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Sample records for temperature-dependent sex determination

  1. Molecular players involved in temperature-dependent sex determination and sex differentiation in Teleost fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that underlie sex determination and differentiation are conserved and diversified. In fish species, temperature-dependent sex determination and differentiation seem to be ubiquitous and molecular players involved in these mechanisms may be conserved. Although how the ambient temperature transduces signals to the undifferentiated gonads remains to be elucidated, the genes downstream in the sex differentiation pathway are shared between sex-determining mechanisms. In this paper, we review recent advances on the molecular players that participate in the sex determination and differentiation in fish species, by putting emphasis on temperature-dependent sex determination and differentiation, which include temperature-dependent sex determination and genetic sex determination plus temperature effects. Application of temperature-dependent sex differentiation in farmed fish and the consequences of temperature-induced sex reversal are discussed. PMID:24735220

  2. Population viability at extreme sex-ratio skews produced by temperature-dependent sex determination.

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    Hays, Graeme C; Mazaris, Antonios D; Schofield, Gail; Laloë, Jacques-Olivier

    2017-02-08

    For species with temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) there is the fear that rising temperatures may lead to single-sex populations and population extinction. We show that for sea turtles, a major group exhibiting TSD, these concerns are currently unfounded but may become important under extreme climate warming scenarios. We show how highly female-biased sex ratios in developing eggs translate into much more balanced operational sex ratios so that adult male numbers in populations around the world are unlikely to be limiting. Rather than reducing population viability, female-biased offspring sex ratios may, to some extent, help population growth by increasing the number of breeding females and hence egg production. For rookeries across the world (n = 75 sites for seven species), we show that extreme female-biased hatchling sex ratios do not compromise population size and are the norm, with a tendency for populations to maximize the number of female hatchlings. Only at extremely high incubation temperature does high mortality within developing clutches threaten sea turtles. Our work shows how TSD itself is a robust strategy up to a point, but eventually high mortality and female-only hatchling production will cause extinction if incubation conditions warm considerably in the future. © 2017 The Author(s).

  3. Dimorphic DNA methylation during temperature-dependent sex determination in the sea turtle Lepidochelys olivacea.

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    Venegas, Daniela; Marmolejo-Valencia, Alejandro; Valdes-Quezada, Christian; Govenzensky, Tzipe; Recillas-Targa, Félix; Merchant-Larios, Horacio

    2016-09-15

    Sex determination in vertebrates depends on the expression of a conserved network of genes. Sea turtles such as Lepidochelys olivacea have temperature-dependent sex determination. The present work analyses some of the epigenetic processes involved in this. We describe sexual dimorphism in global DNA methylation patterns between ovaries and testes of L. olivacea and show that the differences may arise from a combination of DNA methylation and demethylation events that occur during sex determination. Irrespective of incubation temperature, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine was abundant in the bipotential gonad; however, following sex determination, this modification was no longer found in pre-Sertoli cells in the testes. These changes correlate with the establishment of the sexually dimorphic DNA methylation patterns, down regulation of Sox9 gene expression in ovaries and irreversible gonadal commitment towards a male or female differentiation pathway. Thus, DNA methylation changes may be necessary for the stabilization of the gene expression networks that drive the differentiation of the bipotential gonad to form either an ovary or a testis in L. olivacea and probably among other species that manifest temperature-dependent sex determination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Coexistence of genotypic and temperature-dependent sex determination in pejerrey Odontesthes bonariensis.

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    Yoji Yamamoto

    Full Text Available In this study, we examined whether a homolog of the master sex-determining gene amhy of Odontesthes hatcheri is present and plays any role in testis determination of pejerrey O. bonariensis, a species otherwise known for its strong temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD. Screening of wild and laboratory-reared pejerrey for amhy revealed a high, although not complete linkage with phenotypic sex. The sex ratio in an amhy+/-/amhy-/- full sibling progeny reared during the thermolabile period of sex determination at an intermediate temperature of 25°C was 68.7% male:31.3% female; all amhy+/- fish developed as males whereas about 2/3 and 1/3 of the amhy-/- were female and male, respectively. Expression analyses revealed that amhy transcription began during embryo stage and decreased by the end of sex determination period. The autosomal amha was present in all individuals regardless of amhy genotype; its expression increased significantly from the end of the same period in the gonads of all amhy+/- but only in part of the amhy-/- animals. After histological gonadal differentiation, all gonads of amhy-/- animals with amha ISH signals were testes and those without it were ovaries. These results suggest that amhy is important for testicular differentiation in pejerrey, at least at intermediate temperatures. Thus, we hypothesize that amhy+/- animals differentiate as males by expression of either amhy alone or amhy and amha together whereas the amhy-/- probably rely solely on amha expression. These findings represent the first clear genomic evidence that genotypic and environmental sex determinants can coexist in species with marked TSD such as the pejerrey. The finding of amhy will make possible to monitor wild pejerrey populations for mismatches between genotypic and phenotypic sex and may prove instrumental for field studies addressing the effects of endocrine disruptors or abnormal temperatures on reproduction and the ecological relevance of TSD

  5. Embryonic origin of mate choice in a lizard with temperature-dependent sex determination.

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    Putz, Oliver; Crews, David

    2006-01-01

    Individual differences in the adult sexual behavior of vertebrates are rooted in the fetal environment. In the leopard gecko (Eublepharis macularius), a species with temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD), hatchling sex ratios differ between incubation temperatures, as does sexuality in same-sex animals. This variation can primarily be ascribed to the temperature having direct organizing actions on the brain. Here we demonstrate that embryonic temperature can affect adult mate choice in the leopard gecko. Given the simultaneous choice between two females from different incubation temperatures (30.0 and 34.0 degrees C), males from one incubation temperature (30.0 degrees C) preferred the female from 34.0 degrees C, while males from another incubation temperature (32.5 degrees C) preferred the female from 30.0 degrees C. We suggest that this difference in mate choice is due to an environmental influence on brain development leading to differential perception of opposite-sex individuals. This previously unrecognized modulator of adult mate choice lends further support to the view that mate choice is best understood in the context of an individual's entire life-history. Thus, sexual selection results from a combination of the female's as well as the male's life history. Female attractiveness and male choice therefore are complementary. Copyright 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. ddRADseq reveals determinants for temperature-dependent sex reversal in Nile tilapia on LG23.

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    Wessels, Stephan; Krause, Ina; Floren, Claudia; Schütz, Ekkehard; Beck, Jule; Knorr, Christoph

    2017-07-14

    In Nile tilapia sex determination is governed by a male heterogametic system XX/XY either on LG1 or LG23. The latter carries a Y-specific duplicate of the amh gene, which is a testis-determining factor. Allelic variants in the amh gene demonstrated to be major triggers for autosomal and temperature-dependent sex reversal. Further, QTL on LG23 and LG20 show a temperature-responsiveness with influence on the phenotypic sex relative to the sex chromosomes. Here we present a ddRADseq based approach to identify genomic regions that show unusual large differentiation in terms of fixation index (F ST ) between temperature-treated pseudomales and non-masculinized females using a comparative genome-scan. Genome-wide associations were identified for the temperature-dependent sex using a genetically all-female population devoid of amh-ΔY. Twenty-two thousand three hundred ninety-two SNPs were interrogated for the comparison of temperature-treated pseudomales and females, which revealed the largest differentiation on LG23. Outlier F ST -values (0.35-0.44) were determined for six SNPs in the genomic interval (9,190,077-11,065,693) harbouring the amh gene (9,602,693-9,605,808), exceeding the genome-wide low F ST of 0.013. Association analysis with a set of 9104 selected SNPs confirmed that the same genomic region on LG23 exerts a significant effect on the temperature-dependent sex. This study highlights the role of LG23 in sex determination, harbouring major determinants for temperature-dependent sex reversal in Nile tilapia. Furthermore F ST outlier detection proves a powerful tool for detection of sex-determining regions in fish genomes.

  7. Sex determination and differentiation in Aurelia sp.1: the absence of temperature dependence

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    Liu, Chunsheng; Gu, Zhifeng; Xing, Mengxin; Sun, Yun; Chen, Siqing; Chen, Zhaoting

    2017-03-01

    Cnidarians, being regarded as `basal' metazoan animals, are considered to have relatively high plasticity in terms of sex reversal. In this study we used an experimental approach to demonstrate sexual differentiation and plasticity in benthic polyps and pelagic medusae of Aurelia sp.1 maintained at different temperatures. Results indicated that in Aurelia sp.1, sex differentiation has been determined at the polyp stage and that all medusae originating from a given polyp are, phenotypically, of the same sex. In addition, the sex of polyps budding from the same clone (either male or female) at different temperatures appears to be the same as that of the parent. The sex of medusae that had originated from a known-sex polyp was observed to remain the same as that of the parent, irrespective of differences in strobilation or rearing temperatures. These results indicate that the mechanism of sex determination of Aurelia sp.1. is not influenced by prevailing temperature regimes. A comparison of variability in terms of sexual plasticity of Aurelia sp.1 with that of Hydrozoa and Anthozoa suggests that species characterized by a free-swimming medusa life stage have a high dispersal potential, which probably results in a lower rate of sex reversal.

  8. Temperature-dependent sex determination in the American alligator: expression of SF1, WT1 and DAX1 during gonadogenesis.

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    Western, P S; Harry, J L; Marshall Graves, J A; Sinclair, A H

    2000-01-11

    Sex determination in mammals and birds is chromosomal, while in many reptiles sex determination is temperature dependent. Morphological development of the gonads in these systems is conserved, suggesting that many of the genes involved in gonad development are also conserved. The genes SF1, WT1 and DAX1 play various roles in the mammalian testis-determining pathway. SF1 and WT1 are thought to interact to cause male-specific gene expression during testis development, while DAX1 is believed to inhibit this male-specific gene expression. We have cloned SF1 and DAX1 from the American alligator, a species with temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD). SF1, DAX1 and WT1 are expressed in the urogenital system/gonad throughout the period of alligator gonadogenesis which is temperature sensitive. SF1 appears to be expressed at a higher level in females than in males. This SF1 expression pattern is concordant with the observed pattern during chicken gonadogenesis, but opposite to that observed during mouse gonadogenesis. Although the observed sexual dimorphism of gonadal SF1 expression in alligators and chickens is opposite that observed in the mouse, it is probable that SF1 is involved in control of gonadal steroidogenesis in all these vertebrates. DAX1 and WT1 are both expressed during stages 22-25 of both males and females. However, there appear to be no sex differences in the expression patterns of these genes. We conclude that DAX1, WT1 and SF1 may be involved in gonadal development of the alligator. These genes may form part of a gonadal-development pathway which has been conserved through vertebrate evolution.

  9. The ecology and evolution of temperature-dependent reaction norms for sex determination in reptiles: a mechanistic conceptual model.

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    Pezaro, Nadav; Doody, J Sean; Thompson, Michael B

    2017-08-01

    Sex-determining mechanisms are broadly categorised as being based on either genetic or environmental factors. Vertebrate sex determination exhibits remarkable diversity but displays distinct phylogenetic patterns. While all eutherian mammals possess XY male heterogamety and female heterogamety (ZW) is ubiquitous in birds, poikilothermic vertebrates (fish, amphibians and reptiles) exhibit multiple genetic sex-determination (GSD) systems as well as environmental sex determination (ESD). Temperature is the factor controlling ESD in reptiles and temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) in reptiles has become a focal point in the study of this phenomenon. Current patterns of climate change may cause detrimental skews in the population sex ratios of reptiles exhibiting TSD. Understanding the patterns of variation, both within and among populations and linking such patterns with the selection processes they are associated with, is the central challenge of research aimed at predicting the capacity of populations to adapt to novel conditions. Here we present a conceptual model that innovates by defining an individual reaction norm for sex determination as a range of incubation temperatures. By deconstructing individual reaction norms for TSD and revealing their underlying interacting elements, we offer a conceptual solution that explains how variation among individual reaction norms can be inferred from the pattern of population reaction norms. The model also links environmental variation with the different patterns of TSD and describes the processes from which they may arise. Specific climate scenarios are singled out as eco-evolutionary traps that may lead to demographic extinction or a transition to either male or female heterogametic GSD. We describe how the conceptual principles can be applied to interpret TSD data and to explain the adaptive capacity of TSD to climate change as well as its limits and the potential applications for conservation and management

  10. Female-Bias in a Long-Term Study of a Species with Temperature-Dependent Sex Determination: Monitoring Sex Ratios for Climate Change Research

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    Braun McNeill, Joanne; Avens, Larisa; Goodman Hall, April; Goshe, Lisa R.; Harms, Craig A.; Owens, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Alterations have occurred and continue to manifest in the Earth's biota as a result of climate change. Animals exhibiting temperature dependent sex determination (TSD), including sea turtles, are perhaps most vulnerable to a warming of the Earth as highly skewed sex ratios can result, potentially leading to population extinction resulting from decreased male recruitment. Recent studies have begun to quantify climate change impacts to sea turtle populations, especially in terms of predicting e...

  11. Climate change overruns resilience conferred by temperature-dependent sex determination in sea turtles and threatens their survival.

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    Santidrián Tomillo, Pilar; Genovart, Meritxell; Paladino, Frank V; Spotila, James R; Oro, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) is the predominant form of environmental sex determination (ESD) in reptiles, but the adaptive significance of TSD in this group remains unclear. Additionally, the viability of species with TSD may be compromised as climate gets warmer. We simulated population responses in a turtle with TSD to increasing nest temperatures and compared the results to those of a virtual population with genotypic sex determination (GSD) and fixed sex ratios. Then, we assessed the effectiveness of TSD as a mechanism to maintain populations under climate change scenarios. TSD populations were more resilient to increased nest temperatures and mitigated the negative effects of high temperatures by increasing production of female offspring and therefore, future fecundity. That buffered the negative effect of temperature on the population growth. TSD provides an evolutionary advantage to sea turtles. However, this mechanism was only effective over a range of temperatures and will become inefficient as temperatures rise to levels projected by current climate change models. Projected global warming threatens survival of sea turtles, and the IPCC high gas concentration scenario may result in extirpation of the studied population in 50 years. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1; ERα), not ESR2 (ERβ), modulates estrogen-induced sex reversal in the American alligator, a species with temperature-dependent sex determination.

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    Kohno, Satomi; Bernhard, Melissa C; Katsu, Yoshinao; Zhu, Jianguo; Bryan, Teresa A; Doheny, Brenna M; Iguchi, Taisen; Guillette, Louis J

    2015-05-01

    All crocodilians and many turtles exhibit temperature-dependent sex determination where the temperature of the incubated egg, during a thermo-sensitive period (TSP), determines the sex of the offspring. Estrogens play a critical role in sex determination in crocodilians and turtles, as it likely does in most nonmammalian vertebrates. Indeed, administration of estrogens during the TSP induces male to female sex reversal at a male-producing temperature (MPT). However, it is not clear how estrogens override the influence of temperature during sex determination in these species. Most vertebrates have 2 forms of nuclear estrogen receptor (ESR): ESR1 (ERα) and ESR2 (ERβ). However, there is no direct evidence concerning which ESR is involved in sex determination, because a specific agonist or antagonist for each ESR has not been tested in nonmammalian species. We identified specific pharmaceutical agonists for each ESR using an in vitro transactivation assay employing American alligator ESR1 and ESR2; these were 4,4',4''-(4-propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl)trisphenol (PPT) and 7-bromo-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1,3-benzoxazol-5-ol (WAY 200070), respectively. Alligator eggs were exposed to PPT or WAY 200070 at a MPT just before the TSP, and their sex was examined at the last stage of embryonic development. Estradiol-17β and PPT, but not WAY 200070, induced sex reversal at a MPT. PPT-exposed embryos exposed to the highest dose (5.0 μg/g egg weight) exhibited enlargement and advanced differentiation of the Müllerian duct. These results indicate that ESR1 is likely the principal ESR involved in sex reversal as well as embryonic Müllerian duct survival and growth in American alligators.

  13. Temperature-dependent sex determination in fish revisited: prevalence, a single sex ratio response pattern, and possible effects of climate change.

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    Natalia Ospina-Alvarez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In gonochoristic vertebrates, sex determination mechanisms can be classified as genotypic (GSD or temperature-dependent (TSD. Some cases of TSD in fish have been questioned, but the prevalent view is that TSD is very common in this group of animals, with three different response patterns to temperature. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed field and laboratory data for the 59 fish species where TSD has been explicitly or implicitly claimed so far. For each species, we compiled data on the presence or absence of sex chromosomes and determined if the sex ratio response was obtained within temperatures that the species experiences in the wild. If so, we studied whether this response was statistically significant. We found evidence that many cases of observed sex ratio shifts in response to temperature reveal thermal alterations of an otherwise predominately GSD mechanism rather than the presence of TSD. We also show that in those fish species that actually have TSD, sex ratio response to increasing temperatures invariably results in highly male-biased sex ratios, and that even small changes of just 1-2 degrees C can significantly alter the sex ratio from 1:1 (males:females up to 3:1 in both freshwater and marine species. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrate that TSD in fish is far less widespread than currently believed, suggesting that TSD is clearly the exception in fish sex determination. Further, species with TSD exhibit only one general sex ratio response pattern to temperature. However, the viability of some fish populations with TSD can be compromised through alterations in their sex ratios as a response to temperature fluctuations of the magnitude predicted by climate change.

  14. Female-Bias in a Long-Term Study of a Species with Temperature-Dependent Sex Determination: Monitoring Sex Ratios for Climate Change Research.

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    Braun McNeill, Joanne; Avens, Larisa; Goodman Hall, April; Goshe, Lisa R; Harms, Craig A; Owens, David W

    2016-01-01

    Alterations have occurred and continue to manifest in the Earth's biota as a result of climate change. Animals exhibiting temperature dependent sex determination (TSD), including sea turtles, are perhaps most vulnerable to a warming of the Earth as highly skewed sex ratios can result, potentially leading to population extinction resulting from decreased male recruitment. Recent studies have begun to quantify climate change impacts to sea turtle populations, especially in terms of predicting effects on hatchling sex ratios. However, given the inherent difficulty in studying sex ratios at this life stage, a more accurate assessment of changes in population sex ratios might be derived by evaluating the juvenile portion of foraging aggregations. We investigated the long-term trend in sex ratio of a juvenile loggerhead (Caretta caretta) sea turtle population inhabiting Pamlico and Core Sounds, North Carolina, USA. We used plasma testosterone reference ranges measured using radioimmunoassay (RIA) to assign sex for 959 turtles and confirmed sex assignment of a subset (N = 58) of the sampled turtles through laparoscopic examination of their gonads. Our results demonstrate that for this particular population of loggerheads, sex ratios (3Females:1Male) had not significantly changed over a 10 year period (1998-2007), nor showed any significant difference among 5-cm straight carapace length (SCL) size classes. Ultimately, these findings provide a basis for comparison with future sex ratios, and highlight the importance of establishing similar long-term studies monitoring secondary, rather than primary, sex ratios, so that needed mitigation measures to climate change impacts can be implemented.

  15. Female-Bias in a Long-Term Study of a Species with Temperature-Dependent Sex Determination: Monitoring Sex Ratios for Climate Change Research.

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    Joanne Braun McNeill

    Full Text Available Alterations have occurred and continue to manifest in the Earth's biota as a result of climate change. Animals exhibiting temperature dependent sex determination (TSD, including sea turtles, are perhaps most vulnerable to a warming of the Earth as highly skewed sex ratios can result, potentially leading to population extinction resulting from decreased male recruitment. Recent studies have begun to quantify climate change impacts to sea turtle populations, especially in terms of predicting effects on hatchling sex ratios. However, given the inherent difficulty in studying sex ratios at this life stage, a more accurate assessment of changes in population sex ratios might be derived by evaluating the juvenile portion of foraging aggregations. We investigated the long-term trend in sex ratio of a juvenile loggerhead (Caretta caretta sea turtle population inhabiting Pamlico and Core Sounds, North Carolina, USA. We used plasma testosterone reference ranges measured using radioimmunoassay (RIA to assign sex for 959 turtles and confirmed sex assignment of a subset (N = 58 of the sampled turtles through laparoscopic examination of their gonads. Our results demonstrate that for this particular population of loggerheads, sex ratios (3Females:1Male had not significantly changed over a 10 year period (1998-2007, nor showed any significant difference among 5-cm straight carapace length (SCL size classes. Ultimately, these findings provide a basis for comparison with future sex ratios, and highlight the importance of establishing similar long-term studies monitoring secondary, rather than primary, sex ratios, so that needed mitigation measures to climate change impacts can be implemented.

  16. The lesser known challenge of climate change: thermal variance and sex-reversal in vertebrates with temperature-dependent sex determination.

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    Jennifer L Neuwald

    Full Text Available Climate change is expected to disrupt biological systems. Particularly susceptible are species with temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD, as in many reptiles. While the potentially devastating effect of rising mean temperatures on sex ratios in TSD species is appreciated, the consequences of increased thermal variance predicted to accompany climate change remain obscure. Surprisingly, no study has tested if the effect of thermal variance around high-temperatures (which are particularly relevant given climate change predictions has the same or opposite effects as around lower temperatures. Here we show that sex ratios of the painted turtle (Chrysemys picta were reversed as fluctuations increased around low and high unisexual mean-temperatures. Unexpectedly, the developmental and sexual responses around female-producing temperatures were decoupled in a more complex manner than around male-producing values. Our novel observations are not fully explained by existing ecological models of development and sex determination, and provide strong evidence that thermal fluctuations are critical for shaping the biological outcomes of climate change.

  17. Sex reversal triggers the rapid transition from genetic to temperature-dependent sex.

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    Holleley, Clare E; O'Meally, Denis; Sarre, Stephen D; Marshall Graves, Jennifer A; Ezaz, Tariq; Matsubara, Kazumi; Azad, Bhumika; Zhang, Xiuwen; Georges, Arthur

    2015-07-02

    Sex determination in animals is amazingly plastic. Vertebrates display contrasting strategies ranging from complete genetic control of sex (genotypic sex determination) to environmentally determined sex (for example, temperature-dependent sex determination). Phylogenetic analyses suggest frequent evolutionary transitions between genotypic and temperature-dependent sex determination in environmentally sensitive lineages, including reptiles. These transitions are thought to involve a genotypic system becoming sensitive to temperature, with sex determined by gene-environment interactions. Most mechanistic models of transitions invoke a role for sex reversal. Sex reversal has not yet been demonstrated in nature for any amniote, although it occurs in fish and rarely in amphibians. Here we make the first report of reptile sex reversal in the wild, in the Australian bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps), and use sex-reversed animals to experimentally induce a rapid transition from genotypic to temperature-dependent sex determination. Controlled mating of normal males to sex-reversed females produces viable and fertile offspring whose phenotypic sex is determined solely by temperature (temperature-dependent sex determination). The W sex chromosome is eliminated from this lineage in the first generation. The instantaneous creation of a lineage of ZZ temperature-sensitive animals reveals a novel, climate-induced pathway for the rapid transition between genetic and temperature-dependent sex determination, and adds to concern about adaptation to rapid global climate change.

  18. Acetylcholinesterase-positive innervation is present at undifferentiated stages of the sea turtle Lepidochelis olivacea embryo gonads: implications for temperature-dependent sex determination.

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    Gutiérrez-Ospina, G; Jiménez-Trejo, F J; Favila, R; Moreno-Mendoza, N A; Granados Rojas, L; Barrios, F A; Díaz-Cintra, S; Merchant-Larios, H

    1999-07-19

    In embryos of different reptile species, incubation temperature triggers a cascade of endocrine events that lead to gonad sex differentiation. The cellular and molecular mechanisms by which temperature sets in motion this process are still controversial. Here, we begin evaluating the possible participation of the nervous system in temperature-dependent sex determination by showing the existence and origin of acetylcholinesterase (AchE)-positive nerve fibers in undifferentiated gonads of the Lepidochelys olivacea (L. olivacea) sea turtle putative male and female embryos, along the thermosensitive period for sex determination (TPSD; stages 20-27). AChE-positive nerve bundles and fibers were readily visualized until developmental stage 24 and thereafter. DiI injections and confocal imaging showed that some of these gonadal nerves arise from the lower thoracic and upper lumbar spinal cord levels, and might thus be sensory in nature. Because the vertebrate spinal cord is capable of integrating by itself thermoregulatory responses with no intervention of uppermost levels of the central nervous system, we also evaluated spinal cord maturation during the TPSD. The maturation of the spinal cord was more advanced in putative female than in male embryos, when sex determination is taking place for each sex; this process starts and ends earlier in male than in female embryos. Together these observations open the possibility that the spinal cord and the innervation derived from it could play a direct role in driving or modulating the process of temperature-dependent gonad sex determination and/or differentiation, particularly in female L. olivacea embryos.

  19. Embryological ontogeny of aromatase gene expression in Chrysemys picta and Apalone mutica turtles: comparative patterns within and across temperature-dependent and genotypic sex-determining mechanisms.

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    Valenzuela, Nicole; Shikano, Takahito

    2007-01-01

    Although the role of aromatase in many estrogen-dependent reproductive and metabolic functions is well documented in vertebrates, its involvement in the ovarian development of species exhibiting temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) is incompletely understood. This is partly due to the conflicting temporal and spatial pattern of aromatase expression and activity across taxa. To help resolve this ongoing debate, we compared for the first time the embryological ontogeny of aromatase expression in turtles possessing genotypic sex determination (GSD) (Apalone mutica) and TSD (Chrysemys picta) incubated under identical conditions. As anticipated, we found no significant thermal differences in aromatase expression at any stage examined (prior to until the end of the thermosensitive period) in A. mutica. Surprisingly, the same was true for C. picta. When placed in a phylogenetic context, our results suggest that aromatase expression is evolutionarily plastic with respect to sex determination in reptiles, and that differences between reptilian TSD and GSD are not aromatase-driven. Further research across TSD and GSD species is warranted to fully decipher the evolution of functional differences among sex-determining mechanisms.

  20. Cortisol-induced masculinization: does thermal stress affect gonadal fate in pejerrey, a teleost fish with temperature-dependent sex determination?

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    Ricardo S Hattori

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gonadal fate in many reptiles, fish, and amphibians is modulated by the temperature experienced during a critical period early in life (temperature-dependent sex determination; TSD. Several molecular processes involved in TSD have been described but how the animals "sense" environmental temperature remains unknown. We examined whether the stress-related hormone cortisol mediates between temperature and sex differentiation of pejerrey, a gonochoristic teleost fish with marked TSD, and the possibility that it involves glucocorticoid receptor- and/or steroid biosynthesis-modulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Larvae maintained during the period of gonadal sex differentiation at a masculinizing temperature (29 degrees C; 100% males consistently had higher cortisol, 11-ketotestoterone (11-KT, and testosterone (T titres than those at a feminizing temperature (17 degrees C; 100% females. Cortisol-treated animals had elevated 11-KT and T, and showed a typical molecular signature of masculinization including amh upregulation, cyp19a1a downregulation, and higher incidence of gonadal apoptosis during sex differentiation. Administration of cortisol and a non-metabolizable glucocorticoid receptor (GR agonist (Dexamethasone to larvae at a "sexually neutral" temperature (24 degrees C caused significant increases in the proportion of males. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest a role of cortisol in the masculinization of pejerrey and provide a possible link between stress and testicular differentiation in this gonochoristic TSD species. Cortisol role or roles during TSD of pejerrey seem(s to involve both androgen biosynthesis- and GR-mediated processes. These findings and recent reports of cortisol effects on sex determination of sequential hermaphroditic fishes, TSD reptiles, and birds provide support to the notion that stress responses might be involved in various forms of environmental sex determination.

  1. Support for a rare pattern of temperature-dependent sex determination in archaic reptiles: evidence from two species of tuatara (Sphenodon

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    Pledger Shirley

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sex of many reptiles is determined by the temperature an embryo experiences during its development. Three patterns of temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD have been defined, but one pattern where only males are produced above an upper temperature threshold (Type IB is controversial. Here we report new data on the relationship between constant temperature incubation and sexual phenotype in two species of tuatara (Sphenodon, archaic reptiles of enormous zoological significance as the sole representatives of a once widespread reptilian order. Results In both species, the pattern observed with constant incubation temperatures from 18 to 23°C (or 24°C supported a female→male (FM or Type IB pattern of TSD: in Sphenodon guntheri males were produced above a pivotal temperature of 21.6°C, and in S. punctatus (unnamed subspecies on Stephens Island, Cook Strait, males were produced above a pivotal temperature of 22.0°C. The pivotal temperatures and scaling parameters differed between species (p S. punctatus, the warmest natural nests during the TSP produce predominantly males. Conclusion An FM pattern of TSD could be currently adaptive in promoting sexual size dimorphism in tuatara. However, an FM pattern has particularly serious consequences for S. guntheri because current patterns of global warming could exacerbate the male bias already present in the relic population.

  2. Hox gene expression in the embryonic genital system of the sea turtle Lepidochelys olivacea (Eschscholt, 1829), a species with temperature-dependent sex determination.

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    Sifuentes-Romero, Itzel; Merchant-Larios, Horacio; García-Gasca, Alejandra

    2010-09-01

    Hox genes are conserved transcription factors which regulate embryonic morphogenesis and differentiation. For the first time, we examined the quantitative and spatial expression of two Hox 5' genes, HoxD11 and HoxA13, in the developing genital system of the olive ridley Lepidochelys olivacea, a species with temperature-dependent sex determination. Quantitative and spatial expression patterns of both genes suggest a role in the female pathway rather than the male pathway. For instance, both genes, especially HoxA13, were expressed in the undifferentiated gonad during the thermosensitive period at a female promoting temperature, and downregulated in the differentiated gonad. By contrast, expression of both genes was low in gonads incubated at a male promoting temperature and did not change significantly in the differentiated gonad. Furthermore, we found high expression levels of HoxA13 in the paramesonephric duct at the male promoting temperature but not at the female promoting temperature, suggesting a role for this Hox gene in the partial regression of the Müllerian duct in males. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Experimental determination of monoethanolamine protonation constant and its temperature dependency

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    Ma’mun Sholeh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide as one of the major contributors to the global warming problem is produced in large quantities by many important industries and its emission seems to rise from year to year. Aminebased absorption is one of the methods to capture CO2 from its sources. As a reactive system, mass transfer and chemical reaction take place simultaneously. In a vapor-liquid equilibrium model for the CO2-amine-water system, some parameters such as mass transfer coefficients and chemical equilibrium constants need to be known. However, some parameters could be determined experimentally and the rests could be regressed from the model. The protonation constant (pKa, as one of the model parameters, could then be measured experimentally. The purpose of this study is to measure the pKa of monoethanolamine (MEA at a range of temperatures from 303 to 330K by a potentiometric titration method. The experimental data obtained were in a good agreement with the literature data. The pKa data from this work together with those from the literature were then correlated in an empirical correlation to be used for future research.

  4. Allelic variant in the anti-Müllerian hormone gene leads to autosomal and temperature-dependent sex reversal in a selected Nile tilapia line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, Stephan; Sharifi, Reza Ahmad; Luehmann, Liane Magdalena; Rueangsri, Sawichaya; Krause, Ina; Pach, Sabrina; Hoerstgen-Schwark, Gabriele; Knorr, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Owing to the demand for sustainable sex-control protocols in aquaculture, research in tilapia sex determination is gaining momentum. The mutual influence of environmental and genetic factors hampers disentangling the complex sex determination mechanism in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). Previous linkage analyses have demonstrated quantitative trait loci for the phenotypic sex on linkage groups 1, 3, and 23. Quantitative trait loci for temperature-dependent sex reversal similarly reside on linkage group 23. The anti-Müllerian hormone gene (amh), located in this genomic region, is important for sexual fate in higher vertebrates, and shows sexually dimorphic expression in Nile tilapia. Therefore this study aimed at detecting allelic variants and marker-sex associations in the amh gene. Sequencing identified six allelic variants. A significant effect on the phenotypic sex for SNP ss831884014 (psex, but not for the interaction term (treatment: psex reversal.

  5. DETERMINATION OF TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION FOR ANNULAR FINS WITH TEMPERATURE DEPENDENT THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY BY HPM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davood Domairry Ganji

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, homotopy perturbation method has been used to evaluate the temperature distribution of annular fin with temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and to determine the temperature distribution within the fin. This method is useful and practical for solving the nonlinear heat transfer equation, which is associated with variable thermal conductivity condition. The homotopy perturbation method provides an approximate analytical solution in the form of an infinite power series. The annular fin heat transfer rate with temperature-dependent thermal conductivity has been obtained as a function of thermo-geometric fin parameter and the thermal conductivity parameter describing the variation of the thermal conductivity.

  6. Sex determination and sex reversal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camerino, Giovanna; Parma, Pietro; Radi, Orietta; Valentini, Stella

    2006-06-01

    Sex determination in mammals is based on a genetic cascade that controls the fate of the gonads. Gonads will then direct the establishment of phenotypic sex through the production of hormones. Different types of sex reversal are expected to occur if mutations disrupt one of the three steps of gonadal differentiation: formation of the gonadal primordia, sex determination, and testis or ovary development.

  7. Determination of the built-in voltage of BHJ solar cells by temperature dependent photocurrent measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingebach, Markus; Deibel, Carsten [Experimental Physics VI, Physical Institute, Julius-Maximilians-University of Wuerzburg (Germany); Dyakonov, Vladimir [Experimental Physics VI, Physical Institute, Julius-Maximilians-University of Wuerzburg (Germany); Bavarian Center of Applied Energy Research (ZAE Bayern e.V.), Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Despite all progresses in the performance of organic BHJ solar cells (up to 8% power conversion efficiency) some very important properties such as the voltage dependent photocurrent or the built-in potential are not fully understood yet. We investigate poly(3-hexyl thiophene) (P3HT): [6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 61} butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) solar cells by means of temperature dependent pulsed photocurrent measurements and impedance spectroscopy. We find a point of optimal symmetry (POS) that represents the case of quasi flat bands (QFB) in the bulk of the cell, which is lower than the built-in voltage. This difference is due to band bending at the contacts, which is reduced at lower temperatures. Therefore we can identify the built-in voltage by measuring the POS (confirmed by temperature dependent current voltage measurements). This leads to the conclusion that the potential determined by Mott-Schottky analysis is not the built-in potential.

  8. Temperature-dependent sex-reversal by a transformer-2 gene-edited mutation in the spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianwei; Handler, Alfred M

    2017-09-28

    Female to male sex reversal was achieved in an emerging agricultural insect pest, Drosophila suzukii, by creating a temperature-sensitive point mutation in the sex-determination gene, transformer-2 (tra-2), using CRISPR/Cas9 (clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated) homology-directed repair gene-editing. Ds-tra-2 ts2 mutants developed as normal fertile XX and XY adults at permissive temperatures below 20 °C, but at higher restrictive temperatures (26 to 29 °C) chromosomal XX females developed as sterile intersexuals with a predominant male phenotype, while XY males developed with normal morphology, but were sterile. The temperature-dependent function of the Ds-TRA-2 ts2 protein was also evident by the up- and down-regulation of female-specific Ds-Yolk protein 1 (Ds-Yp1) gene expression by temperature shifts during adulthood. This study confirmed the temperature-dependent function of a gene-edited mutation and provides a new method for the more general creation of conditional mutations for functional genomic analysis in insects, and other organisms. Furthermore, it provides a temperature-dependent system for creating sterile male populations useful for enhancing the efficacy of biologically-based programs, such as the sterile insect technique (SIT), to control D. suzukii and other insect pest species of agricultural and medical importance.

  9. Temperature dependence of the calibration factor of radon and radium determination in water samples by SSNTD

    CERN Document Server

    Hunyadi, I; Hakl, J; Baradacs, E; Dezso, Z

    1999-01-01

    The sensitivity of a sup 2 sup 2 sup 6 Ra determination method of water samples by SSNTD was measured as a function of storage temperature during exposure. The method is based on an etched track type radon monitor, which is closed into a gas permeable foil and is immersed in the water sample. The sample is sealed in a glass vessel and stored for an exposure time of 10-30 days. The sensitivity increased more than a factor of two when the storage temperature was raised from 2 deg. C to 30 deg. C. Temperature dependence of the partition coefficient of radon between water and air provides explanation for this dependence. For practical radio- analytical application the temperature dependence of the calibration factor is given by fitting the sensitivity data obtained by measuring sup 2 sup 2 sup 6 Ra standard solutions (in the activity concentration range of 0.1-48.5 kBq m sup - sup 3) at different storage temperatures.

  10. Allelic variant in the anti-Müllerian hormone gene leads to autosomal and temperature-dependent sex reversal in a selected Nile tilapia line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Wessels

    Full Text Available Owing to the demand for sustainable sex-control protocols in aquaculture, research in tilapia sex determination is gaining momentum. The mutual influence of environmental and genetic factors hampers disentangling the complex sex determination mechanism in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus. Previous linkage analyses have demonstrated quantitative trait loci for the phenotypic sex on linkage groups 1, 3, and 23. Quantitative trait loci for temperature-dependent sex reversal similarly reside on linkage group 23. The anti-Müllerian hormone gene (amh, located in this genomic region, is important for sexual fate in higher vertebrates, and shows sexually dimorphic expression in Nile tilapia. Therefore this study aimed at detecting allelic variants and marker-sex associations in the amh gene. Sequencing identified six allelic variants. A significant effect on the phenotypic sex for SNP ss831884014 (p<0.0017 was found by stepwise logistic regression. The remaining variants were not significantly associated. Functional annotation of SNP ss831884014 revealed a non-synonymous amino acid substitution in the amh protein. Consequently, a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET based genotyping assay was developed and validated with a representative sample of fish. A logistic linear model confirmed a highly significant effect of the treatment and genotype on the phenotypic sex, but not for the interaction term (treatment: p<0.0001; genotype: p<0.0025. An additive genetic model proved a linear allele substitution effect of 12% in individuals from controls and groups treated at high temperature, respectively. Moreover, the effect of the genotype on the male proportion was significantly higher in groups treated at high temperature, giving 31% more males on average of the three genotypes. In addition, the groups treated at high temperature showed a positive dominance deviation (+11.4% males. In summary, marker-assisted selection for amh variant ss831884014

  11. Mechanisms of temperature-dependent swimming: the importance of physics, physiology and body size in determining protist swimming speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beveridge, Oliver S; Petchey, Owen L; Humphries, Stuart

    2010-12-15

    Body temperatures and thus physiological rates of poikilothermic organisms are determined by environmental temperature. The power an organism has available for swimming is largely dependent on physiological rates and thus body temperature. However, retarding forces such as drag are contingent on the temperature-dependent physical properties of water and on an organism's size. Consequently, the swimming ability of poikilotherms is highly temperature dependent. The importance of the temperature-dependent physical properties of water (e.g. viscosity) in determining swimming speed is poorly understood. Here we propose a semi-mechanistic model to describe how biological rates, size and the physics of the environment contribute to the temperature dependency of microbial swimming speed. Data on the swimming speed and size of a predatory protist and its protist prey were collected and used to test our model. Data were collected by manipulating both the temperature and the viscosity (independently of temperature) of the organism's environment. Protists were either cultured in their test environment (for several generations) or rapidly exposed to their test environment to assess their ability to adapt or acclimate to treatments. Both biological rates and the physics of the environment were predicted to and observed to contribute to the swimming speed of protists. Body size was not temperature dependent, and protists expressed some ability to acclimate to changes in either temperature or viscosity. Overall, using our parameter estimates and novel model, we are able to suggest that 30 to 40% (depending on species) of the response in swimming speed associated with a reduction in temperature from 20 to 5°C is due to viscosity. Because encounter rates between protist predators and their prey are determined by swimming speed, temperature- and viscosity-dependent swimming speeds are likely to result in temperature- and viscosity-dependent trophic interactions.

  12. Commentary Sex determination

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR G

    2008-01-31

    Jan 31, 2008 ... The discovery in reptiles that incubation temperature of the embryo affects its adult sex is about 40 ... environmental effects determine sex in some individuals, then those environmentally-influenced .... same pattern of sex-reversing only the homogametic (XX, ZZ) genotype, not the heterogametic (XY, ZW).

  13. DNA methylation of the gonadal aromatase (cyp19a promoter is involved in temperature-dependent sex ratio shifts in the European sea bass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia Navarro-Martín

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Sex ratio shifts in response to temperature are common in fish and reptiles. However, the mechanism linking temperature during early development and sex ratios has remained elusive. We show in the European sea bass (sb, a fish in which temperature effects on sex ratios are maximal before the gonads form, that juvenile males have double the DNA methylation levels of females in the promoter of gonadal aromatase (cyp19a, the enzyme that converts androgens into estrogens. Exposure to high temperature increased the cyp19a promoter methylation levels of females, indicating that induced-masculinization involves DNA methylation-mediated control of aromatase gene expression, with an observed inverse relationship between methylation levels and expression. Although different CpGs within the sb cyp19a promoter exhibited different sensitivity to temperature, we show that the increased methylation of the sb cyp19a promoter, which occurs in the gonads but not in the brain, is not a generalized effect of temperature. Importantly, these effects were also observed in sexually undifferentiated fish and were not altered by estrogen treatment. Thus, methylation of the sb cyp19a promoter is the cause of the lower expression of cyp19a in temperature-masculinized fish. In vitro, induced methylation of the sb cyp19a promoter suppressed the ability of SF-1 and Foxl2 to stimulate transcription. Finally, a CpG differentially methylated by temperature and adjacent to a Sox transcription factor binding site is conserved across species. Thus, DNA methylation of the aromatase promoter may be an essential component of the long-sought-after mechanism connecting environmental temperature and sex ratios in vertebrate species with temperature-dependent sex determination.

  14. Somatic sex determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarkower, David

    2006-02-10

    C. elegans occurs in two natural sexes, the XX hermaphrodite and the XO male, which differ extensively in anatomy, physiology, and behavior. All somatic differences between the sexes result from the differential activity of a "global" sex determination regulatory pathway. This pathway also controls X chromosome dosage compensation, which is coordinated with sex determination by the action of the three SDC proteins. The SDC proteins control somatic and germline sex by transcriptional repression of the her-1 gene. HER-1 is a secreted protein that controls a regulatory module consisting of a transmembrane receptor, TRA-2, three intracellular FEM proteins, and the zinc finger transcription factor TRA-1. The molecular workings of this regulatory module are still being elucidated. Similarity of TRA-2 to patched receptors and of TRA-1 to GLI proteins suggests that parts of the global pathway originally derived from a Hedgehog signaling pathway. TRA-1 controls all aspects of somatic sexual differentiation, presumably by regulating a variety of tissue- and cell-specific downstream targets, including the cell death regulator EGL-1 and the male sexual regulator MAB-3. Sex determination evolves rapidly, and conservation of sexual regulators between phyla has been elusive. An apparent exception involves DM domain proteins, including MAB-3, which control sexual differentiation in nematodes, arthropods, and vertebrates. Important issues needing more study include the detailed molecular mechanisms of the global pathway, the identities of additional sexual regulators acting in the global pathway and downstream of TRA-1, and the evolutionary history of the sex determination pathway. Recently developed genetic and genomic technologies and comparative studies in divergent species have begun to address these issues.

  15. Drosophila mitotypes determine developmental time in a diet and temperature dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towarnicki, Samuel G; Ballard, J William O

    2017-07-01

    It is well known that specific mitochondrial (mt) DNA mutations can reduce organismal fitness and influence mitochondrial-nuclear interactions. However, determining specific mtDNA mutations that are beneficial has been elusive. In this study, we vary the diet and environmental temperature to study larval development time of two Drosophila melanogaster mitotypes (Alstonville and Dahomey), in two nuclear genetic backgrounds, and investigate developmental differences through weight, feeding rate, and movement. To manipulate the diet, we utilize the nutritional geometric framework to manipulate isocaloric diets of differing macronutrient ratios (1:2 and 1:16 protein: carbohydrate (P:C) ratios) and raise flies at three temperatures (19°C, 23°C and 27°C). Larvae with Dahomey mtDNA develop more slowly than Alstonville when fed the 1:2 P:C diet at all temperatures and developed more quickly when fed the 1:16 P:C diet at 23°C and 27°C. We determined that Dahomey larvae eat more, move less, and weigh more than Alstonville larvae when raised on the 1:16 P:C diet and that these physiological responses are modified by temperature. We suggest that 1 (or more) of 4 mtDNA changes is likely responsible for the observed effects and posit the mtDNA changes moderate a physiological trade-off between consumption and foraging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Transport characteristics of n-ZnO/p-Si heterojunction as determined from temperature dependent current–voltage measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djiokap, S.R. Tankio, E-mail: stive.tankiodjiokap@nmmu.ac.za; Urgessa, Z.N.; Mbulanga, C.M.; Venter, A.; Botha, J.R.

    2016-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods have been synthesized by a two-step chemical bath deposition process on silicon substrates having different dopant densities and orientations. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis reveal that the orientation of the Si substrate does not affect the orientation, distribution or crystallinity of the nanostructures. The electrical properties of the ZnO/Si heterojunction are also investigated by current–voltage (I–V) measurements. The ideality factor is found to be 2.6 at 295 K, indicating that complex current transport mechanisms are at play. Temperature dependent I–V characteristics have been used to determine the dominant transport mechanism. The experimental results suggest that in the low bias region the current is dominated by a trap assisted multi-step tunneling process.

  17. Transport characteristics of n-ZnO/p-Si heterojunction as determined from temperature dependent current-voltage measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djiokap, S. R. Tankio; Urgessa, Z. N.; Mbulanga, C. M.; Venter, A.; Botha, J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods have been synthesized by a two-step chemical bath deposition process on silicon substrates having different dopant densities and orientations. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis reveal that the orientation of the Si substrate does not affect the orientation, distribution or crystallinity of the nanostructures. The electrical properties of the ZnO/Si heterojunction are also investigated by current-voltage (I-V) measurements. The ideality factor is found to be 2.6 at 295 K, indicating that complex current transport mechanisms are at play. Temperature dependent I-V characteristics have been used to determine the dominant transport mechanism. The experimental results suggest that in the low bias region the current is dominated by a trap assisted multi-step tunneling process.

  18. Temperature Dependence in Heterogeneous Nucleation with Application to the Direct Determination of Cluster Energy on Nearly Molecular Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, Robert L; Winkler, Paul M; Wagner, Paul E

    2017-12-04

    A re-examination of measurements of heterogeneous nucleation of water vapor on silver nanoparticles is presented here using a model-free framework that derives the energy of critical cluster formation directly from measurements of nucleation probability. Temperature dependence is correlated with cluster stabilization by the nanoparticle seed and previously found cases of unusual increasing nucleation onset saturation ratio with increasing temperature are explained. A necessary condition for the unusual positive temperature dependence is identified, namely that the critical cluster be more stable, on a per molecule basis, than the bulk liquid to exhibit the effect. Temperature dependence is next examined in the classical Fletcher model, modified here to make the energy of cluster formation explicit in the model.  The contact angle used in the Fletcher model is identified as the microscopic contact angle, which can be directly obtained from heterogeneous nucleation experimental data by a recently developed analysis method. Here an equivalent condition, increasing contact angle with temperature, is found necessary for occurrence of unusual temperature dependence. Our findings have immediate applications to atmospheric particle formation and nanoparticle detection in condensation particle counters (CPCs).

  19. Temperature-dependent sex-reversal by a transformer-2 gene-edited mutation in the spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Female to male sex reversal was achieved in an emerging agricultural insect pest, Drosophila suzukii, by creating a temperature-sensitive point mutation in the sex-determination gene, transformer-2 (tra-2) using CRISPR/Cas9 (clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats/ CRISPR-associated) hom...

  20. Sex Determination, Sex Ratios, and Genetic Conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werren, John H.; Beukeboom, Leo W.

    1998-01-01

    Genetic mechanisms of sex determination are unexpectedly diverse and change rapidly during evolution. We review the role of genetic conflict as the driving force behind this diversity and turnover. Genetic conflict occurs when different components of a genetic system are subject to selection in

  1. The evolution of sex ratios and sex-determining systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uller, Tobias; Pen, Ido; Wapstra, Erik; Beukeboom, Leo W.; Komdeur, Jan

    Sex determination is a fundamental process governed by diverse mechanisms. Sex ratio selection is commonly implicated in the evolution of sex-determining systems, although formal models are rare. Here, we argue that, although sex ratio selection can induce shifts in sex determination, genomic

  2. The role of electron transport in determining the temperature dependence of the photosynthetic rate in spinach leaves grown at contrasting temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamori, Wataru; Noguchi, Ko; Kashino, Yasuhiro; Terashima, Ichiro

    2008-04-01

    The temperature response of the uncoupled whole-chain electron transport rate (ETR) in thylakoid membranes differs depending on the growth temperature. However, the steps that limit whole-chain ETR are still unclear and the question of whether the temperature dependence of whole-chain ETR reflects that of the photosynthetic rate remains unresolved. Here, we determined the whole-chain, PSI and PSII ETR in thylakoid membranes isolated from spinach leaves grown at 30 degrees C [high temperature (HT)] and 15 degrees C [low temperature (LT)]. We measured temperature dependencies of the light-saturated photosynthetic rate at 360 microl l(-1) CO2 (A360) in HT and LT leaves. Both of the temperature dependences of whole-chain ETR and of A360 were different depending on the growth temperature. Whole-chain ETR was less than the rates of PSI ETR and PSII ETR in the broad temperature range, indicating that the process was limited by diffusion processes between the PSI and PSII. However, at high temperatures, whole-chain ETR appeared to be limited by not only the diffusion processes but also PSII ETR. The C3 photosynthesis model was used to evaluate the limitations of A360 by whole-chain ETR (Pr) and ribulose bisphosphate carboxylation (Pc). In HT leaves, A360 was co-limited by Pc and Pr at low temperatures, whereas at high temperatures, A360 was limited by Pc. On the other hand, in LT leaves, A360 was solely limited by Pc over the entire temperature range. The optimum temperature for A360 was determined by Pc in both HT and LT leaves. Thus, this study showed that, at low temperatures, the limiting step of A360 was different depending on the growth temperature, but was limited by Pc at high temperatures regardless of the growth temperatures.

  3. Determination of temperature-dependent Henry's law constants of odorous contaminants and their application to human perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omür-Ozbek, Pinar; Dietrich, Andrea M

    2005-06-01

    A new method was developed to measure Henry's law constants at varying temperatures and from these data determine enthalpies of reactions for volatilization of aqueous compounds. The method was applied to 2-methylisoborneol (2-MIB), geosmin, and trans-2,cis-6-nonadienal, which are three of the major odorous compounds found in natural and drinking water. The method used static headspace equilibrium in standard odor analysis flasks and SPME-GC/MS. Dimensionless Henry's law constants were determined at 20, 25, 32, and 39 degrees C in distilled water. Their values ranged from 0.002 to 0.02 and increased with increasing temperature. The study was continued by determining the effects of different concentrations of fulvic acid added to the aqueous media. Decreases of 5-40% in Henry's law constants were observed when fulvic acid was present; however the decrease was not correlated with the fulvic acid concentration. Fulvic acid at any concentration caused a small decrease in constants for geosmin and 2-MIB, yet a more substantial decrease was obtained for nonadienal. Finally, the gas-phase concentrations were predicted using measured Henry's law constants for known aqueous concentrations of 2-MIB, geosmin, and nonadienal at 25 and 45 degrees C. An increase in the gas-phase concentration was not correlated to an increase in human perception as determined by a trained human panel. It is concluded that, after some point, panelists were not able to perceive an increase in the odorant concentration. This has important implications for controlling nuisance odors in the environment.

  4. Determination of temperature dependent Henry's law constants of polychlorinated naphthalenes: Application to air-sea exchange in Izmir Bay, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odabasi, Mustafa; Adali, Mutlu

    2016-12-01

    The Henry's law constant (H) is a crucial variable to investigate the air-water exchange of persistent organic pollutants. H values for 32 polychlorinated naphthalene (PCN) congeners were measured using an inert gas-stripping technique at five temperatures ranging between 5 and 35 °C. H values in deionized water (at 25 °C) varied between 0.28 ± 0.08 Pa m3 mol-1 (PCN-73) and 18.01 ± 0.69 Pa m3 mol-1 (PCN-42). The agreement between the measured and estimated H values from the octanol-water and octanol-air partition coefficients was good (measured/estimated ratio = 1.00 ± 0.41, average ± SD). The calculated phase change enthalpies (ΔHH) were within the interval previously determined for other several semivolatile organic compounds (42.0-106.4 kJ mol-1). Measured H values, paired atmospheric and aqueous concentrations and meteorological variables were also used to reveal the level and direction of air-sea exchange fluxes of PCNs at the coast of Izmir Bay, Turkey. The net PCN air-sea exchange flux varied from -0.55 (volatilization, PCN-24/14) to 2.05 (deposition, PCN-23) ng m-2 day-1. PCN-19, PCN-24/14, PCN-42, and PCN-33/34/37 were mainly volatilized from seawater while the remaining congeners were mainly deposited. The overall number of the cases showing deposition was higher (67.9%) compared to volatilization (21.4%) and near equilibrium (10.7%).

  5. Determination of elastic constants of a single-crystal topaz and their temperature dependence via sphere resonance method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sema, Fumie; Watanabe, Tohru

    2017-10-01

    Water and halogens in ocean floor sediments transported by a descending slab might play important roles in geodynamic processes. Imaging subducted sediments through seismological observations requires a thorough understanding of elastic properties of sediment origin hydrous minerals. Topaz is a sediment origin hydrous mineral, which is formed at the depth of 250-350 km on a cold subducting slab. We determined elastic constants and their temperature derivatives of a natural single-crystal of topaz (Al1.97SiO4(F1.56, OH0.42)) at the temperature from 271.5 to 312.7 °K by using the sphere-resonance method. Elastic constants at an ambient temperature (T = 291.9 °K) are C11 = 281.21(1) GPa, C22 = 346.23(9) GPa, C33 = 294.99(9) GPa, C44 = 108.49(1) GPa, C55 = 132.47(1) GPa, C66 = 130.32(1) GPa, C12 = 121.48(3) GPa, C13 = 80.94(3) GPa and C23 = 81.77(2) GPa. Since our sample [Al2SiO4(F1.56,OH0.42)] was relatively rich in fluorine, only small differences in elastic constants can be seen between our sample and fluorine end member. Elastic constants of OH-rich topaz should be experimentally investigated to understand the influence of F-OH substitution on elasticity of topaz. All the elastic constants decrease linearly with increasing temperature. The temperature derivatives are dC11/dT = -0.014(3) GPa/°K, dC22/dT = -0.010(7) GPa/°K, dC33/dT = -0.021(5) GPa/°K, dC44/dT = -0.011(1) GPa/°K, dC55/dT = -0.016(2) GPa/°K, dC66/dT = -0.0101(2) GPa/°K, dC12/dT = -0.0041(6) GPa/°K, dC13/dT = -0.001(2) GPa/°K and dC23/dT = -0.002(1) GPa/°K. The isotropic seismic velocities in topaz are distinctly higher than those in olivine at 10 GPa and 300-1400 °K. There should be a strong velocity contrast between the overlying mantle and the thin sediment-origin layer at the depth around 300 km. A seismological technique like the receiver function technique should be applied to detect a thin layer of topaz in a cold subduction zone.

  6. Temperature dependence of optically induced cell deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, Anatol; Kiessling, Tobias R.; Stange, Roland; Kaes, Josef A.

    2012-02-01

    The mechanical properties of any material change with temperature, hence this must be true for cellular material. In biology many functions are known to undergo modulations with temperature, like myosin motor activity, mechanical properties of actin filament solutions, CO2 uptake of cultured cells or sex determination of several species. As mechanical properties of living cells are considered to play an important role in many cell functions it is surprising that only little is known on how the rheology of single cells is affected by temperature. We report the systematic temperature dependence of single cell deformations in Optical Stretcher (OS) measurements. The temperature is changed on a scale of about 20 minutes up to hours and compared to defined temperature shocks in the range of milliseconds. Thereby, a strong temperature dependence of the mechanics of single suspended cells is revealed. We conclude that the observable differences arise rather from viscosity changes of the cytosol than from structural changes of the cytoskeleton. These findings have implications for the interpretation of many rheological measurements, especially for laser based approaches in biological studies.

  7. Understanding sex determination in the mouse: genetics ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sex determination; gonad development; organogenesis; mouse genetics; sex reversal; testis determination. ... One challenge now is to understand how controlled epigenomic changes effect the now familiar sexually dimorphic transcriptomic profiles of the male and female gonads, firstly during primary sex determination, but ...

  8. Sex Determination, Sex Chromosomes, and Karyotype Evolution in Insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmon, Heath; Ross, Laura; Bachtrog, Doris

    2017-01-01

    Insects harbor a tremendous diversity of sex determining mechanisms both within and between groups. For example, in some orders such as Hymenoptera, all members are haplodiploid, whereas Diptera contain species with homomorphic as well as male and female heterogametic sex chromosome systems or paternal genome elimination. We have established a large database on karyotypes and sex chromosomes in insects, containing information on over 13000 species covering 29 orders of insects. This database constitutes a unique starting point to report phylogenetic patterns on the distribution of sex determination mechanisms, sex chromosomes, and karyotypes among insects and allows us to test general theories on the evolutionary dynamics of karyotypes, sex chromosomes, and sex determination systems in a comparative framework. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that male heterogamety is the ancestral mode of sex determination in insects, and transitions to female heterogamety are extremely rare. Many insect orders harbor species with complex sex chromosomes, and gains and losses of the sex-limited chromosome are frequent in some groups. Haplodiploidy originated several times within insects, and parthenogenesis is rare but evolves frequently. Providing a single source to electronically access data previously distributed among more than 500 articles and books will not only accelerate analyses of the assembled data, but also provide a unique resource to guide research on which taxa are likely to be informative to address specific questions, for example, for genome sequencing projects or large-scale comparative studies. © The American Genetic Association 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Sex selection and restricting abortion and sex determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberberg, Julie

    2007-11-01

    Sex selection in India and China is fostered by a limiting social structure that disallows women from performing the roles that men perform, and relegates women to a lower status level. Individual parents and individual families benefit concretely from having a son born into the family, while society, and girls and women as a group, are harmed by the widespread practice of sex selection. Sex selection reinforces oppression of women and girls. Sex selection is best addressed by ameliorating the situations of women and girls, increasing their autonomy, and elevating their status in society. One might argue that restricting or prohibiting abortion, prohibiting sex selection, and prohibiting sex determination would eliminate sex selective abortion. But this decreases women's autonomy rather than increases it. Such practices will turn underground. Sex selective infanticide, and slower death by long term neglect, could increase. If abortion is restricted, the burden is placed on women seeking abortions to show that they have a legally acceptable or legitimate reason for a desired abortion, and this seriously limits women's autonomy. Instead of restricting abortion, banning sex selection, and sex determination, it is better to address the practice of sex selection by elevating the status of women and empowering women so that giving birth to a girl is a real and positive option, instead of a detriment to the parents and family as it is currently. But, if a ban on sex selective abortion or a ban on sex determination is indeed instituted, then wider social change promoting women's status in society should be instituted simultaneously.

  10. SEX DETERMINATION AND CONTROL MECHANISMS IN BIRDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Tagirov

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The modern conception of genetic bases of bird’s sex determination is considered. Following the genotypic mechanism of sex determination, birds implement a complex system of sex chromosome relationships. Z chromosome contains a dose-dependent male sex determinant — gene DMTR1 ensuring the testicles development upon two copy availability in the ZZ combination. Some factors on the W hromosome are not yet identified. On the one hand, they suppress the activity of the DMTR1 gene and on the other hand they activate aromatase enzyme, which in ZW combination promotes the female sex development. It was suggested that while a number of different classes of animal adaptations are appeared ensuring stable embryo development, the dependence of sex determination upon environment and inner signals at the later stages of embryogenesis is reduced. At the same time, sex determinants fixed on genetic level are appeared that are active at the very early stages of development.

  11. Sex determination in forensic odontology: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, K; Sharma, Subramanya; Sreeja, C; Pratima, D Bhavani; Aesha, I; Vijayabanu, B

    2015-08-01

    Forensic odontology is the application of dental principles to legal issues. Sex determination is a subdivision of forensic odontology and it is very important especially when information relating to the deceased is unavailable. Sex determination becomes the first priority in the process of identification of a person by a forensic investigator in the case of mishaps, chemical and nuclear bomb explosions, natural disasters crime investigations, and ethnic studies. This article reviews upon the various methods used in sex determination.

  12. Gonadal differentiation in reptiles exhibiting environmental sex determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Satomi; Parrott, Benjamin B; Yatsu, Ryohei; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Moore, Brandon C; Iguchi, Taisen; Guillette, Louis

    2014-01-01

    As temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) and homozygote or heterozygote genetic sex determination (GSD) exist in multiple reptilian taxa, they represent sex determination systems that have emerged de novo. Current investigations have revealed that the genetic mechanisms used by various reptilian species are similar to those used by other vertebrates. However, the recent completion or near completion of various reptilian genome projects suggests that new studies examining related species with and without TSD could begin to provide additional insight into the evolution of TSD and GSD in vertebrate ancestors. Major questions still remain concerning germ cell migration and specification, the differentiation of gonadal accessory cells, such as the Sertoli cells and granulosa cells of the developing testis and ovary, respectively, and the mechanisms by which gene expression is regulated during TSD events. Further, reptilian sentinels and their mechanisms of gonadogenesis will likely remain important indicator species for environmental health. Thus, ongoing and new investigations need to tie molecular information to gonadal morphogenesis and function in reptiles. Such data will not only provide important information for an understanding of the evolution of these phenomena in vertebrates, but could also provide an important understanding of the health of the environment around us.

  13. Sex determination: insights from the silkworm

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The sex-determining system differs considerably among organisms. Even among insect species, the genetic system for sex-determination is highly diversified. In Drosophila melanogaster, somatic sexual differentiation is regulated by a well characterized genetic hierarchy X : A > Sxl > tra/tra2 > dsx and fru. This cascade ...

  14. Microbial manipulation of host sex determination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukeboom, Leo W.

    A recent study in the lepidopteran Ostrinia scapulalis shows that endosymbionts can actively manipulate the sex determination mechanism of their host. Wolbachia bacteria alter the sex-specific splicing of the doublesex master switch gene. In ZZ males of this female heterogametic system, the female

  15. The Staurotypus turtles and aves share the same origin of sex chromosomes but evolved different types of heterogametic sex determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawagoshi, Taiki; Uno, Yoshinobu; Nishida, Chizuko; Matsuda, Yoichi

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles have a wide diversity of sex-determining mechanisms and types of sex chromosomes. Turtles exhibit temperature-dependent sex determination and genotypic sex determination, with male heterogametic (XX/XY) and female heterogametic (ZZ/ZW) sex chromosomes. Identification of sex chromosomes in many turtle species and their comparative genomic analysis are of great significance to understand the evolutionary processes of sex determination and sex chromosome differentiation in Testudines. The Mexican giant musk turtle (Staurotypus triporcatus, Kinosternidae, Testudines) and the giant musk turtle (Staurotypus salvinii) have heteromorphic XY sex chromosomes with a low degree of morphological differentiation; however, their origin and linkage group are still unknown. Cross-species chromosome painting with chromosome-specific DNA from Chinese soft-shelled turtle (Pelodiscus sinensis) revealed that the X and Y chromosomes of S. triporcatus have homology with P. sinensis chromosome 6, which corresponds to the chicken Z chromosome. We cloned cDNA fragments of S. triporcatus homologs of 16 chicken Z-linked genes and mapped them to S. triporcatus and S. salvinii chromosomes using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Sixteen genes were localized to the X and Y long arms in the same order in both species. The orders were also almost the same as those of the ostrich (Struthio camelus) Z chromosome, which retains the primitive state of the avian ancestral Z chromosome. These results strongly suggest that the X and Y chromosomes of Staurotypus turtles are at a very early stage of sex chromosome differentiation, and that these chromosomes and the avian ZW chromosomes share the same origin. Nonetheless, the turtles and birds acquired different systems of heterogametic sex determination during their evolution.

