WorldWideScience

Sample records for temperature metal caused decomposition

  1. Decomposition mechanism of methylene blue caused by metallic iron-maghemite mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubuki, Shiro, E-mail: kubuki@tmu.ac.jp; Shibano, Koya; Akiyama, Kazuhiko [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering (Japan); Homonnay, Zoltan; Kuzmann, Erno [Eoetvoes Lorand University, Laboratory of Nuclear Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry (Hungary); Ristic, Mira [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Division of Materials Chemistry (Croatia); Nishida, Tetsuaki [Kinki University, Department of Biological and Environmental Chemistry, Faculty of Humanity-Oriented Science and Engineering (Japan)

    2013-04-15

    Decomposition mechanism of methylene blue (MB) caused by a mixture of metallic iron-maghemite (Fe{sup 0}-{gamma}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) was investigated by means of {sup 57}Fe-Moessbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry (XRD), Ultraviolet-Visible Absorption Spectroscopy (UV-vis) and electrospray-ionization mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS). Ten day-leaching test of 10 {mu}mol L{sup - 1} MB aqueous solution and Fe{sup 0}-{gamma}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} mixture (mass ratio 3:7) showed a decrease in the concentration from 10.5 to 4.45 {mu}mol L{sup - 1} with first-order rate constant (k) of 1.57 x 10 - 1 day - 1. An ESI-MS study of Fe{sup 0}-{gamma}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} mixture (3:7) after the leaching test revealed new peaks at m/z of 100, 110 and 137 due to fragmentation of MB, in addition to those observed at m/z of 284, 270 and 256 which were ascribed to MB, Azure B and Azure A, respectively. {sup 57}Fe-Moessbauer spectra of Fe{sup 0}-{gamma}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} mixture (3:7) resulted in a decrease in absorption area (A) for Fe{sup 0} ({delta} = 0.00{sub {+-}0.01} mm s{sup - 1}, H{sub int} = 33.0{sub {+-}0.1} T) from 37.5 to 21.3, 9.7, 7.9, 7.0 and 4.5{sub {+-}0.5} %, together with an increase in A from 0.0 to 5.0, 13.8, 17.2, 21.0 and 22.4{sub {+-}0.5} % for octahedral (O{sub h}) iron (Fe{sup II} + Fe{sup III}) of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. XRD study of these samples indicated that the peak intensity at 2{Theta} of 44.7 Degree-Sign being ascribed to Fe{sup 0} was decreased, while that of 35.6 Degree-Sign due to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} was almost constant; relative peak ratio of Fe {sup 0}/Fe{sub 3} O{sub 4} was decreased from 26.3 to 2.76 after the leaching, indicating that Fe{sup 0} in the Fe{sup 0}-{gamma}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} mixture was oxidized to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. These experimental results suggest that Fe{sup 0}-{gamma}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} mixture could be utilized for the cleaning or decomposition of toxic organic compounds like trichloroethylene.

  2. Decomposition of metal nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, P.A.; Stines, W.B.

    1982-01-01

    Oxides in powder form are obtained from aqueous solutions of one or more heavy metal nitrates (e.g. U, Pu, Th, Ce) by thermal decomposition at 300 to 800 deg C in the presence of about 50 to 500% molar concentration of ammonium nitrate to total metal. (author)

  3. Method for improved decomposition of metal nitrate solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Paul A.; Stines, William B.

    1983-10-11

    A method for co-conversion of aqueous solutions of one or more heavy metal nitrates wherein thermal decomposition within a temperature range of about 300.degree. to 800.degree. C. is carried out in the presence of about 50 to 500% molar concentration of ammonium nitrate to total metal.

  4. Catalytic activity of metal borides in the reaction of decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labodi, I.; Korablev, L.I.; Tavadyan, L.A.; Blyumberg, Eh.A.

    1982-01-01

    Catalytic effect of CoB, MoB 2 , ZrB 2 and NbB 2 , prepared by the method of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis, on decomposition of tertiary butyl hydroperoxide has been studied. A technigue of determination of action mechanism of heterogeneous catalysts in liquid-phase process is suggested. It is established that CoB in contrast to other metal borides catalyzes only hydroperoxide decomposition into radicals

  5. Ozone Decomposition on the Surface of Metal Oxide Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batakliev Todor Todorov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic decomposition of ozone to molecular oxygen over catalytic mixture containing manganese, copper and nickel oxides was investigated in the present work. The catalytic activity was evaluated on the basis of the decomposition coefficient which is proportional to ozone decomposition rate, and it has been already used in other studies for catalytic activity estimation. The reaction was studied in the presence of thermally modified catalytic samples operating at different temperatures and ozone flow rates. The catalyst changes were followed by kinetic methods, surface measurements, temperature programmed reduction and IR-spectroscopy. The phase composition of the metal oxide catalyst was determined by X-ray diffraction. The catalyst mixture has shown high activity in ozone decomposition at wet and dry O3/O2 gas mixtures. The mechanism of catalytic ozone degradation was suggested.

  6. How to Analyse Metal Hydride Decomposition Temperatures Using a Sieverts’ Type Hydriding-Dehydriding Apparatus and Hydrogen-Storage Characteristics for an MgH2–Based Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Jun KWAK

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a method to analyze metal hydride decomposition temperatures (the onset temperature of the metal hydride decomposition and the temperature for the maximum ratio of released gas quantity change with temperature change, of prepared samples were investigated using a Sieverts’ type hydriding-dehydriding apparatus, in which a back-pressure regulator was employed. The quantity of the gas released under 1.0 bar H2 was measured as the temperature was increased with a heating rate of 4 K/min. The variation in the ratio of released hydrogen quantity Hd change with temperature T change, dHd/dT, as a function of temperature was obtained and from the variation in dHd/dT with T, the metal hydride decomposition temperatures were analyzed. This analysis method can be used instead of thermal analysis methods such as thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC analysis, differential thermal analysis (DTA, and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS analysis. For this analysis, a sample with a composition of 89 wt.% MgH2 + 4.9 wt.% Ni + 1.7 wt.% Zn(BH42 + 1.0 wt% NaCl + 1.7 wt.% Ti + 1.7 wt % Fe (named MgH2-Ni-Zn(BH42-NaCl-Ti-Fe sample was prepared by planetary ball milling. In the prepared MgH2-Ni-Zn(BH42-NaCl-Ti-Fe sample, it is believed that MgH2 begins to decompose at about 575 K and dHd/dT reaches its peak at about 610 K.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.24.1.17664

  7. Effect of particle size on thermal decomposition of alkali metal picrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Rui; Zhang, Tonglai, E-mail: ztlbit@bit.edu.cn; Yang, Li; Zhou, Zunning

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: The smaller-sized picrate has greater gas emission than do its larger counterpart. The small size effect reduces the thermal decomposition activation energy, accelerates the reaction rate, and promotes the reaction activity. - Highlights: • Picrates were prepared into three micron sizes by microemulsion synthesis. • Thermal decomposition kinetics and thermodynamics were studied by DPTA and DSC. • Smaller-sized picrate has higher activity and faster reaction rate. • Particle size effect on thermal decomposition kinetics and thermodynamics was revealed. - Abstract: Three alkali metal picrates, KPA, RbPA and CsPA, were prepared into three micron sizes by microemulsion synthesis, and their thermal decomposition behaviors were investigated by DPTA at different temperatures and by DSC at different heating rates. The smaller-sized picrate has greater gas emission and smaller kinetic and thermodynamic parameters than do its larger counterpart. It can be attributed to the decreasing particle size which leads to the high surface energy, the fast mass and heat transfer, and the increasing active sites on the reaction interface. The small size effect and surface effect cause the autocatalysis which reduces the activation energy and promotes the reaction activity. The particle size does not affect the reaction mechanism. However, the picrates with different central alkali metals exhibit different reaction mechanisms even though they are of the same size. This is because the central metal determines the bond energy and consequently affects the stability of picrate.

  8. Effect of particle size on thermal decomposition of alkali metal picrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Rui; Zhang, Tonglai; Yang, Li; Zhou, Zunning

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The smaller-sized picrate has greater gas emission than do its larger counterpart. The small size effect reduces the thermal decomposition activation energy, accelerates the reaction rate, and promotes the reaction activity. - Highlights: • Picrates were prepared into three micron sizes by microemulsion synthesis. • Thermal decomposition kinetics and thermodynamics were studied by DPTA and DSC. • Smaller-sized picrate has higher activity and faster reaction rate. • Particle size effect on thermal decomposition kinetics and thermodynamics was revealed. - Abstract: Three alkali metal picrates, KPA, RbPA and CsPA, were prepared into three micron sizes by microemulsion synthesis, and their thermal decomposition behaviors were investigated by DPTA at different temperatures and by DSC at different heating rates. The smaller-sized picrate has greater gas emission and smaller kinetic and thermodynamic parameters than do its larger counterpart. It can be attributed to the decreasing particle size which leads to the high surface energy, the fast mass and heat transfer, and the increasing active sites on the reaction interface. The small size effect and surface effect cause the autocatalysis which reduces the activation energy and promotes the reaction activity. The particle size does not affect the reaction mechanism. However, the picrates with different central alkali metals exhibit different reaction mechanisms even though they are of the same size. This is because the central metal determines the bond energy and consequently affects the stability of picrate

  9. Nanocrystalline transition metal oxides as catalysts in the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapoor, Inder Pal Singh; Srivastava, Pratibha; Singh, Gurdip [Department of Chemistry, DDU Gorakhpur University, Gorakhpur (India)

    2009-08-15

    Nanocrystalline transition metal oxides (NTMOs) have been successfully prepared by three different methods: novel quick precipitation method (Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}); surfactant mediated method (CuO), and reduction of metal complexes with hydrazine as reducing agent (Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}). The nano particles have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) which shows an average particle diameter of 35-54 nm. Their catalytic activity was measured in the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP). AP decomposition undergoes a two step process where the addition of metal oxide nanocrystals led to a shifting of the high temperature decomposition peak toward lower temperature. The kinetics of the thermal decomposition of AP and catalyzed AP has also been evaluated using model fitting and isoconversional method. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  10. Metal Oxide Decomposition In Hydrothermal Alkaline Sodium Phosphate Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.E. Ziemniak

    2003-09-24

    Alkaline hydrothermal solutions of sodium orthophosphate (2.15 < Na/P < 2.75) are shown to decompose transition metal oxides into two families of sodium-metal ion-(hydroxy)phosphate compounds. Equilibria for these reactions are quantified by determining phosphate concentration-temperature thresholds for decomposition of five oxides in the series: Ti(IV), Cr(III), Fe(III, II), Ni(II) and Zn(II). By application of a computational chemistry method General Utility Lattice Program (GULP), it is demonstrated that the unique non-whole-number Na/P molar ratio of sodium ferric hydroxyphosphate is a consequence of its open-cage structure in which the H{sup +} and excess Na{sup +} ions are located.

  11. Trends in catalytic NO decomposition over transition metal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falsig, Hanne; Bligaard, Thomas; Rass-Hansen, Jeppe

    2007-01-01

    The formation of NOx from combustion of fossil and renewable fuels continues to be a dominant environmental issue. We take one step towards rationalizing trends in catalytic activity of transition metal catalysts for NO decomposition by combining microkinetic modelling with density functional...... theory calculations. We show specifically why the key problem in using transition metal surfaces to catalyze direct NO decomposition is their significant relative overbinding of atomic oxygen compared to atomic nitrogen....

  12. Direct NO decomposition over stepped transition-metal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falsig, Hanne; Bligaard, Thomas; Christensen, Claus H.

    2007-01-01

    We establish the full potential energy diagram for the direct NO decomposition reaction over stepped transition-metal surfaces by combining a database of adsorption energies on stepped metal surfaces with known Bronsted-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) relations for the activation barriers of dissociation...

  13. Decomposition of silicon carbide at high pressures and temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daviau, Kierstin; Lee, Kanani K. M.

    2017-11-01

    We measure the onset of decomposition of silicon carbide, SiC, to silicon and carbon (e.g., diamond) at high pressures and high temperatures in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. We identify decomposition through x-ray diffraction and multiwavelength imaging radiometry coupled with electron microscopy analyses on quenched samples. We find that B3 SiC (also known as 3C or zinc blende SiC) decomposes at high pressures and high temperatures, following a phase boundary with a negative slope. The high-pressure decomposition temperatures measured are considerably lower than those at ambient, with our measurements indicating that SiC begins to decompose at ~ 2000 K at 60 GPa as compared to ~ 2800 K at ambient pressure. Once B3 SiC transitions to the high-pressure B1 (rocksalt) structure, we no longer observe decomposition, despite heating to temperatures in excess of ~ 3200 K. The temperature of decomposition and the nature of the decomposition phase boundary appear to be strongly influenced by the pressure-induced phase transitions to higher-density structures in SiC, silicon, and carbon. The decomposition of SiC at high pressure and temperature has implications for the stability of naturally forming moissanite on Earth and in carbon-rich exoplanets.

  14. Decomposition of vegetation growing on metal mine waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, S T; McNeilly, T; Wellington, E M.H.

    1977-01-01

    Aspects of the decomposition of metal tolerant vegetation growing on mine waste containing high concentrations of lead and zinc were studied and compared with those on an adjacent uncontaminated site. High concentrations of Pb and, to a lesser extent, Zn, accumulated in metal-tolerant grass. Retarded decomposition of this vegetation as compared with that on the uncontaminated site was indicated by a greater accumulation of litter, less humus formation, reduced soil urease activity and smaller microbial and microfaunal populations. Some evidence for increased metal tolerance in microbes from the mine waste was obtained. Concentrations of lead tolerated under laboratory conditions were much lower than those extracted from the mine waste and its vegetation, probably due to the lack of an accurate method for assessing the availability of lead in soil and vegetation.

  15. Decomposition of polychlorinated biphenyls in soil with a dispersion mixture of metallic calcium and calcium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitoma, Yoshiharu; Mallampati, Srinivasa Reddy; Miyata, Hideaki; Kakeda, Mitsunori

    2013-02-01

    This study describes the decomposition of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in soil with dispersion mixtures of metallic calcium (Ca) and calcium oxide (CaO) at different temperatures. In these experiments, naturally moisturized and contaminated soil (1.0 g [31 ppm PCBs]), CaO (dried 2.0 wt%), and metallic Ca (0.01 g [0.25 mmol]) were introduced into a stainless steel pressure reactor under 0.1 MPa N(2) gas. The mixtures were stirred magnetically and heated at 260, 280, and 300 °C, respectively. Soil treatment with metallic Ca and CaO under various temperature conditions is extremely effective for degrading existing PCBs. Decomposition resulted from dechlorination (DC). Initial moisture in soil acted as a hydrogen source during stirring. Soil moisture can be beneficial for hydrodechlorination in the presence of metallic Ca and CaO. Furthermore, metallic Ca and CaO can greatly increase the number of collisions and mutual refinement. Treatment at 260, 280, and 300 °C combined with metallic Ca and CaO is effective for the decomposition (approximately 95 % DC) of PCBs in soil under natural moisture conditions.

  16. Thermal decomposition behaviors of magnesium borohydride doped with metal fluoride additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Z.G.; Wang, H.; Liu, J.W.; Zhu, M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The decomposition proceeded through several distinct steps. • The mixed materials show a dramatically low initial hydrogen release temperature. • The additives react with the Mg–B–H compounds rather than acting as catalysts. • The reaction process was studied using an in situ TEM. - Abstract: The thermal decomposition behaviors of Magnesium borohydride [Mg(BH 4 ) 2 ] and metal fluoride doped mixtures were studied by temperature programmed desorption measurement/mass spectrometry (TPD/MS), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and in situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations. The decomposition and release of hydrogen proceeded through several distinct steps, including two polymorphic transitions, ionic Mg(BH 4 ) 2 melting with solid Mg–B–H amorphous phase formation and Mg–B–H decomposition. The addition of additives such as CaF 2 , ZnF 2 and TiF 3 resulted in a decrease in the hydrogen release temperature. ZnF 2 and TiF 3 reduced the initial hydrogen release temperature to ca. 50 °C. However, hydrogen release during the transformation from γ-Mg(BH 4 ) 2 to the amorphous Mg–B–H compounds at ca. 300 °C was only 4.5 wt.% in contrast to 9.8 wt.% for the direct decomposition of pure Mg(BH 4 ) 2 . TEM observations confirmed that ZnF 2 and TiF 3 reacted with amorphous Mg–B–H compounds rather than acting as catalysts

  17. Investigation of the thermal decomposition of some metal-substituted Keggin tungstophosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamelas, J.A.; Couto, F.A.S.; Trovao, M.C.N.; Cavaleiro, A.M.V.; Cavaleiro, J.A.S.; Jesus, J.D.P. de

    1999-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of the tetrabutylammonium (TBA) salts (TBA) 4 H 3 [PW 11 O 39 ] and (TBA) 4 H x [PW 11 M(H 2 O)O 39 ]·nH 2 O, x = 3-(oxidation number of M), M = Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) or Fe(III), n = 0-3, has been studied by thermal analyses and the decomposition products identified by powder X-ray diffraction, FTIR and NMR spectroscopy. The organic cation started to decompose in the 150-200C range. The release of the metal M from the substituted polyoxoanions accompanied the initial degradation of the organic cations and [PW 12 O 40 ] 3- was formed as an intermediate at ca. 300C. For a comparison, the thermal decomposition of (TBA) 3 [PW 12 O 40 ] was also investigated. The thermal decomposition of the potassium salts of the lacunary and metal-substituted anions was also studied, but the formation of [PW 12 O 40 ] 3- was not observed. The temperature of decomposition of the [PW 11 M(H 2 O)O 39 ] (4+x)- anions was at least 150C higher for the potassium than for the tetrabutylammonium salts. This study exemplified that the thermal stability of some Keggin anions was dependent on the counter-cation present. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  18. High-temperature unimolecular decomposition of ethyl propionate

    KAUST Repository

    Giri, Binod; Alabbad, Mohammed; Farooq, Aamir

    2016-01-01

    This work reports rate coefficients of the thermal unimolecular decomposition reaction of ethyl propionate (EP) behind reflected shock waves over the temperature range of 976–1300 K and pressures of 825–1875 Torr. The reaction progress was monitored

  19. Catalytic activity of γ-irradiated transition metal ions in the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnikar, H.J.; Kapadi, A.H.; Gohad, A.S.; Bhosale, S.B.

    1988-01-01

    The catalystic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide by transition metal ions, Fe 2+ , Fe 3+ , Co 2+ and Cu 2+ , adsorbed on neutral α-alumina was studied over the temperature range of 295-313 K. γ-irradiation of the catalysts to a dose of 0.12 MGy enhanced markedly the first order decomposition rate. Negligible in the case of Cu 2+ , the radiation effect increased roughly in the order of the number of unpaired d electrons in these ions: Cu(II), Fe(II), Co(II) and Fe(III). Results are explained on the basis of Kremer's mechanism of electron induced heterogeneous decomposition of H 2 O 2 . The radiation effect is attributed to the initial excess of electrons released from traps in the beginning of the reaction

  20. High temperature corrosion of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadakkers, W.J.; Schuster, H.; Ennis, P.J.

    1988-08-01

    This paper covers three main topics: 1. high temperature oxidation of metals and alloys, 2. corrosion in sulfur containing environments and 3. structural changes caused by corrosion. The following 21 subjects are discussed: Influence of implanted yttrium and lanthanum on the oxidation behaviour of beta-NiA1; influence of reactive elements on the adherence and protective properties of alumina scales; problems related to the application of very fine markers in studying the mechanism of thin scale formation; oxidation behaviour of chromia forming Co-Cr-Al alloys with or without reactive element additions; growth and properties of chromia-scales on high-temperature alloys; quantification of the depletion zone in high temperature alloys after oxidation in process gas; effects of HC1 and of N2 in the oxidation of Fe-20Cr; investigation under nuclear safety aspects of Zircaloy-4 oxidation kinetics at high temperatures in air; on the sulfide corrosion of metallic materials; high temperature sulfide corrosion of Mn, Nb and Nb-Si alloys; corrosion behaviour or NiCrAl-based alloys in air and air-SO2 gas mixtures; sulfidation of cobalt at high temperatures; preoxidation for sulfidation protection; fireside corrosion and application of additives in electric utility boilers; transport properties of scales with complex defect structures; observations of whiskers and pyramids during high temperature corrosion of iron in SO2; corrosion and creep of alloy 800H under simulated coal gasification conditions; microstructural changes of HK 40 cast alloy caused by exploitation in tubes in steam reformer installation; microstructural changes during exposure in corrosive environments and their effect on mechanical properties; coatings against carburization; mathematical modeling of carbon diffusion and carbide precipitation in Ni-Cr-based alloys. (MM)

  1. Line profile analyses of rhodium metal obtained by decomposition of rhodium carbonyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, D.; Mandalia, H.; Garner, M.L.; Blakely, M.K.; Lau, K.H.

    1995-01-01

    Metal carbonyls are important for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of metals and alloys and formation of high surface area metallic particles which have potential applications as catalysts. Rhodium carbonyl [Rh 6 (CO) 16 ] produces high surface area metallic particles whose structure has been reported as monoclinic (I2/a) with lattice dimensions, a=17.00(±0.03)Angstrom, b=9.78(±0.02)Angstrom, c=17.53(±0.03)Angstrom and Β=121 degrees 45' ± 30' at room temperature. Generally, metal carbonyl crystals dissociate under vacuum as carbonyl gas and decompose to metallic crystals and carbon monoxide at higher temperatures. However, the behavior of rhodium carbonyl crystals is different; they decompose directly to metallic rhodium without the formation of rhodium carbonyl gas in vacuum. Several residual fine grains of rhodium metal are found after the decomposition in vacuum at relatively low temperatures. The metallic samples of rhodium were obtained from vapor pressure experiments using torsion Knudsen-effusion apparatus. X-ray diffraction analyses performed on these gains showed severely broadened Bragg reflections indicative of small particle size and/or lattice microgram. In this study, a comparison of lattice strains and domain sizes obtained by integral breadth and Fourier methods has been made. In addition a comparison of the lattice strains and domain sizes has been made between the Cauchy, Gaussian, Cauchy-Gaussian and Aqua integral breadth methods

  2. Leaf litter decomposition rates increase with rising mean annual temperature in Hawaiian tropical montane wet forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori D. Bothwell

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Decomposing litter in forest ecosystems supplies nutrients to plants, carbon to heterotrophic soil microorganisms and is a large source of CO2 to the atmosphere. Despite its essential role in carbon and nutrient cycling, the temperature sensitivity of leaf litter decay in tropical forest ecosystems remains poorly resolved, especially in tropical montane wet forests where the warming trend may be amplified compared to tropical wet forests at lower elevations. We quantified leaf litter decomposition rates along a highly constrained 5.2 °C mean annual temperature (MAT gradient in tropical montane wet forests on the Island of Hawaii. Dominant vegetation, substrate type and age, soil moisture, and disturbance history are all nearly constant across this gradient, allowing us to isolate the effect of rising MAT on leaf litter decomposition and nutrient release. Leaf litter decomposition rates were a positive linear function of MAT, causing the residence time of leaf litter on the forest floor to decline by ∼31 days for each 1 °C increase in MAT. Our estimate of the Q10 temperature coefficient for leaf litter decomposition was 2.17, within the commonly reported range for heterotrophic organic matter decomposition (1.5–2.5 across a broad range of ecosystems. The percentage of leaf litter nitrogen (N remaining after six months declined linearly with increasing MAT from ∼88% of initial N at the coolest site to ∼74% at the warmest site. The lack of net N immobilization during all three litter collection periods at all MAT plots indicates that N was not limiting to leaf litter decomposition, regardless of temperature. These results suggest that leaf litter decay in tropical montane wet forests may be more sensitive to rising MAT than in tropical lowland wet forests, and that increased rates of N release from decomposing litter could delay or prevent progressive N limitation to net primary productivity with climate warming.

  3. A general melt-injection-decomposition route to oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Dongqiang; Zhang, Xinwei; Hua, Zhenghe; Yang, Shaoguang, E-mail: sgyang@nju.edu.cn

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • A general melt-injection-decomposition (MID) route is proposed for the fabrication of oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays. • Four kinds of metal oxide (CuO, Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanowire arrays have been realized as examples through the developed MID route. • The mechanism of the developed MID route is discussed using Thermogravimetry and Differential Thermal Analysis technique. • The MID route is a versatile, simple, facile and effective way to prepare different kinds of oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays in the future. - Abstract: In this manuscript, a general melt-injection-decomposition (MID) route has been proposed and realized for the fabrication of oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays. Nitrate was used as the starting materials, which was injected into the nanopores of the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane through the capillarity action in its liquid state. At higher temperature, the nitrate decomposed into corresponding metal oxide within the nanopores of the AAO membrane. Oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays were formed within the AAO membrane as a result of the confinement of the nanopores. Four kinds of metal oxide (CuO, Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanowire arrays are presented here as examples fabricated by this newly developed process. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy studies showed clear evidence of the formations of the oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays. Formation mechanism of the metal oxide nanowire arrays is discussed based on the Thermogravimetry and Differential Thermal Analysis measurement results.

  4. A general melt-injection-decomposition route to oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Dongqiang; Zhang, Xinwei; Hua, Zhenghe; Yang, Shaoguang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A general melt-injection-decomposition (MID) route is proposed for the fabrication of oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays. • Four kinds of metal oxide (CuO, Mn_2O_3, Co_3O_4 and Cr_2O_3) nanowire arrays have been realized as examples through the developed MID route. • The mechanism of the developed MID route is discussed using Thermogravimetry and Differential Thermal Analysis technique. • The MID route is a versatile, simple, facile and effective way to prepare different kinds of oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays in the future. - Abstract: In this manuscript, a general melt-injection-decomposition (MID) route has been proposed and realized for the fabrication of oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays. Nitrate was used as the starting materials, which was injected into the nanopores of the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane through the capillarity action in its liquid state. At higher temperature, the nitrate decomposed into corresponding metal oxide within the nanopores of the AAO membrane. Oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays were formed within the AAO membrane as a result of the confinement of the nanopores. Four kinds of metal oxide (CuO, Mn_2O_3, Co_3O_4 and Cr_2O_3) nanowire arrays are presented here as examples fabricated by this newly developed process. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy studies showed clear evidence of the formations of the oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays. Formation mechanism of the metal oxide nanowire arrays is discussed based on the Thermogravimetry and Differential Thermal Analysis measurement results.

  5. Spinodal Decomposition in Functionally Graded Super Duplex Stainless Steel and Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Vahid A.; Thuvander, Mattias; Wessman, Sten; Karlsson, Leif

    2018-04-01

    Low-temperature phase separations (T duplex stainless steel (SDSS) base and weld metals were investigated for short heat treatment times (0.5 to 600 minutes). A novel heat treatment technique, where a stationary arc produces a steady state temperature gradient for selected times, was employed to fabricate functionally graded materials. Three different initial material conditions including 2507 SDSS, remelted 2507 SDSS, and 2509 SDSS weld metal were investigated. Selective etching of ferrite significantly decreased in regions heat treated at 435 °C to 480 °C already after 3 minutes due to rapid phase separations. Atom probe tomography results revealed spinodal decomposition of ferrite and precipitation of Cu particles. Microhardness mapping showed that as-welded microstructure and/or higher Ni content accelerated decomposition. The arc heat treatment technique combined with microhardness mapping and electrolytical etching was found to be a successful approach to evaluate kinetics of low-temperature phase separations in SDSS, particularly at its earlier stages. A time-temperature transformation diagram was proposed showing the kinetics of 475 °C-embrittlement in 2507 SDSS.

  6. Evaluation of the effect of temperature on the stability of metal soaps ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The thermal stability of calcium and zinc dicarboxylates was studied. The kinetics of the decomposition was studied thermogravimetrically at various temperatures. The rates of the first stage decomposition were used to assess the effect of temperature on the susceptibility of the metal soaps of dicarboxylic acids to ...

  7. Programming Enhancements for Low Temperature Thermal Decomposition Workstation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igou, R.E.

    1998-10-01

    This report describes a new control-and-measurement system design for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant's Low Temperature Thermal Decomposition (LTTD) process. The new design addresses problems with system reliability stemming from equipment obsolescence and addresses specific functional improvements that plant production personnel have identified, as required. The new design will also support new measurement techniques, which the Y-12 Development Division has identified for future operations. The new techniques will function in concert with the original technique so that process data consistency is maintained.

  8. Programming Enhancements for Low Temperature Thermal Decomposition Workstation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igou, R.E.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes a new control-and-measurement system design for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant's Low Temperature Thermal Decomposition (LTTD) process. The new design addresses problems with system reliability stemming from equipment obsolescence and addresses specific functional improvements that plant production personnel have identified, as required. The new design will also support new measurement techniques, which the Y-12 Development Division has identified for future operations. The new techniques will function in concert with the original technique so that process data consistency is maintained

  9. High-temperature unimolecular decomposition of ethyl propionate

    KAUST Repository

    Giri, Binod

    2016-10-09

    This work reports rate coefficients of the thermal unimolecular decomposition reaction of ethyl propionate (EP) behind reflected shock waves over the temperature range of 976–1300 K and pressures of 825–1875 Torr. The reaction progress was monitored by detecting CH near 10.532 μm using CO gas laser absorption. In addition, G3//MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ and master equation calculations were performed to assess the pressure- and temperature-dependence of the reaction. Our calculations revealed that CH elimination occurs via a six-centered retro-ene transition state. Our measured rate data are close to the high-pressure limit and showed no discernable temperature fall off.

  10. The effect of increased temperature and nitrogen deposition on decomposition in bogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breeuwer, A.J.G.; Heijmans, M.M.P.D.; Robroek, B.J.M.; Limpens, J.; Berendse, F.

    2008-01-01

    Despite their low primary production, ombrotrophic peatlands have a considerable potential to store atmospheric carbon as a result of their extremely low litter decomposition rates. Projected changes in temperature and nitrogen (N) deposition may increase decomposition rates by their positive

  11. Catalytic decomposition of nitrogen dioxide over various metal oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimokawabe, M; Ohi, A; Takezawa, N [Dept. of Chemical Process Engineering, Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan)

    1992-06-30

    The catalytic decomposition of nitrogen oxide (NO2) was investigated over 18 metal oxides (Al2O3, SiO2, ZrO2, SnO2, TiO2, V2O5, Cr2O3, MnO2, Fe2O3, Co3O4, NiO, CuO, ZnO, MgO, CaO, La2O3, CeO2, and Nd2O3). The relationship between the specific rates of metal oxides (Me{sub x}O{sub y}) (Me{sub x}O{sub y-1} + 1/2O{sub 2} {yields} Me{sub x}O{sub y}) shows a V-shaped curve with a minimum at -{Delta}H around 700 kJ/mol. This suggests that the mechanism dealt with in this article switches at -{Delta}H = 700 kJ/mol. 1 fig., 1 tab., 20 refs.

  12. Effects of anthropogenic heavy metal contamination on litter decomposition in streams – A meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Verónica; Koricheva, Julia; Duarte, Sofia; Niyogi, Dev K.; Guérold, François

    2016-01-01

    Many streams worldwide are affected by heavy metal contamination, mostly due to past and present mining activities. Here we present a meta-analysis of 38 studies (reporting 133 cases) published between 1978 and 2014 that reported the effects of heavy metal contamination on the decomposition of terrestrial litter in running waters. Overall, heavy metal contamination significantly inhibited litter decomposition. The effect was stronger for laboratory than for field studies, likely due to better control of confounding variables in the former, antagonistic interactions between metals and other environmental variables in the latter or differences in metal identity and concentration between studies. For laboratory studies, only copper + zinc mixtures significantly inhibited litter decomposition, while no significant effects were found for silver, aluminum, cadmium or zinc considered individually. For field studies, coal and metal mine drainage strongly inhibited litter decomposition, while drainage from motorways had no significant effects. The effect of coal mine drainage did not depend on drainage pH. Coal mine drainage negatively affected leaf litter decomposition independently of leaf litter identity; no significant effect was found for wood decomposition, but sample size was low. Considering metal mine drainage, arsenic mines had a stronger negative effect on leaf litter decomposition than gold or pyrite mines. Metal mine drainage significantly inhibited leaf litter decomposition driven by both microbes and invertebrates, independently of leaf litter identity; no significant effect was found for microbially driven decomposition, but sample size was low. Overall, mine drainage negatively affects leaf litter decomposition, likely through negative effects on invertebrates. - Highlights: • A meta-analysis was done to assess the effects of heavy metals on litter decomposition. • Heavy metals significantly and strongly inhibited litter decomposition in streams.

  13. A general melt-injection-decomposition route to oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dongqiang; Zhang, Xinwei; Hua, Zhenghe; Yang, Shaoguang

    2016-12-01

    In this manuscript, a general melt-injection-decomposition (MID) route has been proposed and realized for the fabrication of oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays. Nitrate was used as the starting materials, which was injected into the nanopores of the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane through the capillarity action in its liquid state. At higher temperature, the nitrate decomposed into corresponding metal oxide within the nanopores of the AAO membrane. Oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays were formed within the AAO membrane as a result of the confinement of the nanopores. Four kinds of metal oxide (CuO, Mn2O3, Co3O4 and Cr2O3) nanowire arrays are presented here as examples fabricated by this newly developed process. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy studies showed clear evidence of the formations of the oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays. Formation mechanism of the metal oxide nanowire arrays is discussed based on the Thermogravimetry and Differential Thermal Analysis measurement results.

  14. PZT Films Fabricated by Metal Organic Decomposition Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolev, Vladimir; Ishchuk, Valeriy

    2014-03-01

    High quality lead zirconate titanate films have been fabricated on different substrates by metal organic decomposition method and their ferroelectric properties have been investigated. Main attention was paid to studies of the influence of the buffer layer with conditional composition Pb1.3(Zr0.5Ti0.5) O3 on the properties of Pb(Zr0.5Ti0.5) O3 films fabricated on the polycrystalline titanium and platinum substrates. It is found that in the films on the Pt substrate (with or without the buffer layer) the dependencies of the remanent polarization and the coercivity field on the number of switching cycles do not manifest fatigue up to 109 cycles. The remanent polarization dependencies for films on the Ti substrate with the buffer layer containing an excess of PbO demonstrate an fundamentally new feature that consists of a remanent polarization increase after 108 switching cycles. The increase of remanent polarization is about 50% when the number of cycles approaches 1010, while the increase of the coercivity field is small. A monotonic increase of dielectric losses has been observed in all cases.

  15. The decomposition of methyltrichlorosilane: Studies in a high-temperature flow reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allendorf, M.D.; Osterheld, T.H.; Melius, C.F.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the decomposition of methyltrichlorosilane (MTS), a common silicon carbide precursor, in a high-temperature flow reactor are presented. The results indicate that methane and hydrogen chloride are major products of the decomposition. No chlorinated silane products were observed. Hydrogen carrier gas was found to increase the rate of MTS decomposition. The observations suggest a radical-chain mechanism for the decomposition. The implications for silicon carbide chemical vapor deposition are discussed.

  16. High temperature metallic recuperator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, M. E.; Solmon, N. G.; Smeltzer, C. E.

    1981-06-01

    An industrial 4.5 MM Btu/hr axial counterflow recuperator, fabricated to deliver 1600 F combustion air, was designed to handle rapid cyclic loading, a long life, acceptable costs, and a low maintenance requirement. A cost benefit anlysis of a high temperature waste heat recovery system utilizing the recurperator and components capable of 1600 F combustion air preheat shows that this system would have a payback period of less than two years. Fifteen companies and industrial associations were interviewed and expressed great interest in recuperation in large energy consuming industries. Determination of long term environmental effects on candidate recuperator tubing alloys was completed. Alloys found to be acceptable in the 2200 F flue gas environment of a steel billet reheat furnace, were identified.

  17. Evaluation of the Effect of Temperature on the Stability of Metal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    ABSTRACT: The thermal behaviour of metal soaps of Trichosanthes cucumerina seed oil at 433, 453 and 473K was investigated and the thermodynamic parameters of the decomposition process determined. The kinetics of the decomposition was studied thermogravimetrically at various temperatures. The rates of the first ...

  18. Autoclave decomposition method for metals in soils and sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete-López, M; Jonathan, M P; Rodríguez-Espinosa, P F; Salgado-Galeana, J A

    2012-04-01

    Leaching of partially leached metals (Fe, Mn, Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) was done using autoclave technique which was modified based on EPA 3051A digestion technique. The autoclave method was developed as an alternative to the regular digestion procedure passed the safety norms for partial extraction of metals in polytetrafluoroethylene (PFA vessel) with a low constant temperature (119.5° ± 1.5°C) and the recovery of elements were also precise. The autoclave method was also validated using two Standard Reference Materials (SRMs: Loam Soil B and Loam Soil D) and the recoveries were equally superior to the traditionally established digestion methods. Application of the autoclave was samples from different natural environments (beach, mangrove, river, and city soil) to reproduce the recovery of elements during subsequent analysis.

  19. Quantum chemical aided prediction of the thermal decomposition mechanisms and temperatures of ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroon, Maaike C.; Buijs, Wim; Peters, Cor J.; Witkamp, Geert-Jan

    2007-01-01

    The long-term thermal stability of ionic liquids is of utmost importance for their industrial application. Although the thermal decomposition temperatures of various ionic liquids have been measured previously, experimental data on the thermal decomposition mechanisms and kinetics are scarce. It is desirable to develop quantitative chemical tools that can predict thermal decomposition mechanisms and temperatures (kinetics) of ionic liquids. In this work ab initio quantum chemical calculations (DFT-B3LYP) have been used to predict thermal decomposition mechanisms, temperatures and the activation energies of the thermal breakdown reactions. These quantum chemical calculations proved to be an excellent method to predict the thermal stability of various ionic liquids

  20. Synthesis and characterization of Cu-MFI catalyst for the direct medium temperature range NO decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valkaj Karolina Maduna

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study the physico-chemical and catalytic properties of copper bearing MFI zeolites (Cu-MFI with different Si/Al and Si/Cu ratios were investigated. Two different methods for incorporation of metal ions into the zeolite framework were used: the ion exchange from the solution of copper acetate and the direct hydrothermal synthesis. Direct synthesis of a zeolite in the presence of copper-phosphate complexes was expected to generate more active copper species necessary for the desired reaction than the conventional ion exchange method. Direct decomposition of NO was used as a model reaction, because this reaction still offers a very attractive approach to NOX removal. The catalytic properties of zeolite samples were studied using techniques, such as XRD, SEM, EPR and nitrogen adsorption/desorption measurements at 77 K. Results of the kinetic investigation revealed that both methods are applicable for the preparation of the catalysts with active sites capable of catalyzing the NO decomposition. It was found out that Cu-MFI zeolites obtained through direct synthesis are promising catalysts for NO decomposition, especially at lower reaction temperatures. The efficiency of the catalysts prepared by both methods is compared and discussed.

  1. Decomposition of SnH{sub 4} molecules on metal and metal–oxide surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ugur, D. [TNO, Stieltjesweg 1, 2628 CK Delft (Netherlands); Delft University of Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Storm, A.J.; Verberk, R. [TNO, Stieltjesweg 1, 2628 CK Delft (Netherlands); Brouwer, J.C. [Delft University of Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Sloof, W.G., E-mail: w.g.sloof@tudelft.nl [Delft University of Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-01-01

    Atomic hydrogen cleaning is a promising method for EUV lithography systems, to recover from surface oxidation and to remove carbon and tin contaminants. Earlier studies showed, however, that tin may redeposit on nearby surfaces due to SnH{sub 4} decomposition. This phenomenon of SnH{sub 4} decomposition during tin cleaning has been quantified for various metallic and metal-oxide surfaces using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It was observed that the metal oxide surfaces (TiO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}) were significantly less contaminated than metallic surfaces. Tin contamination due to SnH{sub 4} decomposition can thus be reduced or even mitigated by application of a suitable metal-oxide coating.

  2. Decomposition of dual hydroxyapatite/fluoroapatite coatings on metal substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, M.; Evans, J.H.; Wentrup-Byrne, E.

    2000-01-01

    In order to prevent the formation of tricalcium phosphate (TCP), a relatively weak and rapidly biodegradable biomaterial, during sintering of hydroxyapatite (Hap) onto metal substrates, a novel two layer coating was applied. This was achieved by pre-coating the substrate with either Hap or fluorapatite (Fap) which preserved the purity of the Hap top coating. However, Fap is more stable thermally than Hap. The composition of Hap and Fap were determined by x-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. A scanning electron microscope was also used to characterise the surface morphologiy of the coatings. By using Fap the formation of TCP was totally prevented through out the coatings at a sintering temperature of 1050 deg C at which a relatively dense Hap outer coating was produced. Copyright (2000) The Australian Ceramic Society

  3. Reduced substrate supply limits the temperature response of soil organic carbon decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinzia Fissore; Christian P. Giardina; Randall K. Kolka

    2013-01-01

    Controls on the decomposition rate of soil organic carbon (SOC), especially the more stable fraction of SOC, remain poorly understood, with implications for confidence in efforts to model terrestrial C balance under future climate. We investigated the role of substrate supply in the temperature sensitivity of SOC decomposition in laboratory incubations of coarse-...

  4. Crystallization and deuterium permeation behaviors of yttrium oxide coating prepared by metal organic decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takumi Chikada

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Yttrium oxide coatings were fabricated on reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels by metal organic decomposition with a dip-coating technique, and their deuterium permeation behaviors were investigated. The microstructure of the coatings varied with heat-treatment temperature: amorphous at 670ºC (amorphous coating and crystallized at 700ºC (crystallized coating. Deuterium permeation flux of the amorphous coating was lower than the uncoated steel by a factor of 5 at 500ºC, while that of the crystallized coating was lower by a factor of around 100 at 400‒550ºC. The permeation fluxes of both coatings were drastically decreased during the measurements at higher temperatures by a factor of up to 790 for the amorphous coating and 1000 for the crystallized one, indicating a microstructure modification occurred by an effect of test temperature with hydrogen flux. Temperature dependence of deuterium diffusivity in the coatings suggests that the decrease of the permeation flux has been derived from a decrease of the diffusivity. Characteristic permeation behaviors were observed with different annealing conditions; however, they can be interpreted using the permeation mechanism clarified in the previous erbium oxide coating studies.

  5. A High Temperature Kinetic Study for the Thermal Unimolecular Decomposition of Diethyl Carbonate

    KAUST Repository

    Alabbad, Mohammed

    2017-07-08

    Thermal unimolecular decomposition of diethyl carbonate (DEC) was investigated in a shock tube by measuring ethylene concentration with a CO2 gas laser over 900 - 1200 K and 1.2 – 2.8 bar. Rate coefficients were extracted using a simple kinetic scheme comprising of thermal decomposition of DEC as initial step followed by rapid thermal decomposition of the intermediate ethyl-hydrogen-carbonate. Our results were further analysed using ab initio and master equation calculations to obtain pressure- and temperature- dependence of rate coefficients. Similar to alkyl esters, unimolecular decomposition of DEC is found to undergo six-center retro-ene elimination of ethylene in a concerted manner.

  6. A High Temperature Kinetic Study for the Thermal Unimolecular Decomposition of Diethyl Carbonate

    KAUST Repository

    Alabbad, Mohammed; Giri, Binod; Szőri, Milan; Viskolcz, Bé la; Farooq, Aamir

    2017-01-01

    Thermal unimolecular decomposition of diethyl carbonate (DEC) was investigated in a shock tube by measuring ethylene concentration with a CO2 gas laser over 900 - 1200 K and 1.2 – 2.8 bar. Rate coefficients were extracted using a simple kinetic scheme comprising of thermal decomposition of DEC as initial step followed by rapid thermal decomposition of the intermediate ethyl-hydrogen-carbonate. Our results were further analysed using ab initio and master equation calculations to obtain pressure- and temperature- dependence of rate coefficients. Similar to alkyl esters, unimolecular decomposition of DEC is found to undergo six-center retro-ene elimination of ethylene in a concerted manner.

  7. Effect of Temperature on the Desorption and Decomposition of GB on Activated Carbon

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Karwacki, Christopher

    1999-01-01

    ...) and its decomposition products on coconut shell activated carbon (CSC). The results show that, under equilibrium conditions on dry CSC, changes in the partial pressure of GB are affected primarily by its loading and temperature of the adsorbent...

  8. Synthesis of Yttria-stabilized zirconia nanoparticles by decomposition of metal nitrates coated on carbon powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, S.; Stangle, G.C.; Amarakoon, V.R.; Schulze, W.A.

    1996-01-01

    Weakly agglomerated nanoparticles of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) were synthesized by a novel process which involved the decomposition of metal nitrates that had been coated on ultrafine carbon black powder, after which the carbon black was gasified. The use of ultrafine, high-surface-area carbon black powder apparently allowed the nanocrystalline oxide particles to form and remain separate from each other, after which the carbon black was gasified at a somewhat higher temperature. As a result, the degree of agglomeration was shown to be relatively low. The average crystallite size and the specific surface area of the as-synthesized YSZ nanoparticles were 5∼6 nm and 130 m 2 /g, respectively, for powder synthesized at 650 degree C. The as-synthesized YSZ nanoparticles had a light brown color and were translucent, which differs distinctly from conventional YSZ particles which are typically white and opaque. The mechanism of the synthesis process was investigated, and indicated that the gasification temperature had a direct effect on the crystallite size of the as-synthesized YSZ nanoparticles. High-density and ultrafine-grained YSZ ceramic articles were prepared by fast-firing, using a dwell temperature of 1250 degree C and a dwell time of two minutes or less. copyright 1996 Materials Research Society

  9. The influence of temperature on the decomposition kinetics of peracetic acid in solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunigk L.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Peracetic acid is a powerful sanitizer that has only recently been introduced in the Brazilian food industry. The main disadvantage of this sanitizer is its decomposition rate. The main purpose of this paper is to present results obtained in experiments carried out to study the decomposition kinetics of peracetic acid in aqueous solutions at 25, 35, 40 and 45 °C. The decompositon of peracetic acid is a first-order reaction. The decomposition rate constants are between 1.71x10-3 h -1 for 25 °C and 9.64x10-3 h-1 for 45 °C. The decomposition rate constant is affected by temperature according to the Arrhenius equation, and the activation energy for the decomposition of peracetic acid in aqueous solutions prepared from the commercial formulation used in this work is 66.20 kJ/mol.

  10. Energetic materials under high pressures and temperatures: stability, polymorphism and decomposition of RDX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreger, Z A

    2012-01-01

    A recent progress in understanding the response of energetic crystal of cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX) to high pressures and temperatures is summarized. The optical spectroscopy and imaging studies under static compression and high temperatures provided new insight into phase diagram, polymorphism and decomposition mechanisms at pressures and temperatures relevant to those under shock compression. These results have been used to aid the understanding of processes under shock compression, including the shock-induced phase transition and identification of the crystal phase at decomposition. This work demonstrates that studies under static compression and high temperatures provide important complementary route for elucidating the physical and chemical processes in shocked energetic crystals.

  11. Radiolysis of lignin: Prospective mechanism of high-temperature decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, A. V.

    2017-12-01

    The range of the radiation-thermal processes resulting in conversion of lignin into monomeric phenols is considered. Statistically the most probable places of macromolecule ionization are aromatic units. Release of phenolic products from a lignin macromolecule is the multistage process beginning via fragmentation of primary cation-radicals. Reactions of electrons and small radicals with macromolecules, also as degradation of cation-radicals, result in formation of phenoxyl radicals. Macroradicals possess lower heat stability in comparison with macromolecules. Thermal decomposition of macroradicals leads to release of monohydric and dihydric phenols. The probability of benzenediols formation increases in the presence of alkanes. As noted, partial transformation of lignin into charcoal is inevitable.

  12. Improved conductivity of infinite-layer LaNiO2 thin films by metal organic decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Ai; Manabe, Takaaki; Naito, Michio

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •LaNiO 2 films were synthesized by metal organic decomposition and topotactic reduction. •Room-temperature resistivity as low as 0.6 mΩ cm was achieved for infinite-layer LaNiO 2 . •Lattice matched substrates are important in obtaining high conductivity. -- Abstract: Infinite-layer LaNiO 2 thin films were synthesized by metal organic decomposition and subsequent topotactic reduction in hydrogen, and their transport properties were investigated. LaNiO 2 is isostructural to SrCuO 2 , the parent compound of high-T c Sr 0.9 La 0.1 CuO 2 with T c = 44 K, and has 3d 9 configuration, which is very rare in oxides but common to high-T c copper oxides. The bulk synthesis of LaNiO 2 is not easy, but we demonstrate in this article that the thin-film synthesis of LaNiO 2 is rather easy, thanks to a large-surface-to-volume ratio, which makes oxygen diffusion prompt. Our refined synthesis conditions produced highly conducting films of LaNiO 2 . The resistivity of the best film is as low as 640 μΩ cm at 295 K and decreases with temperature down to 230 K but it shows a gradual upturn at lower temperatures

  13. α-Decomposition for estimating parameters in common cause failure modeling based on causal inference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Xiaoyu; Yamaguchi, Akira; Takata, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The traditional α-factor model has focused on the occurrence frequencies of common cause failure (CCF) events. Global α-factors in the α-factor model are defined as fractions of failure probability for particular groups of components. However, there are unknown uncertainties in the CCF parameters estimation for the scarcity of available failure data. Joint distributions of CCF parameters are actually determined by a set of possible causes, which are characterized by CCF-triggering abilities and occurrence frequencies. In the present paper, the process of α-decomposition (Kelly-CCF method) is developed to learn about sources of uncertainty in CCF parameter estimation. Moreover, it aims to evaluate CCF risk significances of different causes, which are named as decomposed α-factors. Firstly, a Hybrid Bayesian Network is adopted to reveal the relationship between potential causes and failures. Secondly, because all potential causes have different occurrence frequencies and abilities to trigger dependent failures or independent failures, a regression model is provided and proved by conditional probability. Global α-factors are expressed by explanatory variables (causes’ occurrence frequencies) and parameters (decomposed α-factors). At last, an example is provided to illustrate the process of hierarchical Bayesian inference for the α-decomposition process. This study shows that the α-decomposition method can integrate failure information from cause, component and system level. It can parameterize the CCF risk significance of possible causes and can update probability distributions of global α-factors. Besides, it can provide a reliable way to evaluate uncertainty sources and reduce the uncertainty in probabilistic risk assessment. It is recommended to build databases including CCF parameters and corresponding causes’ occurrence frequency of each targeted system

  14. Effect of oxygen on decomposition of nitrous oxide over various metal oxide catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satsuma, Atsushi; Maeshima, Hajime; Watanabe, Kiyoshi; Hattori, Tadashi

    2001-01-01

    The inhibitory effect of oxygen on decomposition of nitrous oxide over various metal oxide catalysts was investigated. The activity of nitrous oxide decomposition significantly decreased over CuO, Co 3 O 4 , NiO, Fe 2 O 3 , SnO 2 , In 2 O 3 and Cr 2 O 3 by reversible adsorption of oxygen onto the active sites. On the contrary to this, there was no or small change in the activity of TiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 , MgO, La 2 O 3 and CaO. A good correlation was observed between the degree of inhibition and the heat of formation of metal oxides. On the basis of kinetic model, the reduction of catalytic activity in the presence of oxygen was rationalized with the strength of oxygen adsorption on the metal oxide surface. (author)

  15. Surface spinodal decomposition in coherent metal-hydrogen and other alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kappus, W.; Horner, H.

    1977-01-01

    Spinodal decomposition in metal hydrides and alloys near a surface under the influence of elastic interactions is investigated. As long as the crystals remain coherent this process sets in prior to spinodal decomposition in the bulk. A statistical theory containing thermal fluctuations and nonlinear effects is developed and solutions are found in a mean field approximation. The theory is applied to niobium-hydride and a possible explanation for the appearance of quasiperiodic β-phase precipitates in quenched probes is given. (orig.) [de

  16. Decomposition of belowground litter and metal dynamics in salt marshes (Tagus Estuary, Portugal)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Patricia; Cacador, Isabel; Vale, Carlos; Caetano, Miguel; Costa, Ana Luisa

    2007-01-01

    The concentrations of C, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Pb and Cd were determined monthly in decomposing roots of Halimione portulacoides, using litterbag experiments, in two salt marshes of the Tagus estuary with different levels of contamination. Although carbon concentrations varied within a narrow interval during the experiment, litter decomposed rapidly in the first month (weight loss between 0.051 and 0.065 g d -1 ). The time variation of metals was examined in terms of Me/C ratios and metal stocks. Ratios of Fe/C and Mn/C and their metal stocks increased in spring, presumably due to the precipitation of oxides in the surface of decomposing roots. Subsequent decrease of Fe/C and Mn/C ratios suggests the use of Fe and Mn oxides, as electron acceptors, in the organic matter oxidation. Zinc, Cu, Pb and Cd ratios to C were, in general, higher than at initial conditions implying that metal that leached out was slower than carbon. However, metal stocks decreased during the experiment indicating that incorporation or sorption of metals in Fe and Mn oxides did not counterbalance the amount of Zn, Pb and Cd released from decomposing litter. An exception was observed for Cu, since stock in the less contaminated marsh (Pancas) increased during the decomposition, indicating that litter was efficient on Cu binding under more oxidising conditions. These results emphasize the importance of litter decomposition and sediment characteristics on metal cycling in salt marshes

  17. Ultrafine ferromagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: Facile synthesis by low temperature decomposition of iron glycerolate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartůněk, Vilém, E-mail: vilem.bartunek@vscht.cz [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Průcha, David [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Švecová, Marie [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Engineering, University of Chemistry and Technology, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Ulbrich, Pavel [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Faculty of Food and Biochemical Technology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Technická 3, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Huber, Štěpán; Sedmidubský, David; Jankovský, Ondřej [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2016-09-01

    We synthesized dark colored ultrafine – sub 10 nm iron oxide nanoparticles by a facile and low temperature process based on thermal decomposition of an affordable precursor – iron glycerolate. Simultaneous thermal analysis (STA) was used to study the thermal behaviour during the decomposition. The iron glycerolate was thoroughly analysed by various methods. The size of the iron nanoparticles was determined from XRD patterns and by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and their composition has been confirmed by XPS. Magnetic properties of the nanoparticles were studied by vibrating sample magnetometry. The prepared single phase material exhibiting ferromagnetic properties is usable in a wide range of applications and may be suitable even for large scale industrial applications. - Highlights: • Iron glycerolate prepared and characterised. • Iron oxide nanoparticles prepared by thermal decomposition of iron glycerolate. • STA used to study the decomposition. • Products characterised by XRD, XPS, FT-IR, SEM and TEM. • Magnetic behaviour of monophasic samples determined.

  18. Low temperature kinetics of In-Cd solid solution decomposition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pal-Val, P.P.; Pal-Val, L.N.; Ostapovets, A.A.; Vaněk, Přemysl

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 137, - (2008), s. 35-42 ISSN 1012-0394 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : low temperatures * In-based alloys * solid solutions * isothermal structure instability * Young's modulus * electrical resistivity * phase diagrams Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism http://www.scientific.net/3-908451-53-1/35/

  19. Preparation of Palladium-Impregnated Ceria by Metal Complex Decomposition for Methane Steam Reforming Catalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Worawat Wattanathana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Palladium-impregnated ceria materials were successfully prepared via an integrated procedure between a metal complex decomposition method and a microwave-assisted wetness impregnation. Firstly, ceria (CeO2 powders were synthesized by thermal decomposition of cerium(III complexes prepared by using cerium(III nitrate or cerium(III chloride as a metal source to form a metal complex precursor with triethanolamine or benzoxazine dimer as an organic ligand. Palladium(II nitrate was consequently introduced to the preformed ceria materials using wetness impregnation while applying microwave irradiation to assist dispersion of the dopant. The palladium-impregnated ceria materials were obtained by calcination under reduced atmosphere of 10% H2 in He stream at 700°C for 2 h. Characterization of the palladium-impregnated ceria materials reveals the influences of the metal complex precursors on the properties of the obtained materials. Interestingly, the palladium-impregnated ceria prepared from the cerium(III-benzoxazine dimer complex revealed significantly higher BET specific surface area and higher content of the more active Pdδ+ (δ > 2 species than the materials prepared from cerium(III-triethanolamine complexes. Consequently, it exhibited the most efficient catalytic activity in the methane steam reforming reaction. By optimization of the metal complex precursors, characteristics of the obtained palladium-impregnated ceria catalysts can be modified and hence influence the catalytic activity.

  20. Effect of temperature on the decomposition of labile and recalcitrant organic matter in Chernozem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larioinova, Alla; Kvitkina, Anna; Bykhovets, Sergey; Stulin, Alexandr; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia

    2017-04-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the recalcitrant pool of soil organic matter (SOM) is more temperature sensitive to decomposition than the labile one. The hypothesis was verified for Chernozem soil sampled from the control (unfertilized) and fertilized with NPK experimental plots of the 50 year field experiment with maize monoculture in Voronezh Region, Russia (51o41'N, 39o15'E). The labile and recalcitrant SOM pools at 2, 12, and 22°C in a long-term (430 d) incubation experiment were traced using the method of 13C natural abundance by C3-C4 transition. Based on decomposition rate constants, the SOM pools followed the order plant residues < new (C4) SOM < old (C3) SOM, with plant residues as the most labile C pool. The hypothesis was valid only for the temperature interval of 12-22°C, where Q10 values increased in the recalcitrance order from 1.2 (plant residues) to 4.3 (C3 SOM). At low temperatures (2-12°C), the values of Q10 varied in the narrow range of 2.2-2.8 irrespective of a SOM pool. In the soil under maize monoculture fertilized with NPK, the increased decomposition of C3 SOM was observed compared to the unfertilized control. The input of new C4 carbon decreased the rate of CO2 emission during the decomposition of the old C3 SOM, i.e. induced negative priming effect (PE). To the contrast, the fertilization increased the positive PE for the C3 SOM. Along with the SOM decomposition rate constants, the magnitude of PE was also temperature dependent. The maximal negative PE in control treatment was found at the lowest temperature of 2oC, while the highest positive PE in NPK fertilized soil was observed at the highest temperature of 22oC.

  1. Fructose decomposition kinetics in organic acids-enriched high temperature liquid water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yinghua; Lu, Xiuyang; Yuan, Lei; Liu, Xin [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Zheda Road 38, Hangzhou 310027, Zhejiang (China)

    2009-09-15

    Biomass continues to be an important candidate as a renewable resource for energy, chemicals, and feedstock. Decomposition of biomass in high temperature liquid water is a promising technique for producing industrially important chemicals such as 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF), furfural, levulinic acid with high efficiency. Hexose, which is the hydrolysis product of cellulose, will be one of the most important starting chemicals in the coming society that is highly dependent on biomass. Taking fructose as a model compound, its decomposition kinetics in organic acids-enriched high temperature liquid water was studied in the temperature range from 180 C to 220 C under the pressure of 10 MPa to further improve reaction rate and selectivity of the decomposition reactions. The results showed that the reaction rate is greatly enhanced with the addition of organic acids, especially formic acid. The effects of temperature, residence time, organic acids and their concentrations on the conversion of fructose and yield of 5-HMF were investigated. The evaluated apparent activation energies of fructose decomposition are 126.8 {+-} 3.3 kJ mol{sup -1} without any catalyst, 112.0 {+-} 13.7 kJ mol{sup -1} catalyzed with formic acid, and 125.6 {+-} 3.8 kJ mol{sup -1} catalyzed with acetic acid, respectively, which shows no significant difference. (author)

  2. Quantitative structure—property relationship for thermal decomposition temperature of ionic liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gharagheizi, Farhad; Sattari, Mehdi; Ilani-Kashkouli, Poorandokht

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a wide literature survey has been conducted to gather an extensive set of thermal decomposition temperature (Td) data for ionic liquids (ILs). A data set consisting of Td data for 586 ILs was collated from 71 different literature sources. Using this data set, a reliable quantitativ...

  3. Differences in SOM decomposition and temperature sensitivity among soil aggregate size classes in a temperate grasslands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Wang, Dan; Wen, Xuefa; Yu, Guirui; He, Nianpeng; Wang, Rongfu

    2015-01-01

    The principle of enzyme kinetics suggests that the temperature sensitivity (Q10) of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition is inversely related to organic carbon (C) quality, i.e., the C quality-temperature (CQT) hypothesis. We tested this hypothesis by performing laboratory incubation experiments with bulk soil, macroaggregates (MA, 250-2000 μm), microaggregates (MI, 53-250 μm), and mineral fractions (MF, temperature and aggregate size significantly affected on SOM decomposition, with notable interactive effects (Ptemperature in the following order: MA>MF>bulk soil >MI(P classes (P temperature is closely associated withsoil aggregation and highlights the complex responses of ecosystem C budgets to future warming scenarios.

  4. On the high-temperature unimolecular decomposition of ethyl levulinate

    KAUST Repository

    Alabbad, Mohammed; Giri, Binod; Szőri, Milá n; Farooq, Aamir

    2016-01-01

    The pyrolysis of ethyl levulinate (EL) was studied behind reflected shock waves over the temperature range of 1015-1325K and pressures of 750-1650Torr. The reaction progress was followed by measuring ethylene mole fraction using CO2 gas laser absorption near 10.532 μm. The rate coefficients for the unimolecular dissociation of EL were extracted from the initial slope method and further ascertained by using a complete kinetic model. Our data exhibited no discernible pressure dependence under the current experimental conditions. To rationalize our results further, high-level quantum chemical and master equation calculations were employed to calculate the pressure- and temperature-dependence of the reaction. Our calculations revealed that unimolecular dissociation of EL involves simultaneous 1,5-hydrogen shift of the β-hydrogen to the carbonyl group, rupture of the O-C ester bond and formation of the π-bond (C α -C β ). Our results present evidences that the C2H4 elimination from EL occurs in a concerted manner. To our knowledge, this work represents the first experimental and theoretical study of the thermal unimolecular dissociation of ethyl levulinate. © 2016 The Combustion Institute.

  5. On the high-temperature unimolecular decomposition of ethyl levulinate

    KAUST Repository

    Alabbad, Mohammed

    2016-09-20

    The pyrolysis of ethyl levulinate (EL) was studied behind reflected shock waves over the temperature range of 1015-1325K and pressures of 750-1650Torr. The reaction progress was followed by measuring ethylene mole fraction using CO2 gas laser absorption near 10.532 μm. The rate coefficients for the unimolecular dissociation of EL were extracted from the initial slope method and further ascertained by using a complete kinetic model. Our data exhibited no discernible pressure dependence under the current experimental conditions. To rationalize our results further, high-level quantum chemical and master equation calculations were employed to calculate the pressure- and temperature-dependence of the reaction. Our calculations revealed that unimolecular dissociation of EL involves simultaneous 1,5-hydrogen shift of the β-hydrogen to the carbonyl group, rupture of the O-C ester bond and formation of the π-bond (C α -C β ). Our results present evidences that the C2H4 elimination from EL occurs in a concerted manner. To our knowledge, this work represents the first experimental and theoretical study of the thermal unimolecular dissociation of ethyl levulinate. © 2016 The Combustion Institute.

  6. Metallic substrates for high temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truchan, Thomas G.; Miller, Dean J.; Goretta, Kenneth C.; Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Foley, Robert

    2002-01-01

    A biaxially textured face-centered cubic metal article having grain boundaries with misorientation angles greater than about 8.degree. limited to less than about 1%. A laminate article is also disclosed having a metal substrate first rolled to at least about 95% thickness reduction followed by a first annealing at a temperature less than about 375.degree. C. Then a second rolling operation of not greater than about 6% thickness reduction is provided, followed by a second annealing at a temperature greater than about 400.degree. C. A method of forming the metal and laminate articles is also disclosed.

  7. Improved conductivity of infinite-layer LaNiO{sub 2} thin films by metal organic decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Ai [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Research Fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (Japan); Manabe, Takaaki [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Higashi 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan); Naito, Michio, E-mail: minaito@cc.tuat.ac.jp [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: •LaNiO{sub 2} films were synthesized by metal organic decomposition and topotactic reduction. •Room-temperature resistivity as low as 0.6 mΩ cm was achieved for infinite-layer LaNiO{sub 2}. •Lattice matched substrates are important in obtaining high conductivity. -- Abstract: Infinite-layer LaNiO{sub 2} thin films were synthesized by metal organic decomposition and subsequent topotactic reduction in hydrogen, and their transport properties were investigated. LaNiO{sub 2} is isostructural to SrCuO{sub 2}, the parent compound of high-T{sub c} Sr{sub 0.9}La{sub 0.1}CuO{sub 2} with T{sub c} = 44 K, and has 3d{sup 9} configuration, which is very rare in oxides but common to high-T{sub c} copper oxides. The bulk synthesis of LaNiO{sub 2} is not easy, but we demonstrate in this article that the thin-film synthesis of LaNiO{sub 2} is rather easy, thanks to a large-surface-to-volume ratio, which makes oxygen diffusion prompt. Our refined synthesis conditions produced highly conducting films of LaNiO{sub 2}. The resistivity of the best film is as low as 640 μΩ cm at 295 K and decreases with temperature down to 230 K but it shows a gradual upturn at lower temperatures.

  8. Thermodynamic analysis of trimethylgallium decomposition during GaN metal organic vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Kazuki; Shirakawa, Hiroki; Chokawa, Kenta; Araidai, Masaaki; Kangawa, Yoshihiro; Kakimoto, Koichi; Shiraishi, Kenji

    2018-04-01

    We analyzed the decomposition of Ga(CH3)3 (TMG) during the metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) of GaN on the basis of first-principles calculations and thermodynamic analysis. We performed activation energy calculations of TMG decomposition and determined the main reaction processes of TMG during GaN MOVPE. We found that TMG reacts with the H2 carrier gas and that (CH3)2GaH is generated after the desorption of the methyl group. Next, (CH3)2GaH decomposes into (CH3)GaH2 and this decomposes into GaH3. Finally, GaH3 becomes GaH. In the MOVPE growth of GaN, TMG decomposes into GaH by the successive desorption of its methyl groups. The results presented here concur with recent high-resolution mass spectroscopy results.

