52100 Steels Against Steel and Ceramic Counterparts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Türedi E.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available AISI 52100 bearing steels are commonly used in applications requiring high hardness and abrasion resistance. The bearing steels are working under dynamic loads in service conditions and their toughness properties become important. In order to provide the desired mechanical properties, various heat treatments (austenizing, quenching and tempering are usually applied. In this study, AISI 52100 bearing steel samples were austenized at 900°C for ½ h and water quenched to room temperature. Then tempering was carried out at 795°C, 400°C and 200°C for ½ h. In order to investigate the effect of heat treatment conditions on wear behavior, dry friction tests were performed according to ASTM G99-05 Standard with a ‘ball-on-disk’ type tribometer. The samples were tested against steel and ceramic counterparts using the parameters of 100 m distance and 30 N load and 0.063 m/s rotational speed. After wear test, the surface characterization was carried out using microscopy. Wear loss values were calculated using a novel optical method on both flat and counterpart specimens.

  1. Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorev, N.N.; Astafiev, A.A.; Loboda, A.S.; Savukov, V.P.; Runov, A.E.; Belov, V.A.; Sobolev, J.V.; Sobolev, V.V.; Pavlov, N.M.; Paton, B.E.

    1977-01-01

    Steels also containing Al, N and arsenic, are suitable for the construction of large components for high-power nuclear reactors due to their good mechanical properties such as good through-hardening, sufficiently low brittleness conversion temperature and slight displacement of the latter with neutron irradiation. Defined steels and their properties are described. (IHOE) [de

  2. Changes of structure and properties of cast steels GX10NiCrNb32-20 and GX10NiCrNb3-25 after long-term tempering at 600-1000 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gommans, R.; Schrijen, H.; Sundermann, J.; Steinkusch, W.; Hering, W.

    2001-01-01

    Low-alloy cast steels of type GX 10NiCrNb 32.20 are commonly used for the outlet section of reformer and cracker tubes for the temperature range of 600-1000 C. There was a lack of data on the ductility of the 25%Cr alloyed cast steel GX10NiCrNb 35.25 at room temperature after tempering, which was investigated in a joint project of Pose-Marre and DSM. Mechanical tests were carried out at room temperature and at elevated temperatures. Apart from light microscopy, also SEM/EDX, SAM and TEM analyses were carried out. The 25% alloy has lower ductility than the 20% alloy, owing primarily to the more pronounced development of M 6 C carbide from primary NbC carbide, which takes up Ni and Si during tempering. The microstructure and composition of the M 6 C carbide wre not fully clarified. Information is presented on the potential application of low-carbon materials of the type GX10NiCrNb35.25 [de

  3. Boron-bearing Influences of 9Cr-0.5Mo-2W-V-Nb Ferritic/Martensitic Steels for a SFR Fuel Cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Jong-Hyuk; Han, Chang-Hee; Kim, Woo-Gon; Kim, Sung-Ho; Lee, Chan-Bock

    2008-01-01

    modification, the influences of B-bearing 9Cr-0.5Mo-2W-V-Nb ferritic/ martensitic steels on the microstructural and mechanical properties were systematically investigated in order to evaluate the applicable validity as a cladding material for the Gen-IV SFR fuel

  4. A FIB/TEM study of butterfly crack formation and white etching area (WEA) microstructural changes under rolling contact fatigue in 100Cr6 bearing steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, M.-H.; Walker, J.C.; Ma, C.; Wang, L.; Wood, R.J.K.

    2013-01-01

    Butterflies are microscopic damage features forming at subsurface material imperfections induced during rolling contact fatigue (RCF) in rolling element bearings. Butterflies can lead to degradation of the load bearing capacity of the material by their associated cracks causing premature spalling failures. Recently, butterfly formation has been cited to be related to a premature failure mode in wind turbine gearbox bearings; white structure flaking (WSF). Butterflies consist of cracks with surrounding microstructural change called ‘white etching area’ (WEA) forming wings that revolve around their initiators. The formation mechanisms of butterflies in bearing steels have been studied over the last 50 years, but are still not fully understood. This paper presents a detailed microstructural analysis of a butterfly that has initiated from a void in standard 100Cr6 bearing steel under rolling contact fatigue on a laboratory two-roller test rig under transient operating conditions. Analysis was conducted using focused ion beam (FIB) tomography, 3D reconstruction and transmission electron microscopy (STEM/TEM) methods. FIB tomography revealed an extensive presence of voids/cavities immediately adjacent to the main crack on the non-WEA side and at the crack tip. This provides evidence for a void/cavity coalescence mechanism for the butterfly cracks formation. Spherical M 3 C carbide deformation and dissolution as part of the microstructural change in WEA were observed in both FIB and STEM/TEM analyses, where TEM analyses also revealed the formation of superfine nano-grains (3–15 nm diameter) intersecting a dissolving spherical M 3 C carbide. This is evidence of the early formation of nano-grains associated with the WEA formation mechanism

  5. A FIB/TEM study of butterfly crack formation and white etching area (WEA) microstructural changes under rolling contact fatigue in 100Cr6 bearing steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, M.-H., E-mail: martin.evans@soton.ac.uk [National Centre for Advanced Tribology at Southampton (nCATS), University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Walker, J.C.; Ma, C.; Wang, L.; Wood, R.J.K. [National Centre for Advanced Tribology at Southampton (nCATS), University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-15

    Butterflies are microscopic damage features forming at subsurface material imperfections induced during rolling contact fatigue (RCF) in rolling element bearings. Butterflies can lead to degradation of the load bearing capacity of the material by their associated cracks causing premature spalling failures. Recently, butterfly formation has been cited to be related to a premature failure mode in wind turbine gearbox bearings; white structure flaking (WSF). Butterflies consist of cracks with surrounding microstructural change called ‘white etching area’ (WEA) forming wings that revolve around their initiators. The formation mechanisms of butterflies in bearing steels have been studied over the last 50 years, but are still not fully understood. This paper presents a detailed microstructural analysis of a butterfly that has initiated from a void in standard 100Cr6 bearing steel under rolling contact fatigue on a laboratory two-roller test rig under transient operating conditions. Analysis was conducted using focused ion beam (FIB) tomography, 3D reconstruction and transmission electron microscopy (STEM/TEM) methods. FIB tomography revealed an extensive presence of voids/cavities immediately adjacent to the main crack on the non-WEA side and at the crack tip. This provides evidence for a void/cavity coalescence mechanism for the butterfly cracks formation. Spherical M{sub 3}C carbide deformation and dissolution as part of the microstructural change in WEA were observed in both FIB and STEM/TEM analyses, where TEM analyses also revealed the formation of superfine nano-grains (3–15 nm diameter) intersecting a dissolving spherical M{sub 3}C carbide. This is evidence of the early formation of nano-grains associated with the WEA formation mechanism.

  6. Laser-Hardened and Ultrasonically Peened Surface Layers on Tool Steel AISI D2: Correlation of the Bearing Curves' Parameters, Hardness and Wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesyk, D. A.; Martinez, S.; Mordyuk, B. N.; Dzhemelinskyi, V. V.; Lamikiz, A.; Prokopenko, G. I.; Grinkevych, K. E.; Tkachenko, I. V.

    2018-02-01

    This paper is focused on the effects of the separately applied laser heat treatment (LHT) and ultrasonic impact treatment (UIT) and the combined LHT + UIT process on the wear and friction behaviors of the hardened surface layers of the tool steel AISI D2. In comparison with the initial state, wear losses of the treated specimens after long-term wear tests were decreased by 68, 41, and 77% at the LHT, UIT, and combined LHT + UIT processes, respectively. The Abbott-Firestone bearing curves were used to analyze the material ratio and functional characterization (bearing capacity and oil capacitance) of the studied surface specimens. The wear losses registered after short (15 min) tests correlate well with the changes in experimental surface roughness Ra, and the predictive Rpk, and bearing capacity B C parameters, respectively, evaluated using the Abbott-Firestone curves and Kragelsky-Kombalov formula. The wear losses after the long-term (45 min) tests are in good correlation with the reciprocal surface microhardness HV and with the W L and W P wear parameters, respectively, estimated using Archard-Rabinowicz formula and complex roughness-and-strength approach. The observed HV increase is supported by nanotwins (LHT), by dense dislocation nets (UIT), and by dislocation cells/nanograins fixed with fine carbides (LHT + UIT) formed in the surface layers of the steel.

  7. The influence of silicon in tempered martensite: Understanding the microstructure–properties relationship in 0.5–0.6 wt.% C steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, B.; Boucard, E.; Sourmail, T.; San Martín, D.; Gey, N.; Rivera-Díaz-del-Castillo, P.E.J.

    2014-01-01

    The strengthening contributions in medium-carbon tempered martensite are unveiled in this work. By using transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction, the different microstructural features have been captured; these include precipitation, grain boundary, solid solution and dislocation forest strengthening. The evolution of these features was observed as a function of tempering temperature and silicon content. In trying to elucidate the nature of grain boundary strengthening, three approaches are presented, including a plasticity model based on irreversible thermodynamics, misorientation angle characterization by electron backscatter diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy analysis of failed regions. Based on the findings, it is concluded that silicon inhibits martensite recovery, and that at low tempering temperatures, lath boundaries also appear to contribute to strengthening

  8. Contributions of Cu-rich clusters, dislocation loops and nanovoids to the irradiation-induced hardening of Cu-bearing low-Ni reactor pressure vessel steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergner, F.; Gillemot, F.; Hernández-Mayoral, M.; Serrano, M.; Török, G.; Ulbricht, A.; Altstadt, E.

    2015-06-01

    Dislocation loops, nanovoids and Cu-rich clusters (CRPs) are known to represent obstacles for dislocation glide in neutron-irradiated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels, but a consistent experimental determination of the respective obstacle strengths is still missing. A set of Cu-bearing low-Ni RPV steels and model alloys was characterized by means of SANS and TEM in order to specify mean size and number density of loops, nanovoids and CRPs. The obstacle strengths of these families were estimated by solving an over-determined set of linear equations. We have found that nanovoids are stronger than loops and loops are stronger than CRPs. Nevertheless, CRPs contribute most to irradiation hardening because of their high number density. Nanovoids were only observed for neutron fluences beyond typical end-of-life conditions of RPVs. The estimates of the obstacle strength are critically compared with reported literature data.

  9. Effect of long term thermal ageing on the mechanical properties of ASTM A533B and A508 steels in the quenched and tempered and simulated heat affected zone conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Druce, S.G.; Gage, G.; Jordan, G.

    1985-04-01

    Manganese-molybdenum-nickel steels are used commonly in the fabrication of critical components in the PWR primary circuit operating at temperatures up to 345 C for periods up to several hundred thousand hours. Demonstration of structural integrity throughout service life requires quantification of the effects of thermal ageing on mechanical properties. Thermal ageing in the temperature range 300 to 550 C for durations up to 2000 h was studied in quenched and tempered A533B plate and simulated heat-affected-zone (HAZ) microstructures in A533B and A508 materials. A combination of tensile, hardness and Charpy impact tests were used to assess changes in rheological and toughness related properties. Quantitative fractography and Auger spectroscopy were used to characterize associated changes in fracture mode and grain boundary composition.

  10. The preparation of polytrifluorochloroethylene (PCTFE) micro-particles and application on treating bearing steel surfaces to improve the lubrication effect for copper-graphite (Cu/C)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hailin; Zhang, Pengpeng; Ren, Shanshan; Guo, Junde; Li, Xing; Dong, Guangneng

    2018-01-01

    Contact mechanical seal is a normal technology applied on middle axis of liquid rocket turbo pump, and the kinetic and static seal rings contact low temperature rocket propellant. Copper-graphite (Cu/C) composite as an excellent self-lubrication material was widely used in aerospace industry, this study took Cu/C as ball and bearing steel as disk to investigate the tribology properties, and distilled water were used to simulate the lox tribology performances. This study prepared polytrifluorochloroethylene (PCTFE) micro-particles which were coated on the oxide surfaces of bearing steel disk at temperature of 150 °C. The tribology results showed that the oxide surfaces treated with micro PCTFE particles have lower fiction coefficient and lower wear rate than original disk in water, and the wear morphology revealed that the treated surfaces obviously had less Cu/C composite transfer film than original disk. Meanwhile SEM, EDS, XRD, XPS and light microscope etc revealed that PCTFE micro-particles could associate with the oxide surfaces and caused higher water contact angle, due to the properties of the fluorine-containing composite may cause the good lubrication effect in water. Thus this technology shows great potential to enhance tribological performances for aerospace industry on a large scale.

  11. Effect of Web Holes and Bearing Stiffeners on Flexural-Shear Interaction Strength of Steel Cold-Formed C-Channel Sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman Faridmehr

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper presents an investigation on interaction equation between the required flexural strength, M, and the required shear strength, V, of cold-formed C-channels with web holes and bearing stiffeners. The primarily shear condition test was employed to study total 8 back to back lipped C channel sections of 95 and 100 mm depth when bearing stiffeners and circular holes were placed at center and both ends of specimens. The interaction equation were evaluated via Direct Strength Method, DSM, in accordance with the American Iron and Steel Institute for the design of cold-formed steel structural members, AISI 2007. A nonlinear finite element model was developed and verified against the test results in terms of failure buckling modes. It was concluded that the M-V interaction equation for specimens with web stiffeners was conservative where these specimens experienced plastic failure mode rather than local (Msl or distortional (Msd buckling mode. Moreover, the results indicated that proposed M-V interaction equation calculated by local buckling strength (Msl adequately predicted the behavior of specimens with circular web holes.

  12. The use of niobium bearing ferro-alloys in the manufacture of structural steels in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyakishev, N.P.

    1984-01-01

    Information is presented concerning the use of niobium as a microalloying element in constructional steels of various types. Niobium causes substantial refinement of grain size and inhibits the process of static recrystallization. It is, therefore, widely used in high strength low-alloy steels subjected to controlled-rolling or thermo-mechanical treatment. The largest strength increases are observed with a niobium content of up to 0.05 percent at which point the impact toughness diminishes slightly. Increased amounts of niobium favorably affect both the impact toughness and the transition temperature. The effectiveness of niobium usage in existing types of construction steels, including HSLA steels intended for the manufacture of weldable large-diameter linepipe for use in Arctic environments is described

  13. Tempered fractional calculus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabzikar, Farzad, E-mail: sabzika2@stt.msu.edu [Department of Statistics and Probability, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823 (United States); Meerschaert, Mark M., E-mail: mcubed@stt.msu.edu [Department of Statistics and Probability, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823 (United States); Chen, Jinghua, E-mail: cjhdzdz@163.com [School of Sciences, Jimei University, Xiamen, Fujian, 361021 (China)

    2015-07-15

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered fractional difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series.

  14. Tempered fractional calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabzikar, Farzad; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Chen, Jinghua

    2015-07-01

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered fractional difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series.

  15. Tempered fractional calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabzikar, Farzad; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Chen, Jinghua

    2015-01-01

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered fractional difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series

  16. Microstructure and Texture Evolution in Temper Rolled Fe-Si Steels with New System Nano-Inhibitors Under the Dynamic Annealing Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kováč F.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This work investigates the microstructure and texture evolution in grain-oriented electrotechnical steel with a new inhibition system based on vanadium carbides nano-particles. The novel approach for the preparation of this steel with appropriate final magnetic properties combines not only nanoinhibitors based on the vanadium carbides precipitations but also includes straininduced grain growth mechanism in combination with dynamic continuous annealing during the secondary recrystallization. The experimental grain-oriented steel with proposed new chemical composition was prepared in laboratory conditions. The texture analysis has shown that suggested procedure led the formation of sufficiently strong {110} Goss texture during the short time period of a final annealing process, which is comparable to that obtained in the conventionally treated grain-oriented steels.

  17. Formation Mechanism of CaS-Bearing Inclusions and the Rolling Deformation in Al-Killed, Low-Alloy Steel with Ca Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guang; Jiang, Zhouhua; Li, Yang

    2016-08-01

    The existing form of CaS inclusion in Ca-treated, Al-killed steel during secondary refining process was investigated with scanning electron microscopy and an energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS). The results of 12 heats industrial tests showed that CaS has two kinds of precipitation forms. One form takes place by the direct reaction of Ca and S, and the other takes place by the reaction of CaO in calcium aluminates with dissolved Al and S in liquid steel. Thermodynamic research for different precipitation modes of CaS under different temperature was carried out. In particular, CaO-Al2O3-CaS isothermal section diagrams and component activities of calcium aluminates were calculated by the thermodynamic software FactSage. By thermodynamic calculation, a precipitation-area diagram of oxide-sulfide duplex inclusion was established by fixing the sulfur content. The quantity of CaS, which was precipitated in a reaction between [Al], [S] and (CaO), can be calculated and predicted based on the precipitation-area diagram of oxide-sulfide duplex inclusion. Electron probe microanalysis and EDS were used for observing rolling deformation of different types of CaS-bearing inclusions during the rolling process. Low modification of calcium aluminates wrapped by CaS has different degrees of harm to steel in the rolling process. A thick CaS layer can prevent some fragile calcium aluminates from being crushed during the rolling process. Some oxide-sulfide duplex inclusion contains little CaS performed better deformation during the rolling process, but when CaS in oxide-sulfide duplex inclusion becomes more, it will cause the whole inclusion to lose plastic yielding ability. The plastic deformation region of CaS-bearing inclusion in a CaO-Al2O3-CaS isothermal section diagram is confirmed.

  18. Study on the Effect of Secondary Banded Structure on the Fatigue Property of Non-Quenched and Tempered Micro Alloyed Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajie, Cheng; Qingliang, Liao; Yue, Zhang

    Due to composition segregation and cooling speed, streamline or banded structure were often obtained in the thermal forming parts along the direction of parts forming. Generally speaking, banded structure doesn't decrease the longitudinal mechanical properties, so the secondary banded structure can't get enough attention. The effect of secondary banded structure on the fatigue properties of micro alloyed DG20Mn and 35CrMo steel was investigated using the axial tensile fatigue test of stress ratio of 0.1. The result shows that secondary banded structure was obtained in the center of the steel parts, because of the composition segregation and the lower cooling rate in center part of steel. Secondary banded structure has no significant effect on axial tensile properties of both DG20Mn and 35CrMo, but decreases the axial tensile fatigue performance of DG20Mn steel. This study suggests that under the high cyclic tensile stress, multi-source damage cracks in steel initiated by large strain of pearlite of secondary banded structure, which is larger than damage strain, is the major factor of the decrease of fatigue life of steel.

  19. Effect of Boron on the Strength and Toughness of Direct-Quenched Low-Carbon Niobium Bearing Ultra-High-Strength Martensitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannula, Jaakko; Kömi, Jukka; Porter, David A.; Somani, Mahesh C.; Kaijalainen, Antti; Suikkanen, Pasi; Yang, Jer-Ren; Tsai, Shao-Pu

    2017-11-01

    The effect of boron on the microstructures and mechanical properties of laboratory-control-rolled and direct-quenched 6-mm-thick steels containing 0.08 wt pct C and 0.02 wt pct Nb were studied. The boron contents were 24 ppm and a residual amount of 4 ppm. Two different finish rolling temperatures (FRTs) of 1093 K and 1193 K (820 °C and 920 °C) were used in the hot rolling trials to obtain different levels of pancaked austenite prior to DQ. Continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagrams were constructed to reveal the effect of boron on the transformation behavior of these steels. Microstructural characterization was carried out using various microscopy techniques, such as light optical microscopy (LOM) and scanning electron microscopy-electron backscatter diffraction (SEM-EBSD). The resultant microstructures after hot rolling were mixtures of autotempered martensite and lower bainite (LB), having yield strengths in the range 918 to 1067 MPa with total elongations to fracture higher than 10 pct. The lower FRT of 1093 K (820 °C) produced better combinations of strength and toughness as a consequence of a higher degree of pancaking in the austenite. Removal of boron lowered the 34 J/cm2 Charpy-V impact toughness transition temperature from 206 K to 158 K (-67 °C to -115 °C) when the finishing rolling temperature of 1093 K (820 °C) was used without any loss in the strength values compared to the boron-bearing steel. This was due to the finer and more uniform grain structure in the boron-free steel. Contrary to expectations, the difference was not caused by the formation of borocarbide precipitates, as verified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations, but through the grain coarsening effect of boron.

  20. Fatigue life and cyclic deformation behaviour of quenched and tempered steel AISI 4140 at two-step stress- and total-strain-controlled push-pull loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, V.; Lang, K.H.; Macherauch, E. [Inst. fuer Werkstoffkunde I, Univ. Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2003-05-01

    The behaviour of steels at multi-step cyclic loading was explored up to now almost exclusively in fatigue-life-oriented investigations. Thus, only few works exist dealing with the cyclic deformation behaviour at two- and multi-step loading. Therefore, the cyclic deformation behaviour at two-step experiments with a single amplitude change (2-block experiments) and with multiple changes between two blocks of certain length and different amplitudes (multi-block experiments) was investigated in this work at the technically important steel AISI 4140 (German grade 42CrMo4). (orig.)

  1. Copper precipitation behavior and mechanical properties of Cu-bearing 316L austenitic stainless steel: A comprehensive cross-correlation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi, Tong; Babar Shahzad, M.; Xu, Dake; Zhao, Jinlong; Yang, Chunguang; Qi, Min; Yang, Ke

    2016-01-01

    The effect of precipitation hardening on mechanical properties and coarsening behavior of Cu-rich precipitates in a Cu-bearing 316L austenite stainless steel after aging at 700 °C for different time were systematically investigated. The variations of morphology and composition of Cu-rich precipitates as a function of aging time were respectively characterized by electrical resistivity, atom probe tomography (APT) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was found that both hardness and mechanical strength increased to peak value within short aging time, and remained nearly unchanged with prolonged aging time. The TEM observation confirmed a coherent interface between Cu-rich precipitates and austenite matrix, while high number densities of spheroidal Cu-rich precipitates were observed in all aged samples. APT analyses confirmed virtually 100% Cu core composition of Cu-rich precipitates, whereas the average radius was slightly increased from 1.38±0.46 nm to 2.39±0.81 nm with increasing the aging time. The relatively slow growth and coarsening behavior of Cu-rich precipitates was largely attributed to the slower diffusion kinetics of Cu, low interfacial energy and high strain energy of Cu-rich precipitates in the austenite matrix, and was well predicted by the Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner theory. The slow increase in average radius of Cu-rich precipitates was consistent with the modest change in hardness and yield strength with extended aging. In addition, the precipitation strengthening effects of Cu-rich precipitates were quantitatively evaluated and analyzed. These cumulative results and analyses could provide a solid foundation for much wider applications of Cu-bearing stainless steels.

  2. Copper precipitation behavior and mechanical properties of Cu-bearing 316L austenitic stainless steel: A comprehensive cross-correlation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, Tong [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Babar Shahzad, M.; Xu, Dake; Zhao, Jinlong [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Yang, Chunguang, E-mail: cgyang@imr.ac.cn [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Qi, Min [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Yang, Ke, E-mail: kyang@imr.ac.cn [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2016-10-15

    The effect of precipitation hardening on mechanical properties and coarsening behavior of Cu-rich precipitates in a Cu-bearing 316L austenite stainless steel after aging at 700 °C for different time were systematically investigated. The variations of morphology and composition of Cu-rich precipitates as a function of aging time were respectively characterized by electrical resistivity, atom probe tomography (APT) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was found that both hardness and mechanical strength increased to peak value within short aging time, and remained nearly unchanged with prolonged aging time. The TEM observation confirmed a coherent interface between Cu-rich precipitates and austenite matrix, while high number densities of spheroidal Cu-rich precipitates were observed in all aged samples. APT analyses confirmed virtually 100% Cu core composition of Cu-rich precipitates, whereas the average radius was slightly increased from 1.38±0.46 nm to 2.39±0.81 nm with increasing the aging time. The relatively slow growth and coarsening behavior of Cu-rich precipitates was largely attributed to the slower diffusion kinetics of Cu, low interfacial energy and high strain energy of Cu-rich precipitates in the austenite matrix, and was well predicted by the Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner theory. The slow increase in average radius of Cu-rich precipitates was consistent with the modest change in hardness and yield strength with extended aging. In addition, the precipitation strengthening effects of Cu-rich precipitates were quantitatively evaluated and analyzed. These cumulative results and analyses could provide a solid foundation for much wider applications of Cu-bearing stainless steels.

  3. Correlation of microstructure and strain hardening behavior in the ultrafine-grained Nb-bearing dual phase steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghatei Kalashami, A. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kermanpur, A., E-mail: ahmad_k@cc.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghassemali, E. [Jönköping University, School of Engineering, Department of Materials and Manufacturing, P.O. Box 1026, SE-551 11 Jönköping (Sweden); Najafizadeh, A. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mazaheri, Y. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Materials Engineering, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan 65178-38695 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Ultrafine-grained dual phase (DP) steels with different Nb contents (0.00, 0.06 and 0.12 wt%) were produced by cold-rolling followed by intercritical annealing of ferrite/martensite starting microstructure at 770 °C for different holding times. Scanning electron microscopy, equipped with electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) detector, nanoindentation and tensile testing were used to characterize microstructural evolutions and their correlations to the strain hardening and fracture behavior. EBSD results confirmed the retardation effect of Nb on recrystallization. It was found that the strains stored in the grains and density of geometrically necessary dislocations (GNDs) were increased with the addition of Nb. Strain hardening analysis showed that plastic deformation of the DP steels occurred in three distinct stages, which based on the EBSD results, nanoindentation and fracture analysis, were controlled by microstructural features such martensite volume fraction and size, density of GNDs and individual ferrite and martensite tensile properties.

  4. Precipitation behavior during thin slab thermomechanical processing and isothermal aging of copper-bearing niobium-microalloyed high strength structural steels: The effect on mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misra, R.D.K., E-mail: dmisra@louisiana.edu [Center for Structural and Functional Materials, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, P.O. Box 44130, Lafayette, LA 70503 (United States); Jia, Z. [Center for Structural and Functional Materials, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, P.O. Box 44130, Lafayette, LA 70503 (United States); O' Malley, R. [Nucor Steel Decatur, LLC Sheet Mill, 4301, Iverson Blvd., Trinity, AL 35673 (United States); Jansto, S.J. [CBMM-Reference Metals Company, 1000 Old Pond Road, Bridgeville, PA 15017 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} Copper does not significantly influence toughness. {yields} Copper precipitation during aging occurs at dislocations. {yields} Precipitation of copper and carbides is mutually exclusive. - Abstract: We describe here the precipitation behavior of copper and fine-scale carbides during thermo-mechanical processing and isothermal aging of copper-bearing niobium-microalloyed high strength steels. During thermo-mechanical processing, precipitation of {epsilon}-copper occurs in polygonal ferrite and at the austenite-ferrite interface. In contrast, during isothermal aging, nucleation of {epsilon}-copper precipitation occurs at dislocations. In the three different chemistries investigated, the increase in strength associated with copper during aging results only in a small decrease in impact toughness, implying that copper precipitates do not seriously impair toughness, and can be considered as a viable strengthening element in microalloyed steels. Precipitation of fine-scale niobium carbides occurs extensively at dislocations and within ferrite matrix together with vanadium carbides. In the presence of titanium, titanium carbides act as a nucleus for niobium carbide formation. Irrespective of the nature of carbides, copper precipitates and carbides are mutually exclusive.

  5. Precipitation behavior during thin slab thermomechanical processing and isothermal aging of copper-bearing niobium-microalloyed high strength structural steels: The effect on mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, R.D.K.; Jia, Z.; O'Malley, R.; Jansto, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Copper does not significantly influence toughness. → Copper precipitation during aging occurs at dislocations. → Precipitation of copper and carbides is mutually exclusive. - Abstract: We describe here the precipitation behavior of copper and fine-scale carbides during thermo-mechanical processing and isothermal aging of copper-bearing niobium-microalloyed high strength steels. During thermo-mechanical processing, precipitation of ε-copper occurs in polygonal ferrite and at the austenite-ferrite interface. In contrast, during isothermal aging, nucleation of ε-copper precipitation occurs at dislocations. In the three different chemistries investigated, the increase in strength associated with copper during aging results only in a small decrease in impact toughness, implying that copper precipitates do not seriously impair toughness, and can be considered as a viable strengthening element in microalloyed steels. Precipitation of fine-scale niobium carbides occurs extensively at dislocations and within ferrite matrix together with vanadium carbides. In the presence of titanium, titanium carbides act as a nucleus for niobium carbide formation. Irrespective of the nature of carbides, copper precipitates and carbides are mutually exclusive.

  6. Contributions of Cu-rich clusters, dislocation loops and nanovoids to the irradiation-induced hardening of Cu-bearing low-Ni reactor pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergner, F., E-mail: f.bergner@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Gillemot, F. [Centre for Energy Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 29-33 Konkoly-Thege street, 1121 Budapest XII (Hungary); Hernández-Mayoral, M.; Serrano, M. [Division of Materials, CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Török, G. [Wigner Research Center for Physics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 29-33 Konkoly-Thege street, 1121 Budapest XII (Hungary); Ulbricht, A.; Altstadt, E. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • TEM and SANS were applied to estimate mean size and number density of loops, nanovoids and Cu-rich clusters. • A three-feature dispersed-barrier hardening model was applied to estimate the yield stress increase. • The values and errors of the dimensionless obstacle strength were estimated in a consistent way. • Nanovoids are stronger obstacles for dislocation glide than dislocation loops, loops are stronger than Cu-rich clusters. • For reactor-relevant conditions, Cu-rich clusters contribute most to hardening due to their high number density. - Abstract: Dislocation loops, nanovoids and Cu-rich clusters (CRPs) are known to represent obstacles for dislocation glide in neutron-irradiated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels, but a consistent experimental determination of the respective obstacle strengths is still missing. A set of Cu-bearing low-Ni RPV steels and model alloys was characterized by means of SANS and TEM in order to specify mean size and number density of loops, nanovoids and CRPs. The obstacle strengths of these families were estimated by solving an over-determined set of linear equations. We have found that nanovoids are stronger than loops and loops are stronger than CRPs. Nevertheless, CRPs contribute most to irradiation hardening because of their high number density. Nanovoids were only observed for neutron fluences beyond typical end-of-life conditions of RPVs. The estimates of the obstacle strength are critically compared with reported literature data.