  16. The Staurotypus turtles and aves share the same origin of sex chromosomes but evolved different types of heterogametic sex determination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiki Kawagoshi

    Full Text Available Reptiles have a wide diversity of sex-determining mechanisms and types of sex chromosomes. Turtles exhibit temperature-dependent sex determination and genotypic sex determination, with male heterogametic (XX/XY and female heterogametic (ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes. Identification of sex chromosomes in many turtle species and their comparative genomic analysis are of great significance to understand the evolutionary processes of sex determination and sex chromosome differentiation in Testudines. The Mexican giant musk turtle (Staurotypus triporcatus, Kinosternidae, Testudines and the giant musk turtle (Staurotypus salvinii have heteromorphic XY sex chromosomes with a low degree of morphological differentiation; however, their origin and linkage group are still unknown. Cross-species chromosome painting with chromosome-specific DNA from Chinese soft-shelled turtle (Pelodiscus sinensis revealed that the X and Y chromosomes of S. triporcatus have homology with P. sinensis chromosome 6, which corresponds to the chicken Z chromosome. We cloned cDNA fragments of S. triporcatus homologs of 16 chicken Z-linked genes and mapped them to S. triporcatus and S. salvinii chromosomes using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Sixteen genes were localized to the X and Y long arms in the same order in both species. The orders were also almost the same as those of the ostrich (Struthio camelus Z chromosome, which retains the primitive state of the avian ancestral Z chromosome. These results strongly suggest that the X and Y chromosomes of Staurotypus turtles are at a very early stage of sex chromosome differentiation, and that these chromosomes and the avian ZW chromosomes share the same origin. Nonetheless, the turtles and birds acquired different systems of heterogametic sex determination during their evolution.

  17. Sex determination: genetic models for oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrick, Philip W; Hedgecock, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    In oysters, sex is determined partly by environment, but previous studies employing controlled crosses suggest that genetic factors are also important. Sex ratios in both full- and half-sib families of the Pacific oyster show paternal control of sex ratio and suggest that a single major gene with 2 genotypes controls sex in the Pacific oyster, with FM oysters being male and FF oysters maturing as male or female. Here, we show that such a model does indeed produce a stable polymorphism for either single or multiple age-class populations, though under limited ranges of f, the probability that an FF individual matures as a female. However, this 2-genotype model cannot explain observed heterogeneity of sex ratios among progeny from different dams within half-sib families. We propose an alternative 3-genotype model that also produces a stable polymorphism, for either single or multiple age-class populations, but over all values of f between zero and one. This model accounts for sex ratio heterogeneity among male half-sib families because it features 2 types of females, a protandric FM and a fixed female FF. Furthermore, the 3-genotype model, accounts for the frequencies of mating types inferred from the observed sex ratios of families more closely than the 2-genotype model. Although the mechanism of sex determination may ultimately prove more complex, simple genetic mechanisms can account for the broad features of sexual maturation in oyster families and the stability of sex ratios in populations.

  18. Sex determination in forensic odontology: A review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ramakrishnan, K; Sharma, Subramanya; Sreeja, C; Pratima, D Bhavani; Aesha, I; Vijayabanu, B

    2015-01-01

    Forensic odontology is the application of dental principles to legal issues. Sex determination is a subdivision of forensic odontology and it is very important especially when information relating to the deceased is unavailable...

  19. Sex determination in forensic odontology: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Ramakrishnan, K.; Sharma, Subramanya; Sreeja, C.; Pratima, D. Bhavani; Aesha, I.; Vijayabanu, B.

    2015-01-01

    Forensic odontology is the application of dental principles to legal issues. Sex determination is a subdivision of forensic odontology and it is very important especially when information relating to the deceased is unavailable. Sex determination becomes the first priority in the process of identification of a person by a forensic investigator in the case of mishaps, chemical and nuclear bomb explosions, natural disasters crime investigations, and ethnic studies. This article reviews upon the...

  20. GENETIC SEX DETERMINATION IN HEAVY BREED CHICKEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BENCSIK ALENA

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We have used a non-invasive method to predetermine the sex of chicken embryosthat relies on the bio electromagnetic field generated by the embryonic cells. Tovalidate this method in poultry, on the basis of sexual dimorphism, the genetic sex of120 chicken eggs of heavy breed. One group consisted of 60 eggs with determinedgenetic sex ZZ (cock, abbr. M. The other group consisted of 60 eggs withdetermined genetic sex ZY (hen, abbr. F. After hatching, the chicks were identifiedand the genetic sex was checked repeatedly using the pendulum. The phenoypic sexof the birds was assessed after 60 days at the time the sexual dimorphism wasvisible. From the 60 eggs sexed and incubated for each group, a hatching rate of90%, for the group M and 91,66% for the group F was obtained. The genetic sex ofindividuals determined at the age of one day showed that all individuals of the groupM were cocks (ZZ and all individuals of the group F were hens (ZW. Thephenotypic sex determination performed 60 days later showed that of 54 individualsof the group M, 41 were cocks (77,36%. In the group F from 55 individuals 42 werehens (77,78%. The prediction rate for the group M (77,36% was relativlycomparable with that for the group F (77,78%. This method is non-invasive,relatively rapid, simple and inexpensive with application in effective breedingregimes of poultry production.

  1. Temperature dependence of surface nanobubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkelaar, R.P.; Seddon, James Richard Thorley; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.; Lohse, Detlef

    2012-01-01

    The temperature dependence of nanobubbles was investigated experimentally using atomic force microscopy. By scanning the same area of the surface at temperatures from 51 °C to 25 °C it was possible to track geometrical changes of individual nanobubbles as the temperature was decreased.

  2. Lattice dynamics and dielectric functions of multiferroic BiFeO{sub 3}/c-sapphire films determined by infrared reflectance spectra and temperature-dependent Raman scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Zhihua; Yu, Qian [Key Laboratory of Polar Materials and Devices, Ministry of Education, Department of Electronic Engineering, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China); Wu, Jiada; Sun, Jian [Key Laboratory for Advanced Photonic Materials and Devices, Ministry of Education, Department of Optical Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Hu, Zhigao, E-mail: zghu@ee.ecnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Polar Materials and Devices, Ministry of Education, Department of Electronic Engineering, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China); Chu, Junhao [Key Laboratory of Polar Materials and Devices, Ministry of Education, Department of Electronic Engineering, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China)

    2012-12-15

    Multiferroic BiFeO{sub 3} (BFO) films have been grown on c-sapphire substrates by pulsed laser deposition under different laser energies (E{sub L}). The X-ray diffraction and Raman spectra indicate that the films are polycrystalline and exhibit the single rhombohedral (R) phase. The crystal distortion becomes weaker with decreasing the E{sub L}, which is described by the ratio of c/a. It was found that different E{sub L} values also lead to the variation of the Bi/Fe ratio. Temperature-dependent Raman spectra were carried out to study the phonon mode evolution behaviors. The three A{sub 1} transverse optical (TO) phonon modes located at 219, 172, and 142 cm{sup -1} shift towards a lower energy side with the temperature due to thermal expansion, thermal disorder and the anharmonic effects of lattice. The E(TO) and three A{sub 1}(TO) phonon frequencies slightly increase with increasing the E{sub L} of the growth condition, which results from the Bi vacancies, the changes of the length and intensity of Bi-O bonds and the local structure distortion in the FeO{sub 6} octahedra. The dielectric functions of the BFO films in the frequency range of 50-8000 cm{sup -1} have been extracted by fitting infrared reflectance spectra with the Lorentz multi-oscillator dispersion model. The variation trend of the dielectric functions with different E{sub L} can be observed and related to the packing density, surface roughness, and defect states. It was concluded that the E{sub L} corresponding to changing the c/a ratio has an obvious influence on the lattice vibrations and intraband transitions of the BFO films. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The c/a and Bi/Fe ratios of BiFeO{sub 3} films at different laser energy (E{sub L}). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The temperature-dependent evolution of phonon modes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystal distortion and Bi vacancies influence the lattice vibration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The E{sub L} effect on the dielectric

  3. Determination of Temperature-Dependent Stress State in Thin AlGaN Layer of AlGaN/GaN HEMT Heterostructures by Near-Resonant Raman Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanli Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature-dependent stress state in the AlGaN barrier layer of AlGaN/GaN heterostructure grown on sapphire substrate was investigated by ultraviolet (UV near-resonant Raman scattering. Strong scattering peak resulting from the A1(LO phonon mode of AlGaN is observed under near-resonance condition, which allows for the accurate measurement of Raman shifts with temperature. The temperature-dependent stress in the AlGaN layer determined by the resonance Raman spectra is consistent with the theoretical calculation result, taking lattice mismatch and thermal mismatch into account together. This good agreement indicates that the UV near-resonant Raman scattering can be a direct and effective method to characterize the stress state in thin AlGaN barrier layer of AlGaN/GaN HEMT heterostructures.

  4. SEX DETERMINATION FROM FEMORAL HEAD DIAMETERS IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-03-01

    Mar 1, 2000 ... In medico-legal cases where sophisticated methods of sex determination is lacking, these simple methods should ... anthropologists are a rarity in Africa. Most of the time anatomists are called upon in medico-legal .... SD = standard deviation; SE = standard error. Table 2. Comparison of the mean femoral ...

  5. How is sex determined in insects?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    reversal of XX individuals into sterile males. This recessive loss-of-function mutation, named transformer. (tra), did not have any effect in XY males, suggesting that the gene is required only in XX female flies. This was one of the first pieces of evidence that sex determination can be controlled by genes. Sturtevant also had ...

  6. The role of estrogen in turtle sex determination and the effect of PCBs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, D; Bergeron, J M; McLachlan, J A

    1995-10-01

    In the current model of vertebrate sex determination and sexual differentiation, gonadal sex is fixed at fertilization by specific chromosomes, a process known as genotypic sex determination (GSD). Only after the gonad is formed do hormones begin to exert an influence that modifies specific structures that eventually will differ the sexes. Many egg-laying reptiles do not exhibit GSD but rather depend on the temperature of the incubating egg to determine the gonadal sex of the offspring, a process termed temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD). Research on TSD indicates that sex determination in these species is fundamentally different in at least one way. Gonadal sex is not irrevocably set by the genetic composition inherited at fertilization but depends ultimately on which genes encoding for steroidogenic enzymes and hormone receptors are activated during the midtrimester of embryonic development by temperature. Incubation temperature modifies the activity as well as the temporal and spatial sequence of enzymes and hormone receptors such that sex-specific hormone milieus, created in the urogenital system of the developing embryo, determine gonad type. Estrogen is the physiologic equivalent of incubation temperature and the proximate cue that initiates female sex determination. There is increasing evidence that some polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) compounds are capable of disrupting reproductive and endocrine function in fish, birds, and mammals, including humans. Reproductive disorders resulting from exposure to these xenobiotic compounds may include reductions in fertility, hatch rate in fish and birds, and viability of offspring, as well as alterations in hormone levels or adult sexual behaviors, all of which have further implications, particularly in wildlife population dynamics. Research on the mechanism through which these compounds may be acting to alter reproductive function indicates estrogenic activity, by which the compounds may be altering sexual

  7. Finding clues to the riddle of sex determination in zebrafish

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zebrafish lack identifiable heteromorphic sex chromosomes and sex is determined by multiple genes, with some influence from the environment. Recently, chromosome 4 has been identified as sex chromosome along with few sex-linked loci on chromosomes 5 and 16. The identities of candidate sex-linked genes, however, ...

  8. Sex differences in adolescent depression: do sex hormones determine vulnerability?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naninck, E.F.G.; Lucassen, P.J.; Bakker, J.

    2011-01-01

    Depression is one of the most common, costly and severe psychopathologies worldwide. Its incidence, however, differs significantly between the sexes, and depression rates in women are twice those of men. Interestingly, this sex difference emerges during adolescence. Although the adolescent period is

  9. Sex ratio variation and sex determination in Urtica dioica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glawe, Grit Anja

    2006-01-01

    This thesis will first document on variation in progeny sex ratios among individual female plants of Urtica dioica at our field site in Meijendel (Chapter 2). Next, we show that there is also considerable sex ratio variation among male and female flowering shoots in 26 natural populations studied

  10. The sex and sex determination in Pyropia haitanensis (Bangiales, Rhodophyta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zhang

    Full Text Available Pyropia haitanensis has a biphasic life cycle with macroscopic gametophytic blade (n and microscopic filamentous conchocelis (2n phase. Its gametophytic blades have long been believed to be mainly dioecious. However, when crossing the red mutant (R, ♀ with the wild type (W, ♂, the parental colors were segregated in F1 blades, of which 96.1% were linearly sectored with 2-4 color sectors. When color sectors were excised from the color-sectored blades and cultured singly, 99.7% of the color sectors appeared to be unisexual with an equal sex ratio. Although the sex of color sector did not genetically link with its color, the boundaries of both sex and color sectors coincided precisely. About 87.9% of the examined color-sectored blades were monoecious and the percentage increased with the number of color sectors of a blade. The gametophytic blades from each conchocelis strain produced by parthenogenesis of the excised color sectors were unisexual and unicolor, showing the same sex and color as their original sectors. These results indicate that most of the sexually reproduced Py. haitanensis blades are monoecious, and their sex is controlled by segregation of a pair of alleles during meiosis of conchospore, forming a sex-sectored tetrad. During the subsequent development of blades, one or two lower cell(s of the tetrad contribute mainly to rhizoid formation, and rarely show their sexual phenotype, leading to reduced frequency of full sex phenotype of the meiotic blades. Moreover, the aberrant segregations of sex genes or color genes in a few of F1 blades were probably due to gene conversions, but there was no sex transfer in Py. haitanensis.

  11. The sex and sex determination in Pyropia haitanensis (Bangiales, Rhodophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan; Yan, Xing-hong; Aruga, Yusho

    2013-01-01

    Pyropia haitanensis has a biphasic life cycle with macroscopic gametophytic blade (n) and microscopic filamentous conchocelis (2n) phase. Its gametophytic blades have long been believed to be mainly dioecious. However, when crossing the red mutant (R, ♀) with the wild type (W, ♂), the parental colors were segregated in F1 blades, of which 96.1% were linearly sectored with 2-4 color sectors. When color sectors were excised from the color-sectored blades and cultured singly, 99.7% of the color sectors appeared to be unisexual with an equal sex ratio. Although the sex of color sector did not genetically link with its color, the boundaries of both sex and color sectors coincided precisely. About 87.9% of the examined color-sectored blades were monoecious and the percentage increased with the number of color sectors of a blade. The gametophytic blades from each conchocelis strain produced by parthenogenesis of the excised color sectors were unisexual and unicolor, showing the same sex and color as their original sectors. These results indicate that most of the sexually reproduced Py. haitanensis blades are monoecious, and their sex is controlled by segregation of a pair of alleles during meiosis of conchospore, forming a sex-sectored tetrad. During the subsequent development of blades, one or two lower cell(s) of the tetrad contribute mainly to rhizoid formation, and rarely show their sexual phenotype, leading to reduced frequency of full sex phenotype of the meiotic blades. Moreover, the aberrant segregations of sex genes or color genes in a few of F1 blades were probably due to gene conversions, but there was no sex transfer in Py. haitanensis.

  12. Sex-lethal, master and slave: a hierarchy of germ-line sex determination in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, B; Kim, Y J; Baker, B S

    1993-11-01

    Female sex determination in the germ line of Drosophila melanogaster is regulated by genes functioning in the soma as well as genes that function within the germ line. Genes known or suspected to be involved in germ-line sex determination in Drosophila melanogaster have been examined to determine if they are required upstream or downstream of Sex-lethal+, a known germ-line sex determination gene. Seven genes required for female-specific splicing of germ-line Sex-lethal+ pre-mRNA are identified. These results together with information about the tissues in which these genes function and whether they control sex determination and viability or just sex determination in the germ line have been used to deduce the genetic hierarchy regulating female germ-line sex determination. This hierarchy includes the somatic sex determination genes transformer+, transformer-2+ and doublesex+ (and by inference Sex-lethal+), which control a somatic signal required for female germ-line sex determination, and the germ-line ovarian tumor genes fused+, ovarian tumor+, ovo+, sans fille+, and Sex-lethal+, which are involved in either the reception or interpretation of this somatic sex determination signal. The fused+, ovarian tumor+, ovo+ and sans fille+ genes function upstream of Sex-lethal+ in the germ line.

  13. Maternal control of haplodiploid sex determination in the wasp Nasonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhulst, Eveline C.; Beukeboom, Leo W.; van de Zande, Louis

    2010-01-01

    All insects in the order Hymenoptera have haplodiploid sex determination, in which males emerge from haploid unfertilized eggs and females are diploid. Sex determination in the honeybee Apis mellifera is controlled by the complementary sex determination (csd) locus, but the mechanisms controlling

  14. Finding clues to the riddle of sex determination in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagabhushana, A; Mishra, Rakesh K

    2016-03-01

    How sex is determined has been one of the most intriguing puzzles in biology since antiquity. Although a fundamental process in most metazoans, there seems to be myriad of ways in which sex can be determined - from genetic to environmental sex determination. This variation is limited mainly to upstream triggers with the core of sex determination pathway being conserved. Zebrafish has gained prominence as a vertebrate model system to study development and disease. However, very little is known about its primary sex determination mechanism. Here we review our current understanding of the sex determination in zebrafish. Zebrafish lack identifiable heteromorphic sex chromosomes and sex is determined by multiple genes, with some influence from the environment. Recently, chromosome 4 has been identified as sex chromosome along with few sex-linked loci on chromosomes 5 and 16. The identities of candidate sex-linked genes, however, have remained elusive. Sex in zebrafish is also influenced by the number of meiotic oocytes in the juvenile ovary, which appear to instruct retention of the ovarian fate. The mechanism and identity of this instructive signal remain unknown. We hypothesize that sex in zebrafish is a culmination of combinatorial effects of the genome, germ cells and the environment with inputs from epigenetic factors translating the biological meaning of this interaction.

  15. Genetics of sex determination in the haplodiploid wasp Nasonia ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    As in most other insects, the sex-determining pathway consists of the basal switch doublesex that is sex-specifically regulated by transformer. Analysis of a polyploid and a mutant gynandromorphic strain, suggested a parent-specific effect (imprinting) on sex determination in Nasonia. Zygotic activity of transformer is ...

  16. Determinants of premarital sex in Maiduguri, Nigeria: Implications for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    McRoy

    195. Determinants of premarital sex in Maiduguri, Nigeria: Implications for Human Papilloma Virus vaccination ... human papilloma virus (HPV) which is a precursor of cervical cancer. Aim: To document the determinants of premarital sex with ..... Z, Nyamukapa C, et al. Measuring trends in age at first sex and age at marriage ...

  17. Genetics of sex determination in the haplodiploid wasp Nasonia ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-09-06

    specifically regulated by transformer. Analysis of a polyploid and a mutant gynandromorphic strain, suggested a parent-specific effect (imprinting) on sex determination in .... plete sex reversal of fertilized eggs, causing them to de-.

  18. [Elucidation of key genes in sex determination in genetics teaching].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; He, Zhumei

    2014-06-01

    Sex is an important and complex feature of organisms, which is controlled by the genetic and environmental factors. The genetic factors, i.e., genes, are vital in sex determination. However, not all the related genes play the same roles, and some key genes play a vital role in the sex determination and differentiation. With the development of the modern genetics, a great progress on the key genes has been made in sex determination. In this review, we summarize the mechanism of sex determination and the strategy of how to study the key genes in sex determination. It will help us to understand the mechanism of sex determination better in the teaching of genetics.

  19. The molecular genetics of sex determination and sex reversal in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Alexander; Koopman, Peter

    2012-10-01

    The process of sex determination in mammals normally unfolds in three distinct stages: (1) establishment of chromosomal sex at fertilization (XX or XY); (2) commitment to the appropriate pathway of gonadal differentiation with respect to chromosomal sex, through the action (or absence) of the Y chromosome gene SRY; and (3) correct development of secondary sexual characteristics, including internal and external genitalia, in accordance with gonadal sex. At any of these three steps, the process of sex determination can go awry, leading to disorders of sexual development. In this article, we review the typical mechanism and process of mammalian sex determination, with an emphasis on the well-characterized mouse and human models. We also consider aberrant mammalian sex determination, focusing on examples of sex reversal stemming from gene defects. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  20. Sex determination: insights from the silkworm

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-09-06

    Sep 6, 2010 ... examined to date adopt the ZO/ZZ sex chromosome system. (Traut and Marec 1996). Therefore, it is reasonable to con- sider that the W chromosome emerged after the divergence between Ditrysia and other suborders in Lepidoptera. In 1933, Hashimoto began to understand the principles underlying sex ...

  1. Understanding sex determination in the mouse: genetics ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cattanach, personal communication, April 2015. Introduction. In this overview of the genetics of mammalian sex determi- nation, I will highlight three aspects .... associated with disorders of sex development (DSD), includ- ing XY female individuals. It was therefore somewhat sur- prising that XY mice lacking Dmrt1 develop ...

  2. A Duplicated, Truncated amh Gene Is Involved in Male Sex Determination in an Old World Silverside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilip Kumar Bej

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A master sex-determining gene, the Y chromosome-linked anti-Müllerian hormone (amhy gene, has been described in two New World atheriniform species but little is known on the distribution, evolution, and function(s of this gene in other Atheriniformes. Interestingly, amhy has been found to coexist with temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD, providing a unique opportunity to explore the interplay between genotypic and environmental sex determination. In this study, the search for an amhy homolog was extended to an Old World atheriniform, the cobaltcap silverside Hypoatherina tsurugae (Atherinidae. The full sequences, including the coding and noncoding regions, of the autosomal amh (amha and a putative amhy were obtained. The deduced Amha and Amhy proteins comprised 511 and 340 amino acids (aa, respectively. PCR analysis with genomic DNA from wild adults and from laboratory-reared juveniles revealed a high, but not complete association of ∼95% between amhy and maleness. The spatiotemporal expression of amhy and amha during gonadal sex differentiation was analyzed by qRT-PCR and in situ hybridization (ISH. amhy transcription (in amhy-positive larvae started before and peaked during histological differentiation of the gonads whereas amha was negligible during the same period in both genotypes. These results demonstrate that the amhy, although with some structural differences in relation to the amhy of some New World atheriniforms, is strongly associated with maleness and probably important for testicular development in this Old World atheriniform. Thus, amhy is a candidate sex determination gene in cobaltcap silverside and it will be key to scrutinize the mechanism of sex determination in this species.

  3. Temperature dependence of the NO3 absorption cross-section above 298 K and determination of the equilibrium constant for NO3 + NO2 N2O5 at atmospherically relevant conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osthoff, Hans D; Pilling, Michael J; Ravishankara, A R; Brown, Steven S

    2007-11-21

    The reaction NO3 + NO2 N2O5 was studied over the 278-323 K temperature range. Concentrations of NO3, N2O5, and NO2 were measured simultaneously in a 3-channel cavity ring-down spectrometer. Equilibrium constants were determined over atmospherically relevant concentration ranges of the three species in both synthetic samples in the laboratory and ambient air samples in the field. A fit to the laboratory data yielded Keq = (5.1 +/- 0.8) x 10(-27) x e((10871 +/- 46)/7) cm3 molecule(-1). The temperature dependence of the NO3 absorption cross-section at 662 nm was investigated over the 298-388 K temperature range. The line width was found to be independent of temperature, in agreement with previous results. New data for the peak cross section (662.2 nm, vacuum wavelength) were combined with previous measurements in the 200 K-298 K region. A least-squares fit to the combined data gave sigma = [(4.582 +/- 0.096) - (0.00796 +/- 0.00031) x T] x 10(-17) cm2 molecule(-1).

  4. Sex Determination: Why So Many Ways of Doing It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachtrog, Doris; Mank, Judith E.; Peichel, Catherine L.; Kirkpatrick, Mark; Otto, Sarah P.; Ashman, Tia-Lynn; Hahn, Matthew W.; Kitano, Jun; Mayrose, Itay; Ming, Ray; Perrin, Nicolas; Ross, Laura; Valenzuela, Nicole; Vamosi, Jana C.

    2014-01-01

    Sexual reproduction is an ancient feature of life on earth, and the familiar X and Y chromosomes in humans and other model species have led to the impression that sex determination mechanisms are old and conserved. In fact, males and females are determined by diverse mechanisms that evolve rapidly in many taxa. Yet this diversity in primary sex-determining signals is coupled with conserved molecular pathways that trigger male or female development. Conflicting selection on different parts of the genome and on the two sexes may drive many of these transitions, but few systems with rapid turnover of sex determination mechanisms have been rigorously studied. Here we survey our current understanding of how and why sex determination evolves in animals and plants and identify important gaps in our knowledge that present exciting research opportunities to characterize the evolutionary forces and molecular pathways underlying the evolution of sex determination. PMID:24983465

  5. Conflict over condition-dependent sex allocation can lead to mixed sex-determination systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijper, Bram; Pen, Ido

    2014-01-01

    Theory suggests that genetic conflicts drive turnovers between sex-determining mechanisms, yet these studies only apply to cases where sex allocation is independent of environment or condition. Here, we model parent-offspring conflict in the presence of condition-dependent sex allocation, where the

  6. Sex ratio selection and multi-factorial sex determination in the housefly : A dynamic model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kozielska, M.A.; Pen, I.R.; Beukeboom, L.W.; Weissing, F.J.

    Sex determining (SD) mechanisms are highly variable between different taxonomic groups and appear to change relatively quickly during evolution. Sex ratio selection could be a dominant force causing such changes. We investigate theoretically the effect of sex ratio selection on the dynamics of a

  7. Determining sex ratios of turtle hatchlings

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Previous status assessments of marine turtles have assumed that the natural sex ratio of a marine turtle population is 1:1 (e.g. Conant et al. 2009). However, this...

  8. Genetic architecture of sex determination in fish: applications to sex ratio control in aquaculture

    OpenAIRE

    Paulino eMartínez; Ana eViñas; Laura eSánchez; Noelia eDíaz; Laia eRibas; Francesc ePiferrer

    2014-01-01

    Controlling the sex ratio is essential in finfish farming. A balanced sex ratio is usually good for broodstock management, since it enables to develop appropriate breeding schemes. However, in some species the production of monosex populations is desirable because the existence of sexual dimorphism, primarily in growth or first time of sexual maturation, but also in color or shape, can render one sex more valuable. The knowledge of the genetic architecture of sex determination (SD) is conveni...

  9. Personal identification and sex determination using cheiloscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra Naik Gugulothu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Identification of an individual is a prerequisite for certification of death and for personal, social, and legal reasons. The study of lip prints (cheiloscopy was thought of as a method of identification of a person. It is safe to assume that cheiloscopy, in its present stage of development, has become a means of criminal identification dealing with lip prints. Aims and Objectives: To evaluate the lip prints of different individuals in various parts of the lip, to find out the incidence of any particular pattern in relation to specific gender, to ascertain the authenticity of lip prints as a tool for identification of an individual and establish its evidentiary value. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 500 subjects, which included 250 males (4 twins and 250 females, in the age group of 18-30 years. After application of lipstick evenly, the lip print of each subject was obtained on a simple bond paper. The lip prints of each individual were scanned using an image scanner set at a resolution of 600 dpi for better interpretation. Results: We had correctly matched the gender of 487 individuals out of 500 samples taken. We also found that no lip prints were similar among the 500 subjects and even in twins. Interpretation and Conclusion: Along with other traditional methods, cheiloscopy can also serve as a very important tool in the identification of a person based on the characteristic arrangement of lines and grooves appearing on the red portion of the lips. It can be used for sex determination and personal identification for forensic purposes.

  10. Temperature dependence of the HNO3 UV absorption cross sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholder, James B.; Talukdar, Ranajit K.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Solomon, Susan

    1993-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the HNO3 absorption cross sections between 240 and 360 K over the wavelength range 195 to 350 nm has been measured using a diode array spectrometer. Absorption cross sections were determined using both (1) absolute pressure measurements at 298 K and (2) a dual absorption cell arrangement in which the absorption spectrum at various temperatures is measured relative to the room temperature absorption spectrum. The HNO3 absorption spectrum showed a temperature dependence which is weak at short wavelengths but stronger at longer wavelengths which are important for photolysis in the lower stratosphere. The 298 K absorption cross sections were found to be larger than the values currently recommended for atmospheric modeling (DeMore et al., 1992). Our absorption cross section data are critically compared with the previous measurements of both room temperature and temperature-dependent absorption cross sections. Temperature-dependent absorption cross sections of HNO3 are recommended for use in atmospheric modeling. These temperature dependent HNO3 absorption cross sections were used in a two-dimensional dynamical-photochemical model to demonstrate the effects of the revised absorption cross sections on loss rate of HNO3 and the abundance of NO2 in the stratosphere.

  11. Wild Sex in Zebrafish: Loss of the Natural Sex Determinant in Domesticated Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Catherine A.; High, Samantha K.; McCluskey, Braedan M.; Amores, Angel; Yan, Yi-lin; Titus, Tom A.; Anderson, Jennifer L.; Batzel, Peter; Carvan, Michael J.; Schartl, Manfred; Postlethwait, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Sex determination can be robustly genetic, strongly environmental, or genetic subject to environmental perturbation. The genetic basis of sex determination is unknown for zebrafish (Danio rerio), a model for development and human health. We used RAD-tag population genomics to identify sex-linked polymorphisms. After verifying this “RAD-sex” method on medaka (Oryzias latipes), we studied two domesticated zebrafish strains (AB and TU), two natural laboratory strains (WIK and EKW), and two recent isolates from nature (NA and CB). All four natural strains had a single sex-linked region at the right tip of chromosome 4, enabling sex genotyping by PCR. Genotypes for the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) with the strongest statistical association to sex suggested that wild zebrafish have WZ/ZZ sex chromosomes. In natural strains, “male genotypes” became males and some “female genotypes” also became males, suggesting that the environment or genetic background can cause female-to-male sex reversal. Surprisingly, TU and AB lacked detectable sex-linked loci. Phylogenomics rooted on D. nigrofasciatus verified that all strains are monophyletic. Because AB and TU branched as a monophyletic clade, we could not rule out shared loss of the wild sex locus in a common ancestor despite their independent domestication. Mitochondrial DNA sequences showed that investigated strains represent only one of the three identified zebrafish haplogroups. Results suggest that zebrafish in nature possess a WZ/ZZ sex-determination mechanism with a major determinant lying near the right telomere of chromosome 4 that was modified during domestication. Strains providing the zebrafish reference genome lack key components of the natural sex-determination system but may have evolved variant sex-determining mechanisms during two decades in laboratory culture. PMID:25233988

  12. Sex Determination from Fingerprint Ridge Density | Gungadin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted with an aim to establish a relationship between sex and fingerprint ridge density. The fingerprints were taken from 500 subjects (250 males and 250 females) in the age group of 18-60 years. After taking fingerprints, the ridges were counted in the upper portion of the radial border of each print for all ...

  13. Sex determination of baleen whale artefacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sinding, Mikkel Holger Strander; Tervo, Outi M.; Grønnow, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    with a high probability of PCR failure, such as for example, ancient DNA samples. Here, we investigate the validity of this assumption regarding the use of XY homologue PCR assays for molecular sexing of ancient DNA. We tested a primer set targeting the ZFX/ZFY alleles using ancient DNA extracts from 100...

  14. Sex determination in flowering plants: papaya as a model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, Rishi; Ming, Ray

    2014-03-01

    Unisexuality in flowering plants evolved from a hermaphrodite ancestor. Transition from hermaphrodite to unisexual flowers has occurred multiple times across the different lineages of the angiosperms. Sexuality in plants is regulated by genetic, epigenetic and physiological mechanisms. The most specialized mechanism of sex determination is sex chromosomes. The sex chromosomes ensure the stable segregation of sexual phenotypes by preventing the recombination of sex determining genes. Despite continuous efforts, sex determining genes of dioecious plants have not yet been cloned. Concerted efforts with various model systems are necessary to understand the complex mechanism of sex determination in plants. Papaya (Carica papaya L.) is a tropical fruit tree with three sex forms, male, hermaphrodite, and female. Sexuality in papaya is determined by an XY chromosome system that is in an early evolutionary stage. The male and hermaphrodite of papaya are controlled by two different types of Y chromosomes: Y and Y(h). Large amounts of information in the area of genetics, genomics, and epigenetics of papaya have been accumulated over the last few decades. Relatively short lifecycle, small genome size, and readily available genetic and genomic resources render papaya an excellent model system to study sex determination and sex chromosomes in flowering plants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Insect sex determination : It all evolves around transformer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhulst, Eveline C.; van de Zande, Louis; Beukeboom, Leo W.

    Insects exhibit a variety of sex determining mechanisms including male or female heterogamety and haplodiploidy. The primary signal that starts sex determination is processed by a cascade of genes ending with the conserved switch doublesex that controls sexual differentiation. Transformer is the

  16. Genomic imprinting and maternal effect genes in haplodiploid sex determination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Zande, L.; Verhulst, E. C.

    2014-01-01

    The research into the Drosophila melanogaster sex-determining system has been at the basis of all further research on insect sex determination. This further research has made it clear that, for most insect species, the presence of sufficient functional Transformer (TRA) protein in the early

  17. Climate-driven population divergence in sex-determining systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pen, Ido; Uller, Tobias; Feldmeyer, Barbara; Harts, Anna; While, Geoffrey M.; Wapstra, Erik

    2010-01-01

    Sex determination is a fundamental biological process, yet its mechanisms are remarkably diverse(1,2). In vertebrates, sex can be determined by inherited genetic factors or by the temperature experienced during embryonic development(2,3). However, the evolutionary causes of this diversity remain

  18. Commentary: Sex determination: Are two mechanisms better than ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2008-01-31

    Jan 31, 2008 ... Commentary: Sex determination: Are two mechanisms better than one? J J Bull. Volume 33 Issue 1 March 2008 pp 5-8. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jbsc/033/01/0005-0008. Keywords. Evolution; reptiles; sex determination. Author Affiliations.

  19. Temperature dependence of electromechanical properties of PLZT x ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The compositions of lead lanthanum zirconate titanate PLZT [Pb(Zr0.57Ti0.43)O3 + at% of La, where = 3, 5, 6, 10 and 12] have been synthesized using mixed oxide route. The temperature dependent electromechanical parameters have been determined using vector impedance spectroscopy (VIS). The charge constant ...

  20. New Y chromosomes and early stages of sex chromosome differentiation: sex determination in Megaselia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traut, Walther

    2010-09-01

    The phorid fly Megaselia scalaris is a laboratory model for the turnover and early differentiation of sex chromosomes. Isolates from the field have an XY sex-determining mechanism with chromosome pair 2 acting as X and Y chromosomes. The sex chromosomes are homomorphic but display early signs of sex chromosome differentiation: a low level of molecular differences between X and Y. The male-determining function (M), maps to the distal part of the Y chromosome's short arm. In laboratory cultures, new Y chromosomes with no signs of a molecular differentiation arise at a low rate, probably by transposition of M to these chromosomes. Downstream of the primary signal, the homologue of the Drosophila doublesex (dsx) is part of the sex-determining pathway while Sex-lethal (Sxl), though structurally conserved, is not.

  1. Insect sex determination: it all evolves around transformer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhulst, Eveline C; van de Zande, Louis; Beukeboom, Leo W

    2010-08-01

    Insects exhibit a variety of sex determining mechanisms including male or female heterogamety and haplodiploidy. The primary signal that starts sex determination is processed by a cascade of genes ending with the conserved switch doublesex that controls sexual differentiation. Transformer is the doublesex splicing regulator and has been found in all examined insects, indicating its ancestral function as a sex-determining gene. Despite this conserved function, the variation in transformer nucleotide sequence, amino acid composition and protein structure can accommodate a multitude of upstream sex determining signals. Transformer regulation of doublesex and its taxonomic distribution indicate that the doublesex-transformer axis is conserved among all insects and that transformer is the key gene around which variation in sex determining mechanisms has evolved.

  2. Demographic and genetic consequences of disturbed sex determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedekind, Claus

    2017-09-19

    During sex determination, genetic and/or environmental factors determine the cascade of processes of gonad development. Many organisms, therefore, have a developmental window in which their sex determination can be sensitive to, for example, unusual temperatures or chemical pollutants. Disturbed environments can distort population sex ratios and may even cause sex reversal in species with genetic sex determination. The resulting genotype-phenotype mismatches can have long-lasting effects on population demography and genetics. I review the theoretical and empirical work in this context and explore in a simple population model the role of the fitness vyy of chromosomally aberrant YY genotypes that are a consequence of environmentally induced feminization. Low vyy is mostly beneficial for population growth. During feminization, low vyy reduces the proportion of genetic males and hence accelerates population growth, especially at low rates of feminization and at high fitness costs of the feminization itself (i.e. when feminization would otherwise not affect population dynamics much). When sex reversal ceases, low vyy mitigates the negative effects of feminization and can even prevent population extinction. Little is known about vyy in natural populations. The available models now need to be parametrized in order to better predict the long-term consequences of disturbed sex determination.This article is part of the themed issue 'Adult sex ratios and reproductive decisions: a critical re-examination of sex differences in human and animal societies'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  3. Sex-determination and sex-preselection tests in India: modern techniques for femicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, V

    1989-01-01

    "In India during recent years techniques that were developed to detect genetic deformities in fetuses have been increasingly used mainly for determining the sex of fetuses so that female fetuses can be exterminated. This paper explores the factors underlying this practice and the related practice of preselecting the sex of offspring, examining both the widespread availability and use of sex-determination and sex-preselection techniques and the root causes of female devaluation in India. Also presented and analyzed are the responses of women's groups and the government to these uses of modern technology to carry out the ultimate abuse of women--not allowing them to be born." excerpt

  4. Complementary Sex Determination in the Parasitic Wasp Diachasmimorpha longicaudata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabajal Paladino, Leonela; Muntaabski, Irina; Lanzavecchia, Silvia; Le Bagousse-Pinguet, Yoann; Viscarret, Mariana; Juri, Marianela; Fueyo-Sánchez, Luciana; Papeschi, Alba; Cladera, Jorge; Bressa, María José

    2015-01-01

    We studied the sex determination in Diachasmimorpha longicaudata, a parasitoid braconid wasp widely used as biological control agent of fruit pest tephritid flies. We tested the complementary sex determination hypothesis (CSD) known in at least 60 species of Hymenoptera. According to CSD, male or female development depends on the allelic composition of one sex locus (single-locus CSD) or multiple sex loci (multiple-locus CSD). Hemizygote individuals are normal haploid males, and heterozygotes for at least one sex locus are normal diploid females, but homozygotes for all the sex loci are diploid males. In order to force the occurrence of diploid males in D. longicaudata, we established highly inbred lines and examined their offspring using chromosome counting, flow cytometry, and sex ratio analysis. We found that when mother-son crosses were studied, this wasp produced about 20% of diploid males out of the total male progeny. Our results suggest that this parasitoid may represent the second genus with multiple-locus CSD in Hymenoptera. Knowledge about the sex determination system in D. longicaudata is relevant for the improvement of mass rearing protocols of this species. This information also provides the necessary background for further investigations on the underlying molecular mechanisms of sex determination in this species, and a better insight into the evolution of this pathway in Hymenoptera in particular and insects in general. PMID:25789748

  5. Sex Determination from Fingerprint Ridge Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Sudesh Gungadin

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted with an aim to establish a relationship between sex and fingerprint ridge density. The fingerprints were taken from 500 subjects (250 males and 250 females in the age group of 18-60 years. After taking fingerprints, the ridges were counted in the upper portion of the radial border of each print for all ten fingers and mean value was calculated. The results have shown that a finger print ridge of 14 ridges/25 mm2 is more likely of female origin. It has been successful to support the hypothesis that women tend to have a statistically significant greater ridge density than men.

  6. Vertebrate sex-determining genes play musical chairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Qiaowei; Anderson, Jennifer; Bertho, Sylvain; Herpin, Amaury; Wilson, Catherine; Postlethwait, John H; Schartl, Manfred; Guiguen, Yann

    2016-01-01

    Sexual reproduction is one of the most highly conserved processes in evolution. However, the genetic and cellular mechanisms making the decision of whether the undifferentiated gonad of animal embryos develops either towards male or female are manifold and quite diverse. In vertebrates, sex-determining mechanisms range from environmental to simple or complex genetic mechanisms and different mechanisms have evolved repeatedly and independently. In species with simple genetic sex-determination, master sex-determining genes lying on sex chromosomes drive the gonadal differentiation process by switching on a developmental program, which ultimately leads to testicular or ovarian differentiation. So far, very few sex-determining genes have been identified in vertebrates and apart from mammals and birds, these genes are apparently not conserved over a larger number of related orders, families, genera, or even species. To fill this knowledge gap and to better explore genetic sex-determination, we propose a strategy (RAD-Sex) that makes use of next-generation sequencing technology to identify genetic markers that define sex-specific segments of the male or female genome. Copyright © 2016 Académie des sciences. All rights reserved.

  7. A Century of Sex Determination in Flowering Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkess, Alex; Leebens-Mack, Jim

    2017-01-01

    Plants have evolved a diverse array of strategies for sexual reproduction, particularly through the modification of male and female organs at distinct points in development. The immense variation in sexual systems across the land plants provides a unique opportunity to study the genetic, epigenetic, phylogenetic, and ecological underpinnings of sex determination. Here, we reflect on more than a century of research into flowering plant sex determination, placing a particular focus on the foundational genetic and cytogenetic observations, experiments, and hypotheses. Building on the seminal work on the genetics of plant sex, modern comparative genomic analyses now allow us to address longstanding questions about sex determination and the origins of sex chromosomes. © The American Genetic Association 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Correlation between temperature-dependent permittivity dispersion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The results indicate that the poling temperature plays a crucial role in the domains' alignment process, as expected. The temperature-dependent permittivity frequency dispersion and depolarization behaviours may have same origin. The aligned domains' break up into random state/nanodomains at depoling temperature ...

  9. Temperature Dependent Models of Semiconductor Devices for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper presents an investigation of the temperature dependent model of a diode and bipolar transistor built-in to the NAP-2 program and comparison of these models with experimentally measured characteristics of the BA 100 diode and BC 109 transistor. The detail of the modelling technique has been discussed and ...

  10. Measurements of temperature dependence of 'localized susceptibility'

    CERN Document Server

    Shiozawa, H; Ishii, H; Takayama, Y; Obu, K; Muro, T; Saitoh, Y; Matsuda, T D; Sugawara, H; Sato, H

    2003-01-01

    The magnetic susceptibility of some rare-earth compounds is estimated by measuring magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) of rare-earth 3d-4f absorption spectra. The temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility obtained by the MCD measurement is remarkably different from the bulk susceptibility in most samples, which is attributed to the strong site selectivity of the core MCD measurement.

  11. Temperature dependence of the MDT gas gain

    CERN Document Server

    Gaudio, G; Treichel, M

    1999-01-01

    This note describes the measurements taken in the Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) in the X5 test beam area at CERN to investigate the temperature dependence of the MDT drift gas (Ar/CO2 - 90:10). Spectra were taken with an Americium-241 source during the aging studies. We analysed the effects of temperature changes on the pulse height spectrum.

  12. Investigation Of Temperature Dependent Characteristics Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The structure, magnetization and magnetostriction of Laves phase compound TbCo2 were investigated by temperature dependent high resolution neutron powder diffraction. The compound crystallizes in the cubic Laves phase C15 structure above its Curie temperature, TC and exhibits a rhombohedral distortion (space ...

  13. Sex determination of African Penguins Spheniscus demersus using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Penguins Spheniscus demersus are sexually dimorphic; on average, males are larger than females but measurements overlap making sex determination difficult through observations alone. We developed a discriminant function, using bill length and depth from a sample of birds sexed from gonad visualisation ...

  14. Radiomorphometric analysis of frontal sinus for sex determination

    OpenAIRE

    Verma, Saumya; Mahima, V. G.; Patil, Karthikeya

    2014-01-01

    Context: Sex determination of unknown individuals carries crucial significance in forensic research, in cases where fragments of skull persist with no likelihood of identification based on dental arch. In these instances sex determination becomes important to rule out certain number of possibilities instantly and helps in establishing a biological profile of human remains. Aims: The aim of the study is to evaluate a mathematical method based on logistic regression analysis capable of ascertai...

  15. Sex determination strategies in 2012: towards a common regulatory model?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelopoulou Roxani

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sex determination is a complicated process involving large-scale modifications in gene expression affecting virtually every tissue in the body. Although the evolutionary origin of sex remains controversial, there is little doubt that it has developed as a process of optimizing metabolic control, as well as developmental and reproductive functions within a given setting of limited resources and environmental pressure. Evidence from various model organisms supports the view that sex determination may occur as a result of direct environmental induction or genetic regulation. The first process has been well documented in reptiles and fish, while the second is the classic case for avian species and mammals. Both of the latter have developed a variety of sex-specific/sex-related genes, which ultimately form a complete chromosome pair (sex chromosomes/gonosomes. Interestingly, combinations of environmental and genetic mechanisms have been described among different classes of animals, thus rendering the possibility of a unidirectional continuous evolutionary process from the one type of mechanism to the other unlikely. On the other hand, common elements appear throughout the animal kingdom, with regard to a conserved key genes and b a central role of sex steroid control as a prerequisite for ultimately normal sex differentiation. Studies in invertebrates also indicate a role of epigenetic chromatin modification, particularly with regard to alternative splicing options. This review summarizes current evidence from research in this hot field and signifies the need for further study of both normal hormonal regulators of sexual phenotype and patterns of environmental disruption.

  16. Determination of sex from tooth pulp tissue

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-04-01

    Apr 1, 2010 ... The cells were observed with fluorescent microscope for fluorescent body. Gender was determined by identification of Y chromosome fluorescence in dental pulp. Results: Freshly extracted teeth and for those examined one month later, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive ...

  17. Sex determination using the Probabilistic Sex Diagnosis (DSP: Diagnose Sexuelle Probabiliste) tool in a virtual environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Tara; Lefevre, Philippe; Semal, Patrick; Moiseev, Fedor; Sholukha, Victor; Louryan, Stéphane; Rooze, Marcel; Van Sint Jan, Serge

    2014-01-01

    The hip bone is one of the most reliable indicators of sex in the human body due to the fact it is the most dimorphic bone. Probabilistic Sex Diagnosis (DSP: Diagnose Sexuelle Probabiliste) developed by Murail et al., in 2005, is a sex determination method based on a worldwide hip bone metrical database. Sex is determined by comparing specific measurements taken from each specimen using sliding callipers and computing the probability of specimens being female or male. In forensic science it is sometimes not possible to sex a body due to corpse decay or injury. Skeletalization and dissection of a body is a laborious process and desecrates the body. There were two aims to this study. The first aim was to examine the accuracy of the DSP method in comparison with a current visual sexing method on sex determination. A further aim was to see if it was possible to virtually utilise the DSP method on both the hip bone and the pelvic girdle in order to utilise this method for forensic sciences. For the first part of the study, forty-nine dry hip bones of unknown sex were obtained from the Body Donation Programme of the Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB). A comparison was made between DSP analysis and visual sexing on dry bone by two researchers. CT scans of bones were then analysed to obtain three-dimensional (3D) virtual models and the method of DSP was analysed virtually by importing the models into a customised software programme called lhpFusionBox which was developed at ULB. The software enables DSP distances to be measured via virtually-palpated bony landmarks. There was found to be 100% agreement of sex between the manual and virtual DSP method. The second part of the study aimed to further validate the method by analysing thirty-nine supplementary pelvic girdles of known sex blind. There was found to be a 100% accuracy rate further demonstrating that the virtual DSP method is robust. Statistically significant differences were found in the identification of sex

  18. Evolution of an Expanded Sex Determining Locus in Volvox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Patrick; Olson, Bradley J.S.C.; De Hoff, Peter L.; Douglass, Stephen; Diaz-Cano, David Casero; Prochnik, Simon; Geng, Sa; Rai, Rhitu; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Nishii, Ichiro; Hamaji, Takashi; Nozaki, Hisayoshi; Pellegrini, Matteo; Umen, James G.

    2010-01-01

    Although dimorphic sexes have evolved repeatedly in multicellular eukaryotes, their origins are unknown. The mating locus (MT) of the sexually dimorphic multicellular green alga, Volvox carteri, specifies the production of eggs and sperm and has undergone a remarkable expansion and divergence relative to MT from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a closely related unicellular species that has equal-sized gametes. Transcriptome analysis revealed a rewired gametic expression program for Volvox MT genes relative to Chlamydomonas, and identified multiple gender-specific and sex-regulated transcripts. The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor homolog MAT3 is a Volvox MT gene that displays sexually regulated alternative splicing and evidence of gender-specific selection, both indicative of cooption into the sexual cycle. Thus, sex-determining loci impact the evolution of both sex-related and non-sex-related genes. PMID:20395508

  19. Contactless in ovo sex determination of chicken eggs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galli Roberta

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We resume the research for contactless in ovo sex determination of the domestic chicken, which has the final aim to provide an alternative to day-old cockerels culling in the layer industry. In ovo Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy of blood of eggs incubated until day 3.5 enables correct sexing rates over 90% barely affecting the hatching rate. Full automatization of the processes to guarantee high sexing speed and fulfill industrial demands is required to allow transferring the technology inside the hatcheries in the next future.

  20. Sexual reproduction and sex determination in green algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekimoto, Hiroyuki

    2017-05-01

    The sexual reproductive processes of some representative freshwater green algae are reviewed. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a unicellular volvocine alga having two mating types: mating type plus (mt+) and mating type minus (mt-), which are controlled by a single, complex mating-type locus. Sexual adhesion between the gametes is mediated by sex-specific agglutinin molecules on their flagellar membranes. Cell fusion is initiated by an adhesive interaction between the mt+ and mt- mating structures, followed by localized membrane fusion. The loci of sex-limited genes and the conformation of sex-determining regions have been rearranged during the evolution of volvocine algae; however, the essential function of the sex-determining genes of the isogamous unicellular Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is conserved in the multicellular oogamous Volvox carteri. The sexual reproduction of the unicellular charophycean alga, Closterium peracerosum-strigosum-littorale complex, is also focused on here. The sexual reproductive processes of heterothallic strains are controlled by two multifunctional sex pheromones, PR-IP and PR-IP Inducer, which independently promote multiple steps in conjugation at the appropriate times through different induction mechanisms. The molecules involved in sexual reproduction and sex determination have also been characterized.

  1. Sex determination mode does not affect body or genital development of the central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L. Whiteley

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of male- or female-specific phenotypes in squamates is typically controlled by either temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD or chromosome-based genetic sex determination (GSD. However, while sex determination is a major switch in individual phenotypic development, it is unknownhow evolutionary transitions between GSD and TSD might impact on the evolution of squamate phenotypes, particularly the fast-evolving and diverse genitalia. Here, we take the unique opportunity of studying the impact of both sex determination mechanisms on the embryological development of the central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps. This is possible because of the transitional sex determination system of this species, in which genetically male individuals reverse sex at high incubation temperatures. This can trigger the evolutionary transition of GSD to TSD in a single generation, making P. vitticeps an ideal model organism for comparing the effects of both sex determination processes in the same species. Results We conducted four incubation experiments on 265 P. vitticeps eggs, covering two temperature regimes (“normal” at 28 °C and “sex reversing” at 36 °C and the two maternal sexual genotypes (concordant ZW females or sex-reversed ZZ females. From this, we provide the first detailed staging system for the species, with a focus on genital and limb development. This was augmented by a new sex chromosome identification methodology for P. vitticeps that is non-destructive to the embryo. We found a strong correlation between embryo age and embryo stage. Aside from faster growth in 36 °C treatments, body and external genital development was entirely unperturbed by temperature, sex reversal or maternal sexual genotype. Unexpectedly, all females developed hemipenes (the genital phenotype of adult male P. vitticeps, which regress close to hatching. Conclusions The tight correlation between embryo age and embryo stage

  2. Determinants of premarital sex in Maiduguri, Nigeria: Implications for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Early coital exposure is associated with multiple sexual partners and higher risk of sexually transmitted infections including oncogenic human papilloma virus (HPV) which is a precursor of cervical cancer. Aim: To document the determinants of premarital sex with a view to determine the age of HPV vaccination.

  3. Sex determination in annual fishes: searching for the master sex-determining gene in Austrolebias charrua (Cyprinodontiformes, Rivulidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María José Arezo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Evolution of sex determination and differentiation in fishes involves a broad range of sex strategies (hermaphroditism, gonochorism, unisexuality, environmental and genetic sex determination. Annual fishes inhabit temporary ponds that dry out during the dry season when adults die. The embryos exhibit an atypical developmental pattern and remain buried in the bottom mud until the next rainy season. To elucidate genomic factors involved in the sex determination in annual fish, we explored the presence of a candidate sex-specific gene related to the cascade network in Austrolebias charrua. All phylogenetic analyses showed a high posterior probability of occurrence for a clade integrated by nuclear sequences (aprox. 900 bp from both adults (male and female, with partial cDNA fragments of A. charrua from juveniles (male and the dsx D. melanogaster gene. The expressed fragment was detected from blastula to adulthood stages showing a sexually dimorphic expression pattern. The isolated cDNA sequence is clearly related to dsx D. melanogaster gene and might be located near the top of the sex determination cascade in this species.

  4. Efficacy of cheiloscopy in determination of sex among South indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautilya D, Vijay; Bodkha, Pravir; Rajamohan, Naveen

    2013-10-01

    Human identification plays a vital role in any crime investigation. Along with the various other established methods, cheiloscopy also plays a key role in linking the criminal with the crime. The ability of a technique in differentiating the sex of a person in the field can help in screening a large number of suspects. This study evaluated the efficacy of cheiloscopy in determination of sex among South Indians. It also studied the pattern of dimorphism in the lips and lip prints of south Indians. Lip prints from 100 medical students (50 males and 50 females) were obtained and were analyzed, based on Tsuchihashi and Suzuki classification, to check for dimorphism. Lip dimensions were studied by using standard sliding calipers for dimorphism. The most common pattern of lip print among males was Type III as compared to Type I in females. The outer four portions of the lip showed statistically significant differences in males and females. Middle portion of the lip was statistically insignificant in sex determination, based on lip print patterns. Thickness of the lip was significantly larger in males as compared to that in females and this criterion could be used to establish a logistic regression for determination of sex of a person. Lips not only significantly differ among the males and females in the pattern of the lip print that they present, but they also differ in their size. These features can effectively be used to determine the sex of a person accurately.

  5. Molecular markers for sex determination in papaya ( Carica papaya L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deputy, J C; Ming, R; Ma, H; Liu, Z; Fitch, M M M; Wang, M; Manshardt, R; Stiles, J I

    2002-12-01

    We have developed molecular markers tightly linked to Sex1, the gene that determines plant sex in papaya ( Carica papaya L.). Three RAPD products have been cloned and a portion of their DNA sequenced. Based on these sequences SCAR primers were synthesized. SCAR T12 and SCAR W11 produce products in hermaphrodite and male plants and only rarely in females. SCAR T1 produces a product in all papayas regardless of plant sex. SCAR T12 and SCAR W11 showed no recombination in a population of 182 F2 plants from a 'SunUp' by 'Kapoho' cross. Based on these results a PCR-based technique for rapidly and accurately determining the sex of papaya plants was developed using either W11 or T12 to detect the hermaphrodite or male allele and T1, which amplifies a product regardless of sex type, as a positive control. The sexing technique, using SCAR T12 and SCAR T1 as a positive control, was used to correctly predict hermaphrodite papaya plants in a population of seedlings with an overall accuracy of 99.2%.

  6. Osteometric sex determination of burned human skeletal remains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, D; Thompson, T J U; Cunha, E

    2013-10-01

    Sex determination of human burned skeletal remains is extremely hard to achieve because of heat-related fragmentation, warping and dimensional changes. In particular, the latter is impeditive of osteometric analyses that are based on references developed on unburned bones. New osteometric references were thus obtained which allow for more reliable sex determinations. The calcined remains of cremated Portuguese individuals were examined and specific standard measurements of the humerus, femur, talus and calcaneus were recorded. This allowed for the compilation of new sex discriminating osteometric references which were then tested on independent samples with good results. Both the use of simple section points and of logistic regression equations provided successful sex classification scores. These references may now be used for the sex determination of burned skeletons. Its reliability is highest for contemporary Portuguese remains but nonetheless these results have important repercussion for forensic research. More conservative use of these references may also prove valuable for other populations as well as for archaeological research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  7. Sex hormones alter sex ratios in the Indian skipper frog, Euphlyctis cyanophlyctis: Determining sensitive stages for gonadal sex reversal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuge, S K; Gramapurohit, N P

    2015-09-01

    In amphibians, although genetic factors are involved in sex determination, gonadal sex differentiation can be modified by exogenous steroid hormones suggesting a possible role of sex steroids in regulating the process. We studied the effect of testosterone propionate (TP) and estradiol-17β (E2) on gonadal differentiation and sex ratio at metamorphosis in the Indian skipper frog, Euphlyctis cyanophlyctis with undifferentiated type of gonadal differentiation. A series of experiments were carried out to determine the optimum dose and sensitive stages for gonadal sex reversal. Our results clearly indicate the importance of sex hormones in controlling gonadal differentiation of E. cyanophlyctis. Treatment of tadpoles with 10, 20, 40, and 80μg/L TP throughout larval period resulted in the development of 100% males at metamorphosis at all concentrations. Similarly, treatment of tadpoles with 40μg/L TP during ovarian and testicular differentiation resulted in the development of 90% males, 10% intersexes and 100% males respectively. Treatment of tadpoles with 10, 20, 40, and 80μg/L E2 throughout larval period likewise produced 100% females at all concentrations. Furthermore, exposure to 40μg/L E2 during ovarian and testicular differentiation produced 95% females, 5% intersexes and 91% females, 9% intersexes respectively. Both TP and E2 were also effective in advancing the stages of gonadal development. Present study shows the effectiveness of both T and E2 in inducing complete sex reversal in E. cyanophlyctis. Generally, exposure to E2 increased the larval period resulting in significantly larger females than control group while the larval period of control and TP treated groups was comparable. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Maternal provision of non-sex-specific transformer messenger RNA in sex determination of the wasp Asobara tabida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geuverink, E; Verhulst, E C; van Leussen, M; van de Zande, L; Beukeboom, L W

    2017-10-14

    In many insect species maternal provision of sex-specifically spliced messenger RNA (mRNA) of sex determination genes is an essential component of the sex determination mechanism. In haplodiploid Hymenoptera, maternal provision in combination with genomic imprinting has been shown for the parasitoid Nasonia vitripennis, known as maternal effect genomic imprinting sex determination (MEGISD). Here, we characterize the sex determination cascade of Asobara tabida, another hymenopteran parasitoid. We show the presence of the conserved sex determination genes doublesex (dsx), transformer (tra) and transformer-2 (tra2) orthologues in As. tabida. Of these, At-dsx and At-tra are sex-specifically spliced, indicating a conserved function in sex determination. At-tra and At-tra2 mRNA is maternally provided to embryos but, in contrast to most studied insects, As. tabida females transmit a non-sex-specific splice form of At-tra mRNA to the eggs. In this respect, As. tabida sex determination differs from the MEGISD mechanism. How the paternal genome can induce female development in the absence of maternal provision of sex-specifically spliced mRNA remains an open question. Our study reports a hitherto unknown variant of maternal effect sex determination and accentuates the diversity of insect sex determination mechanisms. © 2017 The Authors. Insect Molecular Biology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Royal Entomological Society.

  9. Temperature Dependent Wire Delay Estimation in Floorplanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Andreas Thor; Liu, Wei; Nannarelli, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Due to large variations in temperature in VLSI circuits and the linear relationship between metal resistance and temperature, the delay through wires of the same length can be different. Traditional thermal aware floorplanning algorithms use wirelength to estimate delay and routability....... In this work, we show that using wirelength as the evaluation metric does not always produce a floorplan with the shortest delay. We propose a temperature dependent wire delay estimation method for thermal aware floorplanning algorithms, which takes into account the thermal effect on wire delay. The experiment...... results show that a shorter delay can be achieved using the proposed method. In addition, we also discuss the congestion and reliability issues as they are closely related to routing and temperature....

  10. Determinants of premarital sex in Maiduguri, Nigeria: Implications for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Determinants of premarital sex in Maiduguri, Nigeria: Implications for Human Papilloma Virus vaccination. ... Frequently Asked Questions about PDFs. Alternatively, you can download the PDF file directly to your computer, from where it can be opened using a PDF reader. To download the PDF, click the Download link ...

  11. How is sex determined in insects? An epilogue

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    With the recent findings in Ceratitis capitata, Musca domestica, Apis mellifera, Lucilia cuprina and Nasonia vitripennis, it is clear that the intermediate genetic module traep/tra-2auxbep is widely conserved, and that sex determination appears to revolve around this module. Despite the availability of the genome sequences of ...

  12. Sex determination from femoral head diameters in black Malawians ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the sex of black Malawians from femoral head diameters. Design: A retrospective study on patients investigated in three x-ray departments. Setting: Radiographs were collected from the archives of Queen Elizabeth Central, Chikwawa and Balaka hospitals. Subject: X-ray films of 496 pelves of adult ...

  13. Sex determination in the Lesser Flamingo ( Phoenicopterus minor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PCR amplification of the CHD-Z and CHD-W genes using DNA extracted from the blood samples was used to determine the sex of each bird. There were significant differences in mass and tarsus length among the three age groups, indicating that Lesser Flamingos continue to grow in skeletal size and mass between ...

  14. Maternal provision of non-sex-specific transformer messenger RNA in sex determination of the wasp Asobara tabida

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geuverink, Elzemiek; Verhulst, E.C.; Leussen, van M.; Zande, L.; Beukeboom, Leo W.

    2017-01-01

    In many insect species maternal provision of sex-specifically spliced messenger RNA (mRNA) of sex determination genes is an essential component of the sex determination mechanism. In haplodiploid Hymenoptera, maternal provision in combination with genomic imprinting has been shown for the parasitoid

  15. Maternal provision of non-sex-specific transformer messenger RNA in sex determination of the wasp Asobara tabida

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geuverink, Elzemiek; Verhulst, E.C.; Leussen, van M.; Zande, L.; Beukeboom, Leo W.

    2018-01-01

    In many insect species maternal provision of sex-specifically spliced messenger RNA (mRNA) of sex determination genes is an essential component of the sex determination mechanism. In haplodiploid Hymenoptera, maternal provision in combination with genomic imprinting has been shown for the parasitoid

  16. Rapid sex determination using PCR technique compared to classic cytogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settin, Ahmad; Elsobky, Ezzat; Hammad, Ayman; Al-Erany, Abeer

    2008-01-01

    Fetal sexual differentiation relies on the translation of chromosomal sex established at fertilization into gonadal sex and somatic sex as development proceeds. In cases where chromosomal, gonadal, and somatic sex are incongruent in human infants and children, rapid establishment of the diagnosis and implementation of medical and surgical management is of paramount importance, since the gender identity is so important to the psychological well-being throughout life. This work was done in order to test the value of PCR technique for rapid sex determination compared to classic cytogenetic technique. Subjects included 20, cases including 10 neonates with ambiguous genitalia, 2 adult females with delayed puberty and 8 adult males with infertility, in addition to 20 normal infants of both sexes as a control group. The diagnosis of sex was attempted through examination, cytogenetic study, ultrasonography, gonadal biopsy and hormonal analysis, in addition to PCR amplification for the detection of SRY and ATL1 gene loci on Y and X chromosomes respectively. Four neonates were diagnosed as partial testicular feminization showed both positive bands for the Y and X chromosomes and a karyogram of 46/XY. Three neonates were diagnosed as true hermaphrodites showed positive amplification for both Y and X chromosomes with a mosaic karyogram 46,XX/XY. Three neonates were diagnosed as cases of adrenogenital syndrome showed positive amplification of only the Xchromosome and had a karyogram of 46/XX. One of the two adult females was diagnosed as turner syndrome showed positive amplification of the X chromosome and a karyogram of 45/XO; the other one was diagnosed as complete testicular feminization had a positive amplification of X and Y chromosomes and a karyogram of 46/XY. The 8 adult males with infertility showed a positive amplification of X and Y chromosome and a karyogram of 47/XXY (Klinefelter syndrome) in 7 cases and 46/XY gonadal dysgenesis in one case. We concluded that PCR

  17. Temperature dependences of hydrous species in feldspars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W. D.; Yang, Y.; Zhu, K. Y.; Xia, Q. K.