  9. Low temperature dissolution flowsheet for plutonium metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, W. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Almond, P. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Rudisill, T. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-05-01

    The H-Canyon flowsheet used to dissolve Pu metal for PuO2 production utilizes boiling HNO3. SRNL was requested to develop a complementary dissolution flowsheet at two reduced temperature ranges. The dissolution and H2 generation rates of Pu metal were investigated using a dissolving solution at ambient temperature (20-30 °C) and for an intermediate temperature of 50-60 °C. Additionally, the testing included an investigation of the dissolution rates and characterization of the off-gas generated from the ambient temperature dissolution of carbon steel cans and the nylon bags that contain the Pu metal when charged to the dissolver.

  10. Decomposition and particle release of a carbon nanotube/epoxy nanocomposite at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlagenhauf, Lukas [Empa - Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Functional Polymers (Switzerland); Kuo, Yu-Ying; Bahk, Yeon Kyoung [Empa - Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Advanced Analytical Technologies (Switzerland); Nüesch, Frank [Empa - Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Functional Polymers (Switzerland); Wang, Jing, E-mail: Jing.Wang@ifu.baug.ethz.ch [Empa - Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Advanced Analytical Technologies (Switzerland)

    2015-11-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as fillers in nanocomposites have attracted significant attention, and one of the applications is to use the CNTs as flame retardants. For such nanocomposites, possible release of CNTs at elevated temperatures after decomposition of the polymer matrix poses potential health threats. We investigated the airborne particle release from a decomposing multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/epoxy nanocomposite in order to measure a possible release of MWCNTs. An experimental set-up was established that allows decomposing the samples in a furnace by exposure to increasing temperatures at a constant heating rate and under ambient air or nitrogen atmosphere. The particle analysis was performed by aerosol measurement devices and by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of collected particles. Further, by the application of a thermal denuder, it was also possible to measure non-volatile particles only. Characterization of the tested samples and the decomposition kinetics were determined by the usage of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The particle release of different samples was investigated, of a neat epoxy, nanocomposites with 0.1 and 1 wt% MWCNTs, and nanocomposites with functionalized MWCNTs. The results showed that the added MWCNTs had little effect on the decomposition kinetics of the investigated samples, but the weight of the remaining residues after decomposition was influenced significantly. The measurements with decomposition in different atmospheres showed a release of a higher number of particles at temperatures below 300 °C when air was used. Analysis of collected particles by TEM revealed that no detectable amount of MWCNTs was released, but micrometer-sized fibrous particles were collected.

  11. Decomposition and particle release of a carbon nanotube/epoxy nanocomposite at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlagenhauf, Lukas; Kuo, Yu-Ying; Bahk, Yeon Kyoung; Nüesch, Frank; Wang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as fillers in nanocomposites have attracted significant attention, and one of the applications is to use the CNTs as flame retardants. For such nanocomposites, possible release of CNTs at elevated temperatures after decomposition of the polymer matrix poses potential health threats. We investigated the airborne particle release from a decomposing multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/epoxy nanocomposite in order to measure a possible release of MWCNTs. An experimental set-up was established that allows decomposing the samples in a furnace by exposure to increasing temperatures at a constant heating rate and under ambient air or nitrogen atmosphere. The particle analysis was performed by aerosol measurement devices and by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of collected particles. Further, by the application of a thermal denuder, it was also possible to measure non-volatile particles only. Characterization of the tested samples and the decomposition kinetics were determined by the usage of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The particle release of different samples was investigated, of a neat epoxy, nanocomposites with 0.1 and 1 wt% MWCNTs, and nanocomposites with functionalized MWCNTs. The results showed that the added MWCNTs had little effect on the decomposition kinetics of the investigated samples, but the weight of the remaining residues after decomposition was influenced significantly. The measurements with decomposition in different atmospheres showed a release of a higher number of particles at temperatures below 300 °C when air was used. Analysis of collected particles by TEM revealed that no detectable amount of MWCNTs was released, but micrometer-sized fibrous particles were collected

  12. Decomposition and particle release of a carbon nanotube/epoxy nanocomposite at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlagenhauf, Lukas; Kuo, Yu-Ying; Bahk, Yeon Kyoung; Nüesch, Frank; Wang, Jing

    2015-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as fillers in nanocomposites have attracted significant attention, and one of the applications is to use the CNTs as flame retardants. For such nanocomposites, possible release of CNTs at elevated temperatures after decomposition of the polymer matrix poses potential health threats. We investigated the airborne particle release from a decomposing multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/epoxy nanocomposite in order to measure a possible release of MWCNTs. An experimental set-up was established that allows decomposing the samples in a furnace by exposure to increasing temperatures at a constant heating rate and under ambient air or nitrogen atmosphere. The particle analysis was performed by aerosol measurement devices and by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of collected particles. Further, by the application of a thermal denuder, it was also possible to measure non-volatile particles only. Characterization of the tested samples and the decomposition kinetics were determined by the usage of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The particle release of different samples was investigated, of a neat epoxy, nanocomposites with 0.1 and 1 wt% MWCNTs, and nanocomposites with functionalized MWCNTs. The results showed that the added MWCNTs had little effect on the decomposition kinetics of the investigated samples, but the weight of the remaining residues after decomposition was influenced significantly. The measurements with decomposition in different atmospheres showed a release of a higher number of particles at temperatures below 300 °C when air was used. Analysis of collected particles by TEM revealed that no detectable amount of MWCNTs was released, but micrometer-sized fibrous particles were collected.

  13. A review of plutonium oxalate decomposition reactions and effects of decomposition temperature on the surface area of the plutonium dioxide product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orr, R.M.; Sims, H.E.; Taylor, R.J.

    2015-01-01

    Plutonium (IV) and (III) ions in nitric acid solution readily form insoluble precipitates with oxalic acid. The plutonium oxalates are then easily thermally decomposed to form plutonium dioxide powder. This simple process forms the basis of current industrial conversion or ‘finishing’ processes that are used in commercial scale reprocessing plants. It is also widely used in analytical or laboratory scale operations and for waste residues treatment. However, the mechanisms of the thermal decompositions in both air and inert atmospheres have been the subject of various studies over several decades. The nature of intermediate phases is of fundamental interest whilst understanding the evolution of gases at different temperatures is relevant to process control. The thermal decomposition is also used to control a number of powder properties of the PuO_2 product that are important to either long term storage or mixed oxide fuel manufacturing. These properties are the surface area, residual carbon impurities and adsorbed volatile species whereas the morphology and particle size distribution are functions of the precipitation process. Available data and experience regarding the thermal and radiation-induced decompositions of plutonium oxalate to oxide are reviewed. The mechanisms of the thermal decompositions are considered with a particular focus on the likely redox chemistry involved. Also, whilst it is well known that the surface area is dependent on calcination temperature, there is a wide variation in the published data and so new correlations have been derived. Better understanding of plutonium (III) and (IV) oxalate decompositions will assist the development of more proliferation resistant actinide co-conversion processes that are needed for advanced reprocessing in future closed nuclear fuel cycles. - Highlights: • Critical review of plutonium oxalate decomposition reactions. • New analysis of relationship between SSA and calcination temperature. • New SEM

  14. A review of plutonium oxalate decomposition reactions and effects of decomposition temperature on the surface area of the plutonium dioxide product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orr, R.M.; Sims, H.E.; Taylor, R.J., E-mail: robin.j.taylor@nnl.co.uk

    2015-10-15

    Plutonium (IV) and (III) ions in nitric acid solution readily form insoluble precipitates with oxalic acid. The plutonium oxalates are then easily thermally decomposed to form plutonium dioxide powder. This simple process forms the basis of current industrial conversion or ‘finishing’ processes that are used in commercial scale reprocessing plants. It is also widely used in analytical or laboratory scale operations and for waste residues treatment. However, the mechanisms of the thermal decompositions in both air and inert atmospheres have been the subject of various studies over several decades. The nature of intermediate phases is of fundamental interest whilst understanding the evolution of gases at different temperatures is relevant to process control. The thermal decomposition is also used to control a number of powder properties of the PuO{sub 2} product that are important to either long term storage or mixed oxide fuel manufacturing. These properties are the surface area, residual carbon impurities and adsorbed volatile species whereas the morphology and particle size distribution are functions of the precipitation process. Available data and experience regarding the thermal and radiation-induced decompositions of plutonium oxalate to oxide are reviewed. The mechanisms of the thermal decompositions are considered with a particular focus on the likely redox chemistry involved. Also, whilst it is well known that the surface area is dependent on calcination temperature, there is a wide variation in the published data and so new correlations have been derived. Better understanding of plutonium (III) and (IV) oxalate decompositions will assist the development of more proliferation resistant actinide co-conversion processes that are needed for advanced reprocessing in future closed nuclear fuel cycles. - Highlights: • Critical review of plutonium oxalate decomposition reactions. • New analysis of relationship between SSA and calcination temperature.

  15. Temperature and Pressure Depences on the Isotopic Fractionation Effect in the Thermal Decomposition of Ozone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Ju Kim

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available To understand the mass-independent isotopic fractionation effects, thermal decomposition of ozone was performed. Initial oxygen gas was converted to ozone completely. Then, the ozone was decomposed to oxygen at various temperatures(30~150C. Isotopic compositions of product oxygen and residual ozone were measured using a stable isotope mass spectrometer. The experimental results were compared with the studies which were peformed at the similar conditions. From the raw experimental data, the functions of the instantaneous fractionation factors were calculated by the least square fit. The results clearly showed the temperature dependence. They also showed the pressure dependence and the surface effect. This study may play an important role in the study of ozone decomposition mechanism. It can be applied to explain the mass-independent isotopic pattern found in stratospheric ozone and in meteorites.

  16. Room-Temperature Synthesis of Transition Metal Clusters and Main Group Polycations from Ionic Liquids

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Ejaz

    2011-01-01

    Main group polycations and transition metal clusters had traditionally been synthesized via high-temperature routes by performing reactions in melts or by CTR, at room-temperature or lower temperature by using so-called superacid solvents, and at room-temperature in benzene–GaX3 media. Considering the major problems associated with higher temperature routes (e.g. long annealing time, risk of product decomposition, and low yield) and taking into account the toxicity of benzene and liquid SO2 i...

  17. High temperature performance and stability of Fe-FER catalyst for N2O decomposition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sádovská, Galina; Tabor, Edyta; Sazama, Petr; Lhotka, M.; Bernauer, M.; Sobalík, Zdeněk

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 89, JAN 2017 (2017), s. 133-137 ISSN 1566-7367 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-10251S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015073 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : High temperature N2O decomposition * FER * Iron Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 3.330, year: 2016

  18. On the Structure Sensitivity of Direct NO Decomposition over Low-Index Transition Metal Facets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falsig, Hanne; Shen, Juan; Khan, Tuhin Suvra

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of the dissociative chemisorption of NO, O2, and N2 over close-packed, stepped, kinked, and open (fcc {111}, {211}, {311}, {532}, {100}, and {110}) transition metal facets using density functional theory (DFT). The offset of the Bronsted-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) relations suggest......} rate. The ordering of the maximum activity over the facets is: {110} > {100} similar to {532} > {311} similar to {211} > {111}, which is in general agreement with the offset in the BEP relations. We show that the top-point location and shape of the volcano relations are approximately independent...... for generally obtaining quantitative agreement between theory and experiments is for the simulations to address in detail the propensities of the various types of active sites. Finally, we show that the ordering of NO decomposition rates among metals and facets is essentially unaltered when using BEP...

  19. Elevated temperature erosive wear of metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Manish

    2006-01-01

    Solid particle erosion of metals and alloys at elevated temperature is governed by the nature of the interaction between erosion and oxidation, which, in turn, is determined by the thickness, pliability, morphology, adhesion characteristics and toughness of the oxide scale. The main objective of this paper is to critically review the present state of understanding of the elevated temperature erosion behaviour of metals and alloys. First of all, the erosion testing at elevated temperature is reviewed. This is followed by discussion of the essential features of elevated temperature erosion with special emphasis on microscopic observation, giving details of the erosion-oxidation (E-O) interaction mechanisms. The E-O interaction has been elaborated in the subsequent section. The E-O interaction includes E-O maps, analysis of transition criteria from one erosion mechanism to another mechanism and quantification of enhanced oxidation kinetics during erosion. Finally, the relevant areas for future studies are indicated. (topical review)

  20. Study of 'liquid gold' coatings: Thermal decomposition and formation of metallic thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deram, V.; Turrell, S.; Darque-Ceretti, E.; Aucouturier, M.

    2006-01-01

    Organo-metallic solutions called liquid gold are largely used to obtain thin gilded films which are employed for decorative, technological and functional uses. However, these films often prove to be fragile with respect to use, resulting in loss of brilliance or even eventual film removal. An understanding of the behaviour of the layers requires good knowledge of the materials themselves. The present work was undertaken to better understand the evolution of the structural properties of liquid gold as it undergoes heat-processing. Accordingly, we followed the thermal decomposition processes of liquid gold coatings and the formation of the gilded metal layer using a combination of experimental techniques. First, thermal analyses coupled with mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy gave information concerning the decomposition of the organic medium. It has been found that the process of film formation can be decomposed into three steps, the second of which is an abrupt transition between 300 and 350 deg. C. Details on this transition have been obtained using real-time X-ray Diffraction and Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry. Above 350 deg. C, the microstructure of the coating is reorganized to obtain a final layer which contains particles, of the size of a few hundreds nanometers, as shown by Transmission Electron Microscopy

  1. Linking temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition to its molecular structure, accessibility, and microbial physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagai, Rota; Kishimoto-Mo, Ayaka W; Yonemura, Seiichiro; Shirato, Yasuhito; Hiradate, Syuntaro; Yagasaki, Yasumi

    2013-04-01

    Temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition may have a significant impact on global warming. Enzyme-kinetic hypothesis suggests that decomposition of low-quality substrate (recalcitrant molecular structure) requires higher activation energy and thus has greater temperature sensitivity than that of high-quality, labile substrate. Supporting evidence, however, relies largely on indirect indices of substrate quality. Furthermore, the enzyme-substrate reactions that drive decomposition may be regulated by microbial physiology and/or constrained by protective effects of soil mineral matrix. We thus tested the kinetic hypothesis by directly assessing the carbon molecular structure of low-density fraction (LF) which represents readily accessible, mineral-free SOM pool. Using five mineral soil samples of contrasting SOM concentrations, we conducted 30-days incubations (15, 25, and 35 °C) to measure microbial respiration and quantified easily soluble C as well as microbial biomass C pools before and after the incubations. Carbon structure of LFs (soil was measured by solid-state (13) C-NMR. Decomposition Q10 was significantly correlated with the abundance of aromatic plus alkyl-C relative to O-alkyl-C groups in LFs but not in bulk soil fraction or with the indirect C quality indices based on microbial respiration or biomass. The warming did not significantly change the concentration of biomass C or the three types of soluble C despite two- to three-fold increase in respiration. Thus, enhanced microbial maintenance respiration (reduced C-use efficiency) especially in the soils rich in recalcitrant LF might lead to the apparent equilibrium between SOM solubilization and microbial C uptake. Our results showed physical fractionation coupled with direct assessment of molecular structure as an effective approach and supported the enzyme-kinetic interpretation of widely observed C quality-temperature relationship for short-term decomposition. Factors

  2. The effects of moisture on LiD single crystals studied by temperature-programmed decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinh, L.N.; Cecala, C.M.; Leckey, J.H.; Balooch, M.

    2001-01-01

    Temperature-programmed decomposition (TPD) technique was performed on LiOH powders and LiD single crystals previously exposed to different moisture levels. Our results show that the LiOH decomposition process is rate-limited by an inward moving reaction front mechanism with an activation energy barrier of ∼122-149 kJ/mol. The LiOH structure is stable even if kept at 320 K. However, LiOH structures formed on the surface of LiD single crystals during moisture exposure at low dosages may have multiple activation energy barriers, some of which may be much lower than 122 kJ/mol. The rate-limiting mechanism for the decomposition of LiOH structures with reduced activation energy barriers is consistent with a unimolecular nucleation model. We attribute the lowering of the activation energy barrier for the LiOH decomposition to the existence of sub-stoichiometric Li(OH) x with x 2 O formation is observed. The release of H 2 O molecules from LiOH · H 2 O structure has small activation energy barriers in the range of 48-69 kJ/mol and follows a unimolecular nucleation process. The loosely bonded H 2 O molecules in the LiOH · H 2 O structure can be easily pumped away at room temperature in a reasonable amount of time. Our experiments also suggest that handling LiD single crystals at an elevated temperature of 340 K or more reduces the growth rate of LiOH and LiOH · H 2 O significantly

  3. Inflammatory pseudotumor causing deep vein thrombosis after metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasty.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Memon, Adeel Rasool

    2013-01-01

    Metal-on-metal hip resurfacings have recently been associated with a variety of complications resulting from adverse reaction to metal debris. We report a case of extensive soft tissue necrosis associated with a huge pelvic mass causing extensive deep vein thrombosis of the lower limb secondary to mechanical compression of the iliac vein. This is a rare and unusual cause of deep vein thrombosis after metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasty.

  4. Er2O3 coating development and improvisation by metal oxide decomposition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rayjada, Pratipalsinh A.; Sircar, Amit; Raole, Prakash M.; Rahman, Raseel; Manocha, Lalit M.

    2015-01-01

    Compact, highly resistive and chemically as well as physically stable ceramic coatings are going to play vital role in successful and safe exploitation of tritium breeding and recovery system in the future fusion reactors. Due to its stability and high resistivity, Er 2 O 3 was initially studied for resistive coating application to mitigate Magneto Hydro Dynamic (MHD) forces in liquid Li cooled blanket concept. Subsequently, its excellence as tritium permeation barrier (TPB) was also revealed. Ever since, there is a continual thrust on studying its relevant properties and application methods among the fusion technology and materials community. Metal Oxide Decomposition is a chemical method of coating development. One of the major advantages of this process over most of the others is its simplicity and ability to coat complex structures swiftly. The component is dipped into a liquid solution of the Er 2 O 3 and subsequently withdrawn at an optimized constant speed, so as to leave a uniform wet layer on the surface. This can be repeated multiple times after drying the surface to obtain the required thickness. Subsequently, the component is heat treated to obtain crystalline uniform Er 2 O 3 coating over it. However, the porosity of the coatings and substrate oxidation are the challenges for in MOD method. We successfully develop Er 2 O 3 coating in cubic crystalline phase on P91 steel and fused silica substrates using 3 wt% erbium carboxylic acid solution in a solvent containing 50.5 wt% turpentine, 25.5 wt% n-butyl acetate, 8.4 wt% ethyl acetate, a stabilizer, and a viscosity adjustor. A dip coating system equipped with 800 C quartz tube furnace was used to prepare these coatings. The withdrawal speed was chosen as 72 mm/min from the literature survey. The crystallization and microstructure are studied as functions of heat treatment temperature in the range of 500-700 C. We also try to improvise the uniform coverage and porosity of the coating by altering the

  5. Influence of Temperature and Catalyst on the Decomposition of Potassium Chlorate in a Simple DTA-Apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiederholt, Erwin

    1983-01-01

    DTA is a technique in which the temperature difference between sample/reference is measured as a function of temperature, while both are subject to a controlled temperature program. Use of a simple DTA-apparatus in demonstrating catalytic effects of manganese dioxide and aluminum oxide on decomposition temperature of potassium chlorate is…

  6. Thermal decomposition of agardites (REE) - relationship between dehydroxylation temperature and electronegativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, Ray L.; Erickson, Kristy L.; Weier, Matt L.; McKinnon, Adam R.; Williams, Peter A.; Leverett, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of a suite of synthetic agardites of formula ACu 6 (AsO 4 ) 2 (OH) 6 ·3H 2 O where A is given by a rare earth element has been studied using thermogravimetric analysis techniques. Dehydration of the agardites occurs at low temperatures and over an extended temperature range from ambient to around 60 deg. C. This loss of water is attributed to the loss of zeolitic water. The mass loss of water indicates 3 mol of zeolitic water in the structure. Dehydroxylation occurs in steps over a wide range of temperatures from 235 to 456 deg. C. The mass loss during dehydroxylation shows the number of moles of hydroxyl units is six. There is a linear relationship between the first dehydroxylation temperature and the electronegativity of the agardites (REE)

  7. Controlled metal nitrate decomposition for the preparation of supported metal Catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, M.

    2010-01-01

    High surface area supported metal (oxide) catalysts are essential for the production of fuels, chemicals, pharmaceuticals and the abatement of environmental pollution. Impregnation of high surface area supports, often silica or alumina, followed by drying, calcination and reduction is one of the

  8. Direct observation and quantification of nanoscale spinodal decomposition in super duplex stainless steel weld metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariq, Ahmed; Hättestrand, Mats; Nilsson, Jan-Olof; Gregori, Andrea

    2009-06-01

    Three variants of super duplex stainless steel weld metals with the basic composition 29Cr-8Ni-2Mo (wt%) were investigated. The nitrogen content of the three materials was 0.22%, 0.33% and 0.37%, respectively. Isothermal heat treatments were performed at 450 degrees C for times up to 243 h. The hardness evolution of the three materials was found to vary with the overall concentration of the nitrogen. Atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM) was used to directly detect and quantify the degree of spinodal decomposition in different material conditions. 3-DAP atomic reconstruction clearly illustrate nanoscale variation of iron rich (alpha) and chromium rich (alpha') phases. A longer ageing time produces a coarser microstructure with larger alpha and alpha' domains. Statistical evaluation of APFIM data showed that phase separation was significant already after 1 h of ageing that gradually became more pronounced. Although nanoscale concentration variation was evident, no significant influence of overall nitrogen content on the degree of spinodal decomposition was found.

  9. The Sabatier Principle Illustrated by Catalytic H2O2 Decomposition on Metal Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Anders Bo; Man, Isabela Costinela; Trinhammer, Ole

    2011-01-01

    Heterogeneous catalysis is important in today’s industry. Hence, it is imperative to introduce students to this field and its tools. A new way of introducing one of these tools, the Sabatier principle, via a laboratory exercise is presented. A volcano plot is constructed for the well-known hetero......Heterogeneous catalysis is important in today’s industry. Hence, it is imperative to introduce students to this field and its tools. A new way of introducing one of these tools, the Sabatier principle, via a laboratory exercise is presented. A volcano plot is constructed for the well......-known heterogeneous H2O2 catalytic decomposition reaction on various metal foils. The activity per catalyst surface area versus the computationally calculated binding energy of OH groups on the catalysts is plotted. The OH group is identified as the only surface intermediate in an intuitive reaction mechanism...

  10. Metallic Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen Separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Y.H.; Catalano, Jacopo; Guazzone, Federico

    2013-01-01

    membrane fabrication methods have matured over the last decades, and the deposition of very thin films (1–5 µm) of Pd over porous ceramics or modified porous metal supports is quite common. The H2 permeances and the selectivities achieved at 400–500 °C were in the order of 50–100 Nm3/m/h/bar0.5 and greater......Composite palladium membranes have extensively been studied in laboratories and, more recently, in small pilot industrial applications for the high temperature separation of hydrogen from reactant mixtures such as water-gas shift (WGS) reaction or methane steam reforming (MSR). Composite Pd...... than 1000, respectively. This chapter describes in detail composite Pd-based membrane preparation methods, which consist of the grading of the support and the deposition of the dense metal layer, their performances, and their applications in catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs) at high temperatures (400...

  11. Refractiry metal monocrystals in high temperature thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuritnyk, I.P.

    1988-01-01

    The regularities of changes in thermoelectric properties of refractory metals in a wide temperature range (300-2300 K) depending on their structural state and impurities, are generalized. It is found that the main reasons for changes in thermo-e.m.f. of refractory metals during their operation in various media are diffusion processes and local microvoltages appearing in nonhomogeneous thermoelectrodes. It is shown that microstructure formation and control of impurities in thermometric materials permit to improve considerably the metrologic parameters of thermal transformers. Tungsten and molybdenum with monocrystalline structure with their high stability of properties, easy to manufacture and opening new possibilities in high-temperature contact measurement are used in thermometry for the first time

  12. Sensitivity of decomposition rates of soil organic matter with respect to simultaneous changes in temperature and moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Carlos A.; Trumbore, Susan E.; Davidson, Eric A.; Vicca, Sara; Janssens, I.

    2015-03-01

    The sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition to global environmental change is a topic of prominent relevance for the global carbon cycle. Decomposition depends on multiple factors that are being altered simultaneously as a result of global environmental change; therefore, it is important to study the sensitivity of the rates of soil organic matter decomposition with respect to multiple and interacting drivers. In this manuscript, we present an analysis of the potential response of decomposition rates to simultaneous changes in temperature and moisture. To address this problem, we first present a theoretical framework to study the sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition when multiple driving factors change simultaneously. We then apply this framework to models and data at different levels of abstraction: (1) to a mechanistic model that addresses the limitation of enzyme activity by simultaneous effects of temperature and soil water content, the latter controlling substrate supply and oxygen concentration for microbial activity; (2) to different mathematical functions used to represent temperature and moisture effects on decomposition in biogeochemical models. To contrast model predictions at these two levels of organization, we compiled different data sets of observed responses in field and laboratory studies. Then we applied our conceptual framework to: (3) observations of heterotrophic respiration at the ecosystem level; (4) laboratory experiments looking at the response of heterotrophic respiration to independent changes in moisture and temperature; and (5) ecosystem-level experiments manipulating soil temperature and water content simultaneously.

  13. A study of the decomposition of silver permanganate at high temperatures with an x-ray diffractometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Witt, B.

    1978-12-01

    A study is made of the thermal decay products of silver permanganate at temperatures between 100 degrees Celsius and 800 degrees Celsius. Previous studies have shown that silver permanganate and the decomposition of silver permanganate decay into an amorphous product and remains in that state until the temperature is higher than 350 degrees Celsius. The amorphous phase is tested at different temperatures

  14. Differences in SOM decomposition and temperature sensitivity among soil aggregate size classes in a temperate grasslands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Wang

    Full Text Available The principle of enzyme kinetics suggests that the temperature sensitivity (Q10 of soil organic matter (SOM decomposition is inversely related to organic carbon (C quality, i.e., the C quality-temperature (CQT hypothesis. We tested this hypothesis by performing laboratory incubation experiments with bulk soil, macroaggregates (MA, 250-2000 μm, microaggregates (MI, 53-250 μm, and mineral fractions (MF, MF>bulk soil >MI(P <0.05. The Q10 values were highest for MA, followed (in decreasing order by bulk soil, MF, and MI. Similarly, the activation energies (Ea for MA, bulk soil, MF, and MI were 48.47, 33.26, 27.01, and 23.18 KJ mol-1, respectively. The observed significant negative correlations between Q10 and C quality index in bulk soil and soil aggregates (P<0.05 suggested that the CQT hypothesis is applicable to soil aggregates. Cumulative C emission differed significantly among aggregate size classes (P <0.0001, with the largest values occurring in MA (1101 μg g-1, followed by MF (976 μg g-1 and MI (879 μg g-1. These findings suggest that feedback from SOM decomposition in response to changing temperature is closely associated withsoil aggregation and highlights the complex responses of ecosystem C budgets to future warming scenarios.

  15. Surfactant controlled low-temperature thermal decomposition route to zinc oxide nanorods from zinc(II) acetylacetonate monohydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purkayastha, Debraj Dhar; Sarma, Bedabrat; Bhattacharjee, Chira R., E-mail: crbhattacharjee@rediffmail.com

    2014-10-15

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods were synthesized via a low-temperature thermal decomposition of zinc(II) acetylacetonate monohydrate, [Zn(C{sub 5}H{sub 7}O{sub 2}){sub 2}].H{sub 2}O. A relatively inexpensive surfactant, octadecylamine (C{sub 18}H{sub 37}NH{sub 2}) served both as a reaction solvent and a capping agent during the synthesis of ZnO nanorods. The synthesized nanorods were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), FT-IR, UV–visible, and photoluminescence (PL) studies. The XRD spectrum furnished evidence for the hexagonal wurtzite structure of ZnO. TEM images revealed the material to be rod shaped having diameter 30 nm and length 200 nm. The HRTEM image showed that the lattice fringes between the two adjacent planes are 0.244 nm apart, which corresponds to the interplanar separation of the (1 0 1) plane of hexagonal ZnO. The electron diffraction (ED) pattern confirmed the single crystalline nature of the nanorods. The PL spectrum showed two UV emissions at 356 nm (∼3.48 eV) and 382 nm (∼3.25 eV). ZnO nanorods also showed very weak blue bands at 445, 453 and 470 nm. - Highlights: Low temperature thermal decomposition of zinc(II) acetylacetonate monohydrate gave zinc oxide nanorods. Powder XRD showed hexagonal wurtzite structure of ZnO having average diameter about 24 nm. TEM images revealed the material to be of rod shape having diameter 30 nm and length 200 nm. ZnO showed band gap luminescence at 356 nm, excitonic emission at 382 nm and defect related blue bands. The synthesis is simple and can act as a paradigm for obtaining various metal oxide nanomaterials.

  16. Improved conductivity of infinite-layer LaNiO2 thin films by metal organic decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Ai; Manabe, Takaaki; Naito, Michio

    2013-12-01

    Infinite-layer LaNiO2 thin films were synthesized by metal organic decomposition and subsequent topotactic reduction in hydrogen, and their transport properties were investigated. LaNiO2 is isostructural to SrCuO2, the parent compound of high-Tc Sr0.9La0.1CuO2 with Tc = 44 K, and has 3d9 configuration, which is very rare in oxides but common to high-Tc copper oxides. The bulk synthesis of LaNiO2 is not easy, but we demonstrate in this article that the thin-film synthesis of LaNiO2 is rather easy, thanks to a large-surface-to-volume ratio, which makes oxygen diffusion prompt. Our refined synthesis conditions produced highly conducting films of LaNiO2. The resistivity of the best film is as low as 640 μΩ cm at 295 K and decreases with temperature down to 230 K but it shows a gradual upturn at lower temperatures.

  17. Synthesis of multi-layer graphene and multi-wall carbon nanotubes from direct decomposition of ethanol by microwave plasma without using metal catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rincón, R; Melero, C; Jiménez, M; Calzada, M D

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of nanostructured carbon materials by using microwave plasmas at atmospheric pressure is presented. This technique involves only one step and without any other supplementary chemical process or metal catalyst. Multi-layer graphene, multi-wall carbon nananotubes and H 2 were obtained by the plasma after ethanol decomposition. Strong emissions of both C 2 molecular bands and C carbon were emitted by the plasma during the process. Futhermore, plasma parameters were studied. Our research shows that both C 2 radicals and high gas temperatures (>3000 K) are required for the synthesis of these materials, which contribute to the understanding of materials synthesis by plasma processes. (fast track communication)

  18. A review of plutonium oxalate decomposition reactions and effects of decomposition temperature on the surface area of the plutonium dioxide product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, R. M.; Sims, H. E.; Taylor, R. J.

    2015-10-01

    Plutonium (IV) and (III) ions in nitric acid solution readily form insoluble precipitates with oxalic acid. The plutonium oxalates are then easily thermally decomposed to form plutonium dioxide powder. This simple process forms the basis of current industrial conversion or 'finishing' processes that are used in commercial scale reprocessing plants. It is also widely used in analytical or laboratory scale operations and for waste residues treatment. However, the mechanisms of the thermal decompositions in both air and inert atmospheres have been the subject of various studies over several decades. The nature of intermediate phases is of fundamental interest whilst understanding the evolution of gases at different temperatures is relevant to process control. The thermal decomposition is also used to control a number of powder properties of the PuO2 product that are important to either long term storage or mixed oxide fuel manufacturing. These properties are the surface area, residual carbon impurities and adsorbed volatile species whereas the morphology and particle size distribution are functions of the precipitation process. Available data and experience regarding the thermal and radiation-induced decompositions of plutonium oxalate to oxide are reviewed. The mechanisms of the thermal decompositions are considered with a particular focus on the likely redox chemistry involved. Also, whilst it is well known that the surface area is dependent on calcination temperature, there is a wide variation in the published data and so new correlations have been derived. Better understanding of plutonium (III) and (IV) oxalate decompositions will assist the development of more proliferation resistant actinide co-conversion processes that are needed for advanced reprocessing in future closed nuclear fuel cycles.

  19. Empirical Mode Decomposition on the sphere: application to the spatial scales of surface temperature variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Fauchereau

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD is applied here in two dimensions over the sphere to demonstrate its potential as a data-adaptive method of separating the different scales of spatial variability in a geophysical (climatological/meteorological field. After a brief description of the basics of the EMD in 1 then 2 dimensions, the principles of its application on the sphere are explained, in particular via the use of a zonal equal area partitioning. EMD is first applied to an artificial dataset, demonstrating its capability in extracting the different (known scales embedded in the field. The decomposition is then applied to a global mean surface temperature dataset, and we show qualitatively that it extracts successively larger scales of temperature variations related, for example, to topographic and large-scale, solar radiation forcing. We propose that EMD can be used as a global data-adaptive filter, which will be useful in analysing geophysical phenomena that arise as the result of forcings at multiple spatial scales.

  20. Synthesis of nanocrystalline ceria thin films by low-temperature thermal decomposition of Ce-propionate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roura, P.; Farjas, J.; Ricart, S.; Aklalouch, M.; Guzman, R.; Arbiol, J.; Puig, T.; Calleja, A.; Peña-Rodríguez, O.; Garriga, M.; Obradors, X.

    2012-01-01

    Thin films of Ce-propionate (thickness below 20 nm) have been deposited by spin coating and pyrolysed into ceria at temperatures below 200 °C. After 1 h of thermal treatment, no signature of the vibrational modes of Ce-propionate is detected by infrared spectroscopy, indicating that decomposition has been completed. The resulting ceria films are nanocrystalline as revealed by X-ray diffraction (average grain size of 2–2.5 nm) and confirmed by microscopy. They are transparent in the visible region and show the characteristic band gap absorption below 400 nm. A direct band gap energy of 3.50 ± 0.05 eV has been deduced irrespective of the pyrolysis temperature (160, 180 and 200 °C).

  1. Strength versus temperature anomalies in metals

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, D J

    2015-01-01

    Perhaps the best-known aspect of the behavior of metals, and indeed of most materials, is that they weaken with temperature. This weakening is however a problem in some applications. Only tungsten for instance, with its naturally high melting-point, was suitable for the manufacture of the filaments of incandescent light-bulbs. Even then, it was necessary to add oxide particles having a yethigher melting-point in order to prevent the weakening effect of grain-growth. These are alloys however which can be said to be weakened by heat, but nevertheless 'hang on' to enough strength to perform their

  2. Room temperature creep in metals and alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deibler, Lisa Anne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Materials Characterization and Performance

    2014-09-01

    Time dependent deformation in the form of creep and stress relaxation is not often considered a factor when designing structural alloy parts for use at room temperature. However, creep and stress relaxation do occur at room temperature (0.09-0.21 Tm for alloys in this report) in structural alloys. This report will summarize the available literature on room temperature creep, present creep data collected on various structural alloys, and finally compare the acquired data to equations used in the literature to model creep behavior. Based on evidence from the literature and fitting of various equations, the mechanism which causes room temperature creep is found to include dislocation generation as well as exhaustion.

  3. Ozone decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batakliev Todor

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic ozone decomposition is of great significance because ozone is a toxic substance commonly found or generated in human environments (aircraft cabins, offices with photocopiers, laser printers, sterilizers. Considerable work has been done on ozone decomposition reported in the literature. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the literature, concentrating on analysis of the physico-chemical properties, synthesis and catalytic decomposition of ozone. This is supplemented by a review on kinetics and catalyst characterization which ties together the previously reported results. Noble metals and oxides of transition metals have been found to be the most active substances for ozone decomposition. The high price of precious metals stimulated the use of metal oxide catalysts and particularly the catalysts based on manganese oxide. It has been determined that the kinetics of ozone decomposition is of first order importance. A mechanism of the reaction of catalytic ozone decomposition is discussed, based on detailed spectroscopic investigations of the catalytic surface, showing the existence of peroxide and superoxide surface intermediates

  4. Ozone decomposition on Ag/SiO2 and Ag/clinoptilolite catalysts at ambient temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolov, Penko; Genov, Krassimir; Konova, Petya; Milenova, Katya; Batakliev, Todor; Georgiev, Vladimir; Kumar, Narendra; Sarker, Dipak K.; Pishev, Dimitar; Rakovsky, Slavcho

    2010-01-01

    Silver modified zeolite (Bulgarian natural clinoptilolite) and Ag/silica catalysts were synthesized by ion exchange and incipient wet impregnation method respectively and characterized by different techniques. DC arc-AES was used for Ag detection. XRD spectra show that Ag is loaded over the surface of the SiO 2 sample and that after the ion-exchange process the HEU type structure of clinoptilolite is retained. UV-VIS (specific reflection at 310 nm) and IR (band at 695 cm -1 ) spectroscopy analysis proved that silver is loaded as a T-atom into zeolite channels as Ag + , instead of Na + , Ca 2+ , or K + ions, existing in the natural clinoptilolite form. The samples Ag/SiO 2 and Ag-clinoptilolite were tested as catalysts for decomposition of gas phase ozone. Very high catalytic activity (up to 99%) was observed and at the same time the catalysts remained active over time at room temperature.

  5. Room temperature and thermal decomposition of magnesium hydride/deuteride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ares, J.R.; Leardini, F.; Bodega, J.; Macia, M.D.; Diaz-Chao, P.; Ferrer, I.J.; Fernandez, J.F.; Sanchez, C. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Lab. de Materiales de Interes en Energias Renovables

    2010-07-01

    Magnesium hydride (MgH{sub 2}) can be considered an interesting material to store hydrogen as long as two main drawbacks were solved: (i) its high stability and (ii) slow (de)hydriding kinetics. In that context, magnesium hydride films are an excellent model system to investigate the influence of structure, morphology and dimensionality on kinetic and thermodynamic properties. In the present work, we show that desorption mechanism of Pd-capped MgH{sub 2} at room temperature is controlled by a bidimensional interphase mechanism and a similar rate step limiting mechanism is observed during thermal decomposition of MgH{sub 2}. This mechanism is different to that occurring in bulk MgH{sub 2} (nucleation and growth) and obtained activation energies are lower than those reported in bulk MgH{sub 2}. We also investigated the Pd-capping properties upon H-absorption/desorption by means of RBS and isotope experiments. (orig.)

  6. Temperature influence on the malonic acid decomposition in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagojević, S. M.; Anić, S. R.; Čupić, Ž. D.; Pejić, N. D.; Kolar-Anić, Lj. Z.

    2009-09-01

    The kinetic investigations of the malonic acid decomposition (8.00 × 10-3 mol dm-3 ≤ [CH2(COOH)2]0 ≤ 4.30 × 10-2 mol dm-3) in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) system in the presence of bromate, bromide, sulfuric acid and cerium sulfate, were performed in the isothermal closed well stirred reactor at different temperatures (25.0°C ≤ T ≤ 45.0°C). The formal kinetics of the overall BZ reaction, and particularly kinetics in characteristic periods of BZ reaction, based on the analyses of the bromide oscillograms, was accomplished. The evolution as well as the rate constants and the apparent activation energies of the reactions, which exist in the preoscillatory and oscillatory periods, are also successfully calculated by numerical simulations. Simulations are based on the model including the Br2O species.

  7. Identification of dominant flow structures in rapidly rotating convection of liquid metals using Dynamic Mode Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, S.; Schmid, P. J.; Aurnou, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    The Earth's metal core acts as a dynamo whose efficiency in generating and maintaining the magnetic field is essentially determined by the rotation rate and the convective motions occurring in its outer liquid part. For the description of the primary physics in the outer core the idealized system of rotating Rayleigh-Bénard convection is often invoked, with the majority of studies considering only working fluids with Prandtl numbers of Pr ≳ 1. However, liquid metals are characterized by distinctly smaller Prandtl numbers which in turn result in an inherently different type of convection. Here, we will present results from direct numerical simulations of rapidly rotating convection in a fluid with Pr ≈ 0.025 in cylindrical containers and Ekman numbers as low as 5 × 10-6. In this system, the Coriolis force is the source of two types of inertial modes, the so-called wall modes, that also exist at moderate Prandtl numbers, and cylinder-filling oscillatory modes, that are a unique feature of small Prandtl number convection. The obtained flow fields were analyzed using the Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD). This technique allows to extract and identify the structures that govern the dynamics of the system as well as their corresponding frequencies. We have investigated both the regime where the flow is purely oscillatory and the regime where wall modes and oscillatory modes co-exist. In the purely oscillatory regime, high and low frequency oscillatory modes characterize the flow. When both types of modes are present, the DMD reveals that the wall-attached modes dominate the flow dynamics. They precess with a relatively low frequency in retrograde direction. Nonetheless, also in this case, high frequency oscillations have a significant contribution.

  8. Metal decomposition rates or 111In-DPTA and EDTA conjugates of monoclonal antibodies in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodwin, D.A.; McTigue, M.; Chaovapong, W.; Meares, C.F.; McCall, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    We have studied the metal chelate decomposition rates in vivo in both 111 In-labelled benzyl EDTA and DTPA (bicyclic anhydride) conjugates of monoclonal anti-IAsup(k) IgG2a with identical Kα = 1 x 10 11 M -1 in both Ag + ve and Ag -ve mice. Twenty μCi was given i.v. and whole body counting done immediately and daily for 10 days. Half the mice in each group received i.p. injections of 5.0 mg CaNa 2 EDTA chase (Versenate) to facilitate urinary excretion of free 111 In. 50% of control 111 In-citrate remained at nine days but only 8% with chase. No significant loss of 111 In with chase occurred with C 1 substituted EDTA conjugates. A 19% increase in excretion was demonstrated with the chase in mice give DTPA conjugates (1.9% per day). While this will not interfere with radioimmunoimaging up to 24 h after injection, waiting periods of a week or longer will produce significant background of free 111 In in the reticuloendothelial system, RES. 111 In-EDTA stability was important in accurate metabolic rate measurements of anti-IAsup(k); T1/2 = 7.0 days in Ag-ve mice, T1/2 = 9.3 days in Ag-ve mice. (author)

  9. Kinetics of thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate with nanocrystals of binary transition metal ferrites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Gurdip; Kapoor, Inder Pal Singh; Dubey, Shalini [Department of Chemistry, D. D. U. Gorakhpur University, Gorakhpur (India); Siril, Prem Felix [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique (LCP), Universite de Paris Sud, Orsay (France)

    2009-02-15

    Binary transition metal ferrite (BTMF) nanocrystals of formula MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}(M=Cu,Co,Ni) were prepared by the coprecipitation method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). XRD patterns gave average particle size by using Scherrer's equation for CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}(CuF), CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}(CoF), and NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (NiF) as 39.9, 27.3, and 43.8 nm, respectively. The catalytic activity measurements on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) were carried out by using thermogravimetry (TG), differential thermal analysis (DTA), and ignition delay studies. Isothermal TG data up to a mass loss of 45% have been used to evaluate kinetic parameters by using model fitting as well as isoconversional method. The order of catalytic activity was found to be: CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}>NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  10. High-temperature Raman study of L-alanine, L-threonine and taurine crystals related to thermal decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavaignac, A.L.O. [Centro de Ciências Sociais, Saúde e Tecnologia, Universidade Federal do Maranhão, Imperatriz, MA 65900-410 (Brazil); Lima, R.J.C., E-mail: ricardo.lima.ufma@gmail.com [Centro de Ciências Sociais, Saúde e Tecnologia, Universidade Federal do Maranhão, Imperatriz, MA 65900-410 (Brazil); Façanha Filho, P.F. [Centro de Ciências Sociais, Saúde e Tecnologia, Universidade Federal do Maranhão, Imperatriz, MA 65900-410 (Brazil); Moreno, A.J.D. [Coordenação de Ciências Naturais, Universidade Federal do Maranhão, Bacabal, MA 65700-000 (Brazil); Freire, P.T.C. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE 60455-760 (Brazil)

    2016-03-01

    In this work high-temperature Raman spectra are used to compare temperature dependence of the lattice mode wavenumber of L-alanine, L-threonine and taurine crystals. Anharmonic effects observed are associated with intermolecular N-H· · ·O hydrogen bond that plays an important role in thermal decomposition process of these materials. Short and strong hydrogen bonds in L-alanine crystal were associated with anharmonic effects in lattice modes leading to low thermal stability compared to taurine crystals. Connection between thermal decomposition process and anharmonic effects is furnished for the first time.

  11. High-temperature Raman study of L-alanine, L-threonine and taurine crystals related to thermal decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavaignac, A.L.O.; Lima, R.J.C.; Façanha Filho, P.F.; Moreno, A.J.D.; Freire, P.T.C.

    2016-01-01

    In this work high-temperature Raman spectra are used to compare temperature dependence of the lattice mode wavenumber of L-alanine, L-threonine and taurine crystals. Anharmonic effects observed are associated with intermolecular N-H· · ·O hydrogen bond that plays an important role in thermal decomposition process of these materials. Short and strong hydrogen bonds in L-alanine crystal were associated with anharmonic effects in lattice modes leading to low thermal stability compared to taurine crystals. Connection between thermal decomposition process and anharmonic effects is furnished for the first time.

  12. In situ synthesis of manganese oxides on polyester fiber for formaldehyde decomposition at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jinlong; Yunus, Rizwangul; Li, Jinge; Li, Peilin; Zhang, Pengyi; Kim, Jeonghyun

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The MnO x particles assembled with nanosheets were uniformly coated on PET fibers. • The growth process of MnO x layer on PET is clearly clarified. • MnO x /PET showed good activity for HCHO decomposition at room temperature. • MnO x /PET material is promising for indoor air purification due to its light, flexible and low air-resistant properties. - Abstract: Removal of low-level formaldehyde (HCHO) is of great interest for indoor air quality improvement. Supported materials especially those with low air pressure drop are of necessity for air purification. Manganese oxides (MnO x ) was in situ deposited on the surface of fibers of a non-woven fabric made of polyethylene terephthalate (PET). As-synthesized MnO x /PET were characterized by SEM, XRD, TEM, ATR-FTIR and XPS analysis. The growth of MnO x layer on PET is thought to start with partial hydrolysis of PET, followed by surface oxidation by KMnO 4 and then surface-deposition of MnO x particles from the bulk phase. The MnO x particles assembled with nanosheets were uniformly coated on the PET fibers. MnO x /PET showed good activity for HCHO decomposition at room temperature which followed the Mars–van Krevelen mechanism. The removal of HCHO was kept over 94% after 10 h continuous reaction under the conditions of inlet HCHO concentration ∼0.6 mg/m 3 , space velocity ∼17,000 h −1 and relative humidity∼50%. This research provides a facile method to deposit active MnO x onto polymers with low air resistance, and composite MnO x /PET material is promising for indoor air purification.

  13. In situ synthesis of manganese oxides on polyester fiber for formaldehyde decomposition at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jinlong [State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Regional Environmental Quality (China); Yunus, Rizwangul [State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Xinjiang Zhongtai Chemical Company, Xinjiang 831511 (China); Li, Jinge; Li, Peilin [State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhang, Pengyi, E-mail: zpy@tsinghua.edu.cn [State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Regional Environmental Quality (China); Kim, Jeonghyun [State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Regional Environmental Quality (China)

    2015-12-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The MnO{sub x} particles assembled with nanosheets were uniformly coated on PET fibers. • The growth process of MnO{sub x} layer on PET is clearly clarified. • MnO{sub x}/PET showed good activity for HCHO decomposition at room temperature. • MnO{sub x}/PET material is promising for indoor air purification due to its light, flexible and low air-resistant properties. - Abstract: Removal of low-level formaldehyde (HCHO) is of great interest for indoor air quality improvement. Supported materials especially those with low air pressure drop are of necessity for air purification. Manganese oxides (MnO{sub x}) was in situ deposited on the surface of fibers of a non-woven fabric made of polyethylene terephthalate (PET). As-synthesized MnO{sub x}/PET were characterized by SEM, XRD, TEM, ATR-FTIR and XPS analysis. The growth of MnO{sub x} layer on PET is thought to start with partial hydrolysis of PET, followed by surface oxidation by KMnO{sub 4} and then surface-deposition of MnO{sub x} particles from the bulk phase. The MnO{sub x} particles assembled with nanosheets were uniformly coated on the PET fibers. MnO{sub x}/PET showed good activity for HCHO decomposition at room temperature which followed the Mars–van Krevelen mechanism. The removal of HCHO was kept over 94% after 10 h continuous reaction under the conditions of inlet HCHO concentration ∼0.6 mg/m{sup 3}, space velocity ∼17,000 h{sup −1} and relative humidity∼50%. This research provides a facile method to deposit active MnO{sub x} onto polymers with low air resistance, and composite MnO{sub x}/PET material is promising for indoor air purification.

  14. Temperature sensitivity and enzymatic mechanisms of soil organic matter decomposition along an altitudinal gradient on Mount Kilimanjaro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagodatskaya, Еvgenia; Blagodatsky, Sergey; Khomyakov, Nikita; Myachina, Olga; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2016-02-01

    Short-term acceleration of soil organic matter decomposition by increasing temperature conflicts with the thermal adaptation observed in long-term studies. Here we used the altitudinal gradient on Mt. Kilimanjaro to demonstrate the mechanisms of thermal adaptation of extra- and intracellular enzymes that hydrolyze cellulose, chitin and phytate and oxidize monomers (14C-glucose) in warm- and cold-climate soils. We revealed that no response of decomposition rate to temperature occurs because of a cancelling effect consisting in an increase in half-saturation constants (Km), which counteracts the increase in maximal reaction rates (Vmax with temperature). We used the parameters of enzyme kinetics to predict thresholds of substrate concentration (Scrit) below which decomposition rates will be insensitive to global warming. Increasing values of Scrit, and hence stronger canceling effects with increasing altitude on Mt. Kilimanjaro, explained the thermal adaptation of polymer decomposition. The reduction of the temperature sensitivity of Vmax along the altitudinal gradient contributed to thermal adaptation of both polymer and monomer degradation. Extrapolating the altitudinal gradient to the large-scale latitudinal gradient, these results show that the soils of cold climates with stronger and more frequent temperature variation are less sensitive to global warming than soils adapted to high temperatures.

  15. Refractory thermowell for continuous high temperature measurement of molten metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiesen, T.J.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a vessel for handling molten metal having an interior refractory lining, apparatus for continuous high temperature measurement of the molten metal. It comprises a thermowell; the thermowell containing a multiplicity of thermocouples; leads being coupled to a means for continuously indicating the temperature of the molten metal in the vessel

  16. Decomposition in soil microcosms of leaves of the metallophyte Arabidopsis halleri: effect of leaf-associated heavy metals on biodegradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucher, Uriel; Balabane, May; Lamy, Isabelle; Cambier, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    More knowledge is needed concerning the disturbance of soil organic matter cycling due to heavy metal pollution. The present study deals with the impact of heavy metal pollution on litter breakdown. Our aim was to assess whether heavy metals initially present in the leaves of the metallophyte Arabidopsis halleri: (i) slow down the rate of C mineralization, in relation to metal toxicity towards microflora, and/or (ii) increase the amount of organic C resistant to biodegradation, in relation to an intrinsic resistance of metallophyte residues to biodegradation. We incubated uncontaminated soil samples with either metal-free or metal-rich plant material. Metal-free material was grown in a greenhouse, and metal-rich material was collected in situ. During the 2-month period of incubation, we measured evolved CO 2 -C and residual plant C in the coarse organic fraction. Our results of CO 2 -C evolution showed a similar mineralization from the microcosms amended with highly metal-rich leaves of A. halleri and the microcosms amended with the metal-free but otherwise similar plant material. Measuring residual plant C in its input size-fraction gave a more precise insight. Our results suggest that only the large pool of easily decomposable C mineralized similarly from metal-free and from metal-rich plant residues. The pool of less decomposable C seemed on the contrary to be preferentially preserved in the case of metal-rich material. These results support the hypothesis of an annual extra-accumulation in situ of such a slowly decomposable fraction of plant residues which could account to some extent for the observed accumulation of metallophyte litter on the surface of highly metal-polluted soils. - Decomposition of slowly decomposable fractions of metal-rich plant residues is slowed by the metals

  17. High-Temperature Decomposition of Brønsted Acid Sites in Gallium-Substituted Zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K Al-majnouni; N Hould; W Lonergan; D Vlachos; R Lobo

    2011-12-31

    The dehydroxylation of Broensted acid sites (BAS) in Ga-substituted zeolites was investigated at temperatures up to 850 C using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and mass spectrometry-temperature programmed desorption (MS-TPD). X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) revealed that the majority of gallium has tetrahedral coordination even after complete dehydroxylation. The interatomic gallium-oxygen distance and gallium coordination number determined by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) are consistent with gallium in tetrahedral coordination at low T (< 550 C). Upon heating Ga-Beta and Ga-ZSM5 to 850 C, analysis of the EXAFS showed that 70 and 80% of the gallium was still in tetrahedral coordination. The remainder of the gallium was found to be in octahedral coordination. No trigonal Ga atoms were observed. FTIR measurements carried out at similar temperatures show that the intensity of the OH vibration due to BAS has been eliminated. MS-TPD revealed that hydrogen in addition to water evolved from the samples during dehydroxylation. This shows that dehydrogenation in addition to dehydration is a mechanism that contributes to BAS decomposition. Dehydrogenation was further confirmed by exposing the sample to hydrogen to regenerate some of the BAS as monitored by FTIR and MS-TPD.

  18. Photoluminescence properties of Tb3Al5O12:Ce3+ garnet synthesized by the metal organic decomposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Yuya; Nakamura, Toshihiro; Adachi, Sadao

    2017-02-01

    Tb3Al5O12:Ce3+ garnet (TAG:Ce3+) phosphor was synthesized by the metal organic decomposition (MOD) method and subsequent calcination at Tc = 800-1200°C for 1 h in air. The effects of Ce3+ concentration on the phosphor properties were investigated in detail using X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, photoluminescence (PL) analysis, PL excitation (PLE) spectroscopy, and PL decay measurements. The maximum intensity in the Ce3+ yellow emission was observed at the Ce3+ concentration of ∼0.20%. PLE and PL decay measurements suggested an evidence of the energy transfer from Tb3+ to Ce3+. Calcination temperature dependence of the XRD and PL intensities yielded an energy of ∼1.5 eV both for the TAG formation in the MOD process and for the optical activation of Ce3+ in its lattice sites. Temperature dependences of the PL intensity for the TAG:Ce3+ yellow-emitting and K2SiF6:Mn4+ red-emitting phosphors were also examined for the future solid-state lighting applications at T = 20-500 K in 10-K steps. The data of TAG:Ce3+ were analyzed using a theoretical model with considering a reservoir level of Et ∼9 meV, yielding a quenching energy of Eq ∼0.35 eV, whereas the K2SiF6:Mn4+ red-emitting phosphor data yielded a value of Eq ∼1.0 eV. The schematic energy-level diagrams for Tb3+ and Ce3+ were proposed for the sake of a better understanding of these ions in the TAG host.

  19. Engineering: Liquid metal pumped at a record temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrinou, Konstantina

    2017-10-01

    Although liquid metals are effective fluids for heat transfer, pumping them at high temperatures is limited by their corrosiveness to solid metals. A clever pump design addresses this challenge using only ceramics. See Article p.199

  20. Chlorpyrifos causes decreased organic matter decomposition by suppressing earthworm and termite communities in tropical soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Silva, P. Mangala C.S., E-mail: msilva@falw.vu.n [Department of Animal Ecology, VU University, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, University of Ruhuna, Matara (Sri Lanka); Pathiratne, Asoka [Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, University of Kelaniya, Kelaniya (Sri Lanka); Straalen, Nico M. van; Gestel, Cornelis A.M. van [Department of Animal Ecology, VU University, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-10-15

    Effects of pesticides on structural and functional properties of ecosystems are rarely studied under tropical conditions. In this study litterbag and earthworm field tests were performed simultaneously at the same tropical field site sprayed with chlorpyrifos (CPF). The recommended dose of CPF (0.6 kg a.i. ha{sup -1}) and two higher doses (4.4-8.8 kg a.i. ha{sup -1}) significantly decreased litter decomposition during the first 3 months after application, which could be explained from lower earthworm and termite abundances during this period. Species-specific effects of CPF on organism abundance and biomass were observed, with termites being mostly affected followed by the earthworm Perionyx excavatus; the earthworm Megascolex sp. was least affected. Recovery was completed within 6 months. Decomposition in the controls and lowest two treatments was completed within 4 months, which suggests the need for modification of standard test guidelines to comply with faster litter degradation under tropical conditions. - Effects of chlorpyrifos on functional and structural endpoints in soil.

  1. Chlorpyrifos causes decreased organic matter decomposition by suppressing earthworm and termite communities in tropical soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Silva, P. Mangala C.S.; Pathiratne, Asoka; Straalen, Nico M. van; Gestel, Cornelis A.M. van

    2010-01-01

    Effects of pesticides on structural and functional properties of ecosystems are rarely studied under tropical conditions. In this study litterbag and earthworm field tests were performed simultaneously at the same tropical field site sprayed with chlorpyrifos (CPF). The recommended dose of CPF (0.6 kg a.i. ha -1 ) and two higher doses (4.4-8.8 kg a.i. ha -1 ) significantly decreased litter decomposition during the first 3 months after application, which could be explained from lower earthworm and termite abundances during this period. Species-specific effects of CPF on organism abundance and biomass were observed, with termites being mostly affected followed by the earthworm Perionyx excavatus; the earthworm Megascolex sp. was least affected. Recovery was completed within 6 months. Decomposition in the controls and lowest two treatments was completed within 4 months, which suggests the need for modification of standard test guidelines to comply with faster litter degradation under tropical conditions. - Effects of chlorpyrifos on functional and structural endpoints in soil.

  2. Metal toxicity- a possible cause of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javed, M.S.; Gilani, R.

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a fatal disease of unknown etiology. Attempts are being made in the world to understand the disease mechanism by knowing its causes. Present research is a part to that contribution. Concentrations of some toxic metals were estimated in the blood and lung tissues of the persons diagnosed to be the subject of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. IPF subjects were selected for this purpose which was admitted in different hospitals in Lahore. Blood samples were taken directly from the patients whereas lung tissue samples were collected from the relevant biopsy labs. Three control blood samples were also collected from healthy persons. The samples were digested with Conc. HNO/sub 3/ to make their solutions for the estimation of metals. The metals selected were Cu, Pb, Cd, Cr, Be, Zn, Al, As and Co. Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS) was used to estimate the metal concentrations in the sample solutions. The mean values of the concentrations (ppm) of these metals in the blood samples were Cu (0.65), Pb(0.69), Cd(1.17), Cr(0.21), Be(0.67), Zn(6.31), Al(1.33), As(0.46) and Co(0.46). The mean values of the concentrations (ppm) of these metals in the lung tissue samples were Cu (1.57), Pb(1.01), Cd(1.70), Cr(0.46), Be(2.02), Zn(10.20), Al(1.68), As(0.83) and Co(0.65). The concentrations of these metals were also estimated in the blood samples of control healthy persons and compared with the subjects. The difference of concentrations (ppm) in the blood samples of IPF subjects and Control Maximum (Mean Subjects - Control Max.) were Cu (0.50), Pb(0.62), Cd(1.17), Cr(0.21), Be(0.56), Zn(5.06), Al(1.31), As(0.46) and Co(0.46). Comparison of the mean values of concentrations of metals in blood samples of IPF subjects with the maximum concentration of metals in the blood samples of control healthy persons shows that metals levels are higher in the subjects than the control ones. i.e. Cu(76.92%), Pb(89.6%), Cd(100%), Cr(100%), Be(83.58%), Zn(80

  3. High temperature embrittlement of metals by helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, H.

    1983-01-01

    The present knowledge of the influence of helium on the high temperature mechanical properties of metals to be used as structural materials in fast fission and in future fusion reactors is reviewed. A wealth of experimental data has been obtained by many different experimental techniques, on many different alloys, and on different properties. This review is mostly concentrated on the behaviour of austenitic alloys -especially austenitic stainless steels, for which the data base is by far the largest - and gives only a few examples of special bcc alloys. The effect of the helium embrittlement on the different properties - tensile, fatigue and, with special emphasis, creep - is demonstrated by representative results. A comparison between data obtained from in-pile (-beam) experiments and from post-irradiation (-implantation) experiments, respectively, is presented. Theoretical models to describe the observed phenomena are briefly outlined and some suggestions are made for future work to resolve uncertainties and differences between our experimental knowledge and theoretical understanding of high temperature helium embrittlement. (author)

  4. Turbulent temperature fluctuations in liquid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawn, C.J.

    1977-01-01

    Examination of experimental data for the spectral distribution of velocity (u and v) and temperature (theta) fluctuations in the fully turbulent region of heated pipe-flow has suggested a schematic representation which incorporates the essential features. Evidence is cited to suggest that the -vtheta correlation coefficient maintains higher values that the uv coefficient at wave-numbers in the inertial subrange. The theory of Batchelor, Howells and Townsend, and limited evidence from experiments in mercury, then suggests the form of the theta 2 spectra and -vtheta cross-spectra in liquid metals. From this information, a limiting Peclet number is deduced, above which the correlation coefficient of v and theta should be a fairly weak function of Pe alone. An attempt to check this inference from published data for the RMS level of temperature fluctuations, and for the turbulent Prandtl number, proves inconclusive, because many of the correlation coefficients so estimated have values greater than unity. It is concluded that all these results for theta tilde must therefore be in error. However, since there is no evidence of very low correlation coefficients, they almost certainly lie in the range 0.5 multiply/divide 2 over a large proportion of the radius. Thus theta tilde can be estimated for any fluid in which the fluctuations are induced by uniform heating, at least to within a factor of 2, using the analysis presented. (author)

  5. Decomposition of Nitrous Oxide over Fe-Ferrierites. Effect of High-Temperature Pretreatment on the Formation of Deposited Oxygen

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nováková, Jana; Schwarze, Michael; Tvarůžková, Zdenka; Sobalík, Zdeněk

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 98, 2/3 (2004), s. 123-127 ISSN 1011-372X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS4040016 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : Fe-ferrierite * high-temperature treatment * effect on N2O decomposition Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.904, year: 2004

  6. Characterisation of silica derived from rice husk (Muar, Johor, Malaysia) decomposition at different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, M. A.; Ismail, N. A. A.; Rizamarhaiza, M.; W. M. Hasif. A. A., K.; Taib, H.

    2016-07-01

    Rice husk was thermally decomposed to yield powder composed of silica (SiO2). Temperatures of 700°C and 1000°C were chosen as the decomposition temperatures. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), X-Ray Florescence (XRF), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) analyses were conducted on a synthetic silica powder (SS-SiO2) and the rice husk ash as for the comparative characterisation study. XRD analyses clearly indicated that the decomposed rice husk yielded silica of different nature which are Crystalline Rice Husk Silica (C-RHSiO2) and Amorphous Rice Husk Silica (A-RHSiO2). Moreover, it was found that SS-SiO2 was of Quartz phase, C-RHSiO2 was of Trydimite and Cristobalite. Through XRF detection, the highest SiO2 purity was detected in SS-SiO2 followed by C-RHSiO2 and A-RHSiO2 with purity percentages of 99.60%, 82.30% and 86.30% respectively. FTIR results clearly indicated silica (SiO2) bonding 1056, 1064, 1047, 777, 790 and 798 cm-1) increased as the crystallinity silica increased. The Cristobalite phase was detected in C-RH SiO2 at the wavelength of 620 cm-1. Morphological features as observed by FESEM analyses confirmed that, SS-SiO2 and C-RH SiO2 showed prominent coarse granular morphology.

  7. Regional Variation in the Temperature Sensitivity of Soil Organic Matter Decomposition in China's Forests and Grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; He, N.; Zhu, J.; Yu, G.; Xu, L.; Niu, S.; Sun, X.; Wen, X.

    2017-12-01

    How to assess the temperature sensitivity (Q10) of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition and its regional variation with high accuracy is one of the largest uncertainties in determining the intensity and direction of the global carbon (C) cycle in response to climate change. In this study, we collected a series of soils from 22 forest sites and 30 grassland sites across China to explore regional variation in Q10 and its underlying mechanisms. We conducted a novel incubation experiment with periodically changing temperature (5-30 °C), while continuously measuring soil microbial respiration rates. The results showed that Q10 varied significantly across different ecosystems, ranging from 1.16 to 3.19 (mean 1.63). Q10 was ordered as follows: alpine grasslands (2.01) > temperate grasslands (1.81) > tropical forests (1.59) > temperate forests (1.55) > subtropical forests (1.52). The Q10 of grasslands (1.90) was significantly higher than that of forests (1.54). Furthermore, Q10 significantly increased with increasing altitude and decreased with increasing longitude. Environmental variables and substrate properties together explained 52% of total variation in Q10 across all sites. Overall, pH and soil electrical conductivity primarily explained spatial variation in Q10. The general negative relationships between Q10 and substrate quality among all ecosystem types supported the C quality temperature (CQT) hypothesis at a large scale, which indicated that soils with low quality should have higher temperature sensitivity. Furthermore, alpine grasslands, which had the highest Q10, were predicted to be more sensitive to climate change under the scenario of global warming.

