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Sample records for temperature-dependent spectral response

  1. Temperature dependence of microwave SQUID response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callegari, A.; Deaver, B.S. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The response of a microwave SQUID using a Ta point contact has been measured at various temperatures giving a progression of operating conditions from the nonhysteretic to the hysteretic mode. The responses calculated by Soerensen and by Burhman and Jackel are in good qualitative agreement with the measurements. However, these theories do not appear to account for the response reported by Rachford, Wolf, Nisenoff, and Huang for thin-film bridges. We present a calculation that exhibits explicitly the dependence of the response on Ω=Phi 0 ν/I/sub c/R, where ν is the microwave frequeny, I/sub c/ and R are the critical current and resistance of the junction, and Phi 0 is the fluxoid quantum, and that agrees with their data and their interpretation of it in terms of a limiting time tau for the supercurrent response with tauproportionalΔ (T) -1 where Δ (T) is the BCS gap parameter

  2. Phase dependent impedance and temperature dependent response of microwave SQUID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callegari, A.C.

    1978-01-01

    We report measurements of the microwave impedance of superconducting point contacts as a function of the quantum mechanical phase difference phi. They yield a conductance of the form G(phi) = G/sub o/(1+alpha cos phi) where alpha is a dimensionless parameter reflecting an interference between the Cooper pairs and the quasiparticles. Experimental results agree with a negative alpha approximately equal to -.5 which can be interpreted in terms of a phenomenological model that follows essentially the Time Dependent Landau Ginzburg theory (TDLG). In the second part we report measurements of the response of a microwave SQUID using a Ta point contact at various temperatures. They give a progression of operating conditions from the non-hysteretic to the hysteretic mode. The responses calculated by Soerensen and by Burhman and Jackel are in qualitative agreement with the measurements. We also present a theory based on a calculation of the reflection coefficient from the point contact. This theory reproduces the results of Bunhman and Jackel and Soerensen and is directly adaptable to our microwave geometry. In the last chapter we present a calculation that exhibits explicitly the dependence of the response on OMEGA = PHI/sub o/nu/I/sub X sub/R where nu is the microwave frequency, I/sub c/ and R the critical current and resistance of the junction and PHI/sub o/ fluxoid quantum, and that agrees with their data and their interpretation of it in terms of a limiting time tau for the supercurrent response with tau varies as DELTA(T)/sup -1/ where DELTA (T) is the BCS gap parameter

  3. Spectral and temperature-dependent infrared emissivity measurements of painted metals for improved temperature estimation during laser damage testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Sean M.; Keenan, Cameron; Marciniak, Michael A.; Perram, Glen P.

    2014-10-01

    A database of spectral and temperature-dependent emissivities was created for painted Al-alloy laser-damage-testing targets for the purpose of improving the uncertainty to which temperature on the front and back target surfaces may be estimated during laser-damage testing. Previous temperature estimates had been made by fitting an assumed gray-body radiance curve to the calibrated spectral radiance data collected from the back surface using a Telops Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (IFTS). In this work, temperature-dependent spectral emissivity measurements of the samples were made from room temperature to 500 °C using a Surface Optics Corp. SOC-100 Hemispherical Directional Reflectometer (HDR) with Nicolet FTS. Of particular interest was a high-temperature matte-black enamel paint used to coat the rear surfaces of the Al-alloy samples. The paint had been assumed to have a spectrally flat and temperatureinvariant emissivity. However, the data collected using the HDR showed both spectral variation and temperature dependence. The uncertainty in back-surface temperature estimation during laser-damage testing made using the measured emissivities was improved from greater than +10 °C to less than +5 °C for IFTS pixels away from the laser burn-through hole, where temperatures never exceeded those used in the SOC-100 HDR measurements. At beam center, where temperatures exceeded those used in the SOC-100 HDR, uncertainty in temperature estimates grew beyond those made assuming gray-body emissivity. Accurate temperature estimations during laser-damage testing are useful in informing a predictive model for future high-energy-laser weapon applications.

  4. The temperature dependence of the spectral and efficiency behavior of Si solar cell under low concentrated solar radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaltout, M.A. Mosalam; Rahoma, U.A.; Sabry, M. [National Research Inst. of Astronomy and Geophysics, Cairo (Egypt); El-Nicklawy, M.M.; Hassan, A.F. [Helwan Univ., Physics Dept., Cairo (Egypt)

    2000-12-01

    Relative spectral response of monocrystalline silicon solar cell is measured at different cell temperatures. At room temperature, the spectral response is found to have its maximum peak in the infrared (IR) range (800-1100 nm). By increasing the cell temperature, modification in the shape of the spectral response is observed and a shift of the peak towards the IR part of the spectrum is found. This behavior is of special importance that the temperature of highly illuminated thin film coated solar cells will be elevated. Other cell parameters as maximum power, fill factor, and cell efficiency are also studied at five illumination levels, viz., 1154, 1329, 1740, 2812, and 4010 W/m{sup 2} and temperature ranging from -3 to 90degC. (Author)

  5. Temperature Dependences of Mechanisms Responsible for the Water-Vapor Continuum Absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qiancheng

    2014-01-01

    The water-vapor continuum absorption plays an important role in the radiative balance in the Earth's atmosphere. It has been experimentally shown that for ambient atmospheric conditions, the continuum absorption scales quadratically with the H2O number density and has a strong, negative temperature dependence (T dependence). Over the years, there have been three different theoretical mechanisms postulated: far-wings of allowed transition lines, water dimers, and collision-induced absorption. The first mechanism proposed was the accumulation of absorptions from the far-wings of the strong allowed transition lines. Later, absorption by water dimers was proposed, and this mechanism provides a qualitative explanation for the continuum characters mentioned above. Despite the improvements in experimental data, at present there is no consensus on which mechanism is primarily responsible for the continuum absorption.

  6. Temperature dependence of the Al2O3:C response in medical luminescence dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edmund, Jens M.; Andersen, Claus E.

    2007-01-01

    Over the last years, attention has been given to applications of Al 2 O 3 :C in space and medical dosimetry. One such application is in vivo dose verification in radiotherapy of cancer patients and here we investigate the temperature effects on the radioluminescence (RL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) signals in the room-to-body temperature region. We found that the OSL response changes with both irradiation and stimulation temperatures as well as the OSL integration time. We conclude that temperature effects on the OSL response can be removed by integration if the irradiation temperature is not varied. The RL response only depends on the irradiation temperature. We recommend that calibration should be carried out at the same irradiation temperature at which the measurement is performed (i.e. at body temperature for in vivo measurements). The overall change in the integrated OSL and RL signals with irradiation and stimulation temperature covers an interval from -0.2% to 0.6% per deg. C. This indicates the correction factor one must take into account when performing luminescence dosimetry at different temperatures. The same effects were observed regardless of crystal type, test doses and stimulation and detection wavelengths. The reported temperature dependence seems to be a general property of Al 2 O 3 :C

  7. Global patterns in lake ecosystem responses to warming based on the temperature dependence of metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, Benjamin M; Chandra, Sudeep; Dell, Anthony I; Dix, Margaret; Kuusisto, Esko; Livingstone, David M; Schladow, S Geoffrey; Silow, Eugene; Sitoki, Lewis M; Tamatamah, Rashid; McIntyre, Peter B

    2017-05-01

    Climate warming is expected to have large effects on ecosystems in part due to the temperature dependence of metabolism. The responses of metabolic rates to climate warming may be greatest in the tropics and at low elevations because mean temperatures are warmer there and metabolic rates respond exponentially to temperature (with exponents >1). However, if warming rates are sufficiently fast in higher latitude/elevation lakes, metabolic rate responses to warming may still be greater there even though metabolic rates respond exponentially to temperature. Thus, a wide range of global patterns in the magnitude of metabolic rate responses to warming could emerge depending on global patterns of temperature and warming rates. Here we use the Boltzmann-Arrhenius equation, published estimates of activation energy, and time series of temperature from 271 lakes to estimate long-term (1970-2010) changes in 64 metabolic processes in lakes. The estimated responses of metabolic processes to warming were usually greatest in tropical/low-elevation lakes even though surface temperatures in higher latitude/elevation lakes are warming faster. However, when the thermal sensitivity of a metabolic process is especially weak, higher latitude/elevation lakes had larger responses to warming in parallel with warming rates. Our results show that the sensitivity of a given response to temperature (as described by its activation energy) provides a simple heuristic for predicting whether tropical/low-elevation lakes will have larger or smaller metabolic responses to warming than higher latitude/elevation lakes. Overall, we conclude that the direct metabolic consequences of lake warming are likely to be felt most strongly at low latitudes and low elevations where metabolism-linked ecosystem services may be most affected. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Generalized Magneto-thermo-microstretch Response of a Half-space with Temperature-dependent Properties During Thermal Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi-lin Xiong

    Full Text Available Abstract The generalized magneto-thermoelastic problem of an infinite homogeneous isotropic microstretch half-space with temperature-dependent material properties placed in a transverse magnetic field is investigated in the context of different generalized thermoelastic theories. The upper surface of the half-space is subjected to a zonal time-dependent heat shock. By solving finite element governing equations, the solution to the problem is obtained, from which the transient magneto-thermoelastic responses, including temperature, stresses, displacements, microstretch, microrotation, induced magnetic field and induced electric field are presented graphically. Comparisons are made in the results obtained under different generalized thermoelastic theories to show some unique features of generalized thermoelasticity, and comparisons are made in the results obtained under three forms of temperature dependent material properties (absolute temperature dependent, reference temperature dependent and temperature-independent to show the effects of absolute temperature and reference temperature. Weibull or Log-normal.

  9. Temperature-Dependent Magnetic Response of Antiferromagnetic Doping in Cobalt Ferrite Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeela Nairan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work MnxCo1−xFe2O4 nanoparticles (NPs were synthesized using a chemical co-precipitation method. Phase purity and structural analyses of synthesized NPs were performed by X-ray diffractometer (XRD. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM reveals the presence of highly crystalline and narrowly-dispersed NPs with average diameter of 14 nm. The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectrum was measured in the range of 400–4000 cm−1 which confirmed the formation of vibrational frequency bands associated with the entire spinel structure. Temperature-dependent magnetic properties in anti-ferromagnet (AFM and ferromagnet (FM structure were investigated with the aid of a physical property measurement system (PPMS. It was observed that magnetic interactions between the AFM (Mn and FM (CoFe2O4 material arise below the Neel temperature of the dopant. Furthermore, hysteresis response was clearly pronounced for the enhancement in magnetic parameters by varying temperature towards absolute zero. It is shown that magnetic properties have been tuned as a function of temperature and an externally-applied field.

  10. Temperature-Dependent Magnetic Response of Antiferromagnetic Doping in Cobalt Ferrite Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nairan, Adeela; Khan, Maaz; Khan, Usman; Iqbal, Munawar; Riaz, Saira; Naseem, Shahzad

    2016-04-18

    In this work Mn x Co 1- x Fe₂O₄ nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized using a chemical co-precipitation method. Phase purity and structural analyses of synthesized NPs were performed by X-ray diffractometer (XRD). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals the presence of highly crystalline and narrowly-dispersed NPs with average diameter of 14 nm. The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum was measured in the range of 400-4000 cm -1 which confirmed the formation of vibrational frequency bands associated with the entire spinel structure. Temperature-dependent magnetic properties in anti-ferromagnet (AFM) and ferromagnet (FM) structure were investigated with the aid of a physical property measurement system (PPMS). It was observed that magnetic interactions between the AFM (Mn) and FM (CoFe₂O₄) material arise below the Neel temperature of the dopant. Furthermore, hysteresis response was clearly pronounced for the enhancement in magnetic parameters by varying temperature towards absolute zero. It is shown that magnetic properties have been tuned as a function of temperature and an externally-applied field.

  11. Identification of microscopic domain wall motion from temperature dependence of nonlinear dielectric response.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mokrý, Pavel; Sluka, T.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 16 (2017), č. článku 162906. ISSN 0003-6951 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-32228S Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : microscopic domain wall * electric fields * temperature dependence Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering OBOR OECD: Electrical and electronic engineering Impact factor: 3.411, year: 2016 http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4981874

  12. Experimental Investigation of Strain Rate and Temperature Dependent Response of an Epoxy Resin Undergoing Large Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamrakar, Sandeep; Ganesh, Raja; Sockalingam, Subramani; Haque, Bazle Z.; Gillespie, John W.

    2018-01-01

    Experimental investigation of the effect of strain rate and temperature on large inelastic deformation of an epoxy resin is presented. Uniaxial compression tests were conducted on DER 353 epoxy resin at strain rates ranging from 0.001 to 12,000/s. Experimental results showed significant rate sensitivity in yield stress, which increased from 85 MPa at 0.001/s to 220 MPa at 12,000/s strain rate. Thermal softening became more prominent as the strain rate was increased, resulting in complete absence of strain hardening at high strain rates. Rise in temperature under high strain rate, due to adiabatic heating, was estimated to increase above glass transition temperature (T g ). A series of compression tests carried out at temperatures ranging from ambient to T g + 80 °C showed yield stress vanishing at T g . Above T g , the epoxy became completely rubbery elastic at quasi-static loading rate. Epoxy became less sensitive to strain rate as the temperature was increased further above T g . The strain rate and temperature dependent yield behavior of the epoxy resin is predicted using Ree-Eyring model.

  13. Positron Annihilation Spectroscopic Investigation on the Origin of Temperature-Dependent Electrical Response in Methylammonium Lead Iodide Perovskite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Joydeep; Sil, Sayantan; Dey, Arka; Ray, Partha Pratim; Sanyal, Dirtha

    2017-04-20

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite has appeared as one of the leading materials for realizing solution-based high-performing optoelectronic devices. The charge transport properties in this class of material are quite intriguing and still need to be carefully investigated. The temperature-dependent electrical property of methylammonium lead iodide (CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 ) has been investigated by employing positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS), which unambiguously reveals the gradual formation of open volume defects with the enhancement in temperature. The high-temperature ionic conductivity is due to the generation of both cationic (CH 3 NH 3 + ) and anionic (I - ) vacancies, possibly because of the elimination of methylammonium iodide (CH 3 NH 3 I) as identified from the coincidence Doppler broadening (CDB) of the positron annihilation spectroscopy. Further, the evolution of temperature-dependent defect density and corresponding electrical responses has been correlated with the structural phase transitions of CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 . This is the first ever report of temperature-dependent PAS measurement on hybrid lead halide perovskites to understand the nature and the origin of its electrical characteristics arising due to the variation in temperature.

  14. Observations of the Temperature Dependent Response of Ozone to NOx Reductions in an Urban Plume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFranchi, B W; Goldstein, A H; Cohen, R C

    2011-01-25

    Observations of NO{sub x} in the Sacramento, CA region show that mixing ratios decreased by 30% between 2001 and 2008. Here we use an observation-based method to quantify net ozone production rates in the outflow from the Sacramento metropolitan region and examine the O{sub 3} decrease resulting from reductions in NO{sub x} emissions. This observational method does not rely on assumptions about detailed chemistry of ozone production, rather it is an independent means to verify and test these assumptions. We use an instantaneous steady-state model as well as a detailed 1-D plume model to aid in interpretation of the ozone production inferred from observations. In agreement with the models, the observations show that early in the plume, the NO{sub x} dependence for O{sub x} (O{sub x} = O{sub 3}+NO{sub 2}) production is strongly coupled with temperature, suggesting that temperature dependent biogenic VOC emissions can drive O{sub x} production between NO{sub x}-limited and NO{sub x}-suppressed regimes. As a result, NO{sub x} reductions were found to be most effective at higher temperatures over the 7 year period. We show that violations of the California 1-hour O{sub 3} standard (90 ppb) in the region have been decreasing linearly with decreases in NO{sub x} (at a given temperature) and predict that reductions of NO{sub x} concentrations (and presumably emissions) by an additional 30% (relative to 2007 levels) will eliminate violations of the state 1 hour standard in the region. If current trends continue, a 30% decrease in NO{sub x} is expected by 2012, and an end to violations of the 1 hour standard in the Sacramento region appears to be imminent.

  15. IBR5 Modulates Temperature-Dependent, R Protein CHS3-Mediated Defense Responses in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyan Liu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Plant responses to low temperature are tightly associated with defense responses. We previously characterized the chilling-sensitive mutant chs3-1 resulting from the activation of the Toll and interleukin 1 receptor-nucleotide binding-leucine-rich repeat (TIR-NB-LRR-type resistance (R protein harboring a C-terminal LIM (Lin-11, Isl-1 and Mec-3 domains domain. Here we report the identification of a suppressor of chs3, ibr5-7 (indole-3-butyric acid response 5, which largely suppresses chilling-activated defense responses. IBR5 encodes a putative dual-specificity protein phosphatase. The accumulation of CHS3 protein at chilling temperatures is inhibited by the IBR5 mutation. Moreover, chs3-conferred defense phenotypes were synergistically suppressed by mutations in HSP90 and IBR5. Further analysis showed that IBR5, with holdase activity, physically associates with CHS3, HSP90 and SGT1b (Suppressor of the G2 allele of skp1 to form a complex that protects CHS3. In addition to the positive role of IBR5 in regulating CHS3, IBR5 is also involved in defense responses mediated by R genes, including SNC1 (Suppressor of npr1-1, Constitutive 1, RPS4 (Resistance to P. syringae 4 and RPM1 (Resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola 1. Thus, the results of the present study reveal a role for IBR5 in the regulation of multiple R protein-mediated defense responses.

  16. Temperature dependence of trophic interactions are driven by asymmetry of species responses and foraging strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell, Anthony I; Pawar, Samraat; Savage, Van M

    2014-01-01

    Environmental temperature has systematic effects on rates of species interactions, primarily through its influence on organismal physiology. We present a mechanistic model for the thermal response of consumer-resource interactions. We focus on how temperature affects species interactions via key traits - body velocity, detection distance, search rate and handling time - that underlie per capita consumption rate. The model is general because it applies to all foraging strategies: active-capture (both consumer and resource body velocity are important), sit-and-wait (resource velocity dominates) and grazing (consumer velocity dominates). The model predicts that temperature influences consumer-resource interactions primarily through its effects on body velocity (either of the consumer, resource or both), which determines how often consumers and resources encounter each other, and that asymmetries in the thermal responses of interacting species can introduce qualitative, not just quantitative, changes in consumer-resource dynamics. We illustrate this by showing how asymmetries in thermal responses determine equilibrium population densities in interacting consumer-resource pairs. We test for the existence of asymmetries in consumer-resource thermal responses by analysing an extensive database on thermal response curves of ecological traits for 309 species spanning 15 orders of magnitude in body size from terrestrial, marine and freshwater habitats. We find that asymmetries in consumer-resource thermal responses are likely to be a common occurrence. Overall, our study reveals the importance of asymmetric thermal responses in consumer-resource dynamics. In particular, we identify three general types of asymmetries: (i) different levels of performance of the response, (ii) different rates of response (e.g. activation energies) and (iii) different peak or optimal temperatures. Such asymmetries should occur more frequently as the climate changes and species' geographical

  17. Temperature dependence of the Al2O3:C response in medical luminescence dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edmund, Jens Morgenthaler; Andersen, Claus Erik

    2007-01-01

    luminescence (OSL) signals in the room-to-body temperature region. We found that the OSL response changes with both irradiation and stimulation temperatures as well as the OSL integration time. We conclude that temperature effects on the OSL response can be removed by integration if the irradiation temperature...... is not varied. The RL response only depends on the irradiation temperature. We recommend that calibration should be carried out at the same irradiation temperature at which the measurement is performed (i.e. at body temperature for in vivo measurements). The overall change in the integrated OSL and RL signals......Over the last years, attention has been given to applications of Al2O3:C in space and medical dosimetry. One such application is in vivo dose verification in radiotherapy of cancer patients and here we investigate the temperature effects on the radioluminescence (RL) and optically stimulated...

  18. Temperature dependent dual hydrogen sensor response of Pd nanoparticle decorated Al doped ZnO surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, D.; Dutta, D.; Kumar, M.; Barman, P. B.; Som, T.; Hazra, S. K.

    2015-10-01

    Sputter deposited Al doped ZnO (AZO) thin films exhibit a dual hydrogen sensing response in the temperature range 40 °C-150 °C after surface modifications with palladium nanoparticles. The unmodified AZO films showed no response in hydrogen in the temperature range 40 °C-150 °C. The operational temperature windows on the low and high temperature sides have been estimated by isolating the semiconductor-to-metal transition temperature zone of the sensor device. The gas response pattern was modeled by considering various adsorption isotherms, which revealed the dominance of heterogeneous adsorption characteristics. The Arrhenius adsorption barrier showed dual variation with change in hydrogen gas concentration on either side of the semiconductor-to-metal transition. A detailed analysis of the hydrogen gas response pattern by considering the changes in nano palladium due to hydrogen adsorption, and semiconductor-to-metal transition of nanocrystalline Al doped ZnO layer due to temperature, along with material characterization studies by glancing incidence X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, are presented.

  19. Temperature-Dependence of the Mechanical Responses for Two Types of Twinning-Induced Plasticity Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H. K.; Tian, Y. Z.; Zhang, Z. J.; Zhang, P.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2018-03-01

    Tensile tests and microstructure observations were conducted for two types of twinning-induced plasticity steels, Fe-22Mn-0.6C and Fe-30Mn-3Si-3Al (wt pct), from 293 K to 443 K. With increasing temperature, Fe-22Mn-0.6C steel exhibited enhanced mechanical properties and stable twinning capability, but Fe-30Mn-3Si-3Al steel displayed a decline on its mechanical properties and twinning capability. Mechanisms for the different mechanical responses were analyzed by assessing the dynamic strain aging effect.

  20. Thermal Response and Stability Characteristics of Bistable Composite Laminates by Considering Temperature Dependent Material Properties and Resin Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, M.; Ziaei-Rad, S.; Salehi, H.

    2013-02-01

    In this study, the stability characteristics and thermal response of a bistable composite plate with different asymmetric composition were considered. The non-linear finite element method (FEM) was utilized to determine the response of the laminate. Attention was focused on the temperature dependency of laminate mechanical properties, especially on the thermal expansion coefficients of the composite graphite-epoxy plate. Also the effect of including the resin layers on the stability characteristics of the laminate was investigated. The effect of the temperature on the laminate cured configurations in the range of 25°C to 180°C and -60°C to 40°C was examined. The results indicate that the coefficient of thermal expansions has a major effect on the cured shapes. Next, optical microscopy was used to characterize the laminate composition and for the first time the effect of including the resin layers on the actuation loads that causes snapping behavior between two stable shapes was studied. The results obtained from the finite element simulations were compared with experimental results and a good correlation was obtained. Finally, the stability characteristics of a tapered composite panel were investigated for using in a sample winglet as a candidate application of bistable structures.

  1. Photocurrent response of B12As2 crystals to blue light, and its temperature- dependent electrical characterizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Gul

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available With the global shortage of 3He gas, researchers worldwide are looking for alternative materials for detecting neutrons. Among the candidate materials, semiconductors are attractive because of their light weight and ease in handling. Currently, we are looking into the suitability of boron arsenide (B12As2 for this specific application. As the first step in evaluating the material qualitatively, the photo-response of B12As2 bulk crystals to light with different wavelengths was examined. The crystals showed photocurrent response to a band of 407- and 470- nm blue light. The maximum measured photoresponsivity and the photocurrent density at 0.7 V for 470 nm blue light at room temperature were 0.25 A ⋅ W−1 and 2.47 mA ⋅ cm−2, respectively. In addition to photo current measurements, the electrical properties as a function of temperature (range: 50-320 K were measured. Reliable data were obtained for the low-temperature I-V characteristics, the temperature dependence of dark current and its density, and the resistivity variations with temperature in B12As2 bulk crystals. The experiments showed an exponential dependence on temperature for the dark current, current density, and resistivity; these three electrical parameters, respectively, had a variation of a few nA to μA, 1-100 μA ⋅ cm−2 and 7.6x105-7.7x103 Ω ⋅ cm, for temperature increasing from 50 K to 320 K. The results from this study reported the first photoresponse and demonstrated that B12As2 is a potential candidate for thermal-neutron detectors.

  2. Temperature dependence of ac response in diluted half-metallic CrO{sub 2} powder compact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Yajie; Zhang Xiaoyu; Cai Tianyi; Li Zhenya

    2004-10-06

    We present a study on temperature dependence of impedance spectra of the cold-pressed chromium dioxide (CrO{sub 2})-titanic dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) composite over the temperature range of 77-300 K, and over the frequency range of 40 Hz-500 kHz. The microstructure of the sample is analyzed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The impedance spectra exhibit a strong dependence upon temperature. By evaluating the ac electricity behavior of the composite, we find the experimental data are successfully described by a power-law behavior {sigma}{sub ac}=A(T){omega}{sup s}, in which the frequency exponent s shows slightly greater than a universal value (0{<=}s{<=}1), and rises approximately linearly with temperature over a broad range of low temperature.

  3. Constraints on temperature-dependent sex determination in the leopard gecko (Eublepharis macularius): response to Kratochvil et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Victoria; Sakata, Jon T; Rhen, Turk; Coomber, Patricia; Simmonds, Sarah; Crews, David

    2008-12-01

    Kratochvil et al. (Naturwissenschaften 95:209-215, 2008) reported recently that in the leopard gecko (Eublepharis macularius) of the family Eublepharidae with temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD), clutches in which eggs were incubated at the same temperature produce only same-sex siblings. Interpreting this result in light of studies of sex steroid hormone involvement in sex determination, they suggested that maternally derived yolk steroid hormones could constrain sex-determining mechanisms in TSD reptiles. We have worked extensively with this species and have routinely incubated clutches at constant temperatures. To test the consistency of high frequency same-sex clutches across different incubation temperatures, we examined our records of clutches at the University of Texas at Austin from 1992 to 2001. We observed that clutches in which eggs were incubated at the same incubation temperature produced mixed-sex clutches as well as same-sex clutches. Furthermore, cases in which eggs within a clutch were separated and incubated at different temperatures produced the expected number of mixed-sex clutches. These results suggest that maternal influences on sex determination are secondary relative to incubation temperature effects.

  4. Planck 2013 results. IX. HFI spectral response

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Armitage-Caplan, C; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bobin, J; Bock, J J; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bridges, M; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chen, X; Chiang, L -Y; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Church, S; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Comis, B; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Désert, F -X; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, T R; Jaffe, A H; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Laureijs, R J; Lawrence, C R; Leahy, J P; Leonardi, R; Leroy, C; Lesgourgues, J; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Mazzotta, P; McGehee, P; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; North, C; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Osborne, S; Oxborrow, C A; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Roudier, G; Rusholme, B; Santos, D; Savini, G; Shellard, E P S; Spencer, L D; Starck, J -L; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sureau, F; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Tavagnacco, D; Terenzi, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2014-01-01

    The Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) spectral response was determined through a series of ground based tests conducted with the HFI focal plane in a cryogenic environment prior to launch. The main goal of the spectral transmission tests was to measure the relative spectral response (including out-of-band signal rejection) of all HFI detectors. This was determined by measuring the output of a continuously scanned Fourier transform spectrometer coupled with all HFI detectors. As there is no on-board spectrometer within HFI, the ground-based spectral response experiments provide the definitive data set for the relative spectral calibration of the HFI. The spectral response of the HFI is used in Planck data analysis and component separation, this includes extraction of CO emission observed within Planck bands, dust emission, Sunyaev-Zeldovich sources, and intensity to polarization leakage. The HFI spectral response data have also been used to provide unit conversion and colour correction analysis tools. Ver...

  5. In vitro temperature dependent activation of T-lymphocytes in Common wall lizards (Podarcis muralis in response to PHA stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Sacchi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ecological immunology attempts to explain the variability of immune response among individuals by invoking costs and trade-offs, which may optimize the immune defence against pathogens. In ectotherms body temperature is correlated to that of the surrounding environment, so that their entire physiology, including immune functions, is influenced by the environmental temperature. We used in vitro phytohaemoagglutinin (PHA stimulation in order to assess the effects of temperature on cell mediated adaptive response in male and female Common wall lizards (Podarcis muralis. Cell cultures were prepared from blood samples, inoculated with PHA and incubated at 22°C, 25°C, 32°C, and 38°C for three days. PHA stimulation caused proliferation of T-lymphocytes, but the effect depended on the incubation temperature. Lymphocyte proliferation was significantly impaired at both 22°C and 38°C compared to 32°C, which represented the highest levels of activation. Furthermore, lymphocyte activation was more variable in males while females were less immune suppressed than males at low temperatures. Differences between sexes suggest a possible influence of steroid hormones.

  6. Temperature-dependent responses of the photosynthetic and chlorophyll fluorescence attributes of apple (Malus domestica) leaves during a sustained high temperature event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Dennis H

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to follow changes in the temperature-dependent responses of photosynthesis and photosystem II performance in leaves of field-grown trees of Malus domestica (Borkh.) cv. 'Red Gala' before and after exposure to a long-term heat event occurring late in the growing season. Light-saturated photosynthesis was optimal at 25 °C before the heat event. The high temperatures caused a reduction in rates at low temperatures (15-20 °C) but increased rates at high temperatures (30-40 °C) and a shift in optimum to 30 °C. Rates at all temperatures increased after the heat event and the optimum shifted to 33 °C, indicative of some acclimation to the high temperatures occurring. Photosystem II attributes were all highly temperature-dependent. The operating quantum efficiency of PSII during the heat event declined, but mostly at high temperatures, partly because of decreased photochemical quenching but also from increased non-photochemical quenching. However, a further reduction in PSII operating efficiency occurred after the heat event subsided. Non-photochemical quenching had subsided, whereas photochemical quenching had increased in the post-heat event period and consistent with a greater fraction of open PSII reaction centres. What remained uncertain was why these effects on PSII performance appeared to have no effect on the process of light-saturated photosynthesis. However, the results provide an enhanced understanding of the impacts of sustained high temperatures on the photosynthetic process and its underlying reactions, notably photochemistry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Temperature Dependent Spectral Response and Detectivity of GeSn Photoconductors on Silicon for Short Wave Infrared Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    R. E. DeWames, and W. E. Tennant, "Planar p‐on‐n HgCdTe heterostructure photovoltaic detectors," Applied Physics Letters 62, 976-978 (1993). 28. H...electronic structure of organic solar cells ," Physical Review B 83, 165207 (2011). 32. S. M. Sze and K. K. Ng, Physics of Semiconductor Devices (John...semiconductor field-effect transistor application," Appl. Phys. Lett. 101(2012). 1. Introduction Detection of short wave infrared (SWIR) light with 2D

  8. Temperature dependence of plastic scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, L.

    2018-03-01

    Plastic scintillator detectors have been studied as dosimeters, since they provide a cost-effective alternative to conventional ionization chambers. Several articles have reported undesired response dependencies on beam energy and temperature, which provides the motivation to determine appropriate correction factors. In this work, we studied the light yield temperature dependency of four plastic scintillators, BCF-10, BCF-60, BC-404, RP-200A and two clear fibers, BCF-98 and SK-80. Measurements were made using a 50 kVp X-ray beam to produce the scintillation and/or radioluminescence signal. The 0 to 40 °C temperature range was scanned for each scintillator, and temperature coefficients were obtained.

  9. Temperature-dependent sex determination in fish revisited: prevalence, a single sex ratio response pattern, and possible effects of climate change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Ospina-Alvarez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In gonochoristic vertebrates, sex determination mechanisms can be classified as genotypic (GSD or temperature-dependent (TSD. Some cases of TSD in fish have been questioned, but the prevalent view is that TSD is very common in this group of animals, with three different response patterns to temperature. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed field and laboratory data for the 59 fish species where TSD has been explicitly or implicitly claimed so far. For each species, we compiled data on the presence or absence of sex chromosomes and determined if the sex ratio response was obtained within temperatures that the species experiences in the wild. If so, we studied whether this response was statistically significant. We found evidence that many cases of observed sex ratio shifts in response to temperature reveal thermal alterations of an otherwise predominately GSD mechanism rather than the presence of TSD. We also show that in those fish species that actually have TSD, sex ratio response to increasing temperatures invariably results in highly male-biased sex ratios, and that even small changes of just 1-2 degrees C can significantly alter the sex ratio from 1:1 (males:females up to 3:1 in both freshwater and marine species. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrate that TSD in fish is far less widespread than currently believed, suggesting that TSD is clearly the exception in fish sex determination. Further, species with TSD exhibit only one general sex ratio response pattern to temperature. However, the viability of some fish populations with TSD can be compromised through alterations in their sex ratios as a response to temperature fluctuations of the magnitude predicted by climate change.

  10. Sequential transition of the injury phenotype, temperature-dependent survival and transcriptional response in Listeria monocytogenes following lethal H2O2 exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, Yoshitsugu; Yamada, Fumiya; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Mochizuki, Mariko; Takano, Takashi; Hondo, Ryo; Ueda, Fukiko

    2017-10-16

    The food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is present persistently in food processing environments, where this bacterium is exposed to various stress factors, including oxidative stress. This study aimed to elucidate the temperature-dependent response of L. monocytogenes to H 2 O 2 exposure and the phenotypic changes in colony formation by H 2 O 2 -treated bacteria. Survival curves indicated an increase in the resistance to H 2 O 2 in L. monocytogenes as the temperature decreased during the stress exposure procedure. Transcriptional induction of genes with key roles in response to H 2 O 2 , including sigB and kat, was observed at 37°C, but not at 20°C, whereas other stress response genes were induced at both temperatures. Following H 2 O 2 exposure, L. monocytogenes produced small colony phenotypes and the colony size decreased in a stress exposure duration-dependent manner. Resuscitated cells with no ability to form colonies in the absence of sodium pyruvate were also found. Our findings show the possibility that a sequential transition in the injury phenotype from small colony phenotype to resuscitated cells occurred during the course of exposure to H 2 O 2 . The higher H 2 O 2 resistance at 20°C than 37°C suggests further investigation of the response to H 2 O 2 exposure under the lower temperatures, including refrigeration temperature, which may contribute to elucidation of bacterial survival over extended time periods in food-processing environments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Planck 2013 results. IX. HFI spectral response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Planck Collaboration,; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.

    2013-01-01

    -of-band signal rejection) of all HFI detectors to a known source of electromagnetic radiation individually. This was determined by measuring the output of all detection channels for radiation propagated through a continuously scanned polarizing Fourier transform spectrometer. As there is no on-board spectrometer......, this paper focuses on the analysis of the pre-flight spectral response measurements and the derivation of data products, e.g. band-average spectra, unit conversion coefficients, and colour correction coefficients, all with related uncertainties. Verifications of the HFI spectral response data are provided...

  12. Spectral entropy and haemodynamic response to surgery during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    Spectral entropy and haemodynamic response to surgery during sevoflurane anaesthesia. Introduction. Apart from somatic responses, surgery also evokes autonomic responses, including haemodynamic responses. Spectral entropy has been validated as a means to monitor the hypnotic state during sevoflurane ...

  13. Temperature-dependent and anisotropic optical response of layered Pr0.5Ca1.5MnO4 probed by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Majidi, M. A.; Thoeng, E.; Gogoi, P. K.; Wendt, F.; Wang, S. H.; Santoso, I.; Asmara, T. C.; Handayani, I. P.; van Loosdrecht, P. H. M.; Nugroho, A. A.; Ruebhausen, M.; Rusydi, A.; Rübhausen, M.

    2013-01-01

    We study the temperature dependence as well as anisotropy of optical conductivity (sigma(1)) in the pseudocubic single crystal Pr0.5Ca1.5MnO4 using spectrocopic ellipsometry. Three transition temperatures are observed and can be linked to charge-orbital (T-CO/OO similar to 320 K),

  14. Temperature dependence of the Brewer global UV measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountoulakis, Ilias; Redondas, Alberto; Lakkala, Kaisa; Berjon, Alberto; Bais, Alkiviadis F.; Doppler, Lionel; Feister, Uwe; Heikkila, Anu; Karppinen, Tomi; Karhu, Juha M.; Koskela, Tapani; Garane, Katerina; Fragkos, Konstantinos; Savastiouk, Volodya

    2017-11-01

    Spectral measurements of global UV irradiance recorded by Brewer spectrophotometers can be significantly affected by instrument-specific optical and mechanical features. Thus, proper corrections are needed in order to reduce the associated uncertainties to within acceptable levels. The present study aims to contribute to the reduction of uncertainties originating from changes in the Brewer internal temperature, which affect the performance of the optical and electronic parts, and subsequently the response of the instrument. Until now, measurements of the irradiance from various types of lamps at different temperatures have been used to characterize the instruments' temperature dependence. The use of 50 W lamps was found to induce errors in the characterization due to changes in the transmissivity of the Teflon diffuser as it warms up by the heat of the lamp. In contrast, the use of 200 or 1000 W lamps is considered more appropriate because they are positioned at longer distances from the diffuser so that warming is negligible. Temperature gradients inside the instrument can cause mechanical stresses which can affect the instrument's optical characteristics. Therefore, during the temperature-dependence characterization procedure warming or cooling must be slow enough to minimize these effects. In this study, results of the temperature characterization of eight different Brewer spectrophotometers operating in Greece, Finland, Germany and Spain are presented. It was found that the instruments' response changes differently in different temperature regions due to different responses of the diffusers' transmittance. The temperature correction factors derived for the Brewer spectrophotometers operating at Thessaloniki, Greece, and Sodankylä, Finland, were evaluated and were found to remove the temperature dependence of the instruments' sensitivity.

  15. Modelling of Continental Lithosphere Breakup and Rifted Margin Formation in Response to an Upwelling Divergent Flow Field Incorporating a Temperature Dependent Rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tymms, V. J.; Kusznir, N. J.

    2005-05-01

    We numerically model continental lithosphere deformation leading to breakup and sea floor spreading initiation in response to an imposed upwelling and divergent flow field applied to continental lithosphere and asthenosphere. The model is used to predict rifted continental margin lithosphere thinning and temperature structure. Model predictions are compared with observed rifted margin structure for four diverse case studies. Prior to application of the upwelling divergent flow field the continental lithosphere is undeformed with a uniform temperature gradient. The upwelling divergent flow field is defined kinematically using boundary conditions consisting of the upwelling velocity Vz at the divergence axis and the half divergence rate Vx . The resultant velocity field throughout the continuum is computed using finite element (FE) code incorporating a Newtonian temperature dependent rheology. The flow field is used to advect the continental lithosphere material and lithospheric and asthenospheric temperatures. Viscosity structure is hence modified and the velocities change correspondingly in a feedback loop. We find the kinematic boundary conditions Vz and Vx to be of first order importance. A high Vz/Vx (greater than10), corresponding to buoyancy assisted flow, leads to minimal mantle exhumation and a well defined continent ocean transition consistent with observations at volcanic margins. For Vz/Vx near unity, corresponding to plate boundary driven divergence, mantle exhumation over widths of up to 100 km is predicted which is consistent with observations at non-volcanic margins. The FE method allows the upwelling velocity Vz to be propagated upwards from the top of the asthenosphere to the Earth's surface without the requirement of imposing Vx. When continental breakup is achieved the half divergence velocity Vx can be applied at the lithosphere surface and the upwelling velocity Vz left free. We find this time and space dependent set of boundary conditions is

  16. Temperature dependence of Brewster's angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei

    2018-01-01

    In this work, a dielectric at a finite temperature is modeled as an ensemble of identical atoms moving randomly around where they are trapped. Light reflection from the dielectric is then discussed in terms of atomic radiation. Specific calculation demonstrates that because of the atoms' thermal motion, Brewster's angle is, in principle, temperature-dependent, and the dependence is weak in the low-temperature limit. What is also found is that the Brewster's angle is nothing but a result of destructive superposition of electromagnetic radiation from the atoms.

  17. Detector response artefacts in spectral reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Ulrik L.; Christensen, Erik D.; Khalil, Mohamad; Gu, Yun; Kehres, Jan

    2017-09-01

    Energy resolved detectors are gaining traction as a tool to achieve better material contrast. K-edge imaging and tomography is an example of a method with high potential that has evolved on the capabilities of photon counting energy dispersive detectors. Border security is also beginning to see instruments taking advantage of energy resolved detectors. The progress of the field is halted by the limitations of the detectors. The limitations include nonlinear response for both x-ray intensity and x-ray spectrum. In this work we investigate how the physical interactions in the energy dispersive detectors affect the quality of the reconstruction and how corrections restore the quality. We have modeled detector responses for the primary detrimental effects occurring in the detector; escape peaks, charge sharing/loss and pileup. The effect of the change in the measured spectra is evaluated based on the artefacts occurring in the reconstructed images. We also evaluate the effect of a correction algorithm for reducing these artefacts on experimental data acquired with a setup using Multix ME-100 V-2 line detector modules. The artefacts were seen to introduce 20% deviation in the reconstructed attenuation coefficient for the uncorrected detector. We performed tomography experiments on samples with various materials interesting for security applications and found the SSIM to increase > 5% below 60keV. Our work shows that effective corrections schemes are necessary for the accurate material classification in security application promised by the advent of high flux detectors for spectral tomography

  18. Spectral entropy and haemodynamic response to surgery during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    Apart from somatic responses, surgery also evokes autonomic responses, including haemodynamic responses. Spectral entropy has been validated as a means to monitor the hypnotic state during sevoflurane anaesthesia. Aim. To investigate the relationship between spectral entropy, heart rate, and blood pressure during ...

  19. Theory of temperature dependent photoemission spectrum of heavy fermion semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riseborough, P.S.

    1998-01-01

    The heavy fermion semiconductors are a class of strongly correlated materials, that at high temperatures show properties similar to those of heavy fermion materials, but at low temperatures show a cross-over into a semi-conducting state. The low temperature insulating state is characterized by an anomalously small energy gap, varying between 10 and 100 K. The smallness of the gap is attributed to the result of a many-body renormalization, and is temperature dependent. The temperature dependence of the electronic spectral density of states is calculated, using the Anderson lattice model at half filling. The spectrum is calculated to second order in 1/N, where N is the degeneracy of the 'f' orbitals, using a slave boson technique. The system is an indirect gap semi-conductor, with an extremely temperature dependent electronic spectral density A(k, ω). The indirect gap is subject to a temperature dependent many-body renormalization, and leads to a sharp temperature dependent structure in the angle resolved photo-emission spectrum at the indirect threshold. The theoretical predictions are compared with experimental observations on FeSi. (Copyright (1998) World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd)

  20. Temperature-dependent spectral density analysis applied to monitoring backbone dynamics of major urinary protein-I complexed with the pheromone 2-sec-butyl-4,5-dihydrothiazole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backbone dynamics of mouse major urinary protein I (MUP-I) was studied by 15 N NMR relaxation. Data were collected at multiple temperatures for a complex of MUP-I with its natural pheromonal ligand, 2-sec-4,5-dihydrothiazole, and for the free protein. The measured relaxation rates were analyzed using the reduced spectral density mapping. Graphical analysis of the spectral density values provided an unbiased qualitative picture of the internal motions. Varying temperature greatly increased the range of analyzed spectral density values and therefore improved reliability of the analysis. Quantitative parameters describing the dynamics on picosecond to nanosecond time scale were obtained using a novel method of simultaneous data fitting at multiple temperatures. Both methods showed that the backbone flexibility on the fast time scale is slightly increased upon pheromone binding, in accordance with the previously reported results. Zero-frequency spectral density values revealed conformational changes on the microsecond to millisecond time scale. Measurements at different temperatures allowed to monitor temperature depencence of the motional parameters

  1. Temperature dependent coordinating self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yijie; Gao, Xuedong; Xiao, Yunlong; Zhao, Qiang; Yang, Jiang; Yan, Yun; Huang, Jianbin

    2015-04-14

    Self-assemblies dominated by coordination interaction are hardly responsive to thermal stimuli. We show that in case the coordinating mode changes with temperature, the resultant assemblies also exhibit temperature dependence. The self-assemblies are constructed with perylene tetracarboxylate and metal ions. Compounds containing a perylene skeleton often self-assemble into micro-belts, which is also true for the combination of perylene tetracarboxylate and metal ions. However, a unique pinecone structure was observed upon increasing the temperature of the coordinating system. The structural transition is triggered by the change of coordinating mode between the carboxylate group and the metal ion. At low temperature, intermolecular coordination occurs which favours the growth of the coordinating self-assembly along the long axis of the perylene. However, upon the elevation of temperature, the coordination is overwhelmed by intra-molecular mode. This is against the extension of the coordinating assembly due to the loss of connection between neighbouring perylenes. As a result, the pinecone structure is observed. We expect that the cases introduced in this work may inspire the design of structurally controllable temperature-dependent soft materials based on coordinating self-assembly.

  2. Temperature-dependent functional response of Spalangia cameroni (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae), a Parasitoid of Stomoxys calcitrans (Diptera: Muscidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgård, Henrik; Nachman, Gøsta Støger

    2015-01-01

    The effects of host density, temperature, and burial depths on the functional response of the synovigenic parasitoid Spalangia cameroni (Perkins) attacking pupae of the stable fly Stomoxys calcitrans (L.) were examined. Five temperatures (15, 20, 25, 30, and 35 degrees C), six host densities (2, 4...

  3. Temperature dependent functional response of Diaeretiella rapae (Hymenoptera: Aphidiidae) to the cabbage aphid, Brevicoryne brassicae (Hemiptera: Aphididae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moayeri, Hamid R. S.; Madadi, Hossein; Pouraskari, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Diaeretiella rapae MacIntosh (Hymenoptera: Aphidiidae) is one of the most common and successful parasitoids of the cabbage aphid. The functional response of D. rapae towards cabbage aphids was examined in laboratory studies at three constant temperatures, 17°C, 25°C and 30°C. D. rapae exhibited...

  4. Genomic insights into temperature-dependent transcriptional responses of Kosmotoga olearia, a deep-biosphere bacterium that can grow from 20 to 79 °C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollo, Stephen M J; Adebusuyi, Abigail A; Straub, Timothy J; Foght, Julia M; Zhaxybayeva, Olga; Nesbø, Camilla L

    2017-11-01

    Temperature is one of the defining parameters of an ecological niche. Most organisms thrive within a temperature range that rarely exceeds ~30 °C, but the deep subsurface bacterium Kosmotoga olearia can grow over a temperature range of 59 °C (20-79 °C). To identify genes correlated with this flexible phenotype, we compared transcriptomes of K. olearia cultures grown at its optimal 65 °C to those at 30, 40, and 77 °C. The temperature treatments affected expression of 573 of 2224 K. olearia genes. Notably, this transcriptional response elicits re-modeling of the cellular membrane and changes in metabolism, with increased expression of genes involved in energy and carbohydrate metabolism at high temperatures and up-regulation of amino acid metabolism at lower temperatures. At sub-optimal temperatures, many transcriptional changes were similar to those observed in mesophilic bacteria at physiologically low temperatures, including up-regulation of typical cold stress genes and ribosomal proteins. Comparative genomic analysis of additional Thermotogae genomes indicates that one of K. olearia's strategies for low-temperature growth is increased copy number of some typical cold response genes through duplication and/or lateral acquisition. At 77 °C one-third of the up-regulated genes are of hypothetical function, indicating that many features of high-temperature growth are unknown.

  5. High spectral response heteroleptic ruthenium (II) complexes as ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    better monochromatic incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency (IPCE) across the spectral range of 400 to 800 nm with solar .... High spectral response heteroleptic ruthenium (II) complexes as sensitizers for dye sensitized solar cells. 39 ..... electrolyte increases the exchange reaction between I- and I3. − which in turn ...

  6. Temperature Dependences of the Quantum-Mechanical and Semi-Classical Spectral-Line Widths and the Separation 0 of the Impact and Non-Impact Regions for an Ar-Perturbed/K-Radiator System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. C. Kreye

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum-mechanical and semi-classical spectral-line shapes are computed at =400, 800, and 1000 K for the line core of the 5802 Å line of the Ar-Perturbed/K-Radiator system. HWHMs ('s are measured from computed full spectral-line shapes. The final-state pseudopotential is for the 721/2 state, and the initial-state potential is for the 423/2,3/2 state. Three high-pressure (P log(—versus—log( curves, corresponding to the non-impact region, intersect a similar set of low-P, impact-region curves at intersections, 0's. Similarly, for two sets of log(—versus—log( curves, which yield intersections, 0's, where is the perturber density. These 0's and 0's separate the two regions and represent the upper limits of the impact regions. A specific validity condition for the impact region is given by the equation ≤0. From an earlier spectroscopic, Fabry-Perot paper, expt=0.021 cm−1 at =400 K and =10 torr. Two theoretical values, theor=0.025 and 0.062 cm−1 corresponding to two different pseudo-potentials, are reported. Two -dependent figures are given, in which the first shows an increase in the impact region with , based on as the basic parameter, and the second which shows a decrease in the impact region with , based on as the basic parameter.

  7. Temperature dependence of elastic properties of paratellurite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvestrova, I.M.; Pisarevskii, Y.V.; Senyushenkov, P.A.; Krupny, A.I.

    1987-01-01

    New data are presented on the temperature dependence of the elastic wave velocities, elastic stiffness constants, and thermal expansion of paratellurite. It is shown that the external pressure appreciably influences the elastic properties of TeO 2 , especially the temperature dependence of the elastic modulus connected with the crystal soft mode. (author)

  8. Temperature dependence of microwave oscillations in magnetic tunnel junctions with a perpendicularly magnetized free layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Peng; Feng, Jiafeng, E-mail: hxwei@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: jiafengfeng@iphy.ac.cn; Wei, Hongxiang, E-mail: hxwei@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: jiafengfeng@iphy.ac.cn; Han, Xiufeng [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Fang, Bin; Zhang, Baoshun; Zeng, Zhongming [Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications, Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ruoshui Road 398, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2015-01-05

    We experimentally study the temperature dependence of the spin-transfer-torque-induced microwave oscillations in MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction nanopillars with a perpendicularly magnetized free layer. We demonstrate that the oscillation frequency increases rapidly with decreasing temperature, which is mainly ascribed to the temperature dependence of both the saturation magnetization and the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. We also find that a strong temperature dependence of the output power while a nonmonotonic temperature dependence of spectral linewidth are maintained for a constant dc bias in measured temperature range. Possible mechanisms leading to the different dependences of oscillation frequency, output power, and linewidth are discussed.

  9. Liquid-filled ionization chamber temperature dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, L. [Dpto. de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, Campus Sur S/N, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)]. E-mail: luciaff@usc.es; Gomez, F. [Dpto. de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, Campus Sur S/N, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Iglesias, A. [Dpto. de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, Campus Sur S/N, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Pardo, J. [Dpto. de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, Campus Sur S/N, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Pazos, A. [Dpto. de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, Campus Sur S/N, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Pena, J. [Dpto. de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, Campus Sur S/N, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Zapata, M. [Dpto. de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, Campus Sur S/N, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2006-05-10

    Temperature and pressure corrections of the read-out signal of ionization chambers have a crucial importance in order to perform high-precision absolute dose measurements. In the present work the temperature and pressure dependences of a sealed liquid isooctane filled ionization chamber (previously developed by the authors) for radiotherapy applications have been studied. We have analyzed the thermal response of the liquid ionization chamber in a {approx}20 deg. C interval around room temperature. The temperature dependence of the signal can be considered linear, with a slope that depends on the chamber collection electric field. For example, a relative signal slope of 0.27x10{sup -2}K{sup -1} for an operation electric field of 1.67x10{sup 6}Vm{sup -1} has been measured in our detector. On the other hand, ambient pressure dependence has been found negligible, as expected for liquid-filled chambers. The thermal dependence of the liquid ionization chamber signal can be parametrized within the Onsager theory on initial recombination. Considering that changes with temperature of the detector response are due to variations in the free ion yield, a parametrization of this dependence has been obtained. There is a good agreement between the experimental data and the theoretical model from the Onsager framework.

  10. Evaluation of temperature dependent neutron resonance integrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, S.V.G.; Sahni, D.C.

    1975-01-01

    The Fourier transform method is extended for evaluating temperature dependent resonance integrals and Doppler coefficients. With the temperature dependent cross-sections, the slowing-down equation is transformed into a Fredholm integral equation of second kind. A method of solution is presented using the familiar Gauss-Hermite quadrature formulae. As a byproduct of the above technique, a fast and accurate method for computing the resonance integral J-function is given. (orig.) [de

  11. Spectral response model for a multibin photon-counting spectral computed tomography detector and its applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuejin; Persson, Mats; Bornefalk, Hans; Karlsson, Staffan; Xu, Cheng; Danielsson, Mats; Huber, Ben

    2015-07-01

    Variations among detector channels in computed tomography can lead to ring artifacts in the reconstructed images and biased estimates in projection-based material decomposition. Typically, the ring artifacts are corrected by compensation methods based on flat fielding, where transmission measurements are required for a number of material-thickness combinations. Phantoms used in these methods can be rather complex and require an extensive number of transmission measurements. Moreover, material decomposition needs knowledge of the individual response of each detector channel to account for the detector inhomogeneities. For this purpose, we have developed a spectral response model that binwise predicts the response of a multibin photon-counting detector individually for each detector channel. The spectral response model is performed in two steps. The first step employs a forward model to predict the expected numbers of photon counts, taking into account parameters such as the incident x-ray spectrum, absorption efficiency, and energy response of the detector. The second step utilizes a limited number of transmission measurements with a set of flat slabs of two absorber materials to fine-tune the model predictions, resulting in a good correspondence with the physical measurements. To verify the response model, we apply the model in two cases. First, the model is used in combination with a compensation method which requires an extensive number of transmission measurements to determine the necessary parameters. Our spectral response model successfully replaces these measurements by simulations, saving a significant amount of measurement time. Second, the spectral response model is used as the basis of the maximum likelihood approach for projection-based material decomposition. The reconstructed basis images show a good separation between the calcium-like material and the contrast agents, iodine and gadolinium. The contrast agent concentrations are reconstructed with more

  12. Detector response artefacts in spectral reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Ulrik Lund; Christensen, Erik D.; Khalil, Mohamad

    2017-01-01

    Energy resolved detectors are gaining traction as a tool to achieve better material contrast. K-edge imaging and tomography is an example of a method with high potential that has evolved on the capabilities of photon counting energy dispersive detectors. Border security is also beginning to see...... instruments taking advantage of energy resolved detectors. The progress of the field is halted by the limitations of the detectors. The limitations include nonlinear response for both x-ray intensity and x-ray spectrum. In this work we investigate how the physical interactions in the energy dispersive...

  13. Spectral response of a polycrystalline silicon solar cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ba, B.; Kane, M.

    1994-10-01

    A theoretical study of the spectral response of a polycrystalline silicon n-p junction solar cell is presented. The case of a fibrously oriented grain structure, involving grain boundary recombination velocity and grain size effects is discussed. The contribution of the base region on the internal quantum efficiency Q int is computed for different grain sizes and grain boundary recombination velocities in order to examine their influence. Suggestions are also made for the determination of base diffusion length in polycrystalline silicon solar cells using the spectral response method. (author). 15 refs, 4 figs

  14. Temperature-dependent Transport Properties of Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Bochen; Singh, Amol; Uddin, Ahsan; Koley, Goutam; Webb, Richard

    2014-03-01

    Temperature-dependent transport properties of graphene synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on a Cu thin sheet have been investigated. Raman spectra of our samples show good quality of the CVD graphene. We have measured the temperature dependence of conductivity, charge-carrier density and Hall mobility of graphene by patterning them into micrometer-sized Hall bars. Quantum Hall effect has been observed when the temperature is about 60 Kelvin, which is the evidence for single-layer graphene. Furthermore, the results of temperature dependence of Hall mobility indicate that impurity and defect scattering is the primary scattering mechanism at low temperature, while substrate surface polar phonon scattering is dominant at high temperature.

  15. Instrument for monitoring spectral acceleration on response seismic ground motion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Buben, Jiří; Rudajev, Vladimír

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 2 (2006), s. 31-38 ISSN 1214-9705 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS3046201 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519; CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : vibration acceleration * spectral response * seismic recorder Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure

  16. Investigation Of Temperature Dependent Characteristics Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The structure, magnetization and magnetostriction of Laves phase compound TbCo2 were investigated by temperature dependent high resolution neutron powder diffraction. The compound crystallizes in the cubic Laves phase C15 structure above its Curie temperature, TC and exhibits a rhombohedral distortion (space ...

  17. Correlation between temperature-dependent permittivity dispersion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 38; Issue 7. Correlation between temperature-dependent permittivity dispersion and depolarization behaviours in Zr4+-modified BiFeO3–BaTiO3 piezoelectric ceramics. Weidong Zeng Changrong Zhou Jianrong Xiao Jiafeng Ma. Volume 38 Issue 7 December 2015 pp ...

  18. The temperature dependence of the magnetoelastic characteristics ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1Industrial Research Institute for Automation and Measurements, Al. Jerozolimskie 202,. 02-486 Warszawa, Poland. 2Institute of Metrology and Measuring Systems, ... One of the most significant limitations in the practical, industrial application of amorphous alloys as cores of force sensors is the temperature dependence of ...

  19. Temperature dependence of thermal conductivity of vanadium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 23; Issue 5. Temperature dependence of thermal conductivity of vanadium substituted BPSCCO system between 10 and 150 K. A K Dhami T K ... Keywords. Thermal conductivity; high temperature superconductors; vanadium substitution; electron + phonon approach.

  20. Temperature Responses to Spectral Solar Variability on Decadal Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahalan, Robert F.; Wen, Guoyong; Harder, Jerald W.; Pilewskie, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Two scenarios of spectral solar forcing, namely Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM)-based out-of-phase variations and conventional in-phase variations, are input to a time-dependent radiative-convective model (RCM), and to the GISS modelE. Both scenarios and models give maximum temperature responses in the upper stratosphere, decreasing to the surface. Upper stratospheric peak-to-peak responses to out-of-phase forcing are approx.0.6 K and approx.0.9 K in RCM and modelE, approx.5 times larger than responses to in-phase forcing. Stratospheric responses are in-phase with TSI and UV variations, and resemble HALOE observed 11-year temperature variations. For in-phase forcing, ocean mixed layer response lags surface air response by approx.2 years, and is approx.0.06 K compared to approx.0.14 K for atmosphere. For out-of-phase forcing, lags are similar, but surface responses are significantly smaller. For both scenarios, modelE surface responses are less than 0.1 K in the tropics, and display similar patterns over oceanic regions, but complex responses over land.

  1. Spectral response of THM grown CdZnTe crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, H.; Awadalla, S.A.; Harris, F.

    2008-01-01

    The spectral response of several crystals grown by the Traveling Heater Method (THM) were investigated. An energy resolution of 0.98% for a Pseudo Frisch-Grid of 4 × 4 × 9 mm3 and 2.1% FWHM for a coplanar-grid of size 11 × 11 × 5 mm3 were measured using 137Cs-662 keV. In addition a 4% FWHM at 122...

  2. Prediction of spectral acceleration response ordinates based on PGA attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graizer, V.; Kalkan, E.

    2009-01-01

    Developed herein is a new peak ground acceleration (PGA)-based predictive model for 5% damped pseudospectral acceleration (SA) ordinates of free-field horizontal component of ground motion from shallow-crustal earthquakes. The predictive model of ground motion spectral shape (i.e., normalized spectrum) is generated as a continuous function of few parameters. The proposed model eliminates the classical exhausted matrix of estimator coefficients, and provides significant ease in its implementation. It is structured on the Next Generation Attenuation (NGA) database with a number of additions from recent Californian events including 2003 San Simeon and 2004 Parkfield earthquakes. A unique feature of the model is its new functional form explicitly integrating PGA as a scaling factor. The spectral shape model is parameterized within an approximation function using moment magnitude, closest distance to the fault (fault distance) and VS30 (average shear-wave velocity in the upper 30 m) as independent variables. Mean values of its estimator coefficients were computed by fitting an approximation function to spectral shape of each record using robust nonlinear optimization. Proposed spectral shape model is independent of the PGA attenuation, allowing utilization of various PGA attenuation relations to estimate the response spectrum of earthquake recordings.

  3. Investigating the structural origin of trpzip2 temperature dependent unfolding fluorescence line shape based on a Markov state model simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jian; Gao, Fang; Cui, Raymond Z; Shuang, Feng; Liang, Wanzhen; Huang, Xuhui; Zhuang, Wei

    2012-10-25

    Vibrationally resolved fluorescence spectra of the β-hairpin trpzip2 peptide at two temperatures as well as during a T-jump unfolding process are simulated on the basis of a combination of Markov state models and quantum chemistry schemes. The broad asymmetric spectral line shape feature is reproduced by considering the exciton-phonon couplings. The temperature dependent red shift observed in the experiment has been attributed to the state population changes of specific chromophores. Through further theoretical study, it is found that both the environment's electric field and the chromophores' geometry distortions are responsible for tryptophan fluorescence shift.