    2018-01-01

    Feldspars are abundant in the crust of the Earth. Multiple hydrogen species such as OH, H2O and NH4 + can occur in the structure of feldspars. Hydrogen species play a critical role in influencing some properties of the host feldspars and the crust, including mechanical strength, electrical property of the crust, and evolution of the crustal fluids. Knowledge of hydrous species in feldspars to date has been mostly derived from spectroscopic studies at ambient temperature. However, the speciation and sites of hydrous species at high temperatures may not be quenchable. Here, we investigated the temperature dependences of several typical hydrous components (e.g., type IIa OH, type IIb OH and type I H2O) in feldspars by measuring the in situ FTIR spectra at elevated temperatures up to 800 °C. We found that the hydrous species demonstrated different behaviors at elevated temperatures. With increasing temperature, type IIa OH redistributes on the various sites in the anorthoclase structure. Additionally, O-H vibration frequencies increase for types IIa and IIb OH, and they decrease for type I H2O with increasing temperature. In contrast to type I H2O which drastically dehydrates during the heating process, types IIa and IIb OH show negligible loss; however, the bulk integral absorption coefficients drastically decrease with increasing temperature. These results may have implications in understanding the properties of hydrous species and feldspars at non-ambient temperatures, not only under geologic conditions but also at cold planetary surface conditions.

  18. Temperature dependent terahertz properties of Ammonium Nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Abdur; Azad, Abul; Moore, David

    Terahertz spectroscopy has been demonstrated as an ideal nondestructive method for identifying hazardous materials such as explosives. Many common explosives exhibit distinct spectral signatures at terahertz range (0.1-6.0 THz) due to the excitations of their low frequency vibrational modes. Ammonium nitrate (AN), an easily accessible oxidizer often used in improvised explosive, exhibits strong temperature dependence. While the room temperature terahertz absorption spectrum of AN is featureless, it reveals distinct spectral features below 240 K due to the polymorphic phase transition. We employed terahertz time domain spectroscopy to measure the effective dielectric properties of AN embedded in polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) binder. The dielectric properties of pure AN were extracted using three different effective medium theories (EMT), simple effective medium approach, Maxwell-Garnett (MG) model, and Bruggeman (BR) model. In order to understand the effect of temperature on the dielectric properties, we varied the sample temperature from 5K to 300K. This study indicates presence of additional vibrational modes at low temperature. These results may greatly enhance the detectability of AN and facilitate more accurate theoretical modeling.

  19. Temperature dependence of phonons in photosynthesis proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mengyang; Myles, Dean; Blankenship, Robert; Markelz, Andrea

    Protein long range vibrations are essential to biological function. For many proteins, these vibrations steer functional conformational changes. For photoharvesting proteins, the structural vibrations play an additional critical role in energy transfer to the reaction center by both phonon assisted energy transfer and energy dissipation. The characterization of these vibrations to understand how they are optimized to balance photoharvesting and photoprotection is challenging. To date this characterization has mainly relied on fluorescence line narrowing measurements at cryogenic temperatures. However, protein dynamics has a strong temperature dependence, with an apparent turn on in anharmonicity between 180-220 K. If this transition affects intramolecular vibrations, the low temperature measurements will not represent the phonon spectrum at biological temperatures. Here we use the new technique of anisotropic terahertz microscopy (ATM) to measure the intramolecular vibrations of FMO complex. ATM is uniquely capable of isolating protein vibrations from isotropic background. We find resonances both red and blue shift with temperature above the dynamical transition. The results indicate that the characterization of vibrations must be performed at biologically relevant temperatures to properly understand the energy overlap with the excitation energy transfer. This work was supported by NSF:DBI 1556359, BioXFEL seed Grant funding from NSF:DBI 1231306, DOE: DE-SC0016317, and the Bruce Holm University at Buffalo Research Foundation Grant.

  20. Progress in studies of sex determination mechanisms and sex control techniques in Cynoglossus semilaevis (half-smooth tongue sole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian ZHOU,Songlin CHEN

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Cynoglossus semilaevis (half-smooth tongue sole is a marine flatfish of great commercial value for fisheries and aquaculture in China. It has a female heterogametic sex determination system (ZW/ZZ and environmental factors can induce sex-reversal of females to phenotypic males, suggesting that it is a promising model for the study of sex determination mechanisms. Additionally, females grow much faster than males and it is feasible to improve the aquaculture production through sex control techniques. This paper reviews the progress in research on sex determination mechanisms research in our laboratory. We have completed whole-genome sequencing and revealed the genome organization and sex chromosome evolution of C. semilaevis. A putative male determining gene dmrt1 was identified and DNA methylation was verified as having a crucial role in the sex reversal process. Genetic maps and sex-specific biomarkers have been used in a marker-assisted selection breeding program and for differentiation of the fish sex. Development and improvement of sex control technologies, including artificial gynogenesis and production of breeding fry with high proportion of females, is also reviewed. These research advances have provided insight into the regulation of sex determination and enabled efficient sex management in artificial culturing of C. semilaevis.

  1. Genetic architecture of sex determination in fish: Applications to sex ratio control in aquaculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulino eMartínez

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Controlling the sex ratio is essential in finfish farming. A balanced sex ratio is usually good for broodstock management, since it enables to develop appropriate breeding schemes. However, in some species the production of monosex populations is desirable because the existence of sexual dimorphism, primarily in growth or first time of sexual maturation, but also in color or shape, can render one sex more valuable. The knowledge of the genetic architecture of sex determination (SD is convenient for controlling sex ratio and for the implementation of breeding programs. Unlike mammals and birds, which show highly conserved master genes that control a conserved genetic network responsible for gonad differentiation (GD, a huge diversity of SD mechanisms has been reported in fish. Despite theory predictions, more than one gene is in many cases involved in fish SD and genetic differences have been observed in the GD network. Environmental factors also play a relevant role and epigenetic mechanisms are becoming increasingly recognized for the establishment and maintenance of the GD pathways. Although major genetic factors are frequently involved in fish SD, these observations strongly suggest that SD in this group resembles a complex trait. Accordingly, the application of quantitative genetics combined with genomic tools is desirable to address its study and in fact, when applied, it has frequently demonstrated a multigene trait interacting with environmental factors in model and cultured fish species. This scenario has notable implications for aquaculture and, depending upon the species, from chromosome manipulation or environmental control techniques up to classical selection or marker assisted selection programs, are being applied. In this review, we selected four relevant species or fish groups to illustrate this diversity and hence the technologies that can be used by the industry for the control of sex ratio: turbot and European sea bass, two

  2. Temperature Dependence of Fraction of Frozen Water in Solutions of Glucose and its Oligomers, Dextrans, and Potato Starch

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    PRADIPASENA, Pasawadee; TATTIAKUL, Jirarat; NAKAMURA, Keiko; MIYAWAKI, Osato

    2007-01-01

    Initial freezing point and freezable water fraction, as the two parameters to determine the temperature dependence of fraction of frozen water, were measured systematically for solutions of glucose...

  3. Germline stem cells and sex determination in Hydra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimiya-Fujisawa, Chiemi; Kobayashi, Satoru

    2012-01-01

    The sex of germline stem cells (GSCs) in Hydra is determined in a cell-autonomous manner. In gonochoristic species like Hydra magnipapillata or H. oligactis, where the sexes are separate, male polyps have sperm-restricted stem cells (SpSCs), while females have egg-restricted stem cells (EgSCs). These GSCs self-renew in a polyp, and are usually transmitted to a new bud from a parental polyp during asexual reproduction. But if these GSCs are lost during subsequent budding or regeneration events, new ones are generated from multipotent stem cells (MPSCs). MPSCs are the somatic stem cells in Hydra that ordinarily differentiate into nerve cells, nematocytes (stinging cells in cnidarians), and gland cells. By means of such a backup system, sexual reproduction is guaranteed for every polyp. Interestingly, Hydra polyps occasionally undergo sex-reversal. This implies that each polyp can produce either type of GSCs, i.e. Hydra are genetically hermaphroditic. Nevertheless a polyp possesses only one type of GSCs at a time. We propose a plausible model for sex-reversal in Hydra. We also discuss so-called germline specific genes, which are expressed in both GSCs and MPSCs, and some future plans to investigate Hydra GSCs.

  4. Gender/Sex as a Social Determinant of Cardiovascular Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Adrienne; Scovelle, Anna J; Milner, Allison J; Kavanagh, Anne

    2018-02-20

    The social gradient for cardiovascular disease (CVD) onset and outcomes is well established. The American Heart Association's Social Determinants of Risk and Outcomes of Cardiovascular Disease Scientific Statement advocates looking beyond breakthroughs in biological science toward a social determinants approach that focuses on socioeconomic position, race and ethnicity, social support, culture and access to medical care, and residential environments to curb the burden of CVD going forward. Indeed, the benefits of this approach are likely to be far reaching, enhancing the positive effects of advances in CVD related to prevention and treatment while reducing health inequities that contribute to CVD onset and outcomes. It is disappointing that the role of gender has been largely neglected despite being a critical determinant of cardiovascular health. It is clear that trajectories and outcomes of CVD differ by biological sex, yet the tendency for sex and gender to be conflated has contributed to the idea that both are constant or fixed with little room for intervention. Rather, as distinct from biological sex, gender is socially produced. Overlaid on biological sex, gender is a broad term that shapes and interacts with one's cognition to guide norms, roles, behaviors, and social relations. It is a fluid construct that varies across time, place, and life stage. Gender can interact with biological sex and, indeed, other social determinants, such as ethnicity and socioeconomic position, to shape cardiovascular health from conception, through early life when health behaviors and risk factors are shaped, into adolescence and adulthood. This article will illustrate how gender shapes the early adoption of health behaviors in childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood by focusing on physical activity, drinking, and smoking behaviors (including the influence of role modeling). We will also discuss the role of gender in psychosocial stress with a focus on trauma from life

  5. Sex-specific transcriptional regulation of the C. elegans sex-determining gene her-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, C; Purnell, B; Gavinski, S; Hageman, J; Chamblin, C; Wood, W B

    1991-03-01

    Expression of the sex-determining gene her-1 is required in C. elegans for the normal male development of XO animals. Abnormal expression in XX animals, which normally develop as hermaphrodites, results in aberrant male development. We have isolated a molecular clone of the her-1 gene and have identified two transcripts that are present in XO animals at all stages of development: an abundant 0.8 kb transcript and a less abundant 1.2 kb transcript. In preparations of XX animals, the 0.8 kb transcript was observed only at very low levels in embryos or L1 larvae and the 1.2 kb transcript was not detected. Two gain-of-function her-1 mutations result in high levels of the 1.2 and 0.8 kb transcripts in XX animals. The levels of these transcripts are also elevated in XX animals carrying a loss-of-function mutation in either sdc-1 or sdc-2, consistent with the proposed roles of these genes as negative regulators of her-1. These results demonstrate that expression of the her-1 gene in males and hermaphrodites is controlled at the level of transcript synthesis or accumulation. This mode of regulation contrasts with that found for the Drosophila sex-determining genes, whose sex-specific expression is controlled by differential splicing in males and females.

  6. Canine index – A tool for sex determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar M. Bakkannavar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Teeth are most useful tools in victim identification in the living as well as the dead in the field of forensic investigations. Their ability to survive in situations like mass disasters makes them constructive devices. Many authors have measured crowns of teeth in both males and females and found certain variations. Canines, reported to survive in air crash and hurricane disasters, are perhaps the most stable teeth in the oral cavity because of the labiolingual thickness of the crown and the root anchorage in the alveolar process of jaws. Measurement of mesiodistal width of the mandibular canines and inter-canine distance of the mandible provides good evidence of sex identification due to dimorphism. This study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of canine index (CI in the determination of sex.

  7. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence from CdS/Si nanoheterojunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yue Li; Li, Yong; Ji, Peng Fei; Zhou, Feng Qun; Sun, Xiao Jun; Yuan, Shu Qing; Wan, Ming Li [Pingdingshan University, Department of Physics, Solar New Energy Research Center, Pingdingshan (China); Ling, Hong [North China University of Water Resources and Electric Power, Department of Mathematics and Information Science, Zhengzhou (China)

    2016-12-15

    CdS/Si nanoheterojunctions have been fabricated by growing nanocrystal CdS (nc-CdS) on the silicon nanoporous pillar array (Si-NPA) through using a chemical bath deposition method. The nanoheterojunctions have been constructed by three layers: the upper layer being a nc-CdS thin films, the intermediate layer being the interface region including nc-CdS and nanocrystal silicon (nc-Si), and the bottom layer being nc-Si layer grown on sc-Si substrate. The room temperature and temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) have been measured and analyzed to provide some useful information of defect states. Utilizing the Gauss-Newton fitting method, five emission peaks from the temperature-dependent PL spectra can be determined. From the high energy to low energy, these five peaks are ascribed to the some luminescence centers which are formed by the oxygen-related deficiency centers in the silicon oxide layer of Si-NPA, the band gap emission of nc-CdS, the transition from the interstitial cadmium (I{sub Cd}) to the valence band, the recombination from I{sub Cd} to cadmium vacancies (V{sub Cd}), and from sulfur vacancies (V{sub s}) to the valence band, respectively. Understanding of the defect states in the CdS/Si nanoheterojunctions is very meaningful for the performance of devices based on CdS/Si nanoheterojunctions. (orig.)

  8. The role of estrogen in turtle sex determination and the effect of PCBs.

    OpenAIRE

    Crews, D; Bergeron, J M; McLachlan, J A

    1995-01-01

    In the current model of vertebrate sex determination and sexual differentiation, gonadal sex is fixed at fertilization by specific chromosomes, a process known as genotypic sex determination (GSD). Only after the gonad is formed do hormones begin to exert an influence that modifies specific structures that eventually will differ the sexes. Many egg-laying reptiles do not exhibit GSD but rather depend on the temperature of the incubating egg to determine the gonadal sex of the offspring, a pro...

  9. More Sex-Determination Mutants of CAENORHABDITIS ELEGANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgkin, Jonathan

    1980-01-01

    Sex determination in Caenorhabditis elegans is controlled by the X chromosome: autosome ratio, i.e. 2A;XX animals are hermaphrodite, and 2A;XO animals are male. A procedure for isolating 2A;XO animals that are transformed into hermaphrodites has been developed. Nine mutations causing this transformation have been obtained: eight are recessive, and all of these fall into a new autosomal complementation group, her-1 V. The remaining mutation (her-2) is dominant and has a genetic map location similar to that of tra-1 III. Recessive mutations of tra-1 cause the reverse transformation, transforming 2A;XX animals into males. Therefore, the her-2 mutation may result in constitutive expression of tra-1. Mutations in her-1 are without effect on XX animals, but the her-2 mutation prevents sperm production in both XX and XO animals, in addition to its effect on the sexual phenotype of XO animals. The epistatic relationships between tra and her genes are used to deduce a model for the action of these genes in controlling sex determination. PMID:7262542

  10. Temperature dependence of contact resistance at metal/MWNT interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang-Eui; Moon, Kyoung-Seok; Sohn, Yoonchul, E-mail: yoonchul.son@samsung.com [Materials Research Center, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Samsung Electronics, Suwon 443-803 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-11

    Although contact resistance of carbon nanotube (CNT) is one of the most important factors for practical application of electronic devices, a study regarding temperature dependence on contact resistance of CNTs with metal electrodes has not been found. Here, we report an investigation of contact resistance at multiwalled nanotube (MWNT)/Ag interface as a function of temperature, using MWNT/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite. Electrical resistance of MWNT/PDMS composite revealed negative temperature coefficient (NTC). Excluding the contact resistance with Ag electrode, the NTC effect became less pronounced, showing lower intrinsic resistivity with the activation energy of 0.019 eV. Activation energy of the contact resistance of MWNT/Ag interface was determined to be 0.04 eV, two times larger than that of MWNT-MWNT network. The increase in the thermal fluctuation assisted electron tunneling is attributed to conductivity enhancement at both MWNT/MWNT and MWNT/Ag interfaces with increasing temperature.

  11. Experimental support for multiple-locus complementary sex determination in the parasitoid Cotesia vestalis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, de J.G.; Ode, P.J.; Rendahl, A.K.; Vet, L.E.M.; Whitfield, J.B.; Heimpel, G.E.

    2008-01-01

    Despite its fundamental role in development, sex determination is highly diverse among animals. Approximately 20% of all animals are haplodiploid, with haploid males and diploid females. Haplodiploid species exhibit diverse but poorly understood mechanisms of sex determination. Some hymenopteran

  12. Experimental Support for Multiple-Locus Complementary Sex Determination in the Parasitoid Cotesia vestalis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Jetske G.; Ode, Paul J.; Rendahl, Aaron K.; Vet, Louise E. M.; Whitfield, James B.; Heimpel, George E.

    2008-01-01

    Despite its fundamental role in development, sex determination is highly diverse among animals. Approximately 20% of all animals are haplodiploid, With haploid males and diploid females. Haplodiploid species exhibit diverse but poorly understood mechanisms of sex determination. Some hymenopteran

  13. Comparative In silico Study of Sex-Determining Region Y (SRY Protein Sequences Involved in Sex-Determining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoume Vakili Azghandi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The SRY gene (SRY provides instructions for making a transcription factor called the sex-determining region Y protein. The sex-determining region Y protein causes a fetus to develop as a male. In this study, SRY of 15 spices included of human, chimpanzee, dog, pig, rat, cattle, buffalo, goat, sheep, horse, zebra, frog, urial, dolphin and killer whale were used for determine of bioinformatic differences. Methods: Nucleotide sequences of SRY were retrieved from the NCBI databank. Bioinformatic analysis of SRY is done by CLC Main Workbench version 5.5 and ClustalW (http:/www.ebi.ac.uk/clustalw/ and MEGA6 softwares. Results: The multiple sequence alignment results indicated that SRY protein sequences from Orcinus orca (killer whale and Tursiopsaduncus (dolphin have least genetic distance of 0.33 in these 15 species and are 99.67% identical at the amino acid level. Homosapiens and Pantroglodytes (chimpanzee have the next lowest genetic distance of 1.35 and are 98.65% identical at the amino acid level. Conclusion: These findings indicate that the SRY proteins are conserved in the 15 species, and their evolutionary relationships are similar.

  14. Maintenance of polygenic sex determination in a fluctuating environment: an individual-based model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, A W; Anholt, B R

    2017-05-01

    R. A. Fisher predicted that individuals should invest equally in offspring of both sexes, and that the proportion of males and females produced (the primary sex ratio) should evolve towards 1:1 when unconstrained. For many species, sex determination is dependent on sex chromosomes, creating a strong tendency for balanced sex ratios, but in other cases, multiple autosomal genes interact to determine sex. In such cases, the maintenance of multiple sex-determining alleles at multiple loci and the consequent among-family variability in sex ratios presents a puzzle, as theory predicts that such systems should be unstable. Theory also predicts that environmental influences on sex can complicate outcomes of genetic sex determination, and that population structure may play a role. Tigriopus californicus, a copepod that lives in splash-pool metapopulations and exhibits polygenic and environment-dependent sex determination, presents a test case for relevant theory. We use this species as a model for parameterizing an individual-based simulation to investigate conditions that could maintain polygenic sex determination. We find that metapopulation structure can delay the degradation of polygenic sex determination and that periods of alternating frequency-dependent selection, imposed by seasonal fluctuations in environmental conditions, can maintain polygenic sex determination indefinitely. © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  15. Inclusion of temperature dependent shell corrections in Landau ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Landau theory used for studying hot rotating nuclei usually uses zero temperature Struti- nsky smoothed total energy for the temperature dependent shell corrections. This is replaced in this work by the temperature dependent Strutinsky smoothed free energy. Our results show that this re- placement has only ...

  16. Inclusion of temperature dependent shell corrections in Landau ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Landau theory used for studying hot rotating nuclei usually uses zero temperature Strutinsky smoothed total energy for the temperature dependent shell corrections. This is replaced in this work by the temperature dependent Strutinsky smoothed free energy. Our results show that this replacement has only marginal effect for ...

  17. Temperature dependence of ferromagnetic resonance measurements in nanostructured line arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raposo V.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the effect of temperature on the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR spectra of nanostructured line arrays. Different temperature dependences are observed for permalloy an nickel based samples. The qualitative features of the temperature dependence of the resonance field and linewidth can be described by the usual expression of slow relaxing linewidth mechanism and Bloch equation.

  18. Temperature dependence of the magnetization of canted spin structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Henrik; Lefmann, Kim; Brok, Erik

    2012-01-01

    for the temperature dependence of the magnetization of a simple canted spin structure in which relaxation can take place at finite temperatures between spin configurations with different canting angles. We show that the saturation magnetization may either decrease or increase with decreasing temperature, depending...

  19. Evolutionary transitions between sex-determining mechanisms: a review of theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Doorn, G S

    2014-01-01

    The extraordinary diversity of sex-determining mechanisms found in nature is thought to have arisen by the addition, modification or replacement of regulators at the upstream end of the sex-determining pathway. The spread of a novel regulator of sex determination can manifest itself by an evolutionary transition between environmental and genetic sex determination, for example, or between male and female heterogamety. Both kinds of transition have occurred frequently in the course of evolution. In this paper, various evolutionary forces acting on sex-determining mutations that can bias transitions in one direction or the other are reviewed. Furthermore, the adaptive significance of the main modes of sex determination are discussed, and the common principle underlying ultimate explanations for environmental sex determination, genetic sex determination and maternal control over sex determination in the offspring are highlighted. Most of the current theory concentrates on the population-genetic aspects of sex determination transitions, using models that do not reflect the developmental mechanisms involved in sex determination. However, the increasing availability of molecular data creates opportunities for the future development of mechanistic models that will further clarify how selection and developmental architecture interact to direct the evolution of sex determination genes. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Evolutionary transitions between sex-determining mechanisms : A review of theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doorn, G. S.

    2014-01-01

    The extraordinary diversity of sex-determining mechanisms found in nature is thought to have arisen by the addition, modification or replacement of regulators at the upstream end of the sex-determining pathway. The spread of a novel regulator of sex determination can manifest itself by an

  1. RNAi-Mediated Gene Silencing in a Gonad Organ Culture to Study Sex Determination Mechanisms in Sea Turtle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifuentes-Romero, Itzel; Merchant-Larios, Horacio; Milton, Sarah L.; Moreno-Mendoza, Norma; Díaz-Hernández, Verónica; García-Gasca, Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    The autosomal Sry-related gene, Sox9, encodes a transcription factor, which performs an important role in testis differentiation in mammals. In several reptiles, Sox9 is differentially expressed in gonads, showing a significant upregulation during the thermo-sensitive period (TSP) at the male-promoting temperature, consistent with the idea that SOX9 plays a central role in the male pathway. However, in spite of numerous studies, it remains unclear how SOX9 functions during this event. In the present work, we developed an RNAi-based method for silencing Sox9 in an in vitro gonad culture system for the sea turtle, Lepidochelys olivacea. Gonads were dissected as soon as the embryos entered the TSP and were maintained in organ culture. Transfection of siRNA resulted in the decrease of both Sox9 mRNA and protein. Furthermore, we found coordinated expression patterns for Sox9 and the anti-Müllerian hormone gene, Amh, suggesting that SOX9 could directly or indirectly regulate Amh expression, as it occurs in mammals. These results demonstrate an in vitro method to knockdown endogenous genes in gonads from a sea turtle, which represents a novel approach to investigate the roles of important genes involved in sex determination or differentiation pathways in species with temperature-dependent sex determination. PMID:24705165

  2. RNAi-Mediated Gene Silencing in a Gonad Organ Culture to Study Sex Determination Mechanisms in Sea Turtle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra García-Gasca

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The autosomal Sry-related gene, Sox9, encodes a transcription factor, which performs an important role in testis differentiation in mammals. In several reptiles, Sox9 is differentially expressed in gonads, showing a significant upregulation during the thermo-sensitive period (TSP at the male-promoting temperature, consistent with the idea that SOX9 plays a central role in the male pathway. However, in spite of numerous studies, it remains unclear how SOX9 functions during this event. In the present work, we developed an RNAi-based method for silencing Sox9 in an in vitro gonad culture system for the sea turtle, Lepidochelys olivacea. Gonads were dissected as soon as the embryos entered the TSP and were maintained in organ culture. Transfection of siRNA resulted in the decrease of both Sox9 mRNA and protein. Furthermore, we found coordinated expression patterns for Sox9 and the anti-Müllerian hormone gene, Amh, suggesting that SOX9 could directly or indirectly regulate Amh expression, as it occurs in mammals. These results demonstrate an in vitro method to knockdown endogenous genes in gonads from a sea turtle, which represents a novel approach to investigate the roles of important genes involved in sex determination or differentiation pathways in species with temperature-dependent sex determination.

  3. Expression of the sex determining cascade genes Sex-lethal and doublesex in the phorid fly Megaselia scalaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievert, V; Kuhn, S; Traut, W

    1997-04-01

    Sex-lethal (Sxl) and doublesex (dsx) are known to represent parts of the sex-determining cascade in Drosophila melanogaster. We generated cDNA probes of the homologous genes from Megaselia scalaris, a fly species with an epistatic maleness factor as the primary sex determining signal. In Northern blot hybridization of poly(A)+ RNA, the M. scalaris dsx probe detected two bands, one of which had a sex-specific size difference, while the Sxl probe bound to RNAs of equal size in females and males. RT-PCR showed Sxl to be transcribed in gonads of adult females and males but not in somatic tissues. Thus, while dsx appears to have a similar function in M. scalaris and D. melanogaster, Sxl does not. The results suggest that the sex-determining pathway of M. scalaris joins that of D. melanogaster between the Sxl and dsx steps.

  4. Sex determination in Madagascar geckos of the genus Paroedura (Squamata: Gekkonidae): are differentiated sex chromosomes indeed so evolutionary stable?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koubová, M.; Johnson Pokorná, Martina; Rovatsos, M.; Farkačová, K.; Altmanová, M.; Kratochvíl, L.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 4 (2014), s. 441-452 ISSN 0967-3849 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP506/10/0718 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : sex chromosomes * heterochromatin * reptiles * sex determination * FISH * ITSs Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 2.478, year: 2014

  5. Sex determination in the fly Megaselia scalaris, a model system for primary steps of sex chromosome evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traut, W

    1994-03-01

    The fly Megaselia scalaris Loew possesses three homomorphic chromosome pairs; 2 is the sex chromosome pair in two wild-type laboratory stocks of different geographic origin (designated "original" sex chromosome pair in this paper). The primary male-determining function moves at a very low rate to other chromosomes, thereby creating new Y chromosomes. Random amplified polymorphic DNA markers obtained by polymerase chain reaction with single decamer primers and a few available phenotypic markers were used in testcrosses to localize the sex-determining loci and to define the new sex chromosomes. Four cases are presented in which the primary male-determining function had been transferred from the original Y chromosome to a new locus either on one of the autosomes or on the original X chromosome, presumably by transposition. In these cases, the sex-determining function had moved to a different locus without an obvious cotransfer of other Y chromosome markers. Thus, with Megaselia we are afforded an experimental system to study the otherwise hypothetical primary stages of sex chromosome evolution. An initial molecular differentiation is apparent even in the new sex chromosomes. Molecular differences between the original X and Y chromosomes illustrate a slightly more advanced stage of sex chromosome evolution.

  6. Distance and sex determine host plant choice by herbivorous beetles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Ballhorn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plants respond to herbivore damage with the release of volatile organic compounds (VOCs. This indirect defense can cause ecological costs when herbivores themselves use VOCs as cues to localize suitable host plants. Can VOCs reliably indicate food plant quality to herbivores? METHODOLOGY: We determined the choice behavior of herbivorous beetles (Chrysomelidae: Gynandrobrotica guerreroensis and Cerotoma ruficornis when facing lima bean plants (Fabaceae: Phaseolus lunatus with different cyanogenic potential, which is an important constitutive direct defense. Expression of inducible indirect defenses was experimentally manipulated by jasmonic acid treatment at different concentrations. The long-distance responses of male and female beetles to the resulting induced plant volatiles were investigated in olfactometer and free-flight experiments and compared to the short-distance decisions of the same beetles in feeding trials. CONCLUSION: Female beetles of both species were repelled by VOCs released from all induced plants independent of the level of induction. In contrast, male beetles were repelled by strongly induced plants, showed no significant differences in choice behavior towards moderately induced plants, but responded positively to VOCs released from little induced plants. Thus, beetle sex and plant VOCs had a significant effect on host searching behavior. By contrast, feeding behavior of both sexes was strongly determined by the cyanogenic potential of leaves, although females again responded more sensitively than males. Apparently, VOCs mainly provide information to these beetles that are not directly related to food quality. Being induced by herbivory and involved in indirect plant defense, such VOCs might indicate the presence of competitors and predators to herbivores. We conclude that plant quality as a food source and finding a potentially enemy-free space is more important for female than for male insect herbivores

  7. Modeling temperature dependence of trace element concentrations in groundwater using temperature dependent distribution coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, H.; Saito, T.; Hamamoto, S.; Komatsu, T.

    2015-12-01

    In our previous study, we have observed trace element concentrations in groundwater increased when groundwater temperature was increased with constant thermal loading using a 50-m long vertical heat exchanger installed at Saitama University, Japan. During the field experiment, 38 degree C fluid was circulated in the heat exchanger resulting 2.8 kW thermal loading over 295 days. Groundwater samples were collected regularly from 17-m and 40-m deep aquifers at four observation wells located 1, 2, 5, and 10 m, respectively, from the heat exchange well and were analyzed with ICP-MS. As a result, concentrations of some trace elements such as boron increased with temperature especially at the 17-m deep aquifer that is known as marine sediment. It has been also observed that the increased concentrations have decreased after the thermal loading was terminated indicating that this phenomenon may be reversible. Although the mechanism is not fully understood, changes in the liquid phase concentration should be associated with dissolution and/or desorption from the solid phase. We therefore attempt to model this phenomenon by introducing temperature dependence in equilibrium linear adsorption isotherms. We assumed that distribution coefficients decrease with temperature so that the liquid phase concentration of a given element becomes higher as the temperature increases under the condition that the total mass stays constant. A shape function was developed to model the temperature dependence of the distribution coefficient. By solving the mass balance equation between the liquid phase and the solid phase for a given element, a new term describing changes in the concentration was implemented in a source/sink term of a standard convection dispersion equation (CDE). The CDE was then solved under a constant ground water flow using FlexPDE. By calibrating parameters in the newly developed shape function, the changes in element concentrations observed were quite well predicted. The

  8. Cytogenetic Insights into the Evolution of Chromosomes and Sex Determination Reveal Striking Homology of Turtle Sex Chromosomes to Amphibian Autosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel, Eugenia E; Badenhorst, Daleen; Lee, Ling S; Literman, Robert; Trifonov, Vladimir; Valenzuela, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Turtle karyotypes are highly conserved compared to other vertebrates; yet, variation in diploid number (2n = 26-68) reflects profound genomic reorganization, which correlates with evolutionary turnovers in sex determination. We evaluate the published literature and newly collected comparative cytogenetic data (G- and C-banding, 18S-NOR, and telomere-FISH mapping) from 13 species spanning 2n = 28-68 to revisit turtle genome evolution and sex determination. Interstitial telomeric sites were detected in multiple lineages that underwent diploid number and sex determination turnovers, suggesting chromosomal rearrangements. C-banding revealed potential interspecific variation in centromere composition and interstitial heterochromatin at secondary constrictions. 18S-NORs were detected in secondary constrictions in a single chromosomal pair per species, refuting previous reports of multiple NORs in turtles. 18S-NORs are linked to ZW chromosomes in Apalone and Pelodiscus and to X (not Y) in Staurotypus. Notably, comparative genomics across amniotes revealed that the sex chromosomes of several turtles, as well as mammals and some lizards, are homologous to components of Xenopus tropicalis XTR1 (carrying Dmrt1). Other turtle sex chromosomes are homologous to XTR4 (carrying Wt1). Interestingly, all known turtle sex chromosomes, except in Trionychidae, evolved via inversions around Dmrt1 or Wt1. Thus, XTR1 appears to represent an amniote proto-sex chromosome (perhaps linked ancestrally to XTR4) that gave rise to turtle and other amniote sex chromosomes. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Disentangling genetic vs. environmental causes of sex determination in the common frog, Rana temporaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merilä Juha

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding of sex ratio dynamics in a given species requires understanding its sex determination system, as well as access for reliable tools for sex identification at different life stages. As in the case of many other amphibians, the common frogs (Rana temporaria do not have well differentiated sex chromosomes, and an identification of individuals' genetic sex may be complicated by sex reversals. Here, we report results of studies shedding light on the sex determination system and sex ratio variation in this species. Results A microsatellite locus RtSB03 was found to be sex-linked in four geographically disparate populations, suggesting male heterogamy in common frogs. However, in three other populations examined, no or little evidence for sex-linkage was detected suggesting either ongoing/recent recombination events, and/or frequent sex-reversals. Comparison of inheritance patterns of alleles in RtSB03 and phenotypic sex within sibships revealed a mixed evidence for sex-linkage: all individuals with male phenotype carried a male specific allele in one population, whereas results were more mixed in another population. Conclusion These results make sense only if we assume that the RtSB03 locus is linked to male sex determination factor in some, but not in all common frog populations, and if phenotypic sex-reversals – for which there is earlier evidence from this species – are frequently occurring.

  10. Field study suggests that sex determination in sea lamprey is directly influenced by larval growth rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nicholas; Swink, William D.; Brenden, Travis O.

    2017-01-01

    Sex determination mechanisms in fishes lie along a genetic-environmental continuum and thereby offer opportunities to understand how physiology and environment interact to determine sex. Mechanisms and ecological consequences of sex determination in fishes are primarily garnered from teleosts, with little investigation into basal fishes. We tagged and released larval sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) into unproductive lake and productive stream environments. Sex ratios produced from these environments were quantified by recapturing tagged individuals as adults. Sex ratios from unproductive and productive environments were initially similar. However, sex ratios soon diverged, with unproductive environments becoming increasingly male-skewed and productive environments becoming less male-skewed with time. We hypothesize that slower growth in unproductive environments contributed to the sex ratio differences by directly influencing sex determination. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study suggesting that growth rate in a fish species directly influences sex determination; other studies have suggested that the environmental variables to which sex determination is sensitive (e.g. density, temperature) act as cues for favourable or unfavourable growth conditions. Understanding mechanisms of sex determination in lampreys may provide unique insight into the underlying principles of sex determination in other vertebrates and provide innovative approaches for their management where valued and invasive.

  11. Temperature Dependence in Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGraw R. L.; Winkler, P. M.; Wagner, P. E.

    2017-08-01

    Heterogeneous nucleation on stable (sub-2 nm) nuclei aids the formation of atmospheric cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) by circumventing or reducing vapor pressure barriers that would otherwise limit condensation and new particle growth. Aerosol and cloud formation depend largely on the interaction between a condensing liquid and the nucleating site. A new paper published this year reports the first direct experimental determination of contact angles as well as contact line curvature and other geometric properties of a spherical cap nucleus at nanometer scale using measurements from the Vienna Size Analyzing Nucleus Counter (SANC) (Winkler et al., 2016). For water nucleating heterogeneously on silver oxide nanoparticles we find contact angles around 15 degrees compared to around 90 degrees for the macroscopically measured equilibrium angle for water on bulk silver. The small microscopic contact angles can be attributed via the generalized Young equation to a negative line tension that becomes increasingly dominant with increasing curvature of the contact line. These results enable a consistent theoretical description of heterogeneous nucleation and provide firm insight to the wetting of nanosized objects.

  12. Temperature dependence of 1H NMR chemical shifts and its influence on estimated metabolite concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wermter, Felizitas C; Mitschke, Nico; Bock, Christian; Dreher, Wolfgang

    2017-07-06

    Temperature dependent chemical shifts of important brain metabolites measured by localised 1H MRS were investigated to test how the use of incorrect prior knowledge on chemical shifts impairs the quantification of metabolite concentrations. Phantom measurements on solutions containing 11 metabolites were performed on a 7 T scanner between 1 and 43 °C. The temperature dependence of the chemical shift differences was fitted by a linear model. Spectra were simulated for different temperatures and analysed by the AQSES program (jMRUI 5.2) using model functions with chemical shift values for 37 °C. Large differences in the temperature dependence of the chemical shift differences were determined with a maximum slope of about ±7.5 × 10-4 ppm/K. For 32-40 °C, only minor quantification errors resulted from using incorrect chemical shifts, with the exception of Cr and PCr. For 1-10 °C considerable quantification errors occurred if the temperature dependence of the chemical shifts was neglected. If 1H MRS measurements are not performed at 37 °C, for which the published chemical shift values have been determined, the temperature dependence of chemical shifts should be considered to avoid systematic quantification errors, particularly for measurements on animal models at lower temperatures.

  13. Competitive interactions modify the temperature dependence of damselfly growth rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson-Ortman, Viktor; Stoks, Robby; Johansson, Frank

    2014-05-01

    Individual growth rates and survival are major determinants of individual fitness, population size structure, and community dynamics. The relationships between growth rate, survival, and temperature may thus be important for predicting biological responses to climate change. Although it is well known that growth rates and survival are affected by competition and predation in addition to temperature, the combined effect of these factors on growth rates, survival, and size structure has rarely been investigated simultaneously in the same ecological system. To address this question, we conducted experiments on the larvae of two species of damselflies and determined the temperature dependence of growth rate, survival, and cohort size structure under three scenarios of increasing ecological complexity: no competition, intraspecific competition, and interspecific competition. In one species, the relationship between growth rate and temperature became steeper in the presence of competitors, whereas that of survival remained unchanged. In the other species, the relationship between growth rate and temperature was unaffected by competitive interactions, but survival was greatly reduced at high temperatures in the presence of interspecific competitors. The combined effect of competitive interactions and temperature on cohort size structure differed from the effects of these factors in isolation. Together, these findings suggest that it will be challenging to scale up information from single-species laboratory studies to the population and community level.

  14. Hysteresis and Temperature Dependency of Moisture Sorption – New Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that sorption characteristics of building materials exhibit hysteresis in the way the equilibrium curves develop between adsorption and desorption, and that the sorption curves are also somewhat temperature dependent. However, these two facts are most often neglected in models...... measurements of hysteresis and temperature dependency of the moisture sorption characteristics of three different porous building materials: aerated concrete, cement paste and spruce. Scanning curves are measured for all three materials where periods with adsorption and desorption interrupt each other...

  15. Motivational Determinants of Status Aspirations: Comments on Sex Variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picou, J. Steven; Howard, William G.

    The impact of sex-role socialization on career-related status orientations was examined in an attempt to specify, by sex, differential reference group influence and motivational variations. Data were derived from a larger data-set on mobility and achievement orientations of a random sample of 1970 senior students stratified according to residence…

  16. Genes involved in sex determination and the influence of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recent surveys show the use of temperature as alternative to the process of sex reversal. However, high or low temperatures have limited effect, in addition to there being a window of sex reversal in which temperature acts, varying from species to species. Thus, we draw a parallel with the role of temperature in the process ...

  17. Breeding Sex Ratios in Adult Leatherback Turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) May Compensate for Female-Biased Hatchling Sex Ratios

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Kelly R.; Dutton, Peter H.

    2014-01-01

    For vertebrates with temperature-dependent sex determination, primary (or hatchling) sex ratios are often skewed, an issue of particular relevance to concerns over effects of climate change on populations. However, the ratio of breeding males to females, or the operational sex ratio (OSR), is important to understand because it has consequences for population demographics and determines the capacity of a species to persist. The OSR also affects mating behaviors and mate choice, depending on th...

  18. Determinants of food label use differ by sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stran, Kimberly A; Knol, Linda L

    2013-05-01

    Although the Nutrition Facts label has been a requirement on food packages for more than 20 years, few studies have conducted comprehensive assessments of food label use. The purpose of this study was to assess the demographic and psychosocial correlates of food label use using a comprehensive approach. A sample of 1,382 males and females (n=573 and n=809, respectively) aged 19 to 70 years was drawn from the 2005-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The food label Check and Use subscales are the sums of multiple questions on frequency of checking and using each separate component on a Nutrition Facts label. Multiple linear regression was used to assess differences in predictors of Check and Use. Determinants of food label use differed by sex. Women check and use food label components more often and thoroughly than men. Older adults and adults with good diet-quality perception were significant predictors of food label use for both men and women. Race was a significant predictor for men only. Mexican-American and other Hispanic groups check (P=0.03) and use (P=0.01) the food label more frequently than non-Hispanic white men. Men who do not receive Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits also check (Pfood labels more frequently than those who receive assistance. The findings of this study could be used to improve nutrition education efforts. It may be beneficial to target men and women separately, as food label use determinants are different. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Selecting Temperature for Protein Crystallization Screens Using the Temperature Dependence of the Second Virial Coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Yin, Da-Chuan; Guo, Yun-Zhu; Wang, Xi-Kai; Xie, Si-Xiao; Lu, Qin-Qin; Liu, Yong-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Protein crystals usually grow at a preferable temperature which is however not known for a new protein. This paper reports a new approach for determination of favorable crystallization temperature, which can be adopted to facilitate the crystallization screening process. By taking advantage of the correlation between the temperature dependence of the second virial coefficient (B22) and the solubility of protein, we measured the temperature dependence of B22 to predict the temperature dependence of the solubility. Using information about solubility versus temperature, a preferred crystallization temperature can be proposed. If B22 is a positive function of the temperature, a lower crystallization temperature is recommended; if B22 shows opposite behavior with respect to the temperature, a higher crystallization temperature is preferred. Otherwise, any temperature in the tested range can be used. PMID:21479212

  20. Temperature dependence of the ClONO{sub 2} UV absorption spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkholder, J.B.; Talukdar, R.K.; Ravishankara, A.R. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1994-04-01

    The temperature dependence of the ClONO{sub 2} absorption spectrum has been measured between 220 and 298 K and between 195 and 430 nm using a diode array spectrometer. The absorption cross sections were determined using both: (1) absolute pressure measurements at 296 K and (2) measurements at various temperatures relative to 296 K using a dual absorption cell arrangement. The temperature dependence of the ClONO{sub 2} absorption spectrum shows very broad structure. The amplitude of the temperature dependence relative to that at 296 K is weak at short wavelengths, < 2% at 215 nm and 220 K, but significant at the wavelengths important in the stratosphere, {approximately} 30% at 325 nm and 220 K. The authors ClONO{sub 2} absorption cross section data are in good general agreement with the previous measurements of Molina and Molina.

  1. Temperature dependence of the ClONO2 UV absorption spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholder, James B.; Talukdar, Ranajit K.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the ClONO2 absorption spectrum has been measured between 220 and 298 K and between 195 and 430 nm using a diode array spectrometer. The absorption cross sections were determined using both: (1) absolute pressure measurements at 296 K and (2) measurements at various temperatures relative to 296 K using a dual absorption cell arrangement. The temperature dependence of the ClONO2 absorption spectrum shows very broad structure. The amplitude of the temperature dependence relative to that at 296 K is weak at short wavelengths, less than 2% at 215 nm and 220 K, but significant at the wavelengths important in the stratosphere, about 30% at 325 nm and 220 K. Our ClONO2 absorption cross section data are in good general agreement with the previous measurements of Molina and Molina (1979).

  2. Sex determination of duck embryos: observations on syrinx development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robert E.; Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Franson, J. Christian

    2013-01-01

    Ducks exhibit sexual dimorphism in vocal anatomy. Asymmetrical ossification of the syrinx (bulla syringealis) is discernable at about 10 days of age in male Pekin duck (Anas platyrhynchos domestica) embryos, but information is lacking on the early development of the bulla in wild ducks. To evaluate the reliability of this characteristic for sexing developing embryos, we examined the syrinx of dead embryos and compared results with molecular sexing techniques in high arctic nesting Common Eiders (Somateria mollissima). Embryos 8 days or older were accurately (100%) sexed based on the presence/absence of a bulla, 2 days earlier than Pekin duck. The use of the tracheal bulla can be a valuable technique when sex identification of embryos or young ducklings is required.

  3. Sex and ancestry determine the free-running circadian period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, Charmane I; Tomaka, Victoria A; Crowley, Stephanie J

    2017-10-01

    The endogenous, free-running circadian period (τ) determines the phase relationship that an organism assumes when entrained to the 24-h day. We found a shorter circadian period in African Americans compared to non-Hispanic European Americans (24.07 versus 24.33 h). We speculate that a short circadian period, closer to 24 h, was advantageous to humans living around the equator, but when humans migrated North out of Africa, where the photoperiod changes with seasons, natural selection favoured people with longer circadian periods. Recently, in evolutionary terms, immigrants came from Europe and Africa to America ('the New World'). The Europeans were descendents of people who had lived in Europe for thousands of years with changing photoperiods (and presumably longer periods), whereas Africans had ancestors who had always lived around the equator (with shorter periods). It may have been advantageous to have a longer circadian period while living in Europe early in the evolution of humans. In our modern world, however, it is better to have a shorter period, because it helps make our circadian rhythms earlier, which is adaptive in our early-bird-dominated society. European American women had a shorter circadian period than men (24.24 versus 24.41), but there was no sex difference in African Americans (24.07 for both men and women). We speculate that selection pressures in Europe made men develop a slightly longer period than women to help them track dawn which could be useful for hunters, but less important for women as gatherers. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Sleep Research published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Sleep Research Society.

  4. A simple equation for describing the temperature dependent growth of free-floating macrophytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heide, van Tj.; Roijackers, R.M.M.; Nes, van E.H.; Peeters, E.T.H.M.

    2006-01-01

    Temperature is one of the most important factors determining growth rates of free-floating macrophytes in the field. To analyse and predict temperature dependent growth rates of these pleustophytes, modelling may play an important role. Several equations have been published for describing

  5. Observed and simulated temperature dependence of the liquid water path of low clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Genio, A.D.; Wolf, A.B. [NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, NY (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Data being acquired at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site can be used to examine the factors determining the temperature dependence of cloud optical thickness. We focus on cloud liquid water and physical thickness variations which can be derived from existing ARM measurements.

  6. Temperature dependent optical properties of PbS nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, M N; Li, Juerong; Clowes, S K; Curry, R J

    2012-07-11

    A comprehensive study of the optical properties of PbS nanocrystals (NCs) is reported that includes the temperature dependent absorption, photoluminescence (PL) and PL lifetime in the range of 3-300 K. The absorption and PL are found to display different temperature dependent behaviour though both redshift as temperature is reduced. This results in a temperature dependent Stokes shift which increases from ∼75 meV at 300 K with reducing temperature until saturating at ∼130 meV below ∼150 K prior to a small reduction to 125 meV upon cooling from 25 to 3 K. The PL lifetime is found to be single exponential at 3 K with a lifetime of τ(1) = 6.5 μs. Above 3 K biexponential behaviour is observed with the lifetime for each process displaying a different temperature dependence. The Stokes shift is modelled using a three-level rate equation model incorporating temperature dependent parameter values obtained via fitting phenomenological relationships to the observed absorption and PL behaviour. This results in a predicted energy difference between the two emitting states of ∼6 meV which is close to the excitonic exchange energy splitting predicted theoretically for these systems.

  7. Determinants of Heterosexual Adolescents Having Sex with Female Sex Workers in Singapore.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junice Y S Ng

    Full Text Available We assessed the proportion of and socio-ecological factors associated with ever having had sex with female sex workers (FSWs among heterosexual adolescents. We also described the characteristics of the adolescents who reported inconsistent condom use with FSWs.This is a cross-sectional study (response rate: 73% of 300 heterosexually active male adolescents of 16 to 19 years attending a national STI clinic in Singapore between 2009 and 2014. We assessed the ecological factors (individual, parental, peer, school and medial influences and sexual risk behaviors using a self-reported questionnaire. Poisson regression was used to obtain the adjusted prevalence ratios (aPR and confidence intervals (CI.The proportion of heterosexual male adolescents who had ever had sex with FSWs was 39%. Multivariate analysis showed that significant factors associated with ever having had sex with FSWs were sex initiation before 16 years old (aPR 1.79 CI: 1.30-2.46, never had a sexually active girlfriend (aPR 1.75 CI 1.28-2.38, reported lower self-esteem score (aPR 0.96 CI: 0.93-0.98, higher rebelliousness score (aPR 1.03 CI: 1.00-1.07 and more frequent viewing of pornography (aPR 1.47 CI: 1.04-2.09. Lifetime inconsistent condom use with FSWs was 30%.A significant proportion of heterosexual male adolescents attending the public STI clinic had ever had sex with FSWs. A targeted intervention that addresses different levels of influence to this behavior is needed. This is even more so because a considerable proportion of adolescents reported inconsistent condom use with FSWs, who may serve as a bridge of STI transmission to the community. National surveys on adolescent health should include the assessment of frequency of commercial sex visits and condom use with FSWs for long-term monitoring and surveillance.

  8. Nuclear genes with sex bias in Ruditapes philippinarum (Bivalvia, veneridae): Mitochondrial inheritance and sex determination in DUI species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Liliana; Ghiselli, Fabrizio; Nuzhdin, Sergey V; Passamonti, Marco

    2013-11-01

    Mitochondria are inherited maternally in most metazoans, but in bivalves with Doubly Uniparental Inheritance (DUI) a mitochondrial lineage is transmitted through eggs (F-type), and another through sperm (M-type). In DUI species, a sex-ratio distortion of the progeny was observed: some females produce a female-biased offspring (female-biased family), others a male-biased progeny (male-biased family), and others a 50:50 sex-ratio. A peculiar segregation pattern of M-type mitochondria in DUI organisms appears to be correlated with the sex bias of these families. According to a proposed model for the inheritance of M-type mitochondria in DUI, the transmission of sperm mitochondria is controlled by three nuclear genes, named W, X, and Z. An additional S gene with different dosage effect would be involved in sex determination. In this study, we analyzed structure and localization of three transcripts (psa, birc, and anubl1) with specific sex and family biases in the Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum. In situ hybridization confirmed the localization of these transcripts in gametogenic cells. In other animals, homologs of these genes are involved in reproduction and ubiquitination. We hypothesized that these genes may have a role in sex determination and could also be responsible for the maintenance/degradation of spermatozoon mitochondria during embryo development of the DUI species R. philippinarum, so that we propose them as candidate factors of the W/X/Z/S system. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Temperature-dependent dispersion model of float zone crystalline silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franta, Daniel; Dubroka, Adam; Wang, Chennan; Giglia, Angelo; Vohánka, Jirí; Franta, Pavel; Ohlídal, Ivan

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we present the temperature dependent dispersion model of float zone crystalline silicon. The theoretical background for valence electronic excitations is introduced in the theoretical part of this paper. This model is based on application of sum rules and parametrization of transition strength functions corresponding to the individual elementary phonon and electronic excitations. The parameters of the model are determined by fitting ellipsometric and spectrophotometric experimental data in the spectral range from far infrared (70 cm-1) to extreme ultraviolet (40 eV). The ellipsometric data were measured in the temperature range 5-700 K. The excitations of the valence electrons to the conduction band are divided into the indirect and direct electronic transitions. The indirect transitions are modeled by truncated Lorentzian terms, whereas the direct transitions are modeled using Gaussian broadened piecewise smooth functions representing 3D and 2D van Hove singularities modified by excitonic effects. Since the experimental data up to high energies (40 eV) are available, we are able to determine the value of the effective number of valence electrons. The Tauc-Lorentz dispersion model is used for modeling high energy electron excitations. Two slightly different values of the effective number of valence electrons are obtained for the Jellison-Modine (4.51) and Campi-Coriasso (4.37) parametrization. Our goal is to obtain the model of dielectric response of crystalline silicon which depends only on photon energy, temperature and small number of material parameters, e.g. the concentration of substituted carbon and interstitial oxygen. The model presented in this paper is accurate enough to replace tabulated values of c-Si optical constants used in the optical characterization of thin films diposited on silicon substrates. The spectral dependencies of the optical constants obtained in our work are compared to results obtained by other authors.

  10. BUCKLING OF A COLUMN WITH TEMPERATURE DEPENDENT MATERIAL PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer SOYKASAP

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Buckling of a column with temperature dependent material properties is investigated. Euler-Bernoulli theory of thin beams is used to derive the element matrices by means of the minimum potential energy principle. Temperature dependency of material properties is taken into account in the formulation. The column is divided into finite elements with the axial degrees of freedom defined at the outer fiber of the column. Column elements have simpler derivations and compact element matrices than those of classical beam-bending element. Some illustrative examples are presented to show the convergence of numerical results obtained by the use of new elements. The results are compared with those of the classical beam-bending element and analytical solution. The new element converges to the analytical results as powerful as the classical beam-bending element. The temperature effects on the buckling loads of the column with temperature dependent material properties are also examined.

  11. Temperature dependent climate projection deficiencies in CMIP5 models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jens H.; Boberg, Fredrik

    2012-01-01

    Monthly mean temperatures for 34 GCMs available from the CMIP5 project are compared with observations from CRU for 26 different land regions covering all major land areas in the world for the period 1961-2000 by means of quantile-quantile (q-q) diagrams. A warm period positive temperature dependent...... bias is identified for many of the models within many of the chosen climate regions. However, the exact temperature dependence varies considerably between the models. We analyse the role of this difference as a contributing factor for some models to project stronger regional warming than others...... that in general models with a positive temperature dependent bias tend to have a large projected temperature change, and these tendencies increase with increasing global warming level. We argue that this appears to be linked with the ability of models to capture complex feedbacks accurately. In particular land...

  12. On the Temperature Dependence of the UNIQUAC/UNIFAC Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjold-Jørgensen, Steen; Rasmussen, Peter; Fredenslund, Aage

    1980-01-01

    Local composition models for the description of the properties of liquid mixtures do not in general give an accurate representation of excess Gibbs energy and excess enthalpy simultaneously. The introduction of temperature dependent interaction parameters leads to considerable improvements...... of the simultaneous correlation. The temperature dependent parameters have, however, little physical meaning and very odd results are frequently obtained when the interaction parameters obtained from excess enthalpy information alone are used for the prediction of vapor-liquid equilibria. The UNIQUAC/UNIFAC models...... are modified in this work by the introduction of a general temperature dependence of the coordination number. The modified UNIQUAC/UNIFAC models are especially suited for the representation of mixtures containing non-associating components. The modified models contain the same number of interaction parameters...

  13. Zebrafish sex determination and differentiation: Involvement of FTZ-F1 genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olsson Per-Erik

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sex determination is the process deciding the sex of a developing embryo. This is usually determined genetically; however it is a delicate process, which in many cases can be influenced by environmental factors. The mechanisms controlling zebrafish sex determination and differentiation are not known. To date no sex linked genes have been identified in zebrafish and no sex chromosomes have been identified. However, a number of genes, as presented here, have been linked to the process of sex determination or differentiation in zebrafish. The zebrafish FTZ-F1 genes are of central interest as they are involved in regulating interrenal development and thereby steroid biosynthesis, as well as that they show expression patterns congruent with reproductive tissue differentiation and function. Zebrafish can be sex reversed by exposure to estrogens, suggesting that the estrogen levels are crucial during sex differentiation. The Cyp19 gene product aromatase converts testosterone into 17 beta-estradiol, and when inhibited leads to male to female sex reversal. FTZ-F1 genes are strongly linked to steroid biosynthesis and the regulatory region of Cyp19 contains binding sites for FTZ-F1 genes, further linking FTZ-F1 to this process. The role of FTZ-F1 and other candidates for zebrafish sex determination and differentiation is in focus of this review.

  14. The temperature dependent amide I band of crystalline acetanilide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruzeiro, Leonor [CCMAR, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Physics Department, FCT, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Freedman, Holly [CCMAR, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal)

    2013-10-01

    The temperature dependent anomalous peak in the amide I band of crystalline acetanilide is thought to be due to self-trapped states. On the contrary, according to the present model, the anomalous peak comes from the fraction of ACN molecules strongly hydrogen-bonded to a neighboring ACN molecule, and its intensity decreases because, on average, this fraction decreases as temperature increases. This model provides, for the first time, an integrated and theoretically consistent view of the temperature dependence of the full amide I band and a qualitative explanation of some of the features of nonlinear pump–probe experiments.

  15. The sex-determining gene doublesex in the fly Megaselia scalaris: conserved structure and sex-specific splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, S; Sievert, V; Traut, W

    2000-12-01

    The well-known sex-determining cascade of Drosophila melanogaster serves as a paradigm for the pathway to sexual development in insects. But the primary sex-determining signal and the subsequent step, Sex-lethal (Sxl), have been shown not to be functionally conserved in non-Drosophila flies. We isolated doublesex (dsx), which is a downstream step in the cascade, from the phorid fly Megaselia scalaris, which is a distant relative of D. melanogaster. Conserved properties, e.g., sex-specific splicing, structure of the female-specific 3' splice site, a splicing enhancer region with binding motifs for the TRA2/RBP1/TRA complex that activates female-specific splicing in Drosophila, and conserved domains for DNA-binding and oligomerization in the putative DSX protein, indicate functional conservation of dsx in M. scalaris. Hence, the dsx step of the sex-determining pathway appears to be conserved among flies and probably in an even wider group of insects, as the analysis of a published cDNA from the silkmoth indicates.

  16. Factors in the Determination of Intimate Same-Sex Friendship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Craig W.; Harwood, B. Thomas

    1977-01-01

    Five hundred unmarried male and female college students were administered a questionnaire and instructed to rate the importance of 39 variables in the formation of an intimate, same-sex friendship. Six factors emerged: Initial attraction, personableness, proximity, attitudinal similarity, intimate accessibility, and reciprocal candor. (BD)

  17. Determinant Factors of Attitude towards Quantitative Subjects: Differences between Sexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondejar-Jimenez, Jose; Vargas-Vargas, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays, almost all curricula in the social sciences contain at least one course in statistics, given the importance of this discipline as an analytical tool. This work identifies the latent factors relating to students' motivation and attitude towards statistics, tests their covariance structure for samples of both sexes, and identifies the…

  18. Children's Physical Attractiveness and Sex as Determinants of Adult Punitiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dion, Karen K.

    1974-01-01

    Two studies investigated the influence of a child's physical attractiveness and sex as potential elicitors of differential adult punitiveness. Assessed were the reactions of 40 women and 44 men. Results reveal differences in men's and women's reactions and suggest differences in their orientation towards children's task behavior. (Author/SDH)

  19. Socioeconomic status determines sex-dependent survival of human offspring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodegom, van D.; Rozing, M.P.; May, L.; Meij, H.J.; Thomese, F.; Zwaan, B.J.; Westendorp, R.G.J.

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives: In polygynous societies, rich men have many offspring through the marriage of multiple wives. Evolutionary, rich households would therefore benefit more from sons, and according to the Trivers–Willard hypothesis, parents invest more in offspring of the sex that has the

  20. Finding clues to the riddle of sex determination in zebrafish

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-02-11

    Feb 11, 2016 ... male development while one copy favours, but does not assure, female development. The female-to-male sex reversal observed could be due to the influence of environ- mental factors (nutrition, density etc.) and genome (and their effects on germ cell numbers) favouring male pathway. (Wilson et al. 2014).

  1. Determination of sex from the patella in a contemporary Spanish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckmann, Tanya R; Meek, Susan; Dilkie, Natasha; Rozendaal, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    The skull and pelvis have been used for the determination of sex for unknown human remains. However, in forensic cases where skeletal remains often exhibit postmortem damage and taphonomic changes the patella may be used for the determination of sex as it is a preservationally favoured bone. The goal of the present research was to derive discriminant function equations from the patella for estimation of sex from a contemporary Spanish population. Six parameters were measured on 106 individuals (55 males and 51 females), ranging in age from 22 to 85 years old, from the Granada Osteological Collection. The statistical analyses showed that all variables were sexually dimorphic. Discriminant function score equations were generated for use in sex determination. The overall accuracy of sex classification ranged from 75.2% to 84.8% for the direct method and 75.5%-83.8% for the stepwise method. When the South African White discriminant functions were applied to the Spanish sample they showed high accuracy rates for sexing female patellae (90%-95.9%) and low accuracy rates for sexing male patellae (52.7%-58.2%). When the South African Black discriminant functions were applied to the Spanish sample they showed high accuracy rates for sexing male patellae (90.9%) and low accuracy rates for sexing female patellae (70%-75.5%). The patella was shown to be useful for sex determination in the contemporary Spanish population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  2. Sex determination of human skeletal populations using latent profile analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passalacqua, Nicholas V; Zhang, Zhen; Pierce, Steven J

    2013-08-01

    Accurately estimating biological sex from the human skeleton can be especially difficult for fragmentary or incomplete remains often encountered in bioarchaeological contexts. Where typical anatomically dimorphic skeletal regions are incomplete or absent, observers often take their best guess to classify biological sex. Latent profile analysis (LPA) is a mixture modeling technique which uses observed continuous data to estimate unobserved categorical group membership using posterior probabilities. In this study, sex is the latent variable (male and female are the two latent classes), and the indicator variables used here were eight standard linear measurements (long bone lengths, diaphyseal and articular breadths, and circumferences). Mplus (Muthén and Muthén: Mplus user's guide, 6th ed. Los Angeles: Muthén & Muthén, 2010) was used to obtain maximum likelihood estimates for latent class membership from a known sample of individuals from the forensic data bank (FDB) (Jantz and Moore-Jansen: Database for forensic anthropology in the United States 1962-1991, Ann Arbor, MI: Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research, 2000) (n = 1,831), yielding 87% of correct classification for sex. Then, a simulation extracted 5,000 different random samples of 206 complete cases each from the FDB (these cases also had known sex). We then artificially imposed patterns of missing data similar to that observed in a poorly preserved bioarchaeological sample from Medieval Asturias, Spain (n = 206), and ran LPA on each sample. This tested the efficacy of LPA under extreme conditions of poor preservation (missing data, 42%). The simulation yielded an average of 82% accuracy, indicating that LPA is robust to large amounts of missing data when analyzing incomplete skeletons. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Climatic variation and the geographical distribution of sex-determining mechanisms in the housefly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feldmeyer, B.; Kozielska-Reid, M.A.; Kuijper, A.L.W.; Weissing, F.J.; Beukeboom, L.W.; Pen, I.R.

    2008-01-01

    Questions: (1) Are the geographic clines of sex-determining factors in the housefly of the northern hemisphere mirrored by similar clines on the southern hemisphere? (2) What climatic factors can best explain the geographical distribution of sex-determining factors in the housefly? Data: Frequencies

  4. Gonad transcriptome analysis of pearl oyster Pinctada margaritifera: identification of potential sex differentiation and sex determining genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teaniniuraitemoana, Vaihiti; Huvet, Arnaud; Levy, Peva; Klopp, Christophe; Lhuillier, Emeline; Gaertner-Mazouni, Nabila; Gueguen, Yannick; Le Moullac, Gilles

    2014-06-18

    Black pearl farming is based on culture of the blacklip pearl oyster Pinctada margaritifera (Mollusca, lophotrochozoa), a protandrous hermaphrodite species. At first maturation, all individuals are males. The female sex appears progressively from two years old, which represents a limitation for broodstock conditioning for aquaculture production. In marine mollusks displaying hermaphroditic features, data on sexual determinism and differentiation, including the molecular sex determining cascade, are scarce. To increase genomic resources and identify the molecular mechanisms whereby gene expression may act in the sexual dimorphism of P. margaritifera, we performed gonad transcriptome analysis. The gonad transcriptome of P. margaritifera was sequenced from several gonadic samples of males and females at different development stages, using a Next-Generation-Sequencing method and RNAseq technology. After Illumina sequencing, assembly and annotation, we obtained 70,147 contigs of which 62.2% shared homologies with existing protein sequences, and 9% showed functional annotation with Gene Ontology terms. Differential expression analysis identified 1,993 differentially expressed contigs between the different categories of gonads. Clustering methods of samples revealed that the sex explained most of the variation in gonad gene expression. K-means clustering of differentially expressed contigs showed 815 and 574 contigs were more expressed in male and female gonads, respectively. The analysis of these contigs revealed the presence of known specific genes coding for proteins involved in sex determinism and/or differentiation, such as dmrt and fem-1 like for males, or foxl2 and vitellogenin for females. The specific gene expression profiles of pmarg-fem1-like, pmarg-dmrt and pmarg-foxl2 in different reproductive stages (undetermined, sexual inversion and regression) suggest that these three genes are potentially involved in the sperm-oocyte switch in P. margaritifera. The study

  5. Duplication of dosage sensitive sex reversal area in a 46, XY patient with normal sex determining region of Y causing complete sex reversal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukumaran, Anju; Desmangles, Jean-Claude; Gartner, Lou Ann; Buchlis, John

    2013-01-01

    The sex chromosome composition of the primordial gonad, either 46XX or 46XY, determines its differentiation as ovaries or testes. Local hormones secreted by developing gonads and tissue specific transcription factors influence the differentiation of external and internal genital structures. Dosage sensitive sex reversal adrenal hypoplasia congenita critical region (DAX1) on Xp21 is a gene which is expressed in the developing adrenals, gonads, hypothalamus and pituitary gland. Duplication of this area causes dosage sensitive male-to-female sex reversal while mutation or deletion leads to adrenal hypoplasia congenita with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in affected males. To report a case with duplication of the X chromosome segment within the region of Xp21.1-22.2 resulting in 46 XY sex reversal and a literature review on DAX1 and dosage sensitive sex reversal (DSS). We present the clinical history, physical findings, laboratory, and imaging study results in a newborn baby. This infant was sex assigned as female at birth and had normal female external genitalia. Chromosome analysis was done due to multiple minor malformations and showed a karyotype of 46 Xp+Y. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis revealed the duplication in the DSS area. Duplication of the DAX1 gene on the X chromosome with normal sex determining region of Y (SRY) results in 46 XY sex reversal. This was inherited from the mother who had normal ovarian function. Additional problems include growth failure, mental retardation and multiple congenital anomalies. The baby did not have a mutation or deletion of DAX1, which would have caused adrenal insufficiency and hypogonadism.