  8. Study of a dense metal membrane reactor for hydrogen separation from hydroiodic acid decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosti, Silvano; Borelli, Rodolfo; Borgognoni, Fabio [ENEA, Dipartimento FPN, C.R. ENEA Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, Frascati, Roma I-00044 (Italy); Favuzza, Paolo; Tarquini, Pietro [ENEA, Dipartimento TER, C.R. ENEA Casaccia, Via Anguillarese 301, Roma (Italy); Rizzello, Claudio [Tesi Sas, Via Bolzano 28, Roma (Italy)

    2008-10-15

    A membrane reactor has been studied for separating the hydrogen produced by the dissociation of hydroiodic acid in the thermochemical-sulfur iodine process. A dense metal membrane tube of wall thickness 0.250 mm has been considered in this analysis for hosting a fixed-bed catalyst: the selective separation of hydrogen from an azeotropic H{sub 2}O-HI mixture has been studied in the temperature range of 700-800 K. The materials being considered for the construction of the membrane tube are niobium and tantalum; as a matter of fact, the most commonly used Pd-Ag membranes cannot withstand the corrosive environment generated by the hydroiodic acid. The Damkohler-Peclet analysis has been used for designing the membrane reactor, while a finite element method has simulated its behaviour: the effect of the temperature and pressure on the HI conversion and hydrogen yield has been evaluated. (author)

  9. High-temperature spreading kinetics of metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauch, N.

    2005-05-15

    In this PhD work a drop transfer setup combined with high speed photography has been used to analyze the spreading of Ag on polished polycrystalline Mo and single crystalline Mo (110) and (100) substrates. The objective of this work was to unveil the basic phenomena controlling spreading in metal-metal systems. The observed spreading kinetics were compared with current theories of low and high temperature spreading such as a molecular kinetic model and a fluid flow model. Analyses of the data reveal that the molecular model does describe the fastest velocity data well for all the investigated systems. Therefore, the energy which is dissipated during the spreading process is a dissipation at the triple line rather than dissipation due to the viscosity in the liquid. A comparison of the determined free activation energy for wetting of {delta}G95{approx}145kJ/mol with literature values allows the statement that the rate determining step seems to be a surface diffusion of the Ag atoms along the triple line. In order to investigate possible ridge formation, due to local atomic diffusion of atoms of the substrate at the triple during the spreading process, grooving experiments of the polycrystalline Mo were performed to calculate the surface diffusities that will control ridge evolution. The analyses of this work showed that a ridge formation at the fastest reported wetting velocities was not possible if there is no initial perturbation for a ridge. If there was an initial perturbation for a ridge the ridge had to be much smaller than 1 nm in order to be able to move with the liquid font. Therefore ridge formation does not influence the spreading kinetics for the studied system and the chosen conditions. SEM, AFM and TEM investigations of the triple line showed that ridge formation does also not occur at the end of the wetting experiment when the drop is close to equilibrium and the wetting velocity is slow. (orig.)

  10. Release of gases from uranium metal at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayi, Y.S.; Ramanjaneyulu, P.S.; Yadav, C.S.; Shankaran, P.S.; Chhapru, G.C.; Ramakumar, K.L.; Venugopal, V.

    2008-01-01

    Depending on the ambient environmental conditions, different gaseous species could get entrapped in uranium metal ingots or pellets. On heating, melting or vapourising uranium metal, these get released and depending on the composition, may cause detrimental effects either within the metal matrix itself or on the surrounding materials/environment. For instance, these gases may affect the performance of the uranium metal, which is used as fuel in the heavy water moderated research reactors, CIRUS and DHRUVA. Hence, detailed investigations have been carried out on the release of gases over a temperature range 875-1500 K employing hot vacuum extraction technique, in specimen uranium pellets made from uranium rods/ingots. Employing an on-line quadrupole mass spectrometer, the analysis of released gases was carried out. The isobaric interference between carbon monoxide and nitrogen at m/e = 28 in the mass spectrometric analysis has been resolved by considering their fragmentation patterns. Since no standards are available to evaluate the results, only the reproducibility is tested. The precision (relative standard deviation at 3σ level) of the method is ±5%. The minimum detectable gas content employing the method is 5.00 x 10 -09 m 3 . About 4 x 10 -04 m 3 /kg of gas is released from uranium pellets, with hydrogen as the main constituent. The gas content increases with storage in air

  11. Study of the temperature dependence of giant magnetoresistance in metallic granular composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju Sheng; Li, Z.-Y.

    2002-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the giant magnetoresistance of metallic granular composite is studied. It is considered that the composite contains both large magnetic grains with surface spin S' and small magnetic impurities. It is found that the decrease of surface spin S' of grain is the main cause of an almost linear decrease of giant magnetoresistance with the increase of temperature in high temperature range. The magnetic impurities, composed of several atoms, lead to an almost linear increase of the giant magnetoresistance with the decrease of temperature in low temperature range. Our calculations are in good agreement with recent experimental data for metallic nanogranular composites

  12. In situ synthesis of manganese oxides on polyester fiber for formaldehyde decomposition at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinlong; Yunus, Rizwangul; Li, Jinge; Li, Peilin; Zhang, Pengyi; Kim, Jeonghyun

    2015-12-01

    Removal of low-level formaldehyde (HCHO) is of great interest for indoor air quality improvement. Supported materials especially those with low air pressure drop are of necessity for air purification. Manganese oxides (MnOx) was in situ deposited on the surface of fibers of a non-woven fabric made of polyethylene terephthalate (PET). As-synthesized MnOx/PET were characterized by SEM, XRD, TEM, ATR-FTIR and XPS analysis. The growth of MnOx layer on PET is thought to start with partial hydrolysis of PET, followed by surface oxidation by KMnO4 and then surface-deposition of MnOx particles from the bulk phase. The MnOx particles assembled with nanosheets were uniformly coated on the PET fibers. MnOx/PET showed good activity for HCHO decomposition at room temperature which followed the Mars-van Krevelen mechanism. The removal of HCHO was kept over 94% after 10 h continuous reaction under the conditions of inlet HCHO concentration ∼0.6 mg/m3, space velocity ∼17,000 h-1 and relative humidity∼50%. This research provides a facile method to deposit active MnOx onto polymers with low air resistance, and composite MnOx/PET material is promising for indoor air purification.

  13. High temperature vaporization/decomposition studies of lanthanide and actinide fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, J.K.; Haire, R.G.

    1987-01-01

    Binary fluorides of the lanthanide and actinide elements comprise a fundamental class of compounds. The authors' investigations of their basic high temperature vaporization and/or decomposition behavior are aimed at elucidating more fully the thermal properties of selected tri- and tetrafluorides and extending such investigations to fluorides which have not been studied previously. Depending on the particular system and the specific experimental conditions, the authors' measurements can provide such information as the enthalpy associated with a congruent vaporization process and/or the relative stabilities of fluorides containing a lanthanide/actinide element in different oxidation states. The authors are also studying the congruent vaporization of selected lanthanide trifluorides with particular emphasis on two areas. The first concerns the variation in the enthalpies of sublimation of the trifluorides across the lanthanide series. Although this variation is rather small (δ5 kcal where ΔH/sub subl/ is approximately 100 kcal), it is larger than observed for other lanthanide trihalides and is unusually irregular. To examine this reported variation more closely, they are attempting to measure relative vapor pressures/enthalpies of vaporization by studying mixtures of two or more lanthanide trifluorides by the technique discussed above

  14. Characterisation of silica derived from rice husk (Muar, Johor, Malaysia) decomposition at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azmi, M. A.; Ismail, N. A. A.; Rizamarhaiza, M.; Hasif, W. M. K. A. A.; Taib, H., E-mail: hariati@uthm.edu.my [Faculty of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, 86400 Batu Pahat, Johor (Malaysia)

    2016-07-19

    Rice husk was thermally decomposed to yield powder composed of silica (SiO{sub 2}). Temperatures of 700°C and 1000°C were chosen as the decomposition temperatures. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), X-Ray Florescence (XRF), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) analyses were conducted on a synthetic silica powder (SS-SiO{sub 2}) and the rice husk ash as for the comparative characterisation study. XRD analyses clearly indicated that the decomposed rice husk yielded silica of different nature which are Crystalline Rice Husk Silica (C-RHSiO{sub 2}) and Amorphous Rice Husk Silica (A-RHSiO{sub 2}). Moreover, it was found that SS-SiO{sub 2} was of Quartz phase, C-RHSiO{sub 2} was of Trydimite and Cristobalite. Through XRF detection, the highest SiO{sub 2} purity was detected in SS-SiO{sub 2} followed by C-RHSiO{sub 2} and A-RHSiO{sub 2} with purity percentages of 99.60%, 82.30% and 86.30% respectively. FTIR results clearly indicated silica (SiO{sub 2}) bonding 1056, 1064, 1047, 777, 790 and 798 cm{sup −1}) increased as the crystallinity silica increased. The Cristobalite phase was detected in C-RH SiO{sub 2} at the wavelength of 620 cm{sup −1}. Morphological features as observed by FESEM analyses confirmed that, SS-SiO{sub 2} and C-RH SiO{sub 2} showed prominent coarse granular morphology.

  15. The influence of temperature on the decomposition kinetics of peracetic acid in solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Kunigk, L.; Gomes, D.R.; Forte, F.; Vidal, K.P.; Gomes, L.F.; Sousa, P.F.

    2001-01-01

    Peracetic acid is a powerful sanitizer that has only recently been introduced in the Brazilian food industry. The main disadvantage of this sanitizer is its decomposition rate. The main purpose of this paper is to present results obtained in experiments carried out to study the decomposition kinetics of peracetic acid in aqueous solutions at 25, 35, 40 and 45 °C. The decompositon of peracetic acid is a first-order reaction. The decomposition rate constants are between 1.71x10-3 h -1 for 25 °C...

  16. Decomposition and N cycling changes in redwood forests caused by sudden oak death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard C. Cobb; David M. Rizzo

    2012-01-01

    Phytophthora ramorum is an emergent pathogen in redwood forests which causes the disease sudden oak death. Although the disease does not kill coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens), extensive and rapid mortality of tanoak (Notholithocarpus densiflorus) has removed this...

  17. Autointoxication mechanism ofOryza sativa : III. Effect of temperature on phytotoxin production during rice straw decomposition in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, C H; Chiang, Y C; Chfng, H H

    1981-07-01

    The phytotoxicity produced during decomposition of rice straw in soil was evaluated under both constant and changing temperature conditions. Bioassay tests showed that the aqueous extract from a soilstraw mixture after incubation at constant temperature was more than twice as phytotoxic as the extract from soil incubated alone. The phytotoxicity was highest at 20-25 ° C. Temperatures above 25 ° C enhanced rice straw decomposition and also degraded the phytotoxic substances more rapidly. After incubation of soil mixtures under changing temperature regimes in a phytotron, the phytotoxicy of the soil aqueous extracts increased in the following order: soil alone lettuce or rice seedlings was also at the highest at the temperature range of 25-30 ° C irrespective of the direction of temperature changes from either low to high or vice versa. Five phytotoxic phenolics,p-hydroxybenzoic, vanillic,p-coumaric, syringic, and ferulic acids, were obtained from both the aqueous extract and residue of the incubated soil samples and were quantitatively estimated by chromatography. The amount of phytotoxins found in various soil mixtures followed the same increasing order as that found by the seed bioassay test. Although no definite distribution pattern of the phenolics in the incubated soil samples can be attributed to temperature variations, the amount of the phenolics was likely higher in the samples incubated at 25 ° C than at either 15 ° C or 35 ° C. The quantity of toxins released during decomposition of rice straw in soil reached highest levels six weeks after incubation and gradually disappeared after twelve weeks.

  18. All-Cause and Cause-Specific Risk of Emergency Transport Attributable to Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although several studies have estimated the associations between mortality or morbidity and extreme temperatures in terms of relative risk, few studies have investigated the risk of emergency transport attributable to the whole temperature range nationwide. We acquired data on daily emergency ambulance dispatches in all 47 prefectures of Japan from 2007 to 2010. We examined the relationship between emergency transport and temperature for each prefecture using a Poisson regression model in a distributed lag nonlinear model with adjustment for time trends. A random-effect multivariate meta-analysis was then applied to pool the estimates at the national level. Attributable morbidity was calculated for high and low temperatures, which were defined as those above or below the optimum temperature (ie, the minimum morbidity temperature) and for moderate and also extreme temperatures, which were defined using cutoffs at the 2.5th and 97.5th temperature percentiles. A total of 15,868,086 cases of emergency transport met the inclusion criteria. The emergency transport was attributable to nonoptimal temperature. The median minimum morbidity percentile was in the 79th percentile for all causes, the 96th percentile for cardiovascular disease, and the 92th percentile for respiratory disease. The fraction attributable to low temperature was 6.94% (95% eCI: 5.93–7.70) for all causes, 17.93% (95% eCI: 16.10–19.25) for cardiovascular disease, and 12.19% (95% eCI: 9.90–13.66) for respiratory disease, whereas the fraction attributable to high temperature was small (all causes = 1.01%, 95% eCI: 0.90–1.11; cardiovascular disease = 0.10%, 95% eCI: 0.04–0.14; respiratory disease = 0.29%, 95% eCI: 0.07–0.50). The all-cause morbidity risk that was attributable to temperature was related to moderate cold, with an overall estimate of 6.41% (95% eCI: 5.47–7.20). Extreme temperatures were responsible for a small fraction, which corresponded to 0.57% (95% e

  19. Metal-semiconductor interface in extreme temperature conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulat, L.P.; Erofeeva, I.A.; Vorobiev, Yu.V.; Gonzalez-Hernandez, J.

    2008-01-01

    We present an investigation of electrons' and phonons' temperatures in the volume of a semiconductor (or metal) sample and at the interface between metal and semiconductor. Two types of mismatch between electrons' and phonons' temperatures take place: at metal-semiconductor interfaces and in the volume of the sample. The temperature mismatch leads to nonlinear terms in expressions for heat and electricity transport. The nonlinear effects should be taken into consideration in the study of electrical and heat transport in composites and in electronic chips

  20. Decomposition of uranyl peroxo-carbonato complex ion in the presence of metal oxides in carbonate media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong-Yong Chung; Min-Sung Park; Keun-Young Lee; Eil-Hee Lee; Kwang-Wook Kim; Jei-Kwon Moon

    2015-01-01

    Uranium oxide was dissolved in the form of the uranyl peroxo-carbonato complex ion, UO 2 (O 2 )(CO 3 ) 2 4- in carbonate solutions with hydrogen peroxide. When UO 2 (O 2 )(CO 3 ) 2 4- ions lose their peroxide component, they become a stable species of uranyl tricarbonato complex ion, UO 2 (O 2 )(CO 3 ) 2 4- . The uranyl peroxo-carbonato complex self-decomposed more rapidly into the uranyl tricarbonato complex ion in the presence of a metal oxide in the carbonate solution. In this study, decomposition of the uranyl peroxo-carbonato complex in a carbonate solution was investigated in the presence of several metal oxides using absorption spectroscopy. (author)

  1. Transformations in refractory compounds, caused by high pressures and temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajnulin, Yu.G.; Alyamovskij, S.I.; Shvejkin, G.P.

    1979-01-01

    Considered is the effect of high pressures and temperatures on structural features of refractory carbides, nitrides and monooxides of transition metals. The results are discussed on the basis of one component of the theory on daltonides and bertollides by N.S. Kurnakov - the theory of imaginary compounds, developed by G.B. Bokij. Several new ideas, resulting from this consideration, are formulated, It is shown that at high pressures and temperatures it is possible to obtain new electron modifications of compounds and to expand sufficiently the region of the existance of variable composition phases. The concept on imaginary compounds is shown to be true. A supposition is made on realization of numerous imaginary compounds at high pressures and temperatures. Other ways of production of imaginary compounds are recommended

  2. Study of 'liquid gold' coatings: Thermal decomposition and formation of metallic thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deram, V. [Laboratoire de Spectrochimie Infrarouge et Raman, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, UMR CNRS 8516, Bat C5 - 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France) and Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Paris, Centre de Mise en Forme des Materiaux, UMR CNRS 7635, BP 207, 06904 Sophia-Antipolis (France)]. E-mail: virginie.deram@ensmp.fr; Turrell, S. [Laboratoire de Spectrochimie Infrarouge et Raman, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, UMR CNRS 8516, Bat C5 - 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Darque-Ceretti, E. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Paris, Centre de Mise en Forme des Materiaux, UMR CNRS 7635, BP 207, 06904 Sophia-Antipolis (France); Aucouturier, M. [Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France, UMR CNRS 171, Palais du Louvre, Porte des Lions, 14 quai F. Mitterrand, 75001 Paris Cedex (France)

    2006-09-25

    Organo-metallic solutions called liquid gold are largely used to obtain thin gilded films which are employed for decorative, technological and functional uses. However, these films often prove to be fragile with respect to use, resulting in loss of brilliance or even eventual film removal. An understanding of the behaviour of the layers requires good knowledge of the materials themselves. The present work was undertaken to better understand the evolution of the structural properties of liquid gold as it undergoes heat-processing. Accordingly, we followed the thermal decomposition processes of liquid gold coatings and the formation of the gilded metal layer using a combination of experimental techniques. First, thermal analyses coupled with mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy gave information concerning the decomposition of the organic medium. It has been found that the process of film formation can be decomposed into three steps, the second of which is an abrupt transition between 300 and 350 deg. C. Details on this transition have been obtained using real-time X-ray Diffraction and Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry. Above 350 deg. C, the microstructure of the coating is reorganized to obtain a final layer which contains particles, of the size of a few hundreds nanometers, as shown by Transmission Electron Microscopy.

  3. Decomposition techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, T.T.; Sanzolone, R.F.

    1992-01-01

    Sample decomposition is a fundamental and integral step in the procedure of geochemical analysis. It is often the limiting factor to sample throughput, especially with the recent application of the fast and modern multi-element measurement instrumentation. The complexity of geological materials makes it necessary to choose the sample decomposition technique that is compatible with the specific objective of the analysis. When selecting a decomposition technique, consideration should be given to the chemical and mineralogical characteristics of the sample, elements to be determined, precision and accuracy requirements, sample throughput, technical capability of personnel, and time constraints. This paper addresses these concerns and discusses the attributes and limitations of many techniques of sample decomposition along with examples of their application to geochemical analysis. The chemical properties of reagents as to their function as decomposition agents are also reviewed. The section on acid dissolution techniques addresses the various inorganic acids that are used individually or in combination in both open and closed systems. Fluxes used in sample fusion are discussed. The promising microwave-oven technology and the emerging field of automation are also examined. A section on applications highlights the use of decomposition techniques for the determination of Au, platinum group elements (PGEs), Hg, U, hydride-forming elements, rare earth elements (REEs), and multi-elements in geological materials. Partial dissolution techniques used for geochemical exploration which have been treated in detail elsewhere are not discussed here; nor are fire-assaying for noble metals and decomposition techniques for X-ray fluorescence or nuclear methods be discussed. ?? 1992.

  4. Status of design code work for metallic high temperature components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieniussa, K.; Seehafer, H.J.; Over, H.H.; Hughes, P.

    1984-01-01

    The mechanical components of high temperature gas-cooled reactors, HTGR, are exposed to temperatures up to about 1000 deg. C and this in a more or less corrosive gas environment. Under these conditions metallic structural materials show a time-dependent structural behavior. Furthermore changes in the structure of the material and loss of material in the surface can result. The structural material of the components will be stressed originating from load-controlled quantities, for example pressure or dead weight, and/or deformation-controlled quantities, for example thermal expansion or temperature distribution, and thus it can suffer rowing permanent strains and deformations and an exhaustion of the material (damage) both followed by failure. To avoid a failure of the components the design requires the consideration of the following structural failure modes: ductile rupture due to short-term loadings; creep rupture due to long-term loadings; reep-fatigue failure due to cyclic loadings excessive strains due to incremental deformation or creep ratcheting; loss of function due to excessive deformations; loss of stability due to short-term loadings; loss of stability due to long-term loadings; environmentally caused material failure (excessive corrosion); fast fracture due to instable crack growth

  5. Temperature dependence of critical resolved shear stress for cubic metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashid, H.; Fazal-e-Aleem; Ali, M.

    1996-01-01

    The experimental measurements for critical resolved shear stress of various BCC and FCC metals have been explained by using Radiation Model. The temperature dependence of CRSS for different cubic metals is found to the first approximation, to upon the type of the crystal. A good agreement between experimental observations and predictions of the Radiation Model is found. (author)

  6. Effect of noble metals in the decomposition of nitrous oxide over Fe-ferrierites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sobalík, Zdeněk; Jíša, Kamil; Kaucký, Dalibor; Vondrová, Alena; Tvarůžková, Zdenka; Nováková, Jana

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 113, 3-4 (2007), s. 124-129 ISSN 1011-372X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET400400413 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : Fe, Pt, Rh, Ru-ferrierite * synergy effects in Fe/Me-ferrierites * N2O decomposition Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.883, year: 2007

  7. Optical properties of amorphous Ba0.7Sr0.3TiO3 thin films obtained by metal organic decomposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Fei; Xu, Zhimou

    2009-08-01

    In this study, the amorphous Ba0.7Sr0.3TiO3 (BST0.7) thin films were grown onto fused quartz and silicon substrates at low temperature by using a metal organic decomposition (MOD)-spin-coating procedure. The optical transmittance spectrum of amorphous BST0.7 thin films on fused quartz substrates has been recorded in the wavelength range 190~900 nm. The films were highly transparent for wavelengths longer than 330 nm; the transmission drops rapidly at 330 nm, and the cutoff wavelength occurs at about 260 nm. In addition, we also report the amorphous BST0.7 thin film groove-buried type waveguides with 90° bent structure fabricated on Si substrates with 1.65 μm thick SiO2 thermal oxide layer. The design, fabrication and optical losses of amorphous BST0.7 optical waveguides were presented. The amorphous BST0.7 thin films were grown onto the SiO2/Si substrates by using a metal organic decomposition (MOD)-spin-coating procedure. The optical propagation losses were about 12.8 and 9.4 dB/cm respectively for the 5 and 10 μm wide waveguides at the wavelength of 632.8 nm. The 90° bent structures with a small curvature of micrometers were designed on the basis of a double corner mirror structure. The bend losses were about 1.2 and 0.9 dB respectively for 5 and 10 μm wide waveguides at the wavelength of 632.8 nm. It is expected for amorphous BST0.7 thin films to be used not only in the passive optical interconnection in monolithic OEICs but also in active waveguide devices on the Si chip.

  8. Corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel subjected to long-term annealing in the spinodal decomposition temperature range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, K.H.; Kwok, C.T.; Chan, W.K.; Zeng, D.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Long-term DLEPR data on duplex stainless steel. ► Spinodal decomposition remains unabated even after 15,000 h of annealing. ► Effect of long-term annealing on healing has been investigated. - Abstract: The effect of thermal annealing up to 15,000 h between 300 °C and 500 °C on the corrosion resistance of the duplex stainless steel (DSS) 7MoPLUS has been investigated by using the DLEPR test. Spinodal decomposition in 7MoPLUS is unabated even after annealing for 15,000 h and no healing has been observed. The possible healing mechanisms in this temperature range (back diffusion of Cr atoms from the Cr-rich ferrite (α Cr ) and diffusion of Cr atoms from the austenite) and its absence in the present steel have been discussed.

  9. Corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel subjected to long-term annealing in the spinodal decomposition temperature range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, K.H., E-mail: KHLO@umac.mo [Department of Electromechanical Engineering, University of Macau, Macau (China); Kwok, C.T.; Chan, W.K.; Zeng, D. [Department of Electromechanical Engineering, University of Macau, Macau (China)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Long-term DLEPR data on duplex stainless steel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spinodal decomposition remains unabated even after 15,000 h of annealing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of long-term annealing on healing has been investigated. - Abstract: The effect of thermal annealing up to 15,000 h between 300 Degree-Sign C and 500 Degree-Sign C on the corrosion resistance of the duplex stainless steel (DSS) 7MoPLUS has been investigated by using the DLEPR test. Spinodal decomposition in 7MoPLUS is unabated even after annealing for 15,000 h and no healing has been observed. The possible healing mechanisms in this temperature range (back diffusion of Cr atoms from the Cr-rich ferrite ({alpha}{sub Cr}) and diffusion of Cr atoms from the austenite) and its absence in the present steel have been discussed.

  10. Role of soil texture, clay mineralogy, location, and temperature in coarse wood decomposition - a mesocosm experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinzia Fissore; Martin F. Jurgensen; James Pickens; Chris Miller; Deborah Page-Dumroese; Christian P. Giardina

    2016-01-01

    Of all the major pools of terrestrial carbon (C), the dynamics of coarse woody debris (CWD) are the least understood. In contrast to soils and living vegetation, the study of CWD has rarely relied on ex situ methods for elaborating controls on decomposition rates. In this study, we report on a mesocosm incubation experiment examining how clay amount (8%, 16%,...

  11. Metal nanoparticle direct inkjet printing for low-temperature 3D micro metal structure fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Seung Hwan; Nam, Koo Hyun; Chung, Jaewon; Hotz, Nico; Grigoropoulos, Costas P

    2010-01-01

    Inkjet printing of functional materials is a key technology toward ultra-low-cost, large-area electronics. We demonstrate low-temperature 3D micro metal structure fabrication by direct inkjet printing of metal nanoparticles (NPs) as a versatile, direct 3D metal structuring approach representing an alternative to conventional vacuum deposition and photolithographic methods. Metal NP ink was inkjet-printed to exploit the large melting temperature drop of the nanomaterial and the ease of the NP ink formulation. Parametric studies on the basic conditions for stable 3D inkjet printing of NP ink were carried out. Furthermore, diverse 3D metal microstructures, including micro metal pillar arrays, helices, zigzag and micro bridges were demonstrated and electrical characterization was performed. Since the process requires low temperature, it carries substantial potential for fabrication of electronics on a plastic substrate

  12. Temperature dependent quasiparticle renormalization in nickel metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovsyannikov, Ruslan; Sanchez-Barriga, Jaime; Fink, Joerg; Duerr, Hermann A. [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin (Germany). BESSY II

    2009-07-01

    One of the fundamental consequences of electron correlation effects is that the bare particles in solids become 'dressed', i.e. they acquire an increased effective mass and a lifetime. We studied the spin dependent quasiparticle band structure of Ni(111) with high resolution angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy. At low temperatures (50 K) a renormalization of quasiparticle energy and lifetime indicative of electron-phonon coupling is observed in agreement with literature. With increasing temperature we observe a decreasing quasiparticle lifetime at the Fermi level for all probed minority spin bands as expected from electron phonon coupling. Surprisingly the majority spin states behave differently. We actually observe a slightly increased lifetime at room temperature. The corresponding increase in Fermi velocity points to a temperature dependent reduction of the majority spin quasiparticle renormalization.

  13. Investigation of the connection between plasma temperature and electrode temperature in metal-halide lamps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fromm, D.C.; Gleixner, K.H.; Lieder, G.H.

    2002-01-01

    Spatial profiles of electrode temperatures and plasma temperatures have been measured on 'real' HID lamps filled with a commercial metal-halide compound. The absolute accuracy of pyrometric determination of electrode tip temperatures was ±30 K, while the determination of plasma core temperatures, using a modified Bartels method, has an accuracy of ±100 K. We could deduce a close correlation between the plasma temperature in front of an electrode T p and its tip temperature T t due to the influence of the cataphoresis. If T p is reduced at the cathode the T t value has also lowered, whereas T p at the anode is raised together with its T t data. This correlation disappears at ballast frequencies above 100 Hz, whereas the cataphoresis influence on T p continues up to 500 Hz. Based on the latter limit, a rough estimation of the cataphoresis velocity delivers 700 cm s -1 . As a tentative interpretation, we suggest that the connection between T p and T t is caused by an increase of the ion part of the total current at the cathode due to Na accumulation before it. Thus, the cathode has to emit fewer electrons and works at a lower temperature. Further results are the temporal behaviour of T t depends on the ballast type. For vertical operation the strong influence of convection on T t has also to be taken into account. Above 100 Hz, where only convection plays a role, the upper electrode T t exceeds the T t value of the lower electrode by nearly 400 K. This discrepancy one may explain, tentatively, by convection heating of the upper electrode and convection cooling of the lower one. (author)

  14. Initial stages of high temperature metal oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, C.Y.; O'Grady, W.E.

    1981-01-01

    The application of XPS and UPS to the study of the initial stages of high temperature (> 350 0 C) electrochemical oxidation of iron and nickel is discussed. In the high temperature experiments, iron and nickel electrodes were electrochemically oxidized in contact with a solid oxide electrolyte in the uhv system. The great advantages of this technique are that the oxygen activity at the interface may be precisely controlled and the ability to run the reactions in uhv allows the simultaneous observation of the reactions by XPS

  15. Temperature-dependent liquid metal flowrate control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    A temperature-dependent liquid metal flowrate control device includes a magnet and a ferromagnetic member defining therebetween a flow path for liquid metal, the ferromagnetic member being formed of a material having a curie temperature at which a change in the flow rate of the liquid metal is desired. According to the preferred embodiment the magnet is a cylindrical rod magnet axially disposed within a cylindrical member formed of a curie material and having iron pole pieces at the ends. A cylindrical iron shunt and a thin wall stainless steel barrier are disposed in the annulus between magnet and curie material. Below the curie temperature flow between steel barrier and curie material is impeded and above the curie temperature flow impedance is reduced

  16. Performance of HT9 clad metallic fuel at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahl, R.G.; Lahm, C.E.; Hayes, S.L.

    1992-01-01

    Steady-state testing of HT9 clad metallic fuel at high temperatures was initiated in EBR-II in November of 1987. At that time U-10 wt. % Zr fuel clad with the low-swelling ferritic/martensitic alloy HT9 was being considered as driver fuel options for both EBR-II and FFTF. The objective of the X447 test described here was to determine the lifetime of HT9 cladding when operated with metallic fuel at beginning of life inside wall temperatures approaching ∼660 degree C. Though stress-temperature design limits for HT9 preclude its use for high burnup applications under these conditions due to excessive thermal creep, the X447 test was carried out to obtain data on high temperature breach phenomena involving metallic fuel since little data existed in that area

  17. [Temperature sensitivity of CO2 fluxes from rhizosphere soil mineralization and root decomposition in Pinus massoniana and Castanopsis sclerophylla forests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Hu, Xiao-Fei; Chen, Fu-Sheng; Yuan, Ping-Cheng

    2013-06-01

    Rhizospheric and non-rhizospheric soils and the absorption, transition, and storage roots were sampled from the mid-subtropical Pinus massoniana and Castanopsis sclerophylla forests to study the CO2 fluxes from soil mineralization and root decomposition in the forests. The samples were incubated in closed jars at 15 degrees C, 25 degrees C, 35 degrees C, and 45 degrees C, respectively, and alkali absorption method was applied to measure the CO2 fluxes during 53 days incubation. For the two forests, the rhizospheric effect (ratio of rhizospheric to non-rhizospheric soil) on the CO2 flux from soil mineralization across all incubation temperature ranged from 1.12 to 3.09, with a decreasing trend along incubation days. There was no significant difference in the CO2 flux from soil mineralization between the two forests at 15 degrees C, but the CO2 flux was significantly higher in P. massoniana forest than in C. sclerophylla forest at 25 degrees C and 35 degrees C, and in an opposite pattern at 45 degrees C. At all incubation temperature, the CO2 release from the absorption root decomposition was higher than that from the transition and storage roots decomposition, and was smaller in P. massoniana than in C. sclerophylla forest for all the root functional types. The Q10 values of the CO2 fluxes from the two forests were higher for soils (1.21-1.83) than for roots (0.96-1.36). No significant differences were observed in the Q10 values of the CO2 flux from soil mineralization between the two forests, but the Q10 value of the CO2 flux from root decomposition was significantly higher in P. massoniana than in C. sclerophylla forest. It was suggested that the increment of CO2 flux from soil mineralization under global warming was far higher than that from root decomposition, and for P. massoniana than for C. sclerophylla forest. In subtropics of China, the adaptability of zonal climax community to global warming would be stronger than that of pioneer community.

  18. Clean thermal decomposition of tertiary-alkyl metal thiolates to metal sulfides: environmentally-benign, non-polar inks for solution-processed chalcopyrite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jungwoo; Kim, Gi-Hwan; Jeong, Jaeki; Yoon, Yung Jin; Seo, Jung Hwa; Walker, Bright; Kim, Jin Young

    2016-11-01

    We report the preparation of Cu2S, In2S3, CuInS2 and Cu(In,Ga)S2 semiconducting films via the spin coating and annealing of soluble tertiary-alkyl thiolate complexes. The thiolate compounds are readily prepared via the reaction of metal bases and tertiary-alkyl thiols. The thiolate complexes are soluble in common organic solvents and can be solution processed by spin coating to yield thin films. Upon thermal annealing in the range of 200-400 °C, the tertiary-alkyl thiolates decompose cleanly to yield volatile dialkyl sulfides and metal sulfide films which are free of organic residue. Analysis of the reaction byproducts strongly suggests that the decomposition proceeds via an SN1 mechanism. The composition of the films can be controlled by adjusting the amount of each metal thiolate used in the precursor solution yielding bandgaps in the range of 1.2 to 3.3 eV. The films form functioning p-n junctions when deposited in contact with CdS films prepared by the same method. Functioning solar cells are observed when such p-n junctions are prepared on transparent conducting substrates and finished by depositing electrodes with appropriate work functions. This method enables the fabrication of metal chalcogenide films on a large scale via a simple and chemically clear process.

  19. Ultrasonic Resonance of Metallic Spheres at Elevated Temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson , W.

    1996-01-01

    A unique ultrasonic system has been constructed for measuring resonant frequencies and damping of metallic spheres at elevated temperatures. This system employs electromagnetic-acoustic transduction, with a solenoid coil surrounding the sphere in a uniform magnetic field. Temperature is measured with an optical pyrometer. Since the acoustic and temperature measurements are noncontacting, the uncertainties associated with external damping are relatively small. The resonant frequency and Q of t...

  20. The criteria of critical runaway and stable temperatures of catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in the presence of hydrochloric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, K.-T.; Yang, C.-C.; Lin, P.-C.

    2006-01-01

    The hydrogen peroxide and hydrochloric acid are used in close proximity in the computer chip manufacture. The hydrochloric acid catalyzes an exothermic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide into oxygen and water. The accumulation of heat and non-condensable gas increases temperature and pressure in this reaction process always lead to runaway reaction and accident owing to inadvertent mixing. Thus, the chemical reaction hazard has to be clearly identified. Its critical runaway temperatures and unstable reaction criteria in this reaction process have to be determined urgently. In this investigation, we estimated its kinetic parameters at various volumetric ratios of the hydrogen peroxide to hydrochloric acid. Then, used these kinetic parameters to evaluate their critical temperatures and stable criteria in each reaction processes. The analytic results are important and useful for the design of safety system in the computer chip manufacture

  1. High temperature equation of state of metallic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shvets, V. T.

    2007-01-01

    The equation of state of liquid metallic hydrogen is solved numerically. Investigations are carried out at temperatures from 3000 to 20 000 K and densities from 0.2 to 3 mol/cm 3 , which correspond both to the experimental conditions under which metallic hydrogen is produced on earth and the conditions in the cores of giant planets of the solar system such as Jupiter and Saturn. It is assumed that hydrogen is in an atomic state and all its electrons are collectivized. Perturbation theory in the electron-proton interaction is applied to determine the thermodynamic potentials of metallic hydrogen. The electron subsystem is considered in the randomphase approximation with regard to the exchange interaction and the correlation of electrons in the local-field approximation. The proton-proton interaction is taken into account in the hard-spheres approximation. The thermodynamic characteristics of metallic hydrogen are calculated with regard to the zero-, second-, and third-order perturbation theory terms. The third-order term proves to be rather essential at moderately high temperatures and densities, although it is much smaller than the second-order term. The thermodynamic potentials of metallic hydrogen are monotonically increasing functions of density and temperature. The values of pressure for the temperatures and pressures that are characteristic of the conditions under which metallic hydrogen is produced on earth coincide with the corresponding values reported by the discoverers of metallic hydrogen to a high degree of accuracy. The temperature and density ranges are found in which there exists a liquid phase of metallic hydrogen

  2. Investigation into Cause of High Temperature Failure of Boiler Superheater Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, D.; Ray, S.; Roy, H.; Shukla, A. K.

    2015-04-01

    The failure of the boiler tubes occur due to various reasons like creep, fatigue, corrosion and erosion. This paper highlights a case study of typical premature failure of a final superheater tube of 210 MW thermal power plant boiler. Visual examination, dimensional measurement, chemical analysis, oxide scale thickness measurement, microstructural examination are conducted as part of the investigations. Apart from these investigations, sulfur print, Energy Dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X ray diffraction analysis (XRD) are also conducted to ascertain the probable cause of failure of final super heater tube. Finally it has been concluded that the premature failure of the super heater tube can be attributed to the combination of localized high tube metal temperature and loss of metal from the outer surface due to high temperature corrosion. The corrective actions have also been suggested to avoid this type of failure in near future.

  3. Long annealing effect on spin Seebeck devices fabricated using Ce x Y3- x Fe5O12 deposited by metal-organic decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Tatsuyoshi; Hirata, Satoshi; Amemiya, Yoshiteru; Tabei, Tetsuo; Yokoyama, Shin

    2018-04-01

    The effects of Ce content and annealing temperature on the electromotive force produced by spin Seebeck devices fabricated using Ce x Y3- x Fe5O12 deposited by metal-organic decomposition was investigated. The Ce content was first varied (x = 0,1,2,3) for a fixed annealing condition of 3 h at 900 °C. It was found that increasing the Ce content led to a decrease in electromotive force, which meant that x = 0 was the optimum Ce content. Next, the effect of annealing temperature was investigated for a Ce1Y2Fe5O12 film for an annealing time of 14 h. The highest electromotive force of 24.0 µV/50 °C was obtained for a sample annealed for 14 h at 800 °C, although the X-ray diffraction peaks were weaker than those for a sample annealed for 14 h at 950 °C.

  4. Consequences of metallic fuel-cladding liquid phase attack during over-temperature transient on fuel element lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahm, C.E.; Koenig, J.F.; Seidel, B.R.

    1990-01-01

    Metallic fuel elements irradiated in EBR-II at temperatures significantly higher than design, causing liquid phase attack of the cladding, were subsequently irradiated at normal operating temperatures to first breach. The fuel element lifetime was compared to that for elements not subjected to the over-temperature transient and found to be equivalent. 1 ref., 3 figs

  5. Decomposition of methane over alumina supported Fe and Ni–Fe bimetallic catalyst: Effect of preparation procedure and calcination temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Al-Fatesh

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic decomposition of methane has been studied extensively as the production of hydrogen and formation of carbon nanotube is proven crucial from the scientific and technological point of view. In that context, variation of catalyst preparation procedure, calcination temperature and use of promoters could significantly alter the methane conversion, hydrogen yield and morphology of carbon nanotubes formed after the reaction. In this work, Ni promoted and unpromoted Fe/Al2O3 catalysts have been prepared by impregnation, sol–gel and co-precipitation method with calcination at two different temperatures. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, N2 physisorption, temperature programmed reduction (TPR and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA techniques. The catalytic activity was tested for methane decomposition reaction. The catalytic activity was high when calcined at 500 °C temperature irrespective of the preparation method. However while calcined at high temperature the catalyst prepared by impregnation method showed a high activity. It is found from XRD and TPR characterization that disordered iron oxides supported on alumina play an important role for dissociative chemisorptions of methane generating molecular hydrogen. The transmission electron microscope technique results of the spent catalysts showed the formation of carbon nanotube which is having length of 32–34 nm. The Fe nanoparticles are present on the tip of the carbon nanotube and nanotube grows by contraction–elongation mechanism. Among three different methodologies impregnation method was more effective to generate adequate active sites in the catalyst surface. The Ni promotion enhances the reducibility of Fe/Al2O3 oxides showing a higher catalytic activity. The catalyst is stable up to six hours on stream as observed in the activity results.

  6. Effect of metal trifluoroacetates on the thermal decomposition of poly(methyl methacrylate)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokrousov, G.M.; Gavrilenko, N.A.; Eremina, N.S.; Garber, N.G.

    2001-01-01

    Thermal stability of polymethylmethacrylate composition depending on introducing additives of alkali metal trifluoroacetates - Li(TFA), K(TFA), Na(TFA) was studied. Three stages of a mass lost were observed on the curves of thermogravimetry of polymethylmethacrylate modified by lithium, sodium and potassium trifluoroacetates. Activation energies of thermal oxidation destruction of polymethylmethacrylate modified by alkali metal trifluoroacetates were calculated and demonstrated. For lithium the electron donor fragments of competing molecules are constituents of coordination sphere of ion. This is possible on account of its comparatively small polarizing ability and does not lead to essential changing activation energy [ru

  7. Sythesis of metal sulfide nanomaerials via thermal decomposition of single-source percursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jen-La Plante, Ilan; Zeid, Tahani W.; Yang, Peidong; Mokari, Taleb

    2010-06-03

    In this report, we present a synthetic method for the formation of cuprous sulfide (Cu2S) and lead sulfide (PbS) nanomaterials directly on substrates from the thermolysis of single-source precursors. We find that the final morphology and arrangement of the nanomaterials may be controlled through the concentration of the dissolved precursors and choice of solvent. One-dimensional (1-D) morphologies may also be grown onto substrates with the addition of a metal catalyst layer through solution-liquid-solid (SLS) growth. These synthetic techniques may be expanded to other metal sulfide materials.

  8. Study on high temperature desulphurization (Part 2). Hydrogen sulphide adsorption and decomposition in the presence of manganese nodules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yumura, Motoo; Furimsky, E. (National Chemical Lab. for Industry, Tsukuba, (Japan))

    1989-06-29

    Manganese nodule, with its large surface area and inclusion of much Fe and Mn, was found to have a high potentiality as an H{sub 2}S desulphurizing agent. Its desulphurization characteristics and reaction with H{sub 2}S were studied to confirm its potentiality as an H{sub 2}S desulphurizing agent. Improvement of its desulphurizing capacity by adding Ca was also attempted. The first stage of the desulphurization is sulphurizing by the agent. After the complete sulphurization, the adsorbent had catalytic effects on H{sub 2}S decomposition. The amount of H{sub 2}S desulphurization of the manganese nodule did not depend on temperature, but the amount of H{sub 2}S decomposition strongly depended on temperature, with the first and a half order respectively. The addition of 10 wt% of CaO to the manganese nodule improved the amount of desulphurization by 30%. The potentiality of the manganese nodule as a desulphurizing agent was verified, and it is suggested that low cost and high performance desulphurizing agents can be developed by adding low cost compounds which have affinity for H{sub 2}S and large surface areas. 11 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Greatly enhanced flux pinning properties of fluorine-free metal-organic decomposition YBCO films by co-addition of halogens (Cl, Br) and metals (Zr, Sn, Hf)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoki, Takanori; Ikeda, Shuhei; Nakamura, Shin-ichi; Honda, Genki; Nagaishi, Tatsuoki; Doi, Toshiya; Shimoyama, Jun-ichi

    2018-04-01

    Additive-free YBCO films, as well as those with halogen (X) added, metal (M) added and (X, M) co-added, have been prepared by the fluorine-free metal-organic decomposition method on SrTiO3(100) single crystalline substrates, where X = Cl, Br and M = Zr, Sn, Hf. It was revealed that the addition of both Cl and Br to the starting solution resulted in the generation of oxyhalide, Ba2Cu3O4 X 2, in the YBCO films, and that the oxyhalide was found to promote the bi-axial orientation of the YBCO crystals. By adding a decent amount of Cl or Br, highly textured YBCO films with high J c were reproducibly obtained, even when an impurity metal, M, was co-added, while the addition of M without X did not greatly improve J c owing to the poor bi-axial orientation of the YBCO crystals. Our results suggest that the addition of Br more effectively enhances J c than the addition of Cl. The pinning force density at 40 K in 4.8 T reached ˜55 GN m-3 with the co-addition of (Br, M). This value is much larger than that of the pure YBCO film, reaching ˜17 GN m-3.

  10. Decomposing the causes of socioeconomic-related health inequality among urban and rural populations in China: a new decomposition approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jiaoli; Coyte, Peter C; Zhao, Hongzhong

    2017-07-18

    In recent decades, China has experienced tremendous economic growth and also witnessed growing socioeconomic-related health inequality. The study aims to explore the potential causes of socioeconomic-related health inequality in urban and rural areas of China over the past two decades. This study used six waves of the China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS) from 1991 to 2006. The recentered influence function (RIF) regression decomposition method was employed to decompose socioeconomic-related health inequality in China. Health status was derived from self-rated health (SRH) scores. The analyses were conducted on urban and rural samples separately. We found that the average level of health status declined from 1989 to 2006 for both urban and rural populations. Average health scores were greater for the rural population compared with those for the urban population. We also found that there exists pro-rich health inequality in China. While income and secondary education were the main factors to reduce health inequality, older people, unhealthy lifestyles and a poor home environment increased inequality. Health insurance had the opposite effects on health inequality for urban and rural populations, resulting in lower inequality for urban populations and higher inequality for their rural counterparts. These findings suggest that an effective way to reduce socioeconomic-related health inequality is not only to increase income and improve access to health care services, but also to focus on improvements in the lifestyles and the home environment. Specifically, for rural populations, it is particularly important to improve the design of health insurance and implement a more comprehensive insurance package that can effectively target the rural poor. Moreover, it is necessary to comprehensively promote the flush toilets and tap water in rural areas. For urban populations, in addition to promoting universal secondary education, healthy lifestyles should be promoted

  11. Mechanism of radiation and thermal decomposition of sulphide non-ferrous metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazhrenova, N.P.

    1998-01-01

    This paper deals with the non-ferrous metals sulfides in term of their radiative sensitivity, directed chances of their physical-chemical, and hence technological properties by radiation influence both on sulfide materials and on the processes with their participation. (author)

  12. Defect states and room temperature ferromagnetism in cerium oxide nanopowders prepared by decomposition of Ce-propionate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mihalache, V.; Grivel, J. C.; Secu, M.

    2018-01-01

    . An improvement of ferromagnetism and intensity of defect-related PL emission was observed when annealing the products in which nanocrystalline cerium oxide coexists with Ce - oxicarbonate traces, Ce2O2CO3. The experimental results were explained based on the following considerations: room temperature......Four batches of cerium oxide powders (with nanocrystallite size of 6.9 nm–572 nm) were prepared from four precursor nanopowders by thermal decomposition of Ce-propionate and annealing in air between 250 °C–1200 °C for 10 min–240 min. Ceria formation reactions, structure, vibrational, luminescence...... and magnetic properties were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry, x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, photoluminescence and SQUID. All the samples exhibit room temperature ferromagnetism, RTFM, (with coercivity, Hc, of 8 Oe - 121 Oe and saturation magnetization, Ms...

  13. DOM composition and transformation in boreal forest soils: The effects of temperature and organic-horizon decomposition state

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Donnell, Jonathan A.; Aiken, George R.; Butler, Kenna D.; Guillemette, Francois; Podgorski, David C.; Spencer, Robert G. M.

    2016-01-01

    The boreal region stores large amounts of organic carbon (C) in organic-soil horizons, which are vulnerable to destabilization via warming and disturbance. Decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) contributes to the production and turnover of dissolved organic matter (DOM). While temperature is a primary control on rates of SOM and DOM cycling, little is known about temperature effects on DOM composition in soil leachate. Here we conducted a 30 day incubation to examine the effects of temperature (20 versus 5°C) and SOM decomposition state (moss versus fibric versus amorphous horizons) on DOM composition in organic soils of interior Alaska. We characterized DOM using bulk dissolved organic C (DOC) concentration, chemical fractionation, optical properties, and ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry. We observed an increase in DOC concentration and DOM aromaticity in the 20°C treatment compared to the 5°C treatment. Leachate from fibric horizons had higher DOC concentration than shallow moss or deep amorphous horizons. We also observed chemical shifts in DOM leachate over time, including increases in hydrophobic organic acids, polyphenols, and condensed aromatics and decreases in low-molecular weight hydrophilic compounds and aliphatics. We compared ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry and optical data and observed strong correlations between polyphenols, condensed aromatics, SUVA254, and humic-like fluorescence intensities. These findings suggest that biolabile DOM was preferentially mineralized, and the magnitude of this transformation was determined by kinetics (i.e., temperature) and substrate quality (i.e., soil horizon). With future warming, our findings indicate that organic soils may release higher concentrations of aromatic DOM to aquatic ecosystems.

  14. Temperature Discontinuity Caused by Relocation of Meteorological Stations in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-wen Hung

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available With global warming upon us, it has be come increasingly important to identify the extent of this warming trend and in doing so be able to rank mean temperature changes in particular seasons and years. This requires a need for homogeneous climate data, which do not reflect individual anomalies in instruments, station locations or local environments (urbanization. Ac curate homogeneous long-term meteorological data helps show how temperature variations have truly occurred in the climate. Many possible factors contribute to artificial abrupt changes or sharp discontinuities in long time series data, such as the impact of station relocation, changes in observational schedules and instrumentation. Homogeneity adjustments of in situ climate data are very important processes for preparing observational data to be used in further analysis and research. Users require a well-documented history of stations to make appropriate homogeneity adjustments because precise historical back ground records of stations can provide researchers with knowledge of when artificial discontinuity has occurred and its causes. With out such de tailed historical data for each meteorological station, abrupt changes are difficult to interpret. Unfortunately, no homogeneity adjustments for temperature records have been con ducted previously in Tai wan, and present available sources of the history of Taiwan's meteorological stations exhibit in consistencies. In this study, information pertaining to station history, especially relocation records, is pro vided. This information is essential for anal y sis of continuous time series data for temperature and climate warming studies. Temperature data from several stations is given in this study to show how artificial discontinuity occurs due to station relocation. Al though there is no homogeneous adjusted climate data provided in this preliminary work, the summarizing of information regarding station relocations should be of assistance

  15. Acoustic study of the characteristic temperature of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tekuchev, V.V.; Rygalov, L.N.; Ivanova, I.V.; Barashkov, B.I.

    2000-01-01

    The calculation of the Debye temperature for 64 metals, including Be, La, Mo, W, Os, Ni, Cd, In, Ta, U, Sc, Cs, Sr, Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb, Lu, Th is carried out. The data on polonium and promethium are obtained for the first time. The calculation is performed with application of ultrasound velocity value at the melting temperature of the given metal. The average derivation of the calculational data on the Debye temperature from the published ones equals 12%. It is noted, that application of the acoustic method for determination of the characteristic temperature makes it possible to solve the wide range of theoretical and applied problems [ru

  16. Size dependent reactivity of metal nanoparticles and alloys supported on HOPG, probed by the H-D exchange and the NH3 decomposition reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiordaliso, Elisabetta Maria

    this investigation have been summarized in a scientific article which has been submitted to the Journal of Physical Chemistry. The second reaction investigated in this thesis is the NH3 decomposition reaction, relevant for hydrogen storage and production in a COx free environment, which has been performed on Ru, Ir......, Rh and Pt thin films, on Ru nanoparticles and on Ir/Ru alloys. Preliminary results indicated that Ru is the most active among the selected metals, but no definitive conclusions can be drawn on the effect of the particle diameter on the decomposition rate. In the case of the Ru/Ir alloys, it is found...

  17. Formation of a metallic glass by thermal decomposition of Fe(CO)5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wonterghem, Jacques van; Mørup, Steen; Charles, Stuart W.

    1985-01-01

    Iron pentacarbonyl has been thermally decomposed in an organic liquid. Mössbauer spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction studies show that the sample contains small particles of a metallic glass. Annealing of the particles at 523 K results in crystallization of the particles into a mixture of α-Fe and χ......-Fe5C2. The mechanism of glass formation is discussed....

  18. Radiation-chemical decomposition of heavy metal azides - II. Silver azide radiolysis scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryabykh, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    As a result of complex studies on the nature and properties of final products and intermediate particles using a wide number of experimental topography and radiolysis kinetics methods, we offer the AgN 3 radiolysis scheme including the following stages: homogeneous excitation of electron subsystem with 'hot' electrons and holes formed; 'hot' electron and hole thermalization with possible formation of N 4 - radical in volume on the point defects; electron localization on the immobile structural defects whose neighbourhood is rich in the mobile positively charged point defects; metal particle formation due to electrostatic attraction of the nearby mobile defect to the localized electron, with no thermal excitation; metal particle growth, according to both the diffusional mechanism of delivering the volume of corresponding positively charged point defect with consequent electron capture, and by decomposing anions on the interphase with the consequent border layer cation addition to the growing metal particle, interior space formation in the volume by disintegrating 'hot' excitons into ion defect pairs; nitrogen formation on the exterior and interior surfaces, as well as those formed by radiation, either by trapping the hole by surface cation vacancy or by removing the surface cation of the hole with the consequent addition of the second hole to the Vsub(F)-center, and by disintegrating the activated complex into three nitrogen molecules. For the above stages the characteristic parameters are determined by means of direct measurement and calculation. The kinetics and energy conditions of the process are also found. (author)

  19. Kinetic study of lithium-cadmium ternary amalgam decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordova, M.H.; Andrade, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of metals, which form stable lithium phase in binary alloys, on the formation of intermetallic species in ternary amalgams and their effect on thermal decomposition in contact with water is analyzed. Cd is selected as ternary metal, based on general experimental selection criteria. Cd (Hg) binary amalgams are prepared by direct contact Cd-Hg, whereas Li is formed by electrolysis of Li OH aq using a liquid Cd (Hg) cathodic well. The decomposition kinetic of Li C(Hg) in contact with 0.6 M Li OH is studied in function of ageing and temperature, and these results are compared with the binary amalgam Li (Hg) decomposition. The decomposition rate is constant during one hour for binary and ternary systems. Ageing does not affect the binary systems but increases the decomposition activation energy of ternary systems. A reaction mechanism that considers an intermetallic specie participating in the activated complex is proposed and a kinetic law is suggested. (author)

  20. Modelling of initial stages of interstitial solid solution decomposition in bcc metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanter, M S

    1982-01-01

    By means of a model of deformation interaction of interstitial atoms added by interlocking of the nearest positions the configuration of cluster of alien atoms intruded into octahedral ..cap alpha..-Fe, V, Nb and Ta interstitially sites is computerized. The cluster structure is determined by elastic properties, of the crystal lattice of the metal-solvent. Clusters in ..cap alpha..-Fe have a plate form in a plane (001) of half lattice period width, in V, Nb and Ta - of monatomic plate in a plane (110). Clusters of interstitials must be sufficiently stable and arise even in solutions low concentration.

  1. The sensitivity of tropical leaf litter decomposition to temperature: results from a large-scale leaf translocation experiment along an elevation gradient in Peruvian forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, N; Malhi, Y; Meir, P; Silman, M; Roman Cuesta, R; Huaman, J; Salinas, D; Huaman, V; Gibaja, A; Mamani, M; Farfan, F

    2011-03-01

    • We present the results from a litter translocation experiment along a 2800-m elevation gradient in Peruvian tropical forests. The understanding of the environmental factors controlling litter decomposition is important in the description of the carbon and nutrient cycles of tropical ecosystems, and in predicting their response to long-term increases in temperature. • Samples of litter from 15 species were transplanted across all five sites in the study, and decomposition was tracked over 448 d. • Species' type had a large influence on the decomposition rate (k), most probably through its influence on leaf quality and morphology. When samples were pooled across species and elevations, soil temperature explained 95% of the variation in the decomposition rate, but no direct relationship was observed with either soil moisture or rainfall. The sensitivity of the decay rate to temperature (κ(T)) varied seven-fold across species, between 0.024 and 0.169 °C⁻¹, with a mean value of 0.118 ± 0.009 °C⁻¹ (SE). This is equivalent to a temperature sensitivity parameter (Q₁₀) for litter decay of 3.06 ± 0.28, higher than that frequently assumed for heterotrophic processes. • Our results suggest that the warming of approx. 0.9 °C experienced in the region in recent decades may have increased decomposition and nutrient mineralization rates by c. 10%. © 2010 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2010 New Phytologist Trust.

  2. Inducing phase decomposition and superconductivity of Bi2Sr2CaCu2Oy single crystals treated in sulphur atmosphere at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Q.W.; China Univ. of Science and Technology, Hefei, AH; Wu, W.B.; Qian, Y.T.; China Univ. of Science and Technology, Hefei, AH; Wang, L.B.; Li, F.Q.; Zhou, G.E.; Chen, Z.Y.; Zhang, Y.H.

    1995-01-01

    As it has been pointed out, phase decomposition which may be hard to be detected in a polycrystalline system and is likely to correlate with changes in both oxygen content and microstructure, has been observed frequently in annealed single crystals especially at higher temperatures (> 500 C). This is still an open question to some degree because the mechanism of phase decomposition is very complex and is dominated by the composition of the Bi-2212 phase, the condition of heat treatment, and the atmosphere. Hence, inducing oxygen loss at low temperature to avoid the evaporation of Bi atoms and other undetected structure changes which would occur at higher temperature annealing undoubtedly provides important information about the relationship between oxygen loss and phase decomposition, as well as the relationship between oxygen content and superconductivity. In this note, we report on the results of treatments of Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O y single crystals in sulphur atmosphere at 160 C. (orig.)

  3. Hydrothermal treatment of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash for dioxin decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Yuyan; Zhang, Pengfei; Chen, Dezhen; Zhou, Bin; Li, Jianyi; Li, Xian-wei

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The first study to apply Fe-sulfate in hydrothermal treatment of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash for dioxin decomposition. ► The first study to comprehensively evaluate the effect of hydrothermal treatment on dioxin decomposition and heavy metal stabilization in municipal solid waste incineration fly ash. ► Gaussian software chemical computational simulation was performed to investigate the mechanism of dioxin decomposition based on quantum chemistry calculation, and to support the experimental data by the calculation results. - Abstract: Hydrothermal treatment of MSWI fly ash was performed in this paper with a purpose to reduce its dioxin content. First a hydrothermal reactor was set up with a mixture of ferric sulphate and ferrous sulphate serviced as the reactant, then the effects caused by reaction conditions such as reaction temperature, pre-treatment by water-washing and reactant dosage were checked; the results showed that as a promising technology, hydrothermal treatment exhibited considerable high efficiencies in decomposition of PCDDs/PCDFs and good stabilization of heavy metals as well. Experimental results also showed that for dioxin destruction, higher reaction temperature is the most important influencing factor followed by Fe addition, and pre-treatment of raw fly ash by water-washing increased the destruction efficiencies of dioxins only very slightly. Finally with help of Gaussian software chemical computational simulation was performed to investigate the mechanism of dioxin decomposition based on quantum chemistry calculation. The calculation results were supported by the experimental data. The leaching toxicities of hydrothermal products were higher than upper limits defined in the latest Chinese standard GB 16889-2008 for sanitary landfill disposal, thus an auxiliary process is suggested after the hydrothermal treatment for heavy metal stabilization.

  4. Adsorption and decomposition of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) on expanded graphite/metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Wei-Che; Wang, Je-Chuang; Wu, Kuo-Hui

    2018-06-01

    Composites based on expanded graphite (EG) and metal oxides (MOs) were prepared by an explosive combustion and blending method. A metal oxide (Ag2O, CuO or ZnO)-containing phase was employed as a component with reactive functionality, which was supported on EG as a component with adsorptive functionality. The physical properties of the EG/MO composites were examined using SEM and FTIR spectroscopy, the results of which indicated that the MOs were incorporated in the EG matrix after impregnation. Solid state magic angle spinning (MAS) 1H, 31P and cross polarization (CP) MAS 13C NMR studies of the EG/MO composites were performed after adsorption of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP). The FTIR and NMR data showed that the initial uptake occurred through both molecular and reactive adsorption. Molecular adsorption occurred by van der Waals interaction of M(Zn, Cu, Ag)⋯Odbnd P and hydrogen-bond formation to isolated hydroxyl groups. Reactive chemisorption appeared to occur through interaction with both Lewis acid sites and active oxygen species present on the MO surface. The FTIR and NMR results exhibited a trend of reactivity towards DMMP in the order Ag2O > ZnO > CuO, which indicated stronger interaction between the Lewis acid sites and the phosphoryl O atom of DMMP for Ag2O as compared with ZnO and CuO, with concomitant formation of surface-coordinated DMMP and bridge-bonded Osbnd Psbnd O phosphorus oxide species.

  5. Low Temperature Metal Coating Method Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1155-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sang-Wook [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gabel, Howard [Innovative Technology, Inc., Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    2018-01-19

    A new metal coating method, cidled KEM (kinetic energy metal.lization), demonstrated in the laboratory by lnovati, utilized fast-moving solid particIes entrained in a gas that are caused to fiow through a nozzIe to effect particle deposition on metal surfaces at room temperature conditions. This method (US Patent 5,795,626) was an attractive and viabIe alternative to the currentIy available high-temperature coating methods avaiIabIe. Since it differs significantly from existing metal coating technologies, a brief description of the method is incIuded here. The proposed method, KEM, achieves cohesive and adhesive metallurgical bonding through the high-speed coUision of powder with a substrate and the subsequent discharge of electrical charge at the substrate. Such coating is effected by entraining metal powder in a gas and accelerating this mixture through a supersonic nozzle. The gas/powder is directed towards the substrate to be coated. Collisions occur, initiaIly between the powder and the substrate, and, as the first Iayer of the coating forms, between the powder and the coating. During these collisions the powder is rapidly deformed, causing the exposure of fresh (oxide free) active metal surface. When these’active surfaces contact one another, they agglomerate and form true metaIIurgicaI bonds. The resultant coating has Iow porosity and high adhesive and cohesive strength. The formation of metaIIurgicaI bonds is potentiated by the discharge of electrical energy. This electrical energy is the result of triboeIectric charging of the particIes during acceleration and transit to the nozzIe. An advantage of the method is that it does not raise the temperature of the powder being appLiedor that of the substrate. Consequently, materials sensitive to high temperature may be applied without changing Me properties of the materkd or substrate.

  6. Xenon Recovery at Room Temperature using Metal-Organic Frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsaidi, Sameh K. [Physical and Computational Science Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, P. O. Box 426 Ibrahimia Alexandria 21321 Egypt; Ongari, Daniele [Laboratory of Molecular Simulation, Institut des Sciences et Ingeénierie Chimiques, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Rue de l' Industrie 17 1951 Sion Valais Switzerland; Xu, Wenqian [X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Mohamed, Mona H. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, P. O. Box 426 Ibrahimia Alexandria 21321 Egypt; Haranczyk, Maciej [IMDEA Materials Institute, c/Eric Kandel 2 28906 Getafe, Madrid Spain; Thallapally, Praveen K. [Physical and Computational Science Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA

    2017-07-24

    Xenon is known to be a very efficient anesthetic gas but its cost prohibits the wider use in medical industry and other potential applications. It has been shown that Xe recovery and recycle from anesthetic gas mixture can significantly reduce its cost as anesthetic. The current technology uses series of adsorbent columns followed by low temperature distillation to recover Xe, which is expensive to use in medical facilities. Herein, we propose much efficient and simpler system to recover and recycle Xe from simulant exhale anesthetic gas mixture at room temperature using metal organic frameworks. Among the MOFs tested, PCN-12 exhibits unprecedented performance with high Xe capacity, Xe/N2 and Xe/O2 selectivity at room temperature. The in-situ synchrotron measurements suggest the Xe is occupied in the small pockets of PCN-12 compared to unsaturated metal centers (UMCs). Computational modeling of adsorption further supports our experimental observation of Xe binding sites in PCN-12.

  7. Correlation between temperature dependence of elastic moduli and Debye temperature of paramagnetic metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodryakov, V.Yu.; Povzner, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    The correlation between the temperature dependence of elastic moduli and the Debye temperature of paramagnetic metal is analyzed in neglect of the temperature dependence of the Poison coefficient σ within the frames of the Debye-Grueneisen presentations. It is shown, that namely the temperature dependence of the elastic moduli determines primarily the temperature dependence of the Debye temperature Θ(T). On the other hand, the temperature dependence Θ(T) very weakly effects the temperature dependence of the elastic moduli. The later made it possible to formulate the self-consistent approach to calculation of the elastic moduli temperature dependence. The numerical estimates of this dependence parameters are conducted by the example of the all around compression modulus of the paramagnetic lutetium [ru

  8. A study on plastic strain accumulation caused by traveling of temperature distribution synchronizing with temperature rise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okajima, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The prevention of excessive deformation by thermal ratcheting is important in the design of high-temperature components of fast breeder reactors (FBR). This includes evaluation methods for a new type of thermal ratcheting caused by an axial traveling of temperature distribution, which corresponds to moving-up of liquid sodium surface in startup phase. Long range traveling of the axial temperature distribution brings flat plastic deformation profile in wide range. Therefore, at the center of this range, residual stress that brings shakedown behavior does not accumulate. As a result, repeating of this temperature traveling brings continuous accumulation of the plastic strain, even if there is no primary stress. In contrast, in the case with short range traveling, residual stress is caused by constraint against elastic part, and finally it results in shakedown. Because of this mechanism, we supposed that limit for the shakedown behavior depends on distance from the elastic part (i.e. half length of region with plastic deformation). In this paper, we examined characteristics of the accumulation of the plastic strain caused by realistic heat transients, namely, traveling of temperature distribution synchronizing with temperature rise. This examination was based on finite element analyses using elastic-perfectly plastic material. As a result, we confirmed that the shakedown limit depends not on the traveling range of the temperature distribution but the plastic deformation range, which was predicted by the elastic analysis. In the actual application, we can control the plastic deformation range by changing rate of the moving-up of liquid sodium surface. (author)

  9. Heat Transfer in Metal Foam Heat Exchangers at High Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafeez, Pakeeza

    Heat transfer though open-cell metal foam is experimentally studied for heat exchanger and heat shield applications at high temperatures (˜750°C). Nickel foam sheets with pore densities of 10 and 40 pores per linear inch (PPI), have been used to make the heat exchangers and heat shields by using thermal spray coating to deposit an Inconel skin on a foam core. Heat transfer measurements were performed on a test rig capable of generating hot gas up to 1000°C. The heat exchangers were tested by exposing their outer surface to combustion gases at a temperature of 550°C and 750°C while being cooled by air flowing through them at room temperature at velocities up to 5 m/s. The temperature rise of the air, the surface temperature of the heat exchangers and the air temperature inside the heat exchanger were measured. The volumetric heat transfer coefficient and Nusselt number were calculated for different velocities. The heat transfer performance of the 40PPI sample brazed with the foil is found to be the most efficient. Pressure drop measurements were also performed for 10 and 40PPI metal foam. Thermographic measurements were done on 40PPI foam heat exchangers using a high temperature infrared camera. A high power electric heater was used to produce hot air at 300°C that passed over the foam heat exchanger while the cooling air was blown through it. Heat shields were made by depositing porous skins on metal foam and it was observed that a small amount of coolant leaking through the pores notably reduces the heat transfer from the hot gases. An analytical model was developed based assuming local thermal non-equilibrium that accounts for the temperature difference between solid and fluid phase. The experimental results are found to be in good agreement with the predicted values of the model.