  4. Molecular-dynamics theory of the temperature-dependent surface phonons of W(001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.Z.; Fasolino, A.; Tosatti, E.

    1987-04-01

    We study the temperature-dependent zone-boundary surface phonons across the c(2x2)→1x1 reconstruction phase transition of the clean W(001) surface. Velocity-velocity correlations and hence the phonon spectral densities are calculated by molecular dynamics for the surface atoms of a finite thickness (001) slab, with interatomic potentials established in a previous study of the surface statics. Our calculated k = (1/2,1/2)(2π/a) surface phonon are dominated by three main low-frequency modes. Of these, the longitudinal and the shear horizontal are reconstruction-related and display critical broadening and softening at the phase transition, while the third, the shear vertical, is basically unaffected. The reconstruction phase mode, shear horizontal, appears to be responsible for the phase fluctuations which destroy long-range order at the transition. (author). 30 refs, 12 figs

  5. Temperature dependent electronic conduction in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, G.G.; Munn, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    This review describes the temperature dependence of bulk-controlled electronic currents in semiconductors. The scope of the article is wide in that it contrasts conduction mechanisms in inorganic and organic solids and also single crystal and disordered semiconductors. In many experimental situations it is the metal-semiconductor contact or the interface between two dissimilar semiconductors that governs the temperature dependence of the conductivity. However, in order to keep the length of the review within reasonable bounds, these topics have been largely avoided and emphasis is therefore placed on bulk-limited currents. A central feature of electronic conduction in semiconductors is the concentrations of mobile electrons and holes that contribute to the conductivity. Various statistical approaches may be used to calculate these densities which are normally strongly temperature dependent. Section 1 emphasizes the relationship between the position of the Fermi level, the distribution of quantum states, the total number of electrons available and the absolute temperature of the system. The inclusion of experimental data for several materials is designed to assist the experimentalist in his interpretation of activation energy curves. Sections 2 and 3 refer to electronic conduction in disordered solids and molecular crystals, respectively. In these cases alternative approaches to the conventional band theory approach must be considered. For example, the velocities of the charge carriers are usually substantially lower than those in conventional inorganic single crystal semiconductors, thus introducing the possibility of an activated mobility. Some general electronic properties of these materials are given in the introduction to each of these sections and these help to set the conduction mechanisms in context. (orig.)

  6. Temperature dependence of giant dipole resonance width

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vdovin, A.I.; Storozhenko, A.N.

    2005-01-01

    The quasiparticle-phonon nuclear model extended to finite temperature within the framework of the thermo field dynamics is applied to calculate a temperature dependence of the spreading width Γ d own of a giant dipole resonance. Numerical calculations are made for 12S n and 208 Pb nuclei. It is found that the width Γ d own increases with T. The reason of this effect is discussed as well as a relation of the present approach to other ones existing in the literature

  7. Temperature dependence of radiation effects in polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, G; Katsumura, Y.; Kudoh, H.; Morita, Y.; Seguchi, T.

    2000-01-01

    Temperature dependence of crosslinking and gas evolution under γ-irradiation was studied for high-density and low-density polyethylene samples in the 30-360degC range. It was found that crosslinking was the predominant process up to 300degC and the gel point decreased with increasing temperature. At above 300degC, however, the gel fraction at a given dose decreased rapidly with temperature and the action of radiation turned to enhance polyethylene degradation. Yields of H 2 and hydrocarbon gases increased with temperature and the compositions of hydrocarbons were dose dependent. (author)

  8. In-Flight Retrieval of SCIAMACHY Instrument Spectral Response Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mourad Hamidouche

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The instrument Spectral Response Function (ISRF has a strong impact on spectral calibration and the atmospheric trace gases retrievals. An accurate knowledge or a fine characterization of the ISRF shape and its FWHM (Full width at half maximum as well as its temporal behavior is therefore crucial. Designing a strategy for the characterization of the ISRF both on ground and in-flight is critical for future missions, such as the spectral imagers in the Copernicus program. We developed an algorithm to retrieve the instrument ISRF in-flight. Our method uses solar measurements taken in-flight by the instrument to fit a parameterized ISRF from on ground based calibration, and then retrieves the shape and FWHM of the actual in-flight ISRF. With such a strategy, one would be able to derive and monitor the ISRF during the commissioning and operation of spectrometer imager missions. We applied our method to retrieve the SCIAMACHY instrument ISRF in its different channels. We compared the retrieved ones with the on ground estimated ones. Besides some peculiarities found in SCIAMACHY channel 8, the ISRF results in other channels were relatively consistent and stable over time in most cases.

  9. Ferromagnetism and temperature-dependent electronic structure in metallic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, T.

    1999-01-01

    In this work the influence of the reduced translational symmetry on the magnetic properties of thin itinerant-electron films and surfaces is investigated within the strongly correlated Hubbard model. Firstly, the possibility of spontaneous ferromagnetism in the Hubbard model is discussed for the case of systems with full translational symmetry. Different approximation schemes for the solution of the many-body problem of the Hubbard model are introduced and discussed in detail. It is found that it is vital for a reasonable description of spontaneous ferromagnetism to be consistent with exact results concerning the general shape of the single-electron spectral density in the limit of strong Coulomb interaction between the electrons. The temperature dependence of the ferromagnetic solutions is discussed in detail by use of the magnetization curves as well as the spin-dependent quasi particle spectrum. For the investigation of thin films and surfaces the approximation schemes for the bulk system have to be generalized to deal with the reduced translational symmetry. The magnetic behavior of thin Hubbard films is investigated by use of the layer dependent magnetization as a function of temperature as well as the thickness of the film. The Curie-temperature is calculated as a function of the film thickness. Further, the magnetic stability at the surface is discussed in detail. Here it is found that for strong Coulomb interaction the magnetic stability at finite temperatures is reduced at the surface compared to the inner layers. This observation clearly contradicts the well-known Stoner picture of band magnetism and can be explained in terms of general arguments which are based on exact results in the limit of strong Coulomb interaction. The magnetic behavior of the Hubbard films can be analyzed in detail by inspecting the local quasi particle density of states as well as the wave vector dependent spectral density. The electronic structure is found to be strongly spin

  10. Temperature dependence of the step free energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zandvliet, H. J. W.; Gurlu, O.; Poelsema, Bene

    2001-01-01

    We have derived an expression for the step free energy that includes the usual thermally induced step meandering term and a vibrational entropy term related to the step edge atoms. The latter term results from the reduced local coordination of the step atoms with respect to the terrace atoms and was introduced recently by Frenken and Stoltze as well as by Bonzel and Emundts. Additionally, we have added third and fourth terms that deal with the vibrational entropy contribution of the thermally generated step and kink atoms. At elevated temperatures the two latter vibrational entropy terms are of the same order of magnitude. Incorporation of these vibrational entropy terms results in a faster decrease of the step free energy with increasing temperature than anticipated previously. This enhanced temperature dependence of the step free energy results in a lower thermal roughening temperature of the facet

  11. Spectral response data for development of cool coloured tile coverings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libbra, Antonio; Tarozzi, Luca; Muscio, Alberto; Corticelli, Mauro A.

    2011-03-01

    Most ancient or traditional buildings in Italy show steep-slope roofs covered by red clay tiles. As the rooms immediately below the roof are often inhabited in historical or densely urbanized centres, the combination of low solar reflectance of tile coverings and low thermal inertia of either wooden roof structures or sub-tile insulation panels makes summer overheating a major problem. The problem can be mitigated by using tiles coated with cool colours, that is colours with the same spectral response of clay tiles in the visible, but highly reflecting in the near infrared range, which includes more than half of solar radiation. Cool colours can yield the same visible aspect of common building surfaces, but higher solar reflectance. Studies aimed at developing cool colour tile coverings for traditional Italian buildings have been started. A few coating solutions with the typical red terracotta colour have been produced and tested in the laboratory, using easily available materials. The spectral response and the solar reflectance have been measured and compared with that of standard tiles.

  12. The spectral response of silicon X-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggert, T.; Boslau, O.; Kemmer, J.; Pahlke, A.; Wiest, F.

    2006-01-01

    A discrete analytic calculation of the spectral response of silicon drift detectors for X-rays is presented. The results are compared with measurements at BESSY II using monochromatic synchrotron radiation in the energy range from 0.2 to 2keV. All Gaussian features (main, escape, and Al fluorescence peak) as well as the background are included in the model. The peak intensities are calculated from energy dependent probability distributions. The non-Gaussian background is produced by charge-loss in the entrance window. The charge loss of energetic photo and Auger electrons and the diffusion of low-energy secondary electrons into the aluminum dead layer are considered. The secondary electrons disperse in a Gaussian charge distribution with the width σ sec , which is the only free parameter of the model. All collected charge is summed up for every possible process and convoluted with electronic and Fano noise, yielding the energy distribution of the background. Its intensity is given by the probability of the process. This method generates all observed spectral background features using a single fundamental calculation scheme. It can, in principle, be applied to any type of semiconductor detector. The calculations are in very good agreement with the measurements

  13. Temperature dependent spin structures in Hexaferrite crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, Y.C. [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Lin, J.G., E-mail: jglin@ntu.edu.tw [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chun, S.H.; Kim, K.H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the Hexaferrite Ba{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 1.5}Zn{sub 2}Fe{sub 12}O{sub 22} (BSZFO) is studied due to its interesting characteristics of long-wavelength spin structure. Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) is used to probe the magnetic states of BSZFO single crystal and its temperature dependence behavior is analyzed by decomposing the multiple lines of FMR spectra into various phases. Distinguished phase transition is observed at 110 K for one line, which is assigned to the ferro(ferri)-magnetic transition from non-collinear to collinear spin state. - Highlights: • For the first time Ferromagnetic Resonance is used to probe the local magnetic structure of Ba{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 1.5}Zn{sub 2}Fe{sub 12}O{sub 22.} • The multiphases in the single crystal is identified, which provides important information toward its future application for the magnetoelectric devices.

  14. Temperature dependences of hydrous species in feldspars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W. D.; Yang, Y.; Zhu, K. Y.; Xia, Q. K.

    2018-01-01

    Feldspars are abundant in the crust of the Earth. Multiple hydrogen species such as OH, H2O and NH4 + can occur in the structure of feldspars. Hydrogen species play a critical role in influencing some properties of the host feldspars and the crust, including mechanical strength, electrical property of the crust, and evolution of the crustal fluids. Knowledge of hydrous species in feldspars to date has been mostly derived from spectroscopic studies at ambient temperature. However, the speciation and sites of hydrous species at high temperatures may not be quenchable. Here, we investigated the temperature dependences of several typical hydrous components (e.g., type IIa OH, type IIb OH and type I H2O) in feldspars by measuring the in situ FTIR spectra at elevated temperatures up to 800 °C. We found that the hydrous species demonstrated different behaviors at elevated temperatures. With increasing temperature, type IIa OH redistributes on the various sites in the anorthoclase structure. Additionally, O-H vibration frequencies increase for types IIa and IIb OH, and they decrease for type I H2O with increasing temperature. In contrast to type I H2O which drastically dehydrates during the heating process, types IIa and IIb OH show negligible loss; however, the bulk integral absorption coefficients drastically decrease with increasing temperature. These results may have implications in understanding the properties of hydrous species and feldspars at non-ambient temperatures, not only under geologic conditions but also at cold planetary surface conditions.

  15. Effect of paramagnetic manganese ions doping on frequency and high temperature dependence dielectric response of layered Na1.9Li0.1Ti3O7 ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, Dharmendra; Pandey, J.L.

    2010-01-01

    The manganese doped layered ceramic samples (Na 1.9 Li 0.1 )Ti 3 O 7 : XMn (0.01 ≤ X ≤ 0.1) have been prepared using high temperature solid state reaction. The room temperature electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) investigations exhibit that at lower percentage of doping the substitution of manganese ions occur as Mn 3+ at Ti 4+ sites, whereas for higher percentage of doping Mn 2+ ions occupy the two different interlayer sodium/lithium sites. In both cases, the charge compensation mechanism should operate to maintain the overall charge neutrality of the lattice. The manganese doped derivatives of layered Na 1.9 Li 0. 1Ti 3 O 7 (SLT) ceramics have been investigated through frequency dependence dielectric spectroscopy in this work. The results indicate that the dielectric losses in these ceramics are the collective contribution of electric conduction, dipole orientation and space charge polarization. Smeared peaks in temperature dependence of permittivity plots suggest diffuse nature of high temperature ferroelectric phase transition. The light manganese doping in SLT enhances the dielectric constant. However, manganese doping decreases dielectric loss due to inhibition of domain wall motion, enhances electron-hopping conduction, and impedes the interlayer ionic conduction as well. Manganese doping also gives rise to contraction of interlayer space. (author)

  16. Temperature-dependent imaging of living cells by AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espenel, Cedric; Giocondi, Marie-Cecile; Seantier, Bastien; Dosset, Patrice; Milhiet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Le Grimellec, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Characterization of lateral organization of plasma membranes is a prerequisite to the understanding of membrane structure-function relationships in living cells. Lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interactions are responsible for the existence of various membrane microdomains involved in cell signalization and in numerous pathologies. Developing approaches for characterizing microdomains associate identification tools like recognition imaging with high-resolution topographical imaging. Membrane properties are markedly dependent on temperature. However, mesoscopic scale topographical information of cell surface in a temperature range covering most of cell biology experimentation is still lacking. In this work we have examined the possibility of imaging the temperature-dependent behavior of eukaryotic cells by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our results establish that the surface of living CV1 kidney cells can be imaged by AFM, between 5 and 37 deg. C, both in contact and tapping modes. These first temperature-dependent data show that large cell structures appeared essentially stable at a microscopic scale. On the other hand, as shown by contact mode AFM, the surface was highly dynamic at a mesoscopic scale, with marked changes in apparent topography, friction, and deflection signals. When keeping the scanning conditions constant, a progressive loss in the image contrast was however observed, using tapping mode, on decreasing the temperature

  17. Temperature-dependent transport properties of FeRh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankovsky, S.; Polesya, S.; Chadova, K.; Ebert, H.; Staunton, J. B.; Gruenbaum, T.; Schoen, M. A. W.; Back, C. H.; Chen, X. Z.; Song, C.

    2017-04-01

    The finite-temperature transport properties of FeRh compounds are investigated by first-principles density-functional-theory-based calculations. The focus is on the behavior of the longitudinal resistivity with rising temperature, which exhibits an abrupt decrease at the metamagnetic transition point, T =Tm , between ferro- and antiferromagnetic phases. A detailed electronic structure investigation for T ≥0 K explains this feature and demonstrates the important role of (i) the difference of the electronic structure at the Fermi level between the two magnetically ordered states and (ii) the different degree of thermally induced magnetic disorder in the vicinity of Tm, giving different contributions to the resistivity. To support these conclusions, we also describe the temperature dependence of the spin-orbit-induced anomalous Hall resistivity and Gilbert damping parameter. For the various response quantities considered, the impact of thermal lattice vibrations and spin fluctuations on their temperature dependence is investigated in detail. Comparison with corresponding experimental data shows, in general, very good agreement.

  18. Temperature Dependence in the Terahertz Spectrum of Nicotinamide: Anharmonicity and Hydrogen-Bonded Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masae; Okamura, Nubuyuki; Fan, Xinyi; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Minamide, Hiroaki

    2017-04-06

    We have investigated the terahertz-spectral property of nicotinamide focusing on the temperature dependence in the range of 14-300 K. We observed that almost all peaks in the terahertz spectrum of the nicotinamide crystal showed a remarkable shift with temperature, whereas the lowest-frequency peak at 34.8 cm -1 showed a negligible shift with temperature. By analyzing the terahertz spectrum with the dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations, we found that the difference in the temperature dependence of the peak shift is well understood in terms of the presence/absence of stretching vibration of the intermolecular hydrogen bond in the mode and the change of cell parameters. The anharmonicity in the dissociation potential energy of very weak intermolecular hydrogen bonding causes the remarkable peak shift with temperature in the terahertz spectrum of nicotinamide. This finding suggests that the assignment and identification of peaks in the terahertz spectrum are systematically enabled by temperature-dependent measurements.

  19. The role of spectral response of photosensors in daylight responsive systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doulos, L.; Topalis, F.V. [Laboratory of Photometry, National Technical University of Athens, Iroon Politexniou 9, 15780 Zografou (Greece); Tsangrassoulis, A. [Department of Architecture, University of Thessaly, Pedion Areos, 38334 Volos (Greece)

    2008-07-01

    Lighting control technologies using photosensors have a great potential for energy savings in areas with high levels of daylight. Although the proper application of these controls can exploit this potential, unfortunately, it has been accomplished in a small percentage of new projects. One reason is the difficulty in justification of energy savings, which in turn, is directly linked with the simulation of the behaviour of these lighting controls. The core of these systems is the photosensor, which adjusts the electric light output in proportion to the amount of the daylight that detects, using its spatial and spectral response. The aim of this study is to quantify the impact of photosensor spectral response on its illuminance values, by taking into account various daylight spectra as these are modified due to various types of coloured glazing. Five commercial photosensors were selected and their spectral response was measured. In addition, spectral transmittance of 16 commercial types of glazing was measured as well. Using these data, a set of simulations were performed using three colour channels in a typical office room and the relative differences in illuminance - and thus energy savings - among the photosensors are presented. The results show that differences are significant ranging from 36 to 118%, a fact that can affect the estimated payback period of a lighting control system. (author)

  20. Spectral response of multi-element silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludewigt, B.A.; Rossington, C.S.; Chapman, K. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Multi-element silicon strip detectors, in conjunction with integrated circuit pulse-processing electronics, offer an attractive alternative to conventional lithium-drifted silicon Si(Li) and high purity germanium detectors (HPGe) for high count rate, low noise synchrotron x-ray fluorescence applications. One of the major differences between the segmented Si detectors and the commercially available single-element Si(Li) or HPGe detectors is that hundreds of elements can be fabricated on a single Si substrate using standard silicon processing technologies. The segmentation of the detector substrate into many small elements results in very low noise performance at or near, room temperature, and the count rate of the detector is increased many-fold due to the multiplication in the total number of detectors. Traditionally, a single channel of detector with electronics can handle {approximately}100 kHz count rates while maintaining good energy resolution; the segmented detectors can operate at greater than MHz count rates merely due to the multiplication in the number of channels. One of the most critical aspects in the development of the segmented detectors is characterizing the charge sharing and charge loss that occur between the individual detector strips, and determining how these affect the spectral response of the detectors.

  1. Temperature dependence of the magnetization of canted spin structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Henrik; Lefmann, Kim; Brok, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies of the low-temperature saturation magnetization of ferrimagnetic nanoparticles and diamagnetically substituted ferrites have shown an anomalous temperature dependence. It has been suggested that this is related to freezing of canted magnetic structures. We present models...... for the temperature dependence of the magnetization of a simple canted spin structure in which relaxation can take place at finite temperatures between spin configurations with different canting angles. We show that the saturation magnetization may either decrease or increase with decreasing temperature, depending...

  2. Temperature dependence of grain boundary free energy and elastic constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foiles, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    This work explores the suggestion that the temperature dependence of the grain boundary free energy can be estimated from the temperature dependence of the elastic constants. The temperature-dependent elastic constants and free energy of a symmetric Σ79 tilt boundary are computed for an embedded atom method model of Ni. The grain boundary free energy scales with the product of the shear modulus times the lattice constant for temperatures up to about 0.75 the melting temperature.

  3. A Temperature-Dependent Hysteresis Model for Relaxor Ferroelectric Compounds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Raye, Julie K; Smith, Ralph C

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarizes the development of a homogenized free energy model which characterizes the temperature-dependent hysteresis and constitutive nonlinearities inherent to relaxor ferroelectric materials...

  4. Dissecting the frog inner ear with Gaussian noise .2. Temperature dependence of inner ear function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanDijk, P; Wit, HP; Segenhout, JM

    1997-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the response of single primary auditory nerve fibers (n = 31) was investigated in the European edible frog, Rana esculenta (seven ears). Nerve fiber responses were analyzed with Wiener kernel analysis and polynomial correlation. The responses were described with a

  5. Temperature dependences of photoconductivity of CdHgTe crystals with photoactive inclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasenko, A.I.; Vlasenko, Z.K.

    1999-01-01

    Temperature dependences of life time τ and spectral characteristics of photoconductivity for Cd x Hg 1-x Te crystals (x = 0.2) with photoactive inclusions are investigated. It is shown that the N-type character of effective lifetime temperature dependences in nonhomogeneous crystals, in particular, its sharp temperature activation in the region of transition from the impurity to the intrinsic conductivity is determined by not the Shockley-Read mechanism, but by the interband impact mechanism with changing effective geometrical sizes of recombination active regions under temperature increase. Within the frames of this model the smoothing of the non-monotone character of the photoconductivity spectral characteristics in the region of fundamental absorption under the heating is explained. The calculation results that are in qualitative agreement with the experimental data are presented [ru

  6. Spectral induced polarization (SIP) response of mine tailings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placencia-Gómez, Edmundo; Parviainen, Annika; Slater, Lee; Leveinen, Jussi

    2015-02-01

    Mine tailings impoundments are a source of leachates known as acid mine drainage (AMD) which can pose a contamination risk for surrounding surface and groundwater. Methodologies which can help management of this environmental issue are needed. We carried out a laboratory study of the spectral induced polarization (SIP) response of tailings from the Haveri Au-Cu mine, SW Finland. The primary objectives were, (1) to determine possible correlations between SIP parameters and textural properties associated with oxidative-weathering mechanisms, mineralogical composition and metallic content, and (2) to evaluate the effects of the pore water chemistry on SIP parameters associated with redox-inactive and redox-active electrolytes varying in molar concentration, conductivity and pH. The Haveri tailings exhibit well defined relaxation spectra between 100 and 10,000 Hz. The relaxation magnitudes are governed by the in-situ oxidative-weathering conditions on sulphide mineral surfaces contained in the tailings, and decrease with the oxidation degree. The oxidation-driven textural variation in the tailings results in changes to the frequency peak of the phase angle, the imaginary conductivity and chargeability, when plotted versus the pore water conductivity. In contrast, the real and the formation electrical conductivity components show a single linear dependence on the pore water conductivity. The increase of the pore water conductivity (dominated by the increase of ions concentration in solution) along with a transition to acidic conditions shifts the polarization peak towards higher frequencies. These findings show the unique sensitivity of the SIP method to potentially discriminate AMD discharges from reactive oxidation zones in tailings, suggesting a significant advantage for monitoring threatened aquifers.

  7. Modeling of Temperature-Dependent Noise in Silicon Nanowire FETs including Self-Heating Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Anandan, P.; Malathi, N.; Mohankumar, N.

    2014-01-01

    Silicon nanowires are leading the CMOS era towards the downsizing limit and its nature will be effectively suppress the short channel effects. Accurate modeling of thermal noise in nanowires is crucial for RF applications of nano-CMOS emerging technologies. In this work, a perfect temperature-dependent model for silicon nanowires including the self-heating effects has been derived and its effects on device parameters have been observed. The power spectral density as a function of thermal resi...

  8. Inclusion of temperature dependent shell corrections in Landau ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Landau theory used for studying hot rotating nuclei usually uses zero temperature Strutinsky smoothed total energy for the temperature dependent shell corrections. This is replaced in this work by the temperature dependent Strutinsky smoothed free energy. Our results show that this replacement has only marginal effect for ...

  9. Effect of gold photocathode contamination on a flat spectral response X-ray diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun-lun; Zhang, Si-qun; Zhou, Shao-tong; Huang, Xian-bin; Ren, Xiao-dong; Dan, Jia-kun; Xu, Qiang

    2018-03-01

    A detector with an approximately flat spectral response is important for diagnosing intense thermal X-ray flux. A flat-spectral-response X-ray diode (FSR-XRD) utilizes a gold photocathode X-ray diode and a specially configured gold filter to give rise to a nearly flat spectral response in the photon energy range of 100-4000 eV. It has been observed that the spectral responses of several FSR-XRDs changed after a few shots of z-pinch experiments on the Primary Test Stand facility. This paper presents an analysis of the changes by fitting the spectral responses of the gold photocathodes using a model with a free parameter which characterizes the thickness of the contamination. The spectral responses of FSR-XRDs were calibrated with synchrotron radiation, and several cleaning methods were tested with the calibration. Considering the results of model and cleaning, it may be anticipated that contamination was the major reason of the response changing. Contamination worsened the flatness of the spectral response of the FSR-XRD and decreased the averaged response, hence it is important to avoid contamination. Current results indicate a requirement of further study of the contamination.

  10. High spectral response heteroleptic ruthenium (II) complexes as ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Compared to N719, H112 sensitizer showed enhanced molar extinction coefficient and relatively better monochromatic incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency (IPCE) across the spectral range of 400 to 800 nm with solar energy-to-electrical conversion efficiency () of 2.43% [open circuit photovoltage (VOC) ...

  11. Temperature dependencies of Henry's law constants for different plant sesquiterpenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copolovici, Lucian; Niinemets, Ülo

    2015-11-01

    Sesquiterpenes are plant-produced hydrocarbons with important ecological functions in plant-to-plant and plant-to-insect communication, but due to their high reactivity they can also play a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. So far, there is little information of gas/liquid phase partition coefficients (Henry's law constants) and their temperature dependencies for sesquiterpenes, but this information is needed for quantitative simulation of the release of sesquiterpenes from plants and modeling atmospheric reactions in different phases. In this study, we estimated Henry's law constants (Hpc) and their temperature responses for 12 key plant sesquiterpenes with varying structure (aliphatic, mono-, bi- and tricyclic sesquiterpenes). At 25 °C, Henry's law constants varied 1.4-fold among different sesquiterpenes, and the values were within the range previously observed for monocyclic monoterpenes. Hpc of sesquiterpenes exhibited a high rate of increase, on average ca. 1.5-fold with a 10 °C increase in temperature (Q10). The values of Q10 varied 1.2-fold among different sesquiterpenes. Overall, these data demonstrate moderately high variation in Hpc values and Hpc temperature responses among different sesquiterpenes. We argue that these variations can importantly alter the emission kinetics of sesquiterpenes from plants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Non-temperature dependent resistor at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Akira; Iwasa, Akio

    2003-01-01

    We measured the temperature dependence of metal film chip resistors (SUSUMU Co., Ltd. RR1220 100 Ω, 1 kΩ, 10 kΩ and 1 MΩ) from 45 mK to 300 K. Although the temperature dependence of these resistors R was not monotonic, the changes in resistance (R(T)-R(T=300 K))/R(T=300 K) were ∼1% (except 1 MΩ). Therefore we can make a filter and a divider without taking the temperature dependence of the resistor into consideration. Below liquid helium temperature, the resistance of the chip resistor increases as log T with decreasing temperature. It is expected that the temperature dependence of log T is due to the Kondo effect

  13. Temperature dependence of sound velocity in yttrium ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L'vov, V.A.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of the phonon-magnon and phonon-phonon interoctions on the temperature dependence of the longitudinal sound velocity in yttrium ferrite is considered. It has been shown that at low temperatures four-particle phonon-magnon processes produce the basic contribution to renormalization of the sound velocity. At higher temperatures the temperature dependence of the sound velocity is mainly defined by phonon-phonon processes

  14. Binding sequences for RdgB, a DNA damage-responsive transcriptional activator, and temperature-dependent expression of bacteriocin and pectin lyase genes in Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kazuteru; Kaneko, Jun; Kamio, Yoshiyuki; Itoh, Yoshifumi

    2008-10-01

    Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum strain Er simultaneously produces the phage tail-like bacteriocin carotovoricin (Ctv) and pectin lyase (Pnl) in response to DNA-damaging agents. The regulatory protein RdgB of the Mor/C family of proteins activates transcription of pnl through binding to the promoter. However, the optimal temperature for the synthesis of Ctv (23 degrees C) differs from that for synthesis of Pnl (30 degrees C), raising the question of whether RdgB directly activates ctv transcription. Here we report that RdgB directly regulates Ctv synthesis. Gel mobility shift assays demonstrated RdgB binding to the P(0), P(1), and P(2) promoters of the ctv operons, and DNase I footprinting determined RdgB-binding sequences (RdgB boxes) on these and on the pnl promoters. The RdgB box of the pnl promoter included a perfect 7-bp inverted repeat with high binding affinity to the regulator (K(d) [dissociation constant] = 150 nM). In contrast, RdgB boxes of the ctv promoters contained an imperfect inverted repeat with two or three mismatches that consequently reduced binding affinity (K(d) = 250 to 350 nM). Transcription of the rdgB and ctv genes was about doubled at 23 degrees C compared with that at 30 degrees C. In contrast, the amount of pnl transcription tripled at 30 degrees C. Thus, the inverse synthesis of Ctv and Pnl as a function of temperature is apparently controlled at the transcriptional level, and reduced rdgB expression at 30 degrees C obviously affected transcription from the ctv promoters with low-affinity RdgB boxes. Pathogenicity toward potato tubers was reduced in an rdgB knockout mutant, suggesting that the RdgAB system contributes to the pathogenicity of this bacterium, probably by activating pnl expression.

  15. JPSS-1 VIIRS RSB sensor spectral response calibration and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jinan; Butler, Jim; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Schwarting, Tom; Mcintire, Jeff; Ji, Qiang; Oudrari, Hassan

    2017-09-01

    We present system-level responsivity calibration results of the visible and near infrared channels of JPSS-1 VIIRS in the reflective solar band (RSB) from bands M1( 412 nm) to M7 (865 nm). A monochromator-based method based on the Spectral Measurement Assembly (SpMA), and a laser-based calibration method based on Travelling-Spectral Irradiance and Radiance responsivity Calibrations using Uniform Sources (T-SIRCUS) were applied with different illumination methods to obtain the relative and absolute spectral responses (RSR and ASR). The spectral features of RSR for each band are verified by comparing to the component-level spectral transmittance of the VIIRS bandpass filters. Variation of RSR results of a single pixel/detector with respect to the band-averaged for each band is also investigated. Utilization of RSR results from SpMA and T-SIRCUS with different illumination methods as well as the component transmittance results enables us to recognize optical and electrical cross-talk from out-of-band, which is estimated at about 3 %. We also attempted to use the ASRs from T-SIRCUS to validate the gain coefficients derived from an independent radiometric calibration test using a broadband source. Three spectral shapes of flat spectral radiance, Tungsten lamp, and solar emission are used to simulate different scenarios for baseline, pre-launch calibration, and on-orbit calibration to verify the radiometric coefficients with the more accurate NIST-traceable calibration.

  16. The spectral response of silicon X-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggert, T.

    2004-01-01

    Energy dispersive Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) show a superior performance compared with other semiconductor detectors, but low energy X-rays generates an undesirable high background due to incomplete charge collection (ICC) in the entrance window. To investigate the reasons for charge losses, a discrete analytic calculation is performed. All loss mechanisms (partial or full loss of both, photo and/or Auger electrons) due to diffusion into the aluminum dead layer are considered. In order to verify the model, measurements with monochromatic X-rays in the 0.2 to 2 keV energy range were conducted at BESSY II. The observed spectral features like shelf, shoulder, and tail are explained by the model. The main reason for ICC is the escape of thermalized electrons at metalization-silicon-interface

  17. Temperature dependence of the HNO3 UV absorption cross sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholder, James B.; Talukdar, Ranajit K.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Solomon, Susan

    1993-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the HNO3 absorption cross sections between 240 and 360 K over the wavelength range 195 to 350 nm has been measured using a diode array spectrometer. Absorption cross sections were determined using both (1) absolute pressure measurements at 298 K and (2) a dual absorption cell arrangement in which the absorption spectrum at various temperatures is measured relative to the room temperature absorption spectrum. The HNO3 absorption spectrum showed a temperature dependence which is weak at short wavelengths but stronger at longer wavelengths which are important for photolysis in the lower stratosphere. The 298 K absorption cross sections were found to be larger than the values currently recommended for atmospheric modeling (DeMore et al., 1992). Our absorption cross section data are critically compared with the previous measurements of both room temperature and temperature-dependent absorption cross sections. Temperature-dependent absorption cross sections of HNO3 are recommended for use in atmospheric modeling. These temperature dependent HNO3 absorption cross sections were used in a two-dimensional dynamical-photochemical model to demonstrate the effects of the revised absorption cross sections on loss rate of HNO3 and the abundance of NO2 in the stratosphere.

  18. Temperature dependence of three-body ion-molecule reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehringer, H.; Arnold, F.

    1983-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the ion-molecule association reactions (i) N 2 + + N 2 + M → N 4 + + M (M=N 2 , He), (ii) O 2 + + O 2 + M → O 4 + + M (M=O 2 , He) and (iii) He + + 2He → He 2 + + He have been studied over an extended temperature range to temperatures as low as 30K with a recently constructed liquid helium-cooled ion drift tube. Over most of the temperature range the threebody reaction rate coefficients show an inverse temperature dependence proportional to Tsup(-n) with n in the range 0.6 to 2.9. This temperature dependence is quite consistent with current theories of ion molecule association. At low temperatures, however, a deviation from the Tsup(-n) dependence was observed for the association reactions (ii). For reactions (i) different temperature dependences were obtained for N 2 and He third bodies indicating an additional temperature dependence of the collisional stabilisation process. (Authors)

  19. Temperature dependence of the magnetization of canted spin structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsen, Henrik; Lefmann, Kim; Brok, Erik; Frandsen, Cathrine; Mørup, Steen

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies of the low-temperature saturation magnetization of ferrimagnetic nanoparticles and diamagnetically substituted ferrites have shown an anomalous temperature dependence. It has been suggested that this is related to freezing of canted magnetic structures. We present models for the temperature dependence of the magnetization of a simple canted spin structure in which relaxation can take place at finite temperatures between spin configurations with different canting angles. We show that the saturation magnetization may either decrease or increase with decreasing temperature, depending on the ratio of the exchange coupling constants. This is in agreement with experimental observations. - Highlights: ► The magnetization of a canted spin structure has been calculated. ► In some cases the magnetization shows an anomalous increase at low temperatures. ► In other cases the magnetization shows an anomalous decrease at low temperatures. ► The results are in accordance with many experimental observations.

  20. Energy based model for temperature dependent behavior of ferromagnetic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sah, Sanjay; Atulasimha, Jayasimha

    2017-01-01

    An energy based model for temperature dependent anhysteretic magnetization curves of ferromagnetic materials is proposed and benchmarked against experimental data. This is based on the calculation of macroscopic magnetic properties by performing an energy weighted average over all possible orientations of the magnetization vector. Most prior approaches that employ this method are unable to independently account for the effect of both inhomogeneity and temperature in performing the averaging necessary to model experimental data. Here we propose a way to account for both effects simultaneously and benchmark the model against experimental data from ~5 K to ~300 K for two different materials in both annealed (fewer inhomogeneities) and deformed (more inhomogeneities) samples. This demonstrates that this framework is well suited to simulate temperature dependent experimental magnetic behavior. - Highlights: • Energy based model for temperature dependent ferromagnetic behavior. • Simultaneously accounts for effect of temperature and inhomogeneities. • Benchmarked against experimental data from 5 K to 300 K.

  1. Study of Cu-Al-Zn alloys hardness temperature dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurmanova, D.T.; Skakov, M.K.; Melikhov, V.D.

    2001-01-01

    In the paper the results of studies for the Cu-Al-Zn ternary alloys hardness temperature dependence are presented. The method of 'hot hardness' has been used during study of the solid state phase transformations and under determination of the hot stability boundaries. Due to the samples brittleness a hardness temperature dependence definition is possible only from 350-400 deg. C. Sensitivity of the 'hot hardness' method is decreasing within high plasticity range, so the measurements have been carried out only up to 700-800 deg. C. It is shown, that the alloys hardness dependence character from temperature is close to exponential one within the certain structure modification existence domain

  2. Temperature dependent charge transport in poly(3-hexylthiophene) diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaman, Abdulla Bin; Sarkar, Atri; Banerjee, Debamalya

    2018-04-01

    In this work, we present charge transport properties of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) diodes under dark conditions. Temperature dependent current-voltage (J-V) characteristics shows that charge transport represents a transition from ohomic to trap limited current. The forward current density obeys a power law J˜Vm, m>2 represents the space charge limited current region in presence of traps within the band gap. Frequency dependent conductivity has been studied in a temperature range 150K-473K. The dc conductivity values show Arrhenius like behavior and it gives conductivity activation energy 223 meV. Temperature dependent conductivity indicates a thermodynamic transition of our system.

  3. Extraction of temperature dependent interfacial resistance of thermoelectric modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Min

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses an approach for extracting the temperature dependency of the electrical interfacial resistance associated with thermoelectric devices. The method combines a traditional module-level test rig and a nonlinear numerical model of thermoelectricity to minimize measurement errors...... on the interfacial resistance. The extracted results represent useful data to investigating the characteristics of thermoelectric module resistance and comparing performance of various modules.......This article discusses an approach for extracting the temperature dependency of the electrical interfacial resistance associated with thermoelectric devices. The method combines a traditional module-level test rig and a nonlinear numerical model of thermoelectricity to minimize measurement errors...

  4. Power-law temperature dependence of collision broadening and shift of atomic and molecular rovibronic lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cybulski, Hubert; Bielski, Andrzej; Ciuryło, Roman; Szudy, Józef; Trawiński, Ryszard S.

    2013-01-01

    The classical phase-shift theory of spectral line shapes is used to examine various aspects of the applicability of the power-law relations to the description of temperature variations of pressure broadening and shifting coefficients of the isolated atomic and rovibronic molecular lines in a wide temperature range. Model calculations performed for potentials of the Lennard-Jones type indicate that the temperature dependence exponents of the broadening and shifting can be related to the details of the intermolecular interactions. It is shown that they are sensitive to the range of temperatures assumed in the fit and therefore extreme care must be taken when the power-law temperature dependence is used as a scaling law. The problems of the failure of the power-law and of variations in the sign of pressure shift coefficients with increasing temperature are discussed. Very good fits of Frost's empirical formula for temperature dependence of pressure shift to the theoretical ones are obtained. -- Highlights: ► Classical theory of line shapes is used to examine the power-law relations. ► The broadening and shifting exponents depend on the range of temperatures in the fit. ► Extreme care must be taken when using the power-law dependence as a scaling law

  5. Frequency response of multipoint chemical shift-based spectral decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Ethan K; Chebrolu, Venkata V; Block, Walter F; Reeder, Scott B

    2010-10-01

    To provide a framework for characterizing the frequency response of multipoint chemical shift based species separation techniques. Multipoint chemical shift based species separation techniques acquire complex images at multiple echo times and perform maximum likelihood estimation to decompose signal from different species into separate images. In general, after a nonlinear process of estimating and demodulating the field map, these decomposition methods are linear transforms from the echo-time domain to the chemical-shift-frequency domain, analogous to the discrete Fourier transform (DFT). In this work we describe a technique for finding the magnitude and phase of chemical shift decomposition for input signals over a range of frequencies using numerical and experimental modeling and examine several important cases of species separation. Simple expressions can be derived to describe the response to a wide variety of input signals. Agreement between numerical modeling and experimental results is very good. Chemical shift-based species separation is linear, and therefore can be fully described by the magnitude and phase curves of the frequency response. The periodic nature of the frequency response has important implications for the robustness of various techniques for resolving ambiguities in field inhomogeneity.

  6. Temperature dependent damping studies of Ni–Mn–Ga polymer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Bull. Mater. Sci., Vol. 34, No. 4, July 2011, pp. 739–743. © Indian Academy of Sciences. 739. Temperature dependent damping studies of Ni–Mn–Ga polymer composites ... martensite transformation (Ullakko et al 1996; Mullner and Ullakko 1998 ... on twin boundaries (Kokorin et al 1996; Segui et al 2004;. Vijay Kumar ...

  7. Temperature dependence studies on the electro-oxidation of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cyclic voltammetry; electrochemical impedance spectroscopy; activation energy; fuel cell; alcohol. Abstract. Temperature dependence on the electro-oxidation of methanol, ethanol and 1-propanol in 0.5 M H2SO4 were investigated with Pt and PtRu electrodes. Tafel slope and apparent activation energy were evaluated ...

  8. Temperature Dependence Viscosity and Density of Different Biodiesel Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtěch Kumbár

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this paper is to assess the effect of rapeseed oil methyl ester (RME concentration in diesel fuel on its viscosity and density behaviour. The density and dynamic viscosity were observed at various mixing ratios of RME and diesel fuel. All measurements were performed at constant temperature of 40 °C. Increasing ratio of RME in diesel fuel was reflected in increased density value and dynamic viscosity of the blend. In case of pure RME, pure diesel fuel, and a blend of both (B30, temperature dependence of dynamic viscosity and density was examined. Temperature range in the experiment was −10 °C to 80 °C. Considerable temperature dependence of dynamic viscosity and density was found and demonstrated for all three samples. This finding is in accordance with theoretical assumptions and reference data. Mathematical models were developed and tested. Temperature dependence of dynamic viscosity was modeled using a polynomial 3rd polynomial degree. Correlation coefficients R −0.796, −0.948, and −0.974 between measured and calculated values were found. Temperature dependence of density was modeled using a 2nd polynomial degree. Correlation coefficients R −0.994, −0.979, and −0.976 between measured and calculated values were acquired. The proposed models can be used for flow behaviour prediction of RME, diesel fuel, and their blends.

  9. Temperature dependence of nitrogen solubility in iron base multicomponent melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, V.M.; Koval'chuk, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    Method for calculating temperature dependence of nitrogen solubility in iron base multicomponent melts is suggested. Application areas of existing methods were determined and advantages of the new method for calculating nitrogen solubility in multicomponent-doped iron melts (Fe-Ni-Cr-Mo, Fe-Ni-Cr-Mn, Fe-Mo-V) at 1773-2073 K are shown

  10. Temperature Dependent FMR on CoCr Layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reuvekamp, E.M.C.M.; Reuvekamp, E.M.C.M.; de Witte, A.M.; Aarnink, W.A.M.; Gerritsma, G.J.; Lodder, J.C.; Aarnink, W.A.M.; Rogalla, Horst

    1989-01-01

    Temperature dependent FMR measurements were performed on two series of rf sputtered films. The FMR measuring temperature could be varied between 77 and 300 K. There is indication of the existence of 2 CoCr phases in the film from ion-milled samples. The perpendicular anisotropy increased with both

  11. Anomalous temperature dependence of excitation transfer between quantum dots

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Král, Karel; Menšík, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 4 (2015), 325-330 ISSN 2164-6627 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD14011; GA MŠk LH12236; GA MŠk LH12186 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : excitation transfer * quantum dots * temperature dependence * electron-phonon interaction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  12. Arrhenius temperature dependence of in vitro tissue plasminogen activator thrombolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, George J; Dhamija, Ashima; Bavani, Nazli; Wagner, Kenneth R; Holland, Christy K

    2007-01-01

    Stroke is a devastating disease and a leading cause of death and disability. Currently, the only FDA approved therapy for acute ischemic stroke is the intravenous administration of the thrombolytic medication, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). However, this treatment has many contraindications and can have dangerous side effects such as intra-cerebral hemorrhage. These treatment limitations have led to much interest in potential adjunctive therapies, such as therapeutic hypothermia (T ≤ 35 deg. C) and ultrasound enhanced thrombolysis. Such interest may lead to combining these therapies with tPA to treat stroke, however little is known about the effects of temperature on the thrombolytic efficacy of tPA. In this work, we measure the temperature dependence of the fractional clot mass loss Δm(T) resulting from tPA exposure in an in vitro human clot model. We find that the temperature dependence is well described by an Arrhenius temperature dependence with an effective activation energy E eff of 42.0 ± 0.9 kJ mole -1 . E eff approximates the activation energy of the plasminogen-to-plasmin reaction of 48.9 kJ mole -1 . A model to explain this temperature dependence is proposed. These results will be useful in predicting the effects of temperature in future lytic therapies

  13. Temperature-dependent viscosity effects on free convection flow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Temperature-dependent viscosity effects on free convection flow over a vertical moving cylinder with constant axial velocity under consideration of radial ... Prandtl number, viscosity-variation parameter, thermal conductivity-variation parameter and magnetic parameter on free convection flow and heat transfer is discussed.

  14. Temperature dependence of anuran distortion product otoacoustic emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meenderink, Sebastlaan W. F.; Van Dijk, Pim

    To study the possible involvement of energy dependent mechanisms in the transduction of sound within the anuran ear, distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) were recorded in the northern leopard frog over a range of body temperatures. The effect of body temperature depended on the stimulus

  15. On the effect of temperature dependent thermal conductivity on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We consider the effect of temperature dependent thermal conductivity on temperature rise in biologic tissues during microwave heating. The method of asymptotic expansion is used for finding solution. An appropriate matching procedure was used in our method. Our result reveals the possibility of multiple solutions and it ...

  16. Crossing regimes of temperature dependence in animal movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibert, Jean P; Chelini, Marie-Claire; Rosenthal, Malcolm F; DeLong, John P

    2016-05-01

    A pressing challenge in ecology is to understand the effects of changing global temperatures on food web structure and dynamics. The stability of these complex ecological networks largely depends on how predator-prey interactions may respond to temperature changes. Because predators and prey rely on their velocities to catch food or avoid being eaten, understanding how temperatures may affect animal movement is central to this quest. Despite our efforts, we still lack a mechanistic understanding of how the effect of temperature on metabolic processes scales up to animal movement and beyond. Here, we merge a biomechanical approach, the Metabolic Theory of Ecology and empirical data to show that animal movement displays multiple regimes of temperature dependence. We also show that crossing these regimes has important consequences for population dynamics and stability, which depend on the parameters controlling predator-prey interactions. We argue that this dependence upon interaction parameters may help explain why experimental work on the temperature dependence of interaction strengths has so far yielded conflicting results. More importantly, these changes in the temperature dependence of animal movement can have consequences that go well beyond ecological interactions and affect, for example, animal communication, mating, sensory detection, and any behavioral modality dependent on the movement of limbs. Finally, by not taking into account the changes in temperature dependence reported here we might not be able to properly forecast the impact of global warming on ecological processes and propose appropriate mitigation action when needed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Temperature dependence of dose rate laser simulation adequacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skorobogatov, P.K.; Nikiforov, A.Y.; Demidov, A.A.

    1999-01-01

    2-D numerical modeling was carried out to analyze the temperature dependence of dose rate laser simulation adequacy in application to p-n junction ionising current. Experimental validation was performed using test structure in the temperature range of 0 to 100 deg.C. (authors)

  18. Electronically induced nuclear transitions - temperature dependence and Rabi oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Niez, J J

    2002-01-01

    This paper deals with a nucleus electromagnetically coupled with the bound states of its electronic surroundings. It describes the temperature dependence of its dynamics and the onset of potential Rabi oscillations by means of a Master Equation. The latter is generalized in order to account for possible strong resonances. Throughout the paper the approximation schemes are discussed and tested. (authors)

  19. Temperature Dependence of the Stability of Ion Pair Interactions ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The current study employs free energy calculations to elucidate the thermodynamics of the formation of salt bridge interactions and the temperature dependence, using acetate and methylguanidium ions as model systems. Three different orientations of the methylguanidinium approaching the carboxylate group have been ...

  20. Pressure–temperature dependence of thermodynamic properties of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Haleh Kangarlou and Arash Abdollahi properties of materials under high pressures and temperatures for microscopic under- standing as well as technological applications. In this paper, we report our theoretical study of both pressure and temperature dependences of the thermal properties of rutile within the Debye and ...

  1. A temperature dependent slip factor based thermal model for friction ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the tool shoulder and pin to predict the thermal history of aluminium alloy was developed by. Rajamanickam et al .... where σy is the temperature dependent yield stress of the workpiece material as shown in table 2. ... greater than the material yield shear stress, hence the material accelerates to a velocity less than the tool ...

  2. Time- and temperature-dependent failures of a bonded joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sihn, Sangwook; Miyano, Yasushi; Tsai, S.W. [Stanford Univ., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Time and temperature dependent properties of a tubular lap bonded joint are reported. The joint bonds a cast iron rod and a composite pipe together with an epoxy type of an adhesive material containing chopped glass fiber. A new fabrication method is proposed.

  3. Temperature dependence of postmortem MR quantification for soft tissue discrimination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zech, Wolf-Dieter; Schwendener, Nicole; Jackowski, Christian; Persson, Anders; Warntjes, Marcel J.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate and correct the temperature dependence of postmortem MR quantification used for soft tissue characterization and differentiation in thoraco-abdominal organs. Thirty-five postmortem short axis cardiac 3-T MR examinations were quantified using a quantification sequence. Liver, spleen, left ventricular myocardium, pectoralis muscle and subcutaneous fat were analysed in cardiac short axis images to obtain mean T1, T2 and PD tissue values. The core body temperature was measured using a rectally inserted thermometer. The tissue-specific quantitative values were related to the body core temperature. Equations to correct for temperature differences were generated. In a 3D plot comprising the combined data of T1, T2 and PD, different organs/tissues could be well differentiated from each other. The quantitative values were influenced by the temperature. T1 in particular exhibited strong temperature dependence. The correction of quantitative values to a temperature of 37 C resulted in better tissue discrimination. Postmortem MR quantification is feasible for soft tissue discrimination and characterization of thoraco-abdominal organs. This provides a base for computer-aided diagnosis and detection of tissue lesions. The temperature dependence of the T1 values challenges postmortem MR quantification. Equations to correct for the temperature dependence are provided. (orig.)

  4. Biocrust spectral response as affected by changing climatic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Caballero, Emilio; Guirado, Emilio; Escribano, Paula; Reyes, Andres; Weber, Bettina

    2017-04-01

    Drylands are characterized by scarce vegetation coverage and low rates of biological activity, both constrained by water scarcity. Under these conditions, biocrusts form key players of ecosystem functioning. They comprise complex poikilohydric communities of cyanobacteria, algae, lichens and bryophytes together with heterotrophic bacteria, archaea and fungi, which cover the uppermost soil layer. Biocrusts can cope with prolonged phases of drought, being rapidly re-activated when water becomes available again. Upon reactivation, biocrusts almost immediately turn green, fixing atmospheric carbon and nitrogen and increasing ecosystem productivity. However, due to their inconspicuous growth they have only rarely been analysed and spatially and temporally continuous information on their response to water pulses is missing. These data are particularly important under changing climatic conditions predicting an increase in aridity and variations in precipitation patterns within most of the dryland regions. In the present study, we used multi-temporal series of NDVI obtained from LANDSAT images to analyze biocrust and vegetation response to water pulses within the South African Succulent Karoo and we predicted their future response under different climate change scenarios. The results showed that biocrust and vegetation greenness are controlled by aridity, solar radiation and soil water content, showing similar annual patterns, with minimum values during dry periods that increased within the rainy season and decreased again after the onset of drought. However, biocrusts responded faster to water availability and turned green almost immediately after small rains, producing a small NDVI peak only few days after rainfall, whereas more time was needed for vegetation to grow new green tissue. However, once the photosynthetic tissue of vegetation was restored, it caused the highest increase of NDVI values after the rain. Predicted changes in precipitation patterns and aridity

  5. On the Temperature Dependence of the UNIQUAC/UNIFAC Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjold-Jørgensen, Steen; Rasmussen, Peter; Fredenslund, Aage

    1980-01-01

    of the simultaneous correlation. The temperature dependent parameters have, however, little physical meaning and very odd results are frequently obtained when the interaction parameters obtained from excess enthalpy information alone are used for the prediction of vapor-liquid equilibria. The UNIQUAC/UNIFAC models...... are modified in this work by the introduction of a general temperature dependence of the coordination number. The modified UNIQUAC/UNIFAC models are especially suited for the representation of mixtures containing non-associating components. The modified models contain the same number of interaction parameters...... parameters based on excess enthalpy data, and the prediction of excess enthalpy information from only one isothermal set of vapor-liquid equilibrium data is qualitatively acceptable. A parameter table for the modified UNIFAC model is given for the five main groups: CH2, C = C, ACH, ACCH2 and CH2O....

  6. Temperature dependence of magnetoresistance in lanthanum manganite ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubkin, M.K.; Zalesskii, A.V.; Perekalina, T.M.

    1996-01-01

    Magnetoresistivity in the La0.9Na0.1Mn0.9(V,Co)0.1O3 and LaMnO3+δ ceramics was studied. The temperature dependence of magnetoresistance in these specimens was found to differ qualitatively from that in the La0.9Na0.1MnO3 single crystal (the magnetoresistance value remains rather high throughout the measurement range below the Curie temperature), with the maximum values being about the same (20-40% in the field of 20 kOe). Previously published data on magnetization, high frequency magnetic susceptibility, and local fields at the 139La nuclei of the specimens with similar properties attest to their magnetic inhomogeneity. The computation of the conductivity of the nonuniformly ordered lanthanum manganite was performed according to the mean field theory. The calculation results allow one to interpret qualitatively various types of experimental temperature dependences of magnetoresistance

  7. Temperature-dependent absorption cross sections for hydrogen peroxide vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicovich, J. M.; Wine, P. H.

    1988-01-01

    Relative absorption cross sections for hydrogen peroxide vapor were measured over the temperature ranges 285-381 K for lambda = 230 nm-295 nm and 300-381 K for lambda = 193 nm-350 nm. The well established 298 K cross sections at 202.6 and 228.8 nm were used as an absolute calibration. A significant temperature dependence was observed at the important tropospheric photolysis wavelengths lambda over 300 nm. Measured cross sections were extrapolated to lower temperatures, using a simple model which attributes the observed temperature dependence to enhanced absorption by molecules possessing one quantum of O-O stretch vibrational excitation. Upper tropospheric photodissociation rates calculated using the extrapolated cross sections are about 25 percent lower than those calculated using currently recommended 298 K cross sections.

  8. Temperature Dependence of Lattice Dynamics of Lithium 7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beg, M. M.; Nielsen, Mourits

    1976-01-01

    parameter is found to be 3.490 ± 0.003 Å at 110 K and 3.537 ± 0.003 Å at 424 K. The elastic constants obtained at 293 K from the model parameters are (1011 dyn/cm2) C11=1.73±0.10, C12=1.31±0.20, and C44=0.84±0.060. The temperature dependence of elastic constants is also determined....... 10% smaller than those at 100 K. Temperature dependences of selected phonons have been studied from 110 K to near the melting point. The energy shifts and phonon linewidths have been evaluated at 293, 383, and 424 K by comparing the widths and energies to those measured at 110 K. The lattice...

  9. Temperature-dependent respiration-growth relations in ancestral maize cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce N. Smith; Jillian L. Walker; Rebekka L. Stone; Angela R. Jones; Lee D. Hansen

    2001-01-01

    Shoots from 4- to 6-day old seedlings of seven ancestral or old cultivars of Zea mays L. were placed in a calorimeter. Dark metabolic heat rate (q) and CO2 production rate (RCO2) were measured at nine temperatures (5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, and 45 °C). Temperature dependencies of q and RCO2 were used to model response of both growth and substrate carbon conversion...

  10. Temperature dependence studies on the electro-oxidation of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. Temperature dependence on the electro-oxidation of methanol, ethanol and 1-propanol in. 0⋅5 M H2SO4 were investigated with Pt and PtRu electrodes. Tafel slope and apparent activation energy were evaluated from the cyclic voltammetric data in the low potential region (0⋅3–0⋅5 V vs SHE). The. CV results ...

  11. Turbulent thermal boundary layers with temperature-dependent viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jin; Jung, Seo Yoon; Sung, Hyung Jin; Zaki, Tamer A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Turbulent thermal boundary layers with temperature-dependent viscosity are simulated. • Effect of temperature-dependent viscosity on the statistics of the scalar field. • An identity for the Stanton number is derived and analyzed. • Effect of temperature-dependent viscosity on the statistics of scalar transfer rate. • Modification of turbulent flow field leads to an enhanced scalar transfer rate. - Abstract: Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent boundary layers (TBLs) over isothermally heated walls were performed, and the influence of the wall-heating on the thermal boundary layers was investigated. The DNS adopt an empirical relation for the temperature-dependent viscosity of water. The Prandtl number therefore changes with temperature, while the Péclet number is constant. Two wall temperatures (T w = 70 °C and 99 °C) were considered relative to T ∞ = 30 °C, and a reference simulation of TBL with constant viscosity was also performed for comparison. In the variable viscosity flow, the mean and variance of the scalar, when normalized by the friction temperature deficit, decrease relative to the constant viscosity flow. A relation for the mean scalar which takes into account the variable viscosity is proposed. Appropriate scalings for the scalar fluctuations and the scalar flux are also introduced, and are shown to be applicable for both variable and constant viscosity flows. Due to the modification of the near-wall turbulence, the Stanton number and the Reynolds analogy factor are augmented by 10% and 44%, respectively, in the variable viscosity flow. An identity for the Stanton number is derived and shows that the mean wall-normal velocity and wall-normal scalar flux cause the increase in the heat transfer coefficient. Finally, the augmented near-wall velocity fluctuations lead to an increase of the wall-normal scalar flux, which contributes favorably to the enhanced heat transfer at the wall

  12. 3d Approach Of Spectral Response For A Bifacial Silicon Solar Cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Losses in emitter region and external magnetic field are also being taken into account in order to perfect the description of measured spectral response. Then the new analytical expressions of carrier, photocurrent and short circuit densities are produced for front side and rear side illuminations. Homemade software based ...

  13. Artifact Interpretation of Spectral Response Measurements on Two-Terminal Multijunction Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Si, F.T.; Isabella, O.; Zeman, M.

    2016-01-01

    Multijunction solar cells promise higher power-conversion efficiency than the single-junction. With respect to two-terminal devices, an accurate measurement of the spectral response requires a delicate adjustment of the light- and voltage-biasing; otherwise it can result in artifacts in the data and

  14. Temperature dependence of photonic crystals based on thermoresponsive magnetic fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pu Shengli; Bai Xuekun; Wang Lunwei

    2011-01-01

    The influence mechanisms of temperature on the band gap properties of the magnetic fluids based photonic crystals are elaborated. A method has been developed to obtain the temperature-dependent structure information (A sol /A) from the existing experimental data and then two critical parameters, i.e. the structure ratio (d/a) and the refractive index contrast (Δn) of the magnetic fluids photonic crystals are deduced for band diagram calculations. The temperature-dependent band gaps are gained for z-even and z-odd modes. Band diagram calculations display that the mid frequencies and positions of the existing forbidden bands are not very sensitive to the temperature, while the number of the forbidden bands at certain strengths of magnetic field may change with the temperature variation. The results presented in this work give a guideline for designing the potential photonic devices based on the temperature characteristics of the magnetic fluids based photonic crystals and are helpful for improving their quality. - Highlights: → Mechanisms of temperature dependence of magnetic fluids based photonic crystals are elaborated. → Properties of existing forbidden bands have relatively fine temperature stability. → Disappearance of existing forbidden band is found for some magnetic fields. → Emergence of new forbidden band with temperature is found for some magnetic fields.

  15. A nanoscale temperature-dependent heterogeneous nucleation theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Y. Y. [Nanosurface Science and Engineering Research Institute, College of Mechatronics and Control Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, 518060 Guangdong (China); Yang, G. W., E-mail: stsygw@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, Nanotechnology Research Center, School of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, 510275 Guangdong (China)

    2015-06-14

    Classical nucleation theory relies on the hypothetical equilibrium of the whole nucleation system, and neglects the thermal fluctuations of the surface; this is because the high entropic gains of the (thermodynamically extensive) surface would lead to multiple stable states. In fact, at the nanometer scale, the entropic gains of the surface are high enough to destroy the stability of the thermal equilibrium during nucleation, comparing with the whole system. We developed a temperature-dependent nucleation theory to elucidate the heterogeneous nucleation process, by considering the thermal fluctuations based on classical nucleation theory. It was found that the temperature not only affected the phase transformation, but also influenced the surface energy of the nuclei. With changes in the Gibbs free energy barrier, nucleation behaviors, such as the nucleation rate and the critical radius of the nuclei, showed temperature-dependent characteristics that were different from those predicted by classical nucleation theory. The temperature-dependent surface energy density of a nucleus was deduced based on our theoretical model. The agreement between the theoretical and experimental results suggested that the developed nucleation theory has the potential to contribute to the understanding and design of heterogeneous nucleation at the nanoscale.