  7. Applicability of empirical formulas and fractography for assessment of creep life and creep fracture modes of tempered martensitic 9%Cr steel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sklenička, Václav; Kuchařová, Květa; Král, Petr; Kvapilová, Marie; Dvořák, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 2 (2017), s. 69-80 ISSN 0023-432X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-09518S; GA MŠk LM2015069 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : P92 steel * mechanical characterisation * creep * plasticity * fracture * electron microscopy Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy OBOR OECD: Materials engineering Impact factor: 0.366, year: 2016

  8. Corrosion resistant steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubchenko, A.S.; Borisov, V.P.; Latyshev, V.B.

    1980-01-01

    Corrosion resistant steel for production of sheets and tubes containing C, Mn, Cr, Si, Fe is suggested. It is alloyed with vanadium and cerium for improving tensile properties and ductility. The steel can be melted by a conventional method in electric-arc or induction furnaces. The mentioned steel is intended to be used as a substitute for nickel-bearing austenitic steels

  9. Tribological performance of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures on titanium and a high toughness bearing steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonse, J., E-mail: joern.bonse@bam.de [BAM Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung, Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin (Germany); Koter, R.; Hartelt, M.; Spaltmann, D.; Pentzien, S. [BAM Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung, Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin (Germany); Höhm, S.; Rosenfeld, A. [Max-Born-Institut für Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie (MBI), Max-Born-Straße 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Krüger, J. [BAM Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung, Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Large LIPSS covered areas were manufactured by fs-laser irradiation on steel (X30CrMoN15-1) and titanium (Ti). • LIPSS with spatial periods around 500 nm were formed homogeneously on both materials. • Tribological performance of LIPSS covered areas was qualified in reciprocal sliding tests in two different lubricating oils. • LIPSS on titanium significantly reduced the friction coefficient and wear when a fully formulated engine oil was used. - Abstract: Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS, ripples) were processed on steel (X30CrMoN15-1) and titanium (Ti) surfaces by irradiation in air with linear polarized femtosecond laser pulses with a pulse duration of 30 fs at 790 nm wavelength. For the processing of large LIPSS covered surface areas (5 mm × 5 mm), the laser fluence and the spatial spot overlap were optimized in a sample-scanning geometry. The laser-processed surfaces were characterized by optical microscopy (OM), white light interference microscopy (WLIM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Spatial LIPSS periods between 450 and 600 nm were determined. The nanostructured surface regions were tribologically tested under reciprocal sliding conditions against a 10-mm diameter ball of hardened 100Cr6 steel. Paraffin oil and engine oil were used as lubricants for 1000 sliding cycles at 1 Hz with a normal load of 1.0 N. The corresponding wear tracks were analyzed by OM and SEM. In particular cases, the laser-generated nanostructures endured the tribological treatment. Simultaneously, a significant reduction of the friction coefficient and the wear was observed in the laser-irradiated (LIPSS-covered) areas when compared to the non-irradiated surface. The experiments reveal the potential benefit of laser surface structuring for tribological applications.

  10. Tribological performance of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures on titanium and a high toughness bearing steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonse, J.; Koter, R.; Hartelt, M.; Spaltmann, D.; Pentzien, S.; Höhm, S.; Rosenfeld, A.; Krüger, J.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Large LIPSS covered areas were manufactured by fs-laser irradiation on steel (X30CrMoN15-1) and titanium (Ti). • LIPSS with spatial periods around 500 nm were formed homogeneously on both materials. • Tribological performance of LIPSS covered areas was qualified in reciprocal sliding tests in two different lubricating oils. • LIPSS on titanium significantly reduced the friction coefficient and wear when a fully formulated engine oil was used. - Abstract: Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS, ripples) were processed on steel (X30CrMoN15-1) and titanium (Ti) surfaces by irradiation in air with linear polarized femtosecond laser pulses with a pulse duration of 30 fs at 790 nm wavelength. For the processing of large LIPSS covered surface areas (5 mm × 5 mm), the laser fluence and the spatial spot overlap were optimized in a sample-scanning geometry. The laser-processed surfaces were characterized by optical microscopy (OM), white light interference microscopy (WLIM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Spatial LIPSS periods between 450 and 600 nm were determined. The nanostructured surface regions were tribologically tested under reciprocal sliding conditions against a 10-mm diameter ball of hardened 100Cr6 steel. Paraffin oil and engine oil were used as lubricants for 1000 sliding cycles at 1 Hz with a normal load of 1.0 N. The corresponding wear tracks were analyzed by OM and SEM. In particular cases, the laser-generated nanostructures endured the tribological treatment. Simultaneously, a significant reduction of the friction coefficient and the wear was observed in the laser-irradiated (LIPSS-covered) areas when compared to the non-irradiated surface. The experiments reveal the potential benefit of laser surface structuring for tribological applications

  11. Fine-scale precipitation and mechanical properties of thin slab processed titanium-niobium bearing high strength steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Z. [Center for Structural and Functional Materials, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, P.O. Box 44130, Lafayette, LA 70503 (United States); Misra, R.D.K., E-mail: dmisra@louisiana.edu [Center for Structural and Functional Materials, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, P.O. Box 44130, Lafayette, LA 70503 (United States); O' Malley, R. [Nucor Steel Decatur, LLC, 4301 Iverson Blvd., Trinity, AL 35673 (United States); Jansto, S.J. [CBMM-Reference Metals Company, 1000 Old Pond Road, Bridgeville, PA 15017 (United States)

    2011-08-25

    Highlights: {yields} Precipitation and mechanical behavior of Ti-Nb and Ti-Nb-Mo-V steels were elucidated. {yields} Distribution of precipitates was analyzed with microscopy and diffraction pattern. {yields} During austenite-ferrite transformation, interface precipitation of NbC was observed. {yields} Epitaxial precipitation of NbC on TiC surface results in mixed precipitates Ti(Nb)C. - Abstract: We describe here the precipitation behavior and mechanical properties of 560 MPa Ti-Nb and 770 MPa Ti-Nb-Mo-V steels. The precipitation characteristics were analyzed in terms of chemistry and size distribution of precipitates, with particular focus on the crystallography of precipitates through an analysis of electron diffraction patterns. In addition to pure carbides (NbC, TiC, Mo{sub 2}C, and VC), Nb containing titanium-rich carbides were also observed. These precipitates were of a size range of 4-20 nm. The mechanism of formation of these Ti-rich niobium containing carbides is postulated to involve epitaxial nucleation of NbC on previously precipitated TiC. Interface precipitation of NbC was an interesting observation in compact strip processing which is characterized by an orientation relationship of [0 0 1]{sub NbC}//[0 0 1]{sub {alpha}-Fe}, implying that the precipitation of NbC occurred during austenite-ferrite transformation.

  12. Fine-scale precipitation and mechanical properties of thin slab processed titanium-niobium bearing high strength steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Z.; Misra, R.D.K.; O'Malley, R.; Jansto, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Precipitation and mechanical behavior of Ti-Nb and Ti-Nb-Mo-V steels were elucidated. → Distribution of precipitates was analyzed with microscopy and diffraction pattern. → During austenite-ferrite transformation, interface precipitation of NbC was observed. → Epitaxial precipitation of NbC on TiC surface results in mixed precipitates Ti(Nb)C. - Abstract: We describe here the precipitation behavior and mechanical properties of 560 MPa Ti-Nb and 770 MPa Ti-Nb-Mo-V steels. The precipitation characteristics were analyzed in terms of chemistry and size distribution of precipitates, with particular focus on the crystallography of precipitates through an analysis of electron diffraction patterns. In addition to pure carbides (NbC, TiC, Mo 2 C, and VC), Nb containing titanium-rich carbides were also observed. These precipitates were of a size range of 4-20 nm. The mechanism of formation of these Ti-rich niobium containing carbides is postulated to involve epitaxial nucleation of NbC on previously precipitated TiC. Interface precipitation of NbC was an interesting observation in compact strip processing which is characterized by an orientation relationship of [0 0 1] NbC //[0 0 1] α-Fe , implying that the precipitation of NbC occurred during austenite-ferrite transformation.

  13. Comparing Microstructures and Tensile Properties of Intercritically Annealed and Quenched-Tempered 1.7Ni-1.5Cu-0.5Mo-0.2C Powder Metallurgy Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güral, Ahmet; Başak, Hüdayim; Türkan, Mustafa

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the influence of intercritical quenching (IQ), step quenching (SQ) and quenching plus tempering (QT) heat treatments on the microstructure and tensile properties of 1.7Ni-1.5Cu-0.5Mo-0.2C pre-alloyed powder metallurgy (P/M) steels. In the microstructures of the IQ and SQ specimens partial martensite having Ni-rich phases formed up in the soft ferritic matrix. It was observed that unlike Mo, a Cu alloying element dissolved homogeneously in the specimens. The martensite volume fraction (MVF) in the SQ specimens was higher than that in the IQ specimens. It was found that macrohardness, yield and tensile strengths increased, whereas microhardness of ferrite and elongation decreased with increasing MVF. However, with this increase, microhardness values of martensite phases decreased in the IQ specimen, while they increased in SQ specimens. It was observed that the yield, tensile, and elongation values of the QT specimens were lower than those of all intercritically annealed specimens having the same hardness values.

  14. An experimental analysis of process parameters to manufacture micro-channels in AISI H13 tempered steel by laser micro-milling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixidor, D.; Ferrer, I.; Ciurana, J.

    2012-04-01

    This paper reports the characterization of laser machining (milling) process to manufacture micro-channels in order to understand the incidence of process parameters on the final features. Selection of process operational parameters is highly critical for successful laser micromachining. A set of designed experiments is carried out in a pulsed Nd:YAG laser system using AISI H13 hardened tool steel as work material. Several micro-channels have been manufactured as micro-mold cavities varying parameters such as scanning speed (SS), pulse intensity (PI) and pulse frequency (PF). Results are obtained by evaluating the dimensions and the surface finish of the micro-channel. The dimensions and shape of the micro-channels produced with laser-micro-milling process exhibit variations. In general the use of low scanning speeds increases the quality of the feature in both surface finishing and dimensional.

  15. Rolling contact fatigue of low hardness steel for slewing ring application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuth, Jason A.

    This thesis discusses the rolling contact fatigue of steel utilized in anti-friction bearings, also referred to as slewing bearings. These slewing bearings are utilized in cranes, excavators, wind turbines and other similar applications. Five materials composed of two different material types were tested. The two material types were high carbon steel and medium carbon alloy steel. The test specimens were processed from forged rolled rings. Two machines were evaluated a ZF-RCF and 3-Ball test machine. The evaluation was to determine which machine can best simulate the application in which the slewing bearing is utilized. Initially, each specimen will be pretested to determine the appropriate testing direction from within the forged rolled rings. Pretesting is needed in order to establish consistent failure modes between samples. The primary goal of the test is to understand the life differences and failure modes between high carbon steel and medium carbon alloy steel. The high carbon steel ring was cut into two sections, one of which was stress relieved and the other was quenched and tempered. The medium carbon alloy steel was cut into three sections, all of which were quenched and tempered to different hardness levels. The test program was dynamically adjusted based upon the previous sample's life and load. An S-N curve was then established from the 5 materials tested at two target loads. The samples were run until the first sign of a crack was detected by an eddy current. At the completion of the rolling contact test, select sample's microstructure was evaluated for crack initiation location. The selected samples were divided into four groups which represent different maximum shear stress levels. These samples displayed indications of material deformation in which the high carbon steel experienced an increased amount of cold work when compared to medium carbon alloy steel. The life of the high carbon steel was nearly equivalent to the expected life of the medium

  16. Tool steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højerslev, C.

    2001-01-01

    On designing a tool steel, its composition and heat treatment parameters are chosen to provide a hardened and tempered martensitic matrix in which carbides are evenly distributed. In this condition the matrix has an optimum combination of hardness andtoughness, the primary carbides provide...... resistance against abrasive wear and secondary carbides (if any) increase the resistance against plastic deformation. Tool steels are alloyed with carbide forming elements (Typically: vanadium, tungsten, molybdenumand chromium) furthermore some steel types contains cobalt. Addition of alloying elements...... serves primarily two purpose (i) to improve the hardenabillity and (ii) to provide harder and thermally more stable carbides than cementite. Assuming proper heattreatment, the properties of a tool steel depends on the which alloying elements are added and their respective concentrations....

  17. Evolución microestructural del acero austenítico al manganeso sometido a tratamiento térmico de temple y revenido Microstructural evolution of manganese austenitic steel submitted to thermal treatments of quenching and tempering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Óscar Fabián Higuera Cobos

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available En el presente trabajo de investigación se evaluaron los cambios microestructurales en aceros austeníticos al manganeso con 9 y 13% Mn en presencia de cromo (1.4 - 2.0% . Se evaluó el ciclo térmico de temple y revenido sobre la estabilidad de la fase austenita y la presencia de compuestos de segunda fase como carburos de hierro y cromo del tipo (Fe, Mn3C y (Fe, Cr7C3. La temperatura de austenización fue de 1050 °C, con un tiempo de sostenimiento de 1 hora y el medio de enfriamiento agua. Los tratamientos de revenido se efectuaron en un rango de 200 a 800 °C con intervalos de 200 °C y tiempo de permanencia 2 horas. Para este análisis el material se sometió a pruebas de caracterización tales como: microscopia electrónica de barrido (SEM-EDS, espectrometría de emisión óptica y difracción de rayos X, en estado de suministro y bonificado.In this study the microstructural changes in manganese austenitic steel with 9 and 13% Mn in presence of chromium with (1,4-2,0% was evaluated, thermal cycles of quenching and tempering in order to evaluate the influence of kinetic of cooling on the stability of the phase austenite and the presence of composed of second phase like iron and chromium carbides of type (Fe, Mn3C and (Fe, Cr7C3. were also evaluated. The temperature of austenitizing was of 1050 °C, with a time of support of 1 hour and means of cooling water. The tempering treatments took place in a rank of 200 to 800 °C with intervals of 200 °C and dwell time 2 hours. The material was evaluated by electronic microscopy of sweeping (SEM-EDS, spectrometry of optical emission and X-ray diffraction, in state as cast and heat treating.

  18. Atomic-scale investigation of ε and θ precipitates in bainite in 100Cr6 bearing steel by atom probe tomography and ab initio calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, W.; Appen, J. von; Choi, P.; Dronskowski, R.; Raabe, D.; Bleck, W.

    2013-01-01

    Carbide precipitation during upper and lower bainite formation in high-carbon bearing steel 100Cr6 is characterized using transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. The results reveal that both ε and θ carbides precipitate in lower bainite isothermally held at 260 °C and only θ precipitates form in upper bainite isothermally held at 500 °C. ε and θ precipitate under paraequilibrium condition at 260 °C in lower bainite and θ precipitates under negligible partitioning local equilibrium condition in upper bainite at 500 °C. In order to theoretically study ε and θ precipitation and the ε → θ transition in bainite, thermodynamic calculations have been carried out using ab initio techniques. We find that ε and θ carbides in ferrite have almost identical thermodynamic stability, and hence have similar formation probability. In austenite, however, cementite formation is clearly preferred: it is favored by 5 kJ mol −1 at room temperature and still by 4 kJ mol −1 at 500 °C. Hence, the thermodynamic predictions agree well with the atom probe tomography results

  19. Interaction between recrystallization and strain-induced precipitation in a high Nb- and N-bearing austenitic stainless steel: Influence of the interpass time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, M.B.R., E-mail: marianabdrs@gmail.com [Department of Materials Engineering, UFSCar, Via Washington Luis, Km 235, 13565-905 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Gallego, J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, UNESP, Avenida Brasil, 56, 15385-000 Ilha Solteira, SP (Brazil); Cabrera, J.M. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, Polytechnic University of Catalunya, Avenida Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fundacio CTM Centre Tecnologic, Plaza de la Ciencia 2, 08243 Manresa (Spain); Balancin, O. [Department of Materials Engineering, UFSCar, Via Washington Luis, Km 235, 13565-905 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Jorge, A.M., E-mail: moreira@dema.ufscar.br [Department of Materials Engineering, UFSCar, Via Washington Luis, Km 235, 13565-905 São Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2015-06-18

    In this work, we studied the influence of the interpass time (20 and 5 s) on the interaction between recrystallization and strain-induced precipitation occurring during multiple passes' deformations under continuous cooling conditions in a high niobium- and nitrogen-bearing austenitic stainless steel (ISO 5832-9). The correlation between microstructure evolution and hot mechanical properties was performed by physical simulation using hot torsion tests. The microstructure evolution was analyzed by optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD). This technique indicated that dynamic recrystallization occurred at the first passes promoting an excellent grain refinement. On the other hand, shorter interpass time (5 s) allowed higher volume fraction of smallest precipitates than larger interpass time (20 s). After soaking, only TiNbN precipitates were found, whereas, Z-phase (CrNbN) and NbN were formed during thermomechanical processing. Particles with sizes between 20 and 50 nm were effective to pin grain boundaries and dislocations.

  20. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of the Outer Ring Cooling Concept in a Hybrid and in an All-Steel Ball Bearing Used in Aero-Engines by the Introduction of a Helical Duct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Flouros

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Rolling element bearings for aero engine applications have to withstand very challenging operating conditions because of the high thermal impact due to elevated rotational speeds and loads. The high rate of heat generation in the bearing has to be sustained by the materials, and in the absence of lubrication these will fail within seconds. For this reason, aero engine bearings have to be lubricated and cooled by a continuous oil stream. When the oil has reached the outer ring it has already been heated up, thus its capability to remove extra heat from the outer ring is considerably reduced. Increasing the mass flow of oil to the bearing is not a solution since excess oil quantity would cause high parasitic losses (churning in the bearing chamber and also increase the demands in the oil system for oil storage, scavenging, cooling, hardware weight, etc. A method has been developed for actively cooling the outer ring of the bearing. The idea behind the outer ring cooling concept was adopted from fins that are used for cooling electronic devices. A spiral groove engraved in the outer ring material of the bearing would function as a fin body with oil instead of air as the cooling medium. The method was first evaluated in an all steel ball bearing and the results were a 50% reduction in the lubricating oil flow with an additional reduction in heat generation by more than 25%. It was then applied on a Hybrid ball bearing of the same size and the former results were reconfirmed. Hybrid bearings are a combination of steel made parts, like the outer ring, the inner ring, and the cage and of ceramic rolling elements. This paper describes the work done to-date as a follow up of the work described in, and demonstrates the potential of the outer ring cooling for a bearing. Friction loss coefficient, Nusselt number, and efficiency correlations have been developed on the basis of the test results and have been compared to correlations from other authors

  1. CHARACTERIZATION OF NEW TOOL STEEL FOR ALUMINUM EXTRUSION DIES

    OpenAIRE

    José Britti Bacalhau; Fernanda Moreno Rodrigues; Rafael Agnelli Mesquita

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum extrusion dies are an important segment of application on industrial tools steels, which are manufactured in steels based on AISI H13 steel. The main properties of steels applied to extrusion dies are: wear resistance, impact resistance and tempering resistance. The present work discusses the characteristics of a newly developed hot work steel to be used on aluminum extrusion dies. The effects of Cr and Mo contents with respect to tempering resistance and the Al addition ...

  2. Tempering of Low-Temperature Bainite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peet, Mathew J.; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh; Miller, Mike K.; Bhadeshia, H. K. D. H.

    2017-07-01

    Electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and atom probe tomography have been used to identify the changes which occur during the tempering of a carbide-free bainitic steel transformed at 473 K (200 °C). Partitioning of solute between ferrite and thin-films of retained austenite was observed on tempering at 673 K (400 °C) for 30 minutes. After tempering at 673 K (400 °C) and 773 K (500 °C) for 30 minutes, cementite was observed in the form of nanometre scale precipitates. Proximity histograms showed that the partitioning of solutes other than silicon from the cementite was slight at 673 K (400 °C) and more obvious at 773 K (500 °C). In both cases, the nanometre scale carbides are greatly depleted in silicon.

  3. Influence of initial heating during final high temperature annealing on the offset of primary and secondary recrystallization in Cu-bearing grain oriented electrical steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Calvillo, P.; Leunis, E.; Van De Putte, T.; Jacobs, S.; Zacek, O.; Saikaly, W.

    2018-04-01

    The industrial production route of Grain Oriented Electrical Steels (GOES) is complex and fine-tuned for each grade. Its metallurgical process requires in all cases the abnormal grain growth (AGG) of the Goss orientation during the final high temperature annealing (HTA). The exact mechanism of AGG is not yet fully understood, but is controlled by the different inhibition systems, namely MnS, AlN and CuxS, their size and distribution, and the initial primary recrystallized grain size. Therefore, among other parameters, the initial heating stage during the HTA is crucial for the proper development of primary and secondary recrystallized microstructures. Cold rolled 0.3 mm Cu-bearing Grain Oriented Electrical Steel has been submitted to interrupted annealing experiments in a lab tubular furnace. Two different annealing cycles were applied:• Constant heating at 30°C/h up to 1000°C. Two step cycle with initial heating at 100°C/h up to 600°C, followed by 18 h soaking at 600°C and then heating at 30°C/h up to 1050°C. The materials are analyzed in terms of their magnetic properties, grain size, texture and precipitates. The characteristic magnetic properties are analyzed for the different extraction temperatures and Cycles. As the annealing was progressing, the coercivity values (Hc 1.7T [A/m]) decreased, showing two abrupt drops, which can be associated to the on-set of primary and secondary recrystallization. The primary recrystallized grain sizes and recrystallized fractions are fitted to a model using a non-isothermal approach. This analysis shows that, although the resulting grain sizes were similar, the kinetics for the two step annealing were faster due to the lower recovery. The on-set of secondary recrystallization was also shifted to higher temperatures in the case of the continuous heating cycle, which might end in different final grain sizes and final magnetic properties. In both samples, nearly all the observed precipitates are Al-Si-Mn nitrides

  4. Influence of initial heating during final high temperature annealing on the offset of primary and secondary recrystallization in Cu-bearing grain oriented electrical steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Rodriguez-Calvillo

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The industrial production route of Grain Oriented Electrical Steels (GOES is complex and fine-tuned for each grade. Its metallurgical process requires in all cases the abnormal grain growth (AGG of the Goss orientation during the final high temperature annealing (HTA. The exact mechanism of AGG is not yet fully understood, but is controlled by the different inhibition systems, namely MnS, AlN and CuxS, their size and distribution, and the initial primary recrystallized grain size. Therefore, among other parameters, the initial heating stage during the HTA is crucial for the proper development of primary and secondary recrystallized microstructures. Cold rolled 0.3 mm Cu-bearing Grain Oriented Electrical Steel has been submitted to interrupted annealing experiments in a lab tubular furnace. Two different annealing cycles were applied:• Constant heating at 30°C/h up to 1000°C. Two step cycle with initial heating at 100°C/h up to 600°C, followed by 18 h soaking at 600°C and then heating at 30°C/h up to 1050°C. The materials are analyzed in terms of their magnetic properties, grain size, texture and precipitates. The characteristic magnetic properties are analyzed for the different extraction temperatures and Cycles. As the annealing was progressing, the coercivity values (Hc 1.7T [A/m] decreased, showing two abrupt drops, which can be associated to the on-set of primary and secondary recrystallization. The primary recrystallized grain sizes and recrystallized fractions are fitted to a model using a non-isothermal approach. This analysis shows that, although the resulting grain sizes were similar, the kinetics for the two step annealing were faster due to the lower recovery. The on-set of secondary recrystallization was also shifted to higher temperatures in the case of the continuous heating cycle, which might end in different final grain sizes and final magnetic properties. In both samples, nearly all the observed precipitates are Al

  5. The Need for Temperance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Inge Tangen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This article explores how temperance as a virtue relates to organizational leadership. The study begins with a short survey of classical Greek and Christian notions of temperance before proceeding to ex-plore temperance in relation to self-leadership, visionary and strategic leadership, and relational lead-ership. The final part of the article offers reflections on how temperance might be cultivated from a theological perspective. Temperance is understood not only as sound thinking but also as embodied self-control and active patience. On the level of self-leadership, it is argued that temperance enables the leader to establish forms of integrity that protect the leader’s self from chaos and destruction. Moreover, temperance may also nurture focused visionary leadership that accepts ethical limits and has an eye to the common good. The study also suggests that organizations should cultivate a culture of strategic discipline that is capable of realizing such visions. On the interpersonal level, temperance is viewed as critical in terms of enabling leaders to treat co-workers with respect and wisdom and han-dle conflict with consideration. Finally, is argued that that the cultivation of temperance is not a one-way street from the inside to the outside or a subordination of feelings to reason but rather a very complex process that includes interpersonal humility, finds vision in an encounter with the good, and yet remains a personal responsibility.

  6. Hot wire TIG temper bead welding for nuclear repairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, J.A.; Gilston, P.F.

    1989-08-01

    A preliminary assessment has been carried out to determine the suitability of the hot wire tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process for the repair of thick section, ferritic steel nuclear pressure vessels. The objective has been to identify a hot wire TIG temper bead procedure, suitable for repairs without post weld heat treatment. This procedure involves depositing two weld layers with carefully selected welding parameters such that overlapping thermal cycles produce a refined and tempered heat affected zone, HAZ, microstructure. (author)

  7. Differences in the cyclic deformation behaviour of quenched and tempered steel 42 CrMo 4 (AISI 4140) due to stress- and strain-control; Versuchsfuehrungsbedingte Unterschiede im zyklischen Verformungsverhalten von verguetetem 42 CrMo 4 bei Spannungs- und Totaldehnungskontrolle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, V.; Lang, K.-H.; Voehringer, O.; Macherauch, E. [Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstoffkunde 1

    1998-04-01

    Cyclic stress-strain-curves and Manson-Coffin-plots of quenched and tempered steel 42 CrMo 4 (AISI 4140) strongly depend on whether they are determined under stress- or total-strain-control. At total-strain-controlled experiments, this is caused on the one hand by comparatively high initial stress-amplitudes which lead to distinctive cyclic work softening. On the other hand, the occuring differences in the evolution of inhomogeneous deformation patterns at both types of loading, which can be recorded by means of photoelasticity and microscopy, lead to differently distributed plastic deformations and to different integral values of plastic strain. (orig.) 11 refs.

  8. Trichinella in arctic, subarctic and temperate regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kapel, C. M O

    1997-01-01

    The transmission and occurrence of Trichinella spp according to the zoogeography of different climatic conditions, socioeconomy and human activity are discussed. Comparing arctic, subarctic and temperate regions, it appears that the species of Trichinella present, the composition of the fauna...... and the human activity are all very important interacting factors affecting epidemiology. In Greenland, where only sylvatic trichinellosis is present, the high prevalence in wildlife appears closely connected with polar bear hunting. In the Scandinavian countries, the prevalence of both sylvatic and domestic...

  9. Fatigue damage of steel components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fæster, Søren; Zhang, Xiaodan; Huang, Xiaoxu

    2014-01-01

    Railway rails and the inner ring in roller bearings in wind turbines are both experiencing steel-to-steel contact in small areas with huge loads resulting in extremely high stresses in the base materials......Railway rails and the inner ring in roller bearings in wind turbines are both experiencing steel-to-steel contact in small areas with huge loads resulting in extremely high stresses in the base materials...

  10. Bearing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapich, Davorin D.

    1987-01-01

    A bearing system includes backup bearings for supporting a rotating shaft upon failure of primary bearings. In the preferred embodiment, the backup bearings are rolling element bearings having their rolling elements disposed out of contact with their associated respective inner races during normal functioning of the primary bearings. Displacement detection sensors are provided for detecting displacement of the shaft upon failure of the primary bearings. Upon detection of the failure of the primary bearings, the rolling elements and inner races of the backup bearings are brought into mutual contact by axial displacement of the shaft.

  11. Encapsulated Ball Bearings for Rotary Micro Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    occurrence as well as the overall tribological properties of the bearing mechanism. Firstly, the number of stainless steel balls influences not only the load...stacks.iop.org/JMM/17/S224 Abstract We report on the first encapsulated rotary ball bearing mechanism using silicon microfabrication and stainless steel balls...The method of capturing stainless steel balls within a silicon race to support a silicon rotor both axially and radially is developed for rotary micro

  12. DETERMINATION OF THE OPTIMAL TEMPERING TEMPERATURE IN HARD FACING OF THE FORGING DIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Mutavdžić

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Here is analyzed selection of the optimal technology for heat treatment during the reparation of the damaged forging dies. Those tools are manufactured from alloyed tool steels for operation at elevated temperatures. Those steels are prone to self-hardening, so in reparatory hard-facing they must be preheated, additionally heated and tempered. During the tempering, in temperature interval 500-600°C, a secondary increase of hardness and decrease of impact toughness occurs, the so-called reversible tempering brittleness. Here is shown that it can be avoided by application of metallurgical and technological measures. Metallurgical measures assume adequate selection of steels. Since the considered steels are per se prone to tempering brittleness, we conducted experimental investigations to define the technological measures to avoid it. Tests on models were conducted: tempering from different temperatures, slow heating and cooling in still air. Hardness measurements showed that at 520°C, the secondary increase of hardness occurs, with drop of the impact toughness. Additional hard-facing tests included samples tempered at various regimes. Samples were prepared for mechanical and metallographic investigations. Results presented illustrate influence of additional heat treatment on structure, hardness and mechanical properties of the hard-faced layers. This enabled establishing the possibility of avoiding the tempering brittleness through technological measures.

  13. Determination of the optimal tempering temperature in hard facing of the forging dies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Mutavdžić

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Here is analyzed selection of the optimal technology for heat treatment during the reparation of the damaged forging dies. Those tools are manufactured from alloyed tool steels for operation at elevated temperatures. Those steels are prone to self-hardening, so in reparatory hard-facing they must be preheated, additionally heated and tempered. During the tempering, in temperature interval 500-600°C, a secondary increase of hardness and decrease of impact toughness occurs, the so-called reversible tempering brittleness. Here is shown that it can be avoided by application of metallurgical and technological measures. Metallurgical measures assume adequate selection of steels. Since the considered steels are per se prone to tempering brittleness, we conducted experimental investigations to define the technological measures to avoid it. Tests on models were conducted: tempering from different temperatures, slow heating and cooling in still air. Hardness measurements showed that at 520°C, the secondary increase of hardness occurs, with drop of the impact toughness. Additional hard-facing tests included samples tempered at various regimes. Samples were prepared for mechanical and metallographic investigations. Results presented illustrate influence of additional heat treatment on structure, hardness and mechanical properties of the hard-faced layers. This enabled establishing the possibility of avoiding the tempering brittleness through technological measures. 