  6. Temperature dependence of electromechanical properties of PLZT x ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    the temperature dependence of electromechanical proper- ties of PLZT. It has been observed that the compositions of PLZT ceramics with Zr/Ti 57/43 show enhanced piezoelectric response at room temperature and can be used in low power transducer devices (Shukla et al 2004). Keeping the device application in view, ...

  7. Temperature dependence of exciton diffusion in conjugated polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mikhnenko, O.V.; Cordella, F.; Sieval, A.B.; Hummelen, J.C.; Blom, P.W.M.; Loi, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the exciton dynamics in a conjugated polymer is studied using time-resolved spectroscopy. Photoluminescence decays were measured in heterostructured samples containing a sharp polymer-fullerene interface, which acts as an exciton quenching wall. Using a ID diffusion

  8. Temperature-dependent gas transport and its correlation with kinetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-05-20

    May 20, 2017 ... Temperature-dependent gas transport and its correlation with kinetic diameter in polymer nanocomposite membrane. N K ACHARYA. Applied Physics Department, Faculty of Technology and Engineering, The M S University of Baroda,. Vadodara 390 001, India sarnavee@gmail.com. MS received 18 May ...

  9. Temperature dependence studies on the electro-oxidation of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cyclic voltammetry; electrochemical impedance spectroscopy; activation energy; fuel cell; alcohol. Abstract. Temperature dependence on the electro-oxidation of methanol, ethanol and 1-propanol in 0.5 M H2SO4 were investigated with Pt and PtRu electrodes. Tafel slope and apparent activation energy were evaluated ...

  10. Electronically induced nuclear transitions - temperature dependence and Rabi oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Niez, J J

    2002-01-01

    This paper deals with a nucleus electromagnetically coupled with the bound states of its electronic surroundings. It describes the temperature dependence of its dynamics and the onset of potential Rabi oscillations by means of a Master Equation. The latter is generalized in order to account for possible strong resonances. Throughout the paper the approximation schemes are discussed and tested. (authors)

  11. Temperature dependence of postmortem MR quantification for soft tissue discrimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zech, Wolf-Dieter; Schwendener, Nicole; Jackowski, Christian [University of Bern, From the Institute of Forensic Medicine, Bern (Switzerland); Persson, Anders; Warntjes, Marcel J. [University of Linkoeping, The Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV), Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2015-08-15

    To investigate and correct the temperature dependence of postmortem MR quantification used for soft tissue characterization and differentiation in thoraco-abdominal organs. Thirty-five postmortem short axis cardiac 3-T MR examinations were quantified using a quantification sequence. Liver, spleen, left ventricular myocardium, pectoralis muscle and subcutaneous fat were analysed in cardiac short axis images to obtain mean T1, T2 and PD tissue values. The core body temperature was measured using a rectally inserted thermometer. The tissue-specific quantitative values were related to the body core temperature. Equations to correct for temperature differences were generated. In a 3D plot comprising the combined data of T1, T2 and PD, different organs/tissues could be well differentiated from each other. The quantitative values were influenced by the temperature. T1 in particular exhibited strong temperature dependence. The correction of quantitative values to a temperature of 37 C resulted in better tissue discrimination. Postmortem MR quantification is feasible for soft tissue discrimination and characterization of thoraco-abdominal organs. This provides a base for computer-aided diagnosis and detection of tissue lesions. The temperature dependence of the T1 values challenges postmortem MR quantification. Equations to correct for the temperature dependence are provided. (orig.)

  12. On the effect of temperature dependent thermal conductivity on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We consider the effect of temperature dependent thermal conductivity on temperature rise in biologic tissues during microwave heating. The method of asymptotic expansion is used for finding solution. An appropriate matching procedure was used in our method. Our result reveals the possibility of multiple solutions and it ...

  13. Extraction of temperature dependent interfacial resistance of thermoelectric modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Min

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses an approach for extracting the temperature dependency of the electrical interfacial resistance associated with thermoelectric devices. The method combines a traditional module-level test rig and a nonlinear numerical model of thermoelectricity to minimize measurement errors...... on the interfacial resistance. The extracted results represent useful data to investigating the characteristics of thermoelectric module resistance and comparing performance of various modules....

  14. Pressure–temperature dependence of thermodynamic properties of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    properties of materials under high pressures and temperatures for microscopic under- standing as well as technological applications. In this paper, we report our theoretical study of both pressure and temperature dependences of the thermal properties of rutile within the Debye and Debye–Grüneisen models with and ...

  15. Arrhenius temperature dependence of in vitro tissue plasminogen activator thrombolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, George J [Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0769 (United States); Dhamija, Ashima [Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0769 (United States); Bavani, Nazli [Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0769 (United States); Wagner, Kenneth R [Department of Neurology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0769 (United States); Holland, Christy K [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0769 (United States)

    2007-06-07

    Stroke is a devastating disease and a leading cause of death and disability. Currently, the only FDA approved therapy for acute ischemic stroke is the intravenous administration of the thrombolytic medication, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). However, this treatment has many contraindications and can have dangerous side effects such as intra-cerebral hemorrhage. These treatment limitations have led to much interest in potential adjunctive therapies, such as therapeutic hypothermia (T {<=} 35 deg. C) and ultrasound enhanced thrombolysis. Such interest may lead to combining these therapies with tPA to treat stroke, however little is known about the effects of temperature on the thrombolytic efficacy of tPA. In this work, we measure the temperature dependence of the fractional clot mass loss {delta}m(T) resulting from tPA exposure in an in vitro human clot model. We find that the temperature dependence is well described by an Arrhenius temperature dependence with an effective activation energy E{sub eff} of 42.0 {+-} 0.9 kJ mole{sup -1}. E{sub eff} approximates the activation energy of the plasminogen-to-plasmin reaction of 48.9 kJ mole{sup -1}. A model to explain this temperature dependence is proposed. These results will be useful in predicting the effects of temperature in future lytic therapies.

  16. Investigation of temperature dependence of development and aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacher, G. A.

    1969-01-01

    Temperature dependence of maturation and metabolic rates in insects, and the failure of vital processes during development were investigated. The paper presented advances the general hypothesis that aging in biological systems is a consequence of the production of entropy concomitant with metabolic activity.

  17. Digital transcriptome analysis of putative sex-determination genes in papaya (Carica papaya).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urasaki, Naoya; Tarora, Kazuhiko; Shudo, Ayano; Ueno, Hiroki; Tamaki, Moritoshi; Miyagi, Norimichi; Adaniya, Shinichi; Matsumura, Hideo

    2012-01-01

    Papaya (Carica papaya) is a trioecious plant species that has male, female and hermaphrodite flowers on different plants. The primitive sex chromosomes genetically determine the sex of the papaya. Although draft sequences of the papaya genome are already available, the genes for sex determination have not been identified, likely due to the complicated structure of its sex-chromosome sequences. To identify the candidate genes for sex determination, we conducted a transcriptome analysis of flower samples from male, female and hermaphrodite plants using high-throughput SuperSAGE for digital gene expression analysis. Among the short sequence tags obtained from the transcripts, 312 unique tags were specifically mapped to the primitive sex chromosome (X or Y(h)) sequences. An annotation analysis revealed that retroelements are the most abundant sequences observed in the genes corresponding to these tags. The majority of tags on the sex chromosomes were located on the X chromosome, and only 30 tags were commonly mapped to both the X and Y(h) chromosome, implying a loss of many genes on the Y(h) chromosome. Nevertheless, candidate Y(h) chromosome-specific female determination genes, including a MADS-box gene, were identified. Information on these sex chromosome-specific expressed genes will help elucidating sex determination in the papaya.

  18. Digital transcriptome analysis of putative sex-determination genes in papaya (Carica papaya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya Urasaki

    Full Text Available Papaya (Carica papaya is a trioecious plant species that has male, female and hermaphrodite flowers on different plants. The primitive sex chromosomes genetically determine the sex of the papaya. Although draft sequences of the papaya genome are already available, the genes for sex determination have not been identified, likely due to the complicated structure of its sex-chromosome sequences. To identify the candidate genes for sex determination, we conducted a transcriptome analysis of flower samples from male, female and hermaphrodite plants using high-throughput SuperSAGE for digital gene expression analysis. Among the short sequence tags obtained from the transcripts, 312 unique tags were specifically mapped to the primitive sex chromosome (X or Y(h sequences. An annotation analysis revealed that retroelements are the most abundant sequences observed in the genes corresponding to these tags. The majority of tags on the sex chromosomes were located on the X chromosome, and only 30 tags were commonly mapped to both the X and Y(h chromosome, implying a loss of many genes on the Y(h chromosome. Nevertheless, candidate Y(h chromosome-specific female determination genes, including a MADS-box gene, were identified. Information on these sex chromosome-specific expressed genes will help elucidating sex determination in the papaya.

  19. Abortion and sex determination: conflicting messages in information materials in a District of Rajasthan, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidadavolu, Vijaya; Bracken, Hillary

    2006-05-01

    Public information campaigns are an integral component of reproductive health programmes, including on abortion. In India, where sex selective abortion is increasing, public information is being disseminated on the illegality of sex determination. This paper presents findings from a study undertaken in 2003 in one district in Rajasthan to analyse the content of information materials on abortion and sex determination and people's perceptions of them. Most of the informational material about abortion was produced by one abortion service provider, but none by the public or private sector. The public sector had produced materials on the illegality of sex determination, some of which failed to distinguish between sex selection and other reasons for abortion. In the absence of knowledge of the legal status of abortion, the negative messages and strong language of these materials may have contributed to the perception that abortion is illegal in India. Future materials should address abortion and sex determination, including the legal status of abortion, availability of providers and social norms that shape decision-making. Married and unmarried women should be addressed and the participation of family members acknowledged, while supporting independent decisions by women. Sex determination should also be addressed, and the conditions under which a woman can and cannot seek an abortion clarified, using media and materials accessible to low-literate audiences. Based on what we learned in this research, a pictorial booklet and educator's manual were produced, covering both abortion and sex determination, and are being distributed in India.

  20. Prevalence and determinants of online-sex use in the German population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred E Beutel

    Full Text Available The unlimited access to sexual features in the World Wide Web has raised concerns about excessive and problematic online-sex use. However, little is known about antecedents of internet-sex use of different intensity. Based on a representative German sample of 2,522 participants between the ages of 14 and 97 years, the aims of the present study were (1 to determine the prevalence rates of online-sex users with the short version (ISSTGSV of the Internet Sex Screening Test and (2 to associate online-sex use with anxious vs. avoidant partner attachment patterns and "Big Five" personality traits as potential antecedents.The ISST is a brief, one-dimensional and reliable measure of online-sex activities (rtt = .69. Overall, 14.7% of respondents reported occasional and 4.2% intensive online-sex use. In multivariate analysis, online-sex use was significantly positively associated with male sex, younger age, unemployment and an anxious partner attachment pattern and negatively with conscientiousness and agreeableness.Arousal and satisfaction by virtual enactment of sexual phantasies may be attractive for anxiously attached persons who find it difficult to commit to a real life relationship due to fear of rejection or low self-esteem. More knowledge about the individual antecedents of intensive online-sex use may also be helpful for the development of consultation and treatment strategies for excessive and addictive online-sex use.

  1. Prevalence and determinants of online-sex use in the German population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutel, Manfred E; Giralt, Sebastian; Wölfling, Klaus; Stöbel-Richter, Yve; Subic-Wrana, Claudia; Reiner, Iris; Tibubos, Ana Nanette; Brähler, Elmar

    2017-01-01

    The unlimited access to sexual features in the World Wide Web has raised concerns about excessive and problematic online-sex use. However, little is known about antecedents of internet-sex use of different intensity. Based on a representative German sample of 2,522 participants between the ages of 14 and 97 years, the aims of the present study were (1) to determine the prevalence rates of online-sex users with the short version (ISSTGSV) of the Internet Sex Screening Test and (2) to associate online-sex use with anxious vs. avoidant partner attachment patterns and "Big Five" personality traits as potential antecedents. The ISST is a brief, one-dimensional and reliable measure of online-sex activities (rtt = .69). Overall, 14.7% of respondents reported occasional and 4.2% intensive online-sex use. In multivariate analysis, online-sex use was significantly positively associated with male sex, younger age, unemployment and an anxious partner attachment pattern and negatively with conscientiousness and agreeableness. Arousal and satisfaction by virtual enactment of sexual phantasies may be attractive for anxiously attached persons who find it difficult to commit to a real life relationship due to fear of rejection or low self-esteem. More knowledge about the individual antecedents of intensive online-sex use may also be helpful for the development of consultation and treatment strategies for excessive and addictive online-sex use.

  2. Ocean acidification but not warming alters sex determination in the Sydney rock oyster,Saccostrea glomerata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Laura M; O'Connor, Wayne A; Byrne, Maria; Dove, Michael; Coleman, Ross A; Pörtner, Hans-O; Scanes, Elliot; Virtue, Patti; Gibbs, Mitchell; Ross, Pauline M

    2018-02-14

    Whether sex determination of marine organisms can be altered by ocean acidification and warming during this century remains a significant, unanswered question. Here, we show that exposure of the protandric hermaphrodite oyster, Saccostrea glomerata to ocean acidification, but not warming, alters sex determination resulting in changes in sex ratios. After just one reproductive cycle there were 16% more females than males. The rate of gametogenesis, gonad area, fecundity, shell length, extracellular pH and survival decreased in response to ocean acidification. Warming as a sole stressor slightly increased the rate of gametogenesis, gonad area and fecundity, but this increase was masked by the impact of ocean acidification at a level predicted for this century. Alterations to sex determination, sex ratios and reproductive capacity will have flow on effects to reduce larval supply and population size of oysters and potentially other marine organisms. © 2018 The Author(s).

  3. Temperature-dependent structure evolution in liquid gallium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, L. H.; Wang, X. D.; Yu, Q.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, F.; Sun, Y.; Cao, Q. P.; Xie, H. L.; Xiao, T. Q.; Zhang, D. X.; Wang, C. Z.; Ho, K. M.; Ren, Y.; Jiang, J. Z.

    2017-04-01

    Temperature-dependent atomistic structure evolution of liquid gallium (Ga) has been investigated by using in situ high energy X-ray diffraction experiment and ab initio molecular dynamics simulation. Both experimental and theoretical results reveal the existence of a liquid structural change around 1000 K in liquid Ga. Below and above this temperature the liquid exhibits differences in activation energy for selfdiffusion, temperature-dependent heat capacity, coordination numbers, density, viscosity, electric resistivity and thermoelectric power, which are reflected from structural changes of the bond-orientational order parameter Q6, fraction of covalent dimers, averaged string length and local atomic packing. This finding will trigger more studies on the liquid-to-liquid crossover in metallic melts.

  4. Temperature-dependent enthalpy of oxygenation in Antarctic fish hemoglobins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fago, A.; Wells, R.M.G.; Weber, Roy E.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the oxygen-binding properties of the hemoglobins of three cold-adapted Antarctic fish species, Dissostichus mawsoni, Pagothenia borchgrevinki and Trematomus, sp., has been investigated under different pH values and buffer conditions. A clear non linear van't Hoff plot...... oxygen binding. The degree of the temperature dependence of the heat of oxygenation observed in these hemoglobins seems to reflect the differences in their allosteric effects rather than a specific molecular adaptation to low temperatures. Moreover, this study indicates that the disagreement between...... (logP(50) vs 1/T) of D. mawsoni hemoglobin indicates that the enthalpy of oxygenation (slope of the plot) is temperature dependent and that at high temperatures oxygen-binding becomes less exothermic. Nearly linear relationships were found in the hemoglobins of the other two species. The data were...

  5. A novel sex determination system in a close relative of the house mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veyrunes, Frederic; Chevret, Pascale; Catalan, Josette; Castiglia, Riccardo; Watson, Johan; Dobigny, Gauthier; Robinson, Terence J.; Britton-Davidian, Janice

    2010-01-01

    Therian mammals have an extremely conserved XX/XY sex determination system. A limited number of mammal species have, however, evolved to escape convention and present aberrant sex chromosome complements. In this study, we identified a new case of atypical sex determination in the African pygmy mouse Mus minutoides, a close evolutionary relative of the house mouse. The pygmy mouse is characterized by a very high proportion of XY females (74%, n = 27) from geographically widespread Southern and Eastern African populations. Sequencing of the high mobility group domain of the mammalian sex determining gene Sry, and karyological analyses using fluorescence in situ hybridization and G-banding data, suggest that the sex reversal is most probably not owing to a mutation of Sry, but rather to a chromosomal rearrangement on the X chromosome. In effect, two morphologically different X chromosomes were identified, one of which, designated X*, is invariably associated with sex-reversed females. The asterisk designates the still unknown mutation converting X*Y individuals into females. Although relatively still unexplored, such an atypical sex chromosome system offers a unique opportunity to unravel new genetic interactions involved in the initiation of sex determination in mammals. PMID:20007182

  6. Temperature dependencies of frequency characteristics of HTSC RLC curcuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buniatyan, Vahe V.; Aroutiounian, V. M.; Shmavonyan, G. Sh.; Buniatyan, Vaz. V.

    2006-05-01

    Analytical expressions of temperature dependencies of magnitude-frequency and phase-frequency characteristics of a HTSC RLC parallel circuit are obtained, where the resistance and inductance are non-linearly depended on the optical signal modulated by the intensity. It is shown that the magnitude-frequency and phase-frequency characteristics of circuits can be controlled by choosing the parameters of the HTSC thin film and optical "pump".

  7. AlN Bandgap Temperature Dependence from its Optical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-07

    AlN bandgap temperature dependence from its optical properties E. Silveira a,, J.A. Freitas b, S.B. Schujman c, L.J. Schowalter c a Depto. de Fisica ...literature could, in part, be lifted in terms of selection rules for the optical transitions [5]. Further experimental investigations corroborated with...CL, transmission/ absorption and OR measurements at different temperatures. 2. Experimental details The high-quality large bulk AlN single crystals

  8. Temperature dependence of the fundamental band gap parameters ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Thin films of ternary ZnxCd1 xSe were deposited on GaAs (100) substrate using metal- organic-chemical-vapour-deposition (MOCVD) technique. Temperature dependence of the near- band-edge emission from these Cd-rich ZnxCd1 xSe (for x = 0.025, 0.045) films has been studied using photoluminescence ...

  9. Sexy splicing: regulatory interplays governing sex determination from Drosophila to mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalli, Enzo; Ohe, Kenji; Latorre, Elisa; Bianchi, Marco E; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2003-02-01

    A remarkable array of strategies is used to produce sexual differentiation in different species. Complex gene hierarchies govern sex determination pathways, as exemplified by the classic D. melanogaster paradigm, where an interplay of transcriptional, splicing and translational mechanisms operate. Molecular studies support the hypothesis that genetic sex determination pathways evolved in reverse order, from downstream to upstream genes, in the cascade. The recent identification of a role for the key regulatory factors SRY and WT1(+KTS) in pre-mRNA splicing indicates that important steps in the mammalian sex determination process are likely to operate at the post-transcriptional level.

  10. Genetic sex determination in Astatotilapia calliptera, a prototype species for the Lake Malawi cichlid radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Erin N.; Cline, Maggie E.; Moore, Emily C.; Roberts, Natalie B.; Roberts, Reade B.

    2017-06-01

    East African cichlids display extensive variation in sex determination systems. The species Astatotilapia calliptera is one of the few cichlids that reside both in Lake Malawi and in surrounding waterways. A. calliptera is of interest in evolutionary studies as a putative immediate outgroup species for the Lake Malawi species flock and possibly as a prototype ancestor-like species for the radiation. Here, we use linkage mapping to test association of sex in A. calliptera with loci that have been previously associated with genetic sex determination in East African cichlid species. We identify a male heterogametic XY system segregating at linkage group (LG) 7 in an A. calliptera line that originated from Lake Malawi, at a locus previously shown to act as an XY sex determination system in multiple species of Lake Malawi cichlids. Significant association of genetic markers and sex produce a broad genetic interval of approximately 26 megabases (Mb) using the Nile tilapia genome to orient markers; however, we note that the marker with the strongest association with sex is near a gene that acts as a master sex determiner in other fish species. We demonstrate that alleles of the marker are perfectly associated with sex in Metriaclima mbenjii, a species from the rock-dwelling clade of Lake Malawi. While we do not rule out the possibility of other sex determination loci in A. calliptera, this study provides a foundation for fine mapping of the cichlid sex determination gene on LG7 and evolutionary context regarding the origin and persistence of the LG7 XY across diverse, rapidly evolving lineages.

  11. An ARMS-based technique for sex determination of red panda (Ailurus fulgens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuzhi; Xu, Xiao; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Zhihe; Shen, Fujun; Zhang, Wenping; Yue, Bisong

    2011-03-01

    Molecular sexing is a key component in the investigation of wild populations. In this study, we developed a fast, accurate and reliable amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) technique for sex determination of red panda based on the exon 4 of the ZFX/ZFY gene. The amplicons were distinguished simply by agarose gel electrophoresis, exhibiting one fragment in females (X: 300 bp) and two in males (X: 300 bp, Y: 166 bp). Robustness of this ARMS system was confirmed by testing both 43 captive red pandas using DNA samples with known-sex and 10 wild red pandas using faecal DNA samples with unknown sex. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Temperature dependence of the elastocaloric effect in natural rubber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Zhongjian, E-mail: zhongjian.xie521@gmail.com; Sebald, Gael; Guyomar, Daniel

    2017-07-12

    The temperature dependence of the elastocaloric (eC) effect in natural rubber (NR) has been studied. This material exhibits a large eC effect over a broad temperature range from 0 °C to 49 °C. The maximum adiabatic temperature change (ΔT) occurred at 10 °C and the behavior could be predicted by the temperature dependence of the strain-induced crystallization (SIC) and the temperature-induced crystallization (TIC). The eC performance of NR was then compared with that of shape memory alloys (SMAs). This study contributes to the SIC research of NR and also broadens the application of elastomers. - Highlights: • A large elastocaloric effect over a broad temperature range was found in natural rubber (NR). • The caloric performance of NR was compared with that of shape memory alloys. • The temperature dependence of the elastocaloric effect in NR can be prediced by the theory of strain-induced crystallization.

  13. Iron mapping using the temperature dependency of the magnetic susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkl, Christoph; Langkammer, Christian; Krenn, Heinz; Goessler, Walter; Ernst, Christina; Haybaeck, Johannes; Stollberger, Rudolf; Fazekas, Franz; Ropele, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    The assessment of iron content in brain white matter (WM) is of high importance for studying neurodegenerative diseases. While R2 * mapping and quantitative susceptibility mapping is suitable for iron mapping in gray matter, iron mapping in WM still remains an unsolved problem. We propose a new approach for iron mapping, independent of diamagnetic contributions of myelin by assessing the temperature dependency of the paramagnetic susceptibility. We used unfixed human brain slices for relaxometry and calculated R2 ' as a measure for microscopic susceptibility variations at several temperatures (4°C-37°C) at 3 Tesla. The temperature coefficient of R2 ' (TcR2p) was calculated by linear regression and related to the iron concentration found by subsequent superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry and by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. In line with SQUID measurements, R2 ' mapping showed a linear temperature dependency of the bulk susceptibility with the highest slope in gray matter. Even in WM, TcR2p yielded a high linear correlation with the absolute iron concentration. According to Curie's law, only paramagnetic matter exhibits a temperature dependency while the diamagnetism shows no effect. We have demonstrated that the temperature coefficient (TcR2p) can be used as a measure of the paramagnetic susceptibility despite of an unknown diamagnetic background. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Sex Determination in Sea Cucumbers: Holothuria forskali and Stichopus regalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipa Pinheiro Santos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Sea cucumber aquaculture is underexploited in temperate regions, and it is inexistent in Portugal. However, there are some species with a large potential for this sector, namely Stichopus regalis and Holothuria forskali, as it their nutritional value. S. regalis is a common sea cucumber that is found in a wide depth range and is currently consumed all over the world, majority in Asia, with a high commercial value. On the other hand, H. forskali is the most plentiful specie of the Portuguese coast. The purpose of this study is to evaluate sex ratio on both species through biopsy method, using biopsy needle to collect a piece of gonad. Holothurian specimens were sampled coastwise in Peniche, Portugal (39° 21′ 32″ N, 9° 22′ 40″ W. A total of 45 H. forskali were collected in the low tide and 48 S. regalis were caught by trawl method. Both species were kept in captivity during 8 months, the rearing conditions are maintained close as possible to the natural habitat, and they were placed in a sand bottom. Mortality was evaluated during conditioning period, and it was verified approximately 19% of mortality in S. regalis, although in H. forskali it was not observed. Sex identification was performed with success only in H. forskali, and sexual ratio found was 1:1. All S. regalis specimens arrived eviscerated to the Aquaculture Laboratory and it was caused by the trawl capture method. For that reason, it was not possible to assess the sexual ratio. The possibility to distinguish holothurian genre is essential to realize sexual behavior, and to ease the understanding of reproductive cycle in attempt to introduce these new species for aquaculture rearing.

  15. Mastoid triangle for sex determination in adult Nigerian population: a validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaja, Blessing N R; Ajua, Christiana O; Didia, Blessing C

    2013-11-01

    In the quest for a simple, reliable technique to estimate the sex of human remains several novel metric skeletal indices have been reported. Only a few have been examined for utility in populations different from those in which they were developed. In this study, the mastoid process was evaluated for sex determination using 102 lateral cephalograms of a Nigerian sample of known age and sex. The asterion-mastoidale distance and mastoid triangular area were sexually dimorphic with mean values higher in males compared with females (p = 0.02). On analysis of the discriminant function, overall accuracy for sex classification was 55%. On cross-validation, the triangular area accurately identified 80% of females and 48% of males. The asterion-mastoidale distance was slightly more accurate at sexing the sample. The practical utility of the mastoid triangle area technique to differentiate sex in Nigerian populations is not supported by the results of this study. © 2013 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  16. Development of PCR‐Based Markers to Determine the Sex of Kelps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipinska, Agnieszka P.; Ahmed, Sophia; Peters, Akira F.; Faugeron, Sylvain; Cock, J. Mark; Coelho, Susana M.

    2015-01-01

    Sex discriminating genetic markers are commonly used to facilitate breeding programs in economically and ecologically important animal and plant species. However, despite their considerable economic and ecological value, the development of sex markers for kelp species has been very limited. In this study, we used the recently described sequence of the sex determining region (SDR) of the brown algal model Ectocarpus to develop novel DNA-based sex-markers for three commercially relevant kelps: Laminaria digitata, Undaria pinnatifida and Macrocystis pyrifera. Markers were designed within nine protein coding genes of Ectocarpus male and female (U/V) sex chromosomes and tested on gametophytes of the three kelp species. Seven primer pairs corresponding to three loci in the Ectocarpus SDR amplified sex-specific bands in the three kelp species, yielding at least one male and one female marker for each species. Our work has generated the first male sex-specific markers for L. digitata and U. pinnatifida, as well as the first sex markers developed for the genus Macrocystis. The markers and methodology presented here will not only facilitate seaweed breeding programs but also represent useful tools for population and demography studies and provide a means to investigate the evolution of sex determination across this largely understudied eukaryotic group. PMID:26496392

  17. Development of PCR-Based Markers to Determine the Sex of Kelps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka P Lipinska

    Full Text Available Sex discriminating genetic markers are commonly used to facilitate breeding programs in economically and ecologically important animal and plant species. However, despite their considerable economic and ecological value, the development of sex markers for kelp species has been very limited. In this study, we used the recently described sequence of the sex determining region (SDR of the brown algal model Ectocarpus to develop novel DNA-based sex-markers for three commercially relevant kelps: Laminaria digitata, Undaria pinnatifida and Macrocystis pyrifera. Markers were designed within nine protein coding genes of Ectocarpus male and female (U/V sex chromosomes and tested on gametophytes of the three kelp species. Seven primer pairs corresponding to three loci in the Ectocarpus SDR amplified sex-specific bands in the three kelp species, yielding at least one male and one female marker for each species. Our work has generated the first male sex-specific markers for L. digitata and U. pinnatifida, as well as the first sex markers developed for the genus Macrocystis. The markers and methodology presented here will not only facilitate seaweed breeding programs but also represent useful tools for population and demography studies and provide a means to investigate the evolution of sex determination across this largely understudied eukaryotic group.

  18. Competitive adsorption equilibrium model with continuous temperature dependent parameters for naringenin enantiomers on Chiralpak AD column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jin; Jiang, Xiaoxiao; Guo, Jinghua; Chen, Yongtao; Yu, Weifang

    2015-11-27

    Determination of competitive adsorption equilibrium model with continuous temperature dependent parameters is important for the design and optimization of a chromatographic separation process operated under non-isothermal conditions. In this study, linear pulse experiments were first carried to determine the parameters of transport-dispersive model and their temperature dependences in the range of 283–313 K. Overloaded band profiles of naringenin enantiomers on a Chiralpak AD column were acquired under various temperatures. Three of them were first separately fitted using Langmuir, linear-Langmuir and bi-Langmuir isotherm models substituted into the transport-dispersive column model. The comparison showed that bi-Langmuir model captures more details of the experimental results. This model was then extended with three extra parameters accounting for adsorption heat effects and used to simultaneously fit the band profiles at three temperatures.

  19. Fgf9 and Wnt4 act as antagonistic signals to regulate mammalian sex determination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuna Kim

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The genes encoding members of the wingless-related MMTV integration site (WNT and fibroblast growth factor (FGF families coordinate growth, morphogenesis, and differentiation in many fields of cells during development. In the mouse, Fgf9 and Wnt4 are expressed in gonads of both sexes prior to sex determination. Loss of Fgf9 leads to XY sex reversal, whereas loss of Wnt4 results in partial testis development in XX gonads. However, the relationship between these signals and the male sex-determining gene, Sry, was unknown. We show through gain- and loss-of-function experiments that fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9 and WNT4 act as opposing signals to regulate sex determination. In the mouse XY gonad, Sry normally initiates a feed-forward loop between Sox9 and Fgf9, which up-regulates Fgf9 and represses Wnt4 to establish the testis pathway. Surprisingly, loss of Wnt4 in XX gonads is sufficient to up-regulate Fgf9 and Sox9 in the absence of Sry. These data suggest that the fate of the gonad is controlled by antagonism between Fgf9 and Wnt4. The role of the male sex-determining switch--Sry in the case of mammals--is to tip the balance between these underlying patterning signals. In principle, sex determination in other vertebrates may operate through any switch that introduces an imbalance between these two signaling pathways.

  20. EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE-DEPENDENCY OF SURFACE EMISSIVITY ON HEAT TRANSFER USING THE PARAMETERIZED PERTURBATION METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maziar Jalaal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the temperature dependence of the physical properties such surface emissivity, which controls the radiative problem, is fundamental for determining the thermal balance of many scientific and industrial processes. The current work studies the ability of a strong analytical method called parameterized perturbation method (PPM, which unlike classic perturbation method do not need small parameter, for nonlinear heat transfer equations. The results are compared with the numerical Runge-Kutta method showed good agreement.

  1. Temperature- vs. estrogen-induced sex determination in Caiman latirostris embryos: Both females, but with different expression patterns of key molecules involved in ovarian development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canesini, Guillermina; Stoker, Cora; Galoppo, Germán H; Durando, Milena L; Tschopp, María V; Luque, Enrique H; Muñoz-de-Toro, Mónica M; Ramos, Jorge G

    2018-04-01

    Caiman latirostris is a species with temperature dependent sex determination (TSD), which implies that the incubation temperature of the eggs is the main factor that determines the sex during a thermo-sensitive period (TSP). However, estrogens play a critical role in this process. The administration of 17β-estradiol (E 2 ) previous to TSP overrides the effects of male incubation temperature, producing phenotypic females. This effect has been defined as sex reversal or estrogen-induced sex determination (E 2 SD). The aim of the present study is to describe similarities and differences in the effects of TSD and E 2 SD treatment conditions on ovary development. Our results show that the two treatment conditions studied are able to produce different ovaries. Treatment with E 2 modified the expression pattern of estrogen receptor alpha and progesterone receptor, and expression of the enzyme aromatase. Moreover, in E 2 SD females, the proliferation/apoptosis dynamic was also altered and high expression of TAp63 was observed suggesting the presence of greater DNA damage in germ cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that describes the morphology of the female gonad of C. latirostris in three stages of embryonic development and shows the expression of TAp63 during the gonad development of a reptile. It is important to emphasize that the changes demonstrated in E 2 SD female gonads of embryos show that environmental compounds with proven estrogenic activity alter the follicular dynamics of C. latirostris in neonatal as much as in juvenile animals, endangering their reproductive health and possibly bringing consequences to ecology and evolution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Manipulation of arthropod sex determination by endosymbionts : Diversity and molecular mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, W. -J.; Vavre, F.; Beukeboom, L. W.

    2014-01-01

    Arthropods exhibit a large variety of sex determination systems both at the chromosomal and molecular level. Male heterogamety, female heterogamety, and haplodiploidy occur frequently, but partially different genes are involved. Endosymbionts, such as Wolbachia, Cardinium, Rickettsia, and

  3. Inbreeding depression in a parasitoid wasp with single-locus complementary sex determination

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vayssade, Chloé; de Fazio, Céline; Quaglietti, Bastien; Auguste, Alexandra; Ris, Nicolas; Fauvergue, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    .... Although recessive deleterious alleles that are expressed in males should be purged, an alternative form of inbreeding depression exists in species with single-locus complementary sex determination (sl-CSD...

  4. Inbreeding Depression in a Parasitoid Wasp with Single-Locus Complementary Sex Determination: e97733

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chloé Vayssade; Céline de Fazio; Bastien Quaglietti; Alexandra Auguste; Nicolas Ris; Xavier Fauvergue

    2014-01-01

    .... Although recessive deleterious alleles that are expressed in males should be purged, an alternative form of inbreeding depression exists in species with single-locus complementary sex determination (sl-CSD...

  5. Body composition in portuguese adolescents: are physical activity and maturity status sex-specific determinant factors?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sofia Silva; Filomena Vieira; Filomena Carnide; Ana Assunção; José Araújo; Ana Vasco

    2014-01-01

    ...) on the differences of body composition in adolescents have been little studied. The purpose of this study was to examine if PA and maturity status were sex-specific determinant factors in the adolescents’ body composition...

  6. QTL Mapping of Sex Determination Loci Supports an Ancient Pathway in Ants and Honey Bees

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miyakawa, Misato O; Mikheyev, Alexander S

    2015-01-01

    .... Here we investigate the origins and evolution of complementary sex determination (CSD) in ants and bees. The honey bee has a well-characterized CSD locus, containing tandemly arranged homologs of the transformer gene...

  7. Sex determination in honeybees: two separate mechanisms induce and maintain the female pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gempe, Tanja; Hasselmann, Martin; Schiøtt, Morten

    2009-01-01

    . Bees heterozygous at Sex Determination Locus are females, whereas bees homozygous or hemizygous are males. Little is known, however, about the regulation that links sex determination to sexual differentiation. To investigate the control of sexual development in honeybees, we analyzed the functions......, fem also controls the splicing of Am-doublesex transcripts encoding conserved male- and female-specific transcription factors involved in sexual differentiation. Our findings reveal how the sex determination process is realized in honeybees differing from Drosophila melanogaster....... and the regulatory interactions of genes involved in the sex determination pathway. We show that heterozygous csd is only required to induce the female pathway, while the feminizer (fem) gene maintains this decision throughout development. By RNAi induced knockdown we show that the fem gene is essential for entire...

  8. Use of a regulatory mechanism of sex determination in pest insect ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-09-06

    Rendón et al. 2004). Use of alternative splicing of sex determining genes in pest insect control. A bisex RIDL system containing a tetracycline-repressible positive feedback transactivator (tTA) was successfully con- structed in C.

  9. Sex determination based on a thoracic vertebra and ribs evaluation using clinical chest radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubaki, Shun; Morishita, Junji; Usumoto, Yosuke; Sakaguchi, Kyoko; Matsunobu, Yusuke; Kawazoe, Yusuke; Okumura, Miki; Ikeda, Noriaki

    2017-07-01

    Our aim was to investigate whether sex can be determined from a combination of geometric features obtained from the 10th thoracic vertebra, 6th rib, and 7th rib. Six hundred chest radiographs (300 males and 300 females) were randomly selected to include patients of six age groups (20s, 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s, and 70s). Each group included 100 images (50 males and 50 females). A total of 14 features, including 7 lengths, 5 indices for the vertebra, and 2 types of widths for ribs, were utilized and analyzed for sex determination. Dominant features contributing to sex determination were selected by stepwise discriminant analysis after checking the variance inflation factors for multicollinearity. The accuracy of sex determination using a combination of the vertebra and ribs was evaluated from the selected features by the stepwise discriminant analysis. The accuracies in each age group were also evaluated in this study. The accuracy of sex determination based on a combination of features of the vertebra and ribs was 88.8% (533/600). This performance was superior to that of the vertebra or ribs only. Moreover, sex determination of subjects in their 20s demonstrated the highest accuracy (96.0%, 96/100). The features selected in the stepwise discriminant analysis included some features in both the vertebra and ribs. These results indicate the usefulness of combined information obtained from the vertebra and ribs for sex determination. We conclude that a combination of geometric characteristics obtained from the vertebra and ribs could be useful for determining sex. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A new component of the Nasonia sex determining cascade is maternally silenced and regulates transformer expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eveline C Verhulst

    Full Text Available Although sex determination is a universal process in sexually reproducing organisms, sex determination pathways are among the most highly variable genetic systems found in nature. Nevertheless, general principles can be identified among the diversity, like the central role of transformer (tra in insects. When a functional TRA protein is produced in early embryogenesis, the female sex determining route is activated, while prevention of TRA production leads to male development. In dipterans, male development is achieved by prevention of female-specific splicing of tra mRNA, either mediated by X-chromosome dose or masculinizing factors. In Hymenoptera, which have haplodiploid sex determination, complementary sex determination and maternal imprinting have been identified to regulate timely TRA production. In the parasitoid Nasonia, zygotic transformer (Nvtra expression and splicing is regulated by a combination of maternal provision of Nvtra mRNA and silencing of Nvtra expression in unfertilized eggs. It is unclear, however, if this silencing is directly on the tra locus or whether it is mediated through maternal silencing of a trans-acting factor. Here we show that in Nasonia, female sex determination is dependent on zygotic activation of Nvtra expression by an as yet unknown factor. This factor, which we propose to term womanizer (wom, is maternally silenced during oogenesis to ensure male development in unfertilized eggs. This finding implicates the upstream recruitment of a novel gene in the Nasonia sex determining cascade and supports the notion that sex determining cascades can rapidly change by adding new components on top of existing regulators.

  11. A New Component of the Nasonia Sex Determining Cascade Is Maternally Silenced and Regulates Transformer Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bopp, Daniel; Beukeboom, Leo W.; van de Zande, Louis

    2013-01-01

    Although sex determination is a universal process in sexually reproducing organisms, sex determination pathways are among the most highly variable genetic systems found in nature. Nevertheless, general principles can be identified among the diversity, like the central role of transformer (tra) in insects. When a functional TRA protein is produced in early embryogenesis, the female sex determining route is activated, while prevention of TRA production leads to male development. In dipterans, male development is achieved by prevention of female-specific splicing of tra mRNA, either mediated by X-chromosome dose or masculinizing factors. In Hymenoptera, which have haplodiploid sex determination, complementary sex determination and maternal imprinting have been identified to regulate timely TRA production. In the parasitoid Nasonia, zygotic transformer (Nvtra) expression and splicing is regulated by a combination of maternal provision of Nvtra mRNA and silencing of Nvtra expression in unfertilized eggs. It is unclear, however, if this silencing is directly on the tra locus or whether it is mediated through maternal silencing of a trans-acting factor. Here we show that in Nasonia, female sex determination is dependent on zygotic activation of Nvtra expression by an as yet unknown factor. This factor, which we propose to term womanizer (wom), is maternally silenced during oogenesis to ensure male development in unfertilized eggs. This finding implicates the upstream recruitment of a novel gene in the Nasonia sex determining cascade and supports the notion that sex determining cascades can rapidly change by adding new components on top of existing regulators. PMID:23717455

  12. Identification of the Major Sex-Determining Region of Turbot (Scophthalmus maximus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Paulino; Bouza, Carmen; Hermida, Miguel; Fernández, Jesús; Toro, Miguel Angel; Vera, Manuel; Pardo, Belén; Millán, Adrián; Fernández, Carlos; Vilas, Román; Viñas, Ana; Sánchez, Laura; Felip, Alicia; Piferrer, Francesc; Ferreiro, Isabel; Cabaleiro, Santiago

    2009-01-01

    Sex determination in fish is a labile character in evolutionary terms. The sex-determining (SD) master gene can differ even between closely related fish species. This group is an interesting model for studying the evolution of the SD region and the gonadal differentiation pathway. The turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) is a flatfish of great commercial value, where a strong sexual dimorphism exists for growth rate. Following a QTL and marker association approach in five families and a natural population, we identified the main SD region of turbot at the proximal end of linkage group (LG) 5, close to the SmaUSC-E30 marker. The refined map of this region suggested that this marker would be 2.6 cM and 1.4 Mb from the putative SD gene. This region appeared mostly undifferentiated between males and females, and no relevant recombination frequency differences were detected between sexes. Comparative genomics of LG5 marker sequences against five model species showed no similarity of this chromosome to the sex chromosomes of medaka, stickleback, and fugu, but suggested a similarity to a sex-associated QTL from Oreochromis spp. The segregation analysis of the closest markers to the SD region demonstrated a ZW/ZZ model of sex determination in turbot. A small proportion of families did not fit perfectly with this model, which suggests that other minor genetic and/or environmental factors are involved in sex determination in this species. PMID:19786621

  13. Sex determination of human crania using Mastoid triangle and Opisthion-Bimastoid triangle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Deepali; Jasuja, O P; Nath, Surinder

    2013-05-01

    In the present study an attempt has been made to establish standards for sex determination from the various direct and indirect measurements of the cranium. A total of 100 cranium (50 of either sex) were measured for nine direct measurements pertaining to Mastoid triangle and Opisthion-Bimastoid triangle. These measurements were used further to calculate four indirect measurements pertaining to the calculation of Opisthion-Bimastoid triangle area and angles. Analysis of data reveals that the male crania exhibit greater values for all the measurements except the angle right Mastoidale-Opisthion-left Mastoidale. The sex difference has been observed to be statistically significant for all the measurements except for the angles of the Opisthion-Bimastoid triangle. Sectioning point was calculated for the diagnosis of sex based on the mean values of these measurements; the accuracy of sex determination varied from measurement to measurement. The highest value for determining sex was obtained for Asterion-Mastoidale length of right side i.e. 80%, followed by Bi-mastoid breadth i.e. 75%. This suggests that these measurements could be used with relatively high degree of accuracy in determining sex of the unknown crania. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  14. A noninvasive, direct real-time PCR method for sex determination in multiple avian species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brubaker, Jessica L.; Karouna-Renier, Natalie K.; Chen, Yu; Jenko, Kathryn; Sprague, Daniel T.; Henry, Paula F.P.

    2011-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods to determine the sex of birds are well established and have seen few modifications since they were first introduced in the 1990s. Although these methods allowed for sex determination in species that were previously difficult to analyse, they were not conducive to high-throughput analysis because of the laboriousness of DNA extraction and gel electrophoresis. We developed a high-throughput real-time PCR-based method for analysis of sex in birds, which uses noninvasive sample collection and avoids DNA extraction and gel electrophoresis.

  15. [Sex determination in ten crane species by DNA marker EE0.6].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudrik, E A; Kashentseva, T A; Gamburg, E A; Politov, D V

    2013-12-01

    Using a unique DNA sequence of W-chromosome EE0.6, we carried out molecular sex determination in 383 individuals often species of cranes (Grusgrus L., G. leucogeranus Pallas, G. japonensis Muller, G. vipio Pallas, G. Canadensis L., G. antigone L., G. monacha Temminck, Anthropoides virgo L., Balearica regulorum Bennett, and B. pavonia L.) kept in zoos and other centers of captive propagation. In 211 birds, sex was determined or verified for the first time. The efficiency of using the sex marker EE0.6 for chicks and immature and adult cranes of different species, as well as for interspecific hybrids was shown.

  16. The Caenorhabditis Elegans Gene Sdc-2 Controls Sex Determination and Dosage Compensation in Xx Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusbaum, C.; Meyer, B. J.

    1989-01-01

    We have identified a new X-linked gene, sdc-2, that controls the hermaphrodite (XX) modes of both sex determination and X chromosome dosage compensation in Caenorhabditis elegans. Mutations in sdc-2 cause phenotypes that appear to result from a shift of both the sex determination and dosage compensation processes in XX animals to the XO modes of expression. Twenty-eight independent sdc-2 mutations have no apparent effect in XO animals, but cause two distinct phenotypes in XX animals: masculinization, reflecting a defect in sex determination, and lethality or dumpiness, reflecting a disruption in dosage compensation. The dosage compensation defect can be demonstrated directly by showing that sdc-2 mutations cause elevated levels of several X-linked transcripts in XX but not XO animals. While the masculinization is blocked by mutations in sex determining genes required for male development (her-1 and fem-3), the lethality, dumpiness and overexpression of X-linked genes are not, indicating that the effect of sdc-2 mutations on sex determination and dosage compensation are ultimately implemented by two independent pathways. We propose a model in which sdc-2 is involved in the coordinate control of both sex determination and dosage compensation in XX animals and acts in the regulatory hierarchy at a step prior to the divergence of the two pathways. PMID:2759421

  17. GENETIC SEX DETERMINATION IN HEAVY BREED CHICKEN EMBRYOS USING AN UNCONVENTIONAL METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. BENCSIK

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available We have used a non-invasive method to predetermine the sex of chicken embryosthat relies on the bio electromagnetic field generated by the embryonic cells. Tovalidate this method in poultry, on the basis of sexual dimorphism, the genetic sex of120 chicken eggs of heavy breed. One group consisted of 60 eggs with determinedgenetic sex ZZ (cock, abbr. M. The other group consisted of 60 eggs withdetermined genetic sex ZY (hen, abbr. F. After hatching, the chicks were identifiedand the genetic sex was checked repeatedly using the pendulum. The phenoypic sexof the birds was assessed after 60 days at the time the sexual dimorphism wasvisible. From the 60 eggs sexed and incubated for each group, a hatching rate of90%, for the group M and 91,66% for the group F was obtained. The genetic sex ofindividuals determined at the age of one day showed that all individuals of thegroup M were cocks (ZZ and all individuals of the group F were hens (ZW. Thephenotypic sex determination performed 60 days later showed that of 54 individualsof the group M, 41 were cocks (77,36%. In the group F from 55 individuals 42 werehens (77,78%. The prediction rate for the group M (77,36% was relativlycomparable with that for the group F (77,78%. This method is non-invasive,relatively rapid, simple and inexpensive with application in effective breedingregimes of poultry production.

  18. Temperature dependence of magnetically dead layers in ferromagnetic thin-films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tokaç

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Polarized neutron reflectometry has been used to study interface magnetism and magnetic dead layers in model amorphous CoFeB:Ta alloy thin-film multilayers with Curie temperatures tuned to be below room-temperature. This allows temperature dependent variations in the effective magnetic thickness of the film to be determined at temperatures that are a significant fraction of the Curie temperature, which cannot be achieved in the material systems used for spintronic devices. In addition to variation in the effective magnetic thickness due to compositional grading at the interface with the tantalum capping layer, the key finding is that at the interface between ferromagnetic film and GaAs(001 substrate local interfacial alloying creates an additional magnetic dead-layer. The thickness of this magnetic dead-layer is temperature dependent, which may have significant implications for elevated-temperature operation of hybrid ferromagnetic metal-semiconductor spintronic devices.

  19. Temperature dependence of Young's modulus of titanium dioxide (TIO2) nanotubes: Molecular mechanics modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukyanov, S. I.; Bandura, A. V.; Evarestov, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Temperature dependence of the Young's modulus of cylindrical single-wall nanotubes with zigzag and armchair chiralities and consolidated-wall nanotubes has been studied by the molecular mechanics method with the use of the atom-atom potential. The nanotubes have been obtained by rolling up of crystal layers (111) of TiO2 with fluorite structure. Calculations have been performed for isothermal conditions on the basis of calculating the Helmholtz free energy of the system. The dependence of the Helmholtz free energy of nanotubes on the period has been calculated in the quasi-harmonic approximation as a result of calculation of phonon frequencies. It has been shown that the temperature dependence of the stiffness of nanotubes is determined by their chirality, and some nanotubes exibit anomalous behavior of both the Young's modulus and the period of unit cell with variation in temperature.

  20. Temperature dependence of magnetically dead layers in ferromagnetic thin-films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokaç, M.; Kinane, C. J.; Atkinson, D.; Hindmarch, A. T.

    2017-11-01

    Polarized neutron reflectometry has been used to study interface magnetism and magnetic dead layers in model amorphous CoFeB:Ta alloy thin-film multilayers with Curie temperatures tuned to be below room-temperature. This allows temperature dependent variations in the effective magnetic thickness of the film to be determined at temperatures that are a significant fraction of the Curie temperature, which cannot be achieved in the material systems used for spintronic devices. In addition to variation in the effective magnetic thickness due to compositional grading at the interface with the tantalum capping layer, the key finding is that at the interface between ferromagnetic film and GaAs(001) substrate local interfacial alloying creates an additional magnetic dead-layer. The thickness of this magnetic dead-layer is temperature dependent, which may have significant implications for elevated-temperature operation of hybrid ferromagnetic metal-semiconductor spintronic devices.

  1. Thermal dissociation of molten KHSO4: Temperature dependence of Raman spectra and thermodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Christian B.; Kalampounias, Angelos G.; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    2008-01-01

    intensities with the stoichiometric coefficients, the equilibrium constant, and the thermodynamics of the reaction equilibrium is derived. The method is used-along with the temperature-dependent features of the Raman spectra-to show that the studied equilibrium 2HSO(4)(-) (1) S2O72-(1) + H2O(g) is the only......Raman spectroscopy is used to study the thermal dissociation of molten KHSO4 at temperatures of 240-450 degrees C under static equilibrium conditions. Raman spectra obtained at 10 different temperatures for the molten phase and for the vapors thereof exhibit vibrational wavenumbers and relative...... band intensities inferring the occurrence of the temperature-dependent dissociation equilibrium 2HSO(4)(-) (1) S2O72-(1) + H2O(g). The Raman data are adequate for determining the partial pressures of H2O in the gas phase above the molten mixtures. A formalism for correlating relative Raman band...

  2. Unusual temperature dependence of the positron lifetime in a polymer of intrinsic microporosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima de Miranda, Rodrigo; Kruse, Jan; Raetzke, Klaus; Faupel, Franz [Technische Fakultaet der Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Lehrstuhl fuer Materialverbunde, Kaiserstr. 2, 24143 Kiel (Germany); Fritsch, Detlev; Abetz, Volker [Institut fuer Polymerforschung, GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Budd, Peter M.; Selbie, James D. [School of Chemistry, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); McKeown, Neil B.; Ghanem, Bader S. [School of Chemistry, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF10 3AT (United Kingdom)

    2007-10-15

    The performance of polymeric membranes for gas separation is mainly determined by the free volume. Polymers of intrinsic microporosity are interesting due to the high abundance of accessible free volume. We performed measurements of the temperature dependence of the positron lifetime, generally accepted for investigation of free volume, in two polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIM-1 and PIM-7) in the range from 143 to 523 K. The mean value of the free volume calculated from the ortho-positronium lifetime is in the range of typical values for high free volume polymers. However, the temperature dependence of the local free volume is non-monotonous in contrast to the macroscopic thermal expansion. The explanation is linked to the spirocenters in the polymer. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. Temperature dependence of the Brewer global UV measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountoulakis, Ilias; Redondas, Alberto; Lakkala, Kaisa; Berjon, Alberto; Bais, Alkiviadis F.; Doppler, Lionel; Feister, Uwe; Heikkila, Anu; Karppinen, Tomi; Karhu, Juha M.; Koskela, Tapani; Garane, Katerina; Fragkos, Konstantinos; Savastiouk, Volodya

    2017-11-01

    Spectral measurements of global UV irradiance recorded by Brewer spectrophotometers can be significantly affected by instrument-specific optical and mechanical features. Thus, proper corrections are needed in order to reduce the associated uncertainties to within acceptable levels. The present study aims to contribute to the reduction of uncertainties originating from changes in the Brewer internal temperature, which affect the performance of the optical and electronic parts, and subsequently the response of the instrument. Until now, measurements of the irradiance from various types of lamps at different temperatures have been used to characterize the instruments' temperature dependence. The use of 50 W lamps was found to induce errors in the characterization due to changes in the transmissivity of the Teflon diffuser as it warms up by the heat of the lamp. In contrast, the use of 200 or 1000 W lamps is considered more appropriate because they are positioned at longer distances from the diffuser so that warming is negligible. Temperature gradients inside the instrument can cause mechanical stresses which can affect the instrument's optical characteristics. Therefore, during the temperature-dependence characterization procedure warming or cooling must be slow enough to minimize these effects. In this study, results of the temperature characterization of eight different Brewer spectrophotometers operating in Greece, Finland, Germany and Spain are presented. It was found that the instruments' response changes differently in different temperature regions due to different responses of the diffusers' transmittance. The temperature correction factors derived for the Brewer spectrophotometers operating at Thessaloniki, Greece, and Sodankylä, Finland, were evaluated and were found to remove the temperature dependence of the instruments' sensitivity.

  4. Gas diffusion and temperature dependence of bubble nucleation during irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foreman, A. J. E.; Singh, Bachu Narain

    1986-01-01

    of the diatomic nucleation of helium bubbles, assuming helium to diffuse substitutionally, with radiation-enhanced diffusion at lower temperatures. The calculated temperature dependence of the bubble density shows excellent agreement with that observed in 600 MeV proton irradiations, including a reduction...... in activation energy below Tm/2. The coalescence of diatomic nuclei due to Brownian motion markedly improves the agreement and also provides a well-defined terminal density. Bubble nucleation by this mechanism is sufficiently fast to inhibit any appreciable initial loss of gas to grain boundaries during...

  5. Temperature dependent Raman scattering in YCrO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mall, A. K.; Mukherjee, S.; Sharma, Y.; Garg, A.; Gupta, R.

    2014-04-01

    High quality polycrystalline YCrO3 samples were synthesized using solid-state-reaction method. The samples were subsequently characterized using X-ray diffraction and magnetometry. Further, temperature dependent Raman spectroscopy over a spectral range from 100 to 800 cm-1 was used to examine the variation of phonons as a function of temperature from 90 to 300 K. In the low temperature ferroelectric phase of YCrO3, the observed phonon spectra showed softening of some Raman modes below the magnetic ordering temperature (TN ˜ 142K), suggesting a coupling between the spin and phonon degrees of freedom.

  6. Temperature dependence of photovoltaic cells, modules, and systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, K.; Burdick, J.; Caiyem, Y. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) cells and modules are often rated in terms of a set of standard reporting conditions defined by a temperature, spectral irradiance, and total irradiance. Because PV devices operates over a wide range of temperatures and irradiances, the temperature and irradiance related behavior must be known. This paper surveys the temperature dependence of crystalline and thin-film, state-of-the-art, research-size cells, modules, and systems measured by a variety of methods. The various error sources and measurement methods that contribute to cause differences in the temperature coefficient for a given cell or module measured with various methods are discussed.

  7. Ultra-capacitor electrical modeling using temperature dependent parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lajnef, W.; Briat, O.; Azzopardi, S.; Woirgard, E.; Vinassa, J.M. [Bordeaux-1 Univ., Lab. IXL CNRS UMR 5818 - ENSEIRB, 33 - Talence (France)

    2004-07-01

    This paper deals with ultra-capacitor electrical modeling. For a proper characterization and identification, a dedicated test bench is designed. First, the ultra-capacitor electric behavior is presented and an electrical model is proposed. The model parameters are identified using a combination of constant currents and frequency response measurements. Then, the temperature dependence of the ultra-capacitor parameters is investigated. Therefore, constant currents and impedance spectroscopy tests are done at different ambient temperatures. Finally, the electrical model parameters are adjusted according to temperature. (authors)

  8. Determination of sex from tooth pulp tissue | Veeraraghavan | Libyan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The cells were observed with fluorescent microscope for fluorescent body. Gender was determined by identification of Y chromosome fluorescence in dental pulp. Results: Freshly extracted teeth and for those examined one month later, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and efficiency ...

  9. The role of ultrasound in determining fetal sex | Gelaw | Ethiopian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The gender of a fetus is necessary to know for many different reasons. There are different ways of determining it during pregnancy. The recently developed method, which is relatively easy and noninvasive, is done by ultrasound of the fetal perineum. This can be done starting from 16 weeks of pregnancy in an ...

  10. The role of ultrasound in determining fetal sex

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    Conclusion: Ultrasound is a safe and a relatively accurate method of determining fetal gender that can be used at the .... Low lying. 4. 1.5. Total. 269. 100. From the total 275 fetuses included in the analysis, US finding showed that 132 (48.0%) were definitely male and all were confirmed to be so at birth, 90 (32.7%) were.

  11. A NEW HYPOTHESIS ON THE EVOLUTION OF SEX DETERMINATION IN VERTEBRATES - BIG FEMALES ZW, BIG MALES XY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KRAAK, SBM; DELOOZE, EMA

    1993-01-01

    Why are there two chromosomal sex-determining mechanisms in vertebrates; ZW/ZZ, meaning female heterogamety, and XX/XY, meaning male heterogamety? We propose an evolutionary explanation. Transition from environmental sex determination to genetic sex determination can result when an allele that

  12. The role of the transformer gene in sex determination and reproduction in the tephritid fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transformer (tra) is a double-switch gene in the somatic sex-determination hierarchy that regulates sexual dimorphism based on RNA splicing in many insects. In tephritids, a Y-linked male determining gene (M) controls sex in the sex-determination pathway. Here, homologues of Drosophila tra and trans...

  13. Temperature dependence of the kinetic isotope effect in β-pinene ozonolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gensch, Iulia; Laumer, Werner; Stein, Olaf; Kammer, Beatrix; Hohaus, Thorsten; Saathoff, Harald; Wegener, Robert; Wahner, Andreas; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid

    2011-10-01

    The temperature dependence of the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of β-pinene ozonolysis was investigated experimentally at 258, 273 and 303 K in the AIDA atmospheric simulation chamber. Compound specific carbon isotopic analysis of gas phase samples was performed off-line with a Thermo Desorption-Gas Chromatography-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (TD-GC-IRMS) system. From the temporal behavior of the δ13C of β-pinene a KIE of 1.00358 ± 0.00013 was derived at 303 K, in agreement with literature data. Furthermore, KIE values of 1.00380 ± 0.00014 at 273 K and 1.00539 ± 0.00012 at 258 K were determined, showing an increasing KIE with decreasing temperature. A parameterization of the observed KIE temperature dependence was deduced and used in a sensitivity study carried out with the global chemistry transport model MOZART-3. Two scenarios were compared, the first neglecting, the second implementing the KIE temperature dependence in the simulations. β-Pinene stable carbon isotope ratio and concentration were computed, with emphasis on boreal zones. For early spring it is shown that when neglecting the temperature dependence of KIE, the calculated average age of β-pinene in the atmosphere can be up to two times over- or underestimated. The evolution of the isotopic composition of the major β-pinene oxidation product, nopinone, was examined using Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM) simulations. The tested hypothesis that formation of nopinone and its associated KIE are the determining factors for the observed δ13C values of nopinone is supported at high β-pinene conversion levels.

  14. Mapping of five candidate sex-determining loci in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew Robert E

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rainbow trout have an XX/XY genetic mechanism of sex determination where males are the heterogametic sex. The homology of the sex-determining gene (SDG in medaka to Dmrt1 suggested that SDGs evolve from downstream genes by gene duplication. Orthologous sequences of the major genes of the mammalian sex determination pathway have been reported in the rainbow trout but the map position for the majority of these genes has not been assigned. Results Five loci of four candidate genes (Amh, Dax1, Dmrt1 and Sox6 were tested for linkage to the Y chromosome of rainbow trout. We exclude the role of all these loci as candidates for the primary SDG in this species. Sox6i and Sox6ii, duplicated copies of Sox6, mapped to homeologous linkage groups 10 and 18 respectively. Genotyping fishes of the OSU × Arlee mapping family for Sox6i and Sox6ii alleles indicated that Sox6i locus might be deleted in the Arlee lineage. Conclusion Additional candidate genes should be tested for their linkage to the Y chromosome. Mapping data of duplicated Sox6 loci supports previously suggested homeology between linkage groups 10 and 18. Enrichment of the rainbow trout genomic map with known gene markers allows map comparisons with other salmonids. Mapping of candidate sex-determining loci is important for analyses of potential autosomal modifiers of sex-determination in rainbow trout.

  15. Non-invasive prenatal testing for fetal sex determination: is ultrasound still relevant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmant, Claire; Morin-Surroca, Michèle; Fuchs, Florent; Fernandez, Hervé; Senat, Marie-Victoire

    2013-12-01

    Early prenatal diagnosis of fetal sex is necessary to optimize pregnancy management in families known to be at risk of some heritable disorders. The demonstration of cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) in the mother's blood has made it possible to identify Y chromosome sequences in maternal blood and to determine fetal sex noninvasively, during the first trimester. This procedure can significantly reduce the number of invasive procedures for women with fetuses at risk of sex-linked diseases and optimize the management of these pregnancies. Fetal sex can be diagnosed by ultrasound with the same sensitivity and specificity, but later in pregnancy. We performed a review of the published literature evaluating the use of cffDNA and ultrasound for prenatal determination of fetal sex during the first trimester of pregnancy. We present the feasibility of the two methods and their impact on clinical practice. We applied a sensitive search of multiple bibliographic databases including Pubmed (MEDLINE), EMBASE, the Cochrane Library and Web of science between 1998 and 2013. Sixteen reports of the determination of fetal sex in maternal blood and 13 reports of the determination by ultrasound met our inclusion criteria. We found a sensitivity and specificity of nearly 100% from 8 weeks of gestation for cffDNA and from 13 weeks of gestation for ultrasound respectively. Based on this review, we conclude that fetal sex can be determined with a high level of accuracy by analyzing cffDNA and at an earlier gestation than ultrasound. Ten years after the first feasibility study, the French National Authority for Health (HAS) released a technological assessment report on the determination of fetal sex in maternal blood, which has resulted in validating this test for reimbursement by the national health insurance fund for the following indications: X-linked recessive disease and congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  16. B chromosomes have a functional effect on female sex determination in Lake Victoria cichlid fishes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohta Yoshida

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The endemic cichlid fishes in Lake Victoria are a model system for speciation through adaptive radiation. Although the evolution of the sex-determination system may also play a role in speciation, little is known about the sex-determination system of Lake Victoria cichlids. To understand the evolution of the sex-determination system in these fish, we performed cytogenetic analysis in 11 cichlid species from Lake Victoria. B chromosomes, which are present in addition to standard chromosomes, were found at a high prevalence rate (85% in these cichlids. In one species, B chromosomes were female-specific. Cross-breeding using females with and without the B chromosomes demonstrated that the presence of the B chromosomes leads to a female-biased sex ratio in this species. Although B chromosomes were believed to be selfish genetic elements with little effect on phenotype and to lack protein-coding genes, the present study provides evidence that B chromosomes have a functional effect on female sex determination. FISH analysis using a BAC clone containing B chromosome DNA suggested that the B chromosomes are derived from sex chromosomes. Determination of the nucleotide sequences of this clone (104.5 kb revealed the presence of several protein-coding genes in the B chromosome, suggesting that B chromosomes have the potential to contain functional genes. Because some sex chromosomes in amphibians and arthropods are thought to be derived from B chromosomes, the B chromosomes in Lake Victoria cichlids may represent an evolutionary transition toward the generation of sex chromosomes.