  16. Temperature dependence of the elastocaloric effect in natural rubber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Zhongjian, E-mail: zhongjian.xie521@gmail.com; Sebald, Gael; Guyomar, Daniel

    2017-07-12

    The temperature dependence of the elastocaloric (eC) effect in natural rubber (NR) has been studied. This material exhibits a large eC effect over a broad temperature range from 0 °C to 49 °C. The maximum adiabatic temperature change (ΔT) occurred at 10 °C and the behavior could be predicted by the temperature dependence of the strain-induced crystallization (SIC) and the temperature-induced crystallization (TIC). The eC performance of NR was then compared with that of shape memory alloys (SMAs). This study contributes to the SIC research of NR and also broadens the application of elastomers. - Highlights: • A large elastocaloric effect over a broad temperature range was found in natural rubber (NR). • The caloric performance of NR was compared with that of shape memory alloys. • The temperature dependence of the elastocaloric effect in NR can be prediced by the theory of strain-induced crystallization.

  17. Application of digital micromirror devices for spectral-response characterization of solar cells and photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Alexandre Y.

    2010-02-01

    A key parameter in evaluating the performance of photovoltaic (PV) solar cells is characterization of electrical response to various incident source spectra. Conventional techniques utilize monochromators that emit single band-passes across a spectral region of interest. Since many solar cells respond differently at different broadband source light levels, a white bias light source that raises the overall light level to simulate the sun's broadband emission is typically introduced. However, such sources cannot render realistic solar continua. We present some initial results demonstrating how a spectrally-dispersed broadband source modulated with Texas Instruments' Digital Light Projection (DLP®) technology can be used to more faithfully synthesize solar spectra for this application.

  18. Does N2 fixation amplify the temperature dependence of ecosystem metabolism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welter, Jill R; Benstead, Jonathan P; Cross, Wyatt F; Hood, James M; Huryn, Alexander D; Johnson, Philip W; Williamson, Tanner J

    2015-03-01

    Variation in resource supply can cause variation in temperature dependences of metabolic processes (e.g., photosynthesis and respiration). Understanding such divergence is particularly important when using metabolic theory to predict ecosystem responses to climate warming. Few studies, however, have assessed the effect of temperature-resource interactions on metabolic processes, particularly in cases where the supply of limiting resources exhibits temperature dependence. We investigated the responses of biomass accrual, gross primary production (GPP), community respiration (CR), and N2 fixation to warming during biofilm development in a streamside channel experiment. Areal rates of GPP, CR, biomass accrual, and N2 fixation scaled positively with temperature, showing a 32- to 71-fold range across the temperature gradient (approximately 7 degrees-24 degrees C). Areal N2-fixation rates exhibited apparent activation energies (1.5-2.0 eV; 1 eV = approximately 1.6 x 10(-19) J) approximating the activation energy of the nitrogenase reaction. In contrast, mean apparent activation energies for areal rates of GPP (2.1-2.2 eV) and CR (1.6-1.9 eV) were 6.5- and 2.7-fold higher than estimates based on metabolic theory predictions (i.e., 0.32 and 0.65 eV, respectively) and did not significantly differ from the apparent activation energy observed for N2 fixation. Mass-specific activation energies for N2 fixation (1.4-1.6 eV), GPP (0.3-0.5 eV), and CR (no observed temperature relationship) were near or lower than theoretical predictions. We attribute the divergence of areal activation energies from those predicted by metabolic theory to increases in N2 fixation with temperature, leading to amplified temperature dependences of biomass accrual and areal rates of GPP and R. Such interactions between temperature dependences must be incorporated into metabolic models to improve predictions of ecosystem responses to climate change.

  19. Spectrally resolved, broadband frequency response characterization of photodetectors using continuous-wave supercontinuum sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Vishal; Prakash, Roopa; Nagarjun, K. P.; Supradeepa, V. R.

    2018-02-01

    A simple and powerful method using continuous wave supercontinuum lasers is demonstrated to perform spectrally resolved, broadband frequency response characterization of photodetectors in the NIR Band. In contrast to existing techniques, this method allows for a simple system to achieve the goal, requiring just a standard continuous wave(CW) high-power fiber laser source and an RF spectrum analyzer. From our recent work, we summarize methods to easily convert any high-power fiber laser into a CW supercontinuum. These sources in the time domain exhibit interesting properties all the way down to the femtosecond time scale. This enables measurement of broadband frequency response of photodetectors while the wide optical spectrum of the supercontinuum can be spectrally filtered to obtain this information in a spectrally resolved fashion. The method involves looking at the RF spectrum of the output of a photodetector under test when incident with the supercontinuum. By using prior knowledge of the RF spectrum of the source, the frequency response can be calculated. We utilize two techniques for calibration of the source spectrum, one using a prior measurement and the other relying on a fitted model. Here, we characterize multiple photodetectors from 150MHz bandwidth to >20GHz bandwidth at multiple bands in the NIR region. We utilize a supercontinuum source spanning over 700nm bandwidth from 1300nm to 2000nm. For spectrally resolved measurement, we utilize multiple wavelength bands such as around 1400nm and 1600nm. Interesting behavior was observed in the frequency response of the photodetectors when comparing broadband spectral excitation versus narrower band excitation.

  20. Resistance to broomrape (Orobanche spp.) in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) is temperature dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eizenberg, H; Plakhine, D; Hershenhorn, J; Kleifeld, Y; Rubin, B

    2003-04-01

    The effects of various temperature regimes in the range 29-17/21-9 degrees C day/night on each stage of the parasitism process of Orobanche cumana and O. aegyptiaca on sunflower were studied under controlled conditions in polyethylene bags. The response of the resistant sunflower variety 'Ambar' was expressed as the degeneration of the parasite tissues after its establishment in the plant roots, and this stage was found to be temperature dependent. The degeneration rate of Orobanche tubercles in the resistant sunflower variety was also found to be temperature dependent and was about five times as great as that in the sensitive variety in the highest temperature regime tested of 29/21 degrees C day/night. The ability to reject the parasite by causing its degeneration and death is the main factor that determines the resistance. As the temperature rises, more tubercles degenerate and die, that is the sunflower plant expresses higher levels of resistance.

  1. On the Temperature Dependence of Enzyme-Catalyzed Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcus, Vickery L; Prentice, Erica J; Hobbs, Joanne K; Mulholland, Adrian J; Van der Kamp, Marc W; Pudney, Christopher R; Parker, Emily J; Schipper, Louis A

    2016-03-29

    One of the critical variables that determine the rate of any reaction is temperature. For biological systems, the effects of temperature are convoluted with myriad (and often opposing) contributions from enzyme catalysis, protein stability, and temperature-dependent regulation, for example. We have coined the phrase "macromolecular rate theory (MMRT)" to describe the temperature dependence of enzyme-catalyzed rates independent of stability or regulatory processes. Central to MMRT is the observation that enzyme-catalyzed reactions occur with significant values of ΔCp(‡) that are in general negative. That is, the heat capacity (Cp) for the enzyme-substrate complex is generally larger than the Cp for the enzyme-transition state complex. Consistent with a classical description of enzyme catalysis, a negative value for ΔCp(‡) is the result of the enzyme binding relatively weakly to the substrate and very tightly to the transition state. This observation of negative ΔCp(‡) has important implications for the temperature dependence of enzyme-catalyzed rates. Here, we lay out the fundamentals of MMRT. We present a number of hypotheses that arise directly from MMRT including a theoretical justification for the large size of enzymes and the basis for their optimum temperatures. We rationalize the behavior of psychrophilic enzymes and describe a "psychrophilic trap" which places limits on the evolution of enzymes in low temperature environments. One of the defining characteristics of biology is catalysis of chemical reactions by enzymes, and enzymes drive much of metabolism. Therefore, we also expect to see characteristics of MMRT at the level of cells, whole organisms, and even ecosystems.

  2. Impact of spectral nudging and domain size in studies of RCM response to parameter modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Separovic, Leo; Laprise, Rene [Universite du Quebec a Montreal, Centre pour l' Etude et la Simulation du Climat a l' Echelle Regionale (ESCER), Montreal, QC (Canada); Universite du Quebec a Montreal (UQAM), Montreal, QC (Canada); Elia, Ramon de [Universite du Quebec a Montreal, Centre pour l' Etude et la Simulation du Climat a l' Echelle Regionale (ESCER), Montreal, QC (Canada); Consortium Ouranos, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2012-04-15

    The paper aims at finding an RCM configuration that facilitates studies devoted to quantifying RCM response to parameter modification. When using short integration times, the response of the time-averaged variables to RCM modification tend to be blurred by the noise originating in the lack of predictability of the instantaneous atmospheric states. Two ways of enhancing the signal-to-noise ratio are studied in this work: spectral nudging and reduction of the computational domain size. The approach followed consists in the analysis of the sensitivity of RCM-simulated seasonal averages to perturbations of two parameters controlling deep convection and stratiform condensation, perturbed one at a time. Sensitivity is analyzed within different simulation configurations obtained by varying domain size and using the spectral nudging option. For each combination of these factors multiple members of identical simulations that differ exclusively in initial conditions are also generated to provide robust estimates of the sensitivities (the signal) and sample the noise. Results show that the noise magnitude is decreased both by reduction of domain size and the spectral nudging. However, the reduction of domain size alters some sensitivity signals. When spectral nudging is used significant alterations of the signal are not found. (orig.)

  3. Temperature dependence of acceptor-hole recombination in germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darken, L.S.; Jellison, G.E. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The recombination kinetics of several centers (Zn - , Cu - , B - , CuH - 2 , CuH - x , Zn = , Cu = , and CuH = x ) in high-purity Ge have been measured as a function of temperature from 8 to 160 K by transient capacitance techniques and are significantly faster than expected from cascade theory. The cascade theory also gives the wrong temperature dependence, and the wrong z dependence. Instead, the data are generally fit by the expression N v /4pτ c congruent kT/h (p and τ c are, respectively, the free-hole concentration in the sample and the experimental mean capture time for a center)

  4. Hysteresis and Temperature Dependency of Moisture Sorption – New Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2011-01-01

    for combined heat and moisture transport in materials. There is a need for further elaboration of the importance of these issues, and it is the intent of this paper to contribute to such elaboration. The paper seeks to contribute to the knowledge base about such sorption characteristic by presenting some new...... measurements of hysteresis and temperature dependency of the moisture sorption characteristics of three different porous building materials: aerated concrete, cement paste and spruce. Scanning curves are measured for all three materials where periods with adsorption and desorption interrupt each other...

  5. Temperature Dependence of GaN HEMT Small Signal Parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Ali M. Darwish; Amr A. Ibrahim; H. Alfred Hung

    2011-01-01

    This study presents the temperature dependence of small signal parameters of GaN/SiC HEMTs across the 0–150°C range. The changes with temperature for transconductance ( m ), output impedance ( d s and d s ), feedback capacitance ( d g ), input capacitance ( g s ), and gate resistance ( g ) are measured. The variations with temperature are established for m , d s , d s , d g , g s , and g in the GaN technology. This information is useful for MMIC designs....

  6. Gas diffusion and temperature dependence of bubble nucleation during irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foreman, A. J. E.; Singh, Bachu Narain

    1986-01-01

    The continuous production of gases at relatively high rates under fusion irradiation conditions may enhance the nucleation of cavities. This can cause dimensional changes and could induce embrittlement arising from gas accumulation on grain boundaries. Computer calculations have been made...... of the diatomic nucleation of helium bubbles, assuming helium to diffuse substitutionally, with radiation-enhanced diffusion at lower temperatures. The calculated temperature dependence of the bubble density shows excellent agreement with that observed in 600 MeV proton irradiations, including a reduction...

  7. Temperature-dependent Photodegradation in UV-resonance Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Hikaru; Saito, Yuika; Kumamoto, Yasuaki; Taguchi, Atushi; Verma, Prabhat; Kawata, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Temperature-dependent photodegradation during UV-resonance Raman spectroscopy was investigated. Photodegradation was quantitatively probed by monitoring the temporal evolution of UV-resonance Raman spectra obtained from bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) showing, resonance effect at a 355-nm excitation wavelength. At 80 K, the molecular photodecomposition rate was 5-times lower than that at room temperature. The decomposition rates of BChl were analyzed by the Arrhenius formula, indicating that the mechanism of photodegradation includes a thermal process having an activation energy of 1.4 kJ/mol.

  8. Measurement of Temperature Dependent Apparent Specific Heat Capacity in Electrosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaki, Wafaa; Akyildiz, Ali; Borca Tasciuc, Diana-Andra; De, Suvranu

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the measurement of temperature dependent apparent specific heat of ex-vivo porcine liver tissue during radiofrequency alternating current heating for a large temperature range. The difference between spatial and temporal evolution of experimental temperature, obtained during electrosurgical heating by infrared thermometry, and predictions based on finite element modeling was minimized to obtain the apparent specific heat. The model was based on transient heat transfer with internal heat generation considering heat storage along with conduction. Such measurements are important to develop computational models for real time simulation of electrosurgical procedures.

  9. Gas diffusion and temperature dependence of bubble nucleation during irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foreman, A. J. E.; Singh, Bachu Narain

    1986-01-01

    of the diatomic nucleation of helium bubbles, assuming helium to diffuse substitutionally, with radiation-enhanced diffusion at lower temperatures. The calculated temperature dependence of the bubble density shows excellent agreement with that observed in 600 MeV proton irradiations, including a reduction...... in activation energy below Tm/2. The coalescence of diatomic nuclei due to Brownian motion markedly improves the agreement and also provides a well-defined terminal density. Bubble nucleation by this mechanism is sufficiently fast to inhibit any appreciable initial loss of gas to grain boundaries during...

  10. Excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction in nonaqueous electrolyte solutions: temperature dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Tuhin; Gazi, Harun Al Rasid; Biswas, Ranjit

    2009-08-07

    Temperature dependence of the excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction of 4-(1-azetidinyl)benzonitrile (P4C) in ethyl acetate (EA), acetonitrile (ACN), and ethanol at several concentrations of lithium perchlorate (LiClO(4)) has been investigated by using the steady state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. The temperature range considered is 267-343 K. The temperature dependent spectral peak shifts and reaction driving force (-DeltaG(r)) in electrolyte solutions of these solvents can be explained qualitatively in terms of interaction between the reactant molecule and ion-atmosphere. Time resolved studies indicate that the decay kinetics of P4C is biexponential, regardless of solvents, LiClO(4) concentrations, and temperatures considered. Except at higher electrolyte concentrations in EA, reaction rates in solutions follow the Arrhenius-type temperature dependence where the estimated activation energy exhibits substantial electrolyte concentration dependence. The average of the experimentally measured activation energies in these three neat solvents is found to be in very good agreement with the predicted value based on data in room temperature solvents. While the rate constant in EA shows a electrolyte concentration induced parabolic dependence on reaction driving force (-DeltaG(r)), the former in ethanol and ACN increases only linearly with the increase in driving force (-DeltaG(r)). The data presented here also indicate that the step-wise increase in solvent reorganization energy via sequential addition of electrolyte induces the ICT reaction in weakly polar solvents to crossover from the Marcus inverted region to the normal region.

  11. Predicting the effective response of bulk polycrystalline ferroelectric ceramics via improved spectral phase field methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidyasagar, A.; Tan, W. L.; Kochmann, D. M.

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the electromechanical response of bulk polycrystalline ferroelectric ceramics requires scale-bridging approaches. Recent advances in fast numerical methods to compute the homogenized mechanical response of materials with heterogeneous microstructure have enabled the solution of hitherto intractable systems. In particular, the use of a Fourier-based spectral method as opposed to the traditional finite element method has gained significant interest in the homogenization of periodic microstructures. Here, we solve the periodic, electro-mechanically-coupled boundary value problem at the mesoscale of polycrystalline ferroelectrics in order to extract the effective response of barium titanate (BaTiO3) and lead zirconate titanate (PZT) under applied electric fields. Results include the effective electric hysteresis and the associated butterfly curve of strain vs. electric field for mean stress-free electric loading. Computational predictions of the 3D polycrystalline response show convincing agreement with our experimental electric cycling and strain hysteresis data for PZT-5A. In addition to microstructure-dependent effective physics, we also show how finite-difference-based approximations in the spectral solution scheme significantly reduce instability and ringing phenomena associated with spectral techniques and lead to spatial convergence with h-refinement, which have been major challenges when modeling high-contrast systems such as polycrystals.

  12. Temperature dependence of photoluminescence from ordered GaInP{sub 2} epitaxial layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prutskij, T. [Instituto de Ciencias, BUAP, Apartado Postal 207, 72000 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Pelosi, C. [IMEM/CNR, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, 43010 Parma (Italy)

    2010-01-15

    The temperature behavior of the integrated intensity of photoluminescence (PL) emission from ordered GaInP{sub 2} epitaxial layer was measured at temperatures of 10 - 300 K. Within this temperature range the PL emission is dominated by band-to-band radiative recombination. The PL intensity temperature dependence has two regions: at low temperatures it quenches rapidly as the temperature increases, and above 100 K it reduces slowly. This temperature behavior is compared with that of disordered GaInP{sub 2} layer. The specter of the PL emission of the disordered layer has two peaks, which are identified as due to donor-accepter (D-A) and band-to-band recombination. The PL intensity quenching of these spectral bands is very different: With increasing temperature, the D-A peak intensity remains almost unchanged at low temperatures and then decreases at a higher rate. The intensity of the band-to-band recombination peak decays gradually, having a higher rate at low temperatures than at higher temperatures. Comparing these temperature dependencies of these PL peaks of ordered and disordered alloys and the temperature behavior of their full width at half maximum (FWHM), we conclude that the different morphology of these alloys causes their different temperature behavior. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Effects of the temperature dependence of the bulk modulus on magnetic exchange-entropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, J.A. da; Plaza, E.J.R.; Campoy, J.C.P.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A thermodynamic route for the field-induced additional exchange-entropy was studied. • The temperature dependence of bulk modulus leads to the additional exchange-entropy. • The total entropy change matches with the sum of conventional and additional terms. • We obtained analytical expressions for deformation and additional exchange-entropy. - Abstract: We have studied the field-induced additional exchange-entropy on an elastic ferromagnet as a response effect of the dependence of its bulk modulus with temperature. We consider that the temperature dependence of the bulk modulus follows a linear behavior or a Wachtman-type equation. Our analysis is based on a free energy model containing exchange, Zeeman and elastic terms. From the deduced expressions for the exchange parameter, the additional exchange-entropy was obtained. This quantity must be the difference between the conventional and the total entropy change which were calculated from well-established thermodynamic expressions, i.e., configurational spin disorder and Maxwell’s equation, respectively. In addition, we established an analytical relation between the field-induced additional exchange-entropy and the temperature dependence of the bulk modulus

  14. Temperature dependence of bulk respiration of crop stands. Measurement and model fitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tani, Takashi; Arai, Ryuji; Tako, Yasuhiro

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine whether the temperature dependence of respiration at a crop-stand scale could be directly represented by an Arrhenius function that was widely used for representing the temperature dependence of leaf respiration. We determined temperature dependences of bulk respiration of monospecific stands of rice and soybean within a range of the air temperature from 15 to 30degC using large closed chambers. Measured responses of respiration rates of the two stands were well fitted by the Arrhenius function (R 2 =0.99). In the existing model to assess the local radiological impact of the anthropogenic carbon-14, effects of the physical environmental factors on photosynthesis and respiration of crop stands are not taken into account for the calculation of the net amount of carbon per cultivation area in crops at harvest which is the crucial parameter for the estimation of the activity concentration of carbon-14 in crops. Our result indicates that the Arrhenius function is useful for incorporating the effect of the temperature on respiration of crop stands into the model which is expected to contribute to a more realistic estimate of the activity concentration of carbon-14 in crops. (author)

  15. Observing the temperature dependent transition of the GP2 peptide using terahertz spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiwen Sun

    Full Text Available The GP2 peptide is derived from the Human Epidermal growth factor Receptor 2 (HER2/nue, a marker protein for breast cancer present in saliva. In this paper we study the temperature dependent behavior of hydrated GP2 at terahertz frequencies and find that the peptide undergoes a dynamic transition between 200 and 220 K. By fitting suitable molecular models to the frequency response we determine the molecular processes involved above and below the transition temperature (T(D. In particular, we show that below T(D the dynamic transition is dominated by a simple harmonic vibration with a slow and temperature dependent relaxation time constant and that above T(D, the dynamic behavior is governed by two oscillators, one of which has a fast and temperature independent relaxation time constant and the other of which is a heavily damped oscillator with a slow and temperature dependent time constant. Furthermore a red shifting of the characteristic frequency of the damped oscillator was observed, confirming the presence of a non-harmonic vibration potential. Our measurements and modeling of GP2 highlight the unique capabilities of THz spectroscopy for protein characterization.

  16. Effects of the temperature dependence of the bulk modulus on magnetic exchange-entropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, J.A. da [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, 49100-000 São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil); Plaza, E.J.R., E-mail: ejrplaza@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, 49100-000 São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil); Campoy, J.C.P. [Departamento de Ciências Naturais, Universidade Federal de São João del Rei, 36301-160 São João del Rei, MG (Brazil)

    2015-05-25

    Highlights: • A thermodynamic route for the field-induced additional exchange-entropy was studied. • The temperature dependence of bulk modulus leads to the additional exchange-entropy. • The total entropy change matches with the sum of conventional and additional terms. • We obtained analytical expressions for deformation and additional exchange-entropy. - Abstract: We have studied the field-induced additional exchange-entropy on an elastic ferromagnet as a response effect of the dependence of its bulk modulus with temperature. We consider that the temperature dependence of the bulk modulus follows a linear behavior or a Wachtman-type equation. Our analysis is based on a free energy model containing exchange, Zeeman and elastic terms. From the deduced expressions for the exchange parameter, the additional exchange-entropy was obtained. This quantity must be the difference between the conventional and the total entropy change which were calculated from well-established thermodynamic expressions, i.e., configurational spin disorder and Maxwell’s equation, respectively. In addition, we established an analytical relation between the field-induced additional exchange-entropy and the temperature dependence of the bulk modulus.

  17. Temperature dependent dynamic susceptibility calculations for itinerant ferromagnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, J. F.

    1980-10-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering experiments have revealed a variety of interesting and unusual phenomena associated with the spin dynamics of the 3-d transition metal ferromagnets nickel and iron. An extensive series of calculations based on the itinerant electron formalism has demonstrated that the itinerant model does provide an excellent quantitative as well as qualitative description of the measured spin dynamics of both nickel and iron at low temperatures. Recent angular photo emission experiments have indicated that there is a rather strong temperature dependence of the electronic spin-splitting which, from relatively crude arguments, appears to be inconsistent with neutron scattering results. In order to investigate this point and also the origin of spin-wave renormalization, a series of calculations of the dynamic susceptibility of nickel and iron has been undertaken. The results of these calculations indicate that a discrepancy exists between the interpretations of neutron and photoemission experimental results regarding the temperature dependence of the spin-splitting of the electronic energy bands.

  18. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence from CdS/Si nanoheterojunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yue Li; Li, Yong; Ji, Peng Fei; Zhou, Feng Qun; Sun, Xiao Jun; Yuan, Shu Qing; Wan, Ming Li [Pingdingshan University, Department of Physics, Solar New Energy Research Center, Pingdingshan (China); Ling, Hong [North China University of Water Resources and Electric Power, Department of Mathematics and Information Science, Zhengzhou (China)

    2016-12-15

    CdS/Si nanoheterojunctions have been fabricated by growing nanocrystal CdS (nc-CdS) on the silicon nanoporous pillar array (Si-NPA) through using a chemical bath deposition method. The nanoheterojunctions have been constructed by three layers: the upper layer being a nc-CdS thin films, the intermediate layer being the interface region including nc-CdS and nanocrystal silicon (nc-Si), and the bottom layer being nc-Si layer grown on sc-Si substrate. The room temperature and temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) have been measured and analyzed to provide some useful information of defect states. Utilizing the Gauss-Newton fitting method, five emission peaks from the temperature-dependent PL spectra can be determined. From the high energy to low energy, these five peaks are ascribed to the some luminescence centers which are formed by the oxygen-related deficiency centers in the silicon oxide layer of Si-NPA, the band gap emission of nc-CdS, the transition from the interstitial cadmium (I{sub Cd}) to the valence band, the recombination from I{sub Cd} to cadmium vacancies (V{sub Cd}), and from sulfur vacancies (V{sub s}) to the valence band, respectively. Understanding of the defect states in the CdS/Si nanoheterojunctions is very meaningful for the performance of devices based on CdS/Si nanoheterojunctions. (orig.)

  19. Temperature dependence of carbon isotope fractionation in CAM plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deleens, E.; Treichel, I.; O'Leary, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    The carbon isotope fractionation associated with nocturnal malic acid synthesis in Kalanchoë daigremontiana and Bryophyllum tubiflorum was calculated from the isotopic composition of carbon-4 of malic acid, after appropriate corrections. In the lowest temperature treatment (17 degrees C nights, 23 degrees C days), the isotope fractionation for both plants is -4 per thousand (that is, malate is enriched in (13)C relative to the atmosphere). For K. daigremontiana, the isotope fractionation decreases with increasing temperature, becoming approximately 0 per thousand at 27 degrees C/33 degrees C. Detailed analysis of temperature effects on the isotope fractionation indicates that stomatal aperture decreases with increasing temperature and carboxylation capacity increases. For B. tubiflorum, the temperature dependence of the isotope fractionation is smaller and is principally attributed to the normal temperature dependences of the rates of diffusion and carboxylation steps. The small change in the isotopic composition of remaining malic acid in both species which is observed during deacidification indicates that malate release, rather than decarboxylation, is rate limiting in the deacidification process

  20. Temperature dependence of carbon isotope fractionation in CAM plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deleens, E.; Treichel, I.; O' Leary, M.H.

    1985-09-01

    The carbon isotope fractionation associated with nocturnal malic acid synthesis in Kalanchoe daigremontiana and Bryophyllum tubiflorum was calculated from the isotopic composition of carbon-4 of malic acid, after appropriate corrections. In the lowest temperature treatment (17/sup 0/C nights, 23/sup 0/C days), the isotope fractionation for both plants is -4% per thousand (that is, malate is enriched in /sup 13/C relative to the atmosphere). For K. daigremontiana, the isotope fractionation decreases with increasing temperature, becoming approximately 0% per thousand at 27/sup 0/C/33/sup 0/C. Detailed analysis of temperature effects on the isotope fractionation indicates that stomatal aperture decreases with increasing temperature and carboxylation capacity increases. For B. tubiflorum, the temperature dependence of the isotope fractionation is smaller and is principally attributed to the normal temperature dependences of the rates of diffusion and carboxylation steps. The small change in the isotopic composition of remaining malic acid in both species which is observed during deacidification indicates that malate release, rather than decarboxylation, is rate limiting in the deacidification process. 28 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  1. Inferring the temperature dependence of population parameters: the effects of experimental design and inference algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palamara, Gian Marco; Childs, Dylan Z; Clements, Christopher F; Petchey, Owen L; Plebani, Marco; Smith, Matthew J

    2014-12-01

    Understanding and quantifying the temperature dependence of population parameters, such as intrinsic growth rate and carrying capacity, is critical for predicting the ecological responses to environmental change. Many studies provide empirical estimates of such temperature dependencies, but a thorough investigation of the methods used to infer them has not been performed yet. We created artificial population time series using a stochastic logistic model parameterized with the Arrhenius equation, so that activation energy drives the temperature dependence of population parameters. We simulated different experimental designs and used different inference methods, varying the likelihood functions and other aspects of the parameter estimation methods. Finally, we applied the best performing inference methods to real data for the species Paramecium caudatum. The relative error of the estimates of activation energy varied between 5% and 30%. The fraction of habitat sampled played the most important role in determining the relative error; sampling at least 1% of the habitat kept it below 50%. We found that methods that simultaneously use all time series data (direct methods) and methods that estimate population parameters separately for each temperature (indirect methods) are complementary. Indirect methods provide a clearer insight into the shape of the functional form describing the temperature dependence of population parameters; direct methods enable a more accurate estimation of the parameters of such functional forms. Using both methods, we found that growth rate and carrying capacity of Paramecium caudatum scale with temperature according to different activation energies. Our study shows how careful choice of experimental design and inference methods can increase the accuracy of the inferred relationships between temperature and population parameters. The comparison of estimation methods provided here can increase the accuracy of model predictions, with important

  2. On the photosynthetic and devlopmental responses of leaves to the spectral composition of light

    OpenAIRE

    Hogewoning, S.W.

    2010-01-01

    Key words: action spectrum, artificial solar spectrum, blue light, Cucumis sativus, gas-exchange, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), light interception, light quality, non-photosynthetic pigments, photo-synthetic capacity, photomorphogenesis, photosystem excitation balance, quantum yield, red light. A wide range of plant properties respond to the spectral composition of irradiance, such as photosynthesis, photomorphogenesis, phototropism and photonastic movements. These responses affect plant pr...

  3. Temperature dependence of luminescence for different surface flaws in high purity silica glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, J.; Grua, P.; Neauport, J.; Fargin, E.; Jubera, V.; Talaga, D.; Del Guerzo, A.; Raffy, G.; Jouannigot, S.

    2013-01-01

    In situ temperature dependence of the Photoluminescence under 325 nm irradiation is used to investigate defect populations existing in different surface flaws in high purity fused silica. Five photoluminescence bands peaking at 1.9, 2.1, 2.3, 2.63 and 3.11 eV have been detected in the spectral area ranging from 1.6 up to 3.6 eV. The Gaussian deconvolution of spectra allows dividing the five luminescence bands in two categories. The former corresponds to bands showing a significant intensity enhancement while temperature decreases; the latter corresponds to bands remaining insensitive to the temperature evolution. Such a behavior brings new information on defects involved in laser damage mechanism at 351 nm in nanosecond regime. (authors)

  4. Temperature dependence of the chromium(III) R1 linewidth in emerald

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carceller-Pastor, Ivana; Hutchison, Wayne D.; Riesen, Hans

    2013-03-01

    The temperature dependent contribution to the R1 (2E ← 4A2) linewidth in emerald, Be3Al2Si6O18:Cr3, has been measured by employing spectral hole-burning, fluorescence line narrowing and conventional luminescence experiments. The contribution varies from 0.6 MHz at 6.5 K to ˜420 GHz at 240 K and the line red-shifts by ˜570 GHz. Above 60 K, the dependence is well described by a non-perturbative formalism for two-phonon Raman scattering. Below this temperature the direct one-phonon process between the levels of the split 2E excited state dominates. However, it appears that a localized low-energy phonon leads to a deviation from the standard pattern at lowest temperatures.

  5. Modeling of Temperature-Dependent Noise in Silicon Nanowire FETs including Self-Heating Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Anandan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon nanowires are leading the CMOS era towards the downsizing limit and its nature will be effectively suppress the short channel effects. Accurate modeling of thermal noise in nanowires is crucial for RF applications of nano-CMOS emerging technologies. In this work, a perfect temperature-dependent model for silicon nanowires including the self-heating effects has been derived and its effects on device parameters have been observed. The power spectral density as a function of thermal resistance shows significant improvement as the channel length decreases. The effects of thermal noise including self-heating of the device are explored. Moreover, significant reduction in noise with respect to channel thermal resistance, gate length, and biasing is analyzed.

  6. Sample holder for studying temperature dependent particle guiding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bereczky, R.J.; Toekesi, K.; Kowarik, G.; Aumayr, F.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The so called guiding effect is a complex process involving the interplay of a large number of charged particles with a solid. Although many research groups joined this field and carried out various experiments with insulator capillaries many details of the interactions are still unknown. We investigated the temperature dependence of the guiding since it opens new possibilities both for a fundamental understanding of the guiding phenomenon and for applications. For the temperature dependent guiding experiments a completely new heatable sample holder was designed. We developed and built such a heatable sample holder to make accurate and reproducible studies of the temperature dependence of the ion guiding effect possible. The target holder (for an exploded view see Fig. 1) consists of two main parts, the front and the back plates. The two plates of the sample holder, which function as an oven, are made of copper. These parts surround the capillary in order to guarantee a uniform temperature along the whole tube. The temperature of the copper parts is monitored by a K-Type thermocouple. Stainless steel coaxial heaters surrounding the oven are used for heating. The heating power up to a few watts is regulated by a PID controller. Cooling of the capillary is achieved by a copper feed-through connected to a liquid nitrogen bath outside the UHV chamber. This solution allows us to change the temperature of the sample from -30 deg C up to 90 deg C. Our experiments with this newly developed temperature regulated capillary holder show that the glass temperature (i.e. conductivity) can be used to control the guiding properties of the glass capillary and adjust the conditions from guiding at room temperature to simple geometrical transmission at elevated temperatures. This holds the promise to investigate the effect of conductivity on particle transport (build-up and removal of charge patches) through capillaries in more details

  7. Temperature dependency of silicon structures for magnetic field gradient sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabsch, Alexander; Rosenberg, Christoph; Stifter, Michael; Keplinger, Franz

    2018-02-01

    This work describes the temperature dependence of two sensors for magnetic field gradient sensors and demonstrates a structure to compensate for the drift of resonance frequency over a wide temperature range. The temperature effect of the sensing element is based on internal stresses induced by the thermal expansion of material, therefore FEM is used to determine the change of the eigenvalues of the sensing structure. The experimental setup utilizes a Helmholtz coil system to generate the magnetic field and to excite the MEMS structure with Lorentz forces. The MEMS structure is placed on a plate heated with resistors and cooled by a Peltier element to control the plate temperature. In the second part, we describe how one can exploit temperature sensitivity for temperature measurements and we show the opportunity to include the temperature effect to increase the sensitivity of single-crystal silicon made flux density gradient sensors.

  8. Temperature-dependent particle-number projected moment of inertia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allal, N. H.; Fellah, M.; Benhamouda, N.; Oudih, M. R.

    2008-01-01

    Expressions of the parallel and perpendicular temperature-dependent particle-number projected nuclear moment of inertia have been established by means of a discrete projection method. They generalize that of the FTBCS method and are well adapted to numerical computation. The effects of particle-number fluctuations have been numerically studied for some even-even actinide nuclei by using the single-particle energies and eigenstates of a deformed Woods-Saxon mean field. It has been shown that the parallel moment of inertia is practically not modified by the use of the projection method. In contrast, the discrepancy between the projected and FTBCS perpendicular moment of inertia values may reach 5%. Moreover, the particle-number fluctuation effects vary not only as a function of the temperature but also as a function of the deformation for a given temperature. This is not the case for the system energy

  9. Temperature-dependent chemical changes of metallic fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youn, Young Sang; Lee, Jeong Mook; KimJong Hwan; Song, Hoon; Kim, Jong Yun [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    We observed the temperature-dependent variations of UZr alloy using surface analysis techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy-dispersive Xray spectroscope (EDS). In this work, we exhibited the results of XPS, Raman, XRD, and SEM-EDS for U-10wt%Zr alloy at room temperature, 610 and 1130 .deg. C. In SEM-EDS data, we observed that uranium and zirconium elements uniformly exist. After the annealing of U-10Zr sample at 1130 .deg. C, the formation of zirconium carbide is verified through Raman spectroscopy and XRD results. Additionally, the change of valence state for uranium element is also confirmed by XPS analysis.

  10. Temperature dependence of carrier capture by defects in gallium arsenide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wampler, William R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Modine, Normand A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-01

    This report examines the temperature dependence of the capture rate of carriers by defects in gallium arsenide and compares two previously published theoretical treatments of this based on multi phonon emission (MPE). The objective is to reduce uncertainty in atomistic simulations of gain degradation in III-V HBTs from neutron irradiation. A major source of uncertainty in those simulations is poor knowledge of carrier capture rates, whose values can differ by several orders of magnitude between various defect types. Most of this variation is due to different dependence on temperature, which is closely related to the relaxation of the defect structure that occurs as a result of the change in charge state of the defect. The uncertainty in capture rate can therefore be greatly reduced by better knowledge of the defect relaxation.

  11. Temperature dependence of the infrared optical constants of germanium films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Dandan, E-mail: ldd6162@163.com; Liu, Huasong; Jiang, Chenghui; Leng, Jian; Zhang, Yanmin; Zhao, Zhihong; Zhuang, Kewen; Jiang, Yugang; Ji, Yiqin

    2015-10-01

    High-temperature transmittance spectrum of germanium films was obtained by a Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy with a high-temperature accessory. The optical constants were determined by transmittance spectrum fitting with a Gaussian oscillator as the dispersion model. The analysis results showed that both the refractive index and extinction coefficient increased with the increasing temperature. The square of the refractive index increased linearly with the increasing temperature. The higher the temperature was, the faster the absorption coefficient increased. The germanium films were deposited on chemical vapor deposition ZnS substrates by ion-beam-assisted deposition. The region of temperature was between room temperature and 773 K, and the analysis spectrum was between 2000 nm and 5000 nm. - Highlights: • Temperature dependence of transmittance spectrum of Germanium films • Temperature properties of refractive index of Germanium films • Temperature properties of absorption coefficient of Germanium films.

  12. Temperature-dependent liquid metal flowrate control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    A temperature-dependent liquid metal flowrate control device includes a magnet and a ferromagnetic member defining therebetween a flow path for liquid metal, the ferromagnetic member being formed of a material having a curie temperature at which a change in the flow rate of the liquid metal is desired. According to the preferred embodiment the magnet is a cylindrical rod magnet axially disposed within a cylindrical member formed of a curie material and having iron pole pieces at the ends. A cylindrical iron shunt and a thin wall stainless steel barrier are disposed in the annulus between magnet and curie material. Below the curie temperature flow between steel barrier and curie material is impeded and above the curie temperature flow impedance is reduced

  13. Temperature dependence of magnetic anisotropies in ultra-thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Hucht, A

    1999-01-01

    shown that in contrast to other works the temperature driven spin reorientation transition in the monolayer is discontinuous also in the simulations, whereas in general it is continuous for the bilayer. Consequently the molecular field theory and the Monte Carlo simulations agree qualitatively. Exemplary for thicker films the influence of an external magnetic field is investigated in the bilayer, furthermore the effective anisotropies K sub n (T) of the phenomenological Landau theory are calculated numerically for the microscopic model. Analytic expressions for the dependence of the anisotropies K sub n (T) on the parameters of the model are obtained by the means of perturbation theory, which lead to a deeper understanding of the spin reorientation transition. Accordingly to this the origin for the spin reorientation transition lies in the differing temperature dependence of the dipolar and spin-orbit parts of the K sub n (T). Additionally the magnetization in the surface of the film decreases more rapidly wi...

  14. Heat experiment design to estimate temperature dependent thermal properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanovski, M

    2008-01-01

    Experimental conditions are studied to optimize transient experiments for estimating temperature dependent thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity. A mathematical model of a specimen is the one-dimensional heat equation with boundary conditions of the second kind. Thermal properties are assumed to vary nonlinearly with temperature. Experimental conditions refer to the thermal loading scheme, sampling times and sensor location. A numerical model of experimental configurations is studied to elicit the optimal conditions. The numerical solution of the design problem is formulated on a regularization scheme with a stabilizer minimization without a regularization parameter. An explicit design criterion is used to reveal the optimal sensor location, heating duration and flux magnitude. Results obtained indicate that even the strongly nonlinear experimental design problem admits the aggregation of its solution and has a strictly defined optimal measurement scheme. Additional region of temperature measurements with allowable identification error is revealed.

  15. Temperature-dependent liquid metal flowrate control device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Roger D.

    1978-01-01

    A temperature-dependent liquid metal flowrate control device includes a magnet and a ferromagnetic member defining therebetween a flow path for liquid metal, the ferromagnetic member being formed of a material having a curie temperature at which a change in the flow rate of the liquid metal is desired. According to the preferred embodiment the magnet is a cylindrical rod magnet axially disposed within a cylindrical member formed of a curie material and having iron pole pieces at the ends. A cylindrical iron shunt and a thin wall stainless steel barrier are disposed in the annulus between magnet and curie material. Below the curie temperature flow between steel barrier and curie material is impeded and above the curie temperature flow impedance is reduced.

  16. Temperature-dependent potential in cluster-decay process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gharaei, R.; Zanganeh, V.

    2016-01-01

    Role of the thermal effects of the parent nucleus in the Coulomb barrier and the half-life of 28 cluster-decays is systematically analyzed within the framework of the proximity formalism, namely proximity potential 2010. The WKB approximation is used to determine the penetration probability of the emitted cluster. It is shown that the height and width of the Coulomb barrier in the temperature-dependent proximity potential are less than its temperature-independent version. Moreover, this investigation reveals that the calculated values of half-life for selected cluster-decays are in better agreement with the experimental data when the mentioned effects are imposed on the proximity approach. A discussion is also presented about the predictions of the present thermal approach for cluster-decay half-lives of the super-heavy-elements.

  17. Temperature-dependent thermal properties of spark plasma sintered alumina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saheb Nouari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we report temperature-dependent thermal properties of alumina powder and bulk alumina consolidated by spark plasma sintering method. The properties were measured between room temperature and 250ºC using a thermal constants analyzer. Alumina powder had very low thermal properties due to the presence of large pores and absence of bonding between its particles. Fully dense alumina with a relative density of 99.6 % was obtained at a sintering temperature of 1400°C and a holding time of 10 min. Thermal properties were found to mainly dependent on density. Thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and specific heat of the fully dense alumina were 34.44 W/mK, 7.62 mm2s-1, and 1.22 J/gK, respectively, at room temperature. Thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity decreased while specific heat increased with the increase in temperature from room temperature to 250ºC.

  18. Temperature dependence of muonium reaction rates in the gas phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, D.G.; Garner, D.M.; Mikula, R.J.; British Columbia Univ., Vancouver

    1981-01-01

    A study of the temperature dependence of reaction rates has long been an important tool in establishing reaction pathways in chemical reactions. This is particularly true for the reactions of muonium (in comparison with those of hydrogen) since a measurement of the activation energy for chemical reaction is sensitive to both the height and the position of the potential barrier in the reaction plane. For collision controlled reactions, on the other hand, the reaction rate is expected to exhibit a weak T 1 sup(/) 2 dependence characteristic of the mean collision velocity. These concepts are discussed and their effects illustrated in a comparison of the chemical and spin exchange reaction rates of muonium and hydrogen in the temperature range approx.300-approx.500 K. (orig.)

  19. Temperature dependence of contact resistance at metal/MWNT interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang-Eui; Moon, Kyoung-Seok; Sohn, Yoonchul, E-mail: yoonchul.son@samsung.com [Materials Research Center, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Samsung Electronics, Suwon 443-803 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-11

    Although contact resistance of carbon nanotube (CNT) is one of the most important factors for practical application of electronic devices, a study regarding temperature dependence on contact resistance of CNTs with metal electrodes has not been found. Here, we report an investigation of contact resistance at multiwalled nanotube (MWNT)/Ag interface as a function of temperature, using MWNT/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite. Electrical resistance of MWNT/PDMS composite revealed negative temperature coefficient (NTC). Excluding the contact resistance with Ag electrode, the NTC effect became less pronounced, showing lower intrinsic resistivity with the activation energy of 0.019 eV. Activation energy of the contact resistance of MWNT/Ag interface was determined to be 0.04 eV, two times larger than that of MWNT-MWNT network. The increase in the thermal fluctuation assisted electron tunneling is attributed to conductivity enhancement at both MWNT/MWNT and MWNT/Ag interfaces with increasing temperature.

  20. Temperature dependence of magnetoresistance in copper single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Q.; Niewczas, M.

    2018-03-01

    Transverse magnetoresistance of copper single crystals has been measured in the orientation of open-orbit from 2 K to 20 K for fields up to 9 T. The experimental Kohler's plots display deviation between individual curves below 16 K and overlap in the range of 16 K-20 K. The violation of the Kohler's rule below 16 K indicates that the magnetotransport can not be described by the classical theory of electron transport on spherical Fermi surface with a single relaxation time. A theoretical model incorporating two energy bands, spherical and cylindrical, with different relaxation times has been developed to describe the magnetoresistance data. The calculations show that the electron-phonon scattering rates at belly and neck regions of the Fermi surface have different temperature dependencies, and in general, they do not follow T3 law. The ratio of the relaxation times in belly and neck regions decreases parabolically with temperature as A - CT2 , with A and C being constants.

  1. Temperature Dependent Variations of Phonon Interactions in Nanocrystalline Cerium Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugandha Dogra Pandey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature dependent anharmonic behavior of the phonon modes of nanocrystalline CeO2 was investigated in the temperature range of 80–440 K. The anharmonic constants have been derived from the shift in phonon modes fitted to account for the anharmonic contributions as well as the thermal expansion contribution using the high pressure parameters derived from our own high pressure experimental data reported previously. The total anharmonicity has also been estimated from the true anharmonicity as well as quasiharmonic component. In the line-width variation analysis, the cubic anharmonic term was found to dominate the quartic term. Finally, the phonon lifetime also reflected the trend so observed.

  2. Temperature Dependence of the Viscosity of Isotropic Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadzyn, J.; Czechowski, G.; Lech, T.

    1999-04-01

    Temperature dependence of the shear viscosity measured for isotropic liquids belonging to the three homologous series: 4-(trans-4'-n-alkylcyclohexyl) isothiocyanatobenzenes (Cn H2n+1 CyHx Ph NCS; nCHBT, n=0-12), n-alkylcyanobiphenyls (CnH2n+1 Ph Ph CN; nCB, n=2-12) and 1,n-alkanediols (HO(CH2)nOH; 1,nAD, n=2-10) were analysed with the use of Arrhenius equation and its two modifications: Vogel--Fulcher and proposed in this paper. The extrapolation of the isothermal viscosity of 1,n-alkanediols (n=2-10) to n=1 leads to an interesting conclusion concerning the expected viscosity of methanediol, HOCH2OH, the compound strongly unstable in a pure state.

  3. Temperature dependence effect of viscosity on ultrathin lubricant film melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V.Khomenko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the melting of an ultrathin lubricant film under friction between atomically flat surfaces at temperature dependencies of viscosity described by Vogel-Fulcher relationship and by power expression, which are observed experimentally. It is shown that the critical temperature exists in both cases the exceeding of which leads to the melting of lubricant and, as a result, the sliding mode of friction sets in. The values of characteristic parameters of lubricant are defined, which are needed for friction reduction. In the systems, where the Vogel-Fulcher dependence is fulfilled, it is possible to choose the parameters at which the melting of lubricant takes place even at zero temperature of friction surfaces. The deformational defect of the shear modulus is taken into account in describing the lubricant melting according to the mechanism of the first-order transition.

  4. Application of spectral imaging to the remote sensing of physiological responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Masaki; Shigeno, Yukihide; Matsuoka, Katsunori

    1998-07-01

    We applied the spectral imaging technique to the remote sensing of physiological responses on the human body. Blood, sweat and thermal distributions and their fluctuation are important and useful information to estimate the physiological state or thermal comfort of a person. Such information can be obtained as images by using cameras which can detect different wavelength regions. The blood distribution can be observed over a 430 nanometer wavelength region by the absorption pattern of oxidized hemoglobin contained in blood. Also information of sweat distribution can be obtained over a 1.9 micrometer region by the absorption pattern of water. Thermal cameras can acquire a thermal distribution of the human body without contact. We therefore attempt to observe simultaneously blood, sweat and thermal distributions and their fluctuations by spectral imaging. Some experimental results are shown. The sensitivity of this technique is discussed.

  5. Temperature dependence of the momentum distribution of positronium in MgF2, SiO2, and H2O

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagai, Y.; Kakimoto, M.; Hyodo, T.

    2000-01-01

    Temperature dependence of the momentum distribution of delocalized Bloch-positronium in solids is studied. The momentum distribution of the positronium, which is proportional to the energy integration of the spectral function weighted with the Bose distribution, is expressed in terms...

  6. Experimental and theoretical studies of spectral alteration in ultrasonic waves resulting from nonlinear elastic response in rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, P.A.; McCall, K.R.; Meegan, G.D. Jr. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1993-11-01

    Experiments in rock show a large nonlinear elastic wave response, far greater than that of gases, liquids and most other solids. The large response is attributed to structural defects in rock including microcracks and grain boundaries. In the earth, a large nonlinear response may be responsible for significant spectral alteration at amplitudes and distances currently considered to be well within the linear elastic regime.

  7. Modeling Climate Responses to Spectral Solar Forcing on Centennial and Decadal Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, G.; Cahalan, R.; Rind, D.; Jonas, J.; Pilewskie, P.; Harder, J.

    2012-01-01

    We report a series of experiments to explore clima responses to two types of solar spectral forcing on decadal and centennial time scales - one based on prior reconstructions, and another implied by recent observations from the SORCE (Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment) SIM (Spectral 1rradiance Monitor). We apply these forcings to the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Global/Middle Atmosphere Model (GCMAM). that couples atmosphere with ocean, and has a model top near the mesopause, allowing us to examine the full response to the two solar forcing scenarios. We show different climate responses to the two solar forCing scenarios on decadal time scales and also trends on centennial time scales. Differences between solar maximum and solar minimum conditions are highlighted, including impacts of the time lagged reSponse of the lower atmosphere and ocean. This contrasts with studies that assume separate equilibrium conditions at solar maximum and minimum. We discuss model feedback mechanisms involved in the solar forced climate variations.

  8. Temperature-dependent attenuation of ex-vessel flux measurements at the Hanford Fast Flux Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLane, F.E.; Wood, M.R.; Rathbun, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    Indicated nuclear power, developed by measuring leakage neutrons, has been found to be temperature dependent at the Hanford Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The magnitude, sense and speed of response of the effect suggest that hot sodium above th core and shield is a significant cause. Future designs which may minimize this effect are discussed

  9. Detection of directivity in seismic site response from microtremor spectral analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Del Gaudio

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent observations have shown that slope response to seismic shaking can be characterised by directional variations of a factor of 2–3 or larger, with maxima oriented along local topography features (e.g. maximum slope direction. This phenomenon appears influenced by slope material properties and has occasionally been detected on landslide-prone slopes, where a down-slope directed amplification could enhance susceptibility to seismically-induced landsliding. The exact conditions for the occurrence of directional amplification remain still unclear and the implementation of investigation techniques capable to reveal the presence of such phenomena is desirable. To this purpose we tested the applicability of a method commonly used to evaluate site resonance properties (Horizontal to Vertical Noise Ratio – HVNR or Nakamura's method as reconnaissance technique for the identification of site response directivity. Measurements of the azimuthal variation of H/V spectral ratios (i.e. between horizontal and vertical component of ambient microtremors were conducted in a landslide-prone study area of central Italy where a local accelerometric network had previously provided evidence of directivity phenomena on some slopes. The test results were compared with average H/V spectral ratios obtained for low-to-moderate earthquakes recorded by the accelerometric stations. In general, noise and seismic recordings provided different amplitudes of spectral ratios at similar frequencies, likely because of differences in signal and instrument characteristics. Nevertheless, both kinds of recordings showed that at sites affected by site response directivity major H/V peaks have orientations consistent (within 20°–30° with the direction of maximum shaking energy. Therefore, HVNR appears to be a promising technique for identifying seismic response directivity. Furthermore, in a comparative test conducted on a slope mantled in part by a deep-seated landslide

  10. Algorithm of artificial time histories meeting requirements of both fitting of response spectrum and envelop of power spectral density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Haitao; He Shuyan; Zhang Zhengming; Yu Suyuan

    2009-01-01

    Artificial time histories are key data inputs for the calculation of floor spectra of the containment building in nuclear power plants. The application of the single-ground-motion analysis method shall meet the requirements of envelop of the power spectral density as well as fitting of the target response spectrum. This paper presents a generation algorithm of artificial time histories in order to meet the needs of both fitting of the target response spectrum and envelop of the power spectral density. The Fourier amplitude spectrum is modified within the effective frequency bandwidths defined for the target response spectrum and power spectral density respectively in this algorithm, and iterations are used in order to meet the corresponding requirements. The numerical examples demonstrate that the artificial time history generated by this algorithm reaches high fitting precision to the target response spectrum and meets the need of envelop of the power spectral density. (authors)

  11. Temperature dependent conformation studies of Calmodulin Protein using Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aneja, Sahil; Bhartiya, Vivek Kumar; Negi, Sunita

    2016-10-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) protein plays a very crucial role in the calcium signaling inside the eukaryotic cell structure [1, 2]. It can also bind to other proteins/targets and facilitate various activities inside the cell [3, 4]. Temperature dependent conformation changes in the CaM protein are studied with extensive molecular dynamics simulations. The quantitative comparison of simulation data with various forms of experimental results probing different aspects of the folding process can facilitate robust assessment of the accuracy of the calculations. It can also provide a detailed structural interpretation for the experimental observations as well as physical interpretation for theory behind different aspects of the experiment. Earlier these kinds of studies have been performed experimentally using fluorescence measurements as in [5]. The calcium bound form of CaM is observed to undergo a reversible conformation change in the range 295-301 K at calcium ion concentration 150 mM. The transition temperature was observed to depend on the calcium ion concentration of the protein. Leap-dynamics approach was used earlier to study the temperature dependent conformation change of CaM [6]. At 290 K, both the N- and C-lobes were stable, at 325 K, the C-lobe unfolds whereas at 360 both the lobes unfold [6]. In this work, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of 100 ns each for the temperatures 325 K and 375 K on the apo form of CaM, 3CLN and 1CFD. A remarkable dependence of the temperature is observed on the overall dynamics of both the forms of the protein as reported in our earlier study [7, 8]. 1CFD shows a much flexible linker as compared to 3CLN whereas the overall dynamics of the lobes mainly N-lobe is observed to be more in later case. Salt bridge formation between the residues 2 (ASP) and 148 (LYS) leads to a more compact form of 1CFD at 325 K. The unfolding of the protein is observed to increase with the increase in the temperature similar to the earlier reported

  12. Effects of Posture and Stimulus Spectral Composition on Peripheral Physiological Responses to Loud Sounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Koch

    Full Text Available In the "loud-tone" procedure, a series of brief, loud, pure-tone stimuli are presented in a task-free situation. It is an established paradigm for measuring autonomic sensitization in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. Successful use of this procedure during fMRI requires elicitation of brain responses that have sufficient signal-noise ratios when recorded in a supine, rather than sitting, position. We investigated the modulating effects of posture and stimulus spectral composition on peripheral psychophysiological responses to loud sounds. Healthy subjects (N = 24 weekly engaged in a loud-tone-like procedure that presented 500 msec, 95 dB sound pressure level, pure-tone or white-noise stimuli, either while sitting or supine and while peripheral physiological responses were recorded. Heart rate, skin conductance, and eye blink electromyographic responses were larger to white-noise than pure-tone stimuli (p's < 0.001, generalized eta squared 0.073-0.076. Psychophysiological responses to the stimuli were similar in the sitting and supine position (p's ≥ 0.082. Presenting white noise, rather than pure-tone, stimuli may improve the detection sensitivity of the neural concomitants of heightened autonomic responses by generating larger responses. Recording in the supine position appears to have little or no impact on psychophysiological response magnitudes to the auditory stimuli.

  13. The effect of spectral filters on VEP and alpha-wave responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willeford, Kevin T; Fimreite, Vanessa; Ciuffreda, Kenneth J

    2016-01-01

    Spectral filters are used to treat light sensitivity in individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI); however, the effect of these filters on normal visual function has not been elucidated. Thus, the current study aimed to determine the effect of spectral filters on objectively-measured visual-evoked potential (VEP) and alpha-wave responses in the visually-normal population. The full-field (15°H×17°V), pattern-reversal VEP (20' check size, mean luminance 52cd/m(2)) was administered to 20 visually-normal individuals. They were tested with four Intuitive-Colorimeter-derived, broad-band, spectral filters (i.e., gray/neutral density, blue, yellow, and red), which produced similar luminance values for the test stimulus. The VEP N75 and P100 latencies, and VEP amplitude, were recorded. Power spectrum analysis was used to derive the respective powers at each frequency, and peak frequency, for the selected 9-11Hz components of the alpha band. Both N75 and P100 latencies increased with the addition of each filter when compared to baseline. Additionally, each filter numerically reduced intra-session amplitude variability relative to baseline. There were no significant effects on either the mean VEP amplitude or alpha wave parameters. The Intuitive Colorimeter filters significantly increased both N75 and P100 latencies, an effect which is primarily attributable (∼75%) to luminance, and in some cases, specific spectral effects (e.g., blue and red). VEP amplitude and alpha power were not significantly affected. These findings provide an important reference to which either amplitude or power changes in light-sensitive, younger clinical groups can be compared. Copyright © 2015 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Spectral-Amplitude-Coded OCDMA Optimized for a Realistic FBG Frequency Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penon, Julien; El-Sahn, Ziad A.; Rusch, Leslie A.; Larochelle, Sophie

    2007-05-01

    We develop a methodology for numerical optimization of fiber Bragg grating frequency response to maximize the achievable capacity of a spectral-amplitude-coded optical code-division multiple-access (SAC-OCDMA) system. The optimal encoders are realized, and we experimentally demonstrate an incoherent SAC-OCDMA system with seven simultaneous users. We report a bit error rate (BER) of 2.7 x 10-8 at 622 Mb/s for a fully loaded network (seven users) using a 9.6-nm optical band. We achieve error-free transmission (BER < 1 x 10-9) for up to five simultaneous users.

  15. Temperature dependence of the two photon absorption in indium arsenide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berryman, K.W.; Rella, C.W.

    1995-01-01

    Nonlinear optical processes in semiconductors have long been a source of interesting physics. Two photon absorption (TPA) is one such process, in which two photons provide the energy for the creation of an electron-hole pair. Researchers at other FEL centers have studied room temperature TPA in InSb, InAs, and HgCdTe. Working at the Stanford Picosecond FEL Center, we have extended and refined this work by measuring the temperature dependence of the TPA coefficient in InAs over the range from 80 to 350 K at four wavelengths: 4.5, 5.06, 6.01, and 6.3 microns. The measurements validate the functional dependence of recent band structure calculations with enough precision to discriminate parabolic from non-parabolic models, and to begin to observe smaller effects, such as contributions due to the split-off band. These experiments therefore serve as a strong independent test of the Kane band theory, as well as providing a starting point for detailed observations of other nonlinear absorption mechanisms

  16. THE TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGION OUTFLOWS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, Harry P.; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Young, Peter R.; Stenborg, Guillermo

    2011-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations with the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode have revealed large areas of high-speed outflows at the periphery of many solar active regions. These outflows are of interest because they may connect to the heliosphere and contribute to the solar wind. In this paper, we use slit rasters from EIS in combination with narrowband slot imaging to study the temperature dependence and morphology of an outflow region and show that it is more complicated than previously thought. Outflows are observed primarily in emission lines from Fe XI to Fe XV. Observations at lower temperatures (Si VII), in contrast, show bright fan-like structures that are dominated by inflows. These data also indicate that the morphology of the outflows and the fans is different, outflows are observed in regions where there is no emission in Si VII. This suggests that the fans, which are often associated with outflows in studies involving imaging data, are not directly related to the active region outflows.

  17. Temperature dependence of 1H chemical shifts in proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxter, Nicola J.; Williamson, Michael P.

    1997-01-01

    Temperature coefficients have been measured by 2D NMR methods for the amide and CαH proton chemical shifts in two globular proteins, bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and hen egg-white lysozyme.The temperature-dependent changes in chemical shift are generally linear up to about 15 deg. below the global denaturation temperature, and the derived coefficients span a range of roughly -16 to +2 ppb/K for amide protons and -4 to +3 ppb/K for CαH. The temperature coefficients can be rationalized by the assumption that heating causes increases in thermal motion in the protein. Precise calculations of temperature coefficients derived from protein coordinates are not possible,since chemical shifts are sensitive to small changes in atomic coordinates.Amide temperature coefficients correlate well with the location of hydrogen bonds as determined by crystallography. It is concluded that a combined use of both temperature coefficients and exchange rates produces a far more reliable indicator of hydrogen bonding than either alone. If an amide proton exchanges slowly and has a temperature coefficient more positive than-4.5 ppb/K, it is hydrogen bonded, while if it exchanges rapidly and has a temperature coefficient more negative than -4.5 ppb/K, it is not hydrogen bonded. The previously observed unreliability of temperature coefficients as measures of hydrogen bonding in peptides may arise from losses of peptide secondary structure on heating

  18. Temperature dependent kinematic viscosity of different types of engine oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libor Severa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to measure how the viscosity of engine oil changes with temperature. Six different commercially distributed engine oils (primarily intended for motorcycle engines of 10W–40 viscosity grade have been evaluated. Four of the oils were of synthetic type, two of semi–synthetic type. All oils have been assumed to be Newtonian fluids, thus flow curves have not been determined. Oils have been cooled to below zero temperatures and under controlled temperature regulation, kinematic viscosity (mm2 / s have been measured in the range of −5 °C and +115 °C. Anton Paar digital viscometer with concentric cylinders geometry has been used. In accordance with expected behavior, kinematic viscosity of all oils was decreasing with increasing temperature. Viscosity was found to be independent on oil’s density. Temperature dependence has been modeled using se­ve­ral mathematical models – Vogel equation, Arrhenius equation, polynomial, and Gaussian equation. The best match between experimental and computed data has been achieved for Gaussian equation (R2 = 0.9993. Knowledge of viscosity behavior of an engine oil as a function of its temperature is of great importance, especially when considering running efficiency and performance of combustion engines. Proposed models can be used for description and prediction of rheological behavior of engine oils.