  10. Anomalous Temperature Dependence in Metal-Black Phosphorus Contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuefei; Grassi, Roberto; Li, Sichao; Li, Tiaoyang; Xiong, Xiong; Low, Tony; Wu, Yanqing

    2018-01-10

    Metal-semiconductor contact has been the performance limiting problem for electronic devices and also dictates the scaling potential for future generation devices based on novel channel materials. Two-dimensional semiconductors beyond graphene, particularly few layer black phosphorus, have attracted much attention due to their exceptional electronic properties such as anisotropy and high mobility. However, due to its ultrathin body nature, few layer black phosphorus-metal contact behaves differently than conventional Schottky barrier (SB) junctions, and the mechanisms of its carrier transport across such a barrier remain elusive. In this work, we examine the transport characteristic of metal-black phosphorus contact under varying temperature. We elucidated the origin of apparent negative SB heights extracted from classical thermionic emission model and also the phenomenon of metal-insulator transition observed in the current-temperature transistor characteristic. In essence, we found that the SB height can be modulated by the back-gate voltage, which beyond a certain critical point becomes so low that the injected carrier can no longer be described by the conventional thermionic emission theory. The transition from transport dominated by a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution for the high energy tail states, to that of a Fermi distribution by low energy Fermi sea electrons, is the physical origin of the observed metal-insulator transition. We identified two distinctive tunneling limited transport regimes in the contact: vertical and longitudinal tunneling.

  11. Contrasting effects of elevated CO2 and warming on temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition in a Chinese paddy field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhaozhi; Wang, Bingyu; Wang, Jinyang; Pan, Genxing; Xiong, Zhengqin

    2015-10-01

    Climate changes including elevated CO2 and temperature have been known to affect soil carbon (C) storage, while the effects of climate changes on the temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter (SOM) are unclear. A 365-day laboratory incubation was used to investigate the temperature sensitivity for decomposition of labile (Q 10-L) and recalcitrant (Q 10-R) SOMs by comparing the time required to decompose a given amount of C at 25 and 35 °C. Soils were collected from a paddy field that was subjected to four treatments: ambient CO2 and temperature, elevated CO2 (500 μmol/mol), enhanced temperature (+2 °C), and their combination. The results showed that the temperature sensitivity of SOM decomposition increased with increasing SOM recalcitrance in this paddy soil (Q 10-L = 2.21 ± 0.16 vs. Q 10-R = 2.78 ± 0.42; mean ± SD). Elevated CO2 and enhanced temperature showed contrasting effects on the temperature sensitivity of SOM decomposition. Elevated CO2 stimulated Q 10-R but had no effect on Q 10-L; in contrast, enhanced temperature increased Q 10-L but had no effect on Q 10-R. Furthermore, the elevated CO2 combined with enhanced temperature treatment significantly increased Q 10-L and Q 10-R by 18.9 and 10.2 %, respectively, compared to the ambient conditions. Results suggested that the responses of SOM to temperature, especially for the recalcitrant SOM pool, were altered by climate changes. The greatly enhanced temperature sensitivity of SOM decomposition by elevated CO2 and temperature indicates that more CO2 will be released to the atmosphere and losses of soil C may be even greater than that previously expected in paddy field.

  12. Corrosion of metallic materials by uranium hexafluoride at high temperatures (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langlois, G.

    1963-01-01

    The corrosion of the following metals or alloys by UF 6 : nickel, monel, Inconel, gold, platinum, stainless steel, is studied in the temperature range from 300 to 1000 deg. C. The test method, designed to avoid heating the apparatus containing the corrosive fluid to a high temperature, consists in using threadlike samples heated by the Joule effect, the rest of the apparatus being maintained close to room temperature. This technique makes it possible also to determine continuously the penetration of the corrosion by measuring the electrical resistance of the sample with a double Thomson bridge. A series of rapid comparison tests shows that stainless steel, precious metals and Inconel are attacked far too rapidly to be used above 500 deg. C; only monel and especially nickel appear capable of resisting at high temperatures. The detailed examination of the behaviour of nickel shows that the metallic fluoride is volatilized and that this influences the corrosion rate. It shows also the existence of a temperature zone situated between 550 and 700 deg. C in which occurs A strong intergranular corrosion the cause of which appears to be the presence of impurities in the metal. (author) [fr

  13. Thermal decomposition process of silver behenate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xianhao; Lu Shuxia; Zhang Jingchang; Cao Weiliang

    2006-01-01

    The thermal decomposition processes of silver behenate have been studied by infrared spectroscopy (IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), combined thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis-mass spectrometry (TG-DTA-MS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV-vis spectroscopy. The TG-DTA and the higher temperature IR and XRD measurements indicated that complicated structural changes took place while heating silver behenate, but there were two distinct thermal transitions. During the first transition at 138 deg. C, the alkyl chains of silver behenate were transformed from an ordered into a disordered state. During the second transition at about 231 deg. C, a structural change took place for silver behenate, which was the decomposition of silver behenate. The major products of the thermal decomposition of silver behenate were metallic silver and behenic acid. Upon heating up to 500 deg. C, the final product of the thermal decomposition was metallic silver. The combined TG-MS analysis showed that the gas products of the thermal decomposition of silver behenate were carbon dioxide, water, hydrogen, acetylene and some small molecule alkenes. TEM and UV-vis spectroscopy were used to investigate the process of the formation and growth of metallic silver nanoparticles

  14. Metal nanoparticle film-based room temperature Coulomb transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willing, Svenja; Lehmann, Hauke; Volkmann, Mirjam; Klinke, Christian

    2017-07-01

    Single-electron transistors would represent an approach to developing less power-consuming microelectronic devices if room temperature operation and industry-compatible fabrication were possible. We present a concept based on stripes of small, self-assembled, colloidal, metal nanoparticles on a back-gate device architecture, which leads to well-defined and well-controllable transistor characteristics. This Coulomb transistor has three main advantages. By using the scalable Langmuir-Blodgett method, we combine high-quality chemically synthesized metal nanoparticles with standard lithography techniques. The resulting transistors show on/off ratios above 90%, reliable and sinusoidal Coulomb oscillations, and room temperature operation. Furthermore, this concept allows for versatile tuning of the device properties such as Coulomb energy gap and threshold voltage, as well as period, position, and strength of the oscillations.

  15. Metal nanoparticle film–based room temperature Coulomb transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willing, Svenja; Lehmann, Hauke; Volkmann, Mirjam; Klinke, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Single-electron transistors would represent an approach to developing less power–consuming microelectronic devices if room temperature operation and industry-compatible fabrication were possible. We present a concept based on stripes of small, self-assembled, colloidal, metal nanoparticles on a back-gate device architecture, which leads to well-defined and well-controllable transistor characteristics. This Coulomb transistor has three main advantages. By using the scalable Langmuir-Blodgett method, we combine high-quality chemically synthesized metal nanoparticles with standard lithography techniques. The resulting transistors show on/off ratios above 90%, reliable and sinusoidal Coulomb oscillations, and room temperature operation. Furthermore, this concept allows for versatile tuning of the device properties such as Coulomb energy gap and threshold voltage, as well as period, position, and strength of the oscillations. PMID:28740864

  16. Thermal decomposition of polystyrene in the high temperature fabrication technology of hollow microspheres. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorogotovtsev, V.M.; Akunets, A.A.; Merkuliev, Y.A.; Turivnoy, A.P.

    1997-01-01

    The degree and nature of polymer degradation that occurs in the high temperature microshell formation process developed at the Lebedev Physical Institute has been examined experimentally. We find that significant mass degradation occurs during the final stages of shell formation. This manifests itself both in terms of mass loss and molecular weight degradation as measured by gel permeation chromatography. This decrease in the molecular weight may be in part responsible for the relatively fragile nature of the shells produced by this high temperature process. 9 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Temperature dependence of contact resistance at metal/MWNT interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang-Eui; Moon, Kyoung-Seok; Sohn, Yoonchul, E-mail: yoonchul.son@samsung.com [Materials Research Center, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Samsung Electronics, Suwon 443-803 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-11

    Although contact resistance of carbon nanotube (CNT) is one of the most important factors for practical application of electronic devices, a study regarding temperature dependence on contact resistance of CNTs with metal electrodes has not been found. Here, we report an investigation of contact resistance at multiwalled nanotube (MWNT)/Ag interface as a function of temperature, using MWNT/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite. Electrical resistance of MWNT/PDMS composite revealed negative temperature coefficient (NTC). Excluding the contact resistance with Ag electrode, the NTC effect became less pronounced, showing lower intrinsic resistivity with the activation energy of 0.019 eV. Activation energy of the contact resistance of MWNT/Ag interface was determined to be 0.04 eV, two times larger than that of MWNT-MWNT network. The increase in the thermal fluctuation assisted electron tunneling is attributed to conductivity enhancement at both MWNT/MWNT and MWNT/Ag interfaces with increasing temperature.

  18. Temperatures and enthalpies of melting of alkali-metal perrhenates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukas, W.; Gaune-Escard, M.

    1982-01-01

    Melting temperatures and enthalpies of melting were determined for alkali-metal perrhenates by differential enthalpic analysis using a high-temperature Calvet microcalorimeter. The following values were obtained: for LiReO 4 : 692 K and 24.9 kJ.mol -1 ; for NaReO 4 : 693 K and 33 kJ.mol -1 ; for KReO 4 : 828 K and 36 kJ.mol -1 ; for RbReO 4 : 878 K and 34 kJ.mol -1 ; for CsReO 4 : 893 K and 34 kJ.mol -1 . (author)

  19. High temperature behavior of metallic inclusions in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, R.L.

    1980-08-01

    The object of this thesis was to construct a temperature gradient furnace to simulate the thermal conditions in the reactor fuel and to study the migration of metallic inclusions in uranium oxide under the influence of temperature gradient. No thermal migration of molybdenum and tungsten inclusions was observed under the experimental conditions. Ruthenium inclusions, however, dissolved and diffused atomically through grain boundaries in slightly reduced uranium oxide. An intermetallic compound (probably URu 3 ) was formed by reaction of Ru and UO/sub 2-x/. The diffusivity and solubility of ruthenium in uranium oxide were measured

  20. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy links structural moieties of soil organic matter to the temperature sensitivity of its decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soucemarianadin, Laure; Erhagen, Björn; Öquist, Mats; Nilsson, Mats; Schleucher, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) represents a huge carbon pool, specifically in boreal ecosystems. Warming-induced release of large amounts of CO2 from the soil carbon pool might become a significant exacerbating feedback to global warming, if decomposition rates of boreal soils were more sensitive to increased temperatures. Despite a large number of studies dedicated to the topic, it has proven difficult to elucidate how the organo-chemical composition of SOM influences its decomposition, or its quality as a substrate for microbial metabolism. A great part of this challenge results from our inability to achieve a detailed characterization of the complex composition of SOM on the level of molecular structural moieties. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a common tool to characterize SOM. However, SOM is a very complex mixture and the chemical shift regions distinguished in the 13C NMR spectra often represent many different molecular fragments. For example, in the carbohydrates region, signals of all monosaccharides present in many different polymers overlap. This overlap thwarts attempts to identify molecular moieties, resulting in insufficient information to characterize SOM composition. We applied two-dimensional (2D) NMR to characterize SOM with highly increased resolution. We directly dissolved finely ground litters and forest floors'fibric and humic horizons'of both coniferous and deciduous boreal forests in dimethyl sulfoxide and analyzed the resulting solution with a 2D 1H-13C NMR experiment. In the 2D planes of these spectra, signals of CH groups can be resolved based on their 13C and 1H chemical shifts, hence the resolving power and information content of these NMR spectra is hugely increased. The 2D spectra indeed resolved overlaps observed in 1D 13C spectra, so that hundreds of distinct CH groups could be observed and many molecular fragments could be identified. For instance, in the aromatics region, signals from individual lignin units could

  1. Hillock Formation, Metal Lifting and Voiding of an AlCu Metallization due to Temperature Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerster, J.; Schuderer, B.; Haeuser, M.; Kallensee, O.; Gross, Th.

    2004-01-01

    A metalstack with a layer composition of Ti/TiN/AlCu/TiN was evaluated in an AlCu metallization. Reliability results show a higher electromigration lifetime compared to a Ti/AlCu/Ti/TiN stack. During the metallization process flow large elevations were seen by optical inspection. Analysis by SEM cross sections showed different deviations. A metal lifting with void formation as consequence was found in large aluminum areas above tungsten plugs. Also voiding in the passivated Metal 2 and the unpassivated Metal 3 with a cracked anti-reflective coating as a result of the expansion of the aluminum was seen. The influence of processes with high thermal budget on the stress behaviour of the new metalstack was investigated. The final annealing was found as the process with the most critical influence. This study shows the influence of different final annealing temperatures on hillock formation and voiding using a Ti/TiN/AlCu/TiN metalstack. A reduction of the maximum temperature of the final annealing process is necessary for using the new AlCu metallization stack. The use of a surface treatment before deposition showed an optimization of the adhesion

  2. Thermal expansion and decomposition of jarosite: a high-temperature neutron diffraction study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Hongwu [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhao, Yusheng [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vogel, Sven C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hickmott, Donald D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Daemen, Luke L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hartl, Monika A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The structure of deuterated jarosite, KFe{sub 3}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}(OD){sub 6}, was investigated using time-of-flight neutron diffraction up to its dehydroxylation temperature. Rietveld analysis reveals that with increasing temperature, its c dimension expands at a rate {approx}10 times greater than that for a. This anisotropy of thermal expansion is due to rapid increase in the thickness of the (001) sheet of [Fe(O,OH){sub 6}] octahedra and [SO{sub 4}] tetrahedra with increasing temperature. Fitting of the measured cell volumes yields a coefficient of thermal expansion, a = a{sub 0} + a{sub 1} T, where a{sub 0} = 1.01 x 10{sup -4} K{sup -1} and a{sub 1} = -1.15 x 10{sup -7} K{sup -2}. On heating, the hydrogen bonds, O1{hor_ellipsis}D-O3, through which the (001) octahedral-tetrahedral sheets are held together, become weakened, as reflected by an increase in the D{hor_ellipsis}O1 distance and a concomitant decrease in the O3-D distance with increasing temperature. On further heating to 575 K, jarosite starts to decompose into nanocrystalline yavapaiite and hematite (as well as water vapor), a direct result of the breaking of the hydrogen bonds that hold the jarosite structure together.

  3. Leaf litter decomposition rates increase with rising mean annual temperature in Hawaiian tropical montane wet forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lori D. Bothwell; Paul C. Selmants; Christian P. Giardina; Creighton M. Litton

    2014-01-01

    Decomposing litter in forest ecosystems supplies nutrients to plants, carbon to heterotrophic soil microorganisms and is a large source of CO2 to the atmosphere. Despite its essential role in carbon and nutrient cycling, the temperature sensitivityof leaf litter decay in tropical forest ecosystems remains poorly resolved, especially in tropical...

  4. Thermal properties of superconducting bulk metallic glasses at ultralow temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothfuss, Daniel Simon

    2013-01-01

    This thesis describes the first investigation of thermal properties of superconducting bulk metallic glasses in the range between 6mK and 300K. Measuring the thermal conductivity provides the possibility to probe the fundamental interactions governing the heat flow in solids. At ultralow temperatures a novel contactless measuring technique was used, which is based on optical heating and paramagnetic temperature sensors that are read out by a SQUID magnetometer. Below the critical temperature T c the results can be described by resonant scattering of phonons by tunneling systems. Above T c the phonon contribution to the thermal conductivity can be described successfully within a model considering not only electrons and phonons but also localized modes as scattering centres. To expand the accessible temperature range for experiments an adiabatic nuclear demagnetization refrigerator was set up. For measuring the base temperature a novel noise thermometer was developed which enables continuous measuring of the temperature in this temperature range for the first time. Therefore the magnetic Johnson noise of a massive copper cylinder is simultaneously monitored by two SQUID magnetometers. A subsequent cross-correlation suppresses the amplifier noise by more than one order of magnitude. The thermometer was characterized between 42μK and 0.8K showing no deviation from the expected linear behaviour between the power spectral density of the thermal noise and the temperature.

  5. The effects of fire temperatures on water soluble heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, P.; Ubeda, X.; Martin, D. A.

    2009-04-01

    Fire ash are majority composed by base cations, however the mineralized organic matter, led also available to transport a higher quantity of heavy metals that potentially could increase a toxicity in soil and water resources. The amount availability of these elements depend on the environment were the fire took place, burning temperature and combusted tree specie. The soil and water contamination from fire ash has been neglected, because the majority of studies are focused on base cations dynamic. Our research, beside contemplate major elements, is focused in to study the behavior of heavy metals released from ash slurries created at several temperatures under laboratory environment, prescribed fires and wildland fires. The results presented in these communication are preliminary and study the presence of Aluminium (Al3+), Manganese (Mn2+), Iron (Fe2+) and Zinc (Zn2+) of ash slurries generated in laboratory environment at several temperatures (150°, 200°, 250°, 300°, 350°, 400°,450°, 500°, 550°C) from Quercus suber, Quercus robur, Pinus pinea and Pinus pinaster and from a low medium temperature prescribed fire in a forest dominated Quercus suber trees. We observed that ash produced at lower and medium temperatures (Pinus ashes. Fe2+ and Zn2+ showed a reduced concentration in test solution in relation to unburned sample at all temperatures of exposition. In the results obtained from prescribed fire, we identify a higher release of Al3+ and a decrease of the remain elements. The solubilization of these elements are related with pH levels and ash calcite content, because their ability to capture ions in solution. Moreover, the amount and the type of ions released in relation to unburned sample vary in each specie. In this study Al3+ release is related with Quercus species and Mn2+ with Pinus species. Fire ashes can be an environmental problem, because at long term can increase soil acidity. After all base cations have being leached, pH values decrease, and

  6. Hypomorphic temperature-sensitive alleles of NSDHL cause CK syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLarren, Keith W; Severson, Tesa M; du Souich, Christèle; Stockton, David W; Kratz, Lisa E; Cunningham, David; Hendson, Glenda; Morin, Ryan D; Wu, Diane; Paul, Jessica E; An, Jianghong; Nelson, Tanya N; Chou, Athena; DeBarber, Andrea E; Merkens, Louise S; Michaud, Jacques L; Waters, Paula J; Yin, Jingyi; McGillivray, Barbara; Demos, Michelle; Rouleau, Guy A; Grzeschik, Karl-Heinz; Smith, Raffaella; Tarpey, Patrick S; Shears, Debbie; Schwartz, Charles E; Gecz, Jozef; Stratton, Michael R; Arbour, Laura; Hurlburt, Jane; Van Allen, Margot I; Herman, Gail E; Zhao, Yongjun; Moore, Richard; Kelley, Richard I; Jones, Steven J M; Steiner, Robert D; Raymond, F Lucy; Marra, Marco A; Boerkoel, Cornelius F

    2010-12-10

    CK syndrome (CKS) is an X-linked recessive intellectual disability syndrome characterized by dysmorphism, cortical brain malformations, and an asthenic build. Through an X chromosome single-nucleotide variant scan in the first reported family, we identified linkage to a 5 Mb region on Xq28. Sequencing of this region detected a segregating 3 bp deletion (c.696_698del [p.Lys232del]) in exon 7 of NAD(P) dependent steroid dehydrogenase-like (NSDHL), a gene that encodes an enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. We also found that males with intellectual disability in another reported family with an NSDHL mutation (c.1098 dup [p.Arg367SerfsX33]) have CKS. These two mutations, which alter protein folding, show temperature-sensitive protein stability and complementation in Erg26-deficient yeast. As described for the allelic disorder CHILD syndrome, cells and cerebrospinal fluid from CKS patients have increased methyl sterol levels. We hypothesize that methyl sterol accumulation, not only cholesterol deficiency, causes CKS, given that cerebrospinal fluid cholesterol, plasma cholesterol, and plasma 24S-hydroxycholesterol levels are normal in males with CKS. In summary, CKS expands the spectrum of cholesterol-related disorders and insight into the role of cholesterol in human development. Copyright © 2010 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Basic properties of the mixed oxides obtained by thermal decomposition of hydrotalcites containing different metallic compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valente, J.S.; Figueras, F.; Gravelle, M.; Kumbhar, P.; Lopez, J.; Besse, J.P.

    2000-01-25

    Carbonated layered double hydroxides (LDHs) containing Al, Fe, or Cr in a Mg(OH){sub 2} matrix or Al dissolved in hydroxides of Mg, Cu, Ni, Co, or Zn are used as precursors of basic catalysts. Decarbonation is studied by thermal analysis. The average basic strength, evaluated by the decarbonation temperature, is related to the partial charge of oxygen in the LDHs obtained from the Sanderson theory of electronegativity. The enthalpy of adsorption of CO{sub 2} on the resulting mixed oxides is measured by calorimetry. A homogeneous surface is generally observed for CO{sub 2} adsorption, with initial heats of adsorption close to those reported for MgO. The number of sites determined by this method is proportional to the rate constants for {beta}-isophorone isomerization, suggesting that both techniques measure surface properties. The layered structure in which OH{sup {minus}} is the compensating anion can be re-formed by hydration. This process does not appreciably change the adsorption of CO{sub 2}; thus, oxygens and hydroxyls show similar basic strengths in this case.

  8. Theoretical evidence of the observed kinetic order dependence on temperature during the N(2)O decomposition over Fe-ZSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guesmi, Hazar; Berthomieu, Dorothee; Bromley, Bryan; Coq, Bernard; Kiwi-Minsker, Lioubov

    2010-03-28

    The characterization of Fe/ZSM5 zeolite materials, the nature of Fe-sites active in N(2)O direct decomposition, as well as the rate limiting step are still a matter of debate. The mechanism of N(2)O decomposition on the binuclear oxo-hydroxo bridged extraframework iron core site [Fe(II)(mu-O)(mu-OH)Fe(II)](+) inside the ZSM-5 zeolite has been studied by combining theoretical and experimental approaches. The overall calculated path of N(2)O decomposition involves the oxidation of binuclear Fe(II) core sites by N(2)O (atomic alpha-oxygen formation) and the recombination of two surface alpha-oxygen atoms leading to the formation of molecular oxygen. Rate parameters computed using standard statistical mechanics and transition state theory reveal that elementary catalytic steps involved into N(2)O decomposition are strongly dependent on the temperature. This theoretical result was compared to the experimentally observed steady state kinetics of the N(2)O decomposition and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) experiments. A switch of the reaction order with respect to N(2)O pressure from zero to one occurs at around 800 K suggesting a change of the rate determining step from the alpha-oxygen recombination to alpha-oxygen formation. The TPD results on the molecular oxygen desorption confirmed the mechanism proposed.

  9. Optimization of NO oxidation by H2O2 thermal decomposition at moderate temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hai-Qian; Wang, Zhong-Hua; Gao, Xing-Cun; Liu, Cheng-Hao; Qi, Han-Bing

    2018-01-01

    H2O2 was adopted to oxidize NO in simulated flue gas at 100-500°C. The effects of the H2O2 evaporation conditions, gas temperature, initial NO concentration, H2O2 concentration, and H2O2:NO molar ratio on the oxidation efficiency of NO were investigated. The reason for the narrow NO oxidation temperature range near 500°C was determined. The NO oxidation products were analyzed. The removal of NOx using NaOH solution at a moderate oxidation ratio was studied. It was proven that rapid evaporation of the H2O2 solution was critical to increase the NO oxidation efficiency and broaden the oxidation temperature range. the NO oxidation efficiency was above 50% at 300-500°C by contacting the outlet of the syringe needle and the stainless-steel gas pipe together to spread H2O2 solution into a thin film on the surface of the stainless-steel gas pipe, which greatly accelerated the evaporation of H2O2. The NO oxidation efficiency and the NO oxidation rate increased with increasing initial NO concentration. This method was more effective for the oxidation of NO at high concentrations. H2O2 solution with a concentration higher than 15% was more efficient in oxidizing NO. High temperatures decreased the influence of the H2O2 concentration on the NO oxidation efficiency. The oxidation efficiency of NO increased with an increase in the H2O2:NO molar ratio, but the ratio of H2O2 to oxidized NO decreased. Over 80% of the NO oxidation product was NO2, which indicated that the oxidation ratio of NO did not need to be very high. An 86.7% NO removal efficiency was obtained at an oxidation ratio of only 53.8% when combined with alkali absorption.

  10. Experimental determination of the temperature dependence of metallic work functions at low temperatures. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pipes, P.B.

    1977-01-01

    Progress made under ERDA Contract No. EY-76-S-02-2314.002 is described. Efforts to gain theoretical insight into the temperature dependence of the contact potential of Nb near the superconducting transition have only been qualitatively successful. Preliminary measurements of adsorbed 4 He gas on the temperature dependence of the contact potentials of metals were performed and compared with a previously developed theory

  11. Efficient decomposition of formaldehyde at room temperature over Pt/honeycomb ceramics with ultra-low Pt content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Longhui; Zheng, Yingqiu; Yu, Jiaguo

    2014-09-14

    Pt/honeycomb ceramic (Pt/HC) catalysts with ultra-low Pt content (0.005-0.055 wt%) were for the first time prepared by an impregnation of honeycomb ceramics with Pt precursor and NaBH4-reduction combined method. The microstructures, morphologies and textural properties of the resulting samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The obtained Pt/HC catalysts were used for catalytic oxidative decomposition of formaldehyde (HCHO) at room temperature. It was found that the as-prepared Pt/HC catalysts can efficiently decompose HCHO in air into CO2 and H2O at room temperature. The catalytic activity of the Pt/HC catalysts increases with increasing the Pt loading in the range of 0.005-0.013 wt%, and the further increase of the Pt loading does not obviously improve catalytic activity. From the viewpoint of cost and catalytic performance, 0.013 wt% Pt loading is the optimal Pt loading amount, and the Pt/HC catalyst with 0.013 wt% Pt loading also exhibited good catalytic stability. Considering practical applications, this work will provide new insights into the low-cost and large-scale fabrication of advanced catalytic materials for indoor air purification.

  12. A Two-Dimensional Multiphysics Coupling Model of a Middle and Low Temperature Solar Receiver/Reactor for Methanol Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanjuan Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: In this paper, the endothermic methanol decomposition reaction is used to obtain syngas by transforming middle and low temperature solar energy into chemical energy. A two-dimensional multiphysics coupling model of a middle and low temperature of 150~300 °C solar receiver/reactor was developed, which couples momentum equation in porous catalyst bed, the governing mass conservation with chemical reaction, and energy conservation incorporating conduction/convection/radiation heat transfer. The complex thermochemical conversion process of the middle and low temperature solar receiver/reactor (MLTSRR system was analyzed. The numerical finite element method (FEM model was validated by comparing it with the experimental data and a good agreement was obtained, revealing that the numerical FEM model is reliable. The characteristics of chemical reaction, coupled heat transfer, the components of reaction products, and the temperature fields in the receiver/reactor were also revealed and discussed. The effects of the annulus vacuum space and the glass tube on the performance of the solar receiver/reactor were further studied. It was revealed that when the direct normal irradiation increases from 200 W/m2 to 800 W/m2, the theoretical efficiency of solar energy transformed into chemical energy can reach 0.14–0.75. When the methanol feeding rate is 13 kg/h, the solar flux increases from 500 W/m2 to 1000 W/m2, methanol conversion can fall by 6.8–8.9% with air in the annulus, and methanol conversion can decrease by 21.8–28.9% when the glass is removed from the receiver/reactor.

  13. Photo-catalytic studies of transition metal doped titanium dioxide thin films processed by metalorganic decomposition (MOD) method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talagala, P.; Marko, X.; Padmanabhan, K. R.; Naik, R.; Rodak, D.; Cheng, Y. T.

    2006-03-01

    We have synthesized pure and transition element (Fe, Co and V) doped Titanium oxide thin films of thickness ˜ 350 nm on sapphire, Si, and stainless steel substrates by Metalorganic Decomposition (MOD) method. The films were subsequently annealed at appropriate temperatures ( 500-750C) to obtain either anatase or the rutile phase of TiO2. Analysis of the composition of the films were performed by energy dispersive X-ray(EDAX) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry(RBS). Ion channeling was used to identify possible epitaxial growth of the films on sapphire. Both XRD and Raman spectra of the films exhibit that the films annealed at 550C are of anatase phase, while those annealed at 700C seem to prefer a rutile structure. The water contact angle measurements of the films before and after photoactivation, demonstrate a significant reduction in the contact angle for the anatase phase. However, the variation in contact angle was observed for films exposed to UV (<10^o-30^o) and dark (25^o-50^o). Films doped with Fe show a trend towards lower contact angle than those doped with Co. Results with films doped with V will also be included.

  14. Decomposition of Sodium Tetraphenylborate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    The chemical decomposition of aqueous alkaline solutions of sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) has been investigated. The focus of the investigation is on the determination of additives and/or variables which influence NaTBP decomposition. This document describes work aimed at providing better understanding into the relationship of copper (II), solution temperature, and solution pH to NaTPB stability

  15. HIGH TEMPERATURE CORROSION RESISTANCE OF METALLIC MATERIALS IN HARSH CONDITIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Novello, Frederic; Dedry, Olivier; De Noose, Vincent; Lecomte-Beckers, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Highly efficient energy recovery from renewable sources and from waste incineration causes new problems of corrosion at high temperature. A similar situation exists for new recycling processes and new energy storage units. These corrosions are generally considered to be caused by ashes or molten salts, the composition of which differs considerably from one plant to another. Therefore, for the assessment of corrosion-resistance of advanced materials, it is essential to precisely evaluate the c...

  16. Mathematical model of the metal mould surface temperature optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mlynek, Jaroslav, E-mail: jaroslav.mlynek@tul.cz; Knobloch, Roman, E-mail: roman.knobloch@tul.cz [Department of Mathematics, FP Technical University of Liberec, Studentska 2, 461 17 Liberec, The Czech Republic (Czech Republic); Srb, Radek, E-mail: radek.srb@tul.cz [Institute of Mechatronics and Computer Engineering Technical University of Liberec, Studentska 2, 461 17 Liberec, The Czech Republic (Czech Republic)

    2015-11-30

    The article is focused on the problem of generating a uniform temperature field on the inner surface of shell metal moulds. Such moulds are used e.g. in the automotive industry for artificial leather production. To produce artificial leather with uniform surface structure and colour shade the temperature on the inner surface of the mould has to be as homogeneous as possible. The heating of the mould is realized by infrared heaters located above the outer mould surface. The conceived mathematical model allows us to optimize the locations of infrared heaters over the mould, so that approximately uniform heat radiation intensity is generated. A version of differential evolution algorithm programmed in Matlab development environment was created by the authors for the optimization process. For temperate calculations software system ANSYS was used. A practical example of optimization of heaters locations and calculation of the temperature of the mould is included at the end of the article.

  17. Mathematical model of the metal mould surface temperature optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mlynek, Jaroslav; Knobloch, Roman; Srb, Radek

    2015-01-01

    The article is focused on the problem of generating a uniform temperature field on the inner surface of shell metal moulds. Such moulds are used e.g. in the automotive industry for artificial leather production. To produce artificial leather with uniform surface structure and colour shade the temperature on the inner surface of the mould has to be as homogeneous as possible. The heating of the mould is realized by infrared heaters located above the outer mould surface. The conceived mathematical model allows us to optimize the locations of infrared heaters over the mould, so that approximately uniform heat radiation intensity is generated. A version of differential evolution algorithm programmed in Matlab development environment was created by the authors for the optimization process. For temperate calculations software system ANSYS was used. A practical example of optimization of heaters locations and calculation of the temperature of the mould is included at the end of the article

  18. Effect of temperature on swelling and bubble growth in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, G.P.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the swelling of copper-boron alloys has been studied in the temperature range of 900-1040deg C. It is observed that beyond 1030deg C, swelling as well as the rate of bubble growth decrease. Similar characteristics of the bubble growth have been observed in aluminium-boron alloys also. At 590deg C, the bubble growth in aluminium-boron alloys is faster as compared to that at 640deg C. It thus appears that the swelling as well as the growth of the gas bubble are retarded at temperatures near the melting point in metals. Possible reasons for this kind of behaviour are discussed. (author)

  19. The effect of transition metals additions on the temperature coefficient of linear expansion of titanium and vanadium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesnaya, M.I.; Volokitin, G.G.; Kashchuk, V.A.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported of an experimental research into the influence of small additions of α-transition metals on the temperature coefficient of linear expansion of titanium and vanadium. Using the configuration model of substance as the basis, expeained are the lowering of the critical liquefaction temperature or the melting point of vanadium and the raising of it, as caused by the addition of metals of the 6 group of the periodic chart and by the addition of metals of the 8 group, respectively, and also a shift in the temperature of the polymorphic α-β-transformation of titanium. Suggested as the best alloying metal for vanadium are tungsten and tantalum; for titaniums is vanadium whose admixtures lower the melting point and shift the polymorphic transformation temperature by as much as 100 to 120 degrees

  20. Carbon Allotrope Dependence on Temperature and Pressure During Thermal Decomposition of Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    hydrogen and argon have been examined by previous work [19]–[21] as an aid to control the release and formation of SiO2 during the CNT growth process...Intense Raman scattering occurs from vibrations which cause a change in the polarizability of the 29 electron cloud around the molecule. Usually...molecule such as oxygen, this is a simple stretch of the O–O bond. This will change the polarizability of the molecule but will not induce any dipole

  1. Brazing refractory metals used in high-temperature nuclear instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, A. J.; Woolstenhulme, C. J.

    2009-01-01

    As part of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored Next Generation Nuclear Project (NGNP) currently ongoing at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the irradiation performance of candidate high-temperature gas reactor fuels and materials is being evaluated at INL's Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The design of the first Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR-1) TRISO fuel experiment, currently being irradiated in the ATR, required development of special techniques for brazing niobium and molybdenum. Brazing is one technique used to join refractory metals to each other and to stainless steel alloys. Although brazing processes are well established, it is difficult to braze niobium, molybdenum, and most other refractory metals because they quickly develop adherent oxides when exposed to room-temperature air. Specialized techniques and methods were developed by INL to overcome these obstacles. This paper describes the techniques developed for removing these oxides, as well as the ASME Section IX-qualified braze procedures that were developed as part of the AGR-1 project. All brazes were made using an induction coil with an inert or reducing atmosphere at low pressure. Other parameters, such as filler metals, fluxes used, and general setup procedures, are also discussed. (authors)

  2. Brazing Refractory Metals Used In High-Temperature Nuclear Instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, A.J.; Woolstenhulme, C.J.

    2009-01-01

    As part of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored Next Generation Nuclear Project (NGNP) currently ongoing at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the irradiation performance of candidate high-temperature gas reactor fuels and materials is being evaluated at INL's Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The design of the first Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR 1) experiment, currently being irradiated in the ATR, required development of special techniques for brazing niobium and molybdenum. Brazing is one technique used to join refractory metals to each other and to stainless steel alloys. Although brazing processes are well established, it is difficult to braze niobium, molybdenum, and most other refractory metals because they quickly develop adherent oxides when exposed to room-temperature air. Specialized techniques and methods were developed by INL to overcome these obstacles. This paper describes the techniques developed for removing these oxides, as well as the ASME Section IX-qualified braze procedures that were developed as part of the AGR-1 project. All brazes were made using an induction coil with an inert or reducing atmosphere at low pressure. Other parameters, such as filler metals, fluxes used, and general setup procedures, are also discussed

  3. Brazing refractory metals used in high-temperature nuclear instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, A. J. [Idaho National Laboratory, MS 3840, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Woolstenhulme, C. J. [EG and G Services, Inc., (United States)

    2009-07-01

    As part of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored Next Generation Nuclear Project (NGNP) currently ongoing at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the irradiation performance of candidate high-temperature gas reactor fuels and materials is being evaluated at INL's Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The design of the first Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR-1) TRISO fuel experiment, currently being irradiated in the ATR, required development of special techniques for brazing niobium and molybdenum. Brazing is one technique used to join refractory metals to each other and to stainless steel alloys. Although brazing processes are well established, it is difficult to braze niobium, molybdenum, and most other refractory metals because they quickly develop adherent oxides when exposed to room-temperature air. Specialized techniques and methods were developed by INL to overcome these obstacles. This paper describes the techniques developed for removing these oxides, as well as the ASME Section IX-qualified braze procedures that were developed as part of the AGR-1 project. All brazes were made using an induction coil with an inert or reducing atmosphere at low pressure. Other parameters, such as filler metals, fluxes used, and general setup procedures, are also discussed. (authors)

  4. High Pressure/Temperature Metal Silicate Partitioning of Tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shofner, G. A.; Danielson, L.; Righter, K.; Campbell, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The behavior of chemical elements during metal/silicate segregation and their resulting distribution in Earth's mantle and core provide insight into core formation processes. Experimental determination of partition coefficients allows calculations of element distributions that can be compared to accepted values of element abundances in the silicate (mantle) and metallic (core) portions of the Earth. Tungsten (W) is a moderately siderophile element and thus preferentially partitions into metal versus silicate under many planetary conditions. The partitioning behavior has been shown to vary with temperature, silicate composition, oxygen fugacity, and pressure. Most of the previous work on W partitioning has been conducted at 1-bar conditions or at relatively low pressures, i.e. pressure. Predictions based on extrapolation of existing data and parameterizations suggest an increased pressured dependence on metal/ silicate partitioning of W at higher pressures 5. However, the dependence on pressure is not as well constrained as T, fO2, and silicate composition. This poses a problem because proposed equilibration pressures for core formation range from 27 to 50 GPa, falling well outside the experimental range, therefore requiring exptrapolation of a parametereized model. Higher pressure data are needed to improve our understanding of W partitioning at these more extreme conditions.

  5. Xenon Recovery at Room Temperature using Metal-Organic Frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsaidi, Sameh K. [Physical and Computational Science Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, P. O. Box 426 Ibrahimia Alexandria 21321 Egypt; Ongari, Daniele [Laboratory of Molecular Simulation, Institut des Sciences et Ingeénierie Chimiques, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Rue de l' Industrie 17 1951 Sion Valais Switzerland; Xu, Wenqian [X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Mohamed, Mona H. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, P. O. Box 426 Ibrahimia Alexandria 21321 Egypt; Haranczyk, Maciej [IMDEA Materials Institute, c/Eric Kandel 2 28906 Getafe, Madrid Spain; Thallapally, Praveen K. [Physical and Computational Science Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA

    2017-07-24

    Xenon is known to be a very efficient anesthetic gas but its cost prohibits the wider use in medical industry and other potential applications. It has been shown that Xe recovery and recycle from anesthetic gas mixture can significantly reduce its cost as anesthetic. The current technology uses series of adsorbent columns followed by low temperature distillation to recover Xe, which is expensive to use in medical facilities. Herein, we propose much efficient and simpler system to recover and recycle Xe from simulant exhale anesthetic gas mixture at room temperature using metal organic frameworks. Among the MOFs tested, PCN-12 exhibits unprecedented performance with high Xe capacity, Xe/O2, Xe/N2 and Xe/CO2 selectivity at room temperature. The in-situ synchrotron measurements suggest the Xe is occupied in the small pockets of PCN-12 compared to unsaturated metal centers (UMCs). Computational modeling of adsorption further supports our experimental observation of Xe binding sites in PCN-12.

  6. Ozone decomposition on Ag/SiO{sub 2} and Ag/clinoptilolite catalysts at ambient temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolov, Penko, E-mail: penmail@mail.bg [Institute of Catalysis, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Genov, Krassimir; Konova, Petya [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Milenova, Katya; Batakliev, Todor; Georgiev, Vladimir [Institute of Catalysis, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Kumar, Narendra [Laboratory of Industrial Chemistry, Process Chemistry Centre, Abo Akademi University, Biskopsgatan 8, 20500 Abo/Turku (Finland); Sarker, Dipak K. [School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences, University of Brighton, Lewes Road, Brighton BN2 4GJ (United Kingdom); Pishev, Dimitar [University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 1756 Sofia (Bulgaria); Rakovsky, Slavcho [Institute of Catalysis, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2010-12-15

    Silver modified zeolite (Bulgarian natural clinoptilolite) and Ag/silica catalysts were synthesized by ion exchange and incipient wet impregnation method respectively and characterized by different techniques. DC arc-AES was used for Ag detection. XRD spectra show that Ag is loaded over the surface of the SiO{sub 2} sample and that after the ion-exchange process the HEU type structure of clinoptilolite is retained. UV-VIS (specific reflection at 310 nm) and IR (band at 695 cm{sup -1}) spectroscopy analysis proved that silver is loaded as a T-atom into zeolite channels as Ag{sup +}, instead of Na{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+}, or K{sup +} ions, existing in the natural clinoptilolite form. The samples Ag/SiO{sub 2} and Ag-clinoptilolite were tested as catalysts for decomposition of gas phase ozone. Very high catalytic activity (up to 99%) was observed and at the same time the catalysts remained active over time at room temperature.

  7. Room temperature desorption of helium-3 from metal tritides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beavis, L.C.; Kass, W.J.

    1976-10-01

    It has long been known that helium-3 accumulates in metal tritides as tritium decays. Early in life nearly 100% of the helium-3 is retained in the lattice, but when a critical concentration is reached (material dependent), the lattice will no longer retain the helium-3 and it is emitted at about the generation rate. Measurements were recently made on a number of erbium tritides with varying concentrations in the ditritide phase. The expected early release characteristics are observed for all of the samples. However, ditritides with higher tritium concentrations reach the rapid release state at much lower helium-3 concentrations. For instance, the helium to metal concentration for rapid release in the unsaturated ditritide is about 0.22, whereas it is only one-tenth this value in the saturated ditritide. The additional tritium in the tritide appears to be the cause of this effect

  8. Modelling of the high temperature behaviour of metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohr, R.

    1999-01-01

    The design of components of metallic high-temperature materials by the finite element method requires the application of phenomenological viscoplastic material models. The route from the choice of a convenient model, the numerical integration of the equations and the parameter identification to the design of components is described. The Chaboche-model is used whose evolution equations are explicitly integrated. The parameters are determined by graphical and numerical methods in order to use the material model for describing the deformation behaviour of a chromium steel and an intermetallic titanium aluminide alloy. (orig.)

  9. Synthesis of nanostructured NiO/Co3O4 through thermal decomposition of a bimetallic (Ni/Co) metal-organic framework as catalyst for cyclooctene epoxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Alireza; Soleimani, Mohammad; Najafi, Mahnaz; Geranmayeh, Shokoofeh

    2017-04-01

    Hydrothermal approach has led to the formation of a three-dimensional metal-organic framework (MOF), [NiCo(μ2-tp)(μ4-tp)(4,4‧-bpy)2]n (1) (tp = terephthalic acid and 4,4‧-bpy = 4,4‧-bipyridine) which was characterized by means of single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), FT-IR spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and inductive coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Thermal decomposition of the MOF afforded nanostructured mixed metal oxide, namely NiO/Co3O4. The XRD and SEM analysis confirm the formation of the mixed metal oxide. The nanostructured NiO/Co3O4 demonstrated good catalytic activity and selectivity in the epoxidation of cyclooctene in the presence of tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) as oxidant.

  10. Platinum redispersion on metal oxides in low temperature fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripković, Vladimir; Cerri, Isotta; Nagami, Tetsuo; Bligaard, Thomas; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2013-03-07

    We have analyzed the aptitude of several metal oxide supports (TiO(2), SnO(2), NbO(2), ZrO(2), SiO(2), Ta(2)O(5) and Nb(2)O(5)) to redisperse platinum under electrochemical conditions pertinent to the Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) cathode. The redispersion on oxide supports in air has been studied in detail; however, due to different operating conditions it is not straightforward to link the chemical and the electrochemical environment. The largest differences reflect in (1) the oxidation state of the surface (the oxygen species coverage), (2) temperature and (3) the possibility of platinum dissolution at high potentials and the interference of redispersion with normal working potential of the PEMFC cathode. We have calculated the PtO(x) (x = 0, 1, 2) adsorption energies on different metal oxides' surface terminations as well as inside the metal oxides' bulk, and we have concluded that NbO(2) might be a good support for platinum redispersion at PEMFC cathodes.

  11. Selective and low temperature transition metal intercalation in layered tellurides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Takeshi; Koshiko, Masaki; Zhang, Yaoqing; Oguchi, Tamio; Yu, Wen; Kato, Daichi; Kobayashi, Yoji; Orikasa, Yuki; Yamamoto, Takafumi; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Green, Mark A.; Kageyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Layered materials embrace rich intercalation reactions to accommodate high concentrations of foreign species within their structures, and find many applications spanning from energy storage, ion exchange to secondary batteries. Light alkali metals are generally most easily intercalated due to their light mass, high charge/volume ratio and in many cases strong reducing properties. An evolving area of materials chemistry, however, is to capture metals selectively, which is of technological and environmental significance but rather unexplored. Here we show that the layered telluride T2PTe2 (T=Ti, Zr) displays exclusive insertion of transition metals (for example, Cd, Zn) as opposed to alkali cations, with tetrahedral coordination preference to tellurium. Interestingly, the intercalation reactions proceed in solid state and at surprisingly low temperatures (for example, 80 °C for cadmium in Ti2PTe2). The current method of controlling selectivity provides opportunities in the search for new materials for various applications that used to be possible only in a liquid. PMID:27966540

  12. Low temperature intermediate band metallic behavior in Ti implanted Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olea, Javier, E-mail: oleaariza@fis.ucm.es; Pastor, David; Garcia-Hemme, Eric; Garcia-Hernansanz, Rodrigo; Prado, Alvaro del; Martil, Ignacio; Gonzalez-Diaz, German

    2012-08-31

    Si samples implanted with very high Ti doses and subjected to Pulsed-Laser Melting (PLM) have been electrically analyzed in the scope of a two-layer model previously reported based on the Intermediate Band (IB) theory. Conductivity and Hall effect measurements using the van der Pauw technique suggest that the insulator-metal transition takes place for implantation doses in the 10{sup 14}-10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} range. Results of the sample implanted with the 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} dose show a metallic behavior at low temperature that is explained by the formation of a p-type IB out of the Ti deep levels. This suggests that the IB would be semi-filled, which is essential for IB photovoltaic devices. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We fabricated high dose Ti implanted Si samples for intermediate band research. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We measured the electronic transport properties in the 7-300 K range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show an insulator to metallic transition when the intermediate band is formed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The intermediate band is semi-filled and populated by holes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We satisfactorily explain the electrical behavior by an intermediate band model.

  13. The influence of temperature and salt on metal and sediment removal in stormwater biofilters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søberg, Laila C; Viklander, Maria; Blecken, Godecke-Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Stormwater biofilters are used to treat stormwater runoff. In countries with cold winter climates, biofilters are subject to low temperatures which, in some cases, are combined with potentially high salt concentrations from road de-icing, potentially affecting the biofilter's performance. Since stormwater biofilters have been developed without consideration of their critical winter use, a laboratory study was carried out to evaluate the performance of stormwater biofilters subjected to low and high temperatures, with and without salt. Both factors and their interaction had a significant effect on outflow concentrations and removal percentages. Salt had a negative impact on outflow concentrations, causing lower removal percentages for (especially dissolved) metals, this impact being most pronounced for Cu and Pb. The unrealistic combination of salt with high temperature seemed to further amplify the negative impacts of salt despite the fact that temperature alone did not cause significant differences in outflow concentrations and removal percentages. Still, biofilters showed the ability to treat stormwater efficiently under the simulated winter conditions; outflow concentrations for total metals as a minimum met the class 4 threshold value defined in the Swedish freshwater quality guidelines, while inflow concentrations clearly exceeded the threshold value for class 5. The relatively coarse filter material (which is recommended to facilitate infiltration during winter) did not seem to exacerbate biofilter performance.

  14. Fragmentation of molten metal drop with instantaneous contact temperature below the boiling point of Na

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inukai, S.; Sugiyama, K. [Hokkaido Univ., Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Sapporo (Japan); Nishimura, S.; Kinoshita, I. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    The consequence of the core disruptive accidents in metallic-fueled Na-cooled reactors is strongly affected by the feedback reactivity originating in the boiling of Na and the dispersion of molten fuel due to fuel-coolant interactions. The design of the core configuration to promote the dispersion of molten fuel is therefore very important for social acceptance. It has been recognized in this context that metallic fuel has a potentiality to make liquefied fuel with fuel pin tube even in the temperature range below the boiling point of Na. If the liquefied fuel solidified without fuel-coolant interactions in the core region, this event leads the core condition to a pessimistic scenario of re-criticality. As a basic study related to this problem, the present experimental study investigates the possibility of fragmentation of metal drop with instantaneous contact temperature below the boiling point of Na (883 C). The molten Al drop, which has a melting point of 660 C above the operational temperature range of core, was selected as a simulant of liquefied fuel in the present study. Al particles of 5 g or 0.56 g were heated up to the initial temperature ranging from 850 C to 1113 C in a crucible by using an electric heater. The molten Al drop was dropped into a sodium pool adjusted the temperature from 280 C to 499 C. The Al drop at initial temperature sufficiently higher that the boiling point of Na was observed to fragment into pieces under the condition of instantaneous contact temperature below the boiling point of Na. It is confirmed that the fragmentation is caused due to the thermal interactions between the molten Al and the Na entrapped into the drop. (author)

  15. Fragmentation of molten metal drop with instantaneous contact temperature below the boiling point of Na

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inukai, S.; Sugiyama, K.; Nishimura, S.; Kinoshita, I.

    2001-01-01

    The consequence of the core disruptive accidents in metallic-fueled Na-cooled reactors is strongly affected by the feedback reactivity originating in the boiling of Na and the dispersion of molten fuel due to fuel-coolant interactions. The design of the core configuration to promote the dispersion of molten fuel is therefore very important for social acceptance. It has been recognized in this context that metallic fuel has a potentiality to make liquefied fuel with fuel pin tube even in the temperature range below the boiling point of Na. If the liquefied fuel solidified without fuel-coolant interactions in the core region, this event leads the core condition to a pessimistic scenario of re-criticality. As a basic study related to this problem, the present experimental study investigates the possibility of fragmentation of metal drop with instantaneous contact temperature below the boiling point of Na (883 C). The molten Al drop, which has a melting point of 660 C above the operational temperature range of core, was selected as a simulant of liquefied fuel in the present study. Al particles of 5 g or 0.56 g were heated up to the initial temperature ranging from 850 C to 1113 C in a crucible by using an electric heater. The molten Al drop was dropped into a sodium pool adjusted the temperature from 280 C to 499 C. The Al drop at initial temperature sufficiently higher that the boiling point of Na was observed to fragment into pieces under the condition of instantaneous contact temperature below the boiling point of Na. It is confirmed that the fragmentation is caused due to the thermal interactions between the molten Al and the Na entrapped into the drop. (author)

  16. Collaborative Research: Process-Resolving Decomposition of the Global Temperature Response to Modes of Low Frequency Variability in a Changing Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Yi [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2014-11-24

    DOE-GTRC-05596 11/24/2104 Collaborative Research: Process-Resolving Decomposition of the Global Temperature Response to Modes of Low Frequency Variability in a Changing Climate PI: Dr. Yi Deng (PI) School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Georgia Institute of Technology 404-385-1821, yi.deng@eas.gatech.edu El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Annular Modes (AMs) represent respectively the most important modes of low frequency variability in the tropical and extratropical circulations. The projection of future changes in the ENSO and AM variability, however, remains highly uncertain with the state-of-the-science climate models. This project conducted a process-resolving, quantitative evaluations of the ENSO and AM variability in the modern reanalysis observations and in climate model simulations. The goal is to identify and understand the sources of uncertainty and biases in models’ representation of ENSO and AM variability. Using a feedback analysis method originally formulated by one of the collaborative PIs, we partitioned the 3D atmospheric temperature anomalies and surface temperature anomalies associated with ENSO and AM variability into components linked to 1) radiation-related thermodynamic processes such as cloud and water vapor feedbacks, 2) local dynamical processes including convection and turbulent/diffusive energy transfer and 3) non-local dynamical processes such as the horizontal energy transport in the oceans and atmosphere. In the past 4 years, the research conducted at Georgia Tech under the support of this project has led to 15 peer-reviewed publications and 9 conference/workshop presentations. Two graduate students and one postdoctoral fellow also received research training through participating the project activities. This final technical report summarizes key scientific discoveries we made and provides also a list of all publications and conference presentations resulted from research activities at Georgia Tech. The main findings include

  17. Catalytic activity of laminated compounds of graphite with transitions metals in decomposition of alcohols and formic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, Yu.N.; Lapkina, N.D.; Vol'pin, M.E.

    1976-01-01

    The catalytic activity is studied of laminated graphite compounds with Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Mo, W and Mn both in the reduced and oxidized forms in gas phase decomposition reactions of isopropyl, n-butyl, cyclohexyl, and 4-tret-butylcyclohexyl alcohols, and also formic acid. All the catalysts are shown to be active in the reactions where isopropyl and n-butyl alcohols undergo decomposition. The laminated compounds of graphite with Co and Ni both in the oxidized and reduction form are the most active catalysts of the selective decomposition of alcohols to aldehydes and ketones, and also formic acid to CO 2 and H 2 . The kinetics of a number of reactions is found to obey the second order equation with allowance made for the system volume

  18. Influence of temperature and salinity on heavy metal uptake by submersed plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritioff, A. [Department of Botany, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)]. E-mail: fritioff@botan.su.se; Kautsky, L. [Department of Botany, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Greger, M. [Department of Botany, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-01-01

    Submersed plants can be useful in reducing heavy metal concentrations in stormwater, since they can accumulate large amounts of heavy metals in their shoots. To investigate the effects of water temperature and salinity on the metal uptake of two submersed plant species, Elodea canadensis (Michx.) and Potamogeton natans (L.), these plants were grown in the presence of Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb at 5, 11, and 20 deg. C in combination with salinities of 0, 0.5, and 5%o. The metal concentrations in the plant tissue increased with increasing temperature in both species; the exception was the concentration of Pb in Elodea, which increased with decreasing salinity. Metal concentrations at high temperature or low salinity were up to twice those found at low temperature or high salinity. Plant biomass affected the metal uptake, with low biomass plants having higher metal concentrations than did high biomass plants. - Metal concentrations increase with increasing temperature and decreasing salinity in two aquatic plants.

  19. Influence of temperature and salinity on heavy metal uptake by submersed plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritioff, A.; Kautsky, L.; Greger, M.

    2005-01-01

    Submersed plants can be useful in reducing heavy metal concentrations in stormwater, since they can accumulate large amounts of heavy metals in their shoots. To investigate the effects of water temperature and salinity on the metal uptake of two submersed plant species, Elodea canadensis (Michx.) and Potamogeton natans (L.), these plants were grown in the presence of Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb at 5, 11, and 20 deg. C in combination with salinities of 0, 0.5, and 5%o. The metal concentrations in the plant tissue increased with increasing temperature in both species; the exception was the concentration of Pb in Elodea, which increased with decreasing salinity. Metal concentrations at high temperature or low salinity were up to twice those found at low temperature or high salinity. Plant biomass affected the metal uptake, with low biomass plants having higher metal concentrations than did high biomass plants. - Metal concentrations increase with increasing temperature and decreasing salinity in two aquatic plants

  20. Pseudotumor from Metal-on-Metal Total Hip Arthroplasty Causing Unilateral Leg Edema: Case Presentation and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caleb W. Grote

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Metal-on-metal (MoM total hip arthroplasty (THA can be associated with adverse metal reactions, including pseudotumors. This case report describes a 58-year-old female with an MoM THA-related pseudotumor that caused unilateral leg edema from compression of her external iliac vein. After thorough preoperative workup to rule out infection and deep vein thrombosis and consultation with a vascular surgeon, the patient underwent revision THA and excision of her pseudotumor. She had complete resolution of her swelling at 4 years after surgery. Review of all available case reports for this rare complication revealed that almost all patients were female. All patients underwent revision THA, with resolution of their symptoms. Literature review demonstrates that women are disproportionally affected by complications associated with MoM THA. We recommend close monitoring of patients with MoM THA, particularly women, for development of adverse metal reactions.

  1. Appendicitis caused by ingestion of metal foreign body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Inácio de Almeida Neto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The ingestion of foreign bodies is a frequent occurrence, especially among children. The majority of these objects travel safely through the gastrointestinal tract, without causing symptoms or leaving sequelae. Acute appendicitis is the emergency surgical pathology of greater prevalence. However, the impaction of a foreign body into the appendicular lumen as an etiologic agent of appendicitis is a very rare event. Case report: We describe the case of a 21-year-old male patient with lower abdominal pain over approximately six days, in association with vomiting, fever and abdominal distension. After imaging studies, a radiopaque foreign body was identified in a pelvic topography, with distention and air-fluid levels in intestinal loops. Our patient was submitted to an open appendectomy, evidencing acute perforated appendicitis and the presence of two foreign bodies in its lumen. The patient progressed satisfactorily in the post-operative period, with use of broad-spectrum antibiotics. Discussion: Foreign bodies impacted in the gastrointestinal tract are usually removed by endoscopic techniques. When these bodies cause infections, there should be a resolution, preferably by surgical laparoscopy, which will serve both for diagnostic as therapeutic purposes. Resumo: Introdução: A ingesta de corpos estranhos é um acontecimento frequente, principalmente entre crianças. A maioria destes passa de forma inócua pelo trato gastrointestinal, sem causar sintomas ou deixar sequelas. Apendicite aguda é a patologia cirúrgica emergencial de maior prevalência. Contudo: a impactação de um corpo estranho no lúmen apendicular como agente etiológico de apendicite é um evento muito raro. Relato de caso: Descrevemos o caso de um paciente masculino de 21 anos com quadro de dor abdominal baixa há aproximadamente 6 dias, associando-se a vômitos, febre e distensão abdominal. Após exames de imagem, identificou-se corpo estranho radiopaco em

  2. Studies on thermal decomposition of phenol binder using TG/DTG/DTA and FTIR-DRIFTS techniques in temperature range 20-500 °C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    *Artur Bobrowski

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of thermoanalytical and structural research on phenolic binder used in foundry for the preparation of moulding sand. The binder has been prepared based on resole type phenolic resin with the addition of ester hardener. The aim of the study was to determine the structural changes taking place in the phenolic binder under the influence of temperature. Results show that in the investigated range of temperatures,phenolic binder exhibits three exothermic thermal effects accompanying the decomposition process. The test results using the Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS technique show that the addition of a hardener stabilizes the binder structure within methylene bridges. The reduction in the reaction rate observed in the DTA curve at about 330 癈 can be associated with the formation of gaseous products by decomposition of the binder or, as suggested by the literature data, the formation of triple bonds and CN-HCN groups.

  3. Dynamics of a metal overlayer on metallic substrates: High temperature effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, T.S.; Black, J.E.; Tian, Zeng Ju

    1992-01-01

    We have explored the structure and the dynamics of a bimetallic system consisting of a hexagonal (almost) overlayer of Ag on a square lattice (Ni(100) and Cu(100)), as a function of the surface temperature. In each case the structure is ''nearly'' incommensurate giving rise to a low frequency Goldstone mode. Also, the overlayer atoms slosh back and forth over the substrate in a corrugated fashion. The calculated dispersion of the Ag/metal vertical mode, at room temperature, is in excellent agreement with experimental data. At higher temperatures floater atoms appear on top of the overlayer displaying a variety of cluster formations and also exchanges with the substrate atoms leading to surface disordering, interdiffusion and melting

  4. All-Cause and Cause-Specific Risk of Emergency Transport Attributable to Temperature: A Nationwide Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito

    2015-12-01

    Although several studies have estimated the associations between mortality or morbidity and extreme temperatures in terms of relative risk, few studies have investigated the risk of emergency transport attributable to the whole temperature range nationwide.We acquired data on daily emergency ambulance dispatches in all 47 prefectures of Japan from 2007 to 2010. We examined the relationship between emergency transport and temperature for each prefecture using a Poisson regression model in a distributed lag nonlinear model with adjustment for time trends. A random-effect multivariate meta-analysis was then applied to pool the estimates at the national level. Attributable morbidity was calculated for high and low temperatures, which were defined as those above or below the optimum temperature (ie, the minimum morbidity temperature) and for moderate and also extreme temperatures, which were defined using cutoffs at the 2.5th and 97.5th temperature percentiles.A total of 15,868,086 cases of emergency transport met the inclusion criteria. The emergency transport was attributable to nonoptimal temperature. The median minimum morbidity percentile was in the 79th percentile for all causes, the 96th percentile for cardiovascular disease, and the 92th percentile for respiratory disease. The fraction attributable to low temperature was 6.94% (95% eCI: 5.93-7.70) for all causes, 17.93% (95% eCI: 16.10-19.25) for cardiovascular disease, and 12.19% (95% eCI: 9.90-13.66) for respiratory disease, whereas the fraction attributable to high temperature was small (all causes = 1.01%, 95% eCI: 0.90-1.11; cardiovascular disease = 0.10%, 95% eCI: 0.04-0.14; respiratory disease = 0.29%, 95% eCI: 0.07-0.50). The all-cause morbidity risk that was attributable to temperature was related to moderate cold, with an overall estimate of 6.41% (95% eCI: 5.47-7.20). Extreme temperatures were responsible for a small fraction, which corresponded to 0.57% (95% eCI: 0.50-0.62) for extreme

  5. Evaluation of complexing agents and column temperature in ion chromatographic separation of alkali metals, alkaline earth metals and transition metals ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelkar, Anoop; Pandey, Ashish; Name, Anil B.; Das, D.K.; Behere, P.G.; Mohd Afzal

    2015-01-01

    The aim of ion chromatography method development is the resolution of all metal ions of interests. Resolution can be improved by changing the selectivity. Selectivity in chromatography can be altered by changes in mobile phase (eg eluent type, eluent strength) or through changes in stationary phase. Temperature has been used in altering the selectivity of particularly in reversed phase liquid chromatography and ion exchange chromatography. Present paper describe the retention behaviour of alkali metals, alkaline earth metals and transition metal ions on a silica based carboxylate function group containing analyte column. Alkali metals, alkaline earth metals and transition metal ions were detected by ion conductivity and UV-VIS detectors respectively

  6. Heavy metals and metalloids as a cause for protein misfolding and aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamás, Markus J; Sharma, Sandeep K; Ibstedt, Sebastian; Jacobson, Therese; Christen, Philipp

    2014-02-25

    While the toxicity of metals and metalloids, like arsenic, cadmium, mercury, lead and chromium, is undisputed, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not entirely clear. General consensus holds that proteins are the prime targets; heavy metals interfere with the physiological activity of specific, particularly susceptible proteins, either by forming a complex with functional side chain groups or by displacing essential metal ions in metalloproteins. Recent studies have revealed an additional mode of metal action targeted at proteins in a non-native state; certain heavy metals and metalloids have been found to inhibit the in vitro refolding of chemically denatured proteins, to interfere with protein folding in vivo and to cause aggregation of nascent proteins in living cells. Apparently, unfolded proteins with motile backbone and side chains are considerably more prone to engage in stable, pluridentate metal complexes than native proteins with their well-defined 3D structure. By interfering with the folding process, heavy metal ions and metalloids profoundly affect protein homeostasis and cell viability. This review describes how heavy metals impede protein folding and promote protein aggregation, how cells regulate quality control systems to protect themselves from metal toxicity and how metals might contribute to protein misfolding disorders.

  7. Ferromagnetism and temperature-dependent electronic structure in metallic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, T.

    1999-01-01

    -, layer-, and temperature-dependent. The last part of this work is concerned about the temperature-driven reorientation transition in thin metallic films. For the description of the magnetic anisotropy in thin films the dipole interaction as well as the spin-orbit interaction have to be included in the model. By calculating the temperature-dependence of the magnetic anisotropy energy it is found that both types of temperature-driven reorientation transitions, from out-of-plane to in-plane (''Fe-type'') and from in-plane to out-of-plane(''Ni-type'') magnetization are possible within the generalized Hubbard films

  8. Vaporization of tungsten-metal in steam at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, G.A.; Finfrock, C.C.

    2000-01-01

    The vaporization of tungsten from the APT spallation target dominates the radiological source term for unmitigated target overheating accidents. Chemical reactions of tungsten with steam which persist to tungsten temperatures as low as 800 C result in the formation of a hydrated tungsten-oxide which has a high vapor pressure and is readily convected in a flowing atmosphere. This low-temperature vaporization reaction essentially removes the oxide film that forms on the tungsten-metal surface as soon as it forms, leaving behind a fresh metallic surface for continued oxidation and vaporization. Experiments were conducted to measure the oxidative vaporization rates of tungsten in steam as part of the effort to quantify the MT radiological source term for severe target accidents. Tests were conducted with tungsten rods (1/8 inch diameter, six inches long) heated to temperatures from approximately 700 C to 1350 C in flowing steam which was superheated to 140 C. A total of 19 experiments was conducted. Fifteen tests were conducted by RF induction heating of single tungsten rods held vertical in a quartz glass retort. Four tests were conducted in a vertically-mounted tube furnace for the low temperature range of the test series. The aerosol which was generated and transported downstream from the tungsten rods was collected by passing the discharged steam through a condenser. This procedure insured total collection of the steam along with the aerosol from the vaporization of the rods. The results of these experiments revealed a threshold temperature for tungsten vaporization in steam. For the two tests at the lowest temperatures which were tested, approximately 700 C, the tungsten rods were observed to oxidize without vaporization. The remainder of the tests was conducted over the temperature range of 800 C to 1350 C. In these tests, the rods were found to have lost weight due to vaporization of the tungsten and the missing weight was collected in the downstream condensate

  9. Low temperature synthesis, photoluminescence, magnetic properties of the transition metal doped wurtzite ZnS nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Jian; Han, Donglai; Wang, Bingji; Fan, Lin; Fu, Hao; Wei, Maobin; Feng, Bo; Liu, Xiaoyan; Yang, Jinghai

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we synthesized the transition metal ions (Mn, Cu, Fe) doped and co-doped ZnS nanowires (NWs) by a one-step hydrothermal method. The results showed that the solid solubility of the Fe 2+ ions in the ZnS NWs was about two times larger than that of the Mn 2+ or Cu 2+ ions in the ZnS NWs. There was no phase transformation from hexagonal to cubic even in a large quantity transition metal ions introduced for all the samples. The Mn 2+ /Cu 2+ /Fe 2+ related emission peaks can be observed in the Mn 2+ ,Cu 2+ and Fe 2+ doped ZnS NWs. The ferromagnetic properties of the co-doped samples were investigated at room temperature. - graphical abstract: The stable wurtzite ZnS:TM 2+ (TM=Mn, Cu, Fe) nanowires with room temperature ferromagnetism properties were obtained. The different elongation of unit cell caused by the different doped ions was observed. Highlights: ► The transition metal ions doped wurtzite ZnS nanowires were synthesized at 180 °C. ► There was no phase transformation from hexagonal to cubic even in a large quantity introduced for all the samples. ► The room temperature ferromagnetism properties of the co-doped nanowires were investigated

  10. Effect of hydrofluoric acid on acid decomposition mixtures for determining iron and other metallic elements in green vegetables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogbe, S.A.; Afful, S.; Debrah, C.