  17. B chromosomes have a functional effect on female sex determination in Lake Victoria cichlid fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kohta; Terai, Yohey; Mizoiri, Shinji; Aibara, Mitsuto; Nishihara, Hidenori; Watanabe, Masakatsu; Kuroiwa, Asato; Hirai, Hirohisa; Hirai, Yuriko; Matsuda, Yoichi; Okada, Norihiro

    2011-08-01

    The endemic cichlid fishes in Lake Victoria are a model system for speciation through adaptive radiation. Although the evolution of the sex-determination system may also play a role in speciation, little is known about the sex-determination system of Lake Victoria cichlids. To understand the evolution of the sex-determination system in these fish, we performed cytogenetic analysis in 11 cichlid species from Lake Victoria. B chromosomes, which are present in addition to standard chromosomes, were found at a high prevalence rate (85%) in these cichlids. In one species, B chromosomes were female-specific. Cross-breeding using females with and without the B chromosomes demonstrated that the presence of the B chromosomes leads to a female-biased sex ratio in this species. Although B chromosomes were believed to be selfish genetic elements with little effect on phenotype and to lack protein-coding genes, the present study provides evidence that B chromosomes have a functional effect on female sex determination. FISH analysis using a BAC clone containing B chromosome DNA suggested that the B chromosomes are derived from sex chromosomes. Determination of the nucleotide sequences of this clone (104.5 kb) revealed the presence of several protein-coding genes in the B chromosome, suggesting that B chromosomes have the potential to contain functional genes. Because some sex chromosomes in amphibians and arthropods are thought to be derived from B chromosomes, the B chromosomes in Lake Victoria cichlids may represent an evolutionary transition toward the generation of sex chromosomes.

  18. Direct LAMP Assay without Prior DNA Purification for Sex Determination of Papaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chi-Chu; Shih, Huei-Chuan; Ko, Ya-Zhu; Wang, Ren-Huang; Li, Shu-Ju; Chiang, Yu-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Papaya (Carica papaya L.) is an economically important tropical fruit tree with hermaphrodite, male and female sex types. Hermaphroditic plants are the major type used for papaya production because their fruits have more commercial advantages than those of female plants. Sex determination of the seedlings, or during the early growth stages, is very important for the papaya seedling industry. Thus far, the only method for determining the sex type of a papaya at the seedling stage has been DNA analysis. In this study, a molecular technique—based on DNA analysis—was developed for detecting male-hermaphrodite-specific markers to examine the papaya’s sex type. This method is based on the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and does not require prior DNA purification. The results show that the method is an easy, efficient, and inexpensive way to determine a papaya’s sex. This is the first report on the LAMP assay, using intact plant materials-without DNA purification-as samples for the analysis of sex determination of papaya. We found that using high-efficiency DNA polymerase was essential for successful DNA amplification, using trace intact plant material as a template DNA source. PMID:27669237

  19. Direct LAMP Assay without Prior DNA Purification for Sex Determination of Papaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Chu Tsai

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Papaya (Carica papaya L. is an economically important tropical fruit tree with hermaphrodite, male and female sex types. Hermaphroditic plants are the major type used for papaya production because their fruits have more commercial advantages than those of female plants. Sex determination of the seedlings, or during the early growth stages, is very important for the papaya seedling industry. Thus far, the only method for determining the sex type of a papaya at the seedling stage has been DNA analysis. In this study, a molecular technique—based on DNA analysis—was developed for detecting male-hermaphrodite-specific markers to examine the papaya’s sex type. This method is based on the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP and does not require prior DNA purification. The results show that the method is an easy, efficient, and inexpensive way to determine a papaya’s sex. This is the first report on the LAMP assay, using intact plant materials-without DNA purification-as samples for the analysis of sex determination of papaya. We found that using high-efficiency DNA polymerase was essential for successful DNA amplification, using trace intact plant material as a template DNA source.

  20. Direct LAMP Assay without Prior DNA Purification for Sex Determination of Papaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chi-Chu; Shih, Huei-Chuan; Ko, Ya-Zhu; Wang, Ren-Huang; Li, Shu-Ju; Chiang, Yu-Chung

    2016-09-24

    Papaya (Carica papaya L.) is an economically important tropical fruit tree with hermaphrodite, male and female sex types. Hermaphroditic plants are the major type used for papaya production because their fruits have more commercial advantages than those of female plants. Sex determination of the seedlings, or during the early growth stages, is very important for the papaya seedling industry. Thus far, the only method for determining the sex type of a papaya at the seedling stage has been DNA analysis. In this study, a molecular technique-based on DNA analysis-was developed for detecting male-hermaphrodite-specific markers to examine the papaya's sex type. This method is based on the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and does not require prior DNA purification. The results show that the method is an easy, efficient, and inexpensive way to determine a papaya's sex. This is the first report on the LAMP assay, using intact plant materials-without DNA purification-as samples for the analysis of sex determination of papaya. We found that using high-efficiency DNA polymerase was essential for successful DNA amplification, using trace intact plant material as a template DNA source.

  1. Sex determination from the calcaneus in a 20th century Greek population using discriminant function analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckmann, Tanya R; Orr, Kayla; Meek, Susan; Manolis, Sotiris K

    2015-12-01

    The skull and post-cranium have been used for the determination of sex for unknown human remains. However, in forensic cases where skeletal remains often exhibit postmortem damage and taphonomic changes the calcaneus may be used for the determination of sex as it is a preservationally favored bone. The goal of the present research was to derive discriminant function equations from the calcaneus for estimation of sex from a contemporary Greek population. Nine parameters were measured on 198 individuals (103 males and 95 females), ranging in age from 20 to 99 years old, from the University of Athens Human Skeletal Reference Collection. The statistical analyses showed that all variables were sexually dimorphic. Discriminant function score equations were generated for use in sex determination. The average accuracy of sex classification ranged from 70% to 90% for the univariate analysis, 82.9% to 87.5% for the direct method, and 86.2% for the stepwise method. Comparisons to other populations were made. Overall, the cross-validated accuracies ranged from 48.6% to 56.1% with males most often identified correctly and females most often misidentified. The calcaneus was shown to be useful for sex determination in the twentieth century Greek population. Copyright © 2015 The Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Sex determination from the talus in a contemporary Greek population using discriminant function analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckmann, Tanya R; Orr, Kayla; Meek, Susan; Manolis, Sotiris K

    2015-07-01

    The determination of sex is an important part of building the biological profile for unknown human remains. Many of the bones traditionally used for the determination of sex are often found fragmented or incomplete in forensic and archaeological cases. The goal of the present research was to derive discriminant function equations from the talus, a preservationally favoured bone, for sexing skeletons from a contemporary Greek population. Nine parameters were measured on 182 individuals (96 males and 86 females) from the University of Athens Human Skeletal Reference Collection. The individuals ranged in age from 20 to 99 years old. The statistical analyses showed that all measured parameters were sexually dimorphic. Discriminant function score equations were generated for use in sex determination. The average accuracy of sex classification ranged from 65.2% to 93.4% for the univariate analysis, 90%-96.5% for the direct method and 86.7% for the stepwise method. Comparisons to other populations were made. Overall, the cross-validated accuracies ranged from 65.5% to 83.2% and males were most often correctly identified. The talus was shown to be useful for sex determination in the modern Greek population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  3. Involvement of androgen receptor in sex determination in an amphibian species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Fujii

    Full Text Available In mice and humans, the androgen receptor (AR gene, located on the X chromosome, is not known to be involved in sex determination. In the Japanese frog Rana rugosa the AR is located on the sex chromosomes (X, Y, Z and W. Phylogenetic analysis shows that the AR on the X chromosome (X-AR of the Korean R. rugosa is basal and segregates into two clusters: one containing W-AR of Japanese R. rugosa, the other containing Y-AR. AR expression is twice as high in ZZ (male compared to ZW (female embryos in which the W-AR is barely expressed. Higher AR-expression may be associated with male sex determination in this species. To examine whether the Z-AR is involved in sex determination in R. rugosa, we produced transgenic (Tg frogs carrying an exogenous Z-AR. Analysis of ZW Tg frogs revealed development of masculinized gonads or 'ovotestes'. Expression of CYP17 and Dmrt1, genes known to be activated during normal male gonadal development, were up-regulated in the ZW ovotestis. Testosterone, supplied to the rearing water, completed the female-to-male sex-reversal in the AR-Tg ZW frogs. Here we report that Z-AR is involved in male sex-determination in an amphibian species.

  4. Mapping the sex determination locus in the Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) using RAD sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaiokostas, Christos; Bekaert, Michaël; Davie, Andrew; Cowan, Mairi E; Oral, Münevver; Taggart, John B; Gharbi, Karim; McAndrew, Brendan J; Penman, David J; Migaud, Hervé

    2013-08-20

    Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) is a high-value, niche market species for cold-water marine aquaculture. Production of monosex female stocks is desirable in commercial production since females grow faster and mature later than males. Understanding the sex determination mechanism and developing sex-associated markers will shorten the time for the development of monosex female production, thus decreasing the costs of farming. Halibut juveniles were masculinised with 17 α-methyldihydrotestosterone (MDHT) and grown to maturity. Progeny groups from four treated males were reared and sexed. Two of these groups (n = 26 and 70) consisted of only females, while the other two (n = 30 and 71) contained balanced sex ratios (50% and 48% females respectively). DNA from parents and offspring from the two mixed-sex families were used as a template for Restriction-site Associated DNA (RAD) sequencing. The 648 million raw reads produced 90,105 unique RAD-tags. A linkage map was constructed based on 5703 Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) markers and 7 microsatellites consisting of 24 linkage groups, which corresponds to the number of chromosome pairs in this species. A major sex determining locus was mapped to linkage group 13 in both families. Assays for 10 SNPs with significant association with phenotypic sex were tested in both population data and in 3 additional families. Using a variety of machine-learning algorithms 97% correct classification could be obtained with the 3% of errors being phenotypic males predicted to be females. Altogether our findings support the hypothesis that the Atlantic halibut has an XX/XY sex determination system. Assays are described for sex-associated DNA markers developed from the RAD sequencing analysis to fast track progeny testing and implement monosex female halibut production for an immediate improvement in productivity. These should also help to speed up the inclusion of neomales derived from many families to maintain a

  5. Identification of the sex-determining locus in grass puffer (Takifugu niphobles) provides evidence for sex-chromosome turnover in a subset of Takifugu species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atsumi, Kazufumi; Kamiya, Takashi; Nozawa, Aoi; Aoki, Yuma; Tasumi, Satoshi; Koyama, Takashi; Nakamura, Osamu; Suzuki, Yuzuru

    2018-01-01

    There is increasing evidence for frequent turnover in sex chromosomes in vertebrates. Yet experimental systems suitable for tracing the detailed process of turnover are rare. In theory, homologous turnover is possible if the new sex-determining locus is established on the existing sex-chromosome. However, there is no empirical evidence for such an event. The genus Takifugu includes fugu (Takifugu rubripes) and its two closely-related species whose sex is most likely determined by a SNP at the Amhr2 locus. In these species, males are heterozygous, with G and C alleles at the SNP site, while females are homozygous for the C allele. To determine if a shift in the sex-determining locus occurred in another member of this genus, we used genetic mapping to characterize the sex-chromosome systems of Takifugu niphobles. We found that the G allele of Amhr2 is absent in T. niphobles. Nevertheless, our initial mapping suggests a linkage between the phenotypic sex and the chromosome 19, which harbors the Amhr2 locus. Subsequent high-resolution analysis using a sex-reversed fish demonstrated that the sex-determining locus maps to the proximal end of chromosome 19, far from the Amhr2 locus. Thus, it is likely that homologous turnover involving these species has occurred. The data also showed that there is a male-specific reduction of recombination around the sex-determining locus. Nevertheless, no evidence for sex-chromosome differentiation was detected: the reduced recombination depended on phenotypic sex rather than genotypic sex; no X- or Y-specific maker was obtained; the YY individual was viable. Furthermore, fine-scale mapping narrowed down the new sex-determining locus to the interval corresponding to approximately 300-kb of sequence in the fugu genome. Thus, T. niphobles is determined to have a young and small sex-determining region that is suitable for studying an early phase of sex-chromosome evolution and the mechanisms underlying turnover of sex chromosome. PMID

  6. Identification of the sex-determining locus in grass puffer (Takifugu niphobles provides evidence for sex-chromosome turnover in a subset of Takifugu species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risa Ieda

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence for frequent turnover in sex chromosomes in vertebrates. Yet experimental systems suitable for tracing the detailed process of turnover are rare. In theory, homologous turnover is possible if the new sex-determining locus is established on the existing sex-chromosome. However, there is no empirical evidence for such an event. The genus Takifugu includes fugu (Takifugu rubripes and its two closely-related species whose sex is most likely determined by a SNP at the Amhr2 locus. In these species, males are heterozygous, with G and C alleles at the SNP site, while females are homozygous for the C allele. To determine if a shift in the sex-determining locus occurred in another member of this genus, we used genetic mapping to characterize the sex-chromosome systems of Takifugu niphobles. We found that the G allele of Amhr2 is absent in T. niphobles. Nevertheless, our initial mapping suggests a linkage between the phenotypic sex and the chromosome 19, which harbors the Amhr2 locus. Subsequent high-resolution analysis using a sex-reversed fish demonstrated that the sex-determining locus maps to the proximal end of chromosome 19, far from the Amhr2 locus. Thus, it is likely that homologous turnover involving these species has occurred. The data also showed that there is a male-specific reduction of recombination around the sex-determining locus. Nevertheless, no evidence for sex-chromosome differentiation was detected: the reduced recombination depended on phenotypic sex rather than genotypic sex; no X- or Y-specific maker was obtained; the YY individual was viable. Furthermore, fine-scale mapping narrowed down the new sex-determining locus to the interval corresponding to approximately 300-kb of sequence in the fugu genome. Thus, T. niphobles is determined to have a young and small sex-determining region that is suitable for studying an early phase of sex-chromosome evolution and the mechanisms underlying turnover of sex

  7. Image analysis of pubic bone for sex determination in a computed tomography sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Alcaraz, Manuel; Garamendi González, Pedro Manuel; Alemán Aguilera, Inmaculada; Botella López, Miguel

    2013-11-01

    Radiology has demonstrated great utility for sex determination, but most studies are based in metrical and morphological methods in order to perform an identification profile. It is presented an easy image analysis-based method aimed to demonstrate the relationship between the bony tissue ultrastructure and sex by using several grey level histogram variables obtained from computed tomography images using sagittal sections of the pubic symphysis surface and the body of the pubis. The CT sample consisted of 169 hospital DICOM archives of known sex and age. The multivariate binary logistic regression models calculated showed reliabilities for sex determination between 87.4 and 95.8 %, with a high intra and inter-observer agreement. The suggested method is not only considered useful to perform an identification profile during Virtopsy, but even for application in further studies in order to attach a quantitative correlation for tissue ultrastructure characteristics without complex and expensive methods beyond image analysis.

  8. Modeling and Compensating Temperature-Dependent Non-Uniformity Noise in IR Microbolometer Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Alejandro; Pezoa, Jorge E.; Figueroa, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Images rendered by uncooled microbolometer-based infrared (IR) cameras are severely degraded by the spatial non-uniformity (NU) noise. The NU noise imposes a fixed-pattern over the true images, and the intensity of the pattern changes with time due to the temperature instability of such cameras. In this paper, we present a novel model and a compensation algorithm for the spatial NU noise and its temperature-dependent variations. The model separates the NU noise into two components: a constant term, which corresponds to a set of NU parameters determining the spatial structure of the noise, and a dynamic term, which scales linearly with the fluctuations of the temperature surrounding the array of microbolometers. We use a black-body radiator and samples of the temperature surrounding the IR array to offline characterize both the constant and the temperature-dependent NU noise parameters. Next, the temperature-dependent variations are estimated online using both a spatially uniform Hammerstein-Wiener estimator and a pixelwise least mean squares (LMS) estimator. We compensate for the NU noise in IR images from two long-wave IR cameras. Results show an excellent NU correction performance and a root mean square error of less than 0.25 ∘C, when the array’s temperature varies by approximately 15 ∘C. PMID:27447637

  9. Molecular modeling of temperature dependence of solubility parameters for amorphous polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xianping; Yuan, Cadmus; Wong, Cell K Y; Zhang, Guoqi

    2012-06-01

    A molecular modeling strategy is proposed to describe the temperature (T) dependence of solubility parameter (δ) for the amorphous polymers which exhibit glass-rubber transition behavior. The commercial forcefield "COMPASS" is used to support the atomistic simulations of the polymer. The temperature dependence behavior of δ for the polymer is modeled by running molecular dynamics (MD) simulation at temperatures ranging from 250 up to 650 K. Comparing the MD predicted δ value at 298 K and the glass transition temperature (T(g)) of the polymer determined from δ-T curve with the experimental value confirm the accuracy of our method. The MD modeled relationship between δ and T agrees well with the previous theoretical works. We also observe the specific volume (v), cohesive energy (U(coh)), cohesive energy density (E(CED)) and δ shows a similar temperature dependence characteristics and a drastic change around the T(g). Meanwhile, the applications of δ and its temperature dependence property are addressed and discussed.

  10. Comparing the temperature dependence of photosynthetic electron transfer in Chloroflexus aurantiacus and Rhodobactor sphaeroides reaction centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhi; Lin, Su; Xin, Yueyong; Wang, Haiyu; Blankenship, Robert E; Woodbury, Neal W

    2011-09-29

    The process of electron transfer from the special pair, P, to the primary electron donor, H(A), in quinone-depleted reaction centers (RCs) of Chloroflexus (Cf.) aurantiacus has been investigated over the temperature range from 10 to 295 K using time-resolved pump-probe spectroscopic techniques. The kinetics of the electron transfer reaction, P* → P(+)H(A)(-), was found to be nonexponential, and the degree of nonexponentiality increased strongly as temperature decreased. The temperature-dependent behavior of electron transfer in Cf. aurantiacus RCs was compared with that of the purple bacterium Rhodobacter (Rb.) sphaeroides . Distinct transitions were found in the temperature-dependent kinetics of both Cf. aurantiacus and Rb. sphaeroides RCs, at around 220 and 160 K, respectively. Structural differences between these two RCs, which may be associated with those differences, are discussed. It is suggested that weaker protein-cofactor hydrogen bonding, stronger electrostatic interactions at the protein surface, and larger solvent interactions likely contribute to the higher transition temperature in Cf. aurantiacus RCs temperature-dependent kinetics compared with that of Rb. sphaeroides RCs. The reaction-diffusion model provides an accurate description for the room-temperature electron transfer kinetics in Cf. aurantiacus RCs with no free parameters, using coupling and reorganization energy values previously determined for Rb. sphaeroides , along with an experimental measure of protein conformational diffusion dynamics and an experimental literature value of the free energy gap between P* and P(+)H(A)(-). © 2011 American Chemical Society

  11. Temperature dependence of amino acid side chain IR absorptions in the amide I' region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Benjamin A; Literati, Alex; Ball, Borden; Kubelka, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Amide I' IR spectra are widely used for studies of structural changes in peptides and proteins as a function of temperature. Temperature dependent absorptions of amino acid side-chains that overlap the amide I' may significantly complicate the structural analyses. While the side-chain IR spectra have been investigated previously, thus far their dependence on temperature has not been reported. Here we present the study of the changes in the IR spectra with temperature for side-chain groups of aspartate, glutamate, asparagine, glutamine, arginine, and tyrosine in the amide I' region (in D2O). Band fitting analysis was employed to extract the temperature dependence of the individual spectral parameters, such as peak frequency, integrated intensity, band width, and shape. As expected, the side-chain IR bands exhibit significant changes with temperature. The majority of the spectral parameters, particularly the frequency and intensity, show linear dependence on temperature, but the direction and magnitude vary depending on the particular side-chain group. The exception is arginine, which exhibits a distinctly nonlinear frequency shift with temperature for its asymmetric CN3H5(+) bending signal, although a linear fit can account for this change to within ~1/3 cm(-1). The applicability of the determined spectral parameters for estimations of temperature-dependent side-chain absorptions in peptides and proteins are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Modeling and Compensating Temperature-Dependent Non-Uniformity Noise in IR Microbolometer Cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Wolf

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Images rendered by uncooled microbolometer-based infrared (IR cameras are severely degraded by the spatial non-uniformity (NU noise. The NU noise imposes a fixed-pattern over the true images, and the intensity of the pattern changes with time due to the temperature instability of such cameras. In this paper, we present a novel model and a compensation algorithm for the spatial NU noise and its temperature-dependent variations. The model separates the NU noise into two components: a constant term, which corresponds to a set of NU parameters determining the spatial structure of the noise, and a dynamic term, which scales linearly with the fluctuations of the temperature surrounding the array of microbolometers. We use a black-body radiator and samples of the temperature surrounding the IR array to offline characterize both the constant and the temperature-dependent NU noise parameters. Next, the temperature-dependent variations are estimated online using both a spatially uniform Hammerstein-Wiener estimator and a pixelwise least mean squares (LMS estimator. We compensate for the NU noise in IR images from two long-wave IR cameras. Results show an excellent NU correction performance and a root mean square error of less than 0.25 ∘ C, when the array’s temperature varies by approximately 15 ∘ C.

  13. Estimation of the temperature dependent interaction between uncharged point defects in Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiyama, Eiji [Department of Communication Engineering, Okayama Prefectural University, 111 Kuboki, Soja-shi, Okayama-ken 719-1197 (Japan); GlobalWafers Japan Co., Ltd., 30 Soya, Hadano, Kanagawa, 257-8566 (Japan); Vanhellemont, Jan [Department of Solid State Sciences, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281-S1, Ghent B-9000 (Belgium); Sueoka, Koji [Department of Communication Engineering, Okayama Prefectural University, 111 Kuboki, Soja-shi, Okayama-ken 719-1197 (Japan)

    2015-01-15

    A method is described to estimate the temperature dependent interaction between two uncharged point defects in Si based on DFT calculations. As an illustration, the formation of the uncharged di-vacancy V{sub 2} is discussed, based on the temperature dependent attractive field between both vacancies. For that purpose, all irreducible configurations of two uncharged vacancies are determined, each with their weight given by the number of equivalent configurations. Using a standard 216-atoms supercell, nineteen irreducible configurations of two vacancies are obtained. The binding energies of all these configurations are calculated. Each vacancy is surrounded by several attractive sites for another vacancy. The obtained temperature dependent of total volume of these attractive sites has a radius that is closely related with the capture radius for the formation of a di-vacancy that is used in continuum theory. The presented methodology can in principle also be applied to estimate the capture radius for pair formation of any type of point defects.

  14. Temperature dependence of critical currents in REBCO thin films with artificial pinning centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Kaname; Nishihara, Masaya; Kimoto, Takamasa; Horide, Tomoya; Jha, Alok Kumar; Yoshida, Yutaka; Awaji, Satoshi; Ichinose, Ataru

    2017-10-01

    Conventionally, δT c type (order parameter modulation) and δl type (mean free path modulation) pinning mechanisms have been proposed to explain the temperature dependence of the flux pinning of superconducting materials. According to previous studies, it is assumed that the temperature dependence of J c of REBa2Cu3O7 (REBCO, RE = Y, Gd, Sm, etc) films without artificial pinning centers (APCs) is δl type, but it is unidentified when APCs are introduced into the films. In this paper, GdBCO thin films doped with BaHfO3 (BHO) deposited on LaAlO3 substrates by pulsed laser deposition were studied. A target exchange method was used to alternately ablate two targets of pure GdBCO and BHO for introducing nanorods as APCs into GdBCO films. Since the insulative BHO acts as a strong pinning center, the δT c pinning mechanism is expected for the temperature dependence of J c of these thin films. However, the experimental results showed that the J c of the films with BHO nanorods was determined by the δl pinning mechanism over a wide temperature range. In order to explain these unexpected results, we examined the pinning mechanism by nanorods based on a resultant pinning force model.

  15. Use of radioimmunoassay procedures for the determination of sex hormones in animal tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, B. (Institut fuer Veterinaermedizin des Bundesgesundheitsamtes (Robert von Ostertag-Institut), Berlin (Germany, F.R.))

    1983-07-01

    Radioimmunoassay methods for the determination of sex steroids and other compounds with sex hormone-like activities in various edible animal tissues and endocrine glands have been developed. Reliability of these methods, allowing quantification in a range of 10/sup -11/ M, has been adequately demonstrated. When applied to monitoring residues of anabolic sex hormones in edible tissues of veal calves, physiological baseline levels of some endogenous ''anabolic'' steroids (like testosterone, oestrogens) were established; in the case of xenobiotics residues at the scheduled time of slaughter could be quantified (trenbolone) and a regulatory method to implement the ban of diethylstilbestrol was introduced.

  16. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence and Raman investigation of Cu-incorporated ZnO nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, J.L. [Institute of Micro/Nano Devices and Solar Cells, School of Physics and Information Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou (China); Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center of Photovolatic Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164, Jiangsu (China); Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials Science, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Lai, Y.F., E-mail: laiyunfeng@gmail.com [Institute of Micro/Nano Devices and Solar Cells, School of Physics and Information Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou (China); Cheng, S.Y.; Zheng, Q. [Institute of Micro/Nano Devices and Solar Cells, School of Physics and Information Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou (China); Chen, Y.H. [Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials Science, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2015-05-15

    Temperature-dependent Raman and photoluminescence (PL) investigation of Cu-incorporated ZnO nanorods prepared by hydrothermal method have been investigated. A strong broad violet–blue emission has been observed in the PL spectra of Cu-incorporated ZnO nanorods, which decreases dramatically with increasing temperature. By Gaussian fitting, this peak can be resolved into two peaks centered at around 393 and 405 nm, respectively, under a temperature of 8 K. The origins of these two peaks are discussed. Temperature-dependent energies of neutral donor bound exciton (D{sup 0}X) are analyzed, and the Einstein temperature is deduced to be around 343±44 K, which do not show significant change compared with that without Cu incorporation. An activation energy of about 14±1 meV is determined from the quenching of D{sup 0}X as a function of temperature in the Cu-incorporated ZnO nanorods, which is much smaller than that deduced in the undoped ZnO nanorods (about 22±2 meV). The small activation energy can be attributed to the additional nonradiative centers introduced by Cu incorporation. The high concentration of defects and impurities in the Cu-incorporated ZnO nanorods are also confirmed by the larger value of the line width of the Raman spectra and its temperature-dependent relationship. - Highlights: • A strong violet–blue emission is observed in the PL spectra of ZnO:Cu nanorods. • This emission can be resolved into two peaks by Gaussian fitting. • Activation energy of the nonradiative centers and Einstein temperature is deduced. • The small activation energy indicates the additional nonradiative centers. • The temperature-dependent Raman spectra indicates more defects in the doping sample.

  17. Inferring the temperature dependence of population parameters: the effects of experimental design and inference algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palamara, Gian Marco; Childs, Dylan Z; Clements, Christopher F; Petchey, Owen L; Plebani, Marco; Smith, Matthew J

    2014-12-01

    Understanding and quantifying the temperature dependence of population parameters, such as intrinsic growth rate and carrying capacity, is critical for predicting the ecological responses to environmental change. Many studies provide empirical estimates of such temperature dependencies, but a thorough investigation of the methods used to infer them has not been performed yet. We created artificial population time series using a stochastic logistic model parameterized with the Arrhenius equation, so that activation energy drives the temperature dependence of population parameters. We simulated different experimental designs and used different inference methods, varying the likelihood functions and other aspects of the parameter estimation methods. Finally, we applied the best performing inference methods to real data for the species Paramecium caudatum. The relative error of the estimates of activation energy varied between 5% and 30%. The fraction of habitat sampled played the most important role in determining the relative error; sampling at least 1% of the habitat kept it below 50%. We found that methods that simultaneously use all time series data (direct methods) and methods that estimate population parameters separately for each temperature (indirect methods) are complementary. Indirect methods provide a clearer insight into the shape of the functional form describing the temperature dependence of population parameters; direct methods enable a more accurate estimation of the parameters of such functional forms. Using both methods, we found that growth rate and carrying capacity of Paramecium caudatum scale with temperature according to different activation energies. Our study shows how careful choice of experimental design and inference methods can increase the accuracy of the inferred relationships between temperature and population parameters. The comparison of estimation methods provided here can increase the accuracy of model predictions, with important

  18. Environmentally Induced Epigenetic Transgenerational Inheritance of Altered SRY Genomic Binding During Gonadal Sex Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Michael K; Bhandari, Ramji K; Haque, M Muksitul; Nilsson, Eric E

    2015-12-01

    A critical transcription factor required for mammalian male sex determination is SRY (sex determining region on the Y chromosome). The expression of SRY in precursor Sertoli cells is one of the initial events in testis development. The current study was designed to determine the impact of environmentally induced epigenetic transgenerational inheritance on SRY binding during gonadal sex determination in the male. The agricultural fungicide vinclozolin and vehicle control (DMSO) exposed gestating females (F0 generation) during gonadal sex determination promoted the transgenerational inheritance of differential DNA methylation in sperm of the F3 generation (great grand-offspring). The fetal gonads in F3 generation males were used to identify potential alterations in SRY binding sites in the developing Sertoli cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation with an SRY antibody followed by genome-wide promoter tiling array (ChIP-Chip) was used to identify alterations in SRY binding. A total of 81 adjacent oligonucleotide sites and 173 single oligo SRY binding sites were identified to be altered transgenerationally in the Sertoli cell vinclozolin lineage F3 generation males. Observations demonstrate the majority of the previously identified normal SRY binding sites were not altered and the altered SRY binding sites were novel and new additional sites. The chromosomal locations, gene associations and potentially modified cellular pathways were investigated. In summary, environmentally induced epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of germline epimutations appears to alter the cellular differentiation and development of the precursor Sertoli cell SRY binding during gonadal sex determination that influence the developmental origins of adult onset testis disease.

  19. Determinants of Declining Child Sex Ratio in India: An Empirical Investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Chakraborty, Lekha S.; Sinha, Darshy

    2006-01-01

    Using fixed effects model of pooled least squares for the last four decennial census data across fifteen major states in India; the paper examined the determinants of declining child sex ratio in India. The results suggest that the child sex ratio is inversely related to the spatial socio-economic characteristics, in particular, female literacy rate and female economic activity rate; with relatively higher elasticity coefficients for urban India. The spatial spillover effects associated with ...

  20. R-spondin1 is essential in sex determination, skin differentiation and malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parma, Pietro; Radi, Orietta; Vidal, Valerie; Chaboissier, Marie Christine; Dellambra, Elena; Valentini, Stella; Guerra, Liliana; Schedl, Andreas; Camerino, Giovanna

    2006-11-01

    R-spondins are a recently characterized small family of growth factors. Here we show that human R-spondin1 (RSPO1) is the gene disrupted in a recessive syndrome characterized by XX sex reversal, palmoplantar hyperkeratosis and predisposition to squamous cell carcinoma of the skin. Our data show, for the first time, that disruption of a single gene can lead to complete female-to-male sex reversal in the absence of the testis-determining gene, SRY.

  1. QTL Mapping of Sex Determination Loci Supports an Ancient Pathway in Ants and Honey Bees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misato O Miyakawa

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sex determination mechanisms play a central role in life-history characteristics, affecting mating systems, sex ratios, inbreeding tolerance, etc. Downstream components of sex determination pathways are highly conserved, but upstream components evolve rapidly. Evolutionary dynamics of sex determination remain poorly understood, particularly because mechanisms appear so diverse. Here we investigate the origins and evolution of complementary sex determination (CSD in ants and bees. The honey bee has a well-characterized CSD locus, containing tandemly arranged homologs of the transformer gene [complementary sex determiner (csd and feminizer (fem]. Such tandem paralogs appear frequently in aculeate hymenopteran genomes. However, only comparative genomic, but not functional, data support a broader role for csd/fem in sex determination, and whether species other than the honey bee use this pathway remains controversial. Here we used a backcross to test whether csd/fem acts as a CSD locus in an ant (Vollenhovia emeryi. After sequencing and assembling the genome, we computed a linkage map, and conducted a quantitative trait locus (QTL analysis of diploid male production using 68 diploid males and 171 workers. We found two QTLs on separate linkage groups (CsdQTL1 and CsdQTL2 that jointly explained 98.0% of the phenotypic variance. CsdQTL1 included two tandem transformer homologs. These data support the prediction that the same CSD mechanism has indeed been conserved for over 100 million years. CsdQTL2 had no similarity to CsdQTL1 and included a 236-kb region with no obvious CSD gene candidates, making it impossible to conclusively characterize it using our data. The sequence of this locus was conserved in at least one other ant genome that diverged >75 million years ago. By applying QTL analysis to ants for the first time, we support the hypothesis that elements of hymenopteran CSD are ancient, but also show that more remains to be learned about the

  2. Different male vs. female breeding periodicity helps mitigate offspring sex ratio skews in sea turtles

    OpenAIRE

    Hays, Graeme C.; Mazaris, Antonios D.; Schofield, Gail

    2014-01-01

    The implications of climate change for global biodiversity may be profound with those species with little capacity for adaptation being thought to be particularly vulnerable to warming. A classic case of groups for concern are those animals exhibiting temperature-dependent sex-determination (TSD), such as sea turtles, where climate warming may produce single sex populations and hence extinction. We show that, globally, female biased hatchling sex ratios dominate sea turtle populations (exceed...

  3. Different male versus female breeding periodicity helps mitigate offspring sex ratio skews in sea turtles

    OpenAIRE

    Graeme Clive Hays; Gail eSchofield; Antonios D Mazaris

    2014-01-01

    The implications of climate change for global biodiversity may be profound with those species with little capacity for adaptation being thought to be particularly vulnerable to warming. A classic case of groups for concern are those animals exhibiting temperature-dependent sex-determination (TSD), such as sea turtles, where climate warming may produce single sex populations and hence extinction. We show that, globally, female biased hatchling sex ratios dominate sea turtle populations (exceed...

  4. Sex Determination of Japanese Quails (Coturnix Coturnix Japonica using with Zoometric Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tülin Çiçek Rathert

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The difficulty of sex determination in most poultry species causes significant financial losses for poultry production as birds cannot be separated at early stages of growth for meat or egg production. Therefore it is important to determine bird’s sex with zoometric parameters. This study was carried out to determine the sex of Japanese quails with zoometric measurements, such as live weight, body length, chest depth and chest width. Eighty-eight male and female Japanese quail chicks were used individually for live weight, chest depth (mm, chest width (mm and body length (mm with using digital scaled balance and caliper for every week over a period of six weeks. The weekly collected data were applied to t test for estimating the sex discrimination. The Pearson’s correlation was applied for examining the interrelationship between sex and biometric traits. The results indicated that there was a significant positive correlation between live weight and body length beginning with the 2nd week. Therefore, zoometric measurement of these body traits is suitable for discriminating the sex of Japanese quails in early phase of life.

  5. Determination of sex by discriminant function analysis of mandibles from a Central Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wankhede, Kanchankumar P; Bardale, Rajesh V; Chaudhari, Gunwant R; Kamdi, Namdeo Y

    2015-01-01

    Identification of sex from skeletal remains is one of the important forensic considerations. Discriminant function analysis is increasingly used to determine the sex from skeleton. To develop discriminant function to determine sex from mandible in a Central Indian population. This was a prospective study done at the Department of Anatomy. The mandibles used in the present study were from the museum specimens. Only 82 adult mandibles (55 male and 27 female) that had been preserved were selected. Ten mandibular parameters were measured. Statistical analysis was conducted using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) for Windows, version 16. The level of statistical significance was set at P discriminant function analysis, only six variables were selected as the best discriminant between sexes, with the projection length of corpus mandibulae being the most dimorphic. It was observed that sex classification accuracy of the discriminant functions ranged from 57.3 to 80.5% for the individual variables, 81.7% for the stepwise method, and 85.4% for the direct method. The results of the study show that mandibles can be used for determining sex and the results are comparable with other similar studies. The studied mandibular variables showed sexual dimorphism with an accuracy comparable with other skeletal remains, next to cranium and pelvis.

  6. Sex determination in the haplodiploid wasp Nasonia vitripennis (Hymenoptera Chalcidoidea) : A critical consideration of models and evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukeboom, Leo W.; Kamping, Albert; van de Zande, Louis

    Sex determining mechanisms are highly diverse. Like all Hymenoptera, the parasitic wasp Nasonia vitripennis reproduces by haplodiploidy: males are haploid and females are diploid. Sex in Nasonia is not determined by complementary alleles at sex loci. Evidence for several alternative models is

  7. THE METHOD OF POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION FOR SEX DETERMINATION IN HUCHEN (HUCHO HUCHO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. Rud

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To analyse the nucleotide sequences of salmonids Y chromosome and to determine the fragment for specific primers selection and also to develop the PCR based method for sex determination in huchen H. hucho. Methodology. Using the ClustalW algorithm in MEGA 5.2, the nucleotide sequences of salmonids Y chromosome were analysed. For developing of method for rapid diagnostic of huchen sex the polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay was used. Tne nucleotide sequences of amplified products were investigated by sequencing. Findings. Using PCR assay the method of sex determination in huchen H. hucho was developed. It was shown that specific PCR products in size of 450 nucleotides were visible in huchen males only. In addition we showed that selected primers can be used in sex determination of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and this fact is proved the high rate of sdY locus similarity and its wide destribution in salmonids. Originality. The nucleotide sequences of salmonids Y chromosome were analysed and highly conservative region of sdY locus for specific primers selection, which covers sex-linked marker, was identified. Practical Value. Rapid sex determination in huchen by the developed method will allow to identify reversal males in process of gormonal sex reversion. At the stage of reversal males screening, this method will allow to identify the genotypic males (XY in experimental group and discard them because only phenotypic males with XX genotype (reversal males must be used in the crosses with native femelas for getting of 100 % all-females stock.

  8. Temperature Dependent Variations of Phonon Interactions in Nanocrystalline Cerium Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugandha Dogra Pandey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature dependent anharmonic behavior of the phonon modes of nanocrystalline CeO2 was investigated in the temperature range of 80–440 K. The anharmonic constants have been derived from the shift in phonon modes fitted to account for the anharmonic contributions as well as the thermal expansion contribution using the high pressure parameters derived from our own high pressure experimental data reported previously. The total anharmonicity has also been estimated from the true anharmonicity as well as quasiharmonic component. In the line-width variation analysis, the cubic anharmonic term was found to dominate the quartic term. Finally, the phonon lifetime also reflected the trend so observed.

  9. Temperature dependence effect of viscosity on ultrathin lubricant film melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V.Khomenko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the melting of an ultrathin lubricant film under friction between atomically flat surfaces at temperature dependencies of viscosity described by Vogel-Fulcher relationship and by power expression, which are observed experimentally. It is shown that the critical temperature exists in both cases the exceeding of which leads to the melting of lubricant and, as a result, the sliding mode of friction sets in. The values of characteristic parameters of lubricant are defined, which are needed for friction reduction. In the systems, where the Vogel-Fulcher dependence is fulfilled, it is possible to choose the parameters at which the melting of lubricant takes place even at zero temperature of friction surfaces. The deformational defect of the shear modulus is taken into account in describing the lubricant melting according to the mechanism of the first-order transition.

  10. Temperature Dependence of the Viscosity of Isotropic Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadzyn, J.; Czechowski, G.; Lech, T.

    1999-04-01

    Temperature dependence of the shear viscosity measured for isotropic liquids belonging to the three homologous series: 4-(trans-4'-n-alkylcyclohexyl) isothiocyanatobenzenes (Cn H2n+1 CyHx Ph NCS; nCHBT, n=0-12), n-alkylcyanobiphenyls (CnH2n+1 Ph Ph CN; nCB, n=2-12) and 1,n-alkanediols (HO(CH2)nOH; 1,nAD, n=2-10) were analysed with the use of Arrhenius equation and its two modifications: Vogel--Fulcher and proposed in this paper. The extrapolation of the isothermal viscosity of 1,n-alkanediols (n=2-10) to n=1 leads to an interesting conclusion concerning the expected viscosity of methanediol, HOCH2OH, the compound strongly unstable in a pure state.

  11. Temperature-dependent thermal properties of spark plasma sintered alumina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saheb Nouari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we report temperature-dependent thermal properties of alumina powder and bulk alumina consolidated by spark plasma sintering method. The properties were measured between room temperature and 250ºC using a thermal constants analyzer. Alumina powder had very low thermal properties due to the presence of large pores and absence of bonding between its particles. Fully dense alumina with a relative density of 99.6 % was obtained at a sintering temperature of 1400°C and a holding time of 10 min. Thermal properties were found to mainly dependent on density. Thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and specific heat of the fully dense alumina were 34.44 W/mK, 7.62 mm2s-1, and 1.22 J/gK, respectively, at room temperature. Thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity decreased while specific heat increased with the increase in temperature from room temperature to 250ºC.

  12. Nonlinear temperature dependent failure analysis of finite width composite laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarkar, A. P.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1979-01-01

    A quasi-three dimensional, nonlinear elastic finite element stress analysis of finite width composite laminates including curing stresses is presented. Cross-ply, angle-ply, and two quasi-isotropic graphite/epoxy laminates are studied. Curing stresses are calculated using temperature dependent elastic properties that are input as percent retention curves, and stresses due to mechanical loading in the form of an axial strain are calculated using tangent modulii obtained by Ramberg-Osgood parameters. It is shown that curing stresses and stresses due to tensile loading are significant as edge effects in all types of laminate studies. The tensor polynomial failure criterion is used to predict the initiation of failure. The mode of failure is predicted by examining individual stress contributions to the tensor polynomial.

  13. Measurement system for temperature dependent noise characterization of magnetoresistive sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nording, F.; Weber, S.; Ludwig, F.; Schilling, M.

    2017-03-01

    Magnetoresistive (MR) sensors and sensor systems are used in a large variety of applications in the field of industrial automation, automotive business, aeronautic industries, and instrumentation. Different MR sensor technologies like anisotropic magnetoresistive, giant magnetoresistive, and tunnel magnetoresistive sensors show strongly varying properties in terms of magnetoresistive effect, response to magnetic fields, achievable element miniaturization, manufacturing effort, and signal-to-noise ratio. Very few data have been reported so far on the comparison of noise performance for different sensor models and technologies, especially including the temperature dependence of their characteristics. In this paper, a stand-alone measurement setup is presented that allows a comprehensive characterization of MR sensors including sensitivity and noise over a wide range of temperatures.

  14. Temperature dependence of topological susceptibility using gradient flow

    CERN Document Server

    Taniguchi, Yusuke; Kanaya, Kazuyuki; Kitazawa, Masakiyo; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Umeda, Takashi; Iwami, Ryo; Wakabayashi, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    We study temperature dependence of the topological susceptibility with the $N_{f}=2+1$ flavors Wilson fermion. We have two major interests in this paper. One is a comparison of gluonic and fermionic definitions of the topological susceptibility. Two definitions are related by the chiral Ward-Takahashi identity but their coincidence is highly non-trivial for the Wilson fermion. By applying the gradient flow both for the gauge and quark fields we find a good agreement of these two measurements. The other is a verification of a prediction of the dilute instanton gas approximation at low temperature region $T_{pc}< T<1.5T_{pc}$, for which we confirm the prediction that the topological susceptibility decays with power $\\chi_{t}\\propto(T/T_{pc})^{-8}$ for three flavors QCD.

  15. Temperature dependence of the dielectric constant of acrylic dielectric elastomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Junjie; Chen, Hualing; Li, Bo; Chang, Longfei [Xi' an Jiaotong University, State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures, Xi' an (China); Xi' an Jiaotong University, School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi' an (China)

    2013-02-15

    The dielectric constant is an essential electrical parameter to the achievable voltage-induced deformation of the dielectric elastomer. This paper primarily focuses on the temperature dependence of the dielectric constant (within the range of 173 K to 373 K) for the most widely used acrylic dielectric elastomer (VHB 4910). First the dielectric constant was investigated experimentally with the broadband dielectric spectrometer (BDS). Results showed that the dielectric constant first increased with temperature up to a peak value and then dropped to a relative small value. Then by analyzing the fitted curves, the Cole-Cole dispersion equation was found better to characterize the rising process before the peak values than the Debye dispersion equation, while the decrease process afterward can be well described by the simple Debye model. Finally, a mathematical model of dielectric constant of VHB 4910 was obtained from the fitted results which can be used to further probe the electromechanical stability of the dielectric elastomers. (orig.)

  16. Temperature dependence of the dielectric constant of acrylic dielectric elastomer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Junjie; Chen, Hualing; Li, Bo; Chang, Longfei

    2013-02-01

    The dielectric constant is an essential electrical parameter to the achievable voltage-induced deformation of the dielectric elastomer. This paper primarily focuses on the temperature dependence of the dielectric constant (within the range of 173 K to 373 K) for the most widely used acrylic dielectric elastomer (VHB 4910). First the dielectric constant was investigated experimentally with the broadband dielectric spectrometer (BDS). Results showed that the dielectric constant first increased with temperature up to a peak value and then dropped to a relative small value. Then by analyzing the fitted curves, the Cole-Cole dispersion equation was found better to characterize the rising process before the peak values than the Debye dispersion equation, while the decrease process afterward can be well described by the simple Debye model. Finally, a mathematical model of dielectric constant of VHB 4910 was obtained from the fitted results which can be used to further probe the electromechanical stability of the dielectric elastomers.

  17. Apparatus for temperature-dependent cathodoluminescence characterization of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, Jan; Schauer, Petr

    2014-07-01

    An apparatus for characterization of temperature-dependent cathodoluminescence (CL) of solid-state materials is presented. This device excites a specimen using an electron beam and the CL emission is collected from the specimen side opposite the e-beam irradiation. The design of the temperature-controlled specimen holder that enables cooling down to 100 K and heating up to 500 K is described. The desired specimen temperature is automatically stabilized using a PID controller, which is the proportional-integral-derivative control feedback loop. Moreover, the specimen holder provides in situ e-beam current measurement during the specimen excitation. The apparatus allows the measurement of the CL intensity, the CL spectrum, or the CL intensity decay depending on the specimen temperature, or on a variety of excitation conditions, such as excitation energy, electron current (dose), or excitation duration. The apparatus abilities are demonstrated by an example of the CL measurements of the YAG:Ce single-crystal scintillator.

  18. Temperature dependence of the electronic structure of semiconductors and insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poncé, S., E-mail: samuel.pon@gmail.com; Gillet, Y.; Laflamme Janssen, J.; Gonze, X. [European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility and Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences, Université catholique de Louvain, Chemin des étoiles 8, bte L07.03.01, B-1348 Louvain-la-neuve (Belgium); Marini, A. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Via Salaria Km 29.3, CP 10, 00016 Monterotondo Stazione (Italy); Verstraete, M. [European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility and Physique des matériaux et nanostructures, Université de Liège, Allée du 6 Août 17, B-4000 Liège (Belgium)

    2015-09-14

    The renormalization of electronic eigenenergies due to electron-phonon coupling (temperature dependence and zero-point motion effect) is sizable in many materials with light atoms. This effect, often neglected in ab initio calculations, can be computed using the perturbation-based Allen-Heine-Cardona theory in the adiabatic or non-adiabatic harmonic approximation. After a short description of the recent progresses in this field and a brief overview of the theory, we focus on the issue of phonon wavevector sampling convergence, until now poorly understood. Indeed, the renormalization is obtained numerically through a slowly converging q-point integration. For non-zero Born effective charges, we show that a divergence appears in the electron-phonon matrix elements at q → Γ, leading to a divergence of the adiabatic renormalization at band extrema. This problem is exacerbated by the slow convergence of Born effective charges with electronic wavevector sampling, which leaves residual Born effective charges in ab initio calculations on materials that are physically devoid of such charges. Here, we propose a solution that improves this convergence. However, for materials where Born effective charges are physically non-zero, the divergence of the renormalization indicates a breakdown of the adiabatic harmonic approximation, which we assess here by switching to the non-adiabatic harmonic approximation. Also, we study the convergence behavior of the renormalization and develop reliable extrapolation schemes to obtain the converged results. Finally, the adiabatic and non-adiabatic theories, with corrections for the slow Born effective charge convergence problem (and the associated divergence) are applied to the study of five semiconductors and insulators: α-AlN, β-AlN, BN, diamond, and silicon. For these five materials, we present the zero-point renormalization, temperature dependence, phonon-induced lifetime broadening, and the renormalized electronic band structure.

  19. Sex determination in femurs of modern Egyptians: A comparative study between metric measurements and SRY gene detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman F. Gaballah

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: The SRY gene detection method for sex determination is quick and simple, requiring only one PCR reaction. It corroborates the results obtained from anatomical measurements and further confirms the sex of the femur bone in question.

  20. A microRNA family exerts maternal control on sex determination inC. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McJunkin, Katherine; Ambros, Victor

    2017-02-15

    Gene expression in early animal embryogenesis is in large part controlled post-transcriptionally. Maternally contributed microRNAs may therefore play important roles in early development. We elucidated a major biological role of the nematode mir-35 family of maternally contributed essential microRNAs. We show that this microRNA family regulates the sex determination pathway at multiple levels, acting both upstream of and downstream from her-1 to prevent aberrantly activated male developmental programs in hermaphrodite embryos. Both of the predicted target genes that act downstream from the mir-35 family in this process, suppressor-26 ( sup-26 ) and NHL (NCL-1, HT2A, and LIN-41 repeat) domain-containing-2 ( nhl-2 ), encode RNA-binding proteins, thus delineating a previously unknown post-transcriptional regulatory subnetwork within the well-studied sex determination pathway of Caenorhabditis elegans Repression of nhl-2 by the mir-35 family is required for not only proper sex determination but also viability, showing that a single microRNA target site can be essential. Since sex determination in C. elegans requires zygotic gene expression to read the sex chromosome karyotype, early embryos must remain gender-naïve; our findings show that the mir-35 family microRNAs act in the early embryo to function as a developmental timer that preserves naïveté and prevents premature deleterious developmental decisions. © 2017 McJunkin and Ambros; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  1. Sex determination in Turdus amaurochalinus (Passeriformes: Muscicapidae): morphometrical analysis supported by CHD gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Katyucha Von Kossel de Andrade; Lôbo-Hajdu, Gisele; Alves, Maria Alice S

    2011-06-01

    Sex determination is important for conservation and population studies, particularly for reproduction programs of threatened species and behavioural ecology. Turdus amaurochalinus, Creamy-bellied Thrush, only exhibits sexual dimorphism during the breeding season, when males are considered to show intense yellow bills, and females and immature males show dark brown bills. The objectives of this study were: 1) to determine the sex of individuals using genetic techniques, and 2) to test the hypothesis that sex dimorphism can be detected by morphometry. This study was carried out at Parque Nacional da Restinga de Jurubatiba, a preserved area located on the North coast of Rio de Janeiro State. The birds were captured using ornithological nets, singly marked with metal rings, weighed, measured and had blood samples collected before being released. The sex of 42 T. amaurochalinus individuals was determined using the CHD gene marker. A total of 20 males and 22 females were identified from June to August, with peak capture frequency in June. Turdus amaurochalinus females and males differed significantly in morphometrical measures. The most important traits to distinguish males from females were wing length (Student t-test = 4.34, df = 40, p = 0.0001) and weight (Student t-test = 2.08, d f = 40, p = 0.044): females were heavier and had significantly shorter wing length than males. Females and males were correctly classified in 86% and 75% of cases, respectively, using Discriminant Analysis. The molecular analysis was the most secure method for sex determination in the studied species.

  2. Trans-species variation in Dmrt1 is associated with sex determination in four European tree-frog species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brelsford, Alan; Dufresnes, Christophe; Perrin, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Empirical studies on the relative roles of occasional XY recombination versus sex-chromosome turnover in preventing sex-chromosome differentiation may shed light on the evolutionary forces acting on sex-determination systems. Signatures of XY recombination are difficult to distinguish from those of homologous transitions (i.e., transitions in sex-determination systems that keep sex-chromosome identity): both models predict X and Y alleles at sex-linked genes to cluster by species. However, the XY-recombination model specifically predicts the reverse pattern (clustering by gametologs) for those genes that are directly involved in sex determination. Hence, the latter model can only be validated by identification of an ancestral sex-determining region (SDR) with trans-species polymorphism associated to sex. Here we combine a candidate-gene approach with a genome scan to identify a small SDR shared by four species of a monophyletic clade of European tree frogs. This SDR encompasses at least the N-terminal part of Dmrt1 and immediate upstream sequences. Our findings provide definitive evidence that sex-chromosome homomorphy in this clade results only from XY recombination, and take an important step toward the identification of the sex-determining locus. Moreover, the sex-diagnostic markers we identify will enable research on environmental sex reversal in a wider range of frog species. © 2016 The Author(s). Evolution © 2016 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  3. Insect Sex Determination Manipulated by Their Endosymbionts: Incidences, Mechanisms and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, Daisuke; Narita, Satoko; Watanabe, Masaya

    2012-01-01

    The sex-determining systems of arthropods are surprisingly diverse. Some species have male or female heterogametic sex chromosomes while other species do not have sex chromosomes. Most species are diploids but some species, including wasps, ants, thrips and mites, are haplodiploids (n in males; 2n in females). Many of the sexual aberrations, such as sexual mosaics, sex-specific lethality and conversion of sexuality, can be explained by developmental defects including double fertilization of a binucleate egg, loss of a sex chromosome or perturbation of sex-determining gene expression, which occur accidentally or are induced by certain environmental conditions. However, recent studies have revealed that such sexual aberrations can be caused by various groups of vertically-transmitted endosymbiotic microbes such as bacteria of the genera Wolbachia, Rickettsia, Arsenophonus, Spiroplasma and Cardinium, as well as microsporidian protists. In this review, we first summarize the accumulated data on endosymbiont-induced sexual aberrations, and then discuss how such endosymbionts affect the developmental system of their hosts and what kinds of ecological and evolutionary effects these endosymbionts have on their host populations. PMID:26467955

  4. Insect Sex Determination Manipulated by Their Endosymbionts: Incidences, Mechanisms and Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaya Watanabe

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The sex-determining systems of arthropods are surprisingly diverse. Some species have male or female heterogametic sex chromosomes while other species do not have sex chromosomes. Most species are diploids but some species, including wasps, ants, thrips and mites, are haplodiploids (n in males; 2n in females. Many of the sexual aberrations, such as sexual mosaics, sex-specific lethality and conversion of sexuality, can be explained by developmental defects including double fertilization of a binucleate egg, loss of a sex chromosome or perturbation of sex-determining gene expression, which occur accidentally or are induced by certain environmental conditions. However, recent studies have revealed that such sexual aberrations can be caused by various groups of vertically-transmitted endosymbiotic microbes such as bacteria of the genera Wolbachia, Rickettsia, Arsenophonus, Spiroplasma and Cardinium, as well as microsporidian protists. In this review, we first summarize the accumulated data on endosymbiont-induced sexual aberrations, and then discuss how such endosymbionts affect the developmental system of their hosts and what kinds of ecological and evolutionary effects these endosymbionts have on their host populations.

  5. Sex determination from scapular length measurements by CT scans images in a Caucasian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giurazza, F; Schena, E; Del Vescovo, R; Cazzato, R L; Mortato, L; Saccomandi, P; Paternostro, F; Onofri, L; Zobel, B Beomonte

    2013-01-01

    Together with race, stature and age, sex is a main component of the biological identity. Thanks to its proportional correlation with parts of the human body, sex can be evaluated form the skeleton. The most accurate approach to determine sex by bone size is based on os coxae or skull. After natural disaster their presence can never be guaranteed, therefore the development of methods of sex determination using other skeletal elements can result crucial. Herein, sexual dimorphism in the human scapula is used to develop a two-variable discriminant function for sex estimation. We have enrolled 100 males and 100 females who underwent thoracic CT scan evaluation and we have estimated two scapular diameters. The estimation has been carried out by analyzing images of the scapulae of each patient after three dimensional post-processing reconstructions. The two-variable function allows to obtain an overall accuracy of 88% on the calibration sample. Furthermore, we have employed the mentioned function on a collection of 10 individual test sample from the collection of the "Museo di Anatomia Umana di Firenze" of the Università degli Studi di Firenze; sex has been correctly predicted on 9 skeletons.

  6. Computer-assisted sperm morphometry fluorescence-based analysis has potential to determine progeny sex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Santolaria

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to determine the ability of computer-assisted sperm morphometry analysis (CASA-Morph with fluorescence to discriminate between spermatozoa carrying different sex chromosomes from the nuclear morphometrics generated and different statistical procedures in the bovine species. The study was divided into two experiments. The first was to study the morphometric differences between X- and Y-chromosome-bearing spermatozoa (SX and SY, respectively. Spermatozoa from eight bulls were processed to assess simultaneously the sex chromosome by FISH and sperm morphometry by fluorescence-based CASA-Morph. SX cells were larger than SY cells on average (P < 0.001 although with important differences between bulls. A simultaneous evaluation of all the measured features by discriminant analysis revealed that nuclear area and average fluorescence intensity were the variables selected by stepwise discriminant function analysis as the best discriminators between SX and SY. In the second experiment, the sperm nuclear morphometric results from CASA-Morph in nonsexed (mixed SX and SY and sexed (SX semen samples from four bulls were compared. FISH allowed a successful classification of spermatozoa according to their sex chromosome content. X-sexed spermatozoa displayed a larger size and fluorescence intensity than nonsexed spermatozoa (P < 0.05. We conclude that the CASA-Morph fluorescence-based method has the potential to find differences between X- and Y-chromosome-bearing spermatozoa in bovine species although more studies are needed to increase the precision of sex determination by this technique.

  7. Sex determination and SRY: down to a wink and a nudge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekido, Ryohei; Lovell-Badge, Robin

    2009-01-01

    Sex-determining region Y (Sry) is the crucial gene that initiates male sex determination in most mammals. Although several components of the pathway regulating sexual differentiation have been elucidated, the mechanism of Sry action within this was unclear. However, recent discoveries in cellular, genetic and molecular aspects of gonad development are shedding light on the precise role of SRY in the regulation of Sox9, a crucial downstream target gene. SRY is thought to act synergistically with SF1, a nuclear receptor, through an enhancer of Sox9 to promote Sertoli cell differentiation in mice. In this review, we focus on the regulation of these genes and their interaction with other genes involved in promoting testis or ovary development. We also explore the common features between sex determination in mammals and in other vertebrates that lack Sry.

  8. Individual heterogeneity determines sex differences in mortality in a monogamous bird with reversed sexual dimorphism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colchero, Fernando; Aliaga, Alix; Jones, Owen

    2017-01-01

    dimorphism. We tested the effect of individual heterogeneity on age-specific mortality, and the extent by which this heterogeneity was determined by average reproductive output and wing length as measures of an individual’s frailty. 3. We found that sex differences in age-specific mortality were primarily....... However, the effect of wing length was different between the two sexes. While larger females had higher survival, larger males had lower chances to survive. 5. Our results contribute a novel perspective to the ongoing debate about the mechanisms that drive sex differences in vital rates in vertebrates....... Although we found that variables that relate to the cost of reproduction and sexual dimorphism are at least partially involved in determing these sex differences, it is through their effect on the level of frailty that they affect age patterns of mortality. Therefore, our results raise the possibility...

  9. Methane fluxes show consistent temperature dependence across microbial to ecosystem scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yvon-Durocher, Gabriel; Allen, Andrew P; Bastviken, David; Conrad, Ralf; Gudasz, Cristian; St-Pierre, Annick; Thanh-Duc, Nguyen; del Giorgio, Paul A

    2014-03-27

    Methane (CH4) is an important greenhouse gas because it has 25 times the global warming potential of carbon dioxide (CO2) by mass over a century. Recent calculations suggest that atmospheric CH4 emissions have been responsible for approximately 20% of Earth's warming since pre-industrial times. Understanding how CH4 emissions from ecosystems will respond to expected increases in global temperature is therefore fundamental to predicting whether the carbon cycle will mitigate or accelerate climate change. Methanogenesis is the terminal step in the remineralization of organic matter and is carried out by strictly anaerobic Archaea. Like most other forms of metabolism, methanogenesis is temperature-dependent. However, it is not yet known how this physiological response combines with other biotic processes (for example, methanotrophy, substrate supply, microbial community composition) and abiotic processes (for example, water-table depth) to determine the temperature dependence of ecosystem-level CH4 emissions. It is also not known whether CH4 emissions at the ecosystem level have a fundamentally different temperature dependence than other key fluxes in the carbon cycle, such as photosynthesis and respiration. Here we use meta-analyses to show that seasonal variations in CH4 emissions from a wide range of ecosystems exhibit an average temperature dependence similar to that of CH4 production derived from pure cultures of methanogens and anaerobic microbial communities. This average temperature dependence (0.96 electron volts (eV)), which corresponds to a 57-fold increase between 0 and 30°C, is considerably higher than previously observed for respiration (approximately 0.65 eV) and photosynthesis (approximately 0.3 eV). As a result, we show that both the emission of CH4 and the ratio of CH4 to CO2 emissions increase markedly with seasonal increases in temperature. Our findings suggest that global warming may have a large impact on the relative contributions of CO2 and CH

  10. Methyl farnesoate synthesis is necessary for the environmental sex determination in the water flea Daphnia pulex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Kenji; Miyakawa, Hitoshi; Hiruta, Chizue; Furuta, Kenjiro; Ogino, Yukiko; Shinoda, Tetsuro; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Shaw, Joseph R; Iguchi, Taisen

    2015-09-01

    Sex-determination systems can be divided into two groups: genotypic sex determination (GSD) and environmental sex determination (ESD). ESD is an adaptive life-history strategy that allows control of sex in response to environmental cues in order to optimize fitness. However, the molecular basis of ESD remains largely unknown. The micro crustacean Daphnia pulex exhibits ESD in response to various external stimuli. Although methyl farnesoate (MF: putative juvenile hormone, JH, in daphnids) has been reported to induce male production in daphnids, the role of MF as a sex-determining factor remains elusive due to the lack of a suitable model system for its study. Here, we establish such a system for ESD studies in D. pulex. The WTN6 strain switches from producing females to producing males in response to the shortened day condition, while the MFP strain only produces females, irrespective of day-length. To clarify whether MF has a novel physiological role as a sex-determining factor in D. pulex, we demonstrate that a MF/JH biosynthesis inhibitor suppressed male production in WTN6 strain reared under the male-inducible condition, shortened day-length. Moreover, we show that juvenile hormone acid O-methyltransferase (JHAMT), a critical enzyme of MF/JH biosynthesis, displays MF-generating activity by catalyzing farnesoic acid. Expression of the JHAMT gene increased significantly just before the MF-sensitive period for male production in the WTN6 strain, but not in the MFP strain, when maintained under male-inducible conditions. These results suggest that MF synthesis regulated by JHAMT is necessary for male offspring production in D. pulex. Our findings provide novel insights into the genetic underpinnings of ESD and they begin to shed light on the physiological function of MF as a male-fate determiner in D. pulex. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Multilocus Sex Determination Revealed in Two Populations of Gynodioecious Wild Strawberry, Fragaria vesca subsp. bracteata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashman, Tia-Lynn; Tennessen, Jacob A; Dalton, Rebecca M; Govindarajulu, Rajanikanth; Koski, Matthew H; Liston, Aaron

    2015-10-19

    Gynodioecy, the coexistence of females and hermaphrodites, occurs in 20% of angiosperm families and often enables transitions between hermaphroditism and dioecy. Clarifying mechanisms of sex determination in gynodioecious species can thus illuminate sexual system evolution. Genetic determination of gynodioecy, however, can be complex and is not fully characterized in any wild species. We used targeted sequence capture to genetically map a novel nuclear contributor to male sterility in a self-pollinated hermaphrodite of Fragaria vesca subsp. bracteata from the southern portion of its range. To understand its interaction with another identified locus and possibly additional loci, we performed crosses within and between two populations separated by 2000 km, phenotyped the progeny and sequenced candidate markers at both sex-determining loci. The newly mapped locus contains a high density of pentatricopeptide repeat genes, a class commonly involved in restoration of fertility caused by cytoplasmic male sterility. Examination of all crosses revealed three unlinked epistatically interacting loci that determine sexual phenotype and vary in frequency between populations. Fragaria vesca subsp. bracteata represents the first wild gynodioecious species with genomic evidence of both cytoplasmic and nuclear genes in sex determination. We propose a model for the interactions between these loci and new hypotheses for the evolution of sex determining chromosomes in the subdioecious and dioecious Fragaria. Copyright © 2015 Ashman et al.