  19. Unraveling the Transcriptional Basis of Temperature-Dependent Pinoxaden Resistance in Brachypodium hybridum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maor Matzrafi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Climate change endangers food security and our ability to feed the ever-increasing human population. Weeds are the most important biotic stress, reducing crop-plant productivity worldwide. Chemical control, the main approach for weed management, can be strongly affected by temperature. Previously, we have shown that temperature-dependent non-target site (NTS resistance of Brachypodium hybridum is due to enhanced detoxification of acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitors. Here, we explored the transcriptional basis of this phenomenon. Plants were characterized for the transcriptional response to herbicide application, high-temperature and their combination, in an attempt to uncover the genetic basis of temperature-dependent pinoxaden resistance. Even though most of the variance among treatments was due to pinoxaden application (61%, plants were able to survive pinoxaden application only when grown under high-temperatures. Biological pathways and expression patterns of members of specific gene families, previously shown to be involved in NTS metabolic resistance to different herbicides, were examined. Cytochrome P450, glucosyl transferase and glutathione-S-transferase genes were found to be up-regulated in response to pinoxaden application under both control and high-temperature conditions. However, biological pathways related to oxidation and glucose conjugation were found to be significantly enriched only under the combination of pinoxaden application and high-temperature. Analysis of reactive oxygen species (ROS was conducted at several time points after treatment using a probe detecting H2O2/peroxides. Comparison of ROS accumulation among treatments revealed a significant reduction in ROS quantities 24 h after pinoxaden application only under high-temperature conditions. These results may indicate significant activity of enzymatic ROS scavengers that can be correlated with the activation of herbicide-resistance mechanisms. This study shows that up

  20. Temperature-dependent THz vibrational spectra of clenbuterol hydrochloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, YuPing; Lei, XiangYun; Yue, Ai; Zhang, Zhenwei

    2013-04-01

    Using the high-resolution Terahertz Time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) and the standard sample pellet technique, the far-infrared vibrational spectra of clenbuterol hydrochloride (CH), a β 2-adrenergic agonist for decreasing fat deposition and enhancing protein accretion, were measured in temperature range of 77-295 K. Between 0.2 and 3.6 THz (6.6-120.0 cm-1), seven highly resolved spectral features, strong line-narrowing and a frequency blue-shift were observed with cooling. However, ractopamine hydrochloride, with some structural and pharmacological similarities to clenbuterol hydrochloride, showed no spectral features, indicating high sensitivity and strong specificity of THz-TDS. These results could be used for the rapid and nondestructive CH residual detection in food safety control.

  1. Simulating charge transport to understand the spectral response of Swept Charge Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athiray, P. S.; Sreekumar, P.; Narendranath, S.; Gow, J. P. D.

    2015-11-01

    Context. Swept Charge Devices (SCD) are novel X-ray detectors optimized for improved spectral performance without any demand for active cooling. The Chandrayaan-1 X-ray Spectrometer (C1XS) experiment onboard the Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft used an array of SCDs to map the global surface elemental abundances on the Moon using the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) technique. The successful demonstration of SCDs in C1XS spurred an enhanced version of the spectrometer on Chandrayaan-2 using the next-generation SCD sensors. Aims: The objective of this paper is to demonstrate validation of a physical model developed to simulate X-ray photon interaction and charge transportation in a SCD. The model helps to understand and identify the origin of individual components that collectively contribute to the energy-dependent spectral response of the SCD. Furthermore, the model provides completeness to various calibration tasks, such as generating spectral matrices (RMFs - redistribution matrix files), estimating efficiency, optimizing event selection logic, and maximizing event recovery to improve photon-collection efficiency in SCDs. Methods: Charge generation and transportation in the SCD at different layers related to channel stops, field zones, and field-free zones due to photon interaction were computed using standard drift and diffusion equations. Charge collected in the buried channel due to photon interaction in different volumes of the detector was computed by assuming a Gaussian radial profile of the charge cloud. The collected charge was processed further to simulate both diagonal clocking read-out, which is a novel design exclusive for SCDs, and event selection logic to construct the energy spectrum. Results: We compare simulation results of the SCD CCD54 with measurements obtained during the ground calibration of C1XS and clearly demonstrate that our model reproduces all the major spectral features seen in calibration data. We also describe our understanding of interactions at

  2. Temperature-dependent infrared reflectivity studies of multiferroic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We have measured near normal incidence far-infrared (FIR) reflectivity spec- tra of a single crystal of TbMnO3 from 10 K to 300 K in the spectral range of 50 cm−1–700 cm−1. Fifteen transverse optic (TO) and longitudinal optic (LO) modes are identified in the imaginary part of the dielectric function ε2(ω) and energy ...

  3. Flat spectral response all-digital broadband variable fiber optic attenuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Mumtaz

    2012-03-01

    The Texas Instruments (TI) digital micromirror device (DMD) is inherently a two dimensional (2-D) blaze grating that causes wavelength-dependent angular spreading of reflected broadband light limiting its use as a broadband variable fiber optic attenuator (VFOA). In this paper, we propose a novel design that utilizes a double-reflection architecture to counter angular spreading while at the same time eliminates the need to use any narrowband components such as wave plates thus delivering a truly flat spectral response VFOA. The key feature of this design is that the DMD, instead of being oriented in the Littrow retro-reflective configuration for the center wavelength, is oriented at a different angle to the input beam such that the blaze condition is still satisfied albeit for a different diffraction order n. The only wavelength dependent loss (WDL) in this design is due to the fact that the blaze condition is satisfied only for a center wavelength λc at which the diffraction efficiency is maximum while at other wavelengths, the blaze condition is not perfectly satisfied resulting in a loss in diffraction efficiency. Simulation results show a WDL of only 0.01 dB over the C-band compared to the previously reported experimental value of +/-0.37 dB thus resulting in a truly flat spectral response VFOA.

  4. A large-area, LED-based spectral response measurement system for solar PV device characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamadani, Behrang; Roller, John; Yoon, Howard; Dougherty, Brian

    2012-02-01

    Accurate and reliable measurement of the spectral responsivity (SR) of a solar cell is an important step in evaluating the electrical performance of competing photovoltaic (PV) technologies. We have investigated ways to measure the spectral responsivity, and hence the external quantum efficiency, of solar cells using measurement techniques that employ light emitting diodes (LEDs). Our setup includes one or more plates of compactly-installed, high-powered LEDs each containing up to 32 different LEDs that span the wavelength range of 375 nm to 1200 nm. Each LED plate is placed at the entrance of a tapered, highly reflective light guide for light mixing and large-area projection. Two unique measurement techniques have been investigated at NIST. The first technique consists of an LED sweep algorithm where a pulsed signal is applied to a given LED and the photogenerated current from the device under test is recorded using a lock-in technique. In the second SR technique, 32 variable-frequency, pulsed signals are applied to all LEDs at the same time, while recording the photogenerated current by a spectrum analyzer in the frequency domain. We will describe the uniqueness and advantages offered by each technique in detail and compare the accuracy of the two methods. A scheme for providing light bias and its impact on the SR measurements will be reported.

  5. Efficient 3D frequency response modeling with spectral accuracy by the rapid expansion method

    KAUST Repository

    Chu, Chunlei

    2012-07-01

    Frequency responses of seismic wave propagation can be obtained either by directly solving the frequency domain wave equations or by transforming the time domain wavefields using the Fourier transform. The former approach requires solving systems of linear equations, which becomes progressively difficult to tackle for larger scale models and for higher frequency components. On the contrary, the latter approach can be efficiently implemented using explicit time integration methods in conjunction with running summations as the computation progresses. Commonly used explicit time integration methods correspond to the truncated Taylor series approximations that can cause significant errors for large time steps. The rapid expansion method (REM) uses the Chebyshev expansion and offers an optimal solution to the second-order-in-time wave equations. When applying the Fourier transform to the time domain wavefield solution computed by the REM, we can derive a frequency response modeling formula that has the same form as the original time domain REM equation but with different summation coefficients. In particular, the summation coefficients for the frequency response modeling formula corresponds to the Fourier transform of those for the time domain modeling equation. As a result, we can directly compute frequency responses from the Chebyshev expansion polynomials rather than the time domain wavefield snapshots as do other time domain frequency response modeling methods. When combined with the pseudospectral method in space, this new frequency response modeling method can produce spectrally accurate results with high efficiency. © 2012 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  6. Temperature dependence of APD-based PET scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keereman, Vincent; Van Holen, Roel; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Vanhove, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Solid state detectors such as avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are increasingly being used in PET detectors. One of the disadvantages of APDs is the strong decrease of their gain factor with increasing ambient temperature. The light yield of most scintillation crystals also decreases when ambient temperature is increased. Both effects lead to considerable temperature dependence of the performance of APD-based PET scanners. In this paper, the authors propose a model for this dependence and the performance of the LabPET8 APD-based small animal PET scanner is evaluated at different temperatures.Methods: The model proposes that the effect of increasing temperature on the energy histogram of an APD-based PET scanner is a compression of the histogram along the energy axis. The energy histogram of the LabPET system was acquired at 21 °C and 25 °C to verify the validity of this model. Using the proposed model, the effect of temperature on system sensitivity was simulated for different detector temperature coefficients and temperatures. Subsequently, the effect of short term and long term temperature changes on the peak sensitivity of the LabPET system was measured. The axial sensitivity profile was measured at 21 °C and 24 °C following the NEMA NU 4-2008 standard. System spatial resolution was also evaluated. Furthermore, scatter fraction, count losses and random coincidences were evaluated at different temperatures. Image quality was also investigated.Results: As predicted by the model, the photopeak energy at 25 °C is lower than at 21 °C with a shift of approximately 6% per °C. Simulations showed that this results in an approximately linear decrease of sensitivity when temperature is increased from 21 °C to 24 °C and energy thresholds are constant. Experimental evaluation of the peak sensitivity at different temperatures showed a strong linear correlation for short term (2.32 kcps/MBq/°C = 12%/°C, R = −0.95) and long term (1.92 kcps/MBq/°C = 10%/

  7. Infrared cross-sections and integrated band intensities of propylene: Temperature-dependent studies

    KAUST Repository

    Es-sebbar, Et-touhami

    2014-01-01

    Propylene, a by-product of biomass burning, thermal cracking of hydrocarbons and incomplete combustion of fossil fuels, is a ubiquitous molecule found in the environment and atmosphere. Accurate infrared (IR) cross-sections and integrated band intensities of propylene are essential for quantitative measurements and atmospheric modeling. We measured absolute IR cross-sections of propylene using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy over the wavenumber range of 400-6500cm-1 and at gas temperatures between 296 and 460K. We recorded these spectra at spectral resolutions ranging from 0.08 to 0.5cm-1 and measured the integrated band intensities for a number of vibrational bands in certain spectral regions. We then compared the integrated band intensities measured at room temperature with values derived from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) databases. Our results agreed well with the results reported in the two databases with a maximum deviation of about 4%. The peak cross-sections for the primary bands decreased by about 20-54% when the temperature increased from 296 to 460K. Moreover, we determined the integrated band intensities as a function of temperature for certain features in various spectral regions; we found no significant temperature dependence over the range of temperatures considered here. We also studied the effect of temperature on absorption cross-section using a Difference Frequency Generation (DFG) laser system. We compared the DFG results with those obtained from the FTIR study at certain wavenumbers over the 2850-2975cm-1 range and found a reasonable agreement with less than 10% discrepancy. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Study on temperature-dependent carrier transport for bilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yali; Li, Weilong; Qi, Mei; Li, Xiaojun; Zhou, Yixuan; Ren, Zhaoyu

    2015-05-01

    In order to investigate the temperature-dependent carrier transport property of the bilayer graphene, graphene films were synthesized on Cu foils by a home-built chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with C2H2. Samples regularity, transmittance (T) and layer number were analyzed by transmission electron microscope (TEM) images, transmittance spectra and Raman spectra. Van Der Pauw method was used for resistivity measurements and Hall measurements at different temperatures. The results indicated that the sheet resistance (Rs), carrier density (n), and mobility (μ) were 1096.20 Ω/sq, 0.75×1012 cm-2, and 7579.66 cm2 V-1 s-1 at room temperature, respectively. When the temperature increased from 0 °C to 240 °C, carrier density (n) increased from 0.66×1012 cm-2 to 1.55×1012 cm-2, sheet resistance (Rs) decreased from 1215.55 Ω/sq to 560.77 Ω/sq, and mobility (μ) oscillated around a constant value 7773.99 cm2 V-1 s-1. The decrease of the sheet resistance (Rs) indicated that the conductive capability of the bilayer graphene film increased with the temperature. The significant cause of the increase of carrier density (n) was the thermal activation of carriers from defects and unconscious doping states. Because the main influence on the carrier mobility (μ) was the lattice defect scattering and a small amount of impurity scattering, the carrier mobility (μ) was temperature-independent for the bilayer graphene.

  9. Spectral response characteristics of the transmission-mode aluminum gallium nitride photocathode with varying aluminum composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Guanghui; Liu, Junle; Ke, Senlin

    2017-12-10

    In order to research spectral response characteristics of transmission-mode nanostructure aluminum gallium nitride (AlGaN) photocathodes, the AlGaN photocathodes materials with varied aluminum (Al) composition were grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and its optical properties were measured. The Al compositions of each AlGaN film of the photocathodes were analyzed from their adsorption properties curves; their thickness was also calculated by the matrix formula of thin-film optics. The nanostructure AlGaN photocathodes were activated with the Caesium-Oxygen (Cs-O) alternation, and after the photocathode was packaged in vacuum, their spectrum responses were measured. The experimental results showed that the trend of spectrum response curves first increased and then decreased along with the increasing of the incident light wavelength. The peak spectrum response value was 17.5 mA/W at 255 nm, and its quantum efficiency was 8.5%. The lattice defects near the interface of the AlGaN heterostructure could impede the electron motion crossing this region and moving toward the photocathode surface; this was a factor that reduces the electron emission performance of the photocathodes. Also, the experimental result showed that the thickness of each AlGaN layer affected the electron diffusion characteristics; this was a key factor that influenced the spectrum response performance.

  10. SHUTTER-LESS TEMPERATURE-DEPENDENT CORRECTION FOR UNCOOLED THERMAL CAMERA UNDER FAST CHANGING FPA TEMPERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Lin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Conventional temperature-dependant correction methods for uncooled cameras are not so valid for images under the condition of fast changing FPA temperature as usual, therefore, a shutter-less temperature-dependant correction method is proposed here to compensate for these errors and stabilize camera's response only related to the object surface temperature. Firstly, sequential images are divided into the following three categories according to the changing speed of FPA temperature: stable (0°C/min, relatively stable (<0.5°C/min, unstable (>0.5°C/min. Then all of the images are projected into the same level using a second order polynomial relation between FPA temperatures and gray values from stable images. Next, a third order polynomial relation between temporal differences of FPA temperatures and the above corrected images is implemented to eliminate the deviation caused by fast changing FPA temperature. Finally, radiometric calibration is applied to convert image gray values into object temperature values. Experiment results show that our method is more effective for fast changing FPA temperature data than FLIR GEV.

  11. Solubility Temperature Dependence Predicted from 2D Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Avdeef

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to find a computational procedure to normalize solubility data determined at various temperatures (e.g., 10 – 50 oC to values at a “reference” temperature (e.g., 25 °C. A simple procedure was devised to predict enthalpies of solution, ΔHsol, from which the temperature dependence of intrinsic (uncharged form solubility, log S0, could be calculated. As dependent variables, values of ΔHsol at 25 °C were subjected to multiple linear regression (MLR analysis, using melting points (mp and Abraham solvation descriptors. Also, the enthalpy data were subjected to random forest regression (RFR and recursive partition tree (RPT analyses. A total of 626 molecules were examined, drawing on 2040 published solubility values measured at various temperatures, along with 77 direct calori    metric measurements. The three different prediction methods (RFR, RPT, MLR all indicated that the estimated standard deviations in the enthalpy data are 11-15 kJ mol-1, which is concordant with the 10 kJ mol-1 propagation error estimated from solubility measurements (assuming 0.05 log S errors, and consistent with the 7 kJ mol-1 average reproducibility in enthalpy values from interlaboratory replicates. According to the MLR model, higher values of mp, H‑bond acidity, polarizability/dipolarity, and dispersion forces relate to more positive (endothermic enthalpy values. However, molecules that are large and have high H-bond basicity are likely to possess negative (exothermic enthalpies of solution. With log S0 values normalized to 25 oC, it was shown that the interlaboratory average standard deviations in solubility measurement are reduced to 0.06 ‑ 0.17 log unit, with higher errors for the least-soluble druglike molecules. Such improvements in data mining are expected to contribute to more reliable in silico prediction models of solubility for use in drug discovery.

  12. Temperature-Dependent Henry's Law Constants of Atmospheric Amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Chunbo; Kish, J Duncan; Roberts, Jason E; Dwebi, Iman; Chon, Nara; Liu, Yong

    2015-08-20

    There has been growing interest in understanding atmospheric amines in the gas phase and their mass transfer to the aqueous phase because of their potential roles in cloud chemistry, secondary organic aerosol formation, and the fate of atmospheric organics. Temperature-dependent Henry's law constants (KH) of atmospheric amines, a key parameter in atmospheric chemical transport models to account for mass transfer, are mostly unavailable. In this work, we investigated gas-liquid equilibria of five prevalent atmospheric amines, namely 1-propylamine, di-n-propylamine, trimethylamine, allylamine, and 4-methylmorpholine using bubble column technique. We reported effective KH, intrinsic KH, and gas phase diffusion coefficients of these species over a range of temperatures relevant to the lower atmosphere for the first time. The measured KH at 298 K and enthalpy of solution for 1-propylamine, di-n-propylamine, trimethylamine, allylamine, and 4-methylmorpholine are 61.4 ± 4.9 mol L(-1) atm(-1) and -49.0 ± 4.8 kJ mol(-1); 14.5 ± 1.2 mol L(-1) atm(-1) and -72.5 ± 6.8 kJ mol(-1); 8.9 ± 0.7 mol L(-1) atm(-1) and -49.6 ± 4.7 kJ mol(-1); 103.5 ± 10.4 mol L(-1) atm(-1) and -42.7 ± 4.3 kJ mol(-1); and 952.2 ± 114.3 mol L(-1) atm(-1) and -82.7 ± 9.7 kJ mol(-1), respectively. In addition, we evaluated amines' characteristic times to achieve gas-liquid equilibrium for partitioning between gas and aqueous phases. Results show gas-liquid equilibrium can be rapidly established at natural cloud droplets surface, but the characteristic times may be extended substantially at lower temperatures and pHs. Moreover, our findings imply that atmospheric amines are more likely to exist in cloud droplets, and ambient temperature, water content, and pH of aerosols play important roles in their partitioning.

  13. Understanding Biological Rates and their Temperature Dependence, from Enzymes to Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, E.; Arcus, V. L.

    2017-12-01

    Temperature responses over various scales in biological systems follow a similar pattern; negative curvature results in an optimum temperature (Topt) for activity/growth/turnover, with decreases in rates on either side of Topt. Previously this downturn in rates at high temperatures has been attributed to enzyme denaturation, where a failing of the basic driving units of metabolism was used to describe curvature at the enzyme and organism level. However, recent developments in our understanding of the factors governing enzyme rates at different temperatures have guided a new understanding of the responses of biological systems. Enzymes catalyse reactions by driving the substrate through a high energy species, which is tightly bound to the enzyme. Macromolecular rate theory (MMRT) has recently been developed to account for the changes in the system brought about by this tight binding, specifically the change in the physical parameter heat capacity (ΔCǂp), and the effect this has on the temperature dependence of enzyme reactions. A negative ΔCǂp imparts the signature negative curvature to rates in the absence of denaturation, and finds that Topt, ΔCǂp and curvature are all correlated, placing constraints on biological systems. The simplest of cells comprise thousands of enzymatically catalysed reactions, functioning in series and in parallel in metabolic pathways to determine the overall growth rate of an organism. Intuitively, the temperature effects of enzymes play a role in determining the overall temperature dependence of an organism, in tandem with cellular level regulatory responses. However, the effect of individual Topt values and curvature on overall pathway behaviour is less apparent. Here, this is investigated in the context of MMRT through the in vitro characterisation of a six-step metabolic pathway to understand the steps in isolation and functioning in series. Pathway behaviour is found to be approximately an average of the properties of the

  14. Analytic models of spectral responses of fiber-grating-based interferometers on FMC theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiangkai; Wei, Lai; Pan, Yingjun; Liu, Shengping; Shi, Xiaohui

    2012-02-13

    In this paper the analytic models (AMs) of the spectral responses of fiber-grating-based interferometers are derived from the Fourier mode coupling (FMC) theory proposed recently. The interferometers include Fabry-Perot cavity, Mach-Zehnder and Michelson interferometers, which are constructed by uniform fiber Bragg gratings and long-period fiber gratings, and also by Gaussian-apodized ones. The calculated spectra based on the analytic models are achieved, and compared with the measured cases and those on the transfer matrix (TM) method. The calculations and comparisons have confirmed that the AM-based spectrum is in excellent agreement with the TM-based one and the measured case, of which the efficiency is improved up to ~2990 times that of the TM method for non-uniform-grating-based in-fiber interferometers.

  15. MODIS Aqua Optical Throughput Degradation Impact on Relative Spectral Response and Calibration on Ocean Color Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shihyan; Meister, Gerhard

    2017-01-01

    Since Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Aqua's launch in 2002, the radiometric system gains of the reflective solar bands have been degrading, indicating changes in the systems optical throughput. To estimate the optical throughput degradation, the electronic gain changes were estimated and removed from the measured system gain. The derived optical throughput degradation shows a rate that is much faster in the shorter wavelengths than the longer wavelengths. The wavelength-dependent optical throughput degradation modulated the relative spectral response (RSR) of the bands. In addition, the optical degradation is also scan angle-dependent due to large changes in response versus the scan angle over time. We estimated the modulated RSR as a function of time and scan angles and its impacts on sensor radiometric calibration for the ocean science. Our results show that the calibration bias could be up to 1.8 % for band 8 (412 nm) due to its larger out-of-band response. For the other ocean bands, the calibration biases are much smaller with magnitudes at least one order smaller.

  16. Assessing signal-driven mechanism in neonates: brain responses to temporally and spectrally different sounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyo eMinagawa-Kawai

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Past studies have found that in adults that acoustic properties of sound signals (such as fast vs. slow temporal features differentially activate the left and right hemispheres, and some have hypothesized that left-lateralization for speech processing may follow from left-lateralization to rapidly changing signals. Here, we tested whether newborns’ brains show some evidence of signal-specific lateralization responses using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS and auditory stimuli that elicits lateralized responses in adults, composed of segments that vary in duration and spectral diversity. We found significantly greater bilateral responses of oxygenated hemoglobin (oxy-Hb in the temporal areas for stimuli with a minimum segment duration of 21 ms, than stimuli with a minimum segment duration of 667 ms. However, we found no evidence for hemispheric asymmetries dependent on the stimulus characteristics. We hypothesize that acoustic-based functional brain asymmetries may develop throughout early infancy, and discuss their possible relationship with brain asymmetries for language.

  17. The effect of disseminated ironsands on the spectral induced polarization response of New Zealand sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingham, Malcolm

    2018-01-01

    The effect of naturally occurring ironsand on the spectral induced polarization response of shallow aquifer sands has been investigated. Laboratory measurements on mixtures of a low polarization silica sand with different proportions of ironsand characterize the main effect of an increasing proportion of ironsand as a lowering of the frequency at which the high frequency SIP phase starts to rise significantly. This ultimately obscures any low frequency polarization which might be related to the hydraulic properties of the sample. The measurements can be successfully modelled using the Maxwell-Clausius-Mossotti relationship and this has also been used to predict the expected SIP response of naturally occurring sands with different concentrations of ironsand. Modelling of these calculated responses using a Cole-Cole model suggests that the low frequency polarization time constant can be well resolved up to mass concentrations of ironsand of between 5 and 10%. The implications of this for the ability of SIP measurements to accurately map permeability variations in shallow aquifers are discussed.

  18. Spectral and Temporal Acoustic Features Modulate Response Irregularities within Primary Auditory Cortex Columns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres Carrasco

    Full Text Available Assemblies of vertically connected neurons in the cerebral cortex form information processing units (columns that participate in the distribution and segregation of sensory signals. Despite well-accepted models of columnar architecture, functional mechanisms of inter-laminar communication remain poorly understood. Hence, the purpose of the present investigation was to examine the effects of sensory information features on columnar response properties. Using acute recording techniques, extracellular response activity was collected from the right hemisphere of eight mature cats (felis catus. Recordings were conducted with multichannel electrodes that permitted the simultaneous acquisition of neuronal activity within primary auditory cortex columns. Neuronal responses to simple (pure tones, complex (noise burst and frequency modulated sweeps, and ecologically relevant (con-specific vocalizations acoustic signals were measured. Collectively, the present investigation demonstrates that despite consistencies in neuronal tuning (characteristic frequency, irregularities in discharge activity between neurons of individual A1 columns increase as a function of spectral (signal complexity and temporal (duration acoustic variations.

  19. Temperature-dependent fine structure splitting in InGaN quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tong; Puchtler, Tim J.; Zhu, Tongtong; Jarman, John C.; Kocher, Claudius C.; Oliver, Rachel A.; Taylor, Robert A.

    2017-07-01

    We report the experimental observation of temperature-dependent fine structure splitting in semiconductor quantum dots using a non-polar (11-20) a-plane InGaN system, up to the on-chip Peltier cooling threshold of 200 K. At 5 K, a statistical average splitting of 443 ± 132 μeV has been found based on 81 quantum dots. The degree of fine structure splitting stays relatively constant for temperatures less than 100 K and only increases above that temperature. At 200 K, we find that the fine structure splitting ranges between 2 and 12 meV, which is an order of magnitude higher than that at low temperatures. Our investigations also show that phonon interactions at high temperatures might have a correlation with the degree of exchange interactions. The large fine structure splitting at 200 K makes it easier to isolate the individual components of the polarized emission spectrally, increasing the effective degree of polarization for potential on-chip applications of polarized single-photon sources.

  20. Plasmon resonance enhanced temperature-dependent photoluminescence of Si-V centers in diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Shaoheng [State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Song, Jie; Wang, Qiliang; Liu, Junsong; Li, Hongdong, E-mail: hdli@jlu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Zhang, Baolin [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2015-11-23

    Temperature dependent optical property of diamond has been considered as a very important factor for realizing high performance diamond-based optoelectronic devices. The photoluminescence feature of the zero phonon line of silicon-vacancy (Si-V) centers in Si-doped chemical vapor deposited single crystal diamond (SCD) with localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) induced by gold nanoparticles has been studied at temperatures ranging from liquid nitrogen temperature to 473 K, as compared with that of the SCD counterpart in absence of the LSPR. It is found that with LSPR the emission intensities of Si-V centers are significantly enhanced by factors of tens and the magnitudes of the redshift (width) of the emissions become smaller (narrower), in comparison with those of normal emissions without plasmon resonance. More interestingly, these strong Si-V emissions appear remarkably at temperatures up to 473 K, while the spectral feature was not reported in previous studies on the intrinsic Si-doped diamonds when temperatures are higher than room temperature. These findings would lead to reaching high performance diamond-based devices, such as single photon emitter, quantum cryptography, biomarker, and so forth, working under high temperature conditions.

  1. Temperature dependence of shear viscosity of SU(3)-gluodynamics within lattice simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astrakhantsev, N.Yu. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics,25 B. Cheremushkinskaya St., 117218, Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology,9 Institutskii per., 141700, Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Braguta, V.V. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics,25 B. Cheremushkinskaya St., 117218, Moscow (Russian Federation); Institute for High Energy Physics NRC “Kurchatov Institute”,1 Pobedy St., Protvino, 142281 (Russian Federation); School of Biomedicine, Far Eastern Federal University,8 Sukhanova St., 690950, Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Kotov, A.Yu. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics,25 B. Cheremushkinskaya St., 117218, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-04-18

    In this paper we study the SU(3)-gluodynamics shear viscosity temperature dependence on the lattice. To do so, we measure the correlation functions of the energy-momentum tensor in the range of temperatures T/T{sub c}∈[0.9,1.5]. To extract the shear viscosity we used two approaches. The first one is to fit the lattice data with a physically motivated ansatz for the spectral function with unknown parameters and then determine the shear viscosity. The second approach is to apply the Backus-Gilbert method allowing to extract the shear viscosity from the lattice data nonparametrically. The results obtained within both approaches agree with each other. Our results allow us to conclude that within the range T/T{sub c}∈[0.9,1.5] the SU(3)-gluodynamics reveals the properties of a strongly interacting system, which cannot be described perturbatively, and has the ratio η/s close to the value 1/4π of the N=4 Supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory.

  2. Temperature dependence of shear viscosity of SU(3)-gluodynamics within lattice simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrakhantsev, N. Yu.; Braguta, V. V.; Kotov, A. Yu.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper we study the SU(3)-gluodynamics shear viscosity temperature dependence on the lattice. To do so, we measure the correlation functions of the energy-momentum tensor in the range of temperatures T /T c ∈ [0 .9 , 1 .5]. To extract the shear viscosity we used two approaches. The first one is to fit the lattice data with a physically motivated ansatz for the spectral function with unknown parameters and then determine the shear viscosity. The second approach is to apply the Backus-Gilbert method allowing to extract the shear viscosity from the lattice data nonparametrically. The results obtained within both approaches agree with each other. Our results allow us to conclude that within the range T /T c ∈ [0 .9 , 1 .5] the SU(3)-gluodynamics reveals the properties of a strongly interacting system, which cannot be described perturbatively, and has the ratio η/s close to the value 1 /4 π of the N = 4 Supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory.

  3. Multiple sweet receptors and transduction pathways revealed in knockout mice by temperature dependence and gurmarin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkuri, Tadahiro; Yasumatsu, Keiko; Horio, Nao; Jyotaki, Masafumi; Margolskee, Robert F; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2009-04-01

    Sweet taste transduction involves taste receptor type 1, member 2 (T1R2), taste receptor type 1, member 3 (T1R3), gustducin, and TRPM5. Because knockout (KO) mice lacking T1R3, gustducin's Galpha subunit (Galphagust), or TRPM5 exhibited greatly reduced, but not abolished responses of the chorda tympani (CT) nerve to sweet compounds, it is likely that multiple sweet transduction pathways exist. That gurmarin (Gur), a sweet taste inhibitor, inhibits some but not all mouse CT responses to sweet compounds supports the existence of multiple sweet pathways. Here, we investigated Gur inhibition of CT responses to sweet compounds as a function of temperature in KO mice lacking T1R3, Galphagust, or TRPM5. In T1R3-KO mice, responses to sucrose and glucose were Gur sensitive (GS) and displayed a temperature-dependent increase (TDI). In Galphagust-KO mice, responses to sucrose and glucose were Gur-insensitive (GI) and showed a TDI. In TRPM5-KO mice, responses to glucose were GS and showed a TDI. All three KO mice exhibited no detectable responses to SC45647, and their responses to saccharin displayed neither GS nor a TDI. For all three KO mice, the lingual application of pronase, another sweet response inhibitor, almost fully abolished responses to sucrose and glucose but did not affect responses to saccharin. These results provide evidence for 1) the existence of multiple transduction pathways underlying responses to sugars: a T1R3-independent GS pathway for sucrose and glucose, and a TRPM5-independent temperature sensitive GS pathway for glucose; 2) the requirement for Galphagust in GS sweet taste responses; and 3) the existence of a sweet independent pathway for saccharin, in mouse taste cells on the anterior tongue.

  4. GISS GCMAM Modeled Climate Responses to Total and Spectral Solar Forcing on Decadal and Centennial Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, G.; Cahalan, R. F.; Rind, D. H.; Jonas, J.; Pilewskie, P.; Harder, J. W.; Krivova, N.

    2014-12-01

    We examine the influence of the SORCE (Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment) SIM (Spectral Irradiance Monitor) observed spectral solar irradiance (SSI) variations on Earth's climate. We apply two reconstructed spectral solar forcing scenarios, one SIM based, the other based on the SATIRE (Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction) model, as inputs to the GISS (Goddard Institute for Space Studies) GCMAM (Global Climate Middle Atmosphere Model) to examine the climate responses on decadal and centennial time scales. We show that the atmosphere has different temperature, ozone, and dynamic responses to the two solar spectral forcing scenarios, even when the variations in TSI (Total Solar Irradiance) are the same. We find that solar variations under either scenario contribute a small fraction of the observed temperature increase since the industrial revolution. The trend of global averaged surface air temperature response to the SIM-based solar forcing is 0.02 °C/century, about half of the temperature trend to the SATIRE-based SSI. However the temporal variation of the surface air temperature for the SIM-based solar forcing scenario is much larger compared to its SATIRE counterpart. Further research is required to examine TSI and SSI variations in the ascending phase of solar cycle 24, to assess their implications for the solar influence on climate.

  5. Temperature dependence of electromechanical properties of PLZT x ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    temperature much lower than the ferroelectric to paraelectric phase transition of the material. The same behaviour is observed for the overtones also. However, the piezoelectric response of the overtones disappears at a lower temperature than the fundamental mode. The quantity, Δfps, depends on the electromechanical.

  6. Temperature dependence of electromechanical properties of PLZT x ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    behaviour is observed for the overtones also. However, the piezoelectric response of the overtones disappears at a lower temperature than the fundamental mode. The quantity, Δfps, depends on the electromechanical coupling coefficient as well as geometry of the piezo- ceramic material (Jaffe et al 1971). The behaviour of ...

  7. Temperature dependence of lattice parameter of (Ga,Mn)As on GaAs substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukura, Fumihiro; Ohno, Hideo

    2015-09-01

    We measure the temperature dependence of the lattice parameter of (Ga,Mn)As by X-ray diffraction. The result shows that the lattice parameter of (Ga,Mn)As shows similar temperature dependence to that of GaAs, and no obvious change is observed in the vicinity of its Curie temperature.

  8. Temperature dependence of plankton community metabolism in the subtropical and tropical oceans

    KAUST Repository

    Garcia-Corral, Lara S.

    2017-06-22

    Here we assess the temperature dependence of the metabolic rates (gross primary production (GPP), community respiration (CR), and the ratio GPP/CR) of oceanic plankton communities. We compile data from 133 stations of the Malaspina 2010 Expedition, distributed among the subtropical and tropical Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian oceans. We used the in vitro technique to measured metabolic rates during 24 h incubations at three different sampled depths: surface, 20%, and 1% of the photosynthetically active radiation measured at surface. We also measured the % of ultraviolet B radiation (UVB) penetrating at surface waters. GPP and CR rates increased with warming, albeit different responses were observed for each sampled depth. The overall GPP/CR ratio declined with warming. Higher activation energies (E-a) were derived for both processes (GPP(Chla) = 0.97; CRChla = 1.26; CRHPA = 0.95 eV) compared to those previously reported. The Indian Ocean showed the highest E-a (GPP(Chla) = 1.70; CRChla = 1.48; CRHPA = 0.57 eV), while the Atlantic Ocean showed the lowest (GPP(Chla) = 0.86; CRChla = 0.77; CRHPA = -0.13 eV). We believe that the difference between previous assessments and the ones presented here can be explained by the overrepresentation of Atlantic communities in the previous data sets. We found that UVB radiation also affects the temperature dependence of surface GPP, which decreased rather than increased under high levels of UVB. Ocean warming, which causes stratification and oligotrophication of the subtropical and tropical oceans, may lead to reduced surface GPP as a result of increased penetration of UVB radiation.

  9. Determination of the electron-hole pair creation energy for semiconductors from the spectral responsivity of photodiodes

    CERN Document Server

    Scholze, F; Kuschnerus, P; Rabus, H; Richter, M; Ulm, G

    2000-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can be detected by the measurement of the charge carriers produced in a detector. The improved semiconductor technology now allows detectors operating near the physical limits of the detector materials to be designed. The mean energy required for producing an electron-hole pair, W, is a material property of the semiconductor. Here, the determination of W from the spectral responsivity of photodiodes is demonstrated. Using spectrally dispersed synchrotron radiation, different types of semiconductor photodiodes have been examined in the UV-, VUV-, and soft X-ray spectral range. Their spectral responsivity was determined with relative uncertainties between 0.4% and 1% using a cryogenic electrical-substitution radiometer as primary detector standard. Results are presented for silicon n-on-p junction photodiodes and for GaAsP/Au Schottky diodes at room temperature. The investigations for silicon covered the complete spectral range from 3 to 1500 eV, yielding a constant value W=(3.66+-0.03) eV fo...

  10. Temperature-dependent structural changes in intrinsically disordered proteins: formation of alpha-helices or loss of polyproline II?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Magnus; Nørholm, Ann-Beth; Hendus-Altenburger, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    temperature, which most likely reflects formation of transient alpha-helices or loss of polyproline II (PPII) content. Using three IDPs, ACTR, NHE1, and Spd1, we show that the temperature-induced structural change is common among IDPs and is accompanied by a contraction of the conformational ensemble...... with increasing temperature, and accordingly these were not responsible for the change in the CD spectra. In contrast, the nonhelical regions exhibited a general temperature-dependent structural change that was independent of long-range interactions. The temperature-dependent CD spectroscopic signature of IDPs...... that has been amply documented can be rationalized to represent redistribution of the statistical coil involving a general loss of PPII conformations....

  11. Effect of combined platinum and electron on the temperature dependence of forward voltage in fast recovery diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Yun-Peng; Zhao Bao; Wu Yu; Zhou Xuan; Li Zhe; Tan Jian; Yang Fei

    2015-01-01

    The temperature dependences of forward voltage drop (V F ) of the fast recovery diodes (FRDs) are remarkably influenced by different lifetime controlled treatments. In this paper the results of an experimental study are presented, which are the lifetime controls of platinum treatment, electron irradiation treatment, and the combined treatment of the above ones. Based on deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements, a new level E6 (E C -0.376 eV) is found in the combined lifetime treated (CLT) sample, which is different from the levels of the individual platinum and electron irradiation ones. Comparing the tested V F results of CLT samples with the others, the level E6 is responsible for the degradation of temperature dependence of the forward voltage drop in the FRD. (paper)

  12. On the detection and monitoring of reduced water content in plants using spectral responses in the visible domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranoski, Gladimir V. G.; Van Leeuwen, Spencer; Chen, Tenn F.

    2016-05-01

    The water status of cultivated plants can have a significant impact not only on food production, but also on the appropriate usage of increasingly scarce freshwater supplies. Accordingly, the cost-effective detection and monitoring of changes in their water content are longstanding remote sensing goals. Existing procedures employed to achieve these goals are largely based on the spectral responses of plant leaves in the infrared domain where the light absorption within the foliar tissues is dominated by water. Recently, it has been suggested that such procedures could be implemented using spectral responses, more specifically spectral subsurface reflectance to transmittance ratios, obtained in the visible domain. The basis for this proposition resides on the premise that a reduced water content (RWC) can result in histological changes whose effects on the foliar optical properties may not be limited to the infrared domain. However, the experiments leading to this proposition were performed on detached leaves, which were not influenced by the whole plant's adaptation mechanisms to water stress. In this work, we investigate whether the spectral responses of living plant leaves in the visible domain can lead to reliable RWC estimations. We employ measured biophysical data and predictive light transport simulations in order to extend qualitatively and quantitatively the scope of previous studies in this area. Our findings indicate that the living specimens' physiological responses to water stress should be taken into account in the design of new procedures for the cost-effective RWC estimation using visible subsurface reflectance to transmittance ratios.

  13. Eddy covariance measurements with a new fast-response, enclosed-path analyzer: Spectral characteristics and cross-system comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. Novick; J. Walker; W.S. Chan; A. Schmidt; C. Sobek; J.M. Vose

    2013-01-01

    A new class of enclosed path gas analyzers suitable for eddy covariance applications combines the advantages of traditional closed-path systems (small density corrections, good performance in poor weather) and open-path systems (good spectral response, low power requirements), and permits estimates of instantaneous gas mixing ratio. Here, the extent to which these...

  14. Effect of surface cleaning on spectral response for InGaAs photocathodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Muchun; Zhang, Yijun; Chen, Xinlong; Hao, Guanghui; Chang, Benkang; Shi, Feng

    2015-12-20

    Photocathode surface treatment aims to obtain high sensitivity, where the key point is to acquire an atomically clean surface. Various surface cleaning methods for removing contamination from InGaAs photocathode surfaces were investigated. The atomic compositions of InGaAs photocathode structures and surfaces were measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Ar ion sputtering. After surface cleaning, the InGaAs surface is arsenoxide-free, however, a small amount of Ga2O3 and In2O3 still can be found. The 1:1 mixed solution of hydrochloric acid to deionized water followed by thermal annealing at 525°C has been demonstrated to be the best choice in dealing with the surface oxides. After the Cs/O activation, a surface model was proposed where the oxides on the surface will lead to a positive electron affinity, adversely affecting low-energy electrons escaping to the vacuum, which is reflected by the photocurrent curves and the spectral response curves.

  15. Metal-organic semiconductor interfacial barrier height determination from internal photoemission signal in spectral response measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Iyer, S. Sundar Kumar

    2017-04-01

    Accurate and convenient evaluation methods of the interfacial barrier ϕb for charge carriers in metal semiconductor (MS) junctions are important for designing and building better opto-electronic devices. This becomes more critical for organic semiconductor devices where a plethora of molecules are in use and standardised models applicable to myriads of material combinations for the different devices may have limited applicability. In this paper, internal photoemission (IPE) from spectral response (SR) in the ultra-violet to near infra-red range of different MS junctions of metal-organic semiconductor-metal (MSM) test structures is used to determine more realistic MS ϕb values. The representative organic semiconductor considered is [6, 6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester, and the metals considered are Al and Au. The IPE signals in the SR measurement of the MSM device are identified and separated before it is analysed to estimate ϕb for the MS junction. The analysis of IPE signals under different bias conditions allows the evaluation of ϕb for both the front and back junctions, as well as for symmetric MSM devices.

  16. Temperature Dependent Cyclic Deformation Mechanisms in Haynes 188 Superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, K. Bhanu Sankara; Castelli, Michael G.; Allen, Gorden P.; Ellis, John R.

    1995-01-01

    The cyclic deformation behavior of a wrought cobalt-base superalloy, Haynes 188, has been investigated over a range of temperatures between 25 and 1000 C under isothermal and in-phase thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) conditions. Constant mechanical strain rates (epsilon-dot) of 10(exp -3)/s and 10(exp -4)/s were examined with a fully reversed strain range of 0.8%. Particular attention was given to the effects of dynamic strain aging (DSA) on the stress-strain response and low cycle fatigue life. A correlation between cyclic deformation behavior and microstructural substructure was made through detailed transmission electron microscopy. Although DSA was found to occur over a wide temperature range between approximately 300 and 750 C the microstructural characteristics and the deformation mechanisms responsible for DSA varied considerably and were dependent upon temperature. In general, the operation of DSA processes led to a maximum of the cyclic stress amplitude at 650 C and was accompanied by pronounced planar slip, relatively high dislocation density, and the generation of stacking faults. DSA was evidenced through a combination of phenomena, including serrated yielding, an inverse dependence of the maximum cyclic hardening with epsilon-dot, and an instantaneous inverse epsilon-dot sensitivity verified by specialized epsilon-dot -change tests. The TMF cyclic hardening behavior of the alloy appeared to be dictated by the substructural changes occuring at the maximum temperature in the TMF cycle.

  17. Frequency and temperature dependence of high damping elastomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulak, R.F.; Hughes, T.H.

    1993-01-01

    High damping steel-laminated elastomeric seismic isolation bearings are one of the preferred devices for isolating large buildings and structures. In the US, the current reference design for the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) uses laminated bearings for seismic isolation. These bearings are constructed from alternating layers of high damping rubber and steel plates. They are typically designed for shear strains between 50 and 100% and are expected to sustain two to three times these levels for beyond design basis loading conditions. Elastomeric bearings are currently designed to provide a system frequency between 0.4 and 0.8 Hz and expected to operate between -20 and 40 degrees Centigrade. To assure proper performance of isolation bearings, it is necessary to characterize the elastomer's response under expected variations of frequency and temperature. The dynamic response of the elastomer must be characterized within the frequency range that spans the bearing acceptance test frequency, which may be as low as 0.005 Hz, and the design frequency. Similarly, the variation in mechanical characteristics of the elastomer must be determined over the design temperature range, which is between -20 and 40 degrees Centigrade. This paper reports on (1) the capabilities of a testing facility at ANL for testing candidate elastomers, (2) the variation with frequency and temperature of the stiffness and damping of one candidate elastomer, and (3) the effect of these variations on bearing acceptance testing criteria and on the choice of bearing design values for stiffness and damping

  18. Frequency and temperature dependence of high damping elastomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulak, R.F.; Hughes, T.H.

    1993-08-01

    High damping steel-laminated elastomeric seismic isolation bearings are one of the preferred devices for isolating large buildings and structures. In the US, the current reference design for the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) uses laminated bearings for seismic isolation. These bearings are constructed from alternating layers of high damping rubber and steel plates. They are typically designed for shear strains between 50 and 100% and are expected to sustain two to three times these levels for beyond design basis loading conditions. Elastomeric bearings are currently designed to provide a system frequency between 0.4 and 0.8 Hz and expected to operate between {minus}20 and 40 degrees Centigrade. To assure proper performance of isolation bearings, it is necessary to characterize the elastomer`s response under expected variations of frequency and temperature. The dynamic response of the elastomer must be characterized within the frequency range that spans the bearing acceptance test frequency, which may be as low as 0.005 Hz, and the design frequency. Similarly, the variation in mechanical characteristics of the elastomer must be determined over the design temperature range, which is between {minus}20 and 40 degrees Centigrade. This paper reports on (1) the capabilities of a testing facility at ANL for testing candidate elastomers, (2) the variation with frequency and temperature of the stiffness and damping of one candidate elastomer, and (3) the effect of these variations on bearing acceptance testing criteria and on the choice of bearing design values for stiffness and damping.

  19. A standard comparison of spectral properties and energy response for a number of ultraviolet dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu Kassem, I.; Bero, M.

    2013-09-01

    The radio-chromic chemical radiation dosimeters are materials that change their optical properties (Spectrique optical absorbance and optical density) due to radiation absorption. These detectors are used for dose measurements of ionizing radiation (γ and X-rays). It was established that these detectors could be used for ultraviolet radiation dose measurements. So, the aim of this work is to study and compare the metrological properties of two radiation chemical detectors, FXG gel and EBT2 Gafchromic film. The FXG gel is prepared directly at laboratory but EBT2 gafchromic film is a self developed radiation sensible film which is available as commercial product. This work focuses on realizing a comparison study between FXG and EBT2 detector metrological properties. It consists of studying optical and spectral properties of the detectors responsivity, radiation and temporal stability, linearity and total detected dose level. The results showed that the studied detectors present a very good responsivity to UVA radiation, high stability in optical absorbance under UVA radiation and good linearity over wide radiation level which contains the solar UVA radiation level reaching the earth surface. But, the EBT2 film presents two time higher total detection dose level than FXG gel, moreover, due to the simplicity of use, it was possible to test the use of EBT2 film for direct solar UVA radiation measurement. The two studied chemical detector (FXG gel and EBT2 film) provide a direct second order mathematical relation between the applied radiation dose and the optical absorbance changes with a very good approximation and suitable uncertainty (Measurement results relative dispersion is about 5%). It is possible to study the EBT2 film optical density variation as a function of UVA dose using directly a portable densitometer (author).

  20. Simulation and analysis of grating-integrated quantum dot infrared detectors for spectral response control and performance enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh Kim, Jun [Center for High Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States); Division of Industrial Metrology, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of); Ku, Zahyun; Urbas, Augustine, E-mail: youngchul.jun@inha.ac.kr, E-mail: Augustine.Urbas@wpafb.af.mil [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States); Krishna, Sanjay [Center for High Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States); Kang, Sang-Woo; Jun Lee, Sang [Division of Industrial Metrology, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of); Chul Jun, Young, E-mail: youngchul.jun@inha.ac.kr, E-mail: Augustine.Urbas@wpafb.af.mil [Department of Physics, Inha University, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-28

    We propose and analyze a novel detector structure for pixel-level multispectral infrared imaging. More specifically, we investigate the device performance of a grating-integrated quantum dots-in-a-well photodetector under backside illumination. Our design uses 1-dimensional grating patterns fabricated directly on a semiconductor contact layer and, thus, adds a minimal amount of additional effort to conventional detector fabrication flows. We show that we can gain wide-range control of spectral response as well as large overall detection enhancement by adjusting grating parameters. For small grating periods, the spectral responsivity gradually changes with parameters. We explain this spectral tuning using the Fabry–Perot resonance and effective medium theory. For larger grating periods, the responsivity spectra get complicated due to increased diffraction into the active region, but we find that we can obtain large enhancement of the overall detector performance. In our design, the spectral tuning range can be larger than 1 μm, and, compared to the unpatterned detector, the detection enhancement can be greater than 92% and 148% for parallel and perpendicular polarizations. Our work can pave the way for practical, easy-to-fabricate detectors, which are highly useful for many infrared imaging applications.

  1. Simulation for spectral response of solar-blind AlGaN based p-i-n photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Shiwei; Xu, Jintong; Li, Xiangyang

    2015-04-01

    In this article, we introduced how to build a physical model of refer to the device structure and parameters. Simulations for solar-blind AlGaN based p-i-n photodiodes spectral characteristics were conducted in use of Silvaco TCAD, where device structure and parameters are comprehensively considered. In simulation, the effects of polarization, Urbach tail, mobility, saturated velocities and lifetime in AlGaN device was considered. Especially, we focused on how the concentration-dependent Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) recombination model affects simulation results. By simulating, we analyzed the effects in spectral response caused by TAUN0 and TAUP0, and got the values of TAUN0 and TAUP0 which can bring a result coincides with test results. After that, we changed their values and made the simulation results especially the part under 255 nm performed better. In conclusion, the spectral response between 200 nm and 320 nm of solar-blind AlGaN based p-i-n photodiodes were simulated and compared with test results. We also found that TAUN0 and TAUP0 have a large impact on spectral response of AlGaN material.

  2. Temperature dependent Dielectric studies of Poly(Ethylene Oxide)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiva Kumar, B. P.; Gurumurthy, T. M.; Praveen, D.

    2018-02-01

    Polymers are known to be better materials for dielectric applications. Various polymers with different molecular weights are being studied for dielectric applications. In the present paper, we report the dielectric measurements of Poly(Ethylene Oxide) {PEO} using Impedance spectroscopy studies. The dielectric studies of PEO were carried out on pellets as a function of temperature. It was found that the dielectric constant seems to be negligibly varying with increase in temperature at high frequencies, however, at low frequencies, dielectric constant varies increases with temperature. This may be due to the fact that with the thermal energy provided to the system, more and more dipoles participate and hence the net dielectric constant of the material is also higher at higher temperature. Also at very high frequencies, due to many non-responsive dipoles for fast switching of the applied signal, net dielectric constant of the material also does vary much with temperatures.

  3. Temperature dependences of growth rates and carrying capacities of marine bacteria depart from metabolic theoretical predictions

    KAUST Repository

    Huete-Stauffer, Tamara Megan

    2015-09-11

    Using the metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) framework, we evaluated over a whole annual cycle the monthly responses to temperature of the growth rates (μ) and carrying capacities (K) of heterotrophic bacterioplankton at a temperate coastal site. We used experimental incubations spanning 6oC with bacterial physiological groups identified by flow cytometry according to membrane integrity (live), nucleic acid content (HNA and LNA) and respiratory activity (CTC+). The temperature dependence of μat the exponential phase of growth was summarized by the activation energy (E), which was variable (-0.52 to 0.72 eV) but followed a seasonal pattern, only reaching the hypothesized value for aerobic heterotrophs of 0.65 eV during the spring bloom for the most active bacterial groups (live, HNA, CTC+). K (i.e. maximum experimental abundance) peaked at 4 × 106 cells mL-1 and generally covaried with μbut, contrary to MTE predictions, it did not decrease consistently with temperature. In the case of live cells, the responses of μand K to temperature were positively correlated and related to seasonal changes in substrate availability, indicating that the responses of bacteria to warming are far from homogeneous and poorly explained by MTE at our site. © FEMS 2015.

  4. Spectral Imaging by Upconversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Pedersen, Christian; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We present a method to obtain spectrally resolved images using upconversion. By this method an image is spectrally shifted from one spectral region to another wavelength. Since the process is spectrally sensitive it allows for a tailored spectral response. We believe this will allow standard sili...... silicon based cameras designed for visible/near infrared radiation to be used for spectral images in the mid infrared. This can lead to much lower costs for such imaging devices, and a better performance.......We present a method to obtain spectrally resolved images using upconversion. By this method an image is spectrally shifted from one spectral region to another wavelength. Since the process is spectrally sensitive it allows for a tailored spectral response. We believe this will allow standard...

  5. Age Spreads and the Temperature Dependence of Age Estimates in Upper Sco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang Qiliang; Herczeg, Gregory J. [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Yiheyuan Lu 5, Haidian Qu, 100871 Beijing (China); Rizzuto, Aaron [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2017-06-20

    Past estimates for the age of the Upper Sco Association are typically 11–13 Myr for intermediate-mass stars and 4–5 Myr for low-mass stars. In this study, we simulate populations of young stars to investigate whether this apparent dependence of estimated age on spectral type may be explained by the star formation history of the association. Solar and intermediate mass stars begin their pre-main sequence evolution on the Hayashi track, with fully convective interiors and cool photospheres. Intermediate-mass stars quickly heat up and transition onto the radiative Henyey track. As a consequence, for clusters in which star formation occurs on a timescale similar to that of the transition from a convective to a radiative interior, discrepancies in ages will arise when ages are calculated as a function of temperature instead of mass. Simple simulations of a cluster with constant star formation over several Myr may explain about half of the difference in inferred ages versus photospheric temperature; speculative constructions that consist of a constant star formation followed by a large supernova-driven burst could fully explain the differences, including those between F and G stars where evolutionary tracks may be more accurate. The age spreads of low-mass stars predicted from these prescriptions for star formation are consistent with the observed luminosity spread of Upper Sco. The conclusion that a lengthy star formation history will yield a temperature dependence in ages is expected from the basic physics of pre-main sequence evolution, and is qualitatively robust to the large uncertainties in pre-main sequence evolutionary models.

  6. Temperature Dependences on Various Types of Photovoltaic (PV) Panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audwinto, I A; Leong, C S; Sopian, K; Zaidi, S H

    2015-01-01

    Temperature is one of the key roles in PV technology performance, since with the increases of temperature the open-circuit voltage will drop accordingly so do the electrical efficiency and power output generation. Different types of Photovoltaic (PV) panels- silicon solar panels and thin film solar panels; mono-crystalline, poly-crystalline, CIS, CIGS, CdTe, back-contact, and bi-facial solar panel under 40°C to 70°C approximately with 5°C interval have been comparatively analyzed their actual performances with uniformly distribution of light illumination from tungsten halogen light source, ±500W/m 2 . DC-Electronic Load and Data Logger devices with “Lab View” data program interface were used to collect all the necessary parameters in this study. Time needed to achieve a certain degree of temperature was recorded. Generally, each of the panels needed 15 minutes to 20 minutes to reach 70°C. Halogen based light source is not compatible in short wave-length in response to thin-film solar cell. Within this period of times, all the panels are facing a performance loss up to 15%. Other parameters; P max , V max , I max , V oc , I sc , R serries , R shunt , Fillfactor were collected as study cases. Our study is important in determining Photovoltaic type selection and system design as for study or industrial needed under different temperature condition. (paper)

  7. Temperature-dependent cross sections of O2-O2 collision-induced absorption resonances at 477 and 577nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sneep, Maarten; Ityaksov, Dmitry; Aben, Ilse; Linnartz, Harold; Ubachs, Wim

    2006-01-01

    Two collision-induced absorption features of oxygen have been investigated by means of the laser-based cavity ring-down technique at pressures between 0 and 1000hPa and at temperatures in the range 184-294K. Peak cross sections, resonance widths and integrated cross sections, as well as spectral profiles, have been determined for the broad O 2 -O 2 resonances centered at 477 and 577nm. Results are compared with previous measurements to establish an updated temperature dependence for the cross sections of both resonances, yielding integrated cross sections, that exhibit a minimum near 200K and that increase in a near-linear fashion in the atmospherically relevant range of 200-300K. A significant increase in the widths of the resonance profiles upon temperature increase is firmly established. Parameters and temperature-dependent trends for the shape and strengths of the resonances are produced, that can be implemented in cloud retrieval in atmospheric Earth observation

  8. Experimental and theoretical temperature dependences of the thermopower of Pb0.82Sn0.18Te

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meglei, D.; Alexeeva, S.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: The great interest in the study of properties of narrow-gap semiconductors and particularly lead telluride - tin telluride single crystals is attributed to wide possibilities of their practical use as detectors and radiation sources in the infrared spectral region, thermoelectric elements, strain gauges, etc. The scientific interest in these materials is primarily associated with their unusual galvanomagnetic, thermomagnetic, and magnetooptic properties. In this study, the temperature dependences of the thermopower of five samples of Pb 0.82 Sn 0.18 Te at different carrier concentrations (0.52 x 10 17 to 15 x 10 17 ) were analyzed. The results showed that the thermopower heavily depends on charge carrier concentration. At low concentrations of charge carriers, the temperature dependences of thermopower exhibit a nonmonotonic behavior and have a maximum. A two-band Gottwick model with a linear temperature term was used to interpret the experimental data. In this approximation, it is assumed that a Lorentz resonance takes place near the Fermi surface. This model makes it possible to determine the Fermi energy, as well as the position and width of the resonance, from experimental data.

  9. ddRADseq reveals determinants for temperature-dependent sex reversal in Nile tilapia on LG23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, Stephan; Krause, Ina; Floren, Claudia; Schütz, Ekkehard; Beck, Jule; Knorr, Christoph

    2017-07-14

    In Nile tilapia sex determination is governed by a male heterogametic system XX/XY either on LG1 or LG23. The latter carries a Y-specific duplicate of the amh gene, which is a testis-determining factor. Allelic variants in the amh gene demonstrated to be major triggers for autosomal and temperature-dependent sex reversal. Further, QTL on LG23 and LG20 show a temperature-responsiveness with influence on the phenotypic sex relative to the sex chromosomes. Here we present a ddRADseq based approach to identify genomic regions that show unusual large differentiation in terms of fixation index (F ST ) between temperature-treated pseudomales and non-masculinized females using a comparative genome-scan. Genome-wide associations were identified for the temperature-dependent sex using a genetically all-female population devoid of amh-ΔY. Twenty-two thousand three hundred ninety-two SNPs were interrogated for the comparison of temperature-treated pseudomales and females, which revealed the largest differentiation on LG23. Outlier F ST -values (0.35-0.44) were determined for six SNPs in the genomic interval (9,190,077-11,065,693) harbouring the amh gene (9,602,693-9,605,808), exceeding the genome-wide low F ST of 0.013. Association analysis with a set of 9104 selected SNPs confirmed that the same genomic region on LG23 exerts a significant effect on the temperature-dependent sex. This study highlights the role of LG23 in sex determination, harbouring major determinants for temperature-dependent sex reversal in Nile tilapia. Furthermore F ST outlier detection proves a powerful tool for detection of sex-determining regions in fish genomes.

  10. Temperature dependence of photoconductivity at 0.7 eV in single-wall carbon nanotube films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukitaka Matsuoka, Akihiko Fujiwara, Naoki Ogawa, Kenjiro Miyano, Hiromichi Kataura, Yutaka Maniwa, Shinzo Suzuki and Yohji Achiba

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Temperature dependence of photoconductivity has been investigated for single-wall carbon nanotube films at 0.7 eV. In order to clarify the effect of atmosphere on photoconductivity, measurements have been performed under helium and nitrogen gas flow in the temperature range from 10 K to room temperature (RT and from 100 K to RT, respectively. Photoconductive response monotonously increases with a decrease in temperature and tends to saturate around 10 K. No clear difference in photoconductive response under different atmosphere was observed. We discuss the mechanism of photoconductivity at 0.7 eV.