    2007-01-01

    The efficiency of acid mixtures, HNO 3 - HCI0 4 -HF, HNO 3 - HCI - HF, HNO 3 - HCIO 4 and HNO 3 - HCI in the decomposition of four edible green vegetables, Gboma (Solanum macrocarpon), Aleefu (Amaranttius hibiridus), Shoeley (Hibiscus sabdariffa) and Ademe (Corchorus olitorius), for flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometer analysis of Fe, Mn, Mg, Cu, Zn and Ca was studied. The concentrations of Fe were higher (120.61 -710.10 mg/kg), while the values of Cu were lower (2.31 - 4.84 mg/kg) in all the samples. The values of concentration for Fe were more reproducible when HF was included in the decomposition mixtures. There were no significant differences in the concentrations of the other elements when HF was included in the acid mixture as compared to the acid mixtures without HF. Therefore, the inclusion of HF in the acid decomposition mixtures would ensure total and precise estimation of Fe in plant materials, but not critical for analysis of Mn, Mg, Cu, Zn and Ca. Performance of the decomposition procedures was verified by applying the methods to analyse Standard Reference Material IAEA-V-10 Hay Powder. (au)

  11. Metal Phosphates as Intermediate Temperature Proton Conducting Electrolytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Yunjie; Li, Q.F.; Pan, Chao

    2012-01-01

    A series of metal phosphates were synthesized and screened as potential proton conductor electrolytes for fuel cells and electrolysers operational at intermediate temperatures. Among the selected, niobium and bismuth phosphates exhibited a proton conductivity of 10-2 and 10-7 S cm-1, respectively......, under the anhydrous atmosphere at 250 °C, showing close correlation with the presence of hydroxyl groups in the phosphate phases. At the water partial pressure of above 0.6 atm, both phosphates possessed a proton conductivity to a level of above 3 x 10-2 S cm-1. Reasonable stability of the proton...... conductivity was observed under either a constant low water partial pressure or under a humidity cycling test within a period of more than 80 hours....

  12. High temperature corrosion studies on friction-welded dissimilar metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arivazhagan, N.; Singh, Surendra; Prakash, Satya; Reddy, G.M.

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the behaviour of weldment at elevated temperatures and especially their corrosion behaviour has become an object of scientific investigation recently. Investigation has been carried out on friction-welded AISI 4140 and AISI 304 under molten salt of Na 2 SO 4 + V 2 O 5 (60%) environment at 500 and 550 deg. C under cyclic condition. The influences of welding parameters on the hot corrosion have been discussed. The resulting oxide scales in the weldment have been characterized systematically using surface analytical techniques. Scale thickness on low alloy steel side was found to be more and was prone to spalling. Weld region has been found to be more prone to degradation than base metals due to inter diffusion of element across the interface and the formation of intermetallic compound

  13. High temperature corrosion studies on friction-welded dissimilar metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arivazhagan, N. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India)]. E-mail: arivadmt@iitr.ernet.in; Singh, Surendra [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India); Prakash, Satya [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India); Reddy, G.M. [Defense Metallurgical and Research Laboratory, Hyderabad (India)

    2006-07-25

    Understanding the behaviour of weldment at elevated temperatures and especially their corrosion behaviour has become an object of scientific investigation recently. Investigation has been carried out on friction-welded AISI 4140 and AISI 304 under molten salt of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + V{sub 2}O{sub 5} (60%) environment at 500 and 550 deg. C under cyclic condition. The influences of welding parameters on the hot corrosion have been discussed. The resulting oxide scales in the weldment have been characterized systematically using surface analytical techniques. Scale thickness on low alloy steel side was found to be more and was prone to spalling. Weld region has been found to be more prone to degradation than base metals due to inter diffusion of element across the interface and the formation of intermetallic compound.

  14. Void growth and coalescence in metals deformed at elevated temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klöcker, H.; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2000-01-01

    For metals deformed at elevated temperatures the growth of voids to coalescence is studied numerically. The voids are assumed to be present from the beginning of deformation, and the rate of deformation considered is so high that void growth is dominated by power law creep of the material, without...... any noticeable effect of surface diffusion. Axisymmetric unit cell model computations are used to study void growth in a material containing a periodic array of voids, and the onset of the coalescence process is defined as the stage where plastic flow localizes in the ligaments between neighbouring...... voids. The focus of the study is on various relatively high stress triaxialties. In order to represent the results in terms of a porous ductile material model a set of constitutive relations are used, which have been proposed for void growth in a material undergoing power law creep....

  15. A model for temperature dependent resistivity of metallic superlattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. I. Uba

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The temperature dependent resistivity of metallic superlattices, to first order approximation, is assumed to have same form as bulk metal, ρ(T = ρo + aT, which permits describing these structures as linear atomic chain. The assumption is, substantiated with the derivation of the above expression from the standard magnetoresistance equation, in which the second term, a Bragg scattering factor, is a correction to the usual model involving magnon and phonon scatterings. Fitting the model to Fe/Cr data from literature shows that Bragg scattering is dominant at T < 50 K and magnon and phonon coefficients are independent of experiment conditions, with typical values of 4.7 × 10−4 μΩcmK−2 and −8 ± 0.7 × 10−7μΩcmK−3. From the linear atomic chain model, the dielectric constant ε q , ω = 8 . 33 × 10 − 2 at Debye frequency for all materials and acoustic speed and Thomas – Fermi screening length are pressure dependent with typical values of 1.53 × 104 m/s and 1.80 × 109 m at 0.5 GPa pressure for an Fe/Cr structure.

  16. The precious metal effect in high temperature corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wit, J.H.W. de (Lab. for Materials Science, Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)); Manen, P.A. van (Lab. for Materials Science, Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands))

    1994-01-01

    Additions of platinum and to a smaller extent rhodium, to aluminium oxide forming alloys are known to improve the high temperature corrosion resistance of the alloys. This effect is known as the ''precious metal effect''. The expensive Pt-additions are used because of the increased lifetime of turbine-vanes especially in marine environments. Only a limited number of coating systems is commercially available, as JML-1, LDC-2 and RT22. Normally Pt is deposited electrochemically or by a fused salt method. After deposition the high or low activity pack-cementation-process is applied to obtain a PtNiAl-coating. In this paper the effect of platinum on the oxidation mechanism is discussed by comparing the oxidation mechanism of [beta]-NiAl and Pt20Ni30Al50. This composition agrees with the average composition of a platinum modified aluminide coating. The alloys were oxidized at temperatures from 1000 to 1200 C. The growth of the oxide scale on the NiAl alloy proceeds both by aluminium and by oxygen diffusion through the scale resulting in growth within the scale. On Pt20Ni30Al50 the growth of the scale is limited to the oxide/gas interface due to a predominant aluminium transport through the scale. The morphology of the oxide scales did not show large differences. However, the extensive void formation at the [beta]-NiAl/oxide interface was not observed on the Pt20Ni30Al50 samples. The absence of voids at the interface and the reduction of growth stresses, as a result of the outward growth of the scale, are the two likely reasons for the improved oxide scale adherence and can thus be considered, to be two elements of the ''precious metal effect''. (orig.)

  17. Crosstalk in a KID Array Caused by the Thickness Variation of Superconducting Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adane, A.; Boucher, C.; Coiffard, G.; Leclercq, S.; Schuster, K. F.; Goupy, J.; Calvo, M.; Hoarau, C.; Monfardini, A.

    2016-07-01

    The work presented in this paper is focused on the improvement of the kinetic detectors used on NIKA2 instrument (New IRAM KID array 2). Based on the simulation and low temperature measurements, it aims at showing how the variations of the superconducting metal corrupt the frequency comb of the kinetic Inductance detectors (KID) in the frequency range (between 1 and 3 GHz), i.e., how the superconducting metal inhomogeneity induces the resonance-to-resonance cross-coupling which deteriorates the homogeneity of the resonance quality factor and the frequency resonance separation. Solutions are then proposed to fight against the effect of these metallic variations when designing the KID array.

  18. Rates of Litter Decomposition and Soil Respiration in Relation to Soil Temperature and Water in Different-Aged Pinus massoniana Forests in the Three Gorges Reservoir Area, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lixiong; Huang, Zhilin; Lei, Jingpin; Zhou, Benzhi; Li, Maihe

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the soil carbon dynamics and cycling in terrestrial ecosystems in response to environmental changes, we studied soil respiration, litter decomposition, and their relations to soil temperature and soil water content for 18-months (Aug. 2010–Jan. 2012) in three different-aged Pinus massoniana forests in the Three Gorges Reservoir Area, China. Across the experimental period, the mean total soil respiration and litter respiration were 1.94 and 0.81, 2.00 and 0.60, 2.19 and 0.71 µmol CO2 m−2 s−1, and the litter dry mass remaining was 57.6%, 56.2% and 61.3% in the 20-, 30-, and 46-year-old forests, respectively. We found that the temporal variations of soil respiration and litter decomposition rates can be well explained by soil temperature at 5 cm depth. Both the total soil respiration and litter respiration were significantly positively correlated with the litter decomposition rates. The mean contribution of the litter respiration to the total soil respiration was 31.0%–45.9% for the three different-aged forests. The present study found that the total soil respiration was not significantly affected by forest age when P. masonniana stands exceed a certain age (e.g. >20 years old), but it increased significantly with increased soil temperature. Hence, forest management strategies need to protect the understory vegetation to limit soil warming, in order to reduce the CO2 emission under the currently rapid global warming. The contribution of litter decomposition to the total soil respiration varies across spatial and temporal scales. This indicates the need for separate consideration of soil and litter respiration when assessing the climate impacts on forest carbon cycling. PMID:25004164

  19. Effects of alkali and alkaline earth metals on nitrogen release during temperature programmed pyrolysis of coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtsuka, Y.; Wu, Z.; Furimsky, E. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Inst. for Chemical Reaction Science

    1997-11-01

    The paper reports that the formation of HCN, NH{sub 3} and N{sub 2} during fixed-bed pyrolysis at 10 K min{sup -1} has been studied using coal samples after partial demineralization followed by addition of metal hydroxides from aqueous systems. Without additives, NH{sub 3} is the predominant product at {le} 700{degree}C, showing the two peaks in the formation rate profile, whereas N{sub 2} is the only product at {ge} 800{degree}C. The presence of NaOH, KOH and Ca(OH){sub 2} promotes considerable NH{sub 3} formation between 450 and 600{degree}C, but in contrast suppresses HCN formation in this region. The Ca shows the largest effect on both the promotion and suppression. It is likely that the NH{sub 3} increased by Ca addition arises partly from HCN, but mainly from secondary reactions of tar-N. These hydroxides affect N{sub 2} formation in quite different manners: the Na decreases the rate between 700 and 950{degree}C, and the K changes it less significantly than the Na, but the Ca remarkably increases the rate in a low temperature region of 550-700{degree}C. These different features are discussed in terms of solid-phase reactions of alkali metal carbonates with char-N and secondary decomposition reactions of tar-N on CaO particles. As a result, total conversion of coal-N to HCN, NH{sub 3} and N{sub 2} up to 1000{degree}C increases in the sequence of Na {lt} none {lt} K {lt} Ca. 40 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Tracing low-temperature aqueous metal migration in mineralized watersheds with Cu isotope fractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, R.; Munk, L.A.; Townley, B.; Gou, K.Y.; Gómez Miguélez, N.; Titley, S.; Chen, G.G.; Song, S.; Reich, M.; Tornos, F.; Ruiz, J.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Cu isotope fractionation of ores and waters identifies copper sulfide weathering. • Redox reactions cause isotopic shift measured in areas of sulfide weathering. • Consistent isotope signature in different deposit, climate, or concentration. - Abstract: Copper isotope signatures in waters emanating from mineralized watersheds provide evidence for the source aqueous copper in solution. Low-temperature aqueous oxidation of Cu sulfide minerals produces significant copper isotopic fractionation between solutions and residues. Abiotic experimental data of fractionation (defined as Δ liquid–solid ‰ = δ 65 Cu liquid − δ 65 Cu solid ) are on the order of 1–3‰ and are unique for copper rich-sulfide minerals. Data presented here from ores and waters within defined boundaries of porphyry copper, massive sulfide, skarn, and epithermal ore deposits mimic abiotic experiments. Thus, the oxidation of sulfide minerals appears to cause the signatures in the waters although significant biological, temperature, and pH variations exist in the fluids. Regardless of the deposit type, water type, concentration of Cu in solution, or location, the data provide a means to trace sources of metals in solutions. This relationship allows for tracking sources and degree of metal migration in low temperature aqueous systems and has direct application to exploration geology and environmental geochemistry

  1. Aridity and decomposition processes in complex landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossola, Alessandro; Nyman, Petter

    2015-04-01

    Decomposition of organic matter is a key biogeochemical process contributing to nutrient cycles, carbon fluxes and soil development. The activity of decomposers depends on microclimate, with temperature and rainfall being major drivers. In complex terrain the fine-scale variation in microclimate (and hence water availability) as a result of slope orientation is caused by differences in incoming radiation and surface temperature. Aridity, measured as the long-term balance between net radiation and rainfall, is a metric that can be used to represent variations in water availability within the landscape. Since aridity metrics can be obtained at fine spatial scales, they could theoretically be used to investigate how decomposition processes vary across complex landscapes. In this study, four research sites were selected in tall open sclerophyll forest along a aridity gradient (Budyko dryness index ranging from 1.56 -2.22) where microclimate, litter moisture and soil moisture were monitored continuously for one year. Litter bags were packed to estimate decomposition rates (k) using leaves of a tree species not present in the study area (Eucalyptus globulus) in order to avoid home-field advantage effects. Litter mass loss was measured to assess the activity of macro-decomposers (6mm litter bag mesh size), meso-decomposers (1 mm mesh), microbes above-ground (0.2 mm mesh) and microbes below-ground (2 cm depth, 0.2 mm mesh). Four replicates for each set of bags were installed at each site and bags were collected at 1, 2, 4, 7 and 12 months since installation. We first tested whether differences in microclimate due to slope orientation have significant effects on decomposition processes. Then the dryness index was related to decomposition rates to evaluate if small-scale variation in decomposition can be predicted using readily available information on rainfall and radiation. Decomposition rates (k), calculated fitting single pool negative exponential models, generally

  2. An investigation on high temperature fatigue properties of tempered nuclear-grade deposited weld metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, X. Y.; Zhu, P.; Yong, Q.; Liu, T. G.; Lu, Y. H.; Zhao, J. C.; Jiang, Y.; Shoji, T.

    2018-02-01

    Effect of tempering on low cycle fatigue (LCF) behaviors of nuclear-grade deposited weld metal was investigated, and The LCF tests were performed at 350 °C with strain amplitudes ranging from 0.2% to 0.6%. The results showed that at a low strain amplitude, deposited weld metal tempered for 1 h had a high fatigue resistance due to high yield strength, while at a high strain amplitude, the one tempered for 24 h had a superior fatigue resistance due to high ductility. Deposited weld metal tempered for 1 h exhibited cyclic hardening at the tested strain amplitudes. Deposited weld metal tempered for 24 h exhibited cyclic hardening at a low strain amplitude but cyclic softening at a high strain amplitude. Existence and decomposition of martensite-austenite (M-A) islands as well as dislocations activities contributed to fatigue property discrepancy among the two tempered deposited weld metal.

  3. Mining-caused changes to habitat structure affect amphibian and reptile population ecology more than metal pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Kiyoshi; Lesbarrères, David; Watson, Glen; Litzgus, Jacqueline

    2015-12-01

    Emissions from smelting not only contaminate water and soil with metals, but also induce extensive forest dieback and changes in resource availability and microclimate. The relative effects of such co-occurring stressors are often unknown, but this information is imperative in developing targeted restoration strategies. We assessed the role and relative effects of structural alterations of terrestrial habitat and metal pollution caused by century-long smelting operations on amphibian and reptile communities by collecting environmental and time- and area-standardized multivariate abundance data along three spatially replicated impact gradients. Overall, species richness, diversity, and abundance declined progressively with increasing levels of metals (As, Cu, and Ni) and soil temperature (T(s)) and decreasing canopy cover, amount of coarse woody debris (CWD), and relative humidity (RH). The composite habitat variable (which included canopy cover, CWD, T(s), and RH) was more strongly associated with most response metrics than the composite metal variable (As, Cu, and Ni), and canopy cover alone explained 19-74% of the variance. Moreover, species that use terrestrial habitat for specific behaviors (e.g., hibernation, dispersal), especially forest-dependent species, were more severely affected than largely aquatic species. These results suggest that structural alterations of terrestrial habitat and concomitant changes in the resource availability and microclimate have stronger effects than metal pollution per se. Furthermore, much of the variation in response metrics was explained by the joint action of several environmental variables, implying synergistic effects (e.g., exacerbation of metal toxicity by elevated temperatures in sites with reduced canopy cover). We thus argue that the restoration of terrestrial habitat conditions is a key to successful recovery of herpetofauna communities in smelting-altered landscapes.

  4. Influence of thermal-decomposition temperatures on structures and properties of V2O5 as cathode materials for lithium ion battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Chen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Submicron spherical V2O5 particles with a uniform size and a lower crystallinity were successfully synthesized by a chemical precipitation-thermal decomposition technique using the commercial V2O5 powders as starting material. The crystal structure and grain morphology of samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM, respectively. Electrochemical testing such as discharge–charge cycling (CD and cyclic voltammetry (CV were employed in evaluating their electrochemical properties as cathode materials for lithium ion battery. Results reveal that the crystallinity and crystalline size of V2O5 particles increased when the thermal-decomposition temperature increased from 400 °C to 500 °C, and their adhesiveness was also synchronously increased. This indicate that the thermal-decomposition temperature palyed a significant influence on electrochemical properties of V2O5 cathodes. The V2O5 sample obtained at 400 °C delivered not only a high initial discharge capacity of 330 mA h g−1 and also the good cycle stability during 50 cycles due to its higher values of α in crystal structure and better dispersity in grain morphology.

  5. Fatigue caused by temperature changes in mixing tees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothenhoefer, Horst

    2010-01-01

    Unexpected damages at mixing tees in piping systems in the past, one of them in the French NPP Civaux, raised questions concerning the basic cause for these events. Assumptions lead to the postulation of a ''new'' degradation mechanism which was called ''striping'', mainly based on thermal fluctuations in the mixing zone of hot and cold fluid which would be transferred to the internal wall of the pipe resulting in High Cycle Fatigue (HCF). Experiments and CFD simulations have been performed to understand the degradation mechanism behind the damages in order to find adequate measures to control that mechanism in future. The knowledge and assessment of all relevant degradation mechanisms is prerequisite for the application of the Integrity Concept, part of the German KTA 3201.4. In this paper numerous publications concerning striping are reviewed and assessed. The published experiments and simulations are separated into two main groups. The first group should help to understand the details of the mixing fluid flow and the corresponding thermal fluctuations. The second group should verify the damage mechanism of local thermal cycles as a HCF load. Latest simulation results and a detailed assessment of the heat transfer between fluid and structure are explained to understand and describe the degradation mechanism of striping and to define adequate measures for failure prevention. It is shown that if the procedure of monitoring and assessment, including the optimization of operational modes, is applied, which some utilities have been practicing for many years, the ''new'' degradation mechanism of striping is covered as well. Finally the conclusions are validated by transferring them to real damages proving that with the new knowledge the damages can be explained and the Integrity Concept can still be applied if the guidelines are realized in practice. (orig.)

  6. Case study: Investigating the causes of temperature breaks in South African summer fruit export cold chains

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Goedhals-Gerber, LL

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the causes and extent of temperature breaks in the South African summer fruit export cold chain from the pack house to the vessel. Numerous causes of temperature breaks throughout the cold chain were found, resulting in many...

  7. Hybrid Metal/Electrolyte Monolithic Low Temperature SOFCs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cochran, Joe

    2004-01-01

    The program objective is to develop SOFCs, operating in the 500-700 degrees C range, based on Metal/Electrolyte square cell honeycomb formed by simultaneous powder extrusion of electrolyte and metal...

  8. An Efficient Approach for Pixel Decomposition to Increase the Spatial Resolution of Land Surface Temperature Images from MODIS Thermal Infrared Band Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Land surface temperature (LST images retrieved from the thermal infrared (TIR band data of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS have much lower spatial resolution than the MODIS visible and near-infrared (VNIR band data. The coarse pixel scale of MODIS LST images (1000 m under nadir have limited their capability in applying to many studies required high spatial resolution in comparison of the MODIS VNIR band data with pixel scale of 250–500 m. In this paper we intend to develop an efficient approach for pixel decomposition to increase the spatial resolution of MODIS LST image using the VNIR band data as assistance. The unique feature of this approach is to maintain the thermal radiance of parent pixels in the MODIS LST image unchanged after they are decomposed into the sub-pixels in the resulted image. There are two important steps in the decomposition: initial temperature estimation and final temperature determination. Therefore the approach can be termed double-step pixel decomposition (DSPD. Both steps involve a series of procedures to achieve the final result of decomposed LST image, including classification of the surface patterns, establishment of LST change with normalized difference of vegetation index (NDVI and building index (NDBI, reversion of LST into thermal radiance through Planck equation, and computation of weights for the sub-pixels of the resulted image. Since the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER with much higher spatial resolution than MODIS data was on-board the same platform (Terra as MODIS for Earth observation, an experiment had been done in the study to validate the accuracy and efficiency of our approach for pixel decomposition. The ASTER LST image was used as the reference to compare with the decomposed LST image. The result showed that the spatial distribution of the decomposed LST image was very similar to that of the ASTER LST image with a root mean square error

  9. An efficient approach for pixel decomposition to increase the spatial resolution of land surface temperature images from MODIS thermal infrared band data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Qin, Zhihao; Li, Wenjuan; Song, Caiying; Karnieli, Arnon; Zhao, Shuhe

    2014-12-25

    Land surface temperature (LST) images retrieved from the thermal infrared (TIR) band data of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) have much lower spatial resolution than the MODIS visible and near-infrared (VNIR) band data. The coarse pixel scale of MODIS LST images (1000 m under nadir) have limited their capability in applying to many studies required high spatial resolution in comparison of the MODIS VNIR band data with pixel scale of 250-500 m. In this paper we intend to develop an efficient approach for pixel decomposition to increase the spatial resolution of MODIS LST image using the VNIR band data as assistance. The unique feature of this approach is to maintain the thermal radiance of parent pixels in the MODIS LST image unchanged after they are decomposed into the sub-pixels in the resulted image. There are two important steps in the decomposition: initial temperature estimation and final temperature determination. Therefore the approach can be termed double-step pixel decomposition (DSPD). Both steps involve a series of procedures to achieve the final result of decomposed LST image, including classification of the surface patterns, establishment of LST change with normalized difference of vegetation index (NDVI) and building index (NDBI), reversion of LST into thermal radiance through Planck equation, and computation of weights for the sub-pixels of the resulted image. Since the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) with much higher spatial resolution than MODIS data was on-board the same platform (Terra) as MODIS for Earth observation, an experiment had been done in the study to validate the accuracy and efficiency of our approach for pixel decomposition. The ASTER LST image was used as the reference to compare with the decomposed LST image. The result showed that the spatial distribution of the decomposed LST image was very similar to that of the ASTER LST image with a root mean square error (RMSE) of 2

  10. Elaboration in the area of low temperature chlorination of rare-metal crude ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsaidov, U.M.

    2002-01-01

    The chemical base of low temperature chlorination of rare-metal crude ore was elaborated. The chemical nature of chlorination process which pass at low temperature was decoded and scientifically elaborated

  11. Modeling FBG sensors sensitivity from cryogenic temperatures to room temperature as a function of metal coating thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendittozzi, Cristian; Felli, Ferdinando; Lupi, Carla

    2018-05-01

    Fiber optics with photo-imprinted Bragg grating have been studied in order to be used as temperature sensors in cryogenic applications. The main disadvantage presented by Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors is the significant drop in sensitivity as temperature decreases, mainly due to the critical lowering of the thermo-optic coefficient of the fiber and the very low thermal expansion coefficient (CTE) of fused silica at cryogenic temperatures. Thus, especially for the latter, it is important to enhance sensitivity to temperature by depositing a metal coating presenting higher CTE. In this work the thermal sensitivity of metal-coated FBG sensors has been evaluated by considering their elongation within temperature variations in the cryogenic range, as compared to bare fiber sensors. To this purpose, a theoretical model simulating elongation of metal-coated sensors has been developed. The model has been used to evaluate the behaviour of different metals which can be used as coating (Ni, Cu, Al, Zn, Pb and In). The optimal coating thickness has been calculated at different fixed temperature (from 5 K to 100 K) for each metal. It has been found that the metal coating effectiveness depends on thickness and operating temperature in accordance to our previous experimental work and theory suggest.

  12. High Performance High Temperature Thermoelectric Composites with Metallic Inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, James M. (Inventor); Bux, Sabah K. (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor); Ravi, Vilupanur A. (Inventor); Firdosy, Samad A. (Inventor); Star, Kurt (Inventor); Kaner, Richard B. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention provides a composite thermoelectric material. The composite thermoelectric material can include a semiconductor material comprising a rare earth metal. The atomic percent of the rare earth metal in the semiconductor material can be at least about 20%. The composite thermoelectric material can further include a metal forming metallic inclusions distributed throughout the semiconductor material. The present invention also provides a method of forming this composite thermoelectric material.

  13. Causes of Greenland temperature variability over the past 4000 yr: implications for northern hemispheric temperature changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kobashi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Precise understanding of Greenland temperature variability is important in two ways. First, Greenland ice sheet melting associated with rising temperature is a major global sea level forcing, potentially affecting large populations in coming centuries. Second, Greenland temperatures are highly affected by North Atlantic Oscillation/Arctic Oscillation (NAO/AO and Atlantic multidecadal oscillation (AMO. In our earlier study, we found that Greenland temperature deviated negatively (positively from northern hemispheric (NH temperature trend during stronger (weaker solar activity owing to changes in atmospheric/oceanic changes (e.g. NAO/AO over the past 800 yr (Kobashi et al., 2013. Therefore, a precise Greenland temperature record can provide important constraints on the past atmospheric/oceanic circulation in the region and beyond. Here, we investigated Greenland temperature variability over the past 4000 yr reconstructed from argon and nitrogen isotopes from trapped air in a GISP2 ice core, using a one-dimensional energy balance model with orbital, solar, volcanic, greenhouse gas, and aerosol forcings. The modelled northern Northern Hemisphere (NH temperature exhibits a cooling trend over the past 4000 yr as observed for the reconstructed Greenland temperature through decreasing annual average insolation. With consideration of the negative influence of solar variability, the modelled and observed Greenland temperatures agree with correlation coefficients of r = 0.34–0.36 (p = 0.1–0.04 in 21 yr running means (RMs and r = 0.38–0.45 (p = 0.1–0.05 on a centennial timescale (101 yr RMs. Thus, the model can explain 14 to 20% of variance of the observed Greenland temperature in multidecadal to centennial timescales with a 90–96% confidence interval, suggesting that a weak but persistent negative solar influence on Greenland temperature continued over the past 4000 yr. Then, we estimated the distribution of multidecadal NH and northern high

  14. High temperature metallic materials for gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    The Specialists' Meeting was organized in conjunction with an earlier meeting on this topic held in Vienna, Austria, 1981, which provided for a comprehensive review of the status of materials development and testing at that time and for a description of test facilities. This meeting provided an opportunity (1) to review and discuss the progress made since 1981 in the development, testing and qualification of high temperature metallic materials, (2) to critically assess results achieved, and (3) to give directions for future research and development programmes. In particular, the meeting provided a form for a close interaction between component designers and materials specialists. The meeting was attended by 48 participants from France, People's Republic of China, Federal Republic of Germany, Japan, Poland, Switzerland, United Kingdom, USSR and USA presenting 22 papers. The technical part of the meeting was subdivided into four technical sessions: Components Design and Testing - Implications for Materials (4 papers); Microstructure and Environmental Compatibility (4 papers); Mechanical Properties (9 papers); New Alloys and Developments (6 papers). At the end of the meeting a round table discussion was organized in order to summarize the meeting and to make recommendations for future activities. This volume contains all papers presented at the meeting. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  15. Pressure Resistance Welding of High Temperature Metallic Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerred, N.; Zirker, L.; Charit, I.; Cole, J.; Frary, M.; Butt, D.; Meyer, M.; Murty, K.L.

    2010-01-01

    Pressure Resistance Welding (PRW) is a solid state joining process used for various high temperature metallic materials (Oxide dispersion strengthened alloys of MA957, MA754; martensitic alloy HT-9, tungsten etc.) for advanced nuclear reactor applications. A new PRW machine has been installed at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls for conducting joining research for nuclear applications. The key emphasis has been on understanding processing-microstructure-property relationships. Initial studies have shown that sound joints can be made between dissimilar materials such as MA957 alloy cladding tubes and HT-9 end plugs, and MA754 and HT-9 coupons. Limited burst testing of MA957/HT-9 joints carried out at various pressures up to 400 C has shown encouraging results in that the joint regions do not develop any cracking. Similar joint strength observations have also been made by performing simple bend tests. Detailed microstructural studies using SEM/EBSD tools and fatigue crack growth studies of MA754/HT-9 joints are ongoing.

  16. Nanoscale decomposition of Nb-Ru-O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Music, Denis; Geyer, Richard W.; Chen, Yen-Ting

    2016-11-01

    A correlative theoretical and experimental methodology has been employed to explore the decomposition of amorphous Nb-Ru-O at elevated temperatures. Density functional theory based molecular dynamics simulations reveal that amorphous Nb-Ru-O is structurally modified within 10 ps at 800 K giving rise to an increase in the planar metal - oxygen and metal - metal population and hence formation of large clusters, which signifies atomic segregation. The driving force for this atomic segregation process is 0.5 eV/atom. This is validated by diffraction experiments and transmission electron microscopy of sputter-synthesized Nb-Ru-O thin films. Room temperature samples are amorphous, while at 800 K nanoscale rutile RuO2 grains, self-organized in an amorphous Nb-O matrix, are observed, which is consistent with our theoretical predictions. This amorphous/crystalline interplay may be of importance for next generation of thermoelectric devices.

  17. Analytical method for estimating the thermal expansion coefficient of metals at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamoto, S; Izumi, S; Nakata, T; Sakai, S; Oinuma, S; Nakatani, Y

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an analytical method for estimating the thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of metals at high-temperature ranges. Although the conventional method based on quasiharmonic approximation (QHA) shows good results at low temperatures, anharmonic effects caused by large-amplitude thermal vibrations reduces its accuracy at high temperatures. Molecular dynamics (MD) naturally includes the anharmonic effect. However, since the computational cost of MD is relatively high, in order to make an interatomic potential capable of reproducing TEC, an analytical method is essential. In our method, analytical formulation of the radial distribution function (RDF) at finite temperature realizes the estimation of the TEC. Each peak of the RDF is approximated by the Gaussian distribution. The average and variance of the Gaussian distribution are formulated by decomposing the fluctuation of interatomic distance into independent elastic waves. We incorporated two significant anharmonic effects into the method. One is the increase in the averaged interatomic distance caused by large amplitude vibration. The second is the variation in the frequency of elastic waves. As a result, the TECs of fcc and bcc crystals estimated by our method show good agreement with those of MD. Our method enables us to make an interatomic potential that reproduces the TEC at high temperature. We developed the GEAM potential for nickel. The TEC of the fitted potential showed good agreement with experimental data from room temperature to 1000 K. As compared with the original potential, it was found that the third derivative of the wide-range curve was modified, while the zeroth, first and second derivatives were unchanged. This result supports the conventional theory of solid state physics. We believe our analytical method and developed interatomic potential will contribute to future high-temperature material development. (paper)

  18. Using thin metal layers on composite structures for shielding the electromagnetic pulse caused by nearby lightning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaj, M.A.; Buesink, Frederik Johannes Karel; Damstra, G.C.; Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Electronic systems in composite structures could be vulnerable to the (dominant magnetic) field caused by a lightning strike, because only thin layers of metal can be used on composite structures. Thin layers result in a very low shielding effectiveness against magnetic fields. Many experiments

  19. Preparation of 147Pm metal and the determination of the melting point and phase transformation temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelini, P.; Adair, H.L.

    1976-07-01

    The promethium metal used in the determination of the melting point and phase transformation temperatures was prepared by reduction of promethium oxide with thorium metal at 1600 0 C and distilling the promethium metal into a quartz dome. The melting point and phase transformation temperatures of promethium metal were found to be 1042 +- 5 0 C and 890 +- 5 0 C, respectively. The ratio for the heat of the high-temperature transformation to the heat of fusion was determined to be 0.415

  20. Melting temperature and structural transformation of some rare-earth metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vu Van Hung; Hoang Van Tich; Dang Thanh Hai

    2009-01-01

    the pressure dependence of the melting temperatures of rare-earth metals is studied using the equation of states derived from the statistical moment (SMM). SMM studies were carried out order to calculate the Helmholtz free energy of hcp, bcc Dy and fcc, bcc Ce metals at a wide range of temperatures. the stable phase of Dy and Ce metals can be determined by examining the Helmholtz free energy at a given temperature, i, e. the phase that gives the lowest free energy will be stable. For example, we found that at T lower than 1750 K the hcp Dy metal is stable. At T higher than 1750 K the bcc Dy metal is also stable. Thus 1750 K marks the phase transition temperature of Dy metal. These findings are in agreement with previous experiments. (author)

  1. Analysis of the decomposition gases from α and β-Cd(BH4)2 synthesized by temperature controlled mechanical milling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanchard, Didier; Zatti, Matteo; Vegge, Tejs

    2013-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study on the controlled phase synthesis and thermal decomposition of Cd(BH2)4, a material for solid state hydrogen storage obtained via the metathesis reaction of LiBH4 with CdCl2. By adjusting the stochiometry of the reactants and controlling the mechanical milling vial...... temperature, we have isolated the tetragonal (P42mn) low temperature phase and the cubic (View the MathML source) high temperature phase of the cadmium borohydride. Cd(BH2)4 has a low thermodynamic stability and decomposes with fast kinetic at 348 K, when heated at 1 K min−1 against a backpressure of 1 bar H2...

  2. Estimation of Hydrazine Decomposition on Measuring the High-Temperature pH in Hydrazine/ETA Solutions at 553 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Jae Sik; Yeon, Jei Won; Yun, Myung Hee; Song, Kyu Seok; Lee, Sang Ill

    2010-01-01

    Hydrazine is one of the most excellent oxygen scavengers used in the secondary circuit of nuclear power plants. Furthermore, in some pants, the hydrazine is used as a source of hydrogen required to suppress radiolysis of the coolant water in the primary loop. When hydrazine was exposed in the high temperature and high pressure water, it can be decomposed into the various products such as NH 3 , N 2 , H 2 , and NO 3 ions. As the result, the pH of solution containing hydrazine in the condition of the high temperature and high pressure can be changed by those decomposed products. In the present work, we investigated the decomposition behavior of hydrazine in ETA (ethanol amine) solution. In addition, we measured the high temperature pH at 553 K on the various hydrazine/ETA solutions for confirming the applicability of the yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ)- based pH electrode in secondary circuit of the nuclear power plants

  3. Summer temperature and spatial variability of all-cause mortality in Surat city, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K Rathi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ample information is available on extreme heat associated mortality for few Indian cities, but scant literature is available on effect of temperature on spatial variability of all-cause mortality for coastal cities. Objective: To assess the effect of daily maximum temperature, relative humidity and heat index on spatial variability of all-cause mortality for summer months (March to May from 2014 to 2015 for the urban population of Surat (coastal city. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of the all-cause mortality data with temperature and humidity was performed on a total of 9,237 deaths for 184 summer days (2014-2015. Climatic and all-cause mortality data were obtained through Tutiempo website and Surat Municipal Corporation respectively. Bivariate analysis performed through SPSS. Observations: Mean daily mortality was estimated at 50.2 ± 8.5 for the study period with a rise of 20% all-cause mortality at temperature ≥ 40°C and rise of 10% deaths per day during extreme danger level (HI: > 54°C days. Spatial (Zone wise analysis revealed rise of 61% all-cause mortality for Southeast and 30% for East zones at temperature ≥ 40°C. Conclusions: All-cause mortality increased on high summer temperature days. Presence of spatial variation in all-cause mortality provided the evidence for high risk zones. Findings may be helpful in designing the interventions at micro level.

  4. Tracheal obstruction caused by an expandable metallic stent: a case of successful removal of the stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Hiroomi; Kubota, Akio; Kawahara, Hisayoshi; Oue, Takaharu; Nose, Satoko; Ihara, Toshiyuki

    2005-07-01

    We report a case of tracheal obstruction caused by an expandable metallic stent. A 3-month-old girl with severe tracheomalacia had a placement of a Palmaz stent. At 3 years of age, she developed progressive dyspnea. The CT scan showed tracheal obstruction caused by granulation tissue over the stent. At operation, the stent was found to have penetrated the posterior tracheal wall. Under partial cardiopulmonary bypass, the stent was removed along with the membranous wall of the trachea, and the trachea was reconstructed using slide tracheoplasty. Tracheal obstruction is one of the serious complications caused by an expandable metallic stent. Direct open approach to the trachea under cardiopulmonary bypass is thought to be a safe way to manage this problem.

  5. Corrosion of metallic materials by uranium hexafluoride at high temperatures (1963); Corrosion de materiaux metalliques par l'hexafluorure d'uranium a haute temperature (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langlois, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    The corrosion of the following metals or alloys by UF{sub 6}: nickel, monel, Inconel, gold, platinum, stainless steel, is studied in the temperature range from 300 to 1000 deg. C. The test method, designed to avoid heating the apparatus containing the corrosive fluid to a high temperature, consists in using threadlike samples heated by the Joule effect, the rest of the apparatus being maintained close to room temperature. This technique makes it possible also to determine continuously the penetration of the corrosion by measuring the electrical resistance of the sample with a double Thomson bridge. A series of rapid comparison tests shows that stainless steel, precious metals and Inconel are attacked far too rapidly to be used above 500 deg. C; only monel and especially nickel appear capable of resisting at high temperatures. The detailed examination of the behaviour of nickel shows that the metallic fluoride is volatilized and that this influences the corrosion rate. It shows also the existence of a temperature zone situated between 550 and 700 deg. C in which occurs A strong intergranular corrosion the cause of which appears to be the presence of impurities in the metal. (author) [French] La corrosion par l'UF{sub 6} des metaux ou alliages suivants: lickel, monel, inconel, or, platine, acier inoxydable, est etudiee dans le un domaine de temperature compris entre 300 et 1000 deg. C. La methode d'essai, destinee a eviter le chauffage de l'enceinte contenant le fluide corrosif a temperature elevee, consiste a utiliser des eprouvettes filiformes, echauffees par effet Joule, le reste de l'appareillage etant maintenu a une temperature proche de l'ambiance. Cette technique permet en outre de determiner en continu la penetration de la corrosion, par mesure de la resistance electrique de l'eprouvette, au moyen d'un pont double de Thomson. Une serie d'essais comparatifs, assez sommaires, montre que l'acier inoxydable, les metaux precieux et l'inconel sont attaques beaucoup

  6. Corrosion of metallic materials by uranium hexafluoride at high temperatures (1963); Corrosion de materiaux metalliques par l'hexafluorure d'uranium a haute temperature (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langlois, G. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    The corrosion of the following metals or alloys by UF{sub 6}: nickel, monel, Inconel, gold, platinum, stainless steel, is studied in the temperature range from 300 to 1000 deg. C. The test method, designed to avoid heating the apparatus containing the corrosive fluid to a high temperature, consists in using threadlike samples heated by the Joule effect, the rest of the apparatus being maintained close to room temperature. This technique makes it possible also to determine continuously the penetration of the corrosion by measuring the electrical resistance of the sample with a double Thomson bridge. A series of rapid comparison tests shows that stainless steel, precious metals and Inconel are attacked far too rapidly to be used above 500 deg. C; only monel and especially nickel appear capable of resisting at high temperatures. The detailed examination of the behaviour of nickel shows that the metallic fluoride is volatilized and that this influences the corrosion rate. It shows also the existence of a temperature zone situated between 550 and 700 deg. C in which occurs A strong intergranular corrosion the cause of which appears to be the presence of impurities in the metal. (author) [French] La corrosion par l'UF{sub 6} des metaux ou alliages suivants: lickel, monel, inconel, or, platine, acier inoxydable, est etudiee dans le un domaine de temperature compris entre 300 et 1000 deg. C. La methode d'essai, destinee a eviter le chauffage de l'enceinte contenant le fluide corrosif a temperature elevee, consiste a utiliser des eprouvettes filiformes, echauffees par effet Joule, le reste de l'appareillage etant maintenu a une temperature proche de l'ambiance. Cette technique permet en outre de determiner en continu la penetration de la corrosion, par mesure de la resistance electrique de l'eprouvette, au moyen d'un pont double de Thomson. Une serie d'essais comparatifs, assez sommaires, montre que l'acier inoxydable, les metaux

  7. The influence of water vapor and sulfur dioxide on the catalytic decomposition of nitrous oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yalamas, C.; Heinisch, R.; Barz, M. [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Energietechnik; Cournil, M. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, 42 - Saint-Etienne (France)

    2001-03-01

    For the nitrous oxide decomposition three groups of catalysts such as metals on support, hydrotalcites, and perovskites were studied relating to their activity in the presence of vapor or sulfur dioxide, in the temperature range from 200 to 500 C. It was found that the water vapor strongly inhibates the nitrous oxide decomposition at T=200-400 C. The sulfur dioxide poisons the catalysts, in particular the perovskites. (orig.)

  8. Epitaxial heterojunctions of oxide semiconductors and metals on high temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Richard P. (Inventor); Hunt, Brian D. (Inventor); Foote, Marc C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Epitaxial heterojunctions formed between high temperature superconductors and metallic or semiconducting oxide barrier layers are provided. Metallic perovskites such as LaTiO3, CaVO3, and SrVO3 are grown on electron-type high temperature superconductors such as Nd(1.85)Ce(0.15)CuO(4-x). Alternatively, transition metal bronzes of the form A(x)MO(3) are epitaxially grown on electron-type high temperature superconductors. Also, semiconducting oxides of perovskite-related crystal structures such as WO3 are grown on either hole-type or electron-type high temperature superconductors.

  9. Causes of the fissure formation with shrinkage of metal on low carbon steel slabs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ksenzuk, F.A.; Khudas, A.L.; Zelenskaya, D.P.

    1977-01-01

    The causes have been investigated underlying the formation of fissures with spread of metal on low-carbon steel slabs during hot rolling. Metallographic investigations of templates from various sections of work pieces from 15-ton ingots of 08 ps (kp) steels have indicated that the fissures on the slabs are formed after the metal spreads along the small plane and the work piece thins out in the course of rolling because of the opening of large thin-walled honeycomb bubbles. The phenomenon was confirmed schematically on a model in the form of a slab-shaped lead specimen with longitudinal hole of a variable diameter close to one of the edges

  10. Energy and exergy analyses of medium temperature latent heat thermal storage with high porosity metal matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Ashish; Saha, Sandip K.

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: I. Metal matrix is used as the thermal conductivity enhancers (TCE) in PCM-based TES. II. Time evolution second law analysis is evaluated for different porosities and pore diameters. III. Reduction in fluctuation in HTF temperature is significantly affected by the change in porosity (ε) shown in figure. IV. Maximum energy and exergy efficiencies are obtained for porosity of 0.85. V. Effect of pore diameter on first law and second law efficiencies is found to be marginal. - Abstract: Thermal energy storage system in a concentrating solar plant (CSP) reduces the gap between energy demand and supply caused by the intermittent behaviour of solar radiation. In this paper, detailed exergy and energy analyses of shell and tube type latent heat thermal storage system (LHTES) for medium temperature solar thermal power plant (∼200 °C) are performed to estimate the net useful energy during the charging and discharging period in a cycle. A commercial-grade organic phase change material (PCM) is stored inside the annular space of the shell and the heat transfer fluid (HTF) flows through the tubes. Thermal conductivity enhancer (TCE) in the form of metal matrix is embedded in PCM to augment heat transfer. A numerical model is developed to investigate the fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics using the momentum equation and the two-temperature non-equilibrium energy equation coupled with the enthalpy method to account for phase change in PCM. The effects of storage material, porosity and pore-diameter on the net useful energy that can be stored and released during a cycle, are studied. It is found that the first law efficiency of sensible heat storage system is less compared to LHTES. With the decrease in porosity, the first law and second law efficiencies of LHTES increase for both the charging and discharging period. There is no significant variation in energy and exergy efficiencies with the change in pore-diameter of the metal matrix.

  11. Study on the decomposition mechanism of alkyl carbonate on lithium metal by pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogi, Ryo; Inaba, Minoru; Iriyama, Yasutoshi; Abe, Takeshi; Ogumi, Zempachi

    The surface films formed on deposited lithium in electrolyte solutions based on ethylene carbonate (EC), diethyl carbonate (DEC), and dimethyl carbonate (DMC) were analyzed by pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (Py-GC-MS). In 1 M LiClO 4/EC, the main component of the surface film was easily hydrolyzed to give ethylene glycol after exposure to air, and hence was considered to have a chemical structure of ROCH 2CH 2OR', of which OR and OR' are OLi or OCO 2Li. Ethylene oxide, acetaldehyde, and 1,4-dioxane were detected in decomposition products, and they were considered to have been formed by pyrolysis of ROCH 2CH 2OR' in the pyrolyzer. The presence of ethanol in decomposition products confirmed that ring cleavage at the CH 2O bonds of EC occurs by one electron reduction. In addition, the presence of methanol implied the cleavage of the CC bond of EC upon reduction. From the surface films formed in 1 M LiClO 4/DEC and /DMC, ethanol and methanol, respectively, were detected, which suggested that corresponding lithium alkoxides and/or lithium alkyl carbonates were the main components. In 1 M LiClO 4/EC+DEC (1:1), EC dominantly decomposed to form the surface film. The surface film formed in 1 M LiPF 6/EC+DEC (1:1) contained a much smaller amount of organic compounds.

  12. On high temperature internal friction in metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zolotukhin, I.V.; Kalinin, Yu.E.; Roshchupkin, A.M.

    1992-01-01

    High temperature background of internal friction in amorphous lanthanum-aluminium alloys was investigated. More rapid growth of internal friction was observed at temperature ∼ 453 K reaching maximal value at 495 K. Crystallization process was accompanied by decrease of internal friction. Increase of mechanical vibration frequency to 1000 Hz leads to rise of internal friction background in the range of room temperatures and to decrease at temperatures above 370 K. Bend was observed on temperature dependence of internal friction at 440 K

  13. Modeling Ethanol Decomposition on Transition Metals: A Combined Application of Scaling and Bronsted-Evans-Polanyi Relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrin, P.; Simonetti, D.; Kandoi, S.

    2009-01-01

    calculations necessary to describe trends in activity and selectivity across metal and alloy surfaces, thus extending the reach of DFT to more complex systems. In-this work, the well-known family of Bronsted-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) correlations, connecting minima with maxima in the potential energy surface...... on a subset of these surfaces are calculated. Experiments on supported catalysts verify that this simple model is reasonably accurate in describing reactivity trends across metals, suggesting that the combination of BEP and scaling relations may substantially reduce the cost of DFT calculations required...

  14. Methods for Prediction of Temperature Distribution in Flashover Caused by Backdraft Fire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guowei Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurately predicting temperature distribution in flashover fire is a key issue for evacuation and fire-fighting. Now many good flashover fire experiments have be conducted, but most of these experiments are proceeded in enclosure with fixed openings; researches on fire development and temperature distribution in flashover caused by backdraft fire did not receive enough attention. In order to study flashover phenomenon caused by backdraft fire, a full-scale fire experiment was conducted in one abandoned office building. Process of fire development and temperature distribution in room and corridor were separately recorded during the experiment. The experiment shows that fire development in enclosure is closely affected by the room ventilation. Unlike existing temperature curves which have only one temperature peak, temperature in flashover caused by backdraft may have more than one peak value and that there is a linear relationship between maximum peak temperature and distance away from fire compartment. Based on BFD curve and experimental data, mathematical models are proposed to predict temperature curve in flashover fire caused by backdraft at last. These conclusions and experiment data obtained in this paper could provide valuable reference to fire simulation, hazard assessment, and fire protection design.

  15. The effect of nanocrystallization and free volume on the room temperature plasticity of Zr-based bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondal, K.; Ohkubo, T.; Toyama, T.; Nagai, Y.; Hasegawa, M.; Hono, K.

    2008-01-01

    To understand the mechanism of the room temperature plasticity of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), microstructure observations, density measurements and positron annihilation studies were carried out for Zr-based BMGs cast at various temperatures and post-annealed under different conditions. We found that higher casting temperatures cause partial crystallization, which enhance the plasticity as long as the volume fraction of the crystalline phase is low. However, a similar nanocrystalline microstructure produced by post-annealing often leads to a large loss of plasticity, while certain conditions enhance the plasticity. Based on density measurements and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy, we conclude that the relative contribution of free volume and nanocrystallization is important for acquiring plasticity in metallic glasses

  16. Metal temperature monitoring in corrosive gases at high temperature and high thermal flows; Monitoreo de temperaturas de metal en gases corrosivos a alta temperatura y altos flujos termicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huerta Espino, Mario; Martinez Flores, Marco Antonio; Martinez Villafane, Alberto; Porcayo Calderon, Jesus; Gomez Guzman, Roberto; Reyes Cervantes, Fernando [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1990-12-31

    The direct measurement of metal temperatures during operation in superheater, reheater, and water wall tubes in zones exposed to high thermal flows is of great interest for the operation and analysis of the correct functioning of a steam generator. The operation temperature measurement of these zones differs very much of the monitored temperature in headers in the dead chamber, since the temperature measured in this zone is the steam temperature that does not reflect the one detected in the gas zone. For this reason, the thermocouples implant in gas zones will detect the real metal temperature and the incidence that some operation variables might have on it (Martinez et al., (1990). [Espanol] La medicion directa de temperaturas de metal durante operacion en tubos de sobrecalentador, recalentador y pared de agua en zonas expuestas a altos flujos termicos es de gran interes para la operacion y analisis del buen funcionamiento de un generador de vapor. La medicion de la temperatura de operacion de estas zonas, difiere mucho de la temperatura monitoreada en cabezales en zona de camara muerta, ya que la temperatura registrada en esta zona es la de vapor que no es un reflejo de la detectada en zona de gases. Por esta razon, la implantacion de termopares en zona de gases detectara la temperatura de metal real y la incidencia que algunas variables de operacion tengan sobre esta (Martinez et al., 1990).

  17. Metal temperature monitoring in corrosive gases at high temperature and high thermal flows; Monitoreo de temperaturas de metal en gases corrosivos a alta temperatura y altos flujos termicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huerta Espino, Mario; Martinez Flores, Marco Antonio; Martinez Villafane, Alberto; Porcayo Calderon, Jesus; Gomez Guzman, Roberto; Reyes Cervantes, Fernando [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1991-12-31

    The direct measurement of metal temperatures during operation in superheater, reheater, and water wall tubes in zones exposed to high thermal flows is of great interest for the operation and analysis of the correct functioning of a steam generator. The operation temperature measurement of these zones differs very much of the monitored temperature in headers in the dead chamber, since the temperature measured in this zone is the steam temperature that does not reflect the one detected in the gas zone. For this reason, the thermocouples implant in gas zones will detect the real metal temperature and the incidence that some operation variables might have on it (Martinez et al., (1990). [Espanol] La medicion directa de temperaturas de metal durante operacion en tubos de sobrecalentador, recalentador y pared de agua en zonas expuestas a altos flujos termicos es de gran interes para la operacion y analisis del buen funcionamiento de un generador de vapor. La medicion de la temperatura de operacion de estas zonas, difiere mucho de la temperatura monitoreada en cabezales en zona de camara muerta, ya que la temperatura registrada en esta zona es la de vapor que no es un reflejo de la detectada en zona de gases. Por esta razon, la implantacion de termopares en zona de gases detectara la temperatura de metal real y la incidencia que algunas variables de operacion tengan sobre esta (Martinez et al., 1990).

  18. Analysis of transient permeation behavior of hydrogen isotope caused by abrupt temperature change of first wall and blanket wall material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamawaki, Michio; Tanaka, Satoru; Kiyoshi, Tsukasa

    1989-01-01

    To obtain further information on the transient permeation behavior of hydrogen isotopes as caused by an abrupt temperature change, numerical calculations were carried out for two typical metals, nickel and vanadium. Deuterium permeation through nickel is analyzed as a typical case of bulk-diffusion-limited permeation. Its transient behavior changed dramatically according to the specimen thickness. The transient behavior, in general, is separated into two parts, initial and latter period behaviors. Conditions which cause such a separation were evaluated. Evaluation of the hydrogen diffusivity and solubility by an analysis of transient curves of hydrogen permeation was carried out. The transient behavior of simultaneous gas- and ion-driven hydrogen permeation through vanadium was also analyzed. Overshooting of the hydrogen permeation rate appears with an abrupt temperature increase. Increasing the impinging ion flux causes the overshooting peak to become sharper, and also reduces the change of the steady-state permeation rate to be attained after the temperature change compared with the initial value. (orig.)

  19. High temperature reactions between molybdenum and metal halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeroeczki, A.; Dobos, G.; Josepovits, V.K.; Hars, Gy.

    2006-01-01

    Good colour rendering properties, high intensity and efficacy are of vital importance for high-end lighting applications. These requirements can be achieved by high intensity discharge lamps doped with different metal halide additives (metal halide lamps). To improve their reliability, it is very important to understand the different failure processes of the lamps. In this paper, the corrosion reactions between different metal halides and the molybdenum electrical feed-through electrode are discussed. The reactions were studied in the feed-through of real lamps and on model samples too. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to establish the chemical states. In case of the model samples we have also used atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) to measure the reaction product amounts. Based on the measurement results we were able to determine the most corrosive metal halide components and to understand the mechanism of the reactions

  20. Fundamental studies of ceramic/metal interfacial reactions at elevated temperatures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDeavitt, S. M.; Billings, G. W.; Indacochea, J. E.

    2000-12-14

    This work characterizes the interfaces resulting from exposing oxide and non-oxide ceramic substrates to zirconium metal and stainless steel-zirconium containing alloys. The ceramic/metal systems together were preheated at about 600 C and then the temperatures were increased to the test maximum temperature, which exceeded 1800 C, in an atmosphere of high purity argon. Metal samples were placed onto ceramic substrates, and the system was heated to elevated temperatures past the melting point of the metallic specimen. After a short stay at the peak temperature, the system was cooled to room temperature and examined. The chemical changes across the interface and other microstructural developments were analyzed with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). This paper reports on the condition of the interfaces in the different systems studied and describes possible mechanisms influencing the microstructure.

  1. Hot metal temperature prediction by neural networks in the blast furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantera, C.; Jimenez, J.; Varela, I.; Formoso, A.

    2002-01-01

    Based on a simplified model, the underlying temperature criteria is proposed as a method to study the temperature trends in a blast furnace. As an application, a neural network able to forecast hot metal temperatures from 2 to 16 h in advance (with decreasing precision) has been built. This neural network has been designed to work at real time in a production plant. (Author)

  2. Danburite decomposition by sulfuric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsaidov, U.; Mamatov, E.D.; Ashurov, N.A.

    2011-01-01

    Present article is devoted to decomposition of danburite of Ak-Arkhar Deposit of Tajikistan by sulfuric acid. The process of decomposition of danburite concentrate by sulfuric acid was studied. The chemical nature of decomposition process of boron containing ore was determined. The influence of temperature on the rate of extraction of boron and iron oxides was defined. The dependence of decomposition of boron and iron oxides on process duration, dosage of H 2 SO 4 , acid concentration and size of danburite particles was determined. The kinetics of danburite decomposition by sulfuric acid was studied as well. The apparent activation energy of the process of danburite decomposition by sulfuric acid was calculated. The flowsheet of danburite processing by sulfuric acid was elaborated.

  3. Thermal decomposition of lutetium propionate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grivel, Jean-Claude

    2010-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of lutetium(III) propionate monohydrate (Lu(C2H5CO2)3·H2O) in argon was studied by means of thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis, IR-spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Dehydration takes place around 90 °C. It is followed by the decomposition of the anhydrous...... °C. Full conversion to Lu2O3 is achieved at about 1000 °C. Whereas the temperatures and solid reaction products of the first two decomposition steps are similar to those previously reported for the thermal decomposition of lanthanum(III) propionate monohydrate, the final decomposition...... of the oxycarbonate to the rare-earth oxide proceeds in a different way, which is here reminiscent of the thermal decomposition path of Lu(C3H5O2)·2CO(NH2)2·2H2O...

  4. Premature failure of dissimilar metal weld joint at intermediate temperature superheater tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Al Hajri

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Dissimilar metal weld (DMW joint between alloyed steel (AS and stainless steel (SS failed at one of intermediate temperature superheater (ITSH tube in steam/power generation plant boiler. The premature failure was detected after a relatively short time of operation (8 years where the crack propagated circumferentially from AS side through the ITSH tube. Apart from physical examination, microstructural studies based on optical microscopy, SEM and EDX analysis were performed. The results of the investigation point out the limitation of Carbides precipitation at the alloyed steel/welding interface. This is synonym of creep stage I involvement in the failure of ITSH. Improper post-welding operation and bending moment are considered as root causes of the premature failure.

  5. Soluble transition metals cause the pro-inflammatory effects of welding fumes in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeilly, Jane D.; Heal, Mathew R.; Beverland, Iain J.; Howe, Alan; Gibson, Mark D.; Hibbs, Leon R.; MacNee, William; Donaldson, Ken

    2004-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have consistently reported a higher incidence of respiratory illnesses such as bronchitis, metal fume fever (MFF), and chronic pneumonitis among welders exposed to high concentrations of metal-enriched welding fumes. Here, we studied the molecular toxicology of three different metal-rich welding fumes: NIMROD 182, NIMROD c276, and COBSTEL 6. Fume toxicity in vitro was determined by exposing human type II alveolar epithelial cell line (A549) to whole welding fume, a soluble extract of fume or the 'washed' particulate. All whole fumes were significantly toxic to A549 cells at doses >63 μg ml -1 (TD 50; 42, 25, and 12 μg ml -1 , respectively). NIMROD c276 and COBSTEL 6 fumes increased levels of IL-8 mRNA and protein at 6 h and protein at 24 h, as did the soluble fraction alone, whereas metal chelation of the soluble fraction using chelex beads attenuated the effect. The soluble fraction of all three fumes caused a rapid depletion in intracellular glutathione following 2-h exposure with a rebound increase by 24 h. In addition, both nickel based fumes, NIMROD 182 and NIMROD c276, induced significant reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in A549 cells after 2 h as determined by DCFH fluorescence. ICP analysis confirmed that transition metal concentrations were similar in the whole and soluble fractions of each fume (dominated by Cr), but significantly less in both the washed particles and chelated fractions. These results support the hypothesis that the enhanced pro-inflammatory responses of welding fume particulates are mediated by soluble transition metal components via an oxidative stress mechanism

  6. Creep behaviour of austenitic stainless steels, base and weld metals used in liquid metal fast breeder reactors, during temperature variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felsen, M.F.

    1982-07-01

    Creep rupture and deformation during temperature variations have been studied for 316 austenitic steel, base and weld metals. Loaded specimens were heated to 900 0 C or 1000 0 C and maintained at this temperature for different durations. The heating rate to these temperatures was between 5 and 50 0 C h -1 , whilst the cooling rate was between 5 and 20 0 C h -1 . The above tests were coupled with short time creep and tensile tests (straining rate 10 -2 h -1 to 10 3 h -1 ) at constant temperature. These tests were used for predicting the creep behaviour of the materials under changing temperature condition. The predictions were in good agreement with the changing temperature and creep experimental results. In addition, a correlation between certains tensile properties, such as the rupture time as a function of stress was observed at high temperature

  7. Synthesis and characterization of thermally stable oligomer-metal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The thermal stabilities of the oligomer-metal complexes were compared by thermogravimetric (TG) and differential thermal (DTA) analyses. According to TG, oligomer-metal complexes were stable against to temperature and thermooxidative decomposition. The weight losses of oligomer-metal complexes were found to be 5 ...

  8. Surface chemistry of metals and their oxides in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomlinson, M.

    1975-01-01

    Examination of oxide and metal surfaces in water at high temperature by a broad spectrum of techniques is bringing understanding of corrosion product movement and alleviation of activity transport in CANDU-type reactor primary coolant circuits. (Author)

  9. Low temperature synthesis of ternary metal phosphides using plasma for asymmetric supercapacitors

    KAUST Repository

    Liang, Hanfeng; Xia, Chuan; Jiang, Qiu; Gandi, Appala; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2017-01-01

    We report a versatile route for the preparation of metal phosphides using PH plasma for supercapacitor applications. The high reactivity of plasma allows rapid and low temperature conversion of hydroxides into monometallic, bimetallic, or even more

  10. Thermophysical and transport properties of metals at high pressure and very high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaner, J.W.; Gathers, G.R.

    1977-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of enthalpy, specific volume, temperature, and electrical resistivity for lead and uranium were measured. From the measured data, estimates of the bulk modulus and sound velocity in these metals are made

  11. Effects of Extreme Temperatures on Cause-Specific Cardiovascular Mortality in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuying; Li, Guoxing; Liu, Liqun; Westerdahl, Dane; Jin, Xiaobin; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2015-12-21

    Limited evidence is available for the effects of extreme temperatures on cause-specific cardiovascular mortality in China. We collected data from Beijing and Shanghai, China, during 2007-2009, including the daily mortality of cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, ischemic heart disease and hypertensive disease, as well as air pollution concentrations and weather conditions. We used Poisson regression with a distributed lag non-linear model to examine the effects of extremely high and low ambient temperatures on cause-specific cardiovascular mortality. For all cause-specific cardiovascular mortality, Beijing had stronger cold and hot effects than those in Shanghai. The cold effects on cause-specific cardiovascular mortality reached the strongest at lag 0-27, while the hot effects reached the strongest at lag 0-14. The effects of extremely low and high temperatures differed by mortality types in the two cities. Hypertensive disease in Beijing was particularly susceptible to both extremely high and low temperatures; while for Shanghai, people with ischemic heart disease showed the greatest relative risk (RRs = 1.16, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.34) to extremely low temperature. People with hypertensive disease were particularly susceptible to extremely low and high temperatures in Beijing. People with ischemic heart disease in Shanghai showed greater susceptibility to extremely cold days.

  12. Effects of Extreme Temperatures on Cause-Specific Cardiovascular Mortality in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuying Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Limited evidence is available for the effects of extreme temperatures on cause-specific cardiovascular mortality in China. Methods: We collected data from Beijing and Shanghai, China, during 2007–2009, including the daily mortality of cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, ischemic heart disease and hypertensive disease, as well as air pollution concentrations and weather conditions. We used Poisson regression with a distributed lag non-linear model to examine the effects of extremely high and low ambient temperatures on cause-specific cardiovascular mortality. Results: For all cause-specific cardiovascular mortality, Beijing had stronger cold and hot effects than those in Shanghai. The cold effects on cause-specific cardiovascular mortality reached the strongest at lag 0–27, while the hot effects reached the strongest at lag 0–14. The effects of extremely low and high temperatures differed by mortality types in the two cities. Hypertensive disease in Beijing was particularly susceptible to both extremely high and low temperatures; while for Shanghai, people with ischemic heart disease showed the greatest relative risk (RRs = 1.16, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.34 to extremely low temperature. Conclusion: People with hypertensive disease were particularly susceptible to extremely low and high temperatures in Beijing. People with ischemic heart disease in Shanghai showed greater susceptibility to extremely cold days.

  13. Metal-coated optical fibers for high temperature sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidelus, Janusz D.; Wysokiński, Karol; Stańczyk, Tomasz; Kołakowska, Agnieszka; Nasiłowski, Piotr; Lipiński, Stanisław; Tenderenda, Tadeusz; Nasiłowski, Tomasz

    2017-10-01

    An novel low-temperature method was used to enhance the corrosion resistance of copper or gold-coated optical fibers. A characterization of the elaborated materials and reports on selected studies such as cyclic temperature tests together with tensile tests is presented. Gold-coated optical fibers are proposed as a component of optical fiber sensors working in oxidizing atmospheres under temperatures exceeding 900 °C.