  14. Significance of rate of work hardening in tempered martensite embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietikainen, J.

    1995-01-01

    The main explanations for tempered martensite embrittlement are based on the effects of impurities and cementite precipitation on the prior austenite grain boundaries. There are some studies where the rate of work hardening is proposed as a potential reason for the brittleness. One steel was studied by means of a specially developed precision torsional testing device. The test steel had a high Si and Ni content so ε carbide and Fe 3 C appear in quite different tempering temperature ranges. The M S temperature is low enough so that self tempering does not occur. With the testing device it was possible to obtain the true stress - true strain curves to very high deformations. The minimum toughness was always associated with the minimum of rate of work hardening. The change of deformed steel volume before the loss of mechanical stability is proposed as at least one reason for tempered martensite embrittlement. The reasons for the minimum of the rate of work hardening are considered. (orig.)

  15. CHARACTERIZATION OF NEW TOOL STEEL FOR ALUMINUM EXTRUSION DIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Britti Bacalhau

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum extrusion dies are an important segment of application on industrial tools steels, which are manufactured in steels based on AISI H13 steel. The main properties of steels applied to extrusion dies are: wear resistance, impact resistance and tempering resistance. The present work discusses the characteristics of a newly developed hot work steel to be used on aluminum extrusion dies. The effects of Cr and Mo contents with respect to tempering resistance and the Al addition on the nitriding response have been evaluated. From forged steel bars, Charpy impact test and characterization via EPMA have been conducted. The proposed contents of Cr, Mo, and Al have attributed to the new VEX grade a much better tempering resistance than H13, as well as a deeper and harder nitrided layer. Due to the unique characteristics, this new steel provides an interesting alternative to the aluminum extrusion companies to increase their competitiveness.

  16. Journal bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, John R.; Boeker, Gilbert F.

    1976-05-11

    1. An improved journal bearing comprising in combination a non-rotatable cylindrical bearing member having a first bearing surface, a rotatable cylindrical bearing member having a confronting second bearing surface having a plurality of bearing elements, a source of lubricant adjacent said bearing elements for supplying lubricant thereto, each bearing element consisting of a pair of elongated relatively shallowly depressed surfaces lying in a cylindrical surface co-axial with the non-depressed surface and diverging from one another in the direction of rotation and obliquely arranged with respect to the axis of rotation of said rotatable member to cause a flow of lubricant longitudinally along said depressed surfaces from their distal ends toward their proximal ends as said bearing members are rotated relative to one another, each depressed surface subtending a radial angle of less than 360.degree., and means for rotating said rotatable bearing member to cause the lubricant to flow across and along said depressed surfaces, the flow of lubricant being impeded by the non-depressed portions of said second bearing surface to cause an increase in the lubricant pressure.

  17. Structural inheritance in cast 30KhGNM-type steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadovskij, V.D.; Bershtejn, L.I.; Mel'nikova, A.A.; Polyakova, A.M.; Schastlivtsev, V.M.

    1980-01-01

    Structural inheritance in the cast 30KhGNM-type steel depending on the heating rate and the temperature of preliminary tempering is investigated. When eating the cast steel with a beinite structure at the rate of 1-150 deg/min, the restoration of austenite grain and the following recrystallization due to the phase cold work, are observed. Slow heating from room temperature or preliminary tempering hinder grain restoration during heating. A non-monotonous effect of tempering temperature on the structural inheritance is established which can be connected with the kinetics of decomposition of residual austenite in steel

  18. Resistance to small plastic strains during martensite tempering under tension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabil' skij, V.V.; Sarrak, V.I. (AN SSSR, Sverdlovsk. Inst. Fiziki Metallov)

    1982-11-01

    The mechanism of plastic deformation of martensite of a series of hardened steels (N18, 20KhG, 50KhFA and others) during tempering under tension and the role of residual internal microstresses and phase transformations are studied. It is shown that martensite low resistance to small plastic deformations during tempering under tension which is usually associated with phase transformations depends as well on the level of residual internal microstresses in the martensite structure. The decrease of resistance to deformation in the course of the decomposition of a solid solution is due to weakening of martensitic matrix because of carbon departure from the solid solution and carbide coarsening. An assumption is made that martensite plastic deformation during tempering under tension is realized at the expense of the directed microplastic deformation in the regions of higher concentration of internal stresses.

  19. Advances in the heat treatment of steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, J.W. Jr.; Kim, J.I.; Syn, C.K.

    1978-06-01

    A number of important recent advances in the processing of steels have resulted from the sophisticated uses of heat treatment to tailor the microstructure of the steels so that desirable properties are established. These new heat treatments often involve the tempering or annealing of the steel to accompish a partial or complete reversion from martensite to austenite. The influence of these reversion heat treatments on the product microstructure and its properties may be systematically discussed in terms of the heat treating temperature in relation to the phase diagram. From this perspective, four characteristic heat treatments are defined: (1) normal tempering, (2) inter-critical tempering, (3) intercritical annealing, and (4) austenite reversion. The reactions occurring during each of these treatments are described and the nature and properties of typical product microstructures discussed, with specific reference to new commercial or laboratory steels having useful and exceptional properties

  20. GAS BEARING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarstrom, C.W.

    1960-09-01

    A gas lubricated bearing for a rotating shaft is described. The assembly comprises a stationary collar having an annular member resiliently supported thereon. The collar and annular member are provided with cooperating gas passages arranged for admission of pressurized gas which supports and lubricates a bearing block fixed to the rotatable shaft. The resilient means for the annular member support the latter against movement away from the bearing block when the assembly is in operation.

  1. Evolution of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steels Made from Water-Atomized Ferritic Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkhurst, Barton Mensah; Kim, Jeoung Han

    2018-05-01

    Nano-structured oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels produced from a 410L stainless steel powder prepared by water-atomization was studied. The influences of Ti content and milling time on the microstructure and the mechanical properties were analysed. It was found that the ODS steels made from the Si bearing 410L powder contained Y-Ti-O, Y-Ti-Si-O, Y-Si-O, and TiO2 oxides. Most nanoparticles produced after 80 h of milling were aggregated nanoparticles; however, after 160 h of milling, most aggregated nanoparticles dissociated into smaller individual nanoparticles. Perfect mixing of Y and Ti was not achieved even after the longer milling time of 160 h; instead, the longer hours of milling rather resulted in Si incorporation into the Y-Ti-O rich nanoparticles and a change in the matrix morphology from an equiaxed microstructure to a tempered martensite-like microstructure. The overall micro-hardness of the ODS steel increased with the increase of milling time. After 80 and 160 h, the microhardnesses were over 400 HV, which primarily resulted from the finer dispersed nanoparticles and in part to the formation of martensitic phases. Tensile strength of the 410L ODS steels was comparable with that of ODS steel produced from gas-atomized powder.

  2. Residual stress in a M3:2 PM high speed steel; effect of mechanical loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højerslev, Christian; Odén, Magnus; Carstensen, Jesper V.

    2001-01-01

    X-ray lattice strains were investigated in an AISI M3:2 PM high-speed steel in the as heat treated condition and after exposure to alternating mechanical load. The volume changes during heat treatment were monitored with dilatometry. Hardened and tempered AISI M3:2 steel consists of tempered lath...

  3. Grizzly bear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, C.C.; Miller, S.D.; Haroldson, M.A.; Feldhamer, G.; Thompson, B.; Chapman, J.

    2003-01-01

    The grizzly bear inspires fear, awe, and respect in humans to a degree unmatched by any other North American wild mammal. Like other bear species, it can inflict serious injury and death on humans and sometimes does. Unlike the polar bear (Ursus maritimus) of the sparsely inhabited northern arctic, however, grizzly bears still live in areas visited by crowds of people, where presence of the grizzly remains physically real and emotionally dominant. A hike in the wilderness that includes grizzly bears is different from a stroll in a forest from which grizzly bears have been purged; nighttime conversations around the campfire and dreams in the tent reflect the presence of the great bear. Contributing to the aura of the grizzly bear is the mixture of myth and reality about its ferocity. unpredictable disposition, large size, strength, huge canines, long claws, keen senses, swiftness, and playfulness. They share characteristics with humans such as generalist life history strategies. extended periods of maternal care, and omnivorous diets. These factors capture the human imagination in ways distinct from other North American mammals. Precontact Native American legends reflected the same fascination with the grizzly bear as modern stories and legends (Rockwell 1991).

  4. Nano-scale study of phase separation in ferrite of long term thermally aged Mo-bearing duplex stainless steels - Atom probe tomography and Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pareige, C.; Emo, J.; Pareige, P.; Saillet, S.; Domain, C.

    2015-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS), used in primary circuit of Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR), are prone to thermal ageing at service temperature, typically between 286 and 323 C. degrees. This ageing is due to the ferrite decomposition via two kinds of phase transformations: spinodal decomposition into Fe rich α zones and Cr rich α' zones and precipitation of G-phase enriched in Ni, Si, Mn and Mo. It has been shown by atom probe tomography (APT) that the G-phase particles form at the interface between α and α' regions thereby demonstrating that α-α' decomposition and G-phase precipitation are highly dependent. The synergy between the two decomposition processes should be related to both the thermodynamics of the system and the diffusion mechanisms active during ageing. This can be studied by atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo (AKMC) with a model that can reproduce the phase transformations which take place in ferrite of duplex stainless steels. This paper presents the first simulations of the kinetics of spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation occurring in ferrite of duplex stainless steels. The kinetics was simulated using a simple but effective atomic kinetic Monte Carlo model in a ternary alloy. The simulations reproduced the α/α' spinodal structure with precipitates at the α/α' interface. The comparison of simulated results with experiments shows that the simulations quantitatively reproduce the kinetics of phase transformation and the synergy observed experimentally between the spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation: the time evolution of the wavelength of the spinodal decomposition and the radius of G-phase precipitates were quantitatively reproduced. The simulations endorse the assumption that G-phase precipitation mainly results from the rejection of G-formers from α and α' domains. By following the vacancy pathway during simulation, we show that coarsening of the G-phase precipitates must proceed via

  5. Investigation of the self tempering effect of martensite by means of atom probe tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackl, Stephanie; Clemens, Helmut; Primig, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Self-tempering effects can be observed in steels with relatively high martensite start temperatures. After the formation of the first martensitic laths, carbon is able to diffuse in these laths during cooling, which can be attributed to sufficiently high temperatures. This effect cannot be observed in laths formed at lower temperatures. In steels containing up to 0.2 m.-% carbon, up to 90 % of the carbon atoms in the martensite segregate to dislocations during quenching. Due to its atomic resolution and sensitivity with respect to light elements, atom probe tomography is very well suited for the investigation of this phenomenon. In this study, the self-tempering effect in a quenched and tempered steel 42CrMo4 with a martensite start temperature of 310 C is investigated by means of atom probe tomography.

  6. Effect of Ceramic Ball and Hybrid Stainless Steel Bearing/Wheel Combinations on the Lifetime of a Precision Translation Stage for the SIM Flight Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, C. John; Klein, Kerry; Jones, William R., Jr.; Jansen, Mark J.; Wemhoner, Jens

    2009-01-01

    A study of hybrid material couples using the Spiral Orbit Tribometer (SOT) was initiated to investigate both lubricated (Pennzane X2000 and Brayco 815Z) and unlubricated Si3N4, 440C SS, Rex 20, Cronidur X30 and X40 plates with Cerbec SN-101-C (Si3N4) and 440C balls. The hybrid wheel/bearing assembly will be used on the Linear Optical Delay Line (LODL) stage as an element of the NASA Space Interferometry Mission (SIM). SIM is an orbiting interferometer linking a pair of telescopes within the spacecraft and, by using an interferometry technique and several precision optical stages, is able to measure the motions of known stars much better than current ground or space based systems. This measurement will provide the data to "infer" the existence of any plants, undetectable by other methods, orbiting these known stars.

  7. Use of cyclic current reversal polarization voltammetry for investigating the relationship between corrosion resistance and heat-treatment induced variations in microstructures of 400 C martensitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Software for running a cyclic current reversal polarization voltammagram has been developed for use with a EG&G Princeton Applied Research Model 273 potentiostat/galvanostat system. The program, which controls the magnitude, direction and duration of an impressed galvanostatic current, will produce data in ASCII spreadsheets (Lotus, Quattro) for graphical representation of CCRPV voltammograms. The program was used to determine differences in corrosion resistance of 440 C martenstic stainless steel produced as a result of changes in microstructure effected by tempering. It was determined that tempering at all temperatures above 400 F resulted in increased polarizability of the material, with the increased likelihood that pitting would be initiated upon exposure to marine environments. These results will be used in development of remedial procedures for lowering the susceptibility of these alloys toward the stress corrosion cracking experienced in bearings used in high pressure oxygen turbopumps used in the main engines of space shuttle orbiters.

  8. Influence of steel-making process and heat-treatment temperature on the fatigue and fracture properties of pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, S. K.; Na, E. G.; Baek, T. H.; Won, S. Y.; Park, S. J.; Lee, S. W.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, high strength pressure vessel steels having the same chemical compositions were manufactured by the two different steel-making processes, such as Vacuum Degassing(VD) and Electro-Slag Remelting(ESR) methods. After the steel-making process, they were normalized at 955 deg. C, quenched at 843 .deg. C, and finally tempered at 550 .deg. C or 450 deg. C, resulting in tempered martensitic microstructures with different yielding strengths depending on the tempering conditions. Low-Cycle Fatigue(LCF) tests, Fatigue Crack Growth Rate(FCGR) tests, and fracture toughness tests were performed to investigate the fatigue and fracture behaviors of the pressure vessel steels. In contrast to very similar monotonic, LCF, and FCGR behaviors between VD and ESR steels, a quite difference was noticed in the fracture toughness. Fracture toughness of ESR steel was higher than that of VD steel, being attributed to the removal of impurities in steel-making process

  9. Response of Seismically Isolated Steel Frame Buildings with Sustainable Lead-Rubber Bearing (LRB Isolator Devices Subjected to Near-Fault (NF Ground Motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Wan Hu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Base isolation has been used as one of the most wildly accepted seismic protection systems that should substantially dissociate a superstructure from its substructure resting on a shaking ground, thereby sustainably preserving entire structures against earthquake forces as well as inside non-structural integrities. Base isolation devices can operate very effectively against near-fault (NF ground motions with large velocity pulses and permanent ground displacements. In this study, comparative advantages for using lead-rubber bearing (LRB isolation systems are mainly investigated by performing nonlinear dynamic time-history analyses with NF ground motions. The seismic responses with respects to base shears and inter-story drifts are compared according to the installation of LRB isolation systems in the frame building. The main function of the base LRB isolator is to extend the period of structural vibration by increasing lateral flexibility in the frame structure, and thus ground accelerations transferred into the superstructure can dramatically decrease. Therefore, these base isolation systems are able to achieve notable mitigation in the base shear. In addition, they make a significant contribution to reducing inter-story drifts distributed over the upper floors. Finally, the fact that seismic performance can be improved by installing isolation devices in the frame structure is emphasized herein through the results of nonlinear dynamic analyses.

  10. Effect of Silicon Nitride Balls and Rollers on Rolling Bearing Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Vlcek, Brian L.; Hendricks, Robert C.

    2005-01-01

    Three decades have passed since the introduction of silicon nitride rollers and balls into conventional rolling-element bearings. For a given applied load, the contact (Hertz) stress in a hybrid bearing will be higher than an all-steel rolling-element bearing. The silicon nitride rolling-element life as well as the lives of the steel races were used to determine the resultant bearing life of both hybrid and all-steel bearings. Life factors were determined and reported for hybrid bearings. Under nominal operating speeds, the resultant calculated lives of the deep-groove, angular-contact, and cylindrical roller hybrid bearings with races made of post-1960 bearing steel increased by factors of 3.7, 3.2, and 5.5, respectively, from those calculated using the Lundberg-Palmgren equations. An all-steel bearing under the same load will have a longer life than the equivalent hybrid bearing under the same conditions. Under these conditions, hybrid bearings are predicted to have a lower fatigue life than all-steel bearings by 58 percent for deep-groove bearings, 41 percent for angular-contact bearings, and 28 percent for cylindrical roller bearings.

  11. Athermal kinetics in low alloy steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leiva, Jorge A Vega; Valencia Morales, Eduardo; Villar Cociña, Ernesto; Hernández Ruiz, Jesús; Donis, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    Athermic analyses for the kinetic study of the reactions in the solid state are preferred because they consume much less experimental work time than the isothermal tests, and lead to more accurate calculations of the energies of activation of reactions that have occurred. In the present work are required conditions where you can apply the equation of speed of an athermal reaction in a low alloy in solid steel. From records of steel (AISI 1050) dilatometric triples were calculated kinetics (E, Ko, n) that characterize the reactions that occurred during the tempering of samples using different methods of iso conversion, one of which is a new modification of the method of Friedman. Also, has shown that during the formation of carbide Epsilon in the first stage of the tempering has occurred a saturation of sites, which validates the use of some methods. Finally, the orders of the reactions occurred during tempering of steel studied treatment are calculated.

  12. The Science of Cost-Effective Materials Design - A Study in the Development of a High Strength, Impact Resistant Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahams, Rachel

    2017-06-01

    Intermediate alloy steels are widely used in applications where both high strength and toughness are required for extreme/dynamic loading environments. Steels containing greater than 10% Ni-Co-Mo are amongst the highest strength martensitic steels, due to their high levels of solution strengthening, and preservation of toughness through nano-scaled secondary hardening, semi-coherent hcp-M2 C carbides. While these steels have high yield strengths (σy 0.2 % >1200 MPa) with high impact toughness values (CVN@-40 >30J), they are often cost-prohibitive due to the material and processing cost of nickel and cobalt. Early stage-I steels such as ES-1 (Eglin Steel) were developed in response to the high cost of nickel-cobalt steels and performed well in extreme shock environments due to the presence of analogous nano-scaled hcp-Fe2.4 C epsilon carbides. Unfortunately, the persistence of W-bearing carbides limited the use of ES-1 to relatively thin sections. In this study, we discuss the background and accelerated development cycle of AF96, an alternative Cr-Mo-Ni-Si stage-I temper steel using low-cost heuristic and Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME)-assisted methods. The microstructure of AF96 was tailored to mimic that of ES-1, while reducing stability of detrimental phases and improving ease of processing in industrial environments. AF96 is amenable to casting and forging, deeply hardenable, and scalable to 100,000 kg melt quantities. When produced at the industrial scale, it was found that AF96 exhibits near-statistically identical mechanical properties to ES-1 at 50% of the cost.

  13. Big bearings. Unsung hero; Kyodaina jikuuke. Hitome ni tsukanai hatarakimono

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanba, S. [Koyo Seiko Co. Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

    1997-03-05

    This paper introduces examples of the use of big bearings. Bearings are divided largely into those used for radial load supporting and those used for thrust load supporting, while big bearings are often used for the latter usage. Thrust bearings include a cutter heat supporting bearing for tunnel excavator working underground, in addition to those used for swing motion of parabolic antennas and tower cranes. A bearing used in an excavator has an outer diameter of about half that of the excavator. The outer diameter of a shielding machine practically used in tunnel drilling currently has an outer diameter of 14,140 mm, and the outer diameter of the bearing is 7200 mm (bearing weighing 45 tons). Other big thrust bearings may include a swing tower swinging thrust bearing used in a continuous casting facility. Big radial bearings are used in iron and steel making facilities. This paper describes two examples of bearings used in this application. A spherical roller bearing to support converter trunion should be of an ultra big size to withstand total weight of about 1400 tons composed of a converter weight and weight of steel to be processed. A four-row cylindrical roller bearing to support the backup roll of a thick plate rolling mill is a bearing with durability against large loads to support reduction rolls whose size have become increasingly large. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Effect of temper and hydrogen embrittlement on mechanical properties of 2,25Cr–1Mo steel grades – Application to Minimum Pressurizing Temperature (MPT) issues. Part II: Vintage reactors and MPT determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillot, Sylvain; Chauvy, Cédric; Corre, Stéphanie; Coudreuse, Lionel; Gingell, Andrew; Héritier, Déborah; Toussaint, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Standard and Vanadium-alloyed 2,25Cr–1Mo steel grades (EN 10028-2 12CrMo9-10/ASTM A387 gr. 22 and 13CrMoV9-10/ASTM A542 tp. D) are commonly used for the fabrication of heavy pressure vessels for applications in petroleum refining plants. These reactors are made of heavy plates, forged shells, forged nozzles and fittings. They are subjected to thermal cycles (stop and go) and to severe service conditions (high temperatures and high hydrogen partial pressures). A primary concern for end-users is the definition of the Minimum Pressurizing Temperature (MPT) of the equipment. This temperature is the lowest temperature at which the vessel can be repressurized after shutdown and insures no risk of brittle failure of the containment body. The MPT is defined by fracture mechanics and/or CVN approaches and calculations. This second part of the paper presents the methodology of MPT determination and the particular case of vintage reactors. MPT determination methodology is explained by using a virtual pressure vessel representative of vessels found in petroleum refineries. A special focus is also set on the evolution of embedded defects

  15. Effect of temper and hydrogen embrittlement on mechanical properties of 2,25Cr–1Mo steel grades – Application to Minimum Pressurizing Temperature (MPT) issues. Part I: General considerations and materials' properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillot, Sylvain; Chauvy, Cédric; Corre, Stéphanie; Coudreuse, Lionel; Gingell, Andrew; Héritier, Déborah; Toussaint, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Standard and Vanadium-alloyed 2,25Cr–1Mo steel grades (EN 10028-2 12CrMo9-10/ASTM A387 gr. 22 and 13CrMoV9-10/ASTM A542 tp. D) are commonly used for the fabrication of heavy pressure vessels for applications in petroleum refining plants. These reactors are made of heavy plates, forged shells, forged nozzles and fittings. They are subjected to thermal cycles (stop and go) and to severe service conditions (high temperatures and high hydrogen partial pressures). A primary concern for end-users is the definition of the Minimum Pressurizing Temperature (MPT) of the equipment. This temperature is the lowest temperature at which the vessel can be repressurized after shutdown and insures no risk of brittle failure of the containment body. The MPT is defined by fracture mechanics and/or CVN approaches and calculations. This first part of the paper presents the impact of thermal aging and exposure to hydrogen on materials' mechanical properties and consequently on the value of MPT

  16. Hydrodynamic bearings

    CERN Document Server

    Bonneau, Dominique; Souchet, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    This Series provides the necessary elements to the development and validation of numerical prediction models for hydrodynamic bearings. This book describes the rheological models and the equations of lubrication. It also presents the numerical approaches used to solve the above equations by finite differences, finite volumes and finite elements methods.

  17. In Situ Study of Phase Transformations during Non-Isothermal Tempering of Bainitic and Martensitic Microstructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hesamodin Talebi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Phase transformations during non-isothermal tempering of bainitic or martensitic microstructures obtained after quenching of a medium-carbon low-alloy steel was studied. The microstructures correspond to different locations of an as-quenched large-sized forged ingot used as a die material in the automotive industry. High-resolution dilatometry experiments were conducted to simulate the heat treatment process, as well as to investigate different phenomena occurring during non-isothermal tempering. The microstructures were characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Dilatometry analyses demonstrated that tempering behavior varied significantly from bainitic to martensitic microstructures. Retained austenite, which exists between bainitic ferrite sheaves, decomposes to lower bainite causing a remarkable volume increase. It was found that this decomposition finishes below 386 °C. By contrast, martensite tempering was accompanied with a volume decrease due to the decomposition of medium-carbon martensite to low carbon martensite and carbides.

  18. Reversible temper brittleness on tensile tests at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadros, N.F. de; Cabral, U.Q.

    1976-01-01

    Tensile tests were carried out on unnotched test pieces at room temperature and three strain rates: 2,5x10 -4 , 2,5x10 -3 and 1,0x10 -2 s -1 in a low alloy No-Cr-Mo steel to observe the variation in its mechanical properties with the occurrence of reversible temper brittleness. The brittle samples showed a sensitivity of 50 0 C in a 48 hour heat treatment at 500 0 C. The tests showed that at the strain rate of 2,5x10 -4 s -1 there are statistically significant differences between the elongations of the material in the brittle and the nonbrittle and regenerated states. A short review of reversible temper brittleness is given and a theory suggested for the mechanism [pt

  19. Time-temperature equivalence in Martensite tempering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackenberg, Robert E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thomas, Grant A. [CSM; Speer, John G. [CSM; Matlock, David K. [CSM; Krauss, George [CSM

    2008-06-16

    The relationship between time and temperature is of great consequence in many materials-related processes including the tempering of martensite. In 1945, Hollomon and Jaffe quantified the 'degree of tempering' as a function of both tempering time, t, and tempering temperature, T, using the expression, T(log t + c). Here, c is thought to be a material constant and appears to decrease linearly with increasing carbon content. The Hollomon-Jaffe tempering parameter is frequently cited in the literature. This work reviews the original derivation of the tempering parameter concept, and presents the use of the characteristics diffusion distance as an alternative time-temperature relationship during martensite tempering. During the tempering of martensite, interstitial carbon atoms diffuse to form carbides. In addition, austenite decomposes, dislocations and grain boundaries rearrange, associated with iron self diffusion. Since these are all diffusional processes, it is reasonable to expect the degree of tempering to relate to the extent of diffusion.

  20. On change of vanadium carbide state during 20Kh3MVF steel heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gitgarts, M.I.; Maksimenko, V.N.

    1975-01-01

    The Xray diffraction study of vanadium carbide MC has been made in the steel-20KH3MVF quenched from 970 and 1040 deg and tempered at 660 deg for 210 hrs. It has been found that the constant of the MC crystal lattice regularly varies with the temperature of isothermal hold-up. In the steel tempered after quenching two vanadium carbides of different content could co-exist simultaneously: carbide formed in the quenching process and carbide formed during tempering. The discovered effect of the temperature dependence of the MC content is, evidently, inherent also to other steels containing vanadium

  1. Engineering of Nanoscale Antifouling and Hydrophobic Surfaces on Naval Structural Steel HY-80 by Anodizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    stainless steel by anodization. The oxide structures produced under these conditions granted the material significant visible light photo catalytic...metallurgically classified as quenched and tempered martensitic steels . They have a martensitic microstructure resulting from the 9 combination of...producing a martensitic structure is carbon. The as-quenched steel manifests high strength and hardness but also is brittle and susceptible to hydrogen

  2. Bearing structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, A.S.; Preece, G.E.

    1988-01-01

    A hydrostatic bearing for the lower end of the vertical shaft of a sodium pump comprises a support shell encircling the shaft and a bush located between the shell and shaft. Liquid sodium is fed from the pump outlet to the bush/shaft and bush/shell interfaces to provide hydrostatic support. The bush outer surface and the shell inner surface are of complementary part-spherical shape and the bush floats relative to the shaft so that the bush can align itself with the shaft axis. Monitoring of the relative rotational speed of the bush with respect to the shaft (such rotation being induced by the viscous drag forces present) is also performed for the purposes of detecting abnormal operation of the bearing or partial seizure, at least one magnet is rotatable with the bush, and a magnetic sensor provides an output having a frequency related to the speed of the bush. (author)

  3. Journal Bearings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Brancati

    1999-01-01

    determined after acquiring and analysing the orbits described by the journal axis for assigned unbalance values in different operating conditions. Analysis of the results shows some particular operating features that were not entirely predicted by the theoretical model and which may give rise to malfunctions in the rotor-tilting pad bearings system. The tests were carried out in the rotor dynamics laboratory of the Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica per l'Energetica at the University of Naples.

  4. Camshaft bearing arrangement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoi, K.; Ozawa, T.

    1986-06-10

    A bearing arrangement is described for the camshaft of an internal combustion engine or the like which camshaft is formed along its length in axial order with a first bearing surface, a first cam lobe, a second bearing surface, a second cam lobe, a third bearing surface, a third cam lobe and a fourth bearing surface, the improvement comprising first bearing means extending around substantially the full circumference of the first bearing surface and journaling the first bearing surface, second bearing means extending around substantially less than the circumference of the second bearing surface and journaling the second bearing surface, third bearing means extending around substantially less than the circumference of the third bearing surface and journaling the third bearing surface, and fourth bearing means extending around substantially the full circumference of the fourth bearing surface and journaling the first bearing surface.

  5. Rapid Thermal Processing to Enhance Steel Toughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, V K; Speer, J G; Clarke, K D; Findley, K O; Clarke, A J

    2018-01-11

    Quenching and Tempering (Q&T) has been utilized for decades to alter steel mechanical properties, particularly strength and toughness. While tempering typically increases toughness, a well-established phenomenon called tempered martensite embrittlement (TME) is known to occur during conventional Q&T. Here we show that short-time, rapid tempering can overcome TME to produce unprecedented property combinations that cannot be attained by conventional Q&T. Toughness is enhanced over 43% at a strength level of 1.7 GPa and strength is improved over 0.5 GPa at an impact toughness of 30 J. We also show that hardness and the tempering parameter (TP), developed by Holloman and Jaffe in 1945 and ubiquitous within the field, is insufficient for characterizing measured strengths, toughnesses, and microstructural conditions after rapid processing. Rapid tempering by energy-saving manufacturing processes like induction heating creates the opportunity for new Q&T steels for energy, defense, and transportation applications.

  6. Joints in Tempered Glass Using Glass Dowel Discs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Henrik; Poulsen, Peter Noe

    One of the major reasons for using glass in structures is its transparency; however, traditional mechanical joints such as friction joints and steel dowel pinned connections are compromising the transparency. The present paper describes a novel joint which is practically maintaining the complete...... transparency of the glass. This is achieved by using a dowel disc made entirely of tempered glass. The concept of the joint is proved by pilot tests and numerical models. From the work it is seen that the load-carrying capacity of such a connection is similar to what is found for traditionally in-plane loaded...