  11. The temperature dependence of pulse shape discrimination with NE213 scintillation counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galloway, R.B.; Sharaf, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the pulse shape discrimination between neutrons and gamma rays has been investigated for two scintillation counters using NE213 liquid scintillator. One counter used the zero cross-over timing technique of pulse shape discrimination and showed no significant temperature dependence over the range 35 to -8 0 C. The other used the space charge saturation technique of pulse shape discrimination and showed a marked temperature dependence. The findings are compared with previously published contradictory results. The influence of temperature on the gain of the detectors is found to be more important than the influence on the pulse shape discrimination. (orig.)

  12. Annealing temperature dependence of exchange bias in BiFeO3/CoFe bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, T.; Naganuma, H.; Wang, W. X.; Ando, Y.; Han, X. F.

    2012-04-01

    BiFeO3/CoFe bilayers with different BiFeO3 (BFO) crystalities were fabricated by chemical solution deposition and sputtering method. Exchange bias has been successfully induced in these bilayers by post-annealing. The annealing temperature dependence of exchange bias as well as coercivity was investigated. Two kinds of annealing temperature dependence behaviors were observed. It is found that, similar to the conventional antiferromagnet/ferromagnet system, the temperature dependence of exchange bias is dominated by direct interface coupling, and the crystality of BFO has no profound effect on exchange bias.

  13. Temperature-dependent phenotypic variation of Campylobacter jejuni lipooligosaccharides

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Semchenko, Evgeny A

    2010-11-30

    Abstract Background Campylobacter jejuni is a major bacterial cause of food-borne enteritis, and its lipooligosaccharide (LOS) plays an initiating role in the development of the autoimmune neuropathy, Guillain-Barré syndrome, by induction of anti-neural cross-reactive antibodies through ganglioside molecular mimicry. Results Herein we describe the existence and heterogeneity of multiple LOS forms in C. jejuni strains of human and chicken origin grown at 37°C and 42°C, respectively, as determined on sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide electrophoresis gels with carbohydrate-specific silver staining and blotting with anti-ganglioside ligands, and confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The C. jejuni NCTC 11168 original isolate (11168-O) was compared to its genome-sequenced variant (11168-GS), and both were found to have a lower-Mr LOS form, which was different in size and structure to the previously characterized higher-Mr form bearing GM1 mimicry. The lower-Mr form production was found to be dependent on the growth temperature as the production of this form increased from ~5%, observed at 37°C to ~35% at 42°C. The structure of the lower-Mr form contained a β-D-Gal-(1→3)-β-D-GalNAc disaccharide moiety which is consistent with the termini of the GM1, asialo-GM1, GD1, GT1 and GQ1 gangliosides, however, it did not display GM1 mimicry as assessed in blotting studies but was shown in NMR to resemble asialo-GM1. The production of multiple LOS forms and lack of GM1 mimicry was not a result of phase variation in the genes tested of NCTC 11168 and was also observed in most of the human and chicken isolates of C. jejuni tested. Conclusion The presence of differing amounts of LOS forms at 37 and 42°C, and the variety of forms observed in different strains, indicate that LOS form variation may play a role in an adaptive mechanism or a stress response of the bacterium during the colonization of different hosts.

  14. Temperature dependence of the electronic structure of La2CuO4 in the multielectron LDA+GTB approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarov, I. A.; Ovchinnikov, S. G.

    2015-01-01

    The band structure of La 2 CuO 4 in antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic phases is calculated at finite temperatures by the multielectron LDA+GTB method. The temperature dependence of the band spectrum and the spectral weight of Hubbard fermions is caused by a change in the occupation numbers of local multielectron spin-split terms in the antiferromagnetic phase. A decrease in the magnetization of the sublattice with temperature gives rise to new bands near the bottom of the conduction band and the top of the valence band. It is shown that the band gap decreases with increasing temperature, but La 2 CuO 4 remains an insulator in the paramagnetic phase as well. These results are consistent with measurements of the red shift of the absorption edge in La 2 CuO 4 with increasing temperature

  15. Temperature dependence of the cosphi conductance in Josephson tunnel junctions determined from plasma resonance experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, N.F.; Soerensen, O.H.; Mygind, J.

    1978-01-01

    The microwave response at 9 GHz of Sn-O-Sn tunnel-junction current biased at zero dc voltage has been measured just below the critical temperature T/sub c/ of the Sn films. The temperature dependence of the cosphi conductance is determined from the resonant response at the junction plasma frequency f/sub p/ as the temperature is decreased from T/sub c/. We used three different schemes for observation of the plasma oscillations: (a) second-harmonic generation (excitation at approx. 4.5 GHz, f/sub p/ approx. 4.5 GHz); (b) mixing (excitations at approx. 9 and approx. 18 GHz, f/sub p/ approx. 9 GHz); (c) parametric half-harmonic oscillation (excitation at approx. 18 GHz, f/sub p/ approx. 9 GHz). Measurements were possible in two temperature intervals; 0.994 or = T/T/sub c/ > or = 0.930, with the result that as the temperature was decreased the cosphi amplitude first increased from about zero to positive values and then at lower temperatures decreased approaching -1 at the lowest temperatures of the experiment

  16. Temperature dependent evolution of wrinkled single-crystal silicon ribbons on shape memory polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Yu, Kai; Qi, H Jerry; Xiao, Jianliang

    2017-10-25

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) can remember two or more distinct shapes, and thus can have a lot of potential applications. This paper presents combined experimental and theoretical studies on the wrinkling of single-crystal Si ribbons on SMPs and the temperature dependent evolution. Using the shape memory effect of heat responsive SMPs, this study provides a method to build wavy forms of single-crystal silicon thin films on top of SMP substrates. Silicon ribbons obtained from a Si-on-insulator (SOI) wafer are released and transferred onto the surface of programmed SMPs. Then such bilayer systems are recovered at different temperatures, yielding well-defined, wavy profiles of Si ribbons. The wavy profiles are shown to evolve with time, and the evolution behavior strongly depends on the recovery temperature. At relatively low recovery temperatures, both wrinkle wavelength and amplitude increase with time as evolution progresses. Finite element analysis (FEA) accounting for the thermomechanical behavior of SMPs is conducted to study the wrinkling of Si ribbons on SMPs, which shows good agreement with experiment. Merging of wrinkles is observed in FEA, which could explain the increase of wrinkle wavelength observed in the experiment. This study can have important implications for smart stretchable electronics, wrinkling mechanics, stimuli-responsive surface engineering, and advanced manufacturing.

  17. Microarray study of temperature-dependent sensitivity and selectivity of metal/oxide sensing interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiffany, Jason; Cavicchi, Richard E.; Semancik, Stephen

    2001-02-01

    Conductometric gas microsensors offer the benefits of ppm-level sensitivity, real-time data, simple interfacing to electronics hardware, and low power consumption. The type of device we have been exploring consists of a sensor film deposited on a "microhotplate"- a 100 micron platform with built-in heating (to activate reactions on the sensing surface) and thermometry. We have been using combinatorial studies of 36-element arrays to characterize the relationship between sensor film composition, operating temperature, and response, as measured by the device's sensitivity and selectivity. Gases that have been tested on these arrays include methanol, ethanol, dichloromethane, propane, methane, acetone, benzene, hydrogen, and carbon monoxide, and are of interest in the management of environmental waste sites. These experiments compare tin oxide films modified by catalyst overlayers, and ultrathin metal seed layers. The seed layers are used as part of a chemical vapor deposition process that uses each array element's microheater to activate the deposition of SnO2, and control its microstructure. Low coverage (20 Ê) catalytic metals (Pd, Cu, Cr, In, Au) are deposited on the oxides by masked evaporation or sputtering. This presentation demonstrates the value of an array-based approach for developing film processing methods, measuring performance characteristics, and establishing reproducibility. It also illustrates how temperature-dependent response data for varied metal/oxide compositions can be used to tailor a microsensor array for a given application.

  18. Temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy and mesoscale deformation in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoica, G. M.; Stoica, A. D.; Miller, M. K.; Ma, D.

    2014-10-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys are a new class of ultrafine-grained oxide dispersion-strengthened steels that have promising properties for service in extreme environments in future nuclear reactors. This is due to the remarkable stability of their complex microstructures containing numerous Y-Ti-O nanoclusters within grains and along grain boundaries. Although nanoclusters account primarily for the exceptional resistance to irradiation damage and high-temperature creep, little is known about the mechanical roles of the polycrystalline grains that constitute the ferritic matrix. Here we report an in situ mesoscale characterization of anisotropic responses of ultrafine ferrite grains to stresses using state-of-the-art neutron diffraction. We show the experimental determination of single-crystal elastic constants for a 14YWT alloy, and reveal a strong temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy that leads to elastic softening and instability of the ferrite. We also demonstrate, from anisotropy-induced intergranular strains, that a deformation crossover exists from low-temperature lattice hardening to high-temperature lattice softening in response to extensive plastic deformation.

  19. Temperature dependencies of Henry’s law constants for different plant sesquiterpenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copolovici, Lucian; Niinemets, Ülo

    2018-01-01

    Sesquiterpenes are plant-produced hydrocarbons with important ecological functions in plant-to-plant and plant-to-insect communication, but due to their high reactivity they can also play a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. So far, there is little information of gas/liquid phase partition coefficients (Henry’s law constants) and their temperature dependencies for sesquiterpenes, but this information is needed for quantitative simulation of the release of sesquiterpenes from plants and modeling atmospheric reactions in different phases. In this study, we estimated Henry’s law constants (Hpc) and their temperature responses for 12 key plant sesquiterpenes with varying structure (aliphatic, mono-, bi- and tricyclic sesquiterpenes). At 25 °C, Henry’s law constants varied 1.4-fold among different sesquiterpenes, and the values were within the range previously observed for monocyclic monoterpenes. Hpc of sesquiterpenes exhibited a high rate of increase, on average ca. 1.5-fold with a 10 °C increase in temperature (Q10). The values of Q10 varied 1.2-fold among different sesquiterpenes. Overall, these data demonstrate moderately high variation in Hpc values and Hpc temperature responses among different sesquiterpenes. We argue that these variations can importantly alter the emission kinetics of sesquiterpenes from plants. PMID:26291755

  20. Temperature-dependent innate defense against the common cold virus limits viral replication at warm temperature in mouse airway cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxman, Ellen F; Storer, James A; Fitzgerald, Megan E; Wasik, Bethany R; Hou, Lin; Zhao, Hongyu; Turner, Paul E; Pyle, Anna Marie; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2015-01-20

    Most isolates of human rhinovirus, the common cold virus, replicate more robustly at the cool temperatures found in the nasal cavity (33-35 °C) than at core body temperature (37 °C). To gain insight into the mechanism of temperature-dependent growth, we compared the transcriptional response of primary mouse airway epithelial cells infected with rhinovirus at 33 °C vs. 37 °C. Mouse airway cells infected with mouse-adapted rhinovirus 1B exhibited a striking enrichment in expression of antiviral defense response genes at 37 °C relative to 33 °C, which correlated with significantly higher expression levels of type I and type III IFN genes and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) at 37 °C. Temperature-dependent IFN induction in response to rhinovirus was dependent on the MAVS protein, a key signaling adaptor of the RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs). Stimulation of primary airway cells with the synthetic RLR ligand poly I:C led to greater IFN induction at 37 °C relative to 33 °C at early time points poststimulation and to a sustained increase in the induction of ISGs at 37 °C relative to 33 °C. Recombinant type I IFN also stimulated more robust induction of ISGs at 37 °C than at 33 °C. Genetic deficiency of MAVS or the type I IFN receptor in infected airway cells permitted higher levels of viral replication, particularly at 37 °C, and partially rescued the temperature-dependent growth phenotype. These findings demonstrate that in mouse airway cells, rhinovirus replicates preferentially at nasal cavity temperature due, in part, to a less efficient antiviral defense response of infected cells at cool temperature.

  1. A physical explanation of the temperature dependence of physiological processes mediated by cilia and flagella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    The majority of biological rates are known to exhibit temperature dependence. Here I reveal a direct link between temperature and ecologically relevant rates such as swimming speeds in Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukaryotes as well as fluid-pumping and filtration rates in many metazoans, and show that this relationship is driven by movement rates of cilia and flagella. I develop models of the temperature dependence of cilial and flagellar movement rates and evaluate these with an extensive compilation of data from the literature. The model captures the temperature dependence of viscosity and provides a mechanistic and biologically interpretable explanation for the temperature dependence of a range of ecologically relevant processes; it also reveals a clear dependence on both reaction rate-like processes and the physics of the environment. The incorporation of viscosity allows further insight into the effects of environmental temperature variation and of processes, such as disease, that affect the viscosity of blood or other body fluids. PMID:23959901

  2. Phonon effect on the temperature dependence of spin susceptibility and magnetization in metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D.J.; Tanaka, C.; Ukon, S.

    1985-06-01

    In many transition metals the paramagnetic spin susceptibility X increases with increasing temperature much beyond ordinary theories could account for. We demonstrate how the effect of the electron-phonon interactions enable us to understand such temperature dependence of X.

  3. Measurement of Linear Coefficient of Thermal Expansion and Temperature-Dependent Refractive Index Using Interferometric System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsetti, James A.; Green, William E.; Ellis, Jonathan D.; Schmidt, Greg R.; Moore, Duncan T.

    2017-01-01

    A system combining an interferometer with an environmental chamber for measuring both coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and temperature-dependent refractive index (dn/dT) simultaneously is presented. The operation and measurement results of this instrument are discussed.

  4. Molecular players involved in temperature-dependent sex determination and sex differentiation in Teleost fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that underlie sex determination and differentiation are conserved and diversified. In fish species, temperature-dependent sex determination and differentiation seem to be ubiquitous and molecular players involved in these mechanisms may be conserved. Although how the ambient temperature transduces signals to the undifferentiated gonads remains to be elucidated, the genes downstream in the sex differentiation pathway are shared between sex-determining mechanisms. In this paper, we review recent advances on the molecular players that participate in the sex determination and differentiation in fish species, by putting emphasis on temperature-dependent sex determination and differentiation, which include temperature-dependent sex determination and genetic sex determination plus temperature effects. Application of temperature-dependent sex differentiation in farmed fish and the consequences of temperature-induced sex reversal are discussed. PMID:24735220

  5. Climate responses to SATIRE and SIM-based spectral solar forcing in a 3D atmosphere-ocean coupled GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Guoyong; Cahalan, Robert F.; Rind, David; Jonas, Jeffrey; Pilewskie, Peter; Wu, Dong L.; Krivova, Natalie A.

    2017-03-01

    We apply two reconstructed spectral solar forcing scenarios, one SIM (Spectral Irradiance Monitor) based, the other the SATIRE (Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction) modeled, as inputs to the GISS (Goddard Institute for Space Studies) GCMAM (Global Climate Middle Atmosphere Model) to examine climate responses on decadal to centennial time scales, focusing on quantifying the difference of climate response between the two solar forcing scenarios. We run the GCMAM for about 400 years with present day trace gas and aerosol for the two solar forcing inputs. We find that the SIM-based solar forcing induces much larger long-term response and 11-year variation in global averaged stratospheric temperature and column ozone. We find significant decreasing trends of planetary albedo for both forcing scenarios in the 400-year model runs. However the mechanisms for the decrease are very different. For SATIRE solar forcing, the decreasing trend of planetary albedo is associated with changes in cloud cover. For SIM-based solar forcing, without significant change in cloud cover on centennial and longer time scales, the apparent decreasing trend of planetary albedo is mainly due to out-of-phase variation in shortwave radiative forcing proxy (downwelling flux for wavelength >330 nm) and total solar irradiance (TSI). From the Maunder Minimum to present, global averaged annual mean surface air temperature has a response of 0.1 °C to SATIRE solar forcing compared to 0.04 °C to SIM-based solar forcing. For 11-year solar cycle, the global surface air temperature response has 3-year lagged response to either forcing scenario. The global surface air 11-year temperature response to SATIRE forcing is about 0.12 °C, similar to recent multi-model estimates, and comparable to the observational-based evidence. However, the global surface air temperature response to 11-year SIM-based solar forcing is insignificant and inconsistent with observation-based evidence.

  6. Experimental determination of the temperature dependence of metallic work functions at low temperatures. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pipes, P.B.

    1977-01-01

    Progress made under ERDA Contract No. EY-76-S-02-2314.002 is described. Efforts to gain theoretical insight into the temperature dependence of the contact potential of Nb near the superconducting transition have only been qualitatively successful. Preliminary measurements of adsorbed 4 He gas on the temperature dependence of the contact potentials of metals were performed and compared with a previously developed theory

  7. Analysis of microwave heating of materials with temperature-dependent properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayappa, K.G.; Davis, H.T.; Davis, E.A.; Gordon, J.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper transient temperature profiles in multilayer slabs are predicted, by simultaneously solving Maxwell's equations with the heat conduction equation, using Galerkin-finite elements. It is assumed that the medium is homogeneous and has temperature-dependent dielectric and thermal properties. The method is illustrated with applications involving the heating of food and polymers with microwaves. The temperature dependence of dielectric properties affects the heating appreciably, as is shown by comparison with a constant property model

  8. Wide-range temperature dependences of Brillouin scattering properties in polymer optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakawa, Kazunari; Hayashi, Neisei; Shinohara, Yuri; Tahara, Masaki; Hosoda, Hideki; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the temperature dependences of the Brillouin scattering properties in a perfluorinated graded-index (PFGI-) polymer optical fiber (POF) in a wide temperature range from -160 to 125 °C. The temperature dependences of the Brillouin frequency shift, linewidth, and Stokes power are almost linear at lower temperature down to -160 °C while they show nonlinear dependences at higher temperature. These behaviors appear to originate from the partial glass transition of the polymer material.

  9. Temperature dependence of 1H NMR relaxation time, T2, for intact and neoplastic plant tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewa, Czesław J.; Lewa, Maria

    Temperature dependences of the spin-spin proton relaxation time, T2, have been shown for normal and tumorous tissues collected from kalus culture Nicotiana tabacum and from the plant Kalanchoe daigremontiana. For neoplastic plant tissues, time T2 was increased compared to that for intact plants, a finding similar to that for animal and human tissues. The temperature dependences obtained were compared to analogous relations observed with animal tissues.

  10. Effect of temperature-dependent energy-level shifts on a semiconductor's Peltier heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emin, D.

    1984-01-01

    The Peltier heat of a charge carrier in a semiconductor is calculated for the situation in which the electronic energy levels are temperature dependent. The temperature dependences of the electronic energy levels, generally observed optically, arise from their dependences on the vibrational energy of the lattice (e.g., as caused by thermal expansion). It has been suggested that these temperature dependences will typically have a major effect on the Peltier heat. The Peltier heat associated with a given energy level is a thermodynamic quantity; it is the product of the temperature and the change of the entropy of the system when a carrier is added in that level. As such, the energy levels cannot be treated as explicitly temperature dependent. The electron-lattice interaction causing the temperature dependence must be expressly considered. It is found that the carrier's interaction with the atomic vibrations lowers its electronic energy. However, the interaction of the carrier with the atomic vibrations also causes an infinitesimal lowering (approx.1/N) of each of the N vibrational frequencies. As a result, there is a finite carrier-induced increase in the average vibrational energy. Above the Debye temperature, this cancels the lowering of the carrier's electronic energy. Thus, the standard Peltier-heat formula, whose derivation generally ignores the temperature dependence of the electronic energy levels, is regained. This explains the apparent success of the standard formula in numerous analyses of electronic transport experiments

  11. Development of a very fast spectral response measurement system for analysis of hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells and modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodríguez, J.A.; Fortes, M.; Alberte, C.; Vetter, M.; Andreu, J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Spectral response equipment for measuring a-Si:H solar cells in a few seconds. ► Equipment based on 16 LEDs with simultaneous illumination of the solar cell. ► The current generated by each LED is analyzed by a Fast Fourier Transform. ► Cheap equipment without lock-in technology for the current measurement. ► Measurement error vs. conventional measurement less than 1% in J sc . - Abstract: An important requirement for a very fast spectral response measurement system is the simultaneous illumination of the solar cell at multiple well defined wavelengths. Nowadays this can be done by means of light emitting diodes (LEDs) available for a multitude of wavelengths. For the purpose to measure the spectral response (SR) of amorphous silicon solar cells a detailed characterization of LEDs emitting in the wavelength range from 300 nm to 800 nm was performed. In the here developed equipment the LED illumination is modulated in the frequency range from 100 Hz to 200 Hz and the current generated by each LED is analyzed by a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) to determine the current component corresponding to each wavelength. The equipment provides a signal to noise ratio of 2–4 orders of magnitude for individual wavelengths resulting in a precise measurement of the SR over the whole wavelength range. The difference of the short circuit current determined from the SR is less than 1% in comparison to a conventional system with monochromator.

  12. Temperature Dependence of the Thermal Conductivity of a Trapped Dipolar Bose-Condensed Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavari, H.

    2018-02-01

    The thermal conductivity of a trapped dipolar Bose condensed gas is calculated as a function of temperature in the framework of linear response theory. The contributions of the interactions between condensed and noncondensed atoms and between noncondensed atoms in the presence of both contact and dipole-dipole interactions are taken into account to the thermal relaxation time, by evaluating the self-energies of the system in the Beliaev approximation. We will show that above the Bose-Einstein condensation temperature ( T > T BEC ) in the absence of dipole-dipole interaction, the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity reduces to that of an ideal Bose gas. In a trapped Bose-condensed gas for temperature interval k B T > k B T, since the relaxation rate {τ}_{c12}^{-1} is independent of temperature and the relaxation rate due to dipolar interaction goes to zero exponentially, the T 2 temperature behavior for the thermal conductivity comes from the thermal mean velocity of the particles. We will also show that in the high-temperature limit ( k B T > n 0 g B ) and low momenta, the relaxation rates {τ}_{c12}^{-1} and {τ}_{dd12}^{-1} change linearly with temperature for both dipolar and contact interactions and the thermal conductivity scales linearly with temperature.

  13. Temperature dependence and interferences of NO and N₂O microelectrodes used in wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenni, Sarina; Mohn, Joachim; Emmenegger, Lukas; Udert, Kai M

    2012-02-21

    Electrodes for nitric and nitrous oxide have been on the market for some time, but have not yet been tested for an application in wastewater treatment processes. Both sensors were therefore assessed with respect to their (non)linear response, temperature dependence and potential cross sensitivity to dissolved compounds, which are present and highly dynamic in nitrogen conversion processes (nitric oxide, nitrous oxide, nitrogen dioxide, ammonia, hydrazine, hydroxylamine, nitrous acid, oxygen, and carbon dioxide). Off-gas measurements were employed to differentiate between cross sensitivity to interfering components and chemical nitric oxide or nitrous oxide production. Significant cross sensitivities were detected for both sensors: by the nitrous oxide sensor to nitric oxide and by the nitric oxide sensor to ammonia, hydrazine, hydroxylamine and nitrous acid. These interferences could, however, be removed by correction functions. Temperature fluctuations in the range of ±1 °C lead to artifacts of ±3.5% for the nitric oxide and ±3.9% for the nitrous oxide sensor and can be corrected with exponential equations. The results from this study help to significantly shorten and optimize the determination of the correction functions and are therefore relevant for all users of nitric and nitrous oxide electrodes.

  14. Viscous heating in fluids with temperature-dependent viscosity: implications for magma flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Costa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Viscous heating plays an important role in the dynamics of fluids with strongly temperature-dependent viscosity because of the coupling between the energy and momentum equations. The heat generated by viscous friction produces a local temperature increase near the tube walls with a consequent decrease of the viscosity which may dramatically change the temperature and velocity profiles. These processes are mainly controlled by the Peclét number, the Nahme number, the flow rate and the thermal boundary conditions. The problem of viscous heating in fluids was investigated in the past for its practical interest in the polymer industry, and was invoked to explain some rheological behaviours of silicate melts, but was not completely applied to study magma flows. In this paper we focus on the thermal and mechanical effects caused by viscous heating in tubes of finite lengths. We find that in magma flows at high Nahme number and typical flow rates, viscous heating is responsible for the evolution from Poiseuille flow, with a uniform temperature distribution at the inlet, to a plug flow with a hotter layer near the walls. When the temperature gradients  induced by viscous heating are very pronounced, local instabilities may occur and the triggering of secondary flows is possible. For completeness, this paper also describes magma flow in infinitely long tubes both at steady state and in transient phase.

  15. Temperature-dependent morphology of hybrid nanoflowers from elastin-like polypeptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koushik Ghosh

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We report a method for creating hybrid organic-inorganic “nanoflowers” using calcium or copper ions as the inorganic component and a recombinantly expressed elastin-like polypeptide (ELP as the organic component. Polypeptides provide binding sites for the dynamic coordination with metal ions, and then such noncovalent complexes become nucleation sites for primary crystals of metal phosphates. We have shown that the interaction between the stimuli-responsive ELP and Ca2+ or Cu2+, in the presence of phosphate, leads to the growth of micrometer-sized particles featuring nanoscale patterns shaped like flower petals. The morphology of these flower-like composite structures is dependent upon the temperature of growth and has been characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The composition of nanoflowers has also been analyzed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The temperature-dependent morphologies of these hybrid nanostructures, which arise from the controllable phase transition of ELPs, hold potential for morphological control of biomaterials in emerging applications such as tissue engineering and biocatalysis.

  16. Temperature-dependent morphology of hybrid nanoflowers from elastin-like polypeptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Koushik; Balog, Eva Rose M.; Sista, Prakash; Williams, Darrick J.; Martinez, Jennifer S., E-mail: jenm@lanl.gov, E-mail: rcrocha@lanl.gov; Rocha, Reginaldo C., E-mail: jenm@lanl.gov, E-mail: rcrocha@lanl.gov [Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Materials Physics and Applications Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Kelly, Daniel [Chemistry Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-02-01

    We report a method for creating hybrid organic-inorganic “nanoflowers” using calcium or copper ions as the inorganic component and a recombinantly expressed elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) as the organic component. Polypeptides provide binding sites for the dynamic coordination with metal ions, and then such noncovalent complexes become nucleation sites for primary crystals of metal phosphates. We have shown that the interaction between the stimuli-responsive ELP and Ca{sup 2+} or Cu{sup 2+}, in the presence of phosphate, leads to the growth of micrometer-sized particles featuring nanoscale patterns shaped like flower petals. The morphology of these flower-like composite structures is dependent upon the temperature of growth and has been characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The composition of nanoflowers has also been analyzed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The temperature-dependent morphologies of these hybrid nanostructures, which arise from the controllable phase transition of ELPs, hold potential for morphological control of biomaterials in emerging applications such as tissue engineering and biocatalysis.

  17. Temperature-Dependent Expression of NodC and Community Structure of Soybean-Nodulating Bradyrhizobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiro, Sokichi; Kuranaga, Chika; Yamamoto, Akihiro; Sameshima-Saito, Reiko; Saeki, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    In order to assess the physiological responses of bradyrhizobia and competition for the nodulation of soybean at different temperatures, we investigated the expression of the nodC gene at 20, 25, and 30°C and the abilities of bacteria to nodulate soybean in microcosms at day/night cultivation temperatures of 23/18°C, 28/23°C, and 33/28°C for 16/8 h. We tested five Bradyrhizobium USDA strains: B. diazoefficiens USDA 110(T) and 122, B. japonicum USDA 123, and B. elkanii USDA 31 and 76(T). The expression of nodC was up-regulated by increasing culture temperatures in USDA 110(T), 122, 31, and 76(T), but was down-regulated in USDA 123. The proportions of USDA 110(T) and 122 within the community were the greatest at 28/23°C. The population of USDA 31 increased, whereas that of USDA 123 decreased with increasing cultivation temperatures. On the other hand, infection by USDA 76(T) was not detected, and low numbers of USDA 76(T) nodules confirmed its poor nodulation ability. These results indicate that the competitiveness of and infection by USDA 110(T), 122, 123, and 31 for soybean nodulation depend on cultivation temperatures, and suggest that the temperature dependence of nodC expression affects the bradyrhizobial community structure.

  18. Temperature-dependent plastic hysteresis in highly confined polycrystalline Nb films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waheed, S.; Hao, R.; Zheng, Z.; Wheeler, J. M.; Michler, J.; Balint, D. S.; Giuliani, F.

    2018-02-01

    In this study, the effect of temperature on the cyclic deformation behaviour of a confined polycrystalline Nb film is investigated. Micropillars encapsulating a thin niobium interlayer are deformed under cyclic axial compression at different test temperatures. A distinct plastic hysteresis is observed for samples tested at elevated temperatures, whereas negligible plastic hysteresis is observed for samples tested at room temperature. These results are interpreted using planar discrete dislocation plasticity incorporating slip transmission across grain boundaries. The effect of temperature-dependent grain boundary energy and dislocation mobility on dislocation penetration and, consequently, the size of plastic hysteresis is simulated to correlate with the experimental results. It is found that the decrease in grain boundary energy barrier caused by the increase in temperature does not lead to any appreciable change in the cyclic response. However, dislocation mobility significantly affects the size of plastic hysteresis, with high mobilities leading to a larger hysteresis. Therefore, it is postulated that the experimental observations are predominantly caused by an increase in dislocation mobility as the temperature is increased above the critical temperature of body-centred cubic niobium.

  19. Extracting the noise spectral densities parameters of JFET transistor by modeling a nuclear electronics channel response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assaf, J.

    2009-07-01

    Mathematical model for the RMS noise of JFET transistor has been realized. Fitting the model according to the experimental results gives the noise spectral densities values. Best fitting was for the model of three noise sources and real preamplifier transfer function. After gamma irradiation, an additional and important noise sources appeared and two point defects are estimated through the fitting process. (author)

  20. Evaluating the response of gastric carcinomas to neoadjuvant chemotherapy using iodine concentration on spectral CT: a comparison with pathological regression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, L.; Li, Z.-Y.; Li, Z.-W.; Zhang, X.-P.; Li, Y.-L.; Li, X.-T.; Wang, Z.-L.; Ji, J.-F.; Sun, Y.-S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the potential of iodine concentration (IC) determined using virtual monochromatic spectral computed tomography (CT) to predict the response of gastric carcinomas to preoperative neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NC). Materials and methods: A total of 20 patients were enrolled who underwent two spectral CT examinations (1 week before and two cycles after NC). The percentage change in tumour thickness (%ΔCWT) and in IC on the arterial phase (%ΔIC-a) and venous phase (%ΔIC-v) after NC were calculated and compared for different histopathological regression grades and response groups. The diagnostic efficacies to discriminate good response (GR) and poor response (PR) of the above three parameters were evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Results: The decrease rate of %ΔIC-a for the GR group was higher than that for the PR group (−0.59 [−0.76, −0.20] versus −0.11 [−0.75, 0.92], p=0.012). There was no significant difference in the %ΔIC-v and %ΔCWT values between the GR and PR groups (p=0.076 and p=0.779, respectively). The areas under the ROC curve (AUC) values were 0.857, 0.762, and 0.542 for %ΔIC-a, %ΔIC-v, and %ΔCWT, respectively, in the response prediction. The cut-off value for identifying PR was a decrease rate of <52.9% for %ΔIC-a, and the sensitivity and specificity values were 0.857 and 0.833. Conclusion: Changes in the IC for gastric carcinomas following NC were detected using spectral CT and correlated with histopathological regression. The prediction efficacy for IC was better than that for tumour thickness, with IC on the arterial phase being a better predictor than IC on the venous phase. - Highlights: • Spectral CT detected the change of IC of gastric carcinomas to NC. • The change of IC had correlation with pathological regression grades. • The response prediction efficacy of IC was better than tumor size. • The response prediction ability of IC on arterial phase was superior to venous

  1. SENSITIVITY TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE RESEARCH OF TV-CAMERAS BASED ON SILICON MATRIXES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey N. Starchenko

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research. The research is dedicated to the analysis of sensitivity change patterns of the cameras based on silicon CMOS-matrixes in various ambient temperatures. This information is necessary for the correct camera application for photometric measurements in-situ. The paper deals with studies of sensitivity variations of two digital cameras with different silicon CMOS matrixes in visible and near IR regions of the spectrum at temperature change. Method. Due to practical restrictions the temperature changes were recorded in separate spectral intervals important for practical use of the cameras. The experiments were carried out with the use of a climatic chamber, providing change and keeping the temperature range from minus 40 to plus 50 °C at a pitch of 10 о С. Two cameras were chosen for research: VAC-135-IP with OmniVision OV9121 matrix and VAC-248-IP with OnSemiconductor VITA2000 matrix. The two tested devices were placed in a climatic chamber at the same time and illuminated by one radiation source with a color temperature about 3000 K in order to eliminate a number of methodological errors. Main Results. The temperature dependence of the signals was shown to be linear and the matrixes sensitivities were determined. The results obtained are consistent with theoretical views, in general. The coefficients of thermal sensitivity were computed by these dependencies. It is shown that the greatest affect of temperature on the sensitivity occurs in the area (0.7–1.1 mkm. Temperature coefficients of sensitivity increase with the downward radiation wavelength increase. The experiments carried out have shown that it is necessary to take into account the changes in temperature sensitivity of silicon matrixes in the red and near in IR regions of the spectrum. The effect reveals itself in a clearly negative way in cameras with an amplitude resolution of 10-12 bits used for aerospace and space spectrozonal photography. Practical Relevance

  2. Agricultural Soil Spectral Response and Properties Assessment: Effects of Measurement Protocol and Data Mining Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asa Gholizadeh

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Soil spectroscopy has shown to be a fast, cost-effective, environmentally friendly, non-destructive, reproducible and repeatable analytical technique. Soil components, as well as types of instruments, protocols, sampling methods, sample preparation, spectral acquisition techniques and analytical algorithms have a combined influence on the final performance. Therefore, it is important to characterize these differences and to introduce an effective approach in order to minimize the technical factors that alter reflectance spectra and consequent prediction. To quantify this alteration, a joint project between Czech University of Life Sciences Prague (CULS and Tel-Aviv University (TAU was conducted to estimate Cox, pH-H2O, pH-KCl and selected forms of Fe and Mn. Two different soil spectral measurement protocols and two data mining techniques were used to examine seventy-eight soil samples from five agricultural areas in different parts of the Czech Republic. Spectral measurements at both laboratories were made using different ASD spectroradiometers. The CULS protocol was based on employing a contact probe (CP spectral measurement scheme, while the TAU protocol was carried out using a CP measurement method, accompanied with the internal soil standard (ISS procedure. Two spectral datasets, acquired from different protocols, were both analyzed using partial least square regression (PLSR technique as well as the PARACUDA II®, a new data mining engine for optimizing PLSR models. The results showed that spectra based on the CULS setup (non-ISS demonstrated significantly higher albedo intensity and reflectance values relative to the TAU setup with ISS. However, the majority of statistics using the TAU protocol was not noticeably better than the CULS spectra. The paper also highlighted that under both measurement protocols, the PARACUDA II® engine proved to be a powerful tool for providing better results than PLSR. Such initiative is not only a way to

  3. Vascular response to ischemia in the feet of falanga torture victims and normal controls--color and spectral Doppler findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torp-Pedersen, Søren; Amris, Kirstine; Holm, Christian Cato

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether signs of chronic compartment syndrome could be found in plantar muscles of falanga torture victims with painful feet and impaired gait. The hypothesis was that the muscular vascular response to two minutes ischemia would be decreased in torture victims compared...... to controls. On color Doppler this would be seen as less color after ischemia and on spectral Doppler as elevated resistive index (RI). METHODS: Ten male torture victims from the Middle East and nine age, sex and ethnically matched controls underwent Doppler examination of the abductor hallucis and flexor...... ischemia. RESULTS: Both torture victims and controls responded to ischemia with an increased CF. There was no difference between torture victims and controls. With spectral Doppler all subjects had an RI of 1.0 before ischemia. After ischemia, in nearly all subjects and all muscles the first RI was lowest...

  4. A Study of the Temperature Dependence of Bienzyme Systems and Enzymatic Chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Kotov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available It is known that most enzyme-facilitated reactions are highly temperature dependent processes. In general, the temperature coefficient, Q10, of a simple reaction reaches 2.0–3.0. Nevertheless, some enzyme-controlled processes have much lower Q10 (about 1.0, which implies that the process is almost temperature independent, even if individual reactions involved in the process are themselves highly temperature dependent. In this work, we investigate a possible mechanism for this apparent temperature compensation: simple mathematical models are used to study how varying types of enzyme reactions are affected by temperature. We show that some bienzyme-controlled processes may be almost temperature independent if the modules involved in the reaction have similar temperature dependencies, even if individually, these modules are strongly temperature dependent. Further, we show that in non-reversible enzyme chains the stationary concentrations of metabolites are dependent only on the relationship between the temperature dependencies of the first and last modules, whilst in reversible reactions, there is a dependence on every module. Our findings suggest a mechanism by which the metabolic processes taking place within living organisms may be regulated, despite strong variation in temperature.

  5. Temperature dependence of1H NMR chemical shifts and its influence on estimated metabolite concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wermter, Felizitas C; Mitschke, Nico; Bock, Christian; Dreher, Wolfgang

    2017-12-01

    Temperature dependent chemical shifts of important brain metabolites measured by localised 1 H MRS were investigated to test how the use of incorrect prior knowledge on chemical shifts impairs the quantification of metabolite concentrations. Phantom measurements on solutions containing 11 metabolites were performed on a 7 T scanner between 1 and 43 °C. The temperature dependence of the chemical shift differences was fitted by a linear model. Spectra were simulated for different temperatures and analysed by the AQSES program (jMRUI 5.2) using model functions with chemical shift values for 37 °C. Large differences in the temperature dependence of the chemical shift differences were determined with a maximum slope of about ±7.5 × 10 -4  ppm/K. For 32-40 °C, only minor quantification errors resulted from using incorrect chemical shifts, with the exception of Cr and PCr. For 1-10 °C considerable quantification errors occurred if the temperature dependence of the chemical shifts was neglected. If 1 H MRS measurements are not performed at 37 °C, for which the published chemical shift values have been determined, the temperature dependence of chemical shifts should be considered to avoid systematic quantification errors, particularly for measurements on animal models at lower temperatures.

  6. Sex reversal triggers the rapid transition from genetic to temperature-dependent sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holleley, Clare E; O'Meally, Denis; Sarre, Stephen D; Marshall Graves, Jennifer A; Ezaz, Tariq; Matsubara, Kazumi; Azad, Bhumika; Zhang, Xiuwen; Georges, Arthur

    2015-07-02

    Sex determination in animals is amazingly plastic. Vertebrates display contrasting strategies ranging from complete genetic control of sex (genotypic sex determination) to environmentally determined sex (for example, temperature-dependent sex determination). Phylogenetic analyses suggest frequent evolutionary transitions between genotypic and temperature-dependent sex determination in environmentally sensitive lineages, including reptiles. These transitions are thought to involve a genotypic system becoming sensitive to temperature, with sex determined by gene-environment interactions. Most mechanistic models of transitions invoke a role for sex reversal. Sex reversal has not yet been demonstrated in nature for any amniote, although it occurs in fish and rarely in amphibians. Here we make the first report of reptile sex reversal in the wild, in the Australian bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps), and use sex-reversed animals to experimentally induce a rapid transition from genotypic to temperature-dependent sex determination. Controlled mating of normal males to sex-reversed females produces viable and fertile offspring whose phenotypic sex is determined solely by temperature (temperature-dependent sex determination). The W sex chromosome is eliminated from this lineage in the first generation. The instantaneous creation of a lineage of ZZ temperature-sensitive animals reveals a novel, climate-induced pathway for the rapid transition between genetic and temperature-dependent sex determination, and adds to concern about adaptation to rapid global climate change.

  7. Silicon spectral response extension through single wall carbon nanotubes in hybrid solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Del Gobbo, Silvano

    2013-01-01

    Photovoltaic devices based on single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and n-silicon multiple heterojunctions have been fabricated by a SWCNT film transferring process. We report on the ability of the carbon nanotubes to extend the Si spectral range towards the near ultraviolet (UV) and the near infrared regions. Semiconducting and about metallic SWCNT networks have been studied as a function of the film sheet resistance, Rsh. Optical absorbance and Raman spectroscopy have been used to assign nanotube chirality and electronic character. This gave us hints of evidence of the participation of the metal nanotubes in the photocurrent generation. Moreover, we provide evidence that the external quantum efficiency spectral range can be modulated as a function of the SWCNT network sheet resistance in a hybrid SWCNT/Si solar cell. This result will be very useful to further design/optimize devices with improved performance in spectral regions generally not covered by conventional Si p-n devices. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  8. Temperature dependence of interlayer coupling in perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions with GdOX barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhouse-Illige, T.; Xu, Y. H.; Liu, Y. H.; Huang, S.; Kato, H.; Bi, C.; Xu, M.; LeRoy, B. J.; Wang, W. G.

    2018-02-01

    Perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions with GdOX tunneling barriers have shown a unique voltage controllable interlayer magnetic coupling effect. Here, we investigate the quality of the GdOX barrier and the coupling mechanism in these junctions by examining the temperature dependence of the tunneling magnetoresistance and the interlayer coupling from room temperature down to 11 K. The barrier is shown to be of good quality with the spin independent conductance only contributing a small portion, 14%, to the total room temperature conductance, similar to AlOX and MgO barriers. The interlayer coupling, however, shows an anomalously strong temperature dependence including sign changes below 80 K. This non-trivial temperature dependence is not described by previous models of interlayer coupling and may be due to the large induced magnetic moment of the Gd ions in the barrier.

  9. Temperature dependence of a refractive index sensor based on a macrobending micro-plastic optical fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Ning; Teng, Chuanxin; Zhao, Xiaowei; Zheng, Jie

    2015-03-10

    We investigate the temperature dependence of a refractive index (RI) sensor based on a macrobending micro-plastic optical fiber (m-POF) both theoretically and experimentally. The performance of the RI sensor at different temperatures (10°C-70°C) is measured and simulated over an RI range from 1.33 to 1.45. It is found that the temperature dependent bending loss and RI measurement deviation monotonically change with temperature, and the RI deviation has a higher gradient with temperature variation for a higher measured RI. Because of the linear trend of temperature dependence of the sensor, it is feasible to correct for changes in ambient temperature.

  10. Temperature dependence of the ClONO{sub 2} UV absorption spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkholder, J.B.; Talukdar, R.K.; Ravishankara, A.R. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1994-04-01

    The temperature dependence of the ClONO{sub 2} absorption spectrum has been measured between 220 and 298 K and between 195 and 430 nm using a diode array spectrometer. The absorption cross sections were determined using both: (1) absolute pressure measurements at 296 K and (2) measurements at various temperatures relative to 296 K using a dual absorption cell arrangement. The temperature dependence of the ClONO{sub 2} absorption spectrum shows very broad structure. The amplitude of the temperature dependence relative to that at 296 K is weak at short wavelengths, < 2% at 215 nm and 220 K, but significant at the wavelengths important in the stratosphere, {approximately} 30% at 325 nm and 220 K. The authors ClONO{sub 2} absorption cross section data are in good general agreement with the previous measurements of Molina and Molina.

  11. Temperature dependence of the ClONO2 UV absorption spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholder, James B.; Talukdar, Ranajit K.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the ClONO2 absorption spectrum has been measured between 220 and 298 K and between 195 and 430 nm using a diode array spectrometer. The absorption cross sections were determined using both: (1) absolute pressure measurements at 296 K and (2) measurements at various temperatures relative to 296 K using a dual absorption cell arrangement. The temperature dependence of the ClONO2 absorption spectrum shows very broad structure. The amplitude of the temperature dependence relative to that at 296 K is weak at short wavelengths, less than 2% at 215 nm and 220 K, but significant at the wavelengths important in the stratosphere, about 30% at 325 nm and 220 K. Our ClONO2 absorption cross section data are in good general agreement with the previous measurements of Molina and Molina (1979).

  12. Temperature dependence of resistance in epitaxial Fe/MgO/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Q. L.; Wang, S. G.; Zhang, J.; Wang, Yan; Ward, R. C. C.; Wang, C.; Kohn, A.; Zhang, X.-G.; Han, X. F.

    2009-08-01

    The temperature dependence of resistance in parallel (P) and antiparallel (AP) configurations (RP,AP) has been investigated in epitaxial Fe/MgO/Fe junctions with varying MgO barrier thicknesses tMgO. RAP exhibits a substantial decrease with increasing temperature for samples with tMgO ranging from 3.0 to 1.5 nm. In contrast, RP is approximately temperature independent when tMgO=3.0 nm and increases with temperature when tMgO=2.1 and 1.5 nm. Possible origins of this temperature dependence of resistance, which include taking into account a spin independent term and consideration of spin-flip scattering, are discussed. We attribute the temperature dependence of RP,AP to the misalignment of magnetic moments in the electrodes due to thermal excitations and its effect on the spin dependent tunneling.

  13. Temperature dependence of the Ho L2-edge XMCD spectra of Ho6Fe23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boada, Roberto; Laguna-Marco, María Angeles; Chaboy, Jesús

    2009-01-01

    An X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) study performed at the Ho L2,3-edges in Ho6Fe23 as a function of temperature is presented. It is demonstrated that the anomalous temperature dependence of the Ho L2-edge XMCD signal is due to the magnetic contribution of Fe atoms. By contrast, the Ho L3-edge XMCD directly reflects the temperature dependence of the Ho magnetic moment. By combining the XMCD at both Ho L2- and L3-edges, the possibility of determining the temperature dependence of the Fe magnetic moment is demonstrated. Then, both microHo(T) and microFe(T) have been determined by tuning only the absorption L-edges of Ho. This result opens new possibilities of applying XMCD at these absorption edges to obtain quantitative element-specific magnetic information that is not directly obtained by other experimental tools.

  14. Acceleration of AMPA receptor kinetics underlies temperature-dependent changes in synaptic strength at the rat calyx of Held.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postlethwaite, M; Hennig, M H; Steinert, J R; Graham, B P; Forsythe, I D

    2007-02-15

    It is well established that synaptic transmission declines at temperatures below physiological, but many in vitro studies are conducted at lower temperatures. Recent evidence suggests that temperature-dependent changes in presynaptic mechanisms remain in overall equilibrium and have little effect on transmitter release at low transmission frequencies. Our objective was to examine the postsynaptic effects of temperature. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from principal neurons in the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body showed that a rise from 25 degrees C to 35 degrees C increased miniature EPSC (mEPSC) amplitude from -33 +/- 2.3 to -46 +/- 5.7 pA (n=6) and accelerated mEPSC kinetics. Evoked EPSC amplitude increased from -3.14 +/- 0.59 to -4.15 +/- 0.73 nA with the fast decay time constant accelerating from 0.75 +/- 0.09 ms at 25 degrees C to 0.56 +/- 0.08 ms at 35 degrees C. Direct application of glutamate produced currents which similarly increased in amplitude from -0.76 +/- 0.10 nA at 25 degrees C to -1.11 +/- 0.19 nA 35 degrees C. Kinetic modelling of fast AMPA receptors showed that a temperature-dependent scaling of all reaction rate constants by a single multiplicative factor (Q10=2.4) drives AMPA channels with multiple subconductances into the higher-conducting states at higher temperature. Furthermore, Monte Carlo simulation and deconvolution analysis of transmission at the calyx of Held showed that this acceleration of the receptor kinetics explained the temperature dependence of both the mEPSC and evoked EPSC. We propose that acceleration in postsynaptic AMPA receptor kinetics, rather than altered presynaptic release, is the primary mechanism by which temperature changes alter synaptic responses at low frequencies.

  15. Quantitative time-course metabolomics in human red blood cells reveal the temperature dependence of human metabolic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurkovich, James T; Zielinski, Daniel C; Yang, Laurence; Paglia, Giuseppe; Rolfsson, Ottar; Sigurjónsson, Ólafur E; Broddrick, Jared T; Bordbar, Aarash; Wichuk, Kristine; Brynjólfsson, Sigurður; Palsson, Sirus; Gudmundsson, Sveinn; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2017-12-01

    The temperature dependence of biological processes has been studied at the levels of individual biochemical reactions and organism physiology ( e.g. basal metabolic rates) but has not been examined at the metabolic network level. Here, we used a systems biology approach to characterize the temperature dependence of the human red blood cell (RBC) metabolic network between 4 and 37 °C through absolutely quantified exo- and endometabolomics data. We used an Arrhenius-type model ( Q 10 ) to describe how the rate of a biochemical process changes with every 10 °C change in temperature. Multivariate statistical analysis of the metabolomics data revealed that the same metabolic network-level trends previously reported for RBCs at 4 °C were conserved but accelerated with increasing temperature. We calculated a median Q 10 coefficient of 2.89 ± 1.03, within the expected range of 2-3 for biological processes, for 48 individual metabolite concentrations. We then integrated these metabolomics measurements into a cell-scale metabolic model to study pathway usage, calculating a median Q 10 coefficient of 2.73 ± 0.75 for 35 reaction fluxes. The relative fluxes through glycolysis and nucleotide metabolism pathways were consistent across the studied temperature range despite the non-uniform distributions of Q 10 coefficients of individual metabolites and reaction fluxes. Together, these results indicate that the rate of change of network-level responses to temperature differences in RBC metabolism is consistent between 4 and 37 °C. More broadly, we provide a baseline characterization of a biochemical network given no transcriptional or translational regulation that can be used to explore the temperature dependence of metabolism. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Climate responses to SATIRE and SIM-based spectral solar forcing in a 3D atmosphere-ocean coupled GCM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Guoyong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We apply two reconstructed spectral solar forcing scenarios, one SIM (Spectral Irradiance Monitor based, the other the SATIRE (Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction modeled, as inputs to the GISS (Goddard Institute for Space Studies GCMAM (Global Climate Middle Atmosphere Model to examine climate responses on decadal to centennial time scales, focusing on quantifying the difference of climate response between the two solar forcing scenarios. We run the GCMAM for about 400 years with present day trace gas and aerosol for the two solar forcing inputs. We find that the SIM-based solar forcing induces much larger long-term response and 11-year variation in global averaged stratospheric temperature and column ozone. We find significant decreasing trends of planetary albedo for both forcing scenarios in the 400-year model runs. However the mechanisms for the decrease are very different. For SATIRE solar forcing, the decreasing trend of planetary albedo is associated with changes in cloud cover. For SIM-based solar forcing, without significant change in cloud cover on centennial and longer time scales, the apparent decreasing trend of planetary albedo is mainly due to out-of-phase variation in shortwave radiative forcing proxy (downwelling flux for wavelength >330 nm and total solar irradiance (TSI. From the Maunder Minimum to present, global averaged annual mean surface air temperature has a response of ~0.1 °C to SATIRE solar forcing compared to ~0.04 °C to SIM-based solar forcing. For 11-year solar cycle, the global surface air temperature response has 3-year lagged response to either forcing scenario. The global surface air 11-year temperature response to SATIRE forcing is about 0.12 °C, similar to recent multi-model estimates, and comparable to the observational-based evidence. However, the global surface air temperature response to 11-year SIM-based solar forcing is insignificant and inconsistent with observation-based evidence.

  17. Anisotropic temperature dependence of the magnetic-field penetration in superconducting UPt3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broholm, C.; Aeppli, G.; Kleiman, R.N.; Harshman, D.R.; Bishop, D.J.; Bucher, E.; Williams, D.L.; Ansaldo, E.J.; Heffner, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    The anisotropy and temperature dependence of the magnetic-field penetration in superconducting UPt 3 have been measured by muon spin relaxation. The extrapolated zero-temperature values for the penetration depths parallel and perpendicular to the c axis are λ parallel =7070±30 A and λ perpendicular =7820±30 A, respectively. The temperature dependences of λ parallel and λ perpendicular are different and can both be accounted for by a superconducting gap function with a line of nodes in the basal plane and axial point nodes

  18. The Temperature Dependence of the Debye-Waller Factor of Magnesium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sledziewska-Blocka, D.; Lebech, Bente

    1976-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the average Debye-Waller factor for magnesium was measured by means of neutron diffraction spectrometry. The experimental results obtained in the temperature range from 5 to 256 K are compared with theoretical calculations, using the harmonic and quasi-harmonic appro......The temperature dependence of the average Debye-Waller factor for magnesium was measured by means of neutron diffraction spectrometry. The experimental results obtained in the temperature range from 5 to 256 K are compared with theoretical calculations, using the harmonic and quasi...

  19. DETERMINATION OF TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION FOR ANNULAR FINS WITH TEMPERATURE DEPENDENT THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY BY HPM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davood Domairry Ganji

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, homotopy perturbation method has been used to evaluate the temperature distribution of annular fin with temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and to determine the temperature distribution within the fin. This method is useful and practical for solving the nonlinear heat transfer equation, which is associated with variable thermal conductivity condition. The homotopy perturbation method provides an approximate analytical solution in the form of an infinite power series. The annular fin heat transfer rate with temperature-dependent thermal conductivity has been obtained as a function of thermo-geometric fin parameter and the thermal conductivity parameter describing the variation of the thermal conductivity.

  20. Temperature dependent electron Lande g-factor and interband matrix element in GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huebner, Jens; Doehrmann, Stefanie; Haegele, Daniel; Oestreich, Michael [Institute for Solid State Physics, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz University Hannover (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    High precision measurements of the electron Lande g-factor in GaAs are presented using spin quantum beat spectroscopy at low excitation densities and temperatures ranging from 2.6 to 300 K. Influences of nuclear spin polarization at low temperatures have been fully compensated. Comparing these measurements with available data for the temperature dependent effective mass reveals an unexpected strong temperature dependence of the interband matrix element and resolves a long lasting discrepancy between experiment and kp - theory. The strong decrease of the interband matrix element with increasing temperature is explained by phonon induced fluctuations of the interatomic spacing and adiabatic following of the electrons.

  1. Temperature dependence of the Hall angle in a correlated three-dimensional metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, T. F.; Husmann, A.; Carter, S. A.; Honig, J. M.

    1998-06-01

    The Hall coefficient, RH, of the Mott-Hubbard system vanadium sesquioxide has a strong temperature dependence in the barely delocalized metal. As in the case of the cuprate superconductors, we find that the resistivity and the Hall angle of V2-yO3 follow different power laws in temperature, implying different longitudinal and transverse scattering mechanisms. Far from half-filling, only one transport scattering rate is needed to describe the data, at which point the temperature dependence of RH disappears.

  2. Temperature dependent properties of InSb and InAs nanowire field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Henrik A.; Caroff, Philippe; Thelander, Claes; Lind, Erik; Karlström, Olov; Wernersson, Lars-Erik

    2010-04-01

    We present temperature dependent electrical measurements on InSb and InAs nanowire field-effect transistors (FETs). The FETs are fabricated from InAs/InSb heterostructure nanowires, where one complete transistor is defined within each of the two segments. Both the InSb and the InAs FETs are n-type with good current saturation and low voltage operation. The off-current for the InSb FET shows a strong temperature dependence, which we attribute to a barrier lowering due to an increased band-to-band tunneling in the drain part of the channel.

  3. Optical power limiting and transmitting properties of cadmium iodide single crystals: Temperature dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miah, M. Idrish, E-mail: m.miah@griffith.edu.a [Nanoscale Science and Technology Centre, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, QLD 4111 (Australia)] [Biomolecular and Physical Sciences, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, QLD 4111 (Australia)] [Department of Physics, University of Chittagong, Chittagong 4331 (Bangladesh)

    2009-09-14

    Optical limiting properties of the single crystals of cadmium iodide are investigated using ns laser pulses. It is found that the transmissions in the crystals increase with increasing temperature. However, they limit the transmissions at high input powers. The limiting power is found to be higher at higher temperature. From the measured transmission data, the photon absorption coefficients are estimated. The temperature dependence of the coefficients shows a decrease in magnitude with increasing temperature. This might be due to the temperature-dependent bandgap shift of the material. The results demonstrate that the cadmium iodide single crystals are promising materials for applications in optical power limiting devices.

  4. Optical power limiting and transmitting properties of cadmium iodide single crystals: Temperature dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miah, M. Idrish

    2009-01-01

    Optical limiting properties of the single crystals of cadmium iodide are investigated using ns laser pulses. It is found that the transmissions in the crystals increase with increasing temperature. However, they limit the transmissions at high input powers. The limiting power is found to be higher at higher temperature. From the measured transmission data, the photon absorption coefficients are estimated. The temperature dependence of the coefficients shows a decrease in magnitude with increasing temperature. This might be due to the temperature-dependent bandgap shift of the material. The results demonstrate that the cadmium iodide single crystals are promising materials for applications in optical power limiting devices.

  5. Temperature dependence of residual electrical resistivity of Cu-Au in pseudopotential approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khwaja, F.A.; Ahmed, I.; Shaukat, A.

    1986-08-01

    The problem of temperature dependence of residual electrical resistivity of Cu-Au system is re-examined in the light of static distortion and thermal vibration of the lattice along with the short-range-order of atoms above critical temperature. The extended version of Ziman's formula for resistivity obtained yields a unified version for the calculation of resistivity in pseudopotential approximation. The temperature dependence of the quantity Δρ/ρ in this framework for Cu-Au system is found to be in better agreement with the experimental data as compared to previous calculation. (author)

  6. Synthesis, structure and temperature dependent luminescence of Eu3+ doped hydroxyapatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaobing; Luo, Xiaoxia; Wang, Hongwei; Deng, Yue; Yang, Peixin; Tian, Yili

    2018-01-01

    A series of Eu3+ substituted hydroxyapatite (HA) were prepared by co-precipitation reactions. The phase, fluorescence and temperature dependent luminescence of the phosphors were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and photoluminescence (PL). It is found that the doped Eu3+ ions have entered the hexagonal lattice with no obvious secondary phase were detected by XRD. The 5D0 → 7F0 transition was clearly split into two even at room temperature. The predominate 573 nm peak illustrates Eu3+ ions occupy more Ca(II) sites. The temperature dependent luminescent results show HA:xEu might be applied as one potential optical thermometry material.

  7. Temperature Dependence of Triplet–Triplet Annihilation Upconversion in Phospholipid Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the temperature dependency of triplet–triplet annihilation upconversion (TTA-UC) is important for optimizing biological applications of upconversion. Here the temperature dependency of red-to-blue TTA-UC is reported in a variety of neutral PEGylated phospholipid liposomes. In these systems a delicate balance between lateral diffusion rate of the dyes, annihilator aggregation, and sensitizer self-quenching leads to a volcano plot, with the maximum upconversion intensity occurring near the main order–disorder transition temperature of the lipid membrane. PMID:28059523

  8. Vascular response to ischemia in the feet of falanga torture victims and normal controls--color and spectral Doppler findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torp-Pedersen, Søren; Amris, Kirstine; Holm, Christian Cato; Kønig, Merete; Prip, Karen; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente

    2009-01-01

    To investigate whether signs of chronic compartment syndrome could be found in plantar muscles of falanga torture victims with painful feet and impaired gait. The hypothesis was that the muscular vascular response to two minutes ischemia would be decreased in torture victims compared to controls. On color Doppler this would be seen as less color after ischemia and on spectral Doppler as elevated resistive index (RI). Ten male torture victims from the Middle East and nine age, sex and ethnically matched controls underwent Doppler examination of the abductor hallucis and flexor digitorum brevis muscles before and after two minutes ischemia induced with a pressure cuff over the malleoli. The color Doppler findings were quantified with the color fraction (CF) before and after ischemia. On spectral Doppler the resistive index was measured once before and three consecutive times after ischemia. Both torture victims and controls responded to ischemia with an increased CF. There was no difference between torture victims and controls. With spectral Doppler all subjects had an RI of 1.0 before ischemia. After ischemia, in nearly all subjects and all muscles the first RI was lowest, the second was higher and the third was highest indicating that the response to ischemia was disappearing as measurements were made. There was a trend that the first RI was higher in torture victims than in controls. The study was not able to confirm the presence of chronic compartment syndrome. However, the trend in RI still supports the hypothesis. The negative findings may be due to inadequate design where the CF and RI were measured in one setting, perhaps resulting in both methods being applied imperfectly. The response to ischemia seems short-lived and we suggest that the Doppler methods may be re-evaluated with separate ischemic phases for CF and RI.