  12. Formal and informal sex education as determinants of premarital sexual behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanier, G B

    1976-01-01

    Controversies exist regarding the effects of sex education in the schools and informal sex education obtained from parents, peers, the mass media, and other sources. Similarly, there is widespread interest in premarital sexual behavior, especially its determinants. This study presents several issues reflecting these concerns which have been the subject of much speculation but which have received little attention by researchers. The purpose of this study was to investigate--through the use of respondent reports--how formal and informal sex education influences premarital sexual behavior during college. A national probability sample of 1177 college students was studied using face-to-face interviews with approximately equal numbers of males and females. These interviews, which were conducted for the Institute for Sex Research, included questions about past and present sexual involvement and other attitudinal, behavioral and background variables. Accordingly, the data about sexual behavior and attitudes are based on the interviewees' self-reports. Indices were created which operationalized independent variables such as familial sexual conservatism, exposure to eroticism, perceived sex knowledge, and sexual exposure and assault during childhood and adolescence. Individual items reflecting childhood sex play, masturbation, current religiosity, religiosity while growing up, social class, sources of sex information, sex education in classrooms, and high school and college dating were used. The dependent variable, premarital sociosexual involvement, is a composite measure of incidence and prevalence of premarital heterosexual involvement which meets Guttman scaling criteria. An Automatic Interaction Detector analysis was used to determine the relative influences of reported sexualization variables on premarital sexual behavior. Major findings can be summarized as follows: Heterosexual behavior progresses in stepwise fashion from elementary to advanced levels of involvement

  13. Use of 2D:4D digit ratios to determine sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Christopher K; Case, D Troy

    2014-09-01

    Second to fourth digit ratios (2D:4D) are sexually dimorphic in human hands and established by the 13th gestational week. Application of 2D:4D for determining sex in living individuals by Kanchan et al. (Forensic Sci Int, 181, 2008, 53.e1) produced classification rates of 80% for males and 74-78% for females. Few studies have explored the use of 2D:4D for sexing skeletal remains. We test estimated finger lengths, phalanx lengths, and 2D:4D derived from hand bones for determining sex. Maximum phalanx length was collected using a mini-osteometric board from 451 individuals of known age, sex, and ancestry in four skeletal collections. Logistic regression of 2nd and 4th digit finger and phalanx lengths produced classification rates greater than 80%. Digit ratios, however, failed to reach classification rates greater than 59%. Our results support those of Voracek (Forensic Sci Int, 185, 2009, e29) and suggest that 2D:4D may be population-specific and thus inappropriate for universal application as a means of determining sex. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  14. Tribolium castaneum Transformer-2 regulates sex determination and development in both males and females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Jayendra Nath; Palli, Subba Reddy

    2013-12-01

    Tribolium castaneum Transformer (TcTra) is essential for female sex determination and maintenance through the regulation of sex-specific splicing of doublesex (dsx) pre-mRNA. In females, TcTra also regulates the sex-specific splicing of its own pre-mRNA to ensure continuous production of functional Tra protein. Transformer protein is absent in males and hence dsx pre-mRNA is spliced in a default mode. The mechanisms by which males inhibit the production of functional Tra protein are not known. Here, we report on functional characterization of transformer-2 (tra-2) gene (an ortholog of Drosophila transformer-2) in T. castaneum. RNA interference-mediated knockdown in the expression of gene coding for tra-2 in female pupae or adults resulted in the production of male-specific isoform of dsx and both female and male isoforms of tra suggesting that Tra-2 is essential for the female-specific splicing of tra and dsx pre-mRNAs. Interestingly, knockdown of tra-2 in males did not affect the splicing of dsx but resulted in the production of both female and male isoforms of tra suggesting that Tra-2 suppresses female-specific splicing of tra pre-mRNA in males. This dual regulation of sex-specific splicing of tra pre-mRNA ensures a tight regulation of sex determination and maintenance. These data suggest a critical role for Tra-2 in suppression of female sex determination cascade in males. In addition, RNAi studies showed that Tra-2 is also required for successful embryonic and larval development in both sexes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Determination of age, sex, and blood group from a single tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayar, Amit K; Parhar, Swati; Thind, Gagandeep; Sharma, Aman; Sharma, Divya

    2017-01-01

    Human identification is one of the most challenging subjects that human has been confronted with. Through the ages, odontological examinations have been a critical determinant in the search of human identity. Data in the form of age, gender, and blood group might provide vital clues in such investigations. In the recent times, it has been often desirable to preserve tissues for further investigations following the unfolding of certain events or discovery of new data. Hence, it is important to gather as much data as possible using less tissue. The purpose of this study was to determine age, sex, and ABO blood group of individual from a single tooth, to determine the effect of different environmental conditions, and to extract maximum information also at the same time preserving some tissue for the further investigation whenever needed. The study sample consisted of sixty teeth divided into four groups under different environmental conditions and time. The teeth were sectioned longitudinally in the buccolingual plane along the midline. Longitudinal ground sections of each tooth were prepared for age determination from cemental lines. Pulp removed was divided into two halves thereafter sex and blood group was determined. For correlation of age between estimated age and actual age, using cemental lines Pearson's correlation coefficient was applied. Further for determination of both sex and blood group between groups, Chi-square test was applied. A strong positive correlation was found between the estimated age and actual age of the study groups. Moreover, there was no significant difference between the actual and determined sex and blood group of the study groups. Although age, sex, and blood group are more reliably determined in freshly extracted teeth, these variables may be of significant help in identification even after a period of 6 weeks postextraction.

  16. Complementary sex determination, inbreeding depression and inbreeding avoidance in a gregarious sawfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, K E; Bagley, R K; Thompson, K L; Linnen, C R

    2016-11-01

    Although most Hymenoptera reproduce via arrhenotokous haplodiploidy, the underlying genetic mechanisms vary. Of these, the most widespread mechanism appears to be single-locus complementary sex determination (sl-CSD), in which individuals that are diploid and heterozygous at a sex-determining locus are female, and individuals that are homozygous or hemizygous are male. Because inbreeding increases the probability of producing diploid males, which are often sterile or inviable, sl-CSD can generate substantial inbreeding depression. To counteract this, Hymenoptera with traits that promote inbreeding, such as gregariousness, may evolve one or more of the following: inbreeding avoidance, functional diploid males or alternative sex determination mechanisms. Here, we investigate sex determination, inbreeding depression and inbreeding avoidance in Neodiprion lecontei, a gregarious, pine-feeding sawfly in the family Diprionidae. First, via inbreeding experiments and flow cytometry, we demonstrate that this species has CSD. By modeling expected sex ratios under different conditions, we also show that our data are consistent with sl-CSD. Second, via tracking survival in inbred and outbred families, we demonstrate that inbred families have reduced larval survival and that this mortality is partly attributable to the death of diploid males. Third, using a no-choice mating assay, we demonstrate that females are less willing to mate with siblings than nonsiblings. Together, these results suggest that inbreeding depression stemming from CSD has shaped mating behavior in N. lecontei. These results also set the stage for future comparative work that will investigate the interplay between sex determination, ecology and behavior in additional diprionid species that vary in larval gregariousness.

  17. Effects of tamoxifen on the sex determination gene and the activation of sex reversal in the developing gonad of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mingxi; Wang, Jingyun; Liu, Wei; Qin, Junwen; Zhou, Quan; Wang, Yongan; Huang, Huihui; Chen, Wenli; Ma, Chao

    2014-07-03

    Tamoxifen, as well as most endocrine-disrupting chemicals, affects the reproductive system and sexual development, but little is known about its disruption of the molecular pathways regulating mammalian sex determination. In fetal mice, the expression levels and pattern of key genes involved in controlling sexually dimorphic balance were analyzed both in vivo and in vitro by using whole-mount in situ hybridization and quantitative-PCR. Developmental tamoxifen exposure induced abnormal up-regulation of the testis differentiation marker Pdfgra in Leydig cells and of Sox9 and Fgf9 in Sertoli cells in XX gonad. Immunohistochemistry analysis confirmed the over-expression of SOX9 protein. Accordingly, the ovary development marker Foxl2 was depressed at both the mRNA and protein levels. The increase in testosterone and the reduction in 17β-estradiol and progesterone were observed by using the in vitro assay with organotypic cultures. Taken together, results indicated that tamoxifen induced the ectopic expression of well-established sex-specific genes during the critical developmental period, thus resulting in abnormal testicular development in the XX gonad of mammals. This study facilitates a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of antiestrogens and possibly of compounds that interrupt estrogen signaling by other modes of action, and the association with the pathogenesis of human sexual developmental disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Temperature-Dependent Electrical and Micromechanical Properties of Lanthanum Titanate with Additions of Yttria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsby, Jon C.

    2010-01-01

    Temperature-dependent elastic properties were determined by establishing continuous flexural vibrations in the material at its lowest resonance frequency of 31tHz. The imaginary part of the complex impedance plotted as a function of frequency and temperature reveals a thermally activated peak, which decreases in magnitude as the temperature increases. Additions of yttria do not degrade the electromechanical in particularly the elastic and anelastic properties of lanthanum titanate. Y2O3/La2Ti2O7 exhibits extremely low internal friction and hence may be more mechanical fatigue-resistant at low strains.

  19. Temperature dependence of dislocation-related luminescence in silicon-germanium heterostructure

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, H S

    1998-01-01

    We measured the photoluminescence spectra of very thin and partially strained Si sub 0 sub . sub 6 Ge sub 0 sub . sub 4 alloys grown on silicon substrate with varying degrees of strain relaxation. We observed photoluminescence lines, so called D-lines, which arose from dislocations in the SiGe/Si alloys. We identified the origin of the D-lines as the dislocations in Si substrate extending from the SiGe/Si interface. We also studied the temperature dependence of the Si D-lines and determined the dissociation energy of the defect energy levels.

  20. Intrinsic differences between males and females determine sex-specific consequences of inbreeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebel, Emily R; Phillips, Patrick C

    2016-02-09

    Inbreeding increases homozygosity and exposes deleterious recessive alleles, generally decreasing the fitness of inbred individuals. Interestingly, males and females are usually affected differently by inbreeding, though the more vulnerable sex depends on the species and trait measured. We used the soil-dwelling nematode Caenorhabditis remanei to examine sex-specific inbreeding depression across nine lineages, five levels of inbreeding, and hundreds of thousands of progeny. Female nematodes consistently suffered greater fitness losses than their male counterparts, especially at high levels of inbreeding. These results suggest that females experience stronger selection on genes contributing to reproductive traits. Inbreeding depression in males may be further reduced by sex chromosome hemizygosity, which affects the dominance of some mutations, as well as by the absence of sexual selection. Determining the relative contributions of sex-specific expression, genes on the sex chromosomes, and the environment they are filtered through-including opportunities for sexual selection-may explain the frequent though inconsistent records of sex differences in inbreeding depression, along with their implications for conservation and the evolution of mating systems.

  1. Genetic mapping of sex determination in a wild strawberry, Fragaria virginiana reveals earliest form of sex chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    The evolution of separate sexes (dioecy) from hermaphroditism is one of the major evolutionary transitions in plants and this transition can be accompanied by the development of sex chromosomes. However, we are now just beginning to gain insight into the initial stages of sex chromosome evolution vi...

  2. Sex determination from chest measurements in a sample of Egyptian adults using Multislice Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Ragaa T; Abdel-Aziz, Manal H; El Nekiedy, Abdel-Aziz M; Sobh, Zahraa K

    2017-11-01

    In forensic sciences to determine one's sex is quite important during the identity defining stage. The reliability of sex determination depends on the completeness of the remains and the degree of sexual dimorphism inherent in the population. Computed Tomography is the imaging modality of choice for two- and three-dimensional documentation and analysis of many autopsy findings. The aim of the present work was to assess the reliability of Three-dimensional Multislice Computed Tomography (3D MSCT) to determine sexual dimorphism from certain chest measurements; sternum and fourth rib using the 3D MSCT and to develop equations for sex determination from these bones among adult Egyptians sample. The present study was performed on 60 adult Egyptians. Their age ranged from 21 up to 74 years and they were equally divided between both sexes. Sixty virtual chests (reconstructed Multislice Computed Tomography 3D images) were examined for detection of Sternal measurements; Manubrium length (ML), Sternal body length (BL), Manubrium width (MW), Sternal body widths(BWa&BWb), Sternal area (SA) [(ML + BL) × (MW + BWa + BWb)/3]and Fourth rib width (FRW). All the studied measurements were significantly higher in males than in females. Multiple regression analysis was used to and three significant regression equations were developed for predicting sex using the different studied chest measurements; the sternal measurements, the sternal area and the widths of the right and left fourth ribs with their accuracies 96.67%.95.0%.72.68% respectively. Sterunm and fourth rib width revealed significant metric sex differences with the use of Multislice Computed Tomography 3D images thus provide a great advantage in the analysis of skeletal remains and badly decomposed bodies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  3. Regulation of Sex Determination in Mice by a Non-coding Genomic Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arboleda, Valerie A.; Fleming, Alice; Barseghyan, Hayk; Délot, Emmanuèle; Sinsheimer, Janet S.; Vilain, Eric

    2014-01-01

    To identify novel genomic regions that regulate sex determination, we utilized the powerful C57BL/6J-YPOS (B6-YPOS) model of XY sex reversal where mice with autosomes from the B6 strain and a Y chromosome from a wild-derived strain, Mus domesticus poschiavinus (YPOS), show complete sex reversal. In B6-YPOS, the presence of a 55-Mb congenic region on chromosome 11 protects from sex reversal in a dose-dependent manner. Using mouse genetic backcross designs and high-density SNP arrays, we narrowed the congenic region to a 1.62-Mb genomic region on chromosome 11 that confers 80% protection from B6-YPOS sex reversal when one copy is present and complete protection when two copies are present. It was previously believed that the protective congenic region originated from the 129S1/SviMJ (129) strain. However, genomic analysis revealed that this region is not derived from 129 and most likely is derived from the semi-inbred strain POSA. We show that the small 1.62-Mb congenic region that protects against B6-YPOS sex reversal is located within the Sox9 promoter and promotes the expression of Sox9, thereby driving testis development within the B6-YPOS background. Through 30 years of backcrossing, this congenic region was maintained, as it promoted male sex determination and fertility despite the female-promoting B6-YPOS genetic background. Our findings demonstrate that long-range enhancer regions are critical to developmental processes and can be used to identify the complex interplay between genome variants, epigenetics, and developmental gene regulation. PMID:24793290

  4. Sex determination in crayfish: are intersex Cherax quadricarinatus (Decapoda, Parastacidae) genetically females?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnes, S; Khalaila, I; Hulata, G; Sagi, A

    2003-10-01

    In the Australian red-claw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus (von Martens) (Decapoda, Parastacidae), a gonochoristic species, seven different combinations of intersex individuals (with both male and female genital openings) have been described. However, to date, the genetic basis for this phenomenon has not been investigated. This study was designed to test a simple chromosome-based sex-determination model for C. quadricarinatus that assumes the male to be the homogametic (ZZ) sex. According to our model, intersex individuals that are functionally males are genetically females (WZ). Individual crosses were performed between intersex and female crayfish, with control crosses being performed between normal males and females. The control crosses yielded, in most cases, the expected 1:1 sex ratio in the F1 progeny. Crosses between intersex individuals and females yielded a 1:3 (male:female) sex ratio in most crosses. According to our hypothesis, one-third of the females produced in a cross of a female with an intersex animal should be WW females. The hypothesis was tested by crossing normal males with F1 females, which were progeny of intersex fathers. These crosses yielded almost 100% females, a finding that conforms to the above-suggested sex determination model for C. quadricarinatus and the female WZ genotype of intersex individuals.

  5. Temperature dependent bacteriophages of a tropical bacterial pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Rebecca Jane Clokie

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing awareness of the multiple ways that bacteriophages (phages influence bacterial evolution, population dynamics, physiology and pathogenicity. By studying a novel group of phages infecting a soil borne pathogen, we revealed a paradigm shifting observation that the phages switch their lifestyle according to temperature. We sampled soil from an endemic area of the serious tropical pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei, and established that podoviruses infecting the pathogen are frequently present in soil, and many of them are naturally occurring variants of a common virus type. Experiments on one phage in the related model Burkholderia thailandensis demonstrated that temperature defines the outcome of phage-bacteria interactions. At higher temperatures (37°C, the phage predominantly goes through a lytic cycle, but at lower temperatures (25°C, the phage remains temperate. This is the first report of a naturally occurring phage that follows a lytic or temperate lifestyle according to temperature. These observations fundamentally alter the accepted views on the abundance, population biology and virulence of B. pseudomallei. Furthermore, when taken together with previous studies, our findings suggest that the phenomenon of temperature dependency in phages is widespread. Such phages are likely to have a profound effect on bacterial life, and on our ability to culture and correctly enumerate viable bacteria.

  6. A Temperature-Dependent Battery Model for Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Leonardo M; Montez, Carlos; Moraes, Ricardo; Portugal, Paulo; Vasques, Francisco

    2017-02-22

    Energy consumption is a major issue in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs), as nodes are powered by chemical batteries with an upper bounded lifetime. Estimating the lifetime of batteries is a difficult task, as it depends on several factors, such as operating temperatures and discharge rates. Analytical battery models can be used for estimating both the battery lifetime and the voltage behavior over time. Still, available models usually do not consider the impact of operating temperatures on the battery behavior. The target of this work is to extend the widely-used Kinetic Battery Model (KiBaM) to include the effect of temperature on the battery behavior. The proposed Temperature-Dependent KiBaM (T-KiBaM) is able to handle operating temperatures, providing better estimates for the battery lifetime and voltage behavior. The performed experimental validation shows that T-KiBaM achieves an average accuracy error smaller than 0.33%, when estimating the lifetime of Ni-MH batteries for different temperature conditions. In addition, T-KiBaM significantly improves the original KiBaM voltage model. The proposed model can be easily adapted to handle other battery technologies, enabling the consideration of different WSN deployments.

  7. A Temperature-Dependent Battery Model for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Leonardo M.; Montez, Carlos; Moraes, Ricardo; Portugal, Paulo; Vasques, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Energy consumption is a major issue in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs), as nodes are powered by chemical batteries with an upper bounded lifetime. Estimating the lifetime of batteries is a difficult task, as it depends on several factors, such as operating temperatures and discharge rates. Analytical battery models can be used for estimating both the battery lifetime and the voltage behavior over time. Still, available models usually do not consider the impact of operating temperatures on the battery behavior. The target of this work is to extend the widely-used Kinetic Battery Model (KiBaM) to include the effect of temperature on the battery behavior. The proposed Temperature-Dependent KiBaM (T-KiBaM) is able to handle operating temperatures, providing better estimates for the battery lifetime and voltage behavior. The performed experimental validation shows that T-KiBaM achieves an average accuracy error smaller than 0.33%, when estimating the lifetime of Ni-MH batteries for different temperature conditions. In addition, T-KiBaM significantly improves the original KiBaM voltage model. The proposed model can be easily adapted to handle other battery technologies, enabling the consideration of different WSN deployments. PMID:28241444

  8. Sex determination from femora in late antique sample from Eastern Adriatic coast (Salona necropolis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerković Ivan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The determination of sex is one of the first steps in anthropological analysis. When skeletal remains are fragmented, the most useful approach is application of osteometric methods. The methods are population specific, and therefore require development of discriminant functions for each population group.

  9. Sex determination of baleen whale artefacts : Implications for ancient DNA use in zooarchaeology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinding, Mikkel Holger S; Tervo, Outi M.; Grønnow, Bjarne; Gulløv, Hans Christian; Toft, Peter A.; Bachmann, Lutz; Fietz, Katharina; Rekdal, Silje L.; Christoffersen, Mads F.; Heide-Jørgensen, Mads Peter; Olsen, Morten Tange; Foote, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Methods to determine the sex from tissue samples of mammals include the amplification of Y chromosome specific regions, which should only amplify from males, or amplification of homologous regions of the X and Y chromosome containing XY specific SNPs. A disadvantage of the first approach is that PCR

  10. Evidence for the evolutionary nascence of a novel sex determination pathway in honeybees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselmann, Martin; Gempe, Tanja; Schiøtt, Morten

    2008-01-01

    and hemizygotes (haploid individuals) are males. Although at least 15 different csd alleles are known among natural bee populations, the mechanisms linking allelic interactions to switching of the sexual development programme are still obscure. Here we report a new component of the sex-determining pathway...

  11. Novel method for determining sex of live adult Laricobius nigrinus (Coleoptera: Derodontidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    William Shepherd; Michael Montgomery; Brian Sullivan; Albert (Bud) Mayfield

    2014-01-01

    A method for determining the sex of live adult Laricobius nigrinus Fender (Coleoptera:Derodontidae) is described. Beetles were briefly chilled and positioned ventral-side-up under a dissecting microscope. Two forceps with blunted ends were used to gently brace the beetle and press on the centre of the abdomen to extrude its terminal segments. Male beetles were...

  12. Phylogenetic distribution and evolutionary dynamics of the sex determination genes doublesex and transformer in insects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geuverink, E.; Beukeboom, L. W.

    2014-01-01

    Sex determination in insects is characterized by a gene cascade that is conserved at the bottom but contains diverse primary signals at the top. The bottom master switch gene doublesex is found in all insects. Its upstream regulator transformer is present in the orders Hymenoptera, Coleoptera and

  13. Sex-determination in the monoecius species cucumber is confined to specific floral whorls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kater, M.M.; Franken, J.; Carney, K.J.; Colombo, L.; Angenent, G.C.

    2001-01-01

    In unisexual flowers, sex is determined by the selective repression of growth or the abortion of either male or female reproductive organs. The mechanism by which this process is controlled in plants is still poorly understood. Because it is known that the identity of reproductive organs in plants

  14. tasselseed1 is a lipoxygenase affecting jasmonic acid signaling in sex determination of maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sex determination in maize is controlled by a developmental cascade leading to the formation of unisexual florets derived from an initially bisexual floral meristem. Abortion of pistil primordia in staminate florets is controlled by a tasselseed-mediated cell death process. Here, we describe the pos...

  15. Artificial gynogenesis and sex determination in half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Song-Lin; Tian, Yong-Sheng; Yang, Jing-Feng; Shao, Chang-Wei; Ji, Xiang-Shan; Zhai, Jie-Ming; Liao, Xiao-Lin; Zhuang, Zhi-Meng; Su, Peng-Zhi; Xu, Jian-Yong; Sha, Zhen-Xia; Wu, Peng-Fei; Wang, Na

    2009-01-01

    Half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis) is an important cultured marine fish as well as a promising model fish for the study of sex determination mechanisms. In the present study, a protocol for artificial gynogenesis of half-smooth tongue sole was developed in order to identify the sex determination mechanism and to generate all-female stock. The optimal UV-irradiation dose for genetically inactivating sea perch spermatozoa was determined to be > or =30 mJ/cm(2). The optimal initiation time for cold shock of gynogenetic embryos was determined to be 5 min after fertilization, while the optimal temperature and treatment duration were determined to be 20-25 min at 5 degrees C. Chromosomes from common diploids, gynogenetic haploids, and diploids were analyzed. WW chromosomes were discovered in some of the gynogenetic diploids. The microsatellite marker was applied to analyze gynogenetic diploid fry. Among the 30 gynogenetic diploid fry, 11 fry contained only one allele, while 19 contained two alleles, which had the same genotype as their mother. The female-specific DNA marker was observed in four individuals out of ten gynogenetic diploid fry. Ploidy analysis of 20 putative gynogenetic fry showed them all to be diploid. Thus, a protocol for the induction of artificial gynogenesis has been developed for the first time in half smooth tongue sole, and the sex determination mechanism in the tongue sole was determined to be female heterogametic with the ZW chromosome.

  16. Male sex in houseflies is determined by Mdmd, a paralog of the generic splice factor gene CWC22

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharma, Akash; Heinze, Svenia D; Wu, Yanli; Kohlbrenner, Tea; Morilla, Ian; Brunner, Claudia; Wimmer, Ernst A; van de Zande, Louis; Robinson, Mark D; Beukeboom, Leo W; Bopp, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Across species, animals have diverse sex determination pathways, each consisting of a hierarchical cascade of genes and its associated regulatory mechanism. Houseflies have a distinctive polymorphic sex determination system in which a dominant male determiner, the M-factor, can reside on any of the

  17. Plasticity of gene‐regulatory networks controlling sex determination: of masters, slaves, usual suspects, newcomers, and usurpators

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Herpin, Amaury; Schartl, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    .... Despite the generality of the phenomenon itself, the mechanisms controlling how sex is determined differ considerably among various organismic groups, have evolved repeatedly and independently...

  18. Sex of Researchers and Sex-Typed Communications as Determinants of Sex Differences in Influenceability: A Meta-Analysis of Social Influence Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagly, Alice H.; Carli, Linda L.

    1981-01-01

    By analyzing the aggregated results of independent studies for possible sex biases in "influenceability" experiments, two hypotheses were tested: (1) content of influence inductions is biased in the masculine direction, and (2) sex typing of content relates to the sex difference outcomes of the experiments, with more masculine content…

  19. Homeoproteins Six1 and Six4 regulate male sex determination and mouse gonadal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Yuka; Tanaka, Satomi S; Yamaguchi, Yasuka L; Kobayashi, Hiroki; Kuroki, Shunsuke; Tachibana, Makoto; Shinomura, Mai; Kanai, Yoshiakira; Morohashi, Ken-Ichirou; Kawakami, Kiyoshi; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi

    2013-08-26

    The Y-linked gene Sry regulates mammalian sex determination in bipotential embryonic gonads. Here, we report that the transcription factors Six1 and Six4 are required for male gonadal differentiation. Loss of Six1 and Six4 together, but neither alone, resulted in a male-to-female sex-reversal phenotype in XY mutant gonads accompanied by a failure in Sry activation. Decreased gonadal precursor cell formation at the onset of Sry expression and a gonadal size reduction in both sexes were also found in mutant embryos. Forced Sry transgene expression in XY mutant gonads rescued testicular development but not the initial disruption to precursor growth. Furthermore, we identified two downstream targets of Six1/Six4 in gonadal development, Fog2 (Zfpm2) and Nr5a1 (Ad4BP/Sf1). These two distinct Six1/Six4-regulated pathways are considered to be crucial for gonadal development. The regulation of Fog2 induces Sry expression in male sex determination, and the regulation of Nr5a1 in gonadal precursor formation determines gonadal size. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Phylogenetic distribution and evolutionary dynamics of the sex determination genes doublesex and transformer in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geuverink, E; Beukeboom, L W

    2014-01-01

    Sex determination in insects is characterized by a gene cascade that is conserved at the bottom but contains diverse primary signals at the top. The bottom master switch gene doublesex is found in all insects. Its upstream regulator transformer is present in the orders Hymenoptera, Coleoptera and Diptera, but has thus far not been found in Lepidoptera and in the basal lineages of Diptera. transformer is presumed to be ancestral to the holometabolous insects based on its shared domains and conserved features of autoregulation and sex-specific splicing. We interpret that its absence in basal lineages of Diptera and its order-specific conserved domains indicate multiple independent losses or recruitments into the sex determination cascade. Duplications of transformer are found in derived families within the Hymenoptera, characterized by their complementary sex determination mechanism. As duplications are not found in any other insect order, they appear linked to the haplodiploid reproduction of the Hymenoptera. Further phylogenetic analyses combined with functional studies are needed to understand the evolutionary history of the transformer gene among insects. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Temperature dependence of Henry's law constant in an extended temperature range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görgényi, Miklós; Dewulf, Jo; Van Langenhove, Herman

    2002-08-01

    The Henry's law constants H for chloroform, 1,1-dichloroethane, 1,2-dichloropropane, trichloroethene, chlorobenzene, benzene and toluene were determined by the EPICS-SPME technique (equilibrium partitioning in closed systems--solid phase microextraction) in the temperature range 275-343 K. The curvature observed in the ln H vs. 1/T plot was due to the temperature dependence of the change in enthalpy delta H0 during the transfer of 1 mol solute from the aqueous solution to the gas phase. The nonlinearity of the plot was explained by means of a thermodynamic model which involves the temperature dependence of delta H0 of the compounds and the thermal expansion of water in the three-parameter equation ln (H rho TT) = A2/T + BTB + C2, where rho T is the density of water at temperature T, TB = ln(T/298) + (298-T)/T, A2 = -delta H298(0)/R, delta H298(0) is the delta H0 value at 298 K, B = delta Cp0/R, and C2 is a constant. delta Cp0 is the molar heat capacity change in volatilization from the aqueous solution. A statistical comparison of the two models demonstrates the superiority of the three-parameter equation over the two-parameter one ln H vs. 1/T). The new, three-parameter equation allows a more accurate description of the temperature dependence of H, and of the solubility of volatile organic compounds in water at higher temperatures.

  2. The Bactrocera tryoni homologue of the Drosophila melanogaster sex-determination gene doublesex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearman, D C; Frommer, M

    1998-11-01

    A homologue of the bifunctional sex-determining gene, doublesex (dsx), has been identified in the tephritid fruit fly, Bactrocera tryoni, and has been found to be expressed in a sex-specific manner in adult flies. The male- and female-specific cDNAs are identical at their 5' ends but differ at their 3' ends and appear to be the products of alternate splicing. The level of identity of the sex-specific DSX proteins of B. tryoni with the D. melanogaster DSX proteins, across the region corresponding to the DNA binding domain and the oligomerization domains, is greater than 85%. Four sequence motifs which are ten to thirteen bases identical to the TRA/TRA-2 binding sites (thirteen-nucleotide repeat sequences) are present in the female-specific exon of the B. tryoni dsx gene.

  3. Mapping the temperature-dependent conformational landscapes of the dynamic enzymes cyclophilin A and urease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, Robert; Keedy, Daniel; Warkentin, Matthew; Fraser, James; Moreau, David; Atakisi, Hakan; Rau, Peter

    Proteins populate complex, temperature-dependent ensembles of conformations that enable their function. Yet in X-ray crystallographic studies, roughly 98% of structures have been determined at 100 K, and most refined to only a single conformation. A combination of experimental methods enabled by studies of ice formation and computational methods for mining low-density features in electron density maps have been applied to determine the evolution of the conformational landscapes of the enzymes cyclophilin A and urease between 300 K and 100 K. Minority conformations of most side chains depopulate on cooling from 300 to ~200 K, below which subsequent conformational evolution is quenched. The characteristic temperatures for this depopulation are highly heterogeneous throughout each enzyme. The temperature-dependent ensemble of the active site flap in urease has also been mapped. These all-atom, site-resolved measurements and analyses rule out one interpretation of the protein-solvent glass transition, and give an alternative interpretation of a dynamical transition identified in site-averaged experiments. They demonstrate a powerful approach to structural characterization of the dynamic underpinnings of protein function. Supported by NSF MCB-1330685.

  4. Temperature dependent modulation of lobster neuromuscular properties by serotonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Jonna L; Edwards, Claire R; Holt, Stephen R; Worden, Mary Kate

    2007-03-01

    In cold-blooded species the efficacy of neuromuscular function depends both on the thermal environmental of the animal's habitat and on the concentrations of modulatory hormones circulating within the animal's body. The goal of this study is to examine how temperature variation within an ecologically relevant range affects neuromuscular function and its modulation by the neurohormone serotonin (5-HT) in Homarus americanus, a lobster species that inhabits a broad thermal range in the wild. The synaptic strength of the excitatory and inhibitory motoneurons innervating the lobster dactyl opener muscle depends on temperature, with the strongest neurally evoked muscle movements being elicited at cold (temperatures. However, whereas neurally evoked contractions can be elicited over the entire temperature range from 2 to >20 degrees C, neurally evoked relaxations of resting muscle tension are effective only at colder temperatures at which the inhibitory junction potentials are hyperpolarizing in polarity. 5-HT has two effects on inhibitory synaptic signals: it potentiates their amplitude and also shifts the temperature at which they reverse polarity by approximately +7 degrees C. Thus 5-HT both potentiates neurally evoked relaxations of the muscle and increases the temperature range over which neurally evoked muscle relaxations can be elicited. Neurally evoked contractions are maximally potentiated by 5-HT at warm (18 degrees C) temperatures; however, 5-HT enhances excitatory junction potentials in a temperature-independent manner. Finally, 5-HT strongly increases resting muscle tension at the coldest extent of the temperature range tested (2 degrees C) but is ineffective at 22 degrees C. These data demonstrate that 5-HT elicits several temperature-dependent physiological changes in the passive and active responses of muscle to neural input. The overall effect of 5-HT is to increase the temperature range over which neurally evoked motor movements can be elicited in this

  5. Determinants of Zambian men's extra-marital sex: a multi-level analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benefo, Kofi D

    2008-08-01

    Research interest in extra-marital sex has increased as scholars have become aware of its role in sustaining epidemics of STDs in sub-Saharan Africa and elsewhere. While most research has used the socioeconomic and demographic features of individuals as determinants of extra-marital sexual behavior, this study examined the role played by community characteristics. Using data from the 2003 Zambian Sexual Behavior Survey for a sample of 1,118 men aged 15-59 and multilevel logistic regression techniques, the study analyzed the effects of community social and demographic characteristics on involvement in extra-marital sex while controlling for the men's individual-level characteristics. Men's involvement in extra-marital sex was found to vary with the characteristics of communities. The chances of men's involvement in extra-marital sex increased with community-level ethnic heterogeneity and urbanization, decreased in commercial centers, and in communities with a demographic surplus of males, health workers active in AIDS prevention, and access to the mass media. These results show that scholars trying to understand the motivations for extra-marital sex must pay attention to the characteristics of both individuals and communities.

  6. Individual heterogeneity determines sex differences in mortality in a monogamous bird with reversed sexual dimorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colchero, Fernando; Aliaga, Alix Eva; Jones, Owen R; Conde, Dalia A

    2017-07-01

    Sex differences in mortality are pervasive in vertebrates, and usually result in shorter life spans in the larger sex, although the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. On the other hand, differences in frailty among individuals (i.e. individual heterogeneity), can play a major role in shaping demographic trajectories in wild populations. The link between these two processes has seldom been explored. We used Bayesian survival trajectory analysis to study age-specific mortality trajectories in the Eurasian sparrowhawk (Accipiter nisus), a monogamous raptor with reversed sexual size dimorphism. We tested the effect of individual heterogeneity on age-specific mortality, and the extent by which this heterogeneity was determined by average reproductive output and wing length as measures of an individual's frailty. We found that sex differences in age-specific mortality were primarily driven by the differences in individual heterogeneity between the two sexes. Females were more heterogeneous than males in their level of frailty. Thus, a larger number of females with low frailty are able to survive to older ages than males, with life expectancy for the least frail adult females reaching up to 4·23 years, while for the least frail adult males it was of 2·68 years. We found that 50% of this heterogeneity was determined by average reproductive output and wing length in both sexes. For both, individuals with high average reproductive output had also higher chances to survive. However, the effect of wing length was different between the two sexes. While larger females had higher survival, larger males had lower chances to survive. Our results contribute a novel perspective to the ongoing debate about the mechanisms that drive sex differences in vital rates in vertebrates. Although we found that variables that relate to the cost of reproduction and sexual dimorphism are at least partially involved in determining these sex differences, it is through their effect on the

  7. The sex-determining region of the Megaselia scalaris (Diptera) Y chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willhoeft, U; Traut, W

    1995-01-01

    In Megaselia scalaris (Loew) the presence or absence of a male-determining factor, M, is responsible for sex determination. In two wild-type strains, M is located on the homomorphic chromosome pair 2. In the laboratory line Except42 a new Y chromosome was created by recombination between the original Y and the original X chromosome. The Except42 Y chromosome has conserved the sex-determining function and four molecular markers of the original Y chromosome, while 13 original Y markers have been lost. The new Y chromosome, therefore, consists of roughly one-quarter of the original Y chromosome and three-quarters of the original X chromosome. To define the sex-determining region, cosmid clones, one from the original X and one from the original Y chromosome region of the Except42 Y chromosome, were isolated and used as probes for chromosomal in situ suppression (CISS) hybridization. The CISS hybridization signals map the conserved Y segment, including the male-determining factor, to the distal segment of the short arm of the Y chromosome.

  8. Efficacy of Sex Determination from Human Dental Pulp Tissue and its Reliability as a Tool in Forensic Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Kaveri Surya

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sex determination is one of the primary steps in forensics. Barr body can be used as a histological method for identification of sex as it is found to be specific to female somatic cells and rare in male cells. To demarcate human dental pulp as an important identification tool of sex in forensic odontology (FO) and to evaluate the time period till which sex can be determined from pulp tissue using three stains H and E, Feulgen, and acridine - orange under fluorescence so as. Materials and Methods: 90 pulp samples (45 males and 45 females) were subjected to Barr body analysis for determination of sex using light and fluorescent microscopy. Results: Barr body was found to be positive for female samples and negative or rare in the male sample (<3%). Conclusion: Barr body from human dental pulp tissue can be used as a successful determinant of sex identification in FO. PMID:26668474

  9. Comparative Analysis of the Shared Sex-Determination Region (SDR) among Salmonid Fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber-Hammond, Joshua J; Phillips, Ruth B; Brown, Kim H

    2015-06-25

    Salmonids present an excellent model for studying evolution of young sex-chromosomes. Within the genus, Oncorhynchus, at least six independent sex-chromosome pairs have evolved, many unique to individual species. This variation results from the movement of the sex-determining gene, sdY, throughout the salmonid genome. While sdY is known to define sexual differentiation in salmonids, the mechanism of its movement throughout the genome has remained elusive due to high frequencies of repetitive elements, rDNA sequences, and transposons surrounding the sex-determining regions (SDR). Despite these difficulties, bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library clones from both rainbow trout and Atlantic salmon containing the sdY region have been reported. Here, we report the sequences for these BACs as well as the extended sequence for the known SDR in Chinook gained through genome walking methods. Comparative analysis allowed us to study the overlapping SDRs from three unique salmonid Y chromosomes to define the specific content, size, and variation present between the species. We found approximately 4.1 kb of orthologous sequence common to all three species, which contains the genetic content necessary for masculinization. The regions contain transposable elements that may be responsible for the translocations of the SDR throughout salmonid genomes and we examine potential mechanistic roles of each one. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  10. The role of the Drosophila LAMMER protein kinase DOA in somatic sex determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinow, Leonard; Samson, Marie-Laure

    2010-09-01

    DOA kinase, the Drosophila member of the LAMMER/Clk protein kinase family, phosphorylates SR and SR-like proteins, including TRA, TRA2 and RBP1, which are responsible for the alternative splicing of transcripts encoding the key regulator of sex-specific expression in somatic cells of the fly, DOUBLESEX. Specific Doa alleles induce somatic female-to-male sex transformations, which can be enhanced when combined with mutations in loci encoding SR and SR-like proteins. The Doa locus encodes six different kinases, of which a 69-kDa isoform is expressed solely in females. Expression of this isoform is itself under the regulation of the somatic sex determination regulatory network, thus forming a putative positive autoregulatory loop which would reinforce the choice of the female cell-fate. We speculate that this loop is part of the evolutionary ancestral sex-determination machinery, based upon evidence demonstrating the existence of an autoregulatory loop involving TRA and TRA2 in several other insect species.

  11. Phenotypic differences in teeth dimensions among Chennai population: An aid in sex determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreedevi Dharman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the presence of sexual dimorphism by studying the size of the teeth among males and females in Chennai population, which aids in sex determination. Materials and Methods: Incisocervical length, mesiodistal and buccolingual diameters were measured in teeth of 60 subjects (30 males, 30 females in the age group of 18-22 years from Chennai population. The differences in the mean values of parameters in males and females were calculated using independent t-test. Discriminant functional analysis was performed to determine the accuracy of sex. Results: Significant differences were found in mean incisocervical length which were found to be larger in males with P < 0.05 in 11, 12, 14, 17, 21, 22, 24, 26, 27, 31, 32, 33, 34, 41, 43, and 45 and with P < 0.001 in 13, 23, 32, 42, 43, and 44, with the exception of 37 and 47 which were larger in females. Mean mesiodistal diameter was larger in males with P < 0.05 in 11, 12, and 21 and with P < 0.001 in 13, 23, 33, and 43. Mean buccolingual diameter was larger in males with P < 0.05 in 12, 21, 31, 33, and 41 and with P < 0.001 in 11, 13, 23, and 43. Accuracy rate of predicting sex based on incisocervical length (17, 23, 47 and mesiodistal diameter (13, 33 was 78.3% and based on buccolingual diameter (13 was 76.7%. Conclusion: Males showed greater sexual dimorphism than females. Application of incisocervical, mesiodistal, and buccolingual dimensional variability among males and females in the Chennai population can aid in sex determination in forensic odontology, as the results showed moderate extent of dimorphism with an overall accuracy rate of predicting sex to be 78%.

  12. Non-invasive prenatal determination of fetal sex: translating research into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, M; Finning, K; Martin, P; Hogg, J; Meaney, C; Norbury, G; Daniels, G; Chitty, L S

    2011-07-01

    The effectiveness and clinical utility of non-invasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPD) for fetal sex determination using cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) was assessed by undertaking a prospective national audit of UK testing. NIPD was performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of the DYS14 or SRY gene in cffDNA extracted from maternal plasma. All cases referred for fetal sex determination from 1 April 2006 to 31 March 2009 were ascertained from two laboratories offering the test. Fetal gender determined by NIPD was compared with that based on ultrasound, invasive test or phenotype at birth. Indication and rate of invasive testing was ascertained. In the first year, results were issued in 150/161 pregnancies tested. Of the 135 with outcome data, results were concordant in 130/135 [96.3% (95% CI 91.6-98.8%)]. Reporting criteria were changed and in the subsequent 511 pregnancies the concordancy rate increased to 401/403 [99.5% (95% CI 98.2-99.9%)]. Over the 3 years only 32.9% (174/528) underwent invasive testing. NIPD for fetal sex determination using cffDNA is highly accurate when performed in National Health Service laboratories if stringent reporting criteria are applied. Parents should be advised of the small risk of discordant results and possible need for repeat testing to resolve inconclusive results. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Temperature-Dependent Henry's Law Constants of Atmospheric Amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Chunbo; Kish, J Duncan; Roberts, Jason E; Dwebi, Iman; Chon, Nara; Liu, Yong

    2015-08-20

    There has been growing interest in understanding atmospheric amines in the gas phase and their mass transfer to the aqueous phase because of their potential roles in cloud chemistry, secondary organic aerosol formation, and the fate of atmospheric organics. Temperature-dependent Henry's law constants (KH) of atmospheric amines, a key parameter in atmospheric chemical transport models to account for mass transfer, are mostly unavailable. In this work, we investigated gas-liquid equilibria of five prevalent atmospheric amines, namely 1-propylamine, di-n-propylamine, trimethylamine, allylamine, and 4-methylmorpholine using bubble column technique. We reported effective KH, intrinsic KH, and gas phase diffusion coefficients of these species over a range of temperatures relevant to the lower atmosphere for the first time. The measured KH at 298 K and enthalpy of solution for 1-propylamine, di-n-propylamine, trimethylamine, allylamine, and 4-methylmorpholine are 61.4 ± 4.9 mol L(-1) atm(-1) and -49.0 ± 4.8 kJ mol(-1); 14.5 ± 1.2 mol L(-1) atm(-1) and -72.5 ± 6.8 kJ mol(-1); 8.9 ± 0.7 mol L(-1) atm(-1) and -49.6 ± 4.7 kJ mol(-1); 103.5 ± 10.4 mol L(-1) atm(-1) and -42.7 ± 4.3 kJ mol(-1); and 952.2 ± 114.3 mol L(-1) atm(-1) and -82.7 ± 9.7 kJ mol(-1), respectively. In addition, we evaluated amines' characteristic times to achieve gas-liquid equilibrium for partitioning between gas and aqueous phases. Results show gas-liquid equilibrium can be rapidly established at natural cloud droplets surface, but the characteristic times may be extended substantially at lower temperatures and pHs. Moreover, our findings imply that atmospheric amines are more likely to exist in cloud droplets, and ambient temperature, water content, and pH of aerosols play important roles in their partitioning.

  14. Gadd45g is essential for primary sex determination, male fertility and testis development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiko Johnen

    Full Text Available In humans and most mammals, differentiation of the embryonic gonad into ovaries or testes is controlled by the Y-linked gene SRY. Here we show a role for the Gadd45g protein in this primary sex differentiation. We characterized mice deficient in Gadd45a, Gadd45b and Gadd45g, as well as double-knockout mice for Gadd45ab, Gadd45ag and Gadd45bg, and found a specific role for Gadd45g in male fertility and testis development. Gadd45g-deficient XY mice on a mixed 129/C57BL/6 background showed varying degrees of disorders of sexual development (DSD, ranging from male infertility to an intersex phenotype or complete gonadal dysgenesis (CGD. On a pure C57BL/6 (B6 background, all Gadd45g(-/- XY mice were born as completely sex-reversed XY-females, whereas lack of Gadd45a and/or Gadd45b did not affect primary sex determination or testis development. Gadd45g expression was similar in female and male embryonic gonads, and peaked around the time of sex differentiation at 11.5 days post-coitum (dpc. The molecular cause of the sex reversal was the failure of Gadd45g(-/- XY gonads to achieve the SRY expression threshold necessary for testes differentiation, resulting in ovary and Müllerian duct development. These results identify Gadd45g as a candidate gene for male infertility and 46,XY sex reversal in humans.

  15. Temperature dependent rate coefficients for the reactions of Criegee biradicals with selected alcohols and sulphides

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillen, Max; McMahon, Laura; Curchod, Basile; Shallcross, Dudley; Orr-Ewing, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    The reactions of Criegee biradicals have received much attention in recent years, yet few reactive systems have undergone direct experimental measurement, and fewer still have been measured as a function of temperature. In this study, absolute temperature-dependent rate coefficients for the gas-phase reactions of a suite of alcohols and sulphides with both formaldehyde oxide (CH2OO) and acetone oxide ((CH3)2COO) are determined experimentally between 254 and 328 K using cavity ringdown spectroscopy for detecting Criegee biradicals. Major differences in reactivity and temperature dependence are observed both in terms of the functionality (between alcohols and sulphides) and also the degree of alkyl substitution about the Criegee biradical. This diverse behaviour represents a uniquely challenging problem for atmospheric chemistry since the atmosphere contains a large variety of both functionalized compounds and Criegee biradicals, leading to a formidable parameter space which may be impossible to cover experimentally. Notwithstanding, new experimental data such as these are vital for understanding the general behaviour of Criegee biradicals in the atmosphere.

  16. On the temperature dependence of H-U{sub iso} in the riding hydrogen model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lübben, Jens; Volkmann, Christian [Institut für Anorganische Chemie, Georg-August-Universität, Tammannstrasse 4, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Grabowsky, Simon [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Stirling Highway 35, WA-6009 Crawley (Australia); Edwards, Alison [Bragg Institute, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); Morgenroth, Wolfgang [Institut für Geowissenschaften, Abteilung Kristallographie, Goethe-Universität, Altenhöferallee 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Fabbiani, Francesca P. A. [GZG, Abteilung Kristallographie, Georg-August Universität, Goldschmidtstrasse 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Sheldrick, George M. [Institut für Anorganische Chemie, Georg-August-Universität, Tammannstrasse 4, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Dittrich, Birger, E-mail: birger.dittrich@chemie.uni-hamburg.de [Institut für Anorganische und Angewandte Chemie, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, 20146 Hamburg (Germany); Institut für Anorganische Chemie, Georg-August-Universität, Tammannstrasse 4, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The temperature dependence of hydrogen U{sub iso} and parent U{sub eq} in the riding hydrogen model is investigated by neutron diffraction, aspherical-atom refinements and QM/MM and MO/MO cluster calculations. Fixed values of 1.2 or 1.5 appear to be underestimated, especially at temperatures below 100 K. The temperature dependence of H-U{sub iso} in N-acetyl-l-4-hydroxyproline monohydrate is investigated. Imposing a constant temperature-independent multiplier of 1.2 or 1.5 for the riding hydrogen model is found to be inaccurate, and severely underestimates H-U{sub iso} below 100 K. Neutron diffraction data at temperatures of 9, 150, 200 and 250 K provide benchmark results for this study. X-ray diffraction data to high resolution, collected at temperatures of 9, 30, 50, 75, 100, 150, 200 and 250 K (synchrotron and home source), reproduce neutron results only when evaluated by aspherical-atom refinement models, since these take into account bonding and lone-pair electron density; both invariom and Hirshfeld-atom refinement models enable a more precise determination of the magnitude of H-atom displacements than independent-atom model refinements. Experimental efforts are complemented by computing displacement parameters following the TLS+ONIOM approach. A satisfactory agreement between all approaches is found.

  17. Temperature dependence of the heterogeneous uptake of acrylic acid on Arizona test dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qifan; Wang, Yidan; Wu, Lingyan; Jing, Bo; Tong, Shengrui; Wang, Weigang; Ge, Maofa

    2017-03-01

    In this study, the temperature dependence of the heterogeneous uptake of acrylic acid on Arizona test dust (ATD) has been investigated within a temperature range of 255-315K using a Knudsen cell reactor. Combined with diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) experiment, it was found that acrylic acid could adsorb on ATD via surface OH groups and convert to carboxylate on the particle surface. The kinetics study suggests that the initial true uptake coefficient (γt) of acrylic acid on ATD decreases from (4.02±0.12)×10(-5) to (1.73±0.05)×10(-5) with a temperature increase from 255 to 315K. According to the temperature dependence of uptake coefficients, the enthalpy (ΔHobs) and entropy (ΔSobs) of uptake processes were determined to be -(9.60±0.38) KJ/mol and -(121.55±1.33) J·K/mol, respectively. The activation energy for desorption (Edes) was calculated to be (14.57±0.60) KJ/mol. These results indicated that the heterogeneous uptake of acrylic acid on ATD surface was sensitive to temperature. The heterogeneous uptake on ATD could affect the concentration of acrylic acid in the atmosphere, especially at low temperature. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Temperature dependence of hydroxyl radical reactions with chloramine species in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Jamie M; McKay, Garrett; Ishida, Kenneth P; Mezyk, Stephen P

    2017-11-01

    The absolute temperature-dependent kinetics for the reaction between hydroxyl radicals and the chloramine water disinfectant species monochloramine (NH2Cl), as well as dichloramine (NHCl2) and trichloramine (NCl3), have been determined using electron pulse radiolysis and transient absorption spectroscopy. These radical reaction rate constants were fast, with values of 6.06 × 108, 2.57 × 108, and 1.67 × 108 M-1 s-1 at 25 °C for NH2Cl, NHCl2, and NCl3, respectively. The corresponding temperature dependence of these reaction rate constants, measured over the range 10-40 °C, is well-described by the transformed Arrhenius equations:giving activation energies of 8.57 ± 0.58, 6.11 ± 0.40, and 5.77 ± 0.72 kJ mol-1 for these three chloramines, respectively. These data will aid water utilities in predicting hydroxyl radical partitioning and chemical contaminant removal efficiencies under real-world advanced oxidation process treatment conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Efficient Temperature-Dependent Green's Functions Methods for Realistic Systems: Compact Grids for Orthogonal Polynomial Transforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kananenka, Alexei A; Phillips, Jordan J; Zgid, Dominika

    2016-02-09

    The Matsubara Green's function that is used to describe temperature-dependent behavior is expressed on a numerical grid. While such a grid usually has a couple of hundred points for low-energy model systems, for realistic systems with large basis sets the size of an accurate grid can be tens of thousands of points, constituting a severe computational and memory bottleneck. In this paper, we determine efficient imaginary time grids for the temperature-dependent Matsubara Green's function formalism that can be used for calculations on realistic systems. We show that, because of the use of an orthogonal polynomial transform, we can restrict the imaginary time grid to a few hundred points and reach micro-Hartree accuracy in the electronic energy evaluation. Moreover, we show that only a limited number of orthogonal polynomial expansion coefficients are necessary to preserve accuracy when working with a dual representation of the Green's function or self-energy and transforming between the imaginary time and frequency domain.

  20. Temperature-dependent elastic properties of brain tissues measured with the shear wave elastography method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan-Lin; Li, Guo-Yang; He, Ping; Mao, Ze-Qi; Cao, Yanping

    2017-01-01

    Determining the mechanical properties of brain tissues is essential in such cases as the surgery planning and surgical training using virtual reality based simulators, trauma research and the diagnosis of some diseases that alter the elastic properties of brain tissues. Here, we suggest a protocol to measure the temperature-dependent elastic properties of brain tissues in physiological saline using the shear wave elastography method. Experiments have been conducted on six porcine brains. Our results show that the shear moduli of brain tissues decrease approximately linearly with a slope of -0.041±0.006kPa/°C when the temperature T increases from room temperature (~23°C) to body temperature (~37°C). A case study has been further conducted which shows that the shear moduli are insensitive to the temperature variation when T is in the range of 37 to 43°C and will increase when T is higher than 43°C. With the present experimental setup, temperature-dependent elastic properties of brain tissues can be measured in a simulated physiological environment and a non-destructive manner. Thus the method suggested here offers a unique tool for the mechanical characterization of brain tissues with potential applications in brain biomechanics research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Similar temperature dependencies of glycolytic enzymes: an evolutionary adaptation to temperature dynamics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cruz Luisa Ana B

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Temperature strongly affects microbial growth, and many microorganisms have to deal with temperature fluctuations in their natural environment. To understand regulation strategies that underlie microbial temperature responses and adaptation, we studied glycolytic pathway kinetics in Saccharomyces cerevisiae during temperature changes. Results Saccharomyces cerevisiae was grown under different temperature regimes and glucose availability conditions. These included glucose-excess batch cultures at different temperatures and glucose-limited chemostat cultures, subjected to fast linear temperature shifts and circadian sinoidal temperature cycles. An observed temperature-independent relation between intracellular levels of glycolytic metabolites and residual glucose concentration for all experimental conditions revealed that it is the substrate availability rather than temperature that determines intracellular metabolite profiles. This observation corresponded with predictions generated in silico with a kinetic model of yeast glycolysis, when the catalytic capacities of all glycolytic enzymes were set to share the same normalized temperature dependency. Conclusions From an evolutionary perspective, such similar temperature dependencies allow cells to adapt more rapidly to temperature changes, because they result in minimal perturbations of intracellular metabolite levels, thus circumventing the need for extensive modification of enzyme levels.

  2. Temperature dependence of positron lifetime in a polymer of intrinsic microporosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raetzke, K.; Miranda, R.L. de; Kruse, J.; Faupel, F. [Univ. Kiel, Materialverbunde (Germany); Fritsch, D.; Abetz, V. [Inst. fuer Polymerforschung, GKSS, Geesthacht (Germany); Budd, P.; Selbie, J. [School of Chemistry, The Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); McKeown, N.; Ghanem, B. [School of Chemistry, Cardiff Univ. (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-01

    The performance of polymeric membranes for gas separation is mainly determined by the free volume. Polymers of intrinsic microporosity are interesting candidates for state of the art gas separation membranes due to the high abundance of accessible free volume. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy is a generally accepted technique for investigation of free volume in polymers where the orthopositronium lifetime is directly connected to the mean free volume size. We performed measurements of the temperature dependence of the positron lifetime in a polymer of intrinsic microporosity (PIM-7) in the range from 143 to 523 K. The mean value of the free volume calculated from the ortho-positronium life time ({sup {proportional_to}}5 ns) is in the range of typical values for high free volume membrane polymers (V=0.47 nm{sup 3}). However, the temperature dependence of the positronium-lifetime is non-monotonous. Comparison with thermal expansion measurements will be made and a possible explanation of this unexpected behavior given. (orig.)

  3. Sex determination by PCR in Carica papaya L. plants obtained via somatic embryogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laisyn Posada Pérez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available For the molecular identification of the sex of papaya plants (Carica papaya L. have been used in field crop plants, however it has not been determined in vitro plants. The objective of this research was to identify hermaphrodite papaya plants var. `Maradol Red' obtained via somatic embryogenesis from immature zygotic embryos. For this, a multiplex PCR enables simultaneous amplification of two fragments (1300 and 800 bp for hermaphrodite and one fragment (1300 bp to female plants was used. DNA was extracted from leaves of in vitro plants by alkaline lysis with NaOH. PCR amplification of DNA extracted from leaf samples, produced fragments of the expected size. In 20 papaya plants lines regenerated through somatic embryogenesis it was achieved differentiate hermaphrodite plants and female plants. This is the first report on sex determination in plants obtained by somatic embryogenesis in the variety `Red Maradol'. Key words: hermaphrodite plants, multiple PCR, zygotic embryos

  4. Determination of sex using cephalo-facial dimensions by discriminant function and logistic regression equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Twisha Shah

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim is to bring together the new anthropological techniques and knowledge about populations that are least known. The present study was performed on 901 healthy Gujarati volunteers (676 males, 225 females within the age group of 21–50 years with the aim to examine whether any correlation exists between cephalofacial measures naming maximum head length, maximum head breadth, bizygomatic breadth, bigonial diameter, morphological facial length, physiognomic facial length, biocular breadth and total cephalofacial height and sex determination. Also, discriminant function and logistic regression methods were verified to check the best accuracy level for sex determination. Mean values of cephalofacial dimensions were higher in males than in females. Best reliable results were obtained by using logistic regression equations in males (92% and discriminant function in females (80.9%. Our study conclusively establishes the existence of a definite statistically significant sexual dimorphism in Gujarati population using cephalo-facial dimensions.

  5. m(6)A potentiates Sxl alternative pre-mRNA splicing for robust Drosophila sex determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haussmann, Irmgard U; Bodi, Zsuzsanna; Sanchez-Moran, Eugenio; Mongan, Nigel P; Archer, Nathan; Fray, Rupert G; Soller, Matthias

    2016-12-08

    N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A) is the most common internal modification of eukaryotic messenger RNA (mRNA) and is decoded by YTH domain proteins. The mammalian mRNA m(6)A methylosome is a complex of nuclear proteins that includes METTL3 (methyltransferase-like 3), METTL14, WTAP (Wilms tumour 1-associated protein) and KIAA1429. Drosophila has corresponding homologues named Ime4 and KAR4 (Inducer of meiosis 4 and Karyogamy protein 4), and Female-lethal (2)d (Fl(2)d) and Virilizer (Vir). In Drosophila, fl(2)d and vir are required for sex-dependent regulation of alternative splicing of the sex determination factor Sex lethal (Sxl). However, the functions of m(6)A in introns in the regulation of alternative splicing remain uncertain. Here we show that m(6)A is absent in the mRNA of Drosophila lacking Ime4. In contrast to mouse and plant knockout models, Drosophila Ime4-null mutants remain viable, though flightless, and show a sex bias towards maleness. This is because m(6)A is required for female-specific alternative splicing of Sxl, which determines female physiognomy, but also translationally represses male-specific lethal 2 (msl-2) to prevent dosage compensation in females. We further show that the m(6)A reader protein YT521-B decodes m(6)A in the sex-specifically spliced intron of Sxl, as its absence phenocopies Ime4 mutants. Loss of m(6)A also affects alternative splicing of additional genes, predominantly in the 5' untranslated region, and has global effects on the expression of metabolic genes. The requirement of m(6)A and its reader YT521-B for female-specific Sxl alternative splicing reveals that this hitherto enigmatic mRNA modification constitutes an ancient and specific mechanism to adjust levels of gene expression.

  6. A Novel Dominant Transformer Allele of the Sex-Determining Gene Her-1 of Caenorhabditis Elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Trent, C.; Wood, W. B.; Horvitz, H. R.

    1988-01-01

    We have characterized a novel dominant allele of the sex-determining gene her-1 of Caenorhabditis elegans. This allele, called n695, results in the incomplete transformation of XX animals into phenotypic males. Previously characterized recessive her-1 alleles transform XO animals into phenotypic hermaphrodites. We have identified five new recessive her-1 mutations as intragenic suppressors of n695. Three of these suppressors are weak, temperature-sensitive alleles. We show that the recessive ...

  7. Assessment of cheiloscopy in sex determination using lysochrome - A preliminary study

    OpenAIRE

    Ramakrishnan, Prabhath; Bahirwani, Shraddha; Valambath, Smruthi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The present study was undertaken with the objective of ascertaining whether latent lip prints generated by persistent lipsticks and developed using lysochrome dyes have the potential of use in sex determination and personal identification. Materials and Methods: This study included a total of 100 subjects (50 males and 50 females) whose latent lip prints were obtained by applying the persistent lipstick Revlon ColorStay Overtime® manufactured by Revlon® consumer products corpora...

  8. XX/XY system of sex determination in the geophilomorph centipede Strigamia maritima

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Green, J. E.; Dalíková, Martina; Sahara, K.; Marec, František; Akam, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 2 (2016), č. článku e0150292. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA600960925; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-22765S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : sex determination * Strigamia maritima * XX/XY system Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.806, year: 2016 http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0150292

  9. Comparing discriminant analysis and neural network for the determination of sex using femur head measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alunni, Véronique; Jardin, Philippe du; Nogueira, Luisa; Buchet, Luc; Quatrehomme, Gérald

    2015-08-01

    The measurement of the femoral head is usually considered an interesting variable for the sex determination of skeletal remains. To date, there are few published reference measurements of the femoral head in a modern European population for the purpose of sex determination. In this study, 116 femurs from 58 individuals of the South of France (Nice Bone Collection, Nice, France) were studied. Three measurements of the femoral head were taken: the vertical head diameter (VHD), the transversal head diameter (THD) and the head circumference (HC). The results show that: (i) there is no statistical difference between the right and left femurs for each of the three measurements (VHD, THD and HC). Therefore we arbitrarily chose to use the measures from the right femurs (N=58) to pursue our experiments; (ii) the measurements of the femoral head are similar to those of contemporary American populations; (iii) the dimensions of the femoral head place the measurements of the French population somewhere between Germany or Croatia, and Spain; (iv) there is no significant secular trend (in contrast with the femoral neck diameter); (v) the femoral head measurement as a single variable is useful for sex determination: a 96.5% rate of accuracy was obtained using THD and HC measurements with the artificial neural network; and a 94.8% rate of accuracy using VHD, both with the discriminant analysis and the neural network. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Metric Sex Determination of the Human Coxal Bone on a Virtual Sample using Decision Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savall, Frédéric; Faruch-Bilfeld, Marie; Dedouit, Fabrice; Sans, Nicolas; Rousseau, Hervé; Rougé, Daniel; Telmon, Norbert

    2015-11-01

    Decision trees provide an alternative to multivariate discriminant analysis, which is still the most commonly used in anthropometric studies. Our study analyzed the metric characterization of a recent virtual sample of 113 coxal bones using decision trees for sex determination. From 17 osteometric type I landmarks, a dataset was built with five classic distances traditionally reported in the literature and six new distances selected using the two-step ratio method. A ten-fold cross-validation was performed, and a decision tree was established on two subsamples (training and test sets). The decision tree established on the training set included three nodes and its application to the test set correctly classified 92% of individuals. This percentage was similar to the data of the literature. The usefulness of decision trees has been demonstrated in numerous fields. They have been already used in sex determination, body mass prediction, and ancestry estimation. This study shows another use of decision trees enabling simple and accurate sex determination. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  11. Comparison of cranial sex determination by discriminant analysis and logistic regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amores-Ampuero, Anabel; Alemán, Inmaculada

    2016-04-05

    Various methods have been proposed for estimating dimorphism. The objective of this study was to compare sex determination results from cranial measurements using discriminant analysis or logistic regression. The study sample comprised 130 individuals (70 males) of known sex, age, and cause of death from San José cemetery in Granada (Spain). Measurements of 19 neurocranial dimensions and 11 splanchnocranial dimensions were subjected to discriminant analysis and logistic regression, and the percentages of correct classification were compared between the sex functions obtained with each method. The discriminant capacity of the selected variables was evaluated with a cross-validation procedure. The percentage accuracy with discriminant analysis was 78.2% for the neurocranium (82.4% in females and 74.6% in males) and 73.7% for the splanchnocranium (79.6% in females and 68.8% in males). These percentages were higher with logistic regression analysis: 85.7% for the neurocranium (in both sexes) and 94.1% for the splanchnocranium (100% in females and 91.7% in males).