  14. Electromagnetic-acoustic coupling in ferromagnetic metals at liquid-helium temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordon, R A

    1981-01-01

    Electromagnetic-acoustic coupling at the surface and in the bulk of ferromagnetic metals at liquid-helium temperatures has been studied using electromagnetically excited acoustic standing-wave resonances at MHz frequencies in a number of ferromagnetic metals and alloys of commercial interest...

  15. Variations in erosive wear of metallic materials with temperature via the electron work function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Xiaochen; Yu, Bin; Yan, X.G.; Li, D.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical properties of metals are intrinsically determined by their electron behavior, which is largely reflected by the electron work function (EWF or φ). Since the work function varies with temperature, the dependence of material properties on temperature could be predicted via variations in work function with temperature. Combining a hardness – φ relationship and the dependence of work function on temperature, a temperature-dependent model for predicting solid-particle erosion is proposed. Erosive wear losses of copper, nickel, and carbon steel as sample materials were measured at different temperatures. Results of the tests are consistent with the theoretical prediction. This study demonstrates a promising parameter, electron work function, for looking into fundamental aspects of wear phenomena, which would also help develop alternative methodologies for material design. - Highlights: • Metallic materials' wear resistance is influenced by temperature. • Electron work function (EWF) intrinsically determines materials' wear resistance. • An EWF-based temperature-dependent solid-particle erosion model is proposed.

  16. Apparatus to measure emissivities of metallic films between 90K and room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekeris, V I [Nunez Univ. Nacional (Argentina). Faculdad de Ciencias Exactas Y Naturales; Ramos, E D [Santa Rosa Univ. Nacional (Argentina). Facultad de Ciencias Exactas Y Naturales; Sanchez, D H [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina). Centro Atomico Bariloche

    1975-09-01

    The development of multilayer insulations is aerospace and cryogenic required to know the emissivity of the metallic films used as reflective layers. This work describes an emissometer that measures the total hemispherical emissivity of metallic films evaporated on polyester substrates. The apparatus works at liquid oxigen temperatures and permits to get emissivities from 90K to room temperatures within a 15% precision. The emissometer construction and operation are described in detail. Results of measurements done on Single Aluminized Mylar are presented.

  17. Relationship between thermal expansion coefficient and glass transition temperature in metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, H.; Chen, H.-S.; Inoue, A.

    2008-01-01

    The thermal expansion coefficients of 13 metallic glasses were measured using a thermo-mechanical analyser. A unique correlation was found between the linear thermal expansion coefficient and the glass transition temperature-their product is nearly constant ∼8.24 x 10 -3 . If one assumes the Debye expression for thermal activation, the total linear thermal expansion up to glass transition temperature (T g ) is reduced to 6 x 10 -3 , nearly 25% of that at the fusion of pure metals

  18. Volume dependence of the melting temperature for alkali metals with Debye's model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soma, T.; Kagaya, H.M.; Nishigaki, M.

    1983-01-01

    Using the volume dependence of the Grueneisen constant at higher temperatures, the volume effect on the melting temperature of alkali metals is studied by Lindeman's melting law and Debye's model. The obtained melting curve increases as a function of the compressed volume and shows the maximum of the melting point at the characteristic volume. The resultant data are qualitatively in agreement with the observed tendency for alkali metals. (author)

  19. Apparatus to measure emissivities of metallic films between 90K and room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekeris, V.I.; Ramos, E.D.; Sanchez, D.H.

    1975-01-01

    The development of multilayer insulations is aerospace and cryogenic required to know the emissivity of the metallic films used as reflective layers. This work describes an emissometer that measures the total hemispherical emissivity of metallic films evaporated on polyester substrates. The apparatus works at liquid oxigen temperatures and permits to get emissivities from 90K to room temperatures within a 15% precision. The emissometer construction and operation are described in detail. Results of measurements done on Single Aluminized Mylar are presented [pt

  20. High temperature microcalorimetry. Study of metal-oxygen systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tetot, R.; Picard, C.; Boureau, G.; Gerdanian, P.

    1981-01-01

    Determination of partial molar enthalpy in metal-oxygen systems at 1050 0 C. Three representative systems are studied: the solution of oxygen in titanium, the titanium-oxygen system and the uranium-oxygen system from UOsub(2.00) to UOsub(2.60) [fr

  1. Thermal decomposition of hydroxylamine: Isoperibolic calorimetric measurements at different conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamopoulou, Theodora; Papadaki, Maria I.; Kounalakis, Manolis; Vazquez-Carreto, Victor; Pineda-Solano, Alba; Wang, Qingsheng; Mannan, M.Sam

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Hydroxylamine thermal decomposition enthalpy was measured using larger quantities. • The rate at which heat is evolved depends on hydroxylamine concentration. • Decomposition heat is strongly affected by the conditions and the selected baseline. • The need for enthalpy measurements using a larger reactant mass is pinpointed. • Hydroxylamine decomposition in the presence of argon is much faster than in air. -- Abstract: Thermal decomposition of hydroxylamine, NH 2 OH, was responsible for two serious accidents. However, its reactive behavior and the synergy of factors affecting its decomposition are not being understood. In this work, the global enthalpy of hydroxylamine decomposition has been measured in the temperature range of 130–150 °C employing isoperibolic calorimetry. Measurements were performed in a metal reactor, employing 30–80 ml solutions containing 1.4–20 g of pure hydroxylamine (2.8–40 g of the supplied reagent). The measurements showed that increased concentration or temperature, results in higher global enthalpies of reaction per unit mass of reactant. At 150 °C, specific enthalpies as high as 8 kJ per gram of hydroxylamine were measured, although in general they were in the range of 3−5 kJ g −1 . The accurate measurement of the generated heat was proven to be a cumbersome task as (a) it is difficult to identify the end of decomposition, which after a fast initial stage, proceeds very slowly, especially at lower temperatures and (b) the environment of gases affects the reaction rate

  2. Thermal decomposition of hydroxylamine: Isoperibolic calorimetric measurements at different conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamopoulou, Theodora [Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, University of Western Greece (formerly of University of Ioannina), Seferi 2, Agrinio GR30100 (Greece); Papadaki, Maria I., E-mail: mpapadak@cc.uoi.gr [Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, University of Western Greece (formerly of University of Ioannina), Seferi 2, Agrinio GR30100 (Greece); Kounalakis, Manolis [Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, University of Western Greece (formerly of University of Ioannina), Seferi 2, Agrinio GR30100 (Greece); Vazquez-Carreto, Victor; Pineda-Solano, Alba [Mary Kay O’Connor Process Safety Center, Artie McFerrin Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Wang, Qingsheng [Department of Fire Protection and Safety and Department of Chemical Engineering, Oklahoma State University, 494 Cordell South, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Mannan, M.Sam [Mary Kay O’Connor Process Safety Center, Artie McFerrin Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: • Hydroxylamine thermal decomposition enthalpy was measured using larger quantities. • The rate at which heat is evolved depends on hydroxylamine concentration. • Decomposition heat is strongly affected by the conditions and the selected baseline. • The need for enthalpy measurements using a larger reactant mass is pinpointed. • Hydroxylamine decomposition in the presence of argon is much faster than in air. -- Abstract: Thermal decomposition of hydroxylamine, NH{sub 2}OH, was responsible for two serious accidents. However, its reactive behavior and the synergy of factors affecting its decomposition are not being understood. In this work, the global enthalpy of hydroxylamine decomposition has been measured in the temperature range of 130–150 °C employing isoperibolic calorimetry. Measurements were performed in a metal reactor, employing 30–80 ml solutions containing 1.4–20 g of pure hydroxylamine (2.8–40 g of the supplied reagent). The measurements showed that increased concentration or temperature, results in higher global enthalpies of reaction per unit mass of reactant. At 150 °C, specific enthalpies as high as 8 kJ per gram of hydroxylamine were measured, although in general they were in the range of 3−5 kJ g{sup −1}. The accurate measurement of the generated heat was proven to be a cumbersome task as (a) it is difficult to identify the end of decomposition, which after a fast initial stage, proceeds very slowly, especially at lower temperatures and (b) the environment of gases affects the reaction rate.

  3. Non-equilibrium thermionic electron emission for metals at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenech-Garret, J. L.; Tierno, S. P.; Conde, L.

    2015-08-01

    Stationary thermionic electron emission currents from heated metals are compared against an analytical expression derived using a non-equilibrium quantum kappa energy distribution for the electrons. The latter depends on the temperature decreasing parameter κ ( T ) , which decreases with increasing temperature and can be estimated from raw experimental data and characterizes the departure of the electron energy spectrum from equilibrium Fermi-Dirac statistics. The calculations accurately predict the measured thermionic emission currents for both high and moderate temperature ranges. The Richardson-Dushman law governs electron emission for large values of kappa or equivalently, moderate metal temperatures. The high energy tail in the electron energy distribution function that develops at higher temperatures or lower kappa values increases the emission currents well over the predictions of the classical expression. This also permits the quantitative estimation of the departure of the metal electrons from the equilibrium Fermi-Dirac statistics.

  4. Low temperature fatigue crack propagation in neutron irradiated Type 316 steel and weld metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, G.J.; Walls, J.D.; Gravenor, J.

    1981-02-01

    The fast cycling fatigue crack propagation characteristics of Type 316 steel and weld metal have been investigated at 380 0 C after irradiation to 1.72-1.92x10 20 n/cm 2 (E>1MeV) and 2.03x10 21 n/cm 2 (E>1MeV) at the same temperature. With mill-annealed Type 316 steel, modest decreases in the rates of crack propagation were observed for both dose levels considered, whereas for cold-worked Type 316 steel irradiation to 2.03x10 21 n/cm 2 (E>1MeV) caused increases in the rate of crack propagation. For Type 316 weld metal, increases in the rate of crack propagation were observed for both dose levels considered. The diverse influences of irradiation upon fatigue crack propagation in these materials are explained by considering a simple continuum mechanics model of crack propagation together with the results of control tensile experiments made on similarly irradiated materials. (author)

  5. Metallic Contaminant Detection using a High-Temperature Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices Gradiometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Saburo; Akai, Tomohiro; Takemoto, Makoto; Hatsukade, Yoshimi; Ohtani, Takeyoshi; Ikeda, Yoshio; Suzuki, Shuichi

    2010-01-01

    We develop magnetic metallic contaminant detectors using high-temperature superconducting quantum interference devices (HTS-SQUIDs) for industrial products. Finding ultra-small metallic contaminants is an important issue for manufacturers producing commercial products such as lithium ion batteries. If such contaminants cause damages, the manufacturer of the product suffers a big financial loss due to having to recall the faulty products. Previously, we described a system for finding such ultra-small particles in food. In this study, we describe further developments of the system, for the reduction of the effect of the remnant field of the products, and we test the parallel magnetization of the products to generate the remnant field only at both ends of the products. In addition, we use an SQUID gradiometer in place of the magnetometer to reduce the edge effect by measuring the magnetic field gradient. We test the performances of the system and find that tiny iron particles as small as 50 × 50 μm 2 on the electrode of a lithium ion battery could be clearly detected. This detection level is difficult to achieve when using other methods. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  6. Microstructure and High Temperature Oxidation Property of Fe-Cr-B Based Metal/Ceramic Composite Manufactured by Powder Injection Molding Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Yeun-Ah; Kim, Young-Kyun; Yoon, Tae-Sik; Lee, Kee-Ahn

    2018-03-01

    This study investigated the microstructure and high temperature oxidation property of Fe-Cr-B metal/ceramic composite manufactured using powder injection molding process. Observations of initial microstructure showed a unique structure where α-Fe and (Cr, Fe)2B form a continuous three-dimensional network. High temperature oxidation tests were performed at 900, 1000 and 1100 °C, for 24 h, and the oxidation weight gain according to each temperature condition was 0.13, 0.84 and 6.4 mg/cm2, respectively. The oxidation results according to time at 900 and 1000 °C conditions represented parabolic curves, and at 1100 °C condition formed a rectilinear curve. Observation and phase analysis results of the oxides identified Cr2O3 and SiO2 at 900 and 1000 °C. In addition to Cr2O3 and SiO2, CrBO3 and FeCr2O4 formed due to phase decomposition of boride were identified at 1100 °C. Based on the findings above, this study suggested the high temperature oxidation mechanism of Fe-Cr-B metal/ceramic composite manufactured using powder injection molding, and the possibility of its application as a high temperature component material was also discussed.

  7. Performance of a combined cooling heating and power system with mid-and-low temperature solar thermal energy and methanol decomposition integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Da; Liu, Qibin; Lei, Jing; Jin, Hongguang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A new middle-and-low temperature solar thermochemical CCHP system is proposed. • The thermodynamic performances of the new system are numerically evaluated. • The superiorities of the new system are demonstrated. - Abstract: In this paper, a new distributed energy system that integrates the mid-and-low temperature solar energy thermochemical process and the methanol decomposition is proposed. Through the solar energy receiver/reactor, the energy collected by a parabolic trough concentrator, at 200–300 °C, is used to drive the decomposition reaction of the methanol into the synthesis gas, and thus the solar thermal energy is converted to the chemical energy. The chemical energy of the synthesis gas released in the combustion chamber of a micro gas turbine is used to drive the combined cooling heating and power systems. Energy analysis and exergy analysis of the system are implemented to evaluate the feasibility of the proposed system. Under the considerations of the changes of the solar irradiation intensity, the off-design performances of the micro turbine and the variations of the load, the design and off-design thermodynamic performances of the system and the characteristics of the chemical energy storage are numerically studied. Numerical results indicate that the primary energy ratio of the system is 76.40%, and the net solar-electricity conversion rate reaches 22.56%, which is higher than exiting large-scale solar thermal power plants. Owing to the introduction of a the solar thermochemical energy storage in the proposed system, the power generation efficiency is insensitive to the variations of the solar radiation, and thus an efficient and stable utilization approach of the solar thermal energy is achieved at all work condition

  8. A Novel Hybrid Data-Driven Model for Daily Land Surface Temperature Forecasting Using Long Short-Term Memory Neural Network Based on Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xike Zhang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Daily land surface temperature (LST forecasting is of great significance for application in climate-related, agricultural, eco-environmental, or industrial studies. Hybrid data-driven prediction models using Ensemble Empirical Mode Composition (EEMD coupled with Machine Learning (ML algorithms are useful for achieving these purposes because they can reduce the difficulty of modeling, require less history data, are easy to develop, and are less complex than physical models. In this article, a computationally simple, less data-intensive, fast and efficient novel hybrid data-driven model called the EEMD Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM neural network, namely EEMD-LSTM, is proposed to reduce the difficulty of modeling and to improve prediction accuracy. The daily LST data series from the Mapoling and Zhijaing stations in the Dongting Lake basin, central south China, from 1 January 2014 to 31 December 2016 is used as a case study. The EEMD is firstly employed to decompose the original daily LST data series into many Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMFs and a single residue item. Then, the Partial Autocorrelation Function (PACF is used to obtain the number of input data sample points for LSTM models. Next, the LSTM models are constructed to predict the decompositions. All the predicted results of the decompositions are aggregated as the final daily LST. Finally, the prediction performance of the hybrid EEMD-LSTM model is assessed in terms of the Mean Square Error (MSE, Mean Absolute Error (MAE, Mean Absolute Percentage Error (MAPE, Root Mean Square Error (RMSE, Pearson Correlation Coefficient (CC and Nash-Sutcliffe Coefficient of Efficiency (NSCE. To validate the hybrid data-driven model, the hybrid EEMD-LSTM model is compared with the Recurrent Neural Network (RNN, LSTM and Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD coupled with RNN, EMD-LSTM and EEMD-RNN models, and their comparison results demonstrate that the hybrid EEMD-LSTM model performs better than the other

  9. A Novel Hybrid Data-Driven Model for Daily Land Surface Temperature Forecasting Using Long Short-Term Memory Neural Network Based on Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xike; Zhang, Qiuwen; Zhang, Gui; Nie, Zhiping; Gui, Zifan; Que, Huafei

    2018-05-21

    Daily land surface temperature (LST) forecasting is of great significance for application in climate-related, agricultural, eco-environmental, or industrial studies. Hybrid data-driven prediction models using Ensemble Empirical Mode Composition (EEMD) coupled with Machine Learning (ML) algorithms are useful for achieving these purposes because they can reduce the difficulty of modeling, require less history data, are easy to develop, and are less complex than physical models. In this article, a computationally simple, less data-intensive, fast and efficient novel hybrid data-driven model called the EEMD Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM) neural network, namely EEMD-LSTM, is proposed to reduce the difficulty of modeling and to improve prediction accuracy. The daily LST data series from the Mapoling and Zhijaing stations in the Dongting Lake basin, central south China, from 1 January 2014 to 31 December 2016 is used as a case study. The EEMD is firstly employed to decompose the original daily LST data series into many Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMFs) and a single residue item. Then, the Partial Autocorrelation Function (PACF) is used to obtain the number of input data sample points for LSTM models. Next, the LSTM models are constructed to predict the decompositions. All the predicted results of the decompositions are aggregated as the final daily LST. Finally, the prediction performance of the hybrid EEMD-LSTM model is assessed in terms of the Mean Square Error (MSE), Mean Absolute Error (MAE), Mean Absolute Percentage Error (MAPE), Root Mean Square Error (RMSE), Pearson Correlation Coefficient (CC) and Nash-Sutcliffe Coefficient of Efficiency (NSCE). To validate the hybrid data-driven model, the hybrid EEMD-LSTM model is compared with the Recurrent Neural Network (RNN), LSTM and Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) coupled with RNN, EMD-LSTM and EEMD-RNN models, and their comparison results demonstrate that the hybrid EEMD-LSTM model performs better than the other five

  10. Platinum redispersion on metal oxides in low temperature fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tripkovic, Vladimir; Cerri, Isotta; Nagami, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    We have analyzed the aptitude of several metal oxide supports (TiO2, SnO2, NbO2, ZrO2, SiO2, Ta2O5 and Nb2O5) to redisperse platinum under electrochemical conditions pertinent to the Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) cathode. The redispersion on oxide supports in air has been studied in ...

  11. Direct high-temperature ohmic heating of metals as liquid pipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, A V; Cahill, J A; Liddell, W L; Murphy, W J; Stokes, C S

    1968-05-03

    When a sufficiently high electric current is passed through a liquid metal, the electromagnetic pressure pinches off the liquid metal and interrupts the flow of current. For the first time the pinch effect has been overcome by use of centrifugal acceleration. By rotation of a pipe of liquid metal, tin or bismuth or their alloys, at sufficiently high speed, it can be heated electrically without intermission of the electric current. One may now heat liquid metallic substances, by resistive (ohmic) heating, to 5000 degrees K and perhaps higher temperatures.

  12. Copper Metallic Substrates for High Temperature Superconducting Coated Conductors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yust, Nicholas A; Nekkanti, Rama; Brunke, Lyle B; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Barnes, Paul N

    2006-01-01

    .... Detailed x-ray diffraction (XRD) studies and orientation imaging microscopy (OIM) were performed to measure the in-plane alignment, out-of-plane alignment, and microtexture at various deformation levels and annealing temperatures...

  13. Effects of radiation and temperature on gallium nitride (GaN) metal-semiconductor-metal ultraviolet photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiamori, Heather C.; Angadi, Chetan; Suria, Ateeq; Shankar, Ashwin; Hou, Minmin; Bhattacharya, Sharmila; Senesky, Debbie G.

    2014-06-01

    The development of radiation-hardened, temperature-tolerant materials, sensors and electronics will enable lightweight space sub-systems (reduced packaging requirements) with increased operation lifetimes in extreme harsh environments such as those encountered during space exploration. Gallium nitride (GaN) is a ceramic, semiconductor material stable within high-radiation, high-temperature and chemically corrosive environments due to its wide bandgap (3.4 eV). These material properties can be leveraged for ultraviolet (UV) wavelength photodetection. In this paper, current results of GaN metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) UV photodetectors behavior after irradiation up to 50 krad and temperatures of 15°C to 150°C is presented. These initial results indicate that GaN-based sensors can provide robust operation within extreme harsh environments. Future directions for GaN-based photodetector technology for down-hole, automotive and space exploration applications are also discussed.

  14. A METALLICITY-SPIN TEMPERATURE RELATION IN DAMPED Lyα SYSTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanekar, Nissim; Smette, Alain; Briggs, Frank H.; Chengalur, Jayaram N.

    2009-01-01

    We report evidence for an anti-correlation between spin temperature T s and metallicity [Z/H], detected at 3.6σ significance in a sample of 26 damped Lyα absorbers (DLAs) at redshifts 0.09 s = (-0.68 ± 0.17) x [Z/H] + (2.13 ± 0.21) from a linear regression analysis. Our results indicate that the high T s values found in DLAs do not arise from differences between the optical and radio sightlines, but are likely to reflect the underlying gas temperature distribution. The trend between T s and [Z/H] can be explained by the larger number of radiation pathways for gas cooling in galaxies with high metal abundances, resulting in a high cold gas fraction, and hence, a low spin temperature. Conversely, low-metallicity galaxies have fewer cooling routes, yielding a larger warm gas fraction and a high T s . Most DLAs at z > 1.7 have low metallicities, [Z/H] s and [Z/H] is consistent with the presence of a mass-metallicity relation in DLAs, suggested by the tight correlation between DLA metallicity and the kinematic widths of metal lines. Most high-z DLAs are likely to arise in galaxies with low masses (M vir 10.5 M sun ), low metallicities ([Z/H] <-1), and low cold gas fractions.

  15. Temperature-dependent thermo-elastic properties of s-, p- and d-block liquid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.N.; Arafin, S.; George, A.K.

    2007-01-01

    Thermodynamic relations involving experimentally known physical quantities are used to determine the ratio of specific heats, γ, for s-block (Na, K, Rb, Cs, Mg), d-block (Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Ag, Au, Zn, Cd, Hg,) and p-block (Al, Ga, In, Tl, Sn, Pb, Sb, Bi, Se, Te) liquid metals. γ is further utilized to determine reliable values for the isothermal compressibility (κ T ) and the specific heat at constant volume (C V ) for these liquid metals near and above the melting temperatures. These data are of considerable significance for various thermo-physical analysis of liquid metals. We have also evaluated the Grueneisen function and its temperature dependence to establish the correlation between the thermal expansion and the elastic response to thermally induced stress. The values of acoustic impedance for liquid metals are evaluated and its physical significance is discussed for the transmission of elastic waves across metallic interfaces

  16. High temperature corrosion of metallic interconnects in solid oxide fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastidas, D. M.

    2006-01-01

    Research and development has made it possible to use metallic interconnects in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) instead of ceramic materials. The use of metallic interconnects was formerly hindered by the high operating temperature, which made the interconnect degrade too much and too fast to be an efficient alternative. When the operating temperature was lowered, the use of metallic interconnects proved to be favourable since they are easier and cheaper to produce than ceramic interconnects. However, metallic interconnects continue to be degraded despite the lowered temperature, and their corrosion products contribute to electrical degradation in the fuel cell. coatings of nickel, chromium, aluminium, zinc, manganese, yttrium or lanthanum between the interconnect and the electrodes reduce this degradation during operation. (Author) 66 refs

  17. Self-propagating high-temperature synthesis of LaMO{sub 3} perovskite-type oxide using heteronuclearcyano metal complex precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sánchez-Rodríguez, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.sanchez@udg.edu [GRMT, Department of Physics, University of Girona, Campus Montilivi, Edif.PII, E17071 Girona, Catalonia (Spain); Wada, Hiroki; Yamaguchi, Syuhei [Department of Materials Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ehime University, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Farjas, Jordi [GRMT, Department of Physics, University of Girona, Campus Montilivi, Edif.PII, E17071 Girona, Catalonia (Spain); Yahiro, Hidenori, E-mail: yahiro.hidenori.me@ehime-u.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ehime University, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    The decomposition of La[Fe(CN){sub 6}]·5H{sub 2}O and La[Co(CN){sub 6}]·5H{sub 2}O under different atmospheres has been analyzed by thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). In addition, the decomposition temperature at different sample locations was monitored for sample masses around 2 g of La[Fe(CN){sub 6}]·5H{sub 2}O and La[Co(CN){sub 6}]·5H{sub 2}O, when they were calcined for 1 h at temperatures ranging from 200 to 400 °C in a controlled gas-flow system. Results showed that, the large enough of the cyano complex precursors undergo combustion when they are decomposed under oxygen atmosphere. X-ray diffraction results revealed that perovskite-type oxides crystallize due to the overheating of the process. As a result, it has been possible to produce LaFeO{sub 3} and LaCoO{sub 3} perovskite-type oxide powders by SHS under oxygen atmosphere using La[Fe(CN){sub 6}]·5H{sub 2}O and La[Co(CN){sub 6}]·5H{sub 2}O as a precursor. The effect of the ignition temperature has been investigated. The specific surface area of the perovskite-type oxides produced via SHS using heteronuclearcyano metal complex as a precursor is significantly higher than that of other LaMO{sub 3} produced using the same technique but obtained from other type of precursors. - Highlights: • The decomposition of La[Fe(CN){sub 6}] and La[Co(CN){sub 6}] precursors was analyzed. • The combustion process proceeded under oxygen when sample was large enough. • Perovskite oxides via SHS from the cyano complex precursors were synthesized. • LaMO{sub 3} perovskite oxides via SHS was obtained with high specific surface area.

  18. High-temperature performance of a new nickel-based filler metal for power generation application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shingledecker, J.; Coleman, K. [Electric Power Research Institute, Charlotte, NC (United States); Siefert, J.; Tanzosh, J. [Babcok and Wilcox Research Center, Barberton, OH (United States); Newell, W. [Euroweld, Mooresville, NC (United States)

    2010-07-01

    A new nickel-based weld filler metal, EPRI P87, has been developed as a superior alternative to ERNiCr-3 for use in dissimilar metal welds (DMW) between ferritic and austenitic materials. EPRI P87 has a low coefficient of thermal expansion more closely matching alloys such as Grade 91 and 92 than other available filler metals. Additionally, the size of the carbon denuded region adjacent to the weld in the heat-affected-zone is minimized/eliminated by proper control of weld metal composition. In this work the high-temperature mechanical behavior of DMWs utilizing EPRI P87 (GTAW and GMAW processes) was characterized through tensile and long-term creep-rupture testing. Microstructure analysis was also conducted on tested specimens to evaluate the HAZ regions and failure modes. Performance of the weld metal and welded joints is discussed and compared with ERNiCr-3 and typical 9%Cr-MoV filler metals. (orig.)

  19. Low-temperature properties of a superconducting disordered metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graebner, J.E.; Golding, B.; Schutz, R.J.; Hsu, F.S.L.; Chen, H.S.

    1977-01-01

    Specific heat C/sub p/ and thermal conductivity kappa measurements between 0.1 and 10 K on the superconducting (T/sub c/ = 2.53 K) and structurally disordered metal Zr/sub 0.7/Pd/sub 0.3/ exhibit an approximately linear term in C/sub p/ and a T/sup 1.9/ dependence of kappa below T/sub c/. The magnitudes of these terms are close to those found for insulating glasses, thereby suggesting that disorder-induced localized excitations exist at similar densities in very different classes of disordered solids

  20. Temperature analysis of laser ignited metalized material using spectroscopic technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, Ishaan; Sharma, Pallavi; Daipuriya, Ritu; Singh, Manpreet

    2018-05-01

    The temperature measurement of the laser ignited aluminized Nano energetic mixture using spectroscopy has a great scope in in analysing the material characteristic and combustion analysis. The spectroscopic analysis helps to do in depth study of combustion of materials which is difficult to do using standard pyrometric methods. Laser ignition was used because it consumes less energy as compared to electric ignition but ignited material dissipate the same energy as dissipated by electric ignition and also with the same impact. Here, the presented research is primarily focused on the temperature analysis of energetic material which comprises of explosive material mixed with nano-material and is ignited with the help of laser. Spectroscopy technique is used here to estimate the temperature during the ignition process. The Nano energetic mixture used in the research does not comprise of any material that is sensitive to high impact.

  1. Cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy causes metal accumulation and metallothionein up-regulation in rat liver and kidney

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Stig Storgaard; Danscher, Gorm; Stoltenberg, Meredin

    2007-01-01

    in liver and kidney. We found that metal ions are liberated from CoCrMo alloys and suggest that they are released by dissolucytosis, a process where macrophages causes the metallic surface to release metal ions. Animals with intramuscular implants accumulated metal in liver and kidney and metallohionein I....../II were elevated in liver tissue. The present data do not tell whether kidney and liver are the primary target organs or what possible toxicological effect the different metal ions might have, but they show that metal ions are liberated from CoCrMo alloys that are not subjected to mechanical wear...... and that they accumulate in liver and kidney tissue. That the liberated metal ions affect the tissues is supported by an up-regulation of the detoxifying/pacifying metalloprotein I/II in the liver. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Dec...

  2. Endoscopic palliation of patients with biliary obstruction caused by nonresectable hilar cholangiocarcinoma: efficacy of self-expandable metallic Wallstents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, John L. S.; Bruno, Marco J.; Bergman, Jacques J.; Rauws, Erik A.; Tytgat, Guido N.; Huibregtse, Kees

    2002-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of an endoscopically inserted self-expandable metal stent for treatment of biliary obstruction caused by nonresectable hilar cholangiocarcinoma. Methods: Data on all patients with nonresectable hilar cholangiocarcinoma receiving

  3. Surface Intermediates on Metal Electrodes at High Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachau-Christiansen, Birgit; Jacobsen, Torben; Bay, Lasse

    1997-01-01

    The mechanisms widely suggested for the O2-reduc-tion or H2-oxidation SOFC reactions involve inter-mediate O/H species adsorbed on the electrode surface. The presence of these intermediates is investigated by linear sweep voltammetry. In airat moderate temperatures (500øC) Pt in contact with YSZ...

  4. High-temperature complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McBrayer, J.D.

    1979-10-01

    Silicon CMOS devices were studied, tested, and evaluated at high temperatures to determine processing, geometric, operating characteristics, and stability parameters. After more than 1000 hours at 300 0 C, most devices showed good stability, reliability, and operating characteristics. Processing and geometric parameters were evaluated and optimization steps discussed

  5. Surface intermediates on metal electrodes at high temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachau-Christiansen, Birgit; Jacobsen, Torben; Bay, Lasse

    1998-01-01

    The mechanisms widely conceived for the O(2)-reduction or H(2)-oxidation reactions in SOFC's involve intermediate O/H species adsorbed on the electrode surface. The presence of these intermediates is investigated by linear sweep voltammetry. In air at moderate temperatures (500 degrees C) Pt...

  6. Clustering of arc volcanoes caused by temperature perturbations in the back-arc mantle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changyeol; Wada, Ikuko

    2017-06-29

    Clustering of arc volcanoes in subduction zones indicates along-arc variation in the physical condition of the underlying mantle where majority of arc magmas are generated. The sub-arc mantle is brought in from the back-arc largely by slab-driven mantle wedge flow. Dynamic processes in the back-arc, such as small-scale mantle convection, are likely to cause lateral variations in the back-arc mantle temperature. Here we use a simple three-dimensional numerical model to quantify the effects of back-arc temperature perturbations on the mantle wedge flow pattern and sub-arc mantle temperature. Our model calculations show that relatively small temperature perturbations in the back-arc result in vigorous inflow of hotter mantle and subdued inflow of colder mantle beneath the arc due to the temperature dependence of the mantle viscosity. This causes a three-dimensional mantle flow pattern that amplifies the along-arc variations in the sub-arc mantle temperature, providing a simple mechanism for volcano clustering.

  7. Thermal decomposition of expanded polystyrene in a pebble bed reactor to get higher liquid fraction yield at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauhan, R.S.; Gopinath, S.; Razdan, P.; Delattre, C.; Nirmala, G.S.; Natarajan, R.

    2008-01-01

    Expanded polystyrene is one of the polymers produced in large quantities due to its versatile application in different fields. This polymer is one of the most intractable components in municipal solid waste. Disposal of polymeric material by pyrolysis or catalytic cracking yields valuable hydrocarbon fuels or monomers. Literature reports different types of reactors and arrangements that have uniform temperatures during pyrolysis and catalytic cracking. The present study focuses on reducing the temperature to maximize the quantity of styrene monomer in the liquid product. A bench scale reactor has been developed to recover the styrene monomer and other valuable chemicals. Experiments were carried under partial oxidation and vacuum conditions in the temperature range of 300-500 deg. C. In the pyrolysis optimization studies, the best atmospheric condition was determined to be vacuum, the pyrolysis temperature should be 500 deg. C, yield of liquid product obtained was 91.7% and yield of styrene obtained was 85.5%. In the characterization studies, distillation and IR spectroscopy experiments were carried out. The remaining of the liquid product comprises of benzene, ethyl benzene, and styrene dimers and trimers

  8. High Temperature Metallic Seal Development For Aero Propulsion and Gas Turbine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Greg; Datta, Amit

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on metallic high temperature static seal development at NASA for gas turbine applications is shown. The topics include: 1) High Temperature Static Seal Development; 2) Program Review; 3) Phase IV Innovative Seal with Blade Alloy Spring; 4) Spring Design; 5) Phase IV: Innovative Seal with Blade Alloy Spring; 6) PHase IV: Testing Results; 7) Seal Seating Load; 8) Spring Seal Manufacturing; and 9) Other Applications for HIgh Temperature Spring Design

  9. Positron annihilation lifetime study of low temperature irradiated metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuramoto, Eiichi [Kyushu Univ., Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1997-11-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime measurements have been made for electron and neutron irradiated Fe, Fe-Cr, Fe-Cu, Fe-Si, Fe-16Cr-17Ni specimens, and isochronal annealing behaviors were obtained for these metals and alloys. It was found that vacancies start to migrate at about 200 K in Fe and form microvoids, but by the addition of small amount of alloying elements this behavior was changed depending on the alloying elements. Positron lifetime calculations were made to explain the experimental results using EAM (embedded atom method) type potential for the lattice relaxation and the atomic superposition method for the lifetime calculation. Fairly good agreements were obtained for the positron lifetime in a vacancy in Fe and other alloys. (author)

  10. Nanofluid based on self-nanoencapsulated metal/metal alloys phase change materials with tuneable crystallisation temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, Nuria; Gimeno-Furio, Alexandra; Mondragon, Rosa; Hernandez, Leonor; Cabedo, Luis; Cordoncillo, Eloisa; Julia, J Enrique

    2017-12-14

    Nanofluids using nanoencapsulated Phase Change Materials (nePCM) allow increments in both the thermal conductivity and heat capacity of the base fluid. Incremented heat capacity is produced by the melting enthalpy of the nanoparticles core. In this work two important advances in this nanofluid type are proposed and experimentally tested. It is firstly shown that metal and metal alloy nanoparticles can be used as self-encapsulated nePCM using the metal oxide layer that forms naturally in most commercial synthesis processes as encapsulation. In line with this, Sn/SnOx nanoparticles morphology, size and thermal properties were studied by testing the suitability and performance of encapsulation at high temperatures and thermal cycling using a commercial thermal oil (Therminol 66) as the base fluid. Secondly, a mechanism to control the supercooling effect of this nePCM type based on non-eutectic alloys was developed.

  11. Low temperature isotope effects of hydrogen diffusion in metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, A.; Kronmueller, H.

    1989-01-01

    Snoek-like relaxation peaks of Hydrogen and Deuterium in amorphous Fe 80 B 20 , Fe 40 Ni 40 P 14 B 6 and Fe 91 Zr 9 are detected. At low H, D concentrations the peaks are near 200 K and show small isotope effects of the average activation energies (anti Q H ≅ 0.6 eV, anti Q D - anti Q H ≤ 10 meV). For higher H, D-contents the peaks shift to lower temperatures around to 120 K and show distinct isotope effects in the activation energies (anti Q H ≅ 0.3 eV, anti Q D - anti Q H ≅ 30 meV) and in the amplitude of the low temperature tails of the relaxation peaks. This points to isotope mass dependent deviations from the Arrhenius law due to nonthermal tunneling processes. (orig.)

  12. Temperature-dependent chemical changes of metallic fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youn, Young Sang; Lee, Jeong Mook; KimJong Hwan; Song, Hoon; Kim, Jong Yun [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    We observed the temperature-dependent variations of UZr alloy using surface analysis techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy-dispersive Xray spectroscope (EDS). In this work, we exhibited the results of XPS, Raman, XRD, and SEM-EDS for U-10wt%Zr alloy at room temperature, 610 and 1130 .deg. C. In SEM-EDS data, we observed that uranium and zirconium elements uniformly exist. After the annealing of U-10Zr sample at 1130 .deg. C, the formation of zirconium carbide is verified through Raman spectroscopy and XRD results. Additionally, the change of valence state for uranium element is also confirmed by XPS analysis.

  13. Some metallic materials and fluoride salts for high temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosnedl, P.; Hron, M.; Matal, O.

    2009-01-01

    There has been a special Ni base alloy MONICR for high temperature applications in fluoride salt environments developed in the framework of the complex R and D program for the Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) - SPHINX (SPent Hot fuel Incinerator by Neutron fluX) concept development in the Czech Republic. Selected results of MONICR alloy tests and results of semi products fabrication from this alloy are discussed in the paper. The results of the structural materials tests are applied on semi-products and for the design of the testing devices as the autoclave in loop arrangement for high temperature fluoride salts applications. Material properties other Ni base alloys are compared to those of MONICR. Corrosion test results of the alloy A686 in the LiF - NaF - ZrF 4 molten salt are provided and compared to the measured values of the polarizing resistance. (author)

  14. Low-temperature embrittlement and fracture of metals with different crystal lattices – Dislocation mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Chernov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The state of a low-temperature embrittlement (cold brittleness and dislocation mechanisms for formation of the temperature of a ductile-brittle transition and brittle fracture of metals (mono- and polycrystals with various crystal lattices (BCC, FCC, HCP are considered. The conditions for their formation connected with a stress-deformed state and strength (low temperature yield strength as well as the fracture breaking stress and mobility of dislocations in the top of a crack of the fractured metal are determined. These conditions can be met for BCC and some HCP metals in the initial state (without irradiation and after a low-temperature damaging (neutron irradiation. These conditions are not met for FCC and many HCP metals. In the process of the damaging (neutron irradiation such conditions are not met also and the state of low-temperature embrittlement of metals is absent (suppressed due to arising various radiation dynamic processes, which increase the mobility of dislocations and worsen the strength characteristics.

  15. The effect of noble metal additives on the optimum operating temperature of SnO2 gas sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad-Yousefi, S.; Rahbarpour, S.; Ghafoorifard, H.

    2017-12-01

    The effect of Pd and Au additives on gas sensing properties of SnO2 was investigated. SnO2 pallets were fabricated and sintered at 900 °C for 90 minutes. Several nanometer layers of Pd and Au were deposited on separate SnO2 pallets and were intentionally dispersed into the SnO2 pallets by long heat treatment (400 °C for 1 Day). All metal loaded samples showed significant enhancement in response level and optimum operating temperature compare to pure SnO2 gas sensors. The amount of enhancement was strongly dependent on the material and the thickness of deposited metal layer. Studying butanol response showed that increasing the thickness of metal causes the response level to increase. Further thickness increase caused contrary effect and decreased the performance of sensors. Best results were achieved at 10 nm-thick Au and 7 nm-thick Pd. Generally, Pd-SnO2 samples demonstrated better performance than Au-SnO2 ones, however, Au-SnO2 samples were proved to be good candidate to sense reducing gases with lower hydrogen atoms in their formula. Given experimental results were also good evidence of chemical activity of gold and simply confirms the relation between chemical activity and gold particle size. Results were qualitatively described by gas diffusion theory and surface reactions take place on metal particles.The first section in your paper

  16. Modeling of helium effects in metals: High temperature embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinkaus, H.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of helium on swelling, creep rupture and fatigue properties of fusion reactor materials subjected to (n,α)-reactions and/or direct α-injection, are controlled by bubble formation. The understanding of such effects requires therefore the modeling of (1) diffusional reactions of He atoms with other defects; (2) nucleation and growth of He bubbles; (3) transformation of such bubbles into cavities under continuous He generation and irradiation or creep stress. The present paper is focussed on the modeling of the (coupled) high temperature bubble nucleation and growth processes within and on grain boundaries. Two limiting cases are considered: di-atomic nucleation described by the simplest possible sets of rate equations, and multi-atomic nucleation described by classical nucleation theory. Scaling laws are derived which characterize the dependence of the bubble densities upon time (He-dose), He generation rate and temperature. Comparison with experimental data of AISI 316 SS α-implanted at temperatures around 1000 K indicates bubble nucleation of the multi-atomic type. The nucleation and growth models are applied to creep tests performed during α-implantation suggesting that in these cases gas driven bubble growth is the life time controlling mechanism. The narrow (creep stress/He generation rate) range of this mechanism in a mechanism map constructed from these tests indicates that in many reactor situations the time to rupture is probably controlled by stress driven cavity growth rather than by gas driven bubble growth. (orig.)

  17. Measuring the temperature history of isochorically heated warm dense metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuffey, Chris; Kim, J.; Park, J.; Moody, J.; Emig, J.; Heeter, B.; Dozieres, M.; Beg, Fn; McLean, Hs

    2017-10-01

    A pump-probe platform has been designed for soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy near edge structure measurements in isochorically heated Al or Cu samples with temperature of 10s to 100s of eV. The method is compatible with dual picosecond-class laser systems and may be used to measure the temperature of the sample heated directly by the pump laser or by a laser-driven proton beam Knowledge of the temperature history of warm dense samples will aid equation of state measurements. First, various low- to mid-Z targets were evaluated for their suitability as continuum X-ray backlighters over the range 200-1800 eV using a 10 J picosecond-class laser with relativistic peak intensity Alloys were found to be more suitable than single-element backlighters. Second, the heated sample package was designed with consideration of target thickness and tamp layers using atomic physics codes. The results of the first demonstration attempts will be presented. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-SC0014600.

  18. Theory of the transition temperature of superconducting amorphous transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwicknagel, G.

    1979-11-01

    In the present paper first the transition temperature Tsub(c) is shown to be a local quantity, which depends on the (average) short range order, and second it is demonstrated how to calculate local electronic properties in the framework of a short range order model and the transition temperature of amorphous systems based on accepted structure models of the amorphous state. In chapter I the theoretical basis of this work is presented in brief. The model used to study the role of short range order (in periodically ordered as well as in disordered system) is described in chapter II. The results of this model for the periodically ordered case are compared in chapter III with band structure calculations. In chapter IV it is shown how to establish short range order models for disordered systems and what kind of information can be obtained with respect to the electronic properties. Finally in chapter V it is discussed to what extend the interpretation of the transition temperature Tsub(c) as being determined by short range order effects can be supported by the electronic properties, which are calculated in the chapters III and IV. (orig.) [de

  19. Direct band gap electroluminescence from bulk germanium at room temperature using an asymmetric fin type metal/germanium/metal structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dong, E-mail: wang.dong.539@m.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Maekura, Takayuki; Kamezawa, Sho [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Yamamoto, Keisuke; Nakashima, Hiroshi [Art, Science and Technology Center for Cooperative Research, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2015-02-16

    We demonstrated direct band gap (DBG) electroluminescence (EL) at room temperature from n-type bulk germanium (Ge) using a fin type asymmetric lateral metal/Ge/metal structure with TiN/Ge and HfGe/Ge contacts, which was fabricated using a low temperature (<400 °C) process. Small electron and hole barrier heights were obtained for TiN/Ge and HfGe/Ge contacts, respectively. DBG EL spectrum peaked at 1.55 μm was clearly observed even at a small current density of 2.2 μA/μm. Superlinear increase in EL intensity was also observed with increasing current density, due to superlinear increase in population of elections in direct conduction band. The efficiency of hole injection was also clarified.

  20. Contribution to the study of the oxidation reaction of the carbon oxide in contact with catalysts issued from the decomposition of nickel hydro-aluminates at various temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samaane, Mikhail

    1966-01-01

    Addressing the study of the oxidation reaction of carbon oxide which produces carbon dioxide, this research thesis reports the study of this reaction in presence of catalysts (2NiO + Al 2 O 3 , NiAl 2 O 4 and NiO + NiAl 2 O 4 ) issued from the decomposition of nickel hydro-aluminates at different temperatures. The first part describes experimental techniques and the nature of materials used in this study. The second part reports the study of the catalytic activity of the 2NiO+Al 2 O 3 catalyst during the oxidation of CO. Preliminary studies are also reported: structure and texture of nickel hydro-aluminate which is the raw material used to produce catalysts, activation of this compound to develop the catalytic activity in CO oxidation, chemisorption of CO, O 2 and CO 2 on the 2NiO+Al 2 O 3 solid, interaction of adsorbed gases at the solid surface, and kinetic study of the oxidation reaction. The third part reports the study of the catalytic activity in the oxidation reaction of CO of spinel catalysts (NiAl 2 O 4 and NiO+NiAl 2 O 4 ) obtained by calcination of nickel hydro-aluminates at high temperature. The formation of the spinel phase, the chemisorption of CO, O 2 and CO 2 on NiAl 2 O 4 , and the kinetic of the oxidation reaction are herein studied

  1. Individual metal-bearing particles in a regional haze caused by firecracker and firework emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Weijun [Environment Research Institute, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); State Key of Laboratory of Atmospheric Boundary Physics and Atmospheric Chemistry, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029 (China); Shi, Zongbo [School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham (United Kingdom); Yan, Chao; Yang, Lingxiao; Dong, Can; Wang, Wenxing [Environment Research Institute, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China)

    2013-01-15

    /fireworks during the Chinese New Year. ► Many fine metal-rich particles were emitted during fireworks and transported long distance. ► Emissions from fireworks/firecrackers can deteriorate air quality and cause a regional haze during the Chinese New year.

  2. Individual metal-bearing particles in a regional haze caused by firecracker and firework emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Weijun; Shi, Zongbo; Yan, Chao; Yang, Lingxiao; Dong, Can; Wang, Wenxing

    2013-01-01

    Year. ► Many fine metal-rich particles were emitted during fireworks and transported long distance. ► Emissions from fireworks/firecrackers can deteriorate air quality and cause a regional haze during the Chinese New year

  3. STABILITY OF BETACYANIN PIGMENTS FROM RED PURPLE PITAYA FRUIT (Hylocereus polyrhizus : INFLUENCE OF PH, TEMPERATURE, METAL IONS AND ASCORBIC ACID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang, C.S Tang, C.S

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Betacyanin pigments from red-purple pitaya fruit (Hylocereus polyrhizus could be an attractive source of red colourant for food application. This paper presents results on the extraction of betacyanin pigments from pitaya fruits grown locally in Malaysia. Both the flesh of the fruit and its mesocarp were investigated and it was found that the flesh had higher pigment contents compared to its peel component. The concentration of betacyanins expressed as betanin equivalents per 100 g of flesh and peel were 10.1 ± 0.6 mg and 6.7 ± 0.2 mg, respectively when 80% methanol was used.  The stability of betacyanin pigments were investigated at different pH, temperature and in presence of different concentrations of metal ions (Cu2+ and Fe2+ and ascorbic acid. The results showed that the pigment was most stable at pH range between 5 and 6. However, it forfeited its stability to the heat induced at elevated temperatures. Metal ions (Cu2+ and Fe2+ proved to be capable of accelerating betacyanin degradation, with Cu2+ exhibiting the greatest effect. By contrast, supplementation with ascorbic acid could enhance the pigment stability against the detrimental effects caused by pH, temperature and metal ions. Nevertheless, if the concentration of ascorbic acid exceeds 0.7 %, it may change its role from pigment stabilizer to become a pro-oxidant.    Keywords: Betacyanin, pigments, pitaya fruit, Hylocereus polyrhizus, ascorbic acid

  4. K-band spectroscopic metallicities and temperatures of M-dwarf stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rojas-Ayala Bárbara

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available I present the metallicity and effective temperature techniques developed for M dwarf stars by Rojas-Ayala et al. (2010, 2012. These techniques are based on absorption features present in the modest resolution K-band spectra (R∼2700 of M dwarfs and have been calibrated using FGK+M dwarf pairs and synthetic atmosphere models. The H2O-K2 index seems to overestimate the effective temperatures of M dwarfs when compared to interferometric measurements. The metallicity distribution of the M dwarf host candidates by the Kepler Mission hints that jovian-size planets form preferentially around solar and super-solar metallicity environments, while small rocky planet host exhibit a wide range of metallicities, just like in their solar-type counterparts.

  5. Interfacial thermal resistance at low temperature between a superconductive metal and a normally resistive metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fouaidy, M.

    1996-01-01

    This lecture is the preliminary of a research program on superconducting cavity resonators. The lecture topic aims at characterizing thermal conduction (and hence thermal losses) at the interface of two metals, one of them being superconductive. Some major works (Barnes and Dillinger, Little) are explained and discussed. (D.L.)

  6. Thermal decomposition of hydroxylamine: isoperibolic calorimetric measurements at different conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamopoulou, Theodora; Papadaki, Maria I; Kounalakis, Manolis; Vazquez-Carreto, Victor; Pineda-Solano, Alba; Wang, Qingsheng; Mannan, M Sam

    2013-06-15

    Thermal decomposition of hydroxylamine, NH2OH, was responsible for two serious accidents. However, its reactive behavior and the synergy of factors affecting its decomposition are not being understood. In this work, the global enthalpy of hydroxylamine decomposition has been measured in the temperature range of 130-150 °C employing isoperibolic calorimetry. Measurements were performed in a metal reactor, employing 30-80 ml solutions containing 1.4-20 g of pure hydroxylamine (2.8-40 g of the supplied reagent). The measurements showed that increased concentration or temperature, results in higher global enthalpies of reaction per unit mass of reactant. At 150 °C, specific enthalpies as high as 8 kJ per gram of hydroxylamine were measured, although in general they were in the range of 3-5 kJ g(-1). The accurate measurement of the generated heat was proven to be a cumbersome task as (a) it is difficult to identify the end of decomposition, which after a fast initial stage, proceeds very slowly, especially at lower temperatures and (b) the environment of gases affects the reaction rate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Hybrid Metal/Electrolyte Monolithic Low Temperature SOFCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-10-15

    ScSz system. • Modeling and simulation of steady state heat transfer and temperature distribution in externally insulated hybrid LCA fuel cell stack...amorphous LSM powder derived from the GNP was then annealed at 800oC for 4 hours to form the perovskite structure, as determined by X-ray diffraction...analysis. The perovskite LSM powder was then ball milled with YSZ in weight ratio of LSM:YSZ= 60:40, together with proper amount of an organic

  8. Low-temperature thermal decomposition of heavy petroleum distillates: interconnection between the electrical properties and concentration of paramagnetic centres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolomatov, M.; Gafurov, M.; Rodionov, A.; Mamin, G.; González, L. Miquel; Vakhin, A.; Petrov, A.; Bakhtizin, R.; Khairudinov, I.; Orlinskii, S.

    2018-05-01

    Changes of paramagnetic centers (PC) concentration in petroleum dispersed systems (PDS) are studied in the process of low-temperature thermolysis. Complex investigation of physicochemical, rheological and electrophysical properties of high-boiling oil fractions is performed. Based on the analysis of the experimental results it can be concluded that the PDS under investigation can be regarded as amorphous broadband organic semiconductors for which PC plays a role of dopant. It shows the perspectives of the asphaltenes usage as a basis for the photovoltaic devices.

  9. Gallium-Based Room-Temperature Liquid Metals: Actuation and Manipulation of Droplets and Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leily Majidi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Gallium-based room-temperature liquid metals possess extremely valuable properties, such as low toxicity, low vapor pressure, and high thermal and electrical conductivity enabling them to become suitable substitutes for mercury and beyond in wide range of applications. When exposed to air, a native oxide layer forms on the surface of gallium-based liquid metals which mechanically stabilizes the liquid. By removing or reconstructing the oxide skin, shape and state of liquid metal droplets and flows can be manipulated/actuated desirably. This can occur manually or in the presence/absence of a magnetic/electric field. These methods lead to numerous useful applications such as soft electronics, reconfigurable devices, and soft robots. In this mini-review, we summarize the most recent progresses achieved on liquid metal droplet generation and actuation of gallium-based liquid metals with/without an external force.

  10. Amine promoted, metal enhanced degradation of Mirex under high temperature conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jallad, Karim N. [American University of Sharjah, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 26666, Sharjah (United Arab Emirates)]. E-mail: kjallad@runbox.com; Lynn, Bert C. [University of Kentucky, Department of Chemistry, Lexington, KY 40506-055 (United States); Alley, Earl G. [Mississippi State University, Department of Chemistry, MS State, MS 39762 (United States)

    2006-07-31

    In this study, zero-valent metal dehalogenation of mirex was conducted with amine solvents at high temperatures. Mirex was treated with excess amine in sealed glass tube reactors under nitrogen. The amines used were n-butyl amine (l), ethyl amine (l), dimethyl amine (g), diethyl amine (l), triethyl amine (l), trimethyl amine (g) and ammonia (g). The metals used were copper, zinc, magnesium, aluminum and calcium. The most suitable amine solvent and metal were selected by running a series of reactions with different amines and different zero-valent metals, in order to optimize the conditions under which complete degradation of mirex takes place. These dehalogenation reactions illustrated the role of zero-valent metals as reductants, whereas the amine solvents acted as proton donors. In this study, we report that mirex was completely degraded with diethyl amine (l) in the presence of copper at 100 deg. C and the hydrogenated products accounted for more than 94 of the degraded mirex.

  11. Effects of holding pressure and process temperatures on the mechanical properties of moulded metallic parts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Esteves, N.M.

    2013-01-01

    Metal injection moulding is gaining more and more importance over the time and needs more research to be done to understand the sensitivity of process to different process parameters. The current paper makes an attempt to better understand the effects of holding pressure and process temperatures...... on the moulded metallic parts. Stainless steel 316L is used in the investigation to produce the specimen by metal injection moulding (MIM) and multiple analyses were carried out on samples produced with different combinations of holding pressure, mould temperature and melt temperature. Finally, the parts were...... characterized to investigate mechanical properties like density, ultimate tensile strength, shrinkage etc. The results are discussed in the paper. The main conclusion from this study is unlike plastic moulding, the tensile properties of MIM parts doesn’t vary based on the flow direction of the melt, and tensile...

  12. Wide gap active brazing of ceramic-to-metal-joints for high temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobzin, K.; Zhao, L.; Kopp, N.; Samadian Anavar, S.

    2014-03-01

    Applications like solid oxide fuel cells and sensors increasingly demand the possibility to braze ceramics to metals with a good resistance to high temperatures and oxidative atmospheres. Commonly used silver based active filler metals cannot fulfill these requirements, if application temperatures higher than 600°C occur. Au and Pd based active fillers are too expensive for many fields of use. As one possible solution nickel based active fillers were developed. Due to the high brazing temperatures and the low ductility of nickel based filler metals, the modification of standard nickel based filler metals were necessary to meet the requirements of above mentioned applications. To reduce thermally induced stresses wide brazing gaps and the addition of Al2O3 and WC particles to the filler metal were applied. In this study, the microstructure of the brazed joints and the thermo-chemical reactions between filler metal, active elements and WC particles were analyzed to understand the mechanism of the so called wide gap active brazing process. With regard to the behavior in typical application oxidation and thermal cycle tests were conducted as well as tensile tests.

  13. Mechanisms of metal dusting corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo

    In this thesis the early stages of metal dusting corrosion is addressed; the development of carbon expanded austenite, C, and the decomposition hereof into carbides. Later stages of metal dusting corrosion are explored by a systematic study of stainless steel foils exposed to metal dusting...... deformed stainless steel flakes is transformed to expanded martensite/austenite during low-temperature carburization. Various experimental procedures to experimentally determine the concentration dependent diffusion coefficient of carbon in expanded austenite are evaluated. The most promising procedure...... powders and flakes. The nature of the decomposition products, carbides of the form M23C6 and M7C3, were evaluated by X-ray diffraction, light optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and thermodynamic modelling. The decomposition was found to be dependent on several parameters such as thermal...

  14. Low temperature uniform plastic deformation of metallic glasses during elastic iteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Takeshi; Wang Zheng; Liu Yanhui; Sheng, Howard; Wang Weihua; Chen Mingwei

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations and dynamic mechanical analysis experiments were employed to investigate the mechanical behavior of metallic glasses subjected to iteration deformation in a nominally elastic region. It was found that cyclic deformation leads to the formation of irreversible shear transformation zones (STZs) and a permanent uniform strain. The initiation of STZs is directly correlated with the atomic heterogeneity of the metallic glass and the accumulated permanent strain has a linear relation with the number of STZs. This study reveals a new deformation mode and offers insights into the atomic mechanisms of STZ formation and low temperature uniform plastic deformation of metallic glasses.

  15. A non-destructive surface burn detection method for ferrous metals based on acoustic emission and ensemble empirical mode decomposition: from laser simulation to grinding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Zhensheng; Wu, Haixi; Yu, Zhonghua; Huang, Youfang

    2014-01-01

    Grinding is usually done in the final finishing of a component. As a result, the surface quality of finished products, e.g., surface roughness, hardness and residual stress, are affected by the grinding procedure. However, the lack of methods for monitoring of grinding makes it difficult to control the quality of the process. This paper focuses on the monitoring approaches for the surface burn phenomenon in grinding. A non-destructive burn detection method based on acoustic emission (AE) and ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) was proposed for this purpose. To precisely extract the AE features caused by phase transformation during burn formation, artificial burn was produced to mimic grinding burn by means of laser irradiation, since laser-induced burn involves less mechanical and electrical noise. The burn formation process was monitored by an AE sensor. The frequency band ranging from 150 to 400 kHz was believed to be related to surface burn formation in the laser irradiation process. The burn-sensitive frequency band was further used to instruct feature extraction during the grinding process based on EEMD. Linear classification results evidenced a distinct margin between samples with and without surface burn. This work provides a practical means for grinding burn detection. (paper)

  16. On the temperatures, colours, and ages of metal-poor stars predicted by stellar models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van den Berg, D A

    2008-01-01

    Most (but not all) of the investigations that have derived the effective temperatures of metal-poor, solar-neighbourhood field stars, from analyses of their spectra or from the infrared flux method, favour a T eff scale that is ∼100-120 K cooler than that given by stellar evolutionary models. This seems to be at odds with photometric results, given that the application of current colour-T eff relations to the observed subdwarf colours suggests a preference for hotter temperatures. Moreover, the predicted temperatures for main-sequence stars at the lowest metallicities ([Fe/H] eff for them unless some fundamental modification is made to the adopted physics. No such problems are found if the temperatures of metal-poor field stars are ∼100-120 K warmer than most determinations. In this case, stellar models would appear to provide consistent interpretations of both field and globular cluster (GC) stars of low metallicity. However, this would imply, e.g. that M 92 has an [Fe/H] value of approximately - 2.2, which is obtained from analyses of Fe I lines, instead of approximately equal to - 2.4, as derived from Fe II lines (and favoured by studies of three-dimensional model atmospheres). Finally, the age of the local, Population II subgiant HD 140283 (and GCs having similar metal abundances) is estimated to be ∼13 Gyr, if diffusive processes are taken into account.

  17. Chemical composition and effective temperatures of metallic line white dwarfs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammond, G.L.

    1974-01-01

    Model atmosphere techniques have been employed to determine the composition, effective temperatures, radii, masses and surface gravities of white dwarfs Ross 640 and van Maanen 2. The non-gray, LTE, convective, constant flux models employed collisional damping constants for the Ca II H and K lines that were measured in a laboratory device that simulated white dwarf atmospheric conditions. Ross 640 was found to have an extremely helium-rich composition and T/sub eff/ = 8500K, while the observed properties of van Maanen 2 were fitted best by a model with 91 percent helium, 9 percent hydrogen and T/sub eff/ = 6100K. The laboratory measurements of pressure shifts for the Ca II lines casts some doubt on the interpretation of recent radial velocity determinations for van Maanen 2. (U.S.)

  18. SiO2 films deposited on silicon at low temperature by plasma-enhanced decomposition of hexamethyldisilazane: Defect characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croci, S.; Pecheur, A.; Autran, J.L.; Vedda, A.; Caccavale, F.; Martini, M.; Spinolo, G.

    2001-01-01

    Silicon dioxide films have been deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition at low substrate temperature (50 deg. C) in a parallel-plate reactor using hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS), diluted in He, and O 2 as Si and O precursors. The effect of the O 2 /(HMDS+He) flow rate ratio on the oxide properties has been investigated in the range of 0.05-1.25 by means of deposition rate, wet etching rate, secondary ion mass spectrometry, thermally stimulated luminescence, and high frequency capacitance-voltage measurements. Both the deposition rate and the etching rate increase by increasing the O 2 /(HMDS+He) flow rate ratio and reach a constant value at flow rate ratios higher than 0.6. The strong increase and saturation in the deposition rate can be attributed to the impinging oxide atoms flux and to the consumption of silyl radicals at the deposition surface, respectively. The Si/SiO 2 interface state density and the positive fixed charge density are in the range 1x10 11 -1x10 12 eV -1 cm -2 and 6x10 11 -1.5x10 12 C cm -2 , respectively. These concentrations are comparable with literature data concerning SiO 2 films obtained by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition at temperatures higher than 200 deg. C using other Si precursors. Moreover, the interface state density decreases while the fixed oxide charge increases by increasing the O 2 /(HMDS+He) flow rate ratio. A correlation has been found between defects monitored by thermally stimulated luminescence and fixed oxide charges. From a comparison with secondary ion mass spectrometry results, the fixed oxide charges can be preliminarily attributed to intrinsic defects

  19. The attenuation of temperature oscillations in passing through liquid metal boundary layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawn, C.J.

    1975-08-01

    One aspect of predicting the endurance of components subject to thermal fatigue in liquid metal cooled reactors is the extent to which oscillations in fluid temperature are transmitted to metal surfaces, such as the above-core structure. The first geometry considered is that of a solid plate in contact with a layer of stagnant fluid, in which temperature oscillations are imposed at a given distance from the plate. Transmission through a laminar boundary layer developing over the plate surface is then considered. An approximate calculation based on the slug-flow analysis of Sucec (1975) is developed. (U.K.)

  20. The temperature coefficient of the resonance integral for uranium metal and oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomberg, P; Hellstrand, E; Homer, S

    1960-06-15

    The temperature coefficient of the resonance integral in uranium metal and oxide has been measured over a wide temperature range for rods with three different diameters. The results for metal agree with most earlier results from activation measurements but differ as much as a factor of two from results obtained with reactivity methods. For oxide only one measurement has been reported recently. Our value is considerably lower than the result of that measurement. The experiments will continue in order to find the reason for the large discrepancy mentioned above.

  1. The temperature coefficient of the resonance integral for uranium metal and oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomberg, P.; Hellstrand, E.; Homer, S.

    1960-06-01

    The temperature coefficient of the resonance integral in uranium metal and oxide has been measured over a wide temperature range for rods with three different diameters. The results for metal agree with most earlier results from activation measurements but differ as much as a factor of two from results obtained with reactivity methods. For oxide only one measurement has been reported recently. Our value is considerably lower than the result of that measurement. The experiments will continue in order to find the reason for the large discrepancy mentioned above

  2. Major signal suppression from metal ion clusters in SFC/ESI-MS - Cause and effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglind, Alfred; Hedeland, Mikael; Arvidsson, Torbjörn; Pettersson, Curt E

    2018-05-01

    The widening application area of SFC-MS with polar analytes and water-containing samples facilitates the use of quick and simple sample preparation techniques such as "dilute and shoot" and protein precipitation. This has also introduced new polar interfering components such as alkali metal ions naturally abundant in e.g. blood plasma and urine, which have shown to be retained using screening conditions in SFC/ESI-TOF-MS and causing areas of major ion suppression. Analytes co-eluting with these clusters will have a decreased signal intensity, which might have a major effect on both quantification and identification. When investigating the composition of the alkali metal clusters using accurate mass and isotopic pattern, it could be concluded that they were previously not described in the literature. Using NaCl and KCl standards and different chromatographic conditions, varying e.g. column and modifier, the clusters proved to be formed from the alkali metal ions in combination with the alcohol modifier and make-up solvent. Their compositions were [(XOCH 3 ) n  + X] + , [(XOH) n  + X] + , [(X 2 CO 3 ) n  + X] + and [(XOOCOCH 3 ) n  + X] + for X = Na + or K + in ESI+. In ESI-, the clusters depended more on modifier, with [(XCl) n  + Cl] - and [(XOCH 3 ) n  + OCH 3 ] - mainly formed in pure methanol and [(XOOCH) n  + OOCH] - when 20 mM NH 4 Fa was added. To prevent the formation of the clusters by avoiding methanol as modifier might be difficult, as this is a widely used modifier providing good solubility when analyzing polar compounds in SFC. A sample preparation with e.g. LLE would remove the alkali ions, however also introducing a time consuming and discriminating step into the method. Since the alkali metal ions were retained and affected by chromatographic adjustments as e.g. mobile phase modifications, a way to avoid them could therefore be chromatographic tuning, when analyzing samples containing them. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier

  3. On the nature of low temperature anomalies of metallic glass inelastic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spivak, L.V.; Khonik, V.A.

    1997-01-01

    Low-temperature (30 60 Nb 40 metallic glass (MG) exposed to the preliminary cold deformation via rolling, to high-temperature homogeneous deformation or to electrolytic hydrogen absorption were investigated. Conclusion is made that the published low-temperature peaks of the internal friction in quick-hardened cold-deformed or hydrogen absorbed MGs are of the common dislocation-like nature. Effect of 2 MeV electron irradiation on the temperature dependence of the internal friction and on the elasticity module of hydrogenated specimens was investigated, as well [ru

  4. On turbulent motion caused by temperature fluctuations - a critical review on the Boussinesq approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruediger, R.