  9. Development of a very fast spectral response measurement system for analysis of hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells and modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, J.A., E-mail: jose.rodriguez@tsolar.eu [Dept. Technology, Development and Innovation, T-Solar Global S.A., Parque Tecnologico de Galicia, Avda. de Vigo 5, E-32900 San Cibrao das Vinas (Ourense) (Spain); Fortes, M. [Departamento de Electronica e Computacion, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Alberte, C.; Vetter, M.; Andreu, J. [Dept. Technology, Development and Innovation, T-Solar Global S.A., Parque Tecnologico de Galicia, Avda. de Vigo 5, E-32900 San Cibrao das Vinas (Ourense) (Spain)

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spectral response equipment for measuring a-Si:H solar cells in a few seconds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Equipment based on 16 LEDs with simultaneous illumination of the solar cell. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The current generated by each LED is analyzed by a Fast Fourier Transform. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cheap equipment without lock-in technology for the current measurement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measurement error vs. conventional measurement less than 1% in J{sub sc}. - Abstract: An important requirement for a very fast spectral response measurement system is the simultaneous illumination of the solar cell at multiple well defined wavelengths. Nowadays this can be done by means of light emitting diodes (LEDs) available for a multitude of wavelengths. For the purpose to measure the spectral response (SR) of amorphous silicon solar cells a detailed characterization of LEDs emitting in the wavelength range from 300 nm to 800 nm was performed. In the here developed equipment the LED illumination is modulated in the frequency range from 100 Hz to 200 Hz and the current generated by each LED is analyzed by a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) to determine the current component corresponding to each wavelength. The equipment provides a signal to noise ratio of 2-4 orders of magnitude for individual wavelengths resulting in a precise measurement of the SR over the whole wavelength range. The difference of the short circuit current determined from the SR is less than 1% in comparison to a conventional system with monochromator.

  10. Response of Spectral Reflectances and Vegetation Indices on Varying Juniper Cone Densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo E. Ponce-Campos

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Juniper trees are widely distributed throughout the world and are common sources of allergies when microscopic pollen grains are transported by wind and inhaled. In this study, we investigated the spectral influences of pollen-discharging male juniper cones within a juniper canopy. This was done through a controlled outdoor experiment involving ASD FieldSpec Pro Spectroradiometer measurements over juniper canopies of varying cone densities. Broadband and narrowband spectral reflectance and vegetation index (VI patterns were evaluated as to their sensitivity and their ability to discriminate the presence of cones. The overall aim of this research was to assess remotely sensed phenological capabilities to detect pollen-bearing juniper trees for public health applications. A general decrease in reflectance values with increasing juniper cone density was found, particularly in the Green (545–565 nm and NIR (750–1,350 nm regions. In contrast, reflectances in the shortwave-infrared (SWIR, 2,000 nm to 2,350 nm region decreased from no cone presence to intermediate amounts (90 g/m2 and then increased from intermediate levels to the highest cone densities (200 g/m2. Reflectance patterns in the Red (620–700 nm were more complex due to shifting contrast patterns in absorptance between cones and juniper foliage, where juniper foliage is more absorbing than cones only within the intense narrowband region of maximum chlorophyll absorption near 680 nm. Overall, narrowband reflectances were more sensitive to cone density changes than the equivalent MODIS broadbands. In all VIs analyzed, there were significant relationships with cone density levels, particularly with the narrowband versions and the two-band vegetation index (TBVI based on Green and Red bands, a promising outcome for the use of phenocams in juniper phenology trait studies. These results indicate that spectral indices are sensitive to certain juniper phenologic traits that can potentially be

  11. Standard Test Methods for Measurement of Electrical Performance and Spectral Response of Nonconcentrator Multijunction Photovoltaic Cells and Modules

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 These test methods provide special techniques needed to determine the electrical performance and spectral response of two-terminal, multijunction photovoltaic (PV) devices, both cell and modules. 1.2 These test methods are modifications and extensions of the procedures for single-junction devices defined by Test Methods E948, E1021, and E1036. 1.3 These test methods do not include temperature and irradiance corrections for spectral response and current-voltage (I-V) measurements. Procedures for such corrections are available in Test Methods E948, E1021, and E1036. 1.4 These test methods may be applied to cells and modules intended for concentrator applications. 1.5 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.6 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and ...

  12. Spectral Induced Polarization Response of Biofilm Formation in Hanford Vadose Zone Sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, A.; Katsenovich, Y.; Lee, B.; Whitman, D.

    2017-12-01

    As a result of the U.S. Nuclear weapons program during the second world war and the cold war, there now exists a significant amount of uranium contamination at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford site located in Washington state. In-situ immobilization of mobile uranium via injections of a soluble sodium tripolyphosphate amendment may prove effective in the formation of insoluble uranyl phosphate mineral, autunite. However, the injected polyphosphate undergoes hydrolysis in aqueous solutions to form orthophosphate, which serves as a readily available nutrient for the various microorganisms in the sediment. Sediment-filled column experiments conducted under saturated oxygen restricted conditions using geophysical Spectral Induced Polarization technique have shown the impact of microbes on the dissolution of autunite, a calcium uranyl phosphate mineral. Spectral Induced Polarization may be an effective way to track changes indicative of bacterial activities on the surrounding environment. This method can be a cost-effective alternative to the drilling of boreholes at a field scale.

  13. Review of temperature dependence of thermal properties, dielectric properties, and perfusion of biological tissues at hyperthermic and ablation temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossmanna, Christian; Haemmerich, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    The application of supraphysiological temperatures (>40°C) to biological tissues causes changes at the molecular, cellular, and structural level, with corresponding changes in tissue function and in thermal, mechanical and dielectric tissue properties. This is particularly relevant for image-guided thermal treatments (e.g. hyperthermia and thermal ablation) delivering heat via focused ultrasound (FUS), radiofrequency (RF), microwave (MW), or laser energy; temperature induced changes in tissue properties are of relevance in relation to predicting tissue temperature profile, monitoring during treatment, and evaluation of treatment results. This paper presents a literature survey of temperature dependence of electrical (electrical conductivity, resistivity, permittivity) and thermal tissue properties (thermal conductivity, specific heat, diffusivity). Data of soft tissues (liver, prostate, muscle, kidney, uterus, collagen, myocardium and spleen) for temperatures between 5 to 90°C, and dielectric properties in the frequency range between 460 kHz and 3 GHz are reported. Furthermore, perfusion changes in tumors including carcinomas, sarcomas, rhabdomyosarcoma, adenocarcinoma and ependymoblastoma in response to hyperthmic temperatures up to 46°C are presented. Where appropriate, mathematical models to describe temperature dependence of properties are presented. The presented data is valuable for mathematical models that predict tissue temperature during thermal therapies (e.g. hyperthermia or thermal ablation), as well as for applications related to prediction and monitoring of temperature induced tissue changes.

  14. Frequency doubling in LiNbO3 using temperature dependent QPM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belmonte, Michele; Skettrup, Torben; Pedersen, Christian

    1999-01-01

    We report the application of temperature-dependent quasi-phase matching (QPM) for second harmonic generation of green light using periodically field poled LiNbO3. In contrast to the usual QPM devices, here the fundamental and second harmonic waves are polarized orthogonally so that the second...

  15. Observed and simulated temperature dependence of the liquid water path of low clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Genio, A.D.; Wolf, A.B. [NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, NY (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Data being acquired at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site can be used to examine the factors determining the temperature dependence of cloud optical thickness. We focus on cloud liquid water and physical thickness variations which can be derived from existing ARM measurements.

  16. Temperature dependence of the in situ widths of a rotating condensate in one dimensional optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, Ahmed S.; Soliman, Shemi S.M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a conventional method of quantum statistical mechanics is used to study the temperature dependence of the in situ widths of a rotating condensate bosons in 1D optical potential. We trace the experimentally accessible parameters for which the temperature dependence of the in situ widths becomes perceivable. The calculated results showed that the temperature dependence of the in situ widths is completely different from that of a rotating condensate or trapped bosons in the optical lattice separately. The z-width shows distinct behavior from x- and y-widths due to the rotation effect. The obtained results provide useful qualitative theoretical results for future Bose Einstein condensation experiments in such traps. - Highlights: • The temperature dependence of the in situ widths of a rotating condensate boson in 1D optical potential is investigated. • We trace the experimentally accessible parameters for which the in situ widths become perceivable. • The above mentioned parameters exhibit a characteristic rotation rate and optical potential depth dependence. • Characteristic dependence of the effective widths on temperature is investigated. • Our results provide useful qualitatively and quantitative theoretical results for experiments in various traps.

  17. Temperature-dependent dynamic mechanical properties of magnetorheological elastomers under magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Benxiang, E-mail: jubenxiang@qq.com [National Instrument Functional Materials Engineering Technology Research Center, Chongqing 400707 (China); Tang, Rui; Zhang, Dengyou; Yang, Bailian [National Instrument Functional Materials Engineering Technology Research Center, Chongqing 400707 (China); Yu, Miao; Liao, Changrong [College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Both anisotropic and isotropic magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) samples were fabricated by using as-prepared polyurethane (PU) matrix and carbonyl iron particles. Temperature-dependent dynamic mechanical properties of MRE were investigated and analyzed. Due to the unique structural features of as-prepared matrix, temperature has a greater impact on the properties of as-prepared MRE, especially isotropic MRE. With increasing of temperature and magnetic field, MR effect of isotropic MRE can reach up to as high as 4176.5% at temperature of 80 °C, and the mechanism of the temperature-dependent in presence of magnetic field was discussed. These results indicated that MRE is a kind of temperature-dependent material, and can be cycled between MRE and MR plastomer (MRP) by varying temperature. - Highlights: • Both anisotropic and isotropic MRE were fabricated by using as-prepared matrix. • Temperature-dependent properties of MRE under magnetic field were investigated. • As-prepared MRE can transform MRE to MRP by adjusting temperature.

  18. Temperature dependence of the in situ widths of a rotating condensate in one dimensional optical potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Ahmed S., E-mail: ahmedhassan117@yahoo.com; Soliman, Shemi S.M.

    2016-01-08

    In this paper, a conventional method of quantum statistical mechanics is used to study the temperature dependence of the in situ widths of a rotating condensate bosons in 1D optical potential. We trace the experimentally accessible parameters for which the temperature dependence of the in situ widths becomes perceivable. The calculated results showed that the temperature dependence of the in situ widths is completely different from that of a rotating condensate or trapped bosons in the optical lattice separately. The z-width shows distinct behavior from x- and y-widths due to the rotation effect. The obtained results provide useful qualitative theoretical results for future Bose Einstein condensation experiments in such traps. - Highlights: • The temperature dependence of the in situ widths of a rotating condensate boson in 1D optical potential is investigated. • We trace the experimentally accessible parameters for which the in situ widths become perceivable. • The above mentioned parameters exhibit a characteristic rotation rate and optical potential depth dependence. • Characteristic dependence of the effective widths on temperature is investigated. • Our results provide useful qualitatively and quantitative theoretical results for experiments in various traps.

  19. Demonstrating the Temperature Dependence of Density via Construction of a Galilean Thermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, Marie A.; Padgett, Lea W.; Padgett, Clifford W.

    2011-01-01

    A method for the construction of a Galilean thermometer out of common chemistry glassware is described. Students in a first-semester physical chemistry (thermodynamics) class can construct the Galilean thermometer as an investigation of the thermal expansivity of liquids and the temperature dependence of density. This is an excellent first…

  20. Dynamic temperature dependence patterns in future energy demand models in the context of climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hekkenberg, M.; Moll, H.C.; Schoot Uiterkamp, A.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Energy demand depends on outdoor temperature in a 'u' shaped fashion. Various studies have used this temperature dependence to investigate the effects of climate change on energy demand. Such studies contain implicit or explicit assumptions to describe expected socio-economic changes that may affect

  1. Temperature dependence of UV radiation effects in Arctic and temperate isolates of three red macrophytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Poll, W.H.; Eggert, A.; Buma, A.G.J.; Breeman, Arno

    The temperature dependence of UV effects was studied for Arctic and temperate isolates of the red macrophytes Palmaria palmata, Coccotylus truncatus and Phycodrys rubens. The effects of daily repeated artificial ultraviolet B and A radiation (UVBR: 280-320 nm, UVAR: 320-400 nm) treatments were

  2. Temperature Dependence and Magnetic Properties of Injection Molding Tool Materials Used in Induction Heating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerrier, Patrick; Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the heating phase of an induction heated injection molding tool precisely, the temperature-dependent magnetic properties, B–H curves, and the hysteresis loss are necessary for the molding tool materials. Hence, injection molding tool steels, core materials among other materials have...

  3. Temperature dependence of mobility in silicon (100) inversion layers at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, Y.; Suzuki, T.; Kawaji, S.

    1982-01-01

    Electron mobility of Si(100) n-inversion layers in MOSFETs having μsub(peak) (4.2 K) = 4000.6500 and 12000 cm 2 /V x s has been measured at temperatures between 1 and 80 K. The carrier concentration dependence of the mobility extrapolated to T = O and the temperature dependent part of the scattering probability are investigated. (orig.)

  4. Temperature-dependent indentation behavior of transformation-toughened zirconia-based ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikare, Veena; Heuer, Arthur H.

    1991-01-01

    Indentation behavior of Ce-TZP, Y-TZP, and Mg-PSZ between room temperature and 1300 C was investigated. Hardness decreased with increasing temperature for all three materials, but indentation cracking increased with increasing temperature. The opposing temperature dependences are discussed in terms of dislocation and transformation plasticity.

  5. Transient thermal stresses in multiple connected region exhibiting temperature dependence of material properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugano, Yoshihiro; Maekawa, Toshiya.

    1983-01-01

    The examples of the analysis of thermal stress in multiple connection regions such as heat exchangers, nuclear reactor cores, ingot cases and polygonal region with elliptic holes are not few, but the temperature dependence of material constants was neglected in these researches because of the difficulty of analysis though the industrial problems related to thermal stress are apt to occur in the condition of relatively large temperature gradient. Also, the analysis of heat conduction problems taking the temperature dependence of material constants into account was limited to one-dimensional problems for which Kirchhoff's transmission can be used. The purpose of this study is to derive the equation of condition which assures the one-value property of rotation and displacement, taking the temperature dependence of material constants into account, and to complete the formulation of the plane thermal stress problems in multiple connection regions by stress function method. Also the method of numerical analysis using difference method is shown to examine the effectiveness of various formulated equations and the effect of the temperature dependence of material constants on temperature and thermal stress. The example of numerical calculation on a thin rectangular plate with a rectangular hole is shown. (Kako, I.)

  6. THE TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF THE EMISSION OF PERCHLORO- ETHYLENE FROM DRY CLEANED FABRICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was conducted to evaluate the emission of perchloroethylene (tetrachloroethylene) from freshly dry cleaned fabrics using small environmental test chambers. The temperature dependence of the release of perchloroethylene was evaluated over a temperature range of 20 to 45°C....

  7. A Temperature-Dependent Thermal Model of IGBT Modules Suitable for Circuit-Level Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Rui; Wang, Huai; Pedersen, Kristian Bonderup

    2016-01-01

    circuits or overloads. The updated Cauer thermal model with varying thermal parameters is obtained by means of FEM thermal simulations with temperature-dependent physical parameters. The proposed method is applied to a case study of a 1700 V/1000 A IGBT module. Furthermore, a testing setup is built up...

  8. Temperature dependence of the superconducting proximity effect quantified by scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stępniak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we present the first systematic study on the temperature dependence of the extension of the superconducting proximity effect in a 1–2 atomic layer thin metallic film, surrounding a superconducting Pb island. Scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS measurements reveal the spatial variation of the local density of state on the film from 0.38 up to 1.8 K. In this temperature range the superconductivity of the island is almost unaffected and shows a constant gap of a 1.20 ± 0.03 meV. Using a superconducting Nb-tip a constant value of the proximity length of 17 ± 3 nm at 0.38 and 1.8 K is found. In contrast, experiments with a normal conductive W-tip indicate an apparent decrease of the proximity length with increasing temperature. This result is ascribed to the thermal broadening of the occupation of states of the tip, and it does not reflect an intrinsic temperature dependence of the proximity length. Our tunneling spectroscopy experiments shed fresh light on the fundamental issue of the temperature dependence of the proximity effect for atomic monolayers, where the intrinsic temperature dependence of the proximity effect is comparably weak.

  9. Temperature dependence of the kinetic coefficients of superconductors in the intermediate state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorelik, L.Y.; Kadigrobov, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    It is demonstrated that in the case of a superconductor in the intermediate state at temperature T such that e0/T 0 denoting the characteristic superconductor energy gap) the sound absorption coefficient can be strongly temperature dependent and thermal conductivity along the layers of normal metal can be nonlinearly dependent on the temperature

  10. Study on the effect of testing machine rigidity on strength and ductility temperature dependences obtained

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krashchenko, V.P.; Statsenko, V.E.; Rudnitskij, N.P.

    1984-01-01

    Investigation procedures are described for rigidity of testing machines and mechanical properties of tantalum and nickel in the temperature range 293-1873K. Temperature dependences are presented for strength characteristics of the investigated materials obtained with the use of installations of different rigidity. Dependence analysis is carried out and recommendations are given as to the characteristics application

  11. Indications for a changing electricity demand pattern : The temperature dependence of electricity demand in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hekkenberg, M.; Benders, R. M. J.; Moll, H. C.; Uiterkamp, A. J. M. Schoot

    This study assesses the electricity demand pattern in the relatively temperate climate of the Netherlands (latitude 52 degrees 30'N). Daily electricity demand and average temperature during the period from 1970 until 2007 are investigated for possible trends in the temperature dependence of

  12. A Simple Method to Calculate the Temperature Dependence of the Gibbs Energy and Chemical Equilibrium Constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Francisco M.

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the Gibbs energy and important quantities such as Henry's law constants, activity coefficients, and chemical equilibrium constants is usually calculated by using the Gibbs-Helmholtz equation. Although, this is a well-known approach and traditionally covered as part of any physical chemistry course, the required…

  13. Unravelling the size and temperature dependence of exciton lifetimes in colloidal ZnSe quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eilers, Joren; Van Hest, Jacobine; Meijerink, A; Donega, Celso De Mello

    2014-01-01

    We report on the temperature dependence of the band-edge photoluminescence decay of organically capped colloidal ZnSe quantum dots (QDs) in the size range from 4.0 to 7.5 nm. A similar trend is observed for all investigated sizes: the decay time is short (∼5 ns) above 20 K and increases sharply

  14. Evaluation of laser treatment response of vascular skin disorders in relation to skin properties using multi-spectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Roode, Rowland; Noordmans, Herke Jan; Rem, Alex; Couwenberg, Sharon; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf

    2008-02-01

    There can be a large variation in response between laser treatments of vascular malformations like port-wine stains even in one patient. This could be ascribed to variations in the skin properties like tint (melanin) and perfusion (redness) which will influence the effectiveness of the laser dosimetry. To obtain a better understanding of the relation between skin properties just before treatment, laser dosimetry and clinical response, a multi-spectral dermatoscope is applied. A sequence of calibrated images is captured from 400 to 720 nm. Images at the treatment laser wavelength (532 nm) show the absorbing structures during laser exposure. Images of different treatment sessions of one patient were matched with dedicated registration software to quantify the results of the laser treatment (change in blood vessels structure, effect on pigment). For feasibility, images were collected from 5 patients and used to determine the optimal wavelength combination strategies. The image matching software gives an objective impression of the improvement, e.g. the clearing of the port-wine stain over time or pigment reactions, which will facilitate the discussion with the patient about the end point of treatment. The multi-spectral dermatoscope and software developed enables the evaluation of large patient series which will result in objective data to advise the dermatologist on the optimal laser dosimetry in future in relation to the skin properties.

  15. Temperature-Dependent Oxygen Effect on NMR D-[Formula: see text] Relaxation-Diffusion Correlation of n-Alkanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikhov, Igor; Arns, Christoph H

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diffusion-relaxation correlation experiments ( D -[Formula: see text]) are widely used for the petrophysical characterisation of rocks saturated with petroleum fluids both in situ and for laboratory analyses. The encoding for both diffusion and relaxation offers increased fluid typing contrast by discriminating fluids based on their self-diffusion coefficients, while relaxation times provide information about the interaction of solid and fluid phases and associated confinement geometry (if NMR responses of pure fluids at particular temperature and pressure are known). Petrophysical interpretation of D -[Formula: see text] correlation maps is typically assisted by the "standard alkane line"-a relaxation-diffusion correlation valid for pure normal alkanes and their mixtures in the absence of restrictions to diffusing molecules and effects of internal gradients. This correlation assumes fluids are free from paramagnetic impurities. In situations where fluid samples cannot be maintained at air-free state the diffusion-relaxation response of fluids shift towards shorter relaxation times due to oxygen paramagnetic relaxation enhancement. Interpretation of such a response using the "standard alkane line" would be erroneous and is further complicated by the temperature-dependence of oxygen solubility for each component of the alkane mixture. We propose a diffusion-relaxation correlation suitable for interpretation of low-field NMR D -[Formula: see text] responses of normal alkanes and their mixtures saturating rocks over a broad temperature range, in equilibrium with atmospheric air. We review and where necessary revise existing viscosity-relaxation correlations. Findings are applied to diffusion-relaxation dependencies taking into account the temperature dependence of oxygen solubility and solvent vapour pressure. The effect is demonstrated on a partially saturated carbonate rock.

  16. Spectral analysis of white ash response to emerald ash borer infestations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calandra, Laura

    The emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) is an invasive insect that has killed over 50 million ash trees in the US. The goal of this research was to establish a method to identify ash trees infested with EAB using remote sensing techniques at the leaf-level and tree crown level. First, a field-based study at the leaf-level used the range of spectral bands from the WorldView-2 sensor to determine if there was a significant difference between EAB-infested white ash (Fraxinus americana) and healthy leaves. Binary logistic regression models were developed using individual and combinations of wavelengths; the most successful model included 545 and 950 nm bands. The second half of this research employed imagery to identify healthy and EAB-infested trees, comparing pixel- and object-based methods by applying an unsupervised classification approach and a tree crown delineation algorithm, respectively. The pixel-based models attained the highest overall accuracies.

  17. Synthesis, FTIR, 13C-NMR and Temperature-Dependent 1H‑NMR Characteristics of Bis-naphthalimide Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Grzesiak

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy is still the most important method of cancer treatment. To make this method more effective and safe, new drugs to destroy cancer cells are needed. Some bis-naphthalimide derivatives show potential anticancer activity via an intercalation mechanism. A higher degree of DNA intercalation corresponds to better therapeutic effects. The degree of intercalation of naphthalimides depends on their structure, molecular dynamics and intermolecular interactions with DNA. In order to apply any active substance as a drug, its molecular dynamics as well as possible interactions with target molecules have to be examined in exhaustive details. This paper describes a practical preparation of some novel bis-naphthalimide derivatives with different functional groups and their FTIR and 1H- and 13C-NMR spectral characteristics. To determine the molecular dynamics of the obtained compounds the temperature, their 1H-NMR spectra were measured. It has been clearly proven in this paper that the unusual temperature-dependent 1H-NMR behavior of the aromatic protons of phthalimide derivatives, previously described in the literature as “hypersensitivity” and explained by n-π interactions and molecular motions of aromatic amide rings, is a result of temperature driven changes of the geometry of carbonyl groups.

  18. Self-Optimizing Photoelectrochemical Growth of Nanopatterned Se–Te Films in Response to the Spectral Distribution of Incident Illumination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carim, Azhar I. [Division of Chemistry and Chemical; Batara, Nicolas A. [Division of Chemistry and Chemical; Premkumar, Anjali [Division of Chemistry and Chemical; Atwater, Harry A. [Division of Chemistry and Chemical; Lewis, Nathan S. [Division of Chemistry and Chemical

    2015-09-02

    Photoelectrochemical growth of Se–Te films spontaneously produces highly ordered, nanoscale lamellar morphologies with periodicities that can be tuned by varying the illumination wavelength during deposition. This phenomenon has been characterized further herein by determining the morphologies of photoelectrodeposited Se–Te films in response to tailored spectral illumination profiles. Se–Te films grown under illumination from four different sources, having similar average wavelengths but having spectral bandwidths that spanned several orders of magnitude, all nevertheless produced similar structures which had a single, common periodicity as quantitatively identified via Fourier analysis. Film deposition using simultaneous illumination from two narrowband sources, which differed in average wavelength by several hundred nanometers, resulted in a structure with only a single periodicity intermediate between the periods observed when either source alone was used. This single periodicity could be varied by manipulating the relative intensity of the two sources. An iterative model that combined full-wave electromagnetic effects with Monte Carlo growth simulations, and that considered only the fundamental light-material interactions during deposition, was in accord with the morphologies observed experimentally. Simulations of light absorption and concentration in idealized lamellar arrays, in conjunction with all of the available data, additionally indicated that a self-optimization of the periodicity of the nanoscale pattern, resulting in the maximization of the anisotropy of interfacial light absorption in the three-dimensional structure, is consistent with the observed growth process of such films.

  19. Enhancement of nonlinear optical response of weakly confined excitons in GaAs thin films by spectrally rectangle-shape-pulse-excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, O; Isu, T; Ishi-Hayase, J; Sasaki, M; Tsuchiya, M

    2007-01-01

    We report the enhancement of the nonlinear optical response of the weakly confined excitons with use of spectrally rectangular pulse. The nonlinear optical response was investigated as a function of excitation energy by a degenerate four-wave-mixing (DFWM) technique. In the case that the laser pulse with the controlled spectral shape excites the plural exciton states simultaneously, the DFWM signal intensity is enhanced by a factor of two in comparison with the intensity under the excitation of a single exciton state. This enhancement is caused by the superposition of the nonlinear optical responses from the plural exciton states

  20. Optical properties of GaP/GaNP core/shell nanowires: a temperature-dependent study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrovolsky, Alexander; Chen, Shula; Kuang, Yanjin; Sukrittanon, Supanee; Tu, Charles W; Chen, Weimin M; Buyanova, Irina A

    2013-05-16

    Recombination processes in GaP/GaNP core/shell nanowires (NWs) grown on Si are studied by employing temperature-dependent continuous wave and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopies. The NWs exhibit bright PL emissions due to radiative carrier recombination in the GaNP shell. Though the radiative efficiency of the NWs is found to decrease with increasing temperature, the PL emission remains intense even at room temperature. Two thermal quenching processes of the PL emission are found to be responsible for the degradation of the PL intensity at elevated temperatures: (a) thermal activation of the localized excitons from the N-related localized states and (b) activation of a competing non-radiative recombination (NRR) process. The activation energy of the latter process is determined as being around 180 meV. NRR is also found to cause a significant decrease of carrier lifetime.

  1. Temperature dependent transport of two dimensional electrons in the integral quantum Hall regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wi, H.P.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the temperature dependent electronic transport properties of a two dimensional electron gas subject to background potential fluctuations and a perpendicular magnetic field. The author carried out an extensive temperature dependent study of the transport coefficients, in the region of an integral quantum plateau, in an In/sub x/Ga/sub 1-x/As/InP heterostructure for 4.2K 10 cm -2 meV -1 ) even at the middle between two Landau levels, which is unexpected from model calculations based on short ranged randomness. In addition, the different T dependent behavior of rho/sub xx/ between the states in the tails and those near the center of a Landau level, indicates the existence of different electron states in a Landau level. Additionally, the author reports T-dependent transport measurements in the transition region between two quantum plateaus in several different materials

  2. Temperature dependent structural evolution in liquid Ag50Ga50 alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Y.; Wang, X. D.; Yu, Q.; Cao, Q. P.; Ruett, U.; Zhang, D. X.; Jiang, J. Z.

    2018-01-01

    The temperature dependence of atomic structural evolution in liquid Ag50Ga50 alloy has been studied using an in situ high energy x-ray diffraction (XRD) experiment combined with first-principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) simulations. The experimental data show a reversible structural crossover at the temperature of about 1050 K. Changes in both electrical resistivity and absolute thermoelectric power at about 1100 K strongly support the XRD results. Additionally, FPMD simulations reveal the abnormal temperature dependent behavior of partial coordination number and atomic diffusivity at about 1200 K, elucidating that the partition experimentally observed changes in structure and properties could be linked with the repartition between Ag and Ga atoms in the liquid at around 1050–1200 K. This finding will trigger more studies on the structural evolution of noble-polyvalent metals in particular and metallic liquids in general.

  3. Temperature dependence of stress in CVD diamond films studied by Raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dychalska Anna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Evolution of residual stress and its components with increasing temperature in chemical vapor deposited (CVD diamond films has a crucial impact on their high temperature applications. In this work we investigated temperature dependence of stress in CVD diamond film deposited on Si(100 substrate in the temperature range of 30 °C to 480 °C by Raman mapping measurement. Raman shift of the characteristic diamond band peaked at 1332 cm-1 was studied to evaluate the residual stress distribution at the diamond surface. A new approach was applied to calculate thermal stress evolution with increasing tempera­ture by using two commonly known equations. Comparison of the residts obtained from the two methods was presented. The intrinsic stress component was calculated from the difference between average values of residual and thermal stress and then its temperature dependence was discussed.

  4. Temperature dependence of the Rashba and Dresselhaus spin–orbit interactions in GaAs wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, W.; Fu, J.Y.

    2016-01-01

    We have recently shown [Fu and Egues, Phys. Rev. B 91 (2015) 075408] unusual properties of the spin–orbit (SO) interaction in relatively wide quantum wells, e.g., the second subband Rashba term can vanish even in asymmetric configurations. Here we report our theoretical investigation on the temperature dependence of Rashba and Dresselhaus SO interactions in GaAs both relatively narrow and wide wells, having the electron occupancy of one and two subbands, respectively. We consider all relevant intra- and intersubband SO terms. We find that the variation of intrasubband couplings as temperatures range from 0.3 to 300 K could attain, ∼meV Å, the order of usual magnitudes for SO terms in GaAs wells. Moreover, we observe distinct behaviors of the SO interaction of the two subbands, as functions of temperature. On the other band, we find that the intersubband SO terms have a relatively weak temperature dependence.

  5. Temperature dependence of the Rashba and Dresselhaus spin–orbit interactions in GaAs wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W. [Department of Physics, Jining University, 273155 Qufu, Shandong (China); Fu, J.Y., E-mail: jiyongfu78@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Qufu Normal University, 273165 Qufu, Shandong (China); Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, 13560-970 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, 13565-905 São Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2016-02-01

    We have recently shown [Fu and Egues, Phys. Rev. B 91 (2015) 075408] unusual properties of the spin–orbit (SO) interaction in relatively wide quantum wells, e.g., the second subband Rashba term can vanish even in asymmetric configurations. Here we report our theoretical investigation on the temperature dependence of Rashba and Dresselhaus SO interactions in GaAs both relatively narrow and wide wells, having the electron occupancy of one and two subbands, respectively. We consider all relevant intra- and intersubband SO terms. We find that the variation of intrasubband couplings as temperatures range from 0.3 to 300 K could attain, ∼meV Å, the order of usual magnitudes for SO terms in GaAs wells. Moreover, we observe distinct behaviors of the SO interaction of the two subbands, as functions of temperature. On the other band, we find that the intersubband SO terms have a relatively weak temperature dependence.

  6. The effect of temperature-dependent thermal conductivity in heat transfer simulations of frozen biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, Y

    2000-01-01

    The thermal conductivity value of pure water ice is inversely proportional to the temperature and decreases about 5-fold as the temperature increases from the liquid nitrogen boiling temperature (77 K to the freezing point of pure water. The temperature dependency of the thermal conductivity is typically overlooked in bioheat transfer simulations. A closed-form solution of the one-dimensional temperature distribution in frozen water and blood is presented in this study, based on a new thermal conductivity model. Results indicate that temperatures are overestimated up to 38K, and heat fluxes through the frozen region boundaries are underestimated by a factor of 2, when the temperature dependency of the thermal conductivity is neglected.

  7. Temperature dependent optical properties of stacked InGaAs/GaAs quantum rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouerghui, W. [Unite de Recherche Des Physiques des Semiconducteurs et Capteurs, Institut Preparatoire aux Etudes Scientifiques et Techniques, La Marsa 2070, Tunis (Tunisia)], E-mail: ouerghuiwalid@yahoo.fr; Martinez-Pastor, J.; Gomis, J. [Instituto de Ciencia de los Materials, Universidad de Valencia, P.O. Box 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Maaref, M. [Unite de Recherche Des Physiques des Semiconducteurs et Capteurs, Institut Preparatoire aux Etudes Scientifiques et Techniques, La Marsa 2070, Tunis (Tunisia); Granados, D.; Garcia, J.M. [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid, Isaac newton 8, 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain)

    2008-07-01

    In this paper we describe the results of temperature dependent photoluminescence intensity and decay time measurements of In(Ga)As/GaAs quantum rings where the depth of barrier is varied from sample to sample. The activation energy found for the reduction of the exciton decay time as a function of the temperature is approximately half the value of the thermionic escape energy of excitons. The temperature dependant behaviour is ascribed to the carriers lost via the excited state to the WL. The time resolved PL study indicates that thermal escape mechanisms is not so affected by reducing the spacer thickness, but it's influenced essentially by the excited state recombination.

  8. Memory effects, two color percolation, and the temperature dependence of Mott variable-range hopping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agam, Oded; Aleiner, Igor L.

    2014-06-01

    There are three basic processes that determine hopping transport: (a) hopping between normally empty sites (i.e., having exponentially small occupation numbers at equilibrium), (b) hopping between normally occupied sites, and (c) transitions between normally occupied and unoccupied sites. In conventional theories all these processes are considered Markovian and the correlations of occupation numbers of different sites are believed to be small (i.e., not exponential in temperature). We show that, contrary to this belief, memory effects suppress the processes of type (c) and manifest themselves in a subleading exponential temperature dependence of the variable-range hopping conductivity. This temperature dependence originates from the property that sites of type (a) and (b) form two independent resistor networks that are weakly coupled to each other by processes of type (c). This leads to a two-color percolation problem which we solve in the critical region.

  9. Temperature dependence of hardness in yttria-stabilized zirconia single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Pirouz, Pirouz; Heuer, Arthur H.

    1991-01-01

    The temperature dependence of hardness and microcracking in single-crystal 9.5-mol pct-Y2O3-fully-stabilized cubic-ZrO2 was studied as a function of orientation. Crack lengths increased with increased temperature up to 500 C; above 800 C, no cracks were found, indicating an indentation brittle-to-ductile transition of about 800 C. The temperature dependence of hardness was reduced around 500 C. Etching studies to delineate the plastic zone around and below indents identified the operative slip systems. The role of dislocations and their interactions within the plastic zone on the hardness and indentation fracture behavior of cubic-ZrO2 are discussed.

  10. Temperature Dependence of the Energy Band Diagram of AlGaN/GaN Heterostructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanli Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Temperature dependence of the energy band diagram of AlGaN/GaN heterostructure was investigated by theoretical calculation and experiment. Through solving Schrodinger and Poisson equations self-consistently by using the Silvaco Atlas software, the energy band diagram with varying temperature was calculated. The results indicate that the conduction band offset of AlGaN/GaN heterostructure decreases with increasing temperature in the range of 7 K to 200 K, which means that the depth of quantum well at AlGaN/GaN interface becomes shallower and the confinement of that on two-dimensional electron gas reduces. The theoretical calculation results are verified by the investigation of temperature dependent photoluminescence of AlGaN/GaN heterostructure. This work provides important theoretical and experimental basis for the performance degradation of AlGaN/GaN HEMT with increasing temperature.

  11. Temperature dependent thermoelectric properties of chemically derived gallium zinc oxide thin films

    KAUST Repository

    Barasheed, Abeer Z.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the temperature dependent thermoelectric properties of sol-gel prepared ZnO and 3% Ga-doped ZnO (GZO) thin films have been explored. The power factor of GZO films, as compared to ZnO, is improved by nearly 17% at high temperature. A stabilization anneal, prior to thermoelectric measurements, in a strongly reducing Ar/H2 (95/5) atmosphere at 500°C was found to effectively stabilize the chemically derived films, practically eliminating hysteresis during thermoelectric measurements. Subtle changes in the thermoelectric properties of stabilized films have been correlated to oxygen vacancies and excitonic levels that are known to exist in ZnO-based thin films. The role of Ga dopants and defects, formed upon annealing, in driving the observed complex temperature dependence of the thermoelectric properties is discussed. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2013.

  12. Yolk-albumen testosterone in a lizard with temperature-dependent sex determination: relation with development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Victoria; Bowden, Rachel M; Crews, David

    2013-06-01

    The leopard gecko (Eublepharis macularius) exhibits temperature-dependent sex determination as well as temperature-influenced polymorphisms. Research suggests that in oviparous reptiles with temperature-dependent sex determination, steroid hormones in the yolk might influence sex determination and sexual differentiation. From captive leopard geckos that were all from the same incubation temperature regime, we gathered freshly laid eggs, incubated them at one of two female-biased incubation temperatures (26 or 34°C), and measured testosterone content in the yolk-albumen at early or late development. No differences in the concentration of testosterone were detected in eggs from different incubation temperatures. We report testosterone concentrations in the yolk-albumen were higher in eggs of late development than early development at 26°C incubation temperatures, a finding opposite that reported in other TSD reptiles studied to date. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Temperature dependent magneto-crystalline anisotropy of thin films: A relativistic disordered local moment approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buruzs, Á.; Szunyogh, L.; Udvardi, L.; Weinberger, P.; Staunton, J. B.

    2007-09-01

    In order to study the temperature dependence of the magnetic anisotropy energy of thin ferromagnetic films from first principles we combined the relativistic extension of the disordered local moment approach with the screened Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker technique for layered systems. We first apply the new method for a Fe monolayer on a Cu(1 1 1) surface and a Co monolayer on a Cu(1 0 0) surface referring to an out-of-plane and an in-plane magnetization, respectively. Interestingly, the magnetic anisotropy energy follows a remarkably different temperature dependence for these two cases. This different behavior is also demonstrated in terms of the relationship between the magnetic anisotropy energy and the average magnetization.

  14. Mechanical and thermal postbuckling of shear-deformable FGM plates with temperature-dependent properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duc, N. D.; Tung, H. V.

    2010-12-01

    An analytical approach to investigating the stability of simply supported rectangular functionally graded plates under in-plane compressive, thermal, and combined loads is presented. The material properties are assumed to be temperature-dependent and graded in the thickness direction according to a simple power-law distribution in terms of volume fractions of constituents. The equilibrium and compatibility equations for the plates are derived by using the first-order shear deformation theory of plates, taking into account both the geometrical nonlinearity in the von Karman sense and initial geometrical imperfections. The resulting equations are solved by employing the Galerkin procedure to obtain expressions from which the postbuckling load-deflection curves can be traced by an iterative procedure. A stability analysis performed for geometrically midplane-symmetric FGM plates shows the effects of material and geometric parameters, in-plane boundary conditions, temperature-dependent material properties, and imperfections on the postbuckling behavior of the plates.

  15. Temperature dependence of fluorescence decay time and emission spectrum of bismuth germanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melcher, C.L.; Liberman, A.; Schweitzer, J.S.; Simonetti, J.

    1985-01-01

    Bismuth germanate has become an increasingly popular replacement for NaI(Tl) scintillators in recent years, mainly due to its higher detection efficiency. However, its scintillation efficiency and fluorescence decay time are strongly temperature dependent. Optimum performance of detector systems which employ BGO crystals depends on knowledge of the BGO pulse shape and intensity and its emission spectrum at the operating temperature of the detector. Measurements of these quantities are presented over the temperature range -47 0 C to +111 0 C. Although the emission spectrum shifts only slightly over this temperature range, the scintillation efficiency and fluorescence decay time are strongly temperature dependent. In addition to the usefulness of these data for optimizing detector design, the results imply that luminescence quenching in BGO cannot be characterized by a single thermal activation to a radiationless transition but that a more complex model is required to characterize the light output from BGO crystals

  16. On the temperature dependence of the reaction O+NO-NO2(asterisk). [in earth atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, W. E.

    1984-01-01

    The published data on the temperature dependence of the radiative combination of atomic oxygen with nitric oxide at pressures near 1 torr is examined. Arguments are advanced to suggest that radiation near the cut-off wavelength (about 3875A) is coming from the unstabilized activated complex, NO2(asterisk). At 4000A a positive activation energy of 1 kcal/mole is deduced. Application of this temperature dependence with the rate coefficient at 5200A is made to airglow measurements in aurora. The deduced NO concentration is about 10 to the 9th per cu cm, in general agreement with that deduced from the measured NO(+)/O2(+) ratio as well as an auroral model prediction.

  17. Temperature Dependence of Faraday Effect-Induced Bias Error in a Fiber Optic Gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuyou; Liu, Pan; Guang, Xingxing; Xu, Zhenlong; Guan, Lianwu; Li, Guangchun

    2017-09-07

    Improving the performance of interferometric fiber optic gyroscope (IFOG) in harsh environments, such as magnetic field and temperature field variation, is necessary for its practical applications. This paper presents an investigation of Faraday effect-induced bias error of IFOG under varying temperature. Jones matrix method is utilized to formulize the temperature dependence of Faraday effect-induced bias error. Theoretical results show that the Faraday effect-induced bias error changes with the temperature in the non-skeleton polarization maintaining (PM) fiber coil. This phenomenon is caused by the temperature dependence of linear birefringence and Verdet constant of PM fiber. Particularly, Faraday effect-induced bias errors of two polarizations always have opposite signs that can be compensated optically regardless of the changes of the temperature. Two experiments with a 1000 m non-skeleton PM fiber coil are performed, and the experimental results support these theoretical predictions. This study is promising for improving the bias stability of IFOG.

  18. Temperature dependence of positron lifetime in ordered porous silica (SBA-3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunishige, S.; Koshimizu, M.; Asai, K.

    2009-01-01

    The temperature dependence of positron lifetime in uniform mesopores was analyzed. We used SBA-3 as the sample material, which possesses an ordered porous structure with uniform cylindrical mesopores. The positron lifetime corresponding to the annihilation in the mesopores increased gradually with a decrease in temperature down to 100 K, and its relative intensity also increased concomitantly. This result was attributed to the lower probability of the escape of the ortho-positronium (o-Ps) from the mesopores into the intergrain space at lower temperatures. An anomalous and sudden increase in the lifetime was observed at around 100 K; this result was in agreement with an increase in the positron lifetime reported in a previous study. It was revealed that the increase in the lifetime is very steep in cases of uniform mesopores, suggesting that the temperature dependence is influenced by the pore size.

  19. Temperature dependence of Raman scattering in β-(AlGa2O3 thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a detailed investigation on temperature-dependent Raman scattering of β-(AlGa2O3 thin films with different Al content (0-0.72 under the temperature range of 77-300 K. The temperature-dependent Raman shifts and linewidths of the phonon modes were obtained by employing Lorentz fitting. The linewidths broadening of phonon modes with the temperature can be well explained by a model involving the effects of thermal expansion, lattice-mismatch-induced strain, and decay of optical phonon into two and three phonons. It is clearly demonstrated dependence of the linewidths and decay process on the Al content in β-(AlGa2O3 thin films, which can provide an experimental basis for realization of (AlGa2O3-based optoelectronic device applications.

  20. Temperature dependence of magnetic excitations in the frustrated antiferromagnetic spinel ZnMn2O4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hun; Hwang, In-Yong; Chung, Jae-Ho; Stewart, J. Ross; Higemoto, Wataru; Miyake, Yasuhiro

    2018-01-01

    We report the temperature-dependent evolution of spin ordering and excitations of the frustrated tetragonal (c >a ) spinel ZnMn2O4 across the two-dimensional antiferromagnetic transition. Muon spin relaxation indicates full development of ordered magnetic moments immediately below TN=62.7 (2 ) K in spite of the apparent low-dimensional ordering. Using inelastic neutron scattering, we obtained the spin Hamiltonian accounting for the temperature-dependent spin excitations. The damped spin waves at high temperature exhibit a continuous increase in their lifetime on cooling across TN. In contrast, the finite anisotropy gap appears suddenly below TN indicating that single-ion anisotropy stabilizes the antiferromagnetic chains. We also observed the frustrated out-of-plane exchange contributing to the high-energy modes.

  1. Probing Temperature-Dependent Recombination Kinetics in Polymer:Fullerene Solar Cells by Electric Noise Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Landi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of solvent additives on the temperature behavior of both charge carrier transport and recombination kinetics in bulk heterojunction solar cells has been investigated by electric noise spectroscopy. The observed differences in charge carrier lifetime and mobility are attributed to a different film ordering and donor-acceptor phase segregation in the blend. The measured temperature dependence indicates that bimolecular recombination is the dominant loss mechanism in the active layer, affecting the device performance. Blend devices prepared with a high-boiling-point solvent additive show a decreased recombination rate at the donor-acceptor interface as compared to the ones prepared with the reference solvent. A clear correlation between the device performance and the morphological properties is discussed in terms of the temperature dependence of the mobility-lifetime product.

  2. EXACT SOLUTION FOR TEMPERATURE-DEPENDENT BUCKLING ANALYSIS OF FG-CNT-REINFORCED MINDLIN PLATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohammad Mousavi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This research deals with the buckling analysis of nanocomposite polymeric temperature-dependent plates reinforced by single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs. For the carbon-nanotube reinforced composite (CNTRC plate, uniform distribution (UD and three types of functionally graded (FG distribution patterns of SWCNT reinforcements are assumed. The material properties of FG-CNTRC plate are graded in the thickness direction and estimated based on the rule of mixture. The CNTRC is located in a elastic medium which is simulated with temperature-dependent Pasternak medium. Based on orthotropic Mindlin plate theory, the governing equations are derived using Hamilton’s principle and solved by Navier method. The influences of the volume fractions of carbon nanotubes, elastic medium, temperature and distribution type of CNTs are considered on the buckling of the plate. Results indicate that CNT distribution close to top and bottom are more efficient than those distributed nearby the mid-plane for increasing the stiffness of plates.

  3. Temperature dependence of conductivity in high mobility MIS structures on a base of (001) silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyrodov, E.A.; Dolgopolov, V.T.; Dorozhkin, C.I.; Zhitenev, N.B.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of the temperature dependence of the conductivity of two-dimensional electrons in silicon MIS structures were carried out. It is shown that the observed dependence is well described by the equation σ(T) = σ(0)(1-Q(kT var-epsilon F )-P(kT/var-epsilon F )3/2 + O[(kT/var-epsilon F ) 2 ]). The variation of the coefficient Q with the density N S of the two-dimensional electrons is determined, and it is shown that the observed trend of the Q(s) curve is described by consideration of the temperature dependence of the dielectric function of a two-dimensional electron gas

  4. Temperature dependence of magnetic anisotropies in ultrathin Fe film on vicinal Si(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yong-Sheng; He, Wei; Ye, Jun; Hu, Bo; Tang, Jin; Zhang, Xiang-Qun [State Key Laboratory of Magnetism and Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Cheng, Zhao-Hua, E-mail: zhcheng@aphy.iphy.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Magnetism and Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); School of Physical Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2017-05-01

    The temperature dependence of magnetic anisotropy of ultrathin Fe film with different thickness epitaxially grown on vicinal Si(111) substrate has been quantitatively investigated using the anisotropic magnetoresistance(AMR) measurements. Due to the effect of the vicinal substrate, the magnetic anisotropy is the superposition of a four-fold, a two-fold and a weakly six-fold contribution. It is found that the temperature dependence of the first-order magnetocrystalline anisotropies coefficient follows power laws of the reduced magnetization m(T)(=M(T)/M(0)) being consistent with the Callen and Callen's theory. However the temperature dependence of uniaxial magnetic anisotropy (UMA) shows novel behavior that decreases roughly as a function of temperature with different power law for samples with different thickness. We also found that the six-fold magnetocrystalline anisotropy is almost invariable over a wide temperature range. Possible mechanisms leading to the different exponents are discussed.

  5. An improved stochastic algorithm for temperature-dependent homogeneous gas phase reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kraft, M

    2003-01-01

    We propose an improved stochastic algorithm for temperature-dependent homogeneous gas phase reactions. By combining forward and reverse reaction rates, a significant gain in computational efficiency is achieved. Two modifications of modelling the temperature dependence (with and without conservation of enthalpy) are introduced and studied quantitatively. The algorithm is tested for the combustion of n-heptane, which is a reference fuel component for internal combustion engines. The convergence of the algorithm is studied by a series of numerical experiments and the computational cost of the stochastic algorithm is compared with the DAE code DASSL. If less accuracy is needed the stochastic algorithm is faster on short simulation time intervals. The new stochastic algorithm is significantly faster than the original direct simulation algorithm in all cases considered.

  6. A Temperature-Dependent Thermal Model of IGBT Modules Suitable for Circuit-Level Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Rui; Wang, Huai; Ma, Ke

    2014-01-01

    Thermal impedance of IGBT modules may vary with operating conditions due to that the thermal conductivity and heat capacity of materials are temperature dependent. This paper proposes a Cauer thermal model for a 1700 V/1000 A IGBT module with temperature-dependent thermal resistances and thermal...... capacitances. The temperature effect is investigated by Finite Element Method (FEM) simulation based on the geometry and material information of the IGBT module. The developed model is ready for circuit-level simulation to achieve an improved accuracy of the estimation on IGBT junction temperature and its...... relevant reliability aspect performance. A test bench is built up with an ultra-fast infrared (IR) camera to validate the proposed thermal impedance model....

  7. Temperature-dependent surface density of alkylthiol monolayers on gold nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuepeng; Lu, Pin; Zhai, Hua; Wu, Yucheng

    2018-03-01

    Atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to study the surface density of passivating monolayers of alkylthiol chains on gold nanocrystals at temperatures ranging from 1 to 800 K. The results show that the surface density of alkylthiol monolayer reaches a maximum value at near room temperature (200-300 K), while significantly decreases with increasing temperature in the higher temperature region (> 300 {{K}}), and slightly decreases with decreasing temperature at low temperature (< 200 {{K}}). We find that the temperature dependence of surface ligand density in the higher temperature region is attributed to the substantial ligand desorption induced by the thermal fluctuation, while that at low temperature results from the reduction in entropy caused by the change in the ordering of passivating monolayer. These results are expected helpful to understand the temperature-dependent surface coverage of gold nanocrystals.

  8. Temperature-Dependent Polarization in Field-Effect Transport and Photovoltaic Measurements of Methylammonium Lead Iodide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labram, John G; Fabini, Douglas H; Perry, Erin E; Lehner, Anna J; Wang, Hengbin; Glaudell, Anne M; Wu, Guang; Evans, Hayden; Buck, David; Cotta, Robert; Echegoyen, Luis; Wudl, Fred; Seshadri, Ram; Chabinyc, Michael L

    2015-09-17

    While recent improvements in the reported peak power conversion efficiency (PCE) of hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite solar cells have been truly astonishing, there are many fundamental questions about the electronic behavior of these materials. Here we have studied a set of electronic devices employing methylammonium lead iodide ((MA)PbI3) as the active material and conducted a series of temperature-dependent measurements. Field-effect transistor, capacitor, and photovoltaic cell measurements all reveal behavior consistent with substantial and strongly temperature-dependent polarization susceptibility in (MA)PbI3 at temporal and spatial scales that significantly impact functional behavior. The relative PCE of (MA)PbI3 photovoltaic cells is observed to reduce drastically with decreasing temperature, suggesting that such polarization effects could be a prerequisite for high-performance device operation.

  9. Temperature dependence of structural parameters in the perovskite Na0.74WO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darlington, C.N.W.; Hriljac, J.A.; Knight, K.S.

    2005-01-01

    Na x WO 3 undergoes three phase transitions involving tilting of the oxygen octahedra about left angle 100 right angle pseudocubic directions. We have measured the temperature dependence of the lattice parameters between 200 and 750 K - a temperature range that spans the three transitions - and determined the evolution of the structure within each phase as temperature changes. The experiments were performed on the high-resolution powder diffractometer HRPD, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK, using time-of-flight neutron diffraction. The critical exponent that describes the temperature dependence of the total tilt angle has been evaluated. An unexpected change in the thermal expansion coefficient in the cubic phase is not understood: an argument based on Landau's theory of phase transitions is used to demonstrate that the change is not the result of co-existence of two phases. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. A Model of Temperature-Dependent Young's Modulus for Ultrahigh Temperature Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiguo Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the different sensitivities of material properties to temperature between ultrahigh temperature ceramics (UHTCs and traditional ceramics, the original empirical formula of temperature-dependent Young's modulus of ceramic materials is unable to describe the temperature dependence of Young's modulus of UHTCs which are used as thermal protection materials. In this paper, a characterization applied to Young's modulus of UHTC materials under high temperature which is revised from the original empirical formula is established. The applicable temperature range of the characterization extends to the higher temperature zone. This study will provide a basis for the characterization for strength and fracture toughness of UHTC materials and provide theoretical bases and technical reserves for the UHTC materials' design and application in the field of spacecraft.

  11. Parasitic bipolar amplification in a single event transient and its temperature dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zheng; Chen Shu-Ming; Chen Jian-Jun; Qin Jun-Rui; Liu Rong-Rong

    2012-01-01

    Using three-dimensional technology computer-aided design (TCAD) simulation, parasitic bipolar amplification in a single event transient (SET) current of a single transistor and its temperature dependence are studied. We quantify the contributions of different current components in a SET current pulse, and it is found that the proportion of parasitic bipolar amplification in total collected charge is about 30% in both 130-nm and 90-nm technologies. The temperature dependence of parasitic bipolar amplification and the mechanism of the SET pulse are also investigated and quantified. The results show that the proportion of charge induced by parasitic bipolar increases with rising temperature, which illustrates that the parasitic bipolar amplification plays an important role in the charge collection of a single transistor

  12. Temperature dependency of the hysteresis behaviour of PZT actuators using Preisach model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mangeot, Charles; Zsurzsan, Tiberiu-Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    The Preisach model is a powerful tool for modelling the hysteresis phenomenon on multilayer piezo actuators under large signal excitation. In this paper, measurements at different temperatures are presented, showing the effect on the density of the Preisach matrix. An energy-based approach...... is presented, aiming at defining a temperature-dependent phenomenological model of hysteresis for a better understanding of the non-linear effects in piezo actuators....

  13. On the temperature dependence of spin pumping in ferromagnet–topological insulator–ferromagnet spin valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Baker

    Full Text Available Topological insulators (TIs have a large potential for spintronic devices owing to their spin-polarized, counter-propagating surface states. Recently, we have investigated spin pumping in a ferromagnet–TI–ferromagnet structure at room temperature. Here, we present the temperature-dependent measurement of spin pumping down to 10 K, which shows no variation with temperature. Keywords: Topological insulator, Spin pumping, Spintronics, Ferromagnetic resonance

  14. On the temperature dependence of possible S8 infrared bands in planetary atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, B. N.; Sagan, C.

    1977-01-01

    The temperature dependence between 77 and 333 K of the infrared spectrum of cyclic S8 in the Jupiter atmosphere has been measured. It was found that the 23-micron Jovian feature (identified by Houck et al., 1975), if real, cannot be attributed to cyclic S8. Other features of S8, however, such as the band with a room-temperature central frequency of 835/cm may prove to be useful temperature calibrators in planetary or satellite spectra.

  15. Temperature dependence of the interfacial magnetic anisotropy in W/CoFeB/MgO

    OpenAIRE

    Kyoung-Min Lee; Jun Woo Choi; Junghyun Sok; Byoung-Chul Min

    2017-01-01

    The interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in W/CoFeB (1.2 ∼ 3 nm)/MgO thin film structures is strongly dependent on temperature, and is significantly reduced at high temperature. The interfacial magnetic anisotropy is generally proportional to the third power of magnetization, but an additional factor due to thermal expansion is required to explain the temperature dependence of the magnetic anisotropy of ultrathin CoFeB films. The reduction of the magnetic anisotropy is more prominent...

  16. Anomalous temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient for the substitutionally-disordered hopping conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raffaelle, R.P.; Parris, P.E.; Anderson, H.U.; Sparlin, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    Thermoelectric power measurements are presented for the (La,Sr)(Cr,Mn)O 3 series. The nonlinear temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient is analyzed in terms of a random distribution of energetically equivalent hopping sites. The limitations of Heikes' formula, which has been traditionally used to calculate small polaron carrier densities in these systems, are discussed. Recent theoretical developments in the interpretation of Seebeck measurements in substitutionally-disordered high-temperature hopping conductors are reviewed

  17. Temperature dependence of shot noise in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Jiasen; Liu, Liang; Feng, J. F.; Han, X. F.; Coey, J. M. D.; Zhang, X.-G.; Wei, Jian

    2018-03-01

    Shot noise reveals spin dependent transport properties in a magnetic tunnel junction. We report measurement of shot noise in CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions, which shows a strong temperature dependence. The Fano factor used to characterize shot noise increases with decreasing temperature. A sequential tunneling model can be used to account for these results, in which a larger Fano factor results from larger spin relaxation length at lower temperatures.

  18. Temperature dependence of the 2D′ mode of an isotopically labelledgraphene double layer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Verhagen, Timotheus; Valeš, Václav; Frank, Otakar; Kalbáč, Martin; Vejpravová, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 253, č. 12 (2016), 2342-2346 ISSN 0370-1972 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-01953S; GA MŠk LL1301 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : graphene * isotope labelling * Raman spectroscopy * temperature dependence Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism; CG - Electrochemistry (UFCH-W) Impact factor: 1.674, year: 2016

  19. Temperature Dependent Sellmeier Equation for the Refractive Index of GaP (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-01

    ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YY) 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 30 January 2018 Interim 30 July 2015 – 30 December 2017 4. TITLE...0.7 and 12.5 μm over a temperature range of 78 to 450 K, is presented. The temperature dependence values of the generated wavelengths in nonlinear...frequency conversion calculated using this equation match well the experimentally measured values . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Nonlinear optical materials

  20. An analytical method for determining the temperature dependent moisture diffusivities of pumpkin seeds during drying process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Can, Ahmet [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Trakya, 22030 Edirne (Turkey)

    2007-02-15

    This paper presents an analytical method, which determines the moisture diffusion coefficients for the natural and forced convection hot air drying of pumpkin seeds and their temperature dependence. In order to obtain scientific data, the pumpkin seed drying process was investigated under both natural and forced hot air convection regimes. This paper presents the experimental results in which the drying air was heated by solar energy. (author)

  1. Temperature dependence of CIE-x,y color coordinates in YAG:Ce single crystal phosphor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rejman, M.; Babin, Vladimir; Kučerková, Romana; Nikl, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 187, Jul (2017), s. 20-25 ISSN 0022-2313 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA04010135 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : YAG:Ce * single-crystal * simulation * energy level lifetime * white LED * CIE * temperature dependence Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 2.686, year: 2016

  2. Derivation of temperature dependent material properties of polymer foam core materials using optical extensometry

    OpenAIRE

    Dulieu-Barton, J.M.; Boyenval Langlois, C.; Thomsen, O.T.; Zhang, S.; Fruehmann, R.K.

    2010-01-01

    A methodology for determining the temperature dependence of Young’s modulus and Poisson’s ratio of polymer foams core materials is presented. The design of the test specimen is described in detail, covering the parasitic effects resulting from departures from the uniform strain condition. The measurement approach is based on a non-contact technique so that the behaviour of the complaint foam is not modified by the attachment of strain gauges or extensometers. Firstly experiments are con...

  3. Effect of excitation frequency on temperature dependent electroluminescence of ZnS : Cu, Mn : (H)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, L.K.

    1986-04-01

    The temperature dependent electroluminescence yields of Hydrogen coactivated (ZnS : Cu, Mn) Phosphor have been investigated under the influence of excitation field frequencies. It was observed that brightness maximum of electroluminescent intensity shifts towards higher temperature region for all emissions. The shift for blue emission is remarkable at some higher frequency. Electroluminescent output under simultaneous effect of frequency and temperature shows the validity of interrelation, f=A e(-c/KT). (author)

  4. Quark mass density- and temperature- dependent model for bulk strange quark matter

    OpenAIRE

    al, Yun Zhang et.

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that the quark mass density-dependent model can not be used to explain the process of the quark deconfinement phase transition because the quark confinement is permanent in this model. A quark mass density- and temperature-dependent model in which the quark confinement is impermanent has been suggested. We argue that the vacuum energy density B is a function of temperature. The dynamical and thermodynamical properties of bulk strange quark matter for quark mass density- and temper...

  5. Accounting of the influence of temperature dependant transient thermodynamic processes on gas laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivchenko, Vladimir

    2018-01-01

    In this paper the effect of the presence of temperature dependent transient thermodynamic processes such as the dissociation, condensation and excitation of vibrational degrees of freedom on the peculiarities of the behaviour of an imperfect gas was considered on a quantitative level. We also discussed the influence of the nonequilibrium thermodynamic effects on the behaviour of real gas and estimated the order of their magnitudes.

  6. An unusual temperature dependence in the oxidation of oxycarbide layers on uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Walton P.