  7. Effect of niobium on the embrittlement of 2.25 Cr and 2.25 Cr-1Mo steels by phosphous

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antunes, J.L.B.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of niobium on the temper embrittlement of 2.25Cr and 2.25 Cr-1Mo steels doped with phosphorus is evaluated. The transition temperatures of the samples tempered at 650 0 C and aged at different temperatures for niobium steels. (M.J.C.) [pt

  8. Tempered stable laws as random walk limits

    OpenAIRE

    Chakrabarty, Arijit; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2010-01-01

    Stable laws can be tempered by modifying the L\\'evy measure to cool the probability of large jumps. Tempered stable laws retain their signature power law behavior at infinity, and infinite divisibility. This paper develops random walk models that converge to a tempered stable law under a triangular array scheme. Since tempered stable laws and processes are useful in statistical physics, these random walk models can provide a basic physical model for the underlying physical phenomena.

  9. Development and Evaluation of Titanium Spacesuit Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Richard; Battisti, Brian; Ytuarte, Raymond, Jr.; Schultz, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    The Z-2 Prototype Planetary Extravehicular Space Suit Assembly is a continuation of NASA's Z-series of spacesuits, designed with the intent of meeting a wide variety of exploration mission objectives, including human exploration of the Martian surface. Incorporating titanium bearings into the Z-series space suit architecture allows us to reduce mass by an estimated 23 lbs per suit system compared to the previously used stainless steel bearing race designs, without compromising suit functionality. There are two obstacles to overcome when using titanium for a bearing race- 1) titanium is flammable when exposed to the oxygen wetted environment inside the space suit and 2) titanium's poor wear properties are often challenging to overcome in tribology applications. In order to evaluate the ignitability of a titanium space suit bearing, a series of tests were conducted at White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) that introduced the bearings to an extreme test profile, with multiple failures imbedded into the test bearings. The testing showed no signs of ignition in the most extreme test cases; however, substantial wear of the bearing races was observed. In order to design a bearing that can last an entire exploration mission (approx. 3 years), design parameters for maximum contact stress need to be identified. To identify these design parameters, bearing test rigs were developed that allow for the quick evaluation of various bearing ball loads, ball diameters, lubricants, and surface treatments. This test data will allow designers to minimize the titanium bearing mass for a specific material and lubricant combination and design around a cycle life requirement for an exploration mission. This paper reviews the current research and testing that has been performed on titanium bearing races to evaluate the use of such materials in an enriched oxygen environment and to optimize the bearing assembly mass and tribological properties to accommodate for the high bearing cycle life for an

  10. Effects of heat treatment condition on the mechanical properties and weldability of 10Cr-1Mo-VNbN cast steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shon, Dae Young; Bang, Kook Soo; Lee, Kyong Woon; Chi, Byung Ha

    2003-01-01

    Mechanical properties and weldability such as HAZ hardness, cold cracking susceptibility and hot ductility of two differently heat treated 10Cr-1Mo-VNbN cast steels were measured and compared. Because of high hardenability of the cast steel, as-annealed cast steel showed martensitic microstructure and thus had higher hardness than annealed-normalized-tempered cast steel which had tempered martensite. Because the welding electrode used resulted in a high hardness weld metal, both cast steels showed same weld metal cold cracking susceptibility even though the as-annealed cast steel had higher HAZ hardness than the annealed-normalized-tempered cast steel. Both cast steels had excellent hot ductility in high temperature range, indicating no risk of grain boundary liquation cracking in the HAZ. However, the as-annealed cast steel showed an inferior ductility in the intermediate temperature range of 1000∼1150 .deg. C because of larger unrecrystallized grain size

  11. Modification of corrosion resistances of steels by rare earths ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Zhaomin; Zhang Weiguo; Liu Fengying; Shao Tongyi; Xiang Xuyang; Gao Fengqin; Li Gongpan

    1987-01-01

    Five kinds of rare earth RE elements have been implanted into steel No.45 and GCr15 bearing steel respectively. The corrosion resistances of the specimens have been examined using electrochemical dynamic potential method, in a NaAc/HAc solution for steel No.45 specimens and in a NaAc/HAc solution containing 0.1 mol/lNaCl for GCr15 bearing steel specimens. It has been found that the aqueous solution corrosion resistances of steel No.45 are obviously modified by implantation of RE element, and the pitting corrosion properties of GCr15 bearing steel are significantly improved due to heavy RE element implantation

  12. Reducing Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Bearing Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, N. E.; Dennies, D. P.; Lumsden, I., J.b.

    1986-01-01

    Resistance to stress-corrosion cracking in some stainless-steel alloys increased by addition of small amounts of noble metals. 0.75 to 1.00 percent by weight of palladium or platinum added to alloy melt sufficient to improve properties of certain stainless steels so they could be used in manufacture of high-speed bearings.

  13. Tribocorrosion wear of austenitic and martensitic steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rozing

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the impact of tribocorrosion wear caused by an aggressive acidic media. Tests were conducted on samples made of stainless steel AISI 316L, 304L and 440C. Austenitic steels were tested in their nitrided state and martensitic in quenched and tempered and then induction hardened state. Electrochemical corrosion resistance testing and analysis of the microstructure and hardness in the cross section was carried out on samples of selected steels. To test the possibility of applying surface modification of selected materials in conditions of use, tests were conducted on samples/parts in a worm press for final pressing.

  14. Use of niobium to substitute vanadium in the steel for hot work AISI H3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branco, J.R.T.; Jesus, B.G. de

    1984-01-01

    Experimental results on austenitic grain size, quenching hardness and response to tempering measured on a H13 tool steel modified by niobium additions are described. It is shown that the replacement of 25 and 50% percent of the total vanadium by 0,05% of niobium does not change the response to quenching and tempering. (Author) [pt

  15. Microstructure and transformation kinetics in bainitic steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luzginova, N.V.

    2008-01-01

    With the aim of reaching a better understanding of the microstructure evolution and the overall phase transformation kinetics in hyper-eutectoid steels a commercial SAE 52100 bearing steel and 7 model alloys with different concentrations of chromium, cobalt and aluminum have been studied in this

  16. Wear-resistant ball bearings for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boving, H.; Hintermann, H. E.; Hanni, W.; Bondivenne, E.; Boeto, M.; Conde, E.

    1977-01-01

    Ball bearings consisting of steel parts of which the rings are coated with hard, wear resistant, chemical vapor deposited TiC are described. Experiments conducted in ultrahigh vacuum, using cages of various materials with self-lubricating properties, show that such bearings are suitable for space applications. The results of laboratory tests on the ESA Meteosat Radiometer Focalizing mechanism, which contains six coated bearings, are summarized.

  17. On the rational alloying of structural chromium-nickel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astaf'ev, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    A study was made on the influence of chromium nickel, phosphorus on the critical brittleness temperature of Cr-Ni-Mo-V structural steels. It is shown that the critical brittleness temperature of these steels increases at chromium content more over than 2% and nickel content more than 2% in the result of carbide transformations during tempering. Increase of nickel content in Cr-Ni-Mo-V-steels strengthens the tendency to embrittlement during slow cooling, from tempering temperature owing to development of process of phosphorus grain-boundary segregation. Two mentioned mechanisms of embrittlement determine principles of rational steel alloying. The extreme dependence of the critical brittleness temperature on chromium and nickel content, which enables to choose the optimum composition of Cr-Ni-Mo-V-steels, was established

  18. Tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mabruri, Efendi, E-mail: effe004@lipi.go.id; Anwar, Moch Syaiful, E-mail: moch.syaiful.anwar@lipi.go.id; Prifiharni, Siska, E-mail: siska.prifiharni@lipi.go.id; Romijarso, Toni B.; Adjiantoro, Bintang [Research Center for Metallurgy and Materials, Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI) Kawasan Puspiptek Gd. 470 Serpong, Tangerang Selatan 15314 (Indonesia)

    2016-04-19

    This paper reports the influence of Mo and Ni on the tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels in tempered condition. Four steels with different content of Mo and Ni were prepared by induction melting followed by hot forging, quenching and tempering. The experimental results showed that the addition of about 1% and 3% Mo has a beneficial effect to increase both the tensile strength and the elongation of the steels. On the contrary, the addition of about 3% Ni into the martensitic stainless steel results in decreasing of both the tensile strength and the elongation. Among the alloys investigated the 13Cr3Mo type steel exhibited largest tensile strength of 1348 MPa and largest elongation of 12%. The observation on the tensile fractured surfaces by using scanning electron microscope supported these findings.

  19. Tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mabruri, Efendi; Anwar, Moch Syaiful; Prifiharni, Siska; Romijarso, Toni B.; Adjiantoro, Bintang

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the influence of Mo and Ni on the tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels in tempered condition. Four steels with different content of Mo and Ni were prepared by induction melting followed by hot forging, quenching and tempering. The experimental results showed that the addition of about 1% and 3% Mo has a beneficial effect to increase both the tensile strength and the elongation of the steels. On the contrary, the addition of about 3% Ni into the martensitic stainless steel results in decreasing of both the tensile strength and the elongation. Among the alloys investigated the 13Cr3Mo type steel exhibited largest tensile strength of 1348 MPa and largest elongation of 12%. The observation on the tensile fractured surfaces by using scanning electron microscope supported these findings.

  20. Toughness of 2,25Cr-1Mo steel and weld metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acarer, Mustafa; Arici, Gökhan; Acar, Filiz Kumdali; Keskinkilic, Selcuk; Kabakci, Fikret

    2017-09-01

    2,25Cr-1Mo steel is extensively used at elevated temperature structural applications in fossil fire power plants for steam pipes, nozzle chambers and petrochemical industry for hydrocracking unit due to its excellent creep resistance and good redundant to oxidation. Also they should have acceptable weldability and toughness. The steels are supplied in quenched and tempered condition and their welded components are subjected to post-weld heat treatment (PWHT). Tempering process is carried out at 690-710°C to improve toughness properties. However they are sensitive to reheat cracking and temper embrittlement. To measure temper embrittlement of the steels and their weld metal, temper embrittlement factor and formula (J factor - Watanabe and X formula- Bruscato) are used. Step cooling heat treatment is also applied to determine temper embrittlement. In this study, toughness properties of Cr Mo (W) steels were reviewed. Also transition temperature curves of 2,25Cr-1Mo steel and its weld metal were constructed before and after step cool heat treatment as experimental study. While 2,25Cr-1Mo steel as base metal was supplied, all weld metal samples were produced in Gedik Welding Company. Hardness measurements and microstructure evaluation were also carried out.

  1. Aircraft Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-19

    component usage. PH 13-8Mo is a precipitation-hardenable martensitic stainless steel combining excellent corrosion resistance with strength. Custom 465 is...a martensitic , age-hardenable stainless steel capable of about 1,724 MPa (250 ksi) UTS when peak-aged (H900 condition). Especially, this steel can...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Five high strength steels (4340, 300M, AerMet 100, Ferrium S53, and Hy-Tuf) and four stainless steels (High Nitrogen, 13

  2. Atom-Probe Tomographic Investigations of a Precipitation-Strengthened HSLA-115 Steel and a Ballistic-Resistant 10 wt. % Ni Steel for Naval Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Divya

    due to overaging of Cu precipitates and tempering of the martensitic matrix. This results in an extended yield strength plateau, compared to alloys relying solely on Cu precipitation strengthening (for example, NUCu-140 steels) and is highly beneficial as impact toughness improves significantly in overaged conditions with respect to Cu precipitates. Optimum mechanical properties (yield strength 141 ksi or 972.1 MPa, elongation to failure 24.8 %, and impact toughness 188.0 J at -18 °C) are attained after 3 h aging at 550 °C. Incorporating finely dispersed M2C carbides with Cu precipitates, thus provides a promising pathway for use of Cu-bearing Naval HSLA-115 steels in higher strength applications, while still meting toughness and ductility requirements. Low-carbon 10 wt. % Ni steels are optimally processed via a multi-step intercritical Quench Lamellarizing Tempering (QLT)-treatment to form a fine dispersion of thermally stable Ni-enriched austenite in a tempered martensitic matrix. Deformation-induced martensitic transformation of this austenite is key to its superior overall mechanical properties, specifically ballistic resistance over HSLA-100 steels. This research elucidates the basic physical principles controlling the thermal stability and kinetics of Ni-stabilized austenite, formed during the QLT-treatment. The role of Ni-enriched austenite and fresh martensitic regions, inherited from the first isothermal intercritical step (L) at 650 °C, in forming thermally stable austenite during the second isothermal intercritical step (T) at 590 °C is highlighted using dilatometry, synchrotron X-ray diffraction, 3-D atom-probe tomography (APT), and thermodynamic and kinetic modeling using ThermoCalc and Dictra. Results indicate the growth of nm-thick austenite layers during T-step tempering (predominantly in the Ni-enriched fresh martensitic regions), with austenite retained from L-step acting as a nucleation template. Thermal stability of austenite is estimated by

  3. Method of treating tool steel die materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, C.S.; Damon, S.

    1981-01-01

    In a method of hardening pilger dies to provide a hard case containing residual compressive stresses and tough body, the tool steel die is heated to the austenitizing temperature range, followed by selectively removing heat from the die at a predetermined faster rate in the direction of the desired case than the rate of heat removal from the balance of the die, and thereafter tempering the die. The invention provides a fully hardened and tempered case on the working surface of the die and a tough body in the balance of the die, usually of lower hardness. (author)

  4. Development of a dc motor with virtually zero powered magnetic bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-01-01

    The development of magnetic bearings for use in direct current electric motors is discussed. The characteristics of the magnets used in the construction of the bearings are described. A magnetic bearing using steel armoring on permanent magnets was selected for performance tests. The specifications of the motor are presented. The test equipment used in the evaluation is described.

  5. The effect of prior tempering on cryogenic treatment to reduce retained austenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stratton, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The consensus view is that a high carbon case gives gears the best overall properties provided that there is no carbide network and that the retained austenite has been reduced below 20% by cryogenic treatment. This view is effectively enshrined in the SAE AMS 2759/7 standard. The cryogenic treatment usually takes place immediately after the quench to avoid austenite stabilisation. However, for some parts with complex geometries that might crack during the treatment, a short low temperature temper is carried out first. Little is known on how this temper affects the subsequent cryogenic treatment. Three carburizing steels used extensively in the aerospace industry were carburized to produce high retained austenite levels in the case using two different, but typical carburizing cycles. The retained austenite was determined by XRD before and after cryogenic treatment carried out in accordance with the standard and compared with that obtained when an intermediate temper was used. This study shows that for three typical carburizing steels, carburized using typical cycles, the efficacy of the cryogenic treatment is reduced only slightly after the temper, and not enough to be industrially significant. (author)

  6. Development of ferritic steels for fusion reactor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Maziasz, P.J.; Corwin, W.R.

    1988-08-01

    Chromium-molybdenum ferritic (martensitic) steels are leading candidates for the structural components for future fusion reactors. However, irradiation of such steels in a fusion environment will produce long-lived radioactive isotopes that will lead to difficult waste-disposal problems. Such problems could be reduced by replacing the elements in the steels (i.e., Mo, Nb, Ni, N, and Cu) that lead to long-lived radioactive isotopes. We have proposed the development of ferritic steels analogous to conventional Cr-Mo steels, which contain molybdenum and niobium. It is proposed that molybdenum be replaced by tungsten and niobium be replaced by tantalum. Eight experimental steels were produced. Chromium concentrations of 2.25, 5, 9, and 12% were used (all concentrations are in wt %). Steels with these chromium compositions, each containing 2% W and 0.25% V, were produced. To determine the effect of tungsten and vanadium, 2.25 Cr steels were produced with 2% W and no vanadium and with 0.25% V and O and 1% W. A 9Cr steel containing 2% W, 0.25 V, and 0.07% Ta was also studied. For all alloys, carbon was maintained at 0.1%. Tempering studies on the normalized steels indicated that the tempering behavior of the new Cr-W steels was similar to that of the analogous Cr-Mo steels. Microscopy studies indicated that 2% tungsten was required in the 2.25 Cr steels to produce 100% bainite in 15.9-mm-thick plate during normalization. The 5Cr and 9Cr steels were 100% martensite, but the 12 Cr steel contained about 75% martensite with the balance delta-ferrite. 33 refs., 35 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Development of ferritic steels for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Maziasz, P.J.; Corwin, W.R.

    1988-08-01

    Chromium-molybdenum ferritic (martensitic) steels are leading candidates for the structural components for future fusion reactors. However, irradiation of such steels in a fusion environment will produce long-lived radioactive isotopes that will lead to difficult waste-disposal problems. Such problems could be reduced by replacing the elements in the steels (i.e., Mo, Nb, Ni, N, and Cu) that lead to long-lived radioactive isotopes. We have proposed the development of ferritic steels analogous to conventional Cr-Mo steels, which contain molybdenum and niobium. It is proposed that molybdenum be replaced by tungsten and niobium be replaced by tantalum. Eight experimental steels were produced. Chromium concentrations of 2.25, 5, 9, and 12% were used (all concentrations are in wt %). Steels with these chromium compositions, each containing 2% W and 0.25% V, were produced. To determine the effect of tungsten and vanadium, 2.25 Cr steels were produced with 2% W and no vanadium and with 0.25% V and O and 1% W. A 9Cr steel containing 2% W, 0.25 V, and 0.07% Ta was also studied. For all alloys, carbon was maintained at 0.1%. Tempering studies on the normalized steels indicated that the tempering behavior of the new Cr-W steels was similar to that of the analogous Cr-Mo steels. Microscopy studies indicated that 2% tungsten was required in the 2.25 Cr steels to produce 100% bainite in 15.9-mm-thick plate during normalization. The 5Cr and 9Cr steels were 100% martensite, but the 12 Cr steel contained about 75% martensite with the balance delta-ferrite. 33 refs., 35 figs., 5 tabs

  8. Steel making

    CERN Document Server

    Chakrabarti, A K

    2014-01-01

    "Steel Making" is designed to give students a strong grounding in the theory and state-of-the-art practice of production of steels. This book is primarily focused to meet the needs of undergraduate metallurgical students and candidates for associate membership examinations of professional bodies (AMIIM, AMIE). Besides, for all engineering professionals working in steel plants who need to understand the basic principles of steel making, the text provides a sound introduction to the subject.Beginning with a brief introduction to the historical perspective and current status of steel making together with the reasons for obsolescence of Bessemer converter and open hearth processes, the book moves on to: elaborate the physiochemical principles involved in steel making; explain the operational principles and practices of the modern processes of primary steel making (LD converter, Q-BOP process, and electric furnace process); provide a summary of the developments in secondary refining of steels; discuss principles a...

  9. Visualization of hydrogen in steels by secondary ion mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takai, Kenichi

    2000-01-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) enables us to visualize hydrogen trapping sites in steels. Information about the hydrogen trapping sites in high-strength steels by SIMS is very important to discuss environmental embrittlement mechanism for developing steels with a high resistance to the environmental embrittlement. Secondary ion image analysis by SIMS has made possible to visualize the hydrogen and deuterium trapping sites in the steels. Hydrogen in tempered martensite steels containing Ca tends to accumulate on inclusions, at grain boundaries, and in segregation bands. Visualization of hydrogen desorption process by secondary ion image analysis confirms that the bonding between the inclusions and the hydrogen is strong. Cold-drawn pearlite steels trap hydrogen along cold-drawing direction. Pearlite phase absorbs the hydrogen more than ferrite phase does. This article introduces the principle of SIMS, its feature, analysis method, and results of hydrogen visualization in steels. (author)

  10. Passive magnetic bearing configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Richard F [Walnut Creek, CA

    2011-01-25

    A journal bearing provides vertical and radial stability to a rotor of a passive magnetic bearing system when the rotor is not rotating and when it is rotating. In the passive magnetic bearing system, the rotor has a vertical axis of rotation. Without the journal bearing, the rotor is vertically and radially unstable when stationary, and is vertically stable and radially unstable when rotating.

  11. The use of double-decker catcher bearing with face-to-face installed inner layer bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yi-Li; Zheng, Zhong-Qiao

    2017-07-01

    In active magnetic bearing (AMB) system, the catcher bearings (CB) are indispensable to temporarily support the rotor from directly impacting the stators. In most cases, traditional CB cannot bear the ultra-high speed, vibrations and impacts after a rotor drop event. To address the shortcomings, a double-decker ball bearing (DDBB) with inner two face-to-face angular contact ball bearings are proposed to be used as CB in an AMB system, and the dynamic response of the rotor after a rotor drop event is experimentally analyzed. The results indicate that using a DDBB as a CB helps to reduce the following collision forces after a rotor drop. Larger ball initial contact angles and smaller pre-load force on the inner layer bearings, larger radial clearance of the outer layer bearing and choosing AISI 10AISI 1045 steel which has a larger density for the adapter ring can effectively reduce the maximum impact force after a rotor drop event.

  12. Rolling Bearing Life Prediction, Theory, and Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    2016-01-01

    A tutorial is presented outlining the evolution, theory, and application of rolling-element bearing life prediction from that of A. Palmgren, 1924; W. Weibull, 1939; G. Lundberg and A. Palmgren, 1947 and 1952; E. Ioannides and T. Harris, 1985; and E. Zaretsky, 1987. Comparisons are made between these life models. The Ioannides-Harris model without a fatigue limit is identical to the Lundberg-Palmgren model. The Weibull model is similar to that of Zaretsky if the exponents are chosen to be identical. Both the load-life and Hertz stress-life relations of Weibull, Lundberg and Palmgren, and Ioannides and Harris reflect a strong dependence on the Weibull slope. The Zaretsky model decouples the dependence of the critical shear stress-life relation from the Weibull slope. This results in a nominal variation of the Hertz stress-life exponent. For 9th- and 8th-power Hertz stress-life exponents for ball and roller bearings, respectively, the Lundberg-Palmgren model best predicts life. However, for 12th- and 10th-power relations reflected by modern bearing steels, the Zaretsky model based on the Weibull equation is superior. Under the range of stresses examined, the use of a fatigue limit would suggest that (for most operating conditions under which a rolling-element bearing will operate) the bearing will not fail from classical rolling-element fatigue. Realistically, this is not the case. The use of a fatigue limit will significantly overpredict life over a range of normal operating Hertz stresses. (The use of ISO 281:2007 with a fatigue limit in these calculations would result in a bearing life approaching infinity.) Since the predicted lives of rolling-element bearings are high, the problem can become one of undersizing a bearing for a particular application. Rules had been developed to distinguish and compare predicted lives with those actually obtained. Based upon field and test results of 51 ball and roller bearing sets, 98 percent of these bearing sets had acceptable

  13. A comparison of low-chromium and high-chromium reduced-activation steels for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Maziasz, P.J.; Alexander, D.J.

    1996-01-01

    Ferritic steels have been considered candidate structural materials for first wall and blanket structures for fusion power plants since the late 1970s. The first steels considered in the United States were the conventional Cr-Mo steels Sandvik HT9 (nominally 12Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.2C, here designated l2Cr-1MoVW), modified 9Cr-1Mo steel (9Cr-1Mo-0.2V-0.06Nb-0. IC, designated 9Cr-1MoVNb) and, to a lesser extent, 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel (2.25Cr-Mo-0.1C). All compositions are in wt. %. The normalized-and-tempered 9 and 12Cr steels had a tempered martensite microstructure, and the normalized-and-tempered 2 1/4 Cr steel had a tempered bainite microstructure. This report describes chromium steels tested in normalized and tempered conditions. Miniature tensile and Charpy specimens were tested

  14. Controlling DC permeability in cast steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumner, Aaran; Gerada, Chris; Brown, Neil; Clare, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Annealing (at multiple cooling rates) and quenching (with tempering) was performed on specimens of cast steel of varying composition. The aim was to devise a method for selecting the steel with the highest permeability, from any given range of steels, and then increasing the permeability by heat treatment. Metallographic samples were imaged using optical microscopy to show the effect of the applied heat treatments on the microstructure. Commonly cast steels can have DC permeability altered by the careful selection of a heat treatment. Increases of up to 381% were achieved by annealing using a cooling rate of 6.0 °C/min. Annealing was found to cause the carbon present in the steel to migrate from grain boundaries and from within ferrite crystals into adjacent pearlite crystals. The migration of the carbon resulted in less carbon at grain boundaries and within ferrite crystals reducing the number of pinning sites between magnetic domains. This gives rise to a higher permeability. Quenching then tempering was found to cause the formation of small ferrite crystals with the carbon content of the steel predominately held in the martensitic crystal structures. The results show that with any given range of steel compositions the highest baseline DC permeability will be found with the steel that has the highest iron content and the lowest carbon content. For the samples tested in this paper a cooling rate of 4.5 °C/min resulted in the relative permeability of the sample with the highest baseline permeability, AS4, increasing from 783 to 1479 at 0.5 T. This paper shows how heat treatments commonly applied to hypoeutectoid cast steels, to improve their mechanical performance, can be used to also enhance electromagnetic properties of these alloys. The use of cast steels allows the creation of DC components for electrical machines not possible by the widely used method of stacking of electrical grade sheet steels. - Highlights: • A range of structural steels had their

  15. Controlling DC permeability in cast steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumner, Aaran, E-mail: aaran.sumner@nottingham.ac.uk [University of Nottingham, Nottingham University Park Campus, Nottingham NG7 2RD, England (United Kingdom); Gerada, Chris, E-mail: chris.gerada@nottingham.ac.uk [Electrical Machines, University of Nottingham, Tower Building, Nottingham NG7 2RD, England (United Kingdom); Brown, Neil, E-mail: neil.brown@cummins.com [Advanced Electrical Machines Research and Technology at Cummins Power Generation, Peterborough PE2 6FZ, England (United Kingdom); Clare, Adam, E-mail: adam.clare@nottingham.ac.uk [Advanced Manufacturing, University of Nottingham, University Park Campus, Nottingham NG7 2RD, England (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-01

    Annealing (at multiple cooling rates) and quenching (with tempering) was performed on specimens of cast steel of varying composition. The aim was to devise a method for selecting the steel with the highest permeability, from any given range of steels, and then increasing the permeability by heat treatment. Metallographic samples were imaged using optical microscopy to show the effect of the applied heat treatments on the microstructure. Commonly cast steels can have DC permeability altered by the careful selection of a heat treatment. Increases of up to 381% were achieved by annealing using a cooling rate of 6.0 °C/min. Annealing was found to cause the carbon present in the steel to migrate from grain boundaries and from within ferrite crystals into adjacent pearlite crystals. The migration of the carbon resulted in less carbon at grain boundaries and within ferrite crystals reducing the number of pinning sites between magnetic domains. This gives rise to a higher permeability. Quenching then tempering was found to cause the formation of small ferrite crystals with the carbon content of the steel predominately held in the martensitic crystal structures. The results show that with any given range of steel compositions the highest baseline DC permeability will be found with the steel that has the highest iron content and the lowest carbon content. For the samples tested in this paper a cooling rate of 4.5 °C/min resulted in the relative permeability of the sample with the highest baseline permeability, AS4, increasing from 783 to 1479 at 0.5 T. This paper shows how heat treatments commonly applied to hypoeutectoid cast steels, to improve their mechanical performance, can be used to also enhance electromagnetic properties of these alloys. The use of cast steels allows the creation of DC components for electrical machines not possible by the widely used method of stacking of electrical grade sheet steels. - Highlights: • A range of structural steels had their

  16. Effect of High-Temperature Thermomechanical Treatment on the Brittle Fracture of Low-Carbon Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, M. A.; Pyshmintsev, I. Yu.; Varnak, O. V.; Mal'tseva, A. N.

    2018-02-01

    The effect of high-temperature thermomechanical treatment (HTMT) on the brittleness connected with deformation-induced aging and on the reversible temper brittleness of a low-carbon tube steel with a ferrite-bainite structure has been studied. When conducting an HTMT of a low-alloy steel, changes should be taken into account in the amount of ferrite in its structure and relationships between the volume fractions of the lath and the acicular bainite. It has been established that steel subjected to HTMT undergoes transcrystalline embrittlement upon deformation aging. At the same time, HTMT, which suppresses intercrystalline fracture, leads to a weakening of the development of reversible temper brittleness.

  17. New temperable solar coatings: Tempsol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiryont, Hulya

    2001-11-01

    This paper deals with the large area deposition and coating properties of the thermo-stable (temperable/bendable) solar coating material, CuO, and some new optical coating systems comprising CuO films for architectural and automotive/transportation applications. The CuO solar coating is combined with other coating layers, for example, an anti-reflection film, a reflection film, a coloration coating layer, etc., which are also thermo-stable. The film systems are developed at the research laboratory by D.C. Magnetron reactive sputtering process. The new developed technologies then transferred to the production line. Product performances are compared before and after heat treatment of the coating systems. Performance tables and other physical properties, including optical parameters, mechanical and environmental stability, storage properties, etc., are also presented for this new product series.

  18. Effects of heat treatment on mechanical properties of h13 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guanghua, Yan; Xinmin, Huang; Yanqing, Wang; Xingguo, Qin; Ming, Yang; Zuoming, Chu; Kang, Jin

    2010-12-01

    Heat treatment on the mechanical properties of H13 hot working die steel for die casting is discussed. The H13 steel for die casting was treated by different temperatures of vacuum quenching, tempering, and secondary tempering to investigate its mechanical properties. Strength, plasticity, hardness, and impact toughness of the H13 hot working die steel for die casting were measured. Microstructure, grain size, and carbide particle size after heat treatment have a great impact on the mechanical properties of H13 hot working die steel for die casting. The microstructure of the H13 was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and by a metallographic microscope. It is found that H13 exhibits excellent mechanical properties after vacuum quenching at 1050°C and twice tempering at 600°C.

  19. Predicting the Abrasion Resistance of Tool Steels by Means of Neurofuzzy Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragutin Lisjak

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This work considers use neurofuzzy set theory for estimate abrasion wear resistance of steels based on chemical composition, heat treatment (austenitising temperature, quenchant and tempering temperature, hardness after hardening and different tempering temperature and volume loss of materials according to ASTM G 65-94. Testing of volume loss for the following group of materials as fuzzy data set was taken: carbon tool steels, cold work tool steels, hot work tools steels, high-speed steels. Modelled adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system (ANFIS is compared to statistical model of multivariable non-linear regression (MNLR. From the results it could be concluded that it is possible well estimate abrasion wear resistance for steel whose volume loss is unknown and thus eliminate unnecessary testing.