    1977-01-01

    Fluctuating motions which are caused by a given stochastical temperature field acting in a gas with gravitation and T = constant are dealt with. It results that the often used Boussinesq approximation much underestimates the horizontal motions in case wide-spread temperature fluctuations occur. For sufficiently large scales the horizontal motion exceeds the vertical ones even in the case of the temperature field fluctuating completely isotropically. Scales of 1,000 km and 1 day in the Earth atmosphere lead to the observed value u'(horizontal)/u'(vertical) approximately 10. Finally besides the relation between density correlation and pressure correlation the expression for the turbulent mass transport vanishing with the molecular viscosity is determined. (author)

  5. Temperature increase can cause hyperecdysonism in American lobsters (Homarus americanus) injected with ecdysterone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aiken, D E; Waddy, S L

    1975-10-01

    In the lobster Homarus americanus the threshold dose for premolt acceleration by ecdysterone can be altered by changes in temperature. Two dose levels of ecdysterone (0.5 and 1.0 ..mu..g/g body weight) were compared at three different temperatures (10, 17, 21/sup 0/C); all three doses remained subthreshold at 10/sup 0/C but at 17/sup 0/C the 1.0-..mu..g dose caused hyperecdysonism--rapid but abnormal completion of premolt terminating in death at ecdysis. In contrast, the 0.5-..mu..g dose remained subthreshold even at 21/sup 0/C. These results demonstrate a dose-temperature relation for response to injected ecdysterone.

  6. Pumping liquid metal at high temperatures up to 1,673 kelvin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amy, C.; Budenstein, D.; Bagepalli, M.; England, D.; Deangelis, F.; Wilk, G.; Jarrett, C.; Kelsall, C.; Hirschey, J.; Wen, H.; Chavan, A.; Gilleland, B.; Yuan, C.; Chueh, W. C.; Sandhage, K. H.; Kawajiri, Y.; Henry, A.

    2017-10-01

    Heat is fundamental to power generation and many industrial processes, and is most useful at high temperatures because it can be converted more efficiently to other types of energy. However, efficient transportation, storage and conversion of heat at extreme temperatures (more than about 1,300 kelvin) is impractical for many applications. Liquid metals can be very effective media for transferring heat at high temperatures, but liquid-metal pumping has been limited by the corrosion of metal infrastructures. Here we demonstrate a ceramic, mechanical pump that can be used to continuously circulate liquid tin at temperatures of around 1,473-1,673 kelvin. Our approach to liquid-metal pumping is enabled by the use of ceramics for the mechanical and sealing components, but owing to the brittle nature of ceramics their use requires careful engineering. Our set-up enables effective heat transfer using a liquid at previously unattainable temperatures, and could be used for thermal storage and transport, electric power production, and chemical or materials processing.

  7. Analysis of Ling'ao nuclear power station unit 1 exciter No.11 bearing white metal damage and its operating temperature abnormally high

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Kaili

    2005-01-01

    On the base of analyzing the type of exciter No.11 bearing white metal damage, the root cause and its solution are found. No damage was found on bearing white metal in the later time. On the base of analyzing the structure of the generator end bracket, it is pointed out that when the generator frame is full of pressed gas, the end bracket will deform, that result in the load on No.11 bearing increase, as a result causes the bearing temperature high. A proposal to this problem is presented. (author)

  8. Partitioning planning studies: Preliminary evaluation of metal and radionuclide partitioning the high-temperature thermal treatment systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liekhus, K.; Grandy, J.; Chambers, A.

    1997-03-01

    A preliminary study of toxic metals and radionuclide partitioning during high-temperature processing of mixed waste has been conducted during Fiscal Year 1996 within the Environmental Management Technology Evaluation Project. The study included: (a) identification of relevant partitioning mechanisms that cause feed material to be distributed between the solid, molten, and gas phases within a thermal treatment system; (b) evaluations of existing test data from applicable demonstration test programs as a means to identify and understand elemental and species partitioning; and, (c) evaluation of theoretical or empirical partitioning models for use in predicting elemental or species partitioning in a thermal treatment system. This preliminary study was conducted to identify the need for and the viability of developing the tools capable of describing and predicting toxic metals and radionuclide partitioning in the most applicable mixed waste thermal treatment processes. This document presents the results and recommendations resulting from this study that may serve as an impetus for developing and implementing these predictive tools

  9. Partitioning planning studies: Preliminary evaluation of metal and radionuclide partitioning the high-temperature thermal treatment systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liekhus, K.; Grandy, J.; Chambers, A. [and others

    1997-03-01

    A preliminary study of toxic metals and radionuclide partitioning during high-temperature processing of mixed waste has been conducted during Fiscal Year 1996 within the Environmental Management Technology Evaluation Project. The study included: (a) identification of relevant partitioning mechanisms that cause feed material to be distributed between the solid, molten, and gas phases within a thermal treatment system; (b) evaluations of existing test data from applicable demonstration test programs as a means to identify and understand elemental and species partitioning; and, (c) evaluation of theoretical or empirical partitioning models for use in predicting elemental or species partitioning in a thermal treatment system. This preliminary study was conducted to identify the need for and the viability of developing the tools capable of describing and predicting toxic metals and radionuclide partitioning in the most applicable mixed waste thermal treatment processes. This document presents the results and recommendations resulting from this study that may serve as an impetus for developing and implementing these predictive tools.

  10. Low temperature incineration of mixed wastes using bulk metal oxide catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, M.J.; Gaur, S.; Kelkar, S.; Baldwin, R.M.

    1996-01-01

    Volume reduction of low-level mixed wastes from former nuclear weapons facilities is a significant environmental problem. Processing of these materials presents unique scientific and engineering problems due to the presence of minute quantities of radionuclides which must be contained and concentrated for later safe disposal. Low-temperature catalytic incineration is one option that has been utilized at the Rocky Flats facility for this purpose. This paper presents results of research regarding evaluation of bulk metal oxides as catalysts for low-temperature incineration of carbonaceous residues which are typical by-products of fluidized bed combustion of mixed wastes under oxygen-lean conditions. A series of 14 metal oxides were screened in a thermogravimetric analyzer, using on-line mass spectrometry for speciation of reaction product gases. Catalyst evaluation criteria focused on the thermal-redox activity of the metals using both carbon black and PVC char as surrogate waste materials. Results indicated that metal oxides which were P-type semiconductor materials were suitable as catalysts for this application. Oxides of cobalt, molybdenum, vanadium, and manganese were found to be particularly stable and active catalysts under conditions specific to this process (T<650C, low oxygen partial pressures). Bench-scale evaluation of these metal oxides with respect to stability to chlorine (HCl) attack was carried out at 550C using a TG/MS system. Cobalt oxide was found to be resistant to metal loss in a HCl/He gaseous environment while metal loss from Mo, Mn, and V-based catalysts was moderate to severe. XRD and SEM/EDX analysis of spent Co catalysts indicated the formation of non-stoichiometric cobalt chlorides. Regeneration of chlorinated cobalt was found to successfully restore the low-temperature combustion activity to that of the fresh metal oxide

  11. Low temperature irradiation effects on plastic deformation in BCC metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aono, Yasuhisa

    1984-01-01

    Low temperature electron beam experiment was carried out on high purity iron and molybdenum single crystals, and its effect on the plastic deformation was examined. As the characteristics of the irradiated iron below 77 K, remarkable softening occurred in all orientations. This phenomenon is based on the interaction of self interstitial atoms and screw dislocations, and the other features such as the absorption of interstitial atoms into screw dislocations and the slip on maximum shearing stress planes were shown. On the other hand, the aggregate of interstitial atoms formed by annealing showed the different plastic characteristics from those of interstitial atoms, and gave the results corresponding to respective stages of the electric resistance recovery curves. Regarding molybdenum, the transfer of its self interstitial atoms is near 40 K, therefore at 77 K, cluster is formed, and it largely affects abnormal slip, which is one of the features of the plasticity of molybdenum. The peculiar dependence of the yield stress on the crystalline orientation was shown. The property of the interaction of the aggregate of interstitial atoms formed and grown by the annealing from 77 K to 500 K with dislocations corresponded to the information of defects obtained by the X-ray research of Maeta, and the similarity to the aggregate of iron was observed. (Kako, I.)

  12. XPS study of influence of exposure to air on thermal stability and kinetics of hydrogen decomposition of MgH{sub 2} films obtained by direct hydrogenation from gaseous phase of metallic Mg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrovolsky, V.D., E-mail: dobersh@ipms.kiev.ua; Khyzhun, O.Y.; Sinelnichenko, A.K.; Ershova, O.G.; Solonin, Y.M.

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Air influence on thermal stability of MgH{sub 2} have been studied by XPS. • XPS spectra of MgH{sub 2} films obtained at different hydrogen pressures have been studied. • Changes in the chemical state of MgH{sub 2} films depending on time of exposure to air are analyzed. • Correlation exists between chemical surface condition of MgH{sub 2} films and their thermal stableness. • Process of hydrogen desorption from MgH{sub 2} films is studied using TDS for model samples. - Abstract: Mechanism of influence of exposure to air on thermal stability of MgH{sub 2} obtained by direct hydrogenation from the gas phase, the nature of the hydride sensitivity to the negative impact of air and the role of its surface chemical state have not been studied enough. The present article presents data of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements of the Mg 2s, O 1s, C 1s core-level spectra of surface of hydride MgH{sub 2} films derived by gas phase hydrogenation of model samples of metallic Mg, and the evolution of changes in the chemical state of the surface of the hydride films depending on the time of exposure to air and formation conditions (hydrogen pressure and hydrogenation regime). Based on results of XPS, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and thermodesorption spectroscopy (TDS), the existence of a relationship (correlation) between chemical surface condition of hydride MgH{sub 2} films obtained at different hydrogen pressures (3.0 MPa and 11.5 MPa) and their thermal stableness and temperature of the beginning of hydride decomposition has been established.

  13. The Interacting controls of pyrolysis temperature and plant taxa on pyrogenic organic matter stability and decomposition in a Northern Michigan forest soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, C. D.; Filley, T. R.; Bird, J. A.; Hatton, P. J.; Stark, R. E.; Nadelhoffer, K. J.

    2017-12-01

    Pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM) produced during forest fires is considered a large sink of stable soil organic matter (SOM) in boreal-temperate forest ecotones, where fire frequency and intensity is growing with changing climate. Understanding how changes in fire regime and predicted shifts in plant taxa will interact to affect PyOM dynamics in soil is imperative to assessing the impact of climate change on SOM maintenance. The stability of PyOM in soil may be co-determined by the physiochemical structure imparted on PyOM during pyrolysis and by its initial taxa-dependent wood chemistry and anatomy. To determine PyOM-C turnover rates in soil, we followed the fate of 13C-enriched wood or PyOM (200, 300, 450, or 600°C) derived from red maple (RM) or jack pine (JP) wood in soil from a recently burned forest in northern Michigan, USA. We found that pyrolysis temperature-controlled physiochemical changes influenced, with threshold dynamics, PyOM stability resulting in mean residence times of 2 (PyOM 200°C) to 450 years for both taxa, confirming that most PyOM (wood taxa did affect PyOM C MRT, in part due to differences in the amount of water soluble C released by PyOM during the initial decomposition dynamics in soil.

  14. Temperature-dependent growth of Geomyces destructans, the fungus that causes bat white-nose syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle L Verant

    Full Text Available White-nose syndrome (WNS is an emergent disease estimated to have killed over five million North American bats. Caused by the psychrophilic fungus Geomyces destructans, WNS specifically affects bats during hibernation. We describe temperature-dependent growth performance and morphology for six independent isolates of G. destructans from North America and Europe. Thermal performance curves for all isolates displayed an intermediate peak with rapid decline in performance above the peak. Optimal temperatures for growth were between 12.5 and 15.8°C, and the upper critical temperature for growth was between 19.0 and 19.8°C. Growth rates varied across isolates, irrespective of geographic origin, and above 12°C all isolates displayed atypical morphology that may have implications for proliferation of the fungus. This study demonstrates that small variations in temperature, consistent with those inherent of bat hibernacula, affect growth performance and physiology of G. destructans, which may influence temperature-dependent progression and severity of WNS in wild bats.

  15. Temperature-dependent growth of Geomyces destructans, the fungus that causes bat white-nose syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verant, Michelle L; Boyles, Justin G; Waldrep, William; Wibbelt, Gudrun; Blehert, David S

    2012-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) is an emergent disease estimated to have killed over five million North American bats. Caused by the psychrophilic fungus Geomyces destructans, WNS specifically affects bats during hibernation. We describe temperature-dependent growth performance and morphology for six independent isolates of G. destructans from North America and Europe. Thermal performance curves for all isolates displayed an intermediate peak with rapid decline in performance above the peak. Optimal temperatures for growth were between 12.5 and 15.8°C, and the upper critical temperature for growth was between 19.0 and 19.8°C. Growth rates varied across isolates, irrespective of geographic origin, and above 12°C all isolates displayed atypical morphology that may have implications for proliferation of the fungus. This study demonstrates that small variations in temperature, consistent with those inherent of bat hibernacula, affect growth performance and physiology of G. destructans, which may influence temperature-dependent progression and severity of WNS in wild bats.

  16. Metal-Controlled Magnetoresistance at Room Temperature in Single-Molecule Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragonès, Albert C; Aravena, Daniel; Valverde-Muñoz, Francisco J; Real, José Antonio; Sanz, Fausto; Díez-Pérez, Ismael; Ruiz, Eliseo

    2017-04-26

    The appropriate choice of the transition metal complex and metal surface electronic structure opens the possibility to control the spin of the charge carriers through the resulting hybrid molecule/metal spinterface in a single-molecule electrical contact at room temperature. The single-molecule conductance of a Au/molecule/Ni junction can be switched by flipping the magnetization direction of the ferromagnetic electrode. The requirements of the molecule include not just the presence of unpaired electrons: the electronic configuration of the metal center has to provide occupied or empty orbitals that strongly interact with the junction metal electrodes and that are close in energy to their Fermi levels for one of the electronic spins only. The key ingredient for the metal surface is to provide an efficient spin texture induced by the spin-orbit coupling in the topological surface states that results in an efficient spin-dependent interaction with the orbitals of the molecule. The strong magnetoresistance effect found in this kind of single-molecule wire opens a new approach for the design of room-temperature nanoscale devices based on spin-polarized currents controlled at molecular level.

  17. Low temperature formation of electrode having electrically conductive metal oxide surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Simone; Anders, Andre; Brown, Ian G.; McLarnon, Frank R.; Kong, Fanping

    1998-01-01

    A low temperature process is disclosed for forming metal suboxides on substrates by cathodic arc deposition by either controlling the pressure of the oxygen present in the deposition chamber, or by controlling the density of the metal flux, or by a combination of such adjustments, to thereby control the ratio of oxide to metal in the deposited metal suboxide coating. The density of the metal flux may, in turn, be adjusted by controlling the discharge current of the arc, by adjusting the pulse length (duration of on cycle) of the arc, and by adjusting the frequency of the arc, or any combination of these parameters. In a preferred embodiment, a low temperature process is disclosed for forming an electrically conductive metal suboxide, such as, for example, an electrically conductive suboxide of titanium, on an electrode surface, such as the surface of a nickel oxide electrode, by such cathodic arc deposition and control of the deposition parameters. In the preferred embodiment, the process results in a titanium suboxide-coated nickel oxide electrode exhibiting reduced parasitic evolution of oxygen during charging of a cell made using such an electrode as the positive electrode, as well as exhibiting high oxygen overpotential, resulting in suppression of oxygen evolution at the electrode at full charge of the cell.

  18. Measurement of mechanical properties of metallic glass at elevated temperature using sonic resonance method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaluvan, Suresh; Zhang, Haifeng; Mridha, Sanghita; Mukherjee, Sundeep

    2017-04-01

    Bulk metallic glasses are fully amorphous multi-component alloys with homogeneous and isotropic structure down to the atomic scale. Some attractive attributes of bulk metallic glasses include high strength and hardness as well as excellent corrosion and wear resistance. However, there are few reports and limited understanding of their mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. We used a nondestructive sonic resonance method to measure the Young's modulus and Shear modulus of a bulk metallic glass, Zr41.2Ti13.8Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5, at elevated temperatures. The measurement system was designed using a laser displacement sensor to detect the sonic vibration produced by a speaker on the specimen in high-temperature furnace. The OMICRON Bode-100 Vector Network Analyzer was used to sweep the frequency and its output was connected to the speaker which vibrated the material in its flexural mode and torsional modes. A Polytec OFV-505 laser vibrometer sensor was used to capture the vibration of the material at various frequencies. The flexural and torsional mode frequency shift due to the temperature variation was used to determine the Young's modulus and Shear modulus. The temperature range of measurement was from 50°C to 350°C. The Young's modulus was found to reduce from 100GPa to 94GPa for the 300°C temperature span. Similarly, the Shear modulus decreased from 38.5GPa at 50°C to 36GPa at 350°C.

  19. High-temperature corrosion of metals in the salt and metallic melts containing rare earths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, V. V.; Abramov, A. V.; Zhilyakov, A. Yu.; Belikov, S. V.; Volkovich, V. A.; Polovov, I. B.; Rebrin, O. I.

    2016-09-01

    A complex of independent methods was employed to study the corrosion resistance of molybdenum, zirconium, tantalum and tungsten in chloride, chloride-fluoride and fluoride-oxide melts based on LiCl, CaCl2, NaCl- KCl, LiF, and containing rare earths. Tests were conducted for 30 h at 750-1050 °C. The metals showed excellent corrosion resistance in fused chlorides (the corrosion rates were below 0.0005 g/(m2 h). Despite the presence of chemically active fluoride ions in the chloride-fluoride melts, the metals studied also showed very low corrosion rates, except molybdenum, for which the rate of corrosion was 0,8 g/(m2 h). The corrosion resistance of tantalum was considerably reduced in the fluoride-oxide melts; the corrosion rate was over 1 g/(m2 h) corresponding to the 8-th grade of stability and placing tantalum to the group of "low stability" materials.

  20. Aging and temperature effects on DOC and elemental release from a metal contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, C.E.; Jacobson, A.R.; McBride, M.B.

    2003-01-01

    Increased aging and temperatures may affect DOC element complexes and their release. - The combined effect of time and temperature on elemental release and speciation from a metal contaminated soil (Master Old Site, MOS) was investigated. The soil was equilibrated at 10, 28, 45, 70 and 90 deg. C for 2 days, 2 weeks, and 2 months in the laboratory. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total soluble elements (by ICP), and labile metals (by DPASV) were determined in the filtered (0.22 μm) supernatants. For the samples equilibrated at 90 deg. C, DOC fractions were size fractionated by filtration and centrifugation; a subsample was only centrifuged while another was also filtered through a 0.45 μm filter. Analyses of the supernatants (ICP, DPASV, DOC) were performed on all size fraction subsamples. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) increased both with temperature and incubation time; however, metal behavior was not as uniform. In general, total soluble metal release (ICP) paralleled the behavior of DOC, increasing with both time and temperature, and confirming the importance of soil organic matter (SOM) in metal retention. Voltammetric analysis (dpasv) of Cu and Zn showed that very little of these metals remains labile in solution due, presumably, to complexation with dissolved organic matter. Labile concentrations of Cd, on the other hand, constituted a significant portion (50%) of total soluble Cd. Copper and Al increased in solution with time (up to 2 months) and temperature up to 70 deg. C; however, at 90 deg. C the soluble concentration declined sharply. The same behavior was observed after equilibration for longer periods of time (550 days) at lower temperatures (23 and 70 deg. C). While concentrations of labile Cu and total soluble Cu and Al increased in the unfiltered samples, the trend remained the same. DPASV analysis showing shifts in labile Cu complexes with temperature and time, together with the results from the unfiltered samples, lead to the hypothesis that Cu

  1. Impaired microbial activity caused by metal pollution: A field study in a deactivated uranium mining area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Sara Cristina; Pereira, Ruth; Marques, Sérgio Miguel; Castro, Bruno Branco; Gonçalves, Fernando

    2011-12-01

    European frameworks for the ecological risk assessment (ERA) of contaminated sites integrate information from three lines of evidence: chemical, ecotoxicological, and ecological. Regarding the last one, field observations at the contaminated sites are compared to reference site(s) and the differences recorded are analysed at the light of a cause-effect relationship, taking into account the site-specific contamination. Thus, included in the tier 2 of a site-specific risk assessment that is being carried out in an deactivated uranium mining area, a battery of soil enzyme activities (dehydrogenases, urease, arysulphatase, cellulase, acid phosphate) and potential nitrification were assessed in seven sampling sites (A-D-E-F-G-H-I) at different distances from the mine pit. These parameters have been considered good indicators of impacts on soil microbial communities and, subsequently, on soil functions. Soil enzyme activities were impaired in the most contaminated site (A, near the mine pit), for which a higher degree of risk was determined in the tier 1 of ERA. Three other sites within the mining area (F, G, and D) were discriminated on the basis of their low microbial activity, using uni- and multivariate approaches, and validating what had been previously found with chemical and ecotoxicological lines of evidence. We observed considerable among-site heterogeneity in terms of soil physical and chemical properties, combined with seasonal differences in enzyme activities. Still, the correlation between microbial parameters and soil general physical and chemical parameters was weak. In opposition, significant and negative correlations were found between soil enzyme activities and several metallic elements (Al, Be, Cu, U). These findings suggest a clear correlation between compromised soil function (nutrient recycling) and metal contamination. Such information reinforces the evidence of risks for some sites within the mining area and is an important contribution for the

  2. On the nature of low temperature internal friction peaks in metallic glasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khonik, VA; Spivak, LV

    Low temperature (30 metallic glass Ni60Nb40 subjected to preliminary inhomogeneous deformation by cold rolling, homogeneous tensile deformation or electrolytic charging with hydrogen is investigated. Cold rolling or hydrogenation result in appearance of similar

  3. Anomalous temperature dependence of the current in a metal-oxide-polymer resistive switching diode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomes, H.L.; Rocha, P.R.F.; Kiazadeh, A.; Leeuw, de D.M.; Meskers, S.C.J.

    2011-01-01

    Metal-oxide polymer diodes exhibit non-volatile resistive switching. The current–voltage characteristics have been studied as a function of temperature. The low-conductance state follows a thermally activated behaviour. The high-conductance state shows a multistep-like behaviour and below 300 K an

  4. Assessment of methane production from shredder waste in landfills: The influence of temperature, moisture and metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fathi Aghdam, Ehsan; Scheutz, Charlotte; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2017-01-01

    different temperatures (20-25°C, 37°C, and 55°C), moisture contents (35% and 75% w/w) and amounts of inoculum (5% and 30% of the samples wet weight). The biochemical methane potential (BMP) from different types of SW (fresh, old and sieved) was determined and compared. The ability of metals (iron, aluminum...

  5. Thermal crackling: study of the mechanical effects of quick temperature fluctuations on metallic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradel, P.

    1984-05-01

    After a brief overview of the thermohydraulical conditions of liquid sodium leading to important temperature fluctuations near the metallic surfaces, the author examines the transfer modes of these fluctuations in the structure thickness and the long term mechanical effects. Dimensioning models based on thermal and metallurgical properties are under study for structures subject to such sodium loads [fr

  6. The effect of welding speed and molten metal peak temperature on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of welding speed and molten metal peak temperature on thermal history of an arch - welded steel plate by numerical methods. SM Adedayo. Abstract. No Abstract. Journal of Applied Science, Engineering and Technology Vol. 1(1) 2001: 1-16. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL ...

  7. Trends in low-temperature water–gas shift reactivity on transition metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schumacher, Nana Maria Pii; Boisen, Astrid; Dahl, Søren

    2005-01-01

    Low-temperature water–gas shift reactivity trends on transition metals were investigated with the use of a microkinetic model based on a redox mechanism. It is established that the adsorption energies for carbon monoxide and oxygen can describe to a large extent changes in the remaining activation...

  8. Effects of a metallic front gate on the temperature-dependent electronic property of pentacene films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yow-Jon, E-mail: rzr2390@yahoo.com.tw [Institute of Photonics, National Changhua University of Education, Changhua 500, Taiwan (China); Tsao, Hou-Yen [Institute of Photonics, National Changhua University of Education, Changhua 500, Taiwan (China); Liu, Day-Shan [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical and Materials Science, National Formosa University, Huwei 632, Taiwan (China)

    2014-11-14

    The effect of a metallic front gate on the temperature-dependent electronic property of pentacene films was investigated in this study. The carrier mobility exhibits strong temperature dependence, implying the dominance of tunneling (hopping) at low (high) temperatures. The room-temperature mobility was drastically increased by capping an In (Au) layer on the pentacene front surface. However, the carrier concentration is not affected. An increase in the phonon energy occurs for In-capped or Au-capped pentacene samples, which corresponds to the abrupt transition to the nonlocal electron–phonon coupling. The enhanced mobility by capping a metal layer is attributed to a change in the electron–phonon coupling. - Highlights: • For the metal-capped and uncapped pentacene films, the mobility was researched. • The mobility was dramatically increased by capping an In (Au) layer. • The induced strain by capping a metal layer is found. • The strain may lead to the electron–phonon coupling variation. • The enhanced mobility is attributed to the weakened electron–phonon coupling.

  9. Butterfly valve with metal seals controls flow of hydrogen from cryogenic through high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L. D.

    1967-01-01

    Butterfly valve with metal seals operates over a temperature range of minus 423 degrees to plus 440 degrees F with hydrogen as a medium and in a radiation environment. Media flow is controlled by an internal butterfly disk which is rotated by an actuation shaft.

  10. Impaired microbial activity caused by metal pollution: A field study in a deactivated uranium mining area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antunes, Sara Cristina; Pereira, Ruth; Marques, Sérgio Miguel; Castro, Bruno Branco; Gonçalves, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    European frameworks for the ecological risk assessment (ERA) of contaminated sites integrate information from three lines of evidence: chemical, ecotoxicological, and ecological. Regarding the last one, field observations at the contaminated sites are compared to reference site(s) and the differences recorded are analysed at the light of a cause-effect relationship, taking into account the site-specific contamination. Thus, included in the tier 2 of a site-specific risk assessment that is being carried out in an deactivated uranium mining area, a battery of soil enzyme activities (dehydrogenases, urease, arysulphatase, cellulase, acid phosphate) and potential nitrification were assessed in seven sampling sites (A–D–E–F–G–H–I) at different distances from the mine pit. These parameters have been considered good indicators of impacts on soil microbial communities and, subsequently, on soil functions. Soil enzyme activities were impaired in the most contaminated site (A, near the mine pit), for which a higher degree of risk was determined in the tier 1 of ERA. Three other sites within the mining area (F, G, and D) were discriminated on the basis of their low microbial activity, using uni- and multivariate approaches, and validating what had been previously found with chemical and ecotoxicological lines of evidence. We observed considerable among-site heterogeneity in terms of soil physical and chemical properties, combined with seasonal differences in enzyme activities. Still, the correlation between microbial parameters and soil general physical and chemical parameters was weak. In opposition, significant and negative correlations were found between soil enzyme activities and several metallic elements (Al, Be, Cu, U). These findings suggest a clear correlation between compromised soil function (nutrient recycling) and metal contamination. Such information reinforces the evidence of risks for some sites within the mining area and is an important

  11. The Elastic Constants Measurement of Metal Alloy by Using Ultrasonic Nondestructive Method at Different Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eryi Hu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ultrasonic nondestructive method is introduced into the elastic constants measurement of metal material. The extraction principle of Poisson’s ratio, elastic modulus, and shear modulus is deduced from the ultrasonic propagating equations with two kinds of vibration model of the elastic medium named ultrasonic longitudinal wave and transverse wave, respectively. The ultrasonic propagating velocity is measured by using the digital correlation technique between the ultrasonic original signal and the echo signal from the bottom surface, and then the elastic constants of the metal material are calculated. The feasibility of the correlation algorithm is verified by a simulation procedure. Finally, in order to obtain the stability of the elastic properties of different metal materials in a variable engineering application environment, the elastic constants of two kinds of metal materials in different temperature environment are measured by the proposed ultrasonic method.

  12. Variations in erosive wear of metallic materials with temperature via the electron work function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xiaochen; Yu, Bin [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2V4 (Canada); Yan, X.G. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Science and Technology, Taiyuan, Shanxi (China); Li, D.Y., E-mail: dongyang.li@ualberta.ca [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2V4 (Canada); School of Mechanical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Science and Technology, Taiyuan, Shanxi (China)

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical properties of metals are intrinsically determined by their electron behavior, which is largely reflected by the electron work function (EWF or φ). Since the work function varies with temperature, the dependence of material properties on temperature could be predicted via variations in work function with temperature. Combining a hardness – φ relationship and the dependence of work function on temperature, a temperature-dependent model for predicting solid-particle erosion is proposed. Erosive wear losses of copper, nickel, and carbon steel as sample materials were measured at different temperatures. Results of the tests are consistent with the theoretical prediction. This study demonstrates a promising parameter, electron work function, for looking into fundamental aspects of wear phenomena, which would also help develop alternative methodologies for material design. - Highlights: • Metallic materials' wear resistance is influenced by temperature. • Electron work function (EWF) intrinsically determines materials' wear resistance. • An EWF-based temperature-dependent solid-particle erosion model is proposed.

  13. Decomposition kinetics of plutonium hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haschke, J.M.; Stakebake, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    Kinetic data for decomposition of PuH/sub 1/ /sub 95/ provides insight into a possible mechanism for the hydriding and dehydriding reactions of plutonium. The fact that the rate of the hydriding reaction, K/sub H/, is proportional to P/sup 1/2/ and the rate of the dehydriding process, K/sub D/, is inversely proportional to P/sup 1/2/ suggests that the forward and reverse reactions proceed by opposite paths of the same mechanism. The P/sup 1/2/ dependence of hydrogen solubility in metals is characteristic of the dissociative absorption of hydrogen; i.e., the reactive species is atomic hydrogen. It is reasonable to assume that the rates of the forward and reverse reactions are controlled by the surface concentration of atomic hydrogen, (H/sub s/), that K/sub H/ = c'(H/sub s/), and that K/sub D/ = c/(H/sub s/), where c' and c are proportionality constants. For this surface model, the pressure dependence of K/sub D/ is related to (H/sub s/) by the reaction (H/sub s/) reversible 1/2H/sub 2/(g) and by its equilibrium constant K/sub e/ = (H/sub 2/)/sup 1/2//(H/sub s/). In the pressure range of ideal gas behavior, (H/sub s/) = K/sub e//sup -1/(RT)/sup -1/2/ and the decomposition rate is given by K/sub D/ = cK/sub e/(RT)/sup -1/2/P/sup 1/2/. For an analogous treatment of the hydriding process with this model, it can be readily shown that K/sub H/ = c'K/sub e//sup -1/(RT)/sup -1/2/P/sup 1/2/. The inverse pressure dependence and direct temperature dependence of the decomposition rate are correctly predicted by this mechanism which is most consistent with the observed behavior of the Pu--H system.

  14. A new technique for precise measurement of thermal conductivity of metals at normal and high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binkele, L.

    1990-09-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations on a new measuring technique are described; a technique similar to the well known Kohlrausch measuring technique, which is characterized by direct electrical sample heating. Subject of the investigations is a cylindrical metallic sample, 5 mm thick and 200 mm in length, which is positioned vertically between water-cooled clamps in a vacuum container. The sample can be heated using two simultaneously operating current sources, a 50 Hz-source for axial flow (main heating) as well as a 200 kHz-induction source for generating eddy currents in two short regions above and below the sample centre (additional heating). By using two heating sources different symmetrical temperature profiles in a central eddy-current-free area of about ± 10mm can be produced for any given central sample temperature. The last chapter contains thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity measuring curves for Pt, W, Fe, Ni, Ag, Al, Mg, Ir, Ru, Re, Ho and Y in the temperature range 273 to 1500 K representative of all the metals and alloys investigated. In cases where comparisons with published precise conductivity data, established by other measuring techniques in restricted temperature ranges, were posible, the new measuring method is greatly supported (in the case of Pt, W, Ni, Ag, Al). For the Metals Ir, Ru, Re, Ho and Y high temperature thermal conductivity data are given for the first time. (orig./MM) [de

  15. Mechanism of high-temperature background of internal friction in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapoval, B.I.; Arzhavitin, V.M.

    1988-01-01

    Data of theoretical and experimental studies on energy dissipation in vibrating metal at small amplitudes and elevated temperatures (high temperature background of internal friction) are generalized and systematized. Evolution of knowledge of the background as a phenomenon influenced mainly by crystal structure defects - their form, quantity, mobility and interaction is followed. Considered is a wide range of investigated metal states and measurement conditions, and interrelations with other characteristics, for instance, strength ones. On the basis of the data obtained by authors and other investigations a concept of an additional third stage of the background increase with the temperature - the stage of deviation from exponential dependence at premelting point, is introduced. 107 refs.; 32 figs.; 3 tabs

  16. On the nature of low temperature internal friction peaks in metallic glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khonik, V.A. [State Pedagogical Univ., Voronezh (Russian Federation); Spivak, L.V. [State Univ., Perm (Russian Federation)

    1996-01-01

    Low temperature (30 < T < 300 K) internal friction in a metallic glass Ni{sub 60}Nb{sub 40} subjected to preliminary inhomogeneous deformation by cold rolling, homogeneous tensile deformation or electrolytic charging with hydrogen is investigated. Cold rolling or hydrogenation result in appearance of similar internal friction peaks and hysteresis damping. Homogeneous deformation has no influence on low temperature internal friction. The phenomenon of microplastic deformation during hydrogenation of weakly stressed samples is revealed. It is argued that microplastic deformation of metallic glasses during hydrogenation without external stress takes place too. Plastic flow both on cold rolling and hydrogenation occurs via formation and motion of dislocation-like defects which are the reason of the observed anelastic anomalies. It is concluded that low temperature internal friction peaks described in the literature for as-cast, cold deformed and hydrogenated samples have common dislocation-like origin.

  17. Oxidation limited lifetime of Ni-Base metal foams in the temperature range 700-900 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chyrkin, Anton; Singheiser, Lorenz; Quadakkers, Willem Joseph [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, IEF-2, Juelich (Germany); Schulze, Sebastian Leif; Bleck, Wolfgang [Department of Ferrous Metallurgy, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Piron-Abellan, Javier [Vallourec Mannesmann Tubes, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    INCONEL 625 metal foams produced from alloy powder by the slip-reaction-foam-sinter-process are tested in respect to cyclic oxidation behavior in air in the temperature range 700-900 C. The structure of the oxide scales formed on the foam particles is characterized using optical microscopy and SEM/EDX analysis. Main emphasis is put on studying the oxidation limited lifetimes of the foams as function of temperature and foam microstructure. It is shown that mechanical disintegration during long term oxidation at the highest test temperatures is caused by a critical depletion of the Cr content in the alloy as a result of the growth of the initially formed surface chromia layer. This results in chemical breakaway due to accelerated oxide growth of voluminous Ni-rich oxide on chromium exhausted alloy particles. Lifetime modeling based on calculation of Cr-depletion in the alloy at the oxide/metal interface of each individual foam particle using the DICTRA software is in good agreement with the experimentally determined values of the time to breakaway. (Copyright copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Probing the thermal decomposition behaviors of ultrathin HfO2 films by an in situ high temperature scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Kun; Wang, Lei; An, Jin; Xu, Jianbin

    2011-05-13

    The thermal decomposition of ultrathin HfO(2) films (∼0.6-1.2 nm) on Si by ultrahigh vacuum annealing (25-800 °C) is investigated in situ in real time by scanning tunneling microscopy. Two distinct thickness-dependent decomposition behaviors are observed. When the HfO(2) thickness is ∼ 0.6 nm, no discernible morphological changes are found below ∼ 700 °C. Then an abrupt reaction occurs at 750 °C with crystalline hafnium silicide nanostructures formed instantaneously. However, when the thickness is about 1.2 nm, the decomposition proceeds gradually with the creation and growth of two-dimensional voids at 800 °C. The observed thickness-dependent behavior is closely related to the SiO desorption, which is believed to be the rate-limiting step of the decomposition process.

  19. A New Method for Low-Temperature Decomposition of Chromites and Dichromium Trioxide using Bromic Acid Evaluated by Chromium Isotope Measurements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chrastný, V.; Rohovec, Jan; Čadková, E.; Pašava, J.; Farkaš, J.; Novák, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 1 (2014), s. 103-110 ISSN 1639-4488 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : chromites * dichromium trioxide * decomposition * chromium isotopes * bromic acid Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 3.792, year: 2013

  20. Synergy of FexCe1−xO2 mixed oxides for N2O decomposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez-Alonso, F.J.; Melián-Cabrera, I.; López Granados, M.; Kapteijn, F.; Fierro, J.L.G.

    2006-01-01

    Fe–Ce mixed oxides prepared by coprecipitation showed considerable synergy in N2O decomposition when compared with pure metal oxide counterparts. The mixed system also displayed higher stability in reaction at high temperature. Through characterisation by XRD, XPS and TPR, the activity–stability

  1. Synergy of FexCe1-xO2 mixed oxides for N2O decomposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez-Alonso, FJ; Melian Cabrera, Ignacio; Granados, ML; Kapteijn, F; Fierro, JLG

    2006-01-01

    Fe-Ce mixed oxides prepared by coprecipitation showed considerable synergy in N2O decomposition when compared with pure metal oxide counterparts. The mixed system also displayed higher stability in reaction at high temperature. Through characterisation by XRD, XPS and TPR, the activity-stability

  2. Behavior of low-burnup metallic fuels for the integral fast reactor at elevated temperatures in ex-reactor tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Hanchung; Liu, Yung Y.; Wang, Da-Yung; Kramer, J.M.

    1991-07-01

    A series of ex-reactor heating tests on low burnup U-26wt.%Pu-10wt.%Zr metallic fuel for the PRISM reactor was conducted to evaluate fuel/cladding metallurgical interaction and its effect on cladding integrity at elevated temperatures. The reaction between the fuel and cladding caused liquid-phase formation and dissolution of the inner surface of the cladding. The rate of cladding penetration was below the existing design correlation, which provides a conservative margin to cladding failure. In a test which enveloped a wide range of postulated reactor transient events, a substantial temporal cladding integrity margin was demonstrated for an intact, whole fuel pin. The cause of the eventual pin breach was reaction-induced cladding thinning combined with fission-gas pressure loading. The behavior of the breached pin was benign. 7 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  3. In vitro growth inhibition of mastitis causing bacteria by phenolics and metal chelators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chew, B.P.; Tjoelker, L.W.; Tanaka, T.S.

    1985-11-01

    Antimicrobial activities of three phenolic compounds and four metal chelators were tested at 0, 250, 500, and 1000 ppm in vitro against four major mastitis-causing bacteria, Streptococcus agalactiae, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pnuemoniae, and Escherichia coli. Overall, butylated hydroxyanisole and tert-butylhydroquinone showed the greatest antimicrobial activity. These phenolics were bactericidal at 250 to 500 ppm against all four bacteria tested. The butylated hydroxytoluene was bactericidal against the gram-positive bacteria but was ineffective against the coliforms. At 250 ppm, disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid was bactericidal against the gram-positive bacteria but much less effective against the gram-negatives. However, diethylene-triaminepentaacetic acid was more growth inhibitory than ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid against the gram-negative bacteria and especially against Escherichia coli. All other compounds were generally much less effective or ineffective against all four microorganisms. Therefore, butylated hydroxyanisole, butylated hydroxytoluene, tert-butylhydroquinone, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid may have practical implications in the prevention or treatment of bovine mastitis.

  4. Solid-state thermal decomposition of the [Co(NH3)5CO3]NO3·0.5H2O complex: A simple, rapid and low-temperature synthetic route to Co3O4 nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farhadi, Saeid; Safabakhsh, Jalil

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► [Co(NH 3 ) 5 CO 3 ]NO 3 ·0.5H 2 O complex was used for preparing pure Co 3 O 4 nanoparticles. ► Co 3 O 4 nanoparticles were prepared at low temperature of 175 °C. ► Co 3 O 4 nanoparticles show a weak ferromagnetic behaviour at room temperature. ► The method is simple, low-cost and suitable for the production of Co 3 O 4 . - Abstract: Co 3 O 4 nanoparticles were easily prepared via the decomposition of the pentammine(carbonato)cobalt(III) nitrate precursor complex [Co(NH 3 ) 5 CO 3 ]NO 3 ·0.5H 2 O at low temperature (175 °C). The product was characterized by thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), UV–visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), Raman spectroscopy, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) specific surface area measurements and magnetic measurements. The FT-IR, XRD, Raman and EDX results indicated that the synthesized Co 3 O 4 nanoparticles are highly pure and have a single phase. The TEM analysis revealed nearly uniform and quasi-spherical Co 3 O 4 nanoparticles with an average particle size of approximately 10 nm. The optical absorption spectrum of the Co 3 O 4 nanoparticles showed two direct band gaps of 2.18 and 3.52 eV with a red shift in comparison with previous reported values. The prepared Co 3 O 4 nanoparticles showed a weak ferromagnetic behaviour that could be attributed to uncompensated surface spins and/or finite-size effects. Using the present method, Co 3 O 4 nanoparticles can be produced without expensive organic solvents and complicated equipment. This simple, rapid, safe and low-cost synthetic route can be extended to the synthesis of other transition-metal oxides.

  5. Metal release behavior of surface oxidized stainless steels into flowing high temperature pure water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Kazuo; Tomari, Haruo; Nakayama, Takenori; Shimogori, Kazutoshi; Ishigure, Kenkichi; Matsuura, Chihiro; Fujita, Norihiko; Ono, Shoichi.

    1987-01-01

    In order to clarify the effect of oxidation treatment of Type 304 SS on the inhibition of metal release into high temperature pure water, metal release rate of individual alloying element into flowing deionized water containing 50 ppb dissolved oxygen was measured as the function of exposure time on representative specimens oxidized in air and steam. The behavior of metal release was also discussed in relation to the structure of surface films. Among the alloying elements the amount of Fe ion, Cr ion and Fe crud in high temperature pure water tended to saturate with the exposure time and that of Ni ion and Co ion tended to increase monotonously with the exposure time for all specimens tested. And the treatment of steam-oxidation was the most effective to decrease the metal release of alloying elements and the treatment by air-oxidation also decreased the metal release. These tendencies were confirmed to correlate well with the structure of the surface films as it was in the results in the static autoclave test. (author)

  6. Low temperature thermocompression bonding between aligned carbon nanotubes and metallized substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, M X; Gan, Z Y; Liu, S [School of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Song, X H, E-mail: chimish@163.com [Division of MOEMS, Wuhan National Lab for Optoelectronics, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2011-08-26

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) turf is proposed for use as an electrical and thermal contact material. For these applications, one route for circumventing the high temperatures required for VACNT growth using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is used to grow firstly VACNTs on one substrate and then transfer them to other substrates. In this work, a nano thermocompression bonding technique between VACNTs and a metallized substrate is developed to allow dry mechanical transfer of the VACNTs. Unlike the diffusion bonding between two bulk materials, nano metal clusters have a high surface energy and the atoms are very active to form alloy with the contacted bulk metal material even at much lower temperatures, so nano thermocompression bonding can decrease the bonding temperature (150 deg. C) and pressure (1 MPa) and greatly shorten the bonding time from hours to 20 min. A debonding experiment shows that the bonding strength between VACNTs and the metallized layer is so high that a break is less likely to occur at the bonding interface.

  7. Linking global climate and temperature variability to widespread amphibian declines putatively caused by disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohr, Jason R; Raffel, Thomas R

    2010-05-04

    The role of global climate change in the decline of biodiversity and the emergence of infectious diseases remains controversial, and the effect of climatic variability, in particular, has largely been ignored. For instance, it was recently revealed that the proposed link between climate change and widespread amphibian declines, putatively caused by the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), was tenuous because it was based on a temporally confounded correlation. Here we provide temporally unconfounded evidence that global El Niño climatic events drive widespread amphibian losses in genus Atelopus via increased regional temperature variability, which can reduce amphibian defenses against pathogens. Of 26 climate variables tested, only factors associated with temperature variability could account for the spatiotemporal patterns of declines thought to be associated with Bd. Climatic predictors of declines became significant only after controlling for a pattern consistent with epidemic spread (by temporally detrending the data). This presumed spread accounted for 59% of the temporal variation in amphibian losses, whereas El Niño accounted for 59% of the remaining variation. Hence, we could account for 83% of the variation in declines with these two variables alone. Given that global climate change seems to increase temperature variability, extreme climatic events, and the strength of Central Pacific El Niño episodes, climate change might exacerbate worldwide enigmatic declines of amphibians, presumably by increasing susceptibility to disease. These results suggest that changes to temperature variability associated with climate change might be as significant to biodiversity losses and disease emergence as changes to mean temperature.

  8. Temperature effect on X-ray photoelectron spectra of 3d transition metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochur, A.G.; Kozakov, A.T.; Yavna, V.A.; Daniel, Ph.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • 2p XPS of 3d metal ions are calculated in an isolated ion approximation. • 2p XPS of Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe ions are temperature dependent even at room temperature. • Temperature effect on 3p XPS is slight. • No temperature effect on 3s XPS is discovered. - Abstract: Temperature effect on 2p- 3s- and 3p X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) of various ions of Ti, V, Cr, Mn and Fe is studied theoretically within an isolated ion approximation. It is shown that the 2p XPS of those ions are temperature dependent even at room temperature due to a very slight energy splitting between the ground-state-term total-momentum J-components which can be thermally populated. Most significant temperature effect is expected in the 2p-spectra of Ti 2+ (3d 2 ), V 2+ (3d 3 ), Cr 2+ (3d 4 ), Mn 3+ (3d 4 ), and Mn 3+ (3d 4 ) ions. The temperature effect on 3p XPS is slight. No temperature effect on 3s XPS is expected

  9. Understanding and Improving High-Temperature Structural Properties of Metal-Silicide Intermetallics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce S. Kang

    2005-10-10

    The objective of this project was to understand and improve high-temperature structural properties of metal-silicide intermetallic alloys. Through research collaboration between the research team at West Virginia University (WVU) and Dr. J.H. Schneibel at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), molybdenum silicide alloys were developed at ORNL and evaluated at WVU through atomistic modeling analyses, thermo-mechanical tests, and metallurgical studies. In this study, molybdenum-based alloys were ductilized by dispersing MgAl2O4 or MgO spinel particles. The addition of spinel particles is hypothesized to getter impurities such as oxygen and nitrogen from the alloy matrix with the result of ductility improvement. The introduction of fine dispersions has also been postulated to improve ductility by acting as a dislocation source or reducing dislocation pile-ups at grain boundaries. The spinel particles, on the other hand, can also act as local notches or crack initiation sites, which is detrimental to the alloy mechanical properties. Optimization of material processing condition is important to develop the desirable molybdenum alloys with sufficient room-temperature ductility. Atomistic analyses were conducted to further understand the mechanism of ductility improvement of the molybdenum alloys and the results showed that trace amount of residual oxygen may be responsible for the brittle behavior of the as-cast Mo alloys. For the alloys studied, uniaxial tensile tests were conducted at different loading rates, and at room and elevated temperatures. Thermal cycling effect on the mechanical properties was also studied. Tensile tests for specimens subjected to either ten or twenty thermal cycles were conducted. For each test, a follow-up detailed fractography and microstructural analysis were carried out. The test results were correlated to the size, density, distribution of the spinel particles and processing time. Thermal expansion tests were carried out using thermo

  10. Microstructure and mechanical properties of metallic high-temperature materials. Research report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mughrabi, H.; Gottstein, G.; Mecking, H.; Riedel, H.; Toboloski, J.

    1999-01-01

    This volume contains 38 lectures of research studies performed in the course of the Priority Programme 'Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Metallic High-Temperature Materials' supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) over a period of six years from 1991 to 1997. The four materials selected were: 1. light metal PM-aluminium and titanium base alloys; 2. ferritic chromium and austenitic alloy 800 steels; 3. (monocrystalline) nickel-base superalloys; and 4. nickel- and iron-base oxide-dispersion-strengthened superalloys. All papers have been abstracted separately for the ENERGY database

  11. Water, Rather than Temperature, Dominantly Impacts How Soil Fauna Affect Dissolved Carbon and Nitrogen Release from Fresh Litter during Early Litter Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Liao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Longstanding observations suggest that dissolved materials are lost from fresh litter through leaching, but the role of soil fauna in controlling this process has been poorly documented. In this study, a litterbag experiment employing litterbags with different mesh sizes (3 mm to permit soil fauna access and 0.04 mm to exclude fauna access was conducted in three habitats (arid valley, ecotone and subalpine forest with changes in climate and vegetation types to evaluate the effects of soil fauna on the concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC and total dissolved nitrogen (TDN during the first year of decomposition. The results showed that the individual density and community abundance of soil fauna greatly varied among these habitats, but Prostigmata, Isotomidae and Oribatida were the dominant soil invertebrates. At the end of the experiment, the mass remaining of foliar litter ranged from 58% for shrub litter to 77% for birch litter, and the DOC and TDN concentrations decreased to 54%–85% and increased to 34%–269%, respectively, when soil fauna were not present. The effects of soil fauna on the concentrations of both DOC and TDN in foliar litter were greater in the subalpine forest (wetter but colder during the winter and in the arid valley (warmer but drier during the growing season, and this effect was positively correlated with water content. Moreover, the effects of fauna on DOC and TDN concentrations were greater for high-quality litter and were related to the C/N ratio. These results suggest that water, rather than temperature, dominates how fauna affect the release of dissolved substances from fresh litter.

  12. Variant selection of martensites in steel welded joints with low transformation temperature weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Masaru; Yasuda, Hiroyuki Y.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We examined the variant selection of martensites in the weld metals. ► We also measured the residual stress developed in the butt and box welded joints. ► 24 martensite variants were randomly selected in the butt welded joint. ► High tensile residual stress in the box welded joint led to the strong variant selection. ► We discussed the rule of the variant selection focusing on the residual stress. -- Abstract: Martensitic transformation behavior in steel welded joints with low transformation temperature weld (LTTW) metal was examined focusing on the variant selection of martensites. The butt and box welded joints were prepared with LTTW metals and 980 MPa grade high strength steels. The residual stress of the welded joints, which was measured by a neutron diffraction technique, was effectively reduced by the expansion of the LTTW metals by the martensitic transformation during cooling after the welding process. In the LTTW metals, the retained austenite and martensite phases have the Kurdjumov–Sachs (K–S) orientation relationship. The variant selection of the martensites in the LTTW metals depended strongly on the type of welded joints. In the butt welded joint, 24 K–S variants were almost randomly selected while a few variants were preferentially chosen in the box welded joint. This suggests that the high residual stress developed in the box welded joint accelerated the formation of specific variants during the cooling process, in contrast to the butt welded joint with low residual stress

  13. Effects of annealing temperature in a metal alloy nano-dot memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Min; Lee, Gae Hun; Song, Yun Heub; Bea, Ji Cheol; Tanaka, Tetsu

    2011-01-01

    The annealing temperature dependence of the capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristic has been studied in a metal-oxide semiconductor structure containing FePt nano-dots. Several in-situ annealing temperatures from 400 to ∼700 .deg. C in a high vacuum ambience (under 1 x 10 -5 Pa) were evaluated in view of the cell's characteristics and its reliability. Here, we demonstrate that the annealing temperature is significant for memory performance in an alloy metal nano-dot structure. A higher in-situ temperature provides better retention and a more reliable memory window. In the sample with an in-situ annealing condition of 700 .deg. C for 30 min, a memory window of 9.2 V at the initial stage was obtained, and a memory window of 6.2 V after 10 years was estimated, which is reliable for a non-volatile memory. From these results, the annealing condition for an alloy metal nano-dot memory is one of the critical parameters for the memory characteristics, and should be optimized for better memory performance.

  14. Metal viscoplasticity with two-temperature thermodynamics and two dislocation densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy Chowdhury, Shubhankar; Kar, Gurudas; Roy, Debasish; Reddy, J. N.

    2018-03-01

    Posed within the two-temperature theory of non-equilibrium thermodynamics, we propose a model for thermoviscoplastic deformation in metals. We incorporate the dynamics of dislocation densities-mobile and forest—that play the role of internal state variables in the formulation. The description based on two temperatures appears naturally when one recognizes that the thermodynamic system undergoing viscoplastic deformation is composed of two weakly interacting subsystems, viz. a kinetic-vibrational subsystem of the vibrating atomic lattices and a configurational subsystem of the slower degrees of freedom relating to defect motion, each with its own temperature. Starting with a basic model that involves only homogeneous deformation, a three-dimensional model for inhomogeneous viscoplasticity applicable to finite deformation is charted out in an overstress driven viscoplastic deformation framework. The model shows how the coupled evolutions of mobile and forest dislocation densities, which are critically influenced by the dynamics of configurational temperature, govern the strength and ductility of the metal. Unlike most contemporary models, the current proposal also affords a prediction of certain finer details as observed in the experimental data on stress-strain behaviour of metals and this in turn enhances the understanding of the evolving and interacting dislocation densities.

  15. Multi parametric sensitivity study applied to temperature measurement of metallic plasma facing components in fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aumeunier, M-H.; Corre, Y.; Firdaouss, M.; Gauthier, E.; Loarer, T.; Travere, J-M.; Gardarein, J-L.; EFDA JET Contributor

    2013-06-01

    In nuclear fusion experiments, the protection system of the Plasma Facing Components (PFCs) is commonly ensured by infrared (IR) thermography. Nevertheless, the surface monitoring of new metallic plasma facing component, as in JET and ITER is being challenging. Indeed, the analysis of infrared signals is made more complicated in such a metallic environment since the signals will be perturbed by the reflected photons coming from high temperature regions. To address and anticipate this new measurement environment, predictive photonic models, based on Monte-Carlo ray tracing (SPEOS R CAA V5 Based), have been performed to assess the contribution of the reflective part in the total flux collected by the camera and the resulting temperature error. This paper deals with the effects of metals features, as the emissivity and reflectivity models, on the accuracy of the surface temperature estimation. The reliability of the features models is discussed by comparing the simulation with experimental data obtained with the wide angle IR thermography system of JET ITER like wall. The impact of the temperature distribution is studied by considering two different typical plasma scenarios, in limiter (ITER start-up scenario) and in X-point configurations (standard divertor scenario). The achievable measurement performances of IR system and risks analysis on its functionalities are discussed. (authors)

  16. Thermal decomposition and reaction of confined explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalano, E.; McGuire, R.; Lee, E.; Wrenn, E.; Ornellas, D.; Walton, J.

    1976-01-01

    Some new experiments designed to accurately determine the time interval required to produce a reactive event in confined explosives subjected to temperatures which will cause decomposition are described. Geometry and boundary conditions were both well defined so that these experiments on the rapid thermal decomposition of HE are amenable to predictive modelling. Experiments have been carried out on TNT, TATB and on two plastic-bonded HMX-based high explosives, LX-04 and LX-10. When the results of these experiments are plotted as the logarithm of the time to explosion versus 1/T K (Arrhenius plot), the curves produced are remarkably linear. This is in contradiction to the results obtained by an iterative solution of the Laplace equation for a system with a first order rate heat source. Such calculations produce plots which display considerable curvature. The experiments have also shown that the time to explosion is strongly influenced by the void volume in the containment vessel. Results of the experiments with calculations based on the heat flow equations coupled with first-order models of chemical decomposition are compared. The comparisons demonstrate the need for a more realistic reaction model

  17. Temperature variation in metal ceramic technology analyzed using time domain optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Topala, Florin I.; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2014-01-01

    The quality of dental prostheses is essential in providing good quality medical services. The metal ceramic technology applied in dentistry implies ceramic sintering inside the dental oven. Every ceramic material requires a special sintering chart which is recommended by the producer. For a regular dental technician it is very difficult to evaluate if the temperature inside the oven remains the same as it is programmed on the sintering chart. Also, maintaining the calibration in time is an issue for the practitioners. Metal ceramic crowns develop a very accurate pattern for the ceramic layers depending on the temperature variation inside the oven where they are processed. Different patterns were identified in the present study for the samples processed with a variation in temperature of +30 °C to +50 °C, respectively - 30 0°C to -50 °C. The OCT imagistic evaluations performed for the normal samples present a uniform spread of the ceramic granulation inside the ceramic materials. For the samples sintered at a higher temperature an alternation between white and darker areas between the enamel and opaque layers appear. For the samples sintered at a lower temperature a decrease in the ceramic granulation from the enamel towards the opaque layer is concluded. The TD-OCT methods can therefore be used efficiently for the detection of the temperature variation due to the ceramic sintering inside the ceramic oven.

  18. Molecular dynamics for near melting temperatures simulations of metals using modified embedded-atom method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etesami, S. Alireza; Asadi, Ebrahim

    2018-01-01

    Availability of a reliable interatomic potential is one of the major challenges in utilizing molecular dynamics (MD) for simulations of metals at near the melting temperatures and melting point (MP). Here, we propose a novel approach to address this challenge in the concept of modified-embedded-atom (MEAM) interatomic potential; also, we apply the approach on iron, nickel, copper, and aluminum as case studies. We propose adding experimentally available high temperature elastic constants and MP of the element to the list of typical low temperature properties used for the development of MD interatomic potential parameters. We show that the proposed approach results in a reasonable agreement between the MD calculations of melting properties such as latent heat, expansion in melting, liquid structure factor, and solid-liquid interface stiffness and their experimental/computational counterparts. Then, we present the physical properties of mentioned elements near melting temperatures using the new MEAM parameters. We observe that the behavior of elastic constants, heat capacity and thermal linear expansion coefficient at room temperature compared to MP follows an empirical linear relation (α±β × MP) for transition metals. Furthermore, a linear relation between the tetragonal shear modulus and the enthalpy change from room temperature to MP is observed for face-centered cubic materials.

  19. Effects of self-absorption on simultaneous estimation of temperature distribution and concentration fields of soot and metal-oxide nanoparticles in nanofluid fuel flames using a spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guannan; Liu, Dong

    2018-06-01

    An improved inverse reconstruction model with consideration of self-absorption effect for the temperature distribution and concentration fields of soot and metal-oxide nanoparticles in nanofluid fuel flames was proposed based on the flame emission spectrometry. The effects of self-absorption on the temperature profile and concentration fields were investigated for various measurement errors, flame optical thicknesses and detecting lines numbers. The model neglecting the self-absorption caused serious reconstruction errors especially in the nanofluid fuel flames with large optical thicknesses, while the improved model was used to successfully recover the temperature distribution and concentration fields of soot and metal-oxide nanoparticles for the flames regardless of the optical thickness. Through increasing detecting lines number, the reconstruction accuracy can be greatly improved due to more flame emission information received by the spectrometer. With the adequate detecting lines number, the estimations for the temperature distribution and concentration fields of soot and metal-oxide nanoparticles in flames with large optical thicknesses were still satisfying even from the noisy radiation intensities with signal to noise ratio (SNR) as low as 46 dB. The results showed that the improved reconstruction model was effective and robust to concurrently retrieve the temperature distribution and volume fraction fields of soot and metal-oxide nanoparticles for the exact and noisy data in nanofluid fuel sooting flames with different optical thicknesses.

  20. Thermocouple and Infrared Sensor-Based Measurement of Temperature Distribution in Metal Cutting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdil Kus

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In metal cutting, the magnitude of the temperature at the tool-chip interface is a function of the cutting parameters. This temperature directly affects production; therefore, increased research on the role of cutting temperatures can lead to improved machining operations. In this study, tool temperature was estimated by simultaneous temperature measurement employing both a K-type thermocouple and an infrared radiation (IR pyrometer to measure the tool-chip interface temperature. Due to the complexity of the machining processes, the integration of different measuring techniques was necessary in order to obtain consistent temperature data. The thermal analysis results were compared via the ANSYS finite element method. Experiments were carried out in dry machining using workpiece material of AISI 4140 alloy steel that was heat treated by an induction process to a hardness of 50 HRC. A PVD TiAlN-TiN-coated WNVG 080404-IC907 carbide insert was used during the turning process. The results showed that with increasing cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut, the tool temperature increased; the cutting speed was found to be the most effective parameter in assessing the temperature rise. The heat distribution of the cutting tool, tool-chip interface and workpiece provided effective and useful data for the optimization of selected cutting parameters during orthogonal machining.

  1. Thermocouple and infrared sensor-based measurement of temperature distribution in metal cutting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kus, Abdil; Isik, Yahya; Cakir, M Cemal; Coşkun, Salih; Özdemir, Kadir

    2015-01-12

    In metal cutting, the magnitude of the temperature at the tool-chip interface is a function of the cutting parameters. This temperature directly affects production; therefore, increased research on the role of cutting temperatures can lead to improved machining operations. In this study, tool temperature was estimated by simultaneous temperature measurement employing both a K-type thermocouple and an infrared radiation (IR) pyrometer to measure the tool-chip interface temperature. Due to the complexity of the machining processes, the integration of different measuring techniques was necessary in order to obtain consistent temperature data. The thermal analysis results were compared via the ANSYS finite element method. Experiments were carried out in dry machining using workpiece material of AISI 4140 alloy steel that was heat treated by an induction process to a hardness of 50 HRC. A PVD TiAlN-TiN-coated WNVG 080404-IC907 carbide insert was used during the turning process. The results showed that with increasing cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut, the tool temperature increased; the cutting speed was found to be the most effective parameter in assessing the temperature rise. The heat distribution of the cutting tool, tool-chip interface and workpiece provided effective and useful data for the optimization of selected cutting parameters during orthogonal machining.

  2. Thermocouple and Infrared Sensor-Based Measurement of Temperature Distribution in Metal Cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kus, Abdil; Isik, Yahya; Cakir, M. Cemal; Coşkun, Salih; Özdemir, Kadir

    2015-01-01

    In metal cutting, the magnitude of the temperature at the tool-chip interface is a function of the cutting parameters. This temperature directly affects production; therefore, increased research on the role of cutting temperatures can lead to improved machining operations. In this study, tool temperature was estimated by simultaneous temperature measurement employing both a K-type thermocouple and an infrared radiation (IR) pyrometer to measure the tool-chip interface temperature. Due to the complexity of the machining processes, the integration of different measuring techniques was necessary in order to obtain consistent temperature data. The thermal analysis results were compared via the ANSYS finite element method. Experiments were carried out in dry machining using workpiece material of AISI 4140 alloy steel that was heat treated by an induction process to a hardness of 50 HRC. A PVD TiAlN-TiN-coated WNVG 080404-IC907 carbide insert was used during the turning process. The results showed that with increasing cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut, the tool temperature increased; the cutting speed was found to be the most effective parameter in assessing the temperature rise. The heat distribution of the cutting tool, tool-chip interface and workpiece provided effective and useful data for the optimization of selected cutting parameters during orthogonal machining. PMID:25587976

  3. Refractive-index change caused by electrons in amorphous AsS and AsSe thin films doped with different metals by photodiffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordman, Olli; Nordman, Nina; Pashkevich, Valfrid

    2001-01-01

    The refractive-index change caused by electrons was measured in amorphous AsS and AsSe thin films. Films were coated with different metals. Diffraction gratings were written by electron-beam lithography. The interactions of electrons in films with and without the photodiffusion of overcoated metal were compared. Incoming electrons caused metal atom and ion diffusion in both investigated cases. The metal diffusion was dependent on the metal and it was found to influence the refractive index. In some cases lateral diffusion of the metal was noticed. The conditions for applications were verified. Copyright 2001 Optical Society of America

  4. Thermodynamic properties of bcc crystals at high temperatures: The transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, R.A.; Shukla, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    The second-neighbor central-force model of a bcc crystal, previously used in lowest-order anharmonic perturbation theory to calculate the thermodynamic properties of the alkali metals, is here applied to the transition metals V, Nb, Ta, Mo, and W. The limitations of the model are apparent in the thermal-expansion results, which fall away from the experimental trend above about 1800 K. The specific heat similarly fails to exhibit the sharp rise that is observed at higher temperatures. A static treatment of vacancies cannot account for the difference between theory and experiment. The electrons have been taken into account by using a model that specifically includes d-band effects in the electron ground-state energy. The results thus obtained for the bulk moduli are quite satisfactory. In the light of these results, we discuss the prerequisites for a better treatment of metals when the electrons play an important role in determining the thermodynamic properties

  5. Evaluating litter decomposition and soil organic matter dynamics in earth system models: contrasting analysis of long-term litter decomposition and steady-state soil carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonan, G. B.; Wieder, W. R.