    1981-09-01

    An anomalous temperature dependence has been observed for the oxidation kinetics of outermost oxycarbide layers on polycrystalline uranium metal. Normally, oxidation or corrosion reactions are expected to proceed more rapidly as the temperature is elevated. Thus, it came as a surprise when we observed that the removal of the outermost atomic layers of carbon from uranium oxycarbide by O 2 reproducibly proceeds at a much faster rate at 25°C than at 280°C.

  7. Brillouin scattering measurements of the temperature dependence of sound velocity and acoustic absorption in simple alcohols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, J. R.; Coakley, R. W.

    2011-07-01

    A scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer was used to measure Brillouin spectra of methanol, isopropanol and a 95% ethanol-water mixture for temperatures ranging between 285 K and 320 K. The Brillouin frequency shifts and linewidths were used to calculate the velocities and absorption coefficients of hypersonic acoustic waves in these liquids. The temperature dependence of sound speed and acoustic attenuation was determined. For all three materials, both sound velocity and absorption coefficient decreased with temperature.

  8. The temperature dependence of the gas gain in sealed proportional counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanha-Honko, V.

    1980-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the gas gain in sealed proportional counters has been studied. It is found that the temperature coefficient of the gas gain can be explained by the thermal expansion of the counter materials. A simple model for the temperature coefficient, based on the Diethorn gas amplification formula, is presented. Abnormal temperature coefficients, attributed to impurities present in the counter gas, have been found in some individual counters. (orig.)

  9. Temperature dependency of electrical resistivity of soils; Tsuchi no hiteiko no ondo izonsei ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S.; Matsui, T. [Osaka University, Osaka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Park, M.; Fujiwara, H. [Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

    1997-10-22

    Kinds of ground materials, porosity, electrical resistivity of pores, degree of saturation, and content of clays are the factors affecting the electrical resistivity of soils. In addition to these factors, the electrical resistivity of soils around hot spring water and geothermal areas depends on the temperature due to fluctuation of cation mobility in the pore water with the temperature. In this paper, the temperature dependency of electrical resistivity of groundwater and soils is investigated by recognizing that of groundwater as that of pore water. As a result, it was found that the electrical resistivity of groundwater becomes lower as increasing the amount of dissolved cation, and that the temperature dependency of electrical resistivity is not significant because of the small mobility of cation. The electrical resistivity of soils was significantly affected by that of pore water, in which the mobility of cation was changed with temperature changes. Accordingly, the temperature dependency of electrical resistivity of soils has a similar tendency as that of groundwater. 5 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Temperature-dependent oxygen limitation and the rise of Bergmann's rule in species with aquatic respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollinson, Njal; Rowe, Locke

    2018-02-21

    Bergmann's rule is the propensity for species-mean body size to decrease with increasing temperature. Temperature-dependent oxygen limitation has been hypothesized to help drive temperature-size relationships among ectotherms, including Bergmann's rule, where organisms reduce body size under warm oxygen-limited conditions, thereby maintaining aerobic scope. Temperature-dependent oxygen limitation should be most pronounced among aquatic ectotherms that cannot breathe aerially, as oxygen solubility in water decreases with increasing temperature. We use phylogenetically explicit analyses to show that species-mean adult size of aquatic salamanders with branchial or cutaneous oxygen uptake becomes small in warm environments and large in cool environments, whereas body size of aquatic species with lungs (i.e., that respire aerially), as well as size of semiaquatic and terrestrial species do not decrease with temperature. We argue that oxygen limitation drives the evolution of small size in warm aquatic environments for species with aquatic respiration. More broadly, the stronger decline in size with temperature observed in aquatic versus terrestrial salamander species mirrors the relatively strong plastic declines in size observed previously among aquatic versus terrestrial invertebrates, suggesting that temperature-dependent oxygen availability can help drive patterns of plasticity, micro- and macroevolution. © 2018 The Author(s). Evolution © 2018 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  11. The temperature--dependent expression of GST of Schistosoma japonicum (Philippine strain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Z H; Song, G C; Xu, Y X; Liu, S X

    1993-03-01

    Obtained from pSj5, the cDNA gene encoding GST antigen of Schistosoma japonicum (Philippine strain) was ligated with efficient temperature-dependent PBV220 vector which was constructed in CAPM, and then introduced into host bacterium-DH5 alpha (E. coli) by transformation. Transformants were selected by ampicillin and recombinant clones were identified by restriction mapping. The result showed that recombinant clone 43 was the one carrying recombinant plasmid PBV 220 with the correct insertion of the gene fragment. The GST expression ability of clone 43 was investigated by GST enzymic activity assay and SDS-PAGE. A relatively high level of GST enzymic activity was expressed by this clone under the temperature-dependent condition, that is, cultured at 30 degrees C and expressed at 42 degrees C. A more strongly stained 26 kDa protein band was identified by SDS-PAGE. The result indicated that GST of S. japonicum (Philippine strain) could be expressed not only by IPTG induction, but also by the temperature-dependent method.

  12. Estimation of the temperature dependent interaction between uncharged point defects in Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiyama, Eiji [Department of Communication Engineering, Okayama Prefectural University, 111 Kuboki, Soja-shi, Okayama-ken 719-1197 (Japan); GlobalWafers Japan Co., Ltd., 30 Soya, Hadano, Kanagawa, 257-8566 (Japan); Vanhellemont, Jan [Department of Solid State Sciences, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281-S1, Ghent B-9000 (Belgium); Sueoka, Koji [Department of Communication Engineering, Okayama Prefectural University, 111 Kuboki, Soja-shi, Okayama-ken 719-1197 (Japan)

    2015-01-15

    A method is described to estimate the temperature dependent interaction between two uncharged point defects in Si based on DFT calculations. As an illustration, the formation of the uncharged di-vacancy V{sub 2} is discussed, based on the temperature dependent attractive field between both vacancies. For that purpose, all irreducible configurations of two uncharged vacancies are determined, each with their weight given by the number of equivalent configurations. Using a standard 216-atoms supercell, nineteen irreducible configurations of two vacancies are obtained. The binding energies of all these configurations are calculated. Each vacancy is surrounded by several attractive sites for another vacancy. The obtained temperature dependent of total volume of these attractive sites has a radius that is closely related with the capture radius for the formation of a di-vacancy that is used in continuum theory. The presented methodology can in principle also be applied to estimate the capture radius for pair formation of any type of point defects.

  13. Temperature dependence of gas-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and organochlorine pesticide concentrations in Chicago air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofuoglu, Aysun; Odabasi, Mustafa; Tasdemir, Yucel; Khalili, Nasrin R.; Holsen, Thomas M.

    The temperature dependence of gas-phase atmospheric concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and organochlorine pesticides measured in Chicago, IL between June and October 1995 were investigated using plots of the natural logarithm of partial pressures (ln P) vs. reciprocal mean temperatures (1/ T). For the eight lowest molecular weight PAHs, temperature dependence was statistically significant (at the 95% confidence level) and temperature accounted for 23-49% of the variability in gas-phase concentrations. The relatively higher slopes for most of the PAHs suggested that volatilization from local sources and short-range transport influenced their concentrations. For pesticides, temperature dependence was statistically significant for DDD and for trans-nonachlor (at the 95% and 90% confidence levels), and was not statistically significant for the other five compounds (2-18% of the variability in their gas-phase concentrations). The relatively lower slopes for individual pesticides suggested that they have mostly non-urban and distant sources. Results of back trajectory analyses suggested that the region, southwest of Chicago, might be an important local or regional source sector for PAHs and organochlorine pesticides. No statistically significant relationship was observed between wind speed and PAH or pesticide concentrations. None of the variables (temperature, wind speed, wind direction, local and regional sources) could fully explain the variation in their concentrations measured in Chicago, therefore, this variation can be attributed to the combined effect of those factors.

  14. Temperature Dependence of Volumetric and Dynamic Properties of Imidazolium-Based Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabaz, Fardin; Zhang, Yong; Xue, Lianjie; Quitevis, Edward L; Maginn, Edward J; Khare, Rajesh

    2018-03-01

    Atomistically detailed molecular dynamics simulations were used to investigate the temperature dependence of the specific volume, dynamic properties, and viscosity of linear alkyl chain ([C n C 1 Im][NTf 2 ], n = 3-7) and branched alkyl chain ([(n - 2)mC n-1 C 1 Im][NTf 2 ]) ionic liquids (ILs). The trend of the glass transition temperature (T g ) values obtained in the simulations as a function of the alkyl chain length of cations was similar to the trend seen in experiments. In addition, the system relaxation behavior as determined from the temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient, rotational relaxation time, and viscosity close to T g was observed to follow the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann expression. Furthermore, the reciprocal of the diffusion coefficient of the anion and cation in both linear and branched IL systems showed a linear correlation with viscosity, thus confirming the validity of the Stokes-Einstein relationship for these systems. Similarly, the average rotational relaxation time of the ions was also found to correlate linearly with the viscosity of the ILs over a wide range of temperatures, thereby validating the Debye-Stokes-Einstein relationship for the ILs. These simulation findings suggest that the temperature dependence of the relaxation time of ILs is very similar to that of other glass-forming liquids.

  15. Temperature dependence of the dynamics of zone boundary phonons in ZnO:Li

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Harish Kumar; Sreenivas, K.; Gupta, Vinay; Katiyar, R. S.

    2008-12-01

    Investigations of zone boundary phonons in ZnO:Li system (Li concentration: 10%) and their dynamics with temperature are reported. Additional modes at 127, 157, and 194 cm-1 are observed and assigned to zone boundary phonons at critical point M in the Brillouin zone [J. M. Calleja and M. Cardona, Phys. Rev. B 16, 3753 (1977)] due to breakdown of crystal translational symmetry with Li incorporation in ZnO. Anharmonicity in peak frequency and linewidth of the zone boundary phonons in a temperature range from 100 to 1000 K is also analyzed taking into account the decay of zone boundary phonons into three- and four-phonon modes (cubic and quadratic anharmonicities). The anharmonic behavior of peak frequency is found to be feebly dependent on three-phonon decay process but thermal expansion of lattice together with four-phonon decay process appropriately defines the temperature dependence. Linewidths, however, follow the simple four-phonon decay mechanism. E2(low) mode, on the other hand, shows a linear temperature dependency and therefore follows a three-phonon decay channel. The calculated values of phonon lifetimes at 100 K for the 127, 157, 194 cm-1, and E2(low) modes are 8.23, 6.54, 5.32, and 11.39 ps. Decay of the zone boundary phonon modes compared to E2(low) mode reveals that dopant induced disorder has a strong temperature dependency.

  16. Dynamic temperature dependence patterns in future energy demand models in the context of climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hekkenberg, M.; Moll, H.C.; Uiterkamp, A.J.M. Schoot

    2009-01-01

    Energy demand depends on outdoor temperature in a 'u' shaped fashion. Various studies have used this temperature dependence to investigate the effects of climate change on energy demand. Such studies contain implicit or explicit assumptions to describe expected socio-economic changes that may affect future energy demand. This paper critically analyzes these implicit or explicit assumptions and their possible effect on the studies' outcomes. First we analyze the interaction between the socio-economic structure and the temperature dependence pattern (TDP) of energy demand. We find that socio-economic changes may alter the TDP in various ways. Next we investigate how current studies manage these dynamics in socio-economic structure. We find that many studies systematically misrepresent the possible effect of socio-economic changes on the TDP of energy demand. Finally, we assess the consequences of these misrepresentations in an energy demand model based on temperature dependence and climate scenarios. Our model results indicate that expected socio-economic dynamics generally lead to an underestimation of future energy demand in models that misrepresent such dynamics. We conclude that future energy demand models should improve the incorporation of socio-economic dynamics. We propose dynamically modeling several key parameters and using direct meteorological data instead of degree days. (author)

  17. Simulation of phase separation with temperature-dependent viscosity using lattice Boltzmann method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Heping; Zang, Duyang; Li, Xiaoguang; Geng, Xingguo

    2017-12-27

    This paper presents an exploration of the phase separation behavior and pattern formation in a binary fluid with temperature-dependent viscosity via a coupled lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). By introducing a viscosity-temperature relation into the LBM, the coupling effects of the viscosity-temperature coefficient [Formula: see text] , initial viscosity [Formula: see text] and thermal diffusion coefficient [Formula: see text] , on the phase separation were successfully described. The calculated results indicated that an increase in initial viscosity and viscosity-temperature coefficient, or a decrease in the thermal diffusion coefficient, can lead to the orientation of isotropic growth fronts over a wide range of viscosity. The results showed that droplet-type phase structures and lamellar phase structures with domain orientation parallel or perpendicular to the walls can be obtained in equilibrium by controlling the initial viscosity, thermal diffusivity, and the viscosity-temperature coefficient. Furthermore, the dataset was rearranged for growth kinetics of domain growth and thermal diffusion fronts in a plot by the spherically averaged structure factor and the ratio of separated and continuous phases. The analysis revealed two different temporal regimes: spinodal decomposition and domain growth stages, which further quantified the coupled effects of temperature and viscosity on the evolution of temperature-dependent phase separation. These numerical results provide guidance for setting optimum temperature ranges to obtain expected phase separation structures for systems with temperature-dependent viscosity.

  18. Re-estimating temperature-dependent consumption parameters in bioenergetics models for juvenile Chinook salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumb, John M.; Moffitt, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    Researchers have cautioned against the borrowing of consumption and growth parameters from other species and life stages in bioenergetics growth models. In particular, the function that dictates temperature dependence in maximum consumption (Cmax) within the Wisconsin bioenergetics model for Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha produces estimates that are lower than those measured in published laboratory feeding trials. We used published and unpublished data from laboratory feeding trials with subyearling Chinook Salmon from three stocks (Snake, Nechako, and Big Qualicum rivers) to estimate and adjust the model parameters for temperature dependence in Cmax. The data included growth measures in fish ranging from 1.5 to 7.2 g that were held at temperatures from 14°C to 26°C. Parameters for temperature dependence in Cmax were estimated based on relative differences in food consumption, and bootstrapping techniques were then used to estimate the error about the parameters. We found that at temperatures between 17°C and 25°C, the current parameter values did not match the observed data, indicating that Cmax should be shifted by about 4°C relative to the current implementation under the bioenergetics model. We conclude that the adjusted parameters for Cmax should produce more accurate predictions from the bioenergetics model for subyearling Chinook Salmon.

  19. Modelled temperature-dependent excitability behaviour of a generalised human peripheral sensory nerve fibre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Jacoba E; Hanekom, Tania; Hanekom, Johan J

    2009-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if a recently developed human Ranvier node model, which is based on a modified version of the Hodgkin-Huxley model, could predict the excitability behaviour in human peripheral sensory nerve fibres with diameters ranging from 5.0 to 15.0 microm. The Ranvier node model was extended to include a persistent sodium current and was incorporated into a generalised single cable nerve fibre model. Parameter temperature dependence was included. All calculations were performed in Matlab. Sensory nerve fibre excitability behaviour characteristics predicted by the new nerve fibre model at different temperatures and fibre diameters compared well with measured data. Absolute refractory periods deviated from measured data, while relative refractory periods were similar to measured data. Conduction velocities showed both fibre diameter and temperature dependence and were underestimated in fibres thinner than 12.5 microm. Calculated strength-duration time constants ranged from 128.5 to 183.0 micros at 37 degrees C over the studied nerve fibre diameter range, with chronaxie times about 30% shorter than strength-duration time constants. Chronaxie times exhibited temperature dependence, with values overestimated by a factor 5 at temperatures lower than body temperature. Possible explanations include the deviated absolute refractory period trend and inclusion of a nodal strangulation relationship.

  20. Temperature dependence of anisotropic magnetoresistance in antiferromagnetic Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C.; Seinige, H.; Tsoi, M., E-mail: tsoi@physics.utexas.edu [Physics Department, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Texas Materials Institute, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Cao, G. [Center for Advanced Materials, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506 (United States); Zhou, J.-S.; Goodenough, J. B. [Texas Materials Institute, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    Temperature-dependent magnetotransport properties of the antiferromagnetic semiconductor Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} are investigated with point-contact devices. The point-contact technique allows to probe very small volumes and, therefore, to look for electronic transport on a microscopic scale. Point-contact measurements with single crystals of Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} were intended to see whether the additional local resistance associated with a small contact area between a sharpened Cu tip and the antiferromagnet shows magnetoresistance (MR) such as that seen in bulk crystals. Point-contact measurements at liquid nitrogen temperature revealed large MRs (up to 28%) for modest magnetic fields (250 mT) applied within an IrO{sub 2} (ab) plane with angular dependence showing a crossover from four-fold to two-fold symmetry with an increasing magnetic field. Point contact measurement exhibits distinctive anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) in comparison to a bulk experiment, imposing intriguing questions about the mechanism of AMR in this material. Temperature-dependent MR measurements show that the MR falls to zero at the Neel temperature, but the temperature dependence of the MR ratio differs qualitatively from that of the resistivity. This AMR study helps to unveil the entanglement between electronic transport and magnetism in Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} while the observed magnetoresistive phenomena can be potentially used to sense the antiferromagnetic order parameter in spintronic applications.

  1. Eliminating the non-Gaussian spectral response of X-ray absorbers for transition-edge sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Divan, Ralu [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Gades, Lisa M. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Kenesei, Peter [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Madden, Timothy J. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Miceli, Antonino [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Park, Jun-Sang [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Patel, Umeshkumar M. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Quaranta, Orlando [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Northwestern Univeristy, Evanston, Illinois 60208, USA; Sharma, Hemant [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Bennett, Douglas A. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305, USA; Doriese, William B. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305, USA; Fowler, Joseph W. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305, USA; Gard, Johnathon D. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305, USA; University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA; Hays-Wehle, James P. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305, USA; Morgan, Kelsey M. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305, USA; University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA; Schmidt, Daniel R. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305, USA; Swetz, Daniel S. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305, USA; Ullom, Joel N. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305, USA; University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA

    2017-11-06

    Transition-edge sensors (TESs) as microcalorimeters for high-energy-resolution X-ray spectroscopy are often fabricated with an absorber made of materials with high Z (for X-ray stopping power) and low heat capacity (for high resolving power). Bismuth represents one of the most compelling options. TESs with evaporated bismuth absorbers have shown spectra with undesirable and unexplained low-energy tails. We have developed TESs with electroplated bismuth absorbers over a gold layer that are not afflicted by this problem and that retain the other positive aspects of this material. To better understand these phenomena, we have studied a series of TESs with gold, gold/evaporated bismuth, and gold/electroplated bismuth absorbers, fabricated on the same die with identical thermal coupling. We show that the bismuth morphology is linked to the spectral response of X-ray TES microcalorimeters. Published by AIP Publishing.

  2. Multistage second-order microring-resonator filters with box-like spectral responses and relaxed fabrication tolerances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Haiyang; Zhang, Lei; Shao, Sizhu; Ding, Jianfeng; Fu, Xin; Yang, Lin

    2017-11-01

    We demonstrate an optical filter based on multistage second-order microring resonators (MRs) with box-like spectral responses. Compared with single-stage high-order optical filters with the same number of MRs, the demonstrated structure has comparable performances in the aspects of passband flatness, rolling-off slope and insertion loss. Moreover, the architecture relaxes the fabrication tolerance, electrical wiring and tuning difficulty since there are only two MRs in each stage. We experimentally demonstrate this kind of optical filter with five stages, which shows a 3-dB bandwidth of ~17 GHz, a rolling-off slope of ~5 dB/GHz and an on-chip insertion loss of ~6 dB. Project supported by the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Nos. 2015AA017001, 2015AA010103) and the Natural National Science Foundation of China (NSFC) (Nos. 61235001, 61575187, 61535002, 61204061, 6157031748, 61377067).

  3. Cosensitization with Vat-Based Organic Dyes for Enhanced Spectral Response of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinnezhad, Mozhgan

    2017-04-01

    Cosensitization using two organic dyes with supplementary absorption spectra on a photoelectrode is an effective method for improving the photovoltaic properties of dye-sensitized solar cells. Two organic dyes based on indigo and thioindigo have been synthesized, purified, and used to sensitize solar cells with spectral response extending across the entire visible region. To improve their photoelectric properties, different molar ratios were investigated, yielding total efficiency of 6.17% at dye 1:dye 2 = 4:6. The effect of the concentration of Cheno antiaggregation agent on the performance of the dye-sensitized solar cells was also considered. The results demonstrate that higher conversion efficiency ( η = 6.82%) was achieved with 10 × 10-3 M Cheno. Finally, the performance of cosensitized solar cells was measured at different temperatures between 10°C and 50°C. The results indicated that J sc decreased with increasing temperature, directly affecting the conversion efficiency.

  4. Eliminating the non-Gaussian spectral response of X-ray absorbers for transition-edge sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Daikang; Divan, Ralu; Gades, Lisa M.; Kenesei, Peter; Madden, Timothy J.; Miceli, Antonino; Park, Jun-Sang; Patel, Umeshkumar M.; Quaranta, Orlando; Sharma, Hemant; Bennett, Douglas A.; Doriese, William B.; Fowler, Joseph W.; Gard, Johnathon D.; Hays-Wehle, James P.; Morgan, Kelsey M.; Schmidt, Daniel R.; Swetz, Daniel S.; Ullom, Joel N.

    2017-11-01

    Transition-edge sensors (TESs) as microcalorimeters for high-energy-resolution X-ray spectroscopy are often fabricated with an absorber made of materials with high Z (for X-ray stopping power) and low heat capacity (for high resolving power). Bismuth represents one of the most compelling options. TESs with evaporated bismuth absorbers have shown spectra with undesirable and unexplained low-energy tails. We have developed TESs with electroplated bismuth absorbers over a gold layer that are not afflicted by this problem and that retain the other positive aspects of this material. To better understand these phenomena, we have studied a series of TESs with gold, gold/evaporated bismuth, and gold/electroplated bismuth absorbers, fabricated on the same die with identical thermal coupling. We show that the bismuth morphology is linked to the spectral response of X-ray TES microcalorimeters.

  5. Higher values of spectral response, absorption coefficient and external quantum efficiency of solar cell in the form of pyramids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, A.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents a study on spectral response, absorption coefficient and external quantum efficiency of solar cell in the form of pyramid [1, 2]. We investigate to what extent and under what conditions we want to take advantage of ray incidence Seven times [3, 4]. It is found that these analyses can be used to determine the optimal surface texture which provides the best light trapping for solar cells in terms of the total internal reflection occurring in the high-index medium at incidence angles larger than the nominal critical angle [3-9]. One of the main contributions of this paper is the analysis and quantification of the influence of the opening between the heads of the two closest pyramids in textured surface for solar cells and its application on the photovoltaic parameters. In this model we show that the material can have seven successive incident ray absorptions instead of five currently, where we changed the direction of the reflected ray, by identifying and install the angle between the two neighbouring pyramids, the incidence angle, the opening between the heads of the two closest pyramids and their height. Thus, with an angle between the two neighbouring pyramid fixed at 12° and for angle of incidence fixed at 84°. For these values of the angle between the two neighbouring pyramids and incidence angle, the opening between the heads of the two closest pyramids fixed at 2.10 μm for a pyramid height of 10 μm. This leads to the largest possible increase in optical efficiency, such as spectral response, Absorption Coefficient and External Quantum Efficiency. The results are in good agreement with the available literature.

  6. Can we use the ozone response in a CCM to say which solar spectral irradiance is most likely correct?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, William; Rozanov, Eugene; Shapiro, Anna

    2015-04-01

    Ozone plays a key role in the temperature structure of the Earth's atmosphere and absorbs damaging ultraviolet (UV) solar radiation. Evidence suggests that variations in stratospheric ozone resulting from changes in solar UV output may have an important role to play in weather over the North Atlantic and Europe on decadal timescales through a "top-down" coupling with the troposphere. However, the magnitude of the stratospheric response to the Sun over the 11-year solar cycle (SC) depends primarily on how much the UV changes. SC UV changes differ significantly between different observational instruments and the observations and models. The substantial disagreements between existing SSI datasets lead to different atmospheric responses when they are used in climate models and, therefore, we still cannot fully understand and simulate the ozone variability. We use the SOCOL chemistry-climate model, in specified dynamics mode, to calculate the atmospheric response from using different spectral irradiance from the SATIRE-S and NRLSSI models and with SORCE observations and a constant Sun. We compare the ozone and hydroxl results from these runs with observations to try to determine which SSI dataset is most likely to be correct. This is important to get a better understanding of which SSI dataset should be used in climate modelling and what magnitude of UV variability the Sun has. This will lead to a better understanding of the Sun's influence upon our climate and weather.

  7. Modulation of auditory evoked responses to spectral and temporal changes by behavioral discrimination training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okamoto Hidehiko

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to auditory experience, musicians have better auditory expertise than non-musicians. An increased neocortical activity during auditory oddball stimulation was observed in different studies for musicians and for non-musicians after discrimination training. This suggests a modification of synaptic strength among simultaneously active neurons due to the training. We used amplitude-modulated tones (AM presented in an oddball sequence and manipulated their carrier or modulation frequencies. We investigated non-musicians in order to see if behavioral discrimination training could modify the neocortical activity generated by change detection of AM tone attributes (carrier or modulation frequency. Cortical evoked responses like N1 and mismatch negativity (MMN triggered by sound changes were recorded by a whole head magnetoencephalographic system (MEG. We investigated (i how the auditory cortex reacts to pitch difference (in carrier frequency and changes in temporal features (modulation frequency of AM tones and (ii how discrimination training modulates the neuronal activity reflecting the transient auditory responses generated in the auditory cortex. Results The results showed that, additionally to an improvement of the behavioral discrimination performance, discrimination training of carrier frequency changes significantly modulates the MMN and N1 response amplitudes after the training. This process was accompanied by an attention switch to the deviant stimulus after the training procedure identified by the occurrence of a P3a component. In contrast, the training in discrimination of modulation frequency was not sufficient to improve the behavioral discrimination performance and to alternate the cortical response (MMN to the modulation frequency change. The N1 amplitude, however, showed significant increase after and one week after the training. Similar to the training in carrier frequency discrimination, a long lasting

  8. Temperature-dependent absorption coefficient of the fourth sound in bulk liquid 4He near absolute zero temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, Chul Won; Um, C. I.

    2000-01-01

    The temperature-dependent absorption coefficient of the fourth sound is evaluated explicitly near absolute zero temperature via the temperature-dependent anomalous excitation spectrum in bulk liquid helium. The coefficient increases with decreasing temperature, and the main contribution is due to the thermal conductivity

  9. A unified approach for suppressing sidelobes arising in the spectral response of rugate filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abo-Zahhad, M.; Bataineh, M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper suggests a universal approach to reduce the side lobes which usually appear at both sides of a stop band of a ru gate filter. Both quin tic matching layers and anodization functions are to used to improve the filter's response. The proposed technique could be used to control the ripples level by properly choosing the refractive index profile after amending it to include mat aching layers and/or modulating its profile with a slowly varying anodization (or ta perine) function. Two illustrative examples are given to demonstrate the robustness of the proposed technique. The given examples suggest that combining both effects on the index of refraction profile lead to the lowest possible ripple level. A multichannel filter response is obtained by wavelet cons traction of the refractive index profile with potential applications in multimode lasers and wavelength division multiple xin networks. The obtained results demonstrate the applicability of the adopted approach to design ripple free ru gate filters. The extension to stack filters and other wave guiding structures are also visible. (authors). 14 refs., 8 figs

  10. Cortical Auditory-Evoked Responses in Preterm Neonates: Revisited by Spectral and Temporal Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminska, A; Delattre, V; Laschet, J; Dubois, J; Labidurie, M; Duval, A; Manresa, A; Magny, J-F; Hovhannisyan, S; Mokhtari, M; Ouss, L; Boissel, A; Hertz-Pannier, L; Sintsov, M; Minlebaev, M; Khazipov, R; Chiron, C

    2017-08-11

    Characteristic preterm EEG patterns of "Delta-brushes" (DBs) have been reported in the temporal cortex following auditory stimuli, but their spatio-temporal dynamics remains elusive. Using 32-electrode EEG recordings and co-registration of electrodes' position to 3D-MRI of age-matched neonates, we explored the cortical auditory-evoked responses (AERs) after 'click' stimuli in 30 healthy neonates aged 30-38 post-menstrual weeks (PMW). (1) We visually identified auditory-evoked DBs within AERs in all the babies between 30 and 33 PMW and a decreasing response rate afterwards. (2) The AERs showed an increase in EEG power from delta to gamma frequency bands over the middle and posterior temporal regions with higher values in quiet sleep and on the right. (3) Time-frequency and averaging analyses showed that the delta component of DBs, which negatively peaked around 550 and 750 ms over the middle and posterior temporal regions, respectively, was superimposed with fast (alpha-gamma) oscillations and corresponded to the late part of the cortical auditory-evoked potential (CAEP), a feature missed when using classical CAEP processing. As evoked DBs rate and AERs delta to alpha frequency power decreased until full term, auditory-evoked DBs are thus associated with the prenatal development of auditory processing and may suggest an early emerging hemispheric specialization. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Quality assurance of the Brewer spectral UV measurements in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Lakkala

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The quality assurance of the two Brewer spectrophotometers of the Finnish Meteorological Institute is discussed in this paper. The complete data processing chain from raw signal to high quality spectra is presented. The quality assurance includes daily maintenance, laboratory characterizations, calculation of long-term spectral responsivity, data processing and quality assessment. The cosine correction of the measurements is based on a new method, and is included in the data processing software. The results showed that the actual cosine correction factor of the two Finnish Brewers can vary between 1.08–1.13 and 1.08–1.12, respectively, depending on the sky radiance distribution and wavelength. The temperature characterization showed a linear temperature dependence between the instruments' internal temperature and the photon counts per cycle, and a temperature correction was used for correcting the measurements. The long-term spectral responsivity was calculated using the time series of several lamps using two slightly different methods. The long-term spectral responsivity was scaled to the irradiance scale of the Helsinki University of Technology (HUT for the whole of the measurement time-periods 1990–2006 and 1995–2006 for Sodankylä and Jokioinen, respectively. Both Brewers have participated in many international spectroradiometer comparisons, and have shown good stability. The differences between the Brewers and the portable reference spectroradiometer QASUME have been within 5% during 2002–2007.

  12. Regulation of flow through a T-Shaped open cavity by temperature dependent P, PI, and PID controllers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, Sourav; Mojumder, Satyajit; Saha, Sumon

    2016-01-01

    P (proportional), PI (proportional-integral), and PID (proportional-integral-derivative) controllers are popular means of controlling industrial processes. Due to superior response, accuracy, and stable performance, PID controllers are mostly used in control systems. This paper presents a mathematical model and subsequent response analysis regarding regulation of flow in mixed convection through a T-shaped open cavity by temperature dependent controllers. The T-shaped cavity has cold top and hot bottom walls, while air is flowing through the inlet at surrounding temperature. The inflow is regulated by a controlled gate which operates according to the signal received from the controller. Values of proportional gain (k p ), integral gain (k i ), and derivative gain (k d ) are varied to obtain the desired system response and to ensure a stable system with fastest response. At first, only P controller is used and eventually PI and finally PID control scheme is applied for controller tuning. Tuning of different controllers (P, PI, and PID) are carried out systematically based on the reference temperature which is continuously monitored at a certain location inside the cavity. It is found that PID controller performs better than P or PI controller.

  13. Regulation of flow through a T-Shaped open cavity by temperature dependent P, PI, and PID controllers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Sourav, E-mail: ssaha09@me.buet.ac.bd; Mojumder, Satyajit, E-mail: satyajit@me.buet.ac.bd; Saha, Sumon, E-mail: sumonsaha@me.buet.ac.bd [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, Dhaka-1000 (Bangladesh)

    2016-07-12

    P (proportional), PI (proportional-integral), and PID (proportional-integral-derivative) controllers are popular means of controlling industrial processes. Due to superior response, accuracy, and stable performance, PID controllers are mostly used in control systems. This paper presents a mathematical model and subsequent response analysis regarding regulation of flow in mixed convection through a T-shaped open cavity by temperature dependent controllers. The T-shaped cavity has cold top and hot bottom walls, while air is flowing through the inlet at surrounding temperature. The inflow is regulated by a controlled gate which operates according to the signal received from the controller. Values of proportional gain (k{sub p}), integral gain (k{sub i}), and derivative gain (k{sub d}) are varied to obtain the desired system response and to ensure a stable system with fastest response. At first, only P controller is used and eventually PI and finally PID control scheme is applied for controller tuning. Tuning of different controllers (P, PI, and PID) are carried out systematically based on the reference temperature which is continuously monitored at a certain location inside the cavity. It is found that PID controller performs better than P or PI controller.

  14. Regulation of flow through a T-Shaped open cavity by temperature dependent P, PI, and PID controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Sourav; Mojumder, Satyajit; Saha, Sumon

    2016-07-01

    P (proportional), PI (proportional-integral), and PID (proportional-integral-derivative) controllers are popular means of controlling industrial processes. Due to superior response, accuracy, and stable performance, PID controllers are mostly used in control systems. This paper presents a mathematical model and subsequent response analysis regarding regulation of flow in mixed convection through a T-shaped open cavity by temperature dependent controllers. The T-shaped cavity has cold top and hot bottom walls, while air is flowing through the inlet at surrounding temperature. The inflow is regulated by a controlled gate which operates according to the signal received from the controller. Values of proportional gain (kp), integral gain (ki), and derivative gain (kd) are varied to obtain the desired system response and to ensure a stable system with fastest response. At first, only P controller is used and eventually PI and finally PID control scheme is applied for controller tuning. Tuning of different controllers (P, PI, and PID) are carried out systematically based on the reference temperature which is continuously monitored at a certain location inside the cavity. It is found that PID controller performs better than P or PI controller.

  15. Characterization of spectral responses of dissolved organic matter (DOM) for atrazine binding during the sorption process onto black soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifan; Zhang, Xinyuan; Zhang, Xing; Meng, Qingjuan; Gao, Fengjie; Zhang, Ying

    2017-08-01

    This study was aim to investigate the interaction between soil-derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) and atrazine as a kind of pesticides during the sorption process onto black soil. According to the experimental data, the adsorption capacity of Soil + DOM, Soil and DOM were 41.80, 31.45 and 9.35 mg kg -1 , separately, which indicated that DOM significantly enhanced the adsorption efficiency of atrazine by soil. Data implied that the pseudo-second-order kinetic equation could well explain the adsorption process. The adsorption isotherms (R 2  > 0.99) had a satisfactory fit in both Langmuir and Freundlich models. Three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (3D-EEM), synchronous fluorescence, two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) were selected to analyze the interaction between DOM and atrazine. 3D-EEM showed that humic acid-like substances were the main component of DOM. The fluorescence of DOM samples were gradually quenched with the increased of atrazine concentrations. Synchronous fluorescence spectra showed that static fluorescence quenching was the main quenching process. 2D-COS indicated that the order of the spectral changes were as following: 336 nm > 282 nm. Furthermore, the fluorescence quenching of humic-like fraction occurred earlier than that of protein-like fraction under atrazine surroundings. FT-IR spectra indicated that main compositions of soil DOM include proteins, polysaccharides and humic substances. The findings of this study are significant to reveal DOM played an important role in the environmental fate of pesticides during sorption process onto black soil and also provide more useful information for understanding the interaction between DOM and pesticides by using spectral responses. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Study of spectral response of a neutron filter. Design of a method to adjust spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colomb-Dolci, F.

    1999-02-01

    The first part of this thesis describes an experimental method which intends to determine a neutron spectrum in the epithermal range [1 eV -10 keV]. Based on measurements of reaction rates provided by activation foils, it gives flux level in each energy range corresponding to each probe. This method can be used in any reactor location or in a neutron beam. It can determine scepter on eight energy groups, five groups in the epithermal range. The second part of this thesis presents a study of an epithermal neutron beam design, in the frame of Neutron Capture Therapy. A beam tube was specially built to test filters made up of different materials. Its geometry was designed to favour epithermal neutron crossing and to cut thermal and fast neutrons. A code scheme was validated to simulate the device response with a Monte Carlo code. Measurements were made at ISIS reactor and experimental spectra were compared to calculated ones. This validated code scheme was used to simulate different materials usable as shields in the tube. A study of these shields is presented at the end of this thesis. (author)

  17. Light-enhanced calcification in hermatypic corals: new insights from light spectral responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itay eCohen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Light enhanced calcification (LEC is a well documented phenomenon in reef-building corals. The main mechanism proposed for LEC is that photosynthetic CO2 uptake by the algal symbionts elevates the pH and thus enhances calcification. We evaluated the role of light and of photosynthesis on calcification by assessing the response of the corals Porites lutea and Acropora variabilis to different components of the light spectrum. Calcification and photosynthesis of both species decreased under lagoon blue, green and red light (peaks at 500, 550 and 600nm respectively. However, blue light (peak at 455nm enhanced calcification rates of P. lutea and A. variabilis (up to 4.1 and 10.5 fold of dark values, respectively reaching levels comparable to those measured under full spectrum illumination. However, contrary to our expectations, photosynthetic oxygen production was considerably reduced under blue light, to the extent that it remained below the compensation point even under illumination as high as 400µmol photons m-2 s-1. It is the first time that a direct effect of light not mediated by the photosynthetic process has been demonstrated to trigger LEC in corals. We propose that blue light signaling, and animal receptors thereof may be involved in the enhancement of calcification by hermatypic corals.

  18. Temperature dependent dynamics of DegP-trimer: A molecular dynamics study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nivedita Rai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DegP is a heat shock protein from high temperature requirement protease A family, which reacts to the environmental stress conditions in an ATP independent way. The objective of the present analysis emerged from the temperature dependent functional diversity of DegP between chaperonic and protease activities at temperatures below and above 28 °C, respectively. DegP is a multimeric protein and the minimal functional unit, DegP-trimer, is of great importance in understanding the DegP pathway. The structural aspects of DegP-trimer with respect to temperature variation have been studied using molecular dynamics simulations (for 100 ns and principal component analysis to highlight the temperature dependent dynamics facilitating its functional diversity. The DegP-trimer revealed a pronounced dynamics at both 280 and 320 K, when compared to the dynamics observed at 300 K. The LA loop is identified as the highly flexible region during dynamics and at extreme temperatures, the residues 46–80 of LA loop express a flip towards right (at 280 and left ( at 320 K with respect to the fixed β-sheet connecting the LA loop of protease for which Phe46 acts as one of the key residues. Such dynamics of LA loop facilitates inter-monomeric interaction with the PDZ1 domain of the neighbouring monomer and explains its active participation when DegP exists as trimer. Hence, the LA loop mediated dynamics of DegP-trimer is expected to provide further insight into the temperature dependent dynamics of DegP towards the understanding of its assembly and functional diversity in the presence of substrate.

  19. Time and Temperature Dependence of Viscoelastic Stress Relaxation in Gold and Gold Alloy Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongkolsuttirat, Kittisun

    Radio frequency (RF) switches based on capacitive MicroElectroMechanical System (MEMS) devices have been proposed as replacements for traditional solid-state field effect transistor (FET) devices. However, one of the limitations of the existing capacitive switch designs is long-term reliability. Failure is generally attributed to electrical charging in the capacitor's dielectric layer that creates an attractive electrostatic force between a moving upper capacitor plate (a metal membrane) and the dielectric. This acts as an attractive stiction force between them that may cause the switch to stay permanently in the closed state. The force that is responsible for opening the switch is the elastic restoring force due to stress in the film membrane. If the restoring force decreases over time due to stress relaxation, the tendency for stiction failure behavior will increase. Au films have been shown to exhibit stress relaxation even at room temperature. The stress relaxation observed is a type of viscoelastic behavior that is more significant in thin metal films than in bulk materials. Metal films with a high relaxation resistance would have a lower probability of device failure due to stress relaxation. It has been shown that solid solution and oxide dispersion can strengthen a material without unacceptable decreases in electrical conductivity. In this study, the viscoelastic behavior of Au, AuV solid solution and AuV2O5 dispersion created by DC magnetron sputtering are investigated using the gas pressure bulge testing technique in the temperature range from 20 to 80°C. The effectiveness of the two strengthening approaches is compared with the pure Au in terms of relaxation modulus and 3 hour modulus decay. The time dependent relaxation curves can be fitted very well with a four-term Prony series model. From the temperature dependence of the terms of the series, activation energies have been deduced to identify the possible dominant relaxation mechanism. The measured

  20. Temperature dependence of the electric field gradient in AgPd and AgPt alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krolas, K.

    1977-07-01

    The measurements of temperature dependence of the electric field gradient (EFG) on 111 Cd nuclei in AgPd and AgPt alloys were performed using the time dependent perturbed angular correlation method. The EFG caused by impurities distributed in further coordination shells decrease stronaer with increasing temperature than the EFG due to single impurity being the nearest neighbour of the probe atom. These results were explained assuming different modes of thermal vibrations of single impurity atoms and impurity complexes in silver host lattice. (author)

  1. On the temperature dependence of H-U iso in the riding hydrogen model

    OpenAIRE

    Lübben, Jens; Volkmann, Christian; Grabowsky, Simon; Edwards, Alison; Morgenroth, Wolfgang; Fabbiani, Francesca P. A.; Sheldrick, George M.; Dittrich, Birger

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of H-Uiso in N-acetyl-l-4-hydroxyproline monohydrate is investigated. Imposing a constant temperature-independent multiplier of 1.2 or 1.5 for the riding hydrogen model is found to be inaccurate, and severely underestimates H-Uiso below 100 K. Neutron diffraction data at temperatures of 9, 150, 200 and 250 K provide benchmark results for this study. X-ray diffraction data to high resolution, collected at temperatures of 9, 30, 50, 75, 100, 150, 200...

  2. A temperature-dependent theory for HeII: Application to the liquid structure factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chela-Flores, J.; Ghassib, H.B.

    1981-08-01

    A temperature-dependent theory is presented for HeII, which is based on both a gauge-theoretic formulation as well as a mean-field (Hartree) approach. A simple model calculation is then performed within this framework for the liquid structure factor of the system. In particular, explicit expressions are obtained for the low-momentum-transfer and low-temperature limits, which seem to conform with the available experimental data. Further, the curvature of the structure factor is predicted, under these circumstances, to be only mildly dependent on temperature. Throughout, we compare and contrast with other theoretical attempts, including Feynman's. (author)

  3. Temperature-dependent exciton recombination in asymmetrical ZnCdSe/ZnSe double quantum wells

    CERN Document Server

    Yu Guang You; Zhang, J Y; Zheng, Z H; Yang, B J; Zhao Xiao Wei; Shen De Zhen; Kong Xiang Gui

    1999-01-01

    Temperature-dependent exciton recombination in asymmetrical ZnCdSe/ZnSe double quantum wells is studied by recording photoluminescence spectra and photoluminescence decay spectra. The exciton tunnelling from the wide well to the narrow well and the thermal dissociation of excitons are two factors that influence the exciton recombination in this structure. In the narrow well, both of the two processes decrease the emission intensity, whereas, in the wide well, these two processes have contrary influences on the exciton density. The change of the emission intensity depends on which is the stronger one. (author)

  4. Defect-induced change of temperature-dependent elastic constants in BCC iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, N.; Setyawan, W.; Zhang, S. H.; Wang, Z. G.

    2017-07-01

    The effects of radiation-induced defects (randomly distributed vacancies, voids, and interstitial dislocation loops) on temperature-dependent elastic constants, C11, C12, and C44 in BCC iron, are studied with molecular dynamics method. The elastic constants are found to decrease with increasing temperatures for all cases containing different defects. The presence of vacancies, voids, or interstitial loops further decreases the elastic constants. For a given number of point defects, the randomly distributed vacancies show the strongest effect compared to voids or interstitial loops. All these results are expected to provide useful information to combine with experimental results for further understanding of radiation damage.

  5. Temperature dependence of dislocation-related luminescence in silicon-germanium heterostructure

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, H S

    1998-01-01

    We measured the photoluminescence spectra of very thin and partially strained Si sub 0 sub . sub 6 Ge sub 0 sub . sub 4 alloys grown on silicon substrate with varying degrees of strain relaxation. We observed photoluminescence lines, so called D-lines, which arose from dislocations in the SiGe/Si alloys. We identified the origin of the D-lines as the dislocations in Si substrate extending from the SiGe/Si interface. We also studied the temperature dependence of the Si D-lines and determined the dissociation energy of the defect energy levels.

  6. Temperature-dependent thermal properties of supported MoS2 monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taube, Andrzej; Judek, Jarosław; Łapińska, Anna; Zdrojek, Mariusz

    2015-03-11

    Thermal properties can substantially affect the operation of various electronics and optoelectronics devices based on two-dimensional materials. In this work, we describe our investigation of temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and interfacial thermal conductance of molybdenum disulfide monolayers supported on SiO2/Si substrates, using Raman spectroscopy. We observed that the calculated thermal conductivity (κ) and interfacial thermal conductance (g) decreased with increasing temperature from 62.2 W m(-1) K(-1) and 1.94 MW m(-2) K(-1) at 300 K to 7.45 W m(-1) K(-1) and 1.25 MW m(-2) K(-1) at 450 K, respectively.

  7. Magnetic field and temperature dependence of the critical vortex velocity in type-II superconducting films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimaldi, G; Leo, A; Cirillo, C; Attanasio, C; Nigro, A; Pace, S [CNR-INFM Laboratorio Regionale SuperMat, Via Salvador Allende, I-84081 Baronissi (Italy)], E-mail: grimaldi@sa.infn.it

    2009-06-24

    We study the vortex dynamics in the instability regime induced by high dissipative states well above the critical current in Nb superconducting strips. The magnetic field and temperature behavior of the critical vortex velocity corresponding to the observed dynamic instability is ascribed to intrinsic non-equilibrium phenomena. The Larkin-Ovchinnikov (LO) theory of electronic instability in high velocity vortex motion has been applied to interpret the temperature dependence of the critical vortex velocity. The magnetic field dependence of the vortex critical velocity shows new features in the low-field regime not predicted by LO.

  8. Study of the temperature dependence of giant magnetoresistance in metallic granular composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju Sheng; Li, Z.-Y.

    2002-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the giant magnetoresistance of metallic granular composite is studied. It is considered that the composite contains both large magnetic grains with surface spin S' and small magnetic impurities. It is found that the decrease of surface spin S' of grain is the main cause of an almost linear decrease of giant magnetoresistance with the increase of temperature in high temperature range. The magnetic impurities, composed of several atoms, lead to an almost linear increase of the giant magnetoresistance with the decrease of temperature in low temperature range. Our calculations are in good agreement with recent experimental data for metallic nanogranular composites

  9. Analysis of the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity of insulating single crystal oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Langenberg

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity of 27 different single crystal oxides is reported from ≈20 K to 350 K. These crystals have been selected among the most common substrates for growing epitaxial thin-film oxides, spanning over a range of lattice parameters from ≈3.7 Å to ≈12.5 Å. Different contributions to the phonon relaxation time are discussed on the basis of the Debye model. This work provides a database for the selection of appropriate substrates for thin-film growth according to their desired thermal properties, for applications in which heat management is important.

  10. Leading temperature dependence of the conductance in Kondo-correlated quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aligia, A. A.

    2018-04-01

    Using renormalized perturbation theory in the Coulomb repulsion, we derive an analytical expression for the leading term in the temperature dependence of the conductance through a quantum dot described by the impurity Anderson model, in terms of the renormalized parameters of the model. Taking these parameters from the literature, we compare the results with published ones calculated using the numerical renormalization group obtaining a very good agreement. The approach is superior to alternative perturbative treatments. We compare in particular to the results of a simple interpolative perturbation approach.

  11. Temperature dependent electrical properties of polyaniline film grown on paper through aniline vapor polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deb, K.; Bera, A.; Saha, B., E-mail: biswajit.physics@gmail.com [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology Agartala, Jirania, West Tripura 799046 (India); Bhowmik, K. L. [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology Agartala, Jirania, West Tripura 799046 (India); Department of Chemistry, Bir Bikram Memorial College, Agartala, West Tripura 799004 (India); Chattopadhyay, K. K. [Department of Physics, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India)

    2016-05-23

    Polyaniline thin film has been prepared on paper by aniline vapor deposition technique. Ferric chloride has been used as polymerizing agent in this approach. The prepared films were studied through electrical resistivity and optical properties measurements. The electrical resistivity of the polyaniline film shows significant temperature dependence. The resistance sharply falls with the increase in temperature. The optical absorbance measurements shows characteristics absorbance peak indicating the formation of conducting emeraldine salt form of polyaniline. The optical energy band gap of the film was calculated from the transmittance spectra. The optical energy band gap and electrical conductivity of the polyaniline film is well suited for their applications in electronic devices.

  12. Temperature-dependent charge transport mechanisms in carbon sphere/polyaniline composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieves, Cesar A.; Martinez, Luis M.; Meléndez, Anamaris; Ortiz, Margarita; Ramos, Idalia; Pinto, Nicholas J.; Zimbovskaya, Natalya

    2017-12-01

    Charge transport in the temperature range 80 K polyaniline (PANi). PANi was synthesized via the oxidative polymerization of aniline with ammonium peroxydisulfate (APS) in acidic media. The CS/PANi composite was prepared by coating the spheres with a thin polyaniline (PANi) film doped with hydrochloric acid (HCl) in situ during the polymerization process. Temperature dependent conductivity measurements show that three dimensional variable range hopping of electrons between polymeric chains in PANi-filled gaps between CS is the predominant transport mechanism through CS/PANi composites. The high conductivity of the CS/PANi composite makes the material attractive for the fabrication of devices and sensors.

  13. Study of temperature dependence of light yield from NaBi(WO4)2 crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amosov, C.Yu.; Kalinin, B.N.; Krechetov, Yu.F.; Moiseenko, A.V.; Naumenko, G.A.; Potylitsin, A.P.; Sarytchev, V.P.; Shuvalov, Ye.N.; Vznuzdaev, Ye.A.; Samsonov, V.M.; Solodov, J.P.

    1994-01-01

    The scintillation time structure and the temperature dependence of the light yield from NaBi(WO 4 ) 2 crystals bombarded by 500 MeV electrons have been measured experimentally. These crystals showed a tendency to exhibit scintillator properties when the temperature of the samples was decreased. The light yield increased by more than an order of magnitude with the temperature falling from the room level to that of liquid nitrogen. The scintillation time structure was of a complex pattern, and a slow luminescent component (τ=30 ns) was present in the spectrum. ((orig.))

  14. Tiny optical fiber temperature sensor based on temperature-dependent refractive index of zinc telluride film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Qiang; Song, Zhangqi; Song, Dongyu; Zhang, Xueliang; Li, Bingsheng; Yu, Yang; Chen, Yuzhong

    2018-03-01

    The temperature-dependent refractive index of zinc telluride film can be used to develop a tiny, low cost and film-coated optical fiber temperature sensor. Pulse reference-based compensation technique is used to largely reduce the background noise which makes it possible to detect the minor reflectivity change of the film in different temperatures. The temperature sensitivity is 0.0034dB/° and the background noise is measured to be 0.0005dB, so the resolution can achieve 0.2°.

  15. Anomalous temperature-dependent anchoring in liquid crystals mediated by thermodynamic smectic wetting sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aya, Satoshi; Araoka, Fumito

    2017-11-01

    We present an unusual temperature dependence of polar anchoring torque in a nematic liquid crystal contacting with a perfluoropolymer surface. Whereas the anchoring torque is conventionally expected to increase with decreasing temperature, we show that the polar anchoring torque in the present system decreases with decreasing temperature. This causes an orientational transition from planar to vertical during cooling. We explain the origin of this phenomenon as the result of thermodynamic growth and spreading of surface-localized smectic wetting sheets. We clearly show that the coverage of these wetting sheets on the surface creates a vertical state that violates the initial planar anchoring in the bulk, thereby reducing the effective polar anchoring torque.

  16. Temperature Dependence of Electrical Resistance of Woven Melt-Infiltrated SiCf/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Matthew P.; Morscher, Gregory N.; Zhu, Dongming

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have successfully shown the use of electrical resistance (ER)measurements to monitor room temperature damage accumulation in SiC fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites (SiCf/SiC) Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs). In order to determine the feasibility of resistance monitoring at elevated temperatures, the present work investigates the temperature dependent electrical response of various MI (Melt Infiltrated)-CVI (Chemical Vapor Infiltrated) SiC/SiC composites containing Hi-Nicalon Type S, Tyranno ZMI and SA reinforcing fibers. Test were conducted using a commercially available isothermal testing apparatus as well as a novel, laser-based heating approach developed to more accurately simulate thermomechanical testing of CMCs. Secondly, a post-test inspection technique is demonstrated to show the effect of high-temperature exposure on electrical properties. Analysis was performed to determine the respective contribution of the fiber and matrix to the overall composite conductivity at elevated temperatures. It was concluded that because the silicon-rich matrix material dominates the electrical response at high temperature, ER monitoring would continue to be a feasible method for monitoring stress dependent matrix cracking of melt-infiltrated SiC/SiC composites under high temperature mechanical testing conditions. Finally, the effect of thermal gradients generated during localized heating of tensile coupons on overall electrical response of the composite is determined.

  17. Interaction potentials of Cd-Ne from temperature dependent of intercombination Cd line 326.1 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roston, G.D. E-mail: gamal_daniel@yahoo.com

    2004-08-01

    The absorption profile and the temperature dependence of the Cd line at 326.1 nm perturbed by Ne at a density of about 1.13x10{sup 19} atoms cm{sup -3} have been carefully studied over a spectral range extending from 600 cm{sup -1} in the blue wing to 700 cm{sup -1} in the red wing using a high-resolution double-beam spectrometer. Interatomic potentials for Cd-Ne in the ground electronic state {sup 1}0{sup +} as well as the exited ({sup 3}0{sup +} and {sup 3}1) states have been deduced from the spectrum. The van der Waals coefficient differences between the ground {sup 1}0{sup +} state and the two exited states {sup 3}0{sup +} and {sup 3}1 ({delta}C{sub 6}{sup 0} and {delta}C{sub 6}{sup 1}) are obtained from the near red wing profile using Kuhn's law. The values of {delta}C{sub 6}{sup 0} and {delta}C{sub 6}{sup 1} are found to be equal to 23.5{+-}2 and 39.3{+-}3 eVA{sup 6}, respectively. The interatomic potentials parameters (well depths {epsilon} (cm{sup -1}) and their positions R{sub m} (A) for the ground {sup 1}0{sup +} and the exited ({sup 3}0{sup +} and {sup 3}1) states are found to be (41.4{+-}3, 4.1{+-}0.2), (82.5{+-}4, 3.7{+-}0.2) and (18.03{+-}2, 4.25{+-}0.3), respectively. The obtained well depths with their allowable errors are in good agreement with the values obtained before for the Cd-Ne system from the molecular beams experiments.

  18. Effect of temperature dependent properties on MHD convection of water near its density maximum in a square cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivasankaran, S.; Hoa, C.J.

    2008-01-01

    Natural convection of water near its density maximum in the presence of magnetic field in a cavity with temperature dependent properties is studied numerically. The viscosity and thermal conductivity of the water is varied with reference temperature and calculated by cubic polynomial. The finite volume method is used to solve the governing equations. The results are presented graphically in the form of streamlines, isotherms and velocity vectors and are discussed for various combinations of reference temperature parameter, Rayleigh number, density inversion parameter and Hartmann number. It is observed that flow and temperature field are affected significantly by changing the reference temperature parameter for temperature dependent thermal conductivity and both temperature dependent viscosity and thermal conductivity cases. There is no significant effect on fluid flow and temperature distributions for temperature dependent viscosity case when changing the values of reference temperature parameter. The average heat transfer rate considering temperature-dependent viscosity are higher than considering temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and both temperature-dependent viscosity and thermal conductivity. The average Nusselt number decreases with an increase of Hartmann number. It is observed that the density inversion of water leaves strong effects on fluid flow and heat transfer due to the formation of bi-cellular structure. The heat transfer rate behaves non-linearly with density inversion parameter. The direction of external magnetic field also affect the fluid flow and heat transfer. (authors)

  19. Study of Thermal-Field Emission Properties and Investigation of Temperature dependent Noise in the Emission Current form vertical Carbon nanotube emitters

    KAUST Repository

    Kolekar, Sadhu

    2017-05-05

    We have investigated temperature dependent field electron emission characteristics of vertical carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The generalized expression for electron emission from well defined cathode surface is given by Millikan and Lauritsen [1] for the combination of temperature and electric field effect. The same expression has been used to explain the electron emission characteristics from vertical CNT emitters. Furthermore, this has been applied to explain the electron emission for different temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1500 K. The real-time field electron emission images at room temperature and 1500 K are recorded by using Charge Coupled Device (CCD), in order to understand the effect of temperature on electron emission spots in image morphology (as indicated by ring like structures) and electron emission spot intensity of the emitters. Moreover, the field electron emission images can be used to calculate the total number of emitters per cm2 for electron emission. The calculated number of emitters per cm2 is 4.5x107 and, the actual number emitters per cm2 present for electron emission calculated from Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) data is 1.2x1012. The measured Current-Voltage (I-V) characteristics obey the Folwer-Nordheim (F-N) type behavior. The fluctuations in the emission current are recorded at different temperatures and, temperature dependence of power spectral density obeys power law relation s(f)=I2/f2 with that of emission current and frequency.

  20. A Higher-Order Thermomechanical Vibration Analysis of Temperature-Dependent FGM Beams with Porosities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Ebrahimi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, thermomechanical vibration characteristics of functionally graded (FG Reddy beams made of porous material subjected to various thermal loadings are investigated by utilizing a Navier solution method for the first time. Four types of thermal loadings, namely, uniform, linear, nonlinear, and sinusoidal temperature rises, through the thickness direction are considered. Thermomechanical material properties of FG beam are assumed to be temperature-dependent and supposed to vary through thickness direction of the constituents according to power-law distribution (P-FGM which is modified to approximate the porous material properties with even and uneven distributions of porosities phases. The governing differential equations of motion are derived based on higher order shear deformation beam theory. Hamilton’s principle is applied to obtain the governing differential equations of motion which are solved by employing an analytical technique called the Navier type solution method. Influences of several important parameters such as power-law exponents, porosity distributions, porosity volume fractions, thermal effects, and slenderness ratios on natural frequencies of the temperature-dependent FG beams with porosities are investigated and discussed in detail. It is concluded that these effects play significant role in the thermodynamic behavior of porous FG beams.

  1. Temperature dependence of conductivity measurement for PEDOT:PSS and corresponding solar cell performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Fernanda; Myers, Brooke; Lucas, Tyler; Barnes, Brandon; Wang, Weining

    Conducting polymers have been studied and used widely; applications include light-emitting diodes, solar cells, and sensors. In our previous work, we have shown that conducting polymers can be used as the back contact of CdTe solar cells. Our results show that the efficiency of the CdTe solar cell increases as the conductivity of the polymer increases. For this reason, it is of interest to study the polymer conductivity's temperature dependence, and how it affects the solar cell. In this work, we show our studies on temperature dependence of conductivity measurement for poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS), and its effect on the CdTe/PEDOT:PSS solar cells. A series of PEDOT:PSS with different conductivities were studied, and a temperature-varying apparatus built in house, using a thermoelectric cooler module, was used to vary the temperature of the polymer films. The activation energy of PEDOT:PSS with different conductivity will be reported. The effect of the temperature on the short-circuit current, open-circuit voltage and efficiency of the solar cells will also be discussed. Clare Boothe Luce Foundation, Cottrell College Science Award from Research Corporation for Science Advancement.