  12. Sex determination in the Squalius alburnoides complex: an initial characterization of sex cascade elements in the context of a hybrid polyploid genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Pala

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sex determination processes vary widely among different vertebrate taxa, but no group offers as much diversity for the study of the evolution of sex determination as teleost fish. However, the knowledge about sex determination gene cascades is scarce in this species-rich group and further difficulties arise when considering hybrid fish taxa, in which mechanisms exhibited by parental species are often disrupted. Even though hybridisation is frequent among teleosts, gene based approaches on sex determination have seldom been conducted in hybrid fish. The hybrid polyploid complex of Squalius alburnoides was used as a model to address this question. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have initiated the isolation and characterization of regulatory elements (dmrt1, wt1, dax1 and figla potentially involved in sex determination in S. alburnoides and in the parental species S. pyrenaicus and analysed their expression patterns by in situ hybridisation. In adults, an overall conservation in the cellular localization of the gene transcripts was observed between the hybrids and parental species. Some novel features emerged, such as dmrt1 expression in adult ovaries, and the non-dimorphic expression of figla, an ovarian marker in other species, in gonads of both sexes in S. alburnoides and S. pyrenaicus. The potential contribution of each gene to the sex determination process was assessed based on the timing and location of expression. Dmrt1 and wt1 transcripts were found at early stages of male development in S. alburnoides and are most likely implicated in the process of gonad development. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: For the first time in the study of this hybrid complex, it was possible to directly compare the gene expression patterns between the bisexual parental species and the various hybrid forms, for an extended set of genes. The contribution of these genes to gonad integrity maintenance and functionality is apparently unaltered in the

  13. Efficacy of Sex Determination from Human Dental Pulp Tissue and its Reliability as a Tool in Forensic Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Khanna, Kaveri Surya

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sex determination is one of the primary steps in forensics. Barr body can be used as a histological method for identification of sex as it is found to be specific to female somatic cells and rare in male cells. To demarcate human dental pulp as an important identification tool of sex in forensic odontology (FO) and to evaluate the time period till which sex can be determined from pulp tissue using three stains H and E, Feulgen, and acridine - orange under fluorescence so as. Mater...

  14. Temperature Dependence of Single-Event Burnout in N-Channel Power MOSFET’s

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-15

    AD-A277 921 P O Temperature Dependence of Single-Event Burnout in N-Channel Power MOSFETs 15 March 1994 Prepared by G. H. JOHNSON, R. D. SCHRIMPF...Makimunm 200 words) The temperature dependence of single-event burnout (SEB) in n-channel power metal-oxide- semiconductor field effect transistors...power MOSFET is tmned off (blocking a large The temperature dependence of single-event burn drain-source bias) [3]. Previous burnout modeling has beow

  15. Improved AIOMFAC model parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients for aqueous organic mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganbavale, G.; Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Peter, T.

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a new, improved parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients in the AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients) model applicable for aqueous as well as water-free organic solutions. For electrolyte-free organic and organic-water mixtures the AIOMFAC model uses a group-contribution approach based on UNIFAC (UNIversal quasi-chemical Functional-group Activity Coefficients). This group-contribution approach explicitly accounts for interactions among organic functional groups and between organic functional groups and water. The previous AIOMFAC version uses a simple parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients, aimed to be applicable in the temperature range from ~ 275 to ~ 400 K. With the goal to improve the description of a wide variety of organic compounds found in atmospheric aerosols, we extend the AIOMFAC parameterisation for the functional groups carboxyl, hydroxyl, ketone, aldehyde, ether, ester, alkyl, aromatic carbon-alcohol, and aromatic hydrocarbon to atmospherically relevant low temperatures. To this end we introduce a new parameterisation for the temperature dependence. The improved temperature dependence parameterisation is derived from classical thermodynamic theory by describing effects from changes in molar enthalpy and heat capacity of a multi-component system. Thermodynamic equilibrium data of aqueous organic and water-free organic mixtures from the literature are carefully assessed and complemented with new measurements to establish a comprehensive database, covering a wide temperature range (~ 190 to ~ 440 K) for many of the functional group combinations considered. Different experimental data types and their processing for the estimation of AIOMFAC model parameters are discussed. The new AIOMFAC parameterisation for the temperature dependence of activity coefficients from low to high temperatures shows an overall improvement of 28% in

  16. Temperature dependence of microwave oscillations in magnetic tunnel junctions with a perpendicularly magnetized free layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Peng; Feng, Jiafeng, E-mail: hxwei@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: jiafengfeng@iphy.ac.cn; Wei, Hongxiang, E-mail: hxwei@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: jiafengfeng@iphy.ac.cn; Han, Xiufeng [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Fang, Bin; Zhang, Baoshun; Zeng, Zhongming [Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications, Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ruoshui Road 398, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2015-01-05

    We experimentally study the temperature dependence of the spin-transfer-torque-induced microwave oscillations in MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction nanopillars with a perpendicularly magnetized free layer. We demonstrate that the oscillation frequency increases rapidly with decreasing temperature, which is mainly ascribed to the temperature dependence of both the saturation magnetization and the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. We also find that a strong temperature dependence of the output power while a nonmonotonic temperature dependence of spectral linewidth are maintained for a constant dc bias in measured temperature range. Possible mechanisms leading to the different dependences of oscillation frequency, output power, and linewidth are discussed.

  17. Chloroplast DNA Copy Number May Link to Sex Determination in Leucadendron (Proteaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MADE PHARMAWATI

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Leucadendron (Proteaceae is a South African genus, the flowers of which have become a popular item in the Australian cut-flower industry. All species are dioecious. In general the female flowers are the more desirable as cut flowers. The availability of a molecular marker linked to sex determination is therefore needed both to maximize the efficiency of breeding programs and to supply markets with flowers from the preferred sex. The polymerase chain reaction-based method of suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH combined with mirror orientation selection (MOS were applied in an attempt to identify genome differences between male and female plants of Leucadendron discolor. Screening of 416 clones from a male-subtracted genomic DNA library and 282 clones from a female-subtracted library identified 13 candidates for male-specific genomic fragments. Sequence analyses of the 13 candidate DNA fragments showed that they were fragments of the chloroplast DNA, raising the possibility that chloroplast DNA copy number is linked to sex determination in Leucadendron.

  18. Automatic Sex Determination of Skulls Based on a Statistical Shape Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Luo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sex determination from skeletons is an important research subject in forensic medicine. Previous skeletal sex assessments are through subjective visual analysis by anthropologists or metric analysis of sexually dimorphic features. In this work, we present an automatic sex determination method for 3D digital skulls, in which a statistical shape model for skulls is constructed, which projects the high-dimensional skull data into a low-dimensional shape space, and Fisher discriminant analysis is used to classify skulls in the shape space. This method combines the advantages of metrical and morphological methods. It is easy to use without professional qualification and tedious manual measurement. With a group of Chinese skulls including 127 males and 81 females, we choose 92 males and 58 females to establish the discriminant model and validate the model with the other skulls. The correct rate is 95.7% and 91.4% for females and males, respectively. Leave-one-out test also shows that the method has a high accuracy.

  19. Determinants of condom breakage among female sex workers in Karnataka, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley Janet

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Condoms are effective in preventing the transmission of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections, when properly used. However, recent data from surveys of female sex workers (FSWs in Karnataka in south India, suggest that condom breakage rates may be quite high. It is important therefore to quantify condom breakage rates, and examine what factors might precipitate condom breakage, so that programmers can identify those at risk, and develop appropriate interventions. Methods We explored determinants of reported condom breakage in the previous month among 1,928 female sex workers in four districts of Karnataka using data from cross-sectional surveys undertaken from July 2008 to February 2009. Using stepwise multivariate logistic regression, we examined the possible determinants of condom breakage, controlling for several independent variables including the district and client load. Results Overall, 11.4% of FSWs reported at least one condom break in the previous month. FSWs were much more likely to report breakage if under 20 years of age (AOR 3.43, p = 0.005; if divorced/ separated/widowed (AOR 1.52, p = 0.012; if they were regular alcohol users (AOR 1.63, p = 0.005; if they mostly entertained clients in lodges/rented rooms (AOR 2.99, p = 0.029 or brothels (AOR 4.77, p = 0.003, compared to street based sex workers; if they had ever had anal sex (AOR 2.03, p = 0.006; if the sex worker herself (as opposed to the client applied the condom at last use (AOR 1.90, p Conclusions The reported incidence of condom breakage was high in this study, and this is a major concern for HIV/STI prevention programs, for which condom use is a key prevention tool. Younger and more marginalized female sex workers were most vulnerable to condom breakage. Special effort is therefore required to seek out such women and to provide information and skills on correct condom use. More research is also needed on what specific situational parameters

  20. The candidate sex-reversing DAX1 gene is autosomal in marsupials: Implications for the evolution of sex determination in mammals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pask, A.; Toder, R.; Wilcox, S.A. [La Trobe Univ., Melbourne (Australia)] [and others

    1997-05-01

    The human X-linked DAX1 gene was cloned from the region of the short arm of the human X found in duplicate in sex-reversed X{sub dup}Y females. DAX1 is suggested to be required for ovarian differentiation and to play an important role in mammalian sex determination or differentiation pathways. Its proposed dose-dependent effect on sexual development suggests that DAX1 could represent an evolutionary link with an ancestral sex-determining mechanism that depended on the dosage of an X-linked gene. Furthermore, DAX1 could also represent the putative X-linked switch gene, which independently controls sexual dimorphisms in marsupial mammals in an X-dose-dependent manner. If DAX1 has a present role in marsupial sexual differentiation or had an ancestral role in mammalian sex determination, it would be expected to lie on the marsupial X chromosome, despite the autosomal localization of other human Xp genes. We therefore cloned and mapped the DAX1 gene in the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii). DAX1 was located on wallaby chromosome 5p near other human Xp genes, indicating that it was originally autosomal and that it is not involved in X-linked dose-dependent sex determination in an ancestral mammal nor in marsupial sexual differentiation. 28 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Determinants of unmet needs for healthcare and sexual health counselling among Ugandan university students with same-sex sexuality experience

    OpenAIRE

    Larsson, Markus; ROSS, MICHAEL W.; Tumwine, Gilbert; Agardh, Anette

    2016-01-01

    Background: Research from sub-Saharan Africa has shown that persons with same-sex sexuality experience are at elevated risk for ill health due to sexual risk taking, stigma, and discrimination. However, studies of healthcare seeking among young people in this region with same-sex sexuality experience are limited.Objective: To identify determinants of unmet healthcare and sexual health counselling needs, respectively, among Ugandan university students with experience of same-sex sexuality.Desi...

  2. Sex Determination According to the Lengths of Hand Bones in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca Mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Huaxiang; Zhao, Xiaojin; Hu, Fengxia; Hu, Haiyang

    2017-10-01

    Measurement of hand bone length has been used for sex determination in humans and nonhuman primates (McFadden and Bracht: Early Hum Dev 85 (2009) 117-124; El-Morsi and Al-Hawary: J Forensic Leg Med 20 (2013) 6-13). The aim of this study was to determine the sex of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) on the basis of the lengths of corresponding rows of metacarpals and phalanges in a macaque population by means of developing discriminant functions. Measurements on direct dry bones only included lengths for 19 bones of the left hand in 39 macaques (consisting of 13 adult males and 26 adult females). The results revealed that the mean values of males were significantly greater than those of females for all of the metacarpals and phalanges. The results were obtained in 84.4% of accuracy from distal phalanges, 93.8% from middle phalanges, and 96.9% from both metacarpals and proximal phalanges, respectively. There was a remarkable difference in the magnitude of sex dimorphism in lengths of each section of the hand bones between the population of macaques and humans. This difference may be attributable to the interaction between genetic factors and various environmental factors. As sex differences of hand bones are population-specific (Lazenby: Am J phys Anthropol 118 (2002) 378-384; Lu, Huo, Shi, Peng, Dang, Jiao, Zhu, Zhong, and Chen: Acta Aantomica Sinica 39 (2008) 267-271; Eshak, Ahmed, and Gawad: J Forensic Leg Med 18 (2011) 246-252), the discriminant equations for all of the metacarpals and phalanges are applicable to the population of Macaca mulatta from the Taihang Mountain. Anat Rec, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Anat Rec, 300:1741-1746, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Statistical sex determination from craniometrics: Comparison of linear discriminant analysis, logistic regression, and support vector machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Frédéric; Guyomarc'h, Pierre; Bruzek, Jaroslav

    2014-12-01

    Accuracy of identification tools in forensic anthropology primarily rely upon the variations inherent in the data upon which they are built. Sex determination methods based on craniometrics are widely used and known to be specific to several factors (e.g. sample distribution, population, age, secular trends, measurement technique, etc.). The goal of this study is to discuss the potential variations linked to the statistical treatment of the data. Traditional craniometrics of four samples extracted from documented osteological collections (from Portugal, France, the U.S.A., and Thailand) were used to test three different classification methods: linear discriminant analysis (LDA), logistic regression (LR), and support vector machines (SVM). The Portuguese sample was set as a training model on which the other samples were applied in order to assess the validity and reliability of the different models. The tests were performed using different parameters: some included the selection of the best predictors; some included a strict decision threshold (sex assessed only if the related posterior probability was high, including the notion of indeterminate result); and some used an unbalanced sex-ratio. Results indicated that LR tends to perform slightly better than the other techniques and offers a better selection of predictors. Also, the use of a decision threshold (i.e. p>0.95) is essential to ensure an acceptable reliability of sex determination methods based on craniometrics. Although the Portuguese, French, and American samples share a similar sexual dimorphism, application of Western models on the Thai sample (that displayed a lower degree of dimorphism) was unsuccessful. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Sex determination by tooth size in a sample of Greek population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsea, A G; Moraitis, K; Leon, G; Nicopoulou-Karayianni, K; Spiliopoulou, C

    2014-08-01

    Sex assessment from tooth measurements can be of major importance for forensic and bioarchaeological investigations, especially when only teeth or jaws are available. The purpose of this study is to assess the reliability and applicability of establishing sex identity in a sample of Greek population using the discriminant function proposed by Rösing et al. (1995). The study comprised of 172 dental casts derived from two private orthodontic clinics in Athens. The individuals were randomly selected and all had clear medical history. The mesiodistal crown diameters of all the teeth were measured apart from those of the 3rd molars. The values quoted for the sample to which the discriminant function was first applied were similar to those obtained for the Greek sample. The results of the preliminary statistical analysis did not support the use of the specific discriminant function for a reliable determination of sex by means of the mesiodistal diameter of the teeth. However, there was considerable variation between different populations and this might explain the reason for lack of discriminating power of the specific function in the Greek population. In order to investigate whether a better discriminant function could be obtained using the Greek data, separate discriminant function analysis was performed on the same teeth and a different equation emerged without, however, any real improvement in the classification process, with an overall correct classification of 72%. The results showed that there were a considerably higher percentage of females correctly classified than males. The results lead to the conclusion that the use of the mesiodistal diameter of teeth is not as a reliable method as one would have expected for determining sex of human remains from a forensic context. Therefore, this method could be used only in combination with other identification approaches. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  5. Temperature dependence of the optical absorption spectra of InP/ZnS quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenko, S. S.; Vokhmintsev, A. S.; Weinstein, I. A.

    2017-03-01

    The optical-absorption spectra of InP/ZnS (core/shell) quantum dots have been studied in a broad temperature range of T = 6.5-296 K. Using the second-order derivative spectrophotometry technique, the energies of optical transitions at room temperature were found to be E 1 = 2.60 ± 0.02 eV (for the first peak of excitonic absorption in the InP core) and E 2 = 4.70 ± 0.02 eV (for processes in the ZnS shell). The experimental curve of E 1( T) has been approximated for the first time in the framework of a linear model and in terms of the Fan's formula. It is established that the temperature dependence of E 1 is determined by the interaction of excitons and longitudinal acoustic phonons with hω = 15 meV.

  6. GLOBAL EPIDEMIOLOGY OF HIV AMONG FEMALE SEX WORKERS: INFLUENCE OF STRUCTURAL DETERMINANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, K; Strathdee, SA; Goldenberg, SM; Duff, P; Mwangi, P; Rusakova, M; Reza-Paul, S; Lau, J; Deering, K; Pickles, M; Boily, M-C

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Female sex workers (FSWs) bear a disproportionately large burden of HIV infection worldwide. Despite decades of research and programme activity, the epidemiology of HIV and the role that structural determinants have in mitigating or potentiating HIV epidemics and access to care for FSWs is poorly understood. We reviewed available published data for HIV prevalence and incidence, condom use, and structural determinants among this group. Only 87 (43%) of 204 unique studies reviewed explicitly examined structural determinants of HIV. Most studies were from Asia, with few from areas with a heavy burden of HIV such as sub-Saharan Africa, Russia, and eastern Europe. To further explore the potential effect of structural determinants on the course of epidemics, we used a deterministic transmission model to simulate potential HIV infections averted through structural changes in regions with concentrated and generalised epidemics, and high HIV prevalence among FSWs. This modelling suggested that elimination of sexual violence alone could avert 17% of HIV infections in Kenya (95% uncertainty interval [UI] 1–31) and 20% in Canada (95% UI 3–39) through its immediate and sustained effect on non-condom use) among FSWs and their clients in the next decade. In Kenya, scaling up of access to antiretroviral therapy among FSWs and their clients to meet WHO eligibility of a CD4 cell count of less than 500 cells per μL could avert 34% (95% UI 25–42) of infections and even modest coverage of sex worker-led outreach could avert 20% (95% UI 8–36) of infections in the next decade. Decriminalisation of sex work would have the greatest effect on the course of HIV epidemics across all settings, averting 33–46% of HIV infections in the next decade. Multipronged structural and community-led interventions are crucial to increase access to prevention and treatment and to promote human rights for FSWs worldwide. PMID:25059947

  7. Global epidemiology of HIV among female sex workers: influence of structural determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Kate; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Goldenberg, Shira M; Duff, Putu; Mwangi, Peninah; Rusakova, Maia; Reza-Paul, Sushena; Lau, Joseph; Deering, Kathleen; Pickles, Michael R; Boily, Marie-Claude

    2015-01-03

    Female sex workers (FSWs) bear a disproportionately large burden of HIV infection worldwide. Despite decades of research and programme activity, the epidemiology of HIV and the role that structural determinants have in mitigating or potentiating HIV epidemics and access to care for FSWs is poorly understood. We reviewed available published data for HIV prevalence and incidence, condom use, and structural determinants among this group. Only 87 (43%) of 204 unique studies reviewed explicitly examined structural determinants of HIV. Most studies were from Asia, with few from areas with a heavy burden of HIV such as sub-Saharan Africa, Russia, and eastern Europe. To further explore the potential effect of structural determinants on the course of epidemics, we used a deterministic transmission model to simulate potential HIV infections averted through structural changes in regions with concentrated and generalised epidemics, and high HIV prevalence among FSWs. This modelling suggested that elimination of sexual violence alone could avert 17% of HIV infections in Kenya (95% uncertainty interval [UI] 1-31) and 20% in Canada (95% UI 3-39) through its immediate and sustained effect on non-condom use) among FSWs and their clients in the next decade. In Kenya, scaling up of access to antiretroviral therapy among FSWs and their clients to meet WHO eligibility of a CD4 cell count of less than 500 cells per μL could avert 34% (95% UI 25-42) of infections and even modest coverage of sex worker-led outreach could avert 20% (95% UI 8-36) of infections in the next decade. Decriminalisation of sex work would have the greatest effect on the course of HIV epidemics across all settings, averting 33-46% of HIV infections in the next decade. Multipronged structural and community-led interventions are crucial to increase access to prevention and treatment and to promote human rights for FSWs worldwide. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Fetal Sex Determination Using Cell-Free Fetal Dna (cffDNA in Maternal Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Nyoman Hariyasa Sanjaya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prenatal test has routinely performed in antenatal care and has become a part of the obstetric care feature in many countries. Prenatal test is divided into screening and diagnostic test. Recently, the early noninvasive method in order to found and lessen the risk factors of pregnancy loss, has been studied. One of the methods is molecular test using cffDNA which has many screening purpose such as sex determination, aneuploidy, paternal inherited genetic disorder, fetus rhesus, and performed early at 7 weeks of pregnancy. Objective: The purpose of this study is to measure diagnostic value of cffDNA in determining fetal sex prenatally. Methods: In a diagnostic test study, 18 randomized samples were selected and divided based on fetal gender confirmed at birth. The group consisted of 9 pregnant women with male babies and 9 pregnant women with female babies. CffDNA then isolated from maternal blood sample and specific region in Y chromosome termed SRY is detected by PCR and electrophoresis. The data obtained analyzed both descriptively for baseline characteristic and analytically to determine its diagnostic value. Results: This study found significant correlation between SRY detection in cffDNA with male fetal phenotype (p<0.05. The sensitivity of the method is 100% with 89% specificity. In addition, we found 9.09 values for positive likelihood ratio (LR+ and 0 for negative likelihood ratio (LR-. Moreover, the result yielded 100% positive predictive value (PPV+ and 88.8% of negative predictive value (PPV-. Conclusion: This study proofed that cffDNA have a great diagnostic value to determine fetal sex prenatally. However, further study with several group of gestational age mother and better matching is required to further confirm the diagnostic potential of cffDNA 

  9. Sex determination in beetles: Production of all male progeny by Parental RNAi knockdown of transformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Jayendra Nath; Palli, Subba Reddy

    2012-01-01

    Sex in insects is determined by a cascade of regulators ultimately controlling sex-specific splicing of a transcription factor, Doublesex (Dsx). We recently identified homolog of dsx in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Tcdsx). Here, we report on the identification and characterization of a regulator of Tcdsx splicing in T. castaneum. Two male-specific and one female-specific isoforms of T. castaneum transformer (Tctra) were identified. RNA interference-aided knockdown of Tctra in pupa or adults caused a change in sex from females to males by diverting the splicing of Tcdsx pre-mRNA to male-specific isoform. All the pupa and adults developed from Tctra dsRNA injected final instar larvae showed male-specific sexually dimorphic structures. Tctra parental RNAi caused an elimination of females from the progeny resulting in production of all male progeny. Transformer parental RNAi could be used to produce all male population for use in pest control though sterile male release methods. PMID:22924109

  10. Temperature dependence of the infinite dilution activity coefficient and Henry's law constant of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reza, Joel; Trejo, Arturo

    2004-08-01

    The water solubility of 9,10-dihydroanthracene was experimentally determined between 278.12 and 313.17 K. Determinations were carried out by an experimental procedure developed in our laboratory, which is a modification of the dynamic coupled column liquid chromatographic technique. The uncertainty of the experimental determinations ranged from +/- 0.50% to +/- 3.10%. These data, as well as the water solubility data of other five polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) previously studied, were used to calculate the temperature dependence of the infinite dilution activity coefficient of 9,10-dihydroanthracene, anthracene, pyrene, 9,10-dihydrophenanthrene, m-terphenyl, and guaiazulene in water. Molar excess enthalpies and entropies at infinite dilution, at 298.15 K, were also derived. The temperature dependence of the infinite dilution activity coefficients was used, together with literature values of the vapor pressures of supercooled liquid PAHs (p(B)(sc)), to estimate their Henry's law constants (HLC). Only HLC for anthracene, pyrene, and 9,10-dihydrophenanthrene were calculated, since no p(B)(sc) data were available in the literature for 9,10-dihydroanthracene, m-terphenyl, and guaiazulene. From the observed temperature dependence of the Henry's law constants the enthalpy and entropy of the phase change from the dissolved phase to the gas phase were also derived for anthracene, pyrene, and 9,10-dihydrophenanthrene.

  11. Assessment of cheiloscopy in sex determination using lysochrome - A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Prabhath; Bahirwani, Shraddha; Valambath, Smruthi

    2015-01-01

    The present study was undertaken with the objective of ascertaining whether latent lip prints generated by persistent lipsticks and developed using lysochrome dyes have the potential of use in sex determination and personal identification. This study included a total of 100 subjects (50 males and 50 females) whose latent lip prints were obtained by applying the persistent lipstick Revlon ColorStay Overtime(®) manufactured by Revlon(®) consumer products corporation, NewYork, USA, and lifting the prints with cellophane sheets. The prints were then developed using lysochrome dyes, and all the samples were blinded and then graded based on defined patterns from the Suzuki and Tsuchihashi classification. No two lip prints were found to be alike. Type I was found to be the most prevalent type. In the female population, Type I (61%) was most prevalent, followed by Type I' (28%), Type II (9%), Type III (2%), Type IV (1%), and Type V (1%); in the male population, Type I (33%) was most prevalent, followed by Type II (23%), Type III (18%), Type IV (14%), Type I' (10%), and Type V (3%). Two examiners were able to determine the correct sexes from the given sample sizes. Their interobserver agreement was assessed using the kappa coefficient for males (κ =0.870) and females (κ = 0.870). Their accuracy was assessed with a confidence interval (CI) of 91.48-99.38. Lysochrome dyes are very efficacious in developing latent lip prints. This preliminary study has conclusively proved that latent lip prints developed with lysochrome dyes hold the potential for use in sex determination and can be maintained in a digital database.

  12. Transcriptional rewiring of the sex determining dmrt1 gene duplicate by transposable elements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaury Herpin

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Control and coordination of eukaryotic gene expression rely on transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulatory networks. Evolutionary innovations and adaptations often require rapid changes of such networks. It has long been hypothesized that transposable elements (TE might contribute to the rewiring of regulatory interactions. More recently it emerged that TEs might bring in ready-to-use transcription factor binding sites to create alterations to the promoters by which they were captured. A process where the gene regulatory architecture is of remarkable plasticity is sex determination. While the more downstream components of the sex determination cascades are evolutionary conserved, the master regulators can switch between groups of organisms even on the interspecies level or between populations. In the medaka fish (Oryzias latipes a duplicated copy of dmrt1, designated dmrt1bY or DMY, on the Y chromosome was shown to be the master regulator of male development, similar to Sry in mammals. We found that the dmrt1bY gene has acquired a new feedback downregulation of its expression. Additionally, the autosomal dmrt1a gene is also able to regulate transcription of its duplicated paralog by binding to a unique target Dmrt1 site nested within the dmrt1bY proximal promoter region. We could trace back this novel regulatory element to a highly conserved sequence within a new type of TE that inserted into the upstream region of dmrt1bY shortly after the duplication event. Our data provide functional evidence for a role of TEs in transcriptional network rewiring for sub- and/or neo-functionalization of duplicated genes. In the particular case of dmrt1bY, this contributed to create new hierarchies of sex-determining genes.

  13. Flower Development and Sex Determination between Male and Female Flowers in Vernicia fordii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingji Mao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Vernicia fordii is a monoecious and diclinous species with male and female flowers on the same inflorescence. Low female to male flower ratio is one of the main reasons for low yield in this species. However, little is known of its floral development and sex determination. Here, according to the results of scanning electron microscopy and histological analysis, the floral development of V. fordii was divided into 12 stages and the first morphological divergence between the male and female flowers was found to occur at stage 7. The male flowers are always unisexual, but the female flowers present bisexual characteristics, with sterile stamen (staminode restricted to pre-meiosis of mother sporogenous cells and cell death occurring at later development stages. To further elucidate the molecular mechanism underling sex determination at the divergence stage for male and female flowers, comparative transcriptome analysis was performed. In total, 56,065 unigenes were generated and 608 genes were differentially expressed between male and female flowers, among which 310 and 298 DEGs (differentially expressed genes showed high expression levels in males and females, respectively. The transcriptome data showed that the sexual dimorphism of female flowers was affected by jasmonic acid, transcription factors, and some genes related to the floral meristem activity. Ten candidate genes showed consistent expression in the qRT-PCR validation and DEGs data. In this study, we provide developmental characterization and transcriptomic information for better understanding of the development of unisexual flowers and the regulatory networks underlying the mechanism of sex determination in V. fordii, which would be helpful in the molecular breeding of V. fordii to improve the yield output.

  14. The role of Fanconi anemia/BRCA genes in zebrafish sex determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Marí, Adriana; Postlethwait, John H

    2011-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a human disease of bone marrow failure, leukemia, squamous cell carcinoma, and developmental anomalies, including hypogonadism and infertility. Bone marrow transplants improve hematopoietic phenotypes but do not prevent other cancers. FA arises from mutation in any of the 15 FANC genes that cooperate to repair double stranded DNA breaks by homologous recombination. Zebrafish has a single ortholog of each human FANC gene and unexpectedly, mutations in at least two of them (fancl and fancd1(brca2)) lead to female-to-male sex reversal. Investigations show that, as in human, zebrafish fanc genes are required for genome stability and for suppressing apoptosis in tissue culture cells, in embryos treated with DNA damaging agents, and in meiotic germ cells. The sex reversal phenotype requires the action of Tp53 (p53), an activator of apoptosis. These results suggest that in normal sex determination, zebrafish oocytes passing through meiosis signal the gonadal soma to maintain expression of aromatase, an enzyme that converts androgen to estrogen, thereby feminizing the gonad and the individual. According to this model, normal male and female zebrafish differ in genetic factors that control the strength of the late meiotic oocyte-derived signal, probably by regulating the number of meiotic oocytes, which environmental factors can also alter. Transcripts from fancd1(brca2) localize at the animal pole of the zebrafish oocyte cytoplasm and are required for normal oocyte nuclear architecture, for normal embryonic development, and for preventing ovarian tumors. Embryonic DNA repair and sex reversal phenotypes provide assays for the screening of small molecule libraries for therapeutic substances for FA. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Identification of the Sex-Determining Region of the Ceratitis Capitata Y Chromosome by Deletion Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willhoeft, U.; Franz, G.

    1996-01-01

    In the medfly Ceratitis capitata, the Y chromosome is responsible for determining the male sex. We have mapped the region containing the relevant factor through the analysis of Y-autosome translocations using fluorescence in situ hybridization with two different probes. One probe, the clone pY114, contains repetitive, Y-specific DNA sequences from C. capitata, while the second clone, pDh2-H8, consists of ribosomal DNA sequences from Drosophila hydei. Clone pY114 labeled most of the long arm and pDh2-H8 hybridizes to the short arm and the centromeric region of the long arm. In 12 of the analyzed 19 Y-autosome translocation strains, adjacent-1 segregation products survive to the late pupal or even adult stage and can, therefore, be sexed. This was correlated with the length of the Y fragment still present in these aberrant individuals and allowed us to map the male-determining factor to a region of the long arm representing ~15% of the entire Y chromosome. No additional factors, affecting for example fertility, were detected outside the male-determining region. PMID:8889534

  16. Temperature dependent current transport of Pd/ZnO nanowire Schottky diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayen, R. N.; Bhattacharyya, S. R.; Jana, P.

    2014-09-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowire based Schottky barrier diodes are fabricated by depositing Pd metal contact on top of vertically well-aligned ZnO nanowire arrays. A vertical array of ZnO nanowires on indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrates is synthesized by hybrid wet chemical route. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurement confirm the formation of stoichiometric well-aligned hexagonal (h-ZnO) nanowire arrays with wurtzite structure. Temperature dependent current-voltage (I-V) measurements on palladium-ZnO (Pd/ZnO) nanowire Schottky junctions in the temperature range 303-383 K exhibit excellent rectifying character. From these nonlinear I-V plots, different electrical parameters of diode-like reverse saturation current, barrier height and ideality factor are determined as a function of temperature assuming pure thermionic emission model. The ideality factor is found to decrease while the barrier height increases with the increase in temperature. The series resistance values calculated from Cheung’s functions also show temperature dependency. Such behavior can be attributed to the presence of defects that traps carriers, and barrier height inhomogeneity at the interface of the barrier junction. After barrier height inhomogeneity correction, considering a Gaussian distributed barrier height fluctuation across the Pd/ZnO interface, the estimated values of mean barrier height and modified Richardson constant are more closely matched to the theoretically predicted value for Pd/ZnO Schottky barrier diodes. The variation of density of interface states as a function of interface state energy is also calculated.

  17. Temperature-dependent fluorescence characteristics of an ytterbium-sensitized erbium-doped tellurite glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Xujie [College of Computer Science and Engineering, Wenzhou University, Zhejiang 325035 (China); Faculty of Information Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory, Base of Novel Functional Materials and Preparation Science, Ningbo University, Zhejiang 315211 (China)], E-mail: lixujie101@yahoo.com.cn; Zhang Wenjie [College of Computer Science and Engineering, Wenzhou University, Zhejiang 325035 (China)

    2008-09-01

    In this article, the 1.5 {mu}m emission spectra corresponding to the {sup 4}I{sub 13/2}{yields}{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} transition of Er{sup 3+} in tellurite glass are studied within the temperature from 8 to 300 K. The emission spectra of Er{sup 3+}: {sup 4}I{sub 13/2}{yields}{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} transition are also analyzed using a peak-fit routine, and an equivalent four-level system is proposed to estimate the stark splitting for the {sup 4}I{sub 15/2} and {sup 4}I{sub 13/2} levels of Er{sup 3+} in the tellurite glass. The results indicate that the {sup 4}I{sub 13/2}{yields}{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} emission of Er{sup 3+} can exhibit a considerable broadening due to a significant enhance the peak a', and b' change, respectively, and the peaks of which are located at about 1507 and 1556 nm. A detailed study of temperature-dependent 1.5 {mu}m emission spectra involving the change of the corresponding sub-bands shows that as the temperature decreases from 300 to 8 K, its line-shape becomes sharper and more intense (the full-width at half-maximum decreases from 59 to 38 nm). Temperature-dependent fluorescence intensities and the experimentally determined lifetimes are investigated; the results show that a decrease behavior of fluorescence intensities and lifetimes are observed for temperature from 8 to 300 K.

  18. Temperature dependence of poly(lactic acid) mechanical properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Chengbo; Guo, Huilong; Li, Jingqing

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of polymers are not only determined by their structures, but also related to the temperature field in which they are located. The yield behaviors, Young's modulus and structures of injection-molded poly(lactic acid) (PLA) samples after annealing at different temperatures...

  19. Temperature Dependence of the Stability of Ion Pair Interactions ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. An understanding of the determinants of the thermal stability of thermostable proteins is expected to enable design of enzymes that can be employed in industrial biocatalytic processes carried out at high temperatures. A major factor that has been proposed to stabilize thermostable proteins is the high occurrence.

  20. Temperature Dependence of the Stability of Ion Pair Interactions ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An understanding of the determinants of the thermal stability of thermostable proteins is expected to enable design of enzymes that can be employed in industrial biocatalytic processes carried out at high temperatures. A major factor that has been proposed to stabilize thermostable proteins is the high occurrenceof salt ...

  1. The roles of Dmrt (Double sex/Male-abnormal-3 Related Transcription factor) genes in sex determination and differentiation mechanisms: Ubiquity and diversity across the animal kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Marion Anne-Lise; Cosseau, Céline; Mouahid, Gabriel; Duval, David; Grunau, Christoph; Toulza, Ève; Allienne, Jean-François; Boissier, Jérôme

    2015-07-01

    The Dmrt (Double sex/Male-abnormal-3 Related Transcription factor) genes have been intensively studied because they represent major transcription factors in the pathways governing sex determination and differentiation. These genes have been identified in animal groups ranging from cnidarians to mammals, and some of the genes functionally studied. Here, we propose to analyze (i) the presence/absence of various Dmrt gene groups in the different taxa across the animal kingdom; (ii) the relative expression levels of the Dmrt genes in each sex; (iii) the specific spatial (by organ) and temporal (by developmental stage) variations in gene expression. This review considers non-mammalian animals at all levels of study (i.e. no particular importance is given to animal models), and using all types of sexual strategy (hermaphroditic or gonochoric) and means of sex determination (i.e. genetic or environmental). To conclude this global comparison, we offer an analysis of the DM domains conserved among the different DMRT proteins, and propose a general sex-specific pattern for each member of the Dmrt gene family. Copyright © 2015 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Genetic studies on sex determination and colouration in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karayuecel, I

    1999-05-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate colour and sex determination mechanisms through the application of androgenesis, gynogenesis and controlled breeding programme with the objective of producing all red males in O. niloticus. The highest yield of androgenetic haploid to pigmentation stage was 24.6{+-}3.5% (relative to controls) with optimal UV irradiation dose of 450JM{sup -2} for 5 minutes. The highest survival rate of diploid androgens was 0.07{+-}0.07% (relative to controls) to yolk sac stage using a heat shock of 42.5 deg. C for 3 minutes 30 seconds applied at 25 minutes after fertilisation. All paternal inheritance of diploid androgenetic tilapia was verified using DNA fingerprinting. The mean recombination frequency of the red skin colour gene in meiotic gynogens was 0.12{+-}0.04. All maternal inheritance of meiotic gynogens was verified using the isozyme locus ADA*. Analyses of sex ratios of meiotic gynogens suggested that male progenies were produced by an epistatic sex determining locus (SDL-2 with two alleles SR and sr) causing female to male sex reversal in the homozygous phase (srsr) but with limited penetrance. A close linkage was found between a sex determining locus (SDL-2) and the red gene. No significant difference was found between colour genotypes (namely homozygous red, heterozygous red and wild type) in terms of total fecundity, ISI (inter spawning interval), egg size and survival rate. Overall mean ISI was 26.3{+-}1.0 days. Mean total fecundity was 1096 eggs. Fecundity varied over successive spawns but this variation did not appear to be related to spawning periodicity. Hormonal and thermal feminization were compared on all YY male progeny of O. niloticus. While similar female percentages of 32.0{+-}5.2 and 33.8{+-}1.5% were produced, significantly higher intersex percentages of 18.5{+-}2.5 and 1.6{+-}0.8 were observed in heat and DES treated groups, respectively. Heat treatment groups showed the lowest survival rate of 62

  3. xol-1, the master sex-switch gene in C. elegans, is a transcriptional target of the terminal sex-determining factor TRA-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargitai, Balázs; Kutnyánszky, Vera; Blauwkamp, Timothy A; Steták, Attila; Csankovszki, Györgyi; Takács-Vellai, Krisztina; Vellai, Tibor

    2009-12-01

    In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, sex is determined by the ratio of X chromosomes to sets of autosomes: XX animals (2X:2A=1.0) develop as hermaphrodites and XO animals (1X:2A=0.5) develop as males. TRA-1, the worm ortholog of Drosophila Cubitus interruptus and mammalian Gli (Glioma-associated homolog) proteins, is the terminal transcription factor of the C. elegans sex-determination pathway, which specifies hermaphrodite fate by repressing male-specific genes. Here we identify a consensus TRA-1 binding site in the regulatory region of xol-1, the master switch gene controlling sex determination and dosage compensation. xol-1 is normally expressed in males, where it promotes male development and prevents dosage compensation. We show that TRA-1 binds to the consensus site in the xol-1 promoter in vitro and inhibits the expression of xol-1 in XX animals in vivo. Furthermore, inactivation of tra-1 enhances, whereas hyperactivation of tra-1 suppresses, lethality in animals with elevated xol-1 activity. These data imply the existence of a regulatory feedback loop within the C. elegans sex-determination and dosage-compensation cascade that ensures the accurate dose of X-linked genes in cells destined to adopt hermaphrodite fate.

  4. Estimation of brittle fracture behavior of SA508 carbon steel by considering temperature dependence of damage model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Shin Beom; Jeong, Jae Uk; Choi, Jae Boong [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Yoon Suk [Kyunghee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min Chul [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Bong Sang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the brittle fracture behavior of reactor pressure vessel steel by considering the temperature dependence of a damage model. A multi island genetic algorithm was linked to a Weibull stress model, which is the model typically used for brittle fracture evaluation, to improve the calibration procedure. The improved calibration procedure and fracture toughness test data for SA508 carbon steel at the temperatures -60 .deg. C, -80 .deg. C, and -100 .deg. C were used to decide the damage parameters required for the brittle fracture evaluation. The model was found to show temperature dependence, similar to the case of NUREG/CR 6930. Finally, on the basis of the quantification of the difference between 2- and 3-parameter Weibull stress models, an engineering equation that can help obtain more realistic fracture behavior by using the simpler 2-parameter Weibull stress model was proposed.

  5. Difficulties of sex determination from forensic bone degraded DNA: A comparison of three methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quincey, Danielle; Carle, Georges; Alunni, Véronique; Quatrehomme, Gérald

    2013-09-01

    Sex determination is of paramount importance in forensic anthropology. Numerous anthropological methods have been described, including visual assessments and various measurements of bones. Nevertheless, whatever the method used, the percentage of correct classification of a single bone usually varies between 80% and 95%, due to significant intra- and inter-population variations, and sometimes variations coming from secular trends. DNA is increasingly used in a forensic context. But forensic DNA extraction from bone raises several issues, because the samples are very often badly altered and/or in very small quantity. Nuclear DNA is difficult to get from degraded samples, according to low copy number, at least in comparison with mitochondrial DNA. In a forensic context (as in a paeleoanthropological context) DNA sex determination is usually complicated by the weak amount of DNA, the degraded nature of nucleic acids, the presence of enzymatic inhibitors in DNA extracts, the possible faint amplification of Y band and the risk of contamination during either excavation or manipulation of samples. The aim of this work was to compare three methods of DNA sex determination from bones: procedure #1 using a single PCR amplification, procedure #2 using a double PCR amplification, and procedure #3 adding bleaching for decontamination of the bone, instead of simply rubbing the bone. These processes were applied to samples of bones (49 samples coming from 39 individuals) that were in various states of post mortem alteration. The main results are the following. (i) No DNA could be extracted from three skulls (parietal bones, mastoid process), the compact bone of one rib, and the diaphysis of one femur; (ii) there was a contamination in three skulls; and (iii) the Y band did not appear in two male cases, with one of the three procedures (male tibia, procedure #2) and with procedures #2 and #3 (male femur). This study emphasises the main issue while working with altered bones: the

  6. Determine sex ratios of green turtles along the U.S. West Coast through examinations of hormones

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A testosterone (T) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was validated for use with green turtle plasma in order to determine the sex of juvenile turtles. We...

  7. Sex Reversal in Reptiles: Reproductive Oddity or Powerful Driver of Evolutionary Change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holleley, Clare E; Sarre, Stephen D; O'Meally, Denis; Georges, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Is sex a product of genes, the environment, or both? In this review, we describe the diversity of sex-determining mechanisms in reptiles, with a focus on systems that display gene-environment interactions. We summarise the field and laboratory-based evidence for the occurrence of environmental sex reversal in reptiles and ask whether this is a widespread evolutionary mechanism affecting the evolution of sex chromosomes and speciation in vertebrates. Sex determination systems exist across a continuum of genetic and environmental influences, blurring the lines between what was once considered a strict dichotomy between genetic sex determination and temperature-dependent sex determination. Across this spectrum, we identify the potential for sex reversal in species with clearly differentiated heteromorphic sex chromosomes (Pogona vitticeps, Bassiana duperreyi, Eremias multiocellata, Gekko japonicus), weakly differentiated homomorphic sex chromosomes (Niveoscincus ocellatus), and species with only a weak heritable predisposition for sex (Emys orbicularis, Trachemys scripta). We argue that sex reversal is widespread in reptiles (Testudines, Lacertidae, Agamidae, Scincidae, Gekkonidae) and has the potential to have an impact on individual fitness, resulting in reproductively, morphologically, and behaviourally unique phenotypes. Sex reversal is likely to be a powerful evolutionary force responsible for generating and maintaining lability and diversity in reptile sex-determining modes. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Seasonality and Temperature-Dependent Flight Dispersal of Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) and Other Vectors of Chagas Disease in Western Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Iorio, Osvaldo; Gürtler, Ricardo E

    2017-09-01

    Flight dispersal of Triatominae is affected by climatic conditions and determines the spatiotemporal patterns of house invasion and transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi Chagas (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae). We investigated the detailed time structure and temperature dependencies of flight occurrence of Triatoma infestans Klug (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) and other triatomine species in a rural village of western Argentina by taking advantage of the attraction of adult triatomines to artificial light sources. Most of the village's streetlight posts were systematically inspected for triatomines twice between sunset and midnight over 425 nights in the spring-summer seasons of 1999-2002, an unprecedented light-trap sampling effort for any triatomine species. In total, 288 adults were captured, including 122 Triatoma guasayana Wygodzinsky and Abalos, 89 T. infestans, 72 Triatoma eratyrusiformis Del Ponte, and 5 Triatoma garciabesi Carcavallo et al. Adult sex ratios were balanced in T. infestans and strongly male-biased in other species. Nearly all flight-dispersing triatomines were caught when temperatures at sunset were >20 °C (range, 16.6-31.7 °C), suggesting a putative threshold around 17-18 °C. Triatomine catches were rare on rainy days. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the proportion of nights in which at least an adult T. infestans was caught increased highly significantly with increasing temperature at sunset and was modified by collection month, with greater catches in early spring and no sex differential. This study confirms that spring represents a previously overlooked, important dispersal period of T. infestans, and shows large variations among and within Triatominae in their temporal patterns of flight occurrence, abundance, and sex ratio. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Determining dental sex dimorphism in South Indians using discriminant function analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuthama, Krishnamurthy; Shankar, S; Ilayaraja, Vadivel; Kumar, Gopal Shiva; Rajmohan, M; Vignesh

    2011-10-10

    Dental forensics forms a vital branch of forensic science which deals with proper handling, examination and evaluation of dental evidences for identification of victims of crime, accidents or calamities. Therefore skull and teeth often provide the identification material. The aim of the study was to investigate the accuracy of odontometric methods in sex determination of permanent teeth and to compute new formula to differentiate male and female teeth using discriminant function analysis for South Indian population. A total of 100 subjects were selected for the study from a parent population of 4800 students by simple random sampling method. Alginate impressions of the upper dental arch were made and casts were poured immediately. A digital vernier calliper was used for the measurement of all upper anteriors. Twelve different tooth measurements were recorded and from those two indexes have been computed. Statistical analysis was performed using the SPSS version 17.0 software. All the predictor variables were subjected to stepwise discriminant function analysis which optimally separates the genders and a best discriminant function was generated. In all the observed mean dimensions, male values exceed the female values. Student's 't' test for the different predictor variables of all teeth selected between male and females were found significant (p technique would be a simple, quick, cost effective, reliable and accurate for sex determination. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Sex Determination Using Inion-Opistocranium-Asterion (IOA) Triangle in Nigerians' Skulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orish, C N; Didia, B C; Fawehinmi, H B

    2014-01-01

    Background. Determination of sex is an important concern to the forensic anthropologists as it is critical for individual identification. This study has investigated the existence of sexual dimorphism in the dimensions and the area of the IOA triangle. Methods. A total of 100 adult dry skulls, (78 males; 22 females) from departments of anatomy in Nigerian universities were used for this study. Automatic digital calliper was used for the measurement. Coefficient of variation, correlation, linear regression, percentiles, and sexual dimorphism ratio were computed from the IOA triangle measurements. The IOA triangle area was compared between sexes. Results. The male parameters were significantly (P triangle of 1938.88 mm(2) and 1305.68 mm(2) for male and female, respectively, was calculated. The left IOA indices were 46.42% and 37.40% in males and females, respectively, while the right IOA indices for males and females were 47.19% and 38.87%, respectively. Conclusion. The anthropometry of inion-opistocranium-asterion IOA triangle can be a guide in gender determination of unknown individuals.

  11. Label-free detection of sex determining region Y (SRY) via capacitive biosensor

    KAUST Repository

    Sivashankar, Shilpa

    2016-10-20

    In this work, we present for the first time, the use of a simple fractal capacitive biosensor for the quantification and detection of sex-determining region Y (SRY) genes. This section of genetic code, which is found on the Y chromosome, finds importance for study as it causes fetuses to develop characteristics of male sex-like gonads when a mutation occurs. It is also an important genetic code in men, and disorders involving the SRY gene can cause infertility and sexual malfunction that lead to a variety of gene mutational disorders. We have therefore designed silicon-based, label-free fractal capacitive biosensors to quantify various proteins and genes. We take advantage of a good dielectric material, Parylene C for enhancing the performance of the sensors. We have integrated these sensors with a simple microchannel for easy handling of fluids on the detection area. The read-out value of an Agilent LCR meter used to measure capacitance of the sensor at a frequency of 1 MHz determined gene specificity and gene quantification. These data revealed that the capacitance measurement of the capacitive biosensor for the SRY gene depended on both the target and the concentration of DNA. The experimental outcomes in the present study can be used to detect DNA and its variations in crucial fields that have a great impact on our daily lives, such as clinical and veterinary diagnostics, industrial and environmental testing and forensic sciences.

  12. Somatic sex determination in Caenorhabditis elegans is modulated by SUP-26 repression of tra-2 translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapes, James; Chen, Jeng-Ting; Yu, Jau-Song; Xue, Ding

    2010-10-19

    Translational repression mediated by RNA-binding proteins or micro RNAs has emerged as a major regulatory mechanism for fine-tuning important biological processes. In Caenorhabditis elegans, translational repression of the key sex-determination gene tra-2 (tra, transformer) is controlled by a 28-nucleotide repeat element, the TRA-2/GLI element (TGE), located in its 3' untranslated region (UTR). Mutations that disrupt TGE or the germline-specific TGE-binding factor GLD-1 increase TRA-2 protein expression and inhibit sperm production in hermaphrodites. Here we report the characterization of the sup-26 gene, which regulates sex determination in the soma and encodes an RNA recognition motif (RRM)-containing protein. We show that SUP-26 regulates the level of the TRA-2 protein through TGE in vivo and binds directly to TGE in vitro through its RRM domain. Interestingly, SUP-26 associates with poly(A)-binding protein 1 (PAB-1) in vivo and may repress tra-2 expression by inhibiting the translation-stimulating activity of PAB-1. Taken together, our results provide further insight into how mRNA-binding factors repress translation and modulate sexual development in different tissues of C. elegans.

  13. Body composition in portuguese adolescents: are physical activity and maturity status sex-specific determinant factors?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Silva

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2014v16n3p247 The influence of biological maturation and physical activity (PA on the differences of body composition in adolescents have been little studied. The purpose of this study was to examine if PA and maturity status were sex-specific determinant factors in the adolescents’ body composition. Ninety-four adolescents (50 boys and 44 girls were evaluated. All anthropometric measures were obtained according to ISAK procedures, bone age was estimated by the TW3 method, and PA was assessed with ActigraphR GT1M, over seven consecutive days. Maturity status explained 33% of the body mass index (BMI and waist circumference (WC and 31% of the sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD in boys. In girls, maturity status explained 27% of the waist-to-hip ratio (WHR, moderate PA explained 17% of the BMI and 12% of the WC, and moderate to vigorous PA explained 11% of the SAD. These results seem to indicate that the determinant factors of the adolescents’ body composition are sex-specific. Maturity status was the main predictive factor in boys and interacted with PA in girls. Our findings support the evidence that researchers need to consider biological maturity when explaining body composition changes in adolescents.

  14. Temperature dependence of thermal conductivity of biological tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, A; Mahajan, R L

    2003-08-01

    In this paper, we present our experimental results on the determination of the thermal conductivity of biological tissues using a transient technique based on the principles of the cylindrical hot-wire method. A novel, 1.45 mm diameter, 50 mm long hot-wire probe was deployed. Initial measurements were made on sponge, gelatin and Styrofoam insulation to test the accuracy of the probe. Subsequent experiments conducted on sheep collagen in the range of 25 degrees C thermal conductivity to be a linear function of temperature. Further, these changes in the thermal conductivity were found to be reversible. However, when the tissue was heated beyond 55 degrees C, irreversible changes in thermal conductivity were observed. Similar experiments were also conducted for determining the thermal conductivity of cow liver. In this case, the irreversible effects were found to set in much later at around 90 degrees C. Below this temperature, in the range of 25 degrees C thermal conductivity, as for sheep collagen, varied linearly with temperature. In the second part of our study, in vivo measurements were taken on the different organs of a living pig. Comparison with reported values for dead tissues shows the thermal conductivities of living organs to be higher, indicating thereby the dominant role played by blood perfusion in enhancing the net heat transfer in living tissues. The degree of enhancement is different in different organs and shows a direct dependence on the blood flow rate.

  15. Mapping and validation of the major sex-determining region in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus L. Using RAD sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Palaiokostas

    Full Text Available Sex in Oreochromis niloticus (Nile tilapia is principally determined by an XX/XY locus but other genetic and environmental factors also influence sex ratio. Restriction Associated DNA (RAD sequencing was used in two families derived from crossing XY males with females from an isogenic clonal line, in order to identify Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs and map the sex-determining region(s. We constructed a linkage map with 3,802 SNPs, which corresponded to 3,280 informative markers, and identified a major sex-determining region on linkage group 1, explaining nearly 96% of the phenotypic variance. This sex-determining region was mapped in a 2 cM interval, corresponding to approximately 1.2 Mb in the O. niloticus draft genome. In order to validate this, a diverse family (4 families; 96 individuals in total and population (40 broodstock individuals test panel were genotyped for five of the SNPs showing the highest association with phenotypic sex. From the expanded data set, SNPs Oni23063 and Oni28137 showed the highest association, which persisted both in the case of family and population data. Across the entire dataset all females were found to be homozygous for these two SNPs. Males were heterozygous, with the exception of five individuals in the population and two in the family dataset. These fish possessed the homozygous genotype expected of females. Progeny sex ratios (over 95% females from two of the males with the "female" genotype indicated that they were neomales (XX males. Sex reversal induced by elevated temperature during sexual differentiation also resulted in phenotypic males with the "female" genotype. This study narrows down the region containing the main sex-determining locus, and provides genetic markers tightly linked to this locus, with an association that persisted across the population. These markers will be of use in refining the production of genetically male O. niloticus for aquaculture.

  16. On the Temperature Dependence of the Shear Viscosity and Holography

    CERN Document Server

    Cremonini, Sera; Szepietowski, Phillip

    2012-01-01

    We examine the structure of the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio eta/s in holographic theories of gravity coupled to a scalar field, in the presence of higher derivative corrections. Thanks to a non-trivial scalar field profile, eta/s in this setup generically runs as a function of temperature. In particular, its temperature behavior is dictated by the shape of the scalar potential and of the scalar couplings to the higher derivative terms. We consider a number of dilatonic setups, but focus mostly on phenomenological models that are QCD-like. We determine the geometric conditions needed to identify local and global minima for eta/s as a function of temperature, which translate to restrictions on the signs and ranges of the higher derivative couplings. Finally, such restrictions lead to an holographic argument for the existence of a global minimum for eta/s in these models, at or above the deconfinement transition.

  17. Temperature dependence of Henry's law constants of metolachlor and diazinon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigenbrugel, Valérie; Le Calvé, Stéphane; Mirabel, Philippe

    2004-10-01

    A dynamic system based on the water/air equilibrium at the interface within the length of a microporous tube has been used to determine experimentally the Henry's law constants (HLC) of two pesticides: metolachlor and diazinon. The measurements were conducted over the temperature range 283-301 K. At 293 K, HLCs values are (42.6+/-2.8) x 10(3) (in units of M atm(-1)) for metolachlor and (3.0+/-0.3)x10(3) for diazinon. The obtained data were used to derive the following Arrhenius expressions: HLC=(3.0+/-0.4) x 10(-11) exp((10,200+/-1,000)/T) for metolachlor and (7.2+/-0.5) x 10(-15) exp((11,900+/-700)/T) for diazinon. At a cumulus cloud temperature of 283 K, the fractions of metolachlor and diazinon in the atmospheric aqueous phase are about 57% and 11% respectively. In order to evaluate the impact of a cloud on the atmospheric chemistry of both studied pesticides, we compare also their atmospheric lifetimes under clear sky (tau(gas)), and cloudy conditions (tau(multiphase)). The calculated multiphase lifetimes (in units of hours) are significantly lower than those in gas phase at a cumulus temperature of 283 K (in parentheses): metolachlor, 0.4 (2.9); diazinon, 1.9 (5.0).

  18. Temperature dependence of electron mobility in N-type organic molecular crystals: Theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lili; Fan, Jianzhong; Jiang, Supu; Wang, Zhongjie; Wang, Chuan-Kui

    2017-11-01

    The temperature dependence of electron mobility in three Fx-TCNQ molecular crystals is studied. The electron mobility calculated based on Marcus charge transfer rate for all three molecules increases, as the temperature becomes high. Nevertheless, the electron mobility calculated based on quantum charge transfer rate shows opposite temperature dependence and indicates bandlike transport mechanism. Similar intrinsic transport properties are obtained for three systems. The different temperature dependence for Fx-TCNQ molecules detected should be induced by different transfer paths or external factors. Our investigation could help one better understand experimental results and provide intuitive view on the transfer mechanism in molecular crystals.

  19. Temperature-dependent gate-swing hysteresis of pentacene thin film transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yow-Jon Lin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The temperature-dependent hysteresis-type transfer characteristics of pentacene-based organic thin film transistors (OTFTs were researched. The temperature-dependent transfer characteristics exhibit hopping conduction behavior. The fitting data for the temperature-dependent off-to-on and on-to-off transfer characteristics of OTFTs demonstrate that the hopping distance (ah and the barrier height for hopping (qϕt control the carrier flow, resulting in the hysteresis-type transfer characteristics of OTFTs. The hopping model gives an explanation of the gate-swing hysteresis and the roles played by qϕt and ah.

  20. Temperature dependent current transport properties in Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danilson, Mati, E-mail: mati.danilson@ttu.ee [Department of Materials Science, Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, 19086 Tallinn (Estonia); Kask, Erkki, E-mail: erkki.kask@ttu.ee [Department of Physics, Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, 19086 Tallinn (Estonia); Pokharel, Nikhil, E-mail: pokharel.nikhil@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science, Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, 19086 Tallinn (Estonia); Department of Natural Sciences (Physics), Kathmandu University, PO Box 6250 Dhulikhel (Nepal); Grossberg, Maarja, E-mail: Maarja.Grossberg@ttu.ee [Department of Materials Science, Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, 19086 Tallinn (Estonia); Kauk-Kuusik, Marit, E-mail: marit.kauk-kuusik@ttu.ee [Department of Materials Science, Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, 19086 Tallinn (Estonia); Varema, Tiit, E-mail: Tiit.Varema@ttu.ee [Department of Materials Science, Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, 19086 Tallinn (Estonia); Krustok, Jüri, E-mail: juri.krustok@ttu.ee [Department of Materials Science, Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, 19086 Tallinn (Estonia); Department of Physics, Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, 19086 Tallinn (Estonia)

    2015-05-01

    Quaternary semiconductor compound Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} (CZTS) is a promising non-toxic absorber material for solar cells made from earth abundant elements. In this study temperature dependencies (T = 10-300 K) of current-voltage (J-V) characteristics and external quantum efficiency (EQE) spectra of CZTS monograin layer solar cells were measured in order to clarify current transport in CZTS that is still not fully understood. Three different temperature ranges can be distinguished from the temperature dependence of the series resistance (R{sub s}) obtained from J-V measurements and the effective bandgap energy (E{sub g}{sup ⁎}) determined from the EQE spectra. Thermally activated conductivity, Mott's variable-range hopping conductivity, and very low temperature (< 40 K) blocking of the interface recombination were observed. - Highlights: • Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} monograin layer solar cell temperature dependent parameters were studied. • Thermally activated conductivity at temperatures T > 90 K • Mott's variable-range hopping conductivity at temperatures T = 90-40 K • Very low temperature (< 40 K) blocking of interface recombination was observed.

  1. Molecular patterns of sex determination in the animal kingdom: a comparative study of the biology of reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelopoulou Roxani

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Determining sexual fate is an integral part of reproduction, used as a means to enrich the genome. A variety of such regulatory mechanisms have been described so far and some of the more extensively studied ones are being discussed. For the insect order of Hymenoptera, the choice lies between uniparental haploid males and biparental diploid females, originating from unfertilized and fertilized eggs accordingly. This mechanism is also known as single-locus complementary sex determination (slCSD. On the other hand, for Dipterans and Drosophila melanogaster, sex is determined by the ratio of X chromosomes to autosomes and the sex switching gene, sxl. Another model organism whose sex depends on the X:A ratio, Caenorhabditis elegans, has furthermore to provide for the brief period of spermatogenesis in hermaphrodites (XX without the benefit of the "male" genes of the sex determination pathway. Many reptiles have no discernible sex determining genes. Their sexual fate is determined by the temperature of the environment during the thermosensitive period (TSP of incubation, which regulates aromatase activity. Variable patterns of sex determination apply in fish and amphibians. In birds, while sex chromosomes do exist, females are the heterogametic (ZW and males the homogametic sex (ZZ. However, we have yet to decipher which of the two (Z or W is responsible for the choice between males and females. In mammals, sex determination is based on the presence of two identical (XX or distinct (XY gonosomes. This is believed to be the result of a lengthy evolutionary process, emerging from a common ancestral autosomal pair. Indeed, X and Y present different levels of homology in various mammals, supporting the argument of a gradual structural differentiation starting around the SRY region. The latter initiates a gene cascade that results in the formation of a male. Regulation of sex steroid production is also a major result of these genetic interactions

  2. Temperature-dependent phenotypic variation of Campylobacter jejuni lipooligosaccharides

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Semchenko, Evgeny A

    2010-11-30

    Abstract Background Campylobacter jejuni is a major bacterial cause of food-borne enteritis, and its lipooligosaccharide (LOS) plays an initiating role in the development of the autoimmune neuropathy, Guillain-Barré syndrome, by induction of anti-neural cross-reactive antibodies through ganglioside molecular mimicry. Results Herein we describe the existence and heterogeneity of multiple LOS forms in C. jejuni strains of human and chicken origin grown at 37°C and 42°C, respectively, as determined on sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide electrophoresis gels with carbohydrate-specific silver staining and blotting with anti-ganglioside ligands, and confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The C. jejuni NCTC 11168 original isolate (11168-O) was compared to its genome-sequenced variant (11168-GS), and both were found to have a lower-Mr LOS form, which was different in size and structure to the previously characterized higher-Mr form bearing GM1 mimicry. The lower-Mr form production was found to be dependent on the growth temperature as the production of this form increased from ~5%, observed at 37°C to ~35% at 42°C. The structure of the lower-Mr form contained a β-D-Gal-(1→3)-β-D-GalNAc disaccharide moiety which is consistent with the termini of the GM1, asialo-GM1, GD1, GT1 and GQ1 gangliosides, however, it did not display GM1 mimicry as assessed in blotting studies but was shown in NMR to resemble asialo-GM1. The production of multiple LOS forms and lack of GM1 mimicry was not a result of phase variation in the genes tested of NCTC 11168 and was also observed in most of the human and chicken isolates of C. jejuni tested. Conclusion The presence of differing amounts of LOS forms at 37 and 42°C, and the variety of forms observed in different strains, indicate that LOS form variation may play a role in an adaptive mechanism or a stress response of the bacterium during the colonization of different hosts.

  3. Temperature-dependent phenotypic variation of Campylobacter jejuni lipooligosaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semchenko, Evgeny A; Day, Christopher J; Wilson, Jennifer C; Grice, I Darren; Moran, Anthony P; Korolik, Victoria

    2010-11-30

    Campylobacter jejuni is a major bacterial cause of food-borne enteritis, and its lipooligosaccharide (LOS) plays an initiating role in the development of the autoimmune neuropathy, Guillain-Barré syndrome, by induction of anti-neural cross-reactive antibodies through ganglioside molecular mimicry. Herein we describe the existence and heterogeneity of multiple LOS forms in C. jejuni strains of human and chicken origin grown at 37 °C and 42 °C, respectively, as determined on sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide electrophoresis gels with carbohydrate-specific silver staining and blotting with anti-ganglioside ligands, and confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The C. jejuni NCTC 11168 original isolate (11168-O) was compared to its genome-sequenced variant (11168-GS), and both were found to have a lower-M(r) LOS form, which was different in size and structure to the previously characterized higher-M(r) form bearing GM₁ mimicry. The lower-M(r) form production was found to be dependent on the growth temperature as the production of this form increased from ~5%, observed at 37 °C to ~35% at 42 °C. The structure of the lower-M(r) form contained a β-D-Gal-(1→3)-β-D-GalNAc disaccharide moiety which is consistent with the termini of the GM₁, asialo-GM₁, GD₁, GT₁ and GQ₁ gangliosides, however, it did not display GM₁ mimicry as assessed in blotting studies but was shown in NMR to resemble asialo-GM₁. The production of multiple LOS forms and lack of GM1 mimicry was not a result of phase variation in the genes tested of NCTC 11168 and was also observed in most of the human and chicken isolates of C. jejuni tested. The presence of differing amounts of LOS forms at 37 and 42 °C, and the variety of forms observed in different strains, indicate that LOS form variation may play a role in an adaptive mechanism or a stress response of the bacterium during the colonization of different hosts.