  20. Influence of two different heat treatment procedures on mechanical and fracture properties of 65 Si 7 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustaic, D.; Cajner, F.

    2001-01-01

    This paper deals with the results of investigations of two different heat treatment procedures and their influence on some mechanical properties as well as on the magnitude of some fracture mechanics parameters for a particular type of steel. The experimental investigations were performed on the specimens made of 65Si7 steel. The processes occurring by tempering of two different microstructures of the steel, i. e. martensite and lower bainite were investigated. An advantage of austempering over hardening and tempering is in obtaining the bainite microstructure. Steel of bainite microstructure has a greater toughness, ductility, contraction, fatigue strength and a better fracture toughness than a tempered martensite of the same type of steel. A bainite microstructure also gives a better resistance to thermal fatigue in comparison with martensite microstructure. The above mentioned improved values of mechanical properties refer to the untempered state of bainite. (author)

  1. Tensile-property characterization of thermally aged cast stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaud, W.F.; Toben, P.T.; Soppet, W.K.; Chopra, O.K.

    1994-02-01

    The effect of thermal aging on tensile properties of cast stainless steels during service in light water reactors has been evaluated. Tensile data for several experimental and commercial heats of cast stainless steels are presented. Thermal aging increases the tensile strength of these steels. The high-C Mo-bearing CF-8M steels are more susceptible to thermal aging than the Mo-free CF-3 or CF-8 steels. A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting the change in tensile flow and yield stresses and engineering stress-vs.-strain curve of cast stainless steel as a function of time and temperature of service. The tensile properties of aged cast stainless steel are estimated from known material information, i.e., chemical composition and the initial tensile strength of the steel. The correlations described in this report may be used for assessing thermal embrittlement of cast stainless steel components

  2. intercritical heat treatments effects on low carbon steels quenched

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR B. A. EZEKOYE

    Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nigeria, Nsukka. 2. E-mail: benjamin.ezekoye@unn.edu.ng; bezekoye@yahoo.com. ABSTRACT. Six low carbon steels containing carbon in the range 0.13-0.18wt%C were studied after intercritical quenching, intercritical quenching with low temperature tempering, ...

  3. Microstructures and properties of low-alloy fire resistant steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    hardening. In a quenched and self-tempered 600 MPa class TMT reinforcement bar steel (YS: 624 MPa), low ..... of processing (1000–1050°C), static, dynamic as well as metadynamic recrystallization of austenite can occur (Poliak and Jonas ...

  4. Stress-Corrosion Cracking of Metallic Materials. Part III. Hydrogen Entry and Embrittlement in Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-04-01

    work of Kerns (36)] 29 22 Crack Velocity vs. Stress Intensity for AISI 4340 Steel (Martensitic and Bainitic Structures) in 314 NaCl Solution (pit = 6.0...magnitude greater for 4340 steel with a tempered martensite structure than for the lower bainite structure. Figure 22 shows crack velocity as a function of...applied stress intensity for martensitic and bainitic steels . The dif- ference was attributed to more effective trapping of hydrogen at coher- ently

  5. Fibre Laser Welding of HY-80 Steel: Procedure Development and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    2 Welding The material used in this study was quenched and tempered martensitic HY80 steel which conforms to MIL-S-1621 [2]. The testing...Journal, 1977. [4] AWS, D1.6 in Structural Welding Code Stainless Steel . 2007, American Welding Society: Miami Florida. [5] DefStan, 02-770 Part 2...Canada Fibre Laser Welding of HY-80 Steel Proceedure Development and Testing Christopher Bayley DLP Neil Aucoin DLP Xinjin Cao NRC IAR AMTC Technical

  6. Effect of Post-weld Heat Treatment on the Mechanical Properties of Supermartensitic Stainless Steel Deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappa, Sebastián; Svoboda, Hernán; Surian, Estela

    2017-02-01

    Supermartensitic stainless steels have good weldability and adequate tensile property, toughness and corrosion resistance. They have been developed as an alternative technology, mainly for oil and gas industries. The final properties of a supermartensitic stainless steel deposit depend on its chemical composition and microstructure: martensite, tempered martensite, ferrite, retained austenite and carbides and/or nitrides. In these steels, the post-weld heat treatments (PWHTs) are usually double tempering ones, to ensure both complete tempering of martensite and high austenite content, to increase toughness and decrease hardness. The aim of this work was to study the effect of post-weld heat treatments (solution treatment with single and double tempering) on the mechanical properties of a supermartensitic stainless steel deposit. An all-weld metal test coupon was welded according to standard ANSI/AWS A5.22-95 using a GMAW supermartensitic stainless steel metal cored wire, under gas shielding. PWHTs were carried out varying the temperature of the first tempering treatment with and without a second tempering one, after solution treatment. All-weld metal chemical composition analysis, metallurgical characterization, hardness and tensile property measurements and Charpy-V tests were carried out. There are several factors which can be affected by the PWHTs, among them austenite content is a significant one. Different austenite contents (0-42%) were found. Microhardness, tensile property and toughness were affected with up to 15% of austenite content, by martensite tempering and carbide precipitation. The second tempering treatment seemed not to have had an important effect on the mechanical properties measured in this work.

  7. The Effect of Tempering on Strength Properties and Seed Coat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of tempering on seed coat adhesion strength and mechanical strength of sorghum and millet grain kernels was investigated at different tempering durations. Tempering reduced the kernel breaking strength and had significant effect on seed coat adhesion strength. Tempering the grain for 60 minutes at ambient ...

  8. Some special problems of steel reinforcement in nuclear structural engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazant, B.; Smejkal, P.; Vetchy, J.

    1986-01-01

    A comparison is made of the mechanical and design characteristics of reinforcing steels for reinforced concrete structures of classes A-0 to A-IV under Czechoslovak State Standard CSN 73 1201 and Soviet standard SNiP II-21-75. Tests were performed to study changes in the values of the yield point, breaking strength, the tensile strength limit and the module of elasticity in selected Czechoslovak steels. The comparison showed that the steels behave in the same manner at high temperatures as Soviet steels of corresponding strength characteristics. Dynamic design strength of Czechoslovak materials also corresponds to values given in the Soviet standard. The technology and evaluation of welded joints equal for both Czechoslovak and Soviet steels. The manufacture was started of tempered wires with a high strength limit for prestressed wire reinforcement. All tests and comparisons showed that Czechoslovak reinforcing steels meet Soviet prescriptions, in some instances Czechoslovak standards are even more strict. (J.B.)

  9. Modern high strength QT, TM and duplex-stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bocquet, P.; Luxenburger, G.; Porter, D.; Ericsson, C.

    2003-01-01

    Pressure vessels are commonly manufactured with normalised steel grades with a yield strength up to 355 MPa or with austenitic stainless steels when corrosion as to be considered. From three decades, modern steels with higher mechanical properties - up to yield strength of 960 Mpa - are available and largely used for other applications where weight saving is of major importance as per off-shore, bridges, cranes, shipbuilding, line pipes.. The paper presents these modern steel's families - TMCP (Thermo Mechanically Controlled Process), QT (Quenched and Tempered) and Duplex (austeno-ferritic) stainless - in comparison with the normalised and austenitic steel grades. The following aspects are presented: the main mechanical properties (tensile and Charpy) as per the requirements of the standards for pressure equipment; some examples of use of these modern steels in the industry are given; the limitations of the forming conditions are considered; the weldability aspects and welds properties are developed; the interest of the PWHT (Post Weld Heat Treatment) is discussed. (orig.)

  10. Powder metallurgy bearings for advanced rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, J. N.; Killman, B. J.; Munson, H.E.

    1985-01-01

    Traditional ingot metallurgy was pushed to the limit for many demanding applications including antifriction bearings. New systems require corrosion resistance, better fatigue resistance, and higher toughness. With conventional processing, increasing the alloying level to achieve corrosion resistance results in a decrease in other properties such as toughness. Advanced powder metallurgy affords a viable solution to this problem. During powder manufacture, the individual particle solidifies very rapidly; as a consequence, the primary carbides are very small and uniformly distributed. When properly consolidated, this uniform structure is preserved while generating a fully dense product. Element tests including rolling contact fatigue, hot hardness, wear, fracture toughness, and corrosion resistance are underway on eleven candidate P/M bearing alloys and results are compared with those for wrought 440C steel, the current SSME bearing material. Several materials which offer the promise of a significant improvement in performance were identified.

  11. Teddy Bear Stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Leeuwen, Theo; Caldas-Coulthardt, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a semiotic analysis of a key cultural artefact, the teddy bear. After introducing the iconography of the teddy bear, it analyses different kinds of stories to show how teddy bears are endowed with meaning in everyday life: stories from children's books, reminiscenses by adults...... bears have traditionally centred on interpersonal relations within the nuclear family, but have recently been institutionalized and commercialized....

  12. The heat treatment effect on the structural changes and properties of high-nitrogen chromium steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinov, V.M.; Elistratov, A.A.; Kolesnikov, A.G.; Rakhshtadt, A.G.; Plokhikh, A.I.; Morozova, E.I.; Kostina, M.V.

    2000-01-01

    The structural transformations in the steels with 0.4-1.3 %N and 15-24 %Cr content, originating by thermal treatment, are studied. The dependences of the phase composition of the high-chromium steels (18 %Cr) on the nitrogen content are established. The ratio of the unchanged austenite increases and the martensite quantity decreases correspondingly with growth of the nitrogen concentration from 0.4 up to 1.2 %. The effect of strengthening the steels with the initial martensite structure as well as austenite and martensite steels is observed in the process of steels tempering due to the hardening on the account of the martensite dispersion hardening [ru

  13. Development of LP turbine rotor steels resistant to stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Takenori; Sugie, Kiyoshi; Fujiwara, Kazuo; Takano, Masayoshi; Kinoshita, Shushi

    1988-01-01

    The effect of various alloying elements on caustic SCC of 3.5 NiCrMoV steel for turbine rotor forgings was studied. From the results, low P (≤ 0.005 %) steel and low P (≤ 0.005 %) - Nb (0.02/0.03 %) steel has been developed as a rotor material, resistant to SCC. It is confirmed that the developed steel has a higher resistance to SCC and to temper embrittlement, and has equivalent other mechanical properties to those of conventional rotor steel. In addition, the role of P and Nb in SCC was also discussed. (author)

  14. Comparisons of invasive plants in southern Africa originating from southern temperate, northern temperate and tropical regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Henderson

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available A subset of invasive alien plant species in southern Africa was analysed in terms of their history of introduction, rate of spread, countries/region of origin, taxonomy, growth forms, cultivated uses, weed status and current distribution in southern Africa, and comparisons made of those originating from south of the tropic of Capricorn, north of the tropic of Cancer and from the tropics. The subset of 233 species, belonging to 58 families, includes all important declared species and some potentially important species. Almost as many species originate from temperate regions (112 as from the tropics (121. Most southern temperate species came from Australia (28/36, most tropical species from tropical America (92/121 and most northern temperate species from Europe (including the Mediterranean and Asia (58/76. Transformers account for 33% of  all species. More transformers are of tropical origin (36 than of northern temperate (24 and southern temperate origin (18. However. 50% of southern temperate species are transformers, compared to 32% of northern temperate and 29% of tropical species. Southern temperate transformer species are mainly woody trees and shrubs that were established on a grand scale as silvicultural crops, barriers (hedges, windbreaks and screens and cover/binders. Most aquatics, herbs, climbers and succulent shrubs an. trom the tropics. Ornamentals are the single largest category of plants from all three regions, the tropics having contributed twice as many species as temperate regions.

  15. Comparison of SA508 Gr.3 and SA508 Gr.4N Low Alloy Steels for Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Chul; Lee, B. S

    2009-12-15

    The microstructural characteristics and mechanical properties of SA508 Gr.3 Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steel and SA508 Gr.4N Ni-Mo-Cr low alloy steel were investigated. The differences in the stable phases between these two low alloy steels were evaluated by means of a thermodynamic calculation using ThermoCalc. They were then compared to microstructural features and correlated with mechanical properties. Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steel shows the upper bainite structure which has the coarse cementite in the lath boundaries. However, Ni-Mo-Cr low alloy steel shows the mixture of lower bainite and tempered martensite structure that homogeneously precipitates the small carbides such as M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and M{sub 7}C{sub 3} due to an increase of hardenability and Cr addition. In the mechanical properties, Ni-Mo-Cr low alloy steel has higher strength and toughness than Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steel. Ni and Cr additions increase the strength by solid solution hardening. Besides, microstructural changes from upper bainite to tempered martensite improve the strength of the low alloy steel by grain refining effect. And the changes in the precipitation behavior by Cr addition improve the ductile-brittle transition behavior along with a toughening effect of Ni addition.

  16. Behavior of prestressing steels after fire

    OpenAIRE

    Atienza Riera, José Miguel; Elices Calafat, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Even if a fire does not give rise to apparent damage in a prestressed structure, mechanical properties of materials as well as load distribution can be affected. A verification of residual load bearing capacity after fire is necessary to determine if the structure can be maintained in use. Mechanical properties of structural steels at high temperatures have been extensively studied. However, no attention has been paid to the behavior of steel wires after fire. This paper seeks to give a simpl...

  17. Chemical heat treatment of low alloyed maraging steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinov, L S; Korotich, I K [Zhdanovskij Metallurgicheskij Inst. (Ukrainian SSR)

    1979-09-01

    The investigation concerned the nitriding, cementation, chromizing, borating of economically alloyed maraging grade 04Kh2N5MFYu steel. The investigated methods of chemothermal treatment were found to considerably increase the hardness of the surface layer of the maraging steel. The high tempering of the grade 04Kh2N5MFYu cemented and hardened steel was found to produce secondary hardening. On chromizing, the diffusion layer is an alloyed ferrite which strengthens because of the dispersion hardening on ageing. The formation of the plastic low-carbon martensite at relatively small cooling rates greatly decreases the tendency of the boride layer to cracking.

  18. Qualification of high damping seismic isolation bearings for the ALMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajirian, F.F.; Gluekler, E.L.; Chen, W.P.; Kelly, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) seismic isolation system consists of high damping steel-laminated elastomeric bearings. This type of bearing is used worldwide to isolate buildings and large critical components. A comprehensive testing program has been developed to qualify the use of this system for the ALMR. The program includes material characterization tests, various scale bearing tests, full-size bearing tests, shake table tests, and long-term aging tests. The main tasks and objectives of this program are described in the paper. Additionally, a detailed assessment of completed ALMR bearing test results will be provided. This assessment will be mainly based on half-scale bearing tests performed at the Earthquake Engineering Research Center (EERC) of the University of California at Berkeley and at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC). These tests were funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Both static and dynamic tests were performed. Bearings with two types of end connections were tested: dowelled and bolted. The parameters examined will include the vertical, horizontal stiffness and damping of the bearings under different loading conditions up to failure. This will determine the available margins in the bearings above the design vertical load and horizontal displacement. Additionally, the self-centering capability of the bearings after an earthquake will be addressed. On the basis of these findings, recommendations can be made if necessary, to improve current manufacturing procedures, quality control, and procurement specifications. (author)

  19. Use of microstructure control to toughen ferritic steels for cryogenic use. I. Fe--Ni steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syn, C.K.; Jin, S.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1976-12-01

    Alternation of austenitization and austenite + ferrite two-phase decomposition treatment in a cyclic thermal treatment allows the achievement of ultra-fine grain size in steels containing 8-12% Ni. The grain refinement leads to a substantial improvement in cryogenic mechanical properties. The ductile-brittle transition temperature of a ferritic Fe-12Ni-0.25Ti alloy was suppressed to below liquid helium temperature by this grain refinement procedure; the transition temperature of commercial ''9Ni'' cryogenic steel was similarly reduced by combining the grain refinement with a final temper which introduces a small admixture of retained austenite

  20. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF MECHANICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF THE STEELS, APPLIED FOR PRODUCTION OF CHIPPING KNIVES, RECEIVED BY METHODS OF THERMAL AND THERMOMECHANICAL PROCESSINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Alifanov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of researches of chemical composition of chipping knives of foreign and domestic producers are given in the article. Results of mechanical tests of samples with determination of temporary resistance, percentage elongation, ultimate strength at cross bending, bend from the various tool steels, subjected to heat treatment (tempering and thermomechanical processing with low tempering, are given. Recommendations on use of TO and TMO for investigated steels are given.

  1. Wear of rolling element bearings in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, C.S.

    1976-01-01

    Rolling element bearings and related mechanisms are attractive for service in liquid sodium but it is not clear what minimum wear rate can be anticipated. For axially loaded angular contact bearings rotation is incompatible with pure rolling on both races and wear arises from the resulting ball spin. The initial pressure distributions and sizes of the contact ellipses can be calculated but will change with bearing wear. However, the most effective distribution for producing wear would be for the full loads to be borne on the tips of the contact areas, whose maximum length is given by examination of the race wear tracks. A calculation on such a basis should set a lower limit for the wear coefficient. Both the torque and instantaneous wear rate of a bearing will be similar functions of the integral over the contact areas of the product of contact pressure and radius from the ball spin axis. A better estimate of wear coefficient should be obtained by relating the average torque, the average wear, the initial torque and the initial wear where the conditions are known. Analysis of tests in sodium at 400 0 C of high speed steel and Stellite bearings by these methods indicates specific wear rates of the order of 10 -15 m 3 /N-m, not unduly out of line with the range of values found in conventional sliding tests

  2. Partial substitution of vanadium by niobium in AISI H13 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itman Filho, A.; Balancin, O.

    1987-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the tempering resistence in conditions of use of the AISI H13 steel, after partial substitution of vanadium by niobium. Four alloys of this steel were elaborated and in three of them the niobim was added in the contents of 0,2; 0,5 and 1,0%. Metallographic techniques were performed to compare qualitatively the niobium effect in several processing and thermal analisys of the steels. Grain size measurements were made after austenitization of the steels, hardness measurements in prepared samples were made after quenching and tempering, tensile testing at elevated temperature was investigated and yield strength, reduction of area after steel breaking and elongation were calculated. After these studies it was possible to certify that the partial substitution of vanadium by niobium did not alter significantly the basic mechanical properties of the AISI H13. (Author) [pt

  3. Study of the distribution of alloying elements between the phases of a heat treated steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, N.; Greday, T.

    1977-01-01

    The behavior of some low-alloy steels during industrial heat treatments is systematically studied. Firstly, the influence of the chemical analysis of the steel, the shape and size of carbides on the kinetics of the dissolution of these carbides at high temperature is pointed out in the case of steels with a relatively simple chemical analysis. Secondly, the effect of tempering treatments on the mechanical properties and characteristic parameters of the microstructure is studied in the case of three low-alloy steels. Bainitic microstructure appears to be the less disturbed one after a tempering treatment. Against, martensitic microstructures undergo an important softening and the mechanical properties of the pearlite lie as a very low level whatever their heat treatment. Peculiar conditions of tempering promotes a fine precipitation and its combined secondary hardening. These conditions are related to both chemical analysis and initial microstructure of the steel. Besides, some chemical identifications were performed in the scanning electron microscope on alloyed carbides precipitated in the steel during very long time tempering treatments

  4. THE HEAT TREATMENT ANALYSIS OF E110 CASE HARDENING STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAJID TOLOUEI-RAD

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates mechanical and microstructural behaviour of E110 case hardening steel when subjected to different heat treatment processes including quenching, normalizing and tempering. After heat treatment samples were subjected to mechanical and metallographic analysis and the properties obtained from applying different processes were analysed. The heat treatment process had certain effects on the resultant properties and microstructures obtained for E110 steel which are described in details. Quenching produced a martensitic microstructure characterized by significant increase in material’s hardness and a significant decreased in its impact energy. Annealed specimens produced a coarse pearlitic microstructure with minimal variation in hardness and impact energy. For normalized samples, fine pearlitic microstructure was identified with a moderate increase in hardness and significant reduction in impact energy. Tempering had a significant effect on quenched specimens, with a substantial rise in material ductility and reduction of hardness with increasing tempering temperature. Furthermore, Results provide additional substantiation of temper embrittlement theory for low-carbon alloys, and indicate potential occurrence of temper embrittlement for fine pearlitic microstructures.

  5. Effect of Cooling Rate on Microstructures and Mechanical Properties in SA508 Gr4N High Strength Low Alloy Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Minchul; Park, Sanggyu; Choi, Kwonjae; Lee, Bongsang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The microstructure of Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel is a mixture of tempered martensite and tempered lower bainite and that of Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steel is predominantly tempered upper bainite. Higher strength and toughness steels are very attractive as an eligible RPV steel, so several researchers have studied to use the Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel for the NPP application. Because of the thickness of reactor vessel, there are large differences in austenitizing cooling rates between the surface and the center locations of thickness in RPV. Because the cooling rates after austenitization determine the microstructure, it would affect the mechanical properties in Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel, and it may lead to inhomogeneous characteristics when the commercial scale of RPV is fabricated. In order to apply the Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel to RPV, it is necessary to evaluate the changes of microstructure and mechanical properties with varying phase fractions in Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel. In this study, the effects of martensite and bainite fractions on mechanical properties in Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel were examined by controlling the cooling rate after austenitization. First of all, continuous cooling transformation(CCT) diagram was established from the dilatometric analyses. Then, the phase fractions at each cooling rate were quantitatively evaluated. Finally, the mechanical properties were correlated with the phase fraction, especially fraction of martensite in Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel.

  6. Polar bears, Ursus maritimus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rode, Karyn D.; Stirling, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Polar bears are the largest of the eight species of bears found worldwide and are covered in a pigment-free fur giving them the appearance of being white. They are the most carnivorous of bear species consuming a high-fat diet, primarily of ice-associated seals and other marine mammals. They range throughout the circumpolar Arctic to the southernmost extent of seasonal pack ice.

  7. The Microstructure and Properties of Super Martensitic Stainless Steel Microalloyed with Tungsten and Copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Dong; Li, Jun; Liu, Yu-Rong; Yong, Qi-Long; Su, Jie; Cao, Jian-Chun; Tao, Jing-Mei; Zhao, Kun-Yu

    2011-06-01

    The microstructure and properties of super martensitic stainless steel (SMSS) microalloyed with tungsten and copper were studied by means of optical microscopy, dilatometer, X-ray diffraction, and tensile tests. The results showed that the microstructure of SMSS, after quenching and tempering, was a typical biphase structure with tempered martensite and reversed austenite dispersedly distributed in the martensite matrix. W and Cu were added into the SMSS to reduce the transformation temperature (Ms) and improve the strength and hardness of the matrix by grain refining and solid solution strengthening. Thermocalc calculations confirmed that M23C6 compound and Laves phase were precipitated during tempering in the investigated steel. Compared with the traditional SMSS, the steel microalloyed with W and Cu performed better mechanical properties.

  8. Relation Between Hertz Stress-Life Exponent, Ball-Race Conformity, and Ball Bearing Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Poplawski, Joseph V.; Root, Lawrence E.

    2008-01-01

    ANSI/ABMA and ISO standards based on Lundberg-Palmgren bearing life theory are normalized for ball bearings having inner- and outerrace conformities of 52 percent (0.52) and made from pre-1940 bearing steel. The Lundberg-Palmgren theory incorporates an inverse 9th power relation between Hertz stress and fatigue life for ball bearings. The effect of race conformity on ball set life independent of race life is not incorporated into the Lundberg-Palmgren theory. In addition, post-1960 vacuum-processed bearing steel exhibits a 12th power relation between Hertz stress and life. The work reported extends the previous work of Zaretsky, Poplawski, and Root to calculate changes in bearing life--that includes the life of the ball set--caused by race conformity, Hertz stress-life exponent, ball bearing type and bearing series. The bearing fatigue life in actual application will usually be equal to or greater than that calculated using the ANSI/ABMA and ISO standards that incorporate the Lundberg-Palmgren theory. The relative fatigue life of an individual race is more sensitive to changes in race conformity for Hertz stress-life exponent n of 12 than where n = 9. However, when the effects are combined to predict actual bearing life for a specified set of conditions and bearing geometry, the predicted life of the bearing will be greater for a value of n = 12 than n = 9.

  9. First Temperate Exoplanet Sized Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Combining observations from the CoRoT satellite and the ESO HARPS instrument, astronomers have discovered the first "normal" exoplanet that can be studied in great detail. Designated Corot-9b, the planet regularly passes in front of a star similar to the Sun located 1500 light-years away from Earth towards the constellation of Serpens (the Snake). "This is a normal, temperate exoplanet just like dozens we already know, but this is the first whose properties we can study in depth," says Claire Moutou, who is part of the international team of 60 astronomers that made the discovery. "It is bound to become a Rosetta stone in exoplanet research." "Corot-9b is the first exoplanet that really does resemble planets in our solar system," adds lead author Hans Deeg. "It has the size of Jupiter and an orbit similar to that of Mercury." "Like our own giant planets, Jupiter and Saturn, the planet is mostly made of hydrogen and helium," says team member Tristan Guillot, "and it may contain up to 20 Earth masses of other elements, including water and rock at high temperatures and pressures." Corot-9b passes in front of its host star every 95 days, as seen from Earth [1]. This "transit" lasts for about 8 hours, and provides astronomers with much additional information on the planet. This is fortunate as the gas giant shares many features with the majority of exoplanets discovered so far [2]. "Our analysis has provided more information on Corot-9b than for other exoplanets of the same type," says co-author Didier Queloz. "It may open up a new field of research to understand the atmospheres of moderate- and low-temperature planets, and in particular a completely new window in our understanding of low-temperature chemistry." More than 400 exoplanets have been discovered so far, 70 of them through the transit method. Corot-9b is special in that its distance from its host star is about ten times larger than that of any planet previously discovered by this method. And unlike all such

  10. EcoBears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Nick; Pedersen, Sandra Bleuenn; Sørensen, Jens Ager

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce the EcoBears concept that aims to augment household appliances with functional and aesthetic features to promote their "use'' and "longevity of use'' to prevent their disposal. The EcoBears also aim to support the communication of environmental issues in the home setting....... We present our initial design and implementation of the EcoBears that consist of two bear modules (a mother and her cub). We also present our preliminary concept validations and lessons learned to be considered for future directions....

  11. Bearing restoration by grinding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanau, H.; Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Chen, S. M.; Bull, H. L.

    1976-01-01

    A joint program was undertaken by the NASA Lewis Research Center and the Army Aviation Systems Command to restore by grinding those rolling-element bearings which are currently being discarded at aircraft engine and transmission overhaul. Three bearing types were selected from the UH-1 helicopter engine (T-53) and transmission for the pilot program. No bearing failures occurred related to the restoration by grinding process. The risk and cost of a bearing restoration by grinding programs was analyzed. A microeconomic impact analysis was performed.

  12. Nano-sized precipitation and properties of a low carbon niobium micro-alloyed bainitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Z.J. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton L8S 4L8 (Canada); Ma, X.P. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton L8S 4L8 (Canada); Shang, C.J., E-mail: cjshang@ustb.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Wang, X.M. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Subramanian, S.V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton L8S 4L8 (Canada)

    2015-08-12

    The present work focuses on microstructure evolution and precipitation strengthening during tempering at region of 550–680 °C to elucidate the structure–property relationship in the steel. The effect of tempering on the development of a 700 MPa grade high strength hot rolled cost-effective bainitic steel was studied for infrastructure applications. Granular bainite with dispersed martenisit–austenite (M–A) constituents in the bainitic ferrite matrix was obtained after hot rolling and air cooling to room temperature. The decomposition of M–A constituents to cementite carbides and the precipitation of nano-sized NbC carbides in bainitic matrix on tempering were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Nano-sized precipitates of NbC precipitated during tempering were in average diameter of ~4.1–6.1 nm. There were ~86–173 MPa increases in yield strength after tempering at region of 550–680 °C. It is noticeable that those nano-sized NbC precipitates provide an effective way to significantly increase the strength of the low carbon bainitic steel. High yield strength of 716 MPa with high ductility (uniform elongation of 9.3% and total elongation of 22.4%), low yield to tensile ratio of 0.9 and good low temperature toughness of 47 J (half thickness) at –40 °C was obtained after tempering at 680 °C for 30 min.

  13. Polar bears at risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, S.; Rosentrater, L.; Eid, P.M. [WWF International Arctic Programme, Oslo (Norway)

    2002-05-01

    Polar bears, the world's largest terrestrial carnivore, spend much of their lives on the arctic sea ice. This is where they hunt and move between feeding, denning, and resting areas. The world population, estimated at 22,000 bears, is made up of 20 relatively distinct populations varying in size from a few hundred to a few thousand animals. About 60 per cent of all polar bears are found in Canada. In general, the status of this species is stable, although there are pronounced differences between populations. Reductions in the extent and thickness of sea ice has lead the IUCN Polar Bear Specialist Group to describe climate change as one of the major threats facing polar bears today. Though the long-term effects of climate change will vary in different areas of the Arctic, impacts on the condition and reproductive success of polar bears and their prey are likely to be negative. Longer ice-free periods resulting from earlier break-up of sea ice in the spring and later formation in the fall is already impacting polar bears in the southern portions of their range. In Canada's Hudson Bay, for example, bears hunt on the ice through the winter and into early summer, after which the ice melts completely, forcing bears ashore to fast on stored fat until freeze-up in the fall. The time bears have on the ice to hunt and build up their body condition is cut short when the ice melts early. Studies from Hudson Bay show that for every week earlier that ice break-up occurs, bears will come ashore 10 kg lighter and in poorer condition. It is likely that populations of polar bears dividing their time between land and sea will be severely reduced and local extinctions may occur as greenhouse gas emissions continue to rise and sea ice melts. Expected changes in regional weather patterns will also impact polar bears. Rain in the late winter can cause maternity dens to collapse before females and cubs have departed, thus exposing occupants to the elements and to predators. Such

  14. The effect of tempering on mechanical properties of 50Mn18Cr4WN retaining ring material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, M.C.; Guo, C.H.; Zheng, Z.Z.; Ma, Z.M.