    2012-12-01

    Decomposition is a large term in the global carbon budget, but models of the earth system that simulate carbon cycle-climate feedbacks are largely untested with respect to litter decomposition. Here, we demonstrate a protocol to document model performance with respect to both long-term (10 year) litter decomposition and steady-state soil carbon stocks. First, we test the soil organic matter parameterization of the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4), the terrestrial component of the Community Earth System Model, with data from the Long-term Intersite Decomposition Experiment Team (LIDET). The LIDET dataset is a 10-year study of litter decomposition at multiple sites across North America and Central America. We show results for 10-year litter decomposition simulations compared with LIDET for 9 litter types and 20 sites in tundra, grassland, and boreal, conifer, deciduous, and tropical forest biomes. We show additional simulations with DAYCENT, a version of the CENTURY model, to ask how well an established ecosystem model matches the observations. The results reveal large discrepancy between the laboratory microcosm studies used to parameterize the CLM4 litter decomposition and the LIDET field study. Simulated carbon loss is more rapid than the observations across all sites, despite using the LIDET-provided climatic decomposition index to constrain temperature and moisture effects on decomposition. Nitrogen immobilization is similarly biased high. Closer agreement with the observations requires much lower decomposition rates, obtained with the assumption that nitrogen severely limits decomposition. DAYCENT better replicates the observations, for both carbon mass remaining and nitrogen, without requirement for nitrogen limitation of decomposition. Second, we compare global observationally-based datasets of soil carbon with simulated steady-state soil carbon stocks for both models. The models simulations were forced with observationally-based estimates of annual

  6. Combined effects of temperature changes and metal contamination at different levels of biological organization in yellow perch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grasset, Julie; Ollivier, Élodie; Bougas, Bérénice; Yannic, Glenn; Campbell, Peter G.C.; Bernatchez, Louis; Couture, Patrice

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Yellow perch were exposed to a combination of heat and metal (Cd or Ni) stress. • Kidney metal accumulation was greatly enhanced at higher temperatures. • Elevated temperatures negatively affected several indicators of condition and metabolic capacities. • Exposure to Ni stimulated gonad development. • Metal stress modified the normal response of antioxidant capacities and apoptosis to heat stress. - Abstract: In this study, we measured the effects of temperature (9 °C, 20 °C, and 28 °C), metal contamination (cadmium and nickel) and their interaction on yellow perch (Perca flavescens) using liver enzymatic and transcriptomic endpoints and biometric indices. Kidney metal concentrations increased with a rise of temperature. The biometric indices analysed (Fulton condition factor, pyloric cæca, hepatosomatic and gonadosomatic indices) generally decreased with an increase of temperature but not with metal contamination. At the enzymatic level, the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), involved in antioxidant response, was affected by both temperature and metal contamination, whereas the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), involved in energy accumulation but also in antioxidant response, was only affected by metal exposure. The response of perch to the stressors at the transcriptional level differed from the metabolic response. In particular, the transcription level of the cco and g6pdh genes sharply decreased with increasing temperature, while the activities of the corresponding enzymes remained stable. The normal response of the transcription level of the apoptotic gene (diablo) to heat stress was also altered in metal-contaminated fish. The combination of metal and temperature stresses also modified the response of antioxidant metabolism induced by these stressors individually. This study contributes to a better understanding of the influences of natural stressors like temperature on biomarkers commonly used in

  7. Combined effects of temperature changes and metal contamination at different levels of biological organization in yellow perch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grasset, Julie [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique (INRS), Centre Eau Terre Environnement, 490 de la Couronne, Québec, QC G1K 9A9 (Canada); Institut de Biologie Intégrative et des Systèmes (IBIS), Université Laval, Québec, QC G1V 0A6 (Canada); Ollivier, Élodie [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique (INRS), Centre Eau Terre Environnement, 490 de la Couronne, Québec, QC G1K 9A9 (Canada); Bougas, Bérénice [Institut de Biologie Intégrative et des Systèmes (IBIS), Université Laval, Québec, QC G1V 0A6 (Canada); Yannic, Glenn [Laboratoire d’Écologie Alpine, UMR CNRS 5553, Université de Savoie Mont Blanc, 73376 Le Bourget-du-lac (France); Campbell, Peter G.C. [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique (INRS), Centre Eau Terre Environnement, 490 de la Couronne, Québec, QC G1K 9A9 (Canada); Bernatchez, Louis [Institut de Biologie Intégrative et des Systèmes (IBIS), Université Laval, Québec, QC G1V 0A6 (Canada); Couture, Patrice, E-mail: patrice.couture@ete.inrs.ca [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique (INRS), Centre Eau Terre Environnement, 490 de la Couronne, Québec, QC G1K 9A9 (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Yellow perch were exposed to a combination of heat and metal (Cd or Ni) stress. • Kidney metal accumulation was greatly enhanced at higher temperatures. • Elevated temperatures negatively affected several indicators of condition and metabolic capacities. • Exposure to Ni stimulated gonad development. • Metal stress modified the normal response of antioxidant capacities and apoptosis to heat stress. - Abstract: In this study, we measured the effects of temperature (9 °C, 20 °C, and 28 °C), metal contamination (cadmium and nickel) and their interaction on yellow perch (Perca flavescens) using liver enzymatic and transcriptomic endpoints and biometric indices. Kidney metal concentrations increased with a rise of temperature. The biometric indices analysed (Fulton condition factor, pyloric cæca, hepatosomatic and gonadosomatic indices) generally decreased with an increase of temperature but not with metal contamination. At the enzymatic level, the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), involved in antioxidant response, was affected by both temperature and metal contamination, whereas the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), involved in energy accumulation but also in antioxidant response, was only affected by metal exposure. The response of perch to the stressors at the transcriptional level differed from the metabolic response. In particular, the transcription level of the cco and g6pdh genes sharply decreased with increasing temperature, while the activities of the corresponding enzymes remained stable. The normal response of the transcription level of the apoptotic gene (diablo) to heat stress was also altered in metal-contaminated fish. The combination of metal and temperature stresses also modified the response of antioxidant metabolism induced by these stressors individually. This study contributes to a better understanding of the influences of natural stressors like temperature on biomarkers commonly used in

  8. A highly reversible room-temperature lithium metal battery based on crosslinked hairy nanoparticles.

    KAUST Repository

    Choudhury, Snehashis; Mangal, Rahul; Agrawal, Akanksha; Archer, Lynden A

    2015-01-01

    Rough electrodeposition, uncontrolled parasitic side-reactions with electrolytes and dendrite-induced short-circuits have hindered development of advanced energy storage technologies based on metallic lithium, sodium and aluminium electrodes. Solid polymer electrolytes and nanoparticle-polymer composites have shown promise as candidates to suppress lithium dendrite growth, but the challenge of simultaneously maintaining high mechanical strength and high ionic conductivity at room temperature has so far been unmet in these materials. Here we report a facile and scalable method of fabricating tough, freestanding membranes that combine the best attributes of solid polymers, nanocomposites and gel-polymer electrolytes. Hairy nanoparticles are employed as multifunctional nodes for polymer crosslinking, which produces mechanically robust membranes that are exceptionally effective in inhibiting dendrite growth in a lithium metal battery. The membranes are also reported to enable stable cycling of lithium batteries paired with conventional intercalating cathodes. Our findings appear to provide an important step towards room-temperature dendrite-free batteries.

  9. A highly reversible room-temperature lithium metal battery based on crosslinked hairy nanoparticles.

    KAUST Repository

    Choudhury, Snehashis

    2015-12-04

    Rough electrodeposition, uncontrolled parasitic side-reactions with electrolytes and dendrite-induced short-circuits have hindered development of advanced energy storage technologies based on metallic lithium, sodium and aluminium electrodes. Solid polymer electrolytes and nanoparticle-polymer composites have shown promise as candidates to suppress lithium dendrite growth, but the challenge of simultaneously maintaining high mechanical strength and high ionic conductivity at room temperature has so far been unmet in these materials. Here we report a facile and scalable method of fabricating tough, freestanding membranes that combine the best attributes of solid polymers, nanocomposites and gel-polymer electrolytes. Hairy nanoparticles are employed as multifunctional nodes for polymer crosslinking, which produces mechanically robust membranes that are exceptionally effective in inhibiting dendrite growth in a lithium metal battery. The membranes are also reported to enable stable cycling of lithium batteries paired with conventional intercalating cathodes. Our findings appear to provide an important step towards room-temperature dendrite-free batteries.

  10. Free volume model: High-temperature deformation of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bletry, M.; Guyot, P.; Blandin, J.J.; Soubeyroux, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    The homogeneous deformation of a zirconium-based bulk metallic glass is investigated in the glass transition region. Compression tests at different temperatures and strain rates have been conducted. The mechanical behavior is analyzed in the framework of the free volume model, taking into account the dependence of the flow defect concentration on deformation. The activation volume is evaluated and allows one to gather the viscosity data (for the different strain rates and temperatures) on a unique master curve. It is also shown that, due to the relation between flow defect concentration and free volume, it is not possible to deduce the equilibrium flow defect concentration directly from mechanical measurements. However, if this parameter is arbitrarily chosen, mechanical measurements give access to the other parameters of the model, these parameters for the alloy under investigation being of the same order of magnitude as those for other metallic glasses

  11. Hot metal temperature prediction and simulation by fuzzy logic in a blast furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, M. A.; Jimenez, J.; Mochon, J.; Formoso, A.; Bueno, F.; Menendez, J. L.

    2000-01-01

    This work describes the development and further validation of a model devoted to blast furnace hot metal temperature forecast, based on Fuzzy logic principles. The model employs as input variables, the control variables of an actual blast furnace: Blast volume, moisture, coal injection, oxygen addition, etc. and it yields as a result the hot metal temperature with a forecast horizon of forty minutes. As far as the variables used to develop the model have been obtained from data supplied by an actual blast furnaces sensors, it is necessary to properly analyse and handle such data. Especial attention was paid to data temporal correlation, fitting by interpolation the different sampling rates. In the training stage of the model the ANFIS (Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System) and the Subtractive Clustering algorithms have been used. (Author) 9 refs

  12. Structural, magnetic, and electronic properties of iron selenide Fe{sub 6-7}Se{sub 8} nanoparticles obtained by thermal decomposition in high-temperature organic solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyubutin, I. S., E-mail: lyubutinig@mail.ru, E-mail: crlin@mail.npue.edu.tw; Funtov, K. O.; Dmitrieva, T. V.; Starchikov, S. S. [Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119333 (Russian Federation); Lin, Chun-Rong, E-mail: lyubutinig@mail.ru, E-mail: crlin@mail.npue.edu.tw [Department of Applied Physics, National Pingtung University of Education, Pingtung 90003, Taiwan (China); Siao, Yu-Jhan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Southern Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Tainan 71005, Taiwan (China); Chen, Mei-Li [Department of Electro-optical Engineering, Southern Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Tainan 71005, Taiwan (China)

    2014-07-28

    Iron selenide nanoparticles with the NiAs-like crystal structure were synthesized by thermal decomposition of iron chloride and selenium powder in a high-temperature organic solvent. Depending on the time of the compound processing at 340 °C, the nanocrystals with monoclinic (M)-Fe{sub 3}Se{sub 4} or hexagonal (H)-Fe{sub 7}Se{sub 8} structures as well as a mixture of these two phases can be obtained. The magnetic behavior of the monoclinic and hexagonal phases is very different. The applied-field and temperature dependences of magnetization reveal a complicated transformation between ferrimagnetic (FRM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) structures, which can be related to the spin rotation process connected with the redistribution of cation vacancies. From XRD and Mössbauer data, the 3c type superstructure of vacancy ordering was found in the hexagonal Fe{sub 7}Se{sub 8}. Redistribution of vacancies in Fe{sub 7}Se{sub 8} from random to ordered leads to the transformation of the magnetic structure from FRM to AFM. The Mössbauer data indicate that vacancies in the monoclinic Fe{sub 3}Se{sub 4} prefer to appear near the Fe{sup 3+} ions and stimulate the magnetic transition with the rotation of the Fe{sup 3+} magnetic moments. Unusually high coercive force H{sub c} was found in both (H) and (M) nanocrystals with the highest (“giant”) value of about 25 kOe in monoclinic Fe{sub 3}Se{sub 4}. This is explained by the strong surface magnetic anisotropy which is essentially larger than the core anisotropy. Such a large coercivity is rare for materials without rare earth or noble metal elements, and the Fe{sub 3}Se{sub 4}-based compounds can be the low-cost, nontoxic alternative materials for advanced magnets. In addition, an unusual effect of “switching” of magnetization in a field of 10 kOe was found in the Fe{sub 3}Se{sub 4} nanoparticles below 280 K, which can be important for applications.

  13. Application of new design methodologies to very high-temperature metallic components of the HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hada, Kazuhiko; Ohkubo, Minoru; Baba, Osamu

    1991-01-01

    The high-temperature piping and helium-to-helium intermediate heat exchanger of the High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) are designed to be operating at very high temperatures of about 900deg C among the class 1 components of the HTTR. At such a high temperature, mechanical strength of heat-resistant metallic materials is very low and thermal expansions of structural members are large. Therefore, innovative design methodologies are needed to reduce both mechanical and thermal loads acting on these components. To the HTTR, the design methodologies which can separate the heat-resistant function from the pressure-retaining functions and allow them to expand freely are applied to reduce pressure and thermal loads. Since these design methodologies need to verify their applicability, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been performing many design and research works on their verifications. The details of the design methodologies and their verifications are given in this paper. (orig.)

  14. Bulk ultrasonic NDE of metallic components at high temperature using magnetostrictive transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashish, Antony Jacob; Rajagopal, Prabhu; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Kumar, Anish; Rao, B. Purnachandra; Jayakumar, Tammana

    2017-02-01

    Online ultrasonic NDE at high-temperature is of much interest to the power, process and automotive industries in view of possible savings in downtime. This paper describes a novel approach to developing ultrasonic transducers capable of high-temperature in-situ operation using the principle of magnetostriction. Preliminary design from previous research by the authors [1] is extended for operation at 1 MHz, and at elevated temperatures by amorphous metallic strips as the magnetostrictive core. Ultrasonic signals in pulse-echo mode are experimentally obtained from the ultrasonic transducer thus developed, in a simulated high-temperature environment of 350 °C for 10 hours. Advantages and challenges for practical deployment of this approach are discussed.

  15. Plasma metallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowther, J.M.

    1997-09-01

    Many methods are currently used for the production of thin metal films. However, all of these have drawbacks associated with them, for example the need for UHV conditions, high temperatures, exotic metal precursors, or the inability to coat complex shaped objects. Reduction of supported metal salts by non-isothermal plasma treatment does not suffer from these drawbacks. In order to produce and analyse metal films before they become contaminated, a plasma chamber which could be attached directly to a UHV chamber with XPS capability was designed and built. This allowed plasma treatment of supported metal salts and surface analysis by XPS to be performed without exposure of the metal film to the atmosphere. Non-equilibrium plasma treatment of Nylon 66 supported gold(lll) chloride using hydrogen as the feed gas resulted in a 95% pure gold film, the remaining 5% of the film being carbon. If argon or helium were used as the feed gases during plasma treatment the resultant gold films were 100% pure. Some degree of surface contamination of the films due to plasma treatment was observed but was easily removed by argon ion cleaning. Hydrogen plasma reduction of glass supported silver(l) nitrate and palladium(ll) acetate films reveals that this metallization technique is applicable to a wide variety of metal salts and supports, and has also shown the ability of plasma reduction to retain the complex 'fern-like' structures seen for spin coated silver(l) nitrate layers. Some metal salts are susceptible to decomposition by X-rays. The reduction of Nylon 66 supported gold(lll) chloride films by soft X-rays to produce nanoscopic gold particles has been studied. The spontaneous reduction of these X-ray irradiated support gold(lll) chloride films on exposure to the atmosphere to produce gold rich metallic films has also been reported. (author)

  16. Artificial crystals with 3d metal and palladium particles subjected to high-temperature heat treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinkevich, A. B.; Nemytova, O. V.; Perov, D. V.; Samoylovich, M. I.; Kuznetsov, E. A.

    2018-04-01

    High-temperature heat treatment has valuable impact on the structure and physical properties of artificial crystals with 3d metal and palladium particles. Artificial crystals are obtained by means of introduction of particles into the interspherical voids of opal matrices. The magnetic properties are studied at the temperatures ranging from 2 to 300 K and in fields up to 350 kOe. Microwave properties are investigated in the millimeter frequency range. The complex dielectric permittivity of several nanocomposites is measured. The influence of heat treatment up to 960 °C on the structure of artificial crystals is clarified.

  17. Temperature-dependence of Threshold Current Density-Length Product in Metallization Lines: A Revisit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duryat, Rahmat Saptono; Kim, Choong-Un

    2016-01-01

    One of the important phenomena in Electromigration (EM) is Blech Effect. The existence of Threshold Current Density-Length Product or EM Threshold has such fundamental and technological consequences in the design, manufacture, and testing of electronics. Temperature-dependence of Blech Product had been thermodynamically established and the real behavior of such interconnect materials have been extensively studied. The present paper reviewed the temperature-dependence of EM threshold in metallization lines of different materials and structure as found in relevant published articles. It is expected that the reader can see a big picture from the compiled data, which might be overlooked when it was examined in pieces. (paper)

  18. Pressure effect on crystallization temperature in Zr70Pd30 metallic glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Jianzhong; Jeppesen, S; Saida, J.

    2004-01-01

    The pressure effect on amorphous-to-quasicrystalline-to-intermetallic phase transformations in a Zr70Pd30 metallic glass has been investigated by in situ x-ray diffraction measurements using synchrotron radiation. It is found that the glass crystallizes in two steps: (1) amorphous...... temperature for the formation of quasicrystals has been further discussed with the nucleation theory. ©2004 American Institute of Physics....

  19. Creep of crystals: High-temperature deformation processes in metals, ceramics and minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, J. P.

    An introductory text describing high-temperature deformation processes in metals, ceramics, and minerals is presented. Among the specific topics discussed are: the mechanical aspects of crystal deformation; lattice defects; and phenomenological and thermodynamical analysis of quasi-steady-state creep. Consideration is also given to: dislocation creep models; the effect of hydrostatic pressure on deformation; creep polygonization; and dynamic recrystallization. The status of experimental techniques for the study of transformation plasticity in crystals is also discussed.

  20. High temperature tribological properties of plasma-sprayed metallic coatings containing ceramic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dallaire, S.; Legoux, J.G.

    1995-01-01

    For sealing a moving metal component with a dense silica-based ceramic pre-heated at 800 C, coatings with a low coefficient of friction and moderate wear loss are required. As reported previously, plasma-sprayed coatings containing solid lubricants could reduce sliding wear in high-temperature applications. Plasma-sprayed metal-based coatings containing ceramic particles have been considered for high temperature sealing. Selected metal powders (NiCoCrAlY, CuNi, CuNiIn, Ag, Cu) and ceramic particles (boron nitride, Zeta-B ceramic) were agglomerated to form suitable spray powders. Plasma-sprayed composite coatings and reference materials were tested in a modified pin-on-disc apparatus in which the stationary disc consisted of a dense silica-based ceramic piece initially heated at 800 C and allowed to cool down during tests. The influence of single exposure and repeated contacts with a dense silica-based ceramic material pre-heated to 800 C on the coefficient of friction, wear loss and damage to the ceramic piece was evaluated. Being submitted to a single exposure at high temperature, coatings containing malleable metals such as indium, silver and copper performed well. The outstanding tribological characteristics of the copper-Zeta-B ceramic coating was attributed to the formation of a glazed layer on the surface of this coating which lasted over exposures to high temperature. This glazed layer, composed of fine oxidation products, provided a smooth and polished surface and helped maintaining the coefficient of friction low

  1. Premature failure of dissimilar metal weld joint at intermediate temperature superheater tube

    OpenAIRE

    Al Hajri, Mohammed; Malik, Anees U.; Meroufel, Abdelkader; Al-Muaili, Fahd

    2015-01-01

    Dissimilar metal weld (DMW) joint between alloyed steel (AS) and stainless steel (SS) failed at one of intermediate temperature superheater (ITSH) tube in steam/power generation plant boiler. The premature failure was detected after a relatively short time of operation (8 years) where the crack propagated circumferentially from AS side through the ITSH tube. Apart from physical examination, microstructural studies based on optical microscopy, SEM and EDX analysis were performed. The results o...

  2. The decomposition of estuarine macrophytes under different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to determine the decomposition characteristics of the most dominant submerged macrophyte and macroalgal species in the Great Brak Estuary. Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the effect of different temperature regimes on the rate of decomposition of 3 macrophyte species ...

  3. Temperature and Burnup Correlated FCCI in U-10Zr Metallic Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William J. Carmack

    2012-05-01

    Metallic fuels are proposed for use in advanced sodium cooled fast reactors. The experience basis for metallic fuels is extensive and includes development and qualification of fuels for the Experimental Breeder Reactor I, the Experimental Breeder Reactor II, FERMI-I, and the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) reactors. Metallic fuels provide a number of advantages over other fuel types in terms of fabricability, performance, recyclability, and safety. Key to the performance of all nuclear fuel systems is the resistance to “breach” and subsequent release of fission products and fuel constituents to the primary coolant system of the nuclear power plant. In metallic fuel, the experience is that significant fuel-cladding chemical (FCCI) interaction occurs and becomes prevalent at high power-high temperature operation and ultimately leads to fuel pin breach and failure. Empirical relationships for metallic fuel pin failure have been developed from a large body of in-pile and out of pile research, development, and experimentation. It has been found that significant in-pile acceleration of the FCCI rate is experienced over similar condition out-of-pile experiments. The study of FCCI in metallic fuels has led to the quantification of in-pile failure rates to establish an empirical time and temperature dependent failure limit for fuel elements. Up until now the understanding of FCCI layer formation has been limited to data generated in EBR-II experiments. This dissertation provides new FCCI data extracted from the MFF-series of metallic fuel irradiations performed in the FFTF. These fuel assemblies contain valuable information on the formation of FCCI in metallic fuels at a variety of temperature and burnup conditions and in fuel with axial fuel height three times longer than EBR-II experiments. The longer fuel column in the FFTF and the fuel pins examined have significantly different flux, power, temperature, and FCCI profiles than that found in similar tests conducted in

  4. A chemical approach toward low temperature alloying of immiscible iron and molybdenum metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazir, Rabia [Department of Chemistry, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Applied Chemistry Research Centre, Pakistan Council of Scientific and Industrial Research Laboratories Complex, Lahore 54600 (Pakistan); Ahmed, Sohail [Department of Chemistry, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Mazhar, Muhammad, E-mail: mazhar42pk@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, University of Malaya, Lembah Pantai, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Akhtar, Muhammad Javed; Siddique, Muhammad [Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Khan, Nawazish Ali [Material Science Laboratory, Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Shah, Muhammad Raza [HEJ Research Institute of Chemistry, University of Karachi, Karachi 75270 (Pakistan); Nadeem, Muhammad [Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Low temperature pyrolysis of [Fe(bipy){sub 3}]Cl{sub 2} and [Mo(bipy)Cl{sub 4}] homogeneous powder. • Easy low temperature alloying of immiscible metals like Fe and Mo. • Uniform sized Fe–Mo nanoalloy with particle size of 48–68 nm. • Characterization by EDXRF, AFM, XRPD, magnetometery, {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer and impedance. • Alloy behaves as almost superparamagnetic obeying simple –R(CPE)– circuit. - Abstract: The present research is based on a low temperature operated feasible method for the synthesis of immiscible iron and molybdenum metals’ nanoalloy for technological applications. The nanoalloy has been synthesized by pyrolysis of homogeneous powder precipitated, from a common solvent, of the two complexes, trisbipyridineiron(II)chloride, [Fe(bipy){sub 3}]Cl{sub 2}, and bipyridinemolybedenum(IV) chloride, [Mo(bipy)Cl{sub 4}], followed by heating at 500 °C in an inert atmosphere of flowing argon gas. The resulting nanoalloy has been characterized by using EDXRF, AFM, XRD, magnetometery, {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer and impedance spectroscopies. These results showed that under provided experimental conditions iron and molybdenum metals, with known miscibility barrier, alloy together to give (1:1) single phase material having particle size in the range of 48–66 nm. The magnetism of iron is considerably reduced after alloy formation and shows its trend toward superparamagnetism. The designed chemical synthetic procedure is equally feasible for the fabrication of other immiscible metals.

  5. A chemical approach toward low temperature alloying of immiscible iron and molybdenum metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazir, Rabia; Ahmed, Sohail; Mazhar, Muhammad; Akhtar, Muhammad Javed; Siddique, Muhammad; Khan, Nawazish Ali; Shah, Muhammad Raza; Nadeem, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Low temperature pyrolysis of [Fe(bipy) 3 ]Cl 2 and [Mo(bipy)Cl 4 ] homogeneous powder. • Easy low temperature alloying of immiscible metals like Fe and Mo. • Uniform sized Fe–Mo nanoalloy with particle size of 48–68 nm. • Characterization by EDXRF, AFM, XRPD, magnetometery, 57 Fe Mössbauer and impedance. • Alloy behaves as almost superparamagnetic obeying simple –R(CPE)– circuit. - Abstract: The present research is based on a low temperature operated feasible method for the synthesis of immiscible iron and molybdenum metals’ nanoalloy for technological applications. The nanoalloy has been synthesized by pyrolysis of homogeneous powder precipitated, from a common solvent, of the two complexes, trisbipyridineiron(II)chloride, [Fe(bipy) 3 ]Cl 2 , and bipyridinemolybedenum(IV) chloride, [Mo(bipy)Cl 4 ], followed by heating at 500 °C in an inert atmosphere of flowing argon gas. The resulting nanoalloy has been characterized by using EDXRF, AFM, XRD, magnetometery, 57 Fe Mössbauer and impedance spectroscopies. These results showed that under provided experimental conditions iron and molybdenum metals, with known miscibility barrier, alloy together to give (1:1) single phase material having particle size in the range of 48–66 nm. The magnetism of iron is considerably reduced after alloy formation and shows its trend toward superparamagnetism. The designed chemical synthetic procedure is equally feasible for the fabrication of other immiscible metals

  6. Process Simulation of Aluminium Sheet Metal Deep Drawing at Elevated Temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winklhofer, Johannes; Trattnig, Gernot; Lind, Christoph; Sommitsch, Christof; Feuerhuber, Hannes

    2010-01-01

    Lightweight design is essential for an economic and environmentally friendly vehicle. Aluminium sheet metal is well known for its ability to improve the strength to weight ratio of lightweight structures. One disadvantage of aluminium is that it is less formable than steel. Therefore complex part geometries can only be realized by expensive multi-step production processes. One method for overcoming this disadvantage is deep drawing at elevated temperatures. In this way the formability of aluminium sheet metal can be improved significantly, and the number of necessary production steps can thereby be reduced. This paper introduces deep drawing of aluminium sheet metal at elevated temperatures, a corresponding simulation method, a characteristic process and its optimization. The temperature and strain rate dependent material properties of a 5xxx series alloy and their modelling are discussed. A three dimensional thermomechanically coupled finite element deep drawing simulation model and its validation are presented. Based on the validated simulation model an optimised process strategy regarding formability, time and cost is introduced.

  7. Growth and decomposition of Lithium and Lithium hydride on Nickel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engbæk, Jakob; Nielsen, Gunver; Nielsen, Jane Hvolbæk

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we have investigated the deposition, structure and decomposition of lithium and lithium-hydride films on a nickel substrate. Using surface sensitive techniques it was possible to quantify the deposited Li amount, and to optimize the deposition procedure for synthesizing lithium......-hydride films. By only making thin films of LiH it is possible to study the stability of these hydride layers and compare it directly with the stability of pure Li without having any transport phenomena or adsorbed oxygen to obscure the results. The desorption of metallic lithium takes place at a lower...... temperature than the decomposition of the lithium-hydride, confirming the high stability and sintering problems of lithium-hydride making the storage potential a challenge. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  8. Effect of catalyst for the decomposition of VOCs in a NTP reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanty, Suchitra; Das, Smrutiprava; Paikaray, Rita; Sahoo, Gourishankar; Samantaray, Subrata

    2015-01-01

    Air pollution has become a major cause of human distress both directly and indirectly. VOCs are becoming the major air pollutants. So the decomposition of VOCs is present need of our society. Non-thermal plasma reactor (NTP) is proven to be effective for low concentration VOCs decomposition. For safe and effective application of DBD, optimization of treatment process requires different plasma parameter characterization. So electron temperature and electron density parameters of VOCs show the decomposition path ways. In this piece of work by taking the emission spectra and comparing the line intensity ratios, the electron temperature and density were determined. Also the decomposition rate in terms of the deposited products on the dielectric surface was studied. Decomposition rate increases in presence of catalyst as compared to the pure compound in presence of a carrier gas. Decomposition process was studied by UV-VIS, FTIR, OES Spectroscopic methods and by GCMS. Deposited products are analyzed by UV-VIS and FTIR spectroscopy. Plasma parameters like electron temperature, density are studied with OES. And gaseous products are studied by GCMS showing the peaks for the by products. (author)

  9. Apparent temperature and cause-specific emergency hospital admissions in Greater Copenhagen, Denmark.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine Wichmann

    Full Text Available One of the key climate change factors, temperature, has potentially grave implications for human health. We report the first attempt to investigate the association between the daily 3-hour maximum apparent temperature (Tapp(max and respiratory (RD, cardiovascular (CVD, and cerebrovascular (CBD emergency hospital admissions in Copenhagen, controlling for air pollution. The study period covered 1 January 2002-31 December 2006, stratified in warm and cold periods. A case-crossover design was applied. Susceptibility (effect modification by age, sex, and socio-economic status was investigated. For an IQR (8°C increase in the 5-day cumulative average of Tapp(max, a 7% (95% CI: 1%, 13% increase in the RD admission rate was observed in the warm period whereas an inverse association was found with CVD (-8%, 95% CI: -13%, -4%, and none with CBD. There was no association between the 5-day cumulative average of Tapp(max during the cold period and any of the cause-specific admissions, except in some susceptible groups: a negative association for RD in the oldest age group and a positive association for CVD in men and the second highest SES group. In conclusion, an increase in Tapp(max is associated with a slight increase in RD and decrease in CVD admissions during the warmer months.

  10. Apparent temperature and cause-specific emergency hospital admissions in Greater Copenhagen, Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichmann, Janine; Andersen, Zorana; Ketzel, Matthias; Ellermann, Thomas; Loft, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    One of the key climate change factors, temperature, has potentially grave implications for human health. We report the first attempt to investigate the association between the daily 3-hour maximum apparent temperature (Tapp(max)) and respiratory (RD), cardiovascular (CVD), and cerebrovascular (CBD) emergency hospital admissions in Copenhagen, controlling for air pollution. The study period covered 1 January 2002-31 December 2006, stratified in warm and cold periods. A case-crossover design was applied. Susceptibility (effect modification) by age, sex, and socio-economic status was investigated. For an IQR (8°C) increase in the 5-day cumulative average of Tapp(max), a 7% (95% CI: 1%, 13%) increase in the RD admission rate was observed in the warm period whereas an inverse association was found with CVD (-8%, 95% CI: -13%, -4%), and none with CBD. There was no association between the 5-day cumulative average of Tapp(max) during the cold period and any of the cause-specific admissions, except in some susceptible groups: a negative association for RD in the oldest age group and a positive association for CVD in men and the second highest SES group. In conclusion, an increase in Tapp(max) is associated with a slight increase in RD and decrease in CVD admissions during the warmer months.

  11. Investigation of firing temperature variation in ovens for ceramic-fused-to-metal dental prostheses using swept source optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todor, Raluca; Negrutiu, Meda-Lavinia; Sinescu, Cosmin; Topala, Florin Ionel; Bradu, Adrian; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Romînu, Mihai; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2018-03-01

    One of the most common fabrication techniques for dental ceramics is sintering, a process of heating of the ceramic to ensure densification. This occurs by viscous flow when the firing temperature is reached. Acceptable restorations require the alloy and ceramic to be chemically, thermally, mechanically, and aesthetically compatible. Thermal and mechanical compatibility include a fusing temperature of ceramic that does not cause distortion of the metal substructure. Decalibration of ovens used for firing of the ceramic layers for metal ceramic dental prostheses leads to stress and cracks in the veneering material, and ultimately to the failure of the restoration. 25 metal ceramic prostheses were made for this study. They were divided in five groups, each sintered at a different temperature: a group at the temperature prescribed by the producer, two groups at lower and two groups at higher temperatures set in the ceramic oven. An established noninvasive biomedical imaging method, swept source (SS) optical coherence tomography (OCT) was employed, in order to evaluate the modifications induced when using temperatures different from those prescribed for firing the samples. A quantitative assessment of the probes is performed by en-face OCT images, taken at constant depths inside the samples. The differences in granulation, thus in reflectivity allow for extracting rules-of-thumb to evaluate fast, by using only the prostheses currently produced the current calibration of the ceramic oven. OCT imaging can allow quick identification of the oven decalibration, to avoid producing dental prostheses with defects.

  12. Low ambient temperature during early postnatal development fails to cause a permanent induction of brown adipocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabowska-Kita, Agnieszka; Trabczynska, Anna; Korytko, Agnieszka; Kaczmarek, Monika M.; Kozak, Leslie P.

    2015-01-01

    The brown adipocyte phenotype (BAP) in white adipose tissue (WAT) is transiently induced in adult mammals in response to reduced ambient temperature. Since it is unknown whether a cold challenge can permanently induce brown adipocytes (BAs), we reared C57BL/6J (B6) and AxB8/PgJ (AxB8) mice at 17 or 29°C from birth to weaning, to assess the BAP in young and adult mice. Energy balance measurements showed that 17°C reduced fat mass in the preweaning mice by increasing energy expenditure and suppressed diet-induced obesity in adults. Microarray analysis of global gene expression of inguinal fat (ING) from 10-day-old (D) mice indicates that expression at 17°C vs. 29°C was not different. Between 10 and 21 days of age, the BAP was induced coincident with morphologic remodeling of ING and marked changes in expression of neural development genes (e.g., Akap 12 and Ngfr). Analyses of Ucp1 mRNA and protein showed that 17°C transiently increased the BAP in ING from 21D mice; however, BAs were unexpectedly present in mice reared at 29°C. The involution of the BAP in WAT occurred after weaning in mice reared at 23°C. Therefore, the capacity to stimulate thermogenically competent BAs in WAT is set by a temperature-independent, genetically controlled program between birth and weaning.—Chabowska-Kita, A., Trabczynska, A., Korytko, A., Kaczmarek, M. M., Kozak, L. P. Low ambient temperature during early postnatal development fails to cause a permanent induction of brown adipocytes. PMID:25896784

  13. Effect of temperature, solvent and nature of metal cations on the potentiometric titration S of iron oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasleem, S.; Ishrat, B.

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive study of the potentiometric titrations of iron oxide in the presence of CU/sub 2/ and Mg/sup 2/ were under taken under different experimental conditions of temperature and concentration of metal ions in aqueous and aqueous/organic mixed solvent. The adsorption of both the metal ions were observed to increase with the increase in pH and temperature of the system. The adsorbent iron oxide preferentially adsorbs transition metal as compared to alkaline earth metal ion. (author)

  14. Acute Inhalation Exposure to Titanium Ethanolate as a Possible Cause of Metal Fume Fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ahmadimanesh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Occupational inhalation exposure to noxious agents is not uncommon. Herein, we present a 26-year-old male student who had accidental acute inhalation exposure to a large quantity of titanium ethanolate and hydrogen chloride in chemistry lab. He was referred to the emergency department of our hospital with low-grade fever, dyspnea, headache, fatigue and myalgia. After 24 hrs of symptomatic treatment (oxygen therapy and acetaminophen, the fever was subsided and the patient discharged home in a good clinical condition. The presented symptoms could be interpreted as a form of metal fume fever. It can therefore be concluded that organo-metallic compound of titanium metal may have the potential to produce metal fume fever in human.

  15. Transition Metal Coatings for Energy Conversion and Storage; Electrochemical and High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falola, Bamidele Daniel

    sequestration easier. One complication of oxyfuel coal combustion is that corrosion problems can be exacerbated due to flue gas recycling, which is employed to dilute the pure O2 feed and reduce the flame temperature. Refractory metal diffusion coatings of Ti and Zr atop P91 steel were created and tested for their ability to prevent corrosion in an oxidizing atmosphere at elevated temperature. Using pack cementation, diffusion coatings of thickness approximately 12 and 20 microm are obtained for Ti and Zr, respectively. The effects of heating to 950°C for 24 hr in 5% O2 in He are studied in situ by thermogravimetric analyses (TGA), and ex situ by SEM analyses and depth profiling by EDX. For Ti-coated, Zr-coated and uncoated P91 samples, extended heating in an oxidizing environment causes relatively thick oxide growth, but extensive oxygen penetration greater than 2.7 mm below the sample surface, and eventual oxide exfoliation, are observed only for the uncoated P91 sample. For the Ti- and Zr-coated samples, oxygen penetrates approximately 16 and 56 microm, respectively, below the surface. in situ TGA verifies that Ti-and Zr-coated P91 samples undergo far smaller mass changes during corrosion than uncoated samples, reaching close to steady state mass after approximately four hours.

  16. Working gas temperature and pressure changes for microscale thermal creep-driven flow caused by discontinuous wall temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Yen-Lin

    2010-01-01

    Microscale temperature gradient-driven (thermal creep/transpiration) gas flows have attracted significant interest during the past decade. For free molecular and transitional conditions, applying temperature gradients to a flow channel's walls induces the thermal creep effect. This results in a working gas flowing through the channel from cold to hot, which is generally accompanied by a rising pressure from cold to hot in the channel. Working gas temperature and pressure distributions can vary significantly, depending on a flow channel's configuration and wall temperature distribution. Understanding working gas temperature excursions, both increases and decreases, is essential to ensure the effective use of thermal creep flows in microscale applications. In this study, the characterizations of working gas temperature variations, due to both temperature discontinuities and more gradual changes, on a variety of flow channel walls, were systematically investigated using the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. A micro/meso-scale pump, the Knudsen compressor, was chosen to illustrate the importance of controlling working gas temperature in thermal creep-driven flows. Gas pressure and temperature variations, through several Knudsen compressor stage configurations, were studied to determine the most advantageous flow phenomena for the efficient operation of Knudsen compressors.

  17. Direct writing of flexible electronics through room temperature liquid metal ink.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunxia Gao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Conventional approaches of making a flexible circuit are generally complex, environment unfriendly, time and energy consuming, and thus expensive. Here, we describe for the first time the method of using high-performance GaIn(10-based electrical ink, a significantly neglected room temperature liquid metal, as both electrical conductors and interconnects, for directly writing flexible electronics via a rather easy going and cost effective way. METHODS: The new generation electric ink was made and its wettability with various materials was modified to be easily written on a group of either soft or rigid substrates such as epoxy resin board, glass, plastic, silica gel, paper, cotton, textiles, cloth and fiber etc. Conceptual experiments were performed to demonstrate and evaluate the capability of directly writing the electrical circuits via the invented metal ink. Mechanisms involved were interpreted through a series of fundamental measurements. RESULTS: The electrical resistivity of the fluid like GaIn(10-based material was measured as 34.5 µΩ·cm at 297 K by four point probe method and increased with addition of the oxygen quantity, which indicates it as an excellent metal ink. The conductive line can be written with features that are approximately 10 µm thick. Several functional devices such as a light emitting diode (LED array showing designed lighting patterns and electrical fan were made to work by directly writing the liquid metal on the specific flexible substrates. And satisfactory performances were obtained. CONCLUSIONS: The present method opens the way to directly and quickly writing flexible electronics which can be as simple as signing a name or drawing a picture on the paper. The unique merit of the GaIn(10-based liquid metal ink lies in its low melting temperature, well controlled wettability, high electrical conductivity and good biocompability. The new electronics writing strategy and basic principle has generalized

  18. Direct writing of flexible electronics through room temperature liquid metal ink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yunxia; Li, Haiyan; Liu, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Conventional approaches of making a flexible circuit are generally complex, environment unfriendly, time and energy consuming, and thus expensive. Here, we describe for the first time the method of using high-performance GaIn(10)-based electrical ink, a significantly neglected room temperature liquid metal, as both electrical conductors and interconnects, for directly writing flexible electronics via a rather easy going and cost effective way. The new generation electric ink was made and its wettability with various materials was modified to be easily written on a group of either soft or rigid substrates such as epoxy resin board, glass, plastic, silica gel, paper, cotton, textiles, cloth and fiber etc. Conceptual experiments were performed to demonstrate and evaluate the capability of directly writing the electrical circuits via the invented metal ink. Mechanisms involved were interpreted through a series of fundamental measurements. The electrical resistivity of the fluid like GaIn(10)-based material was measured as 34.5 µΩ·cm at 297 K by four point probe method and increased with addition of the oxygen quantity, which indicates it as an excellent metal ink. The conductive line can be written with features that are approximately 10 µm thick. Several functional devices such as a light emitting diode (LED) array showing designed lighting patterns and electrical fan were made to work by directly writing the liquid metal on the specific flexible substrates. And satisfactory performances were obtained. The present method opens the way to directly and quickly writing flexible electronics which can be as simple as signing a name or drawing a picture on the paper. The unique merit of the GaIn(10)-based liquid metal ink lies in its low melting temperature, well controlled wettability, high electrical conductivity and good biocompability. The new electronics writing strategy and basic principle has generalized purpose and can be extended to more industrial areas, even

  19. High temperature corrosion in straw-fired power plants: Influence of steam/metal temperature on corrosion rates for TP347H

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Biede, O; Larsen, OH

    2002-01-01

    The corrosion in straw-fired boilers has been investigated at various straw-fired power plants in Denmark. Water/air-cooled probes, a test superheater and test sections removed from the actual superheater have been utilised to characterise corrosion and corrosion rates. This paper describes...... the corrosion rates measured for the TP347H type steel. The corrosion morphology at high temperature consists of grain boundary attack and selective attack of chromium. The corrosion rate increases with calculated metal temperature (based on steam temperature), however there is great variation within....... The difference in the results could be traced back to a lower flue gas temperature on one side of the boiler. Although metal temperature is the most important parameter with respect to corrosion rate, flue gas temperature also plays an important role. Efforts to quantify the effect of flue gas temperature...

  20. MATERIAL DEPENDENCE OF TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION IN MULTI-LAYER MULTI-METAL COOKWARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHAMMADREZA SEDIGH

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Laminated structure is becoming more popular in cookware markets; however, there seems to be a lack of enough scientific studies to evaluate its pros and cons, and to show that how it functions. A numerical model using a finite element method with temperature-dependent material properties has been performed to investigate material and layer dependence of temperature distribution in multi-layer multi-metal plate exposed to irregular heating. Behavior of two parameters including mean temperature value and uniformity on the inner surface of plate under variations of thermal properties and geometrical conditions have been studied. The results indicate that conductive metals used as first layer in bi-layer plates have better thermal performance than those used in the second layer. In addition, since cookware manufacturers increasingly prefer to use all-clad aluminium plate, recently, this structure is analysed in the present study as well. The results show all-clad copper and aluminum plate possesses lower temperature gradient compared with single layer aluminum and all-clad aluminum core plates.

  1. The effect of elevated die temperature on deformation of deep drawn round metal cup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basril, M. A. M.; Hafsyam, Y. M.; Azuddin, M.; Choudhury, I. A.

    2017-06-01

    One of the major considerations in the current deep drawing practice is the product quality. In this research, the effect of heating temperature on the drawability of the round metal cup has been investigated. Firstly, round metal cups of aluminium and mild steel were drawn from the blank diameters of 60 mm, 65 mm and 70 mm. The experiment conducted at room temperature first, then at 50°C and 100°C. The elongation of the major and minor strains along the cup profile after the process is measured and analysed. On the other hand, the defects from the experiment output and ABAQUS/CAE simulation are compared. The result from experiment shows that the highest major elongation is 11.64 mm and it is happened to a deep drawn aluminium round cup with LDR of 1.69 at temperature of 100°C. On the other hand, for deep drawn mild steel round cup, shows highest major elongation of 12.44 mm for a cup with LDR of 1.56 at 100°C. Both of these statements indicates that the higher temperature could improve the formability of the deep drawn parts besides reducing the probability of the defect to be happened.

  2. Investigation on the minimum film boiling temperature on metallic and ceramic heaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladisch, R.

    1980-06-01

    The minimum film boiling temperature on ceramic and metallic heaters has been experimentally studied. The knowledge of this temperature boundary is important in safety considerations on all liquid cooled nuclear reactors. The experiments have been carried out by quenching a hot metal cylinder with and without ceramic coating of aluminium in water. Results show that the minimum film boiling temperature Tsub(min) increases with water subcooling and is dependend upon the thermophysical properties of the heating surface. The roughness of the heater does not affect Tsub(min). At low subcoolings the vapour film is more stable and seems to break down when the specific heatflux upon liquid solid contact is lower than a threshold value above which film boiling can be reestablished. At higher subcoolings instead the vapour film is thinner and more stable. In this case the surface temperature decreases beyond the value by which the specific heatflux upon liquid solid contact would be lower than the threshold value. As soon as the vapour film becomes unstable, it collapses. (orig.) [de

  3. Ultrafast quenching of metals to liquid-helium temperatures - investigation of the low-temperature mobility of hydrogen in niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanz, M.; Blocher, R.; Carstanjen, H.D.; Messer, R.; Plachke, D.; Seeger, A.

    1989-01-01

    A novel technique for ultrafast quenching from 300 K to 4.2 K has been developed. It employs a fast jet of liquid helium with a speed of about 10 2 m/s and allows us to quench metal samples in about 6 ms. This corresponds to a quenching rate of about 4.5x10 4 K/s, which exceeds that achievable by conventional quenching in liquid helium by more than one order of magnitude. The technique has been used for a resistometric study of the behaviour of hydrogen in niobium quenched-in from the α-phase by means of isochronal and isothermal annealing. Even in the low-temperature region below 20 K a considerable recovery of the resistivity has been found, which cannot be seen in conventional quenching experiments. (orig.)

  4. Advanced Oxidation: Oxalate Decomposition Testing With Ozone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketusky, E.; Subramanian, K.

    2012-01-01

    dissolution equilibrium, and then decomposed to (le) 100 Parts per Million (ppm) oxalate. Since AOP technology largely originated on using ultraviolet (UV) light as a primary catalyst, decomposition of the spent oxalic acid, well exposed to a medium pressure mercury vapor light was considered the benchmark. However, with multi-valent metals already contained in the feed, and maintenance of the UV light a concern; testing was conducted to evaluate the impact from removing the UV light. Using current AOP terminology, the test without the UV light would likely be considered an ozone based, dark, ferrioxalate type, decomposition process. Specifically, as part of the testing, the impacts from the following were investigated: (1) Importance of the UV light on the decomposition rates when decomposing 1 wt% spent oxalic acid; (2) Impact of increasing the oxalic acid strength from 1 to 2.5 wt% on the decomposition rates; and (3) For F-area testing, the advantage of increasing the spent oxalic acid flowrate from 40 L/min (liters/minute) to 50 L/min during decomposition of the 2.5 wt% spent oxalic acid. The results showed that removal of the UV light (from 1 wt% testing) slowed the decomposition rates in both the F and H testing. Specifically, for F-Area Strike 1, the time increased from about 6 hours to 8 hours. In H-Area, the impact was not as significant, with the time required for Strike 1 to be decomposed to less than 100 ppm increasing slightly, from 5.4 to 6.4 hours. For the spent 2.5 wt% oxalic acid decomposition tests (all) without the UV light, the F-area decompositions required approx. 10 to 13 hours, while the corresponding required H-Area decompositions times ranged from 10 to 21 hours. For the 2.5 wt% F-Area sludge, the increased availability of iron likely caused the increased decomposition rates compared to the 1 wt% oxalic acid based tests. In addition, for the F-testing, increasing the recirculation flow rates from 40 liter/minute to 50 liter/minute resulted in an

  5. ADVANCED OXIDATION: OXALATE DECOMPOSITION TESTING WITH OZONE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketusky, E.; Subramanian, K.

    2012-02-29

    ) after nearing dissolution equilibrium, and then decomposed to {le} 100 Parts per Million (ppm) oxalate. Since AOP technology largely originated on using ultraviolet (UV) light as a primary catalyst, decomposition of the spent oxalic acid, well exposed to a medium pressure mercury vapor light was considered the benchmark. However, with multi-valent metals already contained in the feed, and maintenance of the UV light a concern; testing was conducted to evaluate the impact from removing the UV light. Using current AOP terminology, the test without the UV light would likely be considered an ozone based, dark, ferrioxalate type, decomposition process. Specifically, as part of the testing, the impacts from the following were investigated: (1) Importance of the UV light on the decomposition rates when decomposing 1 wt% spent oxalic acid; (2) Impact of increasing the oxalic acid strength from 1 to 2.5 wt% on the decomposition rates; and (3) For F-area testing, the advantage of increasing the spent oxalic acid flowrate from 40 L/min (liters/minute) to 50 L/min during decomposition of the 2.5 wt% spent oxalic acid. The results showed that removal of the UV light (from 1 wt% testing) slowed the decomposition rates in both the F & H testing. Specifically, for F-Area Strike 1, the time increased from about 6 hours to 8 hours. In H-Area, the impact was not as significant, with the time required for Strike 1 to be decomposed to less than 100 ppm increasing slightly, from 5.4 to 6.4 hours. For the spent 2.5 wt% oxalic acid decomposition tests (all) without the UV light, the F-area decompositions required approx. 10 to 13 hours, while the corresponding required H-Area decompositions times ranged from 10 to 21 hours. For the 2.5 wt% F-Area sludge, the increased availability of iron likely caused the increased decomposition rates compared to the 1 wt% oxalic acid based tests. In addition, for the F-testing, increasing the recirculation flow rates from 40 liter/minute to 50 liter

  6. Ultrasound-induced crystallization around the glass transition temperature for Pd40Ni40P20 metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichitsubo, Tetsu; Matsubara, Eiichiro; Kai, Satoshi; Hirao, Masahiko

    2004-01-01

    We have found that crystallization of a Pd 40 Ni 40 P 20 bulk metallic glass is accelerated in the vicinity of the glass transition temperature T g when it is subjected to sub/low-MHz frequency ultrasonic vibration. Resonance frequencies and internal frictions have been measured with the electromagnetic acoustic resonance (EMAR) technique. In the initial heating process of an as-cast glassy sample, the resonance frequencies jump up just above T g under ultrasonic excitation, which is attributed to nano-crystallization that is confirmed by the X-ray diffraction profile. However, such a notable change is not observed without ultrasonic vibration. The irregular Λ-shaped internal-friction peaks are also observed prior to the abrupt crystallization. This rapid crystallization is considered to be caused by a stochastic resonance, in which the jump frequency of atoms matches the frequency of the interatomic-potential change by the ultrasonic vibration

  7. On the nature of low temperature internal friction peaks in metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khonik, V.A.; Spivak, L.V.

    1996-01-01

    Low temperature (30 60 Nb 40 subjected to preliminary inhomogeneous deformation by cold rolling, homogeneous tensile deformation or electrolytic charging with hydrogen is investigated. Cold rolling or hydrogenation result in appearance of similar internal friction peaks and hysteresis damping. Homogeneous deformation has no influence on low temperature internal friction. The phenomenon of microplastic deformation during hydrogenation of weakly stressed samples is revealed. It is argued that microplastic deformation of metallic glasses during hydrogenation without external stress takes place too. Plastic flow both on cold rolling and hydrogenation occurs via formation and motion of dislocation-like defects which are the reason of the observed anelastic anomalies. It is concluded that low temperature internal friction peaks described in the literature for as-cast, cold deformed and hydrogenated samples have common dislocation-like origin

  8. Utilizing Rice Husk Briquettes in Firing Crucible Furnace for Low Temperature Melting Metals in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Musa

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The search for alternative fuels for firing crucible furnace for low temperature melting metals has become mandatory, as a result of the pollution problem associated with the use of fossil fuels, the expense of electricity and also deforestation as a result of the use of charcoal. An agricultural waste, rice husk, in briquette form was used as an alternative fuel to fire crucible furnace to melt lead, zinc and aluminium. Results showed that lead and zinc melted and reached their pouring temperatures of 3840C and 5300C in 70 minutes and 75 minutes respectively. Aluminium was raised to a maximum temperature of 5200C in 75 and 100 minutes.The average concentration of the pollutants (CO, SO2and NOX were found to be below the tolerance limit and that of TSP (Total Suspended Particulates was found to be within the tolerance limit stipulated by Federal Environmental Protection Agency (FEPA in Nigeria.

  9. Temperature effects in contacts between a metal and a semiconductor nanowire near the degenerate doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhuting; Burgess, Tim; Tan, H. H.; Jagadish, Chennupati; Kogan, Andrei

    2018-04-01

    We have investigated the nonlinear conductance in diffusion-doped Si:GaAs nanowires contacted by patterned metal films in a wide range of temperatures T. The wire resistance R W and the zero bias resistance R C, dominated by the contacts, exhibit very different responses to temperature changes. While R W shows almost no dependence on T, R C varies by several orders of magnitude as the devices are cooled from room temperature to T = 5 K. We develop a model that employs a sharp donor level very low in the GaAs conduction band and show that our observations are consistent with the model predictions. We then demonstrate that such measurements can be used to estimate carrier properties in nanostructured semiconductors and obtain an estimate for N D, the doping density in our samples. We also discuss the effects of surface states and dielectric confinement on carrier density in semiconductor nanowires.

  10. Specific-heat measurement of single metallic, carbon, and ceramic fibers at very high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradere, C.; Goyheneche, J.M.; Batsale, J.C.; Dilhaire, S.; Pailler, R.

    2005-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to present a method for measuring the specific heat of single metallic, carbon, and ceramic fibers at very high temperature. The difficulty of the measurement is due to the microscale of the fiber (≅10 μm) and the important range of temperature (700-2700 K). An experimental device, a modelization of the thermal behavior, and an analytic model have been developed. A discussion on the measurement accuracy yields a global uncertainty lower than 10%. The characterization of a tungsten filament with thermal properties identical to those of the bulk allows the validation of the device and the thermal estimation method. Finally, measurements on carbon and ceramic fibers have been done at very high temperature

  11. Investigation of size-temperature effects in thin f;.lms of transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loboda, V.B.; Protsenko, I.E.; Smolin, M.D.; Yaremenko, A.V.

    1985-01-01

    The temperature and size dependences are studied for specific rho and temperature coeficients of resistance of transition metal films obtained and annealed in the 10 -6 - 5x10 -7 Pa vacuum. The size dependence of lambda sub(g)(1-p), rho sub(db), R, r and rhosub(db)sup(v) parameters was calculated using the Tellier, Tosser and Pichard theory. The temperature dependence of the conductivity was investigated in the 80-700 K range. A conclusion is made that all differences between dependences rho(T) for thin and bulk samples may be explained by effects specific for films but presenting no class of new physical effects. The size dependence of the electron-phonon interaction near T>THETAsub(D) and proportionality factors in the approximating equation rho approximately Asub(1.2)xTsup(2) is obtained for Ni films

  12. Comparison of soil heavy metal pollution caused by e-waste recycling activities and traditional industrial operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Kailing; Sun, Zehang; Hu, Yuanan; Zeng, Xiangying; Yu, Zhiqiang; Cheng, Hefa

    2017-04-01

    The traditional industrial operations are well recognized as an important source of heavy metal pollution, while that caused by the e-waste recycling activities, which have sprouted in some developing countries, is often overlooked. This study was carried out to compare the status of soil heavy metal pollution caused by the traditional industrial operations and the e-waste recycling activities in the Pearl River Delta, and assess whether greater attention should be paid to control the pollution arising from e-waste recycling activities. Both the total contents and the chemical fractionation of major heavy metals (As, Cr, Cd, Ni, Pb, Cu, and Zn) in 50 surface soil samples collected from the e-waste recycling areas and 20 soil samples from the traditional industrial zones were determined. The results show that the soils in the e-waste recycling areas were mainly polluted by Cu, Zn, As, and Cd, while Cu, Zn, As, Cd, and Pb were the major heavy metals in the soils from the traditional industrial zones. Statistical analyses consistently show that Cu, Cd, Pb, and Zn in the surface soils from both types of sites were contributed mostly by human activities, while As, Cr, and Ni in the soils were dominated by natural background. No clear distinction was found on the pollution characteristic of heavy metals in the surface soils between the e-waste recycling areas and traditional industrial zones. The potential ecological risk posed by heavy metals in the surface soils from both types of sites, which was dominated by that from Cd, ranged from low to moderate. Given the much shorter development history of e-waste recycling and its largely unregulated nature, significant efforts should be made to crack down on illegal e-waste recycling and strengthen pollution control for related activities.

  13. Identification of ribonucleotide reductase mutation causing temperature-sensitivity of herpes simplex virus isolates from whitlow by deep sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daikoku, Tohru; Oyama, Yukari; Yajima, Misako; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Kuroda, Makoto; Shimada, Yuka; Takehara, Kazuhiko; Miwa, Naoko; Okuda, Tomoko; Sata, Tetsutaro; Shiraki, Kimiyasu

    2015-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus 2 caused a genital ulcer, and a secondary herpetic whitlow appeared during acyclovir therapy. The secondary and recurrent whitlow isolates were acyclovir-resistant and temperature-sensitive in contrast to a genital isolate. We identified the ribonucleotide reductase mutation responsible for temperature-sensitivity by deep-sequencing analysis.

  14. A study of marine pollution caused by the release of metals into seawater following acid spills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabon, Jean-Yves; Giamarchi, Philippe; Le Floch, Stephane

    2010-07-01

    This study examined the potential metal pollution induced by the accidental spill of different acids into seawater. The acids sink to the bottom according to their densities and subsequently react with marine sediments. The acids selected for this study were acetic, hydrochloric, nitric, sulfuric, and phosphoric acids; the metallic elements selected were Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb and Zn. The sediment was collected in Brest Harbour. The percentages of metals released from this sediment in the presence of various concentrations of acids in seawater were important; concentrations of approximately 7 mg L(-1) for Mn and 60 mg L(-1) for Zn were observed under our experimental conditions. We also examined the rate of release of these metals from the sediment into the seawater in the presence of the different acids and under different experimental conditions. We found that most of the metallic elements were released from the sediments into the seawater during the first fifteen minutes of exposure. After this time, a high degree of pollution was induced if acids leached into seawater were not rapidly diluted. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Temperature responsive hydrogel magnetic nanocomposites for hyperthermia and metal extraction applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, N. Narayana, E-mail: nagireddynarayana@gmail.com [Center for Advanced Biomaterials for Healthcare, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia@CRIB, Largo Barsanti e Matteucci 53, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Ravindra, S. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, University of South Africa, Johannesburg 1709 (South Africa); Reddy, N. Madhava [Department of Environmental Science, Gates Institute of Technology, NH-7, Gooty, Anantapuram, Andhra Pradesh (India); Rajinikanth, V. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, University of South Africa, Johannesburg 1709 (South Africa); Raju, K. Mohana [Synthetic Polymer Laboratory, Department of Polymer Science & Technology, S.K. University, Anantapuram, Andhra Pradesh (India); Vallabhapurapu, Vijaya Srinivasu [Department of Physics, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, University of South Africa, Johannesburg 1709 (South Africa)

    2015-11-15

    The present work deals with the development of temperature and magnetic responsive hydrogel networks based on poly (N-isopropylacrylamide)/acrylamido propane sulfonic acid. The hydrogel matrices are synthesized by polymerizing N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) monomer in the presence of acrylamido propane sulphonicacid (AMPS) using a cross-linker (N,N-methylenebisacrylamide, MBA) and redox initiating system [ammonium persulphate (APS)/tetramethylethylenediamine (TMEDA)]. The magnetic nanoparticles are generated throughout the hydrogel networks using in situ method by incorporating iron ions and subsequent treatment with ammonia. A series of hydrogel-magnetic nanocomposites (HGMNC) are developed by varying AMPS composition. The synthesized hydrogel magnetic nanocomposites (HGMNC) are characterized by using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Thermal Analyses and Electron Microscopy analysis (Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscope). The metal extraction capacities of the prepared hydrogel (HG) and hydrogel magnetic nanocomposites (HGMNC) were studied at different temperatures. The results suggest that HGMNCs have higher extraction capacity compared to HG and HG loaded iron ions. This data also reveals that the extraction of metals by hydrogel magnetic nanocomposites (HGMNCs) is higher at higher temperatures than room temperature. The prepared HGMNCs are also subjected to hyperthermia (cancer therapy) studies. - Highlights: • We have developed temperature responsive hydrogel magnetic nanocomposites. • Addition of AMPS monomer to this magnetic hydrogel enhances the temperature sensitivity to 40–43 °C. • Similarly the sulfonic groups present in the AMPS units enhances the swelling ratio of magnetic hydrogels. • AMPS acts as good stabilizing agent for nanoparticles in the magnetic nanogel.

  16. Temperature responsive hydrogel magnetic nanocomposites for hyperthermia and metal extraction applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, N. Narayana; Ravindra, S.; Reddy, N. Madhava; Rajinikanth, V.; Raju, K. Mohana; Vallabhapurapu, Vijaya Srinivasu

    2015-01-01

    The present work deals with the development of temperature and magnetic responsive hydrogel networks based on poly (N-isopropylacrylamide)/acrylamido propane sulfonic acid. The hydrogel matrices are synthesized by polymerizing N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) monomer in the presence of acrylamido propane sulphonicacid (AMPS) using a cross-linker (N,N-methylenebisacrylamide, MBA) and redox initiating system [ammonium persulphate (APS)/tetramethylethylenediamine (TMEDA)]. The magnetic nanoparticles are generated throughout the hydrogel networks using in situ method by incorporating iron ions and subsequent treatment with ammonia. A series of hydrogel-magnetic nanocomposites (HGMNC) are developed by varying AMPS composition. The synthesized hydrogel magnetic nanocomposites (HGMNC) are characterized by using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Thermal Analyses and Electron Microscopy analysis (Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscope). The metal extraction capacities of the prepared hydrogel (HG) and hydrogel magnetic nanocomposites (HGMNC) were studied at different temperatures. The results suggest that HGMNCs have higher extraction capacity compared to HG and HG loaded iron ions. This data also reveals that the extraction of metals by hydrogel magnetic nanocomposites (HGMNCs) is higher at higher temperatures than room temperature. The prepared HGMNCs are also subjected to hyperthermia (cancer therapy) studies. - Highlights: • We have developed temperature responsive hydrogel magnetic nanocomposites. • Addition of AMPS monomer to this magnetic hydrogel enhances the temperature sensitivity to 40–43 °C. • Similarly the sulfonic groups present in the AMPS units enhances the swelling ratio of magnetic hydrogels. • AMPS acts as good stabilizing agent for nanoparticles in the magnetic nanogel

  17. Room temperature Zinc-metallation of cationic porphyrin at graphene surface and enhanced photoelectrocatalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Rongjin; Chen, Guoliang; Xiong, Chungang; Li, Gengxian; Zheng, Yinzhi; Chen, Jian; Long, Yunfei; Chen, Shu

    2018-03-01

    A stable zincporphyrin functionalized graphene nanocomposite was prepared by using positively charged cationic porphyrin (5,10,15,20-tetra(4-propyl pyridinio) porphyrin, TPPyP) and successive reduced graphene oxide (rGO) with tuned negative charge. The nanocomposite preparation was accompanied first by distinct electrostatic interactions and π-π stacking between TPPyP and rGO, and followed by fast Zinc-metallation at room temperature. In contrast to free TPPyP with Zn2+, the incorporation reaction is very slow at room temperature and heating or reflux conditions are required to increase the metallation rate. While at the surface of rGO nanosheet, the Zinc-metallation of TPPyP was greatly accelerated to 30 min at 25 °C in aqueous solution. The interaction process and composites formation were fully revealed by significant variations in UV-vis absorption spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) measurements, atomic force microscope (AFM) images, and fluorescence spectra. Furthermore, photoelectrochemical activity of resultant rGO/TPPyP-Zn nanocomposites was evaluated under visible-light irradiation, and enhancement of the photoelectrocatalytic reduction of CO2 was achieved.

  18. Catalysis of metal-clay intercalation compound in the low temperature coal hydrogasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuda, Kiyoshi; Kimura, Mitsuhiko; Miyamoto, Norimitsu; Matsunaga, Toshiaki

    1986-10-23

    Focusing the hydrogenating methanation by gaseous phase catalytic reactions of low temperature volatile components, the catalytic effects of Ni metal and the effects of carriers having sensitive effects on the catalytic activities of Ni metal were studied. Sample coals were prepared from Shin-Yubari coal, and Ni hydride-montmorillonite complex catalysts and the catalysts produced by carring Ni nitrate on alumina and burning in hydrogen gas flows were prepared. The hydrogasification were carried out in a reaction tube. As a result, the montmorillonite-Ni compounds catalysts had high catalitic effects and high conversion ratio of 90% or more in the low temperature coal gasification. The catalitic effects of carried Ni metal strongly depended on the carrier substances, and the rank of effects for the carriers was montmorillonite>zeorite>TiO/sub 2/>alpha-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/>MgO>SiO/sub 2/=gamma-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. (3 figs, 3 tabs, 3 refs)

  19. Microarray study of temperature-dependent sensitivity and selectivity of metal/oxide sensing interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiffany, Jason; Cavicchi, Richard E.; Semancik, Stephen

    2001-02-01

    Conductometric gas microsensors offer the benefits of ppm-level sensitivity, real-time data, simple interfacing to electronics hardware, and low power consumption. The type of device we have been exploring consists of a sensor film deposited on a "microhotplate"- a 100 micron platform with built-in heating (to activate reactions on the sensing surface) and thermometry. We have been using combinatorial studies of 36-element arrays to characterize the relationship between sensor film composition, operating temperature, and response, as measured by the device's sensitivity and selectivity. Gases that have been tested on these arrays include methanol, ethanol, dichloromethane, propane, methane, acetone, benzene, hydrogen, and carbon monoxide, and are of interest in the management of environmental waste sites. These experiments compare tin oxide films modified by catalyst overlayers, and ultrathin metal seed layers. The seed layers are used as part of a chemical vapor deposition process that uses each array element's microheater to activate the deposition of SnO2, and control its microstructure. Low coverage (20 Ê) catalytic metals (Pd, Cu, Cr, In, Au) are deposited on the oxides by masked evaporation or sputtering. This presentation demonstrates the value of an array-based approach for developing film processing methods, measuring performance characteristics, and establishing reproducibility. It also illustrates how temperature-dependent response data for varied metal/oxide compositions can be used to tailor a microsensor array for a given application.

  20. On the spherical nanoindentation creep of metallic glassy thin films at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, T.H.; Ye, J.H. [Institution of Micro/Nano-Mechanical Testing Technology & Application, College of Mechanical Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Feng, Y.H. [State Key Laboratory of Nonlinear Mechanics (LNM), Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Ma, Y., E-mail: may@zjut.edu.cn [Institution of Micro/Nano-Mechanical Testing Technology & Application, College of Mechanical Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China)

    2017-02-08

    Metallic glassy thin films with eight kind of compositions were successfully prepared on Si substrate by magnetron sputtering. The room-temperature creep tests were performed at plastic regions for each sample relying on spherical nanoindetation. The creep deformations were studied by recording the total creep displacement and strain after 2000 s holding. More pronounced creep deformation was observed in the sample with lower glass transition temperature (T{sub g}). Strain rate sensitivity (SRS) was then calculated from the steady-state creep and exhibited a negative correlation with increasing T{sub g}. It is suggested that creep mechanism of the nano-sized metallic glass was T{sub g}-dependent, according to the demarcation of SRS values. Based on the obtained SRS, shear transformation zone (STZ) size in each sample could be estimated. The results indicated that an STZ involves about 25–60 atoms for the employed eight samples and is strongly tied to T{sub g}. The characteristic of STZ size in metallic glassy thin films was discussed in terms of applied method and deformation modes.