  2. On the temperature dependence of H-Uiso in the riding hydrogen model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lübben, Jens; Volkmann, Christian; Grabowsky, Simon; Edwards, Alison; Morgenroth, Wolfgang; Fabbiani, Francesca P. A.; Sheldrick, George M.; Dittrich, Birger

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of hydrogen U iso and parent U eq in the riding hydrogen model is investigated by neutron diffraction, aspherical-atom refinements and QM/MM and MO/MO cluster calculations. Fixed values of 1.2 or 1.5 appear to be underestimated, especially at temperatures below 100 K. The temperature dependence of H-U iso in N-acetyl-l-4-hydroxyproline monohydrate is investigated. Imposing a constant temperature-independent multiplier of 1.2 or 1.5 for the riding hydrogen model is found to be inaccurate, and severely underestimates H-U iso below 100 K. Neutron diffraction data at temperatures of 9, 150, 200 and 250 K provide benchmark results for this study. X-ray diffraction data to high resolution, collected at temperatures of 9, 30, 50, 75, 100, 150, 200 and 250 K (synchrotron and home source), reproduce neutron results only when evaluated by aspherical-atom refinement models, since these take into account bonding and lone-pair electron density; both invariom and Hirshfeld-atom refinement models enable a more precise determination of the magnitude of H-atom displacements than independent-atom model refinements. Experimental efforts are complemented by computing displacement parameters following the TLS+ONIOM approach. A satisfactory agreement between all approaches is found

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF GREEN’S FUNCTION APPROACH CONSIDERING TEMPERATURE-DEPENDENT MATERIAL PROPERTIES AND ITS APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAN-OK KO

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available About 40% of reactors in the world are being operated beyond design life or are approaching the end of their life cycle. During long-term operation, various degradation mechanisms occur. Fatigue caused by alternating operational stresses in terms of temperature or pressure change is an important damage mechanism in continued operation of nuclear power plants. To monitor the fatigue damage of components, Fatigue Monitoring System (FMS has been installed. Most FMSs have used Green's Function Approach (GFA to calculate the thermal stresses rapidly. However, if temperature-dependent material properties are used in a detailed FEM, there is a maximum peak stress discrepancy between a conventional GFA and a detailed FEM because constant material properties are used in a conventional method. Therefore, if a conventional method is used in the fatigue evaluation, thermal stresses for various operating cycles may be calculated incorrectly and it may lead to an unreliable estimation. So, in this paper, the modified GFA which can consider temperature-dependent material properties is proposed by using an artificial neural network and weight factor. To verify the proposed method, thermal stresses by the new method are compared with those by FEM. Finally, pros and cons of the new method as well as technical findings from the assessment are discussed.

  4. Temperature dependence of the acid base equilibrium constants of substituted pyridine N-oxides in acetonitrile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarczyk, Ewa; Wróbel, Roman; Liwo, Adam; Chmurzyński, Lech

    1999-03-01

    Temperature dependence of acid-base equilibrium constants in systems consisting of substituted pyridine N-oxides was studied in acetonitrile, a strongly ionizing polar protophobic aprotic solvent. N-oxides, which have an enhanced tendency towards formation of cationic homo- and heteroconjugates, (OHO +) as a result of their relatively strong basicity, were investigated. For the sake of comparison, also aliphatic trimethylamine N-oxide and pyridine, the parent compound of its N-oxide, were included. Of particular interest were acid dissociation constants of cations of the protonated bases, homoconjugation equilibria of the cationic acids with conjugate bases, as well as cationic heteroconjugation equilibria of the protonated bases with non-conjugated bases. The constants were determined at three temperatures, 292.1, 298.1 and 304.1 K. On the basis of the temperature dependence of the constants, enthalpy changes were calculated for the acid dissociation of the cationic acids, as well as for cationic homo- and heteroconjugation. These values were derived from the known thermodynamic relationships, Δ G = - RTln K and Δ G = Δ H - TΔ S. It has been found that enthalpy changes for the dissociation reactions of the cationic acids and for cationic homoconjugation reactions are consistent with the variations of the protonation and homoconjugation energies, respectively calculated by both the semi-empirical and the ab initio methods on the 4-31G level.

  5. Temperature Dependence on Density, Viscosity, and Electrical Conductivity of Ionic Liquid 1-Ethyl-3-Methylimidazolium Fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengguo Liu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Ionic liquids are considered environmentally friendly media for various industrial applications. Basic data on physicochemical properties are significant for a new material, in terms of developing its potential applications. In this work, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium fluoride ([EMIm]F ionic liquid was synthesized via an anion metathesis process. Physical properties including the density, viscosity, electrical conductivity, and thermal stability of the product were measured. The results show that the density of [EMIm]F decreases linearly with temperature increases, while dynamic viscosity decreases rapidly below 320 K and the temperature dependence of electrical conductivity is in accordance with the VFT (Vogel–Fulcher–Tammann equation. The temperature dependence of the density, conductivity, and viscosity of [EMIm]F can be expressed via the following equations: ρ = 1.516 − 1.22 × 10−3 T, σm = 4417.1exp[−953.17/(T − 166.65] and η = 2.07 × 10−7exp(−5.39 × 104/T, respectively. [EMIm]F exhibited no clear melting point. However, its glass transition point and decomposition temperature are −71.3 °C and 135 °C, respectively.

  6. Efficient Temperature-Dependent Green's Functions Methods for Realistic Systems: Compact Grids for Orthogonal Polynomial Transforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kananenka, Alexei A; Phillips, Jordan J; Zgid, Dominika

    2016-02-09

    The Matsubara Green's function that is used to describe temperature-dependent behavior is expressed on a numerical grid. While such a grid usually has a couple of hundred points for low-energy model systems, for realistic systems with large basis sets the size of an accurate grid can be tens of thousands of points, constituting a severe computational and memory bottleneck. In this paper, we determine efficient imaginary time grids for the temperature-dependent Matsubara Green's function formalism that can be used for calculations on realistic systems. We show that, because of the use of an orthogonal polynomial transform, we can restrict the imaginary time grid to a few hundred points and reach micro-Hartree accuracy in the electronic energy evaluation. Moreover, we show that only a limited number of orthogonal polynomial expansion coefficients are necessary to preserve accuracy when working with a dual representation of the Green's function or self-energy and transforming between the imaginary time and frequency domain.

  7. Temperature-dependent ordinary and thermal diffusion of hydrogen isotopes through thermonuclear reactor components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pendergrass, J.H.

    1976-09-01

    To permit more accurate calculations of tritium permeation for design purposes, theoretical expressions for quasiunidirectional ordinary diffusion of hydrogen isotopes through nonisothermal plane, cylindrical shell, and spherical shell barriers are presented. Arrhenium-type dependence of mass diffusivity on temperature and steady-state constant-thermal-conductivity temperature gradients through the barriers are considered. Analyses that consider thermal diffusion with both constant and temperature-dependent heat of transport are also presented. Other topics discussed are amounts of dissolved hydrogen, variable-thermal-conductivity temperature profiles, hydrogen isotope trapping by chemical impurities, crystal lattice imperfections, and grain boundaries, and mixing rules for dilute dissolution of hydrogen isotope mixtures in metals. Numerical results are given which reveal that neglect of thermal diffusion can lead to errors of up to several hundred percent in calculations of hydrogen isotope transfer through reactor components having large temperature gradients through them. Calculations of combined ordinary and thermal diffusion that rigorously treat the temperature dependences of thermophysical properties typically yield results that differ by only a few percent from results based on physical property evaluations at the arithmetic average of barrier face temperatures.

  8. Temperature dependent polymorphism of pyrazinamide: An in situ Raman and DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Poornima; Nandi, Rajib; Gangopadhyay, Debraj; Singh, Anurag; Singh, Ranjan K.

    2018-02-01

    The α and γ polymorphs of drug pyrazinamide have been detected with the help of temperature dependent Raman spectroscopic technique. Pyrazinamide is a very useful drug used for the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) and plays a significant role in destroying the dormant tubercle bacilli which are not destroyed by other common TB drugs. Temperature dependent Raman spectra suggest polymorphic phase change from α → γ form of pyrazinamide between 145 and 146 °C. In situ Raman spectra of pyrazinamide between 145 and 146 °C show the conversion of α → γ form by the shift in Cdbnd O stretching vibration accompanied by several other changes. The phase change is characterized by the breaking of two linear Nsbnd H ⋯ O type hydrogen bonds associated with Cdbnd O stretching vibration in α dimer and formation of one linear Nsbnd H ⋯ N type hydrogen bond along with a weak intramolecular Csbnd H ⋯ O type hydrogen bond in the γ dimer.

  9. Requirements for investigating the temperature-dependent fracture behavior of irradiated materials by indentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacksteder, Irène, E-mail: irene.sacksteder@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Hostettler, Simon [Synton-MDP Inc., Nidau (Switzerland); Charbonneau, Grégoire; Albinski, Bartlomiej; Schneider, Hans-Christian [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • A custom-made indenter is designed for indentations at high temperature. • The instrumented indentation technique at high temperature will be used to investigate temperature dependent fracture mechanisms in structural materials. • A finite-element based model has been validated with a view to predict crack initiation and propagation in Eurofer97 and tungsten-like materials. -- Abstract: The instrumented indentation technique is an interesting testing tool to examine temperature-dependent fracture mechanisms. It is planned to be used to generate cracks at defined temperatures in hard and brittle metallic materials. The present study describes the properties needed for the use of a new type of indenter operating at high temperature. The indenter was designed to meet mechanical and thermal requirements and other constraints relating to the operation of functional units of the indentation instrument. Additionally, a finite element model has been built with a view to predict indentation induced cracks in Eurofer97 and tungsten. The model has been validated both with the theory of Hertz and experimentally by comparison with indentation curves.

  10. Allele- and temperature-dependency of in vitro HLA class I assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chersi, A; Garzillo, C; Butler, R H; Tanigaki, N

    2001-08-01

    Allelic variations of in vitro HLA class I assembly have been investigated in both the absence and the presence of binding peptides by flow cytometry using human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I alpha chains isolated by alkali treatment from cultured HLA homozygous B cells and polystyrene beads coated with anti-HLA class I alpha chain antibodies specific to the C-terminal segment (anti-HLA class I beads). The specificity of assembly was temperature dependent, while the stability of the assembled complex depended on the bound peptide. The efficiency of assembly was allele dependent and primarily ruled by the binding affinity of alpha chains with beta(2)m. Thus, an allele hierarchy could be defined for the binding of HLA-B alpha chain with beta(2)-microglobulin: B7, B18 > B35, B62 > B27, B51. Allele and temperature dependency was found in HLA class I reassembly on acid treated B cells. The HLA class I proteins, reassembled with specific single peptides, could be efficiently transferred to anti-HLA class I beads. These findings would be used to produce microspheres coupled at high surface density with oriented single-peptide loaded HLA class I molecules and also to improve the preparation efficiency of HLA class I tetramers by the use of site-specific biotinylation.

  11. Analysis of convective longitudinal fin with temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and internal heat generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.G. Sobamowo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, analysis of heat transfer in a longitudinal rectangular fin with temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and internal heat generation was carried out using finite difference method. The developed systems of non-linear equations that resulted from the discretization using finite difference scheme were solved with the aid of MATLAB using fsolve. The numerical solution was validated with the exact solution for the linear problem. The developed heat transfer models were used to investigate the effects of thermo-geometric parameters, coefficient of heat transfer and thermal conductivity (non-linear parameters on the temperature distribution, heat transfer and thermal performance of the longitudinal rectangular fin. From the results, it shows that the fin temperature distribution, the total heat transfer, and the fin efficiency are significantly affected by the thermo-geometric parameters of the fin. Also, for the solution to be thermally stable, the fin thermo-geometric parameter must not exceed a specific value. However, it was established that the increase in temperature-dependent properties and internal heat generation values increases the thermal stability range of the thermo-geometric parameter. The results obtained in this analysis serve as basis for comparison of any other method of analysis of the problem.

  12. Dimorphic DNA methylation during temperature-dependent sex determination in the sea turtle Lepidochelys olivacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venegas, Daniela; Marmolejo-Valencia, Alejandro; Valdes-Quezada, Christian; Govenzensky, Tzipe; Recillas-Targa, Félix; Merchant-Larios, Horacio

    2016-09-15

    Sex determination in vertebrates depends on the expression of a conserved network of genes. Sea turtles such as Lepidochelys olivacea have temperature-dependent sex determination. The present work analyses some of the epigenetic processes involved in this. We describe sexual dimorphism in global DNA methylation patterns between ovaries and testes of L. olivacea and show that the differences may arise from a combination of DNA methylation and demethylation events that occur during sex determination. Irrespective of incubation temperature, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine was abundant in the bipotential gonad; however, following sex determination, this modification was no longer found in pre-Sertoli cells in the testes. These changes correlate with the establishment of the sexually dimorphic DNA methylation patterns, down regulation of Sox9 gene expression in ovaries and irreversible gonadal commitment towards a male or female differentiation pathway. Thus, DNA methylation changes may be necessary for the stabilization of the gene expression networks that drive the differentiation of the bipotential gonad to form either an ovary or a testis in L. olivacea and probably among other species that manifest temperature-dependent sex determination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Temperature-dependent electronic decay profiles in CZT: probe of bulk and surface properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessick, Royal; Maupin, Hugh; Tepper, Gary C.; Szeles, Csaba

    2003-01-01

    The electronic performance of CZT-based gamma radiation spectrometers is governed by a synergism of bulk and surface properties. Compensation is used to increase the bulk resistivity of Cd1-xZnxTe (x~0.1), but the same electronic states that are introduced to increase the material resistivity can also trap charge and reduce the carrier lifetime. Electrical and mechanical surface defects introduced during or subsequent to crystal harvesting are also known to interfere with device performance. Using a contactless, pulsed laser microwave cavity perturbation technique, electronic decay profiles were studied in high pressure Bridgman CZT as a function of temperature. The electronic decay profile was found to depend very strongly on temperature and was modeled using a function consisting of two exponential terms with temperature-dependent amplitudes and time constants. The model was used to relate the observed temperature dependent decay kinetics in CZT to specific trap energies. It was found that, at low temperatures, the electronic decay process is dominated by a deep trap with an energy of approximately 0.69 +/- 0.1 eV from the band edge. As the temperature is increased, the charge trapping becomes dominated by a second trap with an energy of approximately 0.60 +/- 0.1 eV from the band edge. Surface damage introduces additional charge traps that significantly alter the decay kinetics particularly at low temperatures.

  14. POINT 2012: ENDF/B-VII.1 Final Temperature Dependent Cross Section Library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cullen, D E

    2012-02-26

    This report is one in the series of 'POINT' reports that over the years have presented temperature dependent cross sections for the then current version of ENDF/B [R1]. In each case I have used my personal computer at home and publicly available data and codes: (1) publicly available nuclear data (the current ENDF/B data, available on-line at the National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/) and, (2) publicly available computer codes (the current PREPRO codes, available on-line at the Nuclear Data Section, IAEA, Vienna, Austria, http://www-nds.iaea.or.at/ndspub/endf/prepro/) and, (3) My own personal computer located in my home. I have used these in combination to produce the temperature dependent cross sections used in applications and described in this report. I should mention that today anyone with a personal computer can produce these results: by its very nature I consider this data to be born in the public domain.

  15. Temperature-Dependent Rate Coefficients for the Reaction of CH2OO with Hydrogen Sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mica C; Chao, Wen; Kumar, Manoj; Francisco, Joseph S; Takahashi, Kaito; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2017-02-09

    The reaction of the simplest Criegee intermediate CH 2 OO with hydrogen sulfide was measured with transient UV absorption spectroscopy in a temperature-controlled flow reactor, and bimolecular rate coefficients were obtained from 278 to 318 K and from 100 to 500 Torr. The average rate coefficient at 298 K and 100 Torr was (1.7 ± 0.2) × 10 -13 cm 3 s -1 . The reaction was found to be independent of pressure and exhibited a weak negative temperature dependence. Ab initio quantum chemistry calculations of the temperature-dependent reaction rate coefficient at the QCISD(T)/CBS level are in reasonable agreement with the experiment. The reaction of CH 2 OO with H 2 S is 2-3 orders of magnitude faster than the reaction with H 2 O monomer. Though rates of CH 2 OO scavenging by water vapor under atmospheric conditions are primarily controlled by the reaction with water dimer, the H 2 S loss pathway will be dominated by the reaction with monomer. The agreement between experiment and theory for the CH 2 OO + H 2 S reaction lends credence to theoretical descriptions of other Criegee intermediate reactions that cannot easily be probed experimentally.

  16. Ceramic/Metal Composites with Positive Temperature Dependence of Thermal Conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jianhui; Yu Qi; Sun Wei; Zhang Rui; Wang Ke; Li Jingfeng; Ichigozaki, Daisuke

    2013-01-01

    Most materials show decreasing thermal conductivity with increasing temperature, but an opposite temperature dependence of thermal conductivity is required for some industrial applications. The present work was conducted with a motivation to develop composite materials with a positive temperature dependence of thermal conductivity. ZrO 2 / stainless steel powders (304L) composite, with 3% stearic acid, was prepared by normal sintering under the protecting of Ar after mixing by mechanical ball milling technique. With the 304L content increasing from 10% to 20%, the thermal conductivity values increased. For all samples, the thermal conductivity in the temperature range of room temperature to 700 °C decreased with temperature below 300 °C, and then began to increase. The increasing thermal conductivity of the composites (within the high temperature range was attributed to the difference of the thermal conductivity and thermal expansion coefficient between ZrO 2 ceramic and 304L stainless steel powders. Two simple models were also used to estimate the thermal conductivity of the composites, which were in good agreement with the experiment results.

  17. NF3: UV Absorption Spectrum Temperature Dependence and the Atmospheric and Climate Forcing Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Vassileios C.; McGillen, Max R.; Fleming, Eric L.; Jackman, Charles H.; Burkholder, James B.

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen trifluoride (NF3) is an atmospherically persistent greenhouse gas that is primarily removed by UV photolysis and reaction with O((sup 1)D) atoms. In this work, the NF3 gas-phase UV absorption spectrum, sigma(delta,T), was measured at 16 wavelengths between 184.95 and 250 nm at temperatures between 212 and 296 K. A significant spectrum temperature dependence was observed in the wavelength region most relevant to atmospheric photolysis (200-220 nm) with a decrease in sigma(210 nm,T) of approximately 45 percent between 296 and 212 K. Atmospheric photolysis rates and global annually averaged lifetimes of NF3 were calculated using the Goddard Space Flight Center 2-D model and the sigma(delta,T) parameterization developed in this work. Including the UV absorption spectrum temperature dependence increased the stratospheric photolysis lifetime from 610 to 762 years and the total global lifetime from 484 to 585 years; the NF3 global warming potentials on the 20-, 100-, and 500-year time horizons increased less than 0.3, 1.1, and 6.5 percent to 13,300, 17,700, and 19,700, respectively.

  18. Temperature dependence of HU values for various water equivalent phantom materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homolka, P. [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: peter.homolka@univie.ac.at; Nowotny, R. [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Gahleitner, A. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Division of Osteology, University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Department of Oral Surgery, Dental School, University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2002-08-21

    The temperature dependence of water equivalent phantom materials used in radiotherapy and diagnostic imaging has been investigated. Samples of phantom materials based on epoxy resin, polyethylene, a polystyrene-polypropylene mixture and commercially available phantom materials (Solid Water{sup TM}, Gammex RMI and Plastic Water{sup TM}, Nuclear Associates) were scanned at temperatures from 15 to 40 deg. C and HU values determined. At a reference temperature of 20 deg. C materials optimized for CT applications give HU values close to zero while the commercial materials show an offset of 119.77 HU (Plastic Water) and 27.69 HU (Solid Water). Temperature dependence was lowest for epoxy-based materials (EPX-W: -0.23 HU deg. C{sup -1}; Solid Water: -0.25 HU deg. C{sup -1}) and highest for a polyethylene-based material (X0: -0.72 HU deg. C{sup -1}). A material based on a mixture of polystyrene and polypropylene (PSPP1: -0.27 HU deg. C{sup -1}) is comparable to epoxy-based materials and water (-0.29 HU deg. C{sup -1}). (author)

  19. POINT 2012: ENDF/B-VII.1 Final Temperature Dependent Cross Section Library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullen, D.E.

    2012-01-01

    This report is one in the series of 'POINT' reports that over the years have presented temperature dependent cross sections for the then current version of ENDF/B [R1]. In each case I have used my personal computer at home and publicly available data and codes: (1) publicly available nuclear data (the current ENDF/B data, available on-line at the National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/) and, (2) publicly available computer codes (the current PREPRO codes, available on-line at the Nuclear Data Section, IAEA, Vienna, Austria, http://www-nds.iaea.or.at/ndspub/endf/prepro/) and, (3) My own personal computer located in my home. I have used these in combination to produce the temperature dependent cross sections used in applications and described in this report. I should mention that today anyone with a personal computer can produce these results: by its very nature I consider this data to be born in the public domain.

  20. Temperature-dependent growth of Geomyces destructans, the fungus that causes bat white-nose syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verant, Michelle L.; Boyles, Justin G.; Waldrep, William; Wibbelt, Gudrun; Blehert, David S.

    2012-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) is an emergent disease estimated to have killed over five million North American bats. Caused by the psychrophilic fungus Geomyces destructans, WNS specifically affects bats during hibernation. We describe temperature-dependent growth performance and morphology for six independent isolates of G. destructans from North America and Europe. Thermal performance curves for all isolates displayed an intermediate peak with rapid decline in performance above the peak. Optimal temperatures for growth were between 12.5 and 15.8°C, and the upper critical temperature for growth was between 19.0 and 19.8°C. Growth rates varied across isolates, irrespective of geographic origin, and above 12°C all isolates displayed atypical morphology that may have implications for proliferation of the fungus. This study demonstrates that small variations in temperature, consistent with those inherent of bat hibernacula, affect growth performance and physiology of G. destructans, which may influence temperature-dependent progression and severity of WNS in wild bats.

  1. Investigation of temperature dependent barrier height of Au/ZnO/Si schottky diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asghar, M.; Mahmood, K.; Rabia, S.; BM, S.; Shahid, M. Y.; Hasan, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, temperature dependent current-voltage (I-V) measurements have been performed to investigate the inhomogeneity in the temperature dependent barrier heights of Au/ZnO/Si Schottky barrier diode in the temperature range 150 - 400K. The room temperature values for ideality factor and barrier height were found to be 2.9 and 0.60 eV respectively indicating the inhomogenity in the barrier heights of grown samples. The Richardson plot and ideality factor verses barrier height graph were also drawn to verified the discontinuity between Au and ZnO. This barrier height inhomogenity was explained by applying Gaussian distribution model. The extrapolation of the linear Fap (n) plot to n= 1 has given a homogeneous barrier height of approximately 1.1 eV. Fap versus 1/T plot was drawn to obtain the values of mean barrier height for Au/ZnO/Si Schottky diode (1.1 eV) and standard deviation(ds) (0.02 V) at zero bais. (author)

  2. Investigation of temperature dependent barrier height of Au/ZnO/Si schottky diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asghar, M; Mahmood, K; Rabia, S; M, Samaa B; Shahid, M Y; Hasan, M A

    2014-01-01

    In this study, temperature dependent current-voltage (I-V) measurements have been performed to investigate the inhomogeneity in the temperature dependent barrier heights of Au/ZnO/Si Schottky barrier diode in the temperature range 150 – 400K. The room temperature values for ideality factor and barrier height were found to be 2.9 and 0.60 eV respectively indicating the inhomogenity in the barrier heights of grown samples. The Richardson plot and ideality factor verses barrier height graph were also drawn to verified the discontinuity between Au and ZnO. This barrier height inhomogenity was explained by applying Gaussian distribution model. The extrapolation of the linear Φ ap (n) plot to n= 1 has given a homogeneous barrier height of approximately 1.1 eV. Φ ap versus 1/T plot was drawn to obtain the values of mean barrier height for Au/ZnO/Si Schottky diode (1.1 eV) and standard deviation(δ s ) (0.02 V) at zero bais

  3. Temperature dependence of the calibration factor of radon and radium determination in water samples by SSNTD

    CERN Document Server

    Hunyadi, I; Hakl, J; Baradacs, E; Dezso, Z

    1999-01-01

    The sensitivity of a sup 2 sup 2 sup 6 Ra determination method of water samples by SSNTD was measured as a function of storage temperature during exposure. The method is based on an etched track type radon monitor, which is closed into a gas permeable foil and is immersed in the water sample. The sample is sealed in a glass vessel and stored for an exposure time of 10-30 days. The sensitivity increased more than a factor of two when the storage temperature was raised from 2 deg. C to 30 deg. C. Temperature dependence of the partition coefficient of radon between water and air provides explanation for this dependence. For practical radio- analytical application the temperature dependence of the calibration factor is given by fitting the sensitivity data obtained by measuring sup 2 sup 2 sup 6 Ra standard solutions (in the activity concentration range of 0.1-48.5 kBq m sup - sup 3) at different storage temperatures.

  4. Temperature dependence of the current in Schottky-barrier source-gated transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporea, R. A.; Overy, M.; Shannon, J. M.; Silva, S. R. P.

    2015-05-01

    The temperature dependence of the drain current is an important parameter in thin-film transistors. In this paper, we propose that in source-gated transistors (SGTs), this temperature dependence can be controlled and tuned by varying the length of the source electrode. SGTs comprise a reverse biased potential barrier at the source which controls the current. As a result, a large activation energy for the drain current may be present which, although useful in specific temperature sensing applications, is in general deleterious in many circuit functions. With support from numerical simulations with Silvaco Atlas, we describe how increasing the length of the source electrode can be used to reduce the activation energy of SGT drain current, while maintaining the defining characteristics of SGTs: low saturation voltage, high output impedance in saturation, and tolerance to geometry variations. In this study, we apply the dual current injection modes to obtain drain currents with high and low activation energies and propose mechanisms for their exploitation in future large-area integrated circuit designs.

  5. Temperature dependence of energy-transducing functions and inhibitor sensitivity in chloroplasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuurmans, J.J.; Veerman, E.C.I.; Francke, J.A.; Torres-Pereira, J.M.G.; Kraayenhof, R.

    1984-01-01

    A comparative analysis of the temperature dependence of energy-transducing reactions in spinach (Spinacia oleracea) chloroplasts and their sensitivity for uncouplers and energy-transfer inhibitors at different temperatures is presented. Arrhenius plots reveal two groups of transitions, around 19/sup 0/C and around 12/sup 0/C. Activities that show transitions around 19/sup 0/C include linear electron flow from water to ferricyanide, its coupled photophosphorylation, the dark-release of the fluorescent probe atebrin, and the slow component of the 515 nm (carotenoid) absorbance decay after a flash. The transitions around 12/sup 0/C are observed with pyocyanine-mediated cyclic photophosphorylation, light- and dithioerythritol-activated ATP hydrolysis, the dark-release of protons, and the fast 515 nm decay component. It is suggested that both groups of temperature transitions are determined by proton displacements in different domains of the exposed thylakoid membranes. The effects of various uncouplers and an energy-transfer inhibitor are temperature dependent. Some uncouplers also show a different relative inhibition of proton uptake and ATP synthesis at lower temperatures. The efficiency of energy transduction (ATP/e/sub 3/) varied with temperature and was optimal around 10/sup 0/C.

  6. Analysis of thermoelectric energy conversion efficiency with linear and nonlinear temperature dependence in material properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wee, Daehyun

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The effects of temperature dependent material properties on performance is studied. → The main simplification is to approximate the temperature profile with a linear one. → Accurate inclusion of the Thomson effect is essential to understand thermoelectrics. - Abstract: A novel approach to estimate energy conversion efficiency for a power-generating thermoelectric element, whose material properties possess both linear (first order) and nonlinear (second order) dependence on temperature, is developed by solving the differential equation governing its temperature distribution, which includes both the Joule heat and the Thomson effect. In order to obtain analytic expressions for power output and energy conversion efficiency, several steps of simplification are taken. Most notably, the material properties are evaluated with a linear temperature profile between the hot and cold ends. The model is further applied to a high-performance n-type half-Heusler alloy, matching the results of direct numerical analysis. The close correspondence between the proposed model and the numerical solution indeed proves that the approximations we have made are valid. The effect of linear and nonlinear components in the temperature dependence of material properties on the energy conversion efficiency is analyzed both qualitatively and quantitatively with the model. The results suggest that the accurate inclusion of the Thomson effect is essential to understand even the qualitative behavior of thermoelectric energy conversion.

  7. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence of water-soluble quantum dots for a bioprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Tiancai; Huang Zhenli; Wang Haiqiao; Wang Jianhao; Li Xiuqing; Zhao Yuandi; Luo Qingming

    2006-01-01

    The photoluminescence of water-soluble CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots is found to be temperature-dependent: as temperature arising from 280 K to 351 K, the photoluminescence declines with emission peak shifting towards the red at a rate of ∼0.11 nm K -1 . And the studies show that the photoluminescence of water-soluble CdSe/ZnS quantum dots with core capped by a thinner ZnS shell is more sensitive to temperature than that of ones with core capped by a thicker one. That is, with 50% decrement of the quantum yield the temperature of the former need to arise from 280 K to 295 K, while the latter requires much higher temperature (315.6 K), which means that the integrality of shell coverage is a very important factor on temperature-sensitivity to for the photoluminescence of water-soluble CdSe/ZnS quantum dots. Moreover, it is found that the water-soluble CdSe quantum dots with different core sizes, whose cores are capped by thicker ZnS shells, possess almost the same sensitivity to the temperature. All of the studies about photoluminescence temperature-dependence of water-soluble CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots show an indispensable proof for their applications in life science

  8. The temperature dependence of intermediate range oxygen-oxygen correlations in liquid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlesinger, Daniel; Pettersson, Lars G. M.; Wikfeldt, K. Thor; Skinner, Lawrie B.; Benmore, Chris J.; Nilsson, Anders

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the recent temperature dependent oxygen-oxygen pair-distribution functions from experimental high-precision x-ray diffraction data of bulk water by Skinner et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 141, 214507 (2014)] with particular focus on the intermediate range where small, but significant, correlations are found out to 17 Å. The second peak in the pair-distribution function at 4.5 Å is connected to tetrahedral coordination and was shown by Skinner et al. to change behavior with temperature below the temperature of minimum isothermal compressibility. Here we show that this is associated also with a peak growing at 11 Å which strongly indicates a collective character of fluctuations leading to the enhanced compressibility at lower temperatures. We note that the peak at ∼13.2 Å exhibits a temperature dependence similar to that of the density with a maximum close to 277 K or 4 °C. We analyze simulations of the TIP4P/2005 water model in the same manner and find excellent agreement between simulations and experiment albeit with a temperature shift of ∼20 K.

  9. NMR-based microbial metabolomics and the temperature-dependent coral pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroujerdi, Arezue F B; Vizcaino, Maria I; Meyers, Alexander; Pollock, Elizabeth C; Huynh, Sara Lien; Schock, Tracey B; Morris, Pamela J; Bearden, Daniel W

    2009-10-15

    Coral bleaching occurs when the symbioses between coral animals and their zooxanthellae is disrupted, either as part of a natural cycle or as the result of unusual events. The bacterium Vibrio coralliilyticus (type strain ATCC BAA-450) has been linked to coral disease globally (for example in the Mediterranean, Red Sea, Indian Ocean, and Great Barrier Reef) and like many other Vibrio species exhibits a temperature-dependent pathogenicity. The temperature-dependence of V. corallillyticus in regard to its metabolome was investigated. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were obtained of methanol-water extracts of intracellula rmetabolites (endometabolome) from multiple samples of the bacteria cultured into late stationary phase at 27 degrees C (virulent form) and 24 degrees C (avirulent form). The spectra were subjected to principal components analysis (PCA), and significant temperature-based separations in PC1, PC2, and PC3 dimensions were observed. Betaine, succinate, and glutamate were identified as metabolites that caused the greatest temperature-based separations in the PC scores plots. With increasing temperature, betaine was shown to be down regulated, while succinate and glutamate were up regulated.

  10. Temperature dependence of CO2-enhanced primary production in the European Arctic Ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Holding, J. M.

    2015-08-31

    The Arctic Ocean is warming at two to three times the global rate1 and is perceived to be a bellwether for ocean acidification2, 3. Increased CO2 concentrations are expected to have a fertilization effect on marine autotrophs4, and higher temperatures should lead to increased rates of planktonic primary production5. Yet, simultaneous assessment of warming and increased CO2 on primary production in the Arctic has not been conducted. Here we test the expectation that CO2-enhanced gross primary production (GPP) may be temperature dependent, using data from several oceanographic cruises and experiments from both spring and summer in the European sector of the Arctic Ocean. Results confirm that CO2 enhances GPP (by a factor of up to ten) over a range of 145–2,099 μatm; however, the greatest effects are observed only at lower temperatures and are constrained by nutrient and light availability to the spring period. The temperature dependence of CO2-enhanced primary production has significant implications for metabolic balance in a warmer, CO2-enriched Arctic Ocean in the future. In particular, it indicates that a twofold increase in primary production during the spring is likely in the Arctic.

  11. Temperature-dependent striped antiferromagnetism of LaFeAsO in a Green's function approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guibin; Liu Banggui

    2009-01-01

    We use a Green's function method to study the temperature-dependent average moment and magnetic phase-transition temperature of the striped antiferromagnetism of LaFeAsO, and other similar compounds, as the parents of FeAs-based superconductors. We consider the nearest and the next-nearest couplings in the FeAs layer, and the nearest coupling for inter-layer spin interaction. The dependence of the transition temperature T N and the zero-temperature average spin on the interaction constants is investigated. We obtain an analytical expression for T N and determine our temperature-dependent average spin from zero temperature to T N in terms of unified self-consistent equations. For LaFeAsO, we obtain a reasonable estimation of the coupling interactions with the experimental transition temperature T N = 138 K. Our results also show that a non-zero antiferromagnetic (AFM) inter-layer coupling is essential for the existence of a non-zero T N , and the many-body AFM fluctuations reduce substantially the low-temperature magnetic moment per Fe towards the experimental value. Our Green's function approach can be used for other FeAs-based parent compounds and these results should be useful to understand the physical properties of FeAs-based superconductors.

  12. Low-temperature dependence of yielding in AISI 316 stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobler, R.L.; Reed, R.P.

    1981-01-01

    Tensile tests at temperatures between 323 and 4 K were performed on one heat of AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel having the composition Fe-17.34Cr-12.17Ni-1.55Mn-2.16Mo-0.051C. The temperature dependences of the yield and flow strengths at plastic strain increments from 0.2 to 3.65% are analyzed. At the yield strain (0.2%), no body-centered cubic (bcc) martensite phase transformation is detected. At higher strains (approx.3.2 +- 0.6%), bcc martensite forms from the parent austenite phase at test temperatures below 190 K, but there are no discontinuities in the temperature dependence of flow strength. A review of data available for three heats of AISI 316 at temperatures between 973 and 4 K reveals that deviations from thermally activated plastic flow theory occur at temperatures below 175 K, apparently depending on heat-to-heat compositional variations. Grain size and magnetic transition effects on the yield strength are discussed

  13. Temperature dependence of immunoreactions using shear horizontal surface acoustic wave immunosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogai, Takashi; Yatsuda, Hiromi; Kondoh, Jun

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the temperature dependence of immunoreactions, which are antibody-antigen reactions, on a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) immunosensor is described. The immunosensor is based on a reflection-type delay line on a 36° Y-cut 90° X-propagation quartz substrate, where the delay line is composed of a floating electrode unidirectional transducer (FEUDT), a grating reflector, and a sensing area between them. In order to evaluate the temperature dependence of immunoreactions, human serum albumin (HSA) antigen-antibody reactions are investigated. The SH-SAW immunosensor chip is placed in a thermostatic chamber and the changes in the SH-SAW velocity resulting from the immunoreactions are measured at different temperatures. As a result, it is observed that the HSA immunoreactions are influenced by the ambient temperature and that higher temperatures provide more active reactions. In order to analyze the immunoreactions, an analytical approach using an exponential fitting method for changes in SH-SAW velocity is employed.

  14. Improved AIOMFAC model parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients for aqueous organic mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganbavale, G.; Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Peter, T.

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a new, improved parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients in the AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients) model applicable for aqueous as well as water-free organic solutions. For electrolyte-free organic and organic-water mixtures the AIOMFAC model uses a group-contribution approach based on UNIFAC (UNIversal quasi-chemical Functional-group Activity Coefficients). This group-contribution approach explicitly accounts for interactions among organic functional groups and between organic functional groups and water. The previous AIOMFAC version uses a simple parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients, aimed to be applicable in the temperature range from ~ 275 to ~ 400 K. With the goal to improve the description of a wide variety of organic compounds found in atmospheric aerosols, we extend the AIOMFAC parameterisation for the functional groups carboxyl, hydroxyl, ketone, aldehyde, ether, ester, alkyl, aromatic carbon-alcohol, and aromatic hydrocarbon to atmospherically relevant low temperatures. To this end we introduce a new parameterisation for the temperature dependence. The improved temperature dependence parameterisation is derived from classical thermodynamic theory by describing effects from changes in molar enthalpy and heat capacity of a multi-component system. Thermodynamic equilibrium data of aqueous organic and water-free organic mixtures from the literature are carefully assessed and complemented with new measurements to establish a comprehensive database, covering a wide temperature range (~ 190 to ~ 440 K) for many of the functional group combinations considered. Different experimental data types and their processing for the estimation of AIOMFAC model parameters are discussed. The new AIOMFAC parameterisation for the temperature dependence of activity coefficients from low to high temperatures shows an overall improvement of 28% in

  15. Spectral response modeling and analysis of p–n–p In0.53Ga0.47As/InP HPTs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jun; Lv Jiabing

    2016-01-01

    We report our results on the modeling of the spectral response of the near-infrared (NIR) lattice-matched p–n–p In 0.53 Ga 0.47 As/InP heterojunction phototransistors (HPTs). The spectral response model is developed from the solution of the steady state continuity equations that dominate the excess optically generated minority-carriers in the active regions of the HPTs with accurate boundary conditions. In addition, a detailed optical-power absorption profile is constructed for the device modeling. The calculated responsivity is in good agreement with the measured one for the incident radiation at 980 nm, 1310 nm, and 1550 nm. Furthermore, the variation in the responsivity of the device with the base region width is analyzed. (paper)

  16. A multi-scale analysis of influenza A virus fitness trade-offs due to temperature-dependent virus persistence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Handel

    Full Text Available Successful replication within an infected host and successful transmission between hosts are key to the continued spread of most pathogens. Competing selection pressures exerted at these different scales can lead to evolutionary trade-offs between the determinants of fitness within and between hosts. Here, we examine such a trade-off in the context of influenza A viruses and the differential pressures exerted by temperature-dependent virus persistence. For a panel of avian influenza A virus strains, we find evidence for a trade-off between the persistence at high versus low temperatures. Combining a within-host model of influenza infection dynamics with a between-host transmission model, we study how such a trade-off affects virus fitness on the host population level. We show that conclusions regarding overall fitness are affected by the type of link assumed between the within- and between-host levels and the main route of transmission (direct or environmental. The relative importance of virulence and immune response mediated virus clearance are also found to influence the fitness impacts of virus persistence at low versus high temperatures. Based on our results, we predict that if transmission occurs mainly directly and scales linearly with virus load, and virulence or immune responses are negligible, the evolutionary pressure for influenza viruses to evolve toward good persistence at high within-host temperatures dominates. For all other scenarios, influenza viruses with good environmental persistence at low temperatures seem to be favored.

  17. Melatonin in Glycyrrhiza uralensis: response of plant roots to spectral quality of light and UV-B radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afreen, F; Zobayed, S M A; Kozai, T

    2006-09-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is known to be synthesized and secreted by the pineal gland in vertebrates. Evidence for the occurrence of melatonin in the roots of Glycyrrhiza uralensis plants and the response of this plant to the spectral quality of light including red, blue and white light (control) and UV-B radiation (280-315 nm) for the synthesis of melatonin were investigated. Melatonin was extracted and quantified in seed, root, leaf and stem tissues and results revealed that the root tissues contained the highest concentration of melatonin; melatonin concentrations also increased with plant development. After 3 months of growth under red, blue and white fluorescent lamps, the melatonin concentrations were highest in red light exposed plants and varied depending on the wavelength of light spectrum in the following order red > blue > or = white light. Interestingly, in a more mature plant (6 months) melatonin concentration was increased considerably; the increments in concentration were X4, X5 and X3 in 6-month-old red, blue and white light exposed (control) plants, respectively. The difference in melatonin concentrations between blue and white light exposed (control) plants was not significant. The concentration of melatonin quantified in the root tissues was highest in the plants exposed to high intensity UV-B radiation for 3 days followed by low intensity UV-B radiation for 15 days. The reduction of melatonin under longer periods of UV-B exposure indicates that melatonin synthesis may be related to the integrated (intensity and duration) value of UV-B irradiation. Melatonin in G. uralensis plant is presumably for protection against oxidative damage caused as a response to UV irradiation.

  18. Rate of egg maturation in marine turtles exhibits 'universal temperature dependence'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Sam B; Blount, Jonathan D; Godley, Brendan J; Witt, Matthew J; Broderick, Annette C

    2011-09-01

    1. The metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) predicts that, after correcting for body mass variation among organisms, the rates of most biological processes will vary as a universal function of temperature. However, empirical support for 'universal temperature dependence' (UTD) is currently equivocal and based on studies of a limited number of traits. 2. In many ectothermic animals, the rate at which females produce mature eggs is temperature dependent and may be an important factor in determining the costs of reproduction. 3. We tested whether the rate of egg maturation in marine turtles varies with environmental temperature as predicted by MTE, using the time separating successive clutches of individual females to estimate the rate at which eggs are formed. We also assessed the phenotypic contribution to this rate, by using radio telemetry to make repeated measurements of interclutch intervals for individual green turtles (Chelonia mydas). 4. Rates of egg maturation increased with seasonally increasing water temperatures in radio-tracked green turtles, but were not repeatable for individual females, and did not vary according to maternal body size or reproductive investment (number and size of eggs produced). 5. Using a collated data set from several different populations and species of marine turtles, we then show that a single relationship with water temperature explains most of the variation in egg maturation rates, with a slope that is statistically indistinguishable from the UTD predicted by MTE. However, several alternative statistical models also described the relationship between temperature and egg maturation rates equally parsimoniously. 6. Our results offer novel support for the MTE's predicted UTD of biological rates, although the underlying mechanisms require further study. The strong temperature dependence of egg maturation combined with the apparently weak phenotypic contribution to this rate has interesting behavioural implications in ectothermic

  19. Temperature-dependent Henry's law constants of atmospheric organics of biogenic origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Chunbo; Kish, J Duncan; Kelley, Judas; Mach, Mindy; Hiltner, Joseph; Zhang, Yunhong; Liu, Yong

    2013-10-10

    There have been growing interests in modeling studies to understand oxidation of volatile organic compounds in the gas phase and their mass transfer to the aqueous phase for their potential roles in cloud chemistry, formation of secondary organic aerosols, and fate of atmospheric organics. Temperature-dependent Henry's law constants, key parameters in the atmospheric models to account for mass transfer, are often unavailable. In the present work, we investigated gas-liquid equilibriums of isoprene, limonene, α-pinene, and linalool using a bubble column technique. These compounds, originating from biogenic sources, were selected for their implications in atmospheric cloud chemistry and secondary organic aerosol formation. We reported Henry's law constants (K(H)), first order loss rates (k), and gas phase diffusion coefficients over a range of temperatures relevant to the lower atmosphere (278-298 K) for the first time. The measurement results of K(H) values for isoprene, limonene, α-pinene, and linalool at 298 K were 0.036 ± 0.003; 0.048 ± 0.004; 0.029 ± 0.004; and 21.20 ± 0.30 mol L(-1) atm(-1), respectively. The fraction for these compounds in stratocumulus and cumulonimbus clouds at 278 K were also estimated in this work (isoprene, 1.0 × 10(-6), 6.8 × 10(-6); limonene, 1.5 × 10(-6), 1.0 × 10(-5); α-pinene, 4.5 × 10(-7), 3.1 × 10(-6); and linalool, 6.2 × 10(-4), 4.2 × 10(-3)). Our measurements in combination with literature results indicated that noncyclic alkenes could have smaller K(H) values than those of cyclic terpenes and that K(H) values may increase with an increasing number of double bonds. It was also shown that estimated Henry's law constants and their temperature dependence based on model prediction can differ from experimental results considerably and that direct measurements of temperature-dependent Henry's law constants of atmospheric organics are necessary for future work.

  20. Systems of reduced electron concentration and dimensionality. Pt. 1. Temperature dependence of the chemical potential and the electrical resistivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durczewski, K.; Ausloos, M.

    1994-01-01

    Semi-conductors, semi-metals and high critical temperature superconductors are systems with a reduced number of carriers and present effects which are sometimes related to a reduced dimensionality. We consider such effects from the point of view of transport properties in particular, in this paper, the electrical resistivity. We show the influence of the temperature dependence of the chemical potential for such systems. In particular, this leads to a nonlinear temperature dependence of the resistivity at high temperature. (orig.)

  1. Temperature-dependent remineralization in a warming ocean increases surface pCO2through changes in marine ecosystem composition

    OpenAIRE

    Segschneider, Joachim; Bendtsen, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Temperature-dependent remineralization of organic matter is, in general, not included in marine biogeochemistry models currently used for CMIP5 climate projections. Associated feedbacks have therefore not been quantified. In this study we aim at investigating how temperature dependent remineralization rates (Q10 = 2) in a warming ocean impact on the marine carbon cycle, and if this may weaken the oceanic sink for anthropogenic CO2. We perturb an Earth system model used for CMIP5 with temperat...

  2. Temperature-dependent dielectric properties in ITO/AF/Al device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hyun-Min; Kim, Won-Jong; Lee, Jong-Yong; Hong, Jin-Woong; Kim, Tae-Wan

    2010-01-01

    Temperature-dependent dielectric properties were studied in a device with a structure of ITO/amorphous fluoropolymer (AF)/Al. The AF was thermally deposited at a deposition rate of 0.1 A/s to a thickness of 20 nm under a pressure of 5 x 10 -6 Torr. From the dielectric properties of the device, an equivalent circuit for and the equivalent complex impedance Z eq of the device were obtained. The interfacial resistance was found to be approximately 38 Ω. As the temperature was increased, the radius of the Cole-Cole plot and β also increased for a constant applied voltage. However, as the applied voltage was increased, those values decreased at a constant temperature. These behaviors are thought to be due to an orientational polarization effect of the molecules inside the AF layer.

  3. Temperature dependence of the hyperfine interaction in the cubic phase of BaHfO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Garcia, A.R.; de la Presa, P.; Rodriguez, A.M.

    1991-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the hyperfine interaction in the paraelectric phase of BaHfO 3 in the temperature range from liquid-nitrogen temperature to 1350 K has been studied. The experimental results show an Abragam-Pound mechanism for the attenuation of the angular correlation. In this cubic structure the attenuation would be consistent with a relaxation mechanism that involves O-ion hopping between vacant sites in the lattice. Using the point-charge model for the estimation of the electric field gradient produced by an O vacancy in the coordination sphere of the probe ion, the process is characterized by a correlation time τ c =12±1 ps at RT

  4. Temperature Dependence of Oxide Semiconductor and Channel Effect of Thin Film Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Teresa

    2018-03-01

    ZTO was prepared on SiOC/ITO glass and the electrical characteristics were analyzed in accordance with the annealing temperature to research the temperature dependence and an amorphous structure. SiOC annealed at 150 °C as a gate insulator became an amorphous structure. The ZTO annealed at 150 °C had the capacitance without any variation. However, the capacitance of ZTO on SiOC annealed at 150 °C was increased due to the reduction of energy loss. ZTO/SiOC transistor was observed the ambipolar transfer characteristics with high stability and mobility in accordance with the decrement of drain voltages as a result of tunneling effect. Therefore it was obtained that the SiOC annealed at 150 °C means the highest Schottky barrier (SB) at the interface of ZTO/SiOC as the optimization parameter.

  5. Temperature-dependent magnetic properties of individual glass spherules, Apollo 11, 12, and 14 lunar samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, A. N.; Sullivan, S.; Alexander, C. C.; Senftle, F. E.; Dwornik, E. J.

    1972-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility of 11 glass spherules from the Apollo 14 lunar fines have been measured from room temperature to 4 K. Data taken at room temperature, 77 K, and 4.2 K, show that the soft saturation magnetization was temperature independent. In the temperature range 300 to 77 K the temperature-dependent component of the magnetic susceptibility obeys the Curie law. Susceptibility measurements on these same specimens and in addition 14 similar spherules from the Apollo 11 and 12 mission show a Curie-Weiss relation at temperatures less than 77 K with a Weiss temperature of 3-7 degrees in contrast to 2-3 degrees found for tektites and synthetic glasses of tektite composition. A proposed model and a theoretical expression closely predict the variation of the susceptibility of the glass spherules with temperature.

  6. Temperature dependence of Brillouin light scattering spectra of acoustic phonons in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, Kevin S.; Klimovich, Nikita; An, Kyongmo; Sullivan, Sean; Weathers, Annie; Shi, Li; Li, Xiaoqin

    2015-01-01

    Electrons, optical phonons, and acoustic phonons are often driven out of local equilibrium in electronic devices or during laser-material interaction processes. The need for a better understanding of such non-equilibrium transport processes has motivated the development of Raman spectroscopy as a local temperature sensor of optical phonons and intermediate frequency acoustic phonons, whereas Brillouin light scattering (BLS) has recently been explored as a temperature sensor of low-frequency acoustic phonons. Here, we report the measured BLS spectra of silicon at different temperatures. The origins of the observed temperature dependence of the BLS peak position, linewidth, and intensity are examined in order to evaluate their potential use as temperature sensors for acoustic phonons

  7. Temperature dependent dielectric properties and ion transportation in solid polymer electrolyte for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengwa, R. J.; Dhatarwal, Priyanka; Choudhary, Shobhna

    2016-05-01

    Solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) film consisted of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) blend matrix with lithium tetrafluroborate (LiBF4) as dopant ionic salt and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) as plasticizer has been prepared by solution casting method followed by melt pressing. Dielectric properties and ionic conductivity of the SPE film at different temperatures have been determined by dielectric relaxation spectroscopy. It has been observed that the dc ionic conductivity of the SPE film increases with increase of temperature and also the decrease of relaxation time. The temperature dependent relaxation time and ionic conductivity values of the electrolyte are governed by the Arrhenius relation. Correlation observed between dc conductivity and relaxation time confirms that ion transportation occurs with polymer chain segmental dynamics through hopping mechanism. The room temperature ionic conductivity is found to be 4 × 10-6 S cm-1 which suggests the suitability of the SPE film for rechargeable lithium batteries.

  8. On the temperature dependence of the spontaneous polarization of lithium niobate and lithium tantalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismailzade, I.G.; Ismailov, R.M.

    1980-01-01

    The temperature dependence of spontaneous polarization Psub(s)(T) of LiNbO 3 and LiTaO 3 ferroelectrics is studied by the precision X-ray diffraction method up to the Curie temperature - 1140 and 650 deg C, respectively. It is shown that for LiTaO 3 a deviation from continuous variation of spontaneous polarization with temperature is observed, expressing itself more disticntly at temperatures corresponding to intermediate ferroelectric phase transitions. The Psub(s)(T) obtained has whown that up to 210 deg C the value of LiNbO 3 spontaneous polarization practically remains constant and it decreases with the temperature increase, and near the phase transition temperature (transition of the first order) Psub(s)(T) is 40% of spontaneous polarization at room temperature. As in the case of lithium tantalate stepwise changes of Psub(s)(T) for LiNbO 3 are observed

  9. Unusual temperature dependence of the magnetic moment in URu2Si2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faak, B.; Flouquet, J.; Lejay, P.

    1994-01-01

    The influence of the sample quality on the magnetic properties of the heavy-fermion superconductor URu 2 Si 2 has been studied by elastic neutron scattering. Two single crystals prepared under identical conditions received different heat treatments. The as-grown crystal shows an unusual temperature dependence of the magnetic Bragg peak intensity. The annealed sample behaves normally. The low-temperature magnetic moment is identical for the two samples, showing that the small moment of 0.023 (3) μ B is intrinsic. By varying the instrumental resolution, we show that the ordered moment as well as the limited correlation length (200-400 A) are of static origin. The finite correlation length appears related to defects. (author). 9 refs., 1 fig

  10. Transresistance calibrations and temperature dependence evaluation of a magnetic bridge current sensor with shunt standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, T; Kon, S; Tadatsu, T

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with a magnetic bridge current sensor for dc current measurements and a calibration system developed for the current sensor. The current sensor forms a magnetic bridge structure with a magnetic fluid core. The calibration system has been developed by using standard shunts for a test current range of 1 mA to 100 A and establishing a comparison method with a switching/sampling system. In the calibration system, the transresistances of the current sensor are measured and the uncertainties of the system are estimated for the input test current range. Also, the temperature dependence on the transresistances is investigated for temperatures ranging from −40 to 100 °C

  11. Temperature dependence of barrier height in Ni/n-GaN Schottky barrier diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Takuya; Okada, Masaya; Ueno, Masaki; Yamamoto, Yoshiyuki; Kimoto, Tsunenobu; Horita, Masahiro; Suda, Jun

    2017-05-01

    The temperature dependence of barrier height in a Ni/n-GaN Schottky barrier diode fabricated on a GaN homoepitaxial layer was investigated by capacitance-voltage, current-voltage, and internal photoemission measurements in the range of 223-573 K. The barrier height obtained by these methods linearly decreased with increasing temperature. The temperature coefficient was -(1.7-2.3) × 10-4 eV/K, which is about half of the temperature coefficient of the band gap reported previously. This indicates that the decrease in the barrier height may mainly reflect the shrinkage of the band gap (lowering of the conduction band edge) in GaN with increasing temperature.

  12. Temperature-dependent sex determination in the leopard gecko, Eublepharis macularius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viets, B E; Tousignant, A; Ewert, M A; Nelson, C E; Crews, D

    1993-05-01

    The leopard gecko, Eublepharis macularius, has temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD). Previous reports have shown that females are produced predominantly at cool incubation temperatures and males are produced predominantly at warm incubation temperatures (Pattern Ib). We report here that incubation at even higher temperatures (34 and 35 degrees C) produces mostly females (Pattern II). The lethal maximum constant incubation temperature for this species appears to be just above 35 degrees C. Although a previous study indicated that females from a warm incubation temperature (32 degrees C) failed to lay eggs, we found that 12 of 14 mature females incubated at 32.5 degrees C, and 5 of 6 mature females incubated at 34 degrees C produced fertile eggs and viable hatchlings.

  13. Periodic MHD flow with temperature dependent viscosity and thermal conductivity past an isothermal oscillating cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Rubel; Rana, B. M. Jewel; Ahmmed, S. F.

    2017-06-01

    Temperature dependent viscosity and thermal conducting heat and mass transfer flow with chemical reaction and periodic magnetic field past an isothermal oscillating cylinder have been considered. The partial dimensionless equations governing the flow have been solved numerically by applying explicit finite difference method with the help Compaq visual 6.6a. The obtained outcome of this inquisition has been discussed for different values of well-known flow parameters with different time steps and oscillation angle. The effect of chemical reaction and periodic MHD parameters on the velocity field, temperature field and concentration field, skin-friction, Nusselt number and Sherwood number have been studied and results are presented by graphically. The novelty of the present problem is to study the streamlines by taking into account periodic magnetic field.

  14. Temperature-dependent resonance energy transfer from semiconductor quantum wells to graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Young-Jun; Kim, Keun Soo; Nam, Jungtae; Kwon, Se Ra; Byun, Hyeryoung; Lee, Kwanjae; Ryou, Jae-Hyun; Dupuis, Russell D; Kim, Jeomoh; Ahn, Gwanghyun; Ryu, Sunmin; Ryu, Mee-Yi; Kim, Jin Soo

    2015-02-11

    Resonance energy transfer (RET) has been employed for interpreting the energy interaction of graphene combined with semiconductor materials such as nanoparticles and quantum-well (QW) heterostructures. Especially, for the application of graphene as a transparent electrode for semiconductor light emitting diodes, the mechanism of exciton recombination processes such as RET in graphene-semiconductor QW heterojunctions should be understood clearly. Here, we characterized the temperature-dependent RET behaviors in graphene/semiconductor QW heterostructures. We then observed the tuning of the RET efficiency from 5% to 30% in graphene/QW heterostructures with ∼60 nm dipole-dipole coupled distance at temperatures of 300 to 10 K. This survey allows us to identify the roles of localized and free excitons in the RET process from the QWs to graphene as a function of temperature.

  15. Temperature dependence of Brillouin frequency shift in polymers controlled by plasticization effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakawa, Kazunari; Koike, Kotaro; Du, Qiming; Hayashi, Neisei; Koike, Yasuhiro; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2015-04-01

    The temperature-dependence coefficient of Brillouin frequency shift (BFS) in perfluorinated graded-index polymer optical fibers is known to change drastically, because of the glass transition, at a certain critical temperature (Tc), above which the BFS becomes more sensitive to temperature. In this paper, we demonstrate that the Tc value can be adjusted by varying the dopant concentration, which is originally used to form the graded-index profile in the core region. Furthermore, we show that the temperature sensitivity of the BFS is enhanced in the presence of dopant probably because the temperature sensitivity of Young's modulus is increased. The results indicate a big potential of the temperature sensors based on Brillouin scattering with an extremely high sensitivity in a specific desired temperature range.

  16. Temperature dependence of the radiation induced change of depletion voltage in silicon PIN detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziock, H.J.; Holzscheiter, K.; Morgan, A.; Palounek, A.P.T.; Ellison, J.; Heinson, A.P.; Mason, M.; Wimpenny, S.J.; Barberis, E.; Cartiglia, N.; Grillo, A.; O'Shaughnessy, K.; Rahn, J.; Rinaldi, P.; Rowe, W.A.; Sadrozinski, H.F.W.; Seiden, A.; Spencer, E.; Webster, A.; Wichmann, R.; Wilder, M.; Coupal, D.; Pal, T.

    1993-01-01

    The silicon microstrip detectors that will be used in the SDC experiment at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) will be exposed to very large fluences of charged particles, neutrons, and gammas. The authors present a study of how temperature affects the change in the depletion voltage of silicon PIN detectors damaged by radiation. They study the initial radiation damage and the short-term and long-term annealing of that damage as a function of temperature in the range from -10 degrees C to +50 degrees C, and as a function of 800 MeV proton fluence up to 1.5 x 10 14 p/cm 2 . They express the pronounced temperature dependencies in a simple model in terms of two annealing time constants which depend exponentially on the temperature

  17. Derivation of temperature dependent mechanical properties of polymer foam core materials using optical extensometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fruehmann R.K.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A methodology for determining the temperature dependence of Young’s modulus and Poisson’s ratio of polymer foams core materials is presented. The design of the test specimen is described in detail, covering the parasitic effects resulting from departures from the uniform strain condition. The measurement approach is based on a non-contact technique so that the behaviour of the complaint foam is not modified by the attachment of strain gauges or extensometers. Firstly experiments are conducted at room temperature and then at elevated temperatures in a thermal chamber. Readings are taken through an optical window using a standard digital camera. Digital image correlation is used to obtain the strains.

  18. Temperature dependence of clusters with attracting vortices in superconducting niobium studied by neutron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pautrat, A; Brûlet, A

    2014-06-11

    We investigated the intermediate mixed state of a superconducting niobium sample using very small angle neutron scattering. We show that this state is stabilized through a sequence where a regular vortex lattice appears, which then coexists with vortex clusters before vanishing at low temperature. Vortices in clusters have a constant periodicity regardless of the applied field and exhibit a temperature dependence close to the one of the penetration depth. The clusters disappear in the high temperature limit. All the results agree with an explanation in terms of vortex attraction due to non-local effects and indicate a negligible role for pinning. Phase coexistence between the Abrikosov vortex lattice and vortex clusters is reported, showing the first-order nature of the boundary line.

  19. Interpretation of the temperature dependence of the strong visible photoluminescence of porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finkbeiner, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Weber, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    1995-01-15

    The temperature dependence of the strong visible photoluminescence (550-850nm) is studied in differently prepared porous silicon samples. The variation in the photoluminescence intensity with temperature is a result of a decrease in the radiative decay time and an increase in the non-radiative recombination process with increasing temperatures. The strong visible photoluminescence is interpreted by a recombination of singlet and triplet excitons. The singlet-triplet splitting is comparable for all samples but depends on the detection wavelength and on sample preparation. We present similar data for the recombination process in siloxene which supports the model of a common origin of the strong visible photoluminescence in these very differently prepared samples. ((orig.))

  20. Transport through (Ga,Mn)As nanoislands: Coulomb blockade and temperature dependence of the conductance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlapps, Markus; Lermer, Teresa; Geissler, Stefan; Neumaier, Daniel; Sadowski, Janusz; Schuh, Dieter; Wegscheider, Werner; Weiss, Dieter

    2009-09-01

    We report on magnetotransport measurements of nanoconstricted (Ga,Mn)As devices showing very large resistance changes that can be controlled by both an electric and a magnetic field. Based on the bias voltage and temperature-dependent measurements down to the millikelvin range we compare the models currently used to describe transport through (Ga,Mn)As nanoconstrictions. We provide an explanation for the observed spin-valvelike behavior during a magnetic field sweep by means of the magnetization configurations in the device. Furthermore, we prove that Coulomb blockade plays a decisive role for the transport mechanism and show that modeling the constriction as a granular metal describes the temperature and bias dependence of the conductance correctly and allows to estimate the number of participating islands located in the constriction.