    1990-01-01

    50Mn18Cr4WN is a retaining ring steel. It is strengthened by solution heat treatment and cold working. The process produces high macro residual stress. The retaining ring must be tempered for stress-relief. When the ring is sleeved, it is heated too. If the retaining ring is tempered, are the mechanical properties of the retaining ring damaged? The problem is described in the article. The tempering of testing pieces was carried out at several temperatures: 350degC, 400degC, 450degC, 500degC and 650degC. The tempering time was 3h. The yield point, tensile strength, elongation and reduction of area were determined by means of the tensile test. In the results, for temperatures between 350degC and 450degC, the yield point, tensile strength, elongation and reduction of area did not change notably. A stress corrosion cracking test was also carried out in a 3%Ni 4 NO 3 , 36%Ca(NO 3 ) 2 aqueous solution. K 1scc values after tempering at 450degC and without tempering were measured. The results showed that the K 1scc after tempering at 450degC decreased notably. Micrographs show that carbo-nitride precipitated. The precipitated carbo-nitride particles increased in size at the grain boundaries. The precipitated carbonitride particles increased in number at slip lines. It is clear that the precipitated particles lead to the increase of micro-cells and the micro-cells aggravated the stress corrosion cracking process. (orig.)

  15. Well-Tempered Metadynamics Converges Asymptotically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dama, James F.; Parrinello, Michele; Voth, Gregory A.

    2014-06-01

    Metadynamics is a versatile and capable enhanced sampling method for the computational study of soft matter materials and biomolecular systems. However, over a decade of application and several attempts to give this adaptive umbrella sampling method a firm theoretical grounding prove that a rigorous convergence analysis is elusive. This Letter describes such an analysis, demonstrating that well-tempered metadynamics converges to the final state it was designed to reach and, therefore, that the simple formulas currently used to interpret the final converged state of tempered metadynamics are correct and exact. The results do not rely on any assumption that the collective variable dynamics are effectively Brownian or any idealizations of the hill deposition function; instead, they suggest new, more permissive criteria for the method to be well behaved. The results apply to tempered metadynamics with or without adaptive Gaussians or boundary corrections and whether the bias is stored approximately on a grid or exactly.

  16. Biophysical processes leading to the ingress of temperate fish larvae into estuarine nursery areas: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodósio, Maria Alexandra; Paris, Claire B.; Wolanski, Eric; Morais, Pedro

    2016-12-01

    A series of complementary hypotheses have been proposed to explain the recruitment of marine and temperate pelagic fish larvae originated from pelagic eggs in coastal environments. In this review, we propose a new and complementary hypothesis describing the biophysical processes intervening in the recruitment of temperate fish larvae into estuaries. This new hypothesis, the Sense Acuity And Behavioral (SAAB) hypothesis, recognizes that recruitment is unlikely if the larvae drift passively with the water currents, and that successful recruitment requires the sense acuity of temperate fish larvae and their behavioral response to the estuarine cues present in coastal areas. We propose that temperate fish larvae use a hierarchy of sensory cues (odor, sound, visual and geomagnetic cues) to detect estuarine nursery areas and to aid during navigation towards these areas. The sensorial acuity increases along ontogeny, which coincides with increased swimming capabilities. The swimming strategies of post-flexion larvae differ from offshore areas to the tidal zone. In offshore areas, innate behavior might lead larvae towards the coast guided by a sun compass or by the earth's geomagnetic field. In areas under limited influence of estuarine plumes (either in energetic nearshore areas or offshore), post-flexion larvae display a searching swimming behavior for estuarine disconnected patches (infotaxis strategy). After finding an estuarine plume, larvae may swim along the increasing cue concentration to ingress into the estuary. Here, larvae exhibit a rheotaxis behavior and avoid displacement by longshore currents by keeping bearing during navigation. When larvae reach the vicinity of an estuary, merging diel rhythms with feeding and predator avoidance strategies with tidally induced movements is essential to increase their chances of estuarine ingress. A fish larva recruitment model developed for the Ria Formosa lagoon supports the general framework of the SAAB hypothesis. In

  17. Effects of the Microstructure on Segregation behavior of Ni-Cr-Mo High Strength Low Alloy RPV Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Gyu; Wee, Dang Moon [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min Chul; Lee, Bong Sang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    SA508 Gr.4N Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel has an improved fracture toughness and strength, compared to commercial Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy RPV steel SA508 Gr.3. Higher strength and fracture toughness of low alloy steels could be achieved by adding Ni and Cr. So there are several researches on SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel for a RPV application. The operation temperature and time of a reactor pressure vessel is more than 300 .deg. C and over 40 years. Therefore, in order to apply the SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel for a reactor pressure vessel, it requires a resistance of thermal embrittlement in the high temperature range including temper embrittlement resistance. S. Raoul reported that the susceptibility to temper embrittlement was increasing a function of the cooling rate in SA533 steel, which suggests the martensitic microstructures resulting from increased cooling rates are more susceptible to temper embrittlement. However, this result has not been proved yet. So the comparison of temper embrittlement behavior was made between martensitic microstructure and bainitic microstructure with a viewpoint of boundary features in SA508 Gr.4N, which have mixture of tempered bainite/martensite. In this study, we have compared temper embrittlement behaviors of SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel with changing volume fraction of martensite. The mechanical properties of these low alloy steels) were evaluated after a long-term heat treatment(450 .deg. C, 2000hr. Then, the images of the segregated boundaries were observed and segregation behavior was analyzed by AES. In order to compare the misorientation distributions of model alloys, grain boundary structures were measured with EBSD

  18. Evaluation of hyper-tempering and machining residual stresses in a pipe and a cast elbow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupas, P.; Le Delliou, P.; Sussen, L.

    1995-01-01

    Cast elbows in austeno-ferritic stainless steel from the primary circuit of nuclear power plants suffer from important residual stresses initiated during their manufacturing (hyper-tempering followed by machining). Measurements and calculations were performed to determine these stresses. Measurements show a difference between circumferential stresses in the depth of a pipe and of an elbow. On the contrary, calculations indicate similar profiles. Thus, the experimental differences cannot be explained by a geometrical effect of the elbow. (J.S.). 4 refs., 5 figs

  19. Study of the effects of austenitizing and tempering heat treatments on the alloy HT-9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redmon, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    This paper investigates the potential use of the ferritic alloy Sandvik HT-9 (12 Cr - 1 Mo) as an alternative to stainless steels used in high-neutron-fluence environments. The neutron radiation influences embrittlement where the impact-energy versus test-temperature curve is seen displaced to the right. As a result, commercially effective solutioning and tempering processes are needed to suppress this effect in the pre-irradiated condition. The effects of austenitizing treatments on the impact energy of HT-9 were identified. 18 figures, 6 tables

  20. Ultrahigh Ductility, High-Carbon Martensitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shengwei; Liu, Yu; Hao, Qingguo; Zuo, Xunwei; Rong, Yonghua; Chen, Nailu

    2016-10-01

    Based on the proposed design idea of the anti-transformation-induced plasticity effect, both the additions of the Nb element and pretreatment of the normalization process as a novel quenching-partitioning-tempering (Q-P-T) were designed for Fe-0.63C-1.52Mn-1.49Si-0.62Cr-0.036Nb hot-rolled steel. This high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel exhibits a tensile strength of 1890 MPa and elongation of 29 pct accompanied by the excellent product of tensile and elongation of 55 GPa pct. The origin of ultrahigh ductility for high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel is revealed from two aspects: one is the softening of martensitic matrix due to both the depletion of carbon in the matensitic matrix during the Q-P-T process by partitioning of carbon from supersaturated martensite to retained austenite and the reduction of the dislocation density in a martensitic matrix by dislocation absorption by retained austenite effect during deformation, which significantly enhances the deformation ability of martensitic matrix; another is the high mechanical stability of considerable carbon-enriched retained austenite, which effectively reduces the formation of brittle twin-type martensite. This work verifies the correctness of the design idea of the anti-TRIP effect and makes the third-generation advanced high-strength steels extend to the field of high-carbon steels from low- and medium-carbon steels.

  1. Bearings for high performance requirements in two-stroke and four-stroke diesel engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ederer, U.G.

    1983-11-01

    Most measures to reduce fuel consumption in diesel engines lead, directly or indirectly, to more severe operating conditions for the engine bearings. In ever more instances the bearings become the components which limit useful engine life and the time between overhauls. Bearings with improved performance characteristics are required. During recent years, Miba Gleitlager AG has developed several solutions to meet these requirements. They consist of either material improvements, such as a cast white metal (SnSb 12Cu 3 NiCd) with higher fatigue strength, or an electroplated overlay (PbSn 18 Cu) with improved fatigue and wear resistance. New design solutions found included the steel-Al Sn 6-WM 85 bearing for two-stroke engines, the steel-Al Sn 6 PbSn 18 Cu bearing applied to two-stroke crosshead bearings, the steel-AlZn 4,5 PbSn 18 Cu bearing for high bearing loads in four-stroke engines, and the Miba-Rillenlager with its radically new running-surface structure for extreme load and wear conditions. The application potential of these bearings and the operating experience with them are discussed in this article.

  2. Relation Between Residual and Hoop Stresses and Rolling Bearing Fatigue Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Poplawski, Joseph V.

    2015-01-01

    Rolling-element bearings operated at high speed or high vibration may require a tight interference fit between the bore of the bearing and shaft to prevent rotation of the bearing bore around the shaft and fretting damage at the interfaces. Previous work showed that the hoop stresses resulting from tight interference fits can reduce bearing lives by as much as 65 percent. Where tight interference fits are required, case-carburized steel such as AISI 9310 or M50 NiL is often used because the compressive residual stresses inhibit subsurface crack formation and the ductile core inhibits inner-ring fracture. The presence of compressive residual stress and its combination with hoop stress also modifies the Hertz stress-life relation. This paper analyzes the beneficial effect of residual stresses on rolling-element bearing fatigue life in the presence of high hoop stresses for three bearing steels. These additional stresses were superimposed on Hertzian principal stresses to calculate the inner-race maximum shearing stress and the resulting fatigue life of the bearing. The load-life exponent p and Hertz stress-life exponent n increase in the presence of compressive residual stress, which yields increased life, particularly at lower stress levels. The Zaretsky life equation is described and is shown to predict longer bearing lives and greater load- and stress-life exponents, which better predicts observed life of bearings made from vacuum-processed steel.

  3. Microstructure and mechanical properties of unirradiated low activation ferritic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, C.Y.; Lechtenberg, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    Transmission electron micrographs of normalized and tempered 9Cr-2.5W-0.3V-0.15C low activation ferritic steel showed tempered lath-type martensite with precipitation of rod and plate-like carbides at lath and grain boundaries. X-ray diffraction analysis of the extracted replicas revealed nearly 100% M 23 C 6 carbides (a=1.064 nm), with no indication of Fe 2 W-type Laves phase even after thermal aging at 600 0 C/1000 h. Thermal aging increased the number density of rod-like M 23 C 6 along prior austenite grain boundaries and martensite lath boundaries. The elevated-temperature tensile strengths of this steel are about 10% higher than the average strengths of commercial heats of 9Cr-1Mo and modified 9Cr-1Mo steels up to 650 0 C, with equivalent uniform elongation and ∝50% decrease in total elongation. The DBTT was determined to be -25 0 C which is similar to other 9Cr-1Mo steels. Fractographic examination of tensile tested specimens shows a mixed mode of equiaxed and elongated dimples at test temperatures above 400 0 C. Modification of the Ga3X alloy composition for opimization of materials properties is discussed. However, the proposed low activation ferritic steel shows the promise of improved mechanical properties over 9Cr-1Mo steels. (orig.)

  4. Microstructure and embrittlement of VVER 440 reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennion, A.

    1999-03-01

    27 VVER 440 pressurised water reactors operate in former Soviet Union and in Eastern Europe. The pressure vessel, is made of Cr-Mo-V steel. It contains a circumferential arc weld in front of the nuclear core. This weld undergoes a high neutron flux and contains large amounts of copper and phosphorus, elements well known for their embrittlement potency under irradiation. The embrittlement kinetic of the steel is accelerated, reducing the lifetime of the reactor. In order to get informations on the microstructure and mechanical properties of these steels, base metals, HAZ, and weld metals have been characterized. The high amount of phosphorus in weld metals promotes the reverse temper embrittlement that occurs during post-weld heat treatment. The radiation damage structure has been identified by small angle neutron scattering, atomic probe, and transmission electron microscopy. Nanometer-sized clusters of solute atoms, rich in copper with almost the same characteristics as in western pressure vessels steels, and an evolution of the size distribution of vanadium carbides, which are present on dislocation structure, are observed. These defects disappear during post-irradiation tempering. As in western steels, the embrittlement is due to both hardening and reduction of interphase cohesion. The radiation damage specificity of VVER steels arises from their high amount of phosphorus and from their significant density of fine vanadium carbides. (author)

  5. Relationship of bainitic microstructure to impact toughness in Cr-Mo and Cr-W steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    Non-classical bainite microstructures can develop during continuous cooling of low-carbon alloy steels. These differ from classical upper and lower bainite developed by isothermal transformation. Two non-classical bainite microstructures were produced in a 3Cr-1.5Mo0.25V-0.lC steel using different cooling rates after austenitizing--water quenching and air cooling. The carbide-free acicular bainite formed in the quenched steel had a lower ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) than the granular bainite formed in the air-cooled steel. With increasing tempering parameter (defined bv tempering time and temperature), the DBTT of both decreased and approached a common value, although the final value occurred at a much lower tempering parameter for the quenched steel than for the air-cooled steel. The upper-shelf enery was similarly affected by microstructure. These observations along with similar observations in two Cr-W steels indicate that control of the bainite microstructure can be used to optimize strength and toughness

  6. Microstructural Evolution of AerMet100 Steel Coating on 300M Steel Fabricated by Laser Cladding Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Li, Jia; Cheng, Xu; Wang, Huaming

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, the process of coating AerMet100 steel on forged 300M steel with laser cladding was investigated, with a thorough analysis of the chemical composition, microstructure, and hardness of the substrate and the cladding layer as well as the transition zone. Results show that the composition and microhardness of the cladding layer are macroscopically homogenous with the uniformly distributed bainite and a small amount of retained austenite in martensite matrix. The transition zone, which spans approximately 100 μm, yields a gradual change of composition from the cladding layer to 300M steel matrix. The heat-affected zone (HAZ) can be divided into three zones: the sufficiently quenched zone (SQZ), the insufficiently quenched zone (IQZ), and the high tempered zone (HTZ). The SQZ consists of martensitic matrix and bainite, as for the IQZ and the HTZ the microstructures are martensite + tempered martensite and tempered martensite + ferrite, respectively. These complicated microstructures in the HAZ are caused by different peak heating temperatures and heterogeneous microstructures of the as-received 300M steel.

  7. A Facies Model for Temperate Continental Glaciers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Gail Mowry

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the presence and dynamics of continental glaciers in the domination of the physical processes of erosion and deposition in the mid-latitudes during the Pleistocene period. Describes the use of a sedimentary facies model as a guide to recognizing ancient temperate continental glacial deposits. (TW)

  8. The Temperance Movement and Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdach, Allison D.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines a forgotten episode in social work history: the involvement of the profession in the temperance movement in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Though some notable social workers such as Jane Addams, Robert A. Woods, and Representative Jeannette Rankin (the first woman elected to the U.S. Congress), championed the…

  9. Steel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.E.; Stiegler, J.O.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Leitnaker, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    The invention deals with a fuel element for fast breeder reactors. It consits essentially of a uranium oxide, nitride, or carbide or a mixture of these fuels with a plutonium or thorium oxide, nitride, or carbide. The fuel elements are coated with an austenitic stainless steel alloy. Inside the fuel elements, vacancies or small cavities are produced by neutron effects which causes the steel coating to swell. According to the invention, swelling is prevented by a modification of type 304, 316, 321, or 12 K 72HV commercial steels. They consist mainly of Fe, Cr, and Ni in a ratio determined by a temary diagram. They may also contain 1.8 to 2.3% by weight of Mo and a fraction of Si (0.7 to 2% by weight) and Ti(0.10 to 0.5% by weight) to prevent cavity formation. They are structurally modified by cold working. (IHOE) [de

  10. Evaluation of the mechanical properties of Niobium modified cast AISI H 13 hot work tool steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noorian, A.; Kheirandish, Sh.; Saghafian, H.

    2010-01-01

    In this research, the effects of partially replacing of vanadium and molybdenum with niobium on the mechanical properties of AISIH 13 hot-work tool steel have been studied. Cast samples made of the modified new steel were homogenized and austenitized at different conditions, followed by tempering at the specified temperature ranges. Hardness, red hardness, three point bending test and Charpy impact test were carried out to evaluate the mechanical properties together with characterizing the microstructure of the modified steel using scanning electron microscope. The results show that niobium addition modifies the cast structure of Nb-alloyed steel, and increases its maximum hardness. It was found that bending strength; bending strain, impact strength, and red hardness of the modified cast steel are also higher than those of the cast H13 steel, and lower than those of the wrought H13 steel.

  11. Ultra-precision bearings

    CERN Document Server

    Wardle, F

    2015-01-01

    Ultra-precision bearings can achieve extreme accuracy of rotation, making them ideal for use in numerous applications across a variety of fields, including hard disk drives, roundness measuring machines and optical scanners. Ultraprecision Bearings provides a detailed review of the different types of bearing and their properties, as well as an analysis of the factors that influence motion error, stiffness and damping. Following an introduction to basic principles of motion error, each chapter of the book is then devoted to the basic principles and properties of a specific type of bearin

  12. Engineering of rolled constructional microalloyed steel products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamczyk, J.

    2003-01-01

    Flexibility of the microalloyed steels on manufacturing of products with high mechanical and technological properties at not exaggerated production costs, it caused of their application for different constructions and machines in many branches of economy. It is a reason of the big interest of this steel group and the improvement of metallurgical and technological processing. In the work the examples of applications of C-Mn microalloyed steels with V and N microadditions for production of long shape products of R p0.2 > 650 MPa and KCU2 > 57 Jcm -2 are presented. They are manufactured in the controlled rolling process. Moreover this work presents liquid metal treatment in ladlemann process and influence of ingots solidification conditions, controlled rolling of weldable plates with Nb, Ti, V and B microadditions which after quenching and tempering have R p0.2 > 870 MPa, KV -50 o C > 27 J and plastic strain ratio equals 1.2. This work also presents the energy saving rolling technology with controlled recrystallization (method of thermomechanical treatment) of improved Weldox 960 steel plates with Mb, Ti, V and B microadditions which have after high-temperature tempering R p0.2 > 100 MPa, KV -50 o C >90 J and plastic strain ratio is less than 1.2. The introduction of microalloyed constructional steels and the appropriate technology in the domestic industry will contribute to high-processed products with properties competitive to products manufactured in high-industrialized countries. Thanks to that it will be possible to increase the technical level as well as to reduce production costs and import. (author)

  13. Development of High Heat Input Welding High Strength Steel Plate for Oil Storage Tank in Xinyu Steel Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hemin; Dong, Fujun; Liu, Xiaolin; Xiong, Xiong

    This essay introduces the developed high-heat input welding quenched and tempered pressure vessel steel 12MnNiVR for oil storage tank by Xinyu Steel, which passed the review by the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Standards Technical Committee in 2009. The review comments that compared to the domestic and foreign similar steel standard, the key technical index of enterprise standard were in advanced level. After the heat input of 100kJ/cm electro-gas welding, welded points were still with excellent low temperature toughness at -20°C. The steel plate may be constructed for oil storage tank, which has been permitted by thickness range from 10 to 40mm, and design temperature among -20°C-100°C. It studied microstructure genetic effects mechanical properties of the steel. Many production practices indicated that the mechanical properties of products and the steel by stress relief heat treatment of steel were excellent, with pretreatment of hot metal, converter refining, external refining, protective casting, TMCP and heat treatment process measurements. The stability of performance and matured technology of Xinyu Steel support the products could completely service the demand of steel constructed for 10-15 million cubic meters large oil storage tank.

  14. Assessment of martensitic steels as structural materials in magnetic fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawls, J.M.; Chen, W.Y.K.; Cheng, E.T.; Dalessandro, J.A.; Miller, P.H.; Rosenwasser, S.N.; Thompson, L.D.

    1980-01-01

    This manuscript documents the results of preliminary experiments and analyses to assess the feasibility of incorporating ferromagnetic martensitic steels in fusion reactor designs and to evaluate the possible advantages of this class of material with respect to first wall/blanket lifetime. The general class of alloys under consideration are ferritic steels containing from about 9 to 13 percent Cr with some small additions of various strengthening elements such as Mo. These steels are conventionally used in the normalized and tempered condition for high temperature applications and can compete favorably with austenitic alloys up to about 600 0 C. Although the heat treatment can result in either a tempered martensite or bainite structure, depending on the alloy and thermal treatment parameters, this general class of materials will be referred to as martensitic stainless steels for simplicity

  15. Roller bearing geometry design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, M.; Pinkston, B. H. W.

    1976-01-01

    A theory of kinematic stabilization of rolling cylinders is extended and applied to the design of cylindrical roller bearings. The kinematic stabilization mechanism puts a reverse skew into the rolling elements by changing the roller taper. Twelve basic bearing modification designs are identified amd modeled. Four have single transverse convex curvature in their rollers while eight have rollers which have compound transverse curvature made up of a central cylindrical band surrounded by symmetric bands with slope and transverse curvature. The bearing designs are modeled for restoring torque per unit axial displacement, contact stress capacity, and contact area including dynamic loading, misalignment sensitivity and roller proportion. Design programs are available which size the single transverse curvature roller designs for a series of roller slopes and load separations and which design the compound roller bearings for a series of slopes and transverse radii of curvature. The compound rollers are proportioned to have equal contact stresses and minimum size. Design examples are also given.

  16. DW_BEAR

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Subset of BEAR (Bi-Weekly Examination Analysis and Reporting) data used for financial audit remediation reporting within the Coast Guard Business Intelligence (CGBI)...

  17. Influence of silver additions to type 316 stainless steels on bacterial inhibition, mechanical properties, and corrosion resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Tseng, I-Sheng; Møller, Per

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial contamination is a major concern in many areas. In this study, silver was added to type 316 stainless steels in order to obtain an expected bacteria inhibiting property to reduce the occurrence of bacterial contamination. Silver-bearing 316 stainless steels were prepared by vacuum melting...... in areas where hygiene is a major requirement. The possible mechanisms of silver dissolution from the surfaces of silver-bearing 316 stainless steels were also discussed in this report....

  18. Rolling bearing analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, Tedric A

    2001-01-01

    One of the most well-known experts in the field brings cutting-edge research to practitioners in the new edition of this important reference. Covers the improved mathematical calculations for rolling bearing endurance developed by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and the Society of Lubrication and Tribology Engineers. Updated with new material on Condition-Based Maintenance, new testing methods, and new bearing materials.

  19. Gear bearing drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroidis, Constantinos (Inventor); Vranish, John M. (Inventor); Weinberg, Brian (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A gear bearing drive provides a compact mechanism that operates as an actuator providing torque and as a joint providing support. The drive includes a gear arrangement integrating an external rotor DC motor within a sun gear. Locking surfaces maintain the components of the drive in alignment and provide support for axial loads and moments. The gear bearing drive has a variety of applications, including as a joint in robotic arms and prosthetic limbs.

  20. Hegelian Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Poul F.

    2015-01-01

    Even in our globalized world the notion of national economies remain incredibly strong, just as a considerable part of the literature on transnational governance and globalization continue to rely on a zero-sum perspective concerning the relationship between the national and the transnational. De...... of the European steel industry....

  1. Load responsive hydrodynamic bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalsi, Manmohan S.; Somogyi, Dezso; Dietle, Lannie L.

    2002-01-01

    A load responsive hydrodynamic bearing is provided in the form of a thrust bearing or journal bearing for supporting, guiding and lubricating a relatively rotatable member to minimize wear thereof responsive to relative rotation under severe load. In the space between spaced relatively rotatable members and in the presence of a liquid or grease lubricant, one or more continuous ring shaped integral generally circular bearing bodies each define at least one dynamic surface and a plurality of support regions. Each of the support regions defines a static surface which is oriented in generally opposed relation with the dynamic surface for contact with one of the relatively rotatable members. A plurality of flexing regions are defined by the generally circular body of the bearing and are integral with and located between adjacent support regions. Each of the flexing regions has a first beam-like element being connected by an integral flexible hinge with one of the support regions and a second beam-like element having an integral flexible hinge connection with an adjacent support region. A least one local weakening geometry of the flexing region is located intermediate the first and second beam-like elements. In response to application of load from one of the relatively rotatable elements to the bearing, the beam-like elements and the local weakening geometry become flexed, causing the dynamic surface to deform and establish a hydrodynamic geometry for wedging lubricant into the dynamic interface.

  2. Effects of Cryogenic Treatment on the Strength Properties of Heat Resistant Stainless Steel (07X16H6)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadig, D. S.; Bhat, M. R.; Pavan, V. K.; Mahishi, Chandan

    2017-09-01

    Cryogenic treatment on metals is a well known technology where the materials are exposed to cryogenic temperature for prolonged time duration. The process involves three stages viz. slow cooling, holding at cryogenic temperature and warming to room temperature. During this process, hard and micro sized carbide particles are released within the steel material. In addition, soft and unconverted austenite of steel changes to strong martensite structure. These combined effects increase the strength and hardness of the cryotreated steel. In this experimental study, the effects of cryogenic treatment, austenitising and tempering on the mechanical properties of stainless steel (07X16H6) have been carried. After determining the strength properties of the original material, the specimens were cryotreated at 98K for 24 hours in a specially developed cryotreatment system. The effects of austenitising prior to cryogenic treatment and tempering post cryotreatment on the mechanical properties of steel samples have been experimentally determined and analysed.

  3. Technical specifications for the successful fabrication of laminated seismic isolation bearings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulak, R F [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)

    1992-07-01

    High damping steel-laminated elastomeric seismic isolation bearings are becoming a preferred device for isolating large buildings and structures. In the United States, the current reference design for the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor uses laminated bearings for seismic isolation. These bearings are constructed from alternating layers of rubber and steel plates. They are typically designed for shear strains between 50 to 100 percent and expected to sustain two to three times these levels for beyond design basis loading considerations. The technical specifications used to procure these bearings are an important factor in assuring thatthe bearings meet the performance requirements of the design. The key aspects of the current version of the Technical Specifications are discussed in this paper. (author)

  4. Technical specifications for the successful fabrication of laminated seismic isolation bearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulak, R.F.

    1992-01-01

    High damping steel-laminated elastomeric seismic isolation bearings are becoming a preferred device for isolating large buildings and structures. In the United States, the current reference design for the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor uses laminated bearings for seismic isolation. These bearings are constructed from alternating layers of rubber and steel plates. They are typically designed for shear strains between 50 to 100 percent and expected to sustain two to three times these levels for beyond design basis loading considerations. The technical specifications used to procure these bearings are an important factor in assuring that the bearings meet the performance requirements of the design. The key aspects of the current version of the Technical Specifications are discussed in this paper. (author)

  5. Improvement of Strength-Toughness-Hardness Balance in Large Cross-Section 718H Pre-Hardened Mold Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hanghang; Fu, Paixian; Liu, Hongwei; Li, Dianzhong

    2018-01-01

    The strength-toughness combination and hardness uniformity in large cross-section 718H pre-hardened mold steel from a 20 ton ingot were investigated with three different heat treatments for industrial applications. The different microstructures, including tempered martensite, lower bainite, and retained austenite, were obtained at equivalent hardness. The microstructures were characterized by using metallographic observations, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD). The mechanical properties were compared by tensile, Charpy U-notch impact and hardness uniformity tests at room temperature. The results showed that the test steels after normalizing-quenching-tempering (N-QT) possessed the best strength-toughness combination and hardness uniformity compared with the conventional quenched-tempered (QT) steel. In addition, the test steel after austempering-tempering (A-T) demonstrated the worse hardness uniformity and lower yield strength while possessing relatively higher elongation (17%) compared with the samples after N-QT (14.5%) treatments. The better ductility of A-T steel mainly depended on the amount and morphology of retained austenite and thermal/deformation-induced twined martensite. This work elucidates the mechanisms of microstructure evolution during heat treatments and will highly improve the strength-toughness-hardness trade-off in large cross-section steels. PMID:29642642

  6. Improvement of Strength-Toughness-Hardness Balance in Large Cross-Section 718H Pre-Hardened Mold Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanghang Liu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The strength-toughness combination and hardness uniformity in large cross-section 718H pre-hardened mold steel from a 20 ton ingot were investigated with three different heat treatments for industrial applications. The different microstructures, including tempered martensite, lower bainite, and retained austenite, were obtained at equivalent hardness. The microstructures were characterized by using metallographic observations, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD. The mechanical properties were compared by tensile, Charpy U-notch impact and hardness uniformity tests at room temperature. The results showed that the test steels after normalizing-quenching-tempering (N-QT possessed the best strength-toughness combination and hardness uniformity compared with the conventional quenched-tempered (QT steel. In addition, the test steel after austempering-tempering (A-T demonstrated the worse hardness uniformity and lower yield strength while possessing relatively higher elongation (17% compared with the samples after N-QT (14.5% treatments. The better ductility of A-T steel mainly depended on the amount and morphology of retained austenite and thermal/deformation-induced twined martensite. This work elucidates the mechanisms of microstructure evolution during heat treatments and will highly improve the strength-toughness-hardness trade-off in large cross-section steels.

  7. Overview of research trends and problems on Cr-Mo low alloy steels for pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Byung Ha; Kim, Jeong Tae

    2000-01-01

    Cr-Mo low alloy steels have been used for a long time for pressure vessel due to its excellent corrosion resistance, high temperature strength and toughness. The paper reviewed the latest trends on material development and some problems on Cr-Mo low alloy steel for pressure vessel, such as elevated temperature strength, hardenability, synergetic effect between temper and hydrogen embrittlement, hydrogen attack and hydrogen induced disbonding of overlay weld-cladding

  8. Investigation of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties in Hot-work Tool Steels

    OpenAIRE

    Rey, Tomas

    2017-01-01

    Hot-work tool steels make up an important group of steels that are able to perform with good strength and toughness properties at elevated temperatures and stresses. They are able to gain this behavior through their alloy composition and heat treatment, which relies on the precipitation of alloy carbides to counter the loss in strength as the tempered material becomes more ductile. As demand grows for materials that are suitable for even harsher applications and that show improved mechanical ...

  9. Microstructural evolution of martensitic steels during fast neutron iradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    Irradiation of martensitic/ferritic steels with fast neutrons (E > 0.1 MeV) to displacement damage levels of 30--50 dpa at temperatures of 300--500 degree C produces significant changes in the as-tempered microstructure. Dislocation loops and networks can be produced, irradiation-induced precipitates can form, the lath/subgrain boundary structure and the thermal precipitates produced during tempering can become unstable, and if helium is present, bubbles and voids can form. These microstructural changes caused by irradiation can have important effects on the properties of this class of steels for both fast breeder reactor (FBR) and magnetic fusion reactor (MFR) applications. The purpose of this paper is to compare reactor-irradiated and long-term thermally aged 9Cr--1MoVNb specimens, in order to distinguish effects due to displacement damage from those caused by elevated-temperature exposure alone. 7 refs., 1 fig

  10. Cleanliness distribution of high-carbon chromium bearing steel billets and growth behavior of inclusions during solidification; Distribución y crecimiento de inclusiones en la solidificación de barras de acero para rodamientos con cromo y alto contenido de carbono

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, C.; Bao, Y.; Lin, L.

    2017-09-01

    Variation of cleanliness and distribution of inclusions in thickness and width direction of highcarbon chromium bearing steel billets has been studied using total oxygen and nitrogen analysis and SEM/EDS, and the growth behavior of inclusions during solidification was studied with the help of solidification model. The region wit h relatively high total oxygen contents in the cross profile of billets is between inner arc side 3/16 and outer arc side 1/4; between left edge side 5/16 and right edge side 5/16. The formation sequence of inclusions is MgO-Al2O3 > TiN > MnS. MnS could wrap MgO-Al2O3 and reduces the damage to steel matrix caused by the latter, but generally could not effectively wrap TiN. Besides, TiN could wrap MgO-Al2O3 before MnS, which would weaken the protective capacity of MnS. Moreover, compared with MgO-Al2O3 inclusions, the sizes of TiN inclusions are generally larger. Thus the control of TiN inclusions should be strengthened. In hickness direction, the maximum size regions of TiN and MnS inclusions are inner arc side 1/3 and outer arc side 1/3; in width direction, the regions are edge side 1/3. During bearing processing, these regions and the regions with high total oxygen content should be avoided. [Spanish] La distribución de inclusiones en las secciones transversales y longitudinales de barras de acero para rodamientos al cromo con alto contenido de carbono se ha estudiado determinando el contenido total de nitrógeno y oxígeno y mediante SEM/EDS. El crecimiento de inclusiones durante la solidificación se estudió con la ayuda del modelo de solidificación. La zona con contenido total de oxígeno relativamente alto en la sección transversal de las barras, es entre el arco interior de 3/16 y el exterior 1/4; entre el borde izquierdo 5/16 y el derecho 5/16. La secuencia de formación de las inclusiones es MgO-Al2O3 > TiN > MnS. El MnS podría envolver a los óxidos de magnesio y aluminio (MgO-Al2O3) y reducir el daño causado al acero, pero

  11. microstructure change in 12 % Cr steel during creep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winatapura, D. S.; Panjaitan, E.; Arslan, A.; Sulistioso, G.S.

    1998-01-01

    The microstructure change in steel containing of 12% Cr or DIN X20CrMoV 12 1 during creep has been studied by means of optical microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). The creep testing at 650 o C was conducted under constant load of 650 Mpa. The heat treatment of the specimen before creep testing was austenization, followed by tempering for 2 hours. The obtained microstructure was tempered martensitic. This microstructure consisted of the martensite laths, and distributed randomly in the matrix. During tempering, chromium carbide particles of Cr 7 C 6 less than 0,2 μmin-size were precipitated on or and in the subgrain and lath martensite grain boundary. During creep testing those particles transformed and precipitated as chrome carbide precipitates of Cr 23 C 6 . At the secondary creep stage, the void formation occurred, and then it developed into the creep cracks. At tertiary creep stage for 3554 hours, the specimen was failure. The creep cracks were informs of transgranular and intergranular modes which propagated almost perpendicular to the stress axis. From this observation, it is suggested that tempering caused the ductility of martensitic microstructure, which increased the creep resistant or Cr 12% steel

  12. Modification of steel 35 HL surge current during crystallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhbanova O.M.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The method of electro steel melt modification 35 HL variable polarity current pulses with a duration of more 10-3s frequency within the 5–33 Hz, 5–24 porosity meanders, strength 30–40 A at a voltage of 180–240 V during crystallization, which allows to obtain high-quality castings 35 HL steel grade. Show that electro melt processing improves the structure and reduces the physical heterogeneity of castings and increases the rate of dissolution of metallic impurities and other components in the melt, providing fine-grained structure and increases the homogeneity of metal carbides reduces the amount of manganese reduces gases and nonmetallic inclusions. Modifying steel 35 HL pulse current during crystallization of the melt increases the physical and mechanical properties of tempered steel, increasing yield strength by 30 %, the tensile strength at 7 % elongation of 1,5 % relative narrowing by 2 %, toughness at 20 %.

  13. Effects of tempering temperature on microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of high-strength low-alloy D6AC plasma arc welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun-Ming, E-mail: chunming@ntut.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei 10608, Taiwan (China); Lu, Chi-Hao [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10673, Taiwan (China)

    2016-10-31

    This study prepared high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) D6AC weldments using a plasma arc welding (PAW) process. The PAW weldments were then tempered at temperatures of 300 °C, 450 °C, and 600 °C for 1000 min. Microstructural characteristics of the weld in as-welded HSLA-D6AC, tempered D6AC, and tensile-tested D6AC were observed via optical microscopy (OM). We also investigated the hardness, tensile strength, and V-notched tensile strength (NTS) of the tempered specimens using a Vickers hardness tester and a universal testing machine. The fracture surfaces of the specimens were observed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Our results show that the mechanical properties and microstructural features of the HSLA weldments are strongly dependent on tempering temperature. An increase in tempering temperature led to a decrease in the hardness and tensile strength of the weldments but led to an increase in ductility. These effects can be attributed to the transformation of the microstructure and its effect on fracture characteristics. The specimens tempered at 300 °C and 450 °C failed in a ductile-brittle manner due to the presence of inter-lath austenite in the microstructure. After tempering at a higher temperature of 600 °C, martensite embrittlement did not occur, such that specimens failure was predominantly in a ductile manner. In the NTS specimens, an increase in tempering temperature led to a reduction in tensile strength due to notch embrittlement and the effects of grain boundary thickening and sliding. Our findings provide a valuable reference for the application of HSLA-D6AC steel in engineering and other fields.

  14. Microstructural investigations of 0.2% carbon content steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollabimazraehno, Sajjad; Hingerl, Kurt

    2011-10-01

    The effect of thermal annealing to get different phases on low carbon steel was investigated. Steel sheets (0.2 wt. % C) of 900 μm thickness were heat treated to produce different structures. All the samples have the same starting point, transformation to coarse austenite at 900 degree Celsius. The nano indentation results revealed that samples have different hadness. By making conventional SEM micrographs, focus ion beam maps, and Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) the microstructural development and grain boundary variation of transformed phases martensite, biainte, tempered martensite and different combination of these phases were studied.

  15. Stability of MC Carbide Particles Size in Creep Resisting Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vodopivec, F.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical analysis of the dependence microstructure creep rate. Discussion on the effects of carbide particles size and their distribution on the base of accelerated creep tests on a steel X20CrMoV121 tempered at 800 °C. Analysis of the stability of carbide particles size in terms of free energy of formation of the compound. Explanation of the different effect of VC and NbC particles on accelerated creep rate.

  16. Climate Drives Polar Bear Origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    In their provocative analysis of northern bears (“Nuclear genomic sequences reveal that polar bears are an old and distinct bear lineage,” Reports, 20 April, p. 344), F. Hailer et al. use independent nuclear loci to show that polar bears originated during the middle Pleistocene, rather than during t...

  17. Watchable Wildlife: The Black Bear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn L. Rogers

    1992-01-01

    Black bears are the bears people most often encounter. Black bears live in forests over much of North America, unlike grizzlies that live only in Alaska, northern and western Canada, and the northern Rocky Mountains. This brochure presents the latest information on black bear life and how this species responds to an ever-increasing number of campers, hikers, and...

  18. World temperate fruit production: characteristics and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge B. Retamales

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In the last 30 years world population has increased 70% but per capita global fruit consumption is only 20% higher. Even though tropical and temperate fruit have similar contributions to the 50 kg/person/year of US consumption of fresh fruit, in the last 30 years this has been slightly greater for temperate fruit. Within fruit consumption, the largest expansion has been for organic fruit which increased more than 50% in the 2002-2006 period. The largest expansion of area planted in the 1996-2006 has been for kiwi (29% and blueberries (20%, while apples (-24% and sour cherries (-13% have had the largest reductions. Nearly 50% of the total global volume of fruit is produced by 5 countries: China, USA, Brazil, Italy and Spain. The main producer (China accounts for 23% of the total. While the main exporters are Spain, USA and Italy, the main importers are Germany, Russia and UK. Demands for the industry have evolved towards quality, food safety and traceability. The industry faces higher productions costs (labor, energy, agrichemicals. The retailers are moving towards consolidation while the customers are changing preferences (food for health. In this context there is greater pressure on growers, processors and retailers. Emerging issues are labor supply, climate change, water availability and sustainability. Recent developments in precision agriculture, molecular biology, phenomics, crop modelling and post harvest physiology should increase yields and quality, and reduce costs for temperate fruit production around the world.

  19. Impact of bearing plates dimensions on interaction of mine workings support and rock mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Rotkegel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research presented in this article is to assess the impact of bearing plates dimensions on the interaction of steel arch support and rock mass. The analysis of the bearing plates was based on laboratory tests and numerical calculations using the FLAC3D program (a finite difference method and the strain-hardening/softening model based on prescribed variations of Mohr–Coulomb properties. The article presents the results of laboratory tests on selected bearing plates and the results of numerical analysis of the interaction between the bearing plates and rock mass with coal, clay stone and sandstone properties.

  20. Effect of microstructure on the mechanical properties of a commercial 12Cr-1Mo steel (HT-9)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lechtenberg, T.A.

    1981-08-01

    The microstructure of a commercial 12Cr-1Mo steel (HT-9) and its associated effect on strength and toughness properties is being studied in a continuing program aimed at qualifying the alloy for use in fusion energy machines. Interim results show this alloy is subject to a degree of tempered martensite embrittlement and temper embrittlement. For applications projected for fusion machines at lower temperatures, a new heat treatment (1000 0 C, 1 h, air-cooled followed by 650 0 C tempering) at lower temperatures and shorter times than the vendor-recommended heat treatment has been identified. Microstructural differences between the treatments are discussed, and mechanical properties are correlated. 6 figures

  1. Ionic nitriding of high chromium martensitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruhl, S.P; Charadia, R; Vaca, L.S; Cimetta, J

    2008-01-01

    Martensitic stainless steels are used in industrial applications where resistance to corrosion and mechanical resistance are needed simultaneously. These steels are normally used in tempering and annealing condition which gives them hardnesses of 500 and 600 HV (about 54 HRC). Ionic nitriding is an assisted diffusion technique that has recently been successfully applied to harden austenitic stainless steels without reducing their resistance to corrosion. The application with AISI 420 martensitic steels has not given good results yet, because in most cases, it affects their corrosion resistance. This work presents the results of the pulsed nitriding of martensitic steels with a higher chrome content, such as the M340 and M333 Boehler steels and they are compared with the same materials after tempering and annealing, without nitriding. The influence of the variations in the parameters of the process, such as the percentage of active time in the pulsed wave, partial nitrogen pressure, current density and effective tension in the microstructure, hardness and wear and corrosion resistance was studied. The microstructure was studied with an optic microscope; the wear resistance with abrasion tests following ASTM G-65 and corrosion with 100 hour long saline haze tests, in a device built according to ASTM B117. Hardness was found to rise to values of 1000 to 1350 HV in all the steels after ionic nitriding, the modified layers oscillated from 3 to 15 microns. As a result, wear resistance also increased, with differences depending on the microstructure and the thickness of the modified layer. However, corrosion resistance was not good, except in the case of the M333 steel test piece with less hardness and a less thick nitrided layer without a noticeable interphase (au)

  2. Microstructure and mechanical properties of hot wire laser clad layers for repairing precipitation hardening martensitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Peng; Cai, Zhipeng; Feng, Zhenhua; Wang, Gang

    2015-12-01

    Precipitation hardening martensitic stainless steel (PH-MSS) is widely used as load-bearing parts because of its excellent overall properties. It is economical and flexible to repair the failure parts instead of changing new ones. However, it is difficult to keep properties of repaired part as good as those of the substrate. With preheating wire by resistance heat, hot wire laser cladding owns both merits of low heat input and high deposition efficiency, thus is regarded as an advantaged repairing technology for damaged parts of high value. Multi-pass layers were cladded on the surface of FV520B by hot wire laser cladding. The microstructure and mechanical properties were compared and analyzed for the substrate and the clad layer. For the as-cladded layer, microstructure was found non-uniform and divided into quenched and tempered regions. Tensile strength was almost equivalent to that of the substrate, while ductility and impact toughness deteriorated much. With using laser scanning layer by layer during laser cladding, microstructure of the clad layers was tempered to fine martensite uniformly. The ductility and toughness of the clad layer were improved to be equivalent to those of the substrate, while the tensile strength was a little lower than that of the substrate. By adding TiC nanoparticles as well as laser scanning, the precipitation strengthening effect was improved and the structure was refined in the clad layer. The strength, ductility and toughness were all improved further. Finally, high quality clad layers were obtained with equivalent or even superior mechanical properties to the substrate, offering a valuable technique to repair PH-MSS.

  3. Tribology of alternative bearings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, John; Jin, Zhongmin; Tipper, Joanne; Stone, Martin; Ingham, Eileen

    2006-12-01

    The tribological performance and biological activity of the wear debris produced has been compared for highly cross-linked polyethylene, ceramic-on-ceramic, metal-on-metal, and modified metal bearings in a series of in vitro studies from a single laboratory. The functional lifetime demand of young and active patients is 10-fold greater than the estimated functional lifetime of traditional polyethylene. There is considerable interest in using larger diameter heads in these high demand patients. Highly cross-linked polyethylene show a four-fold reduction in functional biological activity. Ceramic-on-ceramic bearings have the lowest wear rates and least reactive wear debris. The functional biological activity is 20-fold lower than with highly cross-linked polyethylene. Hence, ceramic-on-ceramic bearings address the tribological lifetime demand of highly active patients. Metal-on-metal bearings have substantially lower wear rates than highly cross-linked polyethylene and wear decreases with head diameter. Bedding in wear is also lower with reduced radial clearance. Differential hardness ceramic-on-metal bearings and the application of ceramic-like coatings reduce metal wear and ion levels.

  4. Internal friction in martensitic carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyos, J.J.; Ghilarducci, A.A.; Salva, H.R.; Chaves, C.A.; Velez, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes relationships between the internal friction and the microstructure of two steels containing 0.626 and 0.71 wt.% carbon. The steels were annealed at 1093 K for 5 min, quenched into water and tempered for 10 min at 423, 573 and 723 K. Internal friction was measured by using a forced vibration pendulum, in a temperature range from 100 to 450 K. The internal friction spectrum is decomposed into four peaks: P1 at 215 K, P2 at 235 K, P3 at 260 K and P4 at 380 K for 3 Hz. Peak P1 is attributed to the interactions between dislocations and carbon atoms. Peak P2 is related to the interaction between dislocations and carbide. Peak P3 is related to the generations of kink - pairs along edge dislocations. Peak P4 is attributed to epsilon carbide precipitation.

  5. Effect of direct quenching on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the lean-chemistry HSLA-100 steel plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhua, S.K.; Sen, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Direct-quenched and tempered (DQT) steels gives better mechanical properties. → Fine Cu and Nb (C, N) precipitates enhance matrix strengthening and tempering resistance. → Boron promotes hardenability, but low temperature Charpy impact toughness gets affected. → Mechanical properties equivalent to HSLA-100 steel is achieved by directly quenched leaner chemistry alloys. - Abstract: The influence of direct quenching on structure-property behavior of lean chemistry HSLA-100 steels was studied. Two laboratory heats, one containing Cu and Nb (C:0.052, Mn:0.99, Cu:1.08, Nb:0.043, Cr:0.57, Ni:1.76, Mo:0.55 pct) and the other containing Cu, Nb and B (C:0.04, Mn:1.02, Cu:1.06, Nb:0.036, Cr:0.87, Ni:1.32, Mo:0.41, B:0.002 percent) were hot-rolled into 25 and 12.5 mm thick plates by varying finish-rolling temperatures. The plates were heat-treated by conventional reheat quenching and tempering (RQT), as well as by direct quenching and tempering (DQT) techniques. In general, direct-quench and tempered plates of Nb-Cu heat exhibited good strength (yield strength ∼ 900 MPa) and low-temperature impact toughness (average: 74 J at -85 deg. C); the Charpy V-notch impact energies were marginally lower than conventional HSLA-100 steel. In Nb-Cu-B heat, impact toughness at low-temperature was inferior owing to boron segregation at grain boundaries. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning auger microprobe (SAM) analysis confirmed existence of borocarbides at grain boundaries in this steel. In general, for both the steels, the mechanical properties of the direct-quench and tempered plates were found to be superior to reheat quench and tempered plates. A detailed transmission electron microscopy study revealed presence of fine Cu and Nb (C, N) precipitates in these steels. It was also observed that smaller martensite inter-lath spacing, finer grains and precipitates in direct-quench and tempered plates compared to the reheat quench and tempered plates

  6. Heat treatment effect on structure and properties of 16GNMA steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakhovskaya, M.B.; Nadtsyna, L.V.; Efimov, A.M.; Guseva, N.V.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of heating for hot deformation test and of subsequent tempering on the structure, strength and ductility properties of the 16 GNMA sttel used for fabricating pressure vessels has been investigated. It has been found that in the 850-1200 deg C temperature range abrupt umps in the grain growth at 1050 and 1200 deg C occur. In case of tempering in the 500-630 deg C range the yield strength increases while the ultimate resistance to fracture decreases. At 700 deg C the ductility and toughness drop while the fracture becomes totally crystalline. The 16 GNMA steel structure following normalizing and tempering presents a mixture of ferrite and granular bainite. Steel aging at the operation temperature (450 deg C) leads to its strengthening without embrittlement

  7. Variations in frequency content of acoustic emission during extension of HF-1 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, W.F.; Kline, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    Acoustic emissions resulting from continuous, dead-weight, tensile loading of quenched and tempered HF-1 steel were analyzed for frequency content. Three distinct frequency spectra were observed. These correspond to microplasticity, plasticity and deformation after recovery. It is shown that frequency analysis of acoustic emission can be a sensitive evaluation technique for assessing structural integrity

  8. Microstructure of steel X 20 Cr 13 in the electron microscopical picture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gesatzke, W.

    1982-01-01

    The tempered microstructure of the steel X 20 Cr 13 is described by an electron microscopical overall picture and additional information is gained which would not be possible with the optical microscope. The large transmission area permits one to quantitatively evaluate a microstructure component which due to its small size can only be measured with electron microscope pictures. (orig.) [de

  9. Austenite Formation from Martensite in a 13Cr6Ni2Mo Supermartensitic Stainless Steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bojack, A.; Zhao, L.; Morris, P.F.; Sietsma, J.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of austenitization treatment of a 13Cr6Ni2Mo supermartensitic stainless steel (X2CrNiMoV13-5-2) on austenite formation during reheating and on the fraction of austenite retained after tempering treatment is measured and analyzed. The results show the formation of austenite in two

  10. Recovery and Precipitate Analysis of 9 Pct Cr-1 Pct MoVNb Steel during Creep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kabadwal, A.; Tamura, M.; Shinozuka, K.; Esaka, H.

    The effect of tempering temperature and creep exposure on the microstructure of a modified 9Cr steel was investigated. Creep-interrupted specimens, including the grip portion, were investigated precisely using mainly X-ray and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) spectroscopy. After saturation of

  11. Partial tooth gear bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A partial gear bearing including an upper half, comprising peak partial teeth, and a lower, or bottom, half, comprising valley partial teeth. The upper half also has an integrated roller section between each of the peak partial teeth with a radius equal to the gear pitch radius of the radially outwardly extending peak partial teeth. Conversely, the lower half has an integrated roller section between each of the valley half teeth with a radius also equal to the gear pitch radius of the peak partial teeth. The valley partial teeth extend radially inwardly from its roller section. The peak and valley partial teeth are exactly out of phase with each other, as are the roller sections of the upper and lower halves. Essentially, the end roller bearing of the typical gear bearing has been integrated into the normal gear tooth pattern.

  12. Effect of Various Heat Treatment Processes on Fatigue Behavior of Tool Steel for Cold Forging Die

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, S. U.; Kim, S. S.; Lee, Y. S.; Kwon, Y. N.; Lee, J. H.

    Effects of various heat treatment processes, including "Q/T (quenching and tempering)", "Q/CT/T (Quenching, cryogenic treatment and tempering)", "Q/T (quenching and tempering) + Ti-nitriding" and "Q/CT/T (Cryogenic treatment and tempering) + Ti-nitriding", on S-N fatigue behavior of AISI D2 tool steel were investigated. The optical micrographs and Vicker's hardness values at near surface and core area were examined for each specimen. Uniaxial fatigue tests were performed by using an electro-magnetic resonance fatigue testing machine at a frequency of 80 Hz and an R ratio of -1. The overall resistance to fatigue tends to decrease significantly with Ti-nitriding treatment compared to those for the general Q/T and Q/CT/T specimens. The reduced resistance to fatigue with Ti-nitriding is discussed based on the microstructural and fractographic analyses.

  13. PENGARUH VARIASI SUHU PADA PROSES SELF TEMPERING DAN VARIASI WAKTU TAHAN PADA PROSES TEMPERING TERHADAP SIFAT MEKANIS BAJA AISI 4140

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunardi Sunardi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui sifat mekanis pada baja AISI 4140 dengan proses tempering dengan variasi waktu tahan dan variasi suhu pada proses self tempering. Material terlebih dahulu dipanaskan pada suhu 850°C, di tahan dengan waktu 14 dan 28 menit, media pendinginan adalah Oli SAE 20. Pada proses tempering baja dipanaskan kembali dengan suhu 200°C di tahan dengan waktu 30 dan 120 menit. Sedangkan untuk proses self tempering, baja di panaskan pada suhu 850°C di tahan dengan waktu 14 dan 28 menit kemudian didinginkan, suhu yang harus dicapai pada pendinginan adalah 200°C, 400°C dan 600°C. Proses tempering dengan variasi waktu tahan mempunyai nilai kekerasan terbesar 50,1 HRC dengan waktu tahan 120 menit, sedangkan nilai kekerasan terbesar pada proses self tempering dengan variasi suhu adalah 29,68 HRC pada suhu 200°C. Nilai ketangguhan terbesar pada saat proses tempering adalah 0,341 (J/mm2 dengan waktu tahan 120 menit, sedangkan pada saat proses self tempering ketangguhan terbesar pada suhu 600°C dengan nilai 0,375 (J/mm2. Laju korosi terbesar pada saat tempering adalah 0,055 (mpy dengan waktu tahan 30 menit, sedangkan pada saat proses self tempering laju korosi terbesar pada suhu 400°C dengan nilai 0,0388 (mpy. 

  14. Influence of heat treatments on thermoelectric power of pressure vessel steels: effect of microstructural evolutions of strongly segregated areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houze, M.

    2002-12-01

    Thermoelectric power measurement (TEP) is a very potential non destructive evaluation method considered to follow ageing under neutron irradiation of pressure vessel steel of nuclear reactor. Prior to these problems, the aim of this study is to establish correlations between TEP variations and microstructural evolutions of pressure vessel steels during heat treatments. Different steels, permitting to simulate heterogeneities of pressure vessel steels and to deconvoluate main metallurgical phenomenons effects were studied. This work allowed to emphasize effect on TEP of: austenitizing and cooling conditions and therefore of microstructure, metallurgical transformations during tempering (recovery, precipitation of alloying elements), and particularly molybdenum precipitation associated to secondary hardening, residual austenite amount or partial austenitizing. (author)

  15. Estimation of the Ultimate Tensile Strength of Steel from Its HB and HV Hardness Numbers and Coercive Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandomirskii, S. G.

    2017-11-01

    A formula is derived to accurately describe the tabulated relation between the Brinell ( HB) and Vickers ( HV) hardnesses of steel over the entire range of their possible variation. This formula and the formulas describing the relation between the HB hardness of chromium-molybdenum and chromium-nickel steels and their ultimate tensile strength σu are used to analyze the change in σu of 38KhNM steel upon quenching and tempering. The data that reveal a relation between σu of 38KhNM steel and its coercive force are obtained.

  16. Influence of the Mo and W additions on the microstructure evolution and mechanical properties in Si-Cr spring steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, Deok Young; Lee, Sang Lae; Nam, Won Jong

    1998-01-01

    Effects of the Mo and W additions to Si-Cr spring steels on the microstructural evolution and mechanical properties in spring steels were investigated. It was found that the Mo and/or W addition does not change the behavior of tempered carbide at low temperatures, such as the precipitation of ε-carbide and the conversion of ε-carbide to cementite, via dilatometry tests and the observation of microstructure using TEM. However, it would reduce the coarsening rate of cementite at high temperature above 450 .deg. C, resulting in the smaller size of cementite particles due to the lower diffusion rate. Since the sag resistance depends on the distribution and the size of precipitates, steel C(0.2% W) showed the strongest sag resistance whereas steel A showed the weakest sag resistance, when tempered at 450 .deg. C. Also, an abundance of precipitates at 350 deg. C tempering exhibits the maximum loop area, i.e., the sag resistance for all the tested steels. The Mo and W additions to Si-Cr spring steels raised the ratio of loop area/tensile strength. Therefore, the Mo and W additions would be effective method to increase the sag resistance as well as strength in Si-Cr spring steels

  17. Magnetically leviated superconducting bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, Bernard R.; Lynds, Jr., Lahmer

    1993-01-01

    A magnetically levitated superconducting bearing includes a magnet (2) mounted on a shaft (12) that is rotatable around an axis of rotation and a Type II superconductor (6) supported on a stator (14) in proximity to the magnet (2). The superconductor (6) is positioned so that when it is cooled to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field, it interacts with the magnet (2) to produce an attractive force that levitates the magnet (2) and supports a load on the shaft (12). The interaction between the superconductor (6) and magnet(2) also produces surface screening currents (8) that generate a repulsive force perpendicular to the load. The bearing also has means for maintaining the superconductor at a temperature below its critical temperature (16, 18). The bearing could also be constructed so the magnet (2) is supported on the stator (14) and the superconductor (6) is mounted on the shaft (12). The bearing can be operated by cooling the superconductor (6) to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field.

  18. Self-Organization during Friction of Slide Bearing Antifriction Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iosif S. Gershman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the peculiarities of self-organization behavior and formation of dissipative structures during friction of antifriction alloys for slide bearings against a steel counterbody. It shows that during self-organization, the moment of friction in a tribosystem may be decreasing with the load growth and in the bifurcations of the coefficient of friction with respect to load. Self-organization and the formation of dissipative structures lead to an increase in the seizure load.

  19. A Weldability Study of Structural Materials for Manufacturing Bearing Separators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Drizhov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim is to analyze the possibility for using the 08YUT steel separator tape to manufacture separators, which are to be further applied to the bearing assembly via projection welding.Reliability of rolling bearings is determined by many factors such as surface quality of balls and rings and assembly precision, including the seal strength of hemiseparators.The technology based on the double-pulsed condenser projection welding belongs to one of the most efficient technologies to provide the assembly of bearing, for it allows welding of separator simultaneously in all currents. The paper shows that the required condition to assure high reliability of the bearing is induastial development and implementation of an effective and positive quality control system, which will reduce the probability of damages occurring both when welding and in the course of operation.The work used the static tensile test methods, as well as metallographic analysis.The experimental study used the 08YUT steel hemiseparators. A tape thickness of the hemiseparators was of 1.5mm. The number of simultaneously welded points were 8. The experimental studies of the metal damage of welding joints of the the 08YUT steel separator have shown that with a wide range of the changing welding current and compressed electrode force the quality assurance of welding points at the parent metal level could not be retrieved.The metallographic analysis of the metal damage nature of a welded joint revealed that between the atoms on the surfaces of hemiseparators there are no strong bonds – a bond was formed in the contact zone. This phenomenon leads to reduced tensile seal strength.The study has shown that aluminum and titanium added to the low-carbon steel in order to have a more fine-grained metal structure has a negative effect on the quality of welded joint via projection welding.

  20. Ductility and Ultimate Capacity of Prestressed Steel Reinforced Concrete Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengquan Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear numerical analysis of the structural behaviour of prestressed steel reinforced concrete (PSRC beams was carried out by using finite element analysis software ABAQUS. By comparing the load-deformation curves, the rationality and reliability of the finite element model have been confirmed; moreover, the changes of the beam stiffness and stress in the forcing process and the ultimate bearing capacity of the beam were analyzed. Based on the model, the effect of prestressed force, and H-steel to the stiffness, the ultimate bearing capacity and ductility of beam were also analyzed.

  1. Influence of electrolyte nature on steel membrane hydrogen permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisovskij, A.P.; Nazarov, A.P.; Mikhajlovskij, Yu.N.

    1993-01-01

    Effect of electrolyte nature on hydrogen absorption of carbonic steel membrane at its cathode polarization is studied. Electrolyte buffering by anions of subdissociated acids is shown to increase hydrogen flow though the membrane in acid electrolytes. Mechanisms covering dissociation of proton-bearing anion in the electrolyte near-the-electron layer or dissociative adsorption on steel surface are suggested. Effect of proton-bearing bases forming stable complex compounds with iron, is studied. Activation of anode process of iron solution is shown to increase the rate of hydrogen penetration

  2. Parallel tempering in full QCD with Wilson fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilgenfritz, E.-M.; Kerler, W.; Mueller-Preussker, M.; Stueben, H.

    2002-01-01

    We study the performance of QCD simulations with dynamical Wilson fermions by combining the hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm with parallel tempering on 10 4 and 12 4 lattices. In order to compare tempered with standard simulations, covariance matrices between subensembles have to be formulated and evaluated using the general properties of autocorrelations of the parallel tempering algorithm. We find that rendering the hopping parameter κ dynamical does not lead to an essential improvement. We point out possible reasons for this observation and discuss more suitable ways of applying parallel tempering to QCD

  3. CFD Analysis of A Starved Four-Pad Tilting-Pad Journal Bearing with An Elastic Support of Pads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parovay, E. F.; Falaleev, S. V.

    2018-01-01

    Tilting-pad journal bearings are widely used in technics. Oil starvation operation regime is not common for hydrodynamic bearings. However, correctly designed low-flow journal bearing have to operate efficiently and consistently on high rotor speeds. An elastic support of bearing pads is a set of elastic pins made of steel. Elastic support allows pads to self-align and achieve an optimal operational mode. The article presents the thermohydrodynamic performance of an axial journal bearing. The study deals with 60 mm diameter four-pad tilting-pad journal bearing, submitted to a static load varying from 1000 to 30000 N with a rotating speed varying from 1000 to 10000 rpm. The investigation focuses on numerical studying the characteristics of low-flow tilting-pad journal bearings under oil starvation conditions. Dependencies of the bearing performance on the load, rotational speed of the shaft, and the size of the radial clearance are presented.

  4. Influence of Heat Treatment on the Microstructure and Corrosion Resistance of 13 Wt Pct Cr-Type Martensitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Si-Yuan; Yao, Ke-Fu; Chen, Yun-Bo; Wang, Miao-Hui; Ge, Xue-Yuan

    2015-12-01

    The effect of heat treatment on the microstructure and the electrochemical properties of a typical corrosion-resistant plastic mold steel in Cl--containing solution were studied in this research. Through X-ray diffraction patterns, SEM and TEM analysis, it was found that the sequence of the precipitates in the steels tempered at 573 K, 773 K, and 923 K (300 °C, 500 °C, and 650 °C) was θ-M3C carbides, nano-sized Cr-rich M23C6 carbides, and micro/submicron-sized Cr-rich M23C6 carbides, respectively. The results of the electrochemical experiments showed that the pitting potential of the as-quenched martensitic stainless steels increased with the austenitizing temperature. However, the corrosion resistance of the steels would decreased after tempering, especially when tempered at 773 K (500 °C), no passivation regime could be found in the polarization curve of the MSSs and no effective passive film could be formed on the steels in Cl--containing environments. The present results suggested that the temperature around 773 K (500 °C) should be avoided for tempering process of MSS used as plastic molds.

  5. Symbolic aesthetics in steel structural systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usama Abdul-Mun'em Khuraibet

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aesthetic expression and its orders are important for steel structures forming. Steel structures are a compilation of structural elements, where its shapes have standard dimensions and pre-fabricated. As the steel construction systems not only aim to achieve the functional requirements for users, but must also have the symbolic aesthetics which provides visually and cognitive expression for viewers. In this sense the research interested in expressional aesthetics in these systems and highlights the importance of attention as structural items. Therefore the visual items which related with steel structures contain some of the most powerful forms of modern architecture, steel structures with a glass cladding, agility and accuracy in manufacture of structural elements as visual items, structural interest in the forms of spaces which have long span systems or in high buildings are different forms of expression and influence. So the research focuses on the study of those expressive patterns related with the steel construction properties, including the advantages of these systems at the level of strength and firmness, flexibility and economy as well as aesthetic and expression. Accordingly, the research problem concentrated on educational shortage in the study of the structural steel system aspects concerning constructional characteristic, expressive and aesthetic features, and how to deal with them as a language bearing the symbols and meanings which have clear structural style, because it the best ways to make those systems as communication means with users, by premise that the use of expressional symbol in steel construction increases the aesthetic value. Therefore the research aims to reveal the most structural and expressive patterns by analysis the expressional means and steel structural aesthetics.

  6. Oceanic temperate forest versus warm temperate rainforest: a reply to Grubb et al. (2017)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGlone, Matt S.; Buitenwerf, Robert; Richardson, Sarah J.

    2017-01-01

    Grubb et al. (2017) point out that we (McGlone et al. 2016) erroneously stated that the definition of warm temperate rain forest (WTRF; Grubb et al. 2013) was based in part on climatic criteria. We apologise: their text made clear that this was not the case. However, they go on to say that they ‘...

  7. GRINDABILITY OF SELECTED GRADES OF LOW-ALLOY HIGH-SPEED STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Jaworski

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we presents the results of investigations studied the cutting ability and grindability of selected high-speed steels. We analysed the effect of the austenitization temperature on the grain size, the amount of retained austenite and percentage of retained austenite in HS3-1-1 steel. Furthermore, the investigations concerned on the efficiency of the keyway broaches during the whole period of operation were carried out. It was found that the value of average roughness parameter increases together with increases in the grinding depth. The investigations also show the influence of tempering conditions on the volume of carbide phases in HS3-1-1 steel.

  8. Properties of structural steels melted out of high-purity charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchenko, V.N.; Sergeeva, T.K.; Kondakova, N.K.; Morozov, V.P.; Madorskij, L.L.

    1993-01-01

    A comparative evaluation has been made of impurities, mechanical properties and hydrogen embirittlement parameters for steels type 40Kh and 40KhS produced by electrometallurgical method with the use of direct reduced charge (DR-steels) and melted in an open-hearth furnace. Investigation results have shown that 40Kh and 40KhS Dr-steels have more coarse austenitic grains and experience more complete transformation of martensite into ferritic-pearlitic mixture on tempering. Threshold stresses increase 2.5 times due to purity enhancement at the expense of application of direct reduced charge

  9. Influence of microstructure of high-strength low-alloy steels on their weldability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cwiek, J.; Labanowski, J.

    2003-01-01

    Microstructure of steel before welding has influence on the steel's susceptibility to cold cracking because it influences hardenability and maximum hardness of heat affected zone (HAZ). Two high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steel grades 18G2AV and 14HNMBCu, in various heat treatment conditions, were subjected to simulated welding thermal cycles. It was revealed that maximum HAZ hardness is influenced by microstructure presented before thermal cycle was applied. The higher HAZ hardness was observed for quenched and tempered condition, comparing to full annealed and overheated conditions. (author)

  10. Future developments and applications of nitrogen-bearing steels ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    society in the field of materials and some recalling of basic properties and principles ... Environment-friendly technologies (safety in oil pipelines, oil exploration . ..... Vogt J-B, Ait Saadi B, Foct J 1999 Analysis of the fatigue structures in a duplex ...

  11. Swelling behavior of manganese-bearing AISI 216 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.; Garner, F.A.

    1984-01-01

    The inclusion of 8.5 wt % manganese in AISI 216 does not appear to alter the swelling behavior from that found to be typical of austenitic alloys with comparable levels of other austentite-stabilizing elements. The swelling in AISI 216 in EBR-II is quite insensitive to irradiation temperature in the range 400-650 0 C. Microscopy reveals that this may arise from the low level of precipitation that occurs in the alloy

  12. Future developments and applications of nitrogen-bearing steels ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. After considerations related with the global frame of the demand of society in the field of materials and some recalling of basic properties and principles of nitrogen alloying, possible future developments are listed and discussed.

  13. Aging of a copper bearing HSLA-100 steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    to reduce the carbon content to ~ 0⋅05 wt pct, to increase toughness and ... improved toughness, although at the cost of strength. The present work was ..... Wilson A D, Hamburg E G, Colvin D J, Thompson S W and Krauss. G 1988 Proc. int.

  14. Aging of a copper bearing HSLA-100 steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The aging process caused a slow transformation of lath martensite into acicular ferrite ... India; School of Physics and Materials Science, Thapar Institute of Engineering and ... Manuscript received: 6 June 2002; Manuscript revised: 1 April 2003 ...

  15. Development and mechanical results of Zr-bearing ferritic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Lizhen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The mission of the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program is to develop crosscutting technologies for nuclear energy applications. Advanced structural materials with superior performance at elevated temperatures are always desired for nuclear reactors, which can improve reactor economics, safety margins, and design flexibility. They benefit not only new reactors, including advanced light water reactors (LWRs) and fast reactors such as the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) that is primarily designed for management of high-level wastes, but also life extension of the existing fleet when component exchange is needed. Developing and utilizing the modern materials science tools (experimental, theoretical, and computational tools) is an important path to more efficient alloy development and process optimization.

  16. Progress in the Research of Fatigue of Weathering Steel after Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jianyu, Liang; Jian, Yao; Youwu, Xu

    2017-12-01

    Weathering steel has a good corrosion resistance in the atmosphere, and the application of weathering steel in civil structure also reduces the cost of painting and maintenance. It is also possible for the bare weathering steel to bear the fatigue load with a rust layer. This paper summarizes the fatigue researches after corrosion of weathering steel, including the shape of specimens, failure modes of fatigue and the conclusions obtained through experimental investigations. It is also introduced the fatigue model of weathering steel after corrosion, which can be useful for the engineering application or further researches.

  17. [The Steel factor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres-Cortés, J R

    1997-01-01

    Mice bearing mutations at either of two loci, dominant White spotting(W) or Steel(Sl), exhibit development defects in hematopoietic, melanocytic and germ cells. Genetics studies have shown that the SI locus encodes the Steel factor (SF), which is the ligand for the tyrosine kinase receptor c-kit, the product of the W locus. SF is synthesized in membrane-bound form and can be processed to produce a soluble form. Cell-cell interaction is important in the production of normal blood cells in vivo and in vitro and in the cellular expansion of leukemic cells. We discuss here how SF decreases the requirements in cell interaction for blast colony formation in acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) and the presence of membrane-bound SF possibly contributes to the density-dependent growth of the AML blasts. We explain that SF is mainly a survival factor for hematopoietic cells, of little proliferative effect, which maintains CD34+ hematopoietic cells in an undifferentiated state. These properties would potentially allow the maintenance of hematopoietic cells in culture for the purpose of marrow purging or gene therapy. The activation of the c-kit signal transduction pathway may play a significant role in the development of many types of non-hematological malignancies by disrupting normal cell-cell interactions and allowing the growth of cancer cell populations. In summary, the properties of the SF indicate it has a role for survival signals during the process of normal differentiation, AML proliferation and in the maintenance of many c-kit+ tumors.

  18. Experimental study of laminated rubber bearings for earthquake isolation of buildings, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Takafumi; Fujita, Satoshi; Suzuki, Shigenobu; Yoshizawa, Toshikazu.

    1987-01-01

    Rubber bearings of 980 kN rated load were tested to investigate the characteristics of restoring forces of full scale bearings for earthquake isolation of buildings. These bearings comprising 27 natural rubber sheets of 6 mm thickness and 600 mm diameter bonded to steel plates were designed to provide a 100000 kg rated mass with a horizontal natural frequency of 0.51 Hz and a vertical one of 21 Hz and to accept a horizontal displacement larger than 300 mm. The static tests were carried out with satisfactory results. It was confirmed that the performance of the bearing met the specifications well. Furthermore, the vertical load distributions across the top plane of the bearing under various horizontal displacements were measured, and showed that they were always concentrated in the overlapping area of the top and bottom planes. This verified that the rubber bearing substantially supported the vertical load by the overlapping area. (author)

  19. The effect of lead concentration on the corrosion susceptibility of 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel in a lead-lithium liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, B.D.; Edwards, G.R.; Hoffman, N.J.

    1982-01-01

    The intergranular penetration of 21/4Cr-1Mo steel by lead-lithium liquids containing 0, 17.6, and 53 w/o lead has been investigated at temperatures from 300 0 C to 600 0 C for times up to 1000 hours. Limited tests using a 99.3 w/o lead-lithium liquid were also conducted. Tempering was found to remove the susceptibility of as-quenched 21/4Cr-1Mo steel to penetration at 500 0 C by lead-lithium liquids containing up to 53 w/o lead. Penetration by the 99.3 w/o lead-lithium liquid in 1000 hours at 500 0 C was found to be negligible even when the steel was in the as-quenched condition. An Arrhenius analysis yielded the same low initial activation energy (approx. equal to25 kJ/mole) for liquids containing 0, 17.6, and 53 w/o lead. The initial penetration rate for lead-free lithium was significantly greater than that for the lead-bearing liquids, a factor thought to be related to the effect of lead on the wettability of the liquid. The same secondary activation energy (approx. equal to120 kJ/mole) was also found for the three liquids. Furthermore, the secondary penetration rate was found to be insensitive to lead content. Anomalous behavior at 500 0 C, observed in this study as well as in previous studies, is discussed, and a hypothetical explanation for the behavior is presented. (orig.)

  20. Role of Nb in low interstitial 13Cr super martensitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, X.P.; Wang, L.J. [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Liu, C.M., E-mail: cmliu@mail.neu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Subramanian, S.V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, L8S-4L7 (Canada)

    2011-08-25

    Highlights: {yields} Nb retards the kinetics of reversed austenite formation. {yields} Nb suppresses the occurrence of Cr rich precipitates. {yields} Nano-scale precipitates contribute to the significant increase in strength. - Abstract: The effect of adding 0.1 wt% Nb to low interstitial (N 0.01 wt%, C 0.01 wt%) 13Cr super martensitic stainless steel (SMSS) on solid phase transformation and microstructures achieved by normalizing and tempering was investigated using dilatometer, electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and its consequence on mechanical properties was examined to clarify the role of Nb in low interstitial martensitic stainless steel. Nb was found to retard kinetics of reversed austenite formation during tempering and to suppress the occurrence of Cr rich precipitates. The measurement of mechanical properties shows that while the strength properties were significantly increased by nano-scale precipitates enriched in Nb in the steel with 0.10 wt% Nb, the ductility and toughness properties were restored by optimum volume fraction of retained austenite. Excellent strength and adequate toughness properties were obtained by tempering the steel with 0.10 wt% Nb and low interstitial (N 0.01 wt%, C 0.01 wt%) steel at 600 deg. C.

  1. Ni-Ti Next Generation Bearings for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaCorte, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    NASA applications challenge traditional bearing materials. The rigors of launch often include heavy shock loads and exposure to corrosive environments (e.g., salt spray). Unfortunately, ball and roller bearings made from hardened steels are vulnerable to Brinell denting and rust which can limit performance and life. Ceramic materials can eliminate corrosion concerns but their high stiffness and extreme hardness actually makes denting problems worse. In this presentation, an emerging superelastic alloy, NiTi, is introduced for rolling element bearing applications. Through a decade of RD, NiTi alloy bearings have been put through a comprehensive series of life and performance tests. Hardness, corrosion, strength, stiffness, and rolling contact fatigue tests have been conducted and reported. Ball bearings ranging in size from 12 to 50mm bore have been successfully engineered and operated over a wide range of speeds and test conditions including being submerged in water. The combination of high hardness, moderate elastic modulus, low density, and intrinsic corrosion immunity provide new possibilities for mechanisms that operate under extreme conditions. Recent preliminary tests indicate that bearings can be made from NiTi alloys that are easily lubricated by conventional oils and greases and exhibit acceptable rolling contact fatigue resistance. This presentation introduces the NiTi materials systems and shows how NASA is using it to alleviate several specific problems encountered in advanced space applications.

  2. Adhesion and wear properties of boro-tempered ductile iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayali, Yusuf; Yalcin, Yilmaz; Taktak, Suekrue

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → In this study, the wear and adhesion properties of BDI were investigated. → Boro-tempering process under several heat treatment conditions was examined. → Optical microscope, SEM and XRD analysis were carried out to investigate the microstructure. → It was observed that boro-tempering process improves micro-hardness and wear properties of ductile irons. -- Abstract: In this study, adhesion and wear properties of boro-tempered ductile iron (BDI) were investigated. Boro-tempering was carried out on two stage processes i.e. boronizing and tempering. At the first stage, ductile iron samples were boronized by using pack process at 900 o C for 1, 3, and 5 h and then, secondly tempered at 250, 300, 350, and 400 o C for 1 h. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of boro-tempered samples showed that FeB and Fe 2 B phases were found on the surface of the samples. The Daimler-Benz Rockwell-C adhesion test was used to assess the adhesion of boride layer. Test result showed that adhesion decreased with increasing boriding time and increased with increasing tempering temperature. Dry sliding wear tests of these samples were performed against Al 2 O 3 ball at a constant sliding speed and loads of 5 and 10 N. Wear tests indicated that boro-tempering heat treatment increased wear resistance of ductile iron. In addition, it was found that while wear rate of boro-tempered samples decreased with increasing boriding time, there is no significant affect of tempering temperature on wear rate.

  3. Actuators for Active Magnetic Bearings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric H. Maslen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The literature of active magnetic bearing (AMB technology dates back to at least 1937 when the earliest work that clearly describes an active magnetic bearing system was published by Jesse Beams [...

  4. Study of Cold Coiling Spring Steel on Microstructure and Cold Forming Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Y.; Liang, Y. L.; Ming, Y.; Zhao, F.

    2017-09-01

    Medium-carbon cold-coiling locomotive spring steels were treated by a novel Q-P-T (quenching-partitioning-tempering) process. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize the relevant parameters of the steel. Results show that the microstructure of tested steel treated by Q-P-T process is a complex microstructures composed of martensite, bainite and retained austenite. The volume fraction of retained austenite (wt.%) is up to 31%. After pre-deforming and tempering again at 310°C, the plasticity of samples treated by Q-P-T process is still well. Fracture images show that the Q-P-T samples are ductile fracture. It is attributed to the higher volume fraction of the retained austenite and the interactions between the multi-phases in Q-P-T processed sample.

  5. The effect of nickel on the mechanical behavior of molybdenum P/M steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gething, B.A.; Heaney, D.F.; Koss, D.A.; Mueller, T.J.

    2005-01-01

    This study has examined the effects of nickel alloying additions on the microstructural characteristics and mechanical properties of Fe-xNi-0.85Mo-0.4C-base steels that were powder processed using double-press double-sinter processing to maximize density. The steels were examined in the as-processed condition as well as in a quench-and-temper heat treated condition. Tensile behavior indicates that while nickel content (at levels of 2,4, and 6%) increased tensile strength in the as-sintered condition, it did not significantly affect tensile strength in the quenched and tempered condition. In both conditions increasing Ni content decreased elongation to fracture. The 4% Ni steel, which tended to have the smallest maximum pore size, also exhibited the greatest fatigue strength

  6. An Experimental Investigation on Hardness and Microstructure of Heat Treated EN 9 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Palash; Kundu, Arnab; Mondal, Dhiraj

    2017-08-01

    In the modern engineering world, extensive research has led to the development of some special grades of steel, often suited for enhanced functions. EN 9 steel is one such grade, having major applications in power plants, automobile and aerospace industry. Different heat treatment processes are employed to achieve high hardness and high wear resistance, but machinability subsequently decreases. Existing literature is not sufficient to achieve a balance between hardness and machinability. The aim of this experimental work is to determine the hardness values and observe microstructural changes in EN9 steel, when it is subjected to annealing, normalizing and quenching. Finally, the effects of tempering after each of these heat treatments on hardness and microstructure have also been shown. It is seen that the tempering after normalizing the specimen achieved satisfactory results. The microstructure was also observed to be consisting of fine grains.

  7. 76 FR 45509 - Final Results of Antidumping Duty Changed Circumstances Review: Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-29

    ...) high nickel steel; (d) ball bearing steel; and (e) concrete reinforcing bars and rods. Also excluded... its ratio of length (measured along the axis--that is, the direction of rolling--of the rod) over... treatment as Sicartsa. We will instruct U.S. Customs and Border Protection that a cash deposit rate of 1.26...

  8. Process of coke less without waste treatment of direct vanadium allowing steel melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisienko, V.G.; Droujinina, O.G.; Morozova, V.A.; Ladigina, N.V.; Yusfin, Yu.S.; Parenkev, A.E.

    2003-01-01

    The development of new methods of steel production are now conducted with the purpose of energy consumption and harmful emissions reduction. The choice of technology and equipment in this case plays a marginal role. It is well known that vanadium alloying steel has increased service properties. The known classical scheme of vanadium steel melting is very power-intensive, as includes such power-intensive processes as blast furnace process and chemical processing of vanadium slag therewith sintering and by-product coke processes are accompanied by significant harmful emissions. In so doing the vanadium losses may run to 60%. In view of requests of environment protection and economical efficiency the new process of coke less without wastes processing of vanadium-bearing raw material with direct vanadium allowing of steel - LP-process is developed. Its purpose is the melting on the basis of vanadium-bearing titanomagnetite of vanadium allowing steel with increase of vanadium concentration in steel and diminution of vanadium losses without application coke and natural gas with use of any coals and carbon-bearing wastes. LP-process consists of three aggregates and corresponding processes: process of liquid-phase reduction, process of vanadium-bearing pellets metallization in the shaft furnace, and process of alloying steel melting in the arc electric furnace. The obtained results have shown, that the LP-process is more energy saving on a comparison with other methods of vanadium allowing steel production. (Original)

  9. Microstructural Characterization and Mechanical Properties of Electron Beam Welded Joint of High Strength Steel Grade S690QL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błacha S.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the paper the results of metallographic examination and mechanical properties of electron beam welded joint of quenched and tempered steel grade S690QL are presented. Metallographic examination revealed that the concentrated electron beam significantly affect the changes of microstructure in the steel. Parent material as a delivered condition (quenched and tempered had a bainitic-martensitic microstructure at hardness about 290 HV0.5. After welding, the microstructure of heat affected zone is composed mainly of martensite (in the vicinity of the fusion line of hardness 420 HV0.5. It should be noted, however, that the microstructure of steel in the heat affected zone varies with the distance from the fusion line. The observed microstructural changes were in accordance with the CCT-S transformation diagram for the examined steel.

  10. Effect of heat treatment on microstructure and hardness of Eurofer 97, Eurofer ODS and T92 steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Z.; Faulkner, R.G.; Riddle, N.; Martino, F.D.; Yang, K.

    2009-01-01

    Eurofer ODS steel is a potential candidate for fusion reactor application due to its excellent swelling resistance, low thermal expansion coefficient and high temperature properties. One of the main issues is that high fluence neutron irradiation induces a significant increase of ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) at temperatures below 400 deg. C which restricts its application. The aim of this study is to explore the methods to lower the initial DBTT of Eurofer ODS steel by heat treatment optimization. Two heats of Eurofer ODS steels with different C contents are heat-treated at different normalizing temperatures, cooling rates and tempering conditions, and are compared with Eurofer 97 and T92 steels heat-treated with similar conditions. The microstructure is characterized by optical microscopy, FEG-TEM and OIM-EBSD techniques. The effect of normalization, cooling rate and temper on grain size, precipitation, grain boundary misorientation and hardness are investigated. The influences of these properties on DBTT are discussed.

  11. Friction and wear of ball bearings in liquid sodium environment. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleefeldt, K.; Gering, G.

    1975-07-01

    This report describes sodium experiments with ball bearings, fabricated out of five different materials, i.e. tool steel (s-6-5-2), stainless high speed steel (BG 42), stellite, ferro-titanit (WF 13.5) and tungsten carbide/cobalt cermet (GT 10/20). With each material four cageless bearings of the type 6207 were tested in task 1 under the following test conditions, in order to determine the most promising material for further investigations: test temperature 400 0 C, axial load 300 kp, speed 200 min -1 , total revolutions 0.2 x 10 6 , oxygen concentration [de

  12. Non-destructive radiometry inspection technique for locating reinforcements and void/porosity in bridge bearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yahaya bin Jafar; Jaafar bin Abdullah; Mohamad Azmi bin Ismail.

    1989-01-01

    Defects detection in bridge bearings is very important in controlling quality and safety. Typical manufacturing defects include misalligned or bent steel plates and the presence of voids/porosity within the rubber. A non-destructive radiometry inspection technique was used to locate steel plates position and the presence of voids/porosity in bridge bearing samples provided by the Rubber Research Institute of Malaysia (RRIM). Preliminary studies show that the mentioned defects can readily be determined by this technique. Some of the results are also presented. (author)

  13. Model of converter dusts and iron-bearing slurries management in briquetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Gara

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An important problem in metallurgy of iron and steel is management of hydrated, fine-grained, iron-bearing waste which can be formed as a result of gas scrubbing. The article presents a model of application of converter slurry in a closed-circuit flow system. The correct preparation of slag, namely briquetting with defined additives, allows for application of such slag in the steel-making process as the substitute for scrap metal.

  14. Delayed child-bearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jo-Ann; Tough, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    To provide an overview of delayed child-bearing and to describe the implications for women and health care providers. Delayed child-bearing, which has increased greatly in recent decades, is associated with an increased risk of infertility, pregnancy complications, and adverse pregnancy outcome. This guideline provides information that will optimize the counselling and care of Canadian women with respect to their reproductive choices. Maternal age is the most important determinant of fertility, and obstetric and perinatal risks increase with maternal age. Many women are unaware of the success rates or limitations of assisted reproductive technology and of the increased medical risks of delayed child-bearing, including multiple births, preterm delivery, stillbirth, and Caesarean section. This guideline provides a framework to address these issues. Studies published between 2000 and August 2010 were retrieved through searches of PubMed and the Cochrane Library using appropriate key words (delayed child-bearing, deferred pregnancy, maternal age, assisted reproductive technology, infertility, and multiple births) and MeSH terms (maternal age, reproductive behaviour, fertility). The Internet was also searched using similar key words, and national and international medical specialty societies were searched for clinical practice guidelines and position statements. Data were extracted based on the aims, sample, authors, year, and results. The quality of evidence was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table 1). The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. RECOMMENDATIONS 1. Women who delay child-bearing are at increased risk of infertility. Prospective parents, especially women, should know that their fecundity and fertility begin to decline significantly after 32 years of age. Prospective parents should know that assisted reproductive technologies cannot guarantee a live birth or completely

  15. Government Risk-Bearing

    CERN Document Server

    1993-01-01

    The u.s. government bulks large in the nation's financial markets. The huge volume of government-issued and -sponsored debt affects the pricing and volume ofprivate debt and, consequently, resource allocation between competing alternatives. What is often not fully appreciated is the substantial influence the federal government wields overresource allocation through its provisionofcreditandrisk-bearing services to the private economy. Because peopleand firms generally seekto avoid risk, atsomeprice they are willing to pay another party to assume the risk they would otherwise face. Insurance companies are a class of private-sector firms one commonly thinks of as providing these services. As the federal government has expanded its presence in the U.S. economy during this century, it has increasingly developed programs aimed at bearing risks that the private sector either would not take on at any price, or would take on but atapricethoughtto besogreatthatmostpotentialbeneficiarieswouldnotpurchase the coverage. To...

  16. Passive magnetic bearing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Richard F.

    2014-09-02

    An axial stabilizer for the rotor of a magnetic bearing provides external control of stiffness through switching in external inductances. External control also allows the stabilizer to become a part of a passive/active magnetic bearing system that requires no external source of power and no position sensor. Stabilizers for displacements transverse to the axis of rotation are provided that require only a single cylindrical Halbach array in its operation, and thus are especially suited for use in high rotation speed applications, such as flywheel energy storage systems. The elimination of the need of an inner cylindrical array solves the difficult mechanical problem of supplying support against centrifugal forces for the magnets of that array. Compensation is provided for the temperature variation of the strength of the magnetic fields of the permanent magnets in the levitating magnet arrays.

  17. Nickel: makes stainless steel strong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Maeve A.

    2012-01-01

    Nickel is a silvery-white metal that is used mainly to make stainless steel and other alloys stronger and better able to withstand extreme temperatures and corrosive environments. Nickel was first identified as a unique element in 1751 by Baron Axel Fredrik Cronstedt, a Swedish mineralogist and chemist. He originally called the element kupfernickel because it was found in rock that looked like copper (kupfer) ore and because miners thought that "bad spirits" (nickel) in the rock were making it difficult for them to extract copper from it. Approximately 80 percent of the primary (not recycled) nickel consumed in the United States in 2011 was used in alloys, such as stainless steel and superalloys. Because nickel increases an alloy's resistance to corrosion and its ability to withstand extreme temperatures, equipment and parts made of nickel-bearing alloys are often used in harsh environments, such as those in chemical plants, petroleum refineries, jet engines, power generation facilities, and offshore installations. Medical equipment, cookware, and cutlery are often made of stainless steel because it is easy to clean and sterilize. All U.S. circulating coins except the penny are made of alloys that contain nickel. Nickel alloys are increasingly being used in making rechargeable batteries for portable computers, power tools, and hybrid and electric vehicles. Nickel is also plated onto such items as bathroom fixtures to reduce corrosion and provide an attractive finish.

  18. Stacked magnet superconducting bearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigney, T.K. II; Saville, M.P.

    1993-01-01

    A superconducting bearing is described, comprising: a plurality of permanent magnets magnetized end-to-end and stacked side-by-side in alternating polarity, such that flux lines flow between ends of adjacent magnets; isolating means, disposed between said adjacent magnets, for reducing flux leakage between opposing sides of said adjacent magnets; and a member made of superconducting material having at least one surface in communication with said flux lines

  19. Radium bearing waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tope, W.G.; Nixon, D.A.; Smith, M.L.; Stone, T.J.; Vogel, R.A.; Schofield, W.D.

    1995-01-01

    Fernald radium bearing ore residue waste, stored within Silos 1 and 2 (K-65) and Silo 3, will be vitrified for disposal at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). A comprehensive, parametric evaluation of waste form, packaging, and transportation alternatives was completed to identify the most cost-effective approach. The impacts of waste loading, waste form, regulatory requirements, NTS waste acceptance criteria, as-low-as-reasonably-achievable principles, and material handling costs were factored into the recommended approach

  20. Steel Bar corrosion monitoring based on encapsulated piezoelectric sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying; Tang, Tianyou

    2018-05-01

    The durability of reinforced concrete has a great impact on the structural bearing capacity, while the corrosion of steel bars is the main reason for the degradation of structural durability. In this paper, a new type of encapsulated cement based piezoelectric sensor is developed and its working performance is verified. The consistency of the finite element simulation and the experimental results shows the feasibility of monitoring the corrosion of steel bars using encapsulated piezoelectric sensors. The research results show that the corrosion conditions of the steel bars can be determined by the relative amplitude of the measured signal through the encapsulated piezoelectric sensor.