  4. Temperature-dependent phenotypic variation of Campylobacter jejuni lipooligosaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moran Anthony P

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Campylobacter jejuni is a major bacterial cause of food-borne enteritis, and its lipooligosaccharide (LOS plays an initiating role in the development of the autoimmune neuropathy, Guillain-Barré syndrome, by induction of anti-neural cross-reactive antibodies through ganglioside molecular mimicry. Results Herein we describe the existence and heterogeneity of multiple LOS forms in C. jejuni strains of human and chicken origin grown at 37°C and 42°C, respectively, as determined on sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide electrophoresis gels with carbohydrate-specific silver staining and blotting with anti-ganglioside ligands, and confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy. The C. jejuni NCTC 11168 original isolate (11168-O was compared to its genome-sequenced variant (11168-GS, and both were found to have a lower-Mr LOS form, which was different in size and structure to the previously characterized higher-Mr form bearing GM1 mimicry. The lower-Mr form production was found to be dependent on the growth temperature as the production of this form increased from ~5%, observed at 37°C to ~35% at 42°C. The structure of the lower-Mr form contained a β-D-Gal-(1→3-β-D-GalNAc disaccharide moiety which is consistent with the termini of the GM1, asialo-GM1, GD1, GT1 and GQ1 gangliosides, however, it did not display GM1 mimicry as assessed in blotting studies but was shown in NMR to resemble asialo-GM1. The production of multiple LOS forms and lack of GM1 mimicry was not a result of phase variation in the genes tested of NCTC 11168 and was also observed in most of the human and chicken isolates of C. jejuni tested. Conclusion The presence of differing amounts of LOS forms at 37 and 42°C, and the variety of forms observed in different strains, indicate that LOS form variation may play a role in an adaptive mechanism or a stress response of the bacterium during the colonization of different hosts.

  5. Early determinants of vagal activity at preschool age - With potential dependence on sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühne, Britta; Genser, Bernd; De Bock, Freia

    2016-12-01

    In children, autonomic nervous function is related to various highly prevalent health problems and might therefore represent an early indicator of ill health. We aimed to investigate the role of early-life exposures and physical activity (PA) as potential determinants of autonomic function at preschool age. We used an existing longitudinal data set of repeated vagal tone measurements (assessed via heart rate recovery (HRR)) and retrospectively assessed early-life exposures in 1052 children (mean age: 59.4months, 47.5% girls) from 52 preschools in Germany recruited from 2008 to 2010. HRR 1min after submaximal exercise served as primary outcome. Through multilevel linear regression analysis adjusted for demographic and socioeconomic factors, we assessed the association between repeatedly measured HRR and pregnancy smoking status, breastfeeding and objectively measured PA. Besides significant regression coefficients for previously described correlates of HRR (sex, age), we could show positive associations of HRR with breastfeeding (six versus zero months: +4.2 beats per minute (BPM), p=0.004) and PA (+1.0BPM for 10min increase of moderate-to-vigorous PA/day, pearly pre- and postnatal exposures seem to have long-lasting effects on children's autonomic function, still recordable at preschool age. Our data suggest that these effects might be sex-dependent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Influence of Age, Sex, and Anthropometric Determinants on the Foot Posture Index in a Pediatric Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Cebrian, Ana María; Morente-Bernal, María Francisca; Román-Bravo, Pedro Daniel; Saucedo-Badía, Juan Francisco; Alonso-Ríos, Juan Antonio; Montiel-Luque, Alonso

    2017-03-01

    The Foot Posture Index (FPI) is a clinical tool for diagnosis that aims to quantify the grade of a foot position as neutral, pronated, or supinated. Its purpose is to develop a simple six-factor method for rating foot posture with an easy and quantitative result. We evaluated possible differences in the FPI by sex and the influences of age, weight, height, foot size, and body mass index (BMI) on foot posture. In 150 asymptomatic children (79 boys and 71 girls) aged 8 to 13 years, we determined weight, height, BMI, and FPI in the bipedal, static, and relaxed position. The FPI was obtained as the sum of the scores (-2, -1, 0, 1, 2) given to each of the six criteria. The mean ± SD FPI value for the total sample was 5.1 ± 2.1 (boys: 5.1 ± 2.2; girls: 5.2 ± 2.0), so there were no significant differences between the sexes (P = .636). Of the 150 feet examined, none had FPI values of very supinated or highly pronated, two were supinated (1.3%), 76 neutral (50.7%), and 72 pronated (48.0%). Of the total FPI values, 7.7% can be explained by anthropometric variables: height, weight, and foot size (r2 = 0.077; P foot postures in the sample were neutral and pronated. Neither age nor BMI explained variations in the FPI.

  7. Isolation and characterization of the Bactrocera oleae genes orthologous to the sex determining Sex-lethal and doublesex genes of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagos, Dimitrios; Ruiz, M Fernanda; Sánchez, Lucas; Komitopoulou, Katia

    2005-03-28

    Here we report the isolation and characterization of the olive fruit fly Bactrocera oleae genes orthologous to the Drosophila melanogaster sex-determining genes Sex-lethal (Sxl) and doublesex (dsx). Fragments of the Sxl and dsx orthologous were isolated with RT-PCR. Genomic and cDNA clones were then obtained by screening a genomic library and separate male and female cDNA adult libraries using the RT-PCR products as probes in both cases. B. oleae Sxl gene (BoSxl) expresses the same pattern of transcripts which encode for a single common polypeptide in both male and female flies. The gene shares a high degree of similarity in sequence and expression to its Ceratitis capitata orthologous and does not appear to play a key regulatory role in the sex-determining cascade. B. oleae dsx gene (Bodsx) expands in a chromosomal region of more than 50 kb, with 6 exons-5 introns, producing different sex-specific mRNAs, according to the Drosophila model. The cDNA sequences are almost identical to the gene orthologous of Bactrocera tryoni. Four repeat elements identical to the D. melanogaster TRA/TRA-2 binding sites have been found in the untranslated region of the female-specific exon 4, predicting a common regulatory splicing mechanism in all studied species of Diptera.

  8. Can public campaigns effectively change psychological determinants of safer sex? An evaluation of three Dutch campaigns

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yzer, MC; Siero, FW; Buunk, BP

    2000-01-01

    This study evaluated the 1994, 1995 and 1996 Dutch safer sex campaigns as to their effectiveness in terms of improved attitudes, perceived social norms, self-efficacy and intentions regarding safer sex...

  9. The IMD innate immunity pathway of Drosophila influences somatic sex determination via regulation of the Doa locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunpo; Cocco, Claudia; Domenichini, Severine; Samson, Marie-Laure; Rabinow, Leonard

    2015-11-15

    The IMD pathway induces the innate immune response to infection by gram-negative bacteria. We demonstrate strong female-to-male sex transformations in double mutants of the IMD pathway in combination with Doa alleles. Doa encodes a protein kinase playing a central role in somatic sex determination through its regulation of alternative splicing of dsx transcripts. Transcripts encoding two specific Doa isoforms are reduced in Rel null mutant females, supporting our genetic observations. A role for the IMD pathway in somatic sex determination is further supported by the induction of female-to-male sex transformations by Dredd mutations in sensitized genetic backgrounds. In contrast, mutations in either dorsal or Dif, the two other NF-κB paralogues of Drosophila, display no effects on sex determination, demonstrating the specificity of IMD signaling. Our results reveal a novel role for the innate immune IMD signaling pathway in the regulation of somatic sex determination in addition to its role in response to microbial infection, demonstrating its effects on alternative splicing through induction of a crucial protein kinase. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Parameter extraction from temperature-dependent light-current-voltage data of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daubenschüz, Markus; Michalzik, Rainer

    2016-04-01

    We present a novel approach to determine the thermal resistance and the internal temperature of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) based on easily accessible laser parameters. The described method does not use any empirical parameters or pulsed measurements that are often mentioned in literature. We explain how to determine the thermal resistance and show the computation of the internal temperature for any operation point. Furthermore the data evaluation can be used for characteristic parameter extraction that enables us to establish an isothermal and temperature-dependent modeling of the VCSEL operation curves.

  11. Quantitative Analysis of Temperature Dependence of Raman shift of monolayer WS2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huang, Xiaoting; Gao, Yang; Yang, Tianqi; Ren, Wencai; Cheng, Hui-Ming; Lai, Tianshu

    2016-01-01

    We report the temperature-dependent evolution of Raman spectra of monolayer WS2 directly CVD-grown on a gold foil and then transferred onto quartz substrates over a wide temperature range from 84 to 543 K...

  12. Integrated optic current transducers incorporating photonic crystal fiber for reduced temperature dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Woo-Sung; Kim, Sung-Moon; Oh, Min-Cheol

    2015-08-24

    Optical current transducers (OCT) are indispensable for accurate monitoring of large electrical currents in an environment suffering from severe electromagnetic interference. Temperature dependence of OCTs caused by its components, such as wave plates and optical fibers, should be reduced to allow temperature-independent operation. A photonic crystal fiber with a structural optical birefringence was incorporated instead of a PM fiber, and a spun PM fiber was introduced to overcome the temperature-dependent linear birefringence of sensing fiber coil. Moreover, an integrated optic device that provides higher stability than fiber-optics was employed to control the polarization and detect the phase of the sensed optical signal. The proposed OCT exhibited much lower temperature dependence than that from a previous study. The OCT satisfied the 0.5 accuracy class (IIEC 60044-8) and had a temperature dependence less than ± 1% for a temperature range of 25 to 78 °C.

  13. Temperature-dependent structural and functional features of a hyperthermostable enzyme using elastic neutron scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutsopoulos, S; van der Oost, J; Norde, W

    2005-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of an endoglucanase from the hyperthermophilic microorganism Pyrococcus furiosus was investigated using elastic neutron scattering. The temperature dependence of the atomic motions was correlated with conformational. and functional characteristics of the enzyme. The onset of

  14. Sex determination and milk protein genotyping of preimplantation stage bovine embryos using multiplex PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawala, P L; Wagner, V A; Geldermann, H

    1992-11-01

    A method for determining the sex and milk protein genotypes (RFLPs) of preimplantation stage bovine embryos using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is described. Day 6 to 7 embryos were micromanipulated to isolate 5 to 6 cells. These cells were then dried in reaction tubes for transport to the laboratory. Subsequently, two sets of PCRs were performed using Y chromosome, k-casein and beta-lactoglobulin gene specific primers, followed by electrophoretic analysis of the PCR products. The presence or absence of the Y chromosome was ascertained in 90 of 92 embryos. Moreover, the k-casein specific fragment was amplified and detected in all these embryos. The PCR products were digested in order to genotype the k-casein gene. In 70% of the embryos, the beta-lactoglobulin specific fragment was amplified, although together with some unspecific fragments.

  15. A novel dominant transformer allele of the sex-determining gene her-1 of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, C; Wood, W B; Horvitz, H R

    1988-09-01

    We have characterized a novel dominant allele of the sex-determining gene her-1 of Caenorhabditis elegans. This allele, called n695, results in the incomplete transformation of XX animals into phenotypic males. Previously characterized recessive her-1 alleles transform XO animals into phenotypic hermaphrodites. We have identified five new recessive her-1 mutations as intragenic suppressors of n695. Three of these suppressors are weak, temperature-sensitive alleles. We show that the recessive her-1 mutations are loss-of-function alleles, and that the her-1(n695) mutation results in a gain-of-function at the her-1 locus. The existence of dominant and recessive alleles that cause opposite phenotypic transformations demonstrates that the her-1 gene acts to control sexual identity in C. elegans.

  16. Multiple Geographical Origins of Environmental Sex Determination enhanced the diversification of Darwin's Favourite Orchids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Escobar, Oscar Alejandro; Chomicki, Guillaume; Condamine, Fabien L; de Vos, Jurriaan M; Martins, Aline C; Smidt, Eric C; Klitgård, Bente; Gerlach, Günter; Heinrichs, Jochen

    2017-10-10

    Environmental sex determination (ESD) - a change in sexual function during an individual life span driven by environmental cues - is an exceedingly rare sexual system among angiosperms. Because ESD can directly affect reproduction success, it could influence diversification rate as compared with lineages that have alternative reproductive systems. Here we test this hypothesis using a solid phylogenetic framework of Neotropical Catasetinae, the angiosperm lineage richest in taxa with ESD. We assess whether gains of ESD are associated with higher diversification rates compared to lineages with alternative systems while considering additional traits known to positively affect diversification rates in orchids. We found that ESD has evolved asynchronously three times during the last ~5 Myr. Lineages with ESD have consistently higher diversification rates than related lineages with other sexual systems. Habitat fragmentation due to mega-wetlands extinction, and climate instability are suggested as the driving forces for ESD evolution.

  17. Antheridiogen determines sex in ferns via a spatiotemporally split gibberellin synthesis pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Junmu; Yano, Kenji; Aya, Koichiro; Hirano, Ko; Takehara, Sayaka; Koketsu, Eriko; Ordonio, Reynante Lacsamana; Park, Seung-Hyun; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Ueguchi-Tanaka, Miyako; Matsuoka, Makoto

    2014-10-24

    Some ferns possess the ability to control their sex ratio to maintain genetic variation in their colony with the aid of antheridiogen pheromones, antheridium (male organ)-inducing compounds that are related to gibberellin. We determined that ferns have evolved an antheridiogen-mediated communication system to produce males by modifying the gibberellin biosynthetic pathway, which is split between two individuals of different developmental stages in the colony. Antheridiogen acts as a bridge between them because it is more readily taken up by prothalli than bioactive gibberellin. The pathway initiates in early-maturing prothalli (gametophytes) within a colony, which produce antheridiogens and secrete them into the environment. After the secreted antheridiogen is absorbed by neighboring late-maturing prothalli, it is modified in to bioactive gibberellin to trigger male organ formation. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  18. Temperature dependence of the strain response of chemical composition gratings in optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoyu; Guan, Bai-ou

    2008-11-01

    Chemical composition gratings, used as strain sensing elements at high temperature environments, show a temperature dependence of their strain response. Temperature dependence of the strain response of CCGs over a range of temperatures from 24°C to 900°C has been measured. It is found that the wavelength shift of CCGs is linear with applied tensile strain at a constant temperature, and the strain sensitivity is 0.0011nm/μɛ.

  19. Spatial pattern of Baccharis platypoda shrub as determined by sex and life stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Darliana da Costa; de Oliveira, Marcio Leles Romarco; Pereira, Israel Marinho; Gonzaga, Anne Priscila Dias; de Moura, Cristiane Coelho; Machado, Evandro Luiz Mendonça

    2017-11-01

    Spatial patterns of dioecious species can be determined by their nutritional requirements and intraspecific competition, apart from being a response to environmental heterogeneity. The aim of the study was to evaluate the spatial pattern of populations of a dioecious shrub reporting to sex and reproductive stage patterns of individuals. Sampling was carried out in three areas located in the meridional portion of Serra do Espinhaço, where in individuals of the studied species were mapped. The spatial pattern was determined through O-ring analysis and Ripley's K-function and the distribution of individuals' frequencies was verified through x2 test. Populations in two areas showed an aggregate spatial pattern tending towards random or uniform according to the observed scale. Male and female adults presented an aggregate pattern at smaller scales, while random and uniform patterns were verified above 20 m for individuals of both sexes of the areas A2 and A3. Young individuals presented an aggregate pattern in all areas and spatial independence in relation to adult individuals, especially female plants. The interactions between individuals of both genders presented spatial independence with respect to spatial distribution. Baccharis platypoda showed characteristics in accordance with the spatial distribution of savannic and dioecious species, whereas the population was aggregated tending towards random at greater spatial scales. Young individuals showed an aggregated pattern at different scales compared to adults, without positive association between them. Female and male adult individuals presented similar characteristics, confirming that adult individuals at greater scales are randomly distributed despite their distinct preferences for environments with moisture variation.

  20. Sex determination of human mandible using metrical parameters by computed tomography: A prospective radiographic short study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basavaraj N Kallalli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sex determination of unidentified human remains is very important in forensic medicine, medicolegal cases, and forensic anthropology. The mandible is the largest and hardest facial bone that commonly resists postmortem damage and forms an important source of personal identification. Additional studies have demonstrated the applicability of facial reconstruction using three-dimensional computed tomography scan (3D-CT for the purpose of individual identification. Aim: To determine the sex of human mandible using metrical parameters by CT. Materials and Methods: The study included thirty subjects (15 males and 15 females, with age group ranging between 10 and 60 years obtained from the outpatient department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Narsinhbhai Patel Dental College and Hospital. CT scan was performed on all the subjects, and the data obtained were reconstructed for 3D viewing. After obtaining 3D-CT scan, a total of seven mandibular measurements, i.e., gonial angle (G-angle, ramus length (Ramus-L, minimum ramus breadth and gonion-gnathion length (G-G-L, bigonial breadth, bicondylar breadth (BIC-Br, and coronoid length (CO-L were measured; collected data were analyzed using SPSS statistical analysis program by Student's t-test. Results: The result of the study showed that out of seven parameters, G-angle, Ramus-L, G-G-L, BIC-Br, and CO-L showed a significant statistical difference (P < 0.05, with overall accuracy of 86% for males and 82% for females. Conclusion: Personal identification using mandible by conventional methods has already been proved but with variable efficacies. Advanced imaging modalities can aid in personal identification with much higher accuracy than conventional methods.

  1. Foxl2 functions in sex determination and histogenesis throughout mouse ovary development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao Antonio

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Partial loss of function of the transcription factor FOXL2 leads to premature ovarian failure in women. In animal models, Foxl2 is required for maintenance, and possibly induction, of female sex determination independently of other critical genes, e.g., Rspo1. Here we report expression profiling of mouse ovaries that lack Foxl2 alone or in combination with Wnt4 or Kit/c-Kit. Results Following Foxl2 loss, early testis genes (including Inhbb, Dhh, and Sox9 and several novel ovarian genes were consistently dysregulated during embryonic development. In the absence of Foxl2, expression changes affecting a large fraction of pathways were opposite those observed in Wnt4-null ovaries, reinforcing the notion that these genes have complementary actions in ovary development. Loss of one copy of Foxl2 revealed strong gene dosage sensitivity, with molecular anomalies that were milder but resembled ovaries lacking both Foxl2 alleles. Furthermore, a Foxl2 transgene disrupted embryonic testis differentiation and increased the levels of key female markers. Conclusion The results, including a comprehensive principal component analysis, 1 support the proposal of dose-dependent Foxl2 function and anti-testis action throughout ovary differentiation; and 2 identify candidate genes for roles in sex determination independent of FOXL2 (e.g., the transcription factors IRX3 and ZBTB7C and in the generation of the ovarian reserve downstream of FOXL2 (e.g., the cadherin-domain protein CLSTN2 and the sphingomyelin synthase SGMS2. The gene inventory is a first step toward the identification of the full range of pathways with partly autonomous roles in ovary development, and thus provides a framework to analyze the genetic bases of female fertility.

  2. Evaluation of palatal rugae pattern in establishing identification and sex determination in Nalgonda children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thabitha, Rani S; Reddy, Rajendra E; Manjula, M; Sreelakshmi, N; Rajesh, A; Kumar, Vinay L

    2015-01-01

    Establishing individual identification of a decedent only by dental means is a mammoth task in forensic odontology. Palatal rugae's uniqueness, its resistance to heat, and stability throughout life have been proved by its use as an alternative aid in individual identification where comparison of fingerprints and other records is difficult. The aim of the present study was to analyze the role of palatal rugoscopy in personal identification and sex determination of Nalgonda pediatric population. The study group consisted of 100 children having mixed dentition within the age range of 8-11 years, residing in Nalgonda district. Palatal rugae pattern, shape of the incisive papillae, length of the median palatal raphae, and shape of the dental arches were analyzed using Chi-square and Mann-Whitney tests between males and females. Wavy and curved patterns appeared to be most prevalent in both males and females but with no significant difference. The number of primary rugae in females and secondary rugae in males, on left side of the palate, was significantly more than their counterparts (P < 0.05). When rugae unification was observed, diverging type was significantly more in males than in females. Parabolic dental arch form, elliptical type of incisive papilla, and medium length of median palatal raphae was observed in majority of the subjects. The present study hypothesizes the uniqueness of the rugae in personal identification as no two palates showed similar type of rugae in either of the genders. The rugae pattern also contributes minimally towards sex determination as there was no significant difference observed between the two variables.

  3. Accuracy of fetal sex determination in the first trimester of pregnancy using 3D virtual reality ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogers, Hein; Rifouna, Maria S; Koning, Anton H J; Husen-Ebbinge, Margreet; Go, Attie T J I; van der Spek, Peter J; Steegers-Theunissen, Régine P M; Steegers, Eric A P; Exalto, Niek

    2017-10-19

    Early detection of fetal sex is becoming more popular. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of fetal sex determination in the first trimester, using 3D virtual reality. Three-dimensional (3D) US volumes were obtained in 112 pregnancies between 9 and 13 weeks of gestational age. They were offline projected as a hologram in the BARCO I-Space and subsequently the genital tubercle angle was measured. Separately, the 3D US aspect of the genitalia was examined for having a male or female appearance. Although a significant difference in genital tubercle angles was found between male and female fetuses, it did not result in a reliable prediction of fetal gender. Correct sex prediction based on first trimester genital appearance was at best 56%. Our results indicate that accurate determination of the fetal sex in the first trimester of pregnancy is not possible, even using an advanced 3D US technique. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Temperature dependence of stream aeration coefficients and the effect of water turbulence: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demars, B O L; Manson, J R

    2013-01-01

    The gas transfer velocity (K(L)) and related gas transfer coefficient (k(2) = K(L)A/V, with A, area and V, volume) at the air-water interface are critical parameters in all gas flux studies such as green house gas emission, whole stream metabolism or industrial processes. So far, there is no theoretical model able to provide accurate estimation of gas transfer in streams. Hence, reaeration is often estimated with empirical equations. The gas transfer velocity need then to be corrected with a temperature coefficient θ = 1.0241. Yet several studies have long reported variation in θ with temperature and 'turbulence' of water (i.e. θ is not a constant). Here we re-investigate thoroughly a key theoretical model (Dobbins model) in detail after discovering important discrepancies. We then compare it with other theoretical models derived from a wide range of hydraulic behaviours (rigid to free continuous surface water, wave and waterfalls with bubbles). The results of the Dobbins model were found to hold, at least theoretically in the light of recent advances in hydraulics, although the more comprehensive results in this study highlighted a higher degree of complexity in θ's behaviour. According to the Dobbins model, the temperature coefficient θ, could vary from 1.005 to 1.042 within a temperature range of 0-35 °C and wide range of gas transfer velocities, i.e. 'turbulence' condition (0.005 turbulence', and only modest variability in θ with change in temperature. However, the other theoretical models did not have the same temperature coefficient θ (with 1.000 turbulence and bubble mediated gas transfer velocities suggested a lower temperature dependence for bubble (1.013turbulence (1.023turbulence on the temperature dependence of gas transfer at the air-water interface has still to be clarified, although many models simulate different flow conditions which may explain some of the observed discrepancies. We suggest that the temperature dependence curves produced by

  5. The behavioural consequences of sex reversal in dragons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Holleley, Clare E.; Elphick, Melanie; Georges, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Sex differences in morphology, physiology, and behaviour are caused by sex-linked genes, as well as by circulating sex-steroid levels. Thus, a shift from genotypic to environmental sex determination may create an organism that exhibits a mixture of male-like and female-like traits. We studied a lizard species (Central Bearded Dragon, Pogona vitticeps), in which the high-temperature incubation of eggs transforms genetically male individuals into functional females. Although they are reproductively female, sex-reversed dragons (individuals with ZZ genotype reversed to female phenotype) resemble genetic males rather than females in morphology (relative tail length), general behaviour (boldness and activity level), and thermoregulatory tactics. Indeed, sex-reversed ‘females’ are more male-like in some behavioural traits than are genetic males. This novel phenotype may impose strong selection on the frequency of sex reversal within natural populations, facilitating rapid shifts in sex-determining systems. A single period of high incubation temperatures (generating thermally induced sex reversal) can produce functionally female individuals with male-like (or novel) traits that enhance individual fitness, allowing the new temperature-dependent sex-determining system to rapidly replace the previous genetically based one.

  6. The fate of W chromosomes in hybrids between wild silkmoths, Samia cynthia ssp.: no role in sex determination and reproduction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yoshido, Atsuo; Marec, František; Sahara, K.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 116, č. 5 (2016), s. 424-433 ISSN 0018-067X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-22765S Grant - others:The European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013)(CZ) 316304 Program:FP7 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : hybrids * sex chromosomes * sex determination Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.961, year: 2016

  7. A simple method for in-field sex determination of the multicolored Asian lady beetle Harmonia axyridis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCornack, B P; Koch, R L; Ragsdale, D W

    2007-01-01

    The multicolored Asian lady beetle, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), has become a popular study organism due to its promise as a biological control agent and its potential adverse, non-target impacts. Behavioral and ecological research on H. axyridis, including examinations of its impacts, could benefit from non-destructive or non-disruptive sexing techniques for this coccinellid. External morphological characters were evaluated for H. axyridis (succinea color form) sex determination in laboratory and field studies. The shape of the distal margin of the fifth visible abdominal sternite accurately predicted H. axyridis sex for all beetles examined. Males consistently had a concave distal margin, while females had a convex distal margin. In addition, pigmentation of the labrum and prosternum were both significantly associated with H. axyridis sex; males had light pigmentation and females had dark pigmentation. Labrum and prosternum pigmentation increased from light to dark with decreasing rearing temperature and increasing time after adult eclosion for females. Male pigmentation was only affected by a decrease in rearing temperature. Validation through in-field collections indicated that these predictors were accurate. However, labrum pigmentation is a more desirable character to use to determine sex, because it is more accurate and easily accessible. Therefore, we recommend using labrum pigmentation for in-field sex determination of H. axyridis. Implications of this diagnostic technique for applied and basic research on this natural enemy are discussed.

  8. Plasticity of gene-regulatory networks controlling sex determination: of masters, slaves, usual suspects, newcomers, and usurpators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herpin, Amaury; Schartl, Manfred

    2015-10-01

    Sexual dimorphism is one of the most pervasive and diverse features of animal morphology, physiology, and behavior. Despite the generality of the phenomenon itself, the mechanisms controlling how sex is determined differ considerably among various organismic groups, have evolved repeatedly and independently, and the underlying molecular pathways can change quickly during evolution. Even within closely related groups of organisms for which the development of gonads on the morphological, histological, and cell biological level is undistinguishable, the molecular control and the regulation of the factors involved in sex determination and gonad differentiation can be substantially different. The biological meaning of the high molecular plasticity of an otherwise common developmental program is unknown. While comparative studies suggest that the downstream effectors of sex-determining pathways tend to be more stable than the triggering mechanisms at the top, it is still unclear how conserved the downstream networks are and how all components work together. After many years of stasis, when the molecular basis of sex determination was amenable only in the few classical model organisms (fly, worm, mouse), recently, sex-determining genes from several animal species have been identified and new studies have elucidated some novel regulatory interactions and biological functions of the downstream network, particularly in vertebrates. These data have considerably changed our classical perception of a simple linear developmental cascade that makes the decision for the embryo to develop as male or female, and how it evolves. © 2015 The Authors.

  9. Temperature Dependence of the Resistivity and Seebeck Coefficient of Individual Single-Crystal Bismuth Nanowires of 345-nm and 594-nm Diameters Encased in a Quartz Template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Mioko; Homma, Ryoei; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro

    2017-05-01

    Temperature dependence measurements of resistivity and the Seebeck coefficient were performed using individual bismuth nanowires of 345-nm and 594-nm diameters encased in a quartz template. Each nanowire was confirmed as a single crystal by Laue measurement, and an advanced mean free path model was utilized to explain both temperature dependencies. The model successfully explains the dependence over 100 K, which occurs because the carrier mobility is restricted by boundary scattering at the nanowire surface considering the crystal orientation along the wire length direction, band structure, and isotropic Fermi surface. However, it is difficult to determine the temperature dependence of the resistivity in the low-temperature region, in which a much higher temperature coefficient is indicated, especially at temperatures lower than 50 K. Although we calculated the temperature dependence of the resistivity with the influence of p-type contamination in the nanowire because a positive Seebeck coefficient at low temperatures was observed, an explanation of the resistivity in the low-temperature region has not been developed. Therefore, a hypothesis was introduced in which the hole mobility was not restricted in the nanowire, and the hole mobility was estimated by the mobility ratio from the Seebeck coefficient, the measured resistivity, and the electron mobility using the model. Lastly, the temperature dependence of the resistivity can be explained over the entire temperature region. This result suggests that the scattering mechanism between holes and electrons in the nanowire differs and depends on the crystal orientation in the low-temperature region.

  10. A single sex pheromone receptor determines chemical response specificity of sexual behavior in the silkmoth Bombyx mori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Sakurai

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In insects and other animals, intraspecific communication between individuals of the opposite sex is mediated in part by chemical signals called sex pheromones. In most moth species, male moths rely heavily on species-specific sex pheromones emitted by female moths to identify and orient towards an appropriate mating partner among a large number of sympatric insect species. The silkmoth, Bombyx mori, utilizes the simplest possible pheromone system, in which a single pheromone component, (E, Z-10,12-hexadecadienol (bombykol, is sufficient to elicit full sexual behavior. We have previously shown that the sex pheromone receptor BmOR1 mediates specific detection of bombykol in the antennae of male silkmoths. However, it is unclear whether the sex pheromone receptor is the minimally sufficient determination factor that triggers initiation of orientation behavior towards a potential mate. Using transgenic silkmoths expressing the sex pheromone receptor PxOR1 of the diamondback moth Plutella xylostella in BmOR1-expressing neurons, we show that the selectivity of the sex pheromone receptor determines the chemical response specificity of sexual behavior in the silkmoth. Bombykol receptor neurons expressing PxOR1 responded to its specific ligand, (Z-11-hexadecenal (Z11-16:Ald, in a dose-dependent manner. Male moths expressing PxOR1 exhibited typical pheromone orientation behavior and copulation attempts in response to Z11-16:Ald and to females of P. xylostella. Transformation of the bombykol receptor neurons had no effect on their projections in the antennal lobe. These results indicate that activation of bombykol receptor neurons alone is sufficient to trigger full sexual behavior. Thus, a single gene defines behavioral selectivity in sex pheromone communication in the silkmoth. Our findings show that a single molecular determinant can not only function as a modulator of behavior but also as an all-or-nothing initiator of a complex species

  11. Dynamic karyotype evolution and unique sex determination systems in Leptidea wood white butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šíchová, Jindra; Voleníková, Anna; Dincă, Vlad; Nguyen, Petr; Vila, Roger; Sahara, Ken; Marec, František

    2015-05-19

    Chromosomal rearrangements have the potential to limit the rate and pattern of gene flow within and between species and thus play a direct role in promoting and maintaining speciation. Wood white butterflies of the genus Leptidea are excellent models to study the role of chromosome rearrangements in speciation because they show karyotype variability not only among but also within species. In this work, we investigated genome architecture of three cryptic Leptidea species (L. juvernica, L. sinapis and L. reali) by standard and molecular cytogenetic techniques in order to reveal causes of the karyotype variability. Chromosome numbers ranged from 2n = 85 to 91 in L. juvernica and 2n = 69 to 73 in L. sinapis (both from Czech populations) to 2n = 51 to 55 in L. reali (Spanish population). We observed significant differences in chromosome numbers and localization of cytogenetic markers (rDNA and H3 histone genes) within the offspring of individual females. Using FISH with the (TTAGG) n telomeric probe we also documented the presence of multiple chromosome fusions and/or fissions and other complex rearrangements. Thus, the intraspecific karyotype variability is likely due to irregular chromosome segregation of multivalent meiotic configurations. The analysis of female meiotic chromosomes by GISH and CGH revealed multiple sex chromosomes: W1W2W3Z1Z2Z3Z4 in L. juvernica, W1W2W3Z1Z2Z3 in L. sinapis and W1W2W3W4Z1Z2Z3Z4 in L. reali. Our results suggest a dynamic karyotype evolution and point to the role of chromosomal rearrangements in the speciation of Leptidea butterflies. Moreover, our study revealed a curious sex determination system with 3-4 W and 3-4 Z chromosomes, which is unique in the Lepidoptera and which could also have played a role in the speciation process of the three Leptidea species.

  12. Electrochemical properties and temperature dependence of a recombinant laccase from Thermus thermophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Gillespie, Megan; Ozel, Ayca Demirel; Dikici, Emre; Daunert, Sylvia; Bachas, Leonidas G

    2011-01-01

    The electrochemical properties of a laccase from Thermus thermophilus HB27 (Tth-laccase) were characterized. The gene encoding the laccase was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. One-step purification of the corresponding apo-enzyme was achieved by nickel-affinity chromatography. Copper was incorporated into the apo-laccase as the cofactor to yield the holo-enzyme. The temperature-dependent catalytic activity of the laccase was investigated by spectrophotometric as well as electrochemical methods. Specifically, the catalytic properties of the enzyme were characterized by employing a photometric assay based on the oxidation of the substrate 2,2-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS). The electroactive substrate ABTS can be also monitored by cyclic voltammetry, thus allowing for determination of the enzymatic activity electrochemically. It was found that the recombinant laccase exhibited higher activity as the temperature increased up to 65 °C. Spectroscopic studies of Tth-laccase based on circular dichroism and fluorescence measurements are consistent with a thermally stable secondary structure of the protein.

  13. Temperature dependence of nanosecond laser pulse thresholds of melanosome and microsphere microcavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Morgan S.; Kennedy, Paul K.; Noojin, Gary D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.

    2016-01-01

    Melanosome microcavitation is the threshold-level retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) damage mechanism for nanosecond (ns) pulse exposures in the visible and near-infrared (NIR). Thresholds for microcavitation of isolated bovine RPE melanosomes were determined as a function of temperature (20 to 85°C) using single ns laser pulses at 532 and 1064 nm. Melanosomes were irradiated using a 1064-nm Q-switched Nd:YAG (doubled for 532-nm irradiation). For comparison to melanosome data, a similar temperature (20 to 65°C) dependence study was also performed for 532 nm, ns pulse exposures of black polystyrene microbeads. Results indicated a decrease in the microcavitation average radiant exposure threshold with increasing sample temperature for both 532- and 1064-nm single pulse exposures of melanosomes and microbeads. Threshold data and extrapolated nucleation temperatures were used to estimate melanosome absorption coefficients in the visible and NIR, and microbead absorption coefficients in the visible, indicating that melanin is a better absorber of visible light than black polystyrene. The NIR melanosome absorption coefficients ranged from 3713 cm-1 at 800 nm to 222 cm-1 at 1319 nm. These data represent the first temperature-dependent melanosome microcavitation study in the NIR and provide additional information for understanding melanosome microcavitation threshold dependence on wavelength and ambient temperature.

  14. Temperature dependence of N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine binding in egg lecithin vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, P; Solomon, A K

    1975-10-17

    The temperature dependence of the binding of PhNapNH2 (N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine) to vesicles of egg phosphatidylcholine has been determined. The Arrhenius plot of the association constant exhibits a discontinuity at 20.9 degrees C, some 30 degrees C above the broad phase transition region of the phospholipid. In the temperature range above 20 degrees C, deltaH0 =--6100 cal-mol-1 and deltaS0 = 9.7 e.u.; in the temperature range below 20 degrees C, deltaH0 = 0 cal-mol-1 and deltaS0 = 30.4 e.u. These values are consistent with the view that there are well ordered lipid-lipid bonds below 20 degrees C which are significantly less important above this temperature. The order in the temperature range of 5 to 20 degrees C, though significantly greater than that above 20 degrees C, is still significiantly less than that in the crystalline state.

  15. Kinetic study of the reactions between chloramine disinfectants and hydrogen peroxide: temperature dependence and reaction mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Garrett; Sjelin, Brittney; Chagnon, Matthew; Ishida, Kenneth P; Mezyk, Stephen P

    2013-09-01

    The temperature-dependent kinetics for the reaction between hydrogen peroxide and chloramine water disinfectants (NH2Cl, NHCl2, and NCl3) have been determined using stopped flow-UV/Vis spectrophotometry. Rate constants for the mono- and dichloramine-peroxide reaction were on the order of 10(-2)M(-1)s(-1) and 10(-5)M(-1)s(-1), respectively. The reaction of trichloramine with peroxide was negligibly slow compared to its thermal and photolytically-induced decomposition. Arrhenius expressions of ln(kH2O2-NH2Cl)=(17.3±1.5)-(51500±3700)/RT and ln(kH2O2-NHCl2)=(18.2±1.9)-(75800±5100)/RT were obtained for the mono- and dichloramine peroxide reaction over the temperature ranges 11.4-37.9 and 35.0-55.0°C, respectively. Both monochloramine and hydrogen peroxide were first-order in the rate-limiting kinetic step and concomitant measurements made using a chloride ion selective electrode showed that the chloride was produced quantitatively. These data will aid water utilities in predicting chloramine concentrations (and thus disinfection potential) throughout the water distribution system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Homogeneous broadening effect on temperature dependence of green upconversion luminescence in erbium doped fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egatz-Gómez, A. [Facultad de Óptica y Optometría, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Arcos de Jalón 118, Madrid 28037 (Spain); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Calderón, Oscar G., E-mail: oscargc@fis.ucm.es [Facultad de Óptica y Optometría, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Arcos de Jalón 118, Madrid 28037 (Spain); Melle, Sonia; Carreño, F.; Antón, M.A. [Facultad de Óptica y Optometría, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Arcos de Jalón 118, Madrid 28037 (Spain); Gort, Elske M. [Facultad de Óptica y Optometría, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Arcos de Jalón 118, Madrid 28037 (Spain); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Groningen, 9700 RB Groningen (Netherlands)

    2013-07-15

    We study the green upconversion luminescence of Er{sup 3+} ions in an aluminosilicate optical fiber upon near infrared excitation at 787 nm. The dependence of the upconversion luminescence on temperature has been determined. As temperature drops from room to cryogenic temperatures, the upconversion green emission reaches a maximum around 40 K, and then decreases. A nearly quadratic dependence of the upconversion luminescence with excitation power is found, which is consistent with a sequential stepwise two-photon absorption process. These results have been explained with a semiclassical model that considers the inhomogeneous broadening of the optical transitions due to glass imperfections, and the dependence of the homogeneous linewidth broadening on temperature. -- Highlights: ► We study green upconversion luminescence of Er{sup 3+} ions in a fiber excited at 787 nm. ► Upconversion luminescence variation from room to cryogenic temperature is analyzed. ► Upconversion emission consists in a sequential two-photon absorption process. ► A semiclassical model considering inhomogeneous broadening explains the results. ► Homogeneous broadening is responsible for the upconversion temperature dependence.

  17. Temperature dependence of magnetic order in Fe/(Ga,Mn)As studied by Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polesya, Svitlana; Minar, Jan; Ebert, Hubert [LMU Muenchen, Dept. Chemie und Biochemie/Phys. Chemie, Butenandtstrasse 11, D-81377 Muenchen (Germany); Back, Christian [Institut fuer Experimentelle Physik, Univ. Regensburg (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The magnetic order of the heterogeneous interface system (GaMn)As/Fe at finite temperatures has been studied by Monte Carlo simulations. The ground state magnetic properties were determined within ab initio electronic structure calculations using the SPR-TB-KKR Green's function method. All calculations have been performed for the semi-infinite system of (GaMn)As with 5 % Mn covered by a 7 ML Fe film. The temperature dependent properties of this system (with and without external magnetic field) have been studied using MC simulation. The exchange coupling within the Fe and (GaMn)As subsystems were found to be dominantly long-range ferromagnetic whereas the coupling of Fe and Mn moments close to the interface is strongly antiferromagnetic. The Monte Carlo simulations lead to a Curie temperature of about 1000 K for the Fe film. Within the (GaMn)As subsystem due to the polarisation induced by the Fe film the average magnetisation at room temperature is still about 70 % of its T=0 value for several layers close to the interface. These results are in full agreement with recent experimental findings.

  18. Measurement of Wavelength and Temperature-Dependent Optical Properties of Thermochromic Pigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianying; Yu, Xiong Bill

    2017-01-01

    Thermochromic material is a substance that is capable of changing reversibly the color as the temperature rises. Therefore, the optical spectrum of thermochromic material is responsive to the environmental temperature. In this study, the temperature-dependent optical constants of thermochromic pigments over the wavelength of 350-1800 nm were investigated. Three kinds of thermochromic pigments featured with black, blue, and red colors at room temperature were suspended in water and the light reflection and transmission of the suspensions at different temperatures were measured by a multifunctional spectrophotometer. It was found that below the transition temperature of thermochromic material, the refractive index was 2.1-2.5, 2.2-2.6, and 2.0-2.4 over the wavelength range of 350-1800 nm for black, blue, and red thermochromic pigment, respectively, while above the transition temperature it reached 2.3-2.7, 2.4-2.9, and 2.4-2.7, respectively. It was also observed that the relationship between refractive index of thermochromic pigment and wavelength follows the cubic polynomial function. Furthermore, the extinction coefficient is in the range of 1 × 10-5-1.2 × 10-4 for all thermochromic pigments and remains approximately stable at different temperatures. The determination of optical constants of thermochromic pigments provides essential parameters in the modeling of light scattering and absorption by pigment particles to further fine-tune the optical properties of thermochromic coating.

  19. A novel theoretical model for the temperature dependence of band gap energy in semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Peiji; Li, Weiguo; Zhang, Xianhe; Zhang, Xuyao; Deng, Yong; Kou, Haibo

    2017-10-01

    We report a novel theoretical model without any fitting parameters for the temperature dependence of band gap energy in semiconductors. This model relates the band gap energy at the elevated temperature to that at the arbitrary reference temperature. As examples, the band gap energies of Si, Ge, AlN, GaN, InP, InAs, ZnO, ZnS, ZnSe and GaAs at temperatures below 400 K are calculated and are in good agreement with the experimental results. Meanwhile, the band gap energies at high temperatures (T  >  400 K) are predicted, which are greater than the experimental results, and the reasonable analysis is carried out as well. Under low temperatures, the effect of lattice expansion on the band gap energy is very small, but it has much influence on the band gap energy at high temperatures. Therefore, it is necessary to consider the effect of lattice expansion at high temperatures, and the method considering the effect of lattice expansion has also been given. The model has distinct advantages compared with the widely quoted Varshni’s semi-empirical equation from the aspect of modeling, physical meaning and application. The study provides a convenient method to determine the band gap energy under different temperatures.

  20. Temperature dependent dielectric properties and ion transportation in solid polymer electrolyte for lithium ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengwa, R. J., E-mail: rjsengwa@rediffmail.com; Dhatarwal, Priyanka, E-mail: dhatarwalpriyanka@gmail.com; Choudhary, Shobhna, E-mail: shobhnachoudhary@rediffmail.com [Dielectric Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, Jai Narain Vyas University, Jodhpur – 342 005 (India)

    2016-05-06

    Solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) film consisted of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) blend matrix with lithium tetrafluroborate (LiBF{sub 4}) as dopant ionic salt and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) as plasticizer has been prepared by solution casting method followed by melt pressing. Dielectric properties and ionic conductivity of the SPE film at different temperatures have been determined by dielectric relaxation spectroscopy. It has been observed that the dc ionic conductivity of the SPE film increases with increase of temperature and also the decrease of relaxation time. The temperature dependent relaxation time and ionic conductivity values of the electrolyte are governed by the Arrhenius relation. Correlation observed between dc conductivity and relaxation time confirms that ion transportation occurs with polymer chain segmental dynamics through hopping mechanism. The room temperature ionic conductivity is found to be 4 × 10{sup −6} S cm{sup −1} which suggests the suitability of the SPE film for rechargeable lithium batteries.

  1. Diamagnetic Torque Signal and Temperature-Dependent Paramagnetism in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Satoshi; Mochiku, Takashi; Ooi, Shuichi; Hirata, Kazuto; Sugii, Kaori; Terashima, Taichi; Uji, Shinya

    2017-11-01

    Magnetic torque and resistance measurements for the superconducting cuprate Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ with Tc = 87 K have been performed to determine the phase diagram in a parallel magnetic field fields up to 14 T. The anisotropy of the magnetization, derived from the torque, is found to decrease with decreasing temperature below 125 K, which can be ascribed to the temperature dependent paramagnetic spin susceptibility. The angular dependence of the torque clearly shows small diamagnetism due to fluctuating or inhomogeneous superconductivity at temperatures between Tc and ˜100 K. The results suggest that the pseudogap is not of superconducting origin.

  2. Analysis of the sex-determining region of the Y chromosome (SRY) in sex reversed patients: point-mutation in SRY causing sex-reversion in a 46,XY female

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Jørn; Schwartz, M; Skakkebaek, N E

    1992-01-01

    been reported, and it has been called the sex determining region of the Y (SRY). The hypothesis has been supported by the finding of XX individuals with SRY, and two females with 46,XY karyotype and a mutation in SRY. However, XX males without SRY has been reported, and the role of SRY still has...... changing a codon for lysine to a stop codon. This information supports the hypothesis that SRY is significant in normal male sex differentiation. The two remaining 46,XY individuals had an intact HMG box, but it is possible that a mutation may be found in a regulatory gene or further downstream in the gene...

  3. Bombyx mori P-element Somatic Inhibitor (BmPSI Is a Key Auxiliary Factor for Silkworm Male Sex Determination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Manipulation of sex determination pathways in insects provides the basis for a wide spectrum of strategies to benefit agriculture and public health. Furthermore, insects display a remarkable diversity in the genetic pathways that lead to sex differentiation. The silkworm, Bombyx mori, has been cultivated by humans as a beneficial insect for over two millennia, and more recently as a model system for studying lepidopteran genetics and development. Previous studies have identified the B. mori Fem piRNA as the primary female determining factor and BmMasc as its downstream target, while the genetic scenario for male sex determination was still unclear. In the current study, we exploite the transgenic CRISPR/Cas9 system to generate a comprehensive set of knockout mutations in genes BmSxl, Bmtra2, BmImp, BmImpM, BmPSI and BmMasc, to investigate their roles in silkworm sex determination. Absence of Bmtra2 results in the complete depletion of Bmdsx transcripts, which is the conserved downstream factor in the sex determination pathway, and induces embryonic lethality. Loss of BmImp or BmImpM function does not affect the sexual differentiation. Mutations in BmPSI and BmMasc genes affect the splicing of Bmdsx and the female reproductive apparatus appeared in the male external genital. Intriguingly, we identify that BmPSI regulates expression of BmMasc, BmImpM and Bmdsx, supporting the conclusion that it acts as a key auxiliary factor in silkworm male sex determination.

  4. Bombyx mori P-element Somatic Inhibitor (BmPSI) Is a Key Auxiliary Factor for Silkworm Male Sex Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Chen, Shuqing; Zeng, Baosheng; James, Anthony A; Tan, Anjiang; Huang, Yongping

    2017-01-01

    Manipulation of sex determination pathways in insects provides the basis for a wide spectrum of strategies to benefit agriculture and public health. Furthermore, insects display a remarkable diversity in the genetic pathways that lead to sex differentiation. The silkworm, Bombyx mori, has been cultivated by humans as a beneficial insect for over two millennia, and more recently as a model system for studying lepidopteran genetics and development. Previous studies have identified the B. mori Fem piRNA as the primary female determining factor and BmMasc as its downstream target, while the genetic scenario for male sex determination was still unclear. In the current study, we exploite the transgenic CRISPR/Cas9 system to generate a comprehensive set of knockout mutations in genes BmSxl, Bmtra2, BmImp, BmImpM, BmPSI and BmMasc, to investigate their roles in silkworm sex determination. Absence of Bmtra2 results in the complete depletion of Bmdsx transcripts, which is the conserved downstream factor in the sex determination pathway, and induces embryonic lethality. Loss of BmImp or BmImpM function does not affect the sexual differentiation. Mutations in BmPSI and BmMasc genes affect the splicing of Bmdsx and the female reproductive apparatus appeared in the male external genital. Intriguingly, we identify that BmPSI regulates expression of BmMasc, BmImpM and Bmdsx, supporting the conclusion that it acts as a key auxiliary factor in silkworm male sex determination.

  5. Androgenic control of male-typical behavior, morphology and sex recognition is independent of the mode of sex determination: A case study on Lichtenfelder's gecko (Eublepharidae: Goniurosaurus lichtenfelderi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golinski, Alison; Kubička, Lukáš; John-Alder, Henry; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2015-06-01

    Previous work on lizards has shown that many sexually dimorphic traits depend on testosterone (T), but the details of this control can vary among species. Here, we tested the role of T on the expression of morphological, physiological, and behavioral traits in Lichtenfelder's gecko (Goniurosaurus lichtenfelderi), from the lizard family Eublepharidae notable for interspecific variation in sexually dimorphic traits and the mode of sex determination. Experiments included three groups of males (intact control, surgically castrated, castrated with T replacement) and two groups of females (intact control, T supplemented). In males, castration caused reductions in 1) the size of hemipenes, 2) offensive aggression, 3) male sexual behavior in a neutral arena, 4) activity of precloacal glands, and 5) loss of male chemical cues for sex recognition. These reductions were not observed in castrated males with T replacement. Interestingly, castrated males performed sexual behavior in their home cages, which shows that the effect of T depends on the environmental context. Notably, tail vibration, previously reported as a courtship behavior in other eublepharids, is displayed by males of G. lichtenfelderi during interactions with conspecifics of both sexes, suggesting an evolutionary shift in the meaning of this signal. In females, T induced growth of hemipenes and male-typical courtship but did not induce precloacal pore activity, aggression, or mounting. In comparison to previous reports on Eublepharis macularius, our results indicate that effects of T do not depend on the mode of sex determination. Further, our results extend our understanding of the complexity of control of male traits and illustrate how lability in the effects of T can be a general mechanism causing evolutionary changes in the components of suites of functionally correlated traits. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Sexy transgenes: the impact of gene transfer and gene inactivation technologies on the understanding of mammalian sex determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaiman, Daniel

    2003-06-01

    Amongst the various developmental pathways ending in a sound mammal, sex determination presents the peculiarity of a choice between two equally viable options: female or male. Therefore, destroying a 'male-determining gene' or a 'female-determining gene' should generally not be lethal. Genetic sex determination is divided into two consecutive steps: construction of the bipotential gonad, and then sex determination per se. The genes involved in the first step are in fact involved in the development of various body compartments, and their mutation is generally far from innocuous. From transgenic and inactivation studies carried out on the laboratory mouse, a complete picture of the two steps is beginning to emerge, where the gonad itself and the necessary ducts are shown to evolve in a very coordinate way, with well-defined sex-specificities. Compared with testis determination, the ovarian side of the picture is still relatively empty, but this situation can change rapidly as candidate ovarian genes for inactivation studies are beginning to be identified.

  7. TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF 57Fe-MÖSSBAUER SPECTRA FOR A 〖〖Fe〗_Fc^II-Fe〗_tpy^II-〖Fe〗_Fc^II TRINUCLEAR SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumitru Sirbu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available 57Fe Mӧssbauer spectra were recorded for 1'-terpyridine ferrocenecarboxylic acid and [bis(1'-terpyridine ferrocenecarboxylic acid Fe(II]2+ in the temperature range 7 – 293 K. The temperature dependence of the Quadrupole Splitting, Isomer Shift and Debye-Waller factor are discussed. The Debye temperature for the iron nuclei in the investigated compounds was determined.

  8. Temperature Dependence of Rheology and Polymer Diffusion in Silica/Polystyrene Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Wei-Shao; Clarke, Nigel; Composto, Russell; Meth, Jeffrey; Winey, Karen

    2015-03-01

    Time-temperature superposition using the WLF equation is well-established for both the zero shear viscosity and the polymer diffusion coefficient in homopolymer melts. This talk will present the temperature-dependence of polymer dynamics in polymer nanocomposites comprised of polystyrene and phenyl-capped silica nanoparticles (0 - 50 vol%). The WLF equation fits the temperature dependence of the tracer polymer diffusion coefficient and the fitting parameter (B/fo) decreases smoothly with nanoparticle concentration suggesting an increase in the thermal expansion coefficient for the free volume. The WLF equation also fits the temperature dependence of the zero shear viscosity from oscillatory shear experiments, although the fitting parameter (B/fo) increases substantially with nanoparticle concentration. This discrepancy between the diffusion and rheology will be discussed with respect to the reptation model, which predicts that the temperature dependence of polymer diffusion depends predominately on the temperature dependence of local viscosity, and the elastic response in nanocomposites. National Science Foundation DMR-12-10379.

  9. A Study of the Temperature Dependence of Bienzyme Systems and Enzymatic Chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Kotov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available It is known that most enzyme-facilitated reactions are highly temperature dependent processes. In general, the temperature coefficient, Q10, of a simple reaction reaches 2.0–3.0. Nevertheless, some enzyme-controlled processes have much lower Q10 (about 1.0, which implies that the process is almost temperature independent, even if individual reactions involved in the process are themselves highly temperature dependent. In this work, we investigate a possible mechanism for this apparent temperature compensation: simple mathematical models are used to study how varying types of enzyme reactions are affected by temperature. We show that some bienzyme-controlled processes may be almost temperature independent if the modules involved in the reaction have similar temperature dependencies, even if individually, these modules are strongly temperature dependent. Further, we show that in non-reversible enzyme chains the stationary concentrations of metabolites are dependent only on the relationship between the temperature dependencies of the first and last modules, whilst in reversible reactions, there is a dependence on every module. Our findings suggest a mechanism by which the metabolic processes taking place within living organisms may be regulated, despite strong variation in temperature.

  10. Temperature dependencies of Henry's law constants and octanol/water partition coefficients for key plant volatile monoterpenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copolovici, Lucian O; Niinemets, Ulo

    2005-12-01

    To model the emission dynamics and changes in fractional composition of monoterpenoids from plant leaves, temperature dependencies of equilibrium coefficients must be known. Henry's law constants (H(pc), Pa m3 mol(-1) and octanol/water partition coefficients (K(OW), mol mol(-1)) were determined for 10 important plant monoterpenes at physiological temperature ranges (25-50 degrees C for H(pc) and 20-50 degrees C for K(OW)). A standard EPICS procedure was established to determine H(pc) and a shake flask method was used for the measurements of K(OW). The enthalpy of volatilization (deltaH(vol)) varied from 18.0 to 44.3 kJ mol(-1) among the monoterpenes, corresponding to a range of temperature-dependent increase in H(pc) between 1.3- and 1.8-fold per 10 degrees C rise in temperature. The enthalpy of water-octanol phase change varied from -11.0 to -23.8 kJ mol(-1), corresponding to a decrease of K(OW) between 1.15- and 1.32-fold per 10 degrees C increase in temperature. Correlations among physico-chemical characteristics of a wide range of monoterpenes were analyzed to seek the ways of derivation of H(pc) and K(OW) values from other monoterpene physico-chemical characteristics. H(pc) was strongly correlated with monoterpene saturated vapor pressure (P(v)), and for lipophilic monoterpenes, deltaH(vol) scaled positively with the enthalpy of vaporization that characterizes the temperature dependence of P(v) Thus, P(v) versus temperature relations may be employed to derive the temperature relations of H(pc) for these monoterpenes. These data collectively indicate that monoterpene differences in H(pc) and K(OW) temperature relations can importantly modify monoterpene emissions from and deposition on plant leaves.

  11. Can public campaigns effectively change psychological determinants of safer sex? An evaluation of three Dutch campaigns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yzer, MC; Siero, FW; Buunk, BP

    This study evaluated the 1994, 1995 and 1996 Dutch safer sex campaigns as to their effectiveness in terms of improved attitudes, perceived social norms, self-efficacy and intentions regarding safer sex. The hypotheses were tested that variables become more positive when campaigns are conducted and

  12. Determinants of extramarital sex by men in Tanzania: A case study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    analysis of the survey data, which comprised a sample size of 568 married men aged between 15 and 62 years revealed statistically significant association between extramarital sex with current age, education, age at first intercourse and sex before marriage. The effect of these variables was tested through a multivariate ...

  13. The sex-determination genes fruitless and doublesex specify a neural substrate required for courtship song

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rideout, Elizabeth J; Billeter, Jean-Christophe; Goodwin, Stephen F

    2007-01-01

    Courtship song is a critical component of male courtship behavior in Drosophila, making the female more receptive to copulation and communicating species-specific information [1-6]. Sex mosaic studies have shown that the sex of certain regions of the central nervous system (CNS) is critical to song

  14. Tra-2 Mediates Cross-Talk Between Sex Determination and Wing Polyphenism in Female Nilaparvata lugens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Ji-Chong; Lei, Chen; Shi, Ji-Kai; Xu, Nan; Xue, Wen-Hua; Zhang, Meng-Qiu; Ren, Ze-Wei; Zhang, Hou-Hong; Zhang, Chuan-Xi

    2017-11-01

    Sexual dimorphism and wing polyphenism are important and evolutionarily conserved features of many insect species. In this article, we found a cross-talk linking sexual differentiation with wing polyphenism in the brown planthopper (BPH) Nilaparvata lugens (order: Hemiptera). Knockdown of the sex determination gene Transformer-2 in N. lugens (NlTra-2) in nymph caused females to develop into infertile pseudomales containing undeveloped ovaries. Whereas males treated with dsNlTra-2 exhibited normal morphology, but lost fertility. Knockdown of NlTra-2 in adult females (maternal RNAi) resulted in long-winged female offspring, indicating that maternal RNAi changed the wing morphs in female offspring. In addition, silencing of NlTra-2 down-regulated the expression of the forkhead transcription factor FoxO (NlFoxO), and simultaneously up-regulated the expression of phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI(3)K)-protein kinase B (NlAkt), the two critical genes in the insulin signaling pathway. Furthermore, the long-winged effect caused by maternal dsNlTra-2 RNAi could be reversed by silencing of NlInR1 and NlAkt, leading to short-winged morphs. We propose that there is a cross-talk between the sexual differentiation and wing polyphenism pathways mediated by NlTra-2 during embryonic stages. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  15. Inbreeding depression in a parasitoid wasp with single-locus complementary sex determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayssade, Chloé; de Fazio, Céline; Quaglietti, Bastien; Auguste, Alexandra; Ris, Nicolas; Fauvergue, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Inbreeding and inbreeding depression are key processes in small or isolated populations and are therefore central concerns for the management of threatened or (re)introduced organisms. Haplodiploid species of the order Hymenoptera have a particular status with regard to inbreeding depression. Although recessive deleterious alleles that are expressed in males should be purged, an alternative form of inbreeding depression exists in species with single-locus complementary sex determination (sl-CSD). Under sl-CSD, genetically-related parents have a high probability of producing sterile sons instead of fertile daughters. In this article, we study inbreeding depression in Venturia canescens (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae), a parasitoid wasp with sl-CSD. We used a crossing design to manipulate relatedness according to three levels: within-family, between-family and between-population. For each level, several fitness components were measured on parents and female offspring. We found a 20% reduction in egg load at emergence for inbred crosses. Inbred crosses also yielded a higher proportion of males, as expected in a species with sl-CSD. Mating probability, presence of daughters among offspring, body size, symmetry and longevity were unaffected by inbreeding.

  16. The role of the transformer gene in sex determination and reproduction in the tephritid fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wei; Zheng, Wenping; Handler, Alfred M; Zhang, Hongyu

    2015-12-01

    Transformer (tra) is a switch gene in the somatic sex-determination hierarchy that regulates sexual dimorphism based on RNA splicing in many insects. In tephritids, a Y-linked male determining gene (M) controls sex in the sex-determination pathway. Here, homologues of Drosophila tra and transformer-2 (tra-2) genes were isolated and characterized in Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), one of the most destructive agricultural insect pests in many Asian countries. Two male-specific and one female-specific isoforms of B. dorsalis transformer (Bdtra) were identified. The presence of multiple TRA/TRA-2 binding sites in Bdtra suggests that the TRA/TRA-2 proteins are splicing regulators promoting and maintaining, epigenetically, female sex determination by a tra positive feedback loop in XX individuals during development. The expression patterns of female-specific Bdtra transcripts during early embryogenesis shows that a peak appears at 15 h after egg laying. Using dsRNA to knock-down Bdtra expression in the embryo and adult stages, we showed that sexual formation is determined early in the embryo stage and that parental RNAi does not lead to the production of all male progeny as in Tribolium castaneum. RNAi results from adult abdominal dsRNA injections show that Bdtra has a positive influence on female yolk protein gene (Bdyp1) expression and fecundity.

  17. The effect of temperature dependent tissue parameters on acoustic radiation force induced displacements

    CERN Document Server

    Suomi, Visa; Konofagou, Elisa; Cleveland, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Multiple ultrasound elastography techniques rely on acoustic radiation force (ARF) in monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy. However, ARF is dependent on tissue attenuation and sound speed, both of which are also known to change with temperature making the therapy monitoring more challenging. Furthermore, the viscoelastic properties of tissue are also temperature dependent, which affects the displacements induced by ARF. The aim of this study is to quantify the temperature dependent changes in the acoustic and viscoelastic properties of liver and investigate their effect on ARF induced displacements by using both experimental methods and simulations. Furthermore, the temperature dependent viscoelastic properties of liver are experimentally measured over a frequency range of 0.1-200 Hz at temperatures reaching 80 C, and both conventional and fractional Zener models are used to fit the data. The fractional Zener model was found to fit better with the experimental viscoelasticity data with ...

  18. Temperature dependence of a refractive index sensor based on a macrobending micro-plastic optical fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Ning; Teng, Chuanxin; Zhao, Xiaowei; Zheng, Jie

    2015-03-10

    We investigate the temperature dependence of a refractive index (RI) sensor based on a macrobending micro-plastic optical fiber (m-POF) both theoretically and experimentally. The performance of the RI sensor at different temperatures (10°C-70°C) is measured and simulated over an RI range from 1.33 to 1.45. It is found that the temperature dependent bending loss and RI measurement deviation monotonically change with temperature, and the RI deviation has a higher gradient with temperature variation for a higher measured RI. Because of the linear trend of temperature dependence of the sensor, it is feasible to correct for changes in ambient temperature.

  19. Manipulating the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity of graphene phononic crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shiqian; An, Meng; Yang, Nuo; Li, Baowen

    2016-07-01

    By using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, modulating the temperature dependence of thermal conductivity of graphene phononic crystals (GPnCs) is investigated. It is found that the temperature dependence of thermal conductivity of GPnCs follows ∼T (-α) behavior. The power exponents (α) can be efficiently tuned by changing the characteristic size of GPnCs. The phonon participation ratio spectra and dispersion relation reveal that the long-range phonon modes are more affected in GPnCs with larger holes (L 0). Our results suggest that constructing GPnCs is an effective method to manipulate the temperature dependence of thermal conductivity of graphene, which would be beneficial for developing GPnC-based thermal management and signal processing devices.

  20. Investigation on the effects of temperature dependency of material parameters on a thermoelastic loading problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Mukhopadhyay, Santwana

    2017-08-01

    The present work is concerned with the investigation of thermoelastic interactions inside a spherical shell with temperature-dependent material parameters. We employ the heat conduction model with a single delay term. The problem is studied by considering three different kinds of time-dependent temperature and stress distributions applied at the inner and outer surfaces of the shell. The problem is formulated by considering that the thermal properties vary as linear function of temperature that yield nonlinear governing equations. The problem is solved by applying Kirchhoff transformation along with integral transform technique. The numerical results of the field variables are shown in the different graphs to study the influence of temperature-dependent thermal parameters in various cases. It has been shown that the temperature-dependent effect is more prominent in case of stress distribution as compared to other fields and also the effect is significant in case of thermal shock applied at the two boundary surfaces of the spherical